classes ::: subject, the School, work,
children ::: programs (Education)
branches ::: Education, my education

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Education
object:EDU
class:subject
class:the School

--- POTENTIAL MEDIUMS
storytelling rap
childrens books
educational media

--- BOOKS
The Mother, On Education
Rudolf Steiner, The Essentials of Education
Rudolf Steiner, Education As a Force for Social Change
Alice Bailey, Education in the New Age

--- AUTHORS
  The Mother
  Rudolf Steiner

--- CHAPTERS
The Mother, On Education
1.02 - Education
1.03 - Physical Education
1.04 - Vital Education
1.05 - Mental Education
1.06 - Psychic Education

Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears, 1.72 - Education

--- LINKS
Wikipedia - Education
Wikipedia - Pedagogy


--- FOOTER
see also ::: study, the Student, programs, courses, the Library, the School
see also ::: the Science of Living, the Science of Knowing, training
see also ::: the Teacher, the Curriculum
see also ::: assessment, questionnaire, questions, learn,
class:work


see also ::: assessment, courses, learn, programs, questionnaire, questions, study, the_Curriculum, the_Library, the_School, the_Science_of_Knowing, the_Science_of_Living, the_Student, the_Teacher, training

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [18] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
64_Arts
courses
era
era
exam
Horace_Mann
How_to_Learn_anything
Library
my_education
problem_of_education
programs_(Education)
Quadrivium
read
School
Student
studentship
test
training
Trivium
SEE ALSO

assessment
courses
learn
programs
questionnaire
questions
study
the_Curriculum
the_Library
the_School
the_Science_of_Knowing
the_Science_of_Living
the_Student
the_Teacher
training

AUTH
Edward_Haskell
Lewis_Carroll
Mansur_al-Hallaj
Plato
Rudolf_Steiner

BOOKS
An_Outline_of_Occult_Science
Education_As_a_Force_for_Social_Change
Education_in_the_New_Age
Enchiridion_text
Essays_In_Philosophy_And_Yoga
Essays_of_Schopenhauer
Evolution_II
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Infinite_Library
Intuitive_Thinking
Knowledge_of_the_Higher_Worlds
Life_without_Death
Magick_Without_Tears
mcw
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
More_Answers_From_The_Mother
My_Burning_Heart
Mysticism_and_Logic
Mysticism_at_the_Dawn_of_the_Modern_Age
On_Education
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Practical_Advice_to_Teachers
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Some_Answers_From_The_Mother
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Genius_of_Language
The_Republic
The_Science_of_Knowing
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra
Toward_the_Future

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
09.14_-_Education_of_Girls
10.09_-_Education_as_the_Growth_of_Consciousness
10.10_-_Education_is_Organisation
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.02_-_Education
1.03_-_Physical_Education
1.04_-_Vital_Education
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.72_-_Education
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
2.11_-_On_Education
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
The_Essentials_of_Education

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
1.02_-_Education
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.03_-_
1.03_-_Physical_Education
1.04_-_
1.04_-_Vital_Education
1.05_-_
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
1.10_-_Foresight
1.11_-_Transformation
1.13_-_A_Dream
1.mah_-_I_am_the_One_Whom_I_Love
1.mah_-_To_Reach_God
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.2_-_Study
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.1.4.1_-_Teachers
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.3_-_Discipline
2.1.4.4_-_Homework
2.1.4.5_-_Tests
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.1.5.5_-_Other_Subjects
The_Essentials_of_Education

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.00_-_Publishers_Note
00.02_-_Mystic_Symbolism
000_-_Humans_in_Universe
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.00_-_The_Wellspring_of_Reality
0.02_-_II_-_The_Home_of_the_Guru
0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.05_-_The_Nietzschean_Antichrist
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
01.09_-_William_Blake:_The_Marriage_of_Heaven_and_Hell
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.13_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0_1955-04-04
0_1958-02-03b_-_The_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-10-04
0_1958-10-10
0_1959-01-06
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
0_1960-09-20
0_1960-10-25
0_1960-11-12
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-03-17
0_1961-04-25
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-10-02
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-05-29
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-11-30
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-05-25
0_1963-11-20
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-07-28
0_1964-09-23
0_1964-10-14
0_1964-12-02
0_1965-01-16
0_1965-06-02
0_1965-06-05
0_1965-07-31
0_1965-08-31
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-03-19
0_1966-05-18
0_1967-02-18
0_1967-04-03
0_1967-04-15
0_1967-04-19
0_1967-05-13
0_1967-06-03
0_1967-07-26
0_1968-02-07
0_1968-02-17
0_1968-02-28
0_1968-03-27
0_1968-04-13
0_1968-05-22
0_1968-05-29
0_1968-06-26
0_1968-09-04
0_1968-09-07
0_1968-09-28
0_1969-01-29
0_1969-02-08
0_1969-03-19
0_1969-07-30
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-08-27
0_1969-08-30
0_1969-09-03
0_1969-11-08
0_1969-11-22
0_1969-12-31
0_1970-01-17
0_1970-04-01
0_1970-08-01
0_1971-04-01
0_1971-05-26
0_1973-01-20
02.06_-_Vansittartism
02.14_-_Appendix
02.14_-_Panacea_of_Isms
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.06_-_The_Pact_and_its_Sanction
03.07_-_Brahmacharya
03.08_-_The_Spiritual_Outlook
03.09_-_Art_and_Katharsis
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.14_-_From_the_Known_to_the_Unknown?
05.34_-_Light,_more_Light
06.11_-_The_Steps_of_the_Soul
06.19_-_Mental_Silence
07.08_-_The_Divine_Truth_Its_Name_and_Form
07.31_-_Images_of_Gods_and_Goddesses
07.37_-_The_Psychic_Being,_Some_Mysteries
07.42_-_The_Nature_and_Destiny_of_Art
08.02_-_Order_and_Discipline
08.07_-_Sleep_and_Pain
08.11_-_The_Work_Here
08.20_-_Are_Not_The_Ascetic_Means_Helpful_At_Times?
08.21_-_Human_Birth
08.24_-_On_Food
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
09.08_-_The_Modern_Taste
09.13_-_On_Teachers_and_Teaching
09.14_-_Education_of_Girls
09.15_-_How_to_Listen
100.00_-_Synergy
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.05_-_Mind_and_the_Mental_World
1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice
10.07_-_The_Demon
10.08_-_Consciousness_as_Freedom
10.09_-_Education_as_the_Growth_of_Consciousness
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks
10.10_-_Education_is_Organisation
10.11_-_Beyond_Love_and_Hate
1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
10.26_-_A_True_Professor
1.02_-_Education
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_The_Age_of_Individualism_and_Reason
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_What_is_Psycho_therapy?
1.03_-_
1.03_-_A_Sapphire_Tale
1.03_-_Physical_Education
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita
1.03_-_Some_Practical_Aspects
1.03_-_The_Coming_of_the_Subjective_Age
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.04_-_
1.045_-_Piercing_the_Structure_of_the_Object
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_Vital_Education
1.05_-_
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_Consciousness
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_True_and_False_Subjectivism
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_Psycho_therapy_and_a_Philosophy_of_Life
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_Information,_Language,_and_Society
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Splitting_of_the_Human_Personality_during_Spiritual_Training
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
1.10_-_Aesthetic_and_Ethical_Culture
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Foresight
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_ON_THE_NEW_IDOL
1.11_-_The_Second_Genesis
1.11_-_Transformation
1.11_-_Woolly_Pomposities_of_the_Pious_Teacher
1.12_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_RIGHTS_OF_MAN
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.13_-_A_Dream
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.15_-_Index
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.1.5_-_Thought_and_Knowledge
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_The_Importance_of_our_Conventional_Greetings,_etc.
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.19_-_The_Curve_of_the_Rational_Age
1.201_-_Socrates
1.2.04_-_Sincerity
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.21_-_IDOLATRY
1.22_-_How_to_Learn_the_Practice_of_Astrology
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.2.2_-_The_Place_of_Study_in_Sadhana
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.26_-_Mental_Processes_-_Two_Only_are_Possible
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
1.4.03_-_The_Guru
14.04_-_More_of_Yajnavalkya
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
1.439
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
15.03_-_A_Canadian_Question
1.55_-_Money
1.62_-_The_Elastic_Mind
1.69_-_Original_Sin
1.71_-_Morality_2
1.72_-_Education
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.79_-_Progress
1.81_-_Method_of_Training
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-06-09_-_Nature_of_religion_-_Religion_and_the_spiritual_life_-_Descent_of_Divine_Truth_and_Force_-_To_be_sure_of_your_religion,_country,_family-choose_your_own_-_Religion_and_numbers
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1950-12-23_-_Concentration_and_energy
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1950-12-28_-_Correct_judgment.
1950-12-30_-_Perfect_and_progress._Dynamic_equilibrium._True_sincerity.
1951-01-04_-_Transformation_and_reversal_of_consciousness.
1951-01-08_-_True_vision_and_understanding_of_the_world._Progress,_equilibrium._Inner_reality_-_the_psychic._Animals_and_the_psychic.
1951-01-11_-_Modesty_and_vanity_-_Generosity
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-01-15_-_Sincerity_-_inner_discernment_-_inner_light._Evil_and_imbalance._Consciousness_and_instruments.
1951-01-20_-_Developing_the_mind._Misfortunes,_suffering;_developed_reason._Knowledge_and_pure_ideas.
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-12_-_Mental_forms_-_learning_difficult_subjects_-_Mental_fortress_-_thought_-_Training_the_mind_-_Helping_the_vital_being_after_death_-_ceremonies_-_Human_stupidities
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1951-04-28_-_Personal_effort_-_tamas,_laziness_-_Static_and_dynamic_power_-_Stupidity_-_psychic_and_intelligence_-_Philosophies-_different_languages_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_Surrender_of_ones_being_and_ones_work
1953-05-27
1953-06-10
1953-07-01
1953-08-05
1953-08-26
1953-09-02
1953-09-30
1953-10-07
1953-10-28
1953-11-18
1953-12-16
1953-12-23
1953-12-30
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1954-02-10_-_Study_a_variety_of_subjects_-_Memory_-Memory_of_past_lives_-_Getting_rid_of_unpleasant_thoughts
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-03-03_-_Occultism_-_A_French_scientists_experiment
1954-04-14_-_Love_-_Can_a_person_love_another_truly?_-_Parental_love
1954-06-02_-_Learning_how_to_live_-_Work,_studies_and_sadhana_-_Waste_of_the_Energy_and_Consciousness
1954-07-28_-_Money_-_Ego_and_individuality_-_The_shadow
1954-09-15_-_Parts_of_the_being_-_Thoughts_and_impulses_-_The_subconscient_-_Precise_vocabulary_-_The_Grace_and_difficulties
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1955-02-23_-_On_the_sense_of_taste,_educating_the_senses_-_Fasting_produces_a_state_of_receptivity,_drawing_energy_-_The_body_and_food
1955-05-18_-_The_Problem_of_Woman_-_Men_and_women_-_The_Supreme_Mother,_the_new_creation_-_Gods_and_goddesses_-_A_story_of_Creation,_earth_-_Psychic_being_only_on_earth,_beings_everywhere_-_Going_to_other_worlds_by_occult_means
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1955-11-16_-_The_significance_of_numbers_-_Numbers,_astrology,_true_knowledge_-_Divines_Love_flowers_for_Kali_puja_-_Desire,_aspiration_and_progress_-_Determining_ones_approach_to_the_Divine_-_Liberation_is_obtained_through_austerities_-_...
1955-12-07_-_Emotional_impulse_of_self-giving_-_A_young_dancer_in_France_-_The_heart_has_wings,_not_the_head_-_Only_joy_can_conquer_the_Adversary
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1956-06-20_-_Hearts_mystic_light,_intuition_-_Psychic_being,_contact_-_Secular_ethics_-_True_role_of_mind_-_Realise_the_Divine_by_love_-_Depression,_pleasure,_joy_-_Heart_mixture_-_To_follow_the_soul_-_Physical_process_-_remember_the_Mother
1956-06-27_-_Birth,_entry_of_soul_into_body_-_Formation_of_the_supramental_world_-_Aspiration_for_progress_-_Bad_thoughts_-_Cerebral_filter_-_Progress_and_resistance
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-11-14_-_Conquering_the_desire_to_appear_good_-_Self-control_and_control_of_the_life_around_-_Power_of_mastery_-_Be_a_great_yogi_to_be_a_good_teacher_-_Organisation_of_the_Ashram_school_-_Elementary_discipline_of_regularity
1957-02-20_-_Limitations_of_the_body_and_individuality
1957-04-10_-_Sports_and_yoga_-_Organising_ones_life
1957-04-17_-_Transformation_of_the_body
1957-05-01_-_Sports_competitions,_their_value
1957-05-08_-_Vital_excitement,_reason,_instinct
1957-05-29_-_Progressive_transformation
1957-07-17_-_Power_of_conscious_will_over_matter
1957-07-31_-_Awakening_aspiration_in_the_body
1957-09-11_-_Vital_chemistry,_attraction_and_repulsion
1957-11-13_-_Superiority_of_man_over_animal_-_Consciousness_precedes_form
1958-02-19_-_Experience_of_the_supramental_boat_-_The_Censors_-_Absurdity_of_artificial_means
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958-09-17_-_Power_of_formulating_experience_-_Usefulness_of_mental_development
1961_04_26_-_59
1961_05_22?
1962_01_12
1963_03_06
1969_11_08?
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1.jk_-_Acrostic__-_Georgiana_Augusta_Keats
1.jk_-_A_Draught_Of_Sunshine
1.jk_-_A_Galloway_Song
1.jk_-_An_Extempore
1.jk_-_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J.H.Reynolds
1.jk_-_A_Party_Of_Lovers
1.jk_-_Apollo_And_The_Graces
1.jk_-_A_Prophecy_-_To_George_Keats_In_America
1.jk_-_Asleep!_O_Sleep_A_Little_While,_White_Pearl!
1.jk_-_A_Song_About_Myself
1.jk_-_A_Thing_Of_Beauty_(Endymion)
1.jk_-_Ben_Nevis_-_A_Dialogue
1.jk_-_Bright_Star
1.jk_-_Calidore_-_A_Fragment
1.jk_-_Character_Of_Charles_Brown
1.jk_-_Daisys_Song
1.jk_-_Dawlish_Fair
1.jk_-_Dedication_To_Leigh_Hunt,_Esq.
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Extracts_From_An_Opera
1.jk_-_Faery_Songs
1.jk_-_Fancy
1.jk_-_Fill_For_Me_A_Brimming_Bowl
1.jk_-_Fragment_-_Modern_Love
1.jk_-_Fragment_Of_An_Ode_To_Maia._Written_On_May_Day_1818
1.jk_-_Fragment_Of_The_Castle_Builder
1.jk_-_Fragment._Welcome_Joy,_And_Welcome_Sorrow
1.jk_-_Fragment._Wheres_The_Poet?
1.jk_-_Give_Me_Women,_Wine,_And_Snuff
1.jk_-_Hither,_Hither,_Love
1.jk_-_Hymn_To_Apollo
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_III
1.jk_-_Imitation_Of_Spenser
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci_(Original_version_)
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Lines
1.jk_-_Lines_On_Seeing_A_Lock_Of_Miltons_Hair
1.jk_-_Lines_On_The_Mermaid_Tavern
1.jk_-_Lines_Rhymed_In_A_Letter_From_Oxford
1.jk_-_Lines_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Highlands_After_A_Visit_To_Burnss_Country
1.jk_-_Meg_Merrilies
1.jk_-_Ode_On_A_Grecian_Urn
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Indolence
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Melancholy
1.jk_-_Ode_To_A_Nightingale
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Apollo
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Autumn
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Psyche
1.jk_-_Ode._Written_On_The_Blank_Page_Before_Beaumont_And_Fletchers_Tragi-Comedy_The_Fair_Maid_Of_The_In
1.jk_-_On_A_Dream
1.jk_-_On_Death
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jk_-_On_Receiving_A_Curious_Shell
1.jk_-_On_Receiving_A_Laurel_Crown_From_Leigh_Hunt
1.jk_-_On_Seeing_The_Elgin_Marbles_For_The_First_Time
1.jk_-_On_Visiting_The_Tomb_Of_Burns
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jk_-_Robin_Hood
1.jk_-_Sharing_Eves_Apple
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Song._Hush,_Hush!_Tread_Softly!
1.jk_-_Song._I_Had_A_Dove
1.jk_-_Song_Of_Four_Faries
1.jk_-_Song_Of_The_Indian_Maid,_From_Endymion
1.jk_-_Song._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Beaumont_And_Fletchers_Works
1.jk_-_Sonnet._A_Dream,_After_Reading_Dantes_Episode_Of_Paulo_And_Francesca
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_After_Dark_Vapors_Have_Oppressd_Our_Plains
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_As_From_The_Darkening_Gloom_A_Silver_Dove
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Before_He_Went
1.jk_-_Sonnet._If_By_Dull_Rhymes_Our_English_Must_Be_Chaind
1.jk_-_Sonnet_III._Written_On_The_Day_That_Mr._Leigh_Hunt_Left_Prison
1.jk_-_Sonnet_II._To_.........
1.jk_-_Sonnet_I._To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IV._How_Many_Bards_Gild_The_Lapses_Of_Time!
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IX._Keen,_Fitful_Gusts_Are
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Oh!_How_I_Love,_On_A_Fair_Summers_Eve
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_A_Picture_Of_Leander
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_Leigh_Hunts_Poem_The_Story_of_Rimini
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_Peace
1.jk_-_Sonnet_On_Sitting_Down_To_Read_King_Lear_Once_Again
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_The_Sea
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Day_Is_Gone
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Human_Seasons
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Lady_Seen_For_A_Few_Moments_At_Vauxhall
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Young_Lady_Who_Sent_Me_A_Laurel_Crown
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Byron
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Chatterton
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_George_Keats_-_Written_In_Sickness
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Homer
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Mrs._Reynoldss_Cat
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Sleep
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Spenser
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_The_Nile
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VIII._To_My_Brothers
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VII._To_Solitude
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VI._To_G._A._W.
1.jk_-_Sonnet_V._To_A_Friend_Who_Sent_Me_Some_Roses
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_When_I_Have_Fears_That_I_May_Cease_To_Be
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Before_Re-Read_King_Lear
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J._H._Reynolds
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Disgust_Of_Vulgar_Superstition
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Shakespeares_Poems,_Facing_A_Lovers_Complaint
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Space_At_The_End_Of_Chaucers_Tale_Of_The_Floure_And_The_Lefe
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Upon_The_Top_Of_Ben_Nevis
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XIII._Addressed_To_Haydon
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XII._On_Leaving_Some_Friends_At_An_Early_Hour
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XI._On_First_Looking_Into_Chapmans_Homer
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XIV._Addressed_To_The_Same_(Haydon)
1.jk_-_Sonnet_X._To_One_Who_Has_Been_Long_In_City_Pent
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XVII._Happy_Is_England
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XVI._To_Kosciusko
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XV._On_The_Grasshopper_And_Cricket
1.jk_-_Specimen_Of_An_Induction_To_A_Poem
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanzas_On_Charles_Armitage_Brown
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanza._Written_At_The_Close_Of_Canto_II,_Book_V,_Of_The_Faerie_Queene
1.jk_-_Staffa
1.jk_-_Stanzas._In_A_Drear-Nighted_December
1.jk_-_Stanzas_To_Miss_Wylie
1.jk_-_Teignmouth_-_Some_Doggerel,_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Devon_Maid_-_Stanzas_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_Saint_Mark._A_Fragment
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_The_Gadfly
1.jk_-_This_Living_Hand
1.jk_-_To_......
1.jk_-_To_.......
1.jk_-_To_Ailsa_Rock
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jk_-_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_To_George_Felton_Mathew
1.jk_-_To_Hope
1.jk_-_To_Some_Ladies
1.jk_-_To_The_Ladies_Who_Saw_Me_Crowned
1.jk_-_Translated_From_A_Sonnet_Of_Ronsard
1.jk_-_Two_Or_Three
1.jk_-_Two_Sonnets_On_Fame
1.jk_-_Two_Sonnets._To_Haydon,_With_A_Sonnet_Written_On_Seeing_The_Elgin_Marbles
1.jk_-_What_The_Thrush_Said._Lines_From_A_Letter_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Woman!_When_I_Behold_Thee_Flippant,_Vain
1.jk_-_Written_In_The_Cottage_Where_Burns_Was_Born
1.jk_-_You_Say_You_Love
1.jlb_-_Cosmogonia_(&_translation)
1.jlb_-_Everness_(&_interpretation)
1.lb_-_A_Farewell_To_Secretary_Shuyun_At_The_Xietiao_Villa_In_Xuanzhou
1.lb_-_Alone_and_Drinking_Under_the_Moon
1.lb_-_Alone_Looking_at_the_Mountain
1.lb_-_Amidst_the_Flowers_a_Jug_of_Wine
1.lb_-_A_Mountain_Revelry
1.lb_-_Amusing_Myself
1.lb_-_Ancient_Air_(39)
1.lb_-_A_Song_Of_An_Autumn_Midnight
1.lb_-_A_Song_Of_Changgan
1.lb_-_Atop_Green_Mountains_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Autumn_Air
1.lb_-_Autumn_Air_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Autumn_River_Song
1.lb_-_A_Vindication
1.lb_-_Ballads_Of_Four_Seasons:_Spring
1.lb_-_Ballads_Of_Four_Seasons:_Winter
1.lb_-_Bathed_and_Washed
1.lb_-_Before_The_Cask_of_Wine
1.lb_-_Bitter_Love_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Bringing_in_the_Wine
1.lb_-_Changgan_Memories
1.lb_-_Chiang_Chin_Chiu
1.lb_-_Ch'ing_P'ing_Tiao
1.lb_-_Chuang_Tzu_And_The_Butterfly
1.lb_-_Clearing_at_Dawn
1.lb_-_Climbing_West_Of_Lotus_Flower_Peak
1.lb_-_Confessional
1.lb_-_Crows_Calling_At_Night
1.lb_-_Down_Zhongnan_Mountain
1.lb_-_Drinking_Alone_in_the_Moonlight
1.lb_-_Drinking_in_the_Mountains
1.lb_-_Drinking_With_Someone_In_The_Mountains
1.lb_-_Endless_Yearning_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_[Facing]_Wine
1.lb_-_Facing_Wine
1.lb_-_Farewell_to_Meng_Hao-jan
1.lb_-_Farewell_to_Meng_Hao-jan_at_Yellow_Crane_Tower_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Farewell_to_Secretary_Shu-yun_at_the_Hsieh_Tiao_Villa_in_Hsuan-Chou
1.lb_-_For_Wang_Lun
1.lb_-_For_Wang_Lun_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Gazing_At_The_Cascade_On_Lu_Mountain
1.lb_-_Going_Up_Yoyang_Tower
1.lb_-_Gold_painted_jars_-_wines_worth_a_thousand
1.lb_-_Green_Mountain
1.lb_-_Hard_Is_The_Journey
1.lb_-_Hard_Journey
1.lb_-_Hearing_A_Flute_On_A_Spring_Night_In_Luoyang
1.lb_-_Ho_Chih-chang
1.lb_-_In_Spring
1.lb_-_Jade_Stairs_Grievance
1.lb_-_Lament_for_Mr_Tai
1.lb_-_Lament_of_the_Frontier_Guard
1.lb_-_Lament_On_an_Autumn_Night
1.lb_-_Leave-Taking_Near_Shoku
1.lb_-_Leaving_White_King_City
1.lb_-_Lines_For_A_Taoist_Adept
1.lb_-_Listening_to_a_Flute_in_Yellow_Crane_Pavillion
1.lb_-_Looking_For_A_Monk_And_Not_Finding_Him
1.lb_-_Lu_Mountain,_Kiangsi
1.lb_-_Marble_Stairs_Grievance
1.lb_-_Mng_Hao-jan
1.lb_-_Moon_at_the_Fortified_Pass_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Moon_Over_Mountain_Pass
1.lb_-_Mountain_Drinking_Song
1.lb_-_Nefarious_War
1.lb_-_Old_Poem
1.lb_-_On_A_Picture_Screen
1.lb_-_On_Climbing_In_Nan-King_To_The_Terrace_Of_Phoenixes
1.lb_-_On_Dragon_Hill
1.lb_-_On_Kusu_Terrace
1.lb_-_Poem_by_The_Bridge_at_Ten-Shin
1.lb_-_Question_And_Answer_On_The_Mountain
1.lb_-_Quiet_Night_Thoughts
1.lb_-_Reaching_the_Hermitage
1.lb_-_Remembering_the_Springs_at_Chih-chou
1.lb_-_Resentment_Near_the_Jade_Stairs
1.lb_-_Seeing_Off_Meng_Haoran_For_Guangling_At_Yellow_Crane_Tower
1.lb_-_Self-Abandonment
1.lb_-_She_Spins_Silk
1.lb_-_Sitting_Alone_On_Jingting_Mountain_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Song_of_an_Autumn_Midnight_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Song_of_the_Forge
1.lb_-_Song_Of_The_Jade_Cup
1.lb_-_South-Folk_in_Cold_Country
1.lb_-_Spring_Night_In_Lo-Yang_Hearing_A_Flute
1.lb_-_Staying_The_Night_At_A_Mountain_Temple
1.lb_-_Summer_Day_in_the_Mountains
1.lb_-_Summer_in_the_Mountains
1.lb_-_Taking_Leave_of_a_Friend_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Taking_Leave_of_a_Friend_by_Li_Po_Tr._by_Ezra_Pound
1.lb_-_Talk_in_the_Mountains_[Question_&_Answer_on_the_Mountain]
1.lb_-_The_Ching-Ting_Mountain
1.lb_-_The_City_of_Choan
1.lb_-_The_Cold_Clear_Spring_At_Nanyang
1.lb_-_The_Moon_At_The_Fortified_Pass
1.lb_-_The_Old_Dust
1.lb_-_The_River-Captains_Wife__A_Letter
1.lb_-_The_River-Merchant's_Wife:_A_Letter
1.lb_-_The_River_Song
1.lb_-_The_Roosting_Crows
1.lb_-_The_Solitude_Of_Night
1.lb_-_Thoughts_In_A_Tranquil_Night
1.lb_-_Thoughts_On_a_Quiet_Night_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Thoughts_On_A_Still_Night
1.lb_-_Three_Poems_on_Wine
1.lb_-_Through_The_Yangzi_Gorges
1.lb_-_To_His_Two_Children
1.lb_-_To_My_Wife_on_Lu-shan_Mountain
1.lb_-_To_Tan-Ch'iu
1.lb_-_To_Tu_Fu_from_Shantung
1.lb_-_Viewing_Heaven's_Gate_Mountains
1.lb_-_Visiting_a_Taoist_Master_on_Tai-T'ien_Mountain_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_Visiting_A_Taoist_On_Tiatien_Mountain
1.lb_-_Waking_from_Drunken_Sleep_on_a_Spring_Day_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_We_Fought_for_-_South_of_the_Walls
1.lb_-_Yearning
1.lb_-_Ziyi_Song
1.mah_-_I_am_the_One_Whom_I_Love
1.mah_-_To_Reach_God
1.pbs_-_The_Mask_Of_Anarchy
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.rt_-_The_Homecoming
1.rwe_-_Alphonso_Of_Castile
1.rwe_-_A_Nations_Strength
1.rwe_-_Art
1.rwe_-_Astrae
1.rwe_-_Bacchus
1.rwe_-_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Berrying
1.rwe_-_Blight
1.rwe_-_Boston
1.rwe_-_Boston_Hymn
1.rwe_-_Brahma
1.rwe_-_Celestial_Love
1.rwe_-_Character
1.rwe_-_Compensation
1.rwe_-_Concord_Hymn
1.rwe_-_Culture
1.rwe_-_Days
1.rwe_-_Dirge
1.rwe_-_Dmonic_Love
1.rwe_-_Each_And_All
1.rwe_-_Eros
1.rwe_-_Etienne_de_la_Boce
1.rwe_-_Experience
1.rwe_-_Fable
1.rwe_-_Fate
1.rwe_-_Flower_Chorus
1.rwe_-_Forebearance
1.rwe_-_Forerunners
1.rwe_-_Freedom
1.rwe_-_Friendship
1.rwe_-_From_the_Persian_of_Hafiz_I
1.rwe_-_From_the_Persian_of_Hafiz_II
1.rwe_-_Gnothi_Seauton
1.rwe_-_Good-bye
1.rwe_-_Grace
1.rwe_-_Guy
1.rwe_-_Hamatreya
1.rwe_-_Heroism
1.rwe_-_Initial_Love
1.rwe_-_In_Memoriam
1.rwe_-_Letters
1.rwe_-_Life_Is_Great
1.rwe_-_Loss_And_Gain
1.rwe_-_Love_And_Thought
1.rwe_-_Lover's_Petition
1.rwe_-_Manners
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Merlin_I
1.rwe_-_Merlin_II
1.rwe_-_Merlin's_Song
1.rwe_-_Merops
1.rwe_-_Mithridates
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_Musketaquid
1.rwe_-_My_Garden
1.rwe_-_Nature
1.rwe_-_Nemesis
1.rwe_-_Ode_-_Inscribed_to_W.H._Channing
1.rwe_-_Ode_To_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Poems
1.rwe_-_Politics
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Rubies
1.rwe_-_Saadi
1.rwe_-_Seashore
1.rwe_-_Self_Reliance
1.rwe_-_Solution
1.rwe_-_Song_of_Nature
1.rwe_-_Spiritual_Laws
1.rwe_-_Sursum_Corda
1.rwe_-_Suum_Cuique
1.rwe_-_Tact
1.rwe_-_Teach_Me_I_Am_Forgotten_By_The_Dead
1.rwe_-_Terminus
1.rwe_-_The_Adirondacs
1.rwe_-_The_Amulet
1.rwe_-_The_Apology
1.rwe_-_The_Bell
1.rwe_-_The_Chartist's_Complaint
1.rwe_-_The_Cumberland
1.rwe_-_The_Days_Ration
1.rwe_-_The_Enchanter
1.rwe_-_The_Forerunners
1.rwe_-_The_Gods_Walk_In_The_Breath_Of_The_Woods
1.rwe_-_The_Humble_Bee
1.rwe_-_The_Lords_of_Life
1.rwe_-_The_Park
1.rwe_-_The_Past
1.rwe_-_The_Poet
1.rwe_-_The_Problem
1.rwe_-_The_River_Note
1.rwe_-_The_Romany_Girl
1.rwe_-_The_Snowstorm
1.rwe_-_The_Sphinx
1.rwe_-_The_Test
1.rwe_-_The_Titmouse
1.rwe_-_The_Visit
1.rwe_-_The_World-Soul
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.rwe_-_To-day
1.rwe_-_To_Ellen,_At_The_South
1.rwe_-_To_Eva
1.rwe_-_To_J.W.
1.rwe_-_To_Laugh_Often_And_Much
1.rwe_-_To_Rhea
1.rwe_-_Una
1.rwe_-_Unity
1.rwe_-_Uriel
1.rwe_-_Voluntaries
1.rwe_-_Wakdeubsankeit
1.rwe_-_Water
1.rwe_-_Waves
1.rwe_-_Wealth
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.rwe_-_Worship
1.whitman_-_As_A_Strong_Bird_On_Pinious_Free
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_As_A_School_Exercise_At_Hawkshead,_Anno_Aetatis_14
1.ww_-_Michael-_A_Pastoral_Poem
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_The_Mother-Complex
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Cup
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
21.01_-_The_Mother_The_Nature_of_Her_Work
2.10_-_On_Vedic_Interpretation
2.11_-_On_Education
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.2_-_Study
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.1.4.1_-_Teachers
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.3_-_Discipline
2.1.4.4_-_Homework
2.1.4.5_-_Tests
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.1.5.5_-_Other_Subjects
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
22.08_-_The_Golden_Chain
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
29.04_-_Mothers_Playground
29.08_-_The_Iron_Chain
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.04_-_Intuition_and_Inspiration_in_Art
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_The_Soul_World
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Soul_in_the_Soul_World_after_Death
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.04_-_LUNA
3.05_-_SAL
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
31.08_-_The_Unity_of_India
31.09_-_The_Cause_of_Indias_Decline
3.10_-_Punishment
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.3_-_Dreams
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.09_-_Shyampukur
33.10_-_Pondicherry_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.15_-_My_Athletics
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
3-5_Full_Circle
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
37.02_-_The_Story_of_Jabala-Satyakama
3.7.1.09_-_Karma_and_Freedom
38.01_-_Asceticism_and_Renunciation
40.02_-_The_Two_Chains_Of_The_Mother
4.01_-_Prayers_and_Meditations
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_The_Integral_Perfection
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.1_-_Jnana
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.3.2_-_Attacks_by_the_Hostile_Forces
5.01_-_Message
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.4.02_-_Occult_Powers_or_Siddhis
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.04_-_The_Vital
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Aeneid
Apology
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
Cratylus
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.06a_-_Of_Sensation_and_Memory.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
Euthyphro
Gorgias
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
Meno
MoM_References
Phaedo
r1914_04_11
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Essentials_of_Education
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus

PRIMARY CLASS

subject
the_School
work
SIMILAR TITLES
Education
Education As a Force for Social Change
Education in the New Age
my education
On Education
Philosophy of Education
problem of education
programs (Education)
The Essentials of Education

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

educational ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to education.

education contact "job" The person at a company who should receive educational material. (2004-03-11)

education contact ::: (job) The person at a company who should receive educational material.(2004-03-11)

educationist ::: n. --> One who is versed in the theories of, or who advocates and promotes, education.

education ::: n. --> The act or process of educating; the result of educating, as determined by the knowledge skill, or discipline of character, acquired; also, the act or process of training by a prescribed or customary course of study or discipline; as, an education for the bar or the pulpit; he has finished his education.


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. Lacking education or knowledge. 2. Unaware because of a lack of relevant information or knowledge.

(2) The predominantly naturalistic and positivistic period coincides roughly with the nineteenth century. The wars of independence were accompanied by revolt from scholasticism. In the early part of the century, liberal eclectics like Cousin and P. Janet were popular in South America, but French eighteenth century materialism exerted an increasing influence. Later, the thought of Auguste Comte and of Herbert Spencer came to be dominant especially in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Even an idealistically inclined social and educational philosopher like Eugenio Maria de Hostos (1839-1903), although rejecting naturalistic ethics, maintains a positivistic attitude toward metaphysics.

(2) The term experimental psychology is also used in a more restricted sense to designate a special branch of psychology consisting of laboratory studies conducted on normal, human adults as distinguished from such branches as child, abnormal, differential, animal or comparative, social, educational and applied psychology. This restricted sense is employed in the titles of text-books and manuals of "experimental psychology." Included in this field are such topics as sensory phenomena, perception, judgment, memory, learning, reaction-time, motor phenomena, emotional responses, motivation, thinking and reasoning. This identification of experimental psychology with a specific type of content is largely a result of historical accident, the first experimental psychologists were preoccupied with these particular topics.

3. In its historical aspect, aristocracy is a definite class or order known as hereditary nobility, which possesses prescriptive rank and privileges. This group developed from primitive monarchy, by the gradual limitation of the regal authority by those who formed the council of the king. The defense of their prerogatives led them naturally to consider themselves as a separate class fitted by birthright to monopolize government. But at the same time, they assumed a number of corresponding obligations (hence the aphorism noblesse oblige) particularly for maintaining justice, peace and security. [The characteristics of hereditary aristocracy are: descent and birthright, breeding and education, power to command, administrative and military capacities, readiness to fulfill personal and national obligations, interest in field sports, social equality of its members, aloofness and exclusiveness, moral security in the possession of real values regardless of criticism, competition or advancement.] In certain societies as in Great Britain, birth-right is not an exclusive factor: exceptional men are admitted by recognition into the aristocratic circle (circulation of the elite), after a tincture of breeding satisfying its external standards. The decline of hereditary nobility was due to economic rather than to social or political changes. Now aristocracy can claim only a social influence.

6.001 "education" /siks dub*l oh wun/, /dub*l oh wun/ or rarely /siks dub*l oh fun/ {MIT}'s introductory computer class for majors, known for its intensity. Developed by {Gerald Sussman} and {Hal Abelson}, the course is taught in {Scheme} and introduces {recursion}, {higher-order functions}, {object-oriented programming} and much more. Students who grasp the {meta}circular {interpreter} gain entry into the {Knights of the Lambda-Calculus}. 6.001 has been exported to several other colleges, sometimes successfully. The textbook, "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs", written with Julie Sussman is a classic that can be found on the shelves of many computer scientists, whether they took the course or not. Legendary characters from the class, problem sets, and book include the wise Alyssa P. Hacker, Ben Bitdiddle, Lem E. Tweakit and Eva Lu Ator, the careless Louis Reasoner and {Captain Abstraction}. (1994-11-22)

accomplishment ::: n. --> The act of accomplishing; entire performance; completion; fulfillment; as, the accomplishment of an enterprise, of a prophecy, etc.
That which completes, perfects, or equips thoroughly; acquirement; attainment; that which constitutes excellence of mind, or elegance of manners, acquired by education or training.


ACGIH ::: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists; an organization of professional personnel in governmental agencies or educational institutions engaged in occupational safety and health programs. ACGIH develops and publishes recommended occupational exposure limits (see TLV) for hundreds of chemical substances and physical agents.



Acorn Computers Ltd. "company" A UK computer manufacturer, part of the {Acorn Computer Group} plc. Acorn was founded on 1978-12-05, on a kitchen table in a back room. Their first creation was an electronic slot machine. After the {Acorn System 1}, 2 and 3, Acorn launched the first commercial {microcomputer} - the {ATOM} in March 1980. In April 1981, Acorn won a contract from the {BBC} to provide the {PROTON}. In January 1982 Acorn launched the {BBC Microcomputer} System. At one time, 70% of microcomputers bought for UK schools were BBC Micros. The Acorn Computer Group went public on the Unlisted Securities Market in September 1983. In April 1984 Acorn won the Queen's Award for Technology for the BBC Micro and in September 1985 {Olivetti} took a controlling interest in Acorn. The {Master} 128 Series computers were launched in January 1986 and the BBC {Domesday} System in November 1986. In 1983 Acorn began to design the Acorn RISC Machine (ARM), the first low-cost, high volume {RISC} processor chip (later renamed the {Advanced RISC Machine}). In June 1987 they launched the {Archimedes} range - the first 32-bit {RISC} based {microcomputers} - which sold for under UKP 1000. In February 1989 the R140 was launched. This was the first {Unix} {workstation} under UKP 4000. In May 1989 the A3000 (the new {BBC Microcomputer}) was launched. In 1990 Acorn formed {Advanced RISC Machines} Ltd. (ARM) in partnership with {Apple Computer, Inc.} and {VLSI} to develop the ARM processor. Acorn has continued to develop {RISC} based products. With 1992 revenues of 48.2 million pounds, Acorn Computers was the premier supplier of {Information Technology} products to UK education and had been the leading provider of 32-bit RISC based {personal computers} since 1987. Acorn finally folded in the late 1990s. Their operating system, {RISC OS} was further developed by a consortium of suppliers. {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:comp.sys.acorn}, {news:comp.sys.acorn.announce}, {news:comp.sys.acorn.tech}, {news:comp.binaries.acorn}, {news:comp.sources.acorn}, {news:comp.sys.acorn.advocacy}, {news:comp.sys.acorn.games}. {Acorn's FTP server (ftp://ftp.acorn.co.uk/)}. {HENSA software archive (http://micros.hensa.ac.uk/micros/arch.html)}. {Richard Birkby's Acorn page (http://csv.warwick.ac.uk/~phudv/)}. {RiscMan's Acorn page (http://geko.com.au/riscman/)}. {Acorn On The Net (http://stir.ac.uk/~rhh01/Main.html)}. {"The Jungle" by Simon Truss (http://csc.liv.ac.uk/users/u1smt/u1smt.html)}. [Recent history?] (2000-09-26)

Acorn Computers Ltd. ::: (company) A UK computer manufacturer, part of the Acorn Computer Group plc. Acorn was founded on 1978-12-05, on a kitchen table in a back room. Their January 1982 Acorn launched the BBC Microcomputer System. At one time, 70% of microcomputers bought for UK schools were BBC Micros.The Acorn Computer Group went public on the Unlisted Securities Market in September 1983. In April 1984 Acorn won the Queen's Award for Technology for the The Master 128 Series computers were launched in January 1986 and the BBC Domesday System in November 1986.In 1983 Acorn began to design the Acorn RISC Machine (ARM), the first low-cost, high volume RISC processor chip (later renamed the Advanced RISC Machine). In launched. This was the first Unix workstation under UKP 4000. In May 1989 the A3000 (the new BBC Microcomputer) was launched.In 1990 Acorn formed Advanced RISC Machines Ltd. (ARM) in partnership with Apple Computer, Inc. and VLSI to develop the ARM processor. Acorn has continued to develop RISC based products.With 1992 revenues of 48.2 million pounds, Acorn Computers was the premier supplier of Information Technology products to UK education and had been the leading provider of 32-bit RISC based personal computers since 1987.Acorn finally folded in the late 1990s. Their operating system, RISC OS was further developed by a consortium of suppliers.Usenet newsgroups: comp.sys.acorn, comp.sys.acorn.announce, comp.sys.acorn.tech, comp.binaries.acorn, comp.sources.acorn, comp.sys.acorn.advocacy, comp.sys.acorn.games. . . . . .[Recent history?](2000-09-26)

Ada/Ed ::: (language, education) An interpreter, editor, and run-time environment for Ada, intended as a teaching tool. Ada/Ed does not have the capacity, New York University as part of a project in language definition and software prototyping.AdaEd runs on Unix, MS-DOS, Atari ST, and Amiga.It handles nearly all of Ada 83 and was last validated with version 1.7 of the ACVC tests. Being an interpreter, it does not implement most representation clauses and thus does not support systems programming close to the machine level.Latest version: 1.11.0a+, as of 1994-08-18. A later version is known as GW-Ada.E-mail: Michael Feldman . , . . (1999-11-04)

Ada/Ed "language, education" An {interpreter}, editor, and {run-time environment} for {Ada}, intended as a teaching tool. Ada/Ed does not have the capacity, performance, or robustness of commercial Ada compilers. Ada/Ed was developed at {New York University} as part of a project in language definition and software prototyping. AdaEd runs on {Unix}, {MS-DOS}, {Atari ST}, and {Amiga}. It handles nearly all of {Ada 83} and was last validated with version 1.7 of the {ACVC} tests. Being an interpreter, it does not implement most {representation clauses} and thus does not support systems programming close to the machine level. A later version was known as {GW-Ada}. E-mail: Michael Feldman "mfeldman@seas.gwu.edu". {(ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/amiga/languages/ada)}, {(ftp://cnam.cnam.fr/pub/Ada/Ada-Ed)}. {For Amiga (ftp://cs.nyu.edu/pub/adaed)}. {RISC OS port (ftp://micros.hensa.ac.uk/micros/arch/riscos/c/c052)}. (1999-11-04)

"Ah! Since India is the cradle of religion and since so many gods preside over her destiny, who among them will accomplish the miracle of resuscitating the city?" A. Choumel (in an article on Pondicherry in 1928) Follows response by the Mother: "Blinded by false appearances, deceived by calumnies, held back by fear and prejudice, he has passed by the side of the god whose intervention he implores and saw him not; he has walked near to the forces which will accomplish the miracle he demands and had no will to recognise them. Thus has he lost the greatest opportunity of his life—a unique opportunity of entering into contact with the mysteries and marvelswhose existence his brain has divined and to which his heart obscurely aspires. In all times the aspirant, before receiving initiation, had to pass through tests. In the schools of antiquity these tests were artificial and by that they lost the greater part of their value. But it is no longer so now. The test hides behind some very ordinary every-day circumstance and wears an innocent air of coincidence and chance which makes it still more difficult and dangerous.It is only to those who can conquer the mind’s
   references and prejudices of race and education that India reveals the mystery of her treasures. Others depart disappointed, failing to find what they seek; for they have sought it in the wrong way and would not agree to pay the price of the Divine Discovery."
   Ref: CWM Vol. 13, Page: 372-373


Ajahn Chah BodhiNAna. (1918-1992). A prominent Thai monk who was one of the most influential Thai forest-meditation masters (PHRA PA) of the twentieth century. Born in the village of Baan Gor in the northeastern Thai province of Ubon Ratchathani, he was ordained as a novice at his local temple, where he received his basic education and studied the Buddhist teachings. After several years of training, he returned to lay life to attend to the needs of his parents, but motivated by his religious calling, at the age of twenty, he took higher ordination (UPASAMPADA) as a BHIKsU and continued his studies of PAli scripture. His father's death prompted him to travel to other monasteries in an effort to acquire a deeper understanding of Buddhist teaching and discipline under the guidance of different teachers. During his pilgrimage, he met AJAHN MUN BHuRIDATTA, the premier meditation master of the Thai forest-dwelling (ARANNAVASI) tradition. After that encounter, Ajahn Chah traveled extensively throughout the country, devoting his energies to meditation in forests and charnel grounds (sMAsANA). As his reputation grew, he was invited to establish a monastery near his native village, which became known as Wat Pa Pong after the name of the forest (reputed to be inhabited by ghosts) in which it was located. Ajahn Chah's austere lifestyle, simple method of mindfulness meditation, and straightforward style of teaching attracted a large following of monks and lay supporters, including many foreigners. In 1966, he established Wat Pa Nanachat, a branch monastery specifically for Western and other non-Thai nationals, next to Wat Pa Pong. In 1976, he was invited to England, which led to the establishment of the first branch monastery of Wat Pa Pong there, followed by others in Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand, and Italy. He also visited the United States, where he spoke at retreats at the Insight Meditation Center in Barre, Massachusetts. Ajahn Chah died in 1992, after several years in a coma.

Alliance Israelite Universelle ::: International Jewish organization, founded in Paris in 1860 to protect the rights of Jewish citizens and to promote education and professional development among Jews around the world.

Ambedkar, Bhimrao Ramji. (1891-1956). Indian reformer and Buddhist convert, who advocated for reform of the caste system and improvements in the social treatment of "untouchables" or the Dalit community during the independence period. The fourteenth child of a Dalit caste family in the Indian state of Maharashtra, Ambedkar was one of the few members of his caste to receive a secondary-school education and went on to study in New York and London, eventually receiving a doctorate from Columbia University. Upon his return to India, he worked both for Indian independence from Britain and for the social and political rights of the untouchables. After independence, he served in Nehru's government, chairing the committee that drafted the constitution. Seeking a religious identity for Dalits that would free them from the caste prejudice of Hinduism, he settled on Buddhism after considering also Islam, Christianity, and Sikhism. Buddhism had been extinct in India for centuries, but Ambedkar's research led him to conclude that the Dalits were descendants of Buddhists who had been persecuted by Hindus for their beliefs. In 1956, six weeks before his death, Ambedkar publicly converted to Buddhism and then led an audience of 380,000 in taking refuge in the three jewels (RATNATRAYA) and in accepting the five precepts (PANCAsĪLA) of lay Buddhists. Eventually, millions of other Indians, mostly from low-caste and outcaste groups, followed his example. In his writings, Ambedkar portrayed the Buddha as a social reformer, whose teachings could provide India with the foundation for a more egalitarian society.

Amdahl Corporation ::: (company) A US computer manufacturer. Amdahl is a major supplier of large mainframes, UNIX and Open Systems software and servers, data storage subsystems, data communications products, applications development software, and a variety of educational and consulting services.Amdahl products are sold in more than 30 countries for use in both open systems and IBM plug-compatible mainframe computing environments.Quarterly sales $397M, profits $13M (Aug 1994).In 1997 Amdahl became a division of Fujitsu. . (1995-05-23)

Amdahl Corporation "company" A US computer manufacturer. Amdahl is a major supplier of large {mainframes}, {UNIX} and {Open Systems} software and servers, data storage subsystems, data communications products, applications development software, and a variety of educational and consulting services. Amdahl products are sold in more than 30 countries for use in both open systems and {IBM} plug-compatible mainframe computing environments. Quarterly sales $397M, profits $13M (Aug 1994). In 1997 Amdahl became a division of {Fujitsu}. {(http://amdahl.com/)}. (1995-05-23)

Andrew Project "project" A distributed system project for support of educational and research computing at {Carnegie Mellon University}, named after Andrew Carnegie, an American philanthropist who provided money to establish CMU. See also {Andrew File System}, {Andrew Message System}, {Andrew Toolkit}, {class}. {Home FTP (ftp://emsworth.andrew.cmu.edu)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.soft-sys.andrew}. [More detail?] (1997-11-17)

Andrew Project ::: (project) A distributed system project for support of educational and research computing at Carnegie Mellon University, named after Andrew Carnegie, an American philanthropist who provided money to establish CMU.See also Andrew File System, Andrew Message System, Andrew Toolkit, class. .Usenet newsgroup: comp.soft-sys.andrew.[More detail?] (1997-11-17)

antecedent control: a behavioural measure in which the intervention occurs before the behaviour arises. Antecedent procedures include education, attitude change and inducing or preventing behaviours by controlling the triggers which cause them to occur.

arboretum ::: n. --> A place in which a collection of rare trees and shrubs is cultivated for scientific or educational purposes.

Artemis was also the protectress of mankind and was specially active in regard to the education of the child and youth. Boys and girls were consecrated to her in the temples. She was goddess of marriage and presided over births. Her chief festival, that of Ephesia or Artemisia, was held in the spring.

Association for Computing ::: (body) (ACM, before 1997 - Association for Computing Machinery) The largest and oldest international scientific and educational computer society in and application of Information Technology. John Mauchly, co-inventor of the ENIAC, was one of ACM's founders.Since its inception ACM has provided its members and the world of computer science a forum for the sharing of knowledge on developments and achievements necessary to the fruitful interchange of ideas.ACM has 90,000 members - educators, researchers, practitioners, managers, and engineers - who drive the Association's major programs and services - publications, special interest groups, chapters, conferences, awards, and special activities.The ACM Press publishes journals (notably CACM), book series, conference proceedings, CD-ROM, hypertext, video, and specialized publications such as curricula recommendations and self-assessment procedures. . (1998-02-24)

Association for Computing "body" (ACM, before 1997 - "Association for Computing Machinery") The largest and oldest international scientific and educational computer society in the industry. Founded in 1947, only a year after the unveiling of {ENIAC}, ACM was established by mathematicians and electrical engineers to advance the science and application of {Information Technology}. {John Mauchly}, co-inventor of the ENIAC, was one of ACM's founders. Since its inception ACM has provided its members and the world of computer science a forum for the sharing of knowledge on developments and achievements necessary to the fruitful interchange of ideas. ACM has 90,000 members - educators, researchers, practitioners, managers, and engineers - who drive the Association's major programs and services - publications, special interest groups, chapters, conferences, awards, and special activities. The ACM Press publishes journals (notably {CACM}), book series, conference proceedings, {CD-ROM}, {hypertext}, {video}, and specialized publications such as curricula recommendations and self-assessment procedures. {(http://info.acm.org/)}. (1998-02-24)

BASIC "language" Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. A simple language originally designed for ease of programming by students and beginners. Many dialects exist, and BASIC is popular on {microcomputers} with sound and graphics support. Most micro versions are {interactive} and {interpreted}. BASIC has become the leading cause of brain-damage in proto-hackers. This is another case (like {Pascal}) of the cascading lossage that happens when a language deliberately designed as an educational toy gets taken too seriously. A novice can write short BASIC programs (on the order of 10-20 lines) very easily; writing anything longer is painful and encourages bad habits that will make it harder to use more powerful languages. This wouldn't be so bad if historical accidents hadn't made BASIC so common on low-end micros. As it is, it ruins thousands of potential wizards a year. Originally, all references to code, both {GOTO} and GOSUB (subroutine call) referred to the destination by its line number. This allowed for very simple editing in the days before {text editors} were considered essential. Just typing the line number deleted the line and to edit a line you just typed the new line with the same number. Programs were typically numbered in steps of ten to allow for insertions. Later versions, such as {BASIC V}, allow {GOTO}-less {structured programming} with named {procedures} and {functions}, IF-THEN-ELSE
IF constructs and {WHILE} loops etc. Early BASICs had no graphic operations except with graphic characters. In the 1970s BASIC {interpreters} became standard features in {mainframes} and {minicomputers}. Some versions included {matrix} operations as language {primitives}. A {public domain} {interpreter} for a mixture of {DEC}'s {MU-Basic} and {Microsoft Basic} is {here (ftp://oak.oakland.edu/pub/Unix-c/languages/basic/basic.tar-z)}. A {yacc} {parser} and {interpreter} were in the comp.sources.unix archives volume 2. See also {ANSI Minimal BASIC}, {bournebasic}, {bwBASIC}, {ubasic}, {Visual Basic}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-03-15)


Baum Gruppe (Herbert Baum Group) ::: Small, clandestine anti-Nazi organization founded in Berlin at the beginning of the Nazi regime by Herbert and Marianne Baum. It was composed of young people, primarily Jewish members of the Communist party, as well as a number of Zionists. Its activities centered around increasing education, political, and cultural awareness, but it also engaged in one act of spectacular sabotage: The bombing of an anti-Soviet exhibit in Berlin. Most of the members were denounced, tried, and executed between July 1942 and June 1943.

BBC Microcomputer ::: A series of 6502-based personal computers launched by Acorn Computers Ltd. in January 1982, for use in the British Broadcasting Corporation's educational for easy expansion. The 6502-based computers were succeeded in 1987 by the Acorn Archimedes family.xbeeb is a BBC Micro emulator for Unix and X11.

BBC Microcomputer A series of {6502}-based personal computers launched by {Acorn Computers} Ltd. in January 1982, for use in the British Broadcasting Corporation's educational programmes on computing. The computers are noted for their reliability (many are still in active service in 1994) and both hardware and software were designed for easy expansion. The 6502-based computers were succeeded in 1987 by the Acorn {Archimedes} family. {xbeeb} is a BBC Micro {emulator} for {Unix} and {X11}.

BBC Networking Club "body" A {bulletin board} run by the {British Broadcasting Corporation} Education department from April 1994 to 30 Nov 1995. (1997-01-20)

BBC Networking Club ::: (body) A bulletin board run by the British Broadcasting Corporation Education department from April 1994 to 30 Nov 1995. (1997-01-20)

Bdud 'joms Rin po che. (Düdjom Rinpoche) (1904-1987). An influential twentieth-century Tibetan master who served for a time as the head of the RNYING MA sect of Tibetan Buddhism. Born in the southern Tibetan region of PADMA BKOD, Bdud 'joms Rin po che was recognized at the age of three as the reincarnation of the treasure revealer (GTER STON) Bdud 'joms gling pa (Düdjom Lingpa). He trained primarily at SMIN GROL GLING monastery in central Tibet, establishing himself as a leading exponent of Rnying ma doctrine, especially the instructions of RDZOGS CHEN or "great completion." Following his flight into exile in 1959, Bdud 'joms Rin po che became the religious leader of the Rnying ma sect, while actively supporting the educational activities of the Tibetan diasporic community in India. He spent much of his later life in the West, establishing centers and garnering a wide following in the United States and France. He died in 1987 at his religious institution in Dordogne, France. Renowned as a treasure revealer, scholar, and poet, Bdud 'joms Rin po che is especially known for his extensive historical writings, including the comprehensive The Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism: Its Fundamentals and History. His full name is 'Jigs bral ye shes rdo rje (Jikdral Yeshe Dorje).

Beneke, Friedrich Eduard: (1798-1854) A German thinker of Kantian tradition modified by empiricism; his doctrines exerted considerable influence upon the psychology and educational theory of the 19th century. Main works: Erfahrungseelenlehre, 1820; Physik d. Sitten, 1822; Metaphysik, 1822; Logik als Kunstlehre des Denkens, 1832; Lehrbuch d. Psych. als Naturwiss., 1833; Erziehungslehre, 1833; Pragmatische Psychol., 1850. -- R.B.W.

Bodawpaya. (r. 1782-1819). Burmese king and sixth monarch of the Konbaung dynasty (1752-1885). Originally known as Badon Min, he was the fourth son of Alaungpaya (r. 1752-1760), founder of the dynasty, and ascended to the throne through usurpation. His official regnal title was Hsinpyumyashin, "Lord of Many White Elephants"; the name by which he is most commonly known, Bodawpaya, "Lord Grandfather," is a posthumous sobriquet. Immediately upon becoming king in 1782, he began construction of a new capital, AMARAPURA, and convened a conclave of abbots, known as the THUDHAMMA (P. Sudhamm) council, to oversee a reform of the Burmese SAMGHA. In 1784, he conquered the kingdom of Arakan and transported its colossal palladium, the MAHAMUNI image of the Buddha (see ARAKAN BUDDHA), to Amarapura and enshrined it in a temple to the north of the city. Later, in 1787 he dispatched a Buddhist mission to Arakan to bring the Arakanese THERAVADA saMgha into conformity with Thudhamma standards. In 1791 Buddhist missions were sent from the capital to forty-two cities around the realm, each equipped with Thudhamma handbooks and newly edited copies of the Buddhist canon (tipitaka; S. TRIPItAKA). The missions were charged with the threefold task of defrocking unworthy monks, disestablishing local monastic fraternities, and reordaining worthy monks from these local groups into a single empire-wide monastic order under Thudhamma control. In conjunction with this policy of saMgha unification, a standardized syllabus for monastic education was promulgated and monks and novices throughout the realm were thenceforth required to pass state-administered PAli examinations or to leave the order. That same year (1791), Bodawpaya retired from the palace, placing the daily affairs of the kingdom in the hands of his son, the crown prince. While retaining ultimate royal authority, he donned the robes of a mendicant and took up residence at Mingun, some fifteen miles north of Amarapura on the opposite bank of the Irrawaddy River. There, he oversaw for several years the construction of the great Mingun pagoda, which, if it had been completed, would have been the largest pagoda in the world. The labor force for this project, numbering some twenty thousand people, was conscripted from the vanquished kingdom of Arakan. Strict and austere in temperament, Bodawpaya was quick to suppress heresy and banned the use of intoxicants and the slaughter of cattle, on penalty of death. He was enamored of Hindu science and sent several missions to India to acquire Brahmanical treatises on medicine, alchemy, astrology, calendrics, and what he hoped would be original Indian recensions of Buddhist scriptures. His missions reached BODHGAYA and returned with models of the main shrine and maps of its environs, which were used to create a miniature replica of the site at Mingun. He appointed Indian brAhmanas to refine court punctilio and attempted to reform the Burmese calendar along Indian lines. The calendar reforms were rejected by monastic leaders and this rebuff appears to have caused the king to become increasingly critical of the monkhood. Toward the end of his reign, Bodawpaya defrocked the Thudhamma patriarch, declaring the dispensation (P. sAsana; S. sASANA) of Gotama (GAUTAMA) Buddha to be extinct and its saMgha therefore defunct. This attempt to disestablish the Burmese saMgha met with little success outside the capital and was later abandoned. Bodawpaya's military campaigns against Arakan and Assam extended the borders of the Burmese empire to the frontiers of the British East India Company. The cruelty of Bodawpaya's rule in Arakan created an influx of refugees into British territory, who were regularly pursued by Burmese troops. Although British diplomacy kept tensions with the Burmese kingdom under control throughout Bodawpaya's reign, the stage was set for eventual military conflict between the two powers and the subsequent British conquest of Burma in three wars during the nineteenth century.

Bookkeeping - Accounting support functions performed by the book keeper. Bookkeeping is the most basic of the accounting duties and requires less education and experience.

breeding ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Breed ::: n. --> The act or process of generating or bearing.
The raising or improving of any kind of domestic animals; as, farmers should pay attention to breeding.
Nurture; education; formation of manners.


breed ::: v. t. --> To produce as offspring; to bring forth; to bear; to procreate; to generate; to beget; to hatch.
To take care of in infancy, and through the age of youth; to bring up; to nurse and foster.
To educate; to instruct; to form by education; to train; -- sometimes followed by up.
To engender; to cause; to occasion; to originate; to produce; as, to breed a storm; to breed disease.


'Brom ston Rgyal ba'i 'byung gnas. (Dromton Gyalwe Jungne) (1004-1064). The foremost Tibetan disciple of the Bengali scholar ATIsA, and central figure in the founding of the BKA' GDAMS sect of Tibetan Buddhism during the period known as the later dissemination (PHYI DAR) of Buddhism in Tibet. Born in central Tibet, he began his education at an early age. Toward the middle years of his life, news of Atisa's arrival in western Tibet reached him, and he set out on the arduous journey to meet the master. 'Brom ston pa became an early and close student of Atisa and made arrangements for his Indian guru's tour of central Tibet in 1045. After Atisa's death, 'Brom ston pa established RWA SGRENG monastery in 1056, consolidating his career as translator and teacher at this important religious institution. He is remembered especially for the firm austerity of his religious practice. 'Brom ston pa's instructions, as recorded in Bka' gdams pa works such as the Bka' gdams gtor bu ("Bka' gdams Miscellania"), perhaps wary of the potential abuses of tantric practice, instead emphasize meditation on impermanence and compassion coupled with adherence to strict ethical principles and monastic discipline.

bulletin board system "communications, application" (BBS, bboard /bee'bord/, message board, forum; plural: BBSes) A computer and associated software which typically provides an electronic message database where people can log in and leave messages. Messages are typically split into {topic groups} similar to the {newsgroups} on {Usenet} (which is like a distributed BBS). Any user may submit or read any message in these public areas. The term comes from physical pieces of board on which people can pin messages written on paper for general consumption - a "physical bulletin board". {Ward Christensen}, the programmer and operator of the first BBS (on-line 1978-02-16) called it a CBBS for "computer bulletin board system". Since the rise of the {World-Wide Web}, the term has become antiquated, though the concept is more popular than ever, with many {websites} featuring discussion areas where users can post messages for public consumption. Apart from public message areas, some BBSes provided archives of files, personal {electronic mail} and other services of interest to the system operator ({sysop}). Thousands of BBSes around the world were run from amateurs' homes on {MS-DOS} boxes with a single {modem} line each. Although BBSes were traditionally the domain of hobbyists, many connected directly to the {Internet} (accessed via {telnet}), others were operated by government, educational, and research institutions. Fans of {Usenet} or the big commercial {time-sharing} bboards such as {CompuServe}, {CIX} and {GEnie} tended to consider local BBSes the low-rent district of the hacker culture, but they helped connect hackers and users in the personal-{micro} and let them exchange code. Use of this term for a {Usenet} newsgroup generally marks one either as a {newbie} fresh in from the BBS world or as a real old-timer predating {Usenet}. (2005-09-20)

By way of connoting different types of society, many contemporary Marxists, especially in the U.S.S.R., building upon Marx's analysis of the two phases of "communist society" ("Gotha Program") designate the first or lower phase by the term socialism, the second or higher by the term communism (q.v.). The general features of socialist society (identified by Soviet thinkers with the present phase of development of the U.S.S.R.) are conceived as follows: Economic collective ownership of the means of production, such as factories, industrial equipment, the land, and of the basic apparatus of distribution and exchange, including the banking system; the consequent abolition of classes, private profit, exploitation, surplus value, (q.v.) private hiring and firing and involuntary unemployment; an integrated economy based on long time planning in terms of needs and use. It is held that only under these economic conditions is it possible to apply the formula, "from each according to ability, to each according to work performed", the first part of which implies continuous employment, and the second part, the absence of private profit. Political: a state based upon the dictatorship of the proletariat (q.v.) Cultural the extension of all educational and cultural facilities through state planning; the emancipation of women through unrestricted economic opportunities, the abolition of race discrimination through state enforcement, a struggle against all cultural and social institutions which oppose the socialist society and attempt to obstruct its realization. Marx and Engels held that socialism becomes the inevitable outgrowth of capitalism because the evolution of the latter type of society generates problems which can only be solved by a transition to socialism. These problems are traced primarily to the fact that the economic relations under capitalism, such as individual ownership of productive technics, private hiring and firing in the light of profits and production for a money market, all of which originally released powerful new productive potentialities, come to operate, in the course of time, to prevent full utilization of productive technics, and to cause periodic crises, unemployment, economic insecurity and consequent suffering for masses of people. Marx and Engels regarded their doctrine of the transformation of capitalist into socialist society as based upon a scientific examination of the laws of development of capitalism and a realistic appreciation of the role of the proletariat. (q.v.) Unlike the Utopian socialism (q.v.) of St. Simon, Fourier, Owen (q.v.) and others, their socialism asserted the necessity of mass political organization of the working classes for the purpose of gaining political power in order to effect the transition from capitalism, and also foresaw the probability of a contest of force in which, they held, the working class majority would ultimately be victorious. The view taken is that Marx was the first to explain scientifically the nature of capitalist exploitation as based upon surplus value and to predict its necessary consequences. "These two great discoveries, the materialist conception of history and the revelation of the secret of capitalist production by means of surplus value we owe to Marx. With these discoveries socialism became a science . . ." (Engels: Anti-Dühring, pp. 33-34.) See Historical materialism. -- J.M.S.

C. A. Helvetius, De l'Esprit, 1758; De I'Homme, de ses facultes et de son education, 1772. -- H.H.

Carnegie Mellon University ::: (body, education) (CMU) A university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. School of Computer Science . (1997-06-23)

Carnegie Mellon University "body, education" (CMU) A university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. {School of Computer Science (http://cs.cmu.edu/Web/FrontDoor.html)}. (1997-06-23)

Cartesianism: The philosophy of the French thinker, Rene Descartes (Cartesius) 1596-1650. After completing his formal education at the Jesuit College at La Fleche, he spent the years 1612-1621 in travel and military service. The reminder of his life was devoted to study and writing. He died in Sweden, where he had gone in 1649 to tutor Queen Christina. His principal works are: Discours de la methode, (preface to his Geometric, Meteores, Dieptrique) Meditationes de prima philosophia, Principia philosophiae, Passions de l'ame, Regulae ad directionem ingenii, Le monde. Descartes is justly regarded as one of the founders of modern epistemology. Dissatisfied with the lack of agreement among philosophers, he decided that philosophy needed a new method, that of mathematics. He began by resolving to doubt everything which could not pass the test of his criterion of truth, viz. the clearness and distinctness of ideas. Anything which could pass this test was to be readmitted as self-evident. From self-evident truths, he deduced other truths which logically follow from them. Three kinds of ideas were distinguished: innate, by which he seems to mean little more than the mental power to think things or thoughts; adventitious, which come to him from without; factitious, produced within his own mind. He found most difficulty with the second type of ideas. The first reality discovered through his method is the thinking self. Though he might doubt nearly all else, Descartes could not reasonably doubt that he, who was thinking, existed as a res cogitans. This is the intuition enunciated in the famous aphorism: I think, therefore I am, Cogito ergo sum. This is not offered by Descartes as a compressed syllogism, but as an immediate intuition of his own thinking mind. Another reality, whose existence was obvious to Descartes, was God, the Supreme Being. Though he offered several proofs of the Divine Existence, he was convinced that he knew this also by an innate idea, and so, clearly and distinctly. But he did not find any clear ideas of an extra-mental, bodily world. He suspected its existence, but logical demonstration was needed to establish this truth. His adventitious ideas carry the vague suggestion that they are caused by bodies in an external world. By arguing that God would be a deceiver, in allowing him to think that bodies exist if they do not, he eventually convinced himself of the reality of bodies, his own and others. There are, then, three kinds of substance according to Descartes: Created spirits, i.e. the finite soul-substance of each man: these are immaterial agencies capable of performing spiritual operations, loosely united with bodies, but not extended since thought is their very essence. Uncreated Spirit, i.e. God, confined neither to space nor time, All-Good and All-Powerful, though his Existence can be known clearly, his Nature cannot be known adequately by men on earth, He is the God of Christianity, Creator, Providence and Final Cause of the universe. Bodies, i.e. created, physical substances existing independently of human thought and having as their chief attribute, extension. Cartesian physics regards bodies as the result of the introduction of "vortices", i.e. whorls of motion, into extension. Divisibility, figurability and mobility, are the notes of extension, which appears to be little more thin what Descartes' Scholastic teachers called geometrical space. God is the First Cause of all motion in the physical universe, which is conceived as a mechanical system operated by its Maker. Even the bodies of animals are automata. Sensation is the critical problem in Cartesian psychology; it is viewed by Descartes as a function of the soul, but he was never able to find a satisfactory explanation of the apparent fact that the soul is moved by the body when sensation occurs. The theory of animal spirits provided Descartes with a sort of bridge between mind and matter, since these spirits are supposed to be very subtle matter, halfway, as it were, between thought and extension in their nature. However, this theory of sensation is the weakest link in the Cartesian explanation of cognition. Intellectual error is accounted for by Descartes in his theory of assent, which makes judgment an act of free will. Where the will over-reaches the intellect, judgment may be false. That the will is absolutely free in man, capable even of choosing what is presented by the intellect as the less desirable of two alternatives, is probably a vestige of Scotism retained from his college course in Scholasticism. Common-sense and moderation are the keynotes of Descartes' famous rules for the regulation of his own conduct during his nine years of methodic doubt, and this ethical attitude continued throughout his life. He believed that man is responsible ultimately to God for the courses of action that he may choose. He admitted that conflicts may occur between human passions and human reason. A virtuous life is made possible by the knowledge of what is right and the consequent control of the lower tendencies of human nature. Six primary passions are described by Descartes wonder, love, hatred, desire, joy and sorrow. These are passive states of consciousness, partly caused by the body, acting through the animal spirits, and partly caused by the soul. Under rational control, they enable the soul to will what is good for the body. Descartes' terminology suggests that there are psychological faculties, but he insists that these powers are not really distinct from the soul itself, which is man's sole psychic agency. Descartes was a practical Catholic all his life and he tried to develop proofs of the existence of God, an explanation of the Eucharist, of the nature of religious faith, and of the operation of Divine Providence, using his philosophy as the basis for a new theology. This attempted theology has not found favor with Catholic theologians in general.

Chalmers University of Technology ::: (body, education) A Swedish university founded in 1829 offering master of science and doctoral degrees. Research is carried out in the main engineering Five hundred faculty members work in more than 100 departments organised in nine schools. Chalmers collaborates with the University of G�teborg.Around 8500 people work and study on the Chalmers campus, including around 500 faculty members and some 600 teachers and doctoral students. About 4800 students licentiates are awarded. Some 40% of Sweden's engineers and architects are Chalmers graduates.About a thousand research projects are in progress and more than 1500 scientific articles and research reports are published every year. Chalmers is a partner in 80 EC research projects. .Address: S-412 96 G�teborg, Sweden. (1995-02-16)

Chalmers University of Technology "body, education" A Swedish university founded in 1829 offering master of science and doctoral degrees. Research is carried out in the main engineering sciences as well as in technology related mathematical and natural sciences. Five hundred faculty members work in more than 100 departments organised in nine schools. Chalmers collaborates with the University of Göteborg. Around 8500 people work and study on the Chalmers campus, including around 500 faculty members and some 600 teachers and doctoral students. About 4800 students follow the master degree programs. Every year 700 Masters of Science in Engineering and in Architecture graduate from Chalmers, and about 190 PhDs and licentiates are awarded. Some 40% of Sweden's engineers and architects are Chalmers graduates. About a thousand research projects are in progress and more than 1500 scientific articles and research reports are published every year. Chalmers is a partner in 80 EC research projects. {(http://chalmers.se/Home-E.html)}. Address: S-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden. (1995-02-16)

character ::: n. --> A distinctive mark; a letter, figure, or symbol.
Style of writing or printing; handwriting; the peculiar form of letters used by a particular person or people; as, an inscription in the Runic character.
The peculiar quality, or the sum of qualities, by which a person or a thing is distinguished from others; the stamp impressed by nature, education, or habit; that which a person or thing really is; nature; disposition.


Characterology: This name originally was used for types; thus in Aristotle and Theophrastus, and even much later, e.g. in La Bruyere. Gradually it came to signify something individual; a development paralleled by the replacement of "typical" figures on the stage by individualities. There is no agreement, even today, on the definition; confusion reigns especially because of an insufficient distinction between character, personality, and person. But all agree that character manifests itself in the behavior of a person. One can distinguish a merely descriptive approach, one of classification, and one of interpretation. The general viewpoints of interpretation influence also description and classification, since they determine what is considered "important" and lay down the rules by which to distinguish and to classify. One narrow interpretation looks at character mainly as the result of inborn properties, rooted in organic constitution; character is considered, therefore, as essentially unchangeable and predetermined. The attempts at establishing correlations between character and body-build (Kretschmer a.o.) are a special form of such narrow interpretation. It makes but little difference if, besides inborn properties, the influence of environmental factors is acknowledged. The rationalistic interpretation looks at character mainly as the result of convictions. These convictions are seen as purely intellectual in extreme rationalism (virtue is knowledge, Socrates), or as referring to the value-aspect of reality which is conceived as apprehended by other than merely intellectual operations. Thus, Spranger gives a classification according to the "central values" dominating a man's behavior. (Allport has devised practical methods of character study on this basis.) Since the idea a person has of values and their order may change, character is conceived as essentially mutable, even if far going changes may be unfrequent. Character-education is the practical application of the principles of characterology and thus depends on the general idea an author holds in regard to human nature. Character is probably best defined as the individual's way of preferring or rejecting values. It depends on the innate capacities of value-apprehension and on the way these values are presented to the individual. Therefore the enormous influence of social factors. -- R.A.

Ch'eng Ming-tao: (Ch'eng Hou, Ch'eng Po-tun, 1032-1086) Served as government official both in the capital and in various counties with excellent records in social and educational achievements. For decades he studied Taoism and Buddhism but finally repudiated them. Together with his brother, he developed new aspects of Confucianism and became the greatest Confucian since Mencius and a leader of Neo-Confucianism (li hsueh). His works and those of his brother, called Erh Ch'eng Ch'uan-shu (complete works of the Ch'eng brothers), number 107 chuans, in 14 Chinese volumes. -- W.T.C.

Chih shan: Highest excellence; perfection; the ultimate good, the goal of Confucian ethics and education. -- W.T.C Ch'i hsueh: The intellectual movement in the state of Ch'i. See Chi Hsia. Chiliasm: Teaching and belief of some Jews and Christians that the Messiah will appear at the end of time to found a glorious kingdom on earth which is to last one thousand years; also called Millenarianism. -- J.J.R.

Choson Pulgyo yusin non. (朝鮮佛教唯新論). In Korean, "Treatise on the Reformation of Korean Buddhism"; composed by the Korean monk-reformer HAN YONGUN in 1910. While sojourning in Japan, Han personally witnessed what to him seemed quite innovative ways in which Japanese Buddhists were seeking to adapt their religious practices to modern society and hoped to implement similar ideas in Korea. This clarion call for Buddhist reform was one of the first attempts by a Korean author to apply Western liberalism in the context of Korean society. Han attributed many of the contemporary problems Korean Buddhism was facing to its isolation from society at large, a result of the centuries-long persecution Buddhism had suffered in Korea at the hands of Confucian ideologues during the previous Choson dynasty (1392-1910). To help restore Buddhism to a central place in Korean society and culture, Han called for what were at the time quite radical reforms, including social and national egalitarianism, the secularization of the SAMGHA, a married clergy, expanded educational opportunities for monks, the transfer of monasteries from the mountains to the cities, and economic self-reliance within the monastic community. Both the Japanese government-general and the leaders of the Korean Buddhist community rebuffed most of Han's proposals (although several of his suggestions, including a married clergy, were subsequently co-opted by the Japanese colonial administration), but the issues that he raised about how to make Buddhism relevant in an increasingly secularized and capitalist society remain pertinent even to this day.

coeducation ::: n. --> An educating together, as of persons of different sexes or races.

Communism: (Marxian) In its fullest sense, that stage of social development, which, following socialism (q.v.) is conceived to be characterized by an economy of abundance on a world wide scale in which the state as a repressive force (army, jails, police and the like) is considered unnecessary because irreconcilable class antagonisms will have disappeared, and it will be possible to apply the principle, "from each according to ability, to each according to need" (Marx "Gotha Program"). It is held that the release of productive potentialities resulting from socialized ownership of the means of production will create a general sufficiency of economic goods which in turn will afford the possibility of educational and cultural development for all, and that under such conditions people will learn to live in accordance with valued standards without the compulsion of physical force represented by a special apparatus of state power. It is considered that by intelligent planning, both economic and cultural, it will then be possible to eradicate the antagonism between town and country and the opposition between physical and mental labor. It is now considered in the U.S.S.R. that the principal features of communist society, with the exception of the "withering away" of the state, may be attained in one country of an otherwise capitalist world. Trotsky considered this a false version of Marxism. -- J.M.S.

Compact Disc interactive ::: (CD-i) An embedded application of CD-ROM allowing the user limited interaction with films, games and educational applications via a special controller. (1994-11-02)

Compact Disc interactive "storage" (CD-i) An embedded application of {CD-ROM} allowing the user limited interaction with films, games and educational applications via a special {controller}. (1994-11-02)

completion ::: n. --> The act or process of making complete; the getting through to the end; as, the completion of an undertaking, an education, a service.
State of being complete; fulfillment; accomplishment; realization.


Computer-Aided Instruction "application, education" (CAI, or "- assisted", "- learning", CAL, Computer-Based Training CBT, "e-learning") The use of computers for education and training. The programs and data used in CAI, known as "courseware", may be supplied on media such as {CD-ROM} or delivered via a {network} which also enables centralised logging of student progress. CAI may constitute the whole or part of a course, may be done individually or in groups ("Computer Supported Collaborative Learning", CSCL), with or without human guidance. (2011-11-25)

Computer-Aided Instruction ::: (application, education) (CAI, or assisted, learning, CAL) The use of (personal) computers for education and training. (1995-04-13)

Computer Animation Movie Language ::: [A Computer Animation Movie Language for Educational Motion Pictures, D.D. Weiner et al, Proc FJCC 33(2), AFIPS (Fall 1968)]. (1994-11-30)

Computer Animation Movie Language "language" A programming language for generating {animation}. ["A Computer Animation Movie Language for Educational Motion Pictures", D.D. Weiner et al, Proc FJCC 33(2), AFIPS, Fall 1968]. (2012-01-30)

computer literacy ::: (education) Basic skill in use of computers, from the perspective of such skill being a necessary societal skill.The term was coined by Andrew Molnar, while director of the Office of Computing Activities at the National Science Foundation.We started computer literacy in '72 [...] We coined that phrase. It's sort of ironic. Nobody knows what computer literacy is. Nobody can define it. And the OH 234. Center for the History of Information Processing, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota).The term, as a coinage, is similar to earlier coinages, such as visual literacy, which dates to 1971, and the more recent media literacy. (1998-09-07)

computer literacy "education" Basic skill in use of computers, from the perspective of such skill being a necessary societal skill. The term was coined by Andrew Molnar, while director of the Office of Computing Activities at the {National Science Foundation}. "We started computer literacy in '72 [...] We coined that phrase. It's sort of ironic. Nobody knows what computer literacy is. Nobody can define it. And the reason we selected [it] was because nobody could define it, and [...] it was a broad enough term that you could get all of these programs together under one roof" (cited in Aspray, W., (September 25, 1991) "Interview with Andrew Molnar," OH 234. Center for the History of Information Processing, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota). The term, as a coinage, is similar to earlier coinages, such as "visual literacy", which {Merriam-Webster (http://m-w.com/)} dates to 1971, and the more recent "media literacy". A more useful definition from {(http://www.computerliteracyusa.com/)} is: Computer literacy is an understanding of the concepts, terminology and operations that relate to general computer use. It is the essential knowledge needed to function independently with a computer. This functionality includes being able to solve and avoid problems, adapt to new situations, keep information organized and communicate effectively with other computer literate people. (2007-03-23)

Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning "education" (CSCL) Any form of {Computer-Aided Instruction} that emphasises group learning as opposed to working alone. (2011-11-25)

ConflictNet ::: An IGC network serving groups and individuals working for social justice and conflict resolution. ConflictNet's resources include guidelines for choosing a bibliographies, legislative updates, educational materials and newsletters from around the world.

confucianism ::: n. --> The political morality taught by Confucius and his disciples, which forms the basis of the Chinese jurisprudence and education. It can hardly be called a religion, as it does not inculcate the worship of any god.

Confucius taught that "it is man that can make truth great, and not truth that can make man great." Consequently he emphasized moral perfection, true manhood (jen), moral order (li) the Golden Mean (Chung Yung) and the superior man (chun tzu). To this end, knowledge must be directed, names must be rectified (cheng ming), and social relationships harmonized (wu lun). The whole program involved the investigation of things, the extension of knowledge, sincerity of the will, rectification of the heart, cultivation of the personal life, regulation of family life, national order, and finally, world peace. Mencius (371-289 B.C.) carried this further, holding that we not only should be good, but must be good, as human nature is originally good. True manhood (jen) and righteousness (i) are considered man's mind and path, respectively. Government must be established on the basis of benevolence (jen cheng) as against profit and force. Hsun Tzu (c 335-c 288 B.C.) believing human nature to be evil, stressed moral accumulation and education, especially through the rectification of names, music, and the rule of propriety (li). In the book of Chung Yung (Central Harmony, the Golden Mean, third or fourth century B.C.), the doctrine of central harmony is set forth. Our central self or moral being is conceived to be the great basis of existence and harmony or moral order is the universal law in the world. From then on, the relationship between man and the universe became one of direct correspondence. The idea of macrocosmos-rnicrocosmos relationship largely characterized the Confucianism of medieval China. The most glorious development of Confucianism is found in Neo-Confucianism, from the eleventh century to this day. For a summary of medieval Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism, see Chinese philosophy. -- W.T.C.

Consolidation - Similar to refinancing, but there is no loan fee. It simplifies loan repayment by combining several types of federal education loans into one new loan. (In the case of Direct Loan consolidation, the interest rate may be lower than one or more of the underlying loans.).

consortium "body" A group of two or more companies, educational institutions, governments or other bodies with some shared purpose. Examples from computing include the {World Wide Web Consortium} (W3C), {Apache Software Foundation}, {The Open Group}, {X Consortium}. (2009-06-05)

content-free "jargon" 1. (By analogy with "context-free") Used of a message that adds nothing to the recipient's knowledge. Though this adjective is sometimes applied to {flamage}, it more usually connotes derision for communication styles that exalt form over substance or are centred on concerns irrelevant to the subject ostensibly at hand. Perhaps most used with reference to speeches by company presidents and other professional manipulators. See also {four-colour glossies}. "education" 2. Within British schools the term refers to general-purpose {software} such as a {word processor}, a {spreadsheet} or a program that tests spelling of words supplied by the teacher. This is in contrast to software designed to teach a particular topic, e.g. a plant growth simulation, an interactive periodic table or a program that tests spelling of a predetermined list of words. Content-free software can be more cost-effective as it can be reused for many lessons throughout the syllabus. [{Jargon File}] (2014-10-30)

copyright ::: (legal) The exclusive rights of the owner of the copyright on a work to make and distribute copies, prepare derivative works, and perform and display the work in public (these last two mainly apply to plays, films, dances and the like, but could also apply to software).A work, including a piece of software, is under copyright by default in most coutries, whether of not it displays a copyright notice. However, a copyright or company whose name appears in the copyright notice on the box, or the disk or the screen or wherever.A copyright notice has three parts. The first can be either a c with a circle around it (LaTeX \copyright), or the word Copyright or the abbreviation Copr. A c in parentheses: (c) has no legal meaning. This is followed by the name of the copyright holder and the year of first publication.Countries around the world have agreed to recognise and uphold each others' copyrights, but this world-wide protection requires the use of the c in a circle.Originally, most of the computer industry assumed that only the program's underlying instructions were protected under copyright law but, beginning in the early 1980s, a series of lawsuits involving the video screens of game programs extended protections to the appearance of programs.Use of copyright to restrict redistribution is actually immoral, unethical, and illegitimate. It is a result of brainwashing by monopolists and corporate from communists to right wing libertarians, are trying to abolish intellectual property myths.See also public domain, copyleft, software law. US Copyright Office Circular 61 - Copyright Registration for Computer Programs . The US Department of Education's How Does Copyright Law Apply to Computer Software .Usenet newsgroup: misc.legal.computing.[Is this definition correct in the UK? In the US? Elsewhere?](2000-03-23)

Cornell University ::: (body, education) A US Ivy League University founded in 1868 by businessman Ezra Cornell and respected scholar Andrew Dickson White. Cornell College and the Graduate School of Medical Sciences are in New York City. Cornell has 13,300 undergraduates and 6,200 graduate and professional students.See also Concurrent ML, Cornell Theory Center, Cornell University Programming Language, CU-SeeMe, ISIS. . (1996-12-01)

Cornell University "body, education" A US Ivy League University founded in 1868 by businessman Ezra Cornell and respected scholar Andrew Dickson White. Cornell includes thirteen colleges and schools. On the Ithaca campus are the seven undergraduate units and four graduate and professional units. The Medical College and the Graduate School of Medical Sciences are in New York City. Cornell has 13,300 undergraduates and 6,200 graduate and professional students. See also {Concurrent ML}, {Cornell Theory Center}, {Cornell University Programming Language}, {CU-SeeMe}, {ISIS}. {(http://cornell.edu/)}. (1996-12-01)

Corporation for Research and Educational Networking "body" (CREN) The organisation responsible for providing networking service to {BITNET} and {CSNET} users. CREN was formed in October 1989, when {BITNET} and {CSNET} were combined under one authority. {CSNET} is no longer operational, but CREN still runs {BITNET}. [Still true?] (1996-05-17)

Corporation for Research and Educational Networking ::: (body) (CREN) The organisation responsible for providing networking service to BITNET and CSNET users. CREN was formed in October 1989, when BITNET and CSNET were combined under one authority. CSNET is no longer operational, but CREN still runs BITNET.[Still true?] (1996-05-17)

Coursewriter III "language, education" A simple {CAI} language, developed around 1976. ["Coursewriter III, Version 3 Author's Guide", SH20-1009, IBM]. (1995-03-13)

Coursewriter III ::: (language, education) A simple CAI language, developed around 1976.[Coursewriter III, Version 3 Author's Guide, SH20-1009, IBM]. (1995-03-13)

CREN {Corporation for Research and Educational Networking}

Croce, Benedetto: Born it Percasseroli (Abruzzi) Italy, February 25, 1866. Senator, Minister of Public Education. Lives in Naples. Has influenced every branch of Italian culture.

CTI ::: 1. (communications) Computer Telephone Integration.2. (education) Computers in Teaching Initiative. A UK government scheme. (1996-12-08)

CTI 1. "communications" {Computer Telephone Integration}. 2. "education" Computers in Teaching Initiative. A UK government scheme. (1996-12-08)

Culture: (Lat. cultura, from colo, cultivate) The intrinsic value of society. Syn. with civilization. Employed by Spengler to define a civilization in its creative growth-period. The means, i.e. the tools, customs and institutions, of social groups; or the employment of such means. In psychology, the enlightenment or education of the individual. Some distinguish culture from civilization (q.v.) the former being the effect on personal development and expression (art, science, religion) of the institutions, materials and social organization identified with the latter. -- J.K.F.

Cyrenaics: A school of Greek Philosophy founded by Aristippus of Cyrene. The teachings of this school are known as the philosophy of Hedonism, or the doctrine of enjoyment for its own sake. For the Cyrenaics the virtuous or the good life is that which yields the greatest amount of contentment or pleasure derived from the satisfaction of desire. Education and intelligence are necessary so as to guide one to proper enjoyment, that is to such satisfaction of desire as yields most pleasure and is least likely to cause one pain. It also aids one in being master of pleasure and not its slave. -- M.F.

Dewey, John: (1859-) Leading American philosopher. The spirit of democracy and an abiding faith in the efficacy of human intelligence run through the many pages he has presented in the diverse fields of metaphysics, epistemology, logic, psychology, aesthetics, religion, ethics, politics and education, in all of which he has spoken with authority. Progressive education owes its impetus to his guidance and its tenets largely to his formulation. He is the chief exponent of that branch of pragmatism known as instrumentalism. Among his main works are Psychology, 1886; Outline of Ethics, 1891; Studies in Logical Theory, 1903; Ethics (Dewey and Tufts), 1908; How We Think, 1910; Influence of Darwin on German Philosophy, 1910; Democracy and Education, 1916; Essays in Experimental Logic, 1916; Reconstruction in Philosophy, 1920; Human Nature and Conduct, 1922; Experience and Nature, 1925; The Quest for Certainty, 1929; Art as Experience, 1933; Logic: The Theory of Inquiry, 1939.   Cf. J. Ratner, The Philosophy of John Dewey, 1940, M. H. Thomas, A Bibliography of John Dewey, 1882-1939, The Philosophy of John Dewey, ed. P. A. Schilpp (Evanston, 1940). Dharma: (Skr.) Right, virtue, duty, usage, law, social as well as cosmic. -- K.F.L.

Dharmapāla, Anagārika. (1864-1933). An important figure in the revival of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and the dissemination of Buddhism in the West. Born Don David Hēvāvirtarne in Sri Lanka, at that time the British colony of Ceylon, he was raised in the English-speaking middle class of Colombo and educated in Christian schools run by Anglican missionaries, where he is said to have memorized large portions of the Bible. His family was Buddhist, however, and in 1880, at the age of sixteen, he met HENRY STEEL OLCOTT and MADAME BLAVATSKY, founders of the Theosophical Society, during their visit to Sri Lanka in support of Buddhism. In 1881, he took the Buddhist name Dharmapāla, "Protector of the Dharma," and in 1884 was initiated into the Theosophical Society by Colonel Olcott, later accompanying Madame Blavatsky to the headquarters of the Society in Adyar, India. Under the initial patronage of Theosophists, he studied Pāli, choosing to adopt the lifestyle of a celibate lay religious. Prior to that time in Sri Lanka, the leadership in Buddhism had been provided exclusively by monks and kings. Dharmapāla established a new role for Buddhist laypeople, creating the category of the anagārika (meaning "homeless wanderer"), a layperson who studied texts and meditated, as did monks, but who remained socially active in the world, as did laypeople. Free from the restrictions incumbent on the Sinhalese monkhood, yet distinct from ordinary laity, he regarded this new lifestyle of the anagārika as the most suitable status for him to work for the restoration and propagation of Buddhism. A social reformer, rationalist, and religious nationalist, he promoted rural education and a reformist style of Buddhism, stripped of what he considered extraneous superstitions, as a means of uplifting Sinhalese society and gaining independence for his country as a Buddhist nation. While he was in India in 1891, he was shocked to see the state of decay of the great pilgrimage sites of India, all then under Hindu control, and most especially of BODHGAYĀ, the site of the Buddha's enlightenment. In that same year, he joined a group of leading Sri Lankan Buddhists to found the MAHĀBODHI SOCIETY, which called on Buddhists from around the world to work for the return of important Indian Buddhist sites to Buddhist control, and one of whose aims was the restoration of the MAHĀBODHITEMPLE at Bodhgayā. This goal only came to fruition in 1949, well after his death, when the newly independent Indian government granted Buddhists a role in administering the site. His influential Buddhist journal, The Mahā-Bodhi, also established in 1891, continues to be published today. A gifted orator, in 1893 Anagārika Dharmapāla addressed the World's Parliament of Religions, held in conjunction with the Columbian Exhibition in Chicago, drawing much acclaim. Although he was one of several Buddhist speakers, his excellent English and Anglican education made him an effective spokesperson for the dharma, demonstrating both its affinities with, and superiority to, Christianity. In 1925, he founded the British Mahā Bodhi Society in London and a year later established the first THERAVĀDA monastery in the West, the London Buddhist Vihāra. In 1931, he was ordained as a monk (bhikkhu; BHIKsU), taking the name Devamitta. He died in 1933 at SĀRNĀTH, site of the Buddha's first sermon.

didactic ::: a. --> Alt. of Didactical ::: n. --> A treatise on teaching or education.

Didactics: (Gr. didaktikos, taught) The branch of education concerned with methods of teaching and instruction. In theology and religion didactics in contradistinction to catechetics, is instiuction in fundamentals of religious doctrine. -- L.W.

diploma ::: n. --> A letter or writing, usually under seal, conferring some privilege, honor, or power; a document bearing record of a degree conferred by a literary society or educational institution.

discipline ::: n. --> The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.
Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.
Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.
Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by


Dorzhiev, Agvan. (T. Ngag dbang rdo rje) (1854-1938). Influential Mongol-Russian monk in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition; born in the Siberian region of Buryatia to a semi-nomadic Buddhist family. As a child, Dorzhiev was introduced to Buddhism at the monastery at Atsagat, receiving his first tantric empowerment (ABHIsEKA) at the age of thirteen. He continued his education in Urga after his father died in 1868, at which time there were thirteen thousand monks in the city. For a time he was married to a woman named Kholintsog and worked in the local government. In 1873, he began his first journey to LHA SA and spent a few months in eastern China. Because of his linguistic and academic prowess, he was sent to 'BRAS SPUNGS monastery, where he became a scholar at Sgo mang (Gomang) College. In 1880, he settled in Lha sa, and rapidly completed his DGE BSHES degree. By 1888, he was teaching logic, debate, and language at 'Bras spungs. At this time, the thirteenth DALAI LAMA was twelve or thirteen years old, and Dorzhiev became one of his religious teachers and political advisors. Dorzhiev displayed great ability in political diplomacy and served as the only emissary between Russia and Tibet for many years. He feared that British influence in Tibet could be detrimental to the future of the country, and advised the Dalai Lama to initiate relations between Lha sa and St. Petersburg as a counter. In 1898, Prince Ukhtomsky summoned him to St. Petersburg, where he met with Tsar Nicholas II. From there, he traveled to Paris, where he lectured on Buddhism at the Musée Guimet. He then went to Kalmykia and Buryatia before returning to Lha sa. Dorzhiev sought to improve the quality of Buddhist practice in Russia, specifically in Buryatia and Kalmykia, where he opened monasteries, initiated monks, and opened a school for Tibetan Buddhist doctors. In 1915 he opened a temple and monastery in St. Petersburg, the first in the West. Dorzhiev was arrested at the onset of the "Red Terror" of 1918, but was soon released. Buddhism remained comparatively inviolable over the next decade, although other Russian religions suffered. Dorzhiev wrote his memoirs in Tibetan around 1924. In 1922, an "All-Buryat Buddhist Congress" was held, followed by a 1927 "Congress of Soviet Buddhists" in Moscow. Russian Buddhism entered a bleak period after the death of Lenin in 1924; in 1930, an antireligion campaign began in Buryatia, during which the aged Dorzhiev was placed under house arrest. He wrote his will in 1937, at which time he left house arrest in Leningrad and traveled to Ulan Udé, Buryatia. In Ulan Udé, he was arrested and interrogated before being sent to the prison hospital, where he died in January of 1938.

Ecole Normale Superieure "body" (ENS) A higher education and research institution in Paris, France.

Ecole Normale Superieure ::: (body) (ENS) A higher education and research institution in Paris, France.

Econet ::: 1. One of the IGC networks. EcoNet serves individuals and organisations working for environmental preservation and sustainability. Important issues covered include: global warming, energy policy, rainforest preservation, legislative activities, water quality, toxics and environmental education.EcoNet users can send and receive private messages, including fax and telex, to and from more than 18,000 international users on the APC networks or to millions effectiveness of organisations through the use of electronic networking. FTP/Telnet: igc.apc.org.2. A network produced by Acorn Computers Ltd. for the BBC Microcomputer and its successors.

Econet 1. One of the IGC networks. EcoNet serves individuals and organisations working for environmental preservation and sustainability. Important issues covered include: global warming, energy policy, rainforest preservation, legislative activities, water quality, toxics and environmental education. EcoNet users can send and receive private messages, including fax and telex, to and from more than 18,000 international users on the APC networks or to millions on other networks. EcoNet seeks to build coalitions and partnerships with activist and non-profit organisations to develop the use of the electronic communications medium. EcoNet provides subsidies and financial incentives to environmental organisations and committed individuals who foster the effectiveness of organisations through the use of electronic networking. FTP/Telnet: igc.apc.org. 2. A network produced by {Acorn Computers} Ltd. for the {BBC Microcomputer} and its successors.

Edgerton, Franklin. (1885-1963). American scholar of Sanskrit; born in Le Mars, Iowa, he received his undergraduate education at Cornell. He then studied at Munich and Jena before returning to the United States, where he studied Sanskrit and comparative philology at Johns Hopkins. Edgerton taught at the University of Pennsylvania, before moving to Yale in 1926 as Salisbury Professor of Sanskrit. He remained there for the remainder of his academic career, retiring in 1953. Edgerton's great contribution to Buddhist studies was the 1953 publication of his Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Grammar and Dictionary and his Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Reader, the result of some three decades of work. Edgerton coined the term BUDDHIST HYBRID SANSKRIT to describe the language of PRAKRIT, mixed Sanskrit, and Sanskrit that occurs in many Buddhist Sanskrit texts, especially the MAHĀYĀNA SuTRA literature. Prior to Edgerton, this language was sometimes called the Gāthā dialect because it occurred frequently in the verses, or GĀTHĀ, in the Mahāyāna sutras. Edgerton divided Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit into three classes based on the degree of hybridization within a given text. Since its publication, Edgerton's work, and the entire category of Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit itself, has been the subject of much scholarly debate, but Edgerton's dictionary remains widely used.

educated ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Educate ::: a. --> Formed or developed by education; as, an educated man.

educational ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to education.

education contact "job" The person at a company who should receive educational material. (2004-03-11)

education contact ::: (job) The person at a company who should receive educational material.(2004-03-11)

educationist ::: n. --> One who is versed in the theories of, or who advocates and promotes, education.

education ::: n. --> The act or process of educating; the result of educating, as determined by the knowledge skill, or discipline of character, acquired; also, the act or process of training by a prescribed or customary course of study or discipline; as, an education for the bar or the pulpit; he has finished his education.

educative ::: a. --> Tending to educate; that gives education; as, an educative process; an educative experience.

edu "networking" ("education") The {top-level domain} for educational establishments in the USA (and some other countries). E.g. "mit.edu". The UK equivalent is "ac.uk". (1999-01-26)

edu ::: (networking) (education) The top-level domain for educational establishments in the USA (and some other countries). E.g. mit.edu. The UK equivalent is ac.uk. (1999-01-26)

E. Durkheim: De la division du travail sociale, 1893; Les regles de la methode sociologique; Les formes elementaires de la vie religieuse, 1912; Le Socialisme, L'Education morale.

edutainment "application" Interactive education and entertainment services or software, usually supplied commercially via a cable network or on {CD-ROM}. (1995-03-30)

edutainment ::: (application) Interactive education and entertainment services or software, usually supplied commercially via a cable network or on CD-ROM. (1995-03-30)

emancipation (psychological): The step by step development of the personality of a self-reliant mature individual. All good education guides towards mature self-reliance and self-realisation.

Emerging technologies - technologies that are perceived as capable of changing the status quo. These include a variety of technologies such as educational technology, information technology, nanotechnology, biotechnology, cognitive science, robotics, and artificial intelligence.

Eriugena, Joannes Scottus: (800/815 - c. 800) Was of Irish birth and early education. He came to the Court of Charles the Bald, son of Charlemagne, as a teacher c. 845. A good linguist, he translated works of Maximus, Gregory of Nyssa and the Pseudo-Dionysius from Greek to Latin. His thought is partly Augustinian, partly a personal development inspired by the Greek Fathers. He has been accused of Pantheism. Chief works: De Praedestinatione, De divisione Naturae (PL 122). M. Cippuyns, Jean S.. Erigene, sa vie, son oevre, sa pensee (Louvain-Paris, 1933). -- V.J.B.

Eros: (Gr.) 1. Possessive desire or love, commonly erotic. 2. In Platonic thought, the driving force of life aspiring to the absolute Good; hence the motive underlying education, fine art, and philosophy. The connotation of aesthetic fascination, impersonality, and intense desire is retained in Plato's use of the term. Hence Eros is to be distinguished from the Indian Bhakti (selfless devotion), the Buddhist Metta (disinterested benevolence), the Confucian Jen (humanity, charity), and Ai (personal love), and the Christian Agapao (sacrificial, protective brotherly love), and Phileo (personal affection or fondness). -- W.L.

ESOTERIC HISTORY AFTER 1875 The instrument the planetary hierarchy had chosen for the task of publicizing the knowledge which had been kept secret since Atlantis was H. P. Blavatsky (1831-1891). Blavatsky was enjoined not to give out any esoteric facts without special permission in each individual case. She was not to mention anything about the planetary hierarchy.

The truth, or the knowledge of reality, is only to be given gradually, with sparing facts, to a mankind unprepared to receive it. It is necessary to find connections to established fictions of which people have heard enough for them to believe that they comprehend what it all is about. A new, revolutionary system of ideas would be rejected off hand as a mere fantastic invention. It could not be comprehended, let alone understood, without careful preparation.

The most important reason, which probably only esotericians are able to understand, is the fact of the dynamic energy of ideas.

Once the esoteric knowledge was permitted to be published there was no longer any need of initiation into the old knowledge orders, nobody having been initiated into anyone of them since 1875. Although those initiated in previous incarnations were not given the opportunity to revive all their old knowledge, enough was made known, and besides hinted at, for them to be able to discover the most essential by themselves.

The most important esoteric facts to be found in the works of Sinnett, Judge, and
Hartmann &


ESOTERIC HISTORY BEFORE 1875 Members of this planetary hierarchy incarnated in mankind, eventually to make up what in the esoteric history has been called the &

Extended Tiny ::: A research/educational tool for experimenting with array data dependence tests and reordering transformations. It works with a language tiny, which does not have procedures, goto's, pointers, or other features that complicate dependence testing.Michael Wolfe's original tiny has been extended substantially by William Pugh et al. at the University of Maryland.Version 3.0 (Dec 12th, 1992) includes a programming environment, dependence tester, tests translator (Fortran->tiny), documentation, and technical reports. It should run on any Unix system. .E-mail: Omega test research group . (1992-12-12)

Extended Tiny A research/educational tool for experimenting with {array} data dependence tests and reordering transformations. It works with a language {tiny}, which does not have procedures, {goto}'s, pointers, or other features that complicate dependence testing. Michael Wolfe's original {tiny} has been extended substantially by William Pugh "pugh@cs.umd.edu" et al. at the {University of Maryland}. Version 3.0 (Dec 12th, 1992) includes a programming environment, dependence tester, tests translator ({Fortran}-"tiny), documentation, and technical reports. It should run on any {Unix} system. {(ftp://cs.umd.edu/pub/omega)}. E-mail: Omega test research group "omega@cs.umd.edu". (1992-12-12)

FARNET ::: A non-profit corporation, established in 1987, whose mission is to advance the use of computer networks to improve research and education.

FARNET A non-profit corporation, established in 1987, whose mission is to advance the use of computer networks to improve research and education.

Fazun. (法尊) (T. Blo bzang chos 'phags) (1902-1980). Twentieth-century Chinese translator of Buddhist scriptures and scholar of Tibetan religious and political history. In 1920, Fazun was ordained as a novice on WUTAISHAN. He became acquainted with Dayong (1893-1929), a student of TAIXU's who introduced him to the techniques of Buddhist TANTRA, at the time a popular strand of Buddhism in China in its Japanese (MIKKYo) and Tibetan forms. Fully ordained in Beijing in 1922, Fazun trained under Taixu's patronage in the tenets of the PURE LAND and TIANTAI schools at the Wuchang Institute for Buddhist Studies. During the same years, Taixu urged Dayong to train in Japanese mikkyo on KoYASAN. Taixu's aim was to verify and rectify the opinions about Buddhist tantra that circulated in China, where this form of Indian Buddhism had flourished at the Tang court. Upon his return, Dayong conferred on Fazun several ABHIsEKAs of the lower tantric cycles that he had brought from Japan. He also instructed Fazun in the Mizong gangyao ("Essentials of Tantra"), a primer for students of Buddhist tantra by the Japanese SHINGONSHu scholar Gonda Raifu (1846-1934) that Wang Hongyuan (1876-1937), a Chinese student of Gonda's, had translated in 1918. After an introduction to the Tibetan tantric traditions by Bai Puren (1870-1927), a Mongolian lama stationed at Beijing's Yonghe Gong, Dayong became gradually dissatisfied with Japanese mikkyo. With Taixu's endorsement, he resolved to study Buddhist tantra in its Tibetan form. In 1924, Fazun joined Dayong's Group for Learning the Dharma in Tibet (Liu Zang Xuefa Tuan), a team of some thirty Chinese monks who were studying the basics of the Tibetan language in Beijing. From 1925 to 1929, Fazun carried on his language learning in eastern Tibet and began his training in the classics of the DGE LUGS monastic curriculum, which in the ensuing years would become his main focus of translation. After Dayong's passing in 1929, Fazun followed his Tibetan teacher, DGE BSHES A mdo, to central Tibet. He stayed at 'BRAS SPUNGS monastery from 1930 to 1933. In 1934, Taixu asked Fazun to take on the position of director at the newly established Sino-Tibetan Institute (Hanzang Jiaoli Yuan) near Chongqing. The thirteenth DALAI LAMA also encouraged Fazun to spread TSONG KHA PA's synthesis of the Buddhist teachings in China. Hence from 1935, under the Japanese occupation and during the Chinese civil war, Fazun served as an educator of young monks in Tibetan Buddhism and as a translator of Tibetan scriptures at the Sino-Tibetan Institute. These years of prolific translation work established Fazun as the foremost translator of Buddhism from Tibetan sources in the history of Chinese Buddhism. Among his translations are Tsong kha pa's LAM RIM CHEN MO (Putidao cidi guanglun), LEGS BSHAD SNYING PO (Bian liaoyi buliaoyi lun), SNGAGS RIM CHEN MO (Mizong daocidi lun); MAITREYA's ABHISAMAYĀLAMKĀRA (Xianguan zhuangyan lun); CANDRAKĪRTI's MADHYAMAKĀVATĀRA (Ru zhonglun); and ĀRYADEVA's CATUḤsATAKA (Sibailun song). Fazun also translated into Tibetan the ABHIDHARMAMAHĀVIBLĀsA, extant in the two hundred rolls of XUANZANG's Chinese rendering (Da piposha lun), by the title Bye brag bshad mdzod chen mo. In 1950, after the Communist authorities discontinued the activities of the Institute, Fazun moved to Beijing. The Committee for Minority Affairs appointed him as a translator of communist propaganda materials, including Chairman Mao's Xin minzhu zhuyi("New Democracy") and Lun renmin minzhu zhuanzheng ("On the People's Democratic Dictatorship"), for the education of the new generation of cadres in occupied Tibet. In 1966, as the Cultural Revolution set in, he was charged with expressing anti-Communist sentiments during the 1930s. He was confined in a labor camp until his release in 1972. During the 1970s Fazun resumed his translation activity from Tibetan with DHARMAKĪRTI's PRALĀnAVĀRTTIKA (Shiliang lun), DIGNĀGA's PRALĀnASAMUCCAYA (Jiliang lun), and ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNĀNA's BODHIPATHAPRADĪPA (Putidao deng lun). Fazun suffered a fatal heart attack in 1980. Because of his unsurpassed knowledge of Tibetan language, religion, and history, and his writing style inspired by KUMĀRAJĪVA's and Xuanzang's Buddhist Chinese, Fazun is often referred to as "the Xuanzang of modern times."

finished ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Finish ::: a. --> Polished to the highest degree of excellence; complete; perfect; as, a finished poem; a finished education.

Founded in 1949 as a Palestinian emergency assistance organization. Its mandate is to provide education, health and relief services. Its headquarters are in Gaza.

Freud (1856-1939): the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, emphasised the importance of the unconscious mind, childhood experiences and repressed urges. His theory of psychosexual development outlines five stages; oral, anal, phallic, latent and genital, according to the different objects fixated upon at each specific stage. Freud also focused on the structure and development of personality; comprised of three parts - the id, ego and superego. Conflicts between the id and superego are dealt with by the ego that utilizes ?a target="_parent" href="https://www.itseducation.asia/psychology/d.htm

Gentile, Giovanni: Born in Castelvetrano (Sicily) 1875. Professor of Philosophy and History of Philosophy at universities in Palermo, Pisa, and Rome. Minister of Public Education 1922-1924. Senator since 1922. Reformed the school system of Italy.

gentry ::: a. --> Birth; condition; rank by birth.
People of education and good breeding; in England, in a restricted sense, those between the nobility and the yeomanry.
Courtesy; civility; complaisance.


gopher "networking, protocol" A {distributed} document retrieval system which started as a {Campus Wide Information System} at the {University of Minnesota}, and which was popular in the early 1990s. Gopher is defined in {RFC 1436}. The protocol is like a primitive form of {HTTP} (which came later). Gopher lacks the {MIME} features of HTTP, but expressed the equivalent of a document's {MIME type} with a one-character code for the "{Gopher object type}". At time of writing (2001), all Web browers should be able to access gopher servers, although few gopher servers exist anymore. Sir {Tim Berners-Lee}, in his book "Weaving The Web" (pp.72-73), related his opinion that it was not so much the protocol limitations of gopher that made people abandon it in favor of HTTP/{HTML}, but instead the legal missteps on the part of the university where it was developed: "It was just about this time, spring 1993, that the University of Minnesota decided that it would ask for a license fee from certain classes of users who wanted to use gopher. Since the gopher software being picked up so widely, the university was going to charge an annual fee. The browser, and the act of browsing, would be free, and the server software would remain free to nonprofit and educational institutions. But any other users, notably companies, would have to pay to use gopher server software. "This was an act of treason in the academic community and the Internet community. Even if the university never charged anyone a dime, the fact that the school had announced it was reserving the right to charge people for the use of the gopher protocols meant it had crossed the line. To use the technology was too risky. Industry dropped gopher like a hot potato." (2001-03-31)

gopher ::: (networking, protocol) A distributed document retrieval system which started as a Campus Wide Information System at the University of Minnesota, and which was popular in the early 1990s.Gopher is defined in RFC 1436. The protocol is like a primitive form of HTTP (which came later). Gopher lacks the MIME features of HTTP, but expressed the object type. At time of writing (2001), all Web browers should be able to access gopher servers, although few gopher servers exist anymore.Tim Berners-Lee, in his book Weaving The Web (pp.72-73), related his opinion that it was not so much the protocol limitations of gopher that made people abandon it in favor of HTTP/HTML, but instead the legal missteps on the part of the university where it was developed:It was just about this time, spring 1993, that the University of Minnesota decided that it would ask for a license fee from certain classes of users who and educational institutions. But any other users, notably companies, would have to pay to use gopher server software.This was an act of treason in the academic community and the Internet community. Even if the university never charged anyone a dime, the fact that the the gopher protocols meant it had crossed the line. To use the technology was too risky. Industry dropped gopher like a hot potato.(2001-03-31)

Grouped Frequency Distribution ::: A table showing the number of occurrences for a grouping of scores. Used a lot in educational settings where a score of 90 to 100 may be grouped as an A, a score of 80 to 90 may be grouped as a B, etc.

Guifeng Zongmi. (J. Keiho Shumitsu; K. Kyubong Chongmil 圭峰宗密) (780-841). Chinese CHAN master and historian; putative fifth patriarch of the HUAYAN tradition and successor in the Heze school of CHAN; best known for positing the fundamental harmony between the scriptural teachings of Buddhism and Chan practice. Zongmi was a native of Xichong in present-day Sichuan province. Although little is known of his early life, Zongmi is said to have received a classical Confucian education. In 804, Zongmi encountered the monk Daoyuan (d.u.), purportedly a fourth-generation lineage holder of the Heze line of Chan (see HEZE SHENHUI), and became his student. During this period, Zongmi also carried on his studies of the YUANJUE JING. In 808, Zongmi received the full monastic precepts from Daoyuan, who then recommended the monk Nanyin Weizhong (d. 821) as a suitable teacher. In 810, Zongmi met the monk Lingfeng (d.u.), a disciple of the Huayan monk CHENGGUAN, at the monastery of Huijuesi. Two years later Zongmi began his studies of the AVATAMSAKASuTRA under CHENGGUAN in Chang'an. In 816, Zongmi began his residence at the monastery of Zhijusi on ZHONGNANSHAN and in 821 he retired to the temple Caotangsi on Gui peak (Guifeng), whence he acquired his toponym. There, Zongmi devoted himself to such works as his influential commentary on the Yuanjue jing, the Yuanjue jing dashu. In 828, Zongmi was invited to the palace and given a purple robe and the title Dade (Great Virtue). During his stay at the capital he met many important statesmen including Pei Xiu (787-860). Zongmi was a prolific writer whose works include commentaries on the AvataMsakasutra, VAJRACCHEDIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀSuTRA, DASHENG QIXIN LUN, MAHĀPARINIRVĀnASuTRA, SIFEN LÜ ("Four-Part Vinaya"), and others. He also composed a massive, 100-roll history of the Chan school, the Chanyuan zhuquanji ("Collected Writings on the Source of Chan"), only the prolegomenon to which is extant (see CHANYUAN ZHUQUANJI DUXU). Zongmi's writings were extremely influential in the mature Korean SoN school and, especially, in the thought and practice of POJO CHINUL (1158-1210), who drew on Zongmi to advocate an accord between the traditions of Son (C. Chan; meditation) and Kyo (C. JIAO; doctrine). See also LINGZHI; FANZHAO.

hack "jargon" 1. Originally, a quick job that produces what is needed, but not well. 2. An incredibly good, and perhaps very time-consuming, piece of work that produces exactly what is needed. 3. To bear emotionally or physically. "I can't hack this heat!" 4. To work on something (typically a program). In an immediate sense: "What are you doing?" "I'm hacking TECO." In a general (time-extended) sense: "What do you do around here?" "I hack TECO." More generally, "I hack "foo"" is roughly equivalent to ""foo" is my major interest (or project)". "I hack solid-state physics." See {Hacking X for Y}. 5. To pull a prank on. See {hacker}. 6. To interact with a computer in a playful and exploratory rather than goal-directed way. "Whatcha up to?" "Oh, just hacking." 7. Short for {hacker}. 8. See {nethack}. 9. (MIT) To explore the basements, roof ledges, and steam tunnels of a large, institutional building, to the dismay of Physical Plant workers and (since this is usually performed at educational institutions) the Campus Police. This activity has been found to be eerily similar to playing adventure games such as {Dungeons and Dragons} and {Zork}. See also {vadding}. See also {neat hack}, {real hack}. [{Jargon File}] (1996-08-26)

Haeberlin, Paul: (1878-) A well known Swiss thinker whose major contributions until recent years were in the field of education. In his hands phenomenology has become existential philosophy. A transcendental-idealistic tone pervades his philosophy. He combines in theory the advantages of existential phenomenology with those of psychologism. -- H.H.

Hanyong Chongho. (漢永鼎鎬) (1870-1948). Korean monk renowned for his efforts to revitalize Buddhist education during the Japanese colonial period. Hanyong Chongho studied the Confucian classics when young and entered the SAMGHA at seventeen. He became a disciple of Soryu Ch'omyong (1858-1903), from whom he received the dharma name Hanyong. In 1909, he traveled to Seoul and helped lead the Buddhist revitalization movement, along with fellow Buddhist monks HAN YONGUN and Kŭmp'a Kyongho (1868-1915). In 1910, shortly after Japan's formal annexation of Korea, Hoegwang Sason (1862-1933) and others signed a seven-item treaty with the Japanese SoToSHu, which sought to assimilate Korean Buddhism into the Soto order. In response to this threat to Korean Buddhist autonomy, Hanyong Chongho helped Han Yongun and other Korean Buddhist leaders establish the IMJE CHONG order in Korea. In 1913, he published the journal Haedong Pulgyo ("Korean Buddhism") in order to inform the Buddhist community of the need for revitalization and self-awareness. Beginning with his teaching career at Kodŭng Pulgyo Kangsuk in 1914, he devoted himself to the cause of education and went on to teach at various other Buddhist seminaries (kangwon) throughout the country. His many writings include the Songnim sup'il ("Jottings from Stone Forest"), Chongson Ch'imunjiphwa ("Selections from Stories of Admonitions"), and Chongson Yomsong sorhwa ("Selections from the YoMSONG SoRHWA"), a digest of the most-famous Korean kongan (C. GONG'AN) collection.

He lived in the time when the moral and cultural traditions of Chou were in rapid decline. Attempting to uphold the Chou culture, he taught poetry, history, ceremonies and music to 3,000 pupils, becoming the first Chinese educator to offer education to any who cared to come with or without tuition. He taught literature, human conduct, being one's true self and honesty in social relationships. He wrote the chronicles called Spring and Autumn. His tacit judgments on social and political events were such that "unruly ministers and villainous sons were afraid" to repeat their evil deeds.

Helvetius, Claude Adrien: (1715-1771) A French philosopher, he developed on the basis of Condillac's sensationalism his superficial materialistic philosophy. His theories of the original mental equality of individuals, of the egoism or self-interest as the sole motive of human action, and of the omnipotence of education, stress the basic determining influence of circumstances.

HENSA {Higher Education National Software Archive}

Herbartianism: The philosophical, but particularly the psychological and pedagogical doctrines of Johann Friedrich Herbart (q.v.) as expounded in modified and developed form by his disciples, notably M. Lazarus and H. Steinthal in psychology, T. Zillcr and W. Rein in pedagogy, M. Drobisch in religious philosophy and ethics. In America, the movement was vigorous and influential, but shortlived (about 1890-1910) and confined mainly to education (Charles De-Garmo and Charles A. McMurry). Like Herbart, his disciples strove for a clarification of concepts with special emphasis on scientific method, the doctrine of apperception, and the efficacy of a mathematical approach even in their psychology which was dominated by associational thinking; yet they discarded more or less the master's doctrine of reals. -- K.F.L.

Herbart, Johann Friedrich: (1776-1841) Best known as the "father" of scientific pedagogy centrally based upon psychology, a general tenet that still has weight today, Herbart occupies as educational philosophical theorist a position strikingly similar to that of John Dewey, the nestor of American philosophy.

Herder, Johann Gottfried: (1744-1803) A founder of modern religious humanism, he explained human history as a consequence of the nature of man and of man's physical environment. Held implicitly to the view that society is basically an organic whole. Accounted for the differences in culture and institutions of different peoples as being due to geographical conditions. Although history is a process of the education of the human species, it has no definite goal of perfection and development. The vehicle of living culture is a distinct Volk or Nation with its distinct language and traditions. As a child of the Enlightenment, Herder had a blind faith in nature, in man and in the ultimate development of reason and justice.

  “He was a natural clairvoyant of most wonderful powers. With no education or acquaintance with science he wrote works which are now proved to be full of scientific truths; but then, as he says himself, what he wrote upon, he ‘saw it as in a great Deep in the Eternal.’ He had ‘a thorough view of the universe, as in a chaos,’ which yet ‘opened itself in him, from time to time, as in a young plant.’ He was a thorough born Mystic, and evidently of a constitution which is most rare; one of those fine natures whose material envelope impedes in no way the direct, even if only occasional, intercommunion between the intellectual and the spiritual Ego. It is this Ego which Jacob Boehme, like so many other untrained mystics, mistook for God; ‘Man must acknowledge,’ he writes, ‘that his knowledge is not his own, but from God, who manifests the Ideas of Wisdom to the Soul of Man, in what measure he pleases.’ Had this great Theosophist mastered Eastern Occultism he might have expressed it otherwise. He would have known then that the ‘god’ who spoke through his poor uncultured and untrained brain, was his own divine Ego, the omniscient Deity within himself, and that what that Deity gave out was not in ‘what measure he pleased,’ but in the measure of the capacities of the mortal and temporary dwelling IT informed” (TG 60).

Hewlett-Packard ::: (HP) Hewlett-Packard designs, manufactures and services electronic products and systems for measurement, computation and communications. The company's products and services are used in industry, business, engineering, science, medicine and education in approximately 110 countries.HP was founded in 1939 and employs 96600 people, 58900 in the USA. They have manufacturing and R&D establishments in 54 cities in 16 countries and HP's stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange and the Pacific, Tokyo, London, Frankfurt, Zurich and Paris exchanges.Quarterly sales $6053M, profits $347M (Aug 1994). . (1994-09-26)

Hewlett-Packard (HP) Hewlett-Packard designs, manufactures and services electronic products and systems for measurement, computation and communications. The company's products and services are used in industry, business, engineering, science, medicine and education in approximately 110 countries. HP was founded in 1939 and employs 96600 people, 58900 in the USA. They have manufacturing and R&D establishments in 54 cities in 16 countries and approximately 600 sales and service offices in 110 countries. Their revenue (in 1992/1993?) was $20.3 billion. The Chief Executive Officer is Lewis E. Platt. HP's stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange and the Pacific, Tokyo, London, Frankfurt, Zurich and Paris exchanges. Quarterly sales $6053M, profits $347M (Aug 1994). {(http://hp.com/home.html)}. (1994-09-26)

Higher Education National Software Archive ::: (HENSA) . (1995-01-06)

Higher Education National Software Archive (HENSA) {(http://hensa.ac.uk/)}. (1995-01-06)

Human capital -The capitalised value of productive investments in persons; usually refers to value derived from expenditures on education, training, and health improvements.

Humanism: (Lat. humanus, human) Any view in which interest in human welfare is central. Renaissance revival of classical learning as opposed to merely ecclesiastical studies. An ethical and religious movement culminating in Auguste Comte's "Worship of Humanity," better known as Humanitarianism. Philosophical movement represented by F. C. S. Schiller in England, better known as Pragmatism. See Pragmatism. Literary Humanism, movement led in America by Irving Babbit, Paul Elmer More, Norman Foerster protesting against extreme emphasis on vocational education and recommending return to a classical type of liberal education or study of "the Humanities." Sociological term for tendency to extend ideals, such as love, loyalty, kindness, service, honesty, which normally prevail in primary or intimate groups to guide conduct in non-primary or impersonal groups. Religious Humanism is any view which does not consider belief in a deity vital to religion, though not necessarily denying its existence and not necessarily denying practical value to such belief. Represented by a group of left-wing Unitarian ministers and university professors who, in May, 1933, published "The Humanist Manifesto," wherein religion is broadly viewed as a "shared quest for the good life" and social justice and social reform are stressed as important in religious endeavor.

humanity ::: n. --> The quality of being human; the peculiar nature of man, by which he is distinguished from other beings.
Mankind collectively; the human race.
The quality of being humane; the kind feelings, dispositions, and sympathies of man; especially, a disposition to relieve persons or animals in distress, and to treat all creatures with kindness and tenderness.
Mental cultivation; liberal education; instruction in


Human resource accounting – Accounting method that recognises a vari­ety of human resources and shows them on a company's balance sheet. Under human resource accounting, a value is placed on people based on such factors as experience, education, and psychological traits, and, most importantly, future earning power (benefit) to the company.

humma "chat" A filler word used on various "chat" and "talk" programs when you had nothing to say but felt that it was important to say something. The word apparently originated (at least with this definition) on the MECC Timeshare System (MTS, a now-defunct educational {time-sharing} system running in Minnesota during the 1970s and the early 1980s) but was later sighted on early Unix systems. [{Jargon File}] (1999-02-27)

humma ::: (chat) A filler word used on various chat and talk programs when you had nothing to say but felt that it was important to say something.The word apparently originated (at least with this definition) on the MECC Timeshare System (MTS, a now-defunct educational time-sharing system running in Minnesota during the 1970s and the early 1980s) but was later sighted on early Unix systems.[Jargon File] (1999-02-27)

IBM 1130 ::: (computer) A computer introduced by IBM in 1965. It was their cheapest computer to date, and was aimed at price-sensitive, computing-intensive technical markets like education and engineering. It notably included inexpensive disk storage. Non-IBM clones were produced. .(2005-01-17)

IBM 1130 "computer" A computer introduced by {IBM} in 1965. It was their cheapest computer to date, and was aimed at price-sensitive, computing-intensive technical markets like education and engineering. It notably included inexpensive disk storage. Non-IBM {clones} were produced. {IBM 1130 Enthusiasts (http://ibm1130.org/)}. (2005-01-17)

IBM 704 "computer" A large, scientific computer made by {IBM} and used by the largest commercial, government and educational institutions. The IBM 704 had 36-bit memory words, 15-bit addresses and instructions with one address. A few {index register} instructions had the infamous 15-bit decrement field in addition to the 15-bit address. The 704, and {IBM 709} which had the same basic architecture, represented a substantial step forward from the {IBM 650}'s {magnetic drum} storage as they provided random access at electronic speed to {core storage}, typically 32k words of 36 bits each. [Or did the 704 actually come *before* the 650?] A typical 700 series installation would be in a specially built room of perhaps 1000 to 2000 square feet, with cables running under a raised floor and substantial air conditioning. There might be up to eight {magnetic tape} transports, each about 3 x 3 x 6 feet, on one or two "channels." The 1/2 inch tape had seven tracks and moved at 150 inches per second, giving a read/write speed of 15,000 six bit characters (plus parity) per second. In the centre would be the operator's {console} consisting of cabinets and tables for storage of tapes and boxes of cards; and a {card reader}, a {card punch}, and a {line printer}, each perhaps 4 x 4 x 5 feet in dimension. Small {jobs} could be entered via {punched cards} at the console, but as a rule the user jobs were transferred from cards to {magnetic tape} by {off-line} equipment and only control information was entered at the console (see {SPOOL}). Before each job, the {operating system} was loaded from a read-only system tape (because the system in {core} could have been corrupted by the previous user), and then the user's program, in the form of card images on the input tape, would be run. Program output would be written to another tape (typically on another channel) for printing off-line. Well run installations would transfer the user's cards to tape, run the job, and print the output tape with a turnaround time of one to four hours. The processing unit typically occupied a position symmetric but opposite the operator's console. Physically the largest of the units, it included a glass enclosure a few feet in dimension in which could be seen the "core" about one foot on each side. The 36-bit word could hold two 18-bit addresses called the "Contents of the Address Register" ({CAR}) and the "Contents of the Decrement Register" ({CDR}). On the opposite side of the floor from the tape drives and operator's console would be a desk and bookshelves for the ever-present (24 hours a day) "field engineer" dressed in, you guessed it, a grey flannel suit and tie. The maintenance of the many thousands of {vacuum tubes}, each with limited lifetime, and the cleaning, lubrication, and adjustment of mechanical equipment, was augmented by a constant flow of {bug} reports, change orders to both hardware and software, and hand-holding for worried users. The 704 was oriented toward scientific work and included {floating point} hardware and the first {Fortran} implementation. Its hardware was the basis for the requirement in some programming languages that loops must be executed at least once. The {IBM 705} was the business counterpart of the 704. The 705 was a decimal machine with a circular register which could hold several variables (numbers, values) at the same time. Very few 700 series computers remained in service by 1965, but the {IBM 7090}, using {transistors} but similar in logical structure, remained an important machine until the production of the earliest {integrated circuits}. [Was the 704 scientific, business or general purpose? Difference between 704 and 709?] (1996-01-24)

IBM 704 ::: (computer) A large, scientific computer made by IBM and used by the largest commercial, government and educational institutions.The IBM 704 had 36-bit memory words, 15-bit addresses and instructions with one address. A few index register instructions had the infamous 15-bit decrement field in addition to the 15-bit address.The 704, and IBM 709 which had the same basic architecture, represented a substantial step forward from the IBM 650's magnetic drum storage as they provided random access at electronic speed to core storage, typically 32k words of 36 bits each.[Or did the 704 actually come *before* the 650?]A typical 700 series installation would be in a specially built room of perhaps 1000 to 2000 square feet, with cables running under a raised floor and tape had seven tracks and moved at 150 inches per second, giving a read/write speed of 15,000 six bit characters (plus parity) per second.In the centre would be the operator's console consisting of cabinets and tables for storage of tapes and boxes of cards; and a card reader, a card punch, and a output would be written to another tape (typically on another channel) for printing off-line.Well run installations would transfer the user's cards to tape, run the job, and print the output tape with a turnaround time of one to four hours.The processing unit typically occupied a position symmetric but opposite the operator's console. Physically the largest of the units, it included a glass Contents of the Address Register (CAR) and the Contents of the Decrement Register (CDR).On the opposite side of the floor from the tape drives and operator's console would be a desk and bookshelves for the ever-present (24 hours a day) field augmented by a constant flow of bug reports, change orders to both hardware and software, and hand-holding for worried users.The 704 was oriented toward scientific work and included floating point hardware and the first Fortran implementation. Its hardware was the basis for the requirement in some programming languages that loops must be executed at least once.The IBM 705 was the business counterpart of the 704. The 705 was a decimal machine with a circular register which could hold several variables (numbers, values) at the same time.Very few 700 series computers remained in service by 1965, but the IBM 7090, using transistors but similar in logical structure, remained an important machine until the production of the earliest integrated circuits.[Was the 704 scientific, business or general purpose? Difference between 704 and 709?] (1996-01-24)

ICT 1. "education" {Information and Communication Technology}. 2. "testing" {In Circuit Test}. (2000-04-04)

ICT ::: 1. (testing) In Circuit Test.2. (education) Information and Communication Technology.(2000-04-04)

IINREN {Interagency Interim National Research and Education Network}

illustration ::: n. --> The act of illustrating; the act of making clear and distinct; education; also, the state of being illustrated, or of being made clear and distinct.
That which illustrates; a comparison or example intended to make clear or apprehensible, or to remove obscurity.
A picture designed to decorate a volume or elucidate a literary work.


Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine ::: (education) (IC, ICST&M) One of the colleges of London University. The Department of Computing is the home of FOLDOC. .(2005-05-09)

Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine "education" (IC, ICST&M) One of the colleges of London University. The Department of Computing is the home of {FOLDOC}. {IC Home (http://ic.ac.uk/)}. (2005-05-09)

influence ::: n. --> A flowing in or upon; influx.
Hence, in general, the bringing about of an effect, phusical or moral, by a gradual process; controlling power quietly exerted; agency, force, or tendency of any kind which the sun exerts on animal and vegetable life; the influence of education on the mind; the influence, according to astrologers,of the stars over affairs.
Power or authority arising from elevated station, excelence of character or intellect, wealth, etc.; reputation;


Information and Communication Technology ::: (education) (ICT) The study of the technology used to handle information and aid communication. The phrase was coined by [?] Stevenson in his 1997 report to the UK government and promoted by the new National Curriculum documents for the UK in 2000. .(2000-11-06)

Information and Communication Technology "education" (ICT) The study of the technology used to handle information and aid communication. The phrase was coined by [?] Stevenson in his 1997 report to the UK government and promoted by the new National Curriculum documents for the UK in 2000. In addition to the subjects included in {Information Technology} (IT), ICT emcompasses areas such as {telephony}, {broadcast media} and all types of {audio} and {video} processing and transmission. {(http://rubble.ultralab.anglia.ac.uk/stevenson/ICTUKIndex.html)}. (2008-09-19)

In Germany, the movement was initiated by G. W. Leibniz whose writings reveal another motive for the cult of pure reason, i.e. the deep disappointment with the Reformation and the bloody religious wars among Christians who were accused of having forfeited the confidence of man in revealed religion. Hence the outstanding part played by the philosophers of ''natural law", Grotius, S. Pufendorf, and Chr. Thomasius, their theme being advanced by the contributions to a "natural religion" and tolerance by Chr. Wolff, G. E. Lessing, G. Herder, and the Prussian king Frederik II. Fr. v. Schiller's lyric and dramas served as a powerful commendation of ideal freedom, liberty, justice, and humanity. A group of educators (philanthropists) designed new methods and curricula for the advancement of public education, many of them, eg. Pestalozzi, Basedow, Cooper, A. H. Francke, and Fr. A. Wolf, the father of classic humanism, having achieved international recognition. Although in general agreement with th philosophical axioms of foreign enlighteners, the German philosophy decidedly opposed the English sensism (Hume) and French scepticism, and reached its height in Kant's Critiques. The radical rationalism, however, combined with its animosity against religion, brought about strong philosophical, theological, and literal opposition (Hamann, Jacobi, Lavater) which eventually led to its defeat. The ideals of the enlightenment period, the impassioned zeal for the materialization of the ideal man in an ideal society show clearly that it was basically related to the Renaissance and its continuation. See Aufklärung. Cf. J. G. Hibben, The Philosophy of the Enlightenment, 1910. -- S.v.F.

In respect to the field of ethics in general, Soviet philosophers have lately been developing the doctrine known as socialist or proletarian humanism. As distinguished from "bourgeois humanism", this term signifies that system of social institutions and personal values designed to insure that there be no underprivileged gioup or class de facto excluded from full participation in the good life conceived in terms of the educational and cultural development of the individual and the full enjoyment of the things of this world. Such objectives, it is held, are only possible of attainment in a classless society where there is economic security for all. The view taken is that the freedoms and liberties proclaimed by "bourgeois humanism" represented a great historical advance, but one that was, in general, limited in application to the emancipation of the bourgeoisie (q.v.) from the restrictions of feudalism while retaining and making use, to greater or lesser extent, of slavery, serfdom and a system of private capitalism invoking the precarious economic existence and cultural darkness of large proletarian masses. While it is held that there is an absolute light binding upon all, vaguely expressed in such formulations as, each for all and all for each, it is asserted that in class society, the position and class interest of one class may motivate it to oppose a genuine application of this right, whereas the class interest of another class may coincide with such an application. It is held that the proletariat is in this latter position, for its class interest as well as its moral obligation is considered to be in abolishing itself as a proletariat, which is taken to mean, abolishing classes generally.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) The world's largest technical professional society, based in the USA. Founded in 1884 by a handful of practitioners of the new electrical engineering discipline, today's Institute has more than 320,000 members who participate in its activities in 147 countries. The IEEE sponsors technical conferences, symposia and local meetings worldwide, publishes nearly 25% of the world's technical papers in electrical, electronics and computer engineering and computer science, provides educational programs for its members and promotes standardisation. Areas covered include aerospace, computers and communications, biomedical technology, electric power and consumer electronics. {(http://ieee.org/)}. {Gopher (gopher://gopher.ieee.org/)}. {(ftp://ftp.ieee.org/)}. E-mail file-server: "fileserver-help@info.ieee.org". { IEEE Standards Process Automation (SPA) System (http://stdsbbs.ieee.org/)}, {telnet (telnet:stdsbbs.ieee.org)} [140.98.1.11]. (1995-03-10)

institution ::: n. --> The act or process of instituting; as: (a) Establishment; foundation; enactment; as, the institution of a school.
Instruction; education.
The act or ceremony of investing a clergyman with the spiritual part of a benefice, by which the care of souls is committed to his charge.
That which instituted or established
Established order, method, or custom; enactment;


instructional ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or promoting, instruction; educational.

instructional technology "education" Design, development, use, management and evaluation of process and resources for learning. Instructional technology aims to promote the application of validated, practical procedures in the design and delivery of instruction. It is often defined either in terms of media and other technology used (e.g. {audiovisual media} and equipment and computers), or in terms of a systematic process which encompasses instructional design, development, delivery and evaluation. ["Instructional Technology: The Definition and Domains of the Field", 1994, Barbara Seels and Rita Richey, Washington, D.C., Association for Educational Communications and Technology]. (2010-01-29)

intelligent ::: a. --> Endowed with the faculty of understanding or reason; as, man is an intelligent being.
Possessed of intelligence, education, or judgment; knowing; sensible; skilled; marked by intelligence; as, an intelligent young man; an intelligent architect; an intelligent answer.
Gognizant; aware; communicate.


Interagency Interim National Research and Education Network (IINREN) An evolving operating network system. Near term (1992-1996) research and development activities will provide for the smooth evolution of this networking infrastructure into the future gigabit {NREN}. (1994-12-06)

Interagency Interim National Research and Education Network ::: (IINREN) An evolving operating network system. Near term (1992-1996) research and development activities will provide for the smooth evolution of this networking infrastructure into the future gigabit NREN. (1994-12-06)

Intermedia "hypertext" A {hypertext} system developed by a research group at {IRIS} (Brown University) to support education and research. Intermedia was a "shell" over {A/UX} 1.1, programmed using an {object-oriented} toolkit and standard {DBMS} functions. The {data model} and architecture were designed for flexibility and consistency. Intermedia consisted of several {applications} sharing an {event-driven} {gui}. These included a {text editor} (InterText), graphics editor (InterDraw), picture viewer (InterPix), timeline editor (InterVal), 3D model viewer (InterSpect), {animation} editor (InterPlay) and video editor (InterVideo). [{Yankelovich et al, "Intermedia: The Concept and the Construction of a Seamless Information Environment" (http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/sdrucker/papers/intermedia1.pdf)}] {(http://elab.eserver.org/hfl0032.html)}. (2014-11-02)

Internet Public Library (IPL) A project at the {University of Michigan} School of Information and Library Studies to provide an on-line, 24 hour public library, chaired by an assemblage of librarians and information industry professionals. The library aims to provide library services to a target audience estimated to number 1/4 of the entire American population by the end of the century. The Internet Public Library is scheduled to go on-line in March 1995. Among the first services will be on-line reference; youth services; user education; and professional services for librarians. {(http://ipl.sils.umich.edu/)}. {(telnet://ipl.sils.umich.edu/)}. Mailing list: majordomo@sils.umich.edu. (1995-07-20)

Internet Public Library ::: (IPL) A project at the University of Michigan School of Information and Library Studies to provide an on-line, 24 hour public library, chaired by an assemblage provide library services to a target audience estimated to number 1/4 of the entire American population by the end of the century.The Internet Public Library is scheduled to go on-line in March 1995. Among the first services will be on-line reference; youth services; user education; and professional services for librarians. . .Mailing list: (1995-07-20)

Jefferson, Thomas: (1743-1826) Third president of the United States. He was the author of the Declaration of Independence, which remains as one of the monuments to his firm faith in democratic principles. His opposition to Hamiltonian centralization of power placed him at one extreme of the arc described by the pendulum of political theory that has swayed through the history of this country. He had firm faith in free speech and education and his life long efforts stand uppermost among those who struggled for tolerance and religious freedom. In addition to politics, he was keenly interested in the science and mathematics of his day. Cf. Writings of T. J., 10 vols. (N. Y. 1892-9), ed. P. L. Ford. -- L.E.D.

Jesuitism: Noun applied rather loosely to the teachings and practices of the Jesuits, a religious order of men of the Roman Catholic Church engaged in missionary and educational work. Originally it was called the Company, but in the Bull of Pope Paul III approving it in 1540, the Society of Jesus. Besides the three usual vows the members take a fourth of special obedience to the Pope, who may send them on missions anywhere in the world. They depend on alms and gifts for support. The word is frequently used in the depreciative and opprobrious sense of craftiness, deceit, duplicity, and equivocation. -- J.J.R.

'Jigs med gling pa. (Jikme Lingpa) (1729-1798). A Tibetan exegete and visionary, renowned as one of the premier treasure revealers (GTER STON) in the RNYING MA sect of Tibetan Buddhism. 'Jigs med gling pa was born in the central Tibetan region of 'Phyong rgyas (Chongye), and from an early age recalled many of his previous incarnations, including those of the Tibetan king KHRI SRONG LDE BTSAN, the scholars SGAM PO PA and KLONG CHEN PA and, in his immediately preceding birth, Chos rje gling pa. After a period of monastic education, in his late twenties, he undertook an intense series of meditation retreats, first at Dpal ri monastery and then at the CHIMS PHU cave complex near BSAM YAS. In one of the numerous visions he experienced during this period, he received the KLONG CHEN SNYING THIG, or "Heart Sphere of the Great Expanse," from a dĀKINĪ at the BODHNĀTH STuPA in Kathmandu. The revelation of this text is considered a "mind treasure" (dgongs gter), composed by Padmasambhava and revealed to the mind of a later disciple. 'Jigs med gling pa kept this revelation secret for seven years before transcribing it. The klong chen snying thig corpus systematized by 'Jigs med gling pa, including numerous explanatory texts, tantric initiations, and ritual cycles, became a seminal component of the RDZOGS CHEN teachings in the Rnying ma sect. While based in central Tibet, 'Jigs med gling pa was also influential in Tibet's eastern regions, serving as spiritual teacher to the royal family of SDE DGE and supervising the printing of the collected Rnying ma tantras in twenty-eight volumes. His patrons and disciples included some of the most powerful and prestigious individuals from Khams in eastern Tibet, and his active participation in reviving Rnying ma traditions during a time of persecution earned him a place at the forefront of the burgeoning eclectic or nonsectarian (RIS MED) movement. Numerous subsequent visionaries involved in promulgating the movement identified themselves as 'Jigs med gling pa's reincarnation, including 'JAM DBYANG MKHYEN BRTSE DBANG PO, MDO MKHYEN BRTSE YE SHES RDO RJE, DPAL SPRUL RIN PO CHE, and DIL MGO MKHYEN BRTSE. See also GTER MA.

Jiun Onko. (慈雲飮光) (1718-1804). In Japanese, "Cloud of Compassion, Drinker of Light"; a monk of the Shingon Risshu school, which combined the esoteric teachings of the SHINGONSHu with disciplinary observance of the VINAYA; also known as Jiun Sonja. Up to the age of twelve, he received a traditional Confucian education, but after his father's death the following year, he was entrusted to Horakuji, a Shingon Risshu monastery in Kawachi (present-day osaka prefecture), where he studied esoteric teachings and the SIDDHAM Sanskrit syllabary. During his early studies of Buddhism, Jiun came to realize the centrality of the PRĀTIMOKsA precepts to a monastic vocation, and in 1738 decided to take the full set of monk's precepts (J. gusokukai) at the monastery of Yachuji. In the following year, Jiun was appointed abbot of his old monastery of Horakuji, but he resigned two years later to dedicate himself to ZEN practice in the SoToSHu. In his late twenties, he founded a movement called the "vinaya of the true dharma" (shoboritsu), which encouraged Buddhist clerics to commit themselves to the prātimoksa precepts, regardless of their sectarian affiliations. In 1758, Jiun wrote a massive textbook on Sanskrit, the thousand-roll Bongaku shinryo ("The Ford and Bridge to Sanskrit Studies"), the first such study aid published in Japan. In 1775, he compiled his Juzen hogo ("Dharma Discourses on the Ten Wholesome Ways of Action"), a collection of lectures on the KUsALA-KARMAPATHA that he had delivered the two previous years at Amidadera in Kyoto. Late in his life, he moved to KATSURAGISAN, where he pioneered an eclectic religious movement that came to be called Unden SHINTo ("Shinto transmitted by Jiun") or Katsuragi Shinto, which integrated Shingon, Zen, and Confucianism with Japanese indigenous religion.

JNT Association "company" A non-profit company funded by the UK's advisory committee to manage and develop the UK national research network backbone. In 1970, the {United Kingdom Computer Board} commissioned Professor Mike Wells to report on UK university networking. As a result, on 1976-11-01, the Network Unit was created which in turn led to the creation in 1979 of a full-time Joint Network Team (JNT) and in 1982 to the creation of {JANET}. On 1993-12-10, the JNT Association was formed to develop and manage JANET for the education and research community. {ICANN wiki entry (http://icannwiki.com/UKERNA)}. (2016-04-12)

Kempen, Thomas Hemerken van: (1380-1471) Also called Thomas a Kempis, was born at Kempen in Holland, received his early education and instruction in music at the monastery of the Brethren of the Common Life, at Deventer. He attended no university but attained a high degree of spiritual development. His Imitation of Christ is one of the most famous, and most used, books of Catholic spiritual meditation; it has been printed in nearly all languages and is found in innumerable editions. There seems to be no valid reason for questioning his authorship of the work. -- V.J.B.

Kevattasutta. (C. Jiangu jing; J. Kengokyo; K. Kyon'go kyong 堅固經). In Pāli, "Sermon to Kevatta" [alt. Kevaddhasuttanta]; eleventh sutta of the DĪGHANIKĀYA (a separate DHARMAGUPTAKA recension appears as the twenty-fourth sutra in the Chinese translation of the DĪRGHĀGAMA), preached by the Buddha to the householder Kevatta [alt. Kevaddha] in the Pāvārika mango grove at NĀLANDĀ. According to the Pāli account, Kevatta approached the Buddha and asked him to order a monk disciple to perform a miracle in order to inspire faith among the Buddha's followers dwelling in Nālandā. The Buddha responded that there are three kinds of wonder, the wonder of supranormal powers (iddhipātihāriya), the wonder of manifestation (ādesanāpātihāriya), and the wonder of education (anusāsanīpātihāriya). The wonder of supranormal powers is composed of the ability to make multiple bodies of oneself, to become invisible, to pass through solid objects, to penetrate the earth, to walk on water, to fly through the sky, to touch the sun and moon, and to reach the highest heaven of BRAHMĀ. The wonder of manifestation is the ability to read the thoughts and feelings of others. The Buddha declared all these wonders to be trivial and disparages their display as vulgar. Far superior to these, he says, is the wonder of education, which leads to awakening to the teaching and entering the Buddhist order, training in the restraint of action and speech, observance of minor points of morality, guarding the senses, mindfulness, contentment with little, freedom from the five hindrances, joy and peace of mind, the four meditative absorptions, insight (Nānadassana; JNĀNADARsANA) into the conditioned nature and impermanence of body and mind, knowledge of the FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS (catvāry āryasatyāni), and the destruction of the contaminants (āsavakkhaya; S. ĀSRAVAKsAYA).

KeySpell ::: (text, tool, education) A spell checker and teaching aid from UK company KeySpell Limited for Microsoft Windows. KeySpell offers a selection of phonetically similar words, phrases, confusable terms, and examples in context. Even correctly spelt homophones can be checked.KeySpell can be run with Microsoft Word 97 or stand-alone. It includes 225,000 words and phrases and can use subsets of these. . (1999-05-21)

KeySpell "text, tool, education" A spell checker and teaching aid from UK company KeySpell Limited for {Microsoft Windows}. KeySpell offers a selection of phonetically similar words, phrases, confusable terms, and examples in context. Even correctly spelt homophones can be checked. KeySpell can be run with {Microsoft Word} 97 or stand-alone. It includes 225,000 words and phrases and can use subsets of these. {(http://keyspell.com)}. (1999-05-21)

Kihwa. (己和) (1376-1433). Korean SoN master of the Choson dynasty, also known as Hamho Tŭkt'ong and Mujun. Kihwa was a native of Ch'ungju in present-day North Ch'ungch'ong province. The son of a diplomat, Kihwa entered the Songgyun'gwan academy and received a traditional Confucian education, although even there he already showed strong interests in Buddhism. In 1396, after the death of a close friend, Kihwa decided to become a monk, eventually becoming a disciple of the eminent Son master MUHAK CHACH'O (1327-1405) at the monastery of Hoeamsa. After studying kanhwa Son (see KANHUA CHAN) under Chach'o, Kihwa is said to have attained his first awakening at a small hut near his teacher's monastery. Kihwa devoted the next few years to teaching and lecturing at various monasteries around the Korean peninsula. In 1412, Kihwa began a three-year retreat at a small hermitage named Hamhodang near the monastery of Yonbongsa on Mt. Chamo in P'yongsan. In 1420, he made a pilgrimage to Mt. Odae, and the following year he was invited to the royal monastery of Taejaoch'al. In 1424, King Sejong (r. 1419-1450) forcibly consolidated the different schools of Korean Buddhism into the two branches of Son (CHAN; Meditation) and KYO (Doctrine), reduced the number of officially recognized monasteries, and limited the number of monks allowed to ordain. Perhaps in reaction to this increasing persecution of Buddhism, Kihwa left the royal monastery that same year. In response to the growing criticisms of Buddhism by the Confucian scholars at court, Kihwa composed his HYoNJoNG NON. Kihwa also composed influential commentaries on the VAJRACCHEDIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀSuTRA ("Diamond Sutra") and the YUANJUE JING ("Perfect Enlightenment Sutra"). In 1431, he began restorations on a monastery known as Pongamsa on Mt. Hŭiyang in Yongnam and died at the monastery two years later in 1433.

kindergarten ::: n. --> A school for young children, conducted on the theory that education should be begun by gratifying and cultivating the normal aptitude for exercise, play, observation, imitation, and construction; -- a name given by Friedrich Froebel, a German educator, who introduced this method of training, in rooms opening on a garden.

Kiyozawa Manshi. (清沢満之) (1863-1903). Meiji-era Japanese Buddhist leader in the HIGASHI-HONGANJIHA of JoDO SHINSHu. Kiyozawa was born into a poor warrior class family in a small town east of Nagoya and ordained in 1878 as a Higashi-Honganji priest. After studying Western philosophy at college and graduate school in Tokyo, he served his sect as an educator. In 1888, he was appointed principal of a Higashi-Honganji middle school in Kyoto and taught Western philosophy at a Higashi-Honganji seminary. In 1890, however, Kiyozawa left his position as principal to lead a rigorous ascetic life, wearing Buddhist robes, separating himself from his family, and living on simple food. Around this time, Kiyozawa launched a reform movement within Higashi-Honganji to return the school to the spirit of its founder, SHINRAN (1173-1262), and to make its ecclesiastical structure conform better to modern secular society, such as by having its deacons elected democratically. However, his movement failed and he was excommunicated in 1897. After being reinstated a year later, Kiyozawa again played an important role in the sect's education, serving in 1901 and 1902 as a dean of Higashi-Honganji's newly founded college (present-day otani University). He died at the age of forty from the tuberculosis he had contracted during his practice of asceticism. Kiyozawa is credited with popularizing the TANNISHo, a short collection of Shinran's sayings that previously were not widely known. Kiyozawa emphasized individual religious experience, in which the adherent's self-awareness of his or her incapacity for moral perfection would instead prompt the adept to realize the truth of salvation through absolute reliance on the infinite. Kiyozawa argued that such individual spiritual realization could contribute to the welfare of society at large. Although Kiyozawa's thought was not widely accepted during his own age, it influenced a younger generation of Higashi-Honganji scholars, such as Akegarasu Haya (1877-1967), Soga Ryojin (1875-1971), and Kaneko Dai'ei (1881-1976), who later became leading intellectual figures in the sect.

Kotani Kimi. (小谷喜美) (1901-1971). Cofounder along with KUBO KAKUTARo (1892-1944) of the REIYuKAI school of modern Japanese Buddhism, which derives from the teachings of the NICHIRENSHu school of Buddhism. Kotani Kimi was the wife of Kotani Yasukichi, Kubo's elder brother. She and her husband became two of the earliest and most active proponents of Reiyukai. After her husband died, she became the first official president of the group in 1930, and after Kubo's death in 1944, she ran the organization successfully on her own, although many splinter groups formed in reaction to her leadership. Kotani focused on the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), but because ancestor worship was her primary religious practice, she used the sutra rather idiosyncratically as a path to the spiritual realm. Kotani also focused the group's energies on social welfare programs, and especially youth education, for she felt that Japan's rapid modernization was neglecting the needs of the youth.

Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan "body, education" (KTH, Royal Institute of Art and Technology) A Swedish university founded in 1827 that is strong in engineering and computing (e.g. {AI}, {Virtual Reality}). In 1998 KTH had nearly 11,000 undergraduate students, 1,300 postgraduate students, and 2,900 staff, making it the largest of Sweden's six universitites of technology. {(http://kth.se/index-eng.html)}. Address: Stockholm, Sweden. (2001-03-18)

Kungliga Tekniska H�gskolan ::: (body, education) (KTH, Royal Institute of Art and Technology) A Swedish university founded in 1827 that is strong in engineering and computing (e.g. AI, postgraduate students, and 2,900 staff, making it the largest of Sweden's six universitites of technology. .Address: Stockholm, Sweden.(2001-03-18)

Ledi, Sayadaw. (1846-1923). In Burmese, "Senior Monk from Ledi"; honorific title of the prominent Burmese (Myanmar) scholar-monk U Nyanadaza (P. Nānadhaja), a well-known scholar of ABHIDHAMMA (S. ABHIDHARMA) and proponent of VIPASSANĀ (S. VIPAsYANĀ) insight meditation. Born in the village of Saingpyin in the Shwebo district of Upper Burma, he received a traditional education at his village monastery and was ordained a novice (P. sāmanera; S. sRĀMAnERA) at the age of fifteen. He took for himself the name of his teacher, Nyanadaza, under whom he studied Pāli language and the Pāli primer on abhidhamma philosophy, the ABHIDHAMMATTHASAnGAHA. At the age of eighteen, he left the order but later returned to the monkhood, he said, to study the Brahmanical science of astrology with the renowned teacher Gandhama Sayadaw. In 1866, at the age of twenty, Nyanadaza took higher ordination (UPASAMPADĀ) as a monk (P. BHIKKHU; S. BHIKsU) and the following year traveled to the Burmese royal capital of Mandalay to continue his Pāli education. He studied under several famous teachers and particularly excelled in abhidhamma studies. His responses in the Pāli examinations were regarded as so exceptional that they were later published under the title Pāramīdīpanī. In 1869, King MINDON MIN sponsored the recitation and revision of the Pāli tipitaka (S. TRIPItAKA) at Mandalay in what is regarded by the Burmese as the fifth Buddhist council (see COUNCIL, FIFTH). During the proceedings, Nyanadaza assisted in the editing of Pāli texts that were inscribed on stone slabs and erected at the Kuthodaw Pagoda at the base of Mandalay hill. Nyanadaza remained in the capital until 1882, when he moved to Monywa and established a forest monastery named Ledi Tawya, whence his toponym Ledi. It is said that it was in Monywa that he took up in earnest the practice of vipassanā meditation. He was an abhidhamma scholar of wide repute and an advocate of meditation for all Buddhists, ordained and lay alike. With the final conquest of Burma by the British and the fall of the monarchy in 1885, there was a strong sentiment among many Burmese monks that the period of the disappearance of the dharma (see SADDHARMAVIPRALOPA) was approaching. According to the MANORATHAPURĀnĪ by BUDDHAGHOSA, when the dharma disappears, the first books to disappear would be the seven books of the abhidhamma. In order to forestall their disappearance, Ledi decided to teach both abhidhamma and vipassanā widely to the laity, something that had not been previously done on a large scale. He produced over seventy-five vernacular manuals on Buddhist metaphysics and insight meditation. He also wrote several treatises in Pāli, the best known of which was the Pāramatthadīpanī. He taught meditation to several disciples who went on to become some of the most influential teachers of vipassanā in Burma in the twentieth century. In recognition of his scholarship, the British government awarded Ledi Sayadaw the title Aggamahāpandita in 1911. Between 1913 and 1917, Ledi Sayadaw corresponded on points of doctrine with the British Pāli scholar CAROLINE A. F. RHYS DAVIDS, and much of this correspondence was subsequently published in the Journal of the Pali Text Society.

Lévi, Sylvain. (1863-1935). Influential nineteenth-century European scholar of the YOGĀCĀRA school of Buddhism. Born in Paris to Alsatian parents, Lévi had a conservative Jewish education and held his first teaching position at a conservative seminary in Paris. Educated in Sanskrit at the University of Paris, Lévi became a lecturer at the École des Hautes Études in Paris in 1886. There, he taught Sanskrit until he became professor of Sanskrit language and literature at the Collège de France in 1894, a position that he would hold until 1935. Lévi went to India and Japan to carry out his research and also traveled extensively in Korea, Nepal, Vietnam, and Russia. He eventually became the director of the École des Hautes Études. In addition to Sanskrit, Lévi also read classical Chinese, Tibetan, and Kuchean and was one of the first Western scholars to study Indian Buddhism through translations that were extant only in those secondary canonical languages. Perhaps his most significant translations were of seminal texts of the YOGĀCĀRA school, including renderings of VASUBANDHU's twin synopses, the VIMsATIKĀ and TRIMsIKĀ (1925), and ASAnGA's MAHĀYĀNASuTRĀLAMKĀRA, thus introducing the major writings of this important Mahāyāna scholastic school to the Western scholarly world. Lévi also published on classical Indian theater, the history of Nepal, and Sanskrit manuscripts from Bali. Together with TAKAKUSU JUNJIRo, Lévi was the cofounder of the joint Japanese-French Hobogirin, an encyclopedic dictionary of Buddhism, the compilation of which continues to this day.

LINK ::: https://www.itseducation.asia/dictionary/

LINK ::: https://www.itseducation.asia/english-literature/

LINK ::: https://www.itseducation.asia/mathematics/

LINK ::: https://www.itseducation.asia/psychology/

Locke also was a political, economic and religious thinker of note. A "latitudinarian" and broad churchman in theology and a liberal in politics, he argued against the divine right of kings and the authority of the Bible and the Church, and maintained that political sovereignty rests upon the consent of the governed, and ecclesiastical authority upon the consent of reason. He was also an ardent defender of freedom of thought and speech. Main works: Two Treatises on Gov't, 1689; Reasonableness in Christianity, 1695; Some Thoughts on Education, 1693; An Essay on Human Understanding, 1690. -- B.A.G.F.

LOGO "language, education" A {Lisp}-like language for teaching programming, noted for its "turtle graphics" used to draw geometric shapes. LOGO was developed in 1966-1968 by a group at Bolt, Beranek & Newman (now "{BBN Technologies}") headed by Wally Fuerzeig "fuerzeig@bbn.com" (who still works there in 2003) and including Seymour Papert "seymour@media.mit.edu". There are Logo {interpreters} for {Macintosh}, {Unix}, {IBM PC}, {X Window System}, and many PCs. Implmentations include {Berkeley Logo}, {MswLogo}. (2000-03-28)

LOGO ::: (language, education) A Lisp-like language for teaching programming, noted for its turtle graphics used to draw geometric shapes. LOGO was Technologies) headed by Wally Fuerzeig .There are Logo interpreters for Macintosh, Unix, IBM PC, X Window System, and many PCs. Implmentations include Berkeley Logo, MswLogo.(2000-03-28)

lore ::: 1. The body of knowledge, esp. of a traditional, anecdotal, or popular nature, on a particular subject. 2. Knowledge acquired through education or experience.

lorettine ::: n. --> One of a order of nuns founded in 1812 at Loretto, in Kentucky. The members of the order (called also Sisters of Loretto, or Friends of Mary at the Foot of the Cross) devote themselves to the cause of education and the care of destitute orphans, their labors being chiefly confined to the Western United States.

:::   "Love is, in its essence, the joy of identity; it finds its ultimate expression in the bliss of union.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

“Love is, in its essence, the joy of identity; it finds its ultimate expression in the bliss of union.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

Maaleh ::: Educational center for religious Zionism.

mae chi. In Thai, "nun" (although not a novice sRĀMAnERIKĀ or fully ordained BHIKsUNĪ) or the "order of nuns" in Thailand; those who are ordained as mae chi observe the eight precepts (SIKsĀPADA; cf. AstĀnGASAMANVĀGATAM UPAVĀSAM, UPOsADHA), dress in white robes similar in style to the saffron robes of the monks, shave their heads every fortnight, and spend much of their time in religious observances. However, because mae chi have not received a monastic ordination and are thus technically still laywomen (UPĀSIKĀ), they are not afforded the special legal status of fully ordained monks, and typically receive far less financial support from both the government and the laity. During the last two decades of the twentieth century, the number of mae chi increased substantially, particularly among college-educated women. Moreover, there was also an increased emphasis on practicing and teaching VIPASSANĀ (S. VIPAsYANĀ) meditation, as well as on providing young women with opportunities for religious education, particularly those who were economically disadvantaged. The majority of women who ordain as nuns, however, continue to be middle aged and older, in sharp contrast to monks, most of whom ordain as either novices or as young men, and who often enter the monkhood for only a single rains retreat (Thai. pansa, P. vassa; S. VARsĀ). In the late 1990s, there were around ten thousand nuns in Thailand, compared with almost two hundred thousand monks.

Ma gcig lab sgron. (Machik Labdron) (c. 1055-1149). Female Tibetan Buddhist master who codified the important meditation tradition called "severance" (GCOD), classified as one of the so-called eight great conveyances that are lineages of achievement (SGRUB BRGYUD SHING RTA CHEN PO BRGYAD). Born in the southern Tibetan region of LA PHYI, Ma gcig lab sgron was recognized at a young age to be a prodigy. According to her traditional biographies, she had a natural propensity for the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ literature, spending much of her youth reading and studying its root texts and commentaries. She continued her religious education under the monk known as Grwa pa mngon shes (Drapa Ngonshe) and Skyo ston Bsod nams bla ma (Kyoton Sonam Lama) in a monastic setting where she was eventually employed to use her skills in ritual recitation and exegesis. She then took up the lifestyle of a tantric YOGINĪ, living as the consort of the Indian adept Thod pa Bhadra and giving birth to perhaps five children. Reviled in one source as "a nun who had repudiated her religious vows," Ma gcig lab sgron left her family and eventually met the figure who would become her root guru, the famed Indian yogin PHA DAM PA SANGS RGYAS who transmitted to her the instructions of "pacification" (ZHI BYED) and MAHĀMUDRĀ. She combined these with her training in prajNāpāramitā and other indigenous practices, passing them on as the practice of severance, principally to the Nepalese yogin Pham thing pa and her own son Thod smyon bsam grub (Tonyon Samdrup). Ma gcig lab sgron is revered as a dĀKINĪ, an emanation of the Great Mother (Yum chen mo, as the goddess PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ is known in Tibetan), and the female bodhisattva TĀRĀ. Her reincarnations have also been recognized in contemporary individuals, including the former abbess of the important SHUG GSEB nunnery, Rje btsun Rig 'dzin chos nyid zang mo (Jetsun Rikdzin Chonyi Sangmo). Ma gcig lab sgron remains a source of visionary inspiration for new ritual cycles, as well as a primary Tibetan example of the ideal female practitioner. Her tradition of severance continues to be widely practiced by Tibetan Buddhists of all sectarian affiliations.

Main works: System of Synthttic Philosophy (First Principles of Biology, Psychology, Sociology, Ethics), 1862-92; On Moral and Physical Education, 1861.

Makiguchi Tsunesaburo. (牧口常三郎) (1871-1944). Founder of SoKA GAKKAI, a modern Japanese lay movement. Makiguchi was born in a small village in Niigata prefecture. Until 1928, he pursued a career as an educator and writer, serving as a teacher or a principal in several schools, and publishing articles on his educational philosophy, which focused on developing the creativity and personal experience of his students. Perhaps because of such personal misfortunes as the loss of four of his five children, Makiguchi converted in 1928 to NICHIREN SHoSHu, an offshoot of Nichiren Buddhism, after finding that its teachings resonated with his own ideas about engendering social and religious values. Together with his disciple Toda Josei (1900-1958), Makiguchi founded in 1930 the Soka Kyoiku Gakkai (Creating Educational Values), a lay organization under the umbrella of the Nichiren Shoshu, which focused on publicizing his pedagogical ideas, and led its first general meeting. The society subsequently began to take on a decidedly religious character, focusing on missionary work for Nichiren Shoshu. As the Pacific War expanded, Makiguchi and his followers refused to cooperate with state-enforced SHINTo practices, leading to a rift between them and TAISEKIJI, the head monastery of Nichiren Shoshu. As a result, Makiguchi was arrested in 1943 on charges of lèse-majesté and violations of the Public Order Act, and died in prison one year later. After Makiguchi's disciple Toda Josei was released from prison in July 1945, he took charge of the Soka Kyoiku Gakkai organization and renamed it Soka Gakkai in 1946, developing it into one of the largest lay Buddhist organizations in Japan.

MALIZT ::: Hebrew acronym for “Institutes for Jewish-Zionist Education.” Teaches Jewish identity to adults.

Mallikā. [alt. Mālikā] (P. Mallikā; T. Ma li ka; C. Moli; J. Matsuri/Mari; K. Malli 末利). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "Jasmine"; a prominent disciple of the Buddha and the wife of King PRASENAJIT of KOsALA. She was the daughter of a lower-caste garland maker who one day offered the Buddha a basket of fermented rice, without knowing his identity. The Buddha predicted that day that she would become queen of Kosala, which indeed came true. Her faith in the Buddha led to her royal husband becoming a disciple of the Buddha, which occurred when she suggested that the king visit the Buddha to have him interpret some disturbing dreams he had had. Despite her lack of education, she gained extensive knowledge of the dharma from ĀNANDA, who visited the palace to teach. As queen, Mallikā was a generous supporter of the SAMGHA, sponsoring the construction of a hall, lined with ebony, that was used for sermons. In the Mallikāsutta, she asks the Buddha why some women are beautiful and some ugly, some rich and some poor, some powerful and some powerless. The Buddha explains that beauty is the result of gentleness and calmness, wealth is the result of generosity, and power is the result of a lack of envy. The commentary to the DHAMMAPADA (DHAMMAPADAttHAKATHĀ) relates a story in which Mallikā was mounted by her dog while drying herself after a bath. She allowed the dog to continue, not knowing that she was being observed by the king. When he accused her of bestiality, she lied, saying that the window in the bathhouse prevented one from seeing clearly. To prove her point, she told the king to go into the bathhouse. When he returned, she falsely accused him of having intercourse with a goat. As a result of these two misdeeds-the bestiality and the lie-after her death, she was reborn in the AVĪCI hell for seven days, a fact that the Buddha hid from her bereaved husband Prasenajit. After seven days, she was reborn in TUsITA, at which point the Buddha informed the king that his wife had been reborn in a divine realm. In the sRĪMĀLĀDEVĪSIMHANĀDASuTRA, Queen srīmālā is the daughter of Mallikā and Prasenajit.

Marlais ::: (language) A simple-minded interpreter by Brent Benson at Harris for a programming language strongly resembling Dylan. Marlais version 0.2a is a hackers release for education, experimentation, porting, extension, and bug fixing.It has been ported to Sun-3, Sun-4, VAX/BSD, OS/2, Linux, Sequent Symmetry, Encore, HP-UX, Ultrix, SGI, Sony News, and A/UX. . (1993-09-23)

Marlais "language" A simple-minded {interpreter} by Brent Benson at Harris for a programming language strongly resembling {Dylan}. Marlais version 0.2a is a "hackers release" for education, experimentation, porting, extension, and bug fixing. It has been ported to {Sun-3}, {Sun-4}, {VAX}/{BSD}, {OS/2}, {Linux}, {Sequent Symmetry}, {Encore}, {HP-UX}, {Ultrix}, {SGI}, {Sony News}, and {A/UX}. {(ftp://travis.csd.harris.com/pub/marlais-0.2a.tar.gz)}. (1993-09-23)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) An independent, coeducational university located in Cambridge, MA, USA. Its best-known computer-related labs are the {Artificial Intelligence Lab}, the {Lab for Computer Science} and the Media Lab. It is also known for its {hacks} or practical jokes, such as {The Great Dome Police Car Hack (http://the-tech.mit.edu/Bulletins/hack.html)}. Resident computer {hackers} include {Richard Stallman}, {Gerald Sussman} and {Tom Knight}. See also {6.001}. {(http://web.mit.edu/)}.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology ::: (MIT) An independent, coeducational university located in Cambridge, MA, USA. Its best-known computer-related labs are the Artificial Intelligence Lab, the practical jokes, such as . Resident computer hackers include Richard Stallman, Gerald Sussman and Tom Knight.See also 6.001. .

Massive open online course (MOOC) - a free Web-based distance learning program that is designed for the participation of large numbers of geographically dispersed students. See /r/OnlineEducation

MCSA "education" 1. {Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator}. 2. {Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate}. (2013-09-02)

MCSE 1. "education" {Microsoft Certified System Engineer}. 2. "humour" {Minesweeper, Chess, Solitaire Expert}. (2013-03-16)

MENTAL CULTURE The prerequisite of the stage of intellectual culture is a rational and non-contradictory world view and life view, which is free of dogmas and has been made available for all. This presupposes a system of education that develops the power of judgement. P 1.1.13

Mental culture presupposes mental self-reliance and mental self-determination.
Intellectual independence implies the ability critically to sift the material which culture has afforded us, to judge the kind of certainty and degree of probability accruing to the ideas we find. P 1.1.15


Methodology: The systematic analysis and organization of the rational and experimental principles and processes which must guide a scientific inquiry, or which constitute the structure of the special sciences more particularly. Methodology, which is also called scientific method, and more seldom methodeutic, refers not only to the whole of a constituted science, but also to individual problems or groups of problems within a science. As such it is usually considered as a branch of logic; in fact, it is the application of the principles and processes of logic to the special objects of the various sciences; while science in general is accounted for by the combination of deduction and induction as such. Thus, methodology is a generic term exemplified in the specific method of each science. Hence its full significance can be understood only by analyzing the structure of the special sciences. In determining that structure, one must consider the proper object of the special science, the manner in which it develops, the type of statements or generalizations it involves, its philosophical foundations or assumptions, and its relation with the other sciences, and eventually its applications. The last two points mentioned are particularly important: methods of education, for example, will vary considerably according to their inspiration and aim. Because of the differences between the objects of the various sciences, they reveal the following principal methodological patterns, which are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and which are used sometimes in partial combination. It may be added that their choice and combination depend also in a large degree on psychological motives. In the last resort, methodology results from the adjustment of our mental powers to the love and pursuit of truth. There are various rational methods used by the speculative sciences, including theology which adds certain qualifications to their use. More especially, philosophy has inspired the following procedures:   The Soctattc method of analysis by questioning and dividing until the essences are reached;   the synthetic method developed by Plato, Aristotle and the Medieval thinkers, which involves a demonstrative exposition of the causal relation between thought and being;   the ascetic method of intellectual and moral purification leading to an illumination of the mind, as proposed by Plotinus, Augustine and the mystics;   the psychological method of inquiry into the origin of ideas, which was used by Descartes and his followers, and also by the British empiricists;   the critical or transcendental method, as used by Kant, and involving an analysis of the conditions and limits of knowledge;   the dialectical method proceeding by thesis, antithesis and synthesis, which is promoted by Hegelianlsm and Dialectical Materialism;   the intuitive method, as used by Bergson, which involves the immediate perception of reality, by a blending of consciousness with the process of change;   the reflexive method of metaphysical introspection aiming at the development of the immanent realities and values leading man to God;   the eclectic method (historical-critical) of purposive and effective selection as proposed by Cicero, Suarez and Cousin; and   the positivistic method of Comte, Spencer and the logical empiricists, which attempts to apply to philosophy the strict procedures of the positive sciences. The axiomatic or hypothetico-deductive method as used by the theoretical and especially the mathematical sciences. It involves such problems as the selection, independence and simplification of primitive terms and axioms, the formalization of definitions and proofs, the consistency and completeness of the constructed theory, and the final interpretation. The nomological or inductive method as used by the experimental sciences, aims at the discovery of regularities between phenomena and their relevant laws. It involves the critical and careful application of the various steps of induction: observation and analytical classification; selection of similarities; hypothesis of cause or law; verification by the experimental canons; deduction, demonstration and explanation; systematic organization of results; statement of laws and construction of the relevant theory. The descriptive method as used by the natural and social sciences, involves observational, classificatory and statistical procedures (see art. on statistics) and their interpretation. The historical method as used by the sciences dealing with the past, involves the collation, selection, classification and interpretation of archeological facts and exhibits, records, documents, archives, reports and testimonies. The psychological method, as used by all the sciences dealing with human behaviour and development. It involves not only introspective analysis, but also experimental procedures, such as those referring to the relations between stimuli and sensations, to the accuracy of perceptions (specific measurements of intensity), to gradation (least noticeable differences), to error methods (average error in right and wrong cases), and to physiological and educational processes.

metonymy: Using a physical object to embody a more general idea. For example crown is a metonym as it refers to royalty or the entire royal family. Also stating "the pen is mightier than the sword", suggests that the power of education and writing is more potent for changing the world than violence. The word literally means 'change of name'.

Microsoft Certified Application Developer "programming, education" (MCAD) Microsoft's qualification signifying ability to build {applications} with Microsoft {Visual Studio .NET} and {web services} on {Microsoft .NET Framework} 1.0 and 1.1. MCAD can no longer be earned. {(http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/in/certification/mcad.aspx)} (2013-04-21)

Microsoft Certified Database Administrator "educational" (MCDBA) {Microsoft}'s certification of ability to design, implement and manage {SQL Server 2000} {databases}. The qualification was retired on 2012-09-30. {(http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/mcdba-certification.aspx)}. (2013-06-15)

Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician "education" (MCDST) {Microsoft}'s qualification signifying ability to troubleshoot {Windows XP} {desktop} environments and to solve hardware and software operation and application problems on Windows XP. MCDST can no longer be earned. (2013-05-23)

Microsoft Certified Professional Developer "educational, job" (MCPD) {Microsoft}'s certification intended to show comprehensive skills designing, developing and deploying {applications} for a particular job role. (2013-07-21)

Microsoft Certified Solution Developer ::: (programming, education) (MCSD) A course for the VAR or software developer. Candidates must pass three core exams and an elective exam. The core exams cover systems analysis, and desktop and distributed development. .(2001-05-20)

Microsoft Certified Solution Developer "programming, education" (MCSD) A course for the {VAR} or software {developer}. Candidates must pass three core exams and an elective exam. The core exams cover {systems analysis}, and {desktop} and {distributed} development. {(http://microsoft.com/mcsd)}. (2001-05-20)

Microsoft Certified System Engineer ::: (education) (MCSE) A qualification obtained by passing Microsoft's system engineer certification exams. .(2002-07-02)

Microsoft Certified System Engineer "education" (MCSE) A qualification obtained by passing {Microsoft}'s system engineer certification exams. {(http://microsoft.com/mcse)}. (2002-07-02)

Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator "education" (MCSA) {Microsoft}'s qualification for people who administer {network} and system environments based on {Windows} {operating systems}. Specializations include Messaging and Security. Replaced by {Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate}. (2013-09-02)

MINIX ::: (operating system) /MIN-ix/ A small operating system that is very similar to UNIX. MINIX was written for educational purposes by Prof. Andrew S. Tanenbaum of Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam.MINIX has been written from scratch and contains no AT&T code -- neither in the kernel, the compiler, the utilities, nor the libraries. Although copyrighted by Prentice-Hall, all sources, binaries and documentation can be obtained via Internet for educational or research purposes.Current versions as of 1996-11-15:MINIX 2.0 - Intel CPUs from Intel 8088 to PentiumMINIX 1.5 - Intel, Macintosh (MacMinix), Amiga, Atari ST, Sun SPARC. . (1997-06-16)

MINIX "operating system" /MIN-ix/ A small {operating system} that is very similar to {UNIX}. MINIX was written for educational purposes by Prof. {Andrew S. Tanenbaum} of {Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam}. MINIX has been written from scratch and contains no AT&T code -- neither in the {kernel}, the {compiler}, the utilities, nor the libraries. Although copyrighted by Prentice-Hall, all {sources}, {binaries} and {documentation} can be obtained via {Internet} for educational or research purposes. Current versions as of 1996-11-15: MINIX 2.0 - {Intel} {CPUs} from {Intel 8088} to {Pentium} MINIX 1.5 - {Intel}, {Macintosh} ({MacMinix}), {Amiga}, {Atari ST}, {Sun} {SPARC}. {(http://cs.vu.nl/~ast/minix.html)}. (1997-06-16)

Mortal mind: In Christian Science, “that self-contradictory consciousness with which the individual mortal man identifies himself, unless by education and religious craving for metaphysical completeness he recognizes its fallacious character. It has a certain resemblance to Maya (q.v.). Christian Science explains that mortal mind consciousness is an erroneous point of view, and asserts that all imperfection, evil, physical objectivity seen as matter, are misrepresentations of a metaphysically perfect universe. Mortal mind stands in opposition to the ethical nature of the metaphysical universe.” (H. W. Steiger.)

Music [from Greek mousike (techne) the art of the Muses] The music of the Greeks did not signify merely the harmony of sounds, but actually imbodied the idea of inner harmony of the spirit, the becoming at one with the spirit of the Muses, so that the soul responded in harmonic rhythm to the beat of universal harmony. Music with the Greeks, therefore, included, besides vocal and instrumental music, choral dancing, rhythmic motions, and various modes of harmony expressed in action, perhaps most particularly that part of education which we should now classify as a striving for harmony in life combined with aesthetic, in contrast with intellectual and physical branches of study and development. It was culture of the essential person, the ego or soul, whereas the other two divisions care for and supply the needs of the mind and of the body.

n. 1. An exercise serving an educational purpose; something to be learned or studied. lessons. *v. *2. To teach, instruct.

Nārada Mahāthera. (1898-1983). A prominent modern Sri Lankan THERAVĀDA scholar and missionary monk (dhammaduta bhikkhu). Born in a Colombo suburb, he studied at the Roman Catholic St. Benedict's College (where the medium of instruction was English) and at the Buddhist Paramananda Vihāra Sunday school. He was ordained as a novice (P. sāmanera; S. sRĀMAnERA) at the age of eighteen under the guidance of Pelene VajiraNāna Mahānāyaka Thera. He received a traditional monastic education in Pāli but also studied Western philosophy, logic, and ethics. He began missionary work with the Servants of the Buddha Society and took his first journey outside of Sri Lanka in 1929, to India. He later traveled widely in Southeast Asia and developed close ties with Buddhists in Indonesia and Vietnam. In the late 1940s, he was involved in the resumption of Theravāda missionary activity among the Newars of Kathmandu Valley in Nepal after the ban on religious propagation was lifted by the Rana regime. He also devoted himself to promoting Theravāda Buddhism in Australia and Western Europe and was elected president of the Buddhist Vihāra Society in London in 1948. Nārada Mahāthera was a prolific writer, and his publications ranged from Buddhist ethics and meditation to ABHIDHAMMA studies. His more popular books include Buddhism in a Nutshell, The Buddha and His Teachings, The Buddhist Conception of Mind or Consciousness, The Buddhist Doctrine of Kamma and Rebirth, The Way to Nibbana, The Life of the Buddha, and An Elementary Pali Course. His English translations include The Dhammapada and Abhidhammathasangaha: A Manual of Abhidhamma.

National Research and Education Network (NREN) The realisation of an interconnected gigabit computer network devoted to High Performance Computing and Communications. See also {HPPC}, {IINREN}. (1994-11-23)

National Research and Education Network ::: (NREN) The realisation of an interconnected gigabit computer network devoted to High Performance Computing and Communications.See also HPPC, IINREN. (1994-11-23)

New York State Educational Reasearch ETwork (NYSERNET) A New York {Internet} access provider and regional network. NYSERNet has been in the Internet business since about 1985 and have recently upgraded to a {T3} backbone (45 megabits per second). They work with {Sprint}, {NYNEX} and Rochester Telephone. NYSERNet, Inc., provides Internet Training provided through the NYSERNet Internet Training and Education Center (NITEC), a twenty-four station hands-on facility in Syracuse, NY. The Information Services Group supplies tools for marketing via the {Internet} and NYSERNET also provide Technical Consulting Services. {(http://nysernet.org/)}. E-mail: "info@nysernet.org". (1995-02-01)

New York State Educational Reasearch ETwork ::: (NYSERNET) A New York Internet access provider and regional network. NYSERNet has been in the Internet business since about 1985 and have recently upgraded to a T3 backbone (45 megabits per second). They work with Sprint, NYNEX and Rochester Telephone.NYSERNet, Inc., provides Internet Training provided through the NYSERNet Internet Training and Education Center (NITEC), a twenty-four station hands-on marketing via the Internet and NYSERNET also provide Technical Consulting Services. .E-mail: . (1995-02-01)

nortelry ::: n. --> Nurture; education; culture; bringing up.

NREN {National Research and Education Network}

nurture ::: n. --> The act of nourishing or nursing; thender care; education; training.
That which nourishes; food; diet. ::: v. t. --> To feed; to nourish.
To educate; to bring or train up.


Nu, U. (1907-1995). Burmese (Myanmar) political leader and patron of Buddhism. (U is a Burmese honorific.) As a young man, U Nu became active in anti-British agitation and in 1936 was expelled by British authorities from the University of Rangoon law school for his political activities. Thereafter, he became a leader of the Burmese nationalist movement, adopting the nationalist title "Thakin" (master), along with his comrades Aung San, Ne Win, and others. On the eve of the Japanese invasion of Burma in 1942, he was imprisoned by the British as a potential agent. He was released by the Japanese occupation forces and served as the foreign minister of their puppet regime. With growing disenchantment at Japanese mistreatment of Burmese citizens, U Nu helped to organize a clandestine guerilla resistance force that assisted the British when they retook Burma. At the conclusion of World War II, he participated in negotiations with the British for Burmese independence. He became Burma's first prime minister and served three terms in office (1948-1956, 1957-1958, 1960-1962). A devout Buddhist, he organized under government auspices national monastic curricula, promoted the practice of insight meditation (VIPASSANĀ), and, in 1956, sponsored the convention of the sixth Buddhist council (according to Burmese reckoning; see COUNCIL, SIXTH) in celebration of the 2,500th anniversary of the Buddha's parinibbāna (S. PARINIRVĀnA). The council prepared a new Burmese edition of the Pāli canon (P. tipitaka; S. TRIPItAKA), together with its commentaries and sub-commentaries, which is currently used in Burmese monastic education. U Nu also attempted, unsuccessfully, to unite the several noncommensal fraternities (Burmese GAING) of the Burmese SAMGHA into a single body. While achieving much in the religious sphere, U Nu proved unable to cope with the political crises confronting his government, and Burma descended into civil war. He resigned as prime minister in 1956, returned to office in 1957, abdicated civilian government to General Ne Win in 1958, returned to office in 1960, and finally was deposed and arrested by Ne Win in a coup d'état in 1962. U Nu was released in 1968, and a year later he organized a resistance army from exile in Thailand. A rapprochement between U Nu and Ne Win was reached in 1980, and he was allowed to return to Burma, where he devoted himself to religious affairs, in particular as director of a Buddhist translation bureau located at Kaba Aye in Rangoon (Yangon). He again entered politics during the democracy uprising of 1988, setting up a symbolic provisional government when the then-ruling Burmese Socialist government collapsed. He was placed under house arrest in 1989 by the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC), a group composed of generals who succeeded Ne Win. He was released in 1992. A prolific writer on politics and Buddhism, his works include Buddhism: Theory and Practice, Burma under the Japanese, Unite and March, Towards Peace and Democracy, and his autobiography, Saturday's Son.

NYSERNET ::: New York State Educational Reasearch NETwork

NYSERNET {New York State Educational Reasearch NETwork}

Online Computer Library Center, Inc. "library" (OCLC) A nonprofit membership organisation offering computer-based services and research to libraries, educational organisations, and their users. OCLC operates the OCLC Cataloging PRISM service for cataloging and resource sharing, provides on-line reference systems for both librarians and end-users, and distributes on-line electronic journals. OCLC's goals are to increase the availability of library resources and reduce library costs for the fundamental public purpose of furthering access to the world's information. The OCLC library information network connects more than 10,000 36,000 libraries worldwide. Libraries use the OCLC System for cataloguing, interlibrary loan, collection development, bibliographic verification, and reference searching. Their most visible feature is the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC) WorldCat (the OCLC Online Union Catalog). {(http://oclc.org/)}. (2000-03-23)

Online Computer Library Center, Inc. ::: (library) (OCLC) A nonprofit membership organisation offering computer-based services and research to libraries, educational organisations, Their most visible feature is the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC) WorldCat (the OCLC Online Union Catalog). .(2000-03-23)

Open University ::: (education, body) (OU) The UK distance-learning organisation, established in 1969. It teaches degree-level courses in many subjects via BBC radio and television broadcasts and summer schools. . (1999-07-13)

Open University "education, body" (OU) The UK distance-learning organisation, established in 1969. It teaches degree-level courses in many subjects via BBC radio and television broadcasts and summer schools. {(http://hcrl.open.ac.uk/ou/ouhome.html)}. (1999-07-13)

opsimathy ::: n. --> Education late in life.

Oracle Corporation "company" The world's leading supplier of information management software. The company, worth $2 billion, offers its products, along with related consulting, education and support services in more than 90 countries around the world. Oracle is best known for its {database management systems} vendor and {relational DBMS} products. Oracle develops and markets {Oracle Media Server} and the {Oracle7} family of software products for {database} management; {Co-operative Development Environment} and {Oracle Co-operative Applications} Oracle software runs on {personal digital assistants}, {set-top boxs}, {IBM PCs}, {workstations}, {minicomputers}, {mainframes} and {massively parallel computers}. Oracle bought {Sun Microsystems} on 2009-04-20. See also {Adaptable User Interface}, {Bookviewer}, {CASE*Method}, {Component Integration Laboratories}, {DDE Manager}, {Online Media}, {Oracle Card}, {Oracle*CASE}, {siod}. {(http://oracle.com/)}. Address: Redwood Shores, CA, USA. (1995-03-15)

Oracle Corporation ::: (company) The world's leading supplier of information management software. The company, worth $2 billion, offers its products, along with related consulting, education and support services in more than 90 countries around the world.Oracle is best known for its database management systems vendor and relational DBMS products. Oracle develops and markets Oracle Media Server and the Oracle7 family of software products for database management; Co-operative Development Environment and Oracle Co-operative ApplicationsOracle software runs on personal digital assistants, set-top boxs, IBM PCs, workstations, minicomputers, mainframes and massively parallel computers.See also Adaptable User Interface, Bookviewer, CASE*Method, Component Integration Laboratories, DDE Manager, Online Media, Oracle Card, Oracle*CASE, siod. .Address: Redwood Shores, CA, USA. (1995-03-15)

Paekkok Ch'onŭng. (白谷處能) (1617-1680). Korean monk of the Choson dynasty, also known as Sinsu. Ch'onŭng received a traditional Confucian education from Ŭihyon (d.u.) and subsequently became a monk in 1631. He returned to Seoul a few years later and continued to study the Confucian classics from a Confucian scholar by the name of Sin Iksong. He later went to the monastery of SSANGGYESA in CHIRISAN and became the disciple of the Son master PYoGAM KAKSoNG, under whom he studied for the next twenty-three years. In 1680, while lecturing at KŬMSANSA, he passed away at the age of sixty-four. Ch'onŭng was particularly renowned for his writing and poetry, and maintained a close relationship with the leading Confucian scholars at the time. As a response to King Hyonjong's (r. 1660-1674) suppression of Buddhism, Ch'onŭng submitted to the court the Kanp'ye Sokkyo so ("Remonstration against the Ruination of sākyamuni's Teachings"), a critical response to the Confucian criticisms of Buddhism that were prevalent during that period. His writings can also be found in the Paekkok chip and Imsongdang taesa haengjang. The Paekkok chip is a collection of his poems and the biographies, stele inscriptions, and records of other monks. The Kanp'ye Sokkyo so can also be found in the Paekkok chip. He also authored the Imsongdang taesa haengjang, a record of the life of the Son master Imsong Ch'ungon (1567-1638).

page ::: n. --> A serving boy; formerly, a youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education; now commonly, in England, a youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households; in the United States, a boy employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body.
A boy child.
A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman&


Pak Chungbin. (朴重彬) (1891-1943). Founder of the Korean new religion of WoNBULGYO; also known by his cognomen SOT'AESAN. He is said to have begun his quest to discover the fundamental principle of the universe and human life at the age of seven and continued ascetic training for about twenty years. Finally, in 1916 at the age of twenty-six, Sot'aesan is said to have attained a personal enlightenment, which is considered the founding year of his religion. Since Sot'aesan recognized compelling parallels between his own experience and the description of enlightenment in Buddhism, he first called his religious organization the Pulpop Yon'guhoe (Society for the Study of the BUDDHADHARMA); later, the religion adopted the formal name of Wonbulgyo (lit. Consummate Buddhism). He presented his enlightenment, which he symbolized with the "one circle image" (IRWoNSANG), as the criterion of religious belief and practice by proclaiming the "cardinal tenet of one circle" (irwon chongji). Along with organizing his religion's fundamental tenets and building its institutional base, he and his followers also worked to improve the ordinary life of his followers, by establishing thrift and savings institutions and engaging in farming and land reclamation projects. The three foundational religious activities of edification (kyohwa), education (kyoyuk), and public service (chason) continue to be emblematic of Wonbulgyo practice. Sot'aesan published in 1943 the Wonbulgyo chongjon ("Principal Book of Won Buddhism"), a primer of the basic tenets of Wonbulgyo, which is one of the two representative scriptures of the religion, along with the Taejonggyong ("Discourses of the Founding Master"), the dialogues and teachings of Sot'aesan, published in 1962 by his successor Chongsan Song Kyu (1900-1962). Sot'aesan died in 1943 at the age of fifty-three, after delivering his last lecture, entitled "The Truth of Birth and Death" (Saengsa ŭi chilli).

PARALLEL EVOLUTIONS After the mineral kingdom, evolution parts into three parallel lines, of which only one (the so-called human evolution) leads the monads to the human kingdom. The two others are summed up in the term the deva evolution. The purpose of the parallel paths of development is the education of specialists in the work of manifestation: the human evolution specializes in the consciousness aspect and educates supervisors of evolution, the two others aim primarily at the motion and matter aspects and educate administrators of the Law and formers of matter.

PEARL ::: 1. (language, mathematics) A language for constructive mathematics developed by Constable at Cornell University in the 1980s.2. (language, real-time) Process and Experiment Automation Real-Time Language.3. (language, education) One of five pedagogical languages based on Markov algorithms, used in Nonpareil, a Machine Level Machine Independent Language for the Study of Semantics, B. Higman, ULICS Intl Report No ICSI 170, U London (1968). Compare Brilliant, Diamond, Nonpareil, Ruby.4. (language) A multilevel language developed by Brian Randell ca 1970 and mentioned in Machine Oriented Higher Level Languages, W. van der Poel, N-H 1974.5. (language, tool, history) An obsolete term for Larry Wall's PERL programming language, which never fell into common usage other than in typographical errors. The missing 'a' remains as an atrophied remnant in the expansion Practical Extraction and Report Language.[Programming Perl, Larry Wall and Randal L. Schwartz, O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. Sebastopol, CA. ISBN 0-93715-64-1].(2000-08-16)

PEARL 1. "language, mathematics" A language for {constructive mathematics} developed by Constable at {Cornell University} in the 1980s. 2. "language, real-time" {Process and Experiment Automation Real-Time Language}. 3. "language, education" One of five pedagogical languages based on {Markov} {algorithms}, used in "Nonpareil, a Machine Level Machine Independent Language for the Study of Semantics", B. Higman, ULICS Intl Report No ICSI 170, U London (1968). Compare {Brilliant}, {Diamond}, {Nonpareil}, {Ruby}. 4. "language" A multilevel language developed by Brian Randell ca 1970 and mentioned in "Machine Oriented Higher Level Languages", W. van der Poel, N-H 1974. 5. "language, tool, history" An obsolete term for {Larry Wall}'s {PERL} programming language, which never fell into common usage other than in typographical errors. The missing 'a' remains as an atrophied remnant in the expansion "Practical Extraction and Report Language". ["Programming Perl", Larry Wall and Randal L. Schwartz, O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. Sebastopol, CA. ISBN 0-93715-64-1]. (2000-08-16)

Perry, Ralph Barton: (1876-) Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. He was one of the founders of the new realist movement His classic biography of William James won the Pulitzer Prize for 1936. During the first World War he served as a major with the War Department Committee on Education and Special Training and this service has evidenced itself in his fervent advocacy of militant democracy. Among his works are Present Philosophical Tendencies, Philosophy of the Recent Past, General Theory of Value, 1926; Thought and Character of Wm. James, 2 vols., 1935; Shall Not Pertsh From the Earth, 1941. See Neo-Realism. -- L.E.D.

pestalozzian ::: a. --> Belonging to, or characteristic of, a system of elementary education which combined manual training with other instruction, advocated and practiced by Jean Henri Pestalozzi (1746-1827), a Swiss teacher. ::: n. --> An advocate or follower of the system of Pestalozzi.

pestalozzianism ::: n. --> The system of education introduced by Pestalozzi.

philanthropinism ::: n. --> A system of education on so-called natural principles, attempted in Germany in the last century by Basedow, of Dessau.

Piaget (1896-1980): a Swiss developmental psychologist whose work has had a huge influence on psychology and education. Piaget defined four sequential stages of cognitive development; the sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational and formal operational stages, each characterised by different ways of thinking. Through development a child develops ?a target="_blank" href="https://www.itseducation.asia/psychology/s.htm

piarist ::: n. --> One of a religious order who are the regular clerks of the Scuole Pie (religious schools), an institute of secondary education, founded at Rome in the last years of the 16th century.

Ping t’ien hsia: World peace, the ultimate goal of Confucian moral training and education.

Ping t'ien hsia: World peace, the ultimate goal of Confucian moral training and education. -- W.T.C.

Plato: (428-7 - 348-7 B.C.) Was one of the greatest of the Greek philosophers. He was born either in Athens or on the island of Aegina, and was originally known as Aristocles. Ariston, his father, traced his ancestry to the last kings of Athens. His mother, Perictione, was a descendant of the family of Solon. Plato was given the best elementary education possible and he spent eight years, from his own twentieth year to the death of Socrates, as a member of the Socratic circle. Various stories are told about his supposed masters in philosophy, and his travels in Greece, Italy, Sicily and Egypt, but all that we know for certain is that he somehow acquired a knowledge of Pythagoreanisrn, Heracleitanism, Eleaticism and othei Pre-Socratic philosophies. He founded his school of mathematics and philosophy in Athens in 387 B.C. It became known as the Academy. Here he taught with great success until his death at the age of eighty. His career as a teacher was interrupted on two occasions by trips to Sicily, where Plato tried without much success to educate and advise Dionysius the Younger. His works have been very well preserved; we have more than twenty-five authentic dialogues, certain letters, and some definitions which are probably spurious. For a list of works, bibliography and an outline of his thought, see Platonism. -- V.J.B.

Platonism as a political philosophy finds its best known exposition in the theory of the ideal state in the Republic. There, Plato described a city in which social justice would be fully realized. Three classes of men are distinguished: the philosopher kings, apparently a very small group whose education has been alluded to above, who would be the rulers because by nature and by training they were the best men for the job. They must excel particularly in their rational abilities: their special virtue is philosophic wisdom; the soldiers, or guardians of the state, constitute the second class; their souls must be remarkable for the development of the spirited, warlike element, under the control of the virtue of courage; the lowest class is made up of the acquisitive group, the workers of every sort whose characteristic virtue is temperance. For the two upper classes, Plato suggested a form of community life which would entail the abolition of monogamous marriage, family life, and of private property. It is to be noted that this form of semi-communism was suggested for a minority of the citizens only (Repub. III and V) and it is held to be a practical impossibility in the Laws (V, 739-40), though Plato continued to think that some form of community life is theoretically best for man. In Book VIII of the Republic, we find the famous classification of five types of political organization, ranging from aristocracy which is the rule of the best men, timocracy, in which the rulers are motivated by a love of honor, oligarchy, in which the rulers seek wealth, democracy, the rule of the masses who are unfit for the task, to tyranny, which is the rule of one man who may have started as the champion of the people but who governs solely for the advancement of his own, selfish interests.

PLO Departments ::: The PLO is made up for several departments. The biggest one is the Political Department which supervises the work of the PLO abroad. Other departments include: Returnees, Culture and Information, Social Affairs, Education and Popular Organizations.

populace ::: n. --> The common people; the vulgar; the multitude, -- comprehending all persons not distinguished by rank, office, education, or profession.

Port Royal Logic: See Logic, traditional. Port Royalists: Name applied to a group of thinkers, writers, and educators, more or less closely connected with the celebrated Cistercian Abbey of Port Royal near Paris, which during the seventeenth century became the most active center of Jansenism and, to a certain extent, of Cartesianism in France. The Port Royalists were distinguished by the severity and austerity of their moral code and by their new educational methods which greatly promoted the advance of pedagogy. The most noted among them were Jean Duvergier de Hauranne, abbot of Saint Cyran (1581-1643), Antoine-le grand Arnauld (1612-1694), and Pierre Nicole (1625-1695). Cf. Sainte-Beuve, Port-Royal. -- J.J.R.

Princeton University ::: (body, education) Chartered in 1746 as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was British North America's fourth college. First located in century. The College was officially renamed Princeton University in 1896; five years later in 1900 the Graduate School was established.Fully coeducational since 1969, Princeton now enrolls approximately 6,400 students (4,535 undergraduates and 1,866 graduate students). The ratio of full-time students to faculty members (in full-time equivalents) is eight to one.Today Princeton's main campus in Princeton Borough and Princeton Township consists of more than 5.5 million square feet of space in 160 buildings on 600 acres. The University's James Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro consists of one million square feet of space in four complexes on 340 acres.As Mercer County's largest private employer and one of the largest in the Mercer/Middlesex/Somerset County region, with approximately 4,830 permanent employees - including more than 1,000 faculty members - the University plays a major role in the educational, cultural, and economic life of the region. . (1994-01-19)

Princeton University "body, education" Chartered in 1746 as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was British North America's fourth college. First located in Elizabeth, then in Newark, the College moved to Princeton in 1756. The College was housed in Nassau Hall, newly built on land donated by Nathaniel and Rebeckah FitzRandolph. Nassau Hall contained the entire College for nearly half a century. The College was officially renamed Princeton University in 1896; five years later in 1900 the Graduate School was established. Fully coeducational since 1969, Princeton now enrolls approximately 6,400 students (4,535 undergraduates and 1,866 graduate students). The ratio of full-time students to faculty members (in full-time equivalents) is eight to one. Today Princeton's main campus in Princeton Borough and Princeton Township consists of more than 5.5 million square feet of space in 160 buildings on 600 acres. The University's James Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro consists of one million square feet of space in four complexes on 340 acres. As Mercer County's largest private employer and one of the largest in the Mercer/Middlesex/Somerset County region, with approximately 4,830 permanent employees - including more than 1,000 faculty members - the University plays a major role in the educational, cultural, and economic life of the region. {(http://princeton.edu/index.html)}. (1994-01-19)

Project Athena "project" A {distributed system} project for support of educational and research computing at {MIT}. Much of the software developed is now in wider use, especially the {X Window System}. (2000-02-24)

Project Athena ::: (project) A distributed system project for support of educational and research computing at MIT. Much of the software developed is now in wider use, especially the X Window System.(2000-02-24)

Project method: An education method which makes use of practical activities, organizing the scholastic work of the child about complex enterprises, such as making a garden, planning a circus. -- J.E.B.

Quality training – The process of familiarising all employees with the means for preventing, detecting, and eliminating non-quality. The educational processes are tailored to the appropriate groups.

quote :::... the essence of morals and of religion and of education is one, and that one essence is the manner of friendship. Sufis of all ages have named it Suluk, which means divine manner, beneficence.

Ravaisson-Mollien, Jean Gaspard Felix (1813-1900) French idealistic philosopher who studied under Schelling at Munich, became Professor of Philosophy at Rennes in 1838 and later inspector of Higher Education. Although he wrote little, he profoundly influenced French thought in the direction of the "dynamic spiritualism" of Maine de Biran. He explored the spiritual implications of individual personality especially in the domims of art and morals. See Morale et Metaphysique in Revue de Met. et de Mor. 1893. -- L.W.

recentring: in Gestalt theory, developing an alternative ?a target="_blank" href="https://www.itseducation.asia/psychology/m.htm

References between entries are not very numerous. From an educational point of view, it should prove more expedient that the students go through the Dictionary several times over and so doing discover for themselves the natural, logical connections there are between the entries.

Renaissance: Originally, the term refers to a period of cultural, technological, and artistic vitality during the British economic expansion in the late 1500s and early 1600s. More generally a renaissance is any period in which a people or nation experiences a period of vitality and explosive growth in its art, poetry, education, economy, linguistic development, or scientific knowledge. The term is positive in connotation.

Rong ston Smra ba'i seng ge. (Rongton Mawe Senge) (1367-1449). A Tibetan Buddhist master, especially revered within the SA SKYA sect, also known as Rong ston Shes bya kun rig Shākya rgyal mtshan (Rongton Sheja Kunrik Shākya Gyaltsen). Born into a BON family in Rgyal rong (Gyarong) in eastern Tibet, Rong ston traveled to the famed BKA' GDAMS institution of SANG PHU NE'U THOG, where he received ordination and studied all the major branches of Buddhist learning. He furthered his education under numerous masters across central Tibet and became renowned for his writings on PRAMĀnA and PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ. His two most famous students were SHĀKYA MCHOG LDAN and GO BO RAB 'BYAMS PA BSOD NAMS SENG GE, both prolific scholars known for polemical exchanges with early defenders of TSONG KHA PA. Rong ston founded NA LAN DRA monastery in 'Phan yul (Penyul), north of LHA SA, which later became an important Sa skya institution.

Rousseau, Jean Jacques: (1712-1778), a native of Geneva, Switzerland, whose influence in France and throughout Europe was enormous for many a decade, thanks to his timely ideas and colorful and lucid style of writing. Particularly influential were his Emile, a book on education, and Social Contract, a work reviving an old political doctrine concerning the origin of human society, into which he introduced novel democratic ideas. His thought was characterized by skepticism and criticism of the Western civilization regarded by him as a sad deviation from natural conditions of existence, described imaginatively in his New Heloise. -- R.B.W.

Rule of inference: See logic, formal, §§ 1, 3, and logistic system. Russell, Bertrand A. W.: (1872-) Fellow Trinity College, Cambridge, 1895; lecturer in philosophy, University of Cambridge, 1910-1916. Author of: The Philosophy of Leibniz, 1900; The Principles of Mathematics, 1903; Principia Mathematica (in collaboration with A. N. Whitehead), 3 vols. 1910-13, (second edition, 1925-27); The Problems of Philosophy, 1912; Our Knowledge of the External World, 1914; Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, 1918; The Analysis of Mind, 1921; The Analysis of Matter, 1927; An Outline of Philosophy, 1928; An Inquiry into Meaning and Truth, 1940. Also numerous other works on philosophy, politics and education, outrageously attacked by reactionaries.

SAIL ::: 1. (body, education) Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.2. (language) Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language.3. (language) An early system on the Larc computer.[Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959].[Jargon File](2001-06-22)

SAIL 1. "body, education" {Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory}. 2. "language" {Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language}. 3. "language" An early system on the {Larc} computer. [Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959]. [{Jargon File}] (2001-06-22)

Sanctis, Francesco: Born at Morra Irpina (Avellino), March 28, 1817. Died at Naples, December 19, 1883. Imprisoned and exiled because liberal, 1848. Professor in Zurich and later in Naples. Minister of Public Education. His History of Italian Literature (1870) is still considered fundamental.

Sangha Administration Act. A law enacted in Thailand in 1902 designed to bring the entire Buddhist order (P. sangha, S. SAMGHA) of Thailand under a single administrative authority. It was primarily an initiative of Prince Wachirayān, brother of King Chulalongkorn (RĀMA V) and the son of King Mongkut (RĀMA IV). The law was initially applied only to royal monasteries and several other important monasteries, but in 1908 it was extended to encompass the entire northeast region. It established a single system for monastic education and standardized the ordination procedure. Under this act, all abbots in Thailand were appointed by government officials or the king. The act was revised in 1941 and in 1962. It has not met with universal acceptance or compliance, being challenged especially by the tradition of the forest monks (ARANNAVĀSI).

scholarship ::: n. --> The character and qualities of a scholar; attainments in science or literature; erudition; learning.
Literary education.
Maintenance for a scholar; a foundation for the support of a student.


schooling ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of School ::: n. --> Instruction in school; tuition; education in an institution of learning; act of teaching.
Discipline; reproof; reprimand; as, he gave his son a good schooling. html{color:


school ::: n. --> A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish.
A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.
A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.


schoolship ::: n. --> A vessel employed as a nautical training school, in which naval apprentices receive their education at the expense of the state, and are trained for service as sailors. Also, a vessel used as a reform school to which boys are committed by the courts to be disciplined, and instructed as mariners.

Science and Engineering Research Council "body" (SERC) Formerly the largest of the five research councils funded by the British Government through the Office of Science and Technology. SERC funded higher education research in science and engineering, including computing and was responsible for the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, near Oxford; the Daresbury Laboratory, near Warrington; the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Cambridge and the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh. In April 1994 SERC was split into the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. SERC's remote sensing efforts have been transferred to the Natural Environment RC and its biotechnology efforts merged with the Agriculture and Food RC to make the new Biotechnology and Biological Sciences RC. The two major SERC laboratories - {Rutherford Appleton Laboratory} and Daresbury Laboratory are now independent. {(http://unixfe.rl.ac.uk/serc/serc.html)}. (1994-12-15)

secularist ::: n. --> One who theoretically rejects every form of religious faith, and every kind of religious worship, and accepts only the facts and influences which are derived from the present life; also, one who believes that education and other matters of civil policy should be managed without the introduction of a religious element.

See Trivium for the other three of the seven liberal arts, first proposed for education by Plato, Republic, III.

self-culture ::: n. --> Culture, training, or education of one&

seminary ::: n. --> A piece of ground where seed is sown for producing plants for transplantation; a nursery; a seed plat.
Hence, the place or original stock whence anything is brought or produced.
A place of education, as a scool of a high grade, an academy, college, or university.
Seminal state.
Fig.: A seed bed; a source.


Service business - Is a type of business entity which provides services of labour in a wide variety of different sectors, e.g., education, health care and hair care.

Shorashim ::: (Heb. Roots) Group founded to relieve tensions between religious and non-religious communities through educational weekends.

Sidgwick, Henry: (1838-1900) Last of the leading utilitarians, remembered principally for his work in ethics. He was an advocate of college education for women and one of the founders of the Society for Psychical Research. See Utilitarianism. -- L.E.D.

socialisation: is used by sociologists, social psychologists and educationalists to refer to the process of learning ones culture and how to live within it. For the individual it provides the resources necessary for acting and participating within their society

Software Description Database "networking" {Archie}'s database of names and short descriptions of many of the software packages, documents (like {RFCs} and educational material), and data files that are available via the {Internet}. (1995-11-12)

Software Description Database ::: (networking) Archie's database of names and short descriptions of many of the software packages, documents (like RFCs and educational material), and data files that are available via the Internet. (1995-11-12)

Software in the Public Interest, Inc. ::: (company) (SPI) A non-profit corporation which helps organisations develop and distribute open hardware and open software. SPI's goals are:* to create, form and establish an organization to formulate and provide software systems for use by the general public without charge;* to teach and train individuals regarding the use and application of such systems;* to hold classes, seminars and workshops concerning the proper use and application of computers and computer systems;* to endeavor to monitor and improve the quality of currently existing publicly available software;* to support, encourage and promote the creation and development of software available to the general public;* to provide information and education regarding the proper use of the Internet;* to organize, hold and conduct meetings, discussions and forums on contemporary issues concerning the use of computers and computer software;* to foster, promote and increase access to software systems available to the general public;* to solicit, collect and otherwise raise money and to expend such funds in furtherance of the goals and activities of the corporation;* to aid, assist, cooperate, co-sponsor and otherwise engage in concerted action with private, educational and governmental organisations and associations on all issues and matters concerning the use of computers and computer software and;* generally to endeavor to promote, foster and advance interest in computers and computer software by all available means and methods.SPI currently supports Berlin, Debian, GNOME, LSB, Open Source. .(2002-04-14)

Software in the Public Interest, Inc. "company" (SPI) A non-profit corporation which helps organisations develop and distribute {open hardware} and {open software}. SPI's goals are: * to create, form and establish an organization to formulate and provide software systems for use by the general public without charge; * to teach and train individuals regarding the use and application of such systems; * to hold classes, seminars and workshops concerning the proper use and application of computers and computer systems; * to endeavor to monitor and improve the quality of currently existing publicly available software; * to support, encourage and promote the creation and development of software available to the general public; * to provide information and education regarding the proper use of the Internet; * to organize, hold and conduct meetings, discussions and forums on contemporary issues concerning the use of computers and computer software; * to foster, promote and increase access to software systems available to the general public; * to solicit, collect and otherwise raise money and to expend such funds in furtherance of the goals and activities of the corporation; * to aid, assist, cooperate, co-sponsor and otherwise engage in concerted action with private, educational and governmental organisations and associations on all issues and matters concerning the use of computers and computer software and; * generally to endeavor to promote, foster and advance interest in computers and computer software by all available means and methods. SPI currently supports {Berlin}, {Debian}, {GNOME}, {LSB}, {Open Source}. {SPI Home (http://spi-inc.org/)}. (2002-04-14)

Soka Gakkai. (創價學會/創価学会). In Japanese, "Value-Creating Society," a Japanese Buddhist lay organization associated with the NICHIRENSHu, founded by MAKIGUCHI TSUNESABURO (1871-1944) and his disciple Toda Josei (1900-1958). Formerly a teacher, Makiguchi became a follower of Nichiren's teachings, finding that they supported his own ideas about engendering social and religious values, and converted to NICHIREN SHoSHu in 1928. In 1930, he established a lay organization under the umbrella of the Nichiren Shoshu, which initially called itself the Soka Kyoiku Gakkai (Creating Educational Values Society), and led its first general meeting. After its inauguration, the society began to take on a decidedly religious character, focusing on missionary work for Nichiren Shoshu. As the Pacific War expanded, Makiguchi and his followers refused to cooperate with state-enforced SHINTo practices, leading to a rift between them and TAISEKIJI, the head monastery of Nichiren Shoshu. In 1943, the society almost disintegrated with the imprisonment of Makiguchi and Toda, along with twenty other leaders charged with lèse-majesté and violations of the Public Order Act, which required each family to enshrine a Shinto talisman in its home. Makiguchi died in 1944 in prison, but Toda survived and was released on parole in July 1945. After his release, Toda took charge of the organization, renaming it Soka Gakkai in 1946. He successfully led a massive proselytization campaign that gained Soka Gakkai and Nichiren Shoshu vast numbers of new converts and by the late 1950s, upwards of 750,000 families had become adherents. After Toda died in 1958, IKEDA DAISAKU (b. 1928) became its third president and the society grew even more rapidly in Japan during the 1960s and the 1970s. In 1975, Ikeda also founded Soka Gakkai International (SGI), which disseminated the society's values around the world. Soka Gakkai publishes numerous books and periodicals, as well as a daily newspaper in Japan. During this period, Soka Gakkai also became involved in Japanese domestic politics, establishing its own political party, the Komeito (Clean Government Party) in 1964, which became completely separate and independent from the Soka Gakkai in 1970. The society also supported Taisekiji with massive donations, including raising the funds for a new main shrine hall for the monastery. Soka Gakkai, like other groups in the Nichiren lineage, focuses on worship of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra") and its adherents are expected to chant daily the title (DAIMOKU) of the sutra, NAM MYoHoRENGEKYo, as well as recite the most important sections of the sutra and study Nichiren's writings. Soka Gakkai believes that all beings possess the capacity to attain buddhahood and emphasizes the ability of each person's buddha-nature to overcome obstacles and achieve happiness. Soka Gakkai followers can accomplish these goals through a "human revolution" (the title of one of Ikeda's books) that creates a sense of oneness between the individual and the environment, thus demonstrating how each individual can positively affect the surrounding world. As tensions grew between the Nichiren Shoshu and its increasingly powerful lay subsidiary, Nikken (b. 1922), the sixty-seventh chief priest of Nichiren Shoshu, tried to bring its membership directly under his control. His efforts were ultimately unsuccessful and he excommunicated the Soka Gakkai in 1991, forbidding Soka Gakkai followers from having access to the holiest shrines associated with Nichiren. Sokka Gakkai remains at the center of controversy because of its strong emphasis on recruitment and proselytization, its demonization of enemies, and a mentorship structure within the organization that some claim creates a cult of personality centered on Ikeda. Soka Gakkai remains among the largest Buddhist organizations in the Western world.

Spens, Will: An English educator (born 1882), who as Master of Corpus Christi College in Cambridge, has written widely on educational theory. In philosophy and theology, he has developed a theory of Christian doctrine as based on religious experience, which it generalizes and states in terms whose adequacy is determined by their capacity to nourish and develop that experience (Belief and Practice); he has also written on sacramental theology, including several essays (chiefly in the symposium Essays, Catholic and Critical) on the Eucharist; here his view is that by the "real presence" is meant the congeries of opportunities of experiencing through material means the spiritual reality of Christ. -- W.N.P.

split-brain studies: refers to studies derived from split?a target="_blank" href="https://www.itseducation.asia/psychology/b.htm

sponsor ::: n. --> One who binds himself to answer for another, and is responsible for his default; a surety.
One who at the baptism of an infant professore the christian faith in its name, and guarantees its religious education; a godfather or godmother.


Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory "body, education" (SAIL) /sayl/, not /S-A-I-L/ An important site in the early development of {LISP}; with the {MIT AI Lab}, {BBN}, {CMU}, {XEROX PARC}, and the {Unix} community, one of the major wellsprings of technical innovation and hacker-culture traditions (see the {WAITS} entry for details). The SAIL machines were shut down in late May 1990, scant weeks after the MIT AI Lab's ITS cluster was officially decommissioned. [{Jargon File}] (2001-06-22)

Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory ::: (body, education) (SAIL) /sayl/, not /S-A-I-L/ An important site in the early development of LISP; with the MIT AI Lab, BBN, CMU, XEROX PARC, and the were shut down in late May 1990, scant weeks after the MIT AI Lab's ITS cluster was officially decommissioned.[Jargon File](2001-06-22)

Stanford University "education" A University in the city of Palo Alto, California, noted for work in computing, especially {artificial intelligence}. See {SAIL}. (2003-02-28)

Stanford University ::: (education) A University in the city of Palo Alto, California, noted for work in computing, especially artificial intelligence. See SAIL.(2003-02-28)

subgraph: A graph which is a subset of another graph (in terms of https://www.itseducation.asia/mathematics/v.htm

Sumangala. (Venerable Hikkaduva Sri Sumangala Nayaka Mahāthera) (1827-1911). Sumangala, whose given name was Niclaus, was born in the town of Hikkaduwa in the Galle District of southern Sri Lanka. Sumangala received his early education at the local village temple and, at age thirteen, began his monastic education at Totagamuwa. He received full ordination from the Malwatte chapter in Kandy in 1848. Sumangala is considered to be one of the most influential Pāli scholars of his time. He took a significant role in the Sinhalese Buddhist revival, especially in Colombo. He helped GUnĀNANDA prepare for the famous Panadura debate. An accomplished scholar, Sumangala studied Buddhist history, arithmetic, and archeology; he also knew Sinhala, Pāli, Sanskrit, and English. In 1867 he received the title Sripada from the British government, making him the high priest of Adam's Peak (Mt. Sumanakuta). The principal and founder of Vidyodaya College, Sumangala worked with Colonel HENRY STEEL OLCOTT and together they established Ananda College and Mahinda College in Colombo and Dharmaraja College in Kandy during the early 1890s. These schools helped to revitalize Buddhist education, which had dwindled under British colonialism. In 1891, Sumangala became the president of the Bodh Gaya Maha Bodhi Society in Colombo. SUMAnGALA was an inspirational figure for ANAGĀRIKA DHARMAPĀLA and the next generation of Sinhalese Buddhist scholars.

SuperJanet An initiative started in 1989, under the Computer Board, with the aim of developing of a national {broadband} network to support UK higher education and research. The preparatory work culminated in 1992 with the award of a contract worth 18M pounds to British Telecom to provide networking services over a four year period that extends to March 1997. The BT contract will provide a national network with two components: a high speed, configurable bandwidth network serving up to 16 sites, initially using {PDH} to be replaced with {SDH}, and a high speed switched data service ({SMDS}) serving 50 or more sites. The primary role of the PDH/SDH component will be to support the development and deployment of an {ATM} network. These components will be complemented by several high performance {Metropolitan Area Networks} each serving several closely located sites. The aim is to provide, within the first year of the project, a pervasive network capable of supporting a large and diverse user community. The network has two parts, an {IP} data network and an ATM network, both operating at 34Mbit/s. Early in August 1993 the pilot IP network was transferred to full service and was configured to provide a trunk network for JIPS, the {JANET IP Service}. In November 1993 work was well advanced on the next phase which aims to extend SuperJANET to a large number of sites. The pilot four site ATM network will be extended to serve twelve sites and will expand the scope of the video network. The principal vehicle used for the expansion of the data network will be the {SMDS} service provided by {BT}. Most of the work associated with the development of this phase is expected to be completed by the end of March 1994. [Joint Network Team, Network News 40, ISSN 0954 - 0636]. {(ftp://osiris.jnt.ac.uk/pub/newsfiles/documents/netwnews/news40+/news40.para)}. [Current status?] (1994-12-15)

SuperJanet ::: An initiative started in 1989, under the Computer Board, with the aim of developing of a national broadband network to support UK higher education and worth 18M pounds to British Telecom to provide networking services over a four year period that extends to March 1997.The BT contract will provide a national network with two components: a high speed, configurable bandwidth network serving up to 16 sites, initially using year of the project, a pervasive network capable of supporting a large and diverse user community.The network has two parts, an IP data network and an ATM network, both operating at 34Mbit/s. Early in August 1993 the pilot IP network was transferred to full service and was configured to provide a trunk network for JIPS, the JANET IP Service.In November 1993 work was well advanced on the next phase which aims to extend SuperJANET to a large number of sites. The pilot four site ATM network will be SMDS service provided by BT. Most of the work associated with the development of this phase is expected to be completed by the end of March 1994.[Joint Network Team, Network News 40, ISSN 0954 - 0636]. .[Current status?] (1994-12-15)

Suzuki Shunryu. (鈴木俊隆) (1904-1971). Japanese ZEN priest influential in American Buddhism during the mid-twentieth century. Suzuki Shunryu was born in a village forty miles southwest of Tokyo, the son of a poor Zen priest. After elementary school, he went to live at a temple run by a disciple of his father. He was ordained as a novice monk in 1917. After completing his secondary school education, where he excelled at English, he attended Komazawa University in Tokyo, the university affiliated with the Soto sect of Zen, graduating in 1930. He then went on to train at EIHEJI, the head temple of the SoToSHu. In 1932, he took over as priest of his father's temple before moving on to serve as abbot at the larger temple of Rinsoin. He married in 1935. He spent the war years at Rinsoin and, unlike many Buddhist priests, did not actively support the war, although his temple was used to house soldiers, Korean laborers, and children displaced by the bombing of Tokyo. After the war, he engaged in a common occupation of Zen priests: performing services for the dead, while also opening a kindergarten. In 1959, he accepted a post offered by the headquarters of the Soto sect to serve as priest at a Japanese-American Zen temple in San Francisco, where he performed religious services for a community of some sixty families. He began to give lectures in English and to lead meditation retreats at the San Francisco temple. He continued to serve as priest to the Japanese community until 1969, when the tensions between his Japanese parishioners and his American disciples led him to resign from his original position. He then founded the San Francisco Zen Center, which eventually established both a residential center in the city, a mountain center in Tassajara, and a farm at Green Gulch. In 1970, an edited version of some of his lectures were published as Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, a work that became a bestseller and classic of American Zen. Suzuki died in San Francisco in 1971.

Taixu. (太) (1889-1947). In Chinese, "Grand Voidness"; a leading figure in the Chinese Buddhist revival during the first half of the twentieth century. Taixu was ordained at the age of fourteen, purportedly because he wanted to acquire the supernatural powers of the buddhas. He studied under the famous Chinese monk, "Eight Fingers" (Bazhi Toutou), so called because he had burned off one finger of each hand in reverence to the Buddha, and achieved an awakening when reading a PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ SuTRA. In 1908, he joined a group of radicals, including other Buddhist monks, intent on revolution. In 1911, he organized the first of many groups (many of them short-lived) to revitalize Buddhism during this time of national crisis following the fall of the Qing dynasty. In 1912, he was involved in a failed attempt to turn the famous monastery of Chinshansi into a modern school for monks. After this disgrace, beginning in 1914, he went into retreat for three years, during which time he studied Buddhist scriptures and formulated plans to revitalize Buddhism, outlined in such works as his 1915 Zhengli sengqie zhidu lun ("The Reorganization of the SAMGHA System"). He drafted a number of such plans over the remainder of his career, although none was ever implemented. In general, these plans called for improved and modernized education for monks and their participation in community and governmental affairs. He believed that Buddhism had become ossified in China and needed to be reformed into a force that would both inspire and improve society. In his view, for an effective reform of the monastic system to take place, Chinese Buddhists had to be educated according to the same standards as those in other Buddhist countries, beginning with Japan. For Taixu, the revival of Chinese Buddhism entailed starting a dialogue with the Buddhist traditions of other Asian countries; hence, a modern Buddhism had to reach out to these traditions and incorporate their intuitions and original insights. It was from these initial ideas that, during the 1920s, Taixu developed a strong interest in Japanese MIKKYo and Tibetan VAJRAYĀNA, as well as in the THERAVĀDA tradition of Sri Lanka. Taixu's participation in the "Revival of Tantra" (mijiao chongxing) debates with Wang Hongyuan (1876-1937), a Chinese convert to Japanese SHINGON, demonstrated his eclectic ideas about the reformation of Chinese Buddhism. The first of Taixu's activities after his return to public life was the founding of the Bodhi Society (Jueshe) in Shanghai in 1918. He was involved in the publication of a wide variety of Buddhist periodicals, such as "Masses Enlightenment Weekly," "Sound of Enlightenment," "Buddhist Critic," "New Buddhist Youth," "Modern SaMgha," "Mind's Light," and the most enduring, "Sound of the Tides" (Haichaoyin). In 1922, he founded the Wuchang Buddhist Institute, where he hoped to produce a new generation of Buddhist leaders in China. In 1923, he founded the first of several "world Buddhist organizations," as a result of which he began to travel and lecture widely, becoming well known in Europe and America. He encouraged several of his students to learn the languages and traditions of Buddhist Asia. Among his students who went abroad in Tibet and Sri Lanka, FAZUN was the most accomplished in making several commentaries of late Indian Buddhism available to the Chinese public, thus fostering a comparison between the historical and doctrinal developments of Buddhism in China and in Tibet. In 1928 in Paris, Taixu donated funds for the establishment of the World Buddhist Institute, devoted to the unification of Buddhism and science; it would eventually be renamed Les Amis du Bouddhisme. He lectured in Sri Lanka and arranged an exchange program under which Chinese monks would study there. In 1929, he organized the Chinese Buddhist Society, which would eventually attract millions of members. During the Japanese occupation of China in the 1930s and 1940s, Taixu followed the Nationalist government into retreat in Sichuan. In this period, as a result of his efforts to internationalize Chinese Buddhism, Taixu founded two branches of the Wuchang Institute of Buddhist Studies specializing in Pāli and Tibetan Buddhism: the Pāli Language Institute in Xi'an, and the Sino-Tibetan Institute in Chongqing. In 1937, at the Sino-Tibetan Institute, in his famous essay "Wo de fojiao geming shibai shi" ("History of My Failed Buddhist Revolutions"), Taixu began an earnest self-reflection on his lifelong efforts to reform Chinese Buddhism, deeming them a failure in three domains: conceiving a Buddhist revolution, globalizing Buddhist education, and reorganizing the Chinese Buddhist Association. When the first global Buddhist organization, the WORLD FELLOWSHIP OF BUDDHISTS, was founded in 1950, Taixu, who had died three years earlier, was credited as its inspiration. His insights would eventually be developed and implemented by later generations of Buddhists in China and Taiwan. His collected works were published in sixty-four volumes. Several of the leading figures of modern and contemporary Chinese and Taiwanese Buddhism were close disciples of Taixu, including Fazun (1902-1980), Yinshun (1905-2005), Shengyan (1930-2009), and Xingyun (1927-).

Takakusu Junjiro. (高楠順次郎) (1866-1945). One of the leading Japanese scholars of Indian Buddhism of the early twentieth century, who played a leading role in establishing Japan as a major center of scholarship in Buddhist Studies. He was born, surnamed Sawai, in today's Hiroshima prefecture. He was raised in a JoDO SHINSHu family belonging to the NISHI HONGANJIHA, and he remained a devout layman throughout his life. After primary school, he studied at the leading Jodo Shinshu educational institution, today's Ryukoku University, from 1885 to 1889, during which time, through Jodo Shinshu connections, he was adopted into the Takakusu merchant house of Kobe. With the support of his adoptive father, he spent the period from 1890 to 1897 in Europe. Through the introduction of the Jodo Shinshu cleric NANJo BUN'Yu, Takakusu was able to study Indology under FRIEDRICH MAX MÜLLER at Oxford University, receiving a B.A. in 1894 and an M.A. in 1896. While at Oxford, he assisted Müller with the Sacred Books of the East project. The final volume of the series, entitled Buddhist Mahāyāna Texts (1894), included the VAJRACCHEDIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀSuTRA, the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀHṚDAYA, and the three PURE LAND sutras, all Indian works (or at least so regarded at the time) but selected because of their importance for Japanese Buddhism. Müller's choice of these texts was influenced by Takakusu and Nanjo Bun'yu. The works in Buddhist Mahāyāna Texts were translated by Müller, with the exception of the GUAN WULIANGSHOU JING, which was translated by Takakusu. Takakusu also studied in Paris with SYLVAIN LÉVI, with whom he would later collaborate on the Hobogirin Buddhist encyclopedia project. He returned to Japan in 1897 to lecture in Indian philosophy at Tokyo Imperial University, where he served as professor from 1899 to 1927, being appointed to the chair of Sanskrit studies in 1901. He was a devoted supporter of Esperanto and in 1906 was a founding member of the Japanese Esperantists Association. He supervised and contributed substantially to three monumental publishing projects: (1) the Upanishaddo zensho, a Japanese translation of the Upanisads (1922-1924); (2) the TAISHo SHINSHu DAIZoKYo, a modern typeset edition of the East Asian Buddhist canon (see DAZANGJING) (1922-1934); and (3) the Kokuyaku nanden daizokyo, a Japanese translation of the Pāli canon of what he called "Southern Buddhism" (1936-1941). For his work on editing the Taisho canon, he was awarded the Prix Stanislas Julien in Sinology from the Institut de France in 1929. Among his English-language publications, he is known especially for A Record of the Buddhist Religion as Practised in India and the Malay Archipelago (1896), which is his translation of YIJING's pilgrimage record (NANHAI JIGUI NEIFA ZHUAN), and Essentials of Buddhist Philosophy (1947). He died in Shizuoka Prefecture, outside Tokyo.

The first Dalai Lama, DGE 'DUN GRUB, was known as a great scholar and religious practitioner. A direct disciple of TSONG KHA PA, he is remembered for founding BKRA SHIS LHUN PO monastery near the central Tibetan town of Shigatse. The second Dalai Lama, Dge 'dun rgya mtsho, was born the son of a RNYING MA YOGIN and became a renowned tantric master in his own right. ¶ It is with the third Dalai Lama, BSOD NAMS RGYA MTSHO, that the Dalai Lama lineage actually begins. Recognized at a young age as the reincarnation of Dge 'dun rgya mtsho, he was appointed abbot of 'BRAS SPUNGS monastery near LHA SA and soon rose to fame throughout central Asia as a Buddhist teacher. He served as a religious master for the Mongol ruler Altan Khan, who bestowed the title "Dalai Lama," and is credited with converting the Tümed Mongols to Buddhism. Later in life, he traveled extensively across eastern Tibet and western China, teaching and carrying out monastic construction projects. ¶ The fourth Dalai Lama, Yon tan rgya mtsho, was recognized in the person of the grandson of Altan Khan's successor, solidifying Mongol-Tibetan ties. ¶ While the first four Dalai Lamas served primarily as religious scholars and teachers, the fifth Dalai Lama, NGAG DBANG BLO BZANG RGYA MTSHO, combined religious and secular activities to become one of Tibet's preeminent statesmen. He was a dynamic political leader who, with the support of Gushi Khan, defeated his opponents and in 1642 was invested with temporal powers over the Tibetan state, in addition to his religious role, a position that succeeding Dalai Lamas held until 1959. A learned and prolific author, he and his regent, SDE SRID SANGS RGYAS RGYA MTSHO, were largely responsible for the identification of the Dalai Lamas with the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara. The construction of the PO TA LA palace began during his reign (and was completed after this death). He is popularly known as the "Great Fifth." ¶ The sixth Dalai Lama, TSHANGS DBYANGS RGYA MTSHO, was a controversial figure who chose to abandon the strict monasticism of his predecessors in favor of a life of society and culture, refusing to take the vows of a fully ordained monk (BHIKsU). He is said to have frequented the drinking halls below the Po ta la palace. He constructed pleasure gardens and the temple of the NAGAs, called the KLU KHANG, on the palace grounds. He is remembered especially for his poetry, which addresses themes such as love and the difficulty of spiritual practice. Tibetans generally interpret his behavior as exhibiting an underlying tantric wisdom, a skillful means for teaching the dharma. His death is shrouded in mystery. Official accounts state that he died while under arrest by Mongol troops. According to a prominent secret biography (GSANG BA'I RNAM THAR), however, he lived many more years, traveling across Tibet in disguise. ¶ The seventh Dalai Lama, SKAL BZANG RGYA MTSHO, was officially recognized only at the age of twelve, and due to political complications, did not participate actively in affairs of state. He was renowned for his writings on tantra and his poetry. ¶ The eighth Dalai Lama, 'Jam dpal rgya mtsho (Jampal Gyatso, 1758-1804), built the famous NOR BU GLING KHA summer palace. ¶ The ninth through twelfth Dalai Lamas each lived relatively short lives, due, according to some accounts, to political intrigue and the machinations of power-hungry regents. According to tradition, from the death of one Dalai Lama to the investiture of the next Dalai Lama as head of state (generally a period of some twenty years), the nation was ruled by a regent, who was responsible for discovering the new Dalai Lama and overseeing his education. If the Dalai Lama died before reaching his majority, the reign of the regent was extended. ¶ The thirteenth Dalai Lama, THUB BSTAN RGYA MTSHO, was an astute and forward-looking political leader who guided Tibet through a period of relative independence during a time of foreign entanglements with Britain, China, and Russia. In his last testament, he is said to have predicted Tibet's fall to Communist China. ¶ The fourteenth and present Dalai Lama, Bstan 'dzin rgya mtsho, assumed his position several years prior to reaching the age of majority as his country faced the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1950. In 1959, he escaped into exile, establishing a government-in-exile in the Himalayan town of Dharamsala (DHARMAsALA) in northwestern India. Since then, he has traveled and taught widely around the world, while also advocating a nonviolent solution to Tibet's occupation. He was born in the A mdo region of what is now Qinghai province in China to a farming family, although his older brother had already been recognized as an incarnation at a nearby important Dge lugs monastery (SKU 'BUM). On his becoming formally accepted as Dalai Lama, his family became aristocrats and moved to Lha sa. He was educated traditionally by private tutors (yongs 'dzin), under the direction first of the regent Stag brag rin po che (in office 1941-1950), and later Gling rin po che Thub bstan lung rtogs rnam rgyal (1903-1983) and Khri byang rin po che Blo bzang ye shes (1901-1981). His modern education was informal, gained from conversations with travelers, such as the Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer. When the Chinese army entered the Khams region of eastern Tibet in 1951, he formally took over from the regent and was enthroned as the head of the DGA' LDAN PHO BRANG government. In the face of Tibetan unrest as the Chinese government brought Tibet firmly under central control, the Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959; the Indian government accorded the Dalai Lama respect as a religious figure but did not accept his claim to be the head of a separate state. In 1989, the Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, an event that increased his prominence around the world. He is the author of many books in English, most of them the written record of lectures and traditional teachings translated from Tibetan.

The first incarnation, 'Jigs med phrin las 'od zer (Jikme Tinle Öser), was born in the Rdo valley of Mgo log, in eastern Tibet, and for this reason was later known as Rdo grub chen, the "great adept (grub chen) of Rdo." Despite the fact that he was not recognized as an incarnate lama (SPRUL SKU) at a young age, his youth is described as having been filled with visionary experiences of his past lives. He spent his early life studying under numerous masters throughout eastern, central, and southern Tibet, although it was only at the age of forty-one that he met his principal GURU, 'Jigs med gling pa, from whom he received the entire RNYING MA transmissions of BKA' MA and GTER MA and by whom he was certified as the principal lineage holder of the klong chen snying thig tradition. His fame as a spiritual luminary spread and traveled widely among the great monastic communities of eastern Tibet, teaching many of the great Rnying ma masters of his day and establishing the monastic center of Yar klungs Padma bkod in eastern Tibet. The second incarnation, 'Jigs med phun tshogs 'byung gnas (Jikme Puntsok Jungne), was known for his ability to perform miraculous feats, and he continued many of the traditions of his predecessor. He also laid the foundations for what would later become the famed Rdo grub chen monastery. The third incarnation, 'Jigs med bstan pa'i nyi ma (Jikme Tenpe Nyima), was born into a prominent family in the Mgo log region of eastern Tibet: his father was Bdud 'joms gling pa (1835-1903), a famed treasure revealer (GTER STON), and his seven younger brothers were all recognized as incarnate lamas. He studied under many great Rnying ma masters, including DPAL SPRUL RIN PO CHE and 'JAM DBYANGS MKHYEN BRTSE DBANG PO. Two individuals were recognized as the fourth incarnation and were enthroned simultaneously at Rdo grub chen monastery in about 1930. They continued their education together until the age of twenty. The first, Rig 'dzin bstan pa'i rgyal mtshan, was imprisoned during the Chinese invasion of Tibet and died in a prison labor camp. In 1957, the second incarnation, Thub bstan phrin las dpal bzang, escaped into exile in Sikkim where he established a permanent residence. He later became a representative at the Sikkim Research Institute of Tibetology in Gangtok and traveled widely throughout Europe and the United States.

The Method of Statistics. The basic principle of statistical method is that of simplification, which makes possible a concise and comprehensive knowledge of a mass of isolated facts by correlating them along definite lines. The various stages of this method are:   precise definition of the problem or field of inquiry;   collection of material required by the problem;   tabulation and measurement of material in a manner satisfying the purpose of the problem;   clear presentation of the significant features of tabulated material (by means of charts, diagrams, symbols, graphs, equations and the like),   selection of mathematical methods for application to the material obtained;   necessary conclusion from the facts and figures obtained;   general interpretation within the limits of the problem and the procedure used. The special methods of treating statistical data are: collecting, sampling, selecting, tabulating, classifying, totaling or aggregating, measuring, averaging, relating and correlating, presenting symbolically. Each one of these methods uses specialized experimental or mathematical means in its actual application. The special methods of interpreting statistical data already treated are: analyzing, estimiting, describing, comparing, explaining, applying and predicting. In order to be conclusive, the various stages and types of the statistical method must avoid   loose definitions,   cross divisions resulting ftom conflicting interpretations of the problem,   data which are not simultaneous or subject to similar conditions,   conclusions from poor oi incomplete data,   prejudices in judging, even when there is no conuption of evidence. The philosophy of statistics is concerned in general with the discussion and evaluation of the mathematical principles, methods and results of this science; and in particular with a critical analysis of the fitness of biological, psychological, educational, economic and sociological materials, for various types of statistical treatment. The purpose of such an inquiry is to integrate its results into the general problems and schemes of philosophy proper. Cf.. Richard von Mises, Statistics, Probability, and Truth.

The Mother: "Consciousness is indeed the creatrix of the universe, but love is its saviour. . . .” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

The Mother: “Consciousness is indeed the creatrix of the universe, but love is its saviour….” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

The Mother: "For me poetry is beyond all philosophy and beyond all explanation.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

The Mother: “For me poetry is beyond all philosophy and beyond all explanation.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

   The Mother: "In the physical world, of all things it is beauty that expresses best the Divine. the physical world is the world of form and the perfection of form is beauty. Beauty interprets, expresses, manifests the Eternal. Its role is to put all manifested nature in contact with the Eternal through the perfection of form, through harmony and a sense of the ideal which uplifts and leads towards something higher. On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

The Mother: “In the physical world, of all things it is beauty that expresses best the Divine. the physical world is the world of form and the perfection of form is beauty. Beauty interprets, expresses, manifests the Eternal. Its role is to put all manifested nature in contact with the Eternal through the perfection of form, through harmony and a sense of the ideal which uplifts and leads towards something higher. On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

::: The Mother: "True art means the expression of beauty in the material world. In a world wholly converted, that is to say, expressing integrally the divine reality, art must serve as the revealer and teacher of this divine beauty in life.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

The Mother: “True art means the expression of beauty in the material world. In a world wholly converted, that is to say, expressing integrally the divine reality, art must serve as the revealer and teacher of this divine beauty in life.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.**

The Platonic theory of education is based on a drawing out (educatio) of what is already dimly known to the learner. (Meno, Repub. II-VII, Theaetetus, Laws.) The training of the philosopher-ruler, outlined in the Republic, requires the selection of the most promising children in their infancy and a rigorous disciplining of them in gymnastic, music (in the Greek sense of literary studies), mathematics and dialectic (the study of the Ideas). This training was to continue until the students were about thirty-five years of age; then fifteen years of practical apprenticeship in the subordinate offices of the state were required; finally, at the age of fifty, the rulers were advised to return to the study of philosophy. It should be noted that this program is intended only for an intellectual elite; the military class was to undergo a shorter period of training suited to its functions, and the masses of people, engaged in production, trading, and like pursuits, were not offered any special educational schedule.

Three senses of "Ockhamism" may be distinguished: Logical, indicating usage of the terminology and technique of logical analysis developed by Ockham in his Summa totius logicae; in particular, use of the concept of supposition (suppositio) in the significative analysis of terms. Epistemological, indicating the thesis that universality is attributable only to terms and propositions, and not to things as existing apart from discourse. Theological, indicating the thesis that no tneological doctrines, such as those of God's existence or of the immortality of the soul, are evident or demonstrable philosophically, so that religious doctrine rests solely on faith, without metaphysical or scientific support. It is in this sense that Luther is often called an Ockhamist.   Bibliography:   B. Geyer,   Ueberwegs Grundriss d. Gesch. d. Phil., Bd. II (11th ed., Berlin 1928), pp. 571-612 and 781-786; N. Abbagnano,   Guglielmo di Ockham (Lanciano, Italy, 1931); E. A. Moody,   The Logic of William of Ockham (N. Y. & London, 1935); F. Ehrle,   Peter von Candia (Muenster, 1925); G. Ritter,   Studien zur Spaetscholastik, I-II (Heidelberg, 1921-1922).     --E.A.M. Om, aum: (Skr.) Mystic, holy syllable as a symbol for the indefinable Absolute. See Aksara, Vac, Sabda. --K.F.L. Omniscience: In philosophy and theology it means the complete and perfect knowledge of God, of Himself and of all other beings, past, present, and future, or merely possible, as well as all their activities, real or possible, including the future free actions of human beings. --J.J.R. One: Philosophically, not a number but equivalent to unit, unity, individuality, in contradistinction from multiplicity and the mani-foldness of sensory experience. In metaphysics, the Supreme Idea (Plato), the absolute first principle (Neo-platonism), the universe (Parmenides), Being as such and divine in nature (Plotinus), God (Nicolaus Cusanus), the soul (Lotze). Religious philosophy and mysticism, beginning with Indian philosophy (s.v.), has favored the designation of the One for the metaphysical world-ground, the ultimate icility, the world-soul, the principle of the world conceived as reason, nous, or more personally. The One may be conceived as an independent whole or as a sum, as analytic or synthetic, as principle or ontologically. Except by mysticism, it is rarely declared a fact of sensory experience, while its transcendent or transcendental, abstract nature is stressed, e.g., in epistemology where the "I" or self is considered the unitary background of personal experience, the identity of self-consciousness, or the unity of consciousness in the synthesis of the manifoldness of ideas (Kant). --K.F.L. One-one: A relation R is one-many if for every y in the converse domain there is a unique x such that xRy. A relation R is many-one if for every x in the domain there is a unique y such that xRy. (See the article relation.) A relation is one-one, or one-to-one, if it is at the same time one-many and many-one. A one-one relation is said to be, or to determine, a one-to-one correspondence between its domain and its converse domain. --A.C. On-handedness: (Ger. Vorhandenheit) Things exist in the mode of thereness, lying- passively in a neutral space. A "deficient" form of a more basic relationship, termed at-handedness (Zuhandenheit). (Heidegger.) --H.H. Ontological argument: Name by which later authors, especially Kant, designate the alleged proof for God's existence devised by Anselm of Canterbury. Under the name of God, so the argument runs, everyone understands that greater than which nothing can be thought. Since anything being the greatest and lacking existence is less then the greatest having also existence, the former is not really the greater. The greatest, therefore, has to exist. Anselm has been reproached, already by his contemporary Gaunilo, for unduly passing from the field of logical to the field of ontological or existential reasoning. This criticism has been repeated by many authors, among them Aquinas. The argument has, however, been used, if in a somewhat modified form, by Duns Scotus, Descartes, and Leibniz. --R.A. Ontological Object: (Gr. onta, existing things + logos, science) The real or existing object of an act of knowledge as distinguished from the epistemological object. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ontologism: (Gr. on, being) In contrast to psychologism, is called any speculative system which starts philosophizing by positing absolute being, or deriving the existence of entities independently of experience merely on the basis of their being thought, or assuming that we have immediate and certain knowledge of the ground of being or God. Generally speaking any rationalistic, a priori metaphysical doctrine, specifically the philosophies of Rosmini-Serbati and Vincenzo Gioberti. As a philosophic method censored by skeptics and criticists alike, as a scholastic doctrine formerly strongly supported, revived in Italy and Belgium in the 19th century, but no longer countenanced. --K.F.L. Ontology: (Gr. on, being + logos, logic) The theory of being qua being. For Aristotle, the First Philosophy, the science of the essence of things. Introduced as a term into philosophy by Wolff. The science of fundamental principles, the doctrine of the categories. Ultimate philosophy; rational cosmology. Syn. with metaphysics. See Cosmology, First Principles, Metaphysics, Theology. --J.K.F. Operation: "(Lit. operari, to work) Any act, mental or physical, constituting a phase of the reflective process, and performed with a view to acquiring1 knowledge or information about a certain subject-nntter. --A.C.B.   In logic, see Operationism.   In philosophy of science, see Pragmatism, Scientific Empiricism. Operationism: The doctrine that the meaning of a concept is given by a set of operations.   1. The operational meaning of a term (word or symbol) is given by a semantical rule relating the term to some concrete process, object or event, or to a class of such processes, objectj or events.   2. Sentences formed by combining operationally defined terms into propositions are operationally meaningful when the assertions are testable by means of performable operations. Thus, under operational rules, terms have semantical significance, propositions have empirical significance.   Operationism makes explicit the distinction between formal (q.v.) and empirical sentences. Formal propositions are signs arranged according to syntactical rules but lacking operational reference. Such propositions, common in mathematics, logic and syntax, derive their sanction from convention, whereas an empirical proposition is acceptable (1) when its structure obeys syntactical rules and (2) when there exists a concrete procedure (a set of operations) for determining its truth or falsity (cf. Verification). Propositions purporting to be empirical are sometimes amenable to no operational test because they contain terms obeying no definite semantical rules. These sentences are sometimes called pseudo-propositions and are said to be operationally meaningless. They may, however, be 'meaningful" in other ways, e.g. emotionally or aesthetically (cf. Meaning).   Unlike a formal statement, the "truth" of an empirical sentence is never absolute and its operational confirmation serves only to increase the degree of its validity. Similarly, the semantical rule comprising the operational definition of a term has never absolute precision. Ordinarily a term denotes a class of operations and the precision of its definition depends upon how definite are the rules governing inclusion in the class.   The difference between Operationism and Logical Positivism (q.v.) is one of emphasis. Operationism's stress of empirical matters derives from the fact that it was first employed to purge physics of such concepts as absolute space and absolute time, when the theory of relativity had forced upon physicists the view that space and time are most profitably defined in terms of the operations by which they are measured. Although different methods of measuring length at first give rise to different concepts of length, wherever the equivalence of certain of these measures can be established by other operations, the concepts may legitimately be combined.   In psychology the operational criterion of meaningfulness is commonly associated with a behavioristic point of view. See Behaviorism. Since only those propositions which are testable by public and repeatable operations are admissible in science, the definition of such concepti as mind and sensation must rest upon observable aspects of the organism or its behavior. Operational psychology deals with experience only as it is indicated by the operation of differential behavior, including verbal report. Discriminations, or the concrete differential reactions of organisms to internal or external environmental states, are by some authors regarded as the most basic of all operations.   For a discussion of the role of operational definition in phvsics. see P. W. Bridgman, The Logic of Modern Physics, (New York, 1928) and The Nature of Physical Theory (Princeton, 1936). "The extension of operationism to psychology is discussed by C. C. Pratt in The Logic of Modem Psychology (New York. 1939.)   For a discussion and annotated bibliography relating to Operationism and Logical Positivism, see S. S. Stevens, Psychology and the Science of Science, Psychol. Bull., 36, 1939, 221-263. --S.S.S. Ophelimity: Noun derived from the Greek, ophelimos useful, employed by Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) in economics as the equivalent of utility, or the capacity to provide satisfaction. --J.J.R. Opinion: (Lat. opinio, from opinor, to think) An hypothesis or proposition entertained on rational grounds but concerning which doubt can reasonably exist. A belief. See Hypothesis, Certainty, Knowledge. --J.K.F- Opposition: (Lat. oppositus, pp. of oppono, to oppose) Positive actual contradiction. One of Aristotle's Post-predicaments. In logic any contrariety or contradiction, illustrated by the "Square of Opposition". Syn. with: conflict. See Logic, formal, § 4. --J.K.F. Optimism: (Lat. optimus, the best) The view inspired by wishful thinking, success, faith, or philosophic reflection, that the world as it exists is not so bad or even the best possible, life is good, and man's destiny is bright. Philosophically most persuasively propounded by Leibniz in his Theodicee, according to which God in his wisdom would have created a better world had he known or willed such a one to exist. Not even he could remove moral wrong and evil unless he destroyed the power of self-determination and hence the basis of morality. All systems of ethics that recognize a supreme good (Plato and many idealists), subscribe to the doctrines of progressivism (Turgot, Herder, Comte, and others), regard evil as a fragmentary view (Josiah Royce et al.) or illusory, or believe in indemnification (Henry David Thoreau) or melioration (Emerson), are inclined optimistically. Practically all theologies advocating a plan of creation and salvation, are optimistic though they make the good or the better dependent on moral effort, right thinking, or belief, promising it in a future existence. Metaphysical speculation is optimistic if it provides for perfection, evolution to something higher, more valuable, or makes room for harmonies or a teleology. See Pessimism. --K.F.L. Order: A class is said to be partially ordered by a dyadic relation R if it coincides with the field of R, and R is transitive and reflexive, and xRy and yRx never both hold when x and y are different. If in addition R is connected, the class is said to be ordered (or simply ordered) by R, and R is called an ordering relation.   Whitehcid and Russell apply the term serial relation to relations which are transitive, irreflexive, and connected (and, in consequence, also asymmetric). However, the use of serial relations in this sense, instead ordering relations as just defined, is awkward in connection with the notion of order for unit classes.   Examples: The relation not greater than among leal numbers is an ordering relation. The relation less than among real numbers is a serial relation. The real numbers are simply ordered by the former relation. In the algebra of classes (logic formal, § 7), the classes are partially ordered by the relation of class inclusion.   For explanation of the terminology used in making the above definitions, see the articles connexity, reflexivity, relation, symmetry, transitivity. --A.C. Order type: See relation-number. Ordinal number: A class b is well-ordered by a dyadic relation R if it is ordered by R (see order) and, for every class a such that a ⊂ b, there is a member x of a, such that xRy holds for every member y of a; and R is then called a well-ordering relation. The ordinal number of a class b well-ordered by a relation R, or of a well-ordering relation R, is defined to be the relation-number (q. v.) of R.   The ordinal numbers of finite classes (well-ordered by appropriate relations) are called finite ordinal numbers. These are 0, 1, 2, ... (to be distinguished, of course, from the finite cardinal numbers 0, 1, 2, . . .).   The first non-finite (transfinite or infinite) ordinal number is the ordinal number of the class of finite ordinal numbers, well-ordered in their natural order, 0, 1, 2, . . .; it is usually denoted by the small Greek letter omega. --A.C.   G. Cantor, Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers, translated and with an introduction by P. E. B. Jourdain, Chicago and London, 1915. (new ed. 1941); Whitehead and Russell, Princtpia Mathematica. vol. 3. Orexis: (Gr. orexis) Striving; desire; the conative aspect of mind, as distinguished from the cognitive and emotional (Aristotle). --G.R.M.. Organicism: A theory of biology that life consists in the organization or dynamic system of the organism. Opposed to mechanism and vitalism. --J.K.F. Organism: An individual animal or plant, biologically interpreted. A. N. Whitehead uses the term to include also physical bodies and to signify anything material spreading through space and enduring in time. --R.B.W. Organismic Psychology: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, an instrument) A system of theoretical psychology which construes the structure of the mind in organic rather than atomistic terms. See Gestalt Psychology; Psychological Atomism. --L.W. Organization: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, work) A structured whole. The systematic unity of parts in a purposive whole. A dynamic system. Order in something actual. --J.K.F. Organon: (Gr. organon) The title traditionally given to the body of Aristotle's logical treatises. The designation appears to have originated among the Peripatetics after Aristotle's time, and expresses their view that logic is not a part of philosophy (as the Stoics maintained) but rather the instrument (organon) of philosophical inquiry. See Aristotelianism. --G.R.M.   In Kant. A system of principles by which pure knowledge may be acquired and established.   Cf. Fr. Bacon's Novum Organum. --O.F.K. Oriental Philosophy: A general designation used loosely to cover philosophic tradition exclusive of that grown on Greek soil and including the beginnings of philosophical speculation in Egypt, Arabia, Iran, India, and China, the elaborate systems of India, Greater India, China, and Japan, and sometimes also the religion-bound thought of all these countries with that of the complex cultures of Asia Minor, extending far into antiquity. Oriental philosophy, though by no means presenting a homogeneous picture, nevertheless shares one characteristic, i.e., the practical outlook on life (ethics linked with metaphysics) and the absence of clear-cut distinctions between pure speculation and religious motivation, and on lower levels between folklore, folk-etymology, practical wisdom, pre-scientiiic speculation, even magic, and flashes of philosophic insight. Bonds with Western, particularly Greek philosophy have no doubt existed even in ancient times. Mutual influences have often been conjectured on the basis of striking similarities, but their scientific establishment is often difficult or even impossible. Comparative philosophy (see especially the work of Masson-Oursel) provides a useful method. Yet a thorough treatment of Oriental Philosophy is possible only when the many languages in which it is deposited have been more thoroughly studied, the psychological and historical elements involved in the various cultures better investigated, and translations of the relevant documents prepared not merely from a philological point of view or out of missionary zeal, but by competent philosophers who also have some linguistic training. Much has been accomplished in this direction in Indian and Chinese Philosophy (q.v.). A great deal remains to be done however before a definitive history of Oriental Philosophy may be written. See also Arabian, and Persian Philosophy. --K.F.L. Origen: (185-254) The principal founder of Christian theology who tried to enrich the ecclesiastic thought of his day by reconciling it with the treasures of Greek philosophy. Cf. Migne PL. --R.B.W. Ormazd: (New Persian) Same as Ahura Mazdah (q.v.), the good principle in Zoroastrianism, and opposed to Ahriman (q.v.). --K.F.L. Orphic Literature: The mystic writings, extant only in fragments, of a Greek religious-philosophical movement of the 6th century B.C., allegedly started by the mythical Orpheus. In their mysteries, in which mythology and rational thinking mingled, the Orphics concerned themselves with cosmogony, theogony, man's original creation and his destiny after death which they sought to influence to the better by pure living and austerity. They taught a symbolism in which, e.g., the relationship of the One to the many was clearly enunciated, and believed in the soul as involved in reincarnation. Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Plato were influenced by them. --K.F.L. Ortega y Gasset, Jose: Born in Madrid, May 9, 1883. At present in Buenos Aires, Argentine. Son of Ortega y Munillo, the famous Spanish journalist. Studied at the College of Jesuits in Miraflores and at the Central University of Madrid. In the latter he presented his Doctor's dissertation, El Milenario, in 1904, thereby obtaining his Ph.D. degree. After studies in Leipzig, Berlin, Marburg, under the special influence of Hermann Cohen, the great exponent of Kant, who taught him the love for the scientific method and awoke in him the interest in educational philosophy, Ortega came to Spain where, after the death of Nicolas Salmeron, he occupied the professorship of metaphysics at the Central University of Madrid. The following may be considered the most important works of Ortega y Gasset:     Meditaciones del Quijote, 1914;   El Espectador, I-VIII, 1916-1935;   El Tema de Nuestro Tiempo, 1921;   España Invertebrada, 1922;   Kant, 1924;   La Deshumanizacion del Arte, 1925;   Espiritu de la Letra, 1927;   La Rebelion de las Masas, 1929;   Goethe desde Adentio, 1934;   Estudios sobre el Amor, 1939;   Ensimismamiento y Alteracion, 1939;   El Libro de las Misiones, 1940;   Ideas y Creencias, 1940;     and others.   Although brought up in the Marburg school of thought, Ortega is not exactly a neo-Kantian. At the basis of his Weltanschauung one finds a denial of the fundamental presuppositions which characterized European Rationalism. It is life and not thought which is primary. Things have a sense and a value which must be affirmed independently. Things, however, are to be conceived as the totality of situations which constitute the circumstances of a man's life. Hence, Ortega's first philosophical principle: "I am myself plus my circumstances". Life as a problem, however, is but one of the poles of his formula. Reason is the other. The two together function, not by dialectical opposition, but by necessary coexistence. Life, according to Ortega, does not consist in being, but rather, in coming to be, and as such it is of the nature of direction, program building, purpose to be achieved, value to be realized. In this sense the future as a time dimension acquires new dignity, and even the present and the past become articulate and meaning-full only in relation to the future. Even History demands a new point of departure and becomes militant with new visions. --J.A.F. Orthodoxy: Beliefs which are declared by a group to be true and normative. Heresy is a departure from and relative to a given orthodoxy. --V.S. Orthos Logos: See Right Reason. Ostensible Object: (Lat. ostendere, to show) The object envisaged by cognitive act irrespective of its actual existence. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ostensive: (Lat. ostendere, to show) Property of a concept or predicate by virtue of which it refers to and is clarified by reference to its instances. --A.C.B. Ostwald, Wilhelm: (1853-1932) German chemist. Winner of the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1909. In Die Uberwindung des wissenschaftlichen Materialistmus and in Naturphilosophie, his two best known works in the field of philosophy, he advocates a dynamic theory in opposition to materialism and mechanism. All properties of matter, and the psychic as well, are special forms of energy. --L.E.D. Oupnekhat: Anquetil Duperron's Latin translation of the Persian translation of 50 Upanishads (q.v.), a work praised by Schopenhauer as giving him complete consolation. --K.F.L. Outness: A term employed by Berkeley to express the experience of externality, that is the ideas of space and things placed at a distance. Hume used it in the sense of distance Hamilton understood it as the state of being outside of consciousness in a really existing world of material things. --J.J.R. Overindividual: Term used by H. Münsterberg to translate the German überindividuell. The term is applied to any cognitive or value object which transcends the individual subject. --L.W. P

Tominaga Nakamoto. (富永仲基) (1715-1746). Important Japanese thinker during the Edo period. The third son of a soy sauce manufacturer in osaka, Tominaga was raised in the merchant community. Tominaga's social position and subsequent education resulted in an eclectic and fairly impartial understanding of the varying schools of Confucian thought, Buddhism, and Daoism. Tominaga received a classical Confucian education at Kaitokudo, a private academy funded by his father and a few other osaka manufacturers. He began his education at age nine, and eventually studied Buddhist scripture in great breadth and depth, even though he was never ordained. Tominaga was forced to leave Kaitokudo after writing a critical piece on competing Confucian schools of thought. The work, which is no longer extant, was called Setsuhei, or "A Critical Examination of [Confucian] Doctrine." Tominaga did the majority of his study of sutras and MAHĀYĀNA Buddhism between 1730 and 1738. He published two titles that are still extant, Shutsujo kogo ("Emerging from Meditation") (1745), and Okina no fumi ("Writings of an Old Man"), which was published six months after he died of lung disease in 1746. In these works, he took a historical approach that critiqued all claims to authenticity by the existing schools of Japanese religion, suggesting that the different sects of Buddhism evolved by reformations of preceding schools, reformations that were then justified by appeals to the authority of the Buddha himself. He even made the radical claim that the Buddha could not have taught the Mahāyāna sutras because their language and teachings differed so dramatically from other types of Buddhist sutras. Although he was vigorously criticized by the Buddhist ecclesia, his historical approach to Buddhism helped to establish the foundation for the Japanese scholarly study of Buddhism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

top-level domain ::: (networking) The last and most significant component of an Internet fully qualified domain name, the part after the last .. For example, host wombat.doc.ic.ac.uk is in top-level domain uk (for United Kingdom).Every other country has its own top-level domain, including .us for the U.S.A. Within the .us domain, there are subdomains for the fifty states, each generally and a .co.uk domain for commercial ones. Other top-level domains may be divided up in similar ways.In the US and some other countries, the following top-level domains are used much more widely than the country code: .com - commercial bodies.edu - educational institutions as to make it easy for customers to guess or remember the URL of the comany's home page.United Nations entities use the domain names of the countries where they are located. The UN headquarters facility in New York City, for example, is un.org.Several new top-level domains are about to be added (Oct 1997): .nom - individual people (1997-10-08)

top-level domain "networking" The last and most significant component of an {Internet} {fully qualified domain name}, the part after the last ".". For example, {host} wombat.doc.ic.ac.uk is in top-level domain "uk" (for United Kingdom). Every other country has its own top-level domain, including ".us" for the U.S.A. Within the .us domain, there are subdomains for the fifty states, each generally with a name identical to the state's postal abbreviation. These are rarely used however. Within the .uk domain, there is a .ac.uk subdomain for academic sites and a .co.uk domain for commercial ones. Other top-level domains may be divided up in similar ways. In the US and some other countries, the following top-level domains are used much more widely than the country code: .com - commercial bodies .edu - educational institutions .gov - U. S. government .mil - U. S. armed services .net - network operators .org - other organisations Since the rapid commercialisation of the Internet in the 1990s the ".com" domain has become particularly heavily populated with every company trying to register its company name as a subdomain of .com, e.g. "netscape.com" so as to make it easy for customers to guess or remember the {URL} of the comany's {home page}. United Nations entities use the domain names of the countries where they are located. The UN headquarters facility in New York City, for example, is un.org. Several new top-level domains are about to be added (Oct 1997): .nom - individual people .rec - recreational organisations .firm - businesses such as law, accounting, engineering .store - commercial retail companies .ent - entertainment facilities and organisations (1997-10-08)

training ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Train ::: n. --> The act of one who trains; the act or process of exercising, disciplining, etc.; education.

Trivium: (Lat. tres, and viae, three ways) The first three disciplines in the mediaeval, educational system of seven liberal arts. The trivium includes grammar, rhetoric and dialectic See Quadrivium. -- V.J.B.

true-bred ::: a. --> Of a genuine or right breed; as, a true-bred beast.
Being of real breeding or education; as, a true-bred gentleman.


Tsong kha pa Blo bzang grags pa. (Tsong kha pa Losang Drakpa) (1357-1419). A Tibetan scholar and teacher venerated as the founder of the DGE LUGS sect of Tibetan Buddhism; typically known simply as Tsong kha pa. Born in the Tsong kha region of A mdo in northeastern Tibet, he received his initial lay vows under the fourth KARMA PA and began his religious education in the BKA' GDAMS tradition. In 1372, he traveled to central Tibet for further study. He became a disciple of the SA SKYA scholar Red mda' ba Gzhon nu blo gros (Rendawa Shonu Lodro, 1349-1412) but went on to study under many of the leading scholars of the day, including masters of various schools and sectarian affiliations. Another influential teacher was the lama Dbu ma pa (Umapa), from whom he received instructions on the KĀLACAKRATANTRA. He distinguished himself as a brilliant scholar and exegete of both SuTRA and TANTRA. According to his traditional biographies, Tsong kha pa experienced visions of Indian masters such as NĀGĀRJUNA and BUDDHAPĀLITA, who helped to clarify difficult points of doctrine. He is also said to have maintained a special relationship with MANJUsRĪ, the bodhisattva of wisdom, who appeared in visions throughout Tsong kha pa's life offering instruction and advice; Tsong kha pa is sometimes called 'Jam mgon, or "protected by MaNjusrī." Tsong kha pa's biographies speak of four major deeds undertaken during his lifetime. The first, in 1399, was his restoration of an image of the future buddha, MAITREYA. The second was a council to reform the code of VINAYA, convened in 1403 and attended by monks representing all sects of Tibetan Buddhism. The third was the Great Prayer Festival (SMON LAM CHEN MO) inaugurated in 1409 at the JO KHANG in LHA SA, in which he offered the ornaments of a SAMBHOGAKĀYA to the famous statue of JO BO SHĀKYAMUNI, celebrating the Buddha's performance of the sRĀVASTĪ MIRACLES. The festival became an important annual event, drawing thousands of participants from all quarters of the Tibetan Buddhist world. The fourth was the founding in 1409 of DGA' LDAN monastery, which would become one of principal religious institutions in the Lha sa region and seat of the leader of the Dge lugs sect. Tsong kha pa was an original and penetrating philosopher, who saw reason and intellectual development as key aspects of the path to enlightenment. Born during a period when the Tibetan Buddhist canon had been newly formulated, he sought a comprehensive explanation of the Buddhist path, with the PRĀSAnGIKA-MADHYAMAKA of BUDDHAPĀLITA and CANDRAKĪRTI as the highest philosophical view. His works are marked with a concern with systematic consistency, whether it be between sutra and tantra or PRAMĀnA and MADHYAMAKA. A prolific author, Tsong kha pa's works fill eighteen volumes. Among his best known writings are the LAM RIM CHEN MO ("Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment"), composed in 1402 at RWA SGRENG monastery, the SNGAGS RIM CHEN MO ("Great Treatise on the Stages of Mantra"), and the Drang nges LEGS BSHAD SNYING PO ("Essence of Eloquence on the Definitive and Interpretable"). Tsong kha pa called his system of religious practice the Bka' gdams gsar ma, or "New Bka' gdams," after the sect founded by the Bengali master ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNĀNA. His followers were later known as Dga' ldan pa (Gandenpa), "those of Dga' ldan," after the monastic seat established by Tsong kha pa. This was sometimes abbreviated as Dga' lugs pa, "those of the system of Dga' ldan," eventually evolving into the current name Dge lugs pa, "those of the system of virtue." Tsong kha pa's fame was greatly elevated through the political power of the Dge lugs sect after the establishment of the institution of the DALAI LAMA. His tomb at Dga' ldan became an important site of pilgrimage prior to its destruction during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Tsong kha pa's fame in Tibet was sufficiently great that he is commonly known simply as Rje rin po che, the "precious leader."

Tufts, James Hayden: (1862-) Emeritus Professor of Philosophy of Chicago University. He has been strongly influenced by Kant. He collaborated with Dewey in the standard, "Ethics", and among his other writings are: "Ethics of Cooperation," "Education and Training for Social Work" and "America's Social Morality." -- L.E.D.

T'ung: Mere identity, or sameness, especially in social institutions and standards, which is inferior to harmony (ho) in which social distinctions and differences are in complete concord. (Confucianism). Agreement, as in "agreement with the superiors" (shang t'ung). The method of agreement, which includes identity, generic relationship, co-existence, and partial resemblance. "Identity means two substances having one name. Generic relationship means inclusion in the same whole. Both being in the same room is a case of co-existence. Partial resemblance means having some points of resemblance." See Mo chi. (Neo-Mohism). --W.T.C. T'ung i: The joint method of similarities and differences, by which what is present and what is absent can be distinguished. See Mo chi. --W.T.C. Tung Chung-shu: (177-104 B.C.) was the leading Confucian of his time, premier to two feudal princes, and consultant to the Han emperor in framing national policies. Firmly believing in retribution, he strongly advocated the "science of catastrophic and anomalies," and became the founder and leader of medieval Confucianism which was extensively confused with the Yin Yang philosophy. Extremely antagonistic towards rival schools, he established Confucianism as basis of state religion and education. His best known work, Ch-un-ch'iu Fan-lu, awaits English translation. --W.T.C. Turro y Darder, Ramon: Spanish Biologist and Philosopher. Born in Malgrat, Dec. 8 1854. Died in Barcelona, June 5, 1926. As a Biologist, his conclusions about the circulation of the blood, more than half a century ago, were accepted and verified by later researchers and theorists. Among other things, he showed the insufficiency and unsatisfactoriness of the mechanistic and neomechanistic explanations of the circulatory process. He was also the first to busy himself with endocrinology and bacteriological immunity. As a philosopher Turro combated the subjectivistic and metaphysical type of psychology, and circumscribed scientific investigation to the determination of the conditions that precede the occurrence of phenomena, considering useless all attempt to reach final essences. Turro does not admit, however, that the psychical series or conscious states may be causally linked to the organic series. His formula was: Physiology and Consciousness are phenomena that occur, not in connection, but in conjunction. His most important work is Filosofia Critica, in which he has put side by side two antagonistic conceptions of the universe, the objective and the subjectne conceptions. In it he holds that, at the present crisis of science and philosophy, the business of intelligence is to realize that science works on philosophical presuppositions, but that philosophy is no better off with its chaos of endless contradictions and countless systems of thought. The task to be realized is one of coming together, to undo what has been done and get as far as the original primordial concepts with which philosophical inquiry began. --J.A.F. Tychism: A term derived from the Greek, tyche, fortune, chance, and employed by Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) to express any theory which regards chance as an objective reality, operative in the cosmos. Also the hypothesis that evolution occurs owing to fortuitous variations. --J.J.R. Types, theory of: See Logic, formal, § 6; Paradoxes, logical; Ramified theory of types. Type-token ambiguity: The words token and type are used to distinguish between two senses of the word word.   Individual marks, more or less resembling each other (as "cat" resembles "cat" and "CAT") may (1) be said to be "the same word" or (2) so many "different words". The apparent contradiction therby involved is removed by speaking of the individual marks as tokens, in contrast with the one type of which they are instances. And word may then be said to be subject to type-token ambiguity. The terminology can easily be extended to apply to any kind of symbol, e.g. as in speaking of token- and type-sentences.   Reference: C. S. Peirce, Collected Papers, 4.517. --M.B. Tz'u: (a) Parental love, kindness, or affection, the ideal Confucian virtue of parents.   (b) Love, kindness in general. --W.T.C. Tzu hua: Self-transformation or spontaneous transformation without depending on any divine guidance or eternal agency, but following the thing's own principle of being, which is Tao. (Taoism). --W.T.C. Tzu jan: The natural, the natural state, the state of Tao, spontaneity as against artificiality. (Lao Tzu; Huai-nan Tzu, d. 122 B.C.). --W.T.C. U

twirling baton ::: (graphics) The overstrike sequence -/|\-/|\- which produces an animated twirling baton. If you output it with a single backspace between characters, the baton spins from left to right. If you output BS SP BS BS between characters, the batton spins from right to left.The twirling baton was a popular component of animated signature files on the pioneering PLATO educational time-sharing system. The archie Internet service is perhaps the best-known baton program today; it uses the twirling baton as an idler indicating that the program is working on a query.[Jargon File] (1995-02-23)

twirling baton "graphics" The overstrike sequence -/|\-/|\- which produces an animated twirling baton. If you output it with a single {backspace} between characters, the baton spins in place. If you output the sequence BS SP between characters, the baton spins from left to right. If you output BS SP BS BS between characters, the batton spins from right to left. The twirling baton was a popular component of animated signature files on the pioneering {PLATO} educational {time-sharing} system. The "{archie}" {Internet} service is perhaps the best-known baton program today; it uses the twirling baton as an idler indicating that the program is working on a query. [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-23)

UKERNA ::: United Kingdom Education and Research Networking Association

UKERNA {United Kingdom Education and Research Networking Association}

Unamuno y Jugo, Miguel de: Spanish Professor and writer. Born at Bilbao, Spain, September 29, 1864. Died 1936. First and secondary education in Bilbao. Philosophical studies and higher learning at the Central University of Madrid since 1880. Private instructor in Bilbao, 1884-1891. Professor of Greek language and literature at the University of Salamanca since 1891. President of the University of Salamanca and at the same time Professor of the History of the Spanish Language, in 1901. Madariaga considers him "The most important literary figure of Spain". If he does not embody, at least it may be asserted that Unamuno very well symbolizes the character of Spain. His conflict between faith and reason, life and thought, culture and civilization, depicts for us a clear picture of the Spanish cultural crisis.

United Kingdom Education and Research Networking Association "company" (UKERNA or JANET (UK)) The trading name for {JNT Association}. (2016-04-12)

university ::: n. --> The universe; the whole.
An association, society, guild, or corporation, esp. one capable of having and acquiring property.
An institution organized and incorporated for the purpose of imparting instruction, examining students, and otherwise promoting education in the higher branches of literature, science, art, etc., empowered to confer degrees in the several arts and faculties, as in theology, law, medicine, music, etc. A university may exist without


University of Arizona "body, education" The University was founded in 1885 as a Land Grant institution with a three-fold mission of teaching, research and public service. Today, the University is one of the top 20 research universities in the nation, with a student enrollment of more than 35,000, a faculty and staff of 12,500, and a 345-acre campus. {(http://arizona.edu/)}. Address: Tucson, Arizona, USA.

University of Arizona ::: (body, education) The University was founded in 1885 as a Land Grant institution with a three-fold mission of teaching, research and public service. with a student enrollment of more than 35,000, a faculty and staff of 12,500, and a 345-acre campus. .Address: Tucson, Arizona, USA.

University of California at Berkeley "body, education" (UCB) See also {Berzerkley}, {BSD}. {(http://berkeley.edu/)}. Note to British and Commonwealth readers: that's /berk'lee/, not /bark'lee/ as in British Received Pronunciation. (1994-11-29)

University of California at Berkeley ::: (body, education) (UCB)See also Berzerkley, BSD. .Note to British and Commonwealth readers: that's /berk'lee/, not /bark'lee/ as in British Received Pronunciation. (1994-11-29)

University of Durham ::: (body, education) A busy research and teaching community in the historic cathedral city of Durham, UK (population 61000). Its work covers key branches of a major employer, the University contributes in a wide social and economic sense to the community.Founded in 1832, the University developed in Durham and Newcastle until 1963 when the independent University of Newcastle upon Tyne came into being. Durham launched University College, Stockton-on-Tees, which has 190 students in the first year. . (1995-03-17)

University of Durham "body, education" A busy research and teaching community in the historic cathedral city of Durham, UK (population 61000). Its work covers key branches of science and technology and traditional areas of scholarship. Durham graduates are in great demand among employers and the University helps to attract investment into the region. It provides training, short courses, and expertise for industry. Through its cultural events, conferences, tourist business and as a major employer, the University contributes in a wide social and economic sense to the community. Founded in 1832, the University developed in Durham and Newcastle until 1963 when the independent University of Newcastle upon Tyne came into being. Durham is a collegiate body, with 14 Colleges or Societies which are a social and domestic focus for students. In 1992, the Universities of Durham and Teesside launched University College, Stockton-on-Tees, which has 190 students in the first year. {(http://dur.ac.uk/)}. (1995-03-17)

University of East London ::: (body, education) (UEL) A UK University with six academic Faculties: Design and The Built Environment, East London Business School, Institute Of Health and Rehabilitation, Faculty Of Science, Social Sciences and Technology. . (1994-11-29)

University of East London "body, education" (UEL) A UK University with six academic Faculties: Design and The Built Environment, East London Business School, Institute Of Health and Rehabilitation, Faculty Of Science, Social Sciences and Technology. {(http://uel.ac.uk/)}. (1994-11-29)

University of Edinburgh ::: (body, education) A university in the centre of Scotland's capital. The University of Edinburgh has been promoting and setting standards in education Council of Edinburgh, making it the first post-Reformation university in Scotland, and the first civic university to be established in the British Isles.Known in its early years as King James College, or the Tounis (Town's) College, the University soon established itself internationally, and by the 18th century perspective, has kept Edinburgh at the forefront of new research and teaching developments whilst enabling it to retain a uniquely Scottish character.Edinburgh's academics are at the forefront of developments in the study and application of languages, medicine, micro-electronics, biotechnology, University precincts of many independently-funded, but closely linked, national research institutes .Address: Old College, South Bridge, Edinburgh, Scotland EH8 9YL, UK.Telephone: +44 (131) 650 1000.See also ABSET, ABSYS, Alice, ASL+, Baroque, C++Linda, Cogent Prolog, COWSEL, Echidna, Edinburgh Prolog, Edinburgh SML, EdML, ELLIS, ELSIE, ESLPDPRO, Extended POPLER, Prolog, Prolog-2, Prolog-Linda, Scheme-Linda, Skel-ML, Standard ML, Sticks&Stones, supercombinators, SWI-Prolog, tail recursion modulo cons, WPOP. (1995-12-29)

University of Edinburgh "body, education" A university in the centre of Scotland's capital. The University of Edinburgh has been promoting and setting standards in education for over 400 years. Granted its Royal Charter in 1582 by James VI, the son of Mary Queen of Scots, the University was founded the following year by the Town Council of Edinburgh, making it the first post-Reformation university in Scotland, and the first civic university to be established in the British Isles. Known in its early years as King James College, or the Tounis (Town's) College, the University soon established itself internationally, and by the 18th century Edinburgh was a leading centre of the European Enlightenment and one of the continent's principal universities. The University's close relationship with the city in which it is based, coupled with a forward-looking, international perspective, has kept Edinburgh at the forefront of new research and teaching developments whilst enabling it to retain a uniquely Scottish character. Edinburgh's academics are at the forefront of developments in the study and application of languages, medicine, micro-electronics, biotechnology, computer-based disciplines and many other subjects. Edinburgh's standing as a world centre for research is further enhanced by the presence on and around University precincts of many independently-funded, but closely linked, national research institutes {(http://ed.ac.uk/)}. Address: Old College, South Bridge, Edinburgh, Scotland EH8 9YL, UK. Telephone: +44 (131) 650 1000. See also {ABSET}, {ABSYS}, {Alice}, {ASL+}, {Baroque}, {C++Linda}, {Cogent Prolog}, {COWSEL}, {Echidna}, {Edinburgh Prolog}, {Edinburgh SML}, {EdML}, {ELLIS}, {ELSIE}, {ESLPDPRO}, {Extended ML}, {Hope}, {IMP}, {LCF}, {Lisp-Linda}, {Marseille Prolog}, {metalanguage}, {MIKE}, {ML}, {ML Kit}, {ML-Linda}, {Multipop-68}, {Nuprl}, {Oblog}, {paraML}, {Pascal-Linda}, {POP-1}, {POP-2}, {POPLER}, {Prolog}, {Prolog-2}, {Prolog-Linda}, {Scheme-Linda}, {Skel-ML}, {Standard ML}, {Sticks&Stones}, {supercombinators}, {SWI-Prolog}, {tail recursion modulo cons}, {WPOP}. (1995-12-29)

University of Hawaii "body, education" A University spread over 10 campuses on 4 islands throughout the state. {(http://hawaii.edu/uhinfo.html)}. See also {Aloha}, {Aloha Net}. (1995-12-10)

University of Hawaii ::: (body, education) A University spread over 10 campuses on 4 islands throughout the state. .See also Aloha, Aloha Net. (1995-12-10)

University of Iceland "body, education" The Home of {Fjolnir}. {(http://rhi.hi.is/)}. (1995-03-17)

University of Iceland ::: (body, education) The Home of Fjolnir.H�sk�li �slands. . (1995-03-17)

University of London Computing Centre ::: (body, education) (ULCC) One of the UK's national high performance computing centres. It provides networking services and large-scale computing facilities which are used by researchers from all over the UK.ULCC was founded in 1968 to provide a service for education and research. It has been at the forefront of advanced research computing since its foundation, facilities are now centred on a 6 processor, 4 Gbyte Convex C3860 supercomputer (Neptune) with a Convex C3200 front-end (Pluto).ULCC is the main site for national and international network connections in the UK. They run the Network Operations and Service Centre for the JANET Internet Protocol Service (JIPS), the largest of the JANET NOCs and various international links and relays on behalf of UKERNA.ULCC's pilot National Data Repository service provides a network-accessible digital archive and filestore, based on a robotic tape system with 6 Terabytes as if it were on-line. It is made available to you via high-speed links to the JANET and SuperJANET networks. . (1994-11-29)

University of London Computing Centre "body, education" (ULCC) One of the UK's national high performance computing centres. It provides networking services and large-scale computing facilities which are used by researchers from all over the UK. ULCC was founded in 1968 to provide a service for education and research. It has been at the forefront of advanced research computing since its foundation, initially providing large-scale {CDC}-based facilities, then from 1982 to 1991 a national {Cray} {vector} supercomputing service. Its high performance computing facilities are now centred on a 6 processor, 4 Gbyte {Convex C3860} {supercomputer} (Neptune) with a Convex C3200 front-end (Pluto). ULCC is the main site for national and international network connections in the UK. They run the {Network Operations and Service Centre} for the {JANET Internet Protocol Service} (JIPS), the largest of the {JANET} {NOCs} and various international links and relays on behalf of {UKERNA}. ULCC's pilot {National Data Repository} service provides a network-accessible digital archive and filestore, based on a robotic tape system with 6 terabytes of storage. Although the data is stored on tape, you can access it very quickly, as if it were on-line. It is made available to you via high-speed links to the {JANET} and {SuperJANET} networks. {(http://ulcc.ac.uk/)}. (1994-11-29)

University of Michigan ::: (body, education) A large cosmopolitan university in the Midwest USA. Over 50000 students are enrolled at the University of Michigan's three campuses. rank in the top 20% of their high school class. 60% of the students receive financial aid.The main Ann Arbor Campus lies in the Huron River valley, 40 miles west of Detroit. The campus boasts 2700 acres with 200 buildings, six million volumes in 23 libraries, nine museums, seven hospitals, hundreds of laboratories and institutes, and over 18000 microcomputers. . (1995-02-23)

University of Michigan "body, education" A large cosmopolitan university in the Midwest USA. Over 50000 students are enrolled at the University of Michigan's three campuses. The students come from 50 states and over 100 foreign countries. 70% of the University's students graduated in the top 10% of their high school class. 90% rank in the top 20% of their high school class. 60% of the students receive financial aid. The main Ann Arbor Campus lies in the Huron River valley, 40 miles west of Detroit. The campus boasts 2700 acres with 200 buildings, six million volumes in 23 libraries, nine museums, seven hospitals, hundreds of laboratories and institutes, and over 18000 {microcomputers}. {(http://umich.edu/)}. (1995-02-23)

University of Minnesota ::: (body, education) The home of Gopher. .Address: Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. (1995-01-30)

University of Minnesota "body, education" The home of {Gopher}. {(http://umn.edu/)}. Address: Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. (1995-01-30)

University of Nijmegen "body, education" Katholieke University of Nijmegen (KUN), Nijmegen, the Netherlands. KUN's {Computing Science Institute (http://cs.kun.nl/csi)}. is known for the {Clean}, {Comma}, {Communicating Functional Processes}, and {GLASS} projects. {(http://kun.nl/)}. (1995-11-07)

University of Nijmegen ::: (body, education) Katholieke University of Nijmegen (KUN), Nijmegen, the Netherlands.KUN's . is known for the Clean, Comma, Communicating Functional Processes, and GLASS projects. . (1995-11-07)

University of Pennsylvania ::: (body, education) The home of ENIAC and Machiavelli. .Address: Philadelphia, PA, USA.[More info?] (1995-02-21)

University of Pennsylvania "body, education" The home of {ENIAC} and {Machiavelli}. {(http://upenn.edu/)}. Address: Philadelphia, PA, USA. [More info?] (1995-02-21)

University of Tasmania ::: (body, education) . (1995-01-25)

University of Tasmania "body, education" {(ftp://ftp.utas.edu.au/)}. (1995-01-25)

University of Twente ::: (body, education) A university in the east of The Netherlands for technical and social sciences. It was founded in 1961, making it one of the Computer Science; Electrical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Philosophy of science, Technology and Society; Educational Technology. . (1995-04-16)

University of Twente "body, education" A university in the east of The Netherlands for technical and social sciences. It was founded in 1961, making it one of the youngest universities in The Netherlands. It has 7000 students studying Applied Educational Science; Applied Mathematics; Applied Physics; Chemical Technology; Computer Science; Electrical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Philosophy of science, Technology and Society; Educational Technology. {(http://nic.utwente.nl/uthomuk.htm)}. (1995-04-16)

ursuline ::: n. --> One of an order of nuns founded by St. Angela Merici, at Brescia, in Italy, about the year 1537, and so called from St. Ursula, under whose protection it was placed. The order was introduced into Canada as early as 1639, and into the United States in 1727. The members are devoted entirely to education. ::: a.

VajiraNānavarorasa. (Thai. Wachirayanwarorot) (1860-1921). One of the most influential Thai monks of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries; his name (given in its Pāli form here) is also rendered in the Thai vernacular as Wachirayanwarorot [alt. Wachirayan Warot]. The son of King Mongkut (RĀMA IV), after a youth spent in royal luxury, he was ordained as a monk in 1879. He distinguished himself as a scholar of the Buddhist scriptures and in 1892 became abbot of WAT BOWONNIWET [alt. Wat Bovoranives; P. Pavaranivesa], the leading monastery of the THAMMAYUT (P. Dhammayuttika) order. In 1893, he became patriarch of the order and served as supreme patriarch (sangharāja; S. SAMGHARĀJAN) of the Thai sangha (S. SAMGHA) from 1910 until his death. A distinguished scholar of Pāli, he was the author of many textbooks, including the definitive Thai primer on the Pāli VINAYA tradition, the Vinayamukha ("Gateway to the Discipline"), which he wrote in an (unsuccessful) attempt to bring together the two major sects of Thai Buddhism, the Thammuyut and the MAHANIKAI. VajiraNānavarorasa also designed the modern monastic curriculum and reorganized the Thai ecclesiastical hierarchy. As an advisor to King Chulalongkorn (RĀMA V), he also sought to extend modern education into the provinces. VajiraNānavarorasa's autobiography is considered the first work of the genre in Thai vernacular literature.

Vinaya: Humility or sense of propriety; manners; education; mental culture and refinement.

vinaya. ::: humility; sense of propriety; manners; rule of conduct; education; mental culture and refinement; discipline

Vinaya (Sanskrit) Vinaya [from vi-nī to lead towards, instruct, educate] Education, discipline, control; in Buddhism, the rules of discipline, with special application to monks.

Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam ::: (education, body) The Free University of Amsterdam, founded in 1880 by Abraham Kuyper (who later became Prime Minister of The Netherlands). Originally only open to Reformed Christians, it is now open to all.Andrew Tanenbaum is a professor there.Not to be confused with the much older Universiteit van Amsterdam. .(2005-11-05)

Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam "education, body" The "Free University of Amsterdam", founded in 1880 by Abraham Kuyper (who later became Prime Minister of The Netherlands). Originally only open to Reformed Christians, it is now open to all. {Andrew Tanenbaum} is a professor there. Not to be confused with the much older Universiteit van Amsterdam. {(http://vu.nl/)}. (2005-11-05)

Well-ordered: See Ordinal number. Weltanschauung: (Ger.) The compound term means world-view, perspective of life, conception of things. Wen: (a) Culture evidences of the Confucian Moral Law (tao), such as propriety, music, social institutions, governmental systems, education, etc., the tradition of the Chou dynasty which Confucius attempted to preserve. (b) Appearance polish, superficiality. (c) Letters: literature, one of the four things Confucius taught (ssu chiao). -- W.T.C.

Wizo ::: Women's International Zionist Organization founded in 1920, involved in rescuing Jewish children and young people and giving them care and education in Eretz Israel.

Wonbulgyo. (圓佛教). In Korean, "Won Buddhism" or "Consummate Buddhism"; a modern Korean new religion, founded in 1916 by PAK CHUNGBIN (1891-1943), later known by his sobriquet SOT'AESAN. Based on his enlightenment to the universal order of the "one-circle image" (IRWoNSANG), Sot'aesan sought to establish an ideal world where this universal order could be accomplished in and through ordinary human life, rather than the specialized institution of the monastery. After perusing the scriptures of various religions, Sot'aesan came to regard the teachings of Buddhism as the ultimate source of his enlightenment and in 1924 named his new religion the Pulpop Yon'gu hoe (Society for the Study of the Buddhadharma); this organization was later renamed Wonbulgyo in 1947 by Sot'aesan's successor and the second prime Dharma master of the religion, Chongsan, a.k.a. Song Kyu (1900-1962). Since the tenets and institutions of Wonbulgyo are distinct from those of mainstream Buddhism in Korea, the religion is usually considered an indigenous Korean religion that is nevertheless closely aligned with the broader Buddhist tradition. Sot'aesan used the "one-circle image" as a way of representing his vision of the Buddhist notion of the "DHARMAKĀYA buddha" (popsinbul), which was reality itself; since this reality transcended all possible forms of conceptualization, he represented it with a simple circle, an image that is now displayed on the altar at all Wonbulgyo temples. Sot'aesan's religious activities were also directed at improving the daily lot of his adherents, and to this end he and his followers established thrift and savings institutions and led land reclamation projects. Wonbulgyo has focused its activities on the three pillars of religious propagation (kyohwa), education (kyoyuk), and public service (chason): for example, the second prime master Chongsan established temples for propagation, schools such as Won'gwang University for education, and social-welfare facilities such as hospitals and orphanages. These activities, along with international proselytization, were continued by his successors Taesan, Kim Taego (1914-1988), who became the third prime master in 1962, Chwasan, Yi Kwangjong (b. 1936), who became the fourth prime master in 1994, and Kyongsan, Chang Ŭngch'ol (b. 1940), who became the fifth prime master in 2006. The two representative scriptures of Wonbulgyo are the Wonbulgyo chongjon ("Principal Book of Won Buddhism"), a primer of the basic tenets of Wonbulgyo, which was published by Sot'aesan in 1943, and the Taejonggyong ("Scripture of the Founding Master"), the dialogues and teachings of Sot'aesan, published in 1962 by his successor Chongsan. Wonbulgyo remains an influential religious tradition in Korea, especially in the Cholla region in the southwest of the peninsula; in addition, there currently are over fifty Wonbulgyo temples active in over fourteen countries.

World Fellowship of Buddhists. The first international Buddhist organization, founded in Colombo, Sri Lanka, in 1950, by representatives from twenty-seven countries, and headed by GUNAPALA PIYASENA MALALASEKERA (1899-1973). Although most Buddhist traditions around the world are actively involved in the organization, THERAVĀDA Buddhists of Southeast Asia have traditionally played a central role: all its previous and current headquarters have been located in countries where the Theravāda tradition predominates (e.g., Sri Lanka, Myanmar, and Thailand) and all its presidents have also come from those countries. The WFB has more than 130 regional centers in over thirty countries, including India, Australia, the United States, Korea, Japan, and some African and European countries. The organization aims to promote the teachings of the Buddha, strengthen collegiality among Buddhists of different national traditions, and contribute to world peace by participating in social, educational, and humanitarian activities. The current headquarters is located in Bangkok, Thailand.

WORLD TEACHER, THE (T.B.) The head of the second department of the planetary hierarchy (department of education). The same as bodhisattva. The present holder of the office is 43-self Christos-Maitreya. (K 3.1.28)

WRITEACOURSE "language" A {CAI} language for {IBM 360}. ["WRITEACOURSE: An Educational Programming Language", E. Hunt et al, Proc FJCC 33(2) 1968]. (1998-04-28)

WRITEACOURSE ::: (language) A CAI language for IBM 360.[WRITEACOURSE: An Educational Programming Language, E. Hunt et al, Proc FJCC 33(2) 1968]. (1998-04-28)

Yourdon, Inc. ::: (company) The company founded in 1974 by Edward Yourdon to provide educational, publishing, and consulting services in state-of-the-art software computer books on a wide range of software engineering topics; many of these classics are used as standard university computer science textbooks. (1995-04-16)

Yourdon, Inc. "company" The company founded in 1974 by {Edward Yourdon} to provide educational, publishing, and consulting services in state-of-the-art software engineering technology. Over the next 12 years, the company grew to a staff of over 150 people, with offices throughout North America and Europe. As CEO of the company, Yourdon oversaw an operation that trained over 250,000 people around the world; the company was sold in 1986 and eventually became part of {CGI}, the French software company that is now part of {IBM}. The publishing division, Yourdon Press (now part of Prentice Hall), has produced over 150 technical computer books on a wide range of software engineering topics; many of these "classics" are used as standard university computer science textbooks. (1995-04-16)

Youth Aliyah ::: Organization founded in 1932 by Henrietta Szold to rescue Jewish children and young people and give them care and education in Eretz Israel.

Zodiacus vitae (Latin for Zodiac of Life): An old school book by Marcellus Palingenius Stellatus, widely used in England in the 16th century. Its twelve chapters were said by Foster Watson, M.A., Professor of Education in the University College of Wales (in the modern annotated edition published by Philip Wellby in 1908) to “find their parallel in the twelve labours of Hercules,” and thus “to typify the evolution of the human soul through successive stages of mental and spiritual enlightenment.”

Zynet Ltd. ::: (company) A UK Internet service provider offering full Internet Protocol connection by any reasonable means for any number of computers from individual dial-ups to leased line connections to entire networks.Zynet is a sister company of Minerva Software and thus claim a better than average understanding of the needs and idiosyncracies of Acorn systems and will be offering special services for education. .E-mail: .Telephone: +44 (1392) 426 160. Fax: +44 (1392) 421 762.Address: Minerva House, Baring Crescent, Exeter EX1 1TL, UK. (1995-01-31)

Zynet Ltd. "company" A UK {Internet service provider} offering full {Internet Protocol} connection by any reasonable means for any number of computers from individual {dial-ups} to {leased line} connections to entire networks. Zynet is a sister company of {Minerva Software} and thus claim a better than average understanding of the needs and idiosyncracies of {Acorn} systems and will be offering special services for education. {(http://zynet.co.uk/)}. E-mail: "zynet@zynet.co.uk". Telephone: +44 (1392) 426 160. Fax: +44 (1392) 421 762. Address: Minerva House, Baring Crescent, Exeter EX1 1TL, UK. (1995-01-31)



QUOTES [116 / 116 - 1500 / 10251]


KEYS (10k)

   35 The Mother
   10 Sri Aurobindo
   6 Howard Gardner
   3 Claudio Naranjo
   3 Swami Vivekananda
   2 R Buckminster Fuller
   2 Noam Chomsky
   2 Jiddu Krishnamurti
   2 Isaac Asimov
   2 Alfred Korzybski
   2 Confucius
   2 Aristotle
   2 Aleister Crowley
   2 Abraham Maslow
   1 William Butler Yeats
   1 Victor Hugo
   1 T S Eliot
   1 Stratford Caldecott
   1 Socrates
   1 Sidney Hook
   1 Shams Tabrizi
   1 Saint John Bosco
   1 Robert Heinlein
   1 Reverend Chad Ripperger
   1 Origen
   1 M P Pandit
   1 Miriam
   1 Martin Buber
   1 Mark Twain
   1 Margaret Drabble
   1 Joseph Campbell
   1 John Paul II
   1 John Amos Comenius
   1 Jim Rohn
   1 Herbert Spencer
   1 Gerald G. Jampolsky M.D. Author of "Forgiveness: The Greatest Healer of All
   1 Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
   1 George Carlin
   1 Fyodor Dostoevsky
   1 Frank Zappa
   1 Epictetus : Conversations
   1 Dr Robert A Hatch
   1 Dalai Lama
   1 C. S. Lewis
   1 Carl Sagan
   1 Basil of Caesarea
   1 A N Wilson
   1 Alfred North Whitehead
   1 Aldous Huxley
   1 Alan Turing
   1 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   1 Rudolf Steiner
   1 Plato
   1 African Proverb
   1 ?

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   24 Mark Twain
   21 Malala Yousafzai
   20 Mahatma Gandhi
   18 Aristotle
   17 Sai Baba
   17 Plato
   17 John Dewey
   14 Anonymous
   12 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   10 Maria Montessori
   9 Albert Einstein
   8 Paulo Freire
   8 Eleanor Roosevelt
   7 Terry Pratchett
   7 Malcolm X
   7 Louis L Amour
   7 Isaac Asimov
   7 Donald Trump
   7 Bertrand Russell
   7 Alfred North Whitehead

1:Education is at a turning point ~ Howard Gardner,
2:If you think education is expensive, try ignorance." ~ African Proverb,
3:The future is a race between education and catastrophe. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
4:The great aim of education is not knowledge but action. ~ Herbert Spencer,
5:Education serves to keep people idiotic and manipulable. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
6:Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.
   ~ Socrates,
7:Education: the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty. ~ Mark Twain,
8:One of the goals of education should be to teach that life is precious. ~ Abraham Maslow,
9:Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is.
   ~ Isaac Asimov,
10:Education is not the filling of a pail but the lighting of a fire.
   ~ William Butler Yeats,
11:Formal education will make you a living. Self education will make you a fortune.
   ~ Jim Rohn,
12:A hundred years of education is nothing compared with one moment spent with God! ~ Shams Tabrizi,
13:The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.
   ~ Aristotle,
14:Education worthy of the name is essentially education of character. ~ Martin Buber, Between Man and Man,
15:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all. ~ Aristotle,
16:Education breeds confidence. Confidence breeds hope. Hope breeds peace. ~ Confucius,
17:Education breeds confidence. Confidence breeds hope. Hope breeds peace." ~ Confucius,
18:If you do not study, the inertia will go on increasing.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
19:From the very beginning of his education, the child should experience the joy of discovery. ~ Alfred North Whitehead
20:Replace the eagerness for fame by the aspiration for perfection.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
21:3) by instructing, the cause of EDUCATION ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (On NE 8, lect. 11).,
22:An education that seeks competition rather than collaboration is the reflection of a society that is deeply ill. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
23:The measure of the sincerity is the measure of the success.
23 April 1968
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
24:Teachers must be encouraged - I almost said 'freed', to pursue an education that strives for depth of understanding. ~ Howard Gardner,
25:Sometimes it seems the only accomplishment my education ever bestowed on me was the ability to think in quotations. ~ Margaret Drabble,
26:All education is the art of making men ethical (sittlich), of transforming the old Adam into the new Adam. ~ Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, [T5],
27:His business is to suggest and not to impose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
28:Nothing but a radical change of consciousness can deliver the world from its present obscurity. ~ The Mother, On Education,
29:I have realized why corrupt politicians do nothing to improve the quality of public school education. They are terrified of educated voters. ~ Miriam,
30:Never get excited, nervous or agitated. Remain perfectly calm in the face of all circumstances.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
31:Religion has to be lived, not learned as a creed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
32:All experience lies within us as passive or potential memory. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
33:Yes, this is the true love, which is a force; it is the union that enables new possibilities to be realised... ~ The Mother, On Education,
34:Whatever is mechanical and artificial is inoperative for good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
35:Only what the man admires and accepts, becomes part of himself; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
36:Which of Sri Aurobindo's books should I start with?
The Life Divine.
My blessings.
11 March 1941 ~ The Mother, On Education,
37:
   The Riddle of the World

If you can solve it, you will be immortal, but if you fail you will perish. ~ The Mother, On Education, [T5],
38:Every Christian, even if he lacks any education, knows that every place is part of the universe and that the universe itself is the temple of God. ~ Origen, Contra Celsus 7.44,
39:Discover John Amos Comenius famous and rare quotes. Share John Amos Comenius quotations about school, humanity and teaching. "The proper education of the young does not..." ~ ?,
40:A school without music is a school without a soul, for music aids education. It is a most effective means to obtain discipline, morality, and help good feeling. ~ Saint John Bosco,
41:The cause of mediocre work is neither the variety nor the number of activities, but lack of the power of concentration.
   ~ The Mother, On Education, [T5],
42:In the ideal college, intrinsic education would be available to anyone who wanted it...The college would be life-long, for learning can take place all through life. ~ Abraham Maslow,
43:The past is our foundation, the present our material, the future our aim and summit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
44:When one is incapable of comforming to a discipline, one is also incapable of doing anything of lasting value in life. 16 Februrary 1967. ~ The Mother, On Education, [T5],
45:By studying carefully what Sri Aurobindo has said on all subjects one can easily reach a complete knowledge of the things of this world.
   ~ The Mother, On Education, [T5],
46:Everyone who remembers his own educational experience remembers teachers, not methods and techniques. The teacher is the kingpin of the educational situation. ~ Sidney Hook, Education for Modern Man,
47:If you have assimilated five ideas and made them your life and character, you have more education than any man who has got by heart a whole library. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
48:We as economic society are going to have to pay our whole population to go to school and pay it to stay at school. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studie,
49:Let us unite our will in a great aspiration; let us pray for an intervention of the Grace. A miracle can always happen. Faith has a sovereign power. ~ The Mother, On Education, [T5],
50:The future is for those who have the soul of a hero. The stronger and more sincere our faith, the more powerful and effective will be the help received.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
51:Why do you believe in what the astrologers say? It is the belief that brings the trouble.

   Sri Aurobindo says that a man becomes what he thinks he is.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
52:No one can become really educated without having pursued some study in which he took no interest--for it is a part of education to learn to interest ourselves in subjects for which we have no aptitude. ~ T S Eliot,
53:For Sri Aurobindo's centenary, what is the best offering that I can personally make to Sri Aurobindo?

   Offer him your mind in all sincerity. 13 November 1970
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
54:I would say, then, that you are faced with a future in which education is going to be number one amongst the great world industries. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studies,
55:An aimless life is always a miserable life. Every one of you should have an aim. But do not forget that on the quality of your aim will depend the quality of your life.
   ~ The Mother, On Education, p.3,
56:True knowledge takes its base on things, arthas, and only when it has mastered the thing, proceeds to formalise its information. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
57:It is not by mental activity that you can quiet your miind, it is from a higher or deeper level that you can receive the help you need. And both can be reached in silence only.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
58:Anyone who is honestly trying to be a Christian will soon find his intelligence being sharpened: one of the reasons why it needs no special education to be a Christian is that Christianity is an education itself." ~ C. S. Lewis, p. 78,
59:The ideal is that we must have the whole education of our country, spiritual and secular, in our own hands, and it must be on national lines, through national methods as far as practical. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
60:Instead of trying to produce a programme to simulate the adult mind, why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child's? If this were then subjected to an appropriate course of education one would obtain the adult brain. ~ Alan Turing,
61:Knowledge which is acquired under compulsion has no hold on the mind. Therefore do not use compulsion, but let early education be a sort of amusement; you will then be better able to discover the child's natural bent. ~ Plato,
62:The whole human race is so miserable and above all so blind that it is not conscious of its own miseries…" ~ John Amos Comenius, (1592-1670), a Czech philosopher, pedagogue and theologian, considered the father of modern education. His quotes:,
63:Peace of mind comes from not wanting to change others." ~ Gerald G. Jampolsky M.D. Author of "Forgiveness: The Greatest Healer of All,", (1999). is an internationally recognized authority in the fields of psychiatry, health, business, and education.,
64:We would like to be able to show the children pictorial representations of what life should be, but we still have not reached that stage, very far from it. Those films are yet to be made...
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 1968,
65:Be not forgetful of prayer. Every time you pray, if your prayer is sincere, there will be new feeling and new meaning in it, which will give you fresh courage, and you will understand that prayer is an education. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov,
66:Education is a creative activity with persons as its only possible object... all that is by nature present in the human being to be educated is material for the educators, material which their love must find and mould. ~ John Paul II, Love & Responsibility,
67:Yogic or occult powers are no more supernatural or incredible than is supernatural or incredible the power to write a great poem or compose great music. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram, Education, Belief and Yoga,
68:
   Sweet Mother, Can you hear me whenever I call you?

My dear child,
   Be sure that I hear you each time you call and my help and force go straight to you.
   With my blessings.
   1 June 1960
   ~ The Mother, On Education, [T1],
69:It is not by books that Sri Aurobindo ought to be studied but by subjects - what he has said on the Divine, on Unity, on religion, on evolution, on education, on self-perfection, on supermind, etc., etc.
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 205,
70:Each [animal] knows naturally what is salutary and marvelously appropriates what suits its nature. Virtues exist in us also by nature, and the soul has affinity with them not by education, but by nature herself. ~ Basil of Caesarea, On the Hexameron, Homily 9.3-4,
71:Children are nowhere taught, in any systematic way, to distinguish true from false, or meaningful from meaningless, statements. Why is this so? Because their elders, even in the democratic countries, do not want them to be given this kind of education. ~ Aldous Huxley,
72:We must have a hold on the spiritual and secular education of the nation. Do you understand that? You must dream it, you must talk it, you must think it and you must work it out. Till then there is no salvation for the race. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
73:Make of us the hero warriors we aspire to become. May we fight successfully the great battle of the future that is to be born, against the past that seeks to endure, so that the new things may manifest and we be ready to receive them.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
74:What is true love and how to find it?‡
Do you know what is true love?
There is only one true love, the love from the Divine, which, in human beings, turns into love for the Divine. Shall we say that the nature of the Divine is Love. ~ The Mother, On Education,
75:Studies strengthen the mind and turn its concentration away from the impulses and desires of the vital. Concentrating on study is one of the most powerful ways of controlling the mind and the vital; that is why it is so important to study.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
76:Education is the best way to train ourselves that we will secure our own well-being by concerning ourselves with others. It is possible to create a better world, a more compassionate, more peaceful world, which is not only in everyone's interest, but is everyone's responsibility to achieve. ~ Dalai Lama,
77:Our highest endeavor must be to develop free human beings who are able of themselves to impart purpose and direction to their lives. The need for imagination, a sense of truth, and a feeling of responsibility-these three forces are the very nerve of education. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
78:Sri Aurobindo does not belong to the past nor to history.
   Sri Aurobindo is the Future advancing towards its realisation.
   Thus we must shelter the eternal youth required for a speedy advance, in order not to become laggards on the way. 2 April 1967
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 210,
79:What is the way of making the consciousness of human unity grow in man?

   Spiritual education, that is to say an education which gives more importance to the growth of the spirit than to any religious or moral teaching or to the material so-called knowledge.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III,
80:It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creed into law if it acquires the political power to do so, and will follow it by suppressing opposition, subverting all education to seize early the minds of the young, and by killing, locking up, or driving underground all heretics.
   ~ Robert Heinlein, Postscript to Revolt in 2100.,
81:In roughly the last century, important experiments have been launched by such charismatic educators as Maria Montessori, Rudolf Steiner, Shinichi Suzuki, John Dewey, and A. S. Neil. These approaches have enjoyed considerable success[...] Yet they have had relatively little impact on the mainstream of education throughout the contemporary world. ~ Howard Gardner,
82:My dear child, I carry you always in my arms, pressed close to my heart, and I have no doubt that you will become aware of it if you forget the world and concentrate on me. By turning your thoughts towards me you will feel closer and closer to me and peace will come to dwell in your heart. Love. 25 May 1934
   ~ The Mother, On Education, [T0],
83:But once we realize that people have very different kinds of minds, different kinds of strengths -- some people are good in thinking spatially, some in thinking language, others are very logical, other people need to be hands on and explore actively and try things out -- then education, which treats everybody the same way, is actually the most unfair education. ~ Howard Gardner,
84:True strength and protection come from the Divine Presence in the heart.
   If you want to keep this Presence constantly in you, avoid carefully all vulgarity in speech, behaviour and acts.
   Do not mistake liberty for license and freedom for bad manners: the thoughts must be pure and the aspiration ardent.
26 February 1965
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 154,
85:In what then consists progress? He who detaching him self from external things devotes himself entirely to the education and preparation of his faculty of judgment and will in order to put it into accord with Nature and give it elevation, freedom, independence, self-possession,-he it is who is really progressing. ~ Epictetus : Conversations, the Eternal Wisdom
86:Every man has in him something divine, something his own, a chance of strength and perfection in however small a sphere, which God offers him to take or refuse. The task is to find it, develop it, use it. The chief aim of education should be to help the growing soul to draw out that in itself which is best and make it perfect for a noble use. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings,
87:The best way to understand is always to rise high enough in the consciousness to be able to unite all contradictory ideas in a harmonious synthesis.
And for the correct attitude, to know how to pass flexibly from one position to another without ever losing sight even for a moment of the one goal of self-consecration to the Divine and identification with Him.
29 April 1964
~ The Mother, On Education,
88:It is an invaluable possession for every living being to have learnt to know himself and to master himself. To know oneself means to know the motives of one's actions and reactions, the why and the how of all that happens in oneself. To master oneself means to do what one has decided to do, to do nothing but that, not to listen to or follow impulses, desires or fancies. ~ The Mother, On Education, Teachers [T3],
89:When you find a writer who really is saying something to you, read everything that writer has written and you will get more education and depth of understanding out of that than reading a scrap here and a scrap there and elsewhere. Then go to people who influenced that writer, or those who were related to him, and your world builds together in an organic way that is really marvelous. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero's Journey: Joseph Campbell on His Life & Works,
90:If Confucius can serve as the Patron Saint of Chinese education, let me propose Socrates as his equivalent in a Western educational context - a Socrates who is never content with the initial superficial response, but is always probing for finer distinctions, clearer examples, a more profound form of knowing. Our concept of knowledge has changed since classical times, but Socrates has provided us with a timeless educational goal - ever deeper understanding. ~ Howard Gardner,
91:Student debt is structured to be a burden for life. The indebted cannot declare bankruptcy, unlike Donald Trump. Current student debt is estimated to be over $1.45 trillion. There are ample resources for that simply from waste, including the bloated military and the enormous concentrated private wealth that has accumulated in the financial and general corporate sector under neoliberal policies. There is no economic reason why free education cannot flourish from schools through colleges and university. The barriers are not economic but rather political decisions. ~ Noam Chomsky,
92:To take symbolism seriously is to accept the 'analogy of being' between different levels of reality... More than the sum of its parts, the figure is the appearing-to-us of an infinite depth that cannot be fully revealed in time. Every symbol is a kind of gestalt, in which a universal meaning can be glimpsed. Eventually, every created thing can be seen as a manifestation of its own interior essence, and the world is transformed into a radiant book to be read with eyes sensitive to spiritual light. ~ Stratford Caldecott, Beauty for Truth's Sake: On the Re-enchantment of Education,
93:Mother, Some people criticise the fact that we have too many rules in our physical education and that we impose too much discipline on the children.
   There can be no physical education without discipline. The body itself could not function without a strict discipline. Actually, the failure to recognise this fact is the principal cause of illness. Digestion, growth, blood-circulation, everything, everything is a discipline. Thought, movement, gestures, everything is a discipline, and if there is no discipline people immediately fall ill.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
94:The other day I happened to be reading a careful, interesting account of the state of British higher education. The government is a kind of market-oriented government and they came out with an official paper, a 'White Paper' saying that it is not the responsibility of the state to support any institution that can't survive in the market. So, if Oxford is teaching philosophy, the arts, Greek history, medieval history, and so on, and they can't sell it on the market, why should they be supported? Because life consists only of what you can sell in the market and get back, nothing else. That is a real pathology. ~ Noam Chomsky,
95:The real human division is this: the luminous and the shady. To diminish the number of the shady, to augment the number of the luminous,-that is the object. That is why we cry: Education! science! To teach reading, means to light the fire; every syllable spelled out sparkles. However, he who says light does not, necessarily, say joy. People suffer in the light; excess burns. The flame is the enemy of the wing. To burn without ceasing to fly,-therein lies the marvel of genius. When you shall have learned to know, and to love, you will still suffer. The day is born in tears. The luminous weep, if only over those in darkness. ~ Victor Hugo,
96:Why do we go through the struggle to be educated? Is it merely in order to pass some examinations and get a job? Or is it the function of education to prepare us while we are young to understand the whole process of life?

And what does life mean? Is not life an extraordinary thing? The birds, the flowers, the flourishing trees, the heavens, the stars, the rivers and the fish therein-all this is life. Life is the poor and the rich; life is the constant battle between groups, races and nations; life is meditation; life is what we call religion, and it is also the subtle, hidden things of the mind-the envies, the ambitions, the passions, the fears, fulfilments and anxieties. All this and much more is life. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
97:So, it is a basic function of education to help you to find out what you really love to do, so that you can give your whole mind and heart to it, because that creates human dignity, that sweeps away mediocrity, the petty bourgeois mentality. That is why it is very important to have the right teachers, the right atmosphere, so that you will grow up with the love which expresses itself in what you are doing. Without this love your examinations, your knowledge, your capacities, your position and possessions are just ashes, they have no meaning; without this love your actions are going to bring more wars, more hatred, more mischief and destruction. All this may mean nothing to you, because outwardly you are still very young, but I hope it will mean something to your teachers-and also to you, somewhere inside. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
98:5. When in Doubt ::: Read the Syllabus - Read Ahead - Ask Questions: Read the correlated readings (designed to mesh with that lecture) before you come to class. The whole point of correlated readings is to prepare you for the lecture. If the readings are completed at the appropriate time you will have a 'Big Picture' framed by a general narrative and suspended by an ongoing line of argument. These readings should help you establish a set of expectations as well as some unsettling questions. The lectures should help you connect ideas you have read about and, with any luck, they should help you call key issues into question. Your job is to arrive at an understanding you call your own and can defend to a critical audience. Beginning to end, you are the center of your education. You know where to begin. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study,
99:
   Often, when I read Sri Aurobindo's works or listen to His words, I am wonderstruck: how can this eternal truth, this beauty of expression escape people? It is really strange that He is not yet recognised, at least as a supreme creator, a pure artist, a poet par excellence! So I tell myself that my judgments, my appreciations are influenced by my devotion for the Master - and everyone is not devoted. I do not think this is true. But then why are hearts not yet enchanted by His words?

Who can understand Sri Aurobindo? He is as vast as the universe and his teaching is infinite...
   The only way to come a little close to him is to love him sincerely and give oneself unreservedly to his work. Thus, each one does his best and contributes as much as he can to that transformation of the world which Sri Aurobindo has predicted. 2 December 1964
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 396,
100:I have said that from a young age children should be taught to respect good health, physical strength and balance. The great importance of beauty must also be emphasised. A young child should aspire for beauty, not for the sake of pleasing others or winning their admiration, but for the love of beauty itself; for beauty is the ideal which all physical life must realise. Every human being has the possibility of establishing harmony among the different parts of his body and in the various movements of the body in action. Every human body that undergoes a rational method of culture from the very beginning of its existence can realise its own harmony and thus become fit to manifest beauty. When we speak of the other aspects of an integral education, we shall see what inner conditions are to be fulfilled so that this beauty can one day be manifested. ~ The Mother, On Education, Physical Education,
101:The fourth condition is study. One must cultivate the mind, know what others have thought, open the mental being to this impact of the higher vibrations of knowledge. A mental knowledge is not tantamount to realization, it is true, but still one must know mentally where one is going, what has happened to others, how they have achieved, what are the hindrances and the helping points. This education of oneself by study, study of spiritual writings, suddhydya as it is called, a disciplined reading and incorporation of the knowledge contained in scriptures and authentic texts - that is a very important part. Even when you don't understand a text, still if you persist at it, the force that is in that book creates certain new grooves in your brain and the second or the third time when you read it, it begins to make some meaning. This is the meaning of studying, of exposing your mind to the constant vibrations of higher levels of knowledge. Incidentally, the mind gets developed, a mental climate is created, a climate of spiritual culture.
   ~ M P Pandit, The Advent 1981, 30,
102:The object of this course of reading is to familiarize the student with all that has been said by the Great Masters in every time and country. He should make a critical examination of them; not so much with the idea of discovering where truth lies, for he cannot do this except by virtue of his own spiritual experience, but rather to discover the essential harmony in those varied works. He should be on his guard against partisanship with a favourite author. He should familiarize himself thoroughly with the method of mental equilibrium, endeavouring to contradict any statement soever, although it may be apparently axiomatic.

The general object of this course, besides that already stated, is to assure sound education in occult matters, so that when spiritual illumination comes it may find a well-built temple. Where the mind is strongly biased towards any special theory, the result of an illumination is often to inflame that portion of the mind which is thus overdeveloped, with the result that the aspirant, instead of becoming an Adept, becomes a bigot and fanatic. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, APPENDIX I - Curriculum of A. A.
103:
   Sweet Mother, Just as there is a methodical progression of exercises for mental and physical education, isn't there a similar method to progress towards Sri Aurobindo's yoga?
It should vary with each individual.
Could you make a step-by-step programme for me to follow daily?

The mechanical regularity of a fixed programme is indispensable for physical, mental and vital development; but this mechanical rigidity has little or no effect on spiritual development where the spontaneity of an absolute sincerity is indispensable. Sri Aurobindo has written very clearly on this subject. And what he has written on it has appeared in The Synthesis Of Yoga.
   However, as an initial help to set you on the path, I can tell you: (1) that on getting up, before starting the day, it is good to make an offering of this day to the Divine, an offering of all that one thinks, all that one is, all that one will do; (2) and at night, before going to sleep, it is good to review the day, taking note of all the times one has forgotten or neglected to make an offering of one's self or one's action, and to aspire or pray that these lapses do not recur. This is a minimum, a very small beginning - and it should increase with the sincerity of your consecration. 31 March 1965
   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother, [T1],
104:All advance in thought is made by collecting the greatest possible number of facts, classifying them, and grouping them.
   The philologist, though perhaps he only speaks one language, has a much higher type of mind than the linguist who speaks twenty.
   This Tree of Thought is exactly paralleled by the tree of nervous structure.
   Very many people go about nowadays who are exceedingly "well-informed," but who have not the slightest idea of the meaning of the facts they know. They have not developed the necessary higher part of the brain. Induction is impossible to them.
   This capacity for storing away facts is compatible with actual imbecility. Some imbeciles have been able to store their memories with more knowledge than perhaps any sane man could hope to acquire.
   This is the great fault of modern education - a child is stuffed with facts, and no attempt is made to explain their connection and bearing. The result is that even the facts themselves are soon forgotten.
   Any first-rate mind is insulted and irritated by such treatment, and any first-rate memory is in danger of being spoilt by it.
   No two ideas have any real meaning until they are harmonized in a third, and the operation is only perfect when these ideas are contradictory. This is the essence of the Hegelian logic.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Book 4, The Cup,
105:The scientists, all of them, have their duties no doubt, but they do not fully use their education if they do not try to broaden their sense of responsibility toward all mankind instead of closing themselves up in a narrow specialization where they find their pleasure. Neither engineers nor other scientific men have any right to prefer their own personal peace to the happiness of mankind; their place and their duty are in the front line of struggling humanity, not in the unperturbed ranks of those who keep themselves aloof from life. If they are indifferent, or discouraged because they feel or think that they know that the situation is hopeless, it may be proved that undue pessimism is as dangerous a "religion" as any other blind creed. Indeed there is very little difference in kind between the medieval fanaticism of the "holy inquisition," and modern intolerance toward new ideas. All kinds of intellect must get together, for as long as we presuppose the situation to be hopeless, the situation will indeed be hopeless. The spirit of Human Engineering does not know the word "hopeless"; for engineers know that wrong methods are alone responsible for disastrous results, and that every situation can be successfully handled by the use of proper means. The task of engineering science is not only to know but to know how. Most of the scientists and engineers do not yet realize that their united judgment would be invincible; no system or class would care to disregard it. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
106:People think of education as something that they can finish. And what's more, when they finish, it's a rite of passage. You're finished with school. You're no more a child, and therefore anything that reminds you of school - reading books, having ideas, asking questions - that's kid's stuff. Now you're an adult, you don't do that sort of thing any more.

You have everybody looking forward to no longer learning, and you make them ashamed afterward of going back to learning. If you have a system of education using computers, then anyone, any age, can learn by himself, can continue to be interested. If you enjoy learning, there's no reason why you should stop at a given age. People don't stop things they enjoy doing just because they reach a certain age.

What's exciting is the actual process of broadening yourself, of knowing there's now a little extra facet of the universe you know about and can think about and can understand. It seems to me that when it's time to die, there would be a certain pleasure in thinking that you had utilized your life well, learned as much as you could, gathered in as much as possible of the universe, and enjoyed it. There's only this one universe and only this one lifetime to try to grasp it. And while it is inconceivable that anyone can grasp more than a tiny portion of it, at least you can do that much. What a tragedy just to pass through and get nothing out of it. ~ Isaac Asimov, Carl Freedman - Conversations with Isaac Asimov-University Press of Mississippi (2005).pdf,
107:the aim of our yoga :::
   The aim set before our Yoga is nothing less than to hasten this supreme object of our existence here. Its process leaves behind the ordinary tardy method of slow and confused growth through the evolution of Nature. For the natural evolution is at its best an uncertain growth under cover, partly by the pressure of the environment, partly by a groping education and an ill-lighted purposeful effort, an only partially illumined and half-automatic use of opportunities with many blunders and lapses and relapses; a great portion of it is made up of apparent accidents and circumstances and vicissitudes, - though veiling a secret divine intervention and guidance. In Yoga we replace this confused crooked crab-motion by a rapid, conscious and self-directed evolution which is planned to carry us, as far as can be, in a straight line towards the goal set before us. In a certain sense it may be an error to speak of a goal anywhere in a progression which may well be infinite. Still we can conceive of an immediate goal, an ulterior objective beyond our present achievement towards which the soul in man can aspire. There lies before him the possibility of a new birth; there can be an ascent into a higher and wider plane of being and its descent to transform his members. An enlarged and illumined consciousness is possible that shall make of him a liberated spirit and a perfected force - and, if spread beyond the individual, it might even constitute a divine humanity or else a new, a supramental and therefore a superhuman race. It is this new birth that we make our aim: a growth into a divine consciousness is the whole meaning of our Yoga, an integral conversion to divinity not only of the soul but of all the parts of our nature.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Surrender in Works - The Way of the Gita, 89-90,
108:Are there no false visions?
There are what in appearance are false visions. There are, for instance, hundreds or thousands of people who say that they have seen the Christ. Of that number those who have actually seen Him are perhaps less than a dozen, and even with them there is much to say about what they have seen. What the others saw may be an emanation; or it may be a thought or even an image remembered by the mind. There are, too, those who are strong believers in the Christ and have had a vision of some Force or Being or some remembered image that is very luminous and makes upon them a strong impression. They have seen something which they feel belongs to another world, to a supernatural order, and it has created in them an emotion of fear, awe or joy; and as they believe in the Christ, they can think of nothing else and say it is He. But the same vision or experience if it comes to one who believes in the Hindu, the Mohammedan or some other religion, will take a different name and form. The thing seen or experienced may be fundamentally the same, but it is formulated differently according to the different make-up of the apprehending mind. It is only those that can go beyond beliefs and faiths and myths and traditions who are able to say what it really is; but these are few, very few. You must be free from every mental construction, you must divest yourself of all that is merely local or temporal, before you can know what you have seen.

   Spiritual experience means the contact with the Divine in oneself (or without, which comes to the same thing in that domain). And it is an experience identical everywhere in all countries, among all peoples and even in all ages. If you meet the Divine, you meet it always and everywhere in the same way. Difference comes in because between the experience and its formulation there is almost an abyss. Directly you have spiritual experience, which takes place always in the inner consciousness, it is translated into your external consciousness and defined there in one way or another according to your education, your faith, your mental predisposition. There is only one truth, one reality; but the forms through which it may be expressed are many. 21 April 1929 ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
109:the process of unification, the perfecting our one's instrumental being, the help one needs to reach the goal :::
If we truly want to progress and acquire the capacity of knowing the truth of our being, that is to say, what we are truly created for, what we can call our mission upon earth, then we must, in a very regular and constant manner, reject from us or eliminate in us whatever contradicts the truth of our existence, whatever is opposed to it. In this way, little by little, all the parts, all the elements of our being can be organised into a homogeneous whole around our psychic centre. This work of unification requires much time to be brought to some degree of perfection. Therefore, in order to accomplish it, we must arm ourselves with patience and endurance, with a determination to prolong our life as long as necessary for the success of our endeavor.
   As you pursue this labor of purification and unification, you must at the same time take great care to perfect the external and instrumental part of your being. When the higher truth manifests, it must find in you a mind that is supple and rich enough to be able to give the idea that seeks to express itself a form of thought which preserves its force and clarity. This thought, again, when it seeks to clothe itself in words, must find in you a sufficient power of expression so that the words reveal the thought and do not deform it. And the formula in which you embody the truth should be manifested in all your feelings, all your acts of will, all your actions, in all movements of your being. Finally, these movements themselves should, by constant effort, attain their highest perfection. ... It is therefore of capital importance to become conscious of its presence in us [the psychic being], to concentrate on this presence until it becomes a living fact for us and we can identify ourselves with it.
   In various times and places many methods have been prescribed for attaining this perfection and ultimately achieving this identification. Some methods are psychological, some religious, some even mechanical. In reality, everyone has to find the one which suits him best, and if one has an ardent and steadfast aspiration, a persistent and dynamic will, one is sure to meet, in one way or another - outwardly through reading and study, inwardly through concentration, meditation, revelation and experience - the help one needs to reach the goal. Only one thing is absolutely indispensable: the will to discover and to realize. This discovery and realization should be the primary preoccupation of our being, the pearl of great price which we must acquire at any cost. Whatever you do, whatever your occupations and activities, the will to find the truth of your being and to unite with it must be always living and present behind all that you do, all that you feel, all that you think.
   ~ The Mother, On Education, [T1],
110:(Novum Organum by Francis Bacon.)
   34. "Four species of idols beset the human mind, to which (for distinction's sake) we have assigned names, calling the first Idols of the Tribe, the second Idols of the Den, the third Idols of the Market, the fourth Idols of the Theatre.
   40. "The information of notions and axioms on the foundation of true induction is the only fitting remedy by which we can ward off and expel these idols. It is, however, of great service to point them out; for the doctrine of idols bears the same relation to the interpretation of nature as that of the confutation of sophisms does to common logic.
   41. "The idols of the tribe are inherent in human nature and the very tribe or race of man; for man's sense is falsely asserted to be the standard of things; on the contrary, all the perceptions both of the senses and the mind bear reference to man and not to the Universe, and the human mind resembles these uneven mirrors which impart their own properties to different objects, from which rays are emitted and distort and disfigure them.
   42. "The idols of the den are those of each individual; for everybody (in addition to the errors common to the race of man) has his own individual den or cavern, which intercepts and corrupts the light of nature, either from his own peculiar and singular disposition, or from his education and intercourse with others, or from his reading, and the authority acquired by those whom he reverences and admires, or from the different impressions produced on the mind, as it happens to be preoccupied and predisposed, or equable and tranquil, and the like; so that the spirit of man (according to its several dispositions), is variable, confused, and, as it were, actuated by chance; and Heraclitus said well that men search for knowledge in lesser worlds, and not in the greater or common world.
   43. "There are also idols formed by the reciprocal intercourse and society of man with man, which we call idols of the market, from the commerce and association of men with each other; for men converse by means of language, but words are formed at the will of the generality, and there arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. Nor can the definitions and explanations with which learned men are wont to guard and protect themselves in some instances afford a complete remedy-words still manifestly force the understanding, throw everything into confusion, and lead mankind into vain and innumerable controversies and fallacies.
   44. "Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre: for we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a similar nature can be still composed and made to agree with each other, the causes of the most opposite errors being generally the same. Nor, again, do we allude merely to general systems, but also to many elements and axioms of sciences which have become inveterate by tradition, implicit credence, and neglect. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
111:But there's a reason. There's a reason. There's a reason for this, there's a reason education sucks, and it's the same reason that it will never, ever, ever be fixed. It's never gonna get any better. Don't look for it. Be happy with what you got. Because the owners of this country don't want that. I'm talking about the real owners now, the real owners, the big wealthy business interests that control things and make all the important decisions. Forget the politicians. The politicians are put there to give you the idea that you have freedom of choice. You don't. You have no choice. You have owners. They own you. They own everything. They own all the important land. They own and control the corporations. They've long since bought and paid for the senate, the congress, the state houses, the city halls, they got the judges in their back pockets and they own all the big media companies so they control just about all of the news and information you get to hear. They got you by the balls. They spend billions of dollars every year lobbying, lobbying, to get what they want. Well, we know what they want. They want more for themselves and less for everybody else, but I'll tell you what they don't want: They don't want a population of citizens capable of critical thinking. They don't want well informed, well educated people capable of critical thinking. They're not interested in that. That doesn't help them. Thats against their interests. Thats right. They don't want people who are smart enough to sit around a kitchen table to figure out how badly they're getting fucked by a system that threw them overboard 30 fucking years ago. They don't want that. You know what they want? They want obedient workers. Obedient workers. People who are just smart enough to run the machines and do the paperwork, and just dumb enough to passively accept all these increasingly shittier jobs with the lower pay, the longer hours, the reduced benefits, the end of overtime and the vanishing pension that disappears the minute you go to collect it, and now they're coming for your Social Security money. They want your retirement money. They want it back so they can give it to their criminal friends on Wall Street, and you know something? They'll get it. They'll get it all from you, sooner or later, 'cause they own this fucking place. It's a big club, and you ain't in it. You and I are not in the big club. And by the way, it's the same big club they use to beat you over the head with all day long when they tell you what to believe. All day long beating you over the head in their media telling you what to believe, what to think and what to buy. The table is tilted folks. The game is rigged, and nobody seems to notice, nobody seems to care. Good honest hard-working people -- white collar, blue collar, it doesn't matter what color shirt you have on -- good honest hard-working people continue -- these are people of modest means -- continue to elect these rich cocksuckers who don't give a fuck about them. They don't give a fuck about you. They don't give a fuck about you. They don't care about you at all -- at all -- at all. And nobody seems to notice, nobody seems to care. That's what the owners count on; the fact that Americans will probably remain willfully ignorant of the big red, white and blue dick that's being jammed up their assholes everyday. Because the owners of this country know the truth: it's called the American Dream, because you have to be asleep to believe it. ~ George Carlin,
112:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,
113:Education

THE EDUCATION of a human being should begin at birth and continue throughout his life.

   Indeed, if we want this education to have its maximum result, it should begin even before birth; in this case it is the mother herself who proceeds with this education by means of a twofold action: first, upon herself for her own improvement, and secondly, upon the child whom she is forming physically. For it is certain that the nature of the child to be born depends very much upon the mother who forms it, upon her aspiration and will as well as upon the material surroundings in which she lives. To see that her thoughts are always beautiful and pure, her feelings always noble and fine, her material surroundings as harmonious as possible and full of a great simplicity - this is the part of education which should apply to the mother herself. And if she has in addition a conscious and definite will to form the child according to the highest ideal she can conceive, then the very best conditions will be realised so that the child can come into the world with his utmost potentialities. How many difficult efforts and useless complications would be avoided in this way!

   Education to be complete must have five principal aspects corresponding to the five principal activities of the human being: the physical, the vital, the mental, the psychic and the spiritual. Usually, these phases of education follow chronologically the growth of the individual; this, however, does not mean that one of them should replace another, but that all must continue, completing one another until the end of his life.

   We propose to study these five aspects of education one by one and also their interrelationships. But before we enter into the details of the subject, I wish to make a recommendation to parents. Most parents, for various reasons, give very little thought to the true education which should be imparted to children. When they have brought a child into the world, provided him with food, satisfied his various material needs and looked after his health more or less carefully, they think they have fully discharged their duty. Later on, they will send him to school and hand over to the teachers the responsibility for his education.

   There are other parents who know that their children must be educated and who try to do what they can. But very few, even among those who are most serious and sincere, know that the first thing to do, in order to be able to educate a child, is to educate oneself, to become conscious and master of oneself so that one never sets a bad example to one's child. For it is above all through example that education becomes effective. To speak good words and to give wise advice to a child has very little effect if one does not oneself give him an example of what one teaches. Sincerity, honesty, straightforwardness, courage, disinterestedness, unselfishness, patience, endurance, perseverance, peace, calm, self-control are all things that are taught infinitely better by example than by beautiful speeches. Parents, have a high ideal and always act in accordance with it and you will see that little by little your child will reflect this ideal in himself and spontaneously manifest the qualities you would like to see expressed in his nature. Quite naturally a child has respect and admiration for his parents; unless they are quite unworthy, they will always appear to their child as demigods whom he will try to imitate as best he can.

   With very few exceptions, parents are not aware of the disastrous influence that their own defects, impulses, weaknesses and lack of self-control have on their children. If you wish to be respected by a child, have respect for yourself and be worthy of respect at every moment. Never be authoritarian, despotic, impatient or ill-tempered. When your child asks you a question, do not give him a stupid or silly answer under the pretext that he cannot understand you. You can always make yourself understood if you take enough trouble; and in spite of the popular saying that it is not always good to tell the truth, I affirm that it is always good to tell the truth, but that the art consists in telling it in such a way as to make it accessible to the mind of the hearer. In early life, until he is twelve or fourteen, the child's mind is hardly open to abstract notions and general ideas. And yet you can train it to understand these things by using concrete images, symbols or parables. Up to quite an advanced age and for some who mentally always remain children, a narrative, a story, a tale well told teach much more than any number of theoretical explanations.

   Another pitfall to avoid: do not scold your child without good reason and only when it is quite indispensable. A child who is too often scolded gets hardened to rebuke and no longer attaches much importance to words or severity of tone. And above all, take good care never to scold him for a fault which you yourself commit. Children are very keen and clear-sighted observers; they soon find out your weaknesses and note them without pity.

   When a child has done something wrong, see that he confesses it to you spontaneously and frankly; and when he has confessed, with kindness and affection make him understand what was wrong in his movement so that he will not repeat it, but never scold him; a fault confessed must always be forgiven. You should not allow any fear to come between you and your child; fear is a pernicious means of education: it invariably gives birth to deceit and lying. Only a discerning affection that is firm yet gentle and an adequate practical knowledge will create the bonds of trust that are indispensable for you to be able to educate your child effectively. And do not forget that you have to control yourself constantly in order to be equal to your task and truly fulfil the duty which you owe your child by the mere fact of having brought him into the world.

   Bulletin, February 1951

   ~ The Mother, On Education,
114:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study
   Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work.
   The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation.
   Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law.
   Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner.
   Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems.
   Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy.
   The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick.
   The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism.
   Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled.
   The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism.
   The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment.
   The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece.
   Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good.
   The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices.
   The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita.
   The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment.
   The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science.
   The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals.
   Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style.
   The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other.
   The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion.
   Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind.
   The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism.
   The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley.
   The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics.
   The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues.
   Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language.
   Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment.
   Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject.
   Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick.
   The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism.
   The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical.
   The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy.
   The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master.
   The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy.
   The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium.
   Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy.
   Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years.
   Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students.
   The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students.
   The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition.
   Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation.
   Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism.
   Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism.
   First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism.
   Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics.
   The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah.
   The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject.
   The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants
115:The Science of Living

To know oneself and to control oneself

AN AIMLESS life is always a miserable life.

Every one of you should have an aim. But do not forget that on the quality of your aim will depend the quality of your life.

   Your aim should be high and wide, generous and disinterested; this will make your life precious to yourself and to others.

   But whatever your ideal, it cannot be perfectly realised unless you have realised perfection in yourself.

   To work for your perfection, the first step is to become conscious of yourself, of the different parts of your being and their respective activities. You must learn to distinguish these different parts one from another, so that you may become clearly aware of the origin of the movements that occur in you, the many impulses, reactions and conflicting wills that drive you to action. It is an assiduous study which demands much perseverance and sincerity. For man's nature, especially his mental nature, has a spontaneous tendency to give a favourable explanation for everything he thinks, feels, says and does. It is only by observing these movements with great care, by bringing them, as it were, before the tribunal of our highest ideal, with a sincere will to submit to its judgment, that we can hope to form in ourselves a discernment that never errs. For if we truly want to progress and acquire the capacity of knowing the truth of our being, that is to say, what we are truly created for, what we can call our mission upon earth, then we must, in a very regular and constant manner, reject from us or eliminate in us whatever contradicts the truth of our existence, whatever is opposed to it. In this way, little by little, all the parts, all the elements of our being can be organised into a homogeneous whole around our psychic centre. This work of unification requires much time to be brought to some degree of perfection. Therefore, in order to accomplish it, we must arm ourselves with patience and endurance, with a determination to prolong our life as long as necessary for the success of our endeavour.

   As you pursue this labour of purification and unification, you must at the same time take great care to perfect the external and instrumental part of your being. When the higher truth manifests, it must find in you a mind that is supple and rich enough to be able to give the idea that seeks to express itself a form of thought which preserves its force and clarity. This thought, again, when it seeks to clothe itself in words, must find in you a sufficient power of expression so that the words reveal the thought and do not deform it. And the formula in which you embody the truth should be manifested in all your feelings, all your acts of will, all your actions, in all the movements of your being. Finally, these movements themselves should, by constant effort, attain their highest perfection.

   All this can be realised by means of a fourfold discipline, the general outline of which is given here. The four aspects of the discipline do not exclude each other, and can be followed at the same time; indeed, this is preferable. The starting-point is what can be called the psychic discipline. We give the name "psychic" to the psychological centre of our being, the seat within us of the highest truth of our existence, that which can know this truth and set it in movement. It is therefore of capital importance to become conscious of its presence in us, to concentrate on this presence until it becomes a living fact for us and we can identify ourselves with it.

   In various times and places many methods have been prescribed for attaining this perception and ultimately achieving this identification. Some methods are psychological, some religious, some even mechanical. In reality, everyone has to find the one which suits him best, and if one has an ardent and steadfast aspiration, a persistent and dynamic will, one is sure to meet, in one way or another - outwardly through reading and study, inwardly through concentration, meditation, revelation and experience - the help one needs to reach the goal. Only one thing is absolutely indispensable: the will to discover and to realise. This discovery and realisation should be the primary preoccupation of our being, the pearl of great price which we must acquire at any cost. Whatever you do, whatever your occupations and activities, the will to find the truth of your being and to unite with it must be always living and present behind all that you do, all that you feel, all that you think.

   To complement this movement of inner discovery, it would be good not to neglect the development of the mind. For the mental instrument can equally be a great help or a great hindrance. In its natural state the human mind is always limited in its vision, narrow in its understanding, rigid in its conceptions, and a constant effort is therefore needed to widen it, to make it more supple and profound. So it is very necessary to consider everything from as many points of view as possible. Towards this end, there is an exercise which gives great suppleness and elevation to the thought. It is as follows: a clearly formulated thesis is set; against it is opposed its antithesis, formulated with the same precision. Then by careful reflection the problem must be widened or transcended until a synthesis is found which unites the two contraries in a larger, higher and more comprehensive idea.

   Many other exercises of the same kind can be undertaken; some have a beneficial effect on the character and so possess a double advantage: that of educating the mind and that of establishing control over the feelings and their consequences. For example, you must never allow your mind to judge things and people, for the mind is not an instrument of knowledge; it is incapable of finding knowledge, but it must be moved by knowledge. Knowledge belongs to a much higher domain than that of the human mind, far above the region of pure ideas. The mind has to be silent and attentive to receive knowledge from above and manifest it. For it is an instrument of formation, of organisation and action, and it is in these functions that it attains its full value and real usefulness.

   There is another practice which can be very helpful to the progress of the consciousness. Whenever there is a disagreement on any matter, such as a decision to be taken, or an action to be carried out, one must never remain closed up in one's own conception or point of view. On the contrary, one must make an effort to understand the other's point of view, to put oneself in his place and, instead of quarrelling or even fighting, find the solution which can reasonably satisfy both parties; there always is one for men of goodwill.

   Here we must mention the discipline of the vital. The vital being in us is the seat of impulses and desires, of enthusiasm and violence, of dynamic energy and desperate depressions, of passions and revolts. It can set everything in motion, build and realise; but it can also destroy and mar everything. Thus it may be the most difficult part to discipline in the human being. It is a long and exacting labour requiring great patience and perfect sincerity, for without sincerity you will deceive yourself from the very outset, and all endeavour for progress will be in vain. With the collaboration of the vital no realisation seems impossible, no transformation impracticable. But the difficulty lies in securing this constant collaboration. The vital is a good worker, but most often it seeks its own satisfaction. If that is refused, totally or even partially, the vital gets vexed, sulks and goes on strike. Its energy disappears more or less completely and in its place leaves disgust for people and things, discouragement or revolt, depression and dissatisfaction. At such moments it is good to remain quiet and refuse to act; for these are the times when one does stupid things and in a few moments one can destroy or spoil the progress that has been made during months of regular effort. These crises are shorter and less dangerous for those who have established a contact with their psychic being which is sufficient to keep alive in them the flame of aspiration and the consciousness of the ideal to be realised. They can, with the help of this consciousness, deal with their vital as one deals with a rebellious child, with patience and perseverance, showing it the truth and light, endeavouring to convince it and awaken in it the goodwill which has been veiled for a time. By means of such patient intervention each crisis can be turned into a new progress, into one more step towards the goal. Progress may be slow, relapses may be frequent, but if a courageous will is maintained, one is sure to triumph one day and see all difficulties melt and vanish before the radiance of the truth-consciousness.

   Lastly, by means of a rational and discerning physical education, we must make our body strong and supple enough to become a fit instrument in the material world for the truth-force which wants to manifest through us.

   In fact, the body must not rule, it must obey. By its very nature it is a docile and faithful servant. Unfortunately, it rarely has the capacity of discernment it ought to have with regard to its masters, the mind and the vital. It obeys them blindly, at the cost of its own well-being. The mind with its dogmas, its rigid and arbitrary principles, the vital with its passions, its excesses and dissipations soon destroy the natural balance of the body and create in it fatigue, exhaustion and disease. It must be freed from this tyranny and this can be done only through a constant union with the psychic centre of the being. The body has a wonderful capacity of adaptation and endurance. It is able to do so many more things than one usually imagines. If, instead of the ignorant and despotic masters that now govern it, it is ruled by the central truth of the being, you will be amazed at what it is capable of doing. Calm and quiet, strong and poised, at every minute it will be able to put forth the effort that is demanded of it, for it will have learnt to find rest in action and to recuperate, through contact with the universal forces, the energies it expends consciously and usefully. In this sound and balanced life a new harmony will manifest in the body, reflecting the harmony of the higher regions, which will give it perfect proportions and ideal beauty of form. And this harmony will be progressive, for the truth of the being is never static; it is a perpetual unfolding of a growing perfection that is more and more total and comprehensive. As soon as the body has learnt to follow this movement of progressive harmony, it will be possible for it to escape, through a continuous process of transformation, from the necessity of disintegration and destruction. Thus the irrevocable law of death will no longer have any reason to exist.

   When we reach this degree of perfection which is our goal, we shall perceive that the truth we seek is made up of four major aspects: Love, Knowledge, Power and Beauty. These four attributes of the Truth will express themselves spontaneously in our being. The psychic will be the vehicle of true and pure love, the mind will be the vehicle of infallible knowledge, the vital will manifest an invincible power and strength and the body will be the expression of a perfect beauty and harmony.

   Bulletin, November 1950

   ~ The Mother, On Education,
116:Mental Education

OF ALL lines of education, mental education is the most widely known and practised, yet except in a few rare cases there are gaps which make it something very incomplete and in the end quite insufficient.

   Generally speaking, schooling is considered to be all the mental education that is necessary. And when a child has been made to undergo, for a number of years, a methodical training which is more like cramming than true schooling, it is considered that whatever is necessary for his mental development has been done. Nothing of the kind. Even conceding that the training is given with due measure and discrimination and does not permanently damage the brain, it cannot impart to the human mind the faculties it needs to become a good and useful instrument. The schooling that is usually given can, at the most, serve as a system of gymnastics to increase the suppleness of the brain. From this standpoint, each branch of human learning represents a special kind of mental gymnastics, and the verbal formulations given to these various branches each constitute a special and well-defined language.

   A true mental education, which will prepare man for a higher life, has five principal phases. Normally these phases follow one after another, but in exceptional individuals they may alternate or even proceed simultaneously. These five phases, in brief, are:

   (1) Development of the power of concentration, the capacity of attention.
   (2) Development of the capacities of expansion, widening, complexity and richness.
   (3) Organisation of one's ideas around a central idea, a higher ideal or a supremely luminous idea that will serve as a guide in life.
   (4) Thought-control, rejection of undesirable thoughts, to become able to think only what one wants and when one wants.
   (5) Development of mental silence, perfect calm and a more and more total receptivity to inspirations coming from the higher regions of the being.

   It is not possible to give here all the details concerning the methods to be employed in the application of these five phases of education to different individuals. Still, a few explanations on points of detail can be given.

   Undeniably, what most impedes mental progress in children is the constant dispersion of their thoughts. Their thoughts flutter hither and thither like butterflies and they have to make a great effort to fix them. Yet this capacity is latent in them, for when you succeed in arousing their interest, they are capable of a good deal of attention. By his ingenuity, therefore, the educator will gradually help the child to become capable of a sustained effort of attention and a faculty of more and more complete absorption in the work in hand. All methods that can develop this faculty of attention from games to rewards are good and can all be utilised according to the need and the circumstances. But it is the psychological action that is most important and the sovereign method is to arouse in the child an interest in what you want to teach him, a liking for work, a will to progress. To love to learn is the most precious gift that one can give to a child: to love to learn always and everywhere, so that all circumstances, all happenings in life may be constantly renewed opportunities for learning more and always more.

   For that, to attention and concentration should be added observation, precise recording and faithfulness of memory. This faculty of observation can be developed by varied and spontaneous exercises, making use of every opportunity that presents itself to keep the child's thought wakeful, alert and prompt. The growth of the understanding should be stressed much more than that of memory. One knows well only what one has understood. Things learnt by heart, mechanically, fade away little by little and finally disappear; what is understood is never forgotten. Moreover, you must never refuse to explain to a child the how and the why of things. If you cannot do it yourself, you must direct the child to those who are qualified to answer or point out to him some books that deal with the question. In this way you will progressively awaken in the child the taste for true study and the habit of making a persistent effort to know.

   This will bring us quite naturally to the second phase of development in which the mind should be widened and enriched.

   You will gradually show the child that everything can become an interesting subject for study if it is approached in the right way. The life of every day, of every moment, is the best school of all, varied, complex, full of unexpected experiences, problems to be solved, clear and striking examples and obvious consequences. It is so easy to arouse healthy curiosity in children, if you answer with intelligence and clarity the numerous questions they ask. An interesting reply to one readily brings others in its train and so the attentive child learns without effort much more than he usually does in the classroom. By a choice made with care and insight, you should also teach him to enjoy good reading-matter which is both instructive and attractive. Do not be afraid of anything that awakens and pleases his imagination; imagination develops the creative mental faculty and through it study becomes living and the mind develops in joy.

   In order to increase the suppleness and comprehensiveness of his mind, one should see not only that he studies many varied topics, but above all that a single subject is approached in various ways, so that the child understands in a practical manner that there are many ways of facing the same intellectual problem, of considering it and solving it. This will remove all rigidity from his brain and at the same time it will make his thinking richer and more supple and prepare it for a more complex and comprehensive synthesis. In this way also the child will be imbued with the sense of the extreme relativity of mental learning and, little by little, an aspiration for a truer source of knowledge will awaken in him.

   Indeed, as the child grows older and progresses in his studies, his mind too ripens and becomes more and more capable of forming general ideas, and with them almost always comes a need for certitude, for a knowledge that is stable enough to form the basis of a mental construction which will permit all the diverse and scattered and often contradictory ideas accumulated in his brain to be organised and put in order. This ordering is indeed very necessary if one is to avoid chaos in one's thoughts. All contradictions can be transformed into complements, but for that one must discover the higher idea that will have the power to bring them harmoniously together. It is always good to consider every problem from all possible standpoints so as to avoid partiality and exclusiveness; but if the thought is to be active and creative, it must, in every case, be the natural and logical synthesis of all the points of view adopted. And if you want to make the totality of your thoughts into a dynamic and constructive force, you must also take great care as to the choice of the central idea of your mental synthesis; for upon that will depend the value of this synthesis. The higher and larger the central idea and the more universal it is, rising above time and space, the more numerous and the more complex will be the ideas, notions and thoughts which it will be able to organise and harmonise.

   It goes without saying that this work of organisation cannot be done once and for all. The mind, if it is to keep its vigour and youth, must progress constantly, revise its notions in the light of new knowledge, enlarge its frame-work to include fresh notions and constantly reclassify and reorganise its thoughts, so that each of them may find its true place in relation to the others and the whole remain harmonious and orderly.

   All that has just been said concerns the speculative mind, the mind that learns. But learning is only one aspect of mental activity; the other, which is at least equally important, is the constructive faculty, the capacity to form and thus prepare action. This very important part of mental activity has rarely been the subject of any special study or discipline. Only those who want, for some reason, to exercise a strict control over their mental activities think of observing and disciplining this faculty of formation; and as soon as they try it, they have to face difficulties so great that they appear almost insurmountable.

   And yet control over this formative activity of the mind is one of the most important aspects of self-education; one can say that without it no mental mastery is possible. As far as study is concerned, all ideas are acceptable and should be included in the synthesis, whose very function is to become more and more rich and complex; but where action is concerned, it is just the opposite. The ideas that are accepted for translation into action should be strictly controlled and only those that agree with the general trend of the central idea forming the basis of the mental synthesis should be permitted to express themselves in action. This means that every thought entering the mental consciousness should be set before the central idea; if it finds a logical place among the thoughts already grouped, it will be admitted into the synthesis; if not, it will be rejected so that it can have no influence on the action. This work of mental purification should be done very regularly in order to secure a complete control over one's actions.

   For this purpose, it is good to set apart some time every day when one can quietly go over one's thoughts and put one's synthesis in order. Once the habit is acquired, you can maintain control over your thoughts even during work and action, allowing only those which are useful for what you are doing to come to the surface. Particularly, if you have continued to cultivate the power of concentration and attention, only the thoughts that are needed will be allowed to enter the active external consciousness and they then become all the more dynamic and effective. And if, in the intensity of concentration, it becomes necessary not to think at all, all mental vibration can be stilled and an almost total silence secured. In this silence one can gradually open to the higher regions of the mind and learn to record the inspirations that come from there.

   But even before reaching this point, silence in itself is supremely useful, because in most people who have a somewhat developed and active mind, the mind is never at rest. During the day, its activity is kept under a certain control, but at night, during the sleep of the body, the control of the waking state is almost completely removed and the mind indulges in activities which are sometimes excessive and often incoherent. This creates a great stress which leads to fatigue and the diminution of the intellectual faculties.

   The fact is that like all the other parts of the human being, the mind too needs rest and it will not have this rest unless we know how to provide it. The art of resting one's mind is something to be acquired. Changing one's mental activity is certainly one way of resting; but the greatest possible rest is silence. And as far as the mental faculties are concerned a few minutes passed in the calm of silence are a more effective rest than hours of sleep.

   When one has learned to silence the mind at will and to concentrate it in receptive silence, then there will be no problem that cannot be solved, no mental difficulty whose solution cannot be found. When it is agitated, thought becomes confused and impotent; in an attentive tranquillity, the light can manifest itself and open up new horizons to man's capacity. Bulletin, November 1951

   ~ The Mother, On Education,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Education must precede motivation. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
2:By education most have been misled. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
3:Education must start from birth. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
4:Nature is stronger than education. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
5:Education is a nation's cheapest defence ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
6:Education isn't something you can finish ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
7:All of life is a constant education. ~ eleanor-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
8:Education is the best provision for old age. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
9:Education is the cheap defense of nations. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
10:There is no education like adversity. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
11:Without Greek studies there is no education. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
12:Education is inoculation against disruption. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
13:Education is no substitute for intelligence. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
14:Education is the cornerstone of liberty. ~ eleanor-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
15:Knowledge without education is but armed injustice. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
16:Without education, confidence does not come. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
17:I love to read. My education is self-inflicted ~ groucho-marx, @wisdomtrove
18:The highest result of education is tolerance. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
19:A good education is a stepping-stone to wealth. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
20:Don't let schooling interfere with your education. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
21:A cauliflower is a cabbage with a college education. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
22:Education consists mainly of what we have unlearned. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
23:The giving of love is an education in itself. ~ eleanor-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
24:Education gives you neither experience nor wisdom. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
25:Education is hanging around until you've caught on. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
26:For good nurture and education implant good constitutions. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
27:If education is beaten by training, civilization dies. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
28:Animal protection is education to the humanity. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
29:If children have interests, then education happens. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
30:Never begrudge the money you spend on your own education. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
31:Rewards and punishments are the lowest form of education. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
32:True education is a kind of never-ending story . . . ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
33:Experience, travel - these are an education in themselves. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
34:People think of education as something they can finish. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
35:Education is preeminently a matter of quality, not amount. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
36:I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
37:The foundation of every state is the education of its youth. ~ diogenes, @wisdomtrove
38:Genius without education is like silver in the mine. ~ benjamin-franklin, @wisdomtrove
39:The best anti-poverty program is a world-class education. ~ barack-obama, @wisdomtrove
40:Common sense is in spite of, not as the result of education. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
41:Education can no longer be the sole property of the state. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
42:If a man neglects education, he walks lame to the end of his life. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
43:The essence of education is the education of the body. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
44:Very likely education does not make very much difference. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove
45:If you think education is expensive, you should try ignorance ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
46:Ignorance is more costly to any State than education. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
47:It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
48:An education is the investment with the greatest returns. ~ benjamin-franklin, @wisdomtrove
49:Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
50:The school as a means of education to me was simply a blank. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
51:Education is beautification of the inner world and the outer world. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
52:It is through education that all the good in the world arises. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
53:Education levels the playing field, allowing everyone to compete. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
54:Education: the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
55:Humanities education is the worst thing for an industrialist. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
56:I still say the only education worth anything is self-education. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
57:The most important part of education is proper training in the nursery. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
58:Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
59:The very spring and root of honesty and virtue lie in good education. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
60:Higher education is not necessarily a guarantee of higher virtue. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
61:In education, once more, the chief things are equality and freedom. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
62:The real preparation for education is the study of one's self. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
63:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
64:Equality should be the chief basis of the education of youth. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
65:In so many ways, segregation shaped me, and education liberated me. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
66:Intelligence plus character is the true meaning of education. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
67:The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
68:Education breeds confidence. Confidence breeds hope. Hope breeds peace. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
69:Admission of ignorance is often the first step in our education.   ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
70:Intelligence plus character-that is the goal of true education. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
71:There's only one thing that can kill the movies, and that's education. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
72:If the poor boy cannot come to education, education must go to him ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
73:The only purpose of education is freedom; the only method is experience. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
74:The great difficulty in education is to get experience out of ideas. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
75:A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
76:Men are born ignorant, not stupid. They are made stupid by education. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
77:One of the goals of education should be to teach that life is precious. ~ abraham-maslow, @wisdomtrove
78:Ordinary people love entertainment. Extraordinary people adore education. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
79:Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
80:The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future in life. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
81:Education is the manifestation of perfection already existing in man. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
82:Nature is more powerful than education; time will develop everything. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
83:First the education of the senses, then the education of the intellect. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
84:Our most important education system is in the employees' own organization. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
85:Education comes from within; you get it by struggle and effort and thought. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
86:Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
87:I always thought the idea of education was to learn to think for yourself. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
88:The work of education is divided between the teacher and the environment. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
89:The aim of education is the condition of suspended judgment on everything. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
90:A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
91:Education can become a self-fulfilling activity, liberating in and of itself. ~ abraham-maslow, @wisdomtrove
92:Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.   ~ nelson-mandela, @wisdomtrove
93:I no have education. I have inspiration. If I was educated I would be a damn fool. ~ bob-marley, @wisdomtrove
94:I think perhaps education doesn’t do us much good unless it is mixed with sweat. ~ barack-obama, @wisdomtrove
95:The most effective kind of education is that a child should play amongst lovely things. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
96:Harvard gave me an education, but Junior Chamber gave me an education for life. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
97:The great aim of education,’ said Herbert Spencer, ‘is not knowledge but action. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
98:Education for livelihood alone will never make our life full and complete. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
99:Education is not something to prepare you for life; it is a continuous part of life. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
100:Nature makes all the noblemen; wealth, education, or pedigree never made one yet. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
101:Education cannot be effective unless it helps a child to open up himself to life. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
102:Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
103:Culture itself is neither education nor law-making: it is an atmosphere and a heritage. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
104:Education doesn't change life much. It just lifts trouble to a higher plane of regard. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
105:All of life is education and everybody is a teacher and everybody is forever a pupil. ~ abraham-maslow, @wisdomtrove
106:Education is only like good culture,&
107:Education produces natural intuitions, and natural intuitions are erased by education. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
108:I don't care how rich and successful a man is. He's nothing without an education. ~ rodney-dangerfield, @wisdomtrove
109:The goal of education is the advancement of knowledge and the dissemination of truth. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
110:Upon the education of the people of this country the fate of this country depends. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
111:Concentration is a part of life. It is not the consequence of a method of education. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
112:Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
113:Education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
114:To be an American is of itself almost a moral condition, an education, and a career. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
115:Effective leaders are, first and foremost, good teachers. We're in the education business. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
116:If you step up the self-education curve, you will come up with more answers than you can use. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
117:A child's education should begin at least one hundred years before he is born. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
118:Education without morals is like a ship without a compass, merely wandering nowhere. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
119:Make me the the master of education, and I will undertake to change the world. ~ gottfried-wilhelm-leibniz, @wisdomtrove
120:Perception of ideas, rather than the storing of them, should be the aim of education. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
121:The purpose of Compulsory Education is to deprive the common people of their commonsense. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
122:The purpose of education is to enable us to develop to the fullest that which is inside us ~ norman-cousins, @wisdomtrove
123:Not everyone has equal abilities, but everyone should have equal opportunity for education. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
124:Education, as conceived today, is something separated both from biological and social life. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
125:Purity of personal life is the one indispensable condition for building up a sound education.  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
126:The truth is mightier than eloquence, the Spirit greater than genius, faith more than education. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
127:Education without social action is a one-sided value because it has no true power potential. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
128:It might be said now that I have the best of both worlds. A Harvard education and a Yale degree. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
129:The very reason for nature's existence is the education of the soul; it has no other meaning. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
130:Establishing lasting peace is the work of education; all politics can do is keep us out of war. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
131:No part of the education of a politician is more indispensable than the fighting of elections. ~ winston-churchill, @wisdomtrove
132:Education doesn't cease when you leave college or leave the university. Education is a lifetime process. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
133:Education is only the most fully conscious of the channels whereby each generation influences the next. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
134:Football: A sport that bears the same relation to education that bullfighting does to agriculture. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
135:Good relationships require a lot of hard work, education, and willingness to meet each other’s needs. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
136:Opportunities for education should be within the reach of every individual, not for the lucky few. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
137:A person with increasing knowledge and sensory education may derive infinite enjoyment from wine. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
138:I'll tell you what leadership is. It's persuasion and conciliation, and education, and patience. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
139:Every man should have a college education in order to show him how little the thing is really worth. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
140:The best education you can get is investing in yourself, and that doesn't mean college or university. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
141:You can finish school, and even make it easy - but you never finish your education, and it's seldom easy. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
142:Education: that which reveals to the wise and conceals from the stupid the vast limits of their knowledge. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
143:I'm not dismissing the value of higher education; I'm simply saying it comes at the expense of experience. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
144:The goal of early childhood education should be to activate the child's own natural desire to learn. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
145:Education gives sobriety to the young, comfort to the old, riches to the poor and is an ornament to the rich. ~ diogenes, @wisdomtrove
146:Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
147:The education of even a small child, therefore, does not aim at preparing him for school, but for life. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
148:Education should be the process of helping everyone to discover his uniqueness." -Leo Buscaglia (1924-1998) ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
149:Formal education teaches how to stand, but to see the rainbow you must come out and walk many steps on your own. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
150:How can there be any progress of the country without the spread of education, the dawning of knowledge? ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
151:Music has a power of forming the character, and should therefore be introduced into the education of the young. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
152:Nature and education are somewhat similar. The latter transforms man, and in so doing creates a second nature. ~ democritus, @wisdomtrove
153:No man should bring children into the world who is unwilling to persevere to the end in their nature and education. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
154:Education, n.: That which discloses to the wise and disguises from the foolish their lack of understanding. ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
155:The ideal of an “all-round” education is out of date; it has been destroyed by the progress of knowledge. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
156:To understand life is to understand ourselves, and that is both the beginning and the end of education. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
157:A man's real education begins after he has left school. True education is gained through the discipline of life. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
158:Healing comes from gathering wisdom from past actions and letting go of the pain that the education cost you. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
159:Man ultimately decides for himself! And in the end, education must be education towards the ability to decide ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
160:I've learned that education, experience, and memories are three things that no one can take away from you. ~ h-jackson-brown-jr, @wisdomtrove
161:One of the reasons why it needs no special education to be a Christian is that Christianity is an education itself. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
162:The educated man is the man who can do something. The quality of his work marks the degree of his education. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
163:Education demands, then, only this: the utilization of the inner powers of the child for his own instruction. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
164:The aim of totalitarian education has never been to instill convictions but to destroy the capacity to form any. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
165:The object of education is not to fill a man's mind with facts; it is to teach him how to use his mind in thinking. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
166:I doubt whether classical education ever has been or can be successfully carried out without corporal punishment. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
167:That is the one eternal education: to be sure enough that something is true that you dare to tell it to a child. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
168:The function of education is to help you from childhood not to imitate anybody, but be yourself all the time. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
169:We think there is a parallel between federal involvement in education and the decline in profit over recent years. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
170:Healing comes from gathering wisdom from past actions and letting go of the pain that the education cost you. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
171:It seems to me that at this time we need education in the obvious more than investigation of the obscure. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
172:Simply making consistent investments in our self-education and knowledge banks pays major dividends throughout our lives. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
173:Everything that we encounter leaves traces behind. Everything contributes imperceptibly to our education. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
174:Only when the child is able to identify its own center with the center of the universe does education really begin. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
175:Restraint and discipline and examples of virtue and justice. These are the things that form the education of the world. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
176:There is a tolerably general agreement about what a university is not. It is not a place of professional education. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
177:A person with average talent, ambition and education, can outstrip a genius in society, if that person has focused goals. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
178:Our progress as a nation can be no swifter than our progress in education. The human mind is our fundamental resource. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
179:The purpose of adult education is to help them to learn, not to teach them all you know and thus stop them from learning. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
180:Education is the beginning of transformation. Dedicate yourself to daily learning via books/audios/seminars and coaching. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
181:All education is the art of making men ethical (sittlich), of transforming the old Adam into the new Adam. ~ georg-wilhelm-friedrich-hegel, @wisdomtrove
182:Everybody knows that the dumbest people in any American university are in the education department, and English after that. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
183:Natural ability without education has more often raised a man to glory and virtue than education without natural ability. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
184:The true purpose of education is to prepare young men and women for effective citizenship in a free form of government. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
185:The world of education is like an island where people cut off from the world are prepared for life by exclusion from it. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
186:Game shows are designed to make us feel better about the random, useless facts that are all we have left of our education. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
187:The Church is not a gallery for the exhibition of eminent Christians, but a school for the education of imperfect ones. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
188:The role of education is to interest the child profoundly in an external activity to which he will give all his potential ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
189:Your biggest opportunity probably lies under your own feet, in your current job, industry, education, experience or interests. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
190:Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
191:If education tries to make other persons out of us than we essentially are, deeper inside, it stultifies, and reproach matters. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
192:Right education should help the student, not only to develop his capacities, but to understand his own highest interest. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
193:As few subjects are more interesting to society, so few have been more frequently written upon than the education of youth. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
194:Education isn't play&
195:If someone is going down the wrong road, he doesn't need motivation to speed him up. What he needs is education to turn him around. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
196:Instead of focusing on the world's problems, give your attention and energy to trust, love, abundance, education and peace. :-) ~ rhonda-byrne, @wisdomtrove
197:Alas! how much there is in education, and in our social institutions, to prepare us and our children for insanity. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
198:The highest education is that which does not merely give us information but makes our life in harmony with all existence. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
199:Education must enable a man to become more efficient, to achieve with increasing facility the legitimate goals of his life. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
200:If education is to develop human nature so that it may attain the object of its being, it must involve the exercise of judgment. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
201:Now, the education of our children is of national concern, and if they are not educated properly, it is a national calamity. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
202:A fool's brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry. Hence University education. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
203:All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
204:The word education must not be understood in the sense of teaching but of assisting the psychological development of the child. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
205:True education is a kind of never ending story‚ a matter of continual beginnings, of habitual fresh starts, of persistent newness. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
206:Education should no longer be most imparting of knowledge, but must take a new path, seeking the release of human potentialities. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
207:Merely to stuff the child with a lot of information, making him pass examinations, is the most unintelligent form of education. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
208:The earth, the sea and air are the concern of every nation. And science, technology, and education can be the ally of every nation. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
209:Racial understanding is not something we find, but something that we must create. Through education, we seek to change attitudes. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
210:We are faced with the paradoxical fact that education has become one of the chief obstacles to intelligence and freedom of thought. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
211:Due to our preconceptions regarding education, we fail to inquire into the most obvious and wondrous field of study - ourselves. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
212:Education doesn't just take place in stuffy classrooms and university buildings, it can happen everywhere, every day to every person. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
213:The fundamental basis of education must always remain that one must act for oneself. That is clear. One must act for him or herself. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
214:A Brahmin is not so much in need of education as a Chandala. If the son of a Brahmin needs one teacher, that of a Chandala needs ten. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
215:being able to act intelligently and instinctively in the moment is possible only after a long and rigorous of education and experience ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
216:Education in the key to preventing the cycle of violence and hatred that marred the 20th century from repeating itself in the 21st century. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
217:Education without direction is a one-sided social value. Direct action without education is a meaningless expression of pure energy. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
218:Unfortunately, at present, practically no one under thirty goes to workshops. It's a system of education entirely for the middle aged. ~ rupert-sheldrake, @wisdomtrove
219:A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
220:Through the imparting of moral principles, good behaviour, and education we must make the Chandala come up to the level of the Brahmana. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
221:Leaders, whether in the family, in business, in government, or in education, must not allow themselves to mistake intentions for accomplishments . ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
222:At the bottom of education, at the bottom of politics, even at the bottom of religion, there must be for our race economic independence. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
223:Because Vietnam was not a declared war, the veterans are not even eligible for the G. I. Bill of Rights with respect to education or anything. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
224:Intelligence is the capacity to perceive the essential, the what is; and to awaken this capacity, in oneself and in others, is education. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
225:Crucial to science education is hands-on involvement: showing, not just telling; real experiments and field trips and not just "virtual reality". ~ martin-rees, @wisdomtrove
226:Self-education is a continuing source of pleasure to me, for the more I know, the fuller my life is and the better I appreciate my own existence ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
227:If the parents in each generation always or often knew what really goes on at their sons' schools, the history of education would be very different. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
228:The quality of strength lined with tenderness is an unbeatable combination, as are intelligence and necessity when unblunted by formal education. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
229:You are told a lot about your education, but some beautiful, sacred memory, preserved since childhood, is perhaps the best education of all. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
230:Drugs or overeating or alcohol or sex, it was all just another way to find peace. To escape what we know. Our education. Our bite of the apple. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
231:Since we live in an age of innovation, a practical education must prepare a man for work that does not yet exist and cannot yet be clearly defined. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
232:Whatever helps to shape the human being - to make the individual what he is, or hinder him from being what he is not - is part of his education. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
233:Do not be embarrassed by your mistakes. Nothing can teach us better than our understanding of them. This is one of the best ways of self-education. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
234:Cleanliness and order are not matters of instinct; they are matters of education, and like most great things, you must cultivate a taste for them. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
235:Curiosity, or the love of knowledge, has a very limited influence, and requires youth, leisure education, genius and example to make it govern any person ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
236:With a philosophy education, one can infuriate his peers, intimidate his date, think of obscure, unreliable ways to make money, and never regret a thing. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
237:Most men fail, not through lack of education or agreeable personal qualities, but from lack of dogged determination, from lack of dauntless will. ~ orison-swett-marden, @wisdomtrove
238:Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
239:In our democracy every young person should have an equal opportunity to obtain a higher education, regardless of his station in life or financial means. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
240:There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
241:A man is a great bundle of tools. He is born into this life without the knowledge of how to use them. Education is the process of learning their use. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
242:We discovered that education is not something which the teacher does, but that it is a natural process which develops spontaneously in the human being. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
243:Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
244:By education most have been misled; So they believe, because they were bred. The priest continues where the nurse began, And thus the child imposes on the man. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
245:Education is not filling the mind with a lot of facts. Perfecting the instrument and getting complete mastery of my own mind [is the ideal of education]. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
246:A musical education is necessary for musical judgement. What most people relish is hardly music; it is rather a drowsy reverie relieved by nervous thrills. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
247:The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character - that is the goal of true education. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
248:We want the education by which character is formed, strength of mind is increased, the intellect is expanded, and by which one can stand on one's own feet. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
249:You parents can provide no better gift for your children than an education in the liberal arts. House and home burn down, but an education is easy to carry along. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
250:Education is the food of youth, the delight of old age, the ornament of prosperity, the refuge and comfort of adversity, and the provocation to grace in the soul. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
251:[the difference between the old and the new education being] in a word, the old was a kind of propagation-men transmitting manhood to men; the new is merely propaganda. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
252:A good book is an education of the heart. It enlarges your sense of human possibility what human nature is of what happens in the world. It's a creator of inwardness. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
253:I do not want to make teaching films. If I did, I would create a separate organization. It is not higher education that interests me so much as general mass education. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
254:My biggest motivation? Just to keep challenging myself. I see life almost like one long University education that I never had - everyday I'm learning something new. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
255:Give me a man with a good allowance of nose,... when I want any good head-work done I choose a man - provided his education has been suitable - with a long nose. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
256:Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is. The only function of a school is to make self-education easier; failing that, it does nothing. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
257:They who refuse education to a black man would turn the South into a vast poorhouse, and labor into a pendulum, necessity vibrating between poverty and indolence. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
258:Happiness is not the whole aim of education. A man must be independent in his powers and character; able to work and assert his mastery over all that depends on him. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
259:Our world is fast succumbing to the activities of men and women who would stake the future of our species on beliefs that should not survive an elementary school education. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
260:Academic education is the act of memorizing things read in books, and things told by college professors who got their education mostly by memorizing things read in books. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
261:The essence of education is not to stuff you with facts but to help you discover your uniqueness, to teach you how to develop it, and then to show you how to give it away. ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
262:He saw that science had become as great a hoax as religion, that nationalism was a farce, patriotism a fraud, education a form of leprosy, and that morals were for cannibals ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
263:Science is observing truth in the light of head. Religion is observing truth in the light of heart. Humanity is using both the lights. And education is developing that humanity. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
264:The wealthiest Americans often live as though they and their children had nothing to gain from investments in education, infrastructure, clean-energy, and scientific research. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
265:I tell my mother I went to God in spite of my religious education. I feel that my religious education was inadequate, but that doesn't mean that Judaism was inadequate. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
266:The basic proposal of the new education is to be that dunces and idlers must not be made to feel inferior to intelligent and industrious pupils. That would be &
267:Emphasis must be put on learning: there is no substitute to education. It can be briefly formulated in a few words: always, whatever you do in life, think higher and feel deeper. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
268:While the religious divisions in our world are self-evident, many people still imagine that religious conflict is always caused by a lack of education, by poverty, or by politics. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
269:There is an old saying that the course of civilization is a race between catastrophe and education. In a democracy such as ours, we must make sure that education wins the race. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
270:Since one cannot educate adults, the word "education" has an evil sound in politics; there is a pretense of education, when the real purpose is coercion without the use of force. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
271:The essential dilemma of education is to be found in the fact that the sort of man (or woman) who knows a given subject sufficiently well to teach it is usually unwilling to do so. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
272:The problem of education is twofold: first to know, and then to utter. Everyone who lives any semblance of an inner life thinks more nobly and profoundly than he speaks. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
273:Education does not take place when you learn something you did not know before. Education is your ability to use what you have learned to be better today than you were yesterday. ~ lyania-vanzant, @wisdomtrove
274:It makes little difference how many university courses or degrees a person may own. If he cannot use words to move an idea from one point to another, his education is incomplete. ~ norman-cousins, @wisdomtrove
275:Over no nation does the press hold a more absolute control than over the people of America, for the universal education of the poorest classes makes every individual a reader. ~ washington-irving, @wisdomtrove
276:Education is not the means of showing people how to get what they want. Education is an exercise by means of which enough men, it is hoped, will learn to want what is worth having. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
277:It is in fact a part of the function of education to help us escape, not from our own time - for we are bound by that - but from the intellectual and emotional limitations of our time. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
278:Government should uphold-and not undermine-those institutions which are custodians of the very values upon which civilization is founded: religion, education and, above all, family. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
279:I deplore the tendency, in some institutions, to go directly toward training for a trade or profession or something and ignoring the liberal arts. It is the foundation of education. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
280:I thought that culture and education are the shield. An educated person cannot do certain things and, and be educated, you cannot, and there they were, killing children day after day. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
281:It is not that you read a book, pass an examination, and finish with education. The whole of life, from the moment you are born to the moment you die, is a process of learning. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
282:Exactly for the sake of what is new and revolutionary in every child, education must be conservative; it must preserve this newness and introduce it as a new thing into an old world. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
283:The best means of forming a manly, virtuous, and happy people will be found in the right education of youth. Without this foundation, every other means, in my opinion, must fail. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
284:We cannot create observers by saying &
285:Education is learning to grow, learning what to grow toward, learning what is good and bad, learning what is desirable and undesirable, learning what to choose and what not to choose. ~ abraham-maslow, @wisdomtrove
286:Permission marketing turns strangers into friends and friends into loyal customers. It's not just about entertainment - it's about education. Permission marketing is curriculum marketing. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
287:Culture and education have no bounds or limits; now man is in a phase in which he must decide for himself how far he can proceed in the culture that belongs to the whole of humanity. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
288:Education should train the child to use his brains, to make for himself a place in the world and maintain his rights even when it seems that society would shove him into the scrap-heap. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
289:... the exchange of students... should be vastly expanded... Information and education are powerful forces in support of peace. Just as war begins in the minds of men, so does peace. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
290:A new education from birth onwards must be built up. Education must be reconstructed and based on the law of nature and not on the preconceived notions and prejudices of adult society. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
291:All a child's life depends on the ideal it has of its parents. Destroy that and everything goes — morals, behaviour, everything. Absolute trust in some one else is the essence of education. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
292:In true education, anything that comes to our hand is as good as a book: the prank of a page- boy, the blunder of a servant, a bit of table talk - they are all part of the curriculum. ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
293:Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
294:My mother was the most beautiful woman I ever saw. All I am I owe to my mother. I attribute all my success in life to the moral, intellectual and physical education I received from her. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
295:As one man said, "I got a pretty good education. It took me years to get over it." That's what spirituality is all about, you know: unlearning. Unlearning all the rubbish they taught you. ~ anthony-de-mello, @wisdomtrove
296:The heart of the Waldorf method is that education is an art-it must speak to the child's experience. To educate the whole child, his heart and his will must be reached, as well as the mind. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
297:Throughout the course of my life, I have been very fortunate to have had excellent teachers - not just in meditation, but in martial arts, music, scuba diving, and in my academic education. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
298:A boy will learn more true wisdom in a public school in a year than by a private education in five. It is not from masters, but from their equals, that youth learn a knowledge of the world. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
299:The greatness of the human personality begins at the hour of birth. From this almost mystic affirmation there comes what may seem a strange conclusion: that education must start from birth. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
300:Much of the philosophy of religious education has been based upon a false premise, and perhaps many have missed the essence of Christian experience, having had religious training take its place. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
301:Education will not come of itself; it will never come unless you seek it; it will not come unless you take the first steps which lead to it; but, taking these steps, every man can acquire it. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
302:I have the audacity to believe that peoples everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for their minds, and dignity, equality and freedom for their spirits. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
303:Education makes a man a more intelligent shoemaker, if that be his occupation, but not by teaching him how to make shoes; it does so by the mental exercise it gives, and the habits it impresses. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
304:No one can become really educated without having pursued some study in which he took no interest- for it is a part of education to learn to interest ourselves in subjects for which we have no aptitude. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
305:An intelligent person, looking out of his eyes and hearkening in his ears, with a smile on his face all the time, will get more true education than many another in a life of heroic vigils". ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
306:The greatest investment a young person can make is in their own education, in their own mind. Because money comes and goes. Relationships come and go. But what you learn once stays with you forever. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
307:There is not to be found, in all history, any miracle attested by a sufficient number of men, of such unquestioned good sense, education and learning, as to secure us against all delusion in themselves. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
308:Wherever is found what is called a paternal government, there is found state education. It has been discovered that the best way to insure implicit obedience is to commence tyranny in the nursery. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
309:The more that learn to read the less learn how to make a living. That's one thing about a little education. It spoils you for actual work. The more you know the more you think somebody owes you a living. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
310:A general State education is a mere contrivance for moulding people to be exactly like one another, and as the mould in which it casts them is that which pleases the dominant power in the government. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
311:The concept of an education centered upon the care of the living being alters all previous ideas. Resting no longer on a curriculum, or a timetable, education must conform to the facts of human life. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
312:Education is a process that goes on 'til death. The moment you see someone who knows she has found the one true way, and can call all the others false, then you know you're in the company of an ignoramus. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
313:Speaking for the one field which I feel definitely qualified to comment on, I fully believe the animated picture will emerge as one of the greatest mediums, not only of entertainment but also of education. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
314:The older I grow, the more I am convinced that there is no education which one can get from books and costly apparatus that is equal to that which can be gotten from contact with great men and women. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
315:The child is endowed with unknown powers, which can guide us to a radiant future. If what we really want is a new world, then education must take as its aim the development of these hidden possibilities. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
316:You get a very different type of education if you go out to the desert, to the places of power, places where it is easy to cross over from one dimensional plane to another, where power hovers, so to speak. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
317:The basis of self-government and freedom requires the development of character and self-restraint and perseverance and the long view. And these are qualities which require many years of training and education. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
318:The aim of public education is not to spread enlightenment at all; it is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed a standard citizenry, to put down dissent and originality. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
319:There is no end to education. It is not that you read a book, pass an examination, and finish with education. The whole of life, from the moment you are born to the moment you die, is a process of learning. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
320:The supreme end of education is expert discernment in all things-the power to tell the good from the bad, the genuine from the counterfeit, and to prefer the good and the genuine to the bad and the counterfeit. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
321:Their whole life depends on spending money, and now they’ve got none to spend. That’s our civilization and our education: bring up the masses to depend entirely on spending money, and then the money gives out. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
322:Please, don't torture me with cliches. If you're going to try to intimidate me, have the courtesy to go away for a while, acquire a better education, improve your vocabulary, and come back with some fresh metaphors. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
323:The exercises of practical life are formative activities, a work of adaptation to the environment. Such adaptation to the environment and efficient functioning therein is the very essence of a useful education. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
324:Today, however, those things which occupy us in the field of education are the interests of humanity at large and of civilization, and before such great forces we can recognize only one country-the entire world. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
325:Education should be the process of helping everyone to discover his uniqueness, to teach him how to develop that uniqueness, and then to show him how to share it because that’s the only reason for having anything. ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
326:Be not forgetful of prayer. Every time you pray, if your prayer is sincere, there will be new feeling and new meaning in it, which will give you fresh courage, and you will understand that prayer is an education. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
327:The real preparation for education is a study of one's self. The training of the teacher... is something far more than a learning of ideas. It includes the training of character; it is a preparation of the spirit. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
328:Education today, in this particular social period, is assuming truly unlimited importance. And the increased emphasis on its practical value can be summed up in one sentence: education is the best weapon for peace. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
329:Who will bring light to the poor? Who will travel from door to door bringing education to them? Let these people be your God-think of them, work for them, pray for them incessantly. The Lord will show you the way. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
330:There are two extremes to be avoided: one is the attitude of contempt toward education, the other is the tragic snobbery of assuming that marching through an educational system is a sure cure for ignorance and mediocrity. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
331:We must always meet our obligation to those who fall behind without our assistance. But let's remember, without a race there can be no champion, no records broken, no excellence - in education or any other walk of life. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
332:A man of sense and education should meet a suitable companion in a wife. It is a miserable thing when the conversation can only be such as whether the mutton should be boiled or roasted, and probably a dispute about that. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
333:Enjoyment is an art and a skill for which we have little talent or energy... your entire education has has deprived you of this capacity because it was preparing you for the future, instead of showing you how to be alive now. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
334:Education is no substitute for intelligence. That elusive quality is defined only in part by puzzle-solving ability. It is in the creation of new puzzles reflecting what your senses report that you round out the definitions. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
335:If you will make a deliberate decision to develop a positive attitude toward opportunities and obstacles, you are on your way toward having what is the most important quality in education: the power of positive thinking. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
336:I have written 240 books on a wide variety of topics. . . . Some of it I based on education I received in my school, but most of it was backed by other ways of learning - chiefly in the books I obtained in the public library. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
337:Creativity is the highest form of intelligence. Over time, after developing a more advanced creative brain, I started feeling that my college education was more so something to be ashamed of rather than something to be proud of. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
338:What we want is muscles of iron and nerves of steel. We have wept long enough. No more weeping, but stand on your feet and be men. It is man-making theories that we want. It is man-making education all round that we want. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
339:Education is one of the subjects which most essentially require to be considered by various minds, and from a variety of points of view. For, of all many-sided subjects, it is the one which has the greatest number of sides. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
340:The education situation which most effectively promotes significant learning is one in which (1) threat to the self of the learner is reduced to a minimum and (2) differential perception of the field of experience is facilitated ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
341:But remember that the pain of parting from friends will be felt by everybody at times, whatever be their education or state. Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience; or give it a more fascinating name: call it hope. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
342:If Harvard is $60,000 and University of Toronto, where I went to school, is maybe six. So you're really telling me that education is 10 times better at Harvard than it is at University of Toronto? That seems ridiculous to me. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
343:Education in the true sense is helping the individual to be mature and free, to flower greatly in love and goodness. That is what we should be interested in, and not in shaping the child according to some idealistic pattern. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
344:If you use a philosophy education well, you can get your foot in the door of any industry you please. Industries are like the blossoms on a tree while philosophy is the trunk - it holds the tree together, but it often goes unnoticed. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
345:It was my teacher's genius, her quick sympathy, her loving tact which made the first years of my education so beautiful. It was because she seized the right moment to impart knowledge that made it so pleasant and acceptable to me. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
346:You may be able to read Bernard Shaw's plays, you may be able to quote Shakespeare or Voltaire or some new philosopher; but if you in yourself are not intelligent, if you are not creative, what is the point of this education? ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
347:Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities, because in each of us there is a private hope and dream which, fulfilled, can be translated into benefit for everyone and greater strength of the nation. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
348:Our leaders must remember that education doesn't begin with some isolated bureaucrat in Washington. It doesn't even begin with state or local officials. Education begins in the home, where it is a parental right and responsibility. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
349:Talk is by far the most accessible of pleasures. It costs nothing in money, it is all profit, it completes our education, founds and fosters our friendships, and can be enjoyed at any age and in almost any state of health. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
350:By education I mean justice that training in excellence from youth upward which makes a man passionately desire to be a perfect citizen, and teaches him to rule, and to obey, with justice. This is the only education which deserves the name. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
351:Governments want efficient technicians, not human beings, because human beings become dangerous to governments – and to organized religions as well. That is why governments and religious organizations seek to control education. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
352:There was even a recurrent idea in America about an education that would leave out history and the past, that should be a sort of equipment for aerial adventure, weighed down by none of the stowaways of inheritance or tradition. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
353:We must remember that intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character-that is the goal of true education. The complete education gives one not only power of concentration, but worthy objectives upon which to concentrate. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
354:The advanced education in Tantra obviously has to do with the entrance into samadhi, the negation of the self. That is what the path of negation means, not the negation of life, but the negation of anything that is not enlightenment. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
355:If we help an educated man's daughter to go to Cambridge are we not forcing her to think not about education but about war? - not how she can learn, but how she can fight in order that she might win the same advantages as her brothers? ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
356:The highest result of education is tolerance. Long ago men fought and died for their faith; but it took ages to teach them the other kind of courage, - the courage to recognize the faiths of their brethren and their rights of conscience. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
357:Psychology is much bigger than just medicine, or fixing unhealthy things. It's about education, work, marriage - it's even about sports. What I want to do is see psychologists working to help people build strengths in all these domains. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
358:It is exactly in the repetition of the exercises that the education of the senses exists; not that the child shall know colors, forms or qualities, but that he refine his senses through an exercise of attention, comparison and judgment. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
359:An education capable of saving humanity is no small undertaking; it involves the spiritual development of man, the enhancement of his value as an individual, and the preparation of young people to understand the times in which they live. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
360:The power to rethink a situation is our greatest tool for transforming the world. This notion is taking hold in medicine, in business, in education. But not in politics and the media. They are the last holdouts of old-paradigm thinking. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
361:Education is the point at which we decide whether we love the world enough to assume responsibility for it and by the same token save it from that ruin which, except for renewal, except for the coming of the new and young, would be inevitable. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
362:But in truth I know nothing about the philosophy of education except this: that the greatest and the most important difficulty known to human learning seems to lie in that area which treats how to bring up children and how to educate them. ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
363:The problem in our society and in our schools is to inclulcate, without overdoing it, the notion of education, as in the Latin educere&
364:True education is to learn how to think, not what to think. If you know how to think, if you really have that capacity, then you are a free human being-free of dogmas, superstitions, ceremonies-and therefore you can find out what religion is. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
365:I now realize that education is a last wild effort on the part of the authorities to prevent an overdose of leisure from driving the world mad. Learning is no longer an improver; it is merely the most expensive time-filler the world has ever known. ~ quentin-crisp, @wisdomtrove
366:But as to women, who can penetrate the real sufferings of their she condition? Man's very sympathy with their estate has much of selfishness and more suspicion. Their love, their virtue, beauty, education, but form good housekeepers, to breed a nation. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
367:For my part, I should be inclined to suggest that the chief object of education should be to restore simplicity. If you like to put it so, the chief object of education is not to learn things; nay, the chief object of education is to unlearn things. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
368:Education should therefore include the two forms of work, manual and intellectual, for the same person, and thus make it understood by practical experience that these two kinds complete each other and are equally essential to a civilized existence. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
369:Good company requires only birth, education, and manners, and with regard to education is not very nice. Birth and good manners are essential; but a little learning is by no means a dangerous thing in good company; on the contrary, it will do very well. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
370:Children are nowhere taught, in any systematic way, to distinguish true from false, or meaningful from meaningless, statements. Why is this so? Because their elders, even in the democratic countries, do not want them to be given this kind of education. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
371:Politically, I don't care what party you're from, offer a point of view and let's see what happens and really debate the issues rather than use personal attacks. Really talk about it, talk about immigration, talk about education, talk about pollution. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
372:We must be strong at home if we are going to be strong abroad. We understand that. So we want to be strong at home in our morale or in our spirit, we want to be strong intellectually, in our education, in our economy and, where necessary, militarily. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
373:Our brains are so conditioned through education, through religion, to think we are separate entities with separate souls and so on. We are not individuals at all. We are the result of thousands of years of human experience, human endeavor and struggle. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
374:Scientific observation then has established that education is not what the teacher gives; education is a natural process spontaneously carried out by the human individual, and is acquired not by listening to words but by experiences upon the environment. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
375:The immediate need for education and practice in using our natural resources of soil, forest, water, wildlife and areas of inspirational beauty to the best advantage of all, for this generation and others to come, is again apparent to every observant citizen. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
376:There is a power under your control that is greater than poverty, greater than the lack of education, greater than all your fears and superstitions combined. It is the power to take possession of your own mind and direct it to whatever ends you may desire. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
377:The inspirational value of the space program is probably of far greater importance to education than any input of dollars... A whole generation is growing up which has been attracted to the hard disciplines of science and engineering by the romance of space. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
378:You have to set big goals for yourself. And you have to put aside all the negativity in your life that tells you that if you came from a certain education or a certain family background that you can't achieve big goals. That's one of the things that America has. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
379:Our highest endeavor must be to develop free human beings who are able of themselves to impart purpose and direction to their lives. The need for imagination, a sense of truth, and a feeling of responsibility—these three forces are the very nerve of education. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
380:Education and study, and the favors of the muses, confer no greater benefit on those that seek them than these humanizing and civilizing lessons, which teach our natural qualities to submit to the limitations prescribed by reason, and to avoid the wildness of extremes. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
381:Fuller believed human societies would soon rely mainly on renewable sources of energy, such as solar- and wind-derived electricity,. envisioned an age of "universal education and sustenance of all humanity". "The heart has reasons that reason does not understand." ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
382:Tomorrow everybody - or practically everybody - will have had the education of the upper class of yesterday, and will expect equivalent opportunities. That is why we face the problem of making every kind of job meaningful and capable of satisfying every educated man. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
383:I do not think that you can try and systematize education for the whole world. I would try experiments in small communities and in schools to see how they work out, instead of taking the children of an entire nation and trying to bring them up on the same system. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
384:Education to independence demands that young people should be accustomed early to consult their own sense of propriety and their own reason. To regard study as mere receptivity and memory work is to have a most incomplete view of what instruction means. ~ georg-wilhelm-friedrich-hegel, @wisdomtrove
385:If education recognizes the intrinsic value of the child's personality and provides an environment suited to spiritual growth, we have the revelation of an entirely new child whose astonishing characteristics can eventually contribute to the betterment of the world. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
386:There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome." "And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody." "And yours," he replied with a smile, "is wilfully to misunderstand them. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
387:The purpose of a Christian education would not be merely to make men and women pious Christians: a system which aimed too rigidly at this end alone would become only obscurantist. A Christian education must primarily teach people to be able to think in Christian categories. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
388:The function of education, therefore, is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. But education which stops with efficiency may prove the greatest menace to society. The most dangerous criminal may be the man gifted with reason, but with no morals. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
389:The prosperity of a country depends, not on the abundance of its revenues, nor on the strength of its fortifications, nor on the beauty of its public buildings; but it consists in the number of its cultivated citizens, in its men of education, enlightenment and character. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
390:A quality education has the power to transform societies in a single generation, provide children with the protection they need from the hazards of poverty, labor exploitation and disease, and given them the knowledge, skills, and confidence to reach their full potential. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
391:It seems to me that education has a two-fold function to perform in the life of man and in society: the one is utility and the other is culture. Education must enable a man to become more efficient, to achieve with increasing facility the ligitimate goals of his life. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
392:If education is always to be conceived along the same antiquated lines of a mere transmission of knowledge, there is little to be hoped from it in the bettering of man's future. For what is the use of transmitting knowledge if the individual's total development lags behind? ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
393:Even the lowest of the Hindus, the Pariah, has less of the brute in him than a Briton in a similar social status. This is the result of an old and excellent religious civilization. This evolution to a higher spiritual state is possible only through discipline and education. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
394:I am beginning to suspect all elaborate and special systems of education. They seem to me to be built up on the supposition that every child is a kind of idiot who must be taught to think. Whereas, if the child is left to himself, he will think more and better, if less showily. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
395:You've spent years learning how to read and write, years learning how to speak. But what about listening? What training or education have you had that enables you to listen so that you really, deeply understand another human being from that individual's own frame of reference? ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
396:The farmer is a poor creature who skins the land and leaves it worthless to his children. The farmer is a good farmer who, having enabled the land to support himself and to provide for the education of his children, leaves it to them a little better than he found it himself. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
397:A primary object should be the education of our youth in the science of government. In a republic, what species of knowledge can be equally important? And what duty more pressing than communicating it to those who are to be the future guardians of the liberties of the country? ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
398:There is no great difference in reality between one country and another, because it is always people you meet everywhere. They may look different or be dressed differently, they may have a different education or position; but they are all the same. They are all people to be loved. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
399:As long as learning is connected with earning, as long as certain jobs can only be reached through exams, so long must we take the examination system seriously. If another ladder to employment was contrived, much so-called education would disappear, and no one be a penny the stupider. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
400:For after all, what is there behind, except money? Money for the right kind of education, money for influential friends, money for leisure and peace of mind, money for trips to Italy. Money writes books, money sells them. Give me not righteousness, O lord, give me money, only money. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
401:The aim of education is to make the pupil like and dislike what he ought... . The little human animal will not at first have the right responses. It must be trained to feel pleasure, liking, disgust, and hatred at those things which really are pleasant, likable, disgusting, and hateful. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
402:I'm not convinced that women have the education or the sense of their own history enough or that they understand the cruelty of which men are capable and the delight that many men will take in seeing you choose to chain yourself - then they get to say &
403:Teach the ignorant as much as you can; society is culpable in not providing a free education for all and it must answer for the night which it produces. If the soul is left in darkness sins will be committed. The guilty one is not he who commits the sin, but he who causes the darkness. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
404:All of us have been trained by education and environment to seek personal gain and security and to fight for ourselves. Though we cover it over with pleasant phrases, we have been educated for various professions within a system which is based on exploitation and acquisitive fear. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
405:I admire the good samaritan, but I don't want to be one.I don't want to spend my life picking up people by the side of the road after they have been beaten up and robbed.I want to change the Jericho road, so that everybody has an opportunity for a job, education, security, health. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
406:If the idea of having to change ourselves makes us uncomfortable, we can remain as we are. We can choose rest over labour, entertainment over education, delusion over truth, and doubt over confidence. The choices are ours to make, but while we curse the effect, we continue to nourish the cause ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
407:I was lucky enough to be born in a time and place where society values my talent, and gave me a good education to develop that talent, and set up the laws and the finanical system to let me do what I love doing-and make a lot of money doing it. The least I can do is help pay for all that. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
408:The more efficient causes of progress seem to consist of a good education during youth whilst the brain is impressible, and of a high standard of excellence, inculcated by the ablest and best men, embodied in the laws, customs and traditions of the nation, and enforced by public opinion. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
409:The Negro has no room to make any substantial compromises because his store of advantages is too small. He must press unrelentingly for quality, integrated education or his whole drive for freedom will be undermined by the absence of a most vital and indispensable element - learning. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
410:The arts alone give direct access to experience. To eliminate them from education - or worse, to tolerate them as cultural ornaments - is antieducational obscurantism. It is foisted on us by the pedants and snobs of Hellenistic Greece who considered artistic performance fit only for slaves. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
411:Even the men most richly endowed with ability, education, and opportunity, even the giants of the race, after the completest life possible, feel, as they stand on the edge of the grave, that they are but human acorns with all their possibilities still in them, just beginning to sprout. ~ orison-swett-marden, @wisdomtrove
412:I believe the single most significant decision I can make on a day-to-day basis is my choice of attitude. It is more important than my past, my education, my bankroll, my successes or failures, fame or pain, what other people think of me or say about me, my circumstances, or my position. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
413:The plain fact is that education is itself a form of propaganda - a deliberate scheme to outfit the pupil, not with the capacity to weigh ideas, but with a simple appetite for gulping ideas ready-made. The aim is to make &
414:It is difficult to think of anything more important than providing the best education possible for our children. They will develop the next technologies, medical cures, and global industries, while mitigating their unintended effects, or they will fail to do these things and consign us all to oblivion. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
415:Nevertheless, (Jefferson) believed that the habit of skepticism is an essential prerequisite for responsible citizenship. He argued that the cost of education is trivial compared to the cost of ignorance, of leaving government to the wolves. He taught that the country is safe only when the people rule. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
416:Education is the knowledge of how to use the whole of oneself. Many men use but one or two faculties out of the score with which they are endowed. A man is educated who knows how to make a tool of every faculty, how to open it, how to keep it sharp, and how to apply it to all practical purposes. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
417:It is not so very important for a person to learn facts. For that he does not really need a college. He can learn them from books. The value of an education is a liberal arts college is not learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
418:Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune. A successful business owner never stops learning. They educate themselves on the things they need to learn, and they never stop growing. They never arrive at a certain point and think, ahhh... now I don't need to learn anymore. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
419:I am glad that Congress has recently authorized $800,000 to State welfare agencies to expand their day-care services during the remainder of this fiscal year. But we need much more. We need the $8 million in the 1965 budget for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare allocated to this purpose. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
420:Winston Churchill said that appetite was the most important thing about education. Leadership guru Warren Bennis says he wants to be remembered as &
421:America is a melting pot, and education has been a mainspring for our democracy and freedom, a means of providing gifts of knowledge and opportunity to all citizens, no matter how humble their background, so they could climb higher, help build the American dream, and leave a better life for those who follow. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
422:I think the growth industry of the future in this country and the world will soon be the continuing education of adults. ... I think the educated person of the future is somebody who realizes the need to continue to learn. That is the new definition and it is going to change the world we live in and work in. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
423:The aim of education should not be to teach how to use human energies to improve the environment, for we are finally beginning to realize that the cornerstone of education is the development of the human personality, and that in this regard education is of immediate importance for the salvation of mankind. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
424:It would be a thousand pities if women wrote like men, or lived like men, or looked like men, for if two sexes are quite inadequate, considering the vastness and variety of the world, how should we manage with one only? Ought not education to bring out and fortify the differences rather than the similarities? ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
425:The Negro is not the man farthest down. The condition of the coloured farmer in the most backward parts of the Southern States of America, even where he has the least education and the least encouragement, is incomparably better than the condition and opportunities of the agricultural population in Sicily. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
426:By the age of six the average child will have completed the basic American education... . From television, the child will have learned how to pick a lock, commit a fairly elaborate bank holdup, prevent wetness all day long, get the laundry twice as white, and kill people with a variety of sophisticated armaments. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
427:Anyone who is honestly trying to be a Christian will soon find his intelligence being sharpened: one of the reasons why it needs no special education to be a Christian is that Christianity is an education itself. That is why an uneducated believer like Bunyan was able to write a book that has astonished the whole world. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
428:Education is like a diamond with many facets: It includes the basic mastery of numbers and letters that give us access to the treasury of human knowledge, accumulated and refined through the ages; it includes technical and vocational training as well as instruction in science, higher mathematics, and humane letters. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
429:I don’t think people realise how vital libraries are or what a colossal danger it would be if we were to lose any more. Having had a truncated school life myself, all of my education from the age of 17 has been self-taught. I wouldn’t be the person I am today if it wasn’t for the opportunities the library gave me. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
430:Without an integrated understanding of life, our individual and collective problems will only deepen and extend. The purpose of education isn't to produce mere scholars, technicians and job hunters, but integrated men and women who are free of fear; for only between such human beings can there be enduring peace. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
431:In this world, which is so plainly the antechamber of another, there are no happy men. The true division of humanity is between those who live in light and those who live in darkness. Our aim must be to diminish the number of the latter and increase the number of the former. That is why we demand education and knowledge. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
432:One classical role of the pulpit in Protestantism has been to &
433:Our progress as a nation can be no swifter than our progress in education. Our requirements for world leadership, our hopes for economic growth, and the demands of citizenship itself in an era such as this all require the maximum development of every young American's capacity. The human mind is our fundamental resource. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
434:Physical education for the body to be effective must be rigorous and detailed, far sighted and methodological. This will be translated into habits. These habits should be controlled and disciplined, while remaining flexible enough to adapt themselves to circumstances and to the needs of growth and development of the being. ~ sri-aurobindo, @wisdomtrove
435:America's founding fathers did not intend to take religion out of education. Many of the nation's greatest universities were founded by evangelists and religious leaders; but many of these have lost the founders concept and become secular institutions. Because of this attitude, secular education is stumbling and floundering. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
436:Face your deficiencies and acknowledge them; but do not let them master you. Let them teach you patience, sweetness, insight. True education combines intellect, beauty, goodness, and the greatest of these is goodness. When we do the best that we can, we never know what miracle is wrought in our life, or in the life of another. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
437:Leadership is the great challenge of the 21st century in science, politics, education, and industry. But the greatest challenge in leadership is parenting. We need to do more than just get our enterprises ready for the challenges of the twenty-first century. We also need to get our children ready for the challenges of the 21st century. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
438:Someone has said,"Education is going from an unconscious to conscious awareness of one's ignorance."..No one has a corner on wisdom. All the name-dropping in the world does not heighten the significance of our character. If anything, it reduces it. Our acute need is to cultivate a willingness to learn and to remain teachable. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
439:I don't know the real answer, my answer to anything which is essentially human relations is education. Whatever the answer is, education must be its measured component and if you try to educate with generosity not with triumphalism I think sometimes it works, especially young people, that's why I teach, I've been teaching all my life. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
440:If you don’t put the big rocks in first, you’ll never get them in at all. What are the big rocks in your life? A project that you want to accomplish? Time with your loved ones? Your faith, your education, your finances? A cause? Teaching or mentoring others? Remember to put these Big Rocks in first or you’ll never get them in at all. ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
441:If you serve a child a rotten hamburger in America, federal, state, and local agencies will investigate you, summon you, close you down, whatever. But if you provide a child with a rotten education, nothing happens, except that you're liable to be given more money to do it with. Well, we've discovered that money alone isn't the answer. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
442:Even the most inspired verse, which boasts not without a relative justification to be immortal, becomes in the course of ages a scarcely legible hieroglyphic; the language it was written in dies, a learned education and an imaginative effort are requisite to catch even a vestige of its original force. Nothing is so irrevocable as mind. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
443:The cat joined the Re-education Committee and was very active in it for some days. She was seen one dag sitting on a roof and talking to some sparrows who were just out of her reach. She was telling them that all animals were now comrades and that any sparrow who chose could come and perch on her paw; but the sparrows kept their distance. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
444:Everyone has in him something divine, something his own, a chance of perfection and strength in however small a sphere which God offers him to take or refuse. The task is to find it, develop it & use it. The chief aim of education should be to help the growing soul to draw out that in itself which is best and make it perfect for a noble use. ~ sri-aurobindo, @wisdomtrove
445:To be so bent on Marriage - to pursue a man merely for the sake of situation - is a sort of thing that shocks me; I cannot understand it. Poverty is a great Evil, but to a woman of Education and feeling it ought not, it cannot be the greatest. I would rather be a teacher at a school (and I can think of nothing worse) than marry a man I did not like. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
446:Therefore, only through education does one come to be dissatisfied with his own knowledge, and only through teaching others does one come to realize the uncomfortable inadequacy of his knowledge. Being dissatisfied with his own knowledge, one then realizes that the trouble lies with himself, and realizing the uncomfortable inadequacy of his knowledger. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
447:You are told a lot about your education, but some beautiful, sacred memory, preserved since childhood, is perhaps the best education of all. If a man carries many such memories into life with him, he is saved for the rest of his days. And even if only one good memory is left in our hearts, it may also be the instrument of our salvation one day. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
448:Education is not the amount of information that is put into your brain and runs riot there, undigested all your life. We must have life-building, man-making, character-makin g, assimilation of ideas. If you have assimilated five ideas and made them your life and character, you have more education than any man who has got by heart a whole library. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
449:A man's ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hopes of reward after death. It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
450:I would like to dissolve the $10 billion national Department of Education created by President Carter and turn schools back to the local school districts, where we built the greatest public school system the world has ever seen. I think I can make a case that the decline in the quality of public education began when federal aid became federal interference. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
451:In those days a boy on the classical side officially did almost nothing but classics. I think this was wise; the greatest service we can to education today is to teach few subjects. No one has time to do more than a very few things well before he is twenty, and when we force a boy to be a mediocrity in a dozen subjects we destroy his standards, perhaps for life. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
452:The one quality which sets one man apart from another- the key which lifts one to every aspiration while others are caught up in the mire of mediocrity- is not talent, formal education, nor intellectual brightness - it is self-discipline. With self-discipline all things are possible. Without it, even the simplest goal can seem like the impossible dream. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
453:The fundamental rights of [humanity] are, first: the right of habitation; second, the right to move freely; third, the right to the soil and subsoil, and to the use of it; fourth, the right of freedom of labor and of exchange; fifth, the right to justice; sixth, the right to live within a natural national organization; and seventh, the right to education. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
454:If it were felt that the free development of individuality is one of the leading essentials of well-being; that it is not only a coordinate element with all that is designated by the terms civilisation, instruction, education, culture, but is itself a necessary part and condition of all those things; there would be no danger that liberty should be undervalued. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
455:Surely education has no meaning unless it helps you understand the vast experience of life with all its subtleties, with its extraordinary beauty, its sorrows and joys. You may earn degrees, you may have a series of letters after your name and land a good job, but then what? What is the point of it all if in the process your mind becomes dull, weary, stupid? ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
456:It is liberal politics that believes the voter knows best. Liberal art holds that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Liberal economics maintains that the customer is always right. Liberal ethics advises us that if it feels good, we should go ahead and do it. Liberal education teaches us to think for ourselves, because we will find all the answers within us. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
457:We who preach the gospel must not think of ourselves as public relations agents sent to establish good will between Christ and the world. We must not imagine ourselves commissioned to make Christ acceptable to big business, the press, the world of sports or modern education. We are not diplomats but prophets, and our message is not a compromise but an ultimatum. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
458:Dogma is actually the only thing that cannot be separated from education. It IS education. A teacher who is not dogmatic is simply a teacher who is not teaching. There are no uneducated people; only most people are educated wrong. The true task of culture today is not a task of expansion, but of selection-and-rejection. The educationist must find a creed and teach it. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
459:Just been talking today out here to all the Senators investigating these stock swindles and overcapitalizations. There has been hundreds of millions lost. There ought to be some form of guardianship for people that buy all this junk. Education won't do it. The buyers are the ones we have educated up till they are just smart enough to fall for everything that comes along. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
460:We know that the gifts which men have do not come from the schools. If a man is a plain, literal, factual man, you can make a great deal more of him in his own line by education than without education, just as you can make a great deal more of a potato if you cultivate it than if you do not; but no cultivation in this world will ever make an apple out of a potato. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
461:I think great businessmen are more likely made than born. I don't know if it's from your upbringing, your parental background, the struggles you go through. In my own particular situation, I left school at 15 and I was struggling to survive in the jungle and that was a great education. So I think just getting out there, hands on, learning to survive teaches you a lot. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
462:Innately, children seem to have little true realistic anxiety. They will run along the brink of water, climb on the window sill, play with sharp objects and with fire, in short, do everything that is bound to damage them and to worry those in charge of them, that is wholly the result of education; for they cannot be allowed to make the instructive experiences themselves. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
463:Whenever education and refinement carry us away from the common people, they are growing towards selfishness, which is the monster evil of the world. That is true cultivation which gives us sympathy with every form of human life, and enables us to work most successfully for its advancement. Refinement that carries us away from our fellow people is not God's refinement. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
464:Scientific education for the masses will do little good, and probably a lot of harm, if it simply boils down to more physics, more chemistry, more biology, etc to the detriment of literature and history. Its probable effect on the average human being would be to narrow the range of his thoughts and make him more than ever contemptuous of such knowledge as he did not possess. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
465:He had made a passionate study of education, only to come, gradually, to the knowledge that education is nothing but the process of building up, gradually, a complete unit of consciousness. And each unit of consciousness is the living unit of that great social, religious, philosophic idea towards which humankind, like an organism seeking its final form, is laboriously growing. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
466:The danger of education, I have found, is that it so easily confuses means with ends. Worse than that, it quite easily forgets both and devotes itself merely to the mass production of uneducated gradtuates - people literaly unfit for anything except to take part in an elaborate and completely artificial charade which they and their contemporaries have conspired to call "life". ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
467:Despite all that education and experience can do, I retain a certain level of unsophistication that I cannot eradicate and that my friends find amusing. In fact, I think I sometimes detect conspiratorial plottings among my friends to protect me against my own lack of sophistication. I don't mind. I suspect that I am never quite as unsophisticated as they think I am, but I don't mind. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
468:It is precisely because education is the road to equality and citizenship, that it has been made more elusive for Negroes than many other rights. The walling off of Negroes from equal education is part of the historical design to submerge him in second class status. Therefore, as Negroes have struggled to be free they have had to fight for the opportunity for a decent education. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
469:Self-discipline is the key to personal greatness. It is the magic quality that opens all doors for you, and makes everything else possible. With self-discipline, the average person can rise as far and as fast as his talents and intelligence can take him. But without self-discipline, a person with every blessing of background, education and opportunity will seldom rise above mediocrity. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
470:I said to my children, &
471:I can prove at any time that my education tried to make another person out of me than the one I became. It is for the harm, therefore, that my educators could have done me in accordance with their intentions that I reproach them; I demand from their hands the person I now am, and since they cannot give him to me, I make of my reproach and laughter a drumbeat sounding in the world beyond. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
472:Freedom without organization of work would be useless. The child left free without means of work would go to waste, just as a new-born baby, if left free without nourishment, would die of starvation.The organization of the work, therefore, is the cornerstone of this new structure of goodness [in education], but even that organization would be in vain without the liberty to make use of it. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
473:The longer I live the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company . . . a church . . . a home. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
474:Every piece of marble has a statue in it waiting to be released by a person of sufficient skill to chip away the unnecessary parts. Just as the sculptor is to the marble, so is education to the soul.  It releases it.  For only educated people are free people.  You cannot create a statue by smashing the marble with a hammer, and you cannot by the force of arms release the spirit or the soul of people. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
475:A people among whom there is no habit of spontaneous action for a collective interest - who look habitually to their government to command or prompt them in all matters of joint concern - who expect to have everything done for them, except what can be made an affair of mere habit and routine - have their faculties only half developed; their education is defective in one of its most important branches. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
476:The white poor also suffer deprivation and the humiliation of poverty if not of color. They are chained by the weight of discrimination though its badge of degradation does not mark them. It corrupts their lives, frustrates their opportunities and withers their education. In one sense it is more evil for them because it has confused so many by prejudice that they have supported their own oppressors. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
477:Have you ever been at sea in a dense fog, when it seemed as if a tangible white darkness shut you in, and the great ship, tense and anxious, groped her way toward the shore with plummet and sounding-line, and you waited with beating heart for something to happen? I was like that ship before my education began, only I was without compass or sounding-line, and had no way of knowing how near the harbour was. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
478:The principle itself of dogmatic religion, dogmatic morality, dogmatic philosophy, is what requires to be rooted out; not any particular manifestation of that principle. The very corner-stone of an education intended to form great minds, must be the recognition of the principle, that the object is to call forth the greatest possible quantity of intellectual power, and to inspire the intensest love of truth. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
479:... the first thing his education demands is the provision of an environment in which he can develop the powers given him by nature. This does not mean just to amuse him and let him do what he likes.  But it does mean that we have to adjust our minds to doing a work of collaboration with nature, to being obedient to one of her laws, the law which decrees that development comes from environmental experience. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
480:Democracy turns upon and devours itself. Universal suffrage, in theory the palladium of our liberties, becomes the assurance of our slavery. And that slavery will grow more and more abject and ignoble as the differential birth rate, the deliberate encouragement of mendicancy and the failure of popular education produce a larger and larger mass of prehensile half-wits, and so make the demagogues more and more secure. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
481:How then to enforce peace? Not by reason, certainly, nor by education. If a man could not look at the fact of peace and the fact of war and choose the former in preference to the latter, what additional argument could persuade him? What could be more eloquent as a condemnation of war than war itself? What tremendous feat of dialectic could carry with it a tenth the power of a single gutted ship with its ghastly cargo? ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
482:... we discovered that education is not something which the teacher does, but that it is a natural process which develops spontaneously in the human being. It is not acquired by listening to words, but in virtue of experiences in which the child acts on his environment. The teacher's task is not to talk, but to prepare and arrange a series of motives for cultural activity in a special environment made for the child. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
483:Red RodsBefore elaborating any system of education, we must therefore create a favorable environment that will encourage the flowering of a child's natural gifts. All that is needed is to remove the obstacles. And this should be the basis of, and point of departure for, all future education. The first thing to be done, therefore, is to discover the true nature of a child and then assist him in his normal development. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
484:I received the fundamentals of my education in school, but that was not enough. My real education, the superstructure, the details, the true architecture, I got out of the public library. For an impoverished child whose family could not afford to buy books, the library was the open door to wonder and achievement, and I can never be sufficiently grateful that I had the wit to charge through that door and make the most of it. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
485:Man has got to take charge of Man... . Then real education, including pre-natal education. By real education I mean one that has no &
486:‚éA general State education is a mere contrivance for moulding people to be exactly like one another; and as the mould in which it casts them is that which pleases the dominant power in the government, whether this be a monarch, an aristocracy, or a majority of the existing generation; in proportion as it is efficient and successful, it establishes a despotism over the mind, leading by a natural tendency to one over the body. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
487:The effort to improve the conditions of man, however, is not a task for the few. It is the task of all nations-acting alone, acting in groups, acting in the United Nations, for plague and pestilence, plunder and pollution, the hazards of nature and the hunger of children are the foes of every nation. The earth, the sea and the air are the concern of every nation. And science, technology and education can be the ally of every nation. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
488:I ask that you offer to the political arena, and to the critical problems of our society which are decided therein, the benefit of the talents which society has helped to develop in you. I ask you to decide, as Goethe put it, whether you will be an anvilor a hammer. The question is whether you are to be a hammerwhether you are to give to the world in which you were reared and educated the broadest possible benefits of that education. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
489:I too acknowledge the all-out omnipotence of early culture and nature; hereby we have either a doddered dwarf-bush, or a high-towering, wide-shadowing tree! either a sick yellow cabbage, or an edible luxuriant green one. Of a truth, it is the duty of all men, especially of all philosophers, to note down with accuracy the characteristic circumstances of their education,&
490:Men have their virtues and their vices, their heroisms and their perversities; men are neither wholly good nor wholly bad, but possess and practice all that there is of good and bad here below. Such is the general rule. Temperament, education, the accidents of life, are modifying factors. Outside of this, everything is ordered arrangement, everything is chance. Such has been my rule of expectation and it has usually brought me success. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
491:This is education, understood as a help to life; an education from birth, which feeds a peaceful revolution and unites all in a common aim, attracting them as to a single centre. Mothers, fathers, politicians: all must combine in their respect and help for this delicate work of formation, which the little child carries on in the depth of a profound psychological mystery, under the tutelage of an inner guide. This is the bright new hope for mankind. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
492:Education without social action is a one-sided value because it has no true power potential. Social action without education is a weak expression of pure energy. Deeds uninformed by educated thought can take false directions. When we go into action and confront our adversaries, we must be as armed with knowledge as they. Our policies should have the strength of deep analysis beneath them to be able to challenge the clever sophistries of our opponents. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
493:Art and education may refine the taste, but they cannot purify the heart and regenerate the individual. His (Christôs) words were simple yet profound.  And they shook people, provoking either happy acceptance or violent refection.  People were never the same after listening to him¶.The people who followed Him were unique in their generation.  They turned the world upside down because their hearts had been turned right side up.  The world has never been the same. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
494:We cannot know the consequences of suppressing a child's spontaneity when he is just beginning to be active. We may even suffocate life itself. That humanity which is revealed in all its intellectual splendor during the sweet and tender age of childhood should be respected with a kind of religious veneration. It is like the sun which appears at dawn or a flower just beginning to bloom. Education cannot be effective unless it helps a child to open up himself to life. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
495:I have the audacity to believe that peoples everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture of their minds, and dignity, equality, and freedom for their spirits. I believe that what self-centered men have torn down, men other-centered can build up I still believe that one day mankind will bow before the altars of God and be crowned triumphant over war and bloodshed, and nonviolent redemptive goodwill will proclaim the rule of the land. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
496:A tax cut means higher family income and higher business profits and a balanced federal budget. Every taxpayer and his family will have more money left over after taxes for a new car, a new home, new conveniences, education and investment. Every businessman can keep a higher percentage of his profits in his cash register or put it to work expanding or improving his business, and as the national income grows, the federal government will ultimately end up with more revenues. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
497:Depression is now ten times as prevalent as it was in 1960, and it strikes at a much younger age. The mean age of a person’s first episode of depression forty years ago was 29.5, while today it is 14.5 years. This is a paradox, since every objective indicator of well-being—purchasing power, amount of education, availability of music, and nutrition—has been going north, while every indicator of subjective well-being has been going south. How is this epidemic to be explained? ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
498:For unless one is able to live fully in the present, the future is a hoax. There is no point whatever in making plans for a future which you will never be able to enjoy. When your plans mature, you will still be living for some other future beyond. You will never, never be able to sit back with full contentment and say, "Now, I've arrived!" Your entire education has deprived you of this capacity because it was preparing you for the future, instead of showing you how to be alive now. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
499:The pursuit of science, the study of the great works, the value of free inquiry, in short, the very idea of living the life of the mind - yes, these formative and abiding principles of higher education in America had their first and firmest advocate, and their greatest embodiment, in a tall, fair-headed, friendly man who watched this university take form from the mountainside where he lived, the university whose founding he called a crowning achievement to along and well-spent life. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
500:What little recognition the idea of obligation to the public obtains in modern morality, is derived from Greek and Roman sources, not from Christian; as, even in the morality of private life, whatever exists of magnanimity, high-mindeness, personal dignity, even the sense of honour, is derived from the purely human, not the religious part of our education, and never could have grown out of a standard of ethics in which the only worth, professedly recognized, is that of obedience. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Education is life itself. ~ John Dewey,
2:Education is soul crafting. ~ Cornel West,
3:Education, education, education ~ Tony Blair,
4:Prayer is an education. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
5:Education must precede motivation. ~ Jim Rohn,
6:Education is an admirable thing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
7:Education is imposed ignorance. ~ Noam Chomsky,
8:Fear is priceless education. ~ Lance Armstrong,
9:In education, parody is obsolete. ~ Alfie Kohn,
10:True beauty lies in true education. ~ Sai Baba,
11:All education is self-discovery. ~ Ray Bradbury,
12:Education is not filling ~ William Butler Yeats,
13:Labor is God's education. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
14:The effect of education I suppose ~ Jane Austen,
15:There is an education of the mind ~ Edgar Guest,
16:Education is at a turning point ~ Howard Gardner,
17:Empathy before education. ~ Marshall B Rosenberg,
18:The best marketing is education. ~ Regis McKenna,
19:We are here for an education. ~ W Edwards Deming,
20:By education most have been misled. ~ John Dryden,
21:Education forms the common mind. ~ Alexander Pope,
22:Education is at a turning point ~ Howard Gardner,
23:EDUCATION IS THE PREMISE OF PROGRESS ~ Kofi Annan,
24:Philippine education is in crisis ~ Florencio Abad,
25:Repetition is the mother of education. ~ Jean Paul,
26:The problem with education is school. ~ Mark Twain,
27:There is no future without education. ~ Rosa Parks,
28:Education is a thing to be proud of. ~ L Frank Baum,
29:Education must start from birth. ~ Maria Montessori,
30:Real education is about revolution. ~ Bryant McGill,
31:The end of education is character ~ Sathya Sai Baba,
32:All education must be self-education. ~ Robert Henri,
33:Common Core is a big win for education. ~ Bill Gates,
34:Education beats the beauty and the youth. ~ Chanakya,
35:Education is our passport to the future. ~ Malcolm X,
36:Education is the ticket to success ~ Jaime Escalante,
37:Education liberates a woman. ~ Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy,
38:Education makes all the difference. ~ John C Maxwell,
39:Literacy in itself is no education. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
40:My theory on education is... get one. ~ Mary Matalin,
41:Every relationship is an education. ~ Brian K Vaughan,
42:Health and education are always issues. ~ Helen Clark,
43:I did get a degree in special education. ~ Clay Aiken,
44:I like the concept of local education. ~ Donald Trump,
45:I'm a big believer in education, period. ~ Jon Secada,
46:It doesn`t hurt to get more education. ~ Donald Trump,
47:The greatest of all riches is education ~ Jean Sasson,
48:Character is a wish for a perfect education. ~ Novalis,
49:Education brightens a darkened world. ~ Neal A Maxwell,
50:Education can, and should be, dangerous. ~ Howard Zinn,
51:Having an education is invaluable. ~ Maggie Gyllenhaal,
52:Marriage can wait, education cannot. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
53:Nature is stronger than education. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
54:Regarding sex education: no secrets! ~ Albert Einstein,
55:Education is a nation's cheapest defence ~ Edmund Burke,
56:Education isn't something you can finish ~ Isaac Asimov,
57:Education is the best provision for old age ~ Aristotle,
58:I definitely had a top-notch education. ~ Paul Giamatti,
59:I didn't completed my University Education ~ Bill Gates,
60:It doesn`t hurt to get more education. ~ Donald J Trump,
61:A good book is an education of the heart. ~ Susan Sontag,
62:All of life is a constant education. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
63:Education isn't something you can finish. ~ Isaac Asimov,
64:Education is the best provision for old age. ~ Aristotle,
65:Education is the motor-force of revolution. ~ Bill Ayers,
66:I got an early education from television. ~ Debra Wilson,
67:My education was an education by movies. ~ Robert Benton,
68:Traveling is my form of self-education. ~ Yvon Chouinard,
69:An important lesson in Integral Education by ~ The Mother,
70:Education and water should be a human right. ~ Asher Roth,
71:Education begins at the level of the learner. ~ Aristotle,
72:Education is the cheap defense of nations. ~ Edmund Burke,
73:education was about the practice of freedom. ~ bell hooks,
74:SUNY gives you a world-class education. ~ William Baldwin,
75:There is no education like adversity. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
76:This isn't higher education studying itself. ~ James Hunt,
77:Character is the main object for education, ~ David Brooks,
78:Education is an asset no man can take away. ~ George Eliot,
79:Education is a system of imposed ignorance. ~ Noam Chomsky,
80:Education isn't a result. It's a process. ~ Pierce Brosnan,
81:education is the best provision for
old age ~ Aristotle,
82:Education is the number one priority. ~ Vincent Kartheiser,
83:Education should be as broad as man. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
84:Experience is the opposite of education. ~ Ashly Lorenzana,
85:Mundane education is regrettably prosaic ~ Cassandra Clare,
86:Philosophy is the education of grown-ups. ~ Stanley Cavell,
87:There is no depth to education without art. ~ Amiri Baraka,
88:Without Greek studies there is no education. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
89:A good education is another name for happiness. ~ Ann Plato,
90:Education is inoculation against disruption. ~ Robin Sharma,
91:Education is the antidote to many poisons. ~ Steve Maraboli,
92:I believe education is the great equalizer. ~ Dave Heineman,
93:I didn't even complete my University Education ~ Bill Gates,
94:I don't know if I'm a national education figure. ~ Jeb Bush,
95:Mastery begins when formal education ends. ~ James Altucher,
96:My work has been the education I avoided. ~ William Zinsser,
97:Nature has always had more force than education. ~ Voltaire,
98:Nine tenths of education is encouragement. ~ Anatole France,
99:Thank goodness my education was neglected. ~ Beatrix Potter,
100:The best education in film is to make one ~ Stanley Kubrick,
101:The highest result of education is tolerance ~ Helen Keller,
102:Character is the most precious gift of education. ~ Sai Baba,
103:Don't let school interfere with your education. ~ Mark Twain,
104:Education doesn't make you smarter. ~ Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn,
105:Education is meaningless without manners ~ Benny Bellamacina,
106:Education is no substitute for intelligence. ~ Frank Herbert,
107:Education is not received. It is achieved. ~ Albert Einstein,
108:Education is the best economic policy there is. ~ Tony Blair,
109:Education is the cornerstone of liberty. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
110:Education is the miracle; I'm just the worker. ~ Taylor Mali,
111:Education is the transmission of civilization. ~ Will Durant,
112:Few things are as essential as education. ~ Walter Annenberg,
113:If jobs are important, education is important. ~ Amartya Sen,
114:Knowledge without education is but armed injustice. ~ Horace,
115:The highest result of education is tolerance. ~ Helen Keller,
116:Without education, confidence does not come. ~ B K S Iyengar,
117:Education Is All A Matter Of Building Bridges ~ Ralph Ellison,
118:Education is education, be it verbal or written. ~ Aamir Khan,
119:Education is really aimed at helping students ~ Noam Chomsky,
120:Education is the transformation of civilisation ~ Will Durant,
121:Fate of empires depends on the education of youth ~ Aristotle,
122:Home is really where education does begin. ~ David McCullough,
123:I love to read. My education is self-inflicted ~ Groucho Marx,
124:My father had very little formal education. ~ Daniel Berrigan,
125:Public education is an investment in our future. ~ Matt Blunt,
126:Pure love is the chief manifestation of education. ~ Sai Baba,
127:A good education is a stepping-stone to wealth. ~ Helen Keller,
128:Education is all a matter of building bridges. ~ Ralph Ellison,
129:Education is cheap; experience is expensive. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
130:Education is preparation to live completely. ~ Herbert Spencer,
131:Education is suffering from narration sickness. ~ Paulo Freire,
132:Freedom can occur only through education. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
133:If the poor boy cannot come to education, ~ Swami Vivekananda,
134:Ninety percent of education is encouragement. ~ Anatole France,
135:Nothing is more important than a good education. ~ Roy Wilkins,
136:Sometimes, the way around prejudice is education. ~ Liza Mundy,
137:Without an education, you won't have a future. ~ Henry Rollins,
138:Almost all education has a political motive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
139:Bible reading is an education in itself. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
140:Don't let school get in the way of your education. ~ Mark Twain,
141:Don't let schooling interfere with your education. ~ Mark Twain,
142:Education does not necessarily make one wise? ~ Benjamin Carson,
143:Education is the power terrorists fear most. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
144:Getting your education is an advantage you have. ~ Daddy Yankee,
145:If you think education is expensive, try ignorance. ~ Derek Bok,
146:I'm forming a charitable institution for education. ~ Amar Bose,
147:I never let school get in the way of my education! ~ Mark Twain,
148:I've never been a big believer in formal education. ~ Megan Fox,
149:Men of polite learning and a liberal education. ~ Matthew Henry,
150:Your college education is a key moment in life. ~ Robert Greene,
151:Books allow everyone a traveler’s education, ~ Erin Michelle Sky,
152:Education has always been very important to me. ~ Freddie Stroma,
153:Education is not a privilege, it is a right! ~ William J Clinton,
154:Education is not so important as people think. ~ Elizabeth Bowen,
155:Education must promote peace, security and happiness. ~ Sai Baba,
156:I ain't got much education, but I got some sense. ~ Loretta Lynn,
157:If children have interest, then Education happens ~ Sugata Mitra,
158:It is only the ignorant who despise education. ~ Publilius Syrus,
159:No man is complete until his education is complete. ~ Khizr Khan,
160:Reading and the Democratic Ideal of Education ~ Mortimer J Adler,
161:Religion is a distraction from true education. ~ Richard Dawkins,
162:Self-education only produces expressions of self. ~ Robert Henri,
163:There is no true substitute for good education. ~ Jeffrey Archer,
164:Education can change the scope of an entire family ~ Nitin Nohria,
165:Education consists mainly of what we have unlearned. ~ Mark Twain,
166:Education is an organic necessity of a human being. ~ Horace Mann,
167:Education is... doing anything that changes you. ~ George Leonard,
168:Education isn't part of my agenda, it is my agenda. ~ Kenny Guinn,
169:Education reveals the potential of people and market. ~ Toba Beta,
170:The giving of love is an education in itself. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
171:The highest priority you can have is education. ~ Charles Schumer,
172:Very few can be trusted with an education. ~ Louise Imogen Guiney,
173:All genuine education comes about through experience. ~ John Dewey,
174:Civilization is a race between disaster and education. ~ H G Wells,
175:Compassion is a college education. It's a doctorate. ~ Krishna Das,
176:Education gives you neither experience nor wisdom. ~ Peter Drucker,
177:Education is hanging around until you've caught on. ~ Robert Frost,
178:Education is the most important thing you can have. ~ Torrey Smith,
179:Education should be the handmaid of citizenship. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
180:education than most coloured folks. When she squinted ~ Harper Lee,
181:For good nurture and education implant good constitutions. ~ Plato,
182:Getting an education is an awfully wearing process! ~ Jean Webster,
183:I believe in education and wish I had a better one. ~ Loretta Lynn,
184:If education is beaten by training, civilization dies. ~ C S Lewis,
185:I think I can straighten out our mess in education. ~ Donald Trump,
186:It's hard to improve public education - that's clear. ~ Bill Gates,
187:I've never let my school interfere with my education. ~ Mark Twain,
188:"Reward and punishmentis the lowest form of education." ~ Zhuangzi,
189:Rewards and punishment is the lowest form of education. ~ Zhuangzi,
190:The only way to be totally free is through education. ~ Jose Marti,
191:An education not founded on Art will never succeed. ~ Margaret Mead,
192:Animal protection is education to the humanity. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
193:Education is a slow moving but powerful force ~ J William Fulbright,
194:Education is not success but it is to help us succeed. ~ T B Joshua,
195:Education is the only solution. Education first. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
196:Education is very important to my parents and to me. ~ Rumer Willis,
197:Education plays a key role in preventing genocide. ~ David Eagleman,
198:Financial education is more powerful than money ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
199:I never had much education in English poetry as such. ~ Anne Carson,
200:Money cannot eradicate poverty, only education can. ~ M F Moonzajer,
201:My family gave me the best in education. ~ William Standish Knowles,
202:Never let your education interfere with your learning. ~ Mark Twain,
203:Segregation has no place in the education system. ~ Richard Dawkins,
204:True education consists in the cultivation of the heart. ~ Sai Baba,
205:What we suffer from today is an excess of education. ~ Adolf Hitler,
206:Creativity stands at the center of all education. ~ Bruno Bettelheim,
207:Education. Experience. Or are they the same thing? ~ Julian Fellowes,
208:Education has become a prisoner of contemporaneity. ~ Camille Paglia,
209:Education is civil defence against media fallout. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
210:Education is the civil rights issue of our generation. ~ Arne Duncan,
211:Education is the one thing that no one can take from you. ~ B B King,
212:Education is understanding relationships. ~ George Washington Carver,
213:I very much support financial education in schools. ~ George Osborne,
214:Love affairs are the real only education in life. ~ Marlene Dietrich,
215:Never begrudge the money you spend on your own education. ~ Jim Rohn,
216:Prince, a brother of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, ~ Bob Woodward,
217:The education of the will is the end of human life. ~ Anthony Powell,
218:The real safeguard of democracy is education. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt,
219:The value of a good education has never left me. ~ Michelle Pfeiffer,
220:True education is a kind of never-ending story . . . ~ J R R Tolkien,
221:An education without a Bible education is no education. ~ Clive James,
222:an investment in education gives the best returns ~ Benjamin Franklin,
223:By spiritual training I mean education of the heart. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
224:Education has to endow you with an eagerness to surrender. ~ Sai Baba,
225:...for the object of education is to teach us to love beauty. ~ Plato,
226:If children have interests, then education happens. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
227:Learning and seeing are more important than education. ~ Sten Nadolny,
228:My education and background thoroughly inform my writing ~ David Brin,
229:The cultivation of Human Values alone is Education. ~ Sathya Sai Baba,
230:There are no new ideas about female education. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
231:The world exists for the education of each man. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
232:Without education, you really can't dream as a child. ~ Naomie Harris,
233:Education is an act of love, and thus an act of courage ~ Paulo Freire,
234:Education is directly proportional to anxiety . . . ~ Ottessa Moshfegh,
235:Education is teaching our children to desire the right things. ~ Plato,
236:Education is the Jewel casting brilliance into the future ~ Mari Evans,
237:Education is the process of selling someone on books. ~ Douglas Wilson,
238:Experience, travel - these are an education in themselves. ~ Euripides,
239:Good education has got to be good entertainment. ~ Nicholas Negroponte,
240:I dream of a country where education would prevail. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
241:Information may be free, but an education is priceless. ~ Marie Forleo,
242:Let people have an education and you can't stop them. ~ La Monte Young,
243:My education was interrupted only by my schooling. ~ Winston Churchill,
244:People think of education as something they can finish. ~ Isaac Asimov,
245:Storytelling is the oldest form of education. ~ Terry Tempest Williams,
246:The key to education is the experience of beauty. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
247:The only person who can fix education is the student. ~ Oliver DeMille,
248:The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet. ~ Aristotle,
249:You can't be pro-business unless you're pro education. ~ Julian Castro,
250:Doctor, I have more education than most white people. ~ Joycelyn Elders,
251:EDUCATION IS A HUMAN RIGHT WITH IMMENSE POWER TO TRANSFORM ~ Kofi Annan,
252:Education is a human right with immense power to transform ~ Kofi Annan,
253:Education is a state-controlled manufactory of echoes. ~ Norman Douglas,
254:Education is not a luxury, it is a basic human right. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
255:Education is preeminently a matter of quality, not amount. ~ Henry Ford,
256:Education is the ability to meet life's situations. ~ John Grier Hibben,
257:Education is what you learn after you leave school. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
258:I do not allow my schooling to interfere with my education ~ Mark Twain,
259:I dreamt of a country where education would prevail. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
260:I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. ~ Mark Twain,
261:Lack of education turns soldiers into killing machines. ~ Jacque Fresco,
262:Music is a more potent instrument than any other for education. ~ Plato,
263:The education of a man is never completed until he dies. ~ Robert E Lee,
264:The foundation of every state is the education of its youth. ~ Diogenes,
265:The line between education and brainwashing is paper thin ~ Yana Toboso,
266:The objective of education is learning, not teaching ~ Russell L Ackoff,
267:There is no liberal education for the under-languaged. ~ Agnes Repplier,
268:To be successful in life what you need is education. ~ Jawaharlal Nehru,
269:Two things reduce prejudice: education and laughter. ~ Laurence J Peter,
270:Why were there so few who really sought an education? ~ L E Modesitt Jr,
271:After bread, education is the first need of the people. ~ Georges Danton,
272:A good education consists in knowing how to sing and dance well. ~ Plato,
273:An attack on public education is an attack on democracy. ~ Diane Ravitch,
274:As Regis Mckenna once said, the best marketing is education ~ Steve Jobs,
275:Close Dept. of Education, but don't dismantle public schools. ~ Ron Paul,
276:Common sense is in spite of, not the result of, education. ~ Victor Hugo,
277:Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance. ~ Will Durant,
278:Education is helping the child realise his potentialities. ~ Erich Fromm,
279:education is most fundamentally a matter of formation, ~ James K A Smith,
280:Education is the great engine to personal development. ~ Nelson Mandela,
281:Education must not simply teach work-it must teach life. ~ W E B Du Bois,
282:Education should be gentle and stern, not cold and lax. ~ Joseph Joubert,
283:Education should bring to light the ideal of the individual. ~ Jean Paul,
284:Even to see her walk across the room is a liberal education. ~ C S Lewis,
285:Genius without education is like silver in the mine. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
286:My education was interrupted only by my schooling. ~ Winston S Churchill,
287:Never let formal education get in the way of your learning. ~ Mark Twain,
288:Only a Scotsman can really survive a Scottish education. ~ Prince Philip,
289:The best anti-poverty program is a world-class education. ~ Barack Obama,
290:The only solution is education, education, education. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
291:The only way to resist colonialism is through education. ~ Tariq Ramadan,
292:the routine of education in the schools of ~ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,
293:To have a sense of education and ethics is important. ~ Soleil Moon Frye,
294:We need to fight for free education and defund the prisons ~ Chris Crass,
295:Without education, you are not going anywhere in this world. ~ Malcolm X,
296:A father gives his child nothing better than a good education ~ Anonymous,
297:A Good Education Removes the Barriers Between Rich and Poor ~ Orhan Pamuk,
298:All art, all education, can be merely a supplement to nature. ~ Aristotle,
299:All I want is an education, and I am afraid of no one. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
300:Cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education. ~ Mark Twain,
301:Education brings about opportunity, and in turn inspiration. ~ Bill Frist,
302:Education is more valuable than money, in the long run. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
303:Education is neither Eastern nor Western, it is human. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
304:Education is the best provision for old age. — ARISTOTLE ~ Michael J Gelb,
305:Education is the greatest weapon we have against ignorance ~ Kelly Meding,
306:Education must not simply teach work - it much teach life ~ W E B Du Bois,
307:IF A MAN NEGLECTS EDUCATION, HE WALKS LAME TO THE END OF HIS LIFE ~ Plato,
308:I may not have a degree, but I certainly got an education. ~ Jodi Picoult,
309:I spent my life trying to cure myself of my education. ~ Federico Fellini,
310:The great aim of education is not knowledge but action. ~ Herbert Spencer,
311:The most important thing about education is appetite. ~ Winston Churchill,
312:The object of education is to teach us to love what is beautiful. ~ Plato,
313:The only real education comes from what goes counter to you. ~ Andre Gide,
314:The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.
   ~ Aristotle,
315:The sign of a person who has had an education is good manners. ~ Sai Baba,
316:We are the transition from one education to the other. ~ Alfred Rosenberg,
317:Yet internally, poverty, the proletariat, wages, education, ~ Victor Hugo,
318:You can't legislate good will - that comes through education. ~ Malcolm X,
319:An effeminate education weakens both the mind and the body. ~ Edgar Quinet,
320:Common sense is in spite of, not as the result of education. ~ Victor Hugo,
321:Education can no longer be the sole property of the state. ~ Peter Drucker,
322:Education has for its object the formation of character. ~ Herbert Spencer,
323:Education is the art of making man ethical ~ Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel,
324:Education is very important to me, as is helping children. ~ Mark Teixeira,
325:EDUCATION IS VITAL TO DISCERN BETWEEN KNOWLEDGE AND LEARNING ~ Bulleh Shah,
326:If a man neglects education, he walks lame to the end of his life. ~ Plato,
327:I loved education, and, yes, I did want to go on learning. ~ Arthur Hailey,
328:The best contraceptive in the world is a good education. ~ Joycelyn Elders,
329:The best education I've had in my life is to travel. ~ Matthew McConaughey,
330:The essence of education is the education of the body. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
331:Very likely education does not make very much difference. ~ Gertrude Stein,
332:All true education begins in wonder and ends in wisdom—as ~ Sarah Mackenzie,
333:Collectors are paying for our education by purchasing our art. ~ Jack White,
334:Education does not mean the imparting of verbal knowledge alone. ~ Sai Baba,
335:Education had been easy. Learning things had been harder. ~ Terry Pratchett,
336:Education is not a problem. Education is an opportunity. ~ Lyndon B Johnson,
337:Education is very important. I think I understand education. ~ Donald Trump,
338:Education is what most receive, many pass on, and few possess. ~ Karl Kraus,
339:Education sows not seeds in you, but makes your seeds grow. ~ Khalil Gibran,
340:Emmett and I met at a tantric sex education class a year ago, ~ Mary Calmes,
341:For all education is outside, not inside, the schoolroom. ~ Christina Stead,
342:Frivolity is inborn, conceit acquired by education. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
343:If you've had a freakish education, at least use it, use it. ~ J D Salinger,
344:Ignorance is more costly to any State than education. ~ Booker T Washington,
345:It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education. ~ Albert Einstein,
346:It’s money not education that’s the holy grail in America. ~ A S A Harrison,
347:Native ability without education is like a tree without fruit. ~ Aristippus,
348:People think of education as something that they can finish. ~ Isaac Asimov,
349:Reformation, like education, is a journey, not a destination ~ Mother Jones,
350:The future is a race between education and catastrophe. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
351:The idea that education can ever be value-neutral is absurd. ~ Mal Fletcher,
352:The most important thing about education is appetite. ~ Winston S Churchill,
353:The secret of education lies in respecting the pupil. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
354:The true purpose of education is to make minds, not careers. ~ Chris Hedges,
355:Time was when education moved toward soil, not away from it. ~ Aldo Leopold,
356:True education is gained through the discipline of life. There ~ Henry Ford,
357:City Year is taking on some of the toughest work in education. ~ Arne Duncan,
358:education is more precious than that which we call so. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
359:Education is the single most important job of the human race. ~ George Lucas,
360:Education serves to keep people idiotic and manipulable. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
361:Employment was invented to make education seem useful. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
362:Fatherhood is the greatest education a man can ever receive. ~ Asa Don Brown,
363:inequality was a “race between education and technology, ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
364:I try never to let my schooling get in the way of my education. ~ Mark Twain,
365:I've had no sexual education, but I have six children. ~ Janusz Korwin Mikke,
366:Nothing should be overlooked in fighting for better education. ~ Roy Wilkins,
367:The education of women is the best way to save the environment. ~ E O Wilson,
368:We're asking schools to look at kids as partners in education. ~ Jill Vialet,
369:An education is the investment with the greatest returns. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
370:Education is a lifetime assignment & terminates when you do. ~ Orrin Woodward,
371:Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity. ~ Aristotle,
372:Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself. ~ John Dewey,
373:Education isn't everything, for a start it isn't an elephant ~ Spike Milligan,
374:Education is the investment our generation makes in the future. ~ Mitt Romney,
375:Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel. ~ Socrates,
376:I believe that a child going without an education is a crime. ~ Kamala Harris,
377:I consider my education to be the first 10 years of my career. ~ Olivia Wilde,
378:I'd like to work with kids in special education - younger kids. ~ John Madden,
379:Literacy is not the end of education nor even the beginning. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
380:Real education consists in drawing the best out of yourself. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
381:The aim of education is growth: the aim of growth is more growth ~ John Dewey,
382:The main hope of a nation lies in the proper education of its youth ~ Erasmus,
383:There's a very close tie between good health and good education. ~ Laura Bush,
384:The school as a means of education to me was simply a blank. ~ Charles Darwin,
385:The secret in education lies in respecting the student. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
386:True education reveals self-potential, more than just sows ideas. ~ Toba Beta,
387:An education is not a thing one gets, but a lifelong process. ~ Gloria Steinem,
388:An education obtained with money is worse than no education at all. ~ Socrates,
389:Early childhood education begins early, even before birth. ~ Madeleine M Kunin,
390:Education is beautification of the inner world and the outer world. ~ Amit Ray,
391:Education makes you humble, it doesn't make you proud. ~ Elisabeth K bler Ross,
392:For the mass prevention of disease, mass education is a key weapon. ~ T R Reid,
393:If you have four years to complete your college education, do it. ~ Bo Jackson,
394:If you think the cost of education is high, think about ignorance. ~ Derek Bok,
395:Journalism's been a continuing course in adult education for me. ~ Bill Moyers,
396:Life isn't a race to win, it's a school for our higher education. ~ Guy Finley,
397:Listening carefully to the teacher, one acquires an education. ~ Frank Herbert,
398:Not all schooling is education nor all education, schooling. ~ Milton Friedman,
399:Schooling deprived of religious insights is wretched education. ~ Russell Kirk,
400:The biggest mistake of my life was taking a military education. ~ Robert E Lee,
401:The for-profit education industry has proven equal to the task. ~ Steve Eisman,
402:TO OVERLOOK ONE’S OWN FAULTS IS TO MISS A VALUABLE FREE EDUCATION. ~ Anonymous,
403:An investment in education always pays the highest returns. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
404:As a society, we can and should invest more money in education. ~ Daphne Koller,
405:A sense of curiosity is nature's original school of education. ~ Smiley Blanton,
406:Education as growth or maturity should be an ever-present process. ~ John Dewey,
407:Education is an ornament in prosperity & a refuge in adversity. ~ Aristotle,
408:Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. ~ W B Yeats,
409:Education is to learning as tour groups are to adventure. ~ Richard Saul Wurman,
410:Education is what you get from reading the small print; experience is ~ Common,
411:Education of both men and women is a wonderful contraceptive. ~ Henry W Kendall,
412:education that stops with school stops where it is beginning. ~ Stephen Leacock,
413:Education: the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty. ~ Mark Twain,
414:Humanities education is the worst thing for an industrialist. ~ Andrew Carnegie,
415:I am opposed to the use of public funds for private education. ~ Jonathan Kozol,
416:Inspired intellect must endure all kinds of ghastly education. ~ Paul Delaroche,
417:I still say the only education worth anything is self-education. ~ Robert Frost,
418:School is not the end but only the beginning of an education. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
419:Sharing education, sharing a book…that’s what changes the world. ~ Brad Meltzer,
420:The education of attention would be an education par excellence ~ William James,
421:The education of the will is the object of our existence. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
422:The Goal of Education is to Help People Use Their Minds Better ~ Howard Gardner,
423:The most important part of education is proper training in the nursery. ~ Plato,
424:The National Education Association is the al-Qaida of education. ~ Ilana Mercer,
425:The world has changed, but education has not changed with it. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
426:Today education has become a training ground for competition. ~ Parker J Palmer,
427:When I go back into education, I'm going to do business studies. ~ Jourdan Dunn,
428:Wisdom.... comes not from age, but from education and learning. ~ Anton Chekhov,
429:Admission of ignorance is often the first step in our education. ~ Stephen Covey,
430:As if a woman of education bought things because she wanted 'em. ~ John Vanbrugh,
431:Awe is the beginning of wisdom. Awe is the beginning of education. ~ Matthew Fox,
432:Education, done properly, is an emergent, evolutionary phenomenon. ~ Matt Ridley,
433:Education is important! That piece of paper is your key to success ~ Queen Brown,
434:Education is the foundation upon which we build our future. ~ Christine Gregoire,
435:Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.
   ~ Socrates,
436:Education is what remains when what is learned has been taken away. ~ Mark Twain,
437:Education should reduce the gap between appearance and reality. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
438:Education: the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty. ~ Mark Twain,
439:Get an education because no one can take that away from you. ~ Nomar Garciaparra,
440:Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world ~ Jane Austen,
441:It is no longer higher education, it is higher 'indoctrination ' ~ Dennis Prager,
442:One's work may be finished someday, but one's education never. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
443:Our youth should also be educated with music and physical education. ~ Aristotle,
444:Quality in education is what makes learning a pleasure and a joy. ~ Myron Tribus,
445:The deeper education consists in unlearning one's first education. ~ Paul Val ry,
446:The object of all education is to make folks fit to live. ~ Laura Ingalls Wilder,
447:The problem with studying is that it gets in the way of education. ~ Neel Burton,
448:The very spring and root of honesty and virtue lie in good education. ~ Plutarch,
449:What have I got? No looks, no money, no education. Just talent. ~ Sammy Davis Jr,
450:You cannot measure what counts in education—the human qualities, ~ Amanda Ripley,
451:Educating the head without educating the heart is no education at all ~ Aristotle,
452:Education and all sorts of horrible things are going to happen to me. ~ C S Lewis,
453:Education doesn't need to be reformed- it needs to be transformed. ~ Ken Robinson,
454:Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army. ~ Edward Everett,
455:Education is a precondition to survival in America today. ~ Marian Wright Edelman,
456:Education is fundamental to any success. That's your baseboard. ~ Richard Sherman,
457:Higher education is not necessarily a guarantee of higher virtue. ~ Aldous Huxley,
458:I majored in elementary education, and I have a passion for kids. ~ Allyson Felix,
459:In all education the main cause of failure is staleness. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
460:In education, once more, the chief things are equality and freedom. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
461:Interest and attention will insure to you an education. ~ Robert Andrews Millikan,
462:I say further that our system of education should be unsectarian. ~ Edmund Barton,
463:There is no education like adversity.
--Benjamin Disraeli ~ Bear Grylls,
464:Maybe one day there will finally be an education for electronic music. ~ Afrojack,
465:Plants are shaped by cultivation , and men by education . ~ Jean Jacques Rousseau,
466:The aim of education is to guide young persons in the process ~ Jacques Maritain,
467:The beauty of a Jewish education is that you learn how to argue. ~ Andrea Dworkin,
468:The foundation of every state is the education of its youth. ~ Diogenes of Sinope,
469:The goal of female education must invariably be the future mother. ~ Adolf Hitler,
470:The great secret of education is to direct vanity to proper objects. ~ Adam Smith,
471:The real preparation for education is the study of one's self. ~ Maria Montessori,
472:There is no greater education than one that is self-driven. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
473:The secret of life is not enjoyment but education through experience. ~ Sivananda,
474:The whole purpose of education is to turn mirrors into windows. ~ Sydney J Harris,
475:Admission of ignorance is often the first step in our education. ~ Stephen R Covey,
476:Compensatory education has been tried and it apparently has failed ~ Arthur Jensen,
477:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all. ~ Aristotle,
478:Education gives us the power to turn information into meaning. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
479:Education is key. I graduated from high school; everyone needs to. ~ Tracy McGrady,
480:Education is still, in spite of private education, a state matter. ~ Kenneth Arrow,
481:Education is such a noble profession, its a wonderful way to serve. ~ Erin Gruwell,
482:Education is teaching children to find pleasure in the right things. ~ Mary Pipher,
483:Education makes a straight ditch of a free meandering brook. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
484:Equality should be the chief basis of the education of youth. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
485:Going to school- picking an apple Getting an education- eating it ~ E L Konigsburg,
486:If there is anything education does not lack today it is critics. ~ Nathan M Pusey,
487:In a word I claim that our city as a whole is an education to Greece. ~ Thucydides,
488:In so many ways, segregation shaped me, and education liberated me. ~ Maya Angelou,
489:The best education for the best is the best education for all. ~ Robert M Hutchins,
490:The classes were valuable, but the real education was the game. ~ Orson Scott Card,
491:The deficiencies of nature are what art and education seek to fill up. ~ Aristotle,
492:The education of all beautiful women is the knowledge of men. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
493:The first duty of a government is to give education to the people. ~ Simon Bolivar,
494:The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education. ~ Albert Einstein,
495:The only true corrective of Constitutional abuses is education. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
496:The progress of the world depends almost entirely upon education. ~ George Eastman,
497:the purpose of education is to replace an empty mind with an open one. ~ Anonymous,
498:We need innovation in education and dedication to the task before us. ~ Alan Autry,
499:We're going to end Common Core. Going to bring our education local. ~ Donald Trump,
500:What goes on inside the school is an interruption of education. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
501:Adaptability to change is itself a hallmark of successful education. ~ Peter Hilton,
502:An education reformer is as important in America as the first lady. ~ Michelle Rhee,
503:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all. ~ Aristotle,
504:Education and justice are democracy's only life insurance. ~ Nannie Helen Burroughs,
505:Education breeds confidence. Confidence breeds hope. Hope breeds peace. ~ Confucius,
506:Education is the key to unlocking the world, a passport to freedom. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
507:Education must be understood as growth, or the facilitation of growth. ~ John Dewey,
508:Education was a luxury not prioritized in a time of war and famine. ~ Laila Ibrahim,
509:Everyone drank to popular education and to the irrigation of Uzbekistan. ~ Ilya Ilf,
510:If your education is not enough, experience will teach you lessons. ~ Narendra Modi,
511:It is through good education that all the good in the world arises. ~ Immanuel Kant,
512:Opportunity expands when there is excellence and choice in education. ~ Mitt Romney,
513:Racism doesn’t care about respectability, wealth, education, or status ~ Roxane Gay,
514:The education of circumstances is superior to that of tuition. ~ William Wordsworth,
515:The giving of love and understanding is an education in itself. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
516:The result of the educative process is capacity for further education. ~ John Dewey,
517:The road to being somebody in this society starts with education. ~ Hillary Clinton,
518:The two basic processes of education are knowing and valuing. ~ Robert J Havighurst,
519:The world will not Change and find peace if there is not a new education. ~ U Thant,
520:To the Ibos, Western education was a rare opportunity to be seized. ~ Thomas Sowell,
521:Your education is a dress rehearsal for a life that is yours to lead. ~ Nora Ephron,
522:A good education helps us make sense of the world and find our way in it ~ Mike Rose,
523:All my life, I just felt that I should have finished my education. ~ Gretchen Wilson,
524:Education breeds confidence. Confidence breeds hope. Hope breeds peace. ~ Confucius,
525:∑ (Education + Innovation) × Intensity of Tech Use = Economic Growth ~ Satya Nadella,
526:∑ (Education + Innovation) x Intensity of Tech Use = Economic Growth ~ Satya Nadella,
527:Education is experience, and the essence of experience is self-reliance. ~ T H White,
528:Education is learning what you didn't even know you didn't know. ~ Daniel J Boorstin,
529:Education is the instruction of the intellect in the laws of Nature. ~ Thomas Huxley,
530:Education is the key to opportunity. It's a ticket out of poverty. ~ George H W Bush,
531:Education makes some men wiser, others more ridiculous and foolish! ~ Norm MacDonald,
532:Education must have an end in view, for it is not an end in itself. ~ Sybil Marshall,
533:Every child should have the opportunity to receive a quality education. ~ Bill Frist,
534:Getting an education was a bit like a communicable sexual disease. ~ Terry Pratchett,
535:I am Welsh by birth, English by education, and European by nature. ~ Peter Greenaway,
536:If you think education is expensive -- try ignorance. ~ Ann Landers, October 4, 1975,
537:I had an Irish Catholic education. Horrible nuns, vindictive and cruel. ~ John Lydon,
538:[Our system of education ]not designed to create critical thinkers. ~ Edward Snowden,
539:the best education consists not in being taught but in being inspired, ~ Neel Burton,
540:The connection between education and a healthy economy is critical. ~ Ted Strickland,
541:The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future life ~ Plato,
542:The one real goal of education is to leave a person asking questions. ~ Max Beerbohm,
543:The purpose of education is to teach a defense against eloquence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
544:There’s only one thing that can kill the movies, and that’s education. ~ Will Rogers,
545:The secret of success in education is respecting the students. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
546:An education is not so much about making a living as making a person. ~ Tara Westover,
547:A postsecondary education is the ticket to economic success in America. ~ Arne Duncan,
548:Do not use compulsion, but let early education be rather a sort of amusement. ~ Plato,
549:Education is effective only at the time of felt need and clear relevance. ~ Anonymous,
550:Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. ~ Kenneth C Davis,
551:Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom. ~ George Washington Carver,
552:education without inspiration is only recipe for desperation ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
553:Every form of true education trains the student in self-reliance ~ John Henrik Clarke,
554:Getting an education at MIT is like taking a drink from a fire hose. ~ Jerome Wiesner,
555:Going to school- picking an apple
Getting an education- eating it ~ E L Konigsburg,
556:If everyone would paint, political re-education would be unnecessary. ~ Pablo Picasso,
557:If you do not study, the inertia will go on increasing.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
558:If you think education is expensive, try ignorance. ~ Derek Bok, President of Harvard,
559:I paid for my own education by scholarship until I left university. ~ Ellen Wilkinson,
560:No one is going to give you the education you need to overthrow them. ~ Assata Shakur,
561:Online education is like a rising tide, it's going to lift all boats. ~ Anant Agarwal,
562:Parents aren't sex education experts just because they are parents. ~ Pepper Schwartz,
563:The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future life. ~ Plato,
564:The education of peoples is a necessary precondition to peace. ~ Carlo Azeglio Ciampi,
565:The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work ~ Michael Jackson,
566:The test of good education is seeing how it behaves in a fight. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
567:This institution of higher education had no such concept as mercy. ~ Marina Dyachenko,
568:To make your children capable of honesty is the beginning of education. ~ John Ruskin,
569:What we call education is nothing but domestication of the human being. ~ Miguel Ruiz,
570:Whoever controls the education of our children controls the future. ~ Wilma Mankiller,
571:Education helps one case cease being intimidated by strange situations. ~ Maya Angelou,
572:Education is a capital to the poor man, and an interest to the rich man. ~ Horace Mann,
573:Education is the passport to the future. Visit Educationhelm to learn more ~ Anonymous,
574:Education is what survives when what has been learnt has been forgotten. ~ B F Skinner,
575:Education remains the key to both economic and political empowerment. ~ Barbara Jordan,
576:I'd repair our education system or replace it with something that works. ~ Larry Niven,
577:Never mistake education for intelligence, and especially not for drive. ~ Layton Green,
578:One must be grateful for one's education no matter how it arrives. ~ Viet Thanh Nguyen,
579:Religion is an illusion of childhood, outgrown under proper education. ~ Auguste Comte,
580:Sex education classes are like in-home sales parties for abortions. ~ Phyllis Schlafly,
581:That we usually call education is making man stupid. ~ Laxmi Prasad Devkota, Education,
582:The beginning of every government starts with the education of our youth. ~ Pythagoras,
583:The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work. ~ Michael Jackson,
584:The greatest education man has to learn is the science of self. ~ Harbhajan Singh Yogi,
585:The investigation of the meaning of words is the beginning of education. ~ Antisthenes,
586:The main priority of the Socialist Party is education". ~ Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero,
587:The only purpose of education is freedom; the only method is experience. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
588:The only thing that is more expensive than education is ignorance. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
589:"True education can only result from naked reality, not a delusive ideal." ~ Carl Jung,
590:You got me a ‘congratulations on getting
out of re-education’ gift? ~ Richelle Mead,
591:Education and morals make the good man, the good statesman, the good ruler. ~ Aristotle,
592:Education is an ornament for the prosperous, a refuge for the unfortunate. ~ Democritus,
593:Education is one of the most important tools that you can give somebody. ~ Tyler Hilton,
594:Education is the only business still debating the usefulness of technology. ~ Rod Paige,
595:Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten. ~ B F Skinner,
596:education without inspiration is only a recipe for desperation ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
597:Formal education makes you a living, self-education makes you a legend. ~ Habeeb Akande,
598:Get all the education you can then go out and do something - do anything. ~ Lee Iacocca,
599:How was I gonna get an education, sitting right back of Bobby Ann Mason? ~ Rick Trevino,
600:Intelligence plus character-that is the goal of true education. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
601:Latinos care about education, yes, so we need reform, not just money. ~ Susana Martinez,
602:Make walks in the nights to benefit from the education of silence! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
603:Marlon was so sensitive, you thought the poor guy just had a bad education. ~ Uta Hagen,
604:Mundane education is regrettably prosaic," - Jace Lightwood-Herondale ~ Cassandra Clare,
605:Oh my God, I thought. I’m rooming with the Sydney Sage of re-education. ~ Richelle Mead,
606:Oh my God, I thought. I'm rooming with the sydney Sage of re-education. ~ Richelle Mead,
607:Racial segregation has come back to public education with a vengeance. ~ Jonathan Kozol,
608:Teaching is the last refuge of feeble minds with a classical education. ~ Aldous Huxley,
609:The existence of guilty sense is so
important in education and religion. ~ Toba Beta,
610:The great difficulty in education is to get experience out of ideas. ~ George Santayana,
611:The number one rule of our training is empathy before education. ~ Marshall B Rosenberg,
612:The only education in grief that any of us ever gets is a crash course. ~ Gail Caldwell,
613:The purpose of education is to replace an empty mind with an open one. ~ Malcolm Forbes,
614:There is a great reform required in the education and habits of females. ~ Ezra Cornell,
615:we are all born educated, but we need education to be educated ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
616:We can't want an education for kids more than they want it for themselves. ~ Tony Danza,
617:A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself. ~ Jane Austen,
618:a good heart is, I believe, much more desirable than education or brains. ~ L Frank Baum,
619:bad handwriting should be regarded as a sign of an imperfect education. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
620:Educational progress is a national concern; education is a private one. ~ Nikki Giovanni,
621:Education in my family was not merely emphasized, it was our raison d'etre. ~ Steven Chu,
622:Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance.” -Will Durant ~ Angela Roquet,
623:EDUCATION IS NOT THE LEARNING OF FACTS, BUT TRAINING THE MIND TO THINK ~ Albert Einstein,
624:Education is our only political safety. Outside of this ark all is deluge. ~ Horace Mann,
625:Education teaches children to lose interest in what matters most to them. ~ Paul Russell,
626:I am the slave of an internal power more powerful than my education. ~ Arnold Schoenberg,
627:I had an Edinburgh, middle-class childhood and a public school education. ~ Rory Bremner,
628:I think for everybody reading can be a solace, illumination, education. ~ Kate DiCamillo,
629:It’s quite possible that mortality is simply the result of poor education. ~ Umberto Eco,
630:Knowledge of human nature is the beginning and end of political education. ~ Henry Adams,
631:Men are born ignorant, not stupid. They are made stupid by education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
632:Men are born ignorant, not stupid; they are made stupid by education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
633:Nobody gives you an education. If you want one, you have to take it. ~ John Taylor Gatto,
634:One of the goals of education should be to teach that life is precious. ~ Abraham Maslow,
635:Ordinary people love entertainment. Extraordinary people adore education. ~ Robin Sharma,
636:Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is. ~ Isaac Asimov,
637:Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is. ~ Josh Kaufman,
638:The aim of education is the knowledge, not of facts, but of values. ~ William Ralph Inge,
639:The Internet will save higher education, but it may kill your alma mater. ~ John Katzman,
640:The main hope of a nation lies in the proper education of its youth ~ Desiderius Erasmus,
641:There was a long time I had no job security, no options and no education. ~ Ronda Rousey,
642:Total non-retention has kept my education from being a burden to me. ~ Flannery O Connor,
643:When I was young I didn't care about education, just money and box office. ~ Jackie Chan,
644:An education is not something that you get, but something that you claim. ~ Adrienne Rich,
645:Brown versus the Board of Education is no longer the white person's problem. ~ Bill Cosby,
646:Education and prevention are not enough when there is a culture of fraud. ~ Travis Tygart,
647:Education, I fear, is learning to see one thing by going blind to another. ~ Aldo Leopold,
648:Education is not about filling a pail, it's about lighting a fire. ~ William Butler Yeats,
649:Education is the manifestation of perfection already existing in man. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
650:Even in a time of fiscal austerity, education is more than just an expense. ~ Arne Duncan,
651:Few—very few—graduates before the mid-’70s sought out a ‘business’ education; ~ Tony Judt,
652:Higher education is a business that doesn’t know it’s going out of business. ~ Mark Cuban,
653:Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. ~ H G Wells,
654:I certainly didn't learn anything in school. My education was the world. ~ Diana Vreeland,
655:I don't care how somebody gets their education, as long as they have one. ~ Ronee Blakley,
656:If you can feed your family, give them an education, then you are a success. ~ Jami Gertz,
657:I hope that having my life and having an education will lengthen my career. ~ Emma Watson,
658:Intelligence and proper education will give you independence of spirit. ~ Charlotte Bront,
659:I think self-education is the greatest and best thing you could ever make. ~ Tony Robbins,
660:Just know what you're talking about and if you don't, look it up. Education. ~ Asher Roth,
661:Just putting a computer in front of a student doesn't make education better. ~ Joel Klein,
662:Music is the movement of sound to reach the soul for the education of its virtue. ~ Plato,
663:My dream is to empower myself with education, and then it is a weapon. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
664:Nature is more powerful than education; time will develop everything. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
665:No matter what happens on the field, getting an education makes you a winner. ~ Lou Holtz,
666:One of the goals of education should be to teach that life is precious. ~ Abraham Maslow,
667:one of the most important components of homeschooling is worldview education. ~ Anonymous,
668:Rather, they prove that students can make something out of their education. ~ Umberto Eco,
669:Television is something the Russians invented to destroy American education. ~ Paul Erdos,
670:The mystical journey seems to offer a graduate education in the obvious. ~ Michael Pollan,
671:The quality of an education system cannot exceed the quality of its teachers. ~ Anonymous,
672:The State shall make no law with respect to the establishment of education. ~ Ivan Illich,
673:The trouble with modern education is you never know how ignorant they are. ~ Evelyn Waugh,
674:Transformation. Metamorphosis. Falsity. Betrayal. I call it an education. ~ Tara Westover,
675:We've tried ignorance for a thousand years. It's time we try education. ~ Joycelyn Elders,
676:By nature all people are alike, but by education become different ~ Robert Green Ingersoll,
677:Democracy has to be born anew every generation, and education is its midwife. ~ John Dewey,
678:Education and knowledge are the power of the minorities in this country ~ Philip Vera Cruz,
679:Education is a technology that tries to make up for what the human mind is ~ Steven Pinker,
680:Education is everywhere, prompting one to think, to consider, to remember. ~ Louis L Amour,
681:Education is indoctrination if you're white - subjugation if you're black. ~ James Baldwin,
682:Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. ~ William Butler Yeats,
683:Education is one of the blessings of life — and one of its necessities. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
684:Education was the new god, and educated men the new plantation masters. ~ Charles Bukowski,
685:Everybody ought to listen to Benny [Carter]. He's a whole musical education. ~ Miles Davis,
686:First the education of the senses, then the education of the intellect. ~ Maria Montessori,
687:I have education and once I had position. Now I am nobody, but I am happy. ~ Louis L Amour,
688:I know what it feels like to struggle to get the education that you need. ~ Michelle Obama,
689:Intelligence and proper education will give you independence of spirit. ~ Charlotte Bronte,
690:My education, my father liked to point out, was wider than it was deep. ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
691:My goal is to get peace and my goal is to see education of every child. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
692:Our most important education system is in the employees' own organization. ~ Peter Drucker,
693:Preparation through education is less costly than learning through tragedy. ~ Max Mayfield,
694:The aim of education is the knowledge, not the facts, but of values. ~ William S Burroughs,
695:The end and aim of all education is the development of character. ~ Francis Wayland Parker,
696:The highest good and solely useful is liberal education. ~ Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel,
697:the more education a prisoner receives, the less likely he is to reoffend. I ~ Laura Bates,
698:The only time my education was interrupted was when I was in school. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
699:To get matured, you must have an education in the School of Solitude! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
700:To see your enemy and know him is a part of the complete education of man. ~ Marcus Garvey,
701:When elected, I will make education funding a top priority and I believe ~ Chris Christie,
702:Yeah, I'm a thrill seeker, but crikey, education's the most important thing. ~ Steve Irwin,
703:Education comes from within; you get it by struggle and effort and thought. ~ Napoleon Hill,
704:Education is a method whereby one acquires a higher grade of prejudices. ~ Laurence J Peter,
705:Education is extremely important, especially in my business, the music business. ~ Ludacris,
706:Education ought to be affordable for everybody. That only advances a society. ~ Regina Hall,
707:Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune. ~ Jim Rohn,
708:I always thought the idea of education was to learn to think for yourself. ~ Robin Williams,
709:I am convinced that your Mayor must take the leadership role in education too. ~ Alan Autry,
710:If he had had no education, maybe Basho could have been a much greater poet. ~ Nanao Sakaki,
711:If you think education is expensive, try estimating the cost of ignorance. ~ Howard Gardner,
712:I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” -Mark Twain   An ~ Aaron Clarey,
713:I'm prejudiced about education altogether. I think it's terribly overrated. ~ Freeman Dyson,
714:It’s education that’s meant to take us into this future that we can’t grasp. ~ Ken Robinson,
715:I would like to make it so that education was a right, and not a privilege. ~ Daphne Koller,
716:Man must develop his tendency towards the good. ~ Immanuel Kant, Thoughts on Education, #12,
717:My mum and dad had worked incredibly hard to afford me an education. ~ Benedict Cumberbatch,
718:One of the most beautiful things we can give our child is music education. ~ Gloria Estefan,
719:Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is.
   ~ Isaac Asimov,
720:The trouble with modern education is you never know how ignorant people are. ~ Evelyn Waugh,
721:We have to rethink how to teach financial education in the 21st century. ~ Elizabeth Warren,
722:What we call education is nothing but domestication of the human being. ~ Miguel Angel Ruiz,
723:When it comes to the education of our children... failure is not an option. ~ George W Bush,
724:When you use your mind to grow yourself, education doesn't come into it. ~ Stephen Richards,
725:Why do most Americans look up to education and down upon educated people? ~ Sydney J Harris,
726:By education most have been misled. ~ John Dryden, The Hind and Panther, Part III, line 389.,
727:Connectivity enables transparency for better government, education, and health. ~ Bill Gates,
728:Education aims to change what you know. Training aims to change who you are. ~ Eric Greitens,
729:Education doesn't determine how you earn, education determines how you spend. ~ Noam Chomsky,
730:Education is indoctrination if you're white - subjugation if you're black. ~ James A Baldwin,
731:Education is not the filling of a pail but the lighting of a fire.
   ~ William Butler Yeats,
732:Education is what is left after all that has been learnt is forgotten. ~ James Bryant Conant,
733:Education was the most important value in our home when I was growing up. ~ Caroline Kennedy,
734:I also feel I'm a positive role model by not putting my education on hold. ~ Natalie Portman,
735:I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. —MARK TWAIN   There ~ Jason Fried,
736:I operate better with education and awareness, like I think all of us do. ~ Christian Slater,
737:It is the process of mis-education that inhibits the full potential of a nation. ~ Malcolm X,
738:It is through education that the daughter of a peasant can become a doctor. ~ Nelson Mandela,
739:I've always wanted to get an education, and tonight's as good a time as any ~ Burt Lancaster,
740:I was blessed to have a mother and father that recognized the value of education. ~ Jeb Bush,
741:Learning starts with failure; the first failure is the beginning of education. ~ John Hersey,
742:My grandmother wanted me to have an education, so she kept me out of school. ~ Margaret Mead,
743:Only education, self-respect and rational qualities will uplift the down-trodden. ~ Periyar,
744:Our progress as a nation can be not swifter than our progress in education. ~ John F Kennedy,
745:Separate but equal is terrible for education but it's perfect for eyebrows. ~ Demetri Martin,
746:Someone once said that education was knowing what to do when you don’t know, ~ Michael Lewis,
747:The basic task of education is the care and feeding of the imagination. ~ Katherine Paterson,
748:The chief object of education is not to learn things but to unlearn things. ~ G K Chesterton,
749:The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it ~ Lawrence M Krauss,
750:The very reason for nature's existence is for the education of the soul. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
751:The work of education is divided between the teacher and the environment. ~ Maria Montessori,
752:With guns you can kill terrorists, with education you can kill terrorism. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
753:All education which develops power to share effectively in social life is moral. ~ John Dewey,
754:An unfortunate side effect of education among the masses is lack of respect. ~ Steven Erikson,
755:A revolutionary leadership must accordingly practice co-intentional education. ~ Paulo Freire,
756:Because education is such a broad area, I chose to focus on language learning. ~ Luis von Ahn,
757:Education and morals will be found almost the whole that goes to make a good man. ~ Aristotle,
758:Education is implication. It is not the things you say which children ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
759:Education is the ability to perceive the hidden connections between phenomena. ~ Vaclav Havel,
760:Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. ~ Nelson Mandela,
761:Education is what is left after you've forgotten everything you've learned. ~ Albert Einstein,
762:Education is what you must acquire without any interference from your schooling. ~ Mark Twain,
763:Education leans on teaching; teaching cannot be without the teacher! ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
764:Education must award self-confidence, the courage to depend on one's own strength. ~ Sai Baba,
765:Education must open the eyes and enable them to recognise the One behind the many. ~ Sai Baba,
766:Girls possess sexual tact in inverse proportion to their standard of education. ~ John Fowles,
767:I don’t understand why I wasn’t allowed to get a decent education as a child. ~ Tara Westover,
768:I see you've confused what you're learning in school with actual education. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
769:It is personal. That's what an education does. It makes the world personal. ~ Cormac McCarthy,
770:Katczinsky says it is all to do with education - it softens the brain. ~ Erich Maria Remarque,
771:Not all 'schooling' is 'education,' and not all 'education' is 'schooling'. ~ Milton Friedman,
772:.....science-based popular education can have an enormous impact on politics. ~ Carl Phillips,
773:she was seven. The Yorks’ emphasis on a light education was shortsighted. The ~ Kate Williams,
774:The aim of education is the condition of suspended judgment on everything. ~ George Santayana,
775:The ideal of service and the urge to practice it form the very heart of education. ~ Sai Baba,
776:The problem with K-12 education is socialism and the solution is capitalism. ~ Peter Brimelow,
777:The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. ~ Lawrence M Krauss,
778:The taxpayers are getting screwed by Congress and the Department of Education. ~ John Grisham,
779:To me education is a leading out of what is already there in the pupil's soul. ~ Muriel Spark,
780:We all know that education unlocks the door of opportunity for the young. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
781:Why education? Because it is the one science that overwhelmingly works.   Based ~ Laura Bates,
782:And I thought the whole point of my education was that violence IS the answer. ~ Richelle Mead,
783:Aside from the people I love, there is little I value more than my education. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
784:A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
785:Education can lift individuals out of poverty and into rewarding careers. ~ Christine Gregoire,
786:Education can't make us all leaders, but it can teach us which leader to follow. ~ Bel Kaufman,
787:Education, in its broadest sense, is the means of this social continuity of life. ~ John Dewey,
788:Education is the single-most important civil rights issue that we face today. ~ Michelle Obama,
789:Education means to bring out wisdom. Indoctrination means to push in knowledge. ~ Dick Gregory,
790:Education, medical treatment, and work are the natural rights of every citizen in the world. ~,
791:Education should serve to enlarge the vision and broaden the outlook of the people. ~ Sai Baba,
792:Formal education will make you a living. Self education will make you a fortune.
   ~ Jim Rohn,
793:For the violence in the dark streets, education is the best street light! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
794:I believe that education is the fundamental method of social progress and reform. ~ John Dewey,
795:Ibsen: “Education is the capacity to confront the situations posed by life. ~ Jon Lee Anderson,
796:If we make consistent effort, based on proper education, we can change the world. ~ Dalai Lama,
797:In the new economy, information, education, and motivation are everything. ~ William J Clinton,
798:Like the entire Saudi leadership, MBS had, practically speaking, no education. ~ Michael Wolff,
799:Medical school education and post graduate education emphasize thoroughness. ~ Ezekiel Emanuel,
800:Much of education is oriented towards making a living rather then making a life. ~ Roger Walsh,
801:My education is the most important thing so I always have to make time for it. ~ Jackson Guthy,
802:One of the best ways of enslaving a people is to keep them from education. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
803:Replace the eagerness for fame by the aspiration for perfection.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
804:The best education is to be had at a price, as well as the best broadcloth. ~ Anthony Trollope,
805:The most important education you get is your own - the one you learn in solitude. ~ Erica Jong,
806:The preparatory education of candidates for knighthood was long and arduous. ~ Thomas Bulfinch,
807:The real tragedy of nationalised education is how little innovation it has seen. ~ Matt Ridley,
808:They made my life big. They contributed to an education that money can’t buy. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
809:True education is that which proves useful in life and makes you industrious. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
810:We also call for free public education going forward. We know it pays for itself. ~ Jill Stein,
811:Accountability makes no sense when it undermines the larger goals of education. ~ Diane Ravitch,
812:A fondness for reading, which, properly directed, must be an education in itself. ~ Jane Austen,
813:a fondness for reading, which, properly directed, must be an education in itself. ~ Jane Austen,
814:At boarding school there wasn't much time for much of anything except education. ~ Henry Cavill,
815:At the end of the day, the true value proposition of education is employment. ~ Sebastian Thrun,
816:Because this was what education was actually about, defying the nature in oneself. ~ Maja Lunde,
817:Civic education and civic responsibility should be taught in elementary school. ~ Donna Brazile,
818:Education consists mainly of what we have unlearned. ~ Mark Twain, Mark Twain's Notebook (1898),
819:Education is a self-organizing system, where learning is an emergent phenomenon. ~ Sugata Mitra,
820:Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. —W. B. Yeats ~ Daniel Coyle,
821:Education isn't for getting a job. It's about developing yourself as a human being. ~ Liz Berry,
822:Education is the great equalizer, and shouldn't be limited to the wealthiest few. ~ Jim Clyburn,
823:Education must ultimately justify itself in terms of enhancing human understanding. ~ Anonymous,
824:Etymologically, the word education means just a process of leading or bringing up. ~ John Dewey,
825:I no have education. I have inspiration. If I was educated I would be a damn fool. ~ Bob Marley,
826:Instruction may end in the classroom, but education ends only with life. ~ Suzanne Woods Fisher,
827:Is education possibly a process of trading awareness for things of less worth? ~ Bernd Heinrich,
828:I think if education was celebrated in pop culture, wed live in a better place. ~ Cote de Pablo,
829:I think perhaps education doesn’t do us much good unless it is mixed with sweat. ~ Barack Obama,
830:It is our moral obligation to give every child the very best education possible. ~ Desmond Tutu,
831:I was delighted to not go to university. I couldn't wait to be out of education. ~ Tom Stoppard,
832:People are not saints just because they haven't got much money or education. ~ Robertson Davies,
833:Perception of ideas rather than the storing of them should be the aim of education. ~ A W Tozer,
834:Personally I am in favour of education but a university is not the place for it. ~ Tom Stoppard,
835:success or failure in minority education means success or failure for the U.S. ~ Chuck Thompson,
836:Ten Common Beliefs of the JPI Refugees are ignorant and have no formal education. ~ Mary Pipher,
837:The better part of every man's education is that which he gives himself. ~ James Russell Lowell,
838:The most effective kind of education is that a child should play amongst lovely things. ~ Plato,
839:What is education but a process by which a person begins to learn how to learn? ~ Peter Ustinov,
840:When you take the free will out of education, that turns it into schooling. ~ John Taylor Gatto,
841:Your education begins where what is called your education is over. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
842:And just because you have colleges and universities doesn't mean you have education. ~ Malcolm X,
843:An inventor is simply a fellow who doesn't take his education too seriously. ~ Charles Kettering,
844:Capacity without education is deplorable, and education without capacity is thrown away. ~ Saadi,
845:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.” ― Aristotle ~ Penny Reid,
846:Education as the exercise of domination stimulates the credulity of the students. ~ Paulo Freire,
847:Education forms the common mind. Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined. ~ Alexander Pope,
848:Education is an imprecise process, a dance, and a collaborative experience. ~ Siva Vaidhyanathan,
849:Education is not solely about earning a great living. It means living a great life. ~ Brad Henry,
850:Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think. ~ Albert Einstein,
851:Education is one way to be rich. Financial wealth is another way to be rich. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
852:Education is wonderful - it helps you worry about things all over the world. ~ Joey Lauren Adams,
853:From a very early age, I've had to interrupt my education to go to school. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
854:Generally, education is to curiosity what circumcision is to the foreskin. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
855:Harvard gave me an education, but Junior Chamber gave me an education for life. ~ John F Kennedy,
856:I absolutely think the Seattle grunge sound was instrumental to my music education. ~ David Cook,
857:If you don't have jobs, it's hard to have other things like health and education. ~ Michael Dell,
858:I have to say I have an incredible musical education because of my father. ~ Kareem Abdul Jabbar,
859:In my opinion, education is the finest gift an individual can give a young person. ~ Donald Bren,
860:I only had a high school education and believe me, I had to cheat to get that. ~ Sparky Anderson,
861:I think the education I've had as an actor I would never have had at university. ~ Kristin Kreuk,
862:It's powerfully important that our kids get an education in personal finance. ~ Elizabeth Warren,
863:Like Milagros, they’d all gotten where they were by worshiping the god of Education. ~ Mia Alvar,
864:No one can get an education, for of necessity education is a continuing process. ~ Louis L Amour,
865:Not a Harvard-type education, just a not-sticking-up-a-liquor-store-type education. ~ Chris Rock,
866:Public education was not founded to give society what it wants. Quite the opposite. ~ May Sarton,
867:Real education has to draw out the best from the boys and girls to be educated. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
868:Teppic hadn’t been educated. Education had just settled on him, like dandruff. ~ Terry Pratchett,
869:that what befell them was not unsalvageable misfortune but the gift of education— ~ Ryan Holiday,
870:The anti-elitist values in America, I think, are very destructive to education. ~ Joshua Jackson,
871:the great aim of education," said Herbert Spencer, "is not knowledge but action. ~ Dale Carnegie,
872:the great aim of education,’ said Herbert Spencer, ‘is not knowledge but action. ~ Dale Carnegie,
873:the great aim of education,” said Herbert Spencer, “is not knowledge but action. ~ Dale Carnegie,
874:The purpose of education is not to fill a vessel but to kindle a flame. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
875:The secret of successful education is finding out how a particular person learns. ~ Nancy Farmer,
876:We do not know what education can do for us, because we have never tried it. ~ Robert M Hutchins,
877:What is education but a conditioning of the mind to a society and a way of life. ~ Louis L Amour,
878:A hundred years of education is nothing compared with one moment spent with God! ~ Shams Tabrizi,
879:Catherine E. Lhamon, the Education Department's assistant secretary for civil rights, ~ Anonymous,
880:Education cannot be a matter of charity, Education has to be a matter of Right. ~ Arvind Kejriwal,
881:Education for livelihood alone will never make our life full and complete. ~ Mata Amritanandamayi,
882:Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army.” —Edward Everett ~ Angela Roquet,
883:Education is not something to prepare you for life; it is a continuous part of life. ~ Henry Ford,
884:Education is only like good culture,--it changes the size, but not the sort. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
885:Education is the acquisition of the art of the utilisation of knowledge. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
886:Education makes machines which act like men and produces men who act like machines. ~ Erich Fromm,
887:Fine and delicate taste is the fruit of education and experience. ~ Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres,
888:I find that with some girls, the words work and education have gotten a bad rap. ~ Sandra Bullock,
889:I grew up in a Chinese family where the parents No. 1 priority is the kids education. ~ Weili Dai,
890:I had a terrible education. I attended a school for emotionally disturbed teachers. ~ Woody Allen,
891:I'm a huge fan of music in schools and music education because that's how I grew up. ~ Kris Allen,
892:In Islam, it is not just your right, but your responsibility to get education. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
893:I say political economy; you say—worse. I say socialism: worse. Education: worse. ~ Anton Chekhov,
894:My education was neglected, yet I was passionately fond of reading. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,
895:Our identity is fictional, written by parents, relatives, education, society. ~ Genesis P Orridge,
896:The secret of successful education...is finding out how a particular person learns ~ Nancy Farmer,
897:The value of a prototype is in the education it gives you, not in the code itself. ~ Amari Cooper,
898:To be successful in life what you need is education, not literacy and degrees. ~ Munshi Premchand,
899:Was a broad but shallow education superior to one that was narrow but deep? ~ Christopher Paolini,
900:You didn't understand or care to know, you get your education from your lovers. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
901:A hundred years of education is nothing compared with one moment spent with God! ~ Shams Tabrizi ~,
902:and transform that negative situation into an education, a skill set, or a fortune. ~ Ryan Holiday,
903:A university is not a political party, and an education is not an indoctrination. ~ David Horowitz,
904:Common sense without education, is better than education without common sense. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
905:Education in a deepest sense has always been about doing rather than about knowing. ~ Roger Schank,
906:Education, therefore, is a process of living and not a preparation for future living. ~ John Dewey,
907:Free education and health care are essential for the welfare of the population. ~ Jose Ramos Horta,
908:He couldn't have explained this misery of his, it exceeded his education. ~ Louis Ferdinand C line,
909:I began my education at a very early age; in fact, right after I left college. ~ Winston Churchill,
910:I believe primary and secondary education is the bedrock of any sustainable society. ~ Nita Ambani,
911:I didn't want to miss out on my education to model. I can't do just modeling. ~ Georgia May Jagger,
912:If I didn't have some kind of education, then I wouldn't be able to count my money. ~ Missy Elliot,
913:If it is about education, then all who are college graduates should be wealthy. ~ Stephen Richards,
914:If you want to get laid, go to college. If you want an education, go to the library. ~ Frank Zappa,
915:In the U.S., we believe the best way to improve lives is to improve public education. ~ Bill Gates,
916:I think education and intelligence (are) important, but not art. Not artistic education. ~ Brassai,
917:Liberating education consists in acts of cognition, not transferals of information. ~ Paulo Freire,
918:Liberating education consists in acts of cognition, not transferrals of information ~ Paulo Freire,
919:No one can "get" an education, for of necessity education is a continuing process. ~ Louis L Amour,
920:Not living for food, but living for the sake of an ideal, that is the goal of education ~ Sai Baba,
921:One of the benefits of a bad education is the constant pleasure of discovery. ~ Richard Brookhiser,
922:Only time, education and plenty of good schooling will make anti-segregation work. ~ Nat King Cole,
923:Someone once said that education was knowing what to do when you don’t know,” said ~ Michael Lewis,
924:Stupidity cannot be cured with money, or through education, or by legislation. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
925:The chief object of education is not to learn things but to unlearn things. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
926:The education already given to the people creates the necessity of giving them more. ~ Horace Mann,
927:The future belongs to young people with an education and the imagination to create. ~ Barack Obama,
928:What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to the soul.” -Joseph Addison ~ Angela Roquet,
929:When someone takes away your pens you realise quite how important education is. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
930:When someone takes away your pens you realize quite how important education is. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
931:When the true history fades, ask education and the unbiased story tellers ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
932:At some point, our education no longer belongs to our teachers. It belongs to us. ~ Megan Stielstra,
933:Culture and education are the lethal weapons against all kinds of fundamentalism. ~ Marjane Satrapi,
934:Culture, religion, and education, are conspiracies to standardize worldviews. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
935:Education is not a luxury in modern American society-it is essential for survival. ~ John M Perkins,
936:Education is the key,” he drilled into me. “Those who fail to plan, plan to fail. ~ Michael Baisden,
937:Education is the sum of what students teach each other between lectures and seminars. ~ Stephen Fry,
938:Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school. ~ Albert Einstein,
939:Every child has a right to go to high school and end up with a third grade education. ~ Pat Paulsen,
940:I saw that bad handwriting should be regarded as a sign of an imperfect education. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
941:life responsibilities in the right order: God, family, education, and then business. ~ Steve Harvey,
942:Men of polite learning and a liberal education. ~ Matthew Henry, Commentaries, The Acts, Chapter X.,
943:No child in Africa, and in fact anywhere in the world, should be denied education. ~ Nelson Mandela,
944:No golfer has completed his education until he has played and studied Royal Dornoch. ~ Herbert Wind,
945:One could get a first-class education from a shelf of books five feet long. ~ Charles William Eliot,
946:Problem-posing education affirms men and women as beings in the process of becoming. ~ Paulo Freire,
947:The aim of a college education is to teach you to know a good man when you see one. ~ William James,
948:The secret of the superiority of state over private education lies in the fact ~ Lester Frank Ward,
949:We are starving for education... it's like a precious gift. It's like a diamond. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
950:What is defeat? Nothing but education; nothing but the first steps to something better. ~ Anonymous,
951:A brainscan cannot interpret itself and neither can a data dashboard in education. ~ Andy Hargreaves,
952:Being a good conversationalist is really what a liberal arts education is all about. ~ Mark Vonnegut,
953:Education cannot be effective unless it helps a child to open up himself to life. ~ Maria Montessori,
954:Education in a technological world of replaceable and expendable parts is neuter. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
955:Education isn't just about feeding the brain. Art and music feed the heart and soul. ~ Julie Garwood,
956:Education lays the foundation of a large portion of the causes of mental disorder ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
957:For a man with an education the world is a wide place and the opportunities are many ~ Louis L Amour,
958:I started life in a poor family and could not even afford a proper tertiary education. ~ Vincent Tan,
959:It is clearly absurd to limit the term 'education' to a person's formal schooling. ~ Murray Rothbard,
960:Laws and rules of conduct are for the state of childhood; education is an emancipation. ~ Andre Gide,
961:Literary education is of no value, if it is not able to build up a sound character. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
962:Maybe it's a tired tale, but without an education, you're not going to go anywhere. ~ Buzz Bissinger,
963:The aim of all education is, or should be, to teach people to educate themselves. ~ Arnold J Toynbee,
964:The best way to fight poverty is to empower people through access to quality education ~ John Legend,
965:The greatest obstacle to those who hope to reform American education is complacency. ~ Diane Ravitch,
966:The only foundation for useful education in a republic is to be laid in religion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
967:There are pictures that manifest education and there are pictures that manifest love. ~ Robert Henri,
968:This isn’t about getting an education. It’s about arming you for what you will become. ~ Candice Fox,
969:True education flowers at the point when delight falls in love with responsibility. ~ Philip Pullman,
970:We don't have education, we have inspiration; if I was educated I would be a damn fool. ~ Bob Marley,
971:What nutrition and reproduction are to physiological life, education is to social life. ~ John Dewey,
972:What's the use of a high school education if you can't recall it when needed later on? ~ Hal Clement,
973:When I went to school, sex education was mainly muttered warnings about the janitor. ~ Frankie Boyle,
974:Your education or your life, Claire. I'd rather you be alive and a little bit dumber. ~ Rachel Caine,
975:A dog is the greatest gift a parent can give a child. OK, a good education, then a dog. ~ John Grogan,
976:As Governor of North Carolina for two terms, I made improving education a top priority. ~ Mike Easley,
977:Culture itself is neither education nor law-making: it is an atmosphere and a heritage. ~ H L Mencken,
978:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.
André Chevalier ~ Nikki Sex,
979:Education doesn't change life much. It just lifts trouble to a higher plane of regard. ~ Robert Frost,
980:Education is what they equip you with; just in case your dream doesn't workout. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
981:Education provides the necessary tools, equipment by which we learn how to learn. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
982:I do not want art for a few any more than education for a few, or freedom for a few. ~ William Morris,
983:Inclusive, good-quality education is a foundation for dynamic and equitable societies. ~ Desmond Tutu,
984:I really got the best of education , and arts and music and summer camp. I had it great. ~ Jill Stein,
985:Is not education the art of drawing out full manhood of the children under training? ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
986:Leadership is not about experience, education or talent. It's about choosing to lead. ~ Michael Hyatt,
987:My education was dismal. I went to a series of schools for mentally disturbed teachers. ~ Woody Allen,
988:My mother had been a grade-school teacher, and my father had an eighth-grade education. ~ Gordon Bell,
989:One of the benefits of a college education is to show the boy its little avail. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
990:Our principal writers have nearly all been fortunate in escaping regular education. ~ Hugh MacDiarmid,
991:Sex education in the modern manner has been well-described as plumbing for hedonists. ~ George F Will,
992:The education of children for God is the most important business done on earth. ~ Robert Lewis Dabney,
993:the great aim of education,’ said Herbert Spencer, ‘is not knowledge but action.’ And ~ Dale Carnegie,
994:The idea that education will lead to a lessening of bigotry is just factually incorrect. ~ Reza Aslan,
995:The quality of an education system can never exceed the quality of its teachers. ~ Andreas Schleicher,
996:Truly barren is a secular education. It is always in labor, but never gives birth. ~ Gregory of Nyssa,
997:You don't need a city charter to know that education is the foundation of any community. ~ Alan Autry,
998:...a good education is precisely designed to correct the instincts of human nature. ~ Ir ne N mirovsky,
999:All of life is education and everybody is a teacher and everybody is forever a pupil. ~ Abraham Maslow,
1000:America had an emphasis on the individual and so education became available for everyone. ~ John Glenn,
1001:An athletic scholarship shouldn’t be the best opportunity to receive a quality education. ~ Jalen Rose,
1002:A republican government should be based on free and equal education among the people ~ Susan B Anthony,
1003:As a Member of Congress, I've continued my family's tradition of focusing on education. ~ Mark Kennedy,
1004:Be it a village or a city, education is very important, and it always comes into you. ~ Kareena Kapoor,
1005:Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him. ~ John Locke,
1006:Education is not only a ladder of opportunity, but it is also an investment in our future. ~ Ed Markey,
1007:Education must assume full responsibility to enter the moral and spiritual lives of pupils. ~ Sai Baba,
1008:Education produces natural intuitions, and natural intuitions are erased by education. ~ Blaise Pascal,
1009:Hard work and education will take you farther than any government program can ever promise. ~ Mia Love,
1010:I don't care how rich and successful a man is. He's nothing without an education. ~ Rodney Dangerfield,
1011:I don't want to scrounge around and be homeless, and I want to finish my education. ~ Callan McAuliffe,
1012:If you want to see the future of management education you should go to see Team Academy. ~ Peter Senge,
1013:Indeed one of the ultimate advantages of an education is simply coming to the end of it. ~ B F Skinner,
1014:It is clearly absurd to limit the term 'education' to a person's formal schooling. ~ Murray N Rothbard,
1015:I wish my parents had spent more time worrying about my education than me being a star. ~ Shania Twain,
1016:Lincoln had risen to this pinnacle through migration, self-education, and hard work. ~ Robert D Kaplan,
1017:No one has yet invented a system of education that is capable of ruining everyone. ~ Otto E Neugebauer,
1018:Over 20 million children of conflict are out of school. Education is often forgotten. ~ Angelina Jolie,
1019:Technology has brought many possibilities in education and health that are key to women. ~ Paul Kagame,
1020:That which we do not call education is more precious than that which we call so. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1021:The goal of education is the advancement of knowledge and the dissemination of truth. ~ John F Kennedy,
1022:The greatest act of self-education I've ever undertaken has been to become a writer. ~ Mark Rubinstein,
1023:The great failure in education, much of the time, is the lack of excitement and stimulus ~ Bill Bryson,
1024:The one thing we can do is invest in the quality of education, especially higher education. ~ Ron Kind,
1025:The pedigree of your college education matters far less than what you have accomplished. ~ Laszlo Bock,
1026:Upon the education of the people of this country the fate of this country depends. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
1027:We obtain our education at home, at school, and, most important, from life itself. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
1028:What did I get from Simon? An education - the thing my parents always wanted me to have. ~ Lynn Barber,
1029:What education is to the individual, revelation is to the whole human race. ~ Gotthold Ephraim Lessing,
1030:2. Christian education places its emphasis on “unity” in relationships between people. ~ James C Dobson,
1031:An education which does not cultivate the will is an education that depraves the mind. ~ Anatole France,
1032:Character Education helps to create an environment for caring and learning in schools. ~ Thomas Lickona,
1033:Concentration is a part of life. It is not the consequence of a method of education. ~ Maria Montessori,
1034:Don’t hold with schools,” said Granny Weatherwax. “They gets in the way of education. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1035:Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company, and reflection must finish him. ~ John Locke,
1036:Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another. ~ G K Chesterton,
1037:Education reform doesn't come cheap. But the price of ignorance is far, far greater ~ Rania Al Abdullah,
1038:Education was in danger from the source that always hampered it—religious fanaticism. ~ Clarence Darrow,
1039:Education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil. ~ C S Lewis,
1040:How to teach rigor while preserving imagination is an unsolved challenge to education. ~ Ralph W Gerard,
1041:I believe public education is the new civil rights battle and I support charter schools. ~ Andrew Cuomo,
1042:I believe that education is freedom. It provides the tools to affect one's own destiny. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
1043:I believe that religious education must be the sole concern of religious associations. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1044:I believe we owe our young an education that captures the exhilarating drama of science. ~ Brian Greene,
1045:I co-founded Duolingo with the mission of bringing free language education to the world. ~ Luis von Ahn,
1046:I don't think of myself as a policy expert. I think education is the most important thing. ~ Jenna Bush,
1047:If your education, talent and capacity can do nothing; your body can do lots of things. ~ M F Moonzajer,
1048:In opposition to sex education: Let the kids today learn it where we did - in the gutter. ~ Pat Paulsen,
1049:some good, sacred memory, preserved from childhood, is perhaps the best education. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
1050:Some know the value of education by having it. I know it's value by not having it. ~ Frederick Douglass,
1051:Some people get an education without going to college. The rest get it after they get out. ~ Mark Twain,
1052:The first half of my life I went to school, the second half of my life I got an education. ~ Mark Twain,
1053:This is a story of an adventure in education, pursued not under the best of conditions. ~ Louis L Amour,
1054:Thus the radii of all education run together into one center which is called personality. ~ Max Stirner,
1055:To be an American is of itself almost a moral condition, an education, and a career. ~ George Santayana,
1056:we have not yet developed a system of education that is not a system of indoctrination. ~ Doris Lessing,
1057:We really shouldnt be running education like a supermarket where you compare prices. ~ Shirley Williams,
1058:Whatever an education is, it should make you a unique individual, not a conformist. ~ John Taylor Gatto,
1059:You show up at these meetings to stay sober and you walk out with a fucking education. ~ Lawrence Block,
1060:Access to computers and the Internet has become a basic need for education in our society. ~ Kent Conrad,
1061:A good special education teacher is hard to find and even harder to hang on to. ~ Lourdes Garcia Navarro,
1062:An education is not properly an industry, and its proper use is not to serve industries. ~ Wendell Berry,
1063:Education and assimilation were devastatingly effective at controlling a conquered people. ~ Dani Harper,
1064:Education is nice, but talent's much better. Find your inner talent and put it to work. ~ Tassa Desalada,
1065:Education is the most powerful weapon, which you can use to change the world —NelsoN MaNdela ~ Anonymous,
1066:Education with inert ideas is not only useless; it is above all things harmful. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
1067:Everybody should be interested in access to primary and secondary education for everybody. ~ Paul Farmer,
1068:Formal education will earn you a living. Self-education will earn you a fortune.” Jim Rohn ~ Joanna Penn,
1069:If we create a generation of men who aren't getting an education, that's bad for women. ~ Michael Gurian,
1070:If you step up the self-education curve, you will come up with more answers than you can use. ~ Jim Rohn,
1071:I had a very elitist, snobbish, expensive education in India, and that almost destroyed me. ~ Bunker Roy,
1072:I'm from Brooklyn. I grew up very poor- seven people, four rooms. My dad had no education. ~ Peter Criss,
1073:Intellectual education influences the head and values-based education influences the heart. ~ Shiv Khera,
1074:It is the duty of the State to educate, and the right of the people to demand education. ~ Edmund Barton,
1075:It looks like I had the most irrelevant education than anybody in the planet could have. ~ Robert Greene,
1076:Jeb Bush is very good on immigration, he's very good on education. He's a smart guy. ~ Michael Bloomberg,
1077:Let us not, in the eagerness of our haste to educate, forget all the ends of education. ~ William Godwin,
1078:Life must be a constant education; one must learn everything, from speaking to dying. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
1079:Ordinary people seek entertainment. Extraordinary people seek education and learning. ~ Benjamin P Hardy,
1080:propose four models of education, each of which corresponds to explicit aims that have ~ Otto F Kernberg,
1081:The education needs in Silicon Valley versus rural Iowa versus Tennessee are very different. ~ Andy Ogle,
1082:The purpose of education is to free the student from the tyranny of the present. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
1083:The regeneration of society is the regeneration of society by individual education. ~ Jean de la Bruyere,
1084:They will not stop me, I will get my education, if it is in home, school or any place ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1085:To neglect the wise sayings of great thinkers is to deny ourselves the truest education. ~ William James,
1086:Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
1087:We are getting an education of a lifetime. We're actually out there in the real world. ~ Solange Knowles,
1088:What was the point of education, he thought, if people went out afterward and used it? ~ Terry Pratchett,
1089:While wisdom dictates the need for education, education does not necessarily make one wise. ~ Ben Carson,
1090:With dance, it's about education. I'm teaching a lot. I teach the foundations of hip-hop. ~ Stephen Boss,
1091:A child's education should begin at least one hundred years before he is born. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
1092:All men who have turned out worth anything have had the chief hand in their own education. ~ Walter Scott,
1093:(And the phrase “content delivery system” is still used to describe online education, sadly.) ~ Anonymous,
1094:An education is everything, Charley. An education is how you'll make something of yourself. ~ Mitch Albom,
1095:Aristotle says that the aim of education is to make the pupil like and dislike what he ought. ~ C S Lewis,
1096:Democracy, material wealth, and universal education are the soil upon which modernism exists. ~ Ai Weiwei,
1097:Education aims at solving problems, but some educators are problems to be solved ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1098:Every child has a right to education as much as to life, and every woman the right to live. ~ Nita Ambani,
1099:For everyone, everywhere, literacy is, along with education in general, a basic human right. ~ Kofi Annan,
1100:going through life without an education. Tomorrow, I think I'll go to the community college and ~ Various,
1101:I found that almost everyone had something interesting to contribute to my education. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
1102:If we have to give up either religion or education, we should give up education. ~ William Jennings Bryan,
1103:I had begun to conceive of what my education might cost me, and I had begun to resent it. ~ Tara Westover,
1104:I think education has a bigger impact on the lives of people than absolutely anything else. ~ Amartya Sen,
1105:Journeys at youth are part of the education; but at maturity, are part of the experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
1106:Let's make sure that we are working for age-appropriate sex education in our school system. ~ Wendy Davis,
1107:Much of education today focuses on obedience skills rather than critical thinking skills. ~ Bryant McGill,
1108:Never trust the captain who has never taken any education from the School of Storms! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1109:One of the best investments we can make in a child’s life is high-quality early education. ~ Barack Obama,
1110:Our school education ignores, in a thousand ways, the rules of healthy development. ~ Elizabeth Blackwell,
1111:The best and most important part of every man's education is that which he gives himself. ~ Edward Gibbon,
1112:The foundation of every state is the education of its youth. ~ Diogenes of Sinope (according to Stobæus).,
1113:the Reggio Emilia philosophy for the education of young children and the Waldorf schools. ~ Daniel H Pink,
1114:Thirty-three percent of all of our regrets pertain to decisions we made about education. ~ Kathryn Schulz,
1115:Through hard work and education, we can deliver a strong economy and opportunity for all. ~ Julia Gillard,
1116:What if education wasn't first and foremost about what we know, but about what we love? ~ James K A Smith,
1117:What if education wasn’t first and foremost about what we know, but about what we love? ~ James K A Smith,
1118:You must fight others, but through peace, and through dialogue, and through education. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1119:Academics were important to my parents, as immigrants. Education is where it all begins. ~ Renee Zellweger,
1120:Believe me, the library is the temple of God. Education is the most sacred religion of all. ~ Gene Simmons,
1121:Culture is the greatest barrier to your enlightenment, your education, and your decency. ~ Terence McKenna,
1122:Education is not a skyhook from which to hang economic policy; it is an emergent phenomenon. ~ Matt Ridley,
1123:Education is paradoxical in that it is largely composed of things that cannot be learned ~ Roberto Calasso,
1124:Education is the process by which one mind forms another mind, and one heart, another heart. ~ Jules Simon,
1125:Formal education will earn you a living.  Self-education will earn you a fortune.”  Jim Rohn ~ Joanna Penn,
1126:For “the great aim of education,” said Herbert Spencer, “is not knowledge but action.” And ~ Dale Carnegie,
1127:Henry deeply felt the misfortune of being debarred from a liberal education. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,
1128:His lack of education is more than compensated for by his keenly developed moral bankruptcy. ~ Woody Allen,
1129:I.B.M. was my college education, effectively. They were very good at teaching you management. ~ Mike McCue,
1130:I do regard spinning and weaving as a necessary part of any national system of education. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1131:I got a liberal education. A white guy, rapping as Bugs Bunny, on a quintuple-platinum album. ~ Billy West,
1132:I have what passes for an education in this day and time, but I am not deceived by it. ~ Flannery O Connor,
1133:In general, children, like men, and men, like children, prefer entertainment to education. ~ Denis Diderot,
1134:Intelligence and education that hasn't been tempered by human affection isn't worth a damn. ~ Daniel Keyes,
1135:intelligence and education that hasn’t been tempered by human affection isn’t worth a damn. ~ Daniel Keyes,
1136:In the quest for higher education and learning, we must never leave behind... common sense. ~ Jos N Harris,
1137:It is not from nature, but from education and habits, that our wants are chiefly derived. ~ Henry Fielding,
1138:It is only education and understanding of the past that teaches us not to repeat history. ~ Eugene Jarecki,
1139:Jesus changed how the world thinks about science, medicine, human rights, education & more. ~ John Ortberg,
1140:Make me the the master of education, and I will undertake to change the world. ~ Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz,
1141:Most men of education are more superstitious than they admit - nay, than they think. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
1142:One might say that the American trend of education is to reduce the senses almost to nil. ~ Isadora Duncan,
1143:Over the long run, education and technology are the decisive determinants of wage levels. ~ Thomas Piketty,
1144:Reading and writing are not education if they do not help people to be kind to all creatures ~ John Ruskin,
1145:Soap and education are not as sudden as a massacre, but they are more deadly in the long run. ~ Mark Twain,
1146:The biggest thing that I felt basketball could do for me was help me get a good education. ~ Julius Erving,
1147:The child who desires education will be bettered by it; the child who dislikes it disgraced. ~ John Ruskin,
1148:The measure of the sincerity is the measure of the success.
23 April 1968
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
1149:There is no better education than rap battling in terms of performance. It makes you fearless. ~ Doc Brown,
1150:There've been times where I wondered whether it was worth continuing in my own education. ~ Peter R Orszag,
1151:We wouldn't need any job training centers if our education was working in the first place. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
1152:A Harvard education consists of what you learn at Harvard while you are not studying. ~ James Bryant Conant,
1153:As much experience, education and awareness as one can attain is important for a comedian. ~ Shelley Berman,
1154:But without state-approved syllabi and standardized testing, my education can only go so far. ~ Laszlo Bock,
1155:Credentialing, not education, has become the primary business of North American universities. ~ Jane Jacobs,
1156:Education isn’t something your professors make for you. It’s something you make for yourself. ~ Lance Olsen,
1157:Education is something that other people do to you. Learning is something you do for yourself. ~ Joichi Ito,
1158:Education is the leading of human souls to what is best, and making what is best out of them. ~ John Ruskin,
1159:Education must be orientated towards the attainment of character for leading clean simple lives. ~ Sai Baba,
1160:Equality of talents, of education, or of wealth can not be produced by human institutions. ~ Andrew Jackson,
1161:...I do not want art for a few; any more than education for a few; or freedom for a few... ~ William Morris,
1162:I'm 100 percent Jewish by blood, but by education I'm nothing. By affiliation I'm nothing. ~ Joseph Brodsky,
1163:I'm not just a politician, I'm a guy who has a real deep, substantive, commitment to education. ~ Roy Romer,
1164:I really missed going to college. I missed not having that education and that experience. ~ Brooklyn Decker,
1165:I think few people of education enter politics because it seems like a contact blood sport. ~ Sherry Turkle,
1166:Learning to play two pairs is worth about as much as a college education, and about as costly. ~ Mark Twain,
1167:Smiley said all a frog wanted was education, and he could do most any thing and I believe him. ~ Mark Twain,
1168:teaching is not a popularity contest. It’s about getting them involved in their own education. ~ Tony Danza,
1169:The most important day of a person's education is the first day of school, not Graduation Day. ~ Harry Wong,
1170:The object of true education is to make people not merely do the right things, but enjoy them ~ John Ruskin,
1171:The purpose of education is to enable us to develop to the fullest that which is inside us ~ Norman Cousins,
1172:The wonders of the ages assembled for your edification, education and enjoyment - for a price. ~ P T Barnum,
1173:To defend a country, you need an army, but to defend a civilization, you need education... ~ Jonathan Sacks,
1174:Was putting a man on the moon actually easier than improving education in our public schools? ~ B F Skinner,
1175:a college education I would never propose - a bachelor's degree won't even keep you in clothes ~ Cole Porter,
1176:Amherst is a liberal arts college, committed to providing students with a broad education. ~ Joseph Stiglitz,
1177:A positive attitude is often way more important than education, money, and experience. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
1178:Better spend an extra hundred or two on your son's education, than leave it him in your will. ~ George Eliot,
1179:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all" 
                      ~ Aristotle,
1180:Education and admonition commence in the first years of childhood, and last to the very end of life. ~ Plato,
1181:Education is a crutch with which the foolish attack the wise to prove that they are not idiots. ~ Karl Kraus,
1182:Education is not an affair of 'telling' and being told, but an active and constructive process. ~ John Dewey,
1183:Education is the best weapon through which we can fight poverty, ignorance and terrorism. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1184:Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today. ~ Malcolm X,
1185:Education never ends, Watson. It is a series of lessons with the greatest for the last. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1186:Education was almost entirely a matter of luck — usually of ill-luck — in those distant days. ~ George Eliot,
1187:Education without morals is like a ship without a compass, merely wandering nowhere. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
1188:Even when they desired education, the strains of daily survival made it near impossible. ~ Kenneth C Johnson,
1189:Free education is abundant, all over the Internet. It’s the desire to learn that’s scarce. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1190:Good manners will often take people where neither money nor education will take them. ~ Fanny Jackson Coppin,
1191:...I do not want art for a few; any more than education for a few; or freedom for a few... ~ William Morris,
1192:If we want our children to value education, then we must show our appreciation for knowledge. ~ Brad Sherman,
1193:I know the importance of education because my pens and books were taken from me by force, ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1194:I listen to Radio 4 all the time. I didn't go to university, so that's my further education. ~ Helen McCrory,
1195:In a representative republic, the education of our children must be of the utmost importance! ~ James Monroe,
1196:My hobby more and more is likely to be common school education, or universal education. ~ Rutherford B Hayes,
1197:My idea of education is to unsettle the minds of the young and inflame their intellects. ~ Robert M Hutchins,
1198:No one is born a good citizen or a good democrat or a good leader; it takes time and education. ~ Kofi Annan,
1199:Not everyone has equal abilities, but everyone should have equal opportunity for education. ~ John F Kennedy,
1200:[Of] particular importance is the relationship between education and the political process. ~ Jonathan Kozol,
1201:One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds. ~ Aldo Leopold,
1202:She got on with her education. In her opinion, school kept on trying to interfere with it. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1203:So I want my kids to go to public schools because I think it's a better education overall. ~ Charles Schumer,
1204:The best education consists in immunizing people against systematic attempts at education. ~ Paul Feyerabend,
1205:The wise use of leisure, it must be conceded, is a product of civilization and education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1206:To throw obstacles in the way of a complete education is like putting out the eyes. ~ Elizabeth Cady Stanton,
1207:We can only transform humanity and create a happier more compassionate world through education. ~ Dalai Lama,
1208:We don't reinvest in the American people. We don't put enough money into American education. ~ Jedediah Bila,
1209:We must reject that most dismal and fatuous notion that education is a preparation for life. ~ Northrop Frye,
1210:What was education for, if not to acquire contradictions? At least it looked like that to me. ~ Lorrie Moore,
1211:When I was at school you got an overall general education, on many things, even just basic facts. ~ Jo Brand,
1212:You may be a redneck if... you have spent more on your pickup truck than on your education. ~ Jeff Foxworthy,
1213:a foreigner often feels most foreign while witnessing the early education of another culture. ~ Peter Hessler,
1214:Although virtue receives some of its excellencies from nature, yet it is perfected by education. ~ Quintilian,
1215:American education has been littered with failed fads and foolish ideas for the past century. ~ Diane Ravitch,
1216:And the president should be doing more about education than saying, 'Lights, camera, action.' ~ Dick Gephardt,
1217:An education is a more surefire guarantee that you have possibilities opened to you. ~ Jonathan Taylor Thomas,
1218:Art is the more spiritual side of education that really does saves lives and makes amazing individuals. ~ Mya,
1219:Deeply smart people are unique—a product of their particular mind-set, education, and experience. ~ Anonymous,
1220:Education exposes young people to a broader world, a world full of opportunity and hope. ~ Christine Gregoire,
1221:Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance. —WILL DURANT, writer and historian ~ Laura D Adams,
1222:Education is as much about learning what you don’t know as it is about adding to what you do. ~ David McRaney,
1223:Education is only a ladder to gather fruit from the tree of knowledge, not the fruit itself ~ Albert Einstein,
1224:Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1225:Education is very admirable but let us not forget that anything worth knowing cannot be taught. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1226:Education makes the wise slightly wiser, but it makes the fool vastly more dangerous. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
1227:Education never ends, Watson. It is a series of lessons, with the greatest for the last. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1228:Every single progressive education fad of the past thirty years has hurt poor black children. ~ Shelby Steele,
1229:For all my education, accomplishments, and so called 'wisdom'... I can't fathom my own heart. ~ Michael Caine,
1230:I spent the 1960s and 1970s seeking myself - the working-class tradition of self-education. ~ Ken Livingstone,
1231:I think education is both using and improving knowledge and that changes the whole picture. ~ William Glasser,
1232:Literacy makes man a victim of advertising. Education makes him a victim of employment. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
1233:My gut reaction [on Betsy DeVos] was, oh, my God. We are now back into the education wars. ~ Randi Weingarten,
1234:Once we considered education a public expense; we know now that it is a public investment. ~ Lyndon B Johnson,
1235:The education cuts in the President's budget are both irresponsible and morally unjustifiable. ~ Chaka Fattah,
1236:The first condition of education is being able to put someone to wholesome and meaningful work. ~ John Ruskin,
1237:There was always something sly about any act of education. Eve had learned that in the garden. ~ Paul Russell,
1238:To be getting an education means this: to be learning what is your own, and what is not your own. ~ Epictetus,
1239:We have taken a strategic decision to gather education activities under a single roof. ~ Recep Tayyip Erdogan,
1240:Well? Children sometimes steal. Beat them a little, and they stop stealing. Basic education ~ Terry Pratchett,
1241:All claims of education notwithstanding, the pupil will accept only that which his mind craves. ~ Emma Goldman,
1242:American art, like the American language and American education, was as far as possible sexless. ~ Henry Adams,
1243:Any success that I've had in my life has been in spite of my education rather than because of it. ~ Wayne Dyer,
1244:Education, as conceived today, is something separated both from biological and social life. ~ Maria Montessori,
1245:Education begins by teaching children to read and ends by making most of them hate reading. ~ Holbrook Jackson,
1246:Education is all about igniting young minds and enabling them to attain their fullest potential. ~ Nita Ambani,
1247:Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get if you don't. ~ Pete Seeger,
1248:How then is perfection to be sought? Wherein lies our hope? In education, and in nothing else. ~ Immanuel Kant,
1249:I believe the government should ensure all children are provided with a good education. ~ Jacqueline Novogratz,
1250:Let early education be a sort of amusement. You will then be better able to find out the natural bent. ~ Plato,
1251:My favorite subject was either English or History. I had a really awesome high school education. ~ Ian Harding,
1252:My votes against the education bill and my votes against the Medicare bill got huge play at home. ~ Mike Pence,
1253:None of my remedial education classes covered how to escape in the middle of a zombie apocalypse. ~ Mira Grant,
1254:Purity of personal life is the one indispensable condition for building up a sound education. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1255:Read more books than those who have a formal education, developing this into a lifelong habit. ~ Robert Greene,
1256:The failure of American education is an unforgivable dereliction of one generation to the next. ~ Mark R Levin,
1257:The purpose of a good education is to show you that there are three sides to a two-sided story. ~ Stanley Fish,
1258:The things taught in schools & colleges are not an education but the means of education. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1259:The things you learn growing up in and out of prison, Allander thought. A practical education. ~ Gregg Hurwitz,
1260:We need the best education system in the United States. The best system, not the most expensive. ~ Bruce Brown,
1261:What does education often do? It makes a straight-cut ditch of a free, meandering brook. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1262:When technology advances too quickly for education to keep up, inequality generally rises. ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
1263:You're college graduates now, so use your education. Remember: It's not who you know, it's whom. ~ Joan Rivers,
1264:A college education should equip one to entertain three things: a friend, an idea and oneself. ~ Thomas Ehrlich,
1265:A neglect of one's sentimental education early in life could bear the most unfortunate fruit. ~ Daniel Kehlmann,
1266:A person can be educated and still be stupid, and a wise man can have no education at all. ~ Jennifer A Nielsen,
1267:Education is not a race, with winners and losers. It's not a commodity to be bought and sold. ~ Grace Llewellyn,
1268:he insisted, since he’d earned something more useful than a GED—a GE, his “gutter education.” He ~ Karen Abbott,
1269:I am going to provide school choice and put an end to common core and bring our education local. ~ Donald Trump,
1270:I don't want revenge on the Taliban, I want education for sons and daughters of the Taliban. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1271:If a woman seeks education it is probably because her sexual apparatus is malfunctioning. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1272:Ignorance and a narrow education lay the foundation of vice, and imitation and custom rear it up. ~ Mary Astell,
1273:In the world today, a young lady who does not have a college education just is not educated. ~ Walter Annenberg,
1274:I think that what my parents taught me about hard work, optimism and education still holds true. ~ Samuel Alito,
1275:It is difficult for an education in which the heart is involved to remain forever lost. ~ Jean Jacques Rousseau,
1276:It is one proof of a good education and of true refinement of feeling, to respect antiquity. ~ Sigourney Weaver,
1277:its almost as if he was raised by wolves, but wolves who knew the value of a decent education. ~ David Nicholls,
1278:The irony is that for poor people like us, an education at Notre Dame is both cheaper and finer. We ~ J D Vance,
1279:There were not many people who could say that their education had been paid for with cigarettes. ~ Markus Zusak,
1280:The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind. ~ Jacques Barzun,
1281:Too much of what is called "education" is little more than an expensive isolation from reality. ~ Thomas Sowell,
1282:Too much of what is called 'education' is little more than an expensive isolation from reality. ~ Thomas Sowell,
1283:True education must correspond to the surrounding circumstances or it is not a healthy growth. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1284:True. The school admin decided that a girls clothes were more important than her education. ~ Svetlana Chmakova,
1285:Without education, we are in a horrible and deadly danger of taking educated people seriously. ~ G K Chesterton,
1286:A mother's ability to provide for her children is not always tied to income, but rather to education. ~ Cat Cora,
1287:An education is like a crumbling building that needs constant upkeep with repairs and additions. ~ Edith Wharton,
1288:Ask me my three main priorities for government, and I tell you: education, education and education. ~ Tony Blair,
1289:Education has become a very powerful weapon in the struggle to produce a well-developed person. ~ Nelson Mandela,
1290:Education is a kind of continuing dialogue, and a dialogue assumes different points of view. ~ Robert M Hutchins,
1291:Education is a weapon whose effect depends on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed. ~ Joseph Stalin,
1292:From education by the Church to education by Germanic value is a step of several generations. ~ Alfred Rosenberg,
1293:If temperance prevails, then education can prevail; if temperance fails, then education must fail. ~ Horace Mann,
1294:I think the best thing that happened to the education system in New Orleans was Hurricane Katrina. ~ Arne Duncan,
1295:It's not a big secret that what's lacking and what's wrong in our society starts with education. ~ Oren Moverman,
1296:I would rather have India without education, if that is the price to be paid for making it dry. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1297:I would support a devolution of power out of Washington for education, health care, transportation. ~ Jim DeMint,
1298:Just education forms the man. ~ John Gay, The Owl, Swan, Cock, Spider, Ass, and the Farmer. To a Mother, line 9.,
1299:National education to be truly national must reflect the national condition for the time being. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1300:Not to learn from our experiences is a tremendous waste of time. Life is an adult-education school. ~ Ayya Khema,
1301:One of the greatest obstacles to escaping poverty is the staggering cost of higher education. ~ Chris Van Hollen,
1302:Parents do not own their children. They have no ‘natural right’ to control their education fully. ~ John Goodlad,
1303:Since I can’t be a professional on account of lack of education I wouldn’t mind being wealthy. ~ Bernard Malamud,
1304:The Ministry of Truth, which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education and fine arts. ~ George Orwell,
1305:The purpose of Compulsory Education is to deprive the common people of their commonsense. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1306:The true purpose of education is to teach a man to carry himself triumphant to the sunset. ~ Liberty Hyde Bailey,
1307:The truth is mightier than eloquence, the Spirit greater than genius, faith more than education. ~ Martin Luther,
1308:What is the first part of politics? Education. The second? Education. And the third? Education. ~ Jules Michelet,
1309:You're allowed to want to use your education. You're allowed to want to be more than a mother. ~ Jennifer Weiner,
1310:And my career, the things that have happened have happened because of my music education background. ~ Jon Secada,
1311:By education, I mean an all-round drawing of the best in child and man in body, mind and spirit. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1312:Education becomes most rich and alive when it confronts the reality of moral conflict in the world. ~ Howard Zinn,
1313:Education is a weapon, whose effect depends on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed. ~ Joseph Stalin,
1314:Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today. ~ Malcolm X,
1315:Education makes a greater difference between man and man than nature has made between man and brute. ~ John Adams,
1316:education tends to move individuals toward a more extreme version of the dominant cultural tendency. ~ Erin Meyer,
1317:Education: the inculcation of the incomprehensible into the indifferent by the incompetent. ~ John Maynard Keynes,
1318:In the world of entrepreneurs, you don't need a college education. You need a proper education. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1319:It might be said now that I have the best of both worlds. A Harvard education and a Yale degree. ~ John F Kennedy,
1320:It must be the aim of education to teach the citizen that he must first of all rule himself. ~ Winthrop W Aldrich,
1321:Modern education develops the intellect and imparts skills, but does not promote qualities in any way. ~ Sai Baba,
1322:More money," Etcoff writes, "is spent on beauty than on education or social services." FEARS ~ Arianna Huffington,
1323:Neither acquiescence in skepticism nor acquiescence in dogma is what education should produce. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1324:Sex education should be 'relationship education', focusing on how to achieve long-term commitment. ~ Mal Fletcher,
1325:She was a perfectly nice, standard-issue, brown-haired, white woman with a high-school education. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
1326:The best education consists in immunizing people against systematic attempts at education. ~ Paul Karl Feyerabend,
1327:The most important outcome of education is to help students become independent of formal education. ~ Paul E Gray,
1328:The object of education is to prepare the young to educate themselves throughout their lives. ~ Robert M Hutchins,
1329:The source of better ideas is wisdom. The surest path to wisdom is a liberal education. ~ Alfred Whitney Griswold,
1330:The teachers don't know anything. What are the kids going to learn with a horrible education system? ~ Bill Maher,
1331:The very reason for nature's existence is the education of the soul; it has no other meaning. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1332:The way of education leads away from home. That is what we learned from our children’s education. ~ Wendell Berry,
1333:They had all that forgetfulness of history that goes everywhere with the extension of education. ~ G K Chesterton,
1334:What is really needed to make democracy function is not knowledge of facts, but right education. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1335:2016 study looked at more than eight hundred workers (mostly in information technology, education, ~ Daniel H Pink,
1336:A good deal of education consists of unlearning-the breaking of bad habits as with a tennis serve. ~ Mary McCarthy,
1337:Americans are a decade behind Canada when it comes to sex education and understanding their bodies. ~ Sue Johanson,
1338:Education had been the primary instrument of change in my own life, my lever upward in the world. ~ Michelle Obama,
1339:Education turns an empty mind into an open mind. It turns information into behavioural transformation ~ Shiv Khera,
1340:Establishing lasting peace is the work of education; all politics can do is keep us out of war. ~ Maria Montessori,
1341:He believed true love was more like an education: it was deep and subtle and never complete. The ~ Josiah Bancroft,
1342:If you know your Bible and your Shakespeare and can shoot craps, you have a liberal education. ~ Tallulah Bankhead,
1343:I think an education is not only important, it is the most important thing you can do with your life. ~ Dean Kamen,
1344:I think it is totally wrong and terribly harmful if education is defined as acquiring knowledge. ~ William Glasser,
1345:No part of the education of a politician is more indispensable than the fighting of elections. ~ Winston Churchill,
1346:Southern states simply do not believe in funding education to the extent that northern states do. ~ Chuck Thompson,
1347:The whole object of education is...to develop the mind. The mind should be a thing that works. ~ Sherwood Anderson,
1348:Think about every problem, every challenge, we face. The solution to each starts with education. ~ George H W Bush,
1349:Without education, there is no hope for our people and without hope, our future is lost ~ Charles Hamilton Houston,
1350:You can't persuade most of the public that education and making a living aren't the same thing. ~ Robertson Davies,
1351:Creativity is as important now in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status. ~ Ken Robinson,
1352:Education and democracy have the same goal: The fullest possible development of human capabilities ~ Paul Wellstone,
1353:Education doesn't cease when you leave college or leave the university. Education is a lifetime process. ~ Jim Rohn,
1354:Education in the understanding of citizenship is a short-term affair if we are honest and earnest. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1355:Education is beautification of the inner world and the outer world. ~ Amit Ray, Nonviolence: The Transforming Power,
1356:Education is only the most fully conscious of the channels whereby each generation influences the next. ~ C S Lewis,
1357:Football: A sport that bears the same relation to education that bullfighting does to agriculture. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
1358:Good relationships require a lot of hard work, education, and willingness to meet each other’s needs. ~ Joyce Meyer,
1359:Health care and education, in my view, are next up for fundamental software-based transformation. ~ Marc Andreessen,
1360:I didn't go to film school. I got my education on the set as a niche publicist in the film industry. ~ Ava DuVernay,
1361:If you do not have persistence then no amount of education, talent or genius can make up for it. ~ Stephen Richards,
1362:In a normal education everything is designed to suppress spontaneity, but I wanted to develop it. ~ Keith Johnstone,
1363:I read Shakespeare and the Bible, and I can shoot dice. That's what I call a liberal education. ~ Tallulah Bankhead,
1364:I wanted to acquire an education, work extremely hard and never deviate from my goal, to make it. ~ Taylor Caldwell,
1365:Music - that's been my education. There's not a day that goes by that I take it for granted. ~ Billie Joe Armstrong,
1366:My parents discussed singing every night over the dinner table; I had a tremendous music education. ~ Renee Fleming,
1367:Opportunities for education should be within the reach of every individual, not for the lucky few. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
1368:Social housing, education, health, jobs and sustainable surroundings. Those are my priorities. ~ Juan Manuel Santos,
1369:The best education for a writer, I think, is to read a lot - college can be a good place to do that. ~ Rebecca Mead,
1370:The best education you can get is investing in yourself, and that doesn’t mean college or university. ~ Peter Voogd,
1371:There is only one subject matter for education, and that is Life in all its manifestations ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
1372:"Thinking about thinking" has to be a principle ingredient of any empowering practice of education. ~ Jerome Bruner,
1373:A person with increasing knowledge and sensory education may derive infinite enjoyment from wine. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
1374:Creativity now is as important in education as literacy, and we should treat it with the same status. ~ Ken Robinson,
1375:Education has to cultivate humility and discipline, but today it is yielding a harvest of pride and envy. ~ Sai Baba,
1376:Education is the basic tool for the development of consciousness and the reconstitution of society. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1377:Education leads to enlightenment. Enlightenment opens the way to empathy. Empathy foreshadows reform. ~ Derrick Bell,
1378:Education which is not modern share the fate of all organic things which are kept too long. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
1379:Education without social action is a one-sided value because it has no true power potential. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
1380:Everything you think you think because somebody promoted the ideas. Education—nothing but promotion. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
1381:Free education for all children in public schools... Combination of education with industrial production ~ Karl Marx,
1382:From the very beginning of his education, the child should experience the joy of discovery. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
1383:If you want to know how to solve society's problems, you start out with better public education. ~ Michael Bloomberg,
1384:I have an education degree from the University of Minnesota, and I was a teacher for about a minute. ~ Loni Anderson,
1385:It is not beyond our power to create a world in which all children have access to a good education. ~ Nelson Mandela,
1386:I wasn’t a person to educate and then waste that education by letting such valuable knowledge fade. ~ Pepper Winters,
1387:Liberal education reminds those members of a mass democracy who have ears to hear, of human greatness. ~ Leo Strauss,
1388:My husband had an education. He had a degree in Literature. I married into a camp of literary types. ~ Joni Mitchell,
1389:My land, the power of training! Of influence! Of education! It can bring a body up to believe anything. ~ Mark Twain,
1390:Only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual. ~ Jean Piaget,
1391:Real education must ultimately be limited to men who insist on knowing. The rest is mere sheep herding. ~ Ezra Pound,
1392:Real education must ultimately be limited to men who insist on knowing, the rest is mere sheep-herding. ~ Ezra Pound,
1393:Sex education may be a good idea in the schools, but I don't believe the kids should be given homework. ~ Bill Cosby,
1394:The challenge of education is not to prepare a person for success, but to prepare him for failure. ~ James Stockdale,
1395:The chief wonder of education is that it does not ruin everybody concerned in it, teachers and taught. ~ Henry Adams,
1396:The essence of education is that it is a change effected in the organism to satisfy the operator. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1397:The only persons who seem to have nothing to do with the education of the children are the parents. ~ G K Chesterton,
1398:The things taught in schools and colleges are not an education, but the means to an education. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1399:The true measure of your education is not what you know, but how you share what you know with others. ~ Kent Nerburn,
1400:The United States has, overall, the most effective system of higher education the world has ever known. ~ Clark Kerr,
1401:We believe, that is, you and I, that education is not an expense. We believe it is an investment. ~ Lyndon B Johnson,
1402:Why send a daughter to school?” the men often say. “She doesn’t need an education to run a house. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1403:With my ministry of light, part of what I do is work on the California Alliance For Arts Education. ~ Sally Kirkland,
1404:Without education we are in a horrible and deadly danger of taking educated people seriously. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1405:Access to quality education has enabled me to reach far beyond the Bangladeshi village I grew up in. ~ Muhammad Yunus,
1406:All of our schools need to bring 'learn from doing' into the mainstream education, not just afternoon. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
1407:Education is a vast sea of lies, waste, corruption, crackpot theorizing, and careerist log-rolling. ~ John Derbyshire,
1408:Education is everything - education is your power, education is your way in life for whatever you want to do. ~ Ciara,
1409:Education requires both a teacher
and a student. Many of us are too often reluctant to be a student. ~ Chad Fowler,
1410:Every man should have a college education in order to show him how little the thing is really worth. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
1411:I believe that it is higher education's purpose and calling to keep open the door to the American dream. ~ Gordon Gee,
1412:I grew up in the South, so a huge part of our American History education revolved around the Civil War. ~ Anson Mount,
1413:I had a Jesuit education, and I consider acting and the theater as kind of a calling - a vocation. ~ Michael Moriarty,
1414:It is a truism that education is no longer a luxury. Education in this day and age is a necessity. ~ Lyndon B Johnson,
1415:It is not suprising that the banking concept of education regards men as adaptable, manageable beings. ~ Paulo Freire,
1416:I would much rather be considered wise than smart. But, I still think it is wise to get an education. ~ Destiny Booze,
1417:Salsa, classic rock, soul music, jazz... all of that was a part of my education in making hip-hop music. ~ Aloe Blacc,
1418:So if a college education is indispensable, the challenge as I see it is how to make it more accessible. ~ Gordon Gee,
1419:The great thing, then, in all education, is to make our nervous system our ally instead of our enemy. ~ William James,
1420:The inner cities, education is almost worthless, it's horrible. We're going to have Common Core ended. ~ Donald Trump,
1421:The poor need the motivation, the incentives, the skills, the education so they can help themselves. ~ John M Perkins,
1422:The price of a college education should never include a 1 in 5 chance of being sexually assaulted. ~ Claire McCaskill,
1423:True education is the ability to discern the difference between what you do know and what you don't. ~ Anatole France,
1424:Von Köckritz’s entire higher education was free. She considers that perfectly normal—and in Europe, it is. ~ T R Reid,
1425:With technology, we can achieve universal access to secondary education within a generation. ~ Phumzile Mlambo Ngcuka,
1426:A first class system of early childhood education is the hallmark of a caring and civilized society. ~ Andy Hargreaves,
1427:But every error is due to extraneous factors (such as emotion and education); reason itself does not err. ~ Kurt Godel,
1428:Come then, and let us pass a leisure hour in storytelling, and our story shall be the education of our heroes. ~ Plato,
1429:Cutting our education budget, that's not a smart choice. That will not help America compete with China. ~ Barack Obama,
1430:Delaware State began as a school bent on service - teaching education, social services and nursing. ~ Michael N Castle,
1431:Education has in America's whole history been the major hope for improving the individual and society. ~ Gunnar Myrdal,
1432:Education, introspection, self-love and excellence are the only ways to overcome the wrath of ignorance ~ Romany Malco,
1433:Education is directly proportional to anxiety, as you've probably learned, having gone to Columbia. ~ Ottessa Moshfegh,
1434:Education leads to enlightenment. Enlightenment opens the way to empathy. Empathy foreshadows reform. ~ Derrick A Bell,
1435:Education reform has as its main purpose to make sure that the education delivered is of quality. ~ Enrique Pena Nieto,
1436:Higher education holds itself out as a kind of universal church, outside of which there is no salvation. ~ Peter Thiel,
1437:I found in direct selling companies an education system designed to draw out the rich person in you. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1438:I'll tell you what leadership is. It's persuasion and conciliation, and education, and patience. ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
1439:I'm not a policy expert - I am only arguing that there is more to an education than an economic ticket. ~ Rebecca Mead,
1440:In special education, there's too much emphasis placed on the deficit and not enough on the strength. ~ Temple Grandin,
1441:I only got a seventh-grade education, but I have a doctorate in funk, and I like to put that to good use ~ James Brown,
1442:Mastery begins when formal education ends. Find the topic that sets your heart on fire. Then combust. ~ James Altucher,
1443:My education was the liberty I had to read indiscriminately and all the time, with my eyes hanging out. ~ Dylan Thomas,
1444:My grandmother wanted me to get a good education, so she kept me as far away from schools as possible. ~ Margaret Mead,
1445:Of course education becomes very very important and that's for our human resource development. ~ Abdullah Ahmad Badawi,
1446:Progress for black Americans depends on good schools because education is the last great equalizer. ~ Alphonso Jackson,
1447:Sufism is education, in that it has a body of knowledge which it transmits to those who have not got it. ~ Idries Shah,
1448:The best education you can get is investing in yourself, and that doesn't mean college or university. ~ Warren Buffett,
1449:Their conversation was a flow of erudite commentary, moist with the syrup of a superior education. She ~ Gail Carriger,
1450:The transformation in higher education is already here; the question is how learning institutions respond. ~ Anonymous,
1451:The true Church preaches REGENERATION; not reformation, not education, not legislation, but regeneration. ~ M R DeHaan,
1452:When a man doesn't know the meaning of the word 'fear', that might just be a deficiency in his education. ~ Mark Steyn,
1453:all, education is a grab for a better future, no matter how impossible the prospect may seem at the time. ~ Terry Hayes,
1454:Almost everyone today is brain-damaged by our education which is designed to produce docile automatons. ~ Timothy Leary,
1455:Asking Wall Street to provide financial education is the same as asking a fox to raise your chickens. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
1456:During this period at the Department of Education, my working relationship with Judge Thomas was positive. ~ Anita Hill,
1457:Each man begins with his own world to conquer, and his education is the measure of his conquest. ~ Charles Evans Hughes,
1458:Each man is a good education to himself, provided he has the capacity to spy on himself from close up. ~ Sarah Bakewell,
1459:Education is discovering your full potential and flourishing that potential for the benefit of the humanity. ~ Amit Ray,
1460:Education is not a product: mark, diploma, job, money-in that order; it is a process, a never-ending one. ~ Bel Kaufman,
1461:Education isn't a problem until it serves as a buffer rom the world and a refuge from the risk of failure. ~ Seth Godin,
1462:Education no longer stops on graduation day. We must demand excellence at every level of education. ~ William J Clinton,
1463:Education should turn out the pupil with something he knows well and something he can do well. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
1464:Good education is not regeneration. Education may chain up men's lusts, but cannot change their hearts. ~ Thomas Boston,
1465:Government will not fail to employ education, to strengthen its hands and perpetuate its institutions. ~ William Godwin,
1466:His business is to suggest and not to impose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, A System of National Education,
1467:I believe...that education is not only the most important societal problem but the most interesting. ~ Katharine Graham,
1468:If you ask: What is the good of education? The answer is easy: Education makes good men and good men act nobly. ~ Plato,
1469:I'm not dismissing the value of higher education; I'm simply saying it comes at the expense of experience. ~ Steve Jobs,
1470:I think people don't talk enough about education and what we need to do in our public education system. ~ Michelle Rhee,
1471:It should begin much earlier with arts education in the American school system, which is sadly deficient. ~ Frank Gehry,
1472:It would be nice if education was free to everyone who wanted it, but that's not the world we live in. ~ Glenda Jackson,
1473:Let us in education dream of an aristocracy of achievement arising out of a democracy of opportunity ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1474:Mistakes and failures are precisely your means of education. They tell you about your own inadequacies. ~ Robert Greene,
1475:Poorer students take out larger loans and will have to contribute more to the cost of higher education. ~ Anne Campbell,
1476:The advancement of knowledge must be translated into increasing health and education for the children. ~ Herbert Hoover,
1477:The best sex education for kids is when Daddy pats Mommy on the fanny when he comes home from work. ~ William H Masters,
1478:The focus of education should not be on suppressive information but on kindling the thirst for knowing. ~ Jaggi Vasudev,
1479:The goal of early childhood education should be to activate the child's own natural desire to learn. ~ Maria Montessori,
1480:The goal of formal education has always been to produce people who could continue to learn on their own. ~ Ronald Gross,
1481:The point of a true education is to, by the grace of God, learn how to refuse to let the soul get old. ~ Douglas Wilson,
1482:The point of my work is to show that culture and education aren't simply hobbies or minor influences. ~ Pierre Bourdieu,
1483:The purpose of education is to make the choices clear to people, not to make the choices for people. ~ Peter McWilliams,
1484:There are few subjects that match the social significance of women's education in the contemporary world. ~ Amartya Sen,
1485:Theres my education in computers, right there; this is the whole thing, everything I took out of a book. ~ Howard Aiken,
1486:We need to help refugees and immigrants early with job training, education, language, and business loans. ~ Mary Pipher,
1487:Yiddish became the Jews’ tongue via the Jewish mother, who, not being male, was denied a Hebrew education. ~ Leo Rosten,
1488:acquiring more education and skills will not necessarily offer effective protection against job automation ~ Martin Ford,
1489:Although I was raised Jewish, my upbringing didn't include any formal religious education or training. ~ Melissa Gilbert,
1490:Any time we are answer-driven rather than idea driven, we have lost the true meaning of education. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
1491:Ask, could my gifts, education, career, or experience be used to spread the gospel where it’s needed most? ~ David Platt,
1492:A team is a group of people who may not be equal in experience, talent, or education but in commitment. ~ John C Maxwell,
1493:Decisions. Where, what, why. Can't handle them. So I'm prolonging the indecision with higher education. ~ Kamila Shamsie,
1494:Education gives sobriety to the young, comfort to the old, riches to the poor and is an ornament to the rich. ~ Diogenes,
1495:Education is extremely important to the Hispanic community, as well as faith, and certainly working hard. ~ Luis Fortuno,
1496:Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence. ~ Robert Frost,
1497:Every man of any education would rather be called a rascal, than accused of deficiency in the graces. ~ Lyndon B Johnson,
1498:Everything still revolves around memorization and repetition, the old cornerstones of Chinese education. ~ Peter Hessler,
1499:How is it that little children are so intelligent and men so stupid? It must be education that does it ~ Alexandre Dumas,
1500:I believe the American people are entitled to some straight talk when it comes to higher education funding. ~ Ric Keller,

IN CHAPTERS [300/907]



  410 Poetry
  270 Integral Yoga
  115 Philsophy
   34 Philosophy
   30 Occultism
   29 Education
   27 Christianity
   21 Yoga
   16 Psychology
   13 Fiction
   5 Science
   3 Integral Theory
   2 Theosophy
   2 Cybernetics
   1 Sufism
   1 Mysticism
   1 Hinduism
   1 Buddhism
   1 Baha i Faith
   1 Alchemy


  180 The Mother
  163 John Keats
  117 Li Bai
  115 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   78 Satprem
   67 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   53 Sri Aurobindo
   19 Aleister Crowley
   16 Sri Ramakrishna
   14 Carl Jung
   12 Rudolf Steiner
   12 H P Lovecraft
   11 A B Purani
   10 Plato
   9 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   8 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   7 Plotinus
   7 Friedrich Nietzsche
   7 Aldous Huxley
   6 William Wordsworth
   5 Swami Krishnananda
   4 Jordan Peterson
   3 Saint John of Climacus
   3 R Buckminster Fuller
   3 Nirodbaran
   3 Henry David Thoreau
   2 Walt Whitman
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Norbert Wiener
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 George Van Vrekhem


  163 Keats - Poems
  117 Li Bai - Poems
  115 Emerson - Poems
   26 On Education
   18 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   17 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   16 Questions And Answers 1950-1951
   15 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   14 The Human Cycle
   14 Magick Without Tears
   13 Questions And Answers 1957-1958
   13 Questions And Answers 1953
   12 Lovecraft - Poems
   11 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   11 Agenda Vol 10
   11 Agenda Vol 09
   10 Agenda Vol 01
   9 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   9 Questions And Answers 1955
   9 Questions And Answers 1954
   8 Some Answers From The Mother
   8 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03
   8 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02
   8 City of God
   7 The Perennial Philosophy
   7 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   7 Questions And Answers 1956
   7 Agenda Vol 08
   6 Wordsworth - Poems
   6 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   6 The Life Divine
   6 Agenda Vol 02
   5 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   5 The Future of Man
   5 The Essentials of Education
   5 Questions And Answers 1929-1931
   5 On Thoughts And Aphorisms
   5 Liber ABA
   5 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   5 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01
   5 Agenda Vol 05
   4 Words Of Long Ago
   4 Twilight of the Idols
   4 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious
   4 Maps of Meaning
   4 Letters On Yoga IV
   4 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   4 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 08
   4 Agenda Vol 06
   4 Agenda Vol 03
   3 Walden
   3 Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo
   3 Thus Spoke Zarathustra
   3 The Secret Doctrine
   3 The Phenomenon of Man
   3 The Ladder of Divine Ascent
   3 The Bible
   3 Talks
   3 Synergetics - Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking
   3 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02
   3 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05
   3 Agenda Vol 11
   3 Agenda Vol 07
   3 Agenda Vol 04
   2 Whitman - Poems
   2 Theosophy
   2 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   2 Symposium
   2 Preparing for the Miraculous
   2 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 03
   2 Mysterium Coniunctionis
   2 Letters On Yoga II
   2 Letters On Yoga I
   2 Isha Upanishad
   2 Cybernetics
   2 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 06
   2 Borges - Poems
   2 Aion
   2 Agenda Vol 12


00.00 - Publishers Note, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   We are happy to note that the Government of India have given to our Centre of Education a grant to meet the cost of publication of this volume.
   The Mother has graciously permitted the use of her sketch of the author as a frontispiece to the book.

00.02 - Mystic Symbolism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Thus there is a great diversity of symbols. At the one end is the mere metaphor or simile or allegory ('figure', as we have called it) and at the other end is the symbol identical with the thing symbolized. And upon this inner character of the symbol depends also to a large extent its range and scope. There are symbols which are universal and intimately ingrained in the human consciousness itself. Mankind has used them in all ages and climes almost in the same sense and significance. There are others that are limited to peoples and ages. They are made out of forms that are of local and temporal interest and importance. Their significances vary according to time and place. Finally, there are symbols which are true of the individual consciousness only; they depend on personal peculiarities and idiosyncrasies, on one's environment and upbringing and Education.
   Man being an embodied soul, his external consciousness (what the Upanishad calls jgrat) is the milieu in which his soul-experiences naturally manifest and find their play. It is the forms and movements of that consciousness which clo the and give a concrete habitation and name to perceptions on the subtler ranges of the inner existence. If the experiences on these planes are to be presented to the conscious memory and to the brain-mind and made communicable to others through speech, this is the inevitable and natural process. Symbols are a translation in mental and sensual (and vocal) terms of experiences that are beyond the mind and the sense and the speech and yet throw a kind of echoing vibrations upon these lesser levels.

000 - Humans in Universe, #Synergetics - Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking, #R Buckminster Fuller, #Science
  150 national preserves-the people have become Educationally divided into
  "specialists" for exploitation by the supranational powers who divide to conquer

0.00 - INTRODUCTION, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  BREAD-WINNING Education
  KALI TEMPLE AT DAKSHINESWAR
  --
   At the age of sixteen Gadadhar was summoned to Calcutta by his elder brother Ramkumar, who wished assistance in his priestly duties. Ramkumar had opened a Sanskrit academy to supplement his income, and it was his intention gradually to turn his younger brother's mind to Education. Gadadhar applied himself heart and soul to his new duty as family priest to a number of Calcutta families. His worship was very different from that of the professional priests. He spent hours decorating the images and singing hymns and devotional songs; he performed with love the other duties of his office. People were impressed with his ardour. But to his studies he paid scant attention.
   Ramkumar did not at first oppose the ways of his temperamental brother. He wanted Gadadhar to become used to the conditions of city life. But one day he decided to warn the boy about his indifference to the world. After all, in the near future Gadadhar must, as a householder, earn his livelihood through the performance of his brahminical duties; and these required a thorough knowledge of Hindu law, astrology, and kindred subjects. He gently admonished Gadadhar and asked him to pay more attention to his studies. But the boy replied spiritedly: "Brother, what shall I do with a mere bread-winning Education? I would rather acquire that wisdom which will illumine my heart and give me satisfaction for ever."
   --- BREAD-WINNING Education
   The anguish of the inner soul of India found expression through these passionate words of the young Gadadhar. For what did his unsophisticated eyes see around him in Calcutta, at that time the metropolis of India and the centre of modem culture and learning? Greed and lust held sway in the higher levels of society, and the occasional religious practices were merely outer forms from which the soul had long ago departed. Gadadhar had never seen anything like this at Kamarpukur among the simple and pious villagers. The sadhus and wandering monks whom he had served in his boyhood had revealed to him an altogether different India. He had been impressed by their devotion and purity, their self-control and renunciation. He had learnt from them and from his own intuition that the ideal of life as taught by the ancient sages of India was the realization of God.
   When Ramkumar reprimanded Gadadhar for neglecting a "bread-winning Education", the inner voice of the boy reminded him that the legacy of his ancestors — the legacy of Rama, Krishna, Buddha, Sankara, Ramanuja, Chaitanya — was not worldly security but the Knowledge of God. And these noble sages were the true representatives of Hindu society. Each of them was seated, as it were, on the crest of the wave that followed each successive trough in the tumultuous course of Indian national life. All demonstrated that the life current of India is spirituality. This truth was revealed to Gadadhar through that inner vision which scans past and future in one sweep, unobstructed by the barriers of time and space. But he was unaware of the history of the profound change that had taken place in the land of his birth during the previous one hundred years.
   Hindu society during the eighteenth century had been passing through a period of decadence. It was the twilight of the Mussalman rule. There were anarchy and confusion in all spheres. Superstitious practices dominated the religious life of the people. Rites and rituals passed for the essence of spirituality. Greedy priests became the custodians of heaven. True philosophy was supplanted by dogmatic opinions. The pundits took delight in vain polemics.
   In 1757 English traders laid the foundation of British rule in India. Gradually the Government was systematized and lawlessness suppressed. The Hindus were much impressed by the military power and political acumen of the new rulers. In the wake of the merchants came the English educators, and social reformers, and Christian missionaries — all bearing a culture completely alien to the Hindu mind. In different parts of the country Educational institutions were set up and Christian churches established. Hindu young men were offered the heady wine of the Western culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and they drank it to the very dregs.
   The first effect of the draught on the educated Hindus was a complete effacement from their minds of the time-honoured beliefs and traditions of Hindu society. They came to believe that there was no transcendental Truth; The world perceived by the senses was all that existed. God and religion were illusions of the untutored mind. True knowledge could be derived only from the analysis of nature. So atheism and agnosticism became the fashion of the day. The youth of India, taught in English schools, took malicious delight in openly breaking the customs and traditions of their society. They would do away with the caste-system and remove the discriminatory laws about food. Social reform, the spread of secular Education, widow remarriage, abolition of early marriage — they considered these the panacea for the degenerate condition of Hindu society.
   The Christian missionaries gave the finishing touch to the process of transformation. They ridiculed as relics of a barbarous age the images and rituals of the Hindu religion. They tried to persuade India that the teachings of her saints and seers were the cause of her downfall, that her Vedas, Puranas, and other scriptures were filled with superstition. Christianity, they maintained, had given the white races position and power in this world and assurance of happiness in the next; therefore Christianity was the best of all religions. Many intelligent young Hindus became converted. The man in the street was confused. The majority of the educated grew materialistic in their mental outlook. Everyone living near Calcutta or the other strong-holds of Western culture, even those who attempted to cling to the orthodox traditions of Hindu society, became infected by the new uncertainties and the new beliefs.
   But the soul of India was to be resuscitated through a spiritual awakening. We hear the first call of this renascence in the spirited retort of the young Gadadhar: "Brother, what shall I do with a mere bread-winning Education?"
   Ramkumar could hardly understand the import of his young brother's reply. He described in bright colours the happy and easy life of scholars in Calcutta society. But Gadadhar intuitively felt that the scholars, to use one of his own vivid illustrations, were like so many vultures, soaring high on the wings of their uninspired intellect, with their eyes fixed on the charnel-pit of greed and lust. So he stood firm and Ramkumar had to give way.
  --
   In 1878 a schism divided Keshab's Samaj. Some of his influential followers accused him of infringing the Brahmo principles by marrying his daughter to a wealthy man before she had attained the marriageable age approved by the Samaj. This group seceded and established the Sadharan Brahmo Samaj, Keshab remaining the leader of the Navavidhan. Keshab now began to be drawn more and more toward the Christ ideal, though under the influence of Sri Ramakrishna his devotion to the Divine Mother also deepened. His mental oscillation between Christ and the Divine Mother of Hinduism found no position of rest. In Bengal and some other parts of India the Brahmo movement took the form of unitarian Christianity, scoffed at Hindu rituals, and preached a crusade against image worship. Influenced by Western culture, it declared the supremacy of reason, advocated the ideals of the French Revolution, abolished the caste-system among its own members, stood for the emancipation of women, agitated for the abolition of early marriage, sanctioned the remarriage of widows, and encouraged various Educational and social-reform movements. The immediate effect of the Brahmo movement in Bengal was the checking of the proselytizing activities of the Christian missionaries. It also raised Indian culture in the estimation of its English masters. But it was an intellectual and eclectic religious ferment born of the necessity of the time. Unlike Hinduism, it was not founded on the deep inner experiences of sages and prophets. Its influence was confined to a comparatively few educated men and women of the country, and the vast masses of the Hindus remained outside it. It sounded monotonously only one of the notes in the rich gamut of the Eternal Religion of the Hindus.
   --- ARYA SAMAJ
   The other movement playing an important part in the nineteenth-century religious revival of India was the Arya Samaj. The Brahmo Samaj, essentially a movement of compromise with European culture, tacitly admitted the superiority of the West. But the founder of the Arya Samaj was a ' pugnacious Hindu sannyasi who accepted the challenge of Islam and Christianity and was resolved to combat all foreign influence in India. Swami Dayananda (1824-1883) launched this movement in Bombay in 1875, and soon its influence was felt throughout western India. The Swami was a great scholar of the Vedas, which he explained as being strictly monotheistic. He preached against the worship of images and re-established the ancient Vedic sacrificial rites. According to him the Vedas were the ultimate authority on religion, and he accepted every word of them as literally true. The Arya Samaj became a bulwark against the encroachments of Islam and Christianity, and its orthodox flavour appealed to many Hindu minds. It also assumed leadership in many movements of social reform. The caste-system became a target of its attack. Women it liberated from many of their social disabilities. The cause of Education received from it a great impetus. It started agitation against early marriage and advocated the remarriage of Hindu widows. Its influence was strongest in the Punjab, the battle-ground of the Hindu and Islamic cultures. A new fighting attitude was introduced into the slumbering Hindu society. Unlike the Brahmo Samaj, the influence of the Arya Samaj was not confined to the intellectuals. It was a force that spread to the masses. It was a dogmatic movement intolerant of those who disagreed with its views, and it emphasized only one way, the Arya Samaj way, to the realization of Truth. Sri Ramakrishna met Swami Dayananda when the latter visited Bengal.
   --- KESHAB CHANDRA SEN
  --
   Sri Ramakrishna, dressed in a red-bordered dhoti, one end of which was carelessly thrown over his left shoulder, came to Jaygopal's garden house accompanied by Hriday. No one took notice of the unostentatious visitor. Finally the Master said to Keshab, "People tell me you have seen God; so I have come to hear from you about God." A magnificent conversation followed. The Master sang a thrilling song about Kali and forthwith went into samadhi. When Hriday uttered the sacred "Om" in his ears, he gradually came back to consciousness of the world, his face still radiating a divine brilliance. Keshab and his followers were amazed. The contrast between Sri Ramakrishna and the Brahmo devotees was very interesting. There sat this small man, thin and extremely delicate. His eyes were illumined with an inner light. Good humour gleamed in his eyes and lurked in the corners of his mouth. His speech was Bengali of a homely kind with a slight, delightful stammer, and his words held men enthralled by their wealth of spiritual experience, their inexhaustible store of simile and metaphor, their power of observation, their bright and subtle humour, their wonderful catholicity, their ceaseless flow of wisdom. And around him now were the sophisticated men of Bengal, the best products of Western Education, with Keshab, the idol of young Bengal, as their leader.
   Keshab's sincerity was enough for Sri Ramakrishna. Henceforth the two saw each other frequently, either at Dakshineswar or at the temple of the Brahmo Samaj. Whenever the Master was in the temple at the time of divine service, Keshab would request him to speak to the congregation. And Keshab would visit the saint, in his turn, with offerings of flowers and fruits.
  --
   Shivanath vehemently criticized the Master for his other-worldly attitude toward his wife. He writes: "Ramakrishna was practically separated from his wife, who lived in her village home. One day when I was complaining to some friends about the virtual widowhood of his wife, he drew me to one side and whispered in my ear: 'Why do you complain? It is no longer possible; it is all dead and gone.' Another day as I was inveighing against this part of his teaching, and also declaring that our program of work in the Brahmo Samaj includes women, that ours is a social and domestic religion, and that we want to give Education and social liberty to women, the saint became very much excited, as was his way when anything against his settled conviction was asserted — a trait we so much liked in him — and exclaimed, 'Go, thou fool, go and perish in the pit that your women will dig for you.' Then he glared at me and said: 'What does a gardener do with a young plant? Does he not surround it with a fence, to protect it from goats and cattle? And when the young plant has grown up into a tree and it can no longer be injured by cattle, does he not remove the fence and let the tree grow freely?' I replied, 'Yes, that is the custom with gardeners.' Then he remarked, 'Do the same in your spiritual life; become strong, be full-grown; then you may seek them.' To which I replied, 'I don't agree with you in thinking that women's work is like that of cattle, destructive; they are our associates and helpers in our spiritual struggles and social progress' — a view with which he could not agree, and he marked his dissent by shaking his head. Then referring to the lateness of the hour he jocularly remarked, 'It is time for you to depart; take care, do not be late; otherwise your woman will not admit you into her room.' This evoked hearty laughter."
   Pratap Chandra Mazumdar, the right-hand man of Keshab and an accomplished Brahmo preacher in Europe and America, bitterly criticized Sri Ramakrishna's use of uncultured language and also his austere attitude toward his wife. But he could not escape the spell of the Master's personality. In the course of an article about Sri Ramakrishna, Pratap wrote in the "Theistic Quarterly Review": "What is there in common between him and me? I, a Europeanized, civilized, self-centred, semi-sceptical, so-called educated reasoner, and he, a poor, illiterate, unpolished, half-idolatrous, friendless Hindu devotee? Why should I sit long hours to attend to him, I, who have listened to Disraeli and Fawcett, Stanley and Max Muller, and a whole host of European scholars and divines? . . . And it is not I only, but dozens like me, who do the same. . . . He worships Siva, he worships Kali, he worships Rama, he worships Krishna, and is a confirmed advocate of Vedantic doctrines. . . . He is an idolater, yet is a faithful and most devoted meditator on the perfections of the One Formless, Absolute, Infinite Deity. . . . His religion is ecstasy, his worship means transcendental insight, his whole nature burns day and night with a permanent fire and fever of a strange faith and feeling. . . . So long as he is spared to us, gladly shall we sit at his feet to learn from him the sublime precepts of purity, unworldliness, spirituality, and inebriation in the love of God. . . . He, by his childlike bhakti, by his strong conceptions of an ever-ready Motherhood, helped to unfold it [God as our Mother] in our minds wonderfully. . . . By associating with him we learnt to realize better the divine attributes as scattered over the three hundred and thirty millions of deities of mythological India, the gods of the Puranas."
  --
   This contact with the educated and progressive Bengalis opened Sri Ramakrishna's eyes to a new realm of thought. Born and brought up in a simple village, without any formal Education, and taught by the orthodox holy men of India in religious life, he had had no opportunity to study the influence of modernism on the thoughts and lives of the Hindus. He could not properly estimate the result of the impact of Western Education on Indian culture. He was a Hindu of the Hindus, renunciation being to him the only means to the realization of God in life. From the Brahmos he learnt that the new generation of India made a compromise between God and the world. Educated young men were influenced more by the Western philosophers than by their own prophets. But Sri Ramakrishna was not dismayed, for he saw in this, too, the hand of God. And though he expounded to the Brahmos all his ideas about God and austere religious disciplines, yet he bade them accept from his teachings only as much as suited their tastes and temperaments.
   ^The term "woman and gold", which has been used throughout in a collective sense, occurs again and again in the teachings of Sri Ramakrishna to designate the chief impediments to spiritual progress. This favourite expression of the Master, "kaminikanchan", has often been misconstrued. By it he meant only "lust and greed", the baneful influence of which retards the aspirant's spiritual growth. He used the word "kamini", or "woman", as a concrete term for the sex instinct when addressing his man devotees. He advised women, on the other hand, to shun "man". "Kanchan", or "gold", symbolizes greed, which is the other obstacle to spiritual life.
  --
   Suresh Mitra, a beloved disciple whom the Master often addressed as Surendra, had received an English Education and held an important post in an English firm. Like many other educated young men of the time, he prided himself on his atheism and led a Bohemian life. He was addicted to drinking. He cherished an exaggerated notion about man's free will. A victim of mental depression, he was brought to Sri Ramakrishna by Ramchandra chandra Dutta. When he heard the Master asking a disciple to practise the virtue of self-surrender to God, he was impressed. But though he tried thenceforth to do so, he was unable to give up his old associates and his drinking. One day the Master said in his presence, "Well, when a man goes to an undesirable place, why doesn't he take the Divine Mother with him?" And to Surendra himself Sri Ramakrishna said: "Why should you drink wine as wine? Offer it to Kali, and then take it as Her prasad, as consecrated drink
  . But see that you don't become intoxicated; you must not reel and your thoughts must not wander. At first you will feel ordinary excitement, but soon you will experience spiritual exaltation." Gradually Surendra's entire life was changed. The Master designated him as one of those commissioned by the Divine Mother to defray a great part of his expenses. Surendra's purse was always open for the Master's comfort.
  --
   The Europeanized Kristodas Pal did not approve of the Master's emphasis on renunciation and said; "Sir, this cant of renunciation has almost ruined the country. It is for this reason that the Indians are a subject nation today. Doing good to others, bringing Education to the door of the ignorant, and above all, improving the material conditions of the country — these should be our duty now. The cry of religion and renunciation would, on the contrary, only weaken us. You should advise the young men of Bengal to resort only to such acts as will uplift the country." Sri Ramakrishna gave him a searching look and found no divine light within, "You man of poor understanding!" Sri Ramakrishna said sharply. "You dare to slight in these terms renunciation and piety, which our scriptures describe as the greatest of all virtues! After reading two pages of English you think you have come to know the world! You appear to think you are omniscient. Well, have you seen those tiny crabs that are born in the Ganges just when the rains set in? In this big universe you are even less significant than one of those small creatures. How dare you talk of helping the world? The Lord will look to that. You haven't the power in you to do it." After a pause the Master continued: "Can you explain to me how you can work for others? I know what you mean by helping them. To feed a number of persons, to treat them when they are sick, to construct a road or dig a well — isn't that all? These, are good deeds, no doubt, but how trifling in comparison with the vastness of the universe! How far can a man advance in this line? How many people can you save from famine? Malaria has ruined a whole province; what could you do to stop its onslaught? God alone looks after the world. Let a man first realize Him. Let a man get the authority from God and be endowed with His power; then, and then alone, may he think of doing good to others. A man should first be purged of all egotism. Then alone will the Blissful Mother ask him to work for the world." Sri Ramakrishna mistrusted philanthropy that presumed to pose as charity. He warned people against it. He saw in most acts of philanthropy nothing but egotism, vanity, a desire for glory, a barren excitement to kill the boredom of life, or an attempt to soothe a guilty conscience. True charity, he taught, is the result of love of God — service to man in a spirit of worship.
   --- MONASTIC DISCIPLES
  --
   The first of these young men to come to the Master was Latu. Born of obscure parents, in Behar, he came to Calcutta in search of work and was engaged by Ramchandra Dutta as house-boy. Learning of the saintly Sri Ramakrishna, he visited the Master at Dakshineswar and was deeply touched by his cordiality. When he was about to leave, the Master asked him to take some money and return home in a boat or carriage. But Latu declared he had a few pennies and jingled the coins in his pocket. Sri Ramakrishna later requested Ram to allow Latu to stay with him permanently. Under Sri Ramakrishna's guidance Latu made great progress in meditation and was blessed with ecstatic visions, but all the efforts of the Master to give him a smattering of Education failed. Latu was very fond of kirtan and other devotional songs but remained all his life illiterate.
   --- RAKHAL

0.00 - THE GOSPEL PREFACE, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  "M", as the author modestly styles himself, was peculiarly qualified for his task. To a reverent love for his master, to a deep and experiential knowledge of that master's teaching, he added a prodigious memory for the small happenings of each day and a happy gift for recording them in an interesting and realistic way. Making good use of his natural gifts and of the circumstances in which he found himself, "M" produced a book unique, so far as my knowledge goes, in the literature of hagiography. No other saint has had so able and indefatigable a Boswell. Never have the small events of a contemplative's daily life been described with such a wealth of intimate detail. Never have the casual and unstudied utterances of a great religious teacher been set down with so minute a fidelity. To Western readers, it is true, this fidelity and this wealth of detail are sometimes a trifle disconcerting; for the social, religious and intellectual frames of reference within which Sri Ramakrishna did his thinking and expressed his feelings were entirely Indian. But after the first few surprises and bewilderments, we begin to find something peculiarly stimulating and instructive about the very strangeness and, to our eyes, the eccentricity of the man revealed to us in "M's" narrative. What a scholastic philosopher would call the "accidents" of Ramakrishna's life were intensely Hindu and therefore, so far as we in the West are concerned, unfamiliar and hard to understand; its "essence", however, was intensely mystical and therefore universal. To read through these conversations in which mystical doctrine alternates with an unfamiliar kind of humour, and where discussions of the oddest aspects of Hindu mythology give place to the most profound and subtle utterances about the nature of Ultimate Reality, is in itself a liberal, Education in humility, tolerance and suspense of judgment. We must be grateful to the translator for his excellent version of a book so curious and delightful as a biographical document, so precious, at the same time, for what it teaches us of the life of the spirit.
  --------------------
  --
  He was an Educationist all his life both in a spiritual and in a secular sense. After he passed out of College, he took up work as headmaster in a number of schools in succession Narail High School, City School, Ripon College School, Metropolitan School, Aryan School, Oriental School, Oriental Seminary and Model School. The causes of his migration from school to school were that he could not get on with some of the managements on grounds of principles and that often his spiritual mood drew him away to places of pilgrimage for long periods. He worked with some of the most noted public men of the time like Iswar Chandra Vidysgar and Surendranath Banerjee. The latter appointed him as a professor in the City and Ripon Colleges where he taught subjects like English, philosophy, history and economics. In his later days he took over the Morton School, and he spent his time in the staircase room of the third floor of it, administering the school and preaching the message of the Master. He was much respected in Educational circles where he was usually referred to as Rector Mahashay. A teacher who had worked under him writes thus in warm appreciation of his teaching methods: "Only when I worked with him in school could I appreciate what a great Educationist he was. He would come down to the level of his students when teaching, though he himself was so learned, so talented. Ordinarily teachers confine their instruction to what is given in books without much thought as to whether the student can accept it or not. But M., would first of all gauge how much the student could take in and by what means. He would employ aids to teaching like maps, pictures and diagrams, so that his students could learn by seeing. Thirty years ago (from 1953) when the question of imparting Education through the medium of the mother tongue was being discussed, M. had already employed Bengali as the medium of instruction in the Morton School." (M The Apostle and the Evangelist by Swami Nityatmananda Part I. P. 15.)
  Imparting secular Education was, however, only his profession ; his main concern was with the spiritual regeneration of man a calling for which Destiny seems to have chosen him. From his childhood he was deeply pious, and he used to be moved very much by Sdhus, temples and Durga Puja celebrations. The piety and eloquence of the great Brahmo leader of the times, Keshab Chander Sen, elicited a powerful response from the impressionable mind of Mahendra Nath, as it did in the case of many an idealistic young man of Calcutta, and prepared him to receive the great Light that was to dawn on him with the coming of Sri Ramakrishna into his life.
  This epoch-making event of his life came about in a very strange way. M. belonged to a joint family with several collateral members. Some ten years after he began his career as an Educationist, bitter quarrels broke out among the members of the family, driving the sensitive M. to despair and utter despondency. He lost all interest in life and left home one night to go into the wide world with the idea of ending his life. At dead of night he took rest in his sister's house at Baranagar, and in the morning, accompanied by a nephew Siddheswar, he wandered from one garden to another in Calcutta until Siddheswar brought him to the Temple Garden of Dakshineswar where Sri Ramakrishna was then living. After spending some time in the beautiful rose gardens there, he was directed to the room of the Paramahamsa, where the eventful meeting of the Master and the disciple took place on a blessed evening (the exact date is not on record) on a Sunday in March 1882. As regards what took place on the occasion, the reader is referred to the opening section of the first chapter of the Gospel.
  The Master, who divined the mood of desperation in M, his resolve to take leave of this 'play-field of deception', put new faith and hope into him by his gracious words of assurance: "God forbid! Why should you take leave of this world? Do you not feel blessed by discovering your Guru? By His grace, what is beyond all imagination or dreams can be easily achieved!" At these words the clouds of despair moved away from the horizon of M.'s mind, and the sunshine of a new hope revealed to him fresh vistas of meaning in life. Referring to this phase of his life, M. used to say, "Behold! where is the resolve to end life, and where, the discovery of God! That is, sorrow should be looked upon as a friend of man. God is all good." ( Ibid P.33.)
  After this re-settlement, M's life revolved around the Master, though he continued his professional work as an Educationist. During all holidays, including Sundays, he spent his time at Dakshineswar in the Master's company, and at times extended his stay to several days.
  It did not take much time for M. to become very intimate with the Master, or for the Master to recognise in this disciple a divinely commissioned partner in the fulfilment of his spiritual mission. When M. was reading out the Chaitanya Bhagavata, the Master discovered that he had been, in a previous birth, a disciple and companion of the great Vaishnava Teacher, Sri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu, and the Master even saw him 'with his naked eye' participating in the ecstatic mass-singing of the Lord's name under the leadership of that Divine personality. So the Master told M, "You are my own, of the same substance as the father and the son," indicating thereby that M. was one of the chosen few and a part and parcel of his Divine mission.
  --
  Sri Ramakrishna was a teacher for both the Orders of mankind, Sannysins and householders. His own life offered an ideal example for both, and he left behind disciples who followed the highest traditions he had set in respect of both these ways of life. M., along with Nag Mahashay, exemplified how a householder can rise to the highest level of sagehood. M. was married to Nikunja Devi, a distant relative of Keshab Chander Sen, even when he was reading at College, and he had four children, two sons and two daughters. The responsibility of the family, no doubt, made him dependent on his professional income, but the great devotee that he was, he never compromised with ideals and principles for this reason. Once when he was working as the headmaster in a school managed by the great Vidysgar, the results of the school at the public examination happened to be rather poor, and Vidysgar attri buted it to M's preoccupation with the Master and his consequent failure to attend adequately to the school work. M. at once resigned his post without any thought of the morrow. Within a fortnight the family was in poverty, and M. was one day pacing up and down the verandah of his house, musing how he would feed his children the next day. Just then a man came with a letter addressed to 'Mahendra Babu', and on opening it, M. found that it was a letter from his friend Sri Surendra Nath Banerjee, asking whether he would like to take up a professorship in the Ripon College. In this way three or four times he gave up the job that gave him the wherewithal to support the family, either for upholding principles or for practising spiritual Sadhanas in holy places, without any consideration of the possible dire worldly consequences; but he was always able to get over these difficulties somehow, and the interests of his family never suffered. In spite of his disregard for worldly goods, he was, towards the latter part of his life, in a fairly flourishing condition as the proprietor of the Morton School which he developed into a noted Educational institution in the city. The Lord has said in the Bhagavad Git that in the case of those who think of nothing except Him, He Himself would take up all their material and spiritual responsibilities. M. was an example of the truth of the Lord's promise.
  Though his children received proper attention from him, his real family, both during the Master's lifetime and after, consisted of saints, devotees, Sannysins and spiritual aspirants. His life exemplifies the Master's teaching that an ideal householder must be like a good maidservant of a family, loving and caring properly for the children of the house, but knowing always that her real home and children are elsewhere. During the Master's lifetime he spent all his Sundays and other holidays with him and his devotees, and besides listening to the holy talks and devotional music, practised meditation both on the Personal and the Impersonal aspects of God under the direct guidance of the Master. In the pages of the Gospel the reader gets a picture of M.'s spiritual relationship with the Master how from a hazy belief in the Impersonal God of the Brahmos, he was step by step brought to accept both Personality and Impersonality as the two aspects of the same Non-dual Being, how he was convinced of the manifestation of that Being as Gods, Goddesses and as Incarnations, and how he was established in a life that was both of a Jnni and of a Bhakta. This Jnni-Bhakta outlook and way of living became so dominant a feature of his life that Swami Raghavananda, who was very closely associated with him during his last six years, remarks: "Among those who lived with M. in latter days, some felt that he always lived in this constant and conscious union with God even with open eyes (i.e., even in waking consciousness)." (Swami Raghavananda's article on M. in Prabuddha Bharata vol. XXXVII. P. 442.)
  --
  In 1905 he retired from the active life of a Professor and devoted his remaining twenty-seven years exclusively to the preaching of the life and message of the Great Master. He bought the Morton Institution from its original proprietors and shifted it to a commodious four-storeyed house at 50 Amherst Street, where it flourished under his management as one of the most efficient Educational institutions in Calcutta. He generally occupied a staircase room at the top of it, cooking his own meal which consisted only of milk and rice without variation, and attended to all his personal needs himself. His dress also was the simplest possible. It was his conviction that limitation of personal wants to the minimum is an important aid to holy living. About one hour in the morning he would spend in inspecting the classes of the school, and then retire to his staircase room to pour over his diary and live in the divine atmosphere of the earthly days of the Great Master, unless devotees and admirers had already gathered in his room seeking his holy company.
  In appearance, M. looked a Vedic Rishi. Tall and stately in bearing, he had a strong and well-built body, an unusually broad chest, high forehead and arms extending to the knees. His complexion was fair and his prominent eyes were always tinged with the expression of the divine love that filled his heart. Adorned with a silvery beard that flowed luxuriantly down his chest, and a shining face radiating the serenity and gravity of holiness, M. was as imposing and majestic as he was handsome and engaging in appearance. Humorous, sweet-tongued and eloquent when situations required, this great Maharishi of our age lived only to sing the glory of Sri Ramakrishna day and night.
  --
  Though a much-sought-after spiritual guide, an Educationist of repute, and a contemporary and close associate of illustrious personages like Sri Ramakrishna, Swami Vivekananda, Keshab Chander Sen and Iswar Chander Vidysgar, he was always moved by the noble humanity of a lover of God, which consists in respecting the personalities of all as receptacles of the Divine Spirit. So he taught without the consciousness of a teacher, and no bar of superiority stood in the way of his doing the humblest service to his students and devotees. "He was a commission of love," writes his close devotee, Swami Raghavananda, "and yet his soft and sweet words would pierce the stoniest heart, make the worldly-minded weep and repent and turn Godwards."
  ( Prabuddha Bharata Vol. XXXVII P 499.)

0.00 - The Wellspring of Reality, #Synergetics - Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking, #R Buckminster Fuller, #Science
  While it takes but meager search to discover that many well-known concepts are false, it takes considerable search and even more careful examination of one's own personal experiences and inadvertently spontaneous reflexing to discover that there are many popularly and even professionally unknown, yet nonetheless fundamental, concepts to hold true in all cases and that already have been discovered by other as yet obscure individuals. That is to say that many scientific generalizations have been discovered but have not come to the attention of what we call the educated world at large, thereafter to be incorporated tardily within the formal Education processes, and even more tardily, in the ongoing political-economic affairs of everyday life. Knowledge of the existence and comprehensive significance of these as yet popularly unrecognized natural laws often is requisite to the solution of many of the as yet unsolved problems now confronting society. Lack of knowledge of the solution's existence often leaves humanity confounded when it need not be.
  Intellectually advantaged with no more than the child's facile, lucid eagerness to understand constructively and usefully the major transformational events of our own times, it probably is synergetically advantageous to review swiftly the most comprehensive inventory of the most powerful human environment transforming events of our totally known and reasonably extended history. This is especially useful in winnowing out and understanding the most significant of the metaphysical revolutions now recognized as swiftly tending to reconstitute history. By such a comprehensively schematic review, we might identify also the unprecedented and possibly heretofore overlooked pivotal revolutionary events not only of today but also of those trending to be central to tomorrow's most cataclysmic changes.
  It is synergetically reasonable to assume that relativistic evaluation of any of the separate drives of art, science, Education, economics, and ideology, and their complexedly interacting trends within our own times, may be had only through the most comprehensive historical sweep of which we are capable.
  There could be produced a synergetic understanding of humanity's cosmic functioning, which, until now, had been both undiscovered and unpredictable due to our deliberate and exclusive preoccupation only with the separate statistics of separate events. As a typical consequence of the latter, we observe our society's persistent increase of Educational and employment specialization despite the already mentioned, well-documented scientific disclosure that the extinctions of biological species are always occasioned by overspecialization. Specialization's preoccupation with parts deliberately forfeits the opportunity to apprehend and comprehend what is provided exclusively by synergy.
  Today's news consists of aggregates of fragments. Anyone who has taken part in any event that has subsequently appeared in the news is aware of the gross disparity between the actual and the reported events. The insistence by reporters upon having advance "releases" of what, for instance, convocation speakers are supposedly going to say but in fact have not yet said, automatically discredits the value of the largely prefabricated news. We also learn frequently of prefabricated and prevaricated events of a complex nature purportedly undertaken for purposes either of suppressing or rigging the news, which in turn perverts humanity's tactical information resources. All history becomes suspect. Probably our most polluted resource is the tactical information to which humanity spontaneously reflexes.
  --
  The overconcentration on details of hyperspecialization has also been responsible for the lack of recognition by science of its inherently mandatory responsibility to reorient all our Educational curricula because of the synergetically disclosed, but popularly uncomprehended, significance of the 1956 Nobel Prize-winning discovery in physics of the experimental invalidation of the concept of "parity" by which science previously had misassumed that positive-negative complementations consisted exclusively of mirror-imaged behaviors of physical phenomena.
  Science's self-assumed responsibility has been self-limited to disclosure to society only of the separate, supposedly physical (because separately weighable) atomic component isolations data. Synergetic integrity would require the scientists to announce that in reality what had been identified heretofore as physical is entirely metaphysical-because synergetically weightless. Metaphysical has been science's designation for all weightless phenomena such as thought. But science has made no experimental finding of any phenomena that can be described as a solid, or as continuous, or as a straight surface plane, or as a straight line, or as infinite anything. We are now synergetically forced to conclude that all phenomena are metaphysical; wherefore, as many have long suspected-like it or not-life is but a dream.Science has found no up or down directions of Universe, yet scientists are personally so ill-coordinated that they all still personally and sensorially see "solids" going up or down-as, for instance, they see the Sun "going down." Sensorially disconnected from their theoretically evolved information, scientists discern no need on their part to suggest any Educational reforms to correct the misconceiving that science has tolerated for half a millennium.
  Society depends upon its scientists for just such Educational reform guidance.
  Where else might society turn for advice? Unguided by science, society is allowed to go right on filling its childrens' brain banks with large inventories of competence-devastating misinformation. In order to emerge from its massive ignorance, society will probably have to rely exclusively upon its individuals' own minds to survey the pertinent experimental data-as do all great scientist-artists. This, in effect, is what the intuition of world-around youth is beginning to do. Mind can see that reality is evoluting into weightless metaphysics. The wellspring of reality is the family of weightless generalized principles.
  --
  Children freed of the ignorantly founded Educational traditions and exposed only to their spontaneously summoned, computer-stored and -distributed outflow of reliable-opinion-purged, experimentally verified data, shall indeed lead society to its happy egress from all misinformedly conceived, fearfully and legally imposed, and physically enforced customs of yesterday. They can lead all humanity into omnisuccessful survival as well as entrance into an utterly new era of human experience in an as-yet and ever-will-be fundamentally mysterious Universe.
  And whence will come the wealth with which we may undertake to lead world man into his new and validly hopeful life? From the wealth of the minds of world man-whence comes all wealth. Only mind can discover how to do so much with so little as forever to be able to sustain and physically satisfy all humanity.

0.02 - II - The Home of the Guru, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   Guru-griha-vsa staying in the home of the Guru is a very old Indian ideal maintained by seekers through the ages. The Aranyakas the ancient teachings in the forest-groves are perhaps the oldest records of the institution. It was not for Education in the modern sense of the term that men went to live with the Guru; for the Guru is not a 'teacher'. The Guru is one who is 'enlightened', who is a seer, a Rishi, one who has the vision of and has lived the Truth. He has, thus, the knowledge of the goal of human life and has learnt true values in life by living the Truth. He can impart both these to the willing seeker. In ancient times seekers went to the Guru with many questions, difficulties and doubts but also with earnestness. Their questions were preliminary to the quest.
   The Master, the Guru, set at rest the puzzled human mind by his illuminating answers, perhaps even more by his silent consciousness, so that it might be able to pursue unhampered the path of realisation of the Truth. Those ancient discourses answer the mind of man today even across the ages. They have rightly acquired as everything of the past does a certain sanctity. But sometimes that very reverence prevents men from properly evaluating, and living in, the present. This happens when the mind instead of seeking the Spirit looks at the form. For instance, it is not necessary for such discourses that they take place in forest-groves in order to be highly spiritual. Wherever the Master is, there is Light. And guru-griha the house of the Master can be his private dwelling place. So much was this feeling a part of Sri Aurobindo's nature and so particular was he to maintain the personal character of his work that during the first few years after 1923 he did not like his house to be called an 'Ashram', as the word had acquired the sense of a public institution to the modern mind. But there was no doubt that the flower of Divinity had blossomed in him; and disciples, like bees seeking honey, came to him. It is no exaggeration to say that these Evening Talks were to the small company of disciples what the Aranyakas were to the ancient seekers. Seeking the Light, they came to the dwelling place of their Guru, the greatest seer of the age, and found it their spiritual home the home of their parents, for the Mother, his companion in the great mission, had come. And these spiritual parents bestowed upon the disciples freely of their Light, their Consciousness, their Power and their Grace. The modern reader may find that the form of these discourses differs from those of the past but it was bound to be so for the simple reason that the times have changed and the problems that puzzle the modern mind are so different. Even though the disciples may be very imperfect representations of what he aimed at in them, still they are his creations. It is in order to repay, in however infinitesimal a degree, the debt which we owe to him that the effort is made to partake of the joy of his company the Evening Talks with a larger public.

0.02 - The Three Steps of Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Moreover the whole trend of modern thought and modern endeavour reveals itself to the observant eye as a large conscious effort of Nature in man to effect a general level of intellectual equipment, capacity and farther possibility by universalising the opportunities which modern civilisation affords for the mental life. Even the preoccupation of the European intellect, the protagonist of this tendency, with material Nature and the externalities of existence is a necessary part of the effort. It seeks to prepare a sufficient basis in man's physical being and vital energies and in his material environment for his full mental possibilities. By the spread of Education, by the advance of the backward races, by the elevation of depressed classes, by the multiplication of labour-saving appliances, by the movement
  The Three Steps of Nature

0.03 - Letters to My little smile, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  or sufficient Education.
  Lovingly.

0.05 - Letters to a Child, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  in the Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education. He
  began writing to the Mother at the age of twelve.

0.06 - Letters to a Young Sadhak, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  To a young sadhak who later became a teacher in the Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education.1
  I hope and believe Your work does not depend upon

0.08 - Letters to a Young Captain, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  of Physical Education.
  Sweet Mother,

0.09 - Letters to a Young Teacher, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  of Education.
  Sweet Mother,
  --
  On Education, CWM, Vol. 12, p. 185.
  Series Nine - To a Young Teacher

01.05 - The Nietzschean Antichrist, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   This is the Nietzsche we all know. But there is another aspect of his which the world has yet been slow to recognise. For, at bottom, Nietzsche is not all storm and fury. If his Superman is a Destroying Angel, he is none the less an angel. If he is endowed with a supreme sense of strength and power, there is also secreted in the core of his heart a sense of the beautiful that illumines his somewhat sombre aspect. For although Nietzsche is by birth a Slavo-Teuton, by culture and Education he is pre-eminently Hellenic. His earliest works are on the subject of Greek tragedy and form what he describes as an "Apollonian dream." And to this dream, to this Greek aesthetic sense more than to any thing else he sacrifices justice and pity and charity. To him the weak and the miserable, the sick and the maimed are a sort of blot, a kind of ulcer on the beautiful face of humanity. The herd that wallow in suffering and relish suffering disfigure the aspect of the world and should therefore be relentlessly mowed out of existence. By being pitiful to them we give our tacit assent to their persistence. And it is precisely because of this that Nietzsche has a horror of Christianity. For compassion gives indulgence to all the ugliness of the world and thus renders that ugliness a necessary and indispensable element of existence. To protect the weak, to sympathise with the lowly brings about more of weakness and more of lowliness. Nietzsche has an aristocratic taste par excellencewhat he aims at is health and vigour and beauty. But above all it is an aristocracy of the spirit, an aristocracy endowed with all the richness and beauty of the soul that Nietzsche wants to establish. The beggar of the street is the symbol of ugliness, of the poverty of the spirit. And the so-called aristocrat, die millionaire of today is as poor and ugly as any helpless leper. The soul of either of them is made of the same dirty, sickly stuff. The tattered rags, the crouching heart, the effeminate nerve, the unenlightened soul are the standing ugliness of the world and they have no place in the ideal, the perfect humanity. Humanity, according to Nietzsche, is made in order to be beautiful, to conceive the beautiful, to create the beautiful. Nietzsche's Superman has its perfect image in a Grecian statue of Zeus cut out in white marble-Olympian grandeur shedding in every lineament Apollonian beauty and Dionysian vigour.
   The real secret of Nietzsche's philosophy is not an adoration of brute force, of blind irrational joy in fighting and killing. Far from it, Nietzsche has no kinship with Treitschke or Bernhard. What Nietzsche wanted was a world purged of littleness and ugliness, a humanity, not of saints, perhaps, but of heroes, lofty in their ideal, great in their achievement, majestic in their empirea race of titanic gods breathing the glory of heaven itself.

01.07 - The Bases of Social Reconstruction, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The French Revolution wanted to remould human society and its ideal was liberty, equality and fraternity. It pulled down the old machinery and set up a new one in its stead. And the result? "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" remained always in effect a cry in the wilderness. Another wave of idealism is now running over the earth and the Bolshevists are its most fiercely practical exponents. Instead of dealing merely with the political machinery, the Socialistic Revolution tries to break and remake, above all, the social machinery. But judged from the results as yet attained and the tendencies at work, few are the reasons to hope but many to fear the worst. Even Education does not seem to promise us anything better. Which nation was better educatedin the sense we understood and still commonly understand the wordthan Germany?
   And yet we have no hesitation today to call them Huns and Barbarians. That Education is not giving us the right thing is proved further by the fact that we are constantly changing our programmes and curriculums, everyday remodelling old institutions and founding new ones. Even a revolution in the Educational system will not bring about the desired millennium, so long as we lay so much stress upon the system and not upon man himself. And finally, look to all the religions of the worldwe have enough of creeds and dogmas, of sermons and mantras, of churches and templesand yet human life and society do not seem to be any the more worthy for it.
   Are we then to say that human nature is irrevocably vitiated by an original sin and that all our efforts at reformation and regeneration are, as the Indian saying goes, like trying to straighten out the crooked tail of a dog?

01.09 - William Blake: The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Touching the very core of the malady of our age he says that our modern enlightenment seeks to cancel altogether the higher values and install instead the lower alone as true. Thus, for example, Marx and Freud, its twin arch priests, are brothers. Both declare that it is the lower, the under layer alone that matters: to one "the masses", to the other "the instincts". Their wild imperative roars: "Sweep away this pseudo-higher; let the instincts rule, let the pro-letariat dictate!" But more characteristic, Monsieur Thibon has made another discovery which gives the whole value and speciality to his outlook. He says the moderns stress the lower, no doubt; but the old world stressed only the higher and neglected the lower. Therefore the revolt and wrath of the lower, the rage of Revanche in the heart of the dispossessed in the modern world. Enlightenment meant till now the cultivation and embellishment of the Mind, the conscious Mind, the rational and nobler faculties, the height and the depth: and mankind meant the princes and the great ones. In the individual, in the scheme of his culture and Education, the senses were neglected, left to go their own way as they pleased; and in the collective field, the toiling masses in the same way lived and moved as best as they could under the economics of laissez-faire. So Monsieur Thibon concludes: "Salvation has never come from below. To look for it from above only is equally vain. No doubt salvation must come from the higher, but on condition that the higher completely adopts and protects the lower." Here is a vision luminous and revealing, full of great import, if we follow the right track, prophetic of man's true destiny. It is through this infiltration of the higher into the lower and the integration of the lower into the higher that mankind will reach the goal of its evolution, both individually and collectively.
   But the process, Monsieur Thibon rightly asserts, must begin with the individual and within the individual. Man must "turn within, feel alive within himself", re-establish his living contact with God, the source and origin from which he has cut himself off. Man must learn to subordinate having to being. Each individual must be himself, a free and spontaneous expression. Upon such individual , upon individuals grouped naturally in smaller collectivities and not upon unformed or ill-formed wholesale masses can a perfect human society be raised and will be raised. Monsieur Thibon insistsand very rightlyupon the variety and diversity of individual and local growths in a unified humanity and not a dead uniformity of regimented oneness. He declares, as the reviewer of the London Times succinctly puts it: "Let us abolish our insensate worship of number. Let us repeal the law of majorities. Let us work for the unity that draws together instead of idolizing the multiplicity that disintegrates. Let us understand that it is not enough for each to have a place; what matters is that each should be in his right place. For the atomized society let us substitute an organic society, one in which every man will be free to do what he alone is qualified and able to do."

0.10 - Letters to a Young Captain, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  of Physical Education. He began writing to the Mother at the
  age of nineteen.
  --
  and I too have explained everything in the book Education. One
  has to read, study and, above all, practise.
  --
  problem and various possible methods of physical Education. The fundamental problem is this: how can we
  The Queen of Jhansi who died on the battlefield in 1858 while fighting British
  --
  it is utterly indispensable, as in physical Education, for example.
  21 July 1963
  --
  for mental and physical Education, isn't there a similar
  method to progress towards Sri Aurobindo's yoga? It

0.12 - Letters to a Student, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  To a student in the Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education who began writing to the Mother at the age of sixteen.
  Sweet Mother,
  --
  Physical Education means principally all the various exercises for the development and maintenance of the body.
  Naturally, here we have combined the two. But this is mainly

0.13 - Letters to a Student, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  To a student in the Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education who began writing to the Mother at the age of sixteen.
  Sweet Mother,

0 1955-04-04, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   For a long time, Satprem took care of the correspondence with the outside, along with Pavitra, not to mention editing the Ashram Bulletin as well as Mother's writings and talks, translating Sri Aurobindo's works into French, and conducting classes at the Ashram's 'International Centre of Education.'
   Every evening at the Playground, the disciples passed before Mother one by one to receive symbolically some food.

0 1958-02-03b - The Supramental Ship, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   I found myself upon an immense ship, which is the symbolic representation of the place where this work is being carried out. This ship, as big as a city, is thoroughly organized, and it had certainly already been functioning for quite some time, for its organization was fully developed. It is the place where people destined for the supramental life are being trained. These people (or at least a part of their being) had already undergone a supramental transformation because the ship itself and all that was aboard was neither material nor subtle-physical, neither vital nor mental: it was a supramental substance. This substance itself was of the most material supramental, the supramental substance nearest the physical world, the first to manifest. The light was a blend of red and gold, forming a uniform substance of luminous orange. Everything was like that the light was like that, the people were like thateverything had this color, in varying shades, however, which enabled things to be distinguished from one another. The overall impression was of a shadowless world: there were shades, but no shadows. The atmosphere was full of joy, calm, order; everything worked smoothly and silently. At the same time, I could see all the details of the Education, the training in all domains by which the people on board were being prepared.
   This immense ship had just arrived at the shore of the supramental world, and a first batch of people destined to become the future inhabitants of the supramental world were about to disembark. Everything was arranged for this first landing. A certain number of very tall beings were posted on the wharf. They were not human beings and never before had they been men. Nor were they permanent inhabitants of the supramental world. They had been delegated from above and posted there to control and supervise the landing. I was in charge of all this since the beginning and throughout. I myself had prepared all the groups. I was standing on the bridge of the ship, calling the groups forward one by one and having them disembark on the shore. The tall beings posted there seemed to be reviewing those who were disembarking, allowing those who were ready to go ashore and sending back those who were not and who had to continue their training aboard the ship. While standing there watching everyone, that part of my consciousness coming from here became extremely interested: it wanted to see, to identify all the people, to see how they had changed and to find out who had been taken immediately as well as those who had to remain and continue their training. After awhile, as I was observing, I began to feel pulled backwards and that my body was being awakened by a consciousness or a person from here1and in my consciousness, I protested: No, no, not yet! Not yet! I want to see whos there! I was watching all this and noting it with intense interest It went on like that until, suddenly, the clock here began striking three, which violently jerked me back. There was the sensation of a sudden fall into my body. I came back with a shock, but since I had been called back very suddenly, all my memory was still intact. I remained quiet and still until I could bring back the whole experience and preserve it.

0 1958-10-04, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   The other day, for example, though I no longer recall exactly when (I forget everything on purpose)but it was in the last part of the night I had a rather long activity concerning the whole realization of the Ashram, notably in the fields of Education and art. I was apparently inspecting this area to see how things were there, so naturally I saw a certain number of people, their work and their inner states. Some saw me and, at that moment, had a vision of me. It is likely that many were asleep and didnt notice anything, but some actually saw me. The next morning, for example, someone who works at the theater told me that she had had a splendid vision of me in which I had spoken to her, blessed her, etc. This was her way of receiving the work I had done. And this kind of thing is happening more and more, in that my action is awakening the consciousness in others more and more strongly.
   Naturally, the reception is always incomplete or partially modified; when it passes through the individuality, it becomes narrowed, a personal thing. It seems impossible for each one to have a consciousness vast enough to see the thing in its entirety.
  --
   Money is not meant to generate money; money should generate an increase in production, an improvement in the conditions of life and a progress in human consciousness. This is its true use. What I call an improvement in consciousness, a progress in consciousness, is everything that Education in all its forms can providenot as its generally understood, but as we understand it here: Education in art, Education in from the Education of the body, from the most material progress, to the spiritual Education and progress through yoga; the whole spectrum, everything that leads humanity towards its future realization. Money should serve to augment that and to augment the material base for the earths progress, the best use of what the earth can giveits intelligent utilization, not the utilization that wastes and loses energies. The use that allows energies to be replenished.
   In the universe there is an inexhaustible source of energy that asks only to be replenished; if you know how to go about it, it is replenished. Instead of draining life and the energies of our earth and making of it something parched and inert, we must know the practical exercise for replenishing the energy constantly. And these are not just words; I know how its to be done, and science is in the process of thoroughly finding outit has found out most admirably. But instead of using it to satisfy human passions, instead of using what science has found so that men may destroy each other more effectively than they are presently doing, it must be used to enrich the earth: to enrich the earth, to make the earth richer and richer, more active, generous, productive and to make all life grow towards its maximum efficiency. This is the true use of money. And if its not used like that, its a vicea short circuit and a vice.

0 1958-10-10, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   There is ones position in the universal hierarchy, which is something ineluctableit is the eternal lawand there is the development in the manifestation, which is an Education; it is progressive and done from within the being. What is remarkable is that to become a perfect being, this positionwhatever it is, decreed since all eternity, a part of the eternal Truthmust manifest with the greatest possible perfection as a result of evolutionary growth. It is the junction, the union of the two, the eternal position and the evolutionary realization, that will make the total and perfect being, and the manifestation as the Lord has willed it since the beginning of all eternity (which has no beginning at all! ).
   And for the cycle to be complete, one cannot stop on the way at any plane, not even the highest spiritual plane nor the plane closest to matter (like the occult plane in the vital, for example). One must descend right into matter, and this perfection in manifestation must be a material perfection, or otherwise the cycle is not completewhich explains why those who want to flee in order to realize the divine Will are in error. What must be done is exactly the opposite! The two must be combined in a perfect way. This is why all the honest sciences, the sciences that are practiced sincerely, honestly, exclusively with a will to know, are difficult pathsyet such sure paths for the total realization.

0 1959-01-06, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   The Bulletin of Physical Education, which appeared quarterly.
   ***

0 1960-08-10 - questions from center of Education - reading Sri Aurobindo, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
  object:0_1960-08-10 - questions from center of Education - reading Sri Aurobindo
  author class:The Mother
  --
   (Concerning two teachers at the Ashram's Center of Education who wrote Mother asking if 'only' Sri Aurobindo should be studied. Pavitra was present during this conversation.)
   An eight page letternothing but passion.
  --
   And finally, Sweet Mother, what I would really like to know is the purpose of our Center of Education. Is it to teach the works of Sri Aurobindo? And only these? All the works or some only? Or is it to prepare the students to read the works of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother? Is it to prepare them for the Ashram life or for outside occupations as well? So many opinions are floating in the air, and even the old disciples from whom we expect some knowledge make so many contradictory statements
   (Laughing, to Pavitra:) I suppose thats for you!
  --
   It is not a question of preparing students to read these or some other works. It is a question of drawing all those who are capable of it out of the usual human routine of thought, feelings, action; of giving those who are here every opportunity to reject the slavery of the human way of thinking and acting; of teaching all those who want to listen that there is another, truer way of living, and that Sri Aurobindo taught us to become and to live the true being and that the purpose of Education here is to prepare the children for this life and to make them capable of it.
   As for all the others, all those who want the human way of thinking and living, the world is vast and there is place there for everyone.

0 1960-09-20, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   But this way of seeing is too far removed from the state of mind and spiritual Education in which X has lived,4 of course, for him to understand. Nor am I in favor of proselytizing (to convince X); it would disturb him quite needlessly. He has not come here for that. He came here for something special, something I wanted which he brought, and I have learnt it. Now its excellent, he is a part of the group in his own fashion, thats all. And in a certain way, his presence here is having a very good effect on a whole category of people who had not been touched but who are now becoming more and more favorably inclined. It was difficult to reach all the traditionalists, for example, the people attached to the old spiritual forms; well, they seem now to have been touched by something.
   When Amrita,5 seized with zeal, wanted to make him understand what we were doing here and what Sri Aurobindo had wanted, it almost erupted into an unpleasant situation. So after that, I decided to identify myself with him to see I had never done this, because normally I only do it when I am responsible for someone, in order to truly help someone, and Ive never felt any responsibility in regard to X. So I wanted to see his inner situation, what could and could not be done. That was the day you saw him coming down from our meditation in an ecstatic state, when he told you that all separation between him and me had dropped awayit was to be expected, I anticipated as much!

0 1960-10-25, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   Its so contrary not only to the Education but to the make up of people from the West! For an Indian for a modern Indian it would be difficult, but for those who have kept something of the old tradition it would not be difficult. Its easy for children raised in a monastery or near the guru
   (silence)

0 1960-11-12, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   Its a lack of plasticity in the mind, and they are bound by the expression of things; for them, words are rigid. Sri Aurobindo explained it so well in The Secret of the Veda; he shows how language evolves and how, before, it was very supple and evocative. For example, one could at once think of a river and of inspiration. Sri Aurobindo also gives the example of a sailboat and the forward march of life. And he says that for those of the Vedic age it was quite natural, the two could go together, superimposed; it was merely a way of looking at the same thing from two sides, whereas now, when a word is said, we think only of this word all by itself, and to get a clear picture we need a whole literary or poetic imagery (with explanations to boot!). Thats exactly the case with these children; theyre at a stage where everything is rigid. Such is the product of modern Education. It even extracts the subtlest nuance between two words and FIXES it: And above all, dont make any mistake, dont use this word for that word, for otherwise your writings no good. But its just the opposite.
   (silence)
  --
   The Ashram's annual physical Education demonstration at the Sportsground.
   The actual aphorism reads: 'When I read a wearisome book through and with pleasure, yet perceived all the perfection of its wearisomeness, then I knew that my mind was conquered.'

0 1960-12-31, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   There have been similar stories in dreams with X. I saw him when he was very young (his Education, the ideas he had, how he was trained). And the same thing happened. I was with him but Ill tell you that another time6 And then at the end, Id had enough and I said, Oh, no! Its too ridiculous! and with that I left the house. At the door was a little squirrel sitting on his haunches making friendly little gestures towards me. Oh! I said, heres someone who understands better!
   But later I observed, I saw that this had helped drain him of all the weight of his past Education. Very interesting Night after night, night after night, night after nightplenty of things! You could write novels about it all.
   'This wonderful world of Delight waiting at our gates for our call, to come down upon earth.'

0 1961-01-24, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Then she returned to India and I took her in with me. I continued to treat her almost as a friend and I helped her to develop her gifts. Mon petit,10 how dirty she started to get, lying, stealing, and absolutely needlesslyshe had money, she was well treated, she had everything she needed, she ate what we didthere was absolutely no reason! When I finally asked her, But why, why!? (she was no longer young at this point), she replied, When I came back here, it took hold of me again; its stronger than I am. That was a revelation for me! Those old habits had been impervious to Education.
   We think these people are the way they are because the environment is bad, the Education is poor, the conditions are difficultits not true! In the universal economy of things they REPRESENT something, a certain type of force and vibration. It will have to be either dissolved or transformed. Transformed? But perhaps that is. It may disappear along with the hostile forces. Perhaps once everything has been transformed it will disappear I dont know when.
   In any case, I really tried my best, with all the power I had, all the knowledge I had, because I liked this girl a lot, it wasnt at all a question of charity, I found her very interesting. But I watchedwith a kind of horror, reallyas this past repossessed her more and more, more and more each day, until we were finally obliged to dismiss her, to tell her, Go. Yes, I understand, she replied, I cant stay here.

0 1961-03-17, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   The experience occurred in a place corresponding to ours [the main Ashram building], but immense: the rooms were ten times bigger, but absolutely one cant say emptythey were barren. Not that there was nothing in them, but nothing was in order, everything was just where it shouldnt be. There wasnt any furniture so things were strewn here and therea dreadful disarray! Things were being put to uses they werent made for, yet nothing needed for a particular purpose could be found. The whole section having to do with Education [the Ashram School] was in almost total darkness: the lights were out with no way to switch them on, and people were wandering about and coming to me with incoherent, stupid proposals. I tried to find a comer where I could rest (not because I was tired; I simply wanted to concentrate a little and get a clear vision in the midst of it all), but it was impossible, no one would leave me alone. Finally I put a tottering armchair and a footstool end-to-end and tried to rest; but someone immediately came up (I know who, Im purposely not giving names) and said, Oh! This wont do at all! It CANT be arranged like that! Then he began making noise, commotion, disorderwell, it was awful.
   To wind it all up, I went to Sri Aurobindos rooman enormous, enormous room, but in the same state. And he appeared to be in an eternal consciousness, entirely detached from everything yet very clearly aware of our total incapacity.

0 1961-04-25, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But these people just cant get out of their Education! Here is a lady [A. Bailey], quite renowned, it seems (shes dead now), who became the disciple of a Tibetan lama and she still speaks of Christ as the sole Avatar! She just cant get out of it!
   And each one has the absolute Truth!

0 1961-07-07, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I am putting this purposely into rather childish terms so that it will be clearly understood. But this is the way it is. I am sure of it because I have observed it in myself for a VERY long time, and I had to. Due to the whole subconscious formation of childhoodenvironment, Education, and so forthwe have to DRUM into this (Mother touches her body) the consciousness of Unity : the absolute, EXCLUSIVE unity of the Divineexclusive in the sense that nothing exists apart from this Unity, even the things which seem most repulsive.
   Sri Aurobindo also had to struggle against this because he too received a Christian Education. And these Aphorisms are the result the floweringof the necessity to struggle against the subconscious formation which has produced such questions (Mother takes on a scandalized tone): How can God be weak? How can God be foolish? How. But there is nothing but God! He alone exists, there is nothing outside of Him. And whatever seems repugnant to us is something He no longer wishes to existHe is preparing the world so that this no longer manifests, so that the manifestation can pass beyond this state to something else. So of course we violently reject everything in us that is destined to leave the active manifestation. There is a movement of rejection.
   Yet it is He. There is nothing other than He! This should be repeated from morning to night, from night to morning, because we forget it every minute.

0 1961-10-02, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Then there is a doctor, V., who comes here twice a year to give a check-up to all who take part in the physical Education program and all the children. He is an extremely honest and sincere man who believes in the mission of medical science. Each time he comes, I write something in his diary on the day of his departure (his whole diary is full of things Ive written they usually appear in the Bulletin or somewhere). On that very same day I learned that V. was leaving, and it suddenly came to meso clearly! Falsehood in the body that sort of juxtaposition of contraries, the inversion of the Vibration (only it doesnt really invertits a curious phenomenon: the vibration remains what it is but its received inverted)this falsehood in the body is a falsehood in the CONSCIOUSNESS. The falsity of the consciousness naturally has material consequences and thats what illness is! I immediately made an experiment on my body to see if this held, if it actually works that way. And I realized that its true! When you are open and in contact with the Divine, the Vibration gives you strength, energy; and if you are quiet enough, it fills you with great joyand all of this in the cells of the body. You fall back into the ordinary consciousness and straightaway, without anything changing, the SAME thing, the SAME vibration coming from the SAME source turns into a pain, a malaise, a feeling of uncertainty, instability and decrepitude. To be sure of this, I repeated the experiment three or four times, and it was absolutely automatic, like the operation of a chemical formula: same conditions, same results.
   This interested me greatly.

0 1961-12-20, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Seen from the European angle, Sri Aurobindo represents an immense spiritual revolution, redeeming Matter and the creation, which to the Christian religion is fundamentally a fallits really unclear how what has come from God could become so bad, but anyway, better not be too logical! its a fall. The creation is a fall. And thats why they are far more easily convinced by Buddhism. I saw this particularly with Richard, whose Education was entirely in European philosophy, with Christian and positivist influences; under these two influences, when he came into contact with Theons cosmic philosophy and later Sri Aurobindos revelation, he immediately explained, in his Wherefore of the Worlds, that the world is the fruit of DesireGods desire. Yet Sri Aurobindo says (in simple terms), God created the world for the Joy of the creation, or rather, He brought forth the world from Himself for the Joy of living an objective life. This was Theons thesis too, that the world is the Divine in an objective form, but for him the origin of this objective form was the desire to be. All this is playing with words, you understand, but it turns out that in one case the world is reprehensible and in the other it is adorable! And that makes all the difference. To the whole European mind, the whole Christian spirit, the world is reprehensible. And when THAT is pointed out to them, they cant stand it.
   So the very normal, natural reaction against this attitude is to negate the spiritual life: lets take the world as it is, brutally, materially, short and sweet (since it all comes to an end with this short life), lets do all we can to enjoy ourselves now, suffer as little as possible and not think of anything else. Having said that life is a condemned, reprehensible, anti-divine thing, this is the logical conclusion. Then what to do? We dont want to do away with life, so we do away with the Divine.

0 1962-05-29, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Human beings arent that limited, after all! It is rather yes, its a matter of atavism, of Education, of all sorts of things; and above all, I think the main reason is that you have no desire toits no fun for you!
   (Satprem laughs in complete agreement)
  --
   A splendid Education, mon petit!
   Splendid. I am infinitely grateful to her. My body has never asked for fun or well-being or anything else. Thats life, it said, and you just have to take it as it is. And thats why when I first met someone who told me it could be otherwise (I was already past twenty), I said, Oh, really? Is that so? (Mother laughs) And then when he told me all about Thons teachings and The Cosmic Life and about the inner God and a new world that would be a world of beauty and (at least) of peace and light well, I rushed into it headlong.
  --
   Well, I think thats the best Education. To the children here we give the exact opposite! But thats how it is: its a principleits not practical.
   Not practical?

0 1962-06-12, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   You see, the trouble is hes a man whose principles and Education prevent him from believing in progress and transformation. He believes that if you fulfill the conditions you get the siddhi,3 and thats the end of it the goal is reached. He had already attained his goal before meeting us, and then he could have kept his distance, but he became intimately connected with something full of all kinds of difficulties (which we neither ignore nor call for), but its essentially a Power for progressan awesome force for progress. Well, when I saw that, I wondered, How can he possibly bear it? I thought he would keep his distance and not enter the atmosphere, but he did try to enterhe linked up with certain people, and particularly when he started meditating with me (he asked for it, not me), suddenly something responded. And that triggered the conflict in him. One part of his being has gone along with the Movement, while the other is left strandeddoesnt budge. That created a gap.
   Of course, one has to be in a terribly superficial consciousness to react the way he did. He had a rather deep contact with you, and there were moments when he understood very well who you arehe knows, he told me so. Consequently, had he truly been in a yogic state, then even if you had done something tactless or wrong, he would have just smiled! He would have said, Oh, hes just impetuous, but I dont mind.

0 1962-09-05, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I have already told you the reason (there are many reasons): one tiny undeveloped level in the being is enough. It obviously has to do with atavism, with the way the body was built, the milieu one was born in, ones Education, the life one has led. But its mainly how much one has been drawn to higher things. It is clear that your energies have been far more concentrated on breaking through that lid and touching the Source of Truth than on having mediumistic experiencesfar more. And for what you have come to do, that was INFINITELY more important. Minor experiences such as exteriorizing and the like are just diversions along the way thats how I have always seen them.
   Yes, Mother, thats all right. But theres no outer encouragement. I have the feeling that nothing is happening I wake up each morning and theres nothing. I meditate, theres nothing theres never anything! Just the certainty that its the only thing worth doing.

0 1962-11-30, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   A. has a neighbor who is an Educational officer (retired). He does serious Puja daily and has certain powers of foretelling, mind-reading etc. He is under instructions from his Guru never to send back people without answering their questions of whatever kind; never to get angry under any conditions; never to accept money; and never to tell things of his own accord. He is in great demand among ministers and officials of the Madras Government, and Nehru too had an interesting experience at his hands.
   This gentleman told A. on October 20 that the Chinese hostilities will be under Cease-Fire by the end of November. It actually came to be on November 20. Here are a few other things he has said in reply to A. on his return from here:

0 1963-03-06, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   In fact, for Education, people should always encourage both tendencies side by side: the thirst for the Marvelous, the seemingly unrealizable, for something that fills you with a sense of divinity, while at the same time encouraging, in the perception of the world as it is, an exact, correct and sincere observation, the abolition of all imaginings, a constant control, and a most practical and meticulous feeling for exactness in details. Both tendencies should go side by side. Generally, people kill one with the idea that its necessary in order to develop the otherwhich is totally erroneous. The two can coexist, and as knowledge grows, a moment comes when you understand that they are two aspects of the same thing, namely, a clear vision, a superior discernment. But instead of the vision and discernment being limited and narrow, they become absolutely sincere, correct, exactAND immense, embracing an entire field thats not yet part of the concrete Manifestation.
   This is very important from an Educational point of view.
   To see the world as it is, accurately, starkly, in the most practical and down-to-earth way, and to see the world as it can be, with the highest and freest vision, filled with hope and aspiration and a marvelous certainty these are the two poles of discernment. All the most splendid, marvelous, powerful, expressive and total things we are able to imagine are nothing compared to what they can be; and at the same time, our minute observation of the smallest detail can never be sufficiently exact. Both things must go together. When you know this (gesture below) and you know That (gesture above), you are able to make the two meet.

0 1963-05-25, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I have a strong impression and thats why Sri Aurobindo was so interested in the book and took such a part in it that it is the way of explaining things which those with a European Education can best understand. Or those with a modern Education, at any rate, with a modern turn of mind, because its very appropriate for America, too. And for the whole part of India thats under the influence of British Education, it will put them in touch in a way they can understand.
   Not for a second did I think they would publish itin fact, to tell you the truth, it wouldnt make me too happy either! Its not a book for their Collection. Their Collection is much too trite, too superficial.

0 1963-11-20, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Whats you is this (gesture above the head), its there: what sparkles in the light thats you. This [the body] isnt you, its the sediment. You still have your bodys self-esteem! You should feel: this isnt me, it isnt me. It is yes, what was put together more or less clumsily and ignorantly by father, mother, maybe with the influence of grandparents. That discovery I made at the age of about fifteen or sixteen, or seventeen. I began to see clearly all the gifts (if we can call them that) that came from father, mother, parents, grandparents, Education, people who looked after me, that whole mudhole, as it were, into which you fall headfirst. And then, the quality of the vibration, the quality of the sensation, of the so-called thoughts (which arent thoughts, but are almost automatic mental reflexes of sorts) and of the feelings (if you can call them feelings: they are kinds of reactions to the milieu and to all that comes from outside)it all swarms, swarms like worms in the mud.
   When you see it all and you begin to say, But this isnt me! and you feel it isnt you: It isnt me! Nome is what looks on; me is what wills; me is what knows.

0 1964-01-04, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   It was the same thing with you I saw that. He regards you like this (gesture of looking down on Satprem), and then, youre not a pundit (!), you havent had the religious Education of the countryhe regards you as a beginner, he isnt at all conscious of where your mind is, of where your mind can reach. I told him, but even that he doesnt quite understand. But once, I saw (it was at the time when I was giving him meditations downstairs), he had made a remark that was quite preposterous on the fact that people here meditated with eyes closed and that I, too, had my eyes closed when I meditated. It was reported to me. That was long ago, years ago. He was going to come and see me the next morning, so I said, Wait, my friend, Ill show you! And the next day, I meditated with my eyes open (Mother laughs)the poor man! When he went downstairs, he said, Mother meditated with her eyes open, she was like a lion!
   Thats it, you understand, theres a gap.

0 1964-01-18, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   There should be somewhere upon earth a place that no nation could claim as its own, a place where every human being of goodwill, sincere in his aspiration, could live freely as a citizen of the world, obeying one single authority, that of the supreme Truth; a place of peace, concord, harmony, where all the fighting instincts of man would be used exclusively to conquer the causes of his sufferings and miseries, to surmount his weakness and ignorance, to triumph over his limitations and incapacities; a place where the needs of the spirit and the concern for progress would take precedence over the satisfaction of desires and passions, the search for pleasures and material enjoyment. In this place, children would be able to grow and develop integrally without losing contact with their souls; Education would be given not with a view to passing examinations or obtaining certificates and posts, but to enrich ones existing faculties and bring forth new ones. In this place, titles and positions would be replaced by opportunities to serve and organize; everyones bodily needs would be provided for equally, and in the general organization, intellectual, moral and spiritual superiority would be expressed not by increased pleasures and powers in life, but by greater duties and responsibilities. Beauty in all its art formspainting, sculpture, music, literaturewould be accessible to all equally, the ability to share in the joys it brings being limited solely by ones capacities and not by social or financial position. For in this ideal place, money would no longer be the sovereign lord; individual worth would have a far greater importance than that of material wealth and social position. There, work would not be for earning ones living, but the means to express oneself and develop ones capacities and possibilities, while at the same time being of service to the group as a whole, which would in turn provide for everyones subsistence and field of action. In short, it would be a place where human relationships, ordinarily based almost exclusively on competition and strife, would be replaced by relationships of emulation in trying to do ones best, of collaboration and real brotherhood.
   The earth is not ready to realize such an ideal, for humanity does not yet possess either the knowledge necessary to understand and adopt it or the conscious force indispensable for its execution. This is why I call it a dream.

0 1964-09-23, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   There is ONE sound which, to me, has an extraordinary powerextraordinary and UNIVERSAL (