classes ::: author, Poetry,
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branches ::: Oscar Wilde

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object:Oscar Wilde
class:author
subject class:Poetry



--- WIKI
Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 30 November 1900) was an Irish poet and playwright. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, the early 1890s saw him become one of the most popular playwrights in London. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, and the circumstances of his criminal conviction for "gross indecency", imprisonment, and early death at age 46. Wilde's parents were Anglo-Irish intellectuals in Dublin. A young Wilde learned to speak fluent French and German. At university, Wilde read Greats; he demonstrated himself to be an exceptional classicist, first at Trinity College Dublin, then at Oxford. He became associated with the emerging philosophy of aestheticism, led by two of his tutors, Walter Pater and John Ruskin. After university, Wilde moved to London into fashionable cultural and social circles. As a spokesman for aestheticism, he tried his hand at various literary activities: he published a book of poems, lectured in the United States and Canada on the new "English Renaissance in Art" and interior decoration, and then returned to London where he worked prolifically as a journalist. Known for his biting wit, flamboyant dress and glittering conversational skill, Wilde became one of the best-known personalities of his day. At the turn of the 1890s, he refined his ideas about the supremacy of art in a series of dialogues and essays, and incorporated themes of decadence, duplicity, and beauty into what would be his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). The opportunity to construct aesthetic details precisely, and combine them with larger social themes, drew Wilde to write drama. He wrote Salome (1891) in French while in Paris but it was refused a licence for England due to an absolute prohibition on the portrayal of Biblical subjects on the English stage. Unperturbed, Wilde produced four society comedies in the early 1890s, which made him one of the most successful playwrights of late-Victorian London. At the height of his fame and success, while The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) was still being performed in London, Wilde had the Marquess of Queensberry prosecuted for criminal libel. The Marquess was the father of Wilde's lover, Lord Alfred Douglas. The libel trial unearthed evidence that caused Wilde to drop his charges and led to his own arrest and trial for gross indecency with men. After two more trials he was convicted and sentenced to two years' hard labour, the maximum penalty, and was jailed from 1895 to 1897. During his last year in prison, he wrote De Profundis (published posthumously in 1905), a long letter which discusses his spiritual journey through his trials, forming a dark counterpoint to his earlier philosophy of pleasure. On his release, he left immediately for France, never to return to Ireland or Britain. There he wrote his last work, The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898), a long poem commemorating the harsh rhythms of prison life.
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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Infinite_Library

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner
1.22_-_How_to_Learn_the_Practice_of_Astrology
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.18_-_January_1939
2.22_-_1941-1943
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
3.19_-_Of_Dramatic_Rituals
32.11_-_Life_and_Self-Control_(A_Letter)
33.07_-_Alipore_Jail
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
The_Act_of_Creation_text

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Oscar Wilde

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH


TERMS ANYWHERE

Humphreys, Christmas. (1901-1983). Early British popularizer of Buddhism and founder of the Buddhist Society, the oldest lay Buddhist organization in Europe. Born in London in 1901, Humphreys was the son of Sir Travers Humphreys (1867-1956), a barrister perhaps best known as the junior counsel in the prosecution of the Irish writer Oscar Wilde (1854-1900). Following in his father's footsteps, Humphreys studied law at Cambridge University and eventually became a senior prosecutor at the Old Bailey, London, the central criminal court, and later a circuit judge; he was also involved in the Tokyo war crimes trials as a prosecutor, a post he accepted so he could also further in Japan his studies of Buddhism. (Humphreys's later attempts to inject some Buddhist compassion into his courtroom led to him being called the "gentle judge," who gained a reputation for being lenient with felons. After handing down a six-month suspended sentence to an eighteen-year-old who had raped two women at knifepoint, the public outcry that ensued eventually led to his resignation from the bench in 1976.) Humphreys was interested in Buddhism from his youth and declared himself a Buddhist at age seventeen. In 1924, at the age of twenty-three, he founded the Buddhist Society, London, and served as its president until his death; he was also the first publisher of its journal, The Middle Way. Humphreys strongly advocated a nonsectarian approach to Buddhism, which embraced the individual schools of Buddhism as specific manifestations of the religion's central tenets. His interest in an overarching vision of the whole of the Buddhist tradition led him in 1945 to publish his famous Twelve Principles of Buddhism, which has been translated into fourteen languages. These principles focus on the need to recognize the conditioned nature of reality, the truth of impermanence and suffering, and the path that Buddhism provides to save oneself through "the intuition of the individual." A close associate of DAISETZ TEITARO SUZUKI and a contemporary of EDWARD CONZE, Humphreys himself wrote over thirty semischolarly and popular books and tracts on Buddhism, including Buddhism: An Introduction and Guide, published in 1951.

Lisp ::: (language) LISt Processing language.(Or mythically Lots of Irritating Superfluous Parentheses). Artificial Intelligence's mother tongue, a symbolic, functional, recursive language based on the ideas of lambda-calculus, variable-length lists and trees as fundamental data types and the interpretation of code as data and vice-versa.Data objects in Lisp are lists and atoms. Lists may contain lists and atoms. Atoms are either numbers or symbols. Programs in Lisp are themselves lists of functions with side-effects but there is a core of Lisp which is purely functional.All Lisp functions and programs are expressions that return values; this, together with the high memory use of Lisp, gave rise to Alan Perlis's famous quip (itself a take on an Oscar Wilde quote) that Lisp programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing.The original version was LISP 1, invented by John McCarthy at MIT in the late 1950s. Lisp is actually variants are quite different in detail. The dominant HLL among hackers until the early 1980s, Lisp now shares the throne with C. See languages of choice.One significant application for Lisp has been as a proof by example that most newer languages, such as COBOL and Ada, are full of unnecessary crocks. When the Right Thing has already been done once, there is no justification for bogosity in newer languages.See also Association of Lisp Users, Common Lisp, Franz Lisp, MacLisp, Portable Standard Lisp, Interlisp, Scheme, ELisp, Kamin's interpreters.[Jargon File] (1995-04-16)

Lisp "language" LISt Processing language. (Or mythically "Lots of Irritating Superfluous Parentheses"). {Artificial Intelligence}'s mother tongue, a symbolic, {functional}, {recursive} language based on the ideas of {lambda-calculus}, variable-length lists and trees as fundamental data types and the interpretation of code as data and vice-versa. Data objects in Lisp are lists and {atoms}. Lists may contain lists and atoms. Atoms are either numbers or symbols. Programs in Lisp are themselves lists of symbols which can be treated as data. Most implementations of Lisp allow functions with {side-effects} but there is a core of Lisp which is {purely functional}. All Lisp functions and programs are expressions that return values; this, together with the high memory use of Lisp, gave rise to {Alan Perlis}'s famous quip (itself a take on an Oscar Wilde quote) that "Lisp programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing". The original version was {LISP 1}, invented by {John McCarthy} "jmc@sail.stanford.edu" at {MIT} in the late 1950s. Lisp is actually older than any other {high level language} still in use except {Fortran}. Accordingly, it has undergone considerable change over the years. Modern variants are quite different in detail. The dominant {HLL} among hackers until the early 1980s, Lisp now shares the throne with {C}. See {languages of choice}. One significant application for Lisp has been as a proof by example that most newer languages, such as {COBOL} and {Ada}, are full of unnecessary {crocks}. When the {Right Thing} has already been done once, there is no justification for {bogosity} in newer languages. See also {Association of Lisp Users}, {Common Lisp}, {Franz Lisp}, {MacLisp}, {Portable Standard Lisp}, {Interlisp}, {Scheme}, {ELisp}, {Kamin's interpreters}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-04-16)



QUOTES [29 / 29 - 1500 / 2105]


KEYS (10k)

   28 Oscar Wilde
   1 Alan Perlis

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1415 Oscar Wilde
   8 Timothy Ferriss
   4 Anonymous
   2 Tricia O Malley
   2 M C Beaton
   2 Guy Kawasaki
   2 Fernando Pessoa
   2 Cassandra Clare

1:True friends stab you in the front. ~ Oscar Wilde,
2:The very essence of romance is uncertainty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
3:You can never be overdressed or overeducated. ~ Oscar Wilde,
4:The one duty we owe to history is to rewrite it.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
5:Never love anyone who treats you like you're ordinary. ~ Oscar Wilde,
6:Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ~ Oscar Wilde,
7:Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
8:A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
9:Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
10:how else but through a broken heart May Lord Christ enter in?
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
11:We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
12:I sometimes think that God in creating man somewhat overestimated his ability.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
13:If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
14:The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
15:Without order nothing can exist, without chaos nothing can evolve.
   ~ Oscar Wilde, (check capitalization),
16:I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train. ~ Oscar Wilde,
17:It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
18:You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
19:Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
20:LISP programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing. ~ Alan Perlis, ,(take on an Oscar Wilde quote),
21:To do nothing at all is the most difficult thing in the world, the most difficult and the most intellectual. ~ Oscar Wilde,
22:I think it's very healthy to spend time alone. You need to know how to be alone and not be defined by another person. ~ Oscar Wilde,
23:A dreamer is man who can find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
24:Never regret thy fall, O Icarus of the fearless flight For the greatest tragedy of them all Is never to feel the burning light. ~ Oscar Wilde,
25:You don't love someone for their looks, or their clothes, or for their fancy car, but because they sing a song only you can hear. ~ Oscar Wilde,
26:There are only two kinds of people who are really fascinating: people who know absolutely everything, and people who know absolutely nothing." ~ Oscar Wilde,
27:If you pretend to be good, the world takes you very seriously. If you pretend to be bad, it doesn't. Such s the astounding stupidity of optimism.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
28:There are only two tragedies in life: one is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it." ~ Oscar Wilde, (1854 -1900), an Irish poet and playwright, Wikipedia.,
29:The final mystery is oneself. When one has weighed the sun in the balance, and measured the steps of the moon, and mapped out the seven heavens star by star, there still remains oneself. ~ Oscar Wilde,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:All art is quite useless. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
2:History is merely gossip. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
3:Who, being loved, is poor? ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
4:Everything popular is wrong. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
5:A kiss may ruin a human life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
6:All great ideas are dangerous. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
7:Irony is wasted on the stupid. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
8:Hatred is blind, as well as love. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
9:There is no sin except stupidity. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
10:A flower blossoms for its own joy. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
11:He hadn't a single redeeming vice. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
12:White-seeded is her crimson mouth. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
13:Those whom the gods love grow young. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
14:Skepticism is the beginning of Faith. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
15:Biography lends to death a new terror. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
16:Illusion is the first of all pleasures. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
17:Live the wonderful life that is in you. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
18:Art never expresses anything but itself. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
19:Nothing is so aggravating than calmness. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
20:Why was I born with such contemporaries? ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
21:I am not young enough to know everything. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
22:I drink to separate my body from my soul. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
23:I have nothing to declare except my genius. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
24:No man is rich enough to buy back his past. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
25:Scandal is gossip made tedious by morality. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
26:The very essence of romance is uncertainty. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
27:Women are made to be loved, not understood. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
28:All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
29:I am an unspeakable of the Oscar Wilde sort. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
30:Good intentions are invariably ungrammatical. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
31:The worst vice of a fanatic is his sincerity. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
32:In married life three is company and two none. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
33:Some of my best friends are Oscar Wilde. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
34:This suspense is terrible. I hope it will last. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
35:A good friend will always stab you in the front. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
36:The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
37:Experience is one thing you can't get for nothing. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
38:God and other artists are always a little obscure. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
39:Life imitates art far more than art imitates Life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
40:The world was my oyster but I used the wrong fork. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
41:Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
42:Morality like art means a drawing a line someplace. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
43:Romantic literature is in effect imaginative lying. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
44:Consistency : The last refuge of the unimaginative.  ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
45:Don't tempt me I can resist anything but temptation. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
46:Personally, I have a great admiration for stupidity. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
47:To look at a thing is very different from seeing it. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
48:Expert: An ordinary man away from home giving advice. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
49:I have never given adoration to any body except myself. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
50:A man can't be too careful in the choice of his enemies. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
51:Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
52:Deceiving others. That is what the world calls a romance. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
53:The best way to make children good is to make them happy. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
54:Always forgive your enemies - nothing annoys them so much. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
55:A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
56:One should never trust a woman who tells one her real age. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
57:The advantage of the emotions is that they lead us astray. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
58:The function of the artist is to invent, not to chronicle. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
59:A work of art is the unique result of a unique temperament. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
60:He has no enemies but is intensely disliked by his friends. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
61:It is the spectator, and not life, that art really mirrors. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
62:They spoil every romance by trying to make it last forever. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
63:We are each our own devil, and we make this world our hell. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
64:Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
65:Action: The last resource of those who know not how to dream. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
66:Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
67:One should always play fairly when one has the winning cards. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
68:To expect the unexpected shows a thoroughly modern intellect. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
69:If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
70:It is better to have a permanent income than to be fascinating. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
71:Life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
72:Ridicule is the tribute paid to the genius by the mediocrities. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
73:Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
74:What seems to us bitter trials are often blessings in disguise. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
75:Crying is the refuge of plain women but the ruin of pretty ones. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
76:If you want to be a doormat you have to lay yourself down first. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
77:I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
78:The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
79:Ambition is the germ from which all growth of nobleness proceeds. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
80:The imagination imitates. It is the critical spirit that creates. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
81:The soul is born old but grows young. That is the comedy of life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
82:How clever you are, my dear! You never mean a single word you say. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
83:I adore simple pleasures. They are the last refuge of the complex. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
84:I find it harder and harder every day to live up to my blue china. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
85:The gods bestowed on Max [Beerbohm] the gift of perpetual old age. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
86:A man can be happy with any woman, as long as he does not love her. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
87:Anybody can be good in the country. There are no temptations there. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
88:I am the only person in the world I should like to know thoroughly. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
89:An inordinate passion for pleasure is the secret of remaining young. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
90:A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
91:I put all my genius into my life; I put only my talent into my works. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
92:Success is a science; if you have the conditions, you get the result. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
93:The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is young. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
94:To give and not expect return that is what lies at the heart of love. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
95:After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
96:An excellent man; he has no enemies; and none of his friends like him. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
97:A pessimist is one who when he has a choice of two evils chooses both. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
98:Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
99:Other people are quite dreadful. The only possible society is oneself. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
100:Pessimist: One who, when he has the choice of two evils, chooses both. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
101:The man who can dominate a London dinner-table can dominate the world. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
102:The well bred contradict other people. The wise contradict themselves. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
103:Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
104:Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
105:Conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
106:Good taste is the excuse I've always given for leading such a bad life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
107:With freedom, books, flowers, and the moon, who could not be happy?     ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
108:I hate people who are not serious about meals. It is so shallow of them. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
109:Lying, the telling of beautiful untrue things, is the proper aim of Art. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
110:One should always be in love. That is the reason one should never marry. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
111:The condition of perfection is idleness: the aim of perfection is youth. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
112:The tragedy of the poor is that they can afford nothing but self denial. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
113:A man's face is his autobiography. A woman's face is her work of fiction. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
114:Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
115:It is so easy to convince others; it is so difficult to convince oneself. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
116:Man can believe the impossible, but man can never believe the improbable. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
117:There is always something infinitely mean about other people's tragedies. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
118:Those who have much are often greedy, those who have little always share. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
119:To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
120:The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
121:The true perfection of man lies not in what man has, but in what man does. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
122:The moment you think you understand a great work of art, it's dead for you. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
123:It is a very sad thing that nowadays there is so little useless information. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
124:It is through art, and through art only, that we can realise our perfection. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
125:Pleasure is the only thing one should live for, nothing ages like happiness. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
126:The one person who has more illusions than the dreamer is the man of action. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
127:Woman begins by resisting a man's advances and ends up blocking his retreat. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
128:The secret of remaining young is never to have an emotion that is unbecoming. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
129:A pessimist is somebody who complains about the noise when opportunity knocks. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
130:I sometimes think that God in creating man somewhat overestimated his ability. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
131:No woman should ever be quite accurate about her age. It looks so calculating. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
132:All charming people, I fancy, are spoiled. It is the secret of their attraction. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
133:He [Bernard Shaw] hasn't an enemy in the world and none of his friends like him. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
134:No object is so beautiful that, under certain conditions, it will not look ugly. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
135:Art should never try to be popular. The public should try to make itself artistic. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
136:He has fought a good fight and has had to face every difficulty except popularity. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
137:If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
138:One can give a really unbiased opinion only about things that do not interest one. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
139:The world has grown suspicious of anything that looks like a happily married life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
140:When liberty comes with hands dabbled in blood it is hard to shake hands with her. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
141:A little sincerity is a dangerous thing and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
142:I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
143:It is only an auctioneer who can equally and impartially admire all schools of art. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
144:Life has been your art. You have set yourself to music. Your days are your sonnets. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
145:Men always want to be a woman's first love - women like to be a man's last romance. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
146:Morality is simply the attitude we adopt towards people whom we personally dislike. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
147:The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
148:All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That's his. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
149:America had often been discovered before Columbus, but it had always been hushed up. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
150:I always like to know everything about my new friends and nothing about my old ones. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
151:It is he who has broken the bond of marriage - not I. I only break its bondage. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
152:How marriage ruins a man! It is as demoralizing as cigarettes, and far more expensive. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
153:Now art should never try to be popular. The public should try to make itself artistic. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
154:Society exists only as a mental concept; in the real world there are only individuals. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
155:Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
156:It is always a silly thing to give advice, but to give good advice is absolutely fatal. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
157:Life is one fool thing after another where as love is two fool things after each other. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
158:Everything is dangerous, my dear fellow. If it wasn't so, life wouldn't be worth living. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
159:Fathers should be neither seen nor heard. That is the only proper basis for family life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
160:In America the President reigns for four years, and Journalism governs forever and ever. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
161:It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious.  ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
162:Men marry because they are tired, women because they are curious; both are disappointed. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
163:There is no necessity to separate the monarch from the mob; all authority is equally bad. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
164:A man who moralizes is usually a hypocrite, and a woman who moralizes is invariably plain. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
165:If one plays good music, people don't listen and if one plays bad music people don't talk. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
166:The old believe everything, the middle-aged suspect everything, the young know everything. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
167:Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
168:Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
169:Prayer must never be answered: if it is, it ceases to be prayer and becomes correspondence. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
170:Arguments are extremely vulgar, for everyone in good society holds exactly the same opinion. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
171:If you don't get everything you want, think of the things you don't get that you don't want. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
172:All art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
173:If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
174:It is a curious fact that people are never so trivial as when they take themselves seriously. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
175:Nothing makes one so vain as being told one is a sinner. Conscience makes egotists of us all. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
176:What we have to do, what at any rate it is our duty to do, is to revive the old art of Lying. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
177:He must have a truly romantic nature, for he weeps when there is nothing at all to weep about. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
178:There is always something ridiculous about the emotions of people whom one has ceased to love. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
179:A subject that is beautiful in itself gives no suggestion to the artist. It lacks imperfection. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
180:It is better to be beautiful than to be good. But ... it is better to be good than to be ugly. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
181:Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
182:No great artist ever sees things as they really are. If he did, he would cease to be an artist. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
183:As long as a woman can look ten years younger than her own daughter, she is perfectly satisfied. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
184:Don't give a woman advice; one should never give a woman anything she can't wear in the evening. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
185:I don't at all like knowing what people say of me behind my back. It makes me far too conceited. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
186:When I think of all the harm the Bible has done, I despair of ever writing anything equal to it. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
187:In modern life nothing produces such an effect as a good platitude. It makes the whole world kin. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
188:Those who are faithless know the pleasures of love; it is the faithful who know love's tragedies. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
189:Young people, nowadays, imagine that money is everything, and when they grow older, they know it. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
190:America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
191:Death and vulgarity are the only two facts in the nineteenth century that one cannot explain away. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
192:I always pass on good advice. It's the only thing to do with it.  It is never any use to oneself.  ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
193:Philosophies fall away like sand, and creeds follow on another like the withered leaves of Autumn. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
194:Romance should never begin with sentiment. It should begin with science and end with a settlement. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
195:Art is the only serious thing in the world. And the artist is the only person who is never serious. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
196:I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
197:There are many things that we would throw away if we were not afraid that others might pick them up. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
198:There are only two tragedies in life: one is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
199:Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
200:Where there is no extravagance there is no love, and where there is no love there is no understanding. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
201:It is only by not paying one's bills that one can hope to live in the memory of the commercial classes. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
202:The salesman knows nothing of what he is selling save that he is charging a great deal too much for it. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
203:Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth.   ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
204:The English country gentleman galloping after a fox is the unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
205:The one charm about marriage is that it makes a life of deception absolutely necessary for both parties. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
206:Algy, you always adopt a strictly immoral attitude towards life. You are not quite old enough to do that. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
207:The world is divided into two classes, those who believe the incredible, and those who do the improbable. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
208:While we look to the dramatist to give romance to realism, we ask of the actor to give realism to romance. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
209:America has never quite forgiven Europe for having been discovered somewhat earlier in history than itself. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
210:Perhaps, after all, America never has been discovered. I myself would say that it had merely been detected. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
211:Children begin by loving their parents; after a time they judge them; rarely, if ever, do they forgive them. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
212:The consciousness of loving and being loved brings a warmth and richness to life that nothing else can bring. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
213:Actions are the first tragedy in life, words are the second. Words are perhaps the worst. Words are merciless. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
214:By giving us the opinions of the uneducated, journalism keeps us in touch with the ignorance of the community. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
215:Music makes one feel so romantic - at least it always gets on one's nerves - which is the same thing nowadays. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
216:The intellect is not a serious thing, and never has been. It is an instrument on which one plays, that is all. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
217:No matter who broke your heart, or how long it takes to heal, you’ll never get through it without your friends. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
218:The difference between journalism and literature is that journalism is unreadable and literature is never read. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
219:I never saw a man who looked with such a wistful eye upon that little tent of blue which prisoners call the sky. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
220:I see when men love women. They give them but a little of their lives. But women when they love give everything. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
221:When I was young I thought that money was the most important thing in life; now that I am old I know that it is. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
222:Marriage is the triumph of imagination over intelligence. Second marriage is the triumph of hope over experience. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
223:She wore far too much rouge last night and not quite enough clothes; that is always a sign of despair in a woman. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
224:When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss Art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
225:Between men and women there is no friendship possible. There is passion, enmity, worship, love, but no friendship. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
226:Genius lasts longer than Beauty. That accounts for the fact that we all take such pains to over-educate ourselves. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
227:One of the many lessons that one learns in prison is, that things are what they are and will be what they will be. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
228:The young are always ready to give to those who are older than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
229:A critic should be taught to criticise a work of art without making any reference to the personality of the author. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
230:If one could only teach the English how to talk and the Irish how to listen, society here would be quite civilized. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
231:I suppose society is wonderfully delightful. To be in it is merely a bore. But to be out of it is simply a tragedy. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
232:The only difference between the saint and the sinner is that every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
233:The spirit of an age may be best expressed in the abstract ideal arts, for the spirit itself is abstract and ideal. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
234:I like persons better than principles, and I like persons with no principles better than anything else in the world. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
235:Mere color, unspoiled by meaning, and unallied with definite form, can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
236:Pleasure is Nature's test, her sign of approval. When man is happy, he is in harmony with himself and his environment. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
237:The only way a woman can ever reform a man is by boring him so completely that he loses all possible interest in life. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
238:There is nothing in the world like the devotion of a married woman. It is a thing no married man knows anything about. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
239:Women love us for our defects. If we have enough of them, they will forgive us everything, even our gigantic intellects. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
240:The only thing that ever consoles man for the stupid things he does is the praise he always gives himself for doing them. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
241:Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their life a mimicry, their passions a quotation. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
242:The strength of women comes from the fact that psychology cannot explain us. Men can be analysed, women ... merely adored. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
243:Long engagements give people the opportunity of finding out each other's character before marriage which is never advisable. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
244:How can a woman be expected to be happy with a man who insists on treating her as if she were a perfectly normal human being. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
245:I hope you have not been leading a double life, pretending to be wicked and being good all the time. That would be hypocrisy. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
246:In America the young are always ready to give to those who are older than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
247:Ordinary riches can be stolen, real riches cannot. In your soul are infinitely precious things that cannot be taken from you. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
248:Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
249:I choose my friends for their good looks, my acquaintances for their good characters, and my enemies for their good intellects. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
250:Anybody can sympathize with the sufferings of a friend but it requires a very fine nature to sympathize with a friend's success. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
251:If there is anything more annoying in the world than having people talk about you, it is certainly having no one talk about you. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
252:Know Thyself" was written over the portal of the antique world. Over the portal of the new world, "Be Thyself" shall be written. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
253:When a love comes to an end, weaklings cry, efficient ones instantly find another love, and the wise already have one in reserve. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
254:A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
255:The typewriting machine, when played with expression, is no more annoying than the piano when played by a sister or near relation. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
256:We can have in life but one great experience at best, and the secret of life is to reproduce that experience as often as possible. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
257:I like Wagner's music better than any other music; it is so loud that one can talk the whole time without people hearing what one says. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
258:I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. There is something unfair about its use. It is hitting below the intellect. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
259:It is only the unimaginative who ever invents. The true artist is known by the use he makes of what he annexes, and he annexes everything. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
260:When one is in love, one always begins by deceiving one's self, and one always ends by deceiving others. That is what world calls a romance. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
261:I think it is perfectly natural for any artist to admire intensely and love a young man. It is an incident in the life of almost every artist. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
262:Our ambition should be to rule ourselves, the true kingdom for each one of us; and true progress is to know more, and be more, and to do more. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
263:There are only two kinds of people who are really fascinating - people who know absolutely everything, and people who know absolutely nothing. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
264:There is only one class in the community that thinks more about money than the rich, and that is the poor. The poor can think of nothing else. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
265:It is perfectly monstrous the way people go about nowadays saying things against one, behind one's back, that are absolutely and entirely true. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
266:To have the reputation of possessing the most perfect social tact, talk to every woman as if you loved her, and to every man as if he bored you. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
267:If you pretend to be good, the world takes you very seriously. If you pretend to be bad, it doesn't. Such is the astounding stupidity of optimism. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
268:It is a great mistake for men to give up paying compliments, for when they give up saying what is charming, they give up thinking what is charming. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
269:A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at, for it leaves out the one country at which Humanity is always landing. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
270:Plain women are always jealous of their husbands. Beautiful women never are. They are always so occupied with being jealous of other women's husbands. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
271:Art never harms itself by keeping aloof from the social problems of the day: rather, by so doing, it more completely realises for us that which we desire. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
272:And what sort of lives do these people, who pose as being moral, lead themselves? My dear fellow, you forget that we are in the native land of the hypocrite. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
273:There is much to be said in favour of modern journalism. By giving us the opinions of the uneducated, it keeps us in touch with the ignorance of the community. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
274:Each class preaches the importance of those virtues it need not exercise. The rich harp on the value of thrift, the idle grow eloquent over the dignity of labor. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
275:The only thing that sustains one through life is the consciousness of the immense inferiority of everybody else, and this is a feeling that I have always cultivated. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
276:Romantic art deals with the exception and with the individual. Good people, belonging as they do to the normal, and so, commonplace type, are artistically uninteresting. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
277:Sometimes the poor are praised for being thrifty. But to recommend thrift to the poor is both grotesque and insulting. It is like advising a man who is starving to eat less. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
278:The mark of all good art is not that the thing done is done exactly or finely, for machinery may do as much, but that it is worked out with the head and the workman's heart. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
279:It was not intended as a compliment. It was a confession. Now that I have made it, something seems to have gone out of me. Perhaps one should never put one's worship into words. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
280:People who love only once in their lives are shallow people. What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
281:The public have an insatiable curiosity to know everything, except what is worth knowing. Journalism, conscious of this, and having tradesman-like habits, supplies their demands. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
282:He had that curious love of green, which in individuals is always the sign of a subtle artistic temperament, and in nations is said to denote a laxity, if not a decadence of morals. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
283:Talk to every woman as if you loved her, and to every man as if he bored you, and at the end of your first season you will have the reputation of possessing the most perfect social tact. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
284:To regret one's own experiences is to arrest one's own development. To deny one's own experiences is to put a lie into the lips of one's life.  It is no less than a denial of the soul.   ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
285:Bad people are, from the point of view of art, fascinating studies. They represent colour, variety and strangeness. Good people exasperate one's reason; bad people stir one's imagination. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
286:A man who is master of himself can end a sorrow as easily as he can invent a pleasure. I don't want to be at the mercy of my emotions. I want to use them, to enjoy them, and to dominate them. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
287:Alone, and without any reference to his neighbours, without any interference, the artist can fashion a beautiful thing; and if he does not do it solely for his own pleasure, he is not an artist at all. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
288:Beauty has as many meanings as man has moods. Beauty is the symbol of symbols. Beauty reveals everything, because it expresses nothing. When it shows us itself, it shows us the whole fiery-coloured world. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
289:Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead. The consciousness of loving and being loved brings a warmth and richness to life that nothing else can bring. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
290:Death must be so beautiful. To lie in the soft brown earth, with the grasses waving above one's head, and listen to silence. To have no yesterday, and no tomorrow. To forget time, to forgive life, to be at peace. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
291:Beauty is a form of genius - is higher, indeed, than genius, as it needs no explanation. It is of the great facts in the world like sunlight, or springtime, or the reflection in dark water of that silver shell we call the moon. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
292:Newspapers ... chronicle, with degrading avidity, the sins of the second-rate, and with the conscientiousness of the illiterate give us accurate and prosaic details of the doings of people of absolutely no interest whatsoever. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
293:Beauty is the only thing that time cannot harm. Philosophies fall away like sand, and creeds follow one  another like the withered leaves of Autumn; but what is beautiful is a joy for all seasons and a possession for all eternity. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
294:That beauty which is meant by art is no mere accident of human life which people can take or leave, but a positive necessity of life if we are to live as nature meant us to, that is to say unless we are content to be less than men. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
295:In its primary aspect, a painting has no more spiritual message than an exquisite fragment of Venetian glass. The channels by which all noble and imaginative work in painting should touch the soul are not those of the truths of lives. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
296:To be good, according to the vulgar standard of goodness, is obviously quite easy. It merely requires a certain amount of sordid terror, a certain lack of imaginative thought, and a certain low passion for middle- class respectability. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
297:In judging of a beautiful statue, the aesthetic faculty is absolutely and completely gratified by the splendid curves of those marble lips that are dumb to our complaint, the noble modelling of those limbs that are powerless to help us. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
298:Nothing, indeed, is more dangerous to the young artist than any conception of ideal beauty: he is constantly led by it either into weak prettiness or lifeless abstraction: whereas to touch the ideal at all, you must not strip it of vitality. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
299:While one should always study the method of a great artist, one should never imitate his manner. The manner of an artist is essentially individual, the method of an artist is absolutely universal. The first personality, which no one should copy. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
300:Art is Individualism, and Individualism is a disturbing and disintegrating force. Therein lies its immense value. For what it seeks to disturb is monotony of type, slavery of custom, tyranny of habit, and the reduction of man to the level of a machine. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
301:Science is out of the reach of morals, for her eyes are fixed upon eternal truths. Art is out of the reach of morals, for her eyes are fixed upon things beautiful and immortal and ever-changing. To morals belong the lower and less intellectual spheres. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
302:No better way is there to learn to love Nature than to understand Art. It dignifies every flower of the field. And, the boy who sees the thing of beauty which a bird on the wing becomes when transferred to wood or canvas will probably not throw the customary stone. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
303:In England, an inventor is regarded almost as a crazy man, and in too many instances, invention ends in disappointment and poverty. In America, an inventor is honoured, help is forthcoming, and the exercise of ingenuity, the application of science to the work of man, is there the shortest road to wealth. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
304:Do you really think ... that it is weakness that yields to temptation? I tell you that there are terrible temptations that it requires strength, strength and courage, to yield to. To stake all one's life on a single moment, to risk everything on one throw, whether the stake be power or pleasure, I care not - there is no weakness in that. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
305:What is termed Sin is an essential element of progress. Without it the world would stagnate, or grow old, or become colorless. By its curiosity Sin increases the experience of the race. Through its intensified assertion of individualism it saves us from monotony of type. In its rejection of the current notions about morality, it is one with the higher ethics. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
306:There is no such thing as a good influence. Because to influence a person is to give him one's own soul. He does not think his natural thoughts, or burn with his natural passions. His virtues are not real to him. His sins, if there are such thing as sins, are borrowed. He becomes an echo of someone else's music, an actor of a part that has not been written for him. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
307:When I was young, we thought that Oscar Wilde was a great nobleman who had thrown his life away for love. Nothing could be less true. He slept with East Enders who were procured for him by Lord Alfred Douglas. He knew them only &

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:No crime is vulgar, ~ Oscar Wilde,
2:All women are rebels. ~ Oscar Wilde,
3:My wish isn't to mean ~ Oscar Wilde,
4:Liberty is the chosen ~ Oscar Wilde,
5:Love is easily killed. ~ Oscar Wilde,
6:Outcasts always mourn. ~ Oscar Wilde,
7:To define is to limit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
8:Every woman is a rebel. ~ Oscar Wilde,
9:Genius is born-not paid ~ Oscar Wilde,
10:History is only gossip. ~ Oscar Wilde,
11:History is merely gossip ~ Oscar Wilde,
12:All art is quite useless. ~ Oscar Wilde,
13:one pale woman all alone, ~ Oscar Wilde,
14:Sphinxes without secrets. ~ Oscar Wilde,
15:Time is a waste of money. ~ Oscar Wilde,
16:What the hell is an oboe? ~ Oscar Wilde,
17:Wisdom comes with winters ~ Oscar Wilde,
18:A mutual misunderstanding. ~ Oscar Wilde,
19:Fantastic shadows of birds ~ Oscar Wilde,
20:In fact, I am never wrong. ~ Oscar Wilde,
21:Prism! Where is that baby? ~ Oscar Wilde,
22:The only sin is stupidity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
23:The sky was pure opal now. ~ Oscar Wilde,
24:Who, being loved, is poor? ~ Oscar Wilde,
25:Alas! it is a fearful thing ~ Oscar Wilde,
26:I walk the world in wonder. ~ Oscar Wilde,
27:A kiss may ruin a human life ~ Oscar Wilde,
28:Art should never be popular. ~ Oscar Wilde,
29:Divorces are made in heaven. ~ Oscar Wilde,
30:Everything popular is wrong. ~ Oscar Wilde,
31:Hearts Live By Being Wounded ~ Oscar Wilde,
32:The Governor was strong upon ~ Oscar Wilde,
33:A burnt child loves the fire. ~ Oscar Wilde,
34:Authority is quite degrading. ~ Oscar Wilde,
35:Hearts are made to be broken. ~ Oscar Wilde,
36:Irony is wasted on the stupid ~ Oscar Wilde,
37:Most people are other people. ~ Oscar Wilde,
38:One should always be in love. ~ Oscar Wilde,
39:The final mystery is oneself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
40:There's no sin but stupidity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
41:The secret of life is in art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
42:All great ideas are dangerous. ~ Oscar Wilde,
43:Always be a little unexpected. ~ Oscar Wilde,
44:Bad manners make a journalist. ~ Oscar Wilde,
45:I'm too old to know everything ~ Oscar Wilde,
46:Talent borrows, genius steals! ~ Oscar Wilde,
47:Genius lasts longer than beauty ~ Oscar Wilde,
48:Life is a great disappointment. ~ Oscar Wilde,
49:Nature constantly imitates art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
50:Nature is always behind the age ~ Oscar Wilde,
51:And if it feels good... Feel it! ~ Oscar Wilde,
52:Credit is a young man's capital. ~ Oscar Wilde,
53:Education is an admirable thing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
54:Life would be dull without them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
55:No gentleman ever has any money. ~ Oscar Wilde,
56:Only love can keep anyone alive. ~ Oscar Wilde,
57:Punctuality is the thief of time ~ Oscar Wilde,
58:The heart was made to be broken. ~ Oscar Wilde,
59:The moon in her chariot of pearl ~ Oscar Wilde,
60:The supreme vice is shallowness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
61:To be premature is to be perfect ~ Oscar Wilde,
62:Alas, I am dying beyond my means. ~ Oscar Wilde,
63:A mask tells us more than a face. ~ Oscar Wilde,
64:Chrysanthemums from gilded argosy ~ Oscar Wilde,
65:Hatred is blind, as well as love. ~ Oscar Wilde,
66:Immanuel isn't a pun; he Kant be! ~ Oscar Wilde,
67:I wrote when I did not know life; ~ Oscar Wilde,
68:Life is too short to learn German ~ Oscar Wilde,
69:Music is the perfect type of art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
70:Only the shallow know themselves. ~ Oscar Wilde,
71:The best revenge is to live well. ~ Oscar Wilde,
72:There is no sin except stupidity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
73:To be popular I must be mediocre. ~ Oscar Wilde,
74:A flower blossoms for its own joy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
75:America is one long expectoration. ~ Oscar Wilde,
76:And thus we rust Life's iron chain ~ Oscar Wilde,
77:Art, like Nature, has her monsters ~ Oscar Wilde,
78:He hadn’t a single redeeming vice. ~ Oscar Wilde,
79:I am happy in my prison of passion ~ Oscar Wilde,
80:I know not whether Laws be right, ~ Oscar Wilde,
81:Most people are boring and stupid. ~ Oscar Wilde,
82:Sarcasm is the lowest form of wit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
83:Life is too short to be in a hurry. ~ Oscar Wilde,
84:Like strange mechanical grotesques, ~ Oscar Wilde,
85:True friends stab you in the front. ~ Oscar Wilde,
86:Ah! somehow life is bigger after all ~ Oscar Wilde,
87:At six o'clock we cleaned our cells, ~ Oscar Wilde,
88:Be yourself; everyone else is taken. ~ Oscar Wilde,
89:Charity creates a multitude of sins. ~ Oscar Wilde,
90:Conscience makes egotists of us all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
91:Everything that is popular is wrong. ~ Oscar Wilde,
92:I was wrong. God's law is only Love. ~ Oscar Wilde,
93:Nothing worth knowing can be taught. ~ Oscar Wilde,
94:One should absorb the color of life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
95:Those whom the gods love grow young. ~ Oscar Wilde,
96:True friends stab you in the front. ~ Oscar Wilde,
97:You are Beautiful when you are happy ~ Oscar Wilde,
98:Art only begins where Imitation ends. ~ Oscar Wilde,
99:Cleverness becomes a public nuisance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
100:Cultivated leisure is the aim of man. ~ Oscar Wilde,
101:Duty is what one expects from others. ~ Oscar Wilde,
102:Every woman is wrong until she cries. ~ Oscar Wilde,
103:I have a simple taste, only the best. ~ Oscar Wilde,
104:Industry is the root of all ugliness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
105:Scepticism is the beginning of Faith. ~ Oscar Wilde,
106:The weather still continues charming. ~ Oscar Wilde,
107:Truth is independent of facts always. ~ Oscar Wilde,
108:When in doubt, I read Oscar Wilde. ~ Camille Paglia,
109:You know what a woman's curiosity is. ~ Oscar Wilde,
110:Youth is the only thing worth having. ~ Oscar Wilde,
111:All art is at once surface and symbol. ~ Oscar Wilde,
112:Art persists, it timelessly continues. ~ Oscar Wilde,
113:Biography lends to death a new terror. ~ Oscar Wilde,
114:Disobedience is man's original virtue. ~ Oscar Wilde,
115:Each of us has heaven and hell in him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
116:History is a lie commonly agreed upon. ~ Oscar Wilde,
117:It is awfully hard work doing nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
118:It is what we fear that happens to us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
119:People are either charming or tedious. ~ Oscar Wilde,
120:Progress is the realization of utopia. ~ Oscar Wilde,
121:She lives the poetry she cannot write. ~ Oscar Wilde,
122:The basis of optimism is sheer terror. ~ Oscar Wilde,
123:The greatest of all sins is stupidity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
124:The wild Bee reels from bough to bough ~ Oscar Wilde,
125:The world belongs to the discontented. ~ Oscar Wilde,
126:What fire does not destroy, it hardens ~ Oscar Wilde,
127:Where your life leads you, you must go ~ Oscar Wilde,
128:Who am I to tamper with a masterpiece? ~ Oscar Wilde,
129:Any place you love is the world to you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
130:California is an Italy without its art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
131:Create yourself. Be yourself your poem. ~ Oscar Wilde,
132:Illusion is the first of all pleasures. ~ Oscar Wilde,
133:It was only in the theatre that I lived ~ Oscar Wilde,
134:Live the wonderful life that is in you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
135:There is no Mystery so great as Misery. ~ Oscar Wilde,
136:To be in love is to surpass one's self. ~ Oscar Wilde,
137:To be popular one must be a mediocrity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
138:All criticism is a form of autobiography ~ Oscar Wilde,
139:America is not a country, it is a world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
140:Appearance blinds, whereas words reveal. ~ Oscar Wilde,
141:Art never expresses anything but itself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
142:Even things that are true can be proved. ~ Oscar Wilde,
143:I never change, except in my affections. ~ Oscar Wilde,
144:It is always the unreadable that occurs. ~ Oscar Wilde,
145:Life is too short to be taken seriously. ~ Oscar Wilde,
146:Nothing is so aggravating than calmness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
147:Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious. ~ Oscar Wilde,
148:Sometimes, the unnecessary is necessary. ~ Oscar Wilde,
149:The curves of your lips rewrite history. ~ Oscar Wilde,
150:There is only good art and mediocre art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
151:Why was I born with such contemporaries? ~ Oscar Wilde,
152:Work is the curse of the drinking class. ~ Oscar Wilde,
153:A gentleman never offends unintentionally ~ Oscar Wilde,
154:Ah! happy day they whose hearts can break ~ Oscar Wilde,
155:Any place that we love becomes our world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
156:Before Turner there was no fog in London. ~ Oscar Wilde,
157:Bigamy ? It's having one wife too much... ~ Oscar Wilde,
158:Common sense is the enemy of Romance :P:P ~ Oscar Wilde,
159:Don't use big words. They mean so little. ~ Oscar Wilde,
160:I am not young enough to know everything. ~ Oscar Wilde,
161:I drink to separate my body from my soul. ~ Oscar Wilde,
162:I'm so smart, I read and understand Hegel ~ Oscar Wilde,
163:It is a dangerous thing to reform anyone. ~ Oscar Wilde,
164:Life is like a box of terrible analogies. ~ Oscar Wilde,
165:Nothing worth learning can ever be taught ~ Oscar Wilde,
166:Oh, he occasionally takes an alcoholiday. ~ Oscar Wilde,
167:One should always be a little improbable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
168:Only good questions deserve good answers. ~ Oscar Wilde,
169:There is nothing that art cannot express. ~ Oscar Wilde,
170:We women adore failures. They lean on us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
171:When good Americans die they go to Paris. ~ Oscar Wilde,
172:Who, being love, is poor? Oscar Wilde ~ Vikki Wakefield,
173:A publisher is simply a useful middle-man. ~ Oscar Wilde,
174:Everyone should keep someone else's diary. ~ Oscar Wilde,
175:I can resist everything except temptation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
176:Is it thy will that I should wax and wane, ~ Oscar Wilde,
177:She is a peacock in everything but beauty! ~ Oscar Wilde,
178:Spontaneity is a meticulously prepared art ~ Oscar Wilde,
179:The truth is never pure and rarely simple. ~ Oscar Wilde,
180:The truth is rarely pure and never simple. ~ Oscar Wilde,
181:Work is the curse of the drinking classes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
182:Ambition is the last refuge of the failure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
183:Bad artists always admire each others work. ~ Oscar Wilde,
184:I don't recognize you - I've changed a lot. ~ Oscar Wilde,
185:I have nothing to declare except my genuis. ~ Oscar Wilde,
186:Man is many things, but he is not rational. ~ Oscar Wilde,
187:Men become old, but they never become good. ~ Oscar Wilde,
188:No man is rich enough to buy back his past. ~ Oscar Wilde,
189:Scandal is gossip made tedious by morality. ~ Oscar Wilde,
190:Tea is the only simple pleasure left to us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
191:The one advantage of playing with fire...is ~ Oscar Wilde,
192:The very essence of romance is uncertainty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
193:What is beautiful is a joy for all seasons. ~ Oscar Wilde,
194:Women are made to be loved, not understood. ~ Oscar Wilde,
195:All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. ~ Oscar Wilde,
196:Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. ~ Oscar Wilde,
197:Circumstances should never alter principles! ~ Oscar Wilde,
198:I am an unspeakable of the Oscar Wilde sort. ~ E M Forster,
199:I analyzed you, though you did not adore me. ~ Oscar Wilde,
200:I live in terror of not being misunderstood. ~ Oscar Wilde,
201:Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast. ~ Oscar Wilde,
202:The artistic life is a long, lovely suicide. ~ Oscar Wilde,
203:The only thing I can't resist is temptation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
204:Todo arte es completamente inútil. OSCAR WILDE ~ Anonymous,
205:Where there is sorrow, there is holy ground. ~ Oscar Wilde,
206:All bad art is the result of good intentions. ~ Oscar Wilde,
207:A poet can survive everything but a misprint. ~ Oscar Wilde,
208:Dullness is the coming of age of seriousness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
209:Good intentions are invariably ungrammatical. ~ Oscar Wilde,
210:I didn't have a life until I went up onstage. ~ Oscar Wilde,
211:I don't like principles. I prefer prejudices. ~ Oscar Wilde,
212:I expect I shall have to die beyond my means. ~ Oscar Wilde,
213:I had buried my romance in a bed of asphodel. ~ Oscar Wilde,
214:Love is a misunderstanding between two fools. ~ Oscar Wilde,
215:The aim of love is to love. No more, no less. ~ Oscar Wilde,
216:The only proper intoxication is conversation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
217:The only thing I cannot resist is temptation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
218:The ugly can be beautiful. The pretty, never. ~ Oscar Wilde,
219:You can never be overdressed or overeducated. ~ Oscar Wilde,
220:Be yourself, because others are already taken. ~ Oscar Wilde,
221:Bore: a man who is never unintentionally rude. ~ Oscar Wilde,
222:Every impulse we strangle will only poison us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
223:Every thing to be true must become a religion. ~ Oscar Wilde,
224:How does one cure the soul? Through the senses ~ Oscar Wilde,
225:I don't want to earn a living. I want to live. ~ Oscar Wilde,
226:I'm not nearly young enough to know everything ~ Oscar Wilde,
227:In married life three is company and two none. ~ Oscar Wilde,
228:Quotation is a serviceable substitute for wit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
229:Seriousness is the only refuge of the shallow. ~ Oscar Wilde,
230:The only horrible thing in the world is ennui. ~ Oscar Wilde,
231:Beauty is the only thing that time cannot harm. ~ Oscar Wilde,
232:Everything in moderation, including moderation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
233:Her love was trembling in laughter on her lips. ~ Oscar Wilde,
234:I don't want to earn my living, I want to live. ~ Oscar Wilde,
235:I made art a philosophy, and philosophy an art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
236:I want my food dead. Not sick, not dying, dead. ~ Oscar Wilde,
237:Nature: a place where birds fly around uncooked ~ Oscar Wilde,
238:Nowadays to be intelligible is to be found out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
239:So lets knock a couple back and make some noise ~ Oscar Wilde,
240:The heart was made to be broken. –Oscar Wilde ~ Preeti Shenoy,
241:The worst vice of the fanatic is his sincerity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
242:This suspense is terrible. I hope it will last. ~ Oscar Wilde,
243:To be good is to be in harmony with one's self. ~ Oscar Wilde,
244:A good friend will always stab you in the front. ~ Oscar Wilde,
245:Ah, on what little things does happiness depend. ~ Oscar Wilde,
246:All love is true, but not all truth ... is love? ~ Oscar Wilde,
247:Be moderate in all things, including moderation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
248:Experience is a question of instinct about life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
249:For one moment our lives met, our souls touched. ~ Oscar Wilde,
250:Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
251:I have the kiss of Walt Whitman still on my lips ~ Oscar Wilde,
252:Pleasure is Nature's test, her sign of approval. ~ Oscar Wilde,
253:Pleasure without Champagne is purely artificial. ~ Oscar Wilde,
254:The one duty we owe to history is to rewrite it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
255:The unread is always better than the unreadable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
256:The world is made by the singer for the dreamer. ~ Oscar Wilde,
257:Vulgarity is simply the conduct of other people. ~ Oscar Wilde,
258:Bad art is a great deal worse than no art at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
259:But she is happiest alone. She is happiest alone. ~ Oscar Wilde,
260:but the bravest man among us is afraid of himself ~ Oscar Wilde,
261:Come down, O Christ, and help me! reach thy hand, ~ Oscar Wilde,
262:Consistency is the hallmark of the unimaginative. ~ Oscar Wilde,
263:Fool, nothing is impossible in Russia but reform. ~ Oscar Wilde,
264:Full frontal nudity is reserved for Adam and Eve! ~ Oscar Wilde,
265:I love acting. It is so much more real than life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
266:It is not good for one's morals to see bad acting ~ Oscar Wilde,
267:Life is terrible. It rules us, we do not rule it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
268:Oh, I hate the cheap severity of abstract ethics! ~ Oscar Wilde,
269:One's only real life is the life one never leads. ~ Oscar Wilde,
270:The best people to work for are me, myself and I. ~ Oscar Wilde,
271:The one charm of the past is that it is the past. ~ Oscar Wilde,
272:The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast. ~ Oscar Wilde,
273:Where there is no love there is no understanding. ~ Oscar Wilde,
274:A well-tied tie is the first serious step in life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
275:Conformity is the last refuge of the unimaginitive ~ Oscar Wilde,
276:Don't feed the trolls; nothing fuels them so much. ~ Oscar Wilde,
277:Experience is one thing you can't get for nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
278:God and other artists are always a little obscure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
279:I must remember that a good friend is a new world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
280:It is only the intellectually lost who ever argue. ~ Oscar Wilde,
281:Life imitates art far more than art imitates Life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
282:Love is a sacrament that should be taken kneeling. ~ Oscar Wilde,
283:My philosophy? I'm always right and you are wrong. ~ Oscar Wilde,
284:Never buy anything simply because it is expensive. ~ Oscar Wilde,
285:No art ever survived censorship; no art ever will. ~ Oscar Wilde,
286:Placerea este testul naturii, semnul ei aprobator. ~ Oscar Wilde,
287:Religion is the fashionable substitute for belief. ~ Oscar Wilde,
288:Sooner or later we have all to pay for what we do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
289:The proper school to learn art is not life but art ~ Oscar Wilde,
290:The world was my oyster but I used the wrong fork. ~ Oscar Wilde,
291:To have ruined one's self over poetry is an honour ~ Oscar Wilde,
292:Women are meant to be loved, not to be understood. ~ Oscar Wilde,
293:You can fake intelligence, but you can't fake wit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
294:you will always love, and you will always be loved ~ Oscar Wilde,
295:A man who pays his bills on time is soon forgotten. ~ Oscar Wilde,
296:Art is rarely intelligible to the criminal classes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
297:Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
298:I can sympathize with everything, except suffering. ~ Oscar Wilde,
299:I like my food dry. Not sick, not even dying, dead. ~ Oscar Wilde,
300:It is a very dangerous thing to know one’s friends. ~ Oscar Wilde,
301:It is difficult not to be unjust to what one loves. ~ Oscar Wilde,
302:I was very much disappointed in the Atlantic Ocean. ~ Oscar Wilde,
303:Just be your self. Everybody else is already taken. ~ Oscar Wilde,
304:Morality, like art, means drawing a line someplace. ~ Oscar Wilde,
305:Nothing looks so like innocence as an indiscretion. ~ Oscar Wilde,
306:Popularity is the one insult I have never suffered. ~ Oscar Wilde,
307:Romantic literature is in effect imaginative lying. ~ Oscar Wilde,
308:Sometimes it takes courage to give into temptation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
309:Starvation, not sin, is the parent of modern crime. ~ Oscar Wilde,
310:The job of the critic is to report to us his moods. ~ Oscar Wilde,
311:The more we study Art, the less we care for Nature. ~ Oscar Wilde,
312:The one duty we owe to history is to rewrite it.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
313:What is mind but motion in the intellectual sphere? ~ Oscar Wilde,
314:An actor is part illusionist, part artist, part ham. ~ Oscar Wilde,
315:Books are never finished, They are merely abandoned. ~ Oscar Wilde,
316:Crying is for plain women. Pretty women go shopping. ~ Oscar Wilde,
317:Foxhunting... the unspeakable pursuing the inedible. ~ Oscar Wilde,
318:It is only the sacred things that are worth touching ~ Oscar Wilde,
319:I won't belong to a club that accepts me as a member ~ Oscar Wilde,
320:Life is a nightmare that prevents one from sleeping. ~ Oscar Wilde,
321:One does not see anything until one sees its beauty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
322:Personally, I have a great admiration for stupidity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
323:Public opinion exists only where there are no ideas. ~ Oscar Wilde,
324:Some people always know the price, but not the value ~ Oscar Wilde,
325:Some things are too important to be taken seriously. ~ Oscar Wilde,
326:The ages live in history through their anachronisms. ~ Oscar Wilde,
327:To look at a thing is very different from seeing it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
328:When I was young, I was no one. Now, I'm worldwilde. ~ Oscar Wilde,
329:I am jealous of everything whose beauty does not die. ~ Oscar Wilde,
330:I am too fond of reading books to care to write them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
331:I can't stand people that do not take food seriously. ~ Oscar Wilde,
332:If I hadn't believed it, then I wouldn't have seen it ~ Oscar Wilde,
333:If you are not long, I will wait for you all my life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
334:I gave my genius to my life, but my talent to my art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
335:Imitation is the homage mediocrity pays to greatness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
336:It is personalities not principles that move the age. ~ Oscar Wilde,
337:The only things one never regrets are one's mistakes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
338:The study of law is sublime, and its practice vulgar. ~ Oscar Wilde,
339:The truth is rarely pure and never simple. —Oscar Wilde ~ S E Jakes,
340:Veni vidi veni iterum! (I came, I saw, I came again!) ~ Oscar Wilde,
341:We live, I regret to say, in an age of Big Data hype. ~ Oscar Wilde,
342:With age comes wisdom, but sometimes age comes alone. ~ Oscar Wilde,
343:A process which makes one rogue cleverer than another. ~ Oscar Wilde,
344:Books are well written, or badly written. That is all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
345:Consistency is the last refuge of the unimagininative. ~ Oscar Wilde,
346:Everyone is born a king, and most people die in exile. ~ Oscar Wilde,
347:Every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future. ~ Oscar Wilde,
348:Her trust makes me faithful, her belief makes me good. ~ Oscar Wilde,
349:I refuse to have a battle of wits with an unarmed man. ~ Oscar Wilde,
350:It is art, and art only, that reveals us to ourselves. ~ Oscar Wilde,
351:It is only the modern that ever becomes old-fashioned. ~ Oscar Wilde,
352:Lean on principles, one day they'll end up giving way. ~ Oscar Wilde,
353:Man is made for something better than disturbing dirt. ~ Oscar Wilde,
354:Men of thoughts should have nothing to do with action. ~ Oscar Wilde,
355:Never love anyone who treats you like you're ordinary. ~ Oscar Wilde,
356:No man is rich enough to buy back his past. -Oscar Wilde ~ Anonymous,
357:Please do not shoot the pianist. He is doing his best. ~ Oscar Wilde,
358:Questions are never indiscreet, answers sometimes are. ~ Oscar Wilde,
359:The great events of the world take place in the brain. ~ Oscar Wilde,
360:The only real people are the people who never existed. ~ Oscar Wilde,
361:The truth is rarely pure and never simple. -Oscar Wilde ~ Vi Keeland,
362:This wallpaper is dreadful, one of us will have to go. ~ Oscar Wilde,
363:You might see nothing in him. I see everything in him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
364:Comfort is the only thing our civilization can give us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
365:Everybody in American seems in a rush to catch a train. ~ Oscar Wilde,
366:I can believe anything provided it is quite incredible. ~ Oscar Wilde,
367:I like men who have a future and women who have a past. ~ Oscar Wilde,
368:It can never be necessary to do what is not honourable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
369:Learn to differentiate between ignorance and stupidity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
370:Memory... is the diary that we all carry about with us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
371:The commonest thing is delightful if one only hides it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
372:The only thing worse than quoting me, is not quoting me ~ Oscar Wilde,
373:The only way to get rid of tempation is to yeild to it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
374:There is no doubt that genius lasts longer than beauty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
375:There is nothing so difficult to marry as a large nose. ~ Oscar Wilde,
376:To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up. ~ Oscar Wilde,
377:To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
378:A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight. ~ Oscar Wilde,
379:A man can't be too careful in the choice of his enemies. ~ Oscar Wilde,
380:An alliterative prefix served as an ornament of oratory. ~ Oscar Wilde,
381:Anybody can make history; only a great man can write it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
382:A passion for pleasure is the secret of remaining young. ~ Oscar Wilde,
383:A true gentleman is one who is never intentionally rude. ~ Oscar Wilde,
384:Even before I met you I was far from indifferent to you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
385:God, bless me with luxury. Necessities I can do without. ~ Oscar Wilde,
386:If you want to be witty, say what you think at all times ~ Oscar Wilde,
387:I never read a book I must review; it prejudices you so. ~ Oscar Wilde,
388:memory, like a horrible malady, was eating his soul away ~ Oscar Wilde,
389:Ones real life is often the life that one does not lead. ~ Oscar Wilde,
390:Sin is the only real colour element left in modern life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
391:When the gods wish to punish us they answer our prayers. ~ Oscar Wilde,
392:You can have your secret as long as I have your heart[.] ~ Oscar Wilde,
393:Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ~ Oscar Wilde,
394:An idea that isn't risky is hardly worth calling an idea. ~ Oscar Wilde,
395:A writer is someone who has taught his mind to misbehave. ~ Oscar Wilde,
396:Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same. ~ Oscar Wilde,
397:Deceiving others. That is what the world calls a romance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
398:Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
399:Friendship is far more tragic than love. It lasts longer. ~ Oscar Wilde,
400:God's eternal laws are kind-and break the heart of stone. ~ Oscar Wilde,
401:I knew nothing but shadows and I thought them to be real. ~ Oscar Wilde,
402:I live constantly in the fear of not being misunderstood. ~ Oscar Wilde,
403:I put my talent in my work, I save my Genius for my life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
404:Now produce your explanation and pray make it improbable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
405:The best way to make children good is to make them happy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
406:The mystery of love is greater than the mystery of death. ~ Oscar Wilde,
407:The optimist sees the donut, the pessimist sees the hole. ~ Oscar Wilde,
408:The worst thing to do with success, is to boast about it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
409:They have been eating muffins. That looks like repentance ~ Oscar Wilde,
410:True love is just like regular love, but with more truth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
411:Always forgive your enemies - nothing annoys them so much. ~ Oscar Wilde,
412:Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ~ Oscar Wilde,
413:A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
414:Caricature is the tribute which mediocrity pays to genius. ~ Oscar Wilde,
415:His morality is all sympathy, just what morality should be ~ Oscar Wilde,
416:If a man treats life artistically, his brain is his heart. ~ Oscar Wilde,
417:I never put off till tomorrow what I can do the day after. ~ Oscar Wilde,
418:In the old days men had the rack. Now they have the Press. ~ Oscar Wilde,
419:It's the spectator, and not life, that art really mirrors. ~ Oscar Wilde,
420:Just because a man has died for it, does not make it true. ~ Oscar Wilde,
421:Love is not fashionable anymore; the poets have killed it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
422:Men as a rule love with their eyes, woman with their ears. ~ Oscar Wilde,
423:Moderation is a fatal thing. Nothing succeeds like excess. ~ Oscar Wilde,
424:Music is the art which is most nigh to tears and memories. ~ Oscar Wilde,
425:Nothing that actually occurs is of the smallest importance ~ Oscar Wilde,
426:One should either be a work of art, or wear a work of art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
427:She knew nothing, but she had everything that he had lost. ~ Oscar Wilde,
428:The advantage of the emotions is that they lead us astray. ~ Oscar Wilde,
429:The essence of thought, as the essence of life, is growth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
430:The old-fashioned respect for the young is fast dying out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
431:What is said of man is nothing; the point is, who says it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
432:A man who does not think for himself does not think at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
433:And all, but Lust, is turned to dust In Humanity's machine. ~ Oscar Wilde,
434:A work of art is the unique result of a unique temperament. ~ Oscar Wilde,
435:I don't want to go to heaven. None of my friends are there. ~ Oscar Wilde,
436:I have a business appointment that I am anxious... to miss. ~ Oscar Wilde,
437:I tried to visit Albania but I couldn't find it on the map. ~ Oscar Wilde,
438:Never buy a thing you don't want merely because it is dear. ~ Oscar Wilde,
439:Nobody ever commits a crime without doing something stupid. ~ Oscar Wilde,
440:Nothing annoys people so much as not receiving invitations. ~ Oscar Wilde,
441:Nothing should be out of the reach of hope. Life is a hope. ~ Oscar Wilde,
442:Some things are more precious because they don't last long. ~ Oscar Wilde,
443:The best way to appreciate your job is to, is here to stay. ~ Oscar Wilde,
444:The last person who ever crossed me is dead under my bed!!! ~ Oscar Wilde,
445:The man with a clear conscience probably has a poor memory. ~ Oscar Wilde,
446:The only possible form of exercise is to talk, not to walk. ~ Oscar Wilde,
447:The proper basis for marriage is a mutual misunderstanding. ~ Oscar Wilde,
448:The weather is entrancing, but in my heart there is no sun. ~ Oscar Wilde,
449:They spoil every romance by trying to make it last forever. ~ Oscar Wilde,
450:Though one can dine in New York, one could not dwell there. ~ Oscar Wilde,
451:We are each our own devil, and we make this world our hell. ~ Oscar Wilde,
452:We are specially designed to appeal to the sense of humour. ~ Oscar Wilde,
453:We live in the age of the overworked and the undereducated. ~ Oscar Wilde,
454:When critics disagree the artist is in accord with himself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
455:When you really want love you will find it waiting for you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
456:You have never been poor, and never known what ambition is. ~ Oscar Wilde,
457:Do not forget that small daily actions do or undo character. ~ Oscar Wilde,
458:I am a man of simple pleasures. The best suits me perfectly. ~ Oscar Wilde,
459:I am one of those who are made for exceptions, not for laws. ~ Oscar Wilde,
460:If God really wanted to punish, he'd answer all our prayers. ~ Oscar Wilde,
461:Indifference is the revenge the world takes on mediocrities. ~ Oscar Wilde,
462:Mr. Henry James writes fiction as if it were a painful duty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
463:No artist is ever morbid. The artist can express everything. ~ Oscar Wilde,
464:Something was dead in each of us, and what was dead was hope ~ Oscar Wilde,
465:The evolution of man is slow. The injustice of men is great. ~ Oscar Wilde,
466:The Number our envious Persons, confirmation our capability. ~ Oscar Wilde,
467:There are few things easier than to live badly and die well. ~ Oscar Wilde,
468:There can be nothing more frequent than an occasional drink. ~ Oscar Wilde,
469:this woman is a genius in the day time and a beauty at night ~ Oscar Wilde,
470:Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong. ~ Oscar Wilde,
471:Women's styles may change but their designs remain the same. ~ Oscar Wilde,
472:An egg is always an adventure; the next one may be different. ~ Oscar Wilde,
473:A simile committing suicide is always a depressing spectacle. ~ Oscar Wilde,
474:Diversity of opinion about a work of art shows that the work ~ Oscar Wilde,
475:Each time that one loves is the only time one has ever loved. ~ Oscar Wilde,
476:Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching. ~ Oscar Wilde,
477:Experience is the name so many people give to their mistakes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
478:Flowers are as common in the country as people are in London. ~ Oscar Wilde,
479:Give me the luxuries and I can dispense with the necessities. ~ Oscar Wilde,
480:He knew the precise psychological moment when to say nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
481:How else but through a broken heart may Lord Christ enter in? ~ Oscar Wilde,
482:However, it is always nice to be expected, and not to arrive. ~ Oscar Wilde,
483:I could deny it if I liked. I could deny anything if I liked. ~ Oscar Wilde,
484:I don't like novels that end happily. They depress me so much ~ Oscar Wilde,
485:I like looking at geniuses and listening to beautiful people. ~ Oscar Wilde,
486:Judges, like the criminal classes, have their lighter moments ~ Oscar Wilde,
487:Nothing makes one so vain as being told that one is a sinner. ~ Oscar Wilde,
488:One should always play fairly when one has the winning cards. ~ Oscar Wilde,
489:There are times when sorrow seems to me to be the only truth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
490:They are the elect to whom beautiful things mean only Beauty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
491:To expect the unexpected shows a thoroughly modern intellect. ~ Oscar Wilde,
492:Travel ennobles the spirit and does away with our prejudices. ~ Oscar Wilde,
493:Always borrow money from a pessimist. He won't expect it back. ~ Oscar Wilde,
494:Am reading more of Oscar Wilde. What a tiresome, affected sod. ~ No l Coward,
495:Frank Harris has been received in all the great houses - once. ~ Oscar Wilde,
496:Hard work is amply the refuge of those who have nothing to do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
497:I beg your pardon I didn't recognise you - I've changed a lot. ~ Oscar Wilde,
498:I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
499:One can always be kind to people about whom one cares nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
500:Only the great masters of style ever succeed in being obscure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
501:She doth mean the earth to me! By earth, I actually mean dust. ~ Oscar Wilde,
502:The girl never really lived, and so she has never really died. ~ Oscar Wilde,
503:There are only two kinds of women, the plain and the coloured. ~ Oscar Wilde,
504:The universe is God. I am God so that means I am the universe. ~ Oscar Wilde,
505:The world has been made by fools that wise men may live in it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
506:To know anything about oneself one must know all about others. ~ Oscar Wilde,
507:To live in this world is a rare thing; most people just exist. ~ Oscar Wilde,
508:Artists, like the Greek gods, are only revealed to one another. ~ Oscar Wilde,
509:Friendship never forgets. That is the wonderful thing about it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
510:He has no enemies, but he is intensely disliked by his friends. ~ Oscar Wilde,
511:I am sick to death of cleverness. Everybody is clever nowadays. ~ Oscar Wilde,
512:Imagination is imitative-the real innovation lies in criticism. ~ Oscar Wilde,
513:I never forget a face, but in your case I'll make an exception. ~ Oscar Wilde,
514:In every first novel the hero is the author as Christ or Faust. ~ Oscar Wilde,
515:It is better to have a permanent income than to be fascinating. ~ Oscar Wilde,
516:It is the confession, not the priest, that gives us absolution. ~ Oscar Wilde,
517:It's not whether you win or lose, it's how you place the blame. ~ Oscar Wilde,
518:Life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
519:Nothing spoils romance so much as a sense of humor in the woman ~ Oscar Wilde,
520:Put your talent into your work, but your genius into your life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
521:Ridicule is the tribute paid to the genius by the mediocrities. ~ Oscar Wilde,
522:The English have a miraculous power of turning wine into water. ~ Oscar Wilde,
523:There is something very morbid about modern sympathy with pain. ~ Oscar Wilde,
524:The worst slave owners were those who were kind to their slaves ~ Oscar Wilde,
525:Those who see any difference between soul and body have neither ~ Oscar Wilde,
526:To get back one's youth one has merely to repeat one's follies. ~ Oscar Wilde,
527:we always misunderstood ourselves, and rarely understood others ~ Oscar Wilde,
528:Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
529:And all the woods are alive with the murmur and sound of Spring, ~ Oscar Wilde,
530:A woman who cannot make her mistakes charming, is only a female. ~ Oscar Wilde,
531:Crying is the refuge of plain women but the ruin of pretty ones. ~ Oscar Wilde,
532:George Moore leads his readers to the latrine and locks them in. ~ Oscar Wilde,
533:how else but through a broken heart May Lord Christ enter in?
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
534:If you want to be a doormat you have to lay yourself down first. ~ Oscar Wilde,
535:I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best. ~ Oscar Wilde,
536:I must decline your invitation owing to a subsequent engagement. ~ Oscar Wilde,
537:It is better to repent a sin than regret the loss of a pleasure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
538:It is not the perfect, but the imperfect, who have need of love. ~ Oscar Wilde,
539:It is not the prisoners who need reformation, it is the prisons. ~ Oscar Wilde,
540:It takes a thoroughly good woman to do a thoroughly stupid thing ~ Oscar Wilde,
541:Nothing, indeed, is more dangerous to the young artist than any ~ Oscar Wilde,
542:One's dreams must be big enough so as not to lose sight of them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
543:Simple pleasures are the last healthy refuge in a complex world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
544:Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go. ~ Oscar Wilde,
545:The note of the perfect personality is not rebellion, but peace. ~ Oscar Wilde,
546:The only beautiful things are the things that do not concern us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
547:The story of mankind began in a garden and ended in revelations. ~ Oscar Wilde,
548:The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible. ~ Oscar Wilde,
549:A book or poem which has no pity in it had better not be written. ~ Oscar Wilde,
550:A man who marries his mistress leaves a vacancy in that position. ~ Oscar Wilde,
551:Ambition is the germ from which all growth of nobleness proceeds. ~ Oscar Wilde,
552:Every little action of the common day makes or unmakes character. ~ Oscar Wilde,
553:George Moore wrote brilliant English until he discovered grammar. ~ Oscar Wilde,
554:He hasn't an enemy in the world, and none of his friend like him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
555:He who stands most remote from his age is he who mirrors it best. ~ Oscar Wilde,
556:I am tired of myself to-night. I should like to be somebody else. ~ Oscar Wilde,
557:I do not approve of anything which tampers with natural ignorance ~ Oscar Wilde,
558:I often take exercise. Why only yesterday I had breakfast in bed. ~ Oscar Wilde,
559:I think God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability. ~ Oscar Wilde,
560:Let me be surrounded by luxury, I can do without the necessities! ~ Oscar Wilde,
561:The imagination imitates. It is the critical spirit that creates. ~ Oscar Wilde,
562:The soul is born old but grows young. That is the comedy of life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
563:Thinking is wonderful, but the experience is even more wonderful. ~ Oscar Wilde,
564:We teach people how to remember, we never teach them how to grow. ~ Oscar Wilde,
565:What seems to us as bitter trials are often blessings in disguise ~ Oscar Wilde,
566:A grand passion is the privelege of people who have nothing to do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
567:Discontent is the first step in the progress of a man or a nation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
568:Genius learns from nature, its own nature. Talent learns from art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
569:He is fond of being misunderstood. It gives him a post of vantage. ~ Oscar Wilde,
570:He wants to enslave you.' 'I shudder at the thought of being free. ~ Oscar Wilde,
571:How clever you are, my dear! You never mean a single word you say. ~ Oscar Wilde,
572:I adore simple pleasures. They are the last refuge of the complex. ~ Oscar Wilde,
573:I find it harder and harder every day to live up to my blue china. ~ Oscar Wilde,
574:It is always with the best intentions that the worst work is done. ~ Oscar Wilde,
575:It is a much cleverer thing to talk nonsense than to listen to it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
576:I want to be good. I can't bear the idea of my soul being hideous. ~ Oscar Wilde,
577:Misery and poverty are so absolutely degrading, and exercise such ~ Oscar Wilde,
578:My own business always bores me to death; I prefer other people's. ~ Oscar Wilde,
579:Reforms in Russia are very tragic, but they always end in a farce. ~ Oscar Wilde,
580:Religion is the fashionable substitute for belief.” -Oscar Wilde ~ Angela Roquet,
581:Suffering is one very long moment. We cannot divide it by seasons. ~ Oscar Wilde,
582:The best way to enjoy your job is to imagine yourself without one. ~ Oscar Wilde,
583:The gods bestowed on Max [Beerbohm] the gift of perpetual old age. ~ Oscar Wilde,
584:The sign of a Philistine age is the cry of immorality against art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
585:Two men look out a window. One sees mud, the other sees the stars. ~ Oscar Wilde,
586:We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. ~ Oscar Wilde,
587:We are never more true to ourselves than when we are inconsistent. ~ Oscar Wilde,
588:What do you call a bad man? The sort of man who admires innocence. ~ Oscar Wilde,
589:A man can be happy with any woman, as long as he does not love her. ~ Oscar Wilde,
590:Anybody can be good in the country. There are no temptations there. ~ Oscar Wilde,
591:A truth ceases to be true when more than one person believes in it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
592:Every woman is a rebel, and usually in wild revolt against herself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
593:For he who lives more lives than one more deaths than one must die. ~ Oscar Wilde,
594:I am the only person in the world I should like to know thoroughly. ~ Oscar Wilde,
595:It is the stupid and the ugly who have the best of it in this world ~ Oscar Wilde,
596:Marriage is a long, dull meal with dessert served at the beginning. ~ Oscar Wilde,
597:Society often forgives the criminal; it never forgives the dreamer. ~ Oscar Wilde,
598:The dim roar of London was like the bourdon note of a distant organ ~ Oscar Wilde,
599:The only thing that can console one for being poor is extravagance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
600:We are the zanies of sorrow. We are clowns whose hearts are broken. ~ Oscar Wilde,
601:We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. ~ Oscar Wilde,
602:With freedom, books, flowers, and the moon, who could not be happy? ~ Oscar Wilde,
603:Always! That is the dreadful word ... it is a meaningless word, too. ~ Oscar Wilde,
604:Because sometimes you have to do something bad to do something good. ~ Oscar Wilde,
605:Being natural is simply a pose, and the most irritating pose I know. ~ Oscar Wilde,
606:Can they feel, I wonder, those white silent people we call the dead? ~ Oscar Wilde,
607:Everything in the world is about sex except sex. Sex is about power. ~ Oscar Wilde,
608:I can resist anything but the temptation to make a clever witticism. ~ Oscar Wilde,
609:If people were meant to be nude, they would have been born this way. ~ Oscar Wilde,
610:Newspapers have degenerated. They may now be absolutely relied upon. ~ Oscar Wilde,
611:Self-denial is the shining sore on the leprous body of Christianity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
612:The husbands of very beautiful women belong to the criminal classes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
613:Time is jealous of you, and wars against your lilies and your roses. ~ Oscar Wilde,
614:A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally. ~ Oscar Wilde,
615:All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. Oscar Wilde ~ Anonymous,
616:A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. —Oscar Wilde ~ M C Beaton,
617:Cats are put on earth to remind us that not everything has a purpose. ~ Oscar Wilde,
618:Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.” OSCAR WILDE ~ Beatriz Williams,
619:Grass is hard and lumpy and damp, and full of dreadful black insects. ~ Oscar Wilde,
620:I have never learned anything except from people younger than myself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
621:I have put my talent into writing, my genius I have saved for living. ~ Oscar Wilde,
622:I made your sorrow mine also, that you might have help in bearing it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
623:I put all my genius into my life; I put only my talent into my works. ~ Oscar Wilde,
624:I summed up all systems in a phrase, and all existence in an epigram. ~ Oscar Wilde,
625:Now and then it is a joy to have one's table red with wine and roses. ~ Oscar Wilde,
626:One has a right to judge a man by the effect he has over his friends. ~ Oscar Wilde,
627:Success is a science; if you have the conditions, you get the result. ~ Oscar Wilde,
628:Talk to a woman as if you loved her, and to a man as if he bored you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
629:The emotions of man are stirred more quickly than man’s intelligence. ~ Oscar Wilde,
630:Those who try to lead the people can only do so by following the mob. ~ Oscar Wilde,
631:We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
632:You like every one; that is to say, you are indifferent to every one. ~ Oscar Wilde,
633:You told me you had destroyed it." "I was wrong. It has destroyed me. ~ Oscar Wilde,
634:A beggar hates his benefactor as much as he hates himself for begging. ~ Oscar Wilde,
635:After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations. ~ Oscar Wilde,
636:An excellent man; he has no enemies; and none of his friends like him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
637:Anybody can have common sense, provided that they have no imagination. ~ Oscar Wilde,
638:A really well-made buttonhole is the only link between Art and Nature. ~ Oscar Wilde,
639:Behind every exquisite thing that existed, there was something tragic. ~ Oscar Wilde,
640:But beauty, real beauty, ends where an intellectual expression begins. ~ Oscar Wilde,
641:Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes. —Oscar Wilde ~ Guy Kawasaki,
642:Good taste is the excuse I've always given for leading such a bad life ~ Oscar Wilde,
643:If one tells the truth, one is sure, sooner or later, to be found out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
644:In examinations the foolish ask questions that the wise cannot answer. ~ Oscar Wilde,
645:Marriage is hardly a thing one can do now and then, except in America. ~ Oscar Wilde,
646:Missionaries are going to reform the world whether it wants to or not. ~ Oscar Wilde,
647:More than half of modern culture depends upon what one shouldn't read. ~ Oscar Wilde,
648:Other people are quite dreadful. The only possible society is oneself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
649:Pessimist: One who, when he has the choice of two evils, chooses both. ~ Oscar Wilde,
650:Somehow or other I'll be famous, and if not famous, I'll be notorious. ~ Oscar Wilde,
651:Some temptations are so great it takes great courage to yield to them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
652:The man who can dominate a London dinner-table can dominate the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
653:The problem with the common person is that he is so unbearably common! ~ Oscar Wilde,
654:The well bred contradict other people. The wise contradict themselves. ~ Oscar Wilde,
655:To give and not expect return, that is what lies at the heart of love. ~ Oscar Wilde,
656:Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination. ~ Oscar Wilde,
657:Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known. ~ Oscar Wilde,
658:Conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative. ~ Oscar Wilde,
659:I cannot choose one hundred best books because I have only written five ~ Oscar Wilde,
660:I never play cricket. It requires one to assume such indecent postures. ~ Oscar Wilde,
661:I never saw anybody take so long to dress, and with such little result. ~ Oscar Wilde,
662:No man should have a secret from his wife. She invariably finds it out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
663:Only the unimaginative can fail to find a reason for drinking Champagne ~ Oscar Wilde,
664:The answers are all out there, we just need to ask the right questions. ~ Oscar Wilde,
665:The man who says his wife can't take a joke, forgets that she took him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
666:The morality of art consists in the perfect use of an imperfect medium. ~ Oscar Wilde,
667:The true artist is known by what he annexes, and he annexes everything. ~ Oscar Wilde,
668:Truth, in matters of religion, is simply the opinion that has survived. ~ Oscar Wilde,
669:A man who marries without knowing Bunbury has a very tedious time of it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
670:Good resolutions are useless attempts to interfere with scientific laws. ~ Oscar Wilde,
671:I hate people who are not serious about meals. It is so shallow of them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
672:I love to talk about nothing. It's the only thing I know anything about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
673:I prefer women with a past. They're always so damned amusing to talk to. ~ Oscar Wilde,
674:It is only very ugly or very beautiful women who ever hide their faces . ~ Oscar Wilde,
675:I treated Art as the supreme reality and life as a mere mode of fiction. ~ Oscar Wilde,
676:Lying, the telling of beautiful untrue things, is the proper aim of Art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
677:One should always be in love. That is the reason one should never marry. ~ Oscar Wilde,
678:Philosophy teaches us to bear with equanimity the misfortunes of others. ~ Oscar Wilde,
679:Progress in thought is the assertion of individualism against authority. ~ Oscar Wilde,
680:The condition of perfection is idleness: the aim of perfection is youth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
681:The General was essentially a man of peace, except in his domestic life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
682:The happiness of a married man depends on the people he has not married. ~ Oscar Wilde,
683:The tragedy of growing old is not that one is old but that one is young. ~ Oscar Wilde,
684:The tragedy of the poor is that they can afford nothing but self denial. ~ Oscar Wilde,
685:The true perfection of man lies not in what man has, but in what man is. ~ Oscar Wilde,
686:To have become a deeper man is the privilege of those who have suffered. ~ Oscar Wilde,
687:What is the good of friendship if one cannot say exactly what one means? ~ Oscar Wilde,
688:A man's face is his autobiography. A woman's face is her work of fiction. ~ Oscar Wilde,
689:An idea that is not dangerous is unworthy of being called an idea at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
690:Arguments are to be avoided: they are always vulgar and often convincing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
691:Extravagance is the luxury of the poor; penury is the luxury of the rich. ~ Oscar Wilde,
692:In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity, is the vital thing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
693:It is curious how vanity helps the successful man and wrecks the failure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
694:It is so easy to convince others; it is so difficult to convince oneself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
695:Let me be dressed as I will, yet flies worms and flowers exceed me still. ~ Oscar Wilde,
696:Like all people who try to exhaust a subject, he exhausted his listeners. ~ Oscar Wilde,
697:Love will fly if held too lightly Love will die if held too tightly . . . ~ Oscar Wilde,
698:Man can believe the impossible, but man can never believe the improbable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
699:Nature is a wet place where large numbers of ducks fly overhead uncooked. ~ Oscar Wilde,
700:Political life at Washington is like political life in a suburban vestry. ~ Oscar Wilde,
701:sorrow...is a wound that bleeds when any hand but that of love touches it ~ Oscar Wilde,
702:The public is wonderfully tolerant. It forgives everything except genius. ~ Oscar Wilde,
703:There are moments when art attains almost to the dignity of manual labor. ~ Oscar Wilde,
704:There is always something infinitely mean about other people's tragedies. ~ Oscar Wilde,
705:Those who have much are often greedy. Those who have little always share. ~ Oscar Wilde,
706:To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
707:When both a speaker and an audience are confused, the speech is profound. ~ Oscar Wilde,
708:Hear no evil, speak no evil, and you won't be invited to cocktail parties. ~ Oscar Wilde,
709:Ignorance is like a delicate exotic fruit; touch it and the bloom is gone. ~ Oscar Wilde,
710:Marriage is the one subject on which all women agree and all men disagree. ~ Oscar Wilde,
711:Never love anybody that treats you like you're ordinary. - Oscar Wilde ~ Tricia O Malley,
712:The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means. ~ Oscar Wilde,
713:We are each our own devil, and we make this world our hell. - Oscar Wilde ~ Dannika Dark,
714:Wisdom is to have dreams big enough not to lose sight when we pursue them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
715:An expert is an ordinary man away from home giving advice. —OSCAR WILDE ~ Anthony Robbins,
716:If one hears bad music, it is one's duty to drown it by one's conversation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
717:I have nothing to declare but my genius, and this four-kilo bag of cocaine. ~ Oscar Wilde,
718:I knew nothing but shadows, and I thought them to be real. —Oscar Wilde ~ Cassandra Clare,
719:I like to do all the talking myself. It saves time, and prevents arguments. ~ Oscar Wilde,
720:It is absurd to say that the age of miracles is past. It has not yet begun. ~ Oscar Wilde,
721:Millionaire models are rare enough; but model millionaires are rarer still! ~ Oscar Wilde,
722:One should always eat muffins quite calmly. It is the only way to eat them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
723:The critic has to educate the public; the artist has to educate the critic. ~ Oscar Wilde,
724:The face of the enemy frightens me only when I see how much it resembles me ~ Oscar Wilde,
725:The moment you think you understand a great work of art, it's dead for you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
726:To become a spectator of one's own life is to escape the suffering of life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
727:What was it Oscar Wilde said?” “I can resist everything except temptation. ~ Louise Penny,
728:If you cannot prove a man wrong, don't panic. You can always call him names. ~ Oscar Wilde,
729:I think life too complex a thing to be settled by these hard and fast rules. ~ Oscar Wilde,
730:It is a very sad thing that nowadays there is so little useless information. ~ Oscar Wilde,
731:It is through art, and through art only, that we can realise our perfection. ~ Oscar Wilde,
732:[on his deathbed in a Paris hotel room] Either this wallpaper goes, or I do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
733:Perhaps one never seems so much at ones ease as when one has to play a part. ~ Oscar Wilde,
734:Pleasure is the only thing one should live for, nothing ages like happiness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
735:Private information is practically the source of every large modern fortune. ~ Oscar Wilde,
736:The bureaucracy is expanding to meet the needs of the expanding bureaucracy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
737:The final mystery is oneself... Who can calculate the orbit of his own soul. ~ Oscar Wilde,
738:The one person who has more illusions than the dreamer is the man of action. ~ Oscar Wilde,
739:There is no country in the world where machinery is so lovely as in America. ~ Oscar Wilde,
740:The soul is a terrible reality. It can be bought and sold and bartered away. ~ Oscar Wilde,
741:The sure way of knowing nothing about life is to try to make oneself useful. ~ Oscar Wilde,
742:Woman begins by resisting a man's advances and ends by blocking his retreat. ~ Oscar Wilde,
743:Behind the perfection of a man's style, must lie the passion of a man's soul. ~ Oscar Wilde,
744:It is exactly because a man cannot do a thing that he is a proper judge of it ~ Oscar Wilde,
745:My wallpaper and I are fighting a duel to the death. One of us has got to go. ~ Oscar Wilde,
746:Oscar Wilde’s comment about being able to resist everything except temptation. ~ Mark Pryor,
747:The criminal classes are so close to us that even the policemen can see them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
748:The key to making up Oscar Wilde quotes is to add '~ Oscar Wilde' at the end. ~ Oscar Wilde,
749:The secret of remaining young is never to have an emotion that is unbecoming. ~ Oscar Wilde,
750:A grapefruit is just a lemon that saw an opportunity and took advantage of it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
751:Amarse a uno mismo es el principio de una historia de amor eterna. OSCAR WILDE ~ Walter Riso,
752:A pessimist is somebody who complains about the noise when opportunity knocks. ~ Oscar Wilde,
753:Everything popular is wrong. —OSCAR WILDE, The Importance of Being Earnest ~ Timothy Ferriss,
754:Fashion: by which what is really fantastic becomes for a moment the universal. ~ Oscar Wilde,
755:I am sick of women who love one. Women who hate one are much more interesting. ~ Oscar Wilde,
756:I could never quite accustom myself to absinthe, but it suits my style so well ~ Oscar Wilde,
757:I don't like Switzerland; it has produced nothing but theologians and waiters. ~ Oscar Wilde,
758:If we men married the women we deserved, we should have a very bad time of it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
759:I sometimes think that God in creating man somewhat overestimated his ability. ~ Oscar Wilde,
760:Never love anybody that treats you like you're ordinary. - Oscar Wilde     ~ Tricia O Malley,
761:No woman should ever be quite accurate about her age. It looks so calculating. ~ Oscar Wilde,
762:One should never listen. To listen is a sign of indifference to one's hearers. ~ Oscar Wilde,
763:Sin is a thing that writes itself across a man's face. It cannot be concealed. ~ Oscar Wilde,
764:The simplicity of your character makes you exquisitely incomprehensible to me. ~ Oscar Wilde,
765:The worst of having a romance of any kind is that it leaves one so unromantic. ~ Oscar Wilde,
766:When a man is old enough to do wrong he should be old enough to do right also. ~ Oscar Wilde,
767:An opinion is not necesarily correct just because you're willing to die for it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
768:Conversation should touch everything, but should concentrate itself on nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
769:If Nature had been comfortable, mankind would never have invented architecture. ~ Oscar Wilde,
770:It is he who has broken the bond of marriage - not I. I only break its bondage. ~ Oscar Wilde,
771:Looking good and dressing well is a necessity. Having a purpose in life is not. ~ Oscar Wilde,
772:One's past is what one is. It is the only way by which people should be judged. ~ Oscar Wilde,
773:She...can talk brillantly upon any subject provided she knows nothing about it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
774:There is a fatality about good resolutions – that they are always made too late ~ Oscar Wilde,
775:We can forgive a man for making a useful thing as long as he does not admire it ~ Oscar Wilde,
776:What a pity that in life we only get our lessons when they are of no use to us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
777:Whenever one has anything unpleasant to say, one should always be quite candid. ~ Oscar Wilde,
778:All charming people, I fancy, are spoiled. It is the secret of their attraction. ~ Oscar Wilde,
779:A man who moralizes is a hypocrite, and a woman who does so is invariably plain. ~ Oscar Wilde,
780:I delight in men over seventy. They always offer one the devotion of a lifetime. ~ Oscar Wilde,
781:If a woman wants to hold a man she has merely to appeal to what is worst in him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
782:It's beauty that captures your attention. personality which captures your heart. ~ Oscar Wilde,
783:No object is so beautiful that, under certain conditions, it will not look ugly. ~ Oscar Wilde,
784:That is the mission of art - to make us pause and look at a thing a second time. ~ Oscar Wilde,
785:The world has grown suspicious of anything that looks like a happy married life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
786:To make men Socialists is nothing, but to make Socialism human is a great thing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
787:And if life be, as it surely is, a problem to me, I am no less a problem to life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
788:A person who, because he has corns himself, always treads on other people's toes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
789:Fruitcake is like semen, there's a lot of it about but no one wants to swallow it ~ Oscar Wilde,
790:Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery that mediocrity can pay to greatness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
791:I sometimes think that God in creating man somewhat overestimated his ability.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
792:It is a sad truth, but we have lost the faculty of giving lovely names to things. ~ Oscar Wilde,
793:It seems to me that we all look at Nature too much, and live with her too little. ~ Oscar Wilde,
794:Life is never fair, and perhaps it is a good thing for most of us that it is not. ~ Oscar Wilde,
795:No theory of life seemed to him to be of any importance compared with life itself ~ Oscar Wilde,
796:One must have a heart of stone to read the death of little Nell without laughing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
797:Oscar Wilde said it's never the question that's indiscreet, only the answers. ~ Janet Evanovich,
798:Philosophy is like a normal personal organizer, but it's smaller than a matchbox. ~ Oscar Wilde,
799:The growing influence of women is the one reassuring thing in our political life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
800:There is no man who is not, at each moment, what he has been and what he will be. ~ Oscar Wilde,
801:The secret to life is to enjoy the pleasure of being terribly, terribly deceived. ~ Oscar Wilde,
802:The State is to make what is useful. The individual is to make what is beautiful. ~ Oscar Wilde,
803:The truth is the truth. ‘Rarely pure and never simple,’ as Oscar Wilde would say. ~ Kami Garcia,
804:When people talk to me about the weather, I always feel they mean something else. ~ Oscar Wilde,
805:A bore is someone who deprives you of solitude without providing you with company. ~ Oscar Wilde,
806:A refusal of nature as a model is a tradition that goes right back to Oscar Wilde. ~ Todd Haynes,
807:Democracy means simply the bludgeoning of the people by the people for the people. ~ Oscar Wilde,
808:He thinks like a Tory, and talks like a Radical, and that's so important nowadays. ~ Oscar Wilde,
809:I am always astonishing myself. It is the only thing that makes life worth living. ~ Oscar Wilde,
810:Ideals are dangerous things. Realities are better. They wound, but they're better. ~ Oscar Wilde,
811:If art is to have a special train, the critic must keep some seats reserved on it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
812:If there was less sympathy in the world, there would be less trouble in the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
813:If they know nothing of victory, they are at least spared the knowledge of defeat. ~ Oscar Wilde,
814:If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
815:In a temple everything should be serious except the thing that is being worshiped. ~ Oscar Wilde,
816:I never saw so many well-dressed, well-fed, business-looking Bohemians in my life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
817:Its a beautiful woman's fate to be the subject of conversation where ever she goes ~ Oscar Wilde,
818:The only thing in the world worse than being Oscar Wilde is not being Oscar Wilde. ~ Oscar Wilde,
819:The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible. —OSCAR WILDE ~ Jessica Fletcher,
820:What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
821:When liberty comes with hands dabbled in blood it is hard to shake hands with her. ~ Oscar Wilde,
822:All trials are trials for one's life, just as all sentences are sentences of death. ~ Oscar Wilde,
823:Dammit Sir, it's your duty to get married. You can't always be living for pleasure! ~ Oscar Wilde,
824:Fashion is what one wears oneself. What is unfashionable is what other people wear. ~ Oscar Wilde,
825:He would stab his best friend for the sake of writing an epigraph on his tombstone. ~ Oscar Wilde,
826:I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying. ~ Oscar Wilde,
827:If God wished to punish us, all he would need to do would be to answer our prayers. ~ Oscar Wilde,
828:If one tells the truth, one is sure, sooner or later, to be found out. Oscar Wilde ~ John le Carr,
829:If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
830:It is only an auctioneer who can equally and impartially admire all schools of art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
831:It's either the wallpaper or me. One of us has to go. [These were his dying words.] ~ Oscar Wilde,
832:It would leave no room for developments and I intend to develop in many directions. ~ Oscar Wilde,
833:Life has been your art. You have set yourself to music. Your days are your sonnets. ~ Oscar Wilde,
834:Men always want to be a woman's first love - women like to be a man's last romance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
835:Morality is simply the attitude we adopt towards people whom we personally dislike. ~ Oscar Wilde,
836:My Salome is a mystic the sister of Salammbô a Saint Thérèse who worships the moon. ~ Oscar Wilde,
837:One is not always happy when one is good; but one is always good when one is happy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
838:Perhaps in nearly every joy, as certainly in every pleasure, cruelty has its place. ~ Oscar Wilde,
839:The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame. ~ Oscar Wilde,
840:The man who says he has exhausted life generally means that life has exhausted him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
841:You know more than you think you know, just as you know less than you want to know. ~ Oscar Wilde,
842:Alcohol, taken in sufficient quantities, may produce all the effects of drunkenness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
843:A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal. ~ Oscar Wilde,
844:All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That's his. ~ Oscar Wilde,
845:America had often been discovered before Columbus, but it had always been hushed up. ~ Oscar Wilde,
846:And now, I am dying beyond my means. (Said while sipping champagne on his deathbed.) ~ Oscar Wilde,
847:Art, like Nature, has her monsters, things of bestial shape and with hideous voices. ~ Oscar Wilde,
848:As for begging, it is safer to beg than to take, but it is finer to take than to beg ~ Oscar Wilde,
849:A woman will flirt with anybody in the world as long as other people are looking on. ~ Oscar Wilde,
850:I didn't say I liked it Harry. I said it fascinated me. There is a great difference. ~ Oscar Wilde,
851:Most men and women are forced to perform parts for which they have no qualification. ~ Oscar Wilde,
852:No work of art ever puts forward views. Views belong to people who are not artists. ~ Oscar Wilde,
853:Oscar Wilde’s advice, “The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it ~ Timothy Ferriss,
854:Rugby is a good occasion for keeping thirty bullies far from the center of the city. ~ Oscar Wilde,
855:She had a passion for secrecy, but she herself was merely a Sphinx without a secret. ~ Oscar Wilde,
856:The only form of lying that is absolutely beyond reproach is lying for its own sake. ~ Oscar Wilde,
857:The only one you need in your life is that person who shows you he needs you in his. ~ Oscar Wilde,
858:We women, as some one says, love with our ears, just as you men love with your eyes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
859:A man who takes himself too seriously will find that no one else takes him seriously. ~ Oscar Wilde,
860:He wanted to be where no one would know who he was. He wanted to escape from himself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
861:I always like to know everything about my new friends, and nothing about my old ones. ~ Oscar Wilde,
862:In a very ugly and sensible age, the arts borrow, not from life, but from each other. ~ Oscar Wilde,
863:Life, Lady Stutfield, is simply a mauvais quart d'heure made up of exquisite moments. ~ Oscar Wilde,
864:Literature always anticipates life. It doesn't copy it but moulds it to it's purpose. ~ Oscar Wilde,
865:The Book of Life begins with a man and a woman in a garden. It ends with Revelations. ~ Oscar Wilde,
866:The English public always feels perfectly at ease when a mediocrity is talking to it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
867:The only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about. —Oscar Wilde ~ Tonya Hurley,
868:Whenever a man does a thoroughly stupid thing, it is always from the noblest motives. ~ Oscar Wilde,
869:When we are happy, we are always good, but when we are good, we are not always happy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
870:Young men want to be faithful, and are not. Old men want to be faithless, and cannot. ~ Oscar Wilde,
871:A man who is master of himself can end a sorrow as easily as he can invent a pleasure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
872:Good resolutions are simply checks that men draw on a bank where they have no account. ~ Oscar Wilde,
873:How marriage ruins a man! It is as demoralizing as cigarettes, and far more expensive. ~ Oscar Wilde,
874:If we're always guided by other people's thoughts, what's the point in having our own? ~ Oscar Wilde,
875:I have spent most of the day putting in a comma and the rest of the day taking it out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
876:In love, it is better to know and be disappointed, than to not know and always wonder. ~ Oscar Wilde,
877:It is only the superficial qualities that last. Man's deeper nature is soon found out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
878:I've now realised for the first time in my life the vital Importance of Being Earnest. ~ Oscar Wilde,
879:Life is one fool thing after another whereas love is two fool things after each other. ~ Oscar Wilde,
880:M. Zola is determined to show that, if he has not got genius, he can at least be dull. ~ Oscar Wilde,
881:Now art should never try to be popular. The public should try to make itself artistic. ~ Oscar Wilde,
882:Society exists only as a mental concept; in the real world there are only individuals. ~ Oscar Wilde,
883:The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame.
   ~ Oscar Wilde,
884:The man who sees both sides of a question is a man who sees absolutely nothing at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
885:There is no such thing as morality or immorality in thought. There is immoral emotion. ~ Oscar Wilde,
886:To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that’s all. —Oscar Wilde ~ Adam Silvera,
887:We Irish will never achieve anything; but we are the greatest talkers since the Greeks ~ Oscar Wilde,
888:Well, one must be serious about something, if one wants to have any amusement in life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
889:Wherever there is a man who exercises authority, there is a man who resists authority. ~ Oscar Wilde,
890:By doing just a little every day, I can gradually let the task completely overwhelm me. ~ Oscar Wilde,
891:Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months. ~ Oscar Wilde,
892:Intuition is a strange instinct that tells a woman she is right, whether she is or not. ~ Oscar Wilde,
893:It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious. ~ Oscar Wilde,
894:It is always a silly thing to give advice, but to give good advice is absolutely fatal. ~ Oscar Wilde,
895:Never so sweet a repast as the Reaper's when you tread upon the threshold of a Quiznos. ~ Oscar Wilde,
896:Now that the House of Commons is trying to become useful, it does a great deal of harm. ~ Oscar Wilde,
897:Really, if the lower orders don't set a good example, what on earth is the use of them? ~ Oscar Wilde,
898:Religions die when they are proved to be true. Science is the record of dead religions. ~ Oscar Wilde,
899:The Americans are identical to the British in all respects except, of course, language. ~ Oscar Wilde,
900:The good we get from art is not what we learn from it; it is what we become through it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
901:Tread Lightly, she is near Under the snow, Speak gently, she can hear The daisies grow. ~ Oscar Wilde,
902:We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language. ~ Oscar Wilde,
903:Women are a decorative sex. They never have anything to say, but they say it charmingly ~ Oscar Wilde,
904:A live unexamined isn't worth living. I will add, "A life unlived isn't worth examining. ~ Oscar Wilde,
905:An acquaintance that begins with a compliment is sure to develop into a real friendship. ~ Oscar Wilde,
906:Everything is dangerous, my dear fellow. If it wasn't so, life wouldn't be worth living. ~ Oscar Wilde,
907:Fathers should be neither seen nor heard. That is the only proper basis for family life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
908:Greek dress was in its essence inartistic. Nothing should reveal the body but the body. ~ Oscar Wilde,
909:«Hay gente que provoca felicidad allá donde va; otros, siempre que se van.» Oscar Wilde ~ Guy Kawasaki,
910:I am afraid he has one of those terribly weak natures that are susceptible to influence. ~ Oscar Wilde,
911:If this is the way Queen Victoria treats her prisoners, she doesn't deserve to have any. ~ Oscar Wilde,
912:In America the President reigns for four years, and Journalism governs forever and ever. ~ Oscar Wilde,
913:She is very clever, too clever for a woman. She lacks the indefinable charm of weakness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
914:There is no such thing as a heterosexual male, only men who haven't met Oscar Wilde yet. ~ Oscar Wilde,
915:Truth, in matters of religion, is simply the opinion that has survived. –OSCAR WILDE ~ Richard Dawkins,
916:All the quips in the world couldn’t prevent Oscar Wilde from becoming a lovesick fool. ~ David Levithan,
917:Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination. —OSCAR WILDE, ~ Timothy Ferriss,
918:Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination.” –Oscar Wilde ~ Timothy Ferriss,
919:A true artist takes no notice whatever of the public. The public to him are non-existent. ~ Oscar Wilde,
920:Beauty is a form of genius -- is higher, indeed, than genius, as it needs no explanation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
921:I am Irish by race but the English have condemned me to talk the language of Shakespeare. ~ Oscar Wilde,
922:I am thoroughly sick of pearls. They make one look so plain, so good and so intellectual. ~ Oscar Wilde,
923:I don't mind plain women being puritans. It is the only excuse they have for being plain. ~ Oscar Wilde,
924:It is a vulgar error to suppose that America was ever discovered. It was merely detected. ~ Oscar Wilde,
925:Men marry because they are tired; women, because they are curious; both are disappointed. ~ Oscar Wilde,
926:The only way to atone for being occasionally overdressed is to be massively overeducated. ~ Oscar Wilde,
927:The public have an insatiable curiosity to know everything, except what is worth knowing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
928:There is no necessity to separate the monarch from the mob; all authority is equally bad. ~ Oscar Wilde,
929:To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness. ~ Oscar Wilde,
930:Why is it that at a bachelor's establishment the servants invariably drink the champagne. ~ Oscar Wilde,
931:Every effect that one produces gives one an enemy. To be popular one must be a mediocrity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
932:He made me see what Life is, and what Death signifies, and why Love is stronger than both. ~ Oscar Wilde,
933:I believe it is customary in good society to take some slight refreshment at five o'clock. ~ Oscar Wilde,
934:If it is not nailed to the floor, it's mine. If I can pry it loose, it is not nailed down. ~ Oscar Wilde,
935:If one plays good music, people don't listen and if one plays bad music people don't talk. ~ Oscar Wilde,
936:Life under a good government is rarely dramatic; life under a bad government is always so. ~ Oscar Wilde,
937:Nowadays, all the married men live like bachelors, and all the bachelors like married men. ~ Oscar Wilde,
938:The old believe everything, the middle-aged suspect everything, the young know everything. ~ Oscar Wilde,
939:When a man has once loved a woman he will do anything for her except continue to love her. ~ Oscar Wilde,
940:When one pays a visit it is for the purpose of wasting other people's time, not one's own. ~ Oscar Wilde,
941:After a good quality dinner one will be able to forgive anybody, still one's own relations. ~ Oscar Wilde,
942:An artist should create beautiful things, but should put nothing of his own life into them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
943:As for the virtuous poor, one can pity them of course, but one cannot possibly admire them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
944:By persistently remaining single a man converts himself into a permanent public temptation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
945:Comme disait Oscar Wilde, les folies sont les seules choses qu'on ne regrette jamais ! ~ Laurent Gounelle,
946:Don't be afraid. There are exquisite things in store for you. This is merely the beginning. ~ Oscar Wilde,
947:Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter. ~ Oscar Wilde,
948:He was always late on principle, his principle being that punctuality is the thief of time. ~ Oscar Wilde,
949:I like talking to a brick wall- it's the only thing in the world that never contradicts me! ~ Oscar Wilde,
950:I love physical comedy. I love Oscar Wilde, I love Shakespeare comedies, I love improv. ~ Elizabeth Banks,
951:In war, the strong make slaves of the weak, and in peace the rich makes slaves of the poor. ~ Oscar Wilde,
952:Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul. ~ Oscar Wilde,
953:Of course I have played outdoor games. I once played dominoes in an open air cafe in Paris. ~ Oscar Wilde,
954:Philanthropic people lose all sense of humanity. It is their distinguishing characteristic. ~ Oscar Wilde,
955:Prayer must never be answered: if it is, it ceases to be prayer and becomes correspondence. ~ Oscar Wilde,
956:The way of paradoxes is the way of truth. To test Reality we must see it on the tight-rope. ~ Oscar Wilde,
957:True contentment is not having everything, but in being satisfied with everything you have. ~ Oscar Wilde,
958:We live in an age that reads too much to be wise, and that thinks too much to be beautiful. ~ Oscar Wilde,
959:Well, I can't eat muffins in an agitated manner. The butter would probably get on my cuffs. ~ Oscar Wilde,
960:What consoles one nowadays is not repentance but pleasure. Repentance is quite out of date. ~ Oscar Wilde,
961:Women defend themselves by attacking, just as they attack by sudden and strange surrenders. ~ Oscar Wilde,
962:If the poor only had profiles there would be no difficulty in solving the problem of poverty ~ Oscar Wilde,
963:If you don't get everything you want, think of the things you don't get that you don't want. ~ Oscar Wilde,
964:"I hope your hair curls naturally, does it?" "Yes, darling, with a little help from others." ~ Oscar Wilde,
965:I see the moon like a clipped piece of silver. Like gilded bees the stars cluster round her. ~ Oscar Wilde,
966:It is a curious fact that people are never so trivial as when they take themselves seriously ~ Oscar Wilde,
967:It is in the brain that the poppy is red, that the apple is odorous, that the skylark sings. ~ Oscar Wilde,
968:My writing has gone to bits - like my character. I am simply a self-conscious nerve in pain. ~ Oscar Wilde,
969:Never speak disrespectfully of Society, Algernon. Only people who can’t get into it do that. ~ Oscar Wilde,
970:The nicest feeling in the world is to do a good deed anonymously-and have somebody find out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
971:There are two ways of disliking poetry, one way is to dislike it, the other is to read Pope. ~ Oscar Wilde,
972:To toil for a hard master is bitter, but to have no master to toil for is more bitter still. ~ Oscar Wilde,
973:A bishop keeps on saying at the age of eighty what he was told to say at the age of eighteen. ~ Oscar Wilde,
974:All art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril. ~ Oscar Wilde,
975:Do not be afraid of the past. If people tell you that it is irrevocable, do not believe them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
976:Every great man nowadays has his disciples, and it is usually Judas who writes the biography. ~ Oscar Wilde,
977:If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
978:In going to America one learns that poverty is not a necessary accompaniment to civilization. ~ Oscar Wilde,
979:It is better to be beautiful than to be good. But... it is better to be good than to be ugly. ~ Oscar Wilde,
980:Life is not complex. We are complex. Life is simple, and the simple thing is the right thing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
981:Love is like a war; easy to start but hard to end and you never know where it might take you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
982:Memory ...is the diary that we all carry about with us.” ~ Kevin Horsley Oscar Wilde   This ~ Kevin Horsley,
983:Nothing is so dangerous as being too modern; one is apt to grow old fashioned quite suddenly. ~ Oscar Wilde,
984:Oscar Wilde once defined a gentleman as one who never insulted somebody else accidentally. ~ Douglas Wilson,
985:She behaves as if she was beautiful. Most American women do. It is the secret of their charm. ~ Oscar Wilde,
986:The moment one sits down to think, one becomes all nose, or all forehead, or something horrid ~ Oscar Wilde,
987:The world seemed to me fine because you were in it, and goodness more real because you lived. ~ Oscar Wilde,
988:What we have to do, what at any rate it is our duty to do, is to revive the old art of Lying. ~ Oscar Wilde,
989:When good Americans die, they go to Paris" "Where do bad Americans go?" "They stay in America ~ Oscar Wilde,
990:When I ask for a water cress sandwich, I do not mean a loaf with a field in the middle of it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
991:Without order nothing can exist, without chaos nothing can evolve.
   ~ Oscar Wilde, (check capitalization),
992:Youth is the only thing worth having. When I find that I am growing old, I shall kill myself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
993:Arguments are extremely vulgar, for everybody in good society holds exactly the same opinions. ~ Oscar Wilde,
994:Football is all very well as a game for rough girls, but is hardly suitable for delicate boys. ~ Oscar Wilde,
995:He must have a truly romantic nature, for he weeps when there is nothing at all to weep about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
996:It is always worth while asking a question, though it is not always worth while answering one. ~ Oscar Wilde,
997:It is much more easy to have sympathy with suffering than it is to have sympathy with thought. ~ Oscar Wilde,
998:It is not wise to find symbols in everything that one sees. It makes life too full of terrors. ~ Oscar Wilde,
999:Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1000:Life is the art of being well deceived, and to succeed, it must be habitual and uninterrupted. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1001:Morality is simply the attitude we adopt toward people we personally dislike. —OSCAR WILDE ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1002:The exquisite art of idleness, one of the most important things that any University can teach. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1003:There is always something ridiculous about the emotions of people whom one has ceased to love. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1004:They flaunt their conjugal felicity in one's face, as if it were the most fascinating of sins. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1005:To disagree with three-fourths of the British public is one of the first requisites of sanity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1006:Varnishing is the only artistic process with which Royal Academicians are thoroughly familiar. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1007:Women have a wonderful instinct about things. They can discover everything except the obvious. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1008:Don't run down dyed hair and painted faces. There is an extraordinary charm in them, sometimes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1009:Education is very admirable but let us not forget that anything worth knowing cannot be taught. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1010:ever since I met you I have admired you more than any girl...I have ever met since...I met you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1011:Hesitation of any kind is a sign of mental decay in the young, of physical weakness in the old. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1012:I adore political parties. They are the only place left to us where people don't talk politics. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1013:I find him in the curves of certain lines, in the loveliness and subtleties of certain colours. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1014:I love hearing my relations abused. It is the only thing that makes me put up with them at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1015:I never approve, or disapprove, of anything now. It is an absurd attitude to take towards life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1016:It's not hard to get the ideas when they come. They just come... it's painful waiting for them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1017:It takes great deal of courage to see the world in all its tainted glory, and still to love it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1018:Knowledge would be fatal. It is the uncertainty that charms one. A mist makes things wonderful. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1019:Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1020:Memory... is the diary that we all carry about with us. ~ Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, 1895.,
1021:Men are such cowards. They outrage every law in the world and are afraid of the world's tongue. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1022:Most people live for love and admiration. But it is by love and admiration that we should live. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1023:No great artist ever sees things as they really are. If he did, he would cease to be an artist. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1024:Philanthropy [has become] simply the refuge of people who wish to annoy their fellow creatures. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1025:There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1026:The value of an idea has nothing whatever to do with the sincerity of the man who expresses it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1027:The work of art is to dominate the spectator: the spectator is not to dominate the work of art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1028:Well, in the first place girls never marry the men they flirt with. Girls don't think it right. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1029:As long as a woman can look ten years younger than her own daughter, she is perfectly satisfied. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1030:A subject that is beautiful in itself gives no suggestion to the artist. It lacks imperfection. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1031:Despotism is unjust to everybody, including the despot, who was probably made for better things. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1032:Don't give a woman advice; one should never give a woman anything she can't wear in the evening. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1033:For us there is only one season, the season of sorrow. The very sun and moon seem taken from us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1034:He lives the poetry that he cannot write. The others write the poetry that they dare not realize ~ Oscar Wilde,
1035:I don't at all like knowing what people say of me behind my back. It makes me far too conceited. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1036:If you are going to tell people the truth, you had better make them laugh or they will kill you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1037:It is because Humanity has never known where it was going that it has been able to find its way. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1038:Men know life too early. Women know life too late. That is the difference between men and women. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1039:Moderation is a fatal thing. Enough is as bad as a meal. More than enough is as good as a feast. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1040:Oh, no doubt the cod is a splendid swimmer - admirable for swimming purposes but not for eating. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1041:Popularity is the crown of laurel which the world puts on bad art. Whatever is popular is wrong. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1042:Schopenhauer has analysed the pessimism that characterize modern thought, but Hamlet invented it ~ Oscar Wilde,
1043:The youth of the present day are quite monstrous. They have absolutely no respect for dyed hair. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1044:Ultimately the bond of all companionship, whether in marriage or in friendship, is conversation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1045:We in the House of Lords are never in touch with public opinion. That makes us a civilised body. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1046:What men call the shadow of the body is not the shadow of the body, but is the body of the soul. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1047:When bankers get together they talk about art. When artists get together, they talk about money. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1048:I find that forgiving one's enemies is a most curious morbid pleasure; perhaps I should check it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1049:I may have said the same thing before... but my explanation, I am sure, will always be different. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1050:In modern life nothing produces such an effect as a good platitude. It makes the whole world kin. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1051:I wonder that no criminal has ever pleaded the ugliness of your city as an excuse for his crimes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1052:Love! What is love? It's nothing. It's just a word. It doesn't exist. Only pleasure is important. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1053:Murder is always a mistake. One should never do anything that one cannot talk about after dinner. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1054:The artist is the creator of beautiful things. To reveal art and conceal the artist is art's aim. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1055:The best one can say of modern creative art is that it is just a little less vulgar than reality. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1056:The proper aim is to try and reconstruct society on such a basis that poverty will be impossible. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1057:The stage is not merely the meeting place of all the arts, but is also the return of art to life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1058:The youth of America is their oldest tradition. It has been going on now for three hundred years. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1059:Though of all poses a moral pose is the most offensive, still to have a pose at all is something. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1060:Wickedness is a myth invented by good people to account for the curious attractiveness of others. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1061:A sentimentalist is simply one who desires to have the luxury of an emotion without paying for it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1062:Death and vulgarity are the only two facts in the nineteenth century that one cannot explain away. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1063:I have said to you to speak the truth is a painful thing. To be forced to tell lies is much worse. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1064:Lo! with a little rod I did but touch the honey of romance — And must I lose a soul's inheritance? ~ Oscar Wilde,
1065:Nowadays, saying what you really think can be a serious error since one risks being misunderstood. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1066:Philosophies fall away like sand, and creeds follow on another like the withered leaves of Autumn. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1067:Poor? What does that matter? When poverty creeps in at the door, love flies in through the window. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1068:Romance should never begin with sentiment. It should begin with science and end with a settlement. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1069:The birds that were singing in the dew-drenched garden seemed to be telling the flowers about her. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1070:The only thing worse than being misquoted is being sentenced to two years' hard labour for buggery ~ Oscar Wilde,
1071:The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it... I can resist everything but temptation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1072:There is only one thing in life worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1073:To be good is to be in harmony with oneself. Discord is to be forced to be in harmony with others. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1074:When I think of all the harm [the Bible] has done, I despair of ever writing anything to equal it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1075:Women are never disarmed by compliments. Men always are. That is the difference between the sexes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1076:Women have a much better time than men in this world; there are far more things forbidden to them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1077:Yes, I am a thorough republican. No other form of government is so favorable to the growth of art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1078:An engagement should come on a young girl as a surprise, pleasant or unpleasant as the case may be. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1079:Art is the only serious thing in the world. And the artist is the only person who is never serious. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1080:At every single moment of one's life one is what one is going to be no less than what one has been. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1081:Down the long and silent street, The dawn, with silver-sandaled feet, Crept like a frightened girl. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1082:Every woman becomes their mother. That's their tragedy. And no man becomes his. That's his tragedy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1083:I am not at all cynical, I have merely got experience, which, however, is very much the same thing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1084:I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1085:It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1086:It was the passions about whose origin we deceived ourselves that tyrannized most strongly over us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1087:Morality is simply the attitude we adopt toward people we personally dislike.      —OSCAR WILDE ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1088:More women grow old nowadays through the faithfulness of their admirers than through anything else. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1089:Oh! I don't think I would like to catch a sensible man. I shouldn't know what to talk to him about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1090:Rich bachelors should be heavily taxed. It is not fair that some men should be happier than others. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1091:Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1092:They've promised that dreams can come true - but forgot to mention that nightmares are dreams, too. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1093:To elope is cowardly; it is running away from danger; and danger has become so rare in modern life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1094:To me, Beauty is the wonder of wonders...It is only shallow people who do not judge by appearances. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1095:You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1096:Be warned in time, James, and remain, as I do, incomprehensible: to be great is to be misunderstood. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1097:I always pass on good advice. It is the only thing to do with it. It is never of any use to oneself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1098:Poets know how useful passion is for publication. Nowadays a broken heart will run to many editions. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1099:The Americans are certainly hero-worshipers, and always take their heroes from the criminal classes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1100:There are many things that we would throw away if we were not afraid that others might pick them up. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1101:You and I will always be friends." "Yet you poisoned me with a book once. I should not forgive that. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1102:You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1103:A virtuous abstinence from the joys of pederasty comes most easily to those who have no taste for it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1104:He to whom the present is the only thing that is present, knows nothing of the age in which he lives. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1105:I am not in favour of this modern mania for turning bad people into good people at a moment's notice. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1106:If I am occasionally a little over-dressed, I make up for it by being always immensely over-educated. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1107:Intellectual generalities are always interesting, but generalities in morals mean absolutely nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1108:Like dear St. Francis of Assisi I am wedded to Poverty: but in my case the marriage is not a success. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1109:Science can never grapple with the irrational. That is why it has no future before it, in this world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1110:The one charm of marriage is that it makes a life of deception absolutely necessary for both parties. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1111:There are only two tragedies in life: one is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1112:The world is changed because you are made of ivory and gold. The curves of your lips rewrite history. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1113:Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1114:Hablar es tener demasiada consideración por los demás. Por la boca mueren los peces y Oscar Wilde. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
1115:I never take any notice to what common people say, and I never interfere with what charming people do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1116:Lewis would have agreed with Oscar Wilde that our past is what we are. We cannot rid ourselves of it. ~ Barbara Vine,
1117:Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1118:Nature, which makes nothing durable, always repeats itself so that nothing which it makes may be lost. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1119:Oh, why will parents always appear at the wrong time? Some extraordinary mistake in nature, I suppose. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1120:One can survive everything, nowadays, except death, and live down everything except a good reputation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1121:Psycholog­y is in its infancy, as a science. I hope in the interests of Art, it will always remain so. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1122:Religion is like a blind man looking in a black room for a black cat that isn't there, and finding it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1123:The one charm about the past is that it is the past. But women never know when the curtain has fallen. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1124:The only excuse for making a useless thing is that one admires it intensely. All art is quite useless. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1125:There is no feeling more comforting and consoling than knowing you are right next to the one you love. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1126:The truth about the life of a man is not what he does, but the legend which he creates around himself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1127:American girls are as clever at concealing their parents as English women are at concealing their past. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1128:For as Oscar Wilde once said, “The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means. ~ Cat Grant,
1129:It is only by not paying one's bills that one can hope to live in the memory of the commercial classes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1130:Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1131:My experience is that as soon as people are old enough to know better, they don't know anything at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1132:Religions die when they are proved to be true. Science is the record of dead religions. —Oscar Wilde ~ Philip Jenkins,
1133:The basis of action is lack of imagination. It is the last resource of those who know not how to dream. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1134:The English country-gentleman galloping after a fox — the unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1135:The only difference between a caprice and a lifelong passion is that the caprice lasts a little longer. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1136:The salesman knows nothing of what he is selling save that he is charging a great deal too much for it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1137:We have quite the same ideas. No; I think our ideas are quite different. But he has been most pleasant. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1138:Women represent the triumph of matter over mind, just as men represent the triumph of mind over morals. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1139:Women treat us [men] like humanity treats gods – they worship us and keep bothering us to do something. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1140:Youth! There is nothing like youth. The middle-aged are mortgaged to Life. The old are in Life's lumber ~ Oscar Wilde,
1141:Don't tell me that you have exhausted Life. When a man says that, one knows that life has exhausted him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1142:How long could you love a woman who didn't love you, Cecil? A woman who didn't love me? Oh, all my life! ~ Oscar Wilde,
1143:I don't want to be at the mercy of my emotions. I want to use them, to enjoy them, and to dominate them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1144:I have learned this: it is not what one does that is wrong, but what one becomes as a consequence of it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1145:I usually say what I really think. A great mistake nowadays. It makes one so liable to be misunderstood. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1146:I worshipped you too much. I am punished for it. You worshipped yourself too much. We are both punished. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1147:LISP programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing. ~ Alan Perlis, ,(take on an Oscar Wilde quote),
1148:Memory is the diary that chronicles things that never have happened and couldn't possibly have happened. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1149:There is a luxury in self-reproach. When we blame ourselves we feel no one else has a right to blame us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1150:You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you have never had the courage to commit. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1151:Algy, you always adopt a strictly immoral attitude towards life. You are not quite old enough to do that. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1152:If only the picture could grow old, and I stay young. For that...for that, I would give my SOUL for that. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1153:Im Krieg machen die Starken die Schwachen zu Sklaven, im Frieden machen die Reichen die Armen zu Sklaven. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1154:I'm sure I don't know half the people who come to my house. Indeed, from all I hear, I shouldn't like to. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1155:Individualism has really the higher aim. Modern morality consists in accepting the standard of one's age. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1156:I will not bare my soul to their shallow prying eyes. My heart shall never be put under their microscope. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1157:Married men are horribly tedious when they are good husbands, and abominably conceited when they are not. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1158:No artist has ethical sympathies. An ethical sympathy in an artist is an unpardonable mannerism of style. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1159:On an occasion of this kind it becomes more than a moral duty to speak one's mind. It becomes a pleasure. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1160:The world is divided into two classes, those who believe the incredible, and those who do the improbable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1161:Those who are faithful know only the trivial side of love: it is the faithless who know love's tragedies. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1162:To begin with, I dined there on Monday, and once a week is quite enough to dine with one's own relations. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1163:We spend our days, each one of us, in looking for the secret of life. Well, the secret of life is in Art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1164:Wickedness is a myth invented by good people to account for the curious attraction of others. —Oscar Wilde ~ M C Beaton,
1165:Women have become so highly educated... that nothing should surprise us nowadays, except happy marriages. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1166:And when wind and winter harden All the loveless land, It will whisper of the garden, You will understand. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1167:As yet, Bernard Shaw hasn't become prominent enough to have any enemies, but none of his friends like him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1168:A woman's life revolves in curves of emotions. It is upon lines of intellect that a man's life progresses. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1169:Cheap editions of great books may be delightful, but cheap editions of great men are absolutely detestable ~ Oscar Wilde,
1170:I must say... that I ruined myself: and that nobody, great or small, can be ruined except by his own hand. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1171:Rugby is a game for barbarians played by gentlemen. Football is a game for gentlemen played by barbarians. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1172:To be entirely free, and at the same time entirely dominated by law, is the eternal paradox of human life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1173:While we look to the dramatist to give romance to realism, we ask of the actor to give realism to romance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1174:America has never quite forgiven Europe for having been discovered somewhat earlier in history than itself. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1175:Believe me, no civilized man ever regrets a pleasure, and no uncivilized man ever knows what a pleasure is. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1176:I hate vulgar realism in literature. The man who would call a spade a spade should be compelled to use one. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1177:Lord Illingworth told me this morning that there was an orchid there as beautiful as the seven deadly sins. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1178:One should absorb the colour of life, but one should never remember its details. Details are always vulgar. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1179:Perhaps, after all, America never has been discovered. I myself would say that it had merely been detected. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1180:Reported as Oscar Wilde's last words on his death bed... This wallpaper is killing me. One of us has to go. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1181:She said that she would dance with me if I brought her red roses but in all my garden there is no red rose. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1182:Anybody can write a three-volume novel. It merely requires a complete ignorance of both life and literature. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1183:Children begin by loving their parents; after a time they judge them; rarely, if ever, do they forgive them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1184:I think you are wrong, Basil, but I won't argue with you. It is only the intellectually lost who ever argue. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1185:Learned conversation is either the affectation of the ignorant or the profession of the mentally unemployed. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1186:Lots of people act well, but few people talk well. This shows that talking is the more difficult of the two. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1187:The ability of the theist to misunderstand a thing is directly proportional to the obviousness of the thing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1188:The English public takes no interest in a work of art until it is told that the work in question is immoral. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1189:To do nothing at all is the most difficult thing in the world, the most difficult and the most intellectual. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1190:With an evening coat and a white tie, anybody, even a stockbroker, can gain a reputation for being civilized ~ Oscar Wilde,
1191:Any preoccupation with ideas of what is right or wrong in conduct shows an arrested intellectual development. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1192:He is really not so ugly after all, provided, of course, that one shuts one's eyes, and does not look at him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1193:His style is chaos illumined by flashes of lightning. As a writer he has mastered everything except language. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1194:I have always been of opinion that a man who desires to get married should know either everything or nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1195:People fashion their God after their own understanding. They make their God first and worship him afterwards. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1196:The aim of life is self-development. To realize one's nature perfectly - that is what each of us is here for. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1197:The difference between literature and journalism is that journalism is unreadable and literature is not read. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1198:The trouble with the lower classes is that they lack the sense of tragedy given to them by the upper classes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1199:To do nothing at all is the most difficult thing in the world, the most difficult and the most intellectual. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1200:To get back my youth I would do anything in the world, except take exercise, get up early, or be respectable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1201:But what world says that [I'm wicked]? It can only be the next world. This world and I are on excellent terms. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1202:By giving us the opinions of the uneducated, journalism keeps us in touch with the ignorance of the community. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1203:Finding the meaning of life is easy. Simply get a dictionary, go to the 'L' section, and find the word 'life.' ~ Oscar Wilde,
1204:I have never killed anyone, but I have often read about some guy getting his ass taken out with great pleasure ~ Oscar Wilde,
1205:Indeed I have always been of the opinion that hard work is simply the refuge of people who have nothing to do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1206:Music makes one feel so romantic - at least it always gets on one's nerves - which is the same thing nowadays. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1207:One can live for years sometimes without living at all, and then all life comes crowding into one single hour. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1208:One must have some sort of occupation nowadays. If I hadn't my debts I shouldn't have anything to think about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1209:One should not be too severe on English novels; they are the only relaxation of the intellectually unemployed. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1210:Only people who look dull ever get into the House of Commons, and only people who are dull ever succeed there. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1211:People are very fond of giving away what they need most themselves. It is what I call the depth of generosity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1212:The exquisite art of idleness is one of the most important things that any university can teach. —OSCAR WILDE ~ Jerramy Fine,
1213:The great poet is always a seer, seeing less with the eyes of the body than he does with the eyes of the mind. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1214:The intellect is not a serious thing, and never has been. It is an instrument on which one plays, that is all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1215:The modern sympathy with invalids is morbid. Illness of any kind is hardly a thing to be encouraged in others. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1216:Whenever cannibals are on the brink of starvation, Heaven, in its infinite mercy, sends them a fat missionary. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1217:I am very glad I have travelled. Travel improves the mind wonderfully, and does away with all one's prejudices. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1218:If one doesn't talk about a thing, it has never happened. It is simply expression that gives reality to things. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1219:It is Nature who makes our artists for us, though it may be Art who taught them their right mode of expression. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1220:It is only the unimaginative who ever invents. The true artist is known by the use he makes of what he annexes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1221:I would have liked to have known Oscar Wilde because I think he must have been very amusing and entertaining. ~ Truman Capote,
1222:Many of the great achievements of the world were accomplished by tired and discouraged men who kept on working. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1223:The only way to behave to a woman is to make love to her if she is pretty, and to someone else if she is plain. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1224:The reason we are so pleased to find other people's secrets is that it distracts public attention from our own. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1225:Wickedness is a myth invented by good people to account for the curious attractiveness of others. —Oscar Wilde ~ Jill Barnett,
1226:Don't be discouraged if your children reject your advice. Years later they will offer it to their own offspring. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1227:If you cannot write well, you cannot think well; if you cannot think well, others will do your thinking for you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1228:I have always been of the opinion that hard work is simply the refuge of people who have nothing whatever to do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1229:I never saw a man who looked With such a wistful eye Upon that little tent of blue Which prisoners call the sky. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1230:I see when men love women. They give them but a little of their lives. But women when they love give everything. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1231:Musical people always want one to be perfectly dumb at the very moment when one is longing to be perfectly deaf. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1232:The aim of the liar is simply to charm, to delight, to give pleasure. He is the very basis of civilized society. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1233:The bright dawn flooded the room, and swept the fantastic shadows into dusky corners, where they lay shuddering. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1234:The only thing that the artist cannot see is the obvious. The only thing that the public can see is the obvious. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1235:The Roman Catholic Church is for saints and sinners alone - for respectable people, the Anglican Church will do. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1236:The systems that fail are those that rely on the permanency of human nature, and not its growth and development. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1237:When I was young I thought that money was the most important thing in life; now that I am old I know that it is. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1238:Every one is worthy of love, except him who thinks that he is. Love is a sacrament that should be taken kneeling. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1239:Great passions are for the great of soul, and great events can be seen only by those who are on a level with them ~ Oscar Wilde,
1240:I have no objection to anyone's sex life as long as they don't practice it in the street and frighten the horses. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1241:London is full of women who trust their husbands. One can always recognize them. They look so thoroughly unhappy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1242:Marriage is the triumph of imagination over intelligence. Second marriage is the triumph of hope over experience. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1243:She wore far too much rouge last night and not quite enough clothes. That is always a sign of despair in a woman. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1244:The first duty in life is to be as artificial as possible. What the second duty is no one has as yet discovered. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1245:Whatever, in fact, is modern in our life we owe to the Greeks. Whatever is an anachronism is due to mediaevalism. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1246:Actions are the first tragedy in life, words are the second. Words are perhaps the worst. Words are merciless. . . ~ Oscar Wilde,
1247:Between men and women there is no friendship possible. There is passion, enmity, worship, love, but no friendship. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1248:Conscience and cowardice are really the same things, Basil. Conscience is the trade-name of the firm. That is all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1249:Genius lasts longer than Beauty. That accounts for the fact that we all take such pains to over-educate ourselves. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1250:Murder is always a mistake. One should never do anything that one cannot talk about after dinner." —Oscar Wilde ~ Leslie Langtry,
1251:Nothing is good in moderation. You cannot know good in anything until you have torn the heart out of it by excess. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1252:One of the many lessons that one learns in prison is, that things are what they are and will be what they will be. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1253:One should never make one's entrance with a scandal. One should reserve that to give an interest to one's old age. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1254:Oscar Wilde’s “beautiful untrue things” that save the imagination from falling into “careless habits of accuracy. ~ Harold Bloom,
1255:Paradoxically though it may seem, it is none the less true that life imitates art far more than art imitates life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1256:Then there was a man who said, 'I never knew what real happiness was until I got married; by then it was too late' ~ Oscar Wilde,
1257:...The two great turning-points of my life were when my father sent to Oxford, and when society sent me to prison. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1258:All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1259:As Oscar Wilde once wrote, “Morality, like art, means drawing a line somewhere.” The question is: where is the line? ~ Dan Ariely,
1260:I suppose society is wonderfully delightful. To be in it is merely a bore. But to be out of it is simply a tragedy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1261:It is well for his peace that the saint goes to his martyrdom. He is spared the sight of the horror of his harvest. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1262:One should never trust a woman who tells one her real age. A woman who would tell one that would tell one anything. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1263:The Chinese general Sun Tzu said that all war was based on deception. Oscar Wilde said the same thing of romance. ~ Marco Tempest,
1264:The only difference between the saint and the sinner is that every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1265:The only link between Literature and the Drama left to us in England at the present moment is the bill of the play. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1266:To get into the best society, nowadays, one has either to feed people, amuse people, or shock people - that is all! ~ Oscar Wilde,
1267:Actually, I do like pink clothes, but it's not because I'm girly, it's because I'm the reincarnation of Oscar Wilde. ~ Mara Wilson,
1268:All sins, except a sin against itself, Love should forgive. All lives, save loveless lives, true Love should pardon. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1269:Better the rule of One, whom all obey, than to let clamorous demagogues betray our freedom with the kiss of anarchy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1270:For the canons of good society are, or should be, the same as the canons of art. Form is absolutely essential to it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1271:If one could only teach the English how to talk, and the Irish how to listen, society here would be quite civilized. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1272:I like persons better than principles, and I like persons with no principles better than anything else in the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1273:Is insincerity such a terrible thing? I think not. It is merely a method by which we can multiply our personalities. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1274:The burden of this world is too great for one man to bear, and the world’s sorrow too heavy for one heart to suffer. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1275:The English are always degrading truths into facts. When a truth becomes a fact it loses all its intellectual value. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1276:The past could always be annihilated. Regret, denial, or forgetfulness could do that. But the future was inevitable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1277:They get up early, because they have so much to do, and go to bed early, because they have so little to think about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1278:Things are in their essence what we choose to make them. A thing is, according to the mode in which one looks at it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1279:What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1280:All authority is quite degrading. It degrades those who exercise it, and it degrades those over whom it is exercised. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1281:In England it is enough for a man to try and produce any serious, beautiful work to lose all his rights as a citizen. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1282:Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth. Oscar Wilde ~ Robert Bryndza,
1283:Nothing is so aggravating as calmness. There is something positively brutal about the good temper of most modern men. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1284:Shallow sorrows and shallow loves live on. The loves and sorrows that are great are destroyed by their own plenitude. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1285:The only form of fiction in which real characters do not seem out of place is history. In novels they are detestable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1286:When one is in town one amuses oneself. When one is in the country one amuses other people. It is excessively boring. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1287:Yet each man kills the thing he loves . . . The coward does it with a kiss, the brave man with a sword.” —Oscar Wilde ~ Mary Burton,
1288:Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination. —OSCAR WILDE, Irish dramatist and novelist ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1289:By the artificial separation of soul and body men have invented a Realism that is vulgar and an Idealism that is void. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1290:Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them. —Oscar Wilde ~ Ania Ahlborn,
1291:Mere color, unspoiled by meaning, and unallied with definite form, can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1292:Never trust a woman who wears mauve, whatever her age may be, or a woman over thirty-five who is fond of pink ribbons. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1293:Pleasure is Nature's test, her sign of approval. When man is happy, he is in harmony with himself and his environment. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1294:The only way a woman can ever reform a man is by boring him so completely that he loses all possible interest in life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1295:There is nothing in the world like the devotion of a married woman. It is a thing no married man knows anything about. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1296:At twilight, nature is not without loveliness, though perhaps its chief use is to illustrate quotations from the poets. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1297:Don't imagine that your perfection lies in accumulating or possessing external things. Your affection is inside of you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1298:Her capacity for family affection is extraordinary. When her third husband died, her hair turned quite gold from grief. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1299:I find I have, and a heart doesn’t suit me, Windermere. Somehow it doesn’t go with modern dress. It makes one look old. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1300:I should have remembered that when one is going to lead an entirely new life, one requires regular and wholesome meals. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1301:Life cheats us with shadows. We ask it for pleasure. It gives it to us with bitterness and disappointment in its train. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1302:Tal como observó Oscar Wilde: «Solamente hay una cosa en el mundo peor que hablen de ti, y es que no hablen de ti». ~ Richard Branson,
1303:There is one thing worse than an absolutely loveless marriage: a marriage in which there is love, but on one side only. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1304:The things one feels absolutely certain about are never true. That is the fatality of faith, and the lesson of romance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1305:Wordsworth went to the Lakes, but he was never a lake poet. He found in stones the sermons he had already hidden there. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1306:As Oscar Wilde once said, "To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune. To lose both looks like carelessness. ~ Cassandra Clare,
1307:Between the optimist and the pessimist, the difference is droll. The optimist sees the doughnut; the pessimist the hole! ~ Oscar Wilde,
1308:Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them. —OSCAR WILDE, ~ Mikal Gilmore,
1309:Clergymen and people who use phrases without wisdom sometimes talk of suffering as a mystery. It is really a revelation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1310:I love scandals about other people, but scandals about myself don’t interest me. They have not got the charm of novelty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1311:I now see that sorrow, being the supreme emotion of which man is capable, is at once the type and test of all great art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1312:Whether it's Dorothy Parker or Oscar Wilde, they're brilliant with genius bon mots. Of course, I find them extraordinary. ~ Duncan Roy,
1313:Women love us for our defects. If we have enough of them, they will forgive us everything, even our gigantic intellects. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1314:Absolute catholicity of taste is not without its dangers. It is only an auctioneer who should admire all schools of art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1315:As for omens, there is no such thing as an omen. Destiny does not send us heralds. She is too wise or too cruel for that. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1316:Faithfulness is to the emotional life what consistency is to the life of the intellect - simply a confession of failures. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1317:Oscar Wilde once quipped, “The old believe everything, the middle-aged suspect everything and the young know everything. ~ Ian Mortimer,
1318:The only thing that ever consoles man for the stupid things he does is the praise he always gives himself for doing them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1319:A great poet, a really great poet, is the most unpoetical of all creatures. But inferior poets are absolutely fascinating. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1320:If it took Labouchere three columns to prove that I was forgotten, then there is no difference between fame and obscurity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1321:I love the French language... it's a delightful language, especially to curse with. It's like whopping your ass with silk. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1322:I was working on the proof of one of my poems all the morning, and took out a comma. In the afternoon I put it back again. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1323:There were moments when he looked on evil simply as a mode through which he could realize his conception of the beautiful. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1324:The trouble with women is, that when they grow up, they turn into their mothers. The trouble with men is, that they don't. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1325:It is absurd to say that there are neither ruins nor curiosities in America when they have their mothers and their manners. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1326:It is very vulgar to talk about one's own business. Only people like stockbrokers do that, and then only at dinner parties. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1327:Men always want to be a woman's first love. That is their clumsy vanity. We women have a more subtle instinct about things. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1328:Pleasures may turn a heart to stone, riches may make it callous, but sorrows cannot break it. Hearts live by being wounded. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1329:Taking sides is the beginning of sincerity, and earnestness follows shortly afterwards, and the human being becomes a bore. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1330:When one has never heard a man's name in the course of one's life, it speaks volumes for him; he must be quite respectable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1331:Ah! The strength of women comes from the fact that psychology cannot explain us. Men can be analyzed, women...merely adored. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1332:Every single work of art is the fulfillment of a prophecy; for every work of art is the conversion of an idea into an image. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1333:Find expression for a sorrow, and it will become dear to you. Find expression for a joy, and you will intensify its ecstasy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1334:I threw the pearl of my soul into a cup of wine. I went down the primrose path to the sound of flutes. I lived on honeycomb. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1335:It was you I thought of all the time, I gave to them the love you did not need: lavished on them a love that was not theirs. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1336:Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1337:Oh, brothers! I don't care for brothers. My elder brother won't die, and my younger brothers seem never to do anything else. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1338:Public Opinion... an attempt to organize the ignorance of the community, and to elevate it to the dignity of physical force. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1339:Self-denial is simply a method by which arrests his progress, and self-sacrifice a survival of the mutilation of the savage. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1340:The chin a little higher, dear. Style largely depends on the way the chin is worn. They are worn very high, just at present. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1341:The moment that an artist takes notice of what other people want, and tries to supply the demand, he ceases to be an artist. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1342:The vilest deeds like poison weeds Bloom well in prison air; It is only what is good in man That wastes and withers there. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1343:Actions are the first tragedy in life, words are the second. Words are perhaps the worst. Words are merciless...” —Oscar Wilde ~ J J McAvoy,
1344:Concordantly, while your first question may be the most pertinent, you may or may not realize it is also the most irrelevant. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1345:How can a woman be expected to be happy with a man who insists on treating her as if she were a perfectly normal human being. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1346:I don’t write this letter to put bitterness into your heart, but to pluck it out of mine. For my own sake I must forgive you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1347:I hope you have not been leading a double life, pretending to be wicked and being good all the time. That would be hypocrisy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1348:In America the young are always ready to give to those who are older than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1349:Man is a rational animal who always loses his temper when he is called upon to act in accordance with the dictates of reason. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1350:Ordinary riches can be stolen; real riches cannot. In your soul are infinitely precious things that cannot be taken from you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1351:The only thing that one really knows about human nature is that it changes. Change is the one quality we can predicate of it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1352:A dreamer is man who can find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1353:And alien tears will fill for him pity's long broken urn. For his mourners will all be outcast men, and outcasts always mourn. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1354:But, of course, you've either got to amuse people or feed 'em or shock 'em." Marjorie had culled this from Oscar Wilde. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1355:It is love, and not German philosophy, that is the true explanation of the world, whatever may be the explanation of the next. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1356:Nowadays we are all of us so hard up that the only pleasant things to pay are compliments. They’re the only things we can pay. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1357:Personality must be accepted for what it is. You mustn't mind that a poet is a drunk, rather that drunks are not always poets. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1358:A glass of absinthe is as poetical as anything in the world. What difference is there between a glass of absinthe and a sunset? ~ Oscar Wilde,
1359:Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1360:It reminded me of my dad’s favorite quote from Oscar Wilde. Everything in the world is about sex but sex. Sex is about power. ~ Crista McHugh,
1361:Never regret thy fall, O Icarus of the fearless flight For the greatest tragedy of them all Is never to feel the burning light. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1362:Oh, I love London Society! It is entirely composed now of beautiful idiots and brilliant lunatics. Just what Society should be. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1363:Only mediocrities progress. An artist revolves in a cycle of masterpieces, the first of which is no less perfect than the last. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1364:Sympathy with joy intensifies the sum of sympathy in the world, sympathy with pain does not really diminish the amount of pain. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1365:There is nothing that stirs in the whole world of thought to which sorrow does not vibrate in terrible and exquisite pulsation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1366:To believe is very dull. To doubt is intensely engrossing. To be on the alert is to live, to be lulled into security is to die. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1367:What is termed Sin is an essential element of progress. Without it the world would stagnate, or grow old, or become colourless. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1368:And once, or twice, to throw the dice is a gentlemanly game, But he does not win who plays with Sin in the secret house of shame ~ Oscar Wilde,
1369:Anyone can sympathize with the sufferings of a friend, but it requires a very fine nature to sympathize with a friend's success. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1370:If there is anything more annoying in the world than having people talk about you, it is certainly having no one talk about you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1371:Just to let you know that the buffet car will be closing for stocktaking in five minutes. The next station stop is Chesterfield. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1372:Know thyself' was written over the portal of the antique world. Over the portal of the new world, 'Be thyself' shall be written. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1373:Twenty years of romance makes a woman look like a ruin; but twenty years of marriage makes her something like a public building. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1374:What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything, and the value of nothing.
Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere’s Fan ~ Burton G Malkiel,
1375:You know we poor artists have to show ourselves in society from time to time, just to remind the public that we are not savages. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1376:If people are dishonest once, they will be dishonest a second time. And honest people should keep away from them. (Lady Chiltern) ~ Oscar Wilde,
1377:I have never met any really wicked person before. I feel rather frightened. I am so afraid he will look just like every one else. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1378:Most men spontaneously live a fictitious, alien life. Most people are other people, said Oscar Wilde, and he was quite right. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
1379:The form of government that is most suitable to the artist is no government at all. Authority over him and his art is ridiculous. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1380:The reason we all like to think so well of others is that we are all afraid for ourselves. The basis of optimism is sheer terror. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1381:Well I won't argue about the matter. You always want to argue about things. That is exactly what things were originally made for. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1382:We should treat all the trivial things of life seriously, and all the serious things of life with sincere and studied triviality. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1383:What is abnormal in Life stands in normal relations to Art. It is the only thing in Life that stands in normal relations to Art. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1384:When a love comes to an end, weaklings cry, efficient ones instantly find another love, and the wise already have one in reserve. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1385:You don't love someone for their looks, or their clothes, or for their fancy car, but because they sing a song only you can hear. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1386:A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1387:All art is immortal. For emotion for the sake of emotion is the aim of art, and emotion for the sake of action is the aim of life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1388:All thought is immoral. Its very essence is destruction. If you think of anything, you kill it. Nothing survives being thought of. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1389:Art finds her own perfection within, and not outside of, herself. She is not to be judged by any external standard of resemblance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1390:Every prison that men build Is built with bricks of shame, And bound with bars lest Christ should see How men their brothers maim. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1391:Few parents nowadays pay any regard to what their children say to them. The old fashioned respect for the young is fast dying out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1392:Out of the unreal shadows of night comes back the real life that we had known. We have to resume it where we had left off... p 207 ~ Oscar Wilde,
1393:Selfishness is not living your life as you wish to live it. Selfishness is wanting others to live their lives as you wish them to. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1394:The typewriting machine, when played with expression, is no more annoying than the piano when played by a sister or near relation. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1395:Thoạt tiên người đàn bà tìm cách chống đỡ lại sựi ve vãn của người đàn ông. Sau đó, họ tìm cách ngản cản hắn chạy trốn [Oscar Wilde] ~ Anonymous,
1396:To have friends, you know, one need only be good-natured; but when a man has no enemy left there must be something mean about him. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1397:We can have in life but one great experience at best, and the secret of life is to reproduce that experience as often as possible. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1398:A community is infinitely more brutalised by the habitual employment of punishment than it is by the occasional occurence of crime. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1399:Marriage,' said Oscar Wilde, 'is a romance in which the hero dies in the first chapter.' Uncle Bertie made his exit in the Preface. ~ Ruskin Bond,
1400:Mothers, of course, are all right. They pay a chap's bills and don't bother him. But fathers bother a chap and never pay his bills. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1401:Oh, don't cough, Ernest. When one is dictating one should speak fluently and not cough. Besides, I don't know how to spell a cough. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1402:You know I have loved him always. But we are very poor. Who, being loved, is poor? Oh, no one. I hate my riches. They are a burden. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1403:I quite agree with Dr. Nordau's assertion that all men of genius are insane, but Dr. Nordau forgets that all sane people are idiots. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1404:My great mistake, the fault for which I can’t forgive myself, is that one day I ceased my obstinate pursuit of my own individuality. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1405:There is only one real tragedy in a woman's life. The fact that her past is always her lover, and her future invariably her husband. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1406:When asked what he thought of sports, Oscar Wilde replied, "I approve of any activity that requires the wearing of special clothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1407:When people talk to us about others they are usually dull. When they talk to us about themselves they are nearly always interesting. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1408:While to the claims of charity a man may yield and yet be free, to the claims of conformity no man may yield and remain free at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1409:As Oscar Wilde should have said, when bad ideas have nowhere else to go, they emigrate to America and become university courses. ~ Frederic Raphael,
1410:In all unimportant matters, style, not sincerity, is the essential. In all important matters, style, not sincerity, is the essential. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1411:In old days books were written by men of letters and read by the public. Nowadays books are written by the public and read by nobody. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1412:It is immoral to use private property in order to alleviate the horrible evils that result from the institutions of private property. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1413:The British cook, for her iniquities, is a foolish woman who should be turned into a pillar of salt which she never knows how to use. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1414:Would you be in any way offended if I said that you seem to me to be in every way the visible personification of absolute perfection? ~ Oscar Wilde,
1415:And let me touch those curving claws of yellow ivory; and grasp the tail that like a monstrous asp coils round your heavy velvet paws. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1416:And with tears of blood he cleansed the hand, The hand that held the steel: For only blood can wipe out blood, And only tears can heal ~ Oscar Wilde,
1417:I am sorry my life is so marred and maimed by extravagance. But I cannot live otherwise. I, at any rate, pay the penalty of suffering. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1418:In England people actually try to be brilliant at breakfast. That is so dreadful of them! Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1419:Like two doomed ships that pass in storm we had crossed each other's way: but we made no sign, we said no word, we had no word to say. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1420:Oscar Wilde wrote, “In this world there are only two tragedies. One is getting what one wants, and the other is not getting it.” When ~ Esther Perel,
1421:Sins of the flesh are nothing. They are maladies for physicians to cure, if they should be cured. Sins of the soul alone are shameful. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1422:The camera, you know, will never capture you. Photography, in my experience, has the miraculous power of transferring wine into water. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1423:When I like people immensely I never tell their names to anyone. It is like surrendering a part of them. I have grown to love secrecy. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1424:I like Wagner's music better than anybody's. It is so loud that one can talk the whole time without other people hearing what one says. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1425:The most terrible thing about it is not that it breaks one’s heart—hearts are made to be broken—but that it turns one’s heart to stone. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1426:Well, I know, of course, how important it is not to keep a business engagement, if one wants to retain any sense of the beauty of life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1427:What a lurid life Oscar Wilde does lead - so full of extraordinary incidents. What a chance for the memoir writers of the next century ~ Max Beerbohm,
1428:What art seeks to disturb is monotony of type, slavery of custom, tyranny of habit, and the reduction of man to the level of a machine. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1429:Women, as some witty Frenchman once put it, inspire us with the desire to do masterpieces and always prevent us from carrying them out. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1430:And suddenly the moon withdraws her sickle from the lightening skies, and to her sombre cavern flies, wrapped in a veil of yellow gauze. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1431:It was a fatal day when the public discovered that the pen is mightier than the paving-stone and can be made as offensive as a brickbat. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1432:Many people become bankrupt through having invested too heavily in the prose of life. To have ruined one's self over poetry is an honor. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1433:No one wants to see a play called 'Lady Windermere's Fan'. It's going to be called 'Cocks in Frocks II' or I will find another publisher ~ Oscar Wilde,
1434:Without order nothing can exist-without chaos nothing can evolve. Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1435:You know what Oscar Wilde said, ma'am? He said, "nothing that is worth knowing can be taught". Nothing personal, ma'am... Carry on. ~ Charles M Schulz,
1436:As long as war is regarded as wicked, it will always have its fascination. When it is looked upon as vulgar, it will cease to be popular. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1437:For an artist to marry his model is as fatal as for a gourmet to marry his cook: the one gets no sittings, and the other gets no dinners. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1438:I’ve always hated business breakfasts; I believe Oscar Wilde had a point when he said that only dull people are brilliant at breakfast. ~ Joseph Finder,
1439:Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1440:The evil that machinery is doing is not merely in the consequence of its work but in the fact that it makes men themselves machines also. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1441:I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. There is something unfair about its use. It is hitting below the intellect. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1442:If one were to live his life fully and completely were to give form to every feeling, expression to every thought, reality to every dream. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1443:If property had simply pleasures, we could stand it; but its duties make it unbearable. In the interest of the rich we must get rid of it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1444:I have invented an invaluable permanent invalid called Bunbury, in order that I may be able to go down into the country whenever I choose. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1445:To be really mediæval one should have no body. To be really modern one should have no soul. To be really Greek one should have no clothes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1446:Would you like to know the great drama of my life? It is that I have put my genius into my life...I have put only my talent into my works. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1447:And, by the way, one of the most delightful things I find in America is meeting a people without prejudice -- everywhere open to the truth. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1448:Come, dear, [Gwendolen rises] we have already missed five, if not six, trains. To miss any more might expose us to comment on the platform. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1449:He is fairer than the morning star, and whiter than the moon. For his body I would give my soul, and for his love I would surrender heaven. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1450:The only way to even approach doing something perfectly is through experience, and experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1451:There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. ~ Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), Preface.,
1452:After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed and mourning over tragedies that were not my own. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1453:Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination.” –Oscar Wilde Irish writer, author of The Picture of Dorian Gray ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1454:JACK Your duty as a gentleman calls you back. ALGERNON My duty as a gentleman has never interfered with my pleasures in the smallest degree. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1455:Misfortunes one can endure--they come from outside, they are accidents. But to suffer for one's own faults--ah!--there is the sting of life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1456:No publisher should ever express an opinion of the value of what he publishes. That is a matter entirely for the literary critic to decide. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1457:There is no mode of action, no form of emotion, that we do not share with the lower animals. It is only by language that we rise above them. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1458:We live in the age of the overworked, and the under-educated; the age in which people are so industrious that they become absolutely stupid. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1459:What you really are is a Bunburyist. I was quite right in saying you were a Bunburyist. You are one of the most advanced Bunburyists I know. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1460:Action is limited and relative. Unlimited and absolute is the vision of him who sits at ease and watches, who walks in loneliness and dreams. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1461:A man's very highest moment is, I have no doubt at all, when he kneels in the dust, and beats his breast, and tells all the sins of his life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1462:Artists reproduce themselves or each other, with wearisome iteration. But criticism is always moving on, and the critic is always developing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1463:No man dies for what he knows to be true. Men die for what they want to be true, for what some terror in their hearts tells them is not true. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1464:Oscar Wilde summed up the indignation: “A sentimentalist is simply one who desires to have the luxury of an emotion without paying for it. ~ Leslie Jamison,
1465:The beautiful, passionate, ruined South, the land of magnolias and music, of roses and romance . . . living on the memory of crushing defeats ~ Oscar Wilde,
1466:the costume of the nineteenth century is detestable. It is so sombre, so depressing. Sin is the only real colour-element left in modern life. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1467:Damn it all, MacMurrough, are you telling me you are an unspeakable of the Oscar Wilde sort?’
‘If you mean am I Irish, the answer is yes. ~ Jamie O Neill,
1468:Good intentions have been the ruin of the world. The only people who have achieved anything have been those who have had no intentions at all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1469:"I hope to-morrow will be a fine day, Lane." "It never is, sir." "Lane, you're a perfect pessimist." "I do my best to give satisfaction, sir." ~ Oscar Wilde,
1470:Lord AUGUSTUS:(looking around) Time to educate yourself, I suppose. DUMBY: No, time to forget all I have learned. That is much more important. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1471:Music is the art... which most completely realizes the artistic idea and is the condition to which all the other arts are constantly aspiring. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1472:Our ambition should be to rule ourselves, the true kingdom for each one of us; and true progress is to know more, and be more, and to do more. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1473:There are only two kinds of people who are really fascinating - people who know absolutely everything, and people who know absolutely nothing. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1474:There is only one class in the community that thinks more about money than the rich, and that is the poor. The poor can think of nothing else. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1475:And the marvellous rose became crimson, like the rose of the eastern sky. Crimson was the girdle of petals, and crimson as a ruby was the heart ~ Oscar Wilde,
1476:Christ did not die to save people, but to teach people how to save each other. This is, I have no doubt, a grave heresy, but it is also a fact. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1477:Humanity takes itself too seriously. It is the world's original sin. If the cave-man had known how to laugh, History would have been different. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1478:I asked the question for the best reason possible, for the only reason, indeed, that excuses anyone for asking any question - simple curiosity. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1479:I think it was Oscar Wilde who said, You wouldn’t care about what other people thought about you if you realized how seldom they actually did. ~ Maria Semple,
1480:Most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1481:Now it seems to me that love of some kind is the only possible explanation of the extraordinary amount of suffering that there is in the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1482:The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Modern life would be very tedious if it were either, and modern literature a complete impossibility! ~ Oscar Wilde,
1483:I have never admitted that I am more than twenty-nine, or thirty at the most. Twenty-nine when there are pink shades, thirty when there are not. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1484:It is only shallow people who do not judge by appearances. The mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible. OSCAR WILDE, in a letter ~ Susan Sontag,
1485:The terror of society, which is the basis of morals, the terror of God, which is the secret of religion-these are the two things that govern us. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1486:When one is in love, one always begins by deceiving one's self, and one always ends by deceiving others. That is what the world calls a romance. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1487:Yes, we shall win in the end; but the road will be long and red with monstrous martyrdoms.” Oscar Wilde, 1897, on his release from Reading Gaol ~ Mark Simpson,
1488:Beauty ...is of the great facts in the world like sunlight, or springtime, or the reflection in dark water of that silver shell we call the moon. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1489:Even now I cannot help feeling that it is a mistake to think that the passion one feels in creation is ever really shown in the work one creates. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1490:I can't help detesting my relations. I suppose it comes from the fact that none of us can stand other people having the same faults as ourselves. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1491:Make some sacrifice for your art and you will be repaid, but ask of art to sacrifice herself for you and a bitter disappointment may come to you. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1492:There is no such thing as romance in our day, women have become too brilliant; nothing spoils a romance so much as a sense of humor in the woman. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1493:We who live in prison, and in whose lives there is no event but sorrow, have to measure time by throbs of pain, and the record of bitter moments. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1494:But then one regrets the loss even of one's worst habits. Perhaps one regrets them the most. They are such an essential part of one's personality. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1495:Gwendolen, it is a terrible thing for a man to find out suddenly that all his life he has been speaking nothing but the truth. Can you forgive me? ~ Oscar Wilde,
1496:If you pretend to be good, the world takes you very seriously. If you pretend to be bad, it doesn't. Such is the astounding stupidity of optimism. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1497:I wonder who it was defined man as a rational animal. It was the most premature definition ever given. Man is many things, but he is not rational. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1498:Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation. ~ Oscar Wilde, De Profundis (1897).,
1499:My desire to live is as intense as ever, and though my heart is broken, hearts are made to be broken: that is why God sends sorrow into the world. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1500:Set in this stormy Northern sea, Queen of these restless fields of tide, England! what shall men say of thee, Before whose feet the worlds divide? ~ Oscar Wilde,

IN CHAPTERS [12/12]



   7 Integral Yoga
   2 Occultism
   2 Fiction


   3 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   3 A B Purani
   2 H P Lovecraft
   2 Aleister Crowley


   3 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   3 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   2 Lovecraft - Poems


1.01 - An Accomplished Westerner, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Paul's School, where he had enrolled, was so surprised at the aptitude of his young student that he personally coached him in Greek. Three years later, Sri Aurobindo could skip half his classes and spend most of his time engrossed in his favorite occupation:reading. Nothing seemed to escape this voracious adolescent (except cricket, which held as little interest for him as Sunday school.) Shelley and "Prometheus Unbound," the French poets, Homer, Aristophanes, and soon all of European thought for he quickly came to master enough German and Italian to read Dante and Goe the in the original peopled a solitude of which he has said nothing. He never sought to form relationships, while Manmohan, the second brother, roamed through London in the company of his friend Oscar Wilde and would make a name for himself in English poetry. Each of the three brothers led his separate life. However, there was nothing austere about Sri Aurobindo, and certainly nothing of the puritan (the prurient,8 as he called it); it was just that he was "elsewhere," and his world was 6
  Life of Sri Aurobindo, 8

1.22 - How to Learn the Practice of Astrology, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
  Instance: Saturn in the M.C. is said to cause a spectacular rise in a man's career, ending in an equally notable crash. Examples: Napoleon I and III, Oscar Wilde, Woodrow Wilson, Lord Northcliffe, Hitler. Look for figures with Saturn thus placed, whose natives have jogged along equably and died in the odour of sanctity. Find out why what worked in some cases failed in the others.
  By the time you have studied (say) 500 nativities you will be already a fairly competent judge. Work your bloody guns! as Kipling says; get a friend just this once I allow you human intercourse to set up for you figures of historical importance, or with some outstanding characteristic (e.g. murderers, champions of sport, statesmen, monsters, philanthropists, heresiarchs) without telling you to whom it refers.

1f.lovecraft - Old Bugs, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Integral Yoga
   Verlaine, and Oscar Wilde were applied to himself as well, and in the
   short Indian summer of his glory there was talk of a renewed engagement

1f.lovecraft - The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Integral Yoga
   only to the hush that lay on Oscar Wildes name for a decade after his
   disgrace, and in extent only to the fate of that sinful King of Runazar

2.05 - On Poetry, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Integral Yoga
   Disciple: Was not Oscar Wilde his friend?
   Sri Aurobindo: Yes, he was. Manmohan used to visit him very often in the evenings and he used to describe Manmohan in his Wildish way: "A young Indian panther in evening brown!"
  --
   The idea of greatness of poetry is difficult to standardise. The French poet Villon, if you take his poems one by one, is equal in greatness to any other great poet, but if you take his work in a mass you can't justify his greatness. Petrarch has written only sonnets and that on one subject, and yet he is considered a great poet and given a place next to Dante. Simonides has not a single surviving complete poem, he is known by fragments and yet he is regarded as second only to Pindar who is called the greatest Greek lyricist. "The Hound of Heaven" is a far greater poem than any of Oscar Wilde's or Chesterton's.
   26 SEPTEMBER 1943

2.18 - January 1939, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Integral Yoga
   There was a tailor at Cambridge who used to tempt me with all sorts of clothes for suits and make me buy them; of course, he gave credit. Then I went to London. He somehow traced me there and found Manmohan and canvassed orders from him. Manmohan went in for a velvet suit, not staring red but aesthetic, and used to visit Oscar Wilde in that suit. After we came away to India, the tailor was not to be deprived of his dues! He wrote to the Government of Bengal and to the Baroda State for recovering the sum from me and Manmohan. I had paid up all my dues and kept 4/- or so. I did not believe that I was bound to pay it, since he always charged me double. But as the Maharaja said I had better pay it, I paid.
   Disciple: Did Manmohan follow your political career?

2.22 - 1941-1943, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Integral Yoga
   Sri Aurobindo: His judgments are not always sound and his quotations, though they seem striking at first, don't stand a second reading, so that they can't be taken as the best. For example, he speaks of Oscar Wilde, but he has not referred to the "Ballad of the Reading Gaol" which is one of the best things written in English. Also his estimate of Blunden's descriptions of nature photographic and true to Nature perhaps but it is very doubtful if they will survive.
   Shakespeare you can go back to for a hundreth time. That is the test. T. S. Eliot will live, but only as a minor poet. The moderns have all got diction but it has no value without rhythm. They have no rhythm.

30.10 - The Greatness of Poetry, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The moderns may ask: "Is it obligatory that one should have a great soul in order to be, a great poet?" In the hoary past it was almost so. Valmiki, Vyasa and Homer rightly deserve to fall into that category. But the ancient Latin Catullus, the French poet Villon of the medieval age, most of the 'Satanic' poets of the Romantic age, and Oscar Wilde and Rimbaud of the present age - none of them are great souls or possess anything remarkably spiritual in their nature. But on that score can we ever deny or belittle their poetic genius? True, ethics and aesthetics are two radically different things, At times these two may act together. Aesthetics may come into prominence from time to time under the guidance of ethics or take its support. But there is no indivisible relation between the two.
   It is here that a great confusion arises for the admirers of ethics and those of 'aesthetics. Ethics signifies morality, an ideal life and a correct conduct in one's dealings with others. But, as 'a matter of fact, we do not look upon the nature of the Psychic Being or the inner Self in that way. It is something deeper and higher than morality. Even in the absence of morality and good conduct the virtue of the inner Self can remain unimpaired. The virtue of the inner Self does not necessarily depend upon the good qualities of one's character. The Psychic Being is the true nature of the inherent consciousness in the being. Its manifestation may not take place in one's outer conduct or one's day-to-day activities, but it can be discerned in a peculiar turn of one's nature. Byron, in his outer life, was very uncomely and violent. But it was that self-same Byron who stood forth for the oppressed and offered his life for their freedom. Byron here represents the inner magnanimous heart. It is here, in this poetic utterance, that the urge of his inner Self has manifested itself:
  --
   In fact, we never find vulgarity in the artistic creation of any true artist. Baudelaire, Verlaine, Oscar Wilde - these creators who dived deep into the very core of natural experiences never for once lost the decorum of their inner Being. Vulgarity has no place in their language, in the expression of their creativity. The style Baudelaire adopted was purely classical - 'aristo'. On the other hand, there are moralists and religious people who badly lack the virtue of the inner Being. In all their activities rusticity and lack of culture are in abundance. The fragrance of the inner Being can neither be learnt nor acquired. It comes down with man from another world - "cometh from afar" - its manifestation takes place only in man's refined taste. Vulgarity is always wanting in genuine taste. It is, as it were, a gross tongue that gives almost an equal value to the juice of a grape and that of a corn-seed.
   It is really deplorable that the ideal of vulgarity, the King of kings in expressing vulgar ideas, is an Indian. His name must needs be mentioned, for his creations are replete with vulgarity and they are spread all around like poisonous air. It is not that at present he lacks disciples and worshippers. Now who is that notability? He is our Ravi Varma. Curiously enough, his themes are mostly taken from the Puranas, that is to say, his heroes and heroines are the gods and goddesses. But what of that? He has seen them in his own light - with the eyes of an ultra-modern vulgarian. Just recollect to your memory his painting, The Descent of the Ganges.What does Mahadeva look like? He is a great wrestler like Gama or Kikkar Singh but with matted hair, wearing a tiger skin; he stands gazing at the sky with his legs apart. And the river Ganges? A film star with her hair dishevelled jumps out of an aeroplane and glides down! And colour? It is sheer gaudiness. I do not know if the vivid expression of vulgarity has attained a better perfection anywhere else than in the works of Ravi Varma. No doubt, there is a plebeian literature as well as a plebeian art which is simple to the extreme. These are the immature creations of the immature creator, who do not make a high claim to display in their creations. Neither do they have any ambition to do so. They express perfectly what they are. But in the painting of Ravi Varma there is an extravagant endeavour to display something infinitely more than what one actually possesses. So the presence of vulgarity is simply unbearable, nay, past correction.

3.19 - Of Dramatic Rituals, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
  the dance and the beheading, on the lines of Oscar Wildes drama [i.e. Salome],
  Peter Paul being cast for the part of John the Baptist. This ceremony was devised

32.11 - Life and Self-Control (A Letter), #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   In general, life is the play-field of the senses. If self-control implies moving away from the senses, then it is not possible for it to have a place in life. But self-control may mean keeping the senses under control, under a system of rule and discipline. This is the popular sense of self-control: it is a graded withdrawal, a first step towards detachment. This is also how it developed in India. But, as a matter of fact, this popular approach to self-control is not India's speciality alone. Europe has given it a recognised place, not only in the Christian religious life but in her worldly life too. But it will not do to forget that the untrammelled freedom of the senses and their unbridled license have been accepted as an ideal specially in modern times, and it is confined to a particular community. What they are now attempting to reject as a bourgeois trait was one day an aid in the building up of the Euorpean society. To be sure, Europe was not so inclined towards detachment as India. Europe has gone in for the cultivation of the senses, but that does not mean that she has been sticking to an excessive and disorderly play of the senses. Neither Byron nor Oscar Wilde is the ultimate ideal of Europe. When the famous novelist Balzac used to sit down to write he would do so in a lonely place in a monk's tunic in order to help his one-pointed concentration. Napoleon, Caesar and Alexander were no helpless slaves of their senses. In fact, no country or race can build its greatness except on the foundation of self-control. It is not that self-control must necessarily be self-mortification. There can be a via media, and in ordinary life this is a necessity. Self-indulgence is the debit side. True, this side of Europe is much to the fore, but that leads one to think that she is living on her old capital, and it is not long before her capital runs short. The root of the capital is self-restraint, and it is the credit side, the side of accumulated power.
   It may certainly be that the social, moral and other kinds of injunctions regarding control of the senses do not strictly apply any more to our modern life. Man's consciousness demands a wider and more liberal existence. Not a religion of mental conventions but a universal one founded on truth is what he wants. But that is altogether another matter. This problem and its solution will lead us into deeper waters. Hence we have to stop here.

33.07 - Alipore Jail, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   How direct the touch of something eternally true, of a refuge unassailable, a fearless state and foundation unshaken was brought by the words of Vivekananda! They did in truth bring one near to the Self and impart strength, atmada, balada. Later, I read about Oscar Wilde and his experiences in jail, his De Profundis. Whenever I seemed to fall into some deep abyss, immediately there would surge up from the inner depths an aspiration for the heights. This for me was truly the darkest night before dawn.
   One day, as I sat deeply brooding with a rather heavy weight on my head, suddenly there came the feeling of a something that was clear and bright and calm, "the horizons grew bright, the winds felt delightful," disah praseduh marutah vavuh sukhah. I sensed now as if there was nothing more to worry about. My release was destined, a release that was already manifest within me and in the wind and the sky.

Talks With Sri Aurobindo 1, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  NIRODBARAN: Was Oscar Wilde a friend of your brother?
  SRI AUROBINDO: Yes. He used to visit him every evening and Wilde described
  --
  staring red, but aesthetic. He used to go see Oscar Wilde in that suit. When
  we came back to India, that tailor wrote to the Indian Government about the
  --
  that the latter's mother visited him when she was on her death-bed at a distant place. But my brother was a poet, you must remember very imaginative. And, moreover, he was a friend of Oscar Wilde. (Laughter)
  People say that one telepathises a mental idea and this makes the person
  --
  One could hardly think of Oscar Wilde in jail and yet he went there. The
  only thing such people do is to write immortal books in jail. There is Wilde's
  --
  great poem one becomes a great poet. In that case Oscar Wilde and Chesterton are also great because they have each written a great poem.
  SRI AUROBINDO: Thompson's poem is great in a peculiar way. Of course, if
  --
  His motto was, like Oscar Wilde's, to write on anything he liked.
  SRI AUROBINDO: It depends on how you write. Wilde would have been the last

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun oscar_wilde

The noun oscar wilde has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde ::: (Irish writer and wit (1854-1900))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun oscar_wilde

1 sense of oscar wilde                        

Sense 1
Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright
     => writer, author
       => communicator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun oscar_wilde
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun oscar_wilde

1 sense of oscar wilde                        

Sense 1
Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun oscar_wilde

1 sense of oscar wilde                        

Sense 1
Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
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   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
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   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig
  -> dramatist, playwright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aeschylus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Albee, Edward Albee, Edward Franklin Albeen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Maxwell Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anouilh, Jean Anouilh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barrie, James Barrie, J. M. Barrie, James Matthew Barrie, Sir James Matthew Barrie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beaumont, Francis Beaumont
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brecht, Bertolt Brecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calderon, Calderon de la Barca, Pedro Calderon de la Barca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chekhov, Chekov, Anton Chekhov, Anton Chekov, Anton Pavlovich Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich Chekov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Congreve, William Congreve
   HAS INSTANCE=> Corneille, Pierre Corneille
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coward, Noel Coward, Sir Noel Pierce Coward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crouse, Russel Crouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cyrano de Bergerac, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dekker, Decker, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Decker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dryden, John Dryden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Stearns Eliot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Euripides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fletcher, John Fletcher
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fry, Christopher Fry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fugard, Athol Fugard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garcia Lorca, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Lorca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Genet, Jean Genet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giraudoux, Jean Giraudoux, Hippolyte Jean Giraudoux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldoni, Carlo Goldoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Granville-Barker, Harley Granville-Barker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hart, Moss Hart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Havel, Vaclav Havel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hebbel, Friedrich Hebbel, Christian Friedrich Hebbel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hellman, Lillian Hellman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hugo, Victor Hugo, Victor-Marie Hugo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ibsen, Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Johan Ibsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Inge, William Inge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ionesco, Eugene Ionesco
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jonson, Ben Jonson, Benjamin Jonson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kaufman, George S. Kaufman, George Simon Kaufman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kleist, Heinrich von Kleist, Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kyd, Kid, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Kid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lindsay, Howard Lindsay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Luce, Clare Booth Luce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maeterlinck, Count Maurice Maeterlinck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mamet, David Mamet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marlowe, Christopher Marlowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marstan, John Marstan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Menander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Middleton, Thomas Middleton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Arthur Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moliere, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Molnar, Ferenc Molnar
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Casey, Sean O'Casey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Odets, Clifford Odets
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Neill, Eugene O'Neill, Eugene Gladstone O'Neill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Osborne, John Osborne, John James Osborne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pinter, Harold Pinter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pirandello, Luigi Pirandello
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, George Pitt, George Dibdin Pitt, George Dibdin-Pitt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plautus, Titus Maccius Plautus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Racine, Jean Racine, Jean Baptiste Racine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rattigan, Terence Rattigan, Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rice, Elmer Rice, Elmer Leopold Rice, Elmer Reizenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, Lennox Robinson, Esme Stuart Lennox Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rostand, Edmond Rostand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sartre, Jean-Paul Sartre
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scribe, Augustin Eugene Scribe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shepard, Sam Shepard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sheridan, Richard Brinsley Sheridan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sherwood, Robert Emmet Sherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simon, Neil Simon, Marvin Neil Simon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sophocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoppard, Tom Stoppard, Sir Tom Stoppard, Thomas Straussler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Strindberg, August Strindberg, Johan August Strindberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Synge, J. M. Synge, John Millington Synge, Edmund John Millington Synge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Terence, Publius Terentius Afer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tirso de Molina, Gabriel Tellez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ustinov, Sir Peter Ustinov, Peter Alexander Ustinov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vega, Lope de Vega, Lope Felix de Vega Carpio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webster, John Webster
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Tennessee Williams, Thomas Lanier Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wycherley, William Wycherley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yeats, William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats




--- Grep of noun oscar_wilde
oscar wilde



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