classes ::: media, time, verb, noun,
children :::
branches ::: records

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:records
class:media
class:time
word class:verb
word class:noun

recording behaviours, rating tier's, plotting data, see image of tier over time.

A magical diary is the magicians most essential and powerful tool. It should be large enough to allow a full
page for each day. Students should record the time, duration and degree of success of any practice
undertaken. They should make notes about environmental factors conducive (or otherwise) to the work.
~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null, Liber MMM [13

see also :::

questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
7th_Pass_through_Savitri
Savitri_(my_Integral_Yoga)
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Al-Fihrist
books_(by_alpha)
Enchiridion_text
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Infinite_Library
Let_Me_Explain
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Life_without_Death
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
Process_and_Reality
Record_of_Yoga
Savitri
The_Bible
The_Blue_Cliff_Records
the_Book
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
07.06_-_Record_of_World-History
1.whitman_-_Recorders_Ages_Hence
r1927_07_30_-_Record_of_Drishti

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
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r1909_06_25
r1911_02_09
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r1912_01_14a
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r1912_10_18
r1912_10_18a
r1912_10_26
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r1912_11_10
r1912_11_12
r1912_11_13
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r1912_11_15
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r1912_11_19a
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r1913_04_01
r1913_04_12
r1913_05_19
r1913_05_21
r1913_06_04
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r1914_01_01
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r1915_01_01a
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r1919_07_19
r1919_07_20
r1919_07_21
r1919_07_22
r1919_07_23
r1919_07_24
r1919_07_25
r1919_07_26
r1919_07_27
r1919_07_28
r1919_07_29
r1919_07_30
r1919_07_31
r1919_08_01
r1919_08_02
r1919_08_03
r1919_08_04
r1919_08_05
r1919_08_06
r1919_08_07
r1919_08_10
r1919_08_11
r1919_08_12
r1919_08_13
r1919_08_14
r1919_08_15
r1919_08_18
r1919_08_19
r1919_08_20
r1919_08_21
r1919_08_25
r1919_08_26
r1919_08_27
r1919_08_28
r1919_08_29
r1919_08_30
r1919_08_31
r1919_09_01
r1919_09_02
r1919_09_24
r1920_02_01
r1920_02_04
r1920_02_06
r1920_02_07a
r1920_02_07b
r1920_02_08
r1920_02_09
r1920_02_10
r1920_02_14
r1920_02_19
r1920_02_20
r1920_02_21
r1920_02_22
r1920_02_23
r1920_02_24
r1920_02_25
r1920_02_26
r1920_02_27
r1920_02_28
r1920_02_29
r1920_03_01
r1920_03_02
r1920_03_03
r1920_03_04
r1920_03_05
r1920_03_06
r1920_03_07
r1920_03_08
r1920_03_13
r1920_03_14
r1920_03_15
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r1920_03_17
r1920_03_28
r1920_04_01
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r1920_06_26
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r1927_01_04
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r1927_01_30
r1927_01_31
r1927_02_01
r1927_04_07
r1927_04_08
r1927_04_09a
r1927_04_09b
r1927_04_10
r1927_04_12
r1927_04_13
r1927_04_14
r1927_04_15
r1927_04_16
r1927_04_17
r1927_04_18
r1927_04_22
r1927_07_30_-_Record_of_Drishti
r1927_10_24
r1927_10_25
r1927_10_27
r1927_10_29
r1927_10_30
r1927_10_31

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_0.02_-_Topographical_Note
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.00_-_To_the_Reader
0.02_-_II_-_The_Home_of_the_Guru
0.03_-_III_-_The_Evening_Sittings
0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1957-12-21
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-01-27
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-04-15
0_1961-08-25
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-05
0_1962-01-27
0_1962-05-22
0_1962-07-07
0_1962-08-04
0_1962-08-14
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-12-12
0_1963-01-12
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-03-09
0_1963-03-23
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-07-03
0_1963-09-07
0_1963-11-13
0_1963-12-14
0_1963-12-31
0_1964-01-28
0_1964-04-04
0_1964-07-31
0_1964-08-14
0_1964-08-26
0_1964-09-02
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-11-28
0_1964-12-07
0_1965-02-19
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-05-08
0_1965-06-18_-_supramental_ship
0_1965-07-17
0_1965-12-31
0_1966-05-18
0_1966-06-02
0_1966-08-24
0_1966-09-28
0_1966-10-22
0_1966-11-03
0_1966-11-30
0_1967-04-05
0_1967-07-12
0_1967-07-15
0_1967-09-13
0_1967-10-21
0_1967-11-04
0_1967-11-22
0_1968-07-03
0_1968-07-06
0_1968-08-28
0_1968-11-30
0_1969-02-08
0_1969-02-26
0_1969-03-01
0_1969-04-05
0_1969-04-19
0_1969-05-28
0_1969-07-19
0_1969-07-26
0_1969-11-01
0_1969-11-15
0_1970-02-07
0_1970-04-08
0_1970-04-29
0_1970-05-09
0_1970-05-16
0_1970-10-03
0_1970-11-05
0_1970-11-25
0_1971-01-23
0_1971-04-07
0_1971-04-17
0_1971-08-04
0_1971-09-04
0_1971-12-01
0_1972-01-29
0_1972-03-10
0_1972-03-24
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-03-29b
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-13
0_1972-05-13
0_1972-05-19
0_1972-08-09
0_1973-02-08
0_1973-04-08
0_1973-05-05
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
03.02_-_The_Gradations_of_Consciousness__The_Gradation_of_Planes
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.10_-_The_Mission_of_Buddhism
04.02_-_A_Chapter_of_Human_Evolution
04.02_-_Human_Progress
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.03_-_The_Eternal_East_and_West
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
05.04_-_Of_Beauty_and_Ananda
05.07_-_The_Observer_and_the_Observed
05.10_-_Children_and_Child_Mentality
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.13_-_Darshana_and_Philosophy
05.31_-_Divine_Intervention
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.12_-_The_Expanding_Body-Consciousness
06.22_-_I_Have_Nothing,_I_Am_Nothing
07.01_-_Realisation,_Past_and_Future
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.05_-_This_Mystery_of_Existence
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.06_-_Record_of_World-History
07.07_-_Freedom_and_Destiny
07.17_-_Why_Do_We_Forget_Things?
07.36_-_The_Body_and_the_Psychic
07.38_-_Past_Lives_and_the_Psychic_Being
08.07_-_Sleep_and_Pain
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Ultimate_Path_is_Without_Difficulty
1.02_-_The_Vision_of_the_Past
1.02_-_To_Zen_Monks_Kin_and_Koku
1.03_-_Hieroglypics__Life_and_Language_Necessarily_Symbolic
1.03_-_Man_-_Slave_or_Free?
1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Dharana
1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Work_and_Teaching
1.06_-_Gestalt_and_Universals
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_On_mourning_which_causes_joy.
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Continuity_of_Consciousness
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.080_-_Pratyahara_-_The_Return_of_Energy
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_Summary
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Stead_and_Maskelyne
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
11.04_-_The_Triple_Cord
1.1.05_-_The_Siddhis
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_On_our_Knowledge_of_Universals
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_Woolly_Pomposities_of_the_Pious_Teacher
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_Independence
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.1.3_-_Mental_Difficulties_and_the_Need_of_Quietude
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Suprarational_Beauty
1.15_-_Sex_Morality
1.15_-_SILENCE
1.15_-_The_Supreme_Truth-Consciousness
1.16_-_On_Concentration
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
1.19_-_The_Third_Bolgia__Simoniacs._Pope_Nicholas_III._Dante's_Reproof_of_corrupt_Prelates.
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.21_-_Chih_Men's_Lotus_Flower,_Lotus_Leaves
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.23_-_THE_MIRACULOUS
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_Kinks_in_Time
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.28_-_The_Ninth_Bolgia__Schismatics._Mahomet_and_Ali._Pier_da_Medicina,_Curio,_Mosca,_and_Bertr_and_de_Born.
1.29_-_Geri_del_Bello._The_Tenth_Bolgia__Alchemists._Griffolino_d'_Arezzo_and_Capocchino._The_many_people_and_the_divers_wounds
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.33_-_The_Golden_Mean
1.34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after_the_reception_of_the_Most_Holy_Sacrament.
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
1.439
1.43_-_Dionysus
1.45_-_Unserious_Conduct_of_a_Pupil
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.55_-_The_Transference_of_Evil
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.60_-_Knack
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.63_-_The_Interpretation_of_the_Fire-Festivals
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.66_-_Vampires
1.68_-_The_Golden_Bough
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
1.81_-_Method_of_Training
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-06-30_-_Repulsion_felt_towards_certain_animals,_etc_-_Source_of_evil,_Formateurs_-_Material_world
1935_01_04p
1951-01-20_-_Developing_the_mind._Misfortunes,_suffering;_developed_reason._Knowledge_and_pure_ideas.
1951-02-05_-_Surrender_and_tapasya_-_Dealing_with_difficulties,_sincerity,_spiritual_discipline_-_Narrating_experiences_-_Vital_impulse_and_will_for_progress
1951-02-15_-_Dreams,_symbolic_-_true_repose_-_False_visions_-_Earth-memory_and_history
1951-02-24_-_Psychic_being_and_entity_-_dimensions_-_in_the_atom_-_Death_-_exteriorisation_-_unconsciousness_-_Past_lives_-_progress_upon_earth_-_choice_of_birth_-_Consecration_to_divine_Work_-_psychic_memories_-_Individualisation_-_progress
1951-02-26_-_On_reading_books_-_gossip_-_Discipline_and_realisation_-_Imaginary_stories-_value_of_-_Private_lives_of_big_men_-_relaxation_-_Understanding_others_-_gnostic_consciousness
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1953-04-22
1953-07-29
1953-09-30
1953-11-25
1954-02-10_-_Study_a_variety_of_subjects_-_Memory_-Memory_of_past_lives_-_Getting_rid_of_unpleasant_thoughts
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-10-20_-_Stand_back_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Seeing_images_in_meditation_-_Berlioz_-Music_-_Mothers_organ_music_-_Destiny
1954-11-03_-_Body_opening_to_the_Divine_-_Concentration_in_the_heart_-_The_army_of_the_Divine_-_The_knot_of_the_ego_-Streng_thening_ones_will
1955-04-27_-_Symbolic_dreams_and_visions_-_Curing_pain_by_various_methods_-_Different_states_of_consciousness_-_Seeing_oneself_dead_in_a_dream_-_Exteriorisation
1956-02-08_-_Forces_of_Nature_expressing_a_higher_Will_-_Illusion_of_separate_personality_-_One_dynamic_force_which_moves_all_things_-_Linear_and_spherical_thinking_-_Common_ideal_of_life,_microscopic
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1958-02-26_-_The_moon_and_the_stars_-_Horoscopes_and_yoga
1958-03-12_-_The_key_of_past_transformations
1958-09-03_-_How_to_discipline_the_imagination_-_Mental_formations
1960_06_22
1961_03_11_-_58
1962_02_27
1.anon_-_But_little_better
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Martins_Beach
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Slaying_of_the_Monster
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Pompeii_And_Herculaneum
1.jk_-_Dawlish_Fair
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Lines_On_Seeing_A_Lock_Of_Miltons_Hair
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Indolence
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jk_-_Sonnet_III._Written_On_The_Day_That_Mr._Leigh_Hunt_Left_Prison
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IX._Keen,_Fitful_Gusts_Are
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Before_Re-Read_King_Lear
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Shakespeares_Poems,_Facing_A_Lovers_Complaint
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Space_At_The_End_Of_Chaucers_Tale_Of_The_Floure_And_The_Lefe
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Upon_The_Top_Of_Ben_Nevis
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XV._On_The_Grasshopper_And_Cricket
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanzas_On_Charles_Armitage_Brown
1.jk_-_To_Ailsa_Rock
1.jk_-_Written_In_The_Cottage_Where_Burns_Was_Born
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.pbs_-_Marenghi
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VI.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_Vi_(Excerpts)
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VII.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_The_Conversation_Of_Eiros_And_Charmion
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_The_Lost_Leader
1.rb_-_The_Pied_Piper_Of_Hamelin
1.rmr_-_The_Alchemist
1.rt_-_All_These_I_Loved
1.rt_-_At_The_End_Of_The_Day
1.rt_-_My_Pole_Star
1.rt_-_The_Call_Of_The_Far
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XVI_-_Hands_Cling_To_Eyes
1.rt_-_Waiting_For_The_Beloved
1.rwe_-_Astrae
1.rwe_-_From_the_Persian_of_Hafiz_II
1.rwe_-_In_Memoriam
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.wby_-_A_Memory_Of_Youth
1.wby_-_Easter_1916
1.wby_-_Fallen_Majesty
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Manhattan_Streets_I_Saunterd,_Pondering
1.whitman_-_Recorders_Ages_Hence
1.whitman_-_Salut_Au_Monde
1.whitman_-_Turn,_O_Libertad
1.whitman_-_Unnamed_Lands
1.whitman_-_What_Think_You_I_Take_My_Pen_In_Hand?
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_A_Prophecy._February_1807
1.ww_-_Artegal_And_Elidure
1.ww_-_Behold_Vale!_I_Said,_When_I_Shall_Con
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Ninth_[Residence_in_France]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_She_Was_A_Phantom_Of_Delight
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Horn_Of_Egremont_Castle
1.ww_-_The_Old_Cumberland_Beggar
1.ww_-_The_Prelude,_Book_1-_Childhood_And_School-Time
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Fourth
1.ww_-_To--_On_Her_First_Ascent_To_The_Summit_Of_Helvellyn
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_(John_Dyer)
1.ww_-_Tribute_To_The_Memory_Of_The_Same_Dog
2.00_-_BIBLIOGRAPHY
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.02_-_Atomic_Motions
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_The_Purified_Understanding
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.09_-_Memory,_Ego_and_Self-Experience
2.09_-_SEVEN_REASONS_WHY_A_SCIENTIST_BELIEVES_IN_GOD
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.11_-_The_Boundaries_of_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_The_Book
2.14_-_The_Bell
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.02_-_Consciousness_and_the_Inconscient
2.2.1_-_Cheerfulness_and_Happiness
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.24_-_Note_on_the_Text
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.3.01_-_The_Planes_or_Worlds_of_Consciousness
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
2.3.08_-_The_Physical_Consciousness
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
27.02_-_The_Human_Touch_Divine
29.04_-_Mothers_Playground
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Introduction
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Formulae_of_the_Elemental_Weapons
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_The_Four_Foundational_Practices
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.1.02_-_A_Theory_of_the_Human_Being
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
3.10_-_Punishment
3.11_-_Of_Our_Lady_Babalon
3.11_-_Spells
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.17_-_Of_the_License_to_Depart
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.09_-_Shyampukur
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.4.02_-_The_Inconscient
3-5_Full_Circle
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
3.8.1.04_-_Different_Methods_of_Writing
4.01_-_Sweetness_in_Prayer
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.05_-_The_Instruments_of_the_Spirit
4.14_-_The_Power_of_the_Instruments
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.25_-_Towards_the_supramental_Time_Vision
4.26_-_The_Supramental_Time_Consciousness
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.1.01.6_-_The_Book_of_the_Chieftains
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.02_-_Courage
7.02_-_The_Mind
7.16_-_Sympathy
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Apology
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
Averroes_Search
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
Chapter_III_-_WHEREIN_IS_RELATED_THE_DROLL_WAY_IN_WHICH_DON_QUIXOTE_HAD_HIMSELF_DUBBED_A_KNIGHT
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
DS2
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
IS_-_Chapter_1
Kafka_and_His_Precursors
Liber
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
Liber_MMM
LUX.06_-_DIVINATION
Meno
MMM.01_-_MIND_CONTROL
MMM.02_-_MAGIC
MMM.03_-_DREAMING
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Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_500-550
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Philippians
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Gold_Bug
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Immortal
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus

PRIMARY CLASS

media
time
SIMILAR TITLES
records
The Blue Cliff Records

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

records, it is not clear whether Symnay joined

records {record}

Records of ancient medicine in Babylonia, Egypt, Greece, etc., tell of the temples being used as hospitals, with priest-physicians supported by the state giving every care to the sick who came, both rich and poor. In addition to material means of treatment — many of which we have rediscovered — these devotees of the gods of healing used special incense, prayers, the “temple sleep,” invocations, music, astrology, etc., which we regard as harmless superstition of an earlier day. However, such conditions, intelligently adapted to each case, in making a pure, serene, uplifting atmosphere around the sick person, would invoke the influences of wholeness within and without him. By putting the inner man in tune with his body, his disordered nature-forces manifesting as disease would tend to flow freely in the currents of health. Natural magic is as practical as the unknown alchemy which transmutes our digested daily bread into molecules of our living body.


TERMS ANYWHERE

ABC method - Inventory management method that categorizes items in terms of importance. Thus, more emphasis is placed on higher dol­lar value items (As) than on lesser dollar value items (Bs), while the least important items (Cs) receive the least time and attention. Inventory should be analyzed frequently when using the ABC method. The procedure for ABC analysis follows: (1) Separate finished goods into types (chairs of different models, and so on); separate raw materials into types (screws, nuts, and so on). (2) Calculate the annual dollar usage for each type of inventory (multiply the unit cost by the expected future annual usage). (3) Rank each inventory type from highest to lowest, based on annual dollar usage. (4) Classify the inven­tory as A-the top 20%; B-the next 30%; and C-the last 50% of dollars usage, respectively. (5) Tag the inventory with its appropriate ABC classification and record those classifications in the item inventory master records.

Accountant - One who performs accounting services. Accountants prepare financial statements and tax returns, audit financial records, and develop financial plans. They work in private accounting (e.g., for a corporation), public accounting (e.g., for a CPA. firm), not-for-profit accounting (e.g., for a governmental agency). Accountants often specialise in a particular area such as taxes, cost accounting, auditing, and management advisory services. A book keeper is distinguished from an accountant as one who employs lesser professional skills. The book­keeping function is primarily one of recording transactions in the journal and posting to the. ledger

Accounting event - Transaction entered in the accounting records of a business. It can be an external transaction that is, one with an out­sider, such as recording a sale. It can also refer to an internal transaction such as making an adjusting entry (e.g., expense or revenue accrual).

Accounting File "operating system" A file which holds records of the resources used by individual jobs. These records are used to regulate, and calculate charges for, resources. An entry is opened in the accounting file as each job begins. (1996-12-08)

Accounting File ::: (operating system) A file which holds records of the resources used by individual jobs. These records are used to regulate, and calculate charges for, resources. An entry is opened in the accounting file as each job begins. (1996-12-08)

Accounting system - Methods, procedures, and standards followed in accumulating, classifying, recording, and reporting business events and transactions. The accounting system includes the formal records and original source data. Regulatory requirements may exist on how a particular accounting system is to be maintained (e.g., insurance company).

Accounts receivable ledger - A subsidiary ledger which holds the individual records of the business credit customers. The general ledger simply has the total amount that is taken from this ledger.

Accounts - The financial records of a business' transactions.

Accumulated depreciation account- This is an account in general ledger which records the combined amount of depreciation that has been charged against that asset. When the value in this account is equal to the purchase price of the fixed asset the asset is said to have been written off. All fixed assets (except land) have their own accumulated depreciation account. Also referred to as PFD (provision for depreciation).

activation record ::: (compiler) (Or data frame, stack frame) A data structure containing the variables belonging to one particular scope (e.g. a procedure body), as well as links to other activation records.Activation records are usually created (on the stack) on entry to a block and destroyed on exit. If a procedure or function may be returned as a result, chains of links between activation records. There are two kinds of link - the static link and the dynamic link. (1995-03-07)

activation record "compiler" (Or "data frame", "stack frame") A data structure containing the variables belonging to one particular {scope} (e.g. a procedure body), as well as links to other activation records. Activation records are usually created (on the {stack}) on entry to a block and destroyed on exit. If a procedure or function may be returned as a result, stored in a variable and used in an outer scope then its activation record must be stored in a {heap} so that its variables still exist when it is used. Variables in the current {scope} are accessed via the {frame pointer} which points to the current activation record. Variables in an outer scope are accessed by following chains of links between activation records. There are two kinds of link - the {static link} and the {dynamic link}. (1995-03-07)

Adaptive Digital Pulse Code Modulation "communications" (ADPCM) A {compression} technique which records only the difference between samples and adjusts the coding scale dynamically to accomodate large and small differences. ADPCM is simple to implement, but introduces much {noise}. [Used where? Does the {Sony} minidisk use ADPCM or {ATRAC}?] (1998-12-10)

Adaptive Digital Pulse Code Modulation ::: (communications) (ADPCM) A compression technique which records only the difference between samples and adjusts the coding scale dynamically to accomodate large and small differences. ADPCM is simple to implement, but introduces much noise.[Used where? Does the Sony minidisk use ADPCM or ATRAC?] (1998-12-10)

Aethiopians, Ethiopians An undefined but powerful group of peoples, generally placed south of Egypt and east of Babylon; often spoken of as being at one time a monarchy and able to contribute kings to the Egyptian throne. Blavatsky shows the archaic racial connection between Egypt and India (SD 2:417; IU 1:569-70). Migrants from northwestern India to Africa took with them the names of their great river, variously called Aethiops or Nila, now called the Indus. These immigrants were the so-called Sons of Horus or Blacksmiths of Egyptian records, mighty builders but somewhat later than the Atlantean descendants who built the first pyramids. This makes the Aethiopians — and also, therefore, some of the Egyptians — Aryans. A highly advanced urban civilization of Mohenjo-Daro has been discovered on the Indus “between Attock and Sind,” exactly the location mentioned in The Secret Doctrine as the abode of the Aethiopians.

Agrasamdhani (Sanskrit) Agrasaṃdhānī [from agra foremost, beginning + sam together, with + the verbal root dhā to fasten, unite] That which is fastened or strung together from the beginning; the register of human actions kept by Yama, Hindu god of the dead; linked with Chitragupta, scribe of Yama, who records in the Agrasamdhani the deeds and thoughts of every human being (cf MB 13). See also LIPIKA

Akasha: In occultism, a celestial ether, or astral light that fills all space. According to occult teaching, every thought and action which takes place in the material world, is recorded in this akashic medium, whereby one possessed of psychic vision can read and translate the panorama of history, the Akashic Records. They also hint that some day science will be able to tap this record and thus draw upon and even re-enact the words and actions of past ages. (Also spelled Akasa.)

Akashic Records ::: A form of collective memory that can be tapped into via symbolic resonance and is associated mainly with archetypes on the Mental Plane and their Astral counterparts (the visualizations through which they are accessed).

AKASHIC RECORDS (Q.) Such globe memories as can be reached with emotional clairvoyance (48:4-7). They do not contain the past of the planet, but what people in all times have believed about this past. The real akasha, the akasha of the planetary hierarchy, is world 44. (K 6.9)

Akashic Records: Scenic representations of every action, sentiment and thought since the beginning of the world. (Cf. Akasha.)

all parts of the earth. Talmud records that Adam

Although said to have written one thousand books “his great work, however, the heart of his doctrine, the ‘Tao-te-King,’ or the sacred scriptures of the Taosse, has in it, as Stanislas Julien shows, only ‘about 5,000 words,’ hardly a dozen of pages, yet Professor Max Muller finds that ‘the text is unintelligible without commentaries, so that Mr. Julien had to consult more than sixty commentators for the purpose of his translation,’ the earliest going back as far as the year 163 BC, not earlier, as we see. During the four centuries and a half that preceded this earliest of the commentators there was ample time to veil the true Lao-Tse doctrine from all but his initiated priests. . . . Tradition affirms that the commentaries to which our Western Sinologues have access are not the real occult records, but intentional veils, and that the true commentaries, as well as almost all the texts, have long since disappeared from the eyes of the profane” (SD 1:xxv).

and keepers of the celestial records, the cherubim

annals ::: n. pl. --> A relation of events in chronological order, each event being recorded under the year in which it happened.
Historical records; chronicles; history.
The record of a single event or item.
A periodic publication, containing records of discoveries, transactions of societies, etc.; as "Annals of Science."


Anxi guo. (J. Ansoku koku; K. Ansik kuk 安息國). Chinese transcription of the Parthian proper name Aršak, referring to the Arsacid kingdom (c. 250 BCE-224 CE) in the region Roman geographers called PARTHIA. Aršak was the name adopted by all Parthian rulers, and the Chinese employed it to refer to the lands that those rulers controlled to the southeast of the Caspian Sea. In the Marv oasis, where the old Parthian city of Margiana was located, Soviet archeologists discovered the vestiges of a Buddhist monastic complex that has been dated to the third quarter of the fourth century CE, as well as birch-bark manuscripts written in the BRAHMĪ script that are associated with the SARVASTIVADA school of mainstream Buddhism. There is therefore archaeological evidence of at least a semblance of Buddhist presence in the area during the fourth through sixth centuries. Parthian Buddhists who were active in China enable us to push this dating back at least two more centuries, for two of the important early figures in the transmission of Buddhist texts into China also hailed from Parthia: AN SHIGAO (fl. c. 148-180 CE), a prolific translator of mainstream Buddhist works, and An Xuan (fl. c. 168-189), who translated the UGRAPARIPṚCCHA with the assistance of the Chinese Yan Fotiao. (The AN in their names is an ethnikon referring to Parthia.) There is, however, no extant Buddhist literature written in the Parthian language and indeed little evidence that written Parthian was ever used in other than government documents and financial records until the third century CE, when Manichaean texts written in Parthian begin to appear.

A profound lore of numbers, measures, and their relation to the cosmic plan impelled their architects to build their records according to these now forgotten mathematical principles. Many investigators have discovered fragments of this lore but have not succeeded in reconstructing the whole out of the fragments.

archival ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or contained in, archives or records.

archive ::: n. --> The place in which public records or historic documents are kept.
Public records or documents preserved as evidence of facts; as, the archives of a country or family.


archives ::: preserved historical records or documents, also the place where they are kept.

archivist ::: n. --> A keeper of archives or records.

Asokan pillars. Stone pillars erected or embellished during the reign of King AsOKA, many of which bear royal edicts attesting to the king's support of the "dharma" and putatively of Buddhism. Although later Buddhist records mention more than forty such pillars, less than half of these have been identified. At least some pillars predate Asoka's ascendance, but most were erected by the king to commemorate his pilgrimage to sacred Buddhist sites or as Buddhist memorials. One representative example, located at LauriyA Nandangaṛh, stands nearly forty feet tall and extends over ten feet below the ground. The heaviest may weigh up to 75,000 pounds. The pillar edicts form some of the earliest extant written records in the Indian subcontinent and typically avoid mentioning Buddhist philosophy, offering instead general support of dharma, or righteousness, and in some cases of the Buddhist SAMGHA. At one time, the pillars supported stone capitals in the form of animals such as the bull. One Asokan innovation was the use of lion capitals, the most famous being a lotus vase supporting a drum of four wheels and other animals, topped with four lions and a wheel (now missing). The use of lion symbolism may have been a direct reference to the sAKYA clan of the Buddha, which took the lion (siMha) as its emblem.

AsokAvadAna. (T. Ku nA la'i rtogs pa brjod pa; C. Ayu wang zhuan; J. Aiku o den; K. Ayuk wang chon 阿育王傳). In Sanskrit, "The Story of Asoka," a text belonging to the category of "edifying tales" (AVADANA), which narrates the major events in the life of King AsOKA of the Indian Mauryan dynasty. The work focuses primarily on Asoka's conversion to Buddhism, his subsequent support of the DHARMA and monastic community (SAMGHA), his visits to the major sites of the Buddha's life (MAHASTHANA), and his construction of STuPAs. It also records the transmission of the Buddhist teachings by five early teachers: MAHAKAsYAPA, ANANDA, MADHYANTIKA, sAnAKAVASIN, and UPAGUPTA. The AsokAvadAna relates that, in a previous life, Asoka (then a small boy named Jaya) placed a handful of dirt in the Buddha's begging bowl (PATRA). The Buddha predicted that one hundred years after his passage into nirvAna, the child would become a DHARMARAJA and CAKRAVARTIN named Asoka. As emperor, Asoka becomes a devout Buddhist and righteous king, renowned for collecting the relics (sARĪRA) of the Buddha from eight (or in one version, seven of eight) stupas and redistributing them in 84,000 stupas across his realm. Parts of the Sanskrit text have been preserved in the DIVYAVADANA, and the entire work is extant in Chinese. Only the KunAla chapter of the AsokAvadAna was rendered into Tibetan, in the eleventh century, by PadmAkaravarman and RIN CHEN BZANG PO.

Asukadera. (飛鳥寺) In Japanese, "Asuka Temple"; also known as Hokoji ("Monastery of the Flourishing Dharma"), the Asukadera was built during the ASUKA period on a site known as the Amakashi no Oka by the Asuka River near Nara, Japan. Shortly after the death of Emperor Yomei in 587, the powerful vassals Mononobe no Moriya (d. 587), who represented the indigenous ritual specialists, and Soga no Umako (551?-626), a supporter of Buddhism who came from the Korean peninsula, found themselves caught in battle over imperial succession. In celebration of the Soga clan's victory over the Mononobe and the death of Moriya, the Soga commenced the construction of the first complete monastic compound in Japan, which they named Hokoji in 588. Hokoji was completed nine years later in 596 and for more than a century served as the central monastic complex of the Yamato court. The large monastic compound contained a central hall or KONDo and a central pagoda flanked by two other halls. A large lecture hall flanked by a belfry and SuTRA repository was located behind the main monastic complex. According to the NIHON SHOKI ("Historical Records of Japan"), Empress Suiko commissioned two sixteen-feet gilt-bronze icons of the Buddha to be made by Tori Busshi for installment in Hokoji. When the capital was moved from Fujiwarakyo to Heijokyo (modern-day Nara) in 710, the major monasteries including Hokoji were moved as well. Hokoji, otherwise known as Asukadera, was subsequently renamed Gangoji.

Asuka. (飛鳥). Japan's first historical epoch, named after a region in the plains south of modern NARA. Until the eighth century (710) when the capital was moved to Nara, a new palace, and virtually a new capital, was built every time a new ruler succeeded to the throne. One of the earliest capitals was located in the region of Asuka. The Asuka period is characterized by the rise of powerful aristocratic clans such as the Soga and Mononobe and attempts such as the Taika reform (646) to counteract the rise of these clans and to strengthen the authority of the emperor. According to the NIHON SHOKI ("Historical Records of Japan"), the inception of Buddhism occurred in the Japanese isles during this period, when Emperor Kimmei (r. 532-571) received an image of the Buddha from the King Songmyong of the Korean kingdom of Paekche in 552 (var. 538). Buddhism became the central religion of the Asuka court with the support of such famous figures as Prince SHoTOKU, Empress Suiko (r. 593-628), and Empress Jito (r. 686-697). After the establishment of the grand monastery ASUKADERA by the descendants of a Korean clan, other temples modeled after early Chinese monastery campuses, such as HoRYuJI, were also constructed during this period. These temples enshrined the magnificent sculptures executed by Tori Busshi.

Asuramaya (Sanskrit) Asuramaya Also Mayāsura, Mayeśvara. Legendary astronomer spoken of in Sanskrit literature as versed in magic, astronomy, and military science. “In the old Stanzas Pesh-Hun is credited with having calculated and recorded all the astronomical and cosmic cycles to come, and with having taught the Science to the first gazers at the starry vault. And it is Asuramaya, who is said to have based all his astronomical works upon those records, to have determined the duration of all the past geological and cosmical periods, and the length of all the cycles to come, till the end of this life-cycle, or the end of the seventh Race. . . .

A trade_line ::: is a record of activity for any type of credit extended to a borrower and reported to a credit reporting agency. A trade line is established on a borrower’s credit report when a borrower is approved for credit. The trade line records all of the activity associated with an account. Comprehensively trade lines are used by credit reporting agencies to calculate a borrower’s credit score. Different credit reporting agencies give differing weights to the activities of trade lines when establishing a credit score for borrowers.

Auditing evidence - Proof the auditor uses to substantiate a recorded item so that proper reliance may be placed on financial state­ment figures. Proof of accounting data includes examining source documents in support of a transaction. The degree to which evidence gathering is necessary partly depends on the quality of the client's internal control system. Also, the trend in an account should be looked at over time as a basis for determining the extent of testing required. For example, if travel expense went from 2% of sales last year to 25% of sales this year, this inconsistency requires close examination. Test checks of accounts and transactions are necessary. Evidence can be obtained through various means such as physical verification of inventory records or confirmation letters sent to verify recorded amounts of accounts receivable.

Automated Engineering Design ::: (language) (AED) (Or ALGOL Extended for Design) A systems language for the IBM 7090 and IBM 360 developed at MIT System Laboratory ca. 1965 by a team records (plexes), pointers, and dynamic allocation. DYNAMO II was written in AED, as was the first BCPL compiler.Versions: AED-0, AED-1, AED-JR.[The Automated Engineering Design (AED) Approach to Generalized Computer-Aided Design, D.T. Ross, Proc ACM 22nd Natl Conf, 1967].[Sammet 1969 and 1978]. (1995-03-26)

Automated Engineering Design "language" (AED) (Or "ALGOL Extended for Design") A systems language for the {IBM 7090} and {IBM 360} developed at {MIT} System Laboratory ca. 1965 by a team led by Douglas T. Ross (now at {Softech}). AED is an extension of {ALGOL 60} with {records} ("plexes"), pointers, and {dynamic allocation}. {DYNAMO II} was written in AED, as was the first {BCPL} {compiler}. Versions: AED-0, AED-1, AED-JR. ["The Automated Engineering Design (AED) Approach to Generalized Computer-Aided Design", D.T. Ross, Proc ACM 22nd Natl Conf, 1967]. [Sammet 1969 and 1978]. (1995-03-26)

Automatic Number Identification "communications" (ANI) A service that tells the recipient of a telephone call the telephone number of the person making the call. This number can be passed to computer equipment to automatically retrieve associated information about the caller, i.e. account status, billing records, etc. See {CTI}. (1996-12-08)

Automatic Number Identification ::: (communications) (ANI) A service that tells the recipient of a telephone call the telephone number of the person making the call. This number can be passed to computer equipment to automatically retrieve associated information about the caller, i.e. account status, billing records, etc.See CTI. (1996-12-08)

Balance of payments (BOP) - Record of the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. There are three main accounts in the balance of payments: (I) the current account, (2) the capital account, and (3) gold. The current account records trade in goods and services, as well as transfer payments. Services include freight, royalty payments, and interest payments. Transfer payments consist of remittances, gifts, and grants. The balance of trade simply records trade in goods. The capital account records purchases and sales of investments, such as stocks, bonds and land.

Baolin zhuan. (J. Horinden; K. Porim chon 寶林傳). In Chinese, "Chronicle of the Bejeweled Forest (Monastery)"; an important early lineage record of the early Chinese CHAN tradition, in ten rolls; also known as Da Tang Shaozhou Shuangfeng shan Caoxi Baolin zhuan or Caoxi Baolin zhuan. The title refers to Baolinsi, the monastery in which HUINENG, the legendary "sixth patriarch" (LIUZU) of Chan, resided. The Baolin zhuan was compiled by the obscure monk Zhiju (or Huiju) in 801, and only an incomplete version of this text remains (rolls 7, 9, 10 are no longer extant). As one of the earliest extant records of the crucial CHAN legend of patriarchal succession (cf. FASI, ZUSHI), the Baolin zhuan offers a rare glimpse into how the early Chan tradition conceived of the school's unique place in Buddhist history. Texts like the Baolin zhuan helped pave the way for the rise of a new genre of writing, called the "transmission of the lamplight records" (CHUANDENG LU), which provides much more elaborate details on the principal and collateral lineages of the various Chan traditions. The Baolin zhuan's list of patriarchs includes the buddha sAKYAMUNI, twenty-eight Indian patriarchs beginning with MAHAKAsYAPA down to BODHIDHARMA (the Baolin Zhuan is the earliest extant text to provide this account), and the six Chinese patriarchs: Bodhidharma, HUIKE, SENGCAN, DAOXIN, HONGREN, and HUINENG (the Baolin zhuan's entries on the last three figures are no longer extant). For each patriarch, the text gives a short biography and transmission verse (GATHA).

Beal, Samuel. (1825-1889). British translator of Chinese Buddhist works. A graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge, he worked as a chaplain in the British navy and rector of various Anglican parishes, including Wark and Northumberland. In 1877, Beal was appointed as lecturer, and later professor, of Chinese at University College, London, where he specialized in Chinese Buddhist materials. Beal is perhaps best known for his translations of the travelogues of Chinese Buddhist pilgrims to India, including FAXIAN (c. 399/337-422), Song Yun (c. 516-523), and XUANZANG (600/602-664). Especially influential was his translation of Xuanzang's travelogue DA TANG XIYU JI, which he rendered as Si-Yu-Ki: Buddhist Records of the Western World (two volumes, 1884). Beal's anthology of Chinese Buddhist texts, A Catena of Buddhist Scriptures from the Chinese (1872), includes translations of a wide range of important Buddhist texts. Beal also compiled one of the first Western-language catalogues of the Chinese Buddhist canon. Other books of his include The Romantic Legend of sAkya Buddha (1876) and Texts from the Buddhist Canon, commonly known as Dhammapada (1878).

Because of their lofty position, they are identified with the universal intelligence, as its immediate vehicles or channels. Thus they are not only the channels but the imbodiments of karma, and therefore not only the interpreters or agents of karma, but the recorders or scribes upwards into cosmic ideation of whatever takes place on lower planes. Their function is thus dual: imbodiments, channels, or interpreters of karma to be worked out in the universe in which the lipikas function, and thus agents of cosmic ideation; and second, as the scribes or recorders of the innumerably multitudinous karmic records of the beings below themselves.

BhAvanAkrama. (T. Sgom rim). In Sanskrit, "Stages of Meditation," the title of three separate but related works by the late-eighth century Indian master KAMALAsĪLA. During the reign of the Tibetan king KHRI SRONG LDE BTSAN at the end of the eighth century, there were two Buddhist factions at court, a Chinese faction led by the Northern Chan (BEI ZONG) monk Heshang Moheyan (MahAyAna) and an Indian faction of the recently deceased sANTARAKsITA, who with the king and PADMASAMBHAVA had founded the first Tibetan monastery at BSAM YAS (Samye). According to traditional accounts, sAntaraksita foretold of dangers and left instructions in his will that his student Kamalasīla should be summoned from India. A conflict seems to have developed between the Indian and Chinese partisans (and their allies in the Tibetan court) over the question of the nature of enlightenment, with the Indians holding that enlightenment takes place as the culmination of a gradual process of purification, the result of perfecting morality (sĪLA), concentration (SAMADHI), and wisdom (PRAJNA). The Chinese spoke against this view, holding that enlightenment was the intrinsic nature of the mind rather than the goal of a protracted path, such that one need simply to recognize the presence of this innate nature of enlightenment by entering a state of awareness beyond distinctions; all other practices were superfluous. According to both Chinese and Tibetan records, a debate was held between Kamalasīla and Moheyan at Bsam yas, circa 797, with the king himself serving as judge (see BSAM YAS DEBATE). According to Tibetan reports (contradicted by the Chinese accounts), Kamalasīla was declared the winner and Moheyan and his party banished from Tibet, with the king proclaiming that thereafter the MADHYAMAKA school of Indian Buddhist philosophy (to which sAntaraksita and Kamalasīla belonged) would have pride of place in Tibet. ¶ According to Tibetan accounts, after the conclusion of the debate, the king requested that Kamalasīla compose works that presented his view, and in response, Kamalasīla composed the three BhAvanAkrama. There is considerable overlap among the three works. All three are germane to the issues raised in the debate, although whether all three were composed in Tibet is not established with certainty; only the third, and briefest of the three, directly considers, and refutes, the view of "no mental activity" (amanasikAra, cf. WUNIAN), which is associated with Moheyan. The three texts set forth the process for the potential BODHISATTVA to cultivate BODHICITTA and then develop sAMATHA and VIPAsYANA and progress through the bodhisattva stages (BHuMI) to buddhahood. The cultivation of vipasyanA requires the use of both scripture (AGAMA) and reasoning (YUKTI) to understand emptiness (suNYATA); in the first BhAvanAkrama, Kamalasīla sets forth the three forms of wisdom (prajNA): the wisdom derived from learning (sRUTAMAYĪPRAJNA), the wisdom derived from reflection (CINTAMAYĪPRAJNA), and the wisdom derived from cultivation (BHAVANAMAYĪPRAJNA), explaining that the last of these gradually destroys the afflictive obstructions (KLEsAVARAnA) and the obstructions to omniscience (JNEYAVARAnA). The second BhAvanAkrama considers many of these same topics, stressing that the achievement of the fruition of buddhahood requires the necessary causes, in the form of the collection of merit (PUnYASAMBHARA) and the collection of wisdom (JNANASAMBHARA). Both the first and second works espouse the doctrine of mind-only (CITTAMATRA); it is on the basis of these and other statements that Tibetan doxographers classified Kamalasīla as a YOGACARA-SVATANTRIKA-MADHYAMAKA. The third and briefest of the BhAvanAkrama is devoted especially to the topics of samatha and vipasyanA, how each is cultivated, and how they are ultimately unified. Kamalasīla argues that analysis (VICARA) into the lack of self (ATMAN) in both persons (PUDGALA) and phenomena (DHARMA) is required to arrive at a nonconceptual state of awareness. The three texts are widely cited in later Tibetan Buddhist literature, especially on the process for developing samatha and vipasyanA.

bit ::: (unit) (b) binary digit.The unit of information; the amount of information obtained by asking a yes-or-no question; a computational quantity that can take on one of two values, such as false and true or 0 and 1; the smallest unit of storage - sufficient to hold one bit.A bit is said to be set if its value is true or 1, and reset or clear if its value is false or 0. One speaks of setting and clearing bits. To toggle or invert a bit is to change it, either from 0 to 1 or from 1 to 0.The term bit first appeared in print in the computer-science sense in 1949, and seems to have been coined by the eminent statistician, John Tukey. Tukey records that it evolved over a lunch table as a handier alternative to bigit or binit.See also flag, trit, mode bit, byte, word.[Jargon File](2002-01-22)

bit "unit" (b) {binary} digit. The unit of information; the amount of information obtained by asking a yes-or-no question; a computational quantity that can take on one of two values, such as false and true or 0 and 1; the smallest unit of storage - sufficient to hold one bit. A bit is said to be "set" if its value is true or 1, and "reset" or "clear" if its value is false or 0. One speaks of setting and clearing bits. To {toggle} or "invert" a bit is to change it, either from 0 to 1 or from 1 to 0. The term "bit" first appeared in print in the computer-science sense in 1949, and seems to have been coined by the eminent statistician, {John Tukey}. Tukey records that it evolved over a lunch table as a handier alternative to "bigit" or "binit". See also {flag}, {trit}, {mode bit}, {byte}, {word}. [{Jargon File}] (2002-01-22)

Blavatsky mentions him as being “a pious mystic and great adept,” said “to have obtained his knowledge from the ‘great teachers of the Snowy Range’ in Si-dzang” (Hsi Tsang or Tibet), these great teachers being called “brothers of the Sun in the Chinese records” (SD 1:271n).

Blavatsky wrote that astrology is the “science which defines the action of celestial bodies upon mundane affairs, and claims to foretell future events from the positions of the stars. Its antiquity is such as to place it among the very earliest records of human learning. It remained for long ages a secret science in the East, and its final expression remains so to this day, its exoteric application only having been brought to any degree of perfection in the West during the lapse of time since Varaha Mihira wrote his book on Astrology, some 1400 years ago. Claudius Ptolemy, the famous geographer and mathematician, founded the system of astronomy known under his name, wrote his Tetrabiblos which is still the basis of modern Astrology in 135 AD . . . As to the origin of the science, it is known on the one hand that Thebes claimed the honour of the invention of Astrology; whereas, on the other hand, all are agreed that it was the Chaldees who taught that science to the other nations. . . . If later on the name of Astrologer fell into disrepute in Rome and elsewhere, it was owing to the frauds of those who wanted to make money of that which was part and parcel of the Sacred Science of the Mysteries, and who, ignorant of the latter, evolved a system based entirely on mathematics, instead of transcendental metaphysics with the physical celestial bodies as its upadhi or material basis. Yet, all persecutions notwithstanding, the number of adherents to Astrology among the most intellectual and scientific minds was always very great. If Cardan and Kepler were among its ardent supporters, then later votaries have nothing to blush for, even in its now imperfect and distorted form” (Key 318-19).

Blockchain - a decentralized, free-to-access, distributed public database that maintains a continuously growing list of data records that are unchangeable even by operators of the data store's nodes.

blocked records "storage" Several {records} written as a contiguous block on {magnetic tape} so that they may be accessed in a single I/O operation. Blocking increases the amount of data that may be stored on a tape because there are fewer {inter-block gaps}. It requires that the tape drive or processor have a sufficiently large buffer to store the whole block. (1995-04-13)

blocked records ::: (storage) Several records written as a contiguous block on magnetic tape so that they may be accessed in a single I/O operation. Blocking increases the gaps. It requires that the tape drive or processor have a sufficiently large buffer to store the whole block. (1995-04-13)

Bond - 1. a written promise by a company, government, or other institution to pay the face amount at the maturity date. Periodic interest payments are usually required. Bonds are typically stated in $1000 denomi­nations. Bonds may be secured by collateral or unsecured (deben­ture). A registered bond has the class="d-title" name of the owner on the issuer's records, whereas the holder of a bearer bond presents coupons for interest payments. Sinking fund bonds require the company to make annual deposits to a trustee. At maturity, the amount in the sinking fund (principal plus interest) is sufficient to pay the face of the bond. From the company's perspective, a bond issue has several advantages over a stock issue. Interest expense is tax deductible, whereas dividend payments are not. During inflation, debt is paid back in cheaper dollars. When bonds are issued at face value, the entry is to debit cash and credit bonds payable. When bonds are issued at a discount, such as with zero-coupon bonds, the entry is to debit cash and bond discount and credit bonds payable. The entry to record the interest each period is to debit interest expense and credit cash. Or 2. the cash or property given to assure performance (i.e., contractor depositing a performance bond on a construction project to be com­pleted by a specified date). Or 3. type of insurance compensating employer for employee dishonesty.

Books of account - Theses are the financial records of an entity.

Borobudur. [alt. Barabudur]. A massive Indonesian Buddhist monument located in a volcanic area west of Yogyakarta, in the south-central region of the island of Java. Although there are no written records concerning the monument's dating, archaeological and art-historical evidence suggests that construction started around 790 CE during the sailendra dynasty and continued for at least another three-quarters of a century. The derivation of its name remains controversial. The anglicized name Borobudur was given to the site by the colonial governor Sir Thomas Raffles, when Java was under British colonial rule. The name "budur" occurs in an old Javanese text referring to a Buddhist site and Raffles may have added the "boro" to refer to the nearby village of Bore. Borobudur is a pyramid-shaped MAndALA with a large central STuPA, which is surrounded by three concentric circular tiers that include a total of seventy-two individual stupas, and four square terraces, giving the monument the appearance of a towering mountain. The mandala may have been associated with the pilgrimage of the lad SUDHANA described in the GAndAVYuHA (and its embedded version in the "Entering the DharmadhAtu" chapter of the AVATAMSAKASuTRA). This structure is without analogue anywhere else in the Buddhist world, but seems to have influenced Khmer (Cambodian) architectural traditions. The central stupa houses a buddha image, and originally may have also enshrined a relic (sARĪRA). Each of the seventy-two smaller stupas also enshrines an image of a BODHISATTVA, of whom MANJUsRĪ and SAMANTABHADRA are most popular. The walls of Borobudur are carved with some 1,350 bas-reliefs that illustrate tales of the Buddha's past and present lives from the JATAKA and AVADANA literature, as well as events from such texts as the LALITAVISTARA, Gandavyuha, and the BHADRACARĪPRAnIDHANA. There are also niches at the upper parts of the walls that are enshrined with buddha images employing different hand gestures (MUDRA). The three circular tiers of Borobudur are presumed to correspond to the three realms of Buddhist cosmology (TRAIDHATUKA); thus, when pilgrims circumambulated the central stupa, they may have also been traveling symbolically through the sensuous realm (KAMADHATU), the subtle-materiality realm (RuPADHATU) and the immaterial realm (ARuPYADHATU). There are also ten series of bas-reliefs, which suggest that pilgrims making their way through the monument were also ritually reenacting a bodhisattva's progression through the ten stages (DAsABHuMI) of the bodhisattva path (MARGA). The monument is constructed on hilly terrain rather than flat land, and there is also some geological evidence that it may have originally been built on a lakeshore, as if it were a lotus flower floating in a lake. Borobudur is aligned with two other Buddhist temples in the area, Pawon and Mendu, an orientation that may well have had intentional ritual significance. By at least the fifteenth century, Borobudur was abandoned. There are two main theories regarding its fate. Since Borobudur was buried under several layers of volcanic ash at the time of its rediscovery, one theory is that a famine resulting from a volcanic eruption prompted the depopulation of the region and the monument's abandonment. A second explanation is that the rise of Islam hastened the downfall of Buddhism in Java and the neglect of the monument.

records, it is not clear whether Symnay joined

records {record}

Bruno, Giordano: (1548-1600) A Dominican monk, eventually burned at the stake because of his opinions, he was converted from Christianity to a naturalistic and mystical pantheism by the Renaissance and particularly by the new Copernican astronomy. For him God and the universe were two names for one and the same Reality considered now as the creative essence of all things, now as the manifold of realized possibilities in which that essence manifests itself. As God, natura naturans, the Real is the whole, the one transcendent and ineffable. As the Real is the infinity of worlds and objects and events into which the whole divides itself and in which the one displays the infinite potentialities latent within it. The world-process is an ever-lasting going forth from itself and return into itself of the divine nature. The culmination of the outgoing creative activity is reached in the human mind, whose rational, philosophic search for the one in the many, simplicity in variety, and the changeless and eternal in the changing and temporal, marks also the reverse movement of the divine nature re-entering itself and regaining its primordial unity, homogeneity, and changelessness. The human soul, being as it were a kind of boomerang partaking of the ingrowing as well as the outgrowing process, may hope at death, not to be dissolved with the body, which is borne wholly upon the outgoing stream, but to return to God whence it came and to be reabsorbed in him. Cf. Rand, Modern Classical Philosophers, selection from Bruno's On Cause, The Principle and the One. G. Bruno: De l'infinito, universo e mundo, 1584; Spaccio della bestia trionfante, 1584; La cena delta ceneri, 1584; Deglieroici furori, 1585; De Monade, 1591. Cf. R. Honigswald, Giordano Bruno; G. Gentile, Bruno nella storia della cultura, 1907. -- B.A.G.F. Brunschvicg, Leon: (1869-) Professor of Philosophy at the Ecole Normale in Paris. Dismissed by the Nazis (1941). His philosophy is an idealistic synthesis of Spinoza, Kant and Schelling with special stress on the creative role of thought in cultural history as well as in sciences. Main works: Les etapes de la philosophie mathematique, 1913; L'experience humaine et la causalite physique, 1921; De la connaissance de soi, 1931. Buddhism: The multifarious forms, philosophic, religious, ethical and sociological, which the teachings of Gautama Buddha (q.v.) have produced. They centre around the main doctrine of the catvari arya-satyani(q.v.), the four noble truths, the last of which enables one in eight stages to reach nirvana (q.v.): Right views, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. In the absence of contemporary records of Buddha and Buddhistic teachings, much value was formerly attached to the palm leaf manuscripts in Pali, a Sanskrit dialect; but recently a good deal of weight has been given also the Buddhist tradition in Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Chinese. Buddhism split into Mahayanism and Hinayanism (q.v.), each of which, but particularly the former, blossomed into a variety of teachings and practices. The main philosophic schools are the Madhyamaka or Sunyavada, Yogacara, Sautrantika, and Vaibhasika (q.v.). The basic assumptions in philosophy are a causal nexus in nature and man, of which the law of karma (q.v.) is but a specific application; the impermanence of things, and the illusory notion of substance and soul. Man is viewed realistically as a conglomeration of bodily forms (rupa), sensations (vedana), ideas (sanjna), latent karma (sanskaras), and consciousness (vijnana). The basic assumptions in ethics are the universality of suffering and the belief in a remedy. There is no god; each one may become a Buddha, an enlightened one. Also in art and esthetics Buddhism has contributed much throughout the Far East. -- K.F.L.

Bsam yas debate. An important event in the early dissemination (SNGA DAR) of Buddhism in Tibet. During the reign of the king KHRI SRONG LDE BRTSAN at the end of the eighth century, there were two Buddhist factions at court, a Chinese faction led by the Northern Chan (BEI ZONG) monk Heshang MOHEYAN (the Chinese transcription of "MahAyAna") and an Indian faction associated with the recently deceased sANTARAKsITA who, with the king and PADMASAMBHAVA, had founded the first Tibetan monastery at BSAM YAS. According to traditional accounts, sAntaraksita foretold of dangers and left instructions in his will that his student KAMALAsĪLA be called from India. A conflict seems to have developed between the Indian and Chinese partisans (and their allies in the Tibetan court) over the question of the nature of enlightenment, with the Indians holding that enlightenment takes place as the culmination of a gradual process of purification, the result of combining ethical practice (sĪLA), meditation (SAMADHI), and wisdom (PRAJNA). The Chinese spoke against this view, holding that enlightenment was the intrinsic nature of the mind itself rather than the goal of a protracted path of practice. Therefore, to recognize the presence of this innate nature of enlightenment, one need only enter a state of awareness beyond distinctions; all other practices were superfluous. According to both Chinese and Tibetan records, a debate was held between Kamalasīla and Moheyan at Bsam yas, circa 797, with the king himself serving as judge. According to Tibetan records (contradicted by Chinese accounts), Kamalasīla was declared the winner and Moheyan and his party were banished from Tibet, with the king proclaiming that the MADHYAMAKA school of Indian Buddhist philosophy (to which sAntaraksita and Kamalasīla belonged) would thereafter be followed in Tibet. Kamalasīla died shortly after the debate, supposedly assassinated by members of the Chinese faction. Scholars have suggested that although a controversy between the Indian and Chinese Buddhists (and their Tibetan partisans) occurred, it is unlikely that a face-to-face debate took place or that the outcome of the controversy was so unequivocal. The "debate" may instead have been an exchange of statements; indeed, KAmalasīla's third BHAVANAKRAMA seems to derive from this exchange. It is also important to note that, regardless of the merits of the Indian and Chinese philosophical positions, China was Tibet's chief military rival at the time, whereas India posed no such threat. The debate's principal significance derives from the fact that from this point on, Tibet largely sought its Buddhism from India; no school of Chinese Buddhism subsequently exerted any major influence in Tibet. It is said that when he departed, Moheyan left behind one shoe, indicating that traces of his view would remain in Tibet; some scholars have suggested possible connections between Chan positions and the RDZOGS CHEN teachings that developed in the ninth century. In Tibetan polemics of later centuries, it was considered particularly harsh to link one's opponent's views to the antinomian views of Moheyan. Moheyan himself was transformed into something of a trickster figure, popular in Tibetan art and drama. This event is variously referred to in English as the Council of Samye, the Council of Lha sa, and the Samye Debate. See also DUNWU.

Buddhamitra. (C. Fotuomiduoluo; J. Butsudamitsutara; K. Pult'amiltara 佛陀蜜多羅). In Sanskrit, literally "Friend of the Buddha"; one of the Indian patriarchs listed in Chinese lineage records. He is variously listed in Chinese sources as the ninth (e.g., in the LIDAI FABAO JI and BAOLIN ZHUAN), the eighth (e.g., FU FAZANG YINYUAN ZHUAN), or the fifteenth (e.g., LIUZU TAN JING) patriarch of the Indian tradition. He is said to have been born into the vaisya caste of agriculturalists, in the kingdom of Daigya. His master was the patriarch BUDDHANANDI. According to tradition, when Buddhamitra was fifty years old, Buddhanandi was passing by the house in which Buddhamitra lived; seeing a white light floating above the house, Buddhanandi immediately recognized that his successor was waiting inside. Buddhamitra is also said to be one of the teachers of the Indian Buddhist philosopher VASUBANDHU and is considered the author of a work known as the PaNcadvAradhyAnasutramahArthadharma.

Buddhanandi. (C. Fotuonanti; J. Butsudanandai; K. Pult'ananje 佛陀難提). In Sanskrit, literally "Joy of the Buddha"; one of the Indian patriarchs listed in Chinese lineage records. He is variously listed in Chinese sources as the eighth (e.g., in the LIDAI FABAO JI and BAOLIN ZHUAN), the seventh (e.g., FU FAZANG YINYUAN ZHUAN), or the fourteenth (e.g., LIUZU TAN JING) patriarch of the Indian tradition. He is said to hail from the Indian country of Kamala, and is a member of the Gautama family. According to some records (e.g., BAOLIN ZHUAN), his master was the patriarch VASUMITRA.

Buddhi (.Discrimination) ::: Buddhi is a construction of conscious being which quite exceeds its beginnings in the basic chitta; it is the intelligence with its power of knowledge and will. Buddhi takes up and deals with all the rest of the action of the mind and life and body. It is in its nature thought-power and will-power of the Spirit turned into the lower form of a mental activity. We may distinguish three successive gradations of the action of this intelligence. There is first an inferior perceptive understanding which simply takes up, records, understands and responds to the communications of the sense-mind, memory, heart and sensational mentality. It creates by their means an elementary thinking mind which does not go beyond their data, but subjects itself to their mould and rings out their repetitions, runs round and round in the habitual circle of thought and will suggested by them or follows, with an obedient subservience of the reason to the suggestions of life, any fresh determinations which may be offered to its perception and conception. Beyond this elementary understanding, which we all use to an enormous extent, there is a power of arranging or selecting reason and will-force of the intelligence which has for its action and aim an attempt to arrive at a plausible, sufficient, settled ordering of knowledge and will for the use of an intellectual conception of life. In spite of its more purely intellectual character this secondary or intermediate reason is really pragmatic in its intention. It creates a certain kind of intellectual structure, frame, rule into which it tries to cast the inner and outer life so as to use it with a certain mastery and government for the purposes of some kind of rational will. It is this reason which gives to our normal intellectual being our set aesthetic and ethical standards, our structures of opinion and our established norms of idea and purpose. It is highly developed and takes the primacy in all men of an at all developed understanding. But beyond it there is a reason, a highest action of the buddhi which concerns itself disinterestedly with a pursuit of pure truth and right knowledge; it seeks to discover the real Truth behind life and things and our apparent selves and to subject its will to the law of Truth. Few, if any of us, can use this highest reason with any purity, but the attempt to do it is the topmost capacity of the inner instrument, the antahkarana.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 651-52


Buddhi is a construction of conscious being which quite exceeds its beginnings in the basic chitta; it is the intelligence with its power of knowledge and will. Buddhi takes up and deals with all the rest of the action of the mind and life and body. It is in its nature thought-power and will-power of the Spirit turned into the lower form of a mental activity. We may distinguish three successive gradations of the action of this intelligence. There is first an inferior perceptive understanding which simply takes up, records, understands and responds to the communications of the sense-mind, memory, heart and sensational mentality. It creates by their means an elementary thinking mind which does not go beyond their data, but subjects itself to their mould and rings out their repetitions, runs round and round in the habitual circle of thought and will suggested by them or follows, with an obedient subservience of the reason to the suggestions of life, any fresh determinations which may be offered to its perception and conception. Beyond this elementary understanding, which we all use to an enormous extent, there is a power of arranging or selecting reason and will-force of the intelligence which has for its action and aim an attempt to arrive at a plausible, sufficient, settled ordering of knowledge and will for the use of an intellectual conception of life. In spite of its more purely intellectual character this secondary or intermediate reason is really pragmatic in its intention It creates a certain kind of intellectual structure, frame, rule into which it tries to cast the inner and outer life so as to use it with a certain mastery and government for the purposes of some kind of rational will. It is this reason which gives to our normal intellectual being our set aesthetic and ethical standards, our structures of opinion and our established norms of idea and purpose. It is highly developed and takes the primacy in all men of an at all developed understanding. But beyond it there is a reason, a highest action of the buddhi which concerns itself disinterestedly with a pursuit of pure truth and right knowledge; it seeks to discover the real Truth behind life and things and our apparent selves and to subject its will to the law of Truth. Few, if any of us, can use this highest reason with any purity, but the attempt to do it is the topmost capacity of the inner instrument, the antahkarana.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 651-52


buli wenzi. (J. furyumonji; K. pullip muncha 不立文字). In Chinese, lit. "not establishing words and letters"; a line summarizing the CHAN school's unique sense of its own pedigree, as a school of Buddhism that does not rely on the scriptural teachings of Buddhism but has a direct connection through the "buddhas and patriarchs" (FOZU) to the mind of the Buddha himself. The saying is later attributed to the school's traditional founder, BODHIDHARMA. According to GUIFENG ZONGMI's CHANYUAN ZHUQUANJI DUXU, the Indian monk Bodhidharma taught that the mind was the DHARMA and he transmitted this teaching from mind to mind (YIXIN CHUANXIN) without establishing words or letters. This phrase also often appears together with three other phrases: JIAOWAI BIECHUAN ("a special transmission outside the teachings"), ZHIZHI RENXIN ("directly pointing to the human mind"), and JIANXING CHENGFO ("seeing one's own nature and becoming a buddha"). They appear together for the first time in the ZUTING SHIYUAN compiled in 1108 and soon became a normative teaching in the subsequent CHAN, SoN, THIỀN, and ZEN traditions. As a radical interpretation of the notion of UPAYA, the phrase buli wenzi remains to this day a controversial and frequently debated topic. Song-dynasty exponents of "lettered Chan" (WENZI CHAN), such as JUEFAN HUIHONG (1071-1128), decried the bibliophobic tendencies epitomized in this line and advocated instead that Chan insights were made manifest in both Buddhist SuTRAs as well as in the uniquely Chan genres of discourse records (YULU), lineage histories (see CHUANDENG LU), and public-case anthologies (GONG'AN).

Capital account of the balance of payments - A section of a balance of payments accounts that records payments and receipts arising from the Import and exports of long-term and short­term financial capital.

Carnac A village in Brittany celebrated for the enormous number of ancient stone monuments in its vicinity, to be classed with similar monuments found in many parts of the world and with the so-called Dracontia or serpent-mounds. They are records in symbol of the world’s history, designed to be enduring, and in more than one sense actually or mystically the work of giants. “The archaic records show the Initiates of the Second Sub-race of the Aryan family moving from one land to the other for the purpose of supervising the building of menhirs and dolmens, of colossal Zodiacs in stone, and places of sepulchre to serve as receptacles for the ashes of generations to come” (SD 2:750).

cartulary ::: n. --> A register, or record, as of a monastery or church.
An ecclesiastical officer who had charge of records or other public papers.


Carus, Paul. (1852-1919). An early supporter of Buddhism in America and the proponent of the "religion of science": a faith that claimed to be purified of all superstition and irrationality and that, in harmony with science, would bring about solutions to the world's problems. Carus was born in Ilsenberg in Harz, Germany. He immigrated to America in 1884, settling in LaSalle, Illinois, where he assumed the editorship of the Open Court Publishing Company. He attended the World Parliament of Religions in Chicago in 1893 and became friends with several of the Buddhist delegates, including DHARMAPALA and SHAKU SoEN, who were among the first to promote his writing. Later, Shaku Soen's student, DAISETZ TEITARO SUZUKI, would spend eleven years working with and for Carus in LaSalle. In 1894, Carus published The Gospel of Buddha according to Old Records, an anthology of passages from Buddhist texts drawn from contemporary translations in English, French, and German, making particular use of translations from the PAli by THOMAS W. RHYS DAVIDS, as well as translations of the life of the Buddha from Chinese and Tibetan sources. Second only to Edwin Arnold's Light of Asia in intellectual influence at the time, The Gospel was arranged like the Bible, with numbered chapters and verses and a table at the end that listed parallel passages from the New Testament. The Gospel was intended to highlight the many agreements between Buddhism and Christianity, thereby bringing out "that nobler Christianity which aspires to the cosmic religion of universal truth." Carus was free in his manipulation of his sources, writing in the preface that he had rearranged, retranslated, and added emendations and elaborations in order to make them more accessible to a Western audience; for this reason, the translated sources are not always easy to trace back to the original literature. He also makes it clear in the preface that his ultimate goal is to lead his readers to the Religion of Science. He believed that both Buddhism and Christianity, when understood correctly, would point the way to the Religion of Science. Although remembered today for his Gospel, Carus wrote some seventy books and more than a thousand articles. His books include studies of Goethe, Schiller, Kant, and Chinese thought.

Cash payments/disbursements journal - The journal that records all payments or disbursements.

Cash receipts journal - Is the journal which records cash receipts.

*Caturasītisiddhapravṛtti. (T. Grub thob brgyad bcu rtsa bzhi'i lo rgyus). In Sanskrit, "The Lives of the Eighty-four Siddhas"; a tantric doxography ascribed to the early twelfth-century Indian author ABHAYADATTAsRĪ. The original Sanskrit version has been lost, but the text is preserved in Tibetan translation. The work records brief vitae for the great SIDDHAs (or mahAsiddhas) of Indian tantric Buddhism, who are commonly enumerated in a list of eighty-four. While the list varies, according to Abhayadattasrī's work, the eighty-four siddhas include Luyipa, Līlapa, VIRuPA, dombipa, savaripa, SARAHA, Kankaripa, Mīnapa, Goraksa, CaurAngi, Vīnapa, sAntipa, Tantipa, Camaripa, Khadgapa, NAGARJUNA, KAnḥapa, Karnaripa, Thaganapa, NAROPA, salipa, TILOPA, Catrapa, Bhadrapa, Dhukhandi, Ajokipa, Kalapa, Dhombipa, Kankana, Kambala, tengipa, Bhandhepa, Tandhepa, Kukkuripa, Kucipa, Dharmapa, Mahipa, Acinta, Babhahi, Nalina, Bhusuku, INDRABHuTI, Mekopa, Kotali, KaMparipa, JAlandhari, RAHULA, Dharmapa, Dhokaripa, Medhina, Pankaja, Ghandhapa, Yogipa, Caluki, Gorura, Lucika, Niguna, JayAnanda, Pacari, Campaka, Bhiksana, Telopa, Kumaripa, Caparipa, ManibhadrA, MekhalA, KanakhalA, Kalakala, Kantali, Dhahuli, Udheli, Kapalapa, Kirava, Sakara, Sarvabhaksa, NAgabodhi, DArika, Putali, Panaha, Kokali, Ananga, LaksmīnkarA, Samudra, and Vyali. See MAHASIDDHA.

certiorari ::: n. --> A writ issuing out of chancery, or a superior court, to call up the records of a inferior court, or remove a cause there depending, in order that the party may have more sure and speedy justice, or that errors and irregularities may be corrected. It is obtained upon complaint of a party that he has not received justice, or can not have an impartial trial in the inferior court.

Cetiyagiri. In PAli, "Shrine Mountain"; name given to the mountain of MISSAKAPABBATA (see MIHINTALE) in Sri Lanka, because of the many shrines and reliquaries (P. cetiya; S. CAITYA) located there; also called Cetiyapabbata. The Sinhalese king DEVANAMPIYATISSA built a monastery for the elder MAHINDA atop the mountain. Relics acquired from AsOKA and from Sakka (S. sAKRA), king of the gods, were temporarily kept at that site; a sapling from the southern branch of the BODHI TREE brought to Sri Lanka from India by the elder nun, SAnGHAMITTA, was also planted there. Mahinda dwelt for several years at Cetiyagiri and passed away there; his remains were cremated at the site and a reliquary (P. thupa; S. STuPA) erected over them. In the first century BCE, King KanirajAnutissa once had sixty monks from Cetiyagiri executed for treason. Over time, Cetiyagiri became an important monastic center, and the Chinese pilgrim FAXIAN records that when he visited the site in the early fifth century, there were more than two thousand monks in residence.

Chaldeans, Chaldees To the seventh subrace of the third root-race belong the far-distant predecessors of the Mystery school; and to now forgotten geologic history the predecessors of those later called Chaldees, along with Hindu, Egyptian, Persian, and Phoenician sages. In their records are mentioned divine dynasties preceding the human kings, and the cycle of 432,000 years. From them came the origins of all such thoughts as are contained in the occult Nabathean Agriculture, and in their ancient records is found the source of the original Biblical cosmogonic allegories. The mathematical and astronomical lore of the Chaldeans was celebrated in all the ancient Mediterranean world: the word Chaldee often meant simply an adept, magician, or astrologer. In the Bible they are usually spoken of as Babylonians.

Chan. (J. Zen; K. Son; V. Thièn 禪). In Chinese, the "Meditation," or Chan school (CHAN ZONG); one of the major indigenous schools of East Asian Buddhism. The Sinograph "chan" is the first syllable in the transcription channa, the Chinese transcription of the Sanskrit term DHYANA (P. JHANA); thus chan, like the cognate term chanding (chan is a transcription and ding a translation, of dhyAna), is often translated in English simply as "meditation." For centuries, the title CHANSHI (meditation master) was used in such sources as the "Biography of Eminent Monks" (GAOSENG ZHUAN) to refer to a small group of elite monks who specialized in the art of meditation. Some of these specialists adopted the term chan as the formal name of their community (Chan zong), perhaps sometime during the sixth or seventh centuries. These early "Chan" communities gathered around a number of charismatic teachers who were later considered to be "patriarchs" (ZUSHI) of their tradition. The legendary Indian monk BODHIDHARMA was honored as the first patriarch; it was retrospectively claimed that he first brought the Chan teachings to China. Later Chan lineage histories (see CHUANDENG LU) reconstructed elaborate genealogies of such patriarchs that extended back to MAHAKAsYAPA, the first Indian patriarch, and ultimately to the Buddha himself; often, these genealogies would even go back to all of the seven buddhas of antiquity (SAPTABUDDHA). Six indigenous patriarchs (Bodhidharma, HUIKE, SENGCAN, DAOXIN, HONGREN, and HUINENG) are credited by the established tradition with the development and growth of Chan in China, but early records of the Chan school, such as the LENGQIE SHIZI JI and LIDAI FABAO JI, reveal the polemical battles fought between the disparate communities to establish their own teachers as the orthodox patriarchs of the tradition. A particularly controversial dispute over the sixth patriarchy broke out between the Chan master SHENXIU, the leading disciple of the fifth patriarch Hongren, and HEZE SHENHUI, the purported disciple of the legendary Chinese monk Huineng. This dispute is often referred to as the "sudden and gradual debate," and the differing factions came to be retrospectively designated as the gradualist Northern school (BEI ZONG; the followers of Shenxiu) and the subitist Southern school (NAN ZONG; the followers of Huineng). The famous LIUZU TANJING ("Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch"), composed by the followers of this putative Southern school, is an important source for the history of this debate. Following the sixth patriarch, the Chan lineage split into a number of collateral lines, which eventually evolved into the so-called "five houses and seven schools" (WU JIA QI ZONG) of the mature Chan tradition: the five "houses" of GUIYANG (alt. Weiyang), LINJI, CAODONG, YUNMEN, and FAYAN, and the subsequent bifurcation of Linji into the two lineages of HUANGLONG and YANGQI, giving a total of seven schools. ¶ The teachings of the Chan school were introduced to Korea perhaps as early as the end of the seventh century CE and the tradition, there known as SoN, flourished with the rise of the Nine Mountains school of Son (KUSAN SoNMUN) in the ninth century. By the twelfth century, the teachings and practices of Korean Buddhism were dominated by Son; and today, the largest Buddhist denomination in Korea, the CHOGYE CHONG, remains firmly rooted in the Son tradition. The Chan teachings were introduced to Japan in the late twelfth century by MYoAN EISAI (1141-1215); the Japanese tradition, known as ZEN, eventually developed three major sects, RINZAISHu, SoToSHu, and oBAKUSHu. The Chan teachings are traditionally assumed to have been transmitted to Vietnam by VINĪTARUCI (d. 594), a South Indian brAhmana who is claimed (rather dubiously) to have studied in China with the third Chan patriarch SENGCAN before heading south to Guangzhou and Vietnam. In 580, he is said to have arrived in Vietnam and settled at Pháp Van monastery, where he subsequently transmitted his teachings to Pháp Hièn (d. 626), who carried on the Chan tradition, which in Vietnamese is known as THIỀN. In addition to the Vinītaruci lineage, there are two other putative lineages of Vietnamese Thièn, both named after their supposed founders: VÔ NGÔN THÔNG (reputedly a student of BAIZHANG HUAIHAI), and THẢO ĐƯỜNG (reputedly connected to the YUNMEN ZONG lineage in China). Chan had a presence in Tibet during the early dissemination (SNGA DAR) of Buddhism, and the Chan monk MOHEYAN was an influential figure at the Tibetan court in the late eighth century, leading to the famous BSAM YAS DEBATE.

Ch'eng Ming-tao: (Ch'eng Hou, Ch'eng Po-tun, 1032-1086) Served as government official both in the capital and in various counties with excellent records in social and educational achievements. For decades he studied Taoism and Buddhism but finally repudiated them. Together with his brother, he developed new aspects of Confucianism and became the greatest Confucian since Mencius and a leader of Neo-Confucianism (li hsueh). His works and those of his brother, called Erh Ch'eng Ch'uan-shu (complete works of the Ch'eng brothers), number 107 chuans, in 14 Chinese volumes. -- W.T.C.

Cheque (check) book - The journal or source document that records payments by cheque.

Chitragupta (Sanskrit) Citragupta [from citr to depict, color with various colors + gupta hidden] The secret recorder who paints the picture of the person’s life on the astral light; a deva-scribe in the abode of the dead, who records human virtues and vices and reads out the account of every soul’s life from his register when the excarnate soul arrives in the kingdom of Yama, the god of death; a variant of the lipikas.

Chodang chip. (C. Zutang ji; J. Sodoshu 祖堂集). In Korean, "Patriarchs' Hall Collection"; one of the earliest "lamplight histories" (CHUANDENG LU), viz., lineage records, of the CHAN tradition, compiled in 952 by the monks Jing (K. Chong) (d.u.) and Yun/Jun (K. Un/Kyun) (d.u.) of the monastery of Chaojingsi in Quanzhou (in present-day Fujian provine). The Chodang chip builds on an earlier Chan history, the BAOLIN ZHUAN, on which it seems largely to have been based. According to one current theory, the original text by Jing and Yun was a short work in a single roll, which was expanded into ten rolls early in the Song dynasty and subsequently reissued in twenty rolls in the definitive 1245 Korean edition. The anthology includes a preface by the compilers' teacher and collaborator Zhaoqing Shendeng/Wendeng (884-972), also known as the Chan master Jingxiu, who also appends verse panegyrics after several of the biographies in the collection. The Chodang chip provides biographies of 253 figures, including the seven buddhas of the past (SAPTATATHAGATA), the first Indian patriarch (ZUSHI) MAHAKAsYAPA up to and including the sixth patriarch (LIUZU) of Chan in China, HUINENG, and monks belonging to the lineages of Huineng's putative disciples QINGYUAN XINGSI and NANYUE HUAIRANG. In contrast to the later JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, the Chodang chip mentions the lineage of Qingyuan before that of Nanyue. In addition to the biographical narrative, the entries also include short excerpts from the celebrated sayings and dialogues of the persons it covers. These are notable for including many features that derive from the local vernacular (what has sometimes been labeled "Medieval Vernacular Sinitic"); for this reason, the text has been the frequent object of study by Chinese historical linguists. The Chodang chip is also significant for containing the biographies of several Silla-dynasty monks who were founders of, or associated with, the Korean "Nine Mountains School of Son" (KUSAN SoNMUN), eight of whom had lineage ties to the Chinese HONGZHOU ZONG of Chan that derived from MAZU DAOYI; the anthology in fact offers the most extensive body of early material on the developing Korean Son tradition. This emphasis suggests that the two compilers may themselves have been expatriate Koreans training in China and/or that the extant anthology was substantially reedited in Korea. The Chodang chip was lost in China after the Northern Song dynasty and remained completely unknown subsequently to the Chinese Chan and Japanese Zen traditions. However, the 1245 Korean edition was included as a supplement to the Koryo Buddhist canon (KORYo TAEJANGGYoNG), which was completed in 1251 during the reign of the Koryo king Kojong (r. 1214-1259), and fortunately survived; this is the edition that was rediscovered in the 1930s at the Korean monastery of HAEINSA. Because the collection is extant only in a Koryo edition and because of the many Korean monks included in the collection, the Chodang chip is often cited in the scholarly literature by its Korean pronunciation.

choronzon ::: Choronzon The serpent Choronzon is the 'dweller' in the Abyss, the final great obstacle between the magician and true enlightenment. Choronzon is known as the 'Demon of Dispersion', and described by Crowley as "a temporary personification of the raving and inconsistent forces that occupy the Abyss." The name Choronzon has been popularised by Aleister Crowley, but it first occurred in the Enochian records of John Dee, where he is synonymous with the serpent of the garden. See also Oath of the Abyss for further details.

Citragupta (Chitragupta) ::: [the name of an attendant of Yama who records the good and evil deeds of each man].

Clairvoyance Clear-seeing; generally, the power to use the psychic sense of vision to see things on the astral plane, the imperfect shadows of things to come or the astral records of things past. But this faculty is of restricted scope and very apt to mislead; prematurely developed in an untrained person, it is more likely to lead to error than to benefit. True clairvoyance is the opening of spiritual vision, called in India the Eye of Siva and beyond the Himalayas the Eye of Dangma; a faculty which enables the seer to see the truth and to recognize it as such. Among the seven saktis (occult powers) is enumerated jnana-sakti, which in its higher aspects is the power of knowing, true clairvoyance, but which on lower planes becomes more or less perfect psychic clairvoyance. True clairvoyance enables the seer to discern the reality behind its veils, to know right action, and to see what is happening in worlds removed by distance or difference of plane from our own. Retrospective clairvoyance interprets the past through its indelible records in the akasa.

clerk ::: n. --> A clergyman or ecclesiastic.
A man who could read; a scholar; a learned person; a man of letters.
A parish officer, being a layman who leads in reading the responses of the Episcopal church service, and otherwise assists in it.
One employed to keep records or accounts; a scribe; an accountant; as, the clerk of a court; a town clerk.
An assistant in a shop or store.


Compliance audit - The review of financial records to determine whether the entity is complying with specific procedures or rules.

computer ethics "philosophy" Ethics is the field of study that is concerned with questions of value, that is, judgments about what human behaviour is "good" or "bad". Ethical judgments are no different in the area of computing from those in any other area. Computers raise problems of privacy, ownership, theft, and power, to name but a few. Computer ethics can be grounded in one of four basic world-views: Idealism, Realism, Pragmatism, or Existentialism. Idealists believe that reality is basically ideas and that ethics therefore involves conforming to ideals. Realists believe that reality is basically nature and that ethics therefore involves acting according to what is natural. Pragmatists believe that reality is not fixed but is in process and that ethics therefore is practical (that is, concerned with what will produce socially-desired results). Existentialists believe reality is self-defined and that ethics therefore is individual (that is, concerned only with one's own conscience). Idealism and Realism can be considered ABSOLUTIST worldviews because they are based on something fixed (that is, ideas or nature, respectively). Pragmatism and Existentialism can be considered RELATIVIST worldviews because they are based or something relational (that is, society or the individual, respectively). Thus ethical judgments will vary, depending on the judge's world-view. Some examples: First consider theft. Suppose a university's computer is used for sending an e-mail message to a friend or for conducting a full-blown private business (billing, payroll, inventory, etc.). The absolutist would say that both activities are unethical (while recognising a difference in the amount of wrong being done). A relativist might say that the latter activities were wrong because they tied up too much memory and slowed down the machine, but the e-mail message wasn't wrong because it had no significant effect on operations. Next consider privacy. An instructor uses her account to acquire the cumulative grade point average of a student who is in a class which she instructs. She obtained the password for this restricted information from someone in the Records Office who erroneously thought that she was the student's advisor. The absolutist would probably say that the instructor acted wrongly, since the only person who is entitled to this information is the student and his or her advisor. The relativist would probably ask why the instructor wanted the information. If she replied that she wanted it to be sure that her grading of the student was consistent with the student's overall academic performance record, the relativist might agree that such use was acceptable. Finally, consider power. At a particular university, if a professor wants a computer account, all she or he need do is request one but a student must obtain faculty sponsorship in order to receive an account. An absolutist (because of a proclivity for hierarchical thinking) might not have a problem with this divergence in procedure. A relativist, on the other hand, might question what makes the two situations essentially different (e.g. are faculty assumed to have more need for computers than students? Are students more likely to cause problems than faculty? Is this a hold-over from the days of "in loco parentis"?). {"Philosophical Bases of Computer Ethics", Professor Robert N. Barger (http://nd.edu/~rbarger/metaethics.html)}. {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:bit.listserv.ethics-l}, {news:alt.soc.ethics}. (1995-10-25)

Correcting entry - An adjusting entry, is required at the end of an accounting period if a mistake was made in the accounting records during the period.

Cosmic picture gallery: The Akashic Records (q.v.).

Current account - A part of the balance of payments ac­counts that records payments and receipts arising from trade in goods and services and from interest and dividends that are earned by capital owned in one country and invested in another.

Custodian - An entity entrusted with guarding and keeping property or records.

Daianji. (大安寺). In Japanese, "Great Peace Monastery"; one of the seven great monasteries of the ancient Japanese capital of Nara (NANTO SHICHIDAIJI). Daianji was founded in the Asuka area and, according to internal monastery records, was originally the Kudara no odera (Great Paekche Monastery) that was founded by Emperor Jomei in 639. When this monastery burned down in 642, Empress Kogyoku had it rebuilt and renamed it Daianji. If this identification with Kudara no odera is correct, Daianji has the distinction of being the first monastery in Japan founded by the court. The monastery moved to Nara in 716, following the relocation of the capital there in 710. The Koguryo monk Tohyon (J. Togen, fl. c. seventh century) lived at Daianji during the seventh century, where he wrote the Nihon segi, an early historical chronicle, which is no longer extant. Daianji was also the residence of the Indian monk BODHISENA (704-760), who lived and taught there until the end of his life. Bodhisena performed the "opening the eyes" (C. KAIYAN; J. KAIGEN; NETRAPRATIstHAPANA) ceremony for the 752 dedication of the great buddha image of Vairocana (NARA DAIBUTSU; Birushana Nyorai) at ToDAIJI, another of the great Nara monasteries. Daianji was also home to the Korean monk SIMSANG (J. Shinjo, d. 742) from the Silla kingdom, who was instrumental in introducing the teachings of the Kegon (C. HUAYAN; K. Hwaom) school of Buddhism to Japan. Since the time of another famous resident, KuKAI (774-835), Daianji has been associated with the SHINGONSHu of Japanese Buddhism. Daianji was at times quite grand, with two seven-story pagodas and many other buildings on its campus. After a fire destroyed much of the monastery in the 1200s, rebuilding was slow and the renovated structures were damaged once again by an earthquake in 1449. Daianji's fireproof treasury holds nine wooden images from the eighth century, including three different representations of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA, including both his representations as AMOGHAPAsA (J. Fuku Kenjaku) and his thousand-armed manifestation (SAHASRABHUJASAHASRANETRAVALOKITEsVARA), as well as two of the four heavenly kings (S. CATURMAHARAJAKAYIKA; J. shitenno). The monastery also retains two famous images that are brought out for display for one month each year: in March, HAYAGRĪVA, and in October, the eleven-headed Avalokitesvara (Juichimen Kannon).

database ::: 1. (database) One or more large structured sets of persistent data, usually associated with software to update and query the data. A simple database might be a single file containing many records, each of which contains the same set of fields where each field is a certain fixed width.A database is one component of a database management system.See also ANSI/SPARC Architecture, atomic, blob, data definition language, deductive database, distributed database, fourth generation language, functional database, object-oriented database, relational database. .2. (hypertext) A collection of nodes managed and stored in one place and all accessible via the same server. Links outside this are external, and those inside are internal.On the World-Wide Web this is called a website.3. All the facts and rules comprising a logic programming program.(2005-11-17)

database 1. "database" One or more large structured sets of persistent data, usually associated with software to update and {query} the data. A simple database might be a single file containing many {records}, each of which contains the same set of {fields} where each field is a certain fixed width. A database is one component of a {database management system}. See also {ANSI/SPARC Architecture}, {atomic}, {blob}, {data definition language}, {deductive database}, {distributed database}, {fourth generation language}, {functional database}, {object-oriented database}, {relational database}. {Carol E. Brown's tutorial (http://accounting.rutgers.edu/raw/aies/www.bus.orst.edu/faculty/brownc/lectures/db_tutor/db_tutor.htm)}. 2. "hypertext" A collection of {nodes} managed and stored in one place and all accessible via the same {server}. {Links} outside this are "external", and those inside are "internal". On the {World-Wide Web} this is called a {website}. 3. All the facts and rules comprising a {logic programming} program. (2005-11-17)

database management system "database" (DBMS) A suite of programs which typically manage large structured sets of persistent data, offering ad hoc query facilities to many users. They are widely used in business applications. A database management system (DBMS) can be an extremely complex set of software programs that controls the organisation, storage and retrieval of data (fields, records and files) in a database. It also controls the security and integrity of the database. The DBMS accepts requests for data from the application program and instructs the operating system to transfer the appropriate data. When a DBMS is used, information systems can be changed much more easily as the organisation's information requirements change. New categories of data can be added to the database without disruption to the existing system. Data security prevents unauthorised users from viewing or updating the database. Using passwords, users are allowed access to the entire database or subsets of the database, called subschemas (pronounced "sub-skeema"). For example, an employee database can contain all the data about an individual employee, but one group of users may be authorised to view only payroll data, while others are allowed access to only work history and medical data. The DBMS can maintain the integrity of the database by not allowing more than one user to update the same record at the same time. The DBMS can keep duplicate records out of the database; for example, no two customers with the same customer numbers (key fields) can be entered into the database. {Query languages} and {report writers} allow users to interactively interrogate the database and analyse its data. If the DBMS provides a way to interactively enter and update the database, as well as interrogate it, this capability allows for managing personal databases. However, it may not leave an audit trail of actions or provide the kinds of controls necessary in a multi-user organisation. These controls are only available when a set of application programs are customised for each data entry and updating function. A business information system is made up of subjects (customers, employees, vendors, etc.) and activities (orders, payments, purchases, etc.). Database design is the process of deciding how to organize this data into record types and how the record types will relate to each other. The DBMS should mirror the organisation's data structure and process transactions efficiently. Organisations may use one kind of DBMS for daily transaction processing and then move the detail onto another computer that uses another DBMS better suited for random inquiries and analysis. Overall systems design decisions are performed by data administrators and systems analysts. Detailed database design is performed by database administrators. The three most common organisations are the {hierarchical database}, {network database} and {relational database}. A database management system may provide one, two or all three methods. Inverted lists and other methods are also used. The most suitable structure depends on the application and on the transaction rate and the number of inquiries that will be made. Database machines are specially designed computers that hold the actual databases and run only the DBMS and related software. Connected to one or more mainframes via a high-speed channel, database machines are used in large volume transaction processing environments. Database machines have a large number of DBMS functions built into the hardware and also provide special techniques for accessing the disks containing the databases, such as using multiple processors concurrently for high-speed searches. The world of information is made up of data, text, pictures and voice. Many DBMSs manage text as well as data, but very few manage both with equal proficiency. Throughout the 1990s, as storage capacities continue to increase, DBMSs will begin to integrate all forms of information. Eventually, it will be common for a database to handle data, text, graphics, voice and video with the same ease as today's systems handle data. See also: {intelligent database}. (1998-10-07)

database management system ::: (database) (DBMS) A suite of programs which typically manage large structured sets of persistent data, offering ad hoc query facilities to many users. They are widely used in business applications.A database management system (DBMS) can be an extremely complex set of software programs that controls the organisation, storage and retrieval of data (fields, the database. The DBMS accepts requests for data from the application program and instructs the operating system to transfer the appropriate data.When a DBMS is used, information systems can be changed much more easily as the organisation's information requirements change. New categories of data can be added to the database without disruption to the existing system.Data security prevents unauthorised users from viewing or updating the database. Using passwords, users are allowed access to the entire database or subsets of group of users may be authorised to view only payroll data, while others are allowed access to only work history and medical data.The DBMS can maintain the integrity of the database by not allowing more than one user to update the same record at the same time. The DBMS can keep duplicate records out of the database; for example, no two customers with the same customer numbers (key fields) can be entered into the database.Query languages and report writers allow users to interactively interrogate the database and analyse its data.If the DBMS provides a way to interactively enter and update the database, as well as interrogate it, this capability allows for managing personal databases. available when a set of application programs are customised for each data entry and updating function.A business information system is made up of subjects (customers, employees, vendors, etc.) and activities (orders, payments, purchases, etc.). Database and how the record types will relate to each other. The DBMS should mirror the organisation's data structure and process transactions efficiently.Organisations may use one kind of DBMS for daily transaction processing and then move the detail onto another computer that uses another DBMS better suited for data administrators and systems analysts. Detailed database design is performed by database administrators.The three most common organisations are the hierarchical database, network database and relational database. A database management system may provide one, most suitable structure depends on the application and on the transaction rate and the number of inquiries that will be made.Database machines are specially designed computers that hold the actual databases and run only the DBMS and related software. Connected to one or more accessing the disks containing the databases, such as using multiple processors concurrently for high-speed searches.The world of information is made up of data, text, pictures and voice. Many DBMSs manage text as well as data, but very few manage both with equal common for a database to handle data, text, graphics, voice and video with the same ease as today's systems handle data.See also: intelligent database. (1998-10-07)

data set organization "operating system, storage" (DSORG) An {IBM} term for {file} structure. These include PS {physical sequential}, DA {direct access}, IS {indexed sequential}, PO {partitioned} (a library). This system dates from {OS/360}, and breaks down beginning with {VSAM} and {VTAM}, where it is no longer applied. Sequential and indexed data sets can be accessed using either a "basic" or a "queued" "access method." For example a DSORG=PS file can use either BSAM (basic sequential access method) or QSAM (queued sequential access method). It can also be processed as a {direct file} using BDAM. Likewise a library can be processed using BPAM (basic partitioned access method), BSAM, QSAM, or BDAM. DSORG and access method are somewhat, but not completely, orthogonal. The "basic" access method deals with {physical blocks} rather than {records}, and usually provides more control over the specific {device}. Each I/O operation using the "basic" access method reads or writes a single block. A "basic" read or write starts an {asynchronous} I/O operation, and the programmer is responsible for waiting for completion and checking for errors. The "queued" access method deals with {logical records} and provides blocking and deblocking services. It is "queued" because it provides {read-ahead} and {write-behind} services. While a program is processing records in one input block, for example, QSAM may be reading one or more blocks ahead. Queued "get" or "put" operations are synchronous as far as the programmer is concerned. The operation is complete when the next logical record has been successfully processed. EXCP ({Execute Channel Program}) is a lower-level method of accessing data. IBM manuals usually named "Data Administration Guide", e.g. SC26-4505-1 for MVS/ESA DFP 3.1, provide more detail about data set organizations and access methods. (2005-08-08)

data set organization ::: (operating system, storage) (DSORG) An IBM term for file structure. These include PS physical sequential, DA direct, IS indexed sequential, PO partitioned (a library). This system dates from OS/360, and breaks down beginning with VSAM and VTAM, where it is no longer applied.Sequential and indexed data sets can be accessed using either a basic or a queued access method. For example a DSORG=PS file can use either BSAM (basic using BPAM (basic partitioned access method), BSAM, QSAM, or BDAM. DSORG and access method are somewhat, but not completely, orthogonal.The basic access method deals with physical blocks rather than records, and usually provides more control over the specific device. Each I/O operation using write starts an asynchronous I/O operation, and the programmer is responsible for waiting for completion and checking for errors.The queued access method deals with logical records and provides blocking and deblocking services. It is queued because it provides read-ahead and operations are synchronous as far as the programmer is concerned. The operation is complete when the next logical record has been successfully processed.EXCP (Execute Channel Program) is a lower-level method of accessing data.IBM manuals usually named Data Administration Guide, e.g. SC26-4505-1 for MVS/ESA DFP 3.1, provide more detail about data set organizations and access methods.(2005-08-08)

DāthāvaMsa. In Pāli, "History of the Tooth Relic"; a Pāli chronicle in verse, attributed to Dhammakitti, that records the history of the Buddha's TOOTH RELIC before its c. fourth century CE arrival in Sri Lanka; also known as the DantadhātuvaMsa. The work begins with an account of the previous buddha Dīpankara (S. DĪPAMKARA), followed by the story of Gotama (S. GAUTAMA) Buddha, his visit to Sri Lanka, his decease (P. parinibbāna; S. PARINIRVĀnA), and the distribution of his relics (P. sarīra; S. sARĪRA). The history of the Tooth Relic at the city of Dantapura in the Indian kingdom of Kalinga follows. Finally, there is a detailed accounting of the circumstances that culminated in the relic's arrival at Sri Lanka during the reign of Sirimeghavanna in the fourth century CE and the building of a shrine to house it.

delineator ::: n. --> One who, or that which, delineates; a sketcher.
A perambulator which records distances and delineates a profile, as of a road.


Denkoroku. (傳光録). In Japanese, "Record of the Transmission of the Light"; a text also known by its full title, Keizan osho denkoroku ("A Record of the Transmission of the Light by Master Keizan"). The anthology is attributed by Soto tradition to KEIZAN JoKIN, but was most probably composed posthumously by his disciples. The Denkoroku is a collection of pithy stories and anecdotes concerning fifty-two teachers recognized by the Japanese SoToSHu as the patriarchs of the school, accompanied by the author's own explanatory commentaries and concluding verses. Each chapter includes a short opening case (honsoku), which describes the enlightenment experience of the teacher; a longer section (called a kien) offering a short biography and history of the teacher, including some of his representative teachings and exchanges with students and other teachers; a prose commentary (teisho; C. TICHANG) by the author; and a concluding appreciatory verse (juko). The teachers discussed in the text include twenty-seven Indian patriarchs from MAHĀKĀsYAPA to PrajNātāra; six Chinese patriarchs from BODHIDHARMA through HUINENG; seventeen Chinese successors of Huineng in the CAODONG ZONG, from QINGYUAN XINGSI to TIANTONG RUJING; and finally the two Japanese patriarchs DoGEN KIGEN and Koun Ejo (1198-1280). The Denkoroku belongs to a larger genre of texts known as the CHUANDENG LU ("transmission of the lamplight records"), although it is a rigidly sectarian lineage history, discussing only the single successor to each patriarch with no treatment of any collateral lines.

depository ::: n. --> A place where anything is deposited for sale or keeping; as, warehouse is a depository for goods; a clerk&

Devanagari (Sanskrit) Devanāgarī “Divine city writing,” the alphabetic script of Aryan India, in which the Sanskrit language is usually written. The Devanagari alphabet and the art of writing it were kept secret for ages, and the dvijas (twice-born) and the dikshitas (initiates) alone were originally permitted to use this literary art. In India, as in many other countries which have been the seat of archaic civilizations, sacred and secret records were committed to the tablets of the mind, rather than to material tablets. Alone the priesthood invariably had, in addition to the mnemonic records, an ideographic or syllabic script which was used when considered convenient or necessary, mainly for intercommunication between themselves and brother-initiates speaking other tongues. This applied to ideographic characters which can be read with equal facility by those acquainted with them, whatever their spoken mother-tongue may be, and to written characters imbodying an archaic or sacred language, as was the case with the ancient Sanskrit. This is the main reason why these ancient peoples have so few allusions — and sometimes no allusions at all — to writing; in the civilizations of those far past times writing was not found to be a need and was kept as a sacred art for the temple scribes.

Dhammapāla. (d.u.). A celebrated Pāli commentator and author, Dhammapāla is known to have flourished sometime after the time of BUDDHAGHOSA (fl. fifth century CE), though his precise dates are uncertain. Numerous works are attributed to him, although the accuracy of these attributions is sometimes suspect because of the many Pāli authors who have the same name. The SĀSANAVAMSA states that Dhammapāla lived at Badaratittha in southern India. In several of his works, Dhammapāla records that he is a native of KaNcipuram and that he studied at the MAHĀVIHĀRA in the Sinhalese capital of ANURĀDHAPURA. THERAVĀDA congregations affiliated with the Mahāvihāra existed among the Tamils in South India, and it appears that he was familiar with their commentarial traditions. According to one legend, Dhammapāla was so renowned for his intelligence that the local king of KaNcipuram offered him his daughter in marriage. Being interested instead in a life of renunciation and scholarship, Dhammapāla prayed for his release before an image of the Buddha, whereupon the gods carried him away to a place where he could be ordained as a Buddhist monk. Seven of Dhammapāla's commentaries (AttHAKATHĀ) are devoted to the KHUDDAKANIKĀYA division of the SUTTAPItAKA; these include the PARAMATTHADĪPANĪ (a commentary on the UDĀNA, ITIVUTTAKA, VIMĀNAVATTHU, PETAVATTHU, THERAGĀTHĀ, and THERĪGĀTHĀ), as well as exegeses of the Vimānavatthu, Petavatthu, Itivuttaka, and CARIYĀPItAKA. He also wrote commentaries to the NETTIPPAKARAnA and the VISUDDHIMAGGA, the latter of which is titled the PARAMATTHAMANJuSĀ. Dhammapāla also wrote several subcommentaries (tīkā) on Buddhaghosa's exegeses of the Pāli canon, including the Līnatthavannanā on the suttapitaka, and subcommentaries on the JĀTAKA, the BUDDHAVAMSA, and the ABHIDHAMMAPItAKA.

Dharmodgata. (T. Chos 'phags; C. Faqi pusa; J. Hoki bosatsu; K. Popki posal 法起菩薩). In Sanskrit, "Elevated Dharma," or "Dharma Arising," the name of a BODHISATTVA whom the AVATAMSAKASuTRA describes as residing in the Diamond (S. VAJRA) Mountains. According to the Chinese translations of the AvataMsakasutra, Dharmodgata lives in the middle of the sea in the Diamond Mountains (C. Jingangshan; J. KONGoSAN; K. KŬMGANGSAN), where he preaches the dharma to his large congregation of fellow bodhisattvas. The AstASĀHASRIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ also says that Dharmodgata (his name there is transcribed as C. Tanwujian, J. Donmukatsu, and K. Tammugal) preaches the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ three times daily at the City of Fragrances (S. Gandhavatī; C. Zhongxiangcheng; J. Shukojo; K. Chunghyangsong), now used as the name of one of the individual peaks at the Korean KŬMGANGSAN. Since the Chinese Tang dynasty and the Korean Silla dynasty, East Asian Buddhists have presumed that Dharmodgata resided at the Diamond Mountains, just as the bodhisattva MANJUsRĪ lived at WUTAISHAN. In his HUAYAN JING SHU, CHENGGUAN's massive commentary to the AvataMsakasutra, Chengguan explicitly connects the sutra's mention of the Diamond Mountains to the Kŭmgangsan of Korea. At Kŭmgangsan, there are many place names associated with Dharmodgata and several legends and stories concerning him have been transmitted. Records explain that P'YOHUNSA, an important monastery at Kŭmgangsan, at one time had an image of Dharmodgata enshrined in its main basilica (although the image is now lost). According to the Japanese ascetic tradition of SHUGENDo, the semilegendary founder of the school, EN NO OZUNU (b. 634), is considered to be a manifestation of Dharmodgata, and his principal residence, Katsuragi Mountain in Nara prefecture, is therefore also sometimes known as the Diamond Mountains (KONGoSAN).

dianzuo. (J. tenzo; K. chonjwa 典座). In Chinese, lit. "in charge of seating"; the term that comes to be used for a cook at a Buddhist monastery, who supervises the preparation and distribution of meals. In Indian VINAYA texts, the term was used to designate a "manager," the service monk (S. VAIYĀPṚTYA[KARA]; P. veyyāvaccakara) who assigned seating at assemblies and ceremonies and arranged for the distribution of material objects or donations in addition to food. In the pilgrimage records of YIJING in India and ENNIN in China, the term always referred to a "manager," not someone who worked in the monastic kitchen. But sometime after the tenth century, during the Northern Song dynasty, the term came to be used in Chinese monasteries to refer to the cook. In East Asian CHAN monasteries, the cook and five other officers, collectively known as the ZHISHI (J. chiji), oversaw the administration of the monastic community. Typically, the dianzuo position was considered a prestigious position and offered only to monks of senior rank. The Japanese Zen monk DoGEN KIGEN wrote a famous essay on the responsibilities of the cook entitled Tenzo kyokun ("Instructions to the Cook"). Cf. DRAVYA MALLAPUTRA.

discs ::: phonograph records.

display ::: 1. (hardware) monitor.2. (language) A vector of pointers to activation records. The Nth element points to the activation record containing variables declared at lexical depth global or occasionally to the immediately enclosing scope). Displays were used in some ALGOL implementations. (1996-02-22)

display 1. "hardware" {monitor}. 2. "language" A vector of pointers to {activation records}. The Nth element points to the activation record containing variables declared at {lexical depth} N. This allows faster access to variables from outer {scopes} than the alternative of linked activation records (but most variable accesses are either local or global or occasionally to the immediately enclosing scope). Displays were used in some {ALGOL} implementations. (1996-02-22)

Dohan. (道範) (1179-1252). A Kamakura-period SHINGON scholar-monk from KoYASAN, who wrote extensively on the works of KuKAI and KAKUBAN. He is well known for his esoteric writings on the PURE LAND, especially the Himitsu nenbutsusho ("Compendium on the Secret Contemplation of Buddha"). Dohan was ordained at the age of fourteen under Myonin (1148-1229) at Shochiin, and he later studied under KAKUKAI at Keoin. In 1237, Dohan was appointed head administrator of Shochiin. In 1243, a violent dispute erupted between Kongobuji and Daidenboin, which resulted in the exile of Dohan and around thirty other Koyasan elders. Dohan's travel diary, Nankai ruroki ("Record of Wandering by the Southern Sea"), records his time in exile on the island of Shikoku, traveling to many sites associated with Kukai. One of his dharma lectures from his time in exile survives as Dohan goshosoku ("Dohan's Letter"), a short discussion of AJIKAN, or contemplation of the letter "a." In 1249, Dohan was pardoned by imperial decree and permitted to return to Koyasan, where he passed away in 1252.

Dolmen [from Celtic] A rude stone monument consisting of two or more upright monoliths supporting a capstone. Such monuments are found in various parts of the world, notably in Carnac, Brittany. They are symbolic records of the world’s history, designed to be enduring, the work of giants.

Dongshan famen. (J. Tozan homon; K. Tongsan pommun 東山法門). In Chinese, lit. "East Mountain Dharma Gate" or "East Mountain Teachings"; one of the principal early CHAN schools, which is associated with the putative fourth and fifth patriarchs of the tradition, DAOXIN (580-651) and HONGREN (602-675). The name of the school is a toponym for the location of Hongren's monastery, at Huangmei in Qizhou (present-day Hubei province). "East Mountain" refers to the easterly of the "twin peaks" of Mount Shuangfeng, where Hongren taught after the death of his master Daoxin, who had taught on the westerly peak; the term "East Mountain Teachings," however, is typically used to refer to the tradition associated with both masters. The designations Dongshan famen and Dongshan jingmen (East Mountain Pure Gate) first appear in the LENGQIE SHIZI JI ("Records of the Masters and Disciples of the Lankā[vatāra]") and were used in the Northern school of Chan (BEI ZONG) by SHENXIU (606?-706) and his successors to refer to the lineage and teachings that they had inherited from Daoxin and Hongren. ¶ Although later Chan lineage texts list Daoxin and Hongren as respectively the fourth and the fifth Chan patriarchs, succeeding BODHIDHARMA, HUIKE, and SENGCAN, the connection of the East Mountain lineage to these predecessors is tenuous at best and probably nonexistent. The earliest biography of Daoxin, recorded in the XU GAOSENG ZHUAN ("Supplementary Biographies of Eminent Monks"), not only does not posit any connection between Daoxin and the preceding three patriarchs, but does not even mention their names. This connection is first made explicit in the c. 713 CHUAN FABAO JI ("Annals of the Transmission of the Dharma-Jewel"), one of the earliest Chan "transmission of the lamplight" (CHUANDENG LU) lineage texts. Unlike many of the Chan "schools" that were associated with a single charismatic teacher, the "East Mountain Teachings" was unusual in that it had a single, enduring center in Huangmei, which attracted increasing numbers of students. Some five or six names of students who studied with Daoxin survive in the literature, with another twenty-five associated with Hongren. Although Hongren's biography in the Chuan fabao ji certainly exaggerates when it says that eight to nine out of every ten Buddhist practitioners in China studied under Hongren, there is no question that the number of students of the East Mountain Teachings grew significantly over two generations. ¶ The fundamental doctrines and practices of the East Mountain Teachings can be reconstructed on the basis of the two texts: the RUDAO ANXIN YAO FANGBIAN FAMEN ("Essentials of the Teachings of the Expedient Means of Entering the Path and Pacifying the Mind") and the XIUXIN YAO LUN ("Treatise on the Essentials of Cultivating the Mind"), ascribed respectively to Daoxin and Hongren. The Rudao anxin yao fangbian famen, which is included in the Lengqie shizi ji, employs the analogy of a mirror from the Banzhou sanmei jing (S. PRATYUTPANNABUDDHASAMMUKHĀVASTHITASAMĀDHISuTRA) to illustrate the insubstantiality of all phenomena, viz., one's sensory experiences are no more substantial than the reflections in a mirror. The text then presents the "single-practice SAMĀDHI" (YIXING SANMEI) as a practical means of accessing the path leading to NIRVĀnA, based on the Wenshushuo bore jing ("Perfection of Wisdom Sutra Spoken by MANJUsRĪ"). Single-practice samādhi here refers to sitting in meditation, the supreme practice that subsumes all other practices; it is not one samādhi among others, as it is portrayed in the MOHE ZHIGUAN ("Great Calming and Contemplation"). Single-practice samādhi means to contemplate every single aspect of one's mental and physical existence until one realizes they are all empty, just like the reflections in the mirror, and "to guard that one without deviation" (shouyi buyi). The Xiuxin yao lun, which is attributed to Hongren, stresses the importance of "guarding the mind" (SHOUXIN). Here, the relationship between the pure mind and the afflictions (KLEsA) is likened to that between the sun and clouds: the pure mind is obscured by afflictions, just as the sun is covered by layers of clouds, but if one can guard the mind so that it is kept free from false thoughts and delusions, the sun of NIRVĀnA will then appear. The text suggests two specific meditation techniques for realizing this goal: one is continuously to visualize the original, pure mind (viz., the sun) so that it shines without obscuration; the other is to concentrate on one's own deluded thoughts (the clouds) until they disappear. These two techniques purport to "guard the mind" so that delusion can never recur. The East Mountain Teachings laid a firm foundation for the doctrines and practices of later Chan traditions like the Northern school.

Due diligence – A qualitative assessment of management’s character and capability. Comprehensive due diligence may also include an examination of the books and records, asset appraisals, reviews of the company's other debt obligations, legal and accounting affairs, internal controls, planned capital expenditures, and other matters that bear on the company's future success and prof­itability. Due diligence is a legal requirement before public offerings.

Due_diligence ::: is an investigation or audit of a potential investment or product to confirm all facts, such as reviewing all financial records, plus anything else deemed material. It refers to the care a reasonable person should take before entering into an agreement or a financial transaction with another party. Due diligence can also refer to the investigation a seller does of a buyer; items that may be considered are whether the buyer has adequate resources to complete the purchase, as well as other elements that would affect the acquired entity or the seller after the sale has been completed.

duiji. (J. taiki; K. taegi 對機). In Chinese, lit. teaching "in accord with capacity"; an abbreviation of the phrase duiji shuofa, or "speaking the DHARMA in accord with [the student's] capacity," referring to the Buddha's propensity to tailor his message through stratagems (UPĀYA) in order to respond to the specific needs of his audience and his listeners' ability to understand him. The term comes to be used in the CHAN school to refer to a formal exchange between a Chan master and disciple that takes place in the master's room (see FANGZHANG). This exchange between master and disciple is typically a "private" affair, for the master's answers are designed to respond to the spiritual capacity of that specific student. These exchanges constitute much of the content of the discourse records (YULU) of Chan, SoN, and ZEN masters.

Dweller on the Threshold ::: A literary invention of the English mystic and novelist Sir Bulwer Lytton, found in his romance Zanoni.The term has obtained wide currency and usage in theosophical circles. In occultism the word "dweller,"or some exactly equivalent phrase or expression, has been known and used during long ages past. Itrefers to several things, but more particularly has an application to what H. P. Blavatsky calls "certainmaleficent astral Doubles of defunct persons." This is exact. But there is another meaning of this phrasestill more mystical and still more difficult to explain which refers to the imbodied karmic consequencesor results of the man's past, haunting the thresholds which the initiant or initiate must pass before he canadvance or progress into a higher degree of initiation. These dwellers, in the significance of the word justlast referred to are, as it were, the imbodied quasi-human astral haunting parts of the constitution thrownoff in past incarnations by the man who now has to face them and overcome them -- very real and livingbeings, parts of the "new" man's haunting past. The initiant must face these old "selves" of himself andconquer or -- fail, which failure may mean either insanity or death. They are verily ghosts of the deadmen that the present man formerly was, now arising to dog his footsteps, and hence are very truly calledDwellers on the Threshold. In a specific sense they may be truly called the kama-rupas of the man's pastincarnations arising out of the records in the astral light left there by the "old" man of the "new" man whonow is.

dynamic database management system "database" (dynamic DBMS) A {database} with "value-based" relationships where typically the relationship is specified at retrieval time and the locations of related records are discovered during retrieval. Both {Independent Logical File} (ILF) databases and {relational databases} are value-based. The opposite is a {static database management system}. (1998-10-07)

dynamic database management system ::: (database) (dynamic DBMS) A database with value-based relationships where typically the relationship is specified at retrieval time and the locations of related records are discovered during retrieval. Both Independent Logical File (ILF) databases and relational databases are value-based.The opposite is a static database management system. (1998-10-07)

Economic entity - Accounting concept that provides a “point of view” or context for different economic events that have been recorded by the financial records.

EL1 Extensible Language One. An extensible language by B. Wegbreit of Harvard ca 1974. EL1 is internally somewhat {Lisp}-like, but fully typed with {records} and pointers. The external {syntax} is {ALGOL}-like and extensible, supporting user-defined {data structures}, control structures and operations. The {parser} is table-driven, with a modifiable set of productions. Used as the basis for the {ECL} {operating system}. ["Studies in Extensible Programming Languages", B. Wegbreit, Garland. Pub 1980].

EL1 ::: Extensible Language One. An extensible language by B. Wegbreit of Harvard ca 1974. EL1 is internally somewhat Lisp-like, but fully typed with records and table-driven, with a modifiable set of productions. Used as the basis for the ECL operating system.[Studies in Extensible Programming Languages, B. Wegbreit, Garland. Pub 1980].

Enpo dentoroku. (延寶傳燈). In Japanese, "The Enpo Reign-Era Transmission of the Lamplight Record"; a late Japanese genealogical history of the ZEN school, written by the RINZAISHu monk Mangen Shiban (1626-1710) and completed in 1678 and published in 1706, in a total of 41 rolls. Like the earlier Chinese lamplight record JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, which was named after the Chinese reign-era during which the text was compiled, Mangen used the Japanese reign-era Enpo to designate his collection. The text includes the biographies of over one thousand Zen clerics and lay practitioners in the major Zen lineages of the Japanese Rinzaishu and SoToSHu, with excerpts from their sermons and verses. Because of its vast scope, the collection offers a comprehensive overview of the history of the Japanese Zen tradition up to Mangen's time. In his preface, Shiban states that his source materials were these masters' discourse records (J. goroku; C. YULU), biographies, and stele and pagoda inscriptions, which he had collected for over thirty years since his youth. Mangen subsequently collected the biographies of 1,662 Buddhist monks from a range of Japanese sects and compiled them into the HONCHo KoSoDEN, completed in 1702 in a total of 75 rolls.

enroll ::: n. --> To insert in a roil; to register or enter in a list or catalogue or on rolls of court; hence, to record; to insert in records; to leave in writing; as, to enroll men for service; to enroll a decree or a law; also, reflexively, to enlist.
To envelop; to inwrap; to involve.


environment variable ::: (programming, operating system) A variable that is bound in the current environment. When evaluating an expression in some environment, the evaluation of a variable consists of looking up its name in the environment and substituting its value.Most programming languages have some concept of an environment but in Unix shell scripts it has a specific meaning slightly different from other contexts. In contains the local time zone. The variable called SHELL specifies the type of shell being used.These variables are used by commands or shell scripts to discover things about the environment they are operating in. Environment variables can be changed or created by the user or a program.To see a list of environment variables type setenv at the csh or tcsh prompt or set at the sh, bash, jsh or ksh prompt.In other programming languages, e.g. functional programming languages, the environment is extended with new bindings when a function's parameters are bound block-structured procedural language, the environment usually consists of a linked list of activation records. (1999-01-26)

environment variable "programming, operating system" A {variable} that is bound in the current environment. When evaluating an expression in some environment, the evaluation of a variable consists of looking up its name in the environment and substituting its value. Most programming languages have some concept of an environment but in {Unix} {shell scripts} it has a specific meaning slightly different from other contexts. In shell scripts, environment variables are one kind of {shell variable}. They differ from {local variables} and {command line arguments} in that they are inheritted by a {child process}. Examples are the PATH variable that tells the shell the {file system} {paths} to search to find command {executables} and the TZ variable which contains the local time zone. The variable called "SHELL" specifies the type of shell being used. These variables are used by commands or {shell scripts} to discover things about the environment they are operating in. Environment variables can be changed or created by the {user} or a program. To see a list of environment variables type "setenv" at the {csh} or {tcsh} {prompt} or "set" at the {sh}, {bash}, {jsh} or {ksh} prompt. In other programming languages, e.g. {functional programming} languages, the environment is extended with new bindings when a {function}'s {parameters} are bound to its {actual arguments} or when new variables are declared. In a {block-structured} {procedural} language, the environment usually consists of a {linked list} of {activation records}. (1999-01-26)

Epstein-Szpeizer Gymnasium ::: One of a number of Jewish private schools in Vilna. This high school was distinguished by the fact that it was progressive, secular and that Polish was the language of instruction. Long after the war the records of the school were found by a former student, Yulian Rafes, who collected many of them into a book. It gives a glimpse into the lives of a privileged class of Vilna students before the war.

Eridu One of the oldest seats of religious culture in ancient Babylonia, located a few miles SSW of Ur in Chaldea, and mentioned in ancient records as the city of the deep. In it was a temple of Ea, god of the sea and of wisdom. Rediscovered in 1854, it is now about 120 miles from the Persian Gulf, though spoken of in old records as being on the shore; calculations based on the rate of alluvial deposition places its date in the seventh millennium BC. Sayce, by comparing the Akkadian calendar with the present position of the vernal equinox, gives a date going back to 4700 BC.

estreat ::: n. --> A true copy, duplicate, or extract of an original writing or record, esp. of amercements or penalties set down in the rolls of court to be levied by the bailiff, or other officer. ::: v. t. --> To extract or take out from the records of a court, and send up to the court of exchequer to be enforced; -- said of a

event ::: 1. (software) An occurrence or happening of significance to a task or program, such as the completion of an asynchronous input/output operation. A receive asynchronous notification (a signal or interrupt) that the event has occurred.See also event-driven.2. (data) A transaction or other activity that affects the records in a file.(2000-02-09)

event 1. "software" An occurrence or happening of significance to a task or program, such as the completion of an asynchronous input/output operation. A task may wait for an event or any of a set of events or it may (request to) receive asynchronous notification (a {signal} or {interrupt}) that the event has occurred. See also {event-driven}. 2. "data" A transaction or other activity that affects the records in a file. (2000-02-09)

Extension Language Kit ::: (language) (Elk) A Scheme interpreter by Oliver Laumann and Carsten Bormann all artificial limitations removed; generational/incremental garbage collector; Unix system call extensions; Records (structures) and bit strings.Version: 2.2 is mostly R3RS compatible and runs on Unix, Ultrix, VAX, Sun-3, Sun-4, 68000, i386, MIPS, IBM PC RT, RS/6000, HP700, SGI, Sony, MS-DOS (gcc+DJGPP or go32). . . (1994-12-15)

Extension Language Kit ::: (language) (Elk) A Scheme interpreter by Oliver Laumann and Carsten Bormannall artificial limitations removed; generational/incremental garbage collector; Unix system call extensions; Records (structures) and bit strings.Version: 2.2 is mostly R3RS compatible and runs on Unix, Ultrix, VAX, Sun-3, Sun-4, 68000, i386, MIPS, IBM PC RT, RS/6000, HP700, SGI, Sony, MS-DOS (gcc+DJGPP or go32). . . (1994-12-15)

Extension Language Kit "language" (Elk) A {Scheme} {interpreter} by Oliver Laumann "net@cs.tu-berlin.de" and Carsten Bormann "cabo@cs.tu-berlin.de" of the {Technical University of Berlin}. Elk was designed to be used as a general extension language. New {types} and {primitive} procedures can easily be added. It has {first-class environments}, {dynamic-wind}, {fluid-let}, {macros}, {autoload}ing and a {dump}. It provides interfaces to {Xlib}, {Xt} and various {widget} sets; {dynamic loading} of extensions and {object files}; almost all artificial limitations removed; {generational}/{incremental garbage collector}; {Unix} {system call} extensions; {Records} (structures) and {bit strings}. Version: 2.2 is mostly {R3RS} compatible and runs on {Unix}, {Ultrix}, {VAX}, {Sun-3}, {Sun-4}, {68000}, {i386}, {MIPS}, {IBM PC RT}, {RS/6000}, {HP700}, {SGI}, {Sony}, {MS-DOS} ({gcc}+{DJGPP} or {go32}). {Germany (ftp://ftp.fu-berlin.de/pub/Unix/languages/scheme/elk-2.2.tar.gz)}. {US (ftp://ftp.x.org/contrib/elk-2.2.tar.gz)}. {US (ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/comp.sources.misc/volume8/elk)}. (1994-12-15)

fasti ::: n.pl. --> The Roman calendar, which gave the days for festivals, courts, etc., corresponding to a modern almanac.
Records or registers of important events.


Faxian zhuan. (J. Hokken den; K. Pophyon chon 法顯傳). In Chinese, "The Record of Faxian," commonly known as the FOGUO JI (translated into English as A Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms), the record of the Chinese monk FAXIAN's pilgrimage to India. Faxian left the Chinese capital of Chang'an in 399 and visited numerous cities and kingdoms in Central Asia, India, Sri Lanka, and the island of Java. He traveled to many sacred sites in India and Sri Lanka until his return to China in 413. Faxian left a fairly detailed record of the various ways in which Buddhism was practiced in these kingdoms. His record is replete with myths and legends associated with the pilgrimage sites he visited. Faxian's record also served as an authoritative guidebook for many pilgrims who later followed in his footsteps. As one of the earliest records of its kind, the Faxian zhuan serves as an indispensable tool for studying Buddhist pilgrimage, the state of Buddhism across the continent during the early fifth century, and the history of various kingdoms that once flourished in Asia. It was among the first Buddhist texts to be translated in Europe, published in Paris in 1836 as Foĕ Kouĕ Ki ou Relation des royaumes bouddhiques: Voyage dans la Tartarie, dans l'Afghanistan et dans l'Inde, exécuté à la fin du IVesiècle, par Ch˘y Fă Hian. The translation of the text was undertaken by Jean-Pierre Abel-Rémusat (1788-1832). The Chinese text is relatively short, but Abel-Rémusat provided detailed notes, in which he sought to identify and explain the many Buddhist persons, places, and doctrines that occur in Faxian's work. Abel-Rémusat died in the cholera epidemic of 1832, when the book was only half-finished. Heinrich Julius von Klaproth (1783-1835) took over the project until his own death. It was completed by Ernest-Augustin Xavier Clerc de Landresse (1800-1862) and published in 1836. Until the publication of EUGÈNE BURNOUF's Introduction à l'histoire du Buddhisme indien in 1844, this was the most detailed study of Buddhism to be produced in Europe. Faxian's text was translated into English by SAMUEL BEAL in 1869 and by James Legge in 1886.

field "data, database" An area of a {database} {record}, or {graphical user interface} {form}, into which a particular item of data is entered. Example usage: "The telephone number field is not really a numerical field", "Why do we need a four-digit field for the year?". A {database} {column} is the set of all instances of a given field from all records in a {table}. (1999-04-26)

field ::: (data, database) An area of a database record, or graphical user interface form, into which a particular item of data is entered.Example usage: The telephone number field is not really a numerical field, Why do we need a four-digit field for the year?.A database column is the set of all instances of a given field from all records in a table. (1999-04-26)

File - Collection of information stored as records. For example, the records for all charge customers at the local department store collectively form the accounts receivable file.

Fori Qisong. (J. Butsunichi Kaisu; K. Puril Kyesung 佛日契嵩) (1007-1072). In Chinese, "Buddha Sun, Accords with Loftiness"; renowned scholar-monk during the Song dynasty and fifth-generation successor in the YUNMEN ZONG of the Chan school. After entering the monastery in his seventh year and being ordained in his thirteenth year, he traveled widely throughout China to meet with the famous Chan masters of his age. He eventually received formal dharma transmission from Dongshan Xiaocong (d.u.) in the Yunmen school. Qisong served as abbot of Jinghuisi, a monastery located nearby the city of Hangzhou on Mt. Fori, hence his toponym. He was known as a severe abbot, and his presence led many of the less serious monks who had been residing there to leave the monastery. Around 1061, Qisong completed an early history of the Chan school titled Chuanfa zhengzong ji ("Essay on the Authentic Lineage of Dharma Transmission"), which contains the first reference to the five houses schema of the mature Chan school (see WU JIA QI ZONG): the GUIYANG ZONG (which Qisong says was virtually extinct in his day), CAODONG ZONG (which he says is barely extant), and the LINJI ZONG, Yunmen zong, and FAYAN ZONG (all three of which he says were flourishing). Qisong also wrote a widely read and cited introduction to the Yuan-dynasty edition of the "Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch" (LIUZU TAN JING), the edition of that text most commonly used in the Chan school from that point forward. Qisong died in 1072 in his sixty-sixth year. Many relics (sARĪRA) remained after his cremation and near-contemporary records say that his eyes, tongue, and penis survived the flames. These relics were enshrined in a reliquary (STuPA) at Lingyinsi in Hangzhou. We know of only one named disciple of Qisong's, and the Yunmen school with which he was affiliated faded soon after his demise.

  “Founder of the religion variously called Mazdaism, Magism, Parseeism, Fire-Worship, and Zoroastrianism. The age of the last Zoroaster (for it is a generic name) is not known, and perhaps for that very reason. Zanthus of Lydia, the earliest Greek writer who mentions this great lawgiver and religious reformer, places him about six hundred years before the Trojan War. But where is the historian who can now tell when the latter took place? Aristotle and also Eudoxus assign him a date of no less than 6,000 years before the days of Plato, and Aristotle was not one to make a statement without a good reason for it. Berosus makes him a king of Babylon some 2,200 years b.c.; but then, how can one tell what were the original figures of Berosus, before his MSS. passed through the hands of Eusebius, whose fingers were so deft at altering figures, whether in Egyptian synchronistic tables or in Chaldean chronology? Haug refers Zoroaster to at least 1,000 years b.c.; and Bunsen . . . finds that Zarathustra Spitama lived under the King Vistaspa about 3,000 years b.c., and describes him as ‘one of the mightiest intellects and one of the greatest men of all time. . . . the Occult records claim to have the correct dates of each of the thirteen Zoroasters mentioned in the Dabistan. Their doctrines, and especially those of the last (divine) Zoroaster, spread from Bactria to the Medes; thence, under the name of Magism, incorporated by the Adept-Astronomers in Chaldea, they greatly influenced the mystic teachings of the Mosaic doctrines, even before, perhaps, they had culminated into what is now known as the modern religion of the Parsis. Like Manu and Vyasa in India, Zarathustra is a generic name for great reformers and law-givers. The hierarchy began with the divine Zarathustra in the Vendidad, and ended with the great, but mortal man, bearing that title, and now lost to history. . . . the last Zoroaster was the founder of the Fire-temple of Azareksh, many ages before the historical era. Had not Alexander destroyed so many sacred and precious works of the Mazdeans, truth and philosophy would have been more inclined to agree with history, in bestowing upon that Greek Vandal the title of ‘the Great’ ” (TG 384-5).

Fraud - 1. falsification of a tax retur by an individual. Examples of tax fraud are intentionally not reporting taxable income or overstating expenses. Tax fraud is a criminal act. Or 2. deliberate action by individual or entity to cheat another, causing damage. There is typically a misrepresentation to deceive, or purposeful withholding of material data needed for a proper decision. An example of fraud is when a bookkeeping falsifies records in order to steal money.

gong'an. (J. koan; K. kongan 公案). In Chinese, "public case," or "precedent"; better known in the West by its Japanese pronunciation koan, a word that has now entered common English parlance as "koan." Gong'an was originally a legal term, referring to the magistrate's (gong) table (an), which by metonymy comes to refer to a legal precedent or an authoritative judgment; the term also comes to mean simply a "story" (gong'an in vernacular Chinese refers to the genre of detective stories). The term is widely used in the CHAN school in a way that conveys both denotations of a legal precedent and a story. The study of gong'an seems to have had its beginnings in the practice, probably dating from the late-Tang dynasty, of commenting on the exchanges or "ancient precedents" (guce) culled from Chan genealogical histories (e.g., JINGDE CHUANDENG LU) and the recorded sayings or discourse records (YULU) of the Chan masters of the past. Commenting on old cases (niangu), often using verses (SONGGU), seems to have become a well-established practice by the early Song dynasty, as more recorded sayings began to include separate sections known as nianggu and songgu. Perhaps one of the most famous collections of verse commentaries on old cases is the Chan master XUEDOU CHONGXIAN's Xuedou heshang baice songgu, which now exists only as part of a larger influential collection of gong'ans known as the BIYAN LU. Other famous gong'an collections, such as the CONGRONG LU and WUMEN GUAN, were compiled during the Song dynasty and thereafter. These collections often shared a similar format. Each case (bence), with some exceptions, begins with a pointer (CHUISHI), a short introductory paragraph. The actual case, often a short anecdote, is interspersed with interlinear notes known as "annotations" or "capping phrases" (C. zhuoyu/zhuyu; see J. JAKUGO). After the case, a prose commentary (pingchang), verse commentary (songgu), and subcommentary on the verse commentary follow. Traditionally, 1,700 specific gong'an are said to have been in circulation in the Chan school. Although this number does have antecedents within the tradition, there are no fixed numbers of cases included in Chan gong'an anthologies; for example, a late Qing-dynasty collection, the 1712 Zongjian falin, includes 2,720 gong'an, which were claimed to be all the gong'an then in active use within the tradition. Whatever the number, there seems not to have been any kind of systematic curriculum within the Chinese Chan or Korean Son traditions using this full panoply of gong'an. The creation of a pedagogical system of training involving mastery of a series of many different koans is commonly attributed to HAKUIN EKAKU (1685-1768) in the Japanese RINZAISHu of ZEN. The widespread reference to 1,700 gong'an in Western-language materials may derive from accounts of Japanese government attempts in 1627 to routinize the Rinzai monastic curriculum, by promulgating a regulation requiring all Zen abbots to master 1,700 cases as part of their training. ¶ The literary endeavor of studying old cases also gave rise to new forms of meditation. The Chan master DAHUI ZONGGAO in the YANGQI PAI of the LINJI ZONG systematized a practice in which one focuses on what he termed the "meditative topic" (HUATOU), which in some contexts refers to the "keyword," or "critical phrase" of a gong'an story. For instance, the famous huatou "WU" (no) that Dahui used as a meditative topic was derived from a popular gong'an attributed to ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN: A student asked Zhaozhou, "Does a dog have buddha nature, or not?," to which Zhaozhou replied "wu" (no; lit., "it does not have it") (see WU GONG'AN; GOUZI WU FOXING). This new practice was called the "Chan of observing the meditative topic" or, more freely, "questioning meditation" (KANHUA CHAN). During the Song dynasty, students also began to seek private instruction on gong'an from Chan masters. These instructions often occurred in the abbot's quarters (FANGZHANG). ¶ The active study of gong'an in Korean SoN begins with POJO CHINUL and his disciple CHIN'GAK HYESIM, who learned of Dahui's kanhua Chan largely through the writings of their Chinese counterpart. Hyesim was also the first Korean Son monk to compile his own massive collection of cases, titled the SoNMUN YoMSONG CHIP. The use of cases was later transmitted to Japan by pilgrims and émigré monks, where koan study became emblematic of the Rinzaishu. Because rote memorization of capping phrases came to take precedence over skilled literary composition in classical Chinese, the Japanese compiled large collections of capping phrases, such as the ZENRIN KUSHu, to use in their training.

green bytes "jargon" (Or "green words") {Meta-information} embedded in a file, such as the length of the file or its name; as opposed to keeping such information in a separate description file or record. By extension, the non-data bits in any self-describing format. "A {GIF} file contains, among other things, green bytes describing the packing method for the image". At a meeting of the SHARE Systems Division, November 22, 1964, in Washington, DC, George Mealy of {IBM} described the new block tape format for {FORTRAN} in which unformatted binary records had a Control Word. George used green chalk to describe it. No one liked the contents of the Green Word (not information, wrong location, etc.) so Conrad Weisert and Channing Jackson made badges saying "Stamp out Green Words". This was the first computer badge. Compare {out-of-band}, {zigamorph}, {fence}. {Button 251 (http://mxg.com/thebuttonman/search.asp)}. [{Jargon File}] (1994-11-02)

Guanyin. (J. Kannon; K. Kwanŭm 觀音). In Chinese, "Perceiver of Sounds," an abbreviation of the longer name Guanshiyin (J. Kanzeon; K. Kwanseŭm; Perceiver of the World's Sounds); the most famous and influential BODHISATTVA in all of East Asia, who is commonly known in Western popular literature as "The Goddess of Mercy." Guanyin (alt. Guanshiyin) is the Chinese translation of AVALOKITEsVARA, the bodhisattva of compassion; this rendering, popularized by the renowned Kuchean translator KUMĀRAJĪVA in his 405-406 CE translation of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), derives from an earlier form of this bodhisattva's name, Avalokitasvara, which is attested in some Sanskrit manuscripts of this scripture; Kumārajīva interprets this name as "gazing" (avalokita; C. guan) on the "sounds" (svara; C. yin) [of this wailing "world" (C. shi) of suffering]. Avalokitasvara was supplanted during the seventh century CE by the standard Sanskrit form Avalokitesvara, the "gazing" (avalokita) "lord" (īsvara); this later form is followed in XUANZANG's Chinese rendering Guanzizai (J. Kanjizai; K. Kwanjajae), as found in his 649 CE translation of the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀHṚDAYASuTRA ("Heart Sutra"). The primary textual source for Guanyin worship is the twenty-fifth chapter of the Saddharmapundarīkasutra; that chapter is devoted to the bodhisattva and circulated widely as an independent text in East Asia. The chapter guarantees that if anyone in danger calls out Guanshiyin's name with completely sincerity, the bodhisattva will "perceive the sound" of his call and rescue him from harm. Unlike in India and Tibet, Avalokitesvara took on female form in East Asia around the tenth century. In traditional China, indigenous forms of Guanyin, such as BAIYI GUANYIN (White-Robed Guanyin), Yulan Guanyin (Guanyin with Fish Basket), SHUIYUE GUANYIN (Moon in Water Guanyin), Songzi Guanyin (Child-Granting Guanyin), MALANG FU, as well as Princess MIAOSHAN, became popular subjects of worship. Guanyin was worshipped in China by both monastics and laity, but her functions differed according to her manifestation. Guanyin thus served as a protectress against personal misfortune, a symbol of Buddhist ideals and restraint, or a granter of children. Various religious groups and lay communities also took one of her various forms as their patroness, and in this role, Guanyin was seen as a symbol of personal salvation. Beginning in the tenth century, these different manifestations of Guanyin proliferated throughout China through indigenous sutras (see APOCRYPHA), secular narratives, miracle tales, monastic foundation legends, and images. In later dynasties, and up through the twentieth century, Guanyin worship inspired both male and female religious groups. For example, White Lotus groups (see BAILIAN SHE; BAILIAN JIAO) during the Song dynasty included members from both genders, who were active in erecting STuPAs and founding cloisters that promoted Guanyin worship. In the twentieth century, certain women's groups were formed that took Princess Miaoshan's refusal to marry as inspiration to reject the institution of marriage themselves and, under the auspices of a Buddhist patron, pursue other secular activities as single women. ¶ In Japan, Kannon was originally introduced during the eighth century and took on additional significance as a female deity. For example, Kannon was often invoked by both pilgrims and merchants embarking on long sea voyages or overland travel. Invoking Kannon's name was thought to protect travelers from seven different calamities, such as fire, flood, storms, demons, attackers, lust and material desires, and weapons. Moreover, Kannon worship in Japan transcended sectarian loyalties, and there were numerous miracle tales concerning Kannon that circulated throughout the Japanese isles. ¶ In Korea, Kwanŭm is by far the most popular bodhisattva and is also known there as a deity who offers succor and assistance in difficult situations. The cult of Kwanŭm flourished initially under the patronage of the aristocracy in both the Paekche and Silla kingdoms, and historical records tell of supplications made to Kwanŭm for the birth of children or to protect relatives who were prisoners of war or who had been lost at sea. Hence, while the cult of AMITĀBHA was principally focused on spiritual liberation in the next life, Kwanŭm instead was worshipped for protection in this life. Still today, Kwanŭm is an object of popular worship and a focus of ritual chanting in Korean Buddhist monasteries by both monks and, especially, laywomen (and usually chanted in the form Kwanseŭm).

Guoqing bailu. (J. Kokusei hyakuroku; K. Kukch'ong paengnok 國清百録). In Chinese, "One Hundred Records from Guoqing [Monastery]," compiled by the TIANTAI ZONG monk GUANDING. Although the title refers to one hundred records, the Guoqing bailu in fact contains 104 documents that Guanding compiled in memory of his teacher TIANTAI ZHIYI. These documents include Zhiyi's letters, memorial tablets, imperial decrees, ritual manuals, and monastic rules. The Guoqing bailu provides a wealth of information on Zhiyi's thought and career.

Hanshan. (J. Kanzan; K. Hansan 寒山) (d.u.; fl. mid-eighth century). In Chinese, "Cold Mountain"; sobriquet of a legendary Tang dynasty poet and iconoclast of near-mythic status within Chinese Buddhism. The HANSHAN SHI, one of the best-loved collection of poems in the Chinese Buddhist tradition, is attributed to this obscure figure. Hanshan (Cold Mountain) is primarily known as a hermit who dwelled on Mt. Tiantai, in present-day Zhejiang province. References to Hanshan are scattered throughout the discourse records (YULU) of various Chan masters and biographies of eminent monks (GAOSENG ZHUAN). Hanshan also became a favored object in brushstroke art (BOKUSEKI), in which he is often depicted together with SHIDE and FENGGAN. Together, these three iconoclasts are known as the "three recluses of Guoqing [monastery]."

Hatthaka Ālavaka. An eminent lay disciple of the Buddha, declared by him to be foremost among laymen who attract followers by means of the four means of conversion (S. SAMGRAHAVASTU). According to the Pāli account, he was the son of the king of Ālavī, and received his name Hatthaka (which in Pāli means "handed over" as a child), because he had once been given to the Buddha by an ogre (S. YAKsA), who, in turn, handed him back to the king. The ogre, the yakkha Ālavaka, was going to eat the boy but was converted by the Buddha and persuaded to release him, instead. When he grew up, Hatthaka heard the Buddha preach and became a nonreturner (S. ANĀGĀMIN). A gifted preacher, Hatthaka had a following of five hundred disciples who always accompanied him. The suttapitaka records several conversations he had with the Buddha. On one occasion, after the Buddha asked him how he was able to gather such a large following around him, Hatthaka responded that it was through four means of conversion: giving gifts, kind words, kind deeds, and equality in treatment. It was for this capacity that Hatthaka won eminence. The Buddha declared him to be endowed with eight qualities: faith, virtue, conscientiousness, shame, the ability to listen, generosity, wisdom, and modesty. When he died, Hatthaka was reborn as a divinity in avihā heaven in the subtle materiality realm (RuPALOKA), where he was destined to attain final nibbāna (S. NIRVĀnA). Once, he visited the Buddha from his celestial world but collapsed in his presence, unable to support his subtle material body on earth; the Buddha instructed him to create a gross material body, by means of which he was then able to stand. He told the Buddha that he had three regrets upon his death: that he had not seen the Buddha enough, that he had not heard the DHARMA enough, and that he had not served the SAMGHA enough. Together with the householder CITTA (Cittagahapati), Hatthaka Ālavaka is upheld as an ideal layman, who is worthy of emulation.

hierarchical database "database" A kind of {database management system} that links records together like a family tree such that each record type has only one owner, e.g. an order is owned by only one customer. Hierarchical structures were widely used in the first {mainframe} database management systems. However, due to their restrictions, they often cannot be used to relate structures that exist in the real world.

hierarchical database ::: (database) A kind of database management system that links records together like a family tree such that each record type has only one owner, e.g. restrictions, they often cannot be used to relate structures that exist in the real world.

Hierogrammatists [from Greek hierogrammateus from hieros sacred + grammateus scribe] Applied by Greek writers to the sacred scribes of ancient Egypt, who wrote and read the sacred records, and among whose functions was that of the instruction of initiants or neophytes preparing for initiation.

Hiram, Huram, King of Tyre (Hebrew) Ḥīrām, Ḥūrām [from ḥāwar to become white or pale; or from ḥārāh to burn (as with ardor), be noble or free-born; or ḥāram to devote, consecrate as to religion or destruction, be killed or destroyed] A contemporary of the kings of Israel David and Solomon, who sent David cedar trees, carpenters, and masons in order to build him a house and who later, in response to a request from Solomon, sent timber from Lebanon and a skillful man, Hiram Abif or Huram ’abiu, to aid him in building Solomon’s Temple (2 Chron 3:12-13). All the ancient records speak of King Hiram as a master builder who built the temples of Hercules and Astarte, virtually rebuilt Tyre, and reconstructed the national temple of Melkarth (Melekartha). At the entrance to this temple were two pillars, one of gold and one of smaragdus or emerald, which probably were the immediate prototypes of the pillars Jachin and Boaz in front of the temple which Solomon later built with Hiram’s assistance, thus connecting the worship of Jehovah with that of Melkarth or Baal. The original prototype of these pillars were the Pillars of Hermes.

Historiography: (Gr. histor + graphein, to write) The art of recording history (q.v.). History: (Gr. histor, learned) Ambiguously used to denote either (a) events or (b) records of the past. The term historiography (q.v.) is used for (b). Also ambiguous in denoting natural as well as human events, or records of either. History of Art: Vasari (16th century) began the history of the artists. Winckelmann (18th century) began the history of art, that is of the development of the clements comprised in works of art. The history of art today is directed towards a synthesis of the personalities of the artists and of their reaction to tradition and environment. -- L.V.

Hokyoki. (寶慶). In Japanese, "Record from the Baoqing era," a treatise attributed to Japanese SoToSHu ZEN master DoGEN KIGEN. The Hokyoki was discovered after Dogen's death by his disciple Koun Ejo (1198-1280) and a preface was prepared in 1750. The Hokyoki is purportedly a record of Dogen's tutelage under the Chinese CAODONG ZONG master TIANTONG RUJING during his sojourn in China during the Baoqing reign era (1225-1227) of the Southern Song dynasty. The Hokyoki records specific instructions attributed to Rujing, including such topics as the "sloughing off body and mind" (J. SHINJIN DATSURAKU), seated meditation (J. zazen; C. ZUOCHAN), and his doctrinal teachings.

Huanglong pai. (J. oryoha/oryuha; K. Hwangnyong p'a 龍派). In Chinese, "Huanglong school"; collateral lineage of the CHAN school's LINJI ZONG, one of the five houses and seven schools (WU JIA QI ZONG) of the Chan during the Northern Song dynasty (960-1126). The school's name comes from the toponym of its founder, HUANGLONG HUINAN (1002-1069), who taught at Mt. Huanglong in present-day Jiangxi province; Huinan was a disciple of Shishuang Chuyuan (986-1039), himself a sixth-generation successor in the Linji school. The Huanglong school was especially known for "lettered Chan" (WENZI CHAN), a style of Chan that valorized belle lettres, and especially poetry, in Chan practice. Many of the most influential monks in the Huanglong school exemplified a period when Chan entered the mainstream of Chinese intellectual life: their practice of Chan was framed and conceptualized in terms that drew from their wide learning and profound erudition, tendencies that helped make Chan writings particularly appealing to wider Chinese literati culture. JUEFAN HUIHONG (1071-1128), for example, decried the bibliophobic tendencies in Chan that were epitomized in the aphorism that Chan "does not establish words and letters" (BULI WENZI) and advocated that Chan insights were in fact made manifest in both Buddhist sutras and the uniquely Chan genres of discourse records (YULU), lineage histories (see CHUANDENG LU), and public-case anthologies (GONG'AN). Huanglong and YUNMEN ZONG masters made important contributions to the development of the Song Chan literary styles of songgu ([attaching] verses to ancient [cases]) and niangu (raising [and analyzing] ancient [cases]). Because of their pronounced literary tendencies, many Huanglong monks became close associates of such Song literati-officials as Su Shi (1036-1101), Huang Tingjian (1045-1105), and ZHANG SHANGYING (1043-1122). After the founder's death, discord appeared within the Huanglong lineage: the second-generation master Baofeng Kewen (1025-1102) and his disciple Juefan Huihong criticized the practices of another second-generation master Donglin Changzong (1025-1091) and his disciples as clinging to silence and simply waiting for enlightenment; this view may have influenced the subsequent criticism of the CAODONG ZONG by DAHUI ZONGGAO (1089-1163), who trained for a time with the Huanglong master Zhantang Wenjun (1061-1115). The Huanglong pai was the first school of Chan to be introduced to Japan: by MYoAN EISAI (1141-1215), who studied with the eighth-generation Huanglong teacher Xu'an Huaichang (d.u.). The Huanglong pai did not survive as a separate lineage in either country long after the twelfth century, as its rival YANGQI PAI came to prominence; it was eventually reabsorbed into the Yangqi lineage.

Hwangnyongsa. (皇/龍寺). In Korean, "royal," or "Yellow Dragon Monastery" ("royal" and "yellow" are homophonous in Korean); an important Korean monastery located in the Silla-dynasty capital of Kyongju. The monastery was constructed between 553 and 569, during the reign of the Silla king Chinhŭng (r. 540-576) and was especially renowned for its sixteen-foot high image of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha (completed in 574) and its massive, nine-story pagoda (STuPA), which was built in 645 during the reign of Queen Sondok (r. 632-647). In the winter of 1238, during the succeeding Koryo dynasty (918-1392), the entire monastery, including the buddha image and the pagoda, was totally destroyed by invading Mongol troops, and only the foundation stones currently remain. The site of the monastery was excavated by the Kyongju National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage between 1976 and 1983. Royal Dragon monastery flourished due to the support of the Silla royal family, which sought to use Buddhism as an unifying political ideology; The stories told concerning the foundation of the monastery, the image, and the pagoda all reflect this fact. The construction of the monastery is thus often cited as an example of "state-protection Buddhism" hoguk Pulgyo; C. HUGUO FOJIAO) in Korea. According to the SAMGUK YUSA ("Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms"), in the second month of 553, King Chinhŭng was building a new palace to the south of his Dragon Palace and east of Wolsong palace, when a yellow dragon (hwangnyong) appeared at the site. Yellow dragons were popular autochthonous deities in Silla; hence, given the auspicious nature of this apparition, the king changed plans and instead built a Buddhist monastery on the site, which is called both Yellow Dragon and Royal Dragon monastery in the literature. When the Silla monk CHAJANG (d.u.; fl. c. 590-658) was training at WUTAISHAN in China, an emanation of the bodhisattva MANJUsRĪ told him that Hwangnyongsa was constructed on the site of the dispensation of the previous buddha KĀsYAPA. Not long after the monastery's completion, a ship with 57,000 pounds of iron and 30,000 ounces of gold aboard appeared at Sap'o Harbor in Hagok County (currently Kokp'o near Ulsan, on the southeast coast of the peninsula). The ship also carried an inscription, which said that the Indian king AsOKA, having tried and failed three times to forge a sākyamuni triad from these metals, had finally decided to load the materials aboard ship, along with models of the images, and send them off in search of a land with the requisite metallurgical skill to craft such a statue. King Chinŭng ordered his metallurgists to forge this sixteen-foot statue of the Buddha, and they succeeded on the first attempt in the third month of 574. Chajang also was told by MANJUSRĪ that the queen belonged to the Indian KsATRIYA caste. He was later told by a divine being that if a nine-story pagoda were constructed within the precincts of Royal Dragon monastery, the kingdoms bordering Silla would surrender and submit to Silla hegemony. Hearing Chajang's prediction, in 645, the queen built the pagoda, which was 224 feet tall and made entirely of wood. Chajang placed within its columns some of the relics (sARĪRA) of the Buddha that he had received at Wutaishan. (Another portion was enshrined at T'ONGDOSA, where they remain still today.) It was said that the nine stories of the pagoda symbolized the nine kingdoms and tribal leagues surrounding Silla. During the time when Hwangnyongsa was constructed, the unification wars between the three Korean kingdoms of Silla, Koguryo, and Paekche were raging. The Silla monarchs at this time tried to justify their royal authority by relying on Buddhism, particularly by comparing the Silla rulers to the imported Buddhist notion of the ideal Buddhist ruler, or CAKRAVARTIN (wheel-turning emperor) and by positing that the royal family was genealogically related to the ksatriya clan of the Buddha. These associations are also obvious in the personal names of Silla kings, queens, and other royal family members. For example, the names of the King Chinhŭng's two princes were Tongnyun (Copper Wheel) and Kŭmnyun (Gold Wheel), both specific types of cakravartins; additionally, King Chinp'yong's personal name was Paekchong and his queen's was Maya, the Sino-Korean translation and transcription, respectively, of the names of sākyamuni Buddha's father and mother, sUDDHODANA and MĀYĀ. The foundation of Hwangnyongsa was intimately associated with these attempts by the royal family to employ Buddhism as a tool for justifying and reinforcing its authority. The monastery sponsored the Inwang Paekkojwa hoe (Humane Kings Assembly of One-Hundred Seats), a state-protection (hoguk) rite based on the RENWANGJING ("Scripture for Humane Kings"), in the hopes that the power of the buddhadharma would protect and promote the royal family and the kingdom. According to both the Samguk yusa and the Samguk Sagi ("Historical Records of the Three Kingdoms"), such a ceremony was held at Hwangnyongsa in 613 and 636, before the unification of the three kingdoms, as well as several times subsequently. Monks who resided at Hwangnyongsa also played important roles in Silla politics and religion. WoN'GWANG (532-630), who composed the five codes of conduct for the "flower boys" (hwarang), an elite group of male aristocratic youths, may have written there a letter to ask Emperor Yangdi (r. 604-618) of the Sui dynasty to attack Koguryo on Silla's behalf. Another resident, Chajang, encouraged the royal family to adopt Chinese official attire and the Chinese chronological era at the Silla court and was appointed kukt'ong (state superintendent), to supervise the entire Silla Buddhist ecclesia. Several other Hwangnyongsa monks, including Hyehun (fl. c. 640), Kangmyong (fl. 655), and Hunp'il (fl. 879), were appointed to kukt'ong and other important Silla ecclesiastical positions. Finally, several important Silla scholar-monks resided at Hwangnyongsa, including WoNHYO (617-686), who delivered his first public teaching of the KŬMGANG SAMMAEGYoNG NON ("Exposition of the Vajrasamādhisutra") at the monastery.

IBM System/36 "computer" A mid-range {computer} introduced in 1983, which remained popular in the 1990s because of its low cost and high performance. Prices started in the $20k range for the small 5362 to $100+k for the expanded 5360. In 1994, IBM introduced the Advanced 36 for $9,000. The largest 5360 had 7MB of {RAM} and 1432MB of {hard disk}. The smallest 5362 had 256K of RAM and 30MB of hard disk. The Advanced 36 had 64MB of RAM and 4300MB of hard disk, but design issues limit the amount of storage that can actually be addressed by the {operating system}; underlying {microcode} allowed additional RAM to cache disk reads and writes, allowing the Advanced 36 to outperform the S/36 by 600 to 800%. There was only one operating system for the S/36: SSP ({System Support Product}). SSP consumed about 7-10MB of hard drive space. Computer programs on the S/36 reside in "libraries," and the SSP itself resides in a special system library called

IBM System/36 ::: (computer) A mid-range computer introduced in 1983, which remained popular in the 1990s because of its low cost and high performance. Prices started in the $20k range for the small 5362 to $100+k for the expanded 5360. In 1994, IBM introduced the Advanced 36 for $9,000.The largest 5360 had 7MB of RAM and 1432MB of hard disk. The smallest 5362 had 256K of RAM and 30MB of hard disk. The Advanced 36 had 64MB of RAM and 4300MB of to cache disk reads and writes, allowing the Advanced 36 to outperform the S/36 by 600 to 800%.There was only one operating system for the S/36: SSP (System Support Product). SSP consumed about 7-10MB of hard drive space. Computer programs on the S/36 reside in libraries, and the SSP itself resides in a special system library called

Icon "language" A descendant of {SNOBOL4} with {Pascal}-like syntax, produced by Griswold in the 1970's. Icon is a general-purpose language with special features for string scanning. It has dynamic types: records, sets, lists, strings, tables. If has some {object oriented} features but no {modules} or {exceptions}. It has a primitive {Unix} interface. The central theme of Icon is the generator: when an expression is evaluated it may be suspended and later resumed, producing a result sequence of values until it fails. Resumption takes place implicitly in two contexts: iteration which is syntactically loop-like ('every-do'), and goal-directed evaluation in which a conditional expression automatically attempts to produce at least one result. Expressions that fail are used in lieu of Booleans. Data {backtracking} is supported by a reversible {assignment}. Icon also has {co-expressions}, which can be explicitly resumed at any time. Version 8.8 by Ralph Griswold "ralph@cs.arizona.edu" includes an {interpreter}, a compiler (for some {platforms}) and a library (v8.8). Icon has been ported to {Amiga}, {Atari}, {CMS}, {Macintosh}, {Macintosh/MPW}, {MS-DOS}, {MVS}, {OS/2}, {Unix}, {VMS}, {Acorn}. See also {Ibpag2}. {(ftp://cs.arizona.edu/icon/)}, {MS-DOS FTP (ftp://bellcore.com norman/iconexe.zip)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.lang.icon}. E-mail: "icon-project@cs.arizona.edu", "mengarini@delphi.com". Mailing list: icon-group@arizona.edu. ["The Icon Programmming Language", Ralph E. Griswold and Madge T. Griswold, Prentice Hall, seond edition, 1990]. ["The Implementation of the Icon Programmming Language", Ralph E. Griswold and Madge T. Griswold, Princeton University Press 1986]. (1992-08-21)

If the term "experimental" is broadly understood as implying a general mode of inquiry based on observation and the tentative application of hypotheses to particular cases, it includes many studies in aesthetics which avoid quantitative measurement and laboratory procedure. The full application of scientific method is still commonly regarded as impossible or unfruitful in dealing with the more subtle and complex phenomena of art. But the progress of aesthetics toward scientific status is being slowly made, through increasing use of an objective and logical approach instead of a dogmatic or personal one, and through bringing the results of other sciences to bear on aesthetic problems. Recent years have seen a vast increase in the amount and variety of artistic data available for the aesthetician, as a result of anthropological and archeological research and excavation, diversified museum collections, improved reproductions, translations, and phonograph records. -- T.M.

If we take 1897-8 as date of the approximate entry of the sun into Aquarius, the Aries cycle would then have begun about 2400 BC [[originally given as 2443 BC, Blavatsky gives 2410 BC in BCW 8:174n]] and closed around 263 BC when the Pisces cycle began. This agrees very well with other calculations based on the 25,920 years of the precessional cycle, and with very early Babylonian zodiacal records, making due allowance for the uncertainties inherent in the problem.

impressions left in it by our past inner and outer life, Nvoven in a fantastic way which docs not easily yield any due of meaning to the waking mind's remembrance, or arc fragmentary records, mostly distorted, of experiences which arc going on behind the

In all these cases the condition results from a compression of the astral fluid already existing “about a person, so as to form an elastic shell, absolutely non-penetrable by any physical object” (IU 1:378). Nor does ordinary heat register, as such, on astral substance. This invisible shell of compressed astral fluid also accounts for the instances where the person so protected cannot be shot. In these cases the bullets appear just beyond the muzzle of the weapon, quiver in the air, and fall to the ground, as if meeting an impenetrable barrier. This protecting, elastic shell also explains why heavy blows and attacks with sharp instruments will make no impression upon “convulsionaries” as was shown by the historic records in the cases of the convulsionaries of St. Medard (IU 1:373-6).

Indexed Sequential Access Method "database" (ISAM) An {IBM} file management system allowing records to be accessed either sequentially (in the order they were entered) or via an index. Each index orders the records on a different key. ISAM was followed by VSAM ({Virtual Storage Access Method}) and pre-dated {relational databases}. (2003-07-13)

Indexed Sequential Access Method ::: (database) (ISAM) An IBM file management system allowing records to be accessed either sequentially (in the order they were entered) or via an index. Each index orders the records on a different key.ISAM was followed by VSAM (Virtual Storage Access Method) and pre-dated relational databases.(2003-07-13)

In seeking to explain the meaning of these records we are faced with the difficulty of interpreting an ancient science into terms of modern ideas. The science of those days was a comprehensive whole, which has become decomposed into sundered fragments, which seem to us, because of having lost the keys to the ancient wisdom which brought about the construction of these noble monuments, to be unrelated to each other. Were the pyramids initiation chambers, records of astronomical data, of mathematical truths, or of standard measurements? They were all of these and more. When the candidate passed through the processes of initiation he enacted in his own person the self-same processes which occur on the cosmic scale, on the principle of the master-key of analogy, the size, shape, and orientation of the passages and chambers signifying at once cosmic and human mysteries.

intelligent backtracking ::: (algorithm) An improved backtracking algorithm for Prolog interpreters, which records the point at which each logic variable becomes bound and, when a bind any of those variables. No choice from such a choice point can succeed since it does not change the bindings which caused the failure. (1996-04-06)

intelligent backtracking "algorithm" An improved {backtracking} {algorithm} for {Prolog} {interpreters}, which records the point at which each {logic variable} becomes bound and, when a given set of bindings leads to failure, ignores any {choice point} which does not bind any of those variables. No choice from such a choice point can succeed since it does not change the bindings which caused the failure. (1996-04-06)

Internal controls - These include the policies and various procedures that (a) relate maintaining accurate and reasonably specifically detailed records, (b) aimed at providing a reasonable level of assurance that the transactions the firm has had are properly recorded and properly authorised, and (c) help to ensure that assets are safeguarded.

inter-observer reliability: a measure of the extent to which different individuals generate the same records when they observe the same sequence of behaviour. By correlating the scores of observers we can measure inter-observer reliability: individuals (or groups) with highly correlated scores are demonstrating good interobserver reliability.

In The Egyptian Book of the Dead, the deceased must learn to master everything he encounters in the underworld, and does this through the instruction of Thoth, who also teaches the pilgrim the way of procedure. Finally when the deceased reaches the stage of judgment, it is Thoth who records the decree pointed out to him by the dog-headed ape on the balance, the scales of which weigh the heart against the feather. The gods receive the verdict from Thoth, who in turn announce it to Osiris, enabling the candidate to enter the realm of Osiris, as being one osirified. Thus Thoth is the inner spiritual recorder of the human constitution, who registers and records the karmic experiences and foretells the future destiny of the deceased, showing that each person is judged by himself — for Thoth here is the person’s own higher ego; as regards cosmic space, Thoth is not only the cosmic Logos, but its aspect as the intelligent creative urge inherent in that Intelligence.

Inventory control – The monitoring the supplies, raw materials, work in process, and finished goods by various accounting and reporting methods. Some controls are the maintenance of detailed stock records showing receipts and issuances; Inventory ledger showing quantities and dollars; and written policies regarding purchasing, receiving, inspection, and handling.

inverted index "database, information science" A sequence of ({key}, pointer) pairs where each pointer points to a {record} in a {database} which contains the key value in some particular field. The index is sorted on the key values to allow rapid searching for a particular key value, using e.g. {binary search}. The index is "inverted" in the sense that the key value is used to find the record rather than the other way round. For databases in which the records may be searched based on more than one field, multiple indices may be created that are sorted on those keys. An index may contain gaps to allow for new entries to be added in the correct sort order without always requiring the following entries to be shifted out of the way. (1995-02-08)

Invisible account - A form of balance of payments account that records payments and receipts arising out of trade in services and payments for the use of capital. Also called services account.

Iryon. (一然) (1206-1289). Korean monk-literatus during the Koryo dynasty, known as the author of the SAMGUK YUSA ("Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms"), the source for much of the lore concerning the incipiency and early development of Buddhism in Korea. Iryon was born in KYoNGJU, the ancient capital of the Silla dynasty, became a monk while still a child, and passed the monk's examination (SŬNGKWA) in the SoN school at the age of twenty-two. Iryon became a well-known literatus of both Buddhist and Confucian literature and was close to the royal family of the Koryo dynasty, including King Ch'ungnyol (r. 1236-1308), who visited Iryon at KWANGMYoNGSA in 1282. The Samguk yusa was written ca. 1282-1289, during the period of Mongol suzerainty over Korea, which began in 1259. In his miscellany, Iryon includes a variety of hagiographies of eminent monks in the early Korean Buddhist tradition, often drawing from local accounts of conduct (haengjang), rather than official biographies, and reams of material on early Korean Buddhist miracles and anomalies drawn from regional lore. In its emphasis on local narrative, where Buddhism dominated, over official discourse, Iryon's Samguk yusa contrasts with Kim Pusik's (1075-1151) earlier Samguk sagi ("Historical Records of the Three Kingdoms"), which included little information on Buddhism. Iryon's funerary inscription refers to seven other works written by him, in over one hundred rolls; interestingly, however, the Samguk yusa is not included in that list, suggesting that it may have been published posthumously, perhaps sometime around 1310. The only other extant work of Iryon's besides the Samguk yusa is his Chungp'yon Ch'odong owi ("Five Ranks of the Caodong School, Revised"), in two (alt. three) rolls. No longer extant are his orok ("Discourse Record"; two rolls), Kesong chapcho ("Miscellany of Gāthās and Verses"; three rolls), and his massive Sonmun yomsong sawon ("Chrestomathy of Selected Verses of the Son school"), in thirty rolls.

Jewish Historical Institute ::: Originally founded by Jews in Krakow as the Jewish historical Commission, it moved to Warsaw after 1951 and is now the main repository of Gestapo records, archives and Jewish ceremonial art. It is located across the street from the site of the Great Synagogue. Its warehouse has a huge collection, hidden from public view.

Jianfusi. (建福寺). In Chinese, "Establishing Blessings Monastery"; located in Luoyang, the capital of the Eastern Jin dynasty (217-420 CE) and reputed to be the first Buddhist convent in China. Originally a residence of the Jin dynasty's minister of public works, he is said to have donated his residence out of respect toward Kang Minggan and Huizhan, two of the earliest Buddhist nuns appearing in Chinese records. According to the BIQIUNI ZHUAN ("Lives of the Nuns"), Kang Minggan was also responsible for naming the convent. "Blessings" in the convent's name refers first to the fact that she considered the establishment of the convent to be a blessing for all Buddhist practitioners in China, both monastic and lay; secondly, the convent itself was a physical symbol of the act of bestowing blessings. Several nuns whose biographies are contained in the "Lives of the Nuns" resided there, including Fasheng (368-439 CE) of the Liu-Song dynasty (420-479 CE) who became a nun at age seventy. Another Liu-Song resident, Dao Qiong, was said to have displayed such exemplary skill in practice that an empress personally solicited her advice in religious matters. Dao Qiong later commissioned an image of a reclining buddha to be enshrined in the convent. Zhisheng (427-492 CE) of the Southern Qi dynasty (479-502 CE) also is said to have inspired royalty, the Qi heir-apparent Wenhui (458-493 CE), who often summoned her to the imperial palace to seek her guidance on religious matters.

Ji gujin fodao lunheng. (J. Shu kokonbutsudo ronko; K. Chip kogŭm pulto nonhyong 集古今佛道論衡). In Chinese, "A Collection of Past and Present Treatises of the Buddhist and Daoists"; compiled in 661 by the Chinese VINAYA master DAOXUAN. The Ji gujin fodao lunheng is a collection of works pertaining to the history of the Buddho-Daoist conflict in China from the Han to the Tang dynasties. Daoxuan records, for instance, that the famous pilgrim-translator XUANZANG was once ordered to translate the Daode jing into Sanskrit. Because Daoxuan makes frequent reference to works that are now lost, the Ji gujin fodao lunheng serves as an important source for studying the history of the interactions between Buddhism and Daoism in China. Doaxuan's efforts were continued in Zhisheng's (d.u.) Xu ji gujin fodao lunheng.

Jingde chuandeng lu. (J. Keitoku dentoroku; K. Kyongdok chondŭng nok 景德傳燈録). In Chinese, "Record of the Transmission of the Lamplight [Compiled during the] Jingde [Era]." A comprehensive, thirty-roll genealogical collection of short hagiographical notes and anecdotes of the ancient "patriarchs" and teachers (see ZUSHI) of the CHAN school, compiled by Daoyuan (d.u.) in 1004. Beginning with the seven buddhas of the past (SAPTATATHĀGATA) and up to the dharma heirs (see FASI) of the Tang-dynasty Chan monk FAYAN WENYI, the Jingde chuandeng lu provides a record of 1,701 Indian and Chinese successors in different main and collateral lineages of the Chan school. The first twenty-six rolls of the Jingde chuandeng lu is a series of hagiographies of Chan masters, focusing on their enlightenment experiences, and arranged genealogically; roll twenty-seven discusses eminent monks who do not belong to the Chan tradition; and the last three rolls contain YULU, viz., discourse records (roll twenty-eight), poetry and verses (roll twenty-nine), and other miscellaneous materials, such as the XINXIN MING (roll thirty). As the earliest and most influential of the many lamplight histories (denglu) compiled during the Song dynasty, the Jingde chuandeng lu is an invaluable resource for understanding the origins and development of the Chan school in China.

Jingjue. (J. Jokaku; K. Chonggak 淨覺) (683-c. 760). Chinese author of the LENGQIE SHIZI JI ("Records of the Masters and Disciples of the LAnKĀVATĀRASuTRA"); an early lineage record of the CHAN ZONG, presented from the standpoint of the so-called Northern school (BEI ZONG). See LENGQIE SHIZI JI.

JOVIAL "language" (Jule's Own Version of IAL) A version of {IAL} produced by Jules I. Schwartz in 1959-1960. JOVIAL was based on {ALGOL 58}, with extensions for large scale {real-time} programming. It saw extensive use by the US Air Force. The data elements were items, entries ({records}) and tables. Versions include JOVIAL I ({IBM 709}, 1960), JOVIAL II ({IBM 7090}, 1961) and JOVIAL 3 (1965). Dialects: {J3}, {JOVIAL J73}, {JS}, {JTS}. Ada/Jovial Newsletter, Dale Lange +1 (513) 255-4472. [CACM 6(12):721, Dec 1960]. (1996-07-19)

JOVIAL ::: (language) (Jule's Own Version of IAL) A version of IAL produced by Jules I. Schwartz in 1959-1960. JOVIAL was based on ALGOL 58, with extensions for large scale real-time programming. It saw extensive use by the US Air Force. The data elements were items, entries (records) and tables.Versions include JOVIAL I (IBM 709, 1960), JOVIAL II (IBM 7090, 1961) and JOVIAL 3 (1965). Dialects: J3, JOVIAL J73, JS, JTS.Ada/Jovial Newsletter, Dale Lange +1 (513) 255-4472.[CACM 6(12):721, Dec 1960]. (1996-07-19)

Juefan Huihong. (J. Kakuhan Eko; K. Kakpom Hyehong 覺範慧洪) (1071-1128). Chinese CHAN monk in the HUANGLONG PAI collateral line of the LINJI ZONG during the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127) and major proponent of "lettered Chan" (WENZI CHAN), which valorized belle lettres, and especially poetry, in the practice of Chan. Huihong entered the monastery after he was orphaned at fourteen, eventually passing the monastic examinations at age nineteen and receiving ordination at Tianwangsi in the eastern capital of Kaifeng. After studying the CHENG WEISHI LUN (*VijNaptimātratāsiddhi) for four years, he eventually began to study at LUSHAN with the Chan master Zhenjing Kewen (1025-1102), under whom he achieved enlightenment. Because of Huihong's close ties to the famous literati officials of his day, and especially with the statesman and Buddhist patron ZHANG SHANGYING (1043-1122), his own career was subject to many of the same political repercussions as his associates; indeed, Huihong himself was imprisoned, defrocked, and exiled multiple times in his life when his literati colleagues were purged. Compounding his problems, Huihong also suffered along with many other monks during the severe Buddhist persecution (see FANAN) that occurred during the reign of Emperor Huizong (r. 1100-1125). Even amid these trying political times, however, Huihong managed to maintain both his monastic vocation and his productive literary career. Huihong is in fact emblematic of many Chan monks during the Song dynasty, when Chan enters the mainstream of Chinese intellectual life: his practice of Chan was framed and conceptualized in terms that drew from his wide learning and profound erudition, tendencies that helped make Chan writings particularly appealing to wider Chinese literati culture. Huihong decried the bibliophobic tendencies in Chan that were epitomized in the aphorism that Chan "does not establish words and letters" (BULI WENZI) and advocated that Chan insights were made manifest in both Buddhist sutras as well as in the uniquely Chan genres of discourse records (YULU), genealogical histories (see CHUANDENG LU), and public-case anthologies (GONG'AN). Given his literary penchant, it is no surprise that Huihong was a prolific author. His works associated with Chan lineages include the CHANLIN SENGBAO ZHUAN ("Chronicles of the SAMGHA Jewel in the Chan Grove"), a collection of biographies of about a hundred eminent Chan masters important in the development of lettered Chan; and the Linjian lu ("Anecdotes from the Groves [of Chan]"), completed in 1107 and offering a record of Huihong's own encounters with fellow monks and literati and his reflections on Buddhist practice. Huihong also wrote two studies of poetics and poetic criticism, the Lengzhai yehua ("Evening Discourses from Cold Studio") and Tianchu jinluan ("Forbidden Cutlets from the Imperial Kitchen"), and numerous commentaries to Buddhist scriptures, including the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), SHOULENGYAN JING, and YUANJUE JING.

Jushi zhuan. (居士傳). In Chinese, "Record of [Eminent] Laymen," by the Qing-dynasty author PENG SHAOSHENG (1740-1796), a Confucian literatus turned Buddhist layman; in fifty-six rolls. Written between 1770 and 1775, the record collects 312 biographies of Chinese Buddhist laymen (C. jushi; S. UPĀSAKA) from the inception of Buddhism in China through the reign of the Qing-dynasty Kangxi emperor (r. 1662-1722). The compilation was intended to give appropriate recognition to the contributions laymen made to the development of the Buddhist tradition in China. Its entries are adapted from the occasional biographies of laymen that are widely scattered throughout such collections as the HONGMING JI, Fofa jintang, Faxi zhi, FOZU TONG JI, JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, Wudeng hui yuan, Donglin zhuan, and WANGSHENG JINGTU ZHUAN. Although there had been some biographical collections of laymen affiliated with the Chan school, such as the Jushi fendeng lu, Xianjue zongsheng, and Jushi Chandeng lu, the records of laymen involved with other schools were much more widely dispersed. To prepare a more comprehensive and accurate portrayal of Chinese laymen, Peng Shaosheng reexamined the aforementioned works and excerpted certain portions from them, discarding many spurious records and adding corroborating information taken from additional historical, biographical, and genealogical works. His biographies thus describe in detail the individual backgrounds and religious experiences of the laymen profiled, and provide much broader and rich coverage of lay activities throughout the full panoply of Chinese Buddhism. Although Peng Shaosheng himself was a PURE LAND adherent, his Jushi zhuan includes figures associated with Chan, pure land, and various Buddhist doctrinal schools. This book provides valuable information for understanding the motivations underlying lay Buddhist practice and the changes that practice took over time. Peng Shaosheng followed his record of male householders with a parallel collection of the biographies of Buddhist laywomen, the SHANNÜREN ZHUAN.

Kamalasīla. (T. Ka ma la shī la) (c. 740-795). One of the most important Madhyamaka authors of late Indian Buddhism, a major representative of the Yogācāra-Madhyamaka synthesis, and a participant in the famous BSAM YAS DEBATE. According to Tibetan doxographies, he was a proponent of the YOGĀCĀRA-SVĀTANTRIKA-MADHYAMAKA. Although little is known about his life, according to Tibetan sources he was a monk and teacher at NĀLANDĀ. Tibetan sources also count him as one of three (together with sĀNTARAKsITA and JNĀNAGARBHA) "Eastern Svātantrikas" (RANG RGYUD SHAR GSUM), suggesting that he was from Bengal. He was clearly a direct disciple of sāntaraksita, composing important commentaries on his teacher's two major works, the MADHYAMAKĀLAMKĀRA and the TATTVASAMGRAHA. The latter commentary, which is extant in Sanskrit, is an important source for both Hindu and Buddhist philosophical positions in the eighth century. sāntaraksita had gone to Tibet at the invitation of the Tibetan king KHRI SRONG LDE BTSAN, where, with the assistance of PADMASAMBHAVA, he founded BSAM YAS, the first Buddhist monastery in Tibet. According to tradition, at the time of his death sāntaraksita warned that a mistaken philosophical view would become established in Tibet and advised the king to invite Kamalasīla to come to Tibet in order to dispel it. This mistaken view was apparently that of Heshang MOHEYAN, a Northern CHAN (BEI ZONG) monk who had developed a following at the Tibetan court. Kamalasīla was invited, and a debate was held between the Indian monk and his Chinese counterpart, with the king serving as judge. It is unclear whether a face-to-face debate took place or rather an exchange of documents. According to Tibetan sources, the king declared Kamalasīla the winner, named MADHYAMAKA as the official philosophical school of his realm, and banished the Chinese contingent. (Chinese records describe a different outcome.) This event, variously known as the BSAM YAS DEBATE, the Council of Bsam yas, and the Council of Lhasa, is regarded as one of the key moments in the history of Tibetan Buddhism. Three of Kamalasīla's most important works appear to have been composed in response to the issues raised in the debate, although whether all three were composed in Tibet is not established with certainty. These texts, each entitled BHĀVANĀKRAMA or "Stages of Meditation," set forth the process for the potential BODHISATTVA to cultivate BODHICITTA and then develop sAMATHA and VIPAsYANĀ and progress through the bodhisattva stages (BHuMI) to buddhahood. The cultivation of vipasyanā requires the use of both scripture (ĀGAMA) and reasoning (YUKTI) to understand emptiness (suNYATĀ); in the first Bhāvanākrama, he sets forth the three forms of wisdom (PRAJNĀ): the wisdom derived from hearing or learning (sRUTAMAYĪPRAJNĀ), the wisdom derived from thinking and reflection (CINTĀMAYĪPRAJNĀ), and the wisdom derived from meditation (BHĀVANĀMAYĪPRAJNĀ). This "gradual" approach, very different from what was advocated in the Chinese CHAN ZONG, is set forth in all three of the Bhāvanākrama, which, according to Tibetan tradition, were composed in Tibet after the Bsam yas debate, at the request of the king. However, only the third, and the briefest, directly considers, and refutes, the view of "no mental activity" (amanasikāra), which is associated with Moheyan. It was also during his time in Tibet that Kamalasīla composed his most important independent (i.e., noncommentarial) philosophical work, the MADHYAMAKĀLOKA, or "Illumination of the Middle Way," a wide-ranging exposition of the Yogācāra-Madhyamaka synthesis. It deals with a number of central epistemological and logical issues to articulate what is regarded as the defining tenet of the Yogācāra-Svātantrika-Madhyamaka school: that major YOGĀCĀRA doctrines, such as "mind-only" (CITTAMĀTRA), and the three natures (TRISVABHĀVA) are important in initially overcoming misconceptions, but they are in fact only provisional (NEYĀRTHA) teachings for those who have not yet understood the Madhyamaka view. The Madhyamakāloka is also important for its exploration of such central MAHĀYĀNA doctrines as the TATHĀGATAGARBHA and the question of the EKAYĀNA. On this latter point, Kamalasīla argues against the Yogācāra position that there are three final vehicles (for the sRĀVAKA, PRATYEKABUDDHA, and BODHISATTVA, with some beings excluded from any path to liberation) in favor of the position that there is a single vehicle to buddhahood (BUDDHAYĀNA) for all beings. Kamalasīla is said to have been murdered in Tibet by partisans of the Chinese position, who caused his death by squeezing his kidneys.

kanhua Chan. (J. kannazen/kanwazen; K. kanhwa Son 看話禪). In Chinese, "Chan of investigating the topic of inquiry," or, more freely, "questioning meditation." The systematization of this meditative practice is commonly traced back to the writings of the Song-dynasty CHAN master DAHUI ZONGGAO. The kanhua Chan technique grew out of the growing interest in the study of "public cases" (GONG'AN), viz., old stories and anecdotes of Chan masters, which flourished during the Song dynasty. Dahui's teacher YUANWU KEQIN is also known to have lectured on numerous public cases, and his anthology of gong'an, along with his analysis of them, was recorded in the famous collection the BIYAN LU ("Blue Cliff Records"). Dahui further elaborated upon Yuanwu's investigation of public cases and applied this process to the practice of Chan meditation. In his lectures and letters (DAHUI PUJUE CHANSHI SHU), Dahui urged his students (many of whom were educated literati) to use the gong'an as a "topic of meditative inquiry" (HUATOU, K. hwadu), rather than interpret it from purely intellectual or conceptual perspectives. Perhaps the most famous huatou is the topic "no" (WU) attributed to the Chan master ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN: A monk asked Zhaozhou, "Does a dog have buddha-nature (FOXING), or not?" to which Zhaozhou replied "WU" ("no"; lit. "it does not have it"). (See WU GONG'AN; GOUZI WU FOXING.) (Because of the popularity of this one-word meditative topic, kanhua Chan is often interpreted to mean the investigation of the "critical phrase" or "keyword," in which the "keyword" "wu" is presumed to have been extracted from the longer gong'an exchange.) The investigation of this huatou starts by "investigating the meaning" (C. canyi; K. ch'amŭi) of the huatou: what could Zhaozhou have meant by answering "no" to this question, when the right answer should be "yes"? The mainstream of East Asian Buddhist doctrine insists that all sentient beings, including dogs, are inherently enlightened and thus do in fact possess the buddha-nature, so this question promotes inquiry. Examining what Zhaozhou might have meant by saying "no" has what Dahui termed "taste" (C. wei, K. mi), meaning intellectual interest. As one's intellectual inquiry into this question continues, however, the student is ultimately left with "doubt" (YIQING), viz., the inability of the (unenlightened) mind to understand Zhaozhou's motive in giving this response to the student's question. Doubt, Dahui says, renders the mind "puzzled, frustrated, and tasteless" (viz., lacking intellectual interest), just as if you were gnawing on an iron rod." Once doubt arises, there is no longer any conceptual support for the meditation, and the student moves on to "investigating the word" (C. canju; K. ch'amgu), viz., just sitting with the huatou wu and no longer trying to understand Zhaozhou's motive in offering this response. At this point, the huatou becomes a "live word" (C. huoju; K. hwalgu) that helps to free the mind from conceptualization and to lead the meditator forward toward liberation. As the sense of doubt becomes more and more intense, it finally "explodes" (C. po; K. p'a), bringing an end to the deluded processes of thought and removing the limiting point of view that is the self. Once the distinctions between self and other disintegrate, the meditator experiences the interconnection between himself or herself and all the phenomena in the universe (SHISHI WU'AI). Kanhua Chan, therefore, employs the inevitable doubt that a benighted person would have about the sayings of the enlightened Chan masters of old to create a powerful sense of inquiry that leads the meditator toward the experience of nonconceptualization and finally enlightenment. ¶ Dahui's system of kanhua Chan was first taught in Korea by POJO CHINUL, where it is known as kanhwa Son, and popularized by Chinul's successor, CHIN'GAK HYESIM. Kanhwa Son continues to be the most common contemplative technique practiced in Korean Son halls. Korean Son monks typically work on one hwadu-often Zhaozhou's "no"-for much of their career, continually deepening their experience of that topic. In China, after the Ming dynasty, kanhua Chan merged with the recitation of the buddha AMITĀBHA's name (NIANFO), so that Chan meditators would turn the recitation into a huatou by reflecting on the topic "Who is reciting the Buddha's name?" In Japanese Zen, due in large part to the efforts of HAKUIN EKAKU and his disciples, kannazen became widespread within the RINZAI ZEN tradition, where it was incorporated into an elaborate system of koan training, involving the systematic investigation of many different koans.

keeper appointed over the records of the living

key 1. "database" A value used to identify a {record} in a database, derived by applying some fixed function to the record. The key is often simply one of the {fields} (a {column} if the database is considered as a table with records being rows, see "{key field}"). Alternatively the key may be obtained by applying some function, e.g. a {hash function}, to one or more of the fields. The set of keys for all records forms an {index}. Multiple indexes may be built for one database depending on how it is to be searched. 2. "cryptography" A value which must be fed into the {algorithm} used to decode an encrypted message in order to reproduce the original {plain text}. Some encryption schemes use the same (secret) key to encrypt and decrypt a message, but {public key encryption} uses a "private" (secret) key and a "public" key which is known by all parties. 3. "hardware" An electromechanical {keyboard} button. (2003-07-04)

key ::: 1. (database) A value used to identify a record in a database, derived by applying some fixed function to the record. The key is often simply one of the for all records forms an index. Multiple indexes may be built for one database depending on how it is to be searched.2. (cryptography) A value which must be fed into the algorithm used to decode an encrypted message in order to reproduce the original plain text. Some but public key encryption uses a private (secret) key and a public key which is known by all parties.3. (hardware) An electromechanical keyboard button.(2003-07-04)

Khri srong lde btsan. (Trisong Detsen) (r. 754-799). A Tibetan ruler considered the second of three great religious kings (chos rgyal) during the Imperial Period, the other two being SRONG BTSAN SGAM PO and RAL PA CAN, and as a human incarnation of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA. Inheriting the throne in 754 as the thirty-eighth monarch of the Yar klungs dynasty, Khri srong lde btsan directed several events that are considered milestones in Tibetan history. During the early years of his reign, he extended the boundaries of the Tibetan empire forged under his predecessors. In 763, the king's army occupied the imperial capital of Tang China at Chang'an (present-day Xi'an), an action commemorated on a stele that was erected in front of the PO TA LA Palace. However, Khri srong lde btsan is best remembered for his patronage of Buddhism and support in founding Tibet's first Buddhist monastery of BSAM YAS. Later chronicles record that he actively suppressed the native BON religion, as well as the aristocratic clans who were its benefactors, although he never entirely proscribed early Bon rituals. Khri srong lde btsan invited the renowned Indian Buddhist preceptor sĀNTARAKsITA to oversee the project of building Bsam yas and to establish the first monastic order in Tibet. According to traditional accounts, local spirits inimical to Buddhism created obstacles that hindered the project, which prompted the Indian abbot to request Khri srong lde btsan to invite the powerful tantric master PADMASAMBHAVA to Tibet in order to aid in their subjugation, after which the establishment of the monastery was able to proceed. Khri srong lde btsan is said to have become a devotee of Padmasambhava, with one of his queens, YE SHES MTSHO RGYAL, becoming the yogin's consort and serving as scribe for many of his GTER MA teachings. Padmasambhava also revived the king's eight-year-old daughter PADMA GSAL after her death in order to bestow a special teaching. According to tradition, at the time of his death, sĀNTARAKsITA warned in his final testament that a mistaken philosophical view would become established in Tibet and advised the king to invite KAMALAsĪLA to come to Tibet in order to dispel it. The view was apparently that of the Northen Chan (BEI ZONG) monk Heshang Moheyan, who had developed a following at the Tibetan court. Kamalasīla was invited and a debate was held between the Indian monk and the Chinese monk, with the king serving as judge. It is unclear whether a face-to-face debate took place or rather an exchange of documents. According to Tibetan sources, the king declared Kamalasīla the winner, named MADHYAMAKA as the official philosophical school of his realm, and banished the Chinese party from his kingdom. (Chinese records describe a different outcome.) This event, variously known as the BSAM YAS DEBATE, the Council of Bsam yas, and the Council of Lhasa, is regarded as one of the key moments in the history of Tibetan Buddhism.

Kondāne. Early Buddhist monastic cave site located in western India, which dates from the early decades of the first century CE. The highly ornamented, four-story facade of its CAITYA hall has projecting balconies supported by curved brackets and deeply recessed windows with latticed screens. Although carved in stone, the architectural form is modeled after earlier wooden designs and accords well with the real woodwork of the main arch, fragments of which are still in situ. This style of architecture is related to the slightly earlier hall at BHĀJĀ. In the third row of balconies are panels depicting pairs of dancers, who display ease of movement and considerable rhythmic grace. In this cave, there is also an inscription in BRAHMĪ script that records the name of one Balaka, a student of Kanha (or Kṛsna), who constructed the cave. The record is carved near the head of a statue that probably represents Balaka.

Kukai. (空海) (774-835). In Japanese, "Sea of Emptiness"; monk who is considered the founder of the tradition, often referred to as the SHINGONSHu, Tomitsu, or simply MIKKYo. He is often known by his posthumous title KoBo DAISHI, or "Great Master Who Spread the Dharma," which was granted to him by Emperor Daigo in 921. A native of Sanuki province on the island of Shikoku, Kukai came from a prominent local family. At the age of fifteen, he was sent to Nara, where he studied the Chinese classics and was preparing to become a government official. However, he seems to have grown disillusioned with this life. At the age of twenty, Kukai was ordained, perhaps by the priest Gonso, and the following year he took the full precepts at ToDAIJI. He is claimed to have experienced an awakening while performing the Kokuzo gumonjiho, a ritual dedicated to the mantra of the BODHISATTVA ĀKĀsAGARBHA. While studying Buddhist texts on his own, Kukai is said to have encountered the MAHĀVAIROCANĀBHISAMBODHISuTRA and, unable to find a master who could teach him to read its MANTRAs, decided to travel to China to learn from masters there. In 804, he was selected as a member of a delegation to China that set sail in four ships; SAICHo was aboard another of the ships. Kukai eventually traveled to the Tang capital of Chang'an, where he studied tantric MIJIAO Buddhist rituals and theory under HUIGUO and Sanskrit under the Indian monk PRAJNA. Under the direction of his Chinese master, Kukai was initiated into the two realm (ryobu) MAndALA lineages of YIXING, sUBHAKARASIMHA, VAJRABODHI, and AMOGHAVAJRA. In 806, Kukai returned to Japan; records of the texts and implements he brought with him are preserved in the Shorai mokuroku. Little is known about his activities until 809, when he moved to Mt. Takao by imperial request. Kukai described his new teachings as mikkyo, or "secret teachings," VAJRAYĀNA (J. kongojo), and MANTRAYĀNA (J. shingonjo). At the core of Kukai's doctrinal and ritual program was the belief that all acts of body, speech, and mind are rooted in, and expressions of, the cosmic buddha MAHĀVAIROCANA (see VAIROCANA), as the DHARMAKĀYA. Kukai argued that the dharmakāya itself teaches through the artistic and ritual forms that he brought to Japan. Once his teachings gained some renown, Kukai conducted several ABHIsEKA ceremonies, including one for the TENDAI patriarch SAICHo and his disciples. However, Kukai and Saicho's relationship soured when Kukai refused to transmit the highest level of initiation to Saicho. In 816, Emperor Saga granted Kukai rights to KoYASAN, to serve as a training center for his Shingon mikkyo tradition. In early 823, Kukai was granted the temple of ToJI in Kyoto, which became a second center for the Shingon tradition. In the summer of 825, Kukai built a lecture hall at Toji, and in 827 he was promoted to senior assistant high priest in the Bureau of Clergy. In 829, he built an abhiseka platform at Todaiji. In early 834, he received permission to establish a Shingon chapel within the imperial palace, where he constructed a mandala altar. Kukai passed into eternal SAMĀDHI (J. nyujo) in 835 on Mt. Koya, and it is said that he remains in his mausoleum in meditation waiting for the BODHISATTVA MAITREYA to appear. Kukai authored a number of important texts, including the BENKENMITSU NIKYoRON, a treatise outlining the inherent differences of kengyo (revealed) and mikkyo (inner) teachings; Sokushin jobutsugi, a treatise on the doctrine of attainment of buddhahood in "this very body" (J. SOKUSHIN JoBUTSU); Unjigi, a text describing the contemplation of Sanskrit syllables (S. BĪJA, J. shuji); Shojijissogi, a text outlining Kukai's theory of language in which all sounds and letters are themselves full embodiments of the dharmakāya's teachings; and his magnum opus, the HIMITSU MANDARA JuJuSHINRON, in which Kukai makes his case for recognizing Shingon mikkyo as the pinnacle of Buddhist wisdom. Kukai was an accomplished calligrapher, poet, engineer, and sculptor and is also said to have invented kana, the Japanese syllabary.

Lam rim chen mo. In Tibetan, "Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path"; the abbreviated title for one of the best-known works on Buddhist thought and practice in Tibet, composed by the Tibetan luminary TSONG KHA PA BLO BZANG GRAGS PA in 1402 at the central Tibetan monastery of RWA SGRENG. A lengthy treatise belonging to the LAM RIM, or stages of the path, genre of Tibetan Buddhist literature, the LAM RIN CHEN MO takes its inspiration from numerous earlier writings, most notably the BODHIPATHAPRADĪPA ("Lamp for the Path to Enlightenment") by the eleventh-century Bengali master ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNĀNA. It is the most extensive treatment of three principal stages that Tsong kha pa composed. The others include (1) the LAM RIM CHUNG BA ("Short Treatise on the Stages of the Path"), also called the Lam rim 'bring ba ("Intermediate Treatise on the States of the Path") and (2) the LAM RIM BSDUS DON ("Concise Meaning of the Stages of the Path"), occasionally also referred to as the Lam rim chung ngu ("Brief Stages of the Path"). The latter text, which records Tsong kha pa's own realization of the path in verse form, is also referred to as the Lam rim nyams mgur ma ("Song of Experience of the Stages of the Path"). The LAM RIM CHEN MO is a highly detailed and often technical treatise presenting a comprehensive and synthetic overview of the path to buddhahood. It draws, often at length, upon a wide range of scriptural sources including the SuTRA and sĀSTRA literature of both the HĪNAYĀNA and MAHĀYĀNA; Tsong kha pa treats tantric practice in a separate work. The text is organized under the rubric of the three levels of spiritual predilection, personified as "the three individuals" (skyes bu gsum): the beings of small capacity, who engage in religious practice in order to gain a favorable rebirth in their next lifetime; the beings of intermediate capacity, who seek liberation from rebirth for themselves as an ARHAT; and the beings of great capacity, who seek to liberate all beings in the universe from suffering and thus follow the bodhisattva path to buddhahood. Tsong kha pa's text does not lay out all the practices of these three types of persons but rather those practices essential to the bodhisattva path that are held in common by persons of small and intermediate capacity, such as the practice of refuge (sARAnA) and contemplation of the uncertainty of the time of death. The text includes extended discussions of topics such as relying on a spiritual master, the development of BODHICITTA, and the six perfections (PĀRAMITĀ). The last section of the text, sometimes regarded as a separate work, deals at length with the nature of serenity (sAMATHA) and insight (VIPAsYANĀ); Tsong kha pa's discussion of insight here represents one of his most important expositions of emptiness (suNYATĀ). Primarily devoted to exoteric Mahāyāna doctrine, the text concludes with a brief reference to VAJRAYĀNA and the practice of tantra, a subject discussed at length by Tsong kha pa in a separate work, the SNGAGS RIM CHEN MO ("Stages of the Path of Mantra"). The Lam rim chen mo's full title is Skyes bu gsum gyi rnyams su blang ba'i rim pa thams cad tshang bar ston pa'i byang chub lam gyi rim pa.

Language of Science: See Scientific Empiricism II B 1. Lao Tzu: Whether the founder of Taoism (tao chia) was the same as Li Erh and Li An, whether he lived before or after Confucius, and whether the Tao Te Ching (Eng. trans.: The Canon of Reason and Virtue by P. Carus, The Way and Its Power by A. Waley, etc.) contains his teachings are controversial. According to the Shih Chi (Historical Records), he was a native of Chu (in present Honan), land of romanticism in the south, and a custodian of documents whom Confucius went to consult on rituals. Thus he might have been a priest-teacher who, by advocating the doctrine of "inaction", attempted to preserve the declining culture of his people, the suppressed people of Yin, while Confucius worked hard to promote the culture of the ruling people of Chou. -- W.T.C.

Lankāvatārasutra. (T. Lang kar gshegs pa'i mdo; C. Ru Lengqie jing; J. Nyu Ryogakyo; K. Ip Nŭngga kyong 入楞伽經). In Sanskrit, "Scripture on the Descent into Lanka"; a seminal MAHĀYĀNA sutra that probably dates from around the fourth century CE. In addition to the Sanskrit recension, which was discovered in Nepal, there are also three extant translations in Chinese, by GUnABHADRA (translated in 443), BODHIRUCI (made in 513), and sIKsĀNANDA (made in 700), and two in Tibetan. The text is composed as a series of exchanges between the Buddha and the BODHISATTVA Mahāmati, who asks his questions on behalf of Rāvana, the YAKsA king of Lanka. Thanks to the wide-ranging nature of Mahāmati's questions, the text covers many of the major themes that were the focus of contemporary Indian Mahāyāna Buddhism, and especially the emerging YOGĀCĀRA school, including the theory of the storehouse consciousness (ĀLAYAVIJNĀNA), the womb or embryo of the buddhas (TATHĀGATAGARBHA), and mind-only (CITTAMĀTRA); despite these apparent parallels, however, the sutra is never quoted in the writings of the most famous figures of Indian Yogācāra, ASAnGA (c. 320-390) and VASUBANDHU (c. fourth century CE). The sutra also offers one of the earliest sustained condemnations in Buddhist literature of meat eating, a practice that was not proscribed within the mainstream Buddhist tradition (see JAINA; DHUTAnGA). The Lankāvatāra purports to offer a comprehensive synthesis of the Mahāyāna, and indeed, its many commentators have sought to discover in it a methodical exposition of scholastic doctrine. In fact, however, as in most Mahāyāna sutras, there is little sustained argumentation through the scripture, and the scripture is a mélange composed with little esprit de synthèse. ¶ The emerging CHAN school of East Asia retrospectively identified the Lankāvatāra as a source of scriptural authority; indeed, some strands of the tradition even claimed that the sutra was so influential in the school's development that its first translator, Gunabhadra, superseded BODHIDHARMA in the roster of the Chan patriarchal lineage, as in the LENGQIE SHIZI JI ("Records of the Masters and Disciples of the Lankāvatāra"). Rather than viewing the Chan school as a systematic reading of the Lankāvatāra, as the tradition claims, it is perhaps more appropriate to say that the tradition was inspired by similar religious concerns. The Newari Buddhist tradition of Nepal also includes the Lankāvatāra among its nine principal books of the Mahāyāna (NAVAGRANTHA; see NAVADHARMA).

Lengqie shizi ji. (J. Ryoga shishiki; K. Nŭngga saja ki 楞伽師資). In Chinese, "Records of the Masters and Disciples of the Lankāvatāra"; a genealogical anthology associated with the Northern school (BEI ZONG) of the early CHAN tradition, compiled by JINGJUE (683-c. 760). The Lengqie shizi ji contains the biographies and sayings of eight generations of masters (twenty-four in total), who received the "transmission of the lamp" (chuandeng) as patriarchs (ZUSHI) in the Chan school. The transmission narrative presented in this text differs markedly from that found in the LIUZU TAN JING ("Platform Sutra"), which becomes normative in the mature Chan tradition. The recipients of the special transmission of the Chan teachings in the Lenqi shizi ji belong instead to the Northern school. Jingjue places GUnABHADRA before BODHIDHARMA in the Chan patriarchal lineage (probably because of his role in translating the LAnKĀVATĀRASuTRA, an important scriptural influence in the early Chan school); in addition, SHENXIU is listed as the successor to the fifth Chinese patriarch, HONGREN, in place of HUINENG. The Lenqie shizi ji also contains a set of rhetorical questions and doctrinal admonitions known as zhishi wenyi (lit. "pointing at things and inquiring into their meaning") in the biographies of Gunabhadra, Bodhidharma, Hongren, and Shenxiu. Jingjue quotes from numerous sources, including his teacher Xuanze's (d.u.) Lengqie renfa zhi ("Records of the Men and Teachings of the Lankāvatāra," apparently extant only in these embedded quotations in the Lenqie shizi ji), the DASHENG QIXIN LUN, the XIUXIN YAO LUN, Bodhidharma's ERRU SIXING LUN, and the Rudao anxin yao fangpian famen attributed to DAOXIN (which also seems to exist only as quoted, apparently in its entirety, in the Lenqie shizi ji). As one of the earliest Chan texts to delineate the transmission-of-the-lamplight theory as espoused by the adherents of the Northern school of Chan, the Lenqie shizi ji is an invaluable tool for understanding the development of the lineage of Chan patriarchs and the early history of the Chan school. See also CHUANDENG LU; LIDAI FABAO JI.

Linji zong. (J. Rinzaishu; K. Imje chong 臨濟宗). In Chinese, the "Linji school"; one of the so-called Five Houses and Seven Schools (WU JIA QI ZONG) of the mature Chinese CHAN school. Chan genealogical records (see CHUANDENG LU) describe a lineage of monks that can be traced back to the eponymous Tang-dynasty Chan master LINJI YIXUAN. Linji's lineage came to dominate the Chan tradition in the southern regions of China, largely through the pioneering efforts of his Song-dynasty spiritual descendants Fengxue Yanzhao (896-973), Fenyang Shanshao (947-1024), and Shishuang Chuyuan (986-1040). Shishuang's two major disciples, HUANGLONG HUINAN (1002-1069) and YANGQI FANGHUI (992-1049), produced the two most successful collateral lines within the Linji lineage: the HUANGLONG PAI and YANGQI PAI. Few monks had as significant an impact on the Chan tradition as DAHUI ZONGGAO, a successor in the Yangqi branch of the Linji lineage. Dahui continued the efforts of his teacher YUANWU KEQIN, who is credited with compiling the influential BIYAN LU ("Blue Cliff Record") and developed the use of Chan cases or precedents (GONG'AN) as subjects of meditation (see KANHUA CHAN). Dahui and his spiritual descendants continued to serve as abbots of the most powerful monasteries in China, such as WANSHOUSI (see GOZAN). During Dahui's time, the Linji lineage came into brief conflict with the resurgent CAODONG ZONG lineage over the issue of the latter's distinctive form of meditative practice, which Dahui pejoratively labeled "silent-illumination meditation" (MOZHAO CHAN). Other famous masters in the Linji lineage include WUZHUN SHIFAN, GAOFENG YUANMIAO, and ZHONGFENG MINGBEN. For the Korean and Japanese counterparts, see IMJE CHONG; RINZAISHu.

LUCID 1. Early query language, ca. 1965, System Development Corp, Santa Monica, CA. [Sammet 1969, p.701]. 2. A family of dataflow languages descended from {ISWIM}, {lazy} but {first-order}. Ashcroft & Wadge "wwadge@csr.uvic.ca", 1981. They use a dynamic {demand driven} model. Statements are regarded as equations defining a network of processors and communication lines, through which the data flows. Every data object is thought of as an infinite {stream} of simple values, every function as a {filter}. Lucid has no {data constructors} such as {arrays} or {records}. {Iteration} is simulated with 'is current' and 'fby' (concatenation of sequences). Higher-order functions are implemented using pure dataflow and no closures or heaps. ["Lucid: The Dataflow Language" by Bill Wadge "wwadge@csr.UVic.CA" and Ed Ashcroft, c. 1985]. ["Lucid, the Dataflow Programming Language", W. Wadge, Academic Press 1985]. (1995-02-16)

M2toM3 A simple {Modula-2} to {Modula-3} translator by Peter Klein "pk@i3.informatik.rwth-aachen.de" which covers most of the syntactic differences between those languages. No context sensitive analysis is done, so WITH statements, local {modules}, {enumeration type} literals and {variant RECORDs} have to be dealt with by hand. Part of the {Sun} Modula 2 library is emulated by the Modula 3 library. Version 1.01. {(ftp://martha.informatik.rwth-aachen.de/pub/Modula3)}. (1992-12-01)

Madhav: “Moment is the sequence of Time. Each moment records what is happening at that point. It relates to the present. The Ray of the Eternal interrupts the movement of Time for a while and lights up things that are not yet manifest. It gives a peep into the future. The Ray of the Eternal is able to do it because the future is already present in the vision of the Eternal.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhyāntika. (P. Majjhantika; T. Nyi ma gung pa; C. Motiandi; J. Matsudenchi/Madenchi; K. Malchonji 末田地). The third of the five teachers (dharmācārya) mentioned in Indian Sanskrit texts as the initial successors of the Buddha: viz., MAHĀKĀsYAPA, ĀNANDA, Madhyāntika, sĀnAKAVĀSIN, and UPAGUPTA. The AsOKĀVADĀNA records that he lived a hundred years after the Buddha's death and, after becoming an ARHAT, was sent by his teacher Ānanda to disseminate Buddhism in Kashmir (see KASHMIR-GANDHĀRA). According to BUDDHAGHOSA's fifth-century CE VINAYA commentary, the SAMANTAPĀSĀDIKĀ, Madhyāntika was the preceptor of MAHINDA (S. Mahendra), the son of King Asoka (S. AsOKA), who converted the Sinhalese king DEVĀNAMPIYATISSA to Buddhism in the third century BCE, thus inaugurating Buddhism in Sri Lanka. According to that same text, after the third Buddhist council (see COUNCIL, THIRD), Madhyāntika traveled to Kashmir, where he led countless Kashmiris to enlightenment and ordained a thousand as novice monks (sRĀMAnERA). He is also said to have tamed a malevolent NĀGA living in a lake there. The DA TANG XIYU JI by the Chinese pilgrim XUANZANG (600/602-664) records that the Buddha predicted before his PARINIRVĀnA that Madhyāntika would travel to Udyāna in Kashmir to disseminate the dharma. Fifty years after the Buddha's death, Madhyāntika heard this prediction from his teacher Ānanda and set out on a successful mission to that region. Xuanzang reports that, in Udyāna, Madhyāntika supervised the carving of a hundred-foot-high wooden image of MAITREYA Buddha; Madhyāntika used his spiritual powers to send a sculptor directly to the TUsITA heaven (on three separate occasions, according to the account) so he would be able to accurately model the image after the person of Maitreya himself. Sanskrit VINAYA materials, including those from the MAHĀSĀMGHIKA and MuLASARVĀSTIVĀDA schools, typically list Madhyāntika as the third successor of the Buddha. He is also subsequently listed as the third Indian patriarch (ZUSHI) in early Chinese records of dharma transmission (CHUANFA), such as the FU FAZANG YINYUAN ZHUAN and the CHU SANZANG JIJI, as well as in early Chan genealogical records, such as the CHUAN FABAO JI and the LIDAI FABAO JI. Later Chan lineage texts compiled after about the early ninth century, such as the BAOLIN ZHUAN and the JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, eliminate him from the roster and move sānakavāsin up to the position of third patriarch.

magnetic tape "storage" (Or "magtape", "tape" - {paper tape} is now obsolete) A data storage medium consisting of a magnetisable oxide coating on a thin plastic strip, commonly used for {backup} and {archiving}. Early industry-standard magnetic tape was half an inch wide and wound on removable reels 10.5 inches in diameter. Different lengths were available with 2400 feet and 4800 feet being common. {DECtape} was a variation on this "{round tape}". In modern magnetic tape systems the reels are much smaller and are fixed inside a {cartridge} to protect the tape and for ease of handling ("{square tape}" - though it's really rectangular). Cartridge formats include {QIC}, {DAT}, and {Exabyte}. Tape is read and written on a tape drive (or "deck") which winds the tape from one reel to the other causing it to move past a read/write head. Early tape had seven parallel tracks of data along the length of the tape allowing six bit characters plus {parity} written across the tape. A typical recording density was 556 characters per inch. The tape had reflective marks near its end which signaled beginning of tape (BOT) and end of tape (EOT) to the hardware. Data is written to tape in {blocks} with {inter-block gaps} between them. Each block is typically written in a single operation with the tape running continuously during the write. The larger the block the larger the data {buffer} required in order to supply or receive the data written to or read from the tape. The smaller the block the more tape is wasted as inter-block gaps. Several logical {records} may be combined into one physical block to reduce wastage ("{blocked records}"). Finding a certain block on the tape generally involved reading sequentially from the beginning, in contrast to {magnetic disks}. Tape is not suitable for {random access}. The exception to this is that some systems allow {tape marks} to be written which can be detected while winding the tape forward or rewinding it at high speed. These are typically used to separate logical files on a tape. Most tape drives now include some kind of {data compression}. There are several {algorithms} which provide similar results: {LZ} (most), {IDRC} ({Exabyte}), {ALDC} ({IBM}, {QIC}) and {DLZ1} ({DLT}). See also {cut a tape}, {flap}, {Group Code Recording}, {spool}, {macrotape}, {microtape}, {Non Return to Zero Inverted}, {Phase Encoded}. (1997-04-05)

Mahāmudropadesa. (T. Phyag rgya chen po'i man ngag). In Sanskrit, "Instructions on the Great Seal"; a text known primarily through its Tibetan translations. It records seminal instructions on the view and practice of MAHĀMUDRĀ, taught by TILOPA to his disciple NĀROPA on the banks of the Ganges River. Due to this setting, the works is commonly known in Tibet as the Phyag chen gang gā ma ("Ganges Mahāmudrā") or simply the Gang gā ma. Several versions are preserved in the Tibetan Buddhist canon and the writings of various Tibetan Buddhist masters.

Mahatma(Mahatman, Sanskrit) ::: "Great soul" or "great self" is the meaning of this compound word (maha, "great";atman, "self"). The mahatmas are perfected men, relatively speaking, known in theosophical literature asteachers, elder brothers, masters, sages, seers, and by other names. They are indeed the "elder brothers"of mankind. They are men, not spirits -- men who have evolved through self-devised efforts in individualevolution, always advancing forwards and upwards until they have now attained the lofty spiritual andintellectual human supremacy that now they hold. They were not so created by any extra-cosmic Deity,but they are men who have become what they are by means of inward spiritual striving, by spiritual andintellectual yearning, by aspiration to be greater and better, nobler and higher, just as every good man inhis own way so aspires. They are farther advanced along the path of evolution than the majority of menare. They possess knowledge of nature's secret processes, and of hid mysteries, which to the average manmay seem to be little short of the marvelous -- yet, after all, this mere fact is of relatively smallimportance in comparison with the far greater and more profoundly moving aspects of their nature andlifework.Especially are they called teachers because they are occupied in the noble duty of instructing mankind, ininspiring elevating thoughts, and in instilling impulses of forgetfulness of self into the hearts of men.Also are they sometimes called the guardians, because they are, in very truth, the guardians of the raceand of the records -- natural, racial, national -- of past ages, portions of which they give out from time totime as fragments of a now long-forgotten wisdom, when the world is ready to listen to them; and theydo this in order to advance the cause of truth and of genuine civilization founded on wisdom andbrotherhood.Never -- such is the teaching -- since the human race first attained self-consciousness has this order orassociation or society or brotherhood of exalted men been without its representatives on our earth.It was the mahatmas who founded the modern Theosophical Society through their envoy or messenger,H. P. Blavatsky, in New York in 1875.

mail exchanger "messaging" A {server} running {SMTP} {Message Transfer Agent} {software} that accepts incoming {electronic mail} and either delivers it locally or forwards it to another server. The mail exchanger to use for a given domain can be discovered by querying {DNS} for {Mail Exchange Records}. (2007-01-29)

Maintenance of accounts - Accounting, means to ensure that all the transactions and other accounting records are kept or recorded in accordance with the GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles) and any other applicable laws. Further to this the records must be in sufficient detail to allow an effective annual audit to be conducted.

Mazdean (Persian) [from Mazda bestower of intellect or knowledge] Also Mazdeism. Applied to the ancient religion of the Iranians and to the scriptures of the Zoroastrians, who are represented today by the Parsis. The earliest followers of the Zoroastrianism, however, in their records called themselves Airyavo danghavo (Aryan races). Nowadays the Parsis call themselves Mazdiasnians, or Mazda-Yasna, which means worship of intellect, referring to all those who believe in the supremacy of light over darkness. From the time of the renovation of Zoroastrianism during the Sassanid period, this term has been used concurrently in the same sense as Zoroastrianism.

Memory of Nature: The Akashic Records (q.v.).

metadata "data, data processing" /me't*-day`t*/, or combinations of /may'-/ or (Commonwealth) /mee'-/; /-dah`t*/ (Or "meta-data") Data about {data}. In {data processing}, metadata is definitional data that provides information about or documentation of other data managed within an application or environment. For example, metadata would document data about {data elements} or {attributes}, (name, size, data type, etc) and data about {records} or {data structures} (length, fields, columns, etc) and data about data (where it is located, how it is associated, ownership, etc.). Metadata may include descriptive information about the context, quality and condition, or characteristics of the data. A collection of metadata, e.g. in a {database}, is called a {data dictionary}. Myers of {The Metadata Company} claims to have coined the term in 1969 though it appears in the book, "Extension of programming language concepts" published in 1968, by {Philip R. Bagley}. Bagley was a pioneer of computer document retrieval. "A survey of extensible programming languages" by Solntsseff and Yezerski (Annual Review in Automatic Programming, 1974, pp267-307) cites "the notion of 'metadata' introduced by Bagley". (2010-05-15)

meta-data ::: (data) /me't*-day`t*/, or combinations of /may'-/ or (Commonwealth) /mee'-/; /-dah`t*/ (Or meta data) Data about data. In data processing, meta-data is definitional data that provides information about or documentation of other data managed within an application or environment.For example, meta-data would document data about data elements or attributes, (name, size, data type, etc) and data about records or data structures (length, associated, ownership, etc.). Meta-data may include descriptive information about the context, quality and condition, or characteristics of the data.Not to be confused with Metadata. (1997-04-06)

Methodology: The systematic analysis and organization of the rational and experimental principles and processes which must guide a scientific inquiry, or which constitute the structure of the special sciences more particularly. Methodology, which is also called scientific method, and more seldom methodeutic, refers not only to the whole of a constituted science, but also to individual problems or groups of problems within a science. As such it is usually considered as a branch of logic; in fact, it is the application of the principles and processes of logic to the special objects of the various sciences; while science in general is accounted for by the combination of deduction and induction as such. Thus, methodology is a generic term exemplified in the specific method of each science. Hence its full significance can be understood only by analyzing the structure of the special sciences. In determining that structure, one must consider the proper object of the special science, the manner in which it develops, the type of statements or generalizations it involves, its philosophical foundations or assumptions, and its relation with the other sciences, and eventually its applications. The last two points mentioned are particularly important: methods of education, for example, will vary considerably according to their inspiration and aim. Because of the differences between the objects of the various sciences, they reveal the following principal methodological patterns, which are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and which are used sometimes in partial combination. It may be added that their choice and combination depend also in a large degree on psychological motives. In the last resort, methodology results from the adjustment of our mental powers to the love and pursuit of truth. There are various rational methods used by the speculative sciences, including theology which adds certain qualifications to their use. More especially, philosophy has inspired the following procedures:   The Soctattc method of analysis by questioning and dividing until the essences are reached;   the synthetic method developed by Plato, Aristotle and the Medieval thinkers, which involves a demonstrative exposition of the causal relation between thought and being;   the ascetic method of intellectual and moral purification leading to an illumination of the mind, as proposed by Plotinus, Augustine and the mystics;   the psychological method of inquiry into the origin of ideas, which was used by Descartes and his followers, and also by the British empiricists;   the critical or transcendental method, as used by Kant, and involving an analysis of the conditions and limits of knowledge;   the dialectical method proceeding by thesis, antithesis and synthesis, which is promoted by Hegelianlsm and Dialectical Materialism;   the intuitive method, as used by Bergson, which involves the immediate perception of reality, by a blending of consciousness with the process of change;   the reflexive method of metaphysical introspection aiming at the development of the immanent realities and values leading man to God;   the eclectic method (historical-critical) of purposive and effective selection as proposed by Cicero, Suarez and Cousin; and   the positivistic method of Comte, Spencer and the logical empiricists, which attempts to apply to philosophy the strict procedures of the positive sciences. The axiomatic or hypothetico-deductive method as used by the theoretical and especially the mathematical sciences. It involves such problems as the selection, independence and simplification of primitive terms and axioms, the formalization of definitions and proofs, the consistency and completeness of the constructed theory, and the final interpretation. The nomological or inductive method as used by the experimental sciences, aims at the discovery of regularities between phenomena and their relevant laws. It involves the critical and careful application of the various steps of induction: observation and analytical classification; selection of similarities; hypothesis of cause or law; verification by the experimental canons; deduction, demonstration and explanation; systematic organization of results; statement of laws and construction of the relevant theory. The descriptive method as used by the natural and social sciences, involves observational, classificatory and statistical procedures (see art. on statistics) and their interpretation. The historical method as used by the sciences dealing with the past, involves the collation, selection, classification and interpretation of archeological facts and exhibits, records, documents, archives, reports and testimonies. The psychological method, as used by all the sciences dealing with human behaviour and development. It involves not only introspective analysis, but also experimental procedures, such as those referring to the relations between stimuli and sensations, to the accuracy of perceptions (specific measurements of intensity), to gradation (least noticeable differences), to error methods (average error in right and wrong cases), and to physiological and educational processes.

Microsoft Access ::: 1. (database) A relational database running under Microsoft Windows. Data is stored as a number of tables, e.g. Stock. Each table consists of a number of records (e.g. for different items) and each record contains a number of fields, e.g. Product code, Supplier, Quantity in stock.Access allows the user to create forms and reports. A form shows one record in a user-designed format and allows the user to step through records one at a grouped into sections with different kinds of total (including sum, minimum, maximum, average).There are also facilities to use links (joins) between tables which share a common field and to filter records according to certain criteria or search for particular field values.Version: 2 (date?).Usenet newsgroup: comp.databases.ms-access.2. (communications) A communications program from Microsoft, meant to compete with ProComm and other programs. It sucked and was dropped. Years later they reused the name for their database.[Date?] (1997-07-20)

Microsoft Access 1. "database" A {relational database} running under {Microsoft Windows}. Data is stored as a number of "{tables}", e.g. "Stock". Each table consists of a number of "{records}" (e.g. for different items) and each record contains a number of "{fields}", e.g. "Product code", "Supplier", "Quantity in stock". Access allows the user to create "{forms}" and "reports". A form shows one record in a user-designed format and allows the user to step through records one at a time. A report shows selected records in a user-designed format, possibly grouped into sections with different kinds of total (including sum, minimum, maximum, average). There are also facilities to use links ("{joins}") between tables which share a common field and to filter records according to certain criteria or search for particular field values. Version: 2 (date?). {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.databases.ms-access}. 2. "communications" A communications program from Microsoft, meant to compete with {ProComm} and other programs. It sucked and was dropped. Years later they reused the name for their database. [Date?] (1997-07-20)

Mi la ras pa'i rnam thar. (Milarepe Namtar). In Tibetan, "Life of Milarepa"; an account of the celebrated eleventh-century Tibetan yogin MI LA RAS PA. While numerous early Tibetan versions of the life story exist, including several that may date from his lifetime, the best-known account was composed in 1488 by GTSANG SMYON HERUKA, the so-called mad YOGIN of Tsang, based upon numerous earlier works. Its narrative focuses on Mi la ras pa's early wrongdoings, his subsequent training and meditation, and eventual death. It is a companion to the MI LA'I MGUR 'BUM ("The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa"), also arranged and printed by Gtsang smyon Heruka, which records Milarepa's later teaching career through a compilation of his religious instruction and songs of realization. Gtsang smyon Heruka's version of the Mi la ras pa'i rnam thar is known and read throughout the Tibetan Buddhist cultural world and is widely accepted as a great literary achievement by Tibetans and Western scholars alike. The account of Milarepa's life profoundly affected the development of sacred biography in Tibet, a prominent genre in Tibetan Buddhist culture, and has influenced the way in which Tibet's Buddhism and culture have been understood in the West.

MilindapaNha. (C. Naxian biqiu jing; J. Nasenbikukyo; K. Nason pigu kyong 那先比丘經). In Pāli, the "Questions of Milinda"; a famous dialogical text that records the conversations of the ARHAT NĀGASENA and the Bactrian-Greek King Milinda (Menander) on various knotty points of Buddhist doctrine and ethics. The text was presumably composed in northern India in Sanskrit or Prakrit and later translated into Pāli, with the original composition or compilation probably occurring around the beginning of the Common Era. (There is an early Chinese translation made around the late fourth century, probably from a Central Asian recension in GĀNDHĀRĪ titled the *Nāgasenabhiksusutra, which is named after the BHIKsU Nāgasena rather than King Milinda.) It is uncertain whether such a dialogue ever in fact took place. There was indeed a famous king of BACTRIA named Menander (alt. Menandros; Milinda in Indian sources) who ruled over a large region that encompassed parts of modern India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan during the middle of the second century BCE. There is no evidence of Nāgasena's existence, however. Whatever the historical reality, the "Questions of Milinda" is one of the best-known texts of Pāli Buddhism. The text is structured as a series of questions by the king and answers by the monk on a wide range of topics, with each of the interlocutors displaying an impressive knowledge of Buddhist doctrine and literature. Nāgasena always provides a satisfying answer to each of the king's queries. His presentation of the dharma is so successful in fact that at the end of the dialogue King Milinda places his son upon the throne, enters the religious life, and becomes an arahant (S. arhat). The text was translated into Sinhalese in the eighteenth century by the elder Sumangala. The MilindapaNha is included in the Burmese recension of the Pāli TIPItAKA in the KHUDDAKANIKĀYA. Since its translation into English, it has become one of the more commonly anthologized of Pāli texts.

Mindon Min. (r. 1853-1878). Tenth king of the Konbaung dynasty and penultimate Burmese king to rule Burma (Myanmar) before the imposition of complete British rule. His reign is known for its reforms and cultural renaissance. He usurped the throne from his brother Pagan Min (r. 1846-1853), during whose reign Great Britain declared war on Burma for a second time in 1852. Upon becoming king, Mindon Min sued for peace and was compelled to surrender Burma's remaining coastal provinces to Britain in exchange for a cessation of hostilities. In 1857 he built a new capital, MANDALAY, and sought to make it into a center for Buddhist learning. In 1871, he summoned scholar-monks from throughout the country to convene a Buddhist council for the purpose of revising the Pāli TIPItAKA and its commentaries. By Burmese reckoning, this conclave was the fifth Buddhist council (see COUNCIL, FIFTH). The revised texts were inscribed on stone tablets and erected in the Kuthodaw Pagoda compound at the base of Mandalay Hill, where they can still be seen today. In the secular sphere, Mindon promoted a number of reforms. He assessed a land tax and fixed the salaries for government officials. He standardized the country's weights and measures, built roads and a telegraph system, and was the first Burmese king to issue coinage. In 1872, he sent his chief minister, Kinwun Mingyi U Gaung, to London, Paris, and Rome to secure recognition of his kingdom as an independent country. Despite his efforts to revitalize his country culturally and politically, contemporary records indicate that many within the Burmese sangha (S. SAMGHA) regarded British conquest of the Burmese kingdom as inevitable and imminent. Fundamentalist reform factions arose within the Burmese order that resisted the directives of the king's monastic council and organized themselves into independent self-governing congregations (see GAING). After the British destruction of the Burmese monarchy in 1885, these reformed congregations were to play an important role in shaping Burmese monastic culture in the twentieth century.

mittimus ::: n. --> A precept or warrant granted by a justice for committing to prison a party charged with crime; a warrant of commitment to prison.
A writ for removing records from one court to another.


Mujaku Dochu. (無着道忠) (1653-1744). Japanese ZEN master and historian of the RINZAISHu. Mujaku was a native of Tajima in present-day Hyogo prefecture. He entered the monastery at a young age and was ordained by the monk Jikuin Somon (d.u.) at the monastery of Ryugein. At the age of twenty-two, Mujaku followed his teacher Jikuin to Daijoji, where the latter was invited as its founding abbot (kaisan; C. KAISHAN). Later that same year, Jikuin was invited to MYoSHINJI as its abbot and again Mujaku followed. In 1707, Mujaku himself became the abbot of Myoshinji and served again as abbot in 1714. He retired to Ryugein in 1722 and devoted much of his time to his writing. Mujaku was a prolific writer who is said to have composed more than 370 works. His works include commentaries on various scriptures and discourse records (YULU) of CHAN and Zen masters, monastic regulations for the Zen community (see QINGGUI), histories of temples and monasteries, and dictionaries of Zen terms and vernacular phrases. His work thus serves as an invaluable tool for studying the history, doctrine, ritual, daily behavior, and language of the Zen tradition.

multiple value "database" (MU) A one-to-many relationship between entries in a database, for example a person may have an address field which spanned multiple records (with different indexes). Multiple values are a non-{relational} technique. MUs have recently been made available in {DB2}, despite the product being so heavily influenced by {Codd's Laws} of {relational databases}. [Confirm, clarify?] (1995-10-30)

multiple value ::: (database) (MU) A one-to-many relationship between entries in a database, for example a person may have an address field which spanned multiple records (with different indexes). Multiple values are a non-relational technique.MUs have recently been made available in DB2, despite the product being so heavily influenced by Codd's Laws of relational databases.[Confirm, clarify?] (1995-10-30)

MUMPS "language" (Or "M") Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System. A programming language with extensive tools for the support of {database management systems}. MUMPS was originally used for medical records and is now widely used where multiple users access the same databases simultaneously, e.g. banks, stock exchanges, travel agencies, hospitals. Early MUMPS implementations for {PDP-11} and {IBM PC} were complete {operating systems}, as well as programming languages, but current-day implementations usually run under a normal host {operating system}. A MUMPS program hardly ever explicitly performs low-level operations such as opening a file - there are programming constructs in the language that will do so implicitly, and most MUMPS programmers are not even aware of the {operating system} activity that MUMPS performs. Syntactically MUMPS has only one data-type: strings. Semantically, the language has many data-types: text strings, {binary strings}, {floating point} values, {integer} values, {Boolean} values. Interpretation of strings is done inside functions, or implicitly while applying mathematical {operators}. Since many operations involve only moving data from one location to another, it is faster to just move uninterpreted strings. Of course, when a value is used multiple times in the context of arithmetical operations, optimised implementations will typically save the numerical value of the string. MUMPS was designed for portability. Currently, it is possible to share the same MUMPS database between radically different architectures, because all values are stored as text strings. The worst an implementation may have to do is swap pairs of bytes. Such multi-CPU databases are actually in use, some offices share databases between {VAX}, {DEC Alpha}, {SUN}, {IBM PC} and {HP} {workstations}. Versions of MUMPS are available on practically all {hardware}, from the smallest ({IBM PC}, {Apple Macintosh}, {Acorn} {Archimedes}), to the largest {mainframe}. MSM ({Micronetics Standard MUMPS}) runs on {IBM PC RT} and {R6000}; DSM (Digital Standard Mumps) on the {PDP-11}, {VAX}, {DEC Alpha}, and {Windows-NT}; {Datatree MUMPS} from {InterSystems} runs on {IBM PC}; and {MGlobal MUMPS} on the {Macintosh}. Multi-{platform} versions include {M/SQL}, available from {InterSystems}, {PFCS} "mumps@pfcs.com" and {MSM}. {Greystone Technologies}' GT/M runs on {VAX} and {DEC Alpha}. This is a compiler whereas the others are {interpreters}. {GT/SQL} is their {SQL} pre-processor. ISO standard 11756 (1991). ANSI standard: "MUMPS Language Standard", X11.1 (1977, 1984, 1990, 1995?). The MUMPS User's Group was the {M Technology Association}. {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:comp.lang.mumps}. (2003-06-04)

MUMPS ::: (language) (Or M) Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System.A programming language with extensive tools for the support of database management systems. MUMPS was originally used for medical records and is now widely used where multiple users access the same databases simultaneously, e.g. banks, stock exchanges, travel agencies, hospitals.Early MUMPS implementations for PDP-11 and IBM PC were complete operating systems, as well as programming languages, but current-day implementations usually run under a normal host operating system.A MUMPS program hardly ever explicitly performs low-level operations such as opening a file - there are programming constructs in the language that will do so implicitly, and most MUMPS programmers are not even aware of the operating system activity that MUMPS performs.Syntactically MUMPS has only one data-type: strings. Semantically, the language has many data-types: text strings, binary strings, floating point values, times in the context of arithmetical operations, optimised implementations will typically save the numerical value of the string.MUMPS was designed for portability. Currently, it is possible to share the same MUMPS database between radically different architectures, because all values are of bytes. Such multi-CPU databases are actually in use, some offices share databases between VAX, DEC Alpha, SUN, IBM PC and HP workstations.Versions of MUMPS are available on practically all hardware, from the smallest (IBM PC, Apple Macintosh, Acorn Archimedes), to the largest mainframe. MSM versions include M/SQL, available from InterSystems, PFCS and MSM.Greystone Technologies' GT/M runs on VAX and DEC Alpha. This is a compiler whereas the others are interpreters. GT/SQL is their SQL pre-processor.ISO standard 11756 (1991). ANSI standard: MUMPS Language Standard, X11.1 (1977, 1984, 1990, 1995?).The MUMPS User's Group was the M Technology Association.Usenet newsgroups: comp.lang.mumps.(2003-06-04)

Nabateans ::: A semitic people who inhabited the Negev and ancient Edom in Transjordan from the third century BCE to the seventh century CE. The Nabateans were nomads at first, then became travelers and led caravans along the Spice Route. The Nabateans founded six cities in the Negev. They left no written records, but are mentioned in Greek and Latin sources.

Nanyue Huairang. (J. Nangaku Ejo; K. Namak Hoeyang 南嶽懷讓) (677-744). Chinese CHAN monk of the Tang dynasty, Huairang was a native of Jinzhou in present-day Shandong province. At an early age, Huairang is said to have gone to the monastery of Yuquansi in Jingzhou (present-day Hubei province) where he studied VINAYA under the vinaya master Hongjing (d.u.). Later, he visited SONGSHAN and continued his studies under Hui'an (also known as Lao'an or "Old An"; 582-709), a reputed disciple of the fifth patriarch HONGREN (601-674). Hui'an purportedly introduced Huairang to the sixth patriarch (LIUZU) HUINENG (638-713), from whom Huairang eventually received dharma transmission. In 713, Huairang began teaching at the monastery of Boresi on Mt. Nanyue (present-day Hunan province), whence his toponym. There, Huairang acquired his most famous disciple, MAZU DAOYI (709-788). As most of what is known of Huairang comes from the work of Mazu and Mazu's students, some scholars contend that the obscure figure of Huairang was used as a convenient means of linking Mazu's successful HONGZHOU ZONG line with the legendary sixth patriarch Huineng. The Chan lamplight records (CHUANDENG LU) trace the GUIYANG ZONG and LINJI ZONG, two of the traditional "five houses" (see WU JIA QI ZONG) of the mature Chan tradition, back to Nanyue Huirang.

Nan zong. (J. Nanshu; K. Nam chong 南宗). In Chinese, "Southern School," an appellation used widely throughout the Tang dynasty, largely due to the efforts of HEZE SHENHUI (684-758) and his lineage, to describe what they claimed to be the orthodox lineage of the CHAN ZONG; in distinction to the collateral lineage of the "Northern School" (BEI ZONG) of SHENXIU (606-706) and his successors. Heze Shenhui toured various provinces and constructed ordination platforms, where he began to preach that HUINENG (638-713), whom he claimed as his teacher, was the true sixth patriarch (LIUZU) of the Chan school. In 732, during an "unrestricted assembly" (WUZHE DAHUI) held at the monastery of Dayunsi in Huatai, Shenhui engaged a monk by the name of Chongyuan (d.u.) and publicly criticized what he called the "Northern School" of Shenxiu's disciples PUJI (651-739), YIFU (661-736), and XIANGMO ZANG (d.u.) as being merely a collateral branch of BODHIDHARMA's lineage, which advocated an inferior gradualistic teaching. Shenhui argued that his teacher Huineng had received the orthodox transmission of Bodhidharma's lineage and the "sudden teaching" (DUNJIAO), which was the unique soteriological doctrine of Bodhidharma and his Chan school. Shenhui launched a vociferous attack on the Northern School, whose influence and esteem in both religious and political circles were unrivaled at the time. He condemned Shenxiu's so-called "Northern School" for having wrongly usurped the mantle of the Chan patriarchy from Huineng's "Southern School." Shenhui also (mis)characterized the teaching of the "Northern School" as promoting a "gradual" approach to enlightenment (JIANWU), which ostensibly stood in stark contrast to Huineng's and thus Shenhui's own "sudden awakening" (DUNWU) teachings. As a result of Shenhui's polemical attacks on Shenxiu and his disciples, subsequent Chan historians, such as GUIFENG ZONGMI (780-841), came to refer reflexively to a gradualist "Northern School" that was to be rigidly distinguished from a subitist "Southern School." Modern scholarship has demonstrated that, in large measure, the centrality of the "Southern School" to early Chan history is a retrospective creation. The Chan patriarchal lineage going back to Chan's putative founder, Bodhidharma, was still inchoate in the eighth century; indeed, contemporary genealogical histories, such as the LIDAI FABAO JI, CHUAN FABAO JI, LENGQIE SHIZI JI, and BAOLIN ZHUAN, demonstrate how fluid and fragile the notion of the Chan lineage remained at this early period. Because the lineages that eventually came to be recognized within the later tradition were not yet cast in stone, it was therefore possible for Shenhui to advocate that a semilegendary, and relatively unknown figure, Huineng, rather than the leading Chan figures of his time, was the orthodox successor of the fifth patriarch HONGREN and the real sixth patriarch (liuzu). While this characterization is now known to be misleading, subsequent histories of the Chan tradition more or less adopted Shenhui's vision of early Chan history. The influential LIUZU TAN JING played an important role in this process of distinguishing a supposedly inferior, gradualist Northern School from a superior, subitist Southern School. By the eleventh century, with the composition of the mature Chan genealogical histories, such as the CHODANG CHIP (C. ZUTANG JI) and JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, this orthodox lineage was solidified within the tradition and became mainstream. In these later "transmission of the lamplight" records (CHUANDENG LU), the "Southern School" was now unquestioned as the orthodox successor in Bodhidharma's lineage, a position it retained throughout the subsequent history of the Chan tradition. Despite Shenhui's virulent attacks against the "Northern School," we now know that Shenxiu and his disciples were much more central to the early Chan school, and played much more important roles in Chan's early growth and development, than the mature tradition realized.

Neith or Net (Egyptian) Neith or Net. One of the most ancient Egyptian deities, the Lady of the West. Her characteristic symbol is the arrow; later Greek writers equated her with Pallas Athene. In late dynastic times, Net was closely associated with Hathor, but in the earliest records she is connected with the primeval watery ocean or cosmic chaos, from which arose the sun god Ra. More often she was associated with Isis — her concrete or manifested self — being called “the great goddess, mother of all the gods, mistress of heaven who came into being in the beginning.” Net is portrayed as the virgin mother, suckling the infant Horus, similar to the representations of Isis. The famous passage given by Plutarch (Isis and Osiris ch 9) generally attributed to Isis, was said to have been found engraved upon a statue of Net. Plutarch also states that the Egyptians often called Isis Athene, signifying “I have come from myself” (ch 42).

noctograph ::: n. --> A kind of writing frame for the blind.
An instrument or register which records the presence of watchmen on their beats.


Non cash expense - An expense that is recognised in the financial records of a company without actual cash having being paid for it e.g. depreciation, or amortisation.

notary ::: n. --> One who records in shorthand what is said or done; as, the notary of an ecclesiastical body.
A public officer who attests or certifies deeds and other writings, or copies of them, usually under his official seal, to make them authentic, especially in foreign countries. His duties chiefly relate to instruments used in commercial transactions, such as protests of negotiable paper, ship&


Oberon "language" A {strongly typed} {procedural} programming language and an operating environment evolved from {Modula-2} by {Nicklaus Wirth} in 1988. Oberon adds type extension ({inheritance}), extensible record types, multidimensional open arrays, and {garbage collection}. It eliminates {variant records}, {enumeration types}, {subranges}, lower array indices and {for loops}. A successor called Oberon-2 by H. Moessenboeck features a handful of extensions to Oberon including type-bound procedures ({methods}). Seneca is a variant of Oberon focussing on numerical programming under development by R. Griesemer in April 1993 (to be renamed). See also {Ceres workstation Oberon System}. {(http://oberon.ethz.ch)}. {(http://math.tau.ac.il/~laden/Oberon.html)}. {Free ETH Oberon (ftp://ftp.inf.ethz.ch/pub/Oberon)}. {MS-DOS (ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/mirrors/msdos/pgmutl/)}. {Amiga (ftp://ftp.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/amiga/fish/ff380)}. ["The Programming Language Oberon", N. Wirth, Soft Prac & Exp 18(7):671-690 July 1988]. ["Programming in Oberon: Steps Beyond Pascal and Modula", M. Reiser & N. Wirth, A-W 1992]. ["Project Oberon: the design of an operating system and compiler", N. Wirth & J. Gutknecht, ACM Press 1992]. ["The Oberon Companion: A Guide to Using and Programming Oberon System 3", André Fischer, Hannes Marais, vdf Verlag der Fachhochschulen, Zurich, 1997, ISBN 3-7281-2493-1. Includes CD-ROM for Windows, Linux, Macintosh and PC Native]. (1998-03-14)

Oberon ::: (language) A strongly typed procedural programming language and an operating environment evolved from Modula-2 by Nicklaus Wirth in 1988. Oberon open arrays, and garbage collection. It eliminates variant records, enumeration types, subranges, lower array indices and for loops.A successor called Oberon-2 by H. Moessenboeck features a handful of extensions to Oberon including type-bound procedures (methods).Seneca is a variant of Oberon focussing on numerical programming under development by R. Griesemer in April 1993 (to be renamed).See also Ceres workstation Oberon System. . . .[The Programming Language Oberon, N. Wirth, Soft Prac & Exp 18(7):671-690 July 1988].[Programming in Oberon: Steps Beyond Pascal and Modula, M. Reiser & N. Wirth, A-W 1992].[Project Oberon: the design of an operating system and compiler, N. Wirth & J. Gutknecht, ACM Press 1992].[The Oberon Companion: A Guide to Using and Programming Oberon System 3, Andr� Fischer, Hannes Marais, vdf Verlag der Fachhochschulen, Zurich, 1997, ISBN 3-7281-2493-1. Includes CD-ROM for Windows, Linux, Macintosh and PC Native]. (1998-03-14)

observation: used to describe a situation where an observer records behaviour demonstrated by a participant. An observation does not involve manipulation of an independent variable, but simply allows the observation of relationships between variables as they occur. Observation includes a variety of differing types of observation including naturalistic observation, participant and non-participant observation.

of the heavenly books and records.” [See Radu-

orator ::: n. --> A public speaker; one who delivers an oration; especially, one distinguished for his skill and power as a public speaker; one who is eloquent.
In equity proceedings, one who prays for relief; a petitioner.
A plaintiff, or complainant, in a bill in chancery.
An officer who is the voice of the university upon all public occasions, who writes, reads, and records all letters of a


Our subliminal self is not, like our surface physical being, an outcome of the energy of the Inconscient; it is a meeting-place of the consciousness that emerges from below by evolution and the consciousness that has descended from above for involution. There is in it an inner mind, an inner vital being of ourselves, an inner or subtle-physical being larger than our outer being and nature. This inner existence is the concealed origin of almost all in our surface self that is not a construction of the first inconscient World-Energy or a natural developed functioning of our surface consciousness or a reaction of it to impacts from the outside universal Nature,—and even in this construction, these functionings, these reactions the subliminal takes part and exercises on them a considerable influence. There is here a consciousness which has a power of direct contact with the universal unlike the mostly indirect contacts which our surface being maintains with the universe through the sense-mind and the senses. There are here inner senses, a subliminal sight, touch, hearing; but these subtle senses are rather channels of the inner being’s direct consciousness of things than its informants: the subliminal is not dependent on its senses for its knowledge, they only give a form to its direct experience of objects; they do not, so much as in waking mind, convey forms of objects for the mind’s documentation or as the starting-point or basis for an indirect constructive experience. The subliminal has the right of entry into the mental and vital and subtle-physical planes of the universal consciousness, it is not confined to the material plane and the physical world; it possesses means of communication with the worlds of being which the descent towards involution created in its passage and with all corresponding planes or worlds that may have arisen or been constructed to serve the purpose of the re-ascent from Inconscience to Superconscience. It is into this large realm of interior existence that our mind and vital being retire when they withdraw from the surface activities whether by sleep or inward-drawn concentration or by the inner plunge of trance. Our waking state is unaware of its connection with the subliminal being, although it receives from it—but without any knowledge of the place of origin—the inspirations, intuitions, ideas, will-suggestions, sense-suggestions, urges to action that rise from below or from behind our limited surface existence. Sleep like trance opens the gate of the subliminal to us; for in sleep, as in trance, we retire behind the veil of the limited waking personality and it is behind this veil that the subliminal has its existence. But we receive the records of our sleep experience through dream and in dream figures and not in that condition which might be called an inner waking and which is the most accessible form of the trance state, nor through the supernormal clarities of vision and other more luminous and concrete ways of communication developed by the inner subliminal cognition when it gets into habitual or occasional conscious connection with our waking self. The subliminal, with the subconscious as an annexe of itself,—for the subconscious is also part of the behind-the-veil entity,—is the seer of inner things and of supraphysical experiences; the surface subconscious is only a transcriber. It is for this reason that the Upanishad describes the subliminal being as the Dream Self because it is normally in dreams, visions, absorbed states of inner experience that we enter into and are part of its experiences...
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 236


Padaeng Chronicle. "Chronicle of the Red Forest Monastery," a chronicle of uncertain date written in the Khun language of Kengtung valley of the Shan states of Burma (Myanmar). It records the history of the THERAVĀDA tradition from its inception to the founding of Wat Padaeng at Kengtung and the vicissitudes of the religion in the Shan states thereafter. It begins with a record of the life of the Buddha, through the three Buddhist councils (SAMGĪTI) in India, to Buddhism's spread to Sri Lanka and the Mon kingdom of SUVAnnABHuMI in Lower Burma. From that point, it describes the introduction of two reformed Sinhalese monastic sects at Martaban (Muttama) in Lower Burma, and the spread of reformed Sinhalese Buddhism from there to the Thai kingdoms of AYUTHAYA, SUKHOTHAI, and Chiangmai, following the narrative outline of the MuLASĀSANA.

Paegun Kyonghan. (白雲景閑) (1299-1374). Korean SoN master in the Imje (C. LINJI ZONG) lineage, who is known as one of the three great Son masters of the late-Koryo dynasty, along with T'AEGO POU (1301-1376) and NAONG HYEGŬN (1320-1376). After entering the monastery at a young age, Kyonghan eventually traveled to Yuan-dynasty China in 1351, where he studied under the Chan master Shiwu Qinggong (1272-1352), a Linji-Chan teacher from whom he received dharma transmission, and under the Indian monk ZHIKONG CHANXIAN, who later came to live and teach in Korea. After awakening in 1353, Kyonghan returned to Korea, residing at An'guksa and Sin'gwangsa, both in Hwanghae province, and later at Ch'wiamsa in Yoju, where he passed away in 1374. Kyonghan's record of dharma talks, Paegun hwasang orok ("Discourse Records of the Master Paegun"), in two rolls, was compiled posthumously by his disciple Sokch'an. Kyonghan is also the author of the PULCHO CHIKCHI SIMCH'E YOJoL, an anthology of the biographies and teachings of the Buddhist patriarchs and Son masters.

Paekkok Ch'onŭng. (白谷處能) (1617-1680). Korean monk of the Choson dynasty, also known as Sinsu. Ch'onŭng received a traditional Confucian education from Ŭihyon (d.u.) and subsequently became a monk in 1631. He returned to Seoul a few years later and continued to study the Confucian classics from a Confucian scholar by the name of Sin Iksong. He later went to the monastery of SSANGGYESA in CHIRISAN and became the disciple of the Son master PYoGAM KAKSoNG, under whom he studied for the next twenty-three years. In 1680, while lecturing at KŬMSANSA, he passed away at the age of sixty-four. Ch'onŭng was particularly renowned for his writing and poetry, and maintained a close relationship with the leading Confucian scholars at the time. As a response to King Hyonjong's (r. 1660-1674) suppression of Buddhism, Ch'onŭng submitted to the court the Kanp'ye Sokkyo so ("Remonstration against the Ruination of sākyamuni's Teachings"), a critical response to the Confucian criticisms of Buddhism that were prevalent during that period. His writings can also be found in the Paekkok chip and Imsongdang taesa haengjang. The Paekkok chip is a collection of his poems and the biographies, stele inscriptions, and records of other monks. The Kanp'ye Sokkyo so can also be found in the Paekkok chip. He also authored the Imsongdang taesa haengjang, a record of the life of the Son master Imsong Ch'ungon (1567-1638).

paging ::: (operating system) A technique for increasing the memory space available by moving infrequently-used parts of a program's working memory from RAM to a secondary storage medium, usually hard {disk. The unit of transfer is called a page.A memory management unit (MMU) monitors accesses to memory and splits each address into a page number (the most significant bits) and an offset within that page table is updated to indicate that the page is paged in and its physical address recorded.The MMU also records whether a page has been modified since it was last paged in. If it has not been modified then there is no need to copy it back to disk and the space can be reused immediately.Paging allows the total memory requirements of all running tasks (possibly just one) to exceed the amount of physical memory, whereas swapping simply allows multiple processes to run concurrently, so long as each process on its own fits within physical memory. (1996-11-22)

paging "operating system" A technique for increasing the memory space available by moving infrequently-used parts of a program's {working memory} from {RAM} to a secondary storage medium, usually {hard {disk}. The unit of transfer is called a page. A {memory management unit} (MMU) monitors accesses to memory and splits each address into a page number (the most significant bits) and an offset within that page (the lower bits). It then looks up the page number in its page table. The page may be marked as paged in or paged out. If it is paged in then the memory access can proceed after translating the {virtual address} to a {physical address}. If the requested page is paged out then space must be made for it by paging out some other page, i.e. copying it to disk. The requested page is then located on the area of the disk allocated for "{swap space}" and is read back into {RAM}. The page table is updated to indicate that the page is paged in and its physical address recorded. The MMU also records whether a page has been modified since it was last paged in. If it has not been modified then there is no need to copy it back to disk and the space can be reused immediately. Paging allows the total memory requirements of all running tasks (possibly just one) to exceed the amount of {physical memory}, whereas {swapping} simply allows multiple processes to run concurrently, so long as each process on its own fits within {physical memory}. (1996-11-22)

Pang Yun. (J. Ho On; K. Pang On 龐蘊) (740-808). One of the most famous lay adepts of the CHAN ZONG, commonly known within the tradition as "Layman Pang" (PANG JUSHI); also referred to as "VIMALAKĪRTI of the East" (Dongtu Weimo). PENG SHAOSHENG (1740-1796), in his JUSHI ZHUAN ("Biographies of Lay Buddhists"), lists Pang Yun as one of the three great lay masters (sangong) of Chinese Buddhism, along with LI TONGXUAN (635-730) and LIU CHENGZHI (354-410), praising Pang for his mastery of Chan practice. One of the famous anecdotes regarding Pang is that, in his middle age, he gave his house away to be used for a monastery and discarded all his personal possessions by loading them onto a boat and sinking them in a river. Subsequently, he is said to have earned his livelihood by making and selling bamboo utensils. He is presumed to have carried on religious practices at a hermitage separate from his residence. Pang was father to both a son and a daughter. The daughter, LING ZHAO, who also attained a deep understanding of Chan, seems to have had an especially close spiritual relationship with her father. Pang is presumed to have visited the Chan master SHITOU XIQIAN (710-790) about 785, whom he asked, "What man is it who does not accompany the ten thousand dharmas?" Shitou covered the layman's mouth with his hand and Pang Yun was instantly enlightened. The layman stayed with Shitou until 786, when he traveled to visit MAZU DAOYI (707-786), one of the most influential Chan masters of his time. When the layman asked Mazu the same question he had asked Shitou, Mazu is said to have replied: "Wait till you've swallowed in one swig all the water of the West River, then I'll tell you," whereupon he attained great enlightenment. After staying with Mazu for two years, Pang Yun is believed to have started pilgrimages around central China, probably writing many verses that are extant now in materials such as the PANG JUSHI YULU ("Recorded Sayings of Layman Pang"), the posthumous records of Pang's later years compiled by his friend the prefect Yu Di. Perhaps the most famous saying attributed to Pang Yun is: "Supernatural powers and marvelous activities are drawing water and carrying firewood." Pang is said to have had a premonition of the time of his death. When he was about to die, he sat up cross-legged in his bed and told his daughter to report to him when it was noon, at which point he would pass away; she looked out and said, "The sun has just reached the zenith, but there is an eclipse." While the layman went out to look at the eclipse, his daughter sat down sat cross-legged on his bed and passed away herself. Seeing this, the layman said, "My daughter has anticipated me." He then postponed his death for seven days and died in the presence of his friend Yu Di, uttering these final words: "Please just regard as empty everything in existence, but beware of presuming that all nonexistence is real. Live comfortably in the world, where all is like shadows and echoes." Records pertaining to Layman Pang are also found in such major Chan texts as BIYAN LU, CHODANG CHIP, ZONGJING LU, and JINGDE CHUANDENG LU.

Parthia. (C. Anxi guo; J. Ansoku koku; K. Ansik kuk 安息國). A region in Central Asia, southeast of the Caspian Sea, which the Roman geographers knew as Parthia; the Chinese is a transcription of the Parthian proper name Aršak or Arsakes (see ANXI GUO), referring to the Arsacid kingdom (c. 250 BCE-224 CE). Aršak was the name adopted by all Parthian rulers, and the Chinese employed it to refer to the lands that those rulers controlled. In the Marv oasis, where the old Parthian city of Margiana was located, Soviet archeologists discovered the vestiges of a Buddhist monastic complex that has been dated to the third quarter of the fourth century CE, as well as birch-bark manuscripts written in the BRĀHMĪ script that are associated with the SARVĀSTIVĀDA school of the mainstream Buddhist tradition. There is therefore archeological evidence of at least a semblance of Buddhist presence in the area during the fourth through sixth centuries. Parthian Buddhists who were active in China enable us to push this dating back at least two more centuries, for two of the important early figures in the transmission of Buddhist texts into China also hailed from Parthia: AN SHIGAO (fl. c. 148-180 CE), a prolific translator of mainstream Buddhist works, and An Xuan (fl. c. 168-189), who translated the UGRAPARIPṚCCHĀ with the assistance of the Chinese Yan Fotiao. (The AN in their names is an ethnicon referring to Parthia.) There is, however, no extant Buddhist literature written in the Parthian language and indeed little evidence that written Parthian was ever used for purposes other than government documents and financial records until the third century CE, when Manichaean texts written in Parthian begin to appear.

partial key "database" A {key} which identifies a subset of a set of information items (e.g. database "{records}"), and which could narrow the subset to one item if other partial key(s) were combined with it. (1997-04-26)

partial key ::: (database) A key which identifies a subset of a set of information items (e.g. database records), and which could narrow the subset to one item if other partial key(s) were combined with it. (1997-04-26)

Pascal ::: (language) (After the French mathematician Blaise Pascal (1623-1662)) A programming language designed by Niklaus Wirth around 1970. Pascal was designed records, and the case statement. Pascal has been extremely influential in programming language design and has a great number of variants and descendants.ANSI/IEEE770X3.97-1993 is very similar to ISO Pascal but does not include conformant arrays.ISO 7185-1983(E). Level 0 and Level 1. Changes from Jensen & Wirth's Pascal include name equivalence; names must be bound before they are used; loop index must be local to the procedure; formal procedure parameters must include their arguments; conformant array schemas.An ALGOL-descended language designed by Niklaus Wirth on the CDC 6600 around 1967--68 as an instructional tool for elementary programming. This language, bondage-and-discipline languages. At the end of a summary of the case against Pascal, Kernighan wrote:9. There is no escapeThis last point is perhaps the most important. The language is inadequate but circumscribed, because there is no way to escape its limitations. There are no the defective run-time environment with a sensible one, unless one controls the compiler that defines the standard procedures. The language is closed.People who use Pascal for serious programming fall into a fatal trap. Because the language is impotent, it must be extended. But each group extends Pascal in all add to the utility of the language for one group but destroy its portability to others.I feel that it is a mistake to use Pascal for anything much beyond its original target. In its pure form, Pascal is a toy language, suitable for teaching but not for real programming.Pascal has since been almost entirely displaced (by C) from the niches it had acquired in serious applications and systems programming, but retains some popularity as a hobbyist language in the MS-DOS and Macintosh worlds.See also Kamin's interpreters, p2c.[The Programming Language Pascal, N. Wirth, Acta Informatica 1:35-63, 1971].[PASCAL User Manual and Report, K. Jensen & N. Wirth, Springer 1975] made significant revisions to the language.[BS 6192, Specification for Computer Programming Language Pascal, British Standards Institute 1982].[Jargon File] (1996-06-12)

Pascal "language" (After the French mathematician {Blaise Pascal} (1623-1662)) A programming language designed by {Niklaus Wirth} around 1970. Pascal was designed for simplicity and for teaching programming, in reaction to the complexity of {ALGOL 68}. It emphasises {structured programming} constructs, data structures and {strong typing}. Innovations included {enumeration types}, {subranges}, sets, {variant records}, and the {case statement}. Pascal has been extremely influential in programming language design and has a great number of variants and descendants. ANSI/IEEE770X3.97-1993 is very similar to {ISO Pascal} but does not include {conformant arrays}. ISO 7185-1983(E). Level 0 and Level 1. Changes from Jensen & Wirth's Pascal include name equivalence; names must be bound before they are used; loop index must be local to the procedure; formal procedure parameters must include their arguments; {conformant array schemas}. An ALGOL-descended language designed by Niklaus Wirth on the CDC 6600 around 1967--68 as an instructional tool for elementary programming. This language, designed primarily to keep students from shooting themselves in the foot and thus extremely restrictive from a general-purpose-programming point of view, was later promoted as a general-purpose tool and, in fact, became the ancestor of a large family of languages including Modula-2 and {Ada} (see also {bondage-and-discipline language}). The hackish point of view on Pascal was probably best summed up by a devastating (and, in its deadpan way, screamingly funny) 1981 paper by Brian Kernighan (of {K&R} fame) entitled "Why Pascal is Not My Favourite Programming Language", which was turned down by the technical journals but circulated widely via photocopies. It was eventually published in "Comparing and Assessing Programming Languages", edited by Alan Feuer and Narain Gehani (Prentice-Hall, 1984). Part of his discussion is worth repeating here, because its criticisms are still apposite to Pascal itself after ten years of improvement and could also stand as an indictment of many other bondage-and-discipline languages. At the end of a summary of the case against Pascal, Kernighan wrote: 9. There is no escape This last point is perhaps the most important. The language is inadequate but circumscribed, because there is no way to escape its limitations. There are no casts to disable the type-checking when necessary. There is no way to replace the defective run-time environment with a sensible one, unless one controls the compiler that defines the "standard procedures". The language is closed. People who use Pascal for serious programming fall into a fatal trap. Because the language is impotent, it must be extended. But each group extends Pascal in its own direction, to make it look like whatever language they really want. Extensions for {separate compilation}, Fortran-like COMMON, string data types, internal static variables, initialisation, {octal} numbers, bit operators, etc., all add to the utility of the language for one group but destroy its portability to others. I feel that it is a mistake to use Pascal for anything much beyond its original target. In its pure form, Pascal is a toy language, suitable for teaching but not for real programming. Pascal has since been almost entirely displaced (by {C}) from the niches it had acquired in serious applications and systems programming, but retains some popularity as a hobbyist language in the {MS-DOS} and {Macintosh} worlds. See also {Kamin's interpreters}, {p2c}. ["The Programming Language Pascal", N. Wirth, Acta Informatica 1:35-63, 1971]. ["PASCAL User Manual and Report", K. Jensen & N. Wirth, Springer 1975] made significant revisions to the language. [BS 6192, "Specification for Computer Programming Language Pascal", {British Standards Institute} 1982]. [{Jargon File}] (1996-06-12)

phonautograph ::: n. --> An instrument by means of which a sound can be made to produce a visible trace or record of itself. It consists essentially of a resonant vessel, usually of paraboloidal form, closed at one end by a flexible membrane. A stylus attached to some point of the membrane records the movements of the latter, as it vibrates, upon a moving cylinder or plate.

Phonetastic ::: (communications) A CTI product from Callware. Phonetastic employs if-then rules and customer records to tell those receiving calls who is calling (based certain sales representative or to the general sales department; receive high-priority treatment; receive a fax-back, etc. (1996-12-08)

Phonetastic "communications" A {CTI} product from {Callware}. Phonetastic employs if-then rules and customer records to tell those receiving calls who is calling (based on {ANI} and {DNIS}) and to determine how the call should be routed, e.g. to a certain sales representative or to the general sales department; receive high-priority treatment; receive a fax-back, etc. (1996-12-08)

Plankalkül "language, history" (Or "Plankalkuel" if you don't have umlauts). The first programming language, designed by {Konrad Zuse}, ca. 1945. Zuse wrote "Rechenplan allgemeiner Struktur" in 1944 which developed into Plankalkül. Plankalkül included {arrays} and {records} and used a style of {assignment} in which the new value appears on the right. Zuse wrote Plankalkül for his {Z3} computer (finished before 1945) and implemented it on there as well. Much of his work may have been either lost or confiscated in the aftermath of World War II. {ESR Plankalkül (http://tuxedo.org/~esr/retro/plankalkuel/)}. ["The Plankalkül of Konrad Zuse", F.L. Bauer et al, CACM 15(7):678-685, Jul 1972]. (2002-05-28)

Plankalk�l ::: (language, history) (Or Plankalkuel if you don't have umlauts). The first programming language, designed by Konrad Zuse, ca. 1945. Zuse wrote Plankalk�l included arrays and records and used a style of assignment in which the new value appears on the right.Zuse wrote Plankalk�l for his Z3 computer (finished before 1945) and implemented it on there as well. Much of his work may have been either lost or confiscated in the aftermath of World War II. .[The Plankalk�l of Konrad Zuse, F.L. Bauer et al, CACM 15(7):678-685, Jul 1972].(2002-05-28)

polygraph ::: n. --> An instrument for multiplying copies of a writing; a manifold writer; a copying machine.
In bibliography, a collection of different works, either by one or several authors.
An instrument for detecting deceptive statements by a subject, by measuring several physiological states of the subject, such as pulse, heartbeat, and sweating. The instrument records these parameters on a strip of paper while the subject is asked questions


Prehistory: That part of history of which we have no written records, documents or oral accounts, but which is reconstructed from material remains by archeologists and anthropologists. Premiss: A proposition, or one of several propositions, from which an inference is drawn, or the sentence expressing such a proposition. Following C. S. Peirce, we here prefer the spelling premiss, to distinguish from the word premise in other senses (in particular to distinguish the plural from the legal term premises). -- A.C.

Prehistory: That part of history of which we have no written records, documents or oral accounts, but which is reconstructed from material remains by archeologists and anthropologists.

Prophecy: Foretelling the future. According to occult teachings anyone who is able to prophesy accurately must be psychically equipped to read the Akashic, or astral, records (cf. Akasha). When there is faulty interpretation it is not the astral light which falters but the adept who is not in tune with the vibratory beam.

Pulcho chikchi simch'e yojol. (佛組直指心體要節). In Korean, "Essential Excerpts of the Buddhas and Patriarchs Pointing Directly to the Essence of Mind," also known by the abbreviated titles Chikchi simch'e yojol, or simply Chikchi; the earliest surviving example from anywhere in the world of a text printed using movable metal type, predating Gutenberg's 1455 printing of the Bible by seventy-eight years. The two-roll lineage anthology of the CHAN school was compiled in 1372 by PAEGUN KYoNGHAN (1299-1374), one of the three great Son masters of the late-Koryo dynasty. This anthology was first printed in 1377 at Hŭngdoksa (the ruins of which were located in 1985 in Unch'ondong, near the city of Ch'ongju in South Korea) using movable cast-metal type. This printing technology was known to have been in use in Koryo-period Korea prior to the Mongol invasions of 1231-1232, but no examples survive. The metal-type printing of the Chikchi is held in the collection of the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris, and its existence was first noted by Maurice Courant in 1901. The first roll of the anthology includes the enlightenment poems of the seven buddhas of antiquity (SAPTATATHĀGATA), the twenty-eight Indian patriarchs of the Son school (starting with MAHĀKĀsYAPA and ending with BODHIDHARMA), the six Chinese patriarchs (ZUSHI) of Chan, and several later Son masters. The second roll is a collection of the poetry, epitaphs, discourse records, and seminal teachings of eminent masters of the Son school, such as the fourteen "nondualities" (ADVAYA) of Kyonghan's Indian teacher ZHIKONG CHANXIAN (K. Chigong Sonhyon; S. *Dhyānabhadra). Like many of these lineage anthologies, the text is derivative, drawing on such earlier genealogical collections as the JINGDE CHUANDENG LU and the SoNMUN YoMSONG CHIP of CHIN'GAK HYESIM (1178-1234). Although the entire first roll and the first page of the second roll of the metal-type recension are lost, a complete xylographic edition of the anthology survives, which dates to 1378, one year later than the metal-type recension.

Purchase returns (return outwards) - A contra purchase account that records all credits from returned inventory purchases.

Pyramid The square pyramid as a symbol is an amplification of the triangle: it has lines, triangles, and a square, proceeding from a point downwards or conversely upwards merging into a point at the apex. Thus we have the four numbers of the tetraktys represented by point, line, triangle, and square. Reference is usually to stone monuments, especially those of Egypt and chiefly to the Great Pyramid of Cheops. All these pyramids, whether in Egypt, Central America, or elsewhere, are records constructed by initiates who journeyed to many lands, for the preservation of sacred knowledge through the dark ages, to be available to posterity.

qinggui. (J. shingi; K. ch'onggyu 清規). In Chinese, lit. "rules of purity" or "rules for the pure (assembly)," a genre of monastic codes compiled by adherents within the CHAN tradition. According to such Song-period genealogical records as the JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, the Tang Chan master BAIZHANG HUAIHAI (720-814) composed the first such Chan code, entitled the BAIZHANG QINGGUI ("Baizhang's Rules of Purity"), in order to establish an independent Chan discipline distinct from the normative VINAYA tradition; his qinggui is not extant, however, and modern scholars doubt that it ever existed. There might have been some Chan monastic codes as early as the Tang dynasty, influenced by such Chinese codes as DAO'AN's (312-384) Sengni guifan ("Standards for Monks and Nuns") or DAOXUAN's (596-667) Jiaojie xinxue biqiu xinghu lüyi ("Exhortation on Manners and Etiquette for Novices in Training"). However, the oldest surviving Chan code is the CHANYUAN QINGGUI compiled by the YUNMEN ZONG master CHANGLU ZONGZE (d. c. 1107). These types of texts were typically composed by the founding abbots of monasteries and thus include their vision of how monks in their monasteries should conduct themselves. These codes deal with daily routines in the monastery, monthly schedules, annual festivals, titles and duties of the administrative monks in the monastery, and outlines of various religious services. They may also include monastic rules and regulations related to state policies regarding SAMGHA administration, such as rules on travel permits and the election of abbots. The codes differed in content, since each monastery compiled its own in accord with its own needs, e.g., as to whether it was a public or private monastery. For this reason, the Yuan Emperor Shun (r. 1333-1368) eventually compiled a unified code based on the rules attributed to Baizhang, entitled the Chixiu Baizhang qinggui. Although the term qinggui originally referred to the monastic codes associated with the Chan school, it later came to be used as a general term for the monastic codes used by other schools, such as in the TIANTAI monk Ziqing's (fl. fourteenth century) Jiaoyuan qinggui ("Pure Rules for the Garden of Doctrine") compiled in 1347. See also BCA' YIG.

Rang 'byung rdo rje. (Rangjung Dorje) (1284-1339). A Tibetan Buddhist master recognized as the third KARMA PA, renowned for his erudition and his knowledge of practice traditions based on both new translation (GSAR MA) and old translation (RNYING MA) tantras. He was born either in the Skyid rong Valley or in the western Tibetan region of Ding ri and, according to traditional sources, as a child, was known for his exceptional perspicacity. The DEB THER SNGON PO ("Blue Annals") records that as a five-year-old boy, he met O RGYAN PA RIN CHEN DPAL, his principal guru, who recognized the young boy as the reincarnation of his teacher KARMA PAKSHI when the child climbed up on a high seat that had been prepared for O rgyan pa Rin chen dpal and declared himself to have been Karma Pakshi in his previous life (this was before the institution of incarnate lamas was established in Tibet). Rang 'byung rdo rje trained first at MTSHUR PHU monastery. He also studied with teachers from GSANG PHU and JO NANG. His collected works include explanations of the major YOGĀCĀRA and MADHYAMAKA treatises and commentaries and rituals based on the CAKRASAMVARA, HEVAJRA, GUHYASAMĀJA, and KĀLACAKRA tantras. According to his traditional biographies, while in retreat, he had a vision of VIMALAMITRA and PADMASAMBHAVA in which he received the complete transmission of the Rnying ma tantras. He received instructions on the RDZOGS CHEN doctrine from Rig 'dzin Gzhon nu rgyal po, and wrote short works on rdzogs chen. He also discovered a treasure text (GTER MA), known as the Karma snying thig. He was a renowned poet and wrote important works on GCOD practice. The third Karma pa was also a skilled physician and astrologer. He developed a new system of astrology known as Mtshur rtsi, or "Mtshur phu astrology," on the basis of which a new Tibetan calendar was formulated and promulgated at Mtshur phu monastery. In 1331, he was summoned to the court of the Yuan emperor Tugh Temür, but stopped enroute when he correctly interpreted portents that the emperor had died. He later traveled to the Mongol capital of Daidu (modern Beijing) during the reign of Togon Temür, for whom he procured an elixir of long life. After returning to Tibet, he was summoned once again to the Mongol capital, where he passed away while meditating in a three-dimensional CakrasaMvara MAndALA. Rang 'byung rdo rje's writings include the influential tantric work Zab mo nang don ("Profound Inner Meaning"). It is said that his image appeared in the full moon on the evening of his death, and illustrations of the third Karma pa often portray him seated amid a lunar disk.

Recognition - 1. recording a business occurrence in the accounting records. An example is recognising an unrealised loss on an investment portfolio at year-end, when aggregate market value is below cost. In this case, the transaction is recognised even though realisation (sale) has not occurred. Or 2. ascertaining the particulars of an item (i.e., amount, timing) before accepting and recording it.

Reconciliation – Refers to the changing, altering or adjusting of difference that exist between two or more items so that the data agrees. e.g. a bank reconciliation is conducted to ensure a businesses records agree with the banks records of the business activities.

Reconciling- This is the process of ensuring accounts are accurate by comparing a businesses records with documents sent by a third party i.e. a bank statement.

record ::: (data, database, programming) An ordered set of fields, usually stored contiguously. The term is used with similar meaning in several different always called a row. Some programming languages use the term to mean a type composed of fields of several other types (C calls this a struct).In all these cases, a record represents an entity with certain field values.Fields may be of a fixed width (bits or characters) or they may be separated by a delimiter character, often comma (CSV) or HT (TSV).In a database the list of values of a given field from all records is called a column.(2002-03-22)

record "data, database, programming" An {ordered set} of {fields}, usually stored contiguously. The term is used with similar meaning in several different contexts. In a file, a "record" probably has some fixed length, in contrast to a "line" which may have any length and is terminated by some {End Of Line} sequence). A {database} record is also called a "row". In a {spreadsheet} it is always called a "row". Some programming languages use the term to mean a type composed of fields of several other types ({C} calls this a "{struct}"). In all these cases, a record represents an entity with certain field values. Fields may be of a fixed width ({bits} or {characters}) or they may be separated by a {delimiter} character, often {comma} ({CSV}) or {HT} ({TSV}). In a database the list of values of a given field from all records is called a column. (2002-03-22)

recorder ::: a person who records in writing, such as an official or historian.

recorder ::: n. --> One who records; specifically, a person whose official duty it is to make a record of writings or transactions.
The title of the chief judical officer of some cities and boroughs; also, of the chief justice of an East Indian settlement. The Recorder of London is judge of the Lord Mayor&


recording ::: that records, sets down in writing or commits to memory for the purpose of preserving information.

Record Management Services "operating system" (RMS) Procedures in the {VMS} {operating system} that {programs} call to process {files} and {records} within files. RMS allows programs to issue GET and PUT requests at the record level (record I/O) as well as read and write {blocks} (block I/O). VMS RMS is an integral part of the system software; its procedures run in {executive mode}. (2003-11-11)

Record Management Services ::: (operating system) (RMS) Procedures in the VMS operating system that programs call to process files and records within files. RMS allows programs to write blocks (block I/O). VMS RMS is an integral part of the system software; its procedures run in executive mode.(2003-11-11)

record ::: n. **1. An account, as of information or facts, set down especially in writing as a means of preserving knowledge. 2. Information or knowledge preserved in writing or the like. records. v. 3. To set down or register in some permanent form. records, recorded.**

Records of ancient medicine in Babylonia, Egypt, Greece, etc., tell of the temples being used as hospitals, with priest-physicians supported by the state giving every care to the sick who came, both rich and poor. In addition to material means of treatment — many of which we have rediscovered — these devotees of the gods of healing used special incense, prayers, the “temple sleep,” invocations, music, astrology, etc., which we regard as harmless superstition of an earlier day. However, such conditions, intelligently adapted to each case, in making a pure, serene, uplifting atmosphere around the sick person, would invoke the influences of wholeness within and without him. By putting the inner man in tune with his body, his disordered nature-forces manifesting as disease would tend to flow freely in the currents of health. Natural magic is as practical as the unknown alchemy which transmutes our digested daily bread into molecules of our living body.

registrar ::: n. --> One who registers; a recorder; a keeper of records; as, a registrar of births, deaths, and marriages. See Register, n., 3.

relational database "database" (RDBMS - relational database management system) A {database} based on the {relational model} developed by {E.F. Codd}. A relational database allows the definition of data structures, storage and retrieval operations and {integrity constraints}. In such a database the data and relations between them are organised in {tables}. A table is a collection of rows or {records} and each row in a table contains the same {fields}. Certain fields may be designated as {keys}, which means that searches for specific values of that field will use indexing to speed them up. Where fields in two different tables take values from the same set, a {join} operation can be performed to select related records in the two tables by matching values in those fields. Often, but not always, the fields will have the same name in both tables. For example, an "orders" table might contain (customer_id, product_code) pairs and a "products" table might contain (product_code, price) pairs so to calculate a given customer's bill you would sum the prices of all products ordered by that customer by joining on the product-code fields of the two tables. This can be extended to joining multiple tables on multiple fields. Because these relationships are only specified at retreival time, relational databases are classed as {dynamic database management system}. The first commercial RDBMS was the {Multics Relational Data Store}, first sold in 1978. {INGRES}, {Oracle}, {Sybase, Inc.}, {Microsoft Access}, and {Microsoft SQL Server} are well-known database products and companies. Others include {PostgreSQL}, {SQL/DS}, and {RDB}. ["Managing Data Bases, Four Critical Factors" Michael M. Gorman, QED Information Sciences, Inc.]. ["An Introduction To Database Systems" (6th ed) C. J. Date, Addison Wesley (an excellent source of detailed info)]. ["An End-User's Guide to Data Base" James Martin, Prentice Hall (excellent place to begin learning about DBMS)]. (2002-06-10)

relational database ::: (database) (RDBMS - relational database management system) A database based on the relational model developed by E.F. Codd. A relational database which means that searches for specific values of that field will use indexing to speed them up.Where fields in two different tables take values from the same set, a join operation can be performed to select related records in the two tables by retreival time, relational databases are classed as dynamic database management system.The first commercial RDBMS was the Multics Relational Data Store, first sold in 1978.INGRES, Oracle, Sybase, Inc., Microsoft Access, and Microsoft SQL Server are well-known database products and companies. Others include PostgreSQL, SQL/DS, and RDB.[Managing Data Bases, Four Critical Factors Michael M. Gorman, QED Information Sciences, Inc.].[An Introduction To Database Systems (6th ed) C. J. Date, Addison Wesley (an excellent source of detailed info)].[An End-User's Guide to Data Base James Martin, Prentice Hall (excellent place to begin learning about DBMS)].(2002-06-10)

Reliability - 1. in auditing, confidence that the financial records have been properly prepared and that accounting procedures and internal controls are correctly functioning. Or 2. in financial accounting theory, term describing information that is reasonably free from error and bias and accurately presents the facts. Verifiabilityexists when a reconstruction of financial data, following acceptable accounting practices, results in the same actual results previously attained; further, two accountants working independently will come up with similar results. Or 3. probability that a product or process will perform satisfactorily over a period of time under specified operating conditions.

Reliability concept – This concept refers to the quality of the accounting information that allows the decision makers to be assured that the information being represented in the relevant financial records and associated financial statements truly captures the actual operating and other conditions and events of the reported business.

Rin chen bzang po. [alt. Lo tsā ba chen po, Lo chen] (Rinchen Sangpo) (958-1055). A Tibetan translator of Sanskrit Buddhist texts who helped to initiate the revival of Buddhism in Tibet known as the later dissemination (PHYI DAR) of the dharma. He was born in the western Tibetan region of GU GE. According to traditional histories, at the age of seventeen, he was sent to India together with a group of twenty other youths by King YE SHES 'OD to study Sanskrit and Indian vernacular languages. Rin chen bzang po made several trips to India, spending a total of seventeen years in Kashmir and the monastic university of VIKRAMAsĪLA before returning the Tibet. During the last years of his life, he collaborated with the Bengali master ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNĀNA at THO LING monastery. Rin chen bzang po's literary career concentrated on new and revised translations of important Indian Buddhist works; he is credited with 178 translations spanning the SuTRAs, TANTRAs, and commentarial literature. Apart from his literary activities, he also brought with him numerous artisans and craftsmen from Kashmir and, with their aid, was highly active in the construction of new monasteries, temples, and shrines across western Tibet. These institutions, and the artwork they house, were strongly influenced by the artistic styles and religious practices of northwest India and now serve as important records of a tradition otherwise nearly lost. Most important among these temples are Tho ling, KHA CHAR, and NYAR MA, although tradition ascribes him with founding 108 buildings in all. Rin chen bzang po is still considered a local hero in the regions of western Tibet, Ladakh, Lahul, Spiti, and Kinnaur, and the current reincarnation, LO CHEN SPRUL SKU, maintains his monastic seat at Kyi monastery in Spiti.

RTL/2 Real Time Language. A small {real-time} language based on {ALGOL 68}, with {separate compilation} designed by J.G.P. Barnes of ICI in 1972 as a successor to {RTL/1}. A program is composed of separately compilable modules called "bricks" which may be datablocks, procedures or stack. A stack is a storage area for use as a workspace by a task. The language is {block-structured} and {weakly typed}. Simple types are byte, int, frac and real. There are no {Booleans}. Compound types may be formed from {arrays}, {records} and {refs} (pointers). There are no user-defined types. Control statements are if-then-elseif-else-end, for-to-by-do-rep, block-endblock, switch, goto, and label variables. ["RTL/2: Design and Philosophy", J.G.P. Barnes, Hayden & Son, 1976].

saga "jargon" (WPI) A {cuspy} but bogus raving story about N {random} broken people. Here is a classic example of the saga form, as told by {Guy Steele} (GLS): Jon L. White (login name JONL) and I (GLS) were office mates at {MIT} for many years. One April, we both flew from Boston to California for a week on research business, to consult face-to-face with some people at {Stanford}, particularly our mutual friend {Richard Gabriel} (RPG). RPG picked us up at the San Francisco airport and drove us back to {Palo Alto} (going {logical} south on route 101, parallel to {El Camino Bignum}). Palo Alto is adjacent to Stanford University and about 40 miles south of San Francisco. We ate at The Good Earth, a "health food" restaurant, very popular, the sort whose milkshakes all contain honey and protein powder. JONL ordered such a shake - the waitress claimed the flavour of the day was "lalaberry". I still have no idea what that might be, but it became a running joke. It was the colour of raspberry, and JONL said it tasted rather bitter. I ate a better tostada there than I have ever had in a Mexican restaurant. After this we went to the local Uncle Gaylord's Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor. They make ice cream fresh daily, in a variety of intriguing flavours. It's a chain, and they have a slogan: "If you don't live near an Uncle Gaylord's - MOVE!" Also, Uncle Gaylord (a real person) wages a constant battle to force big-name ice cream makers to print their ingredients on the package (like air and plastic and other non-natural garbage). JONL and I had first discovered Uncle Gaylord's the previous August, when we had flown to a computer-science conference in {Berkeley}, California, the first time either of us had been on the West Coast. When not in the conference sessions, we had spent our time wandering the length of Telegraph Avenue, which (like Harvard Square in Cambridge) was lined with picturesque street vendors and interesting little shops. On that street we discovered Uncle Gaylord's Berkeley store. The ice cream there was very good. During that August visit JONL went absolutely bananas (so to speak) over one particular flavour, ginger honey. Therefore, after eating at The Good Earth - indeed, after every lunch and dinner and before bed during our April visit --- a trip to Uncle Gaylord's (the one in Palo Alto) was mandatory. We had arrived on a Wednesday, and by Thursday evening we had been there at least four times. Each time, JONL would get ginger honey ice cream, and proclaim to all bystanders that "Ginger was the spice that drove the Europeans mad! That's why they sought a route to the East! They used it to preserve their otherwise off-taste meat." After the third or fourth repetition RPG and I were getting a little tired of this spiel, and began to paraphrase him: "Wow! Ginger! The spice that makes rotten meat taste good!" "Say! Why don't we find some dog that's been run over and sat in the sun for a week and put some *ginger* on it for dinner?!" "Right! With a lalaberry shake!" And so on. This failed to faze JONL; he took it in good humour, as long as we kept returning to Uncle Gaylord's. He loves ginger honey ice cream. Now RPG and his then-wife KBT (Kathy Tracy) were putting us up (putting up with us?) in their home for our visit, so to thank them JONL and I took them out to a nice French restaurant of their choosing. I unadventurously chose the filet mignon, and KBT had je ne sais quoi du jour, but RPG and JONL had lapin (rabbit). (Waitress: "Oui, we have fresh rabbit, fresh today." RPG: "Well, JONL, I guess we won't need any *ginger*!") We finished the meal late, about 11 P.M., which is 2 A.M Boston time, so JONL and I were rather droopy. But it wasn't yet midnight. Off to Uncle Gaylord's! Now the French restaurant was in Redwood City, north of Palo Alto. In leaving Redwood City, we somehow got onto route 101 going north instead of south. JONL and I wouldn't have known the difference had RPG not mentioned it. We still knew very little of the local geography. I did figure out, however, that we were headed in the direction of Berkeley, and half-jokingly suggested that we continue north and go to Uncle Gaylord's in Berkeley. RPG said "Fine!" and we drove on for a while and talked. I was drowsy, and JONL actually dropped off to sleep for 5 minutes. When he awoke, RPG said, "Gee, JONL, you must have slept all the way over the bridge!", referring to the one spanning San Francisco Bay. Just then we came to a sign that said "University Avenue". I mumbled something about working our way over to Telegraph Avenue; RPG said "Right!" and maneuvered some more. Eventually we pulled up in front of an Uncle Gaylord's. Now, I hadn't really been paying attention because I was so sleepy, and I didn't really understand what was happening until RPG let me in on it a few moments later, but I was just alert enough to notice that we had somehow come to the Palo Alto Uncle Gaylord's after all. JONL noticed the resemblance to the Palo Alto store, but hadn't caught on. (The place is lit with red and yellow lights at night, and looks much different from the way it does in daylight.) He said, "This isn't the Uncle Gaylord's I went to in Berkeley! It looked like a barn! But this place looks *just like* the one back in Palo Alto!" RPG deadpanned, "Well, this is the one *I* always come to when I'm in Berkeley. They've got two in San Francisco, too. Remember, they're a chain." JONL accepted this bit of wisdom. And he was not totally ignorant - he knew perfectly well that University Avenue was in Berkeley, not far from Telegraph Avenue. What he didn't know was that there is a completely different University Avenue in Palo Alto. JONL went up to the counter and asked for ginger honey. The guy at the counter asked whether JONL would like to taste it first, evidently their standard procedure with that flavour, as not too many people like it. JONL said, "I'm sure I like it. Just give me a cone." The guy behind the counter insisted that JONL try just a taste first. "Some people think it tastes like soap." JONL insisted, "Look, I *love* ginger. I eat Chinese food. I eat raw ginger roots. I already went through this hassle with the guy back in Palo Alto. I *know* I like that flavour!" At the words "back in Palo Alto" the guy behind the counter got a very strange look on his face, but said nothing. KBT caught his eye and winked. Through my stupor I still hadn't quite grasped what was going on, and thought RPG was rolling on the floor laughing and clutching his stomach just because JONL had launched into his spiel ("makes rotten meat a dish for princes") for the forty-third time. At this point, RPG clued me in fully. RPG, KBT, and I retreated to a table, trying to stifle our chuckles. JONL remained at the counter, talking about ice cream with the guy b.t.c., comparing Uncle Gaylord's to other ice cream shops and generally having a good old time. At length the g.b.t.c. said, "How's the ginger honey?" JONL said, "Fine! I wonder what exactly is in it?" Now Uncle Gaylord publishes all his recipes and even teaches classes on how to make his ice cream at home. So the g.b.t.c. got out the recipe, and he and JONL pored over it for a while. But the g.b.t.c. could contain his curiosity no longer, and asked again, "You really like that stuff, huh?" JONL said, "Yeah, I've been eating it constantly back in Palo Alto for the past two days. In fact, I think this batch is about as good as the cones I got back in Palo Alto!" G.b.t.c. looked him straight in the eye and said, "You're *in* Palo Alto!" JONL turned slowly around, and saw the three of us collapse in a fit of giggles. He clapped a hand to his forehead and exclaimed, "I've been hacked!" [My spies on the West Coast inform me that there is a close relative of the raspberry found out there called an "ollalieberry" - ESR] [Ironic footnote: it appears that the {meme} about ginger vs. rotting meat may be an urban legend. It's not borne out by an examination of mediaeval recipes or period purchase records for spices, and appears full-blown in the works of Samuel Pegge, a gourmand and notorious flake case who originated numerous food myths. - ESR] [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-08)

Sales invoice – The source document which records the sale of an item on credit from a firm to the customer.

Samayabhedoparacanacakra. (T. Gzhung tha dad pa rim par bklag pa'i 'khor lo; C. Yibuzonglun lun; J. Ibushurinron; K. Ibujongnyun non 異部宗輪論). In Sanskrit, "The Wheel of the Formations of Divisions of the Doctrine"; the title of an important historiographical text written by VASUMITRA, a prominent scholar of the SARVĀSTIVĀDA school, who wrote in KASHMIR sometime around the second century CE. The text records the Sarvāstivāda account of the evolution of the various schools (NIKĀYA) that arose in the mainstream Buddhist community in the years after the Buddha's death. Thus, it is an important source of information on the schools and subschools of mainstream Nikāya Buddhism in ancient India. In VASUMITRA's version, the divisions in the Buddhist sects occur roughly one hundred years later than they do in the Sinhalese Pāli records of the same events. According to Vasumitra, the major disagreement that led to the first major schism in the SAMGHA was the result of five propositions put forward by the monk MAHĀDEVA concerning the nature and achievements of an ARHAT. The MAHĀSĀMGHIKA agreed with Mahādeva's five theses, while the STHAVIRANIKĀYA did not, thus leading to the split.

SaMghabhadra. (T. 'Dus bzang; C. Zhongxian; J. Shugen; K. Chunghyon 衆賢) (c. fifth century CE). In Sanskrit, "Auspicious to the Community"; the proper name of an influential Indian master of the VAIBHĀsIKA school of SARVĀSTIVĀDA ABHIDHARMA. Historical sources suggest that SaMghabhadra hailed from KASHMIR and was a younger contemporary of his principal rival VASUBANDHU. The historical records of XUANZANG and PARAMĀRTHA agree that SaMghabhadra publicly challenged Vasubandhu to debate, but his challenge was never accepted. SaMghabhadra's most famous works include the *NYĀYĀNUSĀRA, or "Conformity with Correct Principle," and the *Abhidharmasamayapradīpikā (C. Xianzong lun), or "Exposition of Accepted Doctrine." The *Nyāyānusāra is both a clarification of the ABHIDHARMA philosophy of the Vaibhāsika school and a critical commentary on the presentation found in Vasubandhu's ABHIDHARMAKOsABHĀsYA. The later Samayapradīpikā is a shorter explanation of the doctrines of the Vaibhāsikas, which in large measure summarizes the positions explored in the *Nyāyānusāra. Neither of these works survives in their Sanskrit originals but only in their Chinese translations. SaMghabhadra's defense of Kashmir Sarvāstivāda-Vaibhāsika positions ushered in the neo-Vaibhāsika period of Sarvāstivāda thought, which took the *Nyāyānusāra and the Samayapradīpikā as its main texts.

Samguk yusa. (三國遺事). In Korean, "Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms"; a collection of historical records and legends from the Three Kingdoms period in Korea, attributed to the Korean monk IRYoN (1206-1289), although the extant version may well have been expanded and emended by one of his disciples. The Samguk yusa was written c. 1282-1289, during the period of Mongol suzerainty over Korea, which began in 1259. In his miscellany, Iryon includes a variety of hagiographies of eminent monks in the early Korean Buddhist tradition, often drawing from local accounts of conduct (haengjang) rather than official biographies, and from stories of early Korean Buddhist miracles and anomalies drawn from regional lore. In its emphasis on local narrative, where Buddhism dominated, over official discourse, Iryon's Samguk yusa contrasts with Kim Pusik's (1075-1151) earlier Samguk sagi ("Historical Annals of the Three Kingdoms"), which included little information on Buddhism. The text is divided into nine sections, in five rolls: a dynastic chronology of early Korean kingdoms; "wonders" from the three kingdoms of Koguryo, Paekche, and Silla and their predecessor states; the rise of Buddhism; STuPAs and images; exegetes; divine spells; miraculous responses of bodhisattvas; the lives of recluses; and expressions of filial piety. The dynastic chronology that appears at the beginning of the definitive 1512 edition of the text contains several discrepancies with information that appears later in the text and may be a later addition from the fourteenth century. The Samguk yusa also makes one of the earliest references to the Tan'gun foundation myth of the Korean state and contains many indigenous Korean songs known as hyangga.

Sanboe. (三宝絵). In Japanese, "The Three Jewels," a work composed by Minamoto Tamenori (d. 1011); also known as Sanboekotoba. In this preface, Tamenori laments the fact that the world has now entered into the age of the final dharma (J. mappo; see C. MOFA) and speaks of the need to honor the DHARMA. Tamenori's text largely consists of three sections corresponding to the three jewels (RATNATRAYA), namely the Buddha, dharma, and saMgha. In the buddha-jewel section, Tamenori provides JĀTAKA stories from various sources. In the dharma-jewel section, he describes the history of Buddhism in Japan from the rise of SHoTOKU TAISHI (574-622) to the end of the Nara period. In the saMgha-jewel section, Tamenori relies on many temple records and texts to speak of the representative ceremonies and rituals of Japanese Buddhism, their provenance, and the biographies of some important monks who carried out these events. The Sanboe serves as a valuable source for studying the history of Buddhism during the Nara period.

SāNcī. A famous STuPA or CAITYA about six miles southwest of Vidisā in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh; often seen transcribed as Sanchi. The SāNcī stupa and its surrounding compound is one of the best-preserved Buddhist archeological sites in the world and is well known for its many monasteries, reliquaries, pillars, and stone relief carvings. SāNcī was an active site of worship and pilgrimage in India between the third century BCE and the twelfth century CE. However, unlike other pilgrimage sites such as SĀRNĀTH and BODHGAYĀ, SāNcī is not known to be a place that was associated with the historical Buddha and there are no records or stories of the Buddha himself ever visiting the site. The emperor AsOKA is credited with laying the foundation of the compound by erecting a stupa and a pillar on the site. Other stories mention a Vidisā woman whom Asoka married, called Vidisā Devī, who was a devout Buddhist; according to tradition, she was the one who initiated construction of a Buddhist monastery at the site. When Asoka ascended the throne at PĀtALIPUTRA, she did not accompany him to the capital, but remained behind in her hometown and later became a nun. SāNcī and the nearby city of Vidisā were located near the junction of two important trading routes, and the city's wealthy merchants munificently supported its monasteries and religious sites. Structures erected during the rule of the sungas and the sātavāhanas still stand today, and the area flourished after 400 CE during the reign of the Guptas. SāNcī subsequently fell into a lengthy decline and seems to have been completely deserted at least by the end of the thirteenth century. The site was rediscovered in 1818 by a certain British General Taylor, who excavated the western section of the stupa; his archeological work was continued by F. C. Maisay and Alexander Cunningham, who discovered relics (sARĪRA) believed to be those of the Buddha's two major disciples sĀRIPUTRA and MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA in the center of the dome of the main stupa. There was ongoing controversy within different divisions of the British colonial government over whether or not SāNcī artifacts should be shipped to British museums; finally, in 1861, the Archeological Survey of India was established and the area was preserved and protected. See also NĀSIK.

Scheme-to-C "language" A {Scheme} {compiler} written in {C} that emits C and is embeddable in C. Scheme-to-C was written by Joel Bartlett of {Digital Western Research Laboratory}. Version 15mar93 translates a superset of Revised**4 Scheme to C that is then compiled by the {native} {C} compiler for the {target machine}. This design results in a portable system that allows either stand-alone Scheme programs or programs written in both compiled and interpreted Scheme and other languages. It supports "{expansion passing style}" {macros}, {foreign function} calls, {records}, and interfaces to {Xlib} ({Ezd} and {Scix}). Scheme-to-C runs on {VAX}, {ULTRIX}, {DECstation}, {Alpha AXP} {OSF}/1, {Windows 3.1}, {Apple Macintosh} 7.1, {HP 9000/300}, {HP 9000/700}, {Sony News}, {SGI} {Iris} and {Harris} {Nighthawk}, and other {Unix}-like {88000} systems. The earlier 01nov91 version runs on {Amiga}, {SunOS}, {NeXT}, and {Apollo} systems. {(ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/DEC/Scheme-to-C/)}. (2000-05-24)

Scheme-to-C ::: (language) A Scheme compiler written in C that emits C and is embeddable in C. Scheme-to-C was written by Joel Bartlett of Digital Western Research supports expansion passing style macros, foreign function calls, records, and interfaces to Xlib (Ezd and Scix).Scheme-to-C runs on VAX, ULTRIX, DECstation, Alpha AXP OSF/1, Windows 3.1, Apple Macintosh 7.1, HP 9000/300, HP 9000/700, Sony News, SGI Iris and Harris Nighthawk, and other Unix-like 88000 systems. The earlier 01nov91 version runs on Amiga, SunOS, NeXT, and Apollo systems. .(2000-05-24)

secretariate ::: n. --> The office of a secretary; the place where a secretary transacts business, keeps records, etc.

secretary ::: n. --> One who keeps, or is intrusted with, secrets.

A person employed to write orders, letters, dispatches, public or private papers, records, and the like; an official scribe, amanuensis, or writer; one who attends to correspondence, and transacts other business, for an association, a public body, or an individual.
An officer of state whose business is to superintend and manage the affairs of a particular department of government, and who is usually a member of the cabinet or advisory council of the chief


Sengcan. (J. Sosan; K. Sŭngch'an 僧粲) (d. 606?). Chinese monk and reputed third patriarch of the CHAN tradition. Although the influential Chan poem XINXIN MING ("Faith in Mind") is attributed to Sengcan, little is actually known of this mysterious figure, and he may simply have been a later invention created to connect the BODHIDHARMA-HUIKE line of early Chan with the East Mountain teachings (DONGSHAN FAMEN) of DAOXIN (580-651) and HONGREN (602-675). Most of what is known of Sengcan is constructed retrospectively in such early Chan genealogical histories as the BAOLIN ZHUAN, LENGQIE SHIZI JI, CHUAN FABAO JI, and LIDAI FABAO JI, and in later Chan histories known as "transmission of the lamplight records" (CHUANDENG LU). Sengcan is claimed to have studied under Huike, the first Chinese disciple of the Chan founder, Bodhidharma, and the second patriarch of the Chan school. During Emperor Wu's (r. 502-549) persecution of Buddhism, Sengcan is said to have gone into hiding and later resided on Mt. Sikong in Shuzhou (present-day Anhui province). The Lengqie shizi ji and Chuan fabao ji claim that Daoxin became Sengcan's disciple sometime in the late-sixth century, but Daoxin's connection to this dubious figure is tenuous at best and most probably spurious. Sengcan was later given the posthumous title Chan Master Jingzhi (Mirror-like Wisdom).

sequential file matching ::: A programming technique that matches records in one sequential file with records in another sequential file. The records are accessed in the physical order in which they are stored. (1994-11-02)

sequential file matching A programming technique that matches records in one sequential file with records in another sequential file. The records are accessed in the physical order in which they are stored. (1994-11-02)

shuilu hui. (J. suirikue; K. suryuk hoe 水陸會). In Chinese, "water and land assembly," a Buddhist ritual intended for universal salvation, although it was also sometimes directed only to deceased next of kin; the ceremony was also performed for a variety of this-worldly purposes, such as state protection (see HUGUO FOJIAO) and rain-making. The name "water and land" derives from its intent to save living creatures who inhabit the most painful domains of SAMSĀRA, whether in water or on land. The ceremony, which typically took seven days to complete, was held at two different sites, the inner altar and the outer altar. The main performance was held at the inner altar, which was divided into an upper hall and a lower hall. The enlightened beings-buddhas, BODHISATTVAs, ARHATs, and guardian deities of the three jewels (RATNATRAYA)-were invited and feted with offerings at the upper hall; the unenlightened beings, specifically beings subject to the six rebirth destinies (GATI), were invited and feted at the lower hall. Once summoned to the lower hall at the inner altar, the unenlightened assembly was divested of its afflictions (KLEsA), asked to pay homage to the enlightened assembly, and received offerings of both food and the dharma, which sent them on their way to the PURE LAND. According to the earliest extant records of the ceremony, none of which predate the Song period, the shuilu hui was first performed in 505 by the monk BAOZHI (418-514) at the behest of Emperor Wu (r. 502-549) of the Liang dynasty, with the VINAYA master and scriptural cataloguer SENGYOU (445-518) serving as chief celebrant. The same Song-period sources claim that the ceremony was revived by a monk during the Xianheng era (670-674), after its sudden disappearance following the collapse of the Liang dynasty. It was not until the tenth century, however, that there is independent confirmation in non-Buddhist sources of actual performances of the ceremony and it was not until the eleventh century that it seems to have achieved widespread popularity. According to the monk Zunshi (964-1032), the larger monasteries in the southeast of China maintained separate halls, called either shuilu tang or shuilu yuan, which were devoted entirely to the performance of the ceremony. In the Southern Song period, many of the largest monasteries throughout the realm had a "water and land hall" on their grounds. In Korea, the suryuk hoe was first performed in 971 and became popular during the early Choson dynasty, with the royal family being its main supporter. There are several Chinese and Korean manuals that provide directions for performing the ritual, including the Shuilu yiwen ("Ritual Text for the Water and Land Ceremony") in three rolls, written by a Song-dynasty layman in 1071. The canonical locus classicus for the practice is the story of Jalavāhana in the SUVARnAPRABHĀSOTTAMASuTRA.

Sibylline Oracles Early Christian ecclesiastical literature written in imitation of the archaic Sibylline Books, containing apparently no small amount of material derived from pagan sources. They mostly belong, as far as is now known, to the 2nd and 3rd centuries and are strongly colored by Jewish and Christian ideas; what is called Book IV of these is a virtual attack on the integrity of the archaic heathen sibyls, the records of which the writers of the Christian Sibylline Oracles nevertheless so closely imitated in many respects.

skippet ::: n. --> A small boat; a skiff.
A small round box for keeping records.


smart card ::: Any plastic card (like a credit card) with an embedded integrated circuit for storing information.Smart cards are being incorporated into soldier's dog-tags and used to store hospital patients' medical records. This way they are always instantly accessible.Other uses are as a form of token in banking systems. You could store electronic money on the card or less valuable tokens such as those given away by petrol being that one smart card is easier to carry around than a multitude of paper tokens.alt.technology.smartcards (1995-01-06)

smart card Any plastic card (like a credit card) with an embedded {integrated circuit} for storing information. Smart cards are being incorporated into soldier's dog-tags and used to store hospital patients' medical records. This way they are always instantly accessible. Other uses are as a form of token in banking systems. You could store electronic money on the card or less valuable tokens such as those given away by petrol companies which you collect to exchange for free gifts at a later date. The idea being that one smart card is easier to carry around than a multitude of paper tokens. {news:alt.technology.smartcards} (1995-01-06)

Sod occurs frequently in the Old Testament, translated as secret or assembly, where Mysteries would be a more correct rendering: e.g., “Jacob called unto his sons, and said . . . Simeon and Levi are brethren; instruments of cruelty are in their habitations. . . . come not thou into their secret; unto their assembly” (Genesis 49:1, 5-6). The Bible is “a series of historical records of the great struggle between white and black Magic, between the Adepts of the right path, the Prophets, and those of the left, the Levites, the clergy of the brutal masses. . . . The great schism that arose between the sons of the Fourth Race, as soon as the first Temples and Halls of Initiation had been erected under the guidance of ‘the Sons of God,’ is allegorized in the Sons of Jacob. That there were two schools of Magic, and that the orthodox Levites did not belong to the holy one, is shown in the words pronounced by the dying Jacob” (SD 2:211).

Son'ga kwigam. (C. Chanjia guijian; J. Zenke kikan 禪家龜鑑). In Korean, "Mirror of the Son House"; one of the most widely read SoN texts not only in Korea but also in Japan and China, composed by the Choson-period Son master CH'oNGHo HYUJoNG (1520-1604), a.k.a. SoSAN TAESA, to whom most modern Korean Son teachers trace their lineage. Hyujong composed the text around 1564 by adding his own commentary to excerpts he had culled from about fifty different Buddhist scriptures and CHAN and Son texts. The text was originally written in literary Chinese, but was first published in a 1569 Korean vernacular (onhae) edition. The first literary Chinese edition was published in 1579; the Chinese edition was introduced into China and Japan and has been frequently reprinted since in all three countries. The text is also included as the last section of Hyujong's Samga kwigam ("Mirror of the Three Houses" [of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism]), but that version records only the excerpts without Hyujong's commentary. Hyujong wrote the Son'ga kwigam as a concise primer of Korean Buddhist doctrines and practices for his students. According to Hyujong's preface and the postface of his disciple SAMYoNG YUJoNG (1544-1610), the primary motive for composing the text was to advocate the fundamental harmony between Son and the scriptural teachings of Buddhism (KYO). While supporting the unity between these two major strands of the Buddhist tradition, Hyujong's treatment ultimately subordinates Kyo beliefs to Son practices. This approach is adopted from that of the eminent Koryo state preceptor POJO CHINUL (1158-1210). In particular, the text proposes the practical model of "relinquishing Kyo and entering into Son" (sagyo ipson), by integrating doctrinal studies and the technique of "questioning meditation" (K. kanhwa Son; C. KANHUA CHAN) into Chinul's preferred soteriological schema of sudden awakening/gradual cultivation (K. tono chomsu; C. DUNWU JIANXIU). In addition, the Son'ga kwigam also offers the technique of reciting the name of the buddha AMITĀBHA (K. yombul; C. NIANFO) as an alternative practice for those of inferior spiritual capacity who are not yet able to cultivate the kanhwa Son technique. The text also outlines the styles and lineages of the "five houses" (see WU JIA QI ZONG) of the mature Chan school: in particular, the text promotes the LINJI ZONG as the true heir of the sixth patriarch (LIUZU) of Chan, HUINENG (638-713), and presents a different lineage from the traditional one by suggesting that the four Chan lineages of Linji zong, GUIYANG ZONG, FAYAN ZONG, and YUNMEN ZONG all originated from MAZU DAOYI (707-788). The text thus provides a basic framework for the doctrines and practices that most of the modern Korean tradition follows, and thus remains widely read and studied in Korea today.

Song gaoseng zhuan. (J. So kosoden; K. Song kosŭng chon 宋高僧傳). In Chinese, "Biographies of Eminent Monks [compiled during the] Song dynasty"; a thirty-roll hagiographical collection compiled by the Buddhist historian and VINAYA master ZANNING (919-1001). The compilation of the text began in 980 by Song-dynasty imperial edict and was entered into the official canon (DAZANGJING) in 988. The text records the lives of monks who primarily were active during the period between the early Tang dynasty and the early Song, or some 340 years after the period covered by DAOXUAN's (596-667) XU GAOSENG ZHUAN ("Continued Biographies of Eminent Monks"). The Song gaoseng zhuan contains 531 major and 124 appended biographies, for a total of 655 biographies. The text offers valuable material on the Buddhist history of the Tang dynasty, including information that is not recorded in the official dynastic history. The collection is organized according to the ten categories of monastic expertise used in Daoxuan's collection: translators (yijing), exegetes (yijie), practitioners of meditation (xichan), specialists in vinaya (minglü), protectors of the DHARMA (hufa), sympathetic resonance (gantong), self-immolators (YISHEN), chanters (dusong), benefactors (xingfu), and miscellaneous (zake). What is noteworthy in comparison to its immediate predecessor is that the number of the monks categorized as exegetes (yijie) was reduced significantly from 246 in Daoxuan's collection to ninety-four in Zanning's. This traditional nonsectarian approach to Buddhist biographical writing was soon supplanted by genealogical collections, such as Daoyuan's (d.u.) 1004 JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, which organized the biographies of Chan monks according to explicit sectarian lineages, and ZHIPAN's (1220-1275) FOZU TONGJI, which did the same for the lineage of the TIANTAI ZONG. The Song gaoseng zhuan is not included in the Korean Buddhist canon (KORYo TAEJANGGYoNG), but does appear in Chinese canons compiled during the Song, Yuan, and Ming periods. Unlike its two predecessor collections, the Song gaoseng zhuan is included in the Qing-dynasty imperial archive, the Siku quanshu ("Complete Library of the Four Repositories"), compiled between 1773 and 1782.

sort 1. "application, algorithm" To arrange a collection of items in some specified order. The items - {records} in a file or data structures in memory - consist of one or more {fields} or members. One of these fields is designated as the "sort key" which means the records will be ordered according to the value of that field. Sometimes a sequence of key fields is specified such that if all earlier keys are equal then the later keys will be compared. Within each field some ordering is imposed, e.g. ascending or descending numerical, {lexical ordering}, or date. Sorting is the subject of a great deal of study since it is a common operation which can consume a lot of computer time. There are many well-known sorting {algorithms} with different time and space behaviour and programming {complexity}. Examples are {quicksort}, {insertion sort}, {bubble sort}, {heap sort}, and {tree sort}. These employ many different data structures to store sorted data, such as {arrays}, {linked lists}, and {binary trees}. 2. "tool" The {Unix} utility program for sorting lines of files. {Unix manual page}: sort(1). (1997-02-12)

sort ::: 1. (application, algorithm) To arrange a collection of items in some specified order. The items - records in a file or data structures in memory - some ordering is imposed, e.g. ascending or descending numerical, lexical ordering, or date.Sorting is the subject of a great deal of study since it is a common operation which can consume a lot of computer time. There are many well-known sorting algorithms with different time and space behaviour and programming complexity.Examples are quicksort, insertion sort, bubble sort, heap sort, and tree sort. These employ many different data structures to store sorted data, such as arrays, linked lists, and binary trees.2. (tool) The Unix utility program for sorting lines of files.Unix manual page: sort(1). (1997-02-12)

Special journals – Refers to a journal which records of original entry other than the general journal that are designed for recording specific types of transactions of similar nature, e.g. sales journal, Purchase Journal, cash receipts journal, cash payments/disbursements journal, and Payroll Journal.

Special Treatment ::: The Nazi euphemism meaning that Jewish men, women, and children were to be methodically killed with poisonous gas. In the exacting records kept at Auschwitz, the cause of death of Jews who had been gassed was indicated by "SB," the first letters of the two words that form Sonderbehandlung, the German term for “Special Treatment.”

Stable monetary unit concept – This concept allows accountants to ignore the effect of inflation in the accounting records.

stable sort "programming, data" A {sort algorithm} that preserves the order of records with equal keys. Stability is only relevant when sorting records (or {objects}) that contain data other than the sort key. (2018-09-05)

static database management system "database" (static DBMS) A {database} consisting of "information-based relationships", one that is rigorously structured to facilitate retrieval and update in terms of inherent relationships. This creates a static environment wherein the locations of the related records are already known. Typical static DBMS are either hierarchical ({IMS}, {System 2000}) or a {CODACYL} (network or plex) DBMS (such as {TOTAL}, {IDMS}, {IDS}, {DMS-2}). These environments facilitate rapid, high volume processing of data. The opposite is a {dynamic database management system}. (1998-10-07)

stupa. (P. thupa; T. mchod rten; C. ta; J. to; K. t'ap 塔). In Sanskrit, "reliquary"; a structure, originally in the shape of a hemispherical mound, that contains the relics (sARĪRA) or possessions of the Buddha or a saint, often contained within a reliquary container. In the MAHĀPARINIBBĀNASUTTA, the Buddha says that after he has passed away, his relics should be enshrined in a stupa erected at a crossroads, and that the stupa should be honored with garlands, incense, and sandalwood paste. Because of a dispute among his lay followers after his death, his relics were said to be divided into ten portions and distributed to ten groups or individuals, each of whom constructed a stupa to enshrine their share of the relics in their home region. Two of these sites were the Buddha's home city of KAPILAVASTU, and KUsINAGARĪ, the place of his death, as well as RĀJAGṚHA and VAIsĀLĪ. The original stupas were later said to have been opened and the relics collected by the emperor AsOKA in the third century BCE so that he could subdivide them for a larger number of stupas in order to accumulate merit and protect his realm. Asoka is said to have had eighty-four thousand stupas constructed. The stupa form eventually spread throughout the Buddhist world (and during the twentieth century into the Western hemisphere), with significant variations in architectural form. For example, the dagoba of Sri Lanka and the so-called "PAGODA" (derived from a Portuguese transcription of the Sanskrit BHAGAVAT ["blessed," "fortunate"] or the Persian but kadah ["idol house"]), which are so ubiquitous in East Asia, are styles of stupas. The classical architectural form of the stupa in India consisted of a circular platform surmounted by a hemisphere made of brick within which the relics were enshrined. At the summit of the hemisphere, one or more parasols were affixed. A walking path (see CAnKRAMA) enclosed by a railing was constructed around the stupa, to allow for clockwise circumambulation of the reliquary. Each of these architectural elements would evolve in form and eventually become imbued with rich symbolic meaning as the stupa evolved in India and across Asia. The relics enshrined in the stupa are considered by Buddhists to be living remnants of the Buddha (or the relevant saint) and pilgrimage to, and worship of, stupas has long been an important type of Buddhist practice. For all Buddhist schools, the stupa became a reference point denoting the Buddha's presence in the landscape. Although early texts and archeological records link stupa worship with the Buddha's life and especially the key sites in his career, stupas are also found at places that were sacred for other reasons, often through an association with a local deity. Stupas were constructed for past buddhas and for prominent disciples (sRĀVAKA) of the Buddha. Indeed, stupas dedicated to disciples of the Buddha may have been especially popular because the monastic rules stipulate that donations to such stupas became the property of the monastery, whereas donations to stupas of the Buddha remained the property of the Buddha, who continued to function as a legal resident of most monasteries. By the seventh century, the practice of enshrining the physical relics of the Buddha ceases to appear in the Indian archeological record. Instead, one finds stupas filled with small clay tablets that have been stamped or engraved with a four-line verse (often known by its first two words YE DHARMĀ) that was regarded as conveying the essence of the Buddha's teaching: "For those factors that are produced through causes, the TATHĀGATA has set forth their causes (HETU) and also their cessation (NIRODHA). Thus has spoken the great renunciant." For the MAHĀYĀNA, the stupa conveyed a variety of meanings, such as the Buddha's immortality and buddhahood's omnipresence, and served a variety of functions, such as a site of textual revelation and a center guaranteeing rebirth in a PURE LAND. Stupas were also pivotal in the social history of Buddhism: these monuments became magnets attracting monastery building and votive construction, as well as local ritual traditions and regional pilgrimage. The economics of Buddhist devotion at these sites generated income for local monasteries, artisans, and merchants. The great stupa complexes (which often included monasteries with endowed lands, a pilgrimage center, a market, and support from the state) were essential sites for the Buddhist polities of Asia. See CAITYA and entries for specific stupas, including FAMENSI, RATNAGIRI, SĀNCĪ, SHWEDAGON, SVAYAMBHu/SVAYAMBHuNĀTH, THIÊN MỤ TỰ, THuPĀRĀMA.

Sudoksa. (修德寺). In Korean, "Cultivating Merit Monastery"; the seventh district monastery (PONSA) of the contemporary CHOGYE CHONG of Korean Buddhism, located on the slopes of Toksung (Virtue Exalted) mountain in South Ch'ungch'ong province. According to Sudoksa's monastic records, the monastery was first constructed at the end of the Paekche dynasty by Sungje (d.u.). During the reign of the Paekche king Mu (r. 600-641) the monk Hyehyon (d.u.) is said to have lectured there on the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"). Alternate records state, however, that the monastery was founded by Chimyong (d.u.) during the reign of the Paekche king Pop (r. 599-600). The monastery was subsequently repaired by the renowned Koryo-dynasty Son monk NAONG HYEGŬN (1320-1376), and since that time Sudoksa has been one of the major centers of SoN (C. CHAN) practice in Korea. Sudoksa is best known for its TAEUNG CHoN, the main shrine hall. The taeung chon was rebuilt in 1308 and is presumed to be the oldest wooden building in Korea, having been spared the conflagrations that struck many Korean monasteries during the Japanese Hideyoshi invasions (1592-1598). It was constructed in the Chusimp'o style, so that its support pillars are wider in the middle than they are at the bottom or top. The Tap'o-style bracketing, imported from Fujian during the Southern Song dynasty, is similar to other Koryo-era monasteries, such as Pongjongsa and PUSoKSA. Inside the hall are images of three buddhas, sĀKYAMUNI, AMITĀBHA and BHAIsAJYAGURU, and two bodhisattvas, MANJUsRĪ and SAMANTABHADRA. Paintings depict KsITIGARBHA, the ten kings of hell (see SHIWANG; YAMA), and some indigenous Korean divinities. Many of the oldest original wall paintings were damaged during the Korean War and have now been removed to the safety of the monastery's museum. The courtyard holds two STuPAs, a three-story stone pagoda probably from the Koryo dynasty, and an older seven-story granite pagoda from the late Paekche dynasty, with typical upward curving corners. There is a thirty-three foot high statue of Maitreya a short walk up the mountain; the statue is unusual in that it is wearing Korean clothes, including a double cylindrical hat. It was erected by the Son master MAN'GONG WoLMYoN (1872-1946), one of the renowned Son teachers of the modern era who taught at Sudoksa; other famous masters associated with the monastery include KYoNGHo SoNGU (1849-1912), the nun KIM IRYoP (1869-1971), and Hyeam Hyonmun (1884-1985). Sudoksa recently opened a museum near its entrance to hold the large number of important historical artistic and written works the monastery owns, such as the exquisite wall paintings that formerly were located in the taeung chon. In 1996, Sudoksa was elevated to the status of an ecumenical monastery (CH'ONGNIM), and is one of the five such centers in the contemporary Chogye order, which are all expected to provide training in the full range of practices that exemplify the major strands of the Korean Buddhist tradition; the monastery is thus also known as the Toksung Ch'ongnim.

*suraMgamasutra. (T. Dpa' bar 'gro ba'i mdo; C. Shoulengyan jing; J. Shuryogongyo; K. Sunŭngom kyong 首楞嚴經). A Chinese indigenous scripture (see APOCRYPHA), usually known in the West by its reconstructed Sanskrit title suraMgamasutra, meaning "Heroic March Sutra." Its full title is Dafoding rulai miyin xiuzheng liaoyi zhu pusa wanxing Shoulengyan jing; in ten rolls. (This indigenous scripture should be distinguished from an early-fifth century Chinese translation of the suRAMGAMASAMĀDHISuTRA, attributed by KUMĀRAJĪVA, in two rolls, for which Sanskrit fragments are extant.) According to the account in the Chinese cataloguer Zhisheng's Xu gujin yijing tuji, the suraMgamasutra was brought to China by a sRAMAnA named Pāramiti. Because the suraMgamasutra had been proclaimed a national treasure, the Indian king had forbidden anyone to take the sutra out of the country. In order to transmit this scripture to China, Pāramiti wrote the sutra out in minute letters on extremely fine silk, then he cut open his arm and hid the small scroll inside his flesh. With the sutra safely hidden away, Pāramiti set out for China and eventually arrived in Guangdong province. There, he happened to meet the exiled Prime Minister Fangrong, who invited him to reside at the monastery of Zhizhisi, where he translated the sutra in 705 CE. Apart from Pāramiti's putative connection to the suraMgamasutra, however, nothing more is known about him and he has no biography in the GAOSENG ZHUAN ("Biographies of Eminent Monks"). Zhisheng also has an entry on the suraMgamasutra in his KAIYUAN SHIJIAO LU, but there are contradictions in these two extant catalogue accounts of the sutra's transmission and translation. The Kaiyuan Shijiao lu merely records that the sramana Huidi encountered an unnamed Western monk at Guangdong, who had with him a copy of the Sanskrit recension of this sutra, and Huidi invited him to translate the scripture together. Since the names of this Western monk and his patron Fangrong are not mentioned, the authenticity of the scripture has been called into question. Although Zhisheng assumed the suraMgamasutra was a genuine Indian scripture, the fact that no Sanskrit manuscript of the text is known to exist, as well as the inconsistencies in the stories about its transmission to China, have led scholiasts for centuries to questions the scripture's authenticity. There is also internal evidence of the scripture's Chinese provenance, such as the presence of such indigenous Chinese philosophical concepts as yin-yang cosmology and the five elements (wuxing) theory, the stylistic beauty of the literary Chinese in which the text is written, etc. For these and other reasons, the suraMgamasutra is now generally recognized to be a Chinese apocryphal composition. The sutra opens with one of the most celebrated stories in East Asian Buddhist literature: the Buddha's attendant ĀNANDA's near seduction by the harlot Mātangī. With Ānanda close to being in flagrante delicto, the Buddha sends the bodhisattva MANJUsRĪ to save him from a PĀRĀJIKA offense, by employing the suraMgama DHĀRAnĪ to thwart Mātangī's seductive magic. The Buddha uses the experience to teach to Ānanda and the congregation the suRAMGAMASAMĀDHI, which counters the false views about the aggregates (SKANDHA) and consciousness (VIJNĀNA) and reveals the TATHĀGATAGARBHA that is inherent in all sentient beings. This tathāgatagarbha, or buddha-nature, is made manifest through the suraMgamasamādhi, which constitutes the "heroic march" forward toward enlightenment. The suraMgamasutra was especially influential in the CHAN school during the Song and Ming dynasties, which used the text as the scriptural justification for the school's distinctive teaching that Chan "points directly to the human mind" (ZHIZHI RENXIN), so that one may "see the nature and achieve buddhahood" (JIANXING CHENGFO). Several noted figures within the Chan school achieved their own awakenings through the influence of the suraMgamasutra, including the Ming-dynasty master HANSHAN DEQING (1546-1623), and the sutra was particularly important in the writings of such Ming-dynasty Chan masters as YUNQI ZHUHONG (1535-1615). The leading Chan monk of modern Chinese Buddhism, XUYUN (1840-1959), advocated the practice of the suraMgamasutra throughout his life, and it was the only scripture that he ever annotated. As a mark of the sutra's influence in East Asian Buddhism, the suraMgamasutra is one of the few apocryphal scriptures that receives its own mention in another indigenous sutra: the apocryphal Foshuo fa miejin jing ("The Sutra on the Extinction of the Dharma") states that the first sutra to disappear from the world during the dharma-ending age (MOFA) will in fact be the suraMgamasutra. The Tibetan translation of this Chinese apocryphon was produced during the Qianlong era (1735-1796) of the Qing dynasty; the scripture was apparently so important in contemporary Chinese Buddhism that it was deemed essential for it to be represented in the Tibetan canon as well.

Sutta ::: A discourse or teaching passed down in various religious and spritual traditions originating on the Indian subcontinent. Most commonly seen in reference to Buddhism as the collected aphorisms and discourses of the Buddha and the various spiritual figureheads of Buddhism. Sometimes this is used to refer solely to the canonical records of the Buddha's teachings: the Pali Canon.

table "database" A collection of {records} in a {relational database}. (1997-06-04)

table ::: (database) A collection of records in a relational database. (1997-06-04)

Tabula rasa: Literally, a blank tablet. John Locke (1632-1704) held that human knowledge came by way of experience. The mind is like a slate upon which experience records impressions. This is a denial of innate, a priori knowledge. -- V.F. Ta

tac ::: n. --> A kind of customary payment by a tenant; -- a word used in old records.

Taksasilā. (P. Takkasilā; T. Rdo 'jog; C. Shishi guo; J. Sekishitsu koku; K. Soksil kuk 石室國). Capital of GANDHĀRA (in the Punjab province of modern Pakistan), often known in the West by its Greek name Taxila; an important early center of Indian Buddhist learning and transcontinental trade. The city is mentioned frequently in the JĀTAKAs, but not in the Pāli suttas, although it is presumed that the Buddha's physician JĪVAKA studied there. AsOKA is said to have built a dharmarājika STuPA and monastery there, which were enlarged when the city was rebuilt following Scythian invasions. Taksasilā was a center for both Hindu and Buddhist scholarship, which flourished especially between the first and fifth centuries CE. Among the schools of Indian Buddhism, the SARVĀSTIVĀDA was especially strong in the city. Taksasilā was visited by the Chinese pilgrims FAXIAN and XUANZANG, who described it in their travel records.

The antithesis of these lofty ideas underlies the widespread prevalence of blood rites. In fact, the many blood ceremonials which mark and mar the records of so many peoples are often gross, cruel, and perverted, violating the sacredness of life by offering animal and human sacrifices. Several groups regard blood as one of the essential elements used in their numerous forms of initiations, oblations, invocations to ancestors and to spirits of various kinds. Their fixed belief that the demons or spirits invoked by these ceremonies are harmful if not propitiated, but will be gratified and nourished by the immaterial essence, savor, or fumes of the foods, alcohols, and blood offerings is not without some basis of fact; for the earth-bound kama-rupic entities and astral elementaries are attracted by, and do abstract the impalpable kama-pranic life-force from, the fumes and emanations of such offerings. These beliefs are consistent with much in the tribal customs and rites which attracts and revivifies evil entities in their own astral atmosphere. Customs like poison ordeals for so-called witches, and evil use of nature forces for injuring or destroying personal enemies, added to frequent evocations, make a vicious circle of cause and effect.

The records of the Hebrews declare that the archaic Hebrews were as much given to consulting oracles or idols, statues, images, etc., as were any of the pagan peoples. The teraphim were just such oracular statues.

“The chronology and computations of the Brahmin Initiates are based upon the Zodiacal records of India, and the works of the above-mentioned astronomer and magician — Asuramaya. The Atlantean zodiacal records cannot err, as they were compiled under the guidance of those who first taught astronomy, among other things, to mankind” (SD 2:49).

The ethnology of the ancient peoples inhabiting Mesopotamia is extremely obscure. The records of occult history show that in a previous geological period, all that portion of western and central-western Asia, which includes Persia, Babylonia, Turkestan, Baluchistan, Afghanistan, etc., was once a highly fertile and well-populated portion of the earth’s surface, not only bearing once famous and brilliant civilizations, but likewise the seat of different peoples living side by side. When immense climatic and geological changes took place, this vast stretch of territory became the seeding-place or focus whence spread to the east, south, and west various emigrant offshoots which populated what were then less fertile territories, which in time became on the one hand northern India, Afghanistan, Baluchistan, and Turkestan, and on the southwest Iran, Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, and the Caucasus district. It was far later that a reverse current of emigration left what is now northern India and proceeded westward settling to a certain extent in the lands of their ancient forefathers, and this accounts not only for the similarities between the west and east of this district, but the Indian influence perceptible in Mesopotamia and the close linguistic and other links that existed between the ancient Zoroastrians and the Brahmanical streams of thought.

The extremities of the axis of the ecliptic point to the poles of the ecliptic in the celestial sphere. The axis of the earth is inclined to the axis of the ecliptic at an angle of something more than 23 degrees, called the obliquity, which makes the angle between the ecliptic and the equator. The obliquity is believed by modern astronomers to oscillate about a mean position to the extent of 1 degree 21 minutes on both sides in a period of about 10,000 to 18,000 years; but The Secret Doctrine states that the obliquity has been 90 degrees and 180 degrees, that it has had these positions repeatedly, and that the obliquity varies at the rate of nearly 3.6 degrees in each precessional cycle. It would appear from this that the earth’s axis makes a complete circle or revolution with regard to the ecliptic axis, passing through angles of 90 degrees, 180 degrees, 270 degrees, and so back to the starting point. When the two axes coincide, there can be no seasons, no equinoxes or solstices. When they are at right angles, either the northern hemisphere or the southern, as the case may be, has six months of spring and summer, the opposite hemisphere having six months of autumn and winter; and the ecliptic poles being in the equator. When the axis is entirely inverted, although the zodiacal constellations remain the same, of course, because of the rotation of the earth, they apparently have a reversed movement from their present one (SD 2:785). Herodotus learned from Egyptian priests that the two axes had once coincided and that they had been reversed three times since their records began; and the Denderah zodiacal charts show that the rectangular position and three inversions had taken place. Considering the dynamic bearings of the shifting in space of the earth’s axis in light of the phenomena of the gyrostat, and how the application of an external force will produce a change in the direction of the axis of rotation, a mathematician might deduce the nature and value of the external forces which must in past ages have acted on the rotating earth in order to produce these axial changes.

  "The physical is not the only world; there are others that we become aware of through dream records, through the subtle senses, through influences and contacts, through imagination, intuition and vision. There are worlds of a larger subtler life than ours, vital worlds; worlds in which Mind builds its own forms and figures, mental worlds; psychic worlds which are the soul"s home; others above with which we have little contact. In each of us there is a mental plane of consciousness, a psychic, a vital, a subtle physical as well as the gross physical and material plane. The same planes are repeated in the consciousness of general Nature. It is when we enter or contact these other planes that we come into connection with the worlds above the physical. In sleep we leave the physical body, only a subconscient residue remaining, and enter all planes and all sorts of worlds.” Letters on Yoga

“The physical is not the only world; there are others that we become aware of through dream records, through the subtle senses, through influences and contacts, through imagination, intuition and vision. There are worlds of a larger subtler life than ours, vital worlds; worlds in which Mind builds its own forms and figures, mental worlds; psychic worlds which are the soul’s home; others above with which we have little contact. In each of us there is a mental plane of consciousness, a psychic, a vital, a subtle physical as well as the gross physical and material plane. The same planes are repeated in the consciousness of general Nature. It is when we enter or contact these other planes that we come into connection with the worlds above the physical. In sleep we leave the physical body, only a subconscient residue remaining, and enter all planes and all sorts of worlds.” Letters on Yoga

The post-mortem separation of man’s seven principles frees the higher triad, atma-buddhi-manas, for return to, and experience in, the arupa (formless) planes of existence. Then the human-animal soul — kama-manas — composed of the dregs of the selfish personal emotions, desires, and impulses, becomes for a shorter or longer time a coherent astral form, finding its natural level in kama-loka. These shells of the dead, as well as the various nature spirits and other astral entities, are normally invisible to us as we are to them. However, certain conditions attract them and help them to appear. Actual materializations, though rare, are possible, as are various similar phenomenal appearances; yet none are the spirits they are supposed to be by spiritualists. As a rule they all fall into three general classes: 1) the astral body of the living medium detaches itself and assumes the appearance of the so-called spirit by reflecting some invisible image already in the astral light, or in the mind of one or more of the sitters; 2) the astral shell of a deceased person, devoid of all spirit, intellect, and conscience, can become visible and even partially tangible when the condition of the air and ether is such as to alter the molecular vibration of the shell so that it can be seen; and 3) an unseen mass of chemical, magnetic, and electrical material is collected from the atmosphere, the passive medium, and the circle. With this material, the astral entities automatically make a form, which invariably reflects as pictures or portraits the shape or appearance of any desired person, either dead or alive. The astral entities, which are of various kinds, use the mind-pictures or images which crowd the thoughts and auras of those present, as the astral light receives, preserves, and reflects when conditions are right, pictures or portraits of both dead and living, and indeed of all events. The confusion and illusion of it all may be increased by scenes related to the multiple personality of someone present whose aura presents pictured records of past lives.

The pseudo-Dionysius was a Christian writer of unknown date; the first authentic mention in extant early Christian literature of his writings is found in the records of the Council held at Constantinople, 532 AD, under Emperor Justinian.

  “There are records which show Egyptian priests — Initiates — journeying in a North-Westerly direction, by land, via what became later the Straits of Gibraltar; turning North and travelling through the future Phoenician settlements of Southern Gaul; then still further North, until reaching Carnac (Morbihan) they turned to the West again and arrived, still travelling by land, on the North-Western promontory of the New Continent.

— the state of samadhi that arises "when the mind has lost its outward consciousness . . . and goes inside itself"; this state has some resemblance to ordinary svapna or dream-consciousness, but is characterised not by dreams but by internal visions which are accurate "records of true and actual experiences". The mind in svapnasamadhi "is at work liberated from the immixture of the physical mentality" and "is able to use either its ordinary will and intelligence with a concentrated power or else the higher will and intelligence of the more exalted planes of mind".

The use of the zero to secure position value in a scale of decimal nation came to us, through the Arabs, from India. Modern scholarship seeks among the records of antiquity for some date which it may assign as the origin of decimal notation; but the fact that other systems were in use does not prove that it was unknown, as it may have been kept secret; and indeed we have other systems, besides the decimal, in use of the earth today. In discussing the matter we must distinguish between the decimal notation with the zero, and a mere method of counting in groups of ten and using special signs for ten, a hundred, etc. Blavatsky points to the symbolical character of the upright stroke and the circle, as denoting the number ten and also the masculine and feminine principles; the inference being that the antiquity and universality of this symbol implies a knowledge of decimal notation.

This descent of the ray tip into, and selection of, suitable earth of matter, has been the basis of all the various methods of procreation. The process began in the huge ovoid form of the ethereal first root-race by simple division of this human cell, as the embryo today repeats in beginning its rapid review of racial records. “One infinitesimal cell, out of millions of others at work in the formation of an organism, determining alone and unaided, by means of constant segmentation and multiplication, the correct image of the future man (or animal) in its physical, mental, and psychic characteristics. . . . those germinal cells do not have their genesis at all in the body of the individual, but proceed directly from the ancestral germinal cell passed from father to son through long generations” (SD 1:223n). See also HEREDITY; PROCREATION; REPRODUCTION

This symbol can be traced “from our modern cathedrals down to the Temple of Solomon, to the Egyptian Karnac, 1600 BC. The Thebans find it in the oldest Coptic records of symbols preserved on tablets of stone and recognize it, varying its multitudinous forms with every epoch, every people, creed or worship. It is a Rosicrucian symbol, one of the most ancient and the most mysterious. As the Egyptian Crux ansata, crossor crossthat travelled from India, where it was considered as belonging to the Indian symbolism of the most early ages, its lines and curves could be suited to answer the purpose of many symbols in every age and fitted for every worship” (Some Unpublished Letters of Blavatsky 153-5).

  “Thoth remains changeless from the first to the last Dynasty. . . . the celestial scribe, who records the thoughts, words and deeds of men and weighs them in the balance, liken him to the type of the esoteric Lipikas. His name is one of the first that appears on the oldest monuments. He is the lunar god of the first dynasties, the master of Cynocephalus — the dog-headed ape who stood in Egypt as a living symbol and remembrance of the Third Root-Race” (TG 331).

  “Thus, the Rig-Veda, the oldest of all the known ancient records, may be shown to corroborate the occult teachings in almost every respect. Its hymns — the records written by the earliest Initiates of the Fifth (our race) concerning the primordial teachings — speak of the Seven Races (two still to come) allegorising them by the ‘seven streams’ (I, 35, 8); and of the Five Races (‘panca krishtayah’ [pancha-krishtayah]) which have already inhabited this world (ibid) on the five regions ‘panca pradicah’ [pancha-pradisah] (IX, 86, 29), as also of the three continents that were” (SD 2:606).

Tiantong Rujing. (J. Tendo Nyojo; K. Ch'ondong Yojong 天童如浄) (1162-1227). Chinese CHAN master in the CAODONG ZONG, also known as Jingchang (Pure Chang) and Changweng (Old Man Chang); he received his toponym Tiantong after the mountain where he once dwelled. Rujing was a native of Shaoxing in Yuezhou (present-day Zhejiang province) and was ordained at a local monastery named Tianyisi. Rujing later went to the monastery of Zishengsi on Mt. Xuedou to study under Zu'an Zhijian (1105-1192) and eventually became his dharma heir. Rujing spent the next few decades moving from one monastery to the next. In 1220, he found himself at Qingliangsi in Jiankang (Jiangsu province) and then at Rui'ansi in Taizhou and Jingcisi in Linan. In 1224, Rujing was appointed by imperial decree to the abbotship of the famous monastery of Jingdesi on Mt. Tiantong, where the Chan master HONGZHI ZHENGJUE had once resided. Rujing's teachings can be found in his recorded sayings (YULU), which were preserved in Japan. Although Rujing was a relatively minor figure in the history of Chinese Chan, he was profoundly influential in Japanese ZEN, due to the fact that the Japanese SoToSHu founder DoGEN KIGEN (1200-1253) considered himself to be Rujing's successor. Dogen attributes many of the distinctive features of his own approach to practice, such as "just sitting" (SHIKAN TAZA) and "body and mind sloughed off" (SHINJIN DATSURAKU) to this man whom he regarded as the preeminent Chan master of his era. Little of this distinctively Soto terminology and approach actually appears in the records of Rujing's own lectures, however. Instead, he appears in his discourse record as a fairly typical Song-dynasty Chan master, whose only practical meditative instruction involves the contemplation of ZHAOZHOU's "no" (see WU GONG'AN). This difference may reflect the differing editorial priorities of Rujing's Chinese disciples. It might also derive from the fact that Dogen misunderstood Rujing or received simplified private instructions from him because of Dogen's difficulty in following Rujing's formal oral presentations in vernacular Chinese.

Todaiji. (東大寺). In Japanese, "Great Monastery of the East"; a major monastery in the ancient Japanese capital of Nara affiliated with the Kegon (HUAYAN) school of Buddhism, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The monastery was founded by the Hossoshu (FAXIANG ZONG) monk GYoGI (668-749). The monastery is renowned for its colossal buddha image of VAIROCANA (J. Birushana nyorai), which is commonly known as the NARA DAIBUTSU; at forty-eight feet (fifteen meters) high, this image is the largest extant gilt-bronze image in the world and the Daibutsuden where the image is enshrined is the world's largest wooden building. The Indian monk BODHISENA (J. Bodaisenna) (704-760), who traveled to Japan in 736 at the invitation of Emperor Shomu (r. 724-749), performed the "opening the eyes" (KAIYAN; NETRAPRATIstHĀPANA) ceremony for the 752 dedication of the great buddha image. Todaiji was founded on the site of Konshusenji by order of Emperor Shomu and became the headquarters of a network of provincial monasteries and convents in the Yamato region. The first abbot, Ryoben (689-773), is commemorated in the kaisando (founder's hall; see KAISHAN). Other halls include the inner sanctuary of the hokkedo (lotus hall), which was probably once Konshusenji's main hall. The hall enshrines the Fukukensaku Kannon, a dry lacquer statue of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA, which dates from 746. The monastery was renamed Konkomyoji in 741 and, in 747 when major construction began on the large compound, it finally became known as Todaiji, the name it retains today. The Todaiji complex was completed in 798; monastery records state that 50,000 carpenters, 370,000 metal workers, and 2.18 million laborers worked on the compound, its buildings, and their furnishings, almost bankrupting the country. Entering the monastery through the Great Gate to the South (Nandaimon), itself a Japanese national treasure, a visitor would have passed through two seven-storied, 328-foot high pagodas to the east and west (both subsequently destroyed by earthquakes), before passing through the Inner Gate to the Daibutsuden. North of the Daibutsuden, which is flanked by a belfry and a SuTRA repository, is the kodo (lecture hall), which is surrounded on three sides by the monk's quarters. An ordination hall displays exceptional clay-modeled shitenno (four heavenly kings; see LOKAPĀLA) dating from the Tenpyo Era (729-749). Of the eighth-century buildings, only the tegaimon (the western gate) and the Hokkedo's inner sanctuary have survived. After a conflagration in 1180, then-abbot Chogen (1121-1206) spearheaded a major reconstruction in a style he had seen in Southern Song-dynasty China. This style is exemplified by the south gate, which is protected by two humane-kings statues, both twenty-eight feet in height, carved in 1203. The Tokugawa Shogunate sponsored a second reconstruction after another fire in 1567 and the current Daibutsuden dates from about 1709. The Shosoin repository at the monastery, itself a Japanese national treasure (kokuho), contains over nine thousand precious ornamental and fine-art objects that date from the monastery's founding in the eighth century, including scores of objects imported into Japan via the SILK ROAD from all over Asia, including cut-glass bowls and silk brocade from Persia, Byzantine cups, Egyptians chests, and Indian harps, as well as Chinese Tang and Korean Silla musical instruments, etc. Every spring, the two-week long Omizutori (water-drawing) festival is conducted at Todaiji, which is thought to cure physical ailments and cleanse moral transgressions.

Trần Nhan Tông. (陳仁宗) (1258-1308). The third king of the Vietnamese Trần dynasty (1225-1400) and the founding patriarch of the TRÚC LM (Bamboo Grove) school, the first authentic Vietnamese Thiền (CHAN) school. He was also the national hero who led Vietnam to victory over the Mongols in 1285 and 1288. In 1293, he abdicated, after being on the throne for fifteen years, to become thượng hoàng (retired emperor). When he was crown prince, he revered Buddhism and received instructions from eminent monks, including his uncle Huẹ Trung Thượng Sĩ, an eminent Chan master of the time. In 1299 he went to Mount Yen Tửto become a monk and took the sobriquet Trúc Lam Đại Sĩ. He was reverentially referred to as Trúc Lam Điều Ngự or simply Điều Ngự. Even after taking residence in Yen Tử, he continued to travel to various temples to give instructions to monks, devoting himself to establishing a unified saMgha. The Tam Tổ Thực Lục ("True Records on the Three Patriarchs") relates that he traveled extensively to shut down "depraved temples" and to encourage people to receive the ten precepts. Many eminent monks of the Trần were his disciples. According to historical records, Trần Nhan Tông left behind several treatises on Chan and a few collections of poems in both classical Chinese and Nôm (demotic script). Unfortunately, none of his writing are extant apart from a few poems collected in the Viẹt m Thi Tạp in Chinese and two long poems in Nôm.

Twelve Perhaps the most esoteric of all numerals; so profound was the reverence with which the ancients regarded it that the records concerning it are almost innumerable, found in virtually all branches of human thought and activity. Thus we find it in the twelve hours of the day and of the night; the twelve months of the year; the twelve great gods of ancient pantheons; the twelve apostles in the New Testament and the twelve tribes in the Old Testament; the twelve nidanas in Buddhism; and pointing directly to cosmogonical matters, the twelve signs of the zodiac.

Udāyana Buddha. (C. Youtian wang Shijia xiang; J. Uten'o Shakazo; K. Ujon wang Sokka sang 優塡王釋迦像). An Indian sandalwood image of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha that is purported to be the world's first Buddha image; supposedly commissioned by the VATSĀ king Udāyana (also called Rudrāyana in some versions) and hence named after him. While ancient Indian sources only mention a buddha image made for king PRASENAJIT, the story of this supposedly earlier image made for King Udāyana first appears in the 397 CE Chinese translation of the EKOTTARĀGAMA. XUANZANG later reports a legend about the image's production. According to this legend, when sĀKYAMUNI Buddha ascended to the TRĀYASTRIMsA (heaven of the thirty-three) to preach the DHARMA to his mother MĀYĀ, King Udāyana so missed his teacher that he asked MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA to transport an artist to the heaven to observe the Buddha's thirty-two bodily marks (MAHĀPURUsALAKsAnA) and carve a sandalwood image of the master. Subsequent Indian rulers were unable to dislodge the miraculously powerful statue from its spot and therefore made copies of it for their own realms. FAXIAN and Xuanzang remark in their travel records that they saw a sandalwood image at the JETAVANA VIHĀRA in sRĀVASTĪ, which had been commissioned by King Prasenajit on the model of the Udāyana image. In addition, Xuanzang saw a Udāyana Buddha image enshrined in a large vihāra at Kausāmbī, and mentions a third one, which was reputedly the original statue, that had flown north over the mountains to the Central Asian oasis kingdom of KHOTAN. Both KUMĀRAJĪVA and Xuanzang are claimed to have brought the Udāyana Buddha image to the Chinese capital of Chang'an. The Japanese pilgrim Chonen (938-1016), during his sojourn in China, saw a replica of the allegedly original Indian statue at Qishenyuan in Kaifeng. He hired the artisans Zhang Yanjiao and Zhang Yanxi to make an exact copy of this replica. According to the legend, the original statue spoke to Chonen in a dream, expressing its wish to go to Japan. Chonen thus darkened the copy with smoke and took the original to Japan in 986. The tenth-century Chinese wooden sculpture is commonly known as the Seiryoji Shaka, since it was enshrined in 1022 in the monastery of Seiryoji. In February 1954, a group of Japanese scholars, including the renowned Buddhologist and Seiryoji abbot, Tsukamoto Zenryu (1898-1980), opened the cavity in the back of the image and discovered that it contained silk and brocade textiles, coins, mirrors, glass fragments, a small brass bell, textile intestines, wood-block prints of texts such as the VAJRACCHEDIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀSuTRA ("Diamond Sutra"), a Japanese manuscript of the SUVARnAPRABHĀSOTTAMASuTRA ("Sutra of Golden Light") dated 804, as well as other handwritten documents, such as a vow written by Chonen and Gizo dated 972, which they witnessed with the imprint of their hands in their own blood. The veneration of the Udāyana Buddha image reached its peak in thirteenth-century Japan, when further copies of the Seiryoji Shaka were made, for example, at SAIDAIJI (dated 1249) and ToSHoDAIJI (dated 1258) in Nara and at Gokurakuji (second half of the thirteenth century) in Kamakura.

Unemployment - Those members of the labour force who are willing and able to work cannot find a job. ILO Unemployment or Labour Force Survey method - Records those memebrs of the labour force out of work and has been looking for a job in the past four weeks and is available to take up work in the next two weeks. The measue is claculated by an interview survey of approximately 60,000 households.

Validate-1. to attest to the correctness and reliability of a financial item. A validity review or test is required by the accountant to satisfy the legitimacy of the item. An example of validation is the examination and approval of an employee's expense request form by a supervisor. Another example is the counting of petty cash to see that it con­forms to the amount in the financial records. Or 2. to make something legal or effective. An example is signing one's class="d-title" name to a bill of sale, which closes the deal.

Value - 1.the amounts at which items are stated in financial records and statements. Value is expenditures or amounts deemed to benefit future periods. Or 2. highly subjective term, usually an expression of monetary worth applied to a particular asset, group of assets, business entity, or services rendered. It should not be confused with the term cost even though it is frequently measured, equated, and identified by it. Thus the term should be used with an appropriate modifying adjective. Or 3. represented by the amount of goods, services, or money necessary to complete an exchange for a specific commodity. In economic terms, value of goods equals price multiplied by quantity.

Vinītaruci. (V. Tỳ Ni Đa Lưu Chi 尼多流支) (d. 594). The Sanskrit name of an Indian monk who is traditionally regarded as the founder of the first school of THIỀN (CHAN) in Vietnam. The Vietnamese genealogical history THIỀN UYỂN TẼP ANH records that Vinītaruci was a brāhmana from south India who wandered throughout India as a young man searching for the essence of the Buddhist teaching. He is reputed to have arrived in China in 574, where he went to see the third Chan patriarch SENGCAN, who offered him instruction before advising him to go south. Vinītaruci then traveled to Zhizhi monastery in Guangzhou, where he remained for six years and translated many Buddhist texts. In 580, he arrived in Vietnam and settled at Pháp Van monastery, where he subsequently transmitted the mind-seal (XINYIN) to Pháp Hiền (died 626), who carried on this Chan lineage associated with the third patriarch. He passed away sometime in 595. The Vinītaruci mentioned in the Thiển Uyển Tạp Anh is undoubtedly the same Indian monk whose name is mentioned in Chinese Buddhist literature as a translator; however, it remains unclear whether Vinītaruci ever really came to Vietnam, as the Vietnamese Buddhist tradition reports. In any case, there are no historical grounds for the claim that he was the founding patriarch of a Chan lineage in Vietnam or to attribute to him the teaching style emblematic of the Southern school of Chan (NAN ZONG), which did not appear until centuries after his death.

Wang o Ch'onch'ukkuk chon. (C. Wang wu Tianzhuguo zhuan 往五天竺國傳). In Korean, "Memoir of the Pilgrimage to the Five Regions of India"; composed by the Korean monk-pilgrim HYECH'O (d.u.; c. 704-780). After being ordained in Korea, Hyech'o left for China sometime around 721 and spent perhaps three years on the mainland before departing for India (the Ch'onch'ukkuk of the title) via the southern sea route in 724. After landing on the eastern coast of the subcontinent, Hyech'o subsequently spent about three years on pilgrimage to many of the Buddhist sacred sites, including BODHGAYĀ, KUsINAGARĪ, and SĀRNĀTH, and on visits to several of the major cities in north central India. He then traveled in both southern and western India before making his way toward the northwest, whence he journeyed on into KASHMIR, GANDHĀRA, and Central Asia. Making his way overland across the Central Asian SILK ROAD, Hyech'o arrived back in Chinese territory in December of 727, where he spent the rest of his life. Like other pilgrims before him, Hyech'o kept detailed notes of his pilgrimage, and his travelogue does not differ significantly in terms of style and content from the earlier and more famous records left by FAXIAN and XUANZANG; unfortunately, unlike their works, only fragments of his account survive. His text is largely organized according to the kingdoms, regions, and pilgrimage sites that Hyech'o visited. Hyech'o offers a general description of the geography, climate, economy, customs, and religious practices of each place he visited, and, when necessary, he clarifies whether MAHĀYĀNA, HĪNAYĀNA, or some combination of the two traditions was practiced at a specific site. Although Hyech'o is known to have been the disciple of VAJRABODHI and AMOGHAVAJRA, considered by some as patriarchs of esoteric Buddhism, he makes no mention in his travelogue of tantric texts or practices. Hyech'o does note the dilapidated state of some major STuPAs and monasteries, the advance of the Turkic tribes into Buddhist areas, and the absence of any Buddhist practice in Tibet at that early date. In these and other respects, Hyech'o's memoir serves as a valuable resource for the study of Buddhism and regional history along the Silk Road.

Wanthadipani. (P. VaMsadīpanī). In Burmese, "Lamp on the History [of the Religion]"; the first of four Burmese thathanawin, or Buddhist chronicles, that were composed in Burma (Myanmar) during the Konbaung dynasty (1752-1885). Written c. 1799 in the Burmese language by the monk Mehti SAYADAW, the text records the history of the THERAVĀDA sangha (S. SAMGHA) from its inception during the lifetime of the Buddha, through cycles of decline and restoration in ancient India, Sri Lanka, and Burma, up through a reformation of the Burmese sangha begun at the capital AMARAPURA in 1784, of which Mehti Sayadaw himself was a leader. The text relies heavily on the Pāli chronicles SAMANTAPĀSĀDIKĀ and MAHĀVAMSA for its account of the ancient tradition in India and Sri Lanka. It takes its material for the history of Buddhism in Burma among the Pyu, Myamma (ethnic Burmans), and Mon peoples from a variety of indigenous sources, including the KALYĀnĪ INSCRIPTIONS (1479), the YAZAWIN-KYAW (1502), and U Kala's MAHAYAZAWIN-GYI (c. 1730). The text concludes with an account of Mehti Sayadaw's missionary activities in the city of Taungoo, where he was dispatched to propagate the new monastic reforms among the local sangha.

  “What was the object of their long journey? . . . The archaic records show the Initiates of the Second Sub-race of the Aryan family moving from one land to the other for the purpose of supervising the building of menhirs and dolmens, of colossal Zodiacs in stone, and places of sepulchre to serve as receptacles for the ashes of generations to come” (SD 2:750).

While the Romans produced critics and skeptics who attempted to throw doubt on the nature and reliability of these Sibylline Oracles, the greatest men of the Roman State held them in reverence, and they were most carefully guarded through the centuries of Roman history as being among the most important and sacred treasures of the royal, republican, and imperial archives. The Sibylline Oracles or Books were consulted on every occasion of important crisis which confronted the Roman State, and it would appear from existing records that when so consulted, the results following always accrued to the benefit and prosperity of the government and people.

WORLDS. ::: The physical is not the only world ; there are others that we become aware of through dream records, through the subtle senses, through influences and contacts, through imagination, Intuition and vision. There are worlds of a larger subtler life than ours, vital worlds ; worlds in which Mind builds its own forms and figures, mental worlds ; psychic worlds which are the soul’s home ; others above with which we have littfe contact. In each of us there is a mental plane of consciousness, a psychic, a vital, a subtle physical as w’cll as the gross physical and material plane. The same planes are repeated in the cons- ciousness of general Nature. It is when we enter or contact these other planes that we come into conoeciion with the worlds above the physical. In sleep we leave the physical body, only a sub- conscient residue remaining, and enter all planes and all sorts of worlds. In each we see scenes, meet beings, share in happen- ings, come across formations, influences, suggestions which belong to these planes. Even when we are awake, part of us moves in these planes, but their activity goes on behind the veil ; our waking minds are not aware of it. Dreams are often only incoherent constructions of our subcooscient, but others are records (often much mixed and distorted) or transcripts of experiences in these supraphystcal planes. When we do sadbana, this kind of dream becomes very common ; then subconscious dreams cease to predominate.

Wuwei sanzang chanyao. (J. Mui sanzo zen'yo; K. Muoe samjang sonyo 無畏三藏禪要). In Chinese, "Essentials of Meditation by the TREPItAKA sUBHAKARASIMHA"; a relatively short treatise that purportedly records a sermon that the esoteric master subhākarasiMha prepared for a debate he had with CHAN master SHENXIU's disciple Jingxuan (660-723) sometime after 716. The sermon is largely concerned with the conferral of the BODHISATTVA precepts, repentance, the threefold pure precepts (SANJU JINGJIE; see sĪLATRAYA), and what subhākarasiMha calls the secret essentials of meditation. subhākarasiMha critiques Jingxuan and other fellow practitioners of meditation for their adherence to the doctrine of "no-thought" (WUNIAN) and offers instead a meditation technique that involves uttering a series of DHĀRAnĪs, gesturing in a series of MUDRĀs, mindful breathing, and visualizing a lunar disk.

Xu gaoseng zhuan. (J. Zoku kosoden; K. Sok kosŭng chon 續高僧傳). In Chinese, "Supplement to the Biographies of Eminent Monks," compiled by the VINAYA master DAOXUAN; also known as the Tang gaoseng zhuan. As the title suggests, the Xu gaoseng zhuan "supplements" or "continues" the work of HUIJIAO's earlier GAOSENG ZHUAN and records the lives of monks who were active in the period between Huijiao's composition during the Liang dynasty and Daoxuan's own time. The Xu gaoseng zhuan contains 485 major and 219 appended biographies, neatly categorized under translators (yijing), exegetes (yijie), practitioners of meditation (xichan), specialists of VINAYA(minglü), protectors of the DHARMA (hufa), sympathetic resonance (GANTONG), sacrifice of the body (YISHEN), chanters (dusong), benefactors (xingfu), and miscellaneous (zake). Although Daoxuan generally followed Huijiao's earlier categorizations, he made several changes. In lieu of Huijiao's divine wonders (shenyi), viz., thaumaturgists, Daoxuan opted to use the term sympathetic resonance, instead; he also subsumed Huijiao's hymnodists (jingshi) and propagators (changdao) under the "miscellaneous" category. Daoxuan also introduced the new category of protectors of the dharma order to leave a record of disputes that occurred at court with Daoists. These adjustments seem to reflect ongoing developments within Chinese Buddhism in how to conceive of, and write, history. Other related biographical collections include ZANNING's SONG GAOSENG ZHUAN, Shi Baochang's BIQIUNI ZHUAN, the Korean HAEDONG KOSŬNG CHoN, and the Japanese HONCHo KoSoDEN.

yamabushi. (山伏). In Japanese, lit. "those who lie down [or sleep] in the mountains"; itinerant mountain ascetics associated with the SHUGENDo (way of cultivating supernatural power) tradition; also known as shugenja, or "those who cultivate supernatural powers." Records reveal that as early as the Nara period (although possibly before), yamabushi practiced a variety of severe austerities in the mountains, which were thought to be numinous places that housed the spirits of the dead. Thanks to the special powers accumulated through this training, such adepts were able to mediate with the realm of the dead, convert baleful spirits, and provide healing services. During this early period, the yamabushi were not formally ordained but instead operated independently, drawing freely from Buddhism, Daoism, and indigenous religious beliefs. In the mid to late Heian period (794-1185), such Shugendo sites as the mountains of Yoshino and KUMANO became affiliated with Japanese Tendaishu (TIANTAI) and SHINGONSHu institutions, and yamabushi increasingly incorporated esoteric Buddhism into their training, whereby they strove to attain buddhahood (SOKUSHIN JoBUTSU) through severe asceticism, such as immersion under waterfalls, solitary confinement in caves, fasting, meditating, and the recitation of spells (MANTRA). In addition, yamabushi guided people on pilgrimages through their mountain redoubts and performed powerful rites for the aristocratic nobility and royal court. During the Tokugawa period (1600-1868), they were forced because of temple regulations (J. jin hatto) to adopt permanent residences. While higher-ranking practitioners stayed at the mountain centers, many others settled down in villages, where they performed shamanic rituals and offered healing and prayers. Later in the Tokugawa period, many of these practices would provide the foundation for Japan's so-called new religions. When Shugendo was proscribed in 1872, yamabushi were forced to join either Buddhist or Shinto institutions and to forgo many of their former practices. When this ban was lifted in the late 1940s following World War II, yamabushi at some centers, including Mt. Haguro and Kumano, resumed their former practice, which continues to the present.

Yasodharā. (P. Yasodharā; T. Grags 'dzin ma; C. Yeshutuoluo; J. Yashudara; K. Yasudara 耶輸陀羅). The Sanskrit proper name of wife of the prince and BODHISATTVA, SIDDHĀRTHA GAUTAMA, and mother of his son, RĀHULA (she is often known in Pāli sources as Rāhulamātā, Rāhula's Mother); she eventually became an ARHAT, who was declared by the Buddha to be foremost among nuns possessing the six superknowledges (ABHIJNĀ; P. abhiNNā). According to Pāli accounts, she was born on the same day as Prince Gautama and had skin the color of gold, hence another of her epithets, Bhaddā Kaccānā. She is also referred to in Pāli commentaries as Bimbā. Yasodharā married the prince when she was sixteen, after he had proved his superior skill in archery and other manly arts. She was chief consort in a harem of forty thousand women. On the day her son, Rāhula, was born, the prince renounced the world and abandoned his wife, child, and palace to become a mendicant. According to another version of the story, Rāhula was conceived on the night of the prince's departure and was not born until the night of the prince's enlightenment, six years later. Yasodharā was so heartbroken at her husband's departure that she took up his ascetic lifestyle, eating only one meal per day and wearing the yellow robes of a mendicant. When the Buddha returned to his former palace in KAPILAVASTU after his enlightenment, Yasodharā was allowed the honor of worshipping him in the manner she saw fit. After seven days, as the Buddha was about to depart, Yasodharā instructed her son Rāhula to ask for his inheritance. In response, the Buddha instructed sĀRIPUTRA to ordain his son. As Rāhula was the first child to be admitted to the order, he became the first Buddhist novice (sRĀMAnERA). Yasodharā and Rāhula's grandfather sUDDHODANA were greatly saddened at losing the child and heir to the order; hence, at suddhodana's request, the Buddha passed a rule that, thenceforth, no child should be ordained without the consent of its parents. When later the Buddha allowed women to enter the order, Yasodharā became a nun (BHIKsUnĪ) under MAHĀPRAJĀPATĪ, who was chief of the nuns' order and the Buddha's stepmother. Yasodharā cultivated insight and became an arhat with extraordinary supranormal powers. She could recall her past lives stretching back an immeasurable age and one hundred thousand eons without effort. The JĀTAKA records numerous occasions when Yasodharā had been the wife of the bodhisattva in earlier existences. Also mentioned as the wife of the Buddha is Gopā, although it is unclear whether this refers to another wife or is another name for Yasodharā.

Year 2000 "programming" (Y2K, or "millennium bug") A common name for all the difficulties the turn of the century, or dates in general, bring to computer users. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, the turn of the century looked so remote and memory/disk was so expensive that most programs stored only the last two digits of the year. These produce surprising results when dealing with dates after 1999. They may believe that 1 January 2000 is before 31 December 1999 (00"99), they may miscalculate the day of week, etc. Some programs used the year 99 as a special marker; there are rumours that some car insurance policies were cancelled because a year of 99 was used to mark deleted records. Complete testing of date-dependent code is virtually impossible, especially where the system under test relies on other systems such as customers' or suppliers' computers. Despite this, the predicted "millennium meltdown" never occurred. Various fixes and work-arounds were successfully applied, e.g. {time shifting}. And yes, the year 2000 was a leap year (multiples of 100 aren't leap years unless they're also multiples of 400). {PPR Corp Y2K FAQ (http://pprcorp.com/y2k/y2kfaq_j97.html)}. (2003-08-15)

Year 2000 ::: (programming) (Y2K, or millennium bug) A common name for all the difficulties the turn of the century, or dates in general, bring to computer users.Back in the 1970s and 1980s, the turn of the century looked so remote and memory/disk was so expensive that most programs stored only the last two digits special marker; there are rumours that some car insurance policies were cancelled because a year of 99 was used to mark deleted records.Complete testing of date-dependent code is virtually impossible, especially where the system under test relies on other systems such as customers' or occurred. Various fixes and work-arounds were successfully applied, e.g. time shifting.And yes, the year 2000 was a leap year (multiples of 100 aren't leap years unless they're also multiples of 400). .(2003-08-15)

Ye shes sde. (Yeshe De) (fl. late eighth/early ninth century). A Tibetan translator (LO TSĀ BA) during the early dissemination (SNGA DAR) of Buddhism in Tibet; a native of Ngam shod of the Sna nam clan, also referred to by the clan name Zhang. He is said to have been a disciple of both PADMASAMBHAVA and sRĪSIMHA, from whom he received tantric instructions, especially in the SEMS SDE (mind class) of RDZOGS CHEN. He collaborated with some fifteen Indian scholars, among them Jinamitra, sīlendrabodhi, and Dānasīla, on the translation of as many as 347 different works, if the later canonical records are correct. His translations includes upwards of 163 Mahāyāna sutras, among them the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ, AVATAMSAKASuTRA, and RATNAKutASuTRA collections, translations of the YOGĀCĀRABHuMI and other basic MADHYAMAKA and YOGĀCĀRA treatises, as well as a number of works by his contemporaries sĀNTARAKsITA and KAMALAsĪLA. He is also credited with the translation of tantric works that would come to be known as the "old translations" used by the RNYING MA sect. He is said to have been a practitioner of the VAJRAKĪLAYA tantras. He is also author of a number of original compositions, among them the Lta ba'i khyad par ("Differences in Views"), preserved in both a BSTAN 'GYUR and DUNHUANG version, which divides the Madhyamaka school into Sautrāntika-Madhyamaka and Yogācāra-Madhyamaka. See also DPAL BRTSEGS; KLU'I RGYAL MTSHAN.

yulu. (J. goroku; K. orok 語録). In Chinese, "discourse records" or "recorded sayings," also known as yuben (lit. "edition of discourses") or guanglu ("extensive records"); compilations of the sayings of CHAN, SoN, and ZEN masters. This genre of Chan literature typically involved collections of the formal sermons (SHANGTANG), exchanges (WENDA), and utterances of Chan masters, which were edited together by their disciples soon after their deaths. The yulu genre sought to capture the vernacular flavor of the master's speech, thus giving it a personal and intimate quality, as if the master himself were in some sense still accessible. Often the recorded sayings of a master would also include his biography, poetry, death verse (YIJI), inscriptions, letters (SHUZHUANG), and other writings, in addition to the transcription of his lectures and sayings. For this reason, Chan discourse records are the Buddhist equivalent of the literary collections (wenji) of secular literati. The term first appears in the SONG GAOSENG ZHUAN, and the genre is often associated particularly with the Chan master MAZU DAOYI (709-788) and his HONGZHOU line of Chan. Among the more famous recorded sayings are the Mazu yulu (a.k.a. Mazu Daoyi chanshi guanglu), LINJI YIXUAN's LINJI LU, and HUANGBO XIYUN's CHUANXIN FAYAO. Recorded sayings written in Japanese vernacular are also often called a hogo (dharma discourse).

Yunjusi. (雲居寺). In Chinese, "Cloud Dwelling Monastery"; monastery that is the home of the FANGSHAN SHIJING (stone scriptures). The monk Jingwan (?-639) allegedly founded this monastery in 631, but a stone inscription dated to 669 is the earliest written record of its existence. The monastery was also known as Xiyusi (Western Valley or Western Region Monastery), and in the seventh-century Mingbaoji ("Records of Miraculous Retribution") it is called Zhichuansi (Fount of Wisdom Monastery). On the nearby hill of Shijingshan (Stone Scriptures Hill) just to the east of Yunjusi, nine cave libraries stored the Fangshan lithic canon: its total of 14,278 lithic blocks of 1,122 Buddhist scriptures represent textual lineages that derive from recensions that circulated during the Tang and Khitan Liao dynasties. The carving of the lithic scriptures started during the Sui dynasty under the monk Jingwan with the support of Empress Xiao (r. 604-617), and continued through the late Ming dynasty. The monastery itself is famous for its pagodas, which were closely associated with the engraving of the lithographs. Seven stone pagodas date from the Tang, of which the single-story one at the top of Stone Scriptures Hill, with an inscription dated to 898, is noted for both its architecture and carved decorations. Two of the five pagodas from the Liao are especially significant. Built in 1117, the octagonal Southern Pagoda has eleven stories and pointed eaves and includes a depository of Buddhist scriptures beneath it. The Northern Pagoda is uniquely shaped: the bottom half is octagonal with bracketed eaves and carved niches, while the upper half is cone-shaped and decorated with nine circular bands. Its surface is decorated with more than thirty groups of brick reliefs depicting scenes of dancing and singing, the most interesting example of which is a goddess strumming a three-stringed instrument, one of the rare extant examples for the study of Liao musical culture. The Northern Pagoda is surrounded by smaller stone pagodas dating from the Tang dynasty, several of which resemble the Xiaoyanta (Small Wild Goose Pagoda; see DACI'ENSI) in the ancient Chinese capital of Chang'an (modern Xi'an).

Zenrin kushu. (禪林句集). In Japanese, "Phrase Collection of the ZEN Grove"; a lengthy collection of more than four thousand Zen phrases-specifically capping phrases (JAKUGO) or appended phrases (AGYO)-culled from Buddhist SuTRAs, discourse records (YULU), koan collections (see C. GONG'AN), and various Chinese belletristic classics. The collection was edited by a certain Ijushi in 1688. Ijushi's collection is based on a shorter phrase book entitled the Kuzoshi, compiled by the Zen master Toyo Eicho (1428-1504) of the MYoSHINJI lineage of the RINZAISHu. Beginning with single-character phrases, the Zen phrases in the Zenrin kushu are sequentially organized according to their number of Sinographs. The Zenrin kushu is one of the most commonly used collections in Japanese koan training today.

Zhengfayanzang. (J. Shobogenzo; K. Chongpobanjang 正法眼蔵). In Chinese, "Treasury of the Eye of the True Dharma," in three rolls, edited by the CHAN master DAHUI ZONGGAO and his lay disciples in 1147. The Zhengfayanzang is largely a collection of 661 cases or GONG'AN with Dahui's prose commentary (pingchang), annotations (C. zhuoyu/zhuyu; see J. JAKUGO), and instructions for the assembly. The zhengfayanzang of the title is a term used within Chan to indicate the school's special repository of the "eye" or "mind" of the BUDDHADHARMA, which is independent from the scriptural tradition. (See JIAOWAI BIECHUAN). The exchanges between masters and disciples that Daohui covers in his collection are described as being the transmission of this eye. His Zhengfayanzang thus records the exchanges of a number of renowned Tang and Northern Song Chan masters and their disciples, including ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN, DESHAN XUANJIAN, and XUEFENG YICUN, as well as the sermons of masters associated especially with the LINJI ZONG, including LINJI YIXUAN, YANGQI FANGHUI, and HUANGLONG HUINAN. Dahui strings together typically between three and six exchanges or sermons and, at the end of each section, adds his own brief prose commentary, often about twenty Sinographs in length, most starting with "Miaoxi says." (Miaoxi is one of Daihui's cognomens.) The Zhengfayanzang seems to have exerted some influence on the compilation of the ZONGMEN LIANDENG HUIYAO, by Dahui's third-generation successor Huiweng Wuming (d.u.). The SHoBoGENZo, the magnum opus of the Japanese SoToSHu monk DoGEN KIGEN, bears the same title but in its Japanese pronunciation.

Zhongfeng Mingben. (J. Chuho Myohon; K. Chungbong Myongbon 中峰明本) (1263-1323). Chinese CHAN master in the LINJI ZONG and one of the most influential monks of the Yuan dynasty; also known by the toponym Huanzhu (Illusory Abode). Zhongfeng was a native of Qiantang in Hangzhou prefecture (present-day Zhejiang province). While still a youth, Zhongfeng left home to study under the Chan master GAOFENG YUANMIAO of Mt. Tianmu, from whom he eventually received his monastic precepts at age twenty-four. After he left Gaofeng, Zhongfeng maintained no fixed residence and would on some occasions dwell on a boat. As his reputation grew, he came to be known as the Old Buddha of the South (Jiangnan Gufo). Mingben was an especially eloquent advocate of "questioning meditation" (KANHUA CHAN); his descriptions of the meaning and significance of Chan cases (GONG'AN) and meditative topics (HUATOU) and the processes and experience of kanhua practice are widely cited in the literature. In 1318, he was given a golden robe and the title Chan master Foci Yuanzhao Guanghui (Buddha's Compassion, Perfect Illumination, Broad Wisdom) from Emperor Renzong (r. 1311-1320). Zhongfeng also served as teacher of the next emperor Yingzong (r. 1320-1323). Emperor Wenzong (r. 1329-1332) also bestowed upon him the posthumous title Chan master Zhijue (Wise Enlightenment). Five years later, Emperor Shundi (r. 1333-1367) entered Zhongfeng's discourse records (YULU), the Zhongfeng guanglu, into the Chinese Buddhist canon (DAZANGJING), a signal honor for an indigenous author (few of whom are represented in the official canon); Shundi also bestowed on him the title State Preceptor Puying (Universal Resonance). Zhongfeng also composed his own set of monastic rules (QINGGUI) titled the Huanzhu'an qinggui.

Zongjing lu. (J. Sugyoroku; K. Chonggyong nok 宗鏡録). In Chinese, "Records of the Mirror of the Source"; composed c. 961 by the Song-dynasty CHAN master YONGMING YANSHOU (904-975), in one hundred rolls; also called "Records of the Mirror of the Mind" (Xinjing lu). The "source" (zong), Yanshou says in the preface to the Zongjing lu, refers to the "one mind" (YIXIN), which functions like a mirror that is able to reflect all dharmas. This comprehensive collection offers an exhaustive elaboration of the Chan teaching of "one mind" by systematizing the doctrinal and meditative positions of the various Chan traditions of past and present. The Zongjing lu consists of three main sections: exemplifications of the source (biaozong zhang), questions and answers (wenda chang), and citations (yinzheng chang). The first section, which comprises much of the first roll, offers a general overview of the treatise, focusing on Chan's "source" in the one mind. The massive second section, corresponding to the second half of the first roll through the ninety-third roll, offers various explanations on the one mind through a question raised at the beginning of each section, followed by Yanshou's detailed response. His explanations are typically accompanied by extensive citations from various sutras and commentaries, such as the YUANJUE JING and the DAZHIDU LUN. Throughout this exhaustive survey and explanation of doctrinal matters, Yanshou underscores the importance of the one mind or one dharma as the underlying source of all external phenomena. The third and final section, which comprises the last seven rolls of the collection, validates the previous explanations through quotations of hundreds of scriptures and sayings of eminent Chan masters; its aim is to help those of inferior spiritual capacity give rise to faith. Many of these quotations are from materials that are no longer extant, thus providing an important overview of Chan during Yanshou's time. Yanshou's goal throughout this work is to present his distinctive vision of Chan as a pansectarian tradition that subsumes not only the different Chan lineages, but also such doctrinal traditions as TIANTAI, HUAYAN, and FAXIANG. Much of the source material that Yanshou compiled in the Zongjing lu may derive from GUIFENG ZONGMI's similarly massive Chanyuan ji ("Chan Collection"), only the prolegomenon to which survives (see CHANYUAN ZHUQUANJI DUXU). The collection was influential not only in China, but also in Koryo-period Korean SoN and the five mountain (GOZAN) schools of Ashikaga-period Japanese ZEN.

Zongmen liandeng huiyao. (J. Shumon rentoeyo; K. Chongmun yondŭng hoeyo 宗門聯燈會要). In Chinese, "Essential Collection of the Lamplight Connections within the [Chan] Tradition"; composed by Huiweng Wuming (d.u.), a third-generation disciple of the CHAN master DAHUI ZONGGAO, in 1183. This work is a collection of anecdotes and teachings culled from the biographies and discourse records (YULU) of over six hundred patriarchs and teachers (ZUSHI) of the Chan tradition. Huiweng begins the collection with the seven buddhas of the past (SAPTABUDDHA), the twenty-eight Indian patriarchs, and the six patriarchs of China (see CHUANDENG LU). His collections also include the various lineages and collateral lines that split off from the sixth patriarch (LIUZU) HUINENG's disciples QINGYUAN XINGSI (up to the seventeenth generation) and NANYUE HUAIRANG (up to the fifteenth generation). In addition to its role as a genealogical history, the Zongmen liandeng huiyao was favored by many followers of Chan as a reliable and convenient collection of Chan cases (GONG'AN).

zushi. (J. soshi; K. chosa 祖師). In Chinese, "patriarch" (lit. "ancestral teacher"), referring to eminent teachers in lineages that are claimed to trace back to sĀKYAMUNI Buddha or even earlier buddhas. Indian Sanskrit texts dating from the 2nd century CE onward refer to a tradition of five "masters of the dharma" (dharmācārya) who succeeded the Buddha as head of the SAMGHA: MAHĀKĀsYAPA, ĀNANDA, MADHYĀNTIKA, sĀnAKAVĀSIN, and UPAGUPTA . Later sources expand this list into a roster of nine eminent masters who "handed down the lamplight of wisdom successively through the generations." Often, these genealogies were extended as far back as the seven buddhas of antiquity (SAPTATATHĀGATA). It is widely presumed that this notion of dharma-transmission lineages developed from the earlier VINAYA concept of the "preceptor" (UPĀDHYĀYA), a senior monk who confers the lower ordination (pravrajyā, see PRAVRAJITA) to new novices (sRĀMAnERA) and higher ordination (UPASAMPADĀ) to monks (BHIKsU). This personal connection between preceptor and disciple created incipient ordination families connected to specific preceptors, connections that later could be extended to dharma transmission as well. ¶ In East Asia, these lists of Indian dharma masters continued to be expanded and elaborated upon so that they also included the preeminent indigenous figures within each lineage, thus connecting the Chinese patriarchs of each lineage with their Indian predecessors. Most of the indigenous traditions of East Asian Buddhism, including the CHAN ZONG, TIANTAI ZONG, JINGTU ZONG, and HUAYAN ZONG, draw their legitimacy at least partially from their claims that their teachings and practices derive from an unbroken lineage of authoritative teachers that can be traced back geographically to India and temporally to the person of the Buddha himself. The specific names and numbers of patriarchs recognized within each lineage typically change over time and vary widely between the different traditions. Of these lists, the list of patriarchs recognized in the Chan school has received the lion's share of scholarly attention in the West. This Chan list varies widely, but a well-established roster includes twenty-eight Indian and six Chinese patriarchs. These six Chinese patriarchs (liu zu)-BODHIDHARMA, HUIKE, SENGCAN, DAOXIN, HONGREN, and HUINENG-are credited by the classical tradition with the development and growth of Chan in China, but early records of the Chan school, such as the LENGQIE SHIZU JI and LIDAI FABAO JI, reveal the polemical battles fought between disparate contemporary Chan communities to place their own teachers on this roster of patriarchal orthodoxy. It is important to note that all of these various lists of patriarchs, in all the different traditions, are created retrospectively as a way of legitimizing specific contemporary lineages or teachers and verifying the authenticity of their teachings; thus their accounts of the chronology and history of their lineages must be used critically. The compound zushi can mean either "patriarch" (lit., ancestral teacher) or in other contexts "patriarchs and teachers," as in the stock phrase "all the buddhas of the three time-periods and patriarchs and teachers throughout successive generations" (sanshi zhufo lidai zushi), which explicitly traces a school's ancestral lineage from the past to the present and into the future. Some modern Buddhists, especially in the West, deplore the sexism inherent in the term "patriarch," preferring instead to render it with the gender-neutral term "ancestor." See also CHUANDENG LU; FASI; PARAMPARĀ; YINKE.

Zuting shiyuan. (J. Sotei jion; K. Chojong sawon 祖庭事苑). In Chinese, "Garden of Matters from the Patriarchs' Hall," edited in eight rolls by Mu'an Shanxiang (d.u.) in 1108; the oldest encyclopedia of the Chinese CHAN tradition. This collection includes over 2,400 items related to Chan pedagogy, culled from Buddhist and secular stories, proverbs, numerological lists, personal names, local dialects, and so forth. Mu'an is said to have embarked on this project in response to the growing number of monks who were unable to understand the rich content and context of the many GONG'AN exchanges found in Chan literature. Mu'an's material is drawn from over twenty important Chan sources, such as the discourse records (YULU) of YUNMEN WENYAN, XUEDOU CHONGXIAN, and FAYAN WENYI, and YONGJIA XUANJUE's popular ZHENGDAO GE. The encyclopedia functions as a glossary for these works, offering explanations for their difficult technical terms and obscure names (which are not necessarily Chan or Buddhist in origin), and drawing his explanations from Buddhist, Confucian, and Daoist materials, as well as such secular sources. For example, the first roll of the encyclopedia provides a glossary of the Yunmen lu, which discusses the author Yunmen Wenyan, offers definitions of terms and explanations of names appearing in the text, drawing on sources ranging from the Shiji ("Book of History") to the AGAMA SuTRAs, and fills out the myriad numerical lists that appear in the text, such as the three vehicles (C. sansheng; S. TRIYĀNA), the three baskets of the canon (C. sanzang; S. TRIPItAKA), the eight teachings of Tiantai (see WUSHI BAJIAO), etc. Mu'an's exhaustive collection meticulously traces the source of each item and provides a detailed commentary on each. The Zuting shiyuan was republished in 1154, and numerous editions were published during the Tokugawa period in Japan.



QUOTES [3 / 3 - 1500 / 2525]


KEYS (10k)

   1 C S Lewis
   1 Athanasius
   1 The Mother

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1:Scripture records her giving birth, and says: She wrapped him in swaddling clothes. Her breasts, which fed him, were called blessed. Sacrifice was offered because the child was her firstborn. ~ Athanasius,
2:If God is Love, He is, by definition, something more than mere kindness. And it appears, from all the records, that though He has often rebuked us and condemned us, He has never regarded us with contempt. He has paid us the intolerable compliment of loving us, in the deepest, most tragic, most inexorable sense. ~ C S Lewis,
3:The capacity for visions, when it is sincere and spontaneous, can put you in touch with events which you are not capable of knowing in your outer consciousness.... There is a very interesting fact, it is that somewhere in the terrestrial mind, somewhere in the terrestrial vital, somewhere in the subtle physical, one can find an exact, perfect, automatic recording of everything that happens. It is the most formidable memory one could imagine, which misses nothing, forgets nothing, records all. And if you are able to enter into it, you can go backward, you can go forward, and in all directions, and you will have the "memory" of all things - not only of things of the past, but of things to come. For everything is recorded there.

   In the mental world, for instance, there is a domain of the physical mind which is related to physical things and keeps the memory of physical happenings upon earth. It is as though you were entering into innumerable vaults, one following another indefinitely, and these vaults are filled with small pigeon-holes, one above another, one above another, with tiny doors. Then if you want to know something and if you are conscious, you look, and you see something like a small point - a shining point; you find that this is what you wish to know and you have only to concentrate there and it opens; and when it opens, there is a sort of an unrolling of something like extremely subtle manuscripts, but if your concentration is sufficiently strong you begin to read as though from a book. And you have the whole story in all its details. There are thousands of these little holes, you know; when you go for a walk there, it is as though you were walking in infinity. And in this way you can find the exact facts about whatever you want to know. But I must tell you that what you find is never what has been reported in history - histories are always planned out; I have never come across a single "historical" fact which is like history.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951, 109 [T7],

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:The historian records, but the novelist creates. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
2:Many a politician wishes there was a law to burn old records. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
3:The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
4:the history of the world records is the fact of-Christ's birth." ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
5:Nothing can be more contemptible than to suppose Public Records to be true. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
6:If I made records for my own pleasure, I would only record Charley Patton songs. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
7:Records told the same tale, then the lie passed into history and became truth. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
8:Why is the competition always so intense to set new records for maximum stupidity? ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
9:Records are made to be broken. It is in man's nature to continue to strive to do just that. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
10:I've got nothing against records - I've spent my life making them - but they are a kind of historical blip. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
11:I went to a record store, they said they specialized in hard-to-find records. Nothing was alphabetized! ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
12:If you study the history and records of the world you must admit that the source of justice was the fear of injustice. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
13:It must be quite mysterious to some people why I bother to carry on. Because, you know, I don't sell that many records. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
14:I collect records. And cats. I don't have any cats right now. But if I'm taking a walk and I see a cat, I'm happy. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
15:For Hades is mighty in calling men to account below the earth, and with a mind that records in tablets he surveys all things. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
16:I believe God's keeping the records and I believe you will be rewarded even in this life; somehow, some way God will make it up to you. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
17:The day I was born songs were on records, phones were tied down, computers needed rooms and the web was fiction. Change the world. You can. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
18:But that's not all the law is. The law is also memory; the law also records a long-running conversation, a nation arguing with its conscience. ~ barack-obama, @wisdomtrove
19:Check the records; there has never been an undisciplined person who was a champion. Regardless of the field of endeavor, you'll find this to be true. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
20:When I started making my own records, I had this idea of drowning out the singer and putting the rest in the foreground. It was the background that interested me. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
21:Dalton's records, carefully preserved for a century, were destroyed during the World War II bombing of Manchester. It is not only the living who are killed in war. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
22:John Dalton's records, carefully preserved for a century, were destroyed during the World War II bombing of Manchester. It is not only the living who are killed in war. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
23:Jesus, that ear. He should donate it to The Smithsonian. Brian Wilson, he made all his records with four tracks, but you couldn't make his records if you had a hundred tracks today. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
24:A page from a journal of modern experimental physics will be as mysterious to the uninitiated as a Tibetan mandala. Both are records of enquiries into the nature of the universe. ~ fritjof-capra, @wisdomtrove
25:History can be formed from permanent monuments and records; but lives can only be written from personal knowledge, which is growing every day less, and in a short time is lost forever. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
26:Many of the greatest tyrants on the records of history have begun their reigns in the fairest manner. But the truth is, this unnatural power corrupts both the heart and the understanding. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
27:No one in this world, so far as I know - and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
28:It's easy to identify many investment managers with great recent records. But past results, though important, do not suffice when prospective performance is being judged. How the record has been achieved is crucial. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
29:The music industry is a strange combination of having real and intangible assets: pop bands are brand names in themselves, and at a given stage in their careers their name alone can practically gaurantee hit records. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
30:We must always meet our obligation to those who fall behind without our assistance. But let's remember, without a race there can be no champion, no records broken, no excellence - in education or any other walk of life. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
31:A studio is an absolute labyrinth of possibilities - this is why records take so long to make because there are millions of permutations of things you can do. The most useful thing you can do is to get rid of some of those options before you start ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
32:Every day the word &
33:No matter how carefully records are kept and filed and computerized, they grow fuzzy with time. Stories grow by accretion. Tales accumulate&
34:And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed if all records told the same tale, then the lie passed into history and became truth. &
35:Personal branding is about managing your name - even if you don't own a business - in a world of misinformation, disinformation, and semi-permanent Google records. Going on a date? Chances are that your "blind" date has Googled your name. Going to a job interview? Ditto. ~ tim-ferris, @wisdomtrove
36:Records can be destroyed if they do not suit the prejudices of ruling cliques, lost if they become incomprehensible, distorted if a copyist wishes to impose a new meaning upon them, misunderstood if we lack the information to interpret them. The past is like a huge library, mostly fiction. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
37:I was the kind of entrepreneur that never really felt I made it. When Mike Olefield's "Tubular Bells" [Virgin Records' first release] sold 8 or 10 million copies, I suppose, at age 19, I could've possibly retired on the money. Instead, I immediately pushed the boat and took that risk again. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
38:The micro-compositions are the pieces themselves, but the macro-composition is the whole set of them and how it moves from track to track and how the titles relate to one another, for example. Always when I do records like this of a selection of instrumental pieces - the titles, to me, are very important. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
39:I believe God's keeping the records, and I believe you will be rewarded even in this life. Somehow, some way, God will make it up to you. It may be He protected you from an accident you never knew. You can't give God something without God giving you more in return, whether it's peace or joy or satisfaction. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
40:If God is Love, He is, by definition, something more than mere kindness. And it appears, from all the records, that though He has often rebuked us and condemned us, He has never regarded us with contempt. He has paid us the intolerable compliment of loving us, in the deepest, most tragic, most inexorable sense. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
41:There's enough songs for people to listen to, if they want to listen to songs. For every man, woman and child on earth, they could be sent, probaby, each of them, a hundred records, and never be repeated. There's enough songs. Unless someone's gonna come along with a pure heart and has something to say. That's a different story. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
42:I know all about the despair of overcoming chronic temptation. It is not serious, provided self-offended petulance, annoyance at breaking records, impatience, etc., don't get the upper hand. No amount of falls will really undo us if we keep picking ourselves up each time... The only fatal thing is to lose one's temper and give up. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
43:See where Congress passed a two billion dollar bill to relieve bankers' mistakes. You can always count on us helping those who have lost part of their fortune, but our whole history records nary a case where the loan was for the man who had absolutely nothing. Our theory is to help only those who can get along, even if they don't get a loan. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
44:It is difficult for young players to learn - because of the great emphasis on records - but, ideally, the joy and frustration of sport should come from the performance itself, not the score. While he is playing, the worst thing a player can think about in terms of concentration - and therefore of success - is losing. The next worst is winning. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
45:Budget deficits are not caused by wild-eyed spenders, but by slow economic growth and periodic recessions. And any new recession would break all deficit records. In short, it is a paradoxical truth that tax rates are too high today and tax revenues are too low, and the soundest way to raise the revenues in the long run is to cut the rates now. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
46:I have no use whatsoever for projections or forecasts. They create an illusion of apparent precision. The more meticulous they are, the more concerned you should be. We never look at projections, but we care very much about, and look very deeply at, track records. If a company has a lousy track record, but a very bright future, we will miss the opportunity. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
47:Start listening to the voice in your head as often as you can. Pay particular attention to any repetitive thought patterns, those old gramophone records that have been playing in your head perhaps for many years. This is what I mean by ‘waching the thinker,’ which is another way of saying: listen to the voice in your head, be there as the witnessing presence.   ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
48:I am fond of history and am very well contented to take the false with the true. In the principal facts they have sources of intelligence in former histories and records, which may be as much depended on, I conclude, as anything that does not actually pass under ones own observation; and as for the little embellishments you speak of, they are embellishments, and I like them as such. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
49:The mutability of the past is the central tenet of Ingsoc. Past events, it is argued, have no objective existance, but survive only in written records and in human memories. The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon. And since the Party is in full control of all records, and in equally full control of the minds of its members, it follows that the past is whatever the Party chooses to make it. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
50:Every individual is at once the beneficiary and the victim of the linguistic tradition into which he has been born - the beneficiary inasmuch as language gives access to the accumulated records of other people's experience, the victim in so far as it confirms him in the belief that reduced awareness is the only awareness and as it bedevils his sense of reality, so that he is all too apt to take his concepts for data, his words for actual things. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
51:I will remember the kisses our lips raw with love and how you gave me everything you had and how I offered you what was left of me, and I will remember your small room the feel of you the light in the window your records your books our morning coffee our noons our nights our bodies spilled together sleeping the tiny flowing currents immediate and forever your leg my leg your arm my arm your smile and the warmth of you who made me laugh again. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
52:Consequently, if my theory be true, it is indisputable that before the lowest Silurian stratum was deposited, long periods elapsed, as long as, or probably far longer than, the whole interval from the Silurian age to the present day; and that during these vast, yet quite unknown, periods of time, the world swarmed with living creatures. To the question why we do not find records of these vast primordial periods, I can give no satisfactory answer. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
53:Being singer is different than being an actor, where you call up sources from your own experience that you can apply to whatever Shakespeare drama you're in. But an actor is pretending to be somebody, a singer isn't. And that's the difference. Singers today have to sing songs where there's very little emotion involved. That and the fact that they have to sing hit records from years gone by doesn't leave a lot of room for any kind of intelligent creativity. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
54:Reading was like an addiction; I read while I ate, on the train, in bed until late at night, in school, where I'd keep the book hidden so I could read during class. Before long I bought a small stereo and spent all my time in my room, listening to jazz records. But I had almost no desire to talk to anyone about the experience I gained through books and music. I felt happy just being me and no one else. In that sense I could be called a stack-up loner. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
55:I hate the thought that someone had picked up one of my song records and was really excited about it, and walks [out of] a record shop with On Land and is disappointed because it isn't what they wanted. So, I try to make signs, graphically and visually, to say to people "Okay, this is this department of my work and this is this other department of my work." And of course I'm very pleased if people like all of them, but I don't want them to feel deceived at any point. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
56:Winston worked in the RECORDS DEPARTMENT (a single branch of the Ministry of Truth) editing and writing for The Times. He dictated into a machine called a Speakwrite. Winston would receive articles or news-items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, in Newspeak, rectify. If, for example, the Ministry of Plenty forecast a surplus, and in reality the result was grossly less, Winston's job was to change previous versions so the old version would agree with the new one. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
57:To square the records, however, it should be said that if the Calvinist does not rise as high, he usually stays up longer. He places more emphasis on the Holy Scriptures which never change, while his opposite number (as the newspapers say) tends to judge his spiritual condition by the state of his feelings, which change constantly. This may be the reason that so many Calvinistic churches remain orthodox for centuries, at least in doctrine, while many churches of the Arminian persuasion often go liberal in one generation. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
58:Early on, before rock &
59:No one in this world, so far as I know&
60:Humanity is an organism, inherently rejecting all that is deleterious, that is, wrong, and absorbing after trial what is beneficial, that is, right. If so disposed, the Architect of the Universe, we must assume, might have made the world and man perfect, free from evil and from pain, as angels in heaven are thought to be; but although this was not done, man has been given the power of advancement rather than of retrogression. The Old and New Testaments remain, like other sacred writings of other lands, of value as records of the past and for such good lessons as they inculcate. Like the ancient writers of the Bible our thoughts should rest upon this life and our duties here. "To perform the duties of this world well, troubling not about another, is the prime wisdom," says Confucius, great sage and teacher. The next world and its duties we shall consider when we are placed in it. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:I don't play for records. ~ Albert Pujols,
2:I can't stand making records. ~ Eric Church,
3:To me, making records isn't work. ~ Jeff Lynne,
4:I want to make big-sounding pop records. ~ Mika,
5:Records are there to be broken. ~ Shahid Afridi,
6:Records don't have to be perfect. ~ Joshua Homme,
7:World records are only borrowed. ~ Sebastian Coe,
8:All records are made to be broken. ~ Red Auerbach,
9:I don't want to live on past records. ~ Barry Gibb,
10:I write the most sexiest records out. ~ Kool Keith,
11:what CDR stood for—call detail records. ~ Mike Omer,
12:All records are not made to be broken. ~ Karl Malone,
13:I don't take breaks, I just break records ~ Lil Wayne,
14:I have to make rock records occasionally. ~ Evan Dando,
15:I don't know how many records I'm selling. ~ Squarepusher,
16:When I die, just keep playing the records. ~ Jimi Hendrix,
17:Get down with your old Allman Bros. records! ~ Bryan Ferry,
18:I'm down to sell records but not my soul. ~ Curtis Jackson,
19:La ciutat era de paper, però els records, no. ~ John Green,
20:My account is paid up. Your records are wrong. ~ Jon Jones,
21:Records don’t mean anything in rivalry games. ~ Dez Bryant,
22:The facts are facts and records are records. ~ John McCain,
23:I've pretty much done records with everybody. ~ Young Jeezy,
24:He's been breaking Olympic records like ninepins ~ Des Lynam,
25:Records are very rare if events occur at random. ~ Anonymous,
26:Aren't people just like gramophone records? ~ Agatha Christie,
27:Critics don't buy records. They get 'em free. ~ Nat King Cole,
28:I listen to my records and I think, 'Wow, ~ Alanis Morissette,
29:I want to make 20, 30, 50 studio records. ~ Mickey Melchiondo,
30:I think rock records tend to be very expensive. ~ Andy Summers,
31:Most great records really start with the drums. ~ Billy Corgan,
32:Once you got three records, you pretty much got 10. ~ Curren y,
33:Sophomore records are historically really difficult. ~ Karen O,
34:The historian records, but the novelist creates. ~ E M Forster,
35:The records made money, but I didn't get none. ~ Little Walter,
36:All I want to do is sing on other people's records. ~ Neko Case,
37:I also tried to avoid doing obvious dance records. ~ Boy George,
38:I don't believe in having bands for solo records. ~ Mick Jagger,
39:Collecting records is, for many, beyond a hobby. ~ Henry Rollins,
40:It leaves a good legacy to have five records. ~ Theophilus London,
41:At the end of the day, you're just phonograph records. ~ Tom Petty,
42:I don't release records to be anything but enjoyable. ~ John Lydon,
43:The oldest written records known to us are Sumerian; ~ Will Durant,
44:Theres nothing like Nashville for making records. ~ Carol Channing,
45:We need to have our medical records put on the IT. ~ George W Bush,
46:I like records. My favorite is Simon and Garfunkel. ~ Morgan Saylor,
47:I plan to stay in music. I plan to keep making records. ~ Joan Jett,
48:I sold my life to Capitol Records; it sucks. ~ Melissa Auf der Maur,
49:I've sold my records outta shopping carts on the street. ~ GG Allin,
50:The ultimate goal is to always break records. ~ Floyd Mayweather Jr,
51:You can't trust an artist that just makes good records. ~ Nick Cave,
52:Bought all the Beatle records, I sounded just like Paul. ~ Mac Davis,
53:I buy records - vinyl. I have a record player at home. ~ Amber Heard,
54:When I was a kid, I had some Charles Lloyd records. ~ David Johansen,
55:I think my records will always tend to be approachable. ~ Tom DeLonge,
56:The trouble with records is that they're too short. ~ Mahalia Jackson,
57:Nowadays people sell millions of records that can't sing. ~ Dee Snider,
58:The scratches in Yoko Ono records are moments of relief. ~ Albie Sachs,
59:I go by records and Bob Paisley is the No 1 manager ever! ~ Alan Hansen,
60:I think people get mad because I make more direct records. ~ Kool Keith,
61:My only expenses are probably guitar strings and records. ~ Chris Isaak,
62:Records aren't selling anymore; people are burning music. ~ Tom DeLonge,
63:The most that I can learn is in records that you burn. ~ Marilyn Manson,
64:I'm playing to the sort of people who like the same records. ~ Nick Lowe,
65:Making records is not how it used to be! #stillwerking ~ Madonna Ciccone,
66:I'm the ultimate record fan. I still go out and buy records. ~ Elton John,
67:Maybe we should all just listen to records and quit our jobs ~ Jack White,
68:My records don't go platinum or gold. I think they go cedar. ~ Dave Sitek,
69:The day I run out of ideas is the day I stop making records. ~ John Lydon,
70:There haven't been many credible electronic covers records. ~ Martin Gore,
71:There were records, but Oswald was not regarded as dangerous. ~ Jim Bishop,
72:We always sold 4 or 5 million records no matter what we did. ~ Sammy Hagar,
73:What kind of heaven is that, you can’t have your records? ~ Michael Chabon,
74:Have your friends collect your records and then change your number. ~ Gotye,
75:I don't make my living making records. Maybe someday I will. ~ Dan Auerbach,
76:I'm selling more records on my own than I did on major labels. ~ Aimee Mann,
77:I was always concerned with making cool-sounding rock records. ~ A C Newman,
78:Life skills, like makeup and playing records and trapping boys. ~ Anonymous,
79:Nobody's going to sell 10 million records by not working hard. ~ Daryl Hall,
80:The hand that records is also what makes everything unclear. ~ M T Anderson,
81:There's a lot about records that you cannot feel from a CD. ~ Anton Corbijn,
82:It's a sad state when more people retweet than buy records. ~ Noel Gallagher,
83:We recorded to document ourselves, not to sell a lot of records. ~ Stan Getz,
84:Chasing records doesn't keep me on my bike. Happiness does. ~ Lance Armstrong,
85:Even by the time I was four or five, I had Gene Autry records. ~ Robert Quine,
86:I wasn't aware that Track Records were interested in the Bonzos. ~ Neil Innes,
87:My original idea was to produce and not make records myself. ~ T Bone Burnett,
88:The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon. ~ George Orwell,
89:Well, some people die and then they sell more records, go figure. ~ Tommy Lee,
90:I love making records; I love making music; I love writing songs. ~ Barry Gibb,
91:In records that defy the tooth of time. ~ Edward Young, The Statesman's Creed.,
92:It's hard to sell records when you can get it for free everywhere. ~ Jason Wade,
93:Becoming famous and selling a lot of records doesn't change a thing. ~ Macy Gray,
94:Records used to be documents, but now record companies want product. ~ Stan Getz,
95:The eye records. The eye takes vivid, unforgettable pictures. ~ John D MacDonald,
96:The most gratifying thing, with no question, is making records. ~ Roland Orzabal,
97:Invariably, guitar players that go solo make really bad records. ~ Richard Hawley,
98:It's hard sometimes to capture magic when it comes to live records. ~ Josh Turner,
99:I've never had a huge collection of records; I've never been a beat digga. ~ El P,
100:Songwriters tend to make records instead of talking to people. ~ Sharleen Spiteri,
101:Under Adverse conditions - some people break down,some break records ~ Shiv Khera,
102:I always want to make Strokes records and play Strokes shows. ~ Julian Casablancas,
103:I have no clue what my stats are. Records are for after the season. ~ Delmon Young,
104:The more you release records, in some ways it takes pressure off you. ~ Craig Finn,
105:I love Don Williams records. And old Ralph Stanley and Bill Monroe. ~ Dan Fogelberg,
106:I just to put out the best records I can and perform the best I can. ~ Dave Lombardo,
107:I'll keep making records until I don't have more ideas for records. ~ John Darnielle,
108:You must wanna be in the Guinness Book of World Records as the dumbest. ~ Puff Daddy,
109:Anybody who's putting out records is probably not making money at it. ~ Alan Sparhawk,
110:I definitely hope to continue to release records at an accelerated pace. ~ Craig Finn,
111:Stevie Wonder's records introduced me to '70s soul when I was 12 or 13. ~ Alicia Keys,
112:Being able to still make records is a privilege. I don't take it casually. ~ Tori Amos,
113:I couldn't possibly have lived all the things that Ice-T on the records lived. ~ Ice T,
114:I'll write records until I'm dead. And then maybe even after that! ~ Alanis Morissette,
115:the female suspect, you said someone she’d counseled. You have her records? ~ J D Robb,
116:The first records I heard were from Dizzy Gillespie and people like that. ~ Bill Wyman,
117:We are not any safer through the bulk collection of all Americans' records. ~ Ted Cruz,
118:We have no school records because we’ve never set foot in a classroom. ~ Tara Westover,
119:check DMV records, she thought with a sinking feeling. It was the most ~ Danielle Steel,
120:I always listen to records that I've been a part of with a grain of salt. ~ Jeff Tweedy,
121:I love the live cut part of making records the surprises are the prizes. ~ Shelby Lynne,
122:Records became much cruder in the last 20 years. Let's put it that way. ~ Art Garfunkel,
123:They don't bother too much with the balance and things on blues records. ~ Maurice Gibb,
124:Avui els records eren millors que qualsevol realitat que pogués veure. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
125:I've always wanted the sound of Muddy Waters' early records - only louder ~ Eric Clapton,
126:Virgin Records will probably release their own package sometime next year. ~ Paula Abdul,
127:I listen to my old records and I think, 'How did I ever get on the radio?' ~ Dolly Parton,
128:They told me I should be making my own records. So I figured, 'why not? ~ Dee Dee Warwick,
129:I'll be writing records until I'm dead, whether people like it or not! ~ Alanis Morissette,
130:I am a record executive and I shall be right there in your face with my records. ~ L A Reid,
131:Nothing can be more contemptible than to suppose Public Records to be true. ~ William Blake,
132:Playing shows and making records keeps been getting easier and more fun. ~ Jonathan Richman,
133:Test centuries is one such records which doesn't look like being surpassed ~ Sunil Gavaskar,
134:All I've ever wanted to do was play music and go on the road and make records. ~ Brody Dalle,
135:All my singles went platinum-plus.All my records and videos were groundbreaking. ~ DJ Khaled,
136:If I made records for my own pleasure, I would only record Charley Patton songs. ~ Bob Dylan,
137:I say the phone records of law abiding citizens are none of their damn business! ~ Rand Paul,
138:Nothing records the effects of a sad life so graphically as the human body. ~ Naguib Mahfouz,
139:Records have images. There are wet records and dry records. And big records. ~ Art Garfunkel,
140:As it turns out, it's really expensive to make movies, much more than records. ~ Cass McCombs,
141:WHAT is America but beauty queens, millionaires, stupid records and Hollywood? ~ Adolf Hitler,
142:You can tell a person's religion 85 percent of the time from their phone records. ~ Rand Paul,
143:you. We can drive to Argone and talk to Constance. She has documented records ~ Fern Michaels,
144:A gay murder movie is never going to be, like, breaking box office records. ~ Daniel Radcliffe,
145:Finally, my manager negotiated a deal where I got to produce my own records. ~ Waylon Jennings,
146:I always thought my records were number one; it's just the charts didn't think so. ~ Nick Cave,
147:I started playing jazz by slowing down Tal Farlow records and analyzing his runs ~ Lenny Breau,
148:My favorite Extreme records were the last two. I can't listen to the first one. ~ Gary Cherone,
149:People don't buy records anymore. I don't know how people can support themselves. ~ Aimee Mann,
150:Records told the same tale, then the lie passed into history and became truth. ~ George Orwell,
151:Yea from the table of my memory I'll wipe away all trivial fond records. ~ William Shakespeare,
152:I could kidnap your mother,” he offered. “If you need the phone records explained. ~ C E Murphy,
153:I have records in gold, in platinum, I have two Oscars, I have Grammys and so on. ~ Celine Dion,
154:I learned so much about recording and about singing on records from Ken Nelson. ~ Wanda Jackson,
155:I love country music, blues, and punk, and one day I might make those kinds of records. ~ Kesha,
156:I used to buy records in high school. Mainly dancehall: Super Cat, Buju Banton. ~ Damian Marley,
157:Recordar: To remember; from the Latin records, to pass back through the heart ~ Eduardo Galeano,
158:There are a lot of records coming out, in every field of music, not just jazz. ~ Herbie Hancock,
159:First he threw out all of his records, trashed his heart and then he went to sleep. ~ Pete Wentz,
160:I wouldn't be surprised if history records Tim Berners-Lee as the second Gutenberg. ~ Jeff Bezos,
161:Today I feel like it's about people just looking fresh and their records aren't fresh. ~ Pusha T,
162:Every album I make big records. I'm going to always make an anthem. That's what I do. ~ DJ Khaled,
163:Music critics get their records for free so their opinions usually don't matter. ~ Marilyn Manson,
164:What I'd have liked would have been the money and the hit records without the fame. ~ John Lennon,
165:I feel like I haven't done anything. What have I done? I've just made a few records. ~ Erykah Badu,
166:I'm making records, my fans they can't wait. They write me letters, tell me I'm great. ~ Joe Walsh,
167:It's a pleasure playing your big hit records and it's a real joy to see the audience. ~ Martin Fry,
168:Just because people play songs with great technique doesn't mean the records are better. ~ Kenny G,
169:Making records is fun. It's not some big statement. You're allowed to make mistakes. ~ Norah Jones,
170:When you got a group like G-Unit... we sold millions of records, we got a lot of egos. ~ Tony Yayo,
171:I don't want to extend my career for individual records. This is the time to go. ~ Kumar Sangakkara,
172:I love the idea of making records that people can use, records that have a sense of utility. ~ Moby,
173:I'm a pretty bad troubadour. I'm more of a music fan who got away with making records. ~ Ryan Adams,
174:I think the most important thing for me is putting out records that document ideas. ~ Kieran Hebden,
175:It would be ridiculous to say I don't want to sell records, but I trust my taste. ~ Earl Sweatshirt,
176:Once you get a couple of records in, you kinda vibe out then you see what a full length is. ~ Torae,
177:There's not a whole lot of media interest in me other than just the records that I make. ~ Amos Lee,
178:I'm a weird, bald musician who makes records in his bedroom and lives in the Lower East Side. ~ Moby,
179:I wasn't interested in fabricating things and altering what I did to make hit records. ~ Pat Benatar,
180:Buy real records in real shops, or I'll come round your house and scream at your mother. ~ Ian Gillan,
181:I'm always looking for overlooked post-Dylan singer-songwriter records from the '70s. ~ Noah Baumbach,
182:My mama was a rocker way back in fifty-three, buys them old records that they sell on TV. ~ Tom Petty,
183:Don't confuse correlation and causation. Almost all great records eventually dwindle. ~ Charlie Munger,
184:I'm content with making records, but I don't want to be doing the same thing all the time. ~ John Cale,
185:I'm so famous, people expect me to sell as many records as Celine Dion or Puff Daddy. ~ Marilyn Manson,
186:I put a lot into my records, and I won't release anything I'm not totally thrilled with. ~ Andrew Bird,
187:Second records aren't usually very good. Even Bob Dylan's was a bit disappointing. ~ Madeleine Peyroux,
188:That was your bad, how could you pass up on em? He just take them records and he gas up on em. ~ Drake,
189:Any band on their first couple records is just trying to keep up with their inspiration. ~ Joshua Homme,
190:Between Prince and my dad's fusion-jazz records, I didn't have a choice in being funky. ~ Patrick Stump,
191:DJ culture always made us aware that the best records were going to come from the small shops ~ Chuck D,
192:Touring and putting out records is fun and cool, but I've been doing it for a long time. ~ Serj Tankian,
193:I like that band Get Hustle. They're cool live. I haven't heard their records, though. ~ Stephen Malkmus,
194:I'ma continue to make records, continue to make hits, continue to be what I am, legendary. ~ Young Jeezy,
195:I think English people were a lot better at breakdancing than they were at making records. ~ Fatboy Slim,
196:Of course it's super special to create your own records; it really is a part of my self. ~ Martin Garrix,
197:And as a nurse, I know very well the importance, for example, of electronic medical records. ~ Lois Capps,
198:As I get older, I 've shied away from a lot of convention. I've just been making my records. ~ Kool Keith,
199:I'm a big fan of '70s records where artists could draw on whatever influences they wanted. ~ Deana Carter,
200:In 1906 he and Hulda made the first of several trips to London to sift through the records. ~ Bill Bryson,
201:So people think I'm lying about my age all the time? It's the records that are wrong! ~ Calista Flockhart,
202:God and Country are an unbeatable team; they break all records for oppression and bloodshed. ~ Luis Bunuel,
203:God and Country are an unbeatable team; they break all records for oppression and bloodshed. ~ Luis Bu uel,
204:I don't like to disappear between records. I like to play shows while I'm making the record. ~ Andrew Bird,
205:It is cool to have a label head that is also a songwriter, in a band, and produces records. ~ Rivers Cuomo,
206:It really does take a lot of time to make records, to be in the studio and do all that stuff. ~ Vince Gill,
207:We hear so many records these days that are done with click tracks, as opposed to a drummer. ~ Wayne Coyne,
208:When you live your life through records, the records are a record of your life. ~ Ahmir Questlove Thompson,
209:Alasdair Fraser's Culburnie Records has quietly become one of the best Celtic music labels today. ~ Jim Lee,
210:I'm not ashamed of selling millions of records. I'm very fortunate to be in that position. ~ Chris Daughtry,
211:I've got time, I hope, to make lots of quiet records. So quiet you won't be able to hear them. ~ Evan Dando,
212:material for the records. The rubber was soon replaced by shellac, and that material was used ~ Vaclav Smil,
213:Better the rudest work that tells a story or records a fact, than the richest without meaning. ~ John Ruskin,
214:I'm hyperactive, and I went in the studio and I would just start making records, for no reason. ~ Puff Daddy,
215:Next time!' In what calendar are kept the records of those next times which never come? ~ Helen Hunt Jackson,
216:Once I'd heard 'Modern Times' by Bob Dylan, it really changed the way I wanted to make records. ~ Elton John,
217:The longest voyage of discovery, the boldest adventure in the records of our race, had begun. ~ Stefan Zweig,
218:Aviation records don't fall until someone is willing to mortgage the present for the future. ~ Amelia Earhart,
219:Every country I've had different hit records, so we have to change the set to fit the country. ~ Bonnie Tyler,
220:Records are made to be broken. It is in man's nature to continue to strive to do just that. ~ Richard Branson,
221:As time will not wear out the guilt of sin, so it will not blot out the records of conscience; ~ Matthew Henry,
222:Every artist obviously wants to sell a million records and do the MTV cribs thing, but I'm realistic. ~ JD Era,
223:God and Country are an unbeatable team; they break all records for oppression and bloodshed. ~ Richard Dawkins,
224:He still had to go back into town and serve the warrant on the woman with the billing records. ~ Lynette Eason,
225:Let's be very clear, if you check the F.E.C. records you will see I am supporting George W. Bush ~ Roger Stone,
226:Listen, here's what I'd like to do: I'd like to live in a trailer and play records all night. ~ Charles Portis,
227:So many people I was at school with have all ended up being musicians and putting records out. ~ Kieran Hebden,
228:The leader was identified by his dental records—why he had them on him, no one was quite sure. ~ Jasper Fforde,
229:I'm not bored with my life. I'm not just making the records and touring, I would find that boring. ~ Elton John,
230:No one wants to be some guy who puts records out about how good it is. That seems quite arrogant. ~ Gary Jarman,
231:A lot of reasons I didn't do records with people is because I never wanted their light to reflect on me. ~ Rakim,
232:an average infantryman records one enemy fatality for every fifteen thousand combat rounds expended. ~ Lee Child,
233:Castle Face Records, run by The Oh Sees main man, Johnny Dwyer is always worth checking in with. ~ Henry Rollins,
234:I don't purchase records. I do enjoy listening to things like Japanese folk music or Indian music. ~ John Lennon,
235:I don't really like to sit around the house listening to my own records. They're not that good. ~ David Johansen,
236:I got to play on a couple of records with the Rolling Stones, and that was really special to me. ~ Benmont Tench,
237:Making good records tastes good in your mouh. And when that record sells, it tastes even better. ~ Courtney Love,
238:Mentally it is possible to break records, once you understand that, you can do anything. ~ Arnold Schwarzenegger,
239:Nowadays, you have to sell, like, half a million or a million records just to break even. ~ Maynard James Keenan,
240:I love listening to old records to keep nostalgic feeling; it allows me to not lose the love for hip-hop. ~ Rakim,
241:I think it'd be great to own a fun concept store with my friends and just sell books and records. ~ Tavi Gevinson,
242:People are best on records and books because you can turn them off or put them back on the shelf. ~ Henry Rollins,
243:But we used to go to flea markets and things, and look for old 78 records that had silly song titles. ~ Neil Innes,
244:I'd rather sell 10,000 records that represent me than 2 million that don't represent me at all. ~ Phillip Phillips,
245:I knew each person's delusion, the places their records had scratched, where the sounds repeated. ~ Louise Erdrich,
246:I've made more than 50 records with a wide range of music. I've often veered to check something out. ~ Gary Burton,
247:I would just listen to records and learn what I could, then just roll it over and over and over. ~ Dimebag Darrell,
248:Photographs are never records of the way things are; they're records of the way things were. ~ John Paul Caponigro,
249:The Shades never recorded anything, Little Daddy and the Bachelors recorded a couple of records, ya. ~ Tommy Chong,
250:When someone picks up one of my songs and records it, I'm a flattered man, it's a blessing to me ~ Smokey Robinson,
251:Your woodlot is, in fact, an historical document which faithfully records your personal philosophy. ~ Aldo Leopold,
252:People love their favorite records. And I aspire to make a record someone might be able to love in that way. ~ Moby,
253:I'm a huge fan of Geffen records. Everything about them - their artists, their videos, their marketing. ~ Guy Oseary,
254:I started off playing the clarinet, after I was inspired by listening to my dad's Benny Goodman records. ~ Alvin Lee,
255:Just because you sell lots of records it doesn't mean to say you're any good. Look at Phil Collins. ~ Noel Gallagher,
256:Records should come from feelings. You shouldn't try to do nothing; it should just come out how you feel. ~ Jadakiss,
257:If you heard my records and no one told you, I don't think you'd know whether it's a band or one guy. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
258:I want to keep making records as long as I can, but I don't know how long you can be taken seriously in rap. ~ Eminem,
259:Keeping my family out of prison best I can. That is success to me. I created that without selling records. ~ Yo Gotti,
260:Our attitude is that we want to cross over. You can't go on making records just for your own hometown. ~ Cheryl James,
261:Our parents surround us with origin stories that create deep grooves in the vinyl records of our lives. ~ Amy Poehler,
262:Rap records don't make you feel good no more. Six months after release, it can't come back as a classic ~ Wyclef Jean,
263:I am terrified at the thought that so much hideous and bad music will be put on records forever. ~ Sir Arthur Sullivan,
264:I'd found that what I wrote and put out on records somehow was not fitting into how I perform on stage. ~ Van Morrison,
265:If you really listen to my music my music is more like stories than party records. I never made party records. ~ Ice T,
266:I love to see my records broken, I really do, you get a chance to relive your life, the whole experience. ~ Don Hutson,
267:In America, the photographer is not simply the person who records the past, but the one who invents it. ~ Susan Sontag,
268:Some records with drum machines on them sound phony and plastic. It all depends on how you use the tools. ~ Don Henley,
269:Taking people on a journey is the fundamental element of underground dance music. I don't sell records. ~ Seth Troxler,
270:I have to accept the fact that I was putting out records that reviewers were going to get an image from. ~ Van Morrison,
271:I've got nothing against records - I've spent my life making them - but they are a kind of historical blip. ~ Brian Eno,
272:I went to a record store, they said they specialized in hard-to-find records. Nothing was alphabetized! ~ Mitch Hedberg,
273:Obviously, I want to sell records, but I do it because I find it therapeutic. In music I can be myself. ~ Lindsay Lohan,
274:Still, the best augurs are those who divine from the portents of the past. They compile phenomenal records. ~ Glen Cook,
275:You don't need to see my birth certificate, or my college records, or my legal writings, or... anything. ~ Barack Obama,
276:By computerizing health records, we can avoid dangerous medical mistakes, reduce costs, and improve care ~ George W Bush,
277:China's got a billion people and a hit record over there is a million records. You know that ain't right. ~ Quincy Jones,
278:Fat chance. “Fuck Neil Young,” he snapped, “and fuck his records. You keep them.” End of conversation. ~ Brent Schlender,
279:I don't think Marquee Moon was so good, y'know? Just another record. First records everybody likes a lot. ~ Tom Verlaine,
280:If you really want to torture me, sit me in a room strapped to a chair and put Mariah Carey's records on. ~ Cameron Diaz,
281:Individual records are nice to get, but before the season starts, you want to play to win the Stanley Cup! ~ Guy Lafleur,
282:I've become increasingly confidant in following intuitions ahead of thoughts as I produce more records. ~ Jerry Harrison,
283:I've done quite a few records now, and I look back and think of them as documents of my musical journey. ~ Kieran Hebden,
284:We have a partnership deal with New Line Records, which is part of New Line Cinema, and... I worked on that. ~ James Iha,
285:All the records I've made have pretty much been big club turntable records. You need to feel the rhythm. ~ Jermaine Dupri,
286:Hip-hop and R&B are especially fertile bases of collaboration. It always makes good records and good music. ~ John Legend,
287:I always liked records that didn't explain themselves too well - ones that you had to listen a few times. ~ Tim Heidecker,
288:I don't need to sell tons of records, but I want longevity. I want to make music for the rest of my life. ~ Laura Marling,
289:In a way records are like paintings. Instead of using paints and brushes we use sounds and instruments. ~ John McLaughlin,
290:People have said to me, 'You can't write songs. You can't play an instrument.' But I've got 10 gold records. ~ Sonny Bono,
291:Even when I stop performing or stop making records I won't stop being creative. Songwriting is a good outlet. ~ Billy Joel,
292:Hef holds the Guinness Book of World Records title for largest scrapbook collection at over 2,000 volumes. ~ Holly Madison,
293:I guess I've been making records since I was 16, and even when 50 people bought them, I thought that was amazing. ~ Katy B,
294:I'm happy to have the opportunity to record the records I want to - I'm very aware that that's a privilege. ~ Brad Mehldau,
295:I think we have very steady records of President Putin, who inherited the country with democratic values. ~ Garry Kasparov,
296:I try and make little stories. Whether it's with a pencil or with bits of records, it's really the same thing. ~ Kid Koala,
297:All the records I've put out have had either artwork that I did while I was young or something that my Dad painted. ~ Gotye,
298:It was kind of easier for me to do records that didn't take a year or two years of my life to write and to make. ~ K D Lang,
299:Reed said he could maybe find out where it came from back at his office. Check the certified mail records. ~ David Baldacci,
300:Software archaeology describes the art of mining through the historical records in your version control system. ~ Anonymous,
301:Some records are going to be bigger than others. You're always going to be compared to your biggest record. ~ Howie Dorough,
302:A race that rejected the idea of personal sacrifice would surely be erased from time's records before long. ~ Salman Rushdie,
303:Because my mother was in love with Bobby Darin, I grew up with his records playing in our house all the time. ~ Kevin Spacey,
304:I like records that flow really well and you don't have to skip around because there's lot of different jumps. ~ Norah Jones,
305:I saw that [music] reflected in my mother when we listened to these records [of Bob Gordon]. And I felt it too. ~ Jon Gordon,
306:It's real nice and exciting for me to break the records, but it's more exciting for me to be on a winning team. ~ Dan Marino,
307:My records are basically a litany of complaints against the world, and I'm quite like that in real life as well. ~ Nick Cave,
308:Take your current success as the beginning of your journey and you will keep breaking your own records.  ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
309:Artist development is something that I've been passionate about from my days at Uptown and Motown Records. ~ Laurieann Gibson,
310:History is also a hard taskmaster, for she covers her paths by erasing so much evidence from her records— ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
311:I had to make a drastic change at Sun Records and I didn't really appreciate country music until I went there. ~ Charlie Rich,
312:I let my music do the talking. Ain't no TV show gonna help me. Ain't no hit single gon help me sell no records. ~ Schoolboy Q,
313:I'm not a person who embraces challenges. I run from challenges. I break world records running from challenges. ~ Larry David,
314:It was Noel Coward whose technique I envied and tried to emulate. I collected all his records and writing. ~ Kenneth Williams,
315:Records must not be the focus and that's the most important thing. It mustn't come at the cost of the team. ~ Garfield Sobers,
316:And some by hours; Some measure days by dreams And some by flowers; My heart alone records My days and hours. ~ Madison Cawein,
317:Donald Trump is a big U2 fan and then, even more desperately, that John Gutfreund also buys their records. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
318:Honestly, a lot of pop records have beatboxing. Timbaland beatboxes on his tracks. Justin Timberlake beatboxes. ~ Doug E Fresh,
319:I hold Olympic records for procrastination. I can procrastinate thinking about my procrastination problem. ~ Steven Pressfield,
320:I'm not trying to change the face of hip-hop music. I'm trying to make my records and always take the next step for me. ~ El P,
321:It would be great to do a rock opera, but using more low-fi technology. I love shitty-sounding records. ~ Billie Joe Armstrong,
322:My music is going to be true. I'm not out to sell records. I'm experiencing something, and it's what I feel. ~ Joaquin Phoenix,
323:The Akashic Records are the impressions from all of our past lives that are available within our causal body. ~ Frederick Lenz,
324:If you study the history and records of the world you must admit that the source of justice was the fear of injustice. ~ Horace,
325:I think these days, as an artist, you have to be slightly entrepreneurial. ...Nobody really sells records anymore. ~ Boy George,
326:Keeping records enhances the pleasure of the search and the chance of finding order and meaning in these events. ~ Aldo Leopold,
327:Phil Collins sold five times as many records as I did. Does that make him nearly as influential as I am? Nope. ~ Noel Gallagher,
328:I definitely see myself making classic R&B records with somewhat of a trendy vibe to it. I definitely wouldn't say trap. ~ Mario,
329:If you don't think drugs have done good things for us, then take all of your records, tapes and CD's and burn them. ~ Bill Hicks,
330:I never bothered about keeping track.Every now and then someone records one of my songs, and I get credit for it. ~ Mose Allison,
331:Past records of inter-Korean relations show that confrontation between fellow countrymen leads to nothing but war. ~ Kim Jong un,
332:The point of making records for me isn't to hear 300 songs in 50 minutes; it's to hear the 50-minute piece of music. ~ Girl Talk,
333:The Revolution is the reason why French estate records are probably the richest in the world over the long run. ~ Thomas Piketty,
334:I could see how this civilization will be totally wrecked
if all true records of human prehistory are made public. ~ Toba Beta,
335:I have been an XL fan of Devo since I was in high school in the 1970s. Their records only sound better with time. ~ Henry Rollins,
336:My favorite records are not easy - they're not records that reveal everything to you the first time out. ~ James Vincent McMorrow,
337:The records were in Danish, sadly, but a foreign language was no obstacle at five a.m. with a healthy buzz going. ~ Lars Emmerich,
338:worst that can happen if I refuse to pay up, and these blackmailers turn their records over to the District Attorney? ~ Anonymous,
339:But, for myself, the Earth’s records had taught me to look for widest ruin as the price of highest civilization. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
340:I put my pants on just like the rest of you - one leg at a time. Except, once my pants are on, I make gold records. ~ Will Ferrell,
341:What changed our lives forever was when Malcolm had the idea to sell rock 'n roll records to trendy customers. ~ Vivienne Westwood,
342:I think we had a Ben Webster/Gerry Mulligan record... that might have been it. We only had a few records in the house. ~ Jon Gordon,
343:It must be quite mysterious to some people why I bother to carry on. Because, you know, I don't sell that many records. ~ Brian Eno,
344:When you listen to most of the records that really had an impact on you, they always seem to be from a different era. ~ Jeff Tweedy,
345:Creating records and writing music with people I admire and respect is a very spiritual and enlightening thing for me. ~ Chuck Ragan,
346:I collect records. And cats. I don't have any cats right now. But if I'm taking a walk and I see a cat, I'm happy. ~ Haruki Murakami,
347:If I have more creativity that I want to get out of me, I try to find other ways than pursuing solo records so much. ~ Black Francis,
348:I love getting into the basement of a courthouse, and all the dusty records - all that stuff makes me really happy. ~ Sharon Cameron,
349:I spent a lot of time in Tower Records. I'm a huge music nerd, and Tower was instrumental to me when I was growing up. ~ Colin Hanks,
350:I was signed to a record label at the same time as my friend Elliot Murphy, who makes great records to this day. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
351:My personal favorite records might have to be "Keep It Rollin" and "360" featuring Meek Mill...oh and the Intro Is Murder! ~ Kid Ink,
352:Throughout the records of the Gospels, I saw how Jesus didn’t treat women any differently than men, and I liked that. ~ Sarah Bessey,
353:I am evidence that you don't have to sell a lot of records or succeed in the usual way to have a big audience and a job. ~ Leo Kottke,
354:Modern music is people who can't think signing artists who can't write songs to make records for people who can't hear. ~ Frank Zappa,
355:People hear your records in order, and they think of you as progressing in some direction, but it's not really like that. ~ King Khan,
356:rooms, and being the NYPS-fucking-D, we have a whole division who gets off on going through electronics, records.” “That’s ~ J D Robb,
357:You know, I've released some great records and I've released some dogs. But frankly, the fun is in creating the thing. ~ Phil Collins,
358:All the songs on Yankee Hotel Foxtrot are the encapsulation of heterosexual love. I have different records for gay sex. ~ Margaret Cho,
359:And so, surpassing my own records for dangerous, reckless behavior, I ripped off Sonya's bracelet. "I'm Rose Hathaway. ~ Richelle Mead,
360:Do you know why it's so hard to solve a Redneck murder? 'Cause there's no dental records and all the DNA is the same. ~ Jeff Foxworthy,
361:I'm always happy when I hear about people selling records or selling books or selling movies. It makes me proud of them. ~ Ian MacKaye,
362:The man pervades London, and no one has heard of him. That’s what puts him on a pinnacle in the records of crime. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
363:Today, people are more into the glitz and the glamour of everything. We don't even read the inside of records anymore. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
364:We certainly strive for trying to make a quality record throughout, and I think that's true of all of our records. ~ Christopher Cross,
365:What I said, what are you [Rick Rubin] going to do with me that nobody else has been able to do to sell records with me? ~ Johnny Cash,
366:If you've sold over a million records, you are not punk rock, you are milking the system for everything that it's worth. ~ Billy Corgan,
367:I love making music and I'm falling in love with making records, so it's like having two girlfriends. But I can handle it. ~ Snoop Dogg,
368:It's casual Friday, which means that at the White House, they're casually going through everybody's phone calls and records. ~ Jay Leno,
369:I want to move away from sampling records and just have it be quite minimal. I don't want any more hip-hop beats in there. ~ Gold Panda,
370:There's a pervasive feeling that when somebody sings a song and records a song on a record, that it's their true feeling. ~ David Byrne,
371:Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die. ~ Francois Truffaut,
372:Three films a day, three books a week and records of great music would be enough to make me happy to the day I die. ~ Fran ois Truffaut,
373:You can read all the textbooks and listen to all the records, but you have to play with musicians that are better than you. ~ Stan Getz,
374:I think I'm going to be making country records for as long as I can see into the future. It's much more down-home and real. ~ Neil Young,
375:Records are just moments of achievement. They're like receipts for work done. Time goes on and people keep playing music. ~ Bill Laswell,
376:Third”— he grinned and leaned into her ear—” never in a billion years have couples fucked the way we do. We break records. ~ Gail McHugh,
377:When you write a song you have an idea of how it should be sung but it doesn't work out that way if someone else records it ~ Barry Gibb,
378:And so, surpassing my own records for dangerous, reckless behavior, I ripped off Sonya's bracelet.
"I'm Rose Hathaway. ~ Richelle Mead,
379:For Hades is mighty in calling men to account below the earth, and with a mind that records in tablets he surveys all things. ~ Aeschylus,
380:History records endless struggles to enlarge those realms, inspiring ones; it also records painful reversals and setbacks. ~ Noam Chomsky,
381:I dont believe in the Devil, but if I did I should think of him as the trainer who drives Heaven to break its own records. ~ Robert Musil,
382:People still come up to me and ask me to sign their records. That's right, records! Man, they don't even make records no more! ~ Al Green,
383:Really, throughout my career, what I've done is taken teams with bad records and with every situation I've made them better. ~ Don Nelson,
384:They were recorded without processed cheese. Listen to old '50s records. The style may be dated, but the recording isn't. ~ Richard Lloyd,
385:Today's records, even though they may be lyrically repetitive and not saying anything particularly heavy, they have energy. ~ Carole King,
386:I'm a bit of a nerd, I wouldn't mind working in a shop selling records, or having a radio show where I could play obscure singles. ~ Bjork,
387:This is what I wanted to do from the very beginning: write songs and make records and tour them with a good live band. ~ Christopher Owens,
388:All my records have been written to be records, rather than writing a group of songs and seeing if they fit together. ~ Justin Townes Earle,
389:Havia infringit les meves pròpies normes. En comptes de fugir dels records, havia caminat cap a ells i els havia saludat. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
390:I'm buying records a lot, like, every week I'm just buying old reissues or old originals or new records that I have heard about. ~ Tim Gane,
391:Jealousy is not a barometer by which the depth of love can be read. It merely records the degree of the lover's insecurity. ~ Margaret Mead,
392:President Bush is not fazed by other candidates' war records. He said, I may have not fought in Vietnam, but I created one. ~ Craig Kilborn,
393:To be truthful, Jay-Z wouldn't have a quarter of the records sold today if it wasn't for the white people buying his records. ~ Vanilla Ice,
394:When I make records I have full control of everything and I know how it sounds before it comes out, with films it's outta my hands. ~ Ice T,
395:I had always sung in my dad's shop. I worked there after school, and I'd be singing along with the top-40 records of the day. ~ Neil Diamond,
396:Libraries keep the records on behalf of all humanity. the unique and the absurd, the wise and the fragments of stupidity. ~ Vartan Gregorian,
397:There hasn't been one moment in my career where I felt I didn't have any control over the creative aspects of my records. ~ Enrique Iglesias,
398:deal. Mrs. B belongs in the Guinness Book of World Records on many counts. Signing a non-compete at 99 merely adds one more. ~ Warren Buffett,
399:I don't spend a lot of time feeling sorry for myself, trying to compare how many records I've sold or how much money I've made. ~ Steve Earle,
400:I had a handful of records, but when I was 11 years old, I liked Puccini as much as Little Richard. They both made sense to me. ~ Patti Smith,
401:I think it's essential to make new music now, and to try and make epic records now, and not rely on what happened in the past. ~ Jason Pierce,
402:I think it was Columbia politics, Columbia Records politics that, that, Tom Wilson left [Bob Dylan] after "Like A Rolling Stone". ~ Al Kooper,
403:I've had a couple of guys that I've had co-produce records with me through my career, and it's fun to work with a co-producer. ~ Ricky Skaggs,
404:I've made records that everyone has hated and I've loved, and made records that everyone has loved and I've deemed, at best, mediocre. ~ Moby,
405:That is what the title of artist means: one who perceives more than his fellows, and who records more than he has seen. ~ Edward Gordon Craig,
406:Breaking records is not something you expect to be doing. That's like a sports thing, it's not usually a comedy and writing thing. ~ Louis C K,
407:I'm gonna be making records anyway, even if I had to sell 'em out of the trunk of my car. I'm that kind of musician and singer. ~ Dolly Parton,
408:I taught myself off records, Memphis Slim, them old piano players, then added to it. Yeah, hard and loud, beat it to pieces. ~ Pinetop Perkins,
409:First of all I love Empire Records and That Thing You Do and all the movies he did from that era. He hates when I bring that up. ~ Baron Vaughn,
410:Lessons didn't really work out for me, so I went to the old school, listening to records and learning what I wanted to learn. ~ Dimebag Darrell,
411:Ugster vinyl pumps, Partridge Family records, plastic daisy jewelry, old postcards. . . . It's a magpie Christmas market. ~ Francesca Lia Block,
412:I gotta feel like what I'm giving the fans is 100 per cent and that it's game-changing. I don't just throw out microwave records. ~ Missy Elliot,
413:I'm a tidy sort of bloke. I don't like chaos. I kept records in the record rack, tea in the tea caddy, and pot in the pot box. ~ George Harrison,
414:I'm not trying to sound pretentious, but we did sell 12 million records on the first album, so we did get paid a little bit. ~ Justin Timberlake,
415:Now the music industry is sort of like a Craigslist venture, right? Where you're making your own records and selling them online. ~ Gus Van Sant,
416:Everybody raps. We rap to make money. We do business. Ain't no other record company out there that sold as many records as we did. ~ Tupac Shakur,
417:I've been lucky to be able to make the records I've wanted to make. The record company has never pressured me to cut certain songs. ~ Lyle Lovett,
418:My parents had a huge pile of records - vinyl! - that I loved, especially the Motown stuff, Steely Dan, Stevie Wonder, Otis Redding. ~ Jonny Lang,
419:People who listen to my records expect the ballads from me. The rock 'n roll is on there because it's another mode of expression. ~ Dan Fogelberg,
420:Record companies are not necessarily interested in you realizing your artistic dream. The bottom line is that they got to sell records. ~ Mos Def,
421:There's a certain urgency that comes from the records of the early 60s before overdubbing and multitracking came into play. ~ Justin Townes Earle,
422:The thing that I realize about fashion now, fashion and music, now versus back then is that you had to have fresh records and be fresh. ~ Pusha T,
423:All of my records have been very personal, just writing more and more songs, you get better at being able to say what you feel. ~ Shooter Jennings,
424:I always turn to the sports page first, which records people’s accomplishments. The front page has nothing but man’s failures. ~ Max Allan Collins,
425:My main concern is making the connection with my listeners and making records that the whole world can sing. That's what makes me happy. ~ Ab Soul,
426:records the lives of ideas. People don’t write it, time does. Human truth is just a nail that everybody hangs their hats on. ~ Svetlana Alexievich,
427:Sometimes people say yo do you think rap changed you. No doubt it changed me. If I wasn't making records I'd still be hanging every night. ~ Rakim,
428:The more you push the budgets up, the more you make records cost $20, the more you make records last 4 and 5 minutes on the radio. ~ Queen Latifah,
429:We did six records, then six movies. Now we need to do six of something else, so we get 666 - and then our master Satan can return! ~ Cheech Marin,
430:We listened [with my mother] to [Frank] Sinatra and Glen Campbell and we had some Beatles records that I liked. This was in the '70s. ~ Jon Gordon,
431:Why would I want to sound like Joni Mitchell? I've got Joni Mitchell records, and they're great, and I couldn't possibly be that good. ~ Ben Folds,
432:You're not going out there to make a living out of it by selling records. You want acclaim and you want to know people are listening. ~ Kevin Drew,
433:Don't see others doing better than you, beat your own records everyday, because success is a fight between you and yourself. ~ Chandra Shekhar Azad,
434:Every generation of rock musician will understand that we wouldn't be anywhere without the support of teenagers buying the records. ~ Roger Daltrey,
435:Trying to cope with the balance between home life and road life has been a theme in my music since early Red House Painters records. ~ Mark Kozelek,
436:If they were going to have to identify my body by my dental records, I was going to make sure they all got a good look at my teeth. ~ Seanan McGuire,
437:I'm a businessman. I work for business people. The kind of thing they say is: Now we've sold a lot of records, let's sell some more. ~ Nat King Cole,
438:In the beginning, I wanted to be successful. I wanted to make and have hit records. And I wanted everything that went along with it. ~ George Strait,
439:You're a Keeper. You hunt down the animated records of the dead in your spare time. I'm pretty sure you can handle private school. ~ Victoria Schwab,
440:People get passionate about a song. It's been my experience if you put out radio candy, something commercial, it doesn't sell records. ~ Trace Adkins,
441:The Bible isn’t a book that reflects one point of view. It is a collection of books that records a conversation—even a debate—over time. ~ Peter Enns,
442:You know that I can make hits. You know I can do all these rap records. So, I'm going to start opening up and letting you know my struggles. ~ Future,
443:Everything costs so much—clothes and one’s face—and just silly things like cinemas and cocktails—and even gramophone records!’ Roddy ~ Agatha Christie,
444:The WTO has one of the most impressive records in global economic governance, by promoting trade liberalisation and economic development. ~ Anna Lindh,
445:We live in what's called an open society, which of course means they open our emails, open our phone records, and open our medical records. ~ Jay Leno,
446:In the last two years 24 countries have set new all-time temperature records. We've seen flooding on an epic scale in every continent . ~ Bill McKibben,
447:I think I just want to make and be part of great records, because of what it brings to other people, what it gives back, is so incredible. ~ Erol Alkan,
448:Most of the people who are given these Rock'n'roll Hall of Fame things sell millions of records, so it's kind of like a trophy for them. ~ Tommy Ramone,
449:Selling records is fantastic. But if you're not loving what you do, and if everybody is throwing knives at you, it can get old very fast. ~ Wes Borland,
450:(As a boy) I was listening to Sonny Boy Williamson's (I) records and I would close my eyes and I could visualize myself playing the harp. ~ Junior Wells,
451:I feel like people might be slightly less inclined to hate me as much as they did in the past, and I think part of that is selling fewer records. ~ Moby,
452:I felt that making records in a traditional way - putting them out in the same way, wasting loads of money - was just a pointless exercise. ~ Boy George,
453:If you use a cell phone - as I do - your wireless carrier likely has records about your physical movements going back months, if not years. ~ Al Franken,
454:I learned music listening to Elvis' records. His measurable effect on culture and music was even greater in England than in the States. ~ Mick Fleetwood,
455:I've noticed that when I am selling a lot of records, certain things become easier. I'm not talking about getting a table in a restaurant. ~ David Byrne,
456:The Bible contains not only records of what God has done, but invitations for us to believe in what he will do. (There are, of course, some ~ J D Greear,
457:The day I was born songs were on records, phones were tied down, computers needed rooms and the web was fiction. Change the world. You can. ~ Steve Jobs,
458:Write down the things you wish to remember, and keep those records close. Secured. It’s surprising how much you forget as the years go on. ~ Chloe Neill,
459:Hurricane Katrina reiterated the need for [access to] medical records, ... ... But there's going to be a lot more needed than $4 million. ~ Thomas Carper,
460:I just like writing lyrics. I find a little satisfaction in performing live, making records. But primarily, I just try to write every day. ~ Cass McCombs,
461:I like myself. Other than some late blooming magickal powers and some sealed legal records, I think I'm pretty fucking nifty.
-Mariketa ~ Kresley Cole,
462:I live for playing live. All my records are live, since After the Gold Rush, with the exception of Trans and the vocals on Landing on Water. ~ Neil Young,
463:I've always spent a lot of time on my records with what I think were unique rhythmic approaches... but no one ever writes about your rhythm playing ~ Joe,
464:Longest free fall, highest skydive, and youngest person to break the speed of sound. You only set three world records. - Amy, to Dan ~ C Alexander London,
465:One day, when Kushner accused Walsh of leaking about him, she challenged him back: “My phone records versus yours, my email versus yours. ~ Michael Wolff,
466:all the records and memories we’d kept were soon forgotten, for history is all too easily rewritten and the past is all too easily erased. ~ Susan Dennard,
467:Anybody can make hood music or club records, that's not hard. But can you make music that touch people's souls. That's what I was out to do. ~ Gorilla Zoe,
468:For the most part I stand by all of records. I just always like the one I've done most recently the best and I think that's the whole point. ~ Jeff Tweedy,
469:We all have horrible track records,” he said. “It’s what leads up to the real thing. It’s what allows you to recognize it when it shows up. ~ Jill Shalvis,
470:What Lucie was hearing surpassed all understanding. A mass derangement, with the aid of bogus medical records and money under the table. ~ Franck Thilliez,
471:If you listen to a lot of old funk records, the drums are really small. But you don't perceive it like that because the groove is so heavy. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
472:My records are fairly quiet and my dj sets are really loud. And then the live shows are like a robot soul revue. So i understand people's confusion. ~ Moby,
473:Partying means drinking. It also means playing records by Lou Reed and Chicago, which I thought was a city but is also a band it turns out. ~ Ron Currie Jr,
474:There is an underside to every age about which history does not often speak, because history is written from records left by the privileged”. ~ Howard Zinn,
475:The voting records of virtually every member of Congress reveal that the oath of office is more a ceremonial gesture than a sacred commitment. ~ Tom Coburn,
476:What is normally called religion is what I would tend to call music - participating in music, listening to music, making records and singing. ~ Will Oldham,
477:When I started recording, I thought I'd be able to do all kinds of records: jazz, country, dance - and I've always wanted to do a gospel album. ~ Tom Jones,
478:All the records of your past lives are contained within your own mind, just as the records of your ancestors are contained within your DNA. ~ Frederick Lenz,
479:Certain songs I feel different people should be on different tracks, you know it's emotional. I put myself into characters for certain records. ~ Kool Keith,
480:If you listen to old Jerry Lee Lewis records, he'll always - about nine times out of 10 have the lyrics different than the original record is. ~ Chris Isaak,
481:I'm a singer and as long as I can sing - which, thank God, is something that I still seem to be able to do - I'd like to carry on making records. ~ K D Lang,
482:Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. ~ J D Salinger,
483:There's always gonna be rock n' roll bands, there's always gonna be kids that love rock n' roll records, and there will always be rock n' roll. ~ Dave Grohl,
484:Well-behaved women make history when they do the unexpected, when they create and preserve records and when later generations care. ~ Laurel Thatcher Ulrich,
485:It feels real good to look at some of the guys who have played before me, then come in and break a record. But records are made to be broken. ~ Chris Johnson,
486:People think about, when you sell a million records, "Oh. You must be buying Ferrari's and living in mansions." It was never really like that. ~ Kevin Martin,
487:Performing was the natural thing originally and the rest of it [records and so on] is just like offshoots of that. That's how I see it anyway. ~ Van Morrison,
488:When I'm standing at the Pearly Gates, I want to say to God, 'Don't look at the records. Look at my family. I'm much prouder about that part.' ~ John Fogerty,
489:A lot of people hear the records on the radio, they aren't absolutely sure who exactly Tears For Fears is, they just know they like the song. ~ Roland Orzabal,
490:Bob Dylan's first couple of records in the 60's weren't considered cover records, but he only wrote one or two original songs on each album. ~ John Mellencamp,
491:Dot had discovered in herself a keen interest in diligent research of nice calm paper records, which never wept or ran away or turned nasty. ~ Kerry Greenwood,
492:Nearly 180,000 illegal immigrants with criminal records, ordered deported from America, are tonight roaming free to threaten peaceful citizens. ~ Donald Trump,
493:The notes I have made are not a diary in the ordinary sense, but partly lengthy records of my spiritual experiences, and partly poems in prose. ~ Edvard Munch,
494:When you're making an album with people who made your favorite records as a rebellious teenager, it feels like you've achieved something. ~ Yannis Philippakis,
495:As my memory rests, but never forgets what I lost. ~ Billie Joe Armstrong, "Wake Me Up When September Ends", American Idiot (2004), California: Reprise Records,
496:I heard Pete Seeger records when I was a kid. I saw Bob Dylan when I was about 12. The first song I ever learned to play was a song by Phil Ochs. ~ Ketch Secor,
497:I was going through a period where I was just trying not to write songs and was thinking maybe I wouldn't play in a band and make records anymore. ~ Tim Rutili,
498:Really the only thing holding a lot of records together is the personality of the singer, and the will to write all of these different things. ~ Elvis Costello,
499:Remember thee!  Yea, from the table of my memory  I'll wipe away all trivial fond records. ~ William Shakespeare, Hamlet, c. 1601, Act I, scene 5, line 97.,
500:The films that I really liked and the ones that really blew my mind when I was younger were independent films. They're like great records to me. ~ Jim Sturgess,
501:These were times when all were judged squarely and fairly on their musical tastes, and a personal music collection read as private medical records. ~ Morrissey,
502:At least 3,527 U.S. monthly records for heat, rain, and snow were broken in 2012. We can't let this continue unchecked, and we don't have to. ~ Frances Beinecke,
503:I always turn to the sports page first, which records people's accomplishments. The front page has nothing but man's failures. - Earl Warren ~ Max Allan Collins,
504:I feel like when the songwriting slows, I'd love to help others with their records. If it's something I really believe in, it's worth the effort. ~ Mark Kozelek,
505:I'm trying to make records where people don't feel cheated. Nashville has been guilty of insulting the Country Music audience for years and years. ~ Steve Earle,
506:There's so much around, you don't know what to listen to. All I've got at home is Bo Diddley, some Stones and Beatles stuff, and old jazz records. ~ Syd Barrett,
507:They wouldn't play my records on American radio because I had spiky hair. They said, 'Punk rock doesn't sell advertising, it won't make any money.' ~ Billy Idol,
508:I'm so excited that my label Rocker Records has partnered with Cleopatra Records to put out this collection of RARE and UNIQUE kick ass rock !!! ~ Carmine Appice,
509:Madonna, eat your heart out. Britney Spears, eat your heart out. I would say we have diamond records coming - they're gonna sell 10 million-plus. ~ Spencer Pratt,
510:My first two records are so simply constructed. The reason isn't because I wanted to make simple music. It's because I don't really have the chops. ~ Norah Jones,
511:The human brain is like a memory system that records every thing that happens to us and makes intelligent predictions based on those experiences. ~ Daniel Tammet,
512:Gray’s Electronics and Records had a display in the window, a fake fireplace with a flashing jukebox where the flames would have been. On the record ~ Ravi Howard,
513:I get up, go shopping, clean the flat, cook my boyfriend's dinner. It's great selling records, but it doesn't mean you have to turn into a freak. ~ Dido Armstrong,
514:I like making little videos and little records. I've always loved video cameras and four-track cassette recorders, still cameras, anything. ~ Joseph Gordon Levitt,
515:I never made any money off of my records. It gave me the name across the country so that I could do some of the things in my personal appearances. ~ Mickey Gilley,
516:I've made solo records and that's all been a learning experience. I've just got better at singing and more comfortable with who I am and my voice. ~ Roddy Woomble,
517:When I first started in rock, I had a big guy's audience for my early records. I had a very straight image, particularly through the mid '80s. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
518:A lot of people don't remember anything since 'Ice Ice Baby,' but I've got 3 records out since then and they're all successes - but not commercially. ~ Vanilla Ice,
519:Had records so stellar, they had to lock their resumes in a drawer at night, so the golden light streaming from the pages wouldn't keep them awake. ~ Ilona Andrews,
520:I can't make two records at the same time. Whatever I do, I have to concentrate on and put everything in, because if I don't, I'm just not good. ~ Steve Lillywhite,
521:I have over 150 or 200 records recorded. We have so many EP's and LP's. It's just picking the best records to put the best possible album together. ~ Tony Sunshine,
522:Infiltrating the records of a state penitentiary as well as the state and federal court systems was much more fun than deciphering art. -Phil Roach ~ Aleatha Romig,
523:In the '80s, the way radio was programmed, if you didn't have a hit record you weren't going to be able to make any more records. That was it, period. ~ Huey Lewis,
524:Alex looks quickly around for signs of trouble," his journal records. "But his entry of Mexico is either unnoticed or ignored. Alexander is jubilant! ~ Jon Krakauer,
525:Our business in life is not to get ahead of others, but to get ahead of ourselves—to break our own records, to outstrip our yesterday by our today. ~ John C Maxwell,
526:Take it where you can find it, in old photograph records, old motion pictures, and in old friends; look for it in nature and look for it in yourself. ~ Ray Bradbury,
527:The biggest ones [online stores] I go back to are Amazon.com and eBay.com because it’s great for music and books... I collect vintage vinyl records. ~ John Varvatos,
528:Tyler refused to listen to CDs, insisting that real vinyl records were the only way to go. Blair worried her brother was turning into a loser. ~ Cecily von Ziegesar,
529:I worked with John, but I had enough sense to walk just a little ways behind him. I could have made more records, but I wanted to have a marriage. ~ June Carter Cash,
530:No one sells records anymore. It's all about touring. It's all greatest hits records and box sets. And even those don't sell. People just go online. ~ Frank Stallone,
531:Pessimism and optimism are slammed up against each other in my records, the tension between them is where it's all at, it's what lights the fire. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
532:When I put out the records, when I make a distribution deal, those distributors tell me who they sell it to and how many copies. So I want nothing less. ~ Gail Zappa,
533:When you are trying to do something when you are getting started and you are trying to make records for the first time, you want it to be the best. ~ Freddie Hubbard,
534:I changed my name for that piece of shit. Historical records have been altered—Amy Elliott to Amy Dunne—like it’s nothing. No, he does not get to win. ~ Gillian Flynn,
535:If I never sang on a record again I can still look at my walls. They are covered floor to ceiling with gold and platinum records from all over the world. ~ Don Dokken,
536:I make an embarrassing amount of money for a borderline Marxist, just by selling 100,000 records. I don't sell millions of records, and I don't need to. ~ Steve Earle,
537:Music is so hard. It's a struggle to get people to care. It's hard to make an impact in today's world because people aren't buying records anymore. ~ Juliana Hatfield,
538:The first rule of rock and roll is it's all about live. Then you have to learn a second craft, which is making records. It should go in that order. ~ Steven Van Zandt,
539:Actually, I know for a fact there are some young female artists who don't even sing on their own records and who don't sing live. And that is pathetic. ~ Avril Lavigne,
540:I'd like my records to reach as many people as possible, but I'm also thinking in terms of how I can keep from getting jaded or unhappy with the process. ~ Will Oldham,
541:In what way will our remote posterity be able to cope with the enormous accumulation of historical records which a few centuries will bequeath to them? ~ Immanuel Kant,
542:My folks were country music performers. They made records and even did a few tours with the Grand Ole Opry. There always were a lot of guitarists around. ~ Lenny Breau,
543:So at 16 I got a job at the local radio station. And I was working after school and weekends. I did the news; I did everything. I did - played records. ~ Dick Van Dyke,
544:The most important thing is how you program and how you choose your records. That really does sort out who is a good DJ and who is just playing records. ~ John Digweed,
545:The Robin For The Crumb
864
The Robin for the Crumb
Returns no syllable
But long records the Lady's name
In Silver Chronicle.
~ Emily Dickinson,
546:For me able to do the records I want to do and not have to worry about this producer or that producer or that trend, I'm not really interested in that. ~ Brian McKnight,
547:Gordon Lightfoot looms pretty large in my life as a writer and an artist in general. I never travel anywhere without at least two of his records with me. ~ Ron Sexsmith,
548:If I wanted to see your emails or your wife's phone, all I have to do is use intercepts. I can get your emails, passwords, phone records, credit cards. ~ Edward Snowden,
549:I'm an amateur at music and an amateur at most things. I like the idea of offering some music and some records and a website to people who feel perplexed. ~ Ezra Furman,
550:I still look good. I'm trippin', but people tell me that all the time. So check it out, I'm 63, and still kicking. I've been putting records out every year. ~ Roy Ayers,
551:I try to sing whatever the music makes me feel. And we play so much music from the other records at shows that I hope no one will miss the old style too much. ~ Karen O,
552:I used to listen a lot to Rolling Stones records and play along with them when I was first starting. It's a good way to learn, jamming around basic music. ~ Tommy Bolin,
553:I've been really fortunate to have Bridge Records interested in publishing my music for the past 25 years. Most of my music is available in their catalog. ~ Paul Lansky,
554:I want to be successful. Not just money. Just making a successful record and a successful show... I could feel successful without selling a million records. ~ Tom Petty,
555:Some people speak of the Akashic Records as if they were on an IBM mainframe that's out there somewhere near the Restaurant at the End of the Universe. ~ Frederick Lenz,
556:I don't think we have very good records about what they were thinking except, as I pointed out earlier today, that they did invent our political system. ~ David R Brower,
557:I had just lost my dad and I remembered all the songs we used to go and hear at concerts, and the records around the house and sometimes we'd play together. ~ Vince Gill,
558:Take your records, take you freedom, take your memories, I dont need 'em. And take your cat, and leave my sweater, cause we've got nothing left to weather. ~ Keith Urban,
559:When I'm making records, I don't go in with any intentional [ideas for] cohesion, it just happens by accident. That's the X factor; you can't predict that. ~ Jason Lytle,
560:Harout Pamboukjian is one of the biggest Armenian folk singers in the world. In the '70s, he was making these records that were really Zeppelin-influenced. ~ Serj Tankian,
561:If people like electronic music, then great - let that be the next thing. I don't think I ever really will, but there's plenty of records for me to go buy. ~ Doug Martsch,
562:Records are one thing, and obviously, without hit songs, you don't have the opportunity to do your shows. But my live show has always been my selling tool. ~ Jason Aldean,
563:The actual making of the records obviously have everything to do with each other, because I made them one day after the other, alternating doing it. ~ Matthew Friedberger,
564:What made me want to become a recording artist; I was the first artist that was repeatedly asked by a label to record with them. That label was Def Jam Records. ~ Chuck D,
565:When you make a record, you listen to it literally hundreds of times. When it's done and you can't do anything else, I never listen to my records. ~ Loudon Wainwright III,
566:Both my parents worked, so I was home alone a lot, and I would listen to their records. They belonged to the Columbia House record club, so they had records! ~ Lyle Lovett,
567:Chris Black-well, who owned Island Records. Blackwell loved the tracks and said, “Let’s take it the whole way.” My God, we were on! We cut the rest of ~ Marianne Faithfull,
568:I can't say I want to earn a particular award or sell a certain number of records, because even if I do that, the satisfaction only lasts five minutes. ~ Chantal Kreviazuk,
569:I don't believe that a lot of the things I hear on the air today are going to be played for as long a time as Coleman Hawkins records or Brahms concertos. ~ Oscar Peterson,
570:I guess we were kinda poor when we were kids, but we didn't know it. That's because my dad always refused to let us look at the family's financial records. ~ Frankie Boyle,
571:In dealing with disruptive technologies leading to new markets, however, market researchers and business planners have consistently dismal records. ~ Clayton M Christensen,
572:I retained no records and I am not a good writer anyhow. So the best approach is for historians like you to extract the facts directly from people like me. ~ Shunroku Hata,
573:I think the vast majority of the American people say you shouldn't be able to collect my phone records if I'm not suspicious, if you don't have probable cause. ~ Rand Paul,
574:Our records, if you have a dark sense of humor, were funny, but our records weren't about comedy. They were about protests, fantasy, confrontation and all that. ~ Ice Cube,
575:Archives are very old things—historical records like diaries and letters or even the old Stampede posters you saw at the museum,” said Aunt Judy. ~ Gertrude Chandler Warner,
576:I wouldn't agree with people saying Lil Wayne is wack, you know what I mean? Because I've heard Lil Wayne records many times and he say a lot of clever things. ~ Kool G Rap,
577:People weren't buying as many records. My record company did not want me. I went through three record companies, went on tour at the wrong time. It destroyed me. ~ Adam Ant,
578:Shobha announced, trying to lighten the mood. “And I’ll keep all the books,” Girish said in the same spirit. “Fair enough. But not the records. I take most ~ Amulya Malladi,
579:And this week, I am proposing legislation to strengthen our Open Records laws to make public access to our public records surer, faster, and more comprehensive. ~ Roy Barnes,
580:Emily, who loved her best friend so much she still cannot listen to the records they once enjoyed together, and it is five years already since her friend died. ~ Audre Lorde,
581:Everything changes all the time, and unfortunately, everyone who knows what you do by buying records only hears a small amount of what's going on in your life. ~ Pat Benatar,
582:I did all the musicals in my high school; I was in a pop group signed to Cash Money Records in college. Music has always been a really big part of my life. ~ Janina Gavankar,
583:Increased crime takes a toll on perpetrators as well as victims because they acquire criminal records, which blight their chances of getting a job in the future. ~ Anonymous,
584:My mother knew how to read music and everything. But I just kinda learned off of records. And so, I was listening to records and I'd play 'em over and over. ~ Clint Eastwood,
585:Sooner or later a rider will emerge who will win more Tours. In every sport we have seen how the records eventually get broken and cycling is no exception. ~ Miguel Indurain,
586:I don't think, that all my stuff could've been records. Some, maybe. The ones that I really wanted to be records, those are the ones that are going into the box. ~ Ryan Adams,
587:I think Andy Kaufman is to comedy what the Velvet Underground was to music - it's like, 80 thousand records sold, but everybody who bought one started a band. ~ Courtney Love,
588:I've just been fortunate to havehad a lot of hit records, though Human Wheels doesn't qualify as a hit record-but it's really the best single I've ever had. ~ John Mellencamp,
589:I've never been a huge prog fan. My background is punk. My background is learning how to play a bar chord and listen to Discharge records when I was a kid. ~ Justin Broadrick,
590:NASA sent up two satellites in ’77, and on board both they packed golden records in case the satellite should ever encounter someone who might want to listen. ~ Samantha Hunt,
591:There is a guy on my block who lives for rock, he plays records day and night, and when he feels down he puts the rock and roll on and it makes him feel alright. ~ Ray Davies,
592:The ultimate would be to compete in a couple more Olympics, hopefully break some world records and wind up my sports career with a couple of years in the WNBA. ~ Marion Jones,
593:When I started making my own records, I had this idea of drowning out the singer and putting the rest in the foreground. It was the background that interested me. ~ Brian Eno,
594:With improved historical records, and easier access to them, we actually have better reasons for hating one another, for anger and violence toward one another. ~ Richard Rohr,
595:Yeah, anybody can go in with two turntables and a microphone or a home studio sampler and a little cassette deck or whatever and make records in their bedrooms. ~ David Byrne,
596:I'm the only talk show host, I think, if there's such a category in, what's called, the book of records, to have a guest die while we were taping the show, yeah. ~ Dick Cavett,
597:In Van Halen there were moments, like in some of the ballads, I put my heart and soul into those records. Those lyrics when I sang 'em, I gave myself goosebumps. ~ Sammy Hagar,
598:Beyonce gave us direction, and she had like four or five studios going at one time, but then she only sings what she likes. "Back Up" was one of those records. ~ Rodney Jerkins,
599:If you wait four or five years between records, it better be a masterpiece, you know? And if you keep putting them out, you're saying, 'Hey, here's 10 more songs'. ~ Craig Finn,
600:I'm really starting to think the while world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules. ~ Robin Sloan,
601:It's entertaining to watch somebody break my music down or explain what he thinks I was thinking during the process of making these records. Because... he has no idea. ~ Dr Dre,
602:Pentagon records show that at least 8,000 members of the all-volunteer U.S. Army have deserted since the Iraq war began. Hey, at least somebody has an exit strategy. ~ Tina Fey,
603:Sometimes I'd hear things on other people's records and I say I wanted it on my records, but Leslie Kong said, no, it wasn't right and that it wasn't my style. ~ Desmond Dekker,
604:To be honest, producing records interests me less at the moment and I really don't want to get involved in album projects that are going to take up a lot of time ~ Phil Collins,
605:I have a Guinness Book of World Records entry as the most-watched person on television; now I have a new entry as the only man who has a crab named after him. ~ David Hasselhoff,
606:I’m really starting to think the whole world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults, all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules. ~ Robin Sloan,
607:It was records, though, that made blues a dominant force in the African American entertainment business and the model for later pop trends from R&B to hip-hop. ~ Elijah Wald,
608:The only way to find out anything about what kinds of lives people led in any given period is to tunnel into their records and to let them speak for themselves ~ John Dos Passos,
609:To listen only to records is a sin of narcissism. It is important to hear live music, in concert, which is a source of emotions that a record can never convey. ~ Joaquin Rodrigo,
610:When you have a paper based system, you are relying on your memory to a large extent about the patient. Now the paper records can have various kinds of ticklers. ~ William Davis,
611:As with all our records the final finished disc is as much a diary of a certain number of months of my life, rather than a musical piece that I can view objectively. ~ Nick Mason,
612:At about the age of ten, my friends and I discovered the joys of sitting in graveyards drinking merrydown cider and kissing and stealing our elder siblings' records. ~ Beth Orton,
613:Background checks, waiting periods, reports of transfers, and access to mental health records have not stopped the legal sale of firearms to legitimate buyers. ~ Colleen Hanabusa,
614:But I'd play on everything from pop records to a lot of the glam stuff to rock stuff to classical stuff. I used to get called to do all those things, it was great. ~ Rick Wakeman,
615:I don't mind The Boss. I think he's an honest guy. I have some of his records, not all of them. I've met a couple of the E-Street guys, and they seem really cool. ~ Henry Rollins,
616:Public Enemy, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back is the straight-up peak of hip-hop. Straight-up one of the most powerful records ever made, period, in music. ~ Mr Lif,
617:(Some competitions would offer a few hundred dollars as prize money, but it’s not like So So Def Records set up a booth at USC’s job fair seeking “sick lyricists.”) ~ Jensen Karp,
618:The media is going to stick a label on records. And the public is going to pick it up from that. And that's what I was getting sick of-the whole analyzation thing. ~ Van Morrison,
619:By the numbers, by all the official records, here at the confluence of history, of racism, of poverty, and economic power, this is what our lives are worth: nothing. ~ Jesmyn Ward,
620:Death is a convention, a certification to the end of pain, something for the vital statistics book, not binding upon anyone but the keepers of graveyard records. ~ Wallace Stegner,
621:I do like Britney Spears. I think she's cute. I think she's fun. And I like her records. You know, I'm not a pop snob whatsoever. I think she makes great pop records. ~ Elton John,
622:I've got so much I want to do, and not a lot of time to do it in. People say to me, "You really shouldn't do so many records", because it actually harms your career. ~ Marc Almond,
623:Some of the best records are the ones that really affect you the most - they're pure emotion and energy, and it's like you're in that person's brain. It's pretty cool. ~ Ty Segall,
624:The Patriot Act, passed overwhelmingly but hastily after 9/11, allows the FBI to obtain telecommunication, financial, and credit records without a court order. ~ Rebecca MacKinnon,
625:You're gonna check my computer records? Is that important? I don't think the government needs to know how I feel about teen Asian sluts in order to fight terrorism. ~ Greg Giraldo,
626:I’m really starting to think the whole world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults, all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules. On ~ Robin Sloan,
627:One of the most important improvements in the No Child Left Behind Act for migrant students was the requirement for electronic transfer of migrant student records. ~ Ruben Hinojosa,
628:Taboo was kind of celebrating trash, the kind of records you secretly loved, like Yes Sir, I Can Boogie, by Baccara [laughs] - things that you probably shouldn't like. ~ Boy George,
629:I started buying records in the 80s. I listened to everything new wave, disco, funk synth-pop, rock, but in my house we were listening to bossa nova, tango, and folk. ~ Steven Sater,
630:It's always the generals with the bloodiest records who are the first to shout what a hell it is. And it's always the war widows who lead the Memorial Day parades. ~ Paddy Chayefsky,
631:I've always tried to insert consciousness and spirituality in my records, interpreting the writings of all cultures and religions and how they apply to life in modern times. ~ Rakim,
632:Sometimes when I look back on myself on those earlier records, there was so much effort going in, so much trying. With this, I was trying to make it much more laid back. ~ Kate Bush,
633:The paraphrase of Gödel's Theorem says that for any record player, there are records which it cannot play because they will cause its indirect self-destruction. ~ Douglas Hofstadter,
634:Water records information, and while circulating throughout the earth distributes information. This water sent from the universe is full of the information of life... ~ Masaru Emoto,
635:If you put all the songs together that I've written on band records, and put it up next to my solo record, there's definitely a different kind of feel than Billy's songs. ~ James Iha,
636:The history of pop is a progression of underground styles going mainstream, so there's nothing unusual about the White Stripes or Franz Ferdinand selling records. ~ Sasha Frere Jones,
637:When I was a bit older I had all of the George Carlin records, all of the Steve Martin records, all of the Cheech and Chong records and all of the Richard Pryor records. ~ Marc Maron,
638:Evolution by natural selection requires the copying of genetic records and the construction of proteins, but these processes themselves had to originate somehow. ~ Michael S Gazzaniga,
639:I generally sell my records online or at the show. You can undersell the distributor and the stores, and people know what they're getting cause they've just seen you live. ~ Roy Ayers,
640:I had BEEN making futuristic records way before a lot of the groups that came out, but now everybody is running to make their albums sound new, but it sounds too made up. ~ Kool Keith,
641:I made records in the past that are as traditional as any other country records that have been made, but at the same time the records have a contemporary slant on it too. ~ Vince Gill,
642:In the last 100 years since the invention of sound reproduction, music has really taken off and it is much more a common language because of records and transportation. ~ Jerry Garcia,
643:It just seems like musicians want to sell a few records and put out a perfume line, and I think it's so sad that there are so many musicians who don't want to change the world. ~ Moby,
644:John Dalton's records, carefully preserved for a century, were destroyed during the World War II bombing of Manchester. It is not only the living who are killed in war. ~ Isaac Asimov,
645:John was prosecuted (or threatened with prosecution—the records are sometimes a touch unclear) for trading in wool and for money-lending, both highly illegal activities. ~ Bill Bryson,
646:The paraphrase of Gödel's Theorem says that for any record player, there are records which it cannot play because they will cause its indirect self-destruction. ~ Douglas R Hofstadter,
647:Wynton told us that Miles sold out, just wanted to make more money, just wanted to sell more records. I don't believe that Miles sold out but I'm not in a position to say. ~ Ken Burns,
648:How lucky can one guy get? I was a runaway, and then I was in one of the biggest bands in the world. I've sold out every arena. I've sold millions and millions of records. ~ Nikki Sixx,
649:I think it's ridiculous to try to sell records to teenagers, because teenagers don't buy my records. And there ain't that many teenagers out there in the marketplace. ~ John Mellencamp,
650:I think we could have done a lot more great music, so I was disappointed that we didn't continue making records and touring, but it's hard to argue with 10 good years. ~ Jerry Harrison,
651:Leishmaniasis has a long and terrible history with human beings, stretching back as far as human records exist and causing suffering and death for thousands of years. ~ Douglas Preston,
652:The Bible records that whenever the Lord was with them in battle, the children of Israel were never defeated, and every military campaign ended in overwhelming success. ~ Joseph Prince,
653:You were out on tour, 75 cities in 80 days, and then making records on top of it. And they started calling us the Hollywood Vampires 'cause anybody only saw us at night. ~ Alice Cooper,
654:Anybody who says they don't want to be seen on a show which has millions of people watching it at one time when they're in the business of selling records is a bit silly. ~ Paloma Faith,
655:If you're looking for a deep album or you're looking for me to talk about past situations, it's not even about that. It's just 14 hot records that are gonna make you dance. ~ Puff Daddy,
656:Memory belongs to the imagination. Human memory is not like a computer which records things; it is part of the imaginative process, on the same terms as invention. ~ Alain Robbe Grillet,
657:Some of us have been playing the same self-defeating records over and over again in our heads for so long that we don’t know how to think any differently about ourselves. ~ Steve Harvey,
658:To us, there was Bob Dylan, and there was dad. As for what he meant to other people, that was never glorified in our house. There were no accolades there, no gold records. ~ Jakob Dylan,
659:It's also ironic that in the old days of tape and tape hiss and vinyl records and surface noise, we were always trying to get records louder and louder to overcome that. ~ T Bone Burnett,
660:know what I am. I’m lace and daisies and a fiddle on my grandparents’ back porch. Dirt roads and dandelions, like Papa says. Vinyl records in a world of digital downloads. ~ Caisey Quinn,
661:Many instances of persecution and killing have occurred in countries with atrocious human rights records such as Sri Lanka, Guatemala and the Democratic Republic of Congo. ~ David Suzuki,
662:Rocks are records of events that took place at the time they formed. They are books. They have a different vocabulary, a different alphabet, but you learn how to read them. ~ John McPhee,
663:Well, I haven't seen the records. I haven't seen Hilary Rosen; I personally know three Hilary Rosen's, so I don't know that this Hilary Rosen is the one we're talking about. ~ Jay Carney,
664:A man is like a phonograph with half-a-dozen records. You soon get tired of them all; and yet you have to sit at table whilst he reels them off to every new visitor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
665:At one time they've been the most important thing to me. So I can't hear our records on the radio, I can't stand it, because they sound so out of what everyone else is doing. ~ Ray Davies,
666:Sorry, but they’re burning the State archives.” The furnaces burned for eight days, turning most of the Congo state records to ash and smoke in the sky over Brussels. “I ~ Adam Hochschild,
667:When I was on the big labels, I never calculated what would make me sell more records. I just did what I did -no different than when I wrote songs for myself in high-school. ~ Jill Sobule,
668:You know, I'm really starting to think the whole world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults, all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules. ~ Robin Sloan,
669:You know, I’m really starting to think the whole world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults, all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules. ~ Robin Sloan,
670:At this time touring for most bands was still seen primarily as a way of promoting records to boost album sales, with the odd chance to get some income from the larger venues. ~ Nick Mason,
671:I don’t see why not,” I all but snapped at him. “His body was experimented upon, and there are records of it. What else would you call it?”

“I don’t know. Necropsy? ~ Cherie Priest,
672:I have a habit of recording records very quickly - and not in a haphazardly way, not in a way where I'm not focused on details, because I'm a freak when it comes to that. ~ Balthazar Getty,
673:I love the road. That's always been my goal. I've said that to many record labels. I want to make records. The road is my favorite. Some people hate the road, I love the road. ~ Gary Allan,
674:I really do love Diana Ross; I grew up listening to her records. I grew up in a little town in Mexico, so while we got the music, we never got the experience of watching her. ~ Salma Hayek,
675:Most people assume that a record shop's success lies in selling records. In fact, Virgin's success both in mail order and the record shops lay in skill at buying records. ~ Richard Branson,
676:One guy records the voices, another guy times the storyboard, another guy times the sheets, one guy is the story editor. All these jobs should be covered by the director. ~ John Kricfalusi,
677:There's a boom in genealogy now. With ancestry.com and other sites digitizing so many of the records, you can now find things in a few minutes that used to take months. ~ Henry Louis Gates,
678:I missed out on the Spice Girls. I missed out on all those big pop phenomenon and missed out even on the Madonna records. It's okay, cuz I'm playing catch-up on everything now. ~ Katy Perry,
679:The camera relieves us of the burden of memory. It surveys us like God, and it surveys for us. Yet no other god has been so cynical, for the camera records in order to forget. ~ John Berger,
680:[The producer told me:] "We can try one more record, and we'll see how that one does." Those records never did anything. My music never got mentioned. My color got mentioned. ~ Mose Allison,
681:They think that I was like Amy Grant, when actually no! The label went bankrupt and maybe sold a couple hundred records and that's about it. I was just trying different things. ~ Katy Perry,
682:Dear God, if I made it through this alive and conscious, my name deserved to be added to some X-rated category in the Guinness Book of World Records or something.

-Emma ~ Rachael Wade,
683:For every Foo Fighters record, we've had two or three beautiful, acoustic-based songs, but they never usually make their way to the record, because we want to make rock records. ~ Dave Grohl,
684:I feel like I have to do some promotion to let the people know that the records are out there; but I kind of like the idea that it's my work that does the talking rather than me. ~ Kate Bush,
685:The real question is what to live for. And I can't answer it. Except another one of your records. And another chance for me to write. Art for art's sake, corny as that sounds. ~ Lester Bangs,
686:If there is an angel who records the sorrows of men as well as their sins, he knows how many and deep are the sorrows that spring from false ideas for which no man is culpable. ~ George Eliot,
687:I knew that as a DJ from 1970 on up that I would eventually come with this sound. I brought out all these other break beats that you hear so much on a lot of these records. ~ Afrika Bambaataa,
688:I think track records are very important. If you start early trying to have a perfect one in some simple thing like honesty, you're well on your way to success in this world. ~ Charlie Munger,
689:Wouldn't it be interesting to take Elvis back to his Sun Records period? I don't know. But I'm content to listen to his Sun Records. I don't want to dig him up out of the grave. ~ John Lennon,
690:As for multimillionaires [in Donald Trump's Administration], a lot of us hope to be a multimillionaire some day. Again, spotty records, but it seems to be not without the range. ~ David Brooks,
691:Speaking of WAMU, [bluegrass and old time music DJ] Ray Davis did a lot of work there. I've know Ray, I guess for 50 years - 40, or 50 years. And, he plays a lot of my records. ~ Ralph Stanley,
692:Without challenges, the human body will soften. We thrive when we push our boundaries, reach goals, and blast personal records. We perform better, we look better, and we feel alive. ~ Dan John,
693:How the early priests came into possession of these secrets does not appear, and if there were ever any records of this kind the Church would hardly allow them to become public. ~ Harry Houdini,
694:I have been informed repeatedly that in lieu of records, I would be expected to testify about my service in the White House to demonstrate my experience and judicial philosophy. ~ Harriet Miers,
695:I remember when I was in my late teens just getting rid of lots of records, realizing I only ever listened to them when I was reading, or watching TV, or doing something else. ~ Jonny Greenwood,
696:Jesus, that ear. He should donate it to The Smithsonian. Brian Wilson, he made all his records with four tracks, but you couldn't make his records if you had a hundred tracks today. ~ Bob Dylan,
697:My parents had a love for music. There were so many records, so much music constantly being played. My mother played piano, my father sang, and we were always surrounded in music. ~ Lauryn Hill,
698:No, if it was up to me every record would be brand new studio material but Atlantic records asked me to put out a full live record because my tour really did do well last year. ~ Sebastian Bach,
699:No one really buys records anymore. You can look at sales and do that math real quick. Unfortunately, it's fast food in the music industry. People don't ingest full records anymore. ~ Tommy Lee,
700:Situation comedy on television has thrived for years on 'canned' laughter, grafted by gaglines by technicians using records of guffawing audiences that have been dead for years. ~ Russell Baker,
701:Those early steps are very important in understanding the evolution. But in themselves, maybe now you need the later records to understand the significance of the earlier records! ~ Evan Parker,
702:And in Florida, adults with clean driving records and poor credit scores paid an average of $1,552 more than the same drivers with excellent credit and a drunk driving conviction. ~ Cathy O Neil,
703:A page from a journal of modern experimental physics will be as mysterious to the uninitiated as a Tibetan mandala. Both are records of enquiries into the nature of the universe. ~ Fritjof Capra,
704:I'm appalled by the tendency of some rock records to perfect everything to the point where it sounds like Botox and polish it so heavily that there's no humanity left in it. ~ Yannis Philippakis,
705:In a way, as much as we love to be a big, loud rock band, the acoustic album was a lot easier to make than the rock records. I think because it was brand new territory for the band. ~ Dave Grohl,
706:In many offices it could take several days to find a paper chart and some we'll never find. Ten percent of the paper records are never found. So you have this huge delay in time. ~ William Davis,
707:My motivational music is any music that helps me escape. There are certain records that take you to euphoria, when you're partying and havin' a good time, dancin' with a couple people. ~ Pitbull,
708:Additionally, any Human Rights Council reform that allows countries with despicable human rights records to remain as members, such as China and Saudi Arabia, is not real reform. ~ Michael McCaul,
709:I'm a huge Freddie Mercury fan. I think he was the end-all. I love his lack of inhibition, his talent, the chances he took. He made mistakes on his records, and he didn't care. ~ Harry Connick Jr,
710:I remember singing around the house to records that were playing. All kinds of music. And the great James Cleveland was often in our house, and I grew up with his sound as well. ~ Aretha Franklin,
711:Selfishly, I make music for me. I like to make music. I like looking for songs. I like working with interesting musicians. I like producing records. It's something I will always do. ~ Herb Alpert,
712:Who you are as a performer is one thing, but when you're making records, you're dealing with musicians' tastes, their goals, their wants, their needs, everyone's individual pride. ~ Scott Weiland,
713:As I speak to you today, government censors somewhere are working furiously to erase my words from the records of history. But history itself has already condemned these tactics. ~ Hillary Clinton,
714:As long as you're giving up quality records and you're makin' hit records, people are always gonna want to hear a hit and they'll always want to be attached to something that's doin' great. ~ Akon,
715:I don't think radio is selling records like they used to. They'd hawk the song and hawk the artist and you'd get so excited, you'd stop your car and go into the nearest record store. ~ Herb Alpert,
716:I tend not to listen. When I'm listening to records, I don't listen to much new wave stuff, I tend to listen to the stuff I used to listen to a few years back but sort of odd singles. ~ Ian Curtis,
717:I've got four or five records in my head at a time that I try to work on and I would like to do a guitar trio record next - since The Police I've mostly made records with keyboards. ~ Andy Summers,
718:Nobody heard records of you playing whatever the melody was on those low strings. It worked out good, you know, about 25 or 26 million records later. I guess it worked out alright. ~ Lee Hazlewood,
719:Still, records are documents of a period of time. Most records are documents of two or three years, and I just approached it as a record I was doing over a 20-year period of time. ~ T Bone Burnett,
720:The records didn’t fill the void inside. Didn’t fuel it either. There was no closure.’
‘Then where’s the closure?’
She gestured to his pistol. ‘At the end of that barrel. ~ Nathan M Farrugia,
721:The world has changed a lot since I started making records.I used to go into a studio and there were songs there, chosen for me to see if I liked them. I wasn't encouraged to write. ~ Shelby Lynne,
722:We don't really make bad records, though some people might like some more than others. And we have never really done a bad show. So I think in a way maybe we've been taken for granted. ~ Tom Petty,
723:Being in this game if you are gonna sell drugs and make records too then as many records you make is gonna be as many people that know you sell drugs. We got the hip hop cops listening now. ~ Rakim,
724:I'm at a point where I don't have to wait for the income from the record to survive, so I'm in a comfortable zone, but I'll make rap records as long as I feel I have something to rap about. ~ Ice T,
725:I respect the people who buy my records and come to my concerts. It's only fair that I always try to give them the very best that's in me. After all, I need them more than they need me. ~ Andy Gibb,
726:The history of mankind interests us only as it exhibits a steady gain of truth and right, in the incessant conflict which it records between the material and the moral nature. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
727:The records didn’t fill the void inside. Didn’t fuel it either. There was no closure.’
‘Then where’s the closure?’

She gestured to his pistol. ‘At the end of that barrel. ~ Nathan M Farrugia,
728:Brian Eno records and music became a huge obsession of mine in college, in a way that a pop song can provide solace. I don't know if it's shallow or silly, but it meant so much to me. ~ Greg Mottola,
729:I don't care if it's rap, metal, whatever. You still should play Beatles records mixed with Limp Bizkit mixed with Foghat mixed with Creedence Clearwater Revival, stuff like that. ~ Afrika Bambaataa,
730:I don't use sex to sell records, obviously, but I'd be lying if I said that I don't feel like I have to make an effort to look good when I go out onstage, to wear something pretty. ~ Vanessa Carlton,
731:I produce the records. I don't hand over control to some really expensive producer who then talks to the record company and then tries to bend me to their will - for commercial purposes. ~ Tori Amos,
732:I started recording because I was always complaining about the records that I was getting of my songs. At least if I did them and messed them up, I wouldn't have anyone else to blame. ~ Randy Newman,
733:Our new strategic plan emphasizes the importance of providing access to records anytime, anywhere. This is one of many initiatives that we are launching to make our goal a reality. ~ Allen Weinstein,
734:Our records also show that you are currently unemployed and have therefore been classified as impecunious. Under current federal law, you are now eligible for mandatory indenturement. ~ Ernest Cline,
735:There are so many things to think about when you make an album. Like, who am I trying to impress? Am I going to get respect, critical acclaim? Or am I going to sell lots of records? ~ Ellie Goulding,
736:We definitely didn't want it to be anything like our first or second records. We wanted to experiment more than we ever had and take any new idea and run with it as far as we could. ~ Bert McCracken,
737:You know, I'm unable to make those records where you just go in a studio and that's it. I think you can capture so much more on a record than just a particular performance on one day. ~ Jason Pierce,
738:Creatively, I thought we were still viable and could do more records. But our working relationship just wasn't happening at all, and our chemistry as people broke down because of that. ~ Matt Cameron,
739:For every thought supported by feeling, there is a muscle change. Primary muscle patterns being the biological heritage of man, man's whole body records his emotional thinking. ~ Mabel Elsworth Todd,
740:I look in music magazines now and see things on Luther Allison, and my name's getting out there more, thanks to all the good people at Alligator Records and at my management company. ~ Luther Allison,
741:It seemed like whatever I touched, I was breaking record after record. I just knew I was on. I completely destroyed all existing shooting records there - an omen of things to come. ~ Wilt Chamberlain,
742:I wanted to have all the songs to be the strongest they could be and all the choruses to be catchy. One of those records you could put in your car and just drive and not have to change it. ~ Orianthi,
743:parents were dead. We hadn’t found his birth parents yet. He hadn’t gone to college, his high school records were archived somewhere—we had unis working on it—and his elementary school ~ Marcia Clark,
744:But I'm always trying to plan ahead too and in doing so, and in working on this album, I've met a lot people that I hope to be involved with, on their records and in their situations. ~ Bootsy Collins,
745:I got a very good life. I sold plenty of records, I get recognized plenty, I can always have somebody call up and get me a fine table at a restaurant. What do you really need, ultimately? ~ Huey Lewis,
746:It’s called Zipf’s law, and it applies to résumés and college application rates and best-selling records and everything in between. Winners win big because the marketplace loves a winner. ~ Seth Godin,
747:It would be crazy for me to come out now talking about selling drugs and doing all this stuff I never did for the sake of A&R or records or trying to keep the street buzz or whatever. ~ Chamillionaire,
748:Of course. You know, I’m really starting to think the whole world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults, all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules. * ~ Robin Sloan,
749:Records have always been the most extraordinary form of time travel for me, and that's why it matters to know when something was circulated, and if it had an audience of five or 50,000. ~ David Grubbs,
750:Whereas I want everything to be peaceful during a birth, I take the total opposite approach when I'm helping someone come to terms with leaving this place - I play Richard Pryor records. ~ Erykah Badu,
751:History can be formed from permanent monuments and records; but lives can only be written from personal knowledge, which is growing every day less, and in a short time is lost forever. ~ Samuel Johnson,
752:If I could sell 500 million records every time, it would be great. But I've also had the luxury experience of having it when I was a teenager, in a very kind of model version of it. ~ Alanis Morissette,
753:I never listen to Led Zeppelin. But, I mean, I don't think Robert Plant or Jimmy Page listen to Led Zeppelin, either. We all probably obsessed over the same old blues records growing up. ~ Dan Auerbach,
754:In my first year as governor, we solved some of the problems that had begun to undermine the Open Records Act. We gave the act teeth by providing criminal penalties for knowing violations. ~ Roy Barnes,
755:I was very pleased to find that once I had records out music videos were starting to happen, so I directed some of my own music videos and got to experiment in other areas of expression. ~ Thomas Dolby,
756:activities of Congress so that they can be studied by the public. Additionally, the Senate has the Senate Journal, and the House has the House Journal. These records can be obtained online. ~ Ben Carson,
757:I've always thought, it's the artist that write the songs and make the records. And it's our responsibility to set the tone for what's happening in the industry. And I take that seriously. ~ Eric Church,
758:Many of the greatest tyrants on the records of history have begun their reigns in the fairest manner. But the truth is, this unnatural power corrupts both the heart and the understanding. ~ Edmund Burke,
759:No one starts playing my kind of music to make a fortune. But I do want to keep doing what I do and I do want to continue selling records. And I would, eventually, quite like some money. ~ Laura Marling,
760:A lot of the records you buy, there's nothing you can hold in your hand, it's all 1′s and 0′s, this digital cloud floating in the ether, but with analog albums, you can hold it in your hand. ~ Dave Grohl,
761:I can't sleep very well at night. It takes me a while to get to sleep. I could just be nocturnal. I have my nighttime witching hour where I hang out, listen to records or watch TV. ~ Billie Joe Armstrong,
762:I think when I listen to old records, it puts me back in the atmosphere of what it felt like to make the record and who was there and what the room looked like. It's more a sensory memory. ~ Billy Corgan,
763:I wanted to sell a million records, and I sold a million records. I wanted to go platinum; I went platinum. I've been working nonstop since I was 15. I don't even know how to chill out. ~ Beyonce Knowles,
764:Britain and our friends, by allowing Colonel Bolt’s records to have a grave question mark against your name, would you let that question mark still remain?” Sheila looked puzzled. She was ~ Helen MacInnes,
765:I originally wanted to be a singer, but I was average. I made 18 records, but none were that great. I was in a dance band at Bournemouth Pavilion for three years, and I played guitar too. ~ Tony Blackburn,
766:It's not so much a philosophy as much as it is a pace. We need to be personally involved with every aspect of the records including the artwork, we want everything to have a similar aesthetic. ~ Avey Tare,
767:Its quite there sonically; a strong representation of what the songs on our records are like. It's very loud and our set is based around containing as much energy and dynamics as possible. ~ Matthew Healy,
768:Keepers of books, keepers of print and paper on the shelves, librarians are keepers also of the records of the human spiritthe records of men's watch upon the world and on themselves. ~ Archibald MacLeish,
769:Researchers who examined the voting records of wine judges found that 90 percent of the time they give inconsistent ratings to a particular wine when they judge it on multiple occasions. ~ Nathan Myhrvold,
770:The camera is an eye that sees and records the lives of filthy people. Its pictures are hung in museums and published in thick books that future generations can see how horrible life was. ~ David Shrigley,
771:The principle for us is that works of art shouldn't be considered liquid assets to be converted into cash," says Taylor. "They're records of human creativity that are held in the public trust. ~ Anonymous,
772:The records available for the phone calls from American 77 do not allow for a determination of which of four 'connected calls to unknown numbers' represent the two between Barbara and Ted Olson. ~ Unknown,
773:Tolkien records, “The indefatigable man read me part of a new story!” In the act of sharing his own work, Lewis challenged Tolkien, providing more than a hint of friendly rivalry. But ~ Diana Pavlac Glyer,
774:I don't even listen to the records after they come out. It's outlawed in my house. My wife and my kids can't play any of my music around me. Once it comes out, for me, it's just business. Numbers. ~ Dr Dre,
775:I really don't make music to have platinum records and all that kind of stuff. I've been there. I do it because I love music and I love uplifting people through my music. That's my real goal. ~ Gary Wright,
776:I really don't think records should be made in the manner where you sit and write, and when you're finished writing, you start recording. That just seems conventional and old-fashioned to me. ~ Jay Reatard,
777:The only album that I listen to upon recording a new one is my 'Cry' album, because sonically, I think it's my best album to date. But other than that, I've never listened to my records, ever. ~ Faith Hill,
778:What came first—the music or the misery? Did I listen to music because I was miserable? Or was I miserable because I listened to music? Do all those records turn you into a melancholy person? ~ Nick Hornby,
779:When you are studying jazz, the best thing to do is listen to records or listen to live music. It isn't as though you go to a teacher. You just listen as much as you can and absorb everything. ~ Carla Bley,
780:When you're an artist, you can only do your own stuff. Even if you only write for other people, you're really more focused on yourself. So while everybody's out touring, I'm working on records. ~ Rico Love,
781:I don't think of myself as a folk singer per se, but I really like blues and string-band music. When I started listening to records when I was a teenager, the folk boom was going on. ~ Loudon Wainwright III,
782:I wonder a lot about making things meaningful. You want to do meaningful work and make art, but you're making records, which is good, but you don't want to weight them - it's a very curious thing. ~ Doseone,
783:Listening to albums and records is not the best way to percept Verka Serduchka. Live shows are the place where you can feel that specific atmosphere, that is not going to be the same ever. ~ Verka Serduchka,
784:Sly Stone doesn't make good albums: only good records. His style is so infinite and revolves around so many crucial aspects that it has only come together perfectly on a handful of his singles. ~ Jon Landau,
785:The movie industry places such importance on first-week numbers-which means what to people, I don't know. It's very strange. They hope to sell tons of records the first week, and then what? ~ Brendan Benson,
786:The people who came to hear me perform or to buy my records were not the type who would be offended [by the song 'The Vatican Rag']. But I gather that there were other people who were offended. ~ Tom Lehrer,
787:Develop your talent, man, and leave the world something. Records are really gifts from people. To think that an artist would love you enough to share his music with anyone is a beautiful thing ~ Duane Allman,
788:For the Archivist, this role is a result of his obligation to preserve and assure timely and maximum access to our governmental records in the evolving historic saga of the American people. ~ Allen Weinstein,
789:Most people learn to improvise on their own, listening to records, endless hours of noodling on their instrument in the bedroom with all their spare time. That's traditionally how people learn. ~ Gary Burton,
790:There's some connection between visual images and music. But there's plenty of old records where I have no idea what the band looked like, or even what sort of context the music was played in. ~ Robert Crumb,
791:There's this celebrity thing that goes along with making records or being a rock star. I'm into this celebrity thing just enough to let me go on making records and making a living out of it. ~ Chrissie Hynde,
792:There was an embarrassing moment in the White House earlier today. They were looking around while searching for George Bush's military records. They actually found some old Al Gore ballots. ~ David Letterman,
793:We were excited when we sold our first 10 records. I always felt that if we could get the music out there, and if people became accustomed to it, then a substantial number of them would enjoy it. ~ Greg Ginn,
794:You need two things to remain very, very present. You need to continue to write well and engage yourself in the issues of the day. And you have to continue to make good, relevant records. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
795:I just started to do my own thing for about a year and a half, and I worked in the evening selling phonograph records. Then I said to myself, "I'm afraid I have to go to New York after all." ~ Claes Oldenburg,
796:My records are borderline dance records. They've got a real electro-rock heart and soul, and the vibe of the sentiment is pop, but there's a lot of people that were like, 'This is a dance record.' ~ Lady Gaga,
797:The first was about the secret order from the FISA court compelling Verizon, one of America’s largest telephone companies, to turn over to the NSA all the telephone records of all Americans. ~ Glenn Greenwald,
798:Twitter and Facebook and all of this stuff is, to me, I mean it's, for some reason - I'm probably not the youngest person using it. But for some reason, it works very well. I'm setting records. ~ Donald Trump,
799:I shoved three CDs up my ass and got them out of Tower Records. It hurt like hell but I did it. New Michael Bolton, new Sting, and the best of Sammy Hagar. Totally painful. Definitely worth it. ~ Henry Rollins,
800:I would like to promote the concept of a partnership of insurance companies, physicians and hospitals in deploying a basic framework for an electronic medical records system that is affordable. ~ Samuel Wilson,
801:The real violence is committed in the writing of history, the records of the legal system, the reporting of news, through the manipulation of social contracts, and the control of information. ~ Bryant H McGill,
802:A man who keeps a diary pays, Due toll to many tedious days; But life becomes eventful—then, His busy hand forgets the pen. Most books, indeed, are records less Of fulness than of emptiness. ~ William Allingham,
803:Donald would run for president after failing to vote in the 2002 general election and, as records indicate, in any Republican primary from 1989 until he voted for himself in 2016. Friedrich ~ David Cay Johnston,
804:I just found out last week - my sister told me - that my father had some Beatles records. So I must have heard them quite a bit, but it never registered, really. Now I listen to them with new ears. ~ Sheryl Lee,
805:I'm already 30! It doesn't really feel like a landmark. When I started out, my aim was to keep making records. Just because I've reached the 10th doesn't mean I'm going to rest on my laurels now! ~ Thea Gilmore,
806:Once you feel that you've learned some skills and you know how to make records, the next thing is, "Do we ever get to make one that people will really like?" Because then we'll have something to do. ~ Ry Cooder,
807:Signing with Hollywood Records was a dream come true. I am so blessed to get to do the things that I love to do every day of my life. My fans can expect to be blown away with the music I'm writing. ~ Coco Jones,
808:The way I go about writing records is that I make a calendar date to start the new record, so I have nothing. I don't have a bunch of notes that I bring into the office, I start with nothing at all. ~ Nick Cave,
809:We live in a world of increasing dependence on electronic records and retrieval, unprecedented security and preservation concerns, and insufficient attention to civic and democratic education. ~ Allen Weinstein,
810:We moved into the back, made it into a little 50s sitting room and started to sell the records. We had an immediate success. For one thing, these Teddy Boys were thrilled to buy the records. ~ Vivienne Westwood,
811:I believe every pencil has to be sharpened every now and then to stay sharp, or you dull out. So my records, I chose to speak on what black people do, what white people do, what women do, what men do. ~ Ice Cube,
812:I head off to the back of the store where there are racks and racks of records. As I flick through them and breath in the smell, I smile. It's almost as good a the smell of books. Almost but no quite. ~ Zoe Sugg,
813:The government has investigated our program of collecting through a generalized fashion, everyone's phone records in the country. And they found that no terrorist case has been thwarted through this. ~ Rand Paul,
814:There is nothing like a Bach fugue to remove me from a discordant moment... only Bach hold up fresh and strong after repeated playing. I can always return to Bach when the other records weary me. ~ Edward Weston,
815:To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child. For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history? ~ Robert Harris,
816:Honestly, a lot of people thought that I was on top of the world selling so many millions of records, and that this is the life that everybody would want, but I never got to enjoy any of my success. ~ Vanilla Ice,
817:I am not that thrilled about the way our records sound anyway. Don't get me wrong, I work hard on them and I want them to sound fantastic but I'm happy to have another interpretation of them anyway. ~ Wayne Coyne,
818:It is not that I don't like contemporary country music because I do. I love it. I have recorded a lot and have had great success recording records that have not been very traditional country records. ~ Vince Gill,
819:The ancients had a term in the mystical tradition called the Akashic Records, which was suggestive that nature didn't lose it's experience, that the information accumulated was available forever. ~ Edgar Mitchell,
820:With 'Bangarang,' I didn't make any announcement, no campaign. I just put it on my Facebook and some other places. That's how I've done everything with my previous records. I've always kept it organic. ~ Skrillex,
821:I don't enjoy the work that I do. It's just that it's not self-sustaining anymore. The way that I like to make records - they're expensive records to make and just can't afford to do it anymore. ~ Natalie Merchant,
822:I go to clubs and if I notice the DJs are playing the records faster, then I'll push the beats a little on the next record I make. A lot of people don't know how to watch out for things like that. ~ Jermaine Dupri,
823:I got tired of seeing otherwise innocent young kids from all walks of life getting criminal records for, in effect, doing nothing more than millions of other people in society were doing with alcohol. ~ Ron Clarke,
824:I'm very proud of all the bluegrass-oriented albums. It just reminded me and my fans that I should always record acoustic music and country records, along with anything else that I might want to do. ~ Dolly Parton,
825:New Amsterdam Records, a new label run by composers, has begun documenting this hybrid music, with invigorating discs by the band itsnotyouitsme and the composers Corey Dargel and William Brittelle. ~ Allan Kozinn,
826:Playing along with records is key. And as far as equipment goes it has gotten so much more affordable and the drum sets are of great quality. I play Pearl; their Export Series is great for a beginner. ~ Chad Smith,
827:Playing Etta James in the movie 'Cadillac Records' really changed me. It was a darker character, and I realized that if anything is too comfortable, I want to run from it. It's no fun being safe. ~ Beyonce Knowles,
828:The first thing people look at with Four Seasons records is the vocals. But for me, the drum fills and rhythms are as much a part of it as anything. They're the base on which the harmonies were built. ~ Bob Gaudio,
829:The records of every great religion show the presence of such Supermen, so full of the Divine Life that again and again they have been taken as the very representatives of God Himself. ~ Charles Webster Leadbeater,
830:Bono is my inspiration - not only as a rock star but as a humanitarian. We aren't just put on this earth to sell records. Maybe it's because of my upbringing, but I do consider myself a moral guy. ~ Jesse McCartney,
831:Building a business and becoming a billionaire is it's not championship. It's the competence; the competence in your sector with other companies not looking to have some kind of records in this issue. ~ Carlos Slim,
832:History records that the money changers have used every form of abuse, intrigue, deceit, and violent means possible to maintain their control over governments by controlling money and it's issuance. ~ James Madison,
833:If you listen to really deep ambient records that don't move too much, very still records, long after those records are finished, you might find yourself listening for hours to the sound of the room. ~ Bill Laswell,
834:I like making records right now 'cause I can express myself that way in a very immediate, physical sense. You can always write a book, but you can't always do a rock 'n' roll record that's gonna work. ~ Patti Smith,
835:I think you'll do as well as most professionals. Most professionals don't beat the market. Let's not over-rate my industry. But if you have time, you can be in good mutual funds that have good records. ~ Jim Cramer,
836:It's nice that all the composers have said that nobody interprets a lyric like Fred Astaire. But when it comes to selling records I was never worth anything particularly except as a collector's item. ~ Fred Astaire,
837:I wasn't the kind of person that liked waiting for autographs or following them, I just liked to go to the shows, study their records, driving many, many hours to different states to go to concerts. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
838:major cities wracked by the drug war, as many as 80 percent of young African American men now have criminal records and are thus subject to legalized discrimination for the rest of their lives. ~ Michelle Alexander,
839:The Hank Williams Syndrome: Come to Nashville, write some good songs, cut some hit records, make money, take all the drugs you can and drink all you can, become a wild man and all of a sudden die. ~ Waylon Jennings,
840:There's not a lot of precedent for weird, bald musicians in the Lower East Side making records in their bedrooms and going on to sell a lot of copies of the record. Especially if you look at the pop climate. ~ Moby,
841:This president [Barack Obama ] has seen personnel records of people who have sacrificed for the American people and for the federal government stolen by the Chinese and he's done nothing in return. ~ Chris Christie,
842:I still can't spend a lot of money on records at collector prices. There's something in me that just won't allow me to do that. But I will trade my artwork, which I know is worth thousands of dollars. ~ Robert Crumb,
843:Of course, you're not making records in a vacuum. I'm not making them for myself. It would be nice if I could get more people to hear them. But if I have to sell my soul to the devil to do it, I won't. ~ Pat Benatar,
844:The argument we always used to use was that keeping records in the catalog was good for people that were coming new to the music, but I think that was talking over a ten year or fifteen year time span. ~ Evan Parker,
845:The things I'm saying in my records are always me. I write about things in my life that I'm experiencing. When you hear the personal meaningful records that aren't about partying, they stem from my life. ~ Mike Stud,
846:What came first – the music or the misery? Did I listen to the music because I was miserable? Or was I miserable because I listened to the music? Do all those records turn you into a melancholy person? ~ Nick Hornby,
847:If we got into a situation where people start burning our records, then bring it on. That's the whole point. The gloaming has begun. We're in the darkness. This has happened before. Go read some history. ~ Thom Yorke,
848:I'm kind of proud of that little record! I mean I've heard about a million other records that have come out since then by all these groups around here and there and I really like 'Little Johnny Jewel'. ~ Tom Verlaine,
849:The world felt full of hazards. Every song on every album bristled with portent. She found herself trying to communicate through the records she chose, and interpreting the ones that he chose as code. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
850:I usually kind of can't wait until my records leak. Back in the day, you could give people tapes, but you can't do that anymore, because it would be available to everyone on the planet within an hour. ~ John Darnielle,
851:I was living on the wrong side of the tracks in Evanston, Illinois, in a home for boys. We had these Jackson 5 records. I really related to their voices - they were about my age, but they were doing it. ~ Eddie Vedder,
852:Actually freestyle really comes from 'Planet Rock'. If you listen to all the freestyle records you'll hear that they are based on 'Planet Rock'. All the Miami Bass records are based upon Planet Rock. ~ Afrika Bambaataa,
853:I gave up music criticism because of the increasingly obvious conflict of interest. I couldn't say anything bad about the records when I might be meeting that person's manager backstage an hour later. ~ Stephin Merritt,
854:I hardly ever watch my own work. I just end up picking myself apart! I can't even stand to hear myself on voicemail. the sound of my own voice is like nails on a chalkboard. The same goes for my records. ~ Grey DeLisle,
855:I have directed all my e-mails on clintonemail.com in my custody that were or potentially were federal records be provided to the Department of State and on information and belief, this has been done. ~ Hillary Clinton,
856:I know when I started I would have been happy to sound like the Beatles or Joe Tex or whoever. You want to sound like most bands, you want to sound like their records and that's how you learn your chops. ~ Jon Anderson,
857:It doesn't matter the numbers, it doesn't matter the records, it doesn't matter the money that you make. What matters is to raise that trophy and to be able to bring that smile to the city of St. Louis. ~ Albert Pujols,
858:I was interested in variations in temperatures of the oceans over the past millennium. But there are no records of these changes so I had to find proxy measures: coral growth, ice cores and tree rings. ~ Michael E Mann,
859:My last two records that I made were both quite pointed in one direction and I think I do my best stuff when it's all over the map, when there's a couple traditional things, a couple pretty rocking things. ~ Vince Gill,
860:We used to sit up on the roof with the couple from across the hall and play records and dance?' I sighed, wondering how we had come so far up in income and so far down in the things that really mattered. ~ Lisa Wingate,
861:After you reach a certain age, they think you’re over. Well, I will never be over. I’ll be making records if I have to sell them out of the trunk of my car. I’ve done that in my past, and I’d do it again. ~ Dolly Parton,
862:From my febrile imagination, I conjure a time capsule of the seventies—faux wood paneling, disco records, memorabilia and awards. Maybe a sunken living room. Maybe a sex swing. Maybe a wicker sex swing. ~ Sloane Crosley,
863:Herodotus, the ‘Father of History’, records the moment – and you can hear the emotion in his voice as he does so, a mixture of horror and awe: Then Kleisthenes took into his faction the common people.19 ~ Bettany Hughes,
864:He was wearing an American Legion poppy on his lapel – probably purchased from the wino legionnaire who slept in the Hall of Records parking lot – a man he had once vigorously prosecuted for vagrancy. The ~ James Ellroy,
865:I pick projects according to how fascinating they are to me, and it has resulted in a broad reach. My records are actually in five different sports: balloons, airplanes, airships, gliders, and sailboats. ~ Steve Fossett,
866:[Marco] Rubio says we should collect all Americans' records all of the time. The Constitution says otherwise. I think they're both wrong. I think we defeat terrorism by showing them that we do not fear them. ~ Rand Paul,
867:No mention is made in government records of man-eaters prior to the year 1905 and it would appear that until the advent of the Champawat tiger and the Panar leopard, man-eaters were unknown in Kumaon. When ~ Jim Corbett,
868:See, records have helped me to fall in love, no question. I hear something new, with a chord change that melts my guts, and before I know it I’m looking for someone, and before I know it I’ve
found her. ~ Nick Hornby,
869:Though there are many differences between Barack Obama and Jimmy Carter, they are strikingly similar in their poor economic records and even more so in their shared pessimism and bearishness on America. ~ David Limbaugh,
870:To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child. For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history? ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
871:We had been thrown out of a couple of places that we had lived in when I was a kid and all the family photos and records and toys were long since gone. But I think somebody had given us a couple of records. ~ Jon Gordon,
872:From the moment I own a book, even before I open it to the first page, I feel that it has in some way changed my life. I treat my books the same way I treat my clothes or my shoes or my records: I use them. ~ Joe Queenan,
873:I admire Chris Martin. Coldplay have made some wonderful records for the genre they're involved in, but I would consider them to be more of a pop act. The music is much more cerebral than it is animalistic. ~ Ian Astbury,
874:I think if you checked the attendance records of all the announcers, you'd find a lot better record than you would of anybody else in any other business because we love the game and have a passion for it. ~ Ernie Harwell,
875:You want to live, right? (Syn) Absolutely. (Kiara) Then we’re where you are, bathroom breaks being the only exception – unless you’re in public, and then we get to risk additional arrest records. (Syn) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
876:After I get dolled up and lay down some records and my voice is out, I want to get away and get my back blown out for like a week. Mess up the hair and make-up that I got done. I have been in prison for a while. ~ Remy Ma,
877:A lot of people felt I was getting work because I was Boy George. My response at the time was that there's a lot of DJs making records, they're not all making good records, but they have the right to do that. ~ Boy George,
878:Employees who report receiving recognition and praise within the last seven days show increased productivity, get higher scores from customers, and have better safety records. They're just more engaged at work. ~ Tom Rath,
879:I dont listen to my own records a lot. Once in a while - to check out my mistakes. Because you can always see a spot or two in the record where you could have done better. So you more or less study this way. ~ Ben Webster,
880:I got a naughty thrill out of listening to music that was that dirty, especially being that young and able to listen to it around my parents. Kids would come over to my house to listen to Too $hort records. ~ Moshe Kasher,
881:In the Federal Government, electronic records are as indispensable as their paper counterparts for documenting citizens' rights, the actions for which officials are accountable, and the nation's history. ~ Allen Weinstein,
882:A radio telescope works more like a light meter than a camera. You point it toward some fairly broad region of the sky, and it records how much energy, in a particular radio frequency, is coming down to Earth. ~ Carl Sagan,
883:Consider this: I can go to Antarctica and get cash from an ATM without a glitch, but should I fall ill during my travels, a hospital there could not access my medical records or know what medications I am on. ~ Nathan Deal,
884:Everybody talks about candidate tax returns, and they release those - well, most. But medical records, that's another thing, and that arguably might be more important or relevant than somebody's tax return. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
885:HAG Records, is a company that I've owned. I've had a couple of gospel releases on it. We developed a pretty good distribution setup there and we do have something to use in case they don't want to sign us. ~ Merle Haggard,
886:I don't make records that way, where I'm trying to please the marketplace or anything. Not because I have anything against that, it's just never been a part of my aesthetic, even when I was with the Pixies. ~ Black Francis,
887:I guess my biggest influence was actually my Grandfather. He used to play old records on vinyl, and would play old jazz and soul music like Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday and The Rat Pack and swing music. ~ Ella Henderson,
888:I became a radio nut. I loved the afternoon serials, and I got into jazz through the radio. I had a subscription to Down Beat when I was 12. And I'd spend a lot of time in front of the minor, miming records. ~ George Carlin,
889:I feel like I'd like to continue putting out records and start putting them out more rapidly than I have until now and for me if I can keep selling the records to the fans that already like me that's fine. ~ John Frusciante,
890:I have nothing to prove. I just want to follow the music. I love making records. I love playing live. That's it. There's nothing outside of that. I look forward to the weirdness that's in front of us every day. ~ Mike Dirnt,
891:I'm coming up on 40 next year, and after making so many records and doing music for so long, I'm looking for a change and a different perspective. And every now and then, I think I have something I want to say. ~ Tim McGraw,
892:People used to make records, as in the record of an event, the event of people playing music in a room, and now everything's cross-marketing, its about sunglasses and shoes, or guns and drugs that you choose. ~ Ani DiFranco,
893:We have the highest authority for believing that the meek shall inherit the earth; though I have never found any particular corroboration of this aphorism in the records of Somerset House. ~ F E Smith 1st Earl of Birkenhead,
894:Having lived so long, I can’t tell the difference between the two political parties. They both sound like broken records that started skipping after the founding fathers died. Now there were some real men! ~ Christopher Pike,
895:If a shop has a lot of sections I'll end up putting my record above the James Blunt CDs since he ripped off my bloody artwork and he's selling millions of records! I try to get people to buy mine accidentally. ~ Jamie Lidell,
896:If I tell you desh mein do hazaar crore ka ghotala ho gaya, it’s just a story. But if I tell you the kachcha road outside your house has been ‘made’ last year, as per municipal records, then your blood boils. ~ Rashmi Bansal,
897:Just days after the alleged rape, Florida newspapers were calling for capital punishment of the Groveland Boys. (Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Visual Materials from the NAACP Records) ~ Gilbert King,
898:So, what, you just decided to sack out here and seduce me when I walked in the door? Home from spending the night at my boyfriend's? After having sex with him that could go in the Guinness Book of Records? ~ Charlaine Harris,
899:Yes; my brother Bobby used to distribute records at King Records. I had a job there, too, packing records up and shipping them off. But I always wanted to play sessions at Stax, so I figured out a way to do it. ~ Donald Dunn,
900:Before the whole [music] business was calibrated around the selling of records. I never could have imagined that live performance would become kind of a vortex of the business. It's such a seismic shift really. ~ Arthur Fogel,
901:Biography, especially of the great and good, who have risen by their own exertions to eminence and usefulness, is an inspiring and ennobling study. Its direct tendency is to reproduce the excellence it records. ~ Horace Mann,
902:Bob Dylan is quite a songwriter, and a great singer and musician. I won't bother with comparing myself to him, but I will say that I heard his records at a very young age and I still listen to all his records. ~ Black Francis,
903:If you want to be negative about the whole thing you can say all guitar bands after the Beatles were just a waste of time because the Beatles were the best. I think it's far better to give new records a try. ~ Stephen Malkmus,
904:I made a record in 1996 called 'Animal Rights' that was a very difficult, very dark punk-rock record. Of all the records I've made, it's my favorite one. It's also the one that got the worst reviews and sold the worst. ~ Moby,
905:I'm not deluded enough to think that everyone who knows my name is a listener. You know, I hope that part of that interest - part of that public interest - has to do with me still making records that people like. ~ John Mayer,
906:I started following the news and seeing what was happening around the world with the polar ice caps melting and temperatures breaking records. I became concerned as an animal on this planet but also as a father. ~ Don Cheadle,
907:One or two of my friends set longevity records for people who had AIDS. What they did, incredibly hard though it was, was to practice meditation, positive thinking and they worked out physically quite a bit. ~ Frederick Lenz,
908:People always say 'Etta, you know what your problem is? You're neither fish nor fowl. There is no place to rack you.' When I would go in a record shop, you might find one or two records by me in different stacks. ~ Etta James,
909:The real amazing thing about all of this is I think I've maintained the mentality of a musician throughout it all, which I'm proudest of. And I'm still playing on people's records and singing on people's records. ~ Vince Gill,
910:There are such beings as vampires, some of us have evidence that they exist. Even had we not the proof of our own unhappy experience, the teachings and the records of the past give proof enough for sane peoples. ~ Bram Stoker,
911:The records are black boxes for me. Like, if you want to know who I am, my views, my perspective, things I love, things I hate, my convictions, my anthems. I've never let people's opinions affect the way I write. ~ Katy Perry,
912:We try to press against the boundaries of what we are allowed, walk a step past the edge. Our records will be scrutinized by Congress one day and decisions on whether to enlarge our jurisdiction will be made. ~ Louise Erdrich,
913:As long as bands are still out there slaving away in the garage and putting out their own records and just pushing the envelope for how songs should be written or how they should be played, punk will never die. ~ Milo Aukerman,
914:Gone are the days when Virgin Records was owned by Richard Branson, a fan of music. Now they're all owned by some guy who bought it off some guy who bought it off some guy who wants a return on his investment. ~ Noel Gallagher,
915:I can't even listen to Swans anymore. It doesn't do it for me at all, but I absolutely adore the early records and, on that same token, I wouldn't in any way wish for them to come back and repeat themselves. ~ Justin Broadrick,
916:I'm not one of those artists who doubts that they made dope-ass records. From the first record to now, each record has gotten better. I started dope, so I've just gotten doper and doper and dopest and super dope. ~ Killer Mike,
917:I realize that my memories...are like one of those home movies, where a jerky camera records slices of the action, then breaks off suddenly before picking up again at another point. There are gaps. Gaping holes. ~ Fiona Barton,
918:I've been around for such a long time. My first hit record was over 20 years ago and the people who bought my records then are married now and they probably still play these records and their children like them. ~ Bonnie Tyler,
919:The camera is objective. When it records a face it can't make any hierarchical decisions about a nose being more important than a cheek. The camera is not aware of what it is looking at. It just gets it all down. ~ Chuck Close,
920:The critics have been writing me off for 20 years. That's nothing new. As far as I know I still have plenty of fans and sell lots of records. Do I care what critics say about me? No, and I don't read reviews. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
921:You want to live, right? (Syn)
Absolutely. (Kiara)
Then we’re where you are, bathroom breaks being the only exception – unless you’re in public, and then we get to risk additional arrest records. (Syn) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
922:A lot of people are promoting records that are just throw-it-agains t-the-wall-see- if-it-sticks meaningless bullshit. Everybody has the responsibility to do the right thing and promote artists that mean something. ~ Dave Grohl,
923:I feel like records are moments in time, a modern moment that feels right then and it found its way to us then, that minute. We can all try and repeat records we have made that had success, but it's not possible. ~ Shelby Lynne,
924:I have been listening to the Stooges' self-titled first album for well over half my life, and it remains one of the most exciting and essential records I have ever had the good fortune to come into contact with. ~ Henry Rollins,
925:late 2011, the U.S. Department of Education made a historic change to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act to allow schools to release student records to third-party organizations without parental consent. ~ Glenn Beck,
926:No one in this world, so far as I know - and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. ~ H L Mencken,
927:No one wants to hear me over some smooth, regular beat, or just into the times. I try to do records sometimes that have a different bounce - maybe it's a Southern bounce or something. And people shoot me all day long. ~ Pusha T,
928:There are five kids in my family and I'm the only one who didn't get a diploma. All the kids got their diplomas hanging in my father's room and I got my gold records. I'd say he was more proud of the diplomas. ~ Ronnie Van Zant,
929:The truth is, the best win-lost records are not built on great trial work. They are built on cherry-picking only the strongest cases for trial and pleading out the rest, regardless of the right and wrong of it. ~ William Landay,
930:I have no perspective as regards my work. One reason I put out records and books is people respond to it, and it enables you to actually see the work more clearly. It's a form of therapy for me. Sometimes abusive therapy. ~ Moby,
931:I mean, Justin Bieber, Taylor Swift, Ariana Grande, I think the young kids sell lot of records. But for an older kind of artist, more of a sort of heritage, vintage type of artist, you have to think outside the box. ~ Boy George,
932:In the end, I believe these pages and the Book of Records return to the persistence of this desire: to know the times in which we are alive. To keep the record that must be kept and also, finally, to let it go. ~ Madeleine Thien,
933:When people want me to sign records they usually always have Vivadixie[submarinetransmissions], and I think that's a lot of people's favorite record. And that was sort of when I was just learning what I was doing. ~ Mark Linkous,
934:360 deals are the new things of the industry. It's not about selling records; it's about selling T-shirts, getting a piece of your publishing, getting a piece of your touring, and all these other kind of properties. ~ Lupe Fiasco,
935:A more interesting question is not 'Why did they break up?' but 'Would they have gotten back together?' ... There's always a chance we'd work together again, but I can't see us touring. I just see us making records. ~ John Lennon,
936:I always want to sing, but I don't always want to be trying to have #1 records. I don't think you can do it forever. I don't know what the time span of that is going to be. I want to sing because I want to sing. ~ Trisha Yearwood,
937:I don't release many records just as "Fennesz," so when I do, I want to plan everything in detail. It's not that I want to really lead the listener somewhere; it's more about me being satisfied with a project. ~ Christian Fennesz,
938:If you’re wondering if you’re a collector, ask yourself two questions. Do I own too many records? Do my friends and family feel I own too many records? If your respective answers are No and Yes, you’re a Collector. ~ Steve Almond,
939:My favorite time in music is probably 1970-75. Still Bill by Bill Withers, Harvest by Neil Young, John Prine's first album, James Taylor's One Man Dog-I hope I can bring the same sort of spirit I hear on those records. ~ Amos Lee,
940:Stop saying drug use makes people lazy. Jimi Hendrix did a lot of drugs, even though he's been dead for forty years, he's still making new records. Suck on that, Partnership for a Drug-Free America! ~ Bill Maher,
941:I really don't listen to anyone that I'm not proud of saying that I listen to. Even if it's something a little bit more unexpected, I didn't get too deep into the Waka, Gucci records, but I like those with pride. ~ Solange Knowles,
942:When we're putting out records that people are responding to, it's amazing. And it's obviously what we shoot for every time. It's a tricky balancing act. But as long as it's sort of a righteous idea, then you're good to go. ~ El P,
943:I listen to all the top 20 songs, and top 20 albums, even the rap albums. But I don't like negative messages. If somebody is putting a lot of ego out there, I don't like it. When I make my records I want it to be sincere. ~ Kenny G,
944:I remember when I was coming up, the music stores where you could get guitar strings was where I got my records from. Now the place where you get your records from is where you can get your DJ mats and your mixers. ~ Jam Master Jay,
945:I want you to hear how I can tell stories. I want you to hear how I can make these records about these females and make them feel every way I can. I want you to feel my magic. I want you to respect me and my artistry. ~ Kirko Bangz,
946:New York is very intense. Every time I go back to New York, I'm starting from scratch. You could have all these achievements - records, a tour - and then you get home and get back to the basics. It whips you into shape. ~ Nomi Ruiz,
947:The Ninja, as you know, operates by stealth. And so, case in point: I put out records... no one hears them! I make videos... (whispers) no one sees! I go on tour.... (whispers) no one knows! NINJA! I was never here! ~ Henry Rollins,
948:There's a lot of people over time who have brought out all these funky records that everybody has started jumping on like a catch phrase... When Planet Rock came out, then you had all of the electro funk records. ~ Afrika Bambaataa,
949:Bundy was correct in saying that most serial murderers are addicted to hardcore pornography. FBI records validate that point. Not every person exposed to obscenity will become a killer, of course, but too many will! ~ James C Dobson,
950:I always want to sing, but I don't always want to be trying to have No. 1 records. I don't think you can do it forever. I don't know what the time span of that is going to be. I want to sing because I want to sing. ~ Trisha Yearwood,
951:I have always said that I want to finish my career with the Dolphins and this put me closer to that goal. I have been fortunate to break many personal records, but my overiding goal is to win a Super Bowl here in Miami. ~ Dan Marino,
952:I like clever songs. I like songs that make people think and I try to have substance in all my records, even with 'Sweet Dreams' how it was a club record and it was up tempo, but it was melodic and it was, like, lyrical. ~ Rico Love,
953:Not only my favorite producers, but those are actually brothers, they're part of our We The Best family. To me, they're the biggest guys out, and the music they produce and the records they put out are phenomenal records. ~ Ace Hood,
954:War had always seemed to me to be a purely human behavior. Accounts of warlike behavior date back to the very first written records of human history; it seemed to be an almost universal characteristic of human groups. ~ Jane Goodall,
955:Christianity is more than history; it is also a system of truths. Every event which its history records, either is a truth, or suggests a truth, or expresses a truth which man needs to assent to or to put into practice. ~ Noah Porter,
956:Composing is what I love most from what I do. Each genre has a unique expression that you cannot supplant with another. All the records co-inspire each other though they are not tied conceptually in any way to another. ~ Serj Tankian,
957:He records that he was almost loathe to leave his prison cell because it was there that he realized that real success is success with self. It’s not in having things, but in having mastery, having victory over self. ~ Stephen R Covey,
958:It's easy to identify many investment managers with great recent records. But past results, though important, do not suffice when prospective performance is being judged. How the record has been achieved is crucial. ~ Warren Buffett,
959:People are always coming up to me, thinking I've got some magic wand that can make them a star and I want to tell them that no one can do that. Making hit records is not that easy. But it took me time to realize that myself. ~ Dr Dre,
960:People want you to produce records. They don't care what it took to make it. When a band is out doing concerts, the fans don't want to know about equipment difficulties. They want their hour-and-a-half release, and that's it. ~ Slash,
961:The quality of the information used in background checks is another cause for concern. One of the most common problems is that databases may include arrest records without any indication of whether a person was convicted. ~ Anonymous,
962:To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child. For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history? Cicero, Orator, 46 BC ~ Robert Harris,
963:We don’t always have the explanations for certain events and acts of God. He is sovereign. He owes us no explanation. He purposes to teach us to walk by faith and not by sight. When Scripture records an event or judgment ~ Beth Moore,
964:Well when I was young, when I was very young, when I was a little boy I don't remember the music I heard, but there was an article in the Brooklyn Daily written by my Aunt about how I could choose phonograph records. ~ Elliott Carter,
965:And ultimately the people who produce my records, they know that they're here to serve the purpose of me expressing who I am at this period of time and augmenting that or pulling it forward and I love that process. ~ Alanis Morissette,
966:If Nirvana had remained a small, underground punk rock band, Kurt Cobain would still be alive. And he'd probably be living in Seattle, getting kind of fat and balding, be relatively happy and producing records for other people. ~ Moby,
967:I'm always amazed to hear of air crash victims so badly mutilated that they have to be identified by their dental records. What I can't understand is, if they don't know who you are, how do they know who your dentist is? ~ Paul Merton,
968:It's not easy starting a label and putting out your own records. It's required me at times to humble myself and really push and work hard to try to give this the best shot. I really want to share this with the world. ~ Balthazar Getty,
969:It was very hard to get any records, so the only source for us to really hear what was happening was listening to the Voice of America. We would be taping all the broadcast and then sharing the tapes and talking about it. ~ Jan Hammer,
970:The "Highway 61" album [of Bob Dylan] was produced by Bob Johnston if I'm not incorrect. And Bob Johnston was an entirely different producer than Tom Wilson. Tom Wilson had produced jazz records and was a Harvard educated. ~ Al Kooper,
971:The music industry is a strange combination of having real and intangible assets: pop bands are brand names in themselves, and at a given stage in their careers their name alone can practically gaurantee hit records. ~ Richard Branson,
972:The rewards we get by being those weird guys going against the grain to me are way more massive than selling a million billion records. I like climbing mountains or going on undersea dives for whales and stuff like that. ~ Lupe Fiasco,
973:To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child. For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history? —Cicero, Orator, 46 BC ~ Robert Harris,
974:You can dig through public records and other documents to find out if a certain person had an Aryan grandmother, but there's no way to tell if that grandmother's Eocene ancestor was a sinanthropus or a pithecanthropus. ~ Stanis aw Lem,
975:I used to tell myself when I was much younger that I didn't want to wake up one day and be 32 years old and still playing records. It's just not going to happen. Well, the joke is on me, because I'm 56 years old now. ~ Frankie Knuckles,
976:The whole having records and selling records and being on TV, that was something that I didn't ever think would be for me. I thought that would be for other people. All I wanted to do was make a living playing the drums. ~ Phil Collins,
977:We must always meet our obligation to those who fall behind without our assistance. But let's remember, without a race there can be no champion, no records broken, no excellence - in education or any other walk of life. ~ Ronald Reagan,
978:I don't make records for pleasure. I did when I was a younger artist, but I don't today. I record so that I can feed people what they need, what they feel. Hopefully, I record so that I can help someone overcome a bad time ~ Marvin Gaye,
979:It's just a compulsion to create something new and stay busy. I don't know how to do anything else. It was never exactly right. Those records came out in spite of their flaws. And because of their flaws they were good. ~ Stephen Malkmus,
980:I was sometimes doing DJ stuff and working in a record shop in Tokyo. That place was a very unique shop. It was the place lots of DJs came to get used and rare records. It had a lot of jazz, funk, Latin and seventies rock. ~ Miho Hatori,
981:Later as things progressed and I saw the direct correlation between being able to keep making records and having people know about the music, I became more interested in using popular media as a way to get the word out. ~ Kathleen Hanna,
982:Well, everybody faces the fact there really aren't many records stores around to just go and browse. Maybe browse online, yet that tactile feel of flipping through a stack of vinyl remains one of life's simple pleasures. ~ Billy Gibbons,
983:As the warrant says, I’ll be taking all patient files and billing records.” She crossed her arms. “I’ll help you with the files, but billing records aren’t kept here. Doc had a local gal do all the billing electronically, ~ Lynette Eason,
984:Every time there's a list of the 100 greatest records of all time, all those albums were recorded in two days. Hardly any of them took a year, I'll tell you. In this day and age, I think it's important that people know that. ~ Jack White,
985:I feel so blessed to just have done what I had done. To be able to just use what God has given me is a blessing. You know, never mind the Grammys, never mind the records, never mind all of that. Just to be able to sing. ~ Whitney Houston,
986:If I had interesting things to say, I would have been a speechwriter. I think it gets to musicians' heads a lot of the time. Just because people like your records doesn't mean what you have to say is going to be interesting. ~ Aesop Rock,
987:It is hard for many people to give up the religion in which they were born; to admit that their fathers were utterly mistaken, and that the sacred records of their country are but collections of myths and fables. ~ Robert Green Ingersoll,
988:I wanted to be able to talk with people who have trade jobs and make records with them. I want to do more records with carpenters, electricians, people who specialize in even more bizarre trades that are off the beaten path. ~ Jack White,
989:Jazz isn't like pop, where you sell millions of records with a hit. Your spirit and soul aren't important in pop music. But jazz is like classical music. If people like you, they'll remember you and you'll last forever. ~ Freddie Hubbard,
990:To write a diary is to make a series of choices about what to omit, what to forget.

A memorable sandwich, an unmemorable flight of stairs. A memorable bit of conversation surrounded by chatter that no one records. ~ Sarah Manguso,
991:You do try to write songs that you feel like people can relate to and you try to be as honest as you can so that people hear your records and they feel like, "Oh, my god. This is exactly how I feel. I went through this." ~ Sevyn Streeter,
992:This also turned out to be negative, so there is no material in the Central Intelligence Agency, either in the records or in the mind of any of the individuals, that there was any contact had or even contemplated with him. ~ Richard Helms,
993:Well, it's great to have a Sony Records or a BMG or a Warner Brothers pocketbook. Money is a challenge when you're funding your own start-up costs and everything. But I feel like it's doable. You just have to be very careful. ~ Pam Tillis,
994:Al and Tommy and I sharing the biggest laugh because it was predicted by everything we did in the first three or four records in my career. It was predicted in the grooves that we would be here sometime later on down the road. ~ Al Jarreau,
995:I guarantee if people keep mm..supportin' me....Just buying my records, goin to my concerts, just supporting me..I'ma keep givin' money....Like Makaveli, every time it go platinum, I'm putting money up for community centers. ~ Tupac Shakur,
996:I've been doing it since I was prepubescent when I loved to scratch records and play good music. As it happens, you know I sort of fell into the mix. I really feel like I played a role in bringing dance music to America years ago. ~ A Trak,
997:My favorite record shop was called Recommended Records, in South London near where I lived - they did all the original Faust reissues that came out in 1979, and they also did a lot of Sun Ra stuff. They were a great record shop. ~ Tim Gane,
998:I grew up not far from where Motown was founded, maybe 300 miles from Detroit and I've always liked - I used to like the way they made records. I still do, I just haven't had a chance to hear as much. They used to entertain me. ~ Rick Danko,
999:It's nice to be recognized, but it's not great to have it too conspicuously recognized, if you see what I mean. Gold records on the wall, or titles after your name, it's just not something... I don't feel that great about it. ~ Ian Anderson,
1000:Surely I'd give it for a nipple a rubber Tacitus
For a rattle bag of broken Bach records
Tack Della Francesca all over its crib
Sew the Greek alphabet on its bib
And build for its playpen a roofless Parthenon ~ Gregory Corso,
1001:The information that the Secret Service shared with the White House included hotel records and firsthand accounts - the same types of evidence the agency and military relied on to determine who in their ranks was involved. ~ Carol D Leonnig,
1002:The terrorists that attacked us in San Bernardino was an American citizen, born and raised in this country. And I bet you we wish we would have had access to five years of his records so we could see who he was working with... ~ Marco Rubio,
1003:Excellence is to keep beating your own standards every day. If you don't have a standard for yourself, you have no records to beat; and if you don't have any record to beat, you can't excel. What is your current standard? ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1004:I don't know if there are artists out there who love their own records. I haven't met any, and I'm kind of extreme in the other direction, but therein lies the impetus to keep working and keep making new songs and new records. ~ Ani DiFranco,
1005:I remember getting up and singing with them at Mile One arena in St. John's. It was such an honour that they asked me, but all I could think of was, "But I'm such a fan!" Later I sang on one of their records, that was awesome. ~ Sarah Harmer,
1006:President Bush's campaign is now attacking John Kerry for throwing away some of his medals to protest the Vietnam War. Bush did not have any medals to throw away, but in his defense he did have all his services records thrown out. ~ Jay Leno,
1007:The one thing I do have is good ears. I don't mean perfect pitch, but ears for picking things up. I developed my ear through piano theory, but I never had a guitar lesson in my life, except from Eric Clapton off of records. ~ Eddie Van Halen,
1008:The writing of the record didn't take long, because I just have a huge stack of papers and I just pluck from the stack. It took a long time because it's very expensive to make records; in fact, I think it's a complete rip-off. ~ Cass McCombs,
1009:United Artists wanted to do records with me. I had no idea, what a rare thing that was... to make an album. And they put a guy with me working on songs, and I got busy with films. I just kind of let it slide. Isn't that amazing? ~ John Astin,
1010:Yeah, if someone's selling downloads and collecting money for our songs I would be unhappy about that but if they're trading it I don't mind, obviously if I make a thousand records or CDs or whatever, I like to sell a thousand. ~ Ian MacKaye,
1011:I feel fortunate to have made records during an era where people actually bought music. But I have friends in struggling up-and-coming bands now that will certainly never be able to pay the rent, because music has been devalued. ~ Tom Morello,
1012:I think records and music are more appropriate and more respectful of the human soul than the churches are. And more respectful of the needs of humans to communicate with the aspects of themselves that are neglected by language. ~ Will Oldham,
1013:People used to make records,
as in the record of an event,
the event of people playing music
in a room

Now everything is cross marketing.
It's about sunglasses and shoes,
or guns and drugs.
You choose. ~ Ani DiFranco,
1014:There was a conflict - the actual putting together of the reality of the situation didn't seem to gel. I'd been doing kind of a slow ballad type of thing on records, but when it came to performing, I felt I was limiting myself. ~ Van Morrison,
1015:If youre going to reach for it, reach all the way for it. Albums like Purple Rain and Thriller and those kind of records, you had to reach far above the din of cynicism and modern living to get to that place, against all the odds. ~ Dave Sitek,
1016:I'll release my tax returns when Barack Obama releases his college transcripts and the copy of his admission records to show whether he got any loans as a foreign student. When he releases that, talk to me about my tax returns. ~ Mike Huckabee,
1017:I wanted to get my recording and become a musician again, work; with other people, do that kind of thing because I kind of got away from that for a while once we started happening, you know, selling records, sold out concerts. ~ Bootsy Collins,
1018:My dream many years ago would've been to continue to write and record songs in record/album form for years to come, but now records aren't what they were then - and so it doesn't actually feel very good to make a record of songs. ~ Will Oldham,
1019:My first record wasn't even with the Fugees. I was signed to Big Beat Records, so I was signed back in 1989 to the label that the Knocks are on now. You can always tell which generation had the pulse based on how they see things. ~ Wyclef Jean,
1020:Only a certain number of people go to a store over the period of a year. When a person sees my record on the shelf, it eliminates someone else's record from being sold. It's about continuing to try to find new ways to sell records. ~ Roy Ayers,
1021:Actually, there was another band where we were three girls, around '84 when I met John Zorn, called Sunset Chorus. It was just bass and drums and guitar- we didn't make any records but we played a lot of different clubs in New York. ~ Ikue Mori,
1022:[Brion calls his working relationship with West a natural fit.] His knowledge and understanding of records across the board is great, ... That's the reason why we got along: We don't see music as something that happens in one genre. ~ Jon Brion,
1023:If a regular law enforcement agency wants your phone records, all they have to do is issue a subpoena. But now the intelligence agency is not able to quickly gather records and look at them to see who these terrorists are calling. ~ Marco Rubio,
1024:I try to take a snapshot of who I am now, who I am becoming, as opposed to who I was when I was first starting to make records. I'm not trying to make boring adult music, but I try to make music more reflective of what matters to me now. ~ El P,
1025:I've fought everybody without ducking anyone. I have beaten 10 undefeated guys, and I never was comparing myself to the greatest in the sport. I was not thinking of breaking any records. I'm just enjoying my time in boxing. ~ Wladimir Klitschko,
1026:Before that, there was no official ship History. The only official records were the ship’s logs.” He sighed heavily, shaking his head. “But they were all destroyed. Which is why the History was begun, to provide an alternate ~ Richard Paul Russo,
1027:How I snuffed that Tartar air!--how I spurned that turnpike earth!--that common highway all over dented with the marks of slavish heels and hoofs; and turned me to admire the magnanimity of the sea which will permit no records. ~ Herman Melville,
1028:I'm not a singer. If you've heard any of my records, that's not singing. I have no vocal qualities whatsoever. I've got a lot of enthusisam and I go to the cross, but there's no skill going on there. It's more just intuitiveness. ~ Henry Rollins,
1029:Overall, we had about 50 meetings where the brothers would say that I couldn't do any solo records, I couldn't write for other people, I couldn't do this and I couldn't do that. These guys were trying to nail my feet to the ground. ~ Sammy Hagar,
1030:Senator John McCain, who spent over five years in a Vietnamese POW camp, publicly releases 1,000 pages of medical records. Now people are left with only open nagging questions: what kind of freak has 1,000 pages of medical records? ~ Jon Stewart,
1031:That's one reason why it's pretty worthless, I can't totally buy it, if you think about it, it's things like the Phil Spector records. On one level they were rebellion, on another level they were keeping the teenager in his place. ~ Lester Bangs,
1032:The group MoveOn.org has called on John McCain to release all of his medical records. In response, McCain told them, 'Why don't you just come down to the warehouse and look around for yourself? Bring a forklift, it'll take time.' ~ Conan O Brien,
1033:The quipu is significant because it dispels the notion that mathematics flourishes only after a civilization has developed writing; however, societies can reach advanced states without ever having developed written records. ~ Clifford A Pickover,
1034:The U.S. Army records alone for World War II weigh 17,000 tons, and even the best historians have not done more than just scratch the surface. The story is such that 500 years from now people will be writing and reading about it. ~ Rick Atkinson,
1035:A great hang is mandatory. But in all of my years as a traveling musician, on a whole it's been pretty damn magical. There have been a couple duds along the way, but most time, I'm in awe of the guys who want to play on my records. ~ Shelby Lynne,
1036:At birth, every child was given a Kiyomo Bracelet to wear. Each bead had a purpose—from storing medical records to taking a picture or projecting a free-floating informational screen, much like a web page but suspended in midair. ~ Ronald L Smith,
1037:If the U.N. were to be successful in its efforts to control the Internet, countries where human rights records range from questionable to criminal could be put in charge of determining what is and is not allowed to appear online. ~ John Doolittle,
1038:I just felt, at the time, a little bit relieved, because I was kinda counting the days: 'Come on! Let's get these records into people's homes - nobody will ever be able to get them all back, and it'll be an artefact out in the world.' ~ DJ Shadow,
1039:That resplendent space created by a piece of fiction can really expand the width of time... Clearly there is a spot somewhere inside our heads that records the feelings we had when we read the book, and it stays with us forever ~ Banana Yoshimoto,
1040:...2009 saw the eighth 'ten-year flood' of Fargo, North Dakota, since 1989. In Iowa, Cedar Rapids was hit last year by a flood that exceeded the 500-year flood plain. All-time flood records are being broken in areas throughout the world. ~ Al Gore,
1041:He (Anwar Sadat) records that he was almost loathe to leave his prison cell because it was there that he realized that real success is success with self. It’s not in having things, but in having mastery, having victory over self. ~ Stephen R Covey,
1042:I feel like that I'm learning all the time. I'm learning from new artists, from established artists... every time I listen to '70s rock 'n' roll records, I'm learning. And I think that I'm just now starting to get a hold on what I do. ~ Tim McGraw,
1043:I get upset when people knock hip-hop, because I can absolutely see the musicality in it. These days, when I'm listening to records by hip-hop artists, I hear the production. It's just astounding how great the productions have become. ~ Elton John,
1044:I'm never argumentative for the sake of being argumentative, I don't think. And more than ever, I've had to be willing to fight just to get records released, or just to be able to walk away with a little bit of self-respect and pride. ~ Ryan Adams,
1045:Oftentimes, when people cut a record from analog tape to vinyl, they digitize the music first; I did a little investigating and discovered that most vinyl records that I've ever heard were digitized before they were put onto vinyl. ~ Kevin Shields,
1046:The problem now with changes in the music industry is that there's almost no point in making records anymore. The only thing really is to tour, and then you're revisiting history. Maybe it's better to leave it, if you see what I mean. ~ Nick Mason,
1047:... There's no reason why everyone has to listen to records in hi-fi. Having the violins on the left and the bass on the right doesn't make the music more profound. It's just a more complex way of stimulating a bored imagination. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1048:We are the outcasts, we are the ones that are different, we are the ones that never got along with anyone else, we are the ones that went back to our rooms and put on our headphones and listened to those records that made us happy ~ Bert McCracken,
1049:Whoever makes big records is a winner to me. Not the person with the mumbo jumbo, or the biggest diss record, or whatever the case may be. In the end of the day, whoever is most successful, whoever puts out a big record, wins the battle. ~ Fat Joe,
1050:Accurate data on shark attacks on World War II servicemen may never be known since medical records did not note them. In fact, the navy was sufficiently concerned about loss of morale that it discouraged public mention of the menace. ~ Doug Stanton,
1051:Art is a social object, books and films and records and television shows, they’re social objects that bring people together in conversation. I love the notion that I could write something that two people could share. That’s the goal. ~ Graham Moore,
1052:It's good to listen to lots of different stuff, just whatever you like. The first two records I ever bought were Alice Cooper, Killer and Jethro Tull, Aqualung. That's two weird records to begin with, but I think they hold up well. ~ James Hetfield,
1053:It's like any other job: there's a method to it and it's really important to get that down. I'm still working on it, I got a lot to learn. It's one thing to make records but it's a whole 'nother capacity to be a star - whatever that is. ~ Macy Gray,
1054:Paint records the most delicate gesture and the most tense. It tells whether the painter sat or stood or crouched in front of the canvas. Paint is a cast made of the painter's movements, a portrait of the painter's body and thoughts. ~ James Elkins,
1055:says Sonic Youth’s Lee Ranaldo. “People got this idea that ultimately what mattered was the quality of what you were doing and how much importance you gave to it, regardless of how widespread it became or how many records it sold. ~ Michael Azerrad,
1056:That resplendent space created by a piece of fiction can really expand the width of time... Clearly there is a spot somewhere inside our heads they records that feelings we had when we read the book, and it stays with us forever. ~ Banana Yoshimoto,
1057:The alternate media are becoming important and viable alternatives to playing live. Records, videos, that kind of thing. They're going to start to count for something. Because there's only a limited amount of us-time available to us. ~ Jerry Garcia,
1058:When I first started out in the music industry and went to Elektra Records, I didn't go to be an artist, I went to get a record label started. And they said in order to have a label deal, I had to be an artist - so that's what I did. ~ Missy Elliot,
1059:I sang in the coffee houses . . . in the early 60's with no idea of success in terms of records or television. I just thought I was a storyteller. I had this deep, bassy voice. But I had incredible passion for the music I was singing. ~ Judy Collins,
1060:In the years between 2000 and 2004, I always got the feeling that people were just starting to hear about me and they were all late to the game. I'd be out playing shows for records that I recorded back in 1999 that were just coming out. ~ Ariel Pink,
1061:I've changed the way I look at things. When I put out a record or single I don't allow myself to set up expectations like, "This song must be a number one hit. Its got to sell X amount of records." I have fallen into that trap before. ~ Scott Weiland,
1062:The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself; and can never be erased. ~ Alexander Hamilton,
1063:With my records, it's just a matter of trying to create something fresh for myself in a very finite context, which is the pop song. I don't know anything about the people who buy my records, and what, if anything, they get out of them. ~ Tom Verlaine,
1064:Both my parents recognized early on that I wanted to do something in comedy, and they were really supportive. They're the ones who bought me Steve Martin records and let me watch R-rated comedies long before they probably should have. ~ Chris Hardwick,
1065:In every corner a gramophone shop
in every shop a hundred gramophones
in every gramophone a hundred records
in every record
an alive person playing with a dead one.
Take the steel needle and separate them
if you can. ~ George Seferis,
1066:... her taste in music haunted my memory and I had to stop at Tower Records on the Upper West Side to buy ninety dollars' worth of rap CDs but, as expected, I'm at a loss: [...] voices uttering ugly words like digit, pudding, chunk. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
1067:I do these records. All of these ideas that I have, that I put out there, that inspire me to write, are a purging in a lot of ways. I have to expel them in order for myself to walk around and actually smile and be a regular, or a living, person. ~ El P,
1068:Just take Kosovo: back then, UN bodies decided that Kosovo should become independent of Serbia and that the interests of Serbia's central government had to be subordinated. You can read that in all the records, also in the German ones. ~ Vladimir Putin,
1069:No matter how carefully records are kept and filed and computerized, they grow fuzzy with time. Stories grow by accretion. Tales accumulate--like dust. The longer the time lapse, the dustier the history--until it degenerates into fables. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1070:That's a good thing for me. I own everything, I have 100% creative control, I own all my masters, everything. I'm blessed to be in that situation. If we sell some records, I think we'll just add to the historic pace that this has been going at. ~ Drake,
1071:There are only two types of content of any value online: conversation, and the things about which the conversation takes place. Stop making Electric Age media - start doing Digital Age stuff. Stop making records, start having conversations. ~ Anonymous,
1072:You keep records of their troubles. You’ll learn from them. If you want to Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from. It’s a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn’t education, it’s history. ~ J D Salinger,
1073:I gaped at her before turning to gape at the rest of my family. Gaping seemed like the only real answer. If they were going to have to identify my body by my dental records, I was going to make sure they all got a good look at my teeth. ~ Seanan McGuire,
1074:It probably all started with The Beatles, and then I guess it goes out from there. Springsteen... Fleetwood Mac... I mean, that's all so inherent in us that when we're making records now, we take a lot from the artists who are around us. ~ Jack Antonoff,
1075:It's just natural, it's not a great disaster. People keep talking about it like it's The End of The Earth. It's only a rock group that split up, it's nothing important. You know, you have all the old records there if you want to reminisce. ~ John Lennon,
1076:Brian Eno records and music got me through. It made me feel like there were other people out there who had the same questions and fears and unhappiness. Particularly those kinds of artists who were writing songs about exactly those things. ~ Greg Mottola,
1077:I'm honored when young people say they've gone to school on slide guitar with my records. But people get their influence from my live shows and records and YouTube, not me personally. I walk around with a hat on. People don't know it's me. ~ Bonnie Raitt,
1078:I was signed by L.A. Reid on Arista Records when I was 16. He understood me and believed in me. Arista folded and I got put on RCA or whatever, then there were new people there, and every six months it changes and more new people come in. ~ Avril Lavigne,
1079:Our rooms were bugged, our phones were tapped, and our lawyer's rooms were broken into and their files stolen. We finally had to hire armed guards with pistols to be able to maintain our records. It was hard to believe we weren't in Russia. ~ Jimmy Hoffa,
1080:After consulting census books, cemetery records, city directories, and various other documents, he definitively established that the story the dying Carlson told about her background was true in every detail. She was not Belle Gunness.[ ~ Harold Schechter,
1081:I tried to take some of the same records that were important to me on my album Full Speed that my fans really vibed with content-wise and just made sure that the production and actual sound was put together differently and wasn't rushed as much. ~ Kid Ink,
1082:The London games mark the 24th anniversary of my winning two golds and setting the world record in the heptathlon. Someone is going to want it; records are made to be broken - it's only a matter of time. I hope mine will outlive me. ~ Jackie Joyner Kersee,
1083:And everything was made of paper: sentences, pardons, pleas, bad records, demerits, proof of guilt, but never, it seemed, proof of innocence. If there were no paper, Carter felt, the entire judicial system would collapse and disappear. ~ Patricia Highsmith,
1084:I swear on my children's lives that I never look at the statistics or look at beating anyone's records. All I do is look to improve but not compete against any record. I want to win trophies and score goals because that's my job as a forward. ~ Luis Suarez,
1085:My favorite records are by bands where the musicians are all playing like themselves, but those personalities connect in an exciting way and create music that is one cohesive unit. It's not catchy like a pop song, but it's a really cool song. ~ Dylan Baldi,
1086:The number of managers with great track records in a given market depends far more on the number of people who started in the investment business (in place of going to dental school), rather than on their ability to produce profits. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
1087:The Super Bowl helped me sell a few new records and probably put a few extra fannies in the seats that tour. But what it was really about was this: I felt my band remained one of the mightiest in the land and I wanted you to know it. We ~ Bruce Springsteen,
1088:To pay no attention to health of body but only that of soul. To plan day on arising and evening examination of conscience. More spiritual reading...To waste no time. More conscientious about letters, visits, about these records. More charity. ~ Dorothy Day,
1089:You can't just walk away when somebody recognizes you. You have to take some time out and talk to them. It's not a waste of time - I just love talking to people. And I don't do this to sell records. The truth is, I do what I do because I love it. ~ Kenny G,
1090:Comparing yourself to the people like you, comparing yourself to the people who aren't like you, looking at how many records you've sold, looking at the venue size you're selling out. None of that can even remotely measure how happy you are. ~ Amanda Palmer,
1091:Records are only one-dimensional. Even film is only one-dimensional. That's why music and live theatre is so important, because it's not the same thing. A recording is just a record of part of the experience, but it's not the whole experience. ~ Steve Earle,
1092:Rock records. It's the main source of inspiration for people - fans, or musicians, or both - to act out in ways that they wouldn't normally act out. Especially rock critics. Ultimately, records don't really hurt anybody, and neither do reviews. ~ Ryan Adams,
1093:the university system of becoming a “niche for radicals,” describing the public funding as “a boondoggle,” and demanding that the legislature “starve the beast.” The center dug up professors’ voting records in an effort to prove political bias. ~ Jane Mayer,
1094:And all I could do while I listened to this dude tell me how punk rock saved his life was think, Wow. Why did my friend waste all that time going to chemotherapy? I guess we should have just played him a bunch of shitty Black Flag records. ~ Chuck Klosterman,
1095:Barbra Streisand is without a doubt one of the most honest people I have ever known. There is no doubt in my mind that she will not be doing any more concerts. Of course, she still will be making records and starring and directing in movies ~ Marvin Hamlisch,
1096:Methamphetamine is so Flowers for Algernon: All that super-human cerebral ability fades to limited physical activities like stapling carpet scraps to the wall or masturbation antics worthy of The Guinness Book of World Records. ~ Clint Catalyst,
1097:No woman can be gotten with child without some knowledg, consent and delight in the acting thereof.” Charles J. Hoadly, ed., Records of the Colony or Jurisdiction of New Haven, From May, 1653, to the Union (Hartford: Case, Lockwood, 1858), 123; ~ Jill Lepore,
1098:There was a movement called 'disco sucks', it was a shame to like disco, but then there was no music to dance to, so some DJs started to use old disco records, but the B-sides and the acapellas, and we began producing beats with drum machines. ~ David Guetta,
1099:A studio is an absolute labyrinth of possibilities - this is why records take so long to make because there are millions of permutations of things you can do. The most useful thing you can do is to get rid of some of those options before you start ~ Brian Eno,
1100:But I'm after medals more than anything. Championships don't get taken away from you but records do, so I think I'd rather have medals at every championships rather than times. A world record would be a bonus, but I'm still only 25 in 17 days. ~ Sally Pearson,
1101:It's about giving the people what they want. So many people have told me that they've made love to my records so what I've delivered this time is an album about sex. Pretty much every song has that theme. Straight no chasers, it's booty music! ~ Tyrese Gibson,
1102:jukeboxes—industry estimates suggest that up to half of all the records sold in the United States in the later 1930s went into commercial music machines—and the early electric speakers were particularly suited to the percussive power of a piano. ~ Elijah Wald,
1103:So I played the acoustic guitar and harmonica and stomped my foot and I think I was right in assuming that Greenwich Village would be the best place to perform my own material and possibly get some attention, move on to making records and all. ~ Steve Forbert,
1104:The security of computers and the Internet is a horrible and dangerous mess. Every week we hear about breaches of databases of Social Security numbers and financial information and health records, and about critical infrastructure being insecure. ~ Matt Blaze,
1105:For three years between 16 and 19 I was the opening-act-for-the-opening-act-for-the-opening-act, you know? And then I was on tour with Ice-T, Stetsasonic, EPMD, Sir Mix-a-Lot--legends--and went on to sell 160 million records. It still baffles me. ~ Vanilla Ice,
1106:I do make some drawings for wall pieces. I do work out some ideas for large-scale wall pieces where I have to organize words or get proportions right. I do keep them in my files. Not an exhibit or a show; just as part of my records, my archives. ~ Robert Barry,
1107:I have never cared about setting world records, or filling my boat with fish, or, for that matter, even catching fish. I go for the experience of spending six hours in the arms of the ocean, never thinking of a single thing except chasing fish. ~ Jimmy Buffett,
1108:I wrote and produced millions and millions of selling records, so my publishing company alone was worth millions of dollars. I didn't have to work anymore in life because when the rappers started sampling... I'm the most sampled artist in history. ~ Rick James,
1109:Keep records of your fitness progress throughout your training. Chart all of the food you eat, the exercises you complete, and even the amount of sleep you get each night. Refer back to your records to see where things went right or went wrong. ~ Robert Cheeke,
1110:We feel more and more intensely about the music we make. It's unexpected, and not always what you would think of in Beach House. It's all art in the end. We aren't making records because we have to; it's because it's what we want to express. ~ Victoria Legrand,
1111:For us, selling a million records in 2005 is the equivalent of selling 2 to 3 million records (five years ago). Rock records aren't flying off the shelves like they used to. Hip-hop and pop are so huge. (But) everything's on the upswing for us. ~ Jacoby Shaddix,
1112:I have always been accused of taking the things I love - football, of course, but also books and records - much too seriously, and I do feel a kind of anger when I hear a bad record, or when someone is lukewarm about a book that means a lot to me. ~ Nick Hornby,
1113:Just be careful," a Seattle homicide detective warned. "Maybe we'd better know where to find your dental records in case we need to identify you."
I laughed, but the words were jarring; the black humor that would surround Ted Bundy evermore begun. ~ Ann Rule,
1114:So yeah, it's nothing that I'm doing on purpose, I just think that the more records, the more songs that I write, the more records that I make, you're obviously going to fall into a specific style and thank God it's a style that people are into. ~ Kenny Chesney,
1115:When I was growing up, albums were my closest friends, as sad as that may sound - Joy Division's 'Closer,' or Echo and the Bunnymen's 'Heaven Up Here'... I had a more intimate relationship with those records than I did with most of the people in my life. ~ Moby,
1116:When you play the bars, you pay your dues. It does matter that you know those things [songs]. And the great thing for me, too, is that I draw on that stuff as influences. It's also stuff that you put in the tank that you pull from to make records. ~ Eric Church,
1117:When you're tied to one show, you are very much at the mercy of the writers so you can suddenly get a script where you have a heart attack and die. I've got to be in The Guinness Book of World Records for having the most heart attacks on television. ~ Alan Dale,
1118:Atlantic's Jerry Wexler believes first-rate records are made by first-rate voices. He certainly has worked with enough of them: Clyde McPhatter, Joe Turner, La Vern Baker, Ray Charles, Otis Redding, Solomon Burke, Wilson Pickett and Aretha Franklin. ~ Jon Landau,
1119:I jiggled the watch. An authentic Rolex had serial and model numbers cut into the head behind the bracelet, or on the inner rim below the crystal. High-end fakes often had numbers, too, but fake numbers didn’t appear in the manufacturer’s records. ~ Robert Crais,
1120:The very concept of history implies the scholar and the reader. Without a generation of civilized people to study history, to preserve its records, to absorb its lessons and relate them to its own problems, history, too, would lose its meaning. ~ George F Kennan,
1121:I took a private lesson, but it didn't really work out, so I went back to playing along with records. That's really the thing that got me into playing a lot - getting excited about playing along with my favorite bands like Zeppelin and Black Sabbath. ~ Chad Smith,
1122:I try to write like the writers I admire - I rip them off in form. It comes from George Strait and Merle Haggard records, and country music in general is really good at that, the twisted phrase... So Im always looking for that angle in my own work. ~ Brad Paisley,
1123:Oh, Eddie, it never changes, when the groom lifts the veil, when the bride accepts the ring, the possibilities you see in their eyes, it's the same around the world. They truly believe their love and their marriage is going to break all the records. ~ Mitch Albom,
1124:When I'm doing a drawing, I get lots of ideas I use them in my songs, even. I do a lot of drawings because that's where I get most of my spending cash and I just always have to have new records, to get something to satisfy my listening pleasure. ~ Daniel Johnston,
1125:Actually, we got signed in November of 2000 with Dreamworks which is the most amazing label. We have friends on other labels and though we are not selling millions of records, yet, they treat us with tons of respect and give us some very good guidance. ~ Adam Rich,
1126:All weddings... It never changes, when the groom lifts the veil, when the bride accepts the ring, the possibilities you see in their eyes, it's the same around the world. They truly believe their love and their marriage is going to break all records. ~ Mitch Albom,
1127:Heavy Metal fans are buying Heavy Metal records, taking the records home, listening to the records and then blowing their heads off with shotguns? Where's the problem? That's an unemployment solution right there, folks! It's called natural selection. ~ Denis Leary,
1128:I don't like records that are the same from beginning to end, that are too styled and slick. Everything is so designed and airbrushed and Botoxed, it makes us think, 'Oh, everybody's perfect except me. Everything's smooth except me.' But nothing is smooth. ~ Bjork,
1129:I’ve never intended to make religious records or records that preach some kind of point of view... If you’re involved with imagination and the creative process, it’s not such a difficult thing to believe in a god. But I’m not involved in any religions. ~ Nick Cave,
1130:I wanted to make the kind of records that I heard in the discos that I danced in at that time. Funky, electronic sounds, while the musicians in the band were more rock oriented. This I suppose created the sound we know as Frankie Goes To Hollywood. ~ Holly Johnson,
1131:last address listed was in a place called The Villages. After writing down the information, Bosch checked for a website and found that The Villages was a massive retirement community in Sumter County, Florida. Further searching of online records ~ Michael Connelly,
1132:One thing that old blues records teach you, is that even people with very limited skills can play very personal, distinctive, and appealing music that has nothing to do with the extent of their technique. It was their artistry. It was their feeling. ~ Greil Marcus,
1133:Since 9/11 the United States has been followed by countries with bad records, such as the former Soviet Union countries, into erosions of human rights. Because the United States has changed its standards it is undermining civil liberties elsewhere. ~ Mary Robinson,
1134:the motives of the writer form as important an ingredient in the analysis or his history, as the facts he records. Probability is a powerful and troublesome test; and it is by this troublesome standard that a large portion of historical evidence is sifted. ~ Homer,
1135:When I was eight years old, I got a dummy for Christmas and started teaching myself. I got books and records and sat in front of the bathroom mirror, practising. I did my first show in the third grade and just kept going; there was no reason to quit. ~ Jeff Dunham,
1136:Why do we make records? Because we want to say something. Why are you in art? Because you want to say something. The second you don't have anything to say, you stop making art - you might start making product. And I'm interested in being an artist. ~ Patrick Stump,
1137:Before long I bought a small stereo and spent my time holed up in my room, listening to jazz records. But I had almost no desire to talk with anyone about the experience I gained through books and music. I felt happy just being me and no one else. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1138:I think Badfinger was the epitome of that type of music before the power pop term was coined. 'No Matter What" is always gonna be a great song on the radio. There?s probably two or three others off their records that are as cool like 'Day After Day'. ~ Robin Zander,
1139:I've got a collection of songs that I've had, I keep adding to and they're all great American composers. I wanted to showcase American composers and I've done that on a lot of my records and played things by American composers that I really respect. ~ Charlie Haden,
1140:I would want to be known as a great singer; that the records I've made and the performances that I've done to be remembered. But the voice is the most important thing. The showmanship goes along with it. But I want to be remembered for my vocal ability. ~ Tom Jones,
1141:When I’m moving down Broadway to meet Jean, my secretary, for brunch, in front of Tower Records a college student with a clipboard asks me to name the saddest song I know. I tell him, without pausing, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” by the Beatles. ~ Anonymous,
1142:You are kind of a pet project of mine.” Warner smiles to himself. “I’ve studied your records for a very long time.” I can’t handle his pompous, self-satisfied strut. I want to break the grin off his face. Warner stops walking. “I want you on my team. ~ Tahereh Mafi,
1143:As soon as one of my records goes on, it makes a vast portion of the public nervous. They get spooked by it. To some people who have ears to hear, it's a delightful, refreshing change. But to most of the public, it's a load of homemade-sounding nonsense. ~ Nick Lowe,
1144:Before 2013, if you said the NSA was making records of everybody's phone calls and the [Government Communications Headquarters] was monitoring lawyers and journalists, people raised eyebrows and called you a conspiracy theorist. Those days are over. ~ Edward Snowden,
1145:I don't relate to what's left of the music business. There doesn't seem to be any point to it anymore. The business that I grew up in and loved, we made records a different way - there were record companies, there were stores where you could buy albums. ~ Don McLean,
1146:I have become increasingly convinced that the past records of mutual fund managers are essentially worthless in predicting future success. The few examples of consistently superior performance occur no more frequently than can be expected by chance. ~ Burton Malkiel,
1147:I think up until '71 or '72, Herman's Hermits had our second and third Number One records in 1969 and 1970. You know, the first one was in 1964. It was just a question of the American success being so outrageous, that that attracted the most attention. ~ Peter Noone,
1148:Oh, how romantic. He got arrested for me. Our romantic gestures consisted of getting felony charges on our records for each other. The Bonnie and Clyde of the Fae world.
This is not what I had in mind when I think of Eli and me and handcuffs. ~ Stacey Marie Brown,
1149:People who care about records are always giving me a hard time. I mean, I would destroy records in performances, and break them, and whatever I could do to them to create a sound that was something else than just the sound that was in the groove. ~ Christian Marclay,
1150:All the really great records or people who made them somehow came from Memphis or Louisiana or somewhere along the Mississippi River...And singers like Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters gave me the feeling that they were right there, standing by the river. ~ John Fogerty,
1151:he knew from studying maps in preparation: the broad avenues leading to the Brandenburg Gate. He had played Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos records many times, intricate magic alive in the air. The gate that led to the town of Brandenburg an der Havel. ~ Gregory Benford,
1152:I'm very fussy about how my records sound, but I'm very aware that because of the way they sound, I will never be a big-selling, mainstream artist because the public has gotten conditioned to hearing pop music in a certain way. And I don't do it that way. ~ Nick Lowe,
1153:I see myself as real. Like I mean if I was the President I would have a responsibility, because people put me there. Nobody put me here. They just buy my records. They wouldn't buy my records if my records wasn't good. I'm being who i am in the record. ~ Tupac Shakur,
1154:It is just like your tape-recorder. It records, it reproduces - all by itself. You only listen. Similarly, I watch all that happens, including my talking to you. It is not me who talks, the words appear in my mind and then I hear them said. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
1155:I've looked at pictures that my mom has of me, from when I was four years old at the turntable. I'm there, reaching up to play the records. I feel like I was bred to do what I do. I've been into music, and listening to music and critiquing it, my whole life. ~ Dr Dre,
1156:The blues records of each decade explain something about the philosophical basis of our lives as black people. ... Blues is a basis of historical continuity for black people. It is a ritualized way of talking about ourselves and passing it on. ~ Sherley Anne Williams,
1157:I had made a couple of records in Europe. One as a leader, and one as a sideman before that. It was what it was. I started to work with Maria Schneider around that period and some other people, I started to get called to sub at the Vanguard in my mid-20s. ~ Jon Gordon,
1158:I'm a girl from Sweden. I took a lot of risks and went to New York by myself when I was 19 just because I read about it in a few books. I came here knowing nobody, having no money, and now I'm doing all these things like making records and videos every day. ~ Lykke Li,
1159:The brain appears to possess a special area which we might call poetic memory and which records everything that charms or touches us, that makes our lives beautiful ... Love begins at the point when a woman enters her first word into our poetic memory. ~ Milan Kundera,
1160:The police don’t enforce laws; they don’t even get busy until after the laws are broken. They solve crimes at a pitifully low rate of success. What the police are, to be honest, is a kind of secretarial pool that records the names of the victims ~ George Alec Effinger,
1161:For a producer, you want to be in L.A. You want to be close to the action, and in L.A. there are always singers, artists, songwriters, collaborators and other producers. It's easy to get access to all that, which gives you more opportunity to work records. ~ Steve Aoki,
1162:I feel like all of my records have potential to be hits. Sometimes it's promotion, sometimes it's bad timing, but yeah I take it very personally. I'm very hard on myself when it comes to my records. I really believe that if it's not number one, I've failed. ~ Rico Love,
1163:In the UK, tons of records are now sold in grocery stores, because there are no record stores - it's iTunes or the grocery store. And almost every band that had an impact on me was on a major label. There's value in people actually hearing things, as well. ~ Win Butler,
1164:It's really hard to make records and concentrate and have a free mind, because I have this whole other life. If you don't have kids it's a whole other thing. I think you can be fifty and still have a rock and roll lifestyle; you can still perpetuate that. ~ Pat Benatar,
1165:I was running track early in my years and I was breaking track records in sprint running. I was training and I wanted to be in the Olympics. I thought I was going to be able to win a gold medal, and my mind was pretty much set on 'this is what I want to do'. ~ Sheila E,
1166:Studies have proved that checking records, possible diagnoses and drug interactions on a computer during a medical examination can interfere with what should be not only a fact-based investigation but a deeply human, partly intuitive and empathetic process. ~ Anonymous,
1167:The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature by the hand of the divinity itself and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power. ~ Ron Chernow,
1168:The UN Commission on Human Rights, whose membership in recent years has included countries - such as Libya and Sudan - which have deplorable human rights records, and the recent Oil-for-Food scandal, are just a few examples of why reform is so imperative. ~ John Linder,
1169:When you're spending your money for a nice outing, you want to go have a good time. And I always thought comedies, laughing, was something that was made for entertainment on that level. And records and maybe TV and stuff like that is really made to be heavy. ~ Ice Cube,
1170:But now it's kind of a given that a 15-year-old would have a record deal and sell a quarter of a million records. No one's expecting her to answer any deep theological questions. And I'll tell you, I was asked some deep theological questions from the git-go. ~ Amy Grant,
1171:I don't know if embarrassed is the right word, about pop, but I prefer the abstract and the distorted in music. And I keep writing these proper melodies and harmonies, and they're the bits that get thrown out of the records! And I have quite a collection. ~ Jason Pierce,
1172:If you listen to the great Beatle records, the earliest ones where the lyrics are incredibly simple. Why are they still beautiful? Well, they're beautifully sung, beautifully played, and the mathematics in them is elegant. They retain their elegance. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
1173:I just try to keep busy. I find sometimes, when I put my emotions into records, I don't feel as depressed. It's so easy to get depressed. Sometimes it makes me feel better. Sometimes it makes me feel the same. But, the same squared. So, monumentally the same. ~ Rob Crow,
1174:Once you start altering your body's blueprint, things start falling apart. Some players take steroids, and two years later, after they've broken records, suddenly they have back problems, shoulder problems, arm problems. They're out of the game for good. ~ Charlie Sheen,
1175:So people think I'm lying about my age all the time? It's the records that are wrong. I've never told anyone how old I am. The minute they ask me, I say 'That's none of your business.' So that means I've never once lied about my age. Now that's true! ~ Calista Flockhart,
1176:Well first of all, I'm a singer. I sing since I talk. So the great ballad singers, the people that sang with so much feeling, jazz, blues, all those singers, they were songs that I listened to, records that my mom played for me, and then later I bought. ~ Gloria Estefan,
1177:When Elvis was performing, you just tried to figure out a way to get there. I think he set all the records and anyone that has ever had the good fortune to see him, you know what it's like to try to get in to see Elvis. It was impossible, practically. ~ Jackie DeShannon,
1178:And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed—if all records told the same tale—then the lie passed into history and became truth. 'Who controls the past' ran the Party slogan, 'controls the future: who controls the present controls the past. ~ George Orwell,
1179:Don't tell anyone I'm a poet; they might want me to write a book. Don't tell 'em I can sing, or they'd want me to make records for that awful phonograph. Haven't time to be a public benefactor, so I'll just sing you this little song for your own amusement. ~ L Frank Baum,
1180:Even though there's no forum for me on the radio for the kind of music I sing anymore, I am still excited about having a career where I can sing the best music in the world, and people will come and hear me because of the hit records I've had in the past. ~ Johnny Mathis,
1181:I now possess the tools as a producer and a songwriter to really just go out and make smashes all day long. I could make an album full of smash records that got pop appeal. But my heart is in hip-hop. My heart is in telling stories. And it's like therapy for me. ~ J Cole,
1182:In the earlier part of the 90s, I was really hell-bent on discovering how new technology works and how to make records entirely without a producer, which isn't necessarily what fans wanted. But I had to do it because I felt it was in my destiny or whatever. ~ Johnny Marr,
1183:I took some lessons as a kid but trained myself by ear. I did it the way jazz musicians used to learn years ago, which is to play records and slow them down to figure out the notes. At first I tried to imitate Red Garland, who was my favorite jazz pianist. ~ Donald Fagen,
1184:Many SWAT teams are essentially accountable to no one. These independent SWAT groups claim that although they are funded by the taxpayers, they have incorporated and therefore, as private corporations, they are exempt from opening their records to the public. ~ Jim Marrs,
1185:Rick Perry I have a great fondness for. And what Rick Perry has, like Jeb Bush has, it will be interesting to compare their two records as governor, very close, great economic development, low taxes, all the things we want domestically out of a president. ~ Rudy Giuliani,
1186:The next, magnificent step would of course have been to write , but the Stereometria records it as , and so Heron missed being the earliest known scholar to have derived the square root of a negative number in a mathematical analysis of a physical problem. ~ Paul J Nahin,
1187:They understand what their market is and who they should be selling records to, and most importantly, they know the kind of artist that they want to be, but they have to do it themselves. You don't want a 13-year-old singing some awful song from a musical. ~ Simon Cowell,
1188:Well, it's been an interesting career. Since I last appeared on 'Top Of The Pops,' I've been doing about 150 live shows every year. The live shows have always been well received and they consistently worked, it's just the records that haven't been very good. ~ John Otway,
1189:A lot has been written and said about why he was so great, but I think the best way to appreciate his greatness is just to go back and play some of the old records. Time has a way of being very unkind to old records, but Elvis' keep getting better and better. ~ Huey Lewis,
1190:If the records that I make have one thing in common, it's that there is little recapitulation, and the idea is that it should end in a place very different from where it began, and that you've heard musicians undergo a change or be irreversibly transformed. ~ David Grubbs,
1191:The arguments against insanity fall through with a soft shirring sound;
these are the sounds of dead voices on dead records
floating down the broken shaft of memory.
When I turn to you to ask if you remember,
When I turn to you in our bed
~ Stephen King,
1192:The commonest virtues of the individual are often lacking in the spokesmen of nations; a statesman representing not himself but his country may prove, without incurring excessive blame—­as history often records—­vindictive, perfidious, and egotistic. ~ John Maynard Keynes,
1193:When I read John Cage's book Silence, I was growing up in Louisville, Kentucky. For me, records were a mode of time travel and geographic travel, interfacing with a much larger world. So it seemed antiquated and backwards that Cage would be so down on them. ~ David Grubbs,
1194:When no one's buying your records, it's easy to justify selling a song. But once you start selling records, you can't really justify having two songs in Cadillac commercials. It looks greedy. And it is greedy. This whole music thing should be about music. ~ Patrick Carney,
1195:He required a specific place to land in London, September 1601, during the week before the investor, Sir Edward Greylock, agreed to put his money into the Boston Council for Boston. This was an event we were able to date with precision from legal records. ~ Neal Stephenson,
1196:I'm just trying different styles and switching it up, but getting back to rap and the essence and the swag that I brought to the game from records like "Rack City" and "Faded," records like that. I got some good collaborations that people are gonna be excited about. ~ Tyga,
1197:I realize there will not be another Gretzky, and I will be the first one to say I will not break his records, .. But for him to say that I could, it means I am doing something right. It was probably the best compliment I could get. I'm going to remember it. ~ Sidney Crosby,
1198:I started to listen to music and began collecting records around 1948. And it was fairly soon after that that hi-fi came about, so that it was possible to have really good sound - LPs and tapes and speaker systems. The whole thing came more or less at once. ~ Phill Niblock,
1199:Mail finally arrived for some troops—many had received nothing for two months or more—and Christmas packages often implied a certain homefront incomprehension of life in the combat zone: bathrobes, slippers, and phonograph records were particularly popular. ~ Rick Atkinson,
1200:I am just glad that I can take the music to the people who want to hear it. I love my audiences. I am deeply indebted to them for giving me the chance to sing my concerts, make records, and do what I love. Whatever people call it, it is great to have a voice! ~ Judy Collins,
1201:I feel like fans really want to spread the word about the band. I guess when you've done three records, you feel that you really start to appreciate it. We're looking at it all and it's just like, wow. You appreciate it differently when you work hard for it. ~ Yukimi Nagano,
1202:I have had a lot of fun pushing the boundaries on my balloon and kitesurf adventures, breaking some world records in the process, and I think this attitude of having fun whilst working hard is one that lends itself very well to successful entrepreneurship. ~ Richard Branson,
1203:I have lots of records, quite a collection, actually, that I stole from my mom. I have the original 'Thriller' album and I have a really great 'Elton John's Greatest Hits,' and I also have a N.E.R.D. album. Records sound more original. They have more edge. ~ Elisha Cuthbert,
1204:I like to quote Homer Simpson: 'I'm like a chocoholic except for alcohol.' I come from a long line of alcoholics. It's funny because when I first started making records, I was at the tail end of a period of sobriety, so I somehow got this reputation as Captain Sober. ~ Moby,
1205:I still am in touch with several friends from high school. I don't go to reunions much. I'm afraid that if I go back to the school, they'll suddenly go, 'You know what? We've checked the records and you still have one more French class. Get back in here.' ~ Sigourney Weaver,
1206:It serves to keep the records straight, and is a convenience to the public to whom one wants to do the square thing - affording as it does a bird's eye view of the position of affairs to those of his readers who, through no fault of their own, are not birds. ~ P G Wodehouse,
1207:Like memory, history was synthetic. Humans thought of both as factual records, but study after study confirmed that they were more like dreams, narratives constructed and reconstructed by the mind to fit the demands of the present, not the reality of the past. ~ Eliot Peper,
1208:My mum loved Joan Armatrading and used to play her records all the time and even took me to see her a couple of times when I was really quite young. I didn't really like her music back then because my mum was always playing it, but I've grown to appreciate it more. ~ Katy B,
1209:The best survey of the spirit and practice of the laws of Massachusetts Bay is found in Zechariah Chafee Jr.’s brilliant introduction to the Records of the Suffolk County Court, 1671–1680, in the Colonial Society of Massachusetts Publications, Vol. XXIX. ~ Daniel J Boorstin,
1210:There's no reason that patients can't have electronic access to their complete medical history... Just as people can check their bank account information online or using their ATM card, patients who want to should have electronic access to their medical records. ~ Paul Ryan,
1211:There's nothing like it, but it's not as good as you think it's going to be. . . . I was disappointed because there are records of people finding things that have been there for years. I was hoping for a shirt button, or my club's badge - but not a sausage. ~ Billy Connolly,
1212:The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the Hand of Divinity itself, and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power. ~ Alexander Hamilton,
1213:I've never had anybody produce my records. I've always produced my own records. I've worked with a guy for a while who was an engineer who helped me produce records, but I've always made my own records. I'm a control fanatic. I've got to control everything. ~ John Mellencamp,
1214:I wanted to make good records. But my problem is I've got a low boredom threshold, so I wanted it to look and sound different with each album, which is really tantamount to suicide, cause people lose it, they lose it - they say: 'I like that, and that's not this.' ~ Adam Ant,
1215:No one in this world, so far as I know—and I have researched the records for years, and employed agents to help me—has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. Nor has anyone ever lost public office thereby. ~ Keith Houston,
1216:People think it is all about country music, and I know a lot of country music has come out of there, but like Blonde on Blonde by Bob Dillon was recorded there. A lot of great records; R&B records, jazz records. It's a lot of great players and great studios. ~ Elvis Costello,
1217:All the music I loved as a child, people thought it was junk. People were unaware of the subtext in so many of those records but if you were a kid you were just completely tuned in, even though you didn't always say - you wouldn't dare say it was beautiful. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
1218:Anyone who knows anything about journalism knows that reporters are rarely in a position to investigate anything. They lack the authority to subpoena witnesses, to cross-examine, to scrutinize official records. They are lucky to get their phone calls returned. ~ Irving Kristol,
1219:I care about the records I make and I love writing songs and some songs are really dear to me and they mean something. But the memory of making the records and the activities surrounding the records, the people involved in them is actually a bigger thing to me. ~ Joel Plaskett,
1220:I love sports, but I don't like live sporting events, because I don't like sitting in the crowd. I like listening to records, but I don't like going to concerts, because I don't like standing in the crowd. I guess I just don't like being in the crowd itself. ~ Chuck Klosterman,
1221:In the 1960s, the Stanford historian Peter Laslett did a careful study of British marriage records and found that at no time in the recorded past did people regularly marry at very early ages. Between 1619 and 1660, for instance, 85 percent of women were nineteen ~ Bill Bryson,
1222:It's so different now coming out as a new artist today than it was when I came out almost ten years ago. Now, it's all about singles, it's really quick, it's online. I came out when people sold records and they still do today but - I don't know what the key is. ~ Avril Lavigne,
1223:My parents took an interest in nothing, at home no books, no records. My mother and my father are the emblem of indifference, dryness and bad taste. My father is also terribly stingy, in life as well as in feelings: I have never seen him filling up the bathtub. ~ Vincent Gallo,
1224:Aretha Franklin's 'Let Me in Your Life' is one of the few recent R&B albums that places the emphasis entirely and deservedly on a voice. Many R&B producers have been making records on which the singer is outshined by the song, the arrangement and the sound. ~ Jon Landau,
1225:Bob Dylan continues to release odd and unsettling records, and to do odd and unsettling things on stage. So the term "still" seems meaningless to me. But the real answer is simple: I listen to Bob Dylan for pleasure more than I listen to anyone else for pleasure. ~ Greil Marcus,
1226:Hence, let us place there, carved high, as close to heaven as we can, the words of our leaders, their faces, to show posterity what manner of men they were. Then breathe a prayer that these records will endure until the wind and rain alone shall wear them away. ~ Gutzon Borglum,
1227:I really believe that if I make records that are indispensable to my audience, they'll go out and spend money to buy them, even if they've already downloaded them. If they can afford it. If they can't, I'd rather they be able to download it than not get it at all. ~ Steve Earle,
1228:Names of a long list of kings, from Eremon downward, and important particulars regarding many of them, were preserved by the historical traditions — traditions that were as valuable, and as zealously guarded, as are the written State Records of modern days.[6] ~ Seumas MacManus,
1229:Research conducted by the Corporation for Supportive Housing in New York State shows that the use of state prisons and city jails dropped by 74 percent and 40 percent respectively when people with past criminal records were provided with supportive housing. ~ Michelle Alexander,
1230:...while some communities are chasing visions out, others are chasing one another away. ....while some leaders love breaking records, others love breaking constructed buildings. Good leaders deserve golden trophies while gas cylinder is o.k for the bad ones! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1231:Her heart was finished. It bore, perhaps, records of life, but it wasn't alive. Too late for decoration. Too late for effects. Further handling could only result in cracks and fractures. People could cut themselves on the edgesof her heart, she was sure of it. ~ Stephanie Kallos,
1232:I see a tough time for our cricket. Senior players will establish records and go home, but our cricket will struggle. Young players aren't playing with the freedom that they should enjoy. The selectors and the cricket board should take responsibility for that. ~ Arjuna Ranatunga,
1233:The baby, not too young to start knowing the ledge, the cold truth, the life-and-death facts of it all. 'What kind of heaven is that, you can't have your records?' The baby, understanding perhaps it was purely rhetorical, made no attempt to answer this question. ~ Michael Chabon,
1234:The whole music business in the United States is based on numbers, based on unit sales and not on quality. It's not based on beauty, it's based on hype and it's based on cocaine. It's based on giving presents of large packages of dollars to play records on the air. ~ Frank Zappa,
1235:Although the Bible records several emotions that Christ experiences, nowhere in the Bible will you find it said that Jesus was ever afraid! Why? Because the love that He possessed for the Father was absolutely and positively without question 100 percent perfect love. ~ Lou Priolo,
1236:If a powerful and benevolent spirit has shaped the destiny of this world, we can better discover that destiny from the words that have gathered up the heart's desire of the world, than from historical records, or from speculation, wherein the heart withers. ~ William Butler Yeats,
1237:In principle the first thing on the stream would be my birth certificate, a little electronic version of that, my parents would put my school records, health records, whatever of their child onto the stream. And the stream continues to flow forward through time. ~ David Gelernter,
1238:It was something of a mystery how a couple of teenage girls had managed to escape detection for two years, especially when one of them was a privileged Moroi princess and the other a delinquent dhampir with a disciplinary file so long that it broke school records. ~ Richelle Mead,
1239:Within just a few years immigration as a share of national population is set to break all historical records. The time has come for a new immigration commission to develop a new set of reforms to our legal immigration system in order to achieve the following goals. ~ Donald Trump,
1240:Films and gramophone records, music, books and buildings show clearly how vigorously a man's life and work go on after his death, whether we feel it or not, whether we are aware of the individual names or not. There is no such thing as death according to our view! ~ Martin Bormann,
1241:If it was all about me, I'd do a whole lot of pop records, make a whole lot of money, just rake in the dough. But it's never been all about me. It's all about being a voice for the voiceless. People who can't speak for themselves, who don't have a mic, don't have a say. ~ Ice Cube,
1242:Punk-rock records came out and you bought whatever you could find. But Devo didn't happen for another three years. Sex Pistols didn't tour the States until '78. At that time, for me, it was really about CBGB, Patti Smith, Talking Heads, the Ramones, and Television. ~ Michael Stipe,
1243:The board immediately reinstated Rudy's license and sealed all the records from the public and the press--thus honoring the long-held philosophy of Florida's medical establishment that the last persons who need to know about a doctor's incompetence are the patients. ~ Carl Hiaasen,
1244:This hype word bothers me though It always sounds like an accusation, what does it mean, advertising, column inches in the press? Bands themselves are never really responsible for all of that. That is something that happens to you when you sell millions of records. ~ Holly Johnson,
1245:All records are riddles, and whatever you may want people to think it's about, it may just be throwing them off. And you don't want it to get in the way of what someone else's understanding is. It's not really about anything. At the same time, it will find some meaning. ~ Tom Waits,
1246:And you have a record company behind it, this is a key too, you need people to fight for your records, at least a little bit. So if you have a great song, it's catchy, and you've got a little bit of help, I think that's all you need. But there hasn't been that in music. ~ Joan Jett,
1247:Even without newfangled brain technologies, some forms of deception might become harder to practice thanks to increased availability of many kinds of data, including reputations and track records, or the promulgation of strong epistemic norms and rationality culture. ~ Nick Bostrom,
1248:I live on a ranch in Texas and do my own thing. And I don't care what anyone has to say about it. My joke is that the only people I'm trying to please are myself and my fans, because they're the ones buying my records. And I have the best, most loyal fan base ever. ~ Kelly Clarkson,
1249:I remember back in 1994 when the Eagles charged more than $100 for tickets. They said, 'We ain't Pearl Jam.' That's back when records were selling and the Eagles had sold just about as many as anyone on the planet. And years later we're still charging less than them. ~ Eddie Vedder,
1250:More recently I've come to terms with what I'm doing and why I'm doing it. That's why you start to see me recoiling from 'let's put out radio records, let's get rich and get on out of here.' I have gone towards more speaking to kids and putting out records that I like. ~ Asher Roth,
1251:The State Department allowed Hillary Clinton to remove and destroy government email records, and now we've figured out the State Department is improperly giving government documents to the Clinton operation - documents that should have been turned over to us years ago. ~ Tom Fitton,
1252:We haven't really had the time yet to pore through all those records in Baghdad. We'll find ample evidence confirming the link, that is the connection if you will between al Qaida and the Iraqi intelligence services. They have worked together on a number of occasions. ~ Dick Cheney,
1253:A friend of mine once told me that I can't screw up when I play my own music. I also take voice lessons, play other peoples' songs out of music books, and occasionally figure out how to play other people's music from records. This keeps my ears, fingers, and mind working ~ Lisa Loeb,
1254:Boxes of records made me think that LPs should be outlawed or at least limited to five per person, and I soon came to despise the type who packs even her empty shampoo bottles, figuring she’ll sort things out and throw them away once she’s settled into her new place. ~ David Sedaris,
1255:I see the world is flat and the map flat
that records it, and both page and world
speak each other forever. Put a fold
in eternity and it is just as flat and wide.
Take the map of the world and fold it
into a boat and the boat becomes the world. ~ Dan Beachy Quick,
1256:I think there's always been a myth that sailors brought in records in their knapsacks as if you could ... in the local shops. I think that maybe some songs did come in with the sailors and maybe they did whistle some of the things in the streets in sharp ears because. ~ Derek Taylor,
1257:I think what's happenin' is that, with the overflow of music, it's been diluted. There was a time when people would go search out underground records. Now, underground means free, and people don't really care for it. So now artists tend to go more pop and look for the radio. ~ Ice T,
1258:Star Wars film is breaking all previous box office records. (Why might we want to revisit those characters, that narrative, those jokes and tropes again, in this way, right now? I wonder what it will turn out to reveal about the economics and politics of this moment.) ~ Laura Mullen,
1259:The 160-page critique, which was supposed to remain private but was inadvertently disclosed in an open-records request, concluded that Google’s “conduct has resulted—and will result—in real harm to consumers and to innovation in the online search and advertising markets. ~ Anonymous,
1260:What's amazing about Sarah [Brightman] is that she's sustained such a career. She just keeps going - she's like a machine. She tours and records and loves what she does. I think she's a really good example to anybody in the industry that there is life beyond the shows. ~ Kerry Ellis,
1261:According to court records, during the siege at Wounded Knee, more than two hundred and fifty thousand rounds were fired at our people by U.S. marshalls, FBI agents, the tribal police, the GOONs, and white vigilantes. These boys weren't kidding. And neither were we. ~ Leonard Peltier,
1262:Depressing realization sets in. Writing was invented not by human beings but by accountants. Most of the early writing systems are records of how much crap people own, how much money they have, how much money they owe, and other lowering/boastful facts of human life. ~ Philip Hensher,
1263:I'm a big fan of the American Tapes label. But that's very hard to keep a grip on that because you blink your eyes and they've released three records, all of which are limited edition, all sold at one show. So you have to follow in drips and drops on eBay, which I do. ~ Henry Rollins,
1264:When I think of the artists I admire and seek out musically. It's because I'm curious about where they're going to go the next time they have a chance to put a record out. It's not about where I find them on the radio dial, or how many records they're selling. ~ Mary Chapin Carpenter,
1265:Certain documents, such as the FISA court order allowing collection of telephone records and Obama’s presidential directive to prepare offensive cyber-operations, were among the US government’s most closely held secrets. Deciphering the archive and the NSA’s language ~ Glenn Greenwald,
1266:For me personally - because I do it myself - the scoring of a picture is fun. I edit the picture and when I've finished I go into my room and I have many many records - jazz, classical and popular music. And I have this all at my disposal. I don't have to get a composer. ~ Woody Allen,
1267:I liked blues from the time my mother used to take me to church. I started to listen to gospel music, so I liked that. But I had an aunt at that time, my mother's aunt, who bought records by people like Lonnie Johnson, Robert Johnson, Blind Lemon Jefferson and a few others. ~ B B King,
1268:Personal branding is about managing your name - even if you don't own a business - in a world of misinformation, disinformation, and semi-permanent Google records. Going on a date? Chances are that your "blind" date has Googled your name. Going to a job interview? Ditto. ~ Tim Ferriss,
1269:Somewhere the saving and putting away had to begin again and someone had to do the saving and keeping, one way or another, in books, in records, in people's heads, any way at all so long as it was safe, free from moths, silverfish, rust and dry rot and men with matches. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1270:I also hope that with the assistance and expertise of Dome Records, that I will be able to further pierce the UK and European market. I really like playing there and I want to do more! I've found that the audiences get quite involved and really listen to what's happening. ~ George Duke,
1271:I always freak out when people ask me about my favorite bands or my five favorite records, I just can never do that because it goes through different waves and sometimes you want to listen to something and at other times you want to listen to something else so I don't know. ~ John Bush,
1272:If you have a live reputation and your popularity is proven that way, then you're bound to get signed up because they see all those people buying those tickets and they think some of those people will buy those records, and that's what their business is primarily about. ~ David Gilmour,
1273:Nakalimutan na ng tao ang kabanalan n'ya, na mas marami pa s'yang alam kesa sa nakasulat sa Transcript of Records n'ya, mas marami pa s'yang kayang gawin kesa sa nakalista sa resume n'ya, at mas mataas ang halaga n'ya kesa sa presyong nakasulat sa payslip n'ya tuwing sweldo. ~ Bob Ong,
1274:Amanda Petrusich’s fascinating and insightful journey into the arcane netherworld of 78 records and its bring-‘em-back-alive collectors brims with the joy and passion of discovery, along with a heartfelt affection for those who keep alight the flame of our musical heritage. ~ Lenny Kaye,
1275:But good records seem to get to the people who need them the most. I guess I have to believe that the best marketing tool is still a good song. And that it’s probably better that I put my time into writing one of those than learning how to do social media properly.” Petty ~ Warren Zanes,
1276:I'm not a pop rapper. That's nothing against pop music - I love pop music. I've jumped on pop records for people and still will, but I'm not a pop artist. I didn't start from there. I started in underground music. I consider myself an underground artist, as well as a producer. ~ Juicy J,
1277:My childhood was limited to mostly gospel music. We didn't have, like, a lot of records in our house, you know. It was like my grandparents who raised me. They were pretty old-fashioned in their religious ways, so it was like church, church, church, school, school, school. ~ Faith Evans,
1278:USA Freedom Act did, however, take away a valuable tool that allowed the National Security Agency and other law - and other intelligence agencies to quickly and rapidly access phone records and match them up with other phone records to see who terrorists have been calling. ~ Marco Rubio,
1279:Vaig decidir que necessitava conèixer-la a fons, perquè necessitava acumular més records. I, per tant, abans no comencés el procés vergonyós d'oblidar el com i el perquè de la seva vida i la seva mort, necessitava descobrir-ho tot: el com, el perquè, el quan, l'on i el què. ~ John Green,
1280:You can make records from now 'til doomsday, and there are something like 50,000 records released every year, but the public gets to hear very few of these. They just won't know. They might be great records, but how in the world is the public supposed to find out about them? ~ Ry Cooder,
1281:My mother says I was two-and-a-half when I started playing. My father was a minister, and when he went to church in the morning, she would put on Fats Waller, Billie Holiday, Nat King Cole and Cole Porter records. I'd crawl up on the piano stool, sit on a phone book and play. ~ Tori Amos,
1282:Blackheart Records being 25 years old represents staying power and the fact that we weren't able to get a record out through conventional means, so we had to create this record company to put out our records if we wanted to be a band that had records to give out to their fans. ~ Joan Jett,
1283:Doctors, dressed up in one professional costume or another, have been in busy practice since the earliest records of every culture on earth. It is hard to think of a more dependable or enduring occupation, harder still to imagine any future events leading to its extinction. ~ Lewis Thomas,
1284:fan. You know, Jimmy’s got records stashed away in case something unnatural happens to him.” “Your friend made one threat too many in his life,” Russell shrugged. “I’m only saying the nuclear fallout’s going to hit the fan when they find his body.” “There won’t be a body. ~ Charles Brandt,
1285:I am a big Brian Eno fan - the first few Brian Eno records are just absolute gibberish and he came up with a lot of lyrics by writing down loads and loads of random sentences and streams, and I find meaning in that music, even though he'd probably say it's absolute gibberish. ~ Jay Watson,
1286:If you are having trouble making a chord, get a book, that is how I learned. There are guitar tuning apps so you can tune your guitar, and just learn how to play along with your records. And it's great to be able to play along with another musician. That is like trial by fire. ~ Joan Jett,
1287:Imagine if you had baseball cards that showed all the performance stats for your people: batting averages, home runs, errors, ERAs, win/loss records. You could see what they did well and poorly and call on the right people to play the right positions in a very transparent way. ~ Ray Dalio,
1288:I'm selling my soul to Hollywood Records. I love you like a love song baby, a sinful, miracle, lyrical. He ate my soul. He's Lucifer. I'm torn I'm selling my soul to the rhythm because I'm become so possessed with the music he plays. I chose a path and I'm not looking back. ~ Selena Gomez,
1289:[Ezekiel 1:1a] Hebrew On the fifth day of the fourth month, of the ancient Hebrew lunar calendar. A number of dates in Ezekiel can be cross-checked with dates in surviving Babylonian records and related accurately to our modern calendar. This event occurred on July 31, 593 B.C. ~ Anonymous,
1290:I didn't want to be a solo Westlife - covers and ballads - and the reason I signed with Capitol Records was because they wanted me to write songs myself. It was pretty scary, but they put me in a studio in Nashville with some new songwriters, and the results were pretty good. ~ Shane Filan,
1291:I kind of decided that doing music is enough because I'm already running a couple small businesses. I'm a part of Bikini Kill Records, Le Tigre Records, and Digitally Ruined Records. In dealing with my health and everything, my ability to do that? I wouldn't be good at it. ~ Kathleen Hanna,
1292:My laptop seems to know where I am, even if I don't. My cellphone asks me if I want directions to anywhere from the spot I am standing in. I buy a record online and Amazon.com sends me letters, telling me that people who bought what I bought also bought these other records. ~ Henry Rollins,
1293:Sorry, but they’re burning the State archives.” The furnaces burned for eight days, turning most of the Congo state records to ash and smoke in the sky over Brussels. “I will give them my Congo,” Leopold told Stinglhamber, “but they have no right to know what I did there. ~ Adam Hochschild,
1294:Soze shook his head. “If someone checks our Internet search records, don’t you think it will look suspicious that before we called the police, we checked up on the evidence?”
Poe laughed mirthlessly. “We’re Rose & Grave, junior. Everything we do looks suspicious. ~ Diana Peterfreund,
1295:This I hold to be the chief office of history, to rescue virtuous actions from the oblivion to which a want of records would consign them, and that men should feel a dread of being considered infamous in the opinions of posterity, from their depraved expressions and base actions. ~ Tacitus,
1296:With the "old dog" stuff, maybe the term "old" is in there, but I'm 26. I'm not that old. It's mostly like, "Ah, you dirty old dog!" I'm saying it more like that. I'm still ripping. I'm ready to rip. I'll make a bunch more records and have a nice time. We'll see what happens. ~ Mac DeMarco,
1297:Follow these five decision steps when hiring someone: Understand the job, consider three to five people, study candidates performance records to find their strengths, talk to the candidates’ colleagues about them, and once hired, explain the assignment to the new employee. ~ Peter F Drucker,
1298:I don't want to do one of those records where it's like a compilation of a bunch of all sorts of rappers on my beats. I don't find those to be focused albums. I'd like to sit and work a whole record with a certain person, to come up with a concept and see it through that way. ~ Flying Lotus,
1299:I made a rule for myself in my early 20s not to become a record collector in the sense that I reference all my old records. I can't live like that. I'd just be trapped in comparison, trying to emulate something, so I made a rule to just buy what I need, just the records I need. ~ Jack White,
1300:I've found that in now having experienced what it's like to make records and just through growing up in general that you should be expressive about what's affecting you instead of trying to sing about a subject just for the sake of other people getting something from it. ~ Chantal Kreviazuk,
1301:The Bible records a great deal of history, but as Dr. A. T. Pierson said, “History is His story.” What is written helps us better understand how God worked out His great plan of salvation in this world. In the Bible, historical facts are often windows for spiritual truth. ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
1302:Well, it's such a record that you can only compare it with Bob Beamon's long-jump world record set in the 1968 Olympics in Mexico. At that time it seemed that it would never be broken. Tendulkar's 50 Test centuries is one such records which doesn't look like being surpassed ~ Sunil Gavaskar,
1303:Art is not like other culture because its success is not made by its audience. The public fill concert halls and cinemas every day, we read novels by the millions, and buy records by the billions. 'We the people' affect the making and quality of most of our culture, but not our art. ~ Banksy,
1304:Do you believe in the existence of Socrates? Alexander the Great? Julius Caesar? If historicity is established by written records in multiple copies that date originally from near contemporaneous sources, there is far more proof for Christ's existence than for any of theirs. ~ Dinesh D Souza,
1305:Growing up going to Christian school and the concept that you're born a sinner and you don't really have a choice to change who you are has been hammered into my head and created the entire reason why I made art and made a band and made records called 'Antichrist Superstar.' ~ Marilyn Manson,
1306:It is quite rare for God to provide a great man at the necessary moment to carry out some great deep, which is why when this unusual combination of circumstance does occur, history at once records the name of the chosen one and recommends him to the admiration of posterity. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
1307:I've always said my records are these failures of not getting where I want them to go, they end up detouring somewhere else, so on one level it's partly a disappointment, and on another level it's being comfortable with surrendering to that kind of state of becoming or whatever. ~ Tim Hecker,
1308:You have to get past the idea that music has to be one thing. To be alive in America is to hear all kinds of music constantly: radio, records, churches, cats on the street, everywhere music. And with records, the whole history of music is open to everyone who wants to hear it. ~ Jerry Garcia,
1309:Art is not like other culture because its success is not made by its audience. The public fill concert halls and cinemas every day, we read novels by the millions, and buy records by the billions. 'We the people'--affect the making and quality of most of our culture, but not our art. ~ Banksy,
1310:I joke that I've never been burdened by having an actual hit. There's something to that. My records have sold enough to make the record company money to help me keep my job. But I've never had anything so firmly ingrained in the mind of the public that I'm expected to repeat it. ~ Lyle Lovett,
1311:In pop music, the public usually see the results - the hit records, the Grammy Awards performances, the concert tours - but not all the work that goes into getting into the spotlight. And not everyone realizes that, even if you have a lot of talent, chances are you won't make it. ~ Bruno Mars,
1312:It's really hard to be an artist and put out records and put your heart out there. It's such a gamble, and you're often spending so much time fighting for something that you really believe in and feeling like it's not really getting anywhere. It definitely can try your patience. ~ Diane Birch,
1313:The cash held by US companies are hitting all time records. Companies are using some of this money to buy back their own stock at record rates. When a company is doing this it is saying to it's investors: We don't have any good ideas what to do with this, so here--maybe you do. ~ Geoff Colvin,
1314:Miles Davis would have this lineup of all these amazing musicians and one day would just say, 'We're done.' After tons of great records and tickets sold, he said, 'Now I'm going to grow my hair out and play my horn through a wah-wah pedal.' Rather than play it safe, he went on. ~ Henry Rollins,
1315:My mom and I used to listen to records, read, and take train rides across the country in the summer. It was a very chill life. She didn't expose me to anything that was ahead of my development, but she expected me to adjust to her world - she did not expect to adjust to mine. ~ Martha Plimpton,
1316:The Colorado secretary of state testified before Congress in 2011 that a check of voter registration rolls against state [Division of Motor Vehicles] records indicated that more than 11,000 Colorado registered voters may not be U.S. citizens—and more than 5,000 of them voted.”54 ~ Mark R Levin,
1317:The death of a fly is still death. It’s death marching toward a certain end of the world, which widens the field of the final sleep. When you see a dog die, or a horse die, you say something, like poor thing … But when a fly dies, nothing is said, no one records it, nothing. ~ Marguerite Duras,
1318:The game is always going to be bigger than the man and it doesn't matter what you are doing; records or whatever, somebody is just going to come along and break your records. But to achieve something that people would always look up to is something you will always appreciate. ~ Garfield Sobers,
1319:We have found literary references in records from the last two centuries which seem to substantiate the idea of a Cailleach priestess cult of wise women. However, as is often the case these hints ask more questions than they answer, leaving the reader to make up their own mind. ~ Sorita d Este,
1320:We used to sing along to Judy Garland and Ella Fitzgerald records together. She had the most amazing voice ... She's always encouraged me, and she's still that person who, when things look dire, lifts me up and reminds me of who I am and that we all have a capacity for greatness. ~ Sheryl Crow,
1321:Any time someone tries to tell you that metadata is 'meaningless, don't worry, it's just who you call, it's just phone records, it's not a big deal' - realize we kill people based on metadata. So they must be pretty darn certain that they think they know something based on metadata. ~ Rand Paul,
1322:I think right now, you've seen these artists pop up over the last decade who've flirted with branching together a lot of different kinds of music. Some of them have been huge, and sold millions of records. And I think over time it's become a little bit of what the industry can be. ~ Eric Church,
1323:When you're young, you're not really worried too much about what people think. You're just in this beautiful, natural place with creativity, and it's just flowing through you, whereas after a few years and a few records, you have all these pressures starting to build on your back. ~ Trevor Hall,
1324:A little bit South you've got Macon, Georgia - home of the Allman Brothers, the Marshall Tucker Band and Capricorn Records. And off to west you've got Delta blues. Sprinkle Southern gospel over the top of that, and you're talking about where I came from. I loved all of that music. ~ Travis Tritt,
1325:As it happens I’ve spent a night and a day going through your records. Fascinating stuff.” Kempis took a roll of parchment from his cloak and tossed it onto the desk. “You know what really bugs me?” Enli steepled his hands. “I’m on tenterhooks.” “Anolamies.” “Anomalies?” “Them too. ~ Marc Turner,
1326:Having your own space is getting rarer and rarer these days. It's dangerous giving someone like me - who grew up fantasizing about studios and records - the freedom and resources to build your own studio. I would just live in it, which is what I pretty much did for all of the '90s. ~ Johnny Marr,
1327:If you came to my house and said, "Well, here's the new Katy Perry record," I would give it a listen, but these records are constructed by producers in production houses with no human beings playing on them and it's interesting, but we grew up with human beings playing on records. ~ John Seagall,
1328:My original idea- and I still want to do it -for Pinko Records, would be to create a platform for other artists to do the same thing I did. They could create their own levels of donation and final goal. I have no idea how I would make any money on that -but I don't think like that. ~ Jill Sobule,
1329:Starting off in music, the purpose of it was not to become like well known on the street and be famous. You know, I didn't even think about that part of being famous. Famous for making records, yes, but famous face in a woman's magazine, I never thought of that. I didn't want that. ~ Mick Jagger,
1330:Everyone prioritizes. Everyone wants new jackets and new shoes and new cars and new houses and new caravans and new mountain cabins and new boats. But I don't. I buy books and records because they say something about what life is about, what it is to be a human here on earth. ~ Karl Ove Knausg rd,
1331:how many fossil passenger pigeons are there? How many records are there of fossil passenger pigeons?” “Not many?” I offered. “Two,” he said. “So here’s an incredibly abundant bird that we wiped out. But if you look in the fossil record, you wouldn’t even know that they were there. ~ Peter Brannen,
1332:I had knockback after knockback before I got anywhere. After I got my first record deal I thought that was it, then Gut Records went into liquidation. I was 20. I had no idea what that meant. I had a few days to get myself out of that contract or my work would be owned by someone else. ~ Jessie J,
1333:I wanted to make an album that I wanted to put on myself and could listen to again and again. In the past I've done these records that are very in-depth. I love them and I'm very proud of them but I've always found it hard to listen to them again and again...they're very demanding. ~ Jamie Lidell,
1334:I love music, right? I can't say "I'm only going to listen to a physical medium," because there's a bunch of meaningful records that as a music fan I love that I would've never been able to access. So if I want to be part of something I have to get dragged along with technology. ~ Chuck Klosterman,
1335:We were poor [with my mother], and we didn't have too much. So we sat on the floor and we had a record player, and that's all we had in that room in the apartment. But we had whatever we had. Six records and a record player and it seemed like magic. Seven or eight years old, you know. ~ Jon Gordon,
1336:Following the invention of writing, the special form of heightened language, characteristic of the oral tradition and a collective society, gave way to private writing. Records and messages displaced the collective memory. Poetry was written and detached from the collective festival. ~ Harold Innis,
1337:I loved rock and roll when that came in, Bill Haley, Little Richard, Fats Domino, Buddy Holly, Elvis Presley, all those great records. So I begged my mom and dad for a guitar, which eventually they did get me for Christmas, but it went out of tune very quickly, and it hurt my fingers. ~ Ian McLagan,
1338:In fact, various lawyers' groups - to some extent in the U.S. but mostly in England and Canada and elsewhere - are bringing demands for a war crimes trial for the crime of aggression. However, though the invasion of Iraq was plainly an act of aggression, it doesn't break any records. ~ Noam Chomsky,
1339:Normally, what I do for fun is just nothing. I try to just relax. Normally, it involves just relaxing and reading and maybe going out and meeting up with a friend. I live a very simple existence. I would much rather just sit around and listen to a couple of records and read the paper. ~ Colin Hanks,
1340:Until House came along I don't think the English made very good dance records, you know, there were very few really good English Rap records, whereas once House came along all of a sudden we started and now I think we probably lead the world, and have overtaken America in dance music. ~ Fatboy Slim,
1341:There was a bidding war between Epic Records and Jive - now RCA - which was bittersweet. Just having labels bid over me was really cool, but I ended up going with Jive because it felt better over there, and they have my favorite artists like Usher, Chris Brown, and Justin Timberlake. ~ Jacob Latimore,
1342:What we hear now is great-sounding records with great-sounding grooves and loops. And the sound of these records is irresistible, but the craft of songwriting is just about over. That's why, whenever I get an opportunity to do an album full of standards, I jump at it because I miss it. ~ Barry Manilow,
1343:Everybody in my neighborhood in the '40s, they played pianos. That's how people partied. They didn't try the TV, the radio was OK, records was cool, but when people wanted to party, they got around a piano. My mother played piano, my sister played. I've been around a lot of piano all my life. ~ Dr John,
1344:From 1500, anyone in China found building a ship with more than two masts was liable to the death penalty; in 1551 it became a crime even to go to sea in such a ship.21 The records of Zheng He’s journeys were destroyed. Zheng He himself died and was almost certainly buried at sea. What ~ Niall Ferguson,
1345:I remember when I signed with Kedar Entertainment through Universal Records. It was my first record deal and it's the one I still have now. At that time, there had been a couple of opportunities I was almost given, but at the last minute the giver came back and told me it couldn't happen. ~ Erykah Badu,
1346:I was going to be a singer. If I hadn't been in my profession, I was going to be an Opera singer. That's from a young kid. I had all these records from all those famous Opera singers. I wanted to be an Opera singer - that was my whole thing and physical fitness got in the way, thank God. ~ Jack LaLanne,
1347:Records can be destroyed if they do not suit the prejudices of ruling cliques, lost if they become incomprehensible, distorted if a copyist wishes to impose a new meaning upon them, misunderstood if we lack the information to interpret them. The past is like a huge library, mostly fiction. ~ Henry Ford,
1348:Amy Winehouse: Did she invent white soul? Wearing a beehive? No. But she did something brand new and fresh, altogether as a package, and you see who's in her wake, from the Duffys to the Lana Del Reys. Adele selling 20 million records? That would not have happened if Amy Winehouse was alive. ~ Jack White,
1349:Big Brother in the form of an increasingly powerful government and in an increasingly powerful private sector will pile the records high with reasons why privacy should give way to national security, to law and order, to efficiency of operation, to scientific advancement and the like. ~ William O Douglas,
1350:I have watched independent record stores evaporate all over America and Europe. That's why I go into as many as I can and buy records whenever possible. If we lose the independent record store, we lose big. Every time you buy your records at one of these places, it's a blow to the empire. ~ Henry Rollins,
1351:I'm over being a pop star. I don't wanna be a hot girl. I wanna be iconic. And I feel like I've accomplished a lot. I feel like I'm highly respected, which is more important than any award or any amount of records. And I feel like there comes a point when being a pop star is not enough. ~ Beyonce Knowles,
1352:I basically taught myself how to sing and play by copying records, and that's just how it was for me. I know that's true for a lot of budding musicians out there - that's the thing that gets them inspired, is trying to learn their favorite songs. I think it's a great way to teach yourself. ~ Susanna Hoffs,
1353:Look for young men and women who can one day lead your agency. Is there any way of predicting the capacity to lead? The only way I know is to look at their college records. If they were leaders between the ages of 18 and 22, the odds are that they will emerge as leaders in middle life. Make ~ David Ogilvy,
1354:My wife, when I met her, she had a remarkable record collection. And they were all still in their sleeves! I couldn't believe it. She took care of her records. Rachmaninov, Beefheart. For me, most of my records were out of their sleeves and in a drawer somewhere. I married a record collection. ~ Tom Waits,
1355:We were still able to see the phone records of a potential terrorist cause, we held them, now you have to hope the phone company still has them, you have to argue with their chief counsel by the time you get access to it, and try to find out who they've been talking to before it's too late. ~ Barack Obama,
1356:Anything that has to travel all the way down from your cerebellum to your fingertips, there's a lot of things that can happen on the journey. Sometimes I'll listen to records, my own stuff, and I think god, the original idea for this was so much better than the mutation that we arrived at. ~ Elvis Costello,
1357:Capitol Records were very keen for me to write and see how I got on; I think that is what defined my sound. The first session I had was with two young up-and-coming writers, Nick Atkinson and Tom Wilding, and I went into a session a bit nervous because I hadn't written that many songs before. ~ Shane Filan,
1358:Every medium by which people communicate can be subject to exploitation by those with illegal intentions. Nevertheless, this is no reason to hand Big Brother the keys to unlock our e-mail diaries, open our ATM records, read our medical records, or translate our international communications. ~ John Ashcroft,
1359:For decades, Billboard had to rely on record-store owners and radio stations to report the most-bought and most-played songs. Both parties lied, often because labels nudged or bribed them to plug certain records, or because store owners didn’t want to promote albums they no longer had in stock. ~ Anonymous,
1360:He went in, to a reception desk that could have been in a hip museum or at an upscale dentist’s. Behind it was a guy who looked like he was stationed there as a punishment. Reacher said hello. The guy looked up but didn’t answer. Reacher told him he wanted to see two sets of old census records. ~ Lee Child,
1361:If history records good things about good people, the thoughtful hearer is encouraged to imitate what is good; or if it records the evil of wicked people, the godly listener or reader is encouraged to avoid all that is sinful and bad, and to do what he knows to be good and pleasing to God. ~ Venerable Bede,
1362:When we rely on written records we need to continually ask ourselves what might be missing, what might have been recorded in order to manipulate events and in what direction, and in what ways we are allowing ourselves to assume that objectivity is in any way connected with literacy. ~ Aurora Levins Morales,
1363:A fundamental premise of American democratic theory is that government exists to serve the people. ... Public records are one portal through which the people observe their government, ensuring its accountability, integrity, and equity while minimizing sovereign mischief and malfeasance ~ Sandra Day O Connor,
1364:Forging differs from hoaxing, inasmuch as in the later the deceit is intended to last for a time, and then be discovered, to the ridicule of those who have credited it; whereas the forger is one who, wishing to acquire a reputation for science, records observations which he has never made. ~ Charles Babbage,
1365:Mark records Jesus praying only three times in the Gospel; here (1:35), following the feeding of the five thousand (6:46), and in Gethsemane (14:32-39). All three occur at night and in solitary places. All three also occur in contexts of either implied or expressed opposition to Jesus’ ministry. ~ Anonymous,
1366:...[the photographer] can be considered a kind of disembodied burrowing eye, a conspirator against time and its hammers. His work, print after print of it, seems to call to be shown before the decay which it portrays flattens all... Here are the records of the age before an imminent collapse. ~ Jack Kerouac,
1367:The quantum hologram is a mechanism to explain this concept of the ancients of the Akashic Records. It also explains Rupert Sheldrake's work among animals [his theory of morphic fields and morphic resonance, leading to a vision of a living, developing universe with its own inherent memory]. ~ Edgar Mitchell,
1368:Which was the records department of the city offices. Which had a suite number all its own, on a crowded multi-line floor directory, outside a brick-built multi-purpose government building, which because of its age and its shape Reacher figured had once contained a courtroom. Maybe it still did. ~ Lee Child,
1369:I'm very curious about David Bowie's new record [2016]. I'm very, very... I'm just incredibly curious, I want to see what's happening with that. I don't really know who else is putting out records, we've had our heads buried working on ours. I haven't really been paying much attention lately. ~ Patrick Stump,
1370:I was the kind of entrepreneur that never really felt I made it. When Mike Olefield's "Tubular Bells" [Virgin Records' first release] sold 8 or 10 million copies, I suppose, at age 19, I could've possibly retired on the money. Instead, I immediately pushed the boat and took that risk again. ~ Richard Branson,
1371:Norman Mailer records in his recent essays and public appearances his perfecting of himself as a virile instrument of letters; he is perpetually in training, getting ready to launch himself from his own missile pad into a high, beautiful orbit; even his failures may yet be turned to successes. ~ Susan Sontag,
1372:Now when an American has an idea, he directly seeks a second American to share it. If there be three, they elect a president and two secretaries. Given four, they name a keeper of records, and the office is ready for work; five, they convene a general meeting, and the club is fully constituted. ~ Jules Verne,
1373:families, revealing insights that cannot be found in published histories. Brown doggedly cross-checks information about each grave in emigrant journals, land records, and nineteenth-century newspapers. A lifetime of searching for graves along the Oregon and California trails has also allowed him ~ Rinker Buck,
1374:In a time where everything's a flavor of the month, and it's hard to have any sort of longevity, I've been able to sell records still. I want to be the guy that stands out there and says thank you personally to everyone. And I try after my shows and kick it because I want to genuinely say thanks. ~ Aesop Rock,
1375:Island Records used what we built and tried to cash in on it which is so annoying. So it came time to do Carver City record and Island wanted to do it and we're just like "What's the point?" I mean, at that point they were even admitting like, "Yeah, we're just gonna do what we've always done." ~ Jess Margera,
1376:Most of my records are never going to be commercial successes, and I don't expect that. It's just all a learning process to me. If something appears as a failure, fine. If there's success, fine. I like the record, and my friends like the record, and that's kind of all I can really care about. ~ Kathleen Hanna,
1377:When you're making records, you develop, and so you hear the things you want to move away from. It stings a little, but you know, you gotta own it too. You've got to just go, "You know, I wasn't afraid to learn in front of people, so I give myself a little credit for not being afraid of anything." ~ Neko Case,
1378:I realize that people won't even download the entire album and might just download a song or two and put it in a playlist for a workout or in the background while people do dishes. That's fine and I can't dictate how people listen to my music, but I structure records the way I listen to records. ~ Mikal Cronin,
1379:There were very few real folk singers you know, though I liked Dominic Behan a bit and there was some good stuff to be heard in Liverpool. Just occasionally you hear very old records on the radio or TV of real workers in Ireland or somewhere singing these songs and the power of them is fantastic. ~ John Lennon,
1380:We should look at the Twitter records of Andrew Fraser. Clearly, the ship was on remote control, because he spent all of his time on Twitter. He used to Twitter in the chamber. He used to Twitter at night. He used to Twitter probably in bed at home, but I am not going to go any further there. ~ Campbell Newman,
1381:I'm partly somebody else trying to fit in and say the right things and do the right thing and be in the right place and wear what everybody else is wearing. Sometimes I think we're all trying to be shadows of each other, trying to buy the same records and everything even if we don't like them. ~ Beatrice Sparks,
1382:I still believe in the old-school show thing no frills, no fancy equipment just a guitar and some amps and some drums, and throw it out there and do it the best you can in a live sense, because it's easy to make records. But the live show is where you really show if you've got the balls to do it. ~ Shelby Lynne,
1383:I've known the glory of the stage and the glory of the spotlight. I still crave it. I want to be on 'American Bandstand' and 'Soul Train' as a solo artist. As a producer, songwriter and arranger, I help other artists say what they want to say. But on my records, I say what I want to say. ~ Narada Michael Walden,
1384:Pleasure need not be less keen because there will be centuries of springs to come, their blossom unseen by human eyes, the walls will crumble, the trees die and rot, the gardens revert to weeds and grass, because all beauty will outlive the human intelligence which records, enjoys and celebrates it. ~ P D James,
1385:When I'm actually creating music, I try not to listen to the hip-hop records that are going on, because I think, subconsciously, we steal from each other. If you're listening to a record and it's really hot, then you'll be looking for something that feels like that, or that has a version of it. ~ Curtis Jackson,
1386:Even when I was with Arista records, which was the freest part of my career, you still have to run a lot of stuff by committee whether it's a budget, or the album artwork, or how may songs you get to record. This was total freedom. We had nobody to answer to. We didn't have to get anything approved. ~ Pam Tillis,
1387:I knew [Kurt Cobain] and his daughter. And Courtney [Love] came and stayed at my house. R.E.M. worked on two records in Seattle and Peter Buck lived next door to Kurt and Courtney. So we all knew each other. I reached out to him with that project as an attempt to prevent what was going to happen. ~ Michael Stipe,
1388:our experience with newly-minted MBAs has not been that great. Their academic records always look terrific and the candidates always know just what to say; but too often they are short on personal commitment to the company and general business savvy. It’s difficult to teach a new dog old tricks. ~ Warren Buffett,
1389:pivoted the results on our Criminal Records Bureau and National Insurance database mirrors to get the place of work for everyone who’s on the books, and the pre-processor is turning that into grid reference data so we can plot them on a map or query for areas where the rate of that’s funny . . . ~ Charles Stross,
1390:To my ears, jazz sounds better in warm weather and after the sun has gone down. While I will listen to some of my favorite jazz records in cooler weather, it's the warmer nights that really make them come alive. Something about those sounds and the heat of the night really makes it happen for me. ~ Henry Rollins,
1391:Its true, Im the youngest, highest-grossing French director. I have a few records, but no one knows or simply doesnt care. Thats good, because I like that. Ultimately, I want to keep working, making a lot of movies, and get better at it. Its about finding great scripts and bringing them to life. ~ Louis Leterrier,
1392:One government tactic was to flood record shops with unplayable records, many intended to damage record players. Some of these records included threatening vocals placed in the middle of a recording, which screamed at the unsuspecting listener, “You like rock and roll? Fuck you, anti-Soviet slime! ~ Donnie Eichar,
1393:The brain appears to possess a special area which we might call poetic memory and which records everything that charms or touches us, that makes our lives beautiful ... Love begins with a metaphor. Which is to say, love begins at the point when a woman enters her first word into our poetic memory. ~ Milan Kundera,
1394:The Carnegie Institute of Technology analyzed the records of 10,000 persons, and arrived at the conclusion that 15 percent of success is due to technical training, to brains and skill on the job, and 85 percent of success is due to personality factors, to the ability to deal with people successfully! ~ Les Giblin,
1395:I don't take off as many days as most other producers and songwriters, so I'm working every single day, and I do songs every day. So it's just about finding time, scheduling, getting in and cutting the records. I make it happen and that's the name of the game. It's no excuses - you gotta figure it out. ~ Rico Love,
1396:I like the aspect of technology. For me to spin the way I do, I would have to carry five crates of records with me everywhere I go, which in this day and age would be like two hundred extra dollars in baggage fees. All I need now is a hard drive and a computer and I can rock anywhere in the world. ~ Neil Armstrong,
1397:I started writing little short stories and poems as soon as I learned to read and write. I think I was six years old. And then when I got to be eleven, twelve, and into my teens, I was just listening to records all the time, and I got a guitar. I started to take guitar lessons when I was twelve. ~ Lucinda Williams,
1398:There are a lot of musicians who are still desperately trying to pretend that it's 1998 and by having a huge marketing campaign, they somehow believe that they can sell 10 million records. That's delusional. No one sells 10 million records. The days of musicians getting rich off of selling records are done. ~ Moby,
1399:The tumults of time are oft passed by in records of the private memoirist; for our days consist not of the Senatorial speech and the refracted solar beam cast through heroic cloud, but rather of bread eaten, and ink blotted, and talk of the sermon, and walks along the whiskery avenues in the garden. ~ M T Anderson,
1400:I'm one of these DJs who likes to play true to myself, so I'm not gonna be throwing in some rock bootleg mashup mix of some record to get a reaction. Sometimes it does amaze me, you go to festivals and DJs think, "Oh, I need to play big crowd-pleasing records." You don't need to spoon-feed the crowd. ~ John Digweed,
1401:I haven't talked to [Sterling Simm] personally about the situation. We did a couple retweets to make some noise and get a little feedback, but I would definitely consider it. When we had our session for the "All I Know" collaboration he played me a number of records, one being "All These", that were crazy. ~ Kid Ink,
1402:My grandfather was Bob Shad, one of those legendary jazz and blues producers - he worked with Charlie Parker and Dinah Washington, and he produced Janis Joplin's album [1967's Big Brother & the Holding Company]. He always owned small labels as well - he had a label called Mainstream Records in the 70s. ~ Judd Apatow,
1403:I got involved, for the most part, in the actual song construction, lyrics even. I didn't want to write the lyrics, but if there was a howler in there, I definitely pointed it out. Just trying to bring it up to a higher level. Of course, after a couple records, people get fed up with that. That's fine. ~ Michael Gira,
1404:I loved music. Music was a big thing and so I started collecting records. I had a large collection of jazz records and that was something else I used to listen to. At night, there was a - what the heck was his name? There was a famous - Jazzbo Collins, I used to listen to at night, and some other guys. ~ Robert Barry,
1405:I would get records by Earl Scruggs... I would tune my banjo down and I'd pick out the songs note by note. Learned how to play that way. I persevered. There was a book written by Pete Seeger, who showed you some basic strumming and some basic picking... And I kind of worked out my own style of playing. ~ Steve Martin,
1406:The micro-compositions are the pieces themselves, but the macro-composition is the whole set of them and how it moves from track to track and how the titles relate to one another, for example. Always when I do records like this of a selection of instrumental pieces - the titles, to me, are very important. ~ Brian Eno,
1407:We who hold his (Wolfe Tone) principles believe that any movement which would successfully grapple with the problem of national freedom must draw its inspiration not from the mouldering records of the past, but from the glowing hopes of the living present, the vast possibilities of the mighty future. ~ James Connolly,
1408:But there is no end to the praise of books, to the value of the librar