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object:Charles Dickens
class:author
subject class:Fiction


--- WIKI
Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are still widely read today. Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed readings extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms. Dickens's literary success began with the 1836 serial publication of The Pickwick Papers. Within a few years he had become an international literary celebrity, famous for his humour, satire, and keen observation of character and society. His novels, most published in monthly or weekly instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication. Cliffhanger endings in his serial publications kept readers in suspense. The installment format allowed Dickens to evaluate his audience's reaction, and he often modified his plot and character development based on such feedback. For example, when his wife's chiropodist expressed distress at the way Miss Mowcher in David Copperfield seemed to reflect her disabilities, Dickens improved the character with positive features. His plots were carefully constructed, and he often wove elements from topical events into his narratives. Masses of the illiterate poor chipped in ha'pennies to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers. His 1843 novella A Christmas Carol remains especially popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London. His 1859 novel A Tale of Two Cities (set in London and Paris) is his best-known work of historical fiction. The most famous celebrity of his era, he undertook, in response to public demand, a series of public reading tours in the later part of his career. Dickens has been praised by many of his fellow writersfrom Leo Tolstoy to George Orwell, G. K. Chesterton, and Tom Wolfe for his realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. However, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of sentimentalism. The term Dickensian is used to describe something that is reminiscent of Dickens and his writings, such as poor social conditions or comically repulsive characters.
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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

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Infinite_Library

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IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT

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author
SIMILAR TITLES
Charles Dickens

DEFINITIONS


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amplification: A rhetorical device where language is used to emphasise or extend. For example Charles Dickens used the technique in his opening passages to BLEAK HOUSE, creating an atmosphere of fog, literal and metaphorical. Seerepetition.



QUOTES [7 / 7 - 1500 / 4518]


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   7 Charles Dickens

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1483 Charles Dickens
   2 Anonymous

1:He did each single thing as if he did nothing else.
   ~ Charles Dickens,
2:The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again. ~ Charles Dickens, [T5],
3:An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
4:There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor." ~ Charles Dickens,
5:I hope that real love and truth are stronger in the end than any evil or misfortune in the world. ~ Charles Dickens,
6:There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts. ~ Charles Dickens,
7:Such is the influence which the condition of our own thoughts, exercises, even over the appearance of external objects. Men who look on nature, and their fellow-men, and cry that all is dark and gloomy, are in the right; but the sombre colours are reflections from their own jaundiced eyes and hearts. The real hues are delicate, and need a clearer vision. ~ Charles Dickens,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Change begets change. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
2:Friendship? Yes Please. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
3:God bless us, every one! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
4:Eccentricities of genius. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
5:Least said, soonest mended ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
6:I only ask for information. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
7:Lord, keep my memory green. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
8:A good thing can't be cruel. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
9:The law is an ass, an idiot. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
10:Trifles make the sum of life. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
11:Discipline must be maintained. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
12:He would make a lovely corpse. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
13:Please, sir, I want some more. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
14:Have a heart that never hardens ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
15:Oliver Twist has asked for more! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
16:We must scrunch or be scrunched. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
17:A new heart for a New Year, always! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
18:Death is a mighty, universal truth. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
19:Grief never mended no broken bones. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
20:I wear the chains I forged in life. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
21:Reflect upon your present blessings ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
22:To a young heart everything is fun. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
23:A loving heart is the truest wisdom. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
24:Heaven suits the back to the burden. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
25:Keep up appearances whatever you do. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
26:The American woman is a monstrosity. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
27:We forge the chains we wear in life. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
28:Why then we should drop into poetry. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
29:A man must take the fat with the lean. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
30:We need never be ashamed of our tears. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
31:A multitude of people and yet solitude. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
32:There wasn't room to swing a cat there. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
33:Walk and be Happy, Walk and be Healthy. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
34:You are in every line I have ever read. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
35:Darkness is cheap, and Scrooge liked it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
36:Novelties please less than they impress. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
37:You have been the last dream of my soul. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
38:Your voice and music are the same to me. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
39:A word in earnest is as good as a speech. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
40:In life I was your partner, Jacob Marley. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
41:Once a gentleman, and always a gentleman. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
42:Then I'm sorry to say, I've eat your pie. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
43:Veels vithin veels, a prison in a prison. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
44:What greater gift than the love of a cat. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
45:Let me feel now what sharp distress I may. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
46:Never sign a valentine with your own name. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
47:There might be some credit in being jolly. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
48:Circumstances beyond my individual control. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
49:He was bolder in the daylight-most men are. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
50:Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
51:Nothing of what is nobly done is ever lost. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
52:A boy's story is the best that is ever told. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
53:All partings foreshadow the great final one. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
54:Polly put the kettle on, we'll all have tea. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
55:You should keep dogs-fine animals-sagacious. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
56:Ask no questions, and you'll be told no lies. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
57:Philosophers are only men in armor after all. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
58:And what about the cash, my existence's jewel? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
59:A very little key will open a very heavy door. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
60:Let us be moral. Let us contemplate existence. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
61:Scattered wits take a long time in picking up. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
62:Some people are nobody's enemies but their own ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
63:Drive him fast to his tomb. This, from Jacques. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
64:Make them laugh, make them cry, make them wait. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
65:Poverty and oysters always seem to go together. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
66:Regrets are the natural property of grey hairs. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
67:Surprises, like misfortunes, seldom come alone. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
68:Them which is of other naturs thinks different. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
69:I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
70:I stole her heart away and put ice in its place. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
71:A contented spirit is the sweetness of existence. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
72:Change begets change. Nothing propagates so fast. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
73:Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
74:I must do something or I shall wear my heart away. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
75:In love of home, the love of country has its rise. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
76:It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
77:There seems a magic in the very name of Christmas. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
78:A day wasted on others is not wasted on one's self. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
79:He did each single thing as if he did nothing else. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
80:Home is a word stronger than a magician ever spoke. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
81:Take a little timecount five-and-twenty,Tattycoram. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
82:There is prodigious strength in sorrow and despair. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
83:Vices are sometimes only virtues carried to excess! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
84:Accidents will occur in the best regulated families. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
85:But the mere truth won't do. You must have a lawyer. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
86:It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
87:We never tire of the friendships we form with books. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
88:Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
89:It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
90:Money and goods are certainly the best of references. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
91:Poetry makes life what lights and music do the stage. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
92:Ride on! Ride on over all obstacles and win the race. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
93:We can refute assertions, but who can refute silence? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
94:Champagne is simply one of the elegant extras of life. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
95:I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
96:Life is made of ever so many partings welded together. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
97:You speak so feelingly and so manfully, Charles Darnay ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
98:&
99:Anything that makes a noise is satisfactory to a crowd. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
100:A smattering of everything, and a knowledge of nothing. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
101:God bless us every one! said Tiny Tim, the last of all. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
102:He is quite a good fellow - nobody's enemy but his own. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
103:I am not old, but my young way was never the way to age. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
104:My guiding star always is, Get hold of portable property. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
105:There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
106:This is a world of action, and not moping and droning in. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
107:Hours are golden links&
108:Do not close your heart against all my efforts to help you. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
109:Man cannot really improve himself without improving others. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
110:The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
111:Tongue; well that's a wery good thing when it an't a woman. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
112:Every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
113:If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
114:Detestation of the high is the involuntary homage of the low. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
115:Remembrance, like a candle, burns brightest at Christmastime. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
116:Renunciation remains sorrow, though a sorrow borne willingly. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
117:The age of chivalry is past. Bores have succeeded to dragons. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
118:And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
119:Remember, to the last, that while there is life there is hope. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
120:Take the pencil and write under my name, &
121:Vengeance and retribution require a long time; it is the rule. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
122:Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
123:The bearings of this observation lays in the application of it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
124:You don't carry in your countenance a letter of recommendation. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
125:If a pig could give his mind to anything, he would not be a pig. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
126:I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
127:Industry is the soul of business and the keystone of prosperity. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
128:Although I am an old man, night is generally my time for walking. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
129:Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
130:Now, what I want is, Facts. . . . Facts alone are wanted in life. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
131:One always begins to forgive a place as soon as it's left behind. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
132:The cramped monotony of my existence grinds me away by the grain. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
133:The first rule of business is: Do other men for they would do you ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
134:A merry Christmas to everybody! A happy New Year to all the world! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
135:The worst of all listeners is the man who does nothing but listen. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
136:He had but one eye, and the popular prejudice runs in favor of two. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
137:... as lonesome as a kitten in a wash-house copper with the lid on. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
138:I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
139:Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human nature . ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
140:Sudden shifts and changes are no bad preparation for political life. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
141:There was something very comfortable in having plenty of stationery. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
142:You touch some of the reasons for my going, not for my staying away. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
143:Do all the good you can and make as little fuss about it as possible. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
144:No space of regret can make amends for one life's opportunity misused ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
145:The last trumpet ever to be sounded shall blow even algebra to wreck. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
146:There are strings in the human heart that had better not be vibrated. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
147:There is something in sickness that breaks down the pride of manhood. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
148:Consider nothing impossible, then treat possiblities as probabilities. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
149:The one great principle of English law is to make business for itself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
150:A dangerous quality, if real; and a not less dangerous one, if feigned. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
151:A little learning is a dangerous thing, but a little patronage more so. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
152:It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
153:Never close your lips to those whom you have already opened your heart. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
154:The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
155:To have a cricket on the hearth is the luckiest thing in all the world! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
156:Great men are seldom over-scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
157:One should never be ashamed to cry. Tears are rain on the dust of earth. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
158:The men who learn endurance, are they who call the whole world, brother. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
159:There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
160:... and to-morrow looked in my face more steadily than I could look at it ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
161:Death may beget life, but oppression can beget nothing other than itself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
162:Love, though said to be afflicted with blindness, is a vigilant watchman. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
163:Nobody near me here, but rats, and they are fine stealthy secret fellows. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
164:There is nothing truer than physiognomy, taken in connection with manner. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
165:When you drink of the water, don't forget the spring from which it flows. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
166:Christmas is a poor excuse every 25th of December to pick a man's pockets. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
167:Christmas may not bring a single thing; still, it gives me a song to sing. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
168:I have been, as the phrase is, liberally educated, and am fit for nothing. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
169:It is an old prerogative of kings to govern everything but their passions. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
170:It is not easy to walk alone in the country without musing upon something. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
171:Meow says the cat ,quack says the duck , Bow wow wow says the dog ! Grrrr! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
172:There are only two styles of portrait painting; the serious and the smirk. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
173:There is no substitute for thoroughgoing, ardent, and sincere earnestness. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
174:And it is not a slight thing when they, who are so fresh from God, love us. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
175:If I could not walk far and fast, I think I should just explode and perish. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
176:Is it better to have had a good thing and lost it, or never to have had it? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
177:I was a blacksmith's boy but yesterday; I am - what shall I say I am today? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
178:The more man knows of man, the better for the common brotherhood among men. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
179:The universe, he observed, makes rather an indifferent parent, I am afraid. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
180:True love believes everything, and bears everything, and trusts everything. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
181:If the law supposes that,' said Mr Bumble... ' the law is an ass - an idiot. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
182:In the majority of cases, conscience is an elastic and very flexible article ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
183:Perhaps second-hand cares, like second-hand clothes, come easily off and on. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
184:Then tell Wind and Fire where to stop," returned madame; "but don't tell me. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
185:They don't mind it: its a reg'lar holiday to them - all porter and skittles. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
186:No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of it to anyone else. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
187:There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
188:A man ain't got no right to be a public man, unless he meets the public views. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
189:Her contempt for me was so strong, that it became infectious, and I caught it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
190:The habit of paying compliments kept a man's tongue oiled without any expense. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
191:There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
192:My meaning is, that no man can expect his children to respect what he degrades. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
193:Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
194:There is nothing so strong or safe in an emergency of life as the simple truth. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
195:An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
196:Cleanliness is next to Godliness, and some people do the same by their religion. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
197:I am light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a schoolboy ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
198:if the world go wrong, it was, in some off-hand manner, never meant to go right. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
199:Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, are all very good words for the lips. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
200:Spring is the time of year when it is summer in the sun and winter in the shade. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
201:Think! I've got enough to do, and little enough to get for it, without thinking. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
202:Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
203:It's in vain to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
204:Poetry's unnat'ral; no man ever talked poetry &
205:There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
206:Missionaries are perfect nuisances and leave every place worse than they found it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
207:People like us don't go out at night cause people like them see us for what we are ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
208:The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
209:Your sex have such a surprising animosity against one another, when you do differ. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
210:Old Marley was dead as a doornail... The wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
211:-Why don't you cry again, you little wretch? -Because I'll never cry for you again. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
212:Do the wise thing and the kind thing too, and make the best of us and not the worst. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
213:There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
214:Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches as she does in purple and fine linen. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
215:But the words she spoke of Mrs Harris, lambs could not forgive ... nor worms forget. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
216:I could settle down into a state of equable low spirits, and resign myself to coffee. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
217:Skewered through and through with office-pens, and bound hand and foot with red tape. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
218:Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
219:All of us have wonders hidden in our breasts, only needing circumstances to evoke them. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
220:... The sun does not shine upon this fair earth to meet frowning eyes, depend upon it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
221:Good never come of such evil, a happier end was not in nature to so unhappy a beginning. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
222:I do not know the American gentleman, God forgive me for putting two such words together. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
223:I only know that it was, and ceased to be; and that I have written, and there I leave it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
224:No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
225:Really, for a man who had been out of practice for so many years it was a splendid laugh! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
226:Rich folks may ride on camels, but it ain't so easy for 'em to see out of a needle's eye. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
227:She had gained a reputation for beauty, and (which is often another thing) was beautiful. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
228:That glorious vision of doing good is so often the sanguine mirage of so many good minds. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
229:The New Testament is the very best book that ever was or ever will be known in the world. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
230:Try not to associate bodily defect with mental, my good friend, except for a solid reason ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
231:United metropolitan improved hot muffin and crumpet baking and punctual delivery company. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
232:We all draw a little and compose a little, and none of us have any idea of time or money. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
233:Anything for the quick life, as the man said when he took the situation at the lighthouse. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
234:Be natural my children. For the writer that is natural has fulfilled all the rules of art. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
235:Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy. -Miss Havisham ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
236:Happiness is a gift and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight in it when it comes. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
237:[I]t seemed as if the streets were absorbed by the sky, and the night were all in the air. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
238:She had curiously thoughtful and attentive eyes; eyes that were very pretty and very good. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
239:&
240:If they would rather die, . . . they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
241:Mankind was my business... charity, mercy, forbearance, benevolence, were all my business. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
242:A man can well afford to be as bold as brass, my good fellow, when he gets gold in exchange! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
243:Cheerfulness and contentment are great beautifiers, and are famous preservers of good looks. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
244:Did it ever strike you on such a morning as this that drowning would be happiness and peace? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
245:I went away, dear Agnes, loving you. I stayed away, loving you. I returned home, loving you! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
246:Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see triumph. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
247:Train up a fig tree in the way it should go, and when you are old sit under the shade of it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
248:... what such people miscall their religion, is a vent for their bad humours and arrogance. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
249:&
250:Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
251:Moths, and all sorts of ugly creatures, hover about a lighted candle. Can the candle help it? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
252:Give me a moment, because I like to cry for joy. It's so delicious, John dear, to cry for joy. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
253:Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; - the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
254:My advice is to never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
255:There is no such passion in human nature, as the passion for gravy among commercial gentlemen. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
256:Time has been lost and opportunity thrown away, but I am yet a young man, and may retrieve it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
257:Money, says the proverb, makes money. When you have got a little, it is often easy to get more. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
258:Some women's faces are, in their brightness, a prophecy; and some, in their sadness, a history. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
259:things cannot be expected to turn up of themselves. We must in a measure assist to turn them up ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
260:What an immense impression Paris made upon me. It is the most extraordinary place in the world! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
261:But, tears were not the things to find their way to Mr. Bumble's soul; his heart was waterproof. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
262:The beating of my heart was so violent and wild that I felt as if my life were breaking from me. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
263:The world belongs to those who set out to conquer it armed with self confidence and good humour. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
264:Time and tide will wait for no man, saith the adage. But all men have to wait for time and tide. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
265:&
266:Every traveler has a home of his own, and he learns to appreciate it the more from his wandering. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
267:I hope that real love and truth are stronger in the end than any evil or misfortune in the world. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
268:The sun himself is weak when he first rises, and gathers strength and courage as the day gets on. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
269:I am what you designed me to be.I am your blade. You cannot now complain if you also feel the hurt ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
270:I never see any difference in boys. I only know two sorts of boys. Mealy boys and beef-faced boys. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
271:Stranger, pause and ask thyself the question, Canst thou do likewise? If not, with a blush retire. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
272:I know enough of the world now to have almost lost the capacity of being much surprised by anything ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
273:New thoughts and hopes were whirling through my mind, and all the colours of my life were changing. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
274:Think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
275:&
276:A man is lucky if he is the first love of a woman. A woman is lucky if she is the last love of a man. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
277:I confess I have yet to learn that a lesson of the purest good may not be drawn from the vilest evil. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
278:The broken heart. You think you will die, but you just keep living, day after day after terrible day. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
279:I think it impossible, utterly impossible, for any Englishman to live here [in America], and be happy. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
280:I will live in the past, the present, and the future. The spirits of all three shall strive within me. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
281:Minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled, ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
282:And numerous indeed are the hearts to which Christmas brings a brief season of happiness and enjoyment. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
283:Any man may be in good spirits and good temper when he's well dressed. There ain't much credit in that. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
284:It is because I think so much of warm and sensitive hearts, that I would spare them from being wounded. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
285:The ocean asks for nothing but those who stand by her shores gradually attune themselves to her rhythm. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
286:Troubles are exceedingly gregarious in their nature, and flying in flocks are apt to perch capriciously. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
287:I have always thought of Christmas time... as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
288:It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper; so cry away. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
289:She wasn't a logically reasoning woman, but God is good, and hearts may count in heaven as high as heads. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
290:Women can always put things in fewest words. Except when it's blowing up; and then they lengthens it out. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
291:An inebriated elderly gentleman in the last depths of shabbiness... played the calm and virtuous old men. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
292:We must leave the discovery of this mystery, like all others, to time, and accident, and Heaven's pleasure. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
293:I made a compact with myself that in my person literature should stand by itself, of itself, and for itself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
294:They are so filthy and bestial that no honest man would admit one into his house for a water-closet doormat. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
295:All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
296:Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
297:Family not only need to consist of merely those whom we share blood, but also for those whom we'd give blood. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
298:Home is like the ship at sea, Sailing on eternally; Oft the anchor forth we cast, But can never make it fast. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
299:I feel an earnest and humble desire, and shall do till I die, to increase the stock of harmless cheerfulness. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
300:The shadows of our own desires stand between us and our better angels, and thus their brightness is eclipsed. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
301:Why, Mrs. Piper has a good deal to say, chiefly in parentheses and without punctuation, but not much to tell. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
302:He knew enough of the world to know that there is nothing in it better than the faithful service of the heart. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
303:Loves and Cupids took to flight afraid, and Martyrdom had no such torment in its painted history of suffering. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
304:The New Year, like an Infant Heir to the whole world, was waited for, with welcomes, presents, and rejoicings. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
305:To close the eyes, and give a seemly comfort to the apparel of the dead, is poverty's holiest touch of nature. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
306:My dear if you could give me a cup of tea to clear my muddle of a head I should better understand your affairs. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
307:So new to him," she muttered, "so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
308:Now, I return to this young fellow. And the communication I have got to make is, that he has great expectations. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
309:And this is the eternal law. For, Evil often stops short at istelf and dies with the doer of it! but Good, never. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
310:Buy an annuity cheap, and make your life interesting to yourself and everybody else that watches the speculation. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
311:It's my old girl that advises. She has the head. But I never own to it before her. Discipline must be maintained. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
312:It was a good thing to have a couple of thousand people all rigid and frozen together, in the palm of one's hand. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
313:&
314:For not an orphan in the wide world can be so deserted as the child who is an outcast from a living parent's love. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
315:I love your daughter fondly, dearly, disinterestedly, devotedly. If ever there were love in the world, I love her. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
316:In a utilitarian age, of all other times, it is a matter of grave importance that fairy tales should be respected. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
317:Constancy in love is a good thing; but it means nothing, and is nothing, without constancy in every kind of effort. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
318:A man in public life expects to be sneered at - it is the fault of his elevated situation, and not of himself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
319:Can I view thee panting, lying On thy stomach, without sighing; Can I unmoved see thee dying On a log Expiring frog! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
320:Can you suppose there's any harm in looking as cheerful and being as cheerful as our poor circumstances will permit? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
321:I must be taken as I have been made. The success is not mine, the failure is not mine, but the two together make me. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
322:Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
323:The secret was such an old one now, had so grown into me and become a part of myself, that I could not tear it away. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
324:Credit is a system whereby a person who can not pay gets another person who can not pay to guarantee that he can pay. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
325:Our affections, however laudable, in this transitory world, should never master us; we should guide them, guide them. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
326:Along the Paris streets, the death-carts rumble, hollow and harsh. Six tumbrils carry the day's wine to La Guillotine. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
327:May I tell you why it seems to me a good thing for us to remember wrong that has been done us? That we may forgive it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
328:My hair stands on end at the cost and charges of these boys. Why was I ever a father! Why was my father ever a father! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
329:She better liked to see him free and happy, even than to have him near her, because she loved him better than herself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
330:Every failure teaches a man something, if he will learn; and you are too sensible a man not to learn from this failure. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
331:For though we are perpetually bragging of it as our safety, it is nothing but a poor fringe on the mantle of the upper. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
332:Friendless I can never be, for all mankind are my kindred, and I am on ill terms with no one member of my great family. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
333:Affery, like greater people, had always been right in her facts, and always wrong in the theories she deduced from them. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
334:Don't be afraid! We won't make an author of you, while there's an honest trade to be learnt, or brick-making to turn to. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
335:No varnish can hide the grain of the wood; and that the more varnish you put on, the more the grain will express itself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
336:Of little worth as life is when we misuse it, it is worth that effort. It would cost nothing to lay down if it were not. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
337:&
338:And I am bored to death with it. Bored to death with this place, bored to death with my life, bored to death with myself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
339:For it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child Himself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
340:Lawyers hold that there are two kinds of particularly bad witnesses&
341:Possibly we might even improve the world a little, if we got up early in the morning, and took off our coats to the work. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
342:I believe the spreading of Catholicism to be the most horrible means of political and social degradation left in the world. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
343:Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many - not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
344:We know, Mr. Weller - we, who are men of the world - that a good uniform must work its way with the women, sooner or later. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
345:A brisk, bright, blue-eyed fellow, a very neat figure and rather under the middle size, never out of the way and never in it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
346:... still his philanthropy was of that gunpowderous sort that the difference between it and animosity was hard to determine. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
347:That sort of half sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity's small change in general society. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
348:In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
349:So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
350:The streets looked small, of course. The streets that we have only seen as children always do I believe when we go back to them ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
351:When a man bleeds inwardly, it is a dangerous thing for himself; but when he laughs inwardly, it bodes no good to other people. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
352:Circumstances may accumulate so strongly even against an innocent man, that directed, sharpened, and pointed, they may slay him. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
353:My faith in the people governing is, on the whole, infinitesimal; my faith in the people governed is, on the whole, illimitable. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
354:Oh the nerves, the nerves; the mysteries of this machine called man! Oh the little that unhinges it, poor creatures that we are! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
355:[S]he stood for some moments gazing at the sisters, with affection beaming in one eye, and calculation shining out of the other. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
356:&
357:Ah, Miss Harriet, it would do us no harm to remember oftener than we do, that vices are sometimes only virtues carried to excess! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
358:a most excellent man, though I could have wished his trousers not quite so tight in some places and not quite so loose in others. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
359:A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
360:Black are the brooding clouds and troubled the deep waters, when the Sea of Thought, first heaving from a calm, gives up its Dead ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
361:Come, then," returned the nephew gaily. "What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You're rich enough. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
362:Gold, for the instant, lost its luster in his eyes, for there were countless treasures of the heart which it could never purchase ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
363:It's over, and can't be helped, and that's one consolation, as they always say in Turkey, when they cut the wrong man's head off. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
364:She's the sort of woman now,' said Mould, . . . &
365:A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
366:An evening wind uprose too, and the slighter branches cracked and rattled as they moved, in skeleton dances, to its moaning music. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
367:By the by, who ever knew a man who never read or wrote neither who hadn't got some small back parlour which he would call a study! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
368:In the Destroyer's steps there spring up bright creations that defy his power, and his dark path becomes a way of light to Heaven. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
369:It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
370:To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
371:Up the two terrace flights of steps the rain ran wildly, and beat at the great door, like a swift messenger rousing those within;. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
372:Probably every new and eagerly expected garment ever put on since clothes came in, fell a trifle short of the wearer's expectation. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
373:You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. Stick to Facts, sir! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
374:For your popular rumour, unlike the rolling stone of the proverb, is one which gathers a deal of moss in its wanderings up and down. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
375:In seasons of pestilence, some of us will have a secret attraction to the disease&
376:The cloud of caring for nothing, which overshadowed him with such a fatal darkness, was very rarely pierced by the light within him. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
377:There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
378:The wind's in the east. . . . I am always conscious of an uncomfortable sensation now and then when the wind is blowing in the east. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
379:Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
380:Accidentally consumed five biscuits when I wasn't paying attention. Those biscuits are wily fellows - they leap in like sugary ninjas ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
381:I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free. Mankind will surely not deny to Harold Skimpole what it concedes to the butterflies. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
382:The blossom is blighted, the leaf is withered, the God of day goes down upon the dreary scene, and in short you are for ever floored. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
383:What is peace? Is it war? No. Is it strife? No. Is it lovely, and gentle, and beautiful, and pleasant, and serene, and joyful? O yes! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
384:I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
385:Mystery and disappointment are not absolutely indispensable to the growth of love, but they are, very often, its powerful auxiliaries. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
386:The wine-shops breed, in physical atmosphere of malaria and a moral pestilence of envy and vengeance, the men of crime and revolution. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
387:Annual income is £ 20, the cost is 19, you will feel happiness. If annual income of £ 20, the cost is £ 20.6, you will see suffering ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
388:Cows are my passion. What I have ever sighed for has been to retreat to a Swiss farm, and live entirely surrounded by cows - and china. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
389:I had considered how the things that never happen, are often as much realities to us, in their effects, as those that are accomplished. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
390:Marley was dead, to begin with ... This must be distintly understood, or nothing wonderful can come of the story I am going to relate. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
391:&
392:... As to sleep, you know, I never sleep now. I might be a Watchman, except that I don't get any pay, and he's got nothing on his mind. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
393:Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one; stronger than magician ever spoke, or spirit ever answered to, in the strongest conjuration. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
394:It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
395:Little Red Riding Hood was my first love. I felt that if I could have married Little Red Riding Hood, I should have known perfect bliss. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
396:Spite is a little word, but it represents as strange a jumble of feelings and compound of discords, as any polysyllable in the language. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
397:Such is hope, heaven's own gift to struggling mortals, pervading, like some subtle essence from the skies, all things both good and bad. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
398:But injustice breeds injustice; the fighting with shadows and being defeated by them necessitates the setting up of substances to combat. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
399:May not the complaint, that common people are above their station, often take its rise in the fact of uncommon people being below theirs? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
400:There was a frosty rime upon the trees, which, in the faint light of the clouded moon, hung upon the smaller branches like dead garlands. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
401:When the moon shines very brilliantly, a solitude and stillness seem to proceed from her that influence even crowded places full of life. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
402:Everybody said so. Far be it from me to assert that what everybody says must be true. Everybody is, often, as likely to be wrong as right. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
403:I think it must somewhere be written that the virtues of mothers shall be visited on their children, as well as the sins of their fathers. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
404:My imagination would never have served me as it has, but for the habit of commonplace, humble, patient, daily, toiling, drudging attention ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
405:When we have done our very, very best, papa, and that is not enough, then I think the right time must have come for asking help of others. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
406:The coffee was boiling over a charcoal fire, and large slices of bread and butter were piled one upon the other like deals in a lumber yard. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
407:What are the odds so long as the fire of the soul is kindled at the taper of conviviality, and the wing of friendship never molts a feather? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
408:When the time comes, let loose a tiger and a devil; but wait for the time with the tiger and the devil chained -not shown- yet always ready. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
409:Around and around the house the leaves fall thick, but never fast, for they come circling down with a dead lightness that is sombre and slow. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
410:Electric communication will never be a substitute for the face of someone who with their soul encourages another person to be brave and true. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
411:I verily believe that her not remembering and not minding in the least, made me cry again, inwardly - and that is the sharpest crying of all. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
412:&
413:&
414:I will die here where I have walked. And I will walk here, though I am in my grave. I will walk here until the pride of this house is humbled. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
415:Never," said my aunt, "be mean in anything; never be false; never be cruel. Avoid those three vices, Trot, and I can always be hopeful of you. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
416:and it was not until I began to think, that I began fully to know how wrecked I was, and how the ship in which I had sailed was gone to pieces. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
417:I believe that the heaviest blow ever dealt at liberty's head will be dealt by this nation in the ultimate failure of its example to the earth. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
418:If the parks be "the lungs of London" we wonder what Greenwich Fair is&
419:Most men are individuals no longer so far as their business, its activities, or its moralities are concerned. They are not units but fractions. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
420:The sergeant was describing a military life. It was all drinking, he said, except that there were frequent intervals of eating and love making. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
421:Come in, - come in! and know me better, man! I am the Ghost of Christmas Present. Look upon me! You have never seen the like of me before! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
422:Dickens writes that an event, "began to be forgotten, as most affairs are, when wonder, having no fresh food to support it, dies away of itself. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
423:I'm awful dull, but I hope I've beat out something nigh the rights of this at last. And so GOD bless you, dear old Pip, old chap, GOD bless you! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
424:My daughter, there are times of moral danger when the hardest virtuous resolution to form is flight, and when the most heroic bravery is flight. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
425:My dear young lady, crime, like death, is not confined to the old and withered alone. The youngest and fairest are too often its chosen victims. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
426:The privileges of the side-table included the small prerogatives of sitting next to the toast, and taking two cups of tea to other people's one. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
427:Judiciously show a cat milk, if you wish her to thirst for it. Judiciously show a dog his natural prey, if you wish him to bring it down one day. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
428:We must meet reverses boldly, and not suffer them to frighten us, my dear. We must learn to act the play out. We must live misfortune down, Trot! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
429:Have I yet to learn that the hardest and best-borne trials are those which are never chronicled in any earthly record, and are suffered every day! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
430:In the moonlight which is always sad, as the light of the sun itself is&
431:Old Time, that greatest and longest established spinner of all!... his factory is a secret place, his work is noiseless, and his Hands are mutes. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
432:&
433:And I am quite serious when I say that I do not believe there are, on the whole earth besides, so many intensified bores as in these United States. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
434:I am well aware that I am the &
435:I have made up my mind that I must have money, Pa. I feel that I can't beg it, borrow it, or steal it; and so I have resolved that I must marry it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
436:It is well for a man to respect his own vocation whatever it is and to think himself bound to uphold it and to claim for it the respect it deserves ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
437:&
438:&
439:In particular, there was a butler in a blue coat and bright buttons, who gave quite a winey flavour to the table beer; he poured it out so superbly. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
440:I think the Romans must have aggravated one another very much, with their noses. Perhaps, they became the restless people they were, in consequence. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
441:Let me see you ride a donkey over my green again, and as sure as you have a head upon your shoulders, I'll knock your bonnet off, and tread upon it! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
442:Never imitate the eccentricities of genius, but toil after it in its truer flights. They are not so easy to follow, but they lead to higher regions. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
443:There are not a few among the disciples of charity who require, in their vocation, scarcely less excitement than the votaries of pleasure in theirs. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
444:He was wise enough to know that nothing ever happened on this globe, for good, at which some people did not have their fill of laughter in the outset ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
445:&
446:A heart well worth winning, and well won. A heart that, once won, goes through fire and water for the winner, and never changes, and is never daunted. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
447:I wear the chain I forged in life... .I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
448:Miss Mills replied, on general principles, that the Cottage of content was better than the Palace of cold splendour, and that where love was, all was. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
449:There can't be a quarrel without two parties, and I won't be one. I will be a friend to you in spite of you. So now you know what you've got to expect ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
450:Your Honour, unless your Honour, without a moment's loss of time, makes sail for the nearest shore, this is a doomed ship, and her name is the Coffin! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
451:... I have read in your face, as plain as if it was a book, that but for some trouble and sorrow we should never know half the good there is about us. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
452:You can't make a head and brains out of a brass knob with nothing in it. You couldn't do it when your uncle George was living much less when he's dead. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
453:The word of a gentleman is as good as his bond — sometimes better; as in the present case, where his bond might prove but a doubtful sort of security. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
454:and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves as one, but every child was conducting itself like forty. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
455:What lawsuits grow out of the graves of rich men, every day; sowing perjury, hatred, and lies among near kindred, where there should be nothing but love! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
456:I find my breath gets short, but it seldom gets longer as a man gets older. I take it as it comes, and make the most of it. That's the best way, ain't it? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
457:On the motionless branches of some trees, autumn berries hung like clusters of coral beads, as in those fabled orchards where the fruits were jewels . . . ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
458:The plain rule is to do nothing in the dark, to be a party to nothing underhanded or mysterious, and never to put his foot where he cannot see the ground. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
459:He describes it as a large apartment, with a red brick floor and a capacious chimney; the ceiling garnished with hams, sides of bacon, and ropes of onions. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
460:The Northern onslaught upon slavery was no more than a piece of specious humbug designed to conceal its desire for economic control of the Southern states. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
461:Come, let's be a comfortable couple and take care of each other! How glad we shall be, that we have somebody we are fond of always, to talk to and sit with. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
462:In the little world in which children have their existence, whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt, as injustice. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
463:The aphorism "Whatever is, is right," would be as final as it is lazy, did it not include the troublesome consequence that nothing that ever was, was wrong. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
464:He was consious of a thousand odours floating in the air, each one connected with a thousand thoughts, and hopes, and joys, and cares, long, long, forgotten. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
465:You are always training yourself to be, mind and body, as clear as crystal, and you always are, and never change; whereas I am a muddy, solitary, moping weed. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
466:Pride is one of the seven deadly sins; but it cannot be the pride of a mother in her children, for that is a compound of two cardinal virtues - faith and hope. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
467:There's more of gravey than grave about you, whatever you are!" - Scrooge, referring to Marley's ghost which he believes is a hallucination from food poisoning ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
468:Battledore and shuttlecock's a wery good game, vhen you an't the shuttlecock and two lawyers the battledores, in which case it gets too exciting to be pleasant. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
469:every idiot who goes about with a &
470:I had seen the damp lying on the outside of my little window, as if some goblin had been crying there all night, and using the window for a pocket-handkerchief. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
471:It was the momentary yielding of a nature that had been disappointed from the dawn of its perceptions, but had not quite given up all its hopeful yearnings yet. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
472:Send forth the child and childish man together, and blush for the pride that libels our own old happy state, and gives its title to an ugly and distorted image. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
473:&
474:&
475:I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers, and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
476:Many merry Christmases, many happy New Years. Unbroken friendships, great accumulations of cheerful recollections and affections on earth, and heaven for us all. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
477:The aim of talk should be like the aim of a flying arrow - to hit the mark; but to this end there must be a mark to hit, that is, there must be a listener. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
478:The day was made for laziness, and lying on one's back in green places, and staring at the sky till its brightness forced one to shut one's eyes and go to sleep. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
479:The flowers that sleep by night, opened their gentle eyes and turned them to the day. The light, creation's mind, was everywhere, and all things owned its power. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
480:I have heard it said that as we keep our birthdays when we are alive, so the ghosts of dead people, who are not easy in their graves, keep the day they died upon. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
481:It being a part of Mrs. Pipchin's system not to encourage a child's mind to develop and expand itself like a young flower, but to open it by force like an oyster. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
482:Men's courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead," said Scrooge. "But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
483:Quadruped lions are said to be savage, only when they are hungry; biped lions are rarely sulky longer than when their appetite for distinction remains unappeased. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
484:Shall we speak of the inspiration of a poet or a priest, and not of the heart impelled by love and self-devotion to the lowliest work in the lowliest way of life? ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
485:Try to do unto others as you would have them do to you, and do not be discouraged if they fail sometimes. It is much better that they should fail than you should. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
486:‚ÄéAnd yet I have had the weakness, and have still the weakness, to wish you to know with what a sudden mastery you kindled me, heap of ashes that I am, into fire. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
487:I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
488:It will be your duty, and it will be your pleasure too to estimate her (as you chose her) by the qualities that she has, and not by the qualities she may not have. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
489:And still I stood looking at the house, thinking how happy I should be if I lived there with her, and knowing that I never was happy with her, but always miserable. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
490:He was a very young boy; quite a little child. His hair still hung in curls about his face, and his eyes were very bright; but their light was of Heaven, not earth. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
491:You should know," said Estella. "I am what you have made me. Take all the praise, take all the blame; take all the success, take all the failure; in short, take me. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
492:&
493:It is no worse, because I write of it. It would be no better, if I stopped my most unwilling hand. Nothing can undo it; nothing can make it otherwise than as it was. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
494:It was a long and gloomy night that gathered on me, haunted by the ghosts of many hopes, of many dear remembrances, many errors, many unavailing sorrows and regrets. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
495:The year end brings no greater pleasure then the opportunity to express to you season's greetings and good wishes. May your holidays and new year be filled with joy. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
496:And can it be that in a world so full and busy the loss of one creature makes a void so wide and deep that nothing but the width and depth of eternity can fill it up! ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
497:Everything that Mr Smallweed's grandfather ever put away in his mind was a grub at first, and is a grub at last. In all his life he has never bred a single butterfly. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
498:it's not my business," Scrooge returned. "It's enough for a man to understand his own business, and not to interfere with other people's. Mine occupies me constantly. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
499:We went our several ways," said Lady Dedlock, "and had little in common even before we agreed to differ. It is to be regretted, I suppose, but it could not be helped. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
500:Being that rare sort of old girl that she receives Good to her arms without a hint that it might be Better and catches light from any little spot of darkness near her. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Barkis suspira. ~ Charles Dickens,
2:divided between ~ Charles Dickens,
3:Janet! Donkeys! ~ Charles Dickens,
4:Never say never ~ Charles Dickens,
5:short name, eh? ~ Charles Dickens,
6:The pleasantest ~ Charles Dickens,
7:to be alienated ~ Charles Dickens,
8:hippo-comedietta ~ Charles Dickens,
9:A CHRISTMAS CAROL ~ Charles Dickens,
10:DAVID COPPERFIELD ~ Charles Dickens,
11:did not mind this ~ Charles Dickens,
12:dull indifference ~ Charles Dickens,
13:I'll eat my head! ~ Charles Dickens,
14:que ha perseguido ~ Charles Dickens,
15:somethingological ~ Charles Dickens,
16:CHAPTER LXII FINAL ~ Charles Dickens,
17:Darkness is cheap, ~ Charles Dickens,
18:In an evil hour, I ~ Charles Dickens,
19:Meat, ma'am, meat. ~ Charles Dickens,
20:Never say never... ~ Charles Dickens,
21:nothing else.' 'My ~ Charles Dickens,
22:tergiversation and ~ Charles Dickens,
23:great expectations. ~ Charles Dickens,
24:Keep where you are, ~ Charles Dickens,
25:Mrs. Chickenstalker ~ Charles Dickens,
26:Oh, you queer soul! ~ Charles Dickens,
27:Poor Dick was dead! ~ Charles Dickens,
28:the winds of winter ~ Charles Dickens,
29:What does it matter ~ Charles Dickens,
30:I am saying nothing. ~ Charles Dickens,
31:perennially hopeless ~ Charles Dickens,
32:Well! And hallo you! ~ Charles Dickens,
33:Are there no prisons? ~ Charles Dickens,
34:Change begets change. ~ Charles Dickens,
35:demi-heure, palpitant ~ Charles Dickens,
36:Good day, citizeness. ~ Charles Dickens,
37:Keep my memory green. ~ Charles Dickens,
38:The elder Miss Larkin ~ Charles Dickens,
39:A most malicious cough ~ Charles Dickens,
40:The law is a ass, Sir! ~ Charles Dickens,
41:We are so very 'umble. ~ Charles Dickens,
42:Friendship? Yes Please. ~ Charles Dickens,
43:People must be amuthed. ~ Charles Dickens,
44:than any communications ~ Charles Dickens,
45:El manuscrito de un loco ~ Charles Dickens,
46:Este imbécil es mi jefe. ~ Charles Dickens,
47:God bless us, every one! ~ Charles Dickens,
48:Blind, blind, blind . . . ~ Charles Dickens,
49:Eccentricities of genius. ~ Charles Dickens,
50:It was the best of times, ~ Charles Dickens,
51:Something Wrong Somewhere ~ Charles Dickens,
52:This refection of oysters ~ Charles Dickens,
53:Book the First—Recalled to ~ Charles Dickens,
54:CHAPTER XXI THE EXPEDITION ~ Charles Dickens,
55:Least said, soonest mended ~ Charles Dickens,
56:this is my landlord, Krook ~ Charles Dickens,
57:Halloa!" the guard replied. ~ Charles Dickens,
58:I only ask for information. ~ Charles Dickens,
59:Lord, keep my memory green. ~ Charles Dickens,
60:the mangle in the laundry.  ~ Charles Dickens,
61:The years glide by silently ~ Charles Dickens,
62:twenty miles of the sea. My ~ Charles Dickens,
63:A good thing can't be cruel. ~ Charles Dickens,
64:Bah!" said Scrooge, "Humbug! ~ Charles Dickens,
65:Bah," said Scrooge, "Humbug. ~ Charles Dickens,
66:CHAPTER XLV THE TRUSTY AGENT ~ Charles Dickens,
67:(herself in the family-way), ~ Charles Dickens,
68:Joe gave me some more gravy. ~ Charles Dickens,
69:The law is an ass, an idiot. ~ Charles Dickens,
70:we had everything before us, ~ Charles Dickens,
71:Depth answers only to depth . ~ Charles Dickens,
72:PREFACE TO THE 1857 EDITION I ~ Charles Dickens,
73:Pride is not all of one kind. ~ Charles Dickens,
74:There never was such a goose. ~ Charles Dickens,
75:Trifles make the sum of life. ~ Charles Dickens,
76:You cannot stain a black coat ~ Charles Dickens,
77:CHAPTER LX CHIEFLY MATRIMONIAL ~ Charles Dickens,
78:Clara, are you a perfect fool? ~ Charles Dickens,
79:Discipline must be maintained. ~ Charles Dickens,
80:He would make a lovely corpse. ~ Charles Dickens,
81:If she wounds you, love her... ~ Charles Dickens,
82:Please, sir, I want some more. ~ Charles Dickens,
83:sweeping out of shops, and the ~ Charles Dickens,
84:Your sister Betsey Trotwood... ~ Charles Dickens,
85:Book the First—Recalled to Life ~ Charles Dickens,
86:CHAPTER L MR. TOOTS’S COMPLAINT ~ Charles Dickens,
87:Facts alone are wanted in life. ~ Charles Dickens,
88:Have a heart that never hardens ~ Charles Dickens,
89:London was decidedly overrated. ~ Charles Dickens,
90:Marley was dead: to begin with. ~ Charles Dickens,
91:Ten minutes, good, past eleven. ~ Charles Dickens,
92:you are lost dream of my soul.. ~ Charles Dickens,
93:bad lobster in a dark cellar. It ~ Charles Dickens,
94:CHAPTER L THE PURSUIT AND ESCAPE ~ Charles Dickens,
95:CHAPTER XLVII FATAL CONSEQUENCES ~ Charles Dickens,
96:If I felt less, I could do more. ~ Charles Dickens,
97:Oliver Twist has asked for more! ~ Charles Dickens,
98:streets, came nearer and nearer. ~ Charles Dickens,
99:We must scrunch or be scrunched. ~ Charles Dickens,
100:APPENDIX 1 DICKENS AND CRUIKSHANK ~ Charles Dickens,
101:Baf!" diris Scrooge. "Sensencaĵo! ~ Charles Dickens,
102:I must bear it, if you let it in. ~ Charles Dickens,
103:My life is one demd horrid grind. ~ Charles Dickens,
104:purpose of having his nose pulled ~ Charles Dickens,
105:You've got the key of the street. ~ Charles Dickens,
106:Boys are very like men to be sure. ~ Charles Dickens,
107:CHAPTER XLVIII THE FLIGHT OF SIKES ~ Charles Dickens,
108:I ate 'umble pie with an appetite. ~ Charles Dickens,
109:I wear the chain I forged in life, ~ Charles Dickens,
110:Love is not a feeling to pass away ~ Charles Dickens,
111:A new heart for a New Year, always! ~ Charles Dickens,
112:CHAPTER XLI NEW VOICES IN THE WAVES ~ Charles Dickens,
113:(comparatively) to so few!3 It used ~ Charles Dickens,
114:Death is a mighty, universal truth. ~ Charles Dickens,
115:Grief never mended no broken bones. ~ Charles Dickens,
116:have you taken leave of your senses ~ Charles Dickens,
117:I shall always tell you everything. ~ Charles Dickens,
118:I wear the chains I forged in life. ~ Charles Dickens,
119:Reflect upon your present blessings ~ Charles Dickens,
120:Time and tide will wait for no man, ~ Charles Dickens,
121:To a young heart everything is fun. ~ Charles Dickens,
122:A loving heart is the truest wisdom. ~ Charles Dickens,
123:Are tears the dewdrops of the heart? ~ Charles Dickens,
124:Heaven suits the back to the burden. ~ Charles Dickens,
125:Keep up appearances whatever you do. ~ Charles Dickens,
126:my brother's cognac and tobacco talk ~ Charles Dickens,
127:The American woman is a monstrosity. ~ Charles Dickens,
128:We forge the chains we wear in life. ~ Charles Dickens,
129:Why then we should drop into poetry. ~ Charles Dickens,
130:A demd, damp, moist, unpleasant body! ~ Charles Dickens,
131:and I fancied I was little Pip again. ~ Charles Dickens,
132:Brag is good dog, holdfast is better! ~ Charles Dickens,
133:but such is the wisdom of simplicity! ~ Charles Dickens,
134:Every man thinks his own geese swans. ~ Charles Dickens,
135:Go and be somethingological directly. ~ Charles Dickens,
136:Light 'em up again!' said Mr Meagles. ~ Charles Dickens,
137:People must be amuthed." - Mr. Sleary ~ Charles Dickens,
138:So he whistles it off, and marches on ~ Charles Dickens,
139:the sight of me is good for sore eyes ~ Charles Dickens,
140:tumbril on his way to the Guillotine. ~ Charles Dickens,
141:varieties of sunken cheek, cadaverous ~ Charles Dickens,
142:with a most intent and searching gaze ~ Charles Dickens,
143:A man must take the fat with the lean. ~ Charles Dickens,
144:CHAPTER LII THE JEW’S LAST NIGHT ALIVE ~ Charles Dickens,
145:Dumb as a drum vith a hole in it, sir. ~ Charles Dickens,
146:...he walked up and down through life. ~ Charles Dickens,
147:I distress you; I draw fast to an end. ~ Charles Dickens,
148:If he's a change, give me a constancy. ~ Charles Dickens,
149:I think I know the delights of freedom ~ Charles Dickens,
150:Make the betht of uth; not the wurtht! ~ Charles Dickens,
151:Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail. ~ Charles Dickens,
152:some evil old ruffian of a Dog-stealer ~ Charles Dickens,
153:Temple Bar was hundreds of miles away, ~ Charles Dickens,
154:We need never be ashamed of our tears. ~ Charles Dickens,
155:a lady with such a genius for dreaming! ~ Charles Dickens,
156:A multitude of people and yet solitude. ~ Charles Dickens,
157:diğer saatler kadardı onun da süresi... ~ Charles Dickens,
158:I hope you care to be recalled to life? ~ Charles Dickens,
159:The beer has reminded me that I forgot. ~ Charles Dickens,
160:There is no doubt that Marley was dead. ~ Charles Dickens,
161:There wasn't room to swing a cat there. ~ Charles Dickens,
162:Walk and be Happy, Walk and be Healthy. ~ Charles Dickens,
163:Would it be weakness to return my love? ~ Charles Dickens,
164:You are in every line I have ever read. ~ Charles Dickens,
165:A word in earnest is as good as a speech ~ Charles Dickens,
166:Darkness is cheap, and Scrooge liked it. ~ Charles Dickens,
167:Death is Nature's remedy for all things, ~ Charles Dickens,
168:Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death! ~ Charles Dickens,
169:Marley’s Ghost bothered him exceedingly. ~ Charles Dickens,
170:meet me. He was delighted to see me, and ~ Charles Dickens,
171:Novelties please less than they impress. ~ Charles Dickens,
172:You have been the last dream of my soul. ~ Charles Dickens,
173:Your voice and music are the same to me. ~ Charles Dickens,
174:A multitude of people and yet a solitude. ~ Charles Dickens,
175:A word in earnest is as good as a speech. ~ Charles Dickens,
176:Come up and be dead! Come up and be dead! ~ Charles Dickens,
177:Darkness was cheap, and Scrooge liked it. ~ Charles Dickens,
178:Dear, gentle, patient, noble Nell . . . . ~ Charles Dickens,
179:Evil communications corrupt good manners. ~ Charles Dickens,
180:In life I was your partner, Jacob Marley. ~ Charles Dickens,
181:I shall be there before the commencement. ~ Charles Dickens,
182:It's as well to be kind whenever one can; ~ Charles Dickens,
183:Once a gentleman, and always a gentleman. ~ Charles Dickens,
184:Then I'm sorry to say, I've eat your pie. ~ Charles Dickens,
185:Veels vithin veels, a prison in a prison. ~ Charles Dickens,
186:What greater gift than the love of a cat. ~ Charles Dickens,
187:Anything to vary this detestable monotony. ~ Charles Dickens,
188:domino, and mixes with the masquers.' 'And ~ Charles Dickens,
189:Let me feel now what sharp distress I may. ~ Charles Dickens,
190:Never sign a valentine with your own name. ~ Charles Dickens,
191:The journey has been its own reward. That, ~ Charles Dickens,
192:There might be some credit in being jolly. ~ Charles Dickens,
193:What do you say, Tom?" They both listened. ~ Charles Dickens,
194:You have been in every line I ever read... ~ Charles Dickens,
195:A faithful dependent, I overlook his folly. ~ Charles Dickens,
196:Circumstances beyond my individual control. ~ Charles Dickens,
197:Foul weather didn't know where to have him. ~ Charles Dickens,
198:He was bolder in the daylight-most men are. ~ Charles Dickens,
199:Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one. ~ Charles Dickens,
200:Nothing of what is nobly done is ever lost. ~ Charles Dickens,
201:ostentatious hypocrisy awakens our disgust. ~ Charles Dickens,
202:There's more gravy than of grave about you? ~ Charles Dickens,
203:The world has narrowed to these dimensions, ~ Charles Dickens,
204:A boy's story is the best that is ever told. ~ Charles Dickens,
205:All partings foreshadow the great final one. ~ Charles Dickens,
206:Fairy-land to visit, but a desert to live in ~ Charles Dickens,
207:I assumed my first undivided responsibility. ~ Charles Dickens,
208:Mr. Dombey and the world are alone together. ~ Charles Dickens,
209:Polly put the kettle on, we'll all have tea. ~ Charles Dickens,
210:these memoirs would never have appeared; or, ~ Charles Dickens,
211:Yours is a long life to look back upon, sir? ~ Charles Dickens,
212:You should keep dogs-fine animals-sagacious. ~ Charles Dickens,
213:Ask no questions, and you'll be told no lies. ~ Charles Dickens,
214:Bolje je i nemati oči nego ih imati tako zle! ~ Charles Dickens,
215:Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is a better. ~ Charles Dickens,
216:In effect," madame struck in, looking up from ~ Charles Dickens,
217:Of little worth as life is when we misuse it, ~ Charles Dickens,
218:pero convencidos de que van a ser felices. Es ~ Charles Dickens,
219:Philosophers are only men in armor after all. ~ Charles Dickens,
220:We'll start to forget a place once we left it ~ Charles Dickens,
221:You have been in every line I have ever read. ~ Charles Dickens,
222:above it! But, if the spirits of the Dead ever ~ Charles Dickens,
223:A boy with Somebody-else's pork pie! Stop him! ~ Charles Dickens,
224:And what about the cash, my existence's jewel? ~ Charles Dickens,
225:APPENDIX A PREFACE TO THE CHEAP EDITION (1858) ~ Charles Dickens,
226:A very little key will open a very heavy door. ~ Charles Dickens,
227:Let us be moral. Let us contemplate existence. ~ Charles Dickens,
228:Scattered wits take a long time in picking up. ~ Charles Dickens,
229:Some people are nobody's enemies but their own ~ Charles Dickens,
230:The house is a ruin, and the rats fly from it. ~ Charles Dickens,
231:There were a king with a large jaw and a queen ~ Charles Dickens,
232:with a sharp nose like a sharp autumn evening, ~ Charles Dickens,
233:...a gallon of condescension, upon everybody... ~ Charles Dickens,
234:confiscation, had made provident remittances to ~ Charles Dickens,
235:Drive him fast to his tomb. This, from Jacques. ~ Charles Dickens,
236:Eugene, Eugene, Eugene, this is a bad business! ~ Charles Dickens,
237:Hechos...Dadme realidades, y únicamente hechos. ~ Charles Dickens,
238:I blame Charles Dickens for the death of my father'. ~ John Boyne,
239:Love is in all things a most wonderful teacher, ~ Charles Dickens,
240:Love is in all things a most wonderful teacher. ~ Charles Dickens,
241:Make them laugh, make them cry, make them wait. ~ Charles Dickens,
242:Poverty and oysters always seem to go together. ~ Charles Dickens,
243:Regrets are the natural property of grey hairs. ~ Charles Dickens,
244:Surprises, like misfortunes, seldom come alone. ~ Charles Dickens,
245:The bright day is done and we are for the dark. ~ Charles Dickens,
246:Them which is of other naturs thinks different. ~ Charles Dickens,
247:[T]he wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile. ~ Charles Dickens,
248:APPENDIX 4 THE THIEVES’ LANGUAGE IN OLIVER TWIST ~ Charles Dickens,
249:I don't want to know anything. I am not curious! ~ Charles Dickens,
250:I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free. ~ Charles Dickens,
251:I only ask to be free, the butterflies are free. ~ Charles Dickens,
252:I stole her heart away and put ice in its place. ~ Charles Dickens,
253:Life is made of so many partings welded together ~ Charles Dickens,
254:No rest, no peace. Incessant torture of remorse. ~ Charles Dickens,
255:The picturesque doctor's daughter, Miss Manette. ~ Charles Dickens,
256:There was a moral infection of clap-trap in him. ~ Charles Dickens,
257:To be the hero of my life or forever its victim. ~ Charles Dickens,
258:Try to think not; and ’twill seem better.’ ‘I’ve ~ Charles Dickens,
259:Who am I, for God's sake, that I should be kind! ~ Charles Dickens,
260:You deepen the injury. It is sufficient already. ~ Charles Dickens,
261:A contented spirit is the sweetness of existence. ~ Charles Dickens,
262:A loving heart is the truest wisdom. —Charles Dickens ~ Marie Force,
263:Change begets change. Nothing propagates so fast. ~ Charles Dickens,
264:Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him. ~ Charles Dickens,
265:She must have made Joe Gargery marry her by hand. ~ Charles Dickens,
266:Tell the Wind and the Fire where to stop; not me. ~ Charles Dickens,
267:They seemed so like the rats he had seen outside. ~ Charles Dickens,
268:'Tis love that makes the world go round, my baby. ~ Charles Dickens,
269:what wind blows you here? nit an ill wind, I hope ~ Charles Dickens,
270:Will you never understand that I am incorrigible? ~ Charles Dickens,
271:Yes, sir,” said I; “him too; late of this parish. ~ Charles Dickens,
272:But she never was polite unless there was company. ~ Charles Dickens,
273:En cuanto a todo lo demás…, lo que ha de ser será. ~ Charles Dickens,
274:For my love was founded on a rock, and it endures! ~ Charles Dickens,
275:Have I ever sought release?” “In words. No. Never. ~ Charles Dickens,
276:I must do something or I shall wear my heart away. ~ Charles Dickens,
277:In love of home, the love of country has its rise. ~ Charles Dickens,
278:It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back. ~ Charles Dickens,
279:it was the best of times it was the worst of times ~ Charles Dickens,
280:Money can't buy a happy life, or a peaceful death. ~ Charles Dickens,
281:Our love had begun in folly, and ended in madness! ~ Charles Dickens,
282:There seems a magic in the very name of Christmas. ~ Charles Dickens,
283:Those were drinking days, and most men drank hard. ~ Charles Dickens,
284:Time, consoler of affliction and softener of anger ~ Charles Dickens,
285:Try to think not; and ’twill seem better.’   ‘I’ve ~ Charles Dickens,
286:Yeniden dirilecek olsan ayvayı yerdin valla Jerry. ~ Charles Dickens,
287:A day wasted on others is not wasted on one's self. ~ Charles Dickens,
288:Couldn't something temporary be done with a teapot? ~ Charles Dickens,
289:Customer: Did Charles Dickens ever write anything fun? ~ Jen Campbell,
290:Get out of this office! I'll have no feelings here. ~ Charles Dickens,
291:He did each single thing as if he did nothing else. ~ Charles Dickens,
292:Home is a word stronger than a magician ever spoke. ~ Charles Dickens,
293:Take a little timecount five-and-twenty,Tattycoram. ~ Charles Dickens,
294:That sprung up between us.  You are not truly happy ~ Charles Dickens,
295:There is prodigious strength in sorrow and despair. ~ Charles Dickens,
296:Vices are sometimes only virtues carried to excess! ~ Charles Dickens,
297:What the Devil, I say again!" exclaimed the gaoler, ~ Charles Dickens,
298:Accidents will occur in the best regulated families. ~ Charles Dickens,
299:All that is loathsome, drooping, or decayed is here. ~ Charles Dickens,
300:A Merry Christmas to us all, my dears. God bless us! ~ Charles Dickens,
301:But the mere truth won't do. You must have a lawyer. ~ Charles Dickens,
302:Cada fracaso enseña algo que se necesitaba aprender. ~ Charles Dickens,
303:Hear me!", cried the Ghost. "My time is nearly gone. ~ Charles Dickens,
304:He did each single thing, as if he did nothing else. ~ Charles Dickens,
305:I must do something or I shall wear my heart away... ~ Charles Dickens,
306:It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. ~ Charles Dickens,
307:Oh self, self, self! At every turn nothing but self! ~ Charles Dickens,
308:Time does his work honestly, and I don't mind him. A ~ Charles Dickens,
309:We never tire of the friendships we form with books. ~ Charles Dickens,
310:You'll find us rough, sir, but you'll find us ready. ~ Charles Dickens,
311:A Companion Picture XII. The Fellow of Delicacy XIII. ~ Charles Dickens,
312:Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door. ~ Charles Dickens,
313:Hours are golden links--God's tokens reaching heaven. ~ Charles Dickens,
314:It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home. ~ Charles Dickens,
315:Money and goods are certainly the best of references. ~ Charles Dickens,
316:No amount of regret can make up for a lifetime lost". ~ Charles Dickens,
317:Poetry makes life what lights and music do the stage. ~ Charles Dickens,
318:Ride on! Ride on over all obstacles and win the race. ~ Charles Dickens,
319:We can refute assertions, but who can refute silence? ~ Charles Dickens,
320:When the French come over, May we meet them at Dover! ~ Charles Dickens,
321:Ah me!" said he, "what might have been is not what is! ~ Charles Dickens,
322:And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us, Every One! ~ Charles Dickens,
323:a smattering of everything, and a knowledge of nothing ~ Charles Dickens,
324:at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards IX. The Game Made X. ~ Charles Dickens,
325:Champagne is simply one of the elegant extras of life. ~ Charles Dickens,
326:Days XIX. An Opinion XX. A Plea XXI. Echoing Footsteps ~ Charles Dickens,
327:He did each single thing as if he did nothing else.
   ~ Charles Dickens,
328:I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart ~ Charles Dickens,
329:I fear not yet. It would be dangerous for Charles yet. ~ Charles Dickens,
330:I found your nose... It was in my business again.. ( : ~ Charles Dickens,
331:It’s humbug still!” said Scrooge. “I won’t believe it. ~ Charles Dickens,
332:It was the best of times, it was the worst of times... ~ Charles Dickens,
333:Keep still, you little devil, or I'll cut your throat! ~ Charles Dickens,
334:Life is made of ever so many partings welded together. ~ Charles Dickens,
335:life is made of ever so many partings welded together, ~ Charles Dickens,
336:No eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark master! ~ Charles Dickens,
337:Once out of this court, I'll smash that face of yourn! ~ Charles Dickens,
338:Triumph VII. A Knock at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards ~ Charles Dickens,
339:we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, ~ Charles Dickens,
340:You can be nothing better than yourself; be that [...] ~ Charles Dickens,
341:You speak so feelingly and so manfully, Charles Darnay ~ Charles Dickens,
342:Anything that makes a noise is satisfactory to a crowd. ~ Charles Dickens,
343:A smattering of everything, and a knowledge of nothing. ~ Charles Dickens,
344:But they’re always a-bringing up some new law or other. ~ Charles Dickens,
345:Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The ~ Charles Dickens,
346:God bless us every one! said Tiny Tim, the last of all. ~ Charles Dickens,
347:I cannot rest, I cannot stay, I cannot linger anywhere. ~ Charles Dickens,
348:It is the most miserable thing to feel ashamed at home. ~ Charles Dickens,
349:It is the most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home. ~ Charles Dickens,
350:It was the best of times,
it was the worst of times, ~ Charles Dickens,
351:My advice is, never do to-morrow what you can do to-day ~ Charles Dickens,
352:Oh indeed! Our and the Wilfers' Mutual Friend, my dear. ~ Charles Dickens,
353:Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock Book the Third— ~ Charles Dickens,
354:We count by changes and events within us. Not by years. ~ Charles Dickens,
355:Yet the room was all in all to me, Estella being in it. ~ Charles Dickens,
356:ain't yet as Fash'nable as I may come to be. Henerietty, ~ Charles Dickens,
357:Demon—with the highest respect for you—behold your work! ~ Charles Dickens,
358:I am not old, but my young way was never the way to age. ~ Charles Dickens,
359:it's not personal; it's professional: only professional. ~ Charles Dickens,
360:it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, ~ Charles Dickens,
361:it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, ~ Charles Dickens,
362:shaggy wrapper, flapping hat, and muddy legs, was rather ~ Charles Dickens,
363:Such is hope, heaven's own gift to struggling mortals... ~ Charles Dickens,
364:Take the pencil and write under my name, 'I forgive her. ~ Charles Dickens,
365:the public ways were haunted rather than frequented; and ~ Charles Dickens,
366:Tú apareces en todas las líneas que he leído en mi vida. ~ Charles Dickens,
367:we have done wrong, and are reaping the fruits of wrong. ~ Charles Dickens,
368:What is detestable in a pig is more detestable in a boy. ~ Charles Dickens,
369:a spectacle of imbecility only to be equalled by himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
370:Blustering assertion goes for proof, half over the world. ~ Charles Dickens,
371:. . .for in natures, as in seas, depth answers unto depth ~ Charles Dickens,
372:growlery. When I am out of humour, I come and growl here. ~ Charles Dickens,
373:His own heart laughed: and that was quite enough for him. ~ Charles Dickens,
374:If nothing worse than Ale happens to us, we are well off. ~ Charles Dickens,
375:Mr F.'s Aunt, who had eaten her pie with great solemnity, ~ Charles Dickens,
376:My guiding star always is, Get hold of portable property. ~ Charles Dickens,
377:The Gorgon's Head X. Two Promises XI. A Companion Picture ~ Charles Dickens,
378:Then tell Wind and Fire where to stop, but don't tell me. ~ Charles Dickens,
379:There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart. ~ Charles Dickens,
380:This is a world of action, and not moping and droning in. ~ Charles Dickens,
381:Uriah gave a kind of snivel. I think to express sympathy. ~ Charles Dickens,
382:We are very glad to see you, Oliver, very,' said the Jew. ~ Charles Dickens,
383:whom they knew in life, I believe that the shade of Agnes ~ Charles Dickens,
384:Ahol minden tette megméretik, a szíve is jónak találtatik. ~ Charles Dickens,
385:captain said and did was honestly according to his nature; ~ Charles Dickens,
386:Conscience is a dreadful thing when it accuses man or boy; ~ Charles Dickens,
387:Don't you think that any secret course is an unworthy one? ~ Charles Dickens,
388:EXPLANATORY NOTES A NOTE ON THE TOPOGRAPHY OF OLIVER TWIST ~ Charles Dickens,
389:Foggier yet, and colder! Piercing, searching, biting cold. ~ Charles Dickens,
390:lágrimas, porque son la lluvia que limpia el cegador polvo ~ Charles Dickens,
391:le robé su corazón para sustituirlo por un trozo de hielo. ~ Charles Dickens,
392:Love was made on these occasions in the form of bracelets; ~ Charles Dickens,
393:Made X. The Substance of the Shadow XI. Dusk XII. Darkness ~ Charles Dickens,
394:The last burst carried the mail to the summit of the hill. ~ Charles Dickens,
395:would hover there like shadows from a great magic lantern. ~ Charles Dickens,
396:Ah, if only I had brought a cigar with me! This would have ~ Charles Dickens,
397:Do not close your heart against all my efforts to help you. ~ Charles Dickens,
398:Footsteps XXII. The Sea Still Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. ~ Charles Dickens,
399:him to sea. The board, in imitation of so wise and salutary ~ Charles Dickens,
400:I wished that I had some other guardian of minor abilities. ~ Charles Dickens,
401:Man cannot really improve himself without improving others. ~ Charles Dickens,
402:Permitam que eu lembre como era e traga de volta uma manhã. ~ Charles Dickens,
403:tanto se apasionan con sus errores estas hermosas adivinas. ~ Charles Dickens,
404:The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again. ~ Charles Dickens,
405:There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you ~ Charles Dickens,
406:there was a little too much of the best intentions going on ~ Charles Dickens,
407:They never show mercy because mercy was never shown to them ~ Charles Dickens,
408:Tongue; well that's a wery good thing when it an't a woman. ~ Charles Dickens,
409:Town VIII. Monseigneur in the Country IX. The Gorgon's Head ~ Charles Dickens,
410:Yes, sir!’ from one half.  ‘No, sir!’ from the other.   ‘Of ~ Charles Dickens,
411:Every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last. ~ Charles Dickens,
412:He'd write letters by the ream, if it was a capital offence! ~ Charles Dickens,
413:His was not a lazy trustfulness that hoped, and did no more. ~ Charles Dickens,
414:How can I? Tut, don’t I know?” she added in the same breath, ~ Charles Dickens,
415:If the defendant be a man of straw, who is to pay the costs? ~ Charles Dickens,
416:If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers. ~ Charles Dickens,
417:I have been bent and broken, but I hope into a better shape. ~ Charles Dickens,
418:I have been bent and broken, but—I hope—into a better shape. ~ Charles Dickens,
419:I have been bent and broken, but--I hope--into better shape. ~ Charles Dickens,
420:Master Bates sauntering along with his hands in his pockets; ~ Charles Dickens,
421:Suffer any wrong that can be done you rather than come here! ~ Charles Dickens,
422:The universe makes rather an indifferent parent, I'm afraid. ~ Charles Dickens,
423:Under the guidance of her Christian pastors, she entertained ~ Charles Dickens,
424:various marvels concerning parrots, and mines, and Mexicans, ~ Charles Dickens,
425:Well! And hallo you!" said Jerry, more hoarsely than before. ~ Charles Dickens,
426:Yes. He is quite a good fellow - nobody's enemy but his own. ~ Charles Dickens,
427:chafed the hands that held his arm. "There, there, there! See ~ Charles Dickens,
428:CHAPTER XXX RELATES WHAT OLIVER’S NEW VISITORS THOUGHT OF HIM ~ Charles Dickens,
429:Death has no right to leave him standing, and to mow me down! ~ Charles Dickens,
430:Detestation of the high is the involuntary homage of the low. ~ Charles Dickens,
431:he could trace his genealogy all the way back to his parents, ~ Charles Dickens,
432:I care for no man on earth, and no man on earth cares for me. ~ Charles Dickens,
433:It had more corners in it than the brain of an obstinate man; ~ Charles Dickens,
434:much, for some time; but, having a contented disposition, and ~ Charles Dickens,
435:No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. Still ~ Charles Dickens,
436:on rock, in gravel, and alluvial mud, under the bright sky of ~ Charles Dickens,
437:On the Rampage, Pip, and off the Rampage, Pip - such is Life! ~ Charles Dickens,
438:Remembrance, like a candle, burns brightest at Christmastime. ~ Charles Dickens,
439:Renunciation remains sorrow, though a sorrow borne willingly. ~ Charles Dickens,
440:Tears are not the only proofs of distress, nor the best ones. ~ Charles Dickens,
441:That I growed up a man and not a beast says something for me. ~ Charles Dickens,
442:The age of chivalry is past. Bores have succeeded to dragons. ~ Charles Dickens,
443:tumbrils of the Revolution. But that Woodman and that Farmer, ~ Charles Dickens,
444:vigorous tenacity of love, always so much stronger than hate, ~ Charles Dickens,
445:Am I that man who lay upon the bed?” he cried, upon his knees. ~ Charles Dickens,
446:And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death. ~ Charles Dickens,
447:I have been bent and broken, but--I hope--into a better shape. ~ Charles Dickens,
448:In Secret II. The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm ~ Charles Dickens,
449:It was fine in the morning, particularly in the fine mornings. ~ Charles Dickens,
450:Mankind is evil in its thoughts and in its base constructions, ~ Charles Dickens,
451:Master Bates sauntering along with his hands in his pockets... ~ Charles Dickens,
452:Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! ~ Charles Dickens,
453:Remember, to the last, that while there is life there is hope. ~ Charles Dickens,
454:They looked at one another, and their hearts died within them. ~ Charles Dickens,
455:Vengeance and retribution require a long time; it is the rule. ~ Charles Dickens,
456:whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read ~ Charles Dickens,
457:eighteen years a secret and unaccused prisoner in the Bastille; ~ Charles Dickens,
458:I only know two sorts of boys. Mealy boys, and beef-faced boys. ~ Charles Dickens,
459:Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own. ~ Charles Dickens,
460:The bearings of this observation lays in the application of it. ~ Charles Dickens,
461:The door is locked then, my friend?" said Mr. Lorry, surprised. ~ Charles Dickens,
462:Todas las fuerzas comprimidas con exceso desgarran y destrozan. ~ Charles Dickens,
463:To love and be loved is life itself without which we are nought ~ Charles Dickens,
464:You don't carry in your countenance a letter of recommendation. ~ Charles Dickens,
465:CHAPTER XX WHEREIN OLIVER IS DELIVERED OVER TO MR. WILLIAM SIKES ~ Charles Dickens,
466:If a pig could give his mind to anything, he would not be a pig. ~ Charles Dickens,
467:I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape. ~ Charles Dickens,
468:I have been bent and broken, but - I hope – into a better shape. ~ Charles Dickens,
469:Industry is the soul of business and the keystone of prosperity. ~ Charles Dickens,
470:in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer VI. Triumph VII. A Knock at the Door ~ Charles Dickens,
471:I wish you to know that you have been the last dream of my soul. ~ Charles Dickens,
472:The mere consciousness of an engagement will worry an entire day ~ Charles Dickens,
473:There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are! ~ Charles Dickens,
474:When the voice stopped, he put his hand over his eyes, murmuring ~ Charles Dickens,
475:Your memory does me more honour than my insignificance deserves. ~ Charles Dickens,
476:a family of such antiquity and importance has a right to a ghost. ~ Charles Dickens,
477:Although I am an old man, night is generally my time for walking. ~ Charles Dickens,
478:Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew. ~ Charles Dickens,
479:CHAPTER XXV WHEREIN THIS HISTORY REVERTS TO MR. FAGIN AND COMPANY ~ Charles Dickens,
480:Come in!” exclaimed the Ghost. “Come in! and know me better, man! ~ Charles Dickens,
481:Fellow of No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. ~ Charles Dickens,
482:He cross-examined his very wine when he had nothing else at hand. ~ Charles Dickens,
483:He paused for a moment before opening a door on the second story. ~ Charles Dickens,
484:I found myself with a perseverance worthy of a much better cause. ~ Charles Dickens,
485:I have been bent and broken,
but––I hope––into a better shape. ~ Charles Dickens,
486:I. In Secret II. The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm ~ Charles Dickens,
487:Joe gave a reproachful cough,as much as to say,"Well,told you so. ~ Charles Dickens,
488:Mr. Dick, give me your hand, for your common sense is invaluable. ~ Charles Dickens,
489:next to Godliness, and some people do the same by their religion. ~ Charles Dickens,
490:no man can expect his children to respect what he degrades.' 'Ha, ~ Charles Dickens,
491:Now, what I want is, Facts. . . . Facts alone are wanted in life. ~ Charles Dickens,
492:One always begins to forgive a place as soon as it's left behind. ~ Charles Dickens,
493:One always begins to forgive a place as soon as it's left behind; ~ Charles Dickens,
494:One always begins to forgive a place as soon as it’s left behind. ~ Charles Dickens,
495:She is the prettiest and most engaging little fairy in the world. ~ Charles Dickens,
496:Tell me, would you seek me out and try to win me now?
Ah, no! ~ Charles Dickens,
497:The beauty of the earth is but a breath, and man is but a shadow. ~ Charles Dickens,
498:The cramped monotony of my existence grinds me away by the grain. ~ Charles Dickens,
499:The first rule of business is: Do other men for they would do you ~ Charles Dickens,
500:A merry Christmas to everybody! A happy New Year to all the world! ~ Charles Dickens,
501:CHAPTER XIX IN WHICH A NOTABLE PLAN IS DISCUSSED AND DETERMINED ON ~ Charles Dickens,
502:CHAPTER XLV NOAH CLAYPOLE IS EMPLOYED BY FAGIN ON A SECRET MISSION ~ Charles Dickens,
503:CHAPTER XXXIX FURTHER ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN EDWARD CUTTLE, MARINER ~ Charles Dickens,
504:He did nothing, but he looked on as few other men could have done. ~ Charles Dickens,
505:How slight a thing will disturb the equanimity of our frail minds! ~ Charles Dickens,
506:Let us take heed how we laugh without reason, lest we cry with it. ~ Charles Dickens,
507:Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human natur. ~ Charles Dickens,
508:The happiness he gives is quite as great, as if it cost a fortune. ~ Charles Dickens,
509:The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again. ~ Charles Dickens, [T5],
510:The worst of all listeners is the man who does nothing but listen. ~ Charles Dickens,
511:We are dreadfully real, Mr Carker,' said Mrs Skewton; 'are we not? ~ Charles Dickens,
512:... as lonesome as a kitten in a wash-house copper with the lid on. ~ Charles Dickens,
513:Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer VI. ~ Charles Dickens,
514:He had but one eye, and the popular prejudice runs in favor of two. ~ Charles Dickens,
515:Nunca somos mais bem enganados, neste mundo, do que por nós mesmos. ~ Charles Dickens,
516:The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer ~ Charles Dickens,
517:These books were a way of escaping from the unhappiness of my life. ~ Charles Dickens,
518:What am I doing? Tearing myself. My usual occupation at most times. ~ Charles Dickens,
519:whom they knew in life, I believe that the shade of Agnes sometimes ~ Charles Dickens,
520:and the sea did what it liked, and what it liked was destruction. It ~ Charles Dickens,
521:cada uno de los seres humanos es un profundo secreto para los demás. ~ Charles Dickens,
522:forasmuch as to entertain any suspicion that they were awake, was to ~ Charles Dickens,
523:Here is a new game,” said Scrooge. “One half hour, Spirit, only one! ~ Charles Dickens,
524:if it were one of unmixed joy and happiness, it would be very brief. ~ Charles Dickens,
525:I had merely announced to her my intention of keeping a man-servant, ~ Charles Dickens,
526:In came the cook, with her brother's particular friend, the milkman. ~ Charles Dickens,
527:It is no small thing, when they, who are so fresh from God, love us. ~ Charles Dickens,
528:I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. ~ Charles Dickens,
529:Let me remember how it used to be, and bring one morning back again. ~ Charles Dickens,
530:No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another. ~ Charles Dickens,
531:Shadow XI. Dusk XII. Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done ~ Charles Dickens,
532:Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human nature . ~ Charles Dickens,
533:Sudden shifts and changes are no bad preparation for political life. ~ Charles Dickens,
534:There are dark shadows on earth, but the lights are always brighter. ~ Charles Dickens,
535:There may be, or there will be. It is the same. What would you have? ~ Charles Dickens,
536:There was something very comfortable in having plenty of stationery. ~ Charles Dickens,
537:The time is came, without bringing with it any relief to my feelings ~ Charles Dickens,
538:Your day is done. Night is coming fast for you." - Nickolas Nickleby ~ Charles Dickens,
539:You touch some of the reasons for my going, not for my staying away. ~ Charles Dickens,
540:Bear in mind then, that Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is a better. ~ Charles Dickens,
541:CHAPTER XL A STRANGE INTERVIEW, WHICH IS A SEQUEL TO THE LAST CHAPTER ~ Charles Dickens,
542:CHAPTER XLIII WHEREIN IS SHOWN HOW THE ARTFUL DODGER GOT INTO TROUBLE ~ Charles Dickens,
543:CHAPTER XXVIII LOOKS, AFTER OLIVER, AND PROCEEDS WITH HIS? ADVENTURES ~ Charles Dickens,
544:¿Cuándo podría despertar su corazón, que ahora estaba mudo y dormido? ~ Charles Dickens,
545:Do all the good you can and make as little fuss about it as possible. ~ Charles Dickens,
546:I always loved that boy as if he'd been my-- my-- my own grandfather. ~ Charles Dickens,
547:Imagine my not letting him sink, as I was his fag!’ said Mr. Tartar.  ~ Charles Dickens,
548:No space of regret can make amends for one life's opportunity misused ~ Charles Dickens,
549:Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all, and infinitely more. ~ Charles Dickens,
550:The last trumpet ever to be sounded shall blow even algebra to wreck. ~ Charles Dickens,
551:There are strings in the human heart that had better not be vibrated. ~ Charles Dickens,
552:There is a wisdom of the head, and... there is a wisdom of the heart. ~ Charles Dickens,
553:There is something in sickness that breaks down the pride of manhood. ~ Charles Dickens,
554:XIX. An Opinion XX. A Plea XXI. Echoing Footsteps XXII. The Sea Still ~ Charles Dickens,
555:All other swindlers upon earth are nothing compared to self-swindlers. ~ Charles Dickens,
556:Consider nothing impossible, then treat possiblities as probabilities. ~ Charles Dickens,
557:I have been bent and broken, but—I hope—into better shape. —Charles Dickens ~ Jamie Beck,
558:It is indeed a much greater thing that I do now than I have ever done. ~ Charles Dickens,
559:MARLEY was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. ~ Charles Dickens,
560:Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. ~ Charles Dickens,
561:She had wilfully done me a deeper injury than I could charge her with. ~ Charles Dickens,
562:Take warning of the consequences of being nobody's enemy but your own. ~ Charles Dickens,
563:The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance ~ Charles Dickens,
564:The one great principle of English law is to make business for itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
565:There is prodigious strength,’ I answered him, ‘in sorrow and despair. ~ Charles Dickens,
566:there was something very comfortable in having plenty of stationery. I ~ Charles Dickens,
567:We umble ones have got eyes, mostly speaking - and we look out of 'em. ~ Charles Dickens,
568:What evidence would you have of my reality beyond that of your senses? ~ Charles Dickens,
569:A dangerous quality, if real; and a not less dangerous one, if feigned. ~ Charles Dickens,
570:A little learning is a dangerous thing, but a little patronage more so. ~ Charles Dickens,
571:(...) and turned his head for an instant to look back at his pursuers'. ~ Charles Dickens,
572:Hand at Cards IX. The Game Made X. The Substance of the Shadow XI. Dusk ~ Charles Dickens,
573:It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations. ~ Charles Dickens,
574:Never close your lips to those whom you have already opened your heart. ~ Charles Dickens,
575:The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance. ~ Charles Dickens,
576:There are strings … in the human heart that had better not be vibrated. ~ Charles Dickens,
577:To have a cricket on the hearth is the luckiest thing in all the world! ~ Charles Dickens,
578:...and to-morrow looked in my face more steadily than I could look at it ~ Charles Dickens,
579:APPENDIX 2 THE PREFACE TO OLIVER TWIST AND THE NEWGATE NOVEL CONTROVERSY ~ Charles Dickens,
580:Great men are seldom over scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire; ~ Charles Dickens,
581:Great men are seldom over-scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire. ~ Charles Dickens,
582:Is it better to have had a good thing and lost it, or never have had it? ~ Charles Dickens,
583:It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. ~ Charles Dickens,
584:I was married then. I was the happiest of the happy." - Esther Summerson ~ Charles Dickens,
585:Knitting Done XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever Book the First—Recalled ~ Charles Dickens,
586:...mysteries arise out of close love, as well as out of wide division... ~ Charles Dickens,
587:Nichts ist besser als ein guter Freund, außer ein Freund mit Schokolade. ~ Charles Dickens,
588:One should never be ashamed to cry. Tears are rain on the dust of earth. ~ Charles Dickens,
589:The men who learn endurance, are they who call the whole world, brother. ~ Charles Dickens,
590:There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts. ~ Charles Dickens,
591:What was the nameless shadow which again in that one instant had passed? ~ Charles Dickens,
592:When I went out, light of day seemed a darker color than when I went in. ~ Charles Dickens,
593:And O
there are days
i this life,
worth life and
worth death ~ Charles Dickens,
594:But he is only stunned by the unvanquishable difficulty of his existence. ~ Charles Dickens,
595:Death may beget life, but oppression can beget nothing other than itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
596:He wouldn't hear of anybody's paying taxes, though he was very patriotic. ~ Charles Dickens,
597:if I should make a mistake, it could never be set right in your lifetime. ~ Charles Dickens,
598:I have remembered Who wept for a parting between the living and the dead. ~ Charles Dickens,
599:Love, though said to be afflicted with blindness, is a vigilant watchman. ~ Charles Dickens,
600:Nobody near me here, but rats, and they are fine stealthy secret fellows. ~ Charles Dickens,
601:Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock Book the Third— ~ Charles Dickens,
602:The mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me. ~ Charles Dickens,
603:There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts. ~ Charles Dickens,
604:There is nothing truer than physiognomy, taken in connection with manner. ~ Charles Dickens,
605:When should I awaken the heart within her that was mute and sleeping now? ~ Charles Dickens,
606:When you drink of the water, don't forget the spring from which it flows. ~ Charles Dickens,
607:And it is not a slight thing when we are loved by those so fresh from God. ~ Charles Dickens,
608:Are not the sane and the insane equal at night as the sane lie a dreaming? ~ Charles Dickens,
609:CHAPTER XXXII OF THE HAPPY LIFE OLIVER BEGAN TO LEAD WITH HIS KIND FRIENDS ~ Charles Dickens,
610:Christmas is a poor excuse every 25th of December to pick a man's pockets. ~ Charles Dickens,
611:Christmas may not bring a single thing; still, it gives me a song to sing. ~ Charles Dickens,
612:For gracious sake, don't talk about Liberty; we have quite enough of that. ~ Charles Dickens,
613:I have been, as the phrase is, liberally educated, and am fit for nothing. ~ Charles Dickens,
614:indeed, I felt almost ashamed to have done so little and have won so much. ~ Charles Dickens,
615:In journeys, as in life, it is a great deal easier to go down hill than up ~ Charles Dickens,
616:It is an old prerogative of kings to govern everything but their passions. ~ Charles Dickens,
617:It is not easy to walk alone in the country without musing upon something. ~ Charles Dickens,
618:Meow says the cat ,quack says the duck , Bow wow wow says the dog ! Grrrr! ~ Charles Dickens,
619:Pip, dear old chap, life is made of ever so many partings welded together, ~ Charles Dickens,
620:...she had grown up highly ornamental, but perfectly helpless and useless. ~ Charles Dickens,
621:There are only two styles of portrait painting: the serious and the smirk. ~ Charles Dickens,
622:There are only two styles of portrait painting; the serious and the smirk. ~ Charles Dickens,
623:There is a man who would give his life to keep a life you love beside you. ~ Charles Dickens,
624:There is no substitute for thoroughgoing, ardent, and sincere earnestness. ~ Charles Dickens,
625:THE TIME ARRIVES FOR NANCY TO REDEEM HER PLEDGE TO ROSE MAYLIE. SHE FAILS. ~ Charles Dickens,
626:And it is not a slight thing when they, who are so fresh from God, love us. ~ Charles Dickens,
627:Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy. ~ Charles Dickens,
628:Door VIII. A Hand at Cards IX. The Game Made X. The Substance of the Shadow ~ Charles Dickens,
629:from the death of each day's hope, another hope sprang up to live tomorrow. ~ Charles Dickens,
630:Hardly anything real in the shop but the leeches, and they are second-hand. ~ Charles Dickens,
631:He had but one eye, and the popular prejudice favour runs in favour of two. ~ Charles Dickens,
632:He saw in Mr Chivery, with some astonishment, quite an Allegory of Silence, ~ Charles Dickens,
633:If I could not walk far and fast, I think I should just explode and perish. ~ Charles Dickens,
634:If the law supposes that,' said Mr Bumble...' the law is an ass - an idiot. ~ Charles Dickens,
635:if you deserve it, and repent in action—not in words. I want no more words. ~ Charles Dickens,
636:Is it better to have had a good thing and lost it, or never to have had it? ~ Charles Dickens,
637:I was a blacksmith's boy but yesterday; I am - what shall I say I am today? ~ Charles Dickens,
638:I work pretty hard for a sufficient living, and therefore – yes, I do well. ~ Charles Dickens,
639:Not that they knew, by name or nature, anything about an Ogre Fact forbid!  ~ Charles Dickens,
640:Poetry's unnat'ral; no man ever talked poetry 'cept a beadle on boxin' day. ~ Charles Dickens,
641:The carpenter's daughter has won a name for herself, and deserved to win it ~ Charles Dickens,
642:the Golden Thread I. Five Years Later II. A Sight III. A Disappointment IV. ~ Charles Dickens,
643:The more man knows of man, the better for the common brotherhood among men. ~ Charles Dickens,
644:The universe, he observed, makes rather an indifferent parent, I am afraid. ~ Charles Dickens,
645:True love believes everything, and bears everything, and trusts everything. ~ Charles Dickens,
646:We must have humbug, we all like humbug, we couldn't get on without humbug. ~ Charles Dickens,
647:¡Calla! No quiero saber nada acerca de las fechas. Que venga pronto contigo. ~ Charles Dickens,
648:Estaba seguro de que su belleza habría sido imposible careciendo de corazón. ~ Charles Dickens,
649:I have not bestowed my tenderness anywhere. I have never had any such thing. ~ Charles Dickens,
650:In the majority of cases, conscience is an elastic and very flexible article ~ Charles Dickens,
651:Perhaps second-hand cares, like second-hand clothes, come easily off and on. ~ Charles Dickens,
652:¡Salga inmediatamente de esta oficina! Aquí no tenemos sentimientos. ¡Fuera! ~ Charles Dickens,
653:She indulged in melancholy, that cheapest and most accessible of luxuries... ~ Charles Dickens,
654:Then tell Wind and Fire where to stop," returned madame; "but don't tell me. ~ Charles Dickens,
655:Then tell Wind and Fire where to stop,” returned madame; “but don’t tell me. ~ Charles Dickens,
656:They don't mind it: its a reg'lar holiday to them - all porter and skittles. ~ Charles Dickens,
657:Tst! Joe!" cried the coachman in a warning voice, looking down from his box. ~ Charles Dickens,
658:was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of ~ Charles Dickens,
659:We think the feelings that are very serious in a man quite comical in a boy. ~ Charles Dickens,
660:what was over couldn't be begun, and what couldn't be cured must be endured; ~ Charles Dickens,
661:Best and happiest of all, the Time before him was his own, to make amends in! ~ Charles Dickens,
662:He may not have money, but he always has what is much better—family, my dear. ~ Charles Dickens,
663:I had a confident expectation that things would come round and be all square. ~ Charles Dickens,
664:Meow says the cat ,quack says the duck , Bow wow wow says the dog !
Grrrr! ~ Charles Dickens,
665:Mr. Scrooge!” said Bob; “I’ll give you Mr. Scrooge, the Founder of the Feast! ~ Charles Dickens,
666:No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of it to anyone else. ~ Charles Dickens,
667:Remember how strong we are in our happiness and how weak he is in his misery! ~ Charles Dickens,
668:REMEMBER HOW STRONG WE ARE IN OUR HAPPINESS, AND HOW WEAK HE IS IN IS MISERY! ~ Charles Dickens,
669:There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose. ~ Charles Dickens,
670:to Life I. The Period II. The Mail III. The Night Shadows IV. The Preparation ~ Charles Dickens,
671:We made no more provision for growing older, than we did for growing younger. ~ Charles Dickens,
672:XXII. The Sea Still Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock ~ Charles Dickens,
673:although Sydney Carton would never be a lion, he was an amazingly good jackal, ~ Charles Dickens,
674:A man ain't got no right to be a public man, unless he meets the public views. ~ Charles Dickens,
675:Como si yo les pidiera por favor que se dedicaran a hacerme la vida imposible. ~ Charles Dickens,
676:general benevolence was one of the leading features of the Pickwickian theory, ~ Charles Dickens,
677:Her contempt for me was so strong, that it became infectious, and I caught it. ~ Charles Dickens,
678:I'll bring him to you in one minute, sir,' replied Mrs. Mann. 'Here, you Dick! ~ Charles Dickens,
679:I'm a devil at a quick mistake, and when I make one it takes the form of Lead. ~ Charles Dickens,
680:It’s like a Charles Dickens orphanage collided with a furniture-store showroom. ~ Craig Schaefer,
681:Never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. ~ Charles Dickens,
682:She led me to believe we will going fast because her thoughts were going fast. ~ Charles Dickens,
683:The habit of paying compliments kept a man's tongue oiled without any expense. ~ Charles Dickens,
684:There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast. ~ Charles Dickens,
685:Third—the Track of a Storm I. In Secret II. The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. ~ Charles Dickens,
686:And so, as Tiny Tim said, 'A Merry Christmas to us all; God bless us, everyone! ~ Charles Dickens,
687:Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen six, result happiness. ~ Charles Dickens,
688:As to forming any plan for the future, I could as soon have formed an elephant. ~ Charles Dickens,
689:Commence,” was Monsieur Defarge’s not unreasonable reply, “at the commencement. ~ Charles Dickens,
690:He couldn't be a doctor, or he would have a quieter and more persuasive manner. ~ Charles Dickens,
691:I am not at all respectable, and I don't want to be. Odd perhaps, but so it is! ~ Charles Dickens,
692:In this brief life our ours, it is sad to do almost anything for the last time. ~ Charles Dickens,
693:It's all very true! It's a weakness to be so affectionate, but I can't help it. ~ Charles Dickens,
694:It would be impossible to get on anywhere, in America, without a rocking-chair. ~ Charles Dickens,
695:My meaning is, that no man can expect his children to respect what he degrades. ~ Charles Dickens,
696:... she indulged in melancholy - that cheapest and most accessible of luxuries. ~ Charles Dickens,
697:Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule. ~ Charles Dickens,
698:There is nothing so strong or safe in an emergency of life as the simple truth. ~ Charles Dickens,
699:The Shoemaker Book the Second—the Golden Thread I. Five Years Later II. A Sight ~ Charles Dickens,
700:Whitewash on the forehead hardens the brain into a state of obstinacy, perhaps. ~ Charles Dickens,
701:An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
702:Blažene žene: one nikad ništa ne rade dopola. One uvijek u sve unose svu strast. ~ Charles Dickens,
703:Bless those women; they never do anything by halves. They are always in earnest. ~ Charles Dickens,
704:Cleanliness is next to Godliness, and some people do the same by their religion. ~ Charles Dickens,
705:Don’t let your sober face elate you, however; you don’t know what it may come to ~ Charles Dickens,
706:El sufrimiento me ha roto y me ha doblegado, pero espero que me haya hecho mejor ~ Charles Dickens,
707:He is going to pay the forfeit: it will be paid in five minutes more. Let him be ~ Charles Dickens,
708:he was particular in stipulating that if I were not received with cordiality, or ~ Charles Dickens,
709:I am light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a schoolboy ~ Charles Dickens,
710:if the world go wrong, it was, in some off-hand manner, never meant to go right. ~ Charles Dickens,
711:is questionable whether any man quite relishes being mistaken for any other man; ~ Charles Dickens,
712:Neither clock nor weather-glass is ever right; but we believe in both, devoutly. ~ Charles Dickens,
713:Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, are all very good words for the lips. ~ Charles Dickens,
714:Spring is the time of year when it is summer in the sun and winter in the shade. ~ Charles Dickens,
715:Think! I've got enough to do, and little enough to get for it, without thinking. ~ Charles Dickens,
716:Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. Still Knitting XVII. One Night XVIII. Nine Days XIX. ~ Charles Dickens,
717:An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
718:Blunt tools are are sometimes found of use, where sharper instruments would fail. ~ Charles Dickens,
719:¿Dónde han quedado los adornos de mi alma? ¿Dónde los sentimientos de mi corazón? ~ Charles Dickens,
720:Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. ~ Charles Dickens,
721:It's in vain to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present. ~ Charles Dickens,
722:Life is pounds, shillings, and pence...Death is not pounds, shillings, and pence. ~ Charles Dickens,
723:Man is but mortal; and there is a point beyond which human courage cannot extend. ~ Charles Dickens,
724:Sir Leicester leans back in his chair, and breathlessly ejaculates, "Good heaven! ~ Charles Dickens,
725:There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast. ~ Charles Dickens,
726:Toor rul lol loo, gammon and spinnage, the frog he wouldn't, and high cockolorum, ~ Charles Dickens,
727:When a plunge is to be made into the water, it's of no use lingering on the bank. ~ Charles Dickens,
728:You didn’t take your wife p. 59for fast and for loose; but for better for worse.  ~ Charles Dickens,
729:Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever ~ Charles Dickens,
730:Hay que tomar las cosas como vienen; eso es lo que tenemos que hacer en esta vida. ~ Charles Dickens,
731:It's a gloomy thing, however, to talk about one's own past, with the day breaking. ~ Charles Dickens,
732:I went home, with new matters for my thoughts, though with no relief from the old. ~ Charles Dickens,
733:La paz y el reposo de los domingos reinaba en todas partes, excepto en mi corazón. ~ Charles Dickens,
734:Missionaries are perfect nuisances and leave every place worse than they found it. ~ Charles Dickens,
735:Old Marley was dead as a doornail... The wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile. ~ Charles Dickens,
736:People like us don't go out at night cause people like them see us for what we are ~ Charles Dickens,
737:—¿Por qué no lloras ahora, pequeño miserable?
—Porque no lloraré más por usted ~ Charles Dickens,
738:The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none. ~ Charles Dickens,
739:...[their] children were not growing up or being brought up, but were tumbling up. ~ Charles Dickens,
740:Track of a Storm I. In Secret II. The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm ~ Charles Dickens,
741:V. The Jackal VI. Hundreds of People VII. Monseigneur in Town VIII. Monseigneur in ~ Charles Dickens,
742:Your sex have such a surprising animosity against one another, when you do differ. ~ Charles Dickens,
743:CHAPTER XVI RELATES WHAT BECAME OF OLIVER TWIST, AFTER HE HAD BEEN CLAIMED BY NANCY ~ Charles Dickens,
744:For Evil often stops short at itself and dies with the doer of it; but Good, never. ~ Charles Dickens,
745:If you have a suspicion in your own breast, keep that suspicion in your own breast. ~ Charles Dickens,
746:Let no man talk of murderers escaping justice, and hint that providence must sleep. ~ Charles Dickens,
747:Mr. Perkins’s sister is married to a baronet, Sir Giles Bacon, of Hogwash, Norfolk. ~ Charles Dickens,
748:Mr. Pickwick was a philosopher, but philosophers are only men in armour, after all. ~ Charles Dickens,
749:No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another. —CHARLES DICKENS ~ Crystal Paine,
750:Perhaps the good Samaritan was lean and lank, and found it hard to live. Who knows! ~ Charles Dickens,
751:Spring is the time of the year when it is summer in the sun and winter in the shade ~ Charles Dickens,
752:The mice have gnawed at it, and sharper teeth than teeth of mice have gnawed at me. ~ Charles Dickens,
753:There are many things which I might have derived good, by which I have not profited ~ Charles Dickens,
754:-Why don't you cry again, you little wretch? -Because I'll never cry for you again. ~ Charles Dickens,
755:You are to be in all things regulated and governed,’ said the gentleman, ‘by fact.  ~ Charles Dickens,
756:You comfort me so much! I am so ignorant. Am I to kiss you now? Is the moment come? ~ Charles Dickens,
757:But the words she spoke of Mrs Harris, lambs could not forgive ... nor worms forget. ~ Charles Dickens,
758:could not have seemed to myself further from my hopes when I was nearest to her. The ~ Charles Dickens,
759:Do the wise thing and the kind thing too, and make the best of us and not the worst. ~ Charles Dickens,
760:Ignoro por qué atesoré aquel jirón de esperanza que se habían de llevar los vientos. ~ Charles Dickens,
761:I have a pretty large experience of boys, and you're a bad set of fellows. Now mind! ~ Charles Dickens,
762:STRONGLY ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE POSITION, THAT THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE IS NOT A RAILWAY ~ Charles Dickens,
763:The Knitting Done XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever Book the First—Recalled to Life ~ Charles Dickens,
764:The most important thing in life is to stop saying 'I wish' and start saying 'I will ~ Charles Dickens,
765:There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor. ~ Charles Dickens,
766:Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches as she does in purple and fine linen. ~ Charles Dickens,
767:Whatsume'er the failings on his part, Remember reader he were that good in his hart. ~ Charles Dickens,
768:Country IX. The Gorgon's Head X. Two Promises XI. A Companion Picture XII. The Fellow ~ Charles Dickens,
769:I ain't took so many year to make a gentleman, not without knowing what's due to him. ~ Charles Dickens,
770:I could settle down into a state of equable low spirits, and resign myself to coffee. ~ Charles Dickens,
771:I'll not leave a handful of that dark hair upon your head, if you lay a finger on me! ~ Charles Dickens,
772:It was a maxim with Foxey- our revered father, gentlemen - 'Always suspect everybody. ~ Charles Dickens,
773:"It wasn't the wine," murmured Mr. Snodgrass, in a broken voice. "It was the salmon." ~ Charles Dickens,
774:it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, ~ Charles Dickens,
775:I was glad to be tenderly remembered, to be gently pitied, not to be quite forgotten. ~ Charles Dickens,
776:Oh!’ said my aunt, ‘I was not aware at first to whom I had the pleasure of objecting. ~ Charles Dickens,
777:Skewered through and through with office-pens, and bound hand and foot with red tape. ~ Charles Dickens,
778:The heavy bell of St. Paul's cathedral rang out, announcing the death of another day. ~ Charles Dickens,
779:there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humour. ~ Charles Dickens,
780:Why, my girl,' cried Mr Meagles, more breathless than before, 'how did you come over? ~ Charles Dickens,
781:Companion Picture XII. The Fellow of Delicacy XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy XIV. The ~ Charles Dickens,
782:Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine. ~ Charles Dickens,
783:He left a trail like a meteor, and everyone finds their own version of Charles Dickens. ~ Claire Tomalin,
784:in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer VI. Triumph VII. A Knock at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards ~ Charles Dickens,
785:Recalled to Life I. The Period II. The Mail III. The Night Shadows IV. The Preparation ~ Charles Dickens,
786:—Si yo estuviera muriéndome, creo que una palabra suya me devolvería a la vida, señor. ~ Charles Dickens,
787:The most important thing in life is to stop saying 'I wish' and start saying 'I will'. ~ Charles Dickens,
788:... The sun does not shine upon this fair earth to meet frowning eyes, depend upon it. ~ Charles Dickens,
789:What I said had nothing to do with you. Why need you go trying on other people's hats? ~ Charles Dickens,
790:-Why don't you cry again, you little wretch?
-Because I'll never cry for you again. ~ Charles Dickens,
791:with a sharp nose like a sharp autumn evening, inclining to be frosty towards the end. ~ Charles Dickens,
792:All of us have wonders hidden in our breasts, only needing circumstances to evoke them. ~ Charles Dickens,
793:Al que renuncia a intentarlo no le queda ya otro recurso que acostarse y dejarse morir. ~ Charles Dickens,
794:CHAPTER XLIV THE TIME ARRIVES, FOR NANCY TO REDEEM HER PLEDGE TO ROSE MAYLIE. SHE FAILS ~ Charles Dickens,
795:I don't know anything, I never did know anything, but now I know I don't know anything! ~ Charles Dickens,
796:If I could not walk far and fast, I think I should just explode and perish.”––Charles Dickens ~ Anonymous,
797:I have become accustomed to hear Mr. Micawber assert that he has sold himself to the D. ~ Charles Dickens,
798:I'm wrong in these clothes. I'm wrong out of the forge, the kitchen, or off th' meshes. ~ Charles Dickens,
799:My flesh and blood...when it rises against me, is not my flesh and blood. I discard it. ~ Charles Dickens,
800:No less a question than this: Whether he should allow himself to fall in love with Pet? ~ Charles Dickens,
801:"Oh!" said my aunt, "I was not aware at first to whom I had the pleasure of objecting." ~ Charles Dickens,
802:Sebagian besar orang bukanlah musuh siapapun kecuali diri mereka sendiri. Morris Bolter ~ Charles Dickens,
803:There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast. ~ Charles Dickens,
804:Time, with his innumerable horse-power, worked away, not minding what anybody said, ... ~ Charles Dickens,
805:what such people miscall their religion, is a vent for their bad humours and arrogance. ~ Charles Dickens,
806:You can hold a knife to that black eye, as you run along. It'll keep the swelling down. ~ Charles Dickens,
807:Anything for a quiet life; as the man said when he took the situation at the lighthouse. ~ Charles Dickens,
808:But the woman who stood knitting looked up steadily, and looked the Marquis in the face. ~ Charles Dickens,
809:CHAPTER XV* SHEWING HOW VERY FOND OF OLIVER TWIST, THE MERRY OLD JEW AND MISS NANCY WERE ~ Charles Dickens,
810:Good never come of such evil, a happier end was not in nature to so unhappy a beginning. ~ Charles Dickens,
811:I could settle down into a state of
equable low spirits, and resign myself to coffee. ~ Charles Dickens,
812:I didn't say I understood her. I wouldn't have the presumption to say that of any woman. ~ Charles Dickens,
813:It's in vain, Trot, to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present. ~ Charles Dickens,
814:morsels of tesselated pavement from Herculaneum and Pompeii, like petrified minced veal; ~ Charles Dickens,
815:Now, being prepared for almost anything, he was not by any means prepared for nothing... ~ Charles Dickens,
816:Preparation V. The Wine-shop VI. The Shoemaker Book the Second—the Golden Thread I. Five ~ Charles Dickens,
817:The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance upon Monseigneur. ~ Charles Dickens,
818:There are many things from which I might have derived good by which I have not profited, ~ Charles Dickens,
819:What is substantially true of families in this respect, is true of a whole commonwealth. ~ Charles Dickens,
820:Among other public buildings in a certain town, which for many reasons it will be prudent ~ Charles Dickens,
821:Company, you see - company is - is - it's a very different thing from solitude - an't it? ~ Charles Dickens,
822:comparison only. There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the ~ Charles Dickens,
823:Familial love can find an echo in our own hearts just as it did in that of Charles Dickens. ~ Peter Ackroyd,
824:I do not know the American gentleman, God forgive me for putting two such words together. ~ Charles Dickens,
825:I have such unmanageable thoughts,’ returned his sister, ‘that they will wonder.’   ‘Then ~ Charles Dickens,
826:I only know that it was, and ceased to be; and that I have written, and there I leave it. ~ Charles Dickens,
827:I thought her looking as she always does: superior in all respects to everyone around her ~ Charles Dickens,
828:No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot. ~ Charles Dickens,
829:Not to know that no space of regret can make amends for one life's misused oppurtunities! ~ Charles Dickens,
830:Really, for a man who had been out of practice for so many years it was a splendid laugh! ~ Charles Dickens,
831:Rich folks may ride on camels, but it ain't so easy for 'em to see out of a needle's eye. ~ Charles Dickens,
832:She had gained a reputation for beauty, and (which is often another thing) was beautiful. ~ Charles Dickens,
833:So does a whole world, with all of its greatness and littleness, lie in a twinkling star. ~ Charles Dickens,
834:That glorious vision of doing good is so often the sanguine mirage of so many good minds. ~ Charles Dickens,
835:The life of Shakespeare is a fine mystery and I tremble every day lest something turn up. ~ Charles Dickens,
836:The loveliest things in life are but shadows; they come and go, and change and fade away… ~ Charles Dickens,
837:The New Testament is the very best book that ever was or ever will be known in the world. ~ Charles Dickens,
838:Try not to associate bodily defect with mental, my good friend, except for a solid reason ~ Charles Dickens,
839:United Metropolitan Improved Hot Muffin and Crumpet Baking and Punctual Delivery Company. ~ Charles Dickens,
840:United metropolitan improved hot muffin and crumpet baking and punctual delivery company. ~ Charles Dickens,
841:We all draw a little and compose a little, and none of us have any idea of time or money. ~ Charles Dickens,
842:Anything for the quick life, as the man said when he took the situation at the lighthouse. ~ Charles Dickens,
843:Be natural my children. For the writer that is natural has fulfilled all the rules of art. ~ Charles Dickens,
844:Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy. -Miss Havisham ~ Charles Dickens,
845:But I am thinking like a lover, or like an ass: which I suppose is pretty nearly the same. ~ Charles Dickens,
846:CHAPTER XXXIII WHEREIN THE HAPPINESS OF OLIVER AND HIS FRIENDS, EXPERIENCES A SUDDEN CHECK ~ Charles Dickens,
847:Contents Book the First—Recalled to Life I. The Period II. The Mail III. The Night Shadows ~ Charles Dickens,
848:- Do you deceive and entrap him, Estella?
- Yes, and many others - all of them but you. ~ Charles Dickens,
849:drudge, and a carrier's lad, he is now the merriest young grazier in all Northamptonshire. ~ Charles Dickens,
850:every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. ~ Charles Dickens,
851:Girl number twenty possessed of no facts, in reference to one of the commonest of animals! ~ Charles Dickens,
852:Happiness is a gift and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight in it when it comes. ~ Charles Dickens,
853:He brought in the bread, cheese, and beer, with many high encomiums upon their excellence. ~ Charles Dickens,
854:I'm a straw upon the surface of the deep, and am tossed in all directions by the elephants ~ Charles Dickens,
855:[I]t seemed as if the streets were absorbed by the sky, and the night were all in the air. ~ Charles Dickens,
856:la vida monótona me producía una sensación depresiva y estaba «ligeramente dispéptico». Mi ~ Charles Dickens,
857:Mankind was my business... charity, mercy, forbearance, benevolence, were all my business. ~ Charles Dickens,
858:May we never want a friend in need, nor a bottle to give him!" When found, make a note of. ~ Charles Dickens,
859:Mr. Pickwick was no sluggard, and he sprang like an ardent warrior from his tent-bedstead. ~ Charles Dickens,
860:¿Quién es esa araña? – ¿Qué araña? – pregunté yo. – Ese muchacho moteado, macizo y huraño. ~ Charles Dickens,
861:She had curiously thoughtful and attentive eyes; eyes that were very pretty and very good. ~ Charles Dickens,
862:So does a whole world, with all its greatnesses and littlenesses, lie in a twinkling star. ~ Charles Dickens,
863:So does a whole world with all its greatnesses and littnlenesses, lie in a twinkling star. ~ Charles Dickens,
864:the Shadow XI. Dusk XII. Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The Footsteps ~ Charles Dickens,
865:What a novel illustration of the tender laws of England! They let the paupers go to sleep! ~ Charles Dickens,
866:Book the Second—the Golden Thread I. Five Years Later II. A Sight III. A Disappointment IV. ~ Charles Dickens,
867:CHAPTER XVIII HOW OLIVER PASSED HIS TIME, IN THE IMPROVING SOCIETY OF HIS REPUTABLE FRIENDS ~ Charles Dickens,
868:Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever Book the First—Recalled ~ Charles Dickens,
869:If they would rather die, . . . they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. ~ Charles Dickens,
870:I perceive your tongue is," returned madame; "and what the tongue is, I suppose the man is. ~ Charles Dickens,
871:"It's nothing," returned Mrs Chick. "It's merely change of weather. We must expect change." ~ Charles Dickens,
872:The bird that can sing and won't sing, must be made to sing, they say,' grumbled Tackleton. ~ Charles Dickens,
873:The recess beneath the counter in which his flock mattress was thrust, looked like a grave. ~ Charles Dickens,
874:... what such people miscall their religion, is a vent for their bad humours and arrogance. ~ Charles Dickens,
875:A man can well afford to be as bold as brass, my good fellow, when he gets gold in exchange! ~ Charles Dickens,
876:A merry Christmas to everybody! A happy New Year to all the world. Hallo here! Whoop! Hallo! ~ Charles Dickens,
877:Cheerfulness and contentment are great beautifiers, and are famous preservers of good looks. ~ Charles Dickens,
878:Did it ever strike you on such a morning as this that drowning would be happiness and peace? ~ Charles Dickens,
879:I am afraid to think of what I might have done, on requirement, in the secrecy of my terror. ~ Charles Dickens,
880:I have an affection for the road ... formed in the impressibility of untried youth and hope. ~ Charles Dickens,
881:I went away, dear Agnes, loving you. I stayed away, loving you. I returned home, loving you! ~ Charles Dickens,
882:Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death;—the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine! ~ Charles Dickens,
883:My advice is, never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. ~ Charles Dickens,
884:Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see triumph. ~ Charles Dickens,
885:that his eyes looked most powerfully down into mine, and mine looked most helplessly up into ~ Charles Dickens,
886:towards evening. At such a time I found out for certain that this bleak place overgrown with ~ Charles Dickens,
887:Train up a fig tree in the way it should go, and when you are old sit under the shade of it. ~ Charles Dickens,
888:when smoking umbrellas passed and repassed, spinning round and round like so many teetotums, ~ Charles Dickens,
889:An ancient proverb warns us that we should not expect to find old heads upon young shoulders; ~ Charles Dickens,
890:Bless me, yes. There he is. He was very much attached to me, was Dick. Poor Dick! Dear, dear! ~ Charles Dickens,
891:Cash-up's a very good expression,' observed Martin, 'when other people don't apply it to you. ~ Charles Dickens,
892:CHAPTER XXXVII IN WHICH THE READER MAY PERCEIVE A CONTRAST, NOT UNCOMMON IN MATRIMONIAL CASES ~ Charles Dickens,
893:Come! Let us make that bargain. Think of me at my best, if circumstances should ever part us! ~ Charles Dickens,
894:Don't I what?' said Peg. 'Love your old master too much—' 'No, not a bit too much,' said Peg. ~ Charles Dickens,
895:For many hours, they had little hope of his surviving; but grief is strong, and he recovered. ~ Charles Dickens,
896:Gadso!' said the undertaker: taking Mr. Bumble by the gilt-edged lappel of his official coat; ~ Charles Dickens,
897:Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts. ~ Charles Dickens,
898:Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tries, and a touch that never hurts. ~ Charles Dickens,
899:I am a disappointed drudge, sir. I care for no man on earth, and no man on earth cares for me ~ Charles Dickens,
900:If man would help some of us a little more, God would forgive us all the sooner perhaps.' But ~ Charles Dickens,
901:It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age ~ Charles Dickens,
902:Moths, and all sorts of ugly creatures, hover about a lighted candle. Can the candle help it? ~ Charles Dickens,
903:So may the New Year be a happy one to you, happy to many more whose happiness depends on you! ~ Charles Dickens,
904:Substance of the Shadow XI. Dusk XII. Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The ~ Charles Dickens,
905:the United Metropolitan Improved Hot Muffin and Crumpet Baking and Punctual Delivery Company. ~ Charles Dickens,
906:CHAPTER XXIX HAS AN INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNT OF THE INMATES OF THE HOUSE, TO WHICH OLIVER RESORTED ~ Charles Dickens,
907:Don't leave a stone unturned. It's always something, to know you have done the most you could. ~ Charles Dickens,
908:Give me a moment, because I like to cry for joy. It's so delicious, John dear, to cry for joy. ~ Charles Dickens,
909:If she wounds you, love her. If she tears your heart to pieces-- love her, love her, love her! ~ Charles Dickens,
910:I. The Period II. The Mail III. The Night Shadows IV. The Preparation V. The Wine-shop VI. The ~ Charles Dickens,
911:Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; - the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine! ~ Charles Dickens,
912:My advice is to never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. ~ Charles Dickens,
913:There is no such passion in human nature, as the passion for gravy among commercial gentlemen. ~ Charles Dickens,
914:There was a curious mixture in the boy, of uncompleted savagery, and uncompleted civilization. ~ Charles Dickens,
915:Time has been lost and opportunity thrown away, but I am yet a young man, and may retrieve it. ~ Charles Dickens,
916:Y aquel lugar lleno de ruinas y de cosas muertas me pareció el más indicado para mí aquel día. ~ Charles Dickens,
917:And Master--or Mister--Sloppy?' said the Secretary, in doubt whether he was man, boy, or what. ~ Charles Dickens,
918:Boy, be for ever grateful to all friends, but especially unto them which brought you up by hand ~ Charles Dickens,
919:"Do not repine, my friends," said Mr. Pecksniff, tenderly. "Do not weep for me. It is chronic." ~ Charles Dickens,
920:He had been sobbing violently in his conflict with the Spirit, and his face was wet with tears. ~ Charles Dickens,
921:Money, says the proverb, makes money. When you have got a little, it is often easy to get more. ~ Charles Dickens,
922:No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot. 'Were ~ Charles Dickens,
923:Some women's faces are, in their brightness, a prophecy; and some, in their sadness, a history. ~ Charles Dickens,
924:things cannot be expected to turn up of themselves. We must in a measure assist to turn them up ~ Charles Dickens,
925:What an immense impression Paris made upon me. It is the most extraordinary place in the world! ~ Charles Dickens,
926:What have paupers to do with soul or spirit? It’s quite enough that we let ’em have live bodies ~ Charles Dickens,
927:All these things, and a thousand like them, came to pass in and close upon the dear old year one ~ Charles Dickens,
928:As for the politicians, like everyone else in America, they were motivated by money, not ideals. ~ Charles Dickens,
929:But, tears were not the things to find their way to Mr. Bumble's soul; his heart was waterproof. ~ Charles Dickens,
930:eleven hundred defenceless prisoners of both sexes and all ages had been killed by the populace; ~ Charles Dickens,
931:¡Gracias, mi querida! El honor que me haces sólo es comparable al placer que me causas. Señorita ~ Charles Dickens,
932:Halloa!" the guard replied. "What o'clock do you make it, Joe?" "Ten minutes, good, past eleven. ~ Charles Dickens,
933:I am not aware...that to think of any person is to make a great claim upon that person, my dear. ~ Charles Dickens,
934:She was truest to them in the season of trial, as all the quietly loyal and good will always be. ~ Charles Dickens,
935:The beating of my heart was so violent and wild that I felt as if my life were breaking from me. ~ Charles Dickens,
936:The broken heart. You think you will die, but you keep living, day after day after terrible day. ~ Charles Dickens,
937:their national muskets in a most explosive state of readiness, who stopped all comers and goers, ~ Charles Dickens,
938:The world belongs to those who set out to conquer it armed with self confidence and good humour. ~ Charles Dickens,
939:Time and tide will wait for no man, saith the adage. But all men have to wait for time and tide. ~ Charles Dickens,
940:CHAPTER VIII OLIVER WALKS TO LONDON. HE ENCOUNTERS ON THE ROAD, A STRANGE SORT OF YOUNG GENTLEMAN ~ Charles Dickens,
941:Every traveler has a home of his own, and he learns to appreciate it the more from his wandering. ~ Charles Dickens,
942:I hope that real love and truth are stronger in the end than any evil or misfortune in the world. ~ Charles Dickens,
943:May you have a heart that never hardens, a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts. ~ Charles Dickens,
944:Nobody was hard with him or with me. There was duty to be done, and it was done, but not harshly. ~ Charles Dickens,
945:Secondly, the Philanthropists had not the good temper of the Pugilists, and used worse language.  ~ Charles Dickens,
946:She writhes under her life. A woman more angry, passionate, reckless, and revengeful never lived. ~ Charles Dickens,
947:The sun himself is weak when he first rises, and gathers strength and courage as the day gets on. ~ Charles Dickens,
948:Cottage of content was better than the Palace of cold splendour, and that where love was, all was. ~ Charles Dickens,
949:He had not a handsome face, but it was better than handsome: being extremely amiable and cheerful. ~ Charles Dickens,
950:He never thought of Carton. His mind was so full of the others, that he never once thought of him. ~ Charles Dickens,
951:I am what you designed me to be.I am your blade. You cannot now complain if you also feel the hurt ~ Charles Dickens,
952:if this man was to take him to a bath and was to lay out a few shillings in getting him one or two ~ Charles Dickens,
953:I never see any difference in boys. I only know two sorts of boys. Mealy boys and beef-faced boys. ~ Charles Dickens,
954:In the name of that sharp female newly-born, and called La Guillotine, why did you come to France? ~ Charles Dickens,
955:I was attentive to my knife and fork, spoon, glasses, and other instruments of self-destruction... ~ Charles Dickens,
956:Loadstone Rock Book the Third—the Track of a Storm I. In Secret II. The Grindstone III. The Shadow ~ Charles Dickens,
957:Stranger, pause and ask thyself the question, Canst thou do likewise? If not, with a blush retire. ~ Charles Dickens,
958:What the two drank together, between Hilary Term and Michaelmas, might have floated a king's ship. ~ Charles Dickens,
959:En nuestro fuero interno, medimos el tiempo por los cambios y los acontecimientos, no por los años. ~ Charles Dickens,
960:First—Recalled to Life I. The Period II. The Mail III. The Night Shadows IV. The Preparation V. The ~ Charles Dickens,
961:had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all ~ Charles Dickens,
962:I know enough of the world now to have almost lost the capacity of being much surprised by anything ~ Charles Dickens,
963:In England, there was scarcely an amount of order and protection to justify much national boasting. ~ Charles Dickens,
964:It is, as Mr. Rokesmith says, a matter of feeling, but Lor how many matters ARE matters of feeling! ~ Charles Dickens,
965:New thoughts and hopes were whirling through my mind, and all the colours of my life were changing. ~ Charles Dickens,
966:No man ever really loved a woman, lost her, and knew her with a blameless though an unchanged mind, ~ Charles Dickens,
967:—No tema por mí —responde el señor Crisparkle con serena sonrisa—. Yo no temo por mí personalmente. ~ Charles Dickens,
968:Once upon a time, novelists of the 19th century, such as Charles Dickens, published in serial form. ~ Margaret Atwood,
969:There is nothing I would not have given you to have had you deserve my old opinion of you; nothing! ~ Charles Dickens,
970:Think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you. ~ Charles Dickens,
971:[...] this particular, as in many others, blustering assertion goes for proof, half over the world. ~ Charles Dickens,
972:You are not in a fit state to come here, if you can't come here without spluttering like a bad pen. ~ Charles Dickens,
973:Everything postponed to that imaginary time! Everything held in confusion and indecision until then! ~ Charles Dickens,
974:Fellow of Delicacy XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. Still ~ Charles Dickens,
975:fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven ~ Charles Dickens,
976:It's only about young Twist, my dear,' said Mr. Sowerberry. 'A very good-looking boy, that, my dear. ~ Charles Dickens,
977:Perhaps. Perhaps, see the great crowd of people with its rush and roar, bearing down upon them, too. ~ Charles Dickens,
978:settled for ever. It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. Spiritual ~ Charles Dickens,
979:She kisses his lips; he kisses hers; they solemnly bless each other. The spare hand does not tremble ~ Charles Dickens,
980:They had an ugly look to one as prone to disgust and fear as the changes of a few hours had made me. ~ Charles Dickens,
981:Troubled as the future was, it was the unknown future, and in its obscurity there was ignorant hope. ~ Charles Dickens,
982:unless we learn to do our duty to those whom we employ, they will never learn to do their duty to us ~ Charles Dickens,
983:Vice takes up her abode in many temples; and who can say that a fair outside shall not enshrine her? ~ Charles Dickens,
984:We have none of us long to wait for Death. Patience, patience! He'll be here soon enough for us all. ~ Charles Dickens,
985:you'll find that as you get vider, you'll get viser. Vidth and visdom, Sammy, alvays grows together. ~ Charles Dickens,
986:Acostúmbrese a no considerar nada por su aspecto, sino por su evidencia. No hay regla mejor que ésta. ~ Charles Dickens,
987:A man is lucky if he is the first love of a woman. A woman is lucky if she is the last love of a man. ~ Charles Dickens,
988:I confess I have yet to learn that a lesson of the purest good may not be drawn from the vilest evil. ~ Charles Dickens,
989:If they would rather die,” said Scrooge, “they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. ~ Charles Dickens,
990:The broken heart. You think you will die, but you just keep living, day after day after terrible day. ~ Charles Dickens,
991:This history must sometimes see with Little Dorrit's eyes, and shall begin that course by seeing him. ~ Charles Dickens,
992:Years Later II. A Sight III. A Disappointment IV. Congratulatory V. The Jackal VI. Hundreds of People ~ Charles Dickens,
993:As mariposas, e todo tipo de criaturas horríveis, sempre rondam a vela. O que é que a vela pode fazer? ~ Charles Dickens,
994:Besides which, all that I could have said of the Story to any purpose, I had endeavoured to say in it. ~ Charles Dickens,
995:Charles Dickens was an avid seeker of names - he read directories and looked for odd names on gravestones. ~ Jane Smiley,
996:If he was only sorry, he wouldn't look at me as he does. I am only sorry, and it makes me feel kinder. ~ Charles Dickens,
997:in Town VIII. Monseigneur in the Country IX. The Gorgon's Head X. Two Promises XI. A Companion Picture ~ Charles Dickens,
998:I think it impossible, utterly impossible, for any Englishman to live here [in America], and be happy. ~ Charles Dickens,
999:I will live in the past, the present, and the future. The spirits of all three shall strive within me. ~ Charles Dickens,
1000:Joe went all the way home with his mouth wide open, to rinse the rum out with as much air as possible. ~ Charles Dickens,
1001:Minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled, ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort. ~ Charles Dickens,
1002:My sister having so much to do, was going to church vicariously, that is to say, Joe and I were going. ~ Charles Dickens,
1003:Oh, lady, lady! If there was more like you, there would be fewer like me, - there would - there would! ~ Charles Dickens,
1004:Shadow IV. Calm in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer VI. Triumph VII. A Knock at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards ~ Charles Dickens,
1005:She came out here...turned this way, must have trod on these stones often. Let me follow in her steps. ~ Charles Dickens,
1006:Storm I. In Secret II. The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer VI. Triumph ~ Charles Dickens,
1007:The last of the three now said his say, as he put down his empty drinking vessel and smacked his lips. ~ Charles Dickens,
1008:then p’r’aps we may get into what the ‘Merrikins call a fix, and the English a qvestion o’ privileges. ~ Charles Dickens,
1009:...the one woman who had stood conspicuous, knitting, still knitted on with the steadfastness of Fate. ~ Charles Dickens,
1010:There are very few harmless circumstances that would not seem full of perilous meaning, so considered. ~ Charles Dickens,
1011:...think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you! ~ Charles Dickens,
1012:a brown composition, which looked like diluted pincushions without the covers, and was called porridge. ~ Charles Dickens,
1013:And numerous indeed are the hearts to which Christmas brings a brief season of happiness and enjoyment. ~ Charles Dickens,
1014:Any man may be in good spirits and good temper when he's well dressed. There ain't much credit in that. ~ Charles Dickens,
1015:CHAPTER IX CONTAINING FURTHER PARTICULARS CONCERNING THE PLEASANT OLD GENTLEMAN, AND HIS HOPEFUL PUPILS ~ Charles Dickens,
1016:He couldn't finish the name. The final letter swelled in his throat, to the size of the whole alphabet. ~ Charles Dickens,
1017:him do it. On being asked by a mild boy (not me) how he would proceed if he did begin to see him do it, ~ Charles Dickens,
1018:How do you do, ma'am?" said the captain. "I am very glad to see you. I have come a long way to see you. ~ Charles Dickens,
1019:I love these little people; and it is not a slight thing when they, who are so fresh from God, love us. ~ Charles Dickens,
1020:in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted ~ Charles Dickens,
1021:It is because I think so much of warm and sensitive hearts, that I would spare them from being wounded. ~ Charles Dickens,
1022:Shadow XI. Dusk XII. Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever ~ Charles Dickens,
1023:The change was made in me; the thing was done. Well or ill done, excusably or inescusably, it was done. ~ Charles Dickens,
1024:The change was made in me; the thing was done. Well or ill done, excusably or inexcusably, it was done. ~ Charles Dickens,
1025:The ocean asks for nothing but those who stand by her shores gradually attune themselves to her rhythm. ~ Charles Dickens,
1026:Thus two people who cannot afford to play cards for money, sometimes sit down to a quiet game for love. ~ Charles Dickens,
1027:You are a little low this evening, Frederick,' said the Father of the Marshalsea. 'Anything the matter? ~ Charles Dickens,
1028:. . . and he had never yet, by so much as a single spoken word, disclosed to her the state of his heart. ~ Charles Dickens,
1029:But, there is one broad sky over all the world, and whether it be blue or cloudy, the same heaven beyond ~ Charles Dickens,
1030:He was careless of his life; careless of whether he lived or died, but not actively intent on self harm. ~ Charles Dickens,
1031:If you can't get to be oncommon through going straight, you'll never get to do it through going crooked. ~ Charles Dickens,
1032:If you could see my legs when I take my boots off, you'd form some idea of what unrequited affection is. ~ Charles Dickens,
1033:I have always thought of Christmas time... as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time. ~ Charles Dickens,
1034:¡Maldito seas! A fe que merece simpatía el hombre que me demuestra lo que yo podría haber sido y no soy. ~ Charles Dickens,
1035:Mr. Snagsby, as a timid man, is accustomed to cough with a variety of expressions, and so to save words. ~ Charles Dickens,
1036:My advice is, never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him! ~ Charles Dickens,
1037:Troubles are exceedingly gregarious in their nature, and flying in flocks are apt to perch capriciously. ~ Charles Dickens,
1038:accepting his patronage as he accepted every incident of the labyrinthian world in which he had got lost. ~ Charles Dickens,
1039:And O what a bright old song it is, that O 'tis love, 'tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round! ~ Charles Dickens,
1040:An inebriated elderly gentleman in the last depths of shabbiness... played the calm and virtuous old men. ~ Charles Dickens,
1041:at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards IX. The Game Made X. The Substance of the Shadow XI. Dusk XII. Darkness ~ Charles Dickens,
1042:CHAPTER XLI CONTAINING FRESH DISCOVERIES, AND SHEWING THAT SURPRISES, LIKE MISFORTUNES, SELDOM COME ALONE ~ Charles Dickens,
1043:clean room, a hot dish for dinner, and a bottle of not absolutely poisonous wine, are all I want tonight. ~ Charles Dickens,
1044:He is an honorable, obstinate, truthful, high-spirited, intensely prejudiced, perfectly unreasonable man. ~ Charles Dickens,
1045:Hi, Lady Jane!" A large grey cat leaped from some neighbouring shelf on his shoulder and startled us all. ~ Charles Dickens,
1046:If I might offer any apology for so exaggerated a fiction as the Barnacles and the Circumlocution Office, ~ Charles Dickens,
1047:I hope,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'that our volatile friend is committing no absurdities in that dickey behind. ~ Charles Dickens,
1048:It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper; so cry away. ~ Charles Dickens,
1049:I was lost in the mazes of my future fortunes and could not retrace the by-paths we had trodden together. ~ Charles Dickens,
1050:My advice is, never do to-morrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him! ~ Charles Dickens,
1051:No one is useless in this world,’ retorted the Secretary, ‘who lightens the burden of it for any one else ~ Charles Dickens,
1052:Plea XXI. Echoing Footsteps XXII. The Sea Still Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock ~ Charles Dickens,
1053:Such is the difference between yesterday and today. We are all going to the play, or coming home from it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1054:Taip per visą gyvenimą mes darome žemus ir menkus poelgius, baimindamiesi tų, kurių visiškai nevertiname. ~ Charles Dickens,
1055:What is the matter?" asked the passenger, then, with mildly quavering speech. "Who wants me? Is it Jerry? ~ Charles Dickens,
1056:When one is in a difficulty or at a loss, one never knows in what direction a way out may chance to open. ~ Charles Dickens,
1057:Why should you particularly like a man who resembles you? There is nothing in you to like; you know that. ~ Charles Dickens,
1058:Women can always put things in fewest words. Except when it's blowing up; and then they lengthens it out. ~ Charles Dickens,
1059:Can you—can you sit down?” asked Scrooge, looking doubtfully at him. “I can.” “Do it, then.” Scrooge asked ~ Charles Dickens,
1060:CHAPTER XXVII ATONES FOR THE UNPOLITENESS OF A FORMER CHAPTER; WHICH DESERTED A LADY, MOST UNCEREMONIOUSLY ~ Charles Dickens,
1061:Charles Dickens [Project Gutenberg Editor's Note: There is also another version of this work etext98/grexp10.txt ~ Anonymous,
1062:However, the Sun himself is weak when he first rises, and gathers strength and courage as the day gets on. ~ Charles Dickens,
1063:No one is useless in this world,' retorted the Secretary, 'who lightens the burden of it for any one else. ~ Charles Dickens,
1064:of No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. Still Knitting XVII. One Night XVIII. Nine Days ~ Charles Dickens,
1065:on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves ~ Charles Dickens,
1066:Tan grande es la fuerza de la costumbre, y tan deseable que las costumbres desde el principio sean buenas. ~ Charles Dickens,
1067:The Mail III. The Night Shadows IV. The Preparation V. The Wine-shop VI. The Shoemaker Book the Second—the ~ Charles Dickens,
1068:use—to live by his own industry in England, rather than on the industry of the overladen people of France. ~ Charles Dickens,
1069:What a troublesome world this is, when one has the most right to expect it to be as agreeable as possible. ~ Charles Dickens,
1070:[John Jarndyce] rubbed his head so constantly that not a single hair upon it ever rested in its right place ~ Charles Dickens,
1071:Lucie stood stretching out her arms towards her husband, with nothing in her face but love and consolation. ~ Charles Dickens,
1072:[She wasn't] a logically reasoning woman, but God is good, and hearts may count in heaven as high as heads. ~ Charles Dickens,
1073:The important thing is this: to be ready at any moment to sacrifice what you are for what you could become. ~ Charles Dickens,
1074:The night air ain't quite wholesome, I suppose?' said Mark. 'It's deadly poison,' was the settler's answer. ~ Charles Dickens,
1075:We choose this time, because it is a time, of all others, when Want is keenly felt, and Abundance rejoices. ~ Charles Dickens,
1076:We must leave the discovery of this mystery, like all others, to time, and accident, and Heaven's pleasure. ~ Charles Dickens,
1077:achievements as sentencing a youth to have his hands cut off, his tongue torn out with pincers, and his body ~ Charles Dickens,
1078:A curious monomaniac,' said Eugene. 'The man seems to believe that everybody was acquainted with his mother! ~ Charles Dickens,
1079:Alice!" said the visitor's mild voice, "am I late to-night?"
"You always seem late, but are always early. ~ Charles Dickens,
1080:and if I had turned myself upside down before drinking, the wine could not have gone more direct to my head. ~ Charles Dickens,
1081:...a sea to intensely blue to be looked at, and a sky of purple, set with one great flaming jewel of fire... ~ Charles Dickens,
1082:As I've gotten older I've become a devotee of 19th-century authors, such as Charles Dickens and George Eliot. ~ David Duchovny,
1083:Bè, naturalmente non è l'uomo adatto.... poiché l'uomo che ha un incarico di fiducia non è mai l'uomo adatto ~ Charles Dickens,
1084:boy I ever conversed with, carrying the largest baby I ever saw, offered a supernaturally intelligent explan ~ Charles Dickens,
1085:Está tan por encima de mí en sus condiciones, como la torre de esta catedral de las chimeneas que la rodean. ~ Charles Dickens,
1086:hanging a housebreaker on Saturday who had been taken on Tuesday; now, burning people in the hand at Newgate ~ Charles Dickens,
1087:I am in a ridiculous humour,' quoth Eugene; 'I am a ridiculous fellow. Everything is ridiculous. Come along! ~ Charles Dickens,
1088:I made a compact with myself that in my person literature should stand by itself, of itself, and for itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1089:It is one of the easiest achievements in life to offend your family when your family want to get rid of you. ~ Charles Dickens,
1090:It's a poor heart that never rejoices. Jane, go down to the cellar, and fetch a bottle of Upset ginger-beer. ~ Charles Dickens,
1091:"Madam," replied Mr. Micawber, "it is my intention to register such a vow on the virgin page of the future." ~ Charles Dickens,
1092:—Mi suerte está ya echada, y debo vivir como usted en este mezquino y destemplado rincón del mundo —responde ~ Charles Dickens,
1093:My nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand: Pity me, then, and wish I were renewed!" But ~ Charles Dickens,
1094:Next Mrs. Crupp said it was clear she couldn't be in two places at once (which I felt to be reasonable). . . ~ Charles Dickens,
1095:Pero la fábrica del tiempo se encuentra en un lugar secreto, su trabajo no se siente y sus brazos son mudos. ~ Charles Dickens,
1096:Scrooge hung his head to hear his own words quoted by the Spirit, and was overcome with penitence and grief. ~ Charles Dickens,
1097:So-ho!" the guard sang out, as loud as he could roar. "Yo there! Stand! I shall fire!" The pace was suddenly ~ Charles Dickens,
1098:They are so filthy and bestial that no honest man would admit one into his house for a water-closet doormat. ~ Charles Dickens,
1099:All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1100:A man in public life expects to be sneered at—it is the fault of his elewated sitiwation, and not of himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1101:as at this. Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic ~ Charles Dickens,
1102:A thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists. ~ Charles Dickens,
1103:Ball—when the one woman who had stood conspicuous, knitting, still knitted on with the steadfastness of Fate. ~ Charles Dickens,
1104:But I loved Joe—perhaps for no better reason in those early days than because the dear fellow let me love him ~ Charles Dickens,
1105:But you were always a good man of business, Jacob,” faltered Scrooge, who now began to apply this to himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1106:CHAPTER XVII OLIVER’S DESTINY, CONTINUING UNPROPITIOUS, BRINGS A GREAT MAN TO LONDON TO INJURE HIS REPUTATION ~ Charles Dickens,
1107:Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine. ~ Charles Dickens,
1108:Don't believe that,' said Fagin. 'When a man's his own enemy, it's only because he's too much his own friend. ~ Charles Dickens,
1109:Family not only need to consist of merely those whom we share blood, but also for those whom we'd give blood. ~ Charles Dickens,
1110:[He] should come to the knowledge of the step, as a step taken, and not in the balance of suspense and doubt. ~ Charles Dickens,
1111:He takes out his anger by having his carriage speed through the streets, scattering the commoners in the way. ~ Charles Dickens,
1112:Home is like the ship at sea, Sailing on eternally; Oft the anchor forth we cast, But can never make it fast. ~ Charles Dickens,
1113:I feel an earnest and humble desire, and shall do till I die, to increase the stock of harmless cheerfulness. ~ Charles Dickens,
1114:If you bring the boy back with his head blown to bits by a musket, don’t look to me to put it together again. ~ Charles Dickens,
1115:It is the fate of all authors or chroniclers to create imaginary friends, and lose them in the course of art. ~ Charles Dickens,
1116:It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, ~ Charles Dickens,
1117:Jackal VI. Hundreds of People VII. Monseigneur in Town VIII. Monseigneur in the Country IX. The Gorgon's Head ~ Charles Dickens,
1118:.... non sono vecchio, ma le vie della mia giovinezza non sono state mai di quelle che portano alla vecchiaia ~ Charles Dickens,
1119:The shadows of our own desires stand between us and our better angels, and thus their brightness is eclipsed. ~ Charles Dickens,
1120:They'll not blame me. They'll not object to me. They'll not mind what I do, if it's wrong. I'm only Mr. Dick. ~ Charles Dickens,
1121:VII. A Knock at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards IX. The Game Made X. The Substance of the Shadow XI. Dusk XII. ~ Charles Dickens,
1122:we all did what we undertake to do, as faithfully as Herbert did, we might live in a Republic of the Virtues. ~ Charles Dickens,
1123:Why, Mrs. Piper has a good deal to say, chiefly in parentheses and without punctuation, but not much to tell. ~ Charles Dickens,
1124:appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminster. Even the ~ Charles Dickens,
1125:But, like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child. And his name is David Copperfield ~ Charles Dickens,
1126:CHAPTER XXIV TREATS OF A VERY POOR SUBJECT. BUT IS A SHORT ONE; AND MAY BE FOUND OF IMPORTANCE IN THIS HISTORY ~ Charles Dickens,
1127:He knew enough of the world to know that there is nothing in it better than the faithful service of the heart. ~ Charles Dickens,
1128:I am unfortunate in using a word which may convey a meaning—and evidently does—quite opposite to my intention. ~ Charles Dickens,
1129:I felt like one who was toiling home barefoot from distant travel, and whose wanderings had lasted many years. ~ Charles Dickens,
1130:Loves and Cupids took to flight afraid, and Martyrdom had no such torment in its painted history of suffering. ~ Charles Dickens,
1131:Mind! I don’t mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. ~ Charles Dickens,
1132:My opinion, miss," returned Mr. Cruncher, "is as you're right. Likewise wot I'll stand by you, right or wrong. ~ Charles Dickens,
1133:Plea XXI. Echoing Footsteps XXII. The Sea Still Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock Book ~ Charles Dickens,
1134:Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock Book the Third—the Track of a Storm I. In Secret II. ~ Charles Dickens,
1135:that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminster. Even the Cock-lane ghost had been ~ Charles Dickens,
1136:The New Year, like an Infant Heir to the whole world, was waited for, with welcomes, presents, and rejoicings. ~ Charles Dickens,
1137:The society of girls is a very delightful thing, Copperfield. It's not professional, but it's very delightful. ~ Charles Dickens,
1138:they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself like forty. ~ Charles Dickens,
1139:To close the eyes, and give a seemly comfort to the apparel of the dead, is poverty's holiest touch of nature. ~ Charles Dickens,
1140:... Treachery don't come natural to beaming youth; but trust and pity, love and constancy,-they do, thank God! ~ Charles Dickens,
1141:Why did you get married?” said Scrooge. “Because I fell in love.” “Because you fell in love!” growled Scrooge, ~ Charles Dickens,
1142:A man in public life expects to be sneered at -- it is the fault of his elevated situation, and not of himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1143:CHAPTER XLIX MONKS AND MR. BROWNLOW AT LENGTH MEET. THEIR CONVERSATION, AND THE INTELLIGENCE THAT INTERRUPTS IT ~ Charles Dickens,
1144:Fortune or misfortune, a man can but try; there's not to be done without trying - accept laying down and dying. ~ Charles Dickens,
1145:He had expected labour, and he found it, and did it and made the best of it. In this, his prosperity consisted. ~ Charles Dickens,
1146:He sido el único hijo de padres de edad avanzada, y estoy por creer que he venido al mundo ya un poco viejo. No ~ Charles Dickens,
1147:I believe I had a delirious idea of seizing the red-hot poker out of the fire, and running him through with it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1148:III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer VI. Triumph VII. A Knock at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards ~ Charles Dickens,
1149:Look at me,' said Miss Havisham. 'You are not afraid of a woman who has never seen the sun since you were born? ~ Charles Dickens,
1150:Many a gentleman lives well upon a soft head, who would find a heart of the same quality a very great drawback. ~ Charles Dickens,
1151:My dear if you could give me a cup of tea to clear my muddle of a head I should better understand your affairs. ~ Charles Dickens,
1152:OVERTIME “I have been bent and broken, but - I hope – into a better shape.” -- Charles Dickens, Great Expectations ~ Kennedy Ryan,
1153:Second—the Golden Thread I. Five Years Later II. A Sight III. A Disappointment IV. Congratulatory V. The Jackal ~ Charles Dickens,
1154:So new to him," she muttered, "so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us! ~ Charles Dickens,
1155:There are many things from which I might have derived good, by which I have not profited, I dare say,” returned ~ Charles Dickens,
1156:Caleb was no Sorcerer, but in the only magic art that still remains to us: the magic of devoted, deathless love: ~ Charles Dickens,
1157:I never saw such curls—how could I, for there never were such curls!—as those she shook out to hide her blushes. ~ Charles Dickens,
1158:Mere messages in the earthly order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of ~ Charles Dickens,
1159:Mr. Carton," she answered, after an agitated pause, "the secret is yours, not mine, and I promise to respect it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1160:Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the ~ Charles Dickens,
1161:Now, I return to this young fellow. And the communication I have got to make is, that he has Great Expectations. ~ Charles Dickens,
1162:Now, I return to this young fellow. And the communication I have got to make is, that he has great expectations. ~ Charles Dickens,
1163:Scrooge never painted out Old Marley’s name. There it stood, years afterwards, above the warehouse door: Scrooge ~ Charles Dickens,
1164:Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be. ~ Charles Dickens,
1165:That's the pint, sir,' interposed Sam; 'out vith it, as the father said to the child, wen he swallowed a farden. ~ Charles Dickens,
1166:The Fellow of No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. Still Knitting XVII. One Night XVIII. Nine ~ Charles Dickens,
1167:Todos los falsificadores de la tierra no son nada comparados con los que cometen falsificaciones consigo mismos, ~ Charles Dickens,
1168:You know, there is no language of vegetables, which converts a cucumber into a formal declaration of attachment. ~ Charles Dickens,
1169:...and in all the broad expanse of tranquil light they showed to me, I saw no shadow of another parting from her. ~ Charles Dickens,
1170:And this is the eternal law. For, Evil often stops short at istelf and dies with the doer of it! but Good, never. ~ Charles Dickens,
1171:And this is the eternal law. For, Evil often stops short at itself and dies with the doer of it; but Good, never. ~ Charles Dickens,
1172:as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys. ~ Charles Dickens,
1173:aunque es muy improbable suponer que nadie haya podido, voluntariamente, elegir un indumento de tan pésimo gusto. ~ Charles Dickens,
1174:Buy an annuity cheap, and make your life interesting to yourself and everybody else that watches the speculation. ~ Charles Dickens,
1175:If I might offer any apology for so exaggerated a fiction as the Barnacles and the Circumlocution Office, I would ~ Charles Dickens,
1176:I had cherished a profound conviction that her bringing me up by hand, gave her no right to bring me up by jerks. ~ Charles Dickens,
1177:It's my old girl that advises. She has the head. But I never own to it before her. Discipline must be maintained. ~ Charles Dickens,
1178:It was a good thing to have a couple of thousand people all rigid and frozen together, in the palm of one's hand. ~ Charles Dickens,
1179:IV. Congratulatory V. The Jackal VI. Hundreds of People VII. Monseigneur in Town VIII. Monseigneur in the Country ~ Charles Dickens,
1180:¡Sentimentalismos! No, no tengo tiempo para ello, pues me paso la vida ocupado en mover inmensas sumas de dinero. ~ Charles Dickens,
1181:the First—Recalled to Life I. The Period II. The Mail III. The Night Shadows IV. The Preparation V. The Wine-shop ~ Charles Dickens,
1182:The worm does not his work more surely on the dead body, than does this slow creeping fire upon the living frame. ~ Charles Dickens,
1183:We men of business, who serve a House, are not our own masters. We have to think of the House more than ourselves ~ Charles Dickens,
1184:When you go to Rome, do as Rome does. Rome will be a ugly customer to you, if you don't. I'm your Rome, you know. ~ Charles Dickens,
1185:You must know,’ said Estella, condescending to me as a beautiful and brilliant woman might, ‘that I have no heart ~ Charles Dickens,
1186:A thousand pardons!' said he. 'But the Professore here is so inexorable with me, that I am afraid to stir.' 'Don't ~ Charles Dickens,
1187:For not an orphan in the wide world can be so deserted as the child who is an outcast from a living parent's love. ~ Charles Dickens,
1188:for not an orphan in the wide world can be so deserted as the child who is an outcast from a living parent's love. ~ Charles Dickens,
1189:Her father, cheering her, showed a compassionate superiority to this woman's weakness, which was wonderful to see. ~ Charles Dickens,
1190:He's enough to turn the very beer in the casks sour with his looks; he is! So he would, if it had judgment enough. ~ Charles Dickens,
1191:I love your daughter fondly, dearly, disinterestedly, devotedly. If ever there were love in the world, I love her. ~ Charles Dickens,
1192:In a utilitarian age, of all other times, it is a matter of grave importance that fairy tales should be respected. ~ Charles Dickens,
1193:In short, I should have liked to have had the lightest license of a child, and yet be man enough to know its value ~ Charles Dickens,
1194:I tried to do that very difficult thing, imagine old people young again and invested with the graces of youth. But ~ Charles Dickens,
1195:So new to him," she muttered, "so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us!... ~ Charles Dickens,
1196:A howling corner in the winter time, a dusty corner in the summer time, an undesirable corner at the best of times. ~ Charles Dickens,
1197:A spirit that was once a man could hardly feel stranger or lonelier, going unrecognized among mankind, than I feel. ~ Charles Dickens,
1198:Constancy in love is a good thing; but it means nothing, and is nothing, without constancy in every kind of effort. ~ Charles Dickens,
1199:"Drink with me, my dear," said Mr. Weller. "Put your lips to this here tumbler, and then I can kiss you by deputy." ~ Charles Dickens,
1200:Family need not be defined merely as those with whom we share blood, but as those for whom we would give our blood. ~ Charles Dickens,
1201:He is of what is called the old school - a phrase generally meaning any school that seems never to have been young. ~ Charles Dickens,
1202:I have stood aside to see the phantoms of those days go by me. They are gone, and I resume the journey of my story. ~ Charles Dickens,
1203:I love your daughter fondly, dearly, disninterestedly, devotedly. If ever there were love in the world, I love her. ~ Charles Dickens,
1204:It is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas when the Great Creator was a child himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1205:It’s in vain to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present. Charles Dickens, David Copperfield ~ David Nicholls,
1206:And Ralph always wound up these mental soliloquies by arriving at the conclusion, that there was nothing like money. ~ Charles Dickens,
1207:Approach me again, you — you — you Heep of infamy," gasped Mr. Micawber, " and if your head is human, I'll break it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1208:a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made ~ Charles Dickens,
1209:Can I view thee panting, lying On thy stomach, without sighing; Can I unmoved see thee dying On a log Expiring frog! ~ Charles Dickens,
1210:Can you suppose there's any harm in looking as cheerful and being as cheerful as our poor circumstances will permit? ~ Charles Dickens,
1211:heavy drops fall—drip, drip, drip—upon the broad flagged pavement, called from old time the Ghost's Walk, all night. ~ Charles Dickens,
1212:I must be taken as I have been made. The success is not mine, the failure is not mine, but the two together make me. ~ Charles Dickens,
1213:Lawyers hold that there are two kinds of particularly bad witnesses--a reluctant witness, and a too-willing witness. ~ Charles Dickens,
1214:Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again. ~ Charles Dickens,
1215:On this matter I'm inclined to agree with the French, who gaze upon any personal dietary prohibition as bad manners. ~ Charles Dickens,
1216:O, strânge-mă la pieptul tău, scumpul meu soț, căci dragostea mea e clădită pe stâncă și nu se va clătina niciodată! ~ Charles Dickens,
1217:que las oportunidades no se presentan a uno, sino que es preciso ir en busca de ellas. Por eso yo he ido a buscarla. ~ Charles Dickens,
1218:—Sí. Lo haré, lo haré. ¡Te veo tan fuerte a mi lado! Pero quédate conmigo y acompáñame durante el resto de la noche. ~ Charles Dickens,
1219:The murmuring of many voices, the upturning of many faces, the pressing on of many footsteps in the outskirts of the ~ Charles Dickens,
1220:The secret was such an old one now, had so grown into me and become a part of myself, that I could not tear it away. ~ Charles Dickens,
1221:Credit is a system whereby a person who can not pay gets another person who can not pay to guarantee that he can pay. ~ Charles Dickens,
1222:[Credit is a system whereby] a person who can't pay, gets another person who can't pay, to guarantee that he can pay. ~ Charles Dickens,
1223:I am as light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a school-boy. I am as giddy as a drunken man. ~ Charles Dickens,
1224:It is a dangerous thing to see anything in the sphere of a vain blusterer, before the vain blusterer sees it himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1225:level," said this hoarse messenger, glancing at his mare. "'Recalled to life.' That's a Blazing strange message. Much ~ Charles Dickens,
1226:Our affections, however laudable, in this transitory world, should never master us; we should guide them, guide them. ~ Charles Dickens,
1227:Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. Spiritual revelations were conceded to England at that favoured ~ Charles Dickens,
1228:She had reasons for believing that there was a young sister living, and her greatest desire was, to help that sister. ~ Charles Dickens,
1229:This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy. ~ Charles Dickens,
1230:To do a great right, you may do a little wrong; and you may take any means which the end to be attained will justify. ~ Charles Dickens,
1231:y me indigna porque estoy convencido de que era un malvado sin ningún derecho a cuidar del tesoro que se le confiaba, ~ Charles Dickens,
1232:Along the Paris streets, the death-carts rumble, hollow and harsh. Six tumbrils carry the day's wine to La Guillotine. ~ Charles Dickens,
1233:Heaven be thanked, I love its light and feel the cheerfulness it sheds upon the earth, as much as any creature living. ~ Charles Dickens,
1234:...his philanthropy was of that gunpowderous sort that the difference between it & animosity was hard to determine ~ Charles Dickens,
1235:It is a world of disappointment: often to the hopes we most cherish, and hopes that do our nature the greatest honour. ~ Charles Dickens,
1236:I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong. I ~ Charles Dickens,
1237:May I tell you why it seems to me a good thing for us to remember wrong that has been done us? That we may forgive it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1238:My hair stands on end at the cost and charges of these boys. Why was I ever a father! Why was my father ever a father! ~ Charles Dickens,
1239:nothing ever happened on this globe, for good, at which some people did not have their fill of laughter in the outset; ~ Charles Dickens,
1240:O!  Better to have no home in which to lay his head, than to have a home and dread to go to it, through such a cause.  ~ Charles Dickens,
1241:O! there are many kinds of pride," said Biddy, looking full at me and shaking her head; "pride is not all of one kind— ~ Charles Dickens,
1242:Promises XI. A Companion Picture XII. The Fellow of Delicacy XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman ~ Charles Dickens,
1243:said Mr. Toots, whose fervour of acquiescence was greatly heightened by his entire ignorance of the Captain’s meaning. ~ Charles Dickens,
1244:She better liked to see him free and happy, even than to have him near her, because she loved him better than herself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1245:such a mixing of gaslight and daylight, that they seemed to have got on the wrong side of the pattern of the universe. ~ Charles Dickens,
1246:Such is the influence which the condition of our own thoughts, exercise, even over the appearance of external objects. ~ Charles Dickens,
1247:The inhabitants of Cincinnati are proud of their city as one of the most interesting in America: and with good reason. ~ Charles Dickens,
1248:There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves and a skeleton of truth that we never did. ~ Charles Dickens,
1249:Women, after all, gentlemen,' said the enthusiastic Mr. Snodgrass, 'are the great props and comforts of our existance. ~ Charles Dickens,
1250:You may get cheated, robbed, and murdered, in London. But there are plenty of people anywhere, who'll do that for you. ~ Charles Dickens,
1251:Dear, dear!' ejaculated Mrs. Sowerberry, piously raising her eyes to the kitchen ceiling: 'this comes of being liberal! ~ Charles Dickens,
1252:debe tomárseme como he sido hecha. El éxito no es mío; el fracaso, tampoco, y los dos juntos me han hecho tal como soy. ~ Charles Dickens,
1253:Every failure teaches a man something, if he will learn; and you are too sensible a man not to learn from this failure. ~ Charles Dickens,
1254:For though we are perpetually bragging of it as our safety, it is nothing but a poor fringe on the mantle of the upper. ~ Charles Dickens,
1255:Friendless I can never be, for all mankind are my kindred, and I am on ill terms with no one member of my great family. ~ Charles Dickens,
1256:his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow. ~ Charles Dickens,
1257:In a word, it was impossible for me to separate her, in the past or in the present, from the innermost life of my life. ~ Charles Dickens,
1258:Life is made of ever so many partings welded together ... Divisions among such must come, and must be met as they come. ~ Charles Dickens,
1259:Nor was Mr. Bumble’s gloom the only thing calculated to awaken a pleasing melancholy in the bosom of a spectator. There ~ Charles Dickens,
1260:Only one soul was to be seen, and that was Madame Defarge— who leaned against the door-post, knitting, and saw nothing. ~ Charles Dickens,
1261:The changes of a fevered room are slow and fluctuating; but the changes of the fevered world are rapid and irrevocable. ~ Charles Dickens,
1262:the fire burns up.' So they stood before the fire, waiting: Clennam with his arm about her waist, and the fire shining, ~ Charles Dickens,
1263:there is nothing in it better than the faithful service of the heart; so rendered and so free from any mercenary taint, ~ Charles Dickens,
1264:We have new laws, Evremonde, and new offences, since you were here.' He said it with a hard smile, and went on writing. ~ Charles Dickens,
1265:Affery, like greater people, had always been right in her facts, and always wrong in the theories she deduced from them. ~ Charles Dickens,
1266:Don't be afraid to hear me. Don't shrink from anything I say. I am like one who died young: all my life might have been. ~ Charles Dickens,
1267:Don't be afraid! We won't make an author of you, while there's an honest trade to be learnt, or brick-making to turn to. ~ Charles Dickens,
1268:. . . for not an orphan in the wide world can be so deserted as the child who is an outcast from a living parent's love. ~ Charles Dickens,
1269:He had a particular pride in the phrase eminently practical, which was considered to have a special application to him.  ~ Charles Dickens,
1270:I could not better testify my respect for your sister than by finally relieving her of her brother,” said Sydney Carton. ~ Charles Dickens,
1271:It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the ~ Charles Dickens,
1272:No estoy de humor para adivinar nada a las cinco de la madrugada, cuando tengo la cabeza que parece una olla de grillos. ~ Charles Dickens,
1273:noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. ~ Charles Dickens,
1274:No varnish can hide the grain of the wood; and that the more varnish you put on, the more the grain will express itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1275:Of little worth as life is when we misuse it, it is worth that effort. It would cost nothing to lay down if it were not. ~ Charles Dickens,
1276:Paul did not like Mrs. Pipchin, but he would sit in his arm-chair and look at her. Her ugliness seemed to fascinate him. ~ Charles Dickens,
1277:So, I must be taken as I have been made. The success is not mine, the failure is not mine, but the two together make me. ~ Charles Dickens,
1278:The beauty of the earth is but a breath, and man is but a shadow. What sympathy should a holy preacher have with either? ~ Charles Dickens,
1279:The night crept on apace, the moon went down, the stars grew pale and dim, and morning, cold as they, slowly approached. ~ Charles Dickens,
1280:There ain’t a gen’lm’n in all the land – nor yet sailing upon all the sea – that can love his lady more than I love her. ~ Charles Dickens,
1281:to be industrious , contented, and kind-hearted and to do some good to some one, and win some love to myself if I could. ~ Charles Dickens,
1282:Among these, accordingly, much discoursing with spirits went on - and it did a world of good which never became manifest. ~ Charles Dickens,
1283:And I am bored to death with it. Bored to death with this place, bored to death with my life, bored to death with myself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1284:and my first decided experience of the stupendous power of money was, that it had morally laid upon his back Trabb’s boy. ~ Charles Dickens,
1285:CHAPTER XXXVIII CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF WHAT PASSED BETWEEN MR. AND MRS. BUMBLE, AND MONKS, AT THEIR NOCTURNAL INTERVIEW ~ Charles Dickens,
1286:Courage, dear miss! Courage! Business! The worst will be over in a moment; it is but passing the room-door, and the worst ~ Charles Dickens,
1287:For it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child Himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1288:has that Copperfield no tague! I would do a good deal for you, if you tell me, without lying that somebody had cut it out ~ Charles Dickens,
1289:He described it as if he were there, and it was evident that he saw it vividly; perhaps he had not seen much in his life. ~ Charles Dickens,
1290:it is not unreasonable to ask that the weaving may be looked at in its completed state, and with the pattern finished. If ~ Charles Dickens,
1291:IT WAS THE FIRST TIME THAT A GRAVE HAD OPENED IN MY ROAD OF LIFE, AND the gap it made in the smooth ground was wonderful. ~ Charles Dickens,
1292:Of course I know that, Louisa.  I do not see the application of the remark.’  To do him justice he did not, at all.   She ~ Charles Dickens,
1293:Possibly we might even improve the world a little, if we got up early in the morning, and took off our coats to the work. ~ Charles Dickens,
1294:The death close before me was terrible, but far more terrible than death was the dread of being misremembered after death ~ Charles Dickens,
1295:though the pavement-stones, and stones of the walls and houses, were far too hot to have a hand laid on them comfortably. ~ Charles Dickens,
1296:until I almost thought he would gradually blow his whole being into the large hole at the top, and ooze away at the keys. ~ Charles Dickens,
1297:Up, then, would come Mrs General; taking all the colour out of everything, as Nature and Art had taken it out of herself; ~ Charles Dickens,
1298:Confieso que me habría gustado gozar de las alegres libertades de un niño, y ser lo bastante mayor para apreciar su dolor. ~ Charles Dickens,
1299:For certain, neither of them sees a happy Present, as the gate opens and closes, and one goes in, and the other goes away. ~ Charles Dickens,
1300:It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper, said Mr. Bumble. So cry away. ~ Charles Dickens,
1301:My impression is, after many years of consideration, that there never can have been anybody in the world who played worse. ~ Charles Dickens,
1302:The clerk observed that it was only once a year. “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December! ~ Charles Dickens,
1303:The "sharp female newly-born, and called La Guillotine," was hardly known to him, or to the generality of people, by name. ~ Charles Dickens,
1304:They passed very quietly along the yard; for no one was there, though many heads were stealthily peeping from the windows. ~ Charles Dickens,
1305:We were greatly overcome at parting; and if ever, in my life, I have had a void made in my heart, I had one made that day. ~ Charles Dickens,
1306:You talk very easily of hours, sir! How long do you suppose, sir, that an hour is to a man who is choking for want of air? ~ Charles Dickens,
1307:A person of the name of Michael Jackson, with a blue welveteen waistcoat with a double row of mother of pearl buttons," Mr. ~ Charles Dickens,
1308:Brave and generous friend, will you let me ask you one last question? I am very ignorant, and it troubles me—just a little. ~ Charles Dickens,
1309:CHAPTER XI TREATS OF MR. FANG THE POLICE MAGISTRATE; AND FURNISHES A SLIGHT SPECIMEN OF HIS MODE OF ADMINISTERING JUSTICExs ~ Charles Dickens,
1310:'Do you spell it with a 'V' or a 'W'?' inquired the judge. 'That depends upon the taste and fancy of the speller, my Lord'. ~ Charles Dickens,
1311:Final mente, nos metemos en la cama. ¡Muy bien! No podemos dormir. Damos vueltas y más vueltas, pero no podemos dormir. Las ~ Charles Dickens,
1312:Hunger was shred into atomics in every farthing porringer of husky chips of potato, fried with some reluctant drops of oil. ~ Charles Dickens,
1313:I believe the spreading of Catholicism to be the most horrible means of political and social degradation left in the world. ~ Charles Dickens,
1314:in that England which I shall see no more. I see Her with a child upon her bosom, who bears my name. I see her father, aged ~ Charles Dickens,
1315:I wanted to make Joe less ignorant and common, that he might be worthier of my society and less open to Estella's reproach. ~ Charles Dickens,
1316:Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many - not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some. ~ Charles Dickens,
1317:She's the sort of woman now,' said Mould, . . . 'one would almost feel disposed to bury for nothing: and do it neatly, too! ~ Charles Dickens,
1318:"Then what can you want to do now?" said the old lady,gaining courage. "I wants to make your flesh creep," replied the boy. ~ Charles Dickens,
1319:We know, Mr. Weller - we, who are men of the world - that a good uniform must work its way with the women, sooner or later. ~ Charles Dickens,
1320:You are envious, Biddy, and grudging. You are dissatisfied on account of my rise in fortune, and you can't help showing it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1321:but once a month, or even once a year, of him, or any one who ever wronged you, you would forgive him in your heart, I know! ~ Charles Dickens,
1322:How goes it, Jacques?" said one of these three to Monsieur Defarge. "Is all the spilt wine swallowed?" "Every drop, Jacques, ~ Charles Dickens,
1323:I am running away. They beat and ill-use me, Dick; and I am going to seek my fortune, some long way off. I don’t know where. ~ Charles Dickens,
1324:It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper,’ said Mr. Bumble. ‘So cry away. ~ Charles Dickens,
1325:Mr. Vholes's office, in disposition retiring and in situation retired, is squeezed up in a corner and blinks at a dead wall. ~ Charles Dickens,
1326:Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt successfully overcame that bad habit of living, so highly desirable to be got rid of by some people. ~ Charles Dickens,
1327:... still his philanthropy was of that gunpowderous sort that the difference between it and animosity was hard to determine. ~ Charles Dickens,
1328:VI. Hundreds of People VII. Monseigneur in Town VIII. Monseigneur in the Country IX. The Gorgon's Head X. Two Promises XI. A ~ Charles Dickens,
1329:What he can pay, sir", replied Pancks. "Take all you get, and keep back all you can't be forced to give up. That's business. ~ Charles Dickens,
1330:Yet it did seem (though not to him, for he saw nothing of it) as if fantastic hope could take as strong a hold as Fact.   p. ~ Charles Dickens,
1331:a boy of my name, with a forehead that I know and golden hair, to this place—then fair to look upon, with not a trace of this ~ Charles Dickens,
1332:A brisk, bright, blue-eyed fellow, a very neat figure and rather under the middle size, never out of the way and never in it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1333:Good gracious, Arthur,—I should say Mr Clennam, far more proper—the climb we have had to get up here and how ever to get down ~ Charles Dickens,
1334:great men are urged on to the abuse of power (when they need urging, which is not often), by their flatterers and dependents, ~ Charles Dickens,
1335:I do,” said Scrooge. “Merry Christmas! What right have you to be merry? What reason have you to be merry? You’re poor enough. ~ Charles Dickens,
1336:Little Dorrit that she had not seen Mr F.'s Aunt so full of life and character for weeks; that she would find it necessary to ~ Charles Dickens,
1337:So new to him,” she muttered, “so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us! Call Estella. ~ Charles Dickens,
1338:Therefore I took refuge in the caves of ignorance, wherein I have resided ever since, and which are still my private address. ~ Charles Dickens,
1339:to have on her head a most wonderful bonnet like a Grenadier wooden measure, and good measure too, or a great Stilton cheese, ~ Charles Dickens,
1340:As yet, little Dora was quite unconscious of my desperate firmness, otherwise than as my letters darkly shadowed it forth. But ~ Charles Dickens,
1341:CHAPTER XLII AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE OF OLIVER’S, EXHIBITING DECIDED MARKS OF GENIUS, BECOMES A PUBLIC CHARACTER IN THE METROPOLIS ~ Charles Dickens,
1342:In seasons of pestilence, some of us will have a secret attraction to the disease—a terrible passing inclination to die of it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1343:("I really think this must be a man!" was Mr. Lorry's breathless reflection, simultaneously with his coming against the wall.) ~ Charles Dickens,
1344:I shall never be better than I am. I shall sink lower, and be worse…I am like one who died young. All my life might have been. ~ Charles Dickens,
1345:...lies is lies. Howsever they come, they didn't ought to come, and they come from the father of lies, work round to the same. ~ Charles Dickens,
1346:Oh no! My subconscious slams down her Complete Works of Charles Dickens, leaps up from her armchair, and puts her hands on her hips. ~ E L James,
1347:Si por el camino recto no puedes llegar a ser una persona extraordinaria, jamás lo conseguirás yendo por los caminos torcidos. ~ Charles Dickens,
1348:That sort of half sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity's small change in general society. ~ Charles Dickens,
1349:Volumnia hastens to express her opinion that the shocking people ought to be tried as traitors, and made to support the Party. ~ Charles Dickens,
1350:Dickens writes that one of his characters, "listened to everything without seeming to, which showed he understood his business. ~ Charles Dickens,
1351:He melts, I think. He goes like a drop of froth. You look at him, and there he is. You look at him again, and - there he isn't. ~ Charles Dickens,
1352:Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one; stronger than magician ever spoke, or spirit answered to, in strongest conjuration. ~ Charles Dickens,
1353:In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong. ~ Charles Dickens,
1354:inestimable merit of being the most concise and faithful specimen of biography, extant in the literature of any age or country. ~ Charles Dickens,
1355:In seasons of pestilence, some of us will have a secret attraction to the disease--a terrible passing inclination to die of it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1356:My child, if I have any object in life, it is to provide for your being a good, a sensible, and a happy man. I am bent upon it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1357:No, Mr. Carton. I am sure that the best part of it might still be; I am sure that you might be much, much worthier of yourself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1358:Reflect upon your present blessings -- of which every man has many -- not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some. ~ Charles Dickens,
1359:So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise. ~ Charles Dickens,
1360:The streets looked small, of course. The streets that we have only seen as children always do I believe when we go back to them ~ Charles Dickens,
1361:They passed very quietly along the yard; for no one was there, though many heads were stealthily peeping from the windows. Only ~ Charles Dickens,
1362:When a man bleeds inwardly, it is a dangerous thing for himself; but when he laughs inwardly, it bodes no good to other people. ~ Charles Dickens,
1363:wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. ~ Charles Dickens,
1364:Ah Miss Harriet, it would do us no harm to remember oftener than we do, that vices are sometimes only virtues carried to excess! ~ Charles Dickens,
1365:Ah, rather overdone, M’Choakumchild.  If he had only learnt a little less, how infinitely better he might have taught much more! ~ Charles Dickens,
1366:A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is consituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. ~ Charles Dickens,
1367:Because they can't help it, miss,' replied the girl; 'the reason's plain.' (If Miss Squeers were the reason, it was very plain.) ~ Charles Dickens,
1368:Can I view thee panting, lying
On thy stomach, without sighing;
Can I unmoved see thee dying
On a log
Expiring frog! ~ Charles Dickens,
1369:Circumstances may accumulate so strongly even against an innocent man, that directed, sharpened, and pointed, they may slay him. ~ Charles Dickens,
1370:Crime, like death, is not confined to the old and withered alone. The youngest amd fairest are too often its
chosen victims. ~ Charles Dickens,
1371:Era daqueles dias de março em que o sol brilha quente e o vento sopra frio, de modo que se tem verão ao sol, e inverno à sombra. ~ Charles Dickens,
1372:He was too well accustomed to suffering, and had suffered too much where he was, to bewail the prospect of change very severely. ~ Charles Dickens,
1373:It is a far, far better thing that I do than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known. ~ Charles Dickens,
1374:It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far far better rest that I go to than I have ever known. ~ Charles Dickens,
1375:My faith in the people governing is, on the whole, infinitesimal; my faith in the people governed is, on the whole, illimitable. ~ Charles Dickens,
1376:Oh the nerves, the nerves; the mysteries of this machine called man! Oh the little that unhinges it, poor creatures that we are! ~ Charles Dickens,
1377:[S]he stood for some moments gazing at the sisters, with affection beaming in one eye, and calculation shining out of the other. ~ Charles Dickens,
1378:Sow the same seed of rapacious license and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind. ~ Charles Dickens,
1379:strip the one of the false embellishments, and the other of its illusions, and what is there real in either to live or care for? ~ Charles Dickens,
1380:Ah, Miss Harriet, it would do us no harm to remember oftener than we do, that vices are sometimes only virtues carried to excess! ~ Charles Dickens,
1381:a most excellent man, though I could have wished his trousers not quite so tight in some places and not quite so loose in others. ~ Charles Dickens,
1382:A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. ~ Charles Dickens,
1383:Aye, though he loved her from his soul with such a self denying love as woman seldom wins; he spoke from first to last of Martin. ~ Charles Dickens,
1384:Black are the brooding clouds and troubled the deep waters, when the Sea of Thought, first heaving from a calm, gives up its Dead ~ Charles Dickens,
1385:Come, then," returned the nephew gaily. "What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You're rich enough. ~ Charles Dickens,
1386:Es un hecho maravilloso y digno de reflexionar sobre él, que cada uno de los seres humanos es un profundo secreto para los demás. ~ Charles Dickens,
1387:Gold, for the instant, lost its luster in his eyes, for there were countless treasures of the heart which it could never purchase ~ Charles Dickens,
1388:had considered it a little while, she said to the tiny woman, And you keep watch over this every day? And she cast down her eyes, ~ Charles Dickens,
1389:Having made this lunatic confession, I began to throw my torn-up grass into the river, as if I had some thoughts of following it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1390:Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. ~ Charles Dickens,
1391:He says, no varnish can hide the grain of the wood, and that the more varnish you put on, the more the grain will express itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1392:I am well aware that I am the 'umblest person going. . . . My mother is likewise a very 'umble person. We live in a 'umble abode. ~ Charles Dickens,
1393:In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong. I ~ Charles Dickens,
1394:It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known. ~ Charles Dickens,
1395:It's over, and can't be helped, and that's one consolation, as they always say in Turkey, when they cut the wrong man's head off. ~ Charles Dickens,
1396:I would abandon it, and live otherwise and elsewhere. It is little to relinquish. What is it but a wilderness of misery and ruin? ~ Charles Dickens,
1397:Mr F.'s Aunt, who had eaten her pie with great solemnity, and who had been elaborating some grievous scheme of injury in her mind ~ Charles Dickens,
1398:why should I seek to change, what has been so precious to me for so long! you can never show better than as your own natural self ~ Charles Dickens,
1399:A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1400:An evening wind uprose too, and the slighter branches cracked and rattled as they moved, in skeleton dances, to its moaning music. ~ Charles Dickens,
1401:By the by, who ever knew a man who never read or wrote neither who hadn't got some small back parlour which he would call a study! ~ Charles Dickens,
1402:Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlaying our hard hearts. ~ Charles Dickens,
1403:He had no notion of meeting danger half-way. When it came upon him, he confronted it, but it must come before he troubled himself. ~ Charles Dickens,
1404:He has got his discharge, by G-! said the man.
He had. But he had grown so like death in life, that they knew not when he died. ~ Charles Dickens,
1405:I believe the power of observation in numbers of very young children to be quite wonderful for its closeness and accuracy. Indeed, ~ Charles Dickens,
1406:incluso se decía que, más de una vez, se vio a Carton en pleno día, dirigiéndose a su casa con paso vacilante, como gato calavera. ~ Charles Dickens,
1407:In the Destroyer's steps there spring up bright creations that defy his power, and his dark path becomes a way of light to Heaven. ~ Charles Dickens,
1408:In the Destroyer’s steps there spring up bright creations that defy his power, and his dark path becomes a way of light to Heaven. ~ Charles Dickens,
1409:"I saw her, in the fire, but now. I hear her in music, in the wind, in the dead stillness of the night," returned the haunted man. ~ Charles Dickens,
1410:It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; It is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known. ~ Charles Dickens,
1411:It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known. ~ Charles Dickens,
1412:Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business. ~ Charles Dickens,
1413:Morning made a considerable difference in my general prospects of Life and brightened it so much that is scarcely seemed the same. ~ Charles Dickens,
1414:She watched his face as earnestly as he watched the river. But, in the intensity of her look there was a touch of dread or horror. ~ Charles Dickens,
1415:The great principle of out-of-door relief is, to give the paupers exactly what they don't want; and then they get tired of coming. ~ Charles Dickens,
1416:The misery with them all was, clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters, and had lost the power for ever. ~ Charles Dickens,
1417:To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart. ~ Charles Dickens,
1418:Two other passengers, besides the one, were plodding up the hill by the side of the mail. All three were wrapped to the cheekbones ~ Charles Dickens,
1419:Up the two terrace flights of steps the rain ran wildly, and beat at the great door, like a swift messenger rousing those within;. ~ Charles Dickens,
1420:As to her, she was worthy to be his partner in every sense of the term. If that's not high praise, tell me higher, and I'll use it. ~ Charles Dickens,
1421:But the shadow of the manner of these Defarges was dark upon himself, for all that, and in his secret mind it troubled him greatly. ~ Charles Dickens,
1422:Gold conjures up a mist about a man, more destructive of all his old senses and lulling to his feelings than the fumes of charcoal. ~ Charles Dickens,
1423:Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. I ~ Charles Dickens,
1424:Make the most of it while it lasts. Get in your hay while the sun shines. Take your own way as long as it's in your power, my lady! ~ Charles Dickens,
1425:Mr. Tulkinghorn is always the same, speechless repository of noble confidences, so oddly out of place and yet so perfectly at home. ~ Charles Dickens,
1426:Probably every new and eagerly expected garment ever put on since clothes came in, fell a trifle short of the wearer's expectation. ~ Charles Dickens,
1427:"Some persons hold," he pursued, still hesitating, "that there is a wisdom of the Head, and that there is a wisdom of the Heart..." ~ Charles Dickens,
1428:The miserable man was a man of that confined stolidity of mind that he could not discuss my prospects without having me before him. ~ Charles Dickens,
1429:There never were greed and cunning in the world yet, that did not do too much, and overreach themselves. It is as certain as death. ~ Charles Dickens,
1430:We part with tender relations stretching far behind us, that never can be exactly renewed, and with others dawning - yet before us. ~ Charles Dickens,
1431:Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show ~ Charles Dickens,
1432:You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. Stick to Facts, sir! ~ Charles Dickens,
1433:Your manners have been of that silent and sullen and hangdog kind, that, upon my life and soul, I have been ashamed of you, Sydney! ~ Charles Dickens,
1434:And a beautiful world we live in, when it is possible, and when many other such things are possible, and not only possible, but done ~ Charles Dickens,
1435:Annual income is £ 20, the cost is 19, you will feel happiness. If annual income of £ 20, the cost is £ 20.6, you will see suffering ~ Charles Dickens,
1436:arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminster. Even the Cock-lane ghost had been laid only a round dozen of ~ Charles Dickens,
1437:For your popular rumour, unlike the rolling stone of the proverb, is one which gathers a deal of moss in its wanderings up and down. ~ Charles Dickens,
1438:In the moonlight which is always sad, as the light of the sun itself is -as the light called human life is- at its coming and going. ~ Charles Dickens,
1439:The cloud of caring for nothing, which overshadowed him with such a fatal darkness, was very rarely pierced by the light within him. ~ Charles Dickens,
1440:There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth. ~ Charles Dickens,
1441:The wind's in the east. . . . I am always conscious of an uncomfortable sensation now and then when the wind is blowing in the east. ~ Charles Dickens,
1442:Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. ~ Charles Dickens,
1443:Accidentally consumed five biscuits when I wasn't paying attention. Those biscuits are wily fellows - they leap in like sugary ninjas ~ Charles Dickens,
1444:If the parks be "the lungs of London" we wonder what Greenwich Fair is--a periodical breaking out, we suppose--a sort of spring rash. ~ Charles Dickens,
1445:I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free. Mankind will surely not deny to Harold Skimpole what it concedes to the butterflies. ~ Charles Dickens,
1446:Oh! the suspense, the fearful, acute suspense, of standing idly by while the life of one we dearly love, is trembling in the balance! ~ Charles Dickens,
1447:Pero el amor es ciego, y Nathaniel era bizco; y es posible que la suma de esas dos circunstancias le impidiese ver las cosas como son ~ Charles Dickens,
1448:Se serei o herói de minha própria vida, ou se essa posição será ocupada por alguma outra pessoa, é o que estas páginas devem mostrar. ~ Charles Dickens,
1449:The blossom is blighted, the leaf is withered, the God of day goes down upon the dreary scene, and in short you are for ever floored. ~ Charles Dickens,
1450:The daughter of Jairus was recalled to life, to die; but she, more blest, has heard the same voice, saying unto her, “Arise for ever! ~ Charles Dickens,
1451:There are strings in the human heart which must never be sounded by another, and drinks that I make myself are those strings in mine. ~ Charles Dickens,
1452:throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was ~ Charles Dickens,
1453:throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things ~ Charles Dickens,
1454:What is peace? Is it war? No. Is it strife? No. Is it lovely, and gentle, and beautiful, and pleasant, and serene, and joyful? O yes! ~ Charles Dickens,
1455:a limb o’ the law, Sammy, as has got brains like the frogs, dispersed all over his body, and reachin’ to the wery tips of his fingers; ~ Charles Dickens,
1456:Entre nosotros había alegre ficción de que nos divertíamos constantemente, y tambien la verdad esquelética de que nunca lo lograbamos. ~ Charles Dickens,
1457:How are you to get up the sympathies of the audience in a legitimate manner, if there isn't a little man contending against a big one? ~ Charles Dickens,
1458:hubo ocasiones en que me pareció como si una espesa cortina hubiese caído para ocultarme todo el interés y todo el encanto de la vida, ~ Charles Dickens,
1459:I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. ~ Charles Dickens,
1460:it is always the person not in the predicament who knows what ought to have been done in it, and would unquestionably have done it too ~ Charles Dickens,
1461:La incalificable verdad es que cuando amaba a Estella con amor de hombre, la amaba sólo y sencillamente por considerarla irresistible. ~ Charles Dickens,
1462:Marley was dead, to begin with ... This must be distintly understood, or nothing wonderful can come of the story I am going to relate. ~ Charles Dickens,
1463:Mr. Wopsle’s great-aunt conquered a confirmed habit of living into which she had fallen, and Biddy became a part of our establishment. ~ Charles Dickens,
1464:My sorrow may bear involuntary witness against you at the judgement Throne; but my angry thoughts or my reproaches never will, I know! ~ Charles Dickens,
1465:Mystery and disappointment are not absolutely indispensable to the growth of love, but they are, very often, its powerful auxiliaries. ~ Charles Dickens,
1466:"O, Mrs. Clennam, Mrs. Clennam," said Little Dorrit, "angry feelings and unforgiving deeds are no comfort and no guide to you and me." ~ Charles Dickens,
1467:she hated and detested Nicholas with all the narrowness of mind and littleness of purpose worthy a descendant of the house of Squeers. ~ Charles Dickens,
1468:The time was to come, when that wine too would be spilled on the street-stones, and when the stain of it would be red upon many there. ~ Charles Dickens,
1469:The wine-shops breed, in physical atmosphere of malaria and a moral pestilence of envy and vengeance, the men of crime and revolution. ~ Charles Dickens,
1470:upon the trees. Though the earth was cold and wet, the sky was clear, and the sun rose bright, placid, and beautiful. "Eighteen years! ~ Charles Dickens,
1471:what I mean is, that I am under the influence of some tremendous attraction
which I have resisted in vain, and which overmasters me ~ Charles Dickens,
1472:Why, how's this?' muttered the Jew: changing countenance; 'only two of 'em? Where's the third? They can't have got into trouble. Hark! ~ Charles Dickens,
1473:... As to sleep, you know, I never sleep now. I might be a Watchman, except that I don't get any pay, and he's got nothing on his mind. ~ Charles Dickens,
1474:Being practical people, we never allow anybody to scare the birds; and the birds, being practical people too, come about us in myriads. ~ Charles Dickens,
1475:clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. It was the ~ Charles Dickens,
1476:Cows are my passion. What I have ever sighed for has been to retreat to a Swiss farm, and live entirely surrounded by cows - and china. ~ Charles Dickens,
1477:Depressed and slinking though they were, eyes of fire were not wanting among them; nor compressed lips, white with what they suppressed ~ Charles Dickens,
1478:En cuanto a ella, era digna pareja en toda la extensión de la palabra. Si no es éste un gran elogio, decidme otro mejor, y lo emplearé. ~ Charles Dickens,
1479:Era a primeira vez que uma sepultura se abria na estrada da minha vida, e o rombo que ela formou na superfície lisa era extraordinário. ~ Charles Dickens,
1480:If you can't get to be uncommon through going straight, you'll never get to do it through going crooked. [...] live well and die happy. ~ Charles Dickens,
1481:Így van ez egész életünk során: legsötétebb perceinkben olyan emberek gusztusa szerint cselekszünk, akik megvetésünk tárgyai egyébként. ~ Charles Dickens,
1482:I had considered how the things that never happen, are often as much realities to us, in their effects, as those that are accomplished. ~ Charles Dickens,
1483:I never heerd...nor read of nor see in picters, any angel in tights and gaiters...but...he's a reg'lar thoroughbred angel for all that. ~ Charles Dickens,
1484:in that one glimpse of a better nature, born as it was in selfish thoughts, the rich man felt himself friendless, childless, and alone. ~ Charles Dickens,
1485:No eres impulsiva, no eres romántica, estás habituada a mirarlo todo desde el terreno sólido y desapasionado de la razón y del cálculo. ~ Charles Dickens,
1486:Por menos valor que tenha a vida quando é desperdiçada, vale, contudo, a pena defendê-la. Se assim não fosse, não custaria abandoná-la. ~ Charles Dickens,
1487:Such is the sleight of hand by which we juggle with ourselves, and change our very weaknesses into stanch and most magnanimous virtues! ~ Charles Dickens,
1488:The agony is exquisite, is it not? A broken heart. You think you will die. But you just keep living. Day after day, after terrible day. ~ Charles Dickens,
1489:Vio a quienes habían superado muchas situaciones duras porque llevaban en el pecho los materiales de la felicidad, el contento y la paz ~ Charles Dickens,
1490:Captain Cuttle, like all mankind, little knew how much hope had survived within him under discouragement, until he felt its death-shock. ~ Charles Dickens,
1491:Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one; stronger than magician ever spoke, or spirit ever answered to, in the strongest conjuration. ~ Charles Dickens,
1492:I hope I know my own unworthiness, and that I hate and despise myself and all my fellow-creatures as every practicable Christian should. ~ Charles Dickens,
1493:In the moonlight which is always sad, as the light of the sun itself is--as the light called human life is--at its coming and its going. ~ Charles Dickens,
1494:I should like to ask you:--Does your childhood seem far off? Do the days when you sat at your mother's knee, seem days of very long ago? ~ Charles Dickens,
1495:I think Austin is read more now than Charles Dickens, and Dickens was much more popular in his day. She endures because of her classicism. ~ Whit Stillman,
1496:It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade. ~ Charles Dickens,
1497:I want," said Defarge, who had not removed his gaze from the shoemaker, "to let in a little more light here. You can bear a little more? ~ Charles Dickens,
1498:Little Red Riding Hood was my first love. I felt that if I could have married Little Red Riding Hood, I should have known perfect bliss. ~ Charles Dickens,
1499:Molyok, legyek és más csúnya teremtmények a gyertyaláng körül röpdösnek – felelte Estella, és odapillantott. – Mit tehet a gyertya róla? ~ Charles Dickens,
1500:"O' course I came to look arter you, my darlin'," replied Mr. Weller; for once permitting his passion to get the better of his veracity. ~ Charles Dickens,

IN CHAPTERS [0/0]









WORDNET



--- Overview of noun charles_dickens

The noun charles dickens has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens ::: (English writer whose novels depicted and criticized social injustice (1812-1870))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun charles_dickens

1 sense of charles dickens                      

Sense 1
Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun charles_dickens
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun charles_dickens

1 sense of charles dickens                      

Sense 1
Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun charles_dickens

1 sense of charles dickens                      

Sense 1
Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aiken, Conrad Aiken, Conrad Potter Aiken
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alger, Horatio Alger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Algren, Nelson Algren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Andersen, Hans Christian Andersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Sherwood Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aragon, Louis Aragon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asch, Sholem Asch, Shalom Asch, Sholom Asch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asimov, Isaac Asimov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auchincloss, Louis Auchincloss, Louis Stanton Auchincloss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Austen, Jane Austen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, James Baldwin, James Arthur Baldwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baraka, Imamu Amiri Baraka, LeRoi Jones
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barth, John Barth, John Simmons Barth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barthelme, Donald Barthelme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baum, Frank Baum, Lyman Frank Brown
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beerbohm, Max Beerbohm, Sir Henry Maxmilian Beerbohm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Belloc, Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Hilaire Peter Belloc
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bellow, Saul Bellow, Solomon Bellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benchley, Robert Benchley, Robert Charles Benchley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, William Rose Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bierce, Ambrose Bierce, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boell, Heinrich Boell, Heinrich Theodor Boell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bontemps, Arna Wendell Bontemps
   HAS INSTANCE=> Borges, Jorge Borges, Jorge Luis Borges
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boswell, James Boswell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boyle, Kay Boyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradbury, Ray Bradbury, Ray Douglas Bradbury
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Charlotte Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Emily Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Currer Bell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Anne Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browne, Charles Farrar Browne, Artemus Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buck, Pearl Buck, Pearl Sydenstricker Buck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bunyan, John Bunyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burgess, Anthony Burgess
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnett, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, Edgar Rice Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, William Burroughs, William S. Burroughs, William Seward Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cabell, James Branch Cabell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvino, Italo Calvino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Canetti, Elias Canetti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cather, Willa Cather, Willa Sibert Cather
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chandler, Raymond Chandler, Raymond Thornton Chandler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cheever, John Cheever
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterton, G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert Keith Chesterton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chopin, Kate Chopin, Kate O'Flaherty Chopin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Mark Twain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cocteau, Jean Cocteau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Claudine Colette
   HAS INSTANCE=> Collins, Wilkie Collins, William Wilkie Collins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Teodor Josef Konrad Korzeniowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cooper, James Fenimore Cooper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Stephen Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> cummings, e. e. cummings, Edward Estlin Cummings
   HAS INSTANCE=> Day, Clarence Day, Clarence Shepard Day Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Defoe, Daniel Defoe
   HAS INSTANCE=> De Quincey, Thomas De Quincey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Didion, Joan Didion
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dinesen, Isak Dinesen, Blixen, Karen Blixen, Baroness Karen Blixen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Doctorow, E. L. Doctorow, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dos Passos, John Dos Passos, John Roderigo Dos Passos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoevsky, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Feodor Dostoevski, Fyodor Dostoevski, Feodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dreiser, Theodore Dreiser, Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dumas, Alexandre Dumas
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, George du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, Daphne du Maurier, Dame Daphne du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durrell, Lawrence Durrell, Lawrence George Durrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ehrenberg, Ilya Ehrenberg, Ilya Grigorievich Ehrenberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ellison, Ralph Ellison, Ralph Waldo Ellison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Farrell, James Thomas Farrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ferber, Edna Ferber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fielding, Henry Fielding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaubert, Gustave Flaubert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fleming, Ian Fleming, Ian Lancaster Fleming
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Ford Madox Ford, Ford Hermann Hueffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Forester, C. S. Forester, Cecil Scott Forester
   HAS INSTANCE=> France, Anatole France, Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaboriau, Emile Gaboriau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galsworthy, John Galsworthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaskell, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibran, Kahlil Gibran
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gjellerup, Karl Gjellerup
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gogol, Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Golding, William Golding, Sir William Gerald Golding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldsmith, Oliver Goldsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gombrowicz, Witold Gombrowicz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Jules de Goncourt, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorky, Maksim Gorky, Gorki, Maxim Gorki, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grahame, Kenneth Grahame
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grass, Gunter Grass, Gunter Wilhelm Grass
   HAS INSTANCE=> Graves, Robert Graves, Robert Ranke Graves
   HAS INSTANCE=> Greene, Graham Greene, Henry Graham Greene
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Zane Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Jakob Grimm, Jakob Ludwig Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm, Wilhelm Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haggard, Rider Haggard, Sir Henry Rider Haggard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Elizabeth Haldane, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, Edward Everett Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haley, Alex Haley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Radclyffe Hall, Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hammett, Dashiell Hammett, Samuel Dashiell Hammett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamsun, Knut Hamsun, Knut Pedersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Thomas Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Frank Harris, James Thomas Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Joel Harris, Joel Chandler Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harte, Bret Harte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hasek, Jaroslav Hasek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hawthorne, Nathaniel Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hecht, Ben Hecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Anson Heinlein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heller, Joseph Heller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesse, Hermann Hesse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyse, Paul Heyse, Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyward, DuBois Heyward, Edwin DuBois Hayward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Higginson, Thomas Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Storrow Higginson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holmes, Oliver Wendell Holmes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Howells, William Dean Howells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoyle, Edmond Hoyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hubbard, L. Ron Hubbard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Langston Hughes, James Langston Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Leigh Hunt, James Henry Leigh Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig




--- Grep of noun charles_dickens
charles dickens



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