classes ::: author, Poetry, Play,
children :::
branches ::: William Shakespeare

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object:William Shakespeare
class:author
subject class:Poetry
class:Play

--- WIKI
William Shakespeare (bapt. 26 April 1564 23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's greatest dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" (or simply "the Bard"). His extant works, including collaborations, consist of some 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith. Sometime between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part-owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. At age 49 (around 1613), he appears to have retired to Stratford, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive; this has stimulated considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, his sexuality, his religious beliefs, and whether the works attri buted to him were written by others. Shakespeare produced most of his known works between 1589 and 1613. His early plays were primarily comedies and histories and are regarded as some of the best work produced in these genres. Until about 1608, he wrote mainly tragedies, among them Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth, all considered to be among the finest works in the English language. In the last phase of his life, he wrote tragicomedies (also known as romances) and collaborated with other playwrights. Many of Shakespeare's plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy in his lifetime. However, in 1623, two fellow actors and friends of Shakespeare's, John Heminges and Henry Condell, published a more definitive text known as the First Folio, a posthumous collected edition of Shakespeare's dramatic works that included all but two of his plays. The volume was prefaced with a poem by Ben Jonson, in which Jonson presciently hails Shakespeare in a now-famous quote as "not of an age, but for all time". Throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, Shakespeare's works have been continually adapted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain popular and are studied, performed, and reinterpreted through various cultural and political contexts around the world.
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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Hamlet
Infinite_Library
The_Tempest
Twelfth_Night

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Deutsches_Requiem
The_Act_of_Creation_text

PRIMARY CLASS

author
Play
SIMILAR TITLES
William Shakespeare

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH


TERMS ANYWHERE

topic map "information science" A collection of "topics", their relationships, and information sources. A topic map captures the subjects of which information sources speak, and the relationships between them, in a way that is implementation independent. A topic is a symbol within the computer that represents something in the world such as the play Hamlet, the playwright William Shakespeare, or the "authorship" relationship. Topics can have names. They can also have occurrences, that is, information resources that are considered to be relevant in some way to their subject. Topics can play roles in relationships. Thus, topics have three kinds of characteristics: names, sources, and roles played in relationships. The assignment of such characteristics is considered to be valid within a certain scope, or context. Topic maps can be merged. Merging can take place at the discretion of the user or application (at runtime), or may be indicated by the topic map's author at the time of its creation. (2003-07-19)

topic map ::: (semantics) A collection of topics, their relationships, and information sources. A topic map captures the subjects of which information sources speak, and the relationships between them, in a way that is implementation independent.A topic is a symbol within the computer that represents something in the world such as the play Hamlet, the playwright William Shakespeare, or the authorship relationship.Topics can have names. They can also have occurrences, that is, information resources that are considered to be relevant in some way to their subject. Topics can play roles in relationships.Thus, topics have three kinds of characteristics: names, sources, and roles played in relationships. The assignment of such characteristics is considered to be valid within a certain scope, or context.Topic maps can be merged. Merging can take place at the discretion of the user or application (at runtime), or may be indicated by the topic map's author at the time of its creation.(2003-07-19)



QUOTES [26 / 26 - 1500 / 8722]


KEYS (10k)

   24 William Shakespeare
   1 Mortimer J Adler
   1 Jorge Luis Borges

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1498 William Shakespeare

1:Life is but a walking shadow. ~ William Shakespeare,
2:The sun ariseth in his majesty. ~ William Shakespeare,
3:And simpler than the infancy of truth. ~ William Shakespeare,
4:Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none. ~ William Shakespeare,
5:Thou canst not then be false to any man. ~ William Shakespeare,
6:Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss. ~ William Shakespeare,
7:Have more than you show, speak less than you know. ~ William Shakespeare,
8:We know what we are, but know not what we may be." ~ William Shakespeare,
9:Better three hours too soon than a minute too late." ~ William Shakespeare,
10:The miserable have no other medicine. But only hope.
   ~ William Shakespeare,
11:Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.
   ~ William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night,
12:A little I can read. ~ William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, act 1 scene 2,
13:I like this place and could willingly waste my time in it. ~ William Shakespeare,
14:How much better is it to weep at joy, than to joy at weeping? ~ William Shakespeare,
15:The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves. ~ William Shakespeare,
16:But doth suffer a sea-change
   Into something rich and strange. ~ William Shakespeare,
17:When I saw you I fell in love, and you smiled because you knew. ~ William Shakespeare,
18:Me, poor man, my library
Was dukedom large enough. ~ William Shakespeare, The Tempest
19:Love all; trust a few, Do wrong to none." ~ William Shakespeare, quote from "All's Well That Ends Well,", (1605).,
20:How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a weary world. ~ William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice ,
21:Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange. ~ William Shakespeare, The Tempest,
22:Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them. ~ William Shakespeare,
23:Advance our standards, set upon our foes;
Our ancient word of courage, fair Saint George,
Inspire us with the spleen of fiery dragons!
~ William Shakespeare,
24:All men who repeat a line from Shakespeare are William Shakespeare ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths, Selected Stories and Other Writings,
25:To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and, by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub.
For in this sleep of death what dreams may come. ~ William Shakespeare, Hamlet,
26:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Action is eloquence. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
2:Boldness be my friend. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
3:What is past is prologue. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
4:Tempt not a desperate man. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
5:Brevity is the soul of wit. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
6:I dote on his very absence. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
7:By that sin fell the angels. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
8:Give thy thoughts no tongue. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
9:Nothing can come of nothing. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
10:What's done can't be undone. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
11:When I was green in judgment. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
12:The wheel is come full circle. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
13:Listen to many, speak to a few. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
14:Who can be patient in extremes? ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
15:Conscience is a thousand swords. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
16:For my part, it was Greek to me. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
17:No legacy is so rich as honesty. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
18:Every cloud engenders not a storm. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
19:For the rain it raineth every day. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
20:I am sure care's an enemy to life. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
21:I am falser than vows made in wine. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
22:Neither a borrower nor a lender be. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
23:Strong reasons make strong actions. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
24:Such as we are made of, such we be. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
25:An overflow of good converts to bad. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
26:Friendly counsel cuts off many foes. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
27:Having nothing, nothing can he lose. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
28:Let every man be master of his time. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
29:Virtue is choked with foul ambition. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
30:Haste is needful in a desperate case. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
31:Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
32:But thy eternal summer shall not fade. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
33:The love of heaven makes one heavenly. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
34:To do a great right do a little wrong. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
35:Conscience doth make cowards of us all. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
36:For I can raise no money by vile means. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
37:Security is the chief enemy of mortals. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
38:Truth is truth to the end of reckoning. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
39:All things are ready if our minds be so. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
40:He that sleeps feels not the tooth-ache. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
41:Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
42:O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
43:Though she be but little, she is fierce. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
44:Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
45:Ambition should be made of sterner stuff. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
46:Expectation is the root of all heartache. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
47:I am as vigilant as a cat to steal cream. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
48:If money go before, all ways do lie open. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
49:I say there is no darkness but ignorance. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
50:The empty vessel makes the loudest sound. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
51:The lady doth protest too much, methinks. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
52:Defer no time; delays have dangerous ends. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
53:God! that one might read the book of fate. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
54:In a false quarrel there is no true valor. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
55:I wasted time, and now doth time waste me. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
56:Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
57:The attempt and not the deed confounds us. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
58:There's many a man has more hair than wit. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
59:To be, or not to be, that is the question. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
60:Words without thoughts never to heaven go. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
61:I like not fair terms and a villain's mind. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
62:Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
63:If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
64:Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
65:Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
66:Virtue itself scapes not calumnious strokes. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
67:Delay leads impotent and snail-paced beggary. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
68:Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
69:I am not bound to please thee with my answer. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
70:It is a wise father that knows his own child. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
71:Love is too young to know what conscience is. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
72:Men in rage strike those that wish them best. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
73:Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
74:Strive mightily but eat and drink as friends. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
75:The course of true love never did run smooth. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
76:The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
77:They do not love that do not show their love. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
78:Wisely, and slow. They stumble that run fast. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
79:How well he's read, to reason against reading! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
80:Modest doubt is called the beacon of the wise. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
81:One touch of nature makes the whole world kin. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
82:Pleasure and action make the hours seem short. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
83:Striving to be better, oft we mar what's well. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
84:Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
85:We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
86:With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
87:Youth to itself rebels, though none else near. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
88:April hath put a spirit of youth in everything. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
89:Commit the oldest sins the newest kind of ways. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
90:Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
91:My age is as a lusty winter, frosty but kindly. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
92:So wise so young, they say, do never live long. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
93:Time and the hour run through the roughest day. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
94:We waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
95:And oft, my jealousy shapes faults that are not. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
96:Every one can master a grief but he that has it. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
97:Of all base passions, fear is the most accursed. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
98:Present fears are less than horrible imaginings. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
99:And where the offense is, let the great axe fall. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
100:Lawless are they that make their wills their law. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
101:Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
102:Patience is pale cold cowardice in noble breasts. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
103:Though this be madness, yet there is method in't. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
104:Fortune brings in some boats that are not steered. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
105:Modest wisdom plucks me from over-credulous haste. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
106:Love sought is good, but given unsought, is better. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
107:False face must hide what the false heart doth know. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
108:Suit the action to the word, the word to the action. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
109:When words are scarce they are seldom spent in vain. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
110:I understand a fury in your words, But not the words. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
111:Let every eye negotiate for itself and trust no agent. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
112:Love is not love that alters when it alteration finds. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
113:He does it with better grace, but I do it more natural. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
114:A fine volley of words, gentlemen, and quickly shot off. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
115:Don't waste your love on somebody, who doesn't value it. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
116:The robbed that smiles, steals something from the thief. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
117:Good wine is a good familiar creature if it be well used. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
118:He that loves to be flattered is worthy o' the flatterer. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
119:&
120:Adieu! I have too grieved a heart to take a tedious leave. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
121:God has given you one face, and you make yourself another. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
122:It is the stars, the stars above us govern our conditions. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
123:Come, gentlemen, I hope we shall drink down all unkindness. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
124:I see that the fashion wears out more apparel than the man. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
125:There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
126:All that lives must die, Passing through nature to eternity. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
127:It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
128:Mind your speech a little lest you should mar your fortunes. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
129:&
130:He is winding the watch of his wit; by and by it will strike. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
131:Lord, Lord, how subject we old men are to this vice of lying! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
132:There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
133:No, I will be the pattern of all patience; I will say nothing. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
134:The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
135:Things done well and with a care, exempt themselves from fear. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
136:Honesty is the best policy. If I lose mine honor, I lose myself. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
137:How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds makes ill deeds done! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
138:Give me my robe, put on my crown; I have Immortal longings in me. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
139:Words are easy, like the wind; Faithful friends are hard to find. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
140:A peace above all earthly dignities, a still and quiet conscience. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
141:Golden lads and girls all must / As chimney-sweepers come to dust. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
142:Men's evil manners live in brass, their virtues we write in water. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
143:A man loves the meat in his youth that he cannot endure in his age. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
144:How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is to have a thankless child! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
145:It is a kind of good deed to say well; and yet words are not deeds. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
146:Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
147:The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
148:As he was valiant, I honour him. But as he was ambitious, I slew him. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
149:The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination all compact. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
150:A man cannot make him laugh - but that's no marvel; he drinks no wine. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
151:The stroke of death is as a lover's pinch, which hurts and is desired. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
152:But if it be a sin to covet honour, I am the most offending soul alive. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
153:It is a fool’s prerogative to utter truths that no one else will speak. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
154:Had all his hairs been lives, my great revenge had stomach for them all. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
155:The moon's an arrant thief, And her pale fire she snatches from the sun. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
156:Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit, and look on death itself. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
157:They are sick that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
158:A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
159:Be still prepared for death: and death or life shall thereby be the sweeter. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
160:Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
161:Now is the winter of our discontent made glorious summer by this son of York. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
162:Experience is by industry achieved, And perfected by the swift course of time. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
163:Let me embrace thee, sour adversity, for wise men say it is the wisest course. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
164:So full of artless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
165:Maids want nothing but husbands, and when they have them, they want everything. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
166:Most dangerous is that temptation that doth goad us on to sin in loving virtue. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
167:As soon go kindle fire with snow, as seek to quench the fire of love with words. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
168:Fishes live in the sea, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
169:Ignorance is the curse of God; knowledge is the wing wherewith we fly to heaven. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
170:Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
171:&
172:But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
173:How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees? ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
174:That which in mean men we entitle patience is pale cold cowardice in noble breasts. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
175:Now we sit through Shakespeare in order to recognize the quotations.”   Orson Welles ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
176:We may outrun, by violent swiftness, that which we run at, and lose by over-running. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
177:My tongue will tell the anger of my heart, or else my heart concealing it will break. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
178:Conscience is but a word that cowards use, devised at first to keep the strong in awe. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
179:Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
180:Truly, I would not hang a dog by my will, much more a man who hath any honesty in him. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
181:Cowards die many times before their deaths / The valiant never taste of death but once. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
182:Do not swear by the moon, for she changes constantly. Then your love would also change. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
183:Dramatic fiction - William Shakespeare made his biggest mark writing dramatic love stories. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
184:Fate, show thy force; ourselves we do not owe; What is decreed must be; and be this so. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
185:Teach not thy lip such scorn, for it was made for kissing, lady, not for such contempt. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
186:Expectation whirls me round. The imaginary relish is so sweet that it enchants my sense. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
187:Talking isn't doing. It is a kind of good deed to say well; and yet words are not deeds. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
188:The people are like water and the ruler a boat. Water can support a boat or overturn it. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
189:curse of marriage that we can call these delicate creatures ours and not their appetites! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
190:Filial ingratitude! Is it not as this mouth should tear this hand for lifting food to it. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
191:Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
192:Faith, there hath been many great men that have flattered the people who ne'er loved them. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
193:Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
194:God, O God, how weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable seem to me all the uses of this world! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
195:Experience is a jewel, and it had need be so, for it is often purchased at an infinite rate. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
196:Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
197:Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
198:Give sorrow words. The grief that does not speak whispers the o'er-fraught heart, and bids it break. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
199:O, beware, my lord, of jealousy; it is the green-ey'd monster, which doth mock the meat it feeds on. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
200:Ingratitude is monstrous; and for the multitude to be ungrateful, were to make a monster of the multitude. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
201:I love thee, I love but thee With a love that shall not die Till the sun grows cold And the stars grow old. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
202:If you can look into the seeds of time, and say which grain will grow and which will not, speak then unto me. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
203:I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano; A stage where every man must play a part, And mine is a sad one. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
204:To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
205:Doubt that the stars are fire, doubt that the sun doth move, doubt truth to be a liar, but never doubt I love. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
206:See how she leans her cheek upon her hand. O, that I were a glove upon that hand. That I might touch that cheek! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
207:Sweet are the uses of adversity which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, wears yet a precious jewel in his head. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
208:If music be the food of love, play on, give me excess of it; that surfeiting, the appetite may sicken, and so die. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
209:A good heart is the sun and the moon; or, rather, the sun and not the moon, for it shines bright and never changes. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
210:My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep. The more I give thee, the more I have, For both are infinite. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
211:Farewell, my sister, fare thee well. The elements be kind to thee, and make Thy spirits all of comfort: fare thee well. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
212:Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the word to the action. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
213:I think William Shakespeare was the wisest human being I ever heard of. To be perfectly frank, though, that's not saying much. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
214:I no longer believe that William Shakespeare the actor from Stratford was the author of the works that have been ascribed to him. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
215:Children wish fathers looked but with their eyes; fathers that children with their judgment looked; and either may be wrong. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
216:This above all; to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
217:Men are April when they woo, December when they wed. Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
218:It is the mind that makes the body rich; and as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, so honor peereth in the meanest habit. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
219:The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
220:My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, and every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
221:And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
222:I hate ingratitude more in man than lying, vainness, babbling, drunkenness, or any taint of vice, whose strong corruption inhabits our frail blood. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
223:Youth is full of sport, age's breath is short; youth is nimble, age is lame; Youth is hot and bold, age is weak and cold; Youth is wild, and age is tame. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
224:Blow, blow, thou winter wind, thou art not so unkind as man's ingratitude. Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky, thou dost not bite so nigh, as benefits forgot. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
225:Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
226:And why not death rather than living torment? To die is to be banish'd from myself; And Silvia is myself: banish'd from her Is self from self: a deadly banishment! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
227:My crown is in my heart, not on my head, Nor decked with diamonds and Indian stones, Nor to be seen: My crown is called content: A crown it is, that seldom kings enjoy. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
228:He that is proud eats up himself. Pride is his own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle; and whatever praises itself but in the deed, devours the deed in the praise. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
229:But jealous souls will not be answered so; They are not ever jealous for the cause, But jealous for they're jealous. &
230:How like a winter hath my absence been. From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year! What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen, What old December's bareness everywhere!   ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
231:All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
232:Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleave of care The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
233:What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
234:Crabbed age and youth cannot live together; Youth is full of pleasance, age full of care; Youth like the summer morn, age like winter weather; Youth like summer brave, age like winter bare. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
235:I would there were no age between ten and three-and-twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest; for there is nothing in the between but getting wenches with child, wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
236:Love is merely a madness; and, I tell you, deserves as well a dark house and a whip as madmen do; and the reason why they are not so punished and cured is that the lunacy is so ordinary that the whippers are in love too. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
237:I think Shakespeare is overrated. After all, all he did was string together a lot of old, well-known quotations.”  H.L.Mencken, on William Shakespeare ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
238:Love comforteth like sunshine after rain, But lust's effect is tempest after sun; Love's gentle spring doth always fresh remain, Lust's winter comes ere summer half be done; Love surfeit's not, Lust like a glutton dies, Love is all truth, Lust full. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
239:This life, which had been the tomb of his virtue and of his honour, is but a walking shadow; a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more: it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
240:Nowadays, one of the churches of Tlön maintains platonically that such and such a pain, such and such a greenish-yellow colour, such and such a temperature, such and such a sound, etc., make up the only reality there is. All men, in the climactic instant of coitus, are the same man. All men who repeat one line of Shakespeare are William Shakespeare. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
241:And there are Ben [Jonson] and William Shakespeare in wit-combat, sure enough; Ben bearing down like a mighty Spanish war-ship, fraught with all learning and artillery; Shakespeare whisking away from him - whisking right through him, athwart the big bulk and timbers of him; like a miraculous Celestial Light-ship, woven all of sheet-lightning and sunbeams! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Be advis’d, ~ William Shakespeare,
2:I do oppose ~ William Shakespeare,
3:I pity you. ~ William Shakespeare,
4:ROSENCRANTZ ~ William Shakespeare,
5:speculation ~ William Shakespeare,
6:Such an act ~ William Shakespeare,
7:Thy tongue ~ William Shakespeare,
8:Beauty, wit, ~ William Shakespeare,
9:Beelzebub at ~ William Shakespeare,
10:My endeavors ~ William Shakespeare,
11:Remember me. ~ William Shakespeare,
12:To persevere ~ William Shakespeare,
13:Were it good ~ William Shakespeare,
14:Who's there? ~ William Shakespeare,
15:You are made ~ William Shakespeare,
16:Anger is like ~ William Shakespeare,
17:Be collected. ~ William Shakespeare,
18:eke out hers. ~ William Shakespeare,
19:Et tu, Brute! ~ William Shakespeare,
20:Et tu, Brute? ~ William Shakespeare,
21:I am declined ~ William Shakespeare,
22:I do not know ~ William Shakespeare,
23:Juno’s swans, ~ William Shakespeare,
24:Love is blind ~ William Shakespeare,
25:Love is holy. ~ William Shakespeare,
26:news-cramm’d. ~ William Shakespeare,
27:O Prosperina, ~ William Shakespeare,
28:Our very eyes ~ William Shakespeare,
29:O you beast! ~ William Shakespeare,
30:Peace, I say. ~ William Shakespeare,
31:piteous heart ~ William Shakespeare,
32:saucy lackey, ~ William Shakespeare,
33:Shake it off. ~ William Shakespeare,
34:test me quote ~ William Shakespeare,
35:Thanks to men ~ William Shakespeare,
36:What country, ~ William Shakespeare,
37:What you egg? ~ William Shakespeare,
38:But I will be, ~ William Shakespeare,
39:harbinger, and ~ William Shakespeare,
40:I beseech you, ~ William Shakespeare,
41:I have nothing ~ William Shakespeare,
42:My salad days, ~ William Shakespeare,
43:My way of life ~ William Shakespeare,
44:Remember thee! ~ William Shakespeare,
45:Safely stowed. ~ William Shakespeare,
46:SIR TOBY BELCH ~ William Shakespeare,
47:sophistication ~ William Shakespeare,
48:The game is up ~ William Shakespeare,
49:They may seize ~ William Shakespeare,
50:Time be thine, ~ William Shakespeare,
51:Tis often seen ~ William Shakespeare,
52:Weep I cannot; ~ William Shakespeare,
53:What, you egg? ~ William Shakespeare,
54:Yon grey lines ~ William Shakespeare,
55:As for my wife, ~ William Shakespeare,
56:Brave new world ~ William Shakespeare,
57:But now behold, ~ William Shakespeare,
58:For conspiracy, ~ William Shakespeare,
59:Hagseed, hence! ~ William Shakespeare,
60:Honor's thought ~ William Shakespeare,
61:I am a subject, ~ William Shakespeare,
62:If is a custom, ~ William Shakespeare,
63:Keep thy friend ~ William Shakespeare,
64:Lay on, MacDuff ~ William Shakespeare,
65:Look on beauty, ~ William Shakespeare,
66:Mechanic slaves ~ William Shakespeare,
67:Oh, I am slain! ~ William Shakespeare,
68:Our rash faults ~ William Shakespeare,
69:Plutus himself, ~ William Shakespeare,
70:Upon the heath. ~ William Shakespeare,
71:action.—Soft you ~ William Shakespeare,
72:Anger's my meat. ~ William Shakespeare,
73:Flesh and blood, ~ William Shakespeare,
74:For the success, ~ William Shakespeare,
75:I'll read enough ~ William Shakespeare,
76:I myself am best ~ William Shakespeare,
77:In my mind's eye ~ William Shakespeare,
78:Love is not love ~ William Shakespeare,
79:Love me!... Why? ~ William Shakespeare,
80:My rage is gone, ~ William Shakespeare,
81:Nobody loves you ~ William Shakespeare,
82:Out, damned spot ~ William Shakespeare,
83:Thanks for that. ~ William Shakespeare,
84:That we would do ~ William Shakespeare,
85:The thorny point ~ William Shakespeare,
86:Thought is free. ~ William Shakespeare,
87:Thy food is such ~ William Shakespeare,
88:What's the news? ~ William Shakespeare,
89:androgynous fool, ~ William Shakespeare,
90:Fortune is merry, ~ William Shakespeare,
91:Fortune love you. ~ William Shakespeare,
92:He wears the rose ~ William Shakespeare,
93:I know them, yea, ~ William Shakespeare,
94:Milk-livered man! ~ William Shakespeare,
95:Milk-livered man, ~ William Shakespeare,
96:Please stop, sir. ~ William Shakespeare,
97:quotidian of love ~ William Shakespeare,
98:sans every thing. ~ William Shakespeare,
99:The game's afoot! ~ William Shakespeare,
100:The southern wind ~ William Shakespeare,
101:We burn daylight. ~ William Shakespeare,
102:We must not stint ~ William Shakespeare,
103:What e'er you are ~ William Shakespeare,
104:What's in a name? ~ William Shakespeare,
105:But I remember now ~ William Shakespeare,
106:covetousness. But, ~ William Shakespeare,
107:Enter Dogberry and ~ William Shakespeare,
108:Farewell, bastard. ~ William Shakespeare,
109:Goats and monkies! ~ William Shakespeare,
110:Good fortune then! ~ William Shakespeare,
111:Her name is Portia ~ William Shakespeare,
112:I defy you, stars! ~ William Shakespeare,
113:I defy you, stars. ~ William Shakespeare,
114:I flamed amazement ~ William Shakespeare,
115:O, I have suffered ~ William Shakespeare,
116:That but this blow ~ William Shakespeare,
117:The heavens forbid ~ William Shakespeare,
118:The sweetest honey ~ William Shakespeare,
119:Well roared, lion. ~ William Shakespeare,
120:What's more to do, ~ William Shakespeare,
121:You know that love ~ William Shakespeare,
122:You must not think ~ William Shakespeare,
123:a most sweet wench? ~ William Shakespeare,
124:And I for no woman. ~ William Shakespeare,
125:brook such disgrace ~ William Shakespeare,
126:Denmark's a prison. ~ William Shakespeare,
127:Fie, fie upon her! ~ William Shakespeare,
128:I am fortunes fool. ~ William Shakespeare,
129:I am one, my liege, ~ William Shakespeare,
130:I come, Graymalkin! ~ William Shakespeare,
131:If I lose my honor, ~ William Shakespeare,
132:i knew him, Horatio ~ William Shakespeare,
133:I must have liberty ~ William Shakespeare,
134:I see it feelingly. ~ William Shakespeare,
135:Love and be silent. ~ William Shakespeare,
136:Men that hazard all ~ William Shakespeare,
137:Sê fiel a ti mesmo. ~ William Shakespeare,
138:Set we forward; let ~ William Shakespeare,
139:The end crowns all, ~ William Shakespeare,
140:The interim is mine ~ William Shakespeare,
141:Their understanding ~ William Shakespeare,
142:The rest is silence ~ William Shakespeare,
143:This too shall pass ~ William Shakespeare,
144:To be or not to be. ~ William Shakespeare,
145:What can be avoided ~ William Shakespeare,
146:words, words, words ~ William Shakespeare,
147:A book? O, rare one, ~ William Shakespeare,
148:Action is eloquence. ~ William Shakespeare,
149:A feast of languages ~ William Shakespeare,
150:At once, good night- ~ William Shakespeare,
151:Come, thou tortoise! ~ William Shakespeare,
152:Firm and irrevocable ~ William Shakespeare,
153:From this time forth ~ William Shakespeare,
154:How many ages hence ~ William Shakespeare,
155:I am not what I am.. ~ William Shakespeare,
156:I can see his pride ~ William Shakespeare,
157:I have heard it said ~ William Shakespeare,
158:It puzzles the will. ~ William Shakespeare,
159:I will unbolt to you ~ William Shakespeare,
160:life is like theater ~ William Shakespeare,
161:Love, and be silent. ~ William Shakespeare,
162:Man delights not me. ~ William Shakespeare,
163:O honorable strumpet ~ William Shakespeare,
164:O, what men dare do! ~ William Shakespeare,
165:O, where is loyalty? ~ William Shakespeare,
166:Pleasure and revenge ~ William Shakespeare,
167:pretty chopp’d hands ~ William Shakespeare,
168:Speak, hands for me! ~ William Shakespeare,
169:Sweets to the sweet. ~ William Shakespeare,
170:The breach of custom ~ William Shakespeare,
171:The quality of mercy ~ William Shakespeare,
172:The readiness is all ~ William Shakespeare,
173:therein lies the rub ~ William Shakespeare,
174:There is none but he ~ William Shakespeare,
175:The rest is silence. ~ William Shakespeare,
176:The thing of courage ~ William Shakespeare,
177:This is some fellow, ~ William Shakespeare,
178:To be, or not to be. ~ William Shakespeare,
179:We are not the first ~ William Shakespeare,
180:Well said, old mole! ~ William Shakespeare,
181:what ho, apothecary! ~ William Shakespeare,
182:What's done, is done ~ William Shakespeare,
183:What seest thou else ~ William Shakespeare,
184:Words, words, words. ~ William Shakespeare,
185:You are a saucy boy. ~ William Shakespeare,
186:An angel; or, if not, ~ William Shakespeare,
187:and when he shall die ~ William Shakespeare,
188:A sympathy in choice. ~ William Shakespeare,
189:Avaunt, you cullions! ~ William Shakespeare,
190:A very scurvy fellow. ~ William Shakespeare,
191:Barnes are blessings. ~ William Shakespeare,
192:Death rock me asleep. ~ William Shakespeare,
193:For there's no motion ~ William Shakespeare,
194:Foul deeds will rise, ~ William Shakespeare,
195:Give me my sin again. ~ William Shakespeare,
196:God defend the right. ~ William Shakespeare,
197:Had it pleas'd heaven ~ William Shakespeare,
198:He was too good to be ~ William Shakespeare,
199:Less art, more matter ~ William Shakespeare,
200:Love's night is noon. ~ William Shakespeare,
201:Making night hideous. ~ William Shakespeare,
202:Melt Egypt into Nile! ~ William Shakespeare,
203:Now the time is come, ~ William Shakespeare,
204:O be some other name. ~ William Shakespeare,
205:Pray, do not mock me. ~ William Shakespeare,
206:«¡Romeo, desterrado!» ~ William Shakespeare,
207:That is honor's scorn ~ William Shakespeare,
208:The curse of marriage ~ William Shakespeare,
209:The gates of monarchs ~ William Shakespeare,
210:The past is prologue. ~ William Shakespeare,
211:The play's the thing. ~ William Shakespeare,
212:The readiness is all. ~ William Shakespeare,
213:The rest, is silence. ~ William Shakespeare,
214:The spirit of a youth ~ William Shakespeare,
215:Tremble, thou wretch, ~ William Shakespeare,
216:We rest your hermits. ~ William Shakespeare,
217:You kiss by th' book. ~ William Shakespeare,
218:And she's fair I love. ~ William Shakespeare,
219:A tardiness in nature, ~ William Shakespeare,
220:bearded like the pard, ~ William Shakespeare,
221:Be just, and fear not. ~ William Shakespeare,
222:Blood will have blood. ~ William Shakespeare,
223:Boldness be my friend. ~ William Shakespeare,
224:Experience teacheth us ~ William Shakespeare,
225:Get thee to a nunnery! ~ William Shakespeare,
226:Get thee to a nunnery. ~ William Shakespeare,
227:God grant us patience! ~ William Shakespeare,
228:I bear a charmed life. ~ William Shakespeare,
229:I was adored once too. ~ William Shakespeare,
230:I was once adored too. ~ William Shakespeare,
231:Like Niobe, all tears. ~ William Shakespeare,
232:Live loath'd and long, ~ William Shakespeare,
233:Love all, trust a few. ~ William Shakespeare,
234:Love goes toward love. ~ William Shakespeare,
235:My soul is in the sky. ~ William Shakespeare,
236:My wits begin to turn. ~ William Shakespeare,
237:No man's pie is freed ~ William Shakespeare,
238:O most delicate fiend! ~ William Shakespeare,
239:Reason thus with life: ~ William Shakespeare,
240:She is rich in beauty. ~ William Shakespeare,
241:Sin will pluck on sin. ~ William Shakespeare,
242:So. Lie there, my art. ~ William Shakespeare,
243:So many horrid Ghosts. ~ William Shakespeare,
244:swashing and a martial ~ William Shakespeare,
245:thus with a kiss I die ~ William Shakespeare,
246:- To be, or not to be. ~ William Shakespeare,
247:Turn hell-hound, turn. ~ William Shakespeare,
248:way is to conjure you, ~ William Shakespeare,
249:we must obey the time. ~ William Shakespeare,
250:What man dare, I dare. ~ William Shakespeare,
251:What must be shall be. ~ William Shakespeare,
252:Wishes were ever fools ~ William Shakespeare,
253:Ah me, how weak a thing ~ William Shakespeare,
254:All the world's a stage ~ William Shakespeare,
255:A man can die but once. ~ William Shakespeare,
256:and the rest is silence ~ William Shakespeare,
257:A turn or two I'll walk ~ William Shakespeare,
258:Be checked for silence, ~ William Shakespeare,
259:Be just, and fear not. ~ William Shakespeare,
260:By my heel, I care not. ~ William Shakespeare,
261:Farewell, fair cruelty. ~ William Shakespeare,
262:Fight to the last gasp. ~ William Shakespeare,
263:Friends now fast sworn, ~ William Shakespeare,
264:Give me a bowl of wine, ~ William Shakespeare,
265:Greatness knows itself. ~ William Shakespeare,
266:Ha, ha, are you honest? ~ William Shakespeare,
267:Hate pollutes the mind. ~ William Shakespeare,
268:He does me double wrong ~ William Shakespeare,
269:Lend less than you owe. ~ William Shakespeare,
270:Let us kill all lawyers ~ William Shakespeare,
271:love is not time's fool ~ William Shakespeare,
272:Make love’s quick pants ~ William Shakespeare,
273:Men are as the time is. ~ William Shakespeare,
274:Mine honour is my life. ~ William Shakespeare,
275:Motley's the only wear. ~ William Shakespeare,
276:Much ado about nothing. ~ William Shakespeare,
277:Now no way can I stray; ~ William Shakespeare,
278:O, reason not the need! ~ William Shakespeare,
279:O, the blood more stirs ~ William Shakespeare,
280:Pour on, I will endure. ~ William Shakespeare,
281:Put money in thy purse. ~ William Shakespeare,
282:She is herself a dowry. ~ William Shakespeare,
283:She's good, being gone. ~ William Shakespeare,
284:So loving to my mother, ~ William Shakespeare,
285:Speak me fair in death. ~ William Shakespeare,
286:Take pains. Be perfect. ~ William Shakespeare,
287:Tears water our growth. ~ William Shakespeare,
288:The hideous god of war. ~ William Shakespeare,
289:Then I defy you, stars! ~ William Shakespeare,
290:To cool a gipsy’s lust. ~ William Shakespeare,
291:What a fool honesty is. ~ William Shakespeare,
292:Who are the violets now ~ William Shakespeare,
293:William Shakespeare
~ Adam Oehlenschläger,
294:You are a tedious fool. ~ William Shakespeare,
295:A king of infinite space ~ William Shakespeare,
296:All the world's a stage. ~ William Shakespeare,
297:Ambition's debt is paid. ~ William Shakespeare,
298:A table-full of welcome! ~ William Shakespeare,
299:Better be with the dead, ~ William Shakespeare,
300:Come, Lady, die to live. ~ William Shakespeare,
301:Day, night, late, early, ~ William Shakespeare,
302:El pasado es un prólogo. ~ William Shakespeare,
303:Examine well your blood. ~ William Shakespeare,
304:Exit, pursued by a bear. ~ William Shakespeare,
305:Fools are not mad folks. ~ William Shakespeare,
306:Good wine needs no bush. ~ William Shakespeare,
307:Hold, or cut bowstrings. ~ William Shakespeare,
308:If ever thou shalt love, ~ William Shakespeare,
309:I love him for his sake; ~ William Shakespeare,
310:In jest, there is truth. ~ William Shakespeare,
311:Is she not passing fair? ~ William Shakespeare,
312:I would I were thy bird. ~ William Shakespeare,
313:Let the end try the man. ~ William Shakespeare,
314:Life's uncertain voyage. ~ William Shakespeare,
315:Love and meekness, lord, ~ William Shakespeare,
316:Nós nascemos para morrer ~ William Shakespeare,
317:Oh, I am fortune's fool! ~ William Shakespeare,
318:O war! thou son of Hell! ~ William Shakespeare,
319:Sometimes, less is more. ~ William Shakespeare,
320:Speak comfortable words. ~ William Shakespeare,
321:The best is yet to come. ~ William Shakespeare,
322:The insolence of office. ~ William Shakespeare,
323:The people are the city. ~ William Shakespeare,
324:Time is the king of men. ~ William Shakespeare,
325:To Thine Ownself be True ~ William Shakespeare,
326:What if this cursed hand ~ William Shakespeare,
327:What's past is prologue. ~ William Shakespeare,
328:Wishers were ever fools. ~ William Shakespeare,
329:Woe is forerun with woe. ~ William Shakespeare,
330:A harmless necessary cat. ~ William Shakespeare,
331:A light heart lives long. ~ William Shakespeare,
332:A lightning before death: ~ William Shakespeare,
333:All dark and comfortless. ~ William Shakespeare,
334:All hoods make not monks. ~ William Shakespeare,
335:And makes me poor indeed. ~ William Shakespeare,
336:As if we were God's spies ~ William Shakespeare,
337:Away you three-inch fool! ~ William Shakespeare,
338:Best safety lies in fear. ~ William Shakespeare,
339:Beware the ides of March. ~ William Shakespeare,
340:By-and-by is easily said. ~ William Shakespeare,
341:Contention, like a horse, ~ William Shakespeare,
342:Death is a fearful thing. ~ William Shakespeare,
343:Dirty days hath September ~ William Shakespeare,
344:Falsehood falsehood cures ~ William Shakespeare,
345:Fight till the last gasp. ~ William Shakespeare,
346:For youth no less becomes ~ William Shakespeare,
347:Give me my longsword, ho! ~ William Shakespeare,
348:Grief makes one hour ten. ~ William Shakespeare,
349:grief makes one hour ten. ~ William Shakespeare,
350:Have patience, and endure ~ William Shakespeare,
351:I am thy father's spirit; ~ William Shakespeare,
352:I am too much in the sun. ~ William Shakespeare,
353:I can bear a charmed life ~ William Shakespeare,
354:Ingratitude is monstrous. ~ William Shakespeare,
355:I prithee gentle friend, ~ William Shakespeare,
356:I sat upon a promontory, ~ William Shakespeare,
357:Let each man do his best. ~ William Shakespeare,
358:Lions make leopards tame. ~ William Shakespeare,
359:Love is merely a madness. ~ William Shakespeare,
360:My grief lies all within, ~ William Shakespeare,
361:Not an angel of the air, ~ William Shakespeare,
362:now unmuzzle your wisdom. ~ William Shakespeare,
363:O for a horse with wings! ~ William Shakespeare,
364:Once more into the breach ~ William Shakespeare,
365:O! That way madness lies. ~ William Shakespeare,
366:Pardon's the word to all. ~ William Shakespeare,
367:Poor wretches that depend ~ William Shakespeare,
368:Take you me for a sponge? ~ William Shakespeare,
369:Tempt not a desperate man ~ William Shakespeare,
370:The devil is a gentleman. ~ William Shakespeare,
371:The king-becoming graces, ~ William Shakespeare,
372:The past is the prologue. ~ William Shakespeare,
373:The time is out of joint. ~ William Shakespeare,
374:Thou art all the comfort, ~ William Shakespeare,
375:To thine own self be true ~ William Shakespeare,
376:We cannot all be masters. ~ William Shakespeare,
377:We have seen better days. ~ William Shakespeare,
378:What is past is prologue. ~ William Shakespeare,
379:When law can do no right, ~ William Shakespeare,
380:Who can control his fate? ~ William Shakespeare,
381:Women are angels, wooing: ~ William Shakespeare,
382:All's well that ends well. ~ William Shakespeare,
383:All the world's a stage... ~ William Shakespeare,
384:And Caesar shall go forth. ~ William Shakespeare,
385:Aye me sad hours seem long ~ William Shakespeare,
386:Behold the threaden sails, ~ William Shakespeare,
387:Can we outrun the heavens? ~ William Shakespeare,
388:Drink down all unkindness. ~ William Shakespeare,
389:Every why has a wherefore. ~ William Shakespeare,
390:fleet the time carelessly, ~ William Shakespeare,
391:Go off, I discard you. Let ~ William Shakespeare,
392:His acts being seven ages. ~ William Shakespeare,
393:I am ill at these numbers. ~ William Shakespeare,
394:I came, saw, and overcame. ~ William Shakespeare,
395:Idol of idiot-worshippers! ~ William Shakespeare,
396:I have not slept one wink. ~ William Shakespeare,
397:I will through and through ~ William Shakespeare,
398:Love laughs at locksmiths. ~ William Shakespeare,
399:More matter with less art. ~ William Shakespeare,
400:Nay, had I pow'r, I should ~ William Shakespeare,
401:Nothing that is so, is so. ~ William Shakespeare,
402:Old fools are babes again. ~ William Shakespeare,
403:Old Time the clock-setter. ~ William Shakespeare,
404:Omittance is no quittance. ~ William Shakespeare,
405:Our praises are our wages. ~ William Shakespeare,
406:Patch grief with proverbs. ~ William Shakespeare,
407:so full of shapes is fancy ~ William Shakespeare,
408:Talkers are no good doers. ~ William Shakespeare,
409:Tears shall drown the wind ~ William Shakespeare,
410:The gloomy shade of death. ~ William Shakespeare,
411:The Thane of Cawdor lives, ~ William Shakespeare,
412:The world must be peopled! ~ William Shakespeare,
413:This is some minx's token, ~ William Shakespeare,
414:Thyself and thy belongings ~ William Shakespeare,
415:To saucy doubts and fears. ~ William Shakespeare,
416:To thine own self be true. ~ William Shakespeare,
417:Travelers must be content. ~ William Shakespeare,
418:Trip away;
Make no stay ~ William Shakespeare,
419:Truth hath a quiet breast. ~ William Shakespeare,
420:Well, we were born to die. ~ William Shakespeare,
421:What's the unkindest tide? ~ William Shakespeare,
422:What, you egg? [stabs him] ~ William Shakespeare,
423:Wherefore art thou, Romeo? ~ William Shakespeare,
424:Who is't can read a woman? ~ William Shakespeare,
425:You are yoked with a lamb, ~ William Shakespeare,
426:You must take your chance. ~ William Shakespeare,
427:A fool's bolt is soon shot. ~ William Shakespeare,
428:A fusty nut with no kernel. ~ William Shakespeare,
429:A hit, a very palpable hit. ~ William Shakespeare,
430:All furnished, all in arms; ~ William Shakespeare,
431:All is fair in love and war ~ William Shakespeare,
432:All pride is willing pride. ~ William Shakespeare,
433:All that’s spoke is marr’d. ~ William Shakespeare,
434:... And death unloads thee. ~ William Shakespeare,
435:Appetite, a universal wolf. ~ William Shakespeare,
436:Are you up to your destiny? ~ William Shakespeare,
437:As chaste as unsunned snow. ~ William Shakespeare,
438:As good luck would have it. ~ William Shakespeare,
439:Ay me! sad hours seem long. ~ William Shakespeare,
440:Be as thou wast wont to be. ~ William Shakespeare,
441:Beauty lives with kindness. ~ William Shakespeare,
442:Be not afraid of greatness. ~ William Shakespeare,
443:Brevity is the soul of wit. ~ William Shakespeare,
444:brevity is the soul of wit, ~ William Shakespeare,
445:Come, we burn daylight, ho! ~ William Shakespeare,
446:Death-counterfeiting sleep. ~ William Shakespeare,
447:Despair and die. The ghosts ~ William Shakespeare,
448:Did my heart love 'til now? ~ William Shakespeare,
449:Even in the cannon’s mouth. ~ William Shakespeare,
450:Every why hath a wherefore. ~ William Shakespeare,
451:Farewell, sweet playfellow. ~ William Shakespeare,
452:For to define true madness, ~ William Shakespeare,
453:Foul whisperings are abroad ~ William Shakespeare,
454:Frailty, thy name is woman! ~ William Shakespeare,
455:Friendship's full of dregs. ~ William Shakespeare,
456:Go, bid the soldiers shoot. ~ William Shakespeare,
457:I am wealthy in my friends. ~ William Shakespeare,
458:I dote on his very absence. ~ William Shakespeare,
459:I'll teach you differences. ~ William Shakespeare,
460:Is not the truth the truth? ~ William Shakespeare,
461:Is she kind as she is fair? ~ William Shakespeare,
462:It is a sin to be a mocker. ~ William Shakespeare,
463:I was a coward on instinct. ~ William Shakespeare,
464:Let no such man be trusted. ~ William Shakespeare,
465:Life's an Unceartian Voyage ~ William Shakespeare,
466:Life's but a walking shadow ~ William Shakespeare,
467:Much rain wears the marble. ~ William Shakespeare,
468:On a day - alack the day! - ~ William Shakespeare,
469:Remembrance of things past. ~ William Shakespeare,
470:Say a day without the ever. ~ William Shakespeare,
471:Silence is only commendable ~ William Shakespeare,
472:Slabosti tvoje ime je žena. ~ William Shakespeare,
473:Speak low if you speak love ~ William Shakespeare,
474:Speak, what trade art thou? ~ William Shakespeare,
475:That which I would discover ~ William Shakespeare,
476:The cunning livery of hell. ~ William Shakespeare,
477:The death of each days life ~ William Shakespeare,
478:The heart hath treble wrong ~ William Shakespeare,
479:The heavenly-harness'd team ~ William Shakespeare,
480:The raven chides blackness. ~ William Shakespeare,
481:There is a world elsewhere. ~ William Shakespeare,
482:The world is not thy friend ~ William Shakespeare,
483:They say miracles are past. ~ William Shakespeare,
484:They stumble that run fast. ~ William Shakespeare,
485:They were devils incarnate. ~ William Shakespeare,
486:This thought is as a death. ~ William Shakespeare,
487:Tis hatched and shall be so ~ William Shakespeare,
488:'Tis not to make me jealous ~ William Shakespeare,
489:Too nice, and yet too true! ~ William Shakespeare,
490:To sleep perchance to dream ~ William Shakespeare,
491:We make trifles of terrors, ~ William Shakespeare,
492:who bore him three children ~ William Shakespeare,
493:Who is it can read a woman? ~ William Shakespeare,
494:You, minion, are too saucy. ~ William Shakespeare,
495:A good heart 'is worth gold. ~ William Shakespeare,
496:All's well if all ends well. ~ William Shakespeare,
497:As merry as the day is long. ~ William Shakespeare,
498:Base is the slave that pays. ~ William Shakespeare,
499:Be bloody bold and resolute. ~ William Shakespeare,
500:Be free, and fare thou well! ~ William Shakespeare,
501:By that sin fell the angels. ~ William Shakespeare,
502:Chain me with roaring bears; ~ William Shakespeare,
503:Cold indeed, and labor lost: ~ William Shakespeare,
504:Come away, come away, death, ~ William Shakespeare,
505:Cut him out in little stars. ~ William Shakespeare,
506:For this relief, much thanks ~ William Shakespeare,
507:Foul whisp'rings are abroad. ~ William Shakespeare,
508:Friendship is full of dregs. ~ William Shakespeare,
509:Give me to drink mandragora. ~ William Shakespeare,
510:Give thy thoughts no tongue. ~ William Shakespeare,
511:Hang him, swaggering rascal! ~ William Shakespeare,
512:He that dies pays all debts. ~ William Shakespeare,
513:Highly fed and lowly taught. ~ William Shakespeare,
514:How my achievements mock me! ~ William Shakespeare,
515:I cannot speak your england. ~ William Shakespeare,
516:I may command where I adore. ~ William Shakespeare,
517:Know you where you are, sir? ~ William Shakespeare,
518:Let us our lives, our souls, ~ William Shakespeare,
519:Life is but a walking shadow ~ William Shakespeare,
520:Love reasons without reason. ~ William Shakespeare,
521:More matter with less art.60 ~ William Shakespeare,
522:Nothing can come of nothing. ~ William Shakespeare,
523:Nothing will come of nothing ~ William Shakespeare,
524:Now I could drink hot blood! ~ William Shakespeare,
525:O shame! where is thy blush? ~ William Shakespeare,
526:O shame, where is thy blush? ~ William Shakespeare,
527:O world, thy slippery turns! ~ William Shakespeare,
528:Parting is such sweet sorrow ~ William Shakespeare,
529:Rest you fair, good signior; ~ William Shakespeare,
530:Retire me to my Milan, where ~ William Shakespeare,
531:Silence is the herald of joy ~ William Shakespeare,
532:So young, my lord, and true. ~ William Shakespeare,
533:Speak low if you speak love. ~ William Shakespeare,
534:Speak low, if you speak love ~ William Shakespeare,
535:Such stuff as madmen tongue. ~ William Shakespeare,
536:The icy precepts of respect. ~ William Shakespeare,
537:Then to the elements be free ~ William Shakespeare,
538:Thou art a very ragged Wart. ~ William Shakespeare,
539:Thou lump of foul deformity! ~ William Shakespeare,
540:To sleep perchance to dream. ~ William Shakespeare,
541:To sleep: perchance to dream ~ William Shakespeare,
542:To this urn let those repair ~ William Shakespeare,
543:What a piece of work is man! ~ William Shakespeare,
544:What's done can't be undone. ~ William Shakespeare,
545:Where I could not be honest, ~ William Shakespeare,
546:Why, thou owest god a death. ~ William Shakespeare,
547:All that glisters is not gold ~ William Shakespeare,
548:Although the last, not least. ~ William Shakespeare,
549:A plague on both your houses. ~ William Shakespeare,
550:Are there no stones in heaven ~ William Shakespeare,
551:Away, you mouldy rogue, away! ~ William Shakespeare,
552:But love that comes too late, ~ William Shakespeare,
553:Filths savour but themselves. ~ William Shakespeare,
554:Hang those that talk of fear. ~ William Shakespeare,
555:Holy, fair, and wise is she; ~ William Shakespeare,
556:How shall I murder him, Iago? ~ William Shakespeare,
557:It was a lover and his lass, ~ William Shakespeare,
558:I would fain die a dry death. ~ William Shakespeare,
559:Men should be what they seem. ~ William Shakespeare,
560:Mere prattle without practice ~ William Shakespeare,
561:My stars shine darkly over me ~ William Shakespeare,
562:Oh what fools we mortals are. ~ William Shakespeare,
563:Oh world, thy slippery turns! ~ William Shakespeare,
564:One sin another doth provoke. ~ William Shakespeare,
565:Our tears are not yet brewed. ~ William Shakespeare,
566:Out, damned spot! Out, I say! ~ William Shakespeare,
567:Out, damned spot! out, I say! ~ William Shakespeare,
568:Policy sits above conscience. ~ William Shakespeare,
569:Seeking the bubble reputation ~ William Shakespeare,
570:Speak low, if you speak love. ~ William Shakespeare,
571:Sycorax has grown into a hoop ~ William Shakespeare,
572:The fear's as bad as falling. ~ William Shakespeare,
573:The weakest goes to the wall. ~ William Shakespeare,
574:They are hare-brain'd slaves. ~ William Shakespeare,
575:thrust his maids to the wall. ~ William Shakespeare,
576:What a piece of work is a man ~ William Shakespeare,
577:What did thy song bode, lady? ~ William Shakespeare,
578:What's done cannot be undone. ~ William Shakespeare,
579:Why, what should be the fear? ~ William Shakespeare,
580:Women's weapons, water-drops. ~ William Shakespeare,
581:Words, words, words. Polonius ~ William Shakespeare,
582:Age, thou hast lost thy labor. ~ William Shakespeare,
583:All that glisters is not gold, ~ William Shakespeare,
584:All that glisters is not gold. ~ William Shakespeare,
585:All that glitters is not gold. ~ William Shakespeare,
586:A man should be what he seems. ~ William Shakespeare,
587:And thou, all-shaking thunder, ~ William Shakespeare,
588:A pair of star-crossed lovers. ~ William Shakespeare,
589:A very little little let us do ~ William Shakespeare,
590:Fair Katherine, and most fair, ~ William Shakespeare,
591:Faults that are rich are fair. ~ William Shakespeare,
592:Fill all thy bones with aches. ~ William Shakespeare,
593:For she had eyes and chose me. ~ William Shakespeare,
594:Good luck lies in odd numbers. ~ William Shakespeare,
595:Good things should be praised. ~ William Shakespeare,
596:Hath Death Iain with thy wife. ~ William Shakespeare,
597:Hãy thành thật với chính mình. ~ William Shakespeare,
598:He kills her in her own humor. ~ William Shakespeare,
599:Hereditary sloth instructs me. ~ William Shakespeare,
600:He says, he loves my daughter; ~ William Shakespeare,
601:In delay there lies no plenty. ~ William Shakespeare,
602:In thy foul throat thou liest. ~ William Shakespeare,
603:I scorn you, scurvy companion. ~ William Shakespeare,
604:I wear not motley in my brain. ~ William Shakespeare,
605:Jesters do oft prove prophets. ~ William Shakespeare,
606:Leave us to our free election. ~ William Shakespeare,
607:Let's meet as little as we can ~ William Shakespeare,
608:Love`s reason`s without reason ~ William Shakespeare,
609:Love, whose month is ever May, ~ William Shakespeare,
610:Now the fair goddess, Fortune, ~ William Shakespeare,
611:Report me and my cause aright. ~ William Shakespeare,
612:See the minutes, how they run, ~ William Shakespeare,
613:Serve God, love me, and mend.: ~ William Shakespeare,
614:Sir, the year growing ancient, ~ William Shakespeare,
615:Soft pity enters an iron gate. ~ William Shakespeare,
616:Tamsa patinka meilei: ji akla. ~ William Shakespeare,
617:There is no creature loves me; ~ William Shakespeare,
618:There's a time for all things. ~ William Shakespeare,
619:There's meaning in thy snores. ~ William Shakespeare,
620:The wheel is come full circle. ~ William Shakespeare,
621:The worm is not to be trusted. ~ William Shakespeare,
622:Thy friendship makes us fresh. ~ William Shakespeare,
623:Todo el mundo es un escenario. ~ William Shakespeare,
624:What wouldst thou do, old man? ~ William Shakespeare,
625:What, you egg? [He stabs him.] ~ William Shakespeare,
626:When daffodils begin to peer, ~ William Shakespeare,
627:You are strangely troublesome. ~ William Shakespeare,
628:You gotta be cruel to be kind. ~ William Shakespeare,
629:A dream itself is but a shadow. ~ William Shakespeare,
630:Ambition, the soldier's virtue. ~ William Shakespeare,
631:And nature must obey necessity. ~ William Shakespeare,
632:...an old man is twice a child. ~ William Shakespeare,
633:But virtue never will be mov'd, ~ William Shakespeare,
634:Courage mounteth with occasion. ~ William Shakespeare,
635:Educated men are so impressive! ~ William Shakespeare,
636:Educated men are so impressive. ~ William Shakespeare,
637:Et tu Brute! (You too, Brutus!) ~ William Shakespeare,
638:Fair is foul, and foul is fair. ~ William Shakespeare,
639:For by my fay, I cannot reason. ~ William Shakespeare,
640:Fourth. Henry, Prince of Wales, ~ William Shakespeare,
641:Good wombs have borne bad sons. ~ William Shakespeare,
642:Great griefs medicine the less. ~ William Shakespeare,
643:¡Guárdate de los idus de marzo! ~ William Shakespeare,
644:I 'gin to be aweary of the sun, ~ William Shakespeare,
645:I have a bone to pick with Fate ~ William Shakespeare,
646:I have Immortal longings in me. ~ William Shakespeare,
647:I must be cruel only to be kind ~ William Shakespeare,
648:I pray thee cease thy counsel, ~ William Shakespeare,
649:Journeys end in lovers meeting. ~ William Shakespeare,
650:"Lawyers Are": Perilous mouths. ~ William Shakespeare,
651:Let him smell his way to Dover! ~ William Shakespeare,
652:Listen to many, speak to a few. ~ William Shakespeare,
653:Men's vows are women's traitors ~ William Shakespeare,
654:My pride fell with my fortunes. ~ William Shakespeare,
655:Nor age so eat up my invention. ~ William Shakespeare,
656:O, had I but followed the arts! ~ William Shakespeare,
657:Our content Is our best having. ~ William Shakespeare,
658:Perfume de un momento nada más. ~ William Shakespeare,
659:Something wicked this way comes ~ William Shakespeare,
660:Sweet are the uses of adversity ~ William Shakespeare,
661:Sweetest nut hath sourest rind. ~ William Shakespeare,
662:Ten masts make not the altitude ~ William Shakespeare,
663:Then to the elements be free... ~ William Shakespeare,
664:The proverb is something musty. ~ William Shakespeare,
665:The rain, it raineth every day. ~ William Shakespeare,
666:There is no evil angel but Love ~ William Shakespeare,
667:There's daggers in men's smiles ~ William Shakespeare,
668:There's villainous news abroad. ~ William Shakespeare,
669:The stars govern our conditions ~ William Shakespeare,
670:Those that do teach young babes ~ William Shakespeare,
671:Tongues I'll hang on every tree ~ William Shakespeare,
672:Unsubstantial Death is amorous. ~ William Shakespeare,
673:What, can the devil speak true? ~ William Shakespeare,
674:Who can be patient in extremes? ~ William Shakespeare,
675:Wisely, I say, I am a bachelor. ~ William Shakespeare,
676:Wish chastely, and love dearly. ~ William Shakespeare,
677:Would the cook were o' my mind! ~ William Shakespeare,
678:am but as a guiltless messenger. ~ William Shakespeare,
679:And make death proud to take us. ~ William Shakespeare,
680:And nothing is, but what is not. ~ William Shakespeare,
681:A woman's fitness comes by fits. ~ William Shakespeare,
682:Be as just and gracious unto me, ~ William Shakespeare,
683:Conscience is a thousand swords. ~ William Shakespeare,
684:Faint heart never won fair maid. ~ William Shakespeare,
685:Full fathom five thy father lies ~ William Shakespeare,
686:Gently to hear, kindly to judge. ~ William Shakespeare,
687:Good counselors lack no clients. ~ William Shakespeare,
688:Honor, riches, marriage-blessing ~ William Shakespeare,
689:I am wrapped in dismal thinking. ~ William Shakespeare,
690:I have supped full with horrors. ~ William Shakespeare,
691:I wear my rue with a difference. ~ William Shakespeare,
692:I will despair, and be at enmity ~ William Shakespeare,
693:Love hath made thee a tame snake ~ William Shakespeare,
694:Lovers ever run before the clock ~ William Shakespeare,
695:making the beast with two backs. ~ William Shakespeare,
696:Memory, the warder of the brain. ~ William Shakespeare,
697:My heart is ever at your service ~ William Shakespeare,
698:My stars shine darkly over
me ~ William Shakespeare,
699:No legacy is so rich as honesty. ~ William Shakespeare,
700:O, full of scorpions is my mind! ~ William Shakespeare,
701:O momentary grace of mortal men, ~ William Shakespeare,
702:Ready to go but never to return. ~ William Shakespeare,
703:Ruin has taught me to ruminate, ~ William Shakespeare,
704:Something wicked this way comes. ~ William Shakespeare,
705:Sweet are the uses of adversity, ~ William Shakespeare,
706:Sweet are the uses of adversity. ~ William Shakespeare,
707:Take it in what sense thou wilt. ~ William Shakespeare,
708:That will be ere the set of sun. ~ William Shakespeare,
709:There is flattery in friendship. ~ William Shakespeare,
710:There's Dagger's in men's smiles ~ William Shakespeare,
711:There's daggers in men's smiles. ~ William Shakespeare,
712:The worm is not to be trusted... ~ William Shakespeare,
713:Thou art a votary to fond desire ~ William Shakespeare,
714:Time is like a fashionable host ~ William Shakespeare,
715:we are the lords of all eternity ~ William Shakespeare,
716:Well-apparel'd April on the heel ~ William Shakespeare,
717:What is the city but the people? ~ William Shakespeare,
718:You have witchcraft in your lips ~ William Shakespeare,
719:Adieu, adieu, adieu! remember me. ~ William Shakespeare,
720:All offences come from the heart. ~ William Shakespeare,
721:...a raven's heart within a dove. ~ William Shakespeare,
722:A rotten case abides no handling. ~ William Shakespeare,
723:Away! Thou'rt poison to my blood. ~ William Shakespeare,
724:Ay, is it not a language I speak? ~ William Shakespeare,
725:Cursed be he that moves my bones. ~ William Shakespeare,
726:Downy sleep, death's counterfeit. ~ William Shakespeare,
727:Enter CAPULET, PARIS, and Servant ~ William Shakespeare,
728:For Brutus is an honourable man; ~ William Shakespeare,
729:For I am nothing if not critical. ~ William Shakespeare,
730:Fragilidad tiene nombre de mujer. ~ William Shakespeare,
731:Full fathom five thy father lies; ~ William Shakespeare,
732:Hark, how hard he fetches breath. ~ William Shakespeare,
733:Hear the meaning within the word. ~ William Shakespeare,
734:Homo is a common name to all men. ~ William Shakespeare,
735:Hot and hasty, like a Scotch jig. ~ William Shakespeare,
736:How now, wit! Whither wander you? ~ William Shakespeare,
737:I can no longer live by thinking. ~ William Shakespeare,
738:I can't talk, or I will throw up! ~ William Shakespeare,
739:If you prick us, do we not bleed? ~ William Shakespeare,
740:I have drunk and seen the spider. ~ William Shakespeare,
741:I must be cruel, only to be kind. ~ William Shakespeare,
742:In maiden meditation, fancy free. ~ William Shakespeare,
743:I see no darkness, but ignorance. ~ William Shakespeare,
744:Live how we can, yet die we must. ~ William Shakespeare,
745:Men from children nothing differ. ~ William Shakespeare,
746:     M.O.A. I. doth sway my life. ~ William Shakespeare,
747:My friends were poor, but honest. ~ William Shakespeare,
748:My heart is ever at your service. ~ William Shakespeare,
749:Nothing comes from doing nothing. ~ William Shakespeare,
750:Now, gods, stand up for bastards! ~ William Shakespeare,
751:Now, gods, stand up for bastards. ~ William Shakespeare,
752:Now my charms are all o'erthrown, ~ William Shakespeare,
753:Now my charms are all o'erthrown. ~ William Shakespeare,
754:OPHELIA: Still better, and worse. ~ William Shakespeare,
755:O, the difference of man and man! ~ William Shakespeare,
756:Pray you now, forget and forgive. ~ William Shakespeare,
757:Seek happy nights to happy days.W ~ William Shakespeare,
758:Small things make base men proud. ~ William Shakespeare,
759:Speak to me as to thy thinkings, ~ William Shakespeare,
760:The apparel oft proclaims the man ~ William Shakespeare,
761:This is the very ecstasy of love. ~ William Shakespeare,
762:Thou art a Castilian King urinal! ~ William Shakespeare,
763:Thou art the Mars of malcontents. ~ William Shakespeare,
764:Thou whoreson, senseless villain! ~ William Shakespeare,
765:Were kisses all the joys in bed, ~ William Shakespeare,
766:What is aught but as 'tis valued? ~ William Shakespeare,
767:While we lie tumbling in the hay. ~ William Shakespeare,
768:Who doth molest my contemplation? ~ William Shakespeare,
769:Wine loved I deeply, dice dearly. ~ William Shakespeare,
770:Words to deeds cold breath gives. ~ William Shakespeare,
771:You have witchcraft in your lips. ~ William Shakespeare,
772:You Jig, you amble, and you lisp. ~ William Shakespeare,
773:A great while ago the world begun, ~ William Shakespeare,
774:A man I am cross'd with adversity. ~ William Shakespeare,
775:A poor thing, perhaps, but my own. ~ William Shakespeare,
776:Art made tongue-tied by authority. ~ William Shakespeare,
777:A woman impudent and mannish grown ~ William Shakespeare,
778:By how much unexpected, by so much ~ William Shakespeare,
779:Despair and die.

The ghosts ~ William Shakespeare,
780:Devis’d a new commission; wrote it ~ William Shakespeare,
781:Done to death by slanderous tongue ~ William Shakespeare,
782:Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? ~ William Shakespeare,
783:Eternity was in our lips and eyes, ~ William Shakespeare,
784:Eternity was in our lips and eyes. ~ William Shakespeare,
785:Et tu, Brute? --Then fall, Caesar! ~ William Shakespeare,
786:Every cloud engenders not a storm. ~ William Shakespeare,
787:Extremity is the trier of spirits. ~ William Shakespeare,
788:For there was never yet philosoper ~ William Shakespeare,
789:He is white-livered and red-faced. ~ William Shakespeare,
790:He was not so much brain as earwax ~ William Shakespeare,
791:He will fence with his own shadow. ~ William Shakespeare,
792:His injury the gaoler to his pity. ~ William Shakespeare,
793:I am not in the giving vein today. ~ William Shakespeare,
794:I am sure care's an enemy to life. ~ William Shakespeare,
795:I am too old to fawn upon a nurse, ~ William Shakespeare,
796:If I lose my honor, I lose myself. ~ William Shakespeare,
797:In the night, imagining some fear, ~ William Shakespeare,
798:I will beat thee into handsomeness ~ William Shakespeare,
799:I would not lose so great an honor ~ William Shakespeare,
800:Kindness nobler ever than revenge. ~ William Shakespeare,
801:Light and lust are deadly enemies. ~ William Shakespeare,
802:Lord, what fools these mortals be! ~ William Shakespeare,
803:Love's heralds should be thoughts, ~ William Shakespeare,
804:Marriage is a matter of more worth ~ William Shakespeare,
805:Melancholy is the nurse of frenzy. ~ William Shakespeare,
806:Mirth cannot move a soul in agony. ~ William Shakespeare,
807:Misery makes sport to mock itself. ~ William Shakespeare,
808:My love admits no qualifying dross ~ William Shakespeare,
809:No, by my soul, I never in my life ~ William Shakespeare,
810:Of all matches never was the like. ~ William Shakespeare,
811:o, never shall sun that morrow see ~ William Shakespeare,
812:O that a lady, of one man refused, ~ William Shakespeare,
813:Out, you tallow-face! You baggage! ~ William Shakespeare,
814:Past all shame, so past all truth. ~ William Shakespeare,
815:So many hours must I take my rest; ~ William Shakespeare,
816:Speak on, but be not over-tedious. ~ William Shakespeare,
817:Temptation: the fiend at my elbow. ~ William Shakespeare,
818:Tend to th’ master’s whistle.—Blow ~ William Shakespeare,
819:Thanks, sir; all the rest is mute. ~ William Shakespeare,
820:The apparel oft proclaims the man. ~ William Shakespeare,
821:The due of honor in no point omit. ~ William Shakespeare,
822:The morning steals upon the night, ~ William Shakespeare,
823:The prize of all too precious you. ~ William Shakespeare,
824:There is no virtue like necessity. ~ William Shakespeare,
825:They have a plentiful lack of wit. ~ William Shakespeare,
826:They say, the tongues of dying men ~ William Shakespeare,
827:Thou are the armourer of my heart— ~ William Shakespeare,
828:Thou unfit for any place but hell. ~ William Shakespeare,
829:To liberty, and not to banishment. ~ William Shakespeare,
830:Treason is not inherited, my lord, ~ William Shakespeare,
831:Unquiet meals make ill digestions. ~ William Shakespeare,
832:When the age is in, the wit is out ~ William Shakespeare,
833:Where the greater malady is fixed, ~ William Shakespeare,
834:Yet, for I know thou art religious ~ William Shakespeare,
835:Absence makes the heart grow fonder ~ William Shakespeare,
836:Adversity makes strange bedfellows. ~ William Shakespeare,
837:Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy. ~ William Shakespeare,
838:A jest's prosperity lies in the ear ~ William Shakespeare,
839:Anger's my meat. I sup upon myself, ~ William Shakespeare,
840:Assume a virtue if you have it not. ~ William Shakespeare,
841:A very ancient and fish-like smell. ~ William Shakespeare,
842:Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men; ~ William Shakespeare,
843:Fit to govern? No, not fit to live. ~ William Shakespeare,
844:Glory is like a circle in the water ~ William Shakespeare,
845:Gold--what can it not do, and undo? ~ William Shakespeare,
846:Hanging and wiving goes by destiny. ~ William Shakespeare,
847:Hasty marriage seldom proveth well. ~ William Shakespeare,
848:How can tyrants safely govern home, ~ William Shakespeare,
849:How low am I, thou painted maypole? ~ William Shakespeare,
850:I am a kind of burr; I shall stick. ~ William Shakespeare,
851:I am as true as truth's simplicity, ~ William Shakespeare,
852:I am determinèd to prove a villain, ~ William Shakespeare,
853:I am falser than vows made in wine. ~ William Shakespeare,
854:I am not in the roll of common men. ~ William Shakespeare,
855:I cannot do it without comp[u]ters. ~ William Shakespeare,
856:I do begin to have bloody thoughts. ~ William Shakespeare,
857:I'll make my heaven in a lady's lap ~ William Shakespeare,
858:Ill met by moonlight, proud Titania ~ William Shakespeare,
859:I'll note you in my book of memory. ~ William Shakespeare,
860:It harrows me with fear and wonder. ~ William Shakespeare,
861:Let it be virtuous to be obstinate. ~ William Shakespeare,
862:Love is a wonderful, terrible thing ~ William Shakespeare,
863:Merrily, merrily shall I live now, ~ William Shakespeare,
864:Morir es dormir... y tal vez soñar. ~ William Shakespeare,
865:Neither a borrower nor a lender be. ~ William Shakespeare,
866:Nice customs curtsy to great kings. ~ William Shakespeare,
867:No, for then we should be colliers. ~ William Shakespeare,
868:Now my charms are all o'erthrown... ~ William Shakespeare,
869:Of all the fair resort of gentlemen ~ William Shakespeare,
870:Patch up thine old body for heaven. ~ William Shakespeare,
871:Prosperity's the very bond of love. ~ William Shakespeare,
872:Season your admiration for a while. ~ William Shakespeare,
873:Sir Toby : care is an enemy to life ~ William Shakespeare,
874:So may I, blind fortune leading me, ~ William Shakespeare,
875:Strong reasons make strong actions. ~ William Shakespeare,
876:Such antics do not amount to a man. ~ William Shakespeare,
877:Such as we are made of, such we be. ~ William Shakespeare,
878:Such tricks hath strong imagination ~ William Shakespeare,
879:Swift as shadow, short as any dream ~ William Shakespeare,
880:The Fears as bad as the Falling.... ~ William Shakespeare,
881:There is no darkness but ignorance. ~ William Shakespeare,
882:These blessed candles of the night. ~ William Shakespeare,
883:This liberty is all that I request. ~ William Shakespeare,
884:Tis a cruelty to load a fallen man. ~ William Shakespeare,
885:... To Sleep, Perchance to Dream... ~ William Shakespeare,
886:To thine ownself be true - Polonius ~ William Shakespeare,
887:true apothecary thy drugs art quick ~ William Shakespeare,
888:Virtue is chok'd with foul ambition ~ William Shakespeare,
889:What is done cannot be now amended. ~ William Shakespeare,
890:Why, then is my pump well-flow’red. ~ William Shakespeare,
891:Withal I did infer your lineaments, ~ William Shakespeare,
892:Words pay no debts, give her deeds. ~ William Shakespeare,
893:A fool and his words are soon parted ~ William Shakespeare,
894:All things that we ordained festival ~ William Shakespeare,
895:A Loud Laugh Bespeaks a Vacant Mind! ~ William Shakespeare,
896:And either victory, or else a grave. ~ William Shakespeare,
897:and pay no worship to the garish sun ~ William Shakespeare,
898:an ill-roasted egg, all on one side. ~ William Shakespeare,
899:An overflow of good converts to bad. ~ William Shakespeare,
900:Assume a virtue, if you have it not. ~ William Shakespeare,
901:Câștigă rar cei care piele-și cruță! ~ William Shakespeare,
902:Fill till the wine o'erswell the cup ~ William Shakespeare,
903:Friendly counsel cuts off many foes. ~ William Shakespeare,
904:Gold were as good as twenty orators. ~ William Shakespeare,
905:Good hay, sweet hay, hath no fellow. ~ William Shakespeare,
906:Hardness ever of hardness is mother. ~ William Shakespeare,
907:Have you not heard it said full oft, ~ William Shakespeare,
908:Having nothing, nothing can he lose. ~ William Shakespeare,
909:Her father lov'd me; oft invited me; ~ William Shakespeare,
910:How now, spirit! Whither wander you? ~ William Shakespeare,
911:How now, spirit, whither wander you? ~ William Shakespeare,
912:How use doth breed a habit in a man. ~ William Shakespeare,
913:I can give the loser leave to chide. ~ William Shakespeare,
914:I cannot tell what you and other men ~ William Shakespeare,
915:I come to wive it wealthily in Padua ~ William Shakespeare,
916:I crave fit disposition for my wife; ~ William Shakespeare,
917:I do not set my life at a pin's fee, ~ William Shakespeare,
918:If we are mark'd to die, we are enow ~ William Shakespeare,
919:If yon bethink yourself of any crime ~ William Shakespeare,
920:If you love her, you cannot see her. ~ William Shakespeare,
921:I have thrust myself into this maze, ~ William Shakespeare,
922:I hope to see London once ere I die. ~ William Shakespeare,
923:Inconstancy falls off ere it begins. ~ William Shakespeare,
924:In nature's infinite book of secrecy ~ William Shakespeare,
925:In sooth I know not why I am so sad. ~ William Shakespeare,
926:I see a man's life is a tedious one. ~ William Shakespeare,
927:Juliet is the east and i am the sun. ~ William Shakespeare,
928:Let every man be master of his time. ~ William Shakespeare,
929:Life is but a dream, within a dream. ~ William Shakespeare,
930:light through yonder window breaks!! ~ William Shakespeare,
931:Make not your thoughts your prisons. ~ William Shakespeare,
932:Make passionate my sense of hearing. ~ William Shakespeare,
933:Men have marble, women waxen, minds. ~ William Shakespeare,
934:Methought I was enamour'd of an ass. ~ William Shakespeare,
935:Must find love’s prick and Rosalind. ~ William Shakespeare,
936:My love is as a fever, longing still ~ William Shakespeare,
937:Nay, I am the very pink of courtesy. ~ William Shakespeare,
938:Nay, we must think men are not gods, ~ William Shakespeare,
939:Now, infidel, I have you on the hip! ~ William Shakespeare,
940:Now is the winter of our discontent. ~ William Shakespeare,
941:Observe him, for the love of mockery ~ William Shakespeare,
942:O constancy, be strong upon my side, ~ William Shakespeare,
943:O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been. ~ William Shakespeare,
944:One man in his time plays many parts ~ William Shakespeare,
945:O, what damned minutes tells he o'er ~ William Shakespeare,
946:resolve the propositions of a lover. ~ William Shakespeare,
947:She is a woman, therefore to be won. ~ William Shakespeare,
948:The Eyes are the window to your soul ~ William Shakespeare,
949:Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty. ~ William Shakespeare,
950:The patient must minister to himself ~ William Shakespeare,
951:The quality of mercy is not strained ~ William Shakespeare,
952:The soul of this man is his clothes. ~ William Shakespeare,
953:The time of universal peace is near. ~ William Shakespeare,
954:The weary sun hath made a golden set ~ William Shakespeare,
955:They say an old man is twice a child ~ William Shakespeare,
956:thou art the best o' the cut-throats ~ William Shakespeare,
957:To be direct and honest is not safe. ~ William Shakespeare,
958:Trăim doar cum putem și tot murim... ~ William Shakespeare,
959:Value dwells not in particular will; ~ William Shakespeare,
960:Venus smiles not in a house of tears ~ William Shakespeare,
961:was yet of many accounted beautiful. ~ William Shakespeare,
962:What I can do can do no hurt to try, ~ William Shakespeare,
963:When I waked, I cried to dream again ~ William Shakespeare,
964:Who is it that can tell me who I am? ~ William Shakespeare,
965:Why, this is very midsummer madness. ~ William Shakespeare,
966:You are my true and honourable wife; ~ William Shakespeare,
967:Your praises will become your wages. ~ William Shakespeare,
968:Your tale, sir, would cure deafness. ~ William Shakespeare,
969:A good wit will make use of anything. ~ William Shakespeare,
970:A maiden hath no tongue--but thought. ~ William Shakespeare,
971:And simple truth miscalled simplicity ~ William Shakespeare,
972:And this weak and idle theme, No more ~ William Shakespeare,
973:An earnest conjuration from the King, ~ William Shakespeare,
974:At Christmas I no more desire a rose ~ William Shakespeare,
975:A thousand moral paintings I can show ~ William Shakespeare,
976:Blessed are the peacemakers on earth. ~ William Shakespeare,
977:Crack'd in pieces by malignant Death. ~ William Shakespeare,
978:Death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead! ~ William Shakespeare,
979:Debo irme y vivir, o quedarme y morir ~ William Shakespeare,
980:Dispute not with her: she is lunatic. ~ William Shakespeare,
981:Enjoy the honey-heavy dew of slumber. ~ William Shakespeare,
982:Even through the hollow eyes of death ~ William Shakespeare,
983:Every great drama has its foreshadow. ~ William Shakespeare,
984:Every offense is not a hate at first. ~ William Shakespeare,
985:Fortune reigns in gifts of the world. ~ William Shakespeare,
986:Give obedience where 'tis truly owed. ~ William Shakespeare,
987:Grace and remembrance be to you both. ~ William Shakespeare,
988:Haste is needful in a desperate case. ~ William Shakespeare,
989:Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, ~ William Shakespeare,
990:I can counterfeit the deep tragedian; ~ William Shakespeare,
991:If I profane with my unworthiest hand ~ William Shakespeare,
992:If your mind dislike anything obey it ~ William Shakespeare,
993:I had as lief have been myself alone. ~ William Shakespeare,
994:I heard a bustling rumor like a fray, ~ William Shakespeare,
995:I pardon him, as God shall pardon me. ~ William Shakespeare,
996:I swear again, I would not be a queen ~ William Shakespeare,
997:It is not nor it cannot come to good. ~ William Shakespeare,
998:I will be master of what is mine own: ~ William Shakespeare,
999:I will die bravely, like a bridegroom ~ William Shakespeare,
1000:La esperanza es el bastón del amante. ~ William Shakespeare,
1001:Love is . . . a madness most discreet ~ William Shakespeare,
1002:Love is a spirit all compact of fire. ~ William Shakespeare,
1003:Mów szep­tem, jeśli mówisz o miłości. ~ William Shakespeare,
1004:My love is as a fever, longing still. ~ William Shakespeare,
1005:My love's more richer than my tongue. ~ William Shakespeare,
1006:O heresy in fair, fit for these days, ~ William Shakespeare,
1007:Oh, God! I have an ill-divining soul! ~ William Shakespeare,
1008:O, let my books be then the eloquence ~ William Shakespeare,
1009:One man in his time plays many parts. ~ William Shakespeare,
1010:Or I am mad, or else this is a dream. ~ William Shakespeare,
1011:Our jovial star reigned at his birth. ~ William Shakespeare,
1012:Shall we upon the footing of our land ~ William Shakespeare,
1013:Silence is the perfect herald of joy. ~ William Shakespeare,
1014:Sir, he's a good dog, and a fair dog. ~ William Shakespeare,
1015:Such a mad marriage never was before. ~ William Shakespeare,
1016:Such is my love, to thee I so belong, ~ William Shakespeare,
1017:Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge. ~ William Shakespeare,
1018:The caterpillars of the commonwealth, ~ William Shakespeare,
1019:The labor we delight in physics pain. ~ William Shakespeare,
1020:The labour we delight in physics pain ~ William Shakespeare,
1021:The lady protests too much, methinks. ~ William Shakespeare,
1022:The man that hath no music in himself ~ William Shakespeare,
1023:The More I Rest The More I Go In VAIN ~ William Shakespeare,
1024:The near in blood, the nearer bloody. ~ William Shakespeare,
1025:The presence of a king engenders love ~ William Shakespeare,
1026:There is a tide in the affairs of men ~ William Shakespeare,
1027:There is nothing serious in Mortality ~ William Shakespeare,
1028:They do not love who show their love. ~ William Shakespeare,
1029:[Thine] face is not worth sunburning. ~ William Shakespeare,
1030:This act is an ancient tale new told; ~ William Shakespeare,
1031:This is the short and the long of it. ~ William Shakespeare,
1032:Thou frothy tickle-brained hedge-pig! ~ William Shakespeare,
1033:Thou hast the most unsavoury similes. ~ William Shakespeare,
1034:Thou slave, thou wretch, thou coward! ~ William Shakespeare,
1035:Thus do I ever make my fool my purse; ~ William Shakespeare,
1036:Tis not a year or two shows us a man: ~ William Shakespeare,
1037:Titus Andronicus, my lord the Emperor ~ William Shakespeare,
1038:To unpathed waters, undreamed shores. ~ William Shakespeare,
1039:Venus smiles not in a house of tears. ~ William Shakespeare,
1040:Was ever woman in this humour wooed? ~ William Shakespeare,
1041:We have some salt of our youth in us. ~ William Shakespeare,
1042:We must follow, not force Providence. ~ William Shakespeare,
1043:What sadness lengthens Romeo’s hours? ~ William Shakespeare,
1044:Who is so firm that can't be seduced? ~ William Shakespeare,
1045:Why should calamity be full of words? ~ William Shakespeare,
1046:you saw her fair, none else being by, ~ William Shakespeare,
1047:A knot you are of damned bloodsuckers. ~ William Shakespeare,
1048:Alas, how love can trifle with itself! ~ William Shakespeare,
1049:A little water clears us of this deed. ~ William Shakespeare,
1050:All is well ended, if the suit be won. ~ William Shakespeare,
1051:A smile cures the wounding of a frown. ~ William Shakespeare,
1052:A substitute shines brightly as a king ~ William Shakespeare,
1053:At Christmas, I no more desire a rose. ~ William Shakespeare,
1054:Ay; beauty's princely majesty is such, ~ William Shakespeare,
1055:Between the acting of a dreadful thing ~ William Shakespeare,
1056:But fish not with this melancholy bait ~ William Shakespeare,
1057:But thy eternal summer shall not fade. ~ William Shakespeare,
1058:By being seldom seen, I could not stir ~ William Shakespeare,
1059:Can it be chat modesty may more betray ~ William Shakespeare,
1060:cannot countervail the exchange of joy ~ William Shakespeare,
1061:CAPULET: ...Well, we were born to die. ~ William Shakespeare,
1062:Come give us a taste of your quality. ~ William Shakespeare,
1063:Corruption wins not more than honesty. ~ William Shakespeare,
1064:Dicen que un porqué tiene un para qué. ~ William Shakespeare,
1065:Did you think I meant country matters? ~ William Shakespeare,
1066:Doing thee vantage, double-vantage me. ~ William Shakespeare,
1067:Every fair from fair sometime declines ~ William Shakespeare,
1068:Faith, I have been a truant in the law ~ William Shakespeare,
1069:For grief is crowned with consolation. ~ William Shakespeare,
1070:For mine own part, it was Greek to me. ~ William Shakespeare,
1071:For what is wedlock forced but a hell, ~ William Shakespeare,
1072:Give me a staff of honor for mine age, ~ William Shakespeare,
1073:Glory grows guilty of detested crimes. ~ William Shakespeare,
1074:Haply a woman's voice may do some good ~ William Shakespeare,
1075:Headstrong liberty is lashed with woe. ~ William Shakespeare,
1076:Heaven give you many, many merry days. ~ William Shakespeare,
1077:Heavy is the head that wears the crown ~ William Shakespeare,
1078:His nature is too noble for the world. ~ William Shakespeare,
1079:How every fool can play upon the word! ~ William Shakespeare,
1080:I am that merry wanderer of the night. ~ William Shakespeare,
1081:I cannot heave my heart into my mouth. ~ William Shakespeare,
1082:If I be waspish, best beware my sting. ~ William Shakespeare,
1083:If music be the food of love, play on. ~ William Shakespeare,
1084:If music be the food of love, play on; ~ William Shakespeare,
1085:If music is the food of love, play on. ~ William Shakespeare,
1086:I know we shall have reveling tonight. ~ William Shakespeare,
1087:I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare. ~ Anonymous,
1088:I must become a borrower of the night. ~ William Shakespeare,
1089:In persons grafted in a serious trust, ~ William Shakespeare,
1090:I was born free as Caesar; so were you ~ William Shakespeare,
1091:I will keep still with my philosopher. ~ William Shakespeare,
1092:Love's best habit is a soothing tongue ~ William Shakespeare,
1093:love to cope him in these sullen fits, ~ William Shakespeare,
1094:MARCELO Algo podrido hay en Dinamarca. ~ William Shakespeare,
1095:More can I bear than you dare execute. ~ William Shakespeare,
1096:My only love sprung from my only hate! ~ William Shakespeare,
1097:My only love sprung from my only hate. ~ William Shakespeare,
1098:Nature's tears are reason's merriment. ~ William Shakespeare,
1099:Of chastity, the ornaments are chaste. ~ William Shakespeare,
1100:One sin, I know, another doth provoke. ~ William Shakespeare,
1101:Opinion crowns with an imperial voice. ~ William Shakespeare,
1102:ot ne sa ebesh v gaza be pederas dolen ~ William Shakespeare,
1103:Out of her favour, where I am in love. ~ William Shakespeare,
1104:Presume not that I am the thing I was. ~ William Shakespeare,
1105:Reply not to me with a fool-born jest. ~ William Shakespeare,
1106:Ships are but boards, sailors but men. ~ William Shakespeare,
1107:So fair and foul a day i had not seen. ~ William Shakespeare,
1108:So get the start of the majestic world ~ William Shakespeare,
1109:So many miseries have craz'd my voice, ~ William Shakespeare,
1110:So shaken as we are, so wan with care, ~ William Shakespeare,
1111:Taffeta phrases, silken terms precise, ~ William Shakespeare,
1112:The best in this kind are but shadows. ~ William Shakespeare,
1113:The blessedness of being little!!!
~ William Shakespeare,
1114:The chameleon Love can feed on the air ~ William Shakespeare,
1115:The day shall not be up so soon as I, ~ William Shakespeare,
1116:The error of our eye directs our mind. ~ William Shakespeare,
1117:The leopard does not change his spots. ~ William Shakespeare,
1118:The love of heaven makes one heavenly. ~ William Shakespeare,
1119:The Prince of Darkness is a gentleman. ~ William Shakespeare,
1120:The prince of darkness is a gentleman! ~ William Shakespeare,
1121:There are a sort of men, whose visages ~ William Shakespeare,
1122:There is a history in all men's lives. ~ William Shakespeare,
1123:There's small choice in rotten apples. ~ William Shakespeare,
1124:The seasons alter: hoary-headed frosts ~ William Shakespeare,
1125:They that touch pitch will be defiled. ~ William Shakespeare,
1126:Thou art an elm, my husband, I a vine, ~ William Shakespeare,
1127:Thou art an elm, my husband, I a vine. ~ William Shakespeare,
1128:Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful ~ William Shakespeare,
1129:Thou ominous and fearful owl of death. ~ William Shakespeare,
1130:Thou weedy elf-skinned canker-blossom! ~ William Shakespeare,
1131:'Tis brief, my lord...as woman's love. ~ William Shakespeare,
1132:Tis the mind that makes the body rich. ~ William Shakespeare,
1133:To do a great right do a little wrong. ~ William Shakespeare,
1134:To fear the worst oft cures the worst. ~ William Shakespeare,
1135:To you your father should be as a god. ~ William Shakespeare,
1136:Two may keep counsel putting one away! ~ William Shakespeare,
1137:Virtuous and fair, royal and gracious. ~ William Shakespeare,
1138:We should hold day with the Antipodes, ~ William Shakespeare,
1139:What a deformed thief this fashion is. ~ William Shakespeare,
1140:What e'er thou art, act well thy part. ~ William Shakespeare,
1141:What, you egg? Young fry of treachery! ~ William Shakespeare,
1142:Why, so I do, the noblest that I have: ~ William Shakespeare,
1143:Why, this hath not a finger's dignity. ~ William Shakespeare,
1144:Wisdom and fortune combating together, ~ William Shakespeare,
1145:Would I were in an alehouse in London. ~ William Shakespeare,
1146:You draw me, you hard-hearted adamant; ~ William Shakespeare,
1147:You speak an infinite deal of nothing. ~ William Shakespeare,
1148:Against ill chances men are ever merry, ~ William Shakespeare,
1149:Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale ~ William Shakespeare,
1150:Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio. ~ William Shakespeare,
1151:A light wife doth make a heavy husband. ~ William Shakespeare,
1152:All surfeit is the father of much fast. ~ William Shakespeare,
1153:A ministering angel shall my sister be. ~ William Shakespeare,
1154:And blind oblivion swallowed cities up. ~ William Shakespeare,
1155:As black as Vulcan in the smoke of war. ~ William Shakespeare,
1156:As love is full of unbefitting strains, ~ William Shakespeare,
1157:Asses are made to bear, and so are you. ~ William Shakespeare,
1158:Because I cannot flatter and look fair, ~ William Shakespeare,
1159:begins to mutiny against this servitude ~ William Shakespeare,
1160:Be not lost So poorly in your thoughts. ~ William Shakespeare,
1161:Be not so long to speak; I long to die, ~ William Shakespeare,
1162:Best men oft are moulded out of faults. ~ William Shakespeare,
1163:Better a witty fool than a foolish wit. ~ William Shakespeare,
1164:Be wary then; best safety lies in fear. ~ William Shakespeare,
1165:But love is blind and lovers cannot see ~ William Shakespeare,
1166:Can I go forward when my heart is here? ~ William Shakespeare,
1167:conscience does make cowards of us all; ~ William Shakespeare,
1168:Conscience doth make cowards of us all. ~ William Shakespeare,
1169:Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war! ~ William Shakespeare,
1170:death—        The undiscover’d country, ~ William Shakespeare,
1171:Discretion is the better part of valor. ~ William Shakespeare,
1172:Do not plunge thyself too far in anger. ~ William Shakespeare,
1173:Do not spread the compost on the weeds. ~ William Shakespeare,
1174:Doubting things go ill often hurts more ~ William Shakespeare,
1175:Dreams are the children of idled minds. ~ William Shakespeare,
1176:England is safe, if true within itself. ~ William Shakespeare,
1177:Extreme fear can neither fight nor fly. ~ William Shakespeare,
1178:Fairies, black, grey, green, and white, ~ William Shakespeare,
1179:For doting, not for loving, pupil mine. ~ William Shakespeare,
1180:For I am fresh of spirit, and resolved ~ William Shakespeare,
1181:For I can raise no money by vile means. ~ William Shakespeare,
1182:For in the fatness of these pursy times ~ William Shakespeare,
1183:For they are yet ear-kissing arguments. ~ William Shakespeare,
1184:For who so firm that cannot be seduced? ~ William Shakespeare,
1185:For you and I are past our dancing days ~ William Shakespeare,
1186:Full of wise saws and modern instances. ~ William Shakespeare,
1187:God send everyone their heart's desire! ~ William Shakespeare,
1188:Good words are better than bad strokes. ~ William Shakespeare,
1189:He doth nothing but talk of his horses. ~ William Shakespeare,
1190:He hath eaten me out of house and home. ~ William Shakespeare,
1191:He is well paid that is well satisfied. ~ William Shakespeare,
1192:He must needs go that the devil drives. ~ William Shakespeare,
1193:He receives comfort like cold porridge. ~ William Shakespeare,
1194:He that commends me to mine own content ~ William Shakespeare,
1195:He that sleeps feels not the tooth-ache ~ William Shakespeare,
1196:He was ever precise in promise-keeping. ~ William Shakespeare,
1197:How many fond fools serve mad jealousy! ~ William Shakespeare,
1198:I am a feather for each wind that blows ~ William Shakespeare,
1199:I can call spirits from the vasty deep. ~ William Shakespeare,
1200:I do desire we may be better strangers. ~ William Shakespeare,
1201:I hate the murderer, love him murdered. ~ William Shakespeare,
1202:I have been long a sleeper; but I trust ~ William Shakespeare,
1203:I hourly learn a doctrine of obedience. ~ William Shakespeare,
1204:I know not by what power I'm made bold. ~ William Shakespeare,
1205:Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word. ~ William Shakespeare,
1206:I'll have no husband, if you be not he. ~ William Shakespeare,
1207:I'll speak in a monstrous little voice. ~ William Shakespeare,
1208:In all my life only that dream is real. ~ William Shakespeare,
1209:In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh? ~ William Shakespeare,
1210:In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond. ~ William Shakespeare,
1211:I once did hold it, as our statists do, ~ William Shakespeare,
1212:It is war's prize to take all vantages; ~ William Shakespeare,
1213:I will be brief. Your noble son is mad. ~ William Shakespeare,
1214:I will make thee think thy swan a crow. ~ William Shakespeare,
1215:I will play the swan. And die in music. ~ William Shakespeare,
1216:I wish you well and so I take my leave, ~ William Shakespeare,
1217:Justice always whirls in equal measure. ~ William Shakespeare,
1218:Like madness is the glory of this life. ~ William Shakespeare,
1219:Loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud. ~ William Shakespeare,
1220:Lords, I protest my soul is full of woe ~ William Shakespeare,
1221:Love adds a precious seeing to the eye. ~ William Shakespeare,
1222:Love loving not itself, none other can. ~ William Shakespeare,
1223:May never glorious sun reflex his beams ~ William Shakespeare,
1224:Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope ~ William Shakespeare,
1225:Must embrace the fate of that dark hour ~ William Shakespeare,
1226:Never anger made good guard for itself. ~ William Shakespeare,
1227:No evil lost is wailed when it is gone. ~ William Shakespeare,
1228:Nothing can seem foul to those who win. ~ William Shakespeare,
1229:Nothing emboldens sin so much as mercy. ~ William Shakespeare,
1230:Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, ~ William Shakespeare,
1231:O, call back yesterday, bid time return ~ William Shakespeare,
1232:O gentlemen, the time of life is short! ~ William Shakespeare,
1233:O Hamlet, what a falling-off was there! ~ William Shakespeare,
1234:On pain of death, no person be so bold. ~ William Shakespeare,
1235:On your eyelids crown the god of sleep, ~ William Shakespeare,
1236:Our wills and fates do so contrary run. ~ William Shakespeare,
1237:out vile jelly! where is thy lustre now ~ William Shakespeare,
1238:Podemos compadecerte mas no perdonarte. ~ William Shakespeare,
1239:Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? ~ William Shakespeare,
1240:Security is the chief enemy of mortals. ~ William Shakespeare,
1241:See what a ready tongue suspicion hath! ~ William Shakespeare,
1242:Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? ~ William Shakespeare,
1243:Small to greater matters must give way. ~ William Shakespeare,
1244:So doth the greater glory dim the less: ~ William Shakespeare,
1245:So every bondman in his own hand bears ~ William Shakespeare,
1246:So fair and foul a day I have not seen. ~ William Shakespeare,
1247:So foul and fair a day I have not seen. ~ William Shakespeare,
1248:Sometimes we punish ourselves the most. ~ William Shakespeare,
1249:Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood ~ William Shakespeare,
1250:The bitter clamor of two eager tongues. ~ William Shakespeare,
1251:The color of the king doth come and go, ~ William Shakespeare,
1252:The eagle suffers little birds to sing. ~ William Shakespeare,
1253:The king's name is a tower of strength. ~ William Shakespeare,
1254:The mind of guilt is full of scorpions. ~ William Shakespeare,
1255:Then with the losers let it sympathize, ~ William Shakespeare,
1256:The old folk, time's doting chronicles. ~ William Shakespeare,
1257:There's a skirmish of wit between them. ~ William Shakespeare,
1258:The seasons alter: hoary-headed frosts ~ William Shakespeare,
1259:The truest poetry is the most feigning. ~ William Shakespeare,
1260:The tyrant custom, most grave senators, ~ William Shakespeare,
1261:Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful. ~ William Shakespeare,
1262:Though inclination be as sharp as will, ~ William Shakespeare,
1263:Tidak ada yang lebih tinggi dari mimpi. ~ William Shakespeare,
1264:'Tis pride that pulls the country down. ~ William Shakespeare,
1265:To beguile the time; look like the time ~ William Shakespeare,
1266:To be or not to be that is the question ~ William Shakespeare,
1267:To be or not to be, that's the question ~ William Shakespeare,
1268:To take arms against a sea of troubles. ~ William Shakespeare,
1269:To whom God will, there be the victory. ~ William Shakespeare,
1270:To you your father should be as a god; ~ William Shakespeare,
1271:Truth is truth to the end of reckoning. ~ William Shakespeare,
1272:Two lovely berries moulded on one stem; ~ William Shakespeare,
1273:Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown ~ William Shakespeare,
1274:Well, honor is the subject of my story. ~ William Shakespeare,
1275:We must be gentle now we are gentlemen. ~ William Shakespeare,
1276:What early tongue so sweet saluteth me? ~ William Shakespeare,
1277:What is more miserable than discontent? ~ William Shakespeare,
1278:Who will not change a raven for a dove? ~ William Shakespeare,
1279:Yet writers say, as in the sweetest bud ~ William Shakespeare,
1280:You come most carefully upon your hour. ~ William Shakespeare,
1281:You'd be so lean, that blast of January ~ William Shakespeare,
1282:A flock of blessings light upon thy back ~ William Shakespeare,
1283:A heavy heart bears not a nimble tongue. ~ William Shakespeare,
1284:A knavish speech sleeps in a fool's ear. ~ William Shakespeare,
1285:Alas, I am a woman friendless, hopeless! ~ William Shakespeare,
1286:Allow not nature more than nature needs. ~ William Shakespeare,
1287:All things are ready, if our mind be so. ~ William Shakespeare,
1288:A lover's eyes will gaze an eagle blind. ~ William Shakespeare,
1289:A man is never undone till he be hang'd. ~ William Shakespeare,
1290:And in the morn and liquid dew of youth, ~ William Shakespeare,
1291:And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye, ~ William Shakespeare,
1292:And writers say, as the most forward bud ~ William Shakespeare,
1293:And yet you will; and yet another 'yet'. ~ William Shakespeare,
1294:Angels and ministers of grace defend us! ~ William Shakespeare,
1295:Angels and ministers of grace defend us. ~ William Shakespeare,
1296:As chaste as is the bud ere it be blown. ~ William Shakespeare,
1297:A thousand kisses buys my heart from me; ~ William Shakespeare,
1298:Bait the hook well. This fish will bite. ~ William Shakespeare,
1299:Before thee stands this fair Hesperides, ~ William Shakespeare,
1300:Be lion-mettled, proud, and take no care ~ William Shakespeare,
1301:Better a witty fool, than a foolish wit. ~ William Shakespeare,
1302:... by indirections find directions out. ~ William Shakespeare,
1303:Can one desire too much of a good thing? ~ William Shakespeare,
1304:Come not within the measure of my wrath. ~ William Shakespeare,
1305:Confusion now hath made his masterpiece. ~ William Shakespeare,
1306:Desperate times breed desperate measures ~ William Shakespeare,
1307:Either our history shall with full mouth ~ William Shakespeare,
1308:For a quart of Ale is a dish for a king. ~ William Shakespeare,
1309:For a quart of ale is a dish for a king. ~ William Shakespeare,
1310:For daws to peck at: I am not what I am. ~ William Shakespeare,
1311:For my part, I may speak it to my shame, ~ William Shakespeare,
1312:For you and I are past our dancing days. ~ William Shakespeare,
1313:Give it an understanding, but no tongue. ~ William Shakespeare,
1314:Go girl, seek happy nights to happy days ~ William Shakespeare,
1315:He is not great who is not greatly good. ~ William Shakespeare,
1316:He makes a July's day short as December. ~ William Shakespeare,
1317:Her love is not the hare that I do hunt; ~ William Shakespeare,
1318:How long a time lies in one little word? ~ William Shakespeare,
1319:I did not then entreat to have her stay, ~ William Shakespeare,
1320:If little faults proceeding on distemper ~ William Shakespeare,
1321:I frown upon him; yet he loves me still. ~ William Shakespeare,
1322:If you did wed my sister for her wealth, ~ William Shakespeare,
1323:I...Kisss the tender inward of thy hand. ~ William Shakespeare,
1324:Ill deeds are doubled with an evil word. ~ William Shakespeare,
1325:Is not this Stephano, my drunken butler? ~ William Shakespeare,
1326:Is this a dagger which I see before me, ~ William Shakespeare,
1327:Is twenty hundred kisses such a trouble? ~ William Shakespeare,
1328:It is in pardoning that we are pardoned. ~ William Shakespeare,
1329:It is not night when I do see your face. ~ William Shakespeare,
1330:I will make a Star-chamber matter of it. ~ William Shakespeare,
1331:Lady, with me, with me thy fortune lies. ~ William Shakespeare,
1332:Let gentleness my strong enforcement be. ~ William Shakespeare,
1333:Let me not to the marriage of true minds ~ William Shakespeare,
1334:Like madness, is the glory of this life. ~ William Shakespeare,
1335:Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none. ~ William Shakespeare,
1336:Love is your master, for he masters you; ~ William Shakespeare,
1337:Minutes, hours, days, months, and years, ~ William Shakespeare,
1338:My crown is in my heart, not on my head. ~ William Shakespeare,
1339:My grief lies onward, and my joy behind. ~ William Shakespeare,
1340:My heart laments that virtue cannot live ~ William Shakespeare,
1341:My mistress is my mistress, this myself. ~ William Shakespeare,
1342:My prophecy is but half his journey yet, ~ William Shakespeare,
1343:Myself--a prince by fortune of my birth, ~ William Shakespeare,
1344:Not stepping over the bounds of modesty. ~ William Shakespeare,
1345:Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie, ~ William Shakespeare,
1346:No worse a husband than the best of men. ~ William Shakespeare,
1347:Now stand you on the top of happy hours, ~ William Shakespeare,
1348:O faithless coward! O dishonest wretch! ~ William Shakespeare,
1349:O hell! to choose love by another's eye. ~ William Shakespeare,
1350:O ill-starred wench! Pale as your smock! ~ William Shakespeare,
1351:Opinion's but a fool, that makes us scan ~ William Shakespeare,
1352:O teach me how I should forget to think. ~ William Shakespeare,
1353:Our enemies are our outward consciences. ~ William Shakespeare,
1354:O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath! ~ William Shakespeare,
1355:Pride went before, ambition follows him. ~ William Shakespeare,
1356:Screw your courage to the sticking-place ~ William Shakespeare,
1357:screw your courage to the sticking place ~ William Shakespeare,
1358:See, what a ready tongue suspicion hath! ~ William Shakespeare,
1359:She may be but little but she is fierce. ~ William Shakespeare,
1360:Sometimes we punish our selves the most. ~ William Shakespeare,
1361:So shines a good deed in a naughty world ~ William Shakespeare,
1362:Speak, my fair, and fairly, I pray thee. ~ William Shakespeare,
1363:Still constant is a wondrous excellence. ~ William Shakespeare,
1364:Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind. ~ William Shakespeare,
1365:That strain again! It had a dying fall: ~ William Shakespeare,
1366:The instances that second marriage move ~ William Shakespeare,
1367:The love of wicked men converts to fear; ~ William Shakespeare,
1368:The miserable have no medicine but hope. ~ William Shakespeare,
1369:The near in blood,
The nearer bloody. ~ William Shakespeare,
1370:The pleasing punishment that women bear. ~ William Shakespeare,
1371:There's such divinity doth hedge a king ~ William Shakespeare,
1372:These violent delights have violent ends ~ William Shakespeare,
1373:The sweat of industry would dry and die, ~ William Shakespeare,
1374:The will of man is by his reason sway'd. ~ William Shakespeare,
1375:The will of man is by his reason sway'd; ~ William Shakespeare,
1376:Things are often spoke and seldom meant. ~ William Shakespeare,
1377:Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death. ~ William Shakespeare,
1378:Though she be but little, she is fierce! ~ William Shakespeare,
1379:Thus did I keep my person fresh and new, ~ William Shakespeare,
1380:To beguile the time, look like the time. ~ William Shakespeare,
1381:To be or not to be that is the question. ~ William Shakespeare,
1382:Truth needs no color; beauty, no pencil. ~ William Shakespeare,
1383:Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. ~ William Shakespeare,
1384:We are advertis'd by our loving friends. ~ William Shakespeare,
1385:Well, you will temporize with the hours. ~ William Shakespeare,
1386:We were not born to sue, but to command. ~ William Shakespeare,
1387:We will all laugh at gilded butterflies. ~ William Shakespeare,
1388:What is decreed must be, and be this so. ~ William Shakespeare,
1389:What light through yonder window breaks? ~ William Shakespeare,
1390:What wound did ever heal but by degrees? ~ William Shakespeare,
1391:Within the book and volume of thy brain. ~ William Shakespeare,
1392:You are an alchemist; make gold of that. ~ William Shakespeare,
1393:Accursèd be that tongue that tells me so, ~ William Shakespeare,
1394:Advance our standards, set upon our foes; ~ William Shakespeare,
1395:A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse! ~ William Shakespeare,
1396:A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse! ~ William Shakespeare,
1397:Ambition should be made of sterner stuff. ~ William Shakespeare,
1398:And nothing can we call our own but death ~ William Shakespeare,
1399:And send him many years of sunshine days! ~ William Shakespeare,
1400:A noble shalt thou have, and present pay; ~ William Shakespeare,
1401:Arise fair sun and kill the envious moon, ~ William Shakespeare,
1402:Ay, but to die, and go we know not where. ~ William Shakespeare,
1403:Beauty is bought by judgement of the eye. ~ William Shakespeare,
1404:Before I know myself, seek not to know me ~ William Shakespeare,
1405:Being holiday, the beggar's shop is shut. ~ William Shakespeare,
1406:Be not thy tongue thy own shame's orator. ~ William Shakespeare,
1407:Besides, our nearness to the King in love ~ William Shakespeare,
1408:But earthlier happy is the rose distill'd ~ William Shakespeare,
1409:But, for my own part, it was Greek to me. ~ William Shakespeare,
1410:But I know to be up late is to be up late ~ William Shakespeare,
1411:But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, ~ William Shakespeare,
1412:But say, my lord, it were not regist'red, ~ William Shakespeare,
1413:By Heaven, I love thee better than myself ~ William Shakespeare,
1414:come not between the dragon and his wrath ~ William Shakespeare,
1415:Covering discretion with a coat of folly. ~ William Shakespeare,
1416:Death is my son-in-law, death is my heir. ~ William Shakespeare,
1417:Death lies on her like an untimely frost. ~ William Shakespeare,
1418:Every good servant does not all commands. ~ William Shakespeare,
1419:Every true man's apparel fits your thief. ~ William Shakespeare,
1420:Expectation is the root of all heartache. ~ William Shakespeare,
1421:fair eyes and gentle wishes go with me to ~ William Shakespeare,
1422:Fairies use flowers for their charactery. ~ William Shakespeare,
1423:Forbear to judge, for we are sinners all. ~ William Shakespeare,
1424:Forget, forgive; conclude, and be agreed. ~ William Shakespeare,
1425:For here, I hope, begins our lasting joy. ~ William Shakespeare,
1426:For now they kill me with a living death. ~ William Shakespeare,
1427:For who is living, if those two are gone? ~ William Shakespeare,
1428:Give every man thy ear but few thy voice. ~ William Shakespeare,
1429:Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle. ~ William Shakespeare,
1430:Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle; ~ William Shakespeare,
1431:Greatest scandal waits on greatest state. ~ William Shakespeare,
1432:Having my freedom, boast of nothing else. ~ William Shakespeare,
1433:Home-keeping youth have ever homely wits. ~ William Shakespeare,
1434:How hard it is for women to keep counsel! ~ William Shakespeare,
1435:How much an ill word may empoison liking! ~ William Shakespeare,
1436:How strange or odd some'er I bear myself, ~ William Shakespeare,
1437:I am as vigilant as a cat to steal cream. ~ William Shakespeare,
1438:... I am At war 'twixt will and will not. ~ William Shakespeare,
1439:I am even
The natural fool of fortune. ~ William Shakespeare,
1440:I am giddy, expectation whirls me round. ~ William Shakespeare,
1441:I am never merry when I hear sweet music. ~ William Shakespeare,
1442:I cannot draw a cart, nor eat dried oats; ~ William Shakespeare,
1443:Ideas are the very coinage of your brain. ~ William Shakespeare,
1444:I do the wrong, and first begin to brawl. ~ William Shakespeare,
1445:If fortune torments me, hope contents me. ~ William Shakespeare,
1446:If money go before, all ways do lie open. ~ William Shakespeare,
1447:if money go before, all ways do lie open. ~ William Shakespeare,
1448:If thou wilt lend this money, lend it not ~ William Shakespeare,
1449:If you be King, why should not I succeed? ~ William Shakespeare,
1450:I have more care to stay than will to go. ~ William Shakespeare,
1451:I must be gone and live, or stay and die. ~ William Shakespeare,
1452:In time we hate that which we often fear. ~ William Shakespeare,
1453:In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond... ~ William Shakespeare,
1454:I say there is no darkness but ignorance. ~ William Shakespeare,
1455:It is the disease of not listening...... ~ William Shakespeare,
1456:I wish you all the joy that you can wish. ~ William Shakespeare,
1457:I would that I were low laid in my grave. ~ William Shakespeare,
1458:I would with such perfection govern, sir, ~ William Shakespeare,
1459:Knit your hearts with an unslipping knot. ~ William Shakespeare,
1460:Know thyself into that I own self be true ~ William Shakespeare,
1461:Let me not to the marriage of true minds ~ William Shakespeare,
1462:Let them obey that knows not how to rule. ~ William Shakespeare,
1463:Like a red morn that ever yet betokened, ~ William Shakespeare,
1464:Look what thy soul holds dear, imagine it ~ William Shakespeare,
1465:Love comforteth like sunshine after rain, ~ William Shakespeare,
1466:Love comforteth like sunshine after rain. ~ William Shakespeare,
1467:Love? His affections do not that way tend ~ William Shakespeare,
1468:Make use of time, let not advantage slip. ~ William Shakespeare,
1469:Make use of time, let not advantage slip; ~ William Shakespeare,
1470:Man and wife, being two, are one in love. ~ William Shakespeare,
1471:Mother, you have my father much offended. ~ William Shakespeare,
1472:My cousin's a fool, and thou art another. ~ William Shakespeare,
1473:Nero is an angler in the lake of darkness ~ William Shakespeare,
1474:Now all the youth of England are on fire, ~ William Shakespeare,
1475:O braggart vile and damned furious wight! ~ William Shakespeare,
1476:  O! never say that I was false of heart, ~ William Shakespeare,
1477:Opinion, a sovereign mistress of effects. ~ William Shakespeare,
1478:O wretched state! o bosom black as death! ~ William Shakespeare,
1479:Poor and content is rich, and rich enough ~ William Shakespeare,
1480:Poor soul, the center of my sinful Earth. ~ William Shakespeare,
1481:Profit is a blessing, if it's not stolen. ~ William Shakespeare,
1482:sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none. ~ William Shakespeare,
1483:So all my best is dressing old words new. ~ William Shakespeare,
1484:Some falls the means are happier to rise. ~ William Shakespeare,
1485:So musical a discord, such sweet thunder. ~ William Shakespeare,
1486:So quick bright things come to confusion. ~ William Shakespeare,
1487:Such thanks as fits a king's remembrance. ~ William Shakespeare,
1488:Sufferance is the badge of all our tribe. ~ William Shakespeare,
1489:Summer's lease hath all too short a date. ~ William Shakespeare,
1490:Swear me, Kate, like a lady as thou art, ~ William Shakespeare,
1491:Tear-falling pity dwells not in this eye. ~ William Shakespeare,
1492:The better part of valour, is discretion. ~ William Shakespeare,
1493:The deep of night is crept upon our talk, ~ William Shakespeare,
1494:The earth has music for those who listen. ~ William Shakespeare,
1495:The empty vessel makes the loudest sound. ~ William Shakespeare,
1496:The head is not more native to the heart. ~ William Shakespeare,
1497:The hind that would be mated by the lion ~ William Shakespeare,
1498:The lady doth protest too much, methinks. ~ William Shakespeare,
1499:The let-alone lies not in your good will. ~ William Shakespeare,
1500:Then, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill! ~ William Shakespeare,

IN CHAPTERS [3/3]





   2 Jorge Luis Borges




Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  Time (of which they are made) seemed to have quite forgotten them, but around William Shakespeare wrote
  the tragedy of Macbeth, in whose first scene they appear.

Deutsches Requiem, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  another immense Germanic name, William Shakespeare. Formerly I was
  interested in theology, but from this fantastic discipline (and from the

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  believe that, if William Shakespeare, like his elder sisters, had died in the
  cradle, some other mother in Stratford-upon-Avon or Stratford-atte-

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun william_shakespeare

The noun william shakespeare has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
            
1. Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon ::: (English poet and dramatist considered one of the greatest English writers (1564-1616))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun william_shakespeare

1 sense of william shakespeare                    

Sense 1
Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright
     => writer, author
       => communicator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> poet
     => writer, author
       => communicator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun william_shakespeare
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun william_shakespeare

1 sense of william shakespeare                    

Sense 1
Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright
   INSTANCE OF=> poet




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun william_shakespeare

1 sense of william shakespeare                    

Sense 1
Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
  -> dramatist, playwright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aeschylus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Albee, Edward Albee, Edward Franklin Albeen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Maxwell Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anouilh, Jean Anouilh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barrie, James Barrie, J. M. Barrie, James Matthew Barrie, Sir James Matthew Barrie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beaumont, Francis Beaumont
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brecht, Bertolt Brecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calderon, Calderon de la Barca, Pedro Calderon de la Barca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chekhov, Chekov, Anton Chekhov, Anton Chekov, Anton Pavlovich Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich Chekov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Congreve, William Congreve
   HAS INSTANCE=> Corneille, Pierre Corneille
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coward, Noel Coward, Sir Noel Pierce Coward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crouse, Russel Crouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cyrano de Bergerac, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dekker, Decker, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Decker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dryden, John Dryden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Stearns Eliot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Euripides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fletcher, John Fletcher
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fry, Christopher Fry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fugard, Athol Fugard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garcia Lorca, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Lorca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Genet, Jean Genet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giraudoux, Jean Giraudoux, Hippolyte Jean Giraudoux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldoni, Carlo Goldoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Granville-Barker, Harley Granville-Barker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hart, Moss Hart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Havel, Vaclav Havel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hebbel, Friedrich Hebbel, Christian Friedrich Hebbel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hellman, Lillian Hellman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hugo, Victor Hugo, Victor-Marie Hugo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ibsen, Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Johan Ibsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Inge, William Inge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ionesco, Eugene Ionesco
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jonson, Ben Jonson, Benjamin Jonson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kaufman, George S. Kaufman, George Simon Kaufman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kleist, Heinrich von Kleist, Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kyd, Kid, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Kid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lindsay, Howard Lindsay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Luce, Clare Booth Luce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maeterlinck, Count Maurice Maeterlinck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mamet, David Mamet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marlowe, Christopher Marlowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marstan, John Marstan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Menander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Middleton, Thomas Middleton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Arthur Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moliere, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Molnar, Ferenc Molnar
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Casey, Sean O'Casey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Odets, Clifford Odets
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Neill, Eugene O'Neill, Eugene Gladstone O'Neill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Osborne, John Osborne, John James Osborne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pinter, Harold Pinter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pirandello, Luigi Pirandello
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, George Pitt, George Dibdin Pitt, George Dibdin-Pitt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plautus, Titus Maccius Plautus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Racine, Jean Racine, Jean Baptiste Racine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rattigan, Terence Rattigan, Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rice, Elmer Rice, Elmer Leopold Rice, Elmer Reizenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, Lennox Robinson, Esme Stuart Lennox Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rostand, Edmond Rostand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sartre, Jean-Paul Sartre
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scribe, Augustin Eugene Scribe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shepard, Sam Shepard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sheridan, Richard Brinsley Sheridan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sherwood, Robert Emmet Sherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simon, Neil Simon, Marvin Neil Simon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sophocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoppard, Tom Stoppard, Sir Tom Stoppard, Thomas Straussler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Strindberg, August Strindberg, Johan August Strindberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Synge, J. M. Synge, John Millington Synge, Edmund John Millington Synge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Terence, Publius Terentius Afer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tirso de Molina, Gabriel Tellez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ustinov, Sir Peter Ustinov, Peter Alexander Ustinov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vega, Lope de Vega, Lope Felix de Vega Carpio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webster, John Webster
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Tennessee Williams, Thomas Lanier Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wycherley, William Wycherley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yeats, William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats
  -> poet
   => bard
   => elegist
   => odist
   => poetess
   => poet laureate
   => poet laureate
   => sonneteer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alcaeus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Apollinaire, Guillaume Apollinaire, Wilhelm Apollinaris de Kostrowitzki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arnold, Matthew Arnold
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arp, Jean Arp, Hans Arp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auden, W. H. Auden, Wystan Hugh Auden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baudelaire, Charles Baudelaire, Charles Pierre Baudelaire
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, Stephen Vincent Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Blake, William Blake
   HAS INSTANCE=> Blok, Alexander Alexandrovich Blok, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Blok
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boccaccio, Giovanni Boccaccio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradstreet, Anne Bradstreet, Anne Dudley Bradstreet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brecht, Bertolt Brecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brooke, Rupert Brooke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browning, Robert Browning
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burns, Robert Burns
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Byron, Lord George Gordon Byron, Sixth Baron Byron of Rochdale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calderon, Calderon de la Barca, Pedro Calderon de la Barca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carducci, Giosue Carducci
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carew, Thomas Carew
   HAS INSTANCE=> Catullus, Gaius Valerius Catullus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chaucer, Geoffrey Chaucer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ciardi, John Ciardi, John Anthony Ciardi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coleridge, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Corneille, Pierre Corneille
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cowper, William Cowper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Hart Crane, Harold Hart Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cynewulf, Cynwulf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dante, Dante Alighieri
   HAS INSTANCE=> de la Mare, Walter de la Mare, Walter John de la Mare
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickinson, Emily Dickinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Donne, John Donne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dryden, John Dryden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Stearns Eliot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, Edward Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Frost, Robert Frost, Robert Lee Frost
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garcia Lorca, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Lorca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gilbert, William Gilbert, William S. Gilbert, William Schwenk Gilbert, Sir William Gilbert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ginsberg, Allen Ginsberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gongora, Luis de Gongora y Argote
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gray, Thomas Gray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herrick, Robert Herrick
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesiod
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmannsthal, Hugo von Hoffmannsthal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hogg, James Hogg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Homer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hopkins, Gerard Manley Hopkins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Horace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Housman, A. E. Housman, Alfred Edward Housman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Ted Hughes, Edward James Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hugo, Victor Hugo, Victor-Marie Hugo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ibsen, Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Johan Ibsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jarrell, Randall Jarrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jeffers, Robinson Jeffers, John Robinson Jeffers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jimenez, Juan Ramon Jimenez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jonson, Ben Jonson, Benjamin Jonson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Karlfeldt, Erik Axel Karlfeldt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keats, John Keats
   HAS INSTANCE=> Key, Francis Scott Key
   HAS INSTANCE=> Klopstock, Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lindsay, Vachel Lindsay, Nicholas Vachel Lindsay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Li Po
   HAS INSTANCE=> Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lovelace, Richard Lovelace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowell, Amy Lowell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowell, Robert Lowell, Robert Traill Spence Lowell Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lucretius, Titus Lucretius Carus
   HAS INSTANCE=> MacLeish, Archibald MacLeish
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mallarme, Stephane Mallarme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mandelstam, Osip Mandelstam, Osip Emilevich Mandelstam, Mandelshtam
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marini, Giambattista Marini, Marino, Giambattista Marino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marlowe, Christopher Marlowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marti, Jose Julian Marti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Martial
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marvell, Andrew Marvell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Masefield, John Masefield, John Edward Masefield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Masters, Edgar Lee Masters
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mayakovski, Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Meredith, George Meredith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milton, John Milton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, Marianne Moore, Marianne Craig Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, Thomas Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morris, William Morris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Neruda, Pablo Neruda, Reyes, Neftali Ricardo Reyes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Noyes, Alfred Noyes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Omar Khayyam
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ovid, Publius Ovidius Naso
   HAS INSTANCE=> Palgrave, Francis Turner Palgrave
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petrarch, Petrarca, Francesco Petrarca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pindar
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pope, Alexander Pope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pushkin, Alexander Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Racine, Jean Racine, Jean Baptiste Racine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Riley, James Whitcomb Riley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rilke, Rainer Maria Rilke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud, Jean Nicholas Arthur Rimbaud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, Edwin Arlington Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rostand, Edmond Rostand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seeger, Alan Seeger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sexton, Anne Sexton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shevchenko, Taras Grigoryevich Shevchenko
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sidney, Sir Philip Sidney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Silverstein, Shel Silverstein, Shelby Silverstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sitwell, Dame Edith Sitwell, Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Southey, Robert Southey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spender, Stephen Spender, Sir Stephen Harold Spender
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spenser, Edmund Spenser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevens, Wallace Stevens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Suckling, Sir John Suckling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Swinburne, Algernon Charles Swinburne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symons, Arthur Symons
   HAS INSTANCE=> Synge, J. M. Synge, John Millington Synge, Edmund John Millington Synge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tasso, Torquato Tasso
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tate, Allen Tate, John Orley Allen Tate
   HAS INSTANCE=> Teasdale, Sara Teasdale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tennyson, Alfred Tennyson, First Baron Tennyson, Alfred Lord Tennyson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thespis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thomas, Dylan Thomas, Dylan Marlais Thomas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trumbull, John Trumbull
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tzara, Tristan Tzara, Samuel Rosenstock
   HAS INSTANCE=> Uhland, Johann Ludwig Uhland
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verlaine, Paul Verlaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Villon, Francois Villon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Virgil, Vergil, Publius Vergilius Maro
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voznesenski, Andrei Voznesenski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Watts, Isaac Watts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wheatley, Phillis Wheatley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whitman, Walt Whitman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whittier, John Greenleaf Whittier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, William Carlos Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wordsworth, William Wordsworth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wyatt, Sir Thomas Wyatt, Wyat, Sir Thomas Wyat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wylie, Elinor Morton Hoyt Wylie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yeats, William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yevtushenko, Yevgeni Yevtushenko, Yevgeni Aleksandrovich Yevtushenko
   HAS INSTANCE=> Young, Edward Young




--- Grep of noun william_shakespeare
william shakespeare



IN WEBGEN [10000/159]

Wikipedia - Advanced persistent threat -- Set of stealthy and continuous computer hacking processes
Wikipedia - Automotive hacking -- The exploitation of vulnerabilities within the software, hardware, and communication systems of automobiles
Wikipedia - Billboard hacking
Wikipedia - Black hat hacking
Wikipedia - Category:Films about computer hacking
Wikipedia - Category:Hacking (computer security)
Wikipedia - Category:Hacking in the 1980s
Wikipedia - Cheat Engine -- Memory hacking software
Wikipedia - Computer hacking
Wikipedia - Email hacking -- Unauthorized access to, or manipulation of, an email account or email correspondence
Wikipedia - Ethical hacking
Wikipedia - GnosticPlayers -- Computer hacking group
Wikipedia - Government hacking -- Computer hacking perpetrated by governments
Wikipedia - Grinder (biohacking community)
Wikipedia - Grinder (biohacking)
Wikipedia - Hackaday -- A hardware hacking website
Wikipedia - Hacking Democracy -- 2006 film by Simon Ardizzone
Wikipedia - Hacking (innovation)
Wikipedia - Hacking Matter -- Book by Wil McCarthy
Wikipedia - Hacking of consumer electronics
Wikipedia - Hacking tool
Wikipedia - HackTool.Win32.HackAV -- DDfinition from Kaspersky Labs for a program designed to assist hacking
Wikipedia - Happy Hacking Keyboard
Wikipedia - Ian Hacking
Wikipedia - Lauri Love -- British activist previously wanted by the United States on hacking charges
Wikipedia - Legion of Doom (hacking) -- Hacker group
Wikipedia - Level Seven (hacking group) -- Hacker group
Wikipedia - List of news media phone hacking scandal victims -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of people arrested in the News International phone-hacking scandal -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of security hacking incidents -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - Neurohacking
Wikipedia - News International phone hacking scandal -- Media scandal
Wikipedia - Offensive Security Certified Professional -- Ethical hacking certification by Offensive Security
Wikipedia - Pass the hash -- Hacking technique
Wikipedia - Phile -- files about hacking
Wikipedia - Port Hacking -- Estuary in southern Sydney, Australia
Wikipedia - Pwn2Own -- Computer hacking contest
Wikipedia - Reality Hacking
Wikipedia - Rewriting the Soul -- 1995 book by Ian Hacking
Wikipedia - ROM hacking -- Video game editing technique
Wikipedia - Roof and tunnel hacking
Wikipedia - Template talk:Computer hacking
Wikipedia - Template talk:Hacking in the 1980s
Wikipedia - The Secret History of Hacking -- 2001 film by Ralph Lee
Wikipedia - The Taming of Chance -- 1990 book by Ian Hacking
Wikipedia - Wallhacking
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:Whacking with a wet trout -- Humorous Wikipedia project page
Ian Hacking ::: Born: February 18, 1936; Occupation: Philosopher;
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10754454-language-hacking-guide
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1342300.Hacking_del_Icio_Us
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17876446-hacking-politics
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18164.Hardware_Hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18710039-the-ultimate-guide-to-travel-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1993945.Hacking_Harvard
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20347614-the-phone-hacking-affair
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20936133-growth-hacking-with-content-marketing
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22966671-hacking-human-nature-for-good
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23857762-profit-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23972780-mind-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25111013-mind-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25679709-life-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26829118-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26854189-il-rumore-dell-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26877420-the-small-business-guide-to-growth-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28281527-slipstream-time-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28364817-the-dark-side-of-the-hacking-world
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28450909-language-hacking-french
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28450910-language-hacking-italian
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28450911-language-hacking-german-learn-how-to-speak-german---right-away
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28450912-language-hacking-spanish
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29778972-hacking-chinese
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/31213211-hacking-isis
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33838194-shacking-up
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34237719-the-hacking-of-the-american-mind
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34757578-the-hacking-of-the-american-mind
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35107643-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35278246-calorie-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36295037-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36430181-hacking-darkness
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/390866.Hacking_the_Future
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39888954-hacking-mexico
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40597264-hacking-darwin
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42096650-l-arte-dell-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42815289-hacking-kindle-categories-for-fun-and-profit
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43359681-hacking-the-code-of-life
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/61619.Hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8622761-hacking-work
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/895034.Purity_And_Power_Keswick_Ministry_From_Dick_Lucas_Alan_Flavelle_Philip_Hacking_David_Jackman_Others
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/926312.Hacking_RSS_and_Atom
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9311177-kismet-hacking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9407491-hacking-ma-bell
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/34740.Ian_Hacking
Goodreads author - Ian_Hacking
Move Fast and Break Things: Are Facebook, Amazon, and Google Hacking Our Democracy?
dedroidify.blogspot - defcon-15-t309-hacking-ufology
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/HackingMinigame
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/HollywoodHacking
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Ian_Hacking
Ghost in the Shell(1995) - In the year 2029, the barriers of our world have been broken down by the net and by cybernetics, but this brings new vulnerability to humans in the form of brain-hacking. When a highly-wanted hacker known as 'The Puppetmaster' begins involving them in politics, Section 9, a group of cybernetically e...
https://allthetropes.fandom.com/wiki/Hollywood_Hacking
https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Computer_Hacking
https://dreamfiction.fandom.com/wiki/Firebombing_and_Hacking_of_St._Jude's_High_School
https://iriver.fandom.com/wiki/H10_Hacking_&_Modding
https://moomooio.fandom.com/wiki/Hacking
https://smb-hacking.fandom.com/wiki/Super_Monkey_Ball_Hacking_Wiki
https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Hacking
https://twitter.com/share?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fandom.com%2Farticles%2Fhuman-brain-cyberpunk-2077-hacking
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https://www.fandom.com/articles/human-brain-cyberpunk-2077-hacking
https://www.reddit.com/submit?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fandom.com%2Farticles%2Fhuman-brain-cyberpunk-2077-hacking
Baldr Force Exe Resolution -- -- Satelight -- 4 eps -- Visual novel -- Action Drama Mecha Sci-Fi -- Baldr Force Exe Resolution Baldr Force Exe Resolution -- Any network runs all over the world, and the development of the information network reaches its acme. In this age, there are two developed worlds; "the real world" and "wired", or the virtual network world. -- -- Soma Toru belongs to a hacking group, Steppen Wolf, which runs around the network world freely. They attack the database of the UN forces as their last work. During this attack, he loses Nonomura Yuya, his friend as well as the team leader. Toru is arrested by the army. In exchange for letting him free, he has to work for an anti-hacker organization, the first squad of the UN Security Force Information Administration Bureau. -- -- Working for them, he is looking for the person who killed his friend, while the other members also have their own reason to fight. -- -- The three-way fights of the terrorist group, the security enterprise, and the army, continue every day. The various events occurred during the fight seem to be independent of each other at the first glance, but they're converging on one event as if they were attracted by something. -- -- Based on the game by GIGA. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- OVA - Nov 10, 2006 -- 15,668 6.46
Battle Programmer Shirase -- -- AIC -- 15 eps -- Original -- Comedy Ecchi Sci-Fi -- Battle Programmer Shirase Battle Programmer Shirase -- Battle Programmer Shirase, also known as BPS, is a free programmer with super hacking abilities who doesn't work for money. What he does work for is certainly something that only people like him would appreciate. But, his demeanor certainly doesn't suit the jobs he is hired for. With the evil King of America causing trouble via the internet, Shirase is nothing but busy as each new adventure brings even more interesting people into the picture. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- -- Licensor: -- Maiden Japan -- TV - Oct 4, 2003 -- 30,537 6.93
Digimon Universe: Appli Monsters -- -- Toei Animation -- 52 eps -- Original -- Action Sci-Fi Adventure Comedy Kids Fantasy -- Digimon Universe: Appli Monsters Digimon Universe: Appli Monsters -- Everyone in the world uses smartphone apps. But inside them lurks unknown creatures called "Appli Monsters," or "Appmon." The Appmon are AI lifeforms with the ability to think and act, and exist in the boundary between the human world and digital space. In the vast sea of the internet, the "last boss AI" Leviathan takes control of the Appmon with a virus and begins hacking every system, thus starting to control the human world from the world of the net. Haru Shinkai is led to acquire the Appli Drive, and uses it to materialize Gatchmon, a search app monster. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- 11,498 6.58
High School Agent -- -- J.C.Staff -- 2 eps -- Manga -- Action Drama Military -- High School Agent High School Agent -- Based on a manga by Tanimura Hitoshi, serialized in Comic Burger. -- -- Teenager Kanemori Kousuke is a secret agent for the international VN spy network. Using his computer hacking skills, he tracks international criminals. Later he goes after Neo-Nazis to the Arctic were they try to raise a U-boat with a sinister secret. -- -- (Source: The Anime Encyclopedia) -- OVA - Jul 1, 1987 -- 947 5.47
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Wii_hacking
200911 News of the World phone hacking scandal investigations
Automotive hacking
Baron Hacking
Billboard hacking
Biohacking
Blue chip hacking scandal
Bob Hacking
Body hacking
Douglas Hacking, 1st Baron Hacking
Google hacking
Government hacking
Growth hacking
Hacking
Hacking at Random
Hacking knife
Hacking Matter
Hacking of consumer electronics
Hacking: The Art of Exploitation
Happy Hacking Keyboard
Ian Hacking
Jamie Hacking
John Hacking
Legion of Doom (hacking)
Level Seven (hacking group)
List of documents relating to the News International phone hacking scandal
List of investigations, resignations, suspensions, and dismissals in conjunction with the news media phone hacking scandal
List of people arrested in the News International phone-hacking scandal
List of people related to the News International phone hacking scandal
List of security hacking incidents
List of victims of the News International phone hacking scandal
Metropolitan Police role in the news media phone hacking scandal
Murder of Lori Hacking
News International phone hacking scandal
News media phone hacking scandal reference lists
Patriotic hacking
Philip Hacking
Phone hacking
Port Hacking
ROM hacking
Roof and tunnel hacking
Social hacking
The Secret History of Hacking
Vietnamese airports hackings
Whacking Day



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