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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
music_playlists
wave_music
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Advanced_Dungeons_and_Dragons_2E
A_Treatise_on_Cosmic_Fire
Awaken_the_Giant_Within
Big_Mind,_Big_Heart
City_of_God
DND_DM_Guide_5E
DND_PH_5E
Enchiridion
Enchiridion_text
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Evolution_II
Faust
Flow_-_The_Psychology_of_Optimal_Experience
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Infinite_Library
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Liber_Null
Life_without_Death
Meditation__The_First_and_Last_Freedom
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_02
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_03
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_04
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1950-1951
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Questions_And_Answers_1957-1958
Ready_Player_One
Savitri
Spiral_Dynamics
The_Act_of_Creation
The_Book_of_Secrets__Keys_to_Love_and_Meditation
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Odyssey
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Secret_Doctrine
the_Stack
The_Study_and_Practice_of_Yoga
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Thought_Power
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1951-05-14_-_Chance_-_the_play_of_forces_-_Peace,_given_and_lost_-_Abolishing_the_ego
1954-08-04_-_Servant_and_worker_-_Justification_of_weakness_-_Play_of_the_Divine_-_Why_are_you_here_in_the_Ashram?
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1.bs_-_What_a_carefree_game_He_plays!
1.dd_-_The_Creator_Plays_His_Cosmic_Instrument_In_Perfect_Harmony
1.fs_-_The_Playing_Infant
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jwvg_-_Playing_At_Priests
1.lla_-_Playfully,_you_hid_from_me
1.nmdv_-_Laughing_and_playing,_I_came_to_Your_Temple,_O_Lord
1.okym_-_71_-_And_much_as_Wine_has_playd_the_Infidel
1.rt_-_Playthings
1.rt_-_We_Are_To_Play_The_Game_Of_Death
1.rt_-_Your_flute_plays_the_exact_notes_of_my_pain._(from_The_Lover_of_God)
1.wby_-_A_Song_From_The_Player_Queen
1.wby_-_On_Those_That_Hated_The_Playboy_Of_The_Western_World,_1907
1.wby_-_The_Attack_On_the_Playboy_Of_The_Western_World,_1907
1.wby_-_The_Players_Ask_For_A_Blessing_On_The_Psalteries_And_On_Themselves
1.wby_-_Two_Songs_From_A_Play
20.04_-_Act_II:_The_Play_on_Earth
29.04_-_Mothers_Playground
33.14_-_I_Played_Football

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_0.01_-_Introduction
00.01_-_The_Approach_to_Mysticism
00.02_-_Mystic_Symbolism
0_0.02_-_Topographical_Note
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
00.04_-_The_Beautiful_in_the_Upanishads
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.01_-_Letters_from_the_Mother_to_Her_Son
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature
0.03_-_III_-_The_Evening_Sittings
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.04_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.04_-_The_Systems_of_Yoga
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.01_-_A_Yoga_of_the_Art_of_Life
01.01_-_The_New_Humanity
01.02_-_Natures_Own_Yoga
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.03_-_Yoga_and_the_Ordinary_Life
01.04_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Gita
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_Rabindranath_Tagore:_A_Great_Poet,_a_Great_Man
01.06_-_On_Communism
01.07_-_Blaise_Pascal_(1623-1662)
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
01.08_-_A_Theory_of_Yoga
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.12_-_Goethe
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0_1954-08-25_-_what_is_this_personality?_and_when_will_she_come?
0_1955-04-04
0_1956-05-02
0_1958-01-01
0_1958-05-11_-_the_ship_that_said_OM
0_1958-05-30
0_1958-07-23
0_1958-08-09
0_1958-08-29
0_1958-09-16_-_OM_NAMO_BHAGAVATEH
0_1958-10-01
0_1958-10-10
0_1958-11-02
0_1958-11-27_-_Intermediaries_and_Immediacy
0_1958_12_-_Floor_1,_young_girl,_we_shall_kill_the_young_princess_-_black_tent
0_1959-05-19_-_Ascending_and_Descending_paths
0_1960-01-31
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
0_1960-08-27
0_1960-10-11
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-10-25
0_1960-11-08
0_1960-11-12
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-02-04
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-03-07
0_1961-04-12
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-07-15
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-08-08
0_1961-09-10
0_1961-11-23
0_1961-12-16
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-09
0_1962-01-12_-_supramental_ship
0_1962-01-21
0_1962-02-06
0_1962-02-09
0_1962-02-13
0_1962-02-24
0_1962-03-06
0_1962-04-13
0_1962-05-29
0_1962-06-06
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-06-27
0_1962-07-11
0_1962-07-18
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-08-11
0_1962-08-14
0_1962-08-31
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-10-12
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-11-10
0_1962-11-17
0_1962-11-30
0_1962-12-19
0_1963-01-09
0_1963-01-14
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-02-23
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-03-09
0_1963-03-16
0_1963-04-20
0_1963-05-15
0_1963-05-18
0_1963-06-29
0_1963-07-20
0_1963-07-31
0_1963-08-13a
0_1963-08-13b
0_1963-08-21
0_1963-09-25
0_1963-09-28
0_1963-10-16
0_1963-10-19
0_1963-11-13
0_1963-12-03
0_1963-12-14
0_1963-12-25
0_1963-12-31
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-28
0_1964-02-15
0_1964-03-25
0_1964-05-02
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-08-14
0_1964-08-26
0_1964-08-29
0_1964-09-23
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-10-14
0_1964-10-17
0_1964-10-30
0_1964-11-28
0_1964-12-07
0_1965-01-12
0_1965-02-27
0_1965-03-10
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-05-19
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-05
0_1965-06-12
0_1965-06-30
0_1965-07-07
0_1965-07-10
0_1965-08-18
0_1965-08-21
0_1965-08-31
0_1965-09-18
0_1965-09-29
0_1965-10-27
0_1965-10-30
0_1965-11-03
0_1965-11-23
0_1965-12-15
0_1965-12-25
0_1965-12-31
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-02-19
0_1966-03-04
0_1966-03-09
0_1966-04-27
0_1966-04-30
0_1966-05-18
0_1966-05-25
0_1966-05-28
0_1966-06-08
0_1966-06-11
0_1966-06-25
0_1966-08-24
0_1966-09-03
0_1966-09-21
0_1966-10-15
0_1966-10-26
0_1966-10-29
0_1966-11-15
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-12-07
0_1967-02-08
0_1967-03-02
0_1967-03-04
0_1967-04-19
0_1967-05-03
0_1967-05-10
0_1967-05-26
0_1967-06-14
0_1967-06-21
0_1967-07-05
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-09-06
0_1967-09-16
0_1967-09-20
0_1967-10-14
0_1967-10-25
0_1967-11-04
0_1967-12-06
0_1968-01-06
0_1968-01-12
0_1968-03-09
0_1968-03-13
0_1968-03-23
0_1968-04-10
0_1968-04-23
0_1968-05-18
0_1968-05-25
0_1968-06-08
0_1968-06-15
0_1968-07-20
0_1968-09-07
0_1968-09-11
0_1968-09-21
0_1968-10-26
0_1968-11-09
0_1968-11-23
0_1968-11-27
0_1968-11-30
0_1968-12-11
0_1968-12-14
0_1968-12-28
0_1969-01-18
0_1969-02-08
0_1969-02-15
0_1969-02-22
0_1969-04-02
0_1969-04-05
0_1969-04-09
0_1969-04-19
0_1969-04-30
0_1969-05-17
0_1969-06-25
0_1969-07-12
0_1969-07-30
0_1969-08-09
0_1969-08-20
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-08-27
0_1969-08-30
0_1969-09-20
0_1969-10-11
0_1969-10-25
0_1969-11-05
0_1969-11-15
0_1969-11-19
0_1969-11-29
0_1969-12-31
0_1970-01-03
0_1970-02-07
0_1970-03-18
0_1970-04-18
0_1970-04-22
0_1970-04-29
0_1970-06-20
0_1970-09-30
0_1970-10-07
0_1970-10-31
0_1971-01-16
0_1971-03-03
0_1971-03-06
0_1971-03-10
0_1971-03-17
0_1971-04-07
0_1971-05-15
0_1971-07-17
0_1971-11-20
0_1972-01-19
0_1972-03-11
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-12
0_1972-04-15
0_1972-05-19
0_1972-07-22
02.01_-_A_Vedic_Story
02.01_-_The_World-Stair
02.01_-_The_World_War
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.03_-_An_Aspect_of_Emergent_Evolution
02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_George_Seftris
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.09_-_The_Paradise_of_the_Life-Gods
02.09_-_Two_Mystic_Poems_in_Modern_French
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.10_-_Two_Mystic_Poems_in_Modern_Bengali
02.11_-_Hymn_to_Darkness
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_Mysticism_in_Bengali_Poetry
02.12_-_The_Ideals_of_Human_Unity
02.13_-_In_the_Self_of_Mind
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.14_-_Appendix
02.14_-_Panacea_of_Isms
02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.01_-_The_Malady_of_the_Century
03.01_-_The_New_Year_Initiation
03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother
03.02_-_The_Gradations_of_Consciousness__The_Gradation_of_Planes
03.03_-_Arjuna_or_the_Ideal_Disciple
03.03_-_A_Stainless_Steel_Frame
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.04_-_Towardsa_New_Ideology
03.05_-_Some_Conceptions_and_Misconceptions
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.07_-_Brahmacharya
03.07_-_Some_Thoughts_on_the_Unthinkable
03.08_-_The_Spiritual_Outlook
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.09_-_Sectarianism_or_Loyalty
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.10_-_The_Mission_of_Buddhism
03.11_-_Modernist_Poetry
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
03.13_-_Dynamic_Fatalism
03.14_-_Mater_Dolorosa
03.15_-_Origin_and_Nature_of_Suffering
03.16_-_The_Tragic_Spirit_in_Nature
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.02_-_A_Chapter_of_Human_Evolution
04.02_-_Human_Progress
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.02_-_To_the_Heights_II
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.06_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
04.27_-_To_the_Heights-XXVII
05.01_-_At_the_Origin_of_Ignorance
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
05.01_-_The_Destined_Meeting-Place
05.02_-_Gods_Labour
05.02_-_Satyavan
05.04_-_The_Immortal_Person
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.07_-_Man_and_Superman
05.09_-_Varieties_of_Religious_Experience
05.11_-_The_Soul_of_a_Nation
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.14_-_The_Sanctity_of_the_Individual
05.15_-_Sartrian_Freedom
05.23_-_The_Base_of_Sincerity
05.25_-_Sweet_Adversity
05.26_-_The_Soul_in_Anguish
05.27_-_The_Nature_of_Perfection
05.31_-_Divine_Intervention
05.32_-_Yoga_as_Pragmatic_Power
05.33_-_Caesar_versus_the_Divine
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.05_-_The_Story_of_Creation
06.11_-_The_Steps_of_the_Soul
06.12_-_The_Expanding_Body-Consciousness
06.17_-_Directed_Change
06.22_-_I_Have_Nothing,_I_Am_Nothing
06.25_-_Individual_and_Collective_Soul
06.35_-_Second_Sight
06.36_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.03_-_This_Expanding_Universe
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.07_-_Freedom_and_Destiny
07.10_-_Diseases_and_Accidents
07.19_-_Bad_Thought-Formation
07.22_-_Mysticism_and_Occultism
07.34_-_And_this_Agile_Reason
07.36_-_The_Body_and_the_Psychic
07.37_-_The_Psychic_Being,_Some_Mysteries
07.40_-_Service_Human_and_Divine
07.43_-_Music_Its_Origin_and_Nature
07.44_-_Music_Indian_and_European
07.45_-_Specialisation
08.01_-_Choosing_To_Do_Yoga
08.02_-_Order_and_Discipline
08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest
08.05_-_Will_and_Desire
08.14_-_Poetry_and_Poetic_Inspiration
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
09.05_-_The_Story_of_Love
09.06_-_How_Can_Time_Be_a_Friend?
09.11_-_The_Supramental_Manifestation_and_World_Change
09.13_-_On_Teachers_and_Teaching
100.00_-_Synergy
10.01_-_A_Dream
10.01_-_Cycles_of_Creation
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
10.03_-_Life_in_and_Through_Death
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_Lord_of_Time
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.04_-_Transfiguration
10.08_-_Consciousness_as_Freedom
1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation
1.00b_-_DIVISION_B_-_THE_PERSONALITY_RAY_AND_FIRE_BY_FRICTION
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00d_-_DIVISION_D_-_KUNDALINI_AND_THE_SPINE
1.00d_-_Introduction
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00f_-_DIVISION_F_-_THE_LAW_OF_ECONOMY
1.00h_-_Foreword
1.00_-_INTRODUCTORY_REMARKS
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_PRELUDE_AT_THE_THEATRE
10.10_-_A_Poem
1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_Introduction
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES
1.01_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_first_meeting,_December_1918
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Castle
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_Divine_and_The_Universe
1.01_-_The_Ego
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_The_Rape_of_the_Lock
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World
1.02.1_-_The_Inhabiting_Godhead_-_Life_and_Action
1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_-_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World
1.02.2.2_-_Self-Realisation
10.22_-_Short_Notes_-_5-_Consciousness_and_Dimensions_of_View
1.02.3.1_-_The_Lord
1.02.3.2_-_Knowledge_and_Ignorance
1.02.3.3_-_Birth_and_Non-Birth
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
10.24_-_Savitri
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
10.28_-_Love_and_Love
1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary
1.02_-_BEFORE_THE_CITY-GATE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_Groups_and_Statistical_Mechanics
1.02_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_Priestly_Kings
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_Skillful_Means
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_The_Age_of_Individualism_and_Reason
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law
1.02_-_The_Magic_Circle
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_The_Necessity_of_Magick_for_All
1.02_-_The_Objects_of_Imitation.
1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Shadow
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial
1.02_-_THE_WITHIN_OF_THINGS
1.02_-_What_is_Psycho_therapy?
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
10.31_-_The_Mystery_of_The_Five_Senses
10.32_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Five_Elements
10.33_-_On_Discipline
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_APPRENTICESHIP_AND_ENCULTURATION_-_ADOPTION_OF_A_SHARED_MAP
1.03_-_A_Sapphire_Tale
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Eternal_Presence
1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita
1.03_-_Spiritual_Realisation,_The_aim_of_Bhakti-Yoga
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_The_End_of_the_Intellect
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_ALCHEMY_AND_MANICHAEISM
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Money
1.04_-_Of_other_imperfections_which_these_beginners_are_apt_to_have_with_respect_to_the_third_sin,_which_is_luxury.
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_Pratyahara
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Need_of_Guru
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.05_-_Adam_Kadmon
1.05_-_AUERBACHS_CELLAR
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Dharana
1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice
1.05_-_Of_the_imperfections_into_which_beginners_fall_with_respect_to_the_sin_of_wrath
1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_The_Creative_Principle
1.05_-_The_Destiny_of_the_Individual
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_The_New_Consciousness
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_The_True_Doer_of_Works
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_Vishnu_as_Brahma_creates_the_world
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Yoga_and_Hypnotism
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Confutation_Of_Other_Philosophers
1.06_-_Definition_of_Tragedy.
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Five_Dreams
1.06_-_Iconography
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_PIG_AND_PEPPER
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Breaking_of_the_Limits
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Four_Powers_of_the_Mother
1.06_-_The_Light
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Objective_and_Subjective_Views_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Third_Circle__The_Gluttonous._Cerberus._The_Eternal_Rain._Ciacco._Florence.
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.06_-_WITCHES_KITCHEN
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_On_Dreams
1.07_-_On_mourning_which_causes_joy.
1.07_-_ON_READING_AND_WRITING
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Continuity_of_Consciousness
1.07_-_The_Ego_and_the_Dualities
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Magic_Wand
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Primary_Data_of_Being
1.07_-_The_Process_of_Evolution
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_EVENING_A_SMALL,_NEATLY_KEPT_CHAMBER
1.08_-_Independence_from_the_Physical
1.08_-_Information,_Language,_and_Society
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_Stead_and_the_Spirits
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_The_Magic_Sword,_Dagger_and_Trident
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.08_-_The_Splitting_of_the_Human_Personality_during_Spiritual_Training
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.08_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_3
1.094_-_Understanding_the_Structure_of_Things
1.099_-_The_Entry_of_the_Eternal_into_the_Individual
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_Equality_and_the_Annihilation_of_Ego
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_(Plot_continued.)_Dramatic_Unity.
1.09_-_PROMENADE
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_Taras_Ultimate_Nature
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Chosen_Ideal
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Secret_Chiefs
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
1.1.03_-_Brahman
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
1.1.04_-_The_Self_or_Atman
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
1.10_-_Aesthetic_and_Ethical_Culture
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Fate_and_Free-Will
1.10_-_Foresight
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Harmony
1.10_-_Laughter_Of_The_Gods
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_THE_NEIGHBORS_HOUSE
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Three_Modes_of_Nature
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_On_talkativeness_and_silence.
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Influence_of_the_Sexes_on_Vegetation
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.1.1_-_The_Mind_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.11_-_The_Second_Genesis
1.11_-_The_Three_Purushas
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_GARDEN
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_Sleep_and_Dreams
1.12_-_The_Astral_Plane
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_'quantitative_parts'_of_Tragedy_defined.
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_And_Then?
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.1.3_-_Mental_Difficulties_and_the_Need_of_Quietude
1.13_-_(Plot_continued.)_What_constitutes_Tragic_Action.
1.13_-_Posterity_of_Dhruva
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_System_of_the_O.T.O.
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_Noise
1.14_-_(Plot_continued.)_The_tragic_emotions_of_pity_and_fear_should_spring_out_of_the_Plot_itself.
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_The_Victory_Over_Death
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_Conclusion
1.15_-_Index
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_Sex_Morality
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Supreme_Truth-Consciousness
1.1.5_-_Thought_and_Knowledge
1.16_-_Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Evocational_Magic
1.16_-_Dianus_and_Diana
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_MARTHAS_GARDEN
1.16_-_(Plot_continued.)_Recognition__its_various_kinds,_with_examples
1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood
1.16_-_The_Season_of_Truth
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_The_Triple_Status_of_Supermind
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_AT_THE_FOUNTAIN
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_Geryon._The_Violent_against_Art._Usurers._Descent_into_the_Abyss_of_Malebolge.
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_ON_THE_WAY_OF_THE_CREATOR
1.17_-_Practical_rules_for_the_Tragic_Poet.
1.17_-_The_Divine_Soul
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_Evocation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Further_rules_for_the_Tragic_Poet.
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_Mind_and_Supermind
1.18_-_ON_LITTLE_OLD_AND_YOUNG_WOMEN
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_Equality
1.19_-_Life
1.19_-_NIGHT
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.201_-_Socrates
12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth
12.01_-_This_Great_Earth_Our_Mother
12.02_-_The_Stress_of_the_Spirit
12.04_-_Love_and_Death
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.20_-_Death,_Desire_and_Incapacity
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_HOW_MAY_WE_CONCEIVE_AND_HOPE_THAT_HUMAN_UNANIMIZATION_WILL_BE_REALIZED_ON_EARTH?
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_Talismans_-_The_Lamen_-_The_Pantacle
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
1.2.12_-_Vigilance
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_FROM_THE_PRE-HUMAN_TO_THE_ULTRA-HUMAN,_THE_PHASES_OF_A_LIVING_PLANET
1.2.1_-_Mental_Development_and_Sadhana
1.21_-_WALPURGIS-NIGHT
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.22_-_Ciampolo,_Friar_Gomita,_and_Michael_Zanche._The_Malabranche_quarrel.
1.22_-_EMOTIONALISM
1.22_-_How_to_Learn_the_Practice_of_Astrology
1.22_-_OBERON_AND_TITANIA's_GOLDEN_WEDDING
1.22_-_On_the_many_forms_of_vainglory.
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.22_-_The_Problem_of_Life
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.23_-_Our_Debt_to_the_Savage
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_(Epic_Poetry_continued.)_Further_points_of_agreement_with_Tragedy.
1.24_-_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_Kinks_in_Time
1.25_-_On_Religion
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.25_-_The_Knot_of_Matter
1.26_-_FESTIVAL_AT_ADHARS_HOUSE
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_The_Ascending_Series_of_Substance
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.27_-_The_Sevenfold_Chord_of_Being
1.28_-_Describes_the_nature_of_the_Prayer_of_Recollection_and_sets_down_some_of_the_means_by_which_we_can_make_it_a_habit.
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.28_-_Supermind,_Mind_and_the_Overmind_Maya
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
1.3.04_-_Peace
13.05_-_A_Dream_Of_Surreal_Science
1.3.05_-_Silence
13.06_-_The_Passing_of_Satyavan
1.3.1.02_-_The_Object_of_Our_Yoga
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.3.2.01_-_I._The_Entire_Purpose_of_Yoga
1.32_-_The_Ritual_of_Adonis
1.33_-_The_Gardens_of_Adonis
1.3.4.04_-_The_Divine_Superman
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.3.5.01_-_The_Law_of_the_Way
1.3.5.02_-_Man_and_the_Supermind
1.35_-_Attis_as_a_God_of_Vegetation
1.35_-_The_Tao_2
1.36_-_Human_Representatives_of_Attis
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.38_-_Woman_-_Her_Magical_Formula
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.3_-_Mundaka_Upanishads
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
1.4.02_-_The_Divine_Force
1.4.03_-_The_Guru
14.05_-_The_Golden_Rule
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
14.07_-_A_Review_of_Our_Ashram_Life
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.40_-_Coincidence
1.40_-_The_Nature_of_Osiris
1.439
1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_The_Corn-Mother_and_the_Corn-Maiden_in_Northern_Europe
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
15.03_-_A_Canadian_Question
15.06_-_Words,_Words,_Words...
15.07_-_Souls_Freedom
15.08_-_Ashram_-_Inner_and_Outer
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.54_-_Types_of_Animal_Sacrament
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.55_-_The_Transference_of_Evil
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Do_Angels_Ever_Cut_Themselves_Shaving?
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
1.60_-_Knack
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.63_-_The_Interpretation_of_the_Fire-Festivals
1.64_-_Magical_Power
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
1.70_-_Morality_1
17.11_-_A_Prayer
1.72_-_Education
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
1.79_-_Progress
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.80_-_Life_a_Gamble
1.83_-_Epistola_Ultima
1914_03_03p
1914_05_17p
1914_05_26p
1914_06_24p
1914_08_18p
1915_07_31p
1915_11_07p
1916_12_05p
1916_12_20p
1917_01_05p
1917_03_27p
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-05-05_-_Intellect,_true_and_wrong_movement_-_Attacks_from_adverse_forces_-_Faith,_integral_and_absolute_-_Death,_not_a_necessity_-_Descent_of_Divine_Consciousness_-_Inner_progress_-_Memory_of_former_lives
1929-05-12_-_Beings_of_vital_world_(vampires)_-_Money_power_and_vital_beings_-_Capacity_for_manifestation_of_will_-_Entry_into_vital_world_-_Body,_a_protection_-_Individuality_and_the_vital_world
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1950-12-23_-_Concentration_and_energy
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-01-15_-_Sincerity_-_inner_discernment_-_inner_light._Evil_and_imbalance._Consciousness_and_instruments.
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-02-08_-_Unifying_the_being_-_ideas_of_good_and_bad_-_Miracles_-_determinism_-_Supreme_Will_-_Distinguishing_the_voice_of_the_Divine
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-19_-_Exteriorisation-_clairvoyance,_fainting,_etc_-_Somnambulism_-_Tartini_-_childrens_dreams_-_Nightmares_-_gurus_protection_-_Mind_and_vital_roam_during_sleep
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-03_-_Hostile_forces_-_difficulties_-_Individuality_and_form_-_creation
1951-03-05_-_Disasters-_the_forces_of_Nature_-_Story_of_the_charity_Bazar_-_Liberation_and_law_-_Dealing_with_the_mind_and_vital-_methods
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-03-10_-_Fairy_Tales-_serpent_guarding_treasure_-_Vital_beings-_their_incarnations_-_The_vital_being_after_death_-_Nightmares-_vital_and_mental_-_Mind_and_vital_after_death_-_The_spirit_of_the_form-_Egyptian_mummies
1951-03-12_-_Mental_forms_-_learning_difficult_subjects_-_Mental_fortress_-_thought_-_Training_the_mind_-_Helping_the_vital_being_after_death_-_ceremonies_-_Human_stupidities
1951-03-19_-_Mental_worlds_and_their_beings_-_Understanding_in_silence_-_Psychic_world-_its_characteristics_-_True_experiences_and_mental_formations_-_twelve_senses
1951-03-22_-_Relativity-_time_-_Consciousness_-_psychic_Witness_-_The_twelve_senses_-_water-divining_-_Instinct_in_animals_-_story_of_Mothers_cat
1951-03-29_-_The_Great_Vehicle_and_The_Little_Vehicle_-_Choosing_ones_family,_country_-_The_vital_being_distorted_-_atavism_-_Sincerity_-_changing_ones_character
1951-04-02_-_Causes_of_accidents_-_Little_entities,_helpful_or_mischievous-_incidents
1951-04-05_-_Illusion_and_interest_in_action_-_The_action_of_the_divine_Grace_and_the_ego_-_Concentration,_aspiration,_will,_inner_silence_-_Value_of_a_story_or_a_language_-_Truth_-_diversity_in_the_world
1951-04-07_-_Origin_of_Evil_-_Misery-_its_cause
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-19_-_Demands_and_needs_-_human_nature_-_Abolishing_the_ego_-_Food-_tamas,_consecration_-_Changing_the_nature-_the_vital_and_the_mind_-_The_yoga_of_the_body__-_cellular_consciousness
1951-04-23_-_The_goal_and_the_way_-_Learning_how_to_sleep_-_relaxation_-_Adverse_forces-_test_of_sincerity_-_Attitude_to_suffering_and_death
1951-04-26_-_Irrevocable_transformation_-_The_divine_Shakti_-_glad_submission_-_Rejection,_integral_-_Consecration_-_total_self-forgetfulness_-_work
1951-04-28_-_Personal_effort_-_tamas,_laziness_-_Static_and_dynamic_power_-_Stupidity_-_psychic_and_intelligence_-_Philosophies-_different_languages_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_Surrender_of_ones_being_and_ones_work
1951-05-05_-_Needs_and_desires_-_Discernment_-_sincerity_and_true_perception_-_Mantra_and_its_effects_-_Object_in_action-_to_serve_-_relying_only_on_the_Divine
1951-05-12_-_Mahalakshmi_and_beauty_in_life_-_Mahasaraswati_-_conscious_hand_-_Riches_and_poverty
1951-05-14_-_Chance_-_the_play_of_forces_-_Peace,_given_and_lost_-_Abolishing_the_ego
1953-05-06
1953-05-13
1953-05-27
1953-06-03
1953-06-10
1953-06-17
1953-07-01
1953-07-08
1953-07-22
1953-07-29
1953-08-12
1953-09-02
1953-09-16
1953-10-07
1953-11-25
1953-12-30
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1954-02-10_-_Study_a_variety_of_subjects_-_Memory_-Memory_of_past_lives_-_Getting_rid_of_unpleasant_thoughts
1954-03-24_-_Dreams_and_the_condition_of_the_stomach_-_Tobacco_and_alcohol_-_Nervousness_-_The_centres_and_the_Kundalini_-_Control_of_the_senses
1954-04-28_-_Aspiration_and_receptivity_-_Resistance_-_Purusha_and_Prakriti,_not_masculine_and_feminine
1954-05-05_-_Faith,_trust,_confidence_-_Insincerity_and_unconsciousness
1954-06-16_-_Influences,_Divine_and_other_-_Adverse_forces_-_The_four_great_Asuras_-_Aspiration_arranges_circumstances_-_Wanting_only_the_Divine
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-08-04_-_Servant_and_worker_-_Justification_of_weakness_-_Play_of_the_Divine_-_Why_are_you_here_in_the_Ashram?
1954-08-18_-_Mahalakshmi_-_Maheshwari_-_Mahasaraswati_-_Determinism_and_freedom_-_Suffering_and_knowledge_-_Aspects_of_the_Mother
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1954-10-20_-_Stand_back_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Seeing_images_in_meditation_-_Berlioz_-Music_-_Mothers_organ_music_-_Destiny
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1955-02-09_-_Desire_is_contagious_-_Primitive_form_of_love_-_the_artists_delight_-_Psychic_need,_mind_as_an_instrument_-_How_the_psychic_being_expresses_itself_-_Distinguishing_the_parts_of_ones_being_-_The_psychic_guides_-_Illness_-_Mothers_vision
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1955-05-04_-_Drawing_on_the_universal_vital_forces_-_The_inner_physical_-_Receptivity_to_different_kinds_of_forces_-_Progress_and_receptivity
1955-06-08_-_Working_for_the_Divine_-_ideal_attitude_-_Divine_manifesting_-_reversal_of_consciousness,_knowing_oneself_-_Integral_progress,_outer,_inner,_facing_difficulties_-_People_in_Ashram_-_doing_Yoga_-_Children_given_freedom,_choosing_yoga
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1955-10-05_-_Science_and_Ignorance_-_Knowledge,_science_and_the_Buddha_-_Knowing_by_identification_-_Discipline_in_science_and_in_Buddhism_-_Progress_in_the_mental_field_and_beyond_it
1955-12-07_-_Emotional_impulse_of_self-giving_-_A_young_dancer_in_France_-_The_heart_has_wings,_not_the_head_-_Only_joy_can_conquer_the_Adversary
1956-01-04_-_Integral_idea_of_the_Divine_-_All_things_attracted_by_the_Divine_-_Bad_things_not_in_place_-_Integral_yoga_-_Moving_idea-force,_ideas_-_Consequences_of_manifestation_-_Work_of_Spirit_via_Nature_-_Change_consciousness,_change_world
1956-02-08_-_Forces_of_Nature_expressing_a_higher_Will_-_Illusion_of_separate_personality_-_One_dynamic_force_which_moves_all_things_-_Linear_and_spherical_thinking_-_Common_ideal_of_life,_microscopic
1956-03-07_-_Sacrifice,_Animals,_hostile_forces,_receive_in_proportion_to_consciousness_-_To_be_luminously_open_-_Integral_transformation_-_Pain_of_rejection,_delight_of_progress_-_Spirit_behind_intention_-_Spirit,_matter,_over-simplified
1956-03-28_-_The_starting-point_of_spiritual_experience_-_The_boundless_finite_-_The_Timeless_and_Time_-_Mental_explanation_not_enough_-_Changing_knowledge_into_experience_-_Sat-Chit-Tapas-Ananda
1956-04-04_-_The_witness_soul_-_A_Gita_enthusiast_-_Propagandist_spirit,_Tolstoys_son
1956-04-25_-_God,_human_conception_and_the_true_Divine_-_Earthly_existence,_to_realise_the_Divine_-_Ananda,_divine_pleasure_-_Relations_with_the_divine_Presence_-_Asking_the_Divine_for_what_one_needs_-_Allowing_the_Divine_to_lead_one
1956-05-02_-_Threefold_union_-_Manifestation_of_the_Supramental_-_Profiting_from_the_Divine_-_Recognition_of_the_Supramental_Force_-_Ascent,_descent,_manifestation
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-06-27_-_Birth,_entry_of_soul_into_body_-_Formation_of_the_supramental_world_-_Aspiration_for_progress_-_Bad_thoughts_-_Cerebral_filter_-_Progress_and_resistance
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-09-19_-_Power,_predominant_quality_of_vital_being_-_The_Divine,_the_psychic_being,_the_Supermind_-_How_to_come_out_of_the_physical_consciousness_-_Look_life_in_the_face_-_Ordinary_love_and_Divine_love
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1956-10-03_-_The_Mothers_different_ways_of_speaking_-_new_manifestation_-_new_element,_possibilities_-_child_prodigies_-_Laws_of_Nature,_supramental_-_Logic_of_the_unforeseen_-_Creative_writers,_hands_of_musicians_-_Prodigious_children,_men
1956-11-07_-_Thoughts_created_by_forces_of_universal_-_Mind_Our_own_thought_hardly_exists_-_Idea,_origin_higher_than_mind_-_The_Synthesis_of_Yoga,_effect_of_reading
1956-11-14_-_Conquering_the_desire_to_appear_good_-_Self-control_and_control_of_the_life_around_-_Power_of_mastery_-_Be_a_great_yogi_to_be_a_good_teacher_-_Organisation_of_the_Ashram_school_-_Elementary_discipline_of_regularity
1956-11-28_-_Desire,_ego,_animal_nature_-_Consciousness,_a_progressive_state_-_Ananda,_desireless_state_beyond_enjoyings_-_Personal_effort_that_is_mental_-_Reason,_when_to_disregard_it_-_Reason_and_reasons
1956-12-19_-_Preconceived_mental_ideas_-_Process_of_creation_-_Destructive_power_of_bad_thoughts_-_To_be_perfectly_sincere
1956-12-26_-_Defeated_victories_-_Change_of_consciousness_-_Experiences_that_indicate_the_road_to_take_-_Choice_and_preference_-_Diversity_of_the_manifestation
1957-01-02_-_Can_one_go_out_of_time_and_space?_-_Not_a_crucified_but_a_glorified_body_-_Individual_effort_and_the_new_force
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1957-01-30_-_Artistry_is_just_contrast_-_How_to_perceive_the_Divine_Guidance?
1957-02-07_-_Individual_and_collective_meditation
1957-03-06_-_Freedom,_servitude_and_love
1957-04-10_-_Sports_and_yoga_-_Organising_ones_life
1957-05-01_-_Sports_competitions,_their_value
1957-06-12_-_Fasting_and_spiritual_progress
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1957-08-07_-_The_resistances,_politics_and_money_-_Aspiration_to_realise_the_supramental_life
1957-09-18_-_Occultism_and_supramental_life
1957-10-16_-_Story_of_successive_involutions
1957-10-30_-_Double_movement_of_evolution_-_Disappearance_of_a_species
1957-11-27_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_in_The_Life_Divine_-_Individual_and_cosmic_evolution
1957-12-11_-_Appearance_of_the_first_men
1958-01-01_-_The_collaboration_of_material_Nature_-_Miracles_visible_to_a_deep_vision_of_things_-_Explanation_of_New_Year_Message
1958-03-19_-_General_tension_in_humanity_-_Peace_and_progress_-_Perversion_and_vision_of_transformation
1958-05-07_-_The_secret_of_Nature
1958-06-18_-_Philosophy,_religion,_occultism,_spirituality
1958-07-09_-_Faith_and_personal_effort
1958-07-16_-_Is_religion_a_necessity?
1958-07-30_-_The_planchette_-_automatic_writing_-_Proofs_and_knowledge
1958-08-13_-_Profit_by_staying_in_the_Ashram_-_What_Sri_Aurobindo_has_come_to_tell_us_-_Finding_the_Divine
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958-09-17_-_Power_of_formulating_experience_-_Usefulness_of_mental_development
1958_10_17
1958_10_24
1958_11_14
1958-11-26_-_The_role_of_the_Spirit_-_New_birth
1958_12_05
1960_04_06
1960_04_20
1960_04_27
1960_05_11
1961_05_22?
1962_01_12
1962_01_21
1962_02_27
1962_10_12
1963_01_14
1963_03_06
1964_02_05_-_98
1964_03_25
1965_01_12
1965_05_29
1965_12_25
1965_12_26?
1966_07_06
1969_08_09
1969_08_30_-_140
1969_10_24
1969_12_04
1970_01_13?
1970_03_10
1970_03_24
1970_04_02
1970_04_08
1970_04_15
1970_04_17
1970_04_18
1970_04_21_-_490
1970_04_22_-_493
1970_04_28
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_A_Birthday
1.ac_-_Leah_Sublime
1.ac_-_On_-_On_-_Poet
1.ac_-_The_Garden_of_Janus
1.ac_-_The_Hawk_and_the_Babe
1.anon_-_But_little_better
1.anon_-_Others_have_told_me
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_VIII
1.anon_-_The_Poem_of_Imru-Ul-Quais
1.bni_-_Raga_Ramkali
1.bsf_-_Turn_cheek
1.bsv_-_Make_of_my_body_the_beam_of_a_lute
1.bs_-_What_a_carefree_game_He_plays!
1.cllg_-_A_Dance_of_Unwavering_Devotion
1.dd_-_So_priceless_is_the_birth,_O_brother
1.dd_-_The_Creator_Plays_His_Cosmic_Instrument_In_Perfect_Harmony
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Cool_Air
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_Polaris
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Cats_of_Ulthar
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Evil_Clergyman
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Little_Glass_Bottle
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Other_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Quest_of_Iranon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Secret_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Strange_High_House_in_the_Mist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Till_A_the_Seas
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Amalia
1.fs_-_Cassandra
1.fs_-_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_A_Young_Man
1.fs_-_Elysium
1.fs_-_Fantasie_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Feast_Of_Victory
1.fs_-_Fridolin_(The_Walk_To_The_Iron_Factory)
1.fs_-_Hero_And_Leander
1.fs_-_Hope
1.fs_-_Longing
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Parables_And_Riddles
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Cranes_Of_Ibycus
1.fs_-_The_Dance
1.fs_-_The_Eleusinian_Festival
1.fs_-_The_Fight_With_The_Dragon
1.fs_-_The_Fortune-Favored
1.fs_-_The_Fugitive
1.fs_-_The_Greatness_Of_The_World
1.fs_-_The_Ideal_And_The_Actual_Life
1.fs_-_The_Infanticide
1.fs_-_Thekla_-_A_Spirit_Voice
1.fs_-_The_Lay_Of_The_Bell
1.fs_-_The_Playing_Infant
1.fs_-_The_Poetry_Of_Life
1.fs_-_The_Two_Guides_Of_Life_-_The_Sublime_And_The_Beautiful
1.fs_-_To_Laura_At_The_Harpsichord
1.fs_-_Written_In_A_Young_Lady's_Album
1.fua_-_The_peacocks_excuse
1.grh_-_Gorakh_Bani
1.hs_-_A_Golden_Compass
1.hs_-_I_Know_The_Way_You_Can_Get
1.hs_-_It_Is_Time_to_Wake_Up!
1.hs_-_Several_Times_In_The_Last_Week
1.hs_-_Silence
1.hs_-_Sweet_Melody
1.hs_-_The_Glow_of_Your_Presence
1.hs_-_True_Love
1.jda_-_My_heart_values_his_vulgar_ways_(from_The_Gitagovinda)
1.jda_-_When_he_quickens_all_things_(from_The_Gitagovinda)
1.jda_-_You_rest_on_the_circle_of_Sris_breast_(from_The_Gitagovinda)
1.jk_-_An_Extempore
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Extracts_From_An_Opera
1.jk_-_Fragment_-_Modern_Love
1.jk_-_Fragment_Of_The_Castle_Builder
1.jk_-_Fragment._Welcome_Joy,_And_Welcome_Sorrow
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Ode_On_A_Grecian_Urn
1.jk_-_On_A_Dream
1.jk_-_On_Death
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Sharing_Eves_Apple
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Song_Of_The_Indian_Maid,_From_Endymion
1.jk_-_Sonnet._A_Dream,_After_Reading_Dantes_Episode_Of_Paulo_And_Francesca
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_After_Dark_Vapors_Have_Oppressd_Our_Plains
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VIII._To_My_Brothers
1.jk_-_Specimen_Of_An_Induction_To_A_Poem
1.jk_-_Staffa
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_Saint_Mark._A_Fragment
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_To_Ailsa_Rock
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jlb_-_Chess
1.jlb_-_Instants
1.jlb_-_Unknown_Street
1.jm_-_The_Song_of_Food_and_Dwelling
1.jm_-_The_Song_of_Perfect_Assurance_(to_the_Demons)
1.jm_-_Upon_this_earth,_the_land_of_the_Victorious_Ones
1.jr_-_Because_I_Cannot_Sleep
1.jr_-_Description_Of_Love
1.jr_-_The_real_work_belongs_to_someone_who_desires_God
1.jr_-_What_I_want_is_to_see_your_face
1.jr_-_When_I_Am_Asleep_And_Crumbling_In_The_Tomb
1.jr_-_With_Us
1.jwvg_-_It_Is_Good
1.jwvg_-_June
1.jwvg_-_Living_Remembrance
1.jwvg_-_Nemesis
1.jwvg_-_Night_Thoughts
1.jwvg_-_Playing_At_Priests
1.jwvg_-_The_Wanderer
1.jwvg_-_The_Warning
1.jwvg_-_Welcome_And_Farewell
1.kbr_-_Friend,_Wake_Up!_Why_Do_You_Go_On_Sleeping?
1.kbr_-_Poem_5
1.kbr_-_Poem_9
1.kbr_-_The_Light_of_the_Sun
1.kbr_-_The_light_of_the_sun,_the_moon,_and_the_stars_shines_bright
1.kg_-_Little_Tiger
1.lb_-_Changgan_Memories
1.lb_-_Chiang_Chin_Chiu
1.lb_-_Ch'ing_P'ing_Tiao
1.lb_-_Exile's_Letter
1.lb_-_His_Dream_Of_Skyland
1.lb_-_Listening_to_a_Flute_in_Yellow_Crane_Pavillion
1.lb_-_On_Climbing_In_Nan-King_To_The_Terrace_Of_Phoenixes
1.lb_-_Summer_Day_in_the_Mountains
1.lb_-_The_City_of_Choan
1.lb_-_The_River-Merchant's_Wife:_A_Letter
1.lla_-_Dying_and_giving_birth_go_on
1.lla_-_Playfully,_you_hid_from_me
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Laeta-_A_Lament
1.lovecraft_-_Ode_For_July_Fourth,_1917
1.lovecraft_-_Pacifist_War_Song_-_1917
1.lovecraft_-_Poemata_Minora-_Volume_II
1.lovecraft_-_The_Bride_Of_The_Sea
1.lovecraft_-_The_Garden
1.lovecraft_-_The_Poe-ets_Nightmare
1.lovecraft_-_Waste_Paper-_A_Poem_Of_Profound_Insignificance
1.lovecraft_-_Where_Once_Poe_Walked
1.mb_-_The_Five-Coloured_Garment
1.nmdv_-_He_is_the_One_in_many
1.nmdv_-_Laughing_and_playing,_I_came_to_Your_Temple,_O_Lord
1.nrpa_-_The_Summary_of_Mahamudra
1.okym_-_46_-_For_in_and_out,_above,_about,_below
1.okym_-_49_-_Tis_all_a_Chequer-board_of_Nights_and_Days
1.okym_-_50_-_The_Ball_no_Question_makes_of_Ayes_and_Noes
1.okym_-_71_-_And_much_as_Wine_has_playd_the_Infidel
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Autumn_-_A_Dirge
1.pbs_-_A_Vision_Of_The_Sea
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Chorus_from_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Fiordispina
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_Among_The_Euganean_Hills
1.pbs_-_Marenghi
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_Orpheus
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IX.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VI.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VII.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VIII.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Saint_Edmonds_Eve
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_Song._Sorrow
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Mask_Of_Anarchy
1.pbs_-_The_Pine_Forest_Of_The_Cascine_Near_Pisa
1.pbs_-_The_Question
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Recollection
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley
1.pc_-_Lute
1.poe_-_Enigma
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_The_Conqueror_Worm
1.poe_-_To_The_River
1.rb_-_A_Grammarian's_Funeral_Shortly_After_The_Revival_Of_Learning
1.rb_-_Aix_In_Provence
1.rb_-_A_Light_Woman
1.rb_-_Andrea_del_Sarto
1.rb_-_An_Epistle_Containing_the_Strange_Medical_Experience_of_Kar
1.rb_-_Any_Wife_To_Any_Husband
1.rb_-_A_Toccata_Of_Galuppi's
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_By_The_Fire-Side
1.rb_-_Caliban_upon_Setebos_or,_Natural_Theology_in_the_Island
1.rb_-_Childe_Roland_To_The_Dark_Tower_Came
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_Cristina
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_Garden_Francies
1.rb_-_Holy-Cross_Day
1.rb_-_In_A_Gondola
1.rb_-_Introduction:_Pippa_Passes
1.rb_-_Master_Hugues_Of_Saxe-Gotha
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Rabbi_Ben_Ezra
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Boy_And_the_Angel
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_The_Pied_Piper_Of_Hamelin
1.rb_-_Two_In_The_Campagna
1.rb_-_Waring
1.rmpsd_-_Meditate_on_Kali!_Why_be_anxious?
1.rmpsd_-_Mother_this_is_the_grief_that_sorely_grieves_my_heart
1.rmpsd_-_Who_in_this_world
1.rmpsd_-_Who_is_that_Syama_woman
1.rmr_-_Elegy_IV
1.rmr_-_Elegy_X
1.rmr_-_Falling_Stars
1.rmr_-_Going_Blind
1.rmr_-_On_Hearing_Of_A_Death
1.rmr_-_The_Grown-Up
1.rmr_-_The_Last_Evening
1.rmr_-_The_Neighbor
1.rmr_-_To_Lou_Andreas-Salome
1.rt_-_(63)_Thou_hast_made_me_known_to_friends_whom_I_knew_not_(from_Gitanjali)
1.rt_-_(80)_I_am_like_a_remnant_of_a_cloud_of_autumn_(from_Gitanjali)
1.rt_-_A_Dream
1.rt_-_All_These_I_Loved
1.rt_-_At_The_End_Of_The_Day
1.rt_-_Authorship
1.rt_-_Birth_Story
1.rt_-_Clouds_And_Waves
1.rt_-_Colored_Toys
1.rt_-_Defamation
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_Hes_there_among_the_scented_trees_(from_The_Lover_of_God)
1.rt_-_I
1.rt_-_I_Found_A_Few_Old_Letters
1.rt_-_Innermost_One
1.rt_-_Keep_Me_Fully_Glad
1.rt_-_Kinu_Goalas_Alley
1.rt_-_Lord_Of_My_Life
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LVIII_-_Things_Throng_And_Laugh
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_XXVIII_-_I_Dreamt
1.rt_-_Old_And_New
1.rt_-_One_Day_In_Spring....
1.rt_-_On_The_Seashore
1.rt_-_Our_Meeting
1.rt_-_Paper_Boats
1.rt_-_Parting_Words
1.rt_-_Playthings
1.rt_-_Roaming_Cloud
1.rt_-_Shyama
1.rt_-_Signet_Of_Eternity
1.rt_-_Sleep-Stealer
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_11-_20
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_21_-_30
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_71_-_80
1.rt_-_Superior
1.rt_-_The_Astronomer
1.rt_-_The_Call_Of_The_Far
1.rt_-_The_End
1.rt_-_The_Flower-School
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LV_-_It_Was_Mid-Day
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXVIII_-_None_Lives_For_Ever,_Brother
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XLII_-_O_Mad,_Superbly_Drunk
1.rt_-_The_Gift
1.rt_-_The_Homecoming
1.rt_-_The_Journey
1.rt_-_The_Land_Of_The_Exile
1.rt_-_The_Last_Bargain
1.rt_-_The_Recall
1.rt_-_The_Unheeded_Pageant
1.rt_-_Unending_Love
1.rt_-_Ungrateful_Sorrow
1.rt_-_Untimely_Leave
1.rt_-_Unyielding
1.rt_-_Urvashi
1.rt_-_We_Are_To_Play_The_Game_Of_Death
1.rt_-_When_And_Why
1.rt_-_Who_are_You,_who_keeps_my_heart_awake?_(from_The_Lover_of_God)
1.rt_-_Your_flute_plays_the_exact_notes_of_my_pain._(from_The_Lover_of_God)
1.rvd_-_When_I_existed
1.rwe_-_Art
1.rwe_-_Dirge
1.rwe_-_Dmonic_Love
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Merlin_I
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_My_Garden
1.rwe_-_Ode_To_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Saadi
1.rwe_-_Song_of_Nature
1.rwe_-_The_Adirondacs
1.rwe_-_The_Romany_Girl
1.rwe_-_The_Sphinx
1.rwe_-_The_Titmouse
1.rwe_-_The_Visit
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.rwe_-_To_Ellen,_At_The_South
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.sb_-_Spirit_and_energy_should_be_clear_as_the_night_air
1.sig_-_The_Sun
1.sjc_-_Dark_Night
1.sk_-_Is_there_anyone_in_the_universe
1.srm_-_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters
1.st_-_I_live_in_a_place_without_limits
1.tm_-_A_Psalm
1.tm_-_Aubade_--_The_City
1.tm_-_The_Sowing_of_Meanings
1.tr_-_First_Days_Of_Spring_-_The_sky
1.tr_-_The_Way_Of_The_Holy_Fool
1.vpt_-_All_my_inhibition_left_me_in_a_flash
1.wb_-_Auguries_of_Innocence
1.wb_-_Awake!_awake_O_sleeper_of_the_land_of_shadows
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_A_Lovers_Quarrel_Among_the_Fairies
1.wby_-_Alternative_Song_For_The_Severed_Head_In_The_King_Of_The_Great_Clock_Tower
1.wby_-_A_Memory_Of_Youth
1.wby_-_Among_School_Children
1.wby_-_Anashuya_And_Vijaya
1.wby_-_A_Prayer_For_My_Daughter
1.wby_-_A_Song_From_The_Player_Queen
1.wby_-_A_Woman_Young_And_Old
1.wby_-_Before_The_World_Was_Made
1.wby_-_Crazy_Jane_Grown_Old_Looks_At_The_Dancers
1.wby_-_Crazy_Jane_Reproved
1.wby_-_Fiddler_Of_Dooney
1.wby_-_From_A_Full_Moon_In_March
1.wby_-_Lapis_Lazuli
1.wby_-_Meditations_In_Time_Of_Civil_War
1.wby_-_Never_Give_All_The_Heart
1.wby_-_Nineteen_Hundred_And_Nineteen
1.wby_-_On_A_Picture_Of_A_Black_Centaur_By_Edmund_Dulac
1.wby_-_On_Those_That_Hated_The_Playboy_Of_The_Western_World,_1907
1.wby_-_Parnells_Funeral
1.wby_-_Parting
1.wby_-_Running_To_Paradise
1.wby_-_September_1913
1.wby_-_Shepherd_And_Goatherd
1.wby_-_The_Attack_On_the_Playboy_Of_The_Western_World,_1907
1.wby_-_The_Circus_Animals_Desertion
1.wby_-_The_Collar-Bone_Of_A_Hare
1.wby_-_The_Double_Vision_Of_Michael_Robartes
1.wby_-_The_Fascination_Of_Whats_Difficult
1.wby_-_The_Happy_Townland
1.wby_-_The_Host_Of_The_Air
1.wby_-_The_Hour_Before_Dawn
1.wby_-_The_Ladys_Third_Song
1.wby_-_The_Man_And_The_Echo
1.wby_-_The_Meditation_Of_The_Old_Fisherman
1.wby_-_The_New_Faces
1.wby_-_The_Phases_Of_The_Moon
1.wby_-_The_Pilgrim
1.wby_-_The_Players_Ask_For_A_Blessing_On_The_Psalteries_And_On_Themselves
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_I
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_III
1.wby_-_Three_Songs_To_The_One_Burden
1.wby_-_To_A_Friend_Whose_Work_Has_Come_To_Nothing
1.wby_-_To_A_Squirrel_At_Kyle-Na-No
1.wby_-_To_A_Wealthy_Man_Who_Promised_A_Second_Subscription_To_The_Dublin_Municipal_Gallery_If_It_Were_Prove
1.wby_-_Two_Songs_From_A_Play
1.wby_-_Upon_A_Dying_Lady
1.wby_-_Vacillation
1.wby_-_Wisdom
1.whitman_-_A_Boston_Ballad
1.whitman_-_American_Feuillage
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_Assurances
1.whitman_-_Brother_Of_All,_With_Generous_Hand
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Crossing_Brooklyn_Ferry
1.whitman_-_Faces
1.whitman_-_I_Sing_The_Body_Electric
1.whitman_-_Mannahatta
1.whitman_-_Native_Moments
1.whitman_-_O_Me!_O_Life!
1.whitman_-_Out_From_Behind_His_Mask
1.whitman_-_Out_of_the_Cradle_Endlessly_Rocking
1.whitman_-_O_You_Whom_I_Often_And_Silently_Come
1.whitman_-_Poems_Of_Joys
1.whitman_-_Proud_Music_Of_The_Storm
1.whitman_-_Respondez!
1.whitman_-_Salut_Au_Monde
1.whitman_-_Sea-Shore_Memories
1.whitman_-_Sing_Of_The_Banner_At_Day-Break
1.whitman_-_Song_At_Sunset
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_II
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_IX
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLVII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XVIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXVI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXVIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Exposition
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.whitman_-_The_Centerarians_Story
1.whitman_-_The_Mystic_Trumpeter
1.whitman_-_The_Sleepers
1.whitman_-_The_Unexpressed
1.whitman_-_The_World_Below_The_Brine
1.whitman_-_To_Thee,_Old_Cause!
1.whitman_-_To_The_Garden_The_World
1.whitman_-_Years_Of_The_Modern
1.ww_-_18_-_With_music_strong_I_come,_with_my_cornets_and_my_drums
1.ww_-_2_-_Houses_and_rooms_are_full_of_perfumes,_the_shelves_are_crowded_with_perfumes
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_4-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_5-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_7-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_9_-_The_big_doors_of_the_country_barn_stand_open_and_ready
1.ww_-_Address_To_The_Scholars_Of_The_Village_School_Of_---
1.ww_-_A_Flower_Garden_At_Coleorton_Hall,_Leicestershire.
1.ww_-_A_Jewish_Family_In_A_Small_Valley_Opposite_St._Goar,_Upon_The_Rhine
1.ww_-_A_Narrow_Girdle_Of_Rough_Stones_And_Crags,
1.ww_-_An_Evening_Walk
1.ww_-_Bamboo_Cottage
1.ww_-_Beggars
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_Characteristics_Of_A_Child_Three_Years_Old
1.ww_-_Character_Of_The_Happy_Warrior
1.ww_-_Composed_In_The_Valley_Near_Dover,_On_The_Day_Of_Landing
1.ww_-_Composed_on_The_Eve_Of_The_Marriage_Of_A_Friend_In_The_Vale_Of_Grasmere
1.ww_-_Guilt_And_Sorrow,_Or,_Incidents_Upon_Salisbury_Plain
1.ww_-_How_Sweet_It_Is,_When_Mother_Fancy_Rocks
1.ww_-_I_Know_an_Aged_Man_Constrained_to_Dwell
1.ww_-_Inscriptions_Written_with_a_Slate_Pencil_upon_a_Stone
1.ww_-_I_Travelled_among_Unknown_Men
1.ww_-_Lines_On_The_Expected_Invasion,_1803
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_As_A_School_Exercise_At_Hawkshead,_Anno_Aetatis_14
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_In_Early_Spring
1.ww_-_Lucy_Gray_[or_Solitude]
1.ww_-_Mark_The_Concentrated_Hazels_That_Enclose
1.ww_-_Maternal_Grief
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803
1.ww_-_Michael-_A_Pastoral_Poem
1.ww_-_Minstrels
1.ww_-_Nutting
1.ww_-_Ode_on_Intimations_of_Immortality
1.ww_-_Ode_To_Lycoris._May_1817
1.ww_-_O_Me!_O_life!
1.ww_-_Resolution_And_Independence
1.ww_-_Ruth
1.ww_-_Song_at_the_Feast_of_Brougham_Castle
1.ww_-_Stanzas_Written_In_My_Pocket_Copy_Of_Thomsons_Castle_Of_Indolence
1.ww_-_Stray_Pleasures
1.ww_-_The_Affliction_Of_Margaret
1.ww_-_The_Brothers
1.ww_-_The_Emigrant_Mother
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IX-_Book_Eighth-_The_Parsonage
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Fairest,_Brightest,_Hues_Of_Ether_Fade
1.ww_-_The_French_Revolution_as_it_appeared_to_Enthusiasts
1.ww_-_The_Happy_Warrior
1.ww_-_The_Idiot_Boy
1.ww_-_The_Idle_Shepherd_Boys
1.ww_-_The_Kitten_And_Falling_Leaves
1.ww_-_The_Pet-Lamb
1.ww_-_The_Prelude,_Book_1-_Childhood_And_School-Time
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Redbreast_Chasing_The_Butterfly
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Fourth
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Second
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Third
1.ww_-_To_A_Butterfly
1.ww_-_To_a_Highland_Girl_(At_Inversneyde,_upon_Loch_Lomond)
1.ww_-_To_May
1.ww_-_To_Sir_George_Howland_Beaumont,_Bart_From_the_South-West_Coast_Or_Cumberland_1811
1.ww_-_To_The_Daisy
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_Flower
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_Flower_(Second_Poem)
1.ww_-_Troilus_And_Cresida
1.ww_-_Vaudracour_And_Julia
1.ww_-_View_From_The_Top_Of_Black_Comb
1.ww_-_We_Are_Seven
1.ww_-_When_To_The_Attractions_Of_The_Busy_World
1.ww_-_Written_With_A_Pencil_Upon_A_Stone_In_The_Wall_Of_The_House,_On_The_Island_At_Grasmere
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Revisited
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Visited
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
20.02_-_The_Golden_Journey
20.03_-_Act_I:The_Descent
20.04_-_Act_II:_The_Play_on_Earth
20.05_-_Act_III:_The_Return
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE_AND_THE_POINT
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Picture
2.01_-_The_Therapeutic_value_of_Abreaction
2.01_-_The_Two_Natures
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.01_-_War.
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_The_Bhakta.s_Renunciation_results_from_Love
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_The_Status_of_Knowledge
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Mother-Complex
2.03_-_The_Naturalness_of_Bhakti-Yoga_and_its_Central_Secret
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_Concentration
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_ON_THE_VIRTUOUS
2.05_-_Renunciation
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_The_Tale_of_the_Vampires_Kingdom
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Disciplines_of_Knowledge
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Release_from_Subjection_to_the_Body
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.07_-_The_Upanishad_in_Aphorism
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_The_Release_from_the_Heart_and_the_Mind
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.09_-_Human_representations_of_the_Divine_Ideal_of_Love
2.09_-_Memory,_Ego_and_Self-Experience
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.09_-_The_Pantacle
2.09_-_The_Release_from_the_Ego
2.0_-_Reincarnation_and_Karma
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.1.01_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Sadhana
21.01_-_The_Mother_The_Nature_of_Her_Work
2.1.02_-_Classification_of_the_Parts_of_the_Being
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.11_-_The_Boundaries_of_the_Ignorance
2.11_-_The_Modes_of_the_Self
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_THE_TOMB_SONG
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.12_-_The_Origin_of_the_Ignorance
2.12_-_The_Realisation_of_Sachchidananda
2.1.2_-_The_Vital_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
2.1.3.2_-_Study
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_ON_THOSE_WHO_ARE_SUBLIME
2.13_-_The_Difficulties_of_the_Mental_Being
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.3_-_Discipline
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.14_-_The_Passive_and_the_Active_Brahman
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_ON_IMMACULATE_PERCEPTION
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_The_Cosmic_Consciousness
2.16_-_Oneness
2.16_-_ON_SCHOLARS
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.17_-_The_Soul_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.18_-_The_Soul_and_Its_Liberation
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.19_-_The_Planes_of_Our_Existence
2.19_-_THE_SOOTHSAYER
2.2.01_-_The_Outer_Being_and_the_Inner_Being
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
2.2.03_-_The_Science_of_Consciousness
2.2.04_-_Practical_Concerns_in_Work
22.07_-_The_Ashram,_the_World_and_The_Individual[^4]
2.20_-_Nov-Dec_1939
2.20_-_The_Lower_Triple_Purusha
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.2.1.01_-_The_World's_Greatest_Poets
2.21_-_1940
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_ON_HUMAN_PRUDENCE
2.21_-_The_Ladder_of_Self-transcendence
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_1941-1943
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.2.2_-_Sorrow_and_Suffering
2.22_-_THE_STILLEST_HOUR
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.23_-_Supermind_and_Overmind
2.23_-_The_Conditions_of_Attainment_to_the_Gnosis
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.24_-_Gnosis_and_Ananda
2.2.4_-_Sentimentalism,_Sensitiveness,_Instability,_Laxity
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_The_Higher_and_the_Lower_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_Hathayoga
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.28_-_Rajayoga
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.01_-_The_Planes_or_Worlds_of_Consciousness
2.3.02_-_Opening,_Sincerity_and_the_Mother's_Grace
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.03_-_The_Overmind
2.3.04_-_The_Higher_Planes_of_Mind
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
2.3.06_-_The_Mother's_Lights
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
2.3.08_-_The_Physical_Consciousness
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
23.12_-_A_Note_On_The_Mother_of_Dreams
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.3.2_-_Desire
2.32_-_Prophetic_Visions
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
25.02_-_HYMN_TO_DAWN
27.05_-_In_Her_Company
29.03_-_In_Her_Company
29.04_-_Mothers_Playground
29.05_-_The_Bride_of_Brahman
29.06_-_There_is_also_another,_similar_or_parallel_story_in_the_Veda_about_the_God_Agni,_about_the_disappearance_of_this
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
3.00.1_-_Foreword
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.04_-_Intuition_and_Inspiration_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.06_-_The_Poet_and_The_Seer
30.07_-_The_Poet_and_the_Yogi
30.08_-_Poetry_and_Mantra
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Introduction
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.12_-_The_Obscene_and_the_Ugly_-_Form_and_Essence
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
30.18_-_Boris_Pasternak
3.01_-_Love_and_the_Triple_Path
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_The_Principles_of_Ritual
3.01_-_The_Soul_World
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_ON_THE_VISION_AND_THE_RIDDLE
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Motives_of_Devotion
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.03_-_The_Soul_Is_Mortal
3.03_-_The_Spirit_Land
3.04_-_BEFORE_SUNRISE
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.04_-_The_Way_of_Devotion
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.06_-_Charity
3.06_-_Death
3.06_-_The_Delight_of_the_Divine
3.06_-_Thought-Forms_and_the_Human_Aura
3.07_-_ON_PASSING_BY
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_ON_APOSTATES
3.08_-_The_Mystery_of_Love
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.1.01_-_Distinctive_Features_of_the_Integral_Yoga
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.01_-_The_Marbles_of_Time
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.02_-_The_Mother-_Worship_of_the_Bengalis
3.1.03_-_A_Realistic_Adwaita
31.03_-_The_Trinity_of_Bengal
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
31.05_-_Vivekananda
31.06_-_Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
31.08_-_The_Unity_of_India
31.09_-_The_Cause_of_Indias_Decline
3.10_-_Of_the_Gestures
3.10_-_ON_THE_THREE_EVILS
3.10_-_Punishment
31.10_-_East_and_West
3.1.12_-_A_Child.s_Imagination
3.1.19_-_Parabrahman
3.11_-_Epilogue
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.24_-_In_the_Moonlight
3.1.2_-_Levels_of_the_Physical_Being
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.1.3_-_Difficulties_of_the_Physical_Being
3.13_-_Of_the_Banishings
3.13_-_THE_CONVALESCENT
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.15_-_THE_OTHER_DANCING_SONG
3.16.1_-_Of_the_Oath
3.16.2_-_Of_the_Charge_of_the_Spirit
3.16_-_THE_SEVEN_SEALS_OR_THE_YES_AND_AMEN_SONG
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.19_-_Of_Dramatic_Rituals
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
32.03_-_In_This_Crisis
3.2.04_-_Suddenly_out_from_the_wonderful_East
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Bhagavad_Gita
3.2.07_-_Tantra
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
32.08_-_Fit_and_Unfit_(A_Letter)
32.09_-_On_Karmayoga_(A_Letter)
3.2.09_-_The_Teachings_of_Some_Modern_Indian_Yogis
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
32.10_-_A_Letter
32.11_-_Life_and_Self-Control_(A_Letter)
3.2.1_-_Food
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
3.3.01_-_The_Superman
3.3.02_-_All-Will_and_Free-Will
33.02_-_Subhash,_Oaten:_atlas,_Russell
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
3.3.03_-_The_Delight_of_Works
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.09_-_Shyampukur
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
33.15_-_My_Athletics
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
34.03_-_Hymn_To_Dawn
34.07_-_The_Bride_of_Brahman
34.08_-_Hymn_To_Forest-Range
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.5.01_-_Aphorisms
35.01_-_Hymn_To_The_Sweet_Lord
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
36.09_-_THE_SIT_SUKTA
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.05_-_Narada_-_Sanatkumara_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
37.07_-_Ushasti_Chakrayana_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.05_-_The_Significance_of_Rebirth
3.7.1.06_-_The_Ascending_Unity
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.09_-_Karma_and_Freedom
3.7.1.10_-_Karma,_Will_and_Consequence
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3.7.2.05_-_Appendix_I_-_The_Tangle_of_Karma
38.01_-_Asceticism_and_Renunciation
38.04_-_Great_Time
38.05_-_Living_Matter
38.06_-_Ravana_Vanquished
38.07_-_A_Poem
3.8.1.02_-_Arya_-_Its_Significance
39.09_-_Just_Be_There_Where_You_Are
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Conclusion_-_My_intellectual_position
4.01_-_INTRODUCTION
4.01_-_Introduction
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_The_Psychology_of_Self-Perfection
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION_OF_THE_KING
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_The_Perfection_of_the_Mental_Being
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_The_Instruments_of_the_Spirit
4.05_-_THE_MAGICIAN
4.06_-_THE_KING_AS_ANTHROPOS
4.08_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Spirit
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.09_-_REGINA
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
41.03_-_Bengali_Poems_of_Sri_Aurobindo
4.10_-_AT_NOON
4.10_-_The_Elements_of_Perfection
4.1.1.05_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Yoga
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.11_-_The_Perfection_of_Equality
4.1.2.03_-_Preparation_for_the_Supramental_Change
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.12_-_The_Way_of_Equality
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.13_-_ON_THE_HIGHER_MAN
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.14_-_The_Power_of_the_Instruments
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.16_-_AMONG_DAUGHTERS_OF_THE_WILDERNESS
4.16_-_The_Divine_Shakti
4.17_-_The_Action_of_the_Divine_Shakti
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.02_-_An_Image
4.2.04_-_Epiphany
4.20_-_The_Intuitive_Mind
4.2.1.04_-_The_Psychic_and_the_Mental,_Vital_and_Physical_Nature
4.21_-_The_Gradations_of_the_supermind
4.2.2.04_-_The_Psychic_Opening_and_the_Inner_Centres
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.25_-_Towards_the_supramental_Time_Vision
4.26_-_The_Supramental_Time_Consciousness
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.1.02_-_The_True_Self_Within
4.3.2.04_-_Degrees_in_the_Higher_Consciousness
4.3.2_-_Attacks_by_the_Hostile_Forces
4.3.3_-_Dealing_with_Hostile_Attacks
4.3_-_Bhakti
4.43_-_Chapter_Three
4.4.4.02_-_Peace,_Calm,_Quiet_as_a_Basis_for_the_Descent
4.4.4.03_-_The_Descent_of_Peace
4.4.4.07_-_The_Descent_of_Light
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.01_-_Message
5.02_-_THE_STATUE
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.04_-_Formation_Of_The_World
5.05_-_THE_OLD_ADAM
5.06_-_Supermind_in_the_Evolution
5.06_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.07_-_ROTUNDUM,_HEAD,_AND_BRAIN
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.08_-_Supermind_and_Mind_of_Light
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.5_-_The_Book_of_Achilles
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.01.9_-_Book_IX
5.1.01_-_Terminology
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.1.02_-_The_Gods
5.1.03_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_Hostile_Beings
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.01_-_Word-Formation
5.2.02_-_The_Meditations_of_Mandavya
5.3.04_-_Roots_in_M
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.01_-_THE_ALCHEMICAL_VIEW_OF_THE_UNION_OF_OPPOSITES
6.02_-_STAGES_OF_THE_CONJUNCTION
6.04_-_THE_MEANING_OF_THE_ALCHEMICAL_PROCEDURE
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
6.09_-_Imaginary_Visions
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.06_-_The_Simple_Life
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.10_-_Order
7.12_-_The_Giver
7.15_-_The_Family
7.3.10_-_The_Lost_Boat
7.4.03_-_The_Cosmic_Dance
7.5.26_-_The_Golden_Light
7.6.02_-_The_World_Game
7.6.13_-_The_End?
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
A_Secret_Miracle
Averroes_Search
Big_Mind_(non-dual)
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
CASE_1_-_JOSHUS_DOG
City_of_God_-_BOOK_I
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
Cratylus
Deutsches_Requiem
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_02.01_-_Of_the_Heaven.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.05_-_Of_the_Aristotelian_Distinction_Between_Actuality_and_Potentiality.
ENNEAD_02.06_-_Of_Essence_and_Being.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.03_-_Continuation_of_That_on_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.04_-_Of_Our_Individual_Guardian.
ENNEAD_03.05_-_Of_Love,_or_Eros.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.08b_-_Of_Nature,_Contemplation_and_Unity.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.05_-_Psychological_Questions_III._-_About_the_Process_of_Vision_and_Hearing.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_05.09_-_Of_Intelligence,_Ideas_and_Essence.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Euthyphro
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
IS_-_Chapter_1
I._THE_ATTRACTIVE_POWER_OF_GOD
Jaap_Sahib_Text_(Guru_Gobind_Singh)
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.03_-_INVOCATION
Meno
MMM.01_-_MIND_CONTROL
MoM_References
new_computer
Partial_Magic_in_the_Quixote
Phaedo
r1909_06_18
r1912_02_06
r1912_07_22
r1912_12_17
r1912_12_28
r1912_12_31
r1913_01_05
r1913_01_14
r1913_01_16
r1913_01_26
r1913_09_18
r1913_11_13
r1913_11_18
r1913_11_21
r1913_11_26
r1913_12_13
r1913_12_18
r1913_12_24
r1913_12_30
r1914_01_10
r1914_01_15
r1914_03_18
r1914_03_23
r1914_03_26
r1914_03_28
r1914_03_29
r1914_04_14
r1914_04_19
r1914_05_09
r1914_06_10
r1914_06_12
r1914_06_18
r1914_06_29
r1914_07_04
r1914_07_15
r1914_07_21
r1914_07_30
r1914_08_05
r1914_08_16
r1914_09_13
r1914_09_22
r1914_11_21
r1914_11_26
r1914_12_12
r1914_12_20
r1914_12_21
r1915_01_02
r1915_01_24
r1915_05_21
r1915_05_23
r1916_02_20
r1917_02_02
r1917_02_03
r1917_02_04
r1917_02_12
r1917_02_13
r1917_02_27
r1917_03_01
r1917_03_02
r1917_03_08
r1917_03_10
r1917_03_13
r1917_03_21
r1917_09_02
r1917_09_12
r1918_02_14
r1918_02_18
r1918_02_25
r1918_05_04
r1918_05_08
r1918_05_11
r1918_05_13
r1918_05_18
r1918_05_19
r1918_05_21
r1918_05_22
r1918_05_23
r1918_05_24
r1918_06_14
r1919_07_21
r1919_08_04
r1920_02_09
r1920_02_22
r1920_03_06
r1927_01_19
r1927_01_22
r1927_10_30
Ragnarok
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
SB_1.1_-_Questions_by_the_Sages
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablet_1_-
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_026-050
Talks_051-075
Talks_125-150
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Gold_Bug
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Immortal
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

media
SIMILAR TITLES
Collected Plays And Stories
plays
Playstation

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

playsome ::: a. --> Playful; wanton; sportive.

Playstation ::: (games, hardware) The leading family of games consoles, from Sony Corporation consisting of the original Playstation (PS1) and the Playstation 2 (PS2).The basic Playstations consist of a small box containing the processor and a DVD reader, with video outputs to connect to a TV, sockets for two game controllers, and a socket for one or two memory cards. The PS2 also has USB sockets.The PS2 can run PS1 software because the PS2's I/O processor is the same as the PS1's CPU. . .[Dates? Features?](2003-07-29)

Playstation "games, hardware" The leading family of {games consoles}, from {Sony Corporation} consisting of the original Playstation (PS1) and the Playstation 2 (PS2). The basic Playstations consist of a small box containing the processor and a {DVD} reader, with video outputs to connect to a TV, sockets for two game controllers, and a socket for one or two memory cards. The PS2 also has {USB} sockets. The PS2 can run PS1 software because the PS2's I/O processor is the same as the PS1's CPU. {(http://scea.sony.com/playstation/)}. {FAQ (http://flex.net/users/cjayc/vgfa/system/sony_psx.txt)}. [Dates? Features?] (2003-07-29)


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. A critical study of the method or methods of the sciences, of the nature of scientific symbols and of the logical structure of scientific symbolic svstems. Presumably such a study should include both the empirical and the rational sciences. Whether it should also include the methods of the valuational studies (e.g., ethics, esthetics) and of the historical studies, will depend upon the working definition or science accepted by the investigator. Valuational studies are frequently characterized as "normative" or "axiological" sciences. Many of the recognized sciences (e.g., anthropology, geology) contain important historical aspects, hence there is some justification for the inclusion of the historical method in this aspect of the philosophy of science. As a study of method, the philosophy of science includes much of the traditional logic and theory of knowledge. The attempt is made to define and further clarify such terms as induction, deduction, hypothesis, data, discovery and verification. In addition, the more detailed and specialized methods of science (e.g., experimentation, measurement, classification and idealization) (q.v.) are subjected to examination. Since science is a symbolic system, the general theory of signs plays an important role in the philosophy of science.

1. Brings out of a folded state; spreads or opens out. 2. Discloses or lays open to the view; displays. Also fig.

3DO "company, games, standard" A set of specifications created and owned by the 3DO company, which is a partnership of seven different companies. These specs are the blueprint for making a 3DO Interactive Multiplayer and are licensed to hardware and software producers. A 3DO system has an {ARM60} 32-bit {RISC} {CPU} and a graphics engine based around two custom designed graphics and animation processors. It has 2 Megabytes of {DRAM}, 1 Megabyte of {VRAM}, and a double speed {CD-ROM} drive for main storage. The {Panasonic} 3DO system can run 3DO Interactive software, play audio CDs (including support for CD+G), view {Photo-CDs}, and will eventually be able to play {Video CDs} with a special add-on {MPEG}1 {full-motion video} cartridge. Up to 8 {controllers} can be {daisy-chain}ed on the system at once. A keyboard, mouse, light gun, and other peripherals may also some day be hooked into the system, although they are not currently available (December 1993). The 3DO can display {full-motion video}, fully {texture map}ped 3d landscapes, all in 24-bit colour. {Sanyo} and {AT&T} will also release 3DO systems. Sanyo's in mid 1994 and AT&T in late 1994. There will be a 3DO add-on cartridge based on the {PowerPC} to enable the 3DO to compete with {Sony}'s {Playstation} console and {Sega}'s {Saturn} console, both of which have a higher specification than the original 3DO. The add-on is commonly known as the M2 or Bulldog. It should hit the shops by Christmas 1995 and will (allegedly) do a million flat shaded polygons per second. {3DO Home (http://3do.com/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:rec.games.video.3do}. (1994-12-13)

AbhidhammAvatAra. In PAli, "Introduction to Abhidhamma"; a primer of PAli ABHIDHAMMA attributed to BUDDHADATTA (c. fifth century CE), who is said to have been contemporaneous with the premier PAli scholiast BUDDHAGHOSA; some legends go so far as to suggest that the two ABHIDHAMMIKAS might even have met. The book was written in south India and is the oldest of the noncanonical PAli works on abhidhamma. It offers a systematic scholastic outline of abhidhamma, divided into twenty-four chapters called niddesas (S. nirdesa; "expositions"), and displays many affinities with Buddhaghosa's VISUDDHIMAGGA. These chapters include coverage of the mind (CITTA) and mental concomitants (CETASIKA), the various types of concentration (SAMADHI), the types of knowledge (JNANA) associated with enlightenment, and the process of purification (visuddhi, S. VIsUDDHI). The work is written in a mixture of prose and verse.

A :::market_maker ::: is a "market participant" or member firm of an exchange that also buys and sells securities at prices it displays in an exchange’s trading system for its own account which are called principal trades and for customer accounts which are called agency trades. Using these systems, a market maker can enter and adjust quotes to buy or sell, enter, and execute orders, and clear those orders. Market makers exist under rules created by stock exchanges approved by a securities regulator. In the U.S., the Securities and Exchange Commission is the main regulator of the exchanges. Market maker rights and responsibilities vary by exchange, and the market within an exchange such as equities or options.

actor: A person who plays the role of a character in a performance.

Advanced Power Management "hardware" (APM) A feature of some displays, usually but not always, on {laptop computers}, which turns off power to the display after a preset period of inactivity to conserve electrical power. Monitors with this capability are usually refered to as "green monitors", meaning environmentally friendly. Not to be confused with a {screen blanker} which is {software} that causes the display to go black (by setting every {pixel} to black) to prevent {burn-in}. (1997-08-25)

Advanced Power Management ::: (hardware) (APM) A feature of some displays, usually but not always, on laptop computers, which turns off power to the display after a preset period of inactivity to conserve electrical power. Monitors with this capability are usually refered to as green monitors, meaning environmentally friendly.Not to be confused with a screen blanker which is software that causes the display to go black (by setting every pixel to black) to prevent burn-in. (1997-08-25)

adware "software" Any kind of {software} that displays advertisements while it is running. The display of adverts is sometimes incidental to the software's main purpose (e.g. a game). In the case of a piece of {malware}, the adverts may be its only purpose, possibly hidden behind a pretence of providing some desired function like a security scanner. The adware's distributors may get paid for every machine infected. The adverts may vary in obtrusiveness from occasional or out-of-the-way images, audio or video to blocking access to the desired function while the advert is presented. {Nagware} is a special case of adware where the advert is for a license for, or upgrade to, the program itself. (2018-12-13)

aerognosy ::: n. --> The science which treats of the properties of the air, and of the part it plays in nature.

Aeschylus One of the three greatest Greek tragic poets, born at Eleusis (525-456 BC), the seat of the Mysteries of Demeter, into which he undoubtedly was initiated. Of his perhaps 90 plays, only seven survive. Plato accuses him of impiety and Cicero describes him as almost a Pythagorean. He profaned the Mysteries in the eyes of the Athenians (e.g. in the real meaning of the allegories present in Prometheus Bound and The Eumenides) and has been accused of introducing antagonism among the celestial powers, transferring the political radicalism and demagogy of Athens from the agora to Olympus. His works introduced a second actor, thus creating true dramatic dialogue; he also introduced masks and imposing headdresses and costumes for the actors.

aladr.s.t.i (trikaldrishti) ::: trikaladr.s.t.i (usually foreknowledge) of the exact time of events; "an intuition of Time which is not of the mind and when it plays is always accurate to the very minute and if need be to the very second".

alcoholate ::: n. --> A crystallizable compound of a salt with alcohol, in which the latter plays a part analogous to that of water of crystallization.

A line_graph ::: that displays the intraday movements of a given security. This contrasts to longer term charts, such as those that show a security’s movement over a period of days, months, or even years. Daily charts may also refer to charts that show each bar or trading session as a single day rather than a week or month.

AlphaGo ::: A computer program that plays the board game Go.[20] It was developed by Alphabet Inc.'s Google DeepMind in London. AlphaGo has several versions including AlphaGo Zero, AlphaGo Master, AlphaGo Lee, etc.[21] In October 2015, AlphaGo became the first computer Go program to beat a human professional Go player without handicaps on a full-sized 19×19 board.[22][23]

amygdala: an almond-shaped structure in the limbic system which plays a role in basic emotions, aggression and the development of emotional memories.

anal personality: an adult who has remained ‘fixated’ during the anal stageof psychosexual development and displays an anally retentive personality, which is characterised by obsessive cleanliness, stinginess and aggressiveness, as a result of either excessive or insufficient gratification of id impulses during the anal stage.

Anaxagoras, of Klazomene: (about 430 B.C.) As a middle-aged man he settled in Athens; later he was accused of impiety and forced to leave the city. Anaxagoras taught that there is an infinity of simple substances, that is, such as are only divisible into parts of the same nature as the whole. These "seeds" are distributed throughout the universe. Their coming together gives rise to individual things, their separation entails the passing away of individual things. To account for the cause of motion of these "seeds" or elemental substances Anaxagoras conceived of a special kind of matter or "soul-substance" which alone is in motion itself and can communicate this motion to the rest. Now, since the universe displays harmony, order and purposiveness in its movements, Anaxagoras conceived this special substance as a mind-stuff or an eternal, imperishable Reason diffused throughout the universe. Anaxagoras was thus the first to introduce the teleological principle into the explanation of the natural world. Cf. Burnet, Early Greek Philosophy; Diels, Frag. d. Vorsokr. -- M.F.

angry fruit salad "abuse" A bad visual-interface design that uses too many colours. (This term derives, of course, from the bizarre day-glo colours found in canned fruit salad). Too often one sees similar effects from interface designers using colour window systems such as {X}; there is a tendency to create displays that are flashy and attention-getting but uncomfortable for long-term use. [{Jargon File}] (1995-11-24)

angry fruit salad ::: (abuse) A bad visual-interface design that uses too many colours. (This term derives, of course, from the bizarre day-glo colours found in canned fruit window systems such as X; there is a tendency to create displays that are flashy and attention-getting but uncomfortable for long-term use.[Jargon File] (1995-11-24)

antitrochanter ::: n. --> An articular surface on the ilium of birds against which the great trochanter of the femur plays.

A risk_graph ::: is a two-dimensional graphical representation that displays the range of profit or loss possibilities for an option at various prices in the underlying asset. The x-axis represents the price of the underlying security and the y-axis represents the potential profit/loss. Often called a "profit/loss diagram or p&l graph", this graph provides an easy way to understand and visualize the effects of what may happen to an option under various situations. Risk graphs can be drawn to show the potential payoffs for single options as well as for spreads or combination strategies.

Aristotle, medieval: Contrary to the esteem in which the Fathers held Platonic and especially Neo-Platonic philosophy, Aristotle plays hardly any role in early Patristic and Scholastic writings. Augustine seems not to have known much about him and admired him more as logician whereas he held Plato to be the much greater philosopher. The Middle Ages knew, until the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century, only the logical texts, mostly in the translations made by Boethius of the texts and of the introduction by Porphyrius (Isagoge). During the latter third of the 12th, mostly however at the beginning of the 13th century appeared translations partly from Arabian texts and commentaries, partly from the Greek originals. Finally, Aquinas had William of Moerbeke translate the whole work of Aristotle, who soon came to be known as the Philosopher. Scholastic Aristotelianism is, however, not a simple revival of the Peripatetic views; Thomas is said to have "Christianized" the Philosopher as Augustine had done with Plato. Aristotle was differently interpreted by Aquinas and by the Latin Averroists (q.v. Averroism), especially in regard to the "unity of intellect" and the eternity of the created world. -- R.A.

As liquors deaden the higher mind and feelings, while arousing the lower nature, the victim is largely devoid of the ordinary self-protection of his judgment, will, and conscience, and has gravitated to his own animal level. That he is, for the time, living in the consciousness of his own astral body accounts for the extraordinary strength he often displays, for the disorientation where he “wants to go home,” for his forgetfulness of all this afterwards, and for the convulsions which, when present, are reported as indistinguishable from true epilepsy. To the depleting vital drain from the continued restlessness and violent activity of the attacks, is added the abnormal strain of obsession by one or another excarnate entity which has been vitalized in proportion as the sufferer is exhausted.

aspect ratio "graphics" The ratio of width to height of a {pixel}, {image}, or {display screen}. Square pixels (1:1) are considered preferable but displays are usually about 5:4. (1994-11-30)

aspect ratio ::: (graphics) The ratio of width to height of a pixel, image, or display screen. Square pixels (1:1) are considered preferable but displays are usually about 5:4. (1994-11-30)

As there is a poise of the relations of Purusha with Prakriti in which Matter is the first determinant, a world of material existence, so there is another just above it in which Matter is not supreme, but rather Life-force takes its place as the first determinant. In this world forms do not determine the conditions of the life, but it is life which determines the form, and th
   refore forms are there much more free, fluid, largely and to our conceptions strangely variable than in the material world. This life-force is not inconscient material force, not even, except in its lowest movements, an elemental subconscient energy, but a conscious force of being which makes for formation, but much more essentially for enjoyment, possession, satisfaction of its own dynamic impulse. Desire and the satisfaction of impulse are th
   refore the first law of this world of sheer vital existence, this poise of relations between the soul and its nature in which the life-power plays with so much greater a freedom and capacity than in our physical living; it may be called the desire-world, for that is its principal characteristic.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 452


atellan ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Atella, in ancient Italy; as, Atellan plays; farcical; ribald. ::: n. --> A farcical drama performed at Atella.

Atthakavagga. (S. Arthavargīya; C. Yizu jing; J. Gisokukyo; K. Ŭijok kyong 義足經). In PAli, "The Octet Chapter" [alt. "The Chapter on Meaning," as the Chinese translation suggests], an important chapter of the SUTTANIPATA. Based on analysis of the peculiar meters and grammatical formations used in this text, philologists have reached a broad consensus that the Atthakavagga and its companion chapter, the PArAyanavagga, are among the very earliest strata of extant PAli literature and may have existed even during the Buddha's own lifetime. The PAli suttas include citations and exegeses of some of the verses from the Atthakavagga, and the MAHANIDESA, a commentary that covers the text, is accepted as canonical in the PAli canon (tipitaka, S. TRIPItAKA). All this evidence suggests its relative antiquity within the canon. The teachings contained in the chapter seem to suggest an early stratum of Buddhist teachings, prior to their formalization around fixed numerical lists of doctrines. The technical terminology that becomes emblematic of the standardized Buddhist presentation of doctrine is also relatively absent in its verses (GATHA). The Atthakavagga offers a rigorous indictment of the dangers inherent in "views" (P. ditthi; S. DṚstI) and displays a skepticism about religious dogmas in general, seeing them as virulent sources of attachment that lead ultimately to conceit, quarrels, and divisiveness. Some scholars have suggested that the kind of thoroughgoing critique of views presented in the Atthakavagga might have been the prototype of the later MADHYAMAKA logical approach, which sought to demonstrate the fallacies inherent in any philosophical statement. The verses also seem to represent an earlier stage in the evolution of Buddhist institutions, when monks still lived alone in the forest or with small groups of fellow ascetics, rather than in larger urban monasteries. Monks are still referred to as hermits or "seers" (P. isi, S. ṛsi), a generic Indian term for religious recluses, rather than the formal Buddhist term bhikkhu (BHIKsU) as is seen in the prose passages. A two-roll Chinese translation of a Sanskrit or Middle Indic recension of the text was made by ZHI QIAN during the Wu dynasty (c. 223-253 CE).

A universal myth is that of the sun god fighting the dragon and eventually worsting it, which represents the descent of spirit into matter and the eventual sublimation of matter by spirit in the ascending arc of evolution. There are Bel (and later Merodach) and the dragon Tiamat in Babylonia and with the Hebrews; Fafnir in Scandinavia; Chozzar with the Peratae Gnostics; among the Greeks Python conquered by Apollo and the two serpents killed by Hercules at his birth; the fight between Ahti and the evil serpent in the Kalevala; and many other such stories. In the Christian Apocalypse the dragon plays a great part, but it has been often misinterpreted as evil just as Satan or the Devil has been imagined as the foe of divinity and humanity. Cosmologically, all dragons and serpents slain by their adversaries are the unregulated or chaotic cosmic principles bought to order by the spiritual sun gods or formative cosmic powers. The dragon is the demiurge, the establisher or former of our planet and of all that pertains to it — neither good nor bad, but its differentiated aspects in nature make it assume one or the other character.

bagpiper ::: n. --> One who plays on a bagpipe; a piper.

bayonet ::: n. --> A pointed instrument of the dagger kind fitted on the muzzle of a musket or rifle, so as to give the soldier increased means of offense and defense.

A pin which plays in and out of holes made to receive it, and which thus serves to engage or disengage parts of the machinery. ::: v. t.


Bdag med ma. (Dakmema) (fl. c. eleventh century). Chief of the nine wives of the renowned Tibetan translator MAR PA CHOS KYI BLO GROS. Bdag med ma plays a leading role in the life story of Marpa's chief disciple MI LA RAS PA, as his benefactor, confidant, and teacher. Her name, literally "selfless woman," is the Tibetan translation for the Sanskrit goddess NAIRATMYA, consort of the deity HEVAJRA. Marpa's principal chosen deity (YI DAM) was Hevajra, and it is believed that Marpa's family represented the nine deity Hevajra MAndALA (Kye'i rdo rje lha dgu) consisting of Hevajra and NairAtmyA in the center surrounded by eight goddesses.

belief revision ::: (artificial intelligence) The area of theory change in which preservation of the information in the theory to be changed plays a key role.A fundamental issue in belief revision is how to decide what information to retract in order to maintain consistency, when the addition of a new belief to a priority can be retracted. This ordering can be difficult to generate and maintain.The postulates of the AGM Theory for Belief Revision describe minimal properties a revision process should have.[Better definition?] (1995-03-20)

belief revision "artificial intelligence" The area of {theory change} in which preservation of the information in the theory to be changed plays a key role. A fundamental issue in belief revision is how to decide what information to retract in order to maintain consistency, when the addition of a new belief to a theory would make it inconsistent. Usually, an ordering on the sentences of the theory is used to determine priorities among sentences, so that those with lower priority can be retracted. This ordering can be difficult to generate and maintain. The postulates of the {AGM Theory for Belief Revision} describe minimal properties a revision process should have. [Better definition?] (1995-03-20)

bitmap display ::: (hardware) A computer output device where each pixel displayed on the monitor screen corresponds directly to one or more bits in the computer's video connected via a serial line where the speed of the serial line limits the speed at which the display can be changed.Most modern personal computers and workstations have bitmap displays, allowing the efficient use of graphical user interfaces, interactive graphics and a choice of on-screen fonts. Some more expensive systems still delegate graphics operations to dedicated hardware such as graphics accelerators.The bitmap display might be traced back to the earliest days of computing when the Manchester University Mark I(?) computer, developed by F.C. Williams and T. working memory. Phosphor dots were used to store single bits of data which could be read by the user and interpreted as binary numbers.[Is this history correct? Was it ever used to display graphics? What was the resolution?](2002-05-15)

bitmap display "hardware" A computer {output device} where each {pixel} displayed on the {monitor} screen corresponds directly to one or more {bits} in the computer's {video memory}. Such a display can be updated extremely rapidly since changing a pixel involves only a single processor write to memory compared with a {terminal} or {VDU} connected via a serial line where the speed of the serial line limits the speed at which the display can be changed. Most modern {personal computers} and {workstations} have bitmap displays, allowing the efficient use of {graphical user interfaces}, interactive graphics and a choice of on-screen {fonts}. Some more expensive systems still delegate graphics operations to dedicated hardware such as {graphics accelerators}. The bitmap display might be traced back to the earliest days of computing when the Manchester University Mark I(?) computer, developed by F.C. Williams and T. Kilburn shortly after the Second World War. This used a {storage tube} as its {working memory}. Phosphor dots were used to store single bits of data which could be read by the user and interpreted as binary numbers. [Is this history correct? Was it ever used to display "graphics"? What was the resolution?] (2002-05-15)

bowler ::: n. --> One who plays at bowls, or who rolls the ball in cricket or any other game.

playsome ::: a. --> Playful; wanton; sportive.

BrahmA. [alt. MahAbrahmA] (T. Tshangs pa; C. Fantian; J. Bonten; K. Pomch'on 梵天). An Indian divinity who was adopted into the Buddhist pantheon as a protector of the teachings (DHARMAPALA) and king of the BRAHMALOKA (in the narrow sense of that term). A particular form of the god BrahmA, called SAHAMPATI, plays a crucial role in the inception of the Buddhist dispensation or teaching (sASANA). During the seven weeks following his enlightenment, the newly awakened buddha GAUTAMA was unsure as to whether he should teach, wondering whether there would be anyone in this world who would be able to duplicate his experience. BrahmA descended to earth and convinced him that there were persons "with little dust in their eyes" who would be able to understand his teachings. The Buddha then surveyed the world to determine the most suitable persons to hear the DHARMA. Seeing that his former meditation teachers had died, he chose the "group of five" (PANCAVARGIKA) and proceeded to ṚsIPATANA, where he taught his first sermon, the "Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma" (DHARMACAKRAPRAVARTANASuTRA; P. DHAMMACAKKAPPAVATTANASUTTA). Because of this intervention, BrahmA is considered one of the main dharmapAlas. BUDDHAGHOSA explains, however, that the compassionate Buddha never had any hesitation about teaching the dharma but felt that if he were implored by the god BrahmA, who was revered in the world, it would lend credence to his mission. BrahmA is depicted with four faces and four arms, and his primary attributes are the lotus and the CAKRA. The figure of BrahmA also fused with early Indian BODHISATTVAs such as PADMAPAnI (AVALOKITEsVARA). In Tibet the dharmapAla TSHANGS PA DKAR PO is a fusion of BrahmA and PE HAR RGYAL PO.

braille "human language" /breyl/ (Often capitalised) A class of {writing systems}, intended for use by blind and low-vision users, which express {glyphs} as raised dots. Currently employed braille standards use eight dots per cell, where a cell is a glyph-space two dots across by four dots high; most glyphs use only the top six dots. Braille was developed by Louis Braille (pronounced /looy bray/) in France in the 1820s. Braille systems for most languages can be fairly trivially converted to and from the usual script. Braille has several totally coincidental parallels with digital computing: it is {binary}, it is based on groups of eight bits/dots and its development began in the 1820s, at the same time {Charles Babbage} proposed the {Difference Engine}. Computers output Braille on {braille displays} and {braille printers} for hard copy. {British Royal National Institute for the Blind (http://rnib.org.uk/wesupply/fctsheet/braille.htm)}. (1998-10-19)

braille ::: (human language) /breyl/ (Often capitalised) A class of writing systems, intended for use by blind and low-vision users, which express glyphs as raised is a glyph-space two dots across by four dots high; most glyphs use only the top six dots.Braille was developed by Louis Braille (pronounced /looy bray/) in France in the 1820s. Braille systems for most languages can be fairly trivially converted to and from the usual script.Braille has several totally coincidental parallels with digital computing: it is binary, it is based on groups of eight bits/dots and its development began in the 1820s, at the same time Charles Babbage proposed the Difference Engine.Computers output Braille on braille displays and braille printers for hard copy. . (1998-10-19)

brittle "jargon" Said of {software} that is functional but easily broken by changes in operating environment or configuration, or by any minor tweak to the software itself. Also, any system that responds inappropriately and disastrously to abnormal but expected external stimuli; e.g. a {file system} that is usually totally scrambled by a power failure is said to be brittle. This term is often used to describe the results of a research effort that were never intended to be robust, but it can be applied to commercially developed software, which displays the quality far more often than it ought to. Opposite of {robust}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-05-09)

brittle ::: (jargon) Said of software that is functional but easily broken by changes in operating environment or configuration, or by any minor tweak to the software robust, but it can be applied to commercially developed software, which displays the quality far more often than it ought to.Opposite of robust.[Jargon File] (1995-05-09)

Bruno, Giordano: (1548-1600) A Dominican monk, eventually burned at the stake because of his opinions, he was converted from Christianity to a naturalistic and mystical pantheism by the Renaissance and particularly by the new Copernican astronomy. For him God and the universe were two names for one and the same Reality considered now as the creative essence of all things, now as the manifold of realized possibilities in which that essence manifests itself. As God, natura naturans, the Real is the whole, the one transcendent and ineffable. As the Real is the infinity of worlds and objects and events into which the whole divides itself and in which the one displays the infinite potentialities latent within it. The world-process is an ever-lasting going forth from itself and return into itself of the divine nature. The culmination of the outgoing creative activity is reached in the human mind, whose rational, philosophic search for the one in the many, simplicity in variety, and the changeless and eternal in the changing and temporal, marks also the reverse movement of the divine nature re-entering itself and regaining its primordial unity, homogeneity, and changelessness. The human soul, being as it were a kind of boomerang partaking of the ingrowing as well as the outgrowing process, may hope at death, not to be dissolved with the body, which is borne wholly upon the outgoing stream, but to return to God whence it came and to be reabsorbed in him. Cf. Rand, Modern Classical Philosophers, selection from Bruno's On Cause, The Principle and the One. G. Bruno: De l'infinito, universo e mundo, 1584; Spaccio della bestia trionfante, 1584; La cena delta ceneri, 1584; Deglieroici furori, 1585; De Monade, 1591. Cf. R. Honigswald, Giordano Bruno; G. Gentile, Bruno nella storia della cultura, 1907. -- B.A.G.F. Brunschvicg, Leon: (1869-) Professor of Philosophy at the Ecole Normale in Paris. Dismissed by the Nazis (1941). His philosophy is an idealistic synthesis of Spinoza, Kant and Schelling with special stress on the creative role of thought in cultural history as well as in sciences. Main works: Les etapes de la philosophie mathematique, 1913; L'experience humaine et la causalite physique, 1921; De la connaissance de soi, 1931. Buddhism: The multifarious forms, philosophic, religious, ethical and sociological, which the teachings of Gautama Buddha (q.v.) have produced. They centre around the main doctrine of the catvari arya-satyani(q.v.), the four noble truths, the last of which enables one in eight stages to reach nirvana (q.v.): Right views, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. In the absence of contemporary records of Buddha and Buddhistic teachings, much value was formerly attached to the palm leaf manuscripts in Pali, a Sanskrit dialect; but recently a good deal of weight has been given also the Buddhist tradition in Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Chinese. Buddhism split into Mahayanism and Hinayanism (q.v.), each of which, but particularly the former, blossomed into a variety of teachings and practices. The main philosophic schools are the Madhyamaka or Sunyavada, Yogacara, Sautrantika, and Vaibhasika (q.v.). The basic assumptions in philosophy are a causal nexus in nature and man, of which the law of karma (q.v.) is but a specific application; the impermanence of things, and the illusory notion of substance and soul. Man is viewed realistically as a conglomeration of bodily forms (rupa), sensations (vedana), ideas (sanjna), latent karma (sanskaras), and consciousness (vijnana). The basic assumptions in ethics are the universality of suffering and the belief in a remedy. There is no god; each one may become a Buddha, an enlightened one. Also in art and esthetics Buddhism has contributed much throughout the Far East. -- K.F.L.

Buddhadatta. (fl. c. fifth century CE). A prominent PAli scholar-monk from South India who is presumed by the tradition to have been a personal acquaintance of the preeminent PAli commentator BUDDHAGHOSA. Buddhadatta lived and wrote his several works at BhutamangalagAma monastery in the Cola country (Tamil Nadu) of South India, although it is also said he trained at the MAHAVIHARA in ANURADHAPURA in Sri Lanka. Buddhadatta is best known as the author of the ABHIDHAMMAVATARA, the oldest of the noncanonical PAli works on ABHIDHAMMA (S. ABHIDHARMA). The text is a primer of PAli abhidhamma, divided into twenty-four chapters called niddesa (S. nirdesa; "exposition"), which displays many affinities with Buddhaghosa's VISUDDHIMAGGA. Other works attributed to Buddhadatta include the Vinayavinicchaya, the Uttaravinicchaya, and the RupArupavibhAga. Some authorities also attribute to him the MadhuratthavilAsinī and the JinAlankAra.

buddha. (T. sangs rgyas; C. fo; J. butsu/hotoke; K. pul 佛). In Sanskrit and PAli, "awakened one" or "enlightened one"; an epithet derived from the Sanskrit root √budh, meaning "to awaken" or "to open up" (as does a flower) and thus traditionally etymologized as one who has awakened from the deep sleep of ignorance and opened his consciousness to encompass all objects of knowledge. The term was used in ancient India by a number of different religious groups, but came to be most strongly associated with followers of the teacher GAUTAMA, the "Sage of the sAKYA Clan" (sAKYAMUNI), who claimed to be only the most recent of a succession of buddhas who had appeared in the world over many eons of time (KALPA). In addition to sAkyamuni, there are many other buddhas named in Buddhist literature, from various lists of buddhas of the past, present, and future, to "buddhas of the ten directions" (dasadigbuddha), viz., everywhere. Although the precise nature of buddhahood is debated by the various schools, a buddha is a person who, in the far distant past, made a previous vow (PuRVAPRAnIDHANA) to become a buddha in order to reestablish the dispensation or teaching (sASANA) at a time when it was lost to the world. The path to buddhahood is much longer than that of the ARHAT-as many as three incalculable eons of time (ASAMKHYEYAKALPA) in some computations-because of the long process of training over the BODHISATTVA path (MARGA), involving mastery of the six or ten "perfections" (PARAMITA). Buddhas can remember both their past lives and the past lives of all sentient beings, and relate events from those past lives in the JATAKA and AVADANA literature. Although there is great interest in the West in the "biography" of Gautama or sAkyamuni Buddha, the early tradition seemed intent on demonstrating his similarity to the buddhas of the past rather than his uniqueness. Such a concern was motivated in part by the need to demonstrate that what the Buddha taught was not the innovation of an individual, but rather the rediscovery of a timeless truth (what the Buddha himself called "an ancient path" [S. purAnamArga, P. purAnamagga]) that had been discovered in precisely the same way, since time immemorial, by a person who undertook the same type of extended preparation. In this sense, the doctrine of the existence of past buddhas allowed the early Buddhist community to claim an authority similar to that of the Vedas of their Hindu rivals and of the JAINA tradition of previous tīrthankaras. Thus, in their biographies, all of the buddhas of the past and future are portrayed as doing many of the same things. They all sit cross-legged in their mother's womb; they are all born in the "middle country" (madhyadesa) of the continent of JAMBUDVĪPA; immediately after their birth they all take seven steps to the north; they all renounce the world after seeing the four sights (CATURNIMITTA; an old man, a sick man, a dead man, and a mendicant) and after the birth of a son; they all achieve enlightenment seated on a bed of grass; they stride first with their right foot when they walk; they never stoop to pass through a door; they all establish a SAMGHA; they all can live for an eon if requested to do so; they never die before their teaching is complete; they all die after eating meat. Four sites on the earth are identical for all buddhas: the place of enlightenment, the place of the first sermon that "turns the wheel of the dharma" (DHARMACAKRAPRAVARTANA), the place of descending from TRAYASTRIMsA (heaven of the thirty-three), and the place of their bed in JETAVANA monastery. Buddhas can differ from each other in only eight ways: life span, height, caste (either brAhmana or KsATRIYA), the conveyance by which they go forth from the world, the period of time spent in the practice of asceticism prior to their enlightenment, the kind of tree they sit under on the night of their enlightenment, the size of their seat there, and the extent of their aura. In addition, there are twelve deeds that all buddhas (dvAdasabuddhakArya) perform. (1) They descend from TUsITA heaven for their final birth; (2) they enter their mother's womb; (3) they take birth in LUMBINĪ Garden; (4) they are proficient in the worldly arts; (5) they enjoy the company of consorts; (6) they renounce the world; (7) they practice asceticism on the banks of the NAIRANJANA River; (8) they go to the BODHIMAndA; (9) they subjugate MARA; (10) they attain enlightenment; (11) they turn the wheel of the dharma; and (12) they pass into PARINIRVAnA. They all have a body adorned with the thirty-two major marks (LAKsAnA; MAHAPURUsALAKsAnA) and the eighty secondary marks (ANUVYANJANA) of a great man (MAHAPURUsA). They all have two bodies: a physical body (RuPAKAYA) and a body of qualities (DHARMAKAYA; see BUDDHAKAYA). These qualities of a buddha are accepted by the major schools of Buddhism. It is not the case, as is sometimes suggested, that the buddha of the mainstream traditions is somehow more "human" and the buddha in the MAHAYANA somehow more "superhuman"; all Buddhist traditions relate stories of buddhas performing miraculous feats, such as the sRAVASTĪ MIRACLES described in mainstream materials. Among the many extraordinary powers of the buddhas are a list of "unshared factors" (AVEnIKA[BUDDHA]DHARMA) that are unique to them, including their perfect mindfulness and their inability ever to make a mistake. The buddhas have ten powers specific to them that derive from their unique range of knowledge (for the list, see BALA). The buddhas also are claimed to have an uncanny ability to apply "skill in means" (UPAYAKAUsALYA), that is, to adapt their teachings to the specific needs of their audience. This teaching role is what distinguishes a "complete and perfect buddha" (SAMYAKSAMBUDDHA) from a "solitary buddha" (PRATYEKABUDDHA) who does not teach: a solitary buddha may be enlightened but he neglects to develop the great compassion (MAHAKARUnA) that ultimately prompts a samyaksaMbuddha to seek to lead others to liberation. The MahAyAna develops an innovative perspective on the person of a buddha, which it conceived as having three bodies (TRIKAYA): the DHARMAKAYA, a transcendent principle that is sometimes translated as "truth body"; an enjoyment body (SAMBHOGAKAYA) that is visible only to advanced bodhisattvas in exalted realms; and an emanation body (NIRMAnAKAYA) that displays the deeds of a buddha to the world. Also in the MahAyAna is the notion of a universe filled with innumerable buddha-fields (BUDDHAKsETRA), the most famous of these being SUKHAVATĪ of AmitAbha. Whereas the mainstream traditions claim that the profundity of a buddha is so great that a single universe can only sustain one buddha at any one time, MahAyAna SuTRAs often include scenes of multiple buddhas appearing together. See also names of specific buddhas, including AKsOBHYA, AMITABHA, AMOGHASIDDHI, RATNASAMBHAVA, VAIROCANA. For indigenous language terms for buddha, see FO (C); HOTOKE (J); PHRA PHUTTHA JAO (Thai); PUCH'o(NIM) (K); SANGS RGYAS (T).

bugler ::: n. --> One who plays on a bugle.

Byronic hero: A male character who displays a number of qualities, largely negative. A Byronic hero has a dark side and emotional issues. Heathcliff in Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" is often considered an example of a Byronic hero.

calamist ::: n. --> One who plays upon a reed or pipe.

CamelCase "programming" The practice of concatenating words with either all words capitalised (e.g. "ICantReadThis" - sometimes called "UpperCamelCase" or "PascalCase") or all except the first ("iCantReadThis" - called "lowerCamelCase"). It is used in contexts where space characters are not allowed, such as identifiers in {source code}. Modern best practice separates words in identifiers with {underscore} for readability (like_this_example). CamelCase is probably a historical throw-back to systems that had no underscore or when the length of identifiers was constrained either by the programming language or by the width of computer displays. Unfortunately it has infected many projects, origanisations and programming languages such as {Java} where the uniniated create identifiers like "MemberSubmissionAddressingWSDLParserExtension". (2014-12-02)

candygrammar "language" A programming-language grammar that is mostly {syntactic sugar}; a play on "candygram". {COBOL}, {Apple Computer}'s {Hypertalk} language, and many {4GLs} share this property. The intent is to be as English-like as possible and thus easier for unskilled people to program. However, {syntax} isn't what makes programming hard; it's the mental effort and organisation required to specify an {algorithm} precisely. Thus "candygrammar" languages are just as difficult to program in, and far more painful for the experienced hacker. {GLS} notes: The overtones from the 1977 Chevy Chase "Jaws" parody on Saturday Night Live should not be overlooked. Someone lurking outside an apartment door tries to get the occupant to open up, while ominous music plays in the background. The last attempt is a half-hearted "Candygram!" When the door is opened, a shark bursts in and chomps the poor occupant. There is a moral here for those attracted to candygrammars. [{Jargon File}] (2004-09-23)

carbide ::: n. --> A binary compound of carbon with some other element or radical, in which the carbon plays the part of a negative; -- formerly termed carburet.

catatonic schizophrenia: a form of schizophrenia, characterised by a patient who displays motor abnormalities, for instance, changing between a state of complete immobility to energised excitement.

cerebellum: ('little brain' in Latin) two small hemispheres located beneath the cortical hemispheres, at the back of the head; the cerebellum plays an important role in directing movements and balance.

cetanA. (T. sems pa; C. si; J. shi; K. sa 思). In Sanskrit and PAli, "intention," "volition," or "stimulus"; one of the omnipresent mental factors (MAHABHuMIKA; SARVATRAGA) that accompanies each moment of consciousness; intention directs the mind toward either salutary (KUsALA), unsalutary (AKUsALA), or neutral (AVYAKṚTA) objects. Intention is of crucial importance in the theory of action (KARMAN), where the intent defines the eventual quality of the action: "Action is volition, for after having intended something, one accomplishes action through body, speech, and mind." Hence, cetanA functions as both the stimulus and driving force behind all action, framing the ways in which beings choose to interact with the world at large and coordinating the functioning of the various mental concomitants (CAITTA) that are necessary in order to respond accordingly. In this sense, in a simile drawn from the AttHASALINĪ, cetanA functions like a general, who commands and coordinates the activities of all the soldiers on the battlefield. The emphasis on cetanA in the larger sense of intention is sometimes identified as a Buddhist innovation in KARMAN theory, where the intention motivating a deed plays a significant role in the positive or negative karmic weight of the deed itself.

chanda. (T. 'dun pa; C. yu; J. yoku; K. yok 欲). In Sanskrit and PAli, "zeal" or "desire to act"; one of the ten mental factors or mental concomitants (CAITTA) of wide extent (MAHABHuMIKA) that the VAIBHAsIKA school of SARVASTIVADA ABHIDHARMA says accompany all consciousness activity; alternatively, it is listed as one of the five VINIYATA or pratiniyama mental factors of specific application according to the YOGACARA school, and one of the six pakinnaka (miscellaneous) CETASIKAs of the PAli abhidhamma. Chanda plays an important role in motivating all wholesome (and unwholesome) activity, and is particularly important in the cultivation of sAMATHA (serenity or calm abiding). According to the MADHYANTAVIBHAGA, there are eight forces that counteract five hindrances (NĪVARAnA) to reaching samatha. Chanda is called the ground of all eight forces because, based on sRADDHA (faith or confidence), it leads to a resolute effort (vyAyAma) to apply SMṚTI (mindfulness), SAMPRAJANYA (circumspection), and UPEKsA (equanimity) to reach the final goal.

charts ::: visual displays of information, as maps, graphs, tables, or sheets of information in the form of a diagram delineating a particular subject.

Chips & Technologies ::: (company) A former leading distributor and supplier of integrated circuits and software to personal computer manufacturers. As well as semiconductors they also made flat panel displays, video controllers and other computer related products.In 1998, Intel Corporation bought Chips and Technologies for their flat panel controllers. In January 2000, Asiliant Technologies licensed the rights from Intel to continue to manufacturer and sell Chips and Technologies components.Address: 2950 Zanker Road, San Jose, California 95134, USA.(2006-09-19)

Chips & Technologies "company" A former leading distributor and supplier of {integrated circuits} and {software} to {personal computer} manufacturers. As well as semiconductors they also made {flat panel displays}, {video controllers} and other computer related products. In 1998, {Intel Corporation} bought Chips and Technologies for their flat panel controllers. In January 2000, {Asiliant Technologies} licensed the rights from Intel to continue to manufacturer and sell Chips and Technologies components. Address: 2950 Zanker Road, San Jose, California 95134, USA. (2006-09-19)

Chogyesa. (曹溪寺). In Korean, "Chogye Monastery"; the administrative headquarters of the CHOGYE CHONG, the largest Buddhist order in contemporary Korea, and its first district monastery (PONSA). In an attempt to unify Korean Buddhist institutions during the Japanese colonial period, Korean Buddhist leaders prepared a joint constitution of the SoN and KYO orders and established the Central Bureau of Religious Affairs (Chungang Kyomuwon) in 1929. Eight years later, in 1937, the Japanese government-general decided to help bring the Buddhist tradition under centralized control by establishing a new headquarters for Choson Buddhism (Choson Pulgyo Ch'ongbonsan) in the capital of Seoul. With financial and logistical assistance from the Japanese colonial administration, the former headquarters building of a proscribed Korean new religion, the Poch'on'gyo, was purchased, disassembled, and relocated from the southwest of Korea to the site of Kakhwangsa in the Chongno district of central Seoul. That new monastery was given the name T'aegosa, after its namesake T'AEGO POU, the late-Koryo Son teacher who received dharma transmission in the Chinese LINJI ZONG. After the split in 1962 between the celibate monks of the Chogye chong and the married monks (taech'o sŭng), who organized themselves into the T'AEGO CHONG, T'aegosa was renamed Chogyesa, from the name of the mountain where the sixth patriarch (LIUZU) of Chan, HUINENG, resided (see CAOXISHAN). This monastery continues to serve today as the headquarters of the Chogye chong. In addition to the role it plays as the largest traditional monastery in the city center of Seoul, Chogyesa also houses all of the administrative offices of the order.

Christian existentialism ::: The philosophical movement shares similar views to existentialism with the added idea that the Judeo-Christian God plays an important part in coping with the underlying themes of human existence.

Cichlid ::: (graphics, tool) A tool for rapidly visualising arbitrary data in high-quality 3D, while allowing the viewer to explore and interact with the data (data servers) to the visualisation code (the client), which displays them concurrently.[Who? URL?](2004-01-22)

Cichlid "graphics, tool" A tool for rapidly visualising arbitrary data in high-quality 3D, while allowing the viewer to explore and interact with the data in {real time}. Cichlid was designed with remote data generation and machine independence in mind; data is transmitted via {TCP} from any number of sources (data servers) to the visualisation code (the client), which displays them concurrently. [Who? URL?] (2004-01-22)

circumferentor ::: n. --> A surveying instrument, for taking horizontal angles and bearings; a surveyor&

circus ::: n. --> A level oblong space surrounded on three sides by seats of wood, earth, or stone, rising in tiers one above another, and divided lengthwise through the middle by a barrier around which the track or course was laid out. It was used for chariot races, games, and public shows.
A circular inclosure for the exhibition of feats of horsemanship, acrobatic displays, etc. Also, the company of performers, with their equipage.


Cognitive Psychology ::: The sub-field of psychology associated with information processing and the role it plays in emotion, behavior, and physiology.

comedienne ::: n. --> A women who plays in comedy.

computational mathematics ::: The mathematical research in areas of science where computing plays an essential role.

Computing Devices Canada Ltd. ::: (company) Canada's largest defence electronics company. It has extensive hardware and software developmental capabilities. Its list of achievements electroluminiscent displays, large multi-sensor displays, coastal intrusion detection systems, and fibre-optic distribution systems.Computing Devices Canada was founded in 1948 and is part of the Ceridian group of companies, owned 100% by the Minneapolis-based company.Annual revenue for 1996 was $376 million. (1997-07-31)

Consentience: (Lat. con + sentire, to feel) Conscious unity existing at the level of sensation after the subtraction of all conceptual and interpretative unity. Consentience includes both: (a) the intra-sensory unity of a single sensory continuum (e.g. the visual, tactual or auditory) and (b) the inter-sensory unit embracing the diverse sensory continua. Consentience plays an important role in the psychological doctrine of the presentation-continuum of J. Ward and G. F. Stout. An allied concept is the sensory organization of Gestalt Psychology. See Gestalt Psychology. -- L.W.

console 1. "hardware, operating system, history" The {operator}'s station of a {mainframe} as opposed to an ordinary user's {terminal}. In times past, the console was a privileged location that conveyed godlike powers to anyone with fingers on its keys. Under {Unix} and other modern {time-sharing} {operating systems}, such privileges are guarded by {passwords} instead, and the console is just the {tty} the system was booted from. On Unix the device is called /dev/console. On a {microcomputer} {Unix} box, the console is the main screen and keyboard. Other, character-only, terminals may be connected to {serial ports}. Typically only the console can do real {graphics} or run {X}. See also {CTY}. 2. "games" A self-contained {microcomputer} optimised for gaming, with powerful graphical output designed to be displayed on a television; equipped with one or more {joystick} controllers for input and an {optical drive} to load software. Later generations also feature {Internet} connection via {wireless} or wired {Ethernet} for downloading games and multiplayer networked play. Typically such devices have no keyboard so text must be input using the controller to operate an on-screen keyboard, e.g. to enter player names. The most successful recent examples are the {Sony Playstation} and {Microsoft Xbox} families. [{Jargon File}] (2014-07-01)

Conway's Game of Life "simulation" The first popular {cellular automata} based {artificial life} simulation. Life was invented by British mathematician {John Horton Conway} in 1970 and was first introduced publicly in "Scientific American" later that year. Conway first devised what he called "The Game of Life" and "ran" it using plates placed on floor tiles in his house. Because of he ran out of floor space and kept stepping on the plates, he later moved to doing it on paper or on a checkerboard and then moved to running Life as a computer program on a {PDP-7}. That first implementation of Life as a computer program was written by M. J. T. Guy and {S. R. Bourne} (the author of {Unix}'s {Bourne shell}). Life uses a rectangular grid of binary (live or dead) cells each of which is updated at each step according to the previous state of its eight neighbours as follows: a live cell with less than two, or more than three, live neighbours dies. A dead cell with exactly three neighbours becomes alive. Other cells do not change. While the rules are fairly simple, the patterns that can arise are of a complexity resembling that of organic systems -- hence the name "Life". Many hackers pass through a stage of fascination with Life, and hackers at various places contributed heavily to the mathematical analysis of this game (most notably {Bill Gosper} at {MIT}, who even implemented Life in {TECO}!; see {Gosperism}). When a hacker mentions "life", he is more likely to mean this game than the magazine, the breakfast cereal, the 1950s-era board game or the human state of existence. {On-line implementation (http://pmav.eu/stuff/javascript-game-of-life-v3.1.1/)}. ["Scientific American" 223, October 1970, p120-123, 224; February 1971 p121-117, Martin Gardner]. ["The Garden in The Machine: the Emerging Science of Artificial Life", Claus Emmeche, 1994]. ["Winning Ways, For Your Mathematical Plays", Elwyn R. Berlekamp, John Horton Conway and Richard K. Guy, 1982]. ["The Recursive Universe: Cosmic Complexity and the Limits of Scientific Knowledge", William Poundstone, 1985]. [{Jargon File}] (1997-09-07)

copyright "legal" The exclusive rights of the owner of the copyright on a work to make and distribute copies, prepare derivative works, and perform and display the work in public (these last two mainly apply to plays, films, dances and the like, but could also apply to software). A work, including a piece of software, is under copyright by default in most coutries, whether of not it displays a copyright notice. However, a copyright notice may make it easier to assert ownership. The copyright owner is the person or company whose name appears in the copyright notice on the box, or the disk or the screen or wherever. Most countries have agreed to uphold each others' copyrights. A copyright notice has three parts. The first can be either the {copyright symbol} (a letter C in a circle), the word "Copyright" or the abbreviation "Copr". Only the first of these is recognised internationally and the common {ASCII} rendering "(C)" is not valid anywhere. This is followed by the name of the copyright holder and the year of publication. The year should be the year of _first_ publication, it is not necessary as some believe to update this every year to the current year. Copyright protection in most countries extends for 50 years after the author's death. Originally, most of the computer industry assumed that only the program's underlying instructions were protected under copyright law but, beginning in the early 1980s, a series of lawsuits involving the video screens of game programs extended protections to the appearance of programs. Use of copyright to restrict redistribution is immoral, unethical and illegitimate. It is a result of brainwashing by monopolists and corporate interests and it violates everyone's rights. Such use of copyrights and patents hamper technological progress by making a naturally abundant resource scarce. Many, from communists to right wing libertarians, are trying to abolish intellectual property myths. See also {public domain}, {copyleft}, {software law}. {Universal Copyright Convention (http://www.unesco.org/new/en/culture/themes/creativity/creative-industries/copyright/)}. {US Copyright Office (http://copyright.gov/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:misc.legal.computing}. [Is this definition correct in the UK? In the US? Anywhere?] (2014-01-08)

copyright ::: (legal) The exclusive rights of the owner of the copyright on a work to make and distribute copies, prepare derivative works, and perform and display the work in public (these last two mainly apply to plays, films, dances and the like, but could also apply to software).A work, including a piece of software, is under copyright by default in most coutries, whether of not it displays a copyright notice. However, a copyright or company whose name appears in the copyright notice on the box, or the disk or the screen or wherever.A copyright notice has three parts. The first can be either a c with a circle around it (LaTeX \copyright), or the word Copyright or the abbreviation Copr. A c in parentheses: (c) has no legal meaning. This is followed by the name of the copyright holder and the year of first publication.Countries around the world have agreed to recognise and uphold each others' copyrights, but this world-wide protection requires the use of the c in a circle.Originally, most of the computer industry assumed that only the program's underlying instructions were protected under copyright law but, beginning in the early 1980s, a series of lawsuits involving the video screens of game programs extended protections to the appearance of programs.Use of copyright to restrict redistribution is actually immoral, unethical, and illegitimate. It is a result of brainwashing by monopolists and corporate from communists to right wing libertarians, are trying to abolish intellectual property myths.See also public domain, copyleft, software law. US Copyright Office Circular 61 - Copyright Registration for Computer Programs . The US Department of Education's How Does Copyright Law Apply to Computer Software .Usenet newsgroup: misc.legal.computing.[Is this definition correct in the UK? In the US? Elsewhere?](2000-03-23)

copyright ::: n. --> The right of an author or his assignee, under statute, to print and publish his literary or artistic work, exclusively of all other persons. This right may be had in maps, charts, engravings, plays, and musical compositions, as well as in books. ::: v. t. --> To secure a copyright on.

courter ::: n. --> One who courts; one who plays the lover, or who solicits in marriage; one who flatters and cajoles.

cricketer ::: n. --> One who plays at cricket.

crowder ::: n. --> One who plays on a crowd; a fiddler.
One who crowds or pushes.


Culaniddesa. In PAli, "Shorter Exposition," second part of the Niddesa ("Exposition"), an early commentarial work on the SUTTANIPATA included in the PAli SUTTAPItAKA as the eleventh book of the KHUDDAKANIKAYA; also written as Cullaniddesa. Attributed by tradition to the Buddha's chief disciple, SAriputta (S. sARIPUTRA), the Niddesa is divided into two sections: the MAHANIDDESA ("Longer Exposition"), and Culaniddesa. The MahAniddesa comments on the sixteen suttas (S. SuTRA) of the AttHAKAVAGGA chapter of the SuttanipAta, while the Culaniddesa comments on the sixteen suttas of the ParAyanavagga chapter and on the KhaggavisAnasutta (see KHAdGAVIsAnA). The MahAniddesa and Culaniddesa do not comment on any of the remaining contents of the SuttanipAta, a feature that has suggested to historians that at the time of their composition the Atthakavagga and ParAyanavagga were autonomous anthologies not yet incorporated into the SuttanipAta, and that the KhaggavisAnasutta likewise circulated independently. The exegesis given to the SuttanipAta by the MahA- and Culaniddesa displays the influence of the PAli ABHIDHAMMA (S. ABHIDHARMA) and passages from it are frequently quoted in the VISUDDHIMAGGA. Both parts of the Niddesa are formulaic in structure, a feature that appears to have been designed as a pedagogical aid to facilitate memorization. In Western scholarship, there has long been a debate regarding the dates of these two compositions, with some scholars dating them as early as the third century BCE, others to as late as the second century CE. The MahA- and Culaniddesa are the only commentarial texts besides the SUTTAVIBHAnGA of the VINAYAPItAKA to be included in the Sri Lankan and Thai recensions of the PAli canon. In contrast, the Burmese canon includes two additional early commentaries, the NETTIPAKARAnA and PEtAKOPADESA, as books sixteen and seventeen in its version of the KhuddakanikAya.

debugger "tool, programming" A {tool} used by a {programmer} to monitor and control a program he is trying to fix. The most important functions of a debugger are {tracing}, stepping, {breakpoints} and {watches}. Tracing displays a step-by-step report on what {statement} the program is currently executing, allowing the programmer to follow the {flow of control} through {if statements}, {loops (loop)}, {subroutine} calls, etc. {Breakpoints} and {watches} both pause execution of the program and return control to the debugger under certain conditions. A {breakpoint} triggers when execution reaches a particular {statement} in the program and a {watch} triggers whenever a specific variable is modified. Stepping is like a breakpoint on every statement, often with the option to step "into" or "over" a {subroutine}, i.e. continue stepping through the statements of the subroutine or just execute it without pausing and resume stepping when it returns. Whenever control returns to the debugger it lets the programmer ask to see the values of {variables}, and possibly modify them, before resuming execution. Some debuggers can be set to automatically perform some action like display a variable value and resume. A debugger can interact with the target program in different ways. Some debuggers require the program to be loaded into the debugger which may then modify or "instrument" the program for debugging. Others can "attach" to a program that is already running. Some are built into the normal program execution environment (e.g. an {interpreter}) and can be set to run under certain conditions, e.g. errors. Early debuggers such as {Unix}'s {adb} only knew about the compiled executable code so sometimes debugging had to be done at the level of {machine code} instructions and numerical memory locations. If you were lucky, the debugger could access the program's {symbol table} and display the original names of subroutines and variables. Sometimes this required the program to be "compiled for debugging". Since compiling every program for debugging would add significantly to the size of a {distribution} of a whole {operating system}, it is common for programs to be distributed without debugging support but for individual programs to be made available with it. A major advance in debuggers was source-level debugging. This gives the programmer a view of their {source code} annotated with breakpoints and a pointer to the statement currently being executed. Such a view is commonly part of an {integrated development environment} like {Visual Basic}. (2014-08-23)

Digital Rights Management "legal" (DRM) Any technology used to limit the use of {software}, music, movies or other digital data. This generally relies on some interaction between the media and the system that plays it. For example, video {DVDs} usually include a {region code}. If this does not match the player's region code, the player will refuse to play the disc. (2006-02-02)

Dionysia Festivals sacred to Dionysos, especially those held in Attica and Attic-Ionic settlements. The inferior Dionysia were celebrated in December in country places where the vine was grown; the greater, in Athens for six days at the spring equinox. At this festival the new plays were performed for three consecutive days before immense number of citizens and strangers. The Lenaea (festival of vats) in February-March, the Oschophoria in October-November, and the Anthesteria for three days in February-March were also part of the Athenian cycle of Dionysia. The Dionysiac or Bacchic Mysteries became peculiarly liable to corruption in later times, owing to literal interpretation of the symbolism and the substitution of psychospiritual excitement for pure spiritual inspiration.

display ::: 1. (hardware) monitor.2. (language) A vector of pointers to activation records. The Nth element points to the activation record containing variables declared at lexical depth global or occasionally to the immediately enclosing scope). Displays were used in some ALGOL implementations. (1996-02-22)

display 1. "hardware" {monitor}. 2. "language" A vector of pointers to {activation records}. The Nth element points to the activation record containing variables declared at {lexical depth} N. This allows faster access to variables from outer {scopes} than the alternative of linked activation records (but most variable accesses are either local or global or occasionally to the immediately enclosing scope). Displays were used in some {ALGOL} implementations. (1996-02-22)

displayer ::: n. --> One who, or that which, displays.

Display PostScript ::: An extended form of PostScript permitting its interactive use with bitmap displays.

Display PostScript An extended form of {PostScript} permitting its interactive use with {bitmap displays}.

display standard ::: (hardware) IBM and others have introduced a bewildering plethora of graphics and text display standards for IBM PCs. The standards are mostly connecting the appropriate monitor to it. Each new standard subsumes its predecessors. For example, an EGA board can also do CGA and MDA.With the PS/2, IBM introduced the VGA standard and built it into the main system board motherboard. VGA is also available as a plug-in board for PCs from graphics standard. An 8514 adaptor board plugs into the PS/2, providing a dual-monitor capability.Graphics software has to support the major IBM graphics standards and many non-IBM, proprietary standards for high-resolution displays. Either software software package. In either case, switching software or switching display systems is fraught with compatibility problems. Display Resolution Colours Sponsor Systems T: text, G: graphics.More colours are available from third-party vendors for some display types.See also MDA, CGA, EGA, PGA, Hercules, MCGA, VGA, SVGA, 8514, VESA.

display standard "hardware, standard" {IBM} and others have introduced a bewildering plethora of graphics and text display {standards} for {IBM PC}s. The standards are mostly implemented by plugging in a video display board (or "{graphics adaptor}") and connecting the appropriate monitor to it. Each new standard subsumes its predecessors. For example, an {EGA} board can also do {CGA} and {MDA}. With the {PS/2}, IBM introduced the {VGA} standard and built it into the main system board {motherboard}. VGA is also available as a plug-in board for PCs from third-party vendors. Also with the PS/2, IBM introduced the {8514} high-resolution graphics standard. An 8514 adaptor board plugs into the PS/2, providing a dual-monitor capability. Graphics software had to support the major IBM graphics standards and many non-IBM, proprietary standards for displays. Either software vendors provided {display drivers} or display vendors provided drivers for the software package. In either case, switching software or switching display systems was fraught with compatibility problems. Display  Resolution Colours Sponsor Systems MDA   720x350 T 2 IBM   PC CGA   320x200 4 IBM   PC EGA   640x350 16 IBM   PC PGA   640x480 256 IBM   PC Hercules 729x348 2 non-IBM PC MCGA   720x400 T   320x200 G 256 PS/2 VGA   720x400 T   640x480 G 16 SVGA   800x600 16 VESA XVGA 1024x768 256 (IBM name: 8514) T: text, G: graphics. More colours are available from third-party vendors for some display types. See also {MDA}, {CGA}, {EGA}, {PGA}, {Hercules}, {MCGA}, {VGA}, {SVGA}, {8514}, {VESA}. [What were the corresponding "mode" numbers"?] (2011-03-20)

dithering "data, algorithm" A technique used in {quantisation} processes such as {graphics} and {audio} to reduce or remove the correlation between noise and signal. Dithering is used in {computer graphics} to create additional colors and shades from an existing {palette} by interspersing {pixels} of different colours. On a {monochrome} display, areas of grey are created by varying the proportion of black and white pixels. In colour displays and printers, colours and textures are created by varying the proportions of existing colours. The different colours can either be distributed randomly or regularly. The higher the {resolution} of the display, the smoother the dithered colour will appear to the eye. Dithering doesn't reduce resolution. There are three types: regular dithering which uses a very regular predefined pattern; random dither where the pattern is a random noise; and pseudo random dither which uses a very large, very regular, predefined pattern. Dithering is used to create patterns for use as backgrounds, fills and shading, as well as for creating {halftones} for printing. When used for printing is it very sensitive to paper properties. Dithering can be combined with {rasterising}. It is not related to {anti-aliasing}. (2003-07-20)

dodger ::: n. --> One who dodges or evades; one who plays fast and loose, or uses tricky devices.
A small handbill.
See Corndodger.


double plot: Where a play has both a main and a sub-plot. Some plays may have triple or multiple plots.

dpi ::: Dots per inch.A measure of resolution for printers, scanners and displays.Laser printers typically reach 300 DPI, though 600 DPI is becoming more common. Commercial typesetters are usually around 1200 DPI. (1995-01-05)

dpi Dots per inch. A measure of resolution for printers, scanners and displays. {Laser printers} typically reach 300 DPI, though 600 DPI is becoming more common. Commercial typesetters are usually around 1200 DPI. (1995-01-05)

dramatist ::: n. --> The author of a dramatic composition; a writer of plays.

dṛsti. (P. ditthi; T. lta ba; C. jian; J. ken; K. kyon 見). In Sanskrit, "view" or "opinion"; nearly always used pejoratively in Buddhism to refer to a "wrong view." In the AttHAKAVAGGA chapter of the SUTTANIPĀTA, which seems to belong to the earliest stratum of Pāli Buddhist literature, the Buddha offers a rigorous indictment of the dangers inherent in "views" and displays a skepticism about religious dogmas in general, seeing them as virulent sources of attachment that lead ultimately to conceit, quarrels, and divisiveness. Some scholars have suggested that the thoroughgoing critique of views may have been the core teaching of Buddhism and might have served as the prototype of the later MADHYAMAKA logical approach of reductio ad absurdum, which sought to demonstrate the fallacies inherent in any philosophical statement. A standardized list of five types of wrong views (paNcadṛsti) is commonly found in the literature: (1) the view that there is a perduring self, or soul, that exists in reality (SATKĀYADṚstI); (2) extreme views (ANTAGRĀHADṚstI), viz., in permanence or annihilation (dhruvoccheda); (3) fallacious views (MITHYĀDṚstI), the denial of or disbelief in the efficacy of KARMAN, rebirth, and causality; (4) the rigid attachment to views (DṚstIPARĀMARsA), viz., mistakenly and stubbornly clinging to one's own speculative views as being superior to all others; and (5) the rigid attachment to the soteriological efficacy of rites and rituals (sĪLAVRATAPARĀMARsA). There are numerous other kinds of wrong views listed in the literature. Views are also commonly listed as the second of the four attachments (UPĀDĀNA), along with the attachments to sensuality (KĀMA), the soteriological efficacy of rites and rituals (sīlavrata), and mistaken notions of a perduring soul (ĀTMAVĀDA). Views are also the third of the four contaminants (ĀSRAVA), along with sensuality (KĀMA), the desire for continued existence (BHAVA), and ignorance (AVIDYĀ).

duḥkha. (P. dukkha; T. sdug bsngal; C. ku; J. ku; K. ko 苦). In Sanskrit, "suffering" or "unsatisfactoriness"; the first of the FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS (CATVĀRY ĀRYASATYĀNI) of Buddhism and a concept foundational to Buddhism's worldview and religious practice. The emblematic description of duḥkha, as found in the first noble truth, is, "Birth is suffering, aging is suffering, sickness is suffering, death is suffering. To be conjoined with what one dislikes is suffering and to be separated from what one likes is suffering. Not to get what one wants is suffering. In short, grasping at the five aggregates (SKANDHA) is suffering." Suffering thus not only includes the suffering that will invariably be associated with ordinary life, such as birth, aging, disease, and death, but also subsumes a full range of mental, emotional, and spiritual dissatisfactions, and ultimately is seen to be inherent to life itself. The teaching of suffering therefore seeks to change one's ordinary perspectives on the things of this world as objects worthy of pursuit, so that instead one realizes their nature of impermanence (ANITYA), suffering, and nonself (ANĀTMAN), viz., the three marks of existence (TRILAKsAnA). Through this sort of systematic attention (YONIsOMANASKĀRA), even the pleasures of life are ultimately realized to be "unsatisfactory," because, like all compounded things, they are impermanent and thus inevitably destined to pass away. This awareness of suffering produces a sense of the "dangers" (ĀDĪNAVA) inherent in this world and prompts the practitioner to turn away from this world and toward the radical nonattachment that is NIRVĀnA. ¶ Many types of duḥkha are enumerated in the literature, including forms specific to each of the six realms of rebirth (GATI). Most common are lists of three, four, and eight types of suffering. The three major categories of suffering are: (1) "misery caused by (physical and mental) suffering" (DUḤKHADUḤKHATĀ), viz., the full range of unpleasant or painful sensations (VEDANĀ) that are associated with either the physical body or the mind; (2) "misery caused by change" (VIPARInĀMADUḤKHATĀ), i.e., pleasant sensations may be a cause of suffering because they do not perdure and eventually turn into pain; (3) "misery caused by conditioning" (SAMSKĀRADUḤKHATĀ), i.e., sensations that are neither painful nor pleasant may still be a cause of suffering because they are impermanent and thus undependable; because of past KARMAN, suffering may always occur unexpectedly in the next moment. The four types of suffering are the suffering associated with birth (jātiduḥkha), senescence or aging (jarāduḥkha), sickness (vyādhiduḥkha), and death (maranāduḥkha); various sutras describe the Buddha's quest for enlightenment as motivated by the impulse to overcome these four types of sufferings. The eight types of suffering comprise the above four types plus an additional four: "the suffering of being separated from persons and things one likes" (priyaviprayogaduḥkha), "the suffering of being associated with persons and things one dislikes" (apriyasaMprayogaduḥkha), "the suffering of not getting what one wants" (yad api icchayā paryesamāno na labhate tad api duḥkhaM), and "the suffering inherent in the five aggregates that are objects of clinging" (saMksepena paNcopādānaskandhaduḥkha). In addition to these three typical categories of suffering, there are other lists, from the eighteen types of suffering listed in the sāriputrābhidharmasāstra (Shelifu apitan lun) to the one hundred and ten types enumerated in the YOGĀCĀRABHuMIsĀSTRA. NĀGĀRJUNA's SUHṚLLEKHA gives a list of six sufferings: uncertainty, insatiability, casting off bodies repeatedly, repeated rebirth, repeatedly descending from high to low, and having no companions when dying and being reborn. Tibetan sources stress the role that meditation on suffering plays in producing a feeling of disgust (NIRVEDA; T. nges 'byung), that is, the preliminary turning away from the things of this world and turning toward nirvāna.

dynamic random-access memory "storage" (DRAM) A type of {semiconductor} memory in which the information is stored in {capacitors} on a {MOS} {integrated circuit}. Typically each {bit} is stored as an amount of electrical charge in a storage cell consisting of a capacitor and a {transistor}. Due to leakage the capacitor discharges gradually and the memory cell loses the information. Therefore, to preserve the information, the memory has to be refreshed periodically. Despite this inconvenience, the DRAM is a very popular memory technology because of its high density and consequent low price. The first commercially available DRAM chip was the {Intel 1103}, introduced in 1970. Early DRAM chips, containing up to a 16k x 1 (16384 locations of one bit each), needed 3 supply voltages (+5V, -5V and +12V). Beginning with the 64 kilobit chips, {charge pumps} were included on-chip to create the necessary supply voltages out of a single +5V supply. This was necessary to fit the device into a 16-pin {DIL} package, which was the preferred package at the time, and also made them easier to use. To reduce the pin count, thereby helping miniaturisation, DRAMs generally had a single data line which meant that a computer with an N bit wide {data bus} needed a "bank" of (at least) N DRAM chips. In a bank, the address and control signals of all chips were common and the data line of each chip was connected to one of the data bus lines. Beginning with the 256 kilobit DRAM, a tendency toward {surface mount} packaging arose and DRAMs with more than one data line appeared (e.g. 64k x 4), reducing the number of chips per bank. This trend has continued and DRAM chips with up to 36 data lines are available today. Furthermore, together with surface mount packages, memory manufacturers began to offer memory modules, where a bank of memory chips was preassembled on a little {printed circuit} board (SIP = Single Inline Pin Module, SIMM = Single Inline Memory Module, DIMM = Dual Inline Memory Module). Today, this is the preferred way to buy memory for {workstations} and {personal computers}. DRAM bit cells are arranged on a chip in a grid of rows and columns where the number of rows and columns are usually a power of two. Often, but not always, the number of rows and columns is the same. A one megabit device would then have 1024 x 1024 memory cells. A single memory cell can be selected by a 10-bit row address and a 10-bit column address. To access a memory cell, one entire row of cells is selected and its contents are transferred into an on-chip buffer. This discharges the storage capacitors in the bit cells. The desired bits are then read or written in the buffer. The (possibly altered) information is finally written back into the selected row, thereby refreshing all bits (recharging the capacitors) in the row. To prevent data loss, all bit cells in the memory need to be refreshed periodically. This can be done by reading all rows in regular intervals. Most DRAMs since 1970 have been specified such that one of the rows needs to be refreshed at least every 15.625 microseconds. For a device with 1024 rows, a complete refresh of all rows would then take up to 16 ms; in other words, each cell is guaranteed to hold the data for 16 ms without refresh. Devices with more rows have accordingly longer retention times. Many varieties of DRAM exist today. They differ in the way they are interfaced to the system - the structure of the memory cell itself is essentially the same. "Traditional" DRAMs have multiplexed address lines and separate data inputs and outputs. There are three control signals: RAS\ (row address strobe), CAS\ (column address strobe), and WE\ (write enable) (the backslash indicates an {active low} signal). Memory access procedes as follows: 1. The control signals initially all being inactive (high), a memory cycle is started with the row address applied to the address inputs and a falling edge of RAS\ . This latches the row address and "opens" the row, transferring the data in the row to the buffer. The row address can then be removed from the address inputs since it is latched on-chip. 2. With RAS\ still active, the column address is applied to the address pins and CAS\ is made active as well. This selects the desired bit or bits in the row which subsequently appear at the data output(s). By additionally activating WE\ the data applied to the data inputs can be written into the selected location in the buffer. 3. Deactivating CAS\ disables the data input and output again. 4. Deactivating RAS\ causes the data in the buffer to be written back into the memory array. Certain timing rules must be obeyed to guarantee reliable operation. 1. RAS\ must remain inactivate for a while before the next memory cycle is started to provide sufficient time for the storage capacitors to charge (Precharge Time). 2. It takes some time from the falling edge of the RAS\ or CAS\ signals until the data appears at the data output. This is specified as the Row Access Time and the Column Access Time. Current DRAM's have Row Access Times of 50-100 ns and Column Access Times of 15-40 ns. Speed grades usually refer to the former, more important figure. Note that the Memory Cycle Time, which is the minimum time from the beginning of one access to the beginning of the next, is longer than the Row Access Time (because of the Precharge Time). Multiplexing the address pins saves pins on the chip, but usually requires additional logic in the system to properly generate the address and control signals, not to mention further logic for refresh. Therefore, DRAM chips are usually preferred when (because of the required memory size) the additional cost for the control logic is outweighed by the lower price. Based on these principles, chip designers have developed many varieties to improve performance or ease system integration of DRAMs: PSRAMs (Pseudo Static Random Access Memory) are essentially DRAMs with a built-in address {multiplexor} and refresh controller. This saves some system logic and makes the device look like a normal {SRAM}. This has been popular as a lower cost alternative for SRAM in {embedded systems}. It is not a complete SRAM substitute because it is sometimes busy when doing self-refresh, which can be tedious. {Nibble Mode DRAM} can supply four successive bits on one data line by clocking the CAS\ line. {Page Mode DRAM} is a standard DRAM where any number of accesses to the currently open row can be made while the RAS signal is kept active. Static Column DRAM is similar to Page Mode DRAM, but to access different bits in the open row, only the column address needs to be changed while the CAS\ signal stays active. The row buffer essentially behaves like SRAM. {Extended Data Out DRAM} (EDO DRAM) can continue to output data from one address while setting up a new address, for use in {pipelined} systems. DRAM used for Video RAM ({VRAM}) has an additional long shift register that can be loaded from the row buffer. The shift register can be regarded as a second interface to the memory that can be operated in parallel to the normal interface. This is especially useful in {frame buffers} for {CRT} displays. These frame buffers generate a serial data stream that is sent to the CRT to modulate the electron beam. By using the shift register in the VRAM to generate this stream, the memory is available to the computer through the normal interface most of the time for updating the display data, thereby speeding up display data manipulations. SDRAM (Synchronous DRAM) adds a separate clock signal to the control signals. It allows more complex {state machines} on the chip and high speed "burst" accesses that clock a series of successive bits out (similar to the nibble mode). CDRAM (Cached DRAM) adds a separate static RAM array used for caching. It essentially combines main memory and {cache} memory in a single chip. The cache memory controller needs to be added externally. RDRAM (Rambus DRAM) changes the system interface of DRAM completely. A byte-wide bus is used for address, data and command transfers. The bus operates at very high speed: 500 million transfers per second. The chip operates synchronously with a 250MHz clock. Data is transferred at both rising and falling edges of the clock. A system with signals at such frequencies must be very carefully designed, and the signals on the Rambus Channel use nonstandard signal levels, making it incompatible with standard system logic. These disadvantages are compensated by a very fast data transfer, especially for burst accesses to a block of successive locations. A number of different refresh modes can be included in some of the above device varieties: RAS\ only refresh: a row is refreshed by an ordinary read access without asserting CAS\. The data output remains disabled. CAS\ before RAS\ refresh: the device has a built-in counter for the refresh row address. By activating CAS\ before activating RAS\, this counter is selected to supply the row address instead of the address inputs. Self-Refresh: The device is able to generate refresh cycles internally. No external control signal transitions other than those for bringing the device into self-refresh mode are needed to maintain data integrity. (1996-07-11)

Electronic Performance Support System "tool" (EPSS) A system that provides electronic task guidance and support to the user at the moment of need. EPSS can provide {application} help, reference information, guided instructions and/or tutorials, subject matter expert advice and hints on how to perform a task more efficiently. An EPSS can combine various technologies to present the desired information. The information can be in the form of text, {graphical displays}, sound, and {video} presentations. ["Electronic Performance Support Systems: How and Why to Remake the Workplace Through the Strategic Application of Technology", Gloria Gerry, Weingarten Press]. (1997-10-24)

Electronic Performance Support System ::: (tool) (EPSS) A system that provides electronic task guidance and support to the user at the moment of need. EPSS can provide application help, reference technologies to present the desired information. The information can be in the form of text, graphical displays, sound, and video presentations.[Electronic Performance Support Systems: How and Why to Remake the Workplace Through the Strategic Application of Technology, Gloria Gerry, Weingarten Press]. (1997-10-24)

electron tube "electronics" (Or tube, vacuum tube, UK: valve, electron valve, thermionic valve, firebottle, glassfet) An electronic component consisting of a space exhausted of gas to such an extent that {electrons} may move about freely, and two or more electrodes with external connections. Nearly all tubes are of the thermionic type where one electrode, called the cathode, is heated, and electrons are emitted from its surface with a small energy (typically a Volt or less). A second electrode, called the anode (plate) will attract the electrons when it is positive with respect to the cathode, allowing current in one direction but not the other. In types which are used for amplification of signals, additional electrodes, called grids, beam-forming electrodes, focussing electrodes and so on according to their purpose, are introduced between cathode and plate and modify the flow of electrons by electrostatic attraction or (usually) repulsion. A voltage change on a grid can control a substantially greater change in that between cathode and anode. Unlike {semiconductors}, except perhaps for {FETs}, the movement of electrons is simply a function of electrostatic field within the active region of the tube, and as a consequence of the very low mass of the electron, the currents can be changed quickly. Moreover, there is no limit to the current density in the space, and the electrodes which do dissapate power are usually metal and can be cooled with forced air, water, or other refrigerants. Today these features cause tubes to be the active device of choice when the signals to be amplified are a power levels of more than about 500 watts. The first electronic digital computers used hundreds of vacuum tubes as their active components which, given the reliability of these devices, meant the computers needed frequent repairs to keep them operating. The chief causes of unreliability are the heater used to heat the cathode and the connector into which the tube was plugged. Vacuum tube manufacturers in the US are nearly a thing of the past, with the exception of the special purpose types used in broadcast and image sensing and displays. Eimac, GE, RCA, and the like would probably refer to specific types such as "Beam Power Tetrode" and the like, and rarely use the generic terms. The {cathode ray tube} is a special purpose type based on these principles which is used for the visual display in television and computers. X-ray tubes are diodes (two element tubes) used at high voltage; a tungsten anode emits the energetic photons when the energetic electrons hit it. Magnetrons use magnetic fields to constrain the electrons; they provide very simple, high power, ultra-high frequency signals for radar, microwave ovens, and the like. Klystrons amplify signals at high power and microwave frequencies. (1996-02-05)

electron tube ::: (electronics) (Or tube, vacuum tube, UK: valve, electron valve, thermionic valve, firebottle, glassfet) An electronic component consisting of a when it is positive with respect to the cathode, allowing current in one direction but not the other.In types which are used for amplification of signals, additional electrodes, called grids, beam-forming electrodes, focussing electrodes and so on according change on a grid can control a substantially greater change in that between cathode and anode.Unlike semiconductors, except perhaps for FETs, the movement of electrons is simply a function of electrostatic field within the active region of the tube, tubes to be the active device of choice when the signals to be amplified are a power levels of more than about 500 watts.The first electronic digital computers used hundreds of vacuum tubes as their active components which, given the reliability of these devices, meant the unreliability are the heater used to heat the cathode and the connector into which the tube was plugged.Vacuum tube manufacturers in the US are nearly a thing of the past, with the exception of the special purpose types used in broadcast and image sensing and displays. Eimac, GE, RCA, and the like would probably refer to specific types such as Beam Power Tetrode and the like, and rarely use the generic terms.The cathode ray tube is a special purpose type based on these principles which is used for the visual display in television and computers. X-ray tubes are ultra-high frequency signals for radar, microwave ovens, and the like. Klystrons amplify signals at high power and microwave frequencies. (1996-02-05)

Elijah, Aaron ben: Karaite exegete and philosopher (1300-1369). The Ez Hayyim, i.e. Tree of Size, his philosophical work, deals with all problems of philosophy and displays the influence of both Maimonides and of the teachings of the Mutazilites. -- M.W.

emblazoner ::: n. --> One who emblazons; also, one who publishes and displays anything with pomp.

empeg "hardware" An in-car audio product that plays {MP3} files from a {hard disk}. It is based around a {DEC}/{Intel} {StrongARM} {S-1100} processor and runs a version of {Linux}. The {user interface} is written in {Python}. {(http://empeg.com/)}. See also {MPEG}. (1999-09-14)

empeg ::: (hardware) An in-car audio product that plays MP3 files from a hard disk. It is based around a DEC/Intel StrongARM S-1100 processor and runs a version of Linux. The user interface is written in Python. .See also MPEG. (1999-09-14)

encore ::: adv. / interj. --> Once more; again; -- used by the auditors and spectators of plays, concerts, and other entertainments, to call for a repetition of a particular part. ::: n. --> A call or demand (as, by continued applause) for a repetition; as, the encores were numerous.

endorphins: a neuropeptide which plays an important role in pain and mood states.

European Computer-Industry Research Centre GmbH ::: (body) (ECRC) A joint research organisation founded in 1984 on the initiative of three major European manufacturers: Bull (France), ICL (UK) and competitive ability of the European Information Technology industry and thus complement the work of national and international bodies.The Centre is intended to be the breeding ground for those ideas, techniques and products which are essential for the future use of electronic information processing. The work of the Centre will focus on advanced information processing technology for the next generation of computers.ECRC is an independent company, owned equally by its shareholders. The formal interface between ECRC and its shareholders consists of two bodies: The supervises their execution and the Scientific Advisory Board, which advises the Shareholders' Council in determining future research directions.There are many collaborations between ECRC and its shareholders' companies on specific projects (Technology Transfer, prospective studies etc). The Centre is the member companies, and others seconded from public research agencies and universities.Seminars are held which bring together specialists from the Centre and the member companies.ECRC's mission is to pursue research in fundamental areas of computer science. The aim is to develop the theory, methodologies and tools needed to build to both fundamental research and the process of delivering the results to industry.ECRC plays an important role in Europe and is involved in several European Community initiatives. It is regularly consulted by the Commission of the research plans, international co-operation and relationships between academia and industry.Address: ECRC GmbH, Arabellastrasse 17, D-81925 Munich, Germany. .Telephone: +49 (89) 926 99 0. Fax: +49 (89) 926 99 170. (1994-12-01)

European Computer-Industry Research Centre GmbH "body" (ECRC) A joint research organisation founded in 1984 on the initiative of three major European manufacturers: {Bull} (France), {ICL} (UK) and {Siemens} (Germany). Its activities were intended to enhance the future competitive ability of the European {Information Technology} industry and thus complement the work of national and international bodies. The Centre is intended to be the breeding ground for those ideas, techniques and products which are essential for the future use of electronic information processing. The work of the Centre will focus on advanced information processing technology for the next generation of computers. ECRC is an independent company, owned equally by its shareholders. The formal interface between ECRC and its shareholders consists of two bodies: The Shareholders' Council, which approves the Centre's programmes and budgets and supervises their execution and the Scientific Advisory Board, which advises the Shareholders' Council in determining future research directions. There are many collaborations between ECRC and its shareholders' companies on specific projects (Technology Transfer, prospective studies etc). The Centre is staffed by highly qualified scientists drawn from different countries. Research staff are hired directly by ECRC, as well as some who come on assignment from the member companies, and others seconded from public research agencies and universities. Seminars are held which bring together specialists from the Centre and the member companies. ECRC's mission is to pursue research in fundamental areas of computer science. The aim is to develop the theory, methodologies and tools needed to build innovative computer applications. ECRC contributes actively to the international effort that is expanding the frontiers of knowledge in computer science. It plays an important role in bridging the gap between research and industry by striving to work at the highest academic level with a strong industrial focus. ECRC constitutes an opportunity in Europe for the best scientists and offers young researchers the possibility to mature in an environment which exposes them to both fundamental research and the process of delivering the results to industry. ECRC plays an important role in Europe and is involved in several European Community initiatives. It is regularly consulted by the Commission of the European Communities on strategic issues, such as the definition of future research plans, international co-operation and relationships between academia and industry. Address: ECRC GmbH, Arabellastrasse 17, D-81925 Munich, Germany. {(http://ecrc.de/)}. Telephone: +49 (89) 926 99 0. Fax: +49 (89) 926 99 170. (1994-12-01)

Evolutionary ethics: Any ethical theory in which the doctrine of evolution plays a leading role, as explaining the origin of the moral sense, and, more especially, as contributing importantly to the determination of the moral standard, e.g. the ethics of Charles Darwin, H. Spencer, L. Stephen. Typical moral standards set up by evolutionists are adaptation, conduciveness to life, social health. Cf. H. Spencer, The Data of Ethics. -- W.K.F.

fiddler ::: n. --> One who plays on a fiddle or violin.
A burrowing crab of the genus Gelasimus, of many species. The male has one claw very much enlarged, and often holds it in a position similar to that in which a musician holds a fiddle, hence the name; -- called also calling crab, soldier crab, and fighting crab.
The common European sandpiper (Tringoides hypoleucus); -- so called because it continually oscillates its body.


fifer ::: n. --> One who plays on a fife.

finger "tool" A {Unix} program that displays information about a particular user or all users logged on the system, or a remote system. Finger typically shows full name, last login time, idle time, terminal line, and terminal location (where applicable). It may also display a {plan file} left by the user (see also {Hacking X for Y}). Some versions take a "-l" (long) argument which yields more information. [{Jargon File}] (2002-10-06)

finger ::: (tool) A Unix program that displays information about a particular user or all users logged on the system, or a remote system. Finger typically shows Hacking X for Y). Some versions take a -l (long) argument which yields more information.[Jargon File](2002-10-06)

flirt ::: v. t. --> To throw with a jerk or quick effort; to fling suddenly; as, they flirt water in each other&

F. Logos: (Gr. logos) A term denoting either reason or one of the expressions of reason or order in words or things; such as word, discourse, definition, formula, principle, mathematical ratio. In its most important sense in philosophy it refers to a cosmic reason which gives order and intelligibility to the world. In this sense the doctrine first appears in Heraclitus, who affirms the reality of a Logos analogous to the reason in man that regulates all physical processes and is the source of all human law. The conception is developed more fully by the Stoics, who conceive of the world as a living unity, perfect in the adaptation of its parts to one another and to the whole, and animated by an immanent and purposive reason. As the creative source of this cosmic unity and perfection the world-reason is called the seminal reason (logos spermatikos), and is conceived as containing within itself a multitude of logoi spermatikoi, or intelligible and purposive forms operating in the world. As regulating all things, the Logos is identified with Fate (heimarmene); as directing all things toward the good, with Providence (pronoia); and as the ordered course of events, with Nature (physis). In Philo of Alexandria, in whom Hebrew modes of thought mingle with Greek concepts, the Logos becomes the immaterial instrument, and even at times the personal agency, through which the creative activity of the transcendent God is exerted upon the world. In Christian philosophy the Logos becomes the second person of the Trinity and its functions are identified with the creative, illuminating and redemptive work of Jesus Christ. Finally the Logos plays an important role in the system of Plotinus, where it appears as the creative and form-giving aspect of Intelligence (Nous), the second of the three Hypostases. -- G. R.

fluter ::: n. --> One who plays on the flute; a flutist or flautist.
One who makes grooves or flutings.


Foxing lun. (J. Busshoron; K. Pulsong non 佛性論). In Chinese, "Treatise on the Buddha-Nature," an important exposition of the MAHĀLĀNA theories of buddha-nature (FOXING) and storehouse, womb, or matrix of the tathāgatas (TATHĀGATAGARBHA). Authorship of the treatise is traditionally attributed to the Indian scholiast VASUBANDHU (fl. c. mid-fourth to mid-fifth centuries CE), with the Chinese translation made by the Indian YOGĀLĀRA exegete PARAMĀRTHA (499-569). Scholars now generally accept, however, that the text at the very least displays the heavy editorial hand of Paramārtha and may in fact have been written by him. The text offers a tripartite account of the buddha-nature as "dwelling in itself," "emergent," and "attained" (see discussion in FOXING, s.v.). It is also well known for its outline of three aspects of the tathāgatagarbha, as (1) the contained, (2) the concealed or hidden, and (3) the container. The "contained" means the "embryo" of enlightenment that is contained within the womb of the tathāgatas. "Concealment" denotes both the tathāgata as (a) an active agent of liberation, secreting himself inside the minds of ordinary sentient beings in order to motivate them toward enlightenment, and (b) a passive factor that is covered over and hidden by the afflictions (KLEsA). As the "container," the tathāgatagarbha is the fulfillment of the infinite numbers of meritorious qualities perfected by the buddhas. See also RATNAGOTRAVIBHĀGA.

Fumu enzhong jing. (J. Bumo onjugyo; K. Pumo ŭnjung kyong 父母恩重經). In Chinese, "The Scripture on the Profundity of Parental Kindness," an indigenous Buddhist scripture, composed in the seventh century that extols the virtues of filial piety (C. xiao). There are several different recensions of this sutra, including one discovered in the caves of DUNHUANG. The scripture denounces unfilial sons who, after their marriages, neglect and abuse their parents, and instead urges that they requite the kindness of their parents by making offerings at the ghost festival (C. YULANBEN; S. *ULLAMBANA) and by copying this scripture and reciting it out loud. This text seems to be related to other earlier Chinese APOCRYPHA, such as the Fumu enzhong nanbao jing ("The Scripture on the Difficulty of Requiting Parental Kindness") and the YULANPEN JING ("Ullambana Scripture"), and displays the possible influence of the indigenous Confucian tradition. The Fumu enzhong jing continues to be one of the most popular scriptures in East Asian Buddhism and is frequently cited in the Buddhist literature of China, Korea, and Japan.

Furthermore, because it is an expression of energy, all vibration is force and energy itself, and hence capable of arousing energies or forces of exactly the same quality or rate of intensity in other beings which they affect — this being the reason behind sympathetic vibration. When vibrations thus interlock and synchronize in rate, intensity, and quality, we have what is called sympathy, love, or attraction, and such sympathetic vibration is operative on all the planes of universal nature. Not only is this the case in all relations of humans with each other, but likewise sympathetic vibration plays an enormous part in such matters as mob psychology, quick electrical sympathies affecting audiences, hates and rebellions — even what is known as health and disease are communicated by means of vibrations, the one first affected being able to communicate his “affection” of whatever kind to others who are at the time negative to the vibrational impact and in time vibrating synchronously with the impacting energy. There is, of course, such a thing as resistance, which expresses itself in manifold ways, such as being able to throw off the vibration affecting it, and even to return it upon the sender, consciously or unconsciously; and herein lies the secret of the old medieval saying that curses come home to roost, or that if the magician is not stronger than the elementals or nature spirits he attempts to control, he is almost invariably destined to become their victim.

gamester ::: n. --> A merry, frolicsome person.
A person who plays at games; esp., one accustomed to play for a stake; a gambler; one skilled in games.
A prostitute; a strumpet.


General Dynamics Canada Ltd "company" A Canadian defence electronics company that makes direct and indirect fire control {systems}, vehicle electronics, reconnaissance vehicle surveillance systems, computerised laser sight for anti-tank weapons, tactical {communication systems}, headquarters information distribution system, tactical voice and distribution systems, acoustic signal processing, ASW mission systems, sonobuoy {processors}, active sonar systems, towed array sonar systems, tactical acoustic trainer, {Mil-Spec} {electroluminiscent displays}, large multi-sensor displays, coastal intrusion detection systems and {fibre-optic} distribution systems. The company was founded in 1948 as "Computing Devices Canada Ltd.", part of the Ceridian group of companies. It was renamed General Dynamics Canada Ltd. on 2002-01-01. {General Dynamics Canada (http://www.gdcanada.com/)}. (2013-01-20)

gest ::: n. --> A guest.
Something done or achieved; a deed or an action; an adventure.
An action represented in sports, plays, or on the stage; show; ceremony.
A tale of achievements or adventures; a stock story.
Gesture; bearing; deportment.
A stage in traveling; a stop for rest or lodging in a journey


Get a real computer! "jargon" A typical {hacker} response to news that somebody is having trouble getting work done on a {toy} system or {bitty box}. The threshold for "real computer" rises with time. As of mid-1993 it meant {multi-tasking}, with a {hard disk}, and an {address space} bigger than 16 {megabytes}. At this time, according to {GLS}, computers with character-only displays were verging on "unreal". In 2001, a real computer has a one {gigahertz} processor, 128 MB of {RAM}, 20 GB of hard disk, and runs {Linux}. [{Jargon File}] (2001-06-22)

gnas skor ba. (nekorwa). In Tibetan, lit. "going around a [sacred] place," generally translated as "pilgrimage," a pervasive practice of Tibetan Buddhism. Tibetan pilgrimage is most often a communal practice, involving a group of persons of the same family, the same village, or the same monastery, in some cases led by one or more monks or lamas who provide information and religious instruction along the route. Pilgrimage is undertaken to accrue merit and to expiate transgressions, but it also plays an important social and economic role in Tibetan society. Once the pilgrimage begins, pilgrims will do everything possible not to turn back; failure to complete the journey is thought to be like breaking a vow. Pilgrims generally traverse the pilgrimage route on foot; it is said that more merit is accrued if one walks rather than travels on horseback. The length of the pilgrimage varies according to the distance traveled, the season, the number of mountain passes to be crossed, and the number of sites to be visited. The trip can sometimes take several years, especially if the pilgrims perform prostrations along the entire route. Pilgrims make offerings at the monasteries and temples they visit, both on behalf of themselves but also for relatives who have not made the journey. Monasteries offer pilgrims ceremonial scarves (kha btags), blessed pills, and sometimes also food and lodging. Among the most important destinations for pilgrims is the city of LHA SA. There are eight famous mountains and mountain ranges, including Mount KAILĀSA in western Tibet and Dag pa shel ri (the Crystal Mountain) in TSA RI, a site sacred to CAKRASAMVARA on the border with eastern Nepal, and further afield the sacred sites in India (BODHGAYĀ, SĀRNĀTH, etc.) and in China (WUTAISHAN, etc.). See also MAHĀSTHĀNA.

golfer ::: n. --> One who plays golf.

Graphical Kernel System ::: (graphics, standard) (GKS) The widely recognised standard ANSI X3.124 for graphical input/output. GKS is worked on by the ISO/IEC group JTC1/SC24. It computer graphics output devices. It provides an abstraction to save programmers from dealing with the detailed capabilities and interfaces of specific hardware.GKS defines a basic two-dimensional graphics system with: uniform input and output primitives; a uniform interface to and from a GKS metafile for storing output devices including such as printers, plotters, vector graphics devices, storage tubes, refresh displays, raster displays, and microfilm recorders. (1999-04-01)

Graphical Kernel System "graphics, standard" (GKS) The widely recognised standard {ANSI} X3.124 for graphical input/output. GKS is worked on by the {ISO}/{IEC} group {JTC1/SC24}. It provides applications programmers with standard methods of creating, manipulating, and displaying or printing computer graphics on different types of computer graphics {output devices}. It provides an abstraction to save programmers from dealing with the detailed capabilities and interfaces of specific hardware. GKS defines a basic two-dimensional graphics system with: uniform input and output {primitives}; a uniform interface to and from a {GKS metafile} for storing and transferring graphics information. It supports a wide range of graphics output devices including such as {printers}, {plotters}, {vector graphics} devices, {storage tubes}, {refresh displays}, {raster displays}, and {microfilm recorders}. (1999-04-01)

Graphical User Interface "operating system" (GUI) The use of pictures rather than just words to represent the input and output of a program. A program with a GUI runs under some {windowing system} (e.g. The {X Window System}, {MacOS}, {Microsoft Windows}, {Acorn} {RISC OS}, {NEXTSTEP}). The program displays certain {icons}, {buttons}, {dialogue boxes}, etc. in its {windows} on the screen and the user controls it mainly by moving a {pointer} on the screen (typically controlled by a {mouse}) and selecting certain objects by pressing buttons on the mouse while the pointer is pointing at them. This contrasts with a {command line interface} where communication is by exchange of strings of text. Windowing systems started with the first {real}-time graphic display systems for computers, namely the {SAGE} Project [Dates?] and {Ivan Sutherland}'s {Sketchpad} (1963). {Douglas Engelbart}'s {Augmentation of Human Intellect} project at {SRI} in the 1960s developed the {On-Line System}, which incorporated a mouse-driven cursor and multiple windows. Several people from Engelbart's project went to Xerox PARC in the early 1970s, most importantly his senior engineer, {Bill English}. The Xerox PARC team established the {WIMP} concept, which appeared commercially in the {Xerox 8010} (Star) system in 1981. Beginning in 1980(?), led by {Jef Raskin}, the {Macintosh} team at {Apple Computer} (which included former members of the Xerox PARC group) continued to develop such ideas in the first commercially successful product to use a GUI, the Apple Macintosh, released in January 1984. In 2001 Apple introduced {Mac OS X}. {Microsoft} modeled the first version of {Windows}, released in 1985, on Mac OS. Windows was a GUI for {MS-DOS} that had been shipped with {IBM PC} and compatible computers since 1981. Apple sued Microsoft over infringement of the look-and-feel of the MacOS. The court case ran for many years. [Wikipedia]. (2002-03-25)

green lightning [IBM] 1. Apparently random flashing streaks on the face of 3278-9 terminals while a new symbol set is being downloaded. This hardware bug was left deliberately unfixed, as some genius within IBM suggested it would let the user know that "something is happening". That, it certainly does. Later microprocessor-driven IBM colour graphics displays were actually *programmed* to produce green lightning! 2. [proposed] Any bug perverted into an alleged feature by adroit rationalisation or marketing. "Motorola calls the CISC {cruft} in the 88000 architecture "compatibility logic", but I call it green lightning". See also {feature}.

green lightning ::: [IBM] 1. Apparently random flashing streaks on the face of 3278-9 terminals while a new symbol set is being downloaded. This hardware bug was left microprocessor-driven IBM colour graphics displays were actually *programmed* to produce green lightning!2. [proposed] Any bug perverted into an alleged feature by adroit rationalisation or marketing. Motorola calls the CISC cruft in the 88000 architecture compatibility logic, but I call it green lightning. See also feature.

groundlings: Also known as ‘understanders’, groundlings are those who paid only a penny to watch Shakespeare’s plays. They were the majority of the audience and stood on the ground floor of the theatre, in the yard. Groundlings stood through the entire play, which could be up to four hours long. The upper class, however, paid two pennies to sit and enter the elevated area with seats, whilst nobles often paid three pennies to sit in the Lords' rooms.

Guan Wuliangshou jing. (S. *Amitāyurdhyānasutra; J. Kan Muryojukyo; K. Kwan Muryangsu kyong 觀無量壽經). In Chinese, "Sutra on the Visualization of [the Buddha of] Immeasurable Life"; often called simply the Guan jing, or "Visualization Scripture." Along with the AMITĀBHASuTRA and SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA, the Guan Wuliangshou jing has been considered one of the three central scriptures of the PURE LAND tradition(s) (JINGTU SANBU JING). The Guan jing was extremely influential in East Asian Buddhism for advocating specific types of visualizations or contemplations (guan) on the person of the buddha AMITĀBHA (C. Wuliangshou; S. Amitāyu), and for encouraging oral recitation of Amitābha's name (chengming; see NIANFO). Early commentaries on the scripture were written by SHANDAO (613-681), an important Chinese exponent of pure land practice, as well as by TIANTAI ZHIYI (538-597), and JINGYING HUIYUAN (523-592), all attesting to the text's centrality to the East Asian Buddhist tradition. Although the Guan Wuliangshou jing purports to be a translation by the monk KĀLAYAsAS (fl. c. 383-442), no Sanskrit or Tibetan recension is known to have ever existed; Uighur versions of the Guan Wuliangshou jing are extant, but they are translations of the Chinese version. The scripture also contains specific Chinese influences, such as references to earlier Chinese translations of pure land materials and other contemplation sutras (guan jing), which has suggested to some scholars that the text might be a Chinese indigenous composition (see APOCRYPHA). It is now generally accepted that the scripture outlines a visualization exercise that was practiced in Central Asia, perhaps specifically in the TURFAN region, but includes substantial Chinese admixtures. ¶ The Guan Wuliangshou jing tells the story of prince AJĀTAsATRU who, at the urging of DEVADATTA, imprisons his father, king BIMBISĀRA, and usurps the throne. After Ajātasatru learns that his mother, queen VAIDEHĪ, has been surreptitiously keeping her husband alive by sneaking food in to him, he puts her under house arrest as well. The distraught queen prays to the Buddha for release from her suffering and he immediately appears in her chambers. Vaidehī asks him to show her a land free from sorrow and he displays to her the numerous buddha fields (BUDDHAKsETRA) throughout the ten directions (DAsADIs) of the universe. Queen Vaidehī, however, chooses to be reborn in the buddha AMITĀBHA's pure land of SUKHĀVATĪ, so the Buddha instructs her in sixteen visualizations that ensure the meditator will take rebirth there, including visualizations on the setting sun, the lotus throne of Amitābha, Amitābha himself, as well as the bodhisattvas AVALOKITEsVARA and MAHĀSTHĀMAPRĀPTA. The visualizations largely focus on the details of sukhāvatī's beauty, such as its beryl ground, jeweled trees, and pure water. In the last three visualizations, the Buddha expounds the nine grades of rebirth (JIUPIN) in that land, which became a favorite topic among exegetes in China, Korea, and Japan. The Guan Wuliangshou jing has also exerted much influence in the realm of art. A number of exquisite mural representations of sukhāvatī and the sixteen contemplations adorn the walls of the DUNHUANG cave complex, for example.

hang ::: 1. To wait for an event that will never occur. The system is hanging because it can't read from the crashed drive. See wedged, hung.2. To wait for some event to occur; to hang around until something happens. The program displays a menu and then hangs until you type a character. Compare block.3. To attach a peripheral device, especially in the construction hang off: We're going to hang another tape drive off the file server. Implies a device attached with cables, rather than something that is strictly inside the machine's chassis.

hang 1. To wait for an event that will never occur. "The system is hanging because it can't read from the crashed drive". See {wedged}, {hung}. 2. To wait for some event to occur; to hang around until something happens. "The program displays a menu and then hangs until you type a character." Compare {block}. 3. To attach a peripheral device, especially in the construction "hang off": "We're going to hang another tape drive off the file server." Implies a device attached with cables, rather than something that is strictly inside the machine's chassis.

hanuman. ::: hindu deity in the form of a monkey who plays a central character in the Indian epic

harlequin ::: n. --> A buffoon, dressed in party-colored clothes, who plays tricks, often without speaking, to divert the bystanders or an audience; a merry-andrew; originally, a droll rogue of Italian comedy. ::: n. i. --> To play the droll; to make sport by playing ludicrous tricks.

Heze Shenhui. (J. Kataku Jinne; K. Hat'aek Sinhoe 荷澤神會) (684-758). Chinese CHAN master and reputed main disciple of the sixth patriarch HUINENG; his collateral branch of Huineng's lineage is sometimes referred to as the Heze school. Shenhui was a native of Xiangyang in present-day Hubei province. He became a monk under the master Haoyuan (d.u.) of the monastery of Kuochangsi in his hometown of Xiangyang. In 704, Shenhui received the full monastic precepts in Chang'an, and extant sources provide differing stories of Shenhui's whereabouts thereafter. He is said to have become a student of SHENXIU and later visited MT. CAOXI where he studied under Huineng until the master's death in 713. After several years of traveling, Shenhui settled down in 720 at the monastery of Longxingsi in Nanyang (present-day Henan province). In 732, during an "unrestricted assembly" (WUZHE DAHUI) held at the monastery Dayunsi in Huatai, Shenhui engaged a monk by the name of Chongyuan (d.u.) and publicly criticized the so-called Bei zong (Northern school) of Shenxiu's disciples PUJI and XIANGMO ZANG as being a mere collateral branch of BODHIDHARMA's lineage that upheld a gradualist soteriological teaching. Shenhui also argued that his teacher Huineng had received the orthodox transmission of Bodhidharma's lineage and his "sudden teaching" (DUNJIAO). In 745, Shenhui is said to have moved to the monastery of Hezesi in Luoyang, whence he acquired his toponym. He was cast out of Luoyang by a powerful Northern school follower in 753. Obeying an imperial edict, Shenhui relocated to the monastery of Kaiyuansi in Jingzhou (present-day Hubei province) and assisted the government financially by performing mass ordinations after the economic havoc wrought by the An Lushan rebellion in 755. He was later given the posthumous title Great Master Zhenzong (Authentic Tradition). Shenhui also plays a minor, yet important, role in the LIUZU TAN JING ("Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch"). A treatise entitled the XIANZONGJI, preserved as part of the JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, is attributed to Shenhui. Several other treatises attributed to Shenhui were also discovered at DUNHUANG. Shenhui's approach to Chan practice was extremely influential in GUIFENG ZONGMI's attempts to reconcile different strands of Chan, and even doctrine, later in the Tang dynasty; through Zongmi, Shenhui's teachings also became a critical component of the Korean Son master POJO CHINUL's accounts of Chan soteriology and meditation.

humorist ::: n. --> One who attributes diseases of the state of the humors.
One who has some peculiarity or eccentricity of character, which he indulges in odd or whimsical ways.
One who displays humor in speaking or writing; one who has a facetious fancy or genius; a wag; a droll.


hurler ::: n. --> One who hurls, or plays at hurling.

Huyin Daoji. (J. Koin Dosai; K. Hoŭn Toje 湖隱道濟) (1150-1209). Chinese monk and thaumaturge who is associated with the YANGQI PAI of the LINJI ZONG of CHAN school; he is most commonly known in Chinese as JIGONG (Sire Ji) and sometimes as Jidian (Crazy Ji). A popular subject in vernacular Chinese fiction and plays, it has become difficult to separate the historical Jigong from the legend. Jigong is said to have been a native of Linhai in present-day Zhejiang province. He later visited the Chan master Xiatang Huiyuan (1103-1176), received the full monastic precepts at his monastery of Lingyinsi (present-day Jiangsu province), and became his disciple. After he left Xiatang's side, Jigong is said to have led the life of an itinerant holy man. During this period, Jigong's antinomian behavior, most notably his drinking and meat eating, along with his accomplishments as a trickster and wonderworker, became the subject of popular folklore. His unconventional behavior seems to have led to his ostracism from the SAMGHA. Jigong later moved to the monastery of Jingcisi, where he died in 1209. His teachings are recorded in the Jidian chanshi yulu (first printed in 1569).

hypertext link "hypertext" (Or "{hyperlink}", "button", formerly "span", "region", "extent") A pointer from within the content of one {hypertext} {node} (e.g. a {web page}) to another node. In {HTML} (the language used to write web pages), the source and destination of a {link} are known as "anchors". A source anchor may be a word, phrase, image or the whole node. A destination anchor may be a whole node or some position within the node. A {hypertext browser} displays source anchors in some distinctive way. When the user activates the link (e.g. by clicking on it with the {mouse}), the browser displays the destination anchor to which the link refers. Anchors should be recognisable at all times, not, for example, only when the mouse is over them. Originally links were always underlined but the modern preference is to use {bold} text. In {HTML}, anchors are created with "a..".."/a" anchor elements. The opening "a" tag of a source anchor has an "href" (hypertext reference) {attribute} giving the destination in the form of a {URL} - usually a whole "page". E.g. "a href="http://foldoc.org/"" Free On-line Dictionary of Computing"/a" Destination anchors can be used in HTML to name a position within a page using a "name" attribute. E.g. "a name="chapter3"" The name or "fragment identifier" is appended to the URL of the page after a "

hypocrite ::: n. --> One who plays a part; especially, one who, for the purpose of winning approbation of favor, puts on a fair outside seeming; one who feigns to be other and better than he is; a false pretender to virtue or piety; one who simulates virtue or piety.

Iacchos, the god of wine in more senses than one, plays an important part in these Mysteries. Demeter’s daughter Persephone, goddess of the underworld, was also honored. The usual accounts, vague and fragmentary only, describe the dramatic representations of the adventures of these deities, the esoteric meaning of which was given in the Greater Mysteries.

iambic pentameter: One of the most widespread rhythmical patterns in Englishpoetry. Iambic Pentameter is also the meter in which Shakespeare wrote many of his plays.

IBM 2741 "printer" A slow, letter-quality printing device and {terminal} based on the {IBM Selectric} {typewriter}. The print head was a little sphere resembling a golf ball, bearing reversed embossed images of 88 different characters arranged on four parallels of latitude; one could change the font by changing the golf ball. The device communicated at 134.5 bits per second, {half duplex}. When the computer transmitted, it physically locked the keyboard. This was the technology that enabled {APL} to use a non-{EBCDIC}, non-{ASCII}, and in fact completely non-standard {character set}. This put it 10 years ahead of its time - where it stayed, firmly rooted, for the next 20, until {character displays} gave way to programmable {bit-mapped} devices with the flexibility to support other character sets. (2006-08-04)

Ich: (Ger. I, myself, me, the ego (q.v.)) In the German idealistic movement from Kant through Schopenhauer, the Ich, the final, ultimate conscious subject, plays a central and dynamic role. Kant discredited the traditional Cartesian conception of a simple, undecomposable, substantial I, intuitively known. On his view, the Ich is not a substance, but the functional, dynamic unity of consciousness -- a necessary condition of all experience and the ultimate subject for which all else is object. This "transcendental unity of apperception," bare consciousness as such, is by its very nature empty, it is neither a thing nor a concept. For the pute transcendental I, my empirical self is but one experience among others in the realm of phenomena, and one of which Kant does not seek an adequate definition. The stress on the pure I as opposed to the empirical self is carried over into his practical philosophy, where the moral agent becomes, not the concrete personality, but a pure rational will, i.e., a will seeking to act in accordance with an absolute universal law of duty, the categorical imperative (q.v.).

Ida (-nadi) (Sanskrit) Iḍā-nāḍi [from iḍā refreshment + nāḍi tubular vessel] One of the three channels forming the spinal column of the body, which are the main avenues for not only the psychovital economy of the body, but likewise for spiritual and intellectual currents between the head and the body proper. In occultism the spinal column plays many physiological roles, but is especially threefold in its functions. The central channel is called the sushumna-nadi, with a channel on either side: the pingala-nadi on the right, and the ida-nadi on the left, although sometimes these positions are given as reversed. All the chakras are connected with the spinal column and the nadis “by the nervous and sympathetic systems as well as by the blood vessels. In occultism the spinal column is not only an organ, but it is actually threefold in its functions, being the foundation of the pranic vitality of the body, driven by the kama of pingala and more or less controlled by the higher manasic or directing attributes of ida” (FSO 462).

In his chief work, the Ethica, Spinoza's teaching is expressed in a manner for which geometry supplies the model. This expository device served various purposes. It may be interpreted as a clue to Spinoza's ideal of knowledge. So understood, it represents the condensed and ordered expression, not of 'philosophy' alone, but rather of all knowledge, 'philosophy' and 'science', as an integrated system. In such an ideal ordering of ideas, (rational) theology and metaphysics provide the anchorage for the system. On the one hand, the theology-metaphysics displays the fundamental principles (definitions, postulates, axioms) upon which the anchorage depends, and further displays in deductive fashion the primary fund of ideas upon which the inquiries of science, both 'descriptive' and 'normative' must proceed. On the other hand, the results of scientific inquiry are anchored at the other end, by a complementary metaphysico-theological development of their significance. Ideally, there obtains, for Spinoza, both an initial theology and metaphysics -- a necessary preparation for science -- and a culminating theology and metaphysics, an interpretative absorption of the conclusions of science.

In l'homme qui rit, meaning "The man who laughs" in French, a patient displays inappropriate laughter accompanied by release phenomena of the frontal subdominant lobe.

instrumentalist ::: n. --> One who plays upon an instrument of music, as distinguished from a vocalist.

intelligent terminal "hardware" (or "smart terminal", "programmable terminal") A terminal that often contains not only a keyboard and screen, but also comes with a disk drive and printer, so it can perform limited processing tasks when not communicating directly with the central computer. Some can be programmed by the user to perform many basic tasks, including both arithmetic and logic operations. In some cases, when the user enters data, the {data} will be checked for errors and some type of report will be produced. In addition, the valid data that is entered may be stored on the disk, it will be transmitted over communication lines to the central computer. An intelligent terminal may have enough computing capability to draw graphics or to offload some kind of front-end processing from the computer it talks to. The development of {workstations} and {personal computers} has made this term and the product it describes semi-obsolescent, but one may still hear variants of the phrase "act like a smart terminal" used to describe the behaviour of workstations or PCs with respect to programs that execute almost entirely out of a remote {server}'s storage, using said devices as displays. The term once meant any terminal with an {addressable cursor}; the opposite of a {glass tty}. Today, a terminal with merely an addressable cursor, but with none of the more-powerful features mentioned above, is called a {dumb terminal}. There is a classic quote from Rob Pike (inventor of the {blit} terminal): "A smart terminal is not a smart*ass* terminal, but rather a terminal you can educate". This illustrates a common design problem: The attempt to make peripherals (or anything else) intelligent sometimes results in finicky, rigid "special features" that become just so much dead weight if you try to use the device in any way the designer didn't anticipate. Flexibility and programmability, on the other hand, are *really* smart. Compare {hook}. (1995-04-14)

intelligent terminal ::: (hardware) (or smart terminal, programmable terminal) A terminal that often contains not only a keyboard and screen, but also comes with a disk drive entered may be stored on the disk, it will be transmitted over communication lines to the central computer.An intelligent terminal may have enough computing capability to draw graphics or to offload some kind of front-end processing from the computer it talks to.The development of workstations and personal computers has made this term and the product it describes semi-obsolescent, but one may still hear variants of workstations or PCs with respect to programs that execute almost entirely out of a remote server's storage, using said devices as displays.The term once meant any terminal with an addressable cursor; the opposite of a glass tty. Today, a terminal with merely an addressable cursor, but with none of the more-powerful features mentioned above, is called a dumb terminal.There is a classic quote from Rob Pike (inventor of the blit terminal): A smart terminal is not a smart*ass* terminal, but rather a terminal you can educate. any way the designer didn't anticipate. Flexibility and programmability, on the other hand, are *really* smart.Compare hook. (1995-04-14)

interlude ::: n. --> A short entertainment exhibited on the stage between the acts of a play, or between the play and the afterpiece, to relieve the tedium of waiting.
A form of English drama or play, usually short, merry, and farcical, which succeeded the Moralities or Moral Plays in the transition to the romantic or Elizabethan drama.
A short piece of instrumental music played between the parts of a song or cantata, or the acts of a drama; especially, in


JavaServer Pages "programming, web" (JSP) A freely available specification for extending the {Java Servlet} {API} to generate dynamic {web pages} on a {web server}. The JSP specification was written by industry leaders as part of the Java development program. JSP assists developers in creating {HTML} or {XML} pages that combine static (fixed) page templates with dynamic content. Separating the {user interface} from content generation allows page designers to change the page layout without having to rewrite program code. JSP was designed to be simpler than pure servlets or {CGI} {scripting}. JSP uses XML-like tags and scripts written in Java to generate the page content. HTML or XML formatting {tags} are passed back to the client. Application logic can live on the server, e.g. in {JavaBeans}. JSP is a {cross-platform} alternative to {Microsoft's} {Active Server Pages}, which only runs in {IIS} on {Windows NT}. Applications written to the JSP specification can be run on compliant web servers, and web servers such as {Apache}, {Netscape Enterprise Server}, and Microsoft {IIS} that have had Java support added. JSP should soon be available on {Unix}, {AS/400}, and {mainframe} platforms. {JavaServer Pages (http://java.sun.com/products/jsp/)}. {Infoworld Article (http://infoworld.com/cgi-bin/displayStory.pl?99063.ecjsp.htm)}. (1999-11-28)

Jingying Huiyuan. (J. Joyo Eon; K. Chongyong Hyewon 浄影慧遠) (523-592). Chinese monk and putative DI LUN exegete during the Sui dynasty. Huiyuan was a native of DUNHUANG. At an early age, he entered the monastery of Guxiangusi in Zezhou (present-day Shanxi province) where he was ordained by the monk Sengsi (d.u.). Huiyuan later studied various scriptures under the VINAYA master Lizhan (d.u.) in Ye, the capital of the Eastern Wei dynasty. In his nineteenth year, Huiyuan received the full monastic precepts from Fashang (495-580), ecclesiastical head of the SAMGHA at the time, and became his disciple. Huiyuan also began his training in the DHARMAGUPTAKA "Four-Part Vinaya" (SIFEN LÜ) under the vinaya master Dayin (d.u.). After he completed his studies, Huiyuan moved back to Zezhou and began his residence at the monastery Qinghuasi. In 577, Emperor Wu (r. 560-578) of Northern Zhou began a systematic persecution of Buddhism, and in response, Huiyuan is said to have engaged the emperor in debate; a transcript of the debate, in which Huiyuan defends Buddhism against criticisms of its foreign origins and its neglect of filial piety, is still extant. As the persecution continued, Huiyuan retreated to Mt. Xi in Jijun (present-day Henan province). Shortly after the rise of the Sui dynasty, Huiyuan was summoned by Emperor Wen (r. 581-604) to serve as overseer of the saMgha (shamendu) in Luozhou (present-day Henan). He subsequently spent his time undoing the damage of the earlier persecution. Huiyuan was later asked by Emperor Wen to reside at the monastery of Daxingshansi in the capital. The emperor also built Huiyuan a new monastery named Jingyingsi, which is often used as his toponym to distinguish him from LUSHAN HUIYUAN. Jingying Huiyuan was a prolific writer who composed numerous commentaries on such texts as the AVATAMSAKASuTRA, MAHĀPARINIRVĀnASuTRA, VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA, sRĪMĀLĀDEVĪSIMHANĀDASuTRA, SHIDI JING LUN (VASUBANDHU's commentary on the DAsABHuMIKASuTRA), DASHENG QIXIN LUN, and others. Among his works, the DASHENG YI ZHANG ("Compendium of the Purport of Mahāyāna"), a comprehensive encyclopedia of Mahāyāna doctrine, is perhaps the most influential and is extensively cited by traditional exegetes throughout East Asia. Jingying Huiyuan also plays a crucial role in the development of early PURE LAND doctrine in East Asia. His commentary on the GUAN WULIANGSHOU JING, the earliest extant treatise on this major pure land scripture, is critical in raising the profile of the Guan jing in East Asian Buddhism. His commentary to this text profoundly influenced Korean commentaries on the pure land scriptures during the Silla dynasty, which in turn were crucial in the the evolution of Japanese pure land thought during the Nara and Heian periods. Jingying Huiyuan's concept of the "dependent origination of the TATHĀGATAGARBHA" (rulaizang yuanqi)-in which tathāgatagarbha is viewed as the "essence" (TI) of both NIRVĀnA and SAMSĀRA, which are its "functioning" (YONG)-is later adapted and popularized by the third HUAYAN patriarch, FAZANG, and is an important precursor of later Huayan reconceptualizations of dependent origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA; see FAJIE YUANQI).

Jonson, Ben: An English poet and dramatist (1572 -16370). He was a contemporary of Shakespeare's. many of his plays were satires.

Kaliadovki (Russian) Christmas mystery-plays enacted in Russia, Poland, and Galicia (BCW 2:165). “It is but a few years since, during every Christmas week, Punch-and-Judy-boxes, containing the above named personages [Joseph, Mary, and the angel], an additional display of the infant Jesus in his manager, were carried about the country in Poland and Southern Russia” (IU 2:119).

Kanhwa kyorŭi non. (看話決疑論). In Korean, "Resolving Doubts about Observing the Keyword"; attributed to the Korean SoN master POJO CHINUL. Shortly after Chinul's death in 1210, his disciple CHIN'GAK HYESIM is said to have discovered the Kanhwa kyorŭi non among Chinul's effects and arranged for the text to be published in 1215. The treatise displays the rapid crystallization of Chinul's thought around kanhwa Son (see KANHUA CHAN), but its occasionally polemical tone suggests Hyesim's editorial hand. In the Kanhwa kyorŭi non, Chinul carefully expounds on the practice of observing the hwadu (HUATOU), the "meditative topic" or "keyword" deriving from a Chan public case (kongan; C. GONG'AN). He underscores the efficacy of the hwadu technique in counteracting the defects of conceptual understanding. In a series of questions and answers, Chinul also attempts to clarify the relation between the hwadu technique, the consummate interfusion of the DHARMADHĀTU, and the so-called sudden teachings (DUNJIAO) of Buddhism, as defined in the HUAYAN tenet-classification system (see JIAOXIANG PANSHI; HUAYAN WUJIAO). Chinul demonstrates that the goal of kanhwa Son is not simply to abandon words and thought, as in the "sudden teachings," but to realize the unimpeded interpenetration of all phenomena (SHISHI WU'AI), the consummate description of enlightened experience according to the Huayan school. Unlike the prolix, scholastic explanations of Huayan, however, kanhwa Son relies much less on conceptual descriptions in its soteriology and thus provides a more direct "shortcut" (kyongjol) to enlightenment than is offered in Huayan. Kanhwa Son therefore offers the only truly perfect and sudden (wondon; C. yuandun) approach to enlightenment.

Kārandavyuha. [alt. Karandavyuha; Avalokitesvaraguna-kārandavyuha] (T. Za ma tog bkod pa'i mdo; C. Dasheng zhuangyan baowang jing; J. Daijo shogon hoogyo; K. Taesŭng changom powang kyong 大乘莊嚴寶王經). In Sanskrit, "Description of the Casket [of AVALOKITEsVARA's Qualities]"; the earliest textual source for the BODHISATTVA Avalokitesvara's MANTRA "OM MAnI PADME HuM" (oM, O Jewel-Lotus); the extended version of the title is Avalokitesvaraguna-kārandavyuha. The earliest version of the Kārandavyuha is presumed to have been composed in Kashmir sometime around the end of the fourth or beginning of the fifth centuries CE. There are Tibetan and Chinese translations, including a late Chinese rendering made by the Kashmiri translator TIAN XIZAI (d. 1000) in 983. The Kārandavyuha displays characteristics of both sutra and TANTRA literature in its emphasis on the doctrine of rebirth in AMITĀBHA Buddha's pure land (SUKHĀVATĪ), as well as such tantric elements as the mantra "oM mani padme huM" and the use of MAndALAs; it is thought to represent a transitional stage between the two categories of texts. The sutra is composed as a dialogue between sĀKYAMUNI Buddha and the bodhisattva SARVANĪVARAnAVIsKAMBHIN. While describing Avalokitesvara's supernal qualities and his vocation of saving sentient beings, sākyamuni Buddha tells his audience about the mantra "oM mani padme huM" and the merits that it enables its reciters to accrue. Avalokitesvara is said to be the embodiment of the SAMBHOGAKĀYA (enjoyment body), the body of the buddha that remains constantly present in the world for the edification of all beings, and the dharma that he makes manifest is expressed in this six-syllable mantra (sAdAKsArĪ), the recitation of which invokes the power of that bodhisattva's great compassion (MAHĀKARUnĀ). The sutra claims that the benefit of copying this mantra but once is equivalent to that of copying all the 84,000 teachings of the DHARMA; in addition, there are an infinite number of benefits that derive from a single recitation of it.

KC85/4 ::: (computer) The last commercial home computer from East Germany in the KC series. The KC85/4 was introduced in 1988. It runs at 1.77 MHz, has 64 KB of RAM and uses a Z80 clone CPU. It displays graphics at a resolution of 320x256.(2004-03-31)

KC85/4 "computer" The last commercial home computer from East Germany in the KC series. The KC85/4 was introduced in 1988. It runs at 1.77 {MHz}, has 64 {KB} of {RAM} and uses a {Z80} {clone} {CPU}. It displays graphics at a {resolution} of 320x256. (2004-03-31)

kettledrummer ::: n. --> One who plays on a kettledrum.

keyboardist (Eng) : a musician who plays any instrument with a keyboard. In Classical music, this may refer to instruments such as the piano, pipe organ, harpsichord, and so on. In a jazz or popular music context, this may refer to instruments such as the piano, electric piano, synthesizer, Hammond organ, and so on.

klu. (lu). A class of Tibetan pre-Buddhist subteranean deities associated with water and infectious diseases such as leprosy. With the arrival of Buddhism, the klu were subsumed with the Indian NĀGA. They have the head and torso of humans but the tails of snakes. The klu are possibly related to the Chinese long, or dragon: long fly in the air, klu remain submerged in subterranean lakes, but both are associated with water. The klu must be propitiated before the construction of monasteries and other buildings in Tibet, in rituals that involve both peaceful offerings and displays of violent power. The klu combine with other classes of Tibetan deities to create composite entities: klu bdud, klu sman, klu btsan, klu srin, and the like.

kongokai. (S. vajradhātu; T. rdo rje dbyings; C. jingang jie; K. kŭmgang kye 金剛界). In Japanese, "diamond realm" or "diamond world"; one of the two principal diagrams (MAndALA) used in the esoteric traditions of Japan (see MIKKYo), along with the TAIZoKAI ("womb realm"); the Sanskrit reconstruction for this diagram is *vajradhātumandala. The teachings of the kongokai are said to derive in part from two seminal scriptures of the esoteric traditions, the MAHĀVAIROCANĀBHISAMBODHISuTRA and SARVATATHĀGATATATTVASAMGRAHA, but its construction as a mandala relies on no known written instructions and more likely evolved pictorially. KuKAI (774-835), the founder of the SHINGONSHu, used the kongokai mandala in combination with the taizokai mandala in a variety of esoteric rituals designed to awaken the individual adept. However, Japanese TENDAI Buddhism as well as various SHUGENDo complexes also heavily incorporated their own rituals into the two mandalas. ¶ The kongokai consists of nine smaller, nearly square-shaped mandalas, or "assemblies" (J. e), some of which are sometimes isolated for worship and visualized independently. It is said that, by visualizing the mandala, the kongokai ultimately demonstrates that the universe as a whole is coextensive with the body of the DHARMAKĀYA or cosmic buddha, Mahāvairocana (SEE VAIROCANA). In the center of the mandala, Mahāvairocana sits on a lotus flower, surrounded by four female figures, who symbolize the four perfections. Immediately outside are four discs, each encompassing a directional buddha: AMITĀBHA to the west, AKsOBHYA to the east, AMOGHASIDDHI to the north, and RATNASAMBHAVA to the south. Each is, in turn, surrounded by four BODHISATTVAs. This ensemble of buddhas, bodhisattvas, and female figures is repeated in the first four mandala of outward trajectory and its structure repeated in the lower six. Below the center mandala is the mandala of physical objects, each representing the buddhas and bodhisattvas. The next one in outward trajectory are figures residing inside a three-pointed vajra, representing the sounds of the world. The fourth mandala displays all figures (excluding buddhas) in their female form, each exhibiting specific bodily movements. Arriving next at the upper-left mandala, the group is reduced to Mahāvairocana and four surrounding bodhisattvas. In the top-center mandala sits only a large Mahāvairocana. The last three mandalas in the outward spiral shift toward worldly affairs. The top right reveals passions and desire. In the next to last are horrific demons and deities. The last mandala represents consciousness. ¶ Looking at the depictions in the kongokai individually, the nine smaller mandalas are arrayed in a clockwise direction as follows. (1) The perfected-body assembly (jojinne) is the central assembly of the entire mandala. In the center of this assembly sits Mahāvairocana, displaying the gesture (MUDRĀ) of the wisdom fist (BODHYAnGĪMUDRĀ; J. chiken-in), surrounded by the four directional buddhas (Aksobhya, Ratnasambhava, Amitābha, and Amoghasiddhi), who embody four aspects of Mahāvairocana's wisdom. Each of these buddhas, including Mahāvairocana, is in turn attended by four bodhisattvas. (2) The SAMAYA assembly (J. sammayae; S. samayamandala) replaces the buddhas and bodhisattvas with physical objects, such as VAJRAS and lotuses. (3) The subtle assembly (J. misaime; S. suksmamandala) signifies the adamantine wisdom of Mahāvairocana. (4) In the offerings assembly (J. kuyo-e; S. pujāmandala), bodhisattvas make offerings to the five buddhas. (5) The four-mudrās assembly (J. shiinne; S. caturmudrāmandala) depicts only Mahāvairocana and four bodhisattvas. (6) The single-mudrā assembly (J. ichiinne; S. ekamudrāmandala) represents Mahāvairocana sitting alone in the gesture of wisdom. (7) In the guiding-principle assembly (J. rishu-e; S. nayamandala), VAJRASATTVA sits at the center, surrounded by four female figures, representing craving, physical contact, sexual desire, and fulfillment. (8) In the assembly of the descent into the three realms of existence (J. gozanze-e; S. trailokyavijayamandala), Vajrasattva assumes the ferocious appearance of Gosanze (TRAILOKYAVIJAYA). (9) The samaya of the descent into the three-realms assembly (J. gozanzesammayae; S. trailokyavijayasamaya mandala) has the same structure as the previous one. ¶ In one distinctively Shingon usage, the mandala was placed in the east and the kongokai stood in juxtaposition across from it. The initiate would then invite all buddhas, bodhisattvas, and divinities into the sacred space, invoking all of their power and ultimately unifying with them. In SHUGENDo, the two mandalas were often spatially superimposed over mountain geography or worn as robes on the practitioner while entering the mountain. See TAIZoKAI.

K&R style "programming" An ugly, obsolete, deprecated {source code} {indent style} that looks like this: if (cond) { "body" } The basic indent is eight spaces (or one tab) per level; less commonly four. It is named after {Kernighan} & {Ritchie} because the examples in {K&R} are formatted this way. It is also called "kernel style" (because the {Unix} {kernel} was written in it) or {Egyptian brackets}. This style was popular when programmers worked on small displays, or when printing code on paper, becuase it saves vertical space. It should be avoided because the opening brace is easy to miss at the end of a long condition in an "if" or "while" statement and it makes it hard to pair up braces. (2014-09-28)

Lamed (Heb.): The letter Lamed, or "L", plays a vital rôle in the symbolism of the New Aeon. Together with Aleph (q.v.) it forms the Name of The Book of the Law (AL). The influence especiallyassociated with this letter is known as Nu-Isis (a combination of the two aspects of Nuit, the Heavenly and Earthly). This influence manifests asa cosmic force of which the planetary representative is Venus.

lap ::: n. --> The loose part of a coat; the lower part of a garment that plays loosely; a skirt; an apron.
An edge; a border; a hem, as of cloth.
The part of the clothing that lies on the knees or thighs when one sits down; that part of the person thus covered; figuratively, a place of rearing and fostering; as, to be reared in the lap of luxury.
That part of any substance or fixture which extends over, or lies upon, or by the side of, a part of another; as, the lap of a


leader ::: n. --> One who, or that which, leads or conducts; a guide; a conductor.
One who goes first.
One having authority to direct; a chief; a commander.
A performer who leads a band or choir in music; also, in an orchestra, the principal violinist; the one who plays at the head of the first violins.
A block of hard wood pierced with suitable holes for


lha mo. In Tibetan, lit. "the goddess"; the name for the classical theater of Tibet. These plays are drawn from Tibetan literature, often with Buddhist themes, and can last a full day when performed in their entirety. They are performed with a rich assortment of masks and costumes; the members of the lha mo troupe employ sung dialogue, chanted narration, stylized movement, and dancing. Satire and comic improvisation are also included. The tradition of lha mo is said to have begun with the famous saint THANG STONG RGYAL PO. See 'CHAM.

Liana "language" A {C}-like, interpretive, {object-oriented programming} language, {class} library, and integrated development environment designed specifically for development of {application programs} for {Microsoft Windows} and {Windows NT}. Designed by Jack Krupansky "Jack@BaseTechnology.com" of {Base Technology}, Liana was first released as a commercial product in August 1991. The language is designed to be as easy to use as {BASIC}, as concise as {C}, and as flexible as {Smalltalk}. The {OOP} {syntax} of {C++} was chosen over the less familiar syntax of {Smalltalk} and {Objective-C} to appeal to {C} programmers and in recognition of C++ being the leading OOP language. The syntax is a simplified subset of {C/C++}. The {semantics} are also a simplified subset of C/C++, but extended to achieve the flexibility of Smalltalk. Liana is a typeless language (like {Lisp}, {Snobol} and {Smalltalk}), which means that the datatypes of variables, function parameters, and function return values are not needed since values carry the type information. Hence, variables are simply containers for values and function parameters are simply pipes through which any type of value can flow. {Single inheritance}, but not {multiple inheritance}, is supported. {Memory management} is automatic using {reference counting}. The library includes over 150 {classes}, for {dynamic arrays}, {associative lookup} tables, windows, menus, dialogs, controls, bitmaps, cursors, icons, mouse movement, keyboard input, fonts, text and graphics display, {DDE}, and {MDI}. Liana provides flexible OOP support for Windows programming. For example, a {list box} automatically fills itself from an associated {object}. That object is not some sort of special object, but is merely any object that "behaves like" an array (i.e., has a "size" member function that returns the number of elements, a "get" function that returns the ith element, and the text for each element is returned by calling the "text" member function for the element). A related product, C-odeScript, is an embeddable application scripting language. It is an implementation of Liana which can be called from C/C++ applications to dynamically evaluate expressions and statement sequences. This can be used to offer the end-user a macro/scripting capability or to allow the C/C++ application to be customized without changing the C/C++ source code. Here's a complete Liana program which illustrates the flexibility of the language semantics and the power of the class library: main {  // Prompt user for a string.  // No declaration needed for "x" (becomes a global variable.)  x = ask ("Enter a String");  // Use "+" operator to concatenate strings. Memory  // management for string temporaries is automatic. The  // "message" function displays a Windows message box.  message ("You entered: " + x);  // Now x will take on a different type. The "ask_number"  // function will return a "real" if the user's input  // contains a decimal point or an "int" if no decimal  // point.  x = ask_number ("Enter a Number");  // The "+" operator with a string operand will  // automatically convert the other operand to a string.  message ("You entered: " + x);  // Prompt user for a Liana expression. Store it in a  // local variable (the type, string, is merely for  // documentation.)  string expr = ask ("Enter an Expression");  // Evaluate the expression. The return value of "eval"  // could be any type. The "source_format" member function  // converts any value to its source format (e.g., add  // quotes for a string.) The "class_name" member function  // return the name of the class of an object/value.  // Empty parens can be left off for member function calls.  x = eval (expr);  message ("The value of " + expr + " is " + x.source_format +    " its type is " + x.class_name); } The author explained that the "Li" of Liana stands for "Language interpreter" and liana are vines that grow up trees in tropical forests, which seemed quite appropriate for a tool to deal with the complexity of MS Windows! It is also a woman's name. ["Liana for Windows", Aitken, P., PC TECHNIQUES, Dec/Jan 1993]. ["Liana: A Language For Writing Windows Programs", Burk, R., Tech Specialist (R&D Publications), Sep 1991]. ["Liana v. 1.0." Hildebrand, J.D., Computer Language, Dec 1992]. ["Liana: A Windows Programming Language Based on C and C++", Krupansky, J., The C Users Journal, Jul 1992]. ["Writing a Multimedia App in Liana", Krupansky, J., Dr. Dobb's Journal, Winter Multimedia Sourcebook 1994]. ["The Liana Programming Language", R. Valdes, Dr Dobbs J Oct 1993, pp.50-52]. (1999-06-29)

Life ::: (games) The first popular cellular automata based artificial life game. Life was invented by British mathematician John Horton Conway in 1970 and was first introduced publicly in Scientific American later that year.Conway first devised what he called The Game of Life and ran it using plates placed on floor tiles in his house. Because of he ran out of floor space and That first implementation of Life as a computer program was written by M. J. T. Guy and S. R. Bourne (the author of Unix's Bourne shell).Life uses a rectangular grid of binary (live or dead) cells each of which is updated at each step according to the previous state of its eight neighbours as dies. A dead cell with exactly three neighbours becomes alive. Other cells do not change.While the rules are fairly simple, the patterns that can arise are of a complexity resembling that of organic systems -- hence the name Life.Many hackers pass through a stage of fascination with Life, and hackers at various places contributed heavily to the mathematical analysis of this game than the magazine, the breakfast cereal, the 1950s-era board game or the human state of existence. . .[Scientific American 223, October 1970, p120-123, 224; February 1971 p121-117, Martin Gardner].[The Garden in The Machine: the Emerging Science of Artificial Life, Claus Emmeche, 1994].[Winning Ways, For Your Mathematical Plays, Elwyn R. Berlekamp, John Horton Conway and Richard K. Guy, 1982].[The Recursive Universe: Cosmic Complexity and the Limits of Scientific Knowledge, William Poundstone, 1985].[Jargon File] (1997-09-07)

Limbic System ::: A brain system that plays a role in emotional expression, particularly in the emotional component of behavior, memory, and motivation.

liquid crystal display ::: (hardware) (LCD) An electro-optical device used to display digits, characters or images, commonly used in digital watches, calculators, and portable computers.The heart of the liquid crystal display is a piece of liquid crystal material placed between a pair of transparent electrodes. The liquid crystal changes the number of such cells, or more usually, by using a single liquid crystal plate and a pattern of electrodes.The simplest kind of liquid crystal displays, those used in digital watches and calculators, contain a common electrode plane covering one side and a pattern of applying voltage to one row and several columns the pixels at the intersections are set.The pixels being set one row after the other, in passive matrix displays the number of rows is limited by the ratio of the setting and fading times. In the displays (480 rows) can be easily built. As of 1995 most notebook computers used this technique.Fading can be slowed by putting an active element, such as a transistor, on the top of each pixel. This remembers the setting of that pixel. These active matrix displays are of much better quality (as good as CRTs) but are much more expensive than the passive matrix displays.LCDs are slimmer, lighter and consume less power than the previous dominant display type, the cathode ray tube, hence their importance for portable computers. (1995-12-09)

liquid crystal display "hardware" (LCD) An electro-optical device used to display digits, characters or images, commonly used in digital watches, calculators, and portable computers. The heart of the liquid crystal display is a piece of {liquid crystal} material placed between a pair of transparent {electrodes}. The liquid crystal changes the phase of the light passing through it and this phase change can be controlled by the {voltage} applied between the electrodes. If such a unit is placed between a pair of {plane polariser} plates then light can pass through it only if the correct voltage is applied. Liquid crystal displays are formed by integrating a number of such cells, or more usually, by using a single liquid crystal plate and a pattern of electrodes. The simplest kind of liquid crystal displays, those used in digital watches and calculators, contain a common electrode plane covering one side and a pattern of electrodes on the other. These electrodes can be individually controlled to produce the appropriate display. Computer displays, however, require far too many pixels (typically between 50,000 and several millions) to make this scheme, in particular its wiring, feasible. The electrodes are therefore replaced by a number of row electrodes on one side and column electrodes on the other. By applying voltage to one row and several columns the {pixels} at the intersections are set. The pixels being set one row after the other, in {passive matrix} displays the number of rows is limited by the ratio of the setting and fading times. In the setup described above (known as "{twisted nematic}") the number of rows is limited to about 20. Using an alternative "{supertwisted nematic}" setup {VGA} quality displays (480 rows) can be easily built. As of 1995 most {notebook computers} used this technique. Fading can be slowed by putting an active element, such as a {transistor}, on the top of each pixel. This "remembers" the setting of that pixel. These {active matrix} displays are of much better quality (as good as {CRTs}) but are much more expensive than the passive matrix displays. LCDs are slimmer, lighter and consume less power than the previous dominant display type, the {cathode ray tube}, hence their importance for {portable computers}. (1995-12-09)

local echo ::: (communications) (Obsolete: half-duplex) A mode of operation of a communications program or device in which it displays the characters the user enters at the same time as it sends them to the remote system.In communications between computers or computing processes, particularly those involving human keyboarding and/or reading, duplex came to mean the re-transmission of a keyboard character to the output display.Early input device such as the Teletype ASR-33 teleprinter, being descended from the electric typewriter, printed all input characters as they were typed (i.e. disadvantage of local echo is that it will continue, even when the communication circuit has failed, which can be misleading.(2000-03-30)

local echo "communications" (Obsolete: "{half-duplex}") A mode of operation of a communications program or device in which it displays the characters the user enters at the same time as it sends them to the remote system. In communications between computers or computing processes, particularly those involving human keyboarding and/or reading, duplex came to mean the re-transmission of a keyboard character to the output display. Early input device such as the Teletype {ASR-33} {teleprinter}, being descended from the electric typewriter, printed all input characters as they were typed (i.e. they did local echo). Local echo was typically optional on the {video terminals} that replaced them, and usually disabled in favour of {remote echo}. A disadvantage of local echo is that it will continue, even when the communication circuit has failed, which can be misleading. (2000-03-30)

lutanist ::: n. --> A person that plays on the lute.

luter ::: n. --> One who plays on a lute.
One who applies lute.


lutist ::: n. --> One who plays on a lute.

lyrist ::: 1. Music. One who plays a lyre. 2. A lyric poet.

lyrist ::: n. --> A musician who plays on the harp or lyre; a composer of lyrical poetry.

Macintosh user interface ::: (operating system) The graphical user interface used by Apple Computer's Macintosh family of personal computers, based on graphical representations of familiar office objects (sheets of paper, files, wastepaper bin, etc.) positioned on a two-dimensional desktop workspace.Programs and data files are represented on screen by small pictures (icons). An object is selected by moving a mouse over the real desktop which correspondingly moves the pointer on screen. When the pointer is over an icon on screen, the icon is selected by pressing the button on the mouse.A hierarchical file system is provided that lets a user drag a document (a file) icon into and out of a folder (directory) icon. Folders can also contain can icon. For people that are not computer enthusiasts, managing files on the Macintosh is easier than using the MS-DOS or Unix command-line interpreter.The Macintosh always displays a row of menu titles at the top of the screen. When a mouse button is pressed over a title, a pull-down menu appears below it. With the mouse button held down, the option within the menu is selected by pointing to it and then releasing the button.Unlike the IBM PC, which, prior to Microsoft Windows had no standard graphical user interface, Macintosh developers almost always conform to the Macintosh basic tasks are always performed in the same way. Apple also keeps technical jargon down to a minimum.Although the Macintosh user interface provides consistency; it does not make up for an application program that is not designed well. Not only must the for experienced typists, the mouse is a cumbersome substitute for well-designed keyboard commands, especially for intensive text editing.Urban legned has it that the Mac user interface was copied from Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center. Although it is true that Xerox's smalltalk had a GUI and which are now considered fundamental, such as dragging objects and pull-down menus with the mouse, were actually invented at Apple.Pull-down menus have become common on IBM, Commodore and Amiga computers. Microsoft Windows and OS/2 Presentation Manager, Digital Research's GEM, and operating environments also incorporate some or all of the desktop/mouse/icon features.Apple Computer have tried to prevent other companies from using some GUI concepts by taking legal action against them. It is because of such restrictive refused to support ports of their software to Apple machines, though this ban has now been lifted. [Why? When?] (1996-07-19)

Macintosh user interface "operating system" The {graphical user interface} used by {Apple Computer}'s {Macintosh} family of {personal computers}, based on graphical representations of familiar office objects (sheets of paper, files, wastepaper bin, etc.) positioned on a two-dimensional "{desktop}" workspace. Programs and data files are represented on screen by small pictures ({icons}). An object is selected by moving a {mouse} over the real desktop which correspondingly moves the {pointer} on screen. When the pointer is over an icon on screen, the icon is selected by pressing the button on the mouse. A {hierarchical file system} is provided that lets a user "{drag}" a document (a file) icon into and out of a {folder} (directory) icon. Folders can also contain other folders and so on. To delete a document, its icon is dragged into a {trash can} icon. For people that are not computer enthusiasts, managing files on the Macintosh is easier than using the {MS-DOS} or {Unix} {command-line interpreter}. The Macintosh always displays a row of menu titles at the top of the screen. When a mouse button is pressed over a title, a {pull-down menu} appears below it. With the mouse button held down, the option within the menu is selected by pointing to it and then releasing the button. Unlike the {IBM PC}, which, prior to {Microsoft Windows} had no standard {graphical user interface}, Macintosh developers almost always conform to the Macintosh interface. As a result, users are comfortable with the interface of a new program from the start even if it takes a while to learn all the rest of it. They know there will be a row of menu options at the top of the screen, and basic tasks are always performed in the same way. Apple also keeps technical jargon down to a minimum. Although the Macintosh user interface provides consistency; it does not make up for an {application program} that is not designed well. Not only must the application's menus be clear and understandable, but the locations on screen that a user points to must be considered. Since the mouse is the major selecting method on a Macintosh, mouse movement should be kept to a minimum. In addition, for experienced typists, the mouse is a cumbersome substitute for well-designed keyboard commands, especially for intensive text editing. {Urban legned} has it that the Mac user interface was copied from {Xerox}'s {Palo Alto Research Center}. Although it is true that Xerox's {smalltalk} had a GUI and Xerox introduced some GUI concepts commercially on the {Xerox Star} computer in 1981, and that {Steve Jobs} and members of the Mac and {Lisa} project teams visited PARC, Jef Raskin, who created the Mac project, points out that many GUI concepts which are now considered fundamental, such as dragging objects and pull-down menus with the mouse, were actually invented at Apple. {Pull-down menus} have become common on {IBM}, {Commodore} and {Amiga} computers. {Microsoft Windows} and {OS/2} {Presentation Manager}, {Digital Research}'s {GEM}, {Hewlett-Packard}'s {New Wave}, the {X Window System}, {RISC OS} and many other programs and operating environments also incorporate some or all of the desktop/mouse/icon features. {Apple Computer} have tried to prevent other companies from using some {GUI} concepts by taking legal action against them. It is because of such restrictive practises that organisations such as the {Free Software Foundation} previously refused to support ports of their software to Apple machines, though this ban has now been lifted. [Why? When?] (1996-07-19)

Mahāniddesa. In Pāli, "Longer Exposition," first part of the Niddesa ("Exposition"), an early commentarial work on the SUTTANIPĀTA included in the Pāli SUTTAPItAKA as the eleventh book of the KHUDDAKANIKĀYA. The Niddesa is attributed by tradition to the Buddha's chief disciple, Sāriputta (S. sĀRIPUTRA), and is divided into two sections: the Mahāniddesa and the CulANIDDESA ("Shorter Exposition"). The Mahāniddesa comments on the sixteen suttas (S. SuTRA) of the AttHAKAVAGGA chapter of the Suttanipāta; the Culaniddesa comments on the sixteen suttas of the Parāyanavagga chapter and on the Khaggavisānasutta (see KHAdGAVIsĀnA). The Mahāniddesa and Culaniddesa do not comment on any of the remaining contents of the Suttanipāta, a feature that has suggested to historians that at the time of their composition the Atthakavagga and Parāyanavagga were autonomous anthologies not yet incorporated into the Suttanipāta, and that the Khaggavisānasutta likewise circulated independently. The exegesis of the Suttanipāta by the Mahā- and Culaniddesa displays the influence of the Pāli ABHIDHAMMA (S. ABHIDHARMA) and passages from it are frequently quoted in the VISUDDHIMAGGA. Both parts of the Niddesa are formulaic in structure, a feature that appears to have been designed as a pedagogical aid to facilitate memorization. In Western scholarship, there has long been a debate regarding their dates of composition, with some scholars dating them as early as the third century BCE, others to as late as the second century CE. The Mahā- and Culaniddesa are the only commentarial texts besides the SUTTAVIBHAnGA of the VINAYAPItAKA to be included in the Sri Lankan and Thai recensions of the Pāli canon. In contrast, the Burmese canon includes two additional early commentaries, the NETTIPAKARAnA and PEtAKOPADESA, as books sixteen and seventeen in its recension of the Khuddakanikāya.

Mahāparinirvānasutra. (T. Yongs su mya ngan las 'das pa chen po'i mdo; C. Da banniepan jing; J. Daihatsunehangyo; K. Tae panyolban kyong 大般涅槃經). In Sanskrit, "Discourse on the Great Decease" or the "Great Discourse on the Final Nirvāna"; also known in all languages simply as the Nirvāna Sutra. As its title suggests, the SuTRA describes the events and the Buddha's final instructions prior to his passage into PARINIRVĀnA and is thus the Sanskrit retelling of the mainstream version of the text (see MAHĀPARINIBBĀNASUTTA). However, although some of the same events are narrated in both versions, the Sanskrit text is very different in content, providing one of the most influential sources for MAHĀYĀNA views of the true nature of the Buddha and his NIRVĀnA, and of the buddha-nature (referred to in the sutra as both BUDDHADHĀTU, or "buddha-element," and TATHĀGATAGARBHA). There appear to have been a number of Sanskrit versions of the sutra, the earliest of which was likely compiled in Kashmir (see KASHMIR-GANDHĀRA) in the third century CE. One piece of internal evidence for the date of composition is the presence of prophecies that the dharma would fall into decline seven hundred years after the Buddha's passage into nirvāna. None of the Sanskrit versions is extant (apart from fragments), but several are preserved in Chinese and Tibetan translations. The earliest and shortest of these translations is in six rolls, translated into Chinese by FAXIAN (who brought the Sanskrit text to China from India) and BUDDHABHADRA, and completed in 418 CE. A second version was translated from Sanskrit into Tibetan at the end of the eighth century. The longest version, in forty rolls, was translated into Chinese by DHARMAKsEMA and completed in 423. It is known as the "Northern Text." This version was later translated into Tibetan from the Chinese as the Yongs su mya ngan las das pa chen po'i mdo. Besides the Tibetan translation of the long Chinese version by Dharmaksema, there is another version of the sutra in Tibetan translation, a Mahāparinirvānasutra in 3,900 slokas, translated by Jinamitra, Dhyānagarbha, and Ban de btsan dra, as well as a few folios of a translation of the sutra by Kamalagupta and RIN CHEN BZANG PO. The Faxian and Dharmaksema Chinese versions were subsequently edited into a single work, in thirty-six rolls. Chinese scriptural catalogues (JINGLU) also refer to two other translations of the sutra, made prior to that of Faxian, but these are no longer extant. There were significant differences between the versions of Faxian and Dharmaksema (and hence apparently in the Sanskrit recensions that they translated), so much so that scholars speculate that the shorter version was composed in a non-Mahāyāna community, with Mahāyāna elements being added to what evolved into the longer version. The most famous of the differences between the versions occurs on the question of whether all beings, including "incorrigibles" (ICCHANTIKA), possess the buddha-nature; the shorter version says that they do not and they are therefore condemned to eternal damnation; the longer version says that they do and thus even they retain the capacity to achieve enlightenment. The shorter version of the sutra describes the SAMGHA as consisting of monks and nuns and preaches about the need to provide donations (DĀNA) to them; the longer version includes the laity among the saMgha and preaches the need for charity to all persons. The longer version also recommends various forms of punishment, including execution, for those who denigrate the Mahāyāna. The sutra also makes reference to other famous sutras, such as the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, and is mentioned in other sutras, such as the MAHĀMEGHASuTRA. The Mahāparinirvānasutra, like other important sutras extolling tathāgatagarbha thought, such as the sRĪMĀLĀDEVĪSIMHANĀDASuTRA, plays on the classical doctrine of the four "inverted views" (VIPARYĀSA), according to which sentient beings mistakenly view that which is suffering as being pleasurable, that which is impermanent as permanent, that which is impure as pure, and that which is without self as having self. In this sutra, by contrast, the four right views of suffering, impermanence, impurity, and no-self are proclaimed to be erroneous when describing the Buddha, his nirvāna, and the buddhadhātu; these are instead each said to be in fact blissful, permanent, pure, and endowed with self (see GUnAPĀRAMITĀ). Thus, the Buddha did not pass into nirvāna, for his lifespan is incalculable. The Buddha's nirvāna-which is referred to in the sutra as "great nirvāna" (mahānirvāna) or "great final nirvāna" (MAHĀPARINIRVĀnA)-differs from that of the ARHAT. The nirvāna of the arhat is said to be merely the state of the absence of the afflictions (KLEsA) but with no awareness of the buddhadhātu. The nirvāna of the buddha is instead eternal, pure, blissful, and endowed with self, a primordially existent reality that is only temporarily obscured by the klesa; when that nirvāna and buddhadhātu are finally "recognized," buddhahood is then achieved. The Buddha reveals the existence of this nirvāna to bodhisattvas. Because the buddhadhātu is present within all sentient beings, these four qualities are therefore found not simply in the Buddha but in all beings. This implies, therefore, that the Buddha and all beings are endowed with self, in direct contradiction to the normative Buddhist doctrine of no-self (ANĀTMAN). Here, in this sutra, the teaching of no-self is described as a conventional truth (SAMVṚTISATYA): when the Buddha said that there was no self, what he actually meant was that there is no mundane, conditioned self among the aggregates (SKANDHA). The Buddha's true teaching, as revealed at the time of his nirvāna, is that there is a "great self" or a "true self" (S. mahātman; C. dawo), which is the buddhadhātu, in all beings. To assert that there is no self is to misunderstand the true dharma. The doctrine of emptiness (suNYATĀ) thus comes to mean the absence of that which is compounded, suffering, and impermanent. These teachings would become influential in Tibet, especially among the proponents of the doctrine of "other emptiness" (GZHAN STONG). See also GUnAPĀRAMITĀ.

MaNjusrī. (T. 'Jam dpal; C. Wenshushili; J. Monjushiri; K. Munsusari 文殊師利). In Sanskrit, "Gentle Glory," also known as MANJUGHOsA, "Gentle Voice"; one of the two most important BODHISATTVAs in MAHĀYĀNA Buddhism (along with AVALOKITEsVARA). MaNjusrī seems to derive from a celestial musician (GANDHARVA) named PaNcasikha (Five Peaks), who dwelled on a five-peaked mountain (see WUTAISHAN), whence his toponym. MaNjusrī is the bodhisattva of wisdom and sometimes is said to be the embodiment of all the wisdom of all the buddhas. MaNjusrī, Avalokitesvara, and VAJRAPĀnI are together known as the "protectors of the three families" (TRIKULANĀTHA), representing wisdom, compassion, and power, respectively. Among his many epithets, the most common is KUMĀRABHuTA, "Ever Youthful." Among MaNjusrī's many forms, the most famous shows him seated in the lotus posture (PADMĀSANA), dressed in the raiments of a prince, his right hand holding a flaming sword above his head, his left hand holding the stem of a lotus that blossoms over his left shoulder, a volume of the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ atop the lotus. MaNjusrī plays a major role in many of the most renowned Mahāyāna sutras. MaNjusrī first comes to prominence in the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, which probably dates no later than the first century CE, where only MaNjusrī has the courage to visit and debate with the wise layman VIMALAKĪRTI and eventually becomes the interlocutor for Vimalakīrti's exposition of the dharma. In the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, only MaNjusrī understands that the Buddha is about to preach the "Lotus Sutra." In the AVATAMSAKASuTRA, it is MaNjusrī who sends SUDHANA out on his pilgrimage. In the Ajātasatrukaukṛtyavinodana, it is revealed that MaNjusrī inspired sĀKYAMUNI to set out on the bodhisattva path many eons ago, and that he had played this same role for all the buddhas of the past; indeed, the text tells us that MaNjusrī, in his guise as an ever-youthful prince, is the father of all the buddhas. He is equally important in tantric texts, including those in which his name figures in the title, such as the MANJUsRĪMuLAKALPA and the MANJUsRĪNĀMASAMGĪTI. The bull-headed deity YAMĀNTAKA is said to be the wrathful form of MaNjusrī. Buddhabhadra's early fifth-century translation of the AvataMsakasutra is the first text that seemed to connect MaNjusrī with Wutaishan (Five-Terrace Mountain) in China's Shaanxi province. Wutaishan became an important place of pilgrimage in East Asia beginning at least by the Northern Wei dynasty (424-532), and eventually drew monks in search of a vision of MaNjusrī from across the Asian continent, including Korea, Japan, India, and Tibet. The Svayambhupurāna of Nepal recounts that MaNjusrī came from China to worship the STuPA located in the middle of a great lake. So that humans would be able worship the stupa, he took his sword and cut a great gorge at the southern edge of the lake, draining the water and creating the Kathmandu Valley. As the bodhisattva of wisdom, MaNjusrī is propiated by those who wish to increase their knowledge and learning. It is considered efficacious to recite his mantra "oM arapacana dhīḥ" (see ARAPACANA); Arapacana is an alternate name for MaNjusrī.

melodrama ::: n. --> Formerly, a kind of drama having a musical accompaniment to intensify the effect of certain scenes. Now, a drama abounding in romantic sentiment and agonizing situations, with a musical accompaniment only in parts which are especially thrilling or pathetic. In opera, a passage in which the orchestra plays a somewhat descriptive accompaniment, while the actor speaks; as, the melodrama in the gravedigging scene of Beethoven&

Miller, Arthur: American dramatist and playwright (1915 -2005). He won the Pulitzer prize for drama. Many of his plays are about the American dream.

Model-View-Presenter "programming" (MVP) A {user interface} {architectural pattern} where functions are separated between the model, view and presenter. The model defines the data to be displayed or otherwise acted upon in the user interface. The view displays data from the model and routes user commands (events) to the presenter to act upon that data. The presenter retrieves data from the model and displays it in the view. The implementation of MVP can vary as to how much presentation logic is handled by the presenter and the view. In a {web application} most presentation logic is usually in the view which runs in the {web browser}. MVP is one of the {MV*} variations of the {MVC} pattern. (2014-11-27)

nagware "jargon" /nag'weir/ A term, originally from {Usenet}, for the variety of {shareware} that displays a message on start-up and/or termination reminding you to register, pay or donate (see {guiltware}). Sometimes user interaction is required to dismiss the nag in order to use the program, making it useless in {batch mode}. Nagware may also be {crippleware}, with a message nagging you pay to upgrade to the full or "pro" version. [{Jargon File}] (2015-01-17)

nagware ::: /nag'weir/ [Usenet] The variety of shareware that displays a large screen at the beginning or end reminding you to register, typically requiring some sort of keystroke to continue so that you can't use the software in batch mode. Compare crippleware.[Jargon File]

Nanhuasi. (南華寺). In Chinese, "Southern Florate Monastery"; located in present-day Guangdong province close to Nanhua Mountain and facing the Caoqi River. The monastery was built by an Indian monk in 502 CE during the Liang dynasty and was originally named Baolinsi (Bejeweled Forest Monastery). It went through several name changes until it was renamed Nanhuasi in 968 CE during the Song dynasty, and it has carried that name ever since. In 677 CE, during the Tang dynasty, HUINENG, the so-called sixth patriarch (LIUZU) of the CHAN school, is said to have come to Nanhuasi, where he founded the so-called "Southern school" (NAN ZONG) of Chan. From that point on, the monastery became an important center of the Chan school, and Huineng's remains are enshrined there, as are those of the Ming-dynasty Chan monk HANSHAN DEQING (1546-1623 CE). The monastery contains a stone slab that supposedly displays indentations left by Huineng's constant prostrations during his devotional services. The monastery is also famous for housing a bell named the Nanhua Bell, which weighs six tons and can be heard up to ten miles away.

nanocomputer "architecture" /nan'oh-k*m-pyoo'tr/ A computer with molecular-sized switching elements. Designs for mechanical nanocomputers which use single-molecule sliding rods for their logic have been proposed. The controller for a {nanobot} would be a nanocomputer. Some nanocomputers can also be called {quantum computers} because quantum physics plays a major role in calculations. {Richard P. Feynman} is still cited today for his work in this area. ["Feynman Lectures on Computation", Richard P. Feynman (Editor, Author), Robin W. Allen (Editor), Tony Hey (Author)] [{Jargon File}] (2008-01-14)

Neurotransmitter ::: A chemical found in animals that plays a role in our behavior, cognitions, and emotions.

Niraupamyastava. (T. Dpe med par bstod pa). In Sanskrit, "Hymn to the Peerless One"; one of the four hymns (CATUḤSTAVA) of NĀGĀRJUNA. The other three hymns are the LOKĀTĪTASTAVA, the ACINTYASTAVA, and the PARAMĀRTHASTAVA. All four hymns are preserved in Sanskrit and are cited by a wide range of Indian commentators, leaving little doubt about their authorship. The Niraupamyastava consists of twenty-four stanzas (plus a dedication of merit) in praise of the "Peerless One," i.e., the Buddha. The praise falls roughly into three categories: the first section is devoted to the qualities of the Buddha's mind, the second section is devoted to the qualities of the Buddha's body, and the concluding section explains the relationship between the Buddha's true body and the practice of the three vehicles (TRIYĀNA). Nāgārjuna explains that the Buddha has two bodies. The first is the DHARMAKĀYA, which is the Buddha's true body and which is not visible to the world. The second is his physical body (RuPAKĀYA), which is perfect, without orifices, flesh, blood, or bones and free from hunger, thirst, and any form of impurity. However, in order to conform to the ways of the world, the Buddha displays these physical aspects and engages in worldly activities with this body. With regard to the three vehicles, Nāgārjuna explains that because the DHARMADHĀTU is undifferentiated, there are not different vehicles; however, the Buddha teaches three vehicles in order to prompt beings to enter the path.

Nitrogen plays the part of a vehicle, so far as oxygen of the air is concerned, but plays an extremely important part in plant life. The elements on earth are compound, being several generations below their original parents; and the gross elements contain all the subtle elements, but differ from each other in that each contains one of the subtle elements in a predominant proportion. It is often the subtle element that is meant when the word nitrogen is used in The Secret Doctrine.

Non-Natural Properties: A notion which plays an important part in recent intuitionistic ethics. A non-natural property is one which is neither natural, as yellow and pleasantness are, nor metaphysical, as absoluteness and being commanded by God are. It is, then, a property which is apprehended, not by sensation or by introspection, but in some other way, and which is somehow non-descriptive, non-expository, or non-existential. It is also said sometimes, e.g. by G. E. Moore and W. D. Ross, to be a consequential property, i.e. a property which a thing has in virtue of its having another property, as when an experience is good in virtue of being pleasant. See Intuitionism. -- W.K.F.

Occipital Lobe ::: One of for lobes of the brain. Contains the visual cortex and therefore plays a major role in the interpretation of visual information.

Oedipus (Greek) Oidipous. Swollen-footed; Theban hero, son of Laius, named by the shepherd who found him with his feet swollen from the holes bored in them when he was exposed by his father, as it was predicted that he would kill his father and marry his mother — which he subsequently did. In many cosmogonies there are characters who slay their fathers or who are represented as both husband and son of the same goddess. This symbolism, being interpreted literally in Oedipus’ case, has made a fine story of horror for the tragedians. Oedipus is also famous for having solved the riddle of the Theban Sphinx. Oedipus’ romantic and tragic history formed the theme of three plays by Sophocles and by Aeschylus. The essential significance of the story is the inescapable consequences following upon karmic causes, from which there is no escape once these causes have been set in motion by man.

oratorio ::: n. --> A more or less dramatic text or poem, founded on some Scripture nerrative, or great divine event, elaborately set to music, in recitative, arias, grand choruses, etc., to be sung with an orchestral accompaniment, but without action, scenery, or costume, although the oratorio grew out of the Mysteries and the Miracle and Passion plays, which were acted.
Performance or rendering of such a composition.


organist ::: n. --> One who plays on the organ.
One of the priests who organized or sung in parts.


pageantries ::: grand displays; pomp.

P'algwanhoe. (八關會). In Korean, "Eight-Restrictions Festival," a Korean variant of the pan-Buddhistic BAGUAN ZHAI (eight-restrictions feast). The Korean form is a large winter festival of thanksgiving held over two days during full-moon day of the eleventh month, and has little to do with the baguan zhai's origins in the Buddhist UPOsADHA observance. The Korean version of this festival was sponsored by the royal court and would begin with the king and his ministers exchanging formal greetings, followed by a series of plays that depicted legends of the Silla dynasty. The festival also propitiated some of the important heavenly deities and autochthonous spirits of the mountains and rivers. Spirits of deceased heroes of the state were also commemorated, a practice that seems to stem from the origins of this festival in an earlier Silla ritual to appease the spirits of fallen warriors. This festival therefore combined various aspects of indigenous Korean cultural practice with an imported Buddhist ritual targeting the laity.

Pan: The Arcadian god of shepherds, hunters and rural residents, chief of the minor deities of the Greek pantheon. Represented as a horned, long-eared man with the lower half of the body and legs resembling those of a goat; he plays a pipe on which he can produce music of magic power which “can charm the very gods.”

parasaMbhogakāya. (C. ta shouyong shen; J. tajuyushin; K. t'a suyong sin 他受用身). In Sanskrit, "body intended for others' enjoyment"; one of the four types of buddha bodies (BUDDHAKĀYA) discussed in the BUDDHABHuMIsĀSTRA (C. Fodijing lun), the MAHĀYĀNASAMGRAHA (C. She dasheng lun), and the CHENG WEISHI LUN (S. *VijNaptimātratāsiddhi), along with the "self-nature body" (SVABHĀVAKĀYA), "body intended for personal enjoyment" (SVASAMBHOGAKĀYA), and "transformation body" (NIRMĀnAKĀYA). This fourfold schema of buddha bodies derives from the better-known three bodies of a buddha (TRIKĀYA)-viz., dharma body (DHARMAKĀYA), reward body (SAMBHOGAKĀYA), and transformation body (nirmānakāya)-but distinguishes between two different types of enjoyment bodies. The first, the svasaMbhogakāya, derives from the countless virtues that originate from the accumulation of immeasurable merit and wisdom over a buddha's infinitely long career; this body is a perfect, pure, eternal, and omnipresent material body that enjoys the bliss of dharma (DHARMAPRĪTI) for oneself until the end of time. By contrast, the parasaMbhogakāya is a subtle virtuous body deriving from the wisdom of equality (SAMATĀJNĀNA), which resides in a PURE LAND and displays supernatural powers in order to enhance the enjoyment of the dharma by bodhisattvas at all ten stages of the bodhisattva's career (BODHISATTVABHuMI).

passive matrix display "hardware" A type of {liquid crystal display} which relies on {persistence} to maintain the state of each display element ({pixel}) between refresh scans. The {resolution} of such displays is limited by the ratio between the time to set a pixel and the time it takes to fade. Contrast {active matrix display}. (1995-12-09)

passive matrix display ::: (hardware) A type of liquid crystal display which relies on persistence to maintain the state of each display element (pixel) between refresh scans. The resolution of such displays is limited by the ratio between the time to set a pixel and the time it takes to fade.Contrast active matrix display. (1995-12-09)

Pātikasutta. (C. Anouyi jing; J. Anuikyo; K. Anui kyong 阿夷經). In Pāli, "Discourse on the [Ascetic] Pātika[putta]," the twenty-fourth sutta of the DĪGHANIKĀYA (a separate DHARMAGUPTAKA recension appears as the fifteenth sutra in the Chinese translation of the DĪRGHĀGAMA); a discourse by the Buddha on the display of supernatural powers addressed to the mendicant Bhaggavagotta. The Buddha relates how his former disciple, Sunakkhatta, lost faith in the Buddha because the latter refused to display magical powers or speculate on such questions as the origin of the universe as other teachers of the time were wont to do. The Buddha explains that such displays of magic are trivial, and speculation on such matters does not lead to liberation. He does, however, relate the story of his defeat of the JAINA naked ascetic Pātikaputta, who challenges the Buddha to a miracle-working contest, but when the Buddha answers the challenge, he is unable to rise from his seat.

Performance report - A statement that displays measurements of actual results of some person or entity's activity over some time period.

phagocyte ::: n. --> A leucocyte which plays a part in retrogressive processes by taking up (eating), in the form of fine granules, the parts to be removed.

piper ::: n. --> See Pepper.
One who plays on a pipe, or the like, esp. on a bagpipe.
A common European gurnard (Trigla lyra), having a large head, with prominent nasal projection, and with large, sharp, opercular spines.
A sea urchin (Goniocidaris hystrix) having very long spines, native of both the American and European coasts.


player ::: n. --> One who plays, or amuses himself; one without serious aims; an idler; a trifler.
One who plays any game.
A dramatic actor.
One who plays on an instrument of music.
A gamester; a gambler.


playgoing ::: a. --> Frequenting playhouses; as, the playgoing public. ::: n. --> The practice of going to plays.

Playstation ::: (games, hardware) The leading family of games consoles, from Sony Corporation consisting of the original Playstation (PS1) and the Playstation 2 (PS2).The basic Playstations consist of a small box containing the processor and a DVD reader, with video outputs to connect to a TV, sockets for two game controllers, and a socket for one or two memory cards. The PS2 also has USB sockets.The PS2 can run PS1 software because the PS2's I/O processor is the same as the PS1's CPU. . .[Dates? Features?](2003-07-29)

Playstation "games, hardware" The leading family of {games consoles}, from {Sony Corporation} consisting of the original Playstation (PS1) and the Playstation 2 (PS2). The basic Playstations consist of a small box containing the processor and a {DVD} reader, with video outputs to connect to a TV, sockets for two game controllers, and a socket for one or two memory cards. The PS2 also has {USB} sockets. The PS2 can run PS1 software because the PS2's I/O processor is the same as the PS1's CPU. {(http://scea.sony.com/playstation/)}. {FAQ (http://flex.net/users/cjayc/vgfa/system/sony_psx.txt)}. [Dates? Features?] (2003-07-29)

playwright ::: n. --> A maker or adapter of plays.

playwright: Someone who writes or has written plays. See dramatist.

playwriter ::: n. --> A writer of plays; a dramatist; a playwright.

Pons ::: Part of the brain that plays a role in the regulation of states of arousal, including sleep and dreaming.

preluder ::: n. --> One who, or that which, preludes; one who plays a prelude.

Princeton University ::: (body, education) Chartered in 1746 as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was British North America's fourth college. First located in century. The College was officially renamed Princeton University in 1896; five years later in 1900 the Graduate School was established.Fully coeducational since 1969, Princeton now enrolls approximately 6,400 students (4,535 undergraduates and 1,866 graduate students). The ratio of full-time students to faculty members (in full-time equivalents) is eight to one.Today Princeton's main campus in Princeton Borough and Princeton Township consists of more than 5.5 million square feet of space in 160 buildings on 600 acres. The University's James Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro consists of one million square feet of space in four complexes on 340 acres.As Mercer County's largest private employer and one of the largest in the Mercer/Middlesex/Somerset County region, with approximately 4,830 permanent employees - including more than 1,000 faculty members - the University plays a major role in the educational, cultural, and economic life of the region. . (1994-01-19)

Princeton University "body, education" Chartered in 1746 as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was British North America's fourth college. First located in Elizabeth, then in Newark, the College moved to Princeton in 1756. The College was housed in Nassau Hall, newly built on land donated by Nathaniel and Rebeckah FitzRandolph. Nassau Hall contained the entire College for nearly half a century. The College was officially renamed Princeton University in 1896; five years later in 1900 the Graduate School was established. Fully coeducational since 1969, Princeton now enrolls approximately 6,400 students (4,535 undergraduates and 1,866 graduate students). The ratio of full-time students to faculty members (in full-time equivalents) is eight to one. Today Princeton's main campus in Princeton Borough and Princeton Township consists of more than 5.5 million square feet of space in 160 buildings on 600 acres. The University's James Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro consists of one million square feet of space in four complexes on 340 acres. As Mercer County's largest private employer and one of the largest in the Mercer/Middlesex/Somerset County region, with approximately 4,830 permanent employees - including more than 1,000 faculty members - the University plays a major role in the educational, cultural, and economic life of the region. {(http://princeton.edu/index.html)}. (1994-01-19)

PS1 {Sony Playstation}

PS2 {Sony Playstation}

punter ::: v. t. --> One who punts; specifically, one who plays against the banker or dealer, as in baccara and faro. ::: n. --> One who punts a football; also, one who propels a punt.

Random Access Memory Digital-to-Analog Converter "hardware" (RAMDAC) A combination of three fast {DACs} with a small {SRAM} used in graphics {display adapters} to store the {colour palette} and to generate the analog signals to drive a colour {monitor}. The logical colour number from the display memory is fed into the address inputs of the SRAM to select a palette entry to appear on the output of the SRAM. This entry is composed of three separate values corresponding to the three components (red, green, and blue) of the desired physical colour. Each component value is fed to a separate DAC, whose analog output goes to the monitor, and ultimately to one of its three {electron guns} (or equivalent in non-{CRT} displays). DAC word lengths range usually from 6 to 10 bits. The SRAM's wordlength is three times the DAC's word length. The SRAM acts as a {colour lookup table}. It usually has 256 entries (and thus an 8-bit address). If the DAC's word length is also 8 bits, we have a 256 x 24-bit SRAM which allows a selection of 256 out of 16777216 possible colours for the display. The contents of the SRAM can be changed while the display is not active (during {display blanking} times). The SRAM can usually be bypassed and the DACs can be fed directly by display data (for {true colour} modes). (1996-03-24)

Random Access Memory Digital-to-Analog Converter ::: (hardware) (RAMDAC) A combination of three fast DACs with a small SRAM used in graphics display adapters to store the colour palette and to generate whose analog output goes to the monitor, and ultimately to one of its three electron guns (or equivalent in non-CRT displays).DAC word lengths range usually from 6 to 10 bits. The SRAM's wordlength is three times the DAC's word length. The SRAM acts as a colour lookup table. It usually SRAM can usually be bypassed and the DACs can be fed directly by display data (for true colour modes). (1996-03-24)

ṛddhi. (P. iddhi; T. rdzu 'phrul; C. shenli; J. jinriki; K. sillyok 神力). In Sanskrit, "psychic powers," any number of supernatural powers regarded as a by-product of deep states of meditation (DHYĀNA). When listed as one of the six supranormal powers (ABHIJNĀ; see also ṚDDHIVIDHĀBHIJNĀ), these psychic powers include: (1) the ability to replicate one's body and, having done so, to make it one again; (2) the ability to pass through solid objects, such as walls and mountains, as if they were air; (3) the ability to walk on water as if it were solid earth; (4) the ability to fly through the air like a bird, even with one's legs crossed; and (5) the ability to touch the sun and the moon with one's hand. Such powers may be attained by any YOGIN, whether Buddhist or non-Buddhist, and are not in themselves an indicator of enlightenment. The Buddha is said to have generally dissuaded his monks from the display of such powers, although Buddhist texts are replete with accounts of such displays, including by the Buddha himself.

read-eval-print loop "language, LISP, programming" (REPL) A programming {structure} within {LISP} which repeatedly reads a {form} from the {user}, evaluates it, and displays the result. A read-eval-print {loop} forms the basis of the {Top-Level} {shell} that programmers of the LISP family of languages interact with. In many dialects of LISP a very simple REPL could be implemented as: (loop (print (eval (read)))). (2003-06-23)

read-eval-print loop ::: (language, LISP, programming) (REPL) A programming structure within LISP which repeatedly reads a form from the user, evaluates it, and displays the result.A read-eval-print loop forms the basis of the Top-Level shell that programmers of the LISP family of languages interact with.In many dialects of LISP a very simple REPL could be implemented as: (loop (print (eval (read)))). (2003-06-23)

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal ::: (humour) Back in the good old days - the Golden Era of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called Real Men and out that Real Men don't relate to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.)But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with TRASH-80s.There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings).LANGUAGESThe easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use Fortran. Quiche Eaters use need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a keypunch, a Fortran IV compiler, and a beer.Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran.Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran.Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran.Real Programmers do Artificial Intelligence programs in Fortran.If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in assembly language. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing.STRUCTURED PROGRAMMINGThe academics in computer science have gotten into the structured programming rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming:Real Programmers aren't afraid to use GOTOs.Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused.Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting.Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 nanoseconds in the middle of a tight loop.Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious.Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using assigned GOTOs.Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name.OPERATING SYSTEMSWhat kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M.Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right systems: they send jokes around the world on UUCP-net and write adventure games and research papers.No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte core dump without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.)OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken.PROGRAMMING TOOLSWhat kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer.One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies.In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse.Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - Emacs and VI being two. The the Real Programmer wants a you asked for it, you got it text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise.It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine.For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary object Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called job security.Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers:Fortran preprocessors like MORTRAN and RATFOR. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming.Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps.Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient.Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5].THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORKWhere does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real or sorting mailing lists for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!).Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers.Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions.It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies.Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles.Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter.The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances.As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language.The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs.THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAYGenerally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room:At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it.At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper.At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand.At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary.In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time.THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITATWhat sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done.The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are:Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office.Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush.Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages.Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969.Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine.Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions.Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.)The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general:No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night).Real Programmers don't wear neckties.Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes.Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9].A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire ASCII (or EBCDIC) code table.Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee.THE FUTUREWhat of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers?From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be.Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal "humour" Back in the good old days - the "Golden Era" of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called "Real Men" and "Quiche Eaters" in the literature). During this period, the Real Men were the ones that understood computer programming, and the Quiche Eaters were the ones that didn't. A real computer programmer said things like "DO 10 I=1,10" and "ABEND" (they actually talked in capital letters, you understand), and the rest of the world said things like "computers are too complicated for me" and "I can't relate to computers - they're so impersonal". (A previous work [1] points out that Real Men don't "relate" to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.) But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow Real Men out of the water playing Asteroids and Pac-Man, and anyone can buy and even understand their very own Personal Computer. The Real Programmer is in danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with {TRASH-80s}. There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is made clear, it will give these kids something to aspire to -- a role model, a Father Figure. It will also help explain to the employers of Real Programmers why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings). LANGUAGES The easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use {Fortran}. Quiche Eaters use {Pascal}. Nicklaus Wirth, the designer of Pascal, gave a talk once at which he was asked how to pronounce his name. He replied, "You can either call me by name, pronouncing it 'Veert', or call me by value, 'Worth'." One can tell immediately from this comment that Nicklaus Wirth is a Quiche Eater. The only parameter passing mechanism endorsed by Real Programmers is call-by-value-return, as implemented in the {IBM 370} {Fortran-G} and H compilers. Real programmers don't need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a {keypunch}, a {Fortran IV} {compiler}, and a beer. Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran. Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran. Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran. Real Programmers do {Artificial Intelligence} programs in Fortran. If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in {assembly language}. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing. STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING The academics in computer science have gotten into the "structured programming" rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily understood if the programmer uses some special language constructs and techniques. They don't all agree on exactly which constructs, of course, and the examples they use to show their particular point of view invariably fit on a single page of some obscure journal or another - clearly not enough of an example to convince anyone. When I got out of school, I thought I was the best programmer in the world. I could write an unbeatable tic-tac-toe program, use five different computer languages, and create 1000-line programs that WORKED. (Really!) Then I got out into the Real World. My first task in the Real World was to read and understand a 200,000-line Fortran program, then speed it up by a factor of two. Any Real Programmer will tell you that all the Structured Coding in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming: Real Programmers aren't afraid to use {GOTOs}. Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused. Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting. Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 {nanoseconds} in the middle of a tight loop. Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious. Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using {assigned GOTOs}. Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Wirth (the above-mentioned Quiche Eater) actually wrote an entire book [2] contending that you could write a program based on data structures, instead of the other way around. As all Real Programmers know, the only useful data structure is the Array. Strings, lists, structures, sets - these are all special cases of arrays and can be treated that way just as easily without messing up your programing language with all sorts of complications. The worst thing about fancy data types is that you have to declare them, and Real Programming Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name. OPERATING SYSTEMS What kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M. Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right down to it, Unix is a glorified video game. People don't do Serious Work on Unix systems: they send jokes around the world on {UUCP}-net and write adventure games and research papers. No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great programmer can write JCL without referring to the manual at all. A truly outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte {core dump} without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.) OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is encouraged. The best way to approach the system is through a keypunch. Some people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken. PROGRAMMING TOOLS What kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back in the days when computers had front panels, this was actually done occasionally. Your typical Real Programmer knew the entire bootstrap loader by memory in hex, and toggled it in whenever it got destroyed by his program. (Back then, memory was memory - it didn't go away when the power went off. Today, memory either forgets things when you don't want it to, or remembers things long after they're better forgotten.) Legend has it that {Seymore Cray}, inventor of the Cray I supercomputer and most of Control Data's computers, actually toggled the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer. One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had crashed in the middle of saving some important work. Jim was able to repair the damage over the phone, getting the user to toggle in disk I/O instructions at the front panel, repairing system tables in hex, reading register contents back over the phone. The moral of this story: while a Real Programmer usually includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies. In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a single keypunch. The Real Programmer in this situation has to do his work with a "text editor" program. Most systems supply several text editors to select from, and the Real Programmer must be careful to pick one that reflects his personal style. Many people believe that the best text editors in the world were written at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center for use on their Alto and Dorado computers [3]. Unfortunately, no Real Programmer would ever use a computer whose operating system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse. Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - {Emacs} and {VI} being two. The problem with these editors is that Real Programmers consider "what you see is what you get" to be just as bad a concept in Text Editors as it is in women. No the Real Programmer wants a "you asked for it, you got it" text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise. It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining games to play with TECO is to type your name in as a command line and try to guess what it does. Just about any possible typing error while talking with TECO will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine. For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary {object code} directly, using a wonderful program called SUPERZAP (or its equivalent on non-IBM machines). This works so well that many working programs on IBM systems bear no relation to the original Fortran code. In many cases, the original source code is no longer available. When it comes time to fix a program like this, no manager would even think of sending anything less than a Real Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called "job security". Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers: Fortran preprocessors like {MORTRAN} and {RATFOR}. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming. Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps. Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient. Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5]. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORK Where does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real Programmer would be caught dead writing accounts-receivable programs in {COBOL}, or sorting {mailing lists} for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!). Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers. Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions. It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies. Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles. Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft by heart. With a combination of large ground-based Fortran programs and small spacecraft-based assembly language programs, they are able to do incredible feats of navigation and improvisation - hitting ten-kilometer wide windows at Saturn after six years in space, repairing or bypassing damaged sensor platforms, radios, and batteries. Allegedly, one Real Programmer managed to tuck a pattern-matching program into a few hundred bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter. The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances. As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, however, a black cloud has formed on the Real Programmer horizon. It seems that some highly placed Quiche Eaters at the Defense Department decided that all Defense programs should be written in some grand unified language called "ADA" ((C), DoD). For a while, it seemed that ADA was destined to become a language that went against all the precepts of Real Programming - a language with structure, a language with data types, {strong typing}, and semicolons. In short, a language designed to cripple the creativity of the typical Real Programmer. Fortunately, the language adopted by DoD has enough interesting features to make it approachable -- it's incredibly complex, includes methods for messing with the operating system and rearranging memory, and Edsgar Dijkstra doesn't like it [6]. (Dijkstra, as I'm sure you know, was the author of "GoTos Considered Harmful" - a landmark work in programming methodology, applauded by Pascal programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language. The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing there's enough money in it. There are several Real Programmers building video games at Atari, for example. (But not playing them - a Real Programmer knows how to beat the machine every time: no challenge in that.) Everyone working at LucasFilm is a Real Programmer. (It would be crazy to turn down the money of fifty million Star Trek fans.) The proportion of Real Programmers in Computer Graphics is somewhat lower than the norm, mostly because nobody has found a use for computer graphics yet. On the other hand, all computer graphics is done in Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAY Generally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be doing for fun anyway (although he is careful not to express this opinion out loud). Occasionally, the Real Programmer does step out of the office for a breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room: At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it. At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper. At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand. At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying "Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary." In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time. THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITAT What sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done. The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are: Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office. Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush. Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages. Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969. Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine. Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions. Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.) The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time doesn't bother the Real Programmer - it gives him a chance to catch a little sleep between compiles. If there is not enough schedule pressure on the Real Programmer, he tends to make things more challenging by working on some small but interesting part of the problem for the first nine weeks, then finishing the rest in the last week, in two or three 50-hour marathons. This not only impresses the hell out of his manager, who was despairing of ever getting the project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general: No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night). Real Programmers don't wear neckties. Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes. Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9]. A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire {ASCII} (or EBCDIC) code table. Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee. THE FUTURE What of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same outlook on life as their elders. Many of them have never seen a computer with a front panel. Hardly anyone graduating from school these days can do hex arithmetic without a calculator. College graduates these days are soft - protected from the realities of programming by source level debuggers, text editors that count parentheses, and "user friendly" operating systems. Worst of all, some of these alleged "computer scientists" manage to get degrees without ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers? From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, despite all the efforts of Pascal programmers the world over. Even more subtle tricks, like adding structured coding constructs to Fortran have failed. Oh sure, some computer vendors have come out with Fortran 77 compilers, but every one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be. Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real Programmer - two different and subtly incompatible user interfaces, an arcane and complicated teletype driver, virtual memory. If you ignore the fact that it's "structured", even 'C' programming can be appreciated by the Real Programmer: after all, there's no type checking, variable names are seven (ten? eight?) characters long, and the added bonus of the Pointer data type is thrown in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

  “Referred to as an enigmatical personage by modern writers. Frederic II., King of Prussia, used to say of him that he was a man whom no one had ever been able to make out. Many are his ‘biographies,’ and each is wilder than the other. By some he was regarded as an incarnate god, by others as a clever Alsatian Jew. One thing is certain, Count de St. Germain — whatever his real patronymic may have been — had a right to his name and title, for he had bought a property called San Germano, in the Italian Tyrol, and paid the Pope for the title. He was uncommonly handsome, and his enormous erudition and linguistic capacities are undeniable, for he spoke English, Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Russian, Swedish, Danish, and many Slavonian and Oriental languages, with equal facility with a native. He was extremely wealthy, never received a sou from anyone — in fact never accepted a glass of water or broke bread with anyone — but made most extravagant presents of superb jewellery to all his friends, even to the royal families of Europe. His proficiency in music was marvellous; he played on every instrument, the violin being his favourite. ‘St. Germain rivalled Paganinni himself,’ was said of him by an octogenarian Belgian in 1835, after hearing the ‘Genoese maestro.’ ‘It is St. Germain resurrected who plays the violin in the body of an Italian Skeleton,’ exclaimed a Lithuanian baron who had heard both.

Renaissance: (Lat. re + nasci, to be born) Is a term used by historians to characterize various periods of intellectual revival, and especially that which took place in Italy and Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries. The term was coined by Michelet and developed into a historical concept by J. Burckhardt (1860) who considered individualism, the revival of classical antiquity, the "discovery" of the world and of man as the main characters of that period as opposed to the Middle Ages. The meaning, the temporal limits, and even the usefulness of the concept have been disputed ever since. For the emphasis placed by various historians on the different fields of culture and on the contribution of different countries must lead to different interpretations of the whole period, and attempts to express a complicated historical phenomenon in a simple, abstract definition are apt to fail. Historians are now inclined to admit a very considerable continuity between the "Renaissance" and the Middle Ages. Yet a sweeping rejection of the whole concept is excluded, for it expresses the view of the writers of the period itself, who considered their century a revival of ancient civilization after a penod of decay. While Burckhardt had paid no attention to philosophy, others began to speak of a "philosophy of the renaissance," regarding thought of those centuries not as an accidental accompaniment of renaissance culture, but as its characteristic philosophical manifestation. As yet this view has served as a fruitful guiding principle rather than as a verified hypothesis. Renaissance thought can be defined in a negative way as the period of transition from the medieval, theological to the modern, scientific interpretation of reality. It also displays a few common features, such as an emphasis on man and on his place in the universe, the rejection of certain medieval standards and methods of science, the increased influence of some newly discovered ancient sources, and a new style and literary form in the presentation of philosophical ideas. More obvious are the differences between the various schools and traditions which cannot easily be brought to a common denominator Humimsm, Platonism, Aristotelianism, scepticism and natural philosophy, to which may be added the group of the founders of modern science (Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo). -- P.O.K.

rl Kent Wittenburg "kentw@bellcore.com". The RL files contain code for defining {relational grammars} and using them in a bottom-up parser to recognise and/or parse expressions in Relational Languages. The approach is a simplification of that described in Wittenburg, Weitzman, and Talley (1991), Unification-Based Grammars and Tabular Parsing for Graphical Languages, Journal of Visual Languages and Computing 2:347-370. This code is designed to support the definition and parsing of Relational Languages, which are characterised as sets of objects standing in user-defined relations. Correctness and completeness is independent of the order in which the input is given to the parser. Data to be {parsed} can be in many forms as long as an interface is supported for queries and predicates for the relations used in grammar productions. To date, this software has been used to parse recursive pen-based input such as math expressions and {flow charts}; to check for {data integrity} and design conformance in databases; to automatically generate constraints in drag-and-drop style graphical interfaces; and to generate graphical displays by parsing relational data and generating output code. requires: Common Lisp ports: Allegro Common Lisp 4.1, Macintosh Common Lisp 2.0 {(ftp://flash.bellcore.com/rl/)}. (1992-10-31)

SahāMpati. (P. Sahampati; T. Mi mjed kyi bdag po; C. Suopo shijie zhu; J. Shabasekaishu; K. Saba segye chu 娑婆世界主). In Sanskrit, "Lord of the Sahā World," the epithet of a BRAHMĀ deity. The first concentration (DHYĀNA) of the realm of subtle materiality (RuPADHĀTU; see RuPĀVACARADHYĀNA) has three levels, called BRAHMAKĀYIKA, BRAHMAPUROHITA, and MAHĀBRAHMĀ. The most senior of the deities of this third and highest level within the first concentration is called Brahmā SahāMpati. He plays a crucial role in the inception of the Buddhist teaching (sĀSANA). After his enlightenment, the newly enlightened Buddha is said to have wondered whether there was anyone in this world who would be able to understand his teaching. Brahmā SahāMpati then appeared to him and implored him to teach, convincing him that there were persons "with little dust in their eyes" who would be able to understand his teachings. According to BUDDHAGHOSA, the Buddha had every intention to teach but feigned reluctance in order that Brahmā SahāMpati would make the request, knowing that if the most powerful divinity in the SAHĀLOKA implored the Buddha to teach, those who honored Brahmā would heed the Buddha's teachings. Brahmā SahāMpati also assured the Buddha that in their last lifetimes, none of the buddhas of the past had had a teacher other than the DHARMA they discovered themselves. According to some accounts, he is divinity not of the mahābrahmā realm but rather of the sUDDHĀVĀSA.

sambhala. (T. bde 'byung). Often spelled Shambhala. In the texts associated with the KĀLACAKRATANTRA, the kingdom of sambhala is said to be located north of the Himālayan range. It is a land devoted to the practice of the Kālacakratantra, which the Buddha himself had entrusted to sambhala's king SUCANDRA, who had requested that the Buddha set forth the tantra. The kingdom of sambhala is shaped like a giant lotus and is filled with sandalwood forests and lotus lakes, all encircled by a massive range of snowy peaks. In the center of the kingdom is the capital, Kalapa, where the luster of the palaces, made from gold, silver, and jewels, outshines the moon; the walls of the palaces are plated with mirrors that reflect a light so bright that night is like day. In the very center of the city is the MAndALA of the buddha Kālacakra. The inhabitants of the 960 million villages of sambhala are ruled by a beneficent king, called the Kalkin. The laypeople are all beautiful and wealthy, free of sickness and poverty; the monks maintain their precepts without the slightest infraction. They are naturally intelligent and virtuous, devoted to the practice of the VAJRAYĀNA, although all authentic forms of Indian Buddhism are preserved. The majority of those reborn there attain buddhahood during their lifetime in sambhala. The Kālacakratantra also predicts an apocalyptic war. In the year 2425 CE, the barbarians (generally identified as Muslims) and demons who have destroyed Buddhism in India will set out to invade sambhala. The twenty-fifth Kalkin, Raudracakrin, will lead his armies out of his kingdom and into India, where they will meet the forces of evil in a great battle, from which the forces of Buddhism will emerge victorious. The victory will usher in a golden age in which human life span will increase, crops will grow without being cultivated, and the entire population of the earth will devote itself to the practice of Buddhism. Given the importance of the Kālacakratantra in Tibetan Buddhism, sambhala figures heavily in Tibetan Buddhist belief and practice; in the DGE LUGS sect, it is said that the PAn CHEN LAMAs are reborn as kings of sambhala. There is also a genre of guidebooks (lam yig) that provide the route to sambhala. The location of sambhala has long been a subject of fascination in the West. sambhala plays an important role in the Theosophy of HELENA PETROVNA BLAVATSKY, and the Russian Theosophist Nicholas Roerich led two expeditions in search of sambhala. The name sambhala is considered the likely inspiration of "Shangri-La," described in James Hilton's 1933 novel Lost Horizon.

sāriputra. (P. Sāriputta; T. Shā ri bu; C. Shelifu; J. Sharihotsu; K. Saribul 舍利弗). In Sanskrit, "Son of sārī"; the first of two chief disciples of the Buddha, along with MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA. sāriputra's father was a wealthy brāhmana named Tisya (and sāriputra is sometimes called Upatisya, after his father) and his mother was named sārī or sārikā, because she had eyes like a sārika bird. sārī was the most intelligent woman in MAGADHA; she is also known as sāradvatī, so sāriputra is sometimes referred to as sāradvatīputra. sāriputra was born in Nālaka near RĀJAGṚHA. He had three younger brothers and three sisters, all of whom would eventually join the SAMGHA and become ARHATs. sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana were friends from childhood. Once, while attending a performance, both became overwhelmed with a sense of the vanity of all impermanent things and resolved to renounce the world together. They first became disciples of the agnostic SANJAYA VAIRĀtĪPUTRA, although they later took their leave of him and wandered through India in search of the truth. Finding no solution, they parted company, promising one another that whichever one should succeed in finding the truth would inform the other. It was then that sāriputra met the Buddha's disciple, AsVAJIT, one of the Buddha's first five disciples (PANCAVARGIKA) and already an arhat. sāriputra was impressed with Asvajit's countenance and demeanor and asked whether he was a master or a disciple. When he replied that he was a disciple, sāriputra asked him what his teacher taught. Asvajit said that he was new to the teachings and could only provide a summary, but then uttered one of the most famous statements in the history of Buddhism, "Of those phenomena produced through causes, the TATHĀGATA has proclaimed their causes (HETU) and also their cessation (NIRODHA). Thus has spoken the great renunciant." (See YE DHARMĀ s.v.). Hearing these words, sāriputra immediately became a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA) and asked where he could find this teacher. In keeping with their earlier compact, he repeated the stanza to his friend Mahāmaudgalyāyana, who also immediately became a streamenterer. The two friends resolved to take ordination as disciples of the Buddha and, together with five hundred disciples of their former teacher SaNjaya, proceeded to the VEnUVANAVIHĀRA, where the Buddha was in residence. The Buddha ordained the entire group with the EHIBHIKsUKĀ ("Come, monks") formula, whereupon all except sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana became arhats. Mahāmaudgalyāyana was to attain arhatship seven days after his ordination, while sāriputra reached the goal after a fortnight upon hearing the Buddha preach the Vedanāpariggahasutta (the Sanskrit recension is entitled the Dīrghanakhaparivrājakaparipṛcchā). The Buddha declared sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana his chief disciples the day they were ordained, giving as his reason the fact that both had exerted themselves in religious practice for countless previous lives. sāriputra was declared chief among the Buddha's disciples in wisdom, while Mahāmaudgalyāyana was chief in mastery of supranormal powers (ṚDDHI). sāriputra was recognized as second only to the Buddha in his knowledge of the dharma. The Buddha praised sāriputra as an able teacher, calling him his dharmasenāpati, "dharma general" and often assigned topics for him to preach. Two of his most famous discourses were the DASUTTARASUTTA and the SAnGĪTISUTTA, which the Buddha asked him to preach on his behalf. Sāriputra was meticulous in his observance of the VINAYA, and was quick both to admonish monks in need of guidance and to praise them for their accomplishments. He was sought out by others to explicate points of doctrine and it was he who is said to have revealed the ABHIDHARMA to the human world after the Buddha taught it to his mother, who had been reborn in the TRĀYASTRIMsA heaven; when the Buddha returned to earth each day to collect alms, he would repeat to sāriputra what he had taught to the divinities in heaven. sāriputra died several months before the Buddha. Realizing that he had only seven days to live, he resolved to return to his native village and convert his mother; with this accomplished, he passed away. His body was cremated and his relics were eventually enshrined in a STuPA at NĀLANDĀ. sāriputra appears in many JĀTAKA stories as a companion of the Buddha, sometimes in human form, sometimes in animal form, and sometimes with one of them a human and the other an animal. sāriputra also plays a major role in the MAHĀYĀNA sutras, where he is a common interlocutor of the Buddha and of the chief BODHISATTVAs. Sometimes he is portrayed as a dignified arhat, elsewhere he is made the fool, as in the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA when a goddess turns him into a woman, much to his dismay. In either case, the point is that the wisest of the Buddha's arhat disciples, the master of the abhidharma, does not know the sublime teachings of the Mahāyāna and must have them explained to him. The implication is that the teachings of the Mahāyāna sutras are therefore more profound than anything found in the canons of the MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS. In the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀHṚDAYA ("Heart Sutra"), it is sāriputra who asks AVALOKITEsVARA how to practice the perfection of wisdom, and even then he must be empowered to ask the question by the Buddha. In the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, it is sāriputra's question that prompts the Buddha to set forth the parable of the burning house. The Buddha predicts that in the future, sāriputra will become the buddha Padmaprabha.

screen ::: 1. (hardware) A generic term for a display device that shows text and/or images on a roughly flat rectangular surface. The most common type is usually displays have, since around 2000, become increasingly competitive in price and performance.(2005-07-28)2. A screen multiplexer utility which lets you run multiple interactive terminal sessions (and curses programs) through a single terminal connection (on one virtual console, one terminal, through one modem link, telnet session or xterm).Screen can detach processes from one terminal and attach them to another. Auto-detach lets you continue working after being disconnected and reconnected. It supports keyboard driven cut and paste from any text and/or curses application (like Lynx) to any other (like xemacs).Screen comes with many Linux distributions and is available (free) on many other Unix platforms.(2005-07-29)

screen 1. "hardware" A generic term for a {display device} that shows text and/or images on a roughly flat rectangular surface. The most common type is usually refered to as a "{monitor}" and is based on a {cathode-ray tube}, though {flat panel} displays have, since around 2000, become increasingly competitive in price and performance. (2005-07-28) 2. A {screen multiplexer} utility which lets you run multiple {interactive} {terminal sessions} (and {curses} programs) through a single terminal connection (on one {virtual console}, one terminal, through one {modem} link, {telnet} session or {xterm}). Screen can detach processes from one terminal and attach them to another. "Auto-detach" lets you continue working after being disconnected and reconnected. It supports keyboard driven cut and paste from any text and/or curses application (like {Lynx}) to any other (like {xemacs}). Screen comes with many {Linux} distributions and is available (free) on many other {Unix} {platforms}. (2005-07-29)

screen saver ::: (tool) A program which displays either a completely black image or a constantly changing image on a computer monitor to prevent a stationary image automatically after the computer has had no user input for a preset time. Some screen savers come with many different modules, each giving a different effect.Approximately pre-1990, many cathode ray tubes, in TVs, computer monitors or elsewhere, were prone to burn-in; that is, if the same pattern (e.g., the phosphor on the screen would fatigue and that part of the screen would seem greyed out, even when the CRT was off.Eventually CRTs were developed which were resistant to burn-in (and which sometimes went into sleep mode after a period of inactivity); but in the Atari 2600s) would, when not being played, change the screen every few seconds, to avoid burn-in; and computer screen saver programs were developed.The first screen savers were simple screen blankers - they just set the screen to all black, but, in the best case of creeping featurism ever recorded, these almost-black screen) were added. Later, more complex effects appeared, including animations (often with sound effects!) of arbitrary length and complexity.Along the way, avoiding repetitive patterns and burn-in was completely forgotten and screen savers such as Pointcast were developed, which make no claim to save your monitor, but are simply bloated browsers for push media which self-start after the machine has been inactive for a few minutes. (1997-11-23)

screen saver "tool" A program which displays either a completely black image or a constantly changing image on a computer monitor to prevent a stationary image from "burning" into the phosphor of the screen. Screen savers usually start automatically after the computer has had no user input for a preset time. Some screen savers come with many different modules, each giving a different effect. Approximately pre-1990, many {cathode ray tubes}, in TVs, computer {monitors} or elsewhere, were prone to "burn-in"; that is, if the same pattern (e.g., the {WordPerfect} status line; the {Pong} score readout; or a TV channel-number display) were shown at the same position on the screen for very long periods of time, the phosphor on the screen would "fatigue" and that part of the screen would seem greyed out, even when the CRT was off. Eventually CRTs were developed which were resistant to burn-in (and which sometimes went into {sleep} mode after a period of inactivity); but in the meantime, solutions were developed: home video game systems of the era (e.g., Atari 2600s) would, when not being played, change the screen every few seconds, to avoid burn-in; and computer screen saver programs were developed. The first screen savers were simple screen blankers - they just set the screen to all black, but, in the best case of {creeping featurism} ever recorded, these tiny (often under 1K long) programs grew without regard to efficiency or even basic usefulness. At first, small, innocuous {display hacks} (generally on an almost-black screen) were added. Later, more complex effects appeared, including {animations} (often with sound effects!) of arbitrary length and complexity. Along the way, avoiding repetitive patterns and burn-in was completely forgotten and "screen savers" such as {Pointcast} were developed, which make no claim to save your monitor, but are simply bloated {browsers} for {push media} which self-start after the machine has been inactive for a few minutes. (1997-11-23)

sensational ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to sensation; as, sensational nerves.
Of or pertaining to sensationalism, or the doctrine that sensation is the sole origin of knowledge.
Suited or intended to excite temporarily great interest or emotion; melodramatic; emotional; as, sensational plays or novels; sensational preaching; sensational journalism; a sensational report.


serial port ::: (hardware, communications) (Or com port) A connector on a computer to which you can attach a serial line connected to peripherals which communicate serial port is usually connected to an integrated circuit called a UART which handles the conversion between serial and parallel data.In the days before bit-mapped displays, and today on multi-user systems, the serial port was used to connect one or more terminals (teletypewriters or VDUs), via their serial ports, possibly via modems, can communicate using a protocol such as UUCP or CU or SLIP. (1995-01-12)

serial port "hardware, communications" (Or "com port") A connector on a computer to which you can attach a {serial line} connected to peripherals which communicate using a serial (bit-stream) {protocol}. The most common type of serial port is a 25-pin D-type connector carrying {EIA-232} signals. Smaller connectors (e.g. 9-pin {D-type}) carrying a subset of EIA-232 are often used on {personal computers}. The serial port is usually connected to an {integrated circuit} called a {UART} which handles the conversion between serial and parallel data. In the days before bit-mapped displays, and today on {multi-user} systems, the serial port was used to connect one or more terminals ({teletypewriters} or {VDUs}), printers, {modems} and other serial peripherals. Two computers connected together via their serial ports, possibly via {modems}, can communicate using a {protocol} such as {UUCP} or {CU} or {SLIP}. (1995-01-12)

shifter ::: n. --> One who, or that which, shifts; one who plays tricks or practices artifice; a cozener.
An assistant to the ship&


simple multicast protocol "communications, protocol" A proposed {mulitcast} {protocol} that would ease the requirements for {IP} Multicast, such as no longer mandating that routers be able to calculate the source of a multicast stream. This has not been adopted by the {IETF}. {(http://infoworld.com/cgi-bin/displayStory.pl?981125.whmulti.htm)}. [Reference?] (2001-07-02)

smoke and mirrors Marketing deceptions. The term is mainstream in this general sense. Among hackers it's strongly associated with bogus demos and crocked {benchmarks} (see also {MIPS}, {machoflops}). "They claim their new box cranks 50 MIPS for under $5000, but didn't specify the instruction mix - sounds like smoke and mirrors to me." The phrase has been said to derive from carnie slang for magic acts and "freak show" displays that depend on "trompe l"oeil' effects, but also calls to mind the fierce Aztec god Tezcatlipoca (lit. "Smoking Mirror") for whom the hearts of huge numbers of human sacrificial victims were regularly cut out. Upon hearing about a rigged demo or yet another round of fantasy-based marketing promises, hackers often feel analogously disheartened.

. s.n.a (lilamaya Krishna) ::: Kr.s.n.a as the lilamaya isvara / purus.a, "the eternal Child frolicing in the Universe, the Playmate,Lover, Master, Teacher and Friend of all His creations", he "who draws all of us to him by his love, compels all of us by his masteries and plays his eternal play of joy and strength and beauty in the manifold world". lil lilamaya amaya N Narayana

Sojiji. (總持寺). In Japanese, "DHĀRAnĪ Monastery"; one of the two main monasteries of the SoToSHu of ZEN Buddhism, located in Tsurumi, Yokohama. This monastery was originally established on the Noto peninsula (present-day Ishikawa prefecture) in 740 as Morookadera by the monk GYoGI (668-749), who also founded ToDAIJI. In 1321, KEIZAN JoKIN (1268-1325), the founding patriarch of the Soto Zen institution, came into possession of this local monastery, which he renamed Sojiji. In 1322, Sojiji were sanctioned as an official monastery by Emperor Godaigo (r. 1318-1339), an event that is traditionally considered to mark the official establishment of Soto as an independent Zen institution in Japan. Keizan later entrusted Sojiji to his disciple Gasan Joseki (1276-1366). Sojiji was an important government-sponsored monastery during the Muromachi and Edo periods and its status rivaled that of the other main Soto monastery, EIHEIJI; in its heyday, the monastery is said to have had more than seventy buildings within its precincts. After burning to the ground in 1898, the monastery was rebuilt in Yokohama in 1911, because Soto Zen leaders calculated that a location near Tokyo would have strategic value for the growth of the sect. Sojiji is entered through a gigantic copper-roofed gate (sanmon) that was built in 1969. The butsuden, or main buddha hall, was completed in 1915 and enshrines a statue of sĀKYAMUNI with his disciples MAHĀKĀsYAPA and ĀNANDA. There is a founders' hall (taisodo) for Keizan Jokin that displays statues of the major historical figures of the Soto Zen tradition and that also doubles as a lecture hall; in addition, there is a large SAMGHA hall (daisodo) for ordaining and training monks, which displays a statue of the BODHISATTVA MANJUsRĪ. Other buildings at the monastery include additional living quarters for the monks, a hall for Emperor Godaigo, and a homotsukan, or treasure house, full of important cultural properties held at the monastery, including a hanging tapestry from the Edo period that originally served as a cover for the chair of senior monks delivering sermons, and several precious buddha images.

soloist ::: n. --> One who sings or plays a solo.

somatosensory cortex : a part of the brain responsible for processing stimulation coming from the skin, body wall, muscles, bones, tendons and joints. It plays a part in determining pain intensity.

Sony Playstation ::: Playstation

Sony Playstation {Playstation}

source-level debugger "programming, tool" A {debugger} that shows the programmer the line or {expression} in the {source code} that resulted in a particular {machine code} instruction of a running program loaded in memory. This helps the programmer to analyse a program's behaviour in the high-level terms like source-level {flow control} constructs, {procedure} calls, named {variables}, etc instead of {machine instructions} and memory locations. Source-level debugging also makes it possible to step through execution a line at a time and set source-level {breakpoints}. In order to support source-level debugging, the program must be compiled with this option enabled so that extra information is included in the executable code to identify the corresponding positions in the source code. A {symbolic debugger} is one level lower - it displays symbols (procedure and variable names) stored in the executable but not individual source code lines. {GDB} is a widely used example of a source-level debugger. (2007-04-03)

sport ::: n. --> That which diverts, and makes mirth; pastime; amusement.
Mock; mockery; contemptuous mirth; derision.
That with which one plays, or which is driven about in play; a toy; a plaything; an object of mockery.
Play; idle jingle.
Diversion of the field, as fowling, hunting, fishing, racing, games, and the like, esp. when money is staked.
A plant or an animal, or part of a plant or animal, which


Sthāvarā. (T. Sa'i lha mo; C. Anzhu dishen; J. Anjujijin; K. Anju chisin 安住地神). In Sanskrit, "Immovable," the goddess of the earth, also known as PṚTHIVĪ. She plays an important role in the story of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha's enlightenment. After MĀRA and his armies were unable to unseat the BODHISATTVA, Māra challenged his right to occupy the space beneath the BODHI TREE, claiming that he, Māra, had a greater right since, as a god, he had greater merit; his army boisterously attested to Māra's claim. The bodhisattva responded that his merit was greater because he had practiced the ten perfections (PĀRAMITĀ) for many lifetimes. When Māra asked who would attest to the Bodhisattva's claim, he touched the earth with his right hand in the famous "earth-touching gesture" (BHuMISPARsAMUDRĀ), calling on the goddess of the earth to attest to the truth of his statement. She responded by causing a tremor; in some versions, she emerges from the earth to bear witness. In the GAndAVYuHA (the final chapter of the AVATAMSAKASuTRA), the bodhisattva SUDHANA sets out in search of a teacher, encountering fifty-two beings (twenty of whom are female), including the Buddha's mother MAHĀMĀYĀ, the future buddha MAITREYA, as well as AVALOKITEsVARA and MANJUsRĪ. The thirtieth being he encounters is Sthāvarā, whom he meets at BODHGAYĀ. She also bears witness to his practice of virtue and predicts that he will achieve buddhahood. See also THORANI.

sticky bit "operating system" The {bit} in the mode of a {Unix} file which, if set for an executable, tells the {kernel} to keep the code loaded in {swap space} even after it has finished executing on the assumption that it is likely to be used again soon. This performance optimisation was included in some early (and recent?) versions of {Unix} to save reloading frequently used programs such as the {shell} or {vi} from disk. If the sticky bit is set on a directory, an unprivileged user may not delete or rename files of other users in that directory even if he has write access to the directory. The Unix "ls" command displays a set sticky bit as a "t" in the permissions of a file or directory. (1997-02-26)

sticky bit ::: (operating system) The bit in the mode of a Unix file which, if set for an executable, tells the kernel to keep the code loaded in swap space even after versions of Unix to save reloading frequently used programs such as the shell or vi from disk.If the sticky bit is set on a directory, an unprivileged user may not delete or rename files of other users in that directory even if he has write access to the directory.The Unix ls command displays a set sticky bit as a t in the permissions of a file or directory. (1997-02-26)

streaming "communications" Playing {sound} or {video} in {real time} as it is downloaded over the {Internet} as opposed to storing it in a local file first. A {plug-in} to a {web browser} such as {Netscape Navigator} decompresses and plays the data as it is transferred to your computer over the {web}. Streaming audio or video avoids the delay entailed in downloading an entire file and then playing it with a {helper application}. Streaming requires a fast connection and a computer powerful enough to execute the decompression {algorithm} in {real time}. (1996-11-06)

Subhuti. (T. Rab 'byor; C. Xuputi; J. Shubodai; K. Subori 須菩提). Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of an eminent ARHAT who was foremost among the Buddha's disciples in dwelling at peace in remote places and in worthiness to receive gifts. He was the younger brother of ANĀTHAPIndADA and took ordination on the day the JETAVANA grove was dedicated, when he heard the Buddha preach. He mastered the ubhatovibhanga, the two collections comprising the VINAYAPItAKA, after which he retired to the forest to practice meditation. He attained arhatship on the basis of maitrīdhyāna (P. mettājhāna), meditative absorption cultivated through contemplation of loving-kindness (MAITRĪ). On his alms-rounds, Subhuti would cultivate loving-kindness at the door of every house where he stopped, thus expanding the amount of merit accrued by his donor. Subhuti taught the dharma without distinction or limitation, for which reason the Buddha singled him out for praise. Subhuti was widely revered for his holiness and was sought out as a recipient of gifts. King BIMBISĀRA once promised to build a cave dwelling for him in RĀJAGṚHA but later forgot. Without a dwelling place, Subhuti sat in the open air to practice meditation. Over time, this caused a drought in the region, for the clouds would not rain lest this disturb the saint's meditations. When Bimbisāra became aware of this issue, he built a grass hut for him, and as soon as Subhuti sat inside it, the clouds poured down rain. During the time of Padmottara Buddha, Subhuti had been a famous hermit named Nanda with forty thousand disciples. Once when the Buddha was visiting his hermitage, he directed one of his monks proficient in loving-kindness and foremost in worthiness to receive gifts to preach to his host. Upon hearing the sermon, all forty thousand disciples of Nanda became arhats, while Nanda, enthralled by the charisma of the preaching monk, resolved one day to earn the same distinction. Subhuti also plays a prominent role in a number of MAHĀYĀNA sutras. The most famous of these roles is as the Buddha's chief interlocutor in PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ sutras like the VAJRACCHEDIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀSuTRA. In the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, Subhuti is one the four sRĀVAKAs who understands the parable of the burning house; later his buddhahood is prophesied by the Buddha. In the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, Subhuti is one of the arhats who is reluctant to visit Vimalakīrti. Among the Buddha's ten major disciples, he is said to have been foremost in the knowledge of insubstantiality.

Such symbols as the cross, the svastika, and the serpent may serve as talismans, for a true symbol is more than a mere arbitrary sign and actually plays its part in the evocation of certain influences — but only when intense faith is conjoined in the production of magical effects. Talismans are utterly useless and foolish unless intense faith operates because all such talismanic emblems depend for their efficacy upon the faith of the possessor of them. When a person believes beyond any shadow of doubt and is thoroughly worked up in such conviction, his will power through such faith when concentrated upon a talisman or similar object can actually bring about the functioning of a potent creative power. This is the root of all genuinely magical operations; but the true magician has no need for such exoteric paraphernalia or adventitious aids. He produces his effects through the sole power of his will combined with his wide knowledge of nature and natural laws.

sum 1. "theory" In {domain theory}, the sum A + B of two {domains} contains all elements of both domains, modified to indicate which part of the union they come from, plus a new {bottom} element. There are two constructor functions associated with the sum: inA : A -" A+B   inB : B -" A+B inA(a) = (0,a)    inB(b) = (1,b) and a disassembly operation: case d of {isA(x) -" E1; isB(x) -" E2} This can be generalised to arbitrary numbers of domains. See also {smash sum}, {disjoint union}. 2. "tool" A {Unix} utility to calculate a 16-bit {checksum} of the data in a file. It also displays the size of the file, either in {kilobytes} or in 512-byte blocks. The checksum may differ on machines with 16-bit and 32-bit ints. {Unix manual page}: sum(1). (1995-03-16)

sum ::: 1. (theory) In domain theory, the sum A + B of two domains contains all elements of both domains, modified to indicate which part of the union they come from, plus a new bottom element. There are two constructor functions associated with the sum: inA : A -> A+B inB : B -> A+BinA(a) = (0,a) inB(b) = (1,b) and a disassembly operation: case d of {isA(x) -> E1; isB(x) -> E2} This can be generalised to arbitrary numbers of domains.See also smash sum, disjoint union.2. (tool) A Unix utility to calculate a 16-bit checksum of the data in a file. It also displays the size of the file, either in kilobytes or in 512-byte blocks. The checksum may differ on machines with 16-bit and 32-bit ints.Unix manual page: sum(1). (1995-03-16)

superior colliculus ::: Laminated structure that forms part of the roof of the midbrain; plays an important role in orienting movements of the head and eyes.

Sushumna (Sanskrit) Suṣumṇā, Suṣumnā [probably from su excellent, excellence, excelling + sumna musical hymn, happiness, joy] Perfect harmony; one of the three channels forming the spinal column of the body. These three channels are the main avenues not only for the psychovital economy of the body, but for spiritual and intellectual currents between the head and the body. In occultism the spinal column plays many physiological roles, but is especially threefold in its functions. The central channel or nadi, the sushumna-nadi, is the especial carrier of the “solar ray,” which comprises not merely physiological forces and attributes, but the spiritual and intellectual qualities and powers. The two other channels are the ida and pingala; exoteric Hindu works vary in regard to the positions of these, some place the pingala on the left and the ida on the right, and others the reverse. The sushumna connects the heart with the brahmarandhra and plays an important part in yoga practices.

suspense: A sentiment that is often created within plays and stories to engage the reader. Suspense is the eagerness to know what will happen.

SuvikrāntavikrāmiparipṛcchāprajNāpāramitā. (T. Rab kyi rtsal gyis rnam par gnon pas shus pa shes rab kyi pha rol tu phyin pa; C. Shengtian wang bore boluomi jing; J. Shotenno hannya haramikkyo; K. Sŭngch'on wang panya paramil kyong 勝天王般若波羅蜜經). In Sanskrit, the "Perfection of Wisdom Requested by Suvikrāntavikrāmin." A PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ ("perfection of wisdom") sutra in seven chapters, it is closely related to the first two chapters of the AstASĀHASRIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ in its themes, and displays a great familiarity with the various categories of the ABHIDHARMA, more so than other prajNāpāramitā sutras. In the fourth chapter, it uses twelve similes for dharmas and the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ, including a reflection, a mirage, an echo, the pith of a banana tree, and a bubble (cf. LIUYU, AstAMĀYOPĀMA). The PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ is described as inaccessible and unestablished (aparinispannā) but pure and infinite. In the fifth chapter, sĀRIPUTRA asks SUBHuTI to explain the dharma but Subhuti replies that there is nothing to explain.

svasaMbhogakāya. (C. zi shouyong shen; J. jijuyushin; K. cha suyong sin 自受用身). In Sanskrit, "body intended for personal enjoyment," in contrast to the PARASAMBHOGAKĀYA, "body intended for others' enjoyment"; one of the four types of buddha bodies (BUDDHAKĀYA) discussed in the BUDDHABHuMIsĀSTRA (Fodijing lun), the MAHĀYĀNASAMGRAHA (She dasheng lun), and the CHENG WEISHI LUN (*VijNaptimātratāsiddhisāstra), along with the "self-nature body" (SVABHĀVAKĀYA or svābhāvikakāya), the "body intended for others' enjoyment" (parasaMbhogakāya), and the "transformation body" (NIRMĀnAKĀYA). This fourfold schema of buddha bodies derives from the better-known three bodies of a buddha (TRIKĀYA)-viz., dharma body (DHARMAKĀYA), reward body (SAMBHOGAKĀYA), and transformation body (nirmānakāya)-but distinguishes between these two different types of reward bodies. The svasaMbhogakāya derives from the countless virtues that originate from the accumulation of immeasurable merit and wisdom over a buddha's infinitely-long career; this body is a perfect, pure, eternal and omnipresent material body that enjoys the bliss of dharma (DHARMAPRĪTI) for oneself until the end of time. By contrast, the parasaMbhogakāya is a subtle virtuous body deriving from the cognition of equality (SAMATĀJNĀNA), which resides in a PURE LAND and displays supernatural powers in order to enhance the enjoyment of the dharma by bodhisattvas at all ten stages of the bodhisattva's career (BODHISATTVABHuMI).

Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) ::: Part of the Autonomic Nervous System responsible for the fight or flight phenomenon and which plays a role (along with the Parasympathetic Nervous System) in maintaining the body&

taborer ::: n. --> One who plays on the tabor.

Tehmi: “The Latin word persona means a mask; therefore the dramatis persona at the beginning of plays were the masks which the actors would wear.

Temporal Lobe ::: One of the four lobes of the brain. Contains the auditory cortex and therefore plays a role in receptive language as well as memory and emotion.

The astral light also plays an enormous part in most dreams. We may witness scenes which cannot have formed part of our waking experience, and evidently in this case are seeing pictures in the astral light which we correctly or erroneously connect with our own personality. Again, with prophetic dreams our vision, untrammeled by physical senses, perceives in the astral light the image of what will later happen on the physical plane, and we may occasionally carry a recollection of what has been seen into the waking state.

Theatre of the Absurd: Popular in the 1940s-1960s refers to plays and drama which deal with absurdist notions. These plays generally consider human existence to be without point as the world is devoid of meaning. Famous playwrights in this genre of the Absurd include Pinter, Stoppard and Beckett.

The Mendelian principle of heredity and the combining of the genes in the germ-cells have been found so important in determining variations that the old “natural selection of chance variations” plays a far smaller part in thought concerning evolution than formerly. But the old question still stands: what brings about the combination of genes, or other outward mechanism, that results in the building of the ladder of life from the lowest known to the highest known manifestations of consciousness? Many modern biologists are looking upon evolution as the interaction of life and environment; but life is far more than the physicochemical properties of the genes, the supposed units of heredity. Natural selection, then, is inadequate to yield the results demanded of it; and it still remains to show how any evolution, any response or adaptation to environment, can take place without a pre-formed plan or an innate vital urge within the organism.

theorbist ::: n. --> One who plays on a theorbo.

There is an intuWon of Time which is not of the mind and when it plays is always accurate to the very minute and if need be to the very second.

The requirement of effectiveness plays an important role in connection with logistic systems, but the necessity of the requirement depends on the purpose in hand and it may for some purposes be abandoned. Various writers have proposed non-effective, or non-constructive, logistic systems; in some of these the requirement of finiteness of length of formulas is also abandoned and certain infinite sequences of primitive symbols are admitted as formulas.

The temple then is the shrine of the divine presence, and as such plays a predominant role in all cults, appearing as a Holy of Holies, a tabernacle, etc., and with many elaborations and accessories, such as special chambers, images, sacred vessels, and the like. The word becomes equivalent to all those signifying the receptive side of universal nature, such as moon, ark, and womb. The object of making inner understanding and inner vision seem more real to the mere man, by constructing edifices consecrated to divine worship and designed to draw down divine presences, is one that can readily be understood, and which may be either an assistance or a drawback according to whether the spirit of the worshiper is less or more materialistic.

thick film dielectric electroluminescence "hardware" (TDEL) A phenomenon used in some {flat panel} displays. (2007-06-04)

TMRC /tmerk'/ The Tech Model Railroad Club at {MIT}, one of the wellsprings of {hacker} culture. The 1959 "Dictionary of the TMRC Language" compiled by Peter Samson included several terms that became basics of the hackish vocabulary (see especially {foo}, {mung}, and {frob}). By 1962, TMRC's legendary layout was already a marvel of complexity (and has grown in the thirty years since; all the features described here are still present). The control system alone featured about 1200 relays. There were {scram switch}es located at numerous places around the room that could be thwacked if something undesirable was about to occur, such as a train going full-bore at an obstruction. Another feature of the system was a digital clock on the dispatch board, which was itself something of a wonder in those bygone days before cheap LEDS and seven-segment displays. When someone hit a scram switch the clock stopped and the display was replaced with the word "FOO"; at TMRC the scram switches are therefore called "foo switches". Steven Levy, in his book "Hackers", gives a stimulating account of those early years. TMRC's Power and Signals group included most of the early {PDP-1} hackers and the people who later bacame the core of the {MIT} {AI Lab} staff. This dictionary accordingly includes a number of entries from the TMRC dictionary (via the Hacker Jargon File). [{Jargon File}] (2008-06-30)

Todaiji. (東大寺). In Japanese, "Great Monastery of the East"; a major monastery in the ancient Japanese capital of Nara affiliated with the Kegon (HUAYAN) school of Buddhism, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The monastery was founded by the Hossoshu (FAXIANG ZONG) monk GYoGI (668-749). The monastery is renowned for its colossal buddha image of VAIROCANA (J. Birushana nyorai), which is commonly known as the NARA DAIBUTSU; at forty-eight feet (fifteen meters) high, this image is the largest extant gilt-bronze image in the world and the Daibutsuden where the image is enshrined is the world's largest wooden building. The Indian monk BODHISENA (J. Bodaisenna) (704-760), who traveled to Japan in 736 at the invitation of Emperor Shomu (r. 724-749), performed the "opening the eyes" (KAIYAN; NETRAPRATIstHĀPANA) ceremony for the 752 dedication of the great buddha image. Todaiji was founded on the site of Konshusenji by order of Emperor Shomu and became the headquarters of a network of provincial monasteries and convents in the Yamato region. The first abbot, Ryoben (689-773), is commemorated in the kaisando (founder's hall; see KAISHAN). Other halls include the inner sanctuary of the hokkedo (lotus hall), which was probably once Konshusenji's main hall. The hall enshrines the Fukukensaku Kannon, a dry lacquer statue of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA, which dates from 746. The monastery was renamed Konkomyoji in 741 and, in 747 when major construction began on the large compound, it finally became known as Todaiji, the name it retains today. The Todaiji complex was completed in 798; monastery records state that 50,000 carpenters, 370,000 metal workers, and 2.18 million laborers worked on the compound, its buildings, and their furnishings, almost bankrupting the country. Entering the monastery through the Great Gate to the South (Nandaimon), itself a Japanese national treasure, a visitor would have passed through two seven-storied, 328-foot high pagodas to the east and west (both subsequently destroyed by earthquakes), before passing through the Inner Gate to the Daibutsuden. North of the Daibutsuden, which is flanked by a belfry and a SuTRA repository, is the kodo (lecture hall), which is surrounded on three sides by the monk's quarters. An ordination hall displays exceptional clay-modeled shitenno (four heavenly kings; see LOKAPĀLA) dating from the Tenpyo Era (729-749). Of the eighth-century buildings, only the tegaimon (the western gate) and the Hokkedo's inner sanctuary have survived. After a conflagration in 1180, then-abbot Chogen (1121-1206) spearheaded a major reconstruction in a style he had seen in Southern Song-dynasty China. This style is exemplified by the south gate, which is protected by two humane-kings statues, both twenty-eight feet in height, carved in 1203. The Tokugawa Shogunate sponsored a second reconstruction after another fire in 1567 and the current Daibutsuden dates from about 1709. The Shosoin repository at the monastery, itself a Japanese national treasure (kokuho), contains over nine thousand precious ornamental and fine-art objects that date from the monastery's founding in the eighth century, including scores of objects imported into Japan via the SILK ROAD from all over Asia, including cut-glass bowls and silk brocade from Persia, Byzantine cups, Egyptians chests, and Indian harps, as well as Chinese Tang and Korean Silla musical instruments, etc. Every spring, the two-week long Omizutori (water-drawing) festival is conducted at Todaiji, which is thought to cure physical ailments and cleanse moral transgressions.

TomeRaider "application, file format" A {cross-platform} reference and {e-book reader} program and file format. TomeRaider files are highly compressed and cross-referenced. The reader displays the text and can follow the {hypertext links} embedded in the text. {TomeRaider Home (http://www.tomeraider.com/)}. (2008-02-15)

tooter ::: n. --> One who toots; one who plays upon a pipe or horn.

tragedienne ::: n. --> A woman who plays in tragedy.

Trailokyavijaya. (T. Khams gsum rnam rgyal; C. Xiangsanshi mingwang; J. Gozanze myoo; K. Hangsamse myongwang 降三世明王). In Sanskrit, "Victor of the Three Realms"; a wrathful deity, he is considered a wrathful form of VAJRAPĀnI. He is depicted in Indian Buddhist iconography and plays an important role in the SARVATATHĀGATATATTVASAMGRAHA. It is in the form of Trailokyavijaya that Vajrapāni conquers Mahesvara (the Hindu god siva). It was often the case that Buddhists gave Hindu deities Buddhist forms, especially in the tantras. In this case, Trailokyavijaya may have his antecedent in the Hindu god Tripurāntaka, "Destroyer of the Three [Demon] Cities," a form of siva whose worship was still current at the time the SarvatathāgatatattvasaMgraha was being formulated. Iconographic similarities as well as the Buddhist Trailokyavijaya's subjugation of the rival tradition's Mahesvara support the connection; a Hindu deity is appropriated by Buddhists, with the appropriated form then subduing the Hindu god. The cult of Trailokyavijaya entered China with the translations of the SarvatathāgatatattvasaMgraha, the MAHĀVAIROCANĀBHISAMBODHISuTRA, and several other texts translated by AMOGHAVAJRA in the second half of the eighth century, whence they quickly entered Japan. He is described as being terrible to behold, with four heads and eight arms, although in the GARBHADHĀTU MAndALA, he has a single face with three eyes and two arms. He stands on prone figures of siva and Umā, whom he has thus subdued. His worship was largely replaced by that of HERUKA in the CAKRASAMVARATANTRA cycles, who performs the same function in the taming of Mahesvara.

Trúc Lam. (竹林). In Vietnamese, "Bamboo Grove"; the first indigenous Vietnamese school of THIỀN (C. CHAN), founded by TRẦN NHN TÔNG (1258-1308), the third king of the Trần dynasty (1225-1400). During the Trần period, Chan learning became established with the arrival of Chinese monks and Chan literature. Due to its literary bent (see WENZI CHAN), Chan was embraced by the Trần aristocratic circle, many of whom received instructions from Chan masters. Some Trần kings themselves would later in their lives be ordained and devote themselves to the practice of Chan. From the few extant writings of its three patriarchs, it is clear that Trúc Lam Chan displays a conscious effort to emulate Chinese patriarchal Chan. There were also typical motifs that appear in Chinese Chan literature, including the use of dialogues (see WENDA) as an instructional tool, transmission directly from teacher to disciple, the construction of lineages, the teacher leaving behind instructional verses for his disciples, the teacher bequeathing his robe and begging bowl to his principal student as a mark of succession, the teacher publicly conferring precepts on both monks and laypeople, and so forth. The school died out after the death of its third patriarch Huyền Quang (1254-1334). Although the Trúc Lam school was short-lived, it marked the first serious effort to establish a Buddhist community in medieval Vietnam, functioning essentially as a form of high-culture Buddhism for aristocrats. There were efforts among some Buddhist monks in the Later Le (1428-1788) and Nguyẽn (1802-1945) dynasties to connect themselves to Trúc Lam Chan.

tumbler ::: n. --> One who tumbles; one who plays tricks by various motions of the body; an acrobat.
A movable obstruction in a lock, consisting of a lever, latch, wheel, slide, or the like, which must be adjusted to a particular position by a key or other means before the bolt can be thrown in locking or unlocking.
A piece attached to, or forming part of, the hammer of a gunlock, upon which the mainspring acts and in which are the notches


Upadhi(Sanskrit) ::: A word which is used in various senses in Indian philosophy, the vocable itself meaning"limitation" or "a peculiarity" and hence "a disguise"; and from this last meaning arises the expression"vehicle," which it often bears in modern theosophical philosophy. The gist of the word signifies "thatwhich stands forth following a model or pattern," as a canvas, so to say, upon which the light from aprojecting lantern plays. An upadhi therefore, mystically speaking, is like a play of shadow and form,when compared with the ultimate reality, which is the cause of this play of shadow and form. Man maybe considered as a being composed of three (or even four) essential upadhis or bases.

Upadhi (Sanskrit) Upādhi Limitation, peculiarity, disguise, vehicle; in theosophy, “ ‘that which stands forth following a model or pattern,’ as a canvas, so to say, upon which the light from a projecting lantern plays. An ‘upadhi’ therefore, mystically speaking, is like a play of shadow and form, when compared with the ultimate Reality, which is the cause of this play of shadow and form. Man may be considered as being composed of three (or even four) essential upadhis or bases” (OG 178).

Usanas-Sukra (Sanskrit) Uśanas-śukra [from uśanas Venus + śukra bright, resplendent] Venus-Lucifer, Venus as the light-bringer, referring not so much to physical light as to the light of intellect and inner vision. The guardian spirit, with reference to the solar system, of earth and of mankind; for what the buddhi-manas is in the human constitution when compared with the kama-manas, that same role, mutatis mutandis on the cosmic scale, the regent of Venus plays in the solar system, wherein by comparison the earth is the vehicle for kama-manas. Also commonly called in Hindu mythology Kavi or Kavya, signifying poet and the feeling that the true poet is intellectually intuitional with reference to “feeling” or “seeing” some, at least, of the mysteries of nature.

Vach-sata-rupa (Sanskrit) Vāc-śata-rūpā The goddess in a hundred forms, or Vach as the immanent feminine aspect of divinity in the innumerable phases and forms of nature. Vach as Sata-rupa is the divine creative activity unfolded into the ten planes and their many subplanes of the universe. Each of these has its own keynotes and subordinate keynote. The union of Svayambhuva-Manu with Vach-sata-rupa, his own daughter (here representing the first manifestation of prakriti), is explained cosmically as the symbol of the root-life, the germ from which spring all the solar systems, worlds, and gods, because here Svaymbhuva-Manu is the cosmic manu; on the smaller scale, he with his consort plays the same role in the planetary chains of the solar system, and on a still smaller scale on any globe thereof.

Vajrayoginī. (T. Rdo rje rnal 'byor ma). The most important of the dĀKInĪ in the VAJRAYĀNA, associated especially with the "mother tantras" (MĀTṚTANTRA) of the ANUTTARAYOGA class. She is also the most important of the female YI DAM. Her visualization is central to many tantric SĀDHANAs, especially in the practice of GURUYOGA, in which the meditator imagines himself or herself in the form of Vajrayoginī in order to receive the blessings of the GURU. She is also visualized in GCOD and GTUM MO practice. Her worship seems to originate with the CAKRASAMVARATANTRA and is popular in all sects of Tibetan Buddhism. Vajrayoginī plays a special role in the "six yogas of NĀROPA" (NĀ RO CHOS DRUG), where she is known as Nā ro mkha' spyod ma (Kachoma). She is closely associated with VAJRAVĀRĀHĪ, the consort of CAKRASAMVARA. In her most common form, she stands in the ĀLĪdHA posture, holding a KAtVĀnGA and a skull cup.

Via Straminis (Latin) The way of straw, the wispy way; the Milky Way, the name evidently referring to the wisps of light with which the Milky Way is strewn, as straw was often used to strew the roads in ancient times. The ancient Syrians in their system of describing the stages of nature, called the spiritual regents within and behind the Milky Way their First Principle. Theosophy regards the Milky Way as not only the origin of all manifested solar systems but likewise as the repository of these solar systems when they finish their evolutionary course and return to the invisible background of the galaxy for their long pralayic rest. Yet this is but a minor part that the Milky Way plays in the cosmic economy, for that pathway of the gods, as many ancient mystics called it, contains some of the deepest mysteries that the human mind in its endless research for truth and knowledge has unfolded. The Romans used two other expressions to denote the Milky Way: the circulus lacteus (milky circle) and via lactis (milky way).

Vishnu (Sanskrit) Viṣṇu [from the verbal root viṣ to enter, pervade] The sustainer or preserver; the second of the three gods of the Hindu Trimurti or Triad. Brahma, Siva, and Vishnu together are infinite space, of which the gods, rishis, manus, and all in the universe are simply the manifestations, qualities, and potencies. Vishnu is called the eternal deity, and in the Mahabharata and the Puranas he is declared to be the imbodiment of sattva-guna, the quality of mercy and goodness, which displays itself as the preserving power in the self-existent, all-pervading spirit. His symbol is the chakra (circle). He is identical with the Hindu Idaspati (master of the waters) and with the Greek Poseidon and Latin Neptune.

Visual Display Unit ::: (hardware) (VDU, or video terminal, video display terminal, VDT, display terminal) A device incorporating a cathode ray tube (CRT) display, a electronics which store the received data and convert it into electrical waveforms to drive the CRT.VDUs fall into two categories: dumb terminals and intelligent terminals (sometimes called programmable terminals).Early VDUs could only display characters in a single preset font, and these were confined to being layed out in a rectangular grid, reproducing the functionality of the paper-based teletypes they were designed to replace.Later models added graphics facilities but were still driven via serial communications, typically with several VDUs attached to a single multi-user computer. This contrasts with the much faster single bitmap displays integrated into most modern single-user personal computers and workstations.The term Display Screen Equipment (DSE) is used almost exclusively in connection with the health and safety issues concerning VDUs. .(2002-11-09)

Visual Display Unit "hardware" (VDU, or "video terminal", "video display terminal", VDT, "display terminal") A device incorporating a {cathode ray tube} (CRT) display, a keyboard and a {serial port}. A VDU usually also includes its own display electronics which store the received data and convert it into electrical waveforms to drive the CRT. VDUs fall into two categories: {dumb terminals} and {intelligent terminals} (sometimes called "programmable terminals"). Early VDUs could only display characters in a single preset {font}, and these were confined to being layed out in a rectangular grid, reproducing the functionality of the paper-based {teletypes} they were designed to replace. Later models added graphics facilities but were still driven via serial communications, typically with several VDUs attached to a single multi-user computer. This contrasts with the much faster single {bitmap displays} integrated into most modern single-user {personal computers} and {workstations}. The term "Display Screen Equipment" (DSE) is used almost exclusively in connection with the health and safety issues concerning VDUs. {Working with VDUs - UK Heath and Safety Executive (http://hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg36.pdf)}. (2002-11-09)

wearer ("s) ::: a person who wears or carries or displays something as a body covering or accessory. Also fig.

whiffler ::: n. --> One who whiffles, or frequently changes his opinion or course; one who uses shifts and evasions in argument; hence, a trifler.
One who plays on a whiffle; a fifer or piper.
An officer who went before procession to clear the way by blowing a horn, or otherwise; hence, any person who marched at the head of a procession; a harbinger.
The golden-eye.


Windows CE "operating system" /C E/ A version of the {Microsoft Windows} {operating system} that is being used in a variety of {embedded} products, from {handheld} PCs to specialised industrial {controllers} and consumer electronic devices. Programming for Windows CE is similar to programming for other {Win32} {platforms}. Windows CE was developed to be a customisable operating system for embedded {applications}. Its {kernel} borrows much from other Microsoft {32-bit} operating systems, while eliminating (or replacing) those operating system features that are not needed for typical Windows CE-based applications. For example, as on {Windows NT}, all applications running on Windows CE run in a fully {preemptive multitasking} environment, in fully {protected memory} spaces. The {Win32} (API) for Windows CE is smaller than the Win32 API for the other 32-bit Windows operating systems. It includes approximately half the interface methods of the Windows NT version of the API. But the Win32 API for Windows CE also includes features found in no other Microsoft operating system. The notification API, for example, makes it possible to handle user or application notification events (such as timer events) at the operating-system level, rather than in a running application. The {touch screen} API and the built-in support for the Windows CE {database} are not found in other Windows operating systems. The touch screen API makes it easy to manage screen calibration and user interactions for {touch-sensitive displays}, while the database API provides access to a data storage facility. {(http://channels.microsoft.com/windowsce/developer/default.htm)}. {(http://channels.microsoft.com/windowsce/developer/technical/default.htm)}. (1997-12-20)

Windows CE ::: (operating system) /C E/ A version of the Microsoft Windows operating system that is being used in a variety of embedded products, from handheld PCs to specialised industrial controllers and consumer electronic devices. Programming for Windows CE is similar to programming for other Win32 platforms.Windows CE was developed to be a customisable operating system for embedded applications. Its kernel borrows much from other Microsoft 32-bit operating Windows NT, all applications running on Windows CE run in a fully preemptive multitasking environment, in fully protected memory spaces.The Win32 (API) for Windows CE is smaller than the Win32 API for the other 32-bit Windows operating systems. It includes approximately half the interface interactions for touch-sensitive displays, while the database API provides access to a data storage facility. . . (1997-12-20)

World-Wide Web "web, networking, hypertext" (WWW, W3, the web) A {client-server} {hypertext} distributed information retrieval system, often referred to as "The Internet" though strictly speaking, the Internet is the network and the web is just one use of the network (others being {e-mail}, {DNS}, {SSH}). Basically, the web consists of documents or {web pages} in {HTML} format (a kind of {hypertext}), each of which has a unique {URL} or "web address". {Links} in a page are URLs of other pages which may be part of the same {website} or a page on another site on a different {web server} anywhere on the {Internet}. As well as HTML pages, a URL may refer to an image, some code ({JavaScript} or {Java}), {CSS}, a {video} stream or other kinds of object. URLs typically start with "http://", indicating that the page needs to be fetched using the {HTTP} {protocol} or or "https://" for the {HTTPS} protocol which {encrypts} the request and the resulting page for security. The URL "scheme" (the bit before the ":") indicates the protocol to use. These include {FTP}, the original protocol for transferring files over the Internet. {RTSP} is a {streaming protocol} that allow a continuous feed of {audio} or {video} from the server to the browser. {Gopher} was a predecessor of HTTP and {Telnet} starts an {interactive} {command-line} session with a remote server. The web is accessed using a {client} program known as a {web browser} that runs on the user's computer. The browser fetches and displays pages and allows the user to follow {links} by clicking on them (or similar action) and to input queries to the server. A variety of browsers are freely available, e.g. {Google Chrome}, {Microsoft} {Internet Explorer}, {Apple} {Safari} and {Mozilla} {Firefox}. Early browsers included {NCSA} {Mosaic} and {Netscape} {Navigator}. Queries can be entered into "forms" which allow the user to enter arbitrary text and select options from customisable menus and other controls. The server processes each request - either a simple URL or data from a form - and returns a response, typically a page of HTML. The World-Wide Web originated from the {CERN} High-Energy Physics laboratories in Geneva, Switzerland. In the early 1990s, the developers at CERN spread word of the Web's capabilities to scientific and academic audiences worldwide. By September 1993, the share of Web traffic traversing the {NSFNET} {Internet} {backbone} reached 75 {gigabytes} per month or one percent. By July 1994 it was one {terabyte} per month. The {World Wide Web Consortium} is the main standards body for the web. Following the widespread availability of web browsers and servers from about 1995, organisations started using the same software and protocols on their own private internal {TCP/IP} networks giving rise to the term "{intranet}". {This dictionary} is accessible via the Web at {(http://foldoc.org/)}. {An article by John December (http://sunsite.unc.edu/cmc/mag/1994/oct/webip.html)}. {W3 servers, clients and tools (http://w3.org/Status.html)}. (2017-11-01)

Wraith, Wraie The fleeting apparition of a person, about the moment of death, to another person in kinship or psychomagnetic sympathy. Though wraith may cover different cases, in general it is due to the mayavi-rupa of the person who is dying. It is produced by his thought, though he is unaware of the effect he is producing. An intense and anxious thought about the person he wishes to see becomes objective to the seer, and the apparition wears the aspect and commonly the ordinary clothing of the dying person. In some cases the apparition may not be due to any thought on the part of the dying person, but to abnormal sensitiveness or clairvoyance on the part of the seer. Being in close sympathy with the dying one, he bears the image of that one in his latent memory; and when the event occurs, his higher senses, being aware of it, cause the objectivization of this memory as a visual apparition. The thought itself is objective to a mind capable of perception on that plane; but to become objective to the physical senses, it must clothe itself in matter of a lower grade; and this objectivization may vary from a picture in the mind’s eye to an apparition seen by the physical vision. In any case the organism of the seer can provide the necessary vehicle for such an objectivization. Distance plays no part in the phenomenon, and there is no projection of a physically substantial body through space from one place to another. The above case should be distinguished from an appearance of the astral double seen near the graves of the recently deceased. See also EIDOLON; PHANTOM; SPECTER

Xcoral ::: A multiwindow mouse-based text editor, for the X Window System with a built-in browser to navigate through C functions and C++ classes hierarchies. Xcoral bindings. Xcoral is a direct Xlib client and runs on colour or monochrome X displays. . (1993-03-14)

Xcoral A multiwindow mouse-based text editor, for the {X Window System} with a built-in browser to navigate through {C} functions and {C++} {class}es hierarchies. Xcoral provides variables width {fonts}, menus, {scrollbars}, {buttons}, search, regions, kill-buffers and 3D look. Commands are accessible from menus or standard key bindings. Xcoral is a direct {Xlib} {client} and runs on colour or monochrome X displays. {Version 1.72 (ftp://ftp.inria.fr/X/contrib/clients/xcoral*)}. (1993-03-14)

ye dharmā. In Sanskrit, lit. "those phenomena..."; the opening words of perhaps the most famous synopsis of the teachings of Buddhism; the full declaration in Sanskrit is "ye dharmā hetuprabhavā hetuM tesāM tathāgato hy avadat tesāM ca yo nirodha, evaM vādī mahāsramanaḥ": "Of those phenomena produced through causes, the TATHĀGATA has proclaimed their causes (HETU) and also their cessation (NIRODHA). Thus has spoken the great renunciant (sRAMAnA)." This statement plays a central role in the story of sĀRIPUTRA's conversion. sāriputra, who was a disciple of the agnostic teacher SANJAYA VAIRĀtĪPUTRA, encountered one of the Buddha's five original disciples (PANCAVARGIKA), AsVAJIT. Noticing Asvajit's serene countenance, sāriputra asked him who his teacher might be, to which Asvajit replied that his teacher was the Buddha. When sāriputra asked what it was that the Buddha taught, Asvajit demurred, explaining that he had only recently renounced the life of a householder and was unable to present the teaching in full. sāriputra asked Asvajit to give him the gist of the Buddha's teaching. Asvajit replied with this famous ye dharmā line. Immediately upon hearing these words, sāriputra is said to have gained the rank of stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA), the first stage of sanctity (ĀRYAMĀRGA). He then asked the whereabouts of the Buddha and was ordained, going on to become the disciple most renowned for his wisdom. Asvajit's précis points to the central importance of causality in the Buddha's teachings and provides a kind of summary of the FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS. The Buddha has identified the causes (such as KARMAN and KLEsA) of those things that have causes (such as suffering, S. DUḤKHA), and he has also identified their cessation in the experience of NIRVĀnA. What may therefore have begun as a simple statement to mollify an eager questioner eventually became a slogan and ultimately a MANTRA, the very recitation of which was said to produce apotropaic powers. Like a mantra, the words of the ye dharmā slogan were often transcribed phonetically, rather than translated, into various languages across Asia. These words were also often written on strips of paper and enshrined in STuPAs; they thus became a dharmaverse relic (sARĪRA), serving as a substitute for a bodily relic of the Buddha.

yiqing. (J. gijo; K. ŭijong 疑情). In Chinese, lit. the "sensation of doubt," or simply "doubt"; a feeling of puzzlement and sense of questioning that is a crucial factor in the meditation technique of "questioning meditation" (KANHUA CHAN) as systematized by DAHUI ZONGGAO (1089-1163). In the kanhua technique, doubt refers to the puzzlement and perplexity that the meditator feels when trying to understand the conundrum that is the GONG'AN (public case) or HUATOU (meditative topic). This doubt arises from the inability to understand the significance of the huatou through rational thought. This loss of confidence in one's conceptual and intellectual faculties releases the mind from the false sense of security engendered through habitual ways of thinking, creating a feeling of frustration that is often compared to "a mosquito trying to bite an iron ox." The meditator's sense of self ultimately becomes so identified with the huatou that the intense pressure created by the doubt "explodes" (C. po), freeing the mind from the personal point of view that is the self. Hence, by cutting off conceptualization and producing a state of intense concentration, the sensation of doubt helps to impel meditation forward toward the experience of awakening (WU). The term "sensation of doubt" was not coined by Dahui. One of its earliest usages is in the enlightenment poem of Luohan Guichen (867-928), the teacher of FAYAN WENYI (885-958), which describes enlightenment as shattering the "ball of doubt" (YITUAN). Dahui's grandteacher, WUZU FAYAN (d. 1104), also taught his students to keep the great ball of doubt. But it was Dahui who put doubt at the core of his interpretation of kanhua Chan meditation; for him, the sensation of doubt becomes an effective antidote to conceptual thinking as well as the force that drives the student forward toward enlightenment. The Chinese term yi is also used as the translation for the Sanskrit term VICIKITSĀ, or skeptical doubt, which was one of the five hindrances (NĪVARAnA) to meditative absorption (DHYĀNA). But rather than being viewed as it had been in India as a hindrance, in Dahui's interpretation doubt instead plays a crucial role in the meditative process.

yixin. (S. ekacitta; J. isshin; K. ilsim 一心). In Chinese, "one mind"; the ground of being and the principle (LI) foundational to all phenomena (SHI). The LAnKĀVATĀRASuTRA and the DASHENG QIXIN LUN ("Awakening of Faith According to the Mahāyāna"), both central texts in the TATHĀGATAGARBHA corpus of literature, treat the "one mind" as a central doctrine. The Lankāvatārasutra states that the "calm extinction [of NIRVĀnA] is called the one mind, and this one mind is called the tathāgatagarbha." The Dasheng qixin lun presents all of Buddhism in terms of the one mind and its two aspects: the mind's true-thusness aspect (xin zhenru men) and production-and-cessation aspect (xin shengmie men). The Dasheng qixin lun, arguably the most influential tathāgatagarbha text within the East Asian Buddhist tradition, has long been considered the principal treatise outlining the doctrine of the one mind and its associations with the YOGĀCĀRA theory of consciousness and tathāgatagarbha thought. ¶ The exegeses to the Dasheng qixin lun by JINGYING HUIYUAN (523-592), WoNHYO (617-686), and FAZANG (643-712), which the tradition has regarded as its three major commentaries (san dashu), have each elucidated in considerable detail the foundational role that the notion of the one mind plays in that text. Fazang, for example, glossed the one mind of the Dasheng qixin lun as the "one tathāgatagarbha mind" and thus identified the one mind with the tathāgatagarbha; the two aspects of the one mind, true thusness and production-and-cessation, were correlated, respectively, with either MADHYAMAKA and YOGĀCĀRA or principle (li) and phenomena (shi). Fazang thus places tathāgatagarbha thought above both the SAN LUN ZONG (the Chinese analogue of the Madhyamaka school) and the FAXIANG ZONG (Yogācāra) teachings in his doctrinal taxonomy (panjiao; see JIAOXIANG PANSHI). By contrast, Huiyuan's commentary treats the one mind within the context of the nine-consciousnesses theory of the SHE LUN ZONG, an early Yogācāra-oriented strand of Chinese Buddhist thought. In his analysis of the two aspects of the one mind, Huiyuan correlates the true-thusness aspect of the one mind with the ninth "immaculate consciousness" (AMALAVIJNĀNA); he correlates the production-and-cessation aspect of the one mind with the eighth "storehouse consciousness" (ĀLAYAVIJNĀNA). Unlike Fazang's interpretation, tathāgatagarbha is here not identified with the one mind but is instead viewed as the production-and-cessation aspect of the mind. In Wonhyo's case, rather than seeking as Fazang did to distinguish the Faxiang teachings of Yogācāra from tathāgatagarbha thought, he sought instead to reconcile the Faxiang perspective on consciousness with the Dasheng qixin lun's analysis of mind. Like Huiyuan, Wonhyo identified the tathāgatagarbha with the production-and-cessation aspect of the one mind. ¶ The one mind is also a central theme of the ZONGJING LU, an encyclopedic CHAN anthology compiled by YONGMING YANSHOU (904-976) in the FAYAN ZONG, which seeks to unify the various Chinese schools of Buddhism, including HUAYAN, Yogācāra, and TIANTAI, and to demonstrate the compatibility of doctrinal teachings and meditative practice. Yanshou draws on the doctrinal classification schema of GUIFENG ZONGMI (780-841), the Chan scholiast who was also the fifth patriarch of the Huayan school, in positing three broad strands of Buddhist teaching: dharma characteristics (Faxiang zong), destruction of characteristics (Poxiang), dharma nature (FAXING ZONG). Yanshou states that the Faxing (dharma nature) teachings, which include both the Huayan and Chan schools and which are based on tathāgatagarbha thought, treat both aspects of true thusness or the one mind, that is, the aspect of "immutability" (bubian) and "adaptability" (lit., "according to conditions," suiyuan); the Faxiang (dharma characteristics) teachings, by contrast, only treat the aspect of "adaptability." ¶ In the TIANTAI school, one mind or sometimes one thought (yinian) is said to be the ground of all things in existence in both their tainted and pure manifestations, a notion expressed in the aphorism "one thought [contains] the TRICHILIOCOSM" (YINIAN SANQIAN), one of the main doctrines of the school. The Tiantai teaching that "one mind," viz., a single instance of thought, contains all three "viewpoints" (yixin sanguan) also expresses how the three inseparable aspects of phenomena (SANDI)-viz., the truth of emptiness (kongdi), the truth of being only provisionally real (jiadi), and the truth of the mean (zhongdi)-are each contained in one thought moment. In the PURE LAND tradition, one mind generally refers to single-minded recollection (NIANFO) of, especially, the buddha AMITĀBHA, and is a synonym of one-pointedness of mind.

zero 1. "character" 0, {ASCI} character 48. Numeric zero, as opposed to the letter "O" (the 15th letter of the English alphabet). In their unmodified forms they look a lot alike, and various {kluges} invented to make them visually distinct have compounded the confusion. If your zero is centre-dotted and letter-O is not, or if letter-O looks almost rectangular but zero looks more like an American football stood on end (or the reverse), you're probably looking at a modern character display (though the dotted zero seems to have originated as an option on {IBM 3270} controllers). If your zero is slashed but letter-O is not, you're probably looking at an old-style {ASCII} graphic set descended from the default typewheel on the venerable {ASR-33} {Teletype} (Scandinavians, for whom slashed-O is a letter, curse this arrangement). If letter-O has a slash across it and the zero does not, your display is tuned for a very old convention used at {IBM} and a few other early mainframe makers (Scandinavians curse *this* arrangement even more, because it means two of their letters collide). Some {Burroughs}/{Unisys} equipment displays a zero with a *reversed* slash. And yet another convention common on early {line printers} left zero unornamented but added a tail or hook to the letter-O so that it resembled an inverted Q or cursive capital letter-O. [{Jargon File}] (1995-01-24) 2. To set to zero. Usually said of small pieces of data, such as bits or words (especially in the construction "zero out"). 3. To erase; to discard all data from. Said of disks and directories, where "zeroing" need not involve actually writing zeroes throughout the area being zeroed. One may speak of something being "logically zeroed" rather than being "physically zeroed". See {scribble}. (1999-02-07)

zhike. (J. shika; K. chigaek 知客). In Chinese, "guest prefect"; one of the six prefects (C. TOUSHOU) at a CHAN monastery. The guest prefect is in charge of receiving and accommodating important visitors and guests. In modern Japanese ZEN, the guest prefect plays an important role in the training of young monks on pilgrimage (J. ANGYA; see C. XINGJIAO) as they engage each other in the elaborate ritual of receiving permission to enter the monastery.



QUOTES [135 / 135 - 1500 / 3510]


KEYS (10k)

  112 Sri Aurobindo
   2 Arthur C Clarke
   1 Virginia Woolf
   1 TheMidnightGospel
   1 Terry Pratchett
   1 Ramesh Balsekar
   1 Pope St. Leo the Great
   1 Omar Khayyam
   1 Judith Simmer-Brown
   1 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   1 Jean Danielou
   1 Georg C Lichtenberg
   1 Friedrich Schiller
   1 Eugene Ionesco
   1 Étienne de La Boétie
   1 encompass'd d quiet never echoes to a sound.
As I walk
   1 e. e. cummings
   1 Dion Fortune
   1 Carl Jung
   1 Arthur Schopenhauer
   1 Alfred North Whitehead
   1 Sri Ramakrishna
   1 Kabir

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   93 Sri Aurobindo
   12 William Shakespeare
   12 Anonymous
   11 Tom Stoppard
   11 Edward Albee
   8 Paulo Coelho
   8 Miles Davis
   6 Carl Jung
   5 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   5 Friedrich Schiller
   5 Beth Henley
   5 Anton Chekhov
   4 Steven Pressfield
   4 Philip Seymour Hoffman
   4 Gregory Maguire
   4 George Bernard Shaw
   4 Friedrich Nietzsche
   4 Daniel Kahneman
   4 Charlie Kaufman
   4 Arthur Miller

1:There's a child in the forest! He plays a flute you can hear with your heart ears. ~ TheMidnightGospel,
2:All things too great end soon. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
3:Dare greatly and thou shalt be great. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
4:Adore and what you adore attempt to be. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
5:One age has seen the dreams another lives. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
6:Hope not to hear truth often in royal courts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
7:Man out of Nature wakes to God's complexities, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
8:Death fosters life that life may suckle death. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
9:God plays invisible in the heart of man, being screened by Maya from human view. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
10:Men have made kings that folly might have food. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
11:The moments are Fate's thoughts
Watching me. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
12:Words are but ghosts unless they speak the heart. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
13:In Islam
All men are equal underneath the King. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
14:Love is the hoop of the gods
Hearts to combine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
15:Love itself is sweet enough
Though unreturned. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
16:The master of my stars is he
Who owns no master. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
17:All things Vary to keep the secret witness pleased. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
18:Man only plays when in the full meaning of the word he is a man, and he is only completely a man when he plays. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
19:When Love desires Love,
    Then Love is born. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
20:Soonest is always best
When noble deeds are to be done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
21:Man is a creature blinded by the sun
Who errs by seeing ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
22:The gods use instruments,
Not ask their consent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act Five,
23:There are no whole truths, all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays the devil. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
24:We move as we must,
Not as we choose, whatever we may think. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
25:Music and thunder are the rhythmic chords
Of one majestic harp. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
26:Unity is sweet substance of the heart
And not a chain that binds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
27:Some day surely
The world too shall be saved from death by love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
28:To lift our hopes heaven-high and to extend them
As wide as earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
29:It was to amuse himself God made the world.
For He was dull alone! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
30:Of what use are the gods
If they crown not our just desires on earth? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
31:The sentinel love in man ever imagines
Strange perils for its object. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
32:Nature must flower into art
And science, or else wherefore are we men? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
33:From light lips and casual thoughts
The gods speak best as if by chance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
34:Ravenous waves that march
With blue fierce nostrils quivering for prey, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Prologue,
35:Through the shocks of difficulty and death
Man shall attain his godhead. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Prologue,
36:Sometimes we know them least
Whom most we love and constantly consort with. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
37:It is the tears, the blood
Prodigally spent that build a nation's greatness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
38:Our rapture here is short before we go
To other sweetness on some rarer height ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
39:In this drama of life, consciousness plays and directs all of the roles, of billions of human beings. Every character is played by consciousness. ~ Ramesh Balsekar,
40:Nations that conquer widest, perish first, Sapped by the hate of an uneasy world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
41:God's valet moves away these living dolls
To quite another room and better play. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
42:Like the sweet kindly earth whose patient love
Embraces even our faults and sins. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
43:Even his petty world man cannot rule.
We fear, we blame; life wantons her own way, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
44:Kings are men,
And they are set above their fellow-mortals
To serve us, friends. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
45:Truth! Seldom with her bright and burning wand
She touches the unwilling lips of men ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
46:We are the future's greatness, therefore owe
Some duty to the grandeurs of the past. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
47:But the blind nether forces still have power
And the ascent is slow and long is Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
48:Look round and thou wilt see a world on guard.
All life here armoured walks, shut in. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
49:Yon mountain-peak or some base valley clod,
'Tis one to the heaven-sailing star above ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
50:She builds, she breaks,
She thrones, she slays, as needed for her harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act One,
51:The flower blooms for its flowerhood only,
And not to make its parent bed more high. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
52:The passion of oneness two hearts are this moment
Denies the steps of death for ever. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
53:Dwell far above the laws that govern men
And are not to be mapped by mortal judgments. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
54:They, even when they tyrannise, remain
Most dear and reverend still, who gave us birth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
55:To lavish upon all men love and trust
Shows the heart's royalty, not the brain's craft. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
56:Must first have striven, many must have failed
Before a great thing can be done on earth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
57:Nada is found within. It is a music without strings which plays in the body. It penetrates the inner and outer and leads you away from illusion. ~ Kabir,
58:If it is permissible to write plays that are not intended to be seen, I should like to see who can prevent me from writing a book no one can read. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg, [T5],
59:A presence sits within my heart that sees
Each moment's need and finds the road to meet it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
60:This world's the puppet of a silent Will
Which moves unguessed behind our acts and thoughts; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
61:The deepest things are those thought seizes not;
Our spirits live their hidden meaning out. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
62:'Tis Love, 'tis Love fills up the gulfs of Time!
By Love we find our kinship with the stars. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
63:Desire's so sweet
That the mere joy might seem quite crude and poor
And spoil the sweetness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
64:Noble speech
Is a high prelude fit for noble deeds;
It is the lion's roar before he leaps. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
65:She has her secret calls
And works divinely behind play and sleep,
Shaping her infant powers. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
66:The court gossips over them while they live
And the world gossips over them when they are dead. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
67:For she alone is prompter on our stage,
And all things move by an established doom,
Not freely. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
68:The Gods prodigiously sometimes reverse
The common rule of Nature and compel
Matter with soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
69:They shut our eyes and drive us, but at last
Our souls remember when the act is done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act Five,
70:Dream not that happiness
Can spring from wicked roots. God overrules
And Right denied is mighty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
71:Hoof-Mark on Breast (Sri Vatsa)
To lift our hopes heaven-high and to extend them
As wide as earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
72:Fate orders all and Fate I now
Have recognised as the world's mystic Will
That loves and labours. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
73:Nature is so perfect that the Trinity couldn't have fashioned her any more perfect. She is an organ on which our Lord plays and the devil works the bellows. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
74:This is the Nemesis of men who rise
Too suddenly by fraud or violence
That they suspect all hearts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
75:The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect, but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves"
   ~ Carl Jung,
76:That life is grave and earnest under its smiles,
And we too with a wary gaiety
Should walk its roads. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
77:But helpless Pieces of the Game He plays Upon this Checker-board of Nights and Days; Hither and thither moves, and checks, and slays, And one by one back in the Closet lays. ~ Omar Khayyam,
78:Our consciousness a torch that plays Between the Abyss and a supernal Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Man of the Mediator,
79:As with the figure of a symbol dance
The screened Omniscient plays at Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Dual Being,
80:Strength in the spirit, wisdom in the mind,
Love in the heart complete the trinity
Of glorious manhood. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
81:Justice has her seat, and her fine balance
Disturbed too often spoils an unripe world
With ill-timed mercy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
82:Reason to his best creatures, if they suffer
The rebel blood to o'ercrow that tranquil wise
And perfect minister? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
83:Foemen! they are our playmates in the fight
And should be dear as friends who share our hours
Of closeness and desire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
84:All things here secretly are right; all's wrong
In God's appearances. World, thou art wisely led
In a divine confusion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
85:The harmony of kindred souls that seek
Each other on the strings of body and mind,
Is all the music for which life was born. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
86:Love is gone ere grief can find him;
    But his way
Tears that, falling, lag behind him
    Still betray. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
87:One forward step is something gained,
Since little by little earth must open to heaven
Till her dim soul awakes into the Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
88:All alters in a world that is the same.
Man most must change who is a soul of Time;
His gods too change and live in larger light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
89:Great Nature in her animal trance,
Her life of mighty instincts where no stir
Of the hedged restless mind has spoiled her vasts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
90:If always Fate were careful to fit in
The nature with the lot! But she sometimes
Loves these strange contrasts and crude ironies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
91:In this gigantic world of which one grain of dust
Is all our field, Eternal Memory keeps
Our great things and our trivial equally ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
92:He's creator
Who greatly handles great material,
Calls order out of the abundant deep,
Not who invents sweet shadows out of air. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
93:A screened Necessity drives even the gods.
Over human lives it strides to unseen ends;
Our tragic failures are its stepping-stones. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
94:Each creature labouring in his own vocation
Desires another's and deems the heavy burden
Of his own fate the world's sole heaviness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
95:Close only as love whom sorrow and delight
Cannot diminish, nor long absence change
Nor daily prodigality of joy
Expend immortal love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
96:They say the anarchy of love disturbs
Gods even: shaken are the marble natures,
The deathless hearts are melted to the pang
And rapture. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
97:Love with my love, think with my thoughts; the rest
Leave to much older wiser men whose schemings
Have made God's world an office and a mart. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
98:The gods wrest our careful policies
To their own ends until we stand appalled
Remembering what we meant to do and seeing
What has been done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
99:One fine, pure-seeming falsehood,
Admitted, opens door to all his naked
And leprous family; in, in, they throng
And breed the house quite full. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
100:Rude, hardy stocks
Transplant themselves, expand, outlast the storms
And heat and cold, not slips too gently nurtured
Or lapped in hothouse warmth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
101:There are such hearts, Mymoona,
As think so little of adoring love,
They make it only a pedestal for pride,
A whipping-stock for their vain tyrannies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
102:Unless you love someone, nothing else makes any sense." ~ e. e. cummings, (1894 - 1962), American poet, painter, essayist, author, and playwright, wrote approx. 2,900 poems, two autobiographical novels, four plays, and several essays, Wikipedia.,
103:Walled from ours are other hearts:
For if life's barriers twixt our souls were broken,
Men would be free and one, earth paradise
And the gods live neglected. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
104:There are men so weak in love,
They cannot bear more than an ass's load;
So high in their conceit, the tenderest
Kindest rebuke turns all their sweetness sour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
105:This world is other than our standards are
And it obeys a vaster thought than ours,
Our narrow thoughts! The fathomless desire
Of some huge spirit is its secret law. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
106:The blind nether forces still have power
And the ascent is slow and long is Time.
Yet shall Truth grow and harmony increase:
The day shall come when men feel close and one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
107:I am not of the mild and later gods,
But of that elder world; Lemuria
And old Atlantis raised me crimson altars,
And my huge nostrils keep that scent of blood
For which they quiver. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Prologue,
108:It is not the answer that enlightens, but the question." ~ Eugene Ionesco, (1909 - 1994) Romanian-French playwright, one of the foremost figures of the French Avant-garde theatre; his plays depict the solitude and insignificance of human existence in a tangible way, Wikipedia.,
109:I sit enthroned,
Allah's Vicegerent, to put down all evil
And pluck the virtuous out of danger's hand.
Fit work for Kings! not merely the high crown
And marching armies and superber ease. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
110:Is not ignoble, but has angel soarings,
Howe'er the nether devil plucks him down.
Still we have souls nor is the mould quite broken
Of that original and faultless plan
Which Adam spoilt. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
111:The nether snake who writhes
Sweet-poisoned, perilous in the rich grass,
Lust with the jewel love upon his hood,
Who by his own crown must be charmed, seized, change
Into a warm great god. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
112:Mother-Earth
Is it not better
To live in the great air God made for us,
A peasant in the open glory of earth,
Feeling it, yet not knowing it, like him
To drink the cool life-giving brook ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
113:There's a rhythm
Will shatter hardest stone; each thing in nature
Has its own point where it has done with patience
And starts in pieces; below that point play on it,
Nor overpitch the music. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
114:My waters! see them lift their foam-white tops
Charging from sky to sky in rapid tumult:
Admire their force, admire their thunderous speed.
With green hooves and white manes they trample onwards. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Prologue,
115:In that fair subtle realm behind our own
The form is all, and physical gods are kings.
The inspiring Light plays in fine boundaries;
A faultless beauty comes by Nature's grace; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
116:There is a kingship which exceeds the king.
For Vuthsa unworthy, Vuthsa captive, slain,
This is not captive, this cannot be slain.
It far transcends our petty human forms,
It is a nation's greatness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
117:A life so in the glorious sunlight bathed,
Straight nursed and suckled from the vigorous Earth
With shaping labour and the homely touch
Of the great hearty mother, edifies
A nobler kind than nourished is in courts? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
118:We sin our pleasant sins and then refrain
And think that God's deceived. He waits His time
And when we walk the clean and polished road
He trips us with the mire our shoes yet keep,
The pleasant mud we walked before. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
119:To be a common man mid common men
And live an unaspiring mortal life
Than call into oneself a Titan strength
Too dire and mighty for its human frame,
That only afflicts the oppressed astonished world,
Then breaks its user. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
120:Music is sweet; to rule the heart's rich chords
Of human lyres much sweeter. Art's sublime
But to combine great ends more sovereign still,
Accepting danger and difficulty to break
Through proud and violent opposites to our will.
Song is divine, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
121:Young women... you are, in my opinion, disgracefully ignorant. You have never made a discovery of any sort of importance. You have never shaken an empire or led an army into battle. The plays by Shakespeare are not by you, and you have never introduced a barbarous race to the blessings of civilization. What is your excuse? ~ Virginia Woolf,
122:The master of existence lurks in us
   And plays at hide-and-seek with his own Force;
   In Nature's instrument loiters secret God.
   The immanent lives in man as his house;
   He has made the universe his pastime's field,
   A vast gymnasium of his works of might.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Secret Knowledge,
123:The real meaning of persona is a mask, such as actors were accustomed to wear on the ancient stage; and it is quite true that no one shows himself as he is, but wears his mask and plays his part. Indeed, the whole of our social arrangements may be likened to a perpetual comedy; and this is why a man who is worth anything finds society so insipid, while a blockhead is quite at home in it. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, Essays Vol 4,
124:God does not play dice with the universe; He plays an ineffable game of His own devising, which might be compared, from the perspective of any of the other players [i.e. everybody], to being involved in an obscure and complex variant of poker in a pitch-dark room, with blank cards, for infinite stakes, with a Dealer who won't tell you the rules, and who smiles all the time. ~ Terry Pratchett, Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch,
125:Plays, farces, spectacles, gladiators, strange beasts, medals, pictures, and other such opiates, these were for ancient peoples the bait toward slavery, the price of their liberty, the instruments of tyranny. By these practices and enticements the ancient dictators so successfully lulled their subjects under the yoke, that the stupefied peoples, fascinated by the pastimes and vain pleasures flashed before their eyes, learned subservience as naively, but not so creditably, as little children learn to read by looking at bright picture books. ~ Étienne de La Boétie
126:The Garden ::: There's an ancient, ancient garden that I see sometimes in dreams,
Where the very Maytime sunlight plays and glows with spectral gleams;
Where the gaudy-tinted blossoms seem to wither into grey,
And the crumbling walls and pillars waken thoughts of yesterday.
There are vines in nooks and crannies, and there's moss about the pool,
And the tangled weedy thicket chokes the arbour dark and cool:
In the silent sunken pathways springs a herbage sparse and spare,
Where the musty scent of dead things dulls the fragrance of the air.
There is not a living creature in the lonely space arouna,
And the hedge~encompass'd d quiet never echoes to a sound.
As I walk, and wait, and listen, I will often seek to find
When it was I knew that garden in an age long left behind;
I will oft conjure a vision of a day that is no more,
As I gaze upon the grey, grey scenes I feel I knew before.
Then a sadness settles o'er me, and a tremor seems to start -
For I know the flow'rs are shrivell'd hopes - the garden is my heart. ~ H P Lovecraft,
127:There are two Paths to the Innermost: the Way of the Mystic, which is the way of devotion and meditation, a solitary and subjective path; and the way of the occultist, which is the way of the intellect, of concentration, and of trained will; upon this path the co-operation of fellow workers is required, firstly for the exchange of knowledge, and secondly because ritual magic plays an important part in this work, and for this the assistance of several is needed in most of the greater operations. The mystic derives his knowledge through the direct communion of his higher self with the Higher Powers; to him the wisdom of the occultist is foolishness, for his mind does not work in that way; but, on the other hand, to a more intellectual and extrovert type, the method of the mystic is impossible until long training has enabled him to transcend the planes of form. We must therefore recognize these two distinct types among those who seek the Way of Initiation, and remember that there is a path for each. ~ Dion Fortune, Esoteric Orders and Their Work and The Training and Work of the Initiate,
128:Supermind is the dynamic form of satcitananda (being-consciousness-bliss), and the necessary conduit, mediator or linkage between satcitananda and the manifest creation. (Life Divine Book I, ch.14-16) ... Supermind is spiritual consciousness acting as a self-luminous knowledge, will, sense, aesthesis, energy, self-creative and unveiling power of its own delight and being. Mind is the action of the same powers, but limited and only very indirectly and partially illumined. Supermind lives in unity though it plays with diversity; mind lives in a separative action of diversity, though it may open to unity. Mind is not only capable of ignorance, but, because it acts always partially and by limitation, it works characteristically as a power of ignorance : it may even and it does forget itself in a complete inconscience, or nescience, awaken from it to the ignorance of a partial knowledge and move from the ignorance towards a complete knowledge, -- that is its natural action in the human being, -- but it can never have by itself a complete knowledge.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Psychology of Self-Perfection, 625,
129:1st row Homer, Shakespeare, Valmiki
2nd row Dante, Kalidasa, Aeschylus, Virgil, Milton
3rd row Goethe
...
I am not prepared to classify all the poets in the universe - it was the front bench or benches you asked for. By others I meant poets like Lucretius, Euripides, Calderon, Corneille, Hugo. Euripides (Medea, Bacchae and other plays) is a greater poet than Racine whom you want to put in the first ranks. If you want only the very greatest, none of these can enter - only Vyasa and Sophocles. Vyasa could very well claim a place beside Valmiki, Sophocles beside Aeschylus. The rest, if you like, you can send into the third row with Goethe, but it is something of a promotion about which one can feel some qualms. Spenser too, if you like; it is difficult to draw a line.

Shelley, Keats and Wordsworth have not been brought into consideration although their best work is as fine poetry as any written, but they have written nothing on a larger scale which would place them among the greatest creators. If Keats had finished Hyperion (without spoiling it), if Shelley had lived, or if Wordsworth had not petered out like a motor car with insufficient petrol, it might be different, but we have to take things as they are. As it is, all began magnificently, but none of them finished, and what work they did, except a few lyrics, sonnets, short pieces and narratives, is often flawed and unequal. If they had to be admitted, what about at least fifty others in Europe and Asia? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art,
130:At first, needing the companionship of the human voice, he had listened to classical plays especially the works of Shaw, Ibsen, and Shakespeare - or poetry readings from Discovery's enormous library of recorded sounds. The problems they dealt with, however, seemed so remote, or so easily resolved with a little common sense, that after a while he lost patience with them.

So he switched to opera - usually in Italian or German, so that he was not distracted even by the minimal intellectual content that most operas contained. This phase lasted for two weeks before he realized that the sound of all these superbly trained voices was only exacerbating his loneliness. But what finally ended this cycle was Verdi's Requiem Mass, which he had never heard performed on Earth. The "Dies Irae," roaring with ominous appropriateness through the empty ship, left him completely shattered; and when the trumpets of Doomsday echoed from the heavens, he could endure no more.

Thereafter, he played only instrumental music. He started with the romantic composers, but shed them one by one as their emotional outpourings became too oppressive. Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Berlioz, lasted a few weeks, Beethoven rather longer. He finally found peace, as so many others had done, in the abstract architecture of Bach, occasionally ornamented with Mozart. And so Discovery drove on toward Saturn, as often as not pulsating with the cool music of the harpsichord, the frozen thoughts of a brain that had been dust for twice a hundred years. ~ Arthur C Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey,
131:meta-systemic operations ::: As the 1950's and 60s begin to roll around the last stage of first tier emerged as a cultural force. With the Green Altitude we see the emergence of Pluralistic, Multicultural, Post-Modern world-views.

Cognition is starting to move beyond formal-operations into the realm of co-ordinating systems of abstractions, in what is called Meta-systemic Cognition. While formal-operations acted upon the classes and relations between members of classes. Meta-systemic operations start at the level of relating systems to systems. The focus of these investigations is placed upon comparing, contrasting, transforming and synthesizing entire systems, rather than components of one system. This emergent faculty allows self-sense to focus around a heightened sense of individuality and an increased ability for emotional resonance. The recognition of individual differences, the ability to tolerate paradox and contradiction, and greater conceptual complexity all provide for an understanding of conflict as being both internally and externally caused. Context plays a major role in the creation of truth and individual perspective. With each being context dependent and open to subjective interpretation, meaning each perspective and truth are rendered relative and are not able to be judged as better or more true than any other. This fuels a value set that centers on softness over cold rationality. Sensitivity and preference over objectivity.

Along with a focus on community harmony and equality which drives the valuing of sensitivity to others, reconcilation, consensus, dialogue, relationship, human development, bonding, and a seeking of a peace with the inner-self. Moral decisions are based on rights, values, or principles that are agreeable to all individuals composing a society based on fair and beneficial practices. All of this leads to the Equality movements and multiculturalism. And to the extreme form of relativitism which we saw earlier as context dependant nature of all truth including objective facts.

Faith at the green altitude is called Conjunctive, and allows the self to integrate what was unrecognized by the previous stages self-certainty and cognitive and affective adaptation to reality. New features at this level of faith include the unification of symbolic power with conceptual meaning, an awareness of ones social unconscious, a reworking of ones past, and an opening to ones deeper self. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-52, Meta-systemic Operations,
132:Has creation a definite aim? Is there something like a final end to which it is moving?

The Mother: No, the universe is a movement that is eternally unrolling itself. There is nothing which you can fix upon as the end and one aim. But for the sake of action we have to section the movement, which is itself unending, and to say that this or that is the goal, for in action we need something upon which we can fix our aim. In a picture you need a definite scheme of composition and colour; you have to set a limit, to put the whole thing within a fixed framework; but the limit is illusory, the frame is a mere convention. There is a constant continuation of the picture that stretches beyond any particular frame, and each continuation can be drawn in the same conditions in an unending series of frames. Our aim is this or that, we say, but we know that it is only the beginning of another aim beyond it, and that in its turn leads to yet another; the series develop always and never stop.

What is the proper function of the intellect? Is it a help or a hindrance to Sadhana?

Whether the intellect is a help or a hindrance depends upon the person and upon the way in which it is used. There is a true movement of the intellect and there is a wrong movement; one helps, the other hinders. The intellect that believes too much in its own importance and wants satisfaction for its own sake, is an obstacle to the higher realisation.

But this is true not in any special sense or for the intellect alone, but generally and of other faculties as well. For example, people do not regard an all-engrossing satisfaction of the vital desires or the animal appetites as a virtue; the moral sense is accepted as a mentor to tell one the bounds that one may not transgress. It is only in his intellectual activities that man thinks he can do without any such mentor or censor!

Any part of the being that keeps to its proper place and plays its appointed role is helpful; but directly it steps beyond its sphere, it becomes twisted and perverted and therefore false. A power has the right movement when it is set into activity for the divine's purpose; it has the wrong movement when it is set into activity for its own satisfaction.

The intellect, in its true nature, is an instrument of expression and action. It is something like an intermediary between the true knowledge, whose seat is in the higher regions above the mind, and realisation here below. The intellect or, generally speaking, the mind gives the form; the vital puts in the dynamism and life-power; the material comes in last and embodies. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, 28th April 1931 and 5th May 1929,
133:(Novum Organum by Francis Bacon.)
   34. "Four species of idols beset the human mind, to which (for distinction's sake) we have assigned names, calling the first Idols of the Tribe, the second Idols of the Den, the third Idols of the Market, the fourth Idols of the Theatre.
   40. "The information of notions and axioms on the foundation of true induction is the only fitting remedy by which we can ward off and expel these idols. It is, however, of great service to point them out; for the doctrine of idols bears the same relation to the interpretation of nature as that of the confutation of sophisms does to common logic.
   41. "The idols of the tribe are inherent in human nature and the very tribe or race of man; for man's sense is falsely asserted to be the standard of things; on the contrary, all the perceptions both of the senses and the mind bear reference to man and not to the Universe, and the human mind resembles these uneven mirrors which impart their own properties to different objects, from which rays are emitted and distort and disfigure them.
   42. "The idols of the den are those of each individual; for everybody (in addition to the errors common to the race of man) has his own individual den or cavern, which intercepts and corrupts the light of nature, either from his own peculiar and singular disposition, or from his education and intercourse with others, or from his reading, and the authority acquired by those whom he reverences and admires, or from the different impressions produced on the mind, as it happens to be preoccupied and predisposed, or equable and tranquil, and the like; so that the spirit of man (according to its several dispositions), is variable, confused, and, as it were, actuated by chance; and Heraclitus said well that men search for knowledge in lesser worlds, and not in the greater or common world.
   43. "There are also idols formed by the reciprocal intercourse and society of man with man, which we call idols of the market, from the commerce and association of men with each other; for men converse by means of language, but words are formed at the will of the generality, and there arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. Nor can the definitions and explanations with which learned men are wont to guard and protect themselves in some instances afford a complete remedy-words still manifestly force the understanding, throw everything into confusion, and lead mankind into vain and innumerable controversies and fallacies.
   44. "Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre: for we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a similar nature can be still composed and made to agree with each other, the causes of the most opposite errors being generally the same. Nor, again, do we allude merely to general systems, but also to many elements and axioms of sciences which have become inveterate by tradition, implicit credence, and neglect. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
134:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,
135:64 Arts
   1. Geet vidya: art of singing.
   2. Vadya vidya: art of playing on musical instruments.
   3. Nritya vidya: art of dancing.
   4. Natya vidya: art of theatricals.
   5. Alekhya vidya: art of painting.
   6. Viseshakacchedya vidya: art of painting the face and body with color
   7. Tandula­kusuma­bali­vikara: art of preparing offerings from rice and flowers.
   8. Pushpastarana: art of making a covering of flowers for a bed.
   9. Dasana­vasananga­raga: art of applying preparations for cleansing the teeth, cloths and painting the body.
   10. Mani­bhumika­karma: art of making the groundwork of jewels.
   11. Aayya­racana: art of covering the bed.
   12. Udaka­vadya: art of playing on music in water.
   13. Udaka­ghata: art of splashing with water.
   14. Citra­yoga: art of practically applying an admixture of colors.
   15. Malya­grathana­vikalpa: art of designing a preparation of wreaths.
   16. Sekharapida­yojana: art of practically setting the coronet on the head.
   17. Nepathya­yoga: art of practically dressing in the tiring room.
   18. Karnapatra­bhanga: art of decorating the tragus of the ear.
   19. Sugandha­yukti: art of practical application of aromatics.
   20. Bhushana­yojana: art of applying or setting ornaments.
   21. Aindra­jala: art of juggling.
   22. Kaucumara: a kind of art.
   23. Hasta­laghava: art of sleight of hand.
   24. Citra­sakapupa­bhakshya­vikara­kriya: art of preparing varieties of delicious food.
   25. Panaka­rasa­ragasava­yojana: art of practically preparing palatable drinks and tinging draughts with red color.
   26. Suci­vaya­karma: art of needleworks and weaving.
   27. Sutra­krida: art of playing with thread.
   28. Vina­damuraka­vadya: art of playing on lute and small drum.
   29. Prahelika: art of making and solving riddles.
   30. Durvacaka­yoga: art of practicing language difficult to be answered by others.
   31. Pustaka­vacana: art of reciting books.
   32. Natikakhyayika­darsana: art of enacting short plays and anecdotes.
   33. Kavya­samasya­purana: art of solving enigmatic verses.
   34. Pattika­vetra­bana­vikalpa: art of designing preparation of shield, cane and arrows.
   35. Tarku­karma: art of spinning by spindle.
   36. Takshana: art of carpentry.
   37. Vastu­vidya: art of engineering.
   38. Raupya­ratna­pariksha: art of testing silver and jewels.
   39. Dhatu­vada: art of metallurgy.
   40. Mani­raga jnana: art of tinging jewels.
   41. Akara jnana: art of mineralogy.
   42. Vrikshayur­veda­yoga: art of practicing medicine or medical treatment, by herbs.
   43. Mesha­kukkuta­lavaka­yuddha­vidhi: art of knowing the mode of fighting of lambs, cocks and birds.
   44. Suka­sarika­pralapana: art of maintaining or knowing conversation between male and female cockatoos.
   45. Utsadana: art of healing or cleaning a person with perfumes.
   46. Kesa­marjana­kausala: art of combing hair.
   47. Akshara­mushtika­kathana: art of talking with fingers.
   48. Dharana­matrika: art of the use of amulets.
   49. Desa­bhasha­jnana: art of knowing provincial dialects.
   50. Nirmiti­jnana: art of knowing prediction by heavenly voice.
   51. Yantra­matrika: art of mechanics.
   52. Mlecchita­kutarka­vikalpa: art of fabricating barbarous or foreign sophistry.
   53. Samvacya: art of conversation.
   54. Manasi kavya­kriya: art of composing verse
   55. Kriya­vikalpa: art of designing a literary work or a medical remedy.
   56. Chalitaka­yoga: art of practicing as a builder of shrines called after him.
   57. Abhidhana­kosha­cchando­jnana: art of the use of lexicography and meters.
   58. Vastra­gopana: art of concealment of cloths.
   59. Dyuta­visesha: art of knowing specific gambling.
   60. Akarsha­krida: art of playing with dice or magnet.
   61. Balaka­kridanaka: art of using children's toys.
   62. Vainayiki vidya: art of enforcing discipline.
   63. Vaijayiki vidya: art of gaining victory.
   64. Vaitaliki vidya: art of awakening master with music at dawn.
   ~ Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger, Sexual Secrets,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:I do not believe that the Good Lord plays dice. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
2:The musician who always plays on the same string is laughed at. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
3:I love everybody. Each one plays the role they have to play. ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
4:I love everybody. Each one plays the role they have to play... ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
5:The average man plays to the gallery of his own self-esteem. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
6:Life plays the same lovely and agonizing joke on all of us. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
7:A puppy plays with every pup he meets, but an old dog has few associates. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
8:The Universe is the game of the self, which plays hide and seek forever and ever. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
9:A married couple that plays cards together is just a fight that hasn't started yet. ~ george-burns, @wisdomtrove
10:And, in order to possess the Truth, the plays of the lower nature must be stopped. ~ sri-aurobindo, @wisdomtrove
11:When Jack Benny plays the violin, it sounds as though the strings are still in the cat. ~ fred-allen, @wisdomtrove
12:Beauty is rather a light that plays over the symmetry of things than that symmetry itself. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
13:If one plays good music, people don't listen and if one plays bad music people don't talk. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
14:The hollow horn plays wasted words, proves to warn that he not busy being born is busy dying. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
15:And the wind plays on those great sonorous harps, the shrouds and masts of ships. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
16:Once you see the drivers in Indonesia you understand why religion plays such a part in their lives. ~ erma-bombeck, @wisdomtrove
17:A great social success is a pretty girl who plays her cards as carefully as if she were plain. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
18:Fancy restrained may be compared to a fountain, which plays highest by diminishing the aperture. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
19:See how he throws his baited lines about,/And plays his men as anglers play their trout. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
20:Everyones childhood plays itself out. No wonder no one knows the other or can completely understand. ~ marilyn-monroe, @wisdomtrove
21:Sweet is the scene where genial friendship plays the pleasing game of interchanging praise. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
22:If Miss Honeychurch ever takes to live as she plays, it will be very exciting&
23:Give a man a soccer ball, he plays for a moment. Teach a man to play soccer, he plays for a life time. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
24:The intellect is not a serious thing, and never has been. It is an instrument on which one plays, that is all. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
25:The place of the father in the modern suburban family is a very small one, particularly if he plays golf. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
26:Why is a person who plays the piano called a pianist but a person who drives a racing car not called a racist? ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
27:The most difficult character in comedy is that of the fool, and he must be no simpleton that plays that part. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
28:Coaches who can outline plays on a black board are a dime a dozen. The ones who win get inside their player and motivate. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
29:For truly it is to be noted, that children's plays are not sports, and should be deemed as their most serious actions. ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
30:No matter what he does, every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn’t know it. ~ paulo-coelho, @wisdomtrove
31:I enjoy going back and forth between plays and novels. It`s like having a wife and a mistress. Books are the wife; plays, the mistress. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
32:Nada is found within. It is a music without strings which plays in the body. It penetrates the inner and outer and leads you away from illusion. ~ kabir, @wisdomtrove
33:I love everybody. Each one plays the role they have to play, but in the spiritual arena there are people who are even closer to me than that. ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
34:It would have been impossible, completely and entirely, for any woman to have written the plays of Shakespeare in the age of Shakespeare. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
35:He loves to sit and hear me sing, Then, laughing, sports and plays with me; Then stretches out my golden wing, And mocks my loss of liberty. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
36:What is the use of writing plays, what is the use of writing anything, if there is not a will which finally moulds chaos itself into a race of gods. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
37:Looking for God-or Heaven-by exploring space is like reading or seeing all Shakespeare's plays in the hope that you will find Shakespeare as one of the characters. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
38:The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
39:The whole arrangement of my picture is expressive. The place occupied by the figures or objects, the empty spaces around them, the proportions, everything plays a part. ~ henri-matisse, @wisdomtrove
40:But helpless Pieces of the Game He plays Upon this Checker-board of Nights and Days; Hither and thither moves, and checks, and slays, And one by one back in the Closet lays. ~ omar-khayyam, @wisdomtrove
41:&
42:There is little that gives children greater pleasure than when a grown-up lets himself down to their level, renounces his oppressive superiority and plays with them as an equal. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
43:A s fishes playing in a pond covered over with reeds and scum cannot be seen from outside, so God plays in the heart of a man invisibly, being screened by Maya from human view. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
44:We're also a multi-site church, so we have other pastors on other campuses who want to read the message before the video plays on the weekend services. So it just works better for me. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
45:If you want to help people, if you care, go to the cities. The city is where the pain is the greatest - and the cities are a hell of a lot of fun if you like art, movies and plays. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
46:It is of far more important that a man shall play something himself, even if he plays it badly, than that he shall go with hundreds of companions to see someone else play well. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
47:Our experience is coloured through and through by books and plays and the cinema, and it takes patience and skill to disentangle the things we have really learned from life for ourselves. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
48:All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
49:What you do off the job plays a major role in how far you go on the job. How many good books, do you read each year? How often do you attend workshops? Who do you spend must of your time with? ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
50:I myself grew up when radio was very important. I'd come home from school and turn on the radio. There were funny comedians and wonderful music, and there were plays. I used to pass time with radio. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
51:People take England on trust, and repeat that Shakespeare is the greatest of all authors. I have read him: there is nothing that compares Racine or Corneille: his plays are unreadable, pitiful. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
52:The .350 hitter expects, and also deserves, a big payoff for his performance - even if he plays for a cellar-dwelling team. And a .150 hitter should get no reward - even if he plays for a pennant winner. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
53:He it is, the innermost one, who awakens my being with his deep hidden touches. He it is who puts his enchantment upon these eyes and joyfully plays on the chords of my heart in varied cadence of pleasure and pain. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
54:You may be able to read Bernard Shaw's plays, you may be able to quote Shakespeare or Voltaire or some new philosopher; but if you in yourself are not intelligent, if you are not creative, what is the point of this education? ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
55:If I look at my own experience, Tim is clearly the hero of the story. He’s the star of the show. Other people come and go, but Tim is in every scene. His wife Debbie plays romantic love interest. His best mate Pete plays comic sidekick. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
56:Watch and see with what endless variety of beautiful forms He plays the play of his maya with Himself alone. The lila of the all pervading One goes on and on in this way in infinite diversity. He is without beginning and without end. ~ anandamayi-ma, @wisdomtrove
57:Read books that expand you, that are bright. See films, plays, art forms that elevate your consciousness, that bring you into a sense of how beautiful this world is, how beautiful other worlds are, how beautiful nirvana, the transcendental is. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
58:ice contains no future , just the past, sealed away. As if they're alive, everything in the world is sealed up inside, clear and distinct. Ice can preserve all kinds of things that way- cleanly, clearly. That's the essence of ice, the role it plays. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
59:A statesman who confines himself to popular legislation - or, for the matter of that, a playwright who confines himself to popular plays - is like a blind man's dog who goes wherever the blind man pulls him, on the ground that both of them want to go to the same place. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
60:The human race is divided into two sharply differentiated and mutually antagonistic classes: a smal l minority that plays with ideas and is capable of taking them in, and a vast majority that finds them painful, and is thus arrayed against them, and against all who have traffic with them. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
61:The Infinite alone exists and is Real; the finite is passing and false. The Original Whim in the Beyond caused the apparent descent of the Infinite into the realm of the seeming finite. This is the Divine Mystery and Divine Game in which Infinite Consciousness for ever plays on all levels of finite consciousness. ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
62:If I look at my own experience Tim is clearly the hero of the life story. He’s the star of the show. Other people come and go, but Tim is in every scene. His wife, Debbie, plays romantic love interest. His best mate, Pete, plays comic sidekick. There’s a whole load of extras who figure now and then. But Tim’s the main man. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
63:Young women... you are, in my opinion, disgracefully ignorant. You have never made a discovery of any sort of importance. You have never shaken an empire or led an army into battle. The plays by Shakespeare are not by you, and you have never introduced a barbarous race to the blessings of civilization. What is your excuse? ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
64:The most intense joy, lies not in the having, but in the desire, Delight that never fades, bliss that is eternal, Is only your, when what you most desire, is just out of reach... Anthony Hopkins, from the movie Shadowlands, where he plays C. S. Lewis ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
65:As a culture, we believe that if we kill something, we've killed the issue. That's why so many books end with death, why so many plays end with death, because it's full resolution. I'm always curious to know what happens after Romeo and Juliet die. In a way, that's the beginning of the story. Maybe beyond the story is even better. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
66:But Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. It is a part of an Englishman's constitution. His thoughts and beauties are so spread abroad that one touches them everywhere; one is intimate with him by instinct. No man of any brain can open at a good part of one of his plays without falling into the flow of his meaning immediately. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
67:And the pathetic part of it is that frequently those who have the least justification for a feeling of achievement bolster up their egos by a show of tumult and conceit which is truly nauseating. As Shakespeare put it: … man, proud man, / Drest in a little brief authority, / … Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven / As make the angels weep. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
68:The burgeoning field of computer science has shifted our view of the physical world from that of a collection of interacting material particles to one of a seething network of information. In this way of looking at nature, the laws of physics are a form of software, or algorithm, while the material world-the hardware-plays the role of a gigantic computer. ~ paul-davies, @wisdomtrove
69:In practice, the goal of skepticism is not the discovery of truth, but the exposure of other people's errors. It plays a useful role in science, religion, scholarship, and common sense. But we need to remember that it is a weapon serving belief or self-interest; we need to be skeptical of skeptics. The more militant the skeptic, the stronger the belief. ~ rupert-sheldrake, @wisdomtrove
70:You end up exhausted and spent, but later, in retrospect, you realize what it all was for. The parts fall into place, and you can see the whole picture and finally understand the role each individual part plays. The dawn comes, the sky grows light, and the colors and shapes of the roofs of houses, which you could only glimpse vaguely before, come into focus. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
71:I suspect that religion is a necessary evil in the childhood of our particular species. And that's one of the interesting things about contact with other intelligences: we could see what role, if any, religion plays in their development. I think that religion may be some random by-product of mammalian reproduction. If that's true, would non-mammalian aliens have a religion? ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
72:Pain itself can be pleasurable accidentally in so far as it is accompanied by wonder, as in stage-plays; or in so far as it recalls a beloved object to one's memory, and makes one feel one's love for the thing, whose absence gives us pain. Consequently, since love is pleasant, both pain and whatever else results from love, in so far as they remind us of our love, are pleasant. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
73:Pain itself can be pleasurable accidentally in so far as it is accompanied by wonder, as in stage-plays; or in so far as it recalls a beloved object to one's memory, and makes one feel one's love for the thing, whose absence gives us pain. Consequently, since love is pleasant, both pain and whatever else results from love, in so far as they remind us of our love, are pleasant. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
74:The real meaning of persona is a mask, such as actors were accustomed to wear on the ancient stage; and it is quite true that no one shows himself as he is, but wears his mask and plays his part. Indeed, the whole of our social arrangements may be likened to a perpetual comedy; and this is why a man who is worth anything finds society so insipid, while a blockhead is quite at home in it. ~ arthur-schopenhauer, @wisdomtrove
75:All it has experienced, tasted, suffered: The course of years, generations of animals, Oppression, recovery, friendship of sun and - Wind Will pour forth each day in the song Of its rustling foliage, in the friendly Gesture of its gently swaying crown, In the delicate sweet scent of resinous Sap moistening the sleep-glued buds, And the eternal game of lights and Shadows it plays with itself, content. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
76:Whether we meditate individually or collectively, there is one thing we absolutely must do: we have to meditate consciously. Making an unconscious effort is like forcing oneself to play football in spite of one's utmost unwillingness. One plays, but gets no joy. Conscious effort is like playing football most willingly. One gets real joy. Similarly, conscious meditation gives us inner Delight from the soul. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
77:You travel the world, you go see different things. I like to see Shakespeare plays, so I'll go - I mean, even if it's in a different language. I don't care, I just like Shakespeare, you know. I've seen Othello and Hamlet and Merchant of Venice over the years, and some versions are better than others. Way better. It's like hearing a bad version of a song. But then somewhere else, somebody has a great version. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
78:God is without form, without quality as well as with form and quality. Watch and see with what endless variety of beautiful forms He plays the play of his maya with Himself alone. The lila of the all pervading One goes on and on in this way in infinite diversity. He is without beginning and without end. He is the whole and also the part. The whole and part together make up real Perfection. Sri Anandamayi Ma ~ anandamayi-ma, @wisdomtrove
79:The difference between an admirer and a follower still remains, no matter where you are. The admirer never makes any true sacrifices. He always plays it safe. Though in words, phrases, songs, he is inexhaustible about how highly he prizes Christ, he renounces nothing, gives up nothing, will not reconstruct his life, will not be what he admires, and will not let his life express what it is he supposedly admires. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
80:The pleasure of any incident, whether it is of a sunset, or sexual, or any sensory pleasure, is recorded and thought over. So thought as pleasure plays a tremendous part in our life. Something happened yesterday which was a most lovely thing, a most happy event, it is recorded; thought comes upon it, chews it and keeps on thinking about it and wants it repeated tomorrow, whether it be sexual or otherwise. So thought gives vitality to an incident that is over. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
81:Basketball is an intricate, high-speed game filled with split-second, spontaneous decisions. But that spontaneity is possible only when everyone first engages in hours of highly repetitive and structured practice&
82:Everyone’s childhood plays itself out. No wonder no one knows the other or can completely understand. By this I don’t know if I’m just giving up with this conclusion or resigning myself — or maybe for the first time connecting with reality. How do we know the pain or another’s earlier years, let alone all that he drags with him since along the way at best a lot of leeway is needed for the other — yet how much is unhealthy for one to bear. I think to love bravely is the best and accept — as much as one can bear. ~ marilyn-monroe, @wisdomtrove
83:The individual (no matter how well-meaning he might be, no matter how much strength he might have, if only he would use it) does not have the passion to rip himself away from either the coils of Reflection or the seductive ambiguities of Reflection; nor do the surroundings and times have any events or passions, but rather provide a negative setting of a habit of reflection, which plays with some illusory project only to betray him in the end with a way out: it shows him that the most clever thing to do is nothing at all. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
84:Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible; Shakespeare's plays, for instance, seem to hang there complete by themselves. But when the web is pulled askew, hooked up at the edge, torn in the middle, one remembers that these webs are not spun in midair by incorporeal creatures, but are the work of suffering human beings, and are attached to the grossly material things, like health and money and the houses we live in. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
85:Artists use frauds to make human beings seem more wonderful than they really are. Dancers show us human beings who move much more gracefully than human beings really move. Films and books and plays show us people talking much more entertainingly than people really talk, make paltry human enterprises seem important. Singers and musicians show us human beings making sounds far more lovely than human beings really make. Architects give us temples in which something marvelous is obviously going on. Actually, practically nothing is going on. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
86:I think the other thing that's important is getting to a place, which very, very rarely happens with improvising groups, where somebody can decide not to play for a while. You watch any group of musicians improvising together and they nearly all play nearly all the time. In fact I often say that the biggest difference between classical music and everything else is that classical musicians sometimes shut up because they're told to, because the score tells them to. Whereas any music that's sort of based on folk or jazz, everybody plays all the time. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
87:It is with great satisfaction that I have signed into law the Social Security Amendments of 1961. They represent an additional step toward eliminating many of the hardships resulting from old age, disability, or the death of the family wage-earner. A nation's strength lies in the well-being of its people. The Social Security program plays an important part in providing for families, children, and older persons in time of stress, but it cannot remain static. Changes in our population, in our working habits, and in our standard of living require constant revision. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
88:It is with great satisfaction that I have signed into law the Social Security Amendments of 1961. They represent an additional step toward eliminating many of the hardships resulting from old-age, disability, or the death of the family wage earner. . . . A Nation's strength lies in the well being of its people. The social security program plays an important part in providing for families, children, and older persons in time of stress, but it cannot remain static. Changes in our population, in our working habits, and in our standard of living require constant revision. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
89:Man does not live by bread alone. I have known millionaires starving for lack of the nutriment which alone can sustain all that is human in man, and I know workmen, and many so-called poor men, who revel in luxuries beyond the power of those millionaires to reach. It is the mind that makes the body rich. There is no class so pitiably wretched as that which possesses money and nothing else. Money can only be the useful drudge of things immeasurably higher than itself. Exalted beyond this, as it sometimes is, it remains Caliban still and still plays the beast. My aspirations take a higher flight. Mine be it to have contributed to the enlightenment and the joys of the mind, to the things of the spirit, to all that tends to bring into the lives of the toilers of Pittsburgh sweetness and light. I hold this the noblest possible use of wealth ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:My curse on plays ~ William Butler Yeats,
2:I did plays in grade school. ~ Colin Hanks,
3:the world plays rough with fools, ~ Sarah Lark,
4:God plays pranks and directs. ~ Sathya Sai Baba,
5:I am just a guy who plays drums. ~ Bill Kreutzmann,
6:I used to like doing school plays. ~ Jamie Waylett,
7:Never tempt fate. It plays for keeps. ~ Mira Grant,
8:Time plays for the other team. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
9:I'm not someone who plays hard to get. ~ Heidi Klum,
10:Hindsight plays tricks on our minds. ~ Jeremy Siegel,
11:Destiny plays its role when least expected. ~ Praveer,
12:I don't direct the plays of others. ~ Israel Horovitz,
13:Never tempt fate. It plays for keeps. ~ Seanan McGuire,
14:But helpless Pieces of the Game He plays ~ Omar Khayyam,
15:Good plays drive bad playgoers crazy. ~ Brooks Atkinson,
16:I did two or three plays every summer. ~ Dabney Coleman,
17:I'd like to do plays, maybe a one man show. ~ Jean Reno,
18:this deaf elf sure plays a mean pinball. ~ Rick Riordan,
19:My fault now is making my plays too short. ~ Beth Henley,
20:I like musicals that look more like plays. ~ Alex Timbers,
21:One man in his time plays many parts ~ William Shakespeare,
22:Vanity plays lurid tricks with our memory. ~ Joseph Conrad,
23:I'm somebody who plays the piano... sometimes ~ Harold Budd,
24:Man is only fully human when he plays! ~ Friedrich Schiller,
25:One man in his time plays many parts. ~ William Shakespeare,
26:Flies purify the air, and plays--the morals. ~ Anton Chekhov,
27:I can't stand a ballplayer who plays in fear. ~ Red Auerbach,
28:I've always performed. I've done plays at home. ~ Odeya Rush,
29:Press plays "gotcha"; limit press briefings. ~ Newt Gingrich,
30:Accursed be he who plays with the devil. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
31:Flies purify the air, and plays - the morals. ~ Anton Chekhov,
32:I can make things happen when plays break down. ~ Vince Young,
33:Only assholes write plays about Nazis. ~ David Lindsay Abaire,
34:Some of my plays peter out and some pan out. ~ James M Barrie,
35:The creative mind plays with the object it loves. ~ Carl Jung,
36:The man who plays alone never loses.’ ” Guiliano ~ Mario Puzo,
37:I think I've got some more big plays left in me. ~ Victor Cruz,
38:The universe plays games, but not by the rules. ~ Sarah Noffke,
39:You might say that the universe plays the blues. ~ David Byrne,
40:A child playing air guitar plays no wrong notes ~ Victor Wooten,
41:But rules only work when everyone plays by them. ~ Jodi Picoult,
42:I make impact plays. I make game-changing plays. ~ LeBron James,
43:School plays are fine. Theater in school is fine. ~ Ben Affleck,
44:Sophia Loren plays peasants. I play ladies. ~ Gina Lollobrigida,
45:When the Tigress plays, the dragon whips its tail. ~ Ian Kerner,
46:Before trying a novel I wrote a couple of plays. ~ James Merrill,
47:He who plays advisor is no longer ambassador. ~ Pierre Corneille,
48:Ideas emerge from plays, not the other way around. ~ Sam Shepard,
49:Can an actor ever truly become the part he plays? ~ Bella Forrest,
50:Everyone who plays the flute should learn singing. ~ James Galway,
51:Loving long novels plays havoc with going to school ~ John Irving,
52:Panic plays no part in the training of a nurse. ~ Elizabeth Kenny,
53:Play not for gain, but sport. Who plays for more ~ George Herbert,
54:Plays bass guitar in rock band "Capitol Offense". ~ Mike Huckabee,
55:Random chance plays a huge part in everybody's life. ~ Gary Gygax,
56:The hare grows old as she plays in the sun ~ William Butler Yeats,
57:When God plays guitar he uses Jeff Beck's hands. ~ Steve Lukather,
58:Human intellect plays no role in redemption. ~ John F MacArthur Jr,
59:John Floridis was very inspiring. He plays so well. ~ Shawn Colvin,
60:My son, Wolfgang, plays drums, guitars and bass. ~ Eddie Van Halen,
61:Andrea Jaeger plays tennis like she's double-parked. ~ Mary Carillo,
62:Education plays a key role in preventing genocide. ~ David Eagleman,
63:I like plays, movies, everything. It doesn't matter. ~ Michael Dorn,
64:Plays...Maidens aspiring to Godheads and vice versa! ~ Tom Stoppard,
65:Technique plays a part - you have to know how to play. ~ Jack White,
66:The way a team plays as a whole determines its success. ~ Babe Ruth,
67:Everyone plays their own crucial part towards the film. ~ Tom Felton,
68:I don't like what the radio plays for the most part. ~ Kristin Hersh,
69:I was in 20 Shakespearean plays by the time I was 20. ~ John Lithgow,
70:luck plays a large role in every story of success; ~ Daniel Kahneman,
71:That mush plays havoc downstairs, you know? ~ Alexander Gordon Smith,
72:The plays should have the half-life of plutonium. ~ Suzan Lori Parks,
73:The process of doing plays will make you an actor. ~ Stephen Collins,
74:All plays are social comment to one extent or another. ~ Edward Albee,
75:Another key role the CEO plays is to focus efforts. ~ Scott D Anthony,
76:History plays for keeps; individuals play for time. ~ Gregory Maguire,
77:I do not believe that the Good Lord plays dice. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
78:I did plays and movies and whatever all over the place. ~ Joe Mantegna,
79:I'm lucky. Hard work is the key, but luck plays a part. ~ Neil Diamond,
80:I'm not someone who plays a part for the press junket. ~ Kirsten Dunst,
81:Is a gay play a play that has sex with other plays? ~ Harvey Fierstein,
82:the artist plays freely on his faculty of cognition. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
83:The willow tree plays the water like a harp. ~ Ramon Gomez de la Serna,
84:Zachary Roerig who plays Matt, he's just a character. ~ Candice Accola,
85:Even if I don't have a job, I work on plays and scenes. ~ Jeff Goldblum,
86:God plays a lot of jokes on us to get our attention. ~ Garrison Keillor,
87:People underestimate the role fate plays in our lives. ~ Sally Hepworth,
88:Every actor has to love and loathe the character he plays. ~ Ian McShane,
89:I tell you, revenge plays a big part in momentum down here. ~ Eric Davis,
90:I've been calling plays in the huddle since I was seven. ~ Philip Rivers,
91:Music plays a big part in my life. I am a big music nerd. ~ Olivia Wilde,
92:Now, games have been democratized. Everyone plays games. ~ Chris DeWolfe,
93:The musician who always plays on the same string is laughed at. ~ Horace,
94:You are a pool of clear water where the light plays ~ Jeanette Winterson,
95:I love everybody. Each one plays the role they have to play. ~ Meher Baba,
96:It's not whether God plays dice; it's how God plays dice. ~ David Gilmour,
97:Loyal? As loyal as anyone who plays second fiddle ever is. ~ Willa Cather,
98:Nicklaus plays a kind of golf with which I am not familiar. ~ Bobby Jones,
99:Everyone plays guitar alone, but we can play side by side. ~ Jennifer Lane,
100:How, like a moth, the simple maid Still plays around the flame! ~ John Gay,
101:I'm the drummer that kind of plays more on top of the beat. ~ Tony Palermo,
102:Story plays a role in the budget process when building reels. ~ Ed Catmull,
103:I shall never believe that God plays dice with the world. ~ Albert Einstein,
104:The NBA is tough. Everybody plays hard and every game is vital. ~ Pau Gasol,
105:When Eddie Gray plays on snow, he doesn't leave any footprints. ~ Don Revie,
106:I did some school plays in elementary school, but that was it. ~ Jason Mewes,
107:Image plays a huge part in my music and in my lifestyle. ~ Theophilus London,
108:I think lingerie plays a big part in how you carry yourself. ~ Nicole Richie,
109:Music is my mistress and she plays second fiddle to no one. ~ Duke Ellington,
110:There are like to be short graces where the devil plays host. ~ Charles Lamb,
111:Having to travel so much plays havoc with your personal life. ~ Renee Fleming,
112:Most entrepreneurs will admit luck plays a part in success. ~ Richard Branson,
113:Only a fool plays by the rules when the other side doesn’t. ~ Andrew Peterson,
114:Sometimes fate just plays a strange game of Scrabble with you. ~ Pawan Mishra,
115:The average man plays to the gallery of his own self-esteem. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
116:The mind plays tricks on itself in order to stay in one piece. ~ Meg Wolitzer,
117:Even in writing an annual report, the unconscious plays a role. ~ Mason Cooley,
118:Inevitably, every part an actor plays contains some of himself. ~ David Suchet,
119:Machine learning plays a part in every stage of your life. If ~ Pedro Domingos,
120:Money plays the largest part in determining the course of history. ~ Karl Marx,
121:Delight comes only when our soul dances and plays with another. ~ Deepak Chopra,
122:I don't like television when it gets near to photographed plays. ~ Orson Welles,
123:I'm really an actor first. I'd love to do more straight plays. ~ Shuler Hensley,
124:I've written a couple screenplays and half-finished plays. ~ Christopher Meloni,
125:My pan plays down an unprecedented amount of our national debt. ~ George W Bush,
126:Remember, a hostage negotiator plays a unique role: he has to win. ~ Chris Voss,
127:They don't tell you this in school, Everybody plays the fool. ~ Smokey Robinson,
128:He that plays the king shall be welcome- his Majesty shall ~ William Shakespeare,
129:I thought the plays would speak for themselves. But they didn't. ~ Harold Pinter,
130:Life plays the same lovely and agonizing joke on all of us. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
131:The amateur plays for fun. The professional plays for keeps. ~ Steven Pressfield,
132:The best team does not always win, it's the team that plays the best. ~ Rob Bell,
133:Tim Price is truly blessed - he plays music because he loves it. ~ Charles Lloyd,
134:Your perception plays tricks when you are hoping for something. ~ Buzz Bissinger,
135:Actors between plays are like ghosts looking for bodies to inhabit. ~ Gail Godwin,
136:Coltrane’s labyrinthine solo plays on in my ears, never ending. ~ Haruki Murakami,
137:Free will isn’t always about choice; often weakness plays the game ~ Jeyn Roberts,
138:I'm the empty stage where various actors act out various plays. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
139:My brother plays guitar and base and writes. His name is Chase Ryan. ~ Debby Ryan,
140:Nobody ever plays the romantic part I write for them in my head. ~ Somi Ekhasomhi,
141:Plays never feel like the right thing to do at the time. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
142:You believe in a god that plays dice; I believe in law & order. ~ Albert Einstein,
143:Beautiful music plays, but not everyone with ears can hear it. ~ Danielle Trussoni,
144:Dancers are instruments, like a piano the choreographer plays. ~ George Balanchine,
145:Hatred plays the same part in government as acid in chemistry. ~ Winston Churchill,
146:I write plays instinctively. I don't like writing movie scripts. ~ Jesse Eisenberg,
147:Of course I acted in school plays but mostly as angels or mushrooms. ~ Maj Sj wall,
148:People come along and impose their own stuff on plays, and it shows. ~ Judd Hirsch,
149:When I was younger, I was a robot. Wind her up and she plays tennis. ~ Chris Evert,
150:All things too great end soon. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
151:Anybody who plays golf will tell you that you play against yourself. ~ Martin Sheen,
152:Self confidence plays an important part in every aspect of man's life. ~ Dalai Lama,
153:She kind of resembles Gal Gadot, the actress who plays Wonder Woman. ~ Elle Kennedy,
154:Television has dried up for my generation, so its plays and films. ~ Michael Gambon,
155:You believe in a God who plays dice, I in complete law and order. ~ Albert Einstein,
156:You know I can't stand Shakespeare's plays, but yours are even worse. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
157:An impatient person plays differently than a more patient person. ~ Vladimir Kramnik,
158:It is true that there are few plays of Shakespeare that I haven't done. ~ Judi Dench,
159:Music is the soundtrack to life. It plays the melody of our being. ~ Michael Jackson,
160:This outfit called Los Angeles Theatre Works does readings of plays. ~ Jeffrey Jones,
161:To be able to analyze plays and novels is so relevant to acting. ~ Holliday Grainger,
162:Very few plays would work well with an altar as a fixed centerpiece. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
163:All the women in the world want a phony rock star who plays guitar. ~ John Mellencamp,
164:A lot of people like to run in plays because it's a nice, steady job. ~ Jackie Cooper,
165:good plays prove the better by the help of good epilogues. What ~ William Shakespeare,
166:If you can't run, and the plays in front of you, you just can't get gay. ~ Jim Palmer,
167:I think we can all agree that this deaf elf sure plays a mean pinball. ~ Rick Riordan,
168:Movies have takes. But plays are like life - you don't really get takes. ~ Chris Rock,
169:The uglier a man's legs are, the better he plays golf. It's almost a law. ~ H G Wells,
170:A lot of times, I played bass on songs. Gene plays guitar on some songs. ~ Ace Frehley,
171:Jonny Evans plays sort of international football with Northern Ireland ~ Phil Thompson,
172:That is how war corrupts us. It plays on our pride in our own free will. ~ John Fowles,
173:The uglier a man's legs are, the better he plays golf - it's almost a law. ~ H G Wells,
174:And I've got some screenplays and plays ready to dip into when I need to. ~ Neil LaBute,
175:I did write a couple of original screenplays, but I'd rather write plays. ~ Beth Henley,
176:I speak and the child plays: who can be more serious than we are? ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
177:Jacobean plays, before Shakespeare, were particularly visceral. ~ Christopher Eccleston,
178:My plays tend to be peopled with outsiders in search of clarity. ~ David Lindsay Abaire,
179:Nick plays a corrupt politician, which is kind of a redundant statement. ~ Alan Rudolph,
180:Ovechkin does not play like a Russian. He plays like an NHL player. ~ Vladislav Tretiak,
181:She plays music to heal herself, but nothing can heal her brokenness. ~ Neal Shusterman,
182:The Society music plays around and over us, but our thoughts are our own. ~ Ally Condie,
183:I cannot explain my plays. Each must find out for himself what is meant ~ Samuel Beckett,
184:If you want to support a writer, produce the first five plays he writes. ~ August Wilson,
185:I think it all goes down to who plays the better football on the night. ~ Steven Gerrard,
186:My dad also plays a little banjo and guitar, my mom plays the mandolin. ~ Page McConnell,
187:Now simmer blinks on flowery braes, And o'er the crystal streamlet plays. ~ Robert Burns,
188:Whoever plays deep must necessarily lose his money or his character. ~ Lord Chesterfield,
189:Characters don't belong to anyone, not even the person who plays them. ~ Antonio Banderas,
190:Dare to err and to dream. Deep meaning often lies in childish plays. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
191:I'm not a singer who plays a bit of drums. I'm a drummer that sings a bit. ~ Phil Collins,
192:I was always acting. I was doing after-school plays and stuff like that. ~ Justin Theroux,
193:I write my plays to create an excuse for full-tilt acting and performing. ~ Eric Bogosian,
194:Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules. ~ J D Salinger,
195:Only run special plays for special players; find plays that fit your players. ~ Don Meyer,
196:Ranger plays by his own set of rules, and I don't have a complete copy. ~ Janet Evanovich,
197:The rich are those who play to win. The middle class plays not to lose. ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
198:A couple of flop plays, a death in the family, and it could all collapse. ~ Patrick Marber,
199:Actually, every time I am back in New York, I read for as many plays as I can. ~ Chad Lowe,
200:anyway. He plays the same old stuff every time. I’ll have Charlie let him ~ Danielle Steel,
201:Awareness of motivation plays a central role in the path of liberation. ~ Joseph Goldstein,
202:Dare greatly and thou shalt be great. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
203:I write the music, produce it and the band plays within the parameters that I set. ~ Sting,
204:Mobile phones would have wrecked the plots of most of Shakespeare's plays. ~ Jackie French,
205:Tom Brady rises up to the occasion and plays well. That is just who he is. ~ Deion Sanders,
206:Well, men go to musicals. Women are the ones that buy the tickets for plays. ~ John O Hara,
207:When a woman who is sexual takes off her top, it plays into something. ~ Emily Ratajkowski,
208:A painter paints, a musician plays, a writer writes - but a movie actor waits. ~ Mary Astor,
209:I call myself a comic.But I started as an actress. I did plays since I was 5. ~ Amy Schumer,
210:Love, that elusive leading lady, plays too many parts to be typecast. ~ Francesca Lia Block,
211:One fine day I discovered that more complex plays really have to be directed. ~ Trevor Nunn,
212:Plato's dialogues bear at least some similarities to the classical plays. ~ Benjamin Jowett,
213:That's what happens in plays, yes? The shit hits the fan."
--Edward Albee ~ Edward Albee,
214:Adore and what you adore attempt to be. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
215:Devoid of all romance, the music plays and everyone must dance. I'm bowing out. ~ Don McLean,
216:I got Jimmy Hall from Wet Willie and he also plays now with Hank Williams Jr. ~ Gregg Allman,
217:I have very limited craftsmanship. And a lot of the stuff I make plays on that. ~ David Rees,
218:My father was very musical, and music plays quite a large part in my life. ~ William Golding,
219:The heart lies and the head plays tricks with us, but the eyes see true. ~ George R R Martin,
220:But no one—and I repeat no one—plays with my lady balls. That just won’t do. ~ Sawyer Bennett,
221:For an instant God opens his door and His orchestra plays the Fifth Symphony. ~ Jean Sibelius,
222:For nations, history plays the role that character confers on human beings. ~ Henry Kissinger,
223:He deemed the Georgian “an insincere, masked dictator who plays with people. ~ Stephen Kotkin,
224:I only like decoration if it plays second to the architecture of a dress. ~ Madeleine Vionnet,
225:It doesn't necessarily mean at all that the composer plays his own works best. ~ Leo Ornstein,
226:Everybody I know who goes out and plays a little softball, they break their leg. ~ Nora Ephron,
227:Every rock'n'roll band I know, guys with long hair and tattoos, plays golf now. ~ Alice Cooper,
228:It is a law of nature that everybody plays a hole badly when playing through. ~ Bernard Darwin,
229:I wrote a lot when I was younger, though never anything like plays or scripts. ~ Merritt Wever,
230:Music sounds different to the one who plays it. It is the musician's curse. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
231:Music sounds different to the one who plays it. It is the musician’s curse. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
232:The only difference between a winner and a loser is a winner plays until he wins ~ Big K R I T,
233:The only people who do plays in LA are people who can't get jobs in TV shows. ~ William H Macy,
234:The rain plays a little sleep song on our roof at night And I love the rain. ~ Langston Hughes,
235:The Universe is the game of the self, which plays hide and seek forever and ever. ~ Alan Watts,
236:One age has seen the dreams another lives. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
237:Saying a camera takes nice pictures is like saying a guitar plays nice melodies. ~ Darren Rowse,
238:When the band plays fast, you play slow; when the band plays slow, you play fast. ~ Miles Davis,
239:Yes, but I have to say this: the band is going to decide where the band plays. ~ Sebastian Bach,
240:Before 'Grey's Anatomy,' I was doing musicals, plays, commercials, you name it. ~ Chandra Wilson,
241:Doing classic plays is wonderful. It's a wonderful way of developing style. ~ Christine Baranski,
242:If you want to see your plays performed the way you wrote them, become President. ~ Vaclav Havel,
243:Plays are not as important as players, and players are not as important as teammates ~ Don Meyer,
244:You are a dear soul who plays polo, and I am a poor Pole who plays solo. ~ Ignacy Jan Paderewski,
245:A stander-by may sometimes, perhaps, see more of the game than he that plays it. ~ Jonathan Swift,
246:God not only plays dice, he throws them in the corner where you can't see them. ~ Stephen Hawking,
247:I got into plays in high school then I ended up going to college for it. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
248:Meryl [Streep] plays the me-ish character. I love Meryl. She's totally wonderful. ~ Carrie Fisher,
249:Our histories, our novels, our poems, our plays—they are all in this one book. ~ Simon Winchester,
250:plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn’t know it. ~ Paulo Coelho,
251:The 24 Hour Plays is a quite brilliant, exhilarating event for everyone concerned. ~ Kevin Spacey,
252:When Lester plays, he almost seems to be singing; one can almost hear the words. ~ Billie Holiday,
253:And, in order to possess the Truth, the plays of the lower nature must be stopped. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
254:Hope not to hear truth often in royal courts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
255:I had always written. I had written stories and poems. Then I started writing plays. ~ Lena Dunham,
256:In school nativity plays I was always the bloody little donkey, I was never Mary. ~ Geri Halliwell,
257:I write plays because dialogue is the most respectable way of contradicting myself. ~ Tom Stoppard,
258:The country music stations plays soft but there's nothing, really nothing to turn off. ~ Bob Dylan,
259:The man who occupies the first place seldom plays the principal part. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
260:A guy has to have the want-to. You don't just make plays by a mistake, by accident. ~ Anquan Boldin,
261:I want my fights to be seen as plays that have a beginning, a middle and an end ~ Sugar Ray Leonard,
262:I wouldn't mind seeing someone erase my record of hitting into four triple plays. ~ Brooks Robinson,
263:Man out of Nature wakes to God’s complexities, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
264:Soccer is a feast for the eyes that watch it and a joy for the body that plays it ~ Eduardo Galeano,
265:You don’t know what’s going to happen in the end, and that’s what the best plays are. ~ Katori Hall,
266:A good football team plays offense and defense. You have to be aggressive and disrupt. ~ Vince Flynn,
267:And mine’s a bubble not blown up for praise, But just to play with, as an infant plays. ~ Lord Byron,
268:Death fosters life that life may suckle death. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
269:Don't go out of your way to correct a false assumption if it plays to your advantage. ~ Ivanka Trump,
270:If someone plays a brooding actor in a film, people think they're brooding all the time. ~ Joe Rogan,
271:Musical taste changes so little. The sound of late childhood plays at our funerals. ~ Richard Powers,
272:One will only be free when one plays and one's society will become a piece of art. ~ Herbert Marcuse,
273:When Jack Benny plays the violin, it sounds as though the strings are still in the cat. ~ Fred Allen,
274:When you've seen all of Ionesco's plays, I felt at the end, you've seen one of them. ~ Kenneth Tynan,
275:Are we not all a thousand characters in millions of plays throughout our lifetime? ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
276:Beauty is rather a light that plays over the symmetry of things than that symmetry itself. ~ Plotinus,
277:I'm a great believer in luck and the extraordinary role that plays in all of our lives. ~ Paul Newman,
278:It is not at all obvious that reducing history to morality plays makes anyone moral. ~ Timothy Snyder,
279:It's not always the best team that wins the game it's the team that plays better. ~ Georges St Pierre,
280:Men have made kings that folly might have food. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
281:People are fascinated by the rich: Shakespeare wrote plays about kings, not beggars. ~ Dominick Dunne,
282:The British story of Peter Pan is about a boy who never grows up and plays all day. ~ Donna Jo Napoli,
283:The power of a positive self-image plays a vital role in experiencing perfect health. ~ Deepak Chopra,
284:You know your goals and what you need to do to get better-just eliminate the bad plays. ~ Eli Manning,
285:Because a man plays a king superbly well does not mean that he would make a good king. ~ Louis L Amour,
286:Even when the strings are broken in our lives, the sweet music plays on in our hearts. ~ Bryant McGill,
287:For you know that it's a fool who plays it cool, by making his world a little colder. ~ Paul McCartney,
288:God not only plays dice, He also sometimes throw the dice where they cannot be seen. ~ Stephen Hawking,
289:Humor plays a key role in the playbooks of the world's most inspiring public speakers. ~ Carmine Gallo,
290:I do remember realizing one day that I loved plays more than I loved playing concertos. ~ John Cariani,
291:I like plays where people talk a lot. Conversation is sustained. Argument is sustained. ~ Tom Stoppard,
292:I think generational trauma also plays a big part in the reactions to Israeli politics. ~ Jill Soloway,
293:Sappho survives, because we sing her songs; And Eschylus, because we read his plays! ~ Robert Browning,
294:Schooling after the second grade plays only a minor role in creating or reducing gaps. ~ James Heckman,
295:The crowd sometimes plays a tremendous role to give you wings and carry you to victory. ~ Bela Karolyi,
296:The moments are Fate’s thoughts
Watching me. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
297:There, the Wheel of Fortune everybody plays though it’s universally known to be rigged. ~ Erika Swyler,
298:When Love desires Love,
    Then Love is born. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
299:Words are but ghosts unless they speak the heart. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
300:God not only plays dice, he also sometimes throws the dice where they cannot be seen. ~ Stephen Hawking,
301:In Islam
All men are equal underneath the King. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
302:Love is the hoop of the gods
Hearts to combine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
303:Love itself is sweet enough
Though unreturned. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
304:There's a child in the forest! He plays a flute you can hear with your heart ears. ~ TheMidnightGospel,
305:When I stub my toe it's like I pressed a button that plays all the curse words I know. ~ Demetri Martin,
306:You are a placebo responder. Your body plays tricks on your mind. You cannot be trusted. ~ Ben Goldacre,
307:A leaf of all colors plays a golden-string fiddle
To a double-e waterfall over my back ~ Jerry Garcia,
308:And so he plays his part; the sixth age shifts'... I usually have trouble with that phrase. ~ John Wayne,
309:Happiness is a song that plays you when you share it with the people who matter the most ~ Emily Murdoch,
310:If one plays good music, people don't listen and if one plays bad music people don't talk. ~ Oscar Wilde,
311:I made the tenor sax - there's nobody plays like me and I don't play like anybody else ~ Coleman Hawkins,
312:It was in high school that I first became interested in acting. We put on lots of plays. ~ Blythe Danner,
313:Sloan is like the cat that plays with the mouse before eating it, just because it can. ~ Victoria Schwab,
314:The master of my stars is he
Who owns no master. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
315:All things Vary to keep the secret witness pleased. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
316:His game is baccarat. Far as anyone knows he plays clean. He’s just good at it. Spends ~ Michael Connelly,
317:I write plays because writing dialogue is the only respectable way contradicting yourself. ~ Tom Stoppard,
318:The cat is obeying its blood instinct when it plays with the mouse! It's made that way. ~ Agatha Christie,
319:The film is the first art form capable of demonstrating how matter plays tricks on man. ~ Walter Benjamin,
320:The hollow horn plays wasted words, proves to warn that he not busy being born is busy dying. ~ Bob Dylan,
321:When you're doing what's right, on and off the field, the Lord steps in and plays a part. ~ Austin Collie,
322:At school there was no acting to be had other than school plays which I did now and again. ~ Ewan McGregor,
323:Children's plays are not sports, and should be deemed as their most serious actions. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
324:Humor plays close to the big hot fire which is Truth, and sometimes the reader feels the heat. ~ E B White,
325:I also write plays, so I understand the writers mind, and how obsessed you can get writing. ~ Jeff Daniels,
326:I always wanted to be an independent maverick, writing plays and putting them on myself. ~ Christian McKay,
327:If they ever do my life story, whoever plays me needs lots of hair color and high heels. ~ Charlize Theron,
328:I mean, I did plays in high school, but I was convinced you couldn't make a living doing it. ~ Adam Driver,
329:Oh yeah, I'd love to be a comedian. I've done a lot, but always in the confines of plays. ~ Michael Gambon,
330:A professional plays hurt. A professional takes neither success nor failure personally. In ~ Jocelyn K Glei,
331:A recurrent theme of this book is that luck plays a large role in every story of success; ~ Daniel Kahneman,
332:At the extreme north, the voyagers are obliged to dance and act plays for employment. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
333:Fall in love with someone who truly deserves your heart. Not with someone who plays with it. ~ Sarah Dessen,
334:I am always a great fan of keeping things on an eye level for comedy because it plays better. ~ James Bobin,
335:I don't miss acting. I don't even see movies. I don't see plays. I don't watch television. ~ Charles Grodin,
336:I've been in dance schools since I was four. I went to the Brit school. I did adverts and plays. ~ Jessie J,
337:Life is a stage where the worst actor plays the king while the best actor the beggar. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
338:the French write plays and paint as naturally as we play jazz - it's just a national gift. ~ Alice B Toklas,
339:The only difference was, you could play the music again and again; a life plays only once. ~ Peter Robinson,
340:Time plays a role in almost every decision. And some decisions define your attitude about time. ~ John Cale,
341:For well you know that it's a fool who plays it cool
by making his world a little colder... ~ The Beatles,
342:Isn’t this the Eolian? I had heard that this is where pride pays silver and plays golden. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
343:Memory plays tricks. Memory is another word for story, and nothing is more unreliable. ~ Ann Marie MacDonald,
344:Music plays a very important role in my life. I'm a frustrated musician. I play the drums. ~ Ronald Perelman,
345:The greatest luxury is being able to go to movies and plays now and then in the afternoons. ~ Robert MacNeil,
346:The hypocrite who always plays one and the same part ceases at last to be a hypocrite. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
347:The motion pictures I have made and the plays I have chosen to direct represent my convictions. ~ Elia Kazan,
348:Ali Bell doesn’t play hide-and-seek,” Lucas said. “She plays hide-and-pray-I-don’t-find-you. ~ Gena Showalter,
349:Co-operation between governments still plays an important role and will remain indispensable. ~ Lionel Jospin,
350:Develop a reputation as a person who, rather than talking a good game, actually plays a good game. ~ Bob Burg,
351:Every play should be 90 minutes. There would be so many more theatre-goers if plays were shorter. ~ Eve Myles,
352:...everything seems scarier at night. It's just an illusion. A trick the darkness plays on us. ~ Blake Crouch,
353:I saw Hamlet Prince of Denmark played; but now the old plays begin to disgust this refined age. ~ John Evelyn,
354:It doesn't matter where Messi plays, if it's cold or hot, he always proves that he's the best. ~ Gerard Pique,
355:Never underestimate the role pretension plays when it comes to creating euphemistic language. ~ George Carlin,
356:Playing for money, or adopting the attitude of one who plays for money, lowers the fever. ~ Steven Pressfield,
357:The disturbing thing about Cardan is how well he plays the fool to disguise his own cleverness. ~ Holly Black,
358:And the wind plays on those great sonorous harps, the shrouds and masts of ships. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
359:Anybody who plays the stock market not as an insider is like a man buying cows in the moonlight. ~ Daniel Drew,
360:beauty’ is related not to ‘loveliness’ but to a state in which reality plays a part. ~ William Carlos Williams,
361:Every gentleman plays billiards, but someone who plays billiards too well, is no gentleman. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
362:I can write better plays than any living danced, and dance better than any living playwright. ~ George M Cohan,
363:I did a few more plays, and then I went to L.A., because I knew I could get a coaching job there. ~ Lee Majors,
364:I started writing plays, but the fact that plays don't last forever was too much for me to bear. ~ Lena Dunham,
365:No matter what he does, every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. ~ Paulo Coelho,
366:No one plays this or any game perfectly. It's the guy who recovers from his mistakes who wins. ~ Phil Jackson,
367:Shakespeare is a drunken savage with some imagination whose plays please only in London and Canada. ~ Voltaire,
368:The Internet is a modern infrastructure that plays a key role in the future of the state. ~ Thomas de Maiziere,
369:Advertising also plays a role. Consumers need to know about something before they can buy it. So ~ Jonah Berger,
370:Did you think of party dresses
and high school plays
or hallways full of lovers not yet met? ~ Rod McKuen,
371:I always did plays, I got the comedic roles in college ... or, uh, the ones that would get naked. ~ Amy Schumer,
372:I think he [Vaclav Havel] felt that he could speak more truth, in a way, through writing plays. ~ Judy Woodruff,
373:My plays are always pushing towards cinema anyway. They're down and dirty, real and more fun. ~ Martin McDonagh,
374:My plays are made up of long monologues, which is similar to prose working with the language ~ Elfriede Jelinek,
375:Oh honey, have you learned nothing from these plays? Ain't such a line between faking and being. ~ Gayle Forman,
376:silly plays instead of simply confronting the usurper that was Claudius: man-to-man, face-to-face ~ Karen White,
377:Sometimes people offer you plays, they offer you parts, but they only offer it because I'm famous. ~ Chris Rock,
378:There's so much music out there & so many possibilities. I like anyone who plays any instrument. ~ Bill Frisell,
379:Do not make the mistake of believing that he does not love you because he plays at not caring. ~ Cassandra Clare,
380:I certainly did plays in high school and community theater, and I want to get back on the stage. ~ Busy Philipps,
381:I thought I might be a band instructor, someone who plays all the instruments and teaches others. ~ Adrian Belew,
382:I want to be known as a solid all-around receiver thats fast, not a fast guy that plays receiver. ~ Torrey Smith,
383:I want to see a UN that enables a gathering of energies in which business plays its proper role. ~ Mary Robinson,
384:I wrote two plays before I was cast on The Neighbors. They actually got published, which was cool. ~ Clara Mamet,
385:My family was never cultural in that we never went to see plays, my mum wasn't very into films. ~ Gemma Arterton,
386:Soonest is always best
When noble deeds are to be done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
387:what we choose to focus on and what we choose to ignore—plays in defining the quality of our life. ~ Cal Newport,
388:As we have more women in power, so the plays and the TV dramas are reflecting what's happening. ~ Felicity Kendal,
389:Every team has kind of a style or adjectives people use to describe the game that the team plays. ~ Rachel Martin,
390:I grew up in Jackson, Mississippi, really in suburbia, so my mother was in community theatre plays. ~ Beth Henley,
391:I've been blessed by doing classic plays on Broadway, which was one of my great dreams forever. ~ Michael Emerson,
392:Man is a creature blinded by the sun
Who errs by seeing ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
393:Michael Ralph brilliantly plays the street prophet, a West Indian who foreshadows the Harlem riot. ~ Debbie Allen,
394:Then my hostess said, "Oh, Denis (as my name was before I dyed it) never plays the part of a man. ~ Quentin Crisp,
395:To some women, a job plays the role of a man. To most women, a man plays the role of a job. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
396:a great social success is a pretty girl who plays her cards as carefully as if she were plain ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
397:All of my kids are into music. My older daughter plays guitar, piano, sings. My young son, he sings. ~ Martin Gore,
398:He felt about books as doctors feel about medicines, or managers about plays--cynical but hopeful. ~ Rose Macaulay,
399:He who climbeth on the highest mountains, laugheth at all tragic plays and tragic realities. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
400:I did a couple of plays in junior high school, maybe high school, and then I did a play in college. ~ Jodie Foster,
401:I did one or two plays at school. Once I played a tree, so I never thought I would be a good actor. ~ Suraj Sharma,
402:I submit all my plays to the National Theatre for rejection. To assure myself I am seeing clearly. ~ Howard Barker,
403:Once you see the drivers in Indonesia you understand why religion plays such a part in their lives. ~ Erma Bombeck,
404:The BBC, during its 24 hours on the air, plays a very wide range of stuff. And it's not commercial. ~ Robin Trower,
405:The last new song you liked came out a long, long time ago, and the radio never plays it anymore. ~ Nic Pizzolatto,
406:We notice what varies and changes more than what plays a large role but doesn’t change. We ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
407:A great social success is a pretty girl who plays her cards as carefully as if she were plain. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
408:Crime and vice generally require darkness for prowling. They disappear when light plays upon them. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
409:Every man plays the fool once in his live, but to marry is playing the fool all one's life long. ~ William Congreve,
410:Fancy restrained may be compared to a fountain, which plays highest by diminishing the aperture. ~ Oliver Goldsmith,
411:I tend to think of action movies as exuberant morality plays in which good triumphs over evil. ~ Sylvester Stallone,
412:It's a dangerous game that comedy plays. Sometimes it tells you the truth; sometimes it delays it. ~ Elvis Costello,
413:Men of wit, learning and virtue might strike out every offensive or unbecoming passage from plays. ~ Jonathan Swift,
414:My mom was always pretty supportive. She saw me do plays and she'd always act out the parts I did. ~ Angela Bassett,
415:Paranoia plays into all of us. Trust is a terrifying idea of not knowing who we can rely on. ~ Eric Christian Olsen,
416:See how he throws his baited lines about,/And plays his men as anglers play their trout. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
417:Some plays just come out of me, just on instincts. I'll make a play and wonder, How did I do that? ~ Roberto Alomar,
418:Upscale young men seem to go for the kind of woman who plays with a full deck of credit cards. ~ Barbara Ehrenreich,
419:You know, my sister sings, my brother plays drums in my band. My whole family is a bunch of musicians. ~ Bruno Mars,
420:You know our Alice. She plays hide-and-seek but sometimes forgets to ask someone to look for her. ~ Gregory Maguire,
421:God has a hard-on for a Marine because we kill everything we see. He plays His game, we play ours. ~ Stanley Kubrick,
422:I like a drama. And I think that's the basis of good films, or good plays, is to have a nice drama. ~ Clint Eastwood,
423:My mother had lived in London since I was little, so she never got to see my school plays and stuff. ~ Lauren Graham,
424:When a man plays with your heart it is for one of two reasons: He knows he can or he is undecided. ~ Shannon L Alder,
425:Everyones childhood plays itself out. No wonder no one knows the other or can completely understand. ~ Marilyn Monroe,
426:If Miss Honeychurch ever takes to live as she plays, it will be very exciting--both for us and for her. ~ E M Forster,
427:I loved the theatre-my dad gave me many plays and books to read. The dramatic form just spoke to me. ~ Danny Burstein,
428:One will only be free when one plays and one's society will become a piece of art". - Herbert Marcuse ~ Manfred Eigen,
429:The gods use instruments,
Not ask their consent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act Five,
430:The unforeseen, that strange, haughty power which plays with man, had seized Gauvain and held him fast. ~ Victor Hugo,
431:We move as we must,
Not as we choose, whatever we may think. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
432:every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn't know it ~ Paulo Coelho,
433:I'd love to do theater. I've done so many plays in my life. I still think of that as my main thing. ~ Taylor Schilling,
434:I'm not responsible for the commercialization. The people who produce the plays are responsible for it. ~ Edward Albee,
435:I play dumb like Jessica Simpson plays dumb. But we know exactly what we're doing. We're smart blondes. ~ Paris Hilton,
436:I think I've done 200 plays and 125 movies, so I've been very lucky to have made a living at acting. ~ Charles Durning,
437:It is absolutely clear that government plays a key role, as a catalyst, in promoting long-run growth. ~ Fareed Zakaria,
438:Management plays a role just keeping everything in place for you and making sure everything's going right. ~ Meek Mill,
439:My first few plays took place in the South and even The Lucky Spot was in the thirties but in Louisiana. ~ Beth Henley,
440:Plays close, movies wrap and TV series eventually get cancelled, and we were cancelled in three season. ~ George Takei,
441:Sweet is the scene where genial friendship plays the pleasing game of interchanging praise. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
442:There's a fine line between playing with fear and then taking bad plays and playing with no fear. ~ Robert Griffin III,
443:This is why the classical of the jazz music station plays?
to give a ground of meaning to our pain? ~ Adrienne Rich,
444:Better is the man of humble standing that works for himself than one who plays the great man but lacks bread. ~ Solomon,
445:I don't think anybody in the game over the last several years has made more plays than Richard Sherman. ~ Deion Sanders,
446:I took an acting class at Cerritos Junior College and I did a handful of plays, maybe five or six plays. ~ John Corbett,
447:Music and thunder are the rhythmic chords
Of one majestic harp. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
448:Play is fun, but is also meaningful and complex. The more intelligent the animal, the more it plays. ~ Lawrence J Cohen,
449:There is no better indication of what the people of any period are like than the plays they go to see. ~ Edith Hamilton,
450:A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. ~ Wayne Gretzky,
451:As a student in London, I had seen so many shows, so many plays and had seen so many greats of the day. ~ David Naughton,
452:But those two plays left me on fresh terms with language. I didn't always have to speak in my own voice. ~ James Merrill,
453:Cause you know that its a fool, who plays it cool, by making his world a little colder...
- The Beatles ~ The Beatles,
454:if he stares at your ass or plays with your hair one more time, I won’t be held accountable for my actions. ~ Laura Kaye,
455:Platoons and plays and stores and congresses do not end - they simply move on to a different dimension. ~ David Eagleman,
456:School plays were invented partly to give parents and easy opportunity to demonstrate their priorities. ~ Calvin Trillin,
457:So many plays with magic in them that would be a terrific invitation to an imaginative animation team. ~ Kenneth Branagh,
458:We now have no record of these famous stage plays, so it turned out to be very narrow-minded thinking. ~ Debbie Reynolds,
459:When I'm able to see the ice ahead of time when I get the puck, I'm able to make some pretty good plays. ~ Mario Lemieux,
460:Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent. ~ Miles Davis,
461:Being patient ... and not becoming too stressed out over the big plays, those are the things to remember. ~ Troy Polamalu,
462:For a child, everywhere is a playground; for an adult, it is the same, only the plays are different! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
463:I'd love to do radio plays. I think that one should be open to everything and shouldn't limit oneself. ~ Malcolm McDowell,
464:I've walked out of films. But for every film I've ever walked out of, I've probably walked out of 500 plays. ~ Mike Leigh,
465:I would write plays for my grandmother, who was stone deaf, my mother and the dog, that was our audience. ~ Jayne Meadows,
466:People aren't hiring just a picture, they're hiring someone they can work with. That plays a big role . ~ Gregory Heisler,
467:The family unit plays a critical role in our society and in the training of the generation to come. ~ Sandra Day O Connor,
468:The requiem has started, and when the last melody plays, the only applause will be sweet, eternal silence. ~ Julie Kagawa,
469:The way I see it, the longer I live here the less of a choice you will all have not to hire me for plays. ~ Lindsay Lohan,
470:The way your life plays out depends on which dominoes you chose to push over and which ones you leave alone. ~ Dan Gutman,
471:Tricking your brain into thinking you are getting something sweet plays dirty tricks on your metabolism. ~ Mark Hyman M D,
472:Unity is sweet substance of the heart
And not a chain that binds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
473:With my team I am an absolute czar. My men know it. I order plays and they obey. If the don't, I fine them. ~ John McGraw,
474:Writing plays for me is often an act of looking at basement-level fears in terms of where they come from. ~ Stephen Karam,
475:emotions have the disconcerting tendency to trump the cards of reason, however rationally one plays them, ~ Peter Grainger,
476:Some day surely
The world too shall be saved from death by love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
477:That's a defining moment, there, when someone plays an instrument that everyone relates to around the planet. ~ Neil Young,
478:To lift our hopes heaven-high and to extend them
As wide as earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
479:Give a man a soccer ball, he plays for a moment. Teach a man to play soccer, he plays for a life time. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
480:Harry Potter isn’t going to tank because they’ve replaced the person who plays Quidditch player number four. ~ Jen Calonita,
481:I love TV and I love making films and I love doing plays. I feel very lucky to be able to do all three. ~ Matthew Macfadyen,
482:I started in theater and I wanted to write plays, but I never really found an original voice as a playwright. ~ Atom Egoyan,
483:It was to amuse himself God made the world.
For He was dull alone! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
484:Luck always plays a part for everyone, whether they want to admit it or not. I was very lucky, and I know it. ~ Larry David,
485:Memory plays tricks in the night, in the dark. We imagine things not how they are, but how we want them to be. ~ Celia Rees,
486:The reason why Absurdist plays take place in No Man's Land with only two characters is primarily financial. ~ Arthur Adamov,
487:As far back as I can remember, I am one of those guys that works hard and plays harder. I have to have both. ~ Bret Michaels,
488:As you write plays, you discover what you believe. And until you know what you believe, you can't write a play. ~ David Hare,
489:Despite being in showbiz, I have a very real approach to my life. It plays off with my social life. ~ Aishwarya Rai Bachchan,
490:I always did plays in school because I thought it was fun, but it just never occurred to me as a thing to do. ~ Fred Melamed,
491:I always loved theater and acting in plays and directing, writing little plays and directing friends in plays. ~ Todd Haynes,
492:I did plays in high school and I really loved it, but I think singing was always what I loved most of all. ~ Cristin Milioti,
493:I keep working mainly because my wife and I spend most of our time touring the country doing our own plays. ~ Joseph Bologna,
494:The intellect is not a serious thing, and never has been. It is an instrument on which one plays, that is all. ~ Oscar Wilde,
495:The place of the father in the modern suburban family is a very small one, particularly if he plays golf. ~ Bertrand Russell,
496:Treating people badly in reaction to how they treat us plays into the ugliness in the world and perpetuates it. ~ Kim Holden,
497:With my plays, when the lights go down, at least the audience isn't thinking, 'Oh, God, two more hours of this. ~ David Ives,
498:Yeah, I have the detail-obsessed, controlling personality of a novelist, but I somehow ended up writing plays. ~ Annie Baker,
499:From the age of four, I loved ballet and tap. I was in the school band, the choir, and all my school plays. ~ Gugu Mbatha Raw,
500:I fell into writing plays by accident. But the reason I write plays is that it's the only thing I'm any good at. ~ David Hare,
501:I happen to be a guy who also plays the piano and sings, so people automatically associate me with Billy Joel. ~ Gavin DeGraw,
502:I’m a simple man, Janie. I’m a man that lives hard. I’m a man that plays hard. And I’m a man that loves you. ~ Lani Lynn Vale,
503:Jackson plays a broken guitar because he’s in love with it, and doesn’t want to fix it, I think. It’s so broken. ~ Nikki Reed,
504:Of what use are the gods
If they crown not our just desires on earth? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
505:The only suggestions I get on my plays is to make them more of what they already are, and that's wonderful. ~ Jesse Eisenberg,
506:The sentinel love in man ever imagines
Strange perils for its object. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
507:They call him the Yellow King. Or the Tattered Man. He plays and sings his songs with the Devil’s voice. ~ John Hornor Jacobs,
508:Boobear. He plays on the orange team,” she repeated as though it made sense. “Oh no, I think Boobear is hurt.” It ~ Max Monroe,
509:He'd never seen a woman wring her hands. Not in real life. He'd thought people only wrung their hands in plays. ~ Lauren Royal,
510:He who climbeth on the highest mountains, laugheth at all tragic plays and tragic realities. Courageous, ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
511:I don't like the word rock opera, but I'm trying to write on that level that's reserved for plays still, or novels. ~ Lou Reed,
512:I don't think many people have a very good understanding of leisure and the importance it plays in our lives. ~ Jack Nicholson,
513:I'm always reading plays, and when I find something that I really want to do, then I'll make the time to do it. ~ Stephen Lang,
514:In the Bhagavat culture worship of the spiritual master plays a very important role in our life. ~ Bhaktisvarupa Damodar Swami,
515:I think, without question, the way someone plays sports shows something about inherently who they are, you know? ~ Hill Harper,
516:It's great to do small plays in the theatre and then go off with Blur and play in front of thousands of people. ~ Phil Daniels,
517:Nature must flower into art
And science, or else wherefore are we men? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
518:Russell [Wilson] plays really well in the pocket [and] outside the pocket. He’s just a play waiting to happen. ~ Deion Sanders,
519:She used to only play "Help Yourself," but now she only plays "Delilah." Is that normal?
"It's not unusual. ~ Jasper Fforde,
520:There may be a parallel between woodcuts and radio; radio plays are a living art form everywhere except the USA. ~ Neil Gaiman,
521:Twisted Sister plays 20, 25 shows a year. But if the band had their druthers, they'd be out playing all the time. ~ Dee Snider,
522:Vanity plays lurid tricks with our memory, and the truth of every passion wants some pretence to make it live. ~ Joseph Conrad,
523:As a teenager, I wanted to write novels. By college, it was theater, plays, and then, shortly, it was film. ~ Richard Linklater,
524:He pokes a finger inside me as he plays with my wetness.” —Sofia Herrera (French Kiss, Unbearable Passion, #2) ~ Scarlett Avery,
525:I play Hopkins' daughter. Brad Pitt plays Death. He's a very-good looking Death. With him, dying isn't so bad. ~ Claire Forlani,
526:I think forgiveness plays a very important part in Western society and it comes from the Judeo Christian heritage. ~ Ibn Warraq,
527:My son youngest son David's favorite song - he plays guitar - and he likes "Devil Pray." That's his favorite. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
528:Plays are getting smaller and smaller, not because playwrights minds are shrinking but because of the economics. ~ Lynn Nottage,
529:Sometimes, we play with love, but when you finally realize that you want to get serious, love plays with you. ~ Sudeep Nagarkar,
530:The faster some talents work, the more risk plays into the equation and then the opportunities for injury increases. ~ Jim Ross,
531:The motif of death plays an important role the human psyche in connection with archetypal and karmic material. ~ Stanislav Grof,
532:What would it be like to kiss him? Would he kiss as seriously as he plays? With the same attention to technique? ~ Cath Crowley,
533:When one plays a Steinway, there is a warmth and nobility in the sound that is unequalled by any other instrument. ~ Emanuel Ax,
534:A thief plays the game only when they think they'll win. A pirate plays the game even when they think they'll lose. ~ V E Schwab,
535:Even when I was in school shows, in elementary school doing plays, I'd always go off book and start improvising. ~ Billy Crystal,
536:From light lips and casual thoughts
The gods speak best as if by chance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
537:How come the term 'threesome' is always used in a sexual context? What, nobody plays string instruments any more? ~ Dov Davidoff,
538:In writing, punctuation plays the role of body language. It helps readers hear you the way you want to be heard. ~ Russell Baker,
539:One plays by the conventions of politics in order to be in power when the hour calls for unconventional decisions. ~ Jon Meacham,
540:The American Dream is the largely unacknowledged screen in front of which all American writing plays itself out. ~ Arthur Miller,
541:You didn’t tell me he had a headache!” “I didn’t know!” “What kind of nurse are you?” “The kind who plays hockey! ~ Sarina Bowen,
542:You just have to press the right keys and the right pedals at the right time and the music plays itself. ~ Johann Sebastian Bach,
543:You learn a lot about a person by the way he plays cards."
Then it was a good thing no one had seen her play. ~ Karen Hawkins,
544:As Grandfather used to say, 'In a crowd, everyone plays follow-the leader, even when they don't know who's leading. ~ Ruskin Bond,
545:Asked what role he believes art plays in society, Baselitz replied, 'The same role as a good shoe, nothing more. ~ Georg Baselitz,
546:God knows I've had productions where there were actors in my plays who were making more money per week than I was. ~ Tony Kushner,
547:I was in the school plays, I did a lot of music. I carried on through university for short films and loads of plays. ~ Theo James,
548:Me? I'm the original sad man. I read a book and it makes me sad. See a film: sad. Plays? they really work me over. ~ Ray Bradbury,
549:The self plays among the waves of existence. It surfaces, it comes up for a while, and then it disappears again. ~ Frederick Lenz,
550:The two greatest plays ever written were Hamlet and Oedipus Rex, and they're both about father-son relationships. ~ Arthur Miller,
551:This guy don't come to the ballpark to beat you. He comes to beat you bad. This (Jackie) Robinson, he plays a ton. ~ Leo Durocher,
552:We are all lonely and all seek a hand to hold in the darkness. It is not the harp, but the hand that plays it. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
553:Welcome to Smackdown. This is where the franchise plays. That's Tazz, he's a thug. And that's Michael Cole, he's gay. ~ John Cena,
554:What's disgusting about the Dirty Harry movies is that Eastwood plays this angry tension as righteous indignation. ~ Pauline Kael,
555:When you know psychologically what [characters] are feeling, then that plays out on how you dress a lot of times. ~ Nicole Kidman,
556:I have noticed that in plays where the characters on stage laugh a great deal, the people out front laugh very little. ~ Jean Kerr,
557:I never deliberately set out to shock, but when people don't walk out of my plays I think there is something wrong. ~ John Osborne,
558:Ive been so spoiled in the theater, writing plays where I can just do exactly what I want and nobody messes with me. ~ Sam Shepard,
559:Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules.”
“Yes, sir. I know it is. I know it. ~ J D Salinger,
560:Ravenous waves that march
With blue fierce nostrils quivering for prey, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Prologue,
561:She was the amoureuse of all the novels, the heroine of all the plays, the vague “she” of all the poetry books. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
562:...this miserable trick the romantic plays upon himself: of setting just beyond his reach the very thing he prizes. ~ Walker Percy,
563:This sure as hell better not be a game he plays with other women, because this is our game, dammit. I’ve decided. ~ Laurelin Paige,
564:Very often some of the religious miracle plays you see on television can be very corny, I find. And so simplistic. ~ Robert Duvall,
565:Every band sells t-shirts and plays certain auditoriums, but I'm sick of being like everyone else, because I'm not. ~ Justin Vernon,
566:I'm a football coach. I'm not a doctor ... They don't call plays, I don't do surgeries. We have a great deal here. ~ Bill Belichick,
567:Magic Johnson is the best player who plays on the ground, and Michael Jordan is the best player who plays in the air. ~ John Paxson,
568:Our consciousness a torch that plays Between the Abyss and a supernal Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Man of the Mediator,
569:The most difficult character in comedy is that of the fool, and he must be no simpleton that plays that part. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
570:Through the shocks of difficulty and death
Man shall attain his godhead. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Prologue,
571:Time plays tricks between here and home," said Mogget sepulchrally, frightening the life out of the telephone operator. ~ Garth Nix,
572:You can run a lot of plays when your X is twice as big as the other guys' O. It makes your X's and O's pretty good. ~ Paul Westphal,
573:A diet rich in fruits and vegetables plays a role in reducing the risk of all the major causes of illness and death ~ Walter Willett,
574:David has scored 62 goals in 148 games for Ipswich and those statistics tell me that he plays games and scores goals. ~ David Platt,
575:English plays, Atrocious in content, Absurd in form, Objectionable in action, Execrable EnglishTheatre. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
576:Jace Herondale plays the piano very well.”
“And he knows it.”
“That sounds like a Herondale.” Tessa laughed. ~ Cassandra Clare,
577:Man only plays when in the full meaning of the word he is a man, and he is only completely a man when he plays. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
578:Preparing a child for the world of tomorrow is one of the most important roles a parent plays in a child’s life. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
579:quality, but for most investors these are commodity plays: bulkers = China raw material imports; tankers = oil contango. ~ Anonymous,
580:When he plays
all the flowers swap colors
and years and decades and centuries
of rain pour back into the sky ~ Jandy Nelson,
581:Alternative medicine plays into this exaggerated notion that you can prevent disease simply by doing the right thing. ~ Marcia Angell,
582:As with the figure of a symbol dance
The screened Omniscient plays at Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Dual Being,
583:By working hard, by making the right moves, you can create your own luck, I think. But certainly luck plays a part. ~ Richard Branson,
584:Few novels or plays could exist without at least one troublemaker in the group, and perhaps life couldn't either. ~ Mignon McLaughlin,
585:If you give a small child a bunny and an apple, and she eats the bunny and plays with the apple, I’ll buy you a car. ~ Victoria Moran,
586:I had played many gay characters before, but they were finite - guest characters in TV shows or characters in plays. ~ Eric McCormack,
587:I think it's a bigger risk following a part that plays up your looks than it is to try and carve out a career as an actor. ~ Jude Law,
588:It's the function of a playwright to write. Some playwrights write a large number of plays, some write a small number. ~ Edward Albee,
589:I went for endless auditions for tiny parts in obscure plays, and never got one job until I was in 'Four Weddings'. ~ Anna Chancellor,
590:Obviously Javy [Baez] is able to control his emotions, he plays it as it should be, it's a game. That's how he plays it. ~ Joe Maddon,
591:One-third of your plays are special teams, so to block a punt and get good field position out of it and score was big. ~ Frank Knight,
592:Plays, gentlemen, are to their authors what children are to women: they cost more pain than they give pleasure. ~ Pierre Beaumarchais,
593:She’s probably ovaries-deep in a carton of Ben and Jerry’s right now while Mumford & Sons plays in the background. ~ Elle Kennedy,
594:Some people think that if their opponent plays a beautiful game, it's OK to lose. I don't. You have to be merciless. ~ Magnus Carlsen,
595:Sometimes we know them least
Whom most we love and constantly consort with. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
596:I do choose to write for a living - in addition to writing plays. I no longer write sitcoms, and I no longer feel shame. ~ Lisa Loomer,
597:It is the tears, the blood
Prodigally spent that build a nation’s greatness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
598:I wrote fiction during my entire childhood, from age 4 to 18, and started writing plays when I went to Yale and Oxford. ~ Taiye Selasi,
599:Kevin Costner has feathers in his hair and feathers in his head. The Indians should have called him 'Plays with Camera. ~ Pauline Kael,
600:Robert said, “How can you waste your time on something that won’t make money?” “Didn’t you used to write plays?” I asked. ~ Eve Babitz,
601:Suppression of progress plays into the hands of the social enemy. Every advance in social justice establishes the nation. ~ Henry Ford,
602:And when I go to see plays, I marvel at how people can do that. I've done it all my life, but I still find it mystical. ~ Victor Garber,
603:Defense is something I take pride in. I feel it's just as important as offense. They should have RBIs for defensive plays. ~ Derrek Lee,
604:It is not Atlas who carries the world on his shoulders, but woman; and sometimes she plays with it as with a ball. ~ Henryk Sienkiewicz,
605:My memory plays me odd tricks these days [...] Age spares us nothing, old friend. Like ancient trees, we die from the top. ~ Gore Vidal,
606:Our rapture here is short before we go
To other sweetness on some rarer height ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
607:Technically, the professional takes money. Technically, the pro plays for pay. But in the end, he does it for love. ~ Steven Pressfield,
608:The greatest joy I get is setting up plays for somebody else. I take a lot of pride in helping other people make plays. ~ Troy Polamalu,
609:We are all patchwork, and so shapeless and diverse in composition that each bit, each moment, plays its own game. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
610:A stunning meditation on the power of escape, and on the cat-and-mouse contest the self plays to deflect its own guilt. ~ Ethan Gilsdorf,
611:At one time I'd been to every park except Baltimore and Houston, but can't even keep track of who plays where these days. ~ W P Kinsella,
612:Einstein said, “God doesn’t play dice with the universe.” 22 He was right. As Phillip Gold said, “God plays Scrabble! ~ Norman L Geisler,
613:For me, poetry is the colour of Elizabeth Taylor's eyes, or the pauses in Pinter's plays - only the pauses, not the words. ~ Roger Lewis,
614:I believe that if you really have a strong idea, you can say, "What do you think? Let's see how my idea plays off yours." ~ Julie Taymor,
615:I think many people, especially from other cultures, just don't understand the role hair plays in Black women's lives. ~ Solange Knowles,
616:It will go to someone in my office who has more experience than I do, or who plays golf with my boss, or who has a penis. ~ Jodi Picoult,
617:Nations that conquer widest, perish first, Sapped by the hate of an uneasy world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
618:No girl who plays the role of a hero dates a guy who uses her. She knows who she is. She just forgot for a little while. ~ Donald Miller,
619:One plays at being immortal and after a few weeks one doesn't even know whether or not one can hang on till the next day. ~ Albert Camus,
620:Self-interest speaks all manner of tongues and plays all manner of parts, even that of disinterestedness. ~ Francois de La Rochefoucauld,
621:The games are always been played, and no one plays the games like me. You just have to be the best.
And I usually am. ~ Irvine Welsh,
622:The trouble about Mr Crawford,’ said Kate, ‘is that he puts up with his enemies and plays merry hell with his friends. ~ Dorothy Dunnett,
623:An eye for an eye.”

“That's a revenge thing, right? From some play.”

“The Bible, darling. The Lord of all plays. ~ J D Robb,
624:God’s valet moves away these living dolls
To quite another room and better play. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
625:If you have twenty guys in the room and you just bring in one girl, you change the entire mood and everyone plays different. ~ Jack White,
626:Jiu Jitsu is a mousetrap. The trap does not chase the mouse. But when the mouse grabs the cheese, the trap plays its role. ~ Helio Gracie,
627:Remember what the poet Shakespeare said, Jeeves? 'Exit hurriedly, pursued by a bear.' You'll find it in one of his plays. ~ P G Wodehouse,
628:All the modern verse plays, they're terrible; they're mostly about the poetry. It's more important that the play is first. ~ Denis Johnson,
629:Coaches who can outline plays on a black board are a dime a dozen. The ones who win get inside their player and motivate. ~ Vince Lombardi,
630:Despite the enormous role that local government plays in our daily lives, the constitution makes not one mention of it. ~ Anthony Albanese,
631:Everyone of us plays 'tapes' from our parents until we die. That's why it's so important to talk good values to your child ~ Dennis Prager,
632:Good action films - not crap, but good action films - are really morality plays. They deal in modern, mythic culture. ~ Sylvester Stallone,
633:I don't put pressure on myself. When I put pressure on myself, then I just play bad. When I play bad, my team plays bad. ~ Carmelo Anthony,
634:If intellect plays a large part in the field of violence, I hold that it plays a larger part in the field of nonviolence. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
635:I had done plays in high school. It was something I always wanted to do since I was little. I was a drama major at UC-Irvine. ~ Jon Lovitz,
636:I was lucky that audiences in Mexico liked my work. I was even luckier when I got to do movies and plays with my brothers. ~ Demian Bichir,
637:Like the sweet kindly earth whose patient love
Embraces even our faults and sins. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
638:poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language, and are performed m ~ William Shakespeare,
639:Shakespeare is a great psychologist, and whatever can be known of the heart of man may be found in his plays. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
640:Wayne Gretsky said, “A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. ~ Sean Platt,
641:You think, you got a dick, you gotta do the work. Make the plays. Give the chase. Fight the good fight. But you’re wrong. ~ Kristen Ashley,
642:Arafat contradicts himself every five minutes. He always plays the double-cross, lies even if you ask him what time it is. ~ Oriana Fallaci,
643:dorm. She’s probably ovaries-deep in a carton of Ben and Jerry’s right now while Mumford & Sons plays in the background. ~ Elle Kennedy,
644:Even his petty world man cannot rule.
We fear, we blame; life wantons her own way, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
645:John Stowell plays jazz, but he doesn’t use any of the clichés; he has an incredible originality. John is a master creator. ~ Larry Coryell,
646:Sway laughs and waves him off, and Davey/David blushes.  Oh wow, Sway so called it.  I can’t wait to see how that plays out. ~ Harper Sloan,
647:Dua. I'm the master of my own fate - I'm the Captain of my soul. I shall never believe that God plays dice with the world. ~ Albert Einstein,
648:If I've been accused a number of times of writing plays where the endings are ambivalent, indeed, that's the way I find life. ~ Edward Albee,
649:I'm interested in art for all. I don't want it to be only the sons and daughters of Tory MPs who get to see my plays. ~ Benedict Cumberbatch,
650:Kings are men,
And they are set above their fellow-mortals
To serve us, friends. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
651:She doesn't make music, or create it. She is music. It flows through her as she plays and it's an incredible sight to behold. ~ Caisey Quinn,
652:The actor does not live, he plays. He remains cold toward the object of his acting but his art must be perfection. ~ Konstantin Stanislavski,
653:The Allegory of the Wolf Boy” (“At tennis and at tea/Upon the gentle lawn, he is not ours,/But plays us in a sad duplicity”). ~ Oliver Sacks,
654:Truth grows gradually in us, like a musician who plays a piece again and again until suddenly he hears it for the first time ~ Anne Michaels,
655:Truth! Seldom with her bright and burning wand
She touches the unwilling lips of men ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
656:We are the future’s greatness, therefore owe
Some duty to the grandeurs of the past. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
657:A person may have no relatives anywhere, but Mahamaya may make him keep a cat and thus make him worldly. This is how She plays! ~ Sarada Devi,
658:But the blind nether forces still have power
And the ascent is slow and long is Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
659:I certainly want to establish myself as an actor in my own right, rather than being just the actor who plays Harry Potter. ~ Daniel Radcliffe,
660:Look round and thou wilt see a world on guard.
All life here armoured walks, shut in. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
661:Memory plays tricks. People think of it as a filing cabinet, but it’s more like a garden. Things left there change and grow. ~ Lexi Revellian,
662:The first music I was ever exposed to was Irish folk music, like the Clancy Brothers. My father plays that and Christmas songs. ~ Matt Dillon,
663:The real test of a man is not when he plays the role that he wants for himself but when he plays the role destiny has for him. ~ Vaclav Havel,
664:The real test of a man is not when he plays the role that he wants for himself but when he plays the role destiny has for him. ~ V clav Havel,
665:Yon mountain-peak or some base valley clod,
‘Tis one to the heaven-sailing star above ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
666:You can tell whether a person plays well or not by the way he carries the instrument, whether it means something to him or not. ~ Miles Davis,
667:You put a baby in a crib with an apple and a rabbit. If it eats the rabbit and plays with the apple, I'll buy you a new car. ~ Harvey Diamond,
668:America is not at war with Islam. And it is a mistake and it plays into the hands of the terrorists to act as though we are. ~ Hillary Clinton,
669:And once, or twice, to throw the dice is a gentlemanly game, But he does not win who plays with Sin in the secret house of shame ~ Oscar Wilde,
670:As long as that song plays, I get to put my hands on you, and I can’t guarantee I’m going to be a complete gentleman about it. ~ Meredith Wild,
671:I did a little film called Nina, a small role. I played a French girl who was a nurse to Nina Simone. Zoe Saldana plays Nina. ~ Alaina Huffman,
672:I think I've proven I can build a team that plays a way of football that excites and challenges at the top end of the table. ~ Brendan Rodgers,
673:I think there are two different oceans - the one that plays with you in the summer, and the one that gets so mad in the winter. ~ Jodi Picoult,
674:People clutch onto each other, but the orchestra plays on, because when everything else in life fails, there still has to be music ~ Anonymous,
675:She builds, she breaks,
She thrones, she slays, as needed for her harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act One,
676:The flower blooms for its flowerhood only,
And not to make its parent bed more high. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
677:The passion of oneness two hearts are this moment
Denies the steps of death for ever. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
678:Dwell far above the laws that govern men
And are not to be mapped by mortal judgments. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
679:It is expensive to give plays subtitles, especially for a short run, so most new dramas rarely cross the transcontinental bridge. ~ Katori Hall,
680:I would say that I'm very proud that Metallica plays heavy music - but equally proud that we don't think like a heavy-metal band. ~ Lars Ulrich,
681:Man only plays when he is in the fullest sense of the word a human being, and he is only fully a human being when he plays ~ Friedrich Schiller,
682:No matter what he does, every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn't know it. ~ Paulo Coelho,
683:No matter what he does, every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn’t know it. ~ Paulo Coelho,
684:One of the things I find very little of in America - and certainly not on Broadway - are plays with political attitudes. ~ Michael Lindsay Hogg,
685:Reading a book you are not enjoying is a torture not to be undertaken without a reward. I leave plays at the interval, too! ~ Mariella Frostrup,
686:The greatest films are those which show how society shapes man. The greatest plays are those which show how man shapes society. ~ Kenneth Tynan,
687:The tragic hero prefers death to prudence. The comedian prefers playing tricks to winning. Only the villain really plays to win. ~ Mason Cooley,
688:They, even when they tyrannise, remain
Most dear and reverend still, who gave us birth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
689:Age plays cruel tricks on the human face; all our repressed feelings become visible on the surface, where they harden like a mask. ~ Sue Grafton,
690:Be discerning and courageous about who plays a role in your life. Not everyone has earned the right to be in your inner circle. ~ Valorie Burton,
691:Consciousness does not just passively reflect the objective material world; it plays an active role in creating reality itself. ~ Stanislav Grof,
692:Every cricketer knows that in the early stages of a batsman's innings i.e. before he gets his eye in - luck plays an important part. ~ W G Grace,
693:I like the idea of making out in his car; like a scene from a movie, the windows fog up in the cold and the radio plays our song. ~ Laura Nowlin,
694:I mean, there are peripheral things I do, I do photography, I write plays, I have books published, but that's neither here not there. ~ Lou Reed,
695:I think reading Shakespeare's plays when I was young was extremely important. He had the ability to make utter strangers come alive. ~ Rita Dove,
696:No matter how hard they try, they'll never create anything so perfectly beautiful as what plays out in my own imagination. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
697:There are no whole truths; all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays the devil. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
698:To lavish upon all men love and trust
Shows the heart’s royalty, not the brain’s craft. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
699:Each of you will have a chance to play it, and whosoever plays most sweetly, you will have it. For art is more than virtue or vice. ~ Holly Black,
700:I do so hope he plays us 'The Rains of Castamere.' It has been an hour. I've forgotten how it goes -- Olenna Tyrell, the HBIC ~ George R R Martin,
701:Must first have striven, many must have failed
Before a great thing can be done on earth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
702:Nothing happens in which you are not entangled in a secret manner; for everything has ordered itself around you & plays your innermost ~ Jung,
703:There are no whole truths, all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays the devil. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
704:For the next few weeks, we are going to perform scenes from the plays we read, starting with the age-old classic Romeo and Juliet. ~ Kaitlyn Davis,
705:I thought Eric Clapton was good. He still is. Not only is he good - he's rock's #1 guitarist, and he plays blues better than most of us ~ B B King,
706:The real test of a man is not when he plays the role that he wants for himself, but when he plays the role destiny has for him. ~ Joel C Rosenberg,
707:What plays the mischief with the truth is that men will insist upon the universal application of a temporary feeling or opinion. ~ Herman Melville,
708:You have to watch out with my plays. They're like yeast. You think they're one thing, then all of a sudden subtext gets to working. ~ Horton Foote,
709:Consciousness does not just passively reflect the objective material world; it plays an active role in creating reality
itself. ~ Stanislav Grof,
710:Ideas rather than methods are central to they way I work, although drawing plays a central generative role in everything I do. ~ Patricia Piccinini,
711:I don't think there's been any writer like Samuel Beckett. He's unique. He was a most charming man and I used to send him my plays. ~ Harold Pinter,
712:It's just a huge boost for us to have one extra playmaker on our defense. He makes so many impact plays and changes the game a lot. ~ Adrian Wilson,
713:Luck plays no part in the divinity of the moment that is set to transpire and make two unite into one burning flame of eternal love. ~ Truth Devour,
714:Most gods throw dice, but Fate plays chess, and you don't find out til too late that he's been playing with two queens all along. ~ Terry Pratchett,
715:There are no whole truths: all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays to the devil. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
716:Unlike films, which can be easily disseminated worldwide via DVDs and the Internet, plays struggle to find an international audience. ~ Katori Hall,
717:When you consider that only an estimated 15 percent of the US population plays chess, its cultural prominence is extraordinary. It ~ Garry Kasparov,
718:An actor is an impersonator; he plays many different roles. If you played the same role all the time, God that'd be a boring career. ~ Robert Loggia,
719:A presence sits within my heart that sees
Each moment’s need and finds the road to meet it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
720:I'd love to be a mad scientist who plays around with chemistry, and solves all the world's problems and creates a few of them himself. ~ Kellan Lutz,
721:Im not suggesting that the play is without fault; all of my plays are imperfect, Im rather happy to say-it leaves me something to do. ~ Edward Albee,
722:In Shakespeare's plays, the mourner hastening to bury his friend is all the time colliding with the reveller hastening to his wine. ~ Samuel Johnson,
723:The church has allowed itself to get so swept up in political issues that it plays by the rules of power, which are rules of ungrace ~ Philip Yancey,
724:There is only one religion, though there are a hundred versions of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw, Plays Pleasant and Unpleasant, Vol. II, preface (1898),
725:This world’s the puppet of a silent Will
Which moves unguessed behind our acts and thoughts; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
726:I'd like to be an American Catherine Deneuve. She plays beautiful, sensitive, deep parts with a little bit of intelligence behind them. ~ Sharon Tate,
727:I'm a great believer in getting checked out because if you know you're OK, you actually feel better; your mind plays a big part of it. ~ Simon Cowell,
728:I'm confident in my ability to maintain a career. I don't know if it will be doing either independent films or plays in New England. ~ Randy Harrison,
729:She's great company; she plays a mean hand of gin; and I like holding her hand almost as much as yours. What more do I need? ~ Libby Fischer Hellmann,
730:The decision to write full time was made when I was twenty-eight years old and had just had two small plays accepted for BBC Radio. ~ Douglas Kennedy,
731:The deepest things are those thought seizes not;
Our spirits live their hidden meaning out. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
732:The mind tells you what or whom to love, and then you do it, but sometimes the mind plays tricks, and sometimes the mind is the worst. ~ Rachel Khong,
733:Thinking, as you will see, plays a dominant role in eating. Toxic thoughts can negate the positive effects of good nutrition. Healthy ~ Caroline Leaf,
734:Ultimately I want to be able to create whatever I want whenever I want. And if that doesn't work, I don't mind just doing weird plays. ~ Reggie Watts,
735:Whoever can't see the whole in every part plays at blind man's bluff. A wise man tastes the entire Tigris in every sip. ~ Mirza Asadullah Khan Ghalib,
736:You can pretend it's a play,' I told him. 'Such small things do not anger the gods. Plays only anger the mortal men who watch them ~ Danielle Bennett,
737:You're an idiot. You've screwed up every play we ever ran. You're too stupid to even remember the plays. We ought to get rid of you. ~ Michael Jordan,
738:I enjoy going back and forth between plays and novels. It`s like having a wife and a mistress. Books are the wife; plays, the mistress. ~ Stephen King,
739:I'm a personality - like a George Plimpton who effectively plays himself in a bunch of different roles, or a Paul Lynde-type character. ~ John Hodgman,
740:optimistic bias plays a role—sometimes the dominant role—whenever individuals or institutions voluntarily take on significant risks. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
741:Pitching. You're pitching yourself constantly which is probably why there are so many plays about sales. I think also it's like life. ~ Liev Schreiber,
742:‘Tis Love, ‘tis Love fills up the gulfs of Time!
By Love we find our kinship with the stars. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
743:What?” he says all innocent-like and shrugs. “I like it. Besides, I paid good money for that artwork.” A smirk plays on his full lips. ~ Shannon Duffy,
744:WHEN SCHOLARS TALK ABOUT THE SOURCES OF SHAKESPEARE’S PLAYS, they almost always mean printed books like Raphael Holinshed’s Chronicles ~ James Shapiro,
745:Desire’s so sweet
That the mere joy might seem quite crude and poor
And spoil the sweetness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
746:I can't stand a ballplayer who plays in fear. Anybody who has a good shot has got to take it and keep taking it. So he misses...so what? ~ Red Auerbach,
747:I'm sick of all these knights in shining armor parts, I want to do something worthwhile like plays and films that have something to say. ~ Tyrone Power,
748:I must stop compromising my plays with this whiff of social application. They must be entirely untouched by any suspicion of usefulness. ~ Tom Stoppard,
749:I read an interview with Aaron Sorkin and he said he plays every part when he's writing. I thought, "Oh, I do that too! I'm doing okay." ~ Danny Strong,
750:It's the one touch of nature that makes the whole world kin. (That isn't original. I got it out of one of Shakespeare's plays). However, ~ Jean Webster,
751:Noble speech
Is a high prelude fit for noble deeds;
It is the lion’s roar before he leaps. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
752:Simone plays with her jack-in-the-box—an annoying toy that plays “Pop Goes the Weasel” until you’d like to pop the thing with a hammer. ~ Lolly Winston,
753:Terrorism is really the only existential threat to America as we know it - as a free country that plays a leading role in the world. ~ Graham T Allison,
754:There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself. ~ Johann Sebastian Bach,
755:Briony said reasonably, 'How can you hate plays?'

'It's just showing off.' Pierrot shrugged as he delivered this self-evident truth. ~ Ian McEwan,
756:I had no idea in those days of the enormous and unquestionably helpful part that humbug plays in the social life of great peoples. ~ Winston S Churchill,
757:I'm going to give up hits, so I'm going to need to get some ground balls, double plays and stuff like that. That's just kind of my game. ~ Andy Pettitte,
758:Nada is found within. It is a music without strings which plays in the body. It penetrates the inner and outer and leads you away from illusion. ~ Kabir,
759:She has her secret calls
And works divinely behind play and sleep,
Shaping her infant powers. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
760:The court gossips over them while they live
And the world gossips over them when they are dead. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
761:Alas! how little can a moment show Of an eye where feeling plays In ten thousand dewy rays: A face o'er which a thousand shadows go! ~ William Wordsworth,
762:An actor can play two or three lines where he says one thing, but plays the opposite. That's the most important moving part of a film. ~ Jaco Van Dormael,
763:blinding yourself to the emotional poverty of your childhood might mean you can’t see how that past plays a role in your unhappy marriage. ~ Joseph Burgo,
764:Hopeless heart that thrives on paradox,...that longs for certainty, fidelity, compassion, and plays roulette with anything precious. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
765:Identification makes general sanity and complete adjustment impossible. Training in non-identity plays a therapeutic role with adults. ~ Alfred Korzybski,
766:I've never been a big soloist; I just put in what needs to be there. I'm more of a rhythm player who plays lead - or tries to play lead. ~ Jerry Cantrell,
767:Nada is found within. It is a music without strings which plays in the body. It penetrates the inner and outer and leads you away from illusion. ~ Kabir,
768:Patience plays an enormous part in perseverance as we wait and trust for what is to come—what God has in store for those who worship Him. ~ Beverly Lewis,
769:The amateur plays for fun. The professional plays for keeps. To the amateur, the game is his avocation. To the pro it's his vocation. ~ Steven Pressfield,
770:And it is a very beautiful idea, and possibly true, that a common man from Stratford with a common education was able to write these plays. ~ Mark Rylance,
771:For she alone is prompter on our stage,
And all things move by an established doom,
Not freely. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
772:Gnatho was the attendant of Thraso in the Eunuchus of Terence, one of Luther’s favorite plays; cf. Luther’s Works, 13, p. 182; 23, p. 217. ~ Martin Luther,
773:If you have a child who is seven feet tall, you don't cut off his head or his legs. You buy him a bigger bed and hope he plays basketball. ~ Robert Altman,
774:I love everybody. Each one plays the role they have to play, but in the spiritual arena there are people who are even closer to me than that. ~ Meher Baba,
775:In my plays I want to look at life at the commonplace of existence as if we had just turned a corner and run into it for the first time. ~ Christopher Fry,
776:It does make sense to put on some songs that are relatively short, because radio usually only plays songs that are less than 4 or 5 minutes. ~ Mike Gordon,
777:It would have been impossible, completely and entirely, for any woman to have written the plays of Shakespeare in the age of Shakespeare. ~ Virginia Woolf,
778:Our mind is the scene upon which the gods perform their plays, and we don’t know the beginning and we don’t know the end. ~ Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar,
779:The Gods prodigiously sometimes reverse
The common rule of Nature and compel
Matter with soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
780:They shut our eyes and drive us, but at last
Our souls remember when the act is done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act Five,
781:Your unconscious mind takes the things you can’t handle and plays with them while you sleep until some of the sharp corners are worn off. ~ Lawrence Block,
782:A brilliant treatment of the history of Purgatory in England and its survivals and echoes throughout Shakespeare's plays, above all Hamlet. ~ Carol Zaleski,
783:Christ plays in ten thousand places, Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his To the Father through the features of men's faces. ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins,
784:From bell to bell, from when my entrance plays and I step through that curtain, people have to wonder what's going on inside that guy's head. ~ Randy Orton,
785:I'd say that the question whether love still exists plays the same role in my novels as the question of God's existence in Dostoevsky. ~ Michel Houellebecq,
786:It seems the baseball player of today will not be satisfied until he plays two weeks in the big league and is able to retire at twenty-two. ~ Joe Garagiola,
787:I was always the lead role in plays. I like entertaining people. I like when you're on stage doing crazy stuff and the audience gets it. ~ Vinny Guadagnino,
788:May the dead forgive me, I can do no other
But as I am commanded; to do more is madness." - Ismene, Antigone (The Theban Plays) by Sophocles ~ Sophocles,
789:Paul Klee seems to handle colors and dreams as if they both came out of a box of children's toys. He plays and dreams with whatever he finds. ~ Jean Helion,
790:Plays are always about intense relationships, whether they're intense love relationships or family relationships or existential relationships. ~ David Ives,
791:The dead have come to take the living. The dead in winding-sheets, the regimented dead on horseback, the skeleton that plays the hurdy-gurdy. ~ Don DeLillo,
792:Dream not that happiness
Can spring from wicked roots. God overrules
And Right denied is mighty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
793:Happiness is just another of the tricks that our genetic system plays on us to carry out its only role, which is the survival of the species. ~ Paulo Coelho,
794:He loves to sit and hear me sing, Then, laughing, sports and plays with me; Then stretches out my golden wing, And mocks my loss of liberty. ~ William Blake,
795:We'll run a lot of multiple sets - pro set, twin set, the box set, ... We'll run a lot of option plays and pass the ball more than in the past. ~ John Welch,
796:When a portent repeats itself three times, like something out of Julius Caesar, even Caliban, a couple of plays over, is bound to notice. ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
797:You know what they say: All Welshmen sing. All Scots are thrifty. All Englishmen have stiff upper lips. And all Irishmen write plays. ~ Lilian Jackson Braun,
798:A guy like Scott [Robinson] plays the whole history of music on every instrument you've ever heard of. He's just kind of an unparalleled genius. ~ Jon Gordon,
799:Hoof-Mark on Breast (Sri Vatsa)
To lift our hopes heaven-high and to extend them
As wide as earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
800:I started performing in high school. There was a pretty great drama department at my school, and that's when I started doing plays and musicals. ~ Missi Pyle,
801:I would loved to have played with Scholes. He plays the game the way it should be played and at his peak he was the best midfield player in the world. ~ Xavi,
802:Memories lurk like dustballs in the backs of drawers. The stereo is a special model that plays only music fraught with poignant associations. ~ Jay McInerney,
803:Technically he is perfect and he plays so naturally, almost without effort. It's like when Roger Federer plays tennis, he barely sweats. ~ Vicente del Bosque,
804:That or you could just accept that your awesome best friend sometimes does crazy stuff, but it almost always plays out in our favor.” “One ~ Jessica Sorensen,
805:We’re all players in a game. You’re a player or a piece on the board, you move or you’re moved. You play the game or the game plays you. ~ Niccol Machiavelli,
806:Fate orders all and Fate I now
Have recognised as the world’s mystic Will
That loves and labours. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
807:I've always been a fan of reading art catalogues from exhibitions, and plays, and I've worked with a surrealist German playwright, Heiner Müller. ~ Jenny Hval,
808:Plays in this period, as any reader of Shakespeare knows, are full of double entendres (words or phrases that can be understood in two senses), ~ Melissa Mohr,
809:This is the Nemesis of men who rise
Too suddenly by fraud or violence
That they suspect all hearts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
810:A million people are simply a million social isolates, each one imprisoned within his or her own brain pan, in which a very private Hell plays out. ~ Mark Cain,
811:A real player is somebody who never gives up, who keeps thinking all the way through, who's scared, (darn) right, but plays through being scared. ~ Ralph Wiley,
812:But it's the eyes that hold me captive, empty of concentric creek ripples and breezy tree branches playing the sky like my bow plays my violin. ~ Emily Murdoch,
813:But that methodology where players are pitted against other unfamiliar players has been so widely adapted now that anybody plays with everybody. ~ Derek Bailey,
814:I believe that this country succeeds when everyone gets a fair shot, when everyone does their fair share, when everyone plays by the same rules. ~ Barack Obama,
815:If you look at Shakespeare's history plays, what the setting of monarchy allows is this extraordinary intensification of emotions and predicament. ~ Tom Hooper,
816:I'm an equal opportunity reader - although I don't much read plays. And since I was raised a Presbyterian, pretty much all pleasures are guilty. ~ Richard Ford,
817:It's still the best game in town because you don't have to be big to play, and everybody plays. Even your grandmother probably played baseball. ~ Tommy Lasorda,
818:Luck plays an enormous role in trading success. Some people were lucky enough to be born smart, while others were even smarter and got born lucky. ~ Ed Seykota,
819:Midway between the too soiled ground and the too-sublime vaults, at the level of the air, entering the skin of the role, poetry plays its game. ~ Michel Leiris,
820:Most of the gods throw dice but Fate plays chess, and you don't find out until too late that he's been using two queens all along. Fate wins. ~ Terry Pratchett,
821:On certain plays and situations I feel like I have the advantage. But sometimes I just have to not think about the size of the guy in front of me. ~ Dante Hall,
822:Seth frowns disappointedly. “Yeah, but Kayden wears those super tight pants when he plays football, which is pretty much the same as tights. ~ Jessica Sorensen,
823:But it just comes down to trying to get the work out there and however the team fits together then that's the way it sort of plays into itself. ~ Renee O Connor,
824:But man, proud man,
Dressed in a little brief authority,
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven
As makes the angels weep. ~ William Shakespeare,
825:He leads with his brain and plays down his looks and he acts like he would do the same with any woman he desired—he would choose her for her mind. ~ S G Redling,
826:Kaz narrowed his eyes. “I’m not some character out of a children’s story who plays harmless pranks and steals from the rich to give to the poor. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
827:That life is grave and earnest under its smiles,
And we too with a wary gaiety
Should walk its roads. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
828:And people do enjoy the plays at completely different levels. And, likewise, they enjoy the authorship question... at completely different levels. ~ Mark Rylance,
829:For Christ plays in ten thousand places,/ Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his/ To the Father through the features of men’s faces. ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins,
830:I always wanted to be some kind of writer - I wrote plays and songs and "books" before I realized living and breathing people still wrote poems. ~ Denise Duhamel,
831:I've watched other people singing, I've become a much better singer. I've become a singer that plays the piano instead of a piano player that sings. ~ Elton John,
832:Mindful and creative, a child who has neither a past, nor examples to follow, nor value judgments, simply lives, speaks and plays in freedom. ~ Arnaud Desjardins,
833:One is just an interpreter of what the playwright thinks, and therefore the greater the playwright, the more satisfying it is to act in the plays. ~ Vivien Leigh,
834:Caches of data are being recovered all the time. Why, just the other day, I heard that we now had complete texts for all three of Shakespire's plays! ~ Dan Abnett,
835:Reading about the response of people in stories, plays, poems, helps us to respond more courageously and openly at our own moments of turning. ~ Madeleine L Engle,
836:Chris (Anderson) is risking his life with every chord, that's how much it means to him. He has such a reverence for beauty, he plays like an angel. ~ Charlie Haden,
837:Going to the theater is such a joyous experience. My dad would take my sister and me to plays when we were very young, like six or seven years old. ~ Julia Roberts,
838:I got really into writing plays. I did that for years and years and got some produced and didn't like it as much when I wasn't able to control it. ~ Jake M Johnson,
839:I had stopped writing plays set in villages because they were not relevant to my experiences and I knew my English classmates wouldn't appreciate them. ~ Sefi Atta,
840:The head is what matters. The rest of the body plays the part of antennae making life possible for people and life itself is inside the skull. ~ Alberto Giacometti,
841:You know how they categorize Shakespeare’s plays, right? If it ends with a wedding, it’s a comedy. And if it ends with a funeral, it’s a tragedy. ~ Robyn Schneider,
842:Cal Price can’t act for shit. Thankfully, he has the whole play memorized, but he plays the part of Reuben like a soft-spoken elderly accountant. ~ Becky Albertalli,
843:Classical plays require more imagination and more general training to be able to do. That's why I like playing Shakespeare better than anything else. ~ Vivien Leigh,
844:I don't intend to simply go away and write my plays and be a good boy. I intend to remain an independent and political intelligence in my own right. ~ Harold Pinter,
845:I don't think I've ever written about me. I'm not a character in any of my plays, except that boy, that silent boy that turns up in Three Tall Women. ~ Edward Albee,
846:I'm so grateful to grab hold of something that wants to be a play. It doesn't happen very often. I don't have unwritten plays waiting for their turn. ~ Tom Stoppard,
847:In the plays of Shakespeare man appears as he is, made up of a crowd of passions which contend for the mastery over him, and govern him in turn. ~ Thomas B Macaulay,
848:I strapped an MP3 player to one of those floor-cleaning robots. Call him DJ Roomba - little guy cruises around and plays music. What's hot, DJ Roomba! ~ Aziz Ansari,
849:I think that I have been clear that demonizing and demagoguing about Muslims is not only offensive it is dangerous and it plays into ISIS's hands. ~ Hillary Clinton,
850:movie The Girl Next Door, which plays on basic-cable channels with a constancy normally reserved for documentaries about Kim Jong-un on North Korean TV. ~ Anonymous,
851:Strength in the spirit, wisdom in the mind,
Love in the heart complete the trinity
Of glorious manhood. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
852:The alchemist said, “No matter what he does, every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn’t know it. ~ Paulo Coelho,
853:The only problem with Mitch [Pileggi, the actor who plays Skinner] is that his bald head means there's nothing to hold onto when he starts to buck. ~ David Duchovny,
854:You know you're getting older when they're making TV shows, sequels or plays for things that you did. It's very flattering and very humbling, indeed. ~ Winona Ryder,
855:Chips on shoulder, all that, everybody plays the game for different reasons. You've got to prove yourself every time you go out there. That's the reality. ~ John Fox,
856:I fear that there will be no neat ending to this, in the manner of the old Greek plays. Where the Gods descend, and all is explained, and tidied away. ~ Paul McAuley,
857:I was involved in school plays, but when I left school I did a couple of odd jobs as a baker's apprentice and then as a fruit market porter in Manchester ~ John Thaw,
858:They have a desire to put on plays and to fulfill that traditional role of a theater in a community: to be the place where people go to hear the truth. ~ David Mamet,
859:This is something particular to actors, especially in plays, and in films, too - but in plays, it's like, don't get involved with anyone in the play. ~ Tom Courtenay,
860:You dont grow up in a town of 700 thinking youre going to be an actress. I loved doing [school] plays, but it was just something to keep me busy. ~ Michelle Monaghan,
861:All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts. ~ Austin Kleon,
862:All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts. ~ Blake Crouch,
863:Every life, every love, every action and feeling and thought has its reason and significance: its beginning, and the part it plays in the end. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
864:I don't do stuff to be a star. I do it because I feel it's important for kids, African American kids, to see an African American face that plays baseball. ~ Matt Kemp,
865:Justice has her seat, and her fine balance
Disturbed too often spoils an unripe world
With ill-timed mercy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
866:Great leaders have to know when to divide that line from being selfless to being selfish, and he perfectly chose the time to be selfish and made plays. ~ Michael Irvin,
867:I have yet to be in a game where luck was involved. Well-prepared players make plays. I have yet to be in a game where the most prepared team didn't win. ~ Urban Meyer,
868:Plays are so much more special if they've never ever had a production, but I think you can really work on a play and make it better with each production. ~ Beth Henley,
869:I do have some theatrical background. I've written plays and seen plays and read plays. But I also read novels. One thing I don't read is screenplays. ~ Charlie Kaufman,
870:If it is permissible to write plays that are not intended to be seen, I should like to see who can prevent me from writing a book no one can read. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
871:I've always been somebody that it takes me longer to learn things, but once I learn them... I'm like a quarterback that plays best in the fourth quarter. ~ Jim Gaffigan,
872:I was always an actor, starting in middle school. I was in all the plays and all that. But dancing didn't come into my life until late into high school. ~ Harry Shum Jr,
873:We never pay anyone Dane-geld, no matter how trifling the cost. For the end of that game is oppression and shame and the nation that plays it is lost! ~ Rudyard Kipling,
874:An anarchist is like an undercover agent who plays the game of Reason in order to undercut the authority of Reason (Truth, Honesty, Justice and so on). ~ Paul Feyerabend,
875:I think when I write movies and plays and books and magazine articles, they're all storytelling, and reality is the common denominator that binds them. ~ Lawrence Wright,
876:I've had trouble with criticism, I guess. It's hard to know what role criticism plays in either encouraging poets or in getting other people to read them. ~ Kenneth Koch,
877:I've known Shawn for several years. And he's just an amazing talent. He's a great writer, a marvelous, marvelous guitar player, and plays really good fiddle. ~ Guy Clark,
878:Oh, I was completely hooked on movies and plays and theater from the time I was a day old; I was very, very early on in love with movies and I loved plays. ~ Bob Balaban,
879:Screenplay ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD: THE FILM Radio Plays THE PLAYS FOR RADIO 1964–1983 IN THE NATIVE STATE Fiction LORD MALQUIST AND MR MOON ~ Tom Stoppard,
880:The alchemist said, “No matter what he does, every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn’t know it.” The ~ Paulo Coelho,
881:But we were doing plays and movies which I had nothing to do with other than being a producer, and I don't have that kind of interest or time any more. ~ Gregory Harrison,
882:I am looking forward to a series of productive meetings in both Austria and Estonia, particularly what role organized crime plays in the Baltic drug trade. ~ Howard Coble,
883:I have friends come over and we read plays out loud and I make paintings and I just do things all the time just so I don't ever feel like I'm sitting around. ~ Nikki Reed,
884:I'm interested in music, not in my image. If someone plays something fantastic, that I could never have thought of, it makes me happy to know it exists. ~ Ornette Coleman,
885:It is so much in the nature of men to overreach and deceive one another, that their very sports and plays are founded on that principle. ~ Fulke Greville 1st Baron Brooke,
886:Its the details and the human element that makes Recount entertaining. Even though we know how the election ends, it plays like a thriller. Its also funny. ~ Kevin Spacey,
887:Love is gone ere grief can find him;
    But his way
Tears that, falling, lag behind him
    Still betray. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
888:Strange things happen here. Elle thought. Prince Severin plays in the dirt, and now he’s willing to play the part of a pony? It was all most unsettling. “Good? ~ K M Shea,
889:We have a desperate need for producers in the [commercial Broadway] theatre, and it is very hard for them to get money and find investors for new plays. ~ Arthur Laurents,
890:We need improvement in the style of performance. There is no more advantage in a musician who plays and conducts than in one who is only a beater of rhythm. ~ Franz Liszt,
891:Arthur Miller once payed me a great compliment saying that my plays were 'necessary.' I will go one step further and say that Arthur's plays are 'essential' ~ Edward Albee,
892:I get fed up with all this nonsense of ringing people up and lighting cigarettes and answering the doorbell that passes for action in so many modern plays. ~ Graham Greene,
893:I'm in the business of providing people with secondary satisfactions. It wouldn't have done me much good if they had all written their own plays, would it? ~ J B Priestley,
894:I would take plays and I would cut out all the other dialogue and make long monologues because I felt the other kids weren't taking it as seriously as I did. ~ Sally Field,
895:My study is a converted garage which is largely lined with bookshelves and cardboard boxes filled with manuscripts of my film scripts, plays and books. ~ William Nicholson,
896:Oxygen plays a pivotal role in the proper functioning of the immune system. We can look at oxygen deficiency as the single greatest cause of all diseases. ~ Stephen Levine,
897:Sports plays a societal role in engendering jingoist and chauvinist attitudes. They're designed to organize a community to be committed to their gladiators. ~ Noam Chomsky,
898:I fell in love with acting, just going to a lot of plays. My parents went to a lot of plays, and I went to a lot of schools that would get plays for kids. ~ Patrick J Adams,
899:I loved, loved, loved the fight that I got to do with Matthew Bomer, who plays Bryce, when we did the fight scene that was back to back in the Buy More. ~ Yvonne Strahovski,
900:Sport is the big giveaway. Wherever sport plays a big part in people's lives you can be sure they're bored witless and just waiting to break up the furniture. ~ J G Ballard,
901:Worship plays a major role in the Christian daily life. Throughout Scripture we see worship from David dancing before the Lord to Jesus rejoicing in the Spirit. ~ T D Jakes,
902:I daydream about a high school where everybody plays the harmonica: the students, the teachers, the principal, the janitor and the cook in the cafeteria. ~ Richard Brautigan,
903:I have worked with Tarell Alvin McCraney, who is the play Moonlight is based on. He's a company member at Steppenwolf. I have done a could of his plays here. ~ Andre Holland,
904:In our culture, futility plays the role of transgression and fashion is condemned for having within it the force of the pure sign which signifies nothing. ~ Jean Baudrillard,
905:Is your father writing a book?" said Alison.

"No. He's existing. Some people live, like the rest of us, like the people in your plays. He just exists. ~ Iris Murdoch,
906:An anarchist is like an undercover agent who plays the game of Reason in order to undercut the authority of Reason (Truth, Honesty, Justice and so on). ~ Paul Karl Feyerabend,
907:Everything will look better in the morning.
There will be hope again when the light returns.
The despair is only an illusion, a trick the darkness plays. ~ Blake Crouch,
908:I just can't help thinking what a real shaking up it would give people if, all of a sudden, there were no new books, new plays, new histories, new poems . . . ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
909:I look at Messi, and he makes me laugh. A beautiful footballer who is still like a kid. A world superstar, but still a kid. Innocent, you know. He just plays. ~ Johan Cruijff,
910:I really didn't know much about theater. After I signed on, I started reading a lot of Sam Shepard plays just to brush up on my history and do some research. ~ Taissa Farmiga,
911:I suppose I'd have to say that my favourite author is Homer. After Homer's Ilaid, I'd name The Odyssey, and then I'd mention a number of plays of Euripides. ~ William Golding,
912:Reason to his best creatures, if they suffer
The rebel blood to o’ercrow that tranquil wise
And perfect minister? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
913:There is a guy on my block who lives for rock, he plays records day and night, and when he feels down he puts the rock and roll on and it makes him feel alright. ~ Ray Davies,
914:There's going to be good plays that happen and bad plays that happen, but at the end of the day, when you have the chance to hit a big play, you have to hit it. ~ Andy Dalton,
915:When an actor plays a scene exactly the way a director orders, it isn't acting. It's following instructions. Anyone with the physical qualifications can do that. ~ James Dean,
916:Everyone plays a purpose, even fathers who lie to you or leave you behind. Time takes care of all that pain so if someone derails you, it'll be okay eventually. ~ Adam Silvera,
917:Every time I step in between those lines, I'm in the zone. If you get between me and the ball, you might get smashed a couple times. Things happen, plays happen. ~ Carli Lloyd,
918:For in the wood these golden days Some leaf obeys its Maker's call. And through their hollow aisles it plays With delicate touch the prelude of the Fall. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
919:If it is permissible to write plays that are not intended to be seen, I should like to see who can prevent me from writing a book no one can read. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg, [T5],
920:I have a lot of confidence in myself, a lot of confidence in the race team, our equipment, and as my mind plays its games on me, I just fall back on the team. ~ Jimmie Johnson,
921:In the actual condition of medical science, the physician mostly plays the part of simple spectator of the sad episodes which his profession furnishes him. ~ Francois Magendie,
922:It's a game everybody plays. If you see a man with a beard and holler "Beaver!" it's five points. And if you see a man with a moustache, it's onlI three points. ~ Gracie Allen,
923:I’ve learnt to listen. I don’t think I always did listen. Not just in plays, but in life. And you have to hear what people are saying before you can respond. ~ Penelope Wilton,
924:Looking for God-or Heaven-by exploring space is like reading or seeing all Shakespeare's plays in the hope that you will find Shakespeare as one of the characters. ~ C S Lewis,
925:My brother and I grew up in a musical family. We have an older sister who sings and plays the piano. Our dad is a musician. Music was always a part of our lives. ~ Laura Allen,
926:When I was a kid, I wanted to be an actor. I was acting in all the school plays. I went to school for acting. I was really sure that that's what I wanted to do. ~ Aaron Sorkin,
927:You’re being paid a lot of money to maintain a distorted view of reality, but you don’t notice the tricks that your big bonus plays on your perception of reality. ~ Dan Ariely,
928:I always wanted to act, but I never thought it would be my profession. I thought that I'd end up doing other things, but that in the meantime I'd do plays. ~ Gael Garcia Bernal,
929:It is possible to refine awareness itself so much that the emptiness of things, and the role mental construction plays, becomes a directly apprehended reality. ~ Jay Michaelson,
930:I've always been more interested in the audience than I have in the plays. I like that idea of all those people sitting in the dark together. It's kind of fun. ~ Liev Schreiber,
931:I was always in trouble from an early age. I had a fraught relationship with my parents, who were very traditional. Doing plays at school was a joyous release. ~ Naveen Andrews,
932:Later, as he plays and plays, as all the fog burns away, I think, he's right. That's exactly it--I am crazy sad, and somewhere deep inside, all I want is to fly. ~ Jandy Nelson,
933:Let's say that what's out there is a narrative. Often enough, the picture plays with the question of what actually is happening. Almost the way puns function. ~ Garry Winogrand,
934:Love has a way of cheating itself consciously, like a child who plays at solitary hide-and-seek; it is pleased with assurances that it all the while disbelieves. ~ George Eliot,
935:So I find the fascination, the love, the incredible skill and everything to do with acting, writing plays, and doing them, just darling. Lovely. I love actors. ~ Patrick Macnee,
936:We rest in the hands of a fickle god. He plays on our behalf only for entertainment, and he will close his eyes and sleep if we fail to engage his intellect. ~ Paolo Bacigalupi,
937:When a man plays a woman in a dress, you're halfway there. It's inherently funny. When a woman plays a man, for whatever reason, it's not that instant kind of funny. ~ Tina Fey,
938:As I write this he’s the guitarist with Ferocious Dog. He stands back and simply plays his guitar and I’ve never seen him happier. I’m clearly way more needy than Les. ~ Jim Bob,
939:Everyone judges plays as if they were very easy to write. They don't know that it is hard to write a good play, and twice as hardand tortuous to write a bad one. ~ Anton Chekhov,
940:Foemen! they are our playmates in the fight
And should be dear as friends who share our hours
Of closeness and desire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
941:Here's a test you can try at home, Put a 2 year old in a playpen with an apple and a rabbit. If it plays with the apple and eats the rabbit, you've got a carnivore. ~ Dan Piraro,
942:I believe in freedom, I'm for a world without borders. But that's an ideal. On a practical level, I'm for a secular state where religion only plays a minor role. ~ Shahin Najafi,
943:I never wanted to play guitar when I was younger. I wanted to be a drummer because everybody plays guitar, and I didn't want to do what everybody else wanted to do. ~ Jack White,
944:I sit every once in a while and I think about plays and films I can do with William Petersen into our eighties. He's the most incredible scene partner I've ever had. ~ Jorja Fox,
945:It was the economist Joseph Schumpeter who clarified the crucial, indeed moral, role profit plays. Schumpeter regarded the classical role of equilibrium as nonsense. ~ Anonymous,
946:I wrote poetry, journals, and, especially, plays for the neighborhood kids to perform. I had an ordinary, happy childhood. Nothing much was going on, but I had fun. ~ Alex Flinn,
947:Life has many changes. Tomorrow it may rain, and it's supposed to be sunshine, 'cause it's summertime. But God's got a funny soul, he plays like Charlie Parker. ~ Charles Mingus,
948:Mother, who has an absolute belief that it is not the cards that one is dealt in life, it is how one plays them, is, by far, the highest card I was dealt. ~ Kay Redfield Jamison,
949:So many female characters are the girlfriend of the person having the adventure. I want to play baseball, I don't want to be the girlfriend of the one [who plays]. ~ Geena Davis,
950:Your life story is really about how the hands of history caught you up, played with you, and you with them. History plays for keeps. Individuals play for time. ~ Gregory Maguire,
951:David impresses by his example on the field. He never stops running, he plays with supreme confidence, he always tries his hardest and he scores important goals. ~ Alex Ferguson,
952:I came to Mozambique in 1986, when I first became involved with Teatro Avenida - a theatre company that stages plays concerned with political and social issues. ~ Henning Mankell,
953:If a person plays dissonance long enough, it will sound like consonance. It's a language that was alien and then it's less and less alien as it continues to live. ~ Keith Jarrett,
954:I had no idea of the enormous and unquestionably helpful part that humbug plays in the social life of great peoples dwelling in a state of democratic freedom. ~ Winston Churchill,
955:It would be difficult to determine whether the age is growing better or worse; for I think our plays are growing like sermons, and our sermons like plays. ~ Anna Letitia Barbauld,
956:Propaganda in the ordinary sense of the term plays a less important part in a consumer society, where people greet all official pronouncements with suspicion. ~ Christopher Lasch,
957:Socrates didn't care to visit the theater, as a rule, except when the plays of Euripides (which some think, he himself had helped to compose), were performed. ~ Moses Mendelssohn,
958:The cast gets along pretty well, it's a good work environment. I hang out a lot with Brett Claywell, he plays Tim Smith on the show. We play plenty of basketball ~ James Lafferty,
959:You know how in high school you do these plays and people come up after the show and they're really excited for you? Well, that's what's happening to me right now. ~ Mira Sorvino,
960:All things here secretly are right; all’s wrong
In God’s appearances. World, thou art wisely led
In a divine confusion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
961:An illusionist can make himself disappear; a musician can do the same thing: When he plays a piano, after a while we start seeing only the music, not the man! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
962:I do not want actors and actresses to understand my plays. That is not necessary. If they will only pronounce the correct sounds I can guarantee the results. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
963:It doesn't really matter what a person decides to do, or how radically a person plays with gender. What matters, I think, is how aware a person is of the options. ~ Kate Bornstein,
964:I think by eighth grade I knew I wanted to be an actor. I'd done church plays and stuff, but my first actual acting class was in eighth grade. I was obsessed with it. ~ Aaron Paul,
965:I view myself in the narrowest possible terms, but I don't watch anything I've been in, and I don't read reviews or analysis of movies I've been in, or my plays. ~ Jesse Eisenberg,
966:Noah Baumbach writing is really wonderful. I think the way he plays out each character with a unique voice is really impressive, and rhythmically his dialogue works. ~ Naomi Watts,
967:She imagines the keys under her fingers as she plays along with her mind’s ear, the motor plan unfolded like an old family recipe, still legible after so many years. ~ Lisa Genova,
968:So you write plays?” “Yes. I’m always rather jealous of novelists—the way you get to control everything. You don’t have to deal with actors massacring your best lines. ~ Ruth Ware,
969:Brian Auger is a superb technician on his instrument, but he also plays with feeling that is a rarity. I am looking forward in recording with him in the near future. ~ Eddie Harris,
970:Everything Sholom Aleichem talks about in his plays and his short stories is about people, family, man's relationship with his God, the breaking down of tradition. ~ Norman Jewison,
971:I continue to work on plays, but I've always felt that you could put a note in a bottle and send it offshore, and you'd have as much chance communicating with people. ~ Lewis Black,
972:In short, if we do not comprehend the massive role that sin plays in the Bible and therefore in biblically faithful Christianity, we shall misread the Bible. ~ Christopher W Morgan,
973:many companies fail to deliver exceptional value because they are obsessed by the novelty of their product or service, especially if new technology plays a part in it. ~ W Chan Kim,
974:Of the many qualities I adore about Melissa McCarthy as a comedian and as a dramatic actor, the best is how fully she gives herself to every character she plays. ~ Lisa Schwarzbaum,
975:A director recommended me for the role on 'Soap.' They said, 'She plays heavy roles, murderesses and the like.' He said, 'On stage, she could be very very funny. ~ Katherine Helmond,
976:I am convinced, the way one plays chess always reflects the player's personality. If something defines his character, then it will also define his way of playing. ~ Vladimir Kramnik,
977:I just try to play as hard as I can every possession. If you're aware and you're high-energy, the ball will eventually bounce your way and you'll be able to make plays. ~ Jeremy Lin,
978:The truth is that a lot of plays aren't political at all. In American theater history, political theater has tended to crop up when there's a crisis, a national crisis. ~ Frank Rich,
979:Writing stories and plays is an extension of little-kid doll house play and lego play. We all are kids, just older now, and we plan a bit more, but writing is play. ~ Jeanne Voelker,
980:Astrology had an important role in the ancient world. You can't understand many things unless you know something about astrology - the plays of Shakespeare and so on. ~ Steven Pinker,
981:I have a cultural background that's shaped in England, France and Germany. Bringing that in is nice, in terms of how an actor plays a role or speaks in an interview. ~ Richard Sammel,
982:The child plays at being an adult long before he is one, and so you can play with more desirable beliefs while you are still growing into that more beneficial picture. ~ Seth Roberts,
983:Your life story is really about how the hands of history caught you up, played with you, and you with them. History plays for keeps; individuals play for time. When ~ Gregory Maguire,
984:All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts. ~ William Shakespeare,
985:I'm always very self-conscious and assume the way faith or religion might come up in my plays will seem very harsh to people of faith, or who are currently practicing. ~ Stephen Karam,
986:I write plays because writing dialogue is the only respectable way of contradicting yourself. I put a position, rebut it, refute the rebuttal, and rebut the refutation. ~ Tom Stoppard,
987:The American obliviousness towards the suffering of Palestinians refugees plays a major part in radicalizing people. And we are fanning the flames of puritanism. ~ Khaled Abou El Fadl,
988:The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves. ~ Carl Jung,
989:What is Norah Jones' style? Is it just the albums that we've heard? She has a rock group where she plays guitar in, downtown in New York, so do we really know her style? ~ Talib Kweli,
990:Catch Harry Belafonte. He's got a helluva rhythm section.And so have the Pointer Sisters. And that little guy with Sammy Clayton. He plays the whole show with 40 members. ~ Miles Davis,
991:I hate plays. I’ve never seen the point of paying money to watch people shout a lot and pretend to die, and now that I’m the father of three young children I don’t have to. ~ Tim Moore,
992:I realised that when someone plays hard to get, they are making themselves into a character in a story, and they choose the story that leads to the outcome they want. ~ Scarlett Thomas,
993:I really only did theater in school in college. I did summer stock a couple of times in the summer, and plays that the school put on. But I knew I wanted to be in movies. ~ Geena Davis,
994:I used to do plays and some television commercials when I was younger. I guess my mom's being an actress got me interested in that, but music definitely took its place. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
995:One of the crafty tricks Satan plays is to guide a person safely on the wrong path. When your safety is the priority, you may be on the wrong path but may not know. ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
996:Shakespeare wrote great plays that we're still watching all these years later. Charlie Chaplin made great comedies and they are still as funny today as they ever were. ~ Leonard Maltin,
997:The harmony of kindred souls that seek
Each other on the strings of body and mind,
Is all the music for which life was born. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
998:There will always be a theatrical experience because there will always be cinemas no matter what. It's like there will always be theaters to have stage plays in. ~ Nicolas Winding Refn,
999:The whole arrangement of my picture is expressive. The place occupied by the figures or objects, the empty spaces around them, the proportions, everything plays a part. ~ Henri Matisse,
1000:[Anton] Chekhov is the most produced playwright in the world after Shakespeare, and most of the people in my sort of audience would have seen at least one of his plays. ~ Robert Dessaix,
1001:Christian literature comes from Christian novelists and dramatists - not from the bench of bishops getting together and trying to write plays and novels in their spare time. ~ C S Lewis,
1002:Even through my college years, I was trying out plays and shows, but I never really thought it made much sense to try to be an actor. I thought it was foolish, really. ~ Dermot Mulroney,
1003:In a case like Iraq the UN has again shown what important role it plays as the guarantor for protecting international peace and stability in the global political structure. ~ Anna Lindh,
1004:In pointing out the importance of isolation in the treatment of hysterical anorexia, M. Charcot showed that the psychical element plays, in this disease, a predominant part. ~ Anonymous,
1005:Mad with the love of a wife for her husband... sing for the Most High sing for no other. We are all notes in this eternal song. God plays His flute and we all dance along. ~ Trevor Hall,
1006:Nature is so perfect that the Trinity couldn't have fashioned her any more perfect. She is an organ on which our Lord plays and the devil works the bellows. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1007:"The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves." ~ Carl Jung,
1008:“The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.” ~ Carl Jung,
1009:What happened there was they were moving the chains and we had the call made. We were really trying to get two plays if we could have rather than use the timeout thereafter. ~ Les Miles,
1010:For no art and no religion is possible until we make allowances, until we manage to keep quiet the enfant terrible of logic that plays havoc with the other faculties. ~ John Crowe Ransom,
1011:I have been devoured all my life by an incurable and burning impatience: and to this day find all oratory, biography, operas, films, plays, books, and persons, too long. ~ Margot Asquith,
1012:I started writing and acting in these little plays and then I was discovered by Dustin Hoffman. He got me my first audition for a film he was in, called 'I Heart Huckabees.' ~ Jonah Hill,
1013:I therefore take the liberty of proposing for this hypothetical new atom, which is not light but plays an essential part in every process of radiation, the name photon. ~ Gilbert N Lewis,
1014:Oh god, I'd just hate it if a certain dramaturg got a hold of a Pinter play, for example, which are all mystery and all music. That's how the life get's sucked out of plays. ~ John Guare,
1015:One forward step is something gained,
Since little by little earth must open to heaven
Till her dim soul awakes into the Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
1016:There was something about being in front of audiences when I was in elementary school plays that gave me a thrill. It was like the rush you get from a roller coaster drop. ~ Mira Sorvino,
1017:But the point is this: stories grow out of other stories, poems out of other poems. And they don’t have to stick to genre. Poems can learn from plays, songs from novels. ~ Thomas C Foster,
1018:I've been involved in one or two successes in classical plays but nothing to touch the excitement and the glamour and the gratification of being a children's hero for so long. ~ Tom Baker,
1019:I was about seven years old. In my mother's garage I used to create plays and star in them and charge the neighborhood kids five cents to see them. It was a lot of fun. ~ Franny Armstrong,
1020:My twin sister, my cousin, and I used to write and perform plays for my family. We raided the closets for costumes and fought over parts. I'm sure I was the bossiest one. ~ Connie Britton,
1021:The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves. ~ Julia Cameron,
1022:The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect, but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves"
   ~ Carl Jung,
1023:All alters in a world that is the same.
Man most must change who is a soul of Time;
His gods too change and live in larger light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
1024:Every life, every love, every action and feeling and thought has its reason and significance: its beginning, and the part it plays in the end. Sometimes, we do see. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
1025:Great Nature in her animal trance,
Her life of mighty instincts where no stir
Of the hedged restless mind has spoiled her vasts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
1026:If always Fate were careful to fit in
The nature with the lot! But she sometimes
Loves these strange contrasts and crude ironies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
1027:In this gigantic world of which one grain of dust
Is all our field, Eternal Memory keeps
Our great things and our trivial equally ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
1028:The mind is a key factor throughout this book. Thinking, as you will see, plays a dominant role in eating. Toxic thoughts can negate the positive effects of good nutrition. ~ Caroline Leaf,
1029:There are no whole truths; all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays the devil. ~ Alfred North Whitehead, Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead (1954),
1030:In the lover's heart is a lute
Which plays the melody of longing.

You say he looks crazy—
That's only because your ears are not tuned
to the music by which he dances. ~ Rumi,
1031:Rafferty [Law] plays three or four instruments. He is very gifted. Whereas I pick instruments up and kind of stare at them and go, "I can't ever possibly play this." And I don't! ~ Jude Law,
1032:The way it works: The orchestra plays a few selections of its own and I terminate the first part of the programme on piano, usually with a movement from a Mozart concerto. ~ George Shearing,
1033:Time—and all the events held therein—plays out as it must. We cannot impose our will on it. The only true measure of strength is our ability to bear that which time demands. ~ Michelle Zink,
1034:All five hundred boys want to go out with the same ten anorexic girls." She said, "I'm a good musician, but not many guys are looking for a girl that plays great Bach preludes. ~ Mary Pipher,
1035:Food is not just what we put in our mouths to fill up; it is culture and identity. Reason plays some role in our decisions about food, but it's rarely driving the car. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer,
1036:He’s creator
Who greatly handles great material,
Calls order out of the abundant deep,
Not who invents sweet shadows out of air. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
1037:I got an M.F.A. in acting from NYU, and part of our training is to learn how to use swords in combat situations in a performance and Shakespeare plays where you have to fight. ~ Danai Gurira,
1038:I’m a poet. And then I put the poetry in the drama. I put it in short stories, and I put it in the plays. Poetry’s poetry. It doesn’t have to be called a poem, you know. ~ Tennessee Williams,
1039:Performance art is going to be the future. Plays on Broadway are so restricted. But performance art is like haikus, just one line thing. And it's more casual but more interesting. ~ Yoko Ono,
1040:The egos in this industry are incredibly vulnerable and everybody's afraid to wipe out. So everybody plays it safe and everybody tells everybody else how great they are. ~ Michelle Rodriguez,
1041:Voiceover work reminds me of old-time radio. When I was little I used to sneak and stay up at night and listen to Mystery Radio Theater - I loved all those old radio plays. ~ Virginia Madsen,
1042:War is an old, old plant on this earth, and a natural history of it would have to tell us under what soil conditions it grows, where it plays havoc, and how it is eliminated. ~ Ruth Benedict,
1043:Why should we make account of time, or of magnitude, or of figure? The soul knows how to play with them as a young child plays with graybeards and in churches. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, History,
1044:America has this understanding of Africans that plays like National Geographic: a bunch of Negroes with loincloths running around the plain fields of Africa chasing gazelles. ~ Djimon Hounsou,
1045:A screened Necessity drives even the gods.
Over human lives it strides to unseen ends;
Our tragic failures are its stepping-stones. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
1046:Each creature labouring in his own vocation
Desires another’s and deems the heavy burden
Of his own fate the world’s sole heaviness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
1047:Many of the interconnections in systems operate through the flow of information. Information holds systems together and plays a great role in determining how they operate. ~ Donella H Meadows,
1048:Msabu's bleeding. She does not have this ox. This lion is hungry. He does not have this ox. This wagon is heavy. It doesn't have this ox. God is happy, msabu. He plays with us. ~ Karen Blixen,
1049:Going to see plays isn't what you people should do. Try looking at yourselves a little more often and see what gray lives you all lead. How much of what you say is unnecessary. ~ Anton Chekhov,
1050:Grace Kelly plays with intelligence, wit and feeling. She has a great amount of natural ability and the ability to adapt. That is the hallmark of a first-class jazz musician. ~ Wynton Marsalis,
1051:I doubt if we nuns are really as self-sacrificing as we must seem to be to you who live in the world. We don't give everything for nothing, you know. The mystery plays fair. ~ Elizabeth Goudge,
1052:I have been doing acting my whole life. I did plays in high school. I take it pretty seriously. I used to do a lot of Shakespeare and Shakespearean festivals and monologues. ~ Vinny Guadagnino,
1053:I like Stan [Getz], because he has so much patience, the way he plays those melodies - other people can't get nothing out of a song, but he can, which takes a lot of imagination. ~ Miles Davis,
1054:Love makes you crazy. Love crawls into your brain and plays games with your neurons. All the things you thought you knew about yourself fly out the window when love flies in. ~ Barbara Bretton,
1055:Maddie saw his face and smiled. “It’s the quiet. It plays with your mind. Makes you think you’re hearing something that isn’t there. Pretty soon you’ll start to see things, too. ~ Sam Sisavath,
1056:Speaking of WAMU, [bluegrass and old time music DJ] Ray Davis did a lot of work there. I've know Ray, I guess for 50 years - 40, or 50 years. And, he plays a lot of my records. ~ Ralph Stanley,
1057:A hypocrite is one who plays two parts consciously for his own ends. When we find fault with other people we may be quite sincere, and yet Jesus says in reality we are frauds. ~ Oswald Chambers,
1058:For some unexplained reason, it's always the other end of the table that's wild and raucous, with screaming laughter and a fella who plays 'Holiday for Strings' on water glasses. ~ Erma Bombeck,
1059:Interest in certain themes doesn't mandate a personal stake or personal experience of those themes. I've killed people in plays, but no one asks me what it's like to kill people. ~ Billy Crudup,
1060:I still think that I'm playing instruments, not just pushing buttons and there it goes. It's interactive and alive with the sound and the manipulation and it plays like instruments. ~ Ikue Mori,
1061:It's beautiful to have a smoking jacket, a good cigar and a wife who plays the piano. So relaxing. So lenitive. Between the acts you go out for a smoke and a breath of fresh air. ~ Henry Miller,
1062:I was definitely a thespian of sorts in elementary school. I went to a real small private school and every year I participated in the talent shows and the school plays, all of 'em. ~ Ariel Pink,
1063:Our breath plays a very important role in our life. The breath is the connecting link between the inner world of the mind and the outer world of the body and environment. ~ Sri Sri Ravi Shankar,
1064:There is little that gives children greater pleasure than when a grown-up lets himself down to their level, renounces his oppressive superiority and plays with them as an equal. ~ Sigmund Freud,
1065:They have a baby grand piano, but no one in the family plays. They have shelves of books they've never read, and the tension between the couples was so thick it nearly choked us. ~ Ruta Sepetys,
1066:All fine films, novels, and plays, through all shades of the comic and the tragic, entertain when they give the audience a fresh model of life empowered with an affective meaning. ~ Robert McKee,
1067:Drugs is a government game, Bilal. A way to rob us of our best black men, our army. Everyone who plays the game loses. Then they get you right back where we started, in slavery! ~ Sister Souljah,
1068:If your money is not helping you make your life better, then something is wrong. Chances are you're not making a connection between your values and the role obey plays in your life. ~ David Bach,
1069:It is, perhaps more than anything else, the arrest of time which has taken place in a completed work of art that gives certain plays their feeling of depth and significance. ~ Tennessee Williams,
1070:Light, to me, stands for Living In Gods Heavenly Thoughts. That's a good place to live. That is what influenced me to tell stories in light and that happened to be movies and plays. ~ Gary Busey,
1071:My brother, Mario, is in show business and so are all my cousins on my dad's side. We come from a family of musicians. My grandmother's sister in Puerto Rico plays five instruments. ~ Irene Cara,
1072:We told Stanley Roberts to go on a water diet, and Lake Superior disappeared. Pat Williams When Xavier McDaniel plays against Orlando Wooldridge, it's a coach's dream - X vs O. ~ Mychal Thompson,
1073:When people say, "Oh, she plays like a dude," it's usually dudes who are the ones saying it. They're saying, "Oh, she's as good as us." Of course, that's a stupid statement. ~ Esperanza Spalding,
1074:Work-do plays, learn your craft, and go to school. Keep working. Nobody is going to give you jobs for going to parties or any of that nonsense. Go out, look around, do things. ~ James Gandolfini,
1075:Curiosity is the intellectual need to answer questions and close open patterns. Story plays to this universal desire by doing the opposite, posing questions and opening situations. ~ Robert McKee,
1076:Fitness plays such an important role in my life, and an integral part of my golf structure, that I think I might be quite good at teaching others the benefits of sport and fitness. ~ Rory McIlroy,
1077:I don't like the theatre. I like plays in which the audience is addressed by the actors. I don't like seeing people talking to each other on stage as if there isn't an audience. ~ Jonathan Meades,
1078:The biggest thing you need to be successful with it is a quarterback who wants to be involved in the decision-making process and not just merely want to execute plays sent in to him. ~ Tony Dungy,
1079:There are some nights when sleep plays coy, aloof and disdainful. And all the wiles that I employ to win its service to my side are useless as wounded pride, and much more painful. ~ Maya Angelou,
1080:There is a disease to which plays as well as men become liable with advancing years. In men it is called doting, in plays dating.The more topical the play the more it dates. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1081:Tis all a Chequer-board of nights and days
Where Destiny with men for Pieces plays:
Hither and thither moves, and mates,and slays,
And one by one back in the closet lays. ~ Omar Khayy m,
1082:We need to insist on making culture out of our desire: making paintings, novels, plays and films potent and seductive and authentic enough to undermine and overwhelm the Iron Maiden. ~ Naomi Wolf,
1083:What makes spinal-cord injuries as devastating as they are is that everything about them plays out in absolutes: they are instantaneous, utterly disabling and horribly permanent. ~ Jeffrey Kluger,
1084:A moment comes when you cash in whatever credibility a guy can have who plays and sings rock songs for a living, and you put your chips where you think they might do some good. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
1085:I actually feel that all drama has an element of comedy in it. A great deal of that I learned from writers like Chekhov who called his plays his comedy even when they touch on tragedy. ~ Ira Sachs,
1086:I suppose when I was a kid, and I went to movies, and later went to some plays on my own when I got a little older, in New Orleans, where I was living then, I zeroed in on the actor. ~ Ray Walston,
1087:Was Mann himself fully aware of all the facets of his irony? Probably not - any more than Shakespeare was fully aware of all the riches subsequent critics have found in his plays. ~ Philip Kitcher,
1088:We're also a multi-site church, so we have other pastors on other campuses who want to read the message before the video plays on the weekend services. So it just works better for me. ~ Max Lucado,
1089:While I was doing these plays in the beginning, I wasn't getting paid. I thought of it more as a hobby. Then I realized how seriously a lot of these people took what they were doing ~ Tom Berenger,
1090:An agent saw one of the plays I did at ACT, but my mom was like, No, she's too young. I became so annoying that a year and a half later she just couldn't stand hearing me any more! ~ Marla Sokoloff,
1091:As a professional, as a person, and as a player, I think he's fantastic. It's like he's dancing the tango. I just love how he plays football so elegantly. To me, Andres is Don Andres. ~ Dani Alves,
1092:Close only as love whom sorrow and delight
Cannot diminish, nor long absence change
Nor daily prodigality of joy
Expend immortal love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
1093:Culture defines who we are and how we see ourselves. A new attitude toward nature provides space for a new attitude toward culture and the role it plays in sustainable development ~ Wangari Maathai,
1094:Every time you make a decision, there are a thousand paths you did not follow. Each of those paths plays out in an alternative version of events, with alternative versions of you. ~ Iain Rob Wright,
1095:Golf is recognized as one of the more difficult games to play or teach. One reason for this is that each person necessarily plays by feel, and a feel is almost impossible to describe. ~ Bobby Jones,
1096:I am going to enjoy life in Paris I know. It is so human and there is something noble in the city... It is a real city, old and fine and life plays in it for everybody to see. ~ Katherine Mansfield,
1097:I can write the stuff and play it myself and have something in my head, but the best feeling is when somebody else plays it and they're hearing something other than what I'm hearing. ~ Bill Frisell,
1098:I don't do plays without jokes anymore. I've retired from those plays. I think it's bad manners to invite people to sit in the dark for two and a half hours and not tell them the joke. ~ Bill Nighy,
1099:I find that when my plays are going well, they seem to resemble pieces of music. But if I had to go into specifics about it, I wouldn't be able to. It's merely something that I feel. ~ Edward Albee,
1100:If you want to help people, if you care, go to the cities. The city is where the pain is the greatest - and the cities are a hell of a lot of fun if you like art, movies and plays. ~ Frederick Lenz,
1101:It is of far more important that a man shall play something himself, even if he plays it badly, than that he shall go with hundreds of companions to see someone else play well. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
1102:I've done loads of things people have never seen, dramas on BBC4 and plays upstairs at the Royal Court and the Bush, and because I didn't go to drama school, they gave me an education. ~ Rafe Spall,
1103:Sometimes I think the experience of a play is finished for me when I finish writing it. If it weren't for the need to make a living, I don't know whether I'd have the plays produced. ~ Edward Albee,
1104:The wall is silence, the grass is sleep, Tall trees of peace their vigil keep, And the Fairy of Dreams with moth-wings furled. Plays soft on her flute to the drowsy world. ~ Ida Rentoul Outhwaite,
1105:So here we are today with a new conversation. When University of Georgia plays Georgia Tech, it's uniform color versus skin color. We have - we've overcome that level of racial fear. ~ Jesse Jackson,
1106:The amygdala, along with related areas..., plays a crucial role in coordinating perceptions with memory and behavior. These regions are especially sensitive to social interactions. ~ Daniel J Siegel,
1107:The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves. C. G. JUNG ~ Julia Cameron,
1108:There are just times when your body and your soul feed into a character and you somehow meet at the point where that character truly lives in you. It happens in plays, in TV, in films. ~ Scott Cohen,
1109:The way a team plays as a whole determines its success. You may have the greatest bunch of individual stars in the world, but if they don't play together, the club won't be worth a dime. ~ Babe Ruth,
1110:They say the anarchy of love disturbs
Gods even: shaken are the marble natures,
The deathless hearts are melted to the pang
And rapture. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
1111:Try to be the best; try never to be the worst! Live and play the role honey plays on your tongue in the lives of people; never do the job that pepper does on your eyes to others! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1112:Whenever anyone does as this ad does, plays the actual words of Donald Trump on national television, his response is to yell, "Liar." Their strategy is simply to yell, "Liar, liar, liar." ~ Ted Cruz,
1113:You’re here because it’s somewhere. Dogs pant in the streets. Beer won’t stay cold. The last new song you liked came out a long, long time ago, and the radio never plays it anymore. ~ Nic Pizzolatto,
1114:I like what Oliver Lakes does on the saxophone. The saxophone comes pretty close to the sound of the human voice and when Oliver plays with other sax players, it's like a dialogue. ~ Yusef Komunyakaa,
1115:I think the media plays into the hands of false induction, genuine seduction taking place, wrong deductions, and the inevitable reductions. That's the way and the path of the visual. ~ Ravi Zacharias,
1116:My priorities are leaning more towards family, and I credit my southern upbringing to that. I was raised in the church as well, and God plays a big role in my upbringing and my life. ~ Omari Hardwick,
1117:Our experience is coloured through and through by books and plays and the cinema, and it takes patience and skill to disentangle the things we have really learned from life for ourselves. ~ C S Lewis,
1118:All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. ~ William Shakespeare,
1119:All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages. ~ William Shakespeare,
1120:It is in such a wise that memory plays its pranks for good or ill; for pleasure or pain; for weal or woe. It is thus that life is bittersweet, and that which has been done becomes eternal. ~ Anonymous,
1121:Policymakers are very much like stage managers. They don't write the plays, make the props, or act the parts, but like stage managers, they can determine how smoothly the show goes on. ~ Joyce Appleby,
1122:You cover 50 yards on the playing field of faith with a story that downplays your success. You cover 3 yards, or you may even end up backward, with anything that up-plays or promotes you. ~ Max Lucado,
1123:You're just trying on different identities, like everyone in those Shakespeare plays. And the people we pretend at, they're already in us. That's why we pretend them in the first place. ~ Gayle Forman,
1124:Behold the rich farm boy Malachy Burns
Who plays his pipe among the churns.
He's a coward, he's benighted,
He makes everyone feel slighted,
And all things but music he spurns. ~ Julia Glass,
1125:I'm a father of four so whenever I'm not working my kids have their different sports, or plays, or school performances, so I don't do a whole lot of other stuff besides being a dad. ~ Christopher Judge,
1126:I started really young, like 12 or 13, and then I started doing school plays. We had a really good drama department, so the kind of drama-geek stigma wasn't really there in my high school. ~ Matt Damon,
1127:I think I’m falling for our real,” I say quietly.
A slow-growing smile plays on his lips before he lowers his forehead to mine and whispers back, “That’s good, because I’m already gone. ~ B J Harvey,
1128:I work constantly but I work at a lot of different things. You know, I run a theater company in New York, I direct plays, act in plays, in movies, so I try to keep it eclectic. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
1129:Jazz in itself is not struggling. That is, the music itself is not struggling... It's the attitude that's in trouble. My plays insist that we should not forget or toss away our history. ~ August Wilson,
1130:Love with my love, think with my thoughts; the rest
Leave to much older wiser men whose schemings
Have made God’s world an office and a mart. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
1131:Soccer is a continuous game, rugby is a continuous game, but for the physical elements that are involved in playing a football game and the number of plays that you play, I don't know that ~ Nick Saban,
1132:Tell me not here, it needs not saying, What tune the enchantress plays In aftermaths of soft September Or under blanching mays, For she and I were long acquainted And I knew all her ways. ~ A E Housman,
1133:This Lullaby is only a few words, a simple run of chords, quiet here in this spare room, but you can hear it, hear it, wherever you may go, even if I let you down, this lullaby plays on. ~ Sarah Dessen,
1134:Dave [Holland] plays the way he wants to play. And it's usually what's needed. You know, Dave is such a deep thinker. You can't tell him too much, else it might spoil his spirit, you know. ~ Miles Davis,
1135:Hot baths can also significantly increase GH over baseline, and both sauna and hot baths have been shown to cause a massive release in prolactin, which plays a role in wound healing. I ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1136:It is likely that space as we know it ceases to exist and is replaced by some form of chaotic quantum ‘foam’, where gravity plays a new role in fashioning the forms of energy that can exist. ~ Anonymous,
1137:Lexington High still plays Burlington High on Thanksgiving Day, and Dratch and I trash-text each other. She calls me Burlington garbage and I tell her to go drive her Mercedes into a lake. ~ Amy Poehler,
1138:Played percussively, the piano is a bore. If I go to a concert and someone plays like that I have two choices: go home or go to sleep. The goal is to make the piano sing, sing, sing. ~ Vladimir Horowitz,
1139:We musicians play in Time and with Time, but sometimes it is Time that plays with us. One day, unpredictably, the evolution of culture makes real an oeuvre which has lain in obscurity. ~ Igor Markevitch,
1140:As a fairly objective judgment, I do think that my plays as they come out are better than most other things that are put on the same year. But that doesn't make them very good necessarily. ~ Edward Albee,
1141:I am so glad and grateful, I am. But sometimes the orchestra plays something in swelling chords of luck and joy, and all I can hear is that one violin sawing out a thin melody of grief ~ Catherine Newman,
1142:I was always acting. I was doing after-school plays and stuff like that. But I wasn't doing well in any of the schools, so by ninth or tenth grade, I ended up going to a boarding school. ~ Justin Theroux,
1143:Steve Smith, thats what happened to us. He just kept making plays. We had a plan. We never really doubled him. We ran a lot of Cover 2, and obviously that didnt work out too good for us. ~ Brian Urlacher,
1144:The gods wrest our careful policies
To their own ends until we stand appalled
Remembering what we meant to do and seeing
What has been done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
1145:There are people these days who can do things on the guitar which are beyond my reach. There's one guy who plays with Queen who can do things I would dream of doing. I sincerely mean that. ~ Eric Clapton,
1146:There is also the guitar player Pat Metheny with whom I'd like to work with: he is so elegant and so emotional when he plays that I am sure that, together, we could make a good team. ~ Richard Clayderman,
1147:The thing I know how to do most is write a play. I came up loving plays and learning about plays and writing plays. I actually feel like an outsider when I'm writing movies and television. ~ Aaron Sorkin,
1148:This Lullaby is only a few words, a simple run of chords, quiet here in this spare room, but you can hear it, hear it, wherever you may go, even if I let you down, this lullaby plays on... ~ Sarah Dessen,
1149:                               All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, ~ William Shakespeare,
1150:As a composer I could never find use for over 4 or 5 notes in any musical number, and as a playwright most of my plays have two acts because i couldn't think of an idea for the third act. ~ George M Cohan,
1151:I don't write political plays in the sense that I'm writing essays that are kind of disguised as plays. I would really defy anyone to watch any of my plays and say 'Well, here's the point.' ~ Tony Kushner,
1152:It is easier for a rich person to act on their principles than it is for someone with fewer choices (which is why it is all the more disappointing when a wealthy person plays to the crowd). ~ Chris Cleave,
1153:Most of my recent plays were written in the railway train between Hatfield and Kings Cross. I write anywhere, on the top of omnibuses or wherever I may be; it is all the same to me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1154:Shakespeare's plays often turn on the idea of fate, as much drama does. What makes them so tragic is the gap between what his characters might like to accomplish and what fate provides them. ~ Nate Silver,
1155:The virtue you would like to have, assume it is already yours, appropriate it, enter into the part and live the character just as the great actor is absorbed in... the part he plays. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1156:I want to be the band everyone knows that goes hardest. Plays the hardest, parties the hardest, lives the hardest, loves the hardest, does everything the hardest, harder than anybody else. ~ Austin Carlile,
1157:Noögenic neuroses do not emerge from conflicts between drives and instincts but rather from existential problems. Among such problems, the frustration of the will to meaning plays a large role. ~ Anonymous,
1158:The time at length arrives when grief is rather an indulgence than a necessity; and the smile that plays upon the lips, although it may be deemed a sacrilege, is not banished. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,
1159:The time at length arrives, when grief is rather an indulgence than a necessity and the smile that plays upon the lips, although it may be deemed a sacrilege, is not banished. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,
1160:Wait, were you eavesdropping on my conversation with the duke? That's very rude."

"Is it? Half of the plays in the world contain eavesdropping. I assumed it was a common practice. ~ Sabrina Jeffries,
1161:And Kate Hepburn-God, she's beautiful, God, she plays golf well, God, she can get anyone in the world on the phone, God, she knows what to do all the time, God, she wears clothes well. ~ Joseph L Mankiewicz,
1162:As is often the case with children, the rule of 'monkey see, monkey do' plays out in the workplace. It's hard to be good role model, and it's one of the greatest challenges of leadership. ~ Leon F Lee Ellis,
1163:Ben Affleck (who plays A.J. Frost) and I got to actually go into the neutral buoyancy tank in actual $10 million spacesuits the astronauts wear in outer space, and that was pretty interesting ~ Bruce Willis,
1164:By the time the anthem plays its final strains, all twenty-four of us stand in one unbroken line in what must be the first public show of unity among the districts since the Dark Days. You ~ Suzanne Collins,
1165:In the end it is the musician who actually plays the notes. The impresario - or the project leader - is only there to make sure that happens. That is a very different type of management mind-set. ~ John Kao,
1166:luck plays a large role in every story of success; it is almost always easy to identify a small change in the story that would have turned a remarkable achievement into a mediocre outcome. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
1167:Our concepts structure what we perceive, how we get around in the world and how we relate to other people. Our conceptual system thus plays a central role in defining our everyday realities. ~ George Lakoff,
1168:Shakespeare is the outstanding example of how that can be done. In all of Shakespeare's plays, no matter what tragic events occur, no matter what rises and falls, we return to stability in ~ Charlton Heston,
1169:Take Landon McKellips. He always plays the part of a womanizing playboy, but for all I know, he's completely different from that in real life.' 'No,' Slade said. 'He's actually like that. ~ Janette Rallison,
1170:There's no faster way or surer way to consolidate power and disenfranchise critics than to operate in secret. So this plays squarely into the promotion of the unitary executive. That's one factor. ~ Ted Gup,
1171:Young love don't know nothin' when the radio plays you sing along. When she's holding on you just can't get close enough, you swear it's sent from above. It's real,it's good, and it's young love ~ Kip Moore,
1172:LUBOV. I'm quite sure there wasn't anything at all funny. You oughtn't to go and see plays, you ought to go and look at yourself. What a grey life you lead, what a lot you talk unnecessarily. ~ Anton Chekhov,
1173:new report has discovered that medical errors are the third-leading cause of death among Americans after heart attacks and cancer. Sleeplessness undoubtedly plays a role in those lives lost. ~ Matthew Walker,
1174:One fine, pure-seeming falsehood,
Admitted, opens door to all his naked
And leprous family; in, in, they throng
And breed the house quite full. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
1175:When it comes to pain and inflammation, the food you consume plays a role. You see, food is a critical piece of the puzzle when it comes to controlling for these life and energy draining symptoms ~ Anonymous,
1176:Color is the keyboard, the eyes are the harmonies, the soul is the piano with many strings. The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another, to cause vibrations in the soul. ~ Wassily Kandinsky,
1177:Horror fans are very passionate people, and they are very much into the 'Saw' thing. So they watch sometimes as carefully as the writers and producers do, in terms of the way the story plays out. ~ Tobin Bell,
1178:I used to go with my parents and loved it, I was in school plays, and I started reading plays before I started reading novels. I'll defend it to the hilt. When theatre is good it is fabulous. ~ Patrick Marber,
1179:My first thought about acting, growing up here in New York, was theater, and I feel like I need to force myself to go get my ass kicked in a rehearsal room and do one of those plays at some point. ~ Paul Dano,
1180:No! Once the music plays, it creates me. The instruments move me, through me, they control me. Sometimes I'm uncontrollable and it just happens - boom, boom, boom! - once it gets inside you. ~ Michael Jackson,
1181:There are certain early plays of mine that I really don't like, but I can't imagine going back and fixing them. I would be totally incapable of it. I'm not in the head of the characters anymore. ~ Annie Baker,
1182:There are people out in the big wide world who don’t believe in luck. They don’t believe that luck plays any kind of part in our lives. These people are, if I’m brutally honest, fucking idiots. ~ Steve McHugh,
1183:We theorize about what goes on in the brain, but it is mostly undiscovered country. A writer’s work is to coax the stuff out and see how it plays. Surprise, as I have often said, is everything. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1184:Let's say there was a burning building and you could rush in and you could save only one thing: either the last known copy of Shakespeare's plays or some anonymous human being. What would you do? ~ Woody Allen,
1185:Rude, hardy stocks
Transplant themselves, expand, outlast the storms
And heat and cold, not slips too gently nurtured
Or lapped in hothouse warmth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
1186:Some serious Scrabble players are poor losers. I am a good loser. I love Scrabble so much I don’t care if I lose. I also have to be a good loser because I lose a lot, so practicality plays a role. ~ Roxane Gay,
1187:When it comes to pay raises, Congress always plays the role of Grinch. The bill extends an existing pay freeze for Vice President Joe Biden, specifically, and senior political appointees broadly. ~ Susan Davis,
1188:All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts . . .   —William Shakespeare, As You Like It ~ Michael Port,
1189:Fourth, lucky people have a special ability to turn bad luck into good fortune. Of all four defining factors involved in luck, Wiseman believes this one plays the most important role in survival. ~ Ben Sherwood,
1190:I had done a lot of plays, particularly at my own theater in LA, and it was the first time in my theatrical life where I didn't feel that my role was also to keep everybody else working hard. ~ Gregory Harrison,
1191:I know that some night
in some bedroom
soon
my fingers will
rift
through
soft clean
hair

songs such as no radio
plays

all sadness, grinning
into flow. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1192:Somewhere on the Earth tonight, my Tylla, there is a Man with a Lever, which, when he pulls it, Will Save The World. The man is now unemployed. His switch gathers dust. He himself plays pinochle. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1193:The scriptures offer us so many doctrinal diamonds. And when the light of the Spirit plays upon their several facets, they sparkle with celestial sense and illuminate the path we are to follow. ~ Neal A Maxwell,
1194:Well, well, what I always say is, one should never argue about plays or novels. Everyone has his own way of looking at things, and what may be horrible to you is, perhaps, just what I like best. ~ Marcel Proust,
1195:When I was a kid I really liked the guitarist of The Doors [Robby Krieger]. He plays blues, but he plays a lot of melodic things. He plays scales that are kind of unusual, and some bent notes. ~ Stephen Malkmus,
1196:But that’s done now,” Jason said, shaking his head. “No girl who plays the role of a hero dates a guy who uses her. She knows who she is. She just forgot for a little while.” Part Two A Character ~ Donald Miller,
1197:I had been doing plays in New York and on a whim we packed up and moved West, I started doing commercials and plays and guest star spots on TV and one thing led to another and I got Knots Landing. ~ Joan Van Ark,
1198:I played a lot of sports and it's the plays in basketball that weren't worked out that are the ones that are just fantastic that you remember. We don't know the power that's within our own bodies. ~ Dave Brubeck,
1199:I think the least stereotypical gay character on television is probably Matt LeBlanc on Episodes. He just plays it so straight-faced. They never talk about the fact that he's such a huge gay person. ~ Adam Pally,
1200:I've been singing my whole life, since I was a kid; but never formally as a career. I did it in plays when I was younger, and I sang all styles of music: everything from Italian opera to blues. ~ Brittany Murphy,
1201:Most of my career has been spent with the RSC doing Shakespeare, and the thing you learn from Shakespeare is that his historical plays don't bear anything other than a basic resemblance to history. ~ Antony Sher,
1202:One of the classic Silicon Valley plays is to move from an app to a platform so that you can attract people to build on and to your platform (thereby leveraging the network effect of compatibility ~ Reid Hoffman,
1203:Somebody, my daughter or my wife, gave me a music box for Christmas. It plays "My Funny Valentine" on celeste, you know? So I had Bobby [Irving] just play "Jean Pierre" with the changes on celeste. ~ Miles Davis,
1204:Things that I Hope Are True about Heaven

That the radio always plays what would have been your favourite songs. That there's always coffee if you want it. That you're there. That it's real. ~ Neil Hilborn,
1205:You should also have a bio that plays up your brand—this will be used for any kind of press or speaking engagement. Make it jazzy and exciting, and don’t be afraid of language that really touts you. ~ Kate White,
1206:Genes do not determine disease on their own. Genes function only by being activated, or “expressed,” and nutrition plays a critical role in determining which genes, good and bad, are expressed. ~ T Colin Campbell,
1207:How I Learned to Drive I think it's one of the great American plays. Its one of those plays that will be done forever, and it's timeless. I think it, for me, has so much heart and so much love. ~ Elizabeth Reaser,
1208:If one plays with fire, one should be prepared to burn, Jane.”

“You say that as if I’m in danger from you.”

“Maybe you are,” Tobias growled as the scent of her invaded his nostrils... ~ Monica Burns,
1209:In one of my plays, honestly I forget with one, I wrote that relationships only end in one of two ways: They end in divorce or they end in death. Ironically, death is the happier ending. (Mac) ~ Marshall Thornton,
1210:I think that some of these plays are lost in this new horror called development, which is a place for dramaturgs to say "let me tell you what your play means," and the life gets sucked out of a play. ~ John Guare,
1211:It worries me a little bit the reach and power of TV. More people saw me in The Practice than will ever see me in all the stage plays I ever do. Which is sort of humbling. Or troubling. Or both. ~ Michael Emerson,
1212:The defining aspects of westerns are still pretty much in place - namely landscape and conflict. In other books the conflict can be internal, but in westerns it usually plays out on a big stage. ~ Elizabeth Crook,
1213:We are all patchwork, and so shapeless and diverse in composition that each bit, each moment, plays its own game. And there is as much difference between us and ourselves as between us and others ~ Pascal Mercier,
1214:Youth cannot imagine romance apart from youth. That is why the roles of the heroes and heroines of plays are given by the managers to the most youthful actors they can find among the competent. ~ Booth Tarkington,
1215:Colin Morgan gives a stunning performance in Parked; he plays Merlin in the BBC TV show and he says the two characters are like night and day. Watch him. He’s got everything it takes to be top notch. ~ Colm Meaney,
1216:Footballers can be like artists when the mind and body are working as one. It is what Miles Davis does when he plays free jazz - everything pulls together into one intense moment that is beautiful. ~ Lilian Thuram,
1217:His radio plays include: If You’re Glad I’ll Be Frank, Albert’s Bridge (Italia Prize), Where Are They Now?, Artist Descending A Staircase, The Dog It Was That Died, In the Native State (Sony Award). ~ Tom Stoppard,
1218:I've never been a fan of individual awards because football is such a team sport. There's so many things that goes into making plays. It's about teammates trusting one another and working together. ~ Troy Polamalu,
1219:Play the moment, play whatever plays for you in that moment, and then go to the next moment. It doesn't matter where you're going. Don't worry about that. Just take it moment, moment, moment, moment. ~ Philip Roth,
1220:We are fond of saying “practice makes perfect,” and indeed the title of this book plays on the connection between practice and perfection. But it is more accurate to say that practice makes permanent. ~ Doug Lemov,
1221:After one of my plays came out, I had mixed reviews, some bad and some good. One day, it dawned on me. I thought, 'I wrote a play and he wrote a review, and that's the difference between him and me.' ~ Steve Martin,
1222:Although knowledge of structure is helpful, real creativity comes from leaps of faith in which you jump to something illogical. But those leaps form the memorable moments in movies and plays. ~ Francis Ford Coppola,
1223:As a kid, I was into music, played guitar in a band. Then I started acting in plays in junior high school and just got lost in the puzzle of acting, the magic of it. I think it was an escape for me. ~ Michael J Fox,
1224:I started off doing plays as a theater actor. But I never thought of it in terms of it leading anywhere. I was just trying to be the best actor that I could be in the context of what I was doing. ~ Chiwetel Ejiofor,
1225:I think radio plays are my favourite medium, as they make the listener work and create and contribute in a way that TV and film can never do, and they have an immediacy that written prose often lacks. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1226:I think the teams biggest struggle is remaining a team. It's kinda like a puzzle, If one piece of the puzzle is missing then the puzzle can't be completed. Every team member plays an important part. ~ Katie Cassidy,
1227:I used to spend a lot of time at football training, but that time was later spent in amateur acting classes and my local youth theatre, in plays at school and after-school clubs. That filled the void. ~ Sam Claflin,
1228:Most horror films fail to scare me. I think 'The Ring' plays more as a psychological thriller. It's smarter, there's more character development and some of the themes explored go a little deeper. ~ Martin Henderson,
1229:People take England on trust, and repeat that Shakespeare is the greatest of all authors. I have read him: there is nothing that compares Racine or Corneille: his plays are unreadable, pitiful. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
1230:She’s in that show on the CW, what’s it called, Uncovered? She plays a teenage hooker.” “A hooker?” Stevie said. “A teenager?” Susan Carol said. “That woman plays a teenager? You’re kidding, right? ~ John Feinstein,
1231:There are such hearts, Mymoona,
As think so little of adoring love,
They make it only a pedestal for pride,
A whipping-stock for their vain tyrannies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
1232:Yeah, yeah, it's all fun and games until someone loses an eye type of thing. There's that kind of irreverence to it the humor and in the reality of what's really going on that plays into this movie. ~ Jeremy Renner,
1233:Yep, my daddy was an undependable drunk. But he'd never missed any of my organized games, concerts, plays, or picnics. He may not have loved me perfectly, but he loved me as well as he could. (189) ~ Sherman Alexie,
1234:You know, you should start to be in plays and things like that. Write some scripts. If you're an artist and you truly don't believe what you're spittin' then you need to really seriously be an actor then. ~ Chuck D,
1235:Alexandra, my eldest, here, plays the piano, or reads or sews; Adelaida paints landscapes and portraits (but never finishes any); and Aglaya sits and does nothing. I don't work too much, either. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
1236:Bob Glaudini, the writer, he's a wonderfully talented man and all his plays and his screenplays, they all have sense of something bigger, even though you're looking at something very simple. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
1237:It is occasionally used to imitate the court jester, who plays the fool but knows he is smarter than the king. He talks and talks and entertains, and no one suspects that he is more than just a fool. ~ Robert Greene,
1238:My equally peerless memory allows as to how she included you in that base canard.” “Would that be a musical instrument? Might we find it in the orchestra pit? What kind of musician plays the bass canard? ~ Glen Cook,
1239:No one can compare to Ronaldinho. I remember his plays, his dribbles. I remember him winning every title at the Camp Nou. He made history at Barca, he made history with Brazil and he's still making history. ~ Neymar,
1240:The anarch knows the rules. He has studied them as a historian and goes along with them as a contemporary. Wherever possible, he plays his own game within their framework; this makes the fewest waves. ~ Ernst J nger,
1241:The anarch knows the rules. He has studied them as a historian and goes along with them as a contemporary. Wherever possible, he plays his own game within their framework; this makes the fewest waves. ~ Ernst Junger,
1242:The plays he had liked were the one called Measure for Measure, and another one called Macbeth. They were easy to follow, and what happened in them was kind of like what happened in junior high school. ~ Jane Smiley,
1243:Well, all the plays that I was trying to write were plays that would grab an audience by the throat and not release them, rather than presenting an emotion which you could observe and walk away from. ~ Arthur Miller,
1244:All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. ~ William Shakespeare,
1245:I also talk a lot in Deeper Reading about the importance that confusion plays. When my students come to me, they think confusion is bad. They are wrong. Confusion is the place where learning occurs. ~ Kelly Gallagher,
1246:I began coming to Paris in the 1960s when I was told audiences here liked my work. More than 20 of my plays have been produced in Paris, and several have had long runs and have returned in revivals. ~ Israel Horovitz,
1247:I love doing voiceover work. I started doing voiceover work when I had just dropped out of school, and the first few professional jobs I got were plays, but then I started making money doing voiceovers. ~ Justin Long,
1248:I'm not saying that Sam J. Jones was Flash Gordon - there's no such thing. No actor can be the person, that's a bunch of crap. People pay to see an actor be himself, whether he plays Hamlet or whatever. ~ Sam J Jones,
1249:Never challenge Life to a game, my mother used to say to me. Because Life plays dirty, changes the rules, steals the cards right out of your hands or, sometimes, turns them all to blank― ~ Joanne Harris,
1250:Krishna replies that nothing is wasted or destroyed in the cosmos. All efforts are recorded and they impact future lives. Knowledge acquired in the past plays a role in the wisdom of future lives. ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
1251:Puzzles are made of the things that the mathematician, no less than the child, plays with, and dreams and wonders about, for they are made of things and circumstances of the world he [or she] live in. ~ Edward Kasner,
1252:All the stuff about who's hitting behind you and who's hitting in front of you-it plays a little bit of a part. But you can't just base your approach off that because you'll end up getting beat in the end. ~ Dan Uggla,
1253:Memory is a great servant, but really bad master. When memory plays its role as a master, it limits our choices. It choices doors for us. We react to every single thing in our life because of our memory. ~ Ika Natassa,
1254:My favorite band at the moment is the Dresden Dolls, they're from Boston. It's a guy and a girl. She plays piano and he plays the drums and she also sings. You can find them on the web they're incredible. ~ Gerard Way,
1255:Shakespeare wrote great poetry and preposterous plays. Who really cares, for example, which petty tyrant rules Milan? Or who succeeds to the throne of Denmark? Or why the barons ganged up on Richard II? ~ Edward Abbey,
1256:We are all lumps, and of so various and inform a contexture, that every piece plays, every moment, its own game, and there is as much difference betwixt us and ourselves as betwixt us and others. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
1257:Cal thought: A new player. Terrific. Maybe William Shatner’s in here, too. Also Mike Huckabee . . . Kim Kardashian . . . the guy who plays Opie on Sons of Anarchy and the entire cast of The Walking Dead. ~ Stephen King,
1258:Having translated two plays by Chekhov, and not speaking Russian myself - I cannot say one sentence. This may shock people... However, I am not shocked, as it is not hard to find out what the words mean. ~ Tom Stoppard,
1259:If you study the history of mankind, it seems to be a history of violence. Certainly the history of art, whether you look at paintings or movies or plays or whatever, is just a litany of murder and death. ~ Ethan Hawke,
1260:People may know me from films, but theater is my first love. I did about 35 plays before I even landed my first screen role. I'm very comfortable on stage, and theater is not something you can just wing. ~ Sanaa Lathan,
1261:The ear plays the role of the guide in the museum in the concert I'm taking now. We don't have an oral guide, we have to provide it ourselves. One reason why active listening is absolutely essential. ~ Daniel Barenboim,
1262:When we experience a film, we consciously prime ourselves for illusion. Putting aside will and intellect, we make way for it in our imagination. The sequence of pictures plays directly on our feelings. ~ Ingmar Bergman,
1263:He was bursting with enthusiasms. He probably loved many things: the hawk in flight, the god-damned ocean, full moon, Balzac, bridges, stage plays, the Pulitzer Prize, the piano, the god-damned Bible. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1264:I believe that FEMA plays a key role in working with states and localities to prepare for and respond to natural disasters. As president, I will ensure FEMA has the funding it needs to fulfill its mission. ~ Mitt Romney,
1265:I believe that God plays this enormous role in my life. And I believe that it's my obligation to give back and to follow the rules that were set. And it also gives me an enormous sense of my own place. ~ Ronald Perelman,
1266:In a world in which men write thousands of books and one million scientific papers a year, the mythic bricoleur is the man who plays with all that information and hears a music inside the noise. ~ William Irwin Thompson,
1267:I reckoned they had probably begun to pour out their hearts and entrust each other with the subjects of the plays and novels they had written or planned to write. It was customary after serious drinking. ~ Ismail Kadare,
1268:I think to suggest that somehow Muslims aren't welcome in the USA, to suggest somehow that being a Muslim is incompatible with being western, unintentionally plays into the hand of Daesh and so-called Isis. ~ Sadiq Khan,
1269:It's so logical and so simple. Fat is the backup fuel system. The role it plays in the body is that when there's no carbohydrate around, fat will become the primary energy fuel. That's pretty well known. ~ Robert Atkins,
1270:Pessimism is too easy, even delicious, the badge and plume of intellectuals everywhere. It absolves the thinking classes of solutions. We excite ourselves with dark thoughts in plays, poems, novels, movies. ~ Ian McEwan,
1271:The fact that the Hebrew word 'adam', meaning 'man', is identical with Adam as the name of the father of Seth plays a fundamental role in fusing the three stories (Gen 2:7-3:24, 4:1, 4:25 and 5:1) in one. ~ Kamal Salibi,
1272:. . usually, the biggest problems of adapting plays into screenplays is that they stick too close to the play, and I think film is a completely different medium. I think a novel is much closer to a film. ~ Arthur Miller,
1273:Walled from ours are other hearts:
For if life’s barriers twixt our souls were broken,
Men would be free and one, earth paradise
And the gods live neglected. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
1274:When emotion is entirely left out of the reasoning picture, as happens in certain neurological conditions, reason turns out to be even more flawed than when emotion plays bad tricks on our decisions. ~ Ant nio R Dam sio,
1275:All publicity works upon anxiety. The sum of everything is money, to get money is to overcome anxiety. Alternatively the anxiety on which publicity plays is the fear that having nothing you will be nothing. ~ John Berger,
1276:Chance... in the accommodation peculiar to sensorimotor intelligence, plays the same role as in scientific discovery. It is only useful to the genius and its revelations remain meaningless to the unskilled. ~ Jean Piaget,
1277:Even though I was performing all the time as an actress and I was doing all of these plays as a kid, there's a vulnerability about being a musician that you don't get [when] you perform somebody else's work. ~ Lola Kirke,
1278:My education was doing good plays and also stinkers. When you do a stinker, you learn how to act. I like having to audition. It's nice to do rehearsals. But it's with an audience that you get to love it! ~ Jeffrey Tambor,
1279:Silence, that inspired dealer, takes the day's deck, the life, all in a crazy heap, lays it out, and plays its flawless hand of solitaire, every card in place. Scoops them up, and does it all over again. ~ Patricia Hampl,
1280:The .350 hitter expects, and also deserves, a big payoff for his performance - even if he plays for a cellar-dwelling team. And a .150 hitter should get no reward - even if he plays for a pennant winner. ~ Warren Buffett,
1281:The Overture
October's orchestra plays softly on
The northern forest with its thousand strings,
And Autumn, the conductor wields anon
The Golden-rod-- The baton that he swings.
~ Emily Pauline Johnson,
1282:You can tell whether a person plays or not by the way he carries the instrument, whether it means something to him or not. Then the way they talk and act. If they act too hip, you know they can’t play shit. ~ Miles Davis,
1283:You’re so charming you make us forget that you have to be a serial killer on the inside to do what you do to us. Put us in your plays, warts and all, showing us off like we’re some sort of sideshow freaks. ~ Lauren Groff,
1284:I don't keep a diary and I throw away nearly all the paper I might have kept. I don't keep an archive. There's something worrying about my make-up that I try to leave no trace of myself apart from my plays. ~ Tom Stoppard,
1285:I guess anybody who plays can say that they play guitar, but if you want to be a guitarist, you've got to practice all the time and you've got to get good at it. It's more than just having one and playing it. ~ Jake Pitts,
1286:In making the assumption that human language = Merge, researchers arguably overestimate the importance of syntax, which plays only a minor role in human language as a means to organise information flow. ~ Daniel L Everett,
1287:I often teach a graduate theater seminar on Greek tragedy in performance. I usually begin by saying that no matter what technological advances occur, the wisdom of these plays will never be obsolete. ~ Neil Patrick Harris,
1288:It is baffling to reflect that what men call honour does not correspond always to Christian ethics. Honour is often influenced by that element of pride which plays so large a part in its inspiration. ~ Winston S Churchill,
1289:Man, proud man, drest in a little brief authority, most ignorant of what he's most assur d, glassy essence, like an angry ape, plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven, as make the angels weep. ~ William Shakespeare,
1290:The fact that power plays a role in human motivation does not mean that it plays the only role, or even the primary role ... Beware of single cause interpretations--and beware the people who purvey them. ~ Jordan Peterson,
1291:I did a lot of freelance desk publishing jobs when I graduated from college. I sort of earned a living doing that while I was writing plays, which was what I wanted to do. My hope was to become a playwright. ~ Jason Katims,
1292:It's a beautiful universe... wondrous and the more exciting because no one has written plays and poems and built sculptures to indicate the structure of desire I negotiate every day as I move about in it. ~ Samuel R Delany,
1293:What strikes me about Jesus is that he is a remarkably true person; he never changes his personality to fit in with whatever crowd he finds himself. He is simply himself, and he never plays to his audience. ~ John Eldredge,
1294:A man of sense only trifles with them, plays with them, humors and flatters them, as he does with a sprightly and forward child; but he neither consults them about, nor trusts them with, serious matters. ~ Lord Chesterfield,
1295:A new report claims that William Shakespeare was a marijuana user and may have been high when he wrote some of his plays. Which explains that one line: 'To be, or not to be . . . Wait, what was the question?' ~ Jimmy Fallon,
1296:Black girls could not be too confident, too loud, too smart. Fat girls could be cute but not beautiful, could be the funny sidekick or wise truth-teller in school plays, never the leading role or love interest. ~ Glory Edim,
1297:Blues is the bedrock of everything I do. All the characters in my plays, their ideas and their attitudes, the stance that they adopt in the world, are all ideas and attitudes that are expressed in the blues. ~ August Wilson,
1298:Incident at Vichy, one of my favorite Arthur Miller plays, is a play in which you look at all of the different perspectives of this moral question. And it isn't so easy to decide which position is correct. ~ David Bezmozgis,
1299:It plays right into the hands of ISIS. And that's why Americans need to know that Donald Trump's words are being used in recruitment videos that ISIS is putting out. I think that is a very serious problem. ~ Hillary Clinton,
1300:I was beginning to wonder if Justin was a zombie GPS. Our own portable ‘Harmin’ (you know rhymes with Garmin) or better yet how about a Zom-Zom. Wonderful, death all around and I’m making plays on product names. ~ Mark Tufo,
1301:I write plays, and I have a musical that's starting to get produced now. That's what I would love to do, but it's so hard. The only reason people are reading my plays and musicals is because I'm in movies. ~ Jesse Eisenberg,
1302:People ask me who he reminds me of. The way he's playing, I'd say he doesn't remind me of anybody. I've never seen anybody - running back, quarterback, wide receiver - make the plays that Vince Young made today. ~ Dan Fouts,
1303:Plays by William Shakespeare), “Books I Love” (here she placed Siddhartha, The Painted Bird, On the Road), “Books We Don’t Understand Why People Like” (and here she put Peyton Place and Love Story and Hawaii). It ~ Ann Hood,
1304:Sometimes she plays a game now where she scatters her stuffed animals all over the living room. “Babies, babies,” she mutters darkly as she covers them with white napkins. “Civil War Battlefield,” we call it. ~ Jenny Offill,
1305:The fact that power plays a role in human motivation does not mean that it plays the only role, or even the primary role ... Beware of single cause interpretations--and beware the people who purvey them. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
1306:There are men so weak in love,
They cannot bear more than an ass’s load;
So high in their conceit, the tenderest
Kindest rebuke turns all their sweetness sour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
1307:It never occurred to me that I was a leading man until I was 19 years old. I had been acting since I was 10, so that's nine years and 30 or 40 plays, in school and summer stock, professional theater, too. ~ Christopher Reeve,
1308:Saw is like a big jigsaw puzzle. When you put a jigsaw puzzle together, you put the bottom left corner together first, and then you find yourself working on the upper right corner... Thats the way Saw plays out. ~ Tobin Bell,
1309:The aftermath of the war is what inspired us to write many of our plays. The whole reason for our writing Inherit the Wind was that we were appalled at the blacklisting. We were appalled at thought control. ~ Jerome Lawrence,
1310:The nature of consciousness is to define what it calls reality. It's all of your observations that combine to form what it is you think reality is. God plays dice with the universe, and you be the dice, man. ~ S Andrew Swann,
1311:There's no fun in arguing if you never get shown up. Who plays a game it there's no chance they'll lose? I do so crave to be proven wrong,. It is as sweet as proving yourself right, when done properly. ~ Catherynne M Valente,
1312:When I played with the Knicks, I was just as important or just as smart as any other of the guards I played with. I still had to call out plays, notice schemes, know the systems, do everything they had to do. ~ Patrick Ewing,
1313:A man cannot be professor of zoölogy on one day and of chemistry on the next, and do good work in both. As in a concert all are musicians,-one plays one instrument, and one another, but none all in perfection. ~ Louis Agassiz,
1314:Fella’s a genius. Best ever by a distance in my life time. Never really saw Pele… Souness, Gullit, Venables and now Rooney agree Messi is the best they have seen. He plays a game with which we are not familiar. ~ Gary Lineker,
1315:If it be true that good wine needs no bush,
'tis true that a good play needs no epilogue;
yet to good wine they do use good bushes,
and good plays prove the better by the help of good epilogues. ~ William Shakespeare,
1316:In Michigan, if you want to act, it's local theater, it's high school theater and it's going to camp and putting on plays in the summer, and I always loved doing that. There was something that just drew me to it. ~ James Wolk,
1317:I understand the psychology of the sport, especially inside the ring. From bell to bell, from when my entrance plays and I step through that curtain, people have to wonder what's going on inside that guy's head. ~ Randy Orton,
1318:Mum’s a musician. She plays piano and has a beautiful voice, so she understands the creative need. Mum lights up when she sees me. Her cheeks go pink – she’s all over me, pulling my hair, pinching my cheeks. ~ Alex O Loughlin,
1319:My husband is a composer, so he plays piano all the time and I sit there and clap telling my unborn child, 'Hear me clap, hear the music.' I know music, in general, is supposed to be good for babies to hear. ~ Danica McKellar,
1320:The idea of potential loss plays a large role in human decision making. In fact, people seem to be more motivated by the thought of losing something than by the thought of gaining something of equal value. ~ Robert B Cialdini,
1321:Think about it: No matter who you are, the past plays a large part in your life. I am all about living in the present as best as I can. Try as I might, there is only so much I am able to achieve on this front. ~ Henry Rollins,
1322:But rules only work when everyone plays by them. What happens when someone doesn't, and the fallout bleeds right into his life? Whats stronger- the need to uphold the law, or the motive to turn one's back on it? ~ Jodi Picoult,
1323:He leaves the butterflies bleeding over their wings and descends back to the pits of volcanoes and terror. He plays like it's his last moment on earth. He plays so he feels like crying. And then it's done. Silence. ~ C G Drews,
1324:Human beings, after all, have some sense; they see that you cannot have any real safety or happiness except in a society where every one plays fair, and it is because they see this that they try to behave decently. ~ C S Lewis,
1325:Spread your legs.” His voice was deep and dark, the glow in his eyes feral.
This was what he’d looked like on the field tonight. Running the plays. Focused on the job.
Dominant. Decisive. Certain.
Male. ~ Amy Andrews,
1326:A good golf course is like good music or good anything else; it is not necessarily a course which appeals the first time one plays over it, but one which grows on the player the more frequently he visits it. ~ Alister MacKenzie,
1327:A kitten is so flexible that she is almost double; the hind parts are equivalent to another kitten with which the fore part plays. She does not discover that her tail belongs to her till you tread upon it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1328:All the great Shakespeare plays are about killing. Alas, poor Yorick, that's about death. And in Romeo and Juliet everyone up ends up dying. The greatest dramas in the world are all about sex, violence and death. ~ Ray Winstone,
1329:Every day is a brand-new, completely crazy fantasy-adventure, where I'm either kicking ass or kicking balls. It's all part of the job. All of that is really fun for everyone. It plays like a comic book superhero. ~ Gabriel Luna,
1330:For me right now I think being the world number one is a bigger deal than being the world champion because I think it shows better who plays the best chess. That sounds self-serving but I think it's also right. ~ Magnus Carlsen,
1331:I cut the scene out, but there was a moment where Christoph Waltz plays the piano in 'Django [Unchained]' - Jamie [Foxx] is a magnificent piano-player but there's never a moment where Django plays the piano. ~ Quentin Tarantino,
1332:A popular character in old Italian plays, who imitated with ludicrous incompetence the "buffone", or clown, and was therefore the ape of an ape; for the clown himself imitated the serious characters of the play. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
1333:Eat good dinners and drink good wine; read good novels if you have the leisure and see good plays; fall in love, if there is no reason why you should not fall in love; but do not pore over influenza statistics. ~ Jerome K Jerome,
1334:Force plays a much larger part in the government of the world than it did before 1914, and what is especially alarming, force tends increasingly to fall into the hands of those who are enemies of civilization. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1335:Half the point in reading novels and seeing plays and films is to exercise the faculty of sympathy with our own kind, so often obliterated in the multifarious controls and compulsions of actual social existence. ~ Germaine Greer,
1336:Happiness is self-sabotage, a mean trick that your own mind plays on you. It makes you careless, makes you lose your grip and once you lose your grip, you lose everything. You certainly aren't happy anymore. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
1337:I wouldn't say it was lucky. We executed the play well. We should have had another one (TD). Obviously, if you do what's right on and off the field, I think the Lord steps in and plays a part in it. Magic happens ~ Austin Collie,
1338:I write plays and movies, I live and work at the borderline between word and image just as any cartoonist or illustrator does. I’m not a pure writer. I use words as the score for kinetic imagistic representations. ~ Tony Kushner,
1339:This world is other than our standards are
And it obeys a vaster thought than ours,
Our narrow thoughts! The fathomless desire
Of some huge spirit is its secret law. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
1340:A witty and informative professor posits that more authors do not choose titles borrowed from Shakespeare's sonnets and plays for the reason some people claim not to have partners: "All the good ones are taken." ~ Thomas C Foster,
1341:But it wasn’t until I started teaching these plays, in prison, that their full meaning would come through: beautifully crafted works of literature written hundreds of years ago that can connect with us here and now. ~ Laura Bates,
1342:By the time I was twelve, I had started my own theater company and was doing plays in the backyard and the front yard and all over the neighborhood, so, you know, I was definitely a lifer even back when I was 10. ~ Carrie Preston,
1343:Dreams, puns, elisions, plays on words and similar tricks that we ordinarily think of as frivolous, all play a surprising and somewhat disconcerting role in the communication of important and serious feelings. ~ Milton H Erickson,
1344:If feels good to live after death. It feels good to not be dead. It feels so good to find myself alive and flying home. The music plays in my ears and I float further and further away from war. Fucking Baghdad. ~ Michael Hastings,
1345:In our view, the idea that Democrats should “fight like Republicans” is misguided. First of all, evidence from other countries suggests that such a strategy often plays directly into the hands of authoritarians. ~ Steven Levitsky,
1346:Metastability appears to be the key to explaining the quant meltdown, for example, and it plays a major role in the bursting of any economic bubble, whether in Internet stocks, mortgages, or foreign investment. It ~ Mark Buchanan,
1347:My early attempts writing plays, which are very poetic, did not use the language that I work in now. I didn't recognize the poetry in everyday language of black America. I thought I had to change it to create art. ~ August Wilson,
1348:Now that people know who I am, I get offered plays here and there. It was so much easier to do it when nobody knew who I was. I can't even imagine that somebody would come and pay money just to come and see me now. ~ John Corbett,
1349:You have comfort. You don't have luxury. And don't tell me that money plays a part. The luxury I advocate has nothing to do with money. It cannot be bought. It is the reward of those who have NO Fear or Discomfort. ~ Jean Cocteau,
1350:And then it was like, wait, you can go to college and study theater? And act in plays? This is almost a racket, you know. And then when the opportunity came along to do it professionally, I thought I'd won the lottery. ~ Tom Hanks,
1351:Better a long ignoble life of shallow pleasures than a short stab at heroism, ending with a short stab. And just because one man plays another doesn’t always mean that it’s not the right direction for both of them. ~ Mark Lawrence,
1352:My whole family likes to play basketball. George II plays for his high school team and George III and George IV and George V are going to be good players. One day we're going to have a team and call it Georgetown. ~ George Foreman,
1353:So I recommend reading literature, such as the inspiring biography of Anwar Sadat, In Search of Identity, and seeing movies like Chariots of Fire or plays like Les Misérables that expose you to models of Win/Win. ~ Stephen R Covey,
1354:They [comic books] are not a genre, they are not something to get hot and cold from one year to the next, they're the exact same thing as books and plays: they are a source of great stories and colorful characters. ~ Michael Uslan,
1355:Time plays no favorites and will pass whether you act or not. Take control of your life. Dare to dream and take risks...Compete! If you aren't willing to work for you goals, don't expect others to! Believe in yourself. ~ Anonymous,
1356:When I say, 'I can't stay long, I'm in-between meals,' that plays differently on the radio than it does in person. So I have to pick material that works because the words are funny, not just because of the images. ~ Louie Anderson,
1357:When I was growing up, I didn't do plays in downtown Boston, and my parents weren't putting me in auditions. They never thought, Oh, she has a gift! They never thought of me as an entertainer when I was a young kid. ~ Mindy Kaling,
1358:You need to understand the batsman, where he plays his shot usually, which is his release shot, and then change the angle, vary the pace, line and length. You cannot always react after being at the receiving end. ~ Harbhajan Singh,
1359:Mom and sister played piano growing up; my grandma still plays piano in church. They always beat me over the head trying to get me to play piano, but I was more interested in riding dirt bikes and playing in the mud. ~ Dustin Lynch,
1360:Study, find all the good teachers and study with them, get involved in acting to act, not to be famous or for the money. Do plays. It's not worth it if you are just in it for the money. You have to love it. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
1361:This sounds so bogus, but I would love to, at some point when my kids are in college, is just go do a whole season at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and do a year of plays. Most actors miss the days of live theater. ~ Donal Logue,
1362:When luck plays a part in determining the consequences of your actions, you don't want to study success to learn what strategy was used but rather study strategy to see whether it consistently led to success. ~ Michael J Mauboussin,
1363:I'd always loved the theater, and I began by writing plays. I work in the theater a lot in the UK, and I've worked in the theater out here quite a bit. Everything else - the films - followed as a consequence of that. ~ Lucinda Coxon,
1364:I'm told I was acting in school plays when I was a tiny little boy at the age of three, so they must have seen something then. And even when I was practicing piano eight hours a day, I was still doing school plays. ~ Christian McKay,
1365:As a kid I was always writing and directing plays in my basement with my neighborhood cronies. But please don't get me wrong, I have zero regrets when it comes to the acting stuff. I think it's made me a better director. ~ Coley Sohn,
1366:Been to yesterdays,
lived through todays.
Looking on toward tomorrows -
new characters, new plays.

The whys of life change,
and so do ways,
new scenery is built,
to fill an empty stage. ~ Lee Bennett Hopkins,
1367:I try to be a smart quarterback. I'm not the fastest or the best athlete, but if I can know what the defense is doing and stick to my job and what needs to be done I can make the plays needed to move the ball and score. ~ Eli Manning,
1368:Oh, nobody would ever want to know me in Hollywood. I'm far too puffin-faced for that, too weird-looking. No, I think I'll probably stick to telly, if telly'll have me, though I wouldn't mind doing radio plays as well. ~ Tamsin Greig,
1369:Prayer and holiness are learned in a similar way as commitments are made, habits are formed and battles are fought against a real opponent (Satan, in this case), who with great cunning plays constantly on our weak spots. ~ J I Packer,
1370:The parts of Shaggy, Daphne, Freddie and Velma played by Linda Cardellini are all iconic and not really personality-driven, so it doesn't really matter who plays those roles, ... But it is true that Matthew nailed it. ~ Charles Roven,
1371:                               All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At ~ William Shakespeare,
1372:Film is a disease. When it infects your bloodstream, it takes over as the number one hormone; it bosses the enzymes; directs the pineal gland; plays Iago to your psyche. As with heroin, the antidote to film is more film. ~ Frank Capra,
1373:I like roles that are on the extreme ends of the spectrum, and there's special appeal in exploring these slightly forgotten plays that people might think of as subjects for academic term papers instead of live theater. ~ Geoffrey Rush,
1374:In Tehran, the 444 days of the Iran Hostage Crisis was the first world event in which you could literally have live events beamed into your living room. Now, every world event plays out on its own, and as a media event. ~ Chris Terrio,
1375:I was a theater dork in high school and did all the plays. My theater teacher in high school, Janet Spahr, was absolutely incredible and mentored me throughout school. She taught me a lot about relying on my instincts. ~ Melissa Rauch,
1376:The blind nether forces still have power
And the ascent is slow and long is Time.
Yet shall Truth grow and harmony increase:
The day shall come when men feel close and one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act V,
1377:We should be surprised that a matter that generally plays such an important part in the life of man has hitherto been almost entirely disregarded by philosophers, and lies before us as raw and untreated material. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
1378:Oh, I guess I didn’t mention it before, but yes, I’m in the BAU of the FBI, and no—I do not know Dr. Spencer Reid or the other dude that Shemar Moore plays on the show. Do you realize how often I get asked that question? ~ Andrea Smith,
1379:One of the things I learned in 'Slavs!' is that it's much easier to talk about being gay than it is to talk about being a socialist. People are afraid of socialism, and plays that deal with economics are scarier to them. ~ Tony Kushner,
1380:The poet…is the man of metaphor: while the philosopher is interested only in the truth of meaning, beyond even signs and names, and the sophist manipulates empty signs…the poet plays on the multiplicity of signifieds. ~ Jacques Derrida,
1381:What you wear can largely govern your feelings and your emotions, and how you look influences the way people regard you. So fashion plays an important role on both the practical level and the aesthetic level of activity. ~ Rei Kawakubo,
1382:Whenever you have the kind of market that is taking shape now - a wildly volatile one with big pricing discrepancies - it plays right into the hands of managers who are very focused on research and stock picking. ~ James Russell Lowell,
1383:He it is, the innermost one, who awakens my being with his deep hidden touches. He it is who puts his enchantment upon these eyes and joyfully plays on the chords of my heart in varied cadence of pleasure and pain. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
1384:How we come to have the world-views we do is an interesting question. No doubt reason plays a part, but human needs for meaning and purpose are usually more important. At times personal taste may be what decides the issue. ~ John N Gray,
1385:Mac Rebennack, better known as Dr. John, once told me that when a brass band plays at a small club back up in one of the neighborhoods, it’s as if the audience—dancing, singing to the refrains, laughing—is part of the band. ~ Tom Piazza,
1386:My first real kiss was actually on the set of The Vampire's Assistant, with Jessica Carlson who plays my crush in the movie. I was 15, she was 14. It was actually her first kiss too, so it was an interesting situation! ~ Chris Massoglia,
1387:One reason why I started fighting was because of my family, and with that, you gotta pay the bills, but I enjoy beating people up in the first place, you know, so it plays hand in hand. Beating up, and getting money! ~ Houston Alexander,
1388:So I majored in Drama, did all the plays that were possible to do, skated through school in order to be in every production on stage or backstage in whatever capacity and I came to New York looking for work in the summers. ~ Linda Lavin,
1389:The sweetest melody that plays
on starry nights and wintry days,
most soothing to my listening ears
and calming to beleaguering fears,
I call a symphony on air―
the song of sweet, still silence rare. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
1390:They’d performed more modern plays sometimes in the first few years, but what was startling, what no one would have anticipated, was that audiences seemed to prefer Shakespeare to their other theatrical offerings. ~ Emily St John Mandel,
1391:A lot of artists come into the game with a radio record, but they don't establish the fans as fans of their style of music. It's just that they're a fan of that song, and after that song plays out, it's real hard for 'em. ~ Nipsey Hussle,
1392:Dad climbs down from the table and sits on his cart. “Olmo, men don’t have periods.” “Eh? The brown spots I have in my underpants … Azzy told me I should get a tampon and—” Azalea plays innocent. “I never said such a thing. ~ Mya Robarts,
1393:Every one of us is a hodge-podge, so shapeless and diverse in structure that each piece, each moment, plays its own game. And there is as much difference between us and ourselves as there is between us and others. I ~ Michel de Montaigne,
1394:Im fascinated by failure, and Im fascinated by finality. Shakespeares historical plays are more universal than his comedies because they relate to the finality of life. Without finality, life would not be beautiful. ~ George Hickenlooper,
1395:Nobody plays this life with marked cards, so sometimes we win and sometimes we lose. Do not expect anything in return, do not expect your efforts to be appreciated, your genius to be discovered, your love to be understood. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1396:Puberty is the sickest joke God plays on us. So you're just noticing members of the sex: "Girls girls, ooo". Naturally you want to look your best, and God says "No! You will look the worst you've ever looked in your life!" ~ Eddie Izzard,
1397:The “Okay, I get it and I’ll work on it” is a common shut-down technique. I took a deep breath and leaned into the mother of all rumble tools—curiosity. “Tell me more about how this plays out for y’all. I want to understand. ~ Bren Brown,
1398:Almost every college playwright or sketch or improv comedian was sort of aware of Christopher Durang - even kids in high school. His short plays were so accessible to younger people and I think that was inspirational to me. ~ Mindy Kaling,
1399:Chance plays a powerful role in every life - our brains and personalities are just chemical soup, after all; a few drops here or there matter enormously - but consequences often become more serious as income levels go down. ~ Mohsin Hamid,
1400:I'm really interested with the way light plays on images and one of the artists that really reawakened my interest in comic books was Frank Miller and his treatment of Daredevil, and then Wolverine and, of course, Batman. ~ James Marsters,
1401:In my view the plangent artificiality of a lot of creative work results from the fact that the people who write novels, direct films and put on plays tend to read too many novels, watch too many films and go to too many plays. ~ Will Self,
1402:The Loser proceeds to narrate the same story he tells in virtually every one of his plays and novels: a story of frustrated ambition and (incestuous) love, suicide, and the generally grotesque absurdity of existence. But ~ Thomas Bernhard,
1403:The tilapia has been drowned in a garlic and chilli and coriander sauce, so many exposed white bones in its charred and thorny dorsal fin that they look like the ivory keys in the warped piano organ the devil plays in hell. ~ Trent Dalton,
1404:You’re going to die in your best friend’s arms. And you play along because it’s funny, because it’s written down, you’ve memorized it, it’s all you know. I say the phrases that keep it all going, and everybody plays along. ~ Richard Siken,
1405:Alex sits with them while the rest of the show plays, forcing himself not to smile or jump up and down. He thinks about how tomorrow night, at this time, he’ll be at Nathen’s. Just the two of them. The whole night together. ~ Martin Wilson,
1406:All relationship are about give and take. Power and submission. In a hundred small ways, the battle of two will plays out. Most people find a compromise, a delicate balance between their own wants and their partner´s desires. ~ Roxy Sloane,
1407:Every mode of violent death available to Renaissance man, including a lye pit, land mines, a trained falcon with envenom'd talons, is employed. It plays, as Metzger remarked later, like a Road Runner cartoon in blank verse ~ Thomas Pynchon,
1408:I admit, I do a lot of projects, but it's because I'm in a position now where I'm reading a lot more scripts and plays and things, and I'm really listening to offers and trying to think what I want to do at any given time. ~ Bryan Cranston,
1409:I enjoy writing plays most. I haven't written a radio play in a while and I don't write short stories anymore because the process of submitting them depressed me. I really enjoy revising novels, but drafting them can be a pain. ~ Sefi Atta,
1410:I have 800 books of just Samuel Beckett's work, tons of his correspondence, personal letters that he wrote. I have copies of plays he used when he directed, so all of his handwritten notes are in the corners of the page. ~ John Larroquette,
1411:I'm beginning to get pigeonholed as the girl who plays the crazies and weirdoes - and that's not the entirety of who I am. Hopefully, the whole point of being in this profession is that you change into anyone you want to be. ~ Fairuza Balk,
1412:I think gender plays a part in most things, but I don't know how it would be different because I've never been a man. And my fame is different from Nicole Kidman's or Sharon Stone's. I think everybody's fame is different. ~ Ellen DeGeneres,
1413:I think it is very possible he [Donald Trump] could be nominated and depending on how this all plays out, I would take him seriously in terms of being able to win because he's appealing to a very, very - he's appealing to fear. ~ Joe Biden,
1414:Places like the National Theatre or Sheffield, these great engines of theatre, make us cutting edge because they can be experimental. They can do plays that nobody else can afford to do in ways nobody else can afford to do. ~ Toby Stephens,
1415:The great fun of doing new plays is that people have no idea what's going to happen next. That goes quite soon, as people start talking about it, and the only way you can keep hold of that is genuinely to keep changing it. ~ Stephen Daldry,
1416:What we have in this great story, as I have proposed elsewhere, is not merely a report of history but an imagining of history that is analogous to what Shakespeare did with historical figures and events in his history plays. ~ Robert Alter,
1417:Everyone plays their role and wears a mask. Your mask hides just how brilliant you are, and what emotions and feelings you truly feel. I noticed that the day I met you,” he said. “My mask keeps me safe from scrutiny and suspicion. ~ K N Lee,
1418:I am spellbound by the plays of Shakespeare. And I am spellbound by the second law of thermodynamics. The great ideas in science, like the Cro-Magnon paintings and the plays of Shakespeare, are part of our cultural heritage. ~ Alan Lightman,
1419:The middle class, in any society, plays the role of graphite rods in nuclear reactors: they slow down the reaction and, if it weren't for them, the reactor would explode. A society without a middle class is a society primed for explosion. ~,
1420:There is no more reason for a room on a stage to be a reproduction of an actual room than for an actor who plays the part of Napoleon to be Napoleon, or for an actor who plays Death in the old morality play to be dead. ~ Robert Edmond Jones,
1421:When I look at you, when you touch me, when I see your face...when we kiss, my heart plays a song. It sings that it needs you like I need air. It sings to me that I adore you. It sings that I've found its perfect missing part. ~ Tillie Cole,
1422:Whether he gets hit early or in the middle or late, he gets in his seven innings it seems like every time. There are also great defensive plays made behind him and it's not a coincidence. Guys are in the game. He works quick. ~ Paul Konerko,
1423:You can pick any game and there are two or three plays that determine whether you win or lose, going either way. That's the beauty of the league, man. Every game counts, no matter who you're playing or what their record is. ~ Derrick Brooks,
1424:A lot of the best acting training I had was in junior high and high school. We had very demanding directors and did real plays. You put our plays up against any theater troupe of any age, and they usually did pretty damn well. ~ Jello Biafra,
1425:Creative action plays with the unknown. But as the child fears the dark... the adult child will be fearful too, faced with the dark world of the unknown mind, with vast concepts looking enormous just beyond the front yard. ~ Arthur J Deikman,
1426:In that fair subtle realm behind our own
The form is all, and physical gods are kings.
The inspiring Light plays in fine boundaries;
A faultless beauty comes by Nature’s grace; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
1427:I really liked drama and being in plays, so when I was playing a character onstage and I could act like somebody else, then I wasn't scared or nervous, but I didn't like meeting new people when I had to be myself. That was scary. ~ Meg Cabot,
1428:I will say that Edward Norton, who plays the scout master, would be a first-rate Eagle Scout. He's got all those techniques. If your plane crashes into the jungle somewhere, he would be the guy you would want to have with you. ~ Wes Anderson,
1429:Michael Jackson plays the wounded puppy very well. 'I must be the loneliest man in the world'. Well, you're not a man. And the loneliness is self inflicted, so sod off you pathetic puerile pimp. I wonder what color his willy is. ~ John Lydon,
1430:Oh, I suppose all men of intelligence know how fragile such things as Law and Justice and Civilization really are, but it's not a thing they think of willingly, because it disturbs one's rest and plays hob with one's appetite. ~ Stephen King,
1431:One of the tricks to writing great plays is to get people in a room together and not let them leave. You want the tension to escalate. Keeping them there is the hardest part, so you have to take away any excuse for them to leave. ~ Adam Rapp,
1432:Science is the exploration of the experience of nature without psychedelics. And I propose, therefore, to expand that enterprise and say that we need a science beyond science. We need a science which plays with a full deck. ~ Terence McKenna,
1433:Exactly, and now I have to play nice with him and ‘work together.’ Ever since elementary school I’ve gotten marked down in the ‘plays well with others’ category.” “A problem that has dogged you well into adulthood,” Malone said. ~ Marie Force,
1434:He who meditates on God for many days has substance in him, has divine power in him. Further, he who sings well, plays well on a musical instrument, or has mastered anyone art, has in him real substance and the power of God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
1435:I actually wanted to be a police officer like my dad for the longest time, up until my sophomore year in high school when I started doing plays. I did plays when I was little, but in high school, I started getting into acting. ~ Chad Lindberg,
1436:I was a Russian dancer in my elementary school production of Fiddler on the Roof when I was in third grade or fourth grade. I was one of the younger kids accepted into the play, and the plays were pretty impressive, let me say. ~ Lizzy Caplan,
1437:So I have loitered my life away, reading books, looking at pictures, going to plays, hearing, thinking, writing on what pleased me best. I have wanted only one thing to make me happy, but wanting that have wanted everything. ~ William Hazlitt,
1438:When you come across something that’s hard to discard, consider carefully why you have that specific item in the first place. When did you get it and what meaning did it have for you then? Reassess the role it plays in your life. ~ Marie Kond,
1439:But I find with Francis Bacon, some of the things were in the place, and someone who was connected with these schools of thought, and someone who had a motivation that equals the scope of the comedy and the tragedy in the plays. ~ Mark Rylance,
1440:I've never seen a Western that was really truthful. Most are just morality plays. Good guys and bad guys - and the good guys always win, whereas in reality most of the sheriffs were as bad as the gangsters they were after. ~ Harry Dean Stanton,
1441:I wouldn't say that The Fabric of the Cosmos is a book on cosmology. Cosmology certainly plays a big part, but the major theme is our ever-evolving understanding of space and time, and what it all means for our sense of reality. ~ Brian Greene,
1442:My first job when I got my equity card was acting in 14 plays back-to-back. Playing that many roles, you look for ways of differentiating the characters physically, which goes hand in hand with understanding them psychologically. ~ Andy Serkis,
1443:There’s a Cubs game on WGN. They’re out in San Diego, and they’re winning. For the first time in a long, long time, the Cubs aren’t terrible, and my grandpa isn’t going to get to see how it all plays out. Nancy touches my arm. ~ Matthew Norman,
1444:As a reader, coming to my reading as a writer immersed in fairytales, I cant help but notice in so many stories, plays, poems that I read, the sort of breadcrumbs of fairytale techniques, so Im very excited when I notice that. ~ Kate Bernheimer,
1445:I'm the guy who plays human beings. I understand why the characters are doing what they're doing. When you play a villain, you don't play a villain: you play a human being doing what he thinks he needs to do to get what he wants. ~ Eddie Marsan,
1446:The fact that religion plays such a part in how people vote troubles me, troubles me as a minister's daughter. Because I always felt that the separation of church and state was what our forefathers and foremothers really fought for. ~ Tori Amos,
1447:Then you remember that Jack--that's his name, the mac & cheese--plays lacrosse. That's probably where he got all those yummy muscles. You need two hands for lacrosse.
A pinky? Damn, you might as well starve yourself. ~ Alaya Dawn Johnson,
1448:The streets are empty. Wind skims the voids keeping neighbors apart, as if grazing the hollow of a cut reed, or say, a plundered mailbox. A familiar note is produced. It's the one Desolation plays to keep its instrument in tune. ~ Andrew Hussie,
1449:A recurrent theme of this book is that luck plays a large role in every story of success; it is almost always easy to identify a small change in the story that would have turned a remarkable achievement into a mediocre outcome. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
1450:Concern washes over Jess’s brown eyes. Followed by the heat of accusation as she spins toward Blake again. “You didn’t tell me he had a headache!”
“I didn’t know!”
“What kind of nurse are you?”
“The kind who plays hockey! ~ Sarina Bowen,
1451:From a stupidly young age I was always involved in anything, whether it be a nativity play or little kids plays. Wherever it was, I was involved and I think it was because more than anything, I wanted to be the center of attention. ~ Ed Speleers,
1452:I actually did a quick survey of how caste plays