classes ::: library, Place, database, Education, the School, noun, Place,
children ::: The Library (books)
branches ::: Library, Library Genesis, Library Science

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Library
object:the Library
object:LIB
object:TL

--- BY AUTHORS

--- BY SUBJECTS

--- BY BOOKS
Savitri
The Synthesis of Yoga




--- PROSE
  you arrive at the Library, there are 35 people here. 25 are on silent mode (its a library).
  You see a robot librarian, and three human librarians congregating at a circular kiosk surrounded by intersperced standing computer terminals for accessing the Librarys system.
  You see hundreds of open tables for reading, study and work along with hundreds of individual enclosed workstations, and hundreds of conference rooms for discussions.

  This library seems to be divided into a near hundred sections each pertaining to a different subject or subdiscipline. In each area, tables and often groups of people devoted to that area of study.
  
  While most people have chat disabled there are "" people in the room,
  you say "this is the most beautiful place ive ever soon"

--- LINKS
Hermetic Library - Texts - Index
Bahai Library
sacred-texts
Holy Books.com - Complete Works Compilations

Library Genesis - 2 Million+ Books
Gutenberg

--- NOTES

--- QUOTES
I pray to the unknown gods that some man-even a single man, tens of centuries ago-has perused and read that book. If the honor and wisdom and joy of such a reading are not to be my own, then let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my own place be in hell. Let me be tortured and battered and annihilated, but let there be one instant, one creature, wherein thy enormous Library may find its justification. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The
Library of Babel

--- OBJECTS
  wordlist-terminal (terminals)

--- GOAL
  SUBJECTS LIST
  AUTHORS LIST
  author name, alt names/spellings, desc + biography, bibliography, genres/subjects, tags, quotes,

  BOOKS LIST
  book title, description(s), subject(s)/genres/top shelves, ISBN, author(s), tags, rating(s), date of pub + version(s), quotes, book locations/book checker (pdf / txt), book ids/address(goodreads)

To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering about in a great library without touching the books. ~ Manly P Hall



see also ::: the Infinite Library, the Library of All-Knowledge, the Book, the memory, the Tower of MEM, the Garden



class:library
class:Place
class:database
subject class:Education
class:the School
word class:noun







class:Place

see also ::: the_Book, the_Garden, the_Infinite_Library, the_Library_of_All-Knowledge, the_memory, the_Tower_of_MEM

questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [1] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO

the_Book
the_Garden
the_Infinite_Library
the_Library_of_All-Knowledge
the_memory
the_Tower_of_MEM

AUTH

BOOKS
Advanced_Dungeons_and_Dragons_2E
Collected_Fictions
Conscious_Immortality
DND_MM_5E
Enchiridion_text
Full_Circle
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Infinite_Library
Labyrinths
Liber_Null
On_Interpretation
Process_and_Reality
Symposium
The_Alchemy_of_Happiness
The_Archetypes_and_the_Collective_Unconscious
the_Book
the_Book_of_God
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Foundation_of_Buddhist_Practice_(The_Library_of_Wisdom_and_Compassion_Book_2)
The_Hidden_Words
The_Interior_Castle_or_The_Mansions
The_Nag_Hammadi_Library
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Yoga_Sutras
Words_Of_The_Mother_III

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.01_-_Letters_from_the_Mother_to_Her_Son
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-04-12
0_1962-02-17
0_1962-03-13
0_1962-05-29
0_1962-07-07
0_1964-10-14
0_1965-06-23
0_1967-04-05
0_1967-06-03
0_1968-09-28
0_1969-03-12
0_1969-04-30
0_1969-07-23
0_1972-01-12
07.06_-_Record_of_World-History
08.02_-_Order_and_Discipline
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_Reading
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.075_-_Self-Control,_Study_and_Devotion_to_God
1.07_-_On_Our_Knowledge_of_General_Principles
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.18_-_Evocation
13.05_-_A_Dream_Of_Surreal_Science
14.03_-_Janaka_and_Yajnavalkya
14.04_-_More_of_Yajnavalkya
14.05_-_The_Golden_Rule
15.03_-_A_Canadian_Question
15.07_-_Souls_Freedom
15.08_-_Ashram_-_Inner_and_Outer
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.55_-_Money
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1951-03-19_-_Mental_worlds_and_their_beings_-_Understanding_in_silence_-_Psychic_world-_its_characteristics_-_True_experiences_and_mental_formations_-_twelve_senses
1953-09-30
1953-10-28
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-10-06_-_What_happens_is_for_the_best_-_Blaming_oneself_-Experiences_-_The_vital_desire-soul_-Creating_a_spiritual_atmosphere_-Thought_and_Truth
1955-03-23_-_Procedure_for_rejection_and_transformation_-_Learning_by_heart,_true_understanding_-_Vibrations,_movements_of_the_species_-_A_cat_and_a_Russian_peasant_woman_-_A_cat_doing_yoga
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_History_of_the_Necronomicon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1.is_-_Like_vanishing_dew
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jlb_-_Shinto
1.jlb_-_The_Other_Tiger
1.jlb_-_When_sorrow_lays_us_low
1.jr_-_With_Us
1.pbs_-_Arethusa
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Invocation_To_Misery
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Heaven
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Naples
1.pbs_-_Ozymandias
1.pbs_-_Passage_Of_The_Apennines
1.pbs_-_Pater_Omnipotens
1.pbs_-_Song_Of_Proserpine_While_Gathering_Flowers_On_The_Plain_Of_Enna
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.wby_-_To_A_Wealthy_Man_Who_Promised_A_Second_Subscription_To_The_Dublin_Municipal_Gallery_If_It_Were_Prove
1.whitman_-_As_A_Strong_Bird_On_Pinious_Free
1.whitman_-_Brother_Of_All,_With_Generous_Hand
1.whitman_-_No_Labor-Saving_Machine
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLVI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.yb_-_Clinging_to_the_bell
1.yb_-_In_a_bitter_wind
1.yb_-_The_late_evening_crow
1.yb_-_This_cold_winter_night
1.ym_-_Wrapped,_surrounded_by_ten_thousand_mountains
2.00_-_BIBLIOGRAPHY
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.18_-_January_1939
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
25.02_-_HYMN_TO_DAWN
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.08_-_I_Tried_Sannyas
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
3-5_Full_Circle
40.01_-_November_24,_1926
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Apology
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
A_Secret_Miracle
Averroes_Search
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
Euthyphro
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Liber
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
LUX.04_-_LIBERATION
MoM_References
Partial_Magic_in_the_Quixote
r1914_04_11
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
SB_1.1_-_Questions_by_the_Sages
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
The_Act_of_Creation_text
The_Aleph
The_Book_of_Sand
The_Book_(short_story)
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Fearful_Sphere_of_Pascal
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians

PRIMARY CLASS

books
database
favorite
Library
library
Place
subject
the_School
website
SIMILAR TITLES
Infinite Library
Library
Library Genesis
Library Science
The Foundation of Buddhist Practice (The Library of Wisdom and Compassion Book 2)
The Library (books)
the Library (books)
The Library of All-Knowledge
the Library of All-Knowledge
the Library of the Omega Era
The Nag Hammadi Library

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Library, 1950.

Library, 1951.

Library, 1957,

Library of Biblical and Theological Literature, (ed.) George

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 66-19757

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Library of Efficient Data types and Algorithms ::: (library) (LEDA) A class library for C++ of efficient data types (e.g. graph classes) and algorithms by Stefan Naher of the University of Saarbruecken. Version 3.0 includes both template and non-template versions. . (1996-04-15)

Library of Efficient Data types and Algorithms "library" (LEDA) A {class library} for {C++} of efficient data types (e.g. {graph} {classes}) and {algorithms} by Stefan N"aher "stefan@mpi-sb.mpg.de" of the {University of Saarbruecken}. Version 3.0 includes both {template} and non-template versions. {(ftp://ftp.mpi-sb.mpg.de/pub/LEDA)}. (1996-04-15)

Library Publishers, New York, N. Y., publishers of Swan’s Anglo-American Dictionary.

Library VIII, 573.]

Library, vol. 8, p. 573. For the names of the 8

library ::: n. --> A considerable collection of books kept for use, and not as merchandise; as, a private library; a public library.
A building or apartment appropriated for holding such a collection of books.


library "programming, library" A collection of {subroutines} and {functions} stored in one or more files, usually in compiled form, for linking with other programs. Libraries are one of the earliest forms of organised {code reuse}. They are often supplied by the {operating system} or {software development environment} developer to be used in many different programs. The routines in a library may be general purpose or designed for some specific function such as three dimensional animated graphics. Libraries are linked with the user's program to form a complete {executable}. The linking may be {static linking} or, in some systems, {dynamic linking}. (1998-11-21)

library ::: (programming, library) A collection of subroutines and functions stored in one or more files, usually in compiled form, for linking with other programs. purpose or designed for some specific function such as three dimensional animated graphics.Libraries are linked with the user's program to form a complete executable. The linking may be static linking or, in some systems, dynamic linking. (1998-11-21)


TERMS ANYWHERE

94, and A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene

aard "programming, tool" (Dutch for "earth") A tool to check memory use for {C++} programs, written by Steve Reiss "spr@cs.brown.edu" (who names his programs after living systems). Aard tracks the state of each byte of memory in the {heap} and the {stack}. The state can be one of Undefined, Uninitialised, Free or Set. The program can detect invalid transitions (i.e. attempting to set or use undefined or free storage or attempting to access uninitialised storage). In addition, the program keeps track of heap use through {malloc} and {free} and at the end of the run reports memory blocks that were not freed and that are not accessible (i.e. {memory leaks}). The tools works using a spliced-in {shared library} on {SPARCs} running {C++} 3.0.1 under {SunOS} 4.X. {(ftp://wilma.cs.brown.edu/pub/aard.tar.Z)}. (1998-03-03)

aard ::: (programming, tool) (Dutch for earth) A tool to check memory use for C++ programs, written by Steve Reiss (who names his programs after living systems).Aard tracks the state of each byte of memory in the heap and the stack. The state can be one of Undefined, Uninitialised, Free or Set. The program can detect invalid transitions (i.e. attempting to set or use undefined or free storage or attempting to access uninitialised storage).In addition, the program keeps track of heap use through malloc and free and at the end of the run reports memory blocks that were not freed and that are not accessible (i.e. memory leaks).The tools works using a spliced-in shared library on SPARCs running C++ 3.0.1 under SunOS 4.X. . (1998-03-03)

accept "library, networking" {Berkeley} {Unix} networking {socket} library routine to satisfy a connection request from a remote {host}. A specified socket on the local host (which must be capable of accepting the connection) is connected to the requesting socket on the remote host. The remote socket's socket address is returned. {Unix manual pages}: accept(2), connect(2). (1994-11-08)

accept ::: (library, networking) Berkeley Unix networking socket library routine to satisfy a connection request from a remote host. A specified socket on the local requesting socket on the remote host. The remote socket's socket address is returned.Unix manual pages: accept(2), connect(2). (1994-11-08)

A complete manuscript of the Palestinian Talmud is found in the Leiden Library, and from it was printed its first edition by Bomberg, Venice, 1523-24. -- H.L.G.

A Coptic Ms. In the Chenoboskion Library, Cairo.

ActiveX Data Objects ::: (database, Microsoft, programming) (ADO) Microsoft's library for accessing data sources through OLE DB. Typically it is used to query or modify data stored in a relational database. .(2003-07-08)

ActiveX Data Objects "database, Microsoft, programming" (ADO) {Microsoft}'s {library} for accessing data sources through {OLE DB}. Typically it is used to query or modify data stored in a relational database. {Home (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/ado270/htm/adostartpage1.asp)}. (2003-07-08)

Adamas (Greek) Adamant, inflexible; used by Greek and Latin writers for a stone (as a diamond) of impenetrable hardness. One of the main mystical type-figures of the Gnostic system. In The Gospel of the Egyptians (3: 2), “the incorruptible man Adamas” is a light which radiated from the light; he is “the eye of the [light]. For [this is] the first man, he through whom and to whom everything became, (and) without whom nothing became” (Nag Hammadi Library 198n).

Adaptive Communication Environment "communications, tool" A {C++} wrapper library for communications from the {University of California at Irvine}. (1995-03-16)

Adaptive Communication Environment ::: (communications, tool) A C++ wrapper library for communications from the University of California at Irvine. (1995-03-16)

address resolution "networking" Conversion of an {Internet address} into the corresponding physical address ({Ethernet address}). This is usually done using {Address Resolution Protocol}. The {resolver} is a library routine and a set of processes which converts {hostnames} into {Internet addresses}, though this process in not usually referred to as {resolution}. See {DNS}. (1996-04-09)

address resolution ::: (networking) Conversion of an Internet address into the corresponding physical address (Ethernet address). This is usually done using Address Resolution Protocol.The resolver is a library routine and a set of processes which converts hostnames into Internet addresses, though this process in not usually referred to as resolution. See DNS. (1996-04-09)

aggregator "networking" A program for watching for new content at user-specified {RSS} feeds. An example is {BottomFeeder}. {(http://directory.google.com/Top/Reference/Libraries/Library_and_Information_Science/Technical_Services/Cataloguing/Metadata/RDF/Applications/RSS/News_Readers/)}. (2003-09-29)

alcove ::: n. --> A recessed portion of a room, or a small room opening into a larger one; especially, a recess to contain a bed; a lateral recess in a library.
A small ornamental building with seats, or an arched seat, in a pleasure ground; a garden bower.
Any natural recess analogous to an alcove or recess in an apartment.


alexandrian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Alexandria in Egypt; as, the Alexandrian library.
Applied to a kind of heroic verse. See Alexandrine, n.


Alexandrian Library Begun by Ptolemy Soter (367?-283 BC), and zealously pursued by his successor Ptolemy Philadelphus. The two principal libraries were in the Bruchium and the Serapeum; the number of rolls or “books” is variously estimated between 400,000 and 700,000, but these rolls had not the contents of a modern printed volume. The Bruchium was accidentally set on fire when Caesar burnt the fleet in the harbor, but many rolls were rescued. The Bruchium quarter was destroyed by Aurelian in 273 and probably the library with it; and in about 390 Theodosius ordered the destruction of the Serapeum, and its books were pillaged by Christians. The Moslem Caliph ‘Omar is reputed finally to have destroyed the remainder of the library.

ALPAK "library" A subroutine package used by {ALTRAN}. ["The ALPAK System for Nonnumerical Algebra on a Digital Computer", W.S. Brown, Bell Sys Tech J 42:2081, 1963]. [Sammet 1969, p. 502]. (1995-05-10)

ALPAK ::: (library) A subroutine package used by ALTRAN.[The ALPAK System for Nonnumerical Algebra on a Digital Computer, W.S. Brown, Bell Sys Tech J 42:2081, 1963].[Sammet 1969, p. 502]. (1995-05-10)

American Library [1966],

ANSI C ::: (language, standard) (American National Standards Institute C) A revision of C, adding function prototypes, structure passing, structure assignment and standardised library functions. ANSI X3.159-1989.cgram is a grammar for ANSI C, written in Scheme. unproto is a program for removing function prototypes to translate ANSI C to standard C. lcc is a retargetable compiler for ANSI C. (1995-11-26)

ANSI C "language, standard" (American National Standards Institute C) A revision of {C}, adding {function prototypes}, {structure passing}, {structure assignment} and standardised library functions. {ANSI} X3.159-1989. {cgram} is a {grammar} for ANSI C, written in {Scheme}. {unproto} is a program for removing function prototypes to translate ANSI C to standard C. {lcc} is a {retargetable} {compiler} for ANSI C. (1995-11-26)

ANSI Z39.50 ::: (networking, standard) Information Retrieval Service Definition and Protocol Specification for Library Applications, officially known as ANSI/NISO an OSI application layer service to allow an application on one computer to query a database on another.Z39.50 is used in libraries and for searching some databases on the Internet. The US is the official maintanence agency for Z39.50.Index Data, a Danish company, have released a lot of Z39.50 code. Their website explains the relevant ISO standards and how they are amicably converging in Z39.50 version 4.0. . . (1996-07-22)

ANSI Z39.50 "networking, standard" Information Retrieval Service Definition and Protocol Specification for Library Applications, officially known as ANSI/NISO Z39.50-1992, and ANSI/NISO Z39.50-1995. This {standard}, used by {WAIS}, specifies an {OSI} {application layer} service to allow an application on one computer to query a {database} on another. Z39.50 is used in libraries and for searching some databases on the {Internet}. The US {Library of Congress (http://lcweb.loc.gov/z3950/agency/)} is the official maintanence agency for Z39.50. {Index Data}, a Danish company, have released a lot of Z39.50 code. Their {website} explains the relevant {ISO} {standards} and how they are amicably converging in Z39.50 version 4.0. {Overview (http://nlc-bnc.ca/ifla/VI/5/op/udtop3.htm)}. {Z39.50 resources (http://lamp.cs.utas.edu.au/net.html

Ante-Nicene Fathers Library) and in the Arkhangelike

Ante-Nicene Fathers Library.

apple-touch-icon "programming" (apple-touch-icon.png) {Apple}'s default {icon} (image) used to represent a {website}, e.g. when saved as a {bookmark} or on the {home screen} of an {iOS} device such as an {iPhone} or {iPad}. Apple's scheme allows a site to offer images of different sizes so the client can choose the most appropriate one according to its screen size and resolution. Apple devices and applications completely ignore the {favicon}.ico {de facto standard} which, while somewhat quirky in its use of the {ico} format, has been pretty much universally adopted elsewhere. Conversely, apple-touch-icon.png will be ignored by non-Apple devices, possibly because its 16x16 resolution would look pretty shabby on most smart phones. The icon can be provided in various different resolutions for different screen sizes and resolutions, e.g. apple-touch-icon-152x152.png for {retina iPad} with {iOS7}. {(https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/AppleApplications/Reference/SafariWebContent/ConfiguringWebApplications/ConfiguringWebApplications.html) Apple documentation}. {(https://realfavicongenerator.net/faq)}. (2018-08-19)

Application-Specific Integrated Circuit "hardware" (ASIC) An {integrated circuit} designed to perform a particular function by defining the interconnection of a set of basic circuit building blocks drawn from a library provided by the circuit manufacturer. (1995-02-15)

Application-Specific Integrated Circuit ::: (hardware) (ASIC) An integrated circuit designed to perform a particular function by defining the interconnection of a set of basic circuit building blocks drawn from a library provided by the circuit manufacturer. (1995-02-15)

ARL ::: ASSET Reuse Library

ARL {ASSET Reuse Library}

AS/400 ::: (computer) An IBM minicomputer for small business and departmental users, released in 1988 and still in production in October 1998.Features include a menu-driven interface, multi-user support, terminals that are (in the grand IBM tradition) incompatible with anything else including the IBM 3270 series, and an extensive library-based operating system.The machine survives because its API layer allows the operating system and application programs to take advantage of advances in hardware without exact same operating system and software as a $2 million system. There is a 64-bit RISC processor operating system implementation.Programming languages include RPG, assembly language, C, COBOL, SQL, BASIC, and REXX. Several CASE tools are available: Synon, AS/SET, Lansa. . (1999-07-26)

AS/400 "computer" An {IBM} {minicomputer} for small business and departmental users, released in 1988 and still in production in October 1998. Features include a menu-driven interface, {multi-user} support, terminals that are (in the grand {IBM} tradition) incompatible with anything else including the {IBM 3270} series, and an extensive library-based {operating system}. The machine survives because its {API} layer allows the {operating system} and {application programs} to take advantage of advances in hardware without recompilation and which means that a complete system that costs $9000 runs the exact same operating system and software as a $2 million system. There is a 64-bit {RISC} processor operating system implementation. Programming languages include {RPG}, {assembly language}, {C}, {COBOL}, {SQL}, {BASIC}, and {REXX}. Several {CASE} tools are available: {Synon}, {AS/SET}, {Lansa}. {(http://as400.ibm.com/)}. (1999-07-26)

A

Asset Source for Software Engineering Technology "project" (ASSET) A programme to promote software {reuse} by the US {DoD}. See also {ASSET Reuse Library}. (1996-08-19)

Asset Source for Software Engineering Technology ::: (project) (ASSET) A programme to promote software reuse by the US DoD.See also ASSET Reuse Library. (1996-08-19)

athenaeum ::: n. --> A temple of Athene, at Athens, in which scholars and poets were accustomed to read their works and instruct students.
A school founded at Rome by Hadrian.
A literary or scientific association or club.
A building or an apartment where a library, periodicals, and newspapers are kept for use.


A Tools Integration Standard "software, library" (ATIS) An {object-oriented} interface to a set of services that allows the saving, accessing and managing of information in a common repository. Developed by {Atherton Technology} and {DEC}, based on an extended version of the {Software BackPlane}, proposed as an industry standard. (1994-10-25)

A Tools Integration Standard ::: (software, library) (ATIS) An object-oriented interface to a set of services that allows the saving, accessing and managing of information in a common repository. Developed by Atherton Technology and DEC, based on an extended version of the Software BackPlane, proposed as an industry standard. (1994-10-25)

Basic Object System "programming" (BOS) A {C}-callable library that implements the notion of {object} and which uses {Tcl} as its {interpreter} for interpreted {methods} (you can have "compiled" methods in C, and mix compiled and interpreted methods in the same object, plus lots more). You can subclass and mix in existing objects using BOS to extend, among other things, the set of {tk} {widgets}. BOS is a {class}-free object system, also called a prototype-based object system; it is modelled loosely on the {Self} system from {Stanford University}. Version 1.31 by Sean Levy "Sean.Levy@cs.cmu.edu". {(ftp://barkley.berkeley.edu/tcl)}. (1992-08-21)

Basic Object System ::: (programming) (BOS) A C-callable library that implements the notion of object and which uses Tcl as its interpreter for interpreted methods (you can object system, also called a prototype-based object system; it is modelled loosely on the Self system from Stanford University.Version 1.31 by Sean Levy . . (1992-08-21)

Bedrock ::: A C++ class library for Macintosh user interface portability.

Bedrock A {C++} {class} library for {Macintosh} user interface portability.

bibliothecal ::: a. --> Belonging to a library.

bibliotheca ::: n. --> A library.

bibliotheke ::: n. --> A library.

BioMeDical Package "language, library, statistics" (BMDP) A statistical language and library of over forty statistical routines developed in 1961 at {UCLA}, Health Sciences Computing Facility under Dr. Wilford Dixon. BMDP was first implemented in {Fortran} for the {IBM 7090}. Tapes of the original source were distributed for free all over the world. BMDP is the second iteration of the original {BIMED} programs. It was developed at {UCLA} Health Sciences Computing facility, with NIH funding. The "P" in BMDP originally stood for "parameter" but was later changed to "package". BMDP used keyword parameters to defined what was to be done rather than the fixed card format used by original BIMED programs. BMDP supports many statistical funtions: simple data description, {survival analysis}, {ANOVA}, {multivariate analyses}, {regression analysis}, and {time series} analysis. BMDP Professional combines the full suite of BMDP Classic (Dynamic) release 7.0 with the BMDP New System 2.0 {Windows} front-end. {BMDP from Statistical Solutions (http://statsol.ie/bmdp/bmdp.htm)}. (2004-01-14)

BioMeDical Package ::: (language, library, statistics) (BMDP) A statistical language and library of over forty statistical routines developed in 1961 at UCLA, Health Sciences Fortran for the IBM 7090. Tapes of the original source were distributed for free all over the world.BMDP is the second iteration of the original BIMED programs. It was developed at UCLA Health Sciences Computing facility, with NIH funding. The P in BMDP keyword parameters to defined what was to be done rather than the fixed card format used by original BIMED programs.BMDP supports many statistical funtions: simple data description, survival analysis, ANOVA, multivariate analyses, regression analysis, and time series analysis.BMDP Professional combines the full suite of BMDP Classic (Dynamic) release 7.0 with the BMDP New System 2.0 Windows front-end. .(2004-01-14)

Bletchley Park "body, history" A country house and grounds some 50 miles North of London, England, where highly secret work deciphering intercepted German military radio messages was carried out during World War Two. Thousands of people were working there at the end of the war, including a number of early computer pioneers such as {Alan Turing}. The nature and scale of the work has only emerged recently, with total secrecy having been observed by all the people involved. Throughout the war, Bletchley Park produced highly important strategic and tactical intelligence used by the Allies, (Churchill's "golden eggs"), and it has been claimed that the war in Europe was probably shortened by two years as a result. An exhibition of wartime code-breaking memorabilia, including an entire working {Colossus}, restored by Tony Sale, can be seen at Bletchley Park on alternate weekends. The {Computer Conservation Society} (CCS), a specialist group of the {British Computer Society} runs a museum on the site that includes a working {Elliot} {mainframe} computer and many early {minicomputers} and {microcomputers}. The CCS hope to have substantial facilities for storage and restoration of old artifacts, as well as archive, library and research facilities. Telephone: Bletchley Park Trust office +44 (908) 640 404 (office hours and open weekends). (1998-12-18)

Bletchley Park ::: (body, history) A country house and grounds some 50 miles North of London, England, where highly secret work deciphering intercepted German people were working there at the end of the war, including a number of early computer pioneers such as Alan Turing.The nature and scale of the work has only emerged recently, with total secrecy having been observed by all the people involved. Throughout the war, Bletchley Allies, (Churchill's golden eggs), and it has been claimed that the war in Europe was probably shortened by two years as a result.An exhibition of wartime code-breaking memorabilia, including an entire working Colossus, restored by Tony Sale, can be seen at Bletchley Park on alternate weekends.The Computer Conservation Society (CCS), a specialist group of the British Computer Society runs a museum on the site that includes a working Elliot to have substantial facilities for storage and restoration of old artifacts, as well as archive, library and research facilities.Telephone: Bletchley Park Trust office +44 (908) 640 404 (office hours and open weekends). (1998-12-18)

Library, 1950.

Library, 1951.

Library, 1957,

Library of Biblical and Theological Literature, (ed.) George

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 66-19757

Library of Efficient Data types and Algorithms ::: (library) (LEDA) A class library for C++ of efficient data types (e.g. graph classes) and algorithms by Stefan Naher of the University of Saarbruecken. Version 3.0 includes both template and non-template versions. . (1996-04-15)

Library of Efficient Data types and Algorithms "library" (LEDA) A {class library} for {C++} of efficient data types (e.g. {graph} {classes}) and {algorithms} by Stefan N"aher "stefan@mpi-sb.mpg.de" of the {University of Saarbruecken}. Version 3.0 includes both {template} and non-template versions. {(ftp://ftp.mpi-sb.mpg.de/pub/LEDA)}. (1996-04-15)

Library Publishers, New York, N. Y., publishers of Swan’s Anglo-American Dictionary.

Library VIII, 573.]

Library, vol. 8, p. 573. For the names of the 8

bodleian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley, or to the celebrated library at Oxford, founded by him in the sixteenth century.

bookplate ::: n. --> A label, placed upon or in a book, showing its ownership or its position in a library.

British Library Method "algorithm" {Brute force} searching. According to legends circulating in the 1970s, in the British Library books are searched for by examining each book sequentially in the first shelf, then the next shelf, continuing until the book is found or the entire library has been searched. The term was referred to in a Dutch coursebook, "Inleiding In De Informatica" (Introduction to Informatics) from a course given by C.H.A. Koster and Th.A. Zoethout. This was based on a course given at the TU Berlin. [Reference?] (1999-04-14)

British Library Method ::: (algorithm) Brute force searching.According to legends circulating in the 1970s, in the British Library books are searched for by examining each book sequentially in the first shelf, then the next shelf, continuing until the book is found or the entire library has been searched.The term was referred to in a Dutch coursebook, Inleiding In De Informatica (Introduction to Informatics) from a course given by C.H.A. Koster and Th.A. Zoethout. This was based on a course given at the TU Berlin.[Reference?] (1999-04-14)

browserconfig.xml "web" A {Microsoft} configuration file used to customise the appearance and behaviour of {website} links {pinned} to the {Windows} {start screen} or {desktop} {taskbar}. browserconfig.xml allows the site owner to specify things like {badges} and tile images. {browserconfig.xml reference (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/dn320426%28v=vs.85%29.aspx)}. (2014-07-24)

Bruce Papyrus. Bodleian Library, Oxford.

B-Toolkit "tool, programming, product" A set of software tools designed to support a rigorous or formal development of software systems using the {B-Method}. The Toolkit also provides a development environment automating the management of all associated files, ensuring that the entire development, including code and documentation, is always in a consistent state. The Toolkit includes: a specification, design and code configuration management system, including integrity and dependency management and source file editing facilities; a set of software specification and design analysis tools, which includes {syntax} checkers, type checkers and a specification animator; a set of verification tools, which includes a proof-obligation generator and automatic and interactive provers; a set of coding tools, which includes a translator, linker, rapid prototyping facilities and a reusable specification/code module library; a documentation tool for automatically producing fully cross-referenced and indexed type-set documents from source files; a re-making tool for automatically re-checking and re-generating specifications, designs, code and documentation after modifications to source files. A normal licence costs 25,000 pounds, academic 6,250 pounds. (1995-03-13)

build "programming, systems" To process all of a project's {source code} and other digital assets or resources in order to produce a deployable product. In the simplest case this might mean compiling one file of {C} source to produce an {executable} file. More complex builds would typically involve compiling multiple source files, building library modules, packaging intermediate build products (e.g. {Java} {class files} in a {jar file}), adding or updating version information and other data about the product (e.g. intended deployment {platform}), running tests and interacting with a {source code control} system. The build process is normally automated using tools such as {Unix} {make}, {Apache} {ant} or as part of an {integrated development environment}. This is taken one step further by {continuous integration} set-ups which periodically build the system while you are working on it. (2011-12-16)

by hand 1. Said of an operation (especially a repetitive, trivial, and/or tedious one) that ought to be performed automatically by the computer, but which a hacker instead has to step tediously through. "My mailer doesn't have a command to include the text of the message I'm replying to, so I have to do it by hand." This does not necessarily mean the speaker has to retype a copy of the message; it might refer to, say, dropping into a subshell from the mailer, making a copy of one's mailbox file, reading that into an editor, locating the top and bottom of the message in question, deleting the rest of the file, inserting """ characters on each line, writing the file, leaving the editor, returning to the mailer, reading the file in, and later remembering to delete the file. Compare {eyeball search}. 2. By extension, writing code which does something in an explicit or low-level way for which a presupplied library routine ought to have been available. "This cretinous {B-tree} library doesn't supply a decent iterator, so I'm having to walk the trees by hand." [{Jargon File}]

by hand ::: 1. Said of an operation (especially a repetitive, trivial, and/or tedious one) that ought to be performed automatically by the computer, but which a hacker mailer, reading the file in, and later remembering to delete the file. Compare eyeball search.2. By extension, writing code which does something in an explicit or low-level way for which a presupplied library routine ought to have been available. This cretinous B-tree library doesn't supply a decent iterator, so I'm having to walk the trees by hand.[Jargon File]

Camelot Library "library" ["The Camelot Library", J. Bloch, in "Guide to the Camelot Distributed Transaction Facility: Release I", A.Z. Spector et al eds, CMU 1988, pp. 29-62]. [What is it?] (1995-04-19)

Camelot Library ::: (library)[The Camelot Library, J. Bloch, in Guide to the Camelot Distributed Transaction Facility: Release I, A.Z. Spector et al eds, CMU 1988, pp. 29-62].[What is it?] (1995-04-19)

Categorical Abstract Machine Language "language" (Originally "CAML" - Categorical Abstract Machine Language) A version of {ML} by G. Huet, G. Cousineau, Ascander Suarez, Pierre Weis, Michel Mauny and others of {INRIA} and {ENS}. CAML is intermediate between {LCF ML} and {SML} [in what sense?]. It has {first-class} functions, {static type inference} with {polymorphic} types, user-defined {variant types} and {product types}, and {pattern matching}. It is built on a proprietary run-time system. The CAML V3.1 implementation added {lazy} and {mutable} data structures, a "{grammar}" mechanism for interfacing with the {Yacc} {parser generator}, {pretty-printing} tools, high-performance {arbitrary-precision} arithmetic, and a complete library. CAML V3 is often nicknamed "heavy CAML", because of its heavy memory and CPU requirements compared to {Caml Light}. in 1990 Xavier Leroy and Damien Doligez designed a new implementation called {Caml Light}, freeing the previous implementation from too many experimental high-level features, and more importantly, from the old Le_Lisp back-end. Following the addition of a {native-code} compiler and a powerful {module} system in 1995 and of the {object} and {class} layer in 1996, the project's name was changed to {Objective Caml}. ["The CAML Reference Manual", P. Weis et al, TR INRIA-ENS, 1989]. (2003-04-12)

CDF ::: Common Data Format. A library and toolkit for multi-dimensional data sets.

CERNLIB "library" The {CERN} Program Library. (2004-09-01)

CERNLIB ::: (library) The CERN Program Library.(2004-09-01)

cfortran.h ::: (library) A transparent, machine independent interface between C and Fortran routines and global data, developed by Burkhard Burow at CERN. It provides macros which allow the C preprocessor to translate a simple description of a C (Fortran) routine or global data into a Fortran (C) interface.Version 2.6 runs on VAX/VMS/Ultrix, DECstation, Silicon Graphics, IBM RS/6000, Sun, Cray, Apollo, HP9000, LynxOS, f2c, NAG f90. (1992-04-12)

cfortran.h "library" A {transparent}, machine independent interface between {C} and {Fortran} routines and {global data}, developed by Burkhard Burow at CERN. It provides {macros} which allow the {C} {preprocessor} to translate a simple description of a C (Fortran) routine or global data into a Fortran (C) interface. Version 2.6 runs on {VAX}/{VMS}/{Ultrix}, {DECstation}, {Silicon Graphics}, {IBM} {RS/6000}, {Sun}, {Cray}, {Apollo}, {HP9000}, {LynxOS}, {f2c}, {NAG f90}. {(ftp://zebra.desy.de/cfortran/)}. cfortran.h was reviewed in RS/Magazine November 1992 and a user's experiences with cfortran.h are described in the Jan 93 issue of Computers in Physics. (1992-04-12)

Chenoboskion Library.

Christian Fathers Library. Edinburgh, 1869.

Cited in the Bodleian Library Bruce Papyrus.

class library "programming" A {library} of reusable {class}es for use with an {object-oriented programming} system. (1994-12-05)

class library ::: (programming) A library of reusable classes for use with an object-oriented programming system. (1994-12-05)

CLHEP "library" A {C++} {class library} for high energy physics {applications}. (1994-12-12)

CLHEP ::: (library) A C++ class library for high energy physics applications. (1994-12-12)

CLiCC "language" A {Common Lisp} to {C} compiler by Heinz Knutzen "hk@informatik.uni-kiel.de", Ulrich Hoffman "uho@informatik.uni-kiel.de" and Wolfgang Goerigk "wg@informatik.uni-kiel.de". CLiCC is meant to be used as a supplement to existing {CLISP} systems for generating {portable} {applications}. Target {C} code must be linked with the CLiCC {run-time library} to produce an {executable}. Version 0.6.2 conforms to a subset of {Common Lisp} and {CLOS} called {CL_0} or {CommonLisp_0} and based on {CLtL1}. It runs with {Lucid Lisp}, {AKCL} or {CLISP}. Work on {CLtL2} and {ANSI-CL} conformance is in progress. {(ftp://ftp.informatik.uni-kiel.de/pub/kiel/apply/)}. (1994-01-04)

CLiCC ::: (language) A Common Lisp to C compiler by Heinz Knutzen , Ulrich Hoffman to existing CLISP systems for generating portable applications. Target C code must be linked with the CLiCC run-time library to produce an executable.Version 0.6.2 conforms to a subset of Common Lisp and CLOS called CL_0 or CommonLisp_0 and based on CLtL1. It runs with Lucid Lisp, AKCL or CLISP. Work on CLtL2 and ANSI-CL conformance is in progress. . (1994-01-04)

CLISP "language" 1. A {Common Lisp} implementation by {Bruno Haible (http://haible.de/bruno/)} of {Karlsruhe University} and {Michael Stoll (http://math.uni-duesseldorf.de/~stoll/)}. of {Munich University}, both in Germany. CLISP includes an {interpreter}, {bytecode compiler}, almost all of the {CLOS} {object system}, a {foreign language interface} and a {socket interface}. An {X11} interface is available through {CLX} and {Garnet}. Command line editing is provided by the {GNU} readline library. CLISP requires only 2 MB of {RAM}. The {user interface} comes in German, English, French, Spanish, Dutch, and Russian and can be changed at {run time}. CLISP is {Free Software} and distributed under the {GPL}. It runs on {microcomputers} ({OS/2}, {Microsoft Windows}, {Amiga}, {Acorn}) as well as on {Unix} workstations ({Linux}, {BSD}, {SVR4}, {Sun4}, {Alpha}, {HP-UX}, {NeXTstep}, {SGI}, {AIX}, {Sun3} and others). {Official web page (http://clisp.cons.org)}. {Mailing list (http://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/clisp-list)}. (2003-08-04) 2. {Conversational LISP}. (2019-11-21)

CLX "library, graphics" The {Common Lisp} library providing a low-level interface to the {X Window System}, equivalent to {Xlib}. {Graphics toolkits} can be built on top of CLX, e.g. {McCLIM}, {Garnet}, {CLUE} and {CLIO}. Various LISP implementors have independently ported CLX to their own {platforms}, fixing {bugs} and, in some cases, adding features in the process. {CLX Wiki (http://cliki.net/CLX)}. (2004-08-27)

CLX ::: (library, graphics) The Common Lisp library providing a low-level interface to the X Window System, equivalent to Xlib. Graphics toolkits can be implementors have independently ported CLX to their own platforms, fixing bugs and, in some cases, adding features in the process. .(2004-08-27)

command line option "software" (Or "option", "flag", "switch", "option switch") An argument to a command that modifies its function rather than providing data. Options generally start with "-" in {Unix} or "/" in {MS-DOS}. This is usually followed by a single letter or occasionally a digit. More recently, {GNU} software adopted the --longoptionname style, usually in addition to traditional, single-character, -x style equivalents. Some commands require each option to be a separate argument, introduced by a new "-" or "/", others allow multiple option letters to be concatenated into a single argument with a single "-" or "/", e.g. "ls -al". A few Unix commands (e.g. {ar}, {tar}) allow the "-" to be omitted. Some options may or must be followed by a value, e.g. "cc prog.c -o prog", sometimes with and sometimes without an intervening space. {getopt} and {getopts} are commands for parsing command line options. There is also a {C} library routine called getopt for the same purpose. (2007-02-18)

command line option ::: (software) (Or option, flag, switch, option switch) An argument to a command that modifies its function rather than providing data. Options generally start with - in Unix or / in MS-DOS. This is usually followed by a single letter or occasionally a digit.Some commands require each option to be a separate argument, introduced by a new - or /, others allow multiple option letters to be concatenated into a by a value, e.g. cc prog.c -o prog, sometimes with and sometimes without an intervening space. getopt and getopts are commands for parsing command line options. There is also a C library routine called getopt for the same purpose. (1996-12-11)

command line option ::: (software) (Or option, flag, switch, option switch) An argument to a command that modifies its function rather than providing data. Options generally start with - in Unix or / in MS-DOS. This is usually followed by a single letter or occasionally a digit.Some commands require each option to be a separate argument, introduced by a new - or /, others allow multiple option letters to be concatenated into a by a value, e.g. cc prog.c -o prog, sometimes with and sometimes without an intervening space.getopt and getopts are commands for parsing command line options. There is also a C library routine called getopt for the same purpose. (1996-12-11)

Common Data Format "library" (CDF) A {library} and toolkit based on a {self-describing} data format for {scalar} and multidimensional data. CDF aims to be platform- and discipline-independent. A scientific data management package (CDF Library) allows developers to manage data and {metadata} through APIs. CDF has built-in support for {data compression} ({gZip}, {RLE}, {Huffman}) and files larger than two {gigabytes}. There are interfaces for {C}, {FORTRAN}, {Java}, {Perl}, {C

Common Internet File System "protocol" (CIFS) An {Internet} {file system} {protocol}, based on {Microsoft}'s {SMB}. Microsoft has given CIFS to the {Internet Engineering Task Force} (IETF) as an Internet Draft. CIFS is intended to complement existing protocols such as {HTTP}, {FTP}, and {NFS}. CIFS runs on top of {TCP/IP} and uses the Internet's {Domain Name Service} (DNS). It is optimised to support the slower speed {dial-up} connections common on the Internet. CIFS is more flexible than FTP. FTP operations are carried out on entire files whereas CIFS is aimed at routine data access and incorporates high-performance multi-user read and write operations, {locking}, and file-sharing semantics. CIFS is probably closest in functionality to NFS. NFS gives random access to files and directories, but is {stateless}. With CIFS, once a file is open, state about the current access to that file is stored on both the client and the server. This allows changes on the server side to be notified to the clients that are interested. {Microsoft Overview (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/fileio/base/cifs_smb_protocol_overview.asp)}. {SNIA page (http://snia.org/tech_activities/CIFS/)}. {CIFS: A Common Internet File System, Paul Leach and Dan Perry (http://microsoft.com/Mind/1196/CIFS.htm)}. {IETF Specification. CIFS version 1 (ftp://ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-leach-cifs-v1-spec-01.txt)}. (2003-03-12)

Compiled HTML "filename extension" A {Microsoft} file format for distributing a collection of {HTML} files, along with their associated images, sounds, etc., as a single compressed archive file. Microsoft use this format for {Windows} {HTML Help} files. Most chms include a project (.hhp) file listing the included files and basic settings, a contents (.hhc) file, an index (.hhk) file, html files, and, optionally, image files. Users view chms with hh.exe, the HTML Help viewer installed with {Internet Explorer}. Filename extension: .chm. {(http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/htmlhelp/html/vsconHH1Start.asp)}. (2003-05-17)

connect "library, networking" {Unix} socket library routine to connect a socket that has been created on the local hosts to one at a specified socket address on the remote host. {Unix manual pages}: connect(2), accept(2). (1995-03-21)

connect ::: (library, networking) Unix socket library routine to connect a socket that has been created on the local hosts to one at a specified socket address on the remote host.Unix manual pages: connect(2), accept(2). (1995-03-21)

Consortium for Lexical Research "body" (CLR) A repository for {natural language processing} software, {lexical} data, tools and resources; set up in July 1991 in the Computing Research Laboratory of {New Mexico State University}, Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. CLR maintained a public {FTP} {archive site} and a separate members-only library. As of 1994-02-01, CLR had about 60 members, mostly academic institutions, including most US natural language processing centres. Materials could be contributed in exchange for membership. In 2006, the CRL closed down due to lack of funding. The CLR FTP server and e-mail address seems to have disappeared with it. [{The Consortium for Lexical Research, Y. Wilks, Principal Investigator, Computing Research Laboratory, New Mexico State University (http://clair.eecs.umich.edu/aan/paper.php?paper_id=H92-1114)}]. (2014-07-06)

Consortium for Lexical Research ::: (CLR) The Consortium for Lexical Research is a repository for natural language processing software, lexical data, tools and resources. It was set up in July 1991 in the Computing Research Laboratory of New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico.CLR maintains a public ftp site, and a separate members-only library. Currently (Feb 1994) CLR has about 60 members, mostly academic institutions, including most US natural language processing centres. Materials can be contributed to the archives in exchange for membership. (128.123.1.12). E-mail: .

COOL ::: 1. Concurrent Object-Oriented Language.2. CLIPS Object-Oriented Language?3. A C++ class library developed at Texas Instruments. COOL contains a set of containers like Vectors, List, Hash_Table, etc. It uses a shallow hierarchy with (like libg++). The template syntax is very close to Cfront3.x and g++2.x. Can build shared libraries on Suns.JCOOL's main difference from COOL and GECOOL is that it uses real C++ templates instead of a similar syntax that is preprocessed by a special 'cpp' distributed with COOL and GECOOL. .GECOOL, JCOOL: .E-mail: Van-Duc Nguyen (1992-08-05)

COOL 1. {Concurrent Object-Oriented Language}. 2. CLIPS Object-Oriented Language? 3. A C++ class library developed at {Texas Instruments} that defines {containers} like {Vectors}, {List}, {Hash_Table}, etc. It uses a shallow hierarchy with no common {base class}. The functionality is close to {Common Lisp} data structures (like {libg++}). The {template} {syntax} is very close to {Cfront} 3.x and {g++} 2.x. JCOOL's main difference from COOL and GECOOL is that it uses real C++ templates instead of a similar syntax that is preprocessed by a special 'cpp' distributed with COOL and GECOOL. {(ftp://csc.ti.com/pub/COOL.tar.Z)}. GECOOL, JCOOL: {(ftp://cs.utexas.edu/pub/COOL/)}. E-mail: Van-Duc Nguyen "nguyen@crd.ge.com" (1992-08-05)

copybook "programming, library" (Or "copy member", "copy module") A common piece of {source code} designed to be copied into many source programs, used mainly in {IBM} {DOS} {mainframe} programming. In {mainframe} {DOS} (DOS/VS, DOS/{VSE}, etc.), the copybook was stored as a "book" in a {source} library. A library was comprised of "books", prefixed with a letter designating the language, e.g., A.name for Assembler, C.name for Cobol, etc., because {DOS} didn't support multiple libraries, private libraries, or anything. This term is commonly used by {COBOL} programmers but is supported by most {mainframe} languages. The {IBM} {OS} series did not use the term "copybook", instead it referred to such files as "libraries" implemented as "partitioned data sets" or {PDS}. Copybooks are functionally equivalent to {C} and {C++} {include} files. (1997-07-31)

copybook ::: (programming, library) (Or copy member, copy module) A common piece of source code designed to be copied into many source programs, used mainly in IBM DOS mainframe programming.In mainframe DOS (DOS/VS, DOS/VSE, etc.), the copybook was stored as a book in a source library. A library was comprised of books, prefixed with a letter it referred to such files as libraries implemented as partitioned data sets or PDS.Copybooks are functionally equivalent to C and C++ include files. (1997-07-31)

Copyright © 1953 by Philosophical Library, Inc.

C++SIM A {class} library like the {simulation} class libraries of {SIMULA}, by Mark Little "M.C.Little@newcastle.ac.uk". Version: 1.0. {(ftp://arjuna.ncl.ac.uk/)}. (1993-06-04)

C++SIM ::: A class library like the simulation class libraries of SIMULA, by Mark Little . Version: 1.0. . (1993-06-04)

curseperl ::: A curses library for Perl by the author of Perl, Larry Wall (1994-12-06)

curseperl A {curses} library for {Perl} by the author of Perl, Larry Wall "lwall@netlabs.com". It comes with Perl. (1994-12-06)

data set organization "operating system, storage" (DSORG) An {IBM} term for {file} structure. These include PS {physical sequential}, DA {direct access}, IS {indexed sequential}, PO {partitioned} (a library). This system dates from {OS/360}, and breaks down beginning with {VSAM} and {VTAM}, where it is no longer applied. Sequential and indexed data sets can be accessed using either a "basic" or a "queued" "access method." For example a DSORG=PS file can use either BSAM (basic sequential access method) or QSAM (queued sequential access method). It can also be processed as a {direct file} using BDAM. Likewise a library can be processed using BPAM (basic partitioned access method), BSAM, QSAM, or BDAM. DSORG and access method are somewhat, but not completely, orthogonal. The "basic" access method deals with {physical blocks} rather than {records}, and usually provides more control over the specific {device}. Each I/O operation using the "basic" access method reads or writes a single block. A "basic" read or write starts an {asynchronous} I/O operation, and the programmer is responsible for waiting for completion and checking for errors. The "queued" access method deals with {logical records} and provides blocking and deblocking services. It is "queued" because it provides {read-ahead} and {write-behind} services. While a program is processing records in one input block, for example, QSAM may be reading one or more blocks ahead. Queued "get" or "put" operations are synchronous as far as the programmer is concerned. The operation is complete when the next logical record has been successfully processed. EXCP ({Execute Channel Program}) is a lower-level method of accessing data. IBM manuals usually named "Data Administration Guide", e.g. SC26-4505-1 for MVS/ESA DFP 3.1, provide more detail about data set organizations and access methods. (2005-08-08)

data set organization ::: (operating system, storage) (DSORG) An IBM term for file structure. These include PS physical sequential, DA direct, IS indexed sequential, PO partitioned (a library). This system dates from OS/360, and breaks down beginning with VSAM and VTAM, where it is no longer applied.Sequential and indexed data sets can be accessed using either a basic or a queued access method. For example a DSORG=PS file can use either BSAM (basic using BPAM (basic partitioned access method), BSAM, QSAM, or BDAM. DSORG and access method are somewhat, but not completely, orthogonal.The basic access method deals with physical blocks rather than records, and usually provides more control over the specific device. Each I/O operation using write starts an asynchronous I/O operation, and the programmer is responsible for waiting for completion and checking for errors.The queued access method deals with logical records and provides blocking and deblocking services. It is queued because it provides read-ahead and operations are synchronous as far as the programmer is concerned. The operation is complete when the next logical record has been successfully processed.EXCP (Execute Channel Program) is a lower-level method of accessing data.IBM manuals usually named Data Administration Guide, e.g. SC26-4505-1 for MVS/ESA DFP 3.1, provide more detail about data set organizations and access methods.(2005-08-08)

Digital Library Initiative A project to research digital libraries which aims to provide real collections to real users (high school students, University researchers and students, users in public libraries). The project is sponsored jointly by three US federal funding agencies, led by the National Science Foundation. The {University of Michigan}, one of the six sites selected in 1994 to collaborate, will provide collections on earth and space sciences. The project, known there as the University of Michigan Digital Library Project (UMDL), is a large, multi-year project headed by Daniel Atkins, Dean of the School of Information and Library Studies. {UMDL (http://http2.sils.umich.edu/UMDL/HomePage.html)}. (1995-02-23)

Digital Library Initiative ::: A project to research digital libraries which aims to provide real collections to real users (high school students, University researchers and students, users in public libraries). The project is sponsored jointly by three US federal funding agencies, led by the National Science Foundation.The University of Michigan, one of the six sites selected in 1994 to collaborate, will provide collections on earth and space sciences. The project, large, multi-year project headed by Daniel Atkins, Dean of the School of Information and Library Studies. . (1995-02-23)

displace ::: v. t. --> To change the place of; to remove from the usual or proper place; to put out of place; to place in another situation; as, the books in the library are all displaced.
To crowd out; to take the place of.
To remove from a state, office, dignity, or employment; to discharge; to depose; as, to displace an officer of the revenue.
To dislodge; to drive away; to banish.


dis "programming" A {CPython} {bytecode} {disassembler}. {dis home (https://docs.python.org/2/library/dis.html)}. (2014-06-08)

DLL ::: 1. (networking) Data Link Layer.2. (library) Dynamically Linked Library.3. Dial Long Line equipment.(2000-04-05)

DLL 1. "networking" {Data Link Layer}. 2. "library" {Dynamically Linked Library}. 3. {Dial Long Line} equipment. (2000-04-05)

Domain Name System "networking" (DNS) A general-purpose distributed, replicated, data query service chiefly used on {Internet} for translating {hostnames} into {Internet addresses}. Also, the style of {hostname} used on the Internet, though such a name is properly called a {fully qualified domain name}. DNS can be configured to use a sequence of name servers, based on the domains in the name being looked for, until a match is found. The name resolution client (e.g. Unix's gethostbyname() library function) can be configured to search for host information in the following order: first in the local {hosts file}, second in {NIS} and third in DNS. This sequencing of Naming Services is sometimes called "name service switching". Under {Solaris} is configured in the file /etc/nsswitch.conf. DNS can be queried interactively using the command {nslookup}. It is defined in {STD 13}, {RFC 1034}, {RFC 1035}, {RFC 1591}. {BIND} is a common DNS server. {Info from Virtual Office, Inc. (http://virtual.office.com/domains.html)}. (2001-05-14)

Domain Name System ::: (networking) (DNS) A general-purpose distributed, replicated, data query service chiefly used on Internet for translating hostnames into Internet sequence of name servers, based on the domains in the name being looked for, until a match is found.The name resolution client (e.g. Unix's gethostbyname() library function) can be configured to search for host information in the following order: first in the Services is sometimes called name service switching. Under Solaris is configured in the file /etc/nsswitch.conf.DNS can be queried interactively using the command nslookup. It is defined in STD 13, RFC 1034, RFC 1035, RFC 1591.BIND is a common DNS server. .(2001-05-14)

Douglas Engelbart "person" Douglas C. Engelbart, the inventor of the {mouse}. On 1968-12-09, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the {Augmentation Research Center} at {Stanford Research Institute} in Menlo Park, California, USA, presented a 90-minute live public demonstration of the on live system, {NLS}, they had been working on since 1962. The presentation was a session in the of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer {mouse}, {hypertext}, object addressing, dynamic file linking and shared-screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface. The original 90-minute video: {Hyperlinks (http://vodreal.stanford.edu/engel/08engel200.ram)}, {Mouse (http://vodreal.stanford.edu/engel/12engel200.ram)}, {Web-board (http://vodreal.stanford.edu/engel/23engel200.ram)}. {Biography (http://www2.bootstrap.org/dce-bio.htm)}. {Tia O'Brien, "The Mouse", Silicon Valley News (http://mercurycenter.com/svtech/news/special/engelbart/)}. {(http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa081898.htm)}. (2003-08-06)

Dynamically Linked Library ::: (library) (DLL) A library which is linked to application programs when they are loaded or run rather than as the final phase of compilation. This means code must arrange for library calls to be patched with the addresses of the real shared library routines, possibly via a jump table.The alternative is to make library calls part of the operating system kernel and enter them via some kind of trap instruction. This is generally less efficient than an ordinary subroutine call.It is important to ensure that the version of a dynamically linked library is compatible with what the executable expects.Examples of operating systems using dynamic linking are SunOS (.so - shared object files), Microsoft Windows (.dll) and RISC OS on the Acorn Archimedes (relocatable modules). (1995-12-12)

Dynamically Linked Library "library" (DLL) A {library} which is linked to {application programs} when they are loaded or run rather than as the final phase of {compilation}. This means that the same block of library code can be shared between several {tasks} rather than each task containing copies of the routines it uses. The executable is compiled with a library of "{stubs}" which allow {link errors} to be detected at {compile-time}. Then, at {run time}, either the system {loader} or the task's entry code must arrange for library calls to be patched with the addresses of the real shared library routines, possibly via a {jump table}. The alternative is to make library calls part of the {operating system} {kernel} and enter them via some kind of {trap} instruction. This is generally less efficient than an ordinary {subroutine} call. It is important to ensure that the version of a dynamically linked library is compatible with what the executable expects. Examples of operating systems using dynamic linking are {SunOS} (.so - shared object files), {Microsoft Windows} (.dll) and {RISC OS} on the {Acorn} {Archimedes} (relocatable modules). (1995-12-12)

dynamic link library {Dynamically Linked Library}

Dynix Automated Library Systems ::: (company) The world's largest supplier of library automation systems with European offices in France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands and the UK.Dynix sell two library management systems - Horizon (client/server) and, Dynix (host-based). Both have GUI or terminal interfaces. Dynix also sell other products and services for database enrichment, interconnectivity, and on-line and CD-ROM databases. . (1995-04-28)

Dynix Automated Library Systems "company" The world's largest supplier of library automation systems with European offices in France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands and the UK. Dynix sell two library management systems - Horizon ({client/server}) and, Dynix ({host-based}). Both have {GUI} or {terminal interfaces}. Dynix also sell other products and services for {database} enrichment, interconnectivity, and on-line and {CD-ROM} databases. {(http://uk.dynix.com/dynix.html)}. (1995-04-28)

Dynix "library" A {host-based} library automation system from {Dynix Automated Library Systems}. First installed in 1993, it is now used in over 2000 libraries worldwide. Dynix runs on {Unix} using the {UniVerse} post relational database. The software is configurable using tables of parameters. It includes modules for cataloguing, circulation, OPAC, acquisitions, serials, reserve book room, advance bookings, homebound, BiblioBus, Pac Plus for Windows, Kids Catalog, Dynix Online Catalog, media bookings, and community information. {(http://uk.dynix.com/classic.html)}. (1995-04-28)

Dynix ::: (library) A host-based library automation system from Dynix Automated Library Systems. First installed in 1993, it is now used in over 2000 libraries worldwide.Dynix runs on Unix using the UniVerse post relational database. The software is configurable using tables of parameters. It includes modules for cataloguing, homebound, BiblioBus, Pac Plus for Windows, Kids Catalog, Dynix Online Catalog, media bookings, and community information. . (1995-04-28)

East and West Library [1946],

-. (ed.) A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene

Edward A. Abbey in the Boston Public Library.

Eiffel "language" An {object-oriented} language produced by {Bertrand Meyer} in 1985. Eiffel has {classes} with {multiple inheritance} and {repeated inheritance}, {deferred class}es (like {Smalltalk}'s {abstract class}), and {clusters} of classes. Objects can have both {static types} and {dynamic types}. The dynamic type must be a descendant of the static (declared) type. {Dynamic binding} resolves {multiple inheritance} clashes. It has flattened forms of classes, in which all of the inherited features are added at the same level and {generic class}es parametrised by type. Other features are {persistent objects}, {garbage collection}, {exception} handling, {foreign language interface}. Classes may be equipped with {assertions} (routine preconditions and postconditions, class {invariants}) implementing the theory of "{Design by Contract}" and helping produce more reliable software. Eiffel is compiled to {C}. It comes with libraries containing several hundred classes: data structures and {algorithms} (EiffelBase), graphics and user interfaces (EiffelVision) and language analysis (EiffelLex, EiffelParse). The first release of Eiffel was release 1.4, introduced at the first {OOPSLA} in October 1986. The language proper was first described in a University of California, Santa Barbara report dated September 1985. Eiffel is available, with different libraries, from several sources including {Interactive Software Engineering}, USA (ISE Eiffel version 3.3); Sig Computer GmbH, Germany (Eiffel/S); and {Tower, Inc.}, Austin (Tower Eiffel). The language definition is administered by an open organisation, the Nonprofit International Consortium for Eiffel (NICE). There is a standard kernel library. An {Eiffel source checker} and compiler {front-end} is available. See also {Sather}, {Distributed Eiffel}, {Lace}, {shelf}. E-mail: "queries@eiffel.com". ["Eiffel: The Language", Bertrand Meyer, P-H 1992]. (1998-11-15)

Eiffel ::: (language) An object-oriented language produced by Bertrand Meyer in 1985. Eiffel has classes with multiple inheritance and repeated inheritance, inherited features are added at the same level and generic classes parametrised by type.Other features are persistent objects, garbage collection, exception handling, foreign language interface. Classes may be equipped with assertions (routine preconditions and postconditions, class invariants) implementing the theory of Design by Contract and helping produce more reliable software.Eiffel is compiled to C. It comes with libraries containing several hundred classes: data structures and algorithms (EiffelBase), graphics and user interfaces (EiffelVision) and language analysis (EiffelLex, EiffelParse).The first release of Eiffel was release 1.4, introduced at the first OOPSLA in October 1986. The language proper was first described in a University of California, Santa Barbara report dated September 1985.Eiffel is available, with different libraries, from several sources including Interactive Software Engineering, USA (ISE Eiffel version 3.3); Sig Computer GmbH, Germany (Eiffel/S); and Tower, Inc., Austin (Tower Eiffel).The language definition is administered by an open organisation, the Nonprofit International Consortium for Eiffel (NICE). There is a standard kernel library.An Eiffel source checker and compiler front-end is available.Latest version: 4.2, as of 1998-10-28.Latest version: ISE Eiffel version 3.3.See also Sather, Distributed Eiffel, Lace, shelf.E-mail: .[Eiffel: The Language, Bertrand Meyer, P-H 1992]. (1998-11-15)

elements ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The first ripple or vibration in causal matter creates a new and exceedingly fine and pervasive condition of matter called Akasha or Ether; more complex motion evolves out of Ether a somewhat intenser condition which is called Vayu, Air; and so by ever more complex motion with increasing intensity of condition for result, yet three other matter-states are successively developed, Agni or Fire, Apah or Water and Prithvi or Earth.” *Supplement to the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library

elements ::: “The first ripple or vibration in causal matter creates a new and exceedingly fine and pervasive condition of matter called Akasha or Ether; more complex motion evolves out of Ether a somewhat intenser condition which is called Vayu, Air; and so by ever more complex motion with increasing intensity of condition for result, yet three other matter-states are successively developed, Agni or Fire, Apah or Water and Prithvi or Earth.” Supplement to the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library

elevator controller An archetypal dumb embedded-systems application, like {toaster} (which superseded it). During one period (1983--84) in the deliberations of ANSI X3J11 (the C standardisation committee) this was the canonical example of a really stupid, memory-limited computation environment. "You can't require "printf(3)" to be part of the default run-time library - what if you're targeting an elevator controller?" Elevator controllers became important rhetorical weapons on both sides of several {holy wars}.

exec /eg-zek'/ "operating system" 1. execute. A synonym for {chain} derived from the {Unix} "exec" {system call}. {Unix manual page}: execve(2). 2. (Obsolete) {executive}. The mainstream "exec" as an abbreviation for (human) executive is *not* used. To a hacker, an "exec" is a always a program, never a person. 3. At {IBM} and {VM}/{CMS} shops, the equivalent of a {shell} command file. 4. "operating system" The innermost {kernel} of the {Amiga} {operating system} which provides shared-library support, device interface, {memory management}, {CPU} management, basic {IPC}, and the basic structures for OS extension. The rest of the Amiga OS (windowing, file system, third-party extensions, etc.) is built using these structures. [{Jargon File}] (1997-08-01)

exit 1. "programming" A {library function} in the {C} and {Unix} {run-time library} that causes the program to terminate and return control to the {shell}. The alternative to calling "exit" is simply to "fall off the end" of the program or its top-level, {main}, routine. Equivalent functions, possibly with different names, exist in pretty much every programming language, e.g. "exit" in {Microsoft DOS} or "END" in {BASIC}. On exit, the {run-time system} closes open files and releases other resources. An {exit status} code (a small integer, with zero meaning OK and other values typically indicating some kind of error) can be passed as the only argument to "exit"; this will be made available to the shell. Some languages allow the programmer to set up exit handler code which will be called before the standard system clean-up actions. 2. Any point in a piece of code where control is returned to the caller, possibly activating one or more user-provided exit handlers. This might be a {return} statement, exit call (in sense 1 above) or code that raises an error condition (either intentionally or unintentionally). If the exit is from the top-level routine then such a point would typically terminate the whole program, as in sense 1. (2008-05-15)

fdlibm ::: A new version of the C maths library, libm, by Dr. K-C Ng. It is the basis for the bundled /usr/lib/libm.so in Solaris 2.3 for SPARC and for future Solaris 2 in accordance with various language standards or in the spirit of IEEE 754. The C source code should be portable to any IEEE 754 system.E-mail: (send all from fdlibm), (comments and bug reports). . (1993-12-18).

fdlibm A new version of the {C} maths library, libm, by Dr. K-C Ng. It is the basis for the bundled /usr/lib/libm.so in Solaris 2.3 for SPARC and for future Solaris 2 releases for x86 and PowerPC. It provides the standard functions necessary to pass the usual test suites. This new libm can be configured to handle exceptions in accordance with various language standards or in the spirit of {IEEE 754}. The C source code should be portable to any IEEE 754 system. E-mail: "netlib@research.att.com" ("send all from fdlibm"), "fdlibm-comments@sunpro.eng.sun.com" (comments and bug reports). {(ftp://netlib.att.com/netlib)}. (1993-12-18).

Feel (Free and Eventually Eulisp) An initial implementation of an {EuLisp} {interpreter} by Pete Broadbery "pab@maths.bath.ac.uk". Version 0.75 features an integrated {object} system, {modules}, {parallelism}, interfaces to {PVM} library, {TCP/IP} {sockets}, {futures}, {Linda} and {CSP}. Portable to most {Unix} systems. Can use {shared memory} and {threads} if available. {(ftp://ftp.bath.ac.uk/pub/eulisp/)}. (1992-09-14)

flush ::: (data) To delete something, usually superfluous, or to abort an operation.Flush was standard ITS terminology for aborting an output operation. One spoke of the text that would have been printed, but was not, as having been flushed. characters by hosing down the internal output buffer, washing the characters away before they could be printed.Compare drain.2. To force temporarily buffered data to be written to more permanent memory. E.g. flushing buffered disk writes to disk, as with C's standard I/O library which belongs to one processes must be written out to main memory so that the cache can be used by another process.[Jargon File](2005-07-18)

flush "data" To delete something, usually superfluous, or to abort an operation. "Flush" was standard {ITS} terminology for aborting an output operation. One spoke of the text that would have been printed, but was not, as having been flushed. It is speculated that this term arose from a vivid image of flushing unwanted characters by hosing down the internal output buffer, washing the characters away before they could be printed. Compare {drain}. 2. To force temporarily buffered data to be written to more permanent memory. E.g. flushing buffered disk writes to disk, as with {C}'s {standard I/O} library "fflush(3)" call. This sense was in use among {BLISS} programmers at {DEC} and on {Honeywell} and {IBM} machines as far back as 1965. Another example of this usage is flushing a {cache} on a {context switch} where modified data stored in the cace which belongs to one processes must be written out to main memory so that the cache can be used by another process. [{Jargon File}] (2005-07-18)

forms ::: 1. (programming) fill-out form.2. (library) (Xforms) A GUI component library for X11. (1998-03-24)

forms 1. "programming" {fill-out form}. 2. "library" (Xforms) A {GUI} component library for {X11}. (1998-03-24)

fossil 1. In software, a misfeature that becomes understandable only in historical context, as a remnant of times past retained so as not to break compatibility. Example: the retention of {octal} as default base for string escapes in {C}, in spite of the better match of {hexadecimal} to ASCII and modern byte-addressable architectures. See {dusty deck}. 2. More restrictively, a feature with past but no present utility. Example: the force-all-caps (LCASE) bits in the V7 and {BSD} Unix tty driver, designed for use with monocase terminals. (In a perversion of the usual backward-compatibility goal, this functionality has actually been expanded and renamed in some later {USG Unix} releases as the IUCLC and OLCUC bits.) 3. The FOSSIL (Fido/Opus/Seadog Standard Interface Level) driver specification for serial-port access to replace the {brain-dead} routines in the IBM PC ROMs. Fossils are used by most {MS-DOS} {BBS} software in preference to the "supported" ROM routines, which do not support interrupt-driven operation or setting speeds above 9600; the use of a semistandard FOSSIL library is preferable to the {bare metal} serial port programming otherwise required. Since the FOSSIL specification allows additional functionality to be hooked in, drivers that use the {hook} but do not provide serial-port access themselves are named with a modifier, as in "video fossil". [{Jargon File}]

fprintf ::: (library) Variant of the C library routine printf which prints to a given stream. E.g. fprintf(stderr, %s: can't open file \%s\.,argv[0], argv[1]); (1995-04-25)

fprintf "library" Variant of the {C} library routine {printf} which prints to a given {stream}. E.g. fprintf(stderr, "%s: can't open file \"%s\".", argv[0], argv[1]); which prints to the "{standard error}" output stream. (1995-04-25)

Fudgets "programming" (From "functional widgets") {Graphical user interface} {widgets} available as The Fudget library - a toolkit for concurrent programming of graphical user interfaces, {client/servers} and more written in {Haskell} by Thomas Hallgren "hallgren@cs.chalmers.se" and Magnus Carlsson "magnus@cs.chalmers.se". Version: h9 1995-07-04 (Baastad Spring School Release). {(http://cs.chalmers.se/Fudgets/)}. {(ftp://ftp.cs.chalmers.se/pub/haskell/chalmers)}. (1996-03-17)

Fudgets ::: (programming) (From functional widgets) Graphical user interface widgets available as The Fudget library - a toolkit for concurrent programming Thomas Hallgren and Magnus Carlsson .Version: h9 1995-07-04 (Baastad Spring School Release). . . (1996-03-17)

fuzzy logic A superset of {Boolean logic} dealing with the concept of partial truth -- {truth values} between "completely true" and "completely false". It was introduced by Dr. Lotfi Zadeh of {UCB} in the 1960's as a means to model the uncertainty of {natural language}. Any specific theory may be generalised from a discrete (or "crisp") form to a continuous (fuzzy) form, e.g. "fuzzy calculus", "fuzzy differential equations" etc. Fuzzy logic replaces Boolean truth values with degrees of truth which are very similar to probabilities except that they need not sum to one. Instead of an assertion pred(X), meaning that X definitely has the property associated with {predicate} "pred", we have a truth function truth(pred(X)) which gives the degree of truth that X has that property. We can combine such values using the standard definitions of fuzzy logic: truth(not x) = 1.0 - truth(x) truth(x and y) = minimum (truth(x), truth(y)) truth(x or y) = maximum (truth(x), truth(y)) (There are other possible definitions for "and" and "or", e.g. using sum and product). If truth values are restricted to 0 and 1 then these functions behave just like their Boolean counterparts. This is known as the "extension principle". Just as a Boolean predicate asserts that its argument definitely belongs to some subset of all objects, a fuzzy predicate gives the degree of truth with which its argument belongs to a {fuzzy subset}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.ai.fuzzy}. E-mail servers: "fuzzynet@aptronix.com", "rnalib@its.bldrdoc.gov", "fuzzy-server@til.com". {(ftp://ftp.hiof.no/pub/Fuzzy)}, {(ftp://ntia.its.bldrdoc.gov/pub/fuzzy)}. {FAQ (ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet-by-group/comp.answers/fuzzy-logic)}. {James Brule, "Fuzzy systems - a tutorial", 1985 (http://life.anu.edu.au/complex_systems/fuzzy.html)}. {STB Software Catalog (http://krakatoa.jsc.nasa.gov/stb/catalog.html)}, includes a few fuzzy tools. [H.J. Zimmerman, "Fuzzy Sets, Decision Making and Expert Systems", Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1987]. ["Fuzzy Logic, State of the Art", Ed. R. Lowen, Marc Roubens, Theory and Decision Library, D: System theory, Knowledge Engineering and Problem Solving 12, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1993, ISBN 0-7923-2324-6]. (1995-02-21)

fuzzy logic ::: A superset of Boolean logic dealing with the concept of partial truth -- truth values between completely true and completely false. It was introduced by Dr. Lotfi Zadeh of UCB in the 1960's as a means to model the uncertainty of natural language.Any specific theory may be generalised from a discrete (or crisp) form to a continuous (fuzzy) form, e.g. fuzzy calculus, fuzzy differential equations of truth that X has that property. We can combine such values using the standard definitions of fuzzy logic: truth(not x) = 1.0 - truth(x)truth(x and y) = minimum (truth(x), truth(y)) Boolean counterparts. This is known as the extension principle.Just as a Boolean predicate asserts that its argument definitely belongs to some subset of all objects, a fuzzy predicate gives the degree of truth with which its argument belongs to a fuzzy subset.Usenet newsgroup: comp.ai.fuzzy.E-mail servers: , . , . . . , includes a few fuzzy tools.[H.J. Zimmerman, Fuzzy Sets, Decision Making and Expert Systems, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1987].[Fuzzy Logic, State of the Art, Ed. R. Lowen, Marc Roubens, Theory and Decision Library, D: System theory, Knowledge Engineering and Problem Solving 12, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1993, ISBN 0-7923-2324-6]. (1995-02-21)

games "games" "The time you enjoy wasting is not time wasted." -- {Bertrand Russell}. Here are some games-related pages on the {Web}: {Imperial Nomic (http://mit.edu:8001/people/achmed/fascist/)}, {Thoth's games and recreations page (http://cis.ufl.edu/~thoth/library/recreation.html)}, {Games Domain (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/GamesDomain)}, {Zarf's List of Games on the Web (http://leftfoot.com/games.html)}, {Dave's list of pointers to games resources (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/~djh/index.html)}, {Collaborative Fiction (http://asylum.cid.com/fiction/fiction.html)}. See also {3DO}, {ADL}, {ADVENT}, {ADVSYS}, {alpha/beta pruning}, {Amiga}, {CHIP-8}, {Core Wars}, {DROOL}, {empire}, {I see no X here.}, {Infocom}, {Inglish}, {initgame}, {life}, {minimax}, {moria}, {mudhead}, {multi-user Dimension}, {nethack}, {ogg}, {plugh}, {rogue}, {SPACEWAR}, {virtual reality}, {wizard mode}, {wumpus}, {xyzzy}, {ZIL}, {zorkmid}. See also {game theory}. (1996-03-03)

GASP 1. "library" {Graph Algorithm and Software Package}. 2. "simulation" {General Activities Simulation Program}. 3. "simulation" {General Aerodynamic Simulation Program}.

General Activities Simulation Program "simulation, library" (GASP) A set of {discrete system} {simulation} {subroutines} for {Fortran}. (2003-09-27)

General Activities Simulation Program ::: (simulation, library) (GASP) A set of discrete system simulation subroutines for Fortran.(2003-09-27)

gensym "library" /jen'sim/ (From the {MacLISP} for "generated symbol") To invent a new name for something temporary, in such a way that the name is almost certainly not in conflict with one already in use. The canonical form of a gensym is "Gnnnn" where nnnn represents a number; any {LISP} {hacker} would recognise G0093 (for example) as a gensym. Gensymmed names are useful for storing or uniquely identifying crufties. [{Jargon File}] (1999-10-31)

gensym ::: (library) /jen'sim/ (From the MacLISP for generated symbol) To invent a new name for something temporary, in such a way that the name is almost certainly not in conflict with one already in use.The canonical form of a gensym is Gnnnn where nnnn represents a number; any LISP hacker would recognise G0093 (for example) as a gensym. Gensymmed names are useful for storing or uniquely identifying crufties.[Jargon File] (1999-10-31)

George Boole ::: (person) 1815-11-02 - 1864-12-08. An English mathematician best known for his contribution to symbolic logic (Boolean Algebra) but also active in other equations. He lived, taught, and is buried in Cork City, Ireland. The Boole library at University College Cork is named after him.For centuries philosophers have studied logic, which is orderly and precise reasoning. George Boole argued in 1847 that logic should be allied with mathematics rather than with philosophy.Demonstrating logical principles with mathematical symbols instead of words, he founded symbolic logic, a field of mathematical/philosophical study. In the new of binary computer circuits and telephone switching equipment. These devices make use of Boole's two-valued (presence or absence of a property) system.Born in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK, George Boole was the son of a tradesman and was largely self-taught. He began teaching at the age of 16 to help support his symbolic logic. Two years later he was appointed professor of mathematics at Queen's College in Ireland, even though he had never studied at a university.He died in Ballintemple, Ireland, on 1864-12-08. . (1998-11-19)

George Boole "person" 1815-11-02 - 2008-05-11 22:58 best known for his contribution to symbolic logic ({Boolean Algebra}) but also active in other fields such as probability theory, {algebra}, analysis, and differential equations. He lived, taught, and is buried in Cork City, Ireland. The Boole library at University College Cork is named after him. For centuries philosophers have studied logic, which is orderly and precise reasoning. George Boole argued in 1847 that logic should be allied with mathematics rather than with philosophy. Demonstrating logical principles with mathematical symbols instead of words, he founded {symbolic logic}, a field of mathematical/philosophical study. In the new discipline he developed, known as {Boolean algebra}, all objects are divided into separate classes, each with a given property; each class may be described in terms of the presence or absence of the same property. An electrical circuit, for example, is either on or off. Boolean algebra has been applied in the design of {binary} computer circuits and telephone switching equipment. These devices make use of Boole's two-valued (presence or absence of a property) system. Born in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK, George Boole was the son of a tradesman and was largely self-taught. He began teaching at the age of 16 to help support his family. In his spare time he read mathematical journals and soon began to write articles for them. By the age of 29, Boole had received a gold medal for his work from the British Royal Society. His 'Mathematical Analysis of Logic', a pamphlet published in 1847, contained his first statement of the principles of symbolic logic. Two years later he was appointed professor of mathematics at Queen's College in Ireland, even though he had never studied at a university. He died in Ballintemple, Ireland, on 1864-12-08. {Compton's Encyclopedia Online (http://comptons2.aol.com/encyclopedia/ARTICLES/00619_A.html)}. (1998-11-19)

GINA Generic Interactive Application. An {application framework} based on {Common Lisp} and {OSF}/{Motif}, designed to simplify the construction of graphical interactive applications. GINA consists of {CLM} - a language binding for {OSF}/{Motif} in {Common Lisp}; the GINA application framework - a {class library} in {CLOS}; the GINA interface builder - an interactive tool implemented with GINA to design {Motif} windows. Version 2.2 requires {OSF}/{Motif} 1.1 or better, {Common Lisp} with {CLX}, {CLOS}, {PCL} and processes. It runs with {Franz Allegro}, {Lucid}, {CMU CL} and {Symbolics} {Genera}. {Germany (ftp://ftp.gmd.de/gmd/gina)}. {N. America (ftp://export.lcs.mit.edu/contrib/)}. Mailing list: gina-users-request@gmdzi.gmd.de. (1994-11-02)

GINA ::: Generic Interactive Application. An application framework based on Common Lisp and OSF/Motif, designed to simplify the construction of graphical interactive applications.GINA consists of CLM - a language binding for OSF/Motif in Common Lisp; the GINA application framework - a class library in CLOS; the GINA interface builder - an interactive tool implemented with GINA to design Motif windows.Version 2.2 requires OSF/Motif 1.1 or better, Common Lisp with CLX, CLOS, PCL and processes. It runs with Franz Allegro, Lucid, CMU CL and Symbolics Genera. . Mailing list: (1994-11-02)

GIP ::: 1. General Interpretive Programme.A 1956 interpreted language for the English Electric DEUCE, with array operations and an extensive library of numerical methods.[Interpretive and Brick Schemes, with Special Reference to Matrix Operations, English Electric COmpany, DEUCE News No. 10 (1956)]. (1994-11-02)2. An erroneous singular of GIPS.

GIP 1. General Interpretive Programme. A 1956 interpreted language for the {English Electric} {DEUCE}, with {array} operations and an extensive library of numerical methods. ["Interpretive and Brick Schemes, with Special Reference to Matrix Operations", English Electric COmpany, DEUCE News No. 10 (1956)]. (1994-11-02) 2. An erroneous singular of {GIPS}.

glibc {GNU C Library}

Glish ::: Glish is an interpretive language for building loosely-coupled distributed systems from modular, event-oriented programs. Written by Vern Paxson . These programs are written in conventional languages such as C, C++, or Fortran.Glish scripts can create local and remote processes and control their communication. Glish also provides a full, array-oriented programming language modification and rerouting of data values, but Glish also supports point-to-point links between processes when necessary for high performance.Version 2.4.1 includes an interpreter, C++ class library and user manual. It requires C++ and there are ports to SunOS, Ultrix, an HP/UX (rusty). .[Glish: A User-Level Software Bus for Loosely-Coupled Distributed Systems, Vern Paxson and Chris Saltmarsh, Proceedings of the 1993 Winter USENIX Conference, San Diego, CA, January, 1993]. (1993-11-01)

Glish Glish is an interpretive language for building loosely-coupled distributed systems from modular, event-oriented programs. Written by Vern Paxson "vern@ee.lbl.gov". These programs are written in conventional languages such as C, C++, or Fortran. Glish scripts can create local and remote processes and control their communication. Glish also provides a full, array-oriented programming language (similar to {S}) for manipulating binary data sent between the processes. In general Glish uses a centralised communication model where interprocess communication passes through the Glish {interpreter}, allowing dynamic modification and rerouting of data values, but Glish also supports point-to-point links between processes when necessary for high performance. Version 2.4.1 includes an {interpreter}, {C++} {class} library and user manual. It requires C++ and there are ports to {SunOS}, {Ultrix}, an {HP/UX} (rusty). {(ftp://ftp.ee.lbl.gov/glish/glish-2.4.1.tar.Z)}. ["Glish: A User-Level Software Bus for Loosely-Coupled Distributed Systems," Vern Paxson and Chris Saltmarsh, Proceedings of the 1993 Winter USENIX Conference, San Diego, CA, January, 1993]. (1993-11-01)

GNU BC ::: A GNU version of BC which is self-contained and internally executes its own compiled code rather than acting as a front-end to DC like the standard Unix bc.Version 1.02parser (yacc), interpreter, BC math libraryPhilip A. Nelson FTP bc-1.02.tar.Z from a GNU archive site.requires: vsprintf and vfprintf routinesports: Unix (BSD, System V, MINIX, POSIX) Superset of POSIX BC (P10003.2/D11), with a POSIX-only mode.

GNU BC A {GNU} version of {BC} which is self-contained and internally executes its own compiled code rather than acting as a {front-end} to {DC} like the standard {Unix} bc. Version 1.02 parser (yacc), interpreter, BC math library Philip A. Nelson "phil@cs.wwu.edu" FTP bc-1.02.tar.Z from a {GNU archive site}. requires: vsprintf and vfprintf routines ports: Unix (BSD, System V, MINIX, POSIX) Superset of POSIX BC (P10003.2/D11), with a POSIX-only mode.

GNU C Library ::: (library) (glibc) The run-time library for the GNU C compiler, gcc, and others. glibc is the source code for libc.a. It is maintained separately from the compilers and is a superset of ANSI C and POSIX.1 and a large subset of POSIX.2.Current version: 2.1.3, as of 2000-04-29 .Mailing list: (bugs).(2000-05-31)

GNU C Library "library" (glibc) The {run-time} library for the {GNU C} {compiler}, {gcc}, and others. glibc is the {source code} for libc.a. It is maintained separately from the compilers and is a superset of {ANSI C} and {POSIX}.1 and a large subset of POSIX.2. {(http://gnu.org/glibc)}. Mailing list: "bug-glibc@gnu.org" (bugs). (2000-05-31)

GNU Smalltalk "language" A {GNU} version of {Smalltalk}, by Steven Byrne "sbb@eng.sun.com". Version 1.1.1, {FTP} from your nearest {GNU archive site}. {msgGUI} is a {graphical user interface} library for GNU Smalltalk. (1991-09-15)

GNU Smalltalk ::: (language) A GNU version of Smalltalk, by Steven Byrne .Version 1.1.1,FTP from your nearest GNU archive site.msgGUI is a graphical user interface library for GNU Smalltalk. (1991-09-15)

GNUStep ::: (operating system) A GNU implementation of OpenStep. Work has started on an implementation using an existing library written in Objective-C. Much work remains to be done to bring this library close to the OpenStep specifications. Adam Fedor is head of the project. .[Current status? Newsgroup?] (1999-11-25)

GNUStep "operating system" A {GNU} implementation of {OpenStep}. Work has started on an implementation using an existing library written in {Objective-C}. Much work remains to be done to bring this library close to the OpenStep specifications. Adam Fedor is head of the project. {(http://gnustep.org/)}. [Current status? Newsgroup?] (1999-11-25)

GObject Introspection "programming" A {GNOME} project that defines a {syntax} for {introspection annotation} {pragmas} to be used in the {GObject library} {source code}. Rather than actual {introspection}, these are intended to allow automatic generation of {bindings} ({API}s) to expose the library to higher-level languages. The sort of information provided is the type and direction (in, out, inout) of function parameters and the responsibility for freeing memory used by data structures. {GObject Introspection Home (http://live.gnome.org/GObjectIntrospection/)}. (2010-01-19)

God). New York: Columbia University Library.

Good Thing "convention" (From the 1930 Sellar and Yeatman parody "1066 And All That") Often capitalised; always pronounced as if capitalised. 1. Self-evidently wonderful to anyone in a position to notice: "The {Trailblazer}'s 19.2 K{baud} {PEP} mode with {on-the-fly} {Lempel-Ziv compression} is a Good Thing for sites relaying {netnews}". 2. Something that can't possibly have any ill side-effects and may save considerable grief later: "Removing the {self-modifying code} from that {shared library} would be a Good Thing". 3. When said of software tools or libraries, as in "{Yacc} is a Good Thing", specifically connotes that the thing has drastically reduced a programmer's work load. Opposite: {Bad Thing}, compare {big win}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-05-07)

Good Thing ::: (convention) (From the 1930 Sellar and Yeatman parody 1066 And All That) Often capitalised; always pronounced as if capitalised.1. Self-evidently wonderful to anyone in a position to notice: The Trailblazer's 19.2 Kbaud PEP mode with on-the-fly Lempel-Ziv compression is a Good Thing for sites relaying netnews.2. Something that can't possibly have any ill side-effects and may save considerable grief later: Removing the self-modifying code from that shared library would be a Good Thing.3. When said of software tools or libraries, as in Yacc is a Good Thing, specifically connotes that the thing has drastically reduced a programmer's work load.Opposite: Bad Thing, compare big win.[Jargon File] (1995-05-07)

Graph Algorithm and Software Package "library" (GASP) A {PL/I} extension for programming graph {algorithms}. ["GASP - Gprah Algorithm Software Package", S. Chase, TR CS Dept, U Illinois, Dec 1969]. (1998-02-27)

Graph Algorithm and Software Package ::: (library) (GASP) A PL/I extension for programming graph algorithms.[GASP - Gprah Algorithm Software Package, S. Chase, TR CS Dept, U Illinois, Dec 1969]. (1998-02-27)

GTK+ ::: (graphics, interface, library, open source) (The GIMP ToolKit, or (bogusly) Gnu ToolKit or Generic ToolKit) A multi-platform toolkit for suitable for projects ranging from small one-off projects to complete application suites.GTK+ consists of the three parts; GLib, providing basic data structures, event handling, threads, etc., Pango, for layout and rendering of text, and ATK, providing interfaces for accessibility. .(2003-12-03)

GTK+ "graphics, interface, library, open source" ("The {GIMP} ToolKit", or incorrectly "{Gnu} ToolKit" or "Generic ToolKit") A {multi-platform} toolkit for creating {graphical user interfaces}. Offering a complete set of {widgets}, GTK+ is suitable for projects ranging from small one-off projects to complete application suites. GTK+ consists of the three parts; {GLib}, providing basic data structures, {event handling}, {threads}, etc., {Pango}, for {layout} and {rendering} of text, and {ATK}, providing interfaces for {accessibility}. {GTK+ Home (http://gtk.org/)}. (2003-12-03)

hand for books in my own library. Instead, in my then state of pneumatic innocence, I looked

Haskell B "language" An early version of {Haskell} by Lennart Augustsson "augustss@cs.chalmers.se" from {Chalmers}. Haskell B evolved into a full-featured implementation of Haskell 1.2, with quite a few extensions. Ports exist for many {platforms} including {Sun}, {DEC}, {Sequent}, {IBM PC}, {Symmetry} and unsupported versions for {NS32000}, {IBM RT/PC}, {Cray}, {Sun-3}, {Vax}, {ARM}, and {RS/6000}. Version 0.999.5 included a compiler, interpreter, library, documentation, and examples. {(ftp://ftp.cs.chalmers.se/pub/haskell/chalmers/)}. Mailing list: "haskell-request@cs.yale.edu". E-mail: "hbc@cs.chalmers.se". (1996-08-21)

Haskell B ::: (language) An early version of Haskell by Lennart Augustsson from Chalmers. Haskell B evolved into a full-featured implementation of Haskell 1.2, with quite a few extensions.Ports exist for many platforms including Sun, DEC, Sequent, IBM PC, Symmetry and unsupported versions for NS32000, IBM RT/PC, Cray, Sun-3, Vax, ARM, and RS/6000.Version 0.999.5 included a compiler, interpreter, library, documentation, and examples. .Mailing list: .E-mail: . (1996-08-21)

HBOOK ::: A histogramming package in the CERN program library.

HBOOK A histogramming package in the CERN program library.

Hierarchical Data Format ::: (file format, data) (HDF) A library and multi-object file format for the transfer of graphical and numerical data between computeres. The freely available HDF distribution consists of the library, command line utilities, test suite source, Java interface, and the Java-based HDF Viewer (JHV).HDF supports several different data models, including multidimensional arrays, raster images, and tables. Each defines a specific aggregate data type and provides an API for reading, writing, and organising the data and metadata. New data models can be added by the HDF developers or users.HDF is self-describing, allowing an application to interpret the structure and contents of a file without any outside information.One HDF file can hold a mixture of related objects which can be accessed as a group or as individual objects. Users can create their own grouping structures called vgroups.HDF files can be shared across most common platforms, including many workstations and high performance computers. An HDF file created on one computer can be read on a different system without modification. .(2001-07-02)

Hierarchical Data Format "file format, data" (HDF) A {library} and multi-object file format for the transfer of graphical and numerical data between computeres. The freely available HDF distribution consists of the library, command line utilities, test suite source, {Java} interface, and the Java-based HDF Viewer (JHV). HDF supports several different {data models}, including multidimensional {arrays}, {raster images}, and tables. Each defines a specific aggregate data type and provides an {API} for reading, writing, and organising the data and {metadata}. New data models can be added by the HDF developers or users. HDF is self-describing, allowing an application to interpret the structure and contents of a file without any outside information. One HDF file can hold a mixture of related objects which can be accessed as a group or as individual objects. Users can create their own grouping structures called "vgroups". HDF files can be shared across most common {platforms}, including many workstations and high performance computers. An HDF file created on one computer can be read on a different system without modification. {(http://hdf.ncsa.uiuc.edu/)}. (2001-07-02)

hosts file "networking" A {text file} on a networked computer used to associate {host names} with {IP addresses}. A hosts file contains lines consisting of {whitespace}-separated fields giving an IP address followed by list of host names or {aliases} associated with that address. The {name resolution} library software can use this file to look up the IP address for a host name. The hosts file is "/etc/hosts" on {Unix} and "C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts" or "lmhosts" on {Microsoft Windows}, In most cases, hosts files have now been almost entirely replaced by {DNS}, in which distributed servers provide the same information. A hosts file can still be used to override DNS for testing purposes or other special situations. (2007-05-09)

Hsi-tsang (Chinese) [from hsi west + tsang (cf Tibet tsan) a central province of Tibet whose most important city is Shigatse] Blavatsky spells Si-dzang. The name for Tibet “mentioned in the MSS. of the sacred library of the province of Fo-Kien [Fu-chien], as the great seat of Occult learning from time immemorial, ages before Buddha” (SD 1:271n).

Hungarian Notation "language, convention" A linguistic convention requiring one or more letters to be added to the start of {variable} names to denote {scope} and/or {type}. Hungarian Notation is mainly confined to {Microsoft Windows} programming environments, such as Microsoft {C}, {C++} and {Visual Basic}. It was originally devised by {Charles Simonyi}, a Hungarian, who was a senior programmer at {Microsoft} for many years. He disliked the way that names in C programs gave no clue as to the type, leading to frequent programmer errors. According to legend, fellow programmers at Microsoft, on seeing the convoluted, vowel-less variable names produced by his scheme, said, "This might as well be in Greek - or even Hungarian!". They made up the name "Hungarian notation" (possibly with "{reverse Polish notation}" in mind). Hungarian Notation is not really necessary when using a modern {strongly-typed language} as the {compiler} warns the programmer if a variable of one type is used as if it were another type. It is less useful in {object-oriented programming} languages such as {C++}, where many variables are going to be instances of {classes} and so begin with "obj". In addition, variable names are essentially only {comments}, and thus are just as susceptible to becoming out-of-date and incorrect as any other comment. For example, if a {signed} {short} {int} becomes an unsigned {long} int, the variable name, and every use of it, should be changed to reflect its new type. A variable's name should describe the values it holds. Type and scope are aspects of this, but Hungarian Notation overemphasises their importance by allocating so much of the start of the name to them. Furthermore, type and scope information can be found from the variable's declaration. Ironically, this is particularly easy in the development environments in which Hungarian Notation is typically used. {Simonyi's original monograph (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/techart/hunganotat.htm)}. {Microsoft VB Naming Conventions (http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q110/2/64.asp)}. (2003-09-11)

Hungry ViewKit "operating system, library" A {C++} {class} library for developing {Motif} {application programs} (although this restriction will be lifted once {LessTif} is finished). It follows the {API} of the {Iris}(tm) {ViewKit}, put out by {SGI}. The Hungry ViewKit is a superset of the Iris ViewKit, so any code developed for the Iris version will work with the Hungry version, but possibly not vice versa. {(http://hungry.com/products/viewkit/)}. (1995-03-20)

Hungry ViewKit ::: (operating system, library) A C++ class library for developing Motif application programs (although this restriction will be lifted once LessTif is Hungry ViewKit is a superset of the Iris ViewKit, so any code developed for the Iris version will work with the Hungry version, but possibly not vice versa. . (1995-03-20)

Hurd ::: (operating system) The GNU project's replacement for the Unix kernel. The Hurd is a collection of servers that run on the Mach microkernel to implement Library provides the Unix system call interface, and calls the Hurd for services it can't provide itself.The Hurd aims to establish a framework for shared development and maintenance, allowing a broad range of users to share projects without knowing much about the without freely available source, a well-designed interface, and a multi-server-based design.Currently there are free ports of the Mach kernel to the Intel 80386 IBM PC, the DEC PMAX workstation, the Luna 88k, with more in progress, including the Amiga and DEC Alpha-3000 machines.According to Thomas Bushnell, BSG, the primary architect of the Hurd: 'Hurd' stands for 'Hird of Unix-Replacing Daemons' and 'Hird' stands for 'Hurd of Interfaces Representing Depth'. Possibly the first software to be named by a pair of mutually recursive acronyms. .[June 1994 GNU's Bulletin].(2004-02-24)

Hurd "operating system" The {GNU} project's replacement for the {Unix} {kernel}. The Hurd is a collection of {servers} that run on the {Mach} {microkernel} to implement {file systems}, {network protocols}, file access control, and other features that are implemented by the Unix kernel or similar kernels such as {Linux}. The GNU {C Library} provides the {Unix} {system call} interface, and calls the Hurd for services it can't provide itself. The Hurd aims to establish a framework for shared development and maintenance, allowing a broad range of users to share projects without knowing much about the internal workings of the system - projects that might never have been attempted without freely available source, a well-designed interface, and a multi-server-based design. Currently there are free ports of the {Mach} {kernel} to the {Intel 80386} {IBM PC}, the {DEC} {PMAX} {workstation}, the {Luna} {88k}, with more in progress, including the {Amiga} and {DEC} {Alpha}-3000 machines. According to Thomas Bushnell, BSG, the primary architect of the Hurd: 'Hurd' stands for 'Hird of Unix-Replacing Daemons' and 'Hird' stands for 'Hurd of Interfaces Representing Depth'. Possibly the first software to be named by a pair of {mutually recursive} acronyms. {The Hurd Home (http://gnu.org/software/hurd/hurd.html)}. [June 1994 GNU's Bulletin]. (2004-02-24)

Hytelnet "networking" A {hypertext} database of publicly accessible {Internet} sites created and maintained by Peter Scott "scottp@moondog.usask.ca". Hytelnet currently lists over 1400 sites, including Libraries, Campus-Wide Information Systems, {Gopher}, {WAIS}, {WWW} and {Freenets}. Hytelnet software is available for the {IBM PC}, {Macintosh}, {Unix} and {VMS} systems. {(ftp://ftp.usask.ca/pub/hytelnet)} (128.233.3.11). {Telnet (telnet://access.usask.ca/)}, login: hytelnet. Mailing list: listserv@library.berkeley.edu (no subject, body: subscribe hytelnet FirstName LastName). (1995-10-18)

IBM System/36 "computer" A mid-range {computer} introduced in 1983, which remained popular in the 1990s because of its low cost and high performance. Prices started in the $20k range for the small 5362 to $100+k for the expanded 5360. In 1994, IBM introduced the Advanced 36 for $9,000. The largest 5360 had 7MB of {RAM} and 1432MB of {hard disk}. The smallest 5362 had 256K of RAM and 30MB of hard disk. The Advanced 36 had 64MB of RAM and 4300MB of hard disk, but design issues limit the amount of storage that can actually be addressed by the {operating system}; underlying {microcode} allowed additional RAM to cache disk reads and writes, allowing the Advanced 36 to outperform the S/36 by 600 to 800%. There was only one operating system for the S/36: SSP ({System Support Product}). SSP consumed about 7-10MB of hard drive space. Computer programs on the S/36 reside in "libraries," and the SSP itself resides in a special system library called

IBM System/36 ::: (computer) A mid-range computer introduced in 1983, which remained popular in the 1990s because of its low cost and high performance. Prices started in the $20k range for the small 5362 to $100+k for the expanded 5360. In 1994, IBM introduced the Advanced 36 for $9,000.The largest 5360 had 7MB of RAM and 1432MB of hard disk. The smallest 5362 had 256K of RAM and 30MB of hard disk. The Advanced 36 had 64MB of RAM and 4300MB of to cache disk reads and writes, allowing the Advanced 36 to outperform the S/36 by 600 to 800%.There was only one operating system for the S/36: SSP (System Support Product). SSP consumed about 7-10MB of hard drive space. Computer programs on the S/36 reside in libraries, and the SSP itself resides in a special system library called

icon "graphics" A small picture intended to represent something (a file, directory, or action) in a {graphical user interface}. When an icon is clicked on, some action is performed such as opening a directory or aborting a file transfer. Icons are usually stored as {bitmap} images. {Microsoft Windows} uses a special bitmap format with file name extension ".ico" as well as embedding icons in executable (".exe") and {Dynamically Linked Library} (DLL) files. The term originates from {Alan Kay}'s theory for designing interfaces which was primarily based on the work of Jerome Bruner. Bruner's second developmental stage, iconic, uses a system of representation that depends on visual or other sensory organization and upon the use of summarising images. {IEEE publication (http://ieee.org/organizations/history_center/cht_papers/Barnes.pdf)}. [What MS tool can create .ico files?] (2003-08-01)

icon ::: (graphics) A small picture intended to represent something (a file, directory, or action) in a graphical user interface. When an icon is clicked on, some action is performed such as opening a directory or aborting a file transfer.Icons are usually stored as bitmap images. Microsoft Windows uses a special bitmap format with file name extension .ico as well as embedding icons in executable (.exe) and Dynamically Linked Library (DLL) files.The term originates from Alan Kay's theory for designing interfaces which was primarily based on the work of Jerome Bruner. Bruner's second developmental stage, iconic, uses a system of representation that depends on visual or other sensory organization and upon the use of summarising images. .[What MS tool can create .ico files?](2003-08-01)

Icon "language" A descendant of {SNOBOL4} with {Pascal}-like syntax, produced by Griswold in the 1970's. Icon is a general-purpose language with special features for string scanning. It has dynamic types: records, sets, lists, strings, tables. If has some {object oriented} features but no {modules} or {exceptions}. It has a primitive {Unix} interface. The central theme of Icon is the generator: when an expression is evaluated it may be suspended and later resumed, producing a result sequence of values until it fails. Resumption takes place implicitly in two contexts: iteration which is syntactically loop-like ('every-do'), and goal-directed evaluation in which a conditional expression automatically attempts to produce at least one result. Expressions that fail are used in lieu of Booleans. Data {backtracking} is supported by a reversible {assignment}. Icon also has {co-expressions}, which can be explicitly resumed at any time. Version 8.8 by Ralph Griswold "ralph@cs.arizona.edu" includes an {interpreter}, a compiler (for some {platforms}) and a library (v8.8). Icon has been ported to {Amiga}, {Atari}, {CMS}, {Macintosh}, {Macintosh/MPW}, {MS-DOS}, {MVS}, {OS/2}, {Unix}, {VMS}, {Acorn}. See also {Ibpag2}. {(ftp://cs.arizona.edu/icon/)}, {MS-DOS FTP (ftp://bellcore.com norman/iconexe.zip)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.lang.icon}. E-mail: "icon-project@cs.arizona.edu", "mengarini@delphi.com". Mailing list: icon-group@arizona.edu. ["The Icon Programmming Language", Ralph E. Griswold and Madge T. Griswold, Prentice Hall, seond edition, 1990]. ["The Implementation of the Icon Programmming Language", Ralph E. Griswold and Madge T. Griswold, Princeton University Press 1986]. (1992-08-21)

IGL ::: Interactive Graphic Language. Used primarily by Physics Dept at Brooklyn Poly, uses numerical methods on vectors to approximate continuous function problems that don't have closed form solutions.[Is this being confused with Tektronix's graphics library by the same name?]

IGL Interactive Graphic Language. Used primarily by Physics Dept at Brooklyn Poly, uses numerical methods on vectors to approximate continuous function problems that don't have closed form solutions. [Is this being confused with Tektronix's graphics library by the same name?]

-. In East and West Library. London, 1949.

Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) A method of organising the system and network management departments of large organisations. ITIL defines the (work) processes involved and the interfaces between them. (1995-06-27)

Information Technology Infrastructure Library ::: (ITIL) A method of organising the system and network management departments of large organisations. ITIL defines the (work) processes involved and the interfaces between them. (1995-06-27)

In his economic and political writings, Lenin extended and developed the doctrines of Marx and Engels especially in their application to a phase of capitalism which emerged fully only after their death -- imperialism. In the same fashion Lenin built upon and further extended the Marxist doctrine of the state in his "State and Revolution", written just before the revolution of 1917. In this work Lenin develops a concept like the dictatorship of the proletariat which Marx treated only briefly and generally, elaborates a distinction like that between socialism and communism, only implicit in Marx's work, and asserts a thesis like the possibility of socialism in one country, towards which Marx was negative in the light of conditions as he knew them. After the Bolsheviks came to power, Lenin headed the government until his death on January 21, 1924. In Russian, Lenin's "Collected Works" comprise thirty volumes, with about thirty additional volumes of miscellaneous writings ("Leninskie Sborniki"). The principal English translations are the "Collected Works", to comprise thirty volumes (of which five in eight books have been published to date), the "Selected Works" comprising twelve volumes (for philosophical materials, see especially Volume XI, "Theoretical Principles of Marxism"), and the Little Lenin Library, made up mostly of shorter works, comprising 27 volumes to date. -- J.M.S.

installable file system "operating system" (IFS or "File System Driver", "FSD") An {API} that allows you to extend {OS/2} to access files stored on disk in formats other than {FAT} and {HPFS}, and access files that are stored on a {network file server}. For example an IFS could provide programs running under OS/2 (including DOS and Windows programs) with access to files stored under {Unix} using the {Berkeley fast file system}. The other variety of IFS (a "remote file system" or "redirector") allows file sharing over a {LAN}, e.g. using Unix's {Network File System} {protocol}. In this case, the IFS passes a program's file access requests to a remote file server, possibly also translating between different file attributes used by OS/2 and the remote system. Documentation on the IFS API has been available only by special request from IBM. An IFS is structured as an ordinary 16-bit {DLL} with entry points for opening, closing, reading, and writing files, the swapper, file locking, and {Universal Naming Convention}. The main part of an IFS that runs in {ring} 0 is called by the OS/2 {kernel} in the context of the caller's process and {thread}. The other part that runs in ring 3 is a utility library with entry points for FORMAT, RECOVER, SYS, and CHKDSK. {EDM/2 article (http://edm2.com/0103/)}. (1999-04-07)

installable file system ::: (operating system) (IFS or File System Driver, FSD) An API that allows you to extend OS/2 to access files stored on disk in formats other than FAT and HPFS, and access files that are stored on a network file server.For example an IFS could provide programs running under OS/2 (including DOS and Windows programs) with access to files stored under Unix using the Berkeley fast file system.The other variety of IFS (a remote file system or redirector) allows file sharing over a LAN, e.g. using Unix's Network File System protocol. In this possibly also translating between different file attributes used by OS/2 and the remote system.Documentation on the IFS API has been available only by special request from IBM.An IFS is structured as an ordinary 16-bit DLL with entry points for opening, closing, reading, and writing files, the swapper, file locking, and Universal that runs in ring 3 is a utility library with entry points for FORMAT, RECOVER, SYS, and CHKDSK. . (1999-04-07)

INTERCAL "language, humour" /in't*r-kal/ (Said by the authors to stand for "Compiler Language With No Pronounceable Acronym"). Possibly the most elaborate and long-lived joke in the history of programming languages. It was designed on 1972-05-26 by Don Woods and Jim Lyons at Princeton University. INTERCAL is purposely different from all other computer languages in all ways but one; it is purely a written language, being totally unspeakable. The INTERCAL Reference Manual, describing features of horrifying uniqueness, became an underground classic. An excerpt will make the style of the language clear: It is a well-known and oft-demonstrated fact that a person whose work is incomprehensible is held in high esteem. For example, if one were to state that the simplest way to store a value of 65536 in a 32-bit INTERCAL variable is:   DO :1 "-

INTERCAL ::: (language, humour) /in't*r-kal/ (Said by the authors to stand for Compiler Language With No Pronounceable Acronym).Possibly the most elaborate and long-lived joke in the history of programming languages. It was designed on 1972-05-26 by Don Woods and Jim Lyons at Princeton University.INTERCAL is purposely different from all other computer languages in all ways but one; it is purely a written language, being totally unspeakable. The INTERCAL Reference Manual, describing features of horrifying uniqueness, became an underground classic. An excerpt will make the style of the language clear:It is a well-known and oft-demonstrated fact that a person whose work is incomprehensible is held in high esteem. For example, if one were to state that the simplest way to store a value of 65536 in a 32-bit INTERCAL variable is: DO :1 -

Internet Foundation Classes ::: (language, library, programming, standard) (IFC) A library of classes used in the creation of Java applets with GUIs.Created by Netscape, the Internet Foundation Classes provide GUI elements, as well as classes for Applications Services, Security, Messaging, and Distributed Objects.The IFC code, which is exclusively Java, is layered on top of the Java Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT), thus preserving platform independence.The AWT and IFC collectively form the Java Foundation Classes, which provide a standardised framework for developing powerful Java applications. .(2003-08-17)

Internet Foundation Classes "language, library, programming, standard" (IFC) A {library} of {classes} used in the creation of {Java} {applets} with {GUIs}. Created by {Netscape}, the Internet Foundation Classes provide GUI elements, as well as classes for {Applications Services}, {Security}, {Messaging}, and {Distributed Objects}. The IFC code, which is exclusively Java, is layered on top of the Java {Abstract Windowing Toolkit} (AWT), thus preserving {platform independence}. The AWT and IFC collectively form the {Java Foundation Classes}, which provide a standardised framework for developing powerful Java applications. {IFC download (http://wp.netscape.com/eng/ifc/download.html)}. (2003-08-17)

Internet Public Library (IPL) A project at the {University of Michigan} School of Information and Library Studies to provide an on-line, 24 hour public library, chaired by an assemblage of librarians and information industry professionals. The library aims to provide library services to a target audience estimated to number 1/4 of the entire American population by the end of the century. The Internet Public Library is scheduled to go on-line in March 1995. Among the first services will be on-line reference; youth services; user education; and professional services for librarians. {(http://ipl.sils.umich.edu/)}. {(telnet://ipl.sils.umich.edu/)}. Mailing list: majordomo@sils.umich.edu. (1995-07-20)

Internet Public Library ::: (IPL) A project at the University of Michigan School of Information and Library Studies to provide an on-line, 24 hour public library, chaired by an assemblage provide library services to a target audience estimated to number 1/4 of the entire American population by the end of the century.The Internet Public Library is scheduled to go on-line in March 1995. Among the first services will be on-line reference; youth services; user education; and professional services for librarians. . .Mailing list: (1995-07-20)

InterViews ::: An object-oriented toolkit developed at Stanford University for building graphical user interfaces. It is implemented in C++ and provides a library of objects and a set of protocols for composing them.

InterViews An object-oriented toolkit developed at Stanford University for building graphical user interfaces. It is implemented in C++ and provides a library of objects and a set of protocols for composing them.

In the Oriental Division of the New York Public Library where I was (and still am) a frequent

Intrinsics "operating system, graphics" A library package on top of {Xlib}, extending the basic functions of the {X Window System}. It provides mechanisms for building {widget sets} and application environments. (1996-08-26)

Intrinsics ::: (operating system, graphics) A library package on top of Xlib, extending the basic functions of the X Window System. It provides mechanisms for building widget sets and application environments. (1996-08-26)

Intuition "operating system" The {Amiga} {windowing system} (a shared-code library). (1997-08-01)

Intuition ::: (operating system) The Amiga windowing system (a shared-code library). (1997-08-01)

IPL ::: 1. Information Processing Language.2. Internet Public Library.3. Initial Program Load.4. Initial Program Loader. (1997-08-31)

IPL 1. {Information Processing Language}. 2. {Internet Public Library}. 3. {Initial Program Load}. 4. {Initial Program Loader}. (1997-08-31)

IRIS Explorer "mathematics, tool" {Numerical Algorithms Group} (NAG)'s tool for developing {visualisation} applications via a {visual programming environment}. IRIS Explorer has a range of visualisation techniques, from simple graphs to multidimensional animation, that can help show trends and relationships in data. IRIS Explorer uses standard {Open Inventor}, {ImageVision} and {OpenGL} libraries as well as NAG's own numerical libraries. It is available for Windows, Unix and Linux. It has a point-and-click interface and a library of "modules" (software routines). {IRIS Explorer home (http://www.nag.co.uk/Welcome_IEC.asp)}. (2008-09-04)

ITIL {Information Technology Infrastructure Library}

Java "programming, language" An {object-oriented}, {distributed}, {interpreted}, {architecture-neutral}, {portable}, {multithreaded}, dynamic, buzzword-compliant, general-purpose programming language developed by {Sun Microsystems} in the early 1990s (initially for set-top television controllers) and released to the public in 1995. Java was named after the Indonesian island, a source of {programming fluid}. Java first became popular as the earliest portable dynamic client-side content for the {web} in the form of {platform}-independent {Java applets}. In the late 1990s and into the 2000s it also became very popular on the server side, where an entire set of {APIs} defines the {J2EE}. Java is both a set of public specifications (controlled by {Oracle}, who bought {Sun Microsystems}, through the {JCP}) and a series of implementations of those specifications. Java is syntactially similar to {C++} without user-definable {operator overloading}, (though it does have {method} overloading), without {multiple inheritance} and extensive automatic {coercions}. It has automatic {garbage collection}. Java extends {C++}'s {object-oriented} facilities with those of {Objective C} for {dynamic method resolution}. Whereas programs in C++ and similar languages are compiled and linked to platform-specific binary executables, Java programs are typically compiled to portable {architecture-neutral} {bytecode} ".class" files, which are run using a {Java Virtual Machine}. The JVM is also called an {interpreter}, though it is more correct to say that it uses {Just-In-Time Compilation} to convert the {bytecode} into {native} {machine code}, yielding greater efficiency than most interpreted languages, rivalling C++ for many long-running, non-GUI applications. The run-time system is typically written in {POSIX}-compliant {ANSI C} or {C++}. Some implementations allow Java class files to be translated into {native} {machine code} during or after compilation. The Java compiler and {linker} both enforce {strong type checking} - procedures must be explicitly typed. Java aids in the creation of {virus}-free, tamper-free systems with {authentication} based on {public-key encryption}. Java has an extensive library of routines for all kinds of programming tasks, rivalling that of other languages. For example, the {java.net} package supports {TCP/IP} {protocols} like {HTTP} and {FTP}. Java applications can access objects across the {Internet} via {URLs} almost as easily as on the local {file system}. There are also capabilities for several types of distributed applications. The Java {GUI} libraries provide portable interfaces. For example, there is an abstract {Window} class with implementations for {Unix}, {Microsoft Windows} and the {Macintosh}. The {java.awt} and {javax.swing} classes can be used either in web-based {Applets} or in {client-side applications} or {desktop applications}. There are also packages for developing {XML} applications, {web services}, {servlets} and other web applications, {security}, date and time calculations and I/O formatting, database ({JDBC}), and many others. Java is not related to {JavaScript} despite the name. {(http://oracle.com/java)}. (2011-08-21)

Java ::: (programming, language, portability) (After the Indonesian island, a source of programming fluid) A simple, object-oriented, distributed, Sun Microsystems in the early 1990's (initially for set-top television controllers), and released to the public in 1995.Java first became popular by being the earliest portable dynamic client-side content for the World-Wide Web in the form of platform-independent Java applets. In the late 1990's and into the 2000's it has also become very popular on the server side, where an entire set of APIs defines the J2EE.Java is both a set of public specifications (controlled by Sun Microsystems through the JCP) and a series of implementations of those specifications.Java is syntactially similar to C++ without user-definable operator overloading, (though it does have method overloading), without multiple inheritance, and C++'s object-oriented facilities with those of Objective C for dynamic method resolution.Whereas programs in C++ and similar languages are compiled and linked to platform-specific binary executables, Java programs are typically compiled to implementations allow Java class files to be translated into native machine code during or after compilation.The Java compiler and linker both enforce strong type checking - procedures must be explicitly typed. Java supports the creation of virus-free, tamper-free systems with authentication based on public-key encryption.Java has an extensive library of routines for all kinds of programming tasks, rivalling that of other languages.For example, the java.net} package supports TCP/IP protocols like HTTP and FTP. Java applications can access objects across the Internet via URLs almost as easily as on the local file system. There are also capabilities for several types of distributed applications.The Java GUI libraries provide portable interfaces. For example, there is an abstract Window class and implementations of it for Unix, Microsoft Windows and the Macintosh. The java.awt and javax.swing classes can be used either in Web-based Applets or in client-side or desktop applications.There are also packages for developing XML applications, web services, servlets and other web applications, security, date and time calculations and I/O formatting, database (JDBC), and many others.Java is not directly related to JavaScript despite the name. .Usenet newsgroup: comp.lang.java.(2005-01-21)

JCOOL "language" A version of the {COOL} {C++} {class library} that uses real C++ {templates}. (2007-10-14)

Jossle "language" A type checked language with {separate compilation} using a program library. Mentioned in ["Rationale for the Design of Ada", J. Ichbiah, Cambridge U Press, 1986, p.192]. (2005-02-19)

Jossle ::: (language) A type checked language with separate compilation using a program library.Mentioned in [Rationale for the Design of Ada, J. Ichbiah, Cambridge U Press, 1986, p.192].(2005-02-19)

JSTL {JSP Standard Tag Library}

keyword 1. One of a fixed set of symbols built into the syntax of a language. Typical keywords would be if, then, else, print, goto, while, switch. There are usually restrictions about reusing keywords as names for user-defined objects such as variables or procedures. Languages vary as to what is provided as a keyword and what is a library routine, for example some languages provide keywords for input/output operations whereas in others these are library routines. 2. A small set of words designed to convey the subject of a technical article. Some publications specify a fixed set of keywords from which those for a particular article should be chosen.

keyword ::: 1. One of a fixed set of symbols built into the syntax of a language. Typical keywords would be if, then, else, print, goto, while, switch. There are usually what is a library routine, for example some languages provide keywords for input/output operations whereas in others these are library routines.2. A small set of words designed to convey the subject of a technical article. Some publications specify a fixed set of keywords from which those for a particular article should be chosen.

LEDA {Library of Efficient Data types and Algorithms}

-. Lesser Hechaloth. MS. in Hebrew, Bodleian Library,

LessTif "library" The {Hungry Programmers}' version of {OSF}/{Motif}. It will be source code compatible with Motif, meaning that the same source will compile with both libraries and work exactly the same. All the programming is being done with no reference to the header files for the motif widgets, so that LessTif can be distributed as {free software}. {(http://hungry.com/products/lesstif)}. (1995-03-20)

LessTif ::: (library) The Hungry Programmers' version of OSF/Motif. It will be source code compatible with Motif, meaning that the same source will compile with both reference to the header files for the motif widgets, so that LessTif can be distributed as free software. . (1995-03-20)

Liana "language" A {C}-like, interpretive, {object-oriented programming} language, {class} library, and integrated development environment designed specifically for development of {application programs} for {Microsoft Windows} and {Windows NT}. Designed by Jack Krupansky "Jack@BaseTechnology.com" of {Base Technology}, Liana was first released as a commercial product in August 1991. The language is designed to be as easy to use as {BASIC}, as concise as {C}, and as flexible as {Smalltalk}. The {OOP} {syntax} of {C++} was chosen over the less familiar syntax of {Smalltalk} and {Objective-C} to appeal to {C} programmers and in recognition of C++ being the leading OOP language. The syntax is a simplified subset of {C/C++}. The {semantics} are also a simplified subset of C/C++, but extended to achieve the flexibility of Smalltalk. Liana is a typeless language (like {Lisp}, {Snobol} and {Smalltalk}), which means that the datatypes of variables, function parameters, and function return values are not needed since values carry the type information. Hence, variables are simply containers for values and function parameters are simply pipes through which any type of value can flow. {Single inheritance}, but not {multiple inheritance}, is supported. {Memory management} is automatic using {reference counting}. The library includes over 150 {classes}, for {dynamic arrays}, {associative lookup} tables, windows, menus, dialogs, controls, bitmaps, cursors, icons, mouse movement, keyboard input, fonts, text and graphics display, {DDE}, and {MDI}. Liana provides flexible OOP support for Windows programming. For example, a {list box} automatically fills itself from an associated {object}. That object is not some sort of special object, but is merely any object that "behaves like" an array (i.e., has a "size" member function that returns the number of elements, a "get" function that returns the ith element, and the text for each element is returned by calling the "text" member function for the element). A related product, C-odeScript, is an embeddable application scripting language. It is an implementation of Liana which can be called from C/C++ applications to dynamically evaluate expressions and statement sequences. This can be used to offer the end-user a macro/scripting capability or to allow the C/C++ application to be customized without changing the C/C++ source code. Here's a complete Liana program which illustrates the flexibility of the language semantics and the power of the class library: main {  // Prompt user for a string.  // No declaration needed for "x" (becomes a global variable.)  x = ask ("Enter a String");  // Use "+" operator to concatenate strings. Memory  // management for string temporaries is automatic. The  // "message" function displays a Windows message box.  message ("You entered: " + x);  // Now x will take on a different type. The "ask_number"  // function will return a "real" if the user's input  // contains a decimal point or an "int" if no decimal  // point.  x = ask_number ("Enter a Number");  // The "+" operator with a string operand will  // automatically convert the other operand to a string.  message ("You entered: " + x);  // Prompt user for a Liana expression. Store it in a  // local variable (the type, string, is merely for  // documentation.)  string expr = ask ("Enter an Expression");  // Evaluate the expression. The return value of "eval"  // could be any type. The "source_format" member function  // converts any value to its source format (e.g., add  // quotes for a string.) The "class_name" member function  // return the name of the class of an object/value.  // Empty parens can be left off for member function calls.  x = eval (expr);  message ("The value of " + expr + " is " + x.source_format +    " its type is " + x.class_name); } The author explained that the "Li" of Liana stands for "Language interpreter" and liana are vines that grow up trees in tropical forests, which seemed quite appropriate for a tool to deal with the complexity of MS Windows! It is also a woman's name. ["Liana for Windows", Aitken, P., PC TECHNIQUES, Dec/Jan 1993]. ["Liana: A Language For Writing Windows Programs", Burk, R., Tech Specialist (R&D Publications), Sep 1991]. ["Liana v. 1.0." Hildebrand, J.D., Computer Language, Dec 1992]. ["Liana: A Windows Programming Language Based on C and C++", Krupansky, J., The C Users Journal, Jul 1992]. ["Writing a Multimedia App in Liana", Krupansky, J., Dr. Dobb's Journal, Winter Multimedia Sourcebook 1994]. ["The Liana Programming Language", R. Valdes, Dr Dobbs J Oct 1993, pp.50-52]. (1999-06-29)

Liana ::: (language) A C-like, interpretive, object-oriented programming language, class library, and integrated development environment designed specifically for language is designed to be as easy to use as BASIC, as concise as C, and as flexible as Smalltalk.The OOP syntax of C++ was chosen over the less familiar syntax of Smalltalk and Objective-C to appeal to C programmers and in recognition of C++ being the are also a simplified subset of C/C++, but extended to achieve the flexibility of Smalltalk.Liana is a typeless language (like Lisp, Snobol and Smalltalk), which means that the datatypes of variables, function parameters, and function return values are type of value can flow. Single inheritance, but not multiple inheritance, is supported. Memory management is automatic using reference counting.The library includes over 150 classes, for dynamic arrays, associative lookup tables, windows, menus, dialogs, controls, bitmaps, cursors, icons, mouse movement, keyboard input, fonts, text and graphics display, DDE, and MDI.Liana provides flexible OOP support for Windows programming. For example, a list box automatically fills itself from an associated object. That object is not get function that returns the ith element, and the text for each element is returned by calling the text member function for the element).A related product, C-odeScript, is an embeddable application scripting language. It is an implementation of Liana which can be called from C/C++ applications to offer the end-user a macro/scripting capability or to allow the C/C++ application to be customized without changing the C/C++ source code.Here's a complete Liana program which illustrates the flexibility of the language semantics and the power of the class library: main{ for a tool to deal with the complexity of MS Windows! It is also a woman's name.[Liana for Windows, Aitken, P., PC TECHNIQUES, Dec/Jan 1993].[Liana: A Language For Writing Windows Programs, Burk, R., Tech Specialist (R&D Publications), Sep 1991].[Liana v. 1.0. Hildebrand, J.D., Computer Language, Dec 1992].[Liana: A Windows Programming Language Based on C and C++, Krupansky, J., The C Users Journal, Jul 1992].[Writing a Multimedia App in Liana, Krupansky, J., Dr. Dobb's Journal, Winter Multimedia Sourcebook 1994].[The Liana Programming Language, R. Valdes, Dr Dobbs J Oct 1993, pp.50-52]. (1999-06-29)

liar paradox "philosophy" A sentence which asserts its own falsity, e.g. "This sentence is false" or "I am lying". These paradoxical assertions are meaningless in the sense that there is nothing in the world which could serve to either support or refute them. Philosophers, of course, have a great deal more to say on the subject. ["The Liar: an Essay on Truth and Circularity", Jon Barwise and John Etchemendy, Oxford University Press (1987). ISBN 0-19-505944-1 (PBK), Library of Congress BC199.P2B37]. (1995-02-22)

liar paradox ::: (philosophy) A sentence which asserts its own falsity, e.g. This sentence is false or I am lying. These paradoxical assertions are meaningless support or refute them. Philosophers, of course, have a great deal more to say on the subject.[The Liar: an Essay on Truth and Circularity, Jon Barwise and John Etchemendy, Oxford University Press (1987). ISBN 0-19-505944-1 (PBK), Library of Congress BC199.P2B37]. (1995-02-22)

libg++ ::: (library) The run-time library for the GNU C++ compiler, g++. Version: 2.5.1 is a superset of ANSI and POSIX.1. libg++ is no longer maintained, use libstd++ instead if possible.Available by FTP from a GNU archive site.Bug reports: .(2000-04-24)

libg++ "library" The {run-time library} for the {GNU} {C++} compiler, {g++}. Version: 2.5.1 is a superset of {ANSI} and {POSIX.1}. libg++ is no longer maintained, use libstd++ instead if possible. Available by {FTP} from a {GNU archive site}. Bug reports: "bug-lib-g++@gnu.org". (2000-04-24)

lib "operating system" Library. In {Unix}, the directories /lib and /usr/lib traditionally contain files with {filename extension} ".lib" that are special {archives} containing modules of standard {object code}. In modern Unixes the same directories contain ".so" (shared object) files, which are similar except that the object code they contain is designed to be loaded once and shared by all application code that needs it, thus saving memory. (2008-11-25)

librarian ::: n. --> One who has the care or charge of a library.
One who copies manuscript books.


libraries ::: pl. --> of Library

library ::: n. --> A considerable collection of books kept for use, and not as merchandise; as, a private library; a public library.
A building or apartment appropriated for holding such a collection of books.


library "programming, library" A collection of {subroutines} and {functions} stored in one or more files, usually in compiled form, for linking with other programs. Libraries are one of the earliest forms of organised {code reuse}. They are often supplied by the {operating system} or {software development environment} developer to be used in many different programs. The routines in a library may be general purpose or designed for some specific function such as three dimensional animated graphics. Libraries are linked with the user's program to form a complete {executable}. The linking may be {static linking} or, in some systems, {dynamic linking}. (1998-11-21)

library ::: (programming, library) A collection of subroutines and functions stored in one or more files, usually in compiled form, for linking with other programs. purpose or designed for some specific function such as three dimensional animated graphics.Libraries are linked with the user's program to form a complete executable. The linking may be static linking or, in some systems, dynamic linking. (1998-11-21)

librery "spelling" It's spelled "{library}". (1996-12-13)

librery ::: (spelling) It's spelled library. (1996-12-13)

Lily (LIsp LibrarY) A {C++} {class} library by Roger Sheldon "sheldon@kong.gsfc.nasa.gov" which gives C++ programmers the capability to write {Lisp}-style code. Lily's {garbage collection} mechanism is not sufficient for commercial use however and the documentation is incomplete. It is distributed under the {GNU} Library {General Public License}. Version: 0.1. {(ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/uploads/lily-0.1.tar.gz)}. (1993-11-08)

Lily ::: (LIsp LibrarY) A C++ class library by Roger Sheldon which gives C++ programmers the capability for commercial use however and the documentation is incomplete. It is distributed under the GNU Library General Public License.Version: 0.1. . (1993-11-08)

Linda "language" A "coordination language" from {Yale}, providing a model for {concurrency} with communication via a shared {tuple} space. Linda is usually implemented as a subroutine library for a specific base language, as in {C-Linda}, {Fortran-Linda}, {LindaLISP} and {Prolog-Linda}. It is available from {Scientific Computing Associates, Inc.} [What is?] {(http://cs.yale.edu/HTML/YALE/CS/Linda/linda.html)}. There is a {Multi-BinProlog} Linda implementation available by {(ftp://clement.info.umoncton.ca/)}. ["Generative Communication in Linda", D. Gelernter "gelernter@cs.yale.edu", ACM TOPLAS 7(1):80-112 (1985)]. ["Linda in Context", N. Carreiro et al, Yale U., CACM 32(4):444-458, Apr 1989]. See also {Ease}, {Lucinda}, {Melinda}. (2000-07-07)

linker "programming, tool" (link editor, linkage editor, link loader) A program that combines one or more files containing {object code} from separately compiled program {modules} into a single file containing loadable or executable code This process involves resolving references between the {modules} and fixing the {relocation} information used by the operating system {kernel} when loading the file into memory to run it. Under {Unix}, the linker is called "ld" and {object files} have filename extension .o (object), .so (shared object), or .lib ({library}), and the resulting {executable} is called "a.out" by default. (2001-10-13)

linker ::: (programming, tool) (link editor, linkage editor, link loader) A program that combines one or more files containing object code from separately compiled program modules into a single file containing loadable or executable codeThis process involves resolving references between the modules and fixing the relocation information used by the operating system kernel when loading the file into memory to run it.Under Unix, the linker is called ld and object files have filename extension .o (object), .so (shared object), or .lib (library), and the resulting executable is called a.out by default.(2001-10-13)

Location: E Library—Works Of Sri Aurobindo—English—SABCL—The Life Divine Volume 18—Supermind, Mind And The Overmind Maya …

Location: E Library—Works Of The Mother—English—Cwmce—Questions And Answers Volume 03—Supermind And Overmind …

London: Unit Library, 1903.

m2 ::: A Modula-2 compiler for VAX and MIPS. A Pascal compiler for VAX is also included. The Pascal compiler accepts a language that is almost identical to 1984. Joel McCormack made it faster, fixed lots of bugs, and swiped/wrote a User's Manual. Len Lattanzi ported it to the MIPS.It has the following extensions: foreign function and data interface, dynamic array variables, subarray parameters, multi-dimensional open array parameters, inline procedures, longfloat type, type-checked interface to C library I/O routines.It runs on VAX (Ultrix, BSD) and MIPS (Ultrix). .E-mail: . (1992-07-06)

m2 A {Modula-2} {compiler} for {VAX} and {MIPS}. A {Pascal} compiler for VAX is also included. The Pascal compiler accepts a language that is almost identical to {Berkeley Pascal}. It was originally designed and built by Michael L. Powell in 1984. Joel McCormack made it faster, fixed lots of bugs, and swiped/wrote a User's Manual. Len Lattanzi ported it to the MIPS. It has the following extensions: {foreign function} and data interface, {dynamic array} variables, {subarray parameters}, multi-dimensional {open array parameters}, {inline procedures}, longfloat type, type-checked interface to {C} library I/O routines. It runs on {VAX} ({Ultrix}, {BSD}) and {MIPS} ({Ultrix}). {(ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/DEC/Modula-2/m2.tar.Z)}. E-mail: "modula-2@decwrl.pa.dec.com". (1992-07-06)

M2toM3 A simple {Modula-2} to {Modula-3} translator by Peter Klein "pk@i3.informatik.rwth-aachen.de" which covers most of the syntactic differences between those languages. No context sensitive analysis is done, so WITH statements, local {modules}, {enumeration type} literals and {variant RECORDs} have to be dealt with by hand. Part of the {Sun} Modula 2 library is emulated by the Modula 3 library. Version 1.01. {(ftp://martha.informatik.rwth-aachen.de/pub/Modula3)}. (1992-12-01)

M2toM3 ::: A simple Modula-2 to Modula-3 translator by Peter Klein which covers most of the syntactic have to be dealt with by hand. Part of the Sun Modula 2 library is emulated by the Modula 3 library.Version 1.01. . (1992-12-01)

magnetic disk "storage" A flat rotating disc covered on one or both sides with magnetisable material. The two main types are the {hard disk} and the {floppy disk}. Data is stored on either or both surfaces of discs in concentric rings called "{tracks}". Each track is divided into a whole number of "{sectors}". Where multiple (rigid) discs are mounted on the same axle the set of tracks at the same radius on all their surfaces is known as a "{cylinder}". Data is read and written by a {disk drive} which rotates the discs and positions the {read/write heads} over the desired track(s). The latter radial movement is known as "{seeking}". There is usually one head for each surface that stores data. To reduce {rotational latency} it is possible, though expensive, to have multiple heads at different angles. The head writes binary data by magnetising small areas or "zones" of the disk in one of two opposing orientations. It reads data by detecting current pulses induced in a coil as zones with different magnetic alignment pass underneath it. In theory, bits could be read back as a time sequence of pulse (one) or no pulse (zero). However, a run of zeros would give a prolonged absence of signal, making it hard to accurately divide the signal into individual bits due to the variability of motor speed. {Run Length Limited} is one common solution to this {clock recovery} problem. High speed disks have an {access time} of 28 {milliseconds} or less, and low-speed disks, 65 milliseconds or more. The higher speed disks also transfer their data faster than the slower speed units. The disks are usually aluminium with a magnetic coating. The heads "float" just above the disk's surface on a current of air, sometimes at lower than atmospheric pressure in an air-tight enclosure. The head has an aerodynamic shape so the current pushes it away from the disk. A small spring pushes the head towards the disk at the same time keeping the head at a constant distance from the disk (about two microns). Disk drives are commonly characterised by the kind of interface used to connect to the computer, e.g. {ATA}, {IDE}, {SCSI}. See also {winchester}. Compare {magnetic drum}, {compact disc}, {optical disk}, {magneto-optical disk}. {Suchanka's PC-DISK library (http://pc-disk.de/)}. (2007-06-14)

malloc {C}'s standard library routine for storage allocation. It takes the number of bytes required and returns a pointer to a block of that size. Storage is allocated from a heap which lies after the end of the program and data areas. Memory allocated with malloc must be freed explicitly using the "free" routine before it can be re-used. {gc} is a storage allocator with {garbage collection} that is intended to be used as a plug-in replacement for malloc.

malloc ::: C's standard library routine for storage allocation. It takes the number of bytes required and returns a pointer to a block of that size. Storage is Memory allocated with malloc must be freed explicitly using the free routine before it can be re-used. gc is a storage allocator with garbage collection that is intended to be used as a plug-in replacement for malloc.

malloc ::: C's standard library routine for storage allocation. It takes the number of bytes required and returns a pointer to a block of that size. Storage is Memory allocated with malloc must be freed explicitly using the free routine before it can be re-used.gc is a storage allocator with garbage collection that is intended to be used as a plug-in replacement for malloc.

MathJax "mathematics, web" A {JavaScript} {library} for rendering {mathematical symbols} in {web browsers} using {CSS} with {web fonts} or {SVG}. Input can be in {MathML}, {TeX} or {ASCIImath}. {MathJax Home (https://www.mathjax.org/)}. (2019-01-27)

Mei ::: (library) A set of class libraries by Atsushi Aoki and others for Objectworks Smalltalk Release 4.1. Mei and drawing editors); GUI builder; Lisp interpreter; Prolog interpreter; Pluggable gauges; Extended browser; (package, history, recover, etc.)Mei is available under General Public License and requires Objectworks Smalltalk Release 4.1.Current version: 0.50, as of 1993-01-20. .E-mail: Watanabe Katsuhiro (1999-12-08)

Mei "library" A set of {class libraries} by Atsushi Aoki "aoki@sra.co.jp" and others for {Objectworks Smalltalk} Release 4.1. Mei includes: Grapher Library for drawing diagrams; Meta Grapher Library (grapher to develop grapher); Drawing tools and painting tools (structured diagram editors and drawing editors); {GUI builder}; {Lisp} {interpreter}; {Prolog} interpreter; Pluggable gauges; Extended browser; (package, history, recover, etc.) Mei is available under {General Public License} and requires Objectworks Smalltalk Release 4.1. {Home (http://sra.co.jp/people/aoki/htmls/FreeSoftwareForSmalltalk.html)}. E-mail: Watanabe Katsuhiro "katsu@sran14.sra.co.jp" (1999-12-08)

Message Passing Interface "communications, protocol" A {de facto standard} for communication among the {nodes} running a {parallel program} on a {distributed memory system}. MPI is a {library} of {routines} that can be called from {Fortran} and{ C} programs. MPI's advantage over older message passing libraries is that it is both {portable} (because MPI has been implemented for almost every distributed memory {architecture}) and fast (because each implementation is {optimised} for the {hardware} it runs on). [Address?] (1997-06-09)

Messaging Application Programming Interface "messaging" (MAPI) A messaging architecture and a {client} interface component for applications such as {electronic mail}, scheduling, calendaring and document management. As a messaging architecture, MAPI provides a consistent interface for multiple {application programs} to interact with multiple messaging systems across a variety of {hardware} {platforms}. MAPI provides better performance and control than {Simple MAPI}, {Common Messaging Calls} (CMC) or the {Active Messaging Library}. It has a comprehensive, open, dual-purpose interface, integrated with {Microsoft Windows}. MAPI can be used by all levels and types of client application and "service providers" - driver-like components that provide a MAPI interface to a specific messaging system. For example, a {word processor} can send documents and a {workgroup} application can share and store different types of data using MAPI. MAPI separates the programming interfaces used by the client applications and the service providers. Every component works with a common, {Microsoft Windows}-based user interface. For example, a single messaging client application can be used to receive messages from {fax}, a {bulletin board} system, a host-based messaging system and a {LAN}-based system. Messages from all of these systems can be delivered to a single "universal Inbox". MAPI is aimed at the powerful, new market of workgroup applications that communicate with such different messaging systems as fax, {DEC} {All-In-1}, {voice mail} and public communications services such as {AT&T} Easylink Services, {CompuServe} and {MCI} MAIL. Because workgroup applications demand more of their messaging systems, MAPI offers much more than basic messaging in the programming interface and supports more than {local area network} (LAN)-based messaging systems. Applications can, for example, format text for a single message with a variety of fonts and present to their users a customised view of messages that have been filtered, sorted or preprocessed. MAPI is built into {Windows 95} and {Windows NT} and can be used by 16-bit and 32-bit Windows applications. The programming interface and subsystem contained in the MAPI {DLL} provide objects which conform to the {Component Object Model}. MAPI includes standard messaging client applications that demonstrate different levels of messaging support. MAPI provides cross platform support through such industry standards as {SMTP}, {X.400} and Common Messaging Calls. MAPI is the messaging component of {Windows Open Services Architecture} (WOSA). [Correct expansion? Relatonship with Microsoft?] (1997-12-03)

Messaging Application Programming Interface ::: (messaging) (MAPI) A messaging architecture and a client interface component for applications such as electronic mail, scheduling, calendaring and interface for multiple application programs to interact with multiple messaging systems across a variety of hardware platforms.MAPI provides better performance and control than Simple MAPI, Common Messaging Calls (CMC) or the Active Messaging Library. It has a comprehensive, open, example, a word processor can send documents and a workgroup application can share and store different types of data using MAPI.MAPI separates the programming interfaces used by the client applications and the service providers. Every component works with a common, Microsoft messaging system and a LAN-based system. Messages from all of these systems can be delivered to a single universal Inbox.MAPI is aimed at the powerful, new market of workgroup applications that communicate with such different messaging systems as fax, DEC All-In-1, voice variety of fonts and present to their users a customised view of messages that have been filtered, sorted or preprocessed.MAPI is built into Windows 95 and Windows NT and can be used by 16-bit and 32-bit Windows applications. The programming interface and subsystem contained MAPI includes standard messaging client applications that demonstrate different levels of messaging support.MAPI provides cross platform support through such industry standards as SMTP, X.400 and Common Messaging Calls. MAPI is the messaging component of Windows Open Services Architecture (WOSA).[Correct expansion? Relatonship with Microsoft?] (1997-12-03)

method invocation "programming" In {object-oriented programming}, the way the program looks up the right {code} to run when a {method} with a given name is called ("invoked") on an {object}. The method is first looked for in the object's {class}, then that class's {superclass} and so on up the {class hierarchy} until a method with the given name is found (the name is "resolved"). Generally, method lookup cannot be performed at {compile time} because the object's class is not known until {run time}. This is the case for an {object method} whereas a {class method} is just an ordinary function (that is bundled with a given class) and can be resolved at compile time (or load time in the case of a {dynamically loaded library}). (2014-09-06)

Microsoft Data Access Components "database" (MDAC) Microsoft's umbrella term for their {ActiveX Data Objects} (ADO), {OLE DB}, and {Open Database Connectivity} (ODBC) libraries. Together, these provide access to a variety of data sources, both {relational} ({SQL}) and nonrelational. MDAC is the technology that supports {Universal Data Access}, Microsoft's strategy for providing access to information across the enterprise. {(http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/mdacsdk/htm/mdacstartpage1.asp)}. (2004-02-17)

Missing definition "introduction" First, this is an (English language) __computing__ dictionary. It includes lots of terms from related fields such as mathematics and electronics, but if you're looking for (or want to submit) words from other subjects or general English words or other languages, try {(http://wikipedia.org/)}, {(http://onelook.com/)}, {(http://yourdictionary.com/)}, {(http://www.dictionarist.com/)} or {(http://reference.allrefer.com/)}. If you've already searched the dictionary for a computing term and it's not here then please __don't tell me__. There are, and always will be, a great many missing terms, no dictionary is ever complete. I use my limited time to process the corrections and definitions people have submitted and to add the {most frequently requested missing terms (missing.html)}. Try one of the sources mentioned above or {(http://techweb.com/encyclopedia/)}, {(http://whatis.techtarget.com/)} or {(http://google.com/)}. See {the Help page (help.html)} for more about missing definitions and bad cross-references. (2014-09-20)! {exclamation mark}!!!Batch "language, humour" A daft way of obfuscating text strings by encoding each character as a different number of {exclamation marks} surrounded by {question marks}, e.g. "d" is encoded as "?!!!!?". The language is named after the {MSDOS} {batch file} in which the first converter was written. {esoteric programming languages} {wiki entry (http://esolangs.org/wiki/!!!Batch)}. (2014-10-25)" {double quote}

MIT Scheme ::: (language) (Previously C-Scheme) A Scheme implementation by the MIT Scheme Team (Chris Hanson, Jim Miller, Bill Rozas, and many others) with a rich set of utilities, a compiler called Liar and an editor called Edwin.MIT Scheme includes an interpreter, large run-time library, Emacs macros, native-code compiler, emacs-like editor, and a source-level debugger.Current version: 7.7.1, as of 2002-06-18.MIT Scheme conforms fully with R4RS and almost with the IEEE Scheme standard. It runs on Motorola 68000: HP9000, Sun-3, NeXT; MIPS: Decstation, Sony, SGI; HP-PA: 600, 700, 800; VAX: Ultrix, BSD, DEC Alpha: OSF; Intel i386: MS-DOS, MS Windows, and various other Unix systems.See also: LAP, Schematik, Scode. .Usenet newsgroup: comp.lang.scheme.c.Mailing list: (cross-posted to news).E-mail: (maintainers).(2003-08-14)

MIT Scheme "language" (Previously "C-Scheme") A {Scheme} implementation by the {MIT} Scheme Team (Chris Hanson, Jim Miller, Bill Rozas, and many others) with a rich set of utilities, a compiler called {Liar} and an editor called {Edwin}. MIT Scheme includes an {interpreter}, large {run-time library}, {Emacs} {macros}, {native-code compiler}, emacs-like editor, and a {source-level debugger}. {MIT Scheme} conforms fully with {R4RS} and almost with the {IEEE Scheme} {standard}. It runs on {Motorola 68000}: {HP9000}, {Sun-3}, {NeXT}; {MIPS}: {Decstation}, {Sony}, {SGI}; {HP-PA}: 600, 700, 800; {VAX}: {Ultrix}, {BSD}, {DEC} {Alpha}: {OSF}; {Intel i386}: {MS-DOS}, {MS Windows}, and various other {Unix} systems. See also: {LAP}, {Schematik}, {Scode}. {(http://gnu.org/software/mit-scheme/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.lang.scheme.c}. Mailing list: mit-scheme-announce@gnu.org (cross-posted to news). E-mail: "mit-scheme-devel@gnu.org" (maintainers). (2003-08-14)

monitor 1. A {cathode-ray tube} and associated electronics connected to a computer's video output. A monitor may be either {monochrome} (black and white) or colour ({RGB}). Colour monitors may show either digital colour (each of the red, green and blue signals may be either on or off, giving eight possible colours: black, white, red, green, blue, cyan, magenta and yellow) or analog colour (red, green and blue signals are continuously variable allowing any combination to be displayed). Digital monitors are sometimes known as {TTL} because the voltages on the red, green and blue inputs are compatible with TTL logic chips. See also {gamut}, {multisync}, {visual display unit}. 2. A programming language construct which encapsulates variables, access procedures and initialisation code within an abstract data type. The monitor's variable may only be accessed via its access procedures and only one process may be actively accessing the monitor at any one time. The access procedures are {critical sections}. A monitor may have a queue of processes which are waiting to access it. 3. A hardware device that measures electrical events such as pulses or voltage levels in a digital computer. 4. To oversee a program during execution. For example, the monitor function in the {Unix} {C} library enables profiling of a certain range of code addresses. A histogram is produced showing how often the {program counter} was found to be at each position and how often each profiled function was called. {Unix} {man} page: monitor(3). 5. A control program within the {operating system} that manages the allocation of system resources to active programs. 6. A program that measures software performance.

monitor ::: 1. A cathode-ray tube and associated electronics connected to a computer's video output. A monitor may be either monochrome (black and white) or colour (RGB). displayed). Digital monitors are sometimes known as TTL because the voltages on the red, green and blue inputs are compatible with TTL logic chips.See also gamut, multisync, visual display unit.2. A programming language construct which encapsulates variables, access procedures and initialisation code within an abstract data type. The monitor's critical sections. A monitor may have a queue of processes which are waiting to access it.3. A hardware device that measures electrical events such as pulses or voltage levels in a digital computer.4. To oversee a program during execution. For example, the monitor function in the Unix C library enables profiling of a certain range of code addresses. A histogram is produced showing how often the program counter was found to be at each position and how often each profiled function was called.Unix man page: monitor(3).5. A control program within the operating system that manages the allocation of system resources to active programs.6. A program that measures software performance.

Moscow ML ::: A light-weight implementation of Standard ML written by Sergei Romanenko of the Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics with assistance from Peter Sestoft , Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University. Moscow ML is based on CAML Light.Version: 1.20 implements the Standard ML Core language.The sublanguage of Modules implemented by Moscow ML contains signatures and non-nested structures, and identifies structures with source files. It is is the intention to implement the full Standard ML Modules language (including functors) in due course.Compilation of a signature produces a compiled interface file, which is used when compiling other signatures and structures.Compilation of a structure produces a bytecode file. Bytecode files are compact and load fast. For instance, a 3250-line program consisting of 24 structures and Starting the ML system and loading the 24 bytecode files takes 1-2 cpu seconds plus network delays, less that 5 seconds real time in all.Release 1.20 permits loading of precompiled bytecode files into the top-level interactive session. The next release will be able to create stand-alone executables by linking bytecode files.There is a mechanism for adding basis libraries, as in Caml Light. Release 1.20 includes the basis libraries Array, List, and Vector and the MS-DOS version includes the Graphics library from Caml Light.In principle, Moscow ML can be compiled on any platform supported by Caml Light. So far we have tried Intel 80386-based IBM PCs running MS-DOS, Microsoft Windows, OS/2 or Linux, DEC MIPS running Ultrix, DEC Alpha running OSF/1, Sun-4 running SunOS, HP9000 running HP/UX, SGI MIPS running IRIX 5.Moscow ML is particularly useful when fast compilation and modest storage consumption are more important than fast program execution.Thanks to the efficient Caml Light run-time system used in Moscow ML, it compiles fast and uses little memory, typically 5-10 times less memory than 10 times slower than SML/NJ 0.93 compiled native code (fast on IBM PCs, slower on RISCs). . . .Caml Light 0.61 and gcc are required to recompile Moscow ML for Unix or Caml Light 0.61, djgpp, Perl, and Borland C++ version 2.0 (or later) to recompile Moscow ML for DOS. (1994-12-12)

Moscow ML A light-weight implementation of {Standard ML} written by Sergei Romanenko "sergei-romanenko@refal.msk.su" of the {Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics} with assistance from Peter Sestoft "sestoft@dina.kvl.dk", {Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University}. Moscow ML is based on {CAML Light}. Version: 1.20 implements the Standard ML Core language. The sublanguage of Modules implemented by Moscow ML contains signatures and non-nested structures, and identifies structures with source files. It is certainly less expressive than the full Standard ML Modules language, but the {type-safe} {separate compilation} facility is simple, useful, and easy to use. It is the intention to implement the full Standard ML Modules language (including functors) in due course. Compilation of a {signature} produces a compiled interface file, which is used when compiling other signatures and structures. Compilation of a structure produces a {bytecode} file. Bytecode files are compact and load fast. For instance, a 3250-line program consisting of 24 structures and 17 signatures compiles to 221 KB of bytecode and 241 KB of compiled signatures. Starting the ML system and loading the 24 bytecode files takes 1-2 cpu seconds plus network delays, less that 5 seconds real time in all. Release 1.20 permits loading of precompiled bytecode files into the top-level interactive session. The next release will be able to create stand-alone executables by linking bytecode files. There is a mechanism for adding basis libraries, as in {Caml Light}. Release 1.20 includes the basis libraries Array, List, and Vector and the {MS-DOS} version includes the Graphics library from {Caml Light}. In principle, Moscow ML can be compiled on any {platform} supported by {Caml Light}. So far we have tried {Intel 80386}-based {IBM PCs} running {MS-DOS}, {Microsoft Windows}, {OS/2} or {Linux}, {DEC MIPS} running {Ultrix}, {DEC Alpha} running {OSF/1}, {Sun-4} running {SunOS}, {HP9000} running {HP/UX}, {SGI MIPS} running {IRIX} 5. Moscow ML is particularly useful when fast compilation and modest storage consumption are more important than fast program execution. Thanks to the efficient Caml Light run-time system used in Moscow ML, it compiles fast and uses little memory, typically 5-10 times less memory than {SML/NJ} 0.93 and 2-3 times less than {Edinburgh ML}. Yet the bytecode is only 3 to 10 times slower than SML/NJ 0.93 compiled native code (fast on {IBM PCs}, slower on {RISCs}). {DOS (ftp://dina.kvl.dk/pub/Peter.Sestoft/mosml/mos12bin.zip)}. {Linux (ftp://dina.kvl.dk:pub/Peter.Sestoft/mosml/linux-mos12bin.tar.gz)}. {Source (ftp://dina.kvl.dk:pub/Peter.Sestoft/mosml/mos12src.tar.gz)}. {Caml Light} 0.61 and {gcc} are required to recompile Moscow ML for {Unix} or Caml Light 0.61, {djgpp}, {Perl}, and {Borland C++} version 2.0 (or later) to recompile Moscow ML for {DOS}. (1994-12-12)

mouse "hardware, graphics" The most commonly used computer {pointing device}, first introduced by {Douglas Engelbart} in 1968. The mouse is a device used to manipulate an on-screen {pointer} that's normally shaped like an arrow. With the mouse in hand, the computer user can select, move, and change items on the screen. A conventional {roller-ball mouse} is slid across the surface of the desk, often on a {mouse mat}. As the mouse moves, a ball set in a depression on the underside of the mouse rolls accordingly. The ball is also in contact with two small shafts set at right angles to each other inside the mouse. The rotating ball turns the shafts, and sensors inside the mouse measure the shafts' rotation. The distance and direction information from the sensors is then transmitted to the computer, usually through a connecting wire - the mouse's "tail". The computer then moves the mouse pointer on the screen to follow the movements of the mouse. This may be done directly by the {graphics adaptor}, but where it involves the processor the task should be assigned a high {priority} to avoid any perceptible delay. Some mice are contoured to fit the shape of a person's right hand, and some come in left-handed versions. Other mice are symmetrical. Included on the mouse are usually two or three buttons that the user may press, or click, to initiate various actions such as running {programs} or opening {files}. The left-most button (the {primary mouse button}) is operated with the index finger to select and activate objects represented on the screen. Different {operating systems} and {graphical user interfaces} have different conventions for using the other button(s). Typical operations include calling up a {context-sensitive menu}, modifying the selection, or pasting text. With fewer mouse buttons these require combinations of mouse and keyboard actions. Between its left and right buttons, a mouse may also have a wheel that can be used for scrolling or other special operations defined by the software. Some systems allow the mouse button assignments to be swapped round for left-handed users. Just moving the pointer across the screen with the mouse typically does nothing (though some CAD systems respond to patterns of mouse movement with no buttons pressed). Normally, the pointer is positioned over something on the screen (an {icon} or a {menu} item), and the user then clicks a mouse button to actually affect the screen display. The five most common "gestures" performed with the mouse are: {point} (to place the pointer over an on-screen item), {click} (to press and release a mouse button), {double-click} {to press and release a mouse button twice in rapid succession}, {right-click} (to press and release the right mouse button}, and {drag} (to hold down the mouse button while moving the mouse). Most modern computers include a mouse as standard equipment. However, some systems, especially portable {laptop} and {notebook} models, may have a {trackball}, {touchpad} or {Trackpoint} on or next to the {keyboard}. These input devices work like the mouse, but take less space and don't need a desk. Many other alternatives to the conventional roller-ball mouse exist. A {tailless mouse}, or {hamster}, transmits its information with {infrared} impulses. A {foot-controlled mouse (http://footmouse.com/)} is one used on the floor underneath the desk. An {optical mouse} uses a {light-emitting diode} and {photocells} instead of a rolling ball to track its position. Some optical designs may require a special mouse mat marked with a grid, others, like the Microsoft IntelliMouse Explorer, work on nearly any surface. {Yahoo! (http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Computers/Hardware/Peripherals/Input_Devices/Mice/)}. {(http://peripherals.about.com/library/weekly/aa041498.htm)}. {PC Guide's "Troubleshooting Mice" (http://pcguide.com/ts/x/comp/mice.htm)}. (1999-07-21)

Mozilla "web, open source" The {open source} {web browser}, designed for standards-compliance, performance, and portability, whose development is coordinated by the {Mozilla Foundation}. The Mozilla project started in March 1998 when {Netscape Communications Corporation} released the {source code} of {Netscape Communicator}. The now abandoned version based on that code is referred to as "Mozilla Classic". Since then, much has been rewritten, including the layout engine, the networking library, and the front-end. Mozilla 1.0 was finally released on 2002-06-05. Much of the code was used to build {Firefox}. Although a lot of Mozilla code is under the original Netscape Public License, some parts of the code are under the Mozilla Public License or dual MPL/GPL. "Mozilla" was the original project code name for {Netscape Navigator} and, according to some of the documentation, the correct pronunciation of "Netscape". [Derived from "{Mosaic} killer/Godzilla"?] (2005-01-26)

Mozilla ::: (World-Wide Web, open source) The open source web browser, designed for standards-compliance, performance, and portability, whose development is coordinated by the Mozilla Foundation.The Mozilla project started in March 1998 when Netscape Communications Corporation released the source code of Netscape Communicator. The now abandoned has been rewritten, including the layout engine, the networking library, and the front-end.Mozilla 1.0 was finally released on 2002-06-05. Much of the code was used to build Firefox.Although a lot of Mozilla code is under the original Netscape Public License, some parts of the code are under the Mozilla Public License or dual MPL/GPL.Mozilla was the original project code name for Netscape Navigator and, according to some of the documentation, the correct pronunciation of Netscape.[Derived from Mosaic killer/Godzilla?](2005-01-26)

MS. apocryphon in the Chenohpskion Library. See

msgGUI ::: (library) A graphical user interface for GNU Smalltalk. The msgGUI package contains the basics for creating window applications in the manner available in other graphical Smalltalk implementations. Version 1.0 of the library was by Mark Bush, ECS, Oxford University, UK. .(2000-06-14)

msgGUI "library" A {graphical user interface} for {GNU Smalltalk}. The msgGUI package contains the basics for creating window {applications} in the manner available in other graphical {Smalltalk} implementations. Version 1.0 of the library was by Mark Bush, ECS, Oxford University, UK. {(ftp://ftp.comlab.ox.ac.uk/pub/Packages/mst/mstGUI-1.0.tar.Z)}. (2000-06-14)

MS. in Hebrew in Dropsie College Library, Phila¬

-. Mythology. New York: New American Library,

Name ::: Jhumur: “Hold onto the Name. That is the only power. I remember Mother once told me—because there was a moment when I was attacked by a certain person. She was mad and so had a certain number of people she chose to attack with her vibrations, with her words. If she could she would throw stones. I was very, very young, about 17 or 18. I said, ‘Every time I see her, Mother, I really start to tremble. It has become something so physically terrifying. Once she (the mad person) had thrown a big paperweight, a cement paperweight in the library. It went just past my head, it could have killed me. After that I became really frightened. So Mother told me ‘Nothing will happen to you. Each time you see her just say ‘Ma, Ma, Ma.’ But it was so difficult. Each time I saw her from far I would think, ‘I have to say Ma.’ But when she came close enough I could not say the Name, for a long time, for a very long time. I was so frightened the fear would take the Name away. I knew very well I had to say the Name That is what Mother told me. And one day I could, finally I could and the mad person lost interest in me!”

New American Library, 1957.

New York: Library of Jewish Theological Seminary.

New York: New American Library, 1954.

New York: New American Library, 1956.

New York: The New American Library [I960].

New York: The Wisdom Library, 1956.

Nicene Fathers Library.

Nicene Fathers Library VIII, 573], See entry “Five

NIHCL ::: A class library for C++ from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH).

NIHCL A {class library} for {C++} from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH).

NISO ::: National Information Standards Organisation (USA). NISO Standards cover many aspects of library science, publishing, and information services, and address the application of both traditional and new technologies to information services.

NISO National Information Standards Organisation (USA). NISO Standards cover many aspects of library science, publishing, and information services, and address the application of both traditional and new technologies to information services.

Note: All
   references are from the Collected Works of Sri Aurobindo (CWSA), Collected works of the Mother (CWM) and Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library (SABCL), all published by Sri Aurobindo Ashram, Pondicherry, India. For a free download of the collected works, please visit Collected works of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother (link).


(now in the Morgan Library, New York), by the 15th-16th century artist Satume di Gatti.

OATH ::: Object-oriented Abstract Type Hierarchy, a class library for C++ from Texas Instruments.

OATH Object-oriented Abstract Type Hierarchy, a class library for C++ from {Texas Instruments}.

Objective CAML "language" (Originally "CAML" - Categorical Abstract Machine Language) A version of {ML} by G. Huet, G. Cousineau, Ascander Suarez, Pierre Weis, Michel Mauny and others of {INRIA}. CAML is intermediate between {LCF ML} and {SML} [in what sense?]. It has {first-class} functions, {static type inference} with {polymorphic} types, user-defined {variant types} and {product types}, and {pattern matching}. It is built on a proprietary run-time system. The CAML V3.1 implementation added {lazy} and {mutable} data structures, a "{grammar}" mechanism for interfacing with the {Yacc} {parser generator}, {pretty-printing} tools, high-performance {arbitrary-precision} arithmetic, and a complete library. in 1990 Xavier Leroy and Damien Doligez designed a new implementation called {CAML Light}, freeing the previous implementation from too many experimental high-level features, and more importantly, from the old Le_Lisp back-end. Following the addition of a {native-code} compiler and a powerful {module} system in 1995 and of the {object} and {class} layer in 1996, the project's name was changed to Objective CAML. In 2000, Jacques Garrigue added labeled and optional arguments and anonymous variants. {Objective CAML Home (http://ocaml.org/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.lang.ml}. ["The CAML Reference Manual", P. Weis et al, TR INRIA-ENS, 1989]. (2002-05-21)

Objective CAML ::: (language) (Originally CAML - Categorical Abstract Machine Language) A version of ML by G. Huet, G. Cousineau, Ascander Suarez, Pierre Weis, Michel types, user-defined variant types and product types, and pattern matching. It is built on a proprietary run-time system.The CAML V3.1 implementation added lazy and mutable data structures, a grammar mechanism for interfacing with the Yacc parser generator, pretty-printing tools, high-performance arbitrary-precision arithmetic, and a complete library.in 1990 Xavier Leroy and Damien Doligez designed a new implementation called CAML Light, freeing the previous implementation from too many experimental high-level features, and more importantly, from the old Le_Lisp back-end.Following the addition of a native-code compiler and a powerful module system in 1995 and of the object and class layer in 1996, the project's name was changed to Objective CAML. In 2000, Jacques Garrigue added labeled and optional arguments and anonymous variants. .Usenet newsgroup: comp.lang.ml.[The CAML Reference Manual, P. Weis et al, TR INRIA-ENS, 1989].(2002-05-21)

Objective C "language" An {object-oriented} superset of {ANSI C} by Brad Cox, Productivity Products. Its additions to {C} are few and are mostly based on {Smalltalk}. Objective C is implemented as a {preprocessor} for {C}. Its {syntax} is a superset of standard C syntax, and its {compiler} accepts both C and Objective C {source code} ({filename extension} ".m"). It has no operator {overloading}, {multiple inheritance}, or {class variables}. It does have {dynamic binding}. It is used as the system programming language on the {NeXT}. As implemented for {NEXTSTEP}, the Objective C language is fully compatible with {ANSI C}. Objective C can also be used as an extension to {C++}, which lacks some of the possibilities for {object-oriented design} that {dynamic typing} and {dynamic binding} bring to Objective C. C++ also has features not found in Objective C. Versions exist for {MS-DOS}, {Macintosh}, {VAX}/{VMS} and {Unix} {workstations}. Language versions by {Stepstone}, {NeXT} and {GNU} are slightly different. There is a library of ({GNU}) Objective C {objects} by R. Andrew McCallum "mccallum@cs.rochester.edu" with similar functionality to {Smalltalk}'s Collection objects. It includes: Set, {Bag}, {Array}, LinkedList, LinkList, CircularArray, {Queue}, {Stack}, {Heap}, SortedArray, MappedCollector, GapArray and DelegateList. Version: Alpha Release. {(ftp://iesd.auc.dk/pub/ObjC/)}. See also: {Objectionable-C}. ["Object-Oriented Programming: An Evolutionary Approach", Brad Cox, A-W 1986]. (1999-07-10)

Objective C ::: (language) An object-oriented superset of ANSI C by Brad Cox, Productivity Products. Its additions to C are few and are mostly based on superset of standard C syntax, and its compiler accepts both C and Objective C source code (filename extension .m).It has no operator overloading, multiple inheritance, or class variables. It does have dynamic binding. It is used as the system programming language on the NeXT. As implemented for NEXTSTEP, the Objective C language is fully compatible with ANSI C.Objective C can also be used as an extension to C++, which lacks some of the possibilities for object-oriented design that dynamic typing and dynamic binding bring to Objective C. C++ also has features not found in Objective C.Versions exist for MS-DOS, Macintosh, VAX/VMS and Unix workstations. Language versions by Stepstone, NeXT and GNU are slightly different.There is a library of (GNU) Objective C objects by R. Andrew McCallum with similar functionality to Smalltalk's CircularArray, Queue, Stack, Heap, SortedArray, MappedCollector, GapArray and DelegateList. Version: Alpha Release. .See also: Objectionable-C.[Object-Oriented Programming: An Evolutionary Approach, Brad Cox, A-W 1986]. (1999-07-10)

OCLC {Online Computer Library Center}

of Esdras. [R/! The Ante-Nicene Fathers Library 8,

of Moses (Ante-Nicene Fathers Library, 8 ) is that

of Philippi. Buffalo: Select Library of the Nicene and

Oldest complete manuscript of the Mishna, of the XIIIth century, is preserved in the Library of Parma, Italy.

Online Computer Library Center, Inc. "library" (OCLC) A nonprofit membership organisation offering computer-based services and research to libraries, educational organisations, and their users. OCLC operates the OCLC Cataloging PRISM service for cataloging and resource sharing, provides on-line reference systems for both librarians and end-users, and distributes on-line electronic journals. OCLC's goals are to increase the availability of library resources and reduce library costs for the fundamental public purpose of furthering access to the world's information. The OCLC library information network connects more than 10,000 36,000 libraries worldwide. Libraries use the OCLC System for cataloguing, interlibrary loan, collection development, bibliographic verification, and reference searching. Their most visible feature is the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC) WorldCat (the OCLC Online Union Catalog). {(http://oclc.org/)}. (2000-03-23)

Online Computer Library Center, Inc. ::: (library) (OCLC) A nonprofit membership organisation offering computer-based services and research to libraries, educational organisations, Their most visible feature is the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC) WorldCat (the OCLC Online Union Catalog). .(2000-03-23)

Online Public Access Catalog "library" (OPAC) A computerised system to catalogue and organise materials in a library (the kind that contains books). OPACs have replaced card-based catalogues in many libraries. An OPAC is available to library users (public access). (2000-07-17)

Online Public Access Catalog ::: (library) (OPAC) A computerised system to catalogue and organise materials in a library (the kind that contains books). OPACs have replaced card-based catalogues in many libraries. An OPAC is available to library users (public access).(2000-07-17)

open ::: a. --> Free of access; not shut up; not closed; affording unobstructed ingress or egress; not impeding or preventing passage; not locked up or covered over; -- applied to passageways; as, an open door, window, road, etc.; also, to inclosed structures or objects; as, open houses, boxes, baskets, bottles, etc.; also, to means of communication or approach by water or land; as, an open harbor or roadstead.
Free to be used, enjoyed, visited, or the like; not private; public; unrestricted in use; as, an open library, museum, court, or


OpenGL {Open Graphics Library}

Open Graphics Library ::: (graphics, library) (OpenGL) A multi-platform software interface to graphics hardware, supporting rendering and imaging operations. The OpenGL interface was developed by Silicon Graphics, who license it to other vendors.The OpenGL graphics interface consists of several hundred functions operating on 2D and 3D objects, supporting basic techniques, such as modelling and smooth extension to the X Window System allows an OpenGL client to communicate across a network with a different vendor's OpenGL server.OpenGL is based on Silicon Graphics' proprietary IRIS GL. . (1996-09-30)

Open Graphics Library "graphics, library" (OpenGL) A multi-{platform} software interface to graphics hardware, supporting {rendering} and {imaging} operations. The OpenGL interface was developed by {Silicon Graphics}, who license it to other vendors. The OpenGL graphics interface consists of several hundred functions operating on 2D and 3D objects, supporting basic techniques, such as {modelling} and {smooth shading}, and advanced techniques, such as {texture mapping} and {motion blur}. Many operations require a {frame buffer}. OpenGL is {network-transparent}, and a common extension to the {X Window System} allows an OpenGL {client} to communicate across a network with a different vendor's OpenGL {server}. OpenGL is based on Silicon Graphics' proprietary {IRIS GL}. {OpenGL WWW Center (http://sgi.com/Technology/openGL/)}. {Mesa GL (http://ssec.wisc.edu/~brianp/Mesa.html)} (PD implementation). (1996-09-30)

Open Telecom Platform ::: (communications, library, Erlang) (OTP) A set of standard, open source libraries and tools for use with Erlang. .(2001-08-28)

Open Telecom Platform "communications, library" (OTP) A set of standard, {open source} {libraries} and tools for use with {Erlang}. {(http://erlang.org/faq/t1.html

order ::: n. --> Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system
Of material things, like the books in a library.
Of intellectual notions or ideas, like the topics of a discource.
Of periods of time or occurrences, and the like.
Right arrangement; a normal, correct, or fit condition; as, the house is in order; the machinery is out of order.


OTP ::: 1. (security) One-Time Password.2. (protocol) Open Trading Protocol.3. (storage, integrated circuit) One Time Programmable Read Only Memory.4. (communications, library) Open Telecom Platform.(2001-08-28)

OTP 1. "security" {One-Time Password}. 2. "protocol" {Open Trading Protocol}. 3. "storage, integrated circuit" {One Time Programmable Read Only Memory}. 4. "communications, library" {Open Telecom Platform}. (2001-08-28)

P4 A {macro}/subroutine package for parallel programming by Rusty Lusk "lusk@anta.mcs.anl.gov". P4 uses {monitors} on shared memory machines and message passing on distributed memory machines. It is implemented as a subroutine library for {C} and {Fortran}. An enhancement of the "Argonne macros", {PARMACS}. {(ftp://info.mcs.anl.gov/pub/p4t1.2.tar.Z)}. E-mail: "p4@mcs.anl.gov".

P4 ::: A macro/subroutine package for parallel programming by Rusty Lusk . P4 uses monitors on shared memory machines and subroutine library for C and Fortran. An enhancement of the Argonne macros, PARMACS. . E-mail: .

Paradise Paradise is a subsystem (a set of packages) developed to implement inter-processes, inter-tasks and inter-machine communication for {Ada} programs under {Unix}. This subsystem gives the user full access to files, {pipes}, {sockets} (both Unix and {Internet}) and {pseudo-devices}. Paradise has been ported to {Sun}, {DEC}, {Sony MIPS}, {Verdex} compiler, DEC compiler, {Alsys}/{Systeam} compiler. {Version 2.0 of the library (ftp://cnam.cnam.fr/pub/Ada/Paradise)}. E-mail: "paradise-info@cnam.cnam.fr". (1992-09-30)

pasos2 ::: version: Alphaparts: Compiler, run-time libraryauthor: Willem Jan Withagen .A PASCAL/i386 compiler which generates code for OS/2 and DOS. It uses EMX as DOS extender and GNU/GAS, MASM or TASM as assembler.1993-12-17

pasos2 version:  Alpha parts:       Compiler, run-time library author:       Willem Jan Withagen "wjw@eb.ele.tue.nl" how to get:     {(ftp://ftp.eb.ele.tue.nl/pub/src/pascal/pasos2*)}. A PASCAL/i386 compiler which generates code for OS/2 and DOS. It uses EMX as DOS extender and GNU/GAS, MASM or TASM as assembler. 1993-12-17

PDP-7 ::: (computer) A minicomputer sold by DEC in 1964. It had a memory cycle time of 1.75 microseconds and add time of 4 microseconds. I/O included a keyboard, printer, paper-tape and dual transport DECtape drives (type 555).DEC provided an advanced Fortran II compiler, a Symbolic Assembler, Editor, DDT Debugging System, Maintenance routines and a library of arithmetic, utility and programming aids developed on the program-compatible PDP-4.[DEC sales brochure].The PDP-7 was considered reliable enough (when properly programmed) to be used for control of nuclear reactors and such.Around 1970 Ken Thompson built the operating system that became Unix on a scavenged PDP-7 so he could play a descendant of the SPACEWAR game. (1995-03-10)

PDP-7 "computer" A minicomputer sold by DEC in 1964. It had a memory cycle time of 1.75 microseconds and add time of 4 microseconds. I/O included a keyboard, printer, {paper-tape} and dual transport DECtape drives (type 555). DEC provided an "advanced" {Fortran II} {compiler}, a Symbolic {Assembler}, Editor, {DDT} Debugging System, Maintenance routines and a library of arithmetic, utility and programming aids developed on the program-compatible {PDP-4}. [DEC sales brochure]. The PDP-7 was considered reliable enough (when properly programmed) to be used for control of nuclear reactors and such. Around 1970 {Ken Thompson} built the {operating system} that became {Unix} on a scavenged {PDP-7} so he could play a descendant of the {SPACEWAR} game. (1995-03-10)

Philosophical Library, 1950.

Philosophical Library [1953].

Philosophical Library, 1955.

Philosophical Library, Inc., New York, N. Y., publishers of Hindu Philosophy by T. Bernard, An Encyclopedia of Astrology by N. de Vore, An Encyclopedia of Religion by V. Ferm (ed.), Forgotten Religions by V. Ferm (ed.), Introduction to Comparative Mysticism by J. de Marquette, The Splendour That Was Egypt by M. A. Murray, Dictionary of Philosophy by D. D. Runes (ed.), and Christian Science and Philosophy by H. W. Steiger.

Philosophical Library

PHILOSOPHICAL LIBRARY

Pickthall. New York: New American Library, 1954.

portable computer "computer" (Commonly, "laptop") A portable {personal computer} you can carry with one hand. Some laptops run so hot that it would be quite uncomforable to actually use them on your lap for long. The term "notebook" is often used to describe these, though it also implies a low weight (less than 2kg). A "{luggable}" is one you could carry in one hand but is so heavy you wouldn't want to. One that can by easily operated while held in one hand is a "{palmtop}". The computer considered by most historians to be the first true portable computer was the {Osborne 1} but see the link below for other contenders. {History of laptop computers (http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/bllaptop.htm)}. (2007-05-21)

printf "library" The standard function in the {C} programming language library for printing formatted output. The first argument is a format string which may contain ordinary characters which are just printed and "conversion specifications" - sequences beginning with '%' such as %6d which describe how the other arguments should be printed, in this case as a six-character decimal integer padded on the right with spaces. Possible conversion specifications are d, i or u (decimal integer), o ({octal}), x, X or p ({hexadecimal}), f ({floating-point}), e or E ({mantissa} and {exponent}, e.g. 1.23E-22), g or G (f or e format as appropriate to the value printed), c (a single character), s (a string), % (i.e. %% - print a % character). d, i, f, e, g are signed, the rest are unsigned. The variant {fprintf} prints to a given output stream and sprintf stores what would be printed in a string variable. {Unix manual page}: printf(3). (1996-12-08)

printf ::: (library) The standard function in the C programming language library for printing formatted output.The first argument is a format string which may contain ordinary characters which are just printed and conversion specifications - sequences beginning with '%' such as %6d which describe how the other arguments should be printed, in this case as a six-character decimal integer padded on the right with spaces.Possible conversion specifications are d, i or u (decimal integer), o (octal), x, X or p (hexadecimal), f (floating-point), e or E (mantissa and exponent, e.g. single character), s (a string), % (i.e. %% - print a % character). d, i, f, e, g are signed, the rest are unsigned.The variant fprintf prints to a given output stream and sprintf stores what would be printed in a string variable.Unix manual page: printf(3). (1996-12-08)

Pthreads ::: A library of pre-emptive thread routines (for Ada?), designed and implemented in the PART (POSIX / Ada-Runtime Project). Pthreads is compliant with POSIX 1003.4a Draft 6.Version 1.17 has been ported to Sun-4/SunOS 4.1.x. . Mailing list: (Subject: subscribe-pthreads). E-mail: . (1993-07-22)

QT-OBJECTS ::: A library by Michael Travers (1992-12-20)

QT-OBJECTS A library by Michael Travers "mt@media.mit.edu" and others providing an interface between {MCL} and {QuickTime}. (1992-12-20)

QuickDraw "library, graphics" Part of the software in the {Apple Macintosh}'s {ROM} that performs graphics operations. (1995-05-11)

QuickDraw ::: (library, graphics) Part of the software in the Apple Macintosh's ROM that performs graphics operations. (1995-05-11)

Real Time Streaming Protocol "multimedia, networking, protocol" (RTSP) An {application layer} {protocol} for controlling delivery of a {stream} of {real-time} {multimedia} content. RTSP allows users to start playing from a certain position. It does not actually deliver the data, but works alongside existing delivery channels such as {UDP}, {TCP}, or IP {multicast}. RTSP was developed by {RealNetworks}, {Netscape Communications}, and {Columbia University}, and is described in {RFC 2326}, April 1998. RTSP is an {IETF} proposed {standard}. {FAQ (http://real.com/devzone/library/fireprot/rtsp/faq.html)}. (1999-08-26)

Recursive Macro Actuated Generator ::: (tool) (RMAG) Robert A. Magnuson, NIH ca 1970.A stand-alone macroprocessor for IBM 360/370 under VS or OS. Many built-in features and a library of several hundred macros. Several large systems were written in RMAG to generate source code for languages such as IBM JCL, IBM assembly language, COBOL.There was also a system (SLANG: Structured LANGuage compiler) which would generate 370 assembly language from a pseudo-structured-programming language, based on Michael Kessler's structure programming macros developed at IBM.[Project RMAG--RMAG22 User's Guide, R.A. Magnuson, NIH-DCRT-DMB-SSS-UG103, NIH, DHEW, Bethesda, MD 20205 (1977)]. (1995-11-23)

Recursive Macro Actuated Generator "tool" (RMAG) Robert A. Magnuson, NIH ca 1970. A stand-alone macroprocessor for IBM 360/370 under VS or OS. Many built-in features and a library of several hundred macros. Several large systems were written in RMAG to generate source code for languages such as IBM JCL, IBM assembly language, COBOL. There was also a system (SLANG: Structured LANGuage compiler) which would generate 370 assembly language from a pseudo-structured-programming language, based on Michael Kessler's structure programming macros developed at IBM. ["Project RMAG--RMAG22 User's Guide", R.A. Magnuson, NIH-DCRT-DMB-SSS-UG103, NIH, DHEW, Bethesda, MD 20205 (1977)]. (1995-11-23)

regex ::: The GNU regular expression matching library. See also Rx.

regex The {GNU} {regular expression} matching library. See also {Rx}.

Remote Desktop Protocol "protocol" (RDP) A {Microsoft} {protocol} that provides remote display and input for {Windows}. RDP's {video driver} renders display output by sending packets to the client which translates them into corresponding Microsoft Win32 graphics device interface API calls. Client mouse and keyboard events are redirected from the client to virtual keyboard and mouse drivers on the server. RDP 4.0 was introduced with {Windows NT} Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition. Windows 2000 Terminal Services included RDP 5.0. The Terminal Services Advanced Client (TSAC), an RDP client based on an {ActiveX control}, also supports RDP 5.0. RDP 5.0 provides enhanced performance over low-speed connections. Windows XP uses RDP 5.1 and includes Remote Desktop Web Connection, which is an updated version of the TSAC. RDP extends the {ITU T.120} protocols, allowing separate virtual channels for device communication and presentation data from the server, as well as encrypted mouse and keyboard data. Compare: {VNC}. {MSDN RDP (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/termserv/termserv/remote_desktop_protocol.asp)}. {thinclient.net (http://thinclient.net/technology/RDP_Features_and_Performance.htm)}. (2004-09-14)

Remote Method Invocation ::: (programming) (RMI) Part of the Java programming language library which enables a Java program running on one computer to access the objects and methods of another Java program running on a different computer. . (1997-09-04)

Remote Method Invocation "programming" (RMI) Part of the {Java} {programming language} {library} which enables a Java program running on one computer to access the {objects} and {methods} of another Java program running on a different computer. {Home (http://java.sun.com/products/jdk/1.1/docs/guide/rmi/index.html)}. (1997-09-04)

resolver ::: (networking) The TCP/IP protocol library software that formats requests to be sent to the Domain Name Server for hostname to Internet address conversion. (1995-03-28)

resolver "networking" The {TCP/IP} {protocol} library software that formats requests to be sent to the {Domain Name Server} for {hostname} to {IP address} conversion. (1995-03-28)

Riordan's Internet Privacy Enhanced Mail ::: (messaging) (RIPEM) A (not yet complete, but useful) implementation of Privacy Enhanced Mail (PEM). RIPEM allows your electronic mail to have the four originator authenticity, message integrity measures and non-repudiation of origin (always).RIPEM was written primarily by Mark Riordan . Most of the code is in the public domain, except for the RSA routines, which are a library called RSAREF licensed from RSA Data Security, Inc.The current (November 1993) version of RIPEM is 1.1a; the current version of the Macintosh port of RIPEM is 0.8b1. (1998-07-03)

Riordan's Internet Privacy Enhanced Mail "messaging" (RIPEM) A (not yet complete, but useful) implementation of {Privacy Enhanced Mail} (PEM). RIPEM allows your {electronic mail} to have the four security facilities provided by PEM: {disclosure protection} (optional), originator authenticity, message {integrity} measures and {non-repudiation} of origin (always). RIPEM was written primarily by Mark Riordan "mrr@scss3.cl.msu.edu". Most of the code is in the {public domain}, except for the {RSA} routines, which are a library called RSAREF licensed from {RSA Data Security, Inc}. The current (November 1993) version of RIPEM is 1.1a; the current version of the {Macintosh} {port} of RIPEM is 0.8b1. (1998-07-03)

RLF ::: Reuse Library Framework of the DoD.

RLF {Reuse Library Framework} of the {DoD}.

Romero, Francisco: Born in 1891. Professor of Philosophy at the Universities of Buenos Aires, La Plata, and the National Institute for Teachers. Director of the Philosophical Library of the Losada Publishing House, and distinguished staff member of various cultural magazines and reviews in Latin America. Francisco Romero is one of the most important figures in the philosophical movement of South America. He is the immediate successor of Korn, and as such he follows on the footsteps of his master, doing pioneer work, not only striving towards an Argentinian philosophy, but also campaigning for philosophy in the nations of Latin America through a program of cultural diffusion. Among his most important writings, the following may be mentioned: Vteja y Nueva Concepcion de la Realidad, 1932; Los Problemas de la Filosofia de la Cultura, 1936; Filosofia de la Persona, 1938; Logica (In collaboration with Pucciarelli), 1936; Programa de una Filosofia, 1940; Un Filosofo de la Problematicidad, 1934; Descartes y Husserl, 1938; Contribucion al Estudio de las Relaciones de Comparacion, 1938; Teoria y Practica de la Verdad, 1939. Three characteristic notes may be observed in the philosophy of Romero Aporetics or Problematics, Philosophy of Weltanschauungen, Philosophy of the Person. The first has to do with his criterion of knowledge. Justice to all the facts of experience, over against mere system building, seems to be the watchword. The desirability and gradual imposition of Structuralism as the modern Weltanschauung, over against outworn world conceptions such as Evolution, Mechanism, Rationalism, etc., is the emphasis of the second principle of his philosophy. Personality as a mere function of transcendence, with all that transcendence implies in the realm of value and history, carries the main theme of his thought. See Latin American Philosophy. -- J.A.F.

Ruby "language" 1. A {relational language} designed by Jones and M. Sheeran in 1986 for describing and designing circuits (a {hardware description language}). Ruby programs denote {binary relations} and programs are built-up inductively from primitive relations using a pre-defined set of {relational operators}. Ruby programs also have a geometric interpretation as networks of primitive relations connected by wires, which is important when layout is considered in circuit design. Ruby has been continually developed since 1986, and has been used to design many different kinds of circuits, including {systolic arrays}, {butterfly networks} and arithmetic circuits. {(ftp://ftp.cs.chalmers.se/pub/misc/ruby/)}. E-mail: "graham@cs.chalmers.se". ["Ruby - A Language of Relations and Higher-Order Functions", M. Sheeran, Proc 3rd Banff Workshop on Hardware Verification, Springer 1990]. (1994-10-27) 2. One of five pedagogical languages based on {Markov algorithms}, used in Higman's report (below). The other languages are {Brilliant}, {Diamond}, {Nonpareil}, and {Pearl}. ["Nonpareil, a Machine Level Machine Independent Language for the Study of Semantics", B. Higman, ULICS Intl Report No ICSI 170, U London (1968)]. (1994-10-27) 3. A fully {object oriented} {interpreted} {scripting language} by Yukihiro Matsumoto "matz@netlab.co.jp". Similar in scope to {Perl} and {Python}, Ruby has high-level {data types}, automatic {memory management}, {dynamic typing}, a {module} system, {exceptions}, and a rich standard library. Other features are {CLU}-style {iterators} for {loop abstraction}, {singleton classes}/{methods} and {lexical closures}. In Ruby, everything is an {object}, including the basic data types. For example, the number 1 is an instance of {class} Fixnum. Current version (stable): 1.6.7, as of 2002-03-01. {Ruby Home (http://ruby-lang.org/)}. {Ruby Central (http://rubycentral.com/)}. ["Programming Ruby - The Pragmatic Programmer's Guide", David Thomas, Andrew Hunt, Yukihiro Matsumoto pub. Addison Wesley 2000]. (2002-06-19)

Ruby ::: (language)1. A relational language designed by Jones and M. Sheeran in 1986 for describing and designing circuits (a hardware description language). Ruby programs denote geometric interpretation as networks of primitive relations connected by wires, which is important when layout is considered in circuit design.Ruby has been continually developed since 1986, and has been used to design many different kinds of circuits, including systolic arrays, butterfly networks and arithmetic circuits. .E-mail: .[Ruby - A Language of Relations and Higher-Order Functions, M. Sheeran, Proc 3rd Banff Workshop on Hardware Verification, Springer 1990]. (1994-10-27)2. One of five pedagogical languages based on Markov algorithms, used in Higman's report (below). The other languages are Brilliant, Diamond, Nonpareil, and Pearl.[Nonpareil, a Machine Level Machine Independent Language for the Study of Semantics, B. Higman, ULICS Intl Report No ICSI 170, U London (1968)]. (1994-10-27)3. A fully object oriented interpreted scripting language by Yukihiro Matsumoto .Similar in scope to Perl and Python, Ruby has high-level data types, automatic memory management, dynamic typing, a module system, exceptions, and a rich standard library. Other features are CLU-style iterators for loop abstraction, singleton classes/methods and lexical closures.In Ruby, everything is an object, including the basic data types. For example, the number 1 is an instance of class Fixnum.Current version (stable): 1.6.7, as of 2002-03-01. . .[Programming Ruby - The Pragmatic Programmer's Guide, David Thomas, Andrew Hunt, Yukihiro Matsumoto pub. Addison Wesley 2000].(2002-06-19)

run-time library ::: (operating system, programming, library) A file containing routines which are linked with a program at run time rather than at compile-time. The advantage all active programs, thus reducing RAM and virtual memory requirements and program load time. (1997-07-16)

run-time library "operating system, programming, library" A file containing routines which are linked with a program at {run time} rather than at {compile-time}. The advantage of such {dynamic linking} is that only one copy of the library needs to be stored, rather than a copy being included with each {executable} that refers to it. This can greatly reduce the disk space occupied by programs. Furthermore, it means that all programs immediately benefit from changes (e.g. {bug} fixes) to the single copy of the library without requiring recompilation. Since the library code is normally classified as read-only to the {memory management} system, it is possible for a single copy of the library to be loaded into memory and shared by all active programs, thus reducing {RAM} and {virtual memory} requirements and program load time. (1997-07-16)

run-time system ::: (programming) (RTS, run-time support, run-time) Library code and processes which support software written in a particular language running on a between the program and the operating system such as system calls, program start-up and termination, and memory management. (1999-07-26)

run-time system "programming" (RTS, run-time support, run-time) Library code and processes which support software written in a particular language running on a particular {platform}. The RTS typically deals with details of the interface between the program and the {operating system} such as {system calls}, program start-up and termination, and {memory management}. (1999-07-26)

Samba ::: (networking) A free suite of programs which implement the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol.Originally developed for Unix by Andrew Tridgell at the Australian National University, the Samba server allows files and printers on the host operating system to be shared with clients such as Windows for Workgroups, DOS, OS/2, Windows NT and others.For example, instead of using telnet to log in to a Unix machine to edit a file there, a Windows 95 user might connect a drive in the Windows Explorer to a Samba server on the Unix machine and edit the file in a Windows editor.A Unix client called smbclient, built from the same source code, allows ftp-like access to SMB resources.Samba is available for many Unix variants, OS/2, and VMS. Porting to Novell Netware is in progress (August 1996).smblib is a portable generic library for making SMB calls for implementing client/server functions from within any program. Linux implements a complete file system (based on smbclient) so by default Linux users have full access to resources on LAN Server, Windows NT and LAN Manager networks. . (1998-11-22)

Samba "networking" A free suite of programs which implement the {Server Message Block} (SMB) protocol. Originally developed for {Unix} by Andrew Tridgell at the {Australian National University}, the Samba {server} allows files and printers on the {host} {operating system} to be shared with {clients} such as {Windows for Workgroups}, {DOS}, {OS/2}, {Windows NT} and others. For example, instead of using {telnet} to log in to a Unix machine to edit a file there, a {Windows 95} user might connect a drive in the Windows {Explorer} to a Samba server on the Unix machine and edit the file in a Windows editor. A Unix client called smbclient, built from the same {source code}, allows {ftp}-like access to SMB resources. Samba is available for many Unix variants, OS/2, and {VMS}. Porting to {Novell Netware} is in progress (August 1996). smblib is a {portable} generic library for making SMB calls for implementing {client/server} functions from within any program. {Linux} implements a complete file system (based on smbclient) so by default Linux users have full access to resources on {LAN Server}, Windows NT and {LAN Manager} networks. {(http://samba.org/samba/samba.html)}. (1998-11-22)

San Francisco ::: (project, library) IBM's Java component framework application template.The San Francisco Project, started in 1998(?), aims to create a generic set of java building blocks to provide the core functions of general business processes such as sales order processing, general ledger, inventory management and product distribution.The project aims to use component based design allowing easy vendor customisation and Java code generation allowing applications to be built and run across multiple platforms. It also aims to be compatible with third party development tools. . (1998-08-16)

San Francisco "project, library" {IBM}'s {Java} component {framework} application template. The San Francisco Project, started in 1998(?), aims to create a generic set of {java} building blocks to provide the core functions of general business processes such as sales order processing, general ledger, inventory management and product distribution. The project aims to use component based design allowing easy vendor customisation and Java code generation allowing applications to be built and run across multiple platforms. It also aims to be compatible with third party development tools. {(http://ibm.com/Java/Sanfrancisco/)}. (1998-08-16)

Sather "language" /Say-ther/ (Named after the Sather Tower at {UCB}, as opposed to the Eiffel Tower). An interactive {object-oriented} language designed by Steve M. Omohundro at {ICSI} in 1991. Sather has simple {syntax}, similar to {Eiffel}, but it is non-proprietary and faster. Sather 0.2 was nearly a subset of Eiffel 2.0, but Sather 1.0 adds many distinctive features: parameterised {class}es, {multiple inheritance}, statically-checked {strong typing}, {garbage collection}. The compiler generates {C} as an {intermediate language}. There are versions for most {workstations}. Sather attempts to retain much of {Eiffel}'s theoretical cleanliness and simplicity while achieving the efficiency of {C++}. The compiler generates efficient and portable C code which is easily integrated with existing code. A variety of development tools including a debugger and {browser} based on {gdb} and a {GNU Emacs} development environment have also been written. There is also a {class library} with several hundred classes that implement a variety of basic data structures and numerical, geometric, connectionist, statistical, and graphical abstractions. The authors would like to encourage contributions to the library and hope to build a large collection of efficient, well-written, well-tested classes in a variety of areas of computer science. Sather runs on {Sun-4}, {HP9000}/300, {Decstation} 5000, {MIPS}, {Sony News} 3000, {Sequent}/{Dynix}, {SCO} {SysV}R3.2, {NeXT}, {Linux}. See also {dpSather}, {pSather}, {Sather-K}. {(ftp://ftp.icsi.berkeley.edu/pub/sather)}. E-mail: "sather-admin@icsi.berkeley.edu". Mailing list: sather-request@icsi.berkeley.edu. (1995-04-26)

Sather ::: (language) /Say-ther/ (Named after the Sather Tower at UCB, as opposed to the Eiffel Tower).An interactive object-oriented language designed by Steve M. Omohundro at ICSI in 1991. Sather has simple syntax, similar to Eiffel, but it is non-proprietary and faster.Sather 0.2 was nearly a subset of Eiffel 2.0, but Sather 1.0 adds many distinctive features: parameterised classes, multiple inheritance, statically-checked strong typing, garbage collection. The compiler generates C as an intermediate language. There are versions for most workstations.Sather attempts to retain much of Eiffel's theoretical cleanliness and simplicity while achieving the efficiency of C++. The compiler generates efficient and portable C code which is easily integrated with existing code.A variety of development tools including a debugger and browser based on gdb and a GNU Emacs development environment have also been written. There is also a library and hope to build a large collection of efficient, well-written, well-tested classes in a variety of areas of computer science.Sather runs on Sun-4, HP9000/300, Decstation 5000, MIPS, Sony News 3000, Sequent/Dynix, SCO SysVR3.2, NeXT, Linux.See also dpSather, pSather, Sather-K. .E-mail: .Mailing list: (1995-04-26)

scanf ::: The C library routine that reads data from the standard input stream stdin into the locations given by each entry in its argument list. The first argument is a argument points to a variable with a type that corresponds to a type specifier in the format-string.Unix manual page: scanf(3). (1995-02-23)

scanf The {C} library routine that reads data from the {standard input} {stream} {stdin} into the locations given by each entry in its argument list. The first argument is a format string which controls interpretation of the input and each subsequent argument points to a variable with a type that corresponds to a type specifier in the format-string. {Unix manual page}: scanf(3). (1995-02-23)

Scheme Library "library" (SLIB) A portable {Scheme} library providing compatibiliy and utility functions for all standard Scheme implementations. Version 2c5 supports {Bigloo}, {Chez}, {ELK}, {GAMBIT}, {MacScheme}, {MITScheme}, {PocketScheme}, {RScheme}, {Scheme-"C}, {Scheme48}, {SCM}, {SCSH}, {T3.1}, {UMB-Scheme}, and {VSCM}. {(http://swissnet.ai.mit.edu/~jaffer/SLIB.html)}. (1999-06-07)

Scheme Library ::: (library) (SLIB) A portable Scheme library providing compatibiliy and utility functions for all standard Scheme implementations.Version 2c5 supports Bigloo, Chez, ELK, GAMBIT, MacScheme, MITScheme, PocketScheme, RScheme, Scheme->C, Scheme48, SCM, SCSH, T3.1, UMB-Scheme, and VSCM. . (1999-06-07)

SCOOPS Scheme Object-Oriented Programming System. Developed at {Texas Instruments} in 1986. It supports {multiple inheritance} and {class variables}. {(ftp://altdorf.ai.mit.edu/archive/scheme-library/unsupported/CScheme)}. (1994-11-01)

SDI ::: 1. (library) Selective Dissemination of Information.2. (programming) Single Document Interface. (1999-03-30)

SDI 1. "library" {Selective Dissemination of Information}. 2. "programming" {Single Document Interface}. (1999-03-30)

See also the Bruce Codex, Bodleian Library, Oxford.

Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the

Selective Dissemination of Information "library" (SDI) (From Library Science) SDI is a current awareness system which alerts you to the latest publications in your specified field(s) of interest. A user registers at such a system with keywords representing his or her fields of interest, called a search profile. When new publications matching the search profile appear, the system informs the user of them instantly, periodically or upon request. Some systems may also be able to inform the user if changes in already notified publications occur. {Health Science Library SDI (http://www-hsl.mcmaster.ca/sdi.html)}. {FIZ Karlsruhe Scientific Service Institution (http://fiz-karlsruhe.de/mc-sdi.html)}. (1997-03-10)

Selective Dissemination of Information ::: (library) (SDI) (From Library Science) SDI is a current awareness system which alerts you to the latest publications in your specified field(s) of interest.A user registers at such a system with keywords representing his or her fields of interest, called a search profile. When new publications matching the search upon request. Some systems may also be able to inform the user if changes in already notified publications occur. FIZ Karlsruhe Scientific Service Institution . (1997-03-10)

SETL2 {SETL} with more conventional {Ada}-like syntax, {lexical scope}, full block structure, {first-class functions} and a package and library system. Ported to {OS/2}, {MS-DOS} (3.1 up), Extended {MS-DOS} (80286 and higher processors with extended memory), {Macintosh} (with the {MPW} environment), Sun-3 (SunOS 4), Sun-4 (SunOS 4), IBM RS/6000 (AIX 3.1), DEC RISC product line (Ultrix 4.0), DEC Vaxen (Mt. Xinu Unix or VMS). {(ftp://cs.nyu.edu/pub/languages/setl2)}. Please e-mail Kirk Snyder "snyder@spunky.cs.nyu.edu" if you take a copy. ["The SETL2 Programming Language", W. Kirk Snyder, Courant Inst TR 490, Jan 1990].

SETL2 ::: SETL with more conventional Ada-like syntax, lexical scope, full block structure, first-class functions and a package and library system. Ported to (SunOS 4), IBM RS/6000 (AIX 3.1), DEC RISC product line (Ultrix 4.0), DEC Vaxen (Mt. Xinu Unix or VMS). if you take a copy.[The SETL2 Programming Language, W. Kirk Snyder, Courant Inst TR 490, Jan 1990].

shelf ::: A public library of classes for the Eiffel language.

shelf A public library of {class}es for the {Eiffel} language.

shelve ::: v. t. --> To furnish with shelves; as, to shelve a closet or a library.
To place on a shelf. Hence: To lay on the shelf; to put aside; to dismiss from service; to put off indefinitely; as, to shelve an officer; to shelve a claim. ::: v. i.


SICL {Standard Instrument Control Library}

S-Lang "language" A small but highly functional {embedded} {interpreter}. S-Lang was a stack-based {postfix} language resembling {Forth} and {BC}/{DC} with limited support for {infix notation}. Now it has a {C}-like infix syntax. {Arrays}, stings, integers, {floating-point} and {autoloading} are all suported. The editor {JED} embeds S-lang. S-Lang is available under the {GNU Library General Public License}. It runs on {MS-DOS}, {Unix}, and {VMS}. {(ftp://amy.tch.harvard.edu/)}. E-mail: John E. Davis "davis@tch.harvard.edu". (2000-10-30)

S-Lang ::: (language) A small but highly functional embedded interpreter. S-Lang was a stack-based postfix language resembling Forth and BC/DC with limited support for infix notation. Now it has a C-like infix syntax. Arrays, stings, integers, floating-point and autoloading are all suported. The editor JED embeds S-lang.S-Lang is available under the GNU Library General Public License. It runs on MS-DOS, Unix, and VMS.Latest version: 0.94, as of 1993-06-12. .E-mail: John E. Davis .(2000-10-30)

SLIB ::: Scheme Library

SLIB {Scheme Library}

Smalltalk "language" The pioneering {object-oriented programming} system developed in 1972 by the Software Concepts Group, led by {Alan Kay}, at {Xerox PARC} between 1971 and 1983. It includes a language, a programming environment, and an extensive object library. Smalltalk took the concepts of {class} and {message} from {Simula-67} and made them all-pervasive. Innovations included the {bitmap display}, windowing system, and use of a {mouse}. The {syntax} is very simple. The fundamental construction is to send a message to an {object}: object message or with extra parameters object message: param1 secondArg: param2 .. nthArg: paramN where "secondArg:" etc. are considered to be part of the message name. Five pseudo-variables are defined: "self", "super", "nil", "true", "false". "self" is the receiver of the current message. "super" is used to delegate processing of a message to the {superclass} of the receiver. "nil" is a reference to "nothing" (an instance of UndefinedObject). All variables initially contain a reference to nil. "true" and "false" are {Booleans}. In Smalltalk, any message can be sent to any object. The recipient object itself decides (based on the message name, also called the "message selector") how to respond to the message. Because of that, the {multiple inheritance} system included in the early versions of Smalltalk-80 appeared to be unused in practice. All modern implementations have single inheritance, so each class can have at most one superclass. Early implementations were {interpreted} but all modern ones use {dynamic translation} (JIT). Early versions were Smalltalk-72, Smalltalk-74, Smalltalk-76 (inheritance taken from Simula, and concurrency), and Smalltalk-78, {Smalltalk-80}. Other versions include {Little Smalltalk}, {Smalltalk/V}, {Kamin's interpreters}. Current versions are {VisualWorks}, {Squeak}, {VisualAge}, {Dolphin Smalltalk}, {Object Studio}, {GNU Smalltalk}. See also: {International Smalltalk Association}. {UIUC Smalltalk archive (http://st-www.cs.uiuc.edu/)}. {FAQ (http://XCF.Berkeley.EDU/pub/misc/smalltalk/FAQ/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.lang.smalltalk}. ["The Smalltalk-76 Programming System Design and Implementation", D.H. Ingalls, 5th POPL, ACM 1978, pp. 9-16]. (2001-09-11)

Smalltalk ::: (language) The pioneering object-oriented programming system developed in 1972 by the Software Concepts Group, led by Alan Kay, at Xerox PARC between 1971 and 1983. It includes a language, a programming environment, and an extensive object library.Smalltalk took the concepts of class and message from Simula-67 and made them all-pervasive. Innovations included the bitmap display, windowing system, and use of a mouse.The syntax is very simple. The fundamental construction is to send a message to an object: object message or with extra parameters object message: param1 secondArg: param2 .. nthArg: paramN where secondArg: etc. are considered to be part of the message name.Five pseudo-variables are defined: self, super, nil, true, false. self is the receiver of the current message. super is used to delegate to nothing (an instance of UndefinedObject). All variables initially contain a reference to nil. true and false are Booleans.In Smalltalk, any message can be sent to any object. The recipient object itself decides (based on the message name, also called the message selector) how to practice. All modern implementations have single inheritance, so each class can have at most one superclass.Early implementations were interpreted but all modern ones use dynamic translation (JIT).Early versions were Smalltalk-72, Smalltalk-74, Smalltalk-76 (inheritance taken from Simula, and concurrency), and Smalltalk-78, Smalltalk-80. Other versions are VisualWorks, Squeak, VisualAge, Dolphin Smalltalk, Object Studio, GNU Smalltalk.See also: International Smalltalk Association. . .Usenet newsgroup: comp.lang.smalltalk.[The Smalltalk-76 Programming System Design and Implementation, D.H. Ingalls, 5th POPL, ACM 1978, pp. 9-16].(2001-09-11)

SMG ::: Screen Management Guidelines. A VMS package of run-time library routines providing windows on DEC VT100 terminals.

SMG Screen Management Guidelines. A {VMS} package of run-time library routines providing windows on {DEC} {VT100} terminals.

socket "networking" The {Berkeley Unix} mechansim for creating a virtual connection between processes. Sockets interface {Unix}'s {standard I/O} with its {network} communication facilities. They can be of two types, stream (bi-directional) or {datagram} (fixed length destination-addressed messages). The socket library function socket() creates a communications end-point or socket and returns a {file descriptor} with which to access that socket. The socket has associated with it a socket address, consisting of a {port} number and the local host's network address. {Unix manual page}: socket(2). (1995-01-31)

software ::: (programming) (Or computer program, program, code) The instructions executed by a computer, as opposed to the physical device on which they run (the hardware).The term was coined by the eminent statistician, John Tukey.Programs stored on non-volatile storage built from integrated circuits (e.g. ROM or PROM) are usually called firmware.Software can be split into two main types - system software and application software or application programs. System software is any software required to specific to any particular application. Examples of system software would include the operating system, compilers, editors and sorting programs.Examples of application programs would include an accounts package or a CAD program. Other broad classes of application software include real-time software, business software, scientific and engineering software, embedded software, personal computer software and artificial intelligence software.Software includes both source code written by humans and executable machine code produced by assemblers or compilers. It does not usually include the data (formulae and macros) and data. There are also various intermediate compiled or semi-compiled, forms of software such as library files and byte-code.Some claim that documentation (both paper and electronic) is also software. Others go further and define software to be programs plus documentation though this does not correspond with common usage.The noun program describes a single, complete and more-or-less self-contained list of instructions, often stored in a single file, whereas code and to suggest an interest in the implementation details whereas software is more of a user's term.(2002-07-21)

software "programming" (Or "computer program", "program", "code") The instructions executed by a computer, as opposed to the physical device on which they run (the "{hardware}"). The term was coined by the eminent statistician, {John Tukey}. Programs stored on {non-volatile storage} built from {integrated circuits} (e.g. {ROM} or {PROM}) are usually called {firmware}. Software can be split into two main types - {system software} and application software or {application programs}. System software is any software required to support the production or execution of application programs but which is not specific to any particular application. Examples of system software would include the {operating system}, {compilers}, editors and sorting programs. Examples of application programs would include an accounts package or a {CAD} program. Other broad classes of application software include {real-time} software, {business software}, scientific and engineering software, {embedded software}, personal computer software and {artificial intelligence} software. Software includes both {source code} written by humans and executable {machine code} produced by {assemblers} or {compilers}. It does not usually include the data processed by programs unless this is in a format such as {multimedia} which depends on the use of computers for its presentation. This distinction becomes unclear in cases such as {spread sheets} which can contain both instructions (formulae and {macros}) and data. There are also various intermediate compiled or {semi-compiled}, forms of software such as {library} files and {byte-code}. Some claim that {documentation} (both paper and electronic) is also software. Others go further and define software to be programs plus documentation though this does not correspond with common usage. The noun "program" describes a single, complete and more-or-less self-contained list of instructions, often stored in a single {file}, whereas "code" and "software" are uncountable nouns describing some number of instructions which may constitute one or more programs or part thereof. Most programs, however, rely heavily on various kinds of {operating system} software for their execution. The nounds "code" and "software" both refer to the same thing but "code" tends to suggest an interest in the implementation details whereas "software" is more of a user's term. (2002-07-21)

spawn ::: (operating system) To create a child process in a multitasking operating system. E.g. Unix's fork system call or one of the spawn() library routines provided by most MS-DOS, Novell NetWare and OS/2 C compilers - spawnl(), spawnle(), etc. (1995-03-28)

spawn "operating system" To create a {child process} in a {multitasking} {operating system}. E.g. {Unix}'s {fork} {system call} or one of the spawn() library routines provided by most {MS-DOS}, {Novell NetWare} and {OS/2} {C} compilers - spawnl(), spawnle(), etc. (1995-03-28)

SRC Modula-3 Version 2.11 compiler(-"C), run-time, library, documentation The goal of Modula-3 is to be as simple and safe as it can be while meeting the needs of modern systems programmers. Instead of exploring new features, we studied the features of the Modula family of languages that have proven themselves in practice and tried to simplify them into a harmonious language. We found that most of the successful features were aimed at one of two main goals: greater robustness, and a simpler, more systematic type system. Modula-3 retains one of Modula-2's most successful features, the provision for explicit interfaces between modules. It adds objects and classes, exception handling, garbage collection, lightweight processes (or threads), and the isolation of unsafe features. conformance: implements the language defined in SPwM3. ports: i386/AIX 68020/DomainOS Acorn/RISCiX MIPS/Ultrix 68020/HP-UX RS/6000/AIX IBMRT/4.3 68000/NEXTSTEP i860/SVR4 SPARC/SunOS 68020/SunOS sun386/SunOS Multimax/4.3 VAX/Ultrix Mailing list: comp.lang.modula3 E-mail: Bill Kalsow "kalsow@src.dec.com" From DEC/SRC, Palo Alto, CA. "Modula-3 Report (revised)" Luca Cardelli et al. {(ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/DEC/Modula-3/)}. (1992-02-09)

SRC Modula-3 ::: Version 2.11compiler(->C), run-time, library, documentationThe goal of Modula-3 is to be as simple and safe as it can be while meeting the needs of modern systems conformance: implements the language defined in SPwM3.ports: i386/AIX 68020/DomainOS Acorn/RISCiX MIPS/Ultrix 68020/HP-UX RS/6000/AIX IBMRT/4.3 68000/NEXTSTEP i860/SVR4 SPARC/SunOS 68020/SunOS sun386/SunOS Multimax/4.3 VAX/UltrixMailing list: comp.lang.modula3E-mail: Bill Kalsow From DEC/SRC, Palo Alto, CA. Modula-3 Report (revised) Luca Cardelli et al. . (1992-02-09)

standard input/output ::: (programming, operating system) The predefined input/output channels which every Unix process is initialised with. Standard input is by default from process to another process. The process is normally unaware of such I/O redirection, thus simplifying prototyping of combinations of commands.The C programming language library includes routines to perform basic operations on standard I/O. Examples are printf, allowing text to be sent to standard output, and scanf, allowing the program to read from standard input. (1996-06-07)

standard input/output "programming, operating system" The predefined input/output channels which every {Unix} process is initialised with. Standard input is by default from the terminal, and standard output and standard error are to the terminal. Each of these channels (controlled via a {file descriptor} 0, 1, or 2 - stdin, stdout, stderr) can be redirected to a file, another device or a {pipe} connecting its process to another process. The process is normally unaware of such {I/O redirection}, thus simplifying prototyping of combinations of commands. The {C} programming language library includes routines to perform basic operations on standard I/O. Examples are "printf", allowing text to be sent to standard output, and "scanf", allowing the program to read from standard input. (1996-06-07)

Standard Instrument Control Library (SICL) A {platform}-independent {API} for software to control and test electronic instruments conforming to {IEEE 488}. (1995-01-05)

Standard Instrument Control Library ::: (SICL) A platform-independent API for software to control and test electronic instruments conforming to IEEE 488. (1995-01-05)

Standard ML "language" (SML) Originally an attempt by Robin Milner "rm@lfcs.edinburgh.ac.uk" ca. 1984 to unify the dialects of {ML}, SML has evolved into a robust general-purpose language. Later versions have been maintained by D. B. MacQueen, Lal George "george@research.att.com", and J. H. Reppy "jhr@research.att.com" at AT&T, and A. W. Appel "appel@princeton.edu". SML is {functional}, with {imperative programming} features. It is environment based and {strict}. It adds to ML the {call-by-pattern} of {Hope}, {recursive data types}, {reference types}, typed {exceptions}, and {modules}. (The "core" language excludes the modules). Standard ML is {polymorphic}ally typed and its module system supports flexible yet secure large-scale programming. {Standard ML of New Jersey} is an optimising {native-code compiler} for Standard ML that is written in Standard ML. It runs on a wide range of architectures. The distribution also contains: an extensive library - The Standard ML of New Jersey Library, including detailed documentation; {Concurrent ML} (CML); {eXene} - an elegant interface to {X11} (based on {CML}); {SourceGroup} - a {separate compilation} and "{make}" facility. Implementations: {SML/NJ}, {POPLOG ML}, {Poly/ML}, {Edinburgh SML}, {ANU ML}, {Micro ML}, {lazy sml2c}. {sml2c} compiles to {C}. See also {ML Kit}. Version 0.93 runs on {68000}, {SPARC}, {MIPS}, {HPPA}, {RS/6000}, {Intel 386}, {Intel 486} and {Macintosh}. {Manual (http://dcs.napier.ac.uk/course-notes/sml/manual.html)}. {FTP from ATT (ftp://research.att.com/dist/ml/)}. {FTP from Suny SB (ftp://sbcs.sunysb.edu/)}. Mailing list: sml-request@cs.cmu.edu. ["A Proposal for Standard ML", R. Milner, ACM Symp on LISP and Functional Prog 1984, pp. 184-197]. (1995-12-24)

Standard Widget Toolkit "graphics, programming, standard" (SWT) The {Eclipse Foundation}'s {framework} for developing {graphical user interfaces} in {Java}. SWT is written in explicitly standard Java but uses the {Java Native Interface} to talk to a {platform}-native GUI library. SWT is the third major attempt to give Java a decent GUI framework, following {AWT} and {Swing}. Of the three, SWT is the most consistent with the native GUIs but its programming model is hard to port to non-{Windows} platforms. {Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SWT)}. (2004-12-21)

Storage Allocation and Coding Program "language" (STAC) A symbolic {macro-assembler} for the {English Electric} {DEUCE}. ["DEUCE STAC Programming Manual", DEUCE News No. 38, Report K/AA y 1 DEUCE Library Service, Data Processing and COntrol Systems DIvision, English Electric Company, Kidsgrove, June]. (1998-06-08)

Storage Allocation and Coding Program ::: (language) (STAC) A symbolic macro-assembler for the English Electric DEUCE.[DEUCE STAC Programming Manual, DEUCE News No. 38, Report K/AA y 1 DEUCE Library Service, Data Processing and COntrol Systems DIvision, English Electric Company, Kidsgrove, June]. (1998-06-08)

stream 1. "communications" An {abstraction} referring to any flow of data from a source (or sender, producer) to a single sink (or receiver, consumer). A stream usually flows through a channel of some kind, as opposed to {packets} which may be addressed and routed independently, possibly to multiple recipients. Streams usually require some mechanism for establishing a channel or a "{connection}" between the sender and receiver. 2. "programming" In the {C} language's buffered input/ouput library functions, a stream is associated with a file or device which has been opened using {fopen}. Characters may be read from (written to) a stream without knowing their actual source (destination) and buffering is provided transparently by the library routines. 3. "operating system" Confusingly, {Sun} have called their modular {device driver} mechanism "{STREAMS}". 4. "operating system" In {IBM}'s {AIX} {operating system}, a stream is a {full-duplex} processing and data transfer path between a driver in {kernel space} and a process in {user space}. [IBM AIX 3.2 Communication Programming Concepts, SC23-2206-03]. 5. "communications" {streaming}. 6. "programming" {lazy list}. (1996-11-06)

stream ::: 1. (communications) An abstraction referring to any flow of data from a source (or sender, producer) to a single sink (or receiver, consumer). A stream usually require some mechanism for establishing a channel or a connection between the sender and receiver.2. (programming) In the C language's buffered input/ouput library functions, a stream is associated with a file or device which has been opened their actual source (destination) and buffering is provided transparently by the library routines.3. (operating system) Confusingly, Sun have called their modular device driver mechanism STREAMS.4. (operating system) In IBM's AIX operating system, a stream is a full-duplex processing and data transfer path between a driver in kernel space and a process in user space.[IBM AIX 3.2 Communication Programming Concepts, SC23-2206-03].5. (communications) streaming.6. (programming) lazy list. (1996-11-06)

stub ::: 1. (programming) A dummy procedure used when linking a program with a run-time library. The stub routine need not contain any code and is only present to prevent undefined label errors at link time.2. (programming, networking) A local procedure in a remote procedure call. The client calls the stub to perform some task and need not necessarily be aware that RPC is involved. The stub transmits parameters over the network to the server and returns the results to the caller. (1995-11-09)

stub 1. "programming" A dummy procedure used when linking a program with a {run-time library}. The stub routine need not contain any code and is only present to prevent "undefined label" errors at link time. 2. "programming, networking" A local procedure in a {remote procedure call}. The {client} calls the stub to perform some task and need not necessarily be aware that RPC is involved. The stub transmits parameters over the network to the {server} and returns the results to the caller. (1995-11-09)

Sue ::: The system language used to write an operating system for the IBM 360. It is a cross between Pascal and XPL. It allows type checked separate compilation of internal procedures using a program library.[The System Language for Project Sue, B.L. Clark e al, SIGPLAN Notices 6(9):79-88 (Oct 1971)]. (1994-12-01)

Sue The system language used to write an {operating system} for the {IBM 360}. It is a cross between {Pascal} and {XPL}. It allows type checked {separate compilation} of internal procedures using a program library. ["The System Language for Project Sue", B.L. Clark e al, SIGPLAN Notices 6(9):79-88 (Oct 1971)]. (1994-12-01)

SUPERMAC ::: A general-purpose macro language, embeddable in existing languages as a run-time library.[SUPERMAC - A Macro Facility That can be Added to Existing Compilers, P.J. Brown, Soft Prac & Exp 10(6):431-434]. (1994-12-15)

SUPERMAC A general-purpose {macro} language, embeddable in existing languages as a run-time library. ["SUPERMAC - A Macro Facility That can be Added to Existing Compilers", P.J. Brown, Soft Prac & Exp 10(6):431-434]. (1994-12-15)

Task Control Block "architecture" An {MVS} {control block} used to communicate information about {tasks} within an {address space} that are connected to an {MVS} subsystem such as {MQSeries} for {MVS/ESA} or {CICS}. {FAQ (http://www-4.ibm.com/software/ts/mqseries/library/manuals/csqfao/CSQFAO22.HTM)}. (2000-12-30)

Tcl-DP Tcl-DP extends {Tcl}'s "send" by removing the restriction that you can only send to other clients of the same X11 server. Version 3.0 library by Larry Rowe. {(ftp://toe.cs.berkeley.edu/pub/multimedia/Tcl-DP)}.

Tcl-DP ::: Tcl-DP extends Tcl's send by removing the restriction that you can only send to other clients of the same X11 server. Version 3.0 library by Larry Rowe. .

the Library of Congress, University Fellow (Wroxton College, England), Mr.

the Chenoboskion Library. Extracts quoted by

The Dojo Toolkit "library, programming" A modular, {open source} {JavaScript} library. Dojo is designed for easy development of JavaScript- or {AJAX} based applications and websites. It is supported by the Dojo Foundation, which is sponsored by {IBM}, {AOL}, {Sun} and others. The name is from the Japanese term meaning "place of the way", used for a formal place of training. (2008-07-23)

The Macedonian rulers had established here one of the most famous centers of learning known to history including a museum and a library with its famous collections of books; and the injury done to this center of learning and philosophy by various Roman potentates and Moslem invaders was a disaster for ensuing ages.

Tk ::: (programming, graphics) A GUI library, generally used with TCL by John Ousterhout, but also available from within C or Perl. Tk is available for X Window System, Microsoft Windows and Macintosh. Tk looks very similar to Motif.Version 3.5. . (1995-11-09)

Tk "programming, graphics" A {GUI} library, generally used with {TCL} by {John Ousterhout}, but also available from within {C} or {Perl}. Tk is available for {X Window System}, {Microsoft Windows} and {Macintosh}. Tk looks very similar to {Motif}. Version 3.5. {(ftp://ftp.cs.berkeley.edu/ucb/tcl/)}. (1995-11-09)

Transport Layer Interface ::: (networking, programming) (TLI, or Transport Level Interface) A protocol-independent interface for accessing network facilities, modelled after the ISO transport layer (level 4), that first appeared in Unix SVR3.TLI is defined by SVID as transport mechanism for networking interfaces, in preference to sockets, which are biased toward IP and friends. A disavantage is library, libnsl_s.a. The major functions are t_open, t_bind, t_connect, t_listen, t_accept, t_snd, t_rcv, read, write.According to the Solaris t_open man page, XTI (X/OPEN Transport Interface) evolved from TLI, and supports the TLI API for compatibility, with some variations on semantics. (1999-06-10)

Transport Layer Interface "networking, programming" (TLI, or "Transport Level Interface") A {protocol}-independent interface for accessing network facilities, modelled after the {ISO} {transport layer} (level 4), that first appeared in {Unix SVR3}. TLI is defined by {SVID} as transport mechanism for networking interfaces, in preference to {sockets}, which are biased toward {IP} and friends. A disavantage is that a process cannot use read/write directly, but has to use backends using {stdin} and {stdout} to communicate with the network connection. TLI is implemented in SVR4 using the {STREAMS} interface. It adds no new {system calls}, just a library, libnsl_s.a. The major functions are t_open, t_bind, t_connect, t_listen, t_accept, t_snd, t_rcv, read, write. According to the {Solaris} t_open {man page}, XTI (X/OPEN Transport Interface) evolved from TLI, and supports the TLI {API} for compatibility, with some variations on semantics. (1999-06-10)

Trumpet ::: A news reader for Microsoft Windows, using the WinSock library. There is also an MS-DOS version. Trumpet is shareware from Australia. . .alt.winsock.trumpet.[Author?] (1995-01-12)

Trumpet A {news reader} for {Microsoft Windows}, using the {WinSock} library. There is also an {MS-DOS} version. Trumpet is {shareware} from Australia. {(ftp://ftp.utas.edu.au/pc/trumpet)}. {(ftp://ftp.demon.co.uk/pub/ibmpc/winsock/stacks/trumpwsk/)}. {news:alt.winsock.trumpet}. [Author?] (1995-01-12)

Turbo C "language" {Borland}'s {C} {compiler} for {IBM PCs}. Turbo C, version 1.0, was introduced by Borland in 1987. It offered the first integrated edit-compile-run development environment for {C} on {IBM PCs}. It ran in 384KB of memory. It allowed inline assembly, supported all memory models, and offered optimisations for speed, size, {constant folding}, and {jump elimination}. Version 1.5 shipped on five 360 KB diskettes of uncompressed files, and came with sample C programs, including a stripped down spreadsheet called mcalc. Turbo C 2.0 has a debugger, a fast assembler, and an extensive graphics library. Turbo C has been largely supplanted by {Turbo C++}, introduced circa September, 1990 for both {MS-DOS} and {Microsoft Windows}. ["Compiling the facts on C", Richard Hale Shaw, PC Magazine, September 13, 1988, pages 115-183]. (1996-10-31)

Turbo C ::: (language) Borland's C compiler for IBM PCs.Turbo C, version 1.0, was introduced by Borland in 1987. It offered the first integrated edit-compile-run development environment for C on IBM PCs. It ran in 384KB of memory. It allowed inline assembly, supported all memory models, and offered optimisations for speed, size, constant folding, and jump elimination.Version 1.5 shipped on five 360 KB diskettes of uncompressed files, and came with sample C programs, including a stripped down spreadsheet called mcalc.Turbo C 2.0 has a debugger, a fast assembler, and an extensive graphics library.Turbo C has been largely supplanted by Turbo C++, introduced circa September, 1990 for both MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows.[Compiling the facts on C, Richard Hale Shaw, PC Magazine, September 13, 1988, pages 115-183]. (1996-10-31)

Turbo Pascal ::: (language, product) Borland International's Pascal. Perhaps the first integrated development environment for MS-DOS.Versions 1.0-3.0: standard Pascal with a few extensions Versions 4.0 (1987) and 5.0: separate compilation. Version 5.5: object-oriented. Version 6.0: Turbo Vision OOP library. (1995-05-01)

Turbo Pascal "language, product" {Borland International}'s {Pascal}. Perhaps the first integrated development environment for {MS-DOS}. Versions 1.0-3.0: standard Pascal with a few extensions Versions 4.0 (1987) and 5.0: {separate compilation}. Version 5.5: {object-oriented}. Version 6.0: {Turbo Vision} OOP library. {(http://borland.com/Product/ProdInfo.html)}. {tptc} translates Turbo Pascal to {Turbo C}. (1995-05-01)

uC++ ::: Micro-C++. A extension of C++, by Peter A Ruhr of the University of Waterloo, with light-weight concurrency coroutines and mutual exclusion.Version 3.7 for Unix uses GCC 2.3.3 and requires dmake 3.0+ and the setitimer and sigcontext library calls. It runs on Sequent, Sun-4, Sun-3, Ultrix, SGI, RS/6000, HP-PA. .[Software--Practice and Experience, 22(2):137-172, February 1992]. (1993-06-10)

uC++ Micro-C++. A extension of {C++}, by Peter A Ruhr "pabuhr@plg.uwaterloo.ca" of the {University of Waterloo}, with {light-weight concurrency} {coroutines} and {mutual exclusion}. Version 3.7 for {Unix} uses {GCC} 2.3.3 and requires {dmake} 3.0+ and the setitimer and sigcontext library calls. It runs on {Sequent}, {Sun-4}, {Sun-3}, {Ultrix}, {SGI}, {RS/6000}, {HP-PA}. {(ftp://plg.uwaterloo.ca/pub/uSystem/u++-3.7.tar.Z)}. [Software--Practice and Experience, 22(2):137-172, February 1992]. (1993-06-10)

UCS transformation format "standard, character" (UTF) A set of standard {character encodings} in accordance with {ISO 10646}. One of a set of standard character encodings, the most widely used of which are UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32. The code tables in ISO 10646 and in the {Unicode} standard are identical, although the Unicode standard includes additional material. UTF-8 is the most widely used encoding, at least on {Unix} systems. Since it does not include any bytes like '\0' or '/' which have a special meaning in filenames and other {C} library function parameters, and 7-bit ASCII characters have the same encoding under both {ASCII} and UTF-8, the required changes to existing software are minimised. Other UTFs: UTF-1 and UTF-7 are not widely used. {UTF-8 and Unicode FAQ for Unix/Linux (http://cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/unicode.html

Ulm's Modula-2 System "language" A {Modula-2} {compiler}, library and tools by Andreas Borchert "borchert@mathematik.uni-ulm.de". The compiler is derived from the {ETHZ} compiler for the {Lilith} system. Version 2.2.1 conforms to {PIM3}. It requires {gas} version 1.36 (to be found in the same directory). Commercial use requires a licence. It runs on {Sun-3}, {Nixdorf} {Targon}/31, {Concurrent} 3200 Series. {(ftp://titania.mathematik.uni-ulm.de/pub/soft/modula/ulm/sun3/modula-2.2.1.tar.Z)}. (1992-03-02)

Ulm's Modula-2 System ::: (language) A Modula-2 compiler, library and tools by Andreas Borchert . The compiler is derived from the ETHZ version 1.36 (to be found in the same directory). Commercial use requires a licence. It runs on Sun-3, Nixdorf Targon/31, Concurrent 3200 Series. . (1992-03-02)

UMDL {University of Michigan Digital Library Project}

universal thunk ::: (programming, operating system) A software mechanism allowing a Windows 3.1 application to call a 32-bit dynamically linked library (DLL) under Win32s.The Windows 3.1 application which wants to call an entry in a 32-bit DLL instead calls a corresponding entry in a 16-bit DLL. The programmer must also include code to detect whether the 32-bit DLL is loaded. A 32-bit EXE loads the 32-bit DLL.See also Generic Thunk, Flat Thunk.[Calling a Win32 DLL from a Windows 3.1 Application, Win32 SDK Knowledge Base, Article ID Q97785].[Better explanation?] (1997-10-11)

universal thunk "programming, operating system" A software mechanism allowing a {Windows 3.1} {application} to call a {32-bit} {dynamically linked library} (DLL) under {Win32s}. The {Windows 3.1} {application} which wants to call an entry in a 32-bit DLL instead calls a corresponding entry in a {16-bit} DLL. The programmer must also include {code} to detect whether the {32-bit} DLL is loaded. A {32-bit} {EXE} loads the {32-bit} DLL. See also {Generic Thunk}, {Flat Thunk}. ["Calling a Win32 DLL from a Windows 3.1 Application", Win32 SDK Knowledge Base, Article ID Q97785]. [Better explanation?] (1997-10-11)

University of Michigan Digital Library Project "project" (UMDL) The {University of Michigan}'s part of the {Digital Library Initiative}.

University of Michigan Digital Library Project ::: (project) (UMDL) The University of Michigan's part of the Digital Library Initiative.

Unix manual page "operating system" (Or "man page") A part of {Unix}'s extensive on-line documentation. To read a manual page from the Unix command line, type: man [-s"section"] "page" e.g. "man ftp" (the section number can usually be omitted). Pages are traditionally referred to using the notation "page(section)", e.g. ftp(1). Under {SunOS} (which is fairly typical), Section 1 covers commands, 2 {system calls}, 3 C library routines, 4 devices and networks, 5 file formats, 6 games and {demos}, 7 miscellaneous, 8 system administration. Each section has an introduction which can be obtained with, e.g., "man 2 intro". Manual pages are stored as {nroff} source files. Formatted versions are also usually cached. Man pages for most versions of Unix are available on-line in {HTML}. {Unix manual page}: man(1). {Linux man pages (http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/)}. {Solaris man pages (http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/coll/40.10)}. (2010-01-19)

Unix manual page ::: (operating system) (Or man page) A part of Unix's extensive on-line documentation. To read a manual page, type man [-ssection>] page> omitted). Pages are traditionally referred to using the notation page(section), e.g. ftp(1).Under SunOS (which is fairly typical), Section 1 covers commands, 2 system calls, 3 C library routines, 4 devices and networks, 5 file formats, 6 games and demos, 7 miscellaneous, 8 system administration. Each section has an introduction which can be obtained with, e.g., man 2 intro.Manual pages are stored as nroff source files. Formatted versions are also usually cached.Unix manual page: man(1). . .(2000-03-13)

UTF-8 "character" (UCS transformation format 8) An {ASCII}-compatible multibyte {Unicode} and {UCS} encoding, used by {Java} and {Plan 9}. The {Unicode character} set occupies a 16-bit code space. The most obvious Unicode encoding (known as UCS-2) consists of a sequence of 16-bit words. Such strings can contain bytes like '\0' or '/' which have a special meaning in filenames and other {C} library function parameters. In addition, the majority of {Unix} tools expects ASCII files and can't read 16-bit words as characters without major modifications. For these reasons, UCS-2 is not a suitable external encoding of Unicode in filenames, text files, environment variables, etc. The {ISO 10646} {Universal Character Set} (UCS), a superset of Unicode, occupies a 31-bit code space and the obvious UCS-4 encoding for it (a sequence of 32-bit words) has the same problems. The UTF-8 encoding of Unicode and UCS avoids the problems of fixed-length Unicode encodings because an ASCII file encoded in UTF is exactly same as the original ASCII file and all non-ASCII characters are guaranteed to have the most significant bit set (bit 0x80). This means that normal tools for text searching etc. work as expected. UTF-8 is defined in {RFC 2279}. ["File System Safe UCS Transformation Format (FSS_UTF)", X/Open Preliminary Specification, X/Open Company Ltd., Document Number: P316. This information also appears in ISO/IEC 10646, Annex P]. {Plan 9 UTF manual entry (ftp://ftp.uu.net/doc/obi/Bell.Labs/plan9pm/09utf.ps.Z)}. (1998-07-29)

vatican ::: n. --> A magnificent assemblage of buildings at Rome, near the church of St. Peter, including the pope&

VCL {Visual Component Library}

Visual Component Library "programming" {VCL} A {application framework} library for {Microsoft Windows} and {Borland Software Corp.}'s {Delphi} and {C++Builder} {rapid application development} software. VCL was originally designed for Delphi but is now also used for C++Builder. This replaces {OWL} {Object Windows Library} as Borland's Windows C++ framework of choice. VCL encapsulates the C-based {Win32 API} into a much easier to use, {object-oriented} form. Like its direct rival, {Microsoft Foundation Class Library} (MFC), VCL includes classes to create Windows programs. The VCL component class can be inherited to create new VCL components, which are the building blocks of Delphi and C++Builder applications. VCL components are somewhat in competition with {ActiveX} controls, though a VCL wrapper can be created to make an ActiveX control seem like a VCL component. {Home (http://borland.com/bcppbuilder/productinfo/feaben/visual.html)}. (2001-07-09)

Visual Component Library ::: (programming) VCL A application framework library for Microsoft Windows and Borland Software Corp.'s Delphi and C++Builder rapid application development to use, object-oriented form. Like its direct rival, Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC), VCL includes classes to create Windows programs.The VCL component class can be inherited to create new VCL components, which are the building blocks of Delphi and C++Builder applications. VCL components are somewhat in competition with ActiveX controls, though a VCL wrapper can be created to make an ActiveX control seem like a VCL component. .(2001-07-09)

WCL A {Common Lisp} implementation in a shared library by Wade Hennessey "wade@leland.Stanford.edu". WCL is not a complete Common Lisp, but it does have the full development environment including {dynamic file loading} and debugging. A modified version of {GDB} provides mixed-language debugging. Version 2.14 includes a shared library, run-time support and source debugger. It requires {GNU} {GCC} 2.1 (not 2.2.2) and runs on {SPARC} under {SunOS}. {(ftp://sunrise.stanford.edu/pub/wcl/)}. Mailing list: "wcl-request@sunrise.stanford.edu". E-mail: "wcl@sunrise.stanford.edu". [Proceedings of the 1992 Lisp and Functional Programming Conference]. (1992-10-28)

WCL ::: A Common Lisp implementation in a shared library by Wade Hennessey . WCL is not a complete Common Lisp, but it does have the full development environment including dynamic file loading and debugging. A modified version of GDB provides mixed-language debugging.Version 2.14 includes a shared library, run-time support and source debugger. It requires GNU GCC 2.1 (not 2.2.2) and runs on SPARC under SunOS. . Mailing list: . E-mail: .[Proceedings of the 1992 Lisp and Functional Programming Conference]. (1992-10-28)

welcome ::: n. --> Received with gladness; admitted willingly to the house, entertainment, or company; as, a welcome visitor.

Producing gladness; grateful; as, a welcome present; welcome news.
Free to have or enjoy gratuitously; as, you are welcome to the use of my library.
Salutation to a newcomer.
Kind reception of a guest or newcomer; as, we entered the


Windows Application Binary Interface "operating system, tool" (WABI) A software package from {Sun Microsystems} to allow certain {Microsoft Windows} applications under the {X Window System}. Wabi 2.2 runs under {Solaris} on {SPARC}, {Intel}, and {PowerPC}. Wabi works by providing translated versions of the three core Windows libraries, {user.dll}, {kernel.dll}, and {gdi.dll} which redirect Windows calls to Solaris equivalents. For code other than core library calls Wabi either executes the instructions directly on the hardware, if it is Intel, or emulates them, either one instruction at a time or by translating a block of instructions and caching the result (e.g. for a loop). {WabiServer} allows the Windows application and X display to be on different computers. {Overview (http://sun.com/solaris/products/wabi/)}. (1997-01-08)

Windows Open Service Architecture "architecture, library, Microsoft" (WOSA) One of the mainstays of {Microsoft Windows}: the ethos of {abstraction} of core {services}. For each extension, Windows {Open} Services {Architecture} defines an {API} and an {SPI}, as well as a universal interface (usually placed in a single {DLL}) that both comply to. These then {transparent}ly let the {operating system} speak to {device drivers}, {database managers}, and other {low level} entities. These extensions include, among others, {ODBC} (called the "crowning jewel of WOSA"), {TAPI}, {WOSA/XFS}, {SAPI} and {MAPI}, and their supporting services, as well as the abstraction of access to {printers}, {modems}, and {networking services}, which run identically over {TCP/IP}, {IPX/SPX}, and {NetBEUI}. (2000-08-16)

Windows Open Service Architecture ::: (architecture, library, microsoft) (WOSA) One of the mainstays of Microsoft Windows: the ethos of abstraction of core services.For each extension, Windows Open Services Architecture defines an API and an SPI, as well as a universal interface (usually placed in a single DLL) that both comply to.These then transparently let the operating system speak to device drivers, database managers, and other low level entities.These extensions include, among others, ODBC (called the crowning jewel of WOSA), TAPI, WOSA/XFS, SAPI and MAPI, and their supporting services, as well as the abstraction of access to printers, modems, and networking services, which run identically over TCP/IP, IPX/SPX, and NetBEUI.(2000-08-16)

www.philosophicallibrary.com

X client ::: An application process in the X Window System. It gains access to windowing services via the Xlib library. These are translated by the system into X protocol messages to an X server.

X client An application process in the {X Window System}. It gains access to windowing services via the Xlib library. These are translated by the system into {X protocol} messages to an {X server}.

Xlib ::: X library: program interface to the X Window System.

Xlib X library: program interface to the {X Window System}.

Xv++ A library of classes from Interface Engineering, Stevenage, providing a C++ Application Programmer's Interface to the XView toolkit.

York: New American Library, 1960.

York: Philosophical Library, 1949.

York: Philosophical Library [1953].

York: Philosophical Library, 1954.

York: Philosophical Library (1957).

York Public Library. In acknowledging my indebtedness to these distinguished colleagues and friends,

York: Random (The Modern Library) [1964].

ZEBRA A data management package in the {CERN Program Library}.



QUOTES [35 / 35 - 1500 / 3748]


KEYS (10k)

   6 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Cicero
   2 Arthur Schopenhauer
   2 Swami Vivekananda
   1 William Shakespeare
   1 Ursula K Le Guin
   1 The Sophia of Jesus
   1 Susan Sontag
   1 Sri Aurobindo's translation
   1 Scott Hawkins
   1 Owen Barfield
   1 Orson Scott Card
   1 Neil Gaiman
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 Maggie Stiefvater
   1 Laura Whitcomb
   1 Jorge Luis Borge
   1 Jeffrey J Kripal
   1 Jean-Paul Sartre
   1 James A Michener
   1 H P Lovecraft
   1 Geraldine Brooks
   1 Frank Zappa
   1 Dr Robert A Hatch
   1 C S Lewis
   1 Arthur C Clarke
   1 Andrew Carnegie

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   33 Susan Orlean
   26 Ray Bradbury
   22 Jorge Luis Borges
   19 Terry Pratchett
   19 Jane Austen
   16 Anonymous
   16 Alberto Manguel
   13 Stephen King
   13 J K Rowling
   13 Cassandra Clare
   11 Haruki Murakami
   10 Ta Nehisi Coates
   9 Rachel Caine
   9 Genevieve Cogman
   8 William Shakespeare
   8 Neil Gaiman
   8 Daniel Handler
   8 Austin Kleon
   8 Albert Einstein
   7 Mehmet Murat ildan

1:My library is an archive of longings.
   ~ Susan Sontag,
2:If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. ~ Cicero,
3:If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.
   ~ Cicero,
4:I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library. ~ Jorge Luis Borge,
5:For to know a man's library is, in some measure, to know his mind.
   ~ Geraldine Brooks,
6:We meet no ordinary people in our lives.
   ~ C S Lewis, Inspirational Christian Library,
7:Me, poor man, my library
Was dukedom large enough. ~ William Shakespeare, The Tempest
8:I wanted a library like this...[] A cave of words that I'd made myself.
   ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
9:A library is the first step of a thousand journeys, portal to a thousand worlds. ~ Orson Scott Card,
10:I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple.
   ~ Jean-Paul Sartre,
11:I have always imagined that Paradise as a kind of library.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Seven Nights,
12:Library terror - that feeling of being hopelessly overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of available books... ~ Owen Barfield, Night Operation,
13:A library outranks any other one thing a community can do to benefit its people. It is a never failing spring in the desert.
   ~ Andrew Carnegie,
14:To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering about in a great library without touching the books. ~ Manly P Hall,
15:It is always the same question: have you really read all those books? My answer is always the same: a library is a sign of desire, not of accomplishment. ~ Jeffrey J Kripal,
16:All knowledge that the world has ever received comes from the mind, the infinite library of the universe is in our own mind. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
17:A large library is apt to distract rather than to instruct the learner. It is much better to confine to a few authors than to wander at random over many. ~ James A Michener, Iberia, [T5],
18:I couldn't live a week without a private library - indeed, I'd part with all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I'd let go of the 1500 or so books I possess. ~ H P Lovecraft,
19:Peace of mind is not the absence of conflict but the ability to cope with it." ~ Scott Hawkins, (b. 1969) author of "The Library at Mount Char", (a contemporary fantasy). See https://bit.ly/2UWyXsX,
20:If you have assimilated five ideas and made them your life and character, you have more education than any man who has got by heart a whole library. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
21:Knowledge sets us free, art sets us free. A great library is freedom...and that freedom must not be compromised. It must be available to all who need it, when they need it, and that's always. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
22:Leaving behind the babble of the plaza, I enter the Library. I feel, almost physically, the gravitation of the books, the enveloping serenity of order, time magically dessicated and preserved.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
23:Drop out of school before your mind rots from exposure to our mediocre educational system. Forget about the Senior Prom and go to the library and educate yourself if you've got any guts. Some of you like Pep rallies and plastic robots who tell you what to read. ~ Frank Zappa,
24:As the biggest library if it is in disorder is not as useful as a small but well-arranged one, so you may accumulate a vast amount of knowledge but it will be of far less value than a much smaller amount if you have not thought it over for yourself.
   ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, [T9],
25:Tat savitur varam rupam jyotih parasya dhimahi
yannah satyena dipayet.1

1. Let us meditate on the most auspicious form of Savitri, on the light of the Supreme which shall illumine us with the Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo's translation, Sri Aurobindo Centenary Library, vol. 26, p. 513,
26:Like all those possessing a library, Aurelian was aware that he was guilty of not knowing his in its entirety; this controversy enabled him to fulfill his obligations with many books which seemed to reproach him for his neglect.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths, The Theologians,
27:If honor and wisdom and happiness are not for me, let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my place be in hell. Let me be outraged and annihilated, but for one instant, in one being, let Your enormous Library be justified.~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths, Selected Stories and Other Writings,
28:I pray to the unknown gods that some man-even a single man, tens of centuries ago-has perused and read that book. If the honor and wisdom and joy of such a reading are not to be my own, then let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my own place be in hell. Let me be tortured and battered and annihilated, but let there be one instant, one creature, wherein thy enormous Library may find its justification. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel,
29:The largest library in disorder is not so useful as a smaller but orderly one; in the same way the greatest amount of knowledge, if it has not been worked out in one's own mind, is of less value than a much smaller amount that has been fully considered. For it is only when a man combines what he knows from all sides, and compares one truth with another, that he completely realises his own knowledge and gets it into his power. A man can only think over what he knows, therefore he should learn something; but a man only knows what he has pondered. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
30:The library smells like old books - a thousand leather doorways into other worlds. I hear silence, like the mind of God. I feel a presence in the empty chair beside me. The librarian watches me suspiciously. But the library is a sacred place, and I sit with the patron saint of readers. Pulsing goddess light moves through me for one moment like a glimpse of eternity instantly forgotten. She is gone. I smell mold, I hear the clock ticking, I see an empty chair. Ask me now and I'll say this is just a place where you can't play music or eat. She's gone. The library sucks.
   ~ Laura Whitcomb,
31:I had forgotten what fiction was to me as a boy, forgotten what it was like in the library: fiction was an escape from the intolerable, a doorway into impossibly hospitable worlds where things had rules and could be understood; stories had been a way of learning about life without experiencing it, or perhaps of experiencing it as an eighteenth-century poisoner dealt with poisons, taking them in tiny doses, such that the poisoner could cope with ingesting things that would kill someone who was not inured to them. Sometimes fiction is a way of coping with the poison of the world in a way that lets us survive it. ~ Neil Gaiman,
32:Practical Review Tools ::: Flash cards, Chapter Outlines, 4x6 Summaries: You need to find ways to repeat and rehearse information and ideas that work for you. Any number of creative tools can be used to help you organize and remember information and make it manageable. I like 4x6 cards. They are sturdy, large enough to hold succinct information, and you can scribble ideas that jog the memory. The beauty 4x6's is that they can be carried anywhere. You can study them at the library, laundry, or lavatory. They travel on the bus, they can save you from a boring date, they can be thrown away immediately without guilt or survive years of faithful service. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study,
33:From these two incontrovertible premises he deduced that the Library is total and that its shelves register all the possible combinations of the twenty-odd orthographical symbols (a number which, though extremely vast, is not infinite): in other words, all that it is given to express, in all languages. Everything: the minutely detailed history of the future, the archangels' autobiographies, the faithful catalogue of the Library, thousands and thousands of false catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of those catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of the true catalogue, the Gnostic gospel of Basilides, the commentary on that gospel, the commentary on the commentary on that gospel, the true story of your death, the translation of every book in all languages, the interpolations of every book in all books. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel,
34:At first, needing the companionship of the human voice, he had listened to classical plays especially the works of Shaw, Ibsen, and Shakespeare - or poetry readings from Discovery's enormous library of recorded sounds. The problems they dealt with, however, seemed so remote, or so easily resolved with a little common sense, that after a while he lost patience with them.

So he switched to opera - usually in Italian or German, so that he was not distracted even by the minimal intellectual content that most operas contained. This phase lasted for two weeks before he realized that the sound of all these superbly trained voices was only exacerbating his loneliness. But what finally ended this cycle was Verdi's Requiem Mass, which he had never heard performed on Earth. The "Dies Irae," roaring with ominous appropriateness through the empty ship, left him completely shattered; and when the trumpets of Doomsday echoed from the heavens, he could endure no more.

Thereafter, he played only instrumental music. He started with the romantic composers, but shed them one by one as their emotional outpourings became too oppressive. Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Berlioz, lasted a few weeks, Beethoven rather longer. He finally found peace, as so many others had done, in the abstract architecture of Bach, occasionally ornamented with Mozart. And so Discovery drove on toward Saturn, as often as not pulsating with the cool music of the harpsichord, the frozen thoughts of a brain that had been dust for twice a hundred years. ~ Arthur C Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey,
35:Now I have taught you about Immortal Man and have loosed the bonds of the robbers from him. I have broken the gates of the pitiless ones in their presence. I have humiliated their malicious intent, and they all have been shamed and have risen from their ignorance. Because of this, then, I came here, that they might be joined with that Spirit and Breath, [III continues:] and might from two become one, just as from the first, that you might yield much fruit and go up to Him Who Is from the Beginning, in ineffable joy and glory and honor and grace of the Father of the Universe.

"Whoever, then, knows the Father in pure knowledge will depart to the Father and repose in Unbegotten Father. But whoever knows him defectively will depart to the defect and the rest of the Eighth. Now whoever knows Immortal Spirit of Light in silence, through reflecting and consent in the truth, let him bring me signs of the Invisible One, and he will become a light in the Spirit of Silence. Whoever knows Son of Man in knowledge and love, let him bring me a sign of Son of Man, that he might depart to the dwelling-places with those in the Eighth.

"Behold, I have revealed to you the name of the Perfect One, the whole will of the Mother of the Holy Angels, that the masculine multitude may be completed here, that there might appear in the aeons, the infinities and those that came to be in the untraceable wealth of the Great Invisible Spirit, that they all might take from his goodness, even the wealth of their rest that has no kingdom over it. I came from First Who Was Sent, that I might reveal to you Him Who Is from the Beginning, because of the arrogance of Arch-Begetter and his angels, since they say about themselves that they are gods. And I came to remove them from their blindness, that I might tell everyone about the God who is above the universe. Therefore, tread upon their graves, humiliate their malicious intent, and break their yoke and arouse my own. I have given you authority over all things as Sons of Light, that you might tread upon their power with your feet."

These are the things the blessed Savior said, and he disappeared from them. Then all the disciples were in great, ineffable joy in the spirit from that day on. And his disciples began to preach the Gospel of God, the eternal, imperishable spirit. Amen.
~ The Sophia of Jesus, (excerpt), The Nag Hamadi Library,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Dear me, how I love a library. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
2:library is a beautiful old thing ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
3:Library: A place where the dead lie. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
4:Don't forget to support your public library. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
5:When all else fails, give up and go to the library. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
6:I always felt, if I can get to a library, I'll be OK. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
7:A man will turn over half a library to make one book. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
8:Affliction is the best book in a minister's library. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
9:A completely free library is as rare as a truly free lunch. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
10:My encouragement to you is to go tomorrow to the library. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
11:The infinite library of the Universe is in your mind. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
12:A library card is good to have, you can never have too much ID. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
13:The best candy-shop a child can be left alone in, is the library. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
14:A library is not a luxury but one of the necessities of life. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
15:I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
16:they should let some people into the library by prescription only ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
17:Above all I commend the study of Christ. Let Him be your library. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
18:I had always thought of Paradise / In form and image as a library. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
19:A library is but the soul's burying ground. It is a land of shadows. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
20:Big library of interviews with awakened and inspiring beings of our time. ~ anandamayi-ma, @wisdomtrove
21:I cannot comprehend the neglect of a family library in such days as these." - Mr. Darcy ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
22:When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable If I have not an excellent library. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
23:I admit that I haven't read everything in my library, but I feel smarter just walking in it! ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
24:To arrange a library is to practice in a quiet and modest way the art of criticism. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
25:If I were asked to name the chief event in my life, I should say my father's library. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
26:..you do not leave a library; if you do what it wants you to do, you are taking it with you. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
27:I wouldn’t be the person I am today if it wasn’t for the opportunities the library gave me. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
28:Only library books speak with such wordless eloquence of the power good stories hold over us. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
29:People of all demographic categories and geographic regions will access a good digital library. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
30:Don't join the book burners... Don't be afraid to go in your library and read every book. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
31:I’ve been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
32:Every library should try to be complete on something, if it were only the history of pinheads. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
33:First paycheck I get, I thought, I'm going to get myself a room near the downtown L.A. Public Library. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
34:I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
35:I'm spending more time at this library in four days than I did at the Eureka College Library in four years. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
36:I am never long, even in the society of her I love, without yearning for the company of my lamp and my library. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
37:My father gave me free run of his library. When I think of my boyhood, I think in terms of the books I read. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
38:Like all those possessing a library, Aurelian was aware that he was guilty of not knowing his in its entirety. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
39:I am no indiscriminate novel reader. The mere trash of the common circulating library I hold in the highest contempt. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
40:A library implies an act of faith which generations, still in darkness hid, sign in their night in witness of the dawn. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
41:A little library, growing every year, is an honorable part of a man's history. It is a man's duty to have books. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
42:You can read books without ever stepping into a library; and practice spirituality without ever going to a temple. ~ anthony-de-mello, @wisdomtrove
43:Just the omission of Jane Austen's books alone would make a fairly good library out of a library that hadn't a book in it. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
44:To have your whole music library with you at all times is a quantum leap in listening to music. How do we possibly do this? ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
45:I had plenty of pimples as a kid. One day I fell asleep in the library. When I woke up, a blind man was reading my face. ~ rodney-dangerfield, @wisdomtrove
46:I was in a convenience store, reading a magazine. The clerk told me, "this is not a library!" "OK! I will talk louder, then!" ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
47:A library outranks any other one thing a community can do to benefit its people. It is a never failing spring in the desert. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
48:Yo, que me figuraba el Paraíso / Bajo la especie de una biblioteca. I have always imagined Paradise as a kind of library. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
49:All knowledge that the world has ever received comes from the mind; the infinite library of the universe is in our own mind. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
50:The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading in order to write. A man will turn over half a library to make a book. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
51:A library is a place where you can live a thousand lives. So why are you waiting when you could be living? Visit your library today. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
52:We can Fire a missile across the world with pinpoint accuracy, but we trouble keeping a date with our children to go to the library. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
53:If I have to spend time in purgatory before going to one place or the other, I guess I'll be all right as long as there's a lending library. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
54:Instead of going to Paris to attend lectures, go to the public library, and you won't come out for twenty years, if you really wish to learn. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
55:Law and the Court. Speech at a dinner of the Harvard Law School Association of New York, library.law.harvard.edu. February 15, 1913. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
56:The fact is that poetry is not the books in the library . . . Poetry is the encounter of the reader with the book, the discovery of the book. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
57:Usage tends to be global, while funding tends tobe local. When we allow it to happen, usage of a digital library is remarkably diverse and widespread. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
58:A deserted library in the morning - there's something about it that really gets to me. All possible words and ideas are there, resting peacefully. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
59:The books we read should be chosen with great care, that they may be, as an Egyptian king wrote over his library,'The medicines of the soul. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
60:When I read about the way in which library funds are being cut and cut, I can only think that American society has found one more way to destroy itself. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
61:He snatched the book from me and replaced it hastily on its shelf, muttering that if one brick was removed the whole library was liable to collapse. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
62:Is it advisable to spread out all the conveniences of culture before people to whom a few steps up a stair to a library is a sufficient deterrent from reading? ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
63:We never had books in the house. Not any book in our house. Not a Bible, not anything. So, I would go the library from a very young age and get the books out. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
64:At the moment that we persuade a child, any child, to cross that threshold, that magic threshold into a library, we change their lives forever, for the better. ~ barack-obama, @wisdomtrove
65:She liked to sit on the front porch in the afternoons and read books she'd checked out from the library. Aside from coffee, reading was her only indulgence. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
66:I hate requests. They make me feel unhappy. It's like when I take a book out of the library. As soon as I start to read it, all I can think about is when I'll finish it. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
67:In truth, the Library includes all verbal structures, all variations permitted by the twenty-five orthographical symbols, but not a single example of absolute nonsense. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
68:The Bible is actually a library of books-some long, some short- written over hundreds of years by many authors. Behind each one, however, was [the] Author: the Spirit of God. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
69:Sometimes when I'm in a bookstore or library, I am overwhelmed by all the things that I do not know. Then I am seized by a powerful desire to read all the books, one by one. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
70:And so the moment we persuade a child, any child, to cross that threshold into a library, we've changed their lives forever, and for the better. This is an enormous force for good. ~ barack-obama, @wisdomtrove
71:Second hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
72:If something burns your soul with purpose and desire, it’s your duty to be reduced to ashes by it. Any other form of existence will be yet another dull book in the library of life. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
73:You asked me where I generally lived. In my workshop [i.e. in his study] in the mornings and always in the library in the evening. Books are companions even if you don’t open them. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
74:There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library, this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
75:We are the only species on the planet, so far as we know, to have invented a communal memory stored neither in our genes nor in our brains. The warehouse of this memory is called the library ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
76:There are three things to leave behind; your photographs, your library, and your personal journals. These things are certainly going to be more valuable to future generations than your furniture! ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
77:Leaving behind the babble of the plaza, I enter the Library. I feel, almost physically, the gravitation of the books, the enveloping serenity of order, time magically dessicated and preserved. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
78:The student has his Rome, his Florence, his whole glowing Italy, within the four walls of his library. He has in his books the ruins of an antique world and the glories of a modern one. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
79:The doors of this Library are open now and are all welcome. The judgment of history is left to you, the people. I have no fears of that, for we have done our best. And so I say, come and learn from it. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
80:I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! - When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
81:Those moments when you feel you want to read something truly beautiful. The eyes make a tour of the library, and there is nothing. Then you decide to take no matter what, and it is full of beautiful things. ~ jules-renard, @wisdomtrove
82:Take a laptop with no network or WiFi access, and go to a place where you can work flat out without distractions, such as a library, park, coffee house, or your own backyard. Leave your comm gadgets behind.  ~ steve-pavlina, @wisdomtrove
83:The librarian isn't a clerk who happens to work in a library. A librarian is a data hound, a guide, a sherpa and a teacher. The librarian is the interface between reams of data and the untrained but motivated user. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
84:Lully's machine, Mill's fear and Lasswitz's chaotic library can be the subject of jokes, but they exaggerate a propensity which is common: making metaphysics and the arts into a kind of play with combinations. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
85:Success is deeply rooted in time and place. You may have the drive to read tons of books on biology. But if there are no books on biology in your library, and the library is never open, your drive is meaningless. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
86:I have written 240 books on a wide variety of topics. . . . Some of it I based on education I received in my school, but most of it was backed by other ways of learning - chiefly in the books I obtained in the public library. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
87:While the average person is home watching TV, the Leader Without a Title is in the gym getting stronger or at the library getting smarter or at the office getting better (or with their family growing kinder). Make this day count. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
88:It reminds me of like this pathetic friend that everybody had when they were a little kid who would let you borrow any of his stuff if you would just be his friend. That's what the library is. A government funded pathetic friend. ~ jerry-seinfeld, @wisdomtrove
89:More than a building that houses books and data, the library has always been a window to a larger world&
90:Many years ago, when I was just about as complete a failure as one can become, I began to spend a good deal of time in libraries, looking for some answers. I found all the answers I needed in that golden vein of ore that every library has. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
91:I think you should read everything you can. In my case, by the age of 10, I'd read every book in the Omaha public library about investing, some twice. You need to fill your mind with various competing thoughts and decide which make sense. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
92:It may be primarily property taxes in the case of a public library, or state taxes and tuition in the case of an academic library at a public university, but the funding sources of most libraries continue to have a strong geographic component. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
93:It was from my own early experience that I decided there was no use to which money could be applied so productive of good to girls and boys who have good within them and ability and ambition to develop it as the founding of a public library. ~ andrew-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
94:Many books in my library are now behind and beneath me. They were good in their way once, and so were the clothes I wore when I was ten years old; but I have outgrown them. Nobody ever outgrows Scripture; the book widens and deepens with our years. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
95:How pleasant it is to spend an evening in this way! I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! - When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
96:The library was like a second home. Or maybe more like a real home, more than the place I lived in. By going every day I got to know all the lady librarians who worked there. They knew my name and always said hi. I was painfully shy, though, and could barely reply. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
97:Our homes do not have to offer us permanent occupancy or store our clothes to merit the name. To speak of home in relation to a building is simply to recognise its harmony with our own prized internal song. Home can be an airport or a library, a garden or a motorway diner. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
98:Records can be destroyed if they do not suit the prejudices of ruling cliques, lost if they become incomprehensible, distorted if a copyist wishes to impose a new meaning upon them, misunderstood if we lack the information to interpret them. The past is like a huge library, mostly fiction. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
99:Come indoors then, and open the books on your library shelves. For you have a library and a good one. A working library, a living library; a library where nothing is chained down and nothing is locked up; a library where the songs of the singers rise naturally from the lives of the livers. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
100:Be a little careful about your library. Do you foresee what you will do with it? Very little to be sure. But the real question is, What it will do with you? You will come here and get books that will open your eyes, and your ears, and your curiosity, and turn you inside out or outside in. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
101:The biggest issue for digitally oriented people is that the ease of capturing and storing has generated a write-only syndrome: all they’re doing is capturing information—not actually accessing and using it intelligently. Some consciousness needs to be applied to keep one’s potentially huge digital library functional. ~ david-allen, @wisdomtrove
102:Everything you need for your better future and success has already been written.And guess What? It's all available.All you have to do is go to the library.But guess what?Only three percent of the people in America have a library card.Wow,they must be expensive!No, they're free.Probably in every neighborhood.Three percent! ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
103:I don’t think people realise how vital libraries are or what a colossal danger it would be if we were to lose any more. Having had a truncated school life myself, all of my education from the age of 17 has been self-taught. I wouldn’t be the person I am today if it wasn’t for the opportunities the library gave me. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
104:I am confident that for the foreseeable future (barring some catastrophic event affecting economic, energy, electrical, and communications systems), many subpopulations that use information intensively (e.g., students, academics, library patrons, white collar workers) will be using some sort of portal information appliance. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
105:I wanted to understand things and then be free of them. I needed to learn how to telescope things, ideas. Things were too big to see all at once, like all the books in the library-everything laying around on all the tables. You might be able to put it all into one paragraph or into one verse of a song if you could get it right. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
106:The library connects us with the insight and knowledge, painfully extracted from Nature, of the greatest minds that ever were, with the best teachers, drawn from the entire planet and from all our history, to instruct us without tiring, and to inspire us to make our own contribution to the collective knowledge of the human species. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
107:I am afraid that all the grace that I have got of my comfortable and easy times and happy hours, might almost lie on a penny. But the good that I have received from my sorrows, and pains, and griefs, is altogether incalculable … Affliction is the best bit of furniture in my house. It is the best book in a minister's library. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
108:I am a neat hand at cookery, and I'll tell you what I knocked up for my Christmas-eve dinner in the Library Cart. I knocked up a beefsteak-pudding for one, with two kidneys, a dozen oysters, and a couple of mushrooms thrown in. It's a pudding to put a man in good humour with everything, except the two bottom buttons of his waistcoat. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
109:We had the hardware expertise, the industrial design expertise and the software expertise, including iTunes. One of the biggest insights we have was that we decided not to try to manage your music library on the iPod, but to manage it in iTunes. Other companies tried to do everything on the device itself and made it so complicated that it was useless. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
110:Education is not the amount of information that is put into your brain and runs riot there, undigested all your life. We must have life-building, man-making, character-makin g, assimilation of ideas. If you have assimilated five ideas and made them your life and character, you have more education than any man who has got by heart a whole library. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
111:The great British Library -an immense collection of volumes of all ages and languages, many of which are now forgotten, and most of which are seldom read: one of these sequestered pools of obsolete literature to which modern authors repair, and draw buckets full of classic lore, or pure English, undefiled wherewith to swell their own scanty rills of thought. ~ washington-irving, @wisdomtrove
112:I must say I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns it on, I go to the library and read a good book. ANOTHER VERSION I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. ANOTHER VERSION I find television very educational. Every time someone turns it on, I go in the other room and read a book. ~ groucho-marx, @wisdomtrove
113:Reading is performance. The reader&
114:Congratulations on the new library, because it isn't just a library. It is a space ship that will take you to the farthest reaches of the Universe, a time machine that will take you to the far past and the far future, a teacher that knows more than any human being, a friend that will amuse you and console you-and most of all, a gateway, to a better and happier and more useful life. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
115:It had that comfortably sprung, lived-in look that library books with a lively circulation always get; bent page corners, a dab of mustard on page 331, a whiff of some reader's spilled after-dinner whiskey on page 468. Only library books speak with such wordless eloquence of the power good stories hold over us, how good stories abide, unchanged and mutely wise, while we poor humans grow older and slower. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
116:Books are everywhere; and always the same sense of adventure fills us. Second-hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. Besides, in this random miscellaneous company we may rub against some complete stranger who will, with luck, turn into the best friend we have in the world. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
117:I received the fundamentals of my education in school, but that was not enough. My real education, the superstructure, the details, the true architecture, I got out of the public library. For an impoverished child whose family could not afford to buy books, the library was the open door to wonder and achievement, and I can never be sufficiently grateful that I had the wit to charge through that door and make the most of it. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
118:Money alone is only a mean; it presupposes a man to use it. The rich man can go where he pleases, but perhaps please himself nowhere. He can buy a library or visit the whole world, but perhaps has neither patience to read nor intelligence to see... . The purse may be full and the heart empty. He may have gained the world and lost himself; and with all his wealth around him ... he may live as blank a life as any tattered ditcher. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
119:Knowledge is inherent in man; no knowledge comes from outside; it is all inside. We say Newton discovered gravitation. Was it sitting anywhere waiting for him? It was in his own mind; the time came and he found it out. All knowledge that the world has ever received comes from the mind; the infinite library of the universe is in our own mind. The external world is simply the suggestion, the occasion, which sets you to study your own mind. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
120:He was talking about the sign that said &
121:Do not use intoxicants of any sort. We who should be serving the world should not ruin our health by smoking and drinking. The money we waste on these things can be used for so many useful things. With the money we smoke away, we can buy an artificial leg for one who has lost a leg, pay for an eye operation for someone with a cataract, or buy a wheelchair for a polio victim. Or, if nothing else, we can buy some spiritual books for the local library. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
122:Eratosthenes was the director of the great library of Alexandria, the Centre of science and learning in the ancient world. Aristotle had argued that humanity was divided into Greeks and everybody else, whom he called barbarians and that the Greeks should keep themselves racially pure. He thought it was fitting for the Greeks to enslave other peoples. But Erathosthenes criticized Aristotle for his blind chauvinism, he believed there was good and bad in every nation. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
123:Many flagship state universities have wonderful digital libraries that are accessed by people around the world. In future, if not current, budget crises, trustees, board members, and administrators may wonder why these state institutions - with an articulated primary clientele of students, faculty, and staff members and a secondary clientele of all citizens of the state - should be spending resources on a digital library that is used by many people beyond the primary and secondary service populations. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
124:Lost opportunities, lost possibilities, feelings we can never get back. That's part of what it means to be alive. But inside our heads - at least that's where I imagine it - there's a little room where we store those memories. A room like the stacks in this library. And to understand the workings of our own heart we have to keep on making new reference cards. We have to dust things off every once in awhile, let in fresh air, change the water in the flower vases. In other words, you'll live forever in your own private library. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
125:A library is but the soul's burial ground; it is the land of shadows. Yet one is impressed with the thought, the labor, and the struggle, represented in this vast catacomb of books. Who could dream, by the placid waters that issue from the level mouths of brooks into the lake, all the plunges, the whirls, the divisions, and foaming rushes that had brought them down to the tranquil exit? And who can guess through what channels of disturbance, and experiences of sorrow, the heart passed that has emptied into this Dead Sea of books? ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
126:I don't go to an office, so I write at home. I like to write in the morning, if possible; that's when my mind is freshest. I might write for a couple of hours, and then I head out to have lunch and read the paper. Then I write for a little bit longer if I can, then probably go to the library or make some phone calls. Every day is a little bit different. I'm not highly routinized, so I spend a lot of time wandering around New York City with my laptop in my bag, wondering where I'm going to end up next. It's a fairly idyllic life for someone who likes writing. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
127:Success is in the student, not in the university; greatness is in the individual, not in the library; power is in the man, not in his crutches. A great man will make opportunities, even out of the commonest and meanest situations. If a man is not superior to his education, is not larger than his crutches or his helps, if he is not greater than the means of his culture, which are but the sign-boards pointing the way to success, he will never reach greatness. Not learning, not culture alone, not helps and opportunities, but personal power and sterling integrity, make a man great. ~ orison-swett-marden, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:You're a library of me. ~ Zadie Smith,
2:Freedom is a public library. ~ Paula Fox,
3:Your library is your paradise. ~ Erasmus,
4:if she was in a library. ~ David Baldacci,
5:Keep calm and go to the library ~ J K Rowling,
6:Are you in a library or what?! ~ Stuart Pearce,
7:Library is a hospital for the mind. ~ Anonymous,
8:When in doubt, go to the library. ~ J K Rowling,
9:A library implies an act of faith. ~ Victor Hugo,
10:A library is a hospital for the mind ~ Anonymous,
11:WE WERE SCOOTING THROUGH the library ~ Anonymous,
12:Your library is your portrait. ~ Linda Fairstein,
13:A library is a hospital for the mind. ~ Anonymous,
14:Your library is your portrait. ~ Holbrook Jackson,
15:A library is a hospital for the mind ♥ ~ Anonymous,
16:Dear me, how I love a library. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
17:If there’s a heaven, it’s a library. ~ Neil Gaiman,
18:The library is always an adventure! ~ Ray Bradbury,
19:I can always be tempted by a library. ~ Susan Lyons,
20:Your library is your paradise. ~ Desiderius Erasmus,
21:A house that has a library in it has a soul. ~ Plato,
22:A library is the door to many lives. ~ Sharon Creech,
23:If God existed, he would be a library. ~ Umberto Eco,
24:library is a beautiful old thing ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
25:My alma mater was books, a good library. ~ Malcolm X,
26:My library is an archive of longings. ~ Susan Sontag,
27:A library is a hospital for the mind. ~ Alvin Toffler,
28:Every library is an arsenal. ~ Robert Green Ingersoll,
29:Library: A place where the dead lie. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
30:Library: The Temple of the Wise! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
31:The fire in the library was colorless. ~ Susan Orlean,
32:Trinity College (Dublin) library, ~ William J Bennett,
33:Paradise will be a kind of library ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
34:This is no library. This is the Batcave. ~ Robin Sloan,
35:A library is an arsenal of liberty. ~ Chris Grabenstein,
36:Death is an ascension to a better library. ~ John Donne,
37:Each time someone dies, a library burns. ~ Jandy Nelson,
38:My library is an archive of longings.
   ~ Susan Sontag,
39:A library is infinity under a roof. ~ Gail Carson Levine,
40:Death is an ascension to a better library. ~ John Donne,
41:Don't forget to support your public library. ~ Bob Dylan,
42:She was the books she read in the library. ~ Betty Smith,
43:A man's library is a sort of harem. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
44:Iris GL (GL is short for "graphics library"). ~ Anonymous,
45:When all else fails, trust the library. ~ Margarita Engle,
46:Every death is like the burning of a library. ~ Alex Haley,
47:My Alma mater is the Chicago Public Library. ~ David Mamet,
48:My alma mater is the Chicago Public Library. ~ David Mamet,
49:A library is a physical equivalent of a sigh. ~ Deb Caletti,
50:She ate breakfast at lunch in the library. ~ Patrick deWitt,
51:The Library is a wilderness of books. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
52:The public library was more accommodating; ~ Stephen Hunter,
53:The Web is cool, but the library is magic. ~ Arthur Plotnik,
54:Why buy a book when you can join a library? ~ Ricky Gervais,
55:A library book, I imagine, is a happy book. ~ Cornelia Funke,
56:A library is a fueling station for your mind. ~ Steve Leveen,
57:A library is also a place where love begins. ~ Rudolfo Anaya,
58:I shall be glad to have the library to myself. ~ Jane Austen,
59:The library is the mathematician's laboratory. ~ Paul Halmos,
60:I can hear the library humming in the night, ~ Billy Collins,
61:I spent my life in the library reading books. ~ Michael Caine,
62:On April 29, 1986, the day the library burned, ~ Susan Orlean,
63:The library is testimony to truth and to error, ~ Umberto Eco,
64:Without the library, you have no civilization. ~ Ray Bradbury,
65:A library is a room where the murders take place. ~ J B Morton,
66:Having fun is easy when you have a library cards! ~ Marc Brown,
67:I've got my library card and i'm checking you out! ~ Joe Jonas,
68:My library is filled with UN condemnations. ~ Augusto Pinochet,
69:Nothing is more impotent than an unread library. ~ John Waters,
70:You can tell a lot by the size of a mans library ~ Chloe Neill,
71:Cloud Collections: As your library grows, use Cloud ~ Anonymous,
72:[Cora:] Did you hit your head on a library book? ~ Jessica Lave,
73:Nothing is more important than an unread library. ~ John Waters,
74:No. You can't leave a library. Without a book. ~ Dan Gemeinhart,
75:We need James Bond with a library science degree. ~ Robin Sloan,
76:A library should be like a pair of open arms. ~ Roger Rosenblatt,
77:And you cannot leave a library. Without a book. ~ Dan Gemeinhart,
78:As a child I spent a lot of time at the library. ~ Tracy Chapman,
79:Having fun isn't hard when you have a library card! ~ Marc Brown,
80:I see you in the library. The way you love the books. ~ Ann Hood,
81:The library is therapy for those with minds like mine. ~ R H Sin,
82:A Library goes on as far as thought can reach. ~ Robertson Davies,
83:I gambled for the soul of the Library. And I lost. ~ Rachel Caine,
84:I never went to college, so I went to the library. ~ Ray Bradbury,
85:I was made for the library, not the classroom. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
86:A library is a hospital for the mind.” - Anonymous ~ Alvin Toffler,
87:A library is all the university you will ever need. ~ Ray Bradbury,
88:During the day, the library is a realm of order. ~ Alberto Manguel,
89:Having fun isn't hard When you've got a library card. ~ Marc Brown,
90:Having fun isn't hard when you've got a library card. ~ Marc Brown,
91:I'm really a library man, or second-hand book man. ~ John le Carre,
92:Is there any sadder sight than a burnt out library? ~ Barbara Vine,
93:No use going to class unless you go to the library. ~ Ray Bradbury,
94:Shadows seeped in from all sides of the library, ~ Roshani Chokshi,
95:She did not need a library; she was a library. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
96:What better place to kill time than a library? ~ Diane Setterfield,
97:When all else fails, give up and go to the library. ~ Stephen King,
98:August 23, 1793. (THE LIBRARY COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA) ~ Jim Murphy,
99:I counsel thee, shut not thy heart, nor thy library. ~ Charles Lamb,
100:The best place to find things: the public library. ~ Edward Bernays,
101:The Library is the heart of the University. ~ Charles William Eliot,
102:A man's library opens up his character to the world. ~ Matthew Pearl,
103:away from the library as he, Dink, and Ruth Rose came down ~ Ron Roy,
104:First of all, what kind of lowlife steals from a library? ~ K M Shea,
105:I always felt, if I can get to a library, I'll be OK. ~ Maya Angelou,
106:Police!” I yelled out, briefly flashing my library card. ~ J D Nixon,
107:The most beautiful people are all in the library. ~ Caroline Kennedy,
108:The public library is the most dangerous place in town ~ John Ciardi,
109:There is no problem that a library card can't solve. ~ Eleanor Brown,
110:When an old man dies, a library burns to the ground. ~ Chinua Achebe,
111:You did not know, Little Man, what a library is for. ~ Wilhelm Reich,
112:I saw you in the library. With—” “ Colonel Mustard? ~ Cassandra Clare,
113:I think I could use a library," she answered finally. ~ Michele Jaffe,
114:Nothing makes a man more reverent than a library. ~ Winston Churchill,
115:You belonged in the library, as much as any book. ~ Margaret Rogerson,
116:A library doesn't need windows. A library is a window. ~ Stewart Brand,
117:All I did was go to the library to borrow some books ~ Haruki Murakami,
118:A man will turn over half a library to make one book. ~ Samuel Johnson,
119:An exile, said Zafar, is a refugee with a library. ~ Zia Haider Rahman,
120:In a library, no empty shelf remains empty for long. ~ Alberto Manguel,
121:I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ Jane Austen,
122:Julius Caesar burned down a library?" I asked. "Fucker. ~ Rose Christo,
123:Nothing makes a man more reverent than a library ~ Winston S Churchill,
124:The best way to know someone was to look at their library. ~ Eva Leigh,
125:The library is what keeps us a step ahead of the apes. ~ Dana Stabenow,
126:The public library is where place and possibility meet. ~ Stuart Dybek,
127:Access to a school library results in more reading. ~ Stephen D Krashen,
128:Affliction is the best book in a minister's library. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
129:I will break your heart over a fucking library card. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
130:Library science was the foundation of all sciences. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
131:Stealing from a library?” said Learned Edmund in horror. ~ T Kingfisher,
132:Stu, where you at?” “Up here in the library.” “You hurt? ~ Blake Crouch,
133:We are all but characters in the books of God's library. ~ Chris Colfer,
134:When I got my library card, that's when my life began. ~ Rita Mae Brown,
135:Who wants a library full of books you've already read? ~ Harlan Ellison,
136:A completely free library is as rare as a truly free lunch. ~ Tom Peters,
137:At night, here in the library, the ghosts have voices. ~ Alberto Manguel,
138:Cool! Where did you get such an idea?” “The library. ~ William Kamkwamba,
139:I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
140:Library envy. It’s a thing. And I have it. Acutely. “Wow. ~ Meghan March,
141:Me, poor man, my library Was dukedom large enough. ~ William Shakespeare,
142:My encouragement to you is to go tomorrow to the library. ~ Maya Angelou,
143:Oh. My. God. They were fighting. In the library. Over her. ~ Lauren Kate,
144:The library is like a candy store where everything is free. ~ Jamie Ford,
145:There's a book inside you. There's a library inside me. ~ Niall Williams,
146:A library is a path to the future--find yours there. ~ Mary Higgins Clark,
147:How can you be nervous? Don't you see? We're in a library. ~ Eilis O Neal,
148:The infinite library of the Universe is in your mind. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
149:A library is a hospital for the mind.”

- Anonymous ~ Alvin Toffler,
150:A library is thought in cold storage. ~ Herbert Samuel 1st Viscount Samuel,
151:I saw you in the library.
With—”
“Colonel Mustard? ~ Cassandra Clare,
152:it was just so tawdry, somehow, stealing from a library. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
153:I was fortunate to attend a school with an excellent library ~ Syrie James,
154:They got the Library of Alexandria. They’re not getting mine. ~ John Ringo,
155:14—Among the priceless volumes destroyed in the library here, was ~ Various,
156:A library card is the start of a lifelong adventure. ~ Lilian Jackson Braun,
157:A library could show you everything if you knew where to look. ~ Pat Conroy,
158:Every time a shaman dies, it is as if a library burned down. ~ Mark Plotkin,
159:I'm here for the library. Not for men, and not for ghosts. ~ Laura Andersen,
160:Me, poor man, my library
Was dukedom large enough. ~ William Shakespeare,
161:Two library visits in one evening. Why, it could become a habit. ~ J D Robb,
162:When I got [my] library card, that was when my life began. ~ Rita Mae Brown,
163:Agatha, I've decided. I'm going to marry you for your library. ~ Phil Foglio,
164:And now I’m going to find out how to get a library started. ~ Beverly Cleary,
165:He who has a garden and a library wants for nothing. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
166:I fall in love with any girl who smells of library paste. ~ Charles M Schulz,
167:Inspector had been in the library, and might possibly have ~ Ford Madox Ford,
168:I taught myself more in the library than school taught me. ~ Terry Pratchett,
169:It's a library, only the stupid or the evil are afraid of those ~ Iain Banks,
170:Knowledge is free at the library. Just bring your own container. ~ Anonymous,
171:The function of a great library is to store obscure books. ~ Nicholson Baker,
172:They found the library sadly lacking in texts they could use. ~ Marge Piercy,
173:Access to the public library should be a basic human right. ~ Kaitlyn Dunnett,
174:All photos speak a thousand words. This one contained a library. ~ Rivera Sun,
175:A scholar is just a library's way of making another library. ~ Daniel Dennett,
176:Every time an old person dies, it's like a library burning down. ~ Alex Haley,
177:If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.
   ~ Cicero,
178:It's a library; only the stupid and the evil are afraid of those ~ Iain Banks,
179:It was the kind of library
he had only read about in books. ~ Alan Bennett,
180:Library rules the world, son. Best to have a seat at the table ~ Rachel Caine,
181:Mathematicians do not write for the circulating library. ~ George Henry Lewes,
182:A library card is good to have, you can never have too much ID. ~ Stephen King,
183:All that is necessary for a student is access to a library. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
184:For a moment, the library was as silent as…well, a library. Sam ~ Rick Riordan,
185:I shall be glad to have the library to myself as soon as may be. ~ Jane Austen,
186:My dream writing room would be the Imperial Library in Vienna. ~ Fran Lebowitz,
187:The man who has a garden and a library has everything. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
188:The sea is nothing but a library of all the tears in history. ~ Daniel Handler,
189:I was so getting tired of fighting for my life in the library. ~ Jennifer Estep,
190:Nothing is pleasanter to me than exploring in a library. ~ Walter Savage Landor,
191:People are living books. The real library of life is community. ~ Bryant McGill,
192:Readers transform a library from a mausoleum into many theaters. ~ Mason Cooley,
193:The best candy shop a child can be left alone in, is the library ~ Maya Angelou,
194:What harbor can receive you more securely than a great library? ~ Italo Calvino,
195:A library is an adjustable wrench for opening the head. ~ Matthew Tobin Anderson,
196:He died at home in his library, surrounded by the books he loved. ~ Oliver Sacks,
197:I discovered me in the library. I went to find me in the library. ~ Ray Bradbury,
198:In his library he had been always sure of leisure and tranquillity ~ Jane Austen,
199:I, that used to figure Paradise
In the guise of a library ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
200:The collection had the eclectic impersonality of a public library. ~ John Fowles,
201:A library is a place full of mouth-watering food for thought. ~ Diana Wynne Jones,
202:Earning your Masters in Library and Information Science is beautiful. ~ Lil Wayne,
203:He was a thing of books and alembics to me, library and laboratory. ~ Naomi Novik,
204:She was in the Library. Not just any library, but the Library. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
205:To add a library to a house is to give that house a soul. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
206:We may sit in our library and yet be in all quarters of the earth. ~ John Lubbock,
207:Whoever first thought of imposing a library fine was indeed intelligent. ~ Mu Xin,
208:Why do you think Beauty picked the Beast? It was the library. ~ Chelsea M Cameron,
209:A library is not a luxury but one of the necessities of life. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
210:I have found the most valuable thing in my wallet is my library card. ~ Laura Bush,
211:In the Library you took your good times where you could find them. ~ Scott Hawkins,
212:I spent more time at the library than anyone my age when I was a kid. ~ Dave Sitek,
213:People are living books. The real library of life is community. ~ Bryant H McGill,
214:The distance between the library and the bedroom is astronomical ~ Arthur Koestler,
215:We each contribute our own book to the great library of humanity. ~ Steve Maraboli,
216:You are a total stranger and you want to take my library book. ~ Elizabeth Kostova,
217:You know it's desperate," she said. "Shane is going to the library. ~ Rachel Caine,
218:A university is just a group of buildings gathered around a library. ~ Shelby Foote,
219:Being a writer in a library is rather like being a eunuch in a harem. ~ John Braine,
220:I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
221:It was good to walk into a library again; it smelled like home. ~ Elizabeth Kostova,
222:Night fell as death rode into the Great Library of Summershall. ~ Margaret Rogerson,
223:The public library system of the United States is worth preserving. ~ Henry Rollins,
224:they should let some people into the library by prescription only ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
225:Above all I commend the study of Christ. Let Him be your library. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
226:Let's try the library,' I tell him. 'We can find out anything there! ~ David McPhail,
227:“Paradise, no doubt, is just a huge library.” ~ Gaston Bachelard thanks to @InlibroV,
228:The Widow’s House, The Library of Light and Shadow, or The Queen’s Vow. ~ Wendy Webb,
229:This whole phenomenon of the computer in a library is an amazing thing. ~ Bill Gates,
230:A library, properly maintained, could save the world, or burn it down. ~ Jason Fagone,
231:But the best problem I ever found, I found in my local public library. ~ Andrew Wiles,
232:For to know a man's library is, in some measure, to know his mind. ~ Geraldine Brooks,
233:I sometimes imagine I would like my ashes to be scattered in a library. ~ Neil Gaiman,
234:Knowledge was inherent in all things. The world was a library. ~ Luther Standing Bear,
235:My pen is my harp and my lyre; my library is my garden and my orchard. ~ Judah Halevi,
236:No man will ever put his hand up your dress looking for a library card. ~ Joan Rivers,
237:The library might have been the first place I was ever given autonomy. ~ Susan Orlean,
238:To know a man's library is, in some measure, to know a man's mind. ~ Geraldine Brooks,
239:A city without books, a city without a library is like a graveyard. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
240:I had always thought of Paradise / In form and image as a library. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
241:I have always imagined that Paradise will be some kind of library. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
242:...I, like Borges, think of heaven as something very like a library ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
243:In the universal library, no book will be an island. It’s all connected. ~ Kevin Kelly,
244:It answers to the name of Henry, but you can call it Library Boy. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
245:It was a pastiche of public library porn from Irving Stone to Philip Roth. ~ Nell Zink,
246:Money for the library? What’s that going to do? We need jobs, not books. ~ Vicki Myron,
247:What's the point of having a library full of books you've already read? ~ Ray Bradbury,
248:When an old person dies, it’s as though a library has burnt to the ground. ~ Marc Levy,
249:Your answers lie here," Rovender said, gesturing around the library. ~ Tony DiTerlizzi,
250:And don't look to be saved in any one thing, person, machine or library. ~ Ray Bradbury,
251:Come and take choice of all my library and so beguile thy sorrow. ~ William Shakespeare,
252:I have loved this disaster of a library since I was old enough to read. ~ Eleanor Brown,
253:It's fun to just skim through piles of books in the stacks of a library. ~ John D Agata,
254:It’s like I’m in a beautiful library but none of the books have titles. ~ Dennis Lehane,
255:Natural species are the library from which genetic engineers can work. ~ Thomas Lovejoy,
256:So I spend a lot of time at the library. That doesn't mean I'm a massive nerd! ~ Fabian,
257:The next morning, close to two thousand people showed up at the library. ~ Susan Orlean,
258:And my father always took me to the library. We were both book addicts. ~ Cornelia Funke,
259:Books are for use. ~ Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan, Five Laws of Library Science (1928).,
260:For to know a man's library is, in some measure, to know his mind.
   ~ Geraldine Brooks,
261:She could have started up a branch library (or a spectacular house fire) ~ Kate Atkinson,
262:We meet no ordinary people in our lives.
   ~ C S Lewis, Inspirational Christian Library,
263:A library is but the soul's burying ground. It is a land of shadows. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
264:Alma came to consider her library work as a kind of indoor gardening, ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
265:An original idea. That can't be too hard. The library must be full of them. ~ Stephen Fry,
266:Every child in American should have access to a well-stocked school library. ~ Laura Bush,
267:He didn’t feel God in the library, but he felt something beyond himself. ~ Charlie Lovett,
268:If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
269:The library is inhabited by spirits that come out of the pages at night. ~ Isabel Allende,
270:Books are but dead bodies to you, and a library nothing but a catacomb! ~ George MacDonald,
271:cardinal sin in a library, where the commitment to findability is absolute. ~ Susan Orlean,
272:Come, and take choice of all my library, And so beguile thy sorrow. ~ William Shakespeare,
273:Cuz it sure as hell appeared that his library card was getting stamped tonight. ~ J R Ward,
274:Here is the treasure chest of the world - the public library, or a bookstore. ~ Ben Carson,
275:I have retired to the library, for I am very unhappy, and I want to be alone. ~ Anne Bront,
276:The library, I presume,” he said quietly. “I've a fondness for libraries. ~ Lorraine Heath,
277:The library, to me, is the second most sacred physical space on the planet. ~ Nikky Finney,
278:When a library is open, no matter its size or shape, democracy is open, too. ~ Bill Moyers,
279:I wanted a library like this...[] A cave of words that I'd made myself. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
280:There's no use going to school unless your final destination is the library. ~ Ray Bradbury,
281:This is unbearable ... God. These books she'll never read. Her Life's Library. ~ John Green,
282:this library is another desert. A wasteland of words instead of sand. ~ Stephen R Donaldson,
283:You want weapons? We're in a library! Books! The best weapons in the world! ~ Steven Moffat,
284:A good library has all the good books. A great library has all the books. ~ Daniel C Dennett,
285:Damn. How much time did you spend in the library?"

“I am a library. ~ Brian K Vaughan,
286:Each time one of the medicine men dies, it's as if a library has burned down. ~ Mark Plotkin,
287:Each time someone dies, a library burns by John Lennon "the Sky is everywhere ~ Jandy Nelson,
288:Go ahead, and fear not. You will have a full library at your service. ~ Doris Kearns Goodwin,
289:I do things like get in a taxi and say, "The library, and step on it. ~ David Foster Wallace,
290:I'm a library user and I just don't hoard books. To me, they're for sharing. ~ Sara Sheridan,
291:Larger school library collections and longer hours increase circulation. ~ Stephen D Krashen,
292:The only thing you absolutely have to know is the location of the library. ~ Albert Einstein,
293:The only thing you have to absolutely know is the location of the library. ~ Albert Einstein,
294:Victim,” said the Hon. Freddy, “victim. Me for the corpse in the library. ~ Dorothy L Sayers,
295:When you steal a book, you steal from the world." the Library propaganda said ~ Rachel Caine,
296:You get all sorts of people in the library, and the librarian gets it all. ~ Terry Pratchett,
297:You have the hey to the library," he said. "Only be careful what you read. ~ Kate Bernheimer,
298:You never know what wild and crazy things might be happening at the library. ~ Marion Jensen,
299:Books, bringing people together.' That would make a good slogan for the library. ~ Kasie West,
300:but she took me to the public library before I could read, got me a library card, ~ J D Vance,
301:The only thing you absolutely have to know, is the location of the library. ~ Albert Einstein,
302:The standard library saves programmers from having to reinvent the wheel. ~ Bjarne Stroustrup,
303:You can't love a library of e-books. You can't furnish a room with e-books. ~ Joanna Trollope,
304:A library is a place where you learn what teachers were afraid to teach you. ~ Alan Dershowitz,
305:A library is where ideas sleep between covers, waiting for you to discover them. ~ Lois Ehlert,
306:All the Jane Austen in the library cannot wash the Queens from this little hand. ~ Mary Gordon,
307:An Old English word for library is bochord, which literally means “book hoard. ~ Angela Pepper,
308:but a library is a gorgeous language that you will never speak fluently. ~ Elizabeth McCracken,
309:If you're rich you can buy books. If you're poor, you need a library. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith,
310:I wanted a library like this...[] A cave of words that I'd made myself.
   ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
311:I was in the library reading—getting lost in another world that’s not my reality. ~ Jay McLean,
312:Maybe Heaven will be a library. Then I will be able to finish my to-read list. ~ Kellie Elmore,
313:Szabo frequently preaches the gospel of the library as the people's university. ~ Susan Orlean,
314:We are making the following improvements to the library experience on your Kindle: ~ Anonymous,
315:You should love literature. You should live in the library. Forget about films. ~ Ray Bradbury,
316:Every library is a palace; every book is a king; every reading is a magic! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
317:Getting my library card was like citizenship; it was like American citizenship. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
318:Here is the treasure chest of the world - the public library, or a bookstore. ~ Benjamin Carson,
319:I have always imagined that Paradise as a kind of library.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Seven Nights,
320:In the private library of my spirit, there is a dictionary of words that aren’t. ~ Tayari Jones,
321:The library, like the thrift shop, specialised in the leavings of the elderly dead. ~ Nell Zink,
322:We are the Library," Coppelia pointed out. "What we don't know, we research. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
323:Always be reading. Go to the library. There’s magic in being surrounded by books. ~ Austin Kleon,
324:But I wasn't a well-read bookworm; I was just a dumb whore in the right library. ~ Gillian Flynn,
325:In any library in the world, I am at home, unselfconscious, still and absorbed. ~ Germaine Greer,
326:it was off to the library, where people went before God invented the Internet and ~ Steve Almond,
327:Lazlo couldn’t have belonged at the library more truly if he were a book himself. ~ Laini Taylor,
328:Maybe Heaven will be a library and then I might get to finish my ‘to-read’ list. ~ Kellie Elmore,
329:Mr. Gradgrind greatly tormented his mind about what the people read in this library: ~ Anonymous,
330:One of the most subversive institutions in the United States is the public library. ~ Bell Hooks,
331:The only thing that you absolutely have to know is the location of the library ~ Albert Einstein,
332:Each time someone dies, a library burns. I’m watching it burn right to the ground. ~ Jandy Nelson,
333:Filmmaker John Waters has said, “Nothing is more important than an unread library. ~ Austin Kleon,
334:It was a great place to write a novel about book burning, in the library basement. ~ Ray Bradbury,
335:One of the most subversive institutions in the United States is the public library.. ~ bell hooks,
336:The only thing that you absolutely have to know, is the location of the library ~ Albert Einstein,
337:Gray and I talked about library school the way draft dodgers talked about Canada. ~ Rebecca Schiff,
338:I don't know why anyone has a living room when they could have a library instead. ~ Megan Lindholm,
339:If you want to get laid, go to college. If you want an education, go to the library. ~ Frank Zappa,
340:In many towns, the library is the only place you can browse through physical books. ~ Susan Orlean,
341:I started with a book, and that led me to a library, and that led me everywhere. ~ Terry Pratchett,
342:The greatest knowledge a person can possess is the address of the local library. ~ Albert Einstein,
343:The library is the only place where I don’t have to try to fit in. It’s effortless. ~ Donna Cooner,
344:The only thing that you absolutely have to know, is the location of the library. ~ Albert Einstein,
345:the only thing that you absolutely have to know, is the location of the library. ~ Albert Einstein,
346:Why can't I just Google it like everything else?! I hate you public library system! ~ Vera Brosgol,
347:A library is the first step of a thousand journeys, portal to a thousand worlds. ~ Orson Scott Card,
348:I'll tell you what's more important than all the commentaries in your library: prayer. ~ Mark Dever,
349:Living in a house with a large library,” she said, “is a little like living in heaven ~ Mary Balogh,
350:One day she's throwing a book at me. The next, we're making out behind the library. ~ Richelle Mead,
351:A library is the first step of a thousand journeys, portal to a thousand worlds. ~ Orson Scott Card,
352:All you need in life is truth and beauty and you can find both at the Public Library. ~ Studs Terkel,
353:Anyone who has got a book collection/library and a garden wants for nothing. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
354:Do not be guilty of possessing a library of learned books while lacking learning yourself. ~ Erasmus,
355:His mind was indeed my library, and whenever it was opened to me, I entered bliss. ~ Charlotte Bront,
356:In a modest library, the creep of moisture had bowed the shelves into crooked smiles. ~ Ransom Riggs,
357:In the meantime, there is not an hour to lose. I am about to visit the public library. ~ Jules Verne,
358:It was like living in a library, and that was where I had always been happiest. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
359:Olivia, Time to pay up. Meet me in the library in ten minutes. -Caleb “Unbelievable! ~ Tarryn Fisher,
360:Over the door of the library in Thebes is the inscription "Medicine for the soul. ~ Diodorus Siculus,
361:The world encyclopedia, the universal library, exists, and it is the world itself. ~ Alberto Manguel,
362:when i have a house of my own, i shall be miserable if i have not an excellent library ~ Jane Austen,
363:You'll never go to the library and find a book on how to fail, because we all do it. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
364:Come with me,' Mom says.
To the library.
Books and summertime
go together. ~ Lisa Schroeder,
365:His mind was indeed my library, and whenever it was opened to me, I entered bliss. ~ Charlotte Bronte,
366:I cannot comprehend the neglect of a family library in such days as these." - Mr. Darcy ~ Jane Austen,
367:The biggest thing I did was that I used to go to the library. I fed my mind every day. ~ Tony Robbins,
368:The library is a gathering pool of narratives and of the people who come to find them. ~ Susan Orlean,
369:When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable If I have not an excellent library. ~ Jane Austen,
370:When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ Jane Austen,
371:You shut down a library Louisa, you don't just shut down a building, you shut down hope. ~ Jojo Moyes,
372:A deserted library in the morning—there’s something about it that really gets to me. ~ Haruki Murakami,
373:A library is a place where you can lose your innocence without losing your virginity. ~ Germaine Greer,
374:If peace had a smell,it would be the smell of a library full of old, leather-bound books. ~ Mark Pryor,
375:Let heaven exist, though my place be in hell.

- The Library of Babel ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
376:The library is meant to be a place of learning, not of
judgment,” said Elliot. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
377:We don’t have to destroy the library of the past. We just need to give it a face-lift. ~ Scott Douglas,
378:At its loftiest, a library's goal is to keep as many minds as possible in the game ... ~ Josh Hanagarne,
379:I admit that I haven't read everything in my library, but I feel smarter just walking in it! ~ Jim Rohn,
380:In the houses of the humble a little library in my opinion is a most precious possession. ~ John Bright,
381:One Best Book is Equal To Hundred Good Friends But One Good Friend is Equal To A Library. ~ Abdul Kalam,
382:There is a sad disconnectedness that overcomes a library when its owner is gone. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
383:To arrange a library is to practice in a quiet and modest way the art of criticism. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
384:When I was young, we couldn't afford much. But, my library card was my key to the world. ~ John Goodman,
385:With a library it is easier to hope for serendipity than to look for a precise answer. ~ Daniel Handler,
386:A man may debar nonsense from his library of reason, but not from the arena of his impulses. ~ Rex Stout,
387:I cannot comprehend the neglect of a family library in such days as these."
- Mr. Darcy ~ Jane Austen,
388:If you can't find an answer at the mall or the library, what does that say about the world? ~ Joan Bauer,
389:I told him. We got a library here. Got plenty of good books, too. -Larry Brown, Dirty Work ~ Larry Brown,
390:I wouldn’t be the person I am today if it wasn’t for the opportunities the library gave me. ~ Alan Moore,
391:Jack Benny really liked my book. I know because he called me up from the library and told me. ~ Bob Hope,
392:Medicine for the soul. ~ Inscription over the door of the Library at Thebes. Diodorus Siculus. I. 49. 3.,
393:the board believed it would be in everyone’s best interest to have a man run the library. ~ Susan Orlean,
394:The library (in the migrant community) I grew up in was my only link to the outside world. ~ Luis Valdez,
395:There’s just something magical about a library. It’s like a portal to many different worlds. ~ Amo Jones,
396:ALBUS/RON: How to distract Scorpius from difficult emotional issues. Take him to a library. ~ J K Rowling,
397:Because that's what Hermione does,' said Ron, shrugging. 'When in doubt, go to the library. ~ J K Rowling,
398:If I were asked to name the chief event in my life, I should say my father's library. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
399:Believe me, the library is the temple of God. Education is the most sacred religion of all. ~ Gene Simmons,
400:Here's my library, where I don't do a lot of reading but mostly play Angry Birds on the computer. ~ J Lynn,
401:I feel I want to be wise with white hair in a tall library in a deep chair by a fireplace. ~ Gregory Corso,
402:Jorge Luis Borges: “I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library.” “The ~ Suzanne Kelman,
403:Surrounded by stories surreal and sublime, I fell in Love in the Library once upon a time. ~ Jimmy Buffett,
404:The closest you will ever come in this life to an orderly universe is a good library. ~ Ashleigh Brilliant,
405:Yeats, you need ten years in the library, but I have need of ten years in the wilderness. ~ Lionel Johnson,
406:..you do not leave a library; if you do what it wants you to do, you are taking it with you. ~ Elie Wiesel,
407:Heaven must be a place where the library is open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. ~ Alan Bradley,
408:Nothing is more dangerous to maidenly delicacy of speech than the run of a good library. ~ Robertson Davies,
409:A library is the delivery room for the birth of ideas, a place where history comes to life. ~ Norman Cousins,
410:At the end of it all, it's my little movie library, and you see aspects of me through that. ~ Milla Jovovich,
411:Bless the army for increased patrols, and bless me for memorizing their routes for library trips. ~ K M Shea,
412:Dulcie always found a public library a little upsetting, for one saw so many odd people there. ~ Barbara Pym,
413:Every library is a library of preferences, and every chosen category implies an exclusion. ~ Alberto Manguel,
414:investment books in the library. The best was How to Trade in Stocks, by Jesse Livermore. ~ William J O Neil,
415:It's important to make clear to all the schools at Harvard the central role of the library. ~ Robert Darnton,
416:My great-grandfather was a self-taught man, and his library was extraordinary. I read the lot. ~ Alan Garner,
417:One best book is equal to hundred good friends but one good friend is equal to a library ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
418:Only library books speak with such wordless eloquence of the power good stories hold over us. ~ Stephen King,
419:People of all demographic categories and geographic regions will access a good digital library. ~ Tom Peters,
420:You can learn from a glance at anyone's library, not what they are, but what they wish to be. ~ Alan Bradley,
421:A couple of months in the laboratory can frequently save a couple of hours in the library. ~ Frank Westheimer,
422:I know exactly what I would do with immortality: I would read every book in the library. ~ Mark Jason Dominus,
423:One best book is equal to hundred good friends but one good friend is equal to a library. ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
424:One good book Is Equal To Hundred Friends . . . But One Good Friend Is Equal To A Library ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
425:Rumi is astounding, fertile, abundant, almost more an excitable library of poetry than a person. ~ Robert Bly,
426:The only reason we’ve held them off this long is because we burned the library.” “The library? ~ Laini Taylor,
427:The studious silence of the library ... Thought is the thought of thought. Tranquil brightness. ~ James Joyce,
428:A Nigerian librarian told me that her library offers art and entrepreneurship training classes, ~ Susan Orlean,
429:He had a small but well stocked library. He loved books; books are a remote but reliable friend. ~ Victor Hugo,
430:I want to know how the hell you managed to locate that hideout using the damn public library. ~ Richard Castle,
431:People may go to the library looking mainly for information, but they find each other there. ~ Robert D Putnam,
432:Slartibartfast's study was a total mess, like the results of an explosion in a public library. ~ Douglas Adams,
433:The classroom was a jail of other people’s interests. The library was open, unending, free. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
434:Dead like slipped on a bar of soap or like Colonel Mustard in the library with the lead piping? ~ Nick Harkaway,
435:Do not be guilty of possessing a library of learned books while lacking learning yourself. ~ Desiderius Erasmus,
436:Don't join the book burners... Don't be afraid to go in your library and read every book. ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
437:He that revels in a well-chosen library, has innumerable dishes, and all of admirable flavour. ~ William Godwin,
438:I do readings at the public library. I just did a benefit scene night for my old acting teacher. ~ Mark Ruffalo,
439:If—when—I become rich, I want a library so big that I’ll need a ladder to reach all my books. ~ Erika L S nchez,
440:If you have a question about anything, the answer can be found in a book somewhere in the library. ~ Bill Cosby,
441:Questioners sooner or later end up in a library... And answers are dangerous; they kill your wonder. ~ Rajneesh,
442:The Internet is the world's largest library. It's just that all the books are on the floor. ~ John Allen Paulos,
443:The library is a place where most of the things I came to value as an adult had their beginnings. ~ Pete Hamill,
444:Then what is the purpose of the Library?" Vale asked.
"To save books," Irene said firmly. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
445:Each and every book in the library had a ball of light directly in front of it. Every single book. ~ James Riley,
446:He had been so busy getting away from the library, he hadn't paid attention to where he was going. ~ J K Rowling,
447:He paused, and I knew he was delving again in a mind larger and darker than even his great library. ~ Gene Wolfe,
448:I have said repeatedly that in this country we track library books better than we do sex offenders. ~ Mark Foley,
449:I spent all my time at school in the library. Bad teachers can teach you to learn on your own. ~ Gregory Colbert,
450:No place affords a more striking conviction of the vanity of human hopes than a public library. ~ Samuel Johnson,
451:Nothing is more important than an unread library.” Don’t worry about doing research. Just search. ~ Austin Kleon,
452:The biggest library fire in American history had been upstaged by the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown. ~ Susan Orlean,
453:The library is the biggest cracker box factory in the world. The more you eat, the more you want. ~ Ray Bradbury,
454:CLARE: The library is cool and smells like carpet cleaner, although all I can see is marble. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
455:In Senegal, the polite expression for saying someone died is to say his or her library has burned. ~ Susan Orlean,
456:No place affords a more striking conviction of the vanity of human hopes, than a public library. ~ Samuel Johnson,
457:One of the great advantages of
having a library,your eminence,
is that it is full of books. ~ Michael Hirst,
458:Why couldn’t I be locked away in my room or the library doing something enjoyable, like homework? ~ Richelle Mead,
459:A library is a place that is a repository of information and gives every citizen equal access to it. ~ Neil Gaiman,
460:Ereaders were a great convenience, but nothing could beat the smell of a library and old books. ~ Kate Evangelista,
461:He loved books, never going to sea without a newly replenished library, compact but of the best. ~ Herman Melville,
462:I have a sort of Christmas-morning sense of the library as a big box full of beautiful books. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
463:I've been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
464:I’ve been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
465:Nobody should have children just because it made the photo library on the computer more interesting. ~ Nick Hornby,
466:Scholars have long dreamed of a universal library containing everything that has ever been written. ~ Peter Singer,
467:The library is an arena of possibility, opening both a window into the soul and a door onto the world. ~ Rita Dove,
468:There was a reminder that the library was always seeking books, and that they paid in wine. ~ Emily St John Mandel,
469:A library's ideal function is to be a little bit like a bouquiniste's stall, a place for trouvailles. ~ Umberto Eco,
470:If peace had a smell, he thought, it would be the smell of a library full of old, leather-bound books. ~ Mark Pryor,
471:I was a great reader of fairy tales. I tried to read the entire fairy tale section of the library. ~ Beverly Cleary,
472:Librarians lend people books from the library. The best librarians are children's book librarians. ~ Richard Scarry,
473:One of the many reasons I love libraries. Everyone is lost and not wanting to be found in a library. ~ Sarah Noffke,
474:sparking floor fan resulted in the loss of all the books in Temple University’s law library in 1972. ~ Susan Orlean,
475:The problem with life is, by the time you can read women like a book, your library card has expired. ~ Milton Berle,
476:With a public library card in your hand, you have access to the Internet and a world of opportunities. ~ Bill Gates,
477:After that, I would move out, spend more time at the library, and invest in a truly excellent vibrator. ~ Penny Reid,
478:For anyone who has ever dreamed of finding a body in the library.
- Dedication of Truly Devious ~ Maureen Johnson,
479:I hate being all tidy like a book in a library where nobody reads – prison is horribly like that. ~ Bertrand Russell,
480:I picture heaven as a vast library, with unlimited volumes to read. And paintings and statues to examine ~ Anne Rice,
481:One day, she ventured to the palace library and was delighted to find what good company books could be. ~ E Lockhart,
482:people hack into the library to rehearse hacking into bigger, more secure, and more valuable targets. ~ Susan Orlean,
483:Society was the only threat to the sanctity of selfhood: an unpatroned library was an orderly library. ~ Reif Larsen,
484:There's no better teacher for writing than reading... Get a library card. That's the best investment. ~ Alisa Valdes,
485:Have any sheep been seen walking out of the Library with seagoing adventurers clinging to their wool? ~ Lindsey Davis,
486:I always carry a pistol when I go [to the New York Public Library]. Never did trust those stone lions. ~ Robert Bloch,
487:I like reading in a pub rather than a library or study, as it's generally much easier to get a drink. ~ Pete McCarthy,
488:I wanted to stand up and shout that this was unfair, but loud voices were not permitted in the library. ~ Lynn Austin,
489:... my heart skips a beat. Seriously, like a CD from the public library, it goes ZZebbTTT and skips. ~ Brent Crawford,
490:never leave a page unturned if you find a book and never leave a book untouched if you find a library. ~ Hari Kumar K,
491:Order and surprise: these are two intertwined elements that make for any great library or collection. ~ Michael Dirda,
492:She wasn’t a wielder of chains; she was a breaker of them. She was the library’s will made flesh. ~ Margaret Rogerson,
493:The library is an easy place to be when you have no place you need to go and a desire to be invisible. ~ Susan Orlean,
494:Call me a schoolmarm, but few things make me angrier than people not taking good care of library materials. ~ Tim Gunn,
495:Every library should try to complete on something, if it were only the history of pinheads. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
496:For those without money, the road to the treasure house of the imagination begins at the public library. ~ Pete Hamill,
497:How to distract Scorpius from difficult emotional issues? Take him to a library." - Albus Severus Potter ~ J K Rowling,
498:I have now a library of nearly nine hundred volumes, over seven hundred of which I wrote myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
499:I know that I am a small, weak man, but I have amassed a large library; I dream of dangerous places. ~ Terry Pratchett,
500:My father was in the Army and we moved around a lot, and one of my favorite places was the library. ~ Suzan Lori Parks,
501:The classroom was a jail of other people’s interests. The library was open, unending, free. Slowly, ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
502:twenty-two adults would receive their high school diplomas, courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library. ~ Susan Orlean,
503:Books read in a public library never have the same flavour as books read in the attic or the kitchen. ~ Alberto Manguel,
504:He’s at the library, I think. Safe and sound in his world of books... Maybe he’ll write one someday. ~ Lurlene McDaniel,
505:Sitting in the brightly lit library, surrounded by books, in total silence, that was ma personal zenith. ~ Irvine Welsh,
506:When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library - Caroline Bingley ~ Jane Austen,
507:Doing research on the Web is like using a library assembled piecemeal by pack rats and vandalized nightly. ~ Roger Ebert,
508:Fame is fickle. If the media turn against me, I will just have more time in the library. Not bad as a fate. ~ Mary Beard,
509:In the great tradition of Paris Is Burning, bring out your library cards! Because reading is what? Fundamental! ~ RuPaul,
510:Every library should try to be complete on something, if it were only the history of pinheads. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
511:First paycheck I get, I thought, I'm going to get myself a room near the downtown L.A. Public Library. ~ Charles Bukowski,
512:I always have to go out to work even if it's just a desk somewhere or an office or the British Library. ~ David Morrissey,
513:I wanted to see my name on the cover of a book. If your name is in the Library of Congress, you're immortal. ~ Tom Clancy,
514:Library books were, I suddenly realized, promiscuous, ready to lie in the arms of anyone who asked. ~ Elizabeth McCracken,
515:Library late fines are stiff. Ten lashes a day, and that's just for paperbacks." -Sharon, Library of Souls ~ Ransom Riggs,
516:The library—the place in my life that was full of books—beagan to teach me that books weren't everything. ~ Scott Douglas,
517:A library of books is the fairest garden in the world, and to walk there is an ecstasy. —The Arabian Nights ~ Ellery Adams,
518:If one had never had the good fortune of meeting Borges, then meeting his library was the next best thing ~ Salman Rushdie,
519:If you steal any of the books from the library, I will know, and you'll be sorry.
Jessamine Lovelace. ~ Cassandra Clare,
520:I like to keep my books in my library, he said, 'and I like my library to get bigger rather than smaller. ~ Joseph Delaney,
521:I'm a fastidious bookman and have never liked reading books with library markings or other messy defects. ~ Larry McMurtry,
522:It is like having a book out from the library.
It is like constantly having a book out from the library. ~ Lorrie Moore,
523:Memory, that library of the soul from which I will draw knowledge and experience for the rest of my life. ~ Tove Ditlevsen,
524:Each time you admire the façade of the New York Public Library, you are paying homage to Western civilization. ~ Ibn Warraq,
525:I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
526:I'm spending more time at this library in four days than I did at the Eureka College Library in four years. ~ Ronald Reagan,
527:I spent three days a week for 10 years educating myself in the public library, and it's better than college. ~ Ray Bradbury,
528:The library was open for one hour after school let out. I hid there, looking at art books and reading poetry. ~ Lynda Barry,
529:You will never find me in trouble. You will find me in the library. If you can remember where that is. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
530:I am never long, even in the society of her I love, without yearning for the company of my lamp and my library. ~ Lord Byron,
531:I've got a library copy of Gone with the Wind, a quart of milk and all these cookies. Wow! What an orgy! ~ Jacqueline Susann,
532:Libraries are the center of our lives. There's no use going to a university if you don't live at the library. ~ Ray Bradbury,
533:...library terror - that feeling of being hopelessly overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of available books... ~ Owen Barfield,
534:What is more important in a library than anything else-than everything else-is the fact that it exists. ~ Archibald MacLeish,
535:When I step into this library, I cannot understand why I ever step out of it. ~ Marie de Rabutin Chantal marquise de Sevigne,
536:You wasted $150,000 on an education you could have got for a buck fifty in late charges at the public library. ~ Ben Affleck,
537:A modest garden contains, for those who know how to look and to wait, more instruction than a library. ~ Henri Fr d ric Amiel,
538:A modest garden contains, for those who know how to look and to wait, more instruction than a library. ~ Henri Frederic Amiel,
539:As the light began to fade, the architects lit the library’s gas jets, which hissed like mildly perturbed cats. ~ Erik Larson,
540:If I was a book, I would like to be a library book, so I would be taken home by all different sorts of kids. ~ Cornelia Funke,
541:I followed her to the library, feeling like Princess Leia. Instead of Obi-Wan, this snarky girl was my only hope. ~ D R Perry,
542:There are thousands of different paths in a city but there are millions of different paths in a library! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
543:Traveling is like going to the library! The more you travel, the more you will feel as if reading books! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
544:When I step into this library, I cannot understand why I ever step out of it. ~ Marie de Sevigne, O Magazine (December 2003).,
545:Why spend a day in the library when you can learn the same thing by working in the laboratory for a month? ~ Frank Westheimer,
546:He felt like a mobile library. Where other investigators gathered fingerprints and evidence, he gathered books. ~ Louise Penny,
547:I can see he's not in your good books,' said the messenger. 'No, and if he were I would burn my library. ~ William Shakespeare,
548:I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple.
   ~ Jean-Paul Sartre,
549:I tell you, if you feel strange,

strange things will happen to you:
Fallen peacocks on library shelves ~ Rita Dove,
550:One of the things that people don't do enough of when they do psychedelic work is spend time in the library. ~ Terence McKenna,
551:Reading is at the center of our lives. The library is our brain. Without the library, you have no civilization. ~ Ray Bradbury,
552:The library is not only a diary of the human race, but marks an act of faith in the continuity of humanity. ~ Vartan Gregorian,
553:The two of them were sat at the circular desk in the library, waiting for 1pm so they could go for lunch. Kayleigh ~ E A Price,
554:... even in houses commonly held to be 'booky' one finds, nine times out of ten, not a library but a book-dump. ~ Edith Wharton,
555:Ever since I was little my mother had told me, if you don’t know something, go to the library and look it up. ~ Haruki Murakami,
556:I have this book club, and we don't read one book; we offer up a few suggestions and create a library over time. ~ Claire Danes,
557:I've been cataloguing samples for years, I have this massive library. Songs come out everyday so it's never ending. ~ Girl Talk,
558:My Alma mater was books, a good library... I could spend the rest of my life reading, just satisfying my curiosity. ~ Malcolm X,
559:Scholars don't usually sit gasping and sobbing in corners of the library stacks.
But they should. They should. ~ Joanna Russ,
560:The three most important documents a free society gives are a birth certificate, a passport, and a library card. ~ E L Doctorow,
561:Truthfully, without over-egging it, as I often do, the library and journalism, those things made me who I am. ~ Terry Pratchett,
562:When I graduated from high school I couldn't go to college, so I went to the library 3 days a week for 10 years. ~ Ray Bradbury,
563:Yes?" she said, peering over her spectacles. They teach them to do that at the Royal Academy of Library Science. ~ Alan Bradley,
564:Your intelligence often bears the same relation to your heart as the library of a chateau does to its owner. ~ Nicolas Chamfort,
565:It seems to me that anyone whose library consists of a Kindle lying on a table is some sort of bloodless nerd. ~ Penelope Lively,
566:More than anything, memory resembles a library in alphabetical disorder, and with no collected works by anyone. ~ Joseph Brodsky,
567:My alma mater was books, a good library.... I could spend the rest of my life reading, just satisfying my curiosity. ~ Malcolm X,
568:My father gave me free run of his library. When I think of my boyhood, I think in terms of the books I read. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
569:Reading is at the center of our lives. The library is our brain. Without the library, you have no civilization. ~ Ray Bradbury,
570:What about study hall? Shouldn't I go to the library?
"What for, Ms. Lord?" Mr. anderson said. "You're with me ~ Ilsa J Bick,
571:A library's ideal function is to be a little bit like a bouquiniste's stall, a place for trouvailles. ~ Umberto Eco,
572:A man will turn over half a library to make one book. ~ Samuel Johnson, reported in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1775).,
573:Collect books, even if you don't plan on reading them right away. Nothing is more important than an unread library. ~ John Waters,
574:For a child a library needs to be round the corner. And if we lose local libraries it is children who will suffer. ~ Alan Bennett,
575:Her mother had called, and being a good daughter was as convenient an excuse as any. Anything to avoid the library. ~ Joseph Fink,
576:I can see he's not in your good books,' said the messenger.
'No, and if he were I would burn my library. ~ William Shakespeare,
577:I'm focusing on the music, but I still got a cold library of books that I've either read or I plan on getting to. ~ Nipsey Hussle,
578:Knowing I lov'd my books, he furnish'd me From mine own library with volumes that I prize above my dukedom. ~ William Shakespeare,
579:Problems of human behavior still continue to baffle us, but at least in the Library we have them properly filed. ~ Anita Brookner,
580:That perfect tranquility of life, which is nowhere to be found but in retreat, a faithful friend and a good library. ~ Aphra Behn,
581:The library furnished our dreams, helped us shape our ambitions, made up people of books and ideas and grand designs. ~ Anne Rice,
582:There was much less laughter and a lot more hanging around in the library when Hermione was your best friend. Harry ~ J K Rowling,
583:You took out a book on blow-job technique from the British Library? They shouldn't have books like that in there! ~ Sarra Manning,
584:and when the Tizerkane warriors rode out of the Great Library and out of Zosma, Strange the dreamer went with them. ~ Laini Taylor,
585:He had loved the library, and had felt, as a boy, as though it had a kind of sentience, and perhaps loved him back. ~ Laini Taylor,
586:Hey! I get to sleep in a library and read books all night! Without pity, where would I be? I'm a total pity s-s-ssslut. ~ Joe Hill,
587:Invisible Oompa-Loompas waiting on a scarred millionaire with an occult library. This could only happen to you, ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
588:It is a truth universally acknowledged that any book lover in want of a good book will always find one in a library. ~ Lucy Powrie,
589:it occurred to me that Heaven must be a place where the library is open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. ~ Alan Bradley,
590:Like all those possessing a library, Aurelian was aware that he was guilty of not knowing his in its entirety. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
591:One alphabet at a time, you can write an encyclopaedia. One word at a time, you can publish an entire library. ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
592:The Library is a sphere whose exact centre is any one of its hexagons and whose circumference is inaccessible. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
593:there was this library. I always imagined it filled with beautiful, glowing books, each containing a peculiar soul. ~ Ransom Riggs,
594:They say in every library there is a single book that can answer the question that burns like a fire in the mind. ~ Daniel Handler,
595:were the only ones in the university’s library. If there were someone else, they’d have kicked me out already. My ~ Alycia Linwood,
596:When I was in my 20s, I was a bookworm - spent 12 hours of the day in the library. How I met George, I'll never know. ~ Laura Bush,
597:And ever since I was little my mother had told me, if you don't know something, go to the library and look it up. ~ Haruki Murakami,
598:And ever since I was little my mother had told me, if you don’t know something, go to the library and look it up. ~ Haruki Murakami,
599:But the Library still held everything he’d ever wanted, too. All the knowledge in the world, right at his fingertips ~ Rachel Caine,
600:Heaven must be a place where the library is open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. No … eight days a week. ~ Alan Bradley,
601:I am no indiscriminate novel reader. The mere trash of the common circulating library I hold in the highest contempt. ~ Jane Austen,
602:I'd be happy if I could think that the role of the library was sustained and even enhanced in the age of the computer. ~ Bill Gates,
603:Nine SPEAKING IN TONGUES The following is based on a lecture given at the New York Public Library in December 2008. 1 ~ Zadie Smith,
604:On a library bookshelf, thought progresses in a way that is logical but also dumbfounding, mysterious, irresistible. ~ Susan Orlean,
605:There is such seduction in a library of good books that I cannot resist the temptation to luxuriate in reading. ~ John Quincy Adams,
606:The study of this Book in your Bible classes is a post-graduate course in the richest library of human experience. ~ Herbert Hoover,
607:An empty library?” Whisperer said. “That’s right,” I replied, “the sort of world we’d live in if the fanatics had won. ~ Terry Hayes,
608:I just have this feeling that if it weren't for the Gloversville Free Library that I probably would not be a writer. ~ Richard Russo,
609:In a recent fire Bob Dole's library burned down. Both books were lost. And he hadn't even finished coloring one of them. ~ Jack Kemp,
610:It smelled of man sweat and spaghetti sauce and old books. Like a library where sweaty men went to cook spaghetti. ~ George Saunders,
611:I wished I could take her to the library and hand her over to the librarians. Please teach her about everything, I'd say. ~ A S King,
612:Meeting you in the library that first time felt like a reunion. I’ve loved you in a thousand lifetimes. Do you feel it? ~ Emma Scott,
613:She regarded books as the emblems of secret brotherhood. A man with this sort of library couldn't possibly hurt her. ~ Milan Kundera,
614:Strange the dreamer - library stowaway and scholar of fairy tales - had never been thirstier, or more full of wonder. ~ Laini Taylor,
615:Theano is a python library that makes writing deep learning models easy, and gives the option of training them on a GPU. ~ Anonymous,
616:The Lethean Library, for all its incalculable volumes, is, I know, sadly incomplete without Mr. Goodman's effort. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
617:The library still had a card catalog, the high school still had chalkboards, and our community pool was Lake Moultrie, ~ Kami Garcia,
618:The relationship with my library on a Kindle feels more intimate, like a shelled animal carrying its home on its back. ~ Linda Grant,
619:The sound of someone passing by the library entrance made the two of them scatter away, like cockroaches from the light. ~ A Z Green,
620:To my sister's eyes, there is nothing which cannot be explained if one has access to a proper reference library. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
621:To sit in a big library amongst books and students, that was pretty cool. It was a novel experience for me. ~ Jonathan Taylor Thomas,
622:You build a thousand castles, a thousand sanctuaries, you are nothing; you build a library, you are everything! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
623:A library implies an act of faith which generations, still in darkness hid, sign in their night in witness of the dawn. ~ Victor Hugo,
624:A little library, growing every year, is an honorable part of a man’s history. It is a man’s duty to have books. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
625:A public library is the most democratic thing in the world. What can be found there has undone dictators and tyrants. ~ Doris Lessing,
626:Here was one place where I could find out who I was and what I was going to become. And that was the public library. ~ Jerzy Kosinski,
627:Here was one place where I could find out who I was and what I was going to become. And that was the public library. ~ Jerzy Kosi ski,
628:I feel you," he said, "whether stalking me through the streets of London, or hiding behind a screen in my library. ~ Kristen Callihan,
629:I looked at Sadie. “What do we do now?” She crossed her arms. “Well, that’s obvious, isn’t it? We explore the library. ~ Rick Riordan,
630:OKAY. So I was going to the library every Saturday. So what? So what? It's not like I was reading books or anything. ~ Gary D Schmidt,
631:She was part wide-eyed wood nymph, part awkward society miss, and—he was beginning to realize—part testy library elf. ~ Karen Hawkins,
632:When I started the Imagination Library in my hometown, I never dreamed that one day we would be helping Scottish kids. ~ Dolly Parton,
633:You can read books without ever stepping into a library; and practice spirituality without ever going to a temple. ~ Anthony de Mello,
634:accepting it. Besides, she knew what the Doctor did not, that help was waiting across the hall in the library. ~ Mary Roberts Rinehart,
635:All my life, the library has always been one of my favorite places to go. (Larry Brown: A Writer's Life by Jean W. Cash) ~ Larry Brown,
636:Book lovers will understand me, and they will know too that part of the pleasure of a library lies in its very existence. ~ Jan Morris,
637:He had never measured a footprint in his life, and what he did not know about bloodstains would have filled a library. ~ P G Wodehouse,
638:If you do not throw in a few promises of better things to come, gloomy one, I am going to take you back to the library. ~ Mason Cooley,
639:The air itself is one vast library, on whose pages are for ever written all that man has ever said or woman whispered. ~ Peter Ackroyd,
640:The things you don't like talking about would fill a library."
"That's the kind of life I've had, all right? ~ Cinda Williams Chima,
641:(this is before we're living together, before we do the most faithful act of all, mix our separate books into one library) ~ Ali Smith,
642:A library is never complete. That’s the joy of it. We are always seeking one more book to add to our collection. ~ Catherynne M Valente,
643:A library so big that it distorts reality and has opened gateways to all other libraries, everywhere and everywhen... ~ Terry Pratchett,
644:And for the first time in his life, Kyle Keeley wanted to check out a library book more than anything in the world. ~ Chris Grabenstein,
645:Just the omission of Jane Austen's books alone would make a fairly good library out of a library that hadn't a book in it. ~ Mark Twain,
646:Nobody gets irony anymore, as we are now living in the post-ironic age. Once George Bush gets a library, our irony is dead. ~ Eric Idle,
647:Oh, of course," said Ron, clapping a hand to his forehead. "I forgot we'll be hunting down Voldemort in a mobile library. ~ J K Rowling,
648:What’s the fastest route to the library in Peachtree City? (Carlos)
What? You’ve got an overdue book? (Gabrielle) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
649:A library doesn’t need windows, Andrew. We have books, which are windows into worlds we never even dreamed possible. ~ Chris Grabenstein,
650:An evil librarian is taking over the school. He appears to be making my best friend his special evil library monitor. ~ Michelle Knudsen,
651:I have just committed the mortal sin of laughing in the Members' Library. No-one around here has done that for a while. ~ Nadine Dorries,
652:In the end, I go where I always go when I need information on something baffling, poisonous, or terrifying: the library. ~ Caitlin Moran,
653:I was always a reader. In the fifth grade, I got some sort of prize for having read hundreds of books from the library. ~ Vijay Seshadri,
654:She might ban me from the library."
"The marvelous thing about libraries is that their contents can be easily moved. ~ Alissa Johnson,
655:The library committee had an epic secret meeting about the ethics of literary eugenics which ended in a furious deadlock. ~ Lev Grossman,
656:They should be taking bonuses from bankers, not library books from schoolchildren. What kind of society are we building? ~ Sara Sheridan,
657:To have your whole music library with you at all times is a quantum leap in listening to music. How do we possibly do this? ~ Steve Jobs,
658:He would go somewhere no one knew him, and he would sit in a library all day and read books and listen to people breathing. ~ Neil Gaiman,
659:I have always imagined Paradise as a kind of library. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Dreamtigers (1960) "Poem of the Gifts" ["Poema de los Dones"].,
660:In seventh grade...I found a place on the [library]shelf where my book would be if I ever wrote a book, which I doubted. ~ Beverly Cleary,
661:I remember the hours I had spent in Father's library, drugging myself with books so I could forget my doom for an hour.. ~ Rosamund Hodge,
662:Is anything illegal here?” Addison asked. “Library late fines are stiff. Ten lashes a day, and that’s just for paperbacks. ~ Ransom Riggs,
663:I was born, and then I was quietly resentful of that fact for a few years...but then I went to a library and it was okay. ~ Helen Oyeyemi,
664:I was born an only child in Vienna, Austria. My father found hours to sit by me by the library fire and tell fairy stories. ~ Hedy Lamarr,
665:"Oh, of course," said Ron, clapping a hand to his forehead. "I forgot we'll be hunting down Voldemort in a mobile library." ~ J K Rowling,
666:There was NO WAY we were just sitting there in the library like a bride and groom sharing a piece of wedding cake! ~ Rachel Ren e Russell,
667:You can take the girl out of the library, but you can't take the neurotic, compulsively curious librarian out of the girl. ~ Molly Harper,
668:You can take the girl out of the library, but you can’t take the neurotic, compulsively curious librarian out of the girl. ~ Molly Harper,
669:A library of wisdom, then, is more precious than all wealth, and all things that are desirable cannot be compared to it. ~ Richard de Bury,
670:But with the library, it's like catnip, I suppose: you begin to run in circles because there's so much to look at and read. ~ Ray Bradbury,
671:I am unpacking my library. Yes I am. The books are not yet on the shelves, not yet touched by the mild boredom of order. ~ Walter Benjamin,
672:I believe we do well to fall asleep each night with books. We enter the library of our dreams in good company then. ~ Robert Stephen Parry,
673:I’m reading more than ever. I’ve started on the left wall of the Carnegie Library and plan to read my way around the room. ~ Frances Mayes,
674:It was only on the way home that Anna realised that Ariadne had asked her to the library and not shown her a single book ~ Cassandra Clare,
675:Libraries rock! Not a sermon, just a fact. As a kid I was a library rat and books changed my life. They can change yours. ~ David Baldacci,
676:Rediscovery in the library may be a more difficult and uncertain process than the first discovery in the laboratory. ~ John William Strutt,
677:She also kept literary indexes of books, newspapers, magazines, etc., which she purchased or obtained from the library. ~ Helena Whitbread,
678:she walked round and round the brown library considering by what sort of manoeuvre she could arrest her wandering thoughts. ~ George Eliot,
679:A library is a miracle. A place where you can learn just about anything, for free. A place where your mind can come alive. ~ Josh Hanagarne,
680:I am the keeper of the library, Matthew. Without it I am nothing. Were it to be destroyed again, it would destroy me as well. ~ Neil Gaiman,
681:I’m sorry. I know that I am a small, weak man, but I have amassed a large library; I dream of dangerous places.” “Perhaps ~ Terry Pratchett,
682:I took up a sort of a hobby of just hanging around the local library. I'd pick out an author and I would read all their books. ~ Tom T Hall,
683:It’s been ten years since Ellie Mack disappeared, a fifteen year old fro north London, disappeared on her way to the library. ~ Lisa Jewell,
684:I was locked in the library trying not to panic. Literally locked. As in, no escape. Every door, every window, every air vent. ~ Kasie West,
685:I was vaguely attracted to both library science and accounting, for the way that these disciplines impose order on chaos. ~ Kathleen Norris,
686:Library terror - that feeling of being hopelessly overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of available books... ~ Owen Barfield, Night Operation,
687:Online Computer Library Center, a global cooperative of twenty thousand libraries located in 122 countries around the world. ~ Susan Orlean,
688:Poetry is not the books in the library. Poetry is the encounter of the reader with the book, the discovery of the book. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
689:She never told me anything, but she allowed me to read anything I wanted in the library, which held a great many books. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
690:The public library is more than a repository of books. It's a mysterious, wondrous place with the power to change lives. ~ Elizabeth Taylor,
691:Book lovers will understand me,
and they will know too that part of the pleasure
of a library lies in its very existence. ~ Jan Morris,
692:Books were my window on the world. Growing up at the Elephant and Castle, which was very rough, my paradise was the library. ~ Michael Caine,
693:I can not describe to you the impact that library had on my life and my success. It quite literally made me who I am today. ~ Marie Benedict,
694:In fact, of course, there is no secret knowledge; no one knows anything that can't be found on a shelf in the public library. ~ Daniel Quinn,
695:…in the library…surrounded by things far more dangerous than what roamed the school corridors. For here thoughts were housed. ~ Louise Penny,
696:I own a well-used library card and not much else, though it is true I live in a grand house full of expensive, useless objects. ~ E Lockhart,
697:I want to work at a library someday," I said. "I want to spend every waking day of my adult life surrounded by books. ~ Tracey Garvis Graves,
698:Learn to enjoy things without owning them. Ownership is nothing, access is everything. Visit a library, a park, or a museum. ~ Joshua Becker,
699:My childhood was spent in my local library in a San Diego suburb. It's where I became a writer - by 1st becoming a reader! ~ Tess Gerritsen,
700:The pale green of the St. Johns Bridge, stretching across the river to the Safeway and the library and everything on that side. ~ Peter Rock,
701:and spend lonely nights in the library or laboratory pursuing a glowing truth that only six or seven people will ever care about. ~ Anonymous,
702:Being in the library is so addictive for me that I really have to exercise self-control so I can get some writing done at home. ~ Janet Fitch,
703:...but every living soul is a book of their own history, which sits on the ever-growing shelf in the library of human memories. ~ Jack Gantos,
704:If every library is in some sense a reflection of its readers, it is also an image of that which we are not, and cannot be. ~ Alberto Manguel,
705:If you say self-improvement is a priority, but you spend more time with your Xbox than at the library, I’m believing the Xbox. ~ Darren Hardy,
706:I had plenty of pimples as a kid. One day I fell asleep in the library. When I woke up, a blind man was reading my face. ~ Rodney Dangerfield,
707:In a library we are surrounded by many hundreds of dear friends imprisoned by an enchanter in paper and leathern boxes. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
708:I was in a convenience store, reading a magazine. The clerk told me, "this is not a library!" "OK! I will talk louder, then!" ~ Mitch Hedberg,
709:Library guy, why are you always coming to say hello when I look shitty?” Her mouth turns down in an exaggerated frown. “It’s rude. ~ Sara Ney,
710:Living outside the Library was never safe. Flying sleighs could come out of nowhere and hit you, however careful you were. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
711:Never lend books, for no one ever returns them; the only books I have in my library are books that other folks have left me. ~ Anatole France,
712:Never lend books, for no one ever returns them; the only books I have in my library are books that other folks have lent me. ~ Anatole France,
713:Only in a library did she feel completely capable of collecting her finer feelings and recuperating from such a wearying day. ~ Gail Carriger,
714:outside the library seemed to be losing its memory, day after day, unknowingly, feeling all the wiser the more it forgot. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
715:When I die, I guess I’ll go with a library card in one hand and an OVERDUE stamp in the other. Well, maybe there’s worse ways. ~ Stephen King,
716:Yo, que me figuraba el Paraíso / Bajo la especie de una biblioteca. I have always imagined Paradise as a kind of library. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
717:You, my dear, should spend more time in a library. It's not just a hiding place, but also the place where the chases happen. ~ Jason Reynolds,
718:A library outranks any other one thing a community can do to benefit its people. It is a never failing spring in the desert. ~ Andrew Carnegie,
719:and at the lending library they said if it were not for the girls and the young Jews, they might as well shut up the library). ~ Anton Chekhov,
720:Each and every day, NOAA collects twice as much data as is contained in the entire book collection of the Library of Congress. ~ Michael Lewis,
721:Footnotes are the finer-suckered surfaces that allow testicular paragraphs to hold fast to the wider reality of the library. ~ Nicholson Baker,
722:I steal things from people, characteristics, and I just stock them in my head like a library to use for characters in the future. ~ Luke Mably,
723:Perhaps no place in any community is so totally democratic as the town library. The only entrance requirement is interest. ~ Lady Bird Johnson,
724:The universe (which others call the Library) is composed of an indefinite, perhaps infinite number of hexagonal galleries. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
725:Valten paced the floor of the library, imagining the violence he would wreak on the person responsible for hurting Gisela. ~ Melanie Dickerson,
726:Walking the stacks in a library, dragging your fingers across the spines—it’s hard not to feel the presence of sleeping spirits. ~ Robin Sloan,
727:What a sense of security in an old book which  Time has criticised for us! ~ James Russell Lowell, My Study Windows, Library of Old Authors.,
728:Can you imagine...the detrimental effect on your marriage prospects, to be found unchaperoned in a library with a dead vampire! ~ Gail Carriger,
729:Dynasty was the opportunity to take charge of my career rather than waiting around like a library book waiting to be loaned out. ~ Joan Collins,
730:Each of us is a library of thoughts, memories, experiences, and odors. We adapt to one another to produce the human condition. ~ Josh Hanagarne,
731:Francie thought that all the books in the world were in that library and she had a plan about reading all the books in the world. ~ Betty Smith,
732:I have a couple of thousand books in my personal library. Choosing a favorite is next to impossible. But I do love the written word. ~ Tim Gunn,
733:Now we can travel with more books stored in our telephones than the ancient Egyptians kept in their vast library at Alexandria. ~ Mike Aquilina,
734:Real life is a story too, only much more complicated...the world is a library and you'll never get to read the same book twice. ~ Chris Wooding,
735:Actually, judging by Pinterest alone, I’m pretty sure a lot of people would look forward to hanging out in such a beautiful library. ~ Jenny Han,
736:All knowledge that the world has ever received comes from the mind; the infinite library of the universe is in our own mind. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
737:It's night in the Free People's World Tree Library. All the librarians are asleep, ... between the pages of their enchanted novels. ~ Kelly Link,
738:She thougt of sunrise over the library slope at Cornell University that nobody out on it had seen because the slope faces west. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
739:The first thing my family did when we moved was join the local church. The second was to go to the library and get library cards. ~ John Grisham,
740:The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading in order to write. A man will turn over half a library to make a book. ~ Samuel Johnson,
741:A breeze flew through, picking up some leaves and swirling them around, the sound like fluttering pages in a quiet library. ~ Sarah Addison Allen,
742:A library outranks any other one thing a community can do to benefit its people. It is a never failing spring in the desert.
   ~ Andrew Carnegie,
743:All knowledge that the world has ever received comes from the mind, the infinite library of the universe is in our own mind. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
744:Every book I own, I own for a reason. Not to fill the shelves of my library. But to touch words that have touched me. ~ Kimberly Stedronsky Adams,
745:I smiled at her, but she was already lost in thought, looking around the library as if it held all the answers to all our problems. ~ Kami Garcia,
746:Library. It's where we lock up all those books before they start giving kids ideas," I said solemnly. "Very dangerous place to be. ~ Scott Tracey,
747:Overall, the library held a hushed exultation, as though the cherished volumes were all singing soundlessly within their covers. ~ Diana Gabaldon,
748:Over a man’s life, his semen grew into a mobile library of every part of the body—a condensed distillate of the self. This ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
749:She'd absolutely adored the library an entire building where anyone could take things they didn't own and feel no remorse about it. ~ Ally Carter,
750:She'd absolutely adored the library-an entire building where anyone could take things they didn't own and feel no remorse about it. ~ Ally Carter,
751:Still and all, I think a library is a library is a library, don't you? No matter how big or small. Books are important. ~ Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli,
752:They got the Library of Alexandria. They’re not getting mine. Bumper sticker (with quote flanked by silhouettes of pistol and rifle) ~ John Ringo,
753:Trinity Park lies directly across from the library, Trinity Church rising like a midieval thought amidst the glass and steel towers. ~ Nick Flynn,
754:Walking the stacks in a library, dragging your fingers across the spines -- it's hard not to feel the presence of sleeping spirits. ~ Robin Sloan,
755:We can’t identify patterns and correlations. There’s no consortium on the findings. There’s no great library of paranormal evidence. ~ Zak Bagans,
756:Don't be afraid to go to your library and read every book as long as any document does not offend your own ideas of decency. ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
757:For all intents and purposes, the power of the Library is infinite. Tonight we’re going to settle who inherits control of reality. ~ Scott Hawkins,
758:Let's go downtown," Dad said. "By the public library. You never know what wild and crazy things might be happening at the library. ~ Marion Jensen,
759:Live in the library, for Christ’s sake! Don’t live on your goddamn computers and the internet and all that crap. Go to the library! ~ Ray Bradbury,
760:The library remains a sacred place for secular folk ["What Libraries Can (Still) Do," The New York Review Daily, October 26, 2015]. ~ James Gleick,
761:...a brutal sense of loneliness, eased only by a place like the library, where lonely people can feel slightly less lonely together. ~ Susan Orlean,
762:A community that doesn't think it needs a library isn't a community for whom a library is irrelevant. It's a community that's ill. ~ Josh Hanagarne,
763:A library is a place where you can live a thousand lives. So why are you waiting when you could be living? Visit your library today. ~ Stephen King,
764:All our yesterdays neatly shelved, time cataloged in drawers: News grows brittle and yellow under the library, in catacombs of paper. ~ Dean Koontz,
765:But why’s she got to go to the library?” “Because that’s what Hermione does,” said Ron, shrugging. “When in doubt, go to the library. ~ J K Rowling,
766:Children ask me sometimes what book I'd take to a desert island, but I think I couldn't go to a desert island unless it had a library. ~ Mary Stolz,
767:I attempted briefly to consecrate myself in the public library, believing every crack in my soul could be chinked with a book. ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
768:It's nice to live in a country that has its priorities straight: the library's open three hours a week, and the House of Fist is 24/7. ~ Dana Gould,
769:Mr. Collins was to attend them, at the request of Mr. Bennet, who was most anxious to get rid of him, and have his library to himself ~ Jane Austen,
770:My name is Isaac Vainio," I said. "You smashed my library. Prepare to die."
Everything went better with Princess Bride references. ~ Jim C Hines,
771:No,’ said Hermione, with as much dignity as she could muster with her mouth bulging with sprouts. ‘I just want to get to the library. ~ J K Rowling,
772:The air in the library rooms was silent, full of ideas, the thinking of the writers of books, the thinking of the readers of books. ~ Cynthia Voigt,
773:The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write: a man will turn over half a library to make one book. ~ Samuel Johnson,
774:The idea of a library full of books, the books full of knowledge, fills me with fear and love and courage and endless wonder. ~ Elizabeth McCracken,
775:We can Fire a missile across the world with pinpoint accuracy, but we trouble keeping a date with our children to go to the library. ~ Robin Sharma,
776:You'd be surprised what kind of shit gets tossed into a prison's library. Pretty sure if you dug deep enough, you'd find hieroglyphics. ~ Rhys Ford,
777:All true readers have a book, a moment, like the one I describe, and when Mum offered me that much-read library copy mine was upon me. ~ Kate Morton,
778:A ring? He reached to twist it, and Clary remembered Hodge in the library at the Institute, taking the ring from Jace’s hand . . . ~ Cassandra Clare,
779:Has he not got a wife back wherever he comes from? Is there no wife to say, ‘You must not go off and visit library ladies’? ~ Alexander McCall Smith,
780:he rubbed his feet back and forth on the library carpet and when she walked by, he touched her with the tip of his index finger ~ Jonathan Goldstein,
781:I have always been an obsessive reader - I remember going back and forth to the local library with stacks of books taller than I was. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
782:I suspect that the real attraction was a large library of fine books, which was left to dust and spiders since Uncle March died. ~ Louisa May Alcott,
783:That day I saw you at the library, after we talked at the bus stop. That day I saw you at the library, after we talked at the bus stop. ~ Jay McLean,
784:The earliest complete Odyssey to have survived is from the late tenth century, now in Michelangelo’s Laurentian Library in Florence, ~ Adam Nicolson,
785:There was an extensive collection of cookbooks in the well-stocked library, and he took to pouring over these in the evenings. ~ Alexandra Adornetto,
786:But at night, when the library lamps are lit, the outside world disappears and nothing but the space of books remains in existence. ~ Alberto Manguel,
787:But I didn't mind. I loved that everything was cataloged and ready to go and that I was technically now living and sleeping in a library. ~ B J Novak,
788:...entered the library, and could do nothing but stare in wonder...She wondered if she should curtsy as if she were entering a chapel. ~ Shannon Hale,
789:I don't write at the library, because I smoke when I work or would like the possibility of a smoke. Also, I need to be at my own desk. ~ Tom Stoppard,
790:If in the library of your house you do not have the works of the ancient Greek writers, then you live in a house with no light. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
791:I was raised in rural south Jersey, and there was no culture there. There was a small library, and that was it. There was nothing else. ~ Patti Smith,
792:Of all things I liked books best. My father had a large library and whenever I could manage I tried to satisfy my passion for reading. ~ Nikola Tesla,
793:One of the nastier trends in library management in recent years is the notion that libraries should be 'responsive to their patrons'. ~ Connie Willis,
794:...the air a library and the record of every life lived, every sentence spoken, every word transmitted still reverberating within it. ~ Anthony Doerr,
795:There were valuable first editions of books in the enormous library, most of them had been scribbled in by some idiot named Will H. ~ Cassandra Clare,
796:The search for truth takes us to dangerous places," said Old Woman Josie. "Often it takes us to that most dangerous place: the library. ~ Joseph Fink,
797:The search for truth takes us to dangerous places,” said Old Woman Josie. “Often it takes us to that most dangerous place: the library. ~ Joseph Fink,
798:You want weapons? We’re in a library! Books! Best weapons in the world! This room’s the greatest arsenal we could have. Arm yourself! ~ David Tennant,
799:If all shy, soulful young women who dreamed of becoming writers for a living actually could do that, imagine the library we would have. ~ Sarah Elwell,
800:One day, when I own a house, I'll keep a library full of books. Books are different from other possessions-they're more like friends. ~ Blake Mycoskie,
801:Suddenly she longed for the comfort of books around her. No matter how bad she felt, a library could always make her feel better. ~ Alexandra Sokoloff,
802:The Country is both the Philosopher's Garden and his Library, in which he Reads and Contemplates the Power, Wisdom and Goodness of God. ~ William Penn,
803:The library takes me away from my everyday life and allows me to see other places and learn to understand other people unlike myself. ~ Gloria Estefan,
804:A big island of library, in the middle of an ocean, away from all the fools of the world, would this place not be a real paradise? ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
805:A man in Texas won a divorce from his wife because she tore out the last chapter of every mystery story he borrowed from the library. ~ Shirley Jackson,
806:...and best of all, the wilderness of books, in which she could wander, where she liked, made the library a region of bliss to her. ~ Louisa May Alcott,
807:A real education takes place, not in the lecture hall or library, but in the rooms of friends, with earnest frolic and happy disputation. ~ Stephen Fry,
808:The library is now located and maintained at the Institute of Making which is part of University College London. You could rebuild our ~ Mark Miodownik,
809:Then we rushed down to the library and made it just in time to get our student ID photos. I think mine came out SUPERcute! . . . ~ Rachel Ren e Russell,
810:A library doesn't need windows, Andrew. We have books, which are windows into worlds we never even dreamed possible" -Dr. Zinchencko ~ Chris Grabenstein,
811:Excellent!” Mg. Thane clapped her on the shoulder and strode out of the library. “I’ll be on my way. Try not to burn anything down. ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
812:God had created the universe as a way of sorting through the great library, finding those books that were most beautiful and meaningful. ~ Steven L Peck,
813:He leaves behind in the library a field of resonating sadness, an imagined shape, a disappointed hologram still in possession of his chair. ~ Ian McEwan,
814:Life is like a library owned by the author. In it are a few books which he wrote himself, but most of them were written for him. ~ Harry Emerson Fosdick,
815:(One day, when I own a house, I’ll keep a full library of books. Books are different from other possessions—they’re more like friends.) ~ Blake Mycoskie,
816:Some people say I have issues. I say those people need to expand their horizons because I don't have issues, I have the Library of Congress ~ Mira Grant,
817:But it only passes through her mind, and then, like a dusty book consigned to a shelf, it joins the vast sad library of things left unsaid. ~ Jude Morgan,
818:Get that Property Of Whitford Public Library stamp and stamp it right on his forehead. Then cross out the library's name and write yours ~ Shannon Stacey,
819:I got into Kiss before I got into anybody. The first thing I heard was Detroit Rock City. I heard it in the school library, where I lived. ~ Brian Posehn,
820:There's not a good poet I know who has not at the beck and call of his memory a vast quantity of poetry that composes his mental library. ~ Anthony Hecht,
821:All the books in the Imperial Library will be burned,” he said. “That’s rotten!” said Annie. “Indeed it is!” the scholar said quietly. ~ Mary Pope Osborne,
822:All through my journey his stories had fallen like snow. He was as full of them as a library with unmarked shelves. He was a talking book. ~ Sofia Samatar,
823:Books give not wisdom where was none before,  But where some is, there reading makes it more. ~ John Harington, Epigram in Muses Library (1737), p. 310.,
824:Cal's fingers tightened on mine, and my heart thumped in response. The library felt very quiet and very still around us. "You'll feel it. ~ Rachel Hawkins,
825:He said 'I'm going to chop off the bottom of one of your trouser legs and put it in a library. I thought, "That's a turn-up for the books". ~ Tommy Cooper,
826:He was a professor, a lover of stories, and he was building her a library in the same way other men might build their daughters houses. ~ Jennifer E Smith,
827:If I have to spend time in purgatory before going to one place or the other, I guess I'll be all right as long as there's a lending library ~ Stephen King,
828:If I have to spend time in purgatory before going to one place or the other, I guess I’ll be all right as long as there’s a lending library ~ Stephen King,
829:If you find a footnote,” a library-science prof once told a class of which I was a part, “step on its head and kill it before it can breed. ~ Stephen King,
830:I really enjoy going to a library and spending the day doing research - to me that is the most pleasurable part of writing the science book. ~ Bill Bryson,
831:Still not going back to school, I see.'
'I'm never going back,' I confess.
'A library's a pretty good alternative, then,' he says. ~ Haruki Murakami,
832:The dog always dies. Go to the library and pick out a book with an award sticker and a dog on the cover. Trust me, that dog is going down. ~ Gordon Korman,
833:The library is central to our free society. It is a critical element in the free exchange of information at the heart of our democracy. ~ Vartan Gregorian,
834:To all those men and women who will always find a place for themselves in a library more easily than in society, I dedicate this entertainment ~ Anonymous,
835:To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering about in a great library without touching the books. ~ Dan Brown,
836:Zander was always sneaking off to the library to get more books ... Guy would read anything. Said books were more interesting than people. ~ Justin Cronin,
837:A fool may buy all the books in the world, and they will be in his library; but he will be able to read only those that he deserves to. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
838:Everything you need for better future and success has already been written. And guess what? All you have to do is go to the library. ~ Henri Frederic Amiel,
839:If I have to spend time in purgatory before going to one place or the other, I guess I'll be all right as long as there's a lending library. ~ Stephen King,
840:If you find a footnote, ” a library-science prof once told a class of which I was a part, “step on its head and kill it before it can breed. ~ Stephen King,
841:Instead of going to Paris to attend lectures, go to the public library, and you won't come out for twenty years, if you really wish to learn. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
842:It was clear that people were not rushing to the shelves. In fact, I’d never seen anybody in a library pick up a small literary journal. ~ Josip Novakovich,
843:was made for the library, not the classroom. The classroom was a jail of other people’s interests. The library was open, unending, free. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
844:What a sense of security in an old book which Time has criticised for us! ~ James Russell Lowell, My Study Windows 1871, chapter "Library of Old Authors'".,
845:When I was a kid and the other kids were home watching "Leave it to Beaver," my father and step-mother were marching me off to the library. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
846:All of the life-changing awesome words and pictures and ideas inside your library are useless without just one word outside your library: Open. ~ Mo Willems,
847:I love to tell kids that everything in the library is theirs. “We just keep it here for you.” One million items that you can have for free! ~ Josh Hanagarne,
848:It has been said that when an old man dies, a library burns to the ground. But when a language dies, it is a whole world that comes to an end. ~ Neel Burton,
849:I was made for the library, not the classroom. The classroom was a jail of other people's interests. The library is open, unending, free. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
850:Library-denigrators, pay heed:suggesting that the Internet is a viable substitute for libraries is like saying porn could replace your wife. ~ Joanne Harris,
851:Thing is, I wasn't in the library, didn't study too much, didn't get the best grades, but honestly, I didn't party a lot either. I stayed in a lot. ~ G Eazy,
852:though there were valuable first editions of books in the enormous library, most of them had been scribbled in by some idiot named Will H. ~ Cassandra Clare,
853:What we call imagination is actually the universal library of what's real. You couldn’t imagine it if it weren’t real somewhere, sometime. ~ Terence McKenna,
854:Writing a book, just like building a library, is an act of sheer defiance. It is a declaration that you believe in the persistence of memory. ~ Susan Orlean,
855:History shows that an examination of the personal collection of titles in any man’s library will provide something of a glimpse into his soul. ~ Andrew Smith,
856:I was made for the library, not the classroom. The classroom was a jail of other people's interests. The library was open, unending, free. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
857:I was made for the library, not the classroom. The classroom was a jail of other people’s interests. The library was open, unending, free. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
858:Library-denigrators, pay heed: suggesting that the Internet is a viable substitute for libraries is like saying porn could replace your wife. ~ Joanne Harris,
859:Moving from one room to the next I inhaled in passing that incense of an old library which is worth all the perfumes of the world. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
860:She loved the library and was anxious to worship the lady in charge. But the librarian had other things on her mind. She hated children anyhow. ~ Betty Smith,
861:There is a door I have closed for the final time. Amongst the books in my library (I can see them now) There are some I will never open again. ~ Paulo Coelho,
862:To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering about in a great library without touching the books. ~ Manly P Hall,
863:It stinks of trains and that chili with the chocolate in it. Ooooh, books!" he exclaimed suddenly, making a beeline for the small library. (Al) ~ Kim Harrison,
864:They knew the difference between thoroughness and overkill. It was like Jay Gatsby's library: the books were real, but the pages were uncut. ~ Haruki Murakami,
865:To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering about in a great library without touching the books. ~ Manly P Hall,
866:You must live feverishly in a library. Colleges are not going to do any good unless you are raised and live in a library everyday of your life. ~ Ray Bradbury,
867:A bookshelf is as particular to its owner as are his or her clothes; a personality is stamped on a library just as a shoe is shaped by the foot. ~ Alan Bennett,
868:A deserted library in the morning—there’s something about it that really gets to me. All possible words and ideas are there, resting quietly. ~ Haruki Murakami,
869:A library is a focal point, a sacred place to a community; and its sacredness is its accessibility, its publicness. It’s everybody’s place". ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
870:Depressed I went out into the heat that lay on the neighborhood like a hand swollen with fever in that season, and made my way to the library. ~ Elena Ferrante,
871:I'm not comfortable being preachy, but more people need to start spending as much time in the library as they do on the basketball court. ~ Kareem Abdul Jabbar,
872:The women one meets - what are they but books one has already read? You're a library of the unknown, the uncut. Upon my word I've a subscription. ~ Henry James,
873:The world is full of magical places, and the library has always been one of them for me. A library can be that special place for our children. ~ Julie Andrews,
874:You can find each guide as follows: Apple - Human Interface Guidelines Android – Design Guidelines Windows Phone – Design library for Windows Phone ~ Anonymous,
875:If we can put a man on the moon and sequence the human genome, we should be able to devise something close to a universal digital public library. ~ Peter Singer,
876:It seemed to him that half the fun of a library was stumbling on treasures by chance...
Conor, in The Library at the Edge of the World ~ Felicity Hayes McCoy,
877:John had said McKindless would be revealed through his library, but John was a bookseller; he formed his opinion of everyone through their books. ~ Louise Welsh,
878:Often it takes us to that most dangerous place: the library. You know who said that? No? George Washington did. Minutes before librarians ate him. ~ Joseph Fink,
879:Playing off the NCAA basketball tournament’s “March Madness” theme, Mr. Lemoncello declared the first Saturday in March “Library Lunacy Day. ~ Chris Grabenstein,
880:The books I'd checked out of the library earlier in the week were still stacked on my bureau, whispering my name and begging to be read. ~ Laurie Halse Anderson,
881:The library knows its own mind,” old Master Hyrrokkin told him, leading him back up the secret stairs. “When it steals a boy, we let it keep him. ~ Laini Taylor,
882:The library was one enormous room, with long, high metal shelves and the perfect quiet that libraries provide for anyone looking for an answer. ~ Daniel Handler,
883:[T]he public library is where those without money, power, access, university affiliation, or advanced degrees can get information for free. ~ Siva Vaidhyanathan,
884:Every time I went to the library, it felt like a treasure hunt: somewhere amid those dusty books was the answer, and all I had to do was find it. ~ Jean M Twenge,
885:I have no internet savvy whatsoever, but I love researching things. The Internet is my library... beyond that, I'm completely intimidated by it. ~ Drew Barrymore,
886:In a library we are surrounded by many hundreds of dear friends, but they are imprisoned by an enchanter in these paper and leathern boxes. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
887:I tried to go to a counselor, but it was just too weird. Talking to some stranger about my feelings made me want to vomit. I did go to the library... ~ J D Vance,
888:The fact is that poetry is not the books in the library . . . Poetry is the encounter of the reader with the book, the discovery of the book. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
889:They were like really loud librarians. And as the audience, you better shut the hell up because you’re in the library of rock right now. When ~ Carrie Brownstein,
890:we can stop and see if the library has a copy of Hiding from the Mob in Ten Easy Steps. Maybe there’ll be some tip in there that I’ve missed. ~ Suzanne Brockmann,
891:When we build a public library, we don't have to pay to get in, but when we build a stadium, we have to pay the owner every time we go to a game. ~ Jesse Ventura,
892:I liked to sit in the library to write essays, allowing my sense of time and personal identity to dissolve as the light dimmed outside the windows. ~ Sally Rooney,
893:In my spare time I didn’t go out, I sat and read novels I got from the library: Grazia Deledda, Pirandello, Chekhov, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky. ~ Elena Ferrante,
894:The library is seen as a force for self improvement and the pursuit of knowledge. I fear that in many cases this is no longer true, if it ever was. ~ John Redwood,
895:Whenever she had a problem to consider, she invariably found herself in the library, for it was easier to think when she was surrounded by books. ~ Erika Johansen,
896:When you steal from the library, you are preventing anyone else from reading that book, and the very notion makes me want to drop you in the Void. ~ Piers Anthony,
897:Bessie asked if I would have a book: the word book acted as a transient stimulus, and I begged her to fetch Gulliver’s Travels from the library.  ~ Charlotte Bront,
898:Collect books, even if you don’t plan on reading them right away. Filmmaker John Waters has said, “Nothing is more important than an unread library. ~ Austin Kleon,
899:I know if I stopped hosting 'Wine Library TV,' we'd probably lose 75 percent of our audience, but the remaining 25 percent is still a big number. ~ Gary Vaynerchuk,
900:In fact this bad baronet died true to the conditions of his kind--mysteriously in his library, at midnight, while a great deal of snow was falling. ~ Michael Innes,
901:London has fine museums, the British Library is one of the greatest library institutions in the world... It's got everything you want, really. ~ David Attenborough,
902:peace until the Schleswig-Holstein question was definitely settled. STRASBOURG, October 14—Among the priceless volumes destroyed in the library here, was ~ Various,
903:The intelligent and efficient politician is a species virtually unknown in the galaxy. Perhaps I might secure a scraping [for my] cell library. ~ George R R Martin,
904:There are a lot of surprising things in the library; a lot of things you don’t think of when you try to imagine all of what a library might contain. ~ Susan Orlean,
905:This is why I can't be with Levi. Because I'm the kind of girl who fantasizes about being trapped in a library overnight-and Levi can't even read. ~ Rainbow Rowell,
906:Usage tends to be global, while funding tends tobe local. When we allow it to happen, usage of a digital library is remarkably diverse and widespread. ~ Tom Peters,
907:A deserted library in the morning - there's something about it that really gets to me. All possible words and ideas are there, resting peacefully. ~ Haruki Murakami,
908:A library at night is full of sounds: The unread books can’t stand it any longer and announce their contents, some boasting, some shy, some devious. ~ Helen Oyeyemi,
909:A library at night is full of sounds: the unread books can't stand it any longer and announce their contents, some boasting, some shy, some devious. ~ Helen Oyeyemi,
910:Collect books, even if you don't plan on reading them right away. Filmmaker John Waters has said, "Nothing is more important than an unread library." ~ Austin Kleon,
911:Darwin let his nervous face relax into a smile. "No, Your Majesty. I have no aspirations to your throne, but I make no promises regarding your library. ~ Amber Kell,
912:For anyone but the landed gentry to refer to a room in their house as "the library" might seem affected. But there really was no other word for it. ~ Alison Bechdel,
913:How precious a book is in light of the offering, in the light of the one who has the privilege of this offering. The library tells you of this offering ~ Louis Kahn,
914:I'm a sucker for lost worlds. I was nostalgic even as a child. I was happiest in my hometown library in Adams, Mass., where nothing seemed to change. ~ Stacy Schiff,
915:It's as if the city has become a library of books in an unknown language, the houses great shelves of illegible volumes, the lamps all extinguished. ~ Anthony Doerr,
916:Are we all on the same page, Delilah?
The same page? I don't even think we're even in the same library, but no need to bring that up. ~ Sarah Ockler,
917:But do you really want to spend your life like this, as if you’re locked in a library?” “Of course.” Alba grins. “I can’t think of anything better. ~ Menna van Praag,
918:Every time you enter a library you might say to yourself, "The world is quiet here," as a sort of pledge proclaiming reading to be the greater good. ~ Daniel Handler,
919:I wish I had a dollar for every hour I've spent in the library," he always says. I have to agree- we'd probably never have to worry about money again. ~ Gary Paulsen,
920:They all start competing against Lincoln as the greatest president. And the [library] building becomes the symbol, the memorial to that dream. ~ Doris Kearns Goodwin,
921:To put the pudding in the puff: she had retreated to the library, her favorite sanctuary in any house, only to happen upon an unexpected vampire. She ~ Gail Carriger,
922:We all know the story. We heard it not long after the Night of Fire and Wind. You were the low born library girl turned sorceress who rode with princes. ~ Elise Kova,
923:What better place to kill time than a library? And for me, what better way to get to know someone than through her choice and treatment of books? ~ Diane Setterfield,
924:You smell like a bar," he said.
I thought, You smell like a library. But I wanted to have sex right then, so I said, "You smell like a poem. ~ Melissa Bank,
925:Alberich was a figure out of nightmare. He was the one Librarian who’d betrayed the Library and got away with it and was still somewhere out there. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
926:As Borges has taught us, all the books in the library are contemporary. Great poems are like granaries: they are always ready to enlarge their store. ~ William H Gass,
927:Hey—Penny, is it?” Plum said. “That ought to pay for Quentin’s library fines, don’t you think? Or Alice could just punch you again, it’s all good.” But ~ Lev Grossman,
928:I always made sure to put them back in the exact order in which I had found them, for fear of losing the privilege of browsing in my uncle’s library. ~ Firoozeh Dumas,
929:in 1444, Cosimo founded Europe’s first public library, the Library of San Marco, and thus began to challenge the Church’s long monopoly of learning. ~ Michael Baigent,
930:I was looking forward to my visit to the library. I’ve always been a big reader and thought I might eventually volunteer as a Friend of the Library. ~ Debbie Macomber,
931:Maybe the one dangerous thing about reading a library's worth of books was the way your imagination got pumped up like a bodybuilder on steroids. ~ Dean Koontz,
932:On my first visit to the public library, I was like a kid at a candy store where all the candy was free.

I gorged myself until my tummy ached. ~ Craig Thompson,
933:Peg was involved in a common form of senior-year panic that caused its victims to exhibit permanent distraction and to take up residence in the library. ~ Pamela Dean,
934:the way the floors of the library became progressively less social as you worked your way up. The first floor was a meat market. The top was monkish. ~ Sloane Crosley,
935:The world is full of magical places, and the library has always been one of them for me. A library can be that special place for our children. ~ Julie Andrews Edwards,
936:A singer learned her roles for life - your repertoire was a library of fates held close, like the gowns in this closet, yours until your voice failed. ~ Alexander Chee,
937:I have a huge music library and deliberately choose the piece of music to match the piece I'm writing. So, every book I write has its own "soundtrack." ~ Michael Scott,
938:I have a list of titles that I leave at the [library] desk, because they are bound to be written some day, and it's best to be ahead of the queue. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
939:I like to imagine that, on the day after my last, my library and I will crumble together, so that even when I am no more I'll still be with my books. ~ Alberto Manguel,
940:Sure.” Olivia smirked. “Good ol’ New York Public Library. I’m sure it’s up to date on the latest Demons that escape through well-guarded Demon Gates. ~ Cheyenne McCray,
941:The books we read should be chosen with great care, that they may be, as an Egyptian king wrote over his library,'The medicines of the soul. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
942:The destruction of Dan's Star Wars collectibles would have been mourned with more intensity by their owner than the burning of the library at Alexandria. ~ Adam Nevill,
943:Trapped in the entryway was an old man, dead, hungry, and beating on the interior door. It was kind of funny that he still clung to his library book. ~ Rhiannon Frater,
944:When I read about the way in which library funds are being cut and cut, I can only think that American society has found one more way to destroy itself. ~ Isaac Asimov,
945:A library is a different kind of social reality (of the three dimensional kind), which by its very existence teaches a system of values beyond the fiscal. ~ Zadie Smith,
946:All of the life-changing awesome
words and pictures and ideas
inside your library are useless
without just one word outside
your library: Open. ~ Mo Willems,
947:AT first Raoden stayed away from the library, because it reminded him of her. Then he found himself drawn back to it—because it reminded him of her. ~ Brandon Sanderson,
948:Here's another piece of advice, only date people who have read a different set of books than you have read, it will save you lots of time in the library. ~ Tony Kushner,
949:I think you should read everything you can. In my case, by the age of 10, I'd read every book in the Omaha public library about investing, some twice. ~ Warren Buffett,
950:My favorite language for maintainability is Python. It has simple, clean syntax, object encapsulation, good library support, and optional named parameters. ~ Bram Cohen,
951:Women should look good. Work on yourselves. Education? I spit on education. No man is ever going to put his hand up your dress looking for a library card. ~ Joan Rivers,
952:And there’s no place I’d rather be on my big day than inside a library, surrounded by books. Unless, of course, I could be on a bridge to Terabithia. ~ Chris Grabenstein,
953:But the library - especially one so vast - is no mere cabinet of curiosities; it's a world, complete and uncompleteable, and it is filled with secrets. ~ Matthew Battles,
954:He snatched the book from me and replaced it hastily on its shelf, muttering that if one brick was removed the whole library was liable to collapse. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
955:He spent long nocturnal hours in the Faculty library, turning the pages of rare books that made up a part of the six-thousand-volume occult collection. ~ Chet Williamson,
956:I don't really collect the mementos. I do steal books off of sets. If there's a library on the set, you can bet that I'll steal away with a book or two. ~ Billy Campbell,
957:It should be possible, in a 'debreviation' mode, to type 'clr' on the keyboard and have 'The Council on Library Resources, Inc.' appear on the display. ~ J C R Licklider,
958:So there she was, sitting in the library, pondering what to do. What would be a great way to properly welcome her sister back to a world of open doors? ~ Landry Q Walker,
959:whose addresses can be found at global.penguinrandomhouse.com A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library ISBN 9781786531506 ~ Beth Ciotta,
960:A library is like an island in the middle of a vast sea of ignorance, particularly if the library is very tall and the surrounding area has been flooded. ~ Daniel Handler,
961:And every book, you find, has its own social group - friends of its own it wants to introduce you to, like a party in a library that need never, ever end. ~ Caitlin Moran,
962:Entering a library, I am always stuck by the way in which a certain vision of the world is imposed upon the reader through its categories and its order. ~ Alberto Manguel,
963:He pointed the scepter around the library and had an instant input of all of the books that were there into his brain, as if he had read them all at once. ~ Kaza Kingsley,
964:I grew up in a house full of books, and we belonged to the Country Lending Service - each month the State Library would send us a parcel of books by train. ~ Garry Disher,
965:I have spent enough time around Puritans in general, and Boston Puritans in particular, to know what these people will tell her: lock up the library! Or ~ Neal Stephenson,
966:Is it advisable to spread out all the conveniences of culture before people to whom a few steps up a stair to a library is a sufficient deterrent from reading? ~ Ayn Rand,
967:People wanted so much from the library. They wanted it to solve things for them. They wanted the library to fix them and teach them how to fix their lives. ~ Susan Orlean,
968:While it is true that outside the library I have lived a life of wickedness, inside it I've always been as devoted to knowledge as a saint to his Bible. ~ Andrew Davidson,
969:A good library will never be too neat, or too dusty, because somebody will always be in it, taking books off the shelves and staying up late reading them. ~ Daniel Handler,
970:A good library will never be too neat, or too dusty, because somebody will always be in it, taking books off the shelves and staying up late reading them. ~ Lemony Snicket,
971:A library implies an act of faith which generations, still in darkness hid, sign in their night in witness of the dawn."

À qui la faute? (1872) ~ Victor Hugo,
972:Although I enjoy digging through the library to help students find books, my aim is to help them develop self-confidence in choosing books for themselves. ~ Donalyn Miller,
973:And every book, you find, has its own social group- friends of its own it wants to introduce you to, like a party in the library that need never, ever end. ~ Caitlin Moran,
974:And every book, you find, has its own social group--friends of its own it wants to introduce you to, like a party in the library that need never, ever end. ~ Caitlin Moran,
975:How we use the knowledge we gain determines our progress on earth, in space or on the moon. Your library is a storehouse for mind and spirit. Use it well. ~ Neil Armstrong,
976:I watched Isa cross the library parking lot. The bitch. She wore her backpack by one strap. The glow from her cell phone illumined her features with an odd ~ Melinda Leigh,
977:presenting me with a ring box, in which, instead of a ring, were a dozen old library cards—a symbol for love that could be borrowed, perhaps, but never kept. ~ Jan Ellison,
978:Reading old Gray?  That's right.  Physician's library just three books:  'Gray's Anatomy' and Bible and Shakespeare.  Study.  You may become great doctor. ~ Sinclair Lewis,
979:The Getty Museum & Library is a white monolith of modern architecture perched over one of the worst freeways in LA.  Accessible only by an electric tram, ~ Kate Danley,
980:There is something nice about a library, isn't there?" Mr. Curtis said. He nodded and took in the familiar scenery. "The scent of ink and worn, dusty pages. ~ Ilana Waters,
981:There was a reminder that the library was always seeking books, and that they paid in wine. The librarian, François Diallo, was also the newspaper’s ~ Emily St John Mandel,
982:...we are all a volume on the shelf of the... library, a story unto ourselves, never possibly described with one word or even very accurately with thousands. ~ Deb Caletti,
983:I really hope that all librarians aren't like Gladys Morgan. Because I'd really like , at some point, to walk into a library and not be afraid for my life. ~ Patrick Carman,
984:I was the kind of kid whose parents would drop him off at the local town library on their way to work, and I'd go and work my way through the children's area. ~ Neil Gaiman,
985:So I'm in the library, and I have keyboards out and my headphones out. Everybody's like, "Mike are you making beats right now?" and I'm like, "Yeah... sorry!" ~ Mike Posner,
986:There must be every kind of books in your library. The most beautiful gardens are those with many different flowers, with all kinds of herbs and weeds! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
987:We never had books in the house. Not any book in our house. Not a Bible, not anything. So, I would go the library from a very young age and get the books out. ~ Dean Koontz,
988:At the moment that we persuade a child, any child, to cross that threshold, that magic threshold into a library, we change their lives forever, for the better ~ Barack Obama,
989:He didn’t like having to pay for a phone that had Internet access, but it was like having a huge library and an army of research assistants on the cheap. He ~ David Baldacci,
990:He liked doing research in the library. He liked feeling of accumulating knowledge in his brain. It was something he had enjoyed ever since he was a child. ~ Haruki Murakami,
991:I sometimes get up at night when I can't sleep and walk down into my library and open one of my books and read a paragraph and say, 'My God, did I write that? ~ Ray Bradbury,
992:It is always the same question: have you really read all those books? My answer is always the same: a library is a sign of desire, not of accomplishment. ~ Jeffrey J Kripal,
993:Jane Austen's books, too, are absent from this library. Just that one omission alone would make a fairly good library out of a library that hadn't a book in it. ~ Mark Twain,
994:My brother, being an English gentleman, possesses a library in all his houses, though he never opens a book. This is called fidelity to ancient tradition. ~ Dorothy L Sayers,
995:Somewhere over there,” said Ron, pointing along the shelves. “Looking for another book. I think she’s trying to read the whole library before Christmas.” Harry ~ J K Rowling,
996:There were two free public libraries within walking distance of my home; I remember taking six books home from every visit, the limit set by the library. ~ Martin Lewis Perl,
997:The shipping department at Central moves thirty-two thousand books—the equivalent of an entire branch library—around the city of Los Angeles five days a week. ~ Susan Orlean,
998:To reduce a library to simple architecture, bricks and mortar is a mistake. Similarly, to suggest a library is defined by the books on the shelf is erroneous. ~ Alan Bennett,
999:As a journalist I'm comfortable doing library research, and I did a lot! I had a fellowship at Radcliff for a year which gave me access to the Harvard system. ~ Anita Diament,
1000:Future historians will be able to study at the Jimmy Carter Library, the Gerald Ford Library, the Ronald Reagan Library, and the Bill Clinton Adult Bookstore. ~ George Carlin,
1001:I could no longer pull wands, potions, and light sabers out of books, but when it came to research, give me a well-stocked library and I was a goddamned Merlin. ~ Jim C Hines,
1002:I wanted shelves for my books, and a finer chair for this desk. Of course there should be another library. What was a house to me if it did not possess a library? ~ Anne Rice,
1003:Loaded with note cards for research papers that I was hopelessly behind on, I'd enter the Public Library only to end up wandering around lost, wasting the day. ~ Stuart Dybek,
1004:Making love to Aurelia was like rummaging through a card catalog in a deserted library, searching for one very obscure, little-read entry on Hungarian poetry. ~ Marisha Pessl,
1005:She liked to sit on the front porch in the afternoons and read books she'd checked out from the library. Aside from coffee, reading was her only indulgence. ~ Nicholas Sparks,
1006:So you got Phoenix back,” declared Karla, clapping her hands in delight. “That’s lovely.”
“I’m more on loan,” I muttered.
“Yeah, my little library book. ~ Joss Stirling,
1007:you leave me sitting here writing long margin notes in library books that don't belong to me, some day they'll find out i did it and take my library card away. ~ Helene Hanff,
1008:And you know what to do next, toots—don’t you? Yes—the time had come to make like a hockey player and get the puck out of here, to make like a library and book. ~ Stephen King,
1009:But how could she have forgotten who he was—a man who could lose himself in a single book, not to mention a world-class, open-stack library, for hours on end? ~ Robert Masello,
1010:I wanted the mind of a scholar, but it seemed that Dr. Kerry saw in me the mind of a roofer. The other students belonged in the library; I belonged in a crane. ~ Tara Westover,
1011:Marianne, who had the knack of finding her way in every house to the library, however it might be avoided by the family in general, soon procured herself a book. ~ Jane Austen,
1012:On a grander scale, the New York Public library — and in fact the entire U.S. Library system — was founded and funded by those who relentlessly pursued money. ~ Mike Cernovich,
1013:That day I saw you at the library, after we talked at the bus stop.That was the moment, that for the first time in my life, I wanted to believe in second chances. ~ Jay McLean,
1014:There are distinct duties of a poet laureate. I plan a reading series at the Library of Congress and advise the librarian. The rest is how I want to promote poetry ~ Rita Dove,
1015:There are so many items that are not in the copyright domain. And people might not realize the Library of Congress manages the copyright process for the nation. ~ Carla Hayden,
1016:We sat in his library. amidst his beloved books, whose company I knew he would rather seek than that of most of his acquaintances, did they but know it. ~ Linda Buckley Archer,
1017:You can go into the Library of Congress and find information on just about anything, but that doesn't do you much good unless you know what you are looking for. ~ Noam Chomsky,
1018:A library after closing is a lonely place. It is heart-poundingly silent, and the rows of shelves create an almost unfathomable number of dark and creepy corners. ~ Vicki Myron,
1019:I hope you’ll understand that I am not quoting those great words lightly. I do mean it. Knowledge sets us free, art sets us free. A great library is freedom. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1020:In New York City real estate parlors took your money and lied to you, drug addicts relieved themselves in plain sight, and the Public Library was closed on Mondays. ~ Tom Hanks,
1021:Living wild species are like a library of books still unread. Our heedless destruction of them is akin to burning the library without ever having read its books. ~ John Dingell,
1022:Michael looked around and realised that he was in a school library, with a life-size cut-out of Alex Rider staring at him from the opposite side of the room. ~ Robert Muchamore,
1023:Oh my god,” she says. “You’re Beauty and the Beast-ing me.” I don’t understand any of that. “I’m what?” “From the Disney movie. You’re romancing me with a library. ~ Kati Wilde,
1024:When trouble strikes, head to the library. You will either be able to solve the problem, or simply have something to read as the world crashes down around you. ~ Daniel Handler,
1025:As a kid, I went to the library because, in books, there were people really living lives, and unlike my parents, they talked to me about important things. ~ Gregory Sherl,
1026:Don’t look to be saved in any one thing, person, machine, or library. Do your own bit of saving, and if you drown, at least die knowing you were headed for shore. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1027:Gansey and Adam are getting Adam's stuff so he can move in," Noah said. "Ronan went to the library."
" Move in! I thought he said...wait-Ronan went where? ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
1028:I am not the Library’s child! I must acquire my own information, build my own knowledge, and, through experience, transform it to the treasured gold of wisdom. To ~ Rachel Caine,
1029:I'm not an angel, Jace," she repeated. "I don't return library books. I steal illegal music off the internet. I lie to my mom. I am completely ordinary. ~ Cassandra Clare,
1030:It smelled like a library – the initial whiff of something bitter, followed by the scent lingering in every book there – dusty, sweet, and full of possibilities. ~ Kimberly Krey,
1031:Sometimes I wonder. On the pathetic scale, where would I land? I know other kids my age would go to the mall if they cut school, but I'm off to the library. ~ Lynda Mullaly Hunt,
1032:A large library is apt to distract rather than to instruct the learner; it is much better to be confined to a few authors than to wander at random over many. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1033:My alma mater is the Chicago Public Library. I got what little educational foundation I got in the third-floor reading room, under the tutelage of a Coca-Cola sign. ~ David Mamet,
1034:My office in New York is overflowing with all kinds of cookbooks, and in New Orleans we have a huge culinary library. So yeah, I guess I'm a little bit obsessed. ~ Emeril Lagasse,
1035:The library is a gathering pool of narratives and of the people who come to find them. It is where we can glimpse immortality; in the library, we can live forever. ~ Susan Orlean,
1036:You think he’s a real writer, Park?” “Sure he is. He’s got three books right in this library.” “True or made up?” “Made up.” Parkins put his knife away and sighed. ~ Stephen King,
1037:And Marianne, who had the knack of finding her way in every house to the library, however it might be avoided by the family in general, soon procured herself a book. ~ Jane Austen,
1038:Before laptops and BlackBerries and all the other tools that mistook information for knowledge. It was an old library, filled with old books and dusty old thoughts. ~ Louise Penny,
1039:Fayza leaned in, squinting, as if she didn’t hear me correctly: one of the library of power moves that adults used to signal that other adults were fucking idiots. ~ Daryl Gregory,
1040:For all the harmless innocence conjured by the word "library", the Friedmans knew the truth: a library, properly maintained, could save the world - or burn it down. ~ Jason Fagone,
1041:Go anywhere you wish, talk to everyone. Ask any questions; you will be given answers. When you want to learn, you will be taught. Use the library. Open any book. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1042:In 1276, Peter of Spain was elected Pope John XXI, but he died just nine months later when the ceiling of his library suspiciously collapsed on him as he slept. ~ Christopher Ryan,
1043:In the library I discovered that you could learn by following your nose. And I learned that a book was as close to a living thing as you could get without being one. ~ Bill Harley,
1044:Justice weighs out learning to those who suffer. ~ Aeschylus, Agamemnon, in Early Greek Philosophy: Beginnings and Ionian Thinkers Loeb Classical Library Volume 525 (2016), p. 123,
1045:My childhood library was small enough not to be intimidating. And yet I felt the whole world was contained in those two rooms. I could walk any aisle and smell wisdom. ~ Rita Dove,
1046:She had gone to the library in search of hope, but what she'd found instead was a child. It would take her many years to realize that the two were not so different. ~ Melissa Grey,
1047:The pictures in the library book had provided the idea, hunger and darkness had given me the inspiration, and I'd set out myself on this long, amazing journey. ~ William Kamkwamba,
1048:And this knowledge you say you’ve acquired—are you conscious of an increase in it since your ill-fated visit to the library?” Fed nodded. “I know more than ever. ~ Richard Matheson,
1049:Every day Dot checked out books for her from the high school library, Dickens and Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen. Anything that was not about a girl's love for her horse. ~ Ann Patchett,
1050:For me, books have been a life-long resource-to learning, laughter, solace, excitement, inspiration. At your library, the world awaits you, free for the asking. ~ Lady Bird Johnson,
1051:I took to the Bodleian library as to a lover and ... would sit long hours in Bodley's arms to emerge, blinking and dazed with the smell and feel of all those books. ~ Laurie R King,
1052:She sighed and looked at him sympathetically. 'Cool flame tricks aside, there's no competition.'
He lifted his eyebrow. 'Library wins?'
'Every single time. ~ Elizabeth Hunter,
1053:What we read and why we do so defines us in a profound way. You are what you read, I suppose. Browsing through someone’s library is like peeking into their DNA ~ Guillermo del Toro,
1054:A large library is apt to distract rather than to instruct the learner. It is much better to confine yourself to a few authors than to wander at random over many. ~ James A Michener,
1055:A library is the only single place you can go to learn something new, be comforted, terrified, thrilled, saddened, overjoyed, or excited all in one day. And for free. ~ Amy Neftzger,
1056:A library takes the gift of reading one step further by offering personalized learning opportunities second to none, a powerful antidote to the isolation of the Web. ~ Julie Andrews,
1057:He always took his meals alone, with an open book before him, which he read. He had a well-selected little library. He loved books; books are cold but safe friends. In ~ Victor Hugo,
1058:I used to go to the library all the time when I was kid. As a teenager, I got a book on how to write jokes at the library, and that, in turn, launched my comedy career. ~ Drew Carey,
1059:Oh God. Why, oh why, did I have to be the one to deliver this news? Why couldn’t I be locked away in my room or the library doing something enjoyable, like homework? ~ Richelle Mead,
1060:The books in the library were old, rotted, and there was no one left in the world to read them, but Kira made sure that none of them went into the fire. It seemed wrong. ~ Dan Wells,
1061:The library is our house of intellect, our transcendental university, with one exception: no one graduates from a library. No one possibly can, and no one should. ~ Vartan Gregorian,
1062:Therefore, a human is equivalent to about fifty Harry Potter books, and a major national library can contain about five million books – or about ten trillion bits. ~ Stephen Hawking,
1063:Umberto Eco is the owner of a large personal library of almost 30,000 books that he has not read. [To him] read books are far less valuable than unread ones. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
1064:What we read and why we do so defines us in a profound way. You are what you read, I suppose. Browsing through someone’s library is like peeking into their DNA. ~ Guillermo del Toro,
1065:Great bodies die but great minds don't die! Inside the tomb of great men lay dead body's but at the library of great men lay the living minds of dead bodies! ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1066:Here speaks Professor--' There followed a preposterous little explosion. 'I conduct the classes in Russian. Mrs Fire, who is now working at the library part-time-- ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1067:I am a member of the London Library, and on almost every single job I do, there is some benefit to be had in going there and pulling two or three books off the shelves. ~ Ed Stoppard,
1068:I have my library separate from the family home, and every room is a different genre. The only room that I can guarantee I've read everything is the horror room. ~ Guillermo del Toro,
1069:I use my awards as doorsteps. Others are in the office or in little cubbyholes in our library – they go between the books, because they actually look like arty pieces ~ Helen McCrory,
1070:I've always loved reading fantasy. I used to pick out all the books in the library that had the little unicorn sticker on the side to show that they were fantasy. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
1071:Say what you had to about Ethan, but the boy filled a library very, very well.
Okay—arguably, that wasn’t the only thing he filled out well, but let’s stay on track. ~ Chloe Neill,
1072:Say you forgive me and I will take my leave. I promise I will pester you no more . . . for about the next hour . . . or for as long it is that you will be in this library. ~ Nely Cab,
1073:The Chilson District Library Bookmobile began its maiden voyage. Me, three thousand books, one hundred DVDs, a dozen jigsaw puzzles, two laptop computers-and one Eddie. ~ Laurie Cass,
1074:All the things that are wrong in the world seem conquered by a library’s simple unspoken promise: Here I am, please tell me your story; here is my story, please listen. ~ Susan Orlean,
1075:I acknowledge immense debt to the griots [tribal poets] of Africa - where today it is rightly said that when a griot dies, it is as if a library has burned to the ground. ~ Alex Haley,
1076:I have an unshaken conviction that democracy can never be undermined if we maintain our library resources and a national intelligence capable of utilizing them. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt,
1077:I was the kid who read a lot and who was academic, and who was more of an indoor person than an outdoor person. I would win the summer reading contest at the library. ~ Julianne Moore,
1078:Literature...I'm gonna study books - the way they're written and what the author meant to say by writing the story. When I'm done, I want to get a job in a library. ~ Kim Vogel Sawyer,
1079:the theater should be free to the people just as the Public Library is free, just as the museum is free. ... I want the theater to be made accessible to the people. ~ Eva Le Gallienne,
1080:What was it with people always trying to kill me in the library? Nickamedes so needed to put up warning signs. Danger: Working here could be hazardous to your health. ~ Jennifer Estep,
1081:You're always in the kitchen," Alianora said when she poked her head through the door a moment later. "Or the library. Don't you ever do anything but cook and read? ~ Patricia C Wrede,
1082:As a kid, death seemed boring to me. As an adult, I think that it seems more like a waste of everything. Somebody once said every time a professor dies, a library burns. ~ Stephen King,
1083:As he passed Alistair to depart the library, Bosque said, "I'm pleased you didn't limit your vision. Ambition is the fertile soil in which true power can be cultivated. ~ Andrea Cremer,
1084:Even the most misfitting child
Who's chanced upon the library's worth,
Sits with the genius of the Earth
And turns the key to the whole world.
--"Hear It Again ~ Ted Hughes,
1085:I am convinced that grandkids are inherently evil people who tell their grandparents to "just go to the library and open up an e-mail account - it's free and so simple. ~ Scott Douglas,
1086:Library Science is the key to all science, just as mathematics is its language - and civilization will rise or fall, depending on how well librarians do their jobs. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
1087:Seduced her? Every time I turned round she was up a library ladder. In the end I gave in. That reminds me—I spotted something between her legs that made me think of you. ~ Tom Stoppard,
1088:sometimes after I finished a particularly good book, I had the urge to get the library card, find out who else had read the book, and track them down to talk about it ~ Jeannette Walls,
1089:Yesterday all five living presidents gathered for the opening of the George W. Bush presidential library in Dallas. Well, six living presidents if you count Hillary in 2016. ~ Jay Leno,
1090:It said, “Dad Calling,” and his greeting was a shouted, “I didn’t do two tours with the Marines only for my hometown to close down the library because of nudie boobies! ~ Kristen Ashley,
1091:This is your very own Kindle. No more borrowing mine. I swear, Sarah, I opened it the other day and there was a naked man on the cover of nearly every book in my library. ~ Aly Martinez,
1092:A library is a good place to soften solitude; a place where you feel part of a conversation that has gone on for hundreds and hundreds of years even when you’re all alone. ~ Susan Orlean,
1093:I was so naive about writing, I went to the public library and checked out the only volume they had on the topic - an academic treatise about publishing from the WWII era. ~ Bruce Feiler,
1094:Prepare yourself for some bad news: Ronald Reagan’s library just burned down. Both books were destroyed. But the real horror: He hadn’t finished coloring either one of them. ~ Gore Vidal,
1095:The fear of failure is so great, it is no wonder that the desire to do right by one's children has led to a whole library of books offering advice on how to raise them ~ Bruno Bettelheim,
1096:THOMASINA:
But then the Egyptian noodle made carnal embrace with the enemy who burned the great library of Alexandria without so much as a fine for all that is overdue! ~ Tom Stoppard,
1097:A large library is apt to distract rather than to instruct the learner. It is much better to confine to a few authors than to wander at random over many. ~ James A Michener, Iberia, [T5],
1098:Don't play games with me! You just killed someone I like, that is not a safe place to stand! I'm the Doctor, and you're in the biggest library in the Universe. Look me up. ~ Steven Moffat,
1099:He was rather clumsy and shy and looked as if he'd spent the last ten years of his life locked up in a library - hardly the kind of man any girl your age dreams of ... ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
1100:I can imagine myself saying at the time that life itself was like a book borrowed from the library—something that did not belong to me and was due to expire. How silly. ~ Ottessa Moshfegh,
1101:I do have a library of events I can talk about and I always expect to find a different point of view on it so even if I talk about the same event in the same town it's fresh. ~ Leo Kottke,
1102:I had a serious library at my disposal, because my Popo believed that culture entered by osmosis and it was better to start early, but my favorite books were fairy tales. ~ Isabel Allende,
1103:I hate requests. They make me feel unhappy. It's like when I take a book out of the library. As soon as I start to read it, all I can think about is when I'll finish it. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1104:She’d left the shop with a bag full of new books for her library, including a hardback with crossed flintlocks on the cover that a random woman in the shop had gushed about. ~ Emma Newman,
1105:So you go in a library, and you pull a book off the shelf, and you open it, and what are you looking for? A mirror. All of a sudden, a mirror is there and you see yourself. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1106:As I stood outside in Cow Lane, it occurred to me that Heaven must be a place where the library is open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. No ... eight days a week. ~ Alan Bradley,
1107:He who learns, and makes no use of his learning, is a beast of burden with a load of books. Does the ass comprehend whether he carries on his back a library or a bundle of faggots? ~ Saadi,
1108:In truth, the Library includes all verbal structures, all variations permitted by the twenty-five orthographical symbols, but not a single example of absolute nonsense. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1109:I stared at the trunks of books on the library floor, remembering the pangs I’d once had for a profession, for some purpose. The world had been such a beckoning place once. ~ Sue Monk Kidd,
1110:I went to Europe to live in 1961. I'd never have written Julian if it hadn't been for the sequestered life that I led in Rome and the classical library at the America Academy. ~ Gore Vidal,
1111:Our sense that a library is a public good and our idea of what such a place should look like derived precisely from a model created in Rome several thousand years ago. ~ Stephen Greenblatt,
1112:There might be a charm in the black arts section of the library, but black earth magic used nasty ingredients—like indispensable people parts—and I wasn’t going to go there. ~ Kim Harrison,
1113:[O]ccasionally the sunlight through the library windows would catch my eye, and I knew I should be out in that. I felt as if I had cut myself adrift from everything I loved. ~ James Rebanks,
1114:Raising a cold eye from book to clock in the positively sultry Beardsley College library, among bulky young women caught and petrified in the overflow of human knowledge. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1115:The Bible is actually a library of books-some long, some short- written over hundreds of years by many authors. Behind each one, however, was [the] Author: the Spirit of God. ~ Billy Graham,
1116:Things turn up in strange places all the time. For example library books, which possess a disconcerting ability to move from place to place, seemingly of their own volition. ~ Lauren Willig,
1117:But maybe I’d need something to read on my ride to my future, I thought. I could borrow a few of the finer books from the X-ville library, disappear and never return them. ~ Ottessa Moshfegh,
1118:Every problem that society has, the library has, too, because the boundary between society and the library is porous; nothing good is kept out of the library, and nothing bad. ~ Susan Orlean,
1119:He noticed that the boy seemed rather less elbows than he remembered, stood a little more upright and, bluntly, could use a word like 'expectancy'. It was all that library. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1120:I was always the only black in the movie theater, the only black in class, the only black in the library, the only black in the discotheque. I always felt observed and judged. ~ Concha Buika,
1121:Knowing I lov'd my books, he furnished me  From mine own library with volumes that  I prize above my dukedom. ~ William Shakespeare, The Tempest (c. 1610-1612), Act I, scene 2, line 165.,
1122:Libraries may embody our notion of permanence, but their patrons are always in flux. In truth, a library is as much a portal as it is a place—it is a transit point, a passage. ~ Susan Orlean,
1123:She asked, "Okay, wait, so why is Ronan at the library?"
"Cramming," Noah said. "For an exam on Monday."
It was the nicest thing Blue had ever heard of Ronan doing. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
1124:The apartment was tiny, but neat: the bed was made; a few books (business books and a self-help book, all in English and all from the library) were stacked on a nightstand. ~ Patrick Hoffman,
1125:The great library that Google is rushing to create shouldn’t be confused with the libraries we’ve known up until now. It’s not a library of books. It’s a library of snippets. ~ Nicholas Carr,
1126:The library was quiet. It was busy but it was quiet and I thought it must be like this in a monastery where you had company and sympathy but your thoughts were your own. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
1127:Either her dream had taken a very odd turn or else - or else Mary had really rushed into the room and had said (incredible! fantastic!) that there was a body in the library. ~ Agatha Christie,
1128:Goliath fell to a slingshot and a stone. and the Library is a lumbering giant, dying of its own arrogance; it has to change or fall. We have the tools. The will. The knowledge. ~ Rachel Caine,
1129:I believe murder is ‘tolerated with reservations.’ ” “Is anything illegal here?” Addison asked. “Library late fines are stiff. Ten lashes a day, and that’s just for paperbacks. ~ Ransom Riggs,
1130:I couldn't live a week without a private library - indeed, I'd part with all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I'd let go of the 1500 or so books I possess. ~ H P Lovecraft,
1131:I die and go to a library? Sure, it could be worse, but I’ve spent a lot of time in libraries this year. Quite enough time, really. Do I have to stay forever? Where do I go pee? ~ Brent Weeks,
1132:Libros lege. Quae legeris memento. Liberos erudi. ~ Read books. Remember what you read. Instruct your children. ~   Dicta Catonis advice to his son, Loeb Classical Library vol. 434, p. 595.,
1133:Over a hundred German scientists arrived here [Huntsville] at eleven o’clock on an April morning and by nightfall more than sixty had applied for cards at the free library. ~ James A Michener,
1134:Sometimes when I'm in a bookstore or library, I am overwhelmed by all the things that I do not know. Then I am seized by a powerful desire to read all the books, one by one. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1135:The library was full of wizards, who care about their books in the same way that ants care about their eggs and in time of difficulty carry them around in much the same way. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1136:And he read every book the library had that had won the Hugo Award. When he was done with them, he started reading every book in their collection that had won the Booker Award. ~ Chris Dietzel,
1137:I am in Boston right now, in fact, to do work at the New England Historical Genealogical Library, where I'm trying to finish up tracing my lineage back to the seventeenth century. ~ Rick Moody,
1138:I couldn't live a week without a private library - indeed, I'd part with all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I'd let go of the 1500 or so books I possess. ~ H P Lovecraft,
1139:I don't know which is worse, going to the library or stealing and breaking the laws of Shabbat, but I know what the prophet's talking about when he says one sin begets another. ~ Pearl Abraham,
1140:Some cleric putting a match to her. /Neither of them looks happy about it. /Once lit, she'll burn like a book, /like a book that was ever finished, /like a locked-up library. ~ Margaret Atwood,
1141:Throughout my life, even when times were tough, I never stopped buying books. Or, come to think of it, booze. My library is dusty and well stocked. My liver is well worn. ~ Shehan Karunatilaka,
1142:What do we do now? Invite them all over for tea in the library where you do your best Hercule Poirot imitation and reveal all?” Stewart’s facetious question was directed at me. ~ Miranda James,
1143:Anna, with a show of supreme self-control, did not immediately fall to the floor. She managed to say yes, the library, yes, she would love to see it, yes, library, yes, yes... ~ Cassandra Clare,
1144:Going to the library was the one place we got to go without asking for permission. And they let us choose what we wanted to read. It was a feeling of having a book be mine entirely. ~ Rita Dove,
1145:I began reading everyhing in the family library. Kidnapped, Treasure Island, Robinson Crusoe. And of course, if you're running out of books to read you can always read Shakespeare. ~ Robin Hobb,
1146:I remember hearing grandpa say that a love for god books was one of the best safeguards a man could have,' began Archie, staring thoughtfully at the fine library before him. ~ Louisa May Alcott,
1147:It's partly that I'm an extrovert and that I like being with people. If you shut me up in a library with nothing else around for weeks on end, I'd go mad! I have to sort of go out. ~ N T Wright,
1148:Read properly, fewer books than a hundred would suffice for a liberal education. Read superficially, the British Museum Library might still leave the student a barbarian. ~ Alfred Richard Orage,
1149:Sometimes when I’m in a bookstore or a library, I am overwhelmed by all the things that I do not know. Then I am seized by a powerful desire to read all the books, one by one. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1150:You can't flood the market with every TV show, every reality show, and dump your library into the market all at one time and not have some kind of game plan in terms of pricing. ~ Bill Mechanic,
1151:You don't need a lot of money to live a full life--all you need is a fertile mind, some books and a good attitude. Books are free at the library, but a fertile mind takes practice. ~ Robyn Carr,
1152:Censors don’t want children exposed to ideas different from their own. If every individual with an agenda had his/her way, the shelves in the school library would be close to empty. ~ Judy Blume,
1153:[General James Mattis] a very talented individual. He's - has a personal library of about 10,000 books and he's read most of them on military history and strategy and so forth. ~ Peter R Mansoor,
1154:God bless Interlibrary Loan. I pay a lot of library fines. In the case of 'A Single Shard,' I was using books that hadn't been checked out in 30 years, so I didn't feel too bad. ~ Linda Sue Park,
1155:It's strange, isn't it. You stand in the middle of a library and go aaaaagghhhh' and everyone just stares at you. But you do the same thing on an aeroplane, and everyone joins in. ~ Tommy Cooper,
1156:President Obama has decided that he wants his presidential library to be in Chicago, not Hawaii. Today Hawaii's governor said, 'Great, who's going to want to come to Hawaii now?' ~ Conan O Brien,
1157:This is a great idea,” said Trey. “You kids should totaly go see that play. Make a whole day of it. Grab some dinner and hang out at the library or whatever it is you do for fun. ~ Richelle Mead,
1158:As I stood outside in Cow Lane, it occurred to me that Heaven must be a place where the library is open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

No ... eight days a week. ~ Alan Bradley,
1159:In the University library he wandered through the stacks, among the thousands of books, inhaling the musty odor of leather, cloth, and drying page as if it were an exotic incense. ~ John Williams,
1160:I was made for the library, not the classroom. The classroom was a jail of other people’s interests. The library was open, unending, free. Slowly, I was discovering myself. The ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
1161:Joss's ears perked up. He loved libraries. Nowhere else in the world felt so safe and homey. Nowhere else smelled like books and dust and happy solitude quite like a library did. ~ Heather Brewer,
1162:Those afternoons in the library, breathing the stale sun-warmed dust of a thousand stories (accented by the collective mildew of a hundred years of rising damp), had been enchanted. ~ Kate Morton,
1163:We must not think of learning as only what happens in schools. It is an extended part of life. The most readily available resource for all of life is our public library system. ~ David McCullough,
1164:A fool may buy all the books in the world, and they will be in his library; but he will be able to read only those that he deserves to; and this deserving is produced by Karma. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1165:In the bare room under the old library on the hill in the town at the tip of the small peninsula on the cold island so far from everything else, I lived among strangers and birds. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
1166:Names are hard. I have a library of What to Name Your Baby books, and I’m always picking up new books, and books of baby names from other countries. I like cool-sounding names. ~ George R R Martin,
1167:She closed the book and put her cheek against it. There was still an odor of a library on it, of dust, leather, binding glue, and old paper, one book carrying the smell of hundreds. ~ Shannon Hale,
1168:She thought of the library, so shining white and new; the rows and rows of unread books; the bliss of unhurried sojourns there and of going out to a restaurant, alone, to eat. ~ Maud Hart Lovelace,
1169:They hauled books from the shelves, flipped through the pages, and tossed them to the floor until an entire library of legal volumes lay with cracked spines across the Oriental rug. ~ Ariel Lawhon,
1170:When I read about the way in which library funds are being cut and cut, I can only think that the door is closing and that American society has found one more way to destroy itself. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1171:Children built snowmen in their front lawns, played in the yard of the public library. I would miss that old library. I couldn’t realize at the time how those books had saved me. ~ Ottessa Moshfegh,
1172:In the library I was handed a blueprint on how to live the mysterious, unnamable, big dream life I wanted. I was handed books. And through reading them, I grew up to find that very life. ~ Ann Hood,
1173:In the modern languages there was not, six hundred years ago, a single volume which is now read. The library of our profound scholar must have consisted entirely of Latin books. ~ Thomas B Macaulay,
1174:I wanted to be in a band that gave bang for the buck. I wanted to be in the band who didn't look like a bunch of guys who, you know, should be in a library studying for their finals. ~ Gene Simmons,
1175:My mother was lost to me, but I wasn’t lost. She had anchored me, to Amma, my father, Link, Gatlin, before she left. I felt her in the streets, my house, the library, even the pantry. ~ Kami Garcia,
1176:Second hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. ~ Virginia Woolf,
1177:I went to the library as soon as I could walk. So the training came from reading all kinds of people, from fairy tales and later on to - I don't know why - Schweitz's "Life of Christ." ~ Nat Hentoff,
1178:My stepfather introduced me to The London Library when I was about 18; the clientele has definitely changed since then, but it is still a wonderful oasis in the middle of London. ~ Natascha McElhone,
1179:success” at the library and you will be amazed at the literature you will find: inspirational stories of people who developed greatness in the face of adversity, strategies for improving ~ Anonymous,
1180:A husband willing to fund a library for his bookish wife is not so easy to obtain; most would see it as a pointless expense. You might, however, find one willing to share his library. ~ Marie Brennan,
1181:If something burns your soul with purpose and desire, it’s your duty to be reduced to ashes by it. Any other form of existence will be yet another dull book in the library of life. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1182:Nothing is so intimately a part of a man as his library. It contains just what the possessor wants to look at most often, and comes to form his window or gateway to the larger cosmos. ~ H P Lovecraft,
1183:One day I will lend this heart of mine out -- like a well-read library book -- to someone who'll decide to rip the return date straight out of the inner binding and never let me go. ~ Hannah Brencher,
1184:The library has a robust collection of what I call non-cuddly hate lit. This is one of my favorite things about working here: If you believe censorship is poison, here lies paradise. ~ Josh Hanagarne,
1185:What Now? Talk a walk Start your swipe file Go to the library Buy a notebook and use it Get yourself a calendar Start your logbook Give a copy of this book away Start a blog Take a nap ~ Austin Kleon,
1186:***A SMALL SUGGESTION***
Or maybe there was a woman on Grande Strasse who now kept her library window open for another reason - but that's just be being cynical, or hopeful. Or both. ~ Markus Zusak,
1187:If the library in the morning suggests an echo of the severe and reasonable wishful order of the world, the library at night seems to rejoice in the world's essential, joyful muddle. ~ Alberto Manguel,
1188:If we give up on having library collections (digital or otherwise) and outsource access to and preservation of knowledge to corporations, we will have neither access nor preservation. ~ Barbara Fister,
1189:Silentiary (n.) An official whose job it is to command silence. I would like to have my very own silentiary, someone I can bring to the library and to the apartment next door. Sitzfleisch ~ Ammon Shea,
1190:The student has his Rome, his whole glowing Italy, within the four walls of his library. He has in his books the ruins of an antique world and the glories of a modern one. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
1191:You asked me where I generally lived. In my workshop [i.e. in his study] in the mornings and always in the library in the evening. Books are companions even if you don’t open them. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
1192:You can come with me to the McGregor Room,” I say. “But you have to promise to be quiet.”
Affectionately Peter says, “Lara Jean, only you would look forward to hanging out in a library. ~ Jenny Han,
1193:and then, having fetched a novel from the library, had flung herself in haughty listlessness on a sofa, and prepared to beguile, by the spell of fiction, the tedious hours of absence. ~ Charlotte Bront,
1194:Don't join the book burners. Don't think you're going to conceal faults by concealing evidence that they ever existed. Don't be afraid to go in your library and read every book... ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
1195:I remember being in the public library and my jaw just aching as I looked around at all those books I wanted to read. There just wasn't time enough to read everything I wanted to read. ~ Charles Kuralt,
1196:I think the New York Public Library is so, so amazing. It's literally the coolest place - It's good shelter from the sun and it's the most beautiful building. It's really, really fun. ~ Natalie Portman,
1197:I've been going to the library, looking up our history. There's a ton of it in anthropology books, a ton of it, Ruth. We haven't always been hated. Why didn't we grow up knowing that? ~ Leslie Feinberg,
1198:Libraries allow children to ask questions about the world and find the answers. And the wonderful thing is that once a child learns to use a library, the doors to learning are always open. ~ Laura Bush,
1199:There is a book waiting for him upon the library table; his eyes fancy they still follow its lines of type, his head still runs upon its argument, his fingers itch to take it up again. ~ Susanna Clarke,
1200:This was the doorway to the heart of the Great Keep. The one place
any son of Lila Jane Evers Wate would instinctively find his way,
whether or not he was a Wayward.
The library. ~ Kami Garcia,
1201:You could get a book then. There was a book in the library about Holland. There were lovely foreign names in it and pictures of strangelooking cities and ships. It made you feel so happy. ~ James Joyce,
1202:A house on the park. He'd seen it a million times. And now was in it. It smelled of man sweat and spaghetti sauce and old books. Like a library where sweaty men went to cook spaghetti. ~ George Saunders,
1203:I don't know if you know it, J.B., but you're the sort of fellow who causes hundreds to fall under suspicion when he's found stabbed in his library with a paper-knife of Oriental design. ~ P G Wodehouse,
1204:I have always kept a stack of library books next to my bed as a lifeline. If I ever woke in the middle of the night too scared to move or too sad to roll over, the books were my saviors. ~ Julie Halpern,
1205:I received the fundamentals of my education in school, but that was not enough. My real education, the superstructure, the details, the true architecture, I got out of the public library. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1206:She nodded. “The Michigan State Library fire was caused by a student trying to burn the state draft board files so he wouldn’t be drafted and ended up destroying twenty thousand volumes. ~ Connie Willis,
1207:Speeches are for the younger men who are going places. And I'm not going anyplace except six feet under the floor of that little chapel adjoining the museum and library at Abilene. ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
1208:To: Christian Grey

You've made me cry again.

I love the iPad.

I love the songs.

I love the British Library App.

I love you.

Goodnight.

Ana xx ~ E L James,
1209:I guess in my own egotistical way I like to create my own library of Batman books that doesn't run contrary to a single thing that has been published before, but it also stands on its own. ~ Frank Miller,
1210:I have all my books with me, obviously, and several library books,” Elliot answered. “What if I wished to consult a book and did not have the relevant volume on hand? Think about it. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
1211:I went to the library and began to read some stuff on my own. My discovery of James Baldwin was life-changing. I read Go Tell It on the Mountain first, and that was hugely impactful. ~ Michael Eric Dyson,
1212:Let me tell you this, if I had wanted to have a library of audio and videotapes of Bill Clinton, I could have had that. And after I was accused of being a liar, I wished that I had of. ~ Gennifer Flowers,
1213:Something about the beauty of the library and how many books there were made me feel really eager to read, and I couldn't wait to get some free time so I could go back there and explore. ~ Francine Prose,
1214:So now, when three Landers, members of a street gang, approach me in the back alley behind the Library, knives drawn, the silver barrel of a gun pointed at my heart, I know I am ready. ~ Lindsay Cummings,
1215:The Bibliotheque du Roi then gives you the closest thing that currently exists to God's understanding of the world."
"And yet with a bigger library we could come ever so much closer. ~ Neal Stephenson,
1216:The library at Madingley Grange was rarely used. The pristine books in their diamond-paned cases seemed never to have been sullied by anything so coarse as the perusal of the human eye. ~ Caroline Graham,
1217:There are many horrible sights in the multiverse. Somehow, though, to a soul attuned to the subtle rhythms of a library, there are few worse sights than a hole where a book ought to be. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1218:There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library, this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration. ~ Andrew Carnegie,
1219:We are the only species on the planet, so far as we know, to have invented a communal memory stored neither in our genes nor in our brains. The warehouse of this memory is called the library ~ Carl Sagan,
1220:Doctor Who: You want weapons? We're in a library. Books are the best weapon in the world. This room's the greatest arsenal we could have. Arm yourself! (from Tooth and Claw in Season 2) ~ Russell T Davies,
1221:Do you know what happened when they tried to upgrade SCROLL?” said Bradshaw. “The system conflict wiped out the entire library at Alexandria—they had to torch the lot to stop it spreading. ~ Jasper Fforde,
1222:During the week that I arrived in the United States, I saw an airport, used a telephone, used a library, talked with a scientist, and was shown a computer for the first time in my life. ~ Philip Emeagwali,
1223:First, this isn't about telecommuting, because we still have offices that people will come to regularly when they need to brainstorm together, meet with clients, or do research in the library. ~ Jay Chiat,
1224:In the library I felt better, words you could trust and look at till you understood them, they couldn't change half way through a sentence like people, so it was easier to spot a lie. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
1225:In the library I felt better, words you could trust and look at until you understood them, they couldn't change halfway through a sentence like people, so it was easier to spot a lie. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
1226:On a quick jaunt to the library, I tried not to laugh and drive off the road when a very concerned and serious four-year-old Adolpha asked me, “Someday will I have a mustache on my ’china, too? ~ Jen Mann,
1227:She hadn't met Earth or Fire, the other two cousins, but she'd filled a couple of library requests for each of them in the past week. If they were around, they would help her. Wouldn't they? ~ Anne Bishop,
1228:Somebody's going to have to make the money to buy you all those books."
"They're free," Franny said. "I check them out of the library."
"Well, thank God for libraries," Caroline said. ~ Ann Patchett,
1229:The beautiful thing about learning is nobody can take it away from you. ~ B.B. King, quoted outside the Main Library in uptown Charlotte, North Carolina, in The Charlotte Observer (5 October 1997) Page 2D,
1230:the chaos of the world that counted people as different levels of worthy, the Library served all equally. All genders, races, levels of ability. It was the one place they could all be safe. ~ Rachel Caine,
1231:When I tell people I went to library school, the most common reaction is either “You’re joking, right?” or “They have schools for librarians? Do they teach you how to properly sssh people? ~ Scott Douglas,
1232:Book lovers love books!" her mother announced. "There's romance about the books- even having them seems to have a kind of excitement."
from Mr. Linden's Library by Walter Dean Myers ~ Chris Van Allsburg,
1233:If you possess a library and a garden, you have everything you need. (translation from the French) Si vous possedez une bibliotheque et un jardin, vous avez tout ce qu'il vous faut. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
1234:My library card. Every hurdle I've faced, I have researched my way over at a library. I'm grateful for that part of the American spirit that believes every citizen should have access to books. ~ Sarah Bird,
1235:Seeing one's books on the shelf tells you so much about the way somebody has, over the years, put together their private library, which is a reflection of their minds and their selves. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
1236:The Nag Hammadi Library, as its collection of works is now known, has, since its miraculous discovery just after the war, been published in its entirety. It is freely available on the Internet. ~ Dan Eaton,
1237:Do not be guilty of possessing a library of learned books while lacking learning yourself. ~ Erasmus
“When I have a little money, I buy books; and if I have any left, I buy food and clothes. ~ Erasmus,
1238:I could already tell parenthood wasn't for me. The fact that the kid went to the library was terrific. The fact that he went there to find out how soon he could legally have sex was not. ~ Marshall Thornton,
1239:I like shelves full of books in a library, but if all books become electronic, the task of big research libraries remains the same - keep what's published in the form in which it appeared. ~ Nicholson Baker,
1240:It’s not just a matter of free books. A library is a different kind of social reality (of the three-dimensional kind), which by its very existence teaches a system of values beyond the fiscal. ~ Zadie Smith,
1241:There are three things to leave behind; your photographs, your library, and your personal journals. These things are certainly going to be more valuable to future generations than your furniture! ~ Jim Rohn,
1242:We are the only species on the planet, so far as we know, to have invented a communal memory stored neither in our genes nor in our brains. The warehouse of that memory is called the library. A ~ Carl Sagan,
1243:Well-run libraries are filled with people because what a good library offers cannot be easily found elsewhere: an indoor public space in which you do not have to buy anything in order to stay. ~ Zadie Smith,
1244:Your library teacher would say, "What happens to a generation that doesn't read the Classics?" Me, I'm not your library teacher. But I have some of the same questions and concerns, you know? ~ Saul Williams,
1245:A library in the middle of a community is a cross between an emergency exit, a life raft and a festival. They are cathedrals of the mind; hospitals of the soul; theme parks of the imagination. ~ Alan Bennett,
1246:At one point I took a copy of Berkeley's Principles from my father's library. That was the first philosophy book I read. I found it fascinating and wanted to read more philosophy. ~ Gonzalo Rodriguez Pereyra,
1247:I have a tingly feeling that I get when there are books all around me. The library! I know it's geeky, but I love it. Just sitting between the shelves of books, reading - it's the safest feeling. ~ Nick Lake,
1248:In the New Yorker library, I have long been shelved between Nadine Gordimer and Brendan Gill; an eerie little space nestled between high seriousness of purpose and legendary lightness of touch. ~ Adam Gopnik,
1249:There's this magical place,' he says with mock solemnity, 'called a library--I don't know if you've heard of it, but they have books, and also newspaper, and back issues of newspapers... ~ Mo ra Fowley Doyle,
1250:though I spotted Bernie Nordman, co-owner of Ace Hardware, make her way into the computer/library/board game back room with a steaming mug in one hand and what appeared to be a cherry Danish in ~ Jess Lourey,
1251:Why, the club was just the quietest place in the world, a place where a woman could run in to brush her hair and wash her hands, and change her library book, and have a cup of tea. ~ Kathleen Thompson Norris,
1252:A library in the middle of a community is a cross between an emergency exit, a life raft and a festival. They are cathedrals of the mind; hospitals of the soul; theme parks of the imagination. ~ Caitlin Moran,
1253:But I know, at least, that you would keep a library on the subject, and I hoped that I might be allowed to read from it.” He regarded me with a bemused expression. “You want me for my library. ~ Marie Brennan,
1254:Destroying a library is a kind of terrorism. People think of libraries as the safest and most open places in society. Setting them on fire is like announcing that nothing, and nowhere, is safe. ~ Susan Orlean,
1255:Don't ask for guarantees. And don't look to be saved in any one thing, person, machine, or library. Do your own bit of saving, and if you drown, at least die knowing you were heading for shore. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1256:I always tell people that I became a writer not because I went to school but because my mother took me to the library. I wanted to become a writer so I could see my name in the card catalog. ~ Sandra Cisneros,
1257:If I were not a king, I would be a university man; and if it were so that I must be a prisoner, if I might have my wish, I would desire to have no other prison than that library [the Bodleian]. ~ King James I,
1258:Some of the best memories of my childhood that I have are the times that I played hooky from school so I could spend my days in the public library reading all the wonderful books at my disposal. ~ Woody Allen,
1259:The publicness of the public library is an increasingly rare commodity. It becomes harder all the time to think of places that welcome everyone and don’t charge any money for that warm embrace. ~ Susan Orlean,
1260:This sense of possibility might not last, of course Nothing ever did. But she wasn’t going to spoil it by looking too far ahead. They were safe in the Library, and the Library would endure. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
1261:he went to clean up the library with a fellow janitor; but the moment he entered the huge room, he gasped, put his heads to his temples and fell down on one knee, gasping, “My head! My head! ~ Richard Matheson,
1262:I always get lost in the library,' he said, 'no matter how many times I go. In fact, I think I get lost there more, the more that I go. Like it's getting to know me and revealing new passages. ~ Rainbow Rowell,
1263:I don't speak French, but I took it for five years growing up. So, if I were in a situation where I had to be, like, 'Excuse me, pineapple dog house red, what time is it library?' - no problem. ~ Eugene Mirman,
1264:Mom always says you can solve most problems at the library, and there's a lady there who's my friend. We could ask her about helping Bernice. She has to answer people's questions. It's her job. ~ Laurel Snyder,
1265:...after our weekly trip to the library, she cleared the top of her dresser and set out her week's reading, stood them on their ends, pages fanned out, sending little puffs of text into the air. ~ Eleanor Brown,
1266:During all the months that had elapsed since Mrs Hamley’s death, Molly had wondered many a time about the secret she had so unwittingly become possessed of that last day in the Hall library. ~ Elizabeth Gaskell,
1267:I find that when I come out of the library I’m in what I call the library bliss of being totally taken away from the distractions of life.”

[Woman's Day magazine, March 12, 2002] ~ Tracy Chevalier,
1268:Knowledge sets us free, art sets us free. A great library is freedom...and that freedom must not be compromised. It must be available to all who need it, when they need it, and that's always. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1269:Magic is used in espionage, all the time, for clandestine things. I've got a whole library from a gentleman who was hired by the CIA to create magic technology for the use of anti-terrorism. ~ David Copperfield,
1270:Now look," snapped the Dean, "we've searched everywhere for a decent library on this island. There simply isn't one! It's ridiculous. How is anyone supposed to get anything done? ~ Terry Pratchett,
1271:Readers wanted to fall in love with an author’s library, knowing that there would be more to come. Reader and author could be a lifelong love affair and, like a marriage, it needed tending to. ~ Iain Rob Wright,
1272:(Some girl) "You said we'd have breakfast!"
(Jasper) "If i live, i'll buy you waffles."
"You don't have enough money to buy her waffles," Wylan grumbled.
"Be quite. We're in a library. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
1273:To see the value of a library, ignore the adults. Find an inquisitive child who doesn't have an iPhone yet, take them to the library, and tell them that they can learn anything they want there. ~ Josh Hanagarne,
1274:As I slipped out of the library, a dark figure at the end of the hall caught my eye. Evie. She narrowed her eyes in an accusatory glare. I waved cheerfully. “I was just looking for the bathroom. ~ Leighann Dobbs,
1275:Doctor Who: You want weapons? We're in a library. Books are the best weapon in the world. This room's the greatest arsenal we could have. Arm yourself!

(from Tooth and Claw in Season 2) ~ Russell T Davies,
1276:Fenworth owned a world-famous library. More rooms held books than beds. Pillows stuffed in niches and comfortable chairs scattered throughout each room offered abundant paces to curl up and read. ~ Donita K Paul,
1277:For years I have been coming to this library, and I explore it volume by volume, shelf by shelf, but I could demonstrate to you that I have done nothing but continue the reading of a single book. ~ Italo Calvino,
1278:I always say that the real success of Wine Library wasn't due to the videos I posted, but to the hours I spent talking to people online afterward, making connections and building relationships. ~ Gary Vaynerchuk,
1279:I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ Jane Austen,
1280:In a bitter wind a solitary monk bends to words cut in stone [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, In a bitter wind
,
1281:I smile. Not just at bad clowns, but at "library science." I like that name. It makes a library sound as vast and mysterious as the universe or the ocean, requiring specific study to be understood. ~ Deb Caletti,
1282:Knowledge sets us free, art sets us free. A great library is freedom...and that freedom must not be compromised. It must be available to all who need it, when they need it, and that's always. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1283:Perhaps the various burnings of the Alexandria Library were necessary, like those Australian Forest Fires without which the new seeds cannot burst their shells and make a young, healthy forest. ~ William Golding,
1284:The Battle Creek, Michigan, headquarters of Kellogg’s looks like a spaceship built to look like a pyramid that was then hastily converted into a public library during a period of intergalactic peace. ~ B J Novak,
1285:April, and more bills. I sought distraction and several times a week, I found myself at the public library. There, I wandered the stacks of books or sat in the reading room with a book on my lap. ~ Ann Weisgarber,
1286:Basically I was a rebel growing up. I got kicked out of six schools. But I don't think that it makes you less of an intellect. You know, if you ever crave knowledge, there's always a library. ~ Michelle Rodriguez,
1287:Delighted," Jess said. "I think all houses should be stuffed with books. It makes them--"
"Homes?" the doctor finished. "You are quite the heretic, for someone in a Library uniform."
"Guilty. ~ Rachel Caine,
1288:He remembered how it felt to find himself in the library, away from possible attack but surrounded by things far more dangerous than what roamed the school corridors. For here thoughts were housed. ~ Louise Penny,
1289:I knew books to be objects that loved to cluster and form disordered piles, but here books seemed robbed of their zany capacity to fall about, to conspire. In the library, books behaved themselves. ~ Sheridan Hay,
1290:I sometimes imagine I would like my ashes to be scattered in a library. But then the librarians would just have to come in early the next morning to sweep them up again, before the people got there. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1291:Leaving behind the babble of the plaza, I enter the Library. I feel, almost physically, the gravitation of the books, the enveloping serenity of order, time magically dessicated and preserved. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1292:Now, when I read constantly about the way in which library funds are being cut and cut, I can only think that the door is closing and that American society has found one more way to destroy itself. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1293:Will!" Charlotte threw up her hands. "Why didn't you say so?" "You know, the books on demon pox are in the library," Will said with an injured tone. "I wasn't preventing anyone from reading them ~ Cassandra Clare,
1294:At a given instant everything the surgeon knows suddenly becomes important to the solution of the problem. You can't do it an hour later, or tomorrow. Nor can you go to the library and look it up. ~ John W Kirklin,
1295:I loved going to the library. It was the first time I ever saw Black newspapers and magazines like JET, Ebony, the Baltimore Afro-American, or the Chicago Defender. And I’ll never forget my librarian. ~ John Lewis,
1296:I've got a vendetta to destroy the Net, to make everyone go to the library. I love the organic thing of pen and paper, ink on canvas. I love going down to the library, the feel and smell of books. ~ Joseph Fiennes,
1297:Lively as kittens,” West said as he and Devon walked to the library. “They’re quite wasted out here in the country. I’ll confess, I never knew that the company of innocent girls could be so amusing. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
1298:Mom was never much of a math person, but she took me to the public library before I could read, got me a library card, showed me how to use it, and always made sure I had access to kids’ books at home. ~ J D Vance,
1299:My library was -- all libraries are -- a place of ultimate refuge, a wild and sacred space where meanings are manageable precisely because they aren't binding; and where illusion is comfortingly real. ~ Andr Brink,
1300:The idea that I was building a library to bequeath to the next generation is one of the greatest fallacies of my life. The next generation don’t want old books – they don’t seem to want books at all. ~ Linda Grant,
1301:What people actually refer to as research is really just Googling. I already have a complicated relationship with research. It used to be going to the library and looking up archival photos, etc. ~ Dermot Mulroney,
1302:With a library you are free, not confined by temporary political climates. It is the most democratic of institutions because no one - but no one at all - can tell you what to read and when and how. ~ Doris Lessing,
1303:A library at night is full of sounds: The unread books can’t stand it any longer and announce their contents, some boasting, some shy, some devious. But the sound I heard wasn’t the sound of a book. ~ Helen Oyeyemi,
1304:Always be reading. Go to the library. There's magic in being surrounded by books. Get lost in the stacks. Read bibiliographies. It's not the book you start with, it's the book that book leads you to. ~ Austin Kleon,
1305:Fox is a television character, and she isn’t dead yet. But she will be, soon. She’s a character on a television show called The Library. You’ve never seen the Library on TV, but I bet you wish you had. ~ Kelly Link,
1306:I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ Charlie Lovett,
1307:If—when—I become rich, I want a library so big that I’ll need a ladder to reach all my books. I want first editions, too. I want ancient tomes that I have to handle with forceps and rubber gloves. ~ Erika L S nchez,
1308:I had read once, in one of those pre-plague books in the library, that love was bearing witness. That it was the act of watching someone’s life, of simply being there to say: your life is worth seeing. ~ Anna Carey,
1309:Of course, the guests were also staring because they know of my relationship with Camille, and are wondering what we might be doing here in the library... alone." He wiggled his eyebrows at Tessa. ~ Cassandra Clare,
1310:The pursuit of knowing was freedom to me, the right to declare your own curiosities and follow them through all manner of books. I was made for the library...The library was open, unending, free. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
1311:There's a library here. Would you let me show it to you?"
She scowled. "You're bribing me with books."
"Is it working?"
She let her gaze linger on the door behind his shoulder.
"Perhaps. ~ Sarah MacLean,
1312:The student has his Rome, his Florence, his whole glowing Italy, within the four walls of his library. He has in his books the ruins of an antique world and the glories of a modern one. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
1313:When a library expels a book of mine and leaves an unexpurgated Bible lying around where unprotected youth and age can get hold of it, the deep unconscious irony of it delights me and doesn't anger me. ~ Mark Twain,
1314:I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ Jane Austen,
1315:Just like that, the world changed. Aldrik held out both hands before her and helped her to her feet. Vhalla stood, not as a common-born library girl, a soldier, a sorcerer, or a lady, but as an Empress. ~ Elise Kova,
1316:Leaving behind the babble of the plaza, I enter the Library. I feel, almost physically, the gravitation of the books, the enveloping serenity of order, time magically dessicated and preserved.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1317:Panic will have everyone rushing off in different directions to try to ‘save the Library.’ Panic is the antithesis to good organization. Panic is messy. I am against panic on a point of principle. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
1318:Then he discovered the library’s collection of agriculture books, which included works by Sir Albert Howard and Rudolf Steiner. “I read them and it clicked,” he said. “I mean, it all just came together. ~ Dan Barber,
1319:The pursuit of knowing was freedom to me, the right to declare your own curiosities and follow them through all manner of books. I was made for the library... The library was open, unending, free. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
1320:Until he lost all his money, my father was a successful north London Jewish businessman. He was unusual among his immediate family in that he was enormously cultured and had an incredible library. ~ Anthony Horowitz,
1321:Will!" Charlotte threw up her hands. "Why didn't you say so?"
"You know, the books on demon pox are in the library," Will said with an injured tone. "I wasn't preventing anyone from reading them ~ Cassandra Clare,
1322:Digestion of words as well; I often read aloud to myself in my writing corner in the library, where no one can hear me, for the sake of better savouring the text, so as to make it all the more mine. ~ Alberto Manguel,
1323:I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than that of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ~ Jane Austen,
1324:I had once read, in one of those pre-plague books in the library, that love was bearing witness. That it was the act of watching someone's life, of simply being there to say: you're life is worth seeing. ~ Anna Carey,
1325:In my day the library was a wonderful place.... We didn't have visual aids and didn't have various programs...it was a sanctuary.... So I tend to think the library should remain a center of knowledge. ~ Norman Mailer,
1326:I picture heaven as a vast library, with unlimited volumes to read. And paintings and statues to examine galore. I picture it as a great doorway to learning. Do you think the hereafter could be like that? ~ Anne Rice,
1327:The great sadness,” Helms said in an oral history recorded for the LBJ Library, “was our ignorance—or innocence, if you like—which led us to mis-assess, not comprehend, and make a lot of wrong decisions. ~ Tim Weiner,
1328:You see? I know where every single book used to be in the library. She pointed to the shelf opposite. Over there was Catch-22, which was a hugely popular fishing book and one of a series, I believe. ~ Jasper Fforde,
1329:(about organizing books in his home library, and putting a book in the "Arts and Lit non-fiction section) I personally find that for domestic purposes, the Trivial Pursuit system works better than Dewey. ~ Nick Hornby,
1330:Jamie always wanted me to build her a library; I always put it off for tomorrow. I thought I had more time, but sometimes tomorrow never comes and you’re only left with the memories of yesterdays. ~ Brittainy C Cherry,
1331:She remembered the conversation in the Library, as forgetting was the last thing a fully-trained Librarian should do. Memories were as important as books, and almost as important as proper indexing. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
1332:The doors of this Library are open now and are all welcome. The judgment of history is left to you, the people. I have no fears of that, for we have done our best. And so I say, come and learn from it. ~ Ronald Reagan,
1333:A man should keep his little brain attic stocked with all the furniture that he is likely to use, and the rest he can put away in the lumber room of his library, where he can get it if he wants it. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1334:A man should keep his little brain attic stocked with all the furniture that he is likely to use, and the rest he can put away in the lumber-room of his library, where he can get it if he wants it. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1335:a man should keep his little brain-attic stocked with all the furniture that he is likely to use, and the rest he can put away in the lumber-room of his library, where he can get it if he wants it. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1336:Bessie asked if I would have a book: the word book acted as a transient stimulus, and I begged her to fetch Gulliver’s Travels from the library.  This book I had again and again perused with delight.  ~ Charlotte Bront,
1337:But I’m going to read them all. I call it my Life’s Library. Every summer since I was little, I’ve gone to garage sales and bought all the books that looked interesting. So I always have something to read. ~ John Green,
1338:It meant that New York philanthropists, New York society, would now rediscover the library. ... that learning, books, education have glamour, that self-improvement has glamour, that hope has glamour. ~ Vartan Gregorian,
1339:It’s quite a library, anyway,” she said, trying to sound upbeat. “I’ve begun to think of it as more graveyard than library. End of the line, you know. Where book-of-the-month club comes to die.” As ~ Matthew J Sullivan,
1340:Please," said Lirael..."I think I would like to work in this Library."
"The Library," repeated Sanar, looking troubled. "That can be dangerous to a girl of fourteen. Or a woman of forty, for that matter. ~ Garth Nix,
1341:There is no fighting in the Library. Anyone who starts a fight or responds to a challenge will be thrown out. You may think you can take me. You're probably right. But none of you can take the Library. ~ Seanan McGuire,
1342:The worst thing in the world was the way I felt when I wanted us to be like the families in the books in the library, when I just wanted Daddy Glen to love me like the father in Robinson Crusoe. (209) ~ Dorothy Allison,
1343:Upon her butler’s announcing the arrival of Mr Ravenscar, Lady Mablethorpe, who had been dozing over a novel from the Circulating Library, sat up with a jerk, and raised a hand to her dishevelled cap. ~ Georgette Heyer,
1344:We saw the new gymnasium and the new science labs and the newly expanded library and the new theater arts building and a lot of coeds with moussed hair and bright plastic hair clips and skin cancer tans. ~ Robert Crais,
1345:A library is such a potent symbol of a town's values: each one closed down might as well be six thousand stickers plastered over every available surface, reading "WE CHOSE TO BECOME MORE STUPID AND DULL. ~ Caitlin Moran,
1346:Aren't you affected by Simon's magic?"...
"Took you this long to ask me that?"
She clucks her tongue. "You're not the brightest flame in the fire, are you?"
"Don't make me hit you in a library. ~ Sara Raasch,
1347:Aren't you affected by Simon's magic?"...
"Took you this long to ask me that?"
She clucks her tongue. "You're not the brightest flame in the fire, are you?"
"Don't make me hit you in a library. ~ Sara Raasch,
1348:Clinging to the bell, he dozes so peacefully, this new butterfly [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, Clinging to the bell
,
1349:Have you been reading those books that clueless illiterate Duja in charge of the lending library lets you borrow?’ ‘No, Ma.’ ‘Then what put you in mind of devils possessing nuns to take over the church? ~ Renita D Silva,
1350:He said, "How can the inconsequence of your life not shame you?"
He said, "How do you not feel empty?"
I do, she thought as she pushed through the library doors and let them thud behind her. I do. ~ Marie Rutkoski,
1351:I study the titles in Dr. Stayner’s library, busying myself so I don’t have to look at the fat lip I gave him after yesterday’s group session. It complements the black eye I gave him in last week’s session. ~ K A Tucker,
1352:I've never been a collector - just a consumer - and these days unless a book is signed to me by another author, I don't normally have any qualms about passing it to a friend or donating it to the library. ~ Rick Riordan,
1353:Let heaven exist, though my own place be in hell. Let me be tortured and battered and annihilated, but let there be one instant, one creature, wherein thy enormous Library may find its justification. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1354:The day the library was shut down, he thought, some maiden librarian had moved down the room, pushing each chair against its table. Carefully, with a plodding precision that was the cachet of herself. ~ Richard Matheson,
1355:The late evening crow of deep autumn longing suddenly cries out [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, The late evening crow
,
1356:The opportunity before all of us is living up to the dream of the Library of Alexandria and then taking it a step further - universal access to all knowledge. Interestingly, it is now technically doable ~ Brewster Kahle,
1357:A library is an ever-growing entity; it multiples seemingly unaided, it reproduces itself by purchase, theft, borrowings, gifts, by suggesting gaps through association, by demanding completion of sorts. ~ Alberto Manguel,
1358:Heatstroke is an important and useful addition to the library on climate change, bringing insights from deep-time ecological research to help illuminate the dire forecasts of which we're already so aware. ~ David Quammen,
1359:If anybody wanted to photograph my life, they'd get bored in a day. 'Heres Matt at home learning his lines. Here's Matt researching in aisle six of his local library'. A few hours of that and they'd go home. ~ Matt Damon,
1360:If there’s one place drunks love, Sylvie, it’s a public library. Nice and quiet when you’re nursing a hangover. You can sleep the day away without anyone bothering you except maybe some nag of a librarian. ~ John Searles,
1361:I noted a report indicating that a book written by expert tracker Tom Brown was missing from the Jennings County Library. We knew that Perry had once checked out another book by Brown called The Search. ~ Gavin de Becker,
1362:In the library of the world men have hitherto been ranged according to the form, and the binding; the time is coming when they will take rank and order according to their contents and intrinsic merits. ~ Nicolas Chamfort,
1363:I returned the vial to the book, then surveyed the damage to my library. Angry as I was at Deb’s betrayal, seeing the bullet-ridden texts was worse. It was one thing to shoot at me, but to destroy my books  ~ Jim C Hines,
1364:My mother, stuck in Two Rivers with a head full of unfulfilled dreams, escaped every chance she got via the Two Rivers Free Library - her library card both a passport and necessary currency for her travels. ~ T Greenwood,
1365:Trish decided to go to New York for grad school, and I decided to join her. I wanted to study library science and work on the mainland. She generously offered me a place to stay while I enrolled in school. ~ Penny Watson,
1366:The institution of a public library, containing books on education, would be well adapted for the information of teachers, many of whom are not able to purchase expensive publications on those subjects. ~ Joseph Lancaster,
1367:though I spotted Bernie Nordman, co-owner of Ace Hardware, make her way into the computer/library/board game back room with a steaming mug in one hand and what appeared to be a cherry Danish in the other. My ~ Jess Lourey,
1368:Always be reading. Go to the library. There’s magic in
being surrounded by books. Get lost in the stacks. Read
bibliographies. It’s not the book you start with, it’s the book
that book leads you to. ~ Austin Kleon,
1369:I have lectured at Town Hall N.Y., The Library of Congress, Harvard, Yale, Amherst, Wellesley, Columbia, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Louisiana State University, Colorado, Stanford, and scores of other places. ~ Paul Engle,
1370:It looked the sort of book described in library catalogues as 'slightly foxed,' although it would be more honest to admit that it looked as though it had beed badgered, wolved and possibly beared as well. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1371:It looked the sort of book described in library catalogues as “slightly foxed,” although it would be more honest to admit that it looked as though it had been badgered, wolved and possibly beared as well. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1372:It was funny how none of her classes in library science had prepared her for this sort of thing, dead bodies, staff under suspicion, crazed reporters. Really, they need to consider expanding the curriculum. ~ Jenn McKinlay,
1373:There is something almost sacred about a great library because it represents the preservation of the wisdom, the learning, and the pondering of men and women of all the ages, accumulated under one roof. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
1374:There’s a way of doing it!” Hermione said crossly. “There just has to be!” She seemed to be taking the library’s lack of useful information on the subject as a personal insult; it had never failed her before. ~ J K Rowling,
1375:You can read all the books in this library, be wiser than the master himself someday, and then you will die having never really done anything. You will have only ever lived through everyone else’s experiences. ~ Elise Kova,
1376:And Phoebe and Sebastian went their separate ways, to the blacksmith shop and the library, after several backward glances that weren't coordinated enough to allow either to know that the other one was looking. ~ Jean Ferris,
1377:But it's the particularity of a place, the physical experience of being in a place, that makes it onto the page. That's why I don't just do library research. I very rarely write about somewhere I haven't been. ~ Hari Kunzru,
1378:Ever since we had arrived in the United States, my classmates kept asking me about magic carpets.
- They don't exist-I always said. I was wrong. Magic carpets do exist. But they are called library cards. ~ Firoozeh Dumas,
1379:I must get inside that library! I must have books again. If I cannot read and learn and have things that are worth thinking about, I would rather immolate myself than go on living. ~ Walter Tevis, Mockingbird (1980), p. 134,
1380:The library door was thick and none of the ordinary sounds that might have reminded them, might have held them back, could reach them. They were beyond the present, outside time, with no memories and no future, ~ Ian McEwan,
1381:There are 80 jobs in which women earn more than men - positions like financial analyst, speech-language pathologist, radiation therapist, library worker, biological technician, motion picture projectionist. ~ Warren Farrell,
1382:There are books that I own that somehow even without reading them they mean something to me. So I think people have a relationship with books in a library whether you’ve come specifically to read them or not. ~ Rem Koolhaas,
1383:These items make up my existence. The library tells my story, the mastodon my mistakes, the ship my discoveries and my abilities to make old things new without magic, and the whale...my limitations, I suppose. ~ Lisa McMann,
1384:You see? I know where every single book used to be in the library.' She pointed to the shelf opposite. 'Over there was Catch-22, which was a hugely popular fishing book and one of a series, I believe. ~ Jasper Fforde,
1385:(about organizing books in his home library, and putting a book in the "Arts and Lit non-fiction section)

I personally find that for domestic purposes, the Trivial Pursuit system works better than Dewey. ~ Nick Hornby,
1386:A public library is the most enduring of memorials, the trustiest monument for the preservation of an event or a name or an affection; for it, and it only, is respected by wars and revolutions, and survives them ~ Mark Twain,
1387:If even rock was interesting, if even this ugliness was worth whole shelves at the library, required sophisticated tools to study, and inspired grown men to crack mountains and saw crystals--then what wasn't? ~ Annie Dillard,
1388:In a rare moment of candor, he had once told her that being in a library was like sitting down at a table laid with all his favorite foods but not being able to eat any of them. And he hated himself for it. ~ Karin Slaughter,
1389:It is also said that history is written by the victors. This was particularly true in the Old Realm, where the official historians at the Library of Avaress had been required for centuries to be named Victor. ~ Robert Kroese,
1390:It was funny how none of her classes in library science has prepared her for this sort of thing, dead bodies, staff under suspicion, crazed reporters. Really, they needed to consider expanding the curriculum. ~ Jenn McKinlay,
1391:Just days after the alleged rape, Florida newspapers were calling for capital punishment of the Groveland Boys. (Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Visual Materials from the NAACP Records) ~ Gilbert King,
1392:On dark days like that one, the library windows looked lit up like an aquarium, the inhabitants on display for all the other kids to see: here the most exotic fish, the lonely, the unloved, the weird. ~ Karen Thompson Walker,
1393:one of the Library’s mottos was borrowed directly from the great military thinker Clausewitz: no strategy ever survived contact with the enemy. Or, in the vernacular, Things Will Go Wrong. Be Prepared. She ~ Genevieve Cogman,
1394:The library is a place of mental diversion, learning, and comfort for anyone who has an intellect. I know of no librarian who when asked for food for the mind will offer a stone. What more could anyone ask? ~ Piers Anthony,
1395:We walked out of this library building downtown, just on our way to lunch, and I was walking a few steps behind Travolta, and when he opened the door, it was as if Jesus had just walked out into the commons. ~ Peter Jacobson,
1396:A public library is the most enduring of memorials, the trustiest monument for the preservation of an event or a name or an affection; for it, and it only, is respected by wars and revolutions, and survives them. ~ Mark Twain,
1397:Damn, I know. I remember your mountains of books. I want to build you a library." Jack lowered his mouth and kissed me.
I swallowed as emotion clogged my throat. He might as well have asked me to marry him. ~ Natasha Boyd,
1398:Empowered and knowledgeable, wild readers know they can walk into any library or bookstore and find something to read. Our students must develop this confidence and capacity to become wild readers themselves. ~ Donalyn Miller,
1399:Even so,” I said levelly, “you wouldn’t shoot me.” “Wouldn’t I?” He raised an eyebrow. “You don’t have a silencer,” I pointed out, “and the sign says to be quiet in the library.” I knew I had him there. ~ Henry Louis Gates Jr,
1400:I picture heaven as a vast library, with unlimited volumes to read. And paintings and statues to examine galore. I picture it as a great doorway to learning...rather than one great dull answer to all our questions ~ Anne Rice,
1401:I went to the library to look up the figures, and I found out that the episode we watched is the highest watched anything of television history, which I find amazing because it felt like just the five of us. ~ Stephen Chbosky,
1402:On dark days like that one, the library windows looked lit up like an aquarium , the inhabitants on display for all the other kids to see: here the most exotic fish, the lonely, the unloved, the weird. ~ Karen Thompson Walker,
1403:A library is not information; it is a means of preserving information. In every case, before memory or information can be stored, someone must decide what must be stored. Someone must choose. Someone must curate. ~ John Scalzi,
1404:Before taking her into the library, my wife told me she was an old friend in a marriage crisis. A fatuous lie; at her age there are no crises left in marriage, only acceptance and extraction. (General Villiers) ~ Robert Ludlum,
1405:Have you ever even been dumped before?” Mac asked. “Yeah. Victoria Hanson.” “You were seventeen then.” “Still. I’ve been dumped and it sucked.” “You got head in the library the next day.” “That’s how I grieve. ~ Lina Andersson,
1406:I don’t understand how the St. Clare’s library can ban so many books for being “inappropriate” when they have a whole row of Bibles. Harry Potter might be a wizard, but I’m sure he never hacked a woman to pieces. ~ Katie Henry,
1407:If you want to become a biologist, it doesn't help to go into the Harvard biology library and all the information is there for you. You have to know what to look for and the internet is the same, just magnified. ~ Noam Chomsky,
1408:I'm old enough, by a long shot, to remember going to the library and spending days researching. If I was looking for a line from a poem or something else I needed, that would be the trip I would have to take. ~ Charlie Kaufman,
1409:In the dark, with the windows lit and the rows of books glittering, the library is a closed space, a universe of self-serving rules that pretend to replace or translate those of the shapeless universe beyond. ~ Alberto Manguel,
1410:Ji-li's deeply moving story should be on the shelf of every person's library. Her courage in the face of adversity and her steadfast loyalty and love for her family are truly inspirational for young and old alike. ~ Nien Cheng,
1411:Library books were, I suddenly realized, promiscuous, ready to lie down in the arms of anyone who asked. Not like bookstore books, which married their purchasers, or were brokered for marriages to others. ~ Elizabeth McCracken,
1412:Our minds and souls contain volumes inscribed by our experiences and emotions; each individual’s consciousness is a collection of memories we’ve cataloged and stored inside us, a private library of a life lived. ~ Susan Orlean,
1413:When we got around to books, I was finally set, as our minister would say, on solid ground. I gorged on books. I sneaked them at night. I rubbed their spines and sniffed in the musty smell of them in the library. ~ Lorene Cary,
1414:His library was a fine dark place bricked with books, so anything could happen there and always did. All you had to do was pull a book from the shelf and open it and suddenly the darkness was not so dark anymore. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1415:I had no money to buy books, so between classes and work, I haunted the library. I even tutored in French with a sliding scale of payment: twenty dollars for an A, fifteen for a B, ten for a C, five for a D. ~ Hubert H Humphrey,
1416:In his library he had been always sure of leisure and tranquility; and though prepared, as he told Elizabeth, to meet with folly and conceit in every other room in the house, he was used to be free from them there ~ Jane Austen,
1417:It looked like the sort of book described in library catalogues as 'slightly foxed', although it would be more honest to admit that it looked as though it had been badgered, wolved and possibly beared as well. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1418:It was at our library that I found Nancy Drew and fell in love with the genre. I've been grateful ever since for those tolerant, book-loving librarians who allowed a child like me to read what I wanted to read. ~ Nancy Pickard,
1419:I was a Scholar and Frontiersman and a Two-fisted He-Person and that I went to the roots of that Sissy Library and made it, within two years, an Institution of Character, a He-Library, of which we were all proud. ~ Susan Orlean,
1420:[Kieran]his head propped on a stack of poetry books he’d brought from the library. Almost all of them had been inscribed on the inside cover by a James Herondale, who had neatly written out his favorite lines. ~ Cassandra Clare,
1421:Now take my hand and hold it tight.
I will not fail you here tonight,
For failing you, I fail myself
And place my soul upon a shelf
In Hell's library without light.
I will not fail you here tonight. ~ Dean Koontz,
1422:NYU Film School was the way to learn about film, to be exposed to film, to go to repertory houses, to be exposed to New York and see films. I would go to the library and see one, two or three movies a day. ~ Alfonso Gomez Rejon,
1423:The librarian isn't a clerk who happens to work in a library. A librarian is a data hound, a guide, a sherpa and a teacher. The librarian is the interface between reams of data and the untrained but motivated user. ~ Seth Godin,
1424:This man could walk into any bar or restaurant or, hell, library, and the women would trample each other to propose. It’s not just his fabulous body, but his face is one that could sit in museums. What in the hell? ~ Ella Goode,
1425:Andrew Carnegie, who is the man who built this free library and thousands more libraries with his own money. A man who gave the gift of books and education to every person, regardless of how much money they had. ~ Marie Benedict,
1426:An empty city was like an empty library or school, it made you feel as if the entire thing was built just for you and gave familiar landmarks an individualism that they usually lacked when surrounded by people. ~ Adrianne Brooks,
1427:At the end of my patient reconstruction, I had before me a kind of lesser library, a symbol of the greater, vanished one: a library made up of fragments, quotations, unfinished sentences, amputated stumps of books. ~ Umberto Eco,
1428:In design-speak, 'a library' means a room lined with books, floor-to ceiling, but it all depends on the space you have. You may have a free-standing bookshelf of your favorite books if that's all you have room for. ~ Nate Berkus,
1429:It's still National Library Week. You should be especially nice to a librarian today, or tomorrow. Sometime this week, anyway. Probably the librarians would like tea. Or chocolates. Or a reliable source of funding. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1430:No library of American business achievement is complete without the story of Arthur G. Gaston. . . . Black Titan is a long overdue contribution to the recording of not just black history, but American history. ~ Earl G Graves Sr,
1431:the Library was a dangerous place because of all the magical books, which was true enough, but what made it really one of the most dangerous places there could ever be was the simple fact that it was a library. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1432:There are many nations that have perfected a particular room. You know, you have the French drawing-room, the Austrian ball room, the German dining room, and I think the library is a room the English get right. ~ Julian Fellowes,
1433:A book is a friend whose face is constantly changing. If you read it when you are recovering from an illness, and return to it years after, it is changed surely, with the chance in yourself. ~ Andrew Lang, The Library, Chapter I.,
1434:A few days earlier, Adriana and I had been browsing books at the local library. I happened to turn around and look at her...and that was it. The man who "loved to laugh" in Mary Poppins had nothing on us. ~ Gina Marinello Sweeney,
1435:He needs no library, for he has not done thinking; no church, for he is himself a prophet; no statute book, for he hath the Lawgiver; no money, for he is value itself; no road, for he is at home where he is. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1436:[His] library was a fine dark place bricked with books, so anything could happen there and always did. All you had to do was pull a book from the shelf and open it and suddenly the darkness was not so dark anymore. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1437:In his library he had been always sure of leisure and tranquillity; and though prepared, as he told Elizabeth, to meet with folly and conceit in every other room of the house, he was used to be free from them there; ~ Jane Austen,
1438:Lully's machine, Mill's fear and Lasswitz's chaotic library can be the subject of jokes, but they exaggerate a propensity which is common: making metaphysics and the arts into a kind of play with combinations. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1439:Philanthropy is lost. The human spirit is suppressed. Most people want a legacy; they want to give something back, a library, a hospital wing, a donation to their church. This is a form of socialism that must go. ~ Lindsey Graham,
1440:What would it be like to live in a library of melted books. With sentences streaming over the floor and all the punctuation settled to the bottom as a residue. It would be confusing. Unforgivable. A great adventure. ~ Anne Carson,
1441:But we're a university! We have to have a library!" said Ridcully. "It adds tone. What sort of people would we be if we didn't go into the library?"

"Students," said Senior Wrangler morosely. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1442:He lived in this dream world more than in the real one. The real world: classroom, courtyard, library, dormitory, and chapel were only the surface, a quivering film over the dream-filled super-real world of images. ~ Hermann Hesse,
1443:I sometimes think heaven is walking out into the sunshine with the day ahead of me and no idea what would happen. I'd probably spend most of it in the library, so I guess it don't matter if the sun shines or not. ~ Clare O Donohue,
1444:I wanted to be a librarian from a very young age. Some of my earliest memories are being taken to the local library. I ended up working as a bookseller. Becoming a writer was the logical offshoot of being a reader. ~ Michael Scott,
1445:There are many horrible sights in the multiverse. Somehow, though, to a soul attuned to the subtle rhythms of a library, there are few worse sights than a hole where a book ought to be. Someone had stolen a book. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1446:Thoze four beople who will reprasent awl of the bibrareans id the creat and heroik Mountain states knaw one thing aboot anything primted in a card cadalog sydtem. Without it, library users would simply be lost. ~ Chris Grabenstein,
1447:Why would a scribe have shackles?"
"In the olden times, they were used to keep dark and evil creatures captive for the MacBain kings. In more recent times, it's for those who can't keep quiet in the library. ~ Angela J Townsend,
1448:Books can accommodate the proximity of computers but it doesn't seem to work the other way around. Computers now literally drive out books from the place that should, by definition, be books' own home: the library. ~ Larry McMurtry,
1449:Books in a large university library system: 2,000,000. Books in an average large city library: 10,000. Average number of books in a chain bookstore: 30,000. Books in an average neighborhood branch library: 20,000. ~ Anthony Burgess,
1450:I do go to hell. Every day. For you." And then he whirled around and stalked out of the library, leaving me trembling and confused, angry and hurt. But I didn't cry. I refused to cry another tear over Kyland Barrett. ~ Mia Sheridan,
1451:I don't have any delusions. I'm not a novelist - I'm a comedian who writes. I love doing the stand-up and the touring and the albums and all that, but it's pretty amazing to go into a library and see your book there. ~ Jim Gaffigan,
1452:I found in general, I got involved in that station toward the end of my freshmen year, and I just loved how there's this incredible library of music that I'd never heard of from all over the world and different genres. ~ Chris Baio,
1453:It's a supernatural library filled with unfinished ghost stories, written by ghosts, where time has no meaning , and the Boogeyman wants to blow it all up. What exactly is it you think I can handle about any of that ? ~ D J MacHale,
1454:Success is deeply rooted in time and place. You may have the drive to read tons of books on biology. But if there are no books on biology in your library, and the library is never open, your drive is meaningless. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
1455:The library was one of the few places approved by my mother. I must have read almost every book in that place, living a thousand lives on paper, traveling around the world in eighty days and through the looking glass. ~ Skye Warren,
1456:This cold winter night, that old wooden-head Buddha would make a nice fire [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, This cold winter night
,
1457:As a child, recognizing my difference from other kids, I went to the local public library to try to better understand my reality. Back then, many library card catalogues didn't even list 'homosexuality' as a topic. ~ James McGreevey,
1458:I want a place you hardly dare to even whisper. I want the bravery to not only read, but to do. I want a man, not a library boy. A man who is tall and witty and knows more about the world than you would ever dare dream. ~ Elise Kova,
1459:The colonists had no library at their disposal; but the engineer was a book which was always at hand, always open at the page which one wanted, a book which answered all their questions, and which they often consulted. ~ Jules Verne,
1460:And the smell of the library was always the same - the musty odour of old clothes mixed with the keener scent of unwashed bodies, creating what the chief librarian had once described as 'the steam of the social soup.' ~ Peter Ackroyd,
1461:He was giving her the most important thing he could, the only way he knew how. He was a professor, a lover of stories, and he was building her a library in the same way other men might build their daughters houses. ~ Jennifer E Smith,
1462:If the Library of Alexandria was the emblem of our ambition of omniscience, the Web is the emblem of our ambition of omnipresence; the library that contained everything has become the library that contains anything. ~ Alberto Manguel,
1463:I love to read, but I didn't know how I could keep up with my eyes, ... But I remembered that the library had books on tape, so I started listening to them. You wouldn't believe how much they have brought to my life. ~ Dorothy Bryant,
1464:It was from a very young age that I fell in love with this wonderful artifact--the turn of the first page is almost like a sacred ritual to me. Whenever I walk into a library, it is never without some degree of reverence. ~ Lang Leav,
1465:She turned her head to him then. Her face was as cool as the sea off Cornwall, yet her eyes blazed purple fire. "No, thank you, my Lord", she said bitingly. "I find I no longer care for your library, or anything in it. ~ Heather Snow,
1466:‎"Since I could only take six books per visit from the library, I had to time it right, or I'd be stuck on Sundays rereading the five Reader's Digest Condensed Books sitting on our red laquered living room shelf. ~ Randy Susan Meyers,
1467:The Internet is where we all go to for the first stop of information. It's not the library any more, it's the Internet and if I want to find out about Kate Russell, what do I do? I Google Kate Russell. Simple as that. ~ Theo Paphitis,
1468:The public library building, in my view, is just a little lower than the church, the cathedral, the temple, the synagogue and the mosque. Within those walls and along those stacks, I have found security and assurance. ~ Maya Angelou,
1469:There are many horrible sights in the multiverse. Somehow, though, to a soul attuned to the subtle rhythms of a library, there are few worse sights than a hole where a book ought to be.
Someone had stolen a book. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1470:There was magic, and there was magic. Thanks to Gutenberg, I could no longer pull wands, potions, and light sabers out of books, but when it came to research, give me a well-stocked library and I was a goddamned Merlin. ~ Jim C Hines,
1471:Your brain, Peekay, has two functions; it is a place for original thought, but also it is a reference library. Use it to tell you where to look, and then you will have for yourself all the brains that have ever been ~ Bryce Courtenay,
1472:Boys and girls hid in the library stacks or behind the gym and flew at each other with no promise of love or even kindness, tasting one another in clumsly attempts to steal pleasure before they could be hurt or hated. ~ Laura Whitcomb,
1473:He said, "How can the inconsequence of your life not shame you?"
He said, "How do you not feel empty?"
I do, she thought as she pushed through the library doors and let them thud behind her. I do.” ~ Marie Rutkoski,
1474:I nod, and taking my tea, I head into the library. It’s my refuge. I dig my BlackBerry out of my purse and contemplate calling Christian. I know it’s a shock for him—but he really did overreact. When does he not overreact? ~ E L James,
1475:I've never liked the idea of just having an office in a college somewhere and teaching classes and going to the library and doing research all day. I've never wanted that. The glamorous life is the life that appeals to me. ~ Ben Stein,
1476:Would an Evil Overlord drink the last cup of coffee in the pot? Which book would an Evil Overlord take out from the library? Was dressing in all black a definite Evil Overlord move, or a legitimate choice on laundry day? ~ Holly Black,
1477:A great library is anything and everything. It is not for its current custodians to judge what the future will find to be of importance, and it is this eclecticism that gives it the mystique, that is the wonder of it. ~ Penelope Lively,
1478:If you need to know history, the real story of those before you, then you should go to the library and read newspaper clippings of someone like Muhammad Ali every day, then it might giver you some understanding of the man. ~ Alex Haley,
1479:In this same library we saw some drawings by Michael Angelo (these Italians call him Mickel Angelo,) and Leonardo da Vinci. (They spell it Vinci and pronounce it Vinchy; foreigners always spell better than they pronounce.) ~ Mark Twain,
1480:It's important to clarify that a library is not necessarily made up of books that we've read, or even that we will eventually read. They should be books that we can read. Or that we may read. Even if we never do. ~ Jean Claude Carri re,
1481:Resa longed for the kitchen, always full of the humming of the oversize fridge, for mo's workshop in the garden, and the armchair in the library where you could sit and visit strange worlds without getting lost in them ~ Cornelia Funke,
1482:The idea of education has been so tied to schools, universities, and professors that many assume there is no other way, but education is available to anyone within reach of a library, a post office, or even a newsstand. ~ Louis L Amour,
1483:The library is a prerequisite to let citizens make use of their right to information and freedom of speech. Free access to information is necessary in a democratic society, for open debate and creation of public opinion. ~ Susan Orlean,
1484:The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., contains about seven thousand works on Shakespeare—twenty years’ worth of reading if read at the rate of one a day—and, as this volume slimly attests, the number keeps growing. ~ Bill Bryson,
1485:The search for truth takes us to dangerous places,” said Old Woman Josie. “Often it takes us to that most dangerous place: the library. You know who said that? No? George Washington did. Minutes before librarians ate him. ~ Joseph Fink,
1486:The shelves of books we haven't written, like those of books we haven't read, stretches out into the darkness of the universal library's farthest space. We are always at the beginning of the beginning of the letter A. ~ Alberto Manguel,
1487:God bless ladies with costly, tasteful clothes and touching, dirty fingernails that champion gifted, foreign poets and decorate the library in beautiful, melancholy fashion! My God, this universe is nothing to snicker at! ~ J D Salinger,
1488:In a library in Missouri that was covered with vines
Lived thousands of books in a hundred straight lines
A boy came in at half past nine
Every Saturday, rain or shine
His book selections were clan-des-tine. ~ Rebecca Makkai,
1489:In my work a good library is essential. It enables me to learn the background and previous discussions of the various issues I am called upon to decide. It provides the stability and continuity for the rule of law. ~ Sandra Day O Connor,
1490:Library? That sounded reasonable. As my thoughts revolved around my days surrounded by books, something miraculous happened. My anger subsided. It ebbed away as the thoughts of books, pages, and comfort entered my head. ~ Rebecca Maizel,
1491:The library drew Bean down the street, as it had drawn all of us over the years. Our parents had trained us to become readers, and the town’s library had been the one place, other than church, that we visited every week. ~ Eleanor Brown,
1492:There was nothing so dangerous to a king or an emperor as a book. Yes, a great library—a library as magnificent as this one—was a dangerous arsenal, one that kings and emperors feared more than the greatest army or magazine. ~ Ross King,
1493:thought the Library was a dangerous place because of all the magical books, which was true enough, but what made it really one of the most dangerous places there could ever be was the simple fact that it was a library. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1494:You can't stay in the library all day!" I hiss, sitting next to him.
"This is a school. Studying is encouraged."
"What exactly are you studying?"
He folds the paper and gives me his cat grin. "History students. ~ Kiersten White,
1495:Finally, eternal gratitude to all the (100 percent non-evil) librarians and other library staffers I have known and worked with and been helped and inspired by over the years. I don’t know where I would be without you! ~ Michelle Knudsen,
1496:The Romans' contribution to science was mostly limited to butchering antiquity's greatest mathematician, burning the Library of Alexandria, and slowly stifling the sciences that flourished in the colonies of their Empire. ~ Petr Beckmann,
1497:We are digital archives of the African Pliocene, even of Devonian seas; walking repositories of wisdom out of the old days. You could spend a lifetime reading in this ancient library and die unsated by the wonder of it. ~ Richard Dawkins,
1498:A library book lasts as long as a house, for hundreds of years. It is not an article for mere consumption, but fairly of capital, and often in the case of professional men, setting out in life, it is their only capital. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1499:Irene sighed. "...But I do believe the Library wants an answer to what`s happened. Why else would they call you inn?"
" An answer, certainly," Vale agreed. " But the truth? That mighted be a very dangerous commodity. ~ Genevieve Cogman,
1500:I saw my ex-husband in the street. I was sitting on the steps of the new library.
Hello, my life, I said. We had once been married for twenty-seven years, so I felt justified.
He said, What? What life? No life of mine. ~ Grace Paley,

IN CHAPTERS [171/171]



   44 Fiction
   41 Integral Yoga
   29 Poetry
   11 Philosophy
   9 Occultism
   8 Christianity
   7 Psychology
   5 Yoga
   4 Mythology
   2 Education
   1 Mysticism
   1 Alchemy


   33 H P Lovecraft
   25 The Mother
   17 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   14 Satprem
   14 Jorge Luis Borges
   11 Percy Bysshe Shelley
   6 Walt Whitman
   4 Yosa Buson
   4 Sri Ramakrishna
   4 Sri Aurobindo
   4 Plotinus
   4 Joseph Campbell
   4 Carl Jung
   4 Aleister Crowley
   3 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   2 Swami Krishnananda
   2 Plato
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Aldous Huxley


   33 Lovecraft - Poems
   11 Shelley - Poems
   11 Labyrinths
   7 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05
   6 Whitman - Poems
   4 The Secret Doctrine
   4 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   4 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   4 Agenda Vol 03
   3 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   3 City of God
   3 Borges - Poems
   3 Agenda Vol 10
   2 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   2 The Perennial Philosophy
   2 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious
   2 Selected Fictions
   2 Questions And Answers 1956
   2 Questions And Answers 1954
   2 Questions And Answers 1953
   2 On Education
   2 Magick Without Tears
   2 Liber ABA
   2 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   2 Aion
   2 Agenda Vol 01


0.00 - INTRODUCTION, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
   Mahimacharan and Pratap Hazra were two devotees outstanding for their pretentiousness and idiosyncrasies. But the Master showed them his unfailing love and kindness, though he was aware of their shortcomings. Mahimacharan Chakravarty had met the Master long before the arrival of the other disciples. He had had the intention of leading a spiritual life, but a strong desire to acquire name and fame was his weakness. He claimed to have been initiated by Totapuri and used to say that he had been following the path of knowledge according to his guru's instructions. He possessed a large Library of English and Sanskrit books. But though he pretended to have read them, most of the leaves were uncut. The Master knew all his limitations, yet enjoyed listening to him recite from the Vedas and other scriptures. He would always exhort Mahima to meditate on the meaning of the scriptural texts and to practise spiritual discipline.
   Pratap Hazra, a middle-aged man, hailed from a village near Kamarpukur. He was not altogether unresponsive to religious feelings. On a moment's impulse he had left his home, aged mother, wife, and children, and had found shelter in the temple garden at Dakshineswar, where he intended to lead a spiritual life. He loved to argue, and the Master often pointed him out as an example of barren argumentation. He was hypercritical of others and cherished an exaggerated notion of his own spiritual advancement. He was mischievous and often tried to upset the minds of the Master's young disciples, criticizing them for their happy and joyous life and asking them to devote their time to meditation. The Master teasingly compared Hazra to Jatila and Kutila, the two women who always created obstructions in Krishna's sport with the gopis, and said that Hazra lived at Dakshineswar to "thicken the plot" by adding complications.

0.01 - Letters from the Mother to Her Son, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  a Library and reading-room containing several thousand volumes, a photographic service, general stores containing a wide
  variety of goods, nearly all imported from France, large gardens

0 1960-10-22, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   There was a considerable Library in the studio; one whole end was given over to the Librarymore than two thousand books belonging to my brother. There were even the complete works of several classical writers. And I had my entire collection of the Revue Cosmique, and my post card collection (it was down below)mainly post cards of Algeria, Tlemcen, nearly 200 of them. But there were five years of the Revue Cosmique. And written in such a French! How funny it was!
   Theons wife dictated it in English while she was in trance. Another English lady who was there claimed to know French like a Frenchman. Myself, I never use a dictionary, she would say, I dont need a dictionary. But then she would turn out such translations! She made all the classic mistakes of English words that mustnt be translated like that. Then it was sent to me in Paris for correcting. It was literally impossible.

0 1960-12-31, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   On the 6th, everyone will finally be gone. But tomorrow is going to be dreadful; I have to sit there for at least two hours distributing calendars. And on top of that, there are all these controversies over the music they play at the Library each week. Some say that its very good, others that its very bad (the usual things). And each party has pleaded his case. They told me that theyll give me a concert at Prosperity4 so that I may judge for myself. Its all recorded. Im afraid it will be rather noisy For myself, I know quite well how to get out of it I think of something else! But its going to I can see it already. Didnt I tell you were in a chaos? Well, I have the feeling that this is going to beat all.
   How do you mean a chaos?

0 1961-04-12, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Because later on he would go roaming about; he had become terribly strong and would prowl around everywhere. At that time I was living in the Library house, and he would go off as far as the Ashram street (the Ashram didnt belong to us yet, the house was owned by all kinds of people), but when I would go out on the terrace across from Champaklals kitchen and call, Big boy! Big Boy! although he couldnt hear it, he could sense it, and he would come back galloping, galloping. He always came back, unfailingly. The day he didnt come back, I got worried; the servant went looking for himand found him moaning, vomiting, poisoned. He brought him to me. Oh, really! it was. He was so nice! He wasnt a thief or anythinghe was a wonderful cat. Someone had laid out poison for god knows what cat, and he ate it. I showed him to Sri Aurobindo and said, He has been killed.
   Before that, I lost another one from that kind of typhoid cats get. He was called Browny and he was so beautiful, so nice, such a marvelous cat! Even when utterly sick, he wouldnt make a mess, except in a corner prepared just for that; he would call me to carry him to his box, with such a soft and mournful voice. He was so nice, with something sweeter and more trusting than a child. There is a trust in animals which doesnt exist in humans (even children already have too much of a questioning mind). But with him, there was a kind of worship, an adoration, as soon as I took him in my armsif he could have smiled, he would have. As soon as I held him, he became blissful.

0 1962-02-17, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   All sorts of things. But quite often we are looking for things related to expression sometimes images, sometimes sentences, sometimes. I have told you I frequently meet you in a kind of Library without books. Its very interesting. It is open on top, below too, and no walls; it is extremely spacious, certainly almost as vast as the earth. And there are pigeonholes that seem to hang in the air, with all kinds of things filed in them. We are often sorting through these pigeonholes to find certain txtsideas, I mean. Ideas, explanations, sometimes memories, all kinds of things. This world is mental but very luminous and clear; full of clarity, perfectly ordered, without confusion, and all open. Wide open.
   I frequently find you there.

0 1962-03-13, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   So I greatly appreciate beautiful written form. I love it. There were periods in my life when I read ever so much I am quite a Library! But its not my job.
   Of course not! You didnt come for that.

0 1962-05-29, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Library House, where Sri Aurobindo and Mother lived for several years (from 1922 to February 1927).
   ***

0 1962-07-07, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   No, thats where you have to give in. You have to put all this trying to make them understand out of the picture. If you want to include those things for your personal satisfaction, because it makes the thing more real, more living, I agree; but get rid of this trying to make them understand, its impossible. I tell you, as soon as you go beyond the matter-of-fact (Mother sticks her hand right under her nose), theyre lost. But tell them what they can see when they get off the train: All these houses, thats the Ashram; here is the Library, those are the tennis courts, theres the sports ground, thats. Ah! They understand.
   Its going well; it will be a very good book. But probably only a small portion of it will make them say, Ah, finally! Something practical!

0 1964-10-14, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I remember, once, they held an exhibition on Germany at the Library. They put up a long quotation from Sri Aurobindo in which he said, Here is what the Germans THINK OF THEMSELVES and there followed a whole quotationoh, what a quotation! Anyway, they are the race of the future, of geniuses, they will save the world and so on. But they put up the whole thing without the first sentence! So I arrive there (at the time, I could see clearly), and what do I see! I remembered what Sri Aurobindo had written, Here is what the Germans THINK OF THEMSELVES, SO I told them, But you forgot the most important thing, you must add this. You should have seen their faces, mon petit!
   Its this dishonesty thats frightening they cut out and remove all that bothers them and leave only what suits them.

0 1965-06-23, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Then in the north (thats where there is the most space, naturally), in the direction of Madras: the cultural zone. There, an auditorium (the auditorium I have dreamed of doing for a long time: plans had already been made), an auditorium with a concert hall and grand organ, the best you find now (it seems they make wonderful things). I want a grand organ. There will also be a theater stage with wings (a revolving stage and so on, the very best you can find). So, here, a magnificent auditorium. There will be a Library, there will be a museum, exhibition rooms (not in the auditorium: in addition to it), there will be a cinema studio, a cinema school; there will be a gliding club: already we almost have the governments authorization and promiseanyway its already at a very advanced stage. Then, towards Madras, where there is plenty of space, a stadium. And a stadium that we want to be the most modern and the most perfect possible, with the idea (an idea Ive had for a long time) that twelve years (the Olympic games take place every four years), twelve years after 1968 (in 1968, the Olympiad will be held in Mexico), twelve years after, we would have the Olympic games in India, here. So we need space.
   In between these sections, there are intermediary zones, four intermediary zones: one for public services (the post, etc.), a zone for transportation (railway station and, if possible, an airfield), a zone for food supplies (that one would be towards the Lake and would include dairies, poultry farms, orchards, cultivation, etc.it would spread to incorporate the Lake estate3: what they wanted to do separately will be done as a part of Auroville); then a fourth zone (Ive said public services, transportation, food supplies), and the fourth zone: shops. We dont need many shops, but a few are necessary to get what we dont produce. These zones are like quarters, you see.

0 1967-04-05, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   (Mothers answer in English to the School teachers when she was told that the new special afternoon classes at the Library had chosen as a first research theme Indias Spiritual History.)
   No! It wont do. It is not to be done that way. You should begin with a big BANG!

0 1968-09-28, #Agenda Vol 09, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Oh yes, that has a meaning! We could tell them: If thats what you mean, its precisely the goal of physical education. And teaching is an attempt to replace the Consciousness with (laughing) an inner Library! If I joke too much, they wont understand anymore!
   We can tell them this: The way to really awaken the physical consciousness is physical education. Its physical education that teaches the cells to be conscious. But to develop the brain, its study, observation, intelligent educationespecially observation and reasoning. And naturally, for the whole education of the consciousness from the standpoint of character, its yoga.

0 1969-03-12, #Agenda Vol 10, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I suppose it goes to the Library, I dont know. Or give it back to him?
   He said it was for you. I dont know You have enough clutter around you as it is!

0 1969-04-30, #Agenda Vol 10, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   It has an answer for everything, all the time. Now its become quite active. I got a letter from Y. describing the activities of all those young people who have come for Auroville (they have a place of their own now, its the office of =1, somewhere at the back or in front of the Library). They have an apartment where they do all kinds of things, including improvised dances; Y. wrote about that (with much praise, besides), and she asked, But the important thing is to know what Sri Aurobindo and you too think about it? (Mother smiles ironically) Then this Consciousness (laughing) made me answer her, Just see to it that it doesnt degenerate. And it added (I dont remember exactly because it wasnt I who wrote), See that it remains I forget the words. But mon petit, the irony of it was priceless! And I sent it to her.
   Constantly, constantly it says or answers something. It obliges me to write: Answer this. Say this. It has taken the place of the mind, you understand.

0 1969-07-23, #Agenda Vol 10, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Numerous texts were nevertheless censored in the so-called "complete" edition of Sri Aurobindo's works (the "Centenary Library"), in particular letters about the Ashram. As an illustration, we publish in addendum two of those censored letters, to make the intention plain.
   Emphasis is ours.

07.06 - Record of World-History, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   It is a very curious place, something like a vast Library. It consists of an infinite number of cells, as it were, each containing all information on a particular subject. They seem to be squares in shape and they remain closed normally. If you have to consult a particular square, you press a button and it opens and out of it comes a roll of written matter. You unroll it and find out what you want. There are millions and millions and millions of these cells and rolls, around, above, every-where. Fortunately in the mental world you can move any-where as you like, you do not require lifts and ladders to go up.
   The point, however, is how to go there at all. Well, the first thing is that you must completely silence your mind. Mental cogitations, agitations you must leave behind, no thoughts must enter your consciousness, it must be tranquil and still, like a tram parent sheet of water or smooth and polished like a mirror. The description I have given of a Library is only an image, the real thing is something different. However, you have in this way some idea to go upon. In the silent mind you form a point of consciousness and send it out as an emissary to gather the required information. This point of consciousness must be absolutely detached and free to go as it likes; for if it were in any way kept tied to the normal movements of your own mind, then you will not go further than what is in your head. You must be able to make your brain a blank, you must have no preconceived notion, no idea that the solution of your problem might lie in this way or that. As I say, your mind has to be a thoroughly blank page, a clean slate, with nothing written on it, no mark even. There should' be instead a sincere aspiration to know the truth, without postulating beforeh and what kind of truth it might be; other-wise you will meet your own formation in the brain.
   You can certainly test and correct the information you get from your inner voyage by outside information, what others have found or what are recorded in books. The inner know-ledge need not and should not replace the outer knowledge, but supplement it, both should support and complete each other. But there is a mixture about which you must be very careful. Your silent mind, your inner consciousness receives the necessary knowledge, but as you want to express it or translate in normal terms, that is to say, as your brain gets active again, it may and often does supply its own materials and formations and the original knowledge gets disturbed and distorted. Sometimes what you may do is to dictate most passively the things you see or perceive and let another take down in writing as you proceed. You must say exactly as you see and the other take down exactly as he hears.

08.02 - Order and Discipline, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Hence, to know a man's character you need not spend your time in talking to him, you just go and open a drawer of his or open his almirah, you will know. But I may speak of someone I shall tell you presently who it iswho used to live in the midst of heaps of books and papers. You enter into his room, you find piles of them everywhere. But if by chance, you were, to your misfortune, to displace a single sheet of paper, he would know perfectly well and would ask immediately who was it that had disturbed the papers. There were masses of things, on your entering you would not find your way. But each thing had its placenotes, letters, books, all in order and you could not mishandle them without his knowing it. Well, it was Sri Aurobindo. In other words, you must not confuse orderliness with poverty. Naturally if you have a few thingsa dozen books and a limited number of objectsit is easier to have them properly arranged. But what is to be aimed at is a logical order, a conscious intelligent order among a multiplicity of objects. That requires a capacity for organisation. It is a capacity which every one must acquire and possess, unless of course you are physically disabledwhen one is ill or sickly or maimed and has not the required strength: even then there is a limit. I know of sick people who could tell you: "Open me that drawer, you will find on the right or on the left or at the bottom such and such a thing." They could not themselves move and handle the things but knew where they were. Apart from such cases, the ideal must be one of order, organisation, like that of a Library for example, where you have thousands and thousands of books that are yet all arranged, classified, docketed and you have only to name a title and in a few minutes the book is in your hand of course, it is not the work of a single person; even then, the pattern is there as an example to follow.
   You too must organise your affairs in the same way. You need not follow another's method or system. You have your own rule, that which is convenient and true for you but it must be well planned and properly laid out.

1.01 - Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  Queen of Atlantis has an excellent Library that even contains a
  lost book of Plato. Helen of Troy, in her reincarnation, is

1.02 - The Refusal of the Call, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  Loeb Classical Library).
  This is indeed a dull and unrewarding finish. Apollo, the sun, the lord of time and ripeness, no longer pressed his frightening suit, but instead, simply named the laurel his favorite tree and ironically recommended its leaves to the fashioners of victory wreaths. The girl had retreated to the image of her parent and there found protectionlike the unsuccessful husb and whose dream of mother love preserved him from the state of cleaving to a wife.

10.37 - The Golden Bridge, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Collected Poems [Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library, vol. 5, p. 134] (https://incarnateword.in/cwsa/02/the-golden-light#p1-p4)
   ***

1.03 - Reading, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  My residence was more favorable, not only to thought, but to serious reading, than a university; and though I was beyond the range of the ordinary circulating Library, I had more than ever come within the influence of those books which circulate round the world, whose sentences were first written on bark, and are now merely copied from time to time on to linen paper. Says the poet Mr Camar Uddn Mast,
  Being seated to run through the region of the spiritual world; I have had this advantage in books. To be intoxicated by a single glass of wine; I have experienced this pleasure when I have drunk the liquor of the esoteric doctrines. I kept Homers Iliad on my table through the summer, though I looked at his page only now and then. Incessant labor with my hands, at first, for I had my house to finish and my beans to hoe at the same time, made more study impossible. Yet I sustained myself by the prospect of such reading in future. I read one or two shallow books of travel in the intervals of my work, till that employment made me ashamed of myself, and I asked where it was then that _I_ lived.
  --
  I think that having learned our letters we should read the best that is in literature, and not be forever repeating our a b abs, and words of one syllable, in the fourth or fifth classes, sitting on the lowest and foremost form all our lives. Most men are satisfied if they read or hear read, and perchance have been convicted by the wisdom of one good book, the Bible, and for the rest of their lives vegetate and dissipate their faculties in what is called easy reading. There is a work in several volumes in our Circulating Library entitled Little Reading, which I thought referred to a town of that name which I had not been to. There are those who, like cormorants and ostriches, can digest all sorts of this, even after the fullest dinner of meats and vegetables, for they suffer nothing to be wasted. If others are the machines to provide this provender, they are the machines to read it. They read the nine thousandth tale about Zebulon and Sephronia, and how they loved as none had ever loved before, and neither did the course of their true love run smooth,at any rate, how it did run and stumble, and get up again and go on! how some poor unfortunate got up on to a steeple, who had better never have gone up as far as the belfry; and then, having needlessly got him up there, the happy novelist rings the bell for all the world to come together and hear, O dear! how he did get down again!
  For my part, I think that they had better metamorphose all such aspiring heroes of universal noveldom into man weathercocks, as they used to put heroes among the constellations, and let them swing round there till they are rusty, and not come down at all to bother honest men with their pranks. The next time the novelist rings the bell I will not stir though the meeting-house burn down. The Skip of the
  --
  We boast that we belong to the nineteenth century and are making the most rapid strides of any nation. But consider how little this village does for its own culture. I do not wish to flatter my townsmen, nor to be flattered by them, for that will not advance either of us. We need to be provoked,goaded like oxen, as we are, into a trot. We have a comparatively decent system of common schools, schools for infants only; but excepting the half-starved Lyceum in the winter, and latterly the puny beginning of a Library suggested by the state, no school for ourselves. We spend more on almost any article of bodily aliment or ailment than on our mental aliment. It is time that we had uncommon schools, that we did not leave off our education when we begin to be men and women. It is time that villages were universities, and their elder inhabitants the fellows of universities, with leisureif they are indeed so well offto pursue liberal studies the rest of their lives.
  Shall the world be confined to one Paris or one Oxford forever? Cannot students be boarded here and get a liberal education under the skies of
  --
  Redding & Co. to select our reading? As the nobleman of cultivated taste surrounds himself with whatever conduces to his culture,geniuslearningwitbookspaintingsstatuarymusic philosophical instruments, and the like; so let the village do,not stop short at a pedagogue, a parson, a sexton, a parish Library, and three selectmen, because our pilgrim forefa thers got through a cold winter once on a bleak rock with these. To act collectively is according to the spirit of our institutions; and I am confident that, as our circumstances are more flourishing, our means are greater than the noblemans. New England can hire all the wise men in the world to come and teach her, and board them round the while, and not be provincial at all. That is the _uncommon_ school we want. Instead of noblemen, let us have noble villages of men. If it is necessary, omit one bridge over the river, go round a little there, and throw one arch at least over the darker gulf of ignorance which surrounds us.

1.04 - GOD IN THE WORLD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  St. Bernard speaks in what seems a similar strain. What I know of the divine sciences and Holy Scripture, I learnt in woods and fields. I have had no other masters than the beeches and the oaks. And in another of his letters he says: Listen to a man of experience: thou wilt learn more in the woods than in books. Trees and stones will teach thee more than thou canst acquire from the mouth of a magister. The phrases are similar; but their inner significance is very different. In Augustines language, God alone is to be enjoyed; creatures are not to be enjoyed but usedused with love and compassion and a wondering, detached appreciation, as means to the knowledge of that which may be enjoyed. Wordsworth, like almost all other literary Nature-worshippers, preaches the enjoyment of creatures rather than their use for the attainment of spiritual endsa use which, as we shall see, entails much self-discipline for the user. For Bernard it goes without saying that his correspondents are actively practising this self-discipline and that Nature, though loved and heeded as a teacher, is only being used as a means to God, not enjoyed as though she were God. The beauty of flowers and landscape is not merely to be relished as one wanders lonely as a cloud about the countryside, is not merely to be pleasurably remembered when one is lying in vacant or in pensive mood on the sofa in the Library, after tea. The reaction must be a little more strenuous and purposeful. Here, my brothers, says an ancient Buddhist author, are the roots of trees, here are empty places; meditate. The truth is, of course, that the world is only for those who have deserved it; for, in Philos words, even though a man may be incapable of making himself worthy of the creator of the cosmos, yet he ought to try to make himself worthy of the cosmos. He ought to transform himself from being a man into the nature of the cosmos and become, if one may say so, a little cosmos. For those who have not deserved the world, either by making themselves worthy of its creator (that is to say, by non-attachment and a total self-naughting), or, less arduously, by making themselves worthy of the cosmos (by bringing order and a measure of unity to the manifold confusion of undisciplined human personality), the world is, spiritually speaking, a very dangerous place.
  That Nirvana and Samsara are one is a fact about the nature of the universe; but it is a fact which cannot be fully realized or directly experienced, except by souls far advanced in spirituality. For ordinary, nice, unregenerate people to accept this truth by hearsay, and to act upon it in practice, is merely to court disaster. All the dismal story of antinomianism is there to warn us of what happens when men and women make practical applications of a merely intellectual and unrealized theory that all is God and God is all. And hardly less depressing than the spectacle of antinomianism is that of the earnestly respectable well-rounded life of good citizens who do their best to live sacramentally, but dont in fact have any direct acquaintance with that for which the sacramental activity really stands. Dr. Oman, in his The Natural and the Supernatural, writes at length on the theme that reconciliation to the evanescent is revelation of the eternal; and in a recent volume, Science, Religion and the Future, Canon Raven applauds Dr. Oman for having stated the principles of a theology, in which there could be no ultimate antithesis between nature and grace, science and religion, in which, indeed, the worlds of the scientist and the theologian are seen to be one and the same. All this is in full accord with Taoism and Zen Buddhism and with such Christian teachings as St. Augustines Ama et fac quod vis and Father Lallemants advice to theocentric contemplatives to go out and act in the world, since their actions are the only ones capable of doing any real good to the world. But what neither Dr. Oman nor Canon Raven makes sufficiently clear is that nature and grace, Samsara and Nirvana, perpetual perishing and eternity, are really and experientially one only to persons who have fulfilled certain conditions. Fac quod vis in the temporal world but only when you have learnt the infinitely difficult art of loving God with all your mind and heart and your neighbor as yourself. If you havent learnt this lesson, you will either be an antinomian eccentric or criminal or else a respectable well-rounded-lifer, who has left himself no time to understand either nature or grace. The Gospels are perfectly clear about the process by which, and by which alone, a man may gain the right to live in the world as though he were at home in it: he must make a total denial of selfhood, submit to a complete and absolute mortification. At one period of his career, Jesus himself seems to have undertaken austerities, not merely of the mind, but of the body. There is the record of his forty days fast and his statement, evidently drawn from personal experience, that some demons cannot be cast out except by those who have fasted much as well as prayed. (The Cur dArs, whose knowledge of miracles and corporal penance was based on personal experience, insists on the close correlation between severe bodily austerities and the power to get petitionary prayer answered in ways that are sometimes supernormal.) The Pharisees reproached Jesus because he came eating and drinking, and associated with publicans and sinners; they ignored, or were unaware of, the fact that this apparently worldly prophet had at one time rivalled the physical austerities of John the Baptist and was practising the spiritual mortifications which he consistently preached. The pattern of Jesus life is essentially similar to that of the ideal sage, whose career is traced in the Oxherding Pictures, so popular among Zen Buddhists. The wild ox, symbolizing the unregenerate self, is caught, made to change its direction, then tamed and gradually transformed from black to white. Regeneration goes so far that for a time the ox is completely lost, so that nothing remains to be pictured but the full-orbed moon, symbolizing Mind, Suchness, the Ground. But this is not the final stage. In the end, the herdsman comes back to the world of men, riding on the back of his ox. Because he now loves, loves to the extent of being identified with the divine object of his love, he can do what he likes; for what he likes is what the Nature of Things likes. He is found in company with wine-bibbers and butchers; he and they are all converted into Buddhas. For him, there is complete reconciliation to the evanescent and, through that reconciliation, revelation of the eternal. But for nice ordinary unregenerate people the only reconciliation to the evanescent is that of indulged passions, of distractions submitted to and enjoyed. To tell such persons that evanescence and eternity are the same, and not immediately to qualify the statement, is positively fatalfor, in practice, they are not the same except to the saint; and there is no record that anybody ever came to sanctity, who did not, at the outset of his or her career, behave as if evanescence and eternity, nature and grace, were profoundly different and in many respects incompatible. As always, the path of spirituality is a knife-edge between abysses. On one side is the danger of mere rejection and escape, on the other the danger of mere acceptance and the enjoyment of things which should only be used as instruments or symbols. The versified caption which accompanies the last of the Oxherding Pictures runs as follows.

1.04 - The Core of the Teaching, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   very roots. And if that is what the Gita has to say on a most poignant moral and spiritual problem, we must put it out of the list of the world's Scriptures and thrust it, if anywhere, then into our Library of political science and ethical casuistry.
  Undoubtedly, the Gita does, like the Upanishads, teach the equality which rises above sin and virtue, beyond good and evil, but only as a part of the Brahmic consciousness and for the man who is on the path and advanced enough to fulfil the supreme rule. It does not preach indifference to good and evil for the ordinary life of man, where such a doctrine would have the most pernicious consequences. On the contrary it affirms that the doers of evil shall not attain to God. Therefore if Arjuna simply seeks to fulfil in the best way the ordinary law of man's life, disinterested performance of what he feels to be a sin, a thing of Hell, will not help him, even though that sin be his duty as a soldier. He must refrain from what his conscience abhors though a thousand duties were shattered to pieces.

1.053 - A Very Important Sadhana, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  All meditation is freedom from distraction by directing the energy in one specified manner, and it is also freedom from every other motive, purpose or incentive. Since the senses are accustomed to contemplation on objects and will not so easily yield to this advice, another suggestion is given namely, a daily practice of sacred study, or svadhyaya. If you cannot do japa or meditation, or cannot concentrate the mind in any way, then take to study not of any book at random from the Library, but of a specific sacred text which is supposed to be a moksha shastra, the study of which will generate aspiration in the mind towards the liberation of the soul.
  A daily recitation with the understanding of the meaning of such hymns as the Purusha Sukta from the Veda, for instance, is a great svadhyaya, as Vachaspati Mishra, the commentator on the Yoga Sutras, mentions. Also, the Satarudriya which we chant daily in the temple without perhaps knowing its meaning is a great meditation if it is properly understood and recited with a proper devout attitude of mind. Vachaspati Mishra specifically refers to two great hymns of the Veda the Purusha Sukta and the Satarudriya which he says are highly purifying, not only from the point of view of their being conducive to meditation or concentration of mind, but also in other purifying processes which will take place in the body and the whole system due to the chanting of these mantras. These Veda mantras are immense potencies, like atom bombs, and to handle them and to energise the system with their forces is a spiritual practice by itself. This is one suggestion.

1.05 - THE HOSTILE BROTHERS - ARCHETYPES OF RESPONSE TO THE UNKNOWN, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  Dee, J. (1993). Diary of Doctor John Dee: Together with a catalogue of his Library of manuscripts. New
  York: Holmes.
  --
  Grosset and Dunlap, Companion Library.
  Luria, A.R. (1980). Higher cortical functions in man. New York: Basic Books.
  --
  Milton, J. (1961). Paradise lost (and other poems). New York: New American Library.
  Morley, J. (1923). Rousseau and his era: Vol. 1. New York: Harper and Brothers.
  --
  Modern Library.
  Oatley, K. (1994). A taxonomy of the emotions of literary response and a theory of identification in
  --
  Robinson, J.R. (Ed.). (1988). The Nag Hammadi Library in English. New York: Harper Collins.
  Romme, M.A. & Escher, A.D. (1989). Hearing voices. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 15, 209-216.

1.075 - Self-Control, Study and Devotion to God, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  The svadhyaya that is referred to here is not reading in a Library. It is not going to the Library and reading any book that is there on the shelf. It is a holy resort to a concentrated form of study of a chosen scripture. It may be even two or three texts it does not matter which will become the object of ones daily concentration and meditation, because what is known as svadhyaya,or Self-study, or holy study, or sacred study is a form of meditation itself in a little diffused form.
  The scriptures are supposed to contain all the knowledge that is necessary for the realisation of the Self. It is a spiritual text that we are supposed to study, which is meant by the word svadhyaya. It is not any kind of book. A holy scripture is supposed to be a moksha shastra. A scripture which expounds the nature of, as well as the means to, the liberation of the soul is called a moksha shastra. This is to be studied. All the ways and means to the liberation of the Self should be expounded in the scripture; and the glorious nature of the ideal of perfection, God-realisation that also is to be expounded in it. The means and the end should be delineated in great detail. Such is the text to be resorted to in svadhyaya. By a gradual and daily habituation of oneself to such a study, there is a purification brought about automatically. Inasmuch as it is nothing but meditation that we are practising in a different way, it is supposed to bring us in contact with the ideal.

1.12 - God Departs, #Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo, #Nirodbaran, #Integral Yoga
  The work on Savitri proceeded as usual, but slowed down in pace, especially when we came to a mighty confrontation with the two big Cantos of The Book of Fate. Revision after revision, addition of lines, even punctuations changed so many times! It seemed like a veritable "God's labour" against a rock of resistance. At his time the Press sent up a demand for a new book from him. The Future Poetry was given preference and some passages which were meant to be dovetailed into the text of the chapters were written. But since he wanted to write something on modern poetry and for his works of modern poets were needed, orders were sent to Madras for them while whatever few books were available from our small Library were requisitioned. As I read them out, he said, "Mark that passage," or "These lines have a striking image" (once the lines referred to were, I think, from C. Day Lewis' Magnetic Mountain).He himself read out a poem of Eliot's to me I don't remember exactly which, and remarked, "This is fine poetry." In this way we proceeded. Since we had to wait for the arrival of the books, he said, "Let us go back to Savitri." His whole attention seemed to be focussed on Savitri, but again, the work had to be suspended owing to the pressure of various extraneous demands. They swelled up to such an extent that he was obliged to remark, "I find no more time for my real work." When the path was fairly clear and I was wondering what his next choice would be, he said in a distant voice, "Take up Savitri. I want to finish it soon." This must have been about two months before his departure. The last part of the utterance startled me, though it was said in a subdued tone. I wondered for a moment if I had heard rightly. I looked at him; my bewildered glance met an impassive face. In these twelve years this was the first time I had heard him reckoning with the time factor. An Avatar of poise, patience and equanimity, this was the picture that shone before our eyes whenever we had thought or spoken about him. Hence my wonder. We took up the same two Cantos that had proved so intractable. The work progressed slowly; words, ideas, images seemed to be repeated; the verses themselves appeared to flow with reluctance. Once a punctuation had to be changed four or five times. When the last revision was made and the Cantos were wound up, I said, "It is finished now." An impersonal smile of satisfaction greeted me, and he said, "Ah, it is finished?" How well I remember that flicker of a smile which all of us craved for so long! "What is left now?" was his next query. "The Book of Death and The Epilogue." "Oh, that? We shall see about that later on." That "later on" never came and was not meant to come. Having taken the decision to leave the body, he must have been waiting for the right moment to go, and for reasons known to himself he left the two last-mentioned Books almost as they were. Thus on Savitri was put the seal of incomplete completion about two weeks before the Darshan of November 24th. Other literary works too came to an end.
  And significantly The Book of Fate was the last Book to be revised. What I deemed to be minor flaws or unnecessary repetitions, and thought that a further revision would remove them, appeared, after his passing, to be deliberate and prophetic:

1.14 - Bibliography, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  Translated by A. W. and G. R. Mair. (Loeb Classical Library.)
  London and New York, 1921.
  --
  edited by R. V. G. Tasker. (Everyman's Library.) London and
  New York, 1945. 2 vols. (Original: De Civitate Dei. See Migne,
  --
  Great. Translated by the Rev. Blomfield Jackson. (Select Library
  of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Sec-
  --
  liam Wilson. (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 4, 12.) Edinburgh,
  1867-69. 2 vols.
  --
  tion by Kirsopp Lake. (Loeb Classical Library.) London and New
  York, 1912-13. 2 vols. (Vol. I, pp. 128-63).
  --
  James Donaldson. (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 17.) Edin-
  burgh, 1870.
  --
  and translated by W. A. Oldfather. (Loeb Classical Library.) Lon-
  don and New York, 1926-28. 2 vols. (Vol. II, pp. 479-537-)
  --
  translation by Kirsopp Lake. (Loeb Classical Library.) London
  and New York, 1912-13. 2 vols. (Vol. II, pp. 6-305.)
  --
  Rambaut. (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 5, 9.) Edinburgh,
  1868-69. 2 vols.
  --
  H. Rackham and W. H. S. Jones. (Loeb Classical Library.) Lon-
  don and New York, 1938- (not yet completed).
  --
  lish translation by Frank Cole Babbitt. (Loeb Classical Library.)
  London and New York, 1927 ff. 14 vols. (Vol. V, pp. 6-191.)
  --
  man's Library.) London and New York, 1938.
  Ripley, George. "Duodecim portarum axiomata philosophica." See
  --
  by B. P. Pratten [and others]. (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 3.)
  Edinburgh, 1867.
  --
  Christian Library, 7.) Edinburgh, 1868.
  . Apologeticus adversus gentes pro Christianis. See Migne, P.L.,
  --
  (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 11.) Edinburgh, 1869. (Pp. 53-
  140.)

1.14 - The Structure and Dynamics of the Self, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  96 Zurich Central Library, Graphics Collection, B x 606.
  253

1.18 - Evocation, #The Practice of Magical Evocation, #Franz Bardon, #Occultism
  If the magician takes into his hands a book on evocation, or if he has, in his Library, several books dealing with this subject, he will find a certain connection between all the instructions, and if he takes them all together he will be informed how to call a being and which formulae have to be used for that purpose etc. In none of the books, however, will he find the actual pre-conditions for a successful evocation. Therefore it is not at all surprising that nearly all attempts go wrong. From the hermetic point of view any contact with a spirit being of a certain sphere may be regarded as a sort of evocation, irrespective of the fact whether spiritistic methods, methods of necromancy or any other methods are applied for establishing such a contact. The question of whether the desired being actually appears on account of the various methods applied remains unanswered, for only the person who tries them could give a true statement about it. If sometimes such an attempt made according to the methods laid down in those books leads to a success, it is still undecided, whether the results have come out because of the method, for other practices could also have played a decisive part. For instance, in the case of spiritistic evocations, success can be brought about by some quite different factors, even if a great amount of evidences is available indicating that the success is the result of the method of evocation suggested. The subconsciousness of the oral medium may be the cause for the spiritistic success, if it is a success at all. Furthermore, the subconscious creation of phantoms, elementals, elementaries, which the operator's increased attention and power of imagination might have created during the evocation, can in such a case, not be attributed to the being but to the operator's own individuality.
  This fact is hardly ever acknowledged by the person concerned.

13.05 - A Dream Of Surreal Science, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Collected Poems, Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library, Vol. 5, p. 145.
   Exodus, [20:5]

14.03 - Janaka and Yajnavalkya, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   "There the sun cannot shine and the moon has no lustre; all the stars are blind; there our lightnings flash not, neither any earthly fire. For all that is bright is but the shadow of His brightness and by His shining all this shines." Sri Aurobindo: The Upanishads, Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library, Vol. 12, p. 261.
   ***

14.04 - More of Yajnavalkya, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram, Sri Aurobindo' Birth Centenary Library, Vol. 1, p. 516.
   ***

14.05 - The Golden Rule, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Collected Poems, Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library, Vol. 5, p. 134.
   ***

15.03 - A Canadian Question, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Sri Aurobindo:Letters on Yoga, Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library, Vol. 22, pp. 307-8.
   "If only mankind consented to be spiritualised."

15.07 - Souls Freedom, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library, Vol. 25, p. 24-25
   ***

15.08 - Ashram - Inner and Outer, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   I will tell you a story today, but of another kind. I will tell you of a dream, or a vision that I had sometime ago. It was an ashram, I say an ashram for it was not quite like our ashram although there was a great similarity between the two. In some respects it was like our ashram and in other respects somewhat unlike. First of all the whole ashram was in one place, a consolidated organisation, not houses here and there scattered about: there were no buildings or houses belonging to other people or other organisations, also the buildings were beautiful to look at and the general lay-out artistic, but all the activities we have were there. The school was there, the playground was there, the Library also, but all in an orderly arrangement. The Mother was also there, she was going from place to place, observing all and speaking to people. Among the people, curiously, some I seemed to recognise, some of those even who are here now, there were many strangers from other countries, a good many of them. Regarding those who are here now and whom I seemed to recognise there also, the impression is rather vague and I cannot name them. But some of those who were here and passed away I recognised very well, they had almost the same face and features but in a new, fresh and younger form. They were active and handsome young men, young women I remember Sri Aurobindo quoting from the Rigveda: The Vedic Rishi speaks of a happy herd of cows grazing in green fields; the Rishi adds: even those among them that were old have become young now. The cow represented for the Rishi the light, the sun's ray, the purity of consciousness. Perhaps the image came from the actual life of the Rishis of that time, the cattle they reared, the domestic animals about them, the natural scenery around them, and all that was an important part of their ordinary daily life. A whole herd of cattle all white is a beautiful picture. Even so there was something in the atmosphere of the ashram which gave it a special quality, it was clear pure, limpid and transparent, there was a strange luminosity in it, and it was a very happy atmosphere. While you are there, you feel free and at ease and there were no petty feelings that we have here in the normal life of the world, no anger, no jealousy, no selfishness, no ugliness: there was a happy coordination of all persons and things.
   My feeling is that this ashram that I saw was in fact the inner reality of our ashram here, that inner ashram which is within us all; what we see at present is the outer form, the material form which is a good deal deformed and even falsified in many ways. Indeed that inner ashram has an other worldly atmosphere of its own, an atmosphere of rarefied heights. I have told you very often that those who are here are fortunate, they brea the this atmosphere and in spite of their faults and foibles, and no matter what they do, they are in contact with something of the inner beauty and fragrance. I do not know whether you have heard what Mother said more than once, that all the children here, when they live here for sometime, imbibe and carry a new atmosphere. And she could recognise a person from a distance, even from a great distance, not by his face or physical features but by the atmosphere he carried that he belonged to the ashram, very different from the atmosphere an outsider normally carries. It is an atmosphere or aura made of happiness and purity and luminosity. All the ashram children are surrounded by it because it is Mother's own atmosphere. Therefore in these days, she used to say, these children should not go out into the outside world even in their holidays, because, when they go out, she said, she had seen it, they lose this ashram atmosphere and when they come back, they are coated with a thick layer of the mud of the ordinary world, and it took her a lot of time and trouble to rub and scrub and clean the dross upon the body, to made it shine as before. You may remember here in this connection a Ramakrishna story about the sinners who went to the Ganges for a bath to purify themselves; they leave their sins on the shore or the sins leave them as they get into the Ganges water, but the sins wait for them there on the bank and as soon as they come back purified of their sins, the sins lying in wait jump on them again and the sinners remain always sinners. Here naturally you are not destined to remain sinners always.

1.51 - How to Recognise Masters, Angels, etc., and how they Work, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  It was part of my plan for the Equinox to prepare a final edition of the work of Dr. Dee and Sir Edward Kelly. I had a good many of the data and promised myself to complete them by studying the manuscripts in the Bodleian Library at Oxford which, incidentally, I did in the autumn; but it struck me that it would be useful to get my large paintings of the four Elemental Watch Towers which I had made in Mexico. I thought these were probably in Boleskine. I decided to go up there for a fortnight or so. Incidentally, I had the conveniences for conferring upon Neuberg the degree of Neophyte, he having passed brilliantly through this year as a Probationer.
  I consequently asked him and an Emmanuel man named Kenneth Ward, to come and stay with me. I had met Ward at Wastdale Head shortly before, having gone there to renew my ancient loves with the creeds of the gullies. It happened that Ward was very keen on skiing. I had several pairs and offered to give him some. This casual circumstance proved an essential part of the chain by which I was ultimately dragged behind the chariot of the Secret Chiefs. At least I thought it was a chain. I did not realize that steel of such exquisite temper might be beaten into a sword fit for the hand of a free man.

1.57 - Beings I have Seen with my Physical Eye, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  It seems, too, as if I had picked up something of the sort as an aftereffect of the Evocation of Buer a Mercurial demon; for phenomena of one sort or another were simple showered on me from this moment, pari passu with my constantly improving technique in regular "astral visions." Sometimes I was quite blind, as compared with Frater V.N.; for when the circles was broken one nightsee the whole story in my Autohagiography he saw and identified dozens and scores of Abramelin demons as they marched widdershins around my Library, while all I saw of them was a procession of "half-formed faces" moving shadowy through the dimly-lit room.
  When it was a matter of the sense of touch, it was far otherwise; I got it good and hearty but that is not the subject of this letter. I find all this excessively tedious; I resent having to write about it at all; I wonder whether I am breaking some beastly by-law; in fact, I shall ask you to be content with Buer as far as details go; I never saw anything of importance with purely physical sight with anything like the clarity of my adventure on Mont Collon.

1.58 - Human Scapegoats in Classical Antiquity, #The Golden Bough, #James George Frazer, #Occultism
  which was unearthed from a Greek manuscript in the Paris Library,
  and published by Professor Franz Cumont of Ghent. Two briefer

1951-03-19 - Mental worlds and their beings - Understanding in silence - Psychic world- its characteristics - True experiences and mental formations - twelve senses, #Questions And Answers 1950-1951, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I just read this in Illustration: The spiritual activity par excellence is reading and writing. The centre of spiritual life is the National Library.
   It is a cheap spirituality!

1953-09-30, #Questions And Answers 1953, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   No, you dont understand. To go to that place, at the time of going you must be able to completely silence the mind (and all the other things I have mentioned), but just for going there. For example, you decide: Now, I am going to read such and such a chapter of earths history, then you lounge comfortably in an easy-chair, you tell people not to disturb you, you go within yourself and completely stop your mind, and you send your mental messenger to that place. It is preferable to have someone who can guide you there, because otherwise you can lose your way and go elsewhere! And then you go. It is like a very big Library with many many small compartments. So you find the compartment corresponding to the information you wish to have. You press a button and it opens. And inside it you find a scroll as it were, a mental formation which unrolls before you like a parchment, and you read. And then you make a note of what you have read and afterwards return quietly into your body with the new knowledge, and you may transcribe physically, if you can, what you have found, and then you get up and start your life as before. This may take you ten minutes, it may take one hour, it may take half an hour, it depends upon your capacity, but it is important to know the way, as I said, in order not to make a mistake.
   Why then dont we do that instead of reading books!
  --
   All that has happened upon earthfrom the beginning of the earth till now, all the movements of the mind have been exactly inscribed, all of them. So when you need any accurate information about something, you have only to go there, you find your way. It is a very strange place; it is made as though of small cells, they are like small pigeon-holes; and so, following the shelves and some kind of how to put it? There are libraries of that kind. Why, I saw a picture shown to us at the cinema, the picture of a Library in New York. Well, it is arranged somewhat like that. It is a similar arrangement. It interested me because of that. But instead of being books, these are like small squares. They are all closed. You put your finger, press a button and the thing opens. And then something like a scroll comes out and you unroll it and can read itall that is written about a subject. There are millions and millions and millions of these. And happily, in the mind, one can go down, one can go up, one can go right on the top. You do not need a ladder!
   How does one read? As one reads a book?
  --
   And in order to be more sure (but here one must be fully trained, one must have a very good education), in order to be altogether sure of reporting clearly the knowledge received without deforming it in any way, it is better to say what one sees and what one reads (we say reads, but rather it is what one perceives), to say it as one perceives it, and it should be someone else who notes it down. I repeat: You lie quietly stretched in your easy-chair, without moving and altogether quiet, and you send a messenger from your head. Now, someone should be sitting by your side and when you reach the place and open the door and pull out the manuscript (or whatever you like to call it), you begin, instead of reading only with your eyes that are absent, to describe what you see. You acquire the habit of speaking aloud and as you go on observing up there, you speak here. You narrate precisely your journey through those vast halls and how you reached that place and how it had a small mark that was the sign of what you wanted to see. Then you open that little place and pull out the scroll and start reading. And you read it out aloud. And the person who is there, sitting by your side, goes on noting down what you are reading. In this way there is no danger of the thing getting changed when you return. For, the experience is very clear and precise to that part of your being which is there at the moment, but when you come back into the material world as it is, almost always something escapes and this does not escape when you speak directly at the time you are at work. So all that means very many conditions to fulfil: it is not so easy as taking a book in the Library and reading it! This is within the reach of everybody. That is a little more difficult to accomplish.
   What is the theory of relativity?1
  --
   Not necessarily. It is not necessarily someone who has some experience who is most advanced. He lacks an element of simplicity, modesty, and the plasticity that comes from the fact that one is not yet totally developed. As one grows, something crystallises in the head; it gets more and more fixed and unless you try very hard you finish by becoming fossilised. This is what usually happens to people, particularly those who have tried for some realisation and succeeded in it or those who have come to believe they have reached the goal. In any case, it was their personal goal. They have reached it, they have attained. It is done, they remain there; they settle there, they say thats it. And they do no more any more. So, after that they may live ten years more, or twenty or thirty, they will not budge. They are there, they will stay there. Such people lack all the suppleness of stuff thats necessary for going further and progressing. They are stuck. They are very good objects to be put in a museum, but not for doing work. They are like samples to show what can be done but they are not the stuff to do more. For me personally, I admit I prefer for my work someone who knows very little, has not laboured too much, but who has a great aspiration, much goodwill and who feels in himself this flame, this need for progressing. He may know very little, may have realised still less, but if he has that within him, it is good stuff with which one can go very far, much further. For one must know the way (it is the same thing here as with your Library), one must know the way to go. Well, usually in life when you climb a mountain or go to an unknown land, you look for a man who has been there, who is a guide, and you ask him to direct you. It is the same thing. If you follow the guide, you can go much quicker than someone else who has made much effort, found his own way and is usually quite proud of himself and, in any case, has the feeling of having come to the end, reached the goal he aimed at, finally arrived and he stops, settles down. And he does not move any more.
   Naturally, at the beginning there were no children here and children were not accepted, children were all refused. It was only after the war that children were taken. But I do not regret that they have been accepted. For I believe there is much more stuff for the future among children who know nothing than among those grown-ups who believe they know everything. I do not know if you have much knowledge of sculpture. But to do sculpture, you have to take some clay, soak it with water; it must be finely powdered clay, and you soak it with water and make a paste. You have to keep it wet all the time and you make a statue or whatever you want out of that. When it is finished, you fire it so that it sets. And after thatindeed after thatit cannot move any more. If you want to change something, you must break it and make another. For otherwise, as it is, it is rigid, as hard and stiff as stone. Something similar happens in life. You must not attain something and then remain crystallised, fossilised, immobilised. For otherwise you have to break it, take it to pieces, or else you can do nothing with it any longer.

1953-10-28, #Questions And Answers 1953, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But it is perhaps (with all its horror, from a certain point of view), it is perhaps better than what was produced in that age of extreme and practical philistinism: the Victorian age or in France the Second Empire. So, one starts from a point where there was a harmony and describes a curve, and with this curve one goes completely out of this harmony and may enter into a total darkness; and then one climbs up, and when one finds oneself in line with the old realisation of art, one becomes aware of the truth there was in this realisation, but with the necessity of expressing something more complete and more conscious. But in describing the circle one forgets that art is the expression of forms and one tries to express ideas and feelings with a minimum of forms. That gives what we have, what you may see (I believe we have reproductions of the most modern painters in the University Library). But if one goes a little farther still, this idea and these feelings they wish to express and express very clumsilyif one returns to the same point of the spiral (only a little higher), one will discover that it is the embryo of a new art which will be an art of beauty and will express not only material life but will also try to express its soul.
   Anyway, we have not yet come to that, but let us hope we shall reach there soon. So thats all.

1954-08-11 - Division and creation - The gods and human formations - People carry their desires around them, #Questions And Answers 1954, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  You have perhaps read the books of Maurice Magre; there are some in the Library. He describes this; he had come here, Maurice Magre, and we spoke and he told me that he had always noticedhe was highly sensitivehe had always noticed that people who have sexual desires are surrounded by a kind of small swarm of entities who are somewhat viscous and rather ugly and which torment them constantly, awakening desire in them. He said he had seen this around certain people. It was like being surrounded by a swarm of mosquitoes, yes! But it is more gross, and much uglier still, and it is viscous, it is horrible, and it turns round and round the person and gives him no peace, and it awake in him the desire that has formed these entities and they batten on it. It is their food. This is absolutely true. His observation was quite correct. His vision was very true. It is like that.
  But everyone carries around himself the atmosphere of his own desires. So you dont at all require that people should tell you anything; you have only to look and you see around them exactly the state they are in. They may want to give themselves the airs of angels or saints but they cant deceive you, because that thing is there, turning around them. So, just imagine! (Mother points to all those seated in front of her). You see what you are like, how many of you there, all of you here, and each one has his own little world in this way, of mental formations of which some are clothed in vital substance, and all these crawl together, mix with each other, knock against each other. There is a struggle to see which is the strongest, which tries to realise itself, and all this creates an atmosphere indeed!

1954-10-06 - What happens is for the best - Blaming oneself -Experiences - The vital desire-soul -Creating a spiritual atmosphere -Thought and Truth, #Questions And Answers 1954, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Ah, yes, we are going to put into the books of the lending Library of the University one of Sri Aurobindos short reflections, which is wonderful I had it printed todayin which he says that any teaching, however great it may be, however pure, noble, true it may be, is only one aspect of the Truth and not the Truth itself (I am commenting, the text1 is not exactly this), it is not the entire Truth. Well, that is it. Whatever your thought may be, even if it is very high, very pure, very noble, very true, it is only a very tiny microscopic aspect of the Truth, and consequently it is not entirely true. So in that field one must be practical, as I said, adopt the thought for the time being, the one which will help you to make progress when you have it. Sometimes it comes as an illumination and this helps you to progress. So long as it helps you to make progress, keep it; when it begins to crumble, not to act any longer, well, drop it, and try to get another which will lead you a little farther.
  Many miseries and misfortunes in the world would disappear if people knew the relativity of knowledge, the relativity of faith, the relativity of the teachings and also the relativity of circumstances to what extent a thing is so relatively important! For the moment it may be capital, it may lead you to life or to death I am not speaking of physical life and death, I am speaking of the life and death of the spirit but this is for the moment; and when you have made a certain progress, when you have grown a few years older from the spiritual point of view, and you look back on this thing, this circumstance or idea which perhaps has decided your life, it will seem so relative, so insignificant to you and you will need something much higher to make new progress.

1955-03-23 - Procedure for rejection and transformation - Learning by heart, true understanding - Vibrations, movements of the species - A cat and a Russian peasant woman - A cat doing yoga, #Questions And Answers 1955, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  This one was admirable and it died of the cat diseaseas there is a disease of the dogs, there is a disease of the kittens I dont know how it caught the thing, but it was wonderful during its illness and I was taking care of it as of a child. And it always expressed a kind of aspiration. There was a time before it fell ill we used to have in those days meditation in a room of the Library House, in the room thereSri Aurobindos own room and we used to sit on the floor. And there was an armchair in a corner, and when we gathered for the meditation this cat came every time and settled in the armchair and literally it entered into a trance, it had movements of trance; it did not sleep, it was not asleep, it was truly in a trance; it gave signs of that and had astonishing movements, as when animals dream; and it didnt want to come out from it, it refused to come out, it remained in it for hours. But it never came in until we were beginning the meditation. It settled there and remained there throughout the meditation. We indeed had finished but it remained, and it was only when I went to take it, called it in a particular way, brought it back into its body, that it consented to go away; otherwise no matter who came and called it, it did not move. Well, this cat always had a great aspiration, a kind of aspiration to become a human being; and in fact, when it left its body it entered a human body. Only it was a very tiny part of the consciousness, you see, of the human being; it was like the opposite movement from that of the woman with the other cat. But this one was a cat which leaped over many births, so to say, many psychic stages to enter into contact with a human body. It was a simple enough human body, but still, all the same
  There is a difference in the development of a cat and of a human being

1956-05-23 - Yoga and religion - Story of two clergymen on a boat - The Buddha and the Supramental - Hieroglyphs and phonetic alphabets - A vision of ancient Egypt - Memory for sounds, #Questions And Answers 1956, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  In the Library, Mother, there is something.
  Oh! Because I was wondering how they had restored the names of the pharaohs and gods. Naturally, more recent peoples have spoken about them, the Greeks mention them, the Phoenicians speak of them; they had phonetic writing. But earlier than that? The first pharaohs and all those names of the gods, who discovered these?

1956-06-13 - Effects of the Supramental action - Education and the Supermind - Right to remain ignorant - Concentration of mind - Reason, not supreme capacity - Physical education and studies - inner discipline - True usefulness of teachers, #Questions And Answers 1956, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  But still, at any age, if you are studious and have the will to do it, you can also take up books and work; you dont need to go to school for that. There are enough books in the world to teach you things. There are even many more books than necessary. You can exhaust all subjects simply by going there to Medhanandas, to the Library. You will have enough to fill you up to here! (Gesture)
  But what is very important is to know what you want. And for this a minimum of freedom is necessary. You must not be under a compulsion or an obligation. You must be able to do things whole-heartedly. If you are lazy, well, you will know what it means to be lazy. You know, in life idlers are obliged to work ten times more than others, for what they do they do badly, so they are obliged to do it again. But these are things one must learn by experience. They cant be instilled into you.

1f.lovecraft - At the Mountains of Madness, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   had ever looked into that monstrous book at the college Library.
   On the seventh of November, sight of the westward range having been
  --
   the college Library.
   The higher sky, as we crossed the range, was surely vaporous and

1f.lovecraft - Deaf, Dumb, and Blind, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   swamp. That was his study and Library, and it had a door of double
   thickness with braces. It had been chopped through with axes that
  --
   and archways, at last finding the Library or study which he soughta
   fine southerly room on the ground floor adjoining the once-dreaded

1f.lovecraft - Discarded Draft of, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   And so I spent that evening at the Newburyport Public Library looking
   up data about Innsmouth. When I had tried to question natives in the
  --
   the people at the Library shewed much the same attitude, holding
   Innsmouth to be merely an exaggerated case of civic degeneration.
  --
   the Marsh Refining Company in the business department of the Library,
   and began to realise what a striking thing that lone industry was. The

1f.lovecraft - Facts concerning the Late, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   being. When Sir Robert Jermyn emerged from his Library he left behind
   the strangled corpse of the explorer, and before he could be

1f.lovecraft - He, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   well-furnished, and panelled Library dating from the first quarter of
   the eighteenth century, with splendid doorway pediments, a delightful

1f.lovecraft - Old Bugs, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   instructorship in English. Galpin now devoted his time to the Library
   and lecture platform, preparing volumes and speeches on various
  --
   Appleton. Over the Library mantel in his home hung the exact replica of
   that picture, and all his life he had known and loved its original.

1f.lovecraft - Out of the Aeons, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   hieroglyphs, carefully preserved in the museum Library, received their
   due share of attention. No question could exist as to their association
  --
   In the basement Library room he pored endlessly over the strange metal
   cylinder and its membraneous scroll, photographing them from every
  --
   Necronomicon at the Widener Library.
   On April 5th the article appeared in the Sunday Pillar, smothered in
  --
   the Library downstairs, though later study brought out subtle
   differences. There was no mark of violence on the body, and in view of

1f.lovecraft - The Alchemist, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   shadow-haunted Library of the chateau, and in roaming without aim or
   purpose through the perpetual dusk of the spectral wood that clothes
  --
   Library told off so much more of my doomed existence. At length I
   approached that time which I had so long viewed with apprehension.

1f.lovecraft - The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Hall, the State House, the Public Library, the Athenaeum, the
   Historical Society, the John Carter Brown and John Hay Libraries of
   Brown University, and the newly opened Shepley Library in Benefit
   Street. One may picture him yet as he was in those days; tall, slim,
  --
   well-chosen Library of English and Latin books. Hearing of Curwen as
   the owner of the best Library in Providence, Mr. Merritt early paid him
   a call, and was more cordially received than most other callers at the
  --
   Library of thaumaturgical, alchemical, and theological subjects which
   Curwen kept in a front room were alone sufficient to inspire him with a
  --
   replaced many of the books of the public Library consumed in the Colony
   House fire, and bought heavily in the lottery that gave the muddy
  --
   accounts and invoices in the Shepley Library, did it occur to any
   personsave one embittered youth, perhapsto make dark comparisons
  --
   have been executed on a wall-panel of the Library of the house in Olney
   Court, but neither of the two old diaries mentioning it gave any hint
  --
   that his daughter and granddaughter change their name, burn the Library
   and all remaining papers, and chisel the inscription from the slate
  --
   Library as found after his disappearance, and an unfinished manuscript
   in his handwriting, couched in a cipher none could read. Ward had a
  --
   on a panel of the Curwen Library. This matter of the portrait
   interested him particularly, since he would have given much to know
  --
   the Library of the evil builder. He paid especial attention to the
   large panels of such overmantels as still remained; and was keenly
  --
   study or Library. To Charles was left the task of superintending this
   removal, and on the twenty-eighth of August he accompanied two expert
  --
   the wealth of the great Library in Copley Square, the Widener Library
   at Harvard, or the Zion Research Library in Brookline, where certain
   rare works on Biblical subjects are available. He bought extensively,
  --
   special search among rare manuscripts in the Library of an unnamed
   private collector. He avoided acquaintances, and no tourists brought
  --
   portrait in his Library; and Dr. Willett would often pause by the
   latter after a call, marvelling at the virtual identity, and reflecting
  --
   lived, with books brought up from his Library beneath, till the time he
   purchased the Pawtuxet bungalow and moved to it all his scientific
  --
   sounds which he heard proceeding from the now disused Library of his
   son. Books were apparently being flung about and papers wildly rustled,
  --
   up to the attic. The youths Library was plainly and rigidly
   classified, so that one might tell at a glance the books or at least
  --
   Library and the attic laboratory. His actions were quiet and rational,
   but he had a furtive, hunted look which his mother did not like, and
  --
   the youth in the Library where the picture stared no more. The
   interview was, as always, inconclusive; but Willett is still ready to
  --
   out in a highly terrified fashion upon entering his Library, afterward
   trailing off into a kind of choking gasp. When, however, the butler had
  --
   Library, watching the dusty shelves with their wide gaps where books
   had been removed, and smiling grimly at the panelled overmantel on the
  --
   to normal poise. Willett was glad to escape from that Library, for
   something frightful and unholy seemed to haunt it; as if the vanished
  --
   were a Library and a laboratory elsewhere; but just where, it was
   impossible to say. Essentially defeated in his quest for something he
  --
   the now unused Library of their young patient, examining what books and
   papers of his were left in order to gain some further notion of his
  --
   possessed no Library or laboratory beyond the visible ones, and waxed
   abstruse in explaining the absence from the house of such odours as now
  --
   Library, and they felt a marked relief when they left it at last; for
   there seemed to hover about the place a vague aura of evil. Perhaps it
  --
   than the latest study or Library of Charles Ward. Of the books the
   doctor had seen many before, and a good part of the furniture had
  --
   found in Wards underground Library: Yai ngngah, Yog-Sothoth, and
   so on till the final underlined Zhro. It seemed to soothe him, and he
  --
   bright illumination he had left in the Library. After a while he
   thought he detected a suspicion of a glow infinitely far away, and
  --
   standing once more in young Wards secret Library, trembling with
   relief, and watching the sputterings of that last lamp which had
  --
   have perished along with the rest of Curwens occult Library in the
   final raid. Three archways opened off the laboratory, and these the
  --
   occurring in the recent notes in the Library. They were, roughly
   speaking, the same; with the ancient symbols of Dragons Head and
  --
   subterrene horrors, no secret Library, no Curwen papers, no nightmare
   pits of stench and howling, no laboratory or shelves or chiselled
  --
   dining place and then to the John Hay Library on the hill.
   [cdw3.gif]
   At the Library it was easy to find good manuals of palaeography, and
   over these the two men puzzled till the lights of evening shone out
  --
   men sat still and helpless till the closing of the Library forced them
   to leave. Then they drove listlessly to the Ward mansion in Prospect
  --
   upstairs Library leered and leered and leered. Then the men returned.
   Yes. The altered photograph was a very passable likeness of Dr. Allen.
  --
   abandoned Library upstairs, where the ancient overmantel had gathered
   about itself an aura of noisome horror more intense than when Joseph
  --
   shuddering as he entered the tainted air of the Library to place them
   in the grate. Willett meanwhile had gone up to the dismantled
  --
   Then the doctor locked himself in the Library once more, and by the
   clouds of smoke which rolled down past the windows from the chimney it

1f.lovecraft - The Diary of Alonzo Typer, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   This afternoon I read some of the books in the great shadowy Library at
   the rear of the ground floor, and formed certain suspicions which I
  --
   me. Glancing nervously through a book in the Library I came upon an
   ampler form of the name that has teased my memory so sorely: Trintje,

1f.lovecraft - The Disinterment, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   hideous tomes from his private Library.
   For a long moment I gloated over the prospect before me, and then,

1f.lovecraft - The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   taken to the Library where Kuranes, Lord of Ooth-Nargai and the Sky
   around Serannian, sat pensive in a chair by the window looking on his

1f.lovecraft - The Dreams in the Witch House, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  into the public Library and browsed aimlessly among the lighter
  magazines. Once he met some friends who remarked how oddly sunburned he

1f.lovecraft - The Dunwich Horror, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Library at Harvard, the Bibliothque Nationale in Paris, the British
   Museum, the University of Buenos Ayres, and the Library of Miskatonic
   University of Arkham had failed to get him the loan of a book he
  --
   volume kept under lock and key at the college Librarythe hideous
   Necronomicon of the mad Arab Abdul Alhazred in Olaus Wormius Latin
  --
   Widener Library. Those efforts had been in vain, since Armitage had
   issued warnings of the keenest intensity to all librarians having
  --
   Library. An open window shewed black and gaping in the moonlight. What
   had come had indeed completed its entrance; for the barking and the
  --
   resources of his own Library, and wading night after night amidst the
   arcana of Trithemius Poligraphia, Giambattista Portas De Furtivis
  --
   go over to the Library and summon Rice and Morgan for a conference, and
   the rest of that day and evening the three men tortured their brains in

1f.lovecraft - The Festival, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Necronomicon from the Library of Miskatonic University. They said
   something about a psychosis, and agreed I had better get any

1f.lovecraft - The Haunter of the Dark, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   University campus and behind the marble John Hay Library. It was a cosy
   and fascinating place, in a little garden oasis of village-like

1f.lovecraft - The History of the Necronomicon, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   certain Salem mans Library in 1692. An English translation made by Dr.
   Dee was never printed, and exists only in fragments recovered from the
  --
   seventeenth-century edition is in the Widener Library at Harvard, and
   in the Library of Miskatonic University at Arkham. Also in the Library
   of the University of Buenos Ayres. Numerous other copies probably exist

1f.lovecraft - The Horror at Red Hook, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   high-ceiled Library whose walls were solidly packed with tattered books
   of ponderous, archaic, and vaguely repellent aspect. The growth of the

1f.lovecraft - The Hound, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   opaque body darkened the Library window when the moon was shining
   against it, and another time we thought we heard a whirring or flapping
  --
   cautious scratching at the single door which led to the secret Library
   staircase. Our alarm was now divided, for besides our fear of the
  --
   underneath the Library window a series of footprints utterly impossible
   to describe. They were as baffling as the hordes of great bats which

1f.lovecraft - The Last Test, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   the aftermath of that scene in the Clarendon Library. Only by a day did
   he miss the news of Old Clarendons death from apoplexy, and by so
  --
   mentally and physically exhausted and thrown himself on the Library
   lounge; and in that gloomy room, little by little, the faithful sister
  --
   unopened on the Library table, and his little gold syringe of
   anti-fever seruma clever device of his own, with a self-contained
  --
   the Library, fully dressed and seated at the table, alternately
   consulting the notes in his thick observation book, and making fresh
  --
   in the dining-room and return; but when she reached the Library again
   she found that her brother was gone.
  --
   chair on the Library table; then started resolutely for bed.
   She was not quite asleep when she heard the outer door open and shut.
  --
   robe, and descended to the Library, halting only when she heard voices
   from behind the half-opened door. Clarendon and Surama were talking,
  --
   In the evening she heard him in the Library, talking to himself in a
   fashion most unusual for him, and she felt that he was under a great
  --
   her pleas he made directly for the Library and began to read in a large
   old book which had lain face down on the table. She put her hand on his
  --
   Across the hall the light still shone from the Library, and she looked
   wistfully at the doorway as she quietly donned a hat and left the
  --
   managed to reach the house and get to the Library, where she scrawled a
   hasty note for Margarita to take to James Dalton.
  --
   almost tottered to meet him as he loomed up in the Library doorway; and
   for a moment no word was spoken while he kissed her hand in his
  --
   Library, scanning the shelves and listening for Clarendons nervous
   footstep on the clinic path outside. The vast rooms corners were
  --
   of the doctors Library that he destroyed with such painstaking
   completeness.

1f.lovecraft - The Moon-Bog, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Library poring over his plans for the great work which was to begin on
   the morrow, and for the first time felt a touch of the same kind of

1f.lovecraft - The Picture in the House, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   or Library. It was bound in leather with metal fittings, and was in an
   excellent state of preservation; being altogether an unusual sort of

1f.lovecraft - The Rats in the Walls, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Library chair which my mediaeval plan of furnishing could not banish.
   Later I telephoned to Capt. Norrys, who came over and helped me explore

1f.lovecraft - The Shadow out of Time, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   As soon as permitted, I haunted the college Library at all hours; and
   shortly began to arrange for those odd travels, and special courses at
  --
   Library grate were abundant ashes evidently left from the burning of
   every remaining scrap of paper on which I had written since the advent
  --
   increased Library and travel opportunitiesfor the Great Races central
   archives. The archives were in a colossal subterranean structure near

1f.lovecraft - The Shadow over Innsmouth, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   And so I spent part of that evening at the Newburyport Public Library
   looking up data about Innsmouth. When I had tried to question the
  --
   decadent place; and the people at the Library shewed much the same
   attitude. Clearly, in the eyes of the educated, Innsmouth was merely an
  --
   The Essex County histories on the Library shelves had very little to
   say, except that the town was founded in 1643, noted for shipbuilding
  --
   There was, he said, no public Library or chamber of commerce in
   Innsmouth, but I could probably find my way about. The street I had

1f.lovecraft - The Shunned House, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   low-ceiled Library with the musty white panelling, heavy carved
   overmantel, and small-paned, vine-shaded windows, were the relics and
  --
   Island Historical Society and Shepley Library before I could find a
   local door which the name Etienne Roulet would unlock. In the end I did

1f.lovecraft - The Temple, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   bound into the Library compartment where I sat reading, and his face at
   once betrayed him. I will repeat here what he said, underlining the

1f.lovecraft - The Thing on the Doorstep, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   constantly growing Library.
   Derby went through Miskatonic University in Arkham, since his parents
  --
   subterranean magical lore, for which Miskatonics Library was and is
   famous. Always a dweller on the surface of phantasy and strangeness, he
  --
   college Library, and had hated his wolfish, saturnine face with its
   tangle of iron-grey beard. He had died insaneunder rather queer
  --
   Library, and its crowd of sophisticates, that made Asenath settle in
   Arkham instead of returning permanently home.
  --
   leaving. There, at one of Edwards Library windows, she had glimpsed a
   hastily withdrawn facea face whose expression of pain, defeat, and
  --
   seen occasionally at the college Library in the old days. These
   adumbrations were never specific, but seemed to revolve around some
  --
   take me. . . . A minute before I was locked in the Library, and then I
   was there where she had gone with my bodyin the place of utter
  --
   me, and in a flash I was back at the housein the Library where those
   damned servants had me locked upand in that cursed fiends body . . .
  --
   pacing restlessly about the Library.
   Edward went to pieces rapidly after that. He did not call again, but I
   went daily to see him. He would always be sitting in his Library,
   staring at nothing and having an air of abnormal listening. Sometimes
  --
   receiver in the Library. No one seemed to be on the wire, and I was
   about to hang up and go to bed when my ear caught a very faint

1f.lovecraft - The Tomb, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   browsing amongst the ancient volumes of the family Library. Had it not
   been for my old servant Hiram, I should have by this time become quite

1f.lovecraft - The Trap, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   traces in folklore and written records; and diligent Library sessions,
   plus conferences with various learned Danes, have shed much more light

1f.lovecraft - The Tree on the Hill, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   could hear him moving about in our makeshift Library, cursing volubly.
   Before long he reappeared with an old, leather-bound volume. Theunis
  --
   long black box on the Library table beside the overturned chair.
   Scattered papers blew about in a breeze from the open window, and close

1f.lovecraft - The Whisperer in Darkness, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   have one in your college Library under lock and key.
   To conclude, Mr. Wilmarth, I think that with our respective studies

1f.lovecraft - Through the Gates of the Silver Key, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   He turned toward the door to the Library, Phillips dazedly following in
   a kind of automatic way. Aspinwall remained where he was, studying

1.is - Like vanishing dew, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   English version by Sam Hamill Original Language Japanese Like vanishing dew, a passing apparition or the sudden flash of lightning -- already gone -- thus should one regard one's self. [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton <
1.jk - Sleep And Poetry, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  (line 354): Leigh Hunt's house: he says ... the poem "originated in sleeping in a room adorned with busts and pictures," -- "many a bust from Shout," as Shelley wrote to Mrs. Gisborne. In Hunt's Correspondence (Volume i, page 289) we read "Keats's Sleep and Poetry is a description of a parlour that was mine, no bigger than an old mansion's closet." Charles Cowden Clarke says (Gentleman's Magazine, February 1874) "It was in the Library at Hunt's cottage, where an extemporary bed had been made up for him on the sofa."
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

1.jlb - Shinto, #Borges - Poems, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  the smell of a Library, or of sandalwood,
  the former name of a street,

1.jlb - The Other Tiger, #Borges - Poems, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  Exalts the vast and busy Library
  And seems to set the bookshelves back in gloom;

1.jlb - When sorrow lays us low, #Borges - Poems, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  the smell of a Library, or of sandalwood,
  the former name of a street,

1.jr - With Us, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   English version by Nevit Ergin with Camille Helminski Original Language Persian/Farsi & Turkish Even if you're not a seeker, still, follow us, keep searching with us. Even if you don't know how to play and sing, you'll become like us; with us you'll start singing and dancing. Even if you are Qarun, the richest of kings, when you fall in love, you'll become a beggar. Though you are a sultan, like us you'll become a slave. One candle of this gathering is worth a hundred candles; its light is as great. Either you are alive or dead. You'll come back to life with us. Unbind your feet. Show the rose garden -- start laughing with your whole body, like a rose, like us. Put on the mantle for a moment and see the ones whose hearts are alive. Then, throw out your satin dresses and cover yourself with a cloak, like us. When a seed falls into the ground, it germinates, grows, and becomes a tree: if you understand these symbols, you'll follow us, and fall to the ground, with us. God's Shams of Tabriz says to the heart's bud, "If your eyes are opened, you'll see the things worth seeing." [2510.jpg] -- from The Rumi Collection (Shambhala Library), by Kabir Helminski / Nevit Ergin <
1.pbs - Arethusa, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Published by Mrs. Shelley, Posthumous Poems, 1824, and dated by her 'Pisa, 1820.' There is a fair draft amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.

1.pbs - Hellas - A Lyrical Drama, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Hellas was composed at Pisa in the autumn of 1821, and dispatched to London, November 11. It was published, with the author's name, by C. & J. Ollier in the spring of 1822. A transcript of the poem by Edward Williams is in the Rowfant Library.
  Note by Mrs. Shelley: 'Hellas was among the last of his compositions, and is among the most beautiful. The choruses are singularly imaginative, and melodious in their versification. There are some stanzas that beautifully exemplify Shelley's peculiar style; as, for instance, the assertion of the intellectual empire which must be for ever the inheritance of the country of Homer, Sophocles, and Plato:--

1.pbs - Invocation To Misery, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Published by Medwin, The Athenaeum, September 8, 1832. Reprinted (as Misery, a Fragment) by Mrs. Shelley, Poetical Works, 1839, 1st edition. Our text is that of 1839. A pencil copy of this poem is amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.

1.pbs - Julian and Maddalo - A Conversation, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Composed at Este after Shelley's first visit to Venice, 1818 (Autumn); first published in the Posthumous Poems, London, 1824 (ed. Mrs. Shelley). Shelley's original intention had been to print the poem in Leigh Hunt's Examiner; but he changed his mind and, on August 15, 1819, sent the MS. to Hunt to be published anonymously by Ollier. This MS., found by Mr. Townshend Mayer, and by him placed in the hands of Mr. H. Buxton Forman, C.B., is described by him at length in Mr. Forman's Library Edition of the poems (vol. iii., p. 107). The date, 'May, 1819,' affixed to Julian and Maddalo in the P.P., 1824, indicates the time when the text was finally revised by Shelley.
  Note by Mrs. Shelley: 'From the Baths of Lucca, in 1818, Shelley visited Venice; and, circumstances rendering it eligible that we should remain a few weeks in the neighbourhood of that city, he accepted the offer of Lord Byron, who lent him the use of a villa he rented near Este; and he sent for his family from Lucca to join him.

1.pbs - Ode To Heaven, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Published with Prometheus Unbound, 1820. Dated 'Florence, December, 1819' in Harvard manuscript (Woodberry). A transcript exists amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.

1.pbs - Ode To Naples, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Composed at San Juliano di Pisa, August 17-25, 1820; published in Posthumous Poems, 1824. There is a copy, 'for the most part neat and legible,' amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library

1.pbs - Ozymandias, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  LISTEN HERE: https://soundcloud.com/anton-jarvis-206182017/ozymandias-of-egypt-by-percy-bysshe-shelley Published by Hunt in The Examiner, January, 1818. Reprinted with Rosalind and Helen, 1819. There is a copy amongst the Shelley MSS. at the Bodleian Library.

1.pbs - Passage Of The Apennines, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Composed May 4, 1818. Published by Mrs. Shelley, Posthumous Poems, 1824. There is a copy amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library, which supplies the last word of the fragment.

1.pbs - Pater Omnipotens, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Edited from manuscript Shelley E 4 in the Bodleian Library, and published by Mr. C.D. Locock, Examination etc., Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1903. Here placed conjecturally amongst the compositions of 1820, but of uncertain date, and belonging possibly to 1819 or a still earlier year.

1.pbs - Song Of Proserpine While Gathering Flowers On The Plain Of Enna, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Published by Mrs. Shelley, Poetical Works, 1839, 1st edition. There is a fair draft amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.

1.pbs - The Triumph Of Life, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  Composed at Lerici on the Gulf of Spezzia in the spring and early summer of 1822 -- the poem on which Shelley was engaged at the time of his death. Published by Mrs. Shelley in the Posthumous Poems of 1824, from a MS. (now in the Bodleian Library), whose corrections, omitted words, passages of unrevised improvisation, difficult hand, and long inaccessibility have so far prevented much certainty in the establishment of a text.
  Form: terza rima.

1.wby - To A Wealthy Man Who Promised A Second Subscription To The Dublin Municipal Gallery If It Were Prove, #Yeats - Poems, #William Butler Yeats, #Poetry
  For the San Marco Library,
  Whence turbulent Italy should draw

1.whitman - As A Strong Bird On Pinious Free, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
       Library;
   But an odor I'd bring to-day as from forests of pine in the north, in

1.whitman - Brother Of All, With Generous Hand, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  Labor and toil, the bath, gymnasium, play-ground, Library,
      college,                          

1.whitman - No Labor-Saving Machine, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
      hospital or Library,
  Nor reminiscence of any deed of courage, for America,

1.whitman - Song of Myself, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  I lead no man to a dinner-table, Library, exchange,
  But each man and each woman of you I lead upon a knoll,

1.whitman - Song Of Myself- XLVI, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  I lead no man to a dinner-table, Library, exchange,
  But each man and each woman of you I lead upon a knoll,

1.whitman - Song Of The Broad-Axe, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  Citadel, ceiling, saloon, academy, organ, exhibition-house, Library,
  Cornice, trellis, pilaster, balcony, window, shutter, turret, porch,

1.yb - Clinging to the bell, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   English version by Sam Hamill Original Language Japanese Clinging to the bell, he dozes so peacefully, this new butterfly [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton <
1.yb - In a bitter wind, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   English version by Sam Hamill Original Language Japanese In a bitter wind a solitary monk bends to words cut in stone [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton <
1.yb - The late evening crow, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   English version by Sam Hamill Original Language Japanese The late evening crow of deep autumn longing suddenly cries out [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton <
1.yb - This cold winter night, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   English version by Sam Hamill Original Language Japanese This cold winter night, that old wooden-head Buddha would make a nice fire [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton <
1.ym - Wrapped, surrounded by ten thousand mountains, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   English version by J. P. Seaton Original Language Chinese Wrapped, surrounded by ten thousand mountains, Cut off, no place to go.... Until you're here, there's no way to get here. Once you're here, there's no way to go. [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton <
2.00 - BIBLIOGRAPHY, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  LAO TZU. There are many translations of the Tao Teh King. Consult and compare those of Arthur Waley in The Way and Its Power (London, 1933), of F. R. Hughes in Chinese Philosophy in Classical Times (Everymans Library) and of Chu Ta-Kao (London, 1937) reprinted in The Bible of the World (New York, 1939).
  LAW, WILLIAM. Several modern editions of the Serious Call are available; but many of Laws finest works, such as The Spirit of Love and The Spirit of Prayer, have not been reprinted in recent years and are hard to come by. An excellent anthology of Laws writings, Characters and Characteristics of William Law, was compiled by Alexander Whyte towards the end of last century (3rd ed., London, 1898).

2.01 - The Road of Trials, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  1 - Apuleius, The Golden Ass (Modern Library edition), pp. 131-141.
  2 - Knud Leem, Beskrivelse over Finmarkens Lapper (Copenhagen, 1767), pp. 475-478. An English translation will be found in John Pinkerton, A General Collection of the Best and Most Interesting Voyages and Travels in All Parts of

2.02 - Meeting With the Goddess, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  tional Psycho-Analytical Library," No. 3, 4th edition; London: The Hogarth
  Press, 1931), chapters xii and xiii.

2.05 - Apotheosis, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  grams, 4, 174; Loeb Library, Vol. II, p. 501).
  Ovid's account of Hermaphroditos appears in the Metamorphoses, IV, 288 ff.
  --
  (Ulysses, Modern Library edition, p. 210).
  Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus. See also, Ovid, Metamorphoses, III, 324 ff.,
  --
  The Philosophical Library, no date, p. 63). The word "de-spiration" is con
  trived from a literal Latinization of the Sanskrit "mnyna"; nir = "out, forth,

2.08 - Three Tales of Madness and Destruction, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Now that we have seen these greasy pieces of cardboard become a museum of old masters, a theater of tragedy, a Library of poems and novels, the silent brooding over down-to-earth words bound to come up along the way, following the arcane pictures, can attempt to soar higher, to peal forth winged words, perhaps heard in some theater balcony, where their resonance transforms moth-eaten sets on a creaking stage into palaces and battlefields.
  In fact, the three who now started quarreling did so with solemn gestures as if declaiming, and while all three pointed to the same card, with their free hand and with evocative grimaces they exerted themselves to convey that those figures were to be interpreted this way and not that. Now in the card whose name varies according to custom and language-The Tower, The House of God, The House of the Devil-a young man carrying a sword, you would say for the purpose of scratching his flowing blond hair (now white), recognizes the platform before Elsinore castle when the night's blackness is rent by an apparition which freezes the sentinels in fear: the majestic march of a ghost whose grizzled beard and shining helmet and breastplate cause him to resemble both the tarots' Emperor and the late king of Denmark, who has returned to demand Justice. In such questionable shape, the cards lend themselves to the young man's silent interrogation: "Why the sepulchre hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws that thou, dead corse, again, in complete steel, revisit'st thus the glimpses of The Moon?"

2.1.3.3 - Reading, #On Education, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  I havent read much of English literature I have gone through only a few hundred books. But I know French literature very well I have read a whole Library of it. And I can say that it has no great value in terms of Truth. Real knowledge comes from above the mind. What literature gives is the play of a lot of common or petty ideas. Only on a rare occasion does some ray from above come in. If you look into thousands and thousands of books, you will find just one small intuition here and there. The rest is nothing.
  I cant say that the reading of literature equips one better to understand Sri Aurobindo. On the contrary, it can be a hindrance. For, the same words are used and the purpose for which they are used is so different from the purpose for which Sri Aurobindo has made use of them, the manner in which they have been put together to express things is so different from Sri Aurobindos that these words tend to put one off from the light which Sri Aurobindo wants to convey to us through them. To get to Sri Aurobindos light we must empty our minds of all that literature has said and done. We must go inward and stay in a receptive silence and turn it upward. Then alone we get something in the right way. At the worst, I have seen that the study of literature makes one silly and perverse enough to sit in judgment on Sri Aurobindos English and find fault with his grammar!
  --
  A Library should be an intellectual sanctuary where one comes to find light and progress.
  ***

2.1.4.2 - Teaching, #On Education, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  In silence, one comes into contact with the Truth. Later, the idea descends, passes through the Library of words and picks out the most suitable ones. At first it comes hazily. You must continue until it becomes precise. You can note it down, but you should remain quiet and continue. Then you get the exact word. The word that comes then is used in its essential sense, but not in its conventional sense.
  It is not quite the reality; they are the words which come closest to the reality. The teachers should do that. It would be very useful instead of (gesture of going round and round in the head).

2.18 - January 1939, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   Sri Aurobindo: When we were living in the Library House, we passed through a brilliant period of Sadhana in the Vital. Many people had dazzling experiences and great currents of energy were going round. If we had stopped there like other Yogas do we would have given rise to a brilliant creation, or, would have established some kind of religion; but that would not have been the real work.
   Disciple: Could a great progress in the conquest of the physical being have been made at that time?

2.20 - THE MASTERS TRAINING OF HIS DISCIPLES, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  M: "He visits the Master. Even if he has a little pride, it will not last long. If one only sits in the Master's presence awhile, one's pride crumbles to pieces. It is because the Master himself is totally free from egotism. Pride cannot exist in the presence of humility. A celebrated man like Pundit Iswar Chandra Vidysgar showed great modesty and humility in the Master's presence. The Paramahamsa visited his house; it was nine o'clock in the evening when the Master took his leave. Vidysgar came all the way from the Library to the gate of his compound to see him off. He himself carried the light to show the way. As the Master's carriage started off, Vidysagar stood there with folded hands."
  DOCTOR: "Well, what does Vidysgar think of him?"
  --
  M: "Divine ecstasy may or may not be explainable; but, sir, it cannot be denied that ecstasy, or love of God, is a unique thing. I have seen in your Library Stebbing's book on Darwinism. According to Stebbing the human mind is wonderful, whether it be the result of evolution or of special creation. He gives a beautiful illustration from the theory of light. Light is wonderful, whether you know the wave theory of light or not."
  DOCTOR: "Yes. Have you noticed further that Stebbing accepts both Darwin and God?"

2.25 - AFTER THE PASSING AWAY, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  The southernmost room of the second floor was used for meditation, contemplation, and study, and was known as Kali Tapasvi's room, since Kali used to shut himself in there most of the day. North of this room was the worship room, and north of that, again, was the room where the offerings for the worship were prepared. From this room the devotees used to watch the evening worship. North of the "offering room" was the room of the "danas", a very long hall where the members of the math used to assemble. Here the householder devotees and visitors were received. North of this hall was a small room where the devotees took their meals. East of the worship room and of Kali Tapasvi's room ran a long verandah, at the south-west corner of which was the Library of a society of Baranagore. Between Kali Tapasvi's room and this Library was a staircase; and north of the dining-room was another staircase, leading to the roof.
  Narendra and the other members of the math often spent their evenings on this roof. There they devoted a great deal of lime to discussion of the teachings of Sri Ramakrishna, Sankaracharya, Ramanuja, and Jesus Christ, and of Hindu philosophy, European philosophy, the Vedas, the Puranas, and the Tantras.

3.09 - Of Silence and Secrecy, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  has the Universe for its Library and its Laboratory; all
  Nature is its Subject; and its Game, free from close seasons

33.03 - Muraripukur - I, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   A beginning however was made to introduce some kind of discipline and organisation. It was decided that the entire group should be formed into two sections, one "civil", the other "military". The "military" section was to include the active members and the others were to serve as auxiliaries. The idea originally was to build up an armed force, a regular army in fact, with its full complement of weapons and equipment and trained by regular drills. The "civil" side was to deal with external work like journalism, propaganda and recruitment. The Yugantar, and later the Navashakti, became our publicity organs. I was not much attracted by this "civil" side; I wanted to become one of the "military" men. Prafulla who was one of those dreamy, "introvert", intellectual types and a good writer and speaker took up the "civil" work. They used to say with a touch of humour, no doubt, that he was the Mazzini and I was his Garibaldi. But no provision had yet been made to give this Garibaldi the necessary training in military drill or the use of weapons. So, I had to begin with the science of warfare rather than its art. Barin was at that time writing his series on The Principles of Modern Warfare for the Yugantar. I too began my study of the subject. I started going to the Imperial Library (now the National Library) in Calcutta for my studies and research. Where could I begin? Well, it was a book called The Art of War by the German military expert, Clausewitz, a book where the very first sentence ran like this, "The object of warfare is to destroy the enemy and finish with him." I am not sure how this helped me add to my knowledge of warfare or my skill in the art of fighting.
   During my last days in College, I used to study Mazzini in place of King Johnor The Faerie
   Queene. One day I suddenly discovered that they had removed my Mazzini from the shelves of the Library, and even the Life and Death of Socrates by Plato had disappeared. These books were no doubt supposed to turn the heads of our Indian students!
   About this time, I had been several times to my home town of Rungpore. There at the local Library, I discovered a fine book on the history of Secret Societies. The book gave the story of how subject nations aspiring for freedom began their work in secret. In it the story of Ireland and Russia had been given a good deal of space. The secret societies in Russia had a system which was rather distinctive. It should have been taken over by us, so I have heard Sri Aurobindo say. They would divide the underground workers into little groups of not more than five. No group could know the others, only those belonging to a particular group would know its own members. Each group had a leader, who alone would know his immediate superior placed in charge of only four or five of such little groups. Similarly, the leader of the higher group would have dealings with the one next higher in rank who would be in charge of the bigger groups, and so on, right to the topmost man. Such a system was necessary, for in case someone got caught, that could not implicate the entire organisation but only a handful of his acquaintances. One of the main instruments in the hands of the police or the government for detecting a conspiracy is the confession extracted from the persons caught, whether by torture, through temptations, from sheer bravado, or by whatever other means. Under that system, no one could know anybody except the few members of his own group with whom he came into immediate contact through his work, nor could he know anything about the general plan of work; he had to carry out only the part assigned to him.
   At the Rungpore Library I came across another book, namely, Gibbon's famous Decline and Fall of the Roman
   Empire. I ran through the lengthy volumes from end to end with tremendous enthusiasm and added a great deal to my learning and knowledge. I had a hope that the book might throw some light as to how to bring about the "decline and fall" of the British rule in India. I fear much help did not come that way.

33.08 - I Tried Sannyas, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   After going about a bit, I came to Calcutta and put up with a friend at his Mess. One day, I felt a sudden inspiration. It had to be on that very day: on that very day I must renounce the world, make the Great Departure, there was to be no return. I decided to try the Belur Math first. If they took me in, so much the better. They had a good Library too, I had heard. In case they refused, well, one would see. It was about four in the afternoon when I left the Mess. I had of course been to the Math before, and to Dakshineshwar as well, but always by river in a country-boat. I had since been told there was a railway-station at Belur. I thought the Math must be somewhere near the station, so I should go by train this time. With exactly two and a half annas in my pocket, I left for the Howrah station, bought a ticket for Belur and kept the change, a pice or two. On alighting at the station I was told the Math was quite a distance from there, a couple of miles at least. I had to set out on foot and finally arrived at the Math. A few inmates - Sannyasis - sat on a bench in the verandah. They asked me about the object of my visit. I blurted out straightaway, "I have come to stay here. I wish to take up the spiritual life, the life of sannyasa.""In that case," they said, "you had better consult the authority in charge." This authority was Sarat Maharaj. He received me in his room and bade me sit by him. He listened to all I had to say. Then he spoke to me in a most unassuming and affectionate tone and explained a number of things.
   He asked me, "What precisely do you want to come here for ?"

33.11 - Pondicherry II, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   It will not be out of place here to say something about the sort of education and training we received in those early days of our life in Pondicherry. One of the first needs we felt on coming here was for books, for at that time we had hardly anything we could call our own. We found that at the moment Sri Aurobindo was concentrating on the Rigveda alone and we managed to get for him two volumes of the original text. He had of course his own books and papers packed in two or three trunks. It was felt we might afford to spend ten rupees every month for the purchase of books. We began our purchases with the main classics of English literature, especially the series published in the Home University Library and the World Classics editions. Today you see what a fine Library we have, not indeed one but many, for there is a Library of Physical Education, there is a Medical Library, there is a Library for the School, and there are so many private collections. All this had its origin in the small collections' we began every month. At first, the books had to lie on the floor, for we had nothing like chairs or tables or shelves for our Library" I may add that we had no such thing as a bedding either for our use. Each of us possessed a mat, and this mat had to serve as our bedstead, mattress, coverlet and pillow; this was all our furniture. And mosquito curtains? That was a luxury we could not even dream of. If there were too many mosquitos, we would carry the mats out on to the terrace for a little air, assuming, that is, that there was any. Only for Sri Aurobindo we had somehow managed a chair and a table and a camp cot. We lived a real camp life. I should add that there were a few rickety chairs too, for the use of visitors and guests. And lights? Today you see such a profusion of electric lighting in every room and courtyard; we have mercury lights and flash lights and spotlights and torch lights; we are even getting well into the limelight! There is light everywhere, "all here is shining with light", sarvamidam vibhati. In those days, on the other hand, we did not even have a decent kerosene lamp or lantern. All I can recall is a single candlestick, for the personal use of Sri Aurobindo. Whatever conversations or discussions we had after nightfall had to be in the dark; for the most part we practised silence. The first time there was an electric connection, what a joy it gave us! It came like a revelation almost. We were in the Guest House at the time, had shifted there only a, little while ago. We were out one afternoon for our games (that is, football), and it was already dark by the time we returned. As we opened the door and entered the compound, what a surprise it was! The place was full of light, there were lights everywhere, a real illumination. The electricians had come and fitted the connections whilst we had been away. They had fitted as many as four points for the entire building, the Guest House that you see, two for the first floor and two downstairs!
   We were able to purchase some French books at a very cheap rate, not more than two anna; for each volume in a series. We had about a hundred of them, all classics of French literature. I find a few of them are still there in our Library. Afterwards, I also bought from the second-hand bookshops in the Gujli Kadai area several books in Greek, Latin and French. Once I chanced on a big Greek lexicon which I still use.
   Gradually, a few books in Sanskrit and Bengali too were added to our stock, through purchase and gifts. As the number of books reached a few hundred, the problem was how to keep them. We used some bamboo strips to make a rack or book-stand along the walls of our rooms; the "almirahs" came later. I do not think there were any "almirahs" at all so long as we were in the Guest House. They came after the Mother's arrival, when we shifted with our books to the Library House. That is why it came to be called the Library House.
   This account would be incomplete without a few details as to our housekeeping. As to the furniture, I have already said the mat alone did duty for everything. Of servants we had only one; he did the shopping. But as we did not know his language, we had just memorised a few words connected with shopping and we somehow managed to make him understand with the help of these words and a good deal of gestures. Bejoy had his standing instructions: "meen moon anna" (fish three annas) - it was lucky meen in Tamil is the same as in Bengali - "if ille, then nal anna" (if not, then four annas), the Tamil equivalents of "if" or "then" were beyond the range of our knowledge. Today we have practically one servant per head, thanks to the boundless grace of the Mother. Sri Aurobindo used to smile and make the comment, "We have as many servants as there are sadhaks here."

33.13 - My Professors, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   There is another amusing anecdote about this Naren Laha; it relates to another professor of ours, Harinath De. De was then a comparatively junior man just returned from England. One day he mentioned in class that before he left for England he had kept a page mark in a book he had been reading in the college Library and that the book must still be there with its page mark, exactly as he had left it. I went to the Library to search out the book and could verify the truth of his remark, though I cannot now tell you what the book was about. In his teaching he was noted for parallel passages; he would bring in heaps of quotations from passages of similar thoughts. He also prepared a book of Notes on these lines, although he once himself admitted in class that the Notes had been written at an immature stage with the sole object of showing off his learning and that all those parallel passages were really unnecessary. This Harinath De happened to be our examiner in English at the Annual Test, and in his hands our Naren Laha, a good boy, an exceptionally good boy in fact, received a big zero. This left us gaping and we had no end of fun. We decided among ourselves it must be credited to drink. I need not hide the fact that De had been addicted to alcohol, but that had no adverse effect on his character or learning. He was simple and easy in his manner and very sociable. And as for his learning, it was a veritable ocean. He was proficient in about two dozen languages; whatever language he offered for an examination, he always got a first class first. Greek and Latin he had read with Sri Aurobindo; he knew Sri Aurobindo.
   The youngest of all our teachers of English was Prafulla Ghose. He had just passed out of the University. Precisely because he was a raw young man, he could infuse into his feelings and attitude, his manner and language, a degree of warmth and enthusiasm. One day he asked a question in class. One Kiran Mukherji (he was first in English in his B.A. and M.A. and a Greats scholar at Oxford later) stood up and gave a fine answer. .But Prafulla Ghose remarked, "I see the Roman hand of the master", that is to say, the answer had been given after getting hold of Percival's Notes on the point.1

3-5 Full Circle, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  10. Snow, C. P. The Two Cultures: and a Second Look, New American Library, New York, 1963.
  11. Period 1 has one class, not none. Its controller and work-component are Sub-strata: its controller is the age-group of old people; its work-component is the rest of the age groups.
  --
  28. Padover, Saul K., ed., Thomas Jefferson on Democracy, New American Library, New York, 1946, p. 82.
  29. These tests will of course also show the existence and the size of what Thomas Jefferson called the artficial aristocracy. "There is also an artificial aristocracy," he wrote in the same letter, "founded on wealth and birth, without either virtue or talents."28 We probably can, however, go a great deal deeper: with computer help we probably can show various degrees of talents, and degrees of diverse temperaments. Also significant combinations of these degrees and kinds of innate talent and virtue or viciousness, as the case may be. These we can then match with appropriate schools and other kinds of training.
  --
  5. See, for example, The Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field by Jacques Hadamard. Or Reason and Chance in Scientific Discovery by R. Taton. (See Hadamard, Jacques, The Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field. Princeton Univ. Press, 1945. Taton, R., Reason and Chance in Scientific Discovery, Philosophical Library, New York, 1957.)
  6. The term ectropy was, I repeat, coined by W. V. Quine in 1969, replacing such inelegant terms as negentropy and negative entropy.
  --
  25. Snow, C. P., The Two Cultures--And a Second Look. New American Library, New York, 1963.
  26. I am scheduled to teach a course at Southern Connecticut State College in 1972 titled, Unification of the Two Cultures: Scientific and Literary.

40.01 - November 24, 1926, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 08, #unset, #Zen
   EVEN before that date for some time past, Sri Aurobindo had been more and more withdrawing into himself and retiring within. An external sign of this became visible to us as his lunch hour shifted gradually towards the afternoon. We used to have our meal together and the Mother too ate with us, at the Library House, in the room now used by Ravindra as the fruit-room. There used to be about eight or ten of us. On the previous day, Sri Aurobindo came down to lunch when it was past four. We would naturally wait till he came.
   Then the great day arrived. In the afternoon, it was in fact already getting dark, all of us had gone out as usual. I was on the sea-front. Suddenly, someone came running at full speed and aid to me, "Go, get back at once; the Mother is calling everybody." I had not the least idea as to what might be the reason. I came back running and went straight up, to, the verandah facing the Prosperity room. Sri Aurobindo used to take his seat there in the evening for his talks with us or rather for answering our questions. As I came up, a strange scene met my eyes. Sri Aurobindo was seated in his chair, the Mother sat at his feet, both of them with their faces turned towards us. I looked round to see, if all were present. Satyen was missing and I said, "Satyen has not come. Shall I call him in?" The Mother spoke out, "Yes, all, all." All were called in, everybody was now present. We took our seats before Sri Aurobindo and the Mother, both of whom were facing us. The whole scene and atmosphere had a heavenly halo.

6.0 - Conscious, Unconscious, and Individuation, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  Rhenoviensis, Central Library, Zurich. Here the peacock rep-
  resents the Phoenix rising newborn from the fire. There is a
  --
  English text by H. Rackham. (Loeb Classical Library.) London
  and New York, 1933.
  --
  Nicene Christian Library, 4, 12.) Edinburgh, 1867, 1869. 2 vols.
  Crawley, Alfred Ernest. The Idea of the Soul. London, 1909.
  --
  Classical Library.) London and New York, 1914.
  Honorius of Autun. Expositio in Cantica canticorum. See Migne,
  --
  Rambaut. (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 5, 9.) Edinburgh, 1868.
  2 vols.
  --
  William Fletcher. (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 21, 22.) Edin-
  burgh, 1871. 2 vols.
  --
  (Loeb Classical Library.) London and New York, 1929- . 12 vols,
  published. (Vol. I.)
  --
  lation by H. Rackham. (Loeb Classical Library.) London and New
  York, 1938- . 10 vols, published.
  --
  H. E. Butler. (Loeb Classical Library.) London and New York,
  1912.
  --
  translation by H. J. Thomson. (Loeb Classical Library.) London
  and Cambridge, Mass., 1949-53. (Vol. I, p. 344 -Vol. II, p. 97.)
  --
  man's Library.) London and New York, 1938. See also Deussen.
  Riklin, F. "Uber Gefangnispsychosen," Psychologisch-neurologische

7 - Yoga of Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  OSMAN:A UNIVERSITY Library
  Call No, r y Accession No. ^^ 2-H" \
  --
  It is a very curious place, something like a vast Library.
  It consists of an infinite number of cells, as it were, each
  --
  cription I have given of a Library is only an image, the
  real thing is something different. However, you have in

Apology, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Gutenberg-tm concept of a Library of electronic works that could be
  freely shared with anyone. For forty years, he produced and

APPENDIX I - Curriculum of A. A., #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
      The A.'. A.'. does not offer examination in this course, but recommends these books as the foundation of a Library.
  

SECTION 2. ::: Other books, principally fiction, of a generally suggestive and helpful kind



A Secret Miracle, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  was laid in Hradcany, in the Library of Baron von Roemerstadt, on one of the
  last afternoons of the nineteenth century. In the first scene of the first act a
  --
  naves of the Clementine Library. A librarian wearing dark glasses asked
  him: "What are you looking for?" Hladik answered: "I am looking for God."

Averroes Search, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  when Averroes entered his Library again. (In the harem, the dark-haired
  slave girls had tortured a red-haired slave girl, but he would not know it

Blazing P3 - Explore the Stages of Postconventional Consciousness, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Aurobindo, Sri (1970-75). The future poetry. Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library.
  Pondicherry, India: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.
  --
  Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. Pondicherry, India: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.
  Aurobindo, Sri (1970-75). The life divine Book two part two. Vol. 19, Sri Aurobindo Birth
  Centenary Library. Pondicherry, India: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.
  Aurobindo, Sri (1970-75). The supramental manifestation and other writings, SABCL Vol. 16,
  Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. Pondicherry, India: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.
  Aurobindo, Sri & Dalal A. S. (2001). A greater psychology: An introduction to the
  --
  Underhill, E. (1955). Mysticism. New York: New American Library.
  Vaughan, F. (1985). Discovering transpersonal identity. Journal of Humanistic Psychology

BOOK II. -- PART I. ANTHROPOGENESIS., #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  Initiates have access -- and a whole Library of comments, glossaries, and explanations, form the
  synopsis of Man's genesis.

BOOK II. -- PART III. ADDENDA. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  Empire, it is now agreed, was that of Sargon of Accad, who established a great Library, patronized
  literature, and extended his conquests across the sea into Cyprus. It is now known that he reigned as
  --
  Sayce's remarks are promising. For he explains the difficulty by saying that as -- "the Nineveh Library
  contained mostly copies of older Babylonian texts, and the copyists pitched upon such tablets only as
  --
  Hwang-ti, in 213 B.C.? Surely the brick-clay tablets of the Imperial Babylonian Library, and the
  priceless treasures of the Chinese collections could have never contained such information as one of

BOOK II. -- PART II. THE ARCHAIC SYMBOLISM OF THE WORLD-RELIGIONS, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  translation of it from an Ethiopic MS. in the Bodleian Library, the editor, author of the "Evolution of
  Christianity," remarks: -"In revising the proof-sheets of the Book of Enoch . . . . . the parable of the sheep, rescued by the good
  --
  presented by Pereisc, the traveller, to the Mazarine Library, declared that "no book of Enoch could
  exist among the Abyssinians"! Further researches and discoveries worsted his too dogmatic assertion,
  --
  National Library of Paris, which represents the adoration of Bakhan-Aleare.
  In this extraordinary sculpture and painting one sees the disc of the Sun beaming upon an ansated

BOOK I. -- PART I. COSMIC EVOLUTION, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  It has been claimed in all ages that ever since the destruction of the Alexandrian Library (see Isis
  Unveiled, Vol. II., p. 27), every work of a character that might have led the profane to the ultimate
  --
  thousands of ancient parchments saved when the Alexandrian Library was destroyed; the thousands of
  Sanskrit works which disappeared in India in the reign of Akbar; the universal tradition in China and
  --
  Chinese records. Si-dzang (Tibet) is mentioned in the MSS. of the sacred Library of the province of FoKien, as the great seat of Occult learning from time immemorial, ages before Buddha. The Emperor
  Yu, the "great" (2,207 years B.C.), a pious mystic and great adept, is said to have obtained his

Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  the Argentine National Library.
  Norman Thomas di Giovanni is an American now
  --
  We extend warm thanks for their help to Marian Skedgell, of E. P. Dutton, and to Jos Edmundo Clemente, Assistant Director of the Argentine National Library.
  Buenos Aires, May
  --
  (Chapter ): On page of the first volume of his Zauberbiblio thek [Magic Library], Horst summarizes the teachings
  of the English mystic Jane Lead in this way: Whoever possesses magical powers can, at will, master and change the
  --
  taken from the oracles before the Library of Alexandria was
  burned by Omar. The name of the learned Greek has not
  --
  until before the last World War in the Library of the University of Dresden. It is painful to say that this document has
  also disappeared, and whether as a consequence of bombardment or of the earlier book burning of the Nazis, it is
  --
  shelves of some Library.
  The Phoenix

BOOK XIII. - That death is penal, and had its origin in Adam's sin, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  Foreign Theological Library.
    MESSRS. CLARK beg respectfully to intimate that from this time they will allow a Selection of Twenty Volumes (or more at the same ratio) from the various Series, with the exception of the Volumes issued in 1868-69-70. No Duplicates allowed in a Selection of Twelve or Twenty Volumes.
  --
  [24] As the letters of Vives are not in every Library, we give his comico-pathetic account of the result of his Augustinian labours on his health: "Ex quo Augustinum perfeci, nunquam valui ex sententia; proxim vero hebdomade et hac, fracto corpore cuncto, et nervis lassitudine quadam et debilitate dejectis, in caput decem turres incumbere mihi videntur incidendo pondere, ac mole intolerabili; isti sunt fructus studiorum, et merces pulcherrimi laboris; quid labor et benefacta juvant?"
  [25] See the Editor's Preface.
  --
  concept of a Library of electronic works that could be freely shared
  with anyone. For forty years, he produced and distributed Project

BOOK XVIII. - A parallel history of the earthly and heavenly cities from the time of Abraham to the end of the world, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  One of the Ptolemies, kings of Egypt, desired to know and have these sacred books. For after Alexander of Macedon, who is also styled the Great, had by his most wonderful, but by no means enduring power, subdued the whole of Asia, yea, almost the whole world, partly by force of arms, partly by terror, and, among other kingdoms of the East, had entered and obtained Judea also, on his death his generals did not peaceably divide that most ample kingdom among them for a possession, but rather dissipated it, wasting all things by wars. Then Egypt began to have the Ptolemies as her kings. The first of them, the son of Lagus, carried many captive out of Judea into Egypt. But another Ptolemy, called Philadelphus, who succeeded him, permitted all whom he had brought under the yoke to return free; and, more than that, sent kingly gifts to the temple of God, and begged Eleazar, who was the high priest, to give him the Scriptures, which he had heard by report were truly divine, and therefore greatly desired to have in that most noble Library he had made. When the high[Pg 271] priest had sent them to him in Hebrew, he afterwards demanded interpreters of him, and there were given him seventy-two, out of each of the twelve tribes six men, most learned in both languages, to wit, the Hebrew and Greek; and their translation is now by custom called the Septuagint. It is reported, indeed, that there was an agreement in their words so wonderful, stupendous, and plainly divine, that when they had sat at this work, each one apart (for so it pleased Ptolemy to test their fidelity), they differed from each other in no word which had the same meaning and force, or in the order of the words; but, as if the translators had been one, so what all had translated was one, because in very deed the one Spirit had been in them all. And they received so wonderful a gift of God, in order that the authority of these Scriptures might be commended not as human but divine, as indeed it was, for the benefit of the nations who should at some time believe, as we now see them doing.
    43. Of the authority of the Septuagint translation, which, saving the honour of the Hebrew original, is to be preferred to all translations.

BOOK XV. - The progress of the earthly and heavenly cities traced by the sacred history, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  But if I say this, I shall presently be answered, It is one of the Jews' lies. This, however, we have disposed of above, showing that it cannot be that men of so just a reputation as the seventy translators should have falsified their version. However, if I ask them which of the two is more credible, that the Jewish nation, scattered far and wide, could have unanimously conspired to forge this lie, and so, through envying others the authority of their Scriptures, have deprived themselves of their verity; or that seventy men, who were also themselves Jews, shut up in one place (for Ptolemy king of Egypt had got them together for this work), should have envied foreign nations that same truth, and by common consent inserted these errors: who does not see which can be more naturally and readily believed? But far be it from any prudent man to believe either that the Jews, however malicious and wrong-headed, could have tampered with so many and so widely-dispersed manuscripts; or that those renowned seventy individuals had any common purpose to grudge the truth to the nations. One must therefore more plausibly maintain, that when first their labours began to be transcribed from the copy in Ptolemy's Library, some such misstatement might find its way into the first copy made, and from it might be disseminated far and wide; and that this might arise from no fraud, but from a mere copyist's error. This is a sufficiently plausible account of the difficulty regarding Methuselah's life, and of that other case in which there is a difference in the total of twenty-four years. But in those cases in which there is a methodical resemblance in the falsification, so that uniformly the one version allots to the period before a son and successor is born 100 years more than the other, and to the[Pg 71] period subsequent 100 years less, and vice vers, so that the totals may agree, and this holds true of the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and seventh generations,in these cases error seems to have, if we may say so, a certain kind of constancy, and savours not of accident, but of design.
  Accordingly, that diversity of numbers which distinguishes the Hebrew from the Greek and Latin copies of Scripture, and which consists of a uniform addition and deduction of 100 years in each lifetime for several consecutive generations, is to be attributed neither to the malice of the Jews nor to men so diligent and prudent as the seventy translators, but to the error of the copyist who was first allowed to transcribe the manuscript from the Library of the above-mentioned king. For even now, in cases where numbers contri bute nothing to the easier comprehension or more satisfactory knowledge of anything, they are both carelessly transcribed, and still more carelessly emended. For who will trouble himself to learn how many thousand men the several tribes of Israel contained? He sees no resulting benefit of such knowledge. Or how many men are there who are aware of the vast advantage that lies hid in this knowledge? But in this case, in which during so many consecutive generations 100 years are added in one manuscript where they are not reckoned in the other, and then, after the birth of the son and successor, the years which were wanting are added, it is obvious that the copyist who contrived this arrangement designed to insinuate that the antediluvians lived an excessive number of years only because each year was excessively brief, and that he tried to draw the attention to this fact by his statement of their age of puberty at which they became able to beget children. For, lest the incredulous might stumble at the difficulty of so long a lifetime, he insinuated that 100 of their years equalled but ten of ours; and this insinuation he conveyed by adding 100 years whenever he found the age below 160 years or thereabouts, deducting these years again from the period after the son's birth, that the total might harmonize. By this means he intended to ascribe the generation of offspring to a fit age, without diminishing the total sum of years ascribed to the[Pg 72] lifetime of the individuals. And the very fact that in the sixth generation he departed from this uniform practice, inclines us all the rather to believe that when the circumstance we have referred to required his alterations, he made them; seeing that when this circumstance did not exist, he made no alteration. For in the same generation he found in the Hebrew MS. that Jared lived before he begat Enoch 162 years, which, according to the short year computation, is sixteen years and somewhat less than two months, an age capable of procreation; and therefore it was not necessary to add 100 short years, and so make the age twenty-six years of the usual length; and of course it was not necessary to deduct, after the son's birth, years which he had not added before it. And thus it comes to pass that in this instance there is no variation between the two manuscripts.
  This is corroborated still further by the fact that in the eighth generation, while the Hebrew books assign 182[172] years to Methuselah before Lamech's birth, ours assign to him twenty less, though usually 100 years are added to this period; then, after Lamech's birth, the twenty years are restored, so as to equalize the total in the two books. For if his design was that these 170 years be understood as seventeen, so as to suit the age of puberty, as there was no need for him adding anything, so there was none for his subtracting anything; for in this case he found an age fit for the generation of children, for the sake of which he was in the habit of adding those 100 years in cases where he did not find the age already sufficient. This difference of twenty years we might, indeed, have supposed had happened accidentally, had he not taken care to restore them afterwards as he had deducted them from the period before, so that there might be no deficiency in the total. Or are we perhaps to suppose that there was the still more astute design of concealing the deliberate and uniform addition of 100 years to the first period and their deduction from the subsequent period,did he design to conceal this by doing something similar, that is to[Pg 73] say, adding and deducting, not indeed a century, but some years, even in a case in which there was no need for his doing so? But whatever may be thought of this, whether it be believed that he did so or not, whether, in fine, it be so or not, I would have no manner of doubt that when any diversity is found in the books, since both cannot be true to fact, we do well to believe in preference that language out of which the translation was made into another by translators. For there are three Greek mss., one Latin, and one Syriac, which agree with one another, and in all of these Methuselah is said to have died six years before the deluge.

ENNEAD 02.09 - Against the Gnostics; or, That the Creator and the World are Not Evil., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  concept of a Library of electronic works that could be freely shared
  with anyone. For forty years, he produced and distributed Project

ENNEAD 03.07 - Of Time and Eternity., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 03, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  concept of a Library of electronic works that could be freely shared
  with anyone. For forty years, he produced and distributed Project

ENNEAD 04.02 - How the Soul Mediates Between Indivisible and Divisible Essence., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 01, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  concept of a Library of electronic works that could be freely shared
  with anyone. For forty years, he produced and distributed Project

ENNEAD 06.05 - The One and Identical Being is Everywhere Present In Its Entirety.345, #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  The writer had for several years been working at the premier edition of the fragments of Numenius, in reasonably complete form, with translation and outline. After ransacking the accessible sources of fragments, there remained yet an alleged treatise of Numenius on Matter, in the Library of the Escoreal, near Madrid. This had been known to savants in Germany for many years; and Prof. Uzener, of Bonn, in his criticism of Thedinga's partial collection of fragments, had expressed a strong desire that it be investigated; it had also been noticed by Zeller, and Bouillet, as well as Chaignet. If then I hoped to publish a comparatively reliable collection of the fragments of Numenius, it was my duty, though hailing from far America, and though no European had shown enough interest therein to send for a photographic copy, to go there, and get one, which I did in July, 1913. I bore the precious fragment to Rostock and Prof. Thedinga in Hagen, where, however, we discovered that it was no more than a section of Plotinos's Enneads, iii. 6.6 to end. The manuscript did, indeed, show an erasure of the name1270 of Plotinos, and the substitution of that of Numenius. After the first disappointment, it became unavoidable to ask the question why the monk should have done that. Had he any reason to suppose that this represented Numenian doctrine, even if it was not written by Numenius? Having no external data to go by, it became necessary to resort to internal criticism, to compare this Plotinian treatment of matter with other Plotinian treatments, in other portions of the Enneads.
  This then inevitably led to a close scrutiny of Plotinos's various treatments of the subject, with results that were very much unlooked for. This part that we might well have had reason to ascribe to Numenian influence, on the contrary, turned out to be by far more Plotinian than other sections that we would at first have unhesitatingly considered Plotinian, and, as will be seen elsewhere, the really doubtful portions occur in the very last works of Plotinos's life, where it would have been more natural to expect the most genuine. However, the result was a demonstration of a progress in doctrines in the career of Plotinos, and after a careful study thereof, the reader will agree that we have in this case every element of probability in favor of such a development; indeed, it will seem so natural that the unbiased reader will ask himself why this idea has not before this been the general view of the matter.
  --
  concept of a Library of electronic works that could be freely shared
  with anyone. For forty years, he produced and distributed Project

Euthyphro, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  concept of a Library of electronic works that could be freely shared
  with anyone. For thirty years, he produced and distributed Project

For a Breath I Tarry, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
     "How? I could lay open to you the Library of Man. I could take you around the world and conduct you among the wonders of Man which still remain, hidden. I could summon up visions of times long past when Man walked the Earth. I could show you the things which delighted Him. I could obtain for you anything you desire, excepting Manhood itself."
     "Enough," said Frost. "How could a unit such as yourself do these things, unless it were allied with a far greater Power?"
  --
     "The lay open to me the Library of Man."
     "Very well. There is, of course, a price."
  --
     Mordel departed and returned with the Complete Drama Critics' Living Library. This could not be speeded-up beyond twice natural time, so it took Frost a little over six months to view it in its entirety.
     Then, "What else have you?" he asked.
  --
     Frost had read the entire surviving Library of Man. He decided then upon a human reply:
     "Thank you," he said.
  --
     "From the Library of Man," said Frost.
     "Will you render me _some_ of this data, for processing?"
  --
     "Very well. I will give you the entire Library of Man for less than I paid for it."
     "Paid? _The Complete Unabridged Dictionary_ does not satisfact--"
  --
     Then Beta, who had read the entire Library of Man, selected a human figure of speech: "Good luck then, Frost. There will be many watchers."
     Divcom and Solcom both know, he decided.
  --
     Then the Beta-Machine, who had read the entire Library of Man, interrupted them:
     "Can anything but a Man know despair?" asked Beta.

Liber 46 - The Key of the Mysteries, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   Library."
   "I will do so, for I pass almost all my time in Paris in the public

LUX.04 - LIBERATION, #Liber Null, #Peter J Carroll, #Occultism
  There is a thing more trustworthy than all the sages, and which contains more wisdom than a great Library. Your own body. It asks only for food, warmth, sex and transcendence. Transcendence, the urge to become one with something greater, is variously satisfied in love, humanitarian works, or in the artistic, scientific, or magical quests of truth. To satisfy these simple needs is liberation indeed. Power, authority, excessive wealth and greed for sensory experience are aberrations of these things.
  Anathemism: Self-destruction

MoM References, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Dee, J. (1993). Diary of Doctor John Dee: Together with a catalogue of his Library of manuscripts. New
  York: Holmes.
  --
  Grosset and Dunlap, Companion Library.
  Luria, A.R. (1980). Higher cortical functions in man. New York: Basic Books.
  MacRae, G.W. (Trans.). (1988). The thunder: Perfect mind. In J.M. Robinson (Ed.), The Nag Hammadi Library in English (pp. 297-319). New York: Harper Collins.
  Maier, N.R.F. & Schnierla, T.C. (1935). Principles of animal psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  --
  Milton, J. (1961). Paradise lost (and other poems). New York: New American Library.
  Morley, J. (1923). Rousseau and his era: Vol. 1. New York: Harper and Brothers.
  --
  Modern Library.
  Oatley, K. (1994). A taxonomy of the emotions of literary response and a theory of identification in fictional narrative. Poetics, 23, 53-74.
  --
  Robinson, J.R. (Ed.). (1988). The Nag Hammadi Library in English. New York: Harper Collins.
  Romme, M.A. & Escher, A.D. (1989). Hearing voices. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 15, 209-216.

Partial Magic in the Quixote, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  barber inspect Don Quixote's Library; astoundingly, one of the books
  examined is Cervantes' own Galatea and it turns out that the barber is a

r1914 04 11, #Record of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   Dreams many & for the most part perfectly coherent; only the last two or three were affected by present personality & associations, but not by present images. The incidents & forms were real & coherent, & the incoherence existed only in the thought of the sakshi fixed by adhyaropa on the central images,rupa & karma were correct, nama only confused,eg the Salle de Lecture of Pondicherry adhyaropita on a small but efficient & nobly built Library, the Baroda College or a place of education in the same locality, London, brother, sister etc being brought in & fixed on forms & places entirely different. There was also a tendency to run different dreams into each other. In Samadhi thought has become fluent, coherent & self-possessed above the sushupta mind, lipi is clear & frequent, writing or print struggles to be coherently legible, forms & incidents are still in the stage of obstructed progress towards stability.
   The difficulty now is to harmonise the chanda action of the Mahakali personality with the luminous effectiveness of the vijnana, as it has been harmonised with the internal purity, liberty & bhukti. For the luminous & effective vijnana has hitherto been the privilege of Maheswari-Mahasaraswati, & the Mahakali bhava has been always accompanied by false action, false tejas, false knowledge due to eagerness, hope, desire & preference. The old association has revived in the environmental nature owing to the liberation of the asiddha vayavic forces in the surroundings.

Sayings of Sri Ramakrishna (text), #Sayings of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  in spiritual life, although they have read a whole Library of religious books?" The Master replied, "The
  kite and the vulture soar high up in the air, but all the time their eyes remain fixed on charnel-houses in

Talks With Sri Aurobindo 1, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  SRI AUROBINDO: To me or to the Library?
  PURANI: To you.
  SRI AUROBINDO: Then it won't go to the Library. (Laughter)
  PURANI: The Library doesn't need it. Who will read such books? Those who
  are interested have copieslike Vedavrata and myself.

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  like the burning down of the Library in Alexandria; and that know-
  ledge of the past could be obtained only by archaeological excavations.
  --
  hundreds of technical journals on dusty Library shelves which, if remembered,
  would act as Open Sesames.
  --
  ted to romantic novels from the lending Library feel that the names of
  authors are irrelevant; all that matters is that it should be a 'nice book'.
  --
  analytical Library No. 50, 162 ft, 163 fh. (Weeping and abreaction arrears.),
  1056.

The Aleph, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Beatriz had been tall, frail, slightly stooped; in her walk there was (if the oxymoron may be allowed) a kind of uncertain grace, a hint of expectancy. Carlos Argentino was pink-faced, overweight, gray-haired, fine-featured. He held a minor position in an unreadable Library out on the edge of the Southside of Buenos Aires. He was authoritarian but also unimpressive. Until only recently, he took advantage of his nights and holidays to stay at home. At a remove of two generations, the Italian "S" and demonstrative Italian gestures still survived in him. His mental activity was continuous, deeply felt, far-ranging, and -- all in all -- meaningless. He dealt in pointless analogies and in trivial scruples. He had (as did Beatriz) large, beautiful, finely shaped hands. For several months he seemed to be obsessed with Paul Fort -- less with his ballads than with the idea of a towering reputation. "He is the Prince of poets," Daneri would repeat fatuously. "You will belittle him in vain -- but no, not even the most venomous of your shafts will graze him."
  On the thirtieth of April, 1941, along with the sugared cake I allowed myself to add a bottle of Argentine cognac. Carlos Argentino tasted it, pronounced it "interesting," and, after a few drinks, launched into a glorification of modern man.
  --
  I asked him to read me a passage, if only a short one. He opened a drawer of his writing table, drew out a thick stack of papers -- sheets of a large pad imprinted with the letterhead of the Juan Crisstomo Lafinur Library -- and, with ringing satisfaction, declaimed:
    Mine eyes, as did the Greek's, have known men's
  --
  Here are my reasons. Around 1867, Captain Burton held the post of British Consul in Brazil. In July, 1942, Pedro Henrquez Urea came across a manuscript of Burton's, in a Library at Santos, dealing with the mirror which the Oriental world attributes to Iskander Zu al-Karnayn, or Alexander Bicornis of Macedonia. In its crystal the whole world was reflected. Burton mentions other similar devices -- the sevenfold cup of Kai Kosru; the mirror that Tariq ibn-Ziyad found in a tower (Thousand and One Nights, 272); the mirror that Lucian of Samosata examined on the moon (True History, I, 26); the mirrorlike spear that the first book of Capella's Satyricon attri butes; Merlin's universal mirror, which was "round and hollow... and seem'd a world of glas" (The Faerie Queene, III, 2, 19) -- and adds this curious statement: "But the aforesaid objects (besides the disadvantage of not existing) are mere optical instruments. The Faithful who gather at the mosque of Amr, in Cairo, are acquainted with the fact that the entire universe lies inside one of the stone pillars that ring its central court... No one, of course, can actually see it, but those who lay an ear against the surface tell that after some short while they perceive its busy hum... The mosque dates from the seventh century; the pillars come from other temples of pre-Islamic religions, since, as ibn-Khaldun has written: 'In nations founded by nomads, the aid of foreigners is essential in all concerning masonry.'"
  Does this Aleph exist in the heart of a stone? Did I see it there in the cellar when I saw all things, and have I now forgotten it? Our minds are porous and forgetfulness seeps in; I myself am distorting and losing, under the wearing away of the years, the face of Beatriz.

The Book of Sand, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  An unnamed narrator is visited by a tall Scots Bible-seller, who presents him with a very old cloth-bound book that he bought in India from an Untouchable. The book is emblazoned with the title "Holy Writ," below which title is emblazoned "Bombay,"[1] but is said to be called "The Book of Sand"..."because neither the book nor the sand has any beginning or end." Upon opening it, he is startled to discover that the book, which is written in an unknown language and occasionally punctuated by illustrations, is, in fact, infinite: as one turns the pages, more pages seem to grow out of the front and back covers. He trades a month of his pension and a prized "Wiclif Bible"[1] for the book and hides it on a bookshelf behind his copy of One Thousand and One Nights. Over the summer, the narrator obsesses over the book, poring over it, cataloging its illustrations and refusing to go outside for fear of its theft. In the end, realizing that the book is monstrous, he briefly considers burning it before fearing the possibility of the endless supply of smoke suffocating the world. Instead, he goes to the National Library where he once worked (like Borges) to leave the book among the basement bookshelves, reasoning that "the best place to hide a leaf is in a forest."
  -------
  --
  I thought of fire, but I feared that the burning of an infinite book might likewise prove infinite and suffocate the planet with smoke. Somewhere I recalled reading that the best place to hide a leaf is in a forest. Before retirement, I worked on Mexico Street, at the Argentine National Library, which contains nine hundred thousand volumes. I knew that to the right of the entrance a curved staircase leads down into the basement, where books and maps and periodicals are kept. One day I went there and,
  slipping past a member of the staff and trying not to notice at what height or distance from the door, I lost the Book of Sand on one of the basement's musty shelves.

The Book (short story), #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  The Lovecraft Library wishes to extend its gratitude to Patrick Swinkels for transcribing this text.
  This text has been converted into PDF by Agha Yasir www.ech-pi-el.com

The Coming Race Contents, #The Coming Race, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  SRI AUROBINDO Library
  G. T., MADRAS

The Dwellings of the Philosophers, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  rich Library contained almost all the important works of the hermetic philosophers (1()) . It even
  appears that the dean of the students of France, as Chevreul called himself, had learned a great
  --
  (10) Chevreul left his hermetic Library to the Museum dHistoire Naturelle (Museum of Natural History)
  (11) Cf. La Revue, #18, Sept. 15, 1912, p. 162, et seq.
  --
  Lyon verd, du grand theriaque et du Regime. Ms. Of the 17th century; Lyon Library, #971, p. 900.
  48
  --
  these books have been printed. From a note added to the Manuscript #158 (125) of the Library
  of Rennes, a gentleman of Normandy, Monsieur Bois Jeuffroy, would have inherited all the
  --
  owned by the Library of Rennes, it is nonetheless very clearly stated that they resided in the
  Castle of Flers, whose owner was Grosparmy, "where they accomplished the philosophers
  --
  the 29th day of December of the year 1449". Cf. Rennes Library, ms 158 (125), p. III.
  (4) Cf. Charles Verel: Les Alchimistes de Flers (The Alchemists of Flers)', Alencon, 1889, in the Bulletin de la
  --
  (10) Oeuvres Manuscriptes de Grosparmy, Valois, and Vicot. Library of Rennes, ms 160 (124) Folio 90, Second
  Book by Master Pierre de Vitecoq, priest: "To you, noble and valorous knight, I address and entrust in your
  --
  (Paris) mss # 12246 (2526), 12298 and 12299 (435), 17th century Library of Rennes, ms. 160 (124), folio
  139: "There follows a recapitulation of M. Pierre Vicot, priest... on the writings which precede, which he wrote
  --
  by Floretus in Bethabor. Library of the Arsenal, ms. 3022 (168, S.A.F.), p. 14. Here is the part of the text which is liable to
  interest us:
  --
  by Claudius Popelyn, Parisian; Paris, International Library, 1861).
  (5) The one previously sterile.
  --
  (2) Collection of documents on Avignon; Library of Carpentras, ms. 917, folio 168.
  (3) The Greek name for fish is formed by the combination of the initials of this phrase: [*156-8], Iesous Christos
  --
  by Luis XIV; very beautiful 15th century wood sculptures, coming from the Library of the
  Castle of Hermenault, also in the Vendee district; some Henry II curtains; three of the eight
  --
  from Avisseau; Florentine bronzes; Chinese dishes of the green period; a Library containing
  the works of the most famous architects of the 16th and 17th centuries: Ducerceau, Bietterlin,
  --
  Paris, New Library, 1854.
  (14) Le Grand et Excellent Oeuvre des Sages (The Great and Excellent Work of the Sages) by Jacques Le
  Tesson; Second Dialogue du Lyon Verd (Second Dialogue of the Green Lion), Ch. VI, ms. 17th century. Library
  of Lyon, #971.
  --
  manuscript from the Palais des Arts Library, in Lyons, Lrance, #88 (Delandine, 1899), folio.
  149
  --
  (3) La Generation et Operation du Grande-Oeuvre (The Creation and Operation of the Great Work), Library of
  Lyons, France. Ms. quoted.
  --
  Ms from the 17th century. Library of Lyons #971(900).
  (5) Dragons or serpents devouring their tails; serpents or green lizards devouring their own tails.
  --
  clairvoyance. Her Library seems already big for the time. "According to the only document",
  says Le Roux de Lincy (2) , "which I was able to discover relative to the entire Library formed
  by Anne of Brittany (Index des Comptes de Depenses de 1498 Index of the Accounts

The Fearful Sphere of Pascal, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  Fragments of this illusory Library, compiled or concocted beginning in the
  third century, go to form what is called the Corpus Hermeticum; in one of

The Garden of Forking Paths 1, #Selected Fictions, #unset, #Zen
  The damp path zigzagged like those of my childhood. When we reached the house, we went into a Library filled with books from both East and West. I recognized some large volumes bound in yellow silk-manuscripts of the Lost Encyclopedia which was edited by the Third Emperor of the Luminous Dynasty. They had never been printed. A phonograph record was spinning near a bronze phoenix. I remember also a rose-glazed jar and yet another, older by many centuries, of that blue color which our potters copied from the Persians . . .
  Stephen Albert was watching me with a smile on his face. He was, as I have said, remarkably tall. His face was deeply lined and he had gray eyes and a gray beard.

The Garden of Forking Paths 2, #Selected Fictions, #unset, #Zen
  The damp path zigzagged like those of my childhood. We came to a Library of Eastern and Western books. I recognized bound in yellow silk several volumes of the Lost Encyclopedia, edited by the Third Emperor of the Luminous Dynasty but never printed. The record on the phonograph revolved next to a bronze phoenix. I also recall a famille rose vase and another, many centuries older, of that shade of blue which our craftsmen copied from the potters of Persia. . .
  Stephen Albert observed me with a smile. He was, as I have said, very tall, sharp-featured, with gray eyes and a gray beard. He told me that he had been a missionary in Tientsin "before aspiring to become a Sinologist."

The Gospel of Thomas, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
     I have followed the Nag Hammadi Library standard for typographical symbols in this file. Text contained within [square brackets] indicates a damaged portion of the manuscript where the translators have attempted a reconstruction. Text within
  (parentheses) indicates comments or text added by the translator for clarification purposes. Text within indicates a scribal error (spelling, grammatical, etc) in the original, where the translator has made a correction. Text within

The Library Of Babel 2, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  object:The Library Of Babel 2
  class:short story
  --
  The Library of Babel
  , By this art you may contemplate the variation of the 23 letters ....
  --
  The universe (which others call the Library) is composed of an indefinite,
  perhaps infinite number of hexagonal galleries. In the center of each gallery
  --
  that the Library is not infinite-if it were, what need would there be for that
  illusory replication? I prefer to dream that burnished surfaces are a figura
  --
  Like all the men of the Library, in my younger days I traveled; I have
  journeyed in quest of a book, perhaps the catalog of catalogs. Now that my
  --
  The Library is a sphere whose exact center is any hexagon and whose circum
  ference is unattainable.
  --
  First: The Library has existed ab ternitate. That truth, whose immedi
  ate corollary is the future eternity of the world, no rational mind can doubt.
  --
  the Library and thereby satisfactorily solve the riddle that no conjecture had
  been able to divine-the formless and chaotic nature of virtually all books.
  --
  law of the Library. This philosopher observed that all books, however dif
  ferent from one another they might be, consist of identical elements: the
  --
  ises, the librarian deduced that the Library is "total"-perfect, complete,
  and whole-and that its bookshelves contain all possible combinations of
  --
  archangels, the faithful catalog of the Library, thousands and thousands of
  false catalogs, the proof of the falsity of those false catalogs, a proof of the
  --
  When it was announced that the Library contained all books, the first
  reaction was unbounded joy. All men felt themselves the possessors of an
  --
  of mankind-the origin of the Library and of time-might be revealed. In
  all likelihood those profound mysteries can indeed be explained in words;
  --
  look two widely acknowledged facts: One, that the Library is so huge that
  any reduction by human hands must be infinitesimal. And two, that each
  book is unique and irreplaceable, but (since the Library is total) there are
  always several hundred thousand imperfect facsimiles-books that differ by
  --
  mous Library may find its justification.
  Infidels claim that the rule in the Library is not "sense;' but "non-sense;'
  and that "rationality " (even humble, pure coherence) is an almost miracu
  lous exception. They speak, I know, of "the feverish Library, whose random
  volumes constantly threaten to transmogrify into others, so that they affirm
  --
  and desperate ignorance. For while the Library contains all verbal structures,
  all the variations allowed by the twenty-five orthographic symbols, it in
  --
  already contained somewhere in the Library. There is no com
  bination of characters one can make-dhcmrlchtdj, for example-that the
  divine Library has not foreseen and that in one or more of its secret tongues
  does not hide a terrible significance. There is no syllable one can speak that is
  --
  ubiquitous system of hexagonal galleries," while a Library-the thing-is a
  loaf of bread or a pyramid or something else, and the six words that define
  --
  the only species-teeters at the verge of extinction, yet that the Library
  enlightened, solitary, infinite, perfectly unmoving, armed with precious
  --
  4Letizia Alvarez de Toledo has observed that the vast Library is pointless; strictly
  speaking, all that is required is

The Library of Babel, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  object:The Library of Babel
  class:short story
  --
  The Library of Babel, by Jorge Luis Borges (1941)
  By this art you may contemplate the variations of the 23 letters...
  --
  The universe (which others call the Library) is composed of an indefinite and
  perhaps infinite number of hexagonal galleries, with vast air shafts between,
  --
  appearances. Men usually infer from this mirror that the Library is not infinite (if it
  were, why this illusory duplication?); I prefer to dream that its polished surfaces
  --
  Like all men of the Library, I have traveled in my youth; I have wandered in
  search of a book, perhaps the catalogue of catalogues; now that my eyes can
  --
  which is infinite. I say that the Library is unending. The idealists argue that the
  hexagonal rooms are a necessary form of absolute space or, at least, of our
  --
  classic dictum: The Library is a sphere whose exact center is any one of its
  hexagons and whose circumference is inaccessible.
  --
  First: The Library exists ab aeterno. This truth, whose immediate corollary is
  the future eternity of the world, cannot be placed in doubt by any reasonable
  --
  the fundamental law of the Library. This thinker observed that all the books, no
  matter how diverse they might be, are made up of the same elements: the space,
  --
  fact which travelers have confirmed: In the vast Library there are no two identical
  books. From these two incontrovertible premises he deduced that the Library is
  total and that its shelves register all the possible combinations of the twenty-odd
  --
  autobiographies, the faithful catalogues of the Library, thousands and thousands
  of false catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of those catalogues, the
  --
  When it was proclaimed that the Library contained all books, the first
  impression was one of extravagant happiness. All men felt themselves to be the
  --
  mysteries -- the origin of the Library and of time -- might be found. It is verisimilar
  that these grave mysteries could be explained in words: if the language of
  philosophers is not sufficient, the multiform Library will have produced the
  unprecedented language required, with its vocabularies and grammars. For four
  --
  this frenzy neglect two notable facts. One: the Library is so enormous that any
  reduction of human origin is infinitesimal. The other: every copy is unique,
  irreplaceable, but (since the Library is total) there are always several hundred
  thousand imperfect facsimiles: works which differ only in a letter or a comma.
  --
  one being, let Your enormous Library be justified. The impious maintain that
  nonsense is normal in the Library and that the reasonable (and even humble and
  pure coherence) is an almost miraculous exception. They speak (I know) of the
  "feverish Library whose chance volumes are constantly in danger of changing
  into others and affirm, negate and confuse everything like a delirious divinity."
  --
  truth, the Library includes all verbal structures, all variations permitted by the
  twenty-five orthographical symbols, but not a single example of absolute
  --
  such a justification is verbal and, ex hypothesi, already figures in the Library. I
  cannot combine some characters
  --
  which the divine Library has not foreseen and which in one of its secret
  tongues do not contain a terrible meaning. No one can articulate a syllable which
  --
  galleries, but Library is bread or pyramid or anything else, and these seven words
  which define it have another value. You who read me, are You sure of
  --
  species -- the unique species -- is about to be extinguished, but the Library will
  endure: illuminated, solitary, infinite, perfectly motionless, equipped with precious
  --
  The Library is unlimited and cyclical. If an eternal traveler were to cross it in any
  direction, after centuries he would see that the same volumes were repeated in
  --
  Letizia Alvarez de Toledo has observed that this vast Library is useless: rigorously speaking, a
  single volume would be sufficient, a volume of ordinary format, printed in nine or ten point type,

The Lottery in Babylon, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  In many other books, Borges dealt with metaphysical questions about the meaning of life and the possible existence of higher authorities, and also presented this same paradoxical vision of a world that may be run by a good and wise deity but seems to lack any discernible meaning. This view may also be considered present in "The Library of Babel" ("La biblioteca de Babel"), another Borges story.
  Borges makes a brief reference to Franz Kafka as Qaphqa, the legendary Latrine where spies of the Company leave information.

The Shadow Out Of Time, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  The Shadow Out of Time indirectly tells of the Great Race of Yith, an extraterrestrial species with the ability to travel through space and time. The Yithians accomplish this by switching bodies with hosts from the intended spatial or temporal destination. The story implies that the effect, when seen from the outside, is similar to spiritual possession. The Yithians' original purpose was to study the history of various times and places, and they have amassed a " Library city" that is filled with the past and future history of multiple races, including humans. Ultimately the Yithians use their ability to escape the destruction of their planet in another galaxy by switching bodies with a race of cone-shaped plant beings who lived 250 million years ago on Earth. The cone-shaped entities (subsequently also known as the Great Race of Yith) lived in their vast Library city in what would later become Australia's Great Sandy Desert (223a14aS 1250a39aE).
  The story is told through the eyes of Nathaniel Wingate Peaslee, an American living in the first decade of the 20th century, who is "possessed" by a Yithian. He fears he is losing his mind when he unaccountably sees strange vistas of other worlds and of the Yithian Library city. He also feels himself being led about by these creatures and experiences how they live. When he is returned to his own body, he finds that those around him have judged him insane due to the actions of the Yithian that possessed his body. While he was experiencing a Yithian existence in Earth's ancient past, the Yithian occupying his body was experiencing a human one in the present day.
  The narrator at first believes his episode and subsequent dreams to be the product of some kind of mental illness. His initial relief at discovering other cases like his throughout history is withered when he discovers that the other cases are too similar to his own to be without a connection. The narrator's dreams become more vivid, and he becomes obsessed with archaeology and ancient manuscripts (as was the Yithian) - but lacks any sort of proof that would demonstrate whether he was (or is) simply mad.
  --
  As soon as permitted, I haunted the college Library at all hours; and shortly began to
  arrange for those odd travels, and special courses at American and European Universities,
  --
  In the Library grate were abundant ashes, evidently left from the burning of the every
  remainmg scrap of paper on which I had written since the advent of the amnesia. Dr
  --
  preparing - half voluntarily and half through promises of increased Library and travel
  opportunities - for the Great Race's central archives. The archives were in a colossal
  --
  The Lovecraft Library wishes to extend its gratitude to Eulogio Garca Recalde for transcribing this text.
  This text has been converted into PDF by Agha Yasir

The Theologians, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  Huns entered the monastery Library on horseback and trampled the
  incomprehensible books and vituperated and burned them, perhaps fearful
  --
  adornments.) Like all those possessing a Library, Aurelian was aware that he
  was guilty of not knowing his in its entirety; this controversy enabled him to

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun library

The noun library has 5 senses (first 3 from tagged texts)
                    
1. (3) library ::: (a room where books are kept; "they had brandy in the library")
2. (2) library ::: (a collection of literary documents or records kept for reference or borrowing)
3. (2) library, depository library ::: (a depository built to contain books and other materials for reading and study)
4. library, program library, subroutine library ::: ((computing) a collection of standard programs and subroutines that are stored and available for immediate use)
5. library ::: (a building that houses a collection of books and other materials)


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun library

5 senses of library                          

Sense 1
library
   => room
     => area
       => structure, construction
         => artifact, artefact
           => whole, unit
             => object, physical object
               => physical entity
                 => entity

Sense 2
library
   => collection, aggregation, accumulation, assemblage
     => group, grouping
       => abstraction, abstract entity
         => entity

Sense 3
library, depository library
   => depository, deposit, depositary, repository
     => facility, installation
       => artifact, artefact
         => whole, unit
           => object, physical object
             => physical entity
               => entity

Sense 4
library, program library, subroutine library
   => collection, aggregation, accumulation, assemblage
     => group, grouping
       => abstraction, abstract entity
         => entity

Sense 5
library
   => building, edifice
     => structure, construction
       => artifact, artefact
         => whole, unit
           => object, physical object
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun library

3 of 5 senses of library                        

Sense 2
library
   => bibliotheca
   => public library
   => rental collection

Sense 3
library, depository library
   => athenaeum, atheneum
   => lending library, circulating library

Sense 5
library
   HAS INSTANCE=> National Library of Medicine, United States National Library of Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun library

5 senses of library                          

Sense 1
library
   => room

Sense 2
library
   => collection, aggregation, accumulation, assemblage

Sense 3
library, depository library
   => depository, deposit, depositary, repository

Sense 4
library, program library, subroutine library
   => collection, aggregation, accumulation, assemblage

Sense 5
library
   => building, edifice




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun library

5 senses of library                          

Sense 1
library
  -> room
   => anechoic chamber
   => anteroom, antechamber, entrance hall, hall, foyer, lobby, vestibule
   => back room
   => ballroom, dance hall, dance palace
   => barroom, bar, saloon, ginmill, taproom
   => bathroom, bath
   => bedroom, sleeping room, sleeping accommodation, chamber, bedchamber
   => belfry
   => billiard room, billiard saloon, billiard parlor, billiard parlour, billiard hall
   => boardroom, council chamber
   => cardroom
   => cell, jail cell, prison cell
   => cell, cubicle
   => chamber
   => checkroom, left-luggage office
   => classroom, schoolroom
   => clean room, white room
   => cloakroom, coatroom
   => closet
   => clubroom
   => compartment
   => conference room
   => control room
   => court, courtroom
   => cubby, cubbyhole, snuggery, snug
   => cutting room
   => darkroom
   => den
   => dinette
   => dining room, dining-room
   => door
   => dressing room
   => durbar
   => engineering, engine room
   => floor, trading floor
   => furnace room
   => gallery
   => gallery, art gallery, picture gallery
   => greenroom
   => guardroom
   => hall
   => hospital room
   => kitchen
   => library
   => living room, living-room, sitting room, front room, parlor, parlour
   => locker room
   => lounge, waiting room, waiting area
   => manor hall, hall
   => poolroom
   => presence chamber
   => rathole
   => reading room
   => reception room
   => recreation room, rec room
   => rotunda
   => scriptorium
   => scullery
   => sewing room
   => shipping room
   => shower room
   => sickbay, sick berth
   => sickroom
   => smoking room
   => squad room
   => squad room
   => steam bath, steam room, vapor bath, vapour bath
   => storeroom, storage room, stowage
   => study
   => sun parlor, sun parlour, sun porch, sunporch, sunroom, sun lounge, solarium
   => surgery
   => television room, tv room
   => test room, testing room
   => toilet, lavatory, lav, can, john, privy, bathroom
   => torture chamber
   => vestry, sacristy
   => walk-in
   => war room
   => workroom

Sense 2
library
  -> collection, aggregation, accumulation, assemblage
   => procession
   => pharmacopoeia
   => string
   => wardrobe
   => wardrobe
   => population, universe
   => armamentarium
   => art collection
   => backlog
   => battery
   => block
   => book, rule book
   => book
   => bottle collection
   => bunch, lot, caboodle
   => coin collection
   => collage
   => content
   => ensemble, tout ensemble
   => corpus
   => crop
   => tenantry
   => findings
   => flagging
   => flinders
   => pack
   => hand, deal
   => long suit
   => herbarium
   => stamp collection
   => statuary
   => sum, summation, sum total
   => agglomeration
   => gimmickry
   => nuclear club
   => pile, heap, mound, agglomerate, cumulation, cumulus
   => mass
   => combination
   => congregation
   => hit parade
   => Judaica
   => kludge
   => library, program library, subroutine library
   => library
   => mythology
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nag Hammadi, Nag Hammadi Library
   => biota, biology
   => fauna, zoology
   => petting zoo
   => set
   => Victoriana
   => class, category, family
   => job lot
   => package, bundle, packet, parcel
   => defense, defence, defense team, defense lawyers
   => prosecution
   => planting
   => signage
   => generally accepted accounting principles, GAAP
   => pantheon
   => Free World
   => Third World
   => Europe
   => Asia
   => North America
   => Central America
   => South America
   => Oort cloud
   => galaxy
   => galaxy, extragalactic nebula
   => fleet
   => fleet
   => fleet
   => repertoire, repertory
   => repertory, repertoire
   => assortment, mixture, mixed bag, miscellany, miscellanea, variety, salmagundi, smorgasbord, potpourri, motley
   => batch, clutch
   => batch
   => rogue's gallery
   => exhibition, exposition, expo
   => convoy
   => traffic
   => aviation, air power
   => vegetation, flora, botany
   => law, jurisprudence
   => menagerie
   => data, information
   => ana
   => mail, post
   => treasure
   => treasure trove
   => trinketry
   => troponymy, troponomy
   => smithereens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wise Men, Magi

Sense 3
library, depository library
  -> depository, deposit, depositary, repository
   => archive
   => bank, bank building
   => drop
   => library, depository library
   => lost-and-found
   => museum
   => repertory
   => sperm bank
   => storehouse, depot, entrepot, storage, store
   => treasury

Sense 4
library, program library, subroutine library
  -> collection, aggregation, accumulation, assemblage
   => procession
   => pharmacopoeia
   => string
   => wardrobe
   => wardrobe
   => population, universe
   => armamentarium
   => art collection
   => backlog
   => battery
   => block
   => book, rule book
   => book
   => bottle collection
   => bunch, lot, caboodle
   => coin collection
   => collage
   => content
   => ensemble, tout ensemble
   => corpus
   => crop
   => tenantry
   => findings
   => flagging
   => flinders
   => pack
   => hand, deal
   => long suit
   => herbarium
   => stamp collection
   => statuary
   => sum, summation, sum total
   => agglomeration
   => gimmickry
   => nuclear club
   => pile, heap, mound, agglomerate, cumulation, cumulus
   => mass
   => combination
   => congregation
   => hit parade
   => Judaica
   => kludge
   => library, program library, subroutine library
   => library
   => mythology
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nag Hammadi, Nag Hammadi Library
   => biota, biology
   => fauna, zoology
   => petting zoo
   => set
   => Victoriana
   => class, category, family
   => job lot
   => package, bundle, packet, parcel
   => defense, defence, defense team, defense lawyers
   => prosecution
   => planting
   => signage
   => generally accepted accounting principles, GAAP
   => pantheon
   => Free World
   => Third World
   => Europe
   => Asia
   => North America
   => Central America
   => South America
   => Oort cloud
   => galaxy
   => galaxy, extragalactic nebula
   => fleet
   => fleet
   => fleet
   => repertoire, repertory
   => repertory, repertoire
   => assortment, mixture, mixed bag, miscellany, miscellanea, variety, salmagundi, smorgasbord, potpourri, motley
   => batch, clutch
   => batch
   => rogue's gallery
   => exhibition, exposition, expo
   => convoy
   => traffic
   => aviation, air power
   => vegetation, flora, botany
   => law, jurisprudence
   => menagerie
   => data, information
   => ana
   => mail, post
   => treasure
   => treasure trove
   => trinketry
   => troponymy, troponomy
   => smithereens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wise Men, Magi

Sense 5
library
  -> building, edifice
   => abattoir, butchery, shambles, slaughterhouse
   => apartment building, apartment house
   => architecture
   => aviary, bird sanctuary, volary
   => bathhouse, bathing machine
   => bowling alley
   => center, centre
   => chapterhouse
   => clubhouse, club
   => dormitory, dorm, residence hall, hall, student residence
   => farm building
   => feedlot
   => firetrap
   => gambling house, gambling den, gambling hell, gaming house
   => gazebo, summerhouse
   => government building
   => greenhouse, nursery, glasshouse
   => hall
   => hall
   => Hall of Fame
   => hotel
   => hotel-casino, casino-hotel
   => house
   => house
   HAS INSTANCE=> Independence Hall
   => library
   => medical building, health facility, healthcare facility
   => ministry
   => morgue, mortuary, dead room
   => observatory
   => office building, office block
   => opium den
   => outbuilding
   => packinghouse
   => place of worship, house of prayer, house of God, house of worship
   => planetarium
   => presbytery
   => restaurant, eating house, eating place, eatery
   => rest house
   => rink, skating rink
   => Roman building
   => rotunda
   => ruin
   => school, schoolhouse
   => shooting gallery
   => signal box, signal tower
   => skyscraper
   => student union
   => tavern, tap house
   => telecom hotel, telco building
   => temple
   => theater, theatre, house
   => whorehouse, brothel, bordello, bagnio, house of prostitution, house of ill repute, bawdyhouse, cathouse, sporting house
   HAS INSTANCE=> Houses of Parliament




--- Grep of noun library
bachelor of arts in library science
circulating library
depository library
lending library
library
library card
library catalog
library catalogue
library fine
library paste
library program
library routine
library science
master of arts in library science
master of library science
nag hammadi library
national library of medicine
program library
public library
subroutine library
u.s. national library of medicine
united states national library of medicine



IN WEBGEN [10000/4127]

Wikipedia - 115th Street Library
Wikipedia - 18th Avenue Library
Wikipedia - 1Lib1Ref -- Campaign for library engagement with Wikipedia
Wikipedia - Abbey library of Saint Gall -- Monastery library in St. Gallen, Switzerland
Wikipedia - Abbey library of St. Gallen
Wikipedia - Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, located in Springfield, Illinois
Wikipedia - Academic library
Wikipedia - Accelerator (library)
Wikipedia - Accessibility Toolkit -- Software library
Wikipedia - Accession number (library science) -- Object identifiers used in galleries, libraries, archives, and museums
Wikipedia - Accredited by the American Library Association
Wikipedia - ACM Digital Library
Wikipedia - Acme Novelty Library -- Comic
Wikipedia - Active Template Library
Wikipedia - Adam Mickiewicz Library and Dramatic Circle -- Library in Buffalo, New York
Wikipedia - Advanced Library Format
Wikipedia - Advanced Simulation Library
Wikipedia - Adyar Library
Wikipedia - African Library and Information Associations and Institutions -- Non-profit organization based in Ghana
Wikipedia - Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health -- Exhibition at the United States National Library of Medicine
Wikipedia - Ahlul Bayt Digital Islamic Library Project
Wikipedia - Alabama Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Alabama
Wikipedia - Alabama Public Library Service -- Official library agency of Alabama
Wikipedia - AlajM-CM-$rvi city library -- Library in Finland
Wikipedia - Alaska Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Alaska
Wikipedia - Albany Park Library -- Public library in Chicago
Wikipedia - Albert and Temmy Latner Jewish Public Library -- Public library in Canada
Wikipedia - Albina Library -- Oregon public library
Wikipedia - Albion Carnegie Library -- Public library
Wikipedia - Aldham Robarts LRC -- Library at Liverpool John Moores University
Wikipedia - Algonquin Area Public Library District -- Library district in Illinois
Wikipedia - Alice I. Bryan -- American psychologist and library science scholar
Wikipedia - Alice Rebecca Brooks McGuire -- American professor of library science; librarian
Wikipedia - Alison Macrina -- Librarian and Director of the Library Freedom Project.
Wikipedia - Allan & Maria Myers Academic Centre -- Library in Melbourne
Wikipedia - Almeida Garrett Library -- library in Portugal
Wikipedia - Alpena County Library -- Public library in Michigan
Wikipedia - Altamonte Springs City Library -- library in Florida, US
Wikipedia - Althea Warren -- Director of the Los Angeles Public Library, president of the American Library Association
Wikipedia - American Library Association -- American library association and professional society
Wikipedia - Anderson-Price Memorial Library Building -- United States historic place
Wikipedia - Andorra National Library -- National library in Andorra
Wikipedia - Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules -- Library cataloging standard
Wikipedia - Ang Mo Kio Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Apache C++ Standard Library
Wikipedia - Apache Lucene -- Java library for full-text search
Wikipedia - Archibald Cary Coolidge -- American historian and library director
Wikipedia - Argyle Library Egg -- Australian piece of decorative art
Wikipedia - Arizona Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Arizona
Wikipedia - Arkansas Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Arkansas
Wikipedia - Arleta Branch Library -- United States historic ibrary
Wikipedia - Armstrong Browning Library
Wikipedia - Asociacion de Estados Iberoamericanos para el Desarrollo de las Bibliotecas Nacionales de Iberoamerica -- Library-related professional association
Wikipedia - Assert.h -- Header file in the standard library of the C programming language
Wikipedia - Association for Library and Information Science Education
Wikipedia - Association of College and Research Libraries -- Library organization
Wikipedia - Associative containers -- Group of class templates in the standard library of the C++ programming language that implement ordered associative arrays: std::set, std::map, std::multiset, std::multimap
Wikipedia - Astor Library -- Historic building that used to be part of the NYPL system
Wikipedia - Astrophysics Data System -- Digital Library portal operated by the Smithsonian
Wikipedia - Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System -- Library system for the city of Atlanta and Fulton County, Georgia
Wikipedia - Aubrey Watzek Library -- Library at Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon
Wikipedia - Australian Library and Information Association -- Peak professional organisation for the Australian library and information services sector
Wikipedia - Bachelor of Library Science
Wikipedia - Baden State Library -- Library in Germany
Wikipedia - Baen Free Library
Wikipedia - Bahawalpur Central Library -- Pakistani library
Wikipedia - Balakrishna Memorial Vayanasala -- Public Library in India
Wikipedia - Bamberg State Library
Wikipedia - Bancroft Library
Wikipedia - Bapst Library -- Academic library in Boston
Wikipedia - Barr Smith Library -- Academic library of the University of Adelaide, South Australia
Wikipedia - Base Class Library
Wikipedia - Bavarian Library Network -- German library association
Wikipedia - Beacon Hill Branch Library -- Library in Seattle
Wikipedia - Bedok Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Belfast Free Library -- Public library in Maine
Wikipedia - Belgrade City Library -- Public library in Belgrade, Serbia
Wikipedia - Belmont Library -- Oregon public ibrary
Wikipedia - Belmopan Public Library -- Public library in Belize
Wikipedia - Bentley Historical Library
Wikipedia - Benton Public Library -- Public library in Benton
Wikipedia - Berbera Public Library -- Library in Somaliland
Wikipedia - Bergen County Cooperative Library System
Wikipedia - Berkeley DB -- Software library providing embedded database for key/value data
Wikipedia - Berlin State Library
Wikipedia - Berman Medical Library
Wikipedia - Bethlehem Library -- Library park in Medellin, Colombia
Wikipedia - Biblioburro -- Traveling library in Colombia
Wikipedia - Biblioteca de EspaM-CM-1a (Medellin) -- Library park in the Santo Domingo Savio, Medellin, Colombia
Wikipedia - Biblioteca di Brera -- Italian library in Milan
Wikipedia - Biblioteca Marciana -- Library in Venice, Italy
Wikipedia - Biblioteca Nacional de EspaM-CM-1a -- Public library in Madrid, Spain
Wikipedia - Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Roma -- National library in Rome
Wikipedia - Biblioteca Palafoxiana -- 17th century library in Puebla, Mexico
Wikipedia - Bibliotheca Alexandrina -- Major library and cultural center in Alexandria, Egypt
Wikipedia - Bibliotheca Hertziana - Max Planck Institute for Art History -- Art library in Italy
Wikipedia - Bibliothek des Konservatismus -- Specialized scientific library of right-wing non-fiction literature in Berlin, Germany
Wikipedia - Bibliotheque Marguerite Durand -- Specialized public library in Paris, France
Wikipedia - Bibliotheque municipale de Lyon -- Library in Lyon, France
Wikipedia - Bibliotheque municipale de Nancy -- Public library in Nancy
Wikipedia - Bibliotheque nationale de France -- National Library of France
Wikipedia - BIBSYS -- Supplier of library and information data for all the Norwegian university and college libraries
Wikipedia - Billings Memorial Library -- Library in Vermont, US
Wikipedia - Birmingham and Midland Institute -- UK Educational establishment and library
Wikipedia - Birmingham Archives and Heritage -- Public library in Birmingham
Wikipedia - Birmingham Central Library -- Former main public library in Birmingham, England
Wikipedia - Bishan Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Black Caucus of the American Library Association -- Professional association for Black librarians in the American Library Association
Wikipedia - Blackstone Library -- Library and building in the Chicago Public Library system in the United States
Wikipedia - Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library -- Library baranch in Denver Colorado, US
Wikipedia - Blockly -- JavaScript library
Wikipedia - Bodleian Library -- Main research library of the University of Oxford
Wikipedia - Bodmer Library -- Museum of rare manuscripts in Cologny, Switzerland
Wikipedia - Bohn Library
Wikipedia - Boise Public Library -- Public library system in Idaho, United States
Wikipedia - Bokklubben World Library -- Series of classical books
Wikipedia - Bookmobile -- Vehicle with an onboard library
Wikipedia - Book Stop Intramuros -- Pop-up library, Manila
Wikipedia - Borrowing center -- Library of household items and tools
Wikipedia - Boston Library Consortium -- American non-profit charitable organization
Wikipedia - Boston Public Library, McKim Building -- United States historic place
Wikipedia - Boston Public Library
Wikipedia - Botan (programming library)
Wikipedia - Boulder Public Library
Wikipedia - Bracken Health Sciences Library -- Library in Ontario
Wikipedia - Branford Price Millar Library -- University library in Portland, Oregon
Wikipedia - Braswell Memorial Library -- Library in North Carolina
Wikipedia - Brenda Chawner -- New Zealand library academic
Wikipedia - Brentwood Public Library -- Public library in Missouri
Wikipedia - Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp. -- U.S. legal case on copyright originality
Wikipedia - British Library, MS Egerton 88 -- Late 16th century Irish manuscript
Wikipedia - British Library Sound Archive
Wikipedia - British Library -- National library of the United Kingdom
Wikipedia - British Museum Reading Room -- Room in the British Museum which was formerly the reading room of the British Library
Wikipedia - Bromley House Library -- Subscription library in Nottingham
Wikipedia - Bronx Library Center -- Branch of the New York Public Library in the Bronx, New York
Wikipedia - Brooklyn Library, Multnomah County -- Oregon public library
Wikipedia - Brooklyn Public Library -- Public library system in New York City
Wikipedia - Brooks Memorial Library -- Public library in Brattleboro Vermont
Wikipedia - Brotherton Library -- Library at the University of Leeds, England
Wikipedia - Brotli -- Open source free software compression library
Wikipedia - Broward County Library -- Public library system in Florida
Wikipedia - Bruce Peel Special Collections -- Special collections unit of the University of Alberta Library
Wikipedia - Brynmor Jones Library -- Main Library in the University of Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Wikipedia - Buddhist Library (Singapore) -- Library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Buhl Public Library -- Public library in Minnesota
Wikipedia - Bukbu Library -- Library in South Korea
Wikipedia - Bukit Batok Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Bukit Panjang Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Wikipedia - Burke Library
Wikipedia - Burnaby Public Library
Wikipedia - Business & Career Library -- Branch of Brooklyn Public Library
Wikipedia - Busolwe Public Library -- Ugandan community library
Wikipedia - Byte Code Engineering Library
Wikipedia - Calgary Public Library
Wikipedia - California Digital Library
Wikipedia - California Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in California
Wikipedia - California State Library -- State library of California, United States
Wikipedia - Calvin Coolidge Presidential Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Calvin Coolidge, located in Northampton, Massachusetts
Wikipedia - Cambridge Digital Library
Wikipedia - Cambridge Public Library
Wikipedia - Cambridge University Library -- Main research and legal deposit library of the University of Cambridge
Wikipedia - Canadian Library Association -- Disbanded Canadian library organization
Wikipedia - Capitol Hill Library -- Library in Portland Oregon
Wikipedia - Cardiff Central Library -- Main public library in Cardiff
Wikipedia - Carmel Clay Public Library -- Public library in Carmel, Indiana
Wikipedia - Carnegie Library Building (Athens, Georgia) -- United States historic place
Wikipedia - Carnegie Library, Herne Hill -- Public library in the London Borough of Lambeth in Herne Hill, South London
Wikipedia - Carnegie Library
Wikipedia - Carnegie library -- Libraries built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie: 2,509 Carnegie libraries were built between 1883 and 1929
Wikipedia - Carolina Rediviva -- Main building of the Uppsala University Library
Wikipedia - Carrie Westlake Whitney -- First director of the Kansas City Public Library
Wikipedia - Category:Articles with International Music Score Library Project links
Wikipedia - Category:Articles with Open Library links
Wikipedia - Category:Computer library stubs
Wikipedia - Category:C POSIX library
Wikipedia - Category:Digital library software
Wikipedia - Category:Employees of the British Library
Wikipedia - Category:Librarians at the National Library of Israel
Wikipedia - Category:Library 2.0
Wikipedia - Category:Library cataloging and classification
Wikipedia - Category:Library history
Wikipedia - Category:Library science education
Wikipedia - Category:Library science
Wikipedia - Category:Open Library ID different from Wikidata
Wikipedia - Category:Open Library ID not in Wikidata
Wikipedia - Category:Open Library ID same as Wikidata
Wikipedia - Category:Types of library
Wikipedia - Category:World Digital Library
Wikipedia - Catholic National Library
Wikipedia - CDK (programming library)
Wikipedia - Cecil County Public Library -- Public library in Cecil country
Wikipedia - Cengage -- Publisher and seller of print and digital information services for the academic, professional and library markets
Wikipedia - Central Library (Brooklyn Public Library) -- Central branch of Brooklyn Public Library and historic library building in Brooklyn, New York
Wikipedia - Central Library Cape Town -- Public library in Cape Town, South Africa
Wikipedia - Central Library, Edinburgh -- Public library in Edinburgh
Wikipedia - Central Library (Kansas City, Missouri) -- United States historic place and main library of Kansas City Public library
Wikipedia - Central Library (Portland, Oregon) -- United States historic library
Wikipedia - Central Public Library of Serres -- Public library in Greece
Wikipedia - Central Virginia Regional Library -- Library system serving a part of Virginia
Wikipedia - Centre de documentation collegiale -- Library in Quebec, Canada
Wikipedia - Chapman Branch Library -- public library branch in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Wikipedia - Charles A. Halbert Public Library -- Library in Saint Kitts and Nevis
Wikipedia - Charles E. Young Research Library
Wikipedia - Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals
Wikipedia - Cheng San Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Chester Beatty Library -- Archive in Dublin, Ireland
Wikipedia - Chester County Library System -- Library system in southeastern Pennsylvania, United States
Wikipedia - Chicago Public Library -- Public library system in Chicago, United States
Wikipedia - Chinese Library Classification
Wikipedia - Choa Chu Kang Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Choral Public Domain Library
Wikipedia - Christian Classics Ethereal Library -- Digital library and website
Wikipedia - Christian library
Wikipedia - CiteSeerX -- Search engine and digital library for scientific and academic papers
Wikipedia - Class library
Wikipedia - Clay Sanskrit Library -- Series of books
Wikipedia - Clearwater Public Library System -- Public library system in Florida
Wikipedia - Clementi Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Cleveland Public Library
Wikipedia - Clinton Presidential Center -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Bill Clinton, located in Little Rock, Arkansas
Wikipedia - C mathematical functions -- C standard library header file providing mathematical functions
Wikipedia - Cochrane Library -- Collection of databases in medicine and other healthcare specialties
Wikipedia - Collaborative Summer Library Program -- Nonprofitable, charitable organization
Wikipedia - Colombo Public Library -- Public library in Sri Lanka
Wikipedia - Colon classification -- A system of library classification developed by S. R. Ranganathan
Wikipedia - Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries -- Library consortium
Wikipedia - Colorado State Library -- Official State Library of Colorado
Wikipedia - Columbia Civic Library Association -- Professional association for Black librarians in Washington DC
Wikipedia - Combinator library
Wikipedia - Component Library for Cross Platform
Wikipedia - Concord Free Public Library -- Public library in Concord, Massachusetts
Wikipedia - Connecticut Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Connecticut
Wikipedia - Connecticut State Library -- State Library in the US State of Connecticut
Wikipedia - Controlled digital lending -- a digital library lending model
Wikipedia - Coquitlam Public Library -- Public library system in British Columbia
Wikipedia - Cornell University Library
Wikipedia - Cornish Library -- Public library in Winnipeg, Canada
Wikipedia - Cory Library for Historical Research -- research library in Grahamstown, South Africa
Wikipedia - Cotton Library
Wikipedia - Cotton library
Wikipedia - Council on Library and Information Resources -- Organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching and learning environments
Wikipedia - Coy C. Carpenter Library -- Library in Wake Forest University
Wikipedia - C POSIX library
Wikipedia - Craft Memorial Library -- Public library in Bluefield
Wikipedia - Cranston Public Library -- Public library system in Rhode Island, US
Wikipedia - Crime Library -- Defunct Web site
Wikipedia - Cryptlib -- Open source software security toolkit library
Wikipedia - C++ Standard Library
Wikipedia - C standard library -- Standard library for the C programming language
Wikipedia - Cujas Library -- Law library in Paris
Wikipedia - Curses (programming library)
Wikipedia - Cuyahoga County Public Library
Wikipedia - Dakota Club Library -- Historic Building in South Dakota, US
Wikipedia - Danish National Art Library -- national research library
Wikipedia - Danna C. Bell -- Archivist and librarian at the Library of Congress
Wikipedia - Data Analytics Acceleration Library
Wikipedia - Data library
Wikipedia - Dayton Metro Library
Wikipedia - DeepSpeed -- Microsoft open source library
Wikipedia - Delaware Division of Libraries -- Official state library agency of Delaware
Wikipedia - Delaware Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Delaware
Wikipedia - Delhi Public Library
Wikipedia - Denver Public Library
Wikipedia - Destruction of the Library of Alexandria
Wikipedia - Dewey Decimal Classification -- Library classification system
Wikipedia - Dewey Readmore Books -- Resident cat at the Spencer Public Library in Spencer, Iowa, US
Wikipedia - Digital Bibliography > Library Project
Wikipedia - Digital Comic Museum -- digital library of comic books
Wikipedia - Digital Library Federation
Wikipedia - Digital Library of Mathematical Functions
Wikipedia - Digital Library
Wikipedia - Digital library -- Online database of digital objects stored in electronic media formats and accessible via computers
Wikipedia - Digital Public Library of America
Wikipedia - District of Columbia Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in the District of Columbia
Wikipedia - Divinity Faculty Library, Cambridge
Wikipedia - Dld (software) -- Library package for the C programming language
Wikipedia - Doe Library
Wikipedia - Doe Memorial Library
Wikipedia - Donald A. B. Lindberg -- Director of the US National Library of Medicine
Wikipedia - Draft:Acra (software) -- Cryptographic services library
Wikipedia - Draft:SmartCore -- Machine learning library for the Rust programming language
Wikipedia - Draft:Themis (software) -- Cryptographic services library
Wikipedia - Drumcondra Public Library -- Public library in Dublin, Ireland
Wikipedia - Duke Humfrey's Library -- Reading room in the Bodleian Library
Wikipedia - Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum and Boyhood Home -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, located in Abilene, Kansas
Wikipedia - Dynamically linked library
Wikipedia - Dynamic library
Wikipedia - Dynamic Link Library
Wikipedia - Dynamic-link library
Wikipedia - Easton Area Public Library -- Public library in Easton, Pennsylvania
Wikipedia - East Portland Branch, Public Library of Multnomah County -- United States historic library
Wikipedia - EBSCO Information Services -- Library resource company
Wikipedia - Edinburgh University Library -- Library of the University of Edinburgh
Wikipedia - Edmonton Public Library
Wikipedia - Edward Edwards (librarian) -- British librarian, library historian, and biographer (1812-1886)
Wikipedia - Elaine Didier -- American director of the Gerald R. Ford Library and Museum
Wikipedia - Electra Collins Doren -- Suffragette and library scientist
Wikipedia - Elmer Holmes Bobst Library
Wikipedia - Emma S. Clark Library -- Library in Suffolk County, NY
Wikipedia - Endangered Archives Programme -- Funding programme and digital archive run by the British Library
Wikipedia - English Broadside Ballad Archive -- Digital library of English Broadside Ballads
Wikipedia - Enterprise Public Library -- Historic library in Oregon, USA
Wikipedia - Episcopal Public Library of Barcelona -- Special and heritage library in Barcelona
Wikipedia - Epos (library ship) -- Library ship operating in Norway
Wikipedia - E-rara.ch -- Swiss digital library for antique works
Wikipedia - Erie Public Library -- Erie Public Library
Wikipedia - ETH Library
Wikipedia - European Library -- Web service providing access to resources of national libraries across Europe
Wikipedia - Evangelical Library -- Library in North London with research collections for Christian theology
Wikipedia - Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library -- Public library system in Evansville, Indiana
Wikipedia - Ex Libris: The New York Public Library -- 2017 film
Wikipedia - Expat (library)
Wikipedia - Fairview-Columbia Library -- Oregon public library
Wikipedia - Faith Cabin Library -- Libraries created in South Carolina and Georgia to provide library service to Black people
Wikipedia - Fales Library
Wikipedia - Falkirk Public Library -- Public library in Falkirk, Scotland, UK
Wikipedia - Family History Library -- Genealogical library of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Wikipedia - Federal Depository Library Program -- Government program created to make U.S. federal government publications available to the public at no cost
Wikipedia - Field research -- Collection of information outside a laboratory, library or workplace setting
Wikipedia - Fifty-two Library -- A series of children's adventure stories
Wikipedia - Filipinas Heritage Library
Wikipedia - Finger Lakes Library System
Wikipedia - Fish Hoek Library -- Public library in Fish Hoek in Cape Town, South Africa
Wikipedia - Five laws of library science
Wikipedia - Flawn Academic Center -- Library at the University of Texas at Austin
Wikipedia - Florida Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Florida
Wikipedia - FMRIB Software Library
Wikipedia - Foley Center Library
Wikipedia - Folger Shakespeare Library -- independent research library in Washington, D.C.
Wikipedia - Fondren Library
Wikipedia - Fontconfig -- Free software library to provide configuration, enumeration and substitution of fonts
Wikipedia - Font Library -- Free/open font hosting web site
Wikipedia - Forest Grove City Library -- Public library in Oregon, USA
Wikipedia - Forsyth County Public Library
Wikipedia - Fort Myers Regional Library -- Public library
Wikipedia - Framework Class Library
Wikipedia - Frankfurt University Library
Wikipedia - Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, located in Hyde Park, New York
Wikipedia - Free Component Library
Wikipedia - Free Library of Philadelphia -- Public library system in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Wikipedia - Free Pascal Runtime Library
Wikipedia - Free Public Library Service (Vermont) -- State agecy providing library services to Vermonters
Wikipedia - FreeType -- Software development library to render text onto bitmaps, and other font-related operations
Wikipedia - Fundacion Biblioteca Rafael Hernandez Colon -- Library and museum that records the political life of three-term governor of Puerto Rico, Rafael Hernandez Colon
Wikipedia - Future Library project -- Art project that collects a book a year from 2014 to 2114 to publish them in 2114.
Wikipedia - Galahad library
Wikipedia - Garfield County Library District -- Public library system located in western Colorado, United States
Wikipedia - Garside classification -- Library classification system
Wikipedia - GDAL -- Translator library for raster and vector geospatial data formats
Wikipedia - GD Graphics Library
Wikipedia - Geisel Library -- Main library at UC San Diego.
Wikipedia - General Sciences Library of Ho Chi Minh City -- Library in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Wikipedia - Gennadius Library -- Library in Athens
Wikipedia - George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President George H.W. Bush, located in College Station, Texas
Wikipedia - George W. Bush Presidential Center -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President George W. Bush, located in Dallas, Texas
Wikipedia - George W. Bush Presidential Library
Wikipedia - Georgia Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Georgia
Wikipedia - Georgia Tech Library
Wikipedia - Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library -- Presidential library for U.S. President Gerald Ford, located in Ann Arbor, Michigan
Wikipedia - German National Library of Economics
Wikipedia - German National Library -- Central archival library and national bibliographic centre for the Federal Republic of Germany
Wikipedia - Geylang East Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Ghent University Library
Wikipedia - Gladstone's Library -- Residential library in Hawarden, Wales
Wikipedia - Glasgow Women's Library -- Public library in Glasgow, Scotland
Wikipedia - GLFW -- Software library
Wikipedia - GLib -- Software library
Wikipedia - Glossary of library and information science -- Wikipedia glossary
Wikipedia - Glow (JavaScript library) -- Open-source JavaScript library.
Wikipedia - GNU C Library -- Standard C Library of the GNU Project
Wikipedia - GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library
Wikipedia - GNU Multi-Precision Library
Wikipedia - GNU Readline -- Software library that provides line-editing and history capabilities for interactive programs with a command-line interface
Wikipedia - GNU Scientific Library -- Library for numerical analysis in C and C++
Wikipedia - Gorky Library (Ryazan)
Wikipedia - Gospel of Thomas -- Coptic-language early Christian non-canonical gospel, part of the Nag Hammadi library
Wikipedia - Grace Mellman Community Library -- Public library in Temecula, California, United States
Wikipedia - Graphics library
Wikipedia - Gregory Heights Library -- Library in Oregon
Wikipedia - Gresham Carnegie Library -- Library in Oregon
Wikipedia - Gresham Library -- Library in Oregon
Wikipedia - Grey District Library -- Public library in Greymouth, New Zealand
Wikipedia - Guangzhou Library -- Public library in Guangzhou, China
Wikipedia - Hadrian's Library
Wikipedia - Hagley Museum and Library -- Nonprofit museum and library in Wilmington, Delaware
Wikipedia - Hakodate City Central Library -- Japanese library
Wikipedia - Hale Library -- Main library building on Kansas State University's Manhattan, United States
Wikipedia - Hamilton Public Library (Ontario)
Wikipedia - Hammersmith Library -- Public library in Hammersmith, London
Wikipedia - Harekrushna Mahtab State Library -- Library in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
Wikipedia - HarfBuzz -- Open source text shaping library
Wikipedia - Harold B. Lee Library -- Main campus library for Brigham Young University
Wikipedia - Harold Washington Library -- Central library of the Chicago Public Library system
Wikipedia - Harris County Public Library
Wikipedia - Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Harry S. Truman, located in Independence, Missouri
Wikipedia - Harvard Library -- Library system of the Harvard University
Wikipedia - HathiTrust -- Digital library
Wikipedia - Hawaii Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Hawai'i
Wikipedia - Hawaii State Public Library System -- Statewide public library system in Hawaii
Wikipedia - Hayatnagar Subhas Samity Library -- Library in West Bengal, India
Wikipedia - H. E. Holland Memorial Library -- Public library in Seddonville, New Zealand
Wikipedia - Heights Neighborhood Library
Wikipedia - Helen M. Plum Memorial Library -- public library located in Lombard, Illinois, USA
Wikipedia - Hennepin County Library
Wikipedia - Henry Clay Folger -- American Shakespeare collector, philanthropist, and co-founder of the Folger Shakespeare Library
Wikipedia - Henry Miller Memorial Library
Wikipedia - Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Herbert Hoover in West Branch, Iowa
Wikipedia - Herzog August Library
Wikipedia - Hilandar Research Library -- Research library at Ohio State University
Wikipedia - Hillsboro Public Library -- Historic library in Oregon
Wikipedia - Hillsdale Library -- Library in Oregon
Wikipedia - Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection -- Digital library
Wikipedia - History of library and information science
Wikipedia - History of the Standard Template Library -- History of the STL, a C++ software library
Wikipedia - HKUST Library -- Library of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Wikipedia - Holgate Library -- Library in Oregon
Wikipedia - Hollywood Library -- Library building in Portland, Oregon
Wikipedia - Hoover Institution Library and Archives -- Research center and archival repository at Stanford University
Wikipedia - Houghton Library -- Library of Harvard University
Wikipedia - Hours of Philip the Good -- Collection highlight from the National Library of the Netherlands
Wikipedia - House of Commons Library -- Library and information resource of the lower house of the UK Parliament
Wikipedia - House of Wisdom -- Library, translation institute and research center in Baghdad, Iraq
Wikipedia - Houston Public Library
Wikipedia - Howard V. and Edna H. Hong Kierkegaard Library
Wikipedia - Hunter Library -- University library at Western Carolina University
Wikipedia - Huntington Library -- American library, art museum, and garden in California
Wikipedia - Huntsville-Madison County Public Library -- Public library in Huntsville, Alabama, US
Wikipedia - Hybrid library
Wikipedia - IBM Software Configuration and Library Manager
Wikipedia - IBM Type-III Library
Wikipedia - Idaho Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Idaho
Wikipedia - Illinois State Library -- Official State Library of Illinois
Wikipedia - Imperial College Central Library -- Main academic and research library of Imperial College London
Wikipedia - Inchicore Public Library -- Public library in Dublin, Ireland
Wikipedia - Indiana Library Federation -- Professional association for librarians in Indiana
Wikipedia - Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library
Wikipedia - Inmagic -- American company selling information management and library services software
Wikipedia - Inner Temple Library -- Private law library in London, England
Wikipedia - Input/output (C++) -- C++ standard library header for input/output
Wikipedia - Integrated library system
Wikipedia - Inter-library loan
Wikipedia - International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions
Wikipedia - International Music Score Library Project
Wikipedia - Internet Public Library
Wikipedia - Iowa Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Iowa
Wikipedia - Ismael Alicea -- Librarian who worked at the New York Public Library
Wikipedia - ITunes -- Apple's media library and media player software
Wikipedia - Jacksonville Public Library -- Public library system in Florida
Wikipedia - Jacob Gitlin Library -- Archive of information on Judaism, Jewish culture and history, and the nation of Israel
Wikipedia - Jacob Schwartz (librarian) -- librarian, Apprentices' library of New York
Wikipedia - Jagiellonian Library -- Library of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow
Wikipedia - James V. Brown Library -- public library in Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Wikipedia - Java Class Library
Wikipedia - JavaScript library
Wikipedia - Jefferson County Library Cooperative
Wikipedia - Jefferson Hills Public Library -- Public library serving Allegheny County, Pennsylvania
Wikipedia - Jessore Institute Public Library -- Research institute in Bangladesh
Wikipedia - Jewish Virtual Library
Wikipedia - J. Henry Meyer Memorial Library -- Library at Stanford University, California
Wikipedia - Jimmy Carter Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President Jimmy Carter, located in Atlanta, Georgia
Wikipedia - J. N. Petit Library -- Membership library in Mumbai, India
Wikipedia - John Adams Building -- One of the oldest building of the Library of Congress
Wikipedia - John Cotton Dana Library -- Research library
Wikipedia - John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum -- Presidential library and museum for U.S. President John F. Kennedy in Boston, Massachusetts
Wikipedia - John Jermain Memorial Library -- library in Sag Harbor, New York, US
Wikipedia - John Rylands Library -- Research library building on Deansgate in Manchester, England
Wikipedia - Joins (concurrency library) -- Asynchronous concurrent computing API for .NET
Wikipedia - JQuery -- JavaScript library created by John Resig in 2006
Wikipedia - J. R. Jayewardene Centre -- Library and museum for 1st President of Sri Lanka in Colombo,Sri Lanka
Wikipedia - JsRender/JsViews -- Open-source JavaScript library for writing single-page web applications
Wikipedia - JSTOR -- Subscription digital library
Wikipedia - Jumping library
Wikipedia - Jurong Regional Library -- Regional library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Jurong West Public Library -- Public library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Kansas Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Kansas
Wikipedia - Karamea War Memorial Library -- Library in Karamea, New Zealand
Wikipedia - Kate Sharpley Library
Wikipedia - Kay Raseroka -- Botswanan library, information professional and academic
Wikipedia - Kenneth Spencer Research Library -- Public Library at the University of Kansas
Wikipedia - Kent District Library -- Library system in Kent County, Michigan
Wikipedia - Kent Free Library -- Public library in Kent, Ohio, United States
Wikipedia - Kenton Library -- Library in Oregon
Wikipedia - Kentucky Library Association -- Professional association for librarians in Kentucky
Wikipedia - Keras -- Neural network library
Wikipedia - Kibera Community Library -- Library in Nairobi, Kenya
Wikipedia - King County Library System
Wikipedia - Kitwe Public Library -- public library in Kitwe, Zambia
Wikipedia - Klimo Library -- First public library of Hungary
Wikipedia - Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands
Wikipedia - Ladies Library Association Building -- Historic clubhouse in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
Wikipedia - Lafayette Library and Learning Center -- Library in California
Wikipedia - Lamont Library -- Haevard undergrad library
Wikipedia - Landesbibliothek Coburg -- Library in Saxe-Coburg
Wikipedia - Language binding -- Software library that allows using another library coded in another programming language
Wikipedia - Lanier Theological Library
Wikipedia - LAPACK -- Software library for numerical linear algebra
Wikipedia - La Quintana -- Library park in Medellin, Colombia
Wikipedia - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information -- Medical library in Sao Paulo, Brazil
Wikipedia - Laurel Branch Library -- Library in Maryland, U.S.
Wikipedia - Laurentian Library
Wikipedia - Law library
Wikipedia - Lawrence Public Library -- Library in Lawrence, Kansas, US
Wikipedia - Lawson McGhee Library -- Library in Knoxville, Tennessee
Wikipedia - Lazarus Component Library
Wikipedia - LEMON (C++ library)
Wikipedia - Lending library
Wikipedia - Lenox Library (New York City) -- Library in New York City
Wikipedia - Leo Baeck Institute New York -- Research library and archive in New York
Wikipedia - Leon de Greiff Library -- Library park in Medellin, Colombia
Wikipedia - LeRoy Collins Leon County Public Library -- Public library system in Florida
Wikipedia - Lespar Library of Women's Liberation -- Feminist library in Perth, Western Australia
Wikipedia - Libarc -- C++ library
Wikipedia - LibLAS -- BSD-licensed C++ library for reading/writing ASPRS LAS lidar data
Wikipedia - Librarian of Congress -- Head of the Library of Congress
Wikipedia - Library 2.0
Wikipedia - Library Access to Music Project
Wikipedia - Library acquisitions
Wikipedia - Library and Archives Canada -- National library and archive of Canada
Wikipedia - Library and Information Science
Wikipedia - Library and information science
Wikipedia - Library and information scientist
Wikipedia - Library assessment
Wikipedia - Library Association of Bangladesh -- Research institute in Bangladesh
Wikipedia - Library Association
Wikipedia - Library at Alexandria
Wikipedia - Library Bards -- American nerd parody band
Wikipedia - Library branch
Wikipedia - Library catalog -- Register of bibliographic items
Wikipedia - Library@chinatown -- Public Library in Singapore
Wikipedia - Library circulation -- Book lending