classes ::: author, Philosophy, Humanism, Theology,
children :::
branches ::: Desiderius Erasmus
see also :::

Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Desiderius Erasmus
class:author
subject class:Philosophy
subject class:Humanism
class:Theology


questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT

PRIMARY CLASS

author
Theology
SIMILAR TITLES
Desiderius Erasmus

DEFINITIONS



QUOTES [3 / 3 - 131 / 131]


KEYS (10k)

   2 Desiderius Erasmus
   1 Mortimer J Adler

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  127 Desiderius Erasmus
   2 Desiderius Erasmus

1:He who allows oppression shares the crime. ~ Desiderius Erasmus,
2:When I get a little money, I buy books. If any is left, I buy food and clothes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus, (16th cent.),
3:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Eagles don't catch flies. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
2:Fools are without number. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
3:Fortune favors the audacious. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
4:Fortune favours the audacious. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
5:Of two evils choose the least. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
6:Your library is your paradise. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
7:Frugality is a handsome income. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
8:Prevention is better than cure. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
9:Time takes away the grief of men. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
10:Bidden or unbidden, God is present. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
11:Man is to man either a god or a wolf. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
12:To know nothing is the happiest life. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
13:Concealed talent brings no reputation. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
14:The desire to write grows with writing. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
15:Retain the wind by compressing the belly. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
16:He who allows oppression shares the crime. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
17:He who allows oppression shares the crime. ~ Desiderius Erasmus,
18:He who shuns the millstone, shuns the meal. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
19:Invoked or not invoked, the god is present. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
20:No one respects a talent that is concealed. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
21:War is delightful for those who don't know it ~ Desiderius Erasmus
22:There is no joy in possession without sharing. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
23:[N]o party is any fun unless seasoned with folly. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
24:Don't give your advice before you are called upon. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
25:He who doesn't sin, is the greatest sinner of all. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
26:War is sweet to those who have not experienced it. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
27:Give light, and the darkness will disappear of itself. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
28:In the kingdom of the blind, the one-eyed man is king. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
29:'Tis an easier matter to raise the devil than to lay him. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
30:No Man is wise at all Times, or is without his blind Side. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
31:The wedlocks of minds will be greater than that of bodies. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
32:Wherever you encounter truth, look upon it as Christianity. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
33:War is delightful to those who have had no experience of it. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
34:A good portion of speaking will consist in knowing how to lie. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
35:Anything which causes trouble has special merit in their eyes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
36:I am a citizen of the world, known to all and to all a stranger. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
37:The most disadvantageous peace is better than the most just war. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
38:A nail is driven out by another nail. Habit is overcome by habit. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
39:Everybody hates a prodigy, detests an old head on young shoulders. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
40:The highest form of bliss is living with a certain degree of folly ~ Desiderius Erasmus
41:The chief element of happiness is this: to want to be what you are. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
42:The main hope of a nation lies in the proper education of its youth ~ Desiderius Erasmus
43:Nothing is as peevish and pedantic as men's judgments of one another. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
44:It is a greater advantage to be honestly educated than honorably born. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
45:War is sweet to those who haven't tasted it. Dulce bellum inexpertis. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
46:Before you sleep, read something that is exquisite, and worth remembering. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
47:Love that has nothing but beauty to keep it in good health is short-lived. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
48:Many times what cannot be refuted by arguments can be parried by laughter. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
49:Human affairs are so obscure and various that nothing can be clearly known. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
50:Dulce bellum inexpertis. - War is lovely for those who know nothing about it. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
51:Great abundance of riches cannot be gathered and kept by any man without sin. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
52:It is the chiefest point of happiness that a man is willing to be what he is. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
53:Apothegms are in history, the same as pearls in the sand, or gold in the mine. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
54:It is folly alone that stays the fugue of Youth and beats off touring Old Age. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
55:They are looking in utter darkness for that which has no existence whatsoever. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
56:It is an unscrupulous intellect that does not pay to antiquity its due reverence. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
57:When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
58:By a Carpenter mankind was made, and only by that Carpenter can mankind be remade. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
59:Man's mind is so formed that it is far more susceptible to falsehood than to truth. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
60:Do not put chewed bones back on plates. Instead, throw them on the floor for the dog. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
61:What is popularly called fame is nothing but an empty name and a legacy from paganism. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
62:Great eagerness in the pursuit of wealth, pleasure, or honor, cannot exist without sin. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
63:By identifying the new learning with heresy, you make orthodoxy synonymous with ignorance. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
64:Do not be guilty of possessing a library of learned books while lacking learning yourself. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
65:Modern church music is so constructed that the congregation cannot hear one distinct word. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
66:Our determination to imitiate Christ should be such that we have no time for other matters. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
67:There is nothing I congratulate myself on more heartily than on never having joined a sect. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
68:When I get a little money, I buy books. If any is left, I buy food and clothes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus, (16th cent.),
69:It is wisdom in prosperity, when all is as thou wouldn't have it, to fear and suspect the worst. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
70:Luther was guilty of two great crimes - he struck the Pope in his crown, and the monks in their belly. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
71:By burning Luther's books you may rid your bookshelves of him, but you will not rid men's minds of him. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
72:The opinion formulated by the Church has more value in my eyes than human reasons, whatever they may be. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
73:Young bodies are like tender plants, which grow and become hardened to whatever shape you've trained them. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
74:Heaven grant that the burden you carry may have as easy an exit as it had an entrance. Prayer To A Pregnant Woman ~ Desiderius Erasmus
75:Read first the best books. The important thing for you is not how much you know, but the quality of what you know. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
76:They may attack me with an army of six hundred syllogisms; and if I do not recant, they will proclaim me a heretic. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
77:The more ignorant, reckless and thoughtless a doctor is, the higher his reputation soars even amongst powerful princes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
78:What passes out of one's mouth passes into a hundred ears. It is a great misfortune not to have sense enough to speak well. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
79:It's the generally accepted privilege of theologians to stretch the heavens, that is the Scriptures, like tanners with a hide. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
80:God has administered to us of the present age, a bitter draught and a harsh physician, on account of our abounding infirmities. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
81:Only a very few can be learned, but all can be Christian, all can be devout, and – I shall boldly add – all can be theologians. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
82:Reflection is a flower of the mind, giving out wholesome fragrance; but revelry is the same flower, when rank and running to seed. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
83:You must acquire the best knowledge first, and without delay; it is the height of madness to learn what you will later have to unlearn. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
84:The entire world is my temple, and a very fine one too, if I'm not mistaken, and I'll never lack priests to serve it as long as there are men. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
85:They take unbelievable pleasure in the hideous blast of the hunting horn and baying of the hounds. Dogs dung smells sweet as cinnamon to them. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
86:[Only by] the good influence of our conduct may we bring salvation in human affairs; or like a fatal comet we may bring destruction in our train. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
87:Scarcely is there any peace so unjust that it is better than even the fairest war. -Vix ulla tam iniqua pax, quin bello vel aequissimo sit potior ~ Desiderius Erasmus
88:The majority of the common people loathe war and pray for peace; only a handful of individuals, whose evil joys depend on general misery, desire war. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
89:...it is a sneaking piece of cowardice for authors to put feigned names to their works, as if, like bastards of their brain, they were afraid to own them. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
90:I put up with this church, in the hope that one day it will become better, just as it is constrained to put up with me in the hope that I will become better. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
91:Now I believe I can hear the philosophers protesting that it can only be misery to live in folly, illusion, deception and ignorance, but it isn't -it's human. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
92:I have turned my entire attention to Greek. The first thing I shall do, as soon as the money arrives, is to buy some Greek authors; after that, I shall buy clothes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
93:Whether a party can have much success without a woman present I must ask others to decide, but one thing is certain, no party is any fun unless seasoned with folly. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
94:So our student will flit like a busy bee through the entire garden of literature, light on every blossom, collect a little nectar from each, and carry it to his hive. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
95:Nowadays the rage for possession has got to such a pitch that there is nothing in the realm of nature, whether sacred or profane, out of which profit cannot be squeezed. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
96:It seems to me to be the best proof of an evangelical disposition, that persons are not angry when reproached, and have a Christian charity for those that ill deserve it. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
97:If you look at history you'll find that no state has been so plagued by its rulers as when power has fallen into the hands of some dabbler in philosophy or literary addict. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
98:Human affairs are so obscure and various that nothing can be clearly known. This was the sound conclusion of the Academic sceptics, who were the least surly of philosophers. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
99:At last concluded that no creature was more miserable than man, for that all other creatures are content with those bounds that nature set them, only man endeavors to exceed them. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
100:Besides, it happens (how, I cannot tell) that an idea launched like a javelin in proverbial form strikes with sharper point on the hearer's mind and leaves implanted barbs for meditation. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
101:Given a choice between a folly and a sacrament, one should always choose the folly—because we know a sacrament will not bring us closer to god and there’s always the chance that a folly will. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
102:The nearer people approach old age the closer they return to a semblance of childhood, until the time comes for them to depart this life, again like children, neither tired of living nor aware of death. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
103:Out of all those centuries the Greeks can count seven sages at the most, and if anyone looks at them more closely I swear he'll not find so much as a half-wise man or even a third of a wise man among them. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
104:From hence, no question, has sprung an observation ... confirmed now into a settled opinion, that some long experienced souls in the world, before their dislodging, arrive to the height of prophetic spirits. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
105:Now what else is the whole life of mortals, but a sort of comedy in which the various actors, disguised by various costumes and masks, walk on and play each ones part until the manager walks them off the stage? ~ Desiderius Erasmus
106:A good prince will tax as lightly as possible those commodities which are used by the poorest members of society: grain, bread, beer, wine, clothing, and all other staples without which human life could not exist. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
107:Everyone knows that by far the happiest and universally enjoyable age of man is the first. What is there about babies which makes us hug and kiss and fondle them, so that even an enemy would give them help at that age? ~ Desiderius Erasmus
108:Nature, more of a stepmother than a mother in several ways, has sown a seed of evil in the hearts of mortals, especially in the more thoughtful men, which makes them dissatisfied with their own lot and envious of another s. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
109:You'll see certain Pythagorean whose belief in communism of property goes to such lengths that they pick up anything lying about unguarded, and make off with it without a qualm of conscience as if it had come to them by law. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
110:I doubt if a single individual could be found from the whole of mankind free from some form of insanity. The only difference is one of degree. A man who sees a gourd and takes it for his wife is called insane because this happens to very few people. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
111:The Jewish usurers are fast-rooted even in the smallest villages, and if they lend five gulden they require a security of six times as much. They charge interest, upon interest, and upon this again interest, so that the poor man loses everything that he owns. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
112:Ask a wise man to dinner and he'll upset everyone by his gloomy silence or tiresome questions. Invite him to a dance and you'll have a camel prancing about. Haul him off to a public entertainment and his face will be enough to spoil the people's entertainment. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
113:This type of man who is devoted to the study of wisdom is always most unlucky in everything, and particularly when it comes to procreating children; I imagine this is because Nature wants to ensure that the evils of wisdom shall not spread further throughout mankind. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
114:Jupiter, not wanting man's life to be wholly gloomy and grim, has bestowed far more passion than reason --you could reckon the ration as twenty-four to one. Moreover, he confined reason to a cramped corner of the head and left all the rest of the body to the passions. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
115:What difference is there, do you think, between those in Plato's cave who can only marvel at the shadows and images of various objects, provided they are content and don't know what they miss, and the philosopher who has emerged from the cave and sees the real things? ~ Desiderius Erasmus
116:Providence has decreed that those common acquisitions, money, gems, plate, noble mansions, and dominion, should be sometimes bestowed on the indolent and unworthy; but those things which constitute our true riches, and which are properly our own, must be procured by our own labor. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
117:Christians would show sense if they dispatched these argumentative Scotists and pigheaded Ockhamists and undefeated Albertists along with the whole regiment of Sophists to fight the Turks and Saracens instead of sending those armies of dull-witted soldiers with whom they've long been carrying on war with no result. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
118:Be careful not to be the first to put your hands in the dish. What you cannot hold in your hands you must put on your plate. Also it is a great breach of etiquette when your fingers are dirty and greasy, to bring them to your mouth in order to lick them, or to clean them on your jacket. It would be more decent to use the tablecloth. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
119:I consider as lovers of books not those who keep their books hidden in their store-chests and never handle them, but those who, by nightly as well as daily use thumb them, batter them, wear them out, who fill out all the margins with annotations of many kinds, and who prefer the marks of a fault they have erased to a neat copy full of faults. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
120:Picture the prince, such as most of them are today: a man ignorant of the law, well-nigh an enemy to his people's advantage, while intent on his personal convenience, a dedicated voluptuary, a hater of learning, freedom and truth, without a thought for the interests of his country, and measuring everything in terms of his own profit and desires. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
121:Almost all Christians being wretchedly enslaved to blindness and ignorance, which the priests are so far from preventing or removing, that they blacken the darkness, and promote the delusion: wisely foreseeing that the people (like cows, which never give down their milk so well as when they are gently stroked), would part with less if they knew more. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
122:Nothing is so foolish, they say, as for a man to stand for office and woo the crowd to win its vote, buy its support with presents, court the applause of all those fools and feel self-satisfied when they cry their approval, and then in his hour of triumph to be carried round like an effigy for the public to stare at, and end up cast in bronze to stand in the market place. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
123:Amongst the learned the lawyers claim first place, the most self-satisfied class of people, as they roll their rock of Sisyphus and string together six hundred laws in the same breath, no matter whether relevant or not, piling up opinion on opinion and gloss on gloss to make their profession seem the most difficult of all. Anything which causes trouble has special merit in their eyes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
124:Sacred scripture is of course the basic authority for everything; yet I sometimes run across ancient sayings or pagan writings - even the poets - so purely and reverently and admirably expressed that I can't help believing the author's hearts were moved by some divine power. And perhaps the spirit of Christ is more widespread than we understand, and the company of the saints includes many not on our calendar. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
125:As an example of just how useless these philosophers are for any practice in life there is Socrates himself, the one and only wise man, according to the Delphic Oracle. Whenever he tried to do anything in public he had to break off amid general laughter. While he was philosophizing about clouds and ideas, measuring a flea's foot and marveling at a midge's humming, he learned nothing about the affairs of ordinary life. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
126:There are some whose only reason for inciting war is to use it as a means to exercise their tyranny over their subjects more easily. For in times of peace the authority of the assembly, the dignity of the magistrates, the force of the laws stand in the way to some extent of the ruler doing what he likes. But once war is declared then the whole business of state is subject to the will of a few ... They demand as much money as they like. Why say more? ~ Desiderius Erasmus
127:In short, no association or alliance can be happy or stable without me. People can't long tolerate a ruler, nor can a master his servant, a maid her mistress, a teacher his pupil, a friend his friend nor a wife her husband, a landlord his tenant, a soldier his comrade nor a party-goer his companion, unless they sometimes have illusions about each other, make use of flattery, and have the sense to turn a blind eye and sweeten life for themselves with the honey of folly. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
128:For them it's out-of-date and outmoded to perform miracles; teaching the people is too like hard work, interpreting the holy scriptures is for schoolmen and praying is a waste of time; to shed tears is weak and womanish, to be needy is degrading; to suffer defeat is a disgrace and hardly fitting for one who scarcely permits the greatest of kings to kiss the toes of his sacred feet; and finally, death is an unattractive prospect, and dying on a cross would be an ignominious end. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
129:It hardly needs explaining at length, I think, how much authority or beauty is added to style by the timely use of proverbs. In the first place who does not see what dignity they confer on style by their antiquity alone?... And so to interweave adages deftly and appropriately is to make the language as a whole glitter with sparkles from Antiquity, please us with the colours of the art of rhetoric, gleam with jewel-like words of wisdom, and charm us with titbits of wit and humour. ~ Desiderius Erasmus
130:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus – Tragedies
4. Sophocles – Tragedies
5. Herodotus – Histories
6. Euripides – Tragedies
7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes – Comedies
10. Plato – Dialogues
11. Aristotle – Works
12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid – Elements
14. Archimedes – Works
15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections
16. Cicero – Works
17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil – Works
19. Horace – Works
20. Livy – History of Rome
21. Ovid – Works
22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy – Almagest
27. Lucian – Works
28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations
29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus – The Enneads
32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njál
36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More – Utopia
44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays
48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan
57. René Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton – Works
59. Molière – Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics
63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve – The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler
131:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

IN CHAPTERS









WORDNET



--- Overview of noun desiderius_erasmus

The noun desiderius erasmus has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. Erasmus, Desiderius Erasmus, Gerhard Gerhards, Geert Geerts ::: (Dutch humanist and theologian who was the leading Renaissance scholar of northern Europe; although his criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church led to the Reformation, he opposed violence and condemned Martin Luther (1466-1536))




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun desiderius_erasmus

1 sense of desiderius erasmus                    

Sense 1
Erasmus, Desiderius Erasmus, Gerhard Gerhards, Geert Geerts
   INSTANCE OF=> theologian, theologist, theologizer, theologiser
     => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
       => intellectual, intellect
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> humanist
     => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
       => intellectual, intellect
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity




--- Hyponyms of noun desiderius_erasmus
                                    




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun desiderius_erasmus

1 sense of desiderius erasmus                    

Sense 1
Erasmus, Desiderius Erasmus, Gerhard Gerhards, Geert Geerts
   INSTANCE OF=> theologian, theologist, theologizer, theologiser
   INSTANCE OF=> humanist










--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun desiderius_erasmus

1 sense of desiderius erasmus                    

Sense 1
Erasmus, Desiderius Erasmus, Gerhard Gerhards, Geert Geerts
  -> theologian, theologist, theologizer, theologiser
   => Church Father, Father of the Church, Father
   => Doctor of the Church, Doctor
   => eschatologist
   => futurist
   => presentist
   => preterist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Abelard, Peter Abelard, Pierre Abelard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ambrose, Saint Ambrose, St. Ambrose
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aquinas, Thomas Aquinas, Saint Thomas, St. Thomas, Saint Thomas Aquinas, St. Thomas Aquinas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arminius, Jacobus Arminius, Jacob Harmensen, Jakob Hermandszoon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arnold of Brescia
   HAS INSTANCE=> Athanasius, Saint Athanasius, St. Athanasius, Athanasius the Great
   HAS INSTANCE=> Augustine, Saint Augustine, St. Augustine, Augustine of Hippo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barth, Karl Barth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Basil, St. Basil, Basil of Caesarea, Basil the Great, St. Basil the Great
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bede, Saint Bede, St. Bede, Baeda, Saint Baeda, St. Baeda, Beda, Saint Beda, St. Beda, the Venerable Bede
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bellarmine, Bellarmino, Cardinal Bellarmine, Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bonhoeffer, Dietrich Bonhoeffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bultmann, Rudolf Bultmann, Rudolf Karl Bultmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvin, John Calvin, Jean Cauvin, Jean Caulvin, Jean Chauvin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Duns Scotus, John Duns Scotus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eck, Johann Eck, Johann Maier Eck, Johann Maier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eckhart, Johannes Eckhart, Meister Eckhart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Edwards, Jonathan Edwards
   HAS INSTANCE=> Erasmus, Desiderius Erasmus, Gerhard Gerhards, Geert Geerts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gregory, Gregory Nazianzen, Gregory of Nazianzen, St. Gregory of Nazianzen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hooker, Richard Hooker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hopkins, Mark Hopkins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ignatius of Loyola, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, St. Ignatius of Loyola, Loyola
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jansen, Cornelis Jansen, Cornelius Jansenius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jerome, Saint Jerome, St. Jerome, Hieronymus, Eusebius Hieronymus, Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus
   HAS INSTANCE=> John Chrysostom, St. John Chrysostom
   HAS INSTANCE=> Knox, John Knox
   HAS INSTANCE=> Luther, Martin Luther
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melanchthon, Philipp Melanchthon, Philipp Schwarzerd
   HAS INSTANCE=> Newman, John Henry Newman, Cardinal Newman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Niebuhr, Reinhold Niebuhr
   HAS INSTANCE=> Origen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pusey, Edward Pusey, Edward Bouverie Pusey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Socinus, Faustus Socinus, Fausto Paolo Sozzini
   HAS INSTANCE=> Swedenborg, Svedberg, Emanuel Swedenborg, Emanuel Svedberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tertullian, Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tillich, Paul Tillich, Paul Johannes Tillich
   HAS INSTANCE=> Watts, Isaac Watts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wycliffe, John Wycliffe, Wickliffe, John Wickliffe, Wyclif, John Wyclif, Wiclif, John Wiclif
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zinzendorf, Count Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zwingli, Ulrich Zwingli, Huldreich Zwingli
  -> humanist
   => classicist, classical scholar
   => man of letters
   => philologist, philologue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Erasmus, Desiderius Erasmus, Gerhard Gerhards, Geert Geerts










--- Grep of noun desiderius_erasmus
desiderius erasmus





IN WEBGEN [10000/0]



change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family":
change "padding":
change "table font size":
last updated: 2021-08-18 17:22:25
383072 site hits