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object:Leonardo da Vinci
subject class:Science
subject class:Art
title class:Polymath
class:author

Wikipedia
Leonardo da Vinci[b] (15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519) was an Italian polymath of the High Renaissance who was active as a painter, draughtsman, engineer, scientist, theorist, sculptor and architect.[3] While his fame initially rested on his achievements as a painter, he also became known for his notebooks, in which he made drawings and notes on a variety of subjects, including anatomy, astronomy, botany, cartography, painting, and paleontology. Leonardo's genius epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal,[4] and his collective works compose a contribution to later generations of artists matched only by that of his younger contemporary, Michelangelo.[3][4]

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci

15 April 1452
(Anchiano?)[a] Vinci, Republic of Florence


Died 2 May 1519 (aged 67)
Clos Lucé, Amboise, Kingdom of France

Education Studio of Andrea del Verrocchio

Known for: Painting, drawing, engineering, science, sculpture, architecture

Notable work
  Virgin of the Rocks (c. 1483–1493)
  Lady with an Ermine (c. 1489–1491)
  The Vitruvian Man (c. 1490)
  The Last Supper (c. 1492–1498)
  Salvator Mundi (c. 1499–1510)
  Mona Lisa (c. 1503–1516)



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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
books_(by_alpha)
How_to_think_like_Leonardo_Da_Vinci
Infinite_Library
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1.pbs_-_On_The_Medusa_Of_Leonardo_da_Vinci_In_The_Florentine_Gallery
1.ww_-_The_Last_Supper,_by_Leonardo_da_Vinci,_in_the_Refectory_of_the_Convent_of_Maria_della_GraziaMilan

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_1962-06-30
0_1967-11-29
0_1969-05-10
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1953-10-28
1.pbs_-_On_The_Medusa_Of_Leonardo_da_Vinci_In_The_Florentine_Gallery
1.ww_-_The_Last_Supper,_by_Leonardo_da_Vinci,_in_the_Refectory_of_the_Convent_of_Maria_della_GraziaMilan
3.00_-_Introduction
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
How to think like Leonardo Da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Leonardo da Vinci’s conception of Gabriel, a detail from the Annunciation, in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence. 118

Leonardo da Vinci’s conception of Gabriel, a detail from the Annunciation, in the Utfizi


TERMS ANYWHERE

Leonardo da Vinci’s conception of Gabriel, a detail from the Annunciation, in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence. 118

Leonardo da Vinci’s conception of Gabriel, a detail from the Annunciation, in the Utfizi



QUOTES [35 / 35 - 878 / 878]


KEYS (10k)

   28 Leonardo da Vinci
   2 Leonardo da Vinci
   1 To Develop a Mind:
Study the science of art;
Study the art of science.
Learn how to see.
Realize that everything connects
to everything else." - Leonardo da Vinci
   1 Mortimer J Adler
   1 Michael J. Gelb
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 Anthony Robbins

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  741 Leonardo da Vinci
   20 Walter Isaacson
   8 Anonymous
   5 Robert Greene
   4 Hourly History
   3 Fernando Pessoa
   2 Robert I Sutton
   2 Oliver Bowden
   2 Mortimer J Adler
   2 Michael J Gelb
   2 Maggie Nelson
   2 Jodi Picoult
   2 Jack Kirby
   2 Francis A Schaeffer
   2 Frances Mayes
   2 E M Forster
   2 Banksy

1:The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
2:Life, if well spent, is long. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
3:Learning never exhausts the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
4:Wisdom is the daughter of experience.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
5:Art is never finished, only abandoned.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
6:Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
7:Intellectual passion drives out sensuality.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
8:Truth was the only daughter of Time.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci, ., 1152,
9:Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
10:Where there is shouting, there is no true knowledge." ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
11:Love alone makes me remember. It alone makes me alert. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
12:One can have no smaller or greater mastery than mastery of oneself.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
13:Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
14:turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
15:As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death." ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
16:I roamed the countryside searching for answers to things I did not understand.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
17:The instant does not have time; and time is made from the movement of the instant. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
18:While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
19:Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake?
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
20:To know and to will are two operations of the human mind.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci, Notebooks, Philosophy, 1146,
21:A painter should begin every canvas with a wash of black, because all things in nature are dark except where exposed by the light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
22:As every divided kingdom falls, so every mind divided between many studies confounds and saps itself
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci, [T5],
23:Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen." ~ Leonardo da Vinci, (1452 - 1519),
24:It vexes me greatly that having to earn my living has forced me to interrupt the work and to attend to small matters.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
25:In rivers, the water that you touch is the last of what has passed and the first of that which comes; so with present time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
26:To Develop a Mind:
Study the science of art;
Study the art of science.
Learn how to see.
Realize that everything connects
to everything else." - Leonardo da Vinci,
27:I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
28:A painter should begin every canvas with a wash of black, because all things in nature are dark except where exposed by the light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
29:Look at light and admire its beauty. Close your eyes, and then look again: what you saw is no longer there; and what you will see later is not yet." ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
30:Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
31:If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
32:Certainly we have had our Napoleons and our Hitlers, but we have also had Jesus and Buddha. We have had tyrants, but also great humanitarians. We have had corrupt politicians, but also noble rulers. Even in the most selfish of times, the world has brought forth idealists, philanthropists, great artists, musicians, and poets. If we have inherited ages of feuding and intolerance, we have also inherited the magnificence of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. For each tyrant who has profaned the pages of history, there have been thousands, even millions, of gentle people who have lived unhonored and unknown, keeping principles and living convictions under the most difficult situations. To see this good, and to know it, is to find a new courage and a new faith. ~ Manly P Hall, PRS Journal Summer 1961, p.7,
33:The Seven Da Vincian Principles are:
   Curiosità - An insatiably curious approach to life and an unrelenting quest for continuous learning.
   Dimostrazione - A commitment to test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes.
   Sensazione - The continual refinement of the senses, especially sight, as the means to enliven experience.
   Sfumato (literally "Going up in Smoke") - A willingness to embrace ambiguity, paradox, and uncertainty.
   Arte/Scienza - The development of the balance between science and art, logic and imagination. "Whole-brain" thinking.
   Corporalità - The cultivation of grace, ambidexterity, fitness, and poise.
   Connessione - A recognition of and appreciation for the interconnectedness of all things and phenomena. Systems thinking.
   ~ Michael J. Gelb, How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day,
34:Raise Your Standards
Any time you sincerely want to make a change, the first thing you must do is to raise your standards. When people ask me what really changed my life eight years ago, I tell them that absolutely the most important thing was changing what I demanded of myself. I wrote down all the things I would no longer accept in my life, all the things I would no longer tolerate, and all the things that I aspired to becoming.
Think of the far-reaching consequences set in motion by men and women who raised their standards and acted in accordance with them, deciding they would tolerate no less. History chronicles the inspiring examples of people like Leonardo da Vinci, Abraham Lincoln, Helen Keller, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Albeit Einstein, Cesar Chavez, Soichiro Honda, and many others who took the magnificently powerful step of raising their standards. The same power that was available to them is available to you, if you have the courage to claim it. Changing an organization, acompany, a country-or a world-begins with the simple step of changing yourself.


STEP TWO

Change Your Limiting Beliefs ~ Anthony Robbins, How to take Immediate Control of Your Mental Emotional Physical and Financial Destiny,
35:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:I have wasted my hours. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
2:Life well spent is long. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
3:Nature never breaks her own laws. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
4:The smallest feline is a masterpiece. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
5:Art is never finished, only abandoned. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
6:Our life is made by the death of others. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
7:Water is the driving force of all nature. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
8:Intellectual passion drives out sensuality. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
9:The natural desire of good men is knowledge. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
10:It is better to imitate ancient than modern work. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
11:The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
12:Time stays long enough for anyone who will use it. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
13:He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
14:Where there is shouting, there is no true knowledge. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
15:All our knowledge has its origins in our perceptions. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
16:Time abides long enough for those who make use of it. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
17:A beautiful body perishes, but a work of art dies not. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
18:It's easier to resist at the beginning than at the end. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
19:Our body is dependant on Heaven and Heaven on the Spirit. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
20:The length of a man's outspread arms is equal to his height. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
21:The greatest deception men suffer is from their own opinions. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
22:Just as courage is the danger of life, so is fear its safeguard. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
23:You can have no dominion greater or less than that over yourself. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
24:Beyond a doubt truth bears the same relation to falsehood as light to darkness. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
25:As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
26:The senses are of the earth, the reason stands apart from them in contemplation. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
27:While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
28:Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake?  ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
29:Marriage is like putting your hand into a bag of snakes in the hope of pulling out an eel. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
30:Experience does not err. Only your judgments err by expecting from her what is not in her power. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
31:Knowledge of the past and of the places of the earth is the ornament and food of the mind of man. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
32:There are three classes of people: those who see, those who see when they are shown, those who do not see. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
33:Iron rusts from disuse; water loses its purity from stagnation... even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
34:Medicine is the restoration of discordant elements; sickness is the discord of the elements infused into the living body. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
35:I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
36:Experience never errs; it is only your judgments that err by promising themselves effects such as are not caused by your experiments. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
37:The poet ranks far below the painter in the representation of visible things, and far below the musician in that of invisible things. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
38:The spirit desires to remain with its body, because, without the organic instruments of that body, it can neither act, nor feel anything. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
39:All knowledge which ends in words will die as quickly as it came to life, with the exception of the written word: which is its mechanical part. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
40:Just as food eaten without appetite is a tedious nourishment, so does study without zeal damage the memory by not assimilating what it absorbs. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
41:Nature is the source of all true knowledge. She has her own logic, her own laws, she has no effect without cause nor invention without necessity. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
42:For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
43:For, verily, great love springs from great knowledge of the beloved object, and if you little know it, you will be able to love it only little or not at all. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
44:The human bird shall take his first flight, filling the world with amazement, all writings with his fame, and bringing eternal glory to the nest whence he sprang. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
45:Painting is concerned with all the 10 attributes of sight; which are: Darkness, Light, Solidity and Colour, Form and Position, Distance and Propinquity, Motion and Rest. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
46:Human subtlety will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple or more direct than does nature because in her inventions nothing is lacking, and nothing is superfluous. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
47:The painter who draws merely by practice and by eye, without any reason, is like a mirror which copies every thing placed in front of it without being conscious of their existence. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
48:The mind of the painter must resemble a mirror, which always takes the colour of the object it reflects and is completely occupied by the images of as many objects as are in front of it. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
49:Although nature commences with reason and ends in experience it is necessary for us to do the opposite, that is to commence with experience and from this to proceed to investigate the reason. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
50:There are four powers: memory and intellect, desire and covetousness. The two first are mental and the others sensual. The three senses: sight, hearing and smell cannot well be prevented; touch and taste not at all. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
51:Don't say you don't have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein. ~ h-jackson-brown-jr, @wisdomtrove
52:Don't say you don't have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michaelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein. ~ h-jackson-brown-jr, @wisdomtrove
53:I have found that, in the composition of the human body as compared with the bodies of animals, the organs of sense are duller and coarser. Thus, it is composed of less ingenious instruments, and of spaces less capacious for receiving the faculties of sense. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
54:I love those who can smile in trouble, who can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. &
55:To such an extent does nature delight and abound in variety that among her trees there is not one plant to be found which is exactly like another; and not only among the plants, but among the boughs, the leaves and the fruits, you will not find one which is exactly similar to another. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
56:In order to arrive at knowledge of the motions of birds in the air, it is first necessary to acquire knowledge of the winds, which we will prove by the motions of water in itself, and this knowledge will be a step enabling us to arrive at the knowledge of beings that fly between the air and the wind. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
57:The painter who is familiar with the nature of the sinews, muscles, and tendons, will know very well, in giving movement to a limb, how many and which sinews cause it; and which muscle, by swelling, causes the contraction of that sinew; and which sinews, expanded into the thinnest cartilage, surround and support the said muscle. ~ leonardo-da-vinci, @wisdomtrove
58:There is a connection, hard to explain logically but easy to feel, between achievement in public life and progress in the arts. The age of Pericles was also the age of Phidias. The age of Lorenzo de Medici was also the age of Leonardo da Vinci. The age Elizabeth also the age of Shakespeare. And the New Frontier for which I campaign in public life, can also be a New Frontier for American art. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
59:Homosexuality is assuredly no advantage, but it is nothing to be ashamed of, no vice, no degradation; it cannot be classified as an illness; we consider it to be a variation of the sexual function, produced by a certain arrest of sexual development. Many highly respectable individuals of ancient and modern times have been homosexuals, several of the greatest men among them (Plato, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, etc.). It is a great injustice to persecute homosexuality as a crime&
60:Mind cannot be divided; it is a Whole. Therefore the Whole Mind is back of and immanent in the smallest thought. Not all of its power, perhaps, but all of its being. It was not a part of Shakespeare's mind that created Othello and was immanent in it; not a part of the mind of Dickens that created and lived through Uriah Heep; not a part of the mind of the unknown artist that created and lived in and through the Venus de Milo; not a part of the mind of Leonardo da Vinci that created and smiles through the countenance of the Mona Lisa. Mind, being immaterial, does not occupy space. It cannot be divided into parts. It is a Unity— Indivisible. Wherever Unity is at all, there must all of it be. ~ william-walker-atkinson, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:He who can copy can do. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
2:I have wasted my hours. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
3:Life is pretty simple: ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
4:The moment has no time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
5:The moment is timeless. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
6:I wish to work miracles. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
7:Life well spent is long. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
8:direct from the originals. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
9:Vows begin when hope dies. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
10:Der Augenblick ist zeitlos. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
11:Especially learn how to see. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
12:„Wer wenig denkt, irrt viel. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
13:Who sows virtue reaps honor. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
14:Perché la minestra si fredda. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
15:If there's no love, what then? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
16:For youth, everything is sport. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
17:He who thinks little errs much. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
18:He who thinks little errs much… ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
19:Lust is the cause of generation ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
20:Savage is he who saves himself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
21:LEARNING NEVER EXHAUSTS THE MIND ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
22:Lust is the cause of generation. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
23:Nothing is hidden under the sun. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
24:The cat is nature's masterpiece. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
25:All thoughts start from emotions. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
26:A long life is a life well spent. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
27:Learning never exhausts the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
28:Nature never breaks her own laws. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
29:One's thoughts turn towards Hope. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
30:Poor is the man who desires a lot ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
31:Life, when is spent well, is long. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
32:My body is not a tomb for animals. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
33:Necessity is a guardian in Nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
34:A gray day provides the best light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
35:A well-spent day brings happy sleep ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
36:He who walks straight rarely falls. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
37:Learning never exhausts the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
38:Wood feeds the fire which burns it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
39:A well-spent day brings happy sleep. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
40:Good writing comes from good talent. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
41:Inaction saps the vigor of the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
42:life without love, is no life at all ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
43:Priroda nikada ne krši svoje zakone. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
44:Some promises and time disappoint us ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
45:The Medici created and destroyed me. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
46:Truth was the only daughter of Time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
47:Wisdom is the daughter of experience ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
48:art is never finished, only abandoned ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
49:Not to anticipate is already to moan. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
50:simplicity is the best sophistication ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
51:The smallest feline is a masterpiece. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
52:Water is the driving force in nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
53:Who sows virtue ought to reap honour. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
54:a life without love, is no life at all ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
55:Art is never finished, only abandoned. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
56:Fear arises sooner than anything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
57:I love those who can smile in trouble. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
58:We ought not to desire the impossible. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
59:Art is never completed, only abandoned. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
60:Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
61:The knowledge of all things is possible ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
62:A life well used procures a happy death. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
63:All our knowledge originates in opinion. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
64:Being willing is not enough. We must do. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
65:Dimmi, dimmi se mai fu fatta cosa alcuna ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
66:I love those who can smile in trouble... ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
67:In life beauty perishes, but not in art. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
68:Learn diligence before speedy execution. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
69:Our life is made by the death of others. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
70:When you are alone you are all your own. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
71:Wisdom is the daughter of experience.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
72:Art is never finished, only abandoned.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
73:He turns not back who is bound to a star. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
74:La semplicità è la sofisticazione finale. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
75:Music... is the shaping of the invisible. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
76:Water is the driving force of all nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
77:Ask counsel of him who rules himself well. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
78:Every obstacle is destroyed through rigor. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
79:Fine gold is recognized when it is tested. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
80:Intellectual passion dries out sensuality. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
81:In time and with water, everything changes ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
82:Movement will fail sooner than usefulness. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
83:My body is not a tomb for other creatures. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
84:Nature alone is the master of true genius. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
85:Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
86:The desire to know is natural to good men. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
87:The motive power is the cause of all life. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
88:Truth was always but the daughter of time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
89:Ask advice of him who governs himself well. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
90:Intellectual passion drives out sensuality. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
91:In time and with water, everything changes. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
92:Let not your rage or malice destroy a life. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
93:Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. ~ Leonardo Da Vinci,
94:That which has no limitations, has no form. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
95:To become an artist you have to be curious. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
96:He who truly knows has no occasion to shout. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
97:The deeper the feeling, the greater the pain ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
98:The grave will fall in upon him who digs it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
99:The natural desire of good men is knowledge. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
100:Time stays long enough for those who use it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
101:He who fears dangers will not perish by them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
102:Nuestra vida está hecha de la muerte de otros ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
103:O time! swift devourer of all created things! ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
104:The painter strives and competes with nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
105:Abbreviators do harm to knowledge and to love. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
106:A simplicidade é o último grau de sofisticação ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
107:Every action needs to be prompted by a motive. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
108:God sells us all things at the price of labor. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
109:In der Einfachheit liegt die größte Vollendung ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
110:Intellectual passion drives out sensuality.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
111:Necessity is the mistress and guide of nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
112:The five senses are the ministers of the soul. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
113:We may call painting the grandchild of nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
114:Every man at three years old is half his height ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
115:He who does not value life does not deserve it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
116:Inequality is the cause of all local movements. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
117:My body will not be a tomb for other creatures. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
118:Nothing is so much to be feared as Evil Report. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
119:Ogni nostra cognitione prīcipia da sentimēti. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
120:Perspective is the rein and rudder of painting. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
121:That which can be lost cannot be deemed riches. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
122:The Medici made me and the Medici destroyed me. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
123:...the most sublime of oddballs, Leonardo da Vinci ~ Norman Maclean,
124:Beauty perishes in life, but is immortal in art. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
125:I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
126:Just as courage imperils life, fear protects it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
127:Motion is created by the destruction of balance. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
128:Study the science of art and the art of science. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
129:Tears come from the heart and not from the brain ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
130:The days are long enough for those who use them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
131:The greater the man's soul, the deeper he loves. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
132:The wisest and noblest teacher is nature itself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
133:Truth was the only daughter of Time.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci, ., 1152,
134:Art lives from constraints and dies from freedom. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
135:If you are alone you belong entirely to yourself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
136:It is better to imitate ancient than modern work. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
137:Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
138:Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
139:The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
140:Art is never finished, only abandoned. —LEONARDO DA VINCI ~ Jeff Goins,
141:He who possesses most must be most afraid of loss. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
142:Nothing should be so greatly feared as empty fame. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
143:Poor is the pupil who does not surpass his master. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
144:poor is the pupil who does not surpass his master. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
145:Science is the captain, and practice the soldiers. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
146:The eye encompasses the beauty of the whole world. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
147:Time stays long enough for anyone who will use it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
148:All our knowledge has its origin in our perceptions ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
149:He who does not punish evil commands it to be done. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
150:He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
151:How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci, author Michael J. Gelb ~ Jon Acuff,
152:If the thing loved is base, the lover becomes base. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
153:Medicine is the restoration of discordant elements. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
154:Not to punish evil is equivalent to authorizing it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
155:That painter who has no doubts will achieve little. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
156:The human being, creature of eyes, needs the image. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
157:The painter has the Universe in his mind and hands. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
158:We, by our arts may be called the grandsons of God. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
159:What is fair in men, passes away, but not so in art ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
160:Whoever does not respect life, does not deserve it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
161:As you cannot do what you want, Want what you can do ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
162:He who does not punish evil, commands it to be done. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
163:I woke up only to find the rest of the world asleep. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
164:Realize that everything connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
165:Reprove your friend in secret and praise him openly. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
166:The artist sees what others only catch a glimpse of. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
167:...The world wouldn't be the world, without trouble. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
168:We are deceived by promises and time disappoints us. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
169:Where there is shouting, there is no true knowledge. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
170:All our knowledge has its origins in our perceptions. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
171:Experience is a truer guide than the words of others. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
172:He is a poor pupil who does not go beyond his master. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
173:Learning is the only thing that never disappoints us. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
174:Los je ucenik onaj, koji je ne nadmasi svog ucitelja. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
175:Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
176:Painting is mute poetry, and poetry is blind painting ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
177:The boundaries of bodies are the least of all things. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
178:Threats alone, are the weapons of the threatened man. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
179:A beautiful body perishes, but a work of art dies not. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
180:All our knowledge is the offspring of our perceptions. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
181:I am not poor. Poor are those who desire many things. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
182:Love, Fear, and Esteem, - Write these on three stones. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
183:Slender certainty is better than portentous falsehood. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
184:When counting, try not to mix chickens with blessings. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
185:Your brain is much better than you think; just use it! ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
186:A diamond is just a lump of coal that stuck to its job. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
187:As you cannot do what you want,
Want what you can do ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
188:Avoid studies of which the result dies with the worker. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
189:Constancy does not begin, but is that which perseveres. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
190:It is useful to constantly observe, note, and consider. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
191:It's easier to resist at the beginning than at the end. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
192:Learning acquired in youth arrests the evil of old age. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
193:Nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
194:Reprove your friend in secret and praise him in public. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
195:A natural action is accomplished in the briefest manner. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
196:Details make perfection, and perfection is not a detail. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
197:Every action done by nature is done in the shortest way. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
198:Fix your course on a star and you'll navigate any storm. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
199:He who does not oppose evil......commands it to be done. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
200:I shall do down in history as the man who opened a door! ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
201:It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
202:Tell me if anything was ever done... Tell me... Tell me. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
203:The organ of perception acts more readily than judgment. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
204:There are many kinds of beauty as people who possess it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
205:Happy will they be who lend ear to the words of the dead. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
206:Of the horse I will say nothing because I know the times. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
207:Of the original phenomena, light is the most enthralling. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
208:Our body is dependent on heaven and heaven on the Spirit. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
209:To lie is vile, to tell truth is excellent, if not noble. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
210:i thought i was learning to live but i was learning to die ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
211:Not to appreciate life, all of life, is not to deserve it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
212:Obstacles cannot bend me. Every obstacle yields to effort. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
213:You grow in reputation like bread in the hands of a child. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
214:For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
215:He who wishes to be rich in a day will be hanged in a year. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
216:The supreme misfortune is when theory outstrips performance ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
217:Darkness is absence of light. Shadow is diminution of light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
218:I'm not contented to capture the world. I want to change it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
219:Nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first understood. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
220:The length of a man's outspread arms is equal to his height. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
221:To speak ill of a good person is not truly good, all in all. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
222:I thought I was learning to live; I was only learning to die. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
223:O Lord, thou givest us everything, at the price of an effort. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
224:People of higher talent work, even if they seem to do nothing ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
225:The greatest deception men suffer is from their own opinions. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
226:The study of what is excellent is food for the mind and body. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
227:Where there is most feeling, there is the greatest martyrdom. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
228:Experiment is the sole interpreter of the artifices of Nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
229:He who never puts his trust in any man will never be deceived. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
230:The limiting surface of one thing is the beginning of another. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
231:The memory of benefits is a frail defence against ingratitude. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
232:to Nature, since it is only by chance that they wear the human ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
233:Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
234:He who has access to the fountain does not go to the water-pot. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
235:Lying on a feather mattress or quilt will not bring you renown. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
236:once you have tasted the taste of sky, you will forever look up ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
237:Fix your course to a star and you can navigate through any storm ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
238:I awoke, only to see that the rest of the world is still asleep. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
239:It is easier to contend with evil at the first than at the last. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
240:Just as courage is the danger of life, so is fear its safeguard. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
241:The most beautiful words of love are told in silence for a look. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
242:There is nothing which deceives us as much as our own judgement. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
243:Thou, O God, dost sell us all good things at the price of labor. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
244:Advertisers constantly invent cures to which there is no disease. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
245:A wave is never found alone, but is mingled with the other waves. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
246:I awoke only to find that the rest of the world was still asleep. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
247:Practice should always be based upon a sound knowledge of theory. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
248:The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
249:You can have no dominion greater or less than that over yourself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
250:He who despises painting has no love for the philosophy in nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
251:Lies don't solve problems it just make it worst ...so liars beware ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
252:Obstacles cannot crush me; every obstacle yields to stern resolve. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
253:The truth of things is the chief nutriment of superior intellects. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
254:When taking a selfie, remember the most natural pose is still best ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
255:Whoever in debate quotes authority uses not intellect, but memory. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
256:Be a mirror, absorb everything around you and still remain the same ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
257:Let no man who is not a Mathematician read the elements of my work. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
258:One can have no smaller or greater mastery than mastery of oneself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
259:Small rooms or dwellings discipline the mind, large ones weaken it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
260:Those who are inspired by a model other than Nature, labor in vain. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
261:He who wishes to be rich within a day, will be hanged within a year. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
262:The greatest geniuses sometimes accomplish more when they work less. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
263:To enjoy - to love a thing for its own sake and for no other reason. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
264:La decadencia llega cuando el hombre deja de fijarse en la naturaleza ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
265:Knowledge ... shall always bear witness like a clarion to its creator. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
266:Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
267:Make an effort to collect the good features from many beautiful faces. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
268:One can have no smaller or greater mastery than mastery of oneself.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
269:Hari yang dilewatkan dengan baik, akan menghasilkan tidur yang nyenyak. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
270:Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
271:Men of lofty genius when they are doing the least work are most active. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
272:Blinding ignorance does mislead us. O! Wretched mortals, open your eyes! ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
273:No counsel is more sincere than that given on ships which are in danger. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
274:The eye sees a thing more clearly in dreams, than the imagination awake. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
275:A clever man without wisdom is like a beautiful flower without fragrance. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
276:Common Sense is that which judges the things given to it by other senses. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
277:Nature is full of infinite causes that have never occurred in experience. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
278:Such is the supreme folly of man that he labours so as to labour no more. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
279:You will never have a greater or lesser dominion than that over yourself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
280:Depth and strength of a human character are defined by its moral reserves. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
281:Patience serves as a protection against wrongs as clothes do against cold. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
282:Even the richest soil, if left uncultivated will produce the rankest weeds. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
283:In her (nature's) inventions nothing is lacking and nothing is superfluous. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
284:It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end. —LEONARDO DA VINCI ~ Robert B Cialdini,
285:The evil which does me no harm is like the good which in no wise avails me. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
286:The faculty of imagination is both the rudder and the bridle of the senses. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
287:The motions of men must be such as suggest their dignity or their baseness. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
288:The painter who has no doubt about his own ability will attain very little. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
289:To speak well of a base man is much the same as speaking ill of a good man. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
290:Do not reveal, if liberty is precious to you; my face is the prison of love. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
291:Just as iron rusts from disuse... even so does inaction spoil the intellect. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
292:La Bella Principessa: The Story of the New Masterpiece by Leonardo Da Vinci.31 ~ Walter Isaacson,
293:While I thought I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
294:As a well spent day brings happy sleep, so life well used brings happy death. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
295:Everything in some way connects to everything else".

Leonardo Da Vinci ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
296:If you call painting dumb poetry, the painter may call poetry blind painting. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
297:One can have no more mastery over the environment, than one has over himself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
298:The eye - which sees all objects reversed - retains the images for some time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
299:The good painter must paint two things: a person and the essence of his soul. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
300:Truth is so excellent, that if it praises but small things they become noble. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
301:A good painter is to paint two main things, men and the working of man's mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
302:I roamed the countryside searching for answers to things I did not understand. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
303:It reflects no great honour on a painter to be able to execute one thing well. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
304:Obstacles cannot crush me...he who is fixed to a star does not change his mind ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
305:Therefore, O students, study mathematics and do not build without foundations. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
306:Why does the eye see more clearly when asleep than the imagination when awake? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
307:Although a man be not a painter, he may have just opinions of the forms of men. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
308:Beyond a doubt truth bears the same relation to falsehood as light to darkness. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
309:I am still hopeful. A falcon, Time. But the coincidence is probably accidental. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
310:I have solved what color is, however ; I still have no idea about what line is. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
311:It is ill to praise, and worse to blame, the thing which you do not understand. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
312:The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art.” —Leonardo da Vinci ~ Katy Bowman,
313:You do ill if you praise, but worse if you censure, what you do not understand. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
314:A good painter has two main objects to paint, man and the intention of his soul. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
315:He who cannot establish dominion over himself will have no dominion over others. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
316:Study without desire spoils the memory, and it retains nothing that it takes in. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
317:The bones of the Dead will be seen to govern the fortunes of him who moves them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
318:The Book of the science of Mechanics must precede the Book of useful inventions. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
319:The senses are of the earth, the reason stands apart from them in contemplation. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
320:First study the science, and then practice the art which is born of that science. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
321:I roamed the countryside searching for answers to things I did not understand.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
322:My works are the issue of simple and plain experience which is the true mistress. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
323:Perspective is to painting what the bridle is to the horse, the rudder to a ship. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
324:The great man presides over all his states of consciousness with obstinate rigor. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
325:Vitality and beauty are gifts of Nature for those who live according to its laws. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
326:We might say that the earth has the spirit of growth; that its flesh is the soil. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
327:While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
328:A man of supreme folly: his life flies away while he is merely hoping to enjoy it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
329:[...]E veramente accade che sempre dove manca la ragione suppliscono le grida[...] ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
330:I expose to men the origin of their first, and perhaps second, reason for existing ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
331:Learning is the only thing the mind never exhausts, never fears and never regrets. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
332:One can have no smaller or greater mastery than mastery of oneself. —LEONARDO DA VINCI ~ Robert Greene,
333:sooner will there exist a body without a shadow than virtue unaccompanied by envy. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
334:The earth is moved from its position by the weight of a tiny bird resting upon it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
335:The lover is drawn by the thing loved, as the sense is by that which it perceives. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
336:We know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
337:I have always felt it is my destiny to build a machine that would allow man to fly. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
338:Learning is the only thing the mind never exhausts, never fears, and never regrets. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
339:Leonardo da Vinci: “Obstacles cannot crush me; every obstacle yields to stern resolve. ~ Liane Moriarty,
340:as a well-spent day gives, joy in sleep
so a well-spent life brings, joy in dying ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
341:Avoid the precepts of those thinkers whose reasoning is not confirmed by experience. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
342:Fame alone raises herself to Heaven, because virtuous things are in favour with God. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
343:There is no higher or lower knowledge, but one only, flowing out of experimentation. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
344:When Fortune comes, seize her in front with a sure hand, because behind she is bald. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
345:While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
346:Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
347:Black is like a broken vessel, which is deprived of the capacity to contain anything. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
348:Fire destroys all sophistry, that is deceit; and maintains truth alone, that is gold. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
349:Fire destroys falsehood, that is sophistry, and restores truth, driving out darkness. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
350:Given the cause nature produces the effect in the briefest manner that it can employ. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
351:It's not enough that you believe what you see. You must also understand what you see. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
352:No counsel is more trustworthy than that which is given upon ships that are in peril. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
353:One can have no smaller or greater mastery than mastery of oneself. —LEONARDO DA VINCI In ~ Robert Greene,
354:The eye sees a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination awake. —Leonardo da Vinci ~ Raine Miller,
355:The mind that engages in subjects of too great variety becomes confused and weakened. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
356:The water which rises in the mountains is the blood which keeps the mountain in life. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
357:Who would believe that so small a space could contain the images of all the universe? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
358:Anyone who invokes authors in discussion is not using his intelligence but his memory. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
359:Embora eu acreditasse estar aprendendo a viver, estava aprendendo a morrer. — Leonardo da Vinci ~ Anonymous,
360:It is as great an error to speak well of a worthless man as to speak ill of a good man. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
361:Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” —Leonardo da Vinci ~ Hourly History,
362:The color of the object illuminated partakes of the color of that which illuminates it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
363:The sun gives spirit and life to the plants and the earth nourishes them with moisture. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
364:Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake?
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
365:Although, as Leonardo da Vinci said: “Where there is shouting, there is no true knowledge, ~ Sophie Kinsella,
366:I have offended God and mankind because my work didn't reach the quality it should have. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
367:Instrumental or mechanical science is the noblest and above all others, the most useful. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
368:Many have made a trade of delusions and false miracles, deceiving the stupid multitudes. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
369:Nature appears to have been the cruel stepmother rather than the mother of many animals. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
370:A good memory, which nature has endowed us with, causes things long past to seem present. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
371:Among the great things which are found among us the existence of Nothing is the greatest. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
372:An arch consists of two weaknesses which, leaning one against the other, make a strength. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
373:Envy wounds with false accusations, that is with detraction, a thing which scares virtue. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
374:He only moves toward the perfection of his art whose criticism surpasses his achievement. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
375:Instrumental or mechanical science is the noblest and, above all others, the most useful. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
376:It is the infinite alone that cannot be attained, for if it could it would become finite. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
377:Most people, if you give them a book, they sniff around on it awhile, then try to eat it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
378:Oh! how foul a thing, that we should see the tongue of one animal in the guts of another. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
379:quote from Leonardo da Vinci: “Obstacles cannot crush me; every obstacle yields to stern resolve. ~ Anonymous,
380:To know and to will are two operations of the human mind.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci, Notebooks, Philosophy, 1146,
381:He who does not understand the supreme certainty of mathematics is wallowing in confusion. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
382:If we make mistakes in our first compositions and do not know them, we may not amend them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
383:Marriage is like putting your hand into a bag of snakes in the hope of pulling out an eel. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
384:Most men are of naught more use in their lives but as machines for turning food into sh*t. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
385:Small rooms or dwellings set the mind in the right path, large ones cause it to go astray. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
386:The imagination is to the effect as the shadow to the opaque body which causes the shadow. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
387:For those colours which you wish to be beautiful, always first prepare a pure white ground. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
388:If Michaelangelo or Leonardo Da Vinci were alive today they’d be making Avatar, not painting a chapel. ~ Banksy,
389:Just as Leonardo da Vinci studied human anatomy and dissected corpses, so I try to dissect souls. ~ Edvard Munch,
390:A beautiful body perishes, but a work of art dies not.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci Leonardo da Vinci ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
391:Art is the queen of all sciences communicating knowledge to all the generations of the world. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
392:He who in reasoning cites authority is making use of his memory rather than of his intellect. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
393:Test knowledge through experience, be prepared to make mistakes, and be persistent about it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
394:We know well that mistakes are more easily detected in the works of others than in one's own. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
395:A luminous body will appear more brilliant in proportion as it is surrounded by deeper shadow. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
396:In the days of thy youth seek to obtain that which shall compensate the losses of thy old age. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
397:Just as a well-filled day brings blessed sleep, so a well-employed life brings a blessed death ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
398:No human investigation can be called real science if it cannot be demonstrated mathematically. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
399:How painting surpasses all human works by reason of the subtle possibilities which it contains. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
400:Just as a well-filled day brings blessed sleep, so a well-employed life brings a blessed death. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
401:Leonardo da Vinci: While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. ~ Jodi Picoult,
402:Shadow is the diminution alike of light and of darkness, and stands between darkness and light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
403:The worst evil which can befall the artist is that his work should appear good in his own eyes. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
404:Experience does not err. Only your judgments err by expecting from her what is not in her power. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
405:Experience does not err; only your judgments err by expecting from her what is not in her power. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
406:Those who, in debate, appeal to their qualifications, argue from memory, not from understanding. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
407:The discovery of a good wine is increasingly better for mankind than the discovery of a new star. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
408:While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. – Leonardo da Vinci ~ Oliver Bowden,
409:Nature varies the seed according to the variety of the things she desires to produce in the world. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
410:The painter will produce pictures of little merit if he takes the works of others as his standard. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
411:The part always has a tendency to reunite with its whole in order to escape from its imperfection. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
412:To be a winner you must want to win but must know of the chance of losing and must not fear of it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
413:Many will be busied in taking away from a thing, which will grow in proportion as it is diminished. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
414:Men of genius sometimes accomplish most when they work least, for they are thinking out inventions. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
415:While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die.
-Leonardo Da Vinci ~ Oliver Bowden,
416:Love is something so ugly that the human race would die out if lovers could see what they were doing ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
417:No human investigation can claim to be scientific if it doesn't pass the test of mathematical proof. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
418:As every divided kingdom falls, so every mind divided between many studies confounds and saps itself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
419:One day the world will look upon research upon animals as it now looks upon research on human beings. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
420:Painting is poetry which is seen and not heard, and poetry is a painting which is heard but not seen. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
421:The function of muscle is to pull and not to push, except in the case of the genitals and the tongue. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
422:To any white body receiving the light from the sun, or the air, the shadows will be of a bluish cast. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
423:All sciences are vain and full of errors that are not born of Experience, the mother of all Knowledge. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
424:If you put on more clothes as the cold increases, it will have no power to hurt you. Let us hope that. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
425:It is an acknowledged fact that we perceive errors in the work of others more readily than in our own. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
426:Every part is disposed to unite with the whole, that it may thereby escape from its own incompleteness. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
427:If you do not rest on the good foundation of nature, you will labour with little honor and less profit. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
428:I know that there are numberless people who would, to satisfy a whim, destroy God and all the universe. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
429:Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
430:The body of the earth is of the nature of a fish... because it draws water as its breath instead of air. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
431:There will come a time when men look upon the murder of animals as they now look upon the murder of men. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
432:Old age takes in part savoury wisdom for its food - see to that your old age will not lack in nourishment. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
433:The eye is the window of the human body through which it feels its way and enjoys the beauty of the world. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
434:There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
435:There are three classes of people: those who see, those who see when they are shown, those who do not see. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
436:You should prefer a good scientist without literary abilities than a literate one without scientific skills ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
437:I am never weary of being useful... In serving others I cannot do enough. No labor is sufficient to tire me. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
438:People reveal themselves completely only when they are thrown out of the customary conditions of their life. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
439:Supreme happiness will be the greatest cause of misery, and the perfection of wisdom the occassion of folly. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
440:You must grow in patience when you meet with great wrongs, and they will then be powerless to vex your mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
441:As every divided kingdom falls, so every mind divided between many studies confounds and saps itself
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci, [T5],
442:People of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and made things happen. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
443:An artist's studio should be a small space because small rooms discipline the mind and large ones distract it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
444:Drawing is based upon perspective, which is nothing else than a thorough knowledge of the function of the eye. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
445:Feathers shall raise men even as they do birds towards heaven :- That is by letters written with their quills. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
446:It is a far worthier thing to read by the light of experience than to adorn oneself with the labors of others. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
447:The fame of the rich man dies with him; the fame of the treasure, and not of the man who possessed it, remains. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
448:There is no result in nature without a cause; understand the cause and you will have no need of the experiment. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
449:Things that are separate shall be united and acquire such virtue that they will restore to man his lost memory. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
450:A day will come in which men will look upon an animal's murder the same way they look today upon a man's murder. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
451:The light and heat of the universe comes from the sun, and its cold and darkness from the withdrawal of the sun. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
452:Leonardo Da Vinci combined art and science and aesthetics and engineering, that kind of unity is needed once again. ~ Ben Shneiderman,
453:The first object of the painter is to make a flat plane appear as a body in relief and projecting from that plane ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
454:The time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look on the murder of men. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
455:Iron rusts from disuse; water loses its purity from stagnation... even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
456:Make yourself a master of perspective, then acquire perfect knowledge of the proportions of men and other animals. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
457:Everything comes from everything, and everything is made out of everything, and everything returns into everything. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
458:Nothing will be left, Nothing in the air, nothing under the earth, nothing in the waters. All will be exterminated. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
459:The knowledge of the past times and of the places of the earth is both an ornament and nutriment to the human mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
460:Love shows itself more in adversity than in prosperity; as light does, which shines most where the place is darkest. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
461:Men born in hot countries love the night because it refreshes them and have a horror of light because it burns them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
462:There are three classes of people: those who see; those who see when they are shown; those who do not see. Leonardo da Vinci ~ Anonymous,
463:True and great love springs out of great knowledge, and where you know little you can love but little or not at all. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
464:All the bystanders at an event worthy of note adopt various gestures of admiration when contemplating the occurrence. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
465:Anyone who conducts an argument by appealing to authority is not using his intelligence; he is just using his memory. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
466:It vexes me greatly that having to earn my living has forced me to interrupt the work and to attend to small matters. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
467:Mechanics is the paradise of the mathematical sciences because by means of it one comes to the fruits of mathematics. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
468:Putting your hand into a river, you simultaneously touch the last of what is passing and the first of what is coming. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
469:Every now and then go away, have a little relaxation, for when you come back to your work your judgment will be surer. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
470:Love is something so ugly that the human race would die out if lovers could see what they were doing' (Leonardo da Vinci). ~ Maggie Nelson,
471:Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
472:Truly man is the king of beasts, for his brutality exceeds them. We live by the death of others. We are burial places. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
473:O Time with your teethy years! You swallow up all things little by little in a slow-motion, wrinkling process of dying. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
474:The painter or draftsman ought to be solitary, in order that the well-being of the body not sap the vigour of the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
475:It vexes me greatly that having to earn my living has forced me to interrupt the work and to attend to small matters.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
476:She was like a woman of Leonardo Da Vinci's, whom we love not so much for herself as for the things that she will not tell us. ~ E M Forster,
477:The mind of a painter should be like a mirror which is filled with as many images as there are things placed before him. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
478:Medicine is the restoration of discordant elements; sickness is the discord of the elements infused into the living body. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
479:Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity… even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind. — LEONARDO DA VINCI ~ Michael J Gelb,
480:When you put your hand in a flowing stream, you touch the last that has gone before and the first of what is still to come ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
481:58. “Love is something so ugly that the human race would die out if lovers could see what they were doing” (Leonardo da Vinci). ~ Maggie Nelson,
482:A poet knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
483:Happy will be those who give ear to the words of the dead: - The reading of good works and the observing of their precepts. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
484:In rivers, the water that you touch is the last of what has passed and the first of that which comes; so with present time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
485:Leonardo da Vinci liked to boast that, because he was not formally educated, he had to learn from his own experiences instead ~ Walter Isaacson,
486:Sculptured figures which appear in motion, will, in their standing position, actually look as if they were falling forward. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
487:The air moves like a river and carries the clouds with it; just as running water carries all the things that float upon it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
488:When you put your hand in a flowing stream, you touch the last that has gone before and the first of what is still to come. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
489:There is no object so large but that at a great distance from the eye it does not appear smaller than a smaller object near. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
490:Virtue is our true wealth and the true reward of its possessor; it cannot be lost, it never deserts us until life leaves us. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
491:Even Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci were entertainers. In that way, I am an entertainer and want to make art that is fun. ~ Yasumasa Morimura,
492:Necessity is the mistress and guide of nature. Necessity is the theme and inventress of nature, her curb and her eternal law. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
493:As a kid I read Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, and a few others. As an adult have admired Leonardo da Vinci's drawings and notebooks. ~ Viggo Mortensen,
494:Everything proceeds from everything else and everything becomes everything, and everything can be turned into everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
495:Man's external form, marvellously constructed, is not much as compared with the divine soul that dwells inside that structure. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
496:I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
497:Noi tutti siamo esiliati
entro lo cornici di uno strano quadro.
Chi sa questo, viva da grande,
Gli altri sono insetti. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
498:I abhor the supreme folly of those who blame the disciples of nature in defiance of those masters who were themselves her pupils ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
499:I am not to blame for putting forward, in the course of my work on science, any general rule derived from a previous conclusion. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
500:The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Complete by Leonardo Da Vinci (#3 in our series by Leonardo Da Vinci) ~ Anonymous,
501:A painter should begin every canvas with a wash of black, because all things in nature are dark except where exposed by the light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
502:Great love is born of great knowledge of the thing that is loved, and if you do not know it, you can love it little or not at all. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
503:I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
504:No one should ever imitate the style of another because, with regard to art, he will be called a nephew and not a child of nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
505:Though I may not . . . be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy - on experience. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
506:Any color is more distinctly seen when opposed to its contrary: thus, black on white, blear near yellow, green near red, and so on. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
507:A painter should begin every canvas with a wash of black, because all things in nature are dark except where exposed by the light. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
508:Fire is to represent truth because it destroys all sophistry and lies; and the mask is for lying and falsehood which conceal truth. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
509:The vine that has grown old on an old tree falls with the ruin of that tree, and through that bad companionship must perish with it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
510:When the thing taken into union is perfectly adapted to that which receives it, the result is delight and pleasure and satisfaction. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
511:Wherever good fortune enters, envy lays siege to the place and attacks it; and when it departs, sorrow and repentance remain behind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
512:Experience never errs; it is only your judgments that err by promising themselves effects such as are not caused by your experiments. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
513:In 1482, the year he turned thirty, Leonardo da Vinci left Florence for Milan, where he would end up spending the next seventeen years. ~ Walter Isaacson,
514:The eye which turns from a white object in the light of the sun and goes into a less fully lighted place will see everything as dark. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
515:The poet ranks far below the painter in the representation of visible things, and far below the musician in that of invisible things. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
516:Men standing in opposite hemispheres will converse and deride each other and embrace each other, and understand each other's language. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
517:He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
518:Just as iron which is not used grows rusty, and water putrefies and freezes in the cold, so the mind of which no use is made is spoilt. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
519:Like a kingdom divided, which rushes to its doom, the mind that engages in subjects of too great variety becomes confused and weakened. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
520:To discover the soul living in somebody's body, we watch the surrounding of the body, and if it's messy and disordered, so is the soul. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
521:The spirit desires to remain with its body, because, without the organic instruments of that body, it can neither act, nor feel anything. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
522:Each man is always in the middle of the surface of the earth and under the zenith of his own hemisphere, and over the centre of the earth. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
523:I have discovered that a screw-shaped device such as this, if it is well made from starched linen, will rise in the air if turned quickly. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
524:Just as iron rusts from disuse, and stagnant water putrefies, or when cold turns to ice, so our intellect wastes unless it is kept in use. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
525:Let proportion be found not only in numbers and measures, but also in sounds, weights, times, and positions, and what ever force there is. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
526:Of the four elements water is the second in weight and the second in respect of mobility. It is never at rest until it unites with the sea. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
527:Verrà il tempo in cui l’uomo non dovrà più uccidere per mangiare, ed anche l’uccisione di un solo animale sarà considerato un grave delitto ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
528:As a day well spent makes sleep seem pleasant, so a life well employed makes death pleasant. ========== Thoughts on Art and Life (Leonardo da Vinci) ~ Anonymous,
529:Do not imitate one another's style. If you do, so far as your art is concerned you will be called a grandson, rather than the son of Nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
530:A good painter has two chief objects to paint: man and the intention of his soul. The former is easy, the latter hard. —Leonardo da Vinci (c. 1490) ~ Toby Lester,
531:Being engulfed in practice without delicate knowledge related to it, is in many ways like entering a ship without knowing where it is headed. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
532:For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward; for there you have been, and there you long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
533:Of several bodies, all equally large and equally distant, that which is most brightly illuminated will appear to the eye nearest and largest. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
534:When the fig-tree stood without fruit no one looked at it. Wishing by producing this fruit be praised by men, it was bent and broken by them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
535:A wave is never found alone, but is mingled with as many other waves as there are uneven places in the object where the said wave is produced. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
536:Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity, and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigors of the mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
537:The soul is content to stay imprisoned in the human body... for through the eyes all the various things of nature are represented to the soul. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
538:Throughout history, famous nappers have included Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison, Eleanor Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and John F. Kennedy. ~ Arianna Huffington,
539:All knowledge which ends in words will die as quickly as it came to life, with the exception of the written word: which is its mechanical part. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
540:Just as food eaten without appetite is a tedious nourishment, so does study without zeal damage the memory by not assimilating what it absorbs. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
541:Nessuna cosa si può amare nè odiare, se
prima no si ha cognition di quella.
(No thing you can love or hate, if you don't know it before.) ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
542:I feel that any man that tries, any man that comes out with something we like, is a good man. A man doesn't have to be Leonardo Da Vinci to be sincere. ~ Jack Kirby,
543:You don't get into trouble because of the things you don't know. It is the things you don't know you don't know that really get you into a mess. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
544:but found her throat was filled with the words of Leonardo da Vinci: While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. ~ Jodi Picoult,
545:Nature is the source of all true knowledge. She has her own logic, her own laws, she has no effect without cause nor invention without necessity. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
546:For once you have tasted flight you will walk the Earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
547:For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
548:Look at light and admire its beauty. Close your eyes, and then look again: what you saw is no longer there; and what you will see later is not yet. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
549:The variety of colour in objects cannot be discerned at a great distance, excepting in those parts which are directly lighted up by the solar rays. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
550:Just as eating against one's will is injurious to health, so studying without a liking for it spoils the memory, and it retains nothing it takes in. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
551:O speculators about perpetual motion, how many vain chimeras have you created in the like quest? Go and take your place with the seekers after gold. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
552:A bird is an instrument working according to mathematical law, which instrument it is within the capacity of man to reproduce with all its movements. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
553:A bird is like an instrument working according to mathematical law, and it is in the capacity of man to reproduce such an instrument," Leonardo da Vinci ~ Walter Isaacson,
554:To develop a complete mind: Study the science of art; Study the art of science. Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
555:If you are mindful that old age has wisdom for its food you will so exert yourself in youth that your old age will not lack sustenance. — LEONARDO DA VINCI ~ Michael J Gelb,
556:Science is the observation of things possible, whether present or past; prescience is the knowledge of things which may come to pass, though but slowly. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
557:There shall be wings! If the accomplishment be not for me, 'tis for some other. The spirit cannot die; and man, who shall know all and shall have wings. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
558:If you put on more garments, the cold cannot reach you. Similarly, increase your patience and concentration and even great injuries cannot vex your mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
559:It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
560:Uno non può possedere capacità più grande o più piccola della padronanza di se stesso."
(One can have no greater or lesser mastery than of oneself.) ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
561:But to me all sciences seem vain and full of error that are not born of experience, mother of all certainty, and do not terminate in an actual experience. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
562:Men and words are ready made, and you, O Painter, if you do not know how to make your figures move, are like an orator who knows not how to use his words. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
563:The painter must be solitary. For if you are alone you are completely yourself, but if you are accompanied by a single companion, you are only half yourself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
564:Thirst will parch your tongue and your body will waste through lack of sleep ere you can describe in words that which painting instantly sets before the eye. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
565:Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
566:Man and animals are in reality vehicles and conduits of food, tombs of animals, hostels of Death, coverings that consume, deriving life by the death of others. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
567:Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
568:To Develop a Mind:
Study the science of art;
Study the art of science.
Learn how to see.
Realize that everything connects
to everything else." - Leonardo da Vinci,
569:For once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
570:The human bird shall take his first flight, filling the world with amazement, all writings with his fame, and bringing eternal glory to the nest whence he sprang. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
571:To make a perfume, take some rose water and wash your hands in it, then take a lavender flower and rub it with your palms, and you will achieve the desired effect ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
572:Whoever despises the high wisdom of mathematics nourishes himself on delusion and will never still the sophistic sciences whose only product is an eternal uproar. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
573:Every loss which we incur leaves behind it vexation in the memory, save the greatest loss of all, that is, death, which annihilates the memory, together with life. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
574:When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the Earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
575:Leonardo da Vinci was homosexual, so was Michelangelo, Socrates, Shakespeare, and almost every other figure that has formed what we have come to understand as beauty. ~ Reinaldo Arenas,
576:Perspective is a most subtle discovery in mathematical studies, for by means of lines it causes to appear distant that which is near, and large that which is small. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
577:I was being an artist, being sensitive and technical as artists are. I'm sure Leonardo Da Vinci did that. Artists don't always feel the same as others feel about their work. ~ Roy Ayers,
578:Every action needs to be prompted by a motive. To know and to will are two operations of the human mind. Discerning, judging, deliberating are acts of the human mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
579:Nature is constrained by the cause of her laws which dwell inborn in her. Variant: Nature is constrained by the order of her own law which lives and works within her. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
580:Though I may not, like them, be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy – on experience, the mistress of their Masters ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
581:The human bird shall take his first flight,filling the words with amazement,all writings with his fame,and bringing eternal glory to those whose nest whence he sprang. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
582:Those who fall in love with practice without science are like a sailor who enters a ship without a helm or a compass, and who never can be certain whither he is going. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
583:Though I may not, like them, be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy – on experience, the mistress of their Masters. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
584:As iron rusts when not used, and water gets foul from standing or turns to ice when exposed to cold, so the intellect degenerates without exercise.
-Leonard Da Vinci ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
585:O painter, take care lest the greed for gain prove a stronger incentive than renown in art, for to gain this renown is a far greater thing than is the renown of riches. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
586:I have from an early age abjured the use of meat, and the time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look upon the murder of men. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
587:It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things. —Leonardo da Vinci ~ Sophia Amoruso,
588:Painting is concerned with all the 10 attributes of sight; which are: Darkness, Light, Solidity and Colour, Form and Position, Distance and Propinquity, Motion and Rest. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
589:If you cause your ship to stop and place the head of a long tube in the water and place the outer extremity to your ear, you will hear ships at a great distance from you. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
590:It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them.  They went out and happened to things.  Leonardo da Vinci ~ Doug Dandridge,
591:Oh! Speculators on things, boast not of knowing the things that nature ordinarily brings about; but rejoice if you know the end of those things which you yourself device. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
592:Painting is concerned with the ten things you can see: these are darkness and brightness, substance and color, form and place, remoteness and nearness, movement and rest. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
593:The water you touch in a river is the last of that which has passed, and the first of that which is coming. Thus it is with time present.
Life, if well spent, is long. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
594:Painting is concerned with all the 10 attributes of sight; which are: Darkness and Light, Solidity and Color, Form and Position, Distance and Propinquity, Motion and Rest. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
595:The eye, the window of the soul, is the chief means whereby the understanding can most fully and abundantly appreciate the infinite works of Nature; and the ear is second. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
596:Man has much power of discourse which for the most part is vain and false; animals have but little, but it is useful and true, and a small truth is better than a great lie. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
597:Tomaso of Florence. known as Masaccio, showed by his perfect works how those who took their nourishment from anything but nature, mistress of masters, were laboring in vain. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
598:The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.- Leonardo da Vinci You should forget about morality. Conversations about morality are simply empty talk. Your aim is inner morality. ~ Gurdjieff,
599:The water you touch in a river is the last of that which has passed, and the first of that which is coming. Thus it is with time present.

Life, if well spent, is long. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
600:Those who condemn the supreme certainty of mathematics feed on confusion, and can never silence the contradictions of the sophistical sciences which lead to eternal quackery. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
601:Man and the animals are merely a passage and channel for food, a tomb for other animals, a haven for the dead, giving life by the death of others, a coffer full of corruption. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
602:Here is a thing which the more it is needed the more it is rejected: and this is advice, which is unwillingly heeded by those who most need it, that is to say, by the ignorant. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
603:Truth at last cannot be hidden. Dissimulation is of no avail. Dissimulation is to no purpose before so great a judge. Falsehood puts on a mask. Nothing is hidden under the sun. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
604:While you are alone you are entirely your own master and if you have one companion you are but half your own, and the less so in proportion to the indiscretion of his behavior. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
605:A deaf and dumb person who sees two men in conversation - may nevertheless understand from the attitudes and gestures of the speakers, how well their discussion is getting along. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
606:Here is a thing which the more you fear and avoid it the nearer you approach to it, and this is misery; the more you flee from it the more miserable and restless you will become. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
607:I say that the power of vision extends through the visual rays to the surface of non-transparent bodies, while the power possessed by these bodies extends to the power of vision. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
608:All objects transmit their image to the eye in pyramids and the nearer to the eye these pyramids are intersected the smaller will the image appear of the objects which cause them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
609:Human subtlety will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple or more direct than does nature because in her inventions nothing is lacking, and nothing is superfluous. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
610:Human subtlety will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple or more direct than does Nature, because in her inventions nothing is lacking, and nothing is superfluous. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
611:The painter who draws merely by practice and by eye, without any reason, is like a mirror which copies every thing placed in front of it without being conscious of their existence. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
612:When you're a kid and someone's an artist, you think of Leonardo da Vinci. You don't think that's a job; you just think of a man with a beard painting the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. ~ Noel Fielding,
613:If on your own or by the criticism of others you discover error in your work, correct it then and there; otherwise in exposing your work to the public, you will expose your error also. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
614:Nothing is more apt to deceive us than our own judgment of our work. We derive more benefit from having our faults pointed out by our enemies than from hearing the opinions of friends. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
615:Poetry is superior to painting in the presentation of words, and painting is superior to poetry in the presentation of facts. For this reason I judge painting to be superior to poetry. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
616:The eye transmits its own image through the air to all the objects which face it, and also receives them on its own surface, whence the "sensus communis" takes them and considers them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
617:Weight, force and casual impulse, together with resistance, are the four external powers in which all the visible actions of mortals have their being and their end.” —Leonardo da Vinci “A ~ Hourly History,
618:We must doubt the certainty of everything which passes through the senses, but how much more ought we to doubt things contrary to the senses, such as the existence of God and the soul. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
619:Why seek to embarrass [the artist] with vanities foreign to his quietness? Know you not that certain sciences require the whole man, leaving no part of him at leisure for your trifles? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
620:A good painter has two main objects to paint, man and the intention of his soul. The former is easy, the latter hard as he has to represent it by the attitude and movement of the limbs. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
621:It should not be hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places, in which...you may find really marvellous ideas. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
622:Nitre, vitriol, cinnabar, alum, salt ammoniac, sublimated mercury, rock salt, alcali salt, common salt, rock alum, alum schist, arsenic, sublimate, realgar, tartar, orpiment, verdegris. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
623:Experience never misleads; what you are misled by is only your judgment, and this misleads you by anticipating results from experience of a kind that is not produced by your experiments. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
624:O painter skilled in anatomy, beware lest the undue prominence of the bones, sinews and muscles cause you to become a wooden painter from the desire to make your nude figures reveal all. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
625:Atop the brochure McKenna put a maxim, often attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, that would become the defining precept of Jobs’s design philosophy: “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. ~ Walter Isaacson,
626:How many emperors and how many princes have lived and died and no record of them remains, and they only sought to gain dominions and riches in order that their fame might be ever-lasting. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
627:Leonardo da Vinci had foreseen that beginning humanistically with mathematics one has only particulars and will never come to universals or meaning, but will end only with mechanics. It ~ Francis A Schaeffer,
628:The painter's mind is a copy of the divine mind, since it operates freely in creating the many kinds of animals, plants, fruits, landscapes, countrysides, ruins, and awe-inspiring places. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
629:The acquisition of knowledge is always of use to the intellect, because it may thus drive out useless things and retain the good. For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
630:In fact, whatever exists in the universe, in essence, in appearance, in the imagination, the painter has first in his mind and then in his hands ... it lies in his power to create them . . . ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
631:Make your faces so that they do not all have the same expression, as one sees with most painters, but give them different expression, according to age, complexion, and good or bad character. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
632:The soul can never be corrupted with the corruption of the body, but it is like the wind which causes the sound of the organ, and which ceases to produce a good effect when a pipe is spoilt. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
633:Whatever you think matters - doesn't. Follow this rule, and you will add decades to your life. Rodger Rosenblatt As a well spent day brings happy sleep, so life well used brings happy death. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
634:Although nature commences with reason and ends in experience it is necessary for us to do the opposite, that is to commence with experience and from this to proceed to investigate the reason. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
635:Whatever you do in life, if you want to be creative and intelligent, and develop your brain, you must do everything with the awareness that everything, in some way, connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
636:Man discourseth greatly, and his discourse is for the greater part empty and false; the discourse of animals is small, but useful and true: slender certainty is better than portentous falsehood. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
637:What induces you, oh man, to depart from your home in town, to leave parents and friends, and go to the countryside over mountains and valleys, if it is not for the beauty of the world of nature? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
638:I would venture to affirm that a man cannot attain excellence if he satisfy the ignorant and not those of his own craft, and if he be not 'singular' or 'distant,' or whatever you like to call him. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
639:Painting embraces and contains within itself all the things which nature produces or which results from the fortuitous actions of men... he is but a poor master who makes only a single figure well. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
640:So vile a thing is a lie that even if it spoke fairly of God it would take away somewhat from His divinity; and so excellent a thing is truth that if it praises the humblest things they are exalted. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
641:The term 'renaissance man' is always bandied about. I don't think that applies to me. You think about Leonardo da Vinci, and he was a painter and a physicist and an architect, and that is a true renaissance man. ~ Moby,
642:If you are representing a white body let it be surrounded by ample space, because as white has no colour of its own, it is tinged and altered in some degree by the colour of the objects surrounding it ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
643:If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
644:One shall be born from small beginnings which will rapidly become vast. This will respect no created thing, rather will it, by its power, transform almost every thing from its own nature into another. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
645:We do not lack devices for measuring these miserable days of ours, in which it should be our pleasure that they be not frittered away without leaving behind any memory of ourselves in the mind of men. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
646:Men fight wars and destroy everything around them. The earth should open and swallow them up. He who does not value life does not deserve it. Never destroy another life through rage, or through malice. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
647:Shadows which you see with difficulty, and whose boundaries you cannot define... these you should not represent as finished or sharply defined, for the result would be that your work would seem wooden. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
648:Good culture is born of a good disposition; and since the cause is more to be praised than the effect, I will rather praise a good disposition without culture, than good culture without the disposition. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
649:Learning acquired in youth arrests the evil of old age; and if you understand that old age has wisdom for its food, you will so conduct yourself in youth that your old age will not lack for nourishment. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
650:The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
651:If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings.
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
652:The lie is so vile, that even if it were in speaking well of godly things, it would take off something from God's grace; and Truth is so excellent, that if it praises but small things they become noble. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
653:The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee...gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
654:Principles for the Development of a Complete Mind: Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses- especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
655:„Wenn auch der menschliche Geist durch vielfache Erfindungen mit verschiedenen Instrumenten auf dasselbe Ziel zugeht, nie wird er eine Erfindung machen, die schöner, leichter und kürzer wäre als die Natur. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
656:A painter was asked why, since he made such beautiful figures, which were but dead things, his children were so ugly; to which the painter replied that he made his pictures by day, and his children by night. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
657:If the painter wishes to see beauties that charm him, it lies in his power to create them, and if he wishes to see monstrosities that are frightful, ridiculous, or truly pitiable, he is lord and God thereof. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
658:It is no small benefit on finding oneself in bed in the dark to go over again in the imagination the main lines of the forms previously studied, or other noteworthy things conceived by ingenious speculation. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
659:Că să pot să înţeleg,m-am distrus.A înţelege înseamnă a uita să mai iubeşti.Nu cunosc nimic mai fals şi mai semnificativ în spusa lui Leonardo da Vinci cum că nu poţi iubi sau urî un lucru după ce l-ai înţeles. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
660:Human subtlety will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple or more direct than does Nature, because in her inventions, nothing is lacking and nothing is superfluous.” —Leonardo da Vinci ~ Bathroom Readers Institute,
661:The mole has very small eyes and it always lives under ground; and it lives as long as it is in the dark but when it comes into the light it dies immediately, because it becomes known;--and so it is with lies. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
662:The painter who draws by practise and judgment of the eye without the use of reason is like the mirror which reproduces within itself all the objects which are set opposite to it without knowledge of the same. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
663:Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff. Most fails. Some works. You do more of what works. If it works big, others quickly copy it. Then you do something else. The trick is the doing something else. Leonardo da Vinci ~ Anonymous,
664:O admirable necessity! O powerful action! What mind can penetrate your nature? What language can express this marvel? None, to be sure. This is where human discourse turns toward the contemplation of the divine. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
665:Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art.
Nature is the source of all true knowledge. She has her own logic, her own laws, she has no effect without cause nor invention without necessity. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
666:A man was desired to rise from bed because the sun was already up. He replied: "If I had as far to go and as much to do as he has, I should be up by now; but having but a little way to go, I shall not get up yet." ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
667:An infinite number of men will sell publicly and unhindered things of the very highest price, without leave from the Master of it; while it never was theirs nor in their power; and human justice will not prevent it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
668:In this same library we saw some drawings by Michael Angelo (these Italians call him Mickel Angelo,) and Leonardo da Vinci. (They spell it Vinci and pronounce it Vinchy; foreigners always spell better than they pronounce.) ~ Mark Twain,
669:O mighty and once living instrument of formative nature. Incapable of availing thyself of thy vast strength thou hast to abandon a life of stillness and to obey the law which God and time gave to procreative nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
670:How may paintings have preserved the image of a divine beauty which in its natural manifestation has been rapidly overtaken by time or death. Thus, the work of the painter is nobler than that of nature, its mistress. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
671:The art of procreation and the members employed therein are so repulsive, that if it were not for the beauty of the faces and the adornments of the actors and the pent-up impulse, nature would lose the human species. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
672:Don't say you don't have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein. ~ H Jackson Brown Jr,
673:average human “looks without seeing, listens without hearing, touches without feeling, eats without tasting, moves without physical awareness, inhales without awareness of odour or fragrance, and talks without thinking. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
674:I love this site. It was lovingly hand-shaped it. Your soul transformed this into this art. It was perfect. I have tried to create another equal to it... but to no avail, so I will just have to paint the Sistine Chapel. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
675:It takes courage to reduce the number of the slides in a presentation. It takes courage to speak for 18 minutes instead of rambling on for much longer. Leonardo da Vinci once said, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. ~ Carmine Gallo,
676:Men wrongly lament the flight of time, blaming it for being too swift; they do not perceive that its passage is sufficiently long, but a good memory, which nature has given to us, causes things long past to seem present. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
677:The instant the atmosphere is illuminated it will be filled with an infinite number of images which are produced by the various bodies and colours assembled in it. And the eye is the target, a lodestone, of these images. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
678:When that which loves is united to the thing beloved it can rest there; when the burden is laid down it finds rest there. There will be eternal fame also for the inhabitants of that town, constructed and enlarged by him. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
679:An average human looks without seeing, listens without hearing, touches without feeling, eats without tasting, moves without physical awareness, inhales without awareness of odour or fragrance, and talks without thinking. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
680:Leonardo da Vinci was a man of regal spirit and tremendous breadth of mind; and his name became so famous that not only was he esteemed during his lifetime, but his reputation endured and became even greater after his death. ~ Giorgio Vasari,
681:Why are the bones of great fishes, and oysters and corals and various other shells and sea-snails, found on the high tops of mountains that border the sea, in the same way in which they are found in the depths of the sea? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
682:It is ordained that to the ambitious, who derive no satisfaction from the gifts of life and the beauty of the world, life shall be a cause of suffering, and they shall possess neither the profit nor the beauty of the world. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
683:Like many aspects of the digital age, this idea that innovation resides where art and science connect is not new. Leonardo da Vinci was the exemplar of the creativity that flourishes when the humanities and sciences interact. ~ Walter Isaacson,
684:must do like one who, being poor, comes last to the fair, and can find no other way of providing himself than by taking all the things already seen by other buyers, and not taken but refused by reason of their lesser value. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
685:I believe man will fly and I base this assumption on the fact that God has blessed us with minds that are capable of imagining it. Anything that can be dreamt of will eventually be built. Anyone who says otherwise is a fool. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
686:Strive to preserve your health; and in this you will better succeed in proportion as you keep clear of the physicians, for their drugs are a kind of alchemy concerning which there are no fewer books than there are medicines. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
687:To me it seems that those sciences are vain and full of error which are not born of experience, mother of all certainty, first-hand experience which in its origins, or means, or end has passed through one of the five senses. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
688:Don’t say you don’t have enough time or enough money to change the world. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Gandhi, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci and Jesus Christ. ~ Shannon L Alder,
689:The lover is moved by the beloved object as the senses are by sensual objects; and they unite and become one and the same thing. The work is the first thing born of this union; if the thing loved is base the lover becomes base. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
690:The modern version of Buridan's ass [a figurative description of a man of indecision] has a Ph.D., but no time to grow up as he is undecided between making a Leonardo da Vinci in the test tube or planting a Coca Cola sign on Mars. ~ Erwin Chargaff,
691:The fox when it sees a flock of herons or magpies or birds of that kind, suddenly flings himself on the ground with his mouth open to look as he were dead; and these birds want to peck at his tongue, and he bites off their heads. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
692:Every now and then go away and have a little relaxation. To remain constantly at work will diminish your judgment. Go some distance away, because work will be in perspective and a lack of harmony is more readily seen. —Leonardo da Vinci ~ David Allen,
693:He who wishes to see how the soul inhabits the body should look to see how that body uses its daily surroundings. If the dwelling is dirty and neglected, the body will be kept by its soul in the same condition, dirty and neglected. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
694:If anyone wishes to see how the soul dwells in its body, let him observe how this body uses its daily habitation; that is to say, if this is devoid of order and confused, the body will be kept in disorder and confusion by its soul. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
695:Those who are enamoured of practice without science are like a pilot who goes into a ship without rudder or compass and never has any certainty of where he is going. Practice should always be based upon a sound knowledge of theory. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
696:To understand, I destroyed myself. To understand is to forget about loving. I know nothing more simultaneously false and telling than the statement by Leonardo da Vinci that we cannot love or hate something until we’ve understood it. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
697:... we might say that the earth has a spirit of growth; that its flesh is the soil, its bones the arrangement and connection of the rocks of which the mountains are composed, its cartilage the tufa, and its blood the springs of water. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
698:Experience, the interpreter between creative nature and the human race, teaches the action of nature among mortals: how under the constraint of necessity she cannot act otherwise than as reason, who steers her helm, teaches her to act. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
699:The first of all simple colours is White ... We shall set down White for the representative of light, without which no colour can be seen; Yellow for the earth; Green for water; Blue for air; Red for fire; and Black for total darkness. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
700:Human ingenuity,” wrote Leonardo da Vinci, whose Vitruvian Man became the ultimate symbol of the intersection of art and science, “will never devise any inventions more beautiful, nor more simple, nor more to the purpose than Nature does. ~ Walter Isaacson,
701:The merit of painting lies in the exactness of reproduction. Painting is a science and all sciences are based on mathematics. No human inquiry can be a science unless it pursues its path through mathematical exposition and demonstration. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
702:O sleepers! what a thing is slumber! Sleep resembles death. Ah, why then dost thou not work in such wise as that after death thou mayst retain a resemblance to perfect life, when, during life, thou art in sleep so like to the hapless dead? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
703:such humble beginnings, where in his time his life would have been given no credence to be anything more than an illegitimate son, Leonardo da Vinci went on to astound them all. And he astounds us still, far away into the twenty-first century. ~ Hourly History,
704:Surely when a man is painting a picture he ought not refuse to hear any man's opinion... Since men are able to form a true judgement as to the works of nature, how much more does it behoove us to admit that they are able to judge our faults. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
705:Weight is caused by one element being situated in another; and it moves by the shortest line towards its centre, not by its own choice, not because the centre draws it to itself, but because the other intervening element cannot withstand it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
706:I got married a bit late, I agree. In any other period of history I'd have been dead at that age and they'd have assumed I was gay. Like Michelangelo, or Leonardo da Vinci. But I was a late developer. I didn't go through puberty until I was 35. ~ David Duchovny,
707:The young man should first learn perspective, then the proportions of objects. Next, copy work after the hand of a good master, to gain the habit of drawing parts of the body well; and then to work from nature, to confirm the lessons learned. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
708:Having wandered some distance among gloomy rocks, I came to the entrance of a great cavern ... Two contrary emotions arose in me: fear and desire--fear of the threatening dark cavern, desire to see whether there were any marvelous things in it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
709:While human ingenuity may devise various inventions to the same ends, it will never devise anything more beautiful, nor more simple, nor more to the purpose than nature does, because in her inventions nothing is lacking and nothing is superfluous. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
710:An artist who lacks the power of self-criticism accomplishes but little. It is good if your work stands higher than your own opinion of it; bad if it is on the same level. But it is a great disaster if your work stands lower than your judgment of it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
711:One has no right to love or hate anything if one has not acquired a thorough knowledge of its nature. Great love springs from great knowledge of the beloved object, and if you know it but little you will be able to love it only a little or not at all. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
712:Things severed shall be united and shall acquire of themselves such virtue that they shall restore to men their lost memory: - That is the papyrus sheets, which are formed out of several strips and preserve the memory of the thoughts and deeds of men. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
713:Just as eating contrary to the inclination is injurious to the health, study without desire spoils the memory, and it retains nothing that it takes in. ~ Leonardo da Vinci, MS. 2038, Bib. Nat. 34 r., from a 1908 translation, Leonardo da Vinci's note-books, Edward McCurdy.,
714:The beginnings and ends of shadow lie between the light and darkness and may be infinitely diminished and infinitely increased. Shadow is the means by which bodies display their form. The forms of bodies could not be understood in detail but for shadow. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
715:I roamed the countryside searching for answers to things I did not understand. Why shells existed on the tops of mountains. How the various circles of water form around the spot which has been struck by a stone, and why a bird sustains itself in the air. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
716:Many will think they may reasonably blame me by alleging that my proofs are opposed to the authority of certain men held in the highest reverence by their inexperienced judgments; not considering that my works are the issue of pure and simple experience. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
717:...the love of anything is the offspring of knowledge, love being more fervent in proportion as knowledge is more certain. And this certainty springs from a complete knowledge of all parts which united compose the whole of the thing which out to be loved. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
718:The lover is moved by the thing loved, as the sense is by that which perceives, and it unites with it and they become one and the same thing... when the lover is united with the beloved it finds rest there; when the burden is laid down there it finds rest. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
719:Patience serves us against insults precisely as clothes do against the cold. For if you multiply your garments as the cold increases, that cold cannot hurt you; in the same way increase your patience under great offenses, and they cannot hurt your feelings. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
720:When you are painting you should take a flat mirror and often look at your work within it, and it will then be seen in reverse, and will appear to be by the hand of some other master, and you will be better able to judge of its faults than in any other way. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
721:I have found that, in the composition of the human body as compared with the bodies of animals, the organs of sense are duller and coarser. Thus, it is composed of less ingenious instruments, and of spaces less capacious for receiving the faculties of sense. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
722:Mathematics, such as appertain to painting, are necessary to the painter, also the absence of companions who are alien to his studies: his brain must be versatile and susceptible to the variety of objects which it encounters, and free from distracting cares. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
723:Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind. So we must stretch ourselves to the very limits of human possibility. Anything less is a sin against both God and man. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
724:Although the poet has as wide a choice of subjects as the painter, his creations fail to afford as much satisfaction to mankind as do paintings... if the poet serves the understanding by way of the ear, the painter does so by the eye, which is the nobler sense. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
725:embarked on this book because Leonardo da Vinci is the ultimate example of the main theme of my previous biographies: how the ability to make connections across disciplines—arts and sciences, humanities and technology—is a key to innovation, imagination, and genius. ~ Walter Isaacson,
726:Music cannot be called otherwise than the sister of painting, for she is dependent upon hearing, a sense second to sight, and her harmony is composed of the union of its proportional parts sounded simultaneously, rising and falling in one or more harmonic rhythms. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
727:The draperies that clothe figures must show that they are inhabited by these figures, enveloping them neatly to show the posture and motion of such figures, and avoiding the confusion of many folds, especially over the prominent parts, so that these may be evident ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
728:The philosophic mind inclines always to an elaborate life--the life of Goethe or of Leonardo da Vinci; but the life of the poet isintense--the life of Blake or of Dante--taking into its centre the life that surrounds it and flinging it abroad again amid planetary music. ~ James Joyce,
729:The vivacity and brightness of colors in a landscape will never bear any comparison with a landscape in nature when it is illumined by the sun, unless the painting is placed in such a position that it will receive the same light from the sun as does the landscape. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
730:When you draw a nude, sketch the whole figure and nicely fit the members to it and to each other. Even though you may only finish one portion of the drawing, just make certain that all the parts hang together, so that the study will be useful to you in the future. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
731:A single and distinct luminous body causes stronger relief in the objects than a diffused light; as may be seen by comparing one side of a landscape illuminated by the sun, and one overshadowed by clouds, and illuminated only by the diffused light of the atmosphere. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
732:I love those who can smile in trouble, who can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but they whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves their conduct, will pursue their principles unto death ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
733:I love those who can smile in trouble, who can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but they whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves their conduct, will pursue their principles unto death. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
734:If a man has a tent made of linen of which the apertures have all been stopped up, and be it twelve bracchia across (over twenty-five feet) and twelve in depth, he will be able to throw himself down from any height without sustaining injury. [His concept of the parachute.] ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
735:The divisions of Perspective are 3, as used in drawing; of these, the first includes the diminution in size of opaque objects; the second treats of the diminution and loss of outline in such opaque objects; the third, of the diminution and loss of colour at long distances. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
736:If you are on the side whence the wind is blowing you will see the trees looking much lighter than you would see them on the other sides; and this is due to the fact that the wind turns up the reverse side of the leaves which in all trees is much whiter than the upper side. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
737:You don't leave the film alone. You have a new audience, and you have a new medium. Why would you leave it alone? Film is not an antique. It's not a relic. It's not a Leonardo da Vinci. I don't want someone painting over a da Vinci or Rembrandt. But these movies aren't that. ~ William Friedkin,
738:Those who become enamoured of the art, without having previously applied to the diligent study of the scientific part of it, may be compared to mariners who put to the sea in a ship without rudder or compass and therefore cannot be certain of arriving at the wished for port. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
739:There is nothing that deceives us more than our own judgment when used to give an opinion on our own works. It is sound in judging the work of our enemies but not that of our friends, for hate and love are two of the most powerfully motivating factors found among living things. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
740:Every now and then go away, have a little relaxation, for when you come back to your work your judgment will be surer. Go some distance away because then the work appears smaller and more of it can be taken in at a glance and a lack of harmony and proportion is more readily seen. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
741:If you are alone you belong entirely to yourself. If you are accompanied by even one companion you belong only half to yourself or even less in proportion to the thoughtlessness of his conduct and if you have more than one companion you will fall more deeply into the same plight. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
742:Shakespeare, Leonardo da Vinci, Benjamin Franklin and Abraham Lincoln never saw a movie, heard a radio or looked at television. They had 'Loneliness' and knew what to do with it. They were not afraid of being lonely because they knew that was when the creative mood in them would work. ~ Carl Sandburg,
743:n Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. ~ Orson Welles,
744:Leonardo da Vinci was lucky to be born the same year that Johannes Gutenberg opened his printing shop. As a young person, he could get information about whatever struck his curiosity. The Internet is to our age what Gutenberg's press was to his, so he would have loved being alive today. ~ Walter Isaacson,
745:Nature is so delightful and abundant in its variations that among trees of the same kind there would not be found one which nearly resembles another, and not only the plants as a whole, but among their branches, leaves, and fruit, will not be found one which is precisely like another. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
746:To such an extent does nature delight and abound in variety that among her trees there is not one plant to be found which is exactly like another; and not only among the plants, but among the boughs, the leaves and the fruits, you will not find one which is exactly similar to another. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
747:Patience serves as a protection against wrongs as clothes do against cold. For if you put on more clothes as the cold increases, it will have no power to hurt you. So in like manner you must grow in patience when you meet with great wrongs, and they will then be powerless to vex your mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
748:In Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, bloodshed – but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love; they had five hundred years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. ~ Peter James,
749:Study me, reader, if you delight in me, because on very few occasions shall I return to the world, and because the patience for this profession is found in very few, and only in those who wish to compose things anew. Come, oh men, to see the miracles that such studies will disclose to nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
750:If you throw a stone in a pond... the waves which strike against the shores are thrown back towards the spot where the stone struck; and on meeting other waves they never intercept each other's course... In a small pond one and the same stroke gives birth to many motions of advance and recoil. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
751:That which can be lost cannot be deemed riches. Virtue is our true wealth and the true reward of its possessor; it cannot be lost, it never deserts us until life leaves us. Hold property and external riches with fear; they often leave their possessor scorned and mocked at for having lost them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
752:All the elements will be seen mixed together in a great whirling mass, now borne towards the centre of the world, now towards the sky; and now furiously rushing from the South towards the frozen North, and sometimes from the East towards the West, and then again from this hemisphere to the other. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
753:It seems that it had been destined before that I should occupy myself so thoroughly with the vulture, for it comes to my mind as a very early memory, when I was still in the cradle, a vulture came down to me, he opened my mouth with his tail and struck me a few times with his tail against my lips. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
754:Oysters open completely when the moon is full; and when the crab sees one it throws a piece of stone or seaweed into it and the oyster cannot close again so that it serves the crab for meat. Such is the fate of him who opens his mouth too much and thereby puts himself at the mercy of the listener. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
755:Well, for that matter, I was also a good friend of Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Francis Bacon, Albert Einstein, and John, Paul, George, and Ringo." He pauses, seeing the blank look on my face and groaning when he says, "Christ, Ever, the Beatles!" He shakes his head and laughs. "God, you make me feel old. ~ Alyson Noel,
756:FACT: The Priory of Sion - a European secret society founded in 1099 - is a real organization. In 1975 Paris's Bibliothque Nationale discovered parchments known as Les Dossiers Secrets, identifying numerous members of the Priory of Sion, including Sir Isaac Newton, Botticelli, Victor Hugo, and Leonardo da Vinci. ~ Dan Brown,
757:There are three aspects to perspective. The first has to do with how the size of objects seems to diminish according to distance: the second, the manner in which colors change the farther away they are from the eye; the third defines how objects ought to be finished less carefully the farther away they are. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
758:You should often amuse yourself when you take a walk for recreation, in watching and taking note of the attitudes and actions of men as they talk and dispute, or laugh or come to blows with one another... noting these down with rapid strokes, in a little pocket-book which you ought always to carry with you. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
759:Affective gestures pointing to things near either in time or space should be made with the hand not very far from the body of the person pointing; and if these things are distant, the hand of the painter should be more extended and the face turned toward the person to whom he is addressing the demonstration. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
760:As regards this vice, we read that the peacock is more guilty of it than any other animal. For it is always contemplating the beauty of its tail, which it spreads in the form of a wheel, and by its cries attracts to itself the gaze of the creatures that surround it. And this is the last vice to be conquered. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
761:I think its pretty clear that film is the pre-eminent art form of our age. If Michaelangelo or Leonardo Da Vinci were alive today they’d be making Avatar, not painting a chapel. Film is incredibly democratic and accessible, it’s probably the best option if you actually want to change the world, not just re-decorate it. ~ Banksy,
762:One painter ought never to imitate the manner of any other; because in that case he cannot be called the child of nature, but the grandchild. It is always best to have recourse to nature, which is replete with such abundance of objects, than to the productions of other masters, who learnt everything from her. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
763:This philosophy means that when you’ve entered a den of assholes, you do everything possible to get out as fast as you can—or, better yet, to figure out how to avoid that lair in the first place. I call this the “da Vinci rule.” As Leonardo da Vinci put it, “It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end. ~ Robert I Sutton,
764:Be eager to lend a patient ear to the opinions of others and think long and hard whether whoever finds fault has reason or not to censure you. And if the answer is yes, correct the fault. If no, give the impression that you have not heard him, or if he is a man whom you respect, explain to him why he is mistaken. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
765:"The further art advances the closer it approaches science," said Leonardo da Vinci, painter, sculptor, architect, engineer, and inventor of the wheelbarrow, and other useful instruments from the speaking tube to a mechanically gyp-proof whore-house, "the further science advances the closer it approaches art." ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
766:Leonardo da Vinci, an avowed vegetarian, was so opposed to people eating animals that he often purchased live poultry and then set the birds free. He wrote, “I have, from an early age, abjured the use of meat, and the time will come when men such as I will look on the murder of animals as they now look on the murder of men. ~ Anonymous,
767:O Time! consumer of all things; O envious age! thou dost destroy all things and devour all things with the relentless teeth of years, little by little in a slow death. Helen, when she looked in her mirror, seeing the withered wrinkles made in her face by old age, wept and wondered why she had twice been carried away. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
768:You will never have a greater or lesser dominion than that over yourself...the height of a man's success is gauged by his self-mastery; the depth of his failure by his self-abandonment. ...And this law is the expression of eternal justice. He who cannot establish dominion over himself will have no dominion over others. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
769:Oysters open completely when the moon is full; and when the crab sees one it throws a piece of stone or seaweed into it and the oyster cannot close again so that it serves the crab for meat. Such is the fate of him who opens his mouth too much and thereby puts himself at the mercy of the listener. Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519 ~ Robert Greene,
770:When you look at a wall spotted with stains...you may discover a resemblance to various landscapes, beautiful with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees. Or again, you may see battles and figures in action, or strange faces and costumes, and an endless variety of objects which you could reduce to complete and well-drawn figures. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
771:He who draws... ought to take his position so that the eye of the figure he is drawing is on a level with his own... because, generally, figures or people whom you meet in the streets all have their eyes at the same level as yours, and if you make them higher or lower you will find that your portrait will not resemble them. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
772:I quickly realized that this medium had a lot to offer someone like me. To do Disney-quality hand-drawn cartoons, you have to be a master of two art forms. Seriously, you have to be able to draw like a Leonardo da Vinci or a Michelangelo. But also you have to know movement and timing and control that through 24 frames a second. ~ John Lasseter,
773:And you who wish to represent by words the form of man and all the aspects of his membrification, relinquish that idea. For the more minutely you describe the more you will confine the mind of the reader, and the more you will keep him from the knowledge of the thing described. And so it is necessary to draw and to describe. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
774:You know what the fellow said – in Italy, for thirty years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love, they had five hundred years of democracy and peace – and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. ~ Graham Greene,
775:I know very well that because I am unlettered some presumptuous people will think they have the right to criticize me, saying that I am an uncultured man. What stupid fools! Do they not know that I could reply to them as Marius did to the Roman patricians: "Do those who pride themselves on the works of other men claim to challenge mine? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
776:Perspective is nothing more than a rational demonstration applied to the consideration of how objects in front of the eye transmit their image to it, by means of a pyramid of lines. The Pyramid is the name I apply to the lines which, starting from the surface and edges of each object, converge from a distance and meet in a single point. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
777:I think Leonardo da Vinci teaches us the value of both being focused on things that fascinate us but also, at times, being distracted and deciding to pursue some shiny new idea that you happen to stumble upon. Balancing intense focus with being interested in a whole lot of different things is something that we have to do in the Internet age. ~ Walter Isaacson,
778:Those who are in love with practice without knowledge are like the sailor who gets into a ship without rudder or compass and who never can be certain whether he is going. Practice must always be founded on sound theory, and to this Perspective is the guide and the gateway; and without this nothing can be done well in the matter of drawing. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
779:When the sun is covered by clouds, objects are less conspicuous, because there is little difference between the light and shade of the trees and the buildings being illuminated by the brightness of the atmosphere which surrounds the objects in such a way that the shadows are few, and these few fade away so that their outline is lost in haze. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
780:Nature has placed in the front part of man, as he moves, all those parts which when struck cause him to feel pain; and this is felt in the joints of the legs, the forehead and the nose, and has been so devised for the preservation of man, because if such pain were not felt in these limbs they would be destroyed by the many blows they receive. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
781:The Bactrian have two humps; the Arabian one only. They are swift in battle and most useful to carry burdens. This animal is extremely observant of rule and measure, for it will not move if it has a greater weight than it is used to, and if it is taken too far it does the same, and suddenly stops and so the merchants are obliged to lodge there. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
782:In an atmosphere of uniform density the most distant things seen through it, such as the mountains, in consequence of the great quantity of atmosphere which is between your eye and them, will appear blue. Therefore you should make the building... wall which is more distant less defined and bluer... five times as far away, make five times as blue. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
783:Shadow is the obstruction of light. Shadows appear to me to be of supreme importance in perspective, because, without them opaque and solid bodies will be ill defined; that which is contained within their outlines and their boundaries themselves will be ill-understood unless they are shown against a background of a different tone from themselves. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
784:innovation resides where art and science connect is not new. Leonardo da Vinci was the exemplar of the creativity that flourishes when the humanities and sciences interact. When Einstein was stymied while working out General Relativity, he would pull out his violin and play Mozart until he could reconnect to what he called the harmony of the spheres. ~ Walter Isaacson,
785:The light for drawing from nature should come from the North in order that it may not vary. And if you have it from the South, keep the window screened with cloth, so that with the sun shining the whole day the light may not vary. The height of the light so arranged as that every object shall cast a shadow on the ground of the same length as itself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
786:But does a flying car solve an inherent human need? Though that still begs the question: Why bother with a flying car at all? There have been important changes to transportation since the Sumerians first built horse-drawn carriages and Leonardo da Vinci borrowed from a bird’s anatomy to sketch his flying machine, but more often than not they have been incremental. ~ Amy Webb,
787:In Leonardo da Vinci's Notebooks, we read: "An oyster opens wide at full moon. When the crab sees this, it throws a pebble or a twig at the oyster to keep it from closing and thus have it to feed upon." Da Vinci adds the following suitable moral to this fable: "Like the mouth that, in telling its secret, places itself at the mercy of an indiscreet listener. ~ Gaston Bachelard,
788:I say that in narrative paintings one should mingle direct contraries close by, because they produce strong contrasts with one another, and all the more so when they are very close together; that is, the ugly next to the beautiful, the big to the small, the old to the young, the strong to the weak; in this way you will vary as much as possible and close by. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
789:We relate to Leonardo da Vinci because his genius was just being passionately curious about everything. He wanted to know everything he could know about our universe, including how we fit into it. We can't all have a superhuman intellect like Albert Einstein's, but we can be super-curious. And we can also quit smashing curiosity out of the hands our children. ~ Walter Isaacson,
790:While working on The Last Supper, Leonardo da Vinci regularly took off from painting for several hours at a time and seemed to be daydreaming aimlessly. Urged by his patron, the prior of Santa Maria delle Grazie, to work more continuously, da Vinci is reported to have replied, immodestly but accurately, 'The greatest geniuses accomplish more when they work less. ~ Tony Schwartz,
791:O neglectful Nature, wherefore art thou thus partial, becoming to some of thy children a tender and benignant mother, to others a most cruel and ruthless stepmother? I see thy children given into slavery to others without ever receiving any benefit, and in lieu of any reward for the services they have done for them they are repaid by the severest punishments. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
792:The painter will produce pictures of little merit if he takes the works of others as his standard: but if he will apply himself to learn from the objects of nature he will produce good results. This we see was the case with the painters who came after the time of the Romans, for they continually imitated each other, and from age to age their art steadily declined. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
793:Leonardo da Vinci was comfortable being illegitimate, gay, a misfit, a heretic. But he also respected other people. He didn't get into disputations. He was a genius but he had a certain humility. In his notebooks you see lists of people he wanted to grill about things like how the water diversions in Milan work; he was always interested in learning from other people. ~ Walter Isaacson,
794:If I had to spend equal time doing paintings, and equal time going to galleries and doing art business, and equal time making music, and equal time going to record companies, or to the publicist or to the lawyer, forget it. It would take four times as long to do all that stuff. Unless I had a patron. That's why Leonardo da Vinci was successful. He had the Medicis, right? ~ Debbie Harry,
795:To speak of this subject you must... explain the nature of the resistance of the air, in the second the anatomy of the bird and its wings, in the third the method of working the wings in their various movements, in the fourth the power of the wings and the tail when the wings are not being moved and when the wind is favourable to serve as guide in various movements. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
796:All our knowledge hast its origins in our perceptions … In nature there is no effect without a cause … Experience never errs; it is only your judgments that err by promising themselves effects such as are not caused by your experiments … Science is the observation of things possible, whether present or past; prescience is the knowledge of things which may come to pass. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
797:Hacía apenas un mes que habían robado en el Louvre el famoso cuadro de Leonardo da Vinci. Habían detenido a Apollinaire, un escritor considerado anarquista, y después a un amigo suyo, un joven pintor desconocido, un tal Picasso. Seguían siendo sospechosos, pero hasta el momento no habían encontrado pruebas de su culpabilidad. Tampoco habían detectado ni rastro del cuadro. ~ Edward Rutherfurd,
798:King of the animals — as thou hast described him — I should rather say king of the beasts, thou being the greatest — because thou hast spared slaying them, in order that they may give thee their children for the benefit of the gullet, of which thou hast attempted to make a sepulchre for all animals; and I would say still more, if it were allowed me to speak the entire truth. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
799:There are many occasions when the muscles that form the lips of the mouth move the lateral muscles that are joined to them, and there are an equal number of occasions when these lateral muscles move the lips of this mouth, replacing it where it cannot return of itself, because the function of muscle is to pull and not to push except in the case of the genitals and the tongue. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
800:it is the Mediterranean, specifically Italy, that gave us the poet Ovid, who in the Metamorphoses deplored the eating of animals, and the vegetarian Leonardo da Vinci, who envisioned a day when the life of an animal would be valued as highly as that of a person, and Saint Francis, who once petitioned the Holy Roman Emperor to scatter grain on fields on Christmas Day and give the crested larks a feast. ~ Mary Roach,
801:There is a connection, hard to explain logically but easy to feel, between achievement in public life and progress in the arts. The age of Pericles was also the age of Phidias. The age of Lorenzo de Medici was also the age of Leonardo da Vinci. The age of Elizabeth was also the age of Shakespeare. And the New Frontier for which I campaign in public life, can also be a New Frontier for American art. ~ John F Kennedy,
802:What made Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison and Albert Einstein such creative geniuses? It wasn't reading books or watching YouTube talks about How To Be More Creative, that's for sure... If startling insights could be systematically arrived at, they wouldn't be startling. The best you can do is to create a conducive environment: put in the hours; take time to daydream; avoid mind-corroding substances. ~ Oliver Burkeman,
803:Like many aspects of the digital age, this idea that innovation resides where art and science connect is not new. Leonardo da Vinci was the exemplar of the creativity that flourishes when the humanities and sciences interact. When Einstein was stymied while working out General Relativity, he would pull out his violin and play Mozart until he could reconnect to what he called the harmony of the spheres. ~ Walter Isaacson,
804:Now do you not see that the eye embraces the beauty of the whole world? It counsels and corrects all the arts of mankind... it is the prince of mathematics, and the sciences founded on it are absolutely certain. It has measured the distances and sizes of the stars it has discovered the elements and their location... it has given birth to architecture and to perspective and to the divine art of painting. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
805:O time, swift robber of all created things, how many kings, how many nations hast thou undone, and how many changes of states and of various events have happened since the wondrous forms of this fish perished here in this cavernous and winding recess. Now destroyed by time thou liest patiently in this confined space with bones stripped and bare; serving as a support and prop for the superimposed mountain. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
806:No human investigation can be called real knowledge if it does not pass through mathematical demonstrations; and if you say that the kinds of knowledge that begin and end in the mind have any value as truth, this cannot be conceded, but rather must be denied for many reasons, and first of all because in such mental discussions there is no experimentation, without which nothing provides certainty of itself. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
807:There is no doubt that truth is to falsehood as light is to darkness; and so excellent a thing is truth that even when it touches humble and lowly matters, it still incomparably exceeds the uncertainty and falsehood in which great and elevated discourses are clothed; because even if falsehood be the fifth element of our minds, notwithstanding this, truth is the supreme nourishment of the higher intellects. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
808:It's happened many times before. Usually it results in an exceptional and gifted human. Some of the greatest figures in Earth's history were actually the product of humans and the Loric, including Buddha, Aristotle, Julius Ceasar, Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, Leonardo da Vinci, Isaac Newton, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein... Aprodite, Apollo, Hermes, and Zeus were all real, and had one Loric parent ~ Pittacus Lore,
809:I was smart enough to know that I shouldn't tell anyone the reason I needed that icy air. No need to spill the secret that I was the genius of all geniuses, the Leonardo da Vinci of the 1980s. That would just inspire envy and skepticism. So I'd just stare at the closed window and stew. If ten minutes went by without my lungs getting fresh air, I panicked. I needed to make sure the monoxide hadn't eaten my cranium. ~ A J Jacobs,
810:It reflects no great honor on a painter to be able to execute only one thing well -- such as a head, an academy figure, or draperies, animals, landscapes, or the like -- in other words, confining himself to some particular object of study. This is so because there is scarcely a person so devoid of genius as to fail of success if he applies himself earnestly to one branch of study and practices it continually. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
811:Demetrius was wont to say that there was no difference between the words and speech of the unskilled and ignorant and the sounds and rumblings caused by the stomach being full of superfluous wind. This he said, not without reason, for, as he held, it did not in the least matter from what part of them the voice emanated, whether from the lower parts or the mouth, since the one and the other were of equal worth and importance. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
812:If the painter has clumsy hands, he will be apt to introduce them into his works, and so of any other part of his person, which may not happen to be so beautiful as it ought to be. He must, therefore, guard particularly against that self-love, or too good opinion of his own person, and study by every means to acquire the knowledge of what is most beautiful, and of his own defects, that he may adopt the one and avoid the other. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
813:But Italy worked some marvel in her. It gave her light, and – which he held more precious – it gave her shadow. Soon he detected in her a wonderful reticence. She was like a woman of Leonardo da Vinci's, whom we love not so much for herself as for the things that she will not tell us. The things are assuredly not of this life; no woman of Leonardo's could have anything so vulgar as a "story." She did develop most wonderfully day by day. ~ E M Forster,
814:The most famous improvised lines in the history of the movies are the ones Orson Welles came up with while playing Harry Lime in The Third Man (1949): “In Italy, for 30 years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love, they had 500 years of democracy and peace—and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. ~ Anonymous,
815:A bird is an instrument working according to mathematical law, which instrument it is within the capacity of man to reproduce with all its movements, but not with a corresponding degree of strength, though it is deficient only in the power of maintaining equilibrium. We may therefore say that such an instrument constructed by man is lacking in nothing except the life of the bird, and this life must needs be supplied from that of man. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
816:For the pre-Darwinian age had come to be regarded as a Dark Age in which men still believed that the book of Genesis was a standard scientific treatise, and that the only additions to it were Galileo'a demonstration of Leonardo da Vinci's simple remark that the earth is a moon of the sun, Sir Humphrey Davy's invention of the safety lamp, the discovery of electricity, the application of steam to industrial purposes, and the penny post. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
817:This work should commence with the conception of man, and should describe the nature of the womb, and how the child inhabits it, and in what stage it dwells there, and the manner of its quickening and feeding, and its growth, and what interval there is between one stage of growth and another, and what thing drives it forth from the body of the mother, and for what reason it sometimes emerges from the belly of its mother before the due time. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
818:In whatever system where the weight attached to the wheel should be the cause of motion of the wheel, without any doubt the center of the gravity of the weight will stop beneath the center of its axle. No instrument devised by human ingenuity, which turns with its wheel, can remedy this effect. Oh, speculators about perpetual motion, how many vain chimeras have you created in the like quest. Go and take you place with the seekers after gold. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
819:After painting comes Sculpture, a very noble art, but one that does not in the execution require the same supreme ingenuity as the art of painting, since in two most important and difficult particulars, in foreshortening and in light and shade, for which the painter has to invent a process, sculpture is helped by nature. Moreover, Sculpture does not imitate color which the painter takes pains to attune so that the shadows accompany the lights. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
820:Never make heads straight on the shoulders, but turn them aside to the right or to the left, even though they look down, or upward, or straight ahead, because it is necessary for them to look lively and awake and not asleep. And do not depict the front or rear half of the whole person so that too much straightness is displaced, one half above or below the other half; and if you should wish to use stiff figures, do so only in portraying old people. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
821:Travel releases spontaneity. You become a godlike creature full or choice, free to visit the stately pleasure domes, make love in the morning, sketch a bell tower, read a history of Byzantium, stare for one hour at the face of Leonardo da Vinci's 'Madonna dei fusi.' You open, as in childhood, and--for a time--receive this world. There's visceral aspect, too--the huntress who is free. Free to go, free to return home bringing memories to lay on the hearth. ~ Frances Mayes,
822:Let the painter composing narrative pictures take pleasure in wealth and variety, and avoid repeating any part that occurs in it, so that the uniqueness and abundance attract people to it and delight the eye of the observer. I say that a narrative painting requires (depending on the scene), wherever the eye falls, a mixture of men of diverse appearances, of diverse ages and dress, combined together with women, children, dogs, horses, buildings, fields, and hills. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
823:Leonardo da Vinci had such a playful curiosity. If you read his notebooks, you'll see he's curious about what the tongue of a woodpecker looks like, but also why the sky is blue, or how an emotion forms on somebody's lips. He understood the beauty of everything. I've admired Leonardo my whole life, both as a kid who loved engineering - he was one of the coolest engineers in history - and then as a college student, when I travelled to see his notebooks and paintings. ~ Walter Isaacson,
824:To me it seems that those sciences are vain and full of error which are not born of experience, mother of all certainty, firsthand experience which in its origins, or means, or end has passed through one of the five senses. And if we doubt the certainty of everything which passes through the senses, how much more ought we to doubt things contrary to these senses such as the existence of god or of the soul or similar things over which there is always dispute and contention, ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
825:They will say that I, having no literary skill, cannot properly express that which I desire to treat of, but they do not know that my subjects are to be dealt with by experience rather than by words. And [experience] has been the mistress of those who wrote well. And so, as mistress, I will cite her in all cases. Though I may not, like them, be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy: on experience, the mistress of their masters. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
826:Leonardo’s Vitruvian Man embodies a moment when art and science combined to allow mortal minds to probe timeless questions about who we are and how we fit into the grand order of the universe. It also symbolizes an ideal of humanism that celebrates the dignity, value, and rational agency of humans as individuals. Inside the square and the circle we can see the essence of Leonardo da Vinci, and the essence of ourselves, standing naked at the intersection of the earthly and the cosmic. ~ Walter Isaacson,
827:A bird maintains itself in the air by imperceptible balancing, when near to the mountains or lofty ocean crags; it does this by means of the curves of the winds which as they strike against these projections, being forced to preserve their first impetus bend their straight course towards the sky with divers revolutions, at the beginning of which the birds come to a stop with their wings open, receiving underneath themselves the continual buffetings of the reflex courses of the winds. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
828:Very great charm of shadow and light is to be found in the faces of those who sit in the doors of dark houses. The eye of the spectator sees that part of the face which is in shadow lost in the darkness of the house, and that part of the face which is lit draws its brilliancy from the splendour of the sky. From this intensification of light and shade the face gains greatly in relief and beauty by showing the subtlest shadows in the light part and the subtlest lights in the dark part. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
829:What if at school you had to take an 'art class' in which you were only taught how to paint a fence? What if you were never shown the paintings of Leonardo da Vinci and Picasso? Would that make you appreciate art? Would you want to learn more about it? I doubt it..........but this is how math is taught and so in the eyes of most of us it becomes the equivalent of watching paint dry. While the paintings of the great masters are readily available, the math of the great masters is locked away. ~ Edward Frenkel,
830:Although human ingenuity may devise various inventions which, by the help of various instruments, answer to one and the same purpose, yet will it never discover any inventions more beautiful, more simple or more practical than those of nature, because in her inventions there is nothing lacking and nothing superfluous; and she makes use of no counterpoise when she constructs the limbs of animals in such a way as to correspond to the motion of their bodies, but she puts into them the soul of the body. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
831:The abbreviators of works do injury to knowledge and to love.Of what value is he who,in order to abbreviate the parts of those things of which he professes to give complete knowledge,leaves out the greater part of the things of which the whole is composed?Oh human stupidity!You don’t see that you are falling into the same error as one who strips a tree of its adornment of branches full of leaves,intermingled with fragrant flowers or fruit in order to demonstrate that the tree is good for making planks ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
832:Leonardo da Vinci did not take received wisdom - whether from ancient classical thinkers or medieval scholars or from the Bible - without questioning it. And this was the beginning of the scientific method. This is another lesson for our time: that when we have evidence that contradicts a certain belief, we should be willing to change it. I think this made Leonardo, in some ways, a person who better understood the beauty of God's creation than a person who just takes all received wisdom from the Bible on faith. ~ Walter Isaacson,
833:Quando ouvimos os sinos, ouvimos aquilo que já trazemos em nós mesmos como modelo. Sou da opinião que não se deverá desprezar aquele que olhar atentamente para as manchas da parede, para os carvões sobre a grelha, para as nuvens, ou para a correnteza da água, descobrindo, assim, coisas maravilhosas. O génio do pintor há-de se apossar de todas essas coisas para criar composições diversas: luta de homens e de animais, paisagens, monstros, demónios e outras coisas fantásticas. Tudo, enfim, servirá para engrandecer o artista. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
834:You should look at certain walls stained with damp, or at stones of uneven color. If you have to invent some backgrounds you will be able to see in these the likeness of divine landscapes, adorned with mountains, ruins, rocks, woods, great plains, hills and valleys in great variety; and expressions of faces and clothes and an infinity of things which you will be able to reduce to their complete and proper forms. In such walls the same thing happens as in the sound of bells, in whose stroke you may find every named word which you can imagine. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
835:Homosexuality is assuredly no advantage, but it is nothing to be ashamed of, no vice, no degradation; it cannot be classified as an illness; we consider it to be a variation of the sexual function, produced by a certain arrest of sexual development. Many highly respectable individuals of ancient and modern times have been homosexuals, several of the greatest men among them (Plato, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, etc.). It is a great injustice to persecute homosexuality as a crime--and a cruelty, too. If you do not believe me, read the books of Havelock Ellis. ~ Sigmund Freud,
836:I think it is no small attraction in a painter to be able to give a pleasing air to his figures, and whoever is not naturally possessed of this grace may acquire it by study, as opportunity offers in the following manner: be on the watch to take good parts of many beautiful faces of which the beautiful parts are established by general repute rather than by your own judgement, for you may deceive yourself by selecting faces that resemble your own, since it often seems that such similarities please us; ... so therefore choose the beautiful ones as I tell you and fix them in your mind. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
837:I roamed the countryside searching for the answers to things I did not understand. Why shells existed on the tops of mountains along with the imprints of coral and plant and seaweed usually found in the sea. Why the thunder lasts a longer time than that which causes it and why immediately on its creation the lightening becomes visible to the eye while thunder requires time to travel. How the various circles of water form around the spot which has been struck by a stone and why a bird sustains itself in the air. These questions and other strange phenomena engaged my thought throughout my life. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
838:Experience is never at fault; it is only your judgment that is in error, in promising itself such results from experience as are not caused by our experiments. For having given a beginning, what follows from it must necessarily be a natural development of such a beginning, unless it has been subject to a contrary influence, while, if it is affected by any contrary influence, the result which ought to follow from the aforesaid beginning, will be found to partake of this contrary influence in a greater or lesser degree in proportion as the said influence is more or less powerful than the aforesaid beginning. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
839:You should look at certain walls stained with damp, or at stones of uneven colour. If you have to invent some backgrounds you will be able to see in these the likeness of divine landscapes, adorned with mountains, ruins, rocks, woods, great plains, hills and valleys in great variety; and then again you will see there battles and strange figures in violent action, expressions of faces and clothes and an infinity of things which you will be able to reduce to their complete and proper forms. In such walls the same thing happens as in the sound of bells, in whose stroke you may find every named word which you can imagine. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
840:Bill Lazier’s advice means that you ought to do your homework before taking a job. Find out if you are about to enter a den of assholes, and if you are, don’t give in to the temptation to join them in the first place. Leonardo da Vinci said, “It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end,” which is sound social psychology. The more time and effort that people put into anything—no matter how useless, dysfunctional, or downright stupid it might be—the harder it is for them to walk away, be it a bad investment, a destructive relationship, an exploitive job, or a workplace filled with browbeaters, bullies, and bastards. ~ Robert I Sutton,
841:Durante un rato nos encontramos mirando la pared, absortos en nuestros pensamientos. Sobre el revoque alguien había pintado con letras negras una secuencia en latín.
—¿Qué significa eso? —preguntó Leslie finalmente—. ¿No te olvides de llenar la nevera?
—No —dijo Raphael—. Es una cita de Leonardo Da Vinci y los De Villiers se la robaron para usarla como lema familiar.
—Oh, entonces seguro que traducido es algo así como «No es que seamos unos fanfarrones, es que realmente somos geniales». O «¡Lo sabemos todo y siempre tenemos razón!».
Solté una risita.
—«Unce tu carro a una estrella» —dijo Raphael—: eso significa. [...] ~ Kerstin Gier,
842:I Can Also Paint Around the time that he reached the unnerving milestone of turning thirty, Leonardo da Vinci wrote a letter to the ruler of Milan listing the reasons he should be given a job. He had been moderately successful as a painter in Florence, but he had trouble finishing his commissions and was searching for new horizons. In the first ten paragraphs, he touted his engineering skills, including his ability to design bridges, waterways, cannons, armored vehicles, and public buildings. Only in the eleventh paragraph, at the end, did he add that he was also an artist. “Likewise in painting, I can do everything possible,” he wrote. ~ Walter Isaacson,
843:Though I may not, like them, be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy — on experience, the mistress of their Masters. They go about puffed up and pompous, dressed and decorated with [the fruits], not of their own labours, but of those of others. And they will not allow me my own. They will scorn me as an inventor; but how much more might they — who are not inventors but vaunters and declaimers of the works of others — be blamed. ~ Leonardo da Vinci, The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci (1883) From the published edition of Jean Paul Richter (1883), as translated into English by Mrs. R. C. Bell and Edward John Poynter ,
844:I am fully conscious that, not being a literary man , certain presumptuous persons will think that they may reasonably blame me; alleging that I am not a man of letters. Foolish folks! do they not know that I might retort as Marius did to the Roman Patricians by saying: That they, who deck themselves out in the labours of others will not allow me my own. They will say that I, having no literary skill, cannot properly express that which I desire to treat of, but they do not know that my subjects are to be dealt with by experience rather than by words; and experience has been the mistress of those who wrote well. And so, as mistress, I will cite her in all cases. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
845:For Our Lady Of The Rocks By Leonardo Da Vinci
Mother, is this the darkness of the end,
The Shadow of Death? and is that outer sea
Infinite imminent Eternity?
And does the death-pang by man's seed sustained
In Time's each instant cause thy face to bend
Its silent prayer upon the Son, while He
Blesses the dead with His hand silently
To His long day which hours no more offend?
Mother of grace, the pass is difficult,
Keen as these rocks, and the bewildered souls
Throng it like echoes, blindly shuddering through.
Thy name, O Lord, each spirit's voice extols,
Whose peace abides in the dark avenue
Amid the bitterness of things occult.
~ Dante Gabriel Rossetti,
846:Who have our fighters been?” Calvin asked. “Oh, you must know them, dear,” Mrs Whatsit said. Mrs Who’s spectacles shone out at them triumphantly, “And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.” “Jesus!” Charles Wallace said. “Why, of course, Jesus!” “Of course!” Mrs Whatsit said. “Go on, Charles, love. There were others. All your great artists. They’ve been lights for us to see by.” “Leonardo da Vinci?” Calvin suggested tentatively. “And Michelangelo?” “And Shakespeare,” Charles Wallace called out, “and Bach! And Pasteur and Madame Curie and Einstein!” Now Calvin’s voice rang with confidence. “And Schweitzer and Gandhi and Buddha and Beethoven and Rembrandt and St. Francis! ~ Madeleine L Engle,
847:She knew for a fact that being left-handed automatically made you special.
Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Linus Pauling, and Albert Schweitzer were all left-handed. Of course, no believable scientific theory could rest on such a small group of people. When Lindsay probed further, however, more proof emerged. Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, M.C. Escher, Mark Twain, Hans Christian Andersen, Lewis Carrol, H.G. Wells, Eudora Welty, and Jessamyn West- all lefties. The lack of women in her research had initially bothered her until she mentioned it to Allegra. "Chalk that up to male chauvinism," she said. "Lots of left-handed women were geniuses. Janis Joplin was. All it means is that the macho-man researchers didn't bother asking. ~ Jo Ann Mapson,
848:When Leonardo da Vinci wanted to create a whole new style of painting, one that was more lifelike and emotional, he engaged in an obsessive study of details. He spent endless hours experimenting with forms of light hitting various geometrical solids, to test how light could alter the appearance of objects. He devoted hundreds of pages in his notebooks to exploring the various gradations of shadows in every possible combination. He gave this same attention to the folds of a gown, the patterns in hair, the various minute changes in the expression of a human face. When we look at his work we are not consciously aware of these efforts on his part, but we feel how much more alive and realistic his paintings are, as if he had captured reality. ~ Robert Greene,
849:And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.

Life is a process of becoming, a combination of states we have to go through. Where people fail is that they wish to elect a state and remain in it. This is a kind of death.

Living never wore one out so much as the effort not to live.

Life is truly known only to those who suffer, lose, endure adversity and stumble from defeat to defeat.

Perfection is static, and I am in full progress.

Abnormal pleasures kill the taste for normal ones.

-Anais Nin

"Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return." -Bible-Genesis 3:19

"While I thought that I was learning to live, I have been learning how to die" - Leonardo da Vinci ~ Ana s Nin,
850:The dilemma is this. In the modern world knowledge has been growing so fast and so enormously, in almost every field, that the probabilities are immensely against anybody, no matter how innately clever, being able to make a contribution in any one field unless he devotes all his time to it for years. If he tries to be the Rounded Universal Man, like Leonardo da Vinci, or to take all knowledge for his province, like Francis Bacon, he is most likely to become a mere dilettante and dabbler. But if he becomes too specialized, he is apt to become narrow and lopsided, ignorant on every subject but his own, and perhaps dull and sterile even on that because he lacks perspective and vision and has missed the cross-fertilization of ideas that can come from knowing something of other subjects. ~ Henry Hazlitt,
851:Certainly we have had our Napoleons and our Hitlers, but we have also had Jesus and Buddha. We have had tyrants, but also great humanitarians. We have had corrupt politicians, but also noble rulers. Even in the most selfish of times, the world has brought forth idealists, philanthropists, great artists, musicians, and poets. If we have inherited ages of feuding and intolerance, we have also inherited the magnificence of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. For each tyrant who has profaned the pages of history, there have been thousands, even millions, of gentle people who have lived unhonored and unknown, keeping principles and living convictions under the most difficult situations. To see this good, and to know it, is to find a new courage and a new faith. ~ Manly P Hall, PRS Journal Summer 1961, p.7,
852:Edwin Land of Polaroid talked about the intersection of the humanities and science. I like that intersection. There's something magical about that place. There are a lot of people innovating, and that's not the main distinction of my career. The reason Apple resonates with people is that there's a deep current of humanity in our innovation. I think great artists and great engineers are similar in that they both have a desire to express themselves. In fact some of the best people working on the original Mac were poets and musicians on the side. In the seventies computers became a way for people to express their creativity. Great artists like Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo were also great art science. Michelangelo knew a lot about how to quarry stone, not just how to be a sculptor. ~ Walter Isaacson,
853:To me it seems that those sciences are vain and full of error which are not born of experience, mother of all certainty, first-hand experience which in its origins, or means, or end has passed through one of the five senses. And if we doubt the certainty of everything which passes through the senses, how much more ought we to doubt things contrary to these senses – ribelli ad essi sensi – such as the existence of God or of the soul or similar things over which there is always dispute and contention. And in fact it happens that whenever reason is wanting men to cry out against one another, which does not happen with certainties. For this reason we shall say that where the cry of controversy is heard, there is no true science, because the truth has one single end and when this is published, argument is destroyed for ever. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
854:Lines
ON THE CELEBRATED PICTURE BY LEONARDO DA VINCI, CALLED THE VIRGIN OF
THE ROCKS
While young John runs to greet
The greater Infant's feet,
The Mother standing by, with trembling passion
Of devout admiration,
Beholds the engaging mystic play, and pretty adoration;
Nor knows as yet the full event
Of those so low beginnings,
From whence we date our winnings,
But wonders at the intent
Of those new rites, and what that strange child-worship meant.
But at her side
An angel doth abide,
With such a perfect joy
As no dim doubts alloy,
An intuition,
A glory, an amenity,
Passing the dark condition
Of blind humanity,
As if he surely knew
All the blest wonders should ensue,
Or he had lately left the upper sphere,
And had read all the sovran schemes and divine riddles there.
~ Charles Lamb,
855:Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.
When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.
Learning never exhausts the mind.
Art is never finished, only abandoned.
Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.
The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art.
It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.
I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.
As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death.
Water is the driving force of all nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
856:areas, and brilliantly, too. Leonardo is known as one of the greatest painters who ever lived, and many argue he was the greatest artist ever. However, his genius went far beyond the easel and his paintbrushes. His mind could conceive of almost anything, from a beautiful representation of Heaven to graphical illustrations of the human body in a time when there were no such things as CAT scans or x-rays. Leonardo’s lifetime was spent observing and doing so in many different venues. His notebooks were filled with examples of what it means to be human. He looked at life from numerous perspectives and recorded all he saw. From light and shade to perspective and visual perception, from botany and landscape to physical sciences and astronomy, from architecture and planning to sculpture and experiments, from inventing to philosophy, there was nothing that didn’t touch Leonardo da Vinci. ~ Hourly History,
857:The Seven Da Vincian Principles are:
   Curiosità - An insatiably curious approach to life and an unrelenting quest for continuous learning.
   Dimostrazione - A commitment to test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes.
   Sensazione - The continual refinement of the senses, especially sight, as the means to enliven experience.
   Sfumato (literally "Going up in Smoke") - A willingness to embrace ambiguity, paradox, and uncertainty.
   Arte/Scienza - The development of the balance between science and art, logic and imagination. "Whole-brain" thinking.
   Corporalità - The cultivation of grace, ambidexterity, fitness, and poise.
   Connessione - A recognition of and appreciation for the interconnectedness of all things and phenomena. Systems thinking.
   ~ Michael J. Gelb, How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day,
858:is to read things that are not yet on the page. Edwin Land of Polaroid talked about the intersection of the humanities and science. I like that intersection. There’s something magical about that place. There are a lot of people innovating, and that’s not the main distinction of my career. The reason Apple resonates with people is that there’s a deep current of humanity in our innovation. I think great artists and great engineers are similar, in that they both have a desire to express themselves. In fact some of the best people working on the original Mac were poets and musicians on the side. In the seventies computers became a way for people to express their creativity. Great artists like Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo were also great at science. Michelangelo knew a lot about how to quarry stone, not just how to be a sculptor. People pay us to integrate things for them, because they don’t have the time to think about this stuff 24/7. If you have an extreme passion for producing ~ Walter Isaacson,
859:Creatures shall be seen on the earth who will always be fighting one another, with the greatest losses and frequent deaths on either side. There will be no bounds to their malice; by their strong limbs the vast forests of the world shall be laid low; and when they are filled with food they shall gratify their desires by dealing out death, affliction, labour, terror, and banishment to every living thing; and then from their boundless pride they will desire to rise towards heaven, but the excessive weight of their limbs will hold them down. Nothing shall remain on the earth or under the earth or in the waters that shall not be pursued, disturbed, or spoiled, and that which is in one country removed into another. And their bodies shall be made the tomb and the means of transit of all the living bodies they have slain.
O earth, why do you not open and hurl them into the deep fissures of thy vast abysses and caverns, and no longer display in the sight of heaven so cruel and horrible a monster? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
860:Animals will be seen on the earth who will always be fighting against each other with the greatest loss and frequent deaths on each side. And there will be no end to their malignity; by their strong limbs we shall see a great portion of the trees of the vast forests laid low throughout the universe; and, when they are filled with food the satisfaction of their desires will be to deal death and grief and labour and wars and fury to every living thing; and from their immoderate pride they will desire to rise towards heaven, but the too great weight of their limbs will keep them down. Nothing will remain on earth, or under the earth or in the waters which will not be persecuted, disturbed and spoiled, and those of one country removed into another. And their bodies will become the sepulture and means of transit of all they have killed.

O Earth! why dost thou not open and engulf them in the fissures of thy vast abyss and caverns, and no longer display in the sight of heaven such a cruel and horrible monster? ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
861:The Suspect
Over there, in the Other land, I was
gharb-zadeh, Farsi to the effect of westsmitten. Over here, in 'Our' land, I am
Muslim immigrant, nomenclature with grave
allusions: unemployment, anger, and
unpredictable police attention. Over there
I was an 'apostate', principal's term for
the boy who failed Koran Studies and wrote
an essay on Leonardo da Vinci. Over here
dainty high school girl rejected this thick
accented adolescent for being too hairy
and a 'Muslim rapist'. Over there, utterly guilty
of doodling Zorro; hence flogged by the irate
principal. Over here shackled to a passport
etched with 'born in Tehran'. There I was
suspected of perfidy to the Faith, an Infidelwannabe. Over here I am suspected
of terror, 'Our' values' covert enemy. My likes
aren't to belong to tribes, nations, et al; but
welcome at the cells of the Islamic Republic's
Evin Prison, pliers pinching their fingernails; or sleep-deprived and hooded indefinitely
in the dark solitaries of Guantánamo Bay.
~ Ali Alizadeh,
862:When you travel you become invisible if you want. I do want. I like to be the observer. What makes these people who they are Could I feel at home here No one expects you to have the stack of papers back by Tuesday or to check messages or to fertilize the geraniums or to sit full of dread in the waiting room at the protologist’s office. When travelling you have the delectable possibility of not understanding a word of what is said to you. Language becomes simply a musical background for watching bicycles zoom along a canal calling for nothing from you. Even better if you speak the language you catch nuances and make more contact with people.

Travel releases spontaneity. You become a godlike creature full of choice free to visit the stately pleasure domes make love in the morning sketch a bell tower read a history of Byzantium stare for one hour at the face of Leonardo da Vinci’s Madonna dei fusi. You open as in childhood and – for a time – receive this world. There’s the visceral aspect too – the huntress who is free. Free to go Free to return home bringing memories to lay on the hearth. ~ Frances Mayes,
863:we live in the world of a sad separation that began some five hundred years ago when art and science split apart. Scientists and technicians live in their own world, focusing mostly on the “how” of things. Others live in the world of appearances, using these things but not really understanding how they function. Just before this split occurred, it was the ideal of the Renaissance to combine these two forms of knowledge. This is why the work of Leonardo da Vinci continues to fascinate us, and why the Renaissance remains an ideal. This more rounded knowledge is in fact the way of the future, especially now that so much more information is available to all of us. As Calatrava intuited, this should be a part of our apprenticeship. We must make ourselves study as deeply as possible the technology we use, the functioning of the group we work in, the economics of our field, its lifeblood. We must constantly ask the questions—how do things work, how do decisions get made, how does the group interact? Rounding our knowledge in this way will give us a deeper feel for reality and the heightened power to alter it. ~ Robert Greene,
864:But the worst came from the Mongol Tamerlane, a dedicated Muslim who conducted furious jihad campaigns against the Nestorians and devastated their cities and churches. It was full-blown war against the Assyrian Christians: Tamerlane offered them conversion to Islam, dhimmitude, or death. By 1400, the vast Nestorian domains were no more; Christianity had almost completely died out in Persia, Central Asia, and China.7 After this, virtually all Nestorians lived as dhimmis under Muslim rule. And like the Zoroastrians, their community dwindled down to a tiny remnant under the relentless weight of this institutionalized injustice. If the Christians in Europe had been subjected to the same fate, it is distinctly possible that the world might never have known the works of Dante Alighieri, or Michelangelo, or Leonardo da Vinci, or Mozart, or Bach. It is likely that there would never have been an El Greco, or a Giotto, or an Olivier Messaien. A community that must expend all its energy just to survive does not easily pursue art and music. The Crusades may have made the full flowering of European civilization possible. ~ Robert Spencer,
865:Look at walls splashed with a number of stains, or stones of various mixed colours. If you have to invent some scene, you can see there resemblances to a number of landscapes, adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, great plains, valleys and hills, in various ways. Also you can see various battles, and lively postures of strange figures, expressions on faces, costumes and an infinite number of things, which you can reduce to good integrated form. This happens on such walls and varicoloured stones, (which act) like the sound of bells, in whose peeling you can find every name and word that you can imagine.
Do not despise my opinion, when I remind you that it should not hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or the ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places, in which, if you consider them well, you may find really marvelous ideas. The mind of the painter is
stimulated to new discoveries, the composition of battles of animals and men, various compositions of landscapes and monstrous things, such as devils and similar things, which may bring you honor, because by indistinct things the mind is stimulated to new inventions. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
866:Raise Your Standards
Any time you sincerely want to make a change, the first thing you must do is to raise your standards. When people ask me what really changed my life eight years ago, I tell them that absolutely the most important thing was changing what I demanded of myself. I wrote down all the things I would no longer accept in my life, all the things I would no longer tolerate, and all the things that I aspired to becoming.
Think of the far-reaching consequences set in motion by men and women who raised their standards and acted in accordance with them, deciding they would tolerate no less. History chronicles the inspiring examples of people like Leonardo da Vinci, Abraham Lincoln, Helen Keller, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Albeit Einstein, Cesar Chavez, Soichiro Honda, and many others who took the magnificently powerful step of raising their standards. The same power that was available to them is available to you, if you have the courage to claim it. Changing an organization, acompany, a country-or a world-begins with the simple step of changing yourself.


STEP TWO

Change Your Limiting Beliefs ~ Anthony Robbins, How to take Immediate Control of Your Mental Emotional Physical and Financial Destiny,
867:Now having travelled from the pride of man in the High Renaissance and the Enlightenment down to the present despair, we can understand where modern people are. They have no place for a personal God. But equally they have no place for man as man, or for love, or for freedom, or for significance. This brings a crucial problem. Beginning only from man himself, people affirm that man is only a machine. But those who hold this position cannot live like machines! If they could, there would be no tensions in their intellectual position or in their lives. But even people who believe they are machines cannot live like machines, and thus they must “leap upstairs” against their reason and try to find something which gives meaning to life, even though to do so they have to deny their reason.
This was a solution Leonardo da Vinci and the men of the Renaissance never would have accepted, even if, like Leonardo they ended their thinking in despondency. They would not have done so, for they would have considered it intellectual suicide to separate meaning and values from reason this way. And they would have been right. Such a solution is intellectual suicide, and one may question the intellectual integrity of those who accept such a position when their starting point was pride in the sufficiency of human reason. ~ Francis A Schaeffer,
868:A few more years of the same, though, and I got used to it: I would load entire libraries from country castles and city mansions, fine, rare, leather- and Morroco-bound books, load whole trains full, and as soon as a train had thirty cars, off it would go to Switzerland or Austria, one kilogram of rare books for the equivalent of one crown of convertible currency, and nobody blinked an eye, nobody shed a tear, not even I myself, no, all I did was stand there smiling as I watched the train hauling those priceless libraries off to Switzerland and Austria for one crown in convertible currency a kilo. By then I had mustered the strength to look upon misfortune with composure, to still my emotions, by then I had begun to understand the beauty of destruction and I loaded more and more freight cars, and more and more trains left the station heading west at one crown per kilogram, and as I stood there staring after the red lantern hanging from the last car, as I stood there leaning on a lamppost like Leonardo da Vinci, who stood leaning on a column and looking on while French soldiers used his statue for target practice, shooting away horse and rider bit by bit, I thought how Leonardo, like me, standing and witnessing such horrors with complete composure, had realized even than that neither the heavens are humane nor is any man with a head on his shoulders. ~ Bohumil Hrabal,
869:Are you mad at me?” Her brow was wrinkled and her eyes were worried, and she wasn’t smiling anymore. “I thought you would laugh.” She shrugged. “I told Kathleen I was going to surprise you. And she said, ‘Go right ahead!’ So I did. I used your paints, but I put everything back.”
“Why are you kicking me in the head?”
“It’s our story. We meet. You save me. I kiss you. You kiss me back, but you keep acting like you don’t like me even though I know you do. So I’m kicking some sense into you. And man, does it feel good.” She grinned cheekily, and I looked back at her depiction. That was some kick to the head.
“It’s a terrible mural.” It was terrible. And funny. And very Georgia.
“Well, we can’t all be Leonardo DiCaprio. You painted on my walls, I’m painting on yours. And you don’t even have to pay me. I’m just trying to bond with you over art.”
Leonardo da Vinci, you mean?”
“Him too.” She smiled again and laid back on my bed, patting the spot beside her.
“You could have at least given me some biceps. That doesn’t look anything like me. And why am I saying, ‘Don’t hurt me, Georgia!’”
I plopped down on the bed and purposely landed partially on top of her. She wiggled and scooted breathlessly, trying to free herself from my intentional squishing...
She stroked my head and I breathed against her skin.
“Are we bonding over art?” she whispered in my ear.
“No. ~ Amy Harmon,
870:I belong to a culture that includes Proust, Henry James, Tchaikovsky, Cole Porter, Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Christopher Marlowe, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Tennessee Williams, Byron, E.M. Forster, Lorca, Auden, Francis Bacon, James Baldwin, Harry Stack Sullivan, John Maynard Keynes, Dag Hammarskjold… These are not invisible men. Poor Bruce. Poor frightened Bruce. Once upon a time you wanted to be a soldier.
Bruce, did you know that an openly gay Englishman was as responsible as any man for winning the Second World War? His name was Alan Turing and he cracked the Germans' Enigma code so the Allies knew in advance what the Nazis were going to do — and when the war was over he committed suicide he was so hounded for being gay. Why don't they teach any of this in the schools? If they did, maybe he wouldn't have killed himself and maybe you wouldn't be so terrified of who you are. The only way we'll have real pride is when we demand recognition of a culture that isn't just sexual. It's all there—all through history we've been there; but we have to claim it, and identify who was in it, and articulate what's in our minds and hearts and all our creative contributions to this earth. And until we do that, and until we organize ourselves block by neighborhood by city by state into a united visible community that fights back, we're doomed. That's how I want to be defined: as one of the men who fought the war. ~ Larry Kramer,
871:Drawing a good figure doesn’t make you a good artist. I can name you ten men, right off the bat, who draw better than I do. But I don’t think their work gets as much response as mine. I can’t think of a better man to draw Dick Tracy than Chester Gould, who certainly is no match for Leonardo Da Vinci. But Chester Gould told the story of Dick Tracy. He told the story of Dick Tracy the way it should have been told. No other guy could have done it. It’s not in the draftsmanship, it’s in the man.

Like I say, a tool is dead. A brush is a dead object. It’s in the man.

If you want to do, you do it. If you think a man draws the type of hands that you want to draw, steal ‘em. Take those hands.

The only thing I can say is: Caniff was my teacher, Alex Raymond was my teacher, even the guy who drew Toonerville Trolley was my teacher. Whatever he had stimulated me in some way. And I think that’s all you need. You need that stimulation. Stimulation to make you an individual. And the draftsmanship, hang it. If you can decently: learn to control what you can, learn to control what you have, learn to refine what you have. Damn perfection. You don’t have to be perfect. You are never going to do a Sistine Chapel, unless someone ties you to a ceiling. Damn perfection.

All a man has in this field is pressure. And I think the pressure supplies a stimulation. You have your own stresses, that will supply your own stimulation. If you want to do it, you’ll do it. And you’ll do it anyway you can.

--Jack Kirby ~ Jack Kirby,
872:When he was creating this picture, Leonardo da Vinci encountered a serious problem: he had to depict Good - in the person of Jesus - and Evil - in the figure of Judas, the friend who resolves to betray him during the meal. He stopped work on the painting until he could find his ideal models.

One day, when he was listening to a choir, he saw in one of the boys the perfect image of Christ. He invited him to his studio and made sketches and studies of his face.

Three years went by. The Last Supper was almost complete, but Leonardo had still not found the perfect model for Judas. The cardinal responsible for the church started to put pressure on him to finish the mural.

After many days spent vainly searching, the artist came across a prematurely aged youth, in rags and lying drunk in the gutter. With some difficulty, he persuaded his assistants to bring the fellow directly to the church, since there was no time left to make preliminary sketches.

The beggar was taken there, not quite understanding what was going on. He was propped up by Leonardo's assistants, while Leonardo copied the lines of impiety, sin and egotism so clearly etched on his features.

When he had finished, the beggar, who had sobered up slightly, opened his eyes and saw the picture before him. With a mixture of horror and sadness he said:

'I've seen that picture before!'


'When?' asked an astonished Leonardo.

'Three years ago, before I lost everything I had, at a time when I used to sing in a choir and my life was full of dreams. The artist asked me to pose as the model for the face of Jesus. ~ Paulo Coelho,
873:I.
It lieth, gazing on the midnight sky,
Upon the cloudy mountain-peak supine;
Below, far lands are seen tremblingly;
Its horror and its beauty are divine.
Upon its lips and eyelids seems to lie
Loveliness like a shadow, from which shine,
Fiery and lurid, struggling underneath,
The agonies of anguish and of death.

II.
Yet it is less the horror than the grace
Which turns the gazer's spirit into stone,
Whereon the lineaments of that dead face
Are graven, till the characters be grown
Into itself, and thought no more can trace;
Tis the melodious hue of beauty thrown
Athwart the darkness and the glare of pain,
Which humanize and harmonize the strain.

III.
And from its head as from one body grow,
As grass out of a watery rock,
Hairs which are vipers, and they curl and flow
And their long tangles in each other lock,
And with unending involutions show
Their mailed radiance, as it were to mock
The torture and the death within, and saw
The solid air with many a ragged jaw.

IV.
And, from a stone beside, a poisonous eft
Peeps idly into those Gorgonian eyes;
Whilst in the air a ghastly bat, bereft
Of sense, has flitted with a mad surprise
Out of the cave this hideous light had cleft,
And he comes hastening like a moth that hies
After a taper; and the midnight sky
Flares, a light more dread than obscurity.

V.
'Tis the tempestuous loveliness of terror;
For from the serpents gleams a brazen glare
Kindled by that inextricable error,
Which makes a thrilling vapour of the air
Become a and ever-shifting mirror
Of all the beauty and the terror there--
A womans countenance, with serpent-locks,
Gazing in death on Heaven from those wet rocks.
Published by Mrs. Shelley, Posthumous Poems, 1824.
~ Percy Bysshe Shelley, On The Medusa Of Leonardo da Vinci In The Florentine Gallery
,
874:To understand, I destroyed myself. To understand is to forget about loving. I know nothing more simultaneously false and telling than the statement by Leonardo da Vinci that we cannot love or hate something until we’ve understood it.

Solitude devastates me; company oppresses me. The presence of another person derails my thoughts; I dream of the other’s presence with a strange absent-mindedness that no amount of my analytical scrutiny can define.
Isolation has carved me in its image and likeness. The presence of another person – of any person whatsoever – instantly slows down my thinking, and while for a normal man contact with others is a stimulus to spoken expression and wit, for me it is a counterstimulus, if this compound word be linguistically permissible. When all by myself, I can think of all kinds of clever remarks, quick comebacks to what no one said, and flashes of witty sociability with nobody. But all of this vanishes when I face someone in the flesh: I lose my intelligence, I can no longer speak, and after half an hour I just feel tired. Yes, talking to people makes me feel like sleeping. Only my ghostly and imaginary friends, only the conversations I have in my dreams, are genuinely real and substantial, and in them intelligence gleams like an image in a mirror.

The mere thought of having to enter into contact with someone else makes me nervous. A simple invitation to have dinner with a friend produces an anguish in me that’s hard to define. The idea of any social obligation whatsoever – attending a funeral, dealing with someone about an office matter, going to the station to wait for someone I know or don’t know – the very idea disturbs my thoughts for an entire day, and sometimes I even start worrying the night before, so that I sleep badly. When it takes place, the dreaded encounter is utterly insignificant, justifying none of my anxiety, but the next time is no different: I never learn to learn.

‘My habits are of solitude, not of men.’ I don’t know if it was Rousseau or Senancour who said this. But it was some mind of my species, it being perhaps too much to say of my race. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
875:Beacons
Reubens, river of forgetfulness, garden of sloth,
Pillow of wet flesh that one cannot love,
But where life throngs and seethes without cease
Like the air in the sky and the water in the sea.
Leonardo da Vinci, sinister mirror,
Where these charming angels with sweet smiles
Charged with mystery, appear in shadows
Of glaciers and pines that close off the country.
Rembrandt, sad hospital full of murmurs
Decorated only with a crucifix,
Where tearful prayers arise from filth
And a ray of winter light crosses brusquely.
Michelangelo, a wasteland where one sees Hercules
Mingling with Christ, and rising in a straight line
Powerful phantoms that in the twilight
Tear their shrouds with stretching fingers.
Rage of a boxer, impudence of a faun,
You who gather together the beauty of the boor,
Your big heart swelling with pride at man defective and yellow,
Puget, melancholy emperor of the poor.
Watteau, this carnival of illustrious hearts
Like butterflies, errant and flamboyant,
In the cool decor, with delicate lightning in the chandeliers
Crossing the madness of the twirling ball.
Goya, nightmare of unknown things,
Fetuses roasting on the spit,
Harridans in the mirror and naked children
Tempting demons by loosening their stockings.
Delacroix, haunted lake of blood and evil angels,
Shaded by evergreen forests of dark firs,
Where, under a grieving sky, strange fanfares
Pass, like a gasping breath of Weber.
33
These curses, these blasphemies, these moans,
These ecstasies, these tears, these cries of "Te Deum"
Are an echo reiterated in a thousand mazes;
It is for mortal hearts a divine opium!
It is a cry repeated by a thousand sentinels,
An order returned by a thousand megaphones,
A beacon lighting a thousand citadels
A summons to hunters lost in the wide woods.
For truly, O Lord, what better testimony
Can we give to our dignity
Than this burning sob that rolls from age to age
And comes to die on the shore of Your eternity?
Translated by William A. Sigler
Submitted by Ryan McGuire
~ Charles Baudelaire,
876:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus – Tragedies
4. Sophocles – Tragedies
5. Herodotus – Histories
6. Euripides – Tragedies
7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes – Comedies
10. Plato – Dialogues
11. Aristotle – Works
12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid – Elements
14. Archimedes – Works
15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections
16. Cicero – Works
17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil – Works
19. Horace – Works
20. Livy – History of Rome
21. Ovid – Works
22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy – Almagest
27. Lucian – Works
28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations
29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus – The Enneads
32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njál
36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More – Utopia
44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays
48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan
57. René Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton – Works
59. Molière – Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics
63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve – The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler,
877:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,
878:Les Phares (The Beacons)
Rubens, fleuve d'oubli, jardin de la paresse,
Oreiller de chair fraîche où l'on ne peut aimer,
Mais où la vie afflue et s'agite sans cesse,
Comme l'air dans le ciel et la mer dans la mer;
Léonard de Vinci, miroir profond et sombre,
Où des anges charmants, avec un doux souris
Tout chargé de mystère, apparaissent à l'ombre
Des glaciers et des pins qui ferment leur pays;
Rembrandt, triste hôpital tout rempli de murmures,
Et d'un grand crucifix décoré seulement,
Où la prière en pleurs s'exhale des ordures,
Et d'un rayon d'hiver traversé brusquement;
Michel-Ange, lieu vague où l'on voit des Hercules
Se mêler à des Christs, et se lever tout droits
Des fantômes puissants qui dans les crépuscules
Déchirent leur suaire en étirant leurs doigts;
Colères de boxeur, impudences de faune,
Toi qui sus ramasser la beauté des goujats,
Grand coeur gonflé d'orgueil, homme débile et jaune,
Puget, mélancolique empereur des forçats;
Watteau, ce carnaval où bien des coeurs illustres,
Comme des papillons, errent en flamboyant,
Décors frais et légers éclairés par des lustres
Qui versent la folie à ce bal tournoyant;
Goya, cauchemar plein de choses inconnues,
De foetus qu'on fait cuire au milieu des sabbats,
De vieilles au miroir et d'enfants toutes nues,
Pour tenter les démons ajustant bien leurs bas;
Delacroix, lac de sang hanté des mauvais anges,
Ombragé par un bois de sapins toujours vert,
Où, sous un ciel chagrin, des fanfares étranges
Passent, comme un soupir étouffé de Weber;
345
Ces malédictions, ces blasphèmes, ces plaintes,
Ces extases, ces cris, ces pleurs, ces Te Deum,
Sont un écho redit par mille labyrinthes;
C'est pour les coeurs mortels un divin opium!
C'est un cri répété par mille sentinelles,
Un ordre renvoyé par mille porte-voix;
C'est un phare allumé sur mille citadelles,
Un appel de chasseurs perdus dans les grands bois!
Car c'est vraiment, Seigneur, le meilleur témoignage
Que nous puissions donner de notre dignité
Que cet ardent sanglot qui roule d'âge en âge
Et vient mourir au bord de votre éternité!
The Beacons
Rubens, river of oblivion, garden of indolence,
Pillow of cool flesh where one cannot love,
But where life moves and whirls incessantly
Like the air in the sky and the tide in the sea;
Leonardo, dark, unfathomable mirror,
In which charming angels, with sweet smiles
Full of mystery, appear in the shadow
Of the glaciers and pines that enclose their country;
Rembrandt, gloomy hospital filled with murmuring,
Ornamented only with a large crucifix,
Lit for a moment by a wintry sun,
Where from rot and ordure rise tearful prayers;
Angelo, shadowy place where Hercules' are seen
Mingling with Christs, and rising straight up,
Powerful phantoms, which in the twilights
Rend their winding-sheets with outstretched fingers;
Boxer's wrath, shamelessness of Fauns, you whose genius
Showed to us the beauty in a villain,
Great heart filled with pride, sickly, yellow man,
Puget, melancholy emperor of galley slaves;
346
Watteau, carnival where the loves of many famous hearts
Flutter capriciously like butterflies with gaudy wings;
Cool, airy settings where the candelabras' light
Touches with madness the couples whirling in the dance
Goya, nightmare full of unknown things,
Of fetuses roasted in the midst of witches' sabbaths,
Of old women at the mirror and of nude children,
Tightening their hose to tempt the demons;
Delacroix, lake of blood haunted by bad angels,
Shaded by a wood of fir-trees, ever green,
Where, under a gloomy sky, strange fanfares
Pass, like a stifled sigh from Weber;
These curses, these blasphemies, these lamentations,
These Te Deums, these ecstasies, these cries, these tears,
Are an echo repeated by a thousand labyrinths;
They are for mortal hearts a divine opium.
They are a cry passed on by a thousand sentinels,
An order re-echoed through a thousand megaphones;
They are a beacon lighted on a thousand citadels,
A call from hunters lost deep in the woods!
For truly, Lord, the clearest proofs
That we can give of our nobility,
Are these impassioned sobs that through the ages roll,
And die away upon the shore of your Eternity.
— Translated by William Aggeler
The Beacons
Rubens, the grove of case, Nepenthe's river
Couch of cool flesh, where Love may never be,
But where life ever flows and seems to quiver
As air in heaven, or, in the sea, the sea.
Da Vinci, dusky mirror and profound,
347
Where angels, smiling mystery, appear,
Shaded by pines and glaciers, that surround
And seem to shut their country in the rear.
Rembrandt, sad hospital of murmurs, where
Adorned alone by one great crucifix,
From offal-heaps exhales the weeping prayer
That winter shoots a sunbeam to transfix.
Vague region, Michelangelo, where Titans
Are mixed with Christs: and strong ghosts rise, in crowds
To stand bolt upright in the gloom that lightens,
With gristly talons tearing through their shrouds.
Rage of the boxer, mischief of the faun,
Extracting beauty out of blackguards' looks —
The heart how proud, the man how pinched and drawn —
Puget the mournful emperor of crooks!
Watteau, the carnival, where famous hearts
Go flitting by like butterflies that burn,
While through gay scenes each chandelier imparts
A madness to the dancers as they turn.
Goya's a nightmare full of things unguessed,
Of foeti stewed on nights of witches' revels.
Crones ogle mirrors; children scarcely dressed,
Adjust their hose to tantalise the devils.
A lake of gore where fallen angels dwell
Is Delacroix, by firwoods ever fair,
Where under fretful skies strange fanfares swell
Like Weber's sighs and heartbeats in the air.
These curses, blasphemies, and lamentations,
These ecstasies, tears, cries and soaring psalms —
Through endless mazes, their reverberations
Bring, to our mortal hearts, divinest balms.
A thousand sentinels repeat the cry.
A thousand trumpets echo. Beacon-tossed
A thousand summits flare it through the sky,
348
A call of hunters in the jungle lost.
And certainly this is the most sublime
Proof of our worth and value, Oh Divinity,
That this great sob rolls on through ageless time
To die upon the shores of your infinity.
— Translated by Roy Campbell
Les Phares
Rubens, great river of oblivion,
garden of ease, cool flesh no lovers crave,
but where the floods of life unceasing run,
like wind on wind or wave on ocean wave;
Da Vinci — deep and sombre looking-glass
enchanting angels haunt, with subtle smile
all mystery-charged, while shadows dark amass
and pines and ice-cliffs bound their prison-isle;
Rembrandt — a piteous murmuring hospital
where ordure streams in tears and orisons,
stripped to the crucifix on one bare wall
illumed by one chill dart from wintry suns;
vast desert void, — o Michael Angelo!
— where TItans mix with Christs, and twilight clouds
where mighty spectres rise up stark and slow
— whose opening fingers rend their mouldered shrouds;
the rage of boxers and the satyrs' lust
— thou who hast found a grace in toiling knaves,
great heart, in a poor bilious body thrust
— Puget, the gloomy king of galley-slaves;
Watteau — bright carnival, where courtly pairs,
like butterflies in satin, flit about;
flaming in misty groves 'neath resin-flares
which pour their madness on the whirling rout;
349
Goya, who in a nightmare-horde unfurls
hags boiling foetuses in witches' milk,
beldames before the glass and naked girls
for demon-lovers tightening hose of silk;
and Delacroix — dark lake of blood forlorn
'mid fadeless firs, where evil angels fare,
a sullen sky wherefrom a faery horn
floats, faint as Oberon's horn through muffling air;
these curses, blasphemies and these laments,
these ecstasies, cries, tears, hossanas from
a thousand caverns, form one echo, whence
— death-doomed, we draw a heavenly opium!
theirs is a blast a thousand sentinels
pass on with their trumpets in a thousand moods;
a torch upon a thousand citadels,
a hail from hunters lost in pathless woods!
for truly, 'tis the mightiest voice our souls
command, o Lord, to prove their worth to Thee:
this ardent sob which down the ages rolls
and dies against Thy verge, Eternity!
— Translated by Lewis Piaget Shanks
The Beacons
Reubens, river of forgetfulness, garden of sloth,
Pillow of wet flesh that one cannot love,
But where life throngs and seethes without cease
Like the air in the sky and the water in the sea.
Leonardo da Vinci, sinister mirror,
Where these charming angels with sweet smiles
Charged with mystery, appear in shadows
Of glaciers and pines that close off the country.
Rembrandt, sad hospital full of murmurs
350
Decorated only with a crucifix,
Where tearful prayers arise from filth
And a ray of winter light crosses brusquely.
Michelangelo, a wasteland where one sees Hercules
Mingling with Christ, and rising in a straight line
Powerful phantoms that in the twilight
Tear their shrouds with stretching fingers.
Rage of a boxer, impudence of a faun,
You who gather together the beauty of the boor,
Your big heart swelling with pride at man defective and yellow,
Puget, melancholy emperor of the poor.
Watteau, this carnival of illustrious hearts
Like butterflies, errant and flamboyant,
In the cool decor, with delicate lightning in the chandeliers
Crossing the madness of the twirling ball.
Goya, nightmare of unknown things,
Fetuses roasting on the spit,
Harridans in the mirror and naked children
Tempting demons by loosening their stockings.
Delacroix, haunted lake of blood and evil angels,
Shaded by evergreen forests of dark firs,
Where, under a grieving sky, strange fanfares
Pass, like a gasping breath of Weber.
These curses, these blasphemies, these moans,
These ecstasies, these tears, these cries of 'Te Deum'
Are an echo reiterated in a thousand mazes;
It is for mortal hearts a divine opium!
It is a cry repeated by a thousand sentinels,
An order returned by a thousand megaphones,
A beacon lighting a thousand citadels
A summons to hunters lost in the wide woods.
For truly, O Lord, what better testimony
Can we give to our dignity
Than this burning sob that rolls from age to age
351
And comes to die on the shore of Your eternity?
Translated by William A. Sigler
~ Charles Baudelaire,

IN CHAPTERS [19/19]



   8 Integral Yoga
   3 Psychology
   3 Occultism
   2 Poetry
   2 Philosophy
   1 Fiction
   1 Alchemy


   6 The Mother
   4 Satprem
   3 Carl Jung
   2 Jean Gebser


   2 The Ever-Present Origin
   2 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious


0 1962-06-30, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I found out many, many things about Joan of Arcmany things. And with stunning precision, which made it extremely interesting. I wont repeat them because I dont remember with exactness, and these things have no value unless they are exact. And then, for the Italian Renaissance: Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa; and for the French Renaissance: Franois I, Marguerite de Valois,2 and so forth.
   Twice I knew that it wasnt just images but something that had happened to ME, but it took another form. Once (when I was older, around twenty) it happened at Versailles. I had been invited to dinner by a cousin who, with no warning, served me dry champagne during dinner and I drank it unsuspectingly (I who never drank at all, neither wine nor liquor!). When I had to get up and cross the crowded room, oh, how very difficult it became, so difficult! Then we went to a place near the chateau, with a view of the whole park. And I was staring at the park, when I saw I saw the park filling up with lights (the electric lights had vanished), with all kinds of lights, torches, lanterns and then crowds of people walking about in Louis XIV dress! I was staring at this with my eyes wide open, holding on to the balustrade to keep from falling down (I wasnt too sure of myself!). I was seeing it all, then I saw myself there, engrossed in conversation with some people (I dont remember now, but there were certain corrections here too). I mean I was a certain person (I dont remember who) and there were those two brothers who were sculptors (Mother vainly tries to recollect the names3) anyhow, all kinds of people were there and I saw myself talking, chatting. And I seem to have been sufficiently in control of myself, because when I related all that I had seen, there were some quite interesting details and corrections. That was one time.

0 1967-11-29, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   A painter? Leonardo da Vinci? (Laughing) But he had a beard!
   (To Sujata:) Do you know this person?

0 1969-05-10, #Agenda Vol 10, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Someone has sent a photo of the place where Leonardo da Vinci died. Would you be interested to see that?
   I know that place, I went there (Mother looks at the photo).
  --
   It has been said that Sri Aurobindo was Leonardo da Vinci but Sri Aurobindo never told me so.4 I dont know. Just as it has been often said I was Mona Lisa, but I know nothing about it (!)
   (Mother looks at the photo) Thats right. Which chteau is it?
  --
   Leonardo da Vinci left for France in 1515, and died there in 1519.
   A disciple once put this question to Sri Aurobindo: "is it true that the same consciousness that took the form of Leonardo da Vinci had previously manifested as Augustus Caesar, the first emperor of Rome? If so, will you please tell me what exactly Augustus Caesar stood for in the history of Europe and how Leonardo's work was connected with his?" Sri Aurobindo replied: "Augustus Caesar organised the life of the Roman Empire and it was this that made the framework of the first transmission of the Graeco-Roman civilisation to Europehe came for that work and the writings of Virgil and Horace and others helped greatly towards the success of his mission. After the interlude of the Middle Ages, this civilisation was reborn in a new mould in what is called the Renaissance, not in its life-aspects but in its intellectual aspects. It was therefore a supreme intellectual, Leonardo da Vinci, who took up again the work and summarised in himself the seeds of modern Europe."
   (Life, Literature and Yoga, p. 6, July 29, 1937)

05.12 - The Soul and its Journey, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   We may try to illustrate by examples, although it is a rather dangerous game and may tend to put into a too rigid and' mathematical formula something that is living and variable. Still it will serve to give a clearer picture of the matter. Napoleon, evidently was a child of Mahakali; and Caesar seems to have been fashioned largely by the principle of Maheshwari; while Christ or Chaitanya are clearly emanations in the line of Mahalakshmi. Constructive geniuses, on the other hand, like the great statesman Colbert, for example, or Louis XIV, Ie grand monarque, himself belong to a family (or gotra, as we say in India) that originated from Mahasaraswati. Poets and artists again, although generally they belong to the clan of Mahalakshmi, can be regrouped according to the principle that predominates in each, the godhead that presides over the inspiration in each. The large breath in Homer and Valmiki, the high and noble style of their movement, the dignity and vastness that compose their consciousness affiliate them naturally to the Maheshwari line. A Dante, on the other hand, or a Byron has something in his matter and manner that make us think of the stamp of Mahakali. Virgil or Petrarch, Shelley or our Tagore seem to be emanations of Beauty, Harmony, LoveMahalakshmi. And the perfect artisanship of Mahasaraswati has found its especial embodiment in Horace and Racine and our Kalidasa. Michael Angelo in his fury of inspirations seems to have been impelled by Mahakali, while Mahalakshmi sheds her genial favour upon Raphael and Titian; and the meticulous care and the detailed surety in a Tintoretto makes us think of Mahasaraswati's grace. Mahasaraswati too seems to have especially favoured Leonardo da Vinci, although a brooding presence of Maheshwari also seems to be intermixed there.
   For it must be remembered that the human soul after all is not a simple and unilateral being, it is a little cosmos in itself. The soul is not merely a point or a single ray of light come down straight from its divine archetype or from the Divine himself, it is also a developing fire that increases and enriches itself through the multiple experiences of an evolutionary progressionit not only grows in height but extends in wideness also. Even though it may originally emanate from one principle and Personality, it takes in for its development and fulfilment influences and elements from the others also. Indeed, we know that the Four primal personalities of the Divine are not separate and distinct as they may appear to the human mind which cannot understand distinction without disparity. The Vedic gods themselves are so linked together, so interpenetrate one another that finally it is asserted that there is only one existence, only it is given many names. All the divine personalities are aspects of the Divine blended and fused together. Even so the human soul, being a replica of the Divine, cannot but be a complex of many personalities and often it may be difficult and even harmful to find and fix upon a dominant personality. The full flowering of the human soul, its perfect divinisation demands the realisation of a many-aspected personality, the very richness of the Divine within it.

1.01 - Fundamental Considerations, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  Finally, we would emphasize the general validity of the term aperspectival; it is definitely not intended to be understood as an extension of concepts used in art history and should not be so construed. When we introduced the concept in 1936/1939, it was within the context of scientific as well as artistic traditions. The perspectival structure as fully realized by Leonardo da Vinci is of fundamental importance not only to our scientific-technological but also artistic understanding of the world. Without perspective neither technical drafting nor three-dimensional painting would have been possible. Leonardo - scientist, engineer, and artist in one - was the first to fully develop drafting techniques and perspectival painting. In this same sense, that is from a scientific as well as artistic standpoint, the term aperspectival is valid, and the basis for this significance must not be overlooked, for it legitimizes the validity and applicability of the term to the sciences, the humanities, and the arts.
  It is our intent to furnish evidence that the aperspectival world, whose nascence we are witnessing, can liberate us from the superannuated legacy of both the unperspectival and the perspectival worlds. In very general terms we might say that the unperspectival world preceded the world of mind- and ego-bound perspective discovered and anticipated in late antiquity and first apparent in Leonardos application of it. Viewed in this manner the unperspectival world is collective, the perspectival individualistic. That is, the unperspectival world is related to the anonymous one or the tribal we, the perspectival to the I or Ego; the one world is grounded in Being, the other, beginning with the Renaissance, in Having; the former is predominantly irrational, the later rational.

1.01 - What is Magick?, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
    (Illustrations: There may be failure to understand the case; as when a doctor makes a wrong diagnosis, and his treatment injures his patient. There may be failure to apply the right kind of force, as when a rustic tries to blow out an electric light. There may be failure to apply the right degree of force, as when a wrestler has his hold broken. There may be failure to apply the force in the right manner, as when one presents a cheque at the wrong window of the Bank. There may be failure to employ the correct medium, as when Leonardo da Vinci found his masterpiece fade away. The force may be applied to an unsuitable object, as when one tries to crack a stone, thinking it a nut.)
    4. The first requisite for causing any change is thorough qualitative and quantitative understanding of the condition.

1.02 - The Concept of the Collective Unconscious, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  certain picture by Leonardo da Vinci: St. Anne with the Virgin
  Mary and the Christ-child. Freud interprets this remarkable
  --
  2 Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood, sec. IV.
  44
  --
  need which is reflected in these motifs. If Leonardo da Vinci
  did in fact portray his two mothers in St. Anne and Mary

1.02 - The Three European Worlds, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  In the third decade of the fifteenth century, CenninoCennini wrote his celebrated Trattatadellapittura, the first theoretical treatise an art. The various investigations that had preceded his work, notably those by the friars of MountAthos, Heraclius and Theophilus, had been mere formularies. But Cennini, proceeding from a defense of Giotto's style, offers advice on techniques, suggestions for differentiating man from space, and instructions an rendering mountains and space by the use of gradations and shadings of color, thereby anticipating in principle the "aerial and colorperspectivity" of Leonardo da Vinci.
  About the same time, the brothers van Eyck began to bring increasing clarity and force to the perspectival technique of their painting, while a plethora of attempts at perspective by various other masters points up the need for spatializationon the one hand, and the difficulty of rendering it on the other. Numerous works by these frequently overlooked minor masters bear witness to the unprecedented inner struggle that occurred in artists of that generation of the fifteenth century during their attempts to master space. Their struggle is apparent from the perplexed and chaotic ventures into a perspectival technique which are replete with reversed, truncated, or partial perspective and other unsuccessful experiments. Such examples by the minor masters offer a trenchant example of the decisive process manifest by an increased spatial awareness: the artist's inner compulsion to render space which is only incompletely grasped and only gradually emerges out of his soul toward awareness and clear objectivation and his tenacity in the face of this problem because, however dimly, he has already perceived space.
  --
  This brings us back to our thesis about the antithetical nature of perspective; it locates the observer as well as the observed. Panofsky too underscores this dualistic, antithetical character: "The history of perspective [may be] considered equally as a triumph of the Sense of reality with its detachment and objectivation, and as a triumph of human striving for power with its negation of distances, just as it can be Seen as a process of establishing and systematization of the external world and an expansion of the ego sphere." Let us for now postpone a discussion of his critical term "power expansion," although he has here noted an essential aspect of perspectival man, and turn back to Leonardo da Vinci on whom Drer (as Heinrich Wlfflin points out) indirectly based his understanding.
  With Leonardo the perspectival means and techniques attain their perfection. His Trattatodella Pittura (a collection of his writings assembled by others after his death based on a mid-sixteenth-century compilation known as the Codex Vaticanus Urbinas 1270) is the first truly scientific and not merely theoretical description of all possible types of perspective. It is the first detailed discussion of light as the visible reality of our eyes and not, as was previously believed, as a symbol of the divine spirit. This emergent illumination dispels any remaining obscurities surrounding perspective, and reveals Leonardo as the courageous discoverer of aerial and color, as opposed to linear, perspective. Whereas linear perspective created the perspectival illusion on a plane surface by the projections of technical drafting, aerial and color perspective achieve their comprehension and rendering of space by techniques of gradation of color and hue, by the use of shadow, and by the chromatic treatment of the horizon.

1.03 - Concerning the Archetypes, with Special Reference to the Anima Concept, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  It was this motif that misled Freud in his study of Leonardo da Vinci. Without
  taking account of the fact that Leonardo was by no means the only artist to paint

1.09 - Fundamental Questions of Psycho therapy, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  dual mother motif in a dream of Leonardo da Vinci.
  [247]

1.12 - The Superconscient, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  A second, even more important observation commands our attention. To return to the rocket analogy: the rocket can break through the earth's atmosphere at any point, taking off either from New York or from the equator, and still reach the sun. There is no need to climb Mt. Everest to set up the launching pad! Similarly, the yogi can realize cosmic consciousness in any point, or at any level, of his being in his mind, in his heart, and even in his body because the cosmic Spirit is everywhere, in every point of the universe. The experience can begin anywhere, at any level, by concentrating on a rock or a sparrow, an idea, a prayer, a feeling, or what people scornfully call an idol. Cosmic consciousness is not the highest point of human consciousness; we do not go above the individual to reach it, but outside. It is hardly necessary to ascend in consciousness, or to become Plotinus, in order to attain the universal Spirit. On the contrary, the less mental one is, the easier it is to experience it; a shepherd beneath the stars or a fisherman of Galilee has a better chance at it than all the philosophers of the world put together. What, then, is the use of all this development of consciousness if folk-like mysticism works better? We must admit that either we are all on the wrong track, or else those mystical escapades do not represent the whole meaning of evolution. On the other hand, if we accept that the proper evolutionary course is that of the peak figures of earthly consciousness Leonardo da Vinci, Beethoven, Alexander the Great, Dante we are still forced to acknowledge that none of these great men has been able to transform life. Thus, the summits of the mind or the heart do not give us, any more than the cosmic summits, the key to the riddle and the power to change the world: another principle of consciousness is required. But it must be another principle without any break in continuity with the others, because if the line is broken or if the individual is lost, we fall back into cosmic or mystical dispersion, thereby losing our link with the earth. To be conscious of Oneness and of the Transcendent is certainly an indispensable basis for any realization (without which we might as well try to build a house without foundations), but it must be done in ways that respect evolutionary continuity; it must be an evolution, not a revolution. In other words, we must get out without getting out. Instead of a rocket that ends up crashing on the sun, we need a rocket that harpoons the Sun of the supreme consciousness and is able to bring it down to all points of our earthly consciousness: The ultimate knowledge is that which perceives and accepts God in the universe as well as beyond the universe and the integral Yoga is that which, having found the Transcendent, can return upon the universe and possess it, retaining the power freely to descend as well as ascend the great stair of existence.171 This double movement of ascent and descent of the individual consciousness is the basic principle of the supramental discovery. But in the process Sri Aurobindo was to touch an unknown spring which would change everything.
  

1929-07-28 - Art and Yoga - Art and life - Music, dance - World of Harmony, #Questions And Answers 1929-1931, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Art is nothing less in its fundamental truth than the aspect of beauty of the Divine manifestation. Perhaps, looking from this standpoint, there will be found very few true artists; but still there are some and these can very well be considered as Yogis. For like a Yogi an artist goes into deep contemplation to await and receive his inspiration. To create something truly beautiful, he has first to see it within, to realise it as a whole in his inner consciousness; only when so found, seen, held within, can he execute it outwardly; he creates according to this greater inner vision. This too is a kind of yogic discipline, for by it he enters into intimate communion with the inner worlds. A man like Leonardo da Vinci was a Yogi and nothing else. And he was, if not the greatest, at least one of the greatest painters,although his art did not stop at painting alone.
  Music too is an essentially spiritual art and has always been associated with religious feeling and an inner life. But, here too, we have turned it into something independent and self-sufficient, a mushroom art, such as is operatic music. Most of the artistic productions we come across are of this kind and at best interesting from the point of view of technique. I do not say that even operatic music cannot be used as a medium of a higher art expression; for whatever the form, it can be made to serve a deeper purpose. All depends on the thing itself, on how it is used, on what is behind it. There is nothing that cannot be used for the Divine purposejust as anything can pretend to be the Divine and yet be of the mushroom species.

1951-04-09 - Modern Art - Trend of art in Europe in the twentieth century - Effect of the Wars - descent of vital worlds - Formation of character - If there is another war, #Questions And Answers 1950-1951, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   It must be said that the art of the end of the last century, the art of the Second Empire, was bad. It was an age of businessmen, above all an age of bankers, financiers, and taste, upon my word, had gone very low. I dont believe that businessmen are people necessarily very competent in art, but when they wanted their portrait, they wanted a likeness! One could not leave out the least detail, it was quite comic: But you know I have a little wrinkle there, dont forget to put it in! and the lady who said, You know, you must make my shoulders quite round, and so on. So the artists made portraits which indeed turned into photography. They were flat, cold, without soul and without vision. I can name a number of artists of that period, it was truly a shame for art. This lasted till about the end of the last century, till about 1875. Afterwards, there started the reaction. Then there was an entire very beautiful period (I dont say this because I myself was painting) but all the artists I then knew were truly artists, they were serious and did admirable things which have remained admirable. It was the period of the impressionists; it was the period of Manet, it was a beautiful period, they did beautiful things. But people tire of beautiful things as they tire of bad ones. So there were those who wanted to found the Salon dAutomne. They wanted to surpass the others, go more towards the new, towards the truly anti-photographic. And my goodness, they went a little beyond the limit (according to my taste). They began to depreciate RembrandtRembrandt was a dauber, Titian was a dauber, all the great painters of the Italian Renaissance were daubers. You were not to pronounce the name of Raphael, it was a shame. And all the great period of the Italian Renaissance was not worth very much; even the works of Leonardo da Vinci; You know, you must take them and leave them. Then they went a little further; they wanted something entirely new, they became extravagant. And then, from there, there was only one more step to take for the palette-scrapings and then it was finished.
   This is the history of art as I knew it.

1953-10-28, #Questions And Answers 1953, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Why are todays painters not so good as those of the days of Leonardo da Vinci?
   Because human evolution goes in spirals. I have explained this.1 I said that art had become an altogether mercenary affair, obscure and ignorant, from the beginning of the last century till its middle. It had become something very commercial and quite remote from the true sense of art. And so, naturally, the artistic spirit does not come! It followed bad forms, yet it tried to manifest to counteract the degradation of taste which prevailed. But naturally, as with every movement of Nature in man, some having gone to one extreme, others went to the other extreme; and as these made a sort of servile copy of lifenot even that, in those days it was called a photographic view of things, but now one can no longer say that, for photography has progressed so much that it would be doing it an injustice to say this, wouldnt it? Photography has become artistic; so a picture cannot be criticised by calling it photographic; nor can one call it realistic any longer, for there is a realistic painting which is not at all like that but it was conventional, artificial and without any true life, so the reaction was to the very opposite, and naturally to another absurdity: art was no longer to express physical life but mental life or vital life. And so came all the schools, like the Cubists and others, who created from their head. But in art it is not the head that dominates, it is the feeling for beauty. And they produced absurd and ridiculous and frightful things. Now they have gone farther still, but that, that is due to the warswith every war there descends upon earth a world in decomposition which produces a sort of chaos. And some, of course, find all this very beautiful and admire it very much.

1.pbs - On The Medusa Of Leonardo da Vinci In The Florentine Gallery, #Shelley - Poems, #Percy Bysshe Shelley, #Fiction
  object:1.pbs - On The Medusa Of Leonardo da Vinci In The Florentine Gallery
  author class:Percy Bysshe Shelley

1.ww - The Last Supper, by Leonardo da Vinci, in the Refectory of the Convent of Maria della GraziaMilan, #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Integral Yoga
  object:1.ww - The Last Supper, by Leonardo da Vinci, in the Refectory of the Convent of Maria della GraziaMilan
  author class:William Wordsworth

Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  still engraved on chalices. The bestiary by Leonardo da Vinci
  describes the Pelican in this way:

Talks With Sri Aurobindo 2, #Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Integral Yoga
  PURANI: Coomaraswamy says Leonardo da Vinci followed tradition, there
  is no stamp of personality on his art.

The Dwellings of the Philosophers, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  (16) Leonardo da Vinci used and taught it, transporting it from the mystical domain to that of aesthetic
  morphology.

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun leonardo_da_vinci

The noun leonardo da vinci has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci ::: (Italian painter and sculptor and engineer and scientist and architect; the most versatile genius of the Italian Renaissance (1452-1519))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun leonardo_da_vinci

1 sense of leonardo da vinci                      

Sense 1
Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci
   INSTANCE OF=> old master
     => painter
       => artist, creative person
         => creator
           => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
             => organism, being
               => living thing, animate thing
                 => whole, unit
                   => object, physical object
                     => physical entity
                       => entity
             => causal agent, cause, causal agency
               => physical entity
                 => entity
     => maestro, master
       => artist, creative person
         => creator
           => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
             => organism, being
               => living thing, animate thing
                 => whole, unit
                   => object, physical object
                     => physical entity
                       => entity
             => causal agent, cause, causal agency
               => physical entity
                 => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> sculptor, sculpturer, carver, statue maker
     => artist, creative person
       => creator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> engineer, applied scientist, technologist
     => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
       => organism, being
         => living thing, animate thing
           => whole, unit
             => object, physical object
               => physical entity
                 => entity
       => causal agent, cause, causal agency
         => physical entity
           => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> architect, designer
     => creator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun leonardo_da_vinci
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun leonardo_da_vinci

1 sense of leonardo da vinci                      

Sense 1
Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci
   INSTANCE OF=> old master
   INSTANCE OF=> sculptor, sculpturer, carver, statue maker
   INSTANCE OF=> engineer, applied scientist, technologist
   INSTANCE OF=> architect, designer




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun leonardo_da_vinci

1 sense of leonardo da vinci                      

Sense 1
Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci
  -> old master
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bosch, Hieronymus Bosch, Jerom Bos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Botticelli, Sandro Botticelli, Alessandro di Mariano dei Filipepi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brueghel, Breughel, Bruegel, Pieter Brueghel, Pieter Breughel, Pieter Bruegel, Breughel the Elder, Pieter Brueghel the Elder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caravaggio, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cimabue, Giovanni Cimabue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Correggio, Antonio Allegri da Correggio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durer, Albrecht Durer
   HAS INSTANCE=> El Greco, Greco, Domenikos Theotocopoulos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eyck, van Eyck, Jan van Eyck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giotto, Giotto di Bondone
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hals, Frans Hals
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hogarth, William Hogarth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holbein, Hans Holbein, Holbein the Elder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holbein, Hans Holbein, Holbein the Younger
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Tour, Georges de La Tour
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lippi, Fra Filippo Lippi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lippi, Filippino Lippi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michelangelo, Michelangelo Buonarroti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poussin, Nicolas Poussin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Raphael, Raffaello Santi, Raffaello Sanzio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rembrandt, Rembrandt van Rijn, Rembrandt van Ryn, Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Renoir, Pierre Auguste Renoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rubens, Peter Paul Rubens, Sir Peter Paul Rubens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steen, Jan Steen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Titian, Tiziano Vecellio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vandyke, Van Dyck, Anthony Vandyke, Sir Anthony Vandyke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Velazquez, Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velazquez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vermeer, Jan Vermeer, Jan van der Meer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Veronese, Paolo Veronese, Paola Caliari
   HAS INSTANCE=> Watteau, Jean Antoine Watteau
  -> sculptor, sculpturer, carver, statue maker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Praxiteles
   => sculptress
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bartholdi, Frederic Auguste Bartholdi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bernini, Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brancusi, Constantin Brancusi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calder, Alexander Calder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cellini, Benvenuto Cellini
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crawford, Thomas Crawford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Donatello, Donato di Betto Bardi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epstein, Jacob Epstein, Sir Jacob Epstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> French, Daniel Chester French
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giacometti, Alberto Giacometti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hepworth, Barbara Hepworth, Dame Barbara Hepworth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffman, Malvina Hoffman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lachaise, Gaston Lachaise
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lin, Maya Lin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lipchitz, Jacques Lipchitz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lysippus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maillol, Aristide Maillol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michelangelo, Michelangelo Buonarroti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Modigliani, Amedeo Modigliano
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, Henry Moore, Henry Spencer Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nevelson, Louise Nevelson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Noguchi, Isamu Noguchi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oldenburg, Claes Oldenburg, Claes Thure Oldenburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Phidias, Pheidias
   HAS INSTANCE=> Picasso, Pablo Picasso
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rodin, Auguste Rodin, Francois Auguste Rene Rodin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Segal, George Segal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smith, David Smith, David Roland Smith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Taft, Lorado Taft
  -> engineer, applied scientist, technologist
   => aeronautical engineer
   => aerospace engineer
   => army engineer, military engineer
   => automotive engineer
   => civil engineer
   => electrical engineer
   => marine engineer, naval engineer
   => mechanical engineer
   => metallurgist, metallurgical engineer
   => mining engineer
   => programmer, computer programmer, coder, software engineer
   => rocket engineer, rocket scientist
   => surveyor
   HAS INSTANCE=> Daimler, Gottlieb Daimler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diesel, Rudolf Diesel, Rudolf Christian Karl Diesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Donkin, Bryan Donkin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eiffel, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuller, Buckminster Fuller, R. Buckminster Fuller, Richard Buckminster Fuller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethals, George Washington Goethals
   HAS INSTANCE=> Junkers, Hugo Junkers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kettering, Charles Kettering, Charles Franklin Kettering
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roebling, John Roebling, John Augustus Roebling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shannon, Claude Shannon, Claude E. Shannon, Claude Elwood Shannon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Siemens, Karl Wilhelm Siemens, Sir Charles William Siemens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sperry, Elmer Ambrose Sperry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trevithick, Richard Trevithick
   HAS INSTANCE=> Watson, Thomas Augustus Watson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Watt, James Watt
  -> architect, designer
   => landscape architect, landscape gardener, landscaper, landscapist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aalto, Alvar Aalto, Hugo Alvar Henrik Aalto
   HAS INSTANCE=> Adam, Robert Adam
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alberti, Leon Battista Alberti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Behrens, Peter Behrens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Berlage, Hendrik Petrus Berlage
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bernini, Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bramante, Donato Bramante, Donato d'Agnolo Bramante
   HAS INSTANCE=> Breuer, Marcel Lajos Breuer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brunelleschi, Filippo Brunelleschi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bullfinch, Charles Bullfinch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnham, Daniel Hudson Burnham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butterfield, William Butterfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carrere, John Merven Carrere
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chambers, William Chambers, Sir William Chambers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Delorme, Philibert Delorme, de l'Orme, Philibert de l'Orme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuller, Buckminster Fuller, R. Buckminster Fuller, Richard Buckminster Fuller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garnier, Jean Louis Charles Garnier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaudi, Antonio Gaudi, Gaudi i Cornet, Antonio Gaudi i Cornet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gilbert, Cass Gilbert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giotto, Giotto di Bondone
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gropius, Walter Gropius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hastings, Thomas Hastings
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, Josef Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Horta, Victor Horta
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Richard Morris Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jenny, William Le Baron Jenny
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jones, Inigo Jones
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kahn, Louis Isadore Kahn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Labrouste, Henri Labrouste
   HAS INSTANCE=> Latrobe, Benjamin Henry Latrobe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Le Corbusier, Charles Edouard Jeanneret
   HAS INSTANCE=> L'Enfant, Charles L'Enfant, Pierre Charles L'Enfant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, da Vinci
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lin, Maya Lin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Loos, Adolf Loos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lutyens, Sir Edwin Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer Luytens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansart, Francois Mansart
   HAS INSTANCE=> McKim, Charles Follen McKim
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mendelsohn, Erich Mendelsohn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michelangelo, Michelangelo Buonarroti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mies Van Der Rohe, Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mills, Robert Mills
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nervi, Pier Luigi Nervi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Palladio, Andrea Palladio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paxton, Joseph Paxton, Sir Joseph Paxton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pei, I. M. Pei, Ieoh Ming Pei
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pugin, Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richardson, Henry Hobson Richardson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saarinen, Eero Saarinen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saarinen, Eliel Saarinen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Soufflot, Jacques Germain Soufflot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Speer, Albert Speer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stone, Edward Durell Stone
   HAS INSTANCE=> Strickland, William Strickland
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sullivan, Louis Sullivan, Louis Henry Sullivan, Louis Henri Sullivan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tange, Kenzo Tange
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thornton, William Thornton
   => Town, Ithiel Town
   HAS INSTANCE=> Upjohn, Richard Upjohn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vanbrugh, John Vanbrugh, Sir John Vanbrigh
   HAS INSTANCE=> van de Velde, Henri van de Velde, Henri Clemens van de Velde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Venturi, Robert Venturi, Robert Charles Venturi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wagner, Otto Wagner
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Stanford White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wren, Sir Christopher Wren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Frank Lloyd Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wyatt, James Wyatt




--- Grep of noun leonardo_da_vinci
leonardo da vinci



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First-person shooter
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