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object:Seneca
class:author
subject class:Philosophy
subject:Philosophy

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Enchiridion_text
Infinite_Library
Letters_from_a_Stoic
On_the_Shortness_of_Life

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.04_-_The_First_Circle,_Limbo__Virtuous_Pagans_and_the_Unbaptized._The_Four_Poets,_Homer,_Horace,_Ovid,_and_Lucan._The_Noble_Castle_of_Philosophy.
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.ww_-_Ode_to_Duty
2.01_-_On_Books
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
COSA_-_BOOK_V
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Immortal
Timaeus

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Seneca

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Seneca: (4-65 A.D.) A Roman Stoic and instructor of Nero, who ernphasised the distinction between the soul and body and developed the ethical elements of Stoicism. -- R.B.W.

Seneca in his Quaestiones Naturalis (2:41) states that there is a more sublime Council of Divinities, superior even to Jupiter and the twelve dii consentes, whose combined will and intelligence govern even the deliberations of Jupiter and the twelve great consenting gods. See also SATYAS

Seneca {Oberon-V}

senecas ::: n. pl. --> A tribe of Indians who formerly inhabited a part of Western New York. This tribe was the most numerous and most warlike of the Five Nations.


TERMS ANYWHERE

Seneca: (4-65 A.D.) A Roman Stoic and instructor of Nero, who ernphasised the distinction between the soul and body and developed the ethical elements of Stoicism. -- R.B.W.

Seneca in his Quaestiones Naturalis (2:41) states that there is a more sublime Council of Divinities, superior even to Jupiter and the twelve dii consentes, whose combined will and intelligence govern even the deliberations of Jupiter and the twelve great consenting gods. See also SATYAS

Seneca {Oberon-V}

Oberon "language" A {strongly typed} {procedural} programming language and an operating environment evolved from {Modula-2} by {Nicklaus Wirth} in 1988. Oberon adds type extension ({inheritance}), extensible record types, multidimensional open arrays, and {garbage collection}. It eliminates {variant records}, {enumeration types}, {subranges}, lower array indices and {for loops}. A successor called Oberon-2 by H. Moessenboeck features a handful of extensions to Oberon including type-bound procedures ({methods}). Seneca is a variant of Oberon focussing on numerical programming under development by R. Griesemer in April 1993 (to be renamed). See also {Ceres workstation Oberon System}. {(http://oberon.ethz.ch)}. {(http://math.tau.ac.il/~laden/Oberon.html)}. {Free ETH Oberon (ftp://ftp.inf.ethz.ch/pub/Oberon)}. {MS-DOS (ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/mirrors/msdos/pgmutl/)}. {Amiga (ftp://ftp.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/amiga/fish/ff380)}. ["The Programming Language Oberon", N. Wirth, Soft Prac & Exp 18(7):671-690 July 1988]. ["Programming in Oberon: Steps Beyond Pascal and Modula", M. Reiser & N. Wirth, A-W 1992]. ["Project Oberon: the design of an operating system and compiler", N. Wirth & J. Gutknecht, ACM Press 1992]. ["The Oberon Companion: A Guide to Using and Programming Oberon System 3", André Fischer, Hannes Marais, vdf Verlag der Fachhochschulen, Zurich, 1997, ISBN 3-7281-2493-1. Includes CD-ROM for Windows, Linux, Macintosh and PC Native]. (1998-03-14)

Oberon ::: (language) A strongly typed procedural programming language and an operating environment evolved from Modula-2 by Nicklaus Wirth in 1988. Oberon open arrays, and garbage collection. It eliminates variant records, enumeration types, subranges, lower array indices and for loops.A successor called Oberon-2 by H. Moessenboeck features a handful of extensions to Oberon including type-bound procedures (methods).Seneca is a variant of Oberon focussing on numerical programming under development by R. Griesemer in April 1993 (to be renamed).See also Ceres workstation Oberon System. . . .[The Programming Language Oberon, N. Wirth, Soft Prac & Exp 18(7):671-690 July 1988].[Programming in Oberon: Steps Beyond Pascal and Modula, M. Reiser & N. Wirth, A-W 1992].[Project Oberon: the design of an operating system and compiler, N. Wirth & J. Gutknecht, ACM Press 1992].[The Oberon Companion: A Guide to Using and Programming Oberon System 3, Andr� Fischer, Hannes Marais, vdf Verlag der Fachhochschulen, Zurich, 1997, ISBN 3-7281-2493-1. Includes CD-ROM for Windows, Linux, Macintosh and PC Native]. (1998-03-14)

Oberon-V (Formerly Seneca). R. Griesemer, 1990. Descendant of Oberon designed for numerical applications on supercomputers, especially vector or pipelined architectures. Includes array constructors and an ALL statement. "Seneca - A Language for Numerical Applications on Vectorcomputers", Proc CONPAR 90 - VAPP IV Conf. R. Griesemer, Diss Nr. 10277, ETH Zurich.

Oberon-V ::: (Formerly Seneca). R. Griesemer, 1990. Descendant of Oberon designed for numerical applications on supercomputers, especially vector or pipelined Language for Numerical Applications on Vectorcomputers, Proc CONPAR 90 - VAPP IV Conf. R. Griesemer, Diss Nr. 10277, ETH Zurich.

polygala ::: n. --> A genus of bitter herbs or shrubs having eight stamens and a two-celled ovary (as the Seneca snakeroot, the flowering wintergreen, etc.); milkwort.

senecas ::: n. pl. --> A tribe of Indians who formerly inhabited a part of Western New York. This tribe was the most numerous and most warlike of the Five Nations.

senega ::: n. --> Seneca root.

senegin ::: n. --> A substance extracted from the rootstock of the Polygala Senega (Seneca root), and probably identical with polygalic acid.

tribe ::: n. --> A family, race, or series of generations, descending from the same progenitor, and kept distinct, as in the case of the twelve tribes of Israel, descended from the twelve sons of Jacob.
A number of species or genera having certain structural characteristics in common; as, a tribe of plants; a tribe of animals.
A nation of savages or uncivilized people; a body of rude people united under one leader or government; as, the tribes of the Six Nations; the Seneca tribe.




QUOTES [54 / 54 - 1500 / 2837]


KEYS (10k)

   47 Seneca
   5 Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   1 Seneca: Epistles
   1 Seneca: De Providentia

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  793 Seneca the Younger
  630 Seneca
   40 Seneca the Elder
   7 Ryan Holiday
   5 Timothy Ferriss
   4 Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   2 Suzanne Collins

1:One should count each day a separate life. ~ Seneca,
2:If you wished to be loved, love.
   ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
3:It is the power of the mind to be unconquerable." ~ Seneca,
4:Love in its essence is spiritual fire. ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
5:Sometimes even to live is an act of courage ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
6:If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favourable.
   ~ Seneca,
7:Begin at once to live, and count each separate day as a separate life.
   ~ Seneca, [T5],
8:Thyself vindicate thyself. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
9:No man is crushed by misfortune unless he has first been deceived by prosperity ~ Seneca,
10:It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor." ~ Seneca,
11:Wisdom is a thing vast and grand. She demands all the time that one can consecrate to her. ~ Seneca,
12:Our true glory and true riches are within. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
13:For what is God? He is the soul of the universe. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
14:Let us think that we are born for the common good. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
15:Life is like a play: it's not the length, but the excellence of the acting that matters. ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
16:For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them. ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
17:Fortune fears the brave soul; she crushes the coward. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
18:All the accidents of life can be turned to our profit. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
19:Would you call Him Destiny? You will not be wrong. Providence? You will say well. Nature? That too you may. ~ Seneca,
20:Let us lend ear to the sages who point out to us the way. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
21:He is the happy man whose soul is superior to all happenings. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
22:Hold tight to your own time, hour after hour; you will not depend on the future if you grasp the present in hand. ~ Seneca,
23: Deliver thyself from the inconstancy of human things. ~ Seneca: De Providentia, the Eternal Wisdom
24:I call him a man who recognises no possessions save those he finds in himself. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
25:It is extravagance to ask of others what can be procured by oneself. ~ Seneca: Epistles, the Eternal Wisdom
26:A happy life is the fruit of wisdom achieved; life bearable, of wisdom commenced. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
27:How can the soul which misunderstands itself, have a sure idea of other creatures? ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
28:Wisdom is a thing vast and grand. She demands all the time that one can consecrate to her. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
29:Your greatness is within and only in yourselves can you find a spectacle worthy of your regard. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
30:et the soul be submitted within to an upright judge whose authority extends over our most secret actions. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
31:Would you call Him Destiny? You will not be wrong. Providence? You will say well. Nature? That too you may. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
32:Take care that the reading of numerous writers and books of all kinds does not confuse and trouble thy reason. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
33:The perfection of virtue consists in a certain equality of soul and of conduct which should remain un-alterable. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
34:e should follow the law which Nature has engraved in our hearts. Wisdom lies in the perfect observation of her law. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
35:The least indigent mortal is the one who desires the least. We have everything we wish when we wish only for what is sufficient. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
36:Life is not short if it is filled. The way to fill it is to compel the soul to enjoy its own wealth and to become its own master. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
37:All this universe, and in that word are comprised things divine and human, all is only one great body of which we are the members. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
38:Let us attach ourselves to a solid good, to a good that shines within and not externally. Let us devote all our efforts to its discovery. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
39:If man thinks only of himself and seeks everywhere his own profit, he cannot be happy. If thou wouldst really live for thyself, live for others. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
40:If the soul would give itself leisure to take breath and return into itself, it would be easy for it to draw from its own depths the seeds of the true. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
41:Many things are wanting to indigence, but everything is wanting to greed. A covetous man is useful to none and still less is he of any good to himself. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
42:The sage should be figured in the image of a robust athlete whom long exercise has hardened, one who can baffle the efforts of the most obstinate enemy. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
43:he sovereign good has its abode in the soul; when that is upright, attentive to its duties, shut in upon itself, it has nothing to desire, it enjoys a perfect happiness. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
44:The soul will enjoy veritable felicity when, separating itself from the darkness which surrounds it, it is able to contemplate with a sure gaze the divine light at its source. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
45:Let us take care above all not to walk like a flock of sheep each in the other's traces; let us inform ourselves rather of the place where we ought to go than of that where others are going. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
46:Let us have always in our hearts this thought: I am a man and nothing that interests humanity is foreign to me. We have a common birth; our society resembles the stones of a road that sustain each other. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
47:The sage here surpasses God. God fears nothing by the benefit of his nature; the sage fears nothing, but by the sole strength of his spirit. This indeed is great, to have the weakness of a mortal and yet the fearlessness of a god. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
48:There is no peace for the man who is troubled with thought for the future, makes himself unhappy before even unhappiness comes to him and claims to assure till the end of his life his possession of the objects to which he is attached. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
49:Any truth, I maintain, is my own property. And I shall continue to heap quotations from Epicurus upon you, so that all persons who swear by the words of another, and put a value upon the speaker and not upon the thing spoken, may understand that the best ideas are common property. Farewell. ~ Seneca,
50:Nothing is so dangerous as the habit we have of referring to a common opinion. So long as one trusts other people without taking the trouble to judge for oneself, one lives by the faith of others, error is passed on from hand to hand and example destroys us. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
51:Nature has given us strengths in sufficiency, if only we choose to avail ourselves of them and if we collect and employ them all to our profit instead of turning them against ourselves. Our ill will is the cause of what we attri bute to a pretended impossibility. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
52:Who is worthy of the name of Man and of Roman who does not want to be tested and does not look for a dangerous task? For the strong man inaction is torture. There is only one sight able to command the attention even of a god, and it is that of a strong man battling with bad luck, especially if he has himself challenged it. ~ Seneca,
53:We shall labour to our last sigh, we shall never cease from contri buting to the common good, serving every individual, helping even our enemies, exercising our talents and our industry. We know not an age destined to repose and, like the heroes of whom Virgil tells, our hair grows white under the helmet. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
54:The duty of man is to be useful to men: to a great number if he can, if not, to a small number, otherwise to his neighbours, otherwise to himself : in making himself useful to himself, he works for others. As the vicious man injures not only himself but also those to whom he might have been useful if he had been virtuous, likewise in labouring for oneself one labours also for others, since there is formed a man who can be of use to them. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Seneca devoted much of his time to writing essays in praise of poverty, and in lending money at usurious rates. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
2:Make your own Bible. Select and collect all the words and sentences that in all your reading have been to you like the blast of triumph out of Shakespeare, Seneca, Moses, John and Paul. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Men learn as they teach. ~ Seneca,
2:O tempo revela a verdade. ~ Seneca,
3:Paucis natura contenta est ~ Seneca,
4:Thyself vindicate thyself. ~ Seneca,
5:Time flies on fickle wings ~ Seneca,
6:Timendi causa est nescire. ~ Seneca,
7:fallaces sunt rerum species ~ Seneca,
8:Life is short, art is long. ~ Seneca,
9:Omnes feriunt, ultima necat ~ Seneca,
10:Beyond all things is the sea ~ Seneca,
11:If you are wise, ~ Seneca the Younger,
12:longa est vita si plena est. ~ Seneca,
13:Omnes feriunt, ultima necat. ~ Seneca,
14:Injustice never rules forever ~ Seneca,
15:Nothing is ours, except time. ~ Seneca,
16:Res severa est verum gaudium. ~ Seneca,
17:vita nec bonum nec malum est. ~ Seneca,
18:If you wish to be loved, love. ~ Seneca,
19:No man was ever wise by chance ~ Seneca,
20:One day is equal to every day. ~ Seneca,
21:Time heals what reason cannot. ~ Seneca,
22:Ignorance is the cause of fear. ~ Seneca,
23:Když lidé vyučují, sami se učí. ~ Seneca,
24:La vera gioia è una cosa seria. ~ Seneca,
25:Love of bustle is not industry. ~ Seneca,
26:Maximum remedium est irae mora. ~ Seneca,
27:Non scholae sed vitae discimus. ~ Seneca,
28:Non vitae, sed scholae discimus. ~ Seneca,
29:To be everywhere; is to nowhere. ~ Seneca,
30:Ungoverned anger begets madness. ~ Seneca,
31:Praise thyself never. ~ Seneca the Younger,
32:Time discovers truth. ~ Seneca the Younger,
33:to be everywhere is to be nowhere ~ Seneca,
34:Truth never perishes. ~ Seneca the Younger,
35:You are your choices. ~ Seneca the Younger,
36:All cruelty springs from weakness. ~ Seneca,
37:Everything may happen. ~ Seneca the Younger,
38:Imperare sibi maximum imperium est ~ Seneca,
39:Learn how to feel joy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
40:The best ideas are common property ~ Seneca,
41:The sun also shines on the wicked. ~ Seneca,
42:To be everywhere is to be nowhere. ~ Seneca,
43:To be everywhere; is to be nowhere ~ Seneca,
44:Ignorance is no cure for suffering. ~ Seneca,
45:Man is a social animal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
46:Qui mori didicit servire dedidicit. ~ Seneca,
47:To be everywhere; is to be nowhere. ~ Seneca,
48:While we wait for life, life passes ~ Seneca,
49:Find a path or make one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
50:He who is brave is free. ~ Seneca the Younger,
51:Homo sit naturaliter animal socialis ~ Seneca,
52:Quam bene vivas refert, non quam diu ~ Seneca,
53:Sva surovost proizilazi iz slabosti. ~ Seneca,
54:Tanrı'ya yakın olmak sarsılmamaktır. ~ Seneca,
55:A great mind becomes a great fortune. ~ Seneca,
56:Every journey has an end. ~ Seneca the Younger,
57:If you gain from a crime, you did it. ~ Seneca,
58:Non est ad astra mollis e terris via. ~ Seneca,
59:Nothing is our except time. ~ Seneca the Elder,
60:One must steer, not talk. ~ Seneca the Younger,
61:reading of many books is distraction. ~ Seneca,
62:The miserable are sacred. ~ Seneca the Younger,
63:We pardon familiar vices. ~ Seneca the Younger,
64:While we teach, we learn. ~ Seneca the Younger,
65:If you judge, investigate. ~ Seneca the Younger,
66:Love in its essence is spiritual fire. ~ Seneca,
67:Mad men work for their own destruction ~ Seneca,
68:Man is a reasoning Animal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
69:One hand washes the other. ~ Seneca the Younger,
70:Only time can heal what reason cannot. ~ Seneca,
71:True love can fear no one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
72:Ducunt volentem fata, nolentem trahunt. ~ Seneca,
73:Kingdoms which act unjustly never last. ~ Seneca,
74:Learning how to live takes a whole life ~ Seneca,
75:Life is long if it is full. ~ Seneca the Younger,
76:Life is long if you know how to use it. ~ Seneca,
77:Luck never made a man wise. ~ Seneca the Younger,
78:Men learn while they teach. ~ Seneca the Younger,
79:Mercy often inflicts death. ~ Seneca the Younger,
80:mors quid est? aut finis aut transitus. ~ Seneca,
81:Revenge is an inhuman word. ~ Seneca the Younger,
82:Whatever begins, also ends. ~ Seneca the Younger,
83:What is true belongs to me! ~ Seneca the Younger,
84:While we are postponing, life speeds by ~ Seneca,
85:While you teach, you learn. ~ Seneca the Younger,
86:Excellence withers without an adversary. ~ Seneca,
87:If you want to be loved, love. ~ Seneca the Elder,
88:Life is long, if you know how to use it. ~ Seneca,
89:Nothing is ours except time. ~ Seneca the Younger,
90:Real joy, believe me, is a stern matter. ~ Seneca,
91:To the believers it is true. ~ Seneca the Younger,
92:We learn not in the school, but in life. ~ Seneca,
93:What else is nature but God? ~ Seneca the Younger,
94:While we are postponing, life speeds by. ~ Seneca,
95:After death there is nothing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
96:As the world leads we follow. ~ Seneca the Younger,
97:Restless people often pretend to be calm. ~ Seneca,
98:Teach the art of living well. ~ Seneca the Younger,
99:Truth often harms the one who digs it up. ~ Seneca,
100:Unblest is he who thinks himself unblest. ~ Seneca,
101:Who scorns his own life is lord of yours. ~ Seneca,
102:Chi è dappertutto, non è da nessuna parte. ~ Seneca,
103:Golden roofs break men's rest. ~ Seneca the Younger,
104:He who spares the wicked injures the good. ~ Seneca,
105:He worships God who knows him. ~ Seneca the Younger,
106:If you wish to be loved, love. ~ Seneca the Younger,
107:Injustice never rules forever. ~ Seneca the Younger,
108:Life is short and art is long. ~ Seneca the Younger,
109:Nobody becomes guilty by fate. ~ Seneca the Younger,
110:No man was ever wise by chance” “Associate ~ Seneca,
111:Our true glory and true riches are within. ~ Seneca,
112:To be everywhere, is to be no where at all ~ Seneca,
113:Withdraw into yourself, as far as you can. ~ Seneca,
114:A man’s past is forever set in stone. There ~ Seneca,
115:An unpopular rule is never long maintained. ~ Seneca,
116:Bohatství chytrému slouží, hloupému vládne. ~ Seneca,
117:Cui prodest scelus, is fecit ...
(Medea) ~ Seneca,
118:Fire tests gold, suffering tests brave men. ~ Seneca,
119:Full of men, vacant of friends. ~ Seneca the Younger,
120:If you would judge, understand. ~ Seneca the Younger,
121:Ignorance is the cause of fear. ~ Seneca the Younger,
122:Love of action is not industry. ~ Seneca the Younger,
123:Nemo tam divos habuit faventes, ~ Seneca the Younger,
124:No man was ever wise by chance. ~ Seneca the Younger,
125:No one can have all he desires. ~ Seneca the Younger,
126:No one can keep a mask on long. ~ Seneca the Younger,
127:philosophy teaches us to act, not to speak; ~ Seneca,
128:Self-denial is the best riches. ~ Seneca the Younger,
129:That which is enough is ready to our hands. ~ Seneca,
130:The greatest wealth is a poverty of desires ~ Seneca,
131:The one who knows no hope knows no despair. ~ Seneca,
132:The present alone can make no man wretched. ~ Seneca,
133:There's thunder even on the loftiest peaks. ~ Seneca,
134:While we are postponing,
life speeds by. ~ Seneca,
135:A good mind possesses a kingdom. ~ Seneca the Younger,
136:All art is an imitation of nature. ~ Seneca the Elder,
137:Be harsh with yourself at times. ~ Seneca the Younger,
138:Drunkenness is nothing but voluntary madness ~ Seneca,
139:He who is everywhere is nowhere. ~ Seneca the Younger,
140:Home joys are blessed of heaven. ~ Seneca the Younger,
141:Men practice war; beasts do not. ~ Seneca the Younger,
142:Necessity is stronger than duty. ~ Seneca the Younger,
143:Non impariamo per la scuola, ma per la vita. ~ Seneca,
144:Simple is the language of truth. ~ Seneca the Younger,
145:Sometimes even to live is an act of courage. ~ Seneca,
146:Speech is the index of the mind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
147:The sun also shines on the wicked. ~ Seneca the Elder,
148:What fortune has made yours is not your own. ~ Seneca,
149:Where fear is, happiness is not. ~ Seneca the Younger,
150:As many servants so many enemies. ~ Seneca the Younger,
151:Calamity is virtue's opportunity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
152:Forgive that you may be forgiven. ~ Seneca the Younger,
153:If you want to keep a secret, never share it. ~ Seneca,
154:I would rather be sick than idle. ~ Seneca the Younger,
155:Life is long, if only you knew how to use it. ~ Seneca,
156:Men's language is as their lives. ~ Seneca the Younger,
157:Sometimes, even to live is an act of courage. ~ Seneca,
158:Speech is the mirror of the mind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
159:The best cure for anger is delay. ~ Seneca the Younger,
160:the more a mind takes in the more it expands. ~ Seneca,
161:Unblest is he who thinks himself unblest.[15] ~ Seneca,
162:Who has more leisure than a worm? ~ Seneca the Younger,
163:Wisdom comes to no one by chance. ~ Seneca the Younger,
164:All cruelty springs from weakness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
165:Expediency often silences justice. ~ Seneca the Younger,
166:Fear drives the wretched to prayer ~ Seneca the Younger,
167:Fire tests gold and adversity tests the brave. ~ Seneca,
168:He who needs riches least, enjoys riches most. ~ Seneca,
169:I will storm the gods, and shake the universe. ~ Seneca,
170:Money has yet to make anyone rich. ~ Seneca the Younger,
171:No man ever became wise by chance. ~ Seneca the Younger,
172:The boon that could be given can be withdrawn. ~ Seneca,
173:The Germans, a race eager for war. ~ Seneca the Younger,
174:There is no genius without a touch of madness. ~ Seneca,
175:The sun shines even on the wicked. ~ Seneca the Younger,
176:To be everywhere is to be nowhere. ~ Seneca the Younger,
177:to obey God cheerfully, but Fortune defiantly; ~ Seneca,
178:To the stars through difficulties. ~ Seneca the Younger,
179:To wish to be well is a part of becoming well. ~ Seneca,
180:Unjust dominion cannot be eternal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
181:Unjust rule does not last forever. ~ Seneca the Younger,
182:We always feel anger longer than we feel hurt. ~ Seneca,
183:A good mind is a lord of a kingdom. ~ Seneca the Younger,
184:A great fortune is a great slavery. ~ Seneca the Younger,
185:All art is but imitation of nature. ~ Seneca the Younger,
186:As long as you live, keep learning how to live. ~ Seneca,
187:Everything hangs on one's thinking. ~ Seneca the Younger,
188:Fine conduct is always spontaneous. ~ Seneca the Younger,
189:In every good man a God doth dwell. ~ Seneca the Younger,
190:No time is too short for criminals to do wrong. ~ Seneca,
191:Nullus accusator caret culpa; omnes peccaviums. ~ Seneca,
192:So long as you live, keep learning how to live. ~ Seneca,
193:The best ideas are common property. ~ Seneca the Younger,
194:vices have to be crushed rather than picked at. ~ Seneca,
195:What Chance has made yours is not really yours. ~ Seneca,
196:While we wait for life, life passes ~ Seneca the Younger,
197:You talk one way, you live another. ~ Seneca the Younger,
198:As was his language so was his life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
199:For greed, all nature is too little. ~ Seneca the Younger,
200:For what is God? He is the soul of the universe. ~ Seneca,
201:... frugality makes a poor man rich. ~ Seneca the Younger,
202:It is quality rather than quantity that matters. ~ Seneca,
203:It is the power of the mind to be unconquerable. ~ Seneca,
204:Kings hate to hear the things they order spoken. ~ Seneca,
205:Life is slavery if the courage to die is absent. ~ Seneca,
206:Love of bustle is not industry. —SENECA ~ Timothy Ferriss,
207:No evil is without its compensation. ~ Seneca the Younger,
208:Nothing is more honorable than a grateful heart. ~ Seneca,
209:Persevera ut coepisti, et quantum potes propera. ~ Seneca,
210:Successful villany is called virtue. ~ Seneca the Younger,
211:That which takes effect by chance is not an art. ~ Seneca,
212:The mind when distracted absorbs nothing deeply. ~ Seneca,
213:The voice is nothing but beaten air. ~ Seneca the Younger,
214:To govern was to serve, not to rule. ~ Seneca the Younger,
215:Abstinence is easier than temperance. ~ Seneca the Younger,
216:A great mind becomes a great fortune. ~ Seneca the Younger,
217:Do what you should, not what you may. ~ Seneca the Younger,
218:Fidelity purchased with money, money can destroy. ~ Seneca,
219:He lives badly who does not know how to die well. ~ Seneca,
220:He who begs timidly courts a refusal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
221:Money has never yet made anyone rich. ~ Seneca the Younger,
222:Most powerful is he who has himself in his power. ~ Seneca,
223:No one can wear a mask for very long. ~ Seneca the Younger,
224:One hand washes the other.
(Manus Manum Lavat) ~ Seneca,
225:Philosophy is the health of the mind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
226:See what daily exercise does for one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
227:The abundance of books is distraction ~ Seneca the Younger,
228:The difficulty comes from our lack of confidence. ~ Seneca,
229:There is no easy way from the earth to the stars. ~ Seneca,
230:Whatever can happen at any time can happen today. ~ Seneca,
231:Whatever years be behind us are in death's hands. ~ Seneca,
232:What once were vices are manners now. ~ Seneca the Younger,
233:Who timidly requests invites refusal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
234:You learn to know a pilot in a storm. ~ Seneca the Younger,
235:All cruelty springs from weakness.” -Seneca ~ Clarissa Wild,
236:Consider an enemy may become a friend. ~ Seneca the Younger,
237:He who is penitent is almost innocent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
238:He who needs riches least, enjoys riches most."[8] ~ Seneca,
239:He will live ill who does not know how to die well ~ Seneca,
240:If you wished to be loved, love.
   ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
241:I was shipwrecked before I got aboard. ~ Seneca the Younger,
242:Lack of desire is the greatest riches. ~ Seneca the Younger,
243:Let us think that we are born for the common good. ~ Seneca,
244:Love sometimes injures. Friendship always benefits ~ Seneca,
245:Modesty forbids what the law does not. ~ Seneca the Younger,
246:No crime has been without a precedent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
247:The expression of truth is simplicity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
248:The fortune of war is always doubtful. ~ Seneca the Younger,
249:Time is the greatest remedy for anger. ~ Seneca the Younger,
250:To rule yourself is the ultimate power ~ Seneca the Younger,
251:Whom they have injured they also hate. ~ Seneca the Younger,
252:As long as you live, learn how to live. ~ Seneca the Younger,
253:Do everything as in the eye of another. ~ Seneca the Younger,
254:Every guilty person is his own hangman. ~ Seneca the Younger,
255:Fire is the test of gold; adversity, of strong men. ~ Seneca,
256:Fire proves gold, adversity proves men. ~ Seneca the Younger,
257:For what can be above the man who is above fortune? ~ Seneca,
258:Greed's worst point is its ingratitude. ~ Seneca the Younger,
259:In war there is no prize for runner-up. ~ Seneca the Younger,
260:is natural to touch more often the part that hurts. ~ Seneca,
261:It is opportunity that makes the thief. ~ Seneca the Younger,
262:Know thyself; this is the great object. ~ Seneca the Younger,
263:Let us be brave in the face of adversity. ~ Seneca the Elder,
264:Life is long if you know how to use it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
265:Life without literary studies is death. ~ Seneca the Younger,
266:Malice drinks one-half of its own poison. ~ Seneca the Elder,
267:No man’s good by accident. Virtue has to be learnt. ~ Seneca,
268:Non qui parum habet, sed qui plus cupit pauper est. ~ Seneca,
269:Poverty needs much, avarice everything. ~ Seneca the Younger,
270:The great soul surrenders itself to fate. ~ Seneca the Elder,
271:The most happy ought to wish for death. ~ Seneca the Younger,
272:To meditate an injury is to commit one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
273:We suffer more often in imagination than in reality ~ Seneca,
274:You roll my log, and I will roll yours. ~ Seneca the Younger,
275:A man's as miserable as he thinks he is. ~ Seneca the Younger,
276:Associate with people who are likely to improve you. ~ Seneca,
277:A thousand approaches lie open to death. ~ Seneca the Younger,
278:Courage leads starward, fear toward death. ~ Seneca the Elder,
279:Crime when it succeeds is called virtue. ~ Seneca the Younger,
280:Death takes us piecemeal, not at a gulp. ~ Seneca the Younger,
281:Don't stumble over something behind you. ~ Seneca the Younger,
282:Every change of place becomes a delight. ~ Seneca the Younger,
283:Fire tries gold, misery tries brave men. ~ Seneca the Younger,
284:He is most powerful who governs himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
285:He who has made a fair compact with poverty is rich. ~ Seneca,
286:Light griefs are loquacious, but the great are dumb. ~ Seneca,
287:longing for the future and weariness of the present. ~ Seneca,
288:Lo, to-day is the last; if not, it is near the last. ~ Seneca,
289:Real improvement is of slow growth only. ~ Seneca the Younger,
290:This life is only a prelude to eternity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
291:True love hates and will not bear delay. ~ Seneca the Younger,
292:Virtue is nothing else than right reason ~ Seneca the Younger,
293:We learn not in the school, but in life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
294:we suffer more often in imagination than in reality. ~ Seneca,
295:While we are postponing, life speeds by. ~ Seneca the Younger,
296:A hated government does not long survive. ~ Seneca the Younger,
297:Apples taste sweetest when they're going. ~ Seneca the Younger,
298:Chance makes a plaything of a man's life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
299:Crime oft recoils upon the author's head. ~ Seneca the Younger,
300:Drunkenness is simply voluntary insanity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
301:Every new beginning comes from other beginning’s end. ~ Seneca,
302:Everyone prefers belief to the exercise of judgement. ~ Seneca,
303:Fate leads the willing and drags along the reluctant. ~ Seneca,
304:For manliness gains much strength by being challenged ~ Seneca,
305:Fortune attacks us as often as we attack Fortune.  It ~ Seneca,
306:Fortune fears the brave soul; she crushes the coward. ~ Seneca,
307:Gold tests with fire, woman with gold, man with woman ~ Seneca,
308:His head was turned by too great success. ~ Seneca the Younger,
309:it is better to conquer our grief than to deceive it. ~ Seneca,
310:It's easier to get philosophers to agree than clocks. ~ Seneca,
311:long association brings love of evil as well as good. ~ Seneca,
312:Most powerful is he who has himself in his own power. ~ Seneca,
313:No man has escaped paying the penalty for being born. ~ Seneca,
314:No one becomes a laughingstock who laughs at himself. ~ Seneca,
315:No untroubled day has ever dawned for me. ~ Seneca the Younger,
316:One crime has to be concealed by another. ~ Seneca the Younger,
317:People do not die - they kill themselves. ~ Seneca the Younger,
318:Read good books many times,
rather than many books ~ Seneca,
319:Sometimes even to live is an act of courage.”   Anger ~ Seneca,
320:The fear of war is worse than war itself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
321:There is no great genius without tincture of madness. ~ Seneca,
322:Unblest is he who thinks himself unblest. ~ Seneca the Younger,
323:While crime is punished it yet increases. ~ Seneca the Younger,
324:A family formed by crime must be broken by more crime. ~ Seneca,
325:All the accidents of life can be turned to our profit. ~ Seneca,
326:A man is as unhappy as he has convinced himself he is. ~ Seneca,
327:A troubled countenance oft discloses much. ~ Seneca the Younger,
328:Elegance is not an ornament worthy of man. ~ Seneca the Younger,
329:Everything in art is but a copy of nature. ~ Seneca the Younger,
330:He sins not, who is not wilfully a sinner. ~ Seneca the Younger,
331:La soledad no es estar solo, la soledad es estar vacío ~ Seneca,
332:Nature does not reveal her mysteries once and for all. ~ Seneca,
333:No one is laughable who laughs at himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
334:Of war men ask the outcome, not the cause. ~ Seneca the Younger,
335:O how many noble deeds of women are lost in obscurity! ~ Seneca,
336:Otium sine litteris mors est et hominis vivi sepultura ~ Seneca,
337:Our fears vanish as the danger approaches. ~ Seneca the Younger,
338:Resistance to oppression is second nature. ~ Seneca the Younger,
339:Small sorrows speak great ones are silent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
340:There is no evil without its compensation. ~ Seneca the Younger,
341:The way to good conduct is never too late. ~ Seneca the Younger,
342:Those alone are wise who know how to love. ~ Seneca the Younger,
343:Vice may be learnt, even without a teacher ~ Seneca the Younger,
344:we cease to be so angry once we cease to be so hopeful ~ Seneca,
345:Whatever is well said by another, is mine. ~ Seneca the Younger,
346:An unpopular rule is never long maintained. ~ Seneca the Younger,
347:Crime requires further crime to conceal it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
348:Every reign must submit to a greater reign. ~ Seneca the Younger,
349:Fire tests gold, suffering tests brave men. ~ Seneca the Younger,
350:For Fate/ The willing leads, the unwilling drags along. ~ Seneca,
351:How late it is to begin living only when one must stop! ~ Seneca,
352:It is part of the cure to wish to be cured. ~ Seneca the Younger,
353:It is pleasant at times to play the madman. ~ Seneca the Younger,
354:Let the weary at length possess quiet rest. ~ Seneca the Younger,
355:Life without the courage to die is slavery. ~ Seneca the Younger,
356:Misfortune is the test of a person's merit. ~ Seneca the Younger,
357:No man is free who is a slave to the flesh. ~ Seneca the Younger,
358:One cannot sincerely weep over getting what one wanted. ~ Seneca,
359:That grief is light which can take counsel. ~ Seneca the Younger,
360:That which Fortune has not given, she cannot take away. ~ Seneca,
361:There is no great genius without a tincture of madness. ~ Seneca,
362:There is no great genius without some touch of madness. ~ Seneca,
363:The shortest route to wealth is the contempt of wealth. ~ Seneca,
364:The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately. ~ Seneca,
365:The worse a person is the less he feels it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
366:To what lengths would so precocious an ambition not go? ~ Seneca,
367:To win true freeedom you must be a slave to philosophy. ~ Seneca,
368:Wealth is the slave of a wise man. The master of a fool ~ Seneca,
369:When things are at their worst,
there are no tears. ~ Seneca,
370:A person's fears are lighter when the danger is at hand. ~ Seneca,
371:Beware of doing that again – and this time I pardon you. ~ Seneca,
372:Death's the discharge of our debt of sorrow. ~ Seneca the Younger,
373:Disease is not of the body but of the place. ~ Seneca the Younger,
374:Divine seeds are scattered throughout our mortal bodies; ~ Seneca,
375:Familiarity reduces the greatness of things. ~ Seneca the Younger,
376:God is near you, is with you, is inside you. ~ Seneca the Younger,
377:He who asks with timidity invites a refusal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
378:Indolence is stagnation; employment is life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
379:It is not manly to turn one's back on fortune. ~ Seneca the Elder,
380:Laugh at your problems; everybody else does. ~ Seneca the Younger,
381:Light is that grief which counsel can allay. ~ Seneca the Younger,
382:Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity! ~ Seneca,
383:Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity. ~ Seneca,
384:Many things have fallen only to rise higher. ~ Seneca the Younger,
385:Nature ever provides for her own exigencies. ~ Seneca the Younger,
386:Our plans miscarry because they have no aim. ~ Seneca the Younger,
387:Regard [a friend] as loyal, and you will make him loyal. ~ Seneca,
388:The arts are the servant; wisdom its master. ~ Seneca the Younger,
389:The ascent from earth to heaven is not easy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
390:the fates lead those who will those who won't they drag. ~ Seneca,
391:The greatest wealth is a poverty of desires. ~ Seneca the Younger,
392:The language of truth is unvarnished enough. ~ Seneca the Younger,
393:the preoccupied become aware of it only when it is over. ~ Seneca,
394:Those griefs burn most which gall in secret. ~ Seneca the Younger,
395:To know how many are jealous of you, count your admirers ~ Seneca,
396:To live is not a blessing, but to live well. ~ Seneca the Younger,
397:We do not need many words, but, rather, effective words. ~ Seneca,
398:Courage leads to heaven; fear leads to death. ~ Seneca the Younger,
399:Democracy is more cruel than wars or tyrants. ~ Seneca the Younger,
400:Difficulties strengthen the mind, as labor does the body. ~ Seneca,
401:Dignity increases more easily than it begins. ~ Seneca the Younger,
402:Drunkenness is nothing but voluntary madness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
403:Errare humanum est, sed in errore perseverare diabolicum. ~ Seneca,
404:He has committed the crime who profits by it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
405:He who has great power should use it lightly. ~ Seneca the Younger,
406:If virtue precede us every step will be safe. ~ Seneca the Younger,
407:It is not death we fear, but the thought of it. ~ Seneca the Elder,
408:It is rash to condemn where you are ignorant. ~ Seneca the Younger,
409:It takes you more time to solve a problem than to set it. ~ Seneca,
410:Let us lend ear to the sages who point out to us the way. ~ Seneca,
411:Nullum ad nocendum tempus angustum est malis. ~ Seneca the Younger,
412:The fearful face usually betrays great guilt. ~ Seneca the Younger,
413:We have not to talk, but to steer the vessel. ~ Seneca the Younger,
414:What was hard to suffer is sweet to remember. ~ Seneca the Younger,
415:When in fear, it is safest to force the attack. ~ Seneca the Elder,
416:Even after a bad harvest there must be sowing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
417:Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end. ~ Seneca,
418:Every pleasure is most valued when it is coming to an end. ~ Seneca,
419:Every pleasure is most valued when it is coming to an end? ~ Seneca,
420:Fortune can take away riches, but not courage. ~ Seneca the Younger,
421:Gold is tried by fire, brave men by adversity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
422:I am telling you to be a slow-speaking person. ~ Seneca the Younger,
423:I don't trust liberals, I trust conservatives. ~ Seneca the Younger,
424:It is a rough road that leads to the heights of greatness. ~ Seneca,
425:It is the sign of a weak mind to be unable to bear wealth. ~ Seneca,
426:It is well to be born either a king or a fool. ~ Seneca the Younger,
427:J'ai tant désiré le jour et voici qu'il me brûle les yeux! ~ Seneca,
428:Leisure without books is death, and burial of a man alive. ~ Seneca,
429:Life is most delightful on the downward slope. ~ Seneca the Younger,
430:Life without the courage for death is slavery. ~ Seneca the Younger,
431:Luck is preparation multiplied by opportunity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
432:„Odmítáme ty co nás milují, a milujeme ty co nás odmítají. ~ Seneca,
433:Persistent kindness conquers the ill-disposed. ~ Seneca the Younger,
434:Shame may restrain what law does not prohibit. ~ Seneca the Younger,
435:Sovereignty over any foreign land is insecure. ~ Seneca the Younger,
436:Success consecrates the most offensive crimes. ~ Seneca the Younger,
437:That comes too late that comes for the asking. ~ Seneca the Younger,
438:The mind that is anxious about future events is miserable. ~ Seneca,
439:There is no power greater than true affection. ~ Seneca the Younger,
440:Tis a human trait to hate one you have wronged ~ Seneca the Younger,
441:Tota vita nihil aliud quam ad mortem iter est. ~ Seneca the Younger,
442:To wish to be well is a part of becoming well. ~ Seneca the Younger,
443:We must make it our aim already to have lived long enough. ~ Seneca,
444:We suffer more in imagination than in reality. ~ Seneca the Younger,
445:What you think is the summit is only a step up ~ Seneca the Younger,
446:A great destiny, Seneca reminds us, is great slavery. ~ Ryan Holiday,
447:An age builds up cities: an hour destroys them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
448:Economy is in itself a great source of revenue. ~ Seneca the Younger,
449:For he alone is in kinship with God who has scorned wealth. ~ Seneca,
450:He who boasts of his descent, praises the deeds of another. ~ Seneca,
451:He who forbids not sin when he may, commands it ~ Seneca the Younger,
452:It is not goodness to be better than the worst. ~ Seneca the Younger,
453:Loyalty is the holiest good in the human heart. ~ Seneca the Younger,
454:...nothing happens to the wise man against his expectation. ~ Seneca,
455:Servitude seizes on few, but many seize on her. ~ Seneca the Younger,
456:Sine philosophia nemo intrepide potest vivere, nemo secure. ~ Seneca,
457:Sometimes even to live is an act of courage ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
458:the mind is never right but when it is at peace with itself ~ Seneca,
459:The mind is slow to unlearn what it learnt early. ~ Seneca the Elder,
460:The part of life which we really live is short. ~ Seneca the Younger,
461:The profit on a good action is to have done it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
462:There exists no more difficult art than living. ~ Seneca the Younger,
463:There is nothing the wise man does reluctantly. ~ Seneca the Younger,
464:There's no delight in owning anything unshared. ~ Seneca the Younger,
465:The world itself is too small for the covetous. ~ Seneca the Younger,
466:To forgive all is as inhuman as to forgive none ~ Seneca the Younger,
467:Wealth is the slave of the wise man and master of the fool. ~ Seneca,
468:We are taught for the schoolroom, not for life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
469:Where reason fails, time oft has worked a cure. ~ Seneca the Younger,
470:A dwarf can stand on a mountain, he's no taller. ~ Seneca the Younger,
471:Courage is a scorner of things which inspire fear. ~ Seneca the Elder,
472:Death is a release from and an end of all pains. ~ Seneca the Younger,
473:Fidelity bought with money is overcome by money. ~ Seneca the Younger,
474:He who fears from near at hand often fears less. ~ Seneca the Younger,
475:I do not sacrifice, but lend myself to business. ~ Seneca the Younger,
476:If I only have the will to be grateful, I am so. ~ Seneca the Younger,
477:It is quality rather than quantity that matters. ~ Seneca the Younger,
478:It is the power of the mind to be unconquerable. ~ Seneca the Younger,
479:Laws do not persuade just because they threaten. ~ Seneca the Younger,
480:No possession is gratifying without a companion. ~ Seneca the Younger,
481:Nothing is more honorable than a grateful heart. ~ Seneca the Younger,
482:Nothing satisfies greed, but even a little satisfies nature. ~ Seneca,
483:Oh, what darkness does great prosperity cast over our minds! ~ Seneca,
484:Our words should aim not to please, but to help. ~ Seneca the Younger,
485:O, what blindness does great prosperity cast upon our minds! ~ Seneca,
486:That which takes effect by chance is not an art. ~ Seneca the Younger,
487:There is no genius without a mixture of madness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
488:To make a commencement requires a mental effort. ~ Seneca the Younger,
489:Voyage, travel, and change of place impart vigor ~ Seneca the Younger,
490:We learn not for life but for the debating-room. ~ Seneca the Younger,
491:What were once vices are the fashion of the day. ~ Seneca the Younger,
492:Whenever the speech is corrupted so is the mind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
493:A coward calls himself cautious, a miser thrifty. ~ Seneca the Younger,
494:As long as we are among humans, let us be humane. ~ Seneca the Younger,
495:A thing seriously pursued affords true enjoyment. ~ Seneca the Younger,
496:Fidelity purchased with money, money can destroy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
497:He is the happy man whose soul is superior to all happenings. ~ Seneca,
498:It is the superfluous things for which men sweat. ~ Seneca the Younger,
499:Let ease and rest at times be given to the weary. ~ Seneca the Younger,
500:Make haste to live, and consider each day a life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
501:Quaedam iura non scripta, sed omnibus scriptis certiora sunt. ~ Seneca,
502:The more violent the storm the sooner it is over. ~ Seneca the Younger,
503:There is no easy way from the earth to the stars. ~ Seneca the Younger,
504:To err is human. To repeat error is of the Devil. ~ Seneca the Younger,
505:To keep oneself safe does not mean to bury oneself. ~ Seneca the Elder,
506:What you do for an ungrateful man is thrown away. ~ Seneca the Younger,
507:A young man respects and looks up to his teachers. ~ Seneca the Younger,
508:Brother, the Great Spirit has made us all. . . . . ~ Seneca the Younger,
509:Do not ask for what you will wish you had not got. ~ Seneca the Younger,
510:for that love is greater which wins less through equal danger. ~ Seneca,
511:He who dreads hostility too much is unfit to rule. ~ Seneca the Younger,
512:I am ashamed of my master and not of my servitude. ~ Seneca the Younger,
513:...it is more civilized to make fun of life than to bewail it. ~ Seneca,
514:It is not what you endure that matters, but how you endure it. ~ Seneca,
515:La solitudine è per lo spirito ciò che il cibo è per il corpo. ~ Seneca,
516:Leave in concealment what has long been concealed. ~ Seneca the Younger,
517:Light troubles speak; the weighty are struck dumb. ~ Seneca the Younger,
518:Living is the least important activity of the preoccupied man; ~ Seneca,
519:Modesty once extinguished knows not how to return. ~ Seneca the Younger,
520:Prosperity asks for fidelity; adversity exacts it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
521:Some cures are worse than the dangers they combat. ~ Seneca the Younger,
522:The anger of those in authority is always weighty. ~ Seneca the Younger,
523:The man who can be compelled knows not how to die. ~ Seneca the Younger,
524:The rust of the mind is the destruction of genius. ~ Seneca the Younger,
525:The wretched hasten to hear of their own miseries. ~ Seneca the Younger,
526:The young man must store up, the old man must use. ~ Seneca the Younger,
527:A foolishness is inflicted with a hatred of itself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
528:All fools suffer the burden of dissatisfaction with themselves. ~ Seneca,
529:Ask nature: she will tell you that she made both day and night. ~ Seneca,
530:A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. ~ Seneca,
531:A well-governed appetite is a great part of liberty ~ Seneca the Younger,
532:…because it is natural to touch more often the parts that hurt. ~ Seneca,
533:But it is a pretty thing to see what money will do! ~ Seneca the Younger,
534:Elämä avautuu suurena sille, joka osaa järjestää sen viisaasti. ~ Seneca,
535:Everyone goes out of life just as if he had but lately entered. ~ Seneca,
536:Friendship always benefits; love sometimes injures. ~ Seneca the Younger,
537:He who repents of having sinned is almost innocent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
538:He will live ill who does not know how to die well. ~ Seneca the Younger,
539:It is sometimes pleasant even to act like a madman. ~ Seneca the Younger,
540:Light cares cry out; the great ones still are dumb. ~ Seneca the Younger,
541:nimic nu e mai odios înţelepciunii decât o subtilitate excesivă ~ Seneca,
542:No emotion falls into dislike so readily as sorrow. ~ Seneca the Younger,
543:No matter how many men you kill, you can't kill your successor. ~ Seneca,
544:Nothing costs so much as what is bought by prayers. ~ Seneca the Younger,
545:No wind blows in favor of a ship without direction. ~ Seneca the Younger,
546:The fates lead the willing, and drag the unwilling. ~ Seneca the Younger,
547:The friends of the unfortunate live a long way off. ~ Seneca the Younger,
548:the grief that has been conquered by reason is calmed for ever. ~ Seneca,
549:The way to wickedness is always through wickedness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
550:Timendi causa est nescire -
Ignorance is the cause of fear. ~ Seneca,
551:Whom the dawn sees proud, evening sees prostrate. ~ Seneca the Younger,
552:All things are cause for either laughter or weeping. ~ Seneca the Younger,
553:As often as I have been amongst men, I have returned less a man. ~ Seneca,
554:Associate with people who are likely to improve you. ~ Seneca the Younger,
555:Drunkenness is nothing else but a voluntary madness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
556:Failure changes for the better, success for the worse. ~ Seneca the Elder,
557:Great grief does not of itself put an end to itself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
558:He who has made a fair compact with poverty is rich. ~ Seneca the Younger,
559:I am not born for one corner; the whole world is my native land. ~ Seneca,
560:If a man knows not to which port he sails, no wind is favorable. ~ Seneca,
561:Leisure without study is death; it is a tomb for the living man. ~ Seneca,
562:Life, if thou knowest how to use it, is long enough. ~ Seneca the Younger,
563:Light griefs are plaintive , but great ones are dumb ~ Seneca the Younger,
564:Men love their vices and hate them at the same time. ~ Seneca the Younger,
565:Nature does not bestow virtue; to be good is an art. ~ Seneca the Younger,
566:No man will swim ashore and take his baggage with him. ~ Seneca the Elder,
567:Nothing hinders a cure so much as frequent changes of treatment. ~ Seneca,
568:Nothing is so bitter that a calm mind cannot find comfort in it. ~ Seneca,
569:Our fears are always more numerous than our dangers. ~ Seneca the Younger,
570:Poor woman, do you want to know where hatred ends? Look to love. ~ Seneca,
571:Seneca: “Fate guides the willing but drags the unwilling. ~ Eric Greitens,
572:Shall I tell you what philosophy holds out to humanity? Counsel. ~ Seneca,
573:The approach of liberty makes even an old man brave. ~ Seneca the Younger,
574:The foundation of the true joy is in the conscience. ~ Seneca the Younger,
575:The happy life is a life that is in harmony with its own nature. ~ Seneca,
576:The hour which gives us life begins to take it away. ~ Seneca the Younger,
577:The wish for healing has always been half of health. ~ Seneca the Younger,
578:Things that were hard to bear are sweet to remember. ~ Seneca the Younger,
579:Time discovers truth. Time heals what reason cannot. ~ Seneca the Younger,
580:Virtue with some is nothing but successful temerity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
581:You can end love more easily than you can moderate it. ~ Seneca the Elder,
582:All those who call you to themselves draw you away from yourself. ~ Seneca,
583:Every man prefers belief to the exercise of judgment. ~ Seneca the Younger,
584:For the wise man regards wealth as a slave, the fool as a master. ~ Seneca,
585:Fortune may rob us of our wealth, not of our courage. ~ Seneca the Younger,
586:Fortune reveres the brave, and overwhelms the cowardly. ~ Seneca the Elder,
587:God never repents of what He has first resolved upon. ~ Seneca the Younger,
588:He who fears death will never do anything worthy of a living man. ~ Seneca,
589:I don’t mind citing a bad author if the line is good. ~ Seneca the Younger,
590:It is easier to grow in dignity than to make a start. ~ Seneca the Younger,
591:Leisure without literature is death and burial alive. ~ Seneca the Younger,
592:Most powerful is he who has himself in his own power. ~ Seneca the Younger,
593:Night brings our troubles to the light rather than banishes them. ~ Seneca,
594:The day which we fear as our last is but the birthday of eternity ~ Seneca,
595:The deferring of anger is the best antidote to anger. ~ Seneca the Younger,
596:The mind, unless it is pure and holy, cannot see God. ~ Seneca the Younger,
597:The most onerous slavery is to be a slave to oneself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
598:there has never been a great mind without some degree of madness. ~ Seneca,
599:There is no genius free from some tincture of madness ~ Seneca the Younger,
600:The whole discord of this world consists in discords. ~ Seneca the Younger,
601:Those whom true love has held, it will go on holding. ~ Seneca the Younger,
602:Virtue is according to nature; vice is opposed to it and hostile. ~ Seneca,
603:We cease to be so angry once we cease to be so hopeful.” “Nothing ~ Seneca,
604:We do not receive a life that is short, but rather we make it so. ~ Seneca,
605:Whatever we give to the wretched, we lend to fortune. ~ Seneca the Younger,
606:When modesty has once perished, it will never revive. ~ Seneca the Younger,
607:Who can hope for nothing, should despair for nothing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
608:A man is as unhappy as he has convinced himself he is. ~ Seneca the Younger,
609:Even in the longest life real living is the least portion thereof. ~ Seneca,
610:Everyone goes out of life just as if he had but lately entered it. ~ Seneca,
611:Fate leads the willing, and drags along the reluctant. ~ Seneca the Younger,
612:It is a proof of nobility of mind to despise injuries. ~ Seneca the Younger,
613:It is for the superfluous things of life that men sweat. ~ Seneca the Elder,
614:Light griefs do speak, while sorrow's tongue is bound. ~ Seneca the Younger,
615:No good thing is pleasant to possess, without friends to share it. ~ Seneca,
616:No good thing is pleasant without friends to share it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
617:¿Qué mayor necedad que alabar en el hombre lo que no le pertenece? ~ Seneca,
618:That which achieves its effect by accident is not art. ~ Seneca the Younger,
619:The day which we fear is out last is buth the birthday of eternity ~ Seneca,
620:You have all the fears of mortals and all the desires of immortals ~ Seneca,
621:Enjoy present pleasures in such a way as not to injure future ones. ~ Seneca,
622:Extreme remedies are never the first to be resorted to. ~ Seneca the Younger,
623:fate has decreed that nothing maintains the same condition forever. ~ Seneca,
624:Good sides to adversity are best admired at a distance. ~ Seneca the Younger,
625:Haste trips up its own heels, fetters and stops itself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
626:He praised his own achievements, not without cause but without end. ~ Seneca,
627:He suffers more than necessary, who suffers before it is necessary. ~ Seneca,
628:He that does good to another does good also to himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
629:I shall expose and reopen all the wounds which have already healed. ~ Seneca,
630:It is of course better to know useless things than to know nothing. ~ Seneca,
631:It is sweet to draw the world down with you when you are perishing. ~ Seneca,
632:Live for thy neighbor if thou wouldst live for thyself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
633:Nothing is more hateful to wisdom than to much cunning. ~ Seneca the Younger,
634:Philosophy did not find Plato already a nobleman ; it made him one. ~ Seneca,
635:Remove severe restraint and what will become of virtue? ~ Seneca the Younger,
636:That which Fortune has not given, she cannot take away. ~ Seneca the Younger,
637:The greater part of progress is the desire to progress. ~ Seneca the Younger,
638:The great pilot can sail even when his canvass is rent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
639:We never reflect how pleasant it is to ask for nothing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
640:When I think over what I have said, I envy dumb people. ~ Seneca the Younger,
641:Where silence is not allowed, what then is permissible? ~ Seneca the Younger,
642:You can put up with a change of place if only the place is changed. ~ Seneca,
643:You have all the fears of mortals and all the desires of immortals. ~ Seneca,
644:All outdoors may be bedlam, provided there is no disturbance within. ~ Seneca,
645:A person's fears are lighter when the danger is at hand. ~ Seneca the Younger,
646:He is not guilty who is not guilty of his own free will. ~ Seneca the Younger,
647:How many are quite unworthy to see the light, and yet the day dawns. ~ Seneca,
648:In the ashes all men are levelled. We're born unequal, we die equal. ~ Seneca,
649:I shall never be ashamed of citing a bad author if the line is good. ~ Seneca,
650:I shall never be ashamed to go to a bad author for a good quotation. ~ Seneca,
651:Life’s finest day for wretched mortals here Is always first to flee. ~ Seneca,
652:Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
653:No he nacido para un sólo rincón; mi patria es todo el mundo visible ~ Seneca,
654:Nothing deters a good man from doing what is honourable. ~ Seneca the Younger,
655:Nothing is so contemptible as the sentiments of the mob. ~ Seneca the Younger,
656:Pleasure dies at the very moment when it charms us most. ~ Seneca the Younger,
657:Pobre não é aquele que tem pouco, mas antes aquele que muito deseja. ~ Seneca,
658:Poverty wants some, luxury many, and avarice all things. ~ Seneca the Younger,
659:Prudence will punish to prevent crime, not to avenge it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
660:Speak, and live, in this way; see to it that nothing keeps you down. ~ Seneca,
661:The foremost art of Kings is the power to endure hatred. ~ Seneca the Younger,
662:The largest part of goodness is the will to become good. ~ Seneca the Younger,
663:The willing, Destiny guides them. The unwilling, Destiny drags them. ~ Seneca,
664:Wealth is the slave of a wise man. The master of a fool. ~ Seneca the Younger,
665:What is required is not a lot words, but effectual ones. ~ Seneca the Younger,
666:Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for crisis. ~ Seneca,
667:Whoever has nothing to hope, let him despair of nothing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
668:Am I not to inquire into the identity of the artist of this universe? ~ Seneca,
669:Authority founded on injustice is never of long duration. ~ Seneca the Younger,
670:Difficulties strengthen the mind, as labor does the body. ~ Seneca the Younger,
671:Eyes will not see when the heart wishes them to be blind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
672:Genius always gives its best at first; prudence, at last. ~ Seneca the Younger,
673:He who suffers before it is necessary suffers more than is necessary. ~ Seneca,
674:My joy in learning is partly that it enables me to teach. ~ Seneca the Younger,
675:No es que dispongamos de poco tiempo, es más bien que perdemos mucho. ~ Seneca,
676:No man is despised by another unless he is first despised by himself. ~ Seneca,
677:Non è vero che abbiamo poco tempo, la verità è che ne perdiamo molto. ~ Seneca,
678:Non è vero che abbiamo poco tempo: la verità è che ne perdiamo molto. ~ Seneca,
679:No one should feel pride in anything that is not his own. ~ Seneca the Younger,
680:Not he who has little, but he whose wishes more, is poor. ~ Seneca the Younger,
681:philosophy of Marcus Aurelius and some of the work of Seneca. ~ Robin S Sharma,
682:Slavery takes hold of few, but many take hold of slavery. ~ Seneca the Younger,
683:The bounty of nature is too little for the greedy person. ~ Seneca the Younger,
684:There is no satisfaction in any good without a companion. ~ Seneca the Younger,
685:To expect punishment is to suffer it; and to earn it is to expect it. ~ Seneca,
686:You cannot escape necessities, but you can overcome them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
687:You fear everything as mortals but desire to have everything as gods. ~ Seneca,
688:A benefit is estimated according to the mind of the giver. ~ Seneca the Younger,
689:Begin at once to live, and count each separate day as a separate life. ~ Seneca,
690:Brave men rejoice in adversity, just as brave soldiers triumph in war. ~ Seneca,
691:Constant exposure to dangers will breed contempt for them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
692:Delay not; swift the flight of fortune's greatest favours. ~ Seneca the Younger,
693:El verdadero héroe en una obra literaria es el lector que la aguanta". ~ Seneca,
694:Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end. ~ Seneca the Younger,
695:Fate rules the affairs of men, with no recognizable order. ~ Seneca the Younger,
696:He who boasts of his descent, praises the deed of another. ~ Seneca the Younger,
697:It is a rough road that leads to the heights of greatness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
698:It is often better not to see an insult than to avenge it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
699:It is the sign of a weak mind to be unable to bear wealth. ~ Seneca the Younger,
700:Leisure without books is death, and burial of a man alive.” “Desultory ~ Seneca,
701:Let us train our minds to desire what the situation demands. ~ Seneca the Elder,
702:Often a very old man has no other proof of his long life than his age. ~ Seneca,
703:[P]leasures, when they go beyond a certain limit, are but punishments. ~ Seneca,
704:Pomozi onome koji nosi teret a ne onome
koji ga spušta pored tebe. ~ Seneca,
705:Retirement without the love of letters is a living burial. ~ Seneca the Younger,
706:The day which we fear as our last
is but the birthday of eternity. ~ Seneca,
707:The mind that is anxious about future events is miserable. ~ Seneca the Younger,
708:There is no favorable wind for the sailor who doesn’t know where to go ~ Seneca,
709:There is no grace in a benefit that sticks to the fingers. ~ Seneca the Younger,
710:There is nothing after death, and death itself is nothing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
711:We live not according to reason, but according to fashion. ~ Seneca the Younger,
712:You need a change of soul rather than a change of climate. ~ Seneca the Younger,
713:A crowd of fellow-sufferers is a miserable kind of comfort. ~ Seneca the Younger,
714:All that remains of our existence is not actually life but merely time. ~ Seneca,
715:All things that are still to come lie in uncertainty; live straightway! ~ Seneca,
716:. Deliver thyself from the inconstancy of human things. ~ Seneca: De Providentia,
717:Auditur et altera pars. (The other side shall be heard as well.) ~ Seneca,
718:If we let things terrify us, life will not be worth living. ~ Seneca the Younger,
719:If you wish to fear nothing, consider that all things are to be feared. ~ Seneca,
720:It is proof of a bad cause when it is applauded by the mob. ~ Seneca the Younger,
721:It's a vice to trust all, and equally a vice to trust none. ~ Seneca the Younger,
722:Saiba que um teto de palha abriga o homem
tão bem quanto o de ouro. ~ Seneca,
723:Speech devoted to truth should be straightforward and plain ~ Seneca the Younger,
724:The courts of kings are full of people, but empty of friends. ~ Seneca the Elder,
725:The guilt of enforced crimes lies on those who impose them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
726:The mind unlearns with difficulty what it has long learned. ~ Seneca the Younger,
727:There is more heroism in self-denial than in deeds of arms. ~ Seneca the Younger,
728:The shortest road to wealth lies in the contempt of wealth. ~ Seneca the Younger,
729:We gain so much by quickness, and lose so much by slowness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
730:We have been born under a monarchy; to obey God is freedom. ~ Seneca the Younger,
731:When one is friend on himself, also is friend of everybody. ~ Seneca the Younger,
732:You must live for another if you wish to live for yourself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
733:A great step toward independence is a good-humoured stomach. ~ Seneca the Younger,
734:All that lies betwixt the cradle and the grave is uncertain. ~ Seneca the Younger,
735:A trifling debt makes a man your debtor; a large one makes him an enemy. ~ Seneca,
736:Drunkenness is nothing but a self-induced state of insanity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
737:He who does not prevent a crime, when he can, encourages it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
738:How much better it is that you defeat anger than that it defeats itself! ~ Seneca,
739:I am loath to call clemency what was, rather, the exhaustion of cruelty. ~ Seneca,
740:I had rather never receive a kindness than never bestow one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
741:It is better to have useless knowledge than to know nothing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
742:It is equally a fault to believe all men or to believe none. ~ Seneca the Younger,
743:Let me therefore live as if every moment were to be my last. ~ Seneca the Younger,
744:No man can have a peaceful life who thinks too much about lengthening it ~ Seneca,
745:Not how long, but how well you have lived is the main thing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
746:Poverty brought into conformity with the law of nature, is great wealth. ~ Seneca,
747:The path of increase is slow, but the road to ruin is rapid. ~ Seneca the Younger,
748:The point is, not how long you live, but how nobly you live. ~ Seneca the Younger,
749:Time hath often cured the wound which reason failed to heal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
750:Tis not the belly's hunger that costs so much, but its pride ~ Seneca the Younger,
751:To make another person hold his tongue, be you first silent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
752:who as though inspired with divine utterance sings salutary verses: Life ~ Seneca,
753:Adversity finds at last the man whom she has often passed by. ~ Seneca the Younger,
754:A happy life is one which is in accordance with its own nature. ~ Seneca the Elder,
755:A lesson that is never learned can never be too often taught. ~ Seneca the Younger,
756:A man afraid of death will never play the part of a live man. ~ Seneca the Younger,
757:And as long as nothing satisfies you, you yourself cannot satisfy others. ~ Seneca,
758:An old man at school is a contemptible and ridiculous object. ~ Seneca the Younger,
759:Begin at once to live, and count each day as a separate life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
760:Economy is too late when you are at the bottom of your purse. ~ Seneca the Younger,
761:Fortune dreads the brave, and is only terrible to the coward. ~ Seneca the Younger,
762:Hardly a man will you find who could live with his door open. ~ Seneca the Younger,
763:He may as well not thank at all, who thanks when none are by. ~ Seneca the Younger,
764:linger among a limited number of master thinkers, and digest their works, ~ Seneca,
765:Obedience is yielded more readily to one who commands gently. ~ Seneca the Younger,
766:The first step towards amendment is the recognition of error. ~ Seneca the Younger,
767:the wise man regards the reason for all his actions, but not the results. ~ Seneca,
768:To be enslaved to oneself is the heaviest of all servitudes.- ~ Seneca the Younger,
769:Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for crisis.” “We ~ Seneca,
770:Who needs forgiveness, should the same extend with readiness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
771:Za najmilszy rodzaj łaski uważał niewiedzę o tym, co każdy uczynił złego. ~ Seneca,
772:Add each day something to fortify you against poverty and death. ~ Seneca the Elder,
773:After friendship is formed you must trust, but before that you must judge. ~ Seneca,
774:Harmony makes small things grow; lack of harmony makes great things decay. ~ Seneca,
775:Hence the dictum of the greatest of doctors:† ‘Life is short, art is long. ~ Seneca,
776:He who indulges empty fears earns himself real fears,” wrote Seneca, ~ Ryan Holiday,
777:He who tenders doubtful safety to those in trouble refuses it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
778:How great would be our peril if our slaves began to number us! ~ Seneca the Younger,
779:If an evil has been pondered beforehand, the blow is gentle when it comes. ~ Seneca,
780:If God adds another day to our life, let us receive it gladly. ~ Seneca the Younger,
781:It is not that we have a short time to live but that we waste a lot of it. ~ Seneca,
782:It is uncertain where Death will await you;
there expect it everywhere. ~ Seneca,
783:Leisure without study is death, and the grave of a living man. ~ Seneca the Younger,
784:No man will ever be happy if tortured by the greater happiness of another. ~ Seneca,
785:...nothing is so entirely admirable as a man bravely wretched. ~ Seneca the Younger,
786:That loss is most discreditable which is caused by negligence. ~ Seneca the Younger,
787:The man who thinks only of his own generation is born for few. ~ Seneca the Younger,
788:The mind is never right but when it is at peace within itself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
789:The poor are not the people with less, which is less desirable ~ Seneca the Younger,
790:There is nothing more miserable and foolish than anticipation. ~ Seneca the Younger,
791:Those who are busy with other things do not notice it until the end comes. ~ Seneca,
792:Throw aside all hindrances and give up your time to attaining a sound mind ~ Seneca,
793:Trifling trouble find utterance; deeply felt pangs are silent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
794:Truths open to everyone, and the claims aren't all staked yet. ~ Seneca the Younger,
795:What-so-ever the mind has ordained for itself, it has achieved ~ Seneca the Younger,
796:When you see a man in distress, recognize him as a fellow man. ~ Seneca the Younger,
797:You will die not because you're ill, but because you're alive. ~ Seneca the Younger,
798:A friend always loves, but he who loves is not always a friend. ~ Seneca the Younger,
799:He deserves praise who does not what he may, but what he ought. ~ Seneca the Younger,
800:He, who will not pardon others, must not himself expect pardon. ~ Seneca the Younger,
801:He who would do great things should not attempt them all alone. ~ Seneca the Younger,
802:It is never too late to learn what is always necessary to know. ~ Seneca the Younger,
803:It is our conscience, not our pride, that has put doorkeepers at our doors. ~ Seneca,
804:Power exercised with violence has seldom been of long duration. ~ Seneca the Younger,
805:Take my word for it: since the day you were born you are being led thither. ~ Seneca,
806:The entire world would perish, if pity were not to limit anger. ~ Seneca the Younger,
807:The person you are matters more than the place to which you go. ~ Seneca the Younger,
808:There is but one chain holding us in fetters, and that is our love of life. ~ Seneca,
809:The worst thing about getting old is evil men cease to fear you ~ Seneca the Younger,
810:What progress, you ask, have I made? I have begun to be a friend to myself. ~ Seneca,
811:Above all, my dear Lucilius, make this your business: learn how to feel joy. ~ Seneca,
812:Auditur et altera pars. (The other side shall be heard as well.) ~ Seneca the Younger,
813:Drunkenness does not create vice; it merely brings it into view. ~ Seneca the Younger,
814:Genius has never been accepted without a measure of condonement. ~ Seneca the Younger,
815:If a man knows not to which port he sails, no wind is favorable. ~ Seneca the Younger,
816:If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favourable.
   ~ Seneca,
817:I think Seneca is right: life feels longer the more you engage with it. ~ Zadie Smith,
818:It is a great thing to know the season for speech and the season for silence ~ Seneca,
819:It is a youthful failing to be unable to control one's impulses. ~ Seneca the Younger,
820:It should be our care not so much to live a long life as a satisfactory one. ~ Seneca,
821:It's not that we have little time, but more that we waste a good deal of it. ~ Seneca,
822:Levity of behavior is the bane of all that is good and virtuous. ~ Seneca the Younger,
823:Nihil tam acerbum est in quo non æquus animus solatium inveniat. ~ Seneca the Younger,
824:Nothing is so bitter that a calm mind cannot find comfort in it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
825:One can expect an agreement between philosophers sooner than between clocks. ~ Seneca,
826:Our (the Stoic) motto, as you know, is live according to nature. ~ Seneca the Younger,
827:¿Preguntas cúal es el fundamento de la sabiduría? No gozarte en cosas vanas. ~ Seneca,
828:Religion worships God, while superstition profanes that worship. ~ Seneca the Younger,
829:Straightforwardness and simplicity are in keeping with goodness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
830:The great thing is to know when to speak and when to keep quiet. ~ Seneca the Younger,
831:The man who fears death will never do anything worthy of a man who is alive. ~ Seneca,
832:There is no fair wind for one who knows not whither he is bound. ~ Seneca the Younger,
833:The thing that matters is not what you bear, but how you bear it ~ Seneca the Younger,
834:Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for a kindness.” “A ~ Seneca,
835:distringit librorum multitudo

(the abundance of books is distraction) ~ Seneca,
836:Drunkenness doesn't create vices, but it brings them to the fore. ~ Seneca the Younger,
837:He is a king who fears nothing, he is a king who desires nothing! ~ Seneca the Younger,
838:How much does great prosperity overspread the mind with darkness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
839:I am not born from a single place. My country is the whole world. ~ Seneca the Younger,
840:I do not regard a man as poor, if the little which remains is enough for him. ~ Seneca,
841:I feel, my dear Lucilius, that I am being not only reformed, but transformed. ~ Seneca,
842:If you will fear nothing, think that all things are to be feared. ~ Seneca the Younger,
843:I was not born for one corner. The whole world is my native land. ~ Seneca the Younger,
844:Men love their country, not because it is great, but because it is their own. ~ Seneca,
845:Nature has given us the seeds of knowledge, not knowledge itself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
846:Never to wrong others takes one a long way towards peace of mind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
847:Our posterity will wonder about our ignorance of things so plain. ~ Seneca the Younger,
848:Reason shows us there is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so. ~ Seneca,
849:Shun no toil to make yourself remarkable by some talent or other. ~ Seneca the Younger,
850:The first step in a person's salvation is knowledge of their sin. ~ Seneca the Younger,
851:The path of precept is long, that of example short and effectual. ~ Seneca the Younger,
852:The physician cannot prescribe by letter, he must feel the pulse. ~ Seneca the Younger,
853:There has never been any great genius without a spice of madness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
854:They who have light in themselves will not revolve as satellites. ~ Seneca the Younger,
855:Time is the one thing that is given to everyone in equal measure. ~ Seneca the Younger,
856:Death is the wish of some, the relief of many, and the end of all. ~ Seneca the Younger,
857:El verdadero héroe en una obra literaria es el lector que la aguanta". Séneca. ~ Seneca,
858:I call him a man who recognises no possessions save those he finds in himself. ~ Seneca,
859:I shall never be ashamed of citing a bad author if the line is good. ~ Seneca the Elder,
860:It is extravagance to ask of others what can be procured by oneself. ~ Seneca: Epistles,
861:La mayor rémora de la vida es la espera del mañana y la pérdida del día de hoy ~ Seneca,
862:Let us say what we feel, and feel what we say; let speech harmonize with life. ~ Seneca,
863:Life's neither a good nor an evil: it's a field for good and evil. ~ Seneca the Younger,
864:Night brings our troubles to the light, rather than banishes them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
865:No book can be so good, as to be profitable when negligently read. ~ Seneca the Younger,
866:No one can hold absolute power for long, controlled power endures. ~ Seneca the Younger,
867:No one's so old that he mayn't with decency hope for one more day. ~ Seneca the Younger,
868:Our care should not be to have lived long as to have lived enough. ~ Seneca the Younger,
869:Philosophy is good advice; and no one can give advice at the top of his lungs. ~ Seneca,
870:Remember, not one penny can we take with us into the unknown land. ~ Seneca the Younger,
871:Silently time sneaks up on you, each hour
gone is followed by a worse one. ~ Seneca,
872:The articulate, trained voice is more distracting than mere noise. ~ Seneca the Younger,
873:The day which we fear as our last is but the birthday of eternity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
874:The mind makes the nobleman, and uplifts the lowly to high degree. ~ Seneca the Younger,
875:They lose the day in waiting for the night, and the night in fearing the dawn. ~ Seneca,
876:Those who boast of their descent, brag on what they owe to others. ~ Seneca the Younger,
877:Amintirea plăcerilor este mai de durată și mai de încredere decât prezența lor. ~ Seneca,
878:Anger is like those ruins which smash themselves on what they fall. ~ Seneca the Younger,
879:As Seneca says, “Light griefs are loquacious, but the great are dumb. ~ Mary Ann Shaffer,
880:Begin at once to live, and count each separate day as a separate life.
   ~ Seneca, [T5],
881:Enjoy present pleasures in such a way as not to injure future ones. ~ Seneca the Younger,
882:If we could be satisfied with anything, we should have been satisfied long ago. ~ Seneca,
883:If you wish another to keep your secret, first keep it to yourself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
884:it is while Fortune is kind that it should fortify itself against her violence. ~ Seneca,
885:It's not years nor days, but the mind, that determines that we've lived enough. ~ Seneca,
886:Let us bear with magnanimity whatever it is needful for us to bear. ~ Seneca the Younger,
887:Life is a play.It's not its length,but its performance that counts. ~ Seneca the Younger,
888:No man is crushed by misfortune unless he has first been deceived by prosperity ~ Seneca,
889:Nothing is void of God, his work is everywhere his full of himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
890:Other men's sins are before our eyes; our own are behind our backs. ~ Seneca the Younger,
891:Quanto potius, deorum opera celebrare quam Philippi aut Alexandri latrocinia... ~ Seneca,
892:The mind does not easily unlearn what it has been long in learning. ~ Seneca the Younger,
893:The road by precepts is tedious, by example, short and efficacious. ~ Seneca the Younger,
894:The soul has this proof of divinity: that divine things delight it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
895:We most often go astray on a well trodden and much frequented road. ~ Seneca the Younger,
896:What need is there to weep over parts of life? The whole of it calls for tears. ~ Seneca,
897:And there’s no state of slavery more disgraceful than one which is self-imposed. ~ Seneca,
898:«Come un racconto, così è la vita: non importa che sia lunga, ma che sia buona». ~ Seneca,
899:Go on and increase in valor, O boy! this is the path to immortality. ~ Seneca the Younger,
900:If you are surprised at the number of our maladies, count our cooks. ~ Seneca the Younger,
901:If you wish to fear nothing, consider that everything is to be feared. ~ Seneca the Elder,
902:In a moment the ashes are made, but a forest is a long time growing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
903:It is medicine, not scenery, for which a sick man must go searching. ~ Seneca the Younger,
904:It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor. ~ Seneca,
905:No man is crushed by misfortune unless he has first been deceived by prosperity ~ Seneca,
906:No work is of such merit as to instruct from a mere cursory perusal. ~ Seneca the Younger,
907:Seneca put it, life does not pause to remind you that it is running out. ~ Sarah Bakewell,
908:The Fates guide those who go willingly. Those who do not, they drag. ~ Seneca the Younger,
909:The problem, Paulinus, is not that we have a short life, but that we waste time. ~ Seneca,
910:Theseus: What is the crime for which you must pay by death?
Phaedra: My life. ~ Seneca,
911:The willing, destiny guides them; the unwilling, destiny drags them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
912:This body is not a home, but an inn; and that only for a short time. ~ Seneca the Younger,
913:wealth however limited, if it is entrusted to a good guardian, increases by use, ~ Seneca,
914:We think that death comes after, whereas in fact it comes both before and after. ~ Seneca,
915:Whatsoever has exceeded its proper limit is in an unstable position. ~ Seneca the Younger,
916:Your greatest difficulty is with yourself; for you are your own stumbling-block. ~ Seneca,
917:A happy life is the fruit of wisdom achieved; life bearable, of wisdom commenced. ~ Seneca,
918:Death is a punishment to some, to others a gift and to many a favour. ~ Seneca the Younger,
919:El único bien, causa y soporte de la vida feliz, consiste en confiar en sí mismo. ~ Seneca,
920:I am not born for any one corner of the universe; this whole world is my country. ~ Seneca,
921:It is more fitting for a man to laugh at life than to lament over it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
922:It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor. ~ Seneca,
923:It is the fault of youth that it cannot restrain its own impetuosity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
924:Know this, that he that is a friend to himself, is a friend to all men. ~ Seneca the Elder,
925:Let no man give advice to others that he has not first given himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
926:LETTERA 5 INVITO ALLA SEMPLICITA'

Nessuno è infelice solo per il presente. ~ Seneca,
927:One who seeks friendship for favourable occasions, strips it of all its nobility. ~ Seneca,
928:Our fears are always more numerous than our dangers.”—Seneca the Younger ~ Timothy Ferriss,
929:Success gives the character of honesty to some classes of wickedness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
930:That which has been endured with difficulty is remedied with delight. ~ Seneca the Younger,
931:The heart is great which shows moderation in the midst of prosperity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
932:There is an old adage about gladiators, - that they plan their fight in the ring. ~ Seneca,
933:The tempest threatens before it comes; houses creak before they fall. ~ Seneca the Younger,
934:The vices of idleness are only to be shaken off by active employment. ~ Seneca the Younger,
935:They lose the day in expectation of the night, and the night in fear of the dawn. ~ Seneca,
936:Those that are a friend to themselves are sure to be a friend to all. ~ Seneca the Younger,
937:We Stoics are not subjects of a despot: each of us lays claim to his own freedom. ~ Seneca,
938:When a man does not know what harbor he is making for, no wind is the right wind. ~ Seneca,
939:As is a tale, so is life: not how long it is, but how good it is, is what matters. ~ Seneca,
940:Bonis nocet, qui malis parcit.
He harms the good (people) who spares the evil. ~ Seneca,
941:by overloading the body with food you strangle the soul and render it less active. ~ Seneca,
942:For love of bustle is not industry, —it is only the restlessness of a hunted mind. ~ Seneca,
943:Great men rejoice in adversity, just as brave soldiers triumph in war. ~ Seneca the Younger,
944:How can the soul which misunderstands itself, have a sure idea of other creatures? ~ Seneca,
945:If you don't know what port you are sailing to, no wind is favourable. ~ Seneca the Younger,
946:Ninguém valoriza o tempo, faz-se uso dele muito largamente como se fosse gratuito. ~ Seneca,
947:No man can be sane who searches for what will injure him in place of what is best. ~ Seneca,
948:That is never too often repeated, which is never sufficiently learned. ~ Seneca the Younger,
949:The bravest sight in the world is to see a great man struggling against adversity. ~ Seneca,
950:The greatest power of ruling consists in the exercise of self-control. ~ Seneca the Younger,
951:The wise man lives as long as he should, not just as long as he likes. ~ Seneca the Younger,
952:They are pleased to deceive themselves, as if they deceived Fate at the same time. ~ Seneca,
953:Away with the world's opinion of you-it's always unsettled and divided. ~ Seneca the Younger,
954:Bear in mind that you commit a crime by injuring even a wicked brother. ~ Seneca the Younger,
955:For if we could be satisfied with anything, we should have been satisfied long ago. ~ Seneca,
956:Greed is satisfied by nothing, but nature finds satisfaction even in scant measure. ~ Seneca,
957:Il maggiore ostacolo al vivere è l’attesa, che dipende dal domani e consuma l’oggi. ~ Seneca,
958:I shall never be ashamed to quote a bad author if what he says is good. ~ Seneca the Younger,
959:It is the failing of youth not to be able to restrain its own violence. ~ Seneca the Younger,
960:Nessun vento è favorevole per il marinaio che non sa a quale porto vuole approdare. ~ Seneca,
961:No condition is so distressing that a balanced mind cannot find some comfort in it. ~ Seneca,
962:Slavery holds few men fast; the greater number hold fast their slavery. ~ Seneca the Younger,
963:So live with an inferior as you would wish a superior to live with you. ~ Seneca the Younger,
964:The Best sign of Wisdom is the consistency between the words and deeds. ~ Seneca the Younger,
965:We are sure to get the better of fortune if we do but grapple with her. ~ Seneca the Younger,
966:Accustom yourself to that which you bear ill, and you will bear it well. ~ Seneca the Younger,
967:Anyone who likes may make things easier for himself by viewing them with equanimity. ~ Seneca,
968:For men cease to possess all things the moment they desire all things for their own. ~ Seneca,
969:He who boasts of his pedigree praises that which does not belong to him. ~ Seneca the Younger,
970:He who seeks wisdom is a wise man; he who thinks he has found it is mad. ~ Seneca the Younger,
971:If you would not have a man flinch when the crisis comes, train him before it comes. ~ Seneca,
972:It is not the man who has little, but he who desires more, that is poor. ~ Seneca the Younger,
973:It is not the man who has to little who is poor, but the one who hankers after more. ~ Seneca,
974:There is no such thing as good or bad fortune for the individual; we live in common. ~ Seneca,
975:We are born under circumstances that would be favourable if we did not abandon them. ~ Seneca,
976:Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for a kindness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
977:You act like mortals in all that you fear, and like immortals in all that you desire ~ Seneca,
978:A large part of mankind is angry not with the sins, but with the sinners. ~ Seneca the Younger,
979:He who looks for advantage out of friendship strips it all of its nobility. ~ Seneca the Elder,
980:How can a thing possibly govern others when it cannot be governed itself? ~ Seneca the Younger,
981:Humanity is fortunate, because no man is unhappy except by his own fault. ~ Seneca the Younger,
982:If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favourable. ~ Seneca the Younger,
983:It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor. What ~ Seneca,
984:It is not the man who has too little who is poor, but the one who hankers after more. ~ Seneca,
985:Kalau anda ingin orang lain merahasiakan rahasia anda, simpanlah sendiri rahasia itu. ~ Seneca,
986:No choice maxims - we Stoics don't practice that kind of window dressing. ~ Seneca the Younger,
987:No one can have a peaceful life who thinks too much about lengthening it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
988:Of this one thing make sure against your dying day—let your faults die before you die ~ Seneca,
989:Seneca, the Roman philosopher. Sometimes, even to live is an act of courage. ~ Janet Evanovich,
990:So live with men as if God saw you and speak to God, as if men heard you. ~ Seneca the Younger,
991:The first and greatest punishment of the sinner is the conscience of sin. ~ Seneca the Younger,
992:The kind of solace that arises from having company in misery is spiteful. ~ Seneca the Younger,
993:True happiness is...to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future. ~ Seneca,
994:What narrow innocence it is for one to be good only according to the law. ~ Seneca the Younger,
995:What really ruins our character is the fact that none of us looks back over his life. ~ Seneca,
996:You act like mortals in all that you fear, and like immortals in all that you desire. ~ Seneca,
997:A good character is the only guarantee of everlasting, carefree happiness. ~ Seneca the Younger,
998:Be wary of the man who urges an action in which he himself incurs no risk. ~ Seneca the Younger,
999:If you would escape your troubles, you need not another place but another personality. ~ Seneca,
1000:It does not matter how many books you have, but how good the books are which you have. ~ Seneca,
1001:it is better to understand the balance-sheet of one’s own life than of the corn trade. ~ Seneca,
1002:It is indeed foolish to be unhappy now because you may be unhappy at some future time. ~ Seneca,
1003:It is not the man who has too little that is poor, but the one who hankers after more. ~ Seneca,
1004:Its harder for people to seek retirement from themselves than from the law ~ Seneca the Younger,
1005:It's not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1006:Lay hold of today's task, and you will not depend so much upon tomorrow's. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1007:Life’s like a play. It’s not the length but the excellence of the acting that matters. ~ Seneca,
1008:No man can live a happy life, or even a supportable life, without the study of wisdom. ~ Seneca,
1009:No one can be despised by another until he has learned to despise himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1010:Not to feel one's misfortunes is not human, not to bear them is not manly. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1011:Retirement without literary amusements is death itself, and a living tomb. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1012:See how many are better off than you are, but consider how many are worse. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1013:Take away ambition and vanity, and where will be your heroes and patriots? ~ Seneca the Younger,
1014:The road to learning by precept is long, but by example short and effective. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1015:The worst evil of all is to leave the ranks of the living before one dies. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1016:Whatever one of us blames in another, each one will find in his own heart. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1017:You should keep on learning as long as there is something you do not know. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1018:Death is sometimes a punishment, often a gift; to many it has been a favor. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1019:Es ist nicht wenig Zeit, die wir haben, sondern es ist viel Zeit, die wir nicht nutzen. ~ Seneca,
1020:It is a great thing to know the season for speech and the season for silence. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1021:It is extreme evil to depart from the company of the living before you die. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1022:Philosophy's power to blunt all the blows of circumstance is beyond belief. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1023:Prudence and love cannot be mixed; you can end love, but never moderate it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1024:Sorrowers tend to avoid what they are most fond of and try to give vent to their grief. ~ Seneca,
1025:The acquisition of riches has been for many men, not an end, but a change, of troubles. ~ Seneca,
1026:The fool, with all his other faults, has this also, he is always getting ready to live. ~ Seneca,
1027:The real compensation of a right action is inherent in having performed it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1028:There is nothing wrong with changing a plan when the situation has changed. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1029:True praise comes often even to the lowly; false praise only to the strong. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1030:Whenever you hold a fellow creature in distress, remember that he is a man. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1031:A gift consists not in what is done or given, but in the intention of the giver or doer. ~ Seneca,
1032:And first of all, we should have no cravings like theirs; for rivalry results in strife. ~ Seneca,
1033:A sword by itself does not slay; it is merely the weapon used by the slayer. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1034:Everything that exceeds the bounds of moderation has an unstable foundation. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1035:For that is the people’s verdict, but wise men on the whole reject the people’s decrees. ~ Seneca,
1036:He who blushes at riding in a rattletrap, will boast when he rides in style. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1037:If you wish to have leisure for your mind, either be a poor man, or resemble a poor man. ~ Seneca,
1038:In every good person, there lives a god. Which god? We cannot be sure - but it is a god. ~ Seneca,
1039:I require myself not to be equal to the best, but to be better then the bad. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1040:It is the characteristic of a weak and diseased mind to fear the unfamiliar. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1041:It should be our care not so much to live a long life as a satisfactory one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1042:Let him who has given a favor be silent; let he who has received it tell it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1043:Life is like a play: it's not the length, but the excellence of the acting that matters. ~ Seneca,
1044:No one loves his country for its size or eminence, but because it's his own. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1045:Of this one thing make sure against your dying day - that your faults die before you do. ~ Seneca,
1046:So enjoy the pleasures of the hour as not to spoil those that are to follow. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1047:to make Pythocles rich, do not add to his store of money, but subtract from his desires. ~ Seneca,
1048:Whatever has overstepped its due bounds is always in a state of instability. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1049:When once ambition has passed its natural limits, its progress is boundless. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1050:You can tell the character of every man when you see how he receives praise. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1051:A guilty person sometimes has the luck to escape detection, but never to feel sure of it. ~ Seneca,
1052:And what is more wretched than a man who forgets his benefits and clings to his injuries? ~ Seneca,
1053:A wise man never asks what another man serves, for only his actions will speak the truth. ~ Seneca,
1054:But the man who is not puffed up in good times does not collapse either when they change. ~ Seneca,
1055:For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them ~ Seneca,
1056:He, who holds out but a doubtful hope of succour to the afflicted, denies it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1057:He who receives a benefit with gratitude, repays the first installment of it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1058:I do not know any person with whom I should prefer you to associate rather than yourself. ~ Seneca,
1059:I hold that one is braver at the very moment of death than when one is approaching death. ~ Seneca,
1060:It is impossible to imagine anything which better becomes a ruler than mercy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1061:It is wrong to live under constraint; but no man is constrained to live under constraint. ~ Seneca,
1062:Lay hold of today's task, and you will not need to depend so much upon to-morrow's. While ~ Seneca,
1063:Men love their country, not because it is great, but because it is their own. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1064:Non est ad astra mollis e terris via" - "There is no easy way from the earth to the stars ~ Seneca,
1065:No one is the object of another man's contempt, unless he is first the object of his own. ~ Seneca,
1066:Not single is the death which comes; the death Which takes us off is but the last of all. ~ Seneca,
1067:The best ideas are common property. ~ Seneca the Younger, "On Old Age", Moral Letters to Lucilius.,
1068:The gladiator is formulating his plan in the arena or essentially Too late. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1069:The greatest man is he who chooses right with the most invincible resolution. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1070:The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today. ~ Seneca,
1071:Vice is contagious, and there is no trusting the sound and the sick together. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1072:We are wrong in looking forward to death: in great measure it's past already. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1073:Whatever fortune has raised to a height, she has raised only to cast it down. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1074:When arrogant hands once seize power, the ruler thinks authority resides in stubbornness. ~ Seneca,
1075:You can only acquire it successfully if you cease to feel any sense of shame. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1076:You can tell the character of every man when you see how he receives praise.”   Difficult ~ Seneca,
1077:You must lay aside the burdens of the mind; until you do this, no place will satisfy you. ~ Seneca,
1078:Associate with people who are likely to improve you. —SENECA, Letters from a Stoic ~ Gretchen Rubin,
1079:Be deaf to those who love you most of all; they pray for bad things with good intentions.  ~ Seneca,
1080:He robs present ills of their power who has perceived their coming beforehand. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1081:Just as with storytelling, so with life: it's important how well it is done, not how long. ~ Seneca,
1082:Let us say what we feel, and feel what we say; let speech harmonize with life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1083:Look at the stars lighting up the sky: no one of them stays in the same place. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1084:No man finds it difficult to return to nature, except the man who has deserted nature.  We ~ Seneca,
1085:So called pleasures, when they go beyond a certain limit, are but punishments. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1086:Something that can never be learnt too thoroughly can never be said too often. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1087:That day, which you fear as being the end of all things, is the birthday of your eternity. ~ Seneca,
1088:The best compromise between love and good sense is both to feel longing and to conquer it. ~ Seneca,
1089:The chief bond of the soldier is his oath of allegiance and love for the flag. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1090:The way is long if one follows precepts, but short... if one follows patterns. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1091:What a vile and abject thing is man if he do not raise himself above humanity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1092:What then is good? The knowledge of things. What is evil? The lack of knowledge of things. ~ Seneca,
1093:When you die, it will not be because you are sick, but because you were alive. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1094:Wisdom is a thing vast and grand. She demands all the time that one can consecrate to her. ~ Seneca,
1095:A favor is to a grateful man delightful always; to an ungrateful man only once. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1096:Call it Nature, Fate, Fortune; all these are names of the one and selfsame God. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1097:If a man does not know what port he is steering for, no wind is favorable to him. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1098:It's the admirer and the watcher who provoke us to all the inanities we commit. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1099:Life is a gift of the immortal Gods, but living well is the gift of philosophy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1100:Long is the road to learning by precepts, but short and successful by examples. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1101:Silence is a lesson learned from the many sufferings of life.” —SENECA, THYESTES, 309 ~ Ryan Holiday,
1102:Some lack the fickleness to live as they wish and just live as they have begun. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1103:Some laws, though unwritten, are more firmly established than all written laws. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1104:The evil which assails us is not in the localities we inhabit but in ourselves. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1105:The man who has anticipated the coming of troubles takes away their power when they arrive. ~ Seneca,
1106:The young character, which cannot hold fast to righteousness, must be rescued from the mob; ~ Seneca,
1107:Virtue needs a director and guide. Vice can be learned even without a teacher. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1108:What need is there to weep over parts of life? The whole of it calls for tears. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1109:Wisdom is a thing vast and grand. She demands all the time that one can consecrate to her. ~ Seneca,
1110:You cease to be afraid when you cease to hope; for hope is accompanied by fear. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1111:Anger, if not restrained, is frequently more hurtful to us than the injury that provokes it. ~ Seneca,
1112:Be not dazzled by beauty, but look for those inward qualities which are lasting. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1113:Corporeal punishment falls far more heavily than most weighty pecuniary penalty. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1114:Expecting is the greatest impediment to living. In anticipation of tomorrow, it loses today. ~ Seneca,
1115:God has given some gifts to the whole human race, from which no one is excluded. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1116:Hang on to your youthful enthusiasms -- you’ll be able to use them better when you’re older. ~ Seneca,
1117:If thou art a man, admire those who attempt great things, even though they fail. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1118:If you look on wealth as a thing to be valued your imaginary poverty will cause you torment. ~ Seneca,
1119:It is bad to live for necessity; but there is no necessity to live in necessity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1120:Let us withdraw ourselves in every way; for it is as harmful to be scorned as to be admired. ~ Seneca,
1121:Men are not made restless by activity but driven to madness by false impressions of reality. ~ Seneca,
1122:Only a mind that is deeply stirred can utter something noble and beyond the power of others. ~ Seneca,
1123:Philosophy is good advice, and no one gives good advice at the top of his lungs. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1124:Quo quis est doctor, eo est modestior. The English translation is inmy book THE BANYAN TREE. ~ Seneca,
1125:There is as much greatness of mind in acknowledging a good turn, as in doing it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1126:This is the reason we cannot complain of life: it keeps no one against his will. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1127:To the person who does not know where he wants to go there is no favorable wind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1128:We become wiser by adversity; prosperity destroys our appreciation of the right. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1129:Anger is like a ruin, which, in falling upon its victim, breaks itself to pieces. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1130:Behold a contest worthy of a god, a brave man matched in conflict with adversity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1131:det ille veniam facile, cui venia est opus - the one who needs pardon should readily grant it ~ Seneca,
1132:Do you ask what is the foundation of a sound mind? It is, not to find joy in useless things.  ~ Seneca,
1133:If you sit in judgment, investigate, if you sit in supreme power, sit in command. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1134:It is a small part of life we really live.’ Indeed, all the rest is not life but merely time. ~ Seneca,
1135:It is difficult to bring people to goodness with lessons, but it is easy to do so by example. ~ Seneca,
1136:Live among others as if God beheld you; speak to God as if others were listening. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1137:No man enjoys the true taste of life, but he who is ready and willing to quit it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1138:offer new prayers; pray for a sound mind and for good health, first of soul and then of body. ~ Seneca,
1139:The comfort of having a friend may be taken away, but not that of having had one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1140:The highest good is a mind that scorns the happenings of chance, and rejoices only in virtue. ~ Seneca,
1141:The wise man will always reflect concerning the quality not the quantity of life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1142:They lose the day in expectation of the night, and the night in fear of the dawn. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1143:We are more often frightened than hurt; and we suffer more from imagination than from reality ~ Seneca,
1144:We are not given a short life but we make it short... Life is long if you know how to use it. ~ Seneca,
1145:What you think about yourself is much more important than what others think of you. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1146:Beauty is such a fleeting blossom, how can wisdom rely upon its momentary delight? ~ Seneca the Younger,
1147:Desultory reading is delightful, but to be beneficial, our reading must be carefully directed. ~ Seneca,
1148:How much longer are you going to be a pupil? From now on do some teaching as well. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1149:If you wish to have leisure for your mind, either be a poor man, or resemble a poor man. Study ~ Seneca,
1150:I think the pinnacle of misfortune is to be forced by chance to want things one should loathe. ~ Seneca,
1151:No man has been shattered by the blows of Fortune unless he was first deceived by her favours. ~ Seneca,
1152:Non est ad astra mollis e terris via” - “There is no easy way from the earth to the stars” “To ~ Seneca,
1153:Seneca’s line “Let the wickedness escape . . . for every guilty person is his own hangman. ~ Karen Mack,
1154:The bravest sight in the world is to see a great man struggling against adversity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1155:there are a few men whom slavery holds fast, but there are many more who hold fast to slavery. ~ Seneca,
1156:There is no need to complain of particular grievances, for life in its entirety is lamentable. ~ Seneca,
1157:To live under constraint is a misfortune, but there is no constraint to live under constraint. ~ Seneca,
1158:[T]reat your inferiors in the way in which you would like to be treated by your own superiors. ~ Seneca,
1159:Whatever is well said by anyone is mine. ~ Seneca the Younger, Moral Letters, R. Gummere, trans. (1917),
1160:Where you arrive does not matter as much as what sort of person you are when you arrive there. ~ Seneca,
1161:Anger will abate and become more controlled when it knows it must come before a judge each day. ~ Seneca,
1162:Anyone can stop a man's life, but no one his death; a thousand doors open on to it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1163:Be silent as to services you have rendered, but speak of favours you have received. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1164:Inwardly, we ought to be different in all respects, but our exterior should conform to society. ~ Seneca,
1165:It is not poverty that we praise, it is the man whom poverty cannot humble or bend. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1166:It is true greatness to have in one the frailty of a man and the security of a god. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1167:Nature gave us legs with which to do our own walking, and eyes with which to do our own seeing. ~ Seneca,
1168:Nije da se ne usuđujemo zato što su stvari teške; već su stvari teške zato što se ne usuđujemo. ~ Seneca,
1169:No past life has been lived to lend us glory, and that which has existed before us is not ours. ~ Seneca,
1170:Nothing is as certain as that the vices of leisure are gotten rid of by being busy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1171:Perhaps it will come, perhaps not; in the meantime it is not. So look forward to better things. ~ Seneca,
1172:That which is given with pride and ostentation is rather an ambition than a bounty. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1173:The key to getting everything you want is to never put all your begs in one ask-it! ~ Seneca the Younger,
1174:there can be no place of exile within the world since nothing within the world is alien to men. ~ Seneca,
1175:There is a noble manner of being poor, and who does not know it will never be rich. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1176:Whoever said that smart men were bad in bed clearly hadn’t been banged by Seneca Seminole. ~ Avery Aster,
1177:Your greatness is within and only in yourselves can you find a spectacle worthy of your regard. ~ Seneca,
1178:A grey-haired wrinkled man has not necessarily lived long. More accurately, he has existed long. ~ Seneca,
1179:A man who suffers or stresses before it is necessary, suffers more than is necessary ~ Seneca the Younger,
1180:Do the best you can . . . enjoy the present . . . rest satisfied with what you have. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1181:However wretched a fellow-mortal may be, he is still a member of our common species. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1182:Human society is like an arch, kept from falling by the mutual pressure of its parts ~ Seneca the Younger,
1183:Ignis aurum probat, miseria fortes viros.
Fire is the test of gold; adversity, of strong men. ~ Seneca,
1184:Leisure without study is death—a tomb for the living person.” —SENECA, MORAL LETTERS, 82.4 ~ Ryan Holiday,
1185:LETTERA 2 LA LETTURA CHE GIOVA

È povero non chi possiede poco, ma chi brama avere di più. ~ Seneca,
1186:Religion is regarded by the ignorant as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful. ~ Seneca,
1187:The greatest hindrance to living is expectancy, which depends upon the morrow and wastes to-day. ~ Seneca,
1188:There is no enjoying the possession of anything valuable unless one has someone to share it with ~ Seneca,
1189:To want simply what is enough nowadays suggests to people primitiveness and squalor. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1190:He grieves more than is necessary who grieves before any cause for sorrow has arisen. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1191:If i had not been admitted to these studies it would not have been worth while to have been born. ~ Seneca,
1192:It is by the benefit of letters that absent friends are in a manner brought together. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1193:Let no one rob me of a single day who is not going to make me an adequate return for such a loss. ~ Seneca,
1194:Light cares speak, great ones are speechless. -Curae leves loquuntur ingentes stupent ~ Seneca the Younger,
1195:No man finds it difficult to return to nature except the man who has deserted nature. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1196:No man is so faint-hearted that he would rather hang in suspense for ever than drop once for all. ~ Seneca,
1197:No one can long hide behind a mask; the pretense soon lapses into the true character. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1198:Our universe is a sorry little affair unless it has in it something for every age to investigate. ~ Seneca,
1199:pleasure, unless it has been kept within bounds, tends to rush headlong into the abyss of sorrow. ~ Seneca,
1200:Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by rulers as useful. ~ Seneca,
1201:Seneca may have put it best two thousand years ago: “To be everywhere is to be nowhere.”51 ~ Nicholas Carr,
1202:Seneca observes that “chastity comes with time to spare, lechery has never a moment.”11 ~ William B Irvine,
1203:The artist finds a greater pleasure in painting than in having completed the picture. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1204:The fool's life is empty of gratitude and full of fears; its course lies wholly toward the future ~ Seneca,
1205:There's some end at last for the man who follows a path; mere rambling is interminable. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1206:The surest way for those who want to rule
is praising moderation, talking of peace and quiet. ~ Seneca,
1207:To reduce your worry, you must assume that what you fear may happen is certainly going to happen. ~ Seneca,
1208:True happiness is...to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1209:We often want one thing and pray for another, not telling the truth even to the gods. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1210:What shall we not go in fear of if we fear that which cowardice itself has chosen for its refuge? ~ Seneca,
1211:Where you arrive does not matter so much as what sort of person you are when you arrive there. We ~ Seneca,
1212:Certain laws have not been written, but they are more fixed than all the written laws. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1213:Demand not that I am the equal of the greatest, only that I am better than the wicked. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1214:Each man has a character of his own choosing; it is chance or fate that decides his choice of job. ~ Seneca,
1215:Gegen die Leidenschaften muss man in kräftigem Ansturm kämpfen, nich tmit bedächtiger Behutsamkeit ~ Seneca,
1216:He is greedy of life who is not willing to die when the world is perishing around him. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1217:It does not matter how many books you have, but how good the books are which you have. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1218:It is the evil mind that gets first hold on all of us.  Learning virtue means unlearning vice.  We ~ Seneca,
1219:It’s not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it.” -Lucius Annaeus Seneca ~ Seneca,
1220:Nero: "Am I forbidden to do what all may do?"
Seneca: "From high rank high example is expected. ~ Seneca,
1221:No man is more unhappy than he who never faces adversity. For he is not permitted to prove himself ~ Seneca,
1222:One who's our friend is fond of us; one who's fond of us isn't necessarily our friend. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1223:People pay the doctor for his trouble; for his kindness they still remain in his debt. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1224:The fool's life is empty of gratitude and full of fears; its course lies wholly toward the future. ~ Seneca,
1225:The part of life we really live is small”. All the rest of existence is not life, but merely time. ~ Seneca,
1226:Those vices [luxury and neglect of decent manners] are vices of men, not of the times. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1227:Those whom fortune has never favored are more joyful than those whom she has deserted. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1228:To preserve the life of citizens, is the greatest virtue in the father of his country. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1229:Undisturbed by fears and unspoiled by pleasures, we shall be afraid neither of death nor the gods. ~ Seneca,
1230:What difference does it make, after all, what your position in life is if you dislike it yourself? ~ Seneca,
1231:What progress have I made? I am beginning to be my own friend. That is progress indeed ~ Seneca the Younger,
1232:A man who has taken your time recognises no debt; yet it is the one he can never repay. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1233:Believe me if you consult philosophy she will persuade you not to lit so long at your counting desk ~ Seneca,
1234:For the great benefits of our being- our life, health, and reason-we look upon ourselves. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1235:f you wish to put off all worry, assume that what you fear may happen is certainly going to happen. ~ Seneca,
1236:Homines, dum docent, discunt. - Men learn while they teach. ~ Seneca the Younger, Epistolæ Ad Lucilium, VII.,
1237:Humanity is the quality which stops one being arrogant towards one's fellows, or being acrimonious. ~ Seneca,
1238:I do not distinguish by the eye, but by the mind, which is the proper judge of the man. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1239:Life's like a play; it's not the length, but the excellence of the acting that matters. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1240:No one has anything finished, because we have kept putting off into the future all our undertakings ~ Seneca,
1241:On him does death lie heavily, who, but too well known to all, dies to himself unknown. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1242:The amount of life we truly live is small. For our existence on Earth is not Life, but merely Time. ~ Seneca,
1243:The first proof of a well-ordered mind is to be able to pause and linger within itself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1244:There's one blessing only, the source and cornerstone of beatitude: confidence in self. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1245:To be able to endure odium is the first art to be learned by those who aspire to power. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1246:we are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not ill-supplied but wasteful of it. ~ Seneca,
1247:We must indulge the mind and from time to time allow it the leisure which is its food and strength. ~ Seneca,
1248:We shall be rich with all the more comfort, if we once learn how far poverty is from being a burden ~ Seneca,
1249:What is harder than rock? What is softer than water? Yet hard rocks are hollowed out by soft water? ~ Seneca,
1250:why should I demand of Fortune that she give rather than demand of myself that I should not crave?  ~ Seneca,
1251:Afasta-te da companhia dos perniciosos, eles fazem nascer em ti um licenciosidade que lhe é natutal. ~ Seneca,
1252:If we desire to judge justly, we must persuade ourselves that none of us is without sin. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1253:I guess this is a bad time to mention I hung a dummy and painted Seneca Crane's name on it. ~ Suzanne Collins,
1254:Let him that hath done the good office conceal it; let him that received it disclose it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1255:Let tears flow of their own accord: their flowing is not inconsistent with inward peace and harmony. ~ Seneca,
1256:Many shed tears merely for show, and have dry eyes when no one's around to observe them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1257:Most people fancy themselves innocent of those crimes of which they cannot be convicted. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1258:No delicate breeze brings comfort with icy breath of wind
to the hearts which pant on the flames. ~ Seneca,
1259:No good thing renders its possessor happy, unless his mind is reconciled to the possibility of loss. ~ Seneca,
1260:Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful ~ Seneca,
1261:That day which you fear as being the end of all things is the birthday of your eternity. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1262:The fool, with all his other faults, has this also, he is always getting ready to live."[3] Reflect, ~ Seneca,
1263:To strive with an equal is dangerous; with a superior, mad; with an inferior, degrading. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1264:What is more insane than to vent on senseless things the anger that is felt towards men? ~ Seneca the Younger,
1265:Why do I not seek some real good; one which I could feel, not one which I could display? ~ Seneca the Younger,
1266:A hungry people listens not to reason, not cares for justice, nor is bent by any prayers. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1267:It is wrong not to give a hand to the fallen. This right is common to the whole human race. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1268:It’s not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it.”
-Lucius Annaeus Seneca ~ Seneca,
1269:The man who while he gives thinks of what he will get in return, deserves to be deceived. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1270:therefore whenever his last day comes, the wise man will not hesitate to meet death with a firm step. ~ Seneca,
1271:whenever I wish to enjoy the quips of a clown, I am not compelled to hunt far; I can laugh at myself. ~ Seneca,
1272:You cannot, I repeat, successfully acquire it and preserve your modesty at the same time. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1273:A hungry people neither listens to reason nor is mollified by fair treatment or swayed by any appeals. ~ Seneca,
1274:Dum inter homines sumus, colamus humanitatem"

"As long as we are among humans, let us be humane ~ Seneca,
1275:For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1276:I guess this is a bad time to mention I hung a dummy and painted Seneca Crane's name on it... ~ Suzanne Collins,
1277:La vida es como una pieza teatral; no importa cuánto haya durado sino cuán bien haya sido representada ~ Seneca,
1278:Let the man, who would be grateful, think of repaying a kindness, even while receiving it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1279:The highest duty and the highest proof of wisdom - that deed and word should be in accord. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1280:The part of life we really live is small.' For all the rest of existence is not life, but merely time. ~ Seneca,
1281:The swiftness of time is infinite, as is still more evident when we look back on the past. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1282:To give and to lose is nothing; but to lose and to give still is the part of a great mind. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1283:We are all sinful. Therefore whatever we blame in another we shall find in our own bosoms. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1284:...we are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not ill-supplied but wasteful of it. ~ Seneca,
1285:What difference does it make how much you have? What you do not have amounts to much more. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1286:What does reason demand of a man? A very easy thing-to live in accord with his own nature. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1287:A benefit consists not in what is done or given, but in the intention of the giver or doer. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1288:A man who makes a decision without listening to both sides is unjust, even if his ruling is a fair one. ~ Seneca,
1289:Besides, he who is feared, fears also; no one has been able to arouse terror and live in peace of mind. ~ Seneca,
1290:Countless things that happen every hour call for advice; and such advice is to be sought in philosophy. ~ Seneca,
1291:Dangerous is wrath concealed. Hatred proclaimed doth lose its chance of wreaking vengeance. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1292:It is the practice of the multitude to bark at eminent men, as little dogs do at strangers. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1293:Live in this belief: “I am not born for any one corner of the universe; this whole world is my country. ~ Seneca,
1294:Natural abilities do not respond well to compulsion; when Nature is in opposition, labour is fruitless. ~ Seneca,
1295:Nūllum magnum ingenium sine mixtūrā dēmentiae fuit

No great talent without an element of madness ~ Seneca,
1296:Success is not greedy, as people think, but insignificant. That is why it satisfies nobody. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1297:There is only one relief for great sufferings, and that is to endure and surrender to their compulsion. ~ Seneca,
1298:The velocity with which time flies is infinite, as is most apparent to those who look back. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1299:Unhappy is the man, though he rule the world, who doesn't consider himself supremely blessed. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1300:Whereas a prolonged life is not necessarily better, a prolonged death is necessarily worse. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1301:Anger, if not restrained, is frequently more hurtful to us than the injury that provokes it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1302:Death falls heavily on that man who, known too well to others, dies in ignorance of himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1303:Ein kleiner Teil des Lebens nur ist wahres Leben, der ganze übrige Teil ist nicht Leben, ist blosse Zeit ~ Seneca,
1304:Everything is the product of one universal creative effort. There is nothing dead in Nature. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1305:Expecting is the greatest impediment to living. In anticipation of tomorrow, it loses today. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1306:It is a tedious thing to be always beginning life; they live badly who always begin to live. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1307:Let him who has granted a favour speak not of it; let him who has received one, proclaim it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1308:Life is like a play: it's not the length, but the excellence of the acting that matters. ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
1309:Life is long and there is enough of it for satisfying personal accomplishments if we use our hours well. ~ Seneca,
1310:Many person might have achieved wisdom had they not supposed that they already possessed it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1311:No evil propensity of the human heart is so powerful that it may not be subdued by discipline. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1312:pues para vivir mucho necesitas al destino, pero para vivir plenamente, la sola diligencia del espíritu. ~ Seneca,
1313:The greatest hindrance to living is expectancy, which depends upon tomorrow and wastes today ~ Seneca the Younger,
1314:There is nothing the busy man is less busied with than living: there is nothing that is harder to learn. ~ Seneca,
1315:There is nothing which persevering effort and unceasing and diligent care cannot accomplish. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1316:«The Shortness of Life: Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long.» ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1317:To fight against an equal is risky; against a higher-up, insane; against someone beneath you, degrading. ~ Seneca,
1318:We are more often frightened than hurt; and we suffer more from imagination than from reality. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1319:a man's peace of mind does not depend upon Fortune; for, even when angry she grants enough for our needs. ~ Seneca,
1320:Believe me, that was a happy age, before the days of architects, before the days of builders. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1321:Can you no longer see a road to freedom? It's right in front of you. You need only turn over your wrists. ~ Seneca,
1322:Concealed anger is to be feared; but hatred openly manifested destroys its chance of revenge. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1323:For it is disheartening to inspire in a man the desire, and to take away from him the hope, of emulation. ~ Seneca,
1324:If thou wishest to get rid of thy evil propensities, thou must keep far from evil companions. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1325:If what you have seems insufficient to you, then though you possess the world, you will yet be miserable. ~ Seneca,
1326:It is difficult to bring people to goodness with lessons, but it is easy to do so by example. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1327:It means much not to be spoiled by intimacy with riches; and he is truly great who is poor amidst riches. ~ Seneca,
1328:One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1329:Philosophy does not regard pedigree, she received Plato not as a noble, but she made him one. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1330:That which we are not permitted to have we delight in; that which we can have is disregarded. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1331:There are more things to alarm us than to harm us, and we suffer more often in apprehension than reality. ~ Seneca,
1332:There is nothing the busy man is less busied with than living:  there is nothing that is harder to learn. ~ Seneca,
1333:There is no worse penalty for vice than the fact that it is dissatisfied with itself and all its fellows. ~ Seneca,
1334:A quarrel is quickly settled when deserted by one party; there is no battle unless there be two. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1335:Desultory reading is delightful, but to be beneficial, our reading must be carefully directed. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1336:Everyone hustles his life along, and is troubled by a longing for the future and weariness of the present. ~ Seneca,
1337:For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them. ~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca,
1338:He invites the commission of a crime who does not forbid it, when it is in his power to do so. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1339:How much happier is the man who owes nothing to anybody except the one he can most easily refuse, himself! ~ Seneca,
1340:Inwardly, we ought to be different in every respect, but our outward dress should blend in with the crowd. ~ Seneca,
1341:It is expedient for the victor to wish for peace restored; for the vanquished it is necessary. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1342:Let the soul be submitted within to an upright judge whose authority extends over our most secret actions. ~ Seneca,
1343:Light griefs can speak: deep sorrows are dumb."      —Seneca, Hippolytus, act ii. scene 3.] A ~ Michel de Montaigne,
1344:May be is very well, but Must is the master. It is my duty to show justice without recompense. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1345:Men are so thoughtless, nay, so mad, that some, through fear of death, force themselves to die." Whichever ~ Seneca,
1346:Refuse to let the thought of death bother you: nothing is grim when we have escaped that fear. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1347:The liberal arts do not conduct the soul all the way to virtue, but merely set it going in that direction. ~ Seneca,
1348:The only really leisured people are those who devote time to acquiring true knowledge rather than trivia.  ~ Seneca,
1349:There are a few men whom slavery holds fast, but there are many more who hold fast to slavery. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1350:The road is long if one proceeds by way of precepts but short and effectual if by way of personal example. ~ Seneca,
1351:Whatever is to make us better and happy God has placed either openly before us or close to us. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1352:What nature requires is obtainable, and within easy reach. It is for the superfluous we sweat. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1353:What's the good of dragging up sufferings which are over, of being unhappy now just because you were then? ~ Seneca,
1354:When a person spends all his time in foreign travel, he ends by having many acquaintances, but no friends. ~ Seneca,
1355:All the greatest blessings create anxiety, and Fortune is never less to be trusted than when it is fairest. ~ Seneca,
1356:But life is very short and anxious for those who forget the past, neglect the present, and fear the future. ~ Seneca,
1357:Human greatness is not discovered until it is tested; we must be hardened against fortune by fortune itself ~ Seneca,
1358:It's the great soul that surrenders itself to fate, but a puny degenerate thing that struggles. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1359:We let ourselves drift with every breeze; we are frightened at uncertainties, just as if they were certain. ~ Seneca,
1360:When thou hast profited so much that thou respectest even thyself, thou mayst let go thy tutor. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1361:Wisdom teaches us to do, as well as to talk; and to make our words and actions all of a colour. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1362:Would you call Him Destiny? You will not be wrong. Providence? You will say well. Nature? That too you may. ~ Seneca,
1363:You find in some a sort of graceless modesty, that makes them ashamed to requite an obligation. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1364:Death: There's nothing bad about it at all except the thing that comes before it-the fear of it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1365:El mayor impedimento al vivir es la espera, que, por estar pendiente al día de mañana, pierde el día de hoy. ~ Seneca,
1366:He shows a greater mind who does not restrain his laughter, than he who does not deny his tears. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1367:I shall never be ashamed to quote a bad author if what he says is good. ~ Seneca the Younger, On Tranquility of Mind.,
1368:It is sweet to mingle tears with tears; Griefs, where they wound in solitude, Wound more deeply. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1369:Oft hat ein hochbetagter Greis keinen anderen Beweis für die Länge seiner Lebens als die Summe seiner Jahre. ~ Seneca,
1370:Possession of a friend should be with the spirit: the spirit's never absent: it sees daily whoever it likes. ~ Seneca,
1371:Some men have shrunk so far into dark corners that objects in bright daylight seem quite blurred to them.’ A ~ Seneca,
1372:There is nothing the busy man is less busied with than living; there is nothing harder to learn. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1373:There is nothing the busy man is less busied with than living:  there is nothing that is harder to learn. Of ~ Seneca,
1374:We do not receive a life that is short, but rather we make it so; we are not beggar in it, but spendthrifts. ~ Seneca,
1375:Would you call Him Destiny? You will not be wrong. Providence? You will say well. Nature? That too you may. ~ Seneca,
1376:A good person dyes events with his own color . . . and turns whatever happens to his own benefit. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1377:As it is with a play, so it is with life - what matters is not how long the acting lasts, but how good it is. ~ Seneca,
1378:if you wish Pythocles to have pleasure for ever, do not add to his pleasures, but subtract from his desires"; ~ Seneca,
1379:In times of happiness, no point in shaking things up.
But in a time of crisis, the safest thing is change. ~ Seneca,
1380:it is only in the ideal or perfect state that the virtues of the good citizen and the good man are identical. ~ Seneca,
1381:It is the constant fault and inseparable evil quality of ambition, that it never looks behind it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1382:It makes a great deal of difference whether one wills not to sin or has not the knowledge to sin. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1383:No man can have a peaceful life who thinks too much about lengthening it.’ Seneca (c. 4 BCE to 65 AD) ~ Julian Baggini,
1384:Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by rulers as useful. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1385:So it is: we are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not Ill-supplied but wasteful of it. ~ Seneca,
1386:The proper amount of wealth is that which neither descends to poverty nor is far distant from it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1387:Whoever does not regard what he has as most ample wealth, is unhappy, though he be master of the whole world. ~ Seneca,
1388:A man can refrain from wanting what he has not and cheerfully make the best of a bird in the hand. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1389:Choose as a guide one whom you will admire more when you see him act than when you hear him speak. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1390:Democritus[3] says: "One man means as much to me as a multitude, and a multitude only as much as one man." 11. ~ Seneca,
1391:Mit dem Leben ist es wie mit einem Theaterstück; es kommt nicht darauf an, wie lange es ist, sondern wie bunt. ~ Seneca,
1392:no one can merely go wrong by himself, but he must become both the cause and adviser of another's wrong doing. ~ Seneca,
1393:Philosophy calls for simple living, not for doing penance, and the simple way of life need not be a crude one. ~ Seneca,
1394:Take care that the reading of numerous writers and books of all kinds does not confuse and trouble thy reason. ~ Seneca,
1395:The best way to do good to ourselves is to do it to others; the right way to gather is to scatter. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1396:There is no evil that does not offer inducements. Vices tempt you by the rewards which they offer. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1397:These individulas have riches just as we say that we 'have a fever,' when really the fever has us. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1398:What difference does it make, after all, what your position in life is if you dislike it yourself? ~ Seneca the Younger,
1399:When we have done everything within our power, we shall possess a great deal: but we once possessed the world. ~ Seneca,
1400:Wisdom is the perfect good of the human mind; philosophy is the love of wisdom, and the endeavor to attain it. ~ Seneca,
1401:Everlasting misfortune does have one blessing, that it ends up by toughening those whom it constantly afflicts. ~ Seneca,
1402:for only philosophy or honourable occupation can divert from its anguish a heart whose grief springs from love. ~ Seneca,
1403:No man is more unhappy than he who never faces adversity. For he is not permitted to prove himself. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1404:...speak ill of yourself when by yourself; then you will become accustomed both to speak and to hear the truth. ~ Seneca,
1405:Tranqility is a certain quality of mind, which no condition or fortune can either exalt or depress. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1406:We ought to take outdoor walks, to refresh and raise our spirits by deep breathing in the open air. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1407:what is freedom, you ask?  It means not being a slave to any circumstance, to any constraint, to any chance; it ~ Seneca,
1408:Wherever there is a human being, we have an opportunity for kindness.” —SENECA, ON THE HAPPY LIFE, 24.2–3 ~ Ryan Holiday,
1409:a good man will not waste himself upon mean and discreditable work or be busy merely for the sake of being busy. ~ Seneca,
1410:All we see and admire today will burn in the universal fire that ushers in a new, just, happy world. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1411:Awake, my heart,
And do such deeds as in the time to come
No tongue shall praise, but none refuse to tell. ~ Seneca,
1412:Death lies heavy upon one who, known exceedingly well by all, dies unknown to himself.” —SENECA, THYESTES, ~ Ryan Holiday,
1413:errare humanum est, sed perseverare diabolicum: 'to err is human, but to persist (in the mistake) is diabolical. ~ Seneca,
1414:Finally, it is generally agreed that no activity can be successfully pursued by an individual who is preoccupied ~ Seneca,
1415:He who would arrive at the appointed end must follow a single road and not wander through many ways. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1416:Homines dum docent discunt.(Latin phrase translated “Men learn while they teach.”) —Seneca, Epistolae, VII, 7 ~ Anonymous,
1417:If you don't know, ask. You will be a fool for the moment, but a wise man for the rest of your life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1418:If you wish," said he, "to make Pythocles rich, do not add to his store of money, but subtract from his desires. ~ Seneca,
1419:It is a denial of justice not to stretch out a helping hand to the fallen; that is the common right of humanity. ~ Seneca,
1420:It is the sign of a great mind to dislike greatness, and prefer things in measure to things in excess. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1421:Let tears flow of their own accord; their flowing is not inconsistent with inward peace and harmony. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1422:Roman philosopher Seneca wrote: “All those who summon you to themselves, turn you away from your own self. ~ Rolf Dobelli,
1423:The display of grief makes more demands than grief itself. How few men are sad in their own company. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1424:The perfection of virtue consists in a certain equality of soul and of conduct which should remain un-alterable. ~ Seneca,
1425:The pleasures of the palate deal with us like Egyptian thieves who strangle those whom they embrace. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1426:There is no greater punishment of wickedness that that it is dissatisfied with itself and its deeds. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1427:This, I say, is the highest duty and the highest proof of wisdom, – that deed and word should be in accord, that ~ Seneca,
1428:We are always complaining that our days are few, and acting as though there would be no end to them. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1429:What a great blessing is a friend with a heart so trusty you may safely bury all your secrets in it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1430:You must know for which harbor you are headed, if you are to catch the right wind to take you there. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1431:Count your years, and you will be ashamed to desire and pursue the same things you desired in your boyhood days.  ~ Seneca,
1432:Disasters, therefore, and losses, and wrongs, have only the same power over virtue that a cloud has over the sun. ~ Seneca,
1433:For you have no reason to suppose that we come to grief more through the flattery of others than through our own. ~ Seneca,
1434:Health is the soul that animates all the enjoyments of life, which fade and are tasteless without it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1435:If you are empty-handed, the highwayman passes you by: even along an infested road, the poor may travel in peace. ~ Seneca,
1436:It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that they are difficult. ~ Seneca,
1437:LETTERA 23 LA VERA GIOIA

Ma è difficile avere il senso della misura riguardo a ciò che si ritiene un bene. ~ Seneca,
1438:Many men would have arrived at wisdom had they not believed themselves to have arrived there already. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1439:No action will be considered blameless, unless the will was so, for by the will the act was dictated. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1440:no man, if he be ungrateful, will be unhappy in the future. I allow him no day of grace; he is unhappy forthwith. ~ Seneca,
1441:Only the wise man is content with what is his. All foolishness suffers the burden of dissatisfaction with itself. ~ Seneca,
1442:We shall consider later whether these evils derive their power from their own strength, or from our own weakness. ~ Seneca,
1443:Ab honesto virum bonum nihil deterret. (Nothing deters a good man from doing what is honorable.)-A Wrinkle in Time ~ Seneca,
1444:By the toil of others we are brought into the presence of things which have been brought from darkness into light. ~ Seneca,
1445:Freedom can't be bought for nothing. If you hold her precious, you must hold all else of little worth. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1446:He who has injured thee was either stronger or weaker than thee. If weaker, spare him; if stronger, spare thyself. ~ Seneca,
1447:If you live according to nature, you will never be poor; if you live according to opinion, you will never be rich. ~ Seneca,
1448:Nobody will keep the thing he hears to himself, and nobody will repeat just what he hears and no more. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1449:No man is brave and earnest if he avoids danger, if his spirit does not grow with the very difficulty of his task. ~ Seneca,
1450:Once we have driven away all that excites or affrights us, there ensues unbroken tranquility and enduring freedom. ~ Seneca,
1451:Refrain from following the example of those whose craving is for attention, not their own improvement. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1452:There are no greater wretches in the world than many of those whom people in general take to be happy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1453:There is never a time when new distraction will not show up; we sow them, so several will grow from the same seed. ~ Seneca,
1454:There is nothing in the world so much admired as a man who knows how to bear unhappiness with courage. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1455:We are members of one great body, planted by nature…. We must consider that we were born for the good of the whole ~ Seneca,
1456:If education or warning were of any avail, how could Seneca's pupil be a Nero? ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, The Art of Controversy,
1457:reflect how pleasant it is to demand nothing, how noble it is to be contented and not to be dependent upon Fortune. ~ Seneca,
1458:São econômicos na preservação de seu patrimônio, mas desperdiçam o tempo, a única coisa que justificaria a avareza. ~ Seneca,
1459:The mind should be allowed some relaxation, that it may return to its work all the better for the rest. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1460:There is nothing in the world so much admired as a man who knows how to bear unhappiness with courage."
Seneca ~ Seneca,
1461:A person teaching and a person learning,' he said, 'should have the same end in view: the improvement of the latter. ~ Seneca,
1462:Deve-se aprender a viver por toda a vida, e, por mais que tu talvez te espantes, a vida toda é um aprender a morrer. ~ Seneca,
1463:Hence, every day ought to be regulated as if it closed the series, as if it rounded out and completed our existence. ~ Seneca,
1464:It is never too late to turn from the errors of our ways: He who repents of his sins is almost innocent. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1465:Just where death is expecting you is something we cannot know; so, for your part, expect him everywhere. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1466:[M]aking noble resolutions is not as important as keeping the resolutions you have made already.

(Letter XVI) ~ Seneca,
1467:No one willingly reverts to the past unless all his actions have passed his own censorship, which is never deceived. ~ Seneca,
1468:Shall I tell you what philosophy holds out to humanity? Counsel...You are called in to help the unhappy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1469:Such is the blindness, nay the insanity of mankind, that some men are driven to death by the fear of it. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1470:There is no person so severely punished, as those who subject themselves to the whip of their own remorse. ~ Seneca the Elder,
1471:These individuals have riches just as we say that we ‘have a fever,’ when really the fever has us.” –Seneca ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1472:We should follow the law which Nature has engraved in our hearts. Wisdom lies in the perfect observation of her law. ~ Seneca,
1473:You have to persevere and fortify your pertinacity until the will to good becomes a disposition to good. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1474:Diligentia maximum etiam mediocris ingeni subsidium - Diligence is a very great help even to a mediocre intelligence. ~ Seneca,
1475:For men in a state of freedom had thatch for their shelter, while slavery dwells beneath marble and gold. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1476:Fortune's not content with knocking a man down; she sends him spinning head over heels, crash upon crash. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1477:For what else is Nature but God and the Divine Reason that pervades the whole universe and all its parts. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1478:learning how to live takes a whole life, and, which may surprise you more, it takes a whole life to learn how to die. ~ Seneca,
1479:LETTERA 26 TI GIUDICHERÀ LA MORTE

Apparirà ciò che hai fatto nella vita solo quando esalerai l'ultimo respiro. ~ Seneca,
1480:No nos da miedo hacer las cosas porque sean difíciles, sino que las cosas son difíciles porque nos da miedo hacerlas. ~ Seneca,
1481:No one can live happily who has regard for himself alone and transforms everything into a question of his own utility ~ Seneca,
1482:Philosophy calls for plain living, but not for penance; and we may perfectly well be plain and neat at the same time. ~ Seneca,
1483:since the mind when distracted absorbs nothing deeply, but rejects everything which is, so to speak, crammed into it. ~ Seneca,
1484:The busy man is busy with everything except living; there is nothing that is more difficult to learn how to do right. ~ Seneca,
1485:The important thing about a problem is not its solution, but the strength we gain in finding the solution ~ Seneca the Younger,
1486:There are more things to alarm us than to harm us, and we suffer more often in apprehension than reality. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1487:There is nothing that the busy man is less busy with than living; there is nothing harder to learn.” –Seneca ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1488:All the greatest blessings are a source of anxiety, and at no time is fortune less wisely trusted than when it is best ~ Seneca,
1489:I can show you a philtre, compounded without drugs, herbs, or any witch's incantation: 'If you want to be loved, love. ~ Seneca,
1490:I have never wished to cater to the crowd; for what I know, they do not approve, and what they approve, I do not know. ~ Seneca,
1491:Many are harmed by fear itself, and many may have come to their fate while dreading fate.” —SENECA, OEDIPUS, 992 ~ Ryan Holiday,
1492:Prove - and an easy task it is - that so-called pleasures, when they go beyond a certain limit, are but punishments... ~ Seneca,
1493:The man who does something under orders is not unhappy; he is unhappy who does something against his will. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1494:We are born subjects, and to obey God is perfect liberty. He that does this shall be free, safe and happy. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1495:What's the good of dragging up sufferings which are over, of being unhappy now just because you were then. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1496:A dwarf is small even if he stands on a mountain; a colossus keeps his height, even if he stands in a well. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1497:A great step towards independence is a good-humored stomach, one that is willing to endure rough treatment. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1498:Because thou writest me often, I thank thee ... Never do I receive a letter from thee, but immediately we are together. ~ Seneca,
1499:He, who decides a case without hearing the other side, though he decides justly, cannot be considered just. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1500:I shall use the old road, but if I find a shorter and easier one I shall open it up. [...] Truth lies open to everyone. ~ Seneca,

IN CHAPTERS [23/23]



   8 Christianity
   6 Philosophy
   2 Integral Yoga
   1 Poetry
   1 Occultism
   1 Alchemy


   4 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   4 Plotinus
   2 Jorge Luis Borges


   3 City of God
   2 The Secret Doctrine
   2 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04


01.03 - Mystic Poetry, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Among the ancients, strictly speaking, the later classical Lucretius was a remarkable phenomenon. By nature he was a poet, but his mental interest lay in metaphysical speculation, in philosophy, and unpoetical business. He turned away from arms and heroes, wrath and love and, like Seneca and Aurelius, gave himself up to moralising and philosophising, delving 'into the mystery, the why and the how and the whither of it all. He chose a dangerous subject for his poetic inspiration and yet it cannot be said that his attempt was a failure. Lucretius was not a religious or spiritual poet; he was rather Marxian,atheistic, materialistic. The dialectical materialism of today could find in him a lot of nourishment and support. But whatever the content, the manner has made a whole difference. There was an idealism, a clarity of vision and an intensity of perception, which however scientific apparently, gave his creation a note, an accent, an atmosphere high, tense, aloof, ascetic, at times bordering on the supra-sensual. It was a high light, a force of consciousness that at its highest pitch had the ring and vibration of something almost spiritual. For the basic principle of Lucretius' inspiration is a large thought-force, a tense perception, a taut nervous reactionit is not, of course, the identity in being with the inner realities which is the hallmark of a spiritual consciousness, yet it is something on the way towards that.
   There have been other philosophical poets, a good number of them since thennot merely rationally philosophical, as was the vogue in the eighteenth century, but metaphysically philosophical, that is to say, inquiring not merely into the phenomenal but also into the labyrinths of the noumenal, investigating not only what meets the senses, but also things that are behind or beyond. Amidst the earlier efflorescence of this movement the most outstanding philosopher poet is of course Dante, the Dante of Paradiso, a philosopher in the mediaeval manner and to the extent a lesser poet, according to some. Goe the is another, almost in the grand modern manner. Wordsworth is full of metaphysics from the crown of his head to the tip of his toe although his poetry, perhaps the major portion of it, had to undergo some kind of martyrdom because of it. And Shelley, the supremely lyric singer, has had a very rich undertone of thought-content genuinely metaphysical. And Browning and Arnold and Hardyindeed, if we come to the more moderns, we have to cite the whole host of them, none can be excepted.

1.02 - The Three European Worlds, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  The significance of Philip's ascent cannot be compared to Petrarch's because Livy's emphasis is on the sea, while the land - not yet a landscape - is not mentioned at all. The reference to the sea can be understood as an indication that in antiquity man's experience of the soul was symbolized by the sea, and not by space (as we shall see further on in our discussion). The famous ascents undertaken by such Romans as Hadrian, Strabo, and Lucilius were primarily for administrative and practical, not for aesthetic purposes. As an administrative reformer, Hadrian had climbed MountAetna in order to survey the territory under his jurisdiction, while the fugitive Lucilius, the friend of Seneca, had been motivated by purely practical reasons.
  Let us return to Petrarch's letter. Having mentioned the passage in Livy, he describes his wearisome trek as well as an encounter: "In the ravines we [Petrarch and his brother Gerardol] met an old shepherd who, in a torrent of words, tried to dissuade us from the ascent, saying he had never heard of anyone risking such a venture." Undaunted by the old man's lamentations, they pressed forward: "While still climbing, I urged myself forward by the thought that what I experienced today will surely benefit myself as well as many others who desire the blessed life . . . . "

1.04 - The First Circle, Limbo Virtuous Pagans and the Unbaptized. The Four Poets, Homer, Horace, Ovid, and Lucan. The Noble Castle of Philosophy., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Tully and Livy, and moral Seneca,
  Euclid, geometrician, and Ptolemy,

1.39 - The Ritual of Osiris, #The Golden Bough, #James George Frazer, #Occultism
  ancient, for Seneca tells us that at a place called the Veins of the
  Nile, not far from Philae, the priests used to cast money and

2.01 - On Books, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Integral Yoga
   The Roman could fight and legislate, he could keep the states together, but he made the Greek think for him. Of course, the Greek also could fight but not always so well. The Roman thinkers, Cicero, Seneca, Horace, all owe their philosophy to the Greeks.
   That, again, is another illustration of what I was speaking of as the inrush of forces. Consider a small race like the Greeks living on a small projecting tongue of land: this race was able to build up a culture that has given everything essential to your modern European culture and that in a span of 200 to 300 years only!

BOOK II. -- PART III. ADDENDA. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  hardly comprehend now that which they read in their Scriptures. See what Seneca says in Epistle 9,
  and Quaest. Nat. III., c., ult.: "The world being melted and having re-entered the bosom of Jupiter, this

BOOK I. -- PART III. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  According to Seneca, Berosus taught prophecy of every future event and cataclysm by the Zodiac; and
  the time fixed by him for the conflagration of the world (pralaya), and another for a deluge, is found

Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  In a passage from Seneca, we read that Thales of Miletus
  taught that the earth floats in a surrounding sea, like a ship,

BOOK VI. - Of Varros threefold division of theology, and of the inability of the gods to contri bute anything to the happiness of the future life, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  10. Concerning the liberty of Seneca, who more vehemently censured the civil theology than Varro did the fabulous.
  That liberty, in truth, which this man wanted, so that he did not dare to censure that theology of the city, which is very similar to the theatrical, so openly as he did the theatrical itself, was, though not fully, yet in part possessed by Annus Seneca, whom we have some evidence to show to have flourished in the times of our apostles. It was in part possessed by him, I say, for he possessed it in writing, but not in living. For in that book which he wrote against superstition,[243] he more copiously and vehemently censured that civil and urban theology than Varro the theatrical and fabulous. For, when speaking concerning images, he says, "They dedicate images of the sacred and inviolable immortals in most worthless and motionless matter. They give them[Pg 253] the appearance of man, beasts, and fishes, and some make them of mixed sex, and heterogeneous bodies. They call them deities, when they are such that if they should get breath and should suddenly meet them, they would be held to be monsters." Then, a while afterwards, when extolling the natural theology, he had expounded the sentiments of certain philosophers, he opposes to himself a question, and says, "Here some one says, Shall I believe that the heavens and the earth are gods, and that some are above the moon and some below it? Shall I bring forward either Plato or the peripatetic Strato, one of whom made God to be without a body, the other without a mind?" In answer to which he says, "And, really, what truer do the dreams of Titus Tatius, or Romulus, or Tullus Hostilius appear to thee? Tatius declared the divinity of the goddess Cloacina; Romulus that of Picus and Tiberinus; Tullus Hostilius that of Pavor and Pallor, the most disagreeable affections of men, the one of which is the agitation of the mind under fright, the other that of the body, not a disease, indeed, but a change of colour." Wilt thou rather believe that these are deities, and receive them into heaven? But with what freedom he has written concerning the rites themselves, cruel and shameful! "One," he says, "castrates himself, another cuts his arms. Where will they find room for the fear of these gods when angry, who use such means of gaining their favour when propitious? But gods who wish to be worshipped in this fashion should be worshipped in none. So great is the frenzy of the mind when perturbed and driven from its seat, that the gods are propitiated by men in a manner in which not even men of the greatest ferocity and fable-renowned cruelty vent their rage. Tyrants have lacerated the limbs of some; they never ordered any one to lacerate his own. For the gratification of royal lust, some have been castrated; but no one ever, by the comm and of his lord, laid violent hands on himself to emasculate himself. They kill themselves in the temples. They supplicate with their wounds and with their blood. If any one has time to see the things they do and the things they suffer, he will find so many things unseemly for men of respectability, so unworthy of freemen, so unlike the doings[Pg 254] of sane men, that no one would doubt that they are mad, had they been mad with the minority; but now the multitude of the insane is the defence of their sanity."
  He next relates those things which are wont to be done in the Capitol, and with the utmost intrepidity insists that they are such things as one could only believe to be done by men making sport, or by madmen. For, having spoken with derision of this, that in the Egyptian sacred rites Osiris, being lost, is lamented for, but straightway, when found, is the occasion of great joy by his reappearance, because both the losing and the finding of him are feigned; and yet that grief and that joy which are elicited thereby from those who have lost nothing and found nothing are real;having, I say, so spoken of this, he says, "Still there is a fixed time for this frenzy. It is tolerable to go mad once in the year. Go into the Capitol. One is suggesting divine commands[244] to a god; another is telling the hours to Jupiter; one is a lictor; another is an anointer, who with the mere movement of his arms imitates one anointing. There are women who arrange the hair of Juno and Minerva, standing far away not only from her image, but even from her temple. These move their fingers in the manner of hair-dressers. There are some women who hold a mirror. There are some who are calling the gods to assist them in court. There are some who are holding up documents to them, and are explaining to them their cases. A learned and distinguished comedian, now old and decrepit, was daily playing the mimic in the Capitol, as though the gods would gladly be spectators of that which men had ceased to care about. Every kind of artificers working for the immortal gods is dwelling there in idleness." And a little after he says, "Nevertheless these, though they give themselves up to the gods for purposes superfluous enough, do not do so for any abominable or infamous purpose. There sit certain women in the Capitol who think they are beloved by Jupiter; nor are they frightened even by the look of the, if you will believe the poets, most wrathful Juno."
  --
  This liberty Varro did not enjoy. It was only the poetical theology he seemed to censure. The civil, which this man cuts to pieces, he was not bold enough to impugn. But if we attend to the truth, the temples where these things are performed are far worse than the theatres where they are represented. Whence, with respect to these sacred rites of the civil theology, Seneca preferred, as the best course to be followed by a wise man, to feign respect for them in act, but to have no real regard for them at heart. "All which things," he says, "a wise man will observe as being commanded by the laws, but not as being pleasing to the gods." And a little after he says, "And what of this, that we unite the gods in marriage, and that not even naturally, for we join brothers and sisters? We marry Bellona to Mars, Venus to Vulcan, Salacia to Neptune. Some of them we leave unmarried, as though there were no match for them, which is surely needless, especially when there are certain unmarried goddesses, as Populonia, or Fulgora, or the goddess Rumina, for whom I am not astonished that suitors have been awanting. All this ignoble crowd of gods, which the superstition of ages has amassed, we ought," he says, "to adore in such a way as to remember all the while that its worship belongs rather to custom than to reality." Wherefore, neither those laws nor customs instituted in the civil theology that which was pleasing to the gods, or which pertained to reality. But this man, whom philosophy had made, as it were, free, nevertheless, because he was an illustrious senator of the Roman people, worshipped what he censured, did what he condemned, adored what he reproached, because, forsooth, philosophy had taught him something great,namely, not to be superstitious in the world, but, on account of the laws of cities and the customs of men, to be an actor, not on the stage, but in the temples,conduct the more to be condemned, that those things which he was deceitfully acting he so acted that the people thought he was acting sincerely. But a stage-actor would rather delight people by acting plays than take them in by false pretences.
  11. What Seneca thought concerning the Jews.
   Seneca, among the other superstitions of civil theology,[Pg 256] also found fault with the sacred things of the Jews, and especially the sabbaths, affirming that they act uselessly in keeping those seventh days, whereby they lose through idleness about the seventh part of their life, and also many things which demand immediate attention are damaged. The Christians, however, who were already most hostile to the Jews, he did not dare to mention, either for praise or blame, lest, if he praised them, he should do so against the ancient custom of his country, or, perhaps, if he should blame them, he should do so against his own will.

BOOK V. - Of fate, freewill, and God's prescience, and of the source of the virtues of the ancient Romans, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  But, as to those who call by the name of fate, not the disposition of the stars as it may exist when any creature is conceived, or born, or commences its existence, but the whole connection and train of causes which makes everything become what it does become, there is no need that I should labour and strive with them in a merely verbal controversy, since they attri bute the so-called order and connection of causes to the will and power of God most high, who is most rightly and most truly believed to know all things before they come[Pg 189] to pass, and to leave nothing unordained; from whom are all powers, although the wills of all are not from Him. Now, that it is chiefly the will of God most high, whose power extends itself irresistibly through all things which they call fate, is proved by the following verses, of which, if I mistake not, Annus Seneca is the author:
  "Father supreme, Thou ruler of the lofty heavens, Lead me where'er it is Thy pleasure; I will give A prompt obedience, making no delay, Lo! here I am. Promptly I come to do Thy sovereign will; If Thy comm and shall thwart my inclination, I will still Follow Thee groaning, and the work assigned, With all the suffering of a mind repugnant, Will perform, being evil; which, had I been good, I should have undertaken and performed, though hard, With virtuous cheerfulness. The Fates do lead the man that follows willing; But the man that is unwilling, him they drag."[187]

BOOK XIII. - That death is penal, and had its origin in Adam's sin, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  [61] Diogenes especially, and his followers. See also Seneca, De Tranq. c. 14, and Epist. 92; and in Cicero's Tusc. Disp. i. 43, the answer of Theodorus, the Cyrenian philosopher, to Lysimachus, who threatened him with the cross: "Threaten that to your courtiers; it is of no consequence to Theodorus whether he rot in the earth or in the air."
  [62] Lucan, Pharsalia, vii. 819, of those whom Csar forbade to be buried after the battle of Pharsalia.
  --
  [95] Ter. Eun. iii. 5. 36; and cf. the similar allusion in Aristoph. Clouds, 1033-4. It may be added that the argument of this chapter was largely used by the wiser of the hea then themselves. Dionysius Hal. (ii. 20) and Seneca (De Brev. Vit. c. xvi.) make the very same complaint; and it will be remembered that his adoption of this reasoning was one of the grounds on which Euripides was suspected of atheism.
  [96] This sentence recalls Augustine's own experience as a boy, which he bewails in his Confessions.
  --
  [332] The distinction between bona and commoda is thus given by Seneca (Ep. 87, ad fin.): "Commodum est quod plus usus est quam molesti; bonum sincerum debet esse et ab omni parte innoxium."
  [333] Book xix. ch. 1.
  --
  [336] Seneca, De Clem. ii. 4 and 5.
  [337] Pro. Lig. c. 12.
  --
  [585] Much of this paradoxical statement about death is taken from Seneca. See, among other places, his epistle on the premeditation of future dangers, the passage beginning, "Quotidie morimur, quotidie enim demitur aliqua pars vit."
  [586] Ecclus. xi. 28.

COSA - BOOK V, #The Confessions of Saint Augustine, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  Orations, a very few books of Seneca, some things of the poets, and such
  few volumes of his own sect as were written in Latin and neatly, and

ENNEAD 01.04 - Whether Animals May Be Termed Happy., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  8. If the griefs that he himself undergoes are great, he will support them as well as he can; if they exceed his power of endurance, they will carry him off (as thought Seneca9). In either case, he will not, in the midst of his sufferings, excite any pity: (ever master of his reason) he will not allow his own characteristic light to be extinguished. Thus the flame in the lighthouse continues to shine, in spite of the raging of the tempest, in spite of the violent blowing of the winds. (He should not be upset) even by loss of consciousness, or even if pain becomes so strong that its violence could almost annihilate him. If pain become more intense, he will decide as to what to do; for, under these circumstances, freedom of will is not necessarily lost (for suicide remains possible, as thought Seneca10). Besides, we must realize that these sufferings do not present themselves to the wise man, under the same light as to the common man; that all these need not penetrate to the sanctuary of the man's life; which indeed happens with the greater part of pains, griefs and evils that we see being suffered by others; it would be proof of weakness to be affected thereby. A no less manifest mark of weakness is to consider it an advantage to ignore all these evils, and to esteem ourselves happy that they happen only after death,11 without sympathizing with the fate of others, and thinking only to spare ourselves some grief. This would be a weakness that we should eliminate in ourselves, not allowing ourselves to be frightened by the fear of what might happen. The objection that it is natural to be afflicted at the misfortunes of those who surround us, meets the answer that, to begin with, it is not so with every person; then, that it is part of the duty of virtue to ameliorate the common condition of1032 human nature, and to raise it to what is more beautiful, rising above the opinions of the common people. It is indeed beautiful not to yield to what the common people usually consider to be evils. We should struggle against the blows of fortune not by affected ignoring (of difficulties, like an ostrich), but as a skilful athlete who knows that the dangers he is incurring are feared by certain natures, though a nature such as his bears them easily, seeing in them nothing terrible, or at least considering them terrifying only to children. Certainly, the wise man would not have invited these evils; but on being overtaken by them he opposes to them the virtue which renders the soul unshakable and impassible.
  WISDOM IS NONE THE LESS HAPPY FOR BEING UNCONSCIOUS OF ITSELF.

ENNEAD 02.09 - Against the Gnostics; or, That the Creator and the World are Not Evil., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  204 Cicero, Orator 2; Seneca, Controversiae v. 36.
  205 ii. 8.1.

ENNEAD 03.07 - Of Time and Eternity., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 03, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  221 As thought Heraclitus and the Stoics, who thought that the stars fed themselves from the exhalations of the earth and the waters; see Seneca, Nat. Quest. vi. 16.
  222 See ii. 1.5.

ENNEAD 06.05 - The One and Identical Being is Everywhere Present In Its Entirety.345, #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  His last period was Stoic practise, for so zealously did he practise austerities that his death was, at1281 least, hastened thereby.446 It is unlikely that he would have followed Stoic precepts without some sympathy for, or acquaintance with their philosophical doctrines; and as we saw above, Porphyry acknowledges Plotinos's writings contain hidden Stoic pieces.447 Then, Plotinos spent the last period of his life in Rome, where ruled, in philosophical circles, the traditions of Cicero, Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius.
  That these Stoic practices became fatal to him is significant when we remember that this occurred during the final absence of Porphyry, who may, during his presence, have exerted a friendly restraint on the zealous master. At any rate, it was during Porphyry's regime that the chief works of Plotinos were written, including a bitter diatribe against the Gnostics, who remained the chief protagonists of dualism and belief in positive evil. Prophyry's work, "De Abstinentia," proves clearly enough his Stoic sympathies.
  --
  8 In Plutarch, of Wickedness, and in Seneca, de Tranquil, Animi, 14.
  9 De Providentia, 3.
  --
  42 Seneca, de Provid. 2.
  43 In his Republic, ix. p. 585, Cary, 10.
  --
  77 Marcus Aurelius, Medit. vii. 9; Seneca, Epist. 94.
  78 Numenius, iii. 7.
  --
  216 Seneca, Quest. Nat. i. 1.
  217 See iii. 4.2, 4.
  --
  238 Seneca, Nat. Quest. ii. 32.
  239 According to Aristotle, Met. xii. 3.
  --
  255 See iii. 3.1, 2; see Seneca, de Provid. 5.
  256 See ii. 3.17; iii. 8.
  --
  258 See ii. 4; Seneca, de Provid. 5.
  259 See ii. 9.2; iii. 2, 3. Seneca, de Provid. 5.
  260 Or generative reasons, a Stoic term, Seneca, Quest. Nat. iii. 29; see iii. 3.1, 2, 7.
  261 Plotinos is here harking back to his very earliest writing, 1.6, where, before his monistic adventure with Porphyry, he had, under the Numenian influence of Amelius, constructed his system out of a combination of the doctrines of Plato (about the ideas), Aristotle (the distinctions of form and matter and of potentiality and actualization), and the Stoic (the "reasons," "seminal reasons," action and passions, and "hexis," or "habit," the inorganic informing principle). Of these, Numenius seems to have lacked the Aristotelian doctrines, although he left Plato's single triple-functioned soul for Aristotle's combination of souls of various degrees (fr. 53). Plotinos, therefore, seems to have distinguished in every object two elements, matter and form (ii. 4.1; ii. 5.2). Matter inheres potentially in all beings (ii. 5.3, 4) and therefore is non-being, ugliness, and evil (i. 6.6). Form is the actualization (K. Steinhart's Melemata Plotiniana, p. 31; ii. 5.2); that is, the essence and power (vi. 4.9), which are inseparable. Form alone possesses real existence, beauty and goodness. Form has four degrees: idea, reason, nature and habit; which degrees are the same as those of thought and life (Porphyry, Principles 12, 13, 14). The idea is distinguished into "idea" or intelligible Form, or "eidos," principle of human intellectual life. Reason is 1, divine (theios logos, i. 6, 2; the reason that comes from the universal Soul, iv. 3.10), 2, human (principle of the rational life, see Ficinus on ii. 6.2); 3, the seminal or generative reason (principle of the life of sensation, which imparts to the body the sense-form, "morph," 3.12-end; Bouillet, i. 365). Now reasons reside in the soul (ii. 4.12), and are simultaneously essences and powers (vi. 4.9), and as powers produce the nature, and as essences, the habits. Now nature ("physis") is the principle of the vegetative life, and habit, "hexis," Numenius, fr. 55, see ii. 4.16, is the principle of unity of inorganic things.

Liber 46 - The Key of the Mysteries, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
   of this monster. Seneca, Burrhus, Thrasea, Corbulon, theirs is the real
   guilt of that fearful reign; great men who were either selfish or

Medea - A Vergillian Cento, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  C. Dogson, 1842]). The story, of Medea was, of course, by this point well-known in Rome through such works as Seneca's Medea, and there
  is little here not found there, but it is an interesting composition nonetheless, though more for its style than its content.

Talks With Sri Aurobindo 1, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  could fight also but not always so well. Take the Roman thinkersLucretius, Cicero, Seneca, all owe their philosophy to the Greeks.
  That, again, is an illustration of what I was saying about the inrush of

The Dwellings of the Philosophers, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  In being born, we die every day. A serious thought of Seneca, the philosopher, an axiom
  which we would hardly expect to find here. Evidently, this profound albeit ethical truth,

the Eternal Wisdom, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  16) A happy life is the fruit of wisdom achieved; life bearable, of wisdom commenced. ~ Seneca
  17) Wisdom is a well-spring of life unto him that hath it. ~ Proverbs
  --
  30) Wisdom is a thing vast and grand. She demands all the time that one can consecrate to her. ~ Seneca
  31) To find our real being and know it truly is to acquire wisdom. ~ Porphyry
  --
  10) Would you call Him Destiny? You will not be wrong. Providence? You will say well. Nature? That too you may. ~ Seneca
  11) The Being that is one, sages speak of in many terms. ~ Rig Veda
  --
  1) For what is God? He is the soul of the universe. ~ Seneca
  2) He is the soul of all conscious creatures, who constitutes all things in this world, those which are beyond our senses and those which fall within their range. ~ Aswaghosha
  --
  5) If the soul would give itself leisure to take breath and return into itself, it would be easy for it to draw from its own depths the seeds of the true. ~ Seneca
  6) Assuredly, whoever wishes to discover the universal truth must sound the depths of his own heart. ~ J. Tauler, "Institutions."
  --
  9) Your greatness is within and only in yourselves can you find a spectacle worthy of your regard. ~ Seneca
  10) Seek and you shall find.... It is when we seek for the things which are within us that quest leads to discovery. ~ Meng-Tse II. 7.3
  11) Our true glory and true riches are within. ~ Seneca
  12) Of what use is it to run painfully about the troubled world of visible things when there is a purer world within ourselves? ~ Novalis, "The Disciples at Sais."
  13) The soul will enjoy veritable felicity when, separating itself from the darkness which surrounds it, it is able to contemplate with a sure gaze the divine light at its source. ~ Seneca
  14) Each descent of the gaze on oneself is at the same time an ascension, an assumption, a gaze on the true objectivity. ~ Novalis, "Fragments."
  --
  15) How can the soul which misunderstands itself, have a sure idea of other creatures? ~ Seneca
  16) The soul of man is the mirror of the world. ~ Leibnitz
  --
  23) Take care that the reading of numerous writers and books of all kinds does not confuse and trouble thy reason. ~ Seneca
  24) It would be better not to have books than to believe all that is found in them. ~ Meng Tse. VII. II. III. 1
  --
  8) Let us lend ear to the sages who point out to us the way. ~ Seneca
  9) Employ all the leisure you have in listening to the well-informed; so you shall learn without difficulty what they have learned by long labour. ~ Isocrates
  --
  3) It is extravagance to ask of others what can be procured by oneself. ~ Seneca: Epistles
  4) The superior soul asks nothing from any but itself. The vulgar and unmeritable man asks everything of others. ~ Confucius: Lia yu II XV. 20
  5) I call him a man who recognises no possessions save those he finds in himself. ~ Seneca
  6) He governs his soul and expects nothing from others. ~ Confucius
  --
  9) Nothing is so dangerous as the habit we have of referring to a common opinion. So long as one trusts other people without taking the trouble to judge for oneself, one lives by the faith of others, error is passed on from hand to hand and example destroys us. ~ Seneca
  10) To believe blindly is bad. Reason, judge for yourselves, experiment, verify whether what you have been told is true or false. ~ Vivekananda
  --
  16) Let us take care above all not to walk like a flock of sheep each in the other's traces; let us inform ourselves rather of the place where we ought to go than of that where others are going. ~ Seneca
  17) They will renounce even the treading in the tracks of their fathers and ancestors. They will shut the doors of friendship and hatred on all the dwellers in the world. ~ Baha-ullah
  --
  15). Deliver thyself from the inconstancy of human things. ~ Seneca: De Providentia
  The Kena Upanishad - V View Similar The Doctrine of the Mystics
  --
  2) Let us attach ourselves to a solid good, to a good that shines within and not externally. Let us devote all our efforts to its discovery. ~ Seneca
  3) Attach thyself to the sense of-things and not to their form. The sense is the essential, the form is only an encumbrance. ~ Farid-ud.din-attar : Mantic uttair
  --
  13) There is no peace for the man who is troubled with thought for the future, makes himself unhappy before even unhappiness comes to him and claims to assure till the end of his life his possession of the objects to which he is attached. ~ Seneca
  14) Give not thy heart over to anxieties. ~ Mahabharara
  --
  4) He is the happy man whose soul is superior to all happenings. ~ Seneca
  5) All the accidents of life can be turned to our profit. ~ Seneca
  6) In all things to do what depends on oneself and for the rest to remain firm and calm. ~ Epictetus
  --
  22) The perfection of virtue consists in a certain equality of soul and of conduct which should remain un-alterable. ~ Seneca
  23) The wise in joy and in sorrow depart not from the equality of their souls. ~ Buddhist Text
  --
  3) Nature has given us strengths in sufficiency, if only we choose to avail ourselves of them and if we collect and employ them all to our profit instead of turning them against ourselves. Our ill will is the cause of what we attri bute to a pretended impossibility. ~ Seneca
  4) If a thing is difficult for thee, imagine not therefore! that it is impossible to man; but if a thing is possible and proper to man, think that it is accessible to thee also. ~ Marcus Aurelius
  --
  8) The sage here surpasses God. God fears nothing by the benefit of his nature; the sage fears nothing, but by the sole strength of his spirit. This indeed is great, to have the weakness of a mortal and yet the fearlessness of a god. ~ Seneca
  9) It is only the coward who appeals always to destiny and never to courage. ~ Ramayana
  10) Fortune fears the brave soul; she crushes the coward. ~ Seneca
  11) He who shows not zeal where zeal should be shown, who young and strong gives himself up to indolence, who lets his will and intelligence sleep, that do-nothing, that coward shall not find the way of the perfect knowledge. ~ Dhammapada 280
  --
  7) The least indigent mortal is the one who desires the least. We have everything we wish when we wish only for what is sufficient. ~ Seneca
  8) Many things are wanting to indigence, but everything is wanting to greed. A covetous man is useful to none and still less is he of any good to himself. ~ Seneca
  9) To covet external objects is to defile the mind. ~ Chu-King
  --
  7) Life is not short if it is filled. The way to fill it is to compel the soul to enjoy its own wealth and to become its own master. ~ Seneca
  8) Our intelligence ought to govern us as a herdsman governs his goats, cows and sheep, preferring for himself and his herd all that is useful and agreeable. ~ Philo
  --
  20) The sage should be figured in the image of a robust athlete whom long exercise has hardened, one who can baffle the efforts of the most obstinate enemy. ~ Seneca
  21) He is the perfect athlete who surmounts temptations and the incline of his nature towards sin and exercises over his mind domination and empire. ~ J. Tauler. Institutions
  --
  2)We should follow the law which Nature has engraved in our hearts. Wisdom lies in the perfect observation of her law. ~ Seneca
  3)What is the true law? It is a right reason invariable, eternal, in conformity with Nature, -which is extended in all human being. ~ Cicero
  --
  8)The sovereign good has its abode in the soul; when that is upright, attentive to its duties, shut in upon itself, it has nothing to desire, it enjoys a perfect happiness. ~ Seneca
  9)Learn what are the duties which are engraved in the hearts of men as their means of arriving to beatitude. ~ Laws of Manu
  --
  11)Let the soul be submitted within to an upright judge whose authority extends over our most secret actions. ~ Seneca
  12) Whosoever desireth salvation hath no expectation from man, but from him alone who dwelleth in him inwardly and from within the voice speaketh to him; then is he astonished that such words he hath never heard from any mouth, nor hath ever desired to hear them. ~ Epistle of St. Barnabas
  --
  17) Thyself vindicate thyself. ~ Seneca
  18)Subject thyself to thee. ~ Bhagavad Gita XII. 11
  --
  7) Let us have always in our hearts this thought: I am a man and nothing that interests humanity is foreign to me. We have a common birth; our society resembles the stones of a road that sustain each other. ~ Seneca
  8) One can be solitary in a secluded and temporary environment ; but each of our thoughts and each of our feelings finds, has found and will find an echo in humanity. ~ Amiel
  --
  11) All this universe, and in that word are comprised things divine and human, all is only one great body of which we are the members. ~ Seneca
  12) This world is a people of friends, and these friends are first the gods and next men whom Nature has made for each other. ~ Epictetus
  --
  13) If man thinks only of himself and seeks everywhere his own profit, he cannot be happy. If thou wouldst really live for thyself, live for others. ~ Seneca
  14) If thou livest for thyself alone, thou feelest thyself surrounded by enemies and the happiness of each an obstacle to thy own happiness. Live for others and thou wilt feel thyself surrounded by friends and the happiness of each will become thy happiness. ~ Tolstoi
  --
  2) The duty of man is to be useful to men: to a great number if he can, if not, to a small number, otherwise to his neighbours, otherwise to himself : in making himself useful to himself, he works for others. As the vicious man injures not only himself but also those to whom he might have been useful if he had been virtuous, likewise in labouring for oneself one labours also for others, since there is formed a man who can be of use to them. ~ Seneca
  3) The most perfect man is the one who is most useful to others. ~ Koran
  --
  10) Let us think that we are born for the common good. ~ Seneca
  11) Let us be one even with those who do not wish to be one with us. ~ Bossuet
  --
  27) We shall labour to our last sigh, we shall never cease from contri buting to the common good, serving every individual, helping even our enemies, exercising our talents and our industry. We know not an age destined to repose and, like the heroes of whom Virgil tells, our hair grows white under the helmet. ~ Seneca
  Towards the Supramental Time Vision View Similar Concord

The Immortal, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  Among the commentaries inspired by the foregoing publication, the most curious (if not most urbane) is biblically titled A Coat of Many Colours (Manchester, 1948); it is the work of the supremely persvrant pen of Dr. Nahum Cordovero, and contains some hundred pages. It speaks of the Greek anthologies, of the anthologies of late Latin texts, of that Ben Johnson who defined his contemporaries with excerpts from Seneca, of Alexander Ross's Virgilius evangelizans, of the artifices of George Moore and Eliot, and, finally, of "the tale attri buted to the rare-book dealer Joseph Cartaphilus." In the first chapter it points out brief interpolations from Pliny (Historia naturate, V:8); in the second, from Thomas de Quincey (Writings, III: 439); in the third, from a letter written by Descartes to the ambassador Pierre Chanut; in the fourth, from Bernard Shaw (Back to Methuselah, V). From those "intrusions" (or thefts) it infers that the entire document is apocryphal.
  To my way of thinking, that conclusion is unacceptable. As the end approaches, wrote Cartaphilus, there are no longer any images from memory - there are only words. Words, words, words taken out of place and mutilated, words from other men - those were the alms left him by the hours and the centuries.

Timaeus, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  2. It is an interesting and not unimportant question which is touched upon by Martin, whether the Atlantis of Plato in any degree held out a guiding light to the early navigators. He is inclined to think that there is no real connexion between them. But surely the discovery of the New World was preceded by a prophetic anticipation of it, which, like the hope of a Messiah, was entering into the hearts of men? And this hope was nursed by ancient tradition, which had found expression from time to time in the celebrated lines of Seneca and in many other places. This tradition was sustained by the great authority of Plato, and therefore the legend of the Island of Atlantis, though not closely connected with the voyages of the early navigators, may be truly said to have contri buted indirectly to the great discovery.
  The Timaeus of Plato, like the Protagoras and several portions of the Phaedrus and Republic, was translated by Cicero into Latin. About a fourth, comprehending with lacunae the first portion of the dialogue, is preserved in several MSS. These generally agree, and therefore may be supposed to be derived from a single original. The version is very faithful, and is a remarkable monument of Cicero's skill in managing the difficult and intractable Greek. In his treatise De Natura Deorum, he also refers to the Timaeus, which, speaking in the person of Velleius the Epicurean, he severely criticises.

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun seneca

The noun seneca has 3 senses (no senses from tagged texts)
                  
1. Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca ::: (Roman statesman and philosopher who was an advisor to Nero; his nine extant tragedies are modeled on Greek tragedies (circa 4 BC - 65 AD))
2. Seneca ::: (a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living in New York State south of Lake Ontario)
3. Seneca ::: (the Iroquoian language spoken by the Seneca)


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun seneca

3 senses of seneca                          

Sense 1
Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   INSTANCE OF=> statesman, solon, national leader
     => politician, politico, pol, political leader
       => leader
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright
     => writer, author
       => communicator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher
     => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
       => intellectual, intellect
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity

Sense 2
Seneca
   => Iroquois
     => Indian, American Indian, Red Indian
       => Amerindian, Native American
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity
         => person of color, person of colour
           => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
             => organism, being
               => living thing, animate thing
                 => whole, unit
                   => object, physical object
                     => physical entity
                       => entity
             => causal agent, cause, causal agency
               => physical entity
                 => entity

Sense 3
Seneca
   => Iroquoian, Iroquois, Iroquoian language
     => Amerind, Amerindian language, American-Indian language, American Indian, Indian
       => natural language, tongue
         => language, linguistic communication
           => communication
             => abstraction, abstract entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun seneca
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun seneca

3 senses of seneca                          

Sense 1
Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   INSTANCE OF=> statesman, solon, national leader
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher

Sense 2
Seneca
   => Iroquois

Sense 3
Seneca
   => Iroquoian, Iroquois, Iroquoian language




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun seneca

3 senses of seneca                          

Sense 1
Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
  -> statesman, solon, national leader
   => elder statesman
   => Founding Father
   => stateswoman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Acheson, Dean Acheson, Dean Gooderham Acheson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Adenauer, Konrad Adenauer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Agrippa, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alcibiades
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arafat, Yasser Arafat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ataturk, Kemal Ataturk, Kemal Pasha, Mustafa Kemal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Attlee, Clement Attlee, Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee
   HAS INSTANCE=> Augustus, Gaius Octavianus, Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, Octavian
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Balfour, Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baruch, Bernard Baruch, Bernard Mannes Baruch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Begin, Menachem Begin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ben Gurion, David Ben Gurion, David Grun
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bevin, Ernest Bevin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bismarck, von Bismarck, Otto von Bismarck, Prince Otto von Bismarck, Prince Otto Eduard Leopold von Bismarck, Iron Chancellor
   HAS INSTANCE=> Blair, Tony Blair, Anthony Charles Lynton Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bolivar, Simon Bolivar, El Libertador
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brandt, Willy Brandt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brezhnev, Leonid Brezhnev, Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brutus, Marcus Junius Brutus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burke, Edmund Burke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caesar, Julius Caesar, Gaius Julius Caesar
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cassius, Cassius Longinus, Gaius Cassius Longinus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chamberlain, Neville Chamberlain, Arthur Neville Chamberlain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterfield, Fourth Earl of Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chiang Kai-shek, Chiang Chung-cheng
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cicero, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Tully
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cincinnatus, Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemenceau, Georges Clemenceau, Georges Eugene Benjamin Clemenceau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clive, Robert Clive, Baron Clive, Baron Clive of Plassey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cosimo de Medici, Cosimo the Elder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cromwell, Oliver Cromwell, Ironsides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Davis, Jefferson Davis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dayan, Moshe Dayan
   HAS INSTANCE=> de Gaulle, General de Gaulle, Charles de Gaulle, General Charles de Gaulle, Charles Andre Joseph Marie de Gaulle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Demosthenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Deng Xiaoping, Teng Hsiao-ping, Teng Hsiaoping
   HAS INSTANCE=> de Valera, Eamon de Valera
   HAS INSTANCE=> Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, First Earl of Beaconsfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaminius, Gaius Flaminius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fox, Charles James Fox
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gandhi, Indira Gandhi, Indira Nehru Gandhi, Mrs. Gandhi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gladstone, William Gladstone, William Ewart Gladstone
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorbachev, Mikhail Gorbachev, Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Charles Grey, Second Earl Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Richard Haldane, Richard Burdon Haldane, First Viscount Haldane of Cloan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamilton, Alexander Hamilton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Havel, Vaclav Havel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hindenburg, Paul von Hindenburg, Paul Ludwig von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ho Chi Minh, Nguyen Tat Thanh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jinnah, Muhammad Ali Jinnah
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kalinin, Mikhail Kalinin, Mikhail Ivanovich Kalinin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kaunda, Kenneth Kaunda, Kenneth David Kaunda
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kenyata, Jomo Kenyata
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerensky, Aleksandr Feodorovich Kerensky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Khama, Sir Seretse Khama
   HAS INSTANCE=> Khrushchev, Nikita Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Konoe, Fumimaro Konoe, Prince Fumimaro Konoe, Konoye, Fumimaro Konoye, Prince Fumimaro Konoye
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kruger, Oom Paul Kruger, Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lorenzo de'Medici, Lorenzo the Magnificent
   HAS INSTANCE=> Machiavelli, Niccolo Machiavelli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Major, John Major, John R. Major, John Roy Major
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mandela, Nelson Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marshall, George Marshall, George Catlett Marshall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Meir, Golda Meir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Metternich, Klemens Metternich, Prince Klemens Wenzel Nepomuk Lothar von Metternich
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitterrand, Francois Mitterrand, Francois Maurice Marie Mitterrand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morris, Gouverneur Morris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mubarak, Hosni Mubarak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nansen, Fridtjof Nansen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nasser, Gamal Abdel Nasser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nehru, Jawaharlal Nehru
   HAS INSTANCE=> North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ortega, Daniel Ortega, Daniel Ortega Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paderewski, Ignace Paderewski, Ignace Jan Paderewski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pericles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, William Pitt, First Earl of Chatham, Pitt the Elder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, William Pitt, Second Earl of Chatham, Pitt the Younger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pompey, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, Pompey the Great
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Putin, Vladimir Putin, Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Radhakrishnan, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Sir Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richelieu, Duc de Richelieu, Armand Jean du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rockingham, Second Marquis of Rockingham, Charles Watson-Wentworth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sadat, Anwar Sadat, Anwar el-Sadat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schmidt, Helmut Schmidt, Helmut Heinrich Waldemar Schmidt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smith, Ian Smith, Ian Douglas Smith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smuts, Jan Christian Smuts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Suharto
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sukarno, Achmad Sukarno
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sully, Duc de Sully, Maxmilien de Bethune
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sun Yat-sen, Sun Yixian
   HAS INSTANCE=> Talleyrand, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Themistocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tito, Marshal Tito, Josip Broz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas, Getulio Dornelles Vargas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verwoerd, Hendrik Verwoerd, Hendrik Frensch Verwoerd
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waldheim, Kurt Waldheim
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walesa, Lech Walesa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warwick, Earl of Warwick, Richard Neville, Kingmaker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Weizmann, Chaim Weizmann, Chaim Azriel Weizmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wellington, Duke of Wellington, First Duke of Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, Iron Duke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wykeham, William of Wykeham
  -> dramatist, playwright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aeschylus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Albee, Edward Albee, Edward Franklin Albeen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Maxwell Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anouilh, Jean Anouilh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barrie, James Barrie, J. M. Barrie, James Matthew Barrie, Sir James Matthew Barrie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beaumont, Francis Beaumont
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brecht, Bertolt Brecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calderon, Calderon de la Barca, Pedro Calderon de la Barca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chekhov, Chekov, Anton Chekhov, Anton Chekov, Anton Pavlovich Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich Chekov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Congreve, William Congreve
   HAS INSTANCE=> Corneille, Pierre Corneille
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coward, Noel Coward, Sir Noel Pierce Coward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crouse, Russel Crouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cyrano de Bergerac, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dekker, Decker, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Decker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dryden, John Dryden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Stearns Eliot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Euripides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fletcher, John Fletcher
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fry, Christopher Fry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fugard, Athol Fugard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garcia Lorca, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Lorca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Genet, Jean Genet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giraudoux, Jean Giraudoux, Hippolyte Jean Giraudoux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldoni, Carlo Goldoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Granville-Barker, Harley Granville-Barker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hart, Moss Hart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Havel, Vaclav Havel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hebbel, Friedrich Hebbel, Christian Friedrich Hebbel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hellman, Lillian Hellman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hugo, Victor Hugo, Victor-Marie Hugo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ibsen, Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Johan Ibsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Inge, William Inge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ionesco, Eugene Ionesco
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jonson, Ben Jonson, Benjamin Jonson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kaufman, George S. Kaufman, George Simon Kaufman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kleist, Heinrich von Kleist, Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kyd, Kid, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Kid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lindsay, Howard Lindsay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Luce, Clare Booth Luce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maeterlinck, Count Maurice Maeterlinck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mamet, David Mamet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marlowe, Christopher Marlowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marstan, John Marstan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Menander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Middleton, Thomas Middleton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Arthur Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moliere, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Molnar, Ferenc Molnar
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Casey, Sean O'Casey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Odets, Clifford Odets
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Neill, Eugene O'Neill, Eugene Gladstone O'Neill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Osborne, John Osborne, John James Osborne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pinter, Harold Pinter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pirandello, Luigi Pirandello
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, George Pitt, George Dibdin Pitt, George Dibdin-Pitt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plautus, Titus Maccius Plautus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Racine, Jean Racine, Jean Baptiste Racine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rattigan, Terence Rattigan, Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rice, Elmer Rice, Elmer Leopold Rice, Elmer Reizenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, Lennox Robinson, Esme Stuart Lennox Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rostand, Edmond Rostand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sartre, Jean-Paul Sartre
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scribe, Augustin Eugene Scribe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shepard, Sam Shepard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sheridan, Richard Brinsley Sheridan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sherwood, Robert Emmet Sherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simon, Neil Simon, Marvin Neil Simon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sophocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoppard, Tom Stoppard, Sir Tom Stoppard, Thomas Straussler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Strindberg, August Strindberg, Johan August Strindberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Synge, J. M. Synge, John Millington Synge, Edmund John Millington Synge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Terence, Publius Terentius Afer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tirso de Molina, Gabriel Tellez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ustinov, Sir Peter Ustinov, Peter Alexander Ustinov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vega, Lope de Vega, Lope Felix de Vega Carpio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webster, John Webster
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Tennessee Williams, Thomas Lanier Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wycherley, William Wycherley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yeats, William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats
  -> philosopher
   => nativist
   => Cynic
   => eclectic, eclecticist
   => empiricist
   => epistemologist
   => esthetician, aesthetician
   => ethicist, ethician
   => existentialist, existentialist philosopher, existential philosopher
   => gymnosophist
   => libertarian
   => mechanist
   => moralist
   => naturalist
   => necessitarian
   => nominalist
   => pluralist
   => pre-Socratic
   => realist
   => Scholastic
   => Sophist
   => Stoic
   => transcendentalist
   => yogi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Abelard, Peter Abelard, Pierre Abelard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaxagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arendt, Hannah Arendt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristotle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Averroes, ibn-Roshd, Abul-Walid Mohammed ibn-Ahmad Ibn-Mohammed ibn-Roshd
   HAS INSTANCE=> Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bentham, Jeremy Bentham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bergson, Henri Bergson, Henri Louis Bergson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bruno, Giordano Bruno
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buber, Martin Buber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cassirer, Ernst Cassirer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cleanthes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Comte, Auguste Comte, Isidore Auguste Marie Francois Comte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Condorcet, Marquis de Condorcet, Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas Caritat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Confucius, Kongfuze, K'ung Futzu, Kong the Master
   HAS INSTANCE=> Democritus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Derrida, Jacques Derrida
   HAS INSTANCE=> Descartes, Rene Descartes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dewey, John Dewey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diderot, Denis Diderot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diogenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Empedocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epictetus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epicurus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haeckel, Ernst Heinrich Haeckel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hartley, David Hartley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heraclitus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herbart, Johann Friedrich Herbart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herder, Johann Gottfried von Herder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hobbes, Thomas Hobbes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hume, David Hume
   HAS INSTANCE=> Husserl, Edmund Husserl
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hypatia
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, William James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kant, Immanuel Kant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kierkegaard, Soren Kierkegaard, Soren Aabye Kierkegaard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lao-tzu, Lao-tse, Lao-zi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leibniz, Leibnitz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Locke, John Locke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lucretius, Titus Lucretius Carus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lully, Raymond Lully, Ramon Lully
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mach, Ernst Mach
   HAS INSTANCE=> Machiavelli, Niccolo Machiavelli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maimonides, Moses Maimonides, Rabbi Moses Ben Maimon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malebranche, Nicolas de Malebranche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marcuse, Herbert Marcuse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Karl Marx
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mead, George Herbert Mead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, John Mill, John Stuart Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, James Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montesquieu, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu, Charles Louis de Secondat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, G. E. Moore, George Edward Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Occam, William of Occam, Ockham, William of Ockham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Origen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ortega y Gasset, Jose Ortega y Gasset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parmenides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pascal, Blaise Pascal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Peirce, Charles Peirce, Charles Sanders Peirce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Perry, Ralph Barton Perry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plato
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plotinus
   => Popper, Karl Popper, Sir Karl Raimund Popper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pythagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Quine, W. V. Quine, Willard Van Orman Quine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Radhakrishnan, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Sir Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Reid, Thomas Reid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schopenhauer, Arthur Schopenhauer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schweitzer, Albert Schweitzer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Socrates
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spencer, Herbert Spencer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spengler, Oswald Spengler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spinoza, de Spinoza, Baruch de Spinoza, Benedict de Spinoza
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steiner, Rudolf Steiner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stewart, Dugald Stewart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Teilhard de Chardin, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thales, Thales of Miletus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Theophrastus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Weil, Simone Weil
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whitehead, Alfred North Whitehead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Sir Bernard Williams, Bernard Arthur Owen Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wittgenstein, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Ludwig Josef Johan Wittgenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Xenophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Citium
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Elea

Sense 2
Seneca
  -> Iroquois
   => Cayuga
   => Cherokee
   => Erie
   => Mohawk
   => Oneida
   => Onondaga
   => Seneca
   => Tuscarora

Sense 3
Seneca
  -> Iroquoian, Iroquois, Iroquoian language
   => Cherokee
   => Cayuga
   => Mohawk
   => Seneca
   => Oneida
   => Onondaga
   => Tuscarora




--- Grep of noun seneca
lake seneca
lucius annaeus seneca
seneca
seneca lake
seneca snakeroot



IN WEBGEN [10000/427]

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Wikipedia - Real Time Regional Gateway
Wikipedia - Residential gateway
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Wikipedia - SMS gateway -- |SMS or MMS gateway allows a computer to send or receive text messages (Short Message Service or Multimedia Messaging Service) to or from a telecommunications network
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Wikipedia - St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Awards 2016
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Wikipedia - The Gateway of the Moon -- 1928 film
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Wikipedia - Tower Gateway DLR station -- Docklands Light Railway station
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https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/62556.Gateways
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https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7947592-the-keys-to-the-gateway-of-magic
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/864820.The_Gateway_of_Doom
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9088771-the-gateway-experience
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18549836.The_Reigateway_to_Another_World
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https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Bible_Gateway
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Integral World - Integral Studies and Academia, Barriers and Gateways, Jeff Meyerhoff
selforum - sri aurobindos words gateways to soul
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dedroidify.blogspot - pandoras-box-sobek-and-gateway-to
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Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth(1992) - A sleazy nightclub owner purchases a strange, disturbing sculpture, which he soon discovers contains a mysterious, ornate puzzle box. This box is a legendary object that promises the secrets of ultimate pain and pleasure, but is in fact a gateway to hell. Soon the box's new owner has unleashed the e...
Lock Up(1989) - Sylvester Stallone plays Frank Leone, a convict that is serving the last few months of his sentence. Leone is transferred in the middle of the night to Gateway Prison where he meets with Warden Drumgoole played by Donald Sutherland. Drumgoole is holding a serious grudge since Leone had escaped from...
Counterpart ::: TV-MA | 1h | Drama, Sci-Fi, Thriller | TV Series (20172019) -- A hapless UN employee discovers that the agency he works for is hiding a gateway to a parallel dimension that's in a cold war with our own, and where his other self is a top spy. The war slowly heats up thanks to spies from both sides. Creator:
Counterpart ::: TV-MA | 1h | Drama, Sci-Fi, Thriller | TV Series (2017-2019) Episode Guide 20 episodes Counterpart Poster -- A hapless UN employee discovers that the agency he works for is hiding a gateway to a parallel dimension that's in a cold war with our own, and where his other self is a top spy. The war slowly heats up thanks to spies from both sides. Creator:
Forbidden Zone (1980) ::: 6.7/10 -- R | 1h 14min | Comedy, Fantasy, Musical | 21 March 1982 (USA) -- The bizarre and musical tale of a girl who travels to another dimension through the gateway found in her family's basement. Director: Richard Elfman Writers: Richard Elfman (story), Richard Elfman (screenplay) | 3 more credits
https://allthetropes.fandom.com/wiki/Gateway
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https://eq2.fandom.com/wiki/Stygian_Threshold:_The_Howling_Gateway_(Advanced_Solo)
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https://tolkienlanguages.fandom.com/wiki/Behind_the_Gateway
https://wowwiki-archive.fandom.com/wiki/Demonic_Gateway
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https://www.biblegateway.com/bible?passage=Gal. 1ymalinky.fandom.com/wiki/
Jigokudou Reikai Tsuushin -- -- - -- 1 ep -- Novel -- Fantasy Horror -- Jigokudou Reikai Tsuushin Jigokudou Reikai Tsuushin -- Tetsushi, Ryouchin and Shiina are a youthful trio not to be trifled with; they have a fearsome reputation. One day they decide to enter Jingkudou, a store which is rumored to be the gateway to Hell, the storekeeper sure is creepy enough. He tells them a story and after that they decide, with a magical token provided by the storekeeper, to try and find the restless spirit of a murder victim in order to give her release. This is only the start of their supernatural career... -- -- (Source: BakaBT) -- OVA - Aug 9, 1996 -- 854 6.15
Kekkai Sensen & Beyond -- -- Bones -- 12 eps -- Manga -- Action Comedy Fantasy Shounen Super Power Supernatural Vampire -- Kekkai Sensen & Beyond Kekkai Sensen & Beyond -- Three years ago, a gateway between Earth and the Beyond opened in New York City, trapping extradimensional creatures and humans alike in an impermeable bubble. After the city's restoration, monsters, magic, and madness are common findings in the area now known as Hellsalem's Lot. Leonardo Watch, a young photographer who unwillingly obtained the "All-seeing Eyes of the Gods" in exchange for his sister's eyesight, came to this paranormal city to find answers to the mysterious power that he possesses. He later finds his life drastically changed when he joins Libra, a secret organization of people with supernatural abilities dedicated to maintaining order in the everyday chaos of Hellsalem's Lot. -- -- However, this is only the beginning of Leonardo's unexpected journey ahead. Regardless of the constant threat of otherworldly enemies, he is determined to uncover the secrets of his power and find a way to restore his sister's eyesight. Kekkai Sensen & Beyond follows Leonardo as he sets off on more crazy adventures with his comrades, fighting to ensure peace and order. -- -- 314,725 7.86
Kekkai Sensen & Beyond -- -- Bones -- 12 eps -- Manga -- Action Comedy Fantasy Shounen Super Power Supernatural Vampire -- Kekkai Sensen & Beyond Kekkai Sensen & Beyond -- Three years ago, a gateway between Earth and the Beyond opened in New York City, trapping extradimensional creatures and humans alike in an impermeable bubble. After the city's restoration, monsters, magic, and madness are common findings in the area now known as Hellsalem's Lot. Leonardo Watch, a young photographer who unwillingly obtained the "All-seeing Eyes of the Gods" in exchange for his sister's eyesight, came to this paranormal city to find answers to the mysterious power that he possesses. He later finds his life drastically changed when he joins Libra, a secret organization of people with supernatural abilities dedicated to maintaining order in the everyday chaos of Hellsalem's Lot. -- -- However, this is only the beginning of Leonardo's unexpected journey ahead. Regardless of the constant threat of otherworldly enemies, he is determined to uncover the secrets of his power and find a way to restore his sister's eyesight. Kekkai Sensen & Beyond follows Leonardo as he sets off on more crazy adventures with his comrades, fighting to ensure peace and order. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 314,725 7.86
Kekkai Sensen -- -- Bones -- 12 eps -- Manga -- Action Comedy Super Power Supernatural Vampire Fantasy Shounen -- Kekkai Sensen Kekkai Sensen -- Supersonic monkeys, vampires, talking fishmen, and all sorts of different supernatural monsters living alongside humans—this has been part of daily life in Hellsalem's Lot, formerly known as New York City, for some time now. When a gateway between Earth and the Beyond opened three years ago, New Yorkers and creatures from the other dimension alike were trapped in an impenetrable bubble and were forced to live together. Libra is a secret organization composed of eccentrics and superhumans, tasked with keeping order in the city and making sure that chaos doesn't spread to the rest of the world. -- -- Pursuing photography as a hobby, Leonardo Watch is living a normal life with his parents and sister. But when he obtains the "All-seeing Eyes of the Gods" at the expense of his sister's eyesight, he goes to Hellsalem's Lot in order to help her by finding answers about the mysterious powers he received. He soon runs into Libra, and when Leo unexpectedly joins their ranks, he gets more than what he bargained for. Kekkai Sensen follows Leo's misadventures in the strangest place on Earth with his equally strange comrades—as the ordinary boy unwittingly sees his life take a turn for the extraordinary. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 652,112 7.64
Nouryou Anime: Denkyuu Ika Matsuri -- -- - -- 1 ep -- Original -- Psychological Dementia Horror -- Nouryou Anime: Denkyuu Ika Matsuri Nouryou Anime: Denkyuu Ika Matsuri -- Death is the gateway to birth. The deceased crosses the line to join the kingdom of the dead. He sees there the dance of the sperm and the egg. He is drawn towards the sky. This is the path to the afterlife. -- -- (Source: starandshadow.org.uk) -- Movie - ??? ??, 1993 -- 615 4.58
Touhou Niji Sousaku Doujin Anime: Musou Kakyou -- -- - -- ? eps -- Game -- Magic Vampire Fantasy -- Touhou Niji Sousaku Doujin Anime: Musou Kakyou Touhou Niji Sousaku Doujin Anime: Musou Kakyou -- Welcome to the fascinating world of Gensokyo, in which youkai (A term for all sorts of spiritual creatures), animals and some humans live, completely separated from our world by a magical barrier. The only gateway between the two worlds is the Hakurei shrine. -- -- Reimu Hakurei is the maiden working at said shrine. Whenever problems of supernatural causes (known as "Incidents") occur, Reimu goes out with her friends to investigate, eliminate the cause and hopefully restore Gensokyo to its equilibrium. -- OVA - Dec 29, 2008 -- 31,524 7.15
Warau Salesman Tokubetsu Bangumi -- -- Shin-Ei Animation -- 14 eps -- Manga -- Psychological Supernatural Seinen -- Warau Salesman Tokubetsu Bangumi Warau Salesman Tokubetsu Bangumi -- A special program of Warau Salesman, these episodes were released in a blast format on 3 days in a nearly 2 hour long timeslot each. The individual episodes have their own OPs. The first blast release differed from the main series by having live-action footage of real locations in Japan before delving into the story for each episode. The 2nd had Moguro with the Master interacting with the viewer as if behind the scenes for a studio before delving into each episode. And the 3rd had Moguro and the Master playing outside in the snow as if reporting on an on-location event to the viewer before delving into each episode. -- Special - Dec 26, 1992 -- 653 N/A -- -- Nouryou Anime: Denkyuu Ika Matsuri -- -- - -- 1 ep -- Original -- Psychological Dementia Horror -- Nouryou Anime: Denkyuu Ika Matsuri Nouryou Anime: Denkyuu Ika Matsuri -- Death is the gateway to birth. The deceased crosses the line to join the kingdom of the dead. He sees there the dance of the sperm and the egg. He is drawn towards the sky. This is the path to the afterlife. -- -- (Source: starandshadow.org.uk) -- Movie - ??? ??, 1993 -- 615 4.58
Wolf's Rain -- -- Bones -- 26 eps -- Original -- Action Adventure Drama Fantasy Mystery Sci-Fi -- Wolf's Rain Wolf's Rain -- In a dying world, there exists an ancient legend: when the world ends, the gateway to paradise will be opened. This utopia is the sole salvation for the remnants of life in this barren land, but the legend also dictates that only wolves can find their way to this mythical realm. Though long thought to be extinct, wolves still exist and live amongst humans, disguising themselves through elaborate illusions. -- -- A lone wolf named Kiba finds himself drawn by an intoxicating scent to Freeze City, an impoverished town under the rule of the callous Lord Orkham. Here, Kiba discovers that wolves Hige, Tsume, and Toboe have been drawn in by the same aroma. By following the fragrance of "Lunar Flowers," said to be the key to opening the door to their ideal world, the wolves set off on a journey across desolate landscapes and crumbling cities to find their legendary promised land. However, they are not the only ones seeking paradise, and those with more sinister intentions will do anything in their power to reach it first. -- -- 277,381 7.82
Wolf's Rain -- -- Bones -- 26 eps -- Original -- Action Adventure Drama Fantasy Mystery Sci-Fi -- Wolf's Rain Wolf's Rain -- In a dying world, there exists an ancient legend: when the world ends, the gateway to paradise will be opened. This utopia is the sole salvation for the remnants of life in this barren land, but the legend also dictates that only wolves can find their way to this mythical realm. Though long thought to be extinct, wolves still exist and live amongst humans, disguising themselves through elaborate illusions. -- -- A lone wolf named Kiba finds himself drawn by an intoxicating scent to Freeze City, an impoverished town under the rule of the callous Lord Orkham. Here, Kiba discovers that wolves Hige, Tsume, and Toboe have been drawn in by the same aroma. By following the fragrance of "Lunar Flowers," said to be the key to opening the door to their ideal world, the wolves set off on a journey across desolate landscapes and crumbling cities to find their legendary promised land. However, they are not the only ones seeking paradise, and those with more sinister intentions will do anything in their power to reach it first. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Bandai Entertainment, Funimation -- 277,381 7.82
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