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object:J R R Tolkien
class:author
subject class:Fiction


--- WIKI
John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (3 January 1892 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and academic. He was the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, from 1945 to 1959. He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewisthey were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings. Tolkien was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II on 28 March 1972. After Tolkien's death, his son Christopher published a series of works based on his father's extensive notes and unpublished manuscripts, including The Silmarillion. These, together with The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, form a connected body of tales, poems, fictional histories, invented languages, and literary essays about a fantasy world called Arda and Middle-earth within it. Between 1951 and 1955, Tolkien applied the term legendarium to the larger part of these writings. While many other authors had published works of fantasy before Tolkien, the great success of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings led directly to a popular resurgence of the genre. This has caused Tolkien to be popularly identified as the "father" of modern fantasy literature or, more precisely, of high fantasy. In 2008, The Times ranked him sixth on a list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945". Forbes ranked him the fifth top-earning "dead celebrity" in 2009.
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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

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J R R Tolkien

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   8 J R R Tolkien

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1:That was mother of Heaven's King. ~ J R R Tolkien,
2:The road goes ever on and on.
   ~ J R R Tolkien, Bilbo Baggins,
3:Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. ~ J R R Tolkien, [T5],
4:Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. ~ J R R Tolkien,
5:It is not despair, for despair is only for those who see the end beyond all doubt. We do not.
   ~ J R R Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring,
6:All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost; the old that is strong does not wither, deep roots are not reached by the frost.
   ~ J R R Tolkien,
7:I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend. ~ J R R Tolkien, The Two Towers,
8:I desired dragons with a profound desire. Of course, I in my timid body did not wish to have them in the neighborhood. But the world that contained even the imagination of Fafnir was richer and more beautiful, at whatever the cost of peril. ~ J R R Tolkien, On Fairy-Stories,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Mind your P's and Q's. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
2:See your road through. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
3:Third time pays for all ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
4:Fire, fear, foes! Awake! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
5:Over hill and under hill ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
6:We must do without hope. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
7:My Precious, my Precious. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
8:I'm going on an adventure! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
9:Wraiths! Wraiths on wings! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
10:All's well that ends better. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
11:Handsome is as handsome does ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
12:I wisely started with a map. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
13:Never laugh at live dragons. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
14:No Victory Without Suffering ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
15:Short cuts make long delays. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
16:The road goes ever on and on ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
17:The burned hand teaches best. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
18:All shall love me and despair. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
19:Don't go where I can't follow! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
20:Often does hatred hurt itself. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
21:What does your heart tell you? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
22:Farewell! I go to find the Sun! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
23:Great heart will not be denied. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
24:Tears unnumbered ye shall shed. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
25:Above all shadows rides the sun. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
26:Hush! Take no notice!" - Gandalf ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
27:I will not walk backward in life. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
28:Little by little, one travels far ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
29:Not everyone who wanders is lost. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
30:All that is gold does not glitter. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
31:Fair speech may hide a foul heart. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
32:Slight changes simply make a blur. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
33:Where will wants not, a way opens. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
34:Do not spoil the wonder with haste! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
35:Adventures make one late for supper. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
36:Courage is found in unlikely places. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
37:Speak politely to an enraged dragon. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
38:A pen is to me as a beak is to a hen. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
39:For nothing is evil in the beginning. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
40:I'd got hobbits on my hands hadn't I? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
41:Memory is not what the heart desires. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
42:Not idly do the leaves of Lorien fall ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
43:Oft hope is born when all is forlorn. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
44:The treacherous are ever distrustful. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
45:The wise speak only of what they know ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
46:I am in fact, a hobbit in all but size ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
47:What punishments of God are not gifts? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
48:Faithful heart may have froward tongue. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
49:I dislike allegory wherever I smell it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
50:out of the frying pan and into the fire ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
51:Deep roots are not reached by the frost. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
52:Not all that have fallen are vanquished. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
53:A safe fairyland is untrue to all worlds. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
54:Green are the leaves I leave in Mirkwood. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
55:Help means ruin and saving means slaying. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
56:May the hair on your toes never fall out! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
57:Struck by lightning! Struck by lightning! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
58:The greatest adventure is what lies ahead ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
59:To crooked eyes truth may wear a wry face ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
60:False hopes are more dangerous than fears. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
61:Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
62:Your lullaby would waken a drunken goblin! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
63:Better mistrust undeserved than rash words. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
64:Curse us and crush us, my precious is lost! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
65:For even the very wise cannot see all ends. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
66:Home is now behind you, the world is ahead! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
67:I do not believe this darkness will endure. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
68:I don't know, and I would rather not guess. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
69:I have the hatred of apartheid in my bones. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
70:There is no ship now that can bear me hence ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
71:Time doesn't seem to pass here: it just is. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
72:Valour needs first strength, then a weapon. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
73:It was a hobbit hole, and that means comfort ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
74:The doom lies in yourself, not in your name. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
75:In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
76:It is no bad thing celebrating a simple life. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
77:You aren't nearly through this adventure yet. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
78:And he smote the Balrog upon the mountainside. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
79:Don't put a lump of rock under my elbow again! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
80:I am going with him, if he climbs to the Moon. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
81:I'm a Roman Catholic! A devout Roman Catholic. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
82:It is plain that we were meant to go together. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
83:The Darkness has begun. There will be no dawn. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
84:Wars are not favourable to delicate pleasures. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
85:It's a dangerous business, going out your door. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
86:On their deathbed men will speak true, they say. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
87:If by my life or death I can protect you, I will. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
88:I'm looking for someone to share in an adventure. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
89:It is mine to give to whom I will, like my heart. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
90:Moonlight drowns out all but the brightest stars. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
91:Very potent influence on myself has been Finnish. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
92:Adventures are not all pony-rides in May-sunshine. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
93:Let the unseen days be. Today is more than enough. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
94:A red sun rises. Blood has been spilled this night. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
95:I have no help to send, therefore I must go myself. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
96:Tell me, who are you, alone, yourself and nameless? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
97:I warn you, if you bore me, I shall take my revenge. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
98:Praise from the praise-worthy is beyond all rewards. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
99:The praise of the praiseworthy is above all rewards. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
100:True education is a kind of never-ending story . . . ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
101:For it is easier to shout &
102:If we all got angry together something might be done. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
103:In doubt a man of worth will trust to his own wisdom. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
104:Where there's life there's hope, and need of vittles. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
105:You can only come to the morning through the shadows. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
106:I have an unsatisfied desire to shoot well with a bow. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
107:He drew a deep breath. &
108:I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
109:That was the most awkward Wednesday he ever remembered. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
110:We are never late. We arrive precisely when we mean to. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
111:The world is not in your books and maps, it's out there. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
112:And yet their wills did not yield, and they struggled on. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
113:Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
114:It never does to leave a live Dragon out of the equation. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
115:You may not like my burglar, but please don't damage him. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
116:A single dream is more powerful than a thousand realities. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
117:Deeds will not be less valiant because they are unpraised. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
118:Trolls simply detest the very sight of dwarves (uncooked). ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
119:He stands not alone. You would die before your stroke fell. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
120:I don't feel any guilt complex about The Lord of the Rings. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
121:I will not say, do not weep, for not all tears are an evil. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
122:There are other men, and other lives, and time still to be. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
123:If this is victory, then our hands are too small to hold it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
124:I wished to be loved by another. But I desire no man's pity. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
125:The war made me poignantly aware of the beauty of the world. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
126:What do you fear, lady?' he asked. &
127:Bilbo saw that the moment had come when he must do something. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
128:Do not scorn pity that is the gift of a gentle heart, Éowyn! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
129:Even the smallest person can change the course of the future. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
130:It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
131:Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
132:There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
133:The wolf that one hears is worse than the orc that one fears. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
134:To be a cult figure in one's own lifetime is most unpleasant. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
135:It is mine, I tell you. My own. My precious. Yes, my precious. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
136:I will take the Ring", he said, "though I do not know the way. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
137:So comes snow after fire, and even dragons have their endings. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
138:There is some good in this world, and it's worth fighting for. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
139:You have nice manners for a thief and a liar," said the dragon. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
140:Let him go, you filth! Let him go! You will not touch him again! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
141:For we put the thought of all that we love into all that we make. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
142:It is useless to meet revenge with revenge; it will heal nothing. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
143:A year shall I endure for every day that passes until your return. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
144:his old life lay behind in the mists, dark adventure lay in front. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
145:I may be a burglar... but I'm an honest one, I hope, more or less. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
146:The world changes, and all that once was strong now proves unsure. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
147:A friend of mine tells that I talk in shorthand and then smudge it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
148:All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
149:Fear nothing! Have peace until the morning! Heed no nightly noises! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
150:Go back! Fall into the nothingness that awaits you and your Master. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
151:Go not to the Elves for counsel, for they will say both no and yes. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
152:I am glad you are here with me. Here at the end of all things, Sam. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
153:I have spoken words of hope. But only of hope. Hope is not victory. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
154:I sang of leaves, of leaves of gold, and leaves of gold there grew. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
155:Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
156:You have to understand the good in things, to detect the real evil. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
157:A hunted man sometimes wearies of distrust and longs for friendship. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
158:Let him not vow to walk in the dark, who has not seen the nightfall. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
159:Your talk of sniffling riders with invisible noses has unsettled me. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
160:A box without hinges, key, or lid, yet golden treasure inside is hid. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
161:All have their worth and each contributes to the worth of the others. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
162:It matters little who is the enemy, if we cannot beat off his attack. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
163:The world was fair, the mountains tall In Elder Days before the fall. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
164:&
165:Few there were who could change his courses by counsel. None by force. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
166:I'm in a position where it doesn't matter what people think of me now. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
167:It seemed like all the way to tomorrow and over it to the days beyond. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
168:May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
169:O! Tril-lil-lil-lolly the valley is jolly, ha! ha! -Elves of Rivendell ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
170:Elen sila lumenn' omentielvo, a star shines on the hour of our meeting. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
171:Is it nice, my preciousss? Is it juicy? Is it scrumptiously crunchable? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
172:It simply isn't an adventure worth telling if there aren't any dragons. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
173:The world is indeed full of peril and in it there are many dark places. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
174:I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
175:I want to be a healer, and love all things that grow and are not barren. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
176:Things will go as they will, and there is no need to hurry to meet them. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
177:Their &
178:We set out to save the Shire, Sam and it has been saved - but not for me. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
179:He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
180:Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
181:Ultimately we've only got humanity to work with. It's only clay we've got. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
182:Voiceless it cries, Wingless flutters, Toothless bites, Mouthless mutters. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
183:A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
184:Hinder me? Thou fool. No living man may hinder me!" But no living man am I! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
185:We may stand, if only on one leg, or at least be left still upon our knees. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
186:There are older and fouler things than Orcs in the deep places of the world. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
187:Thief, thief, thief! Baggins! We hates it, we hates it, we hates it forever! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
188:Few can foresee whither their road will lead them, till they come to its end. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
189:If you sit on the doorstep long enough, I daresay you will think of something ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
190:I put before you the one great thing to love on earth: the Blessed Sacrament. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
191:Of all the things that men may heed &
192:There is no curse in Elvish, Entish or the tongues of Men for this treachery! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
193:True courage is about knowing not when to take a life, but when to spare one. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
194:After all, I believe that legends and myths are largely made of &
195:He may become like a glass filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
196:It is perilous to study too deeply the arts of the Enemy, for good or for ill. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
197:May the wind under your wings bear you where the sun sails and the moon walks. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
198:Perilous to us all are the devices of an art deeper than we possess ourselves. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
199:The burned hand teaches best. After that, advice about fire goes to the heart. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
200:A wizard is never late, nor is he early, he arrives precisely when he means to. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
201:Farewell! wherever you fare, till your eyries receive you at the journey’s end! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
202:It is not the strength of the body that counts, but the strength of the spirit. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
203:The world is full enough of hurts and mischances without wars to multiply them. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
204:All my own small perception of beauty both in majesty and simplicity is founded. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
205:Do not meddle in the affairs of Wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
206:Many evil things there are that your strong walls and bright swords do not stay. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
207:Trolls are slow in the uptake, and mighty suspicious about anything new to them. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
208:Come, Mr. Frodo!' he cried. &
209:History often resembles myth, because they are both ultimately of the same stuff. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
210:So fair, so cold; like a morning of pale spring still clinging to winter's chill. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
211:What course am I to take?" "Towards danger; but not too rashly, nor too straight. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
212:Look, up at the sky. There is a light, a beauty up there, that no shadow can touch ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
213:deep they delved us, fair they wrought us, high they builded us; but they are gone. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
214:Don't tell us about dreams ‚ dream dinners aren't any good and we can't share them. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
215:Fear both the heat and the cold of your heart, and strive for patience, if you can. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
216:We don't want any adventures here! You might try over the Hill or Across the Water. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
217:And sometimes you didn't want to know the end‚ ¶ because how could the end be happy? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
218:Gandalf: Three hundred lives of men I have walked this earth and now I have no time. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
219:I shall claim full amends for every fall and stubbed toe, if you do not lead us well. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
220:It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
221:A man that flies from his fear may find that he has only taken a short cut to meet it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
222:Farewell! O Gandalf! May you ever appear where you are most needed and least expected! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
223:For victory is victory, however small, nor is its worth only from what follows from it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
224:If this nice friendliness would spread about in Mordor, half our trouble would be over. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
225:Living by faith includes the call to something greater than cowardly self-preservation. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
226:Speak, or I will put a dint in your hat that even a wizard will find hard to deal with! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
227:Advice is a dangerous gift, even from the wise to the wise, and all courses may run ill. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
228:American English is essentially English after having been wiped off with a dirty sponge. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
229:Oh! That was poetry!" said Pippin. "Do you really mean to start before the break of day? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
230:The greater part of the truth is always hidden, in regions out of the reach of cynicism. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
231:Where iss it, where iss it: my Precious, my Precious? It's ours, it is, and we wants it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
232:His grief he will not forget; but it will not darken his heart, it will teach him wisdom. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
233:I wish I was at home in my nice hole by the fire, with the kettle just beginning to sing! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
234:We meet again, at the turn of the tide. A great storm is coming, but the tide has turned. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
235:And what do you wish?' he said at last. &
236:Far, far below the deepest delvings of the dwarves, the world is gnawed by nameless things. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
237:It needs but one foe to breed a war, and those who have not swords can still die upon them. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
238:The realm of Suaron is ended!' said Gandalf. &
239:Touching your cap to the Squire may be damn bad for the Squire, but it's damn good for you. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
240:And then alas! I let the matter reset, watching and waiting only, as we have too often done. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
241:I don't want to be in a battle. But waiting on the edge of one I can't escape is even worse. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
242:If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
243:It is not despair, for despair is only for those who see the end beyond all doubt. We do not. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
244:it was easier to believe in the Dragon and less easy to believe in Thorin in these wild parts ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
245:Much evil must befall a country before it wholly forgets the Elves, if once they dwelt there. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
246:Over the field rang his clear voice calling: Death! Ride, ride to ruin and the world’s ending! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
247:You have been chosen, and you must therefore use such strength and heart and wits as you have. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
248:But it seems that the wind is setting East, and the withering of all Woods may be drawing near. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
249:People remember Longfellow wrote Hiawatha, quite forget he was a Professor of Modern Languages! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
250:The birth, death, and resurrection of Jesus means that one day everything sad will come untrue. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
251:A story must be told or there'll be no story, yet it is the untold stories that are most moving. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
252:Being a cheerful hobbit, he had not needed hope, as long as despair could be postponed. (Of Sam) ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
253:Elvish singing is not a thing to miss, in June under the stars, not if you care for such things. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
254:End? No, the journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path... One that we all must take. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
255:Faerie is a perilous land, and in it are pitfalls for the unwary, and dungeons for the overbold. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
256:Frodo: Go back, Sam! I’m going to Mordor alone. Sam: Of course you are, and I’m coming with you! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
257:Tomorrow we may come this way, And take the hidden paths that run Towards the Moon or to the Sun ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
258:When he heard there was nothing to eat, he sat down and wept “Why did I ever wake up!” he cried. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
259:Alive without breath, As cold as death; Never thirsty, ever drinking, All in mail never clinking. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
260:Hammer and tongs! I am so torn between rage and joy, that if I do not burst, it will be a marvel! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
261:There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
262:And its object is Art not power, sub-creation not domination and tyrannous re-forming of Creation. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
263:How do you move on? You move on when your heart finally understands that there is no turning back. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
264:No dragon can resist the fascination of riddling talk and of wasting time trying to understand it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
265:No half-heartedness and no worldly fear must turn us aside from following the light unflinchingly. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
266:Don't adventures ever have an end? I suppose not. Someone else always has to carry on on the story. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
267:The whole thing is quite hopeless, so it's no good worrying about tomorrow. It probably won't come. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
268:The wide world is all about you: you can fence yourselves in, but you cannot for ever fence it out. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
269:Don't leave me here alone! It's your Sam calling. Don't go where I can't follow! Wake up, Mr. Frodo! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
270:I was talking aloud to myself. A habit of the old: they choose the wisest person present to speak to ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
271:What has roots as nobody sees, Is taller than trees Up, up it goes, And yet never grows? A mountain. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
272:And the Ring is so heavy, Sam. I begin to see it in my mind all the time, like a great wheel of fire. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
273:Evidently we look so much alike that your desire to make an incurable dent in my hat must be excused. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
274:Courage will now be your best defence against the storm that is at hand-that and such hope as I bring. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
275:Dead men are not friends to living men, and give them no gifts. (Ghan-buri-Ghan, of allies during war) ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
276:I invented that little rhyme about &
277:Maybe the paths that you each shall tread are already laid before your feet though you do not see them ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
278:Well, you can go on looking forward," said Gandalf. "There may be many unexpected feasts ahead of you. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
279:If you don't know where you're going, you'll wind up somewhere else. Not all those who wander are lost. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
280:I give you this toast: To the Hobbits. May they outlast the Sarumans and see spring again in the trees. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
281:We are plain quiet folk, and I have no use for adventures. Nasty, disturbing, and uncomfortable things. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
282:Don't dip your beard in the foam, Father!" They cried to Thorin. "It is long enough without watering it! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
283:Why O why did I ever leave my hobbit-hole?" said poor Mr. Baggins, bumping up and down on Bombur's back. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
284:Shall we mourn here deedless forever a shadow-folk mist-haunting dropping vain tears in the thankless sea ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
285:Truly songs and tales fall utterly short of the reality, O Smaug the Chiefest and greatest of Calamities. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
286:The Resurrection is the eucatastrophe of the story of the Incarnation - This story begins and ends in joy. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
287:Art is the human process that produces by the way (it is not its only or ultimate object) Secondary Belief. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
288:He [Bilbo] fought the real battle in the tunnel alone, before he ever saw the vast danger that lay in wait. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
289:I wish life was not so short. Languages take such a time, and so do all the things one wants to know about. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
290:One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
291:Where there are so many, all speech becomes a debate without end. But two together may perhaps find wisdom. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
292:For you do not yet know the strengths of your hearts, and you cannot foresee what each may meet on the road. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
293:With hope or without hope we will follow the trail of our enemies. And woe to them, if we prove the swifter! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
294:And then her heart changed, or at least she understood it; and the winter passed, and the sun shone upon her. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
295:Yes, I am here. And you are lucky to be here too after all the absurd things you've done since you left home. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
296:I am looking for someone to share in an adventure that I am arranging, and it's very difficult to find anyone. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
297:please don't cook me, kind sirs! I am a good cook myself, and cook better than I cook, if you see what I mean. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
298:The quiet was so deep that their feet seemed to thump along while all the trees leaned over them and listened. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
299:I sit beside the fire and think of people long ago, and of people who will see a world that I shall never know. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
300:Let us remember that a traitor may betray himself and do good that he does not intend. It can be so, sometimes. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
301:Why must you speak your thoughts? Silence, if fair words stick in your throat, would serve all our ends better. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
302:You ought not to be rude to an eagle, when you are only the size of a hobbit, and are up in hid eyrie at night! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
303:Chip the glasses and crack the plates! / Blunt the knives and bend the forks! / That's what Bilbo Baggins hates. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
304:The way is shut. It was made by those who are Dead, and the Dead keep it, until the time comes. The way is shut. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
305:I threw down my enemy, and he fell from the high place and broke the mountain-side where he smote it in his ruin. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
306:Farewell, and may the blessing of Elves and Men and all Free Folk go with you. May the stars shine upon your faces! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
307:Many are the strange chances of the world, and help oft shall come from the hands of the weak when the Wise falter. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
308:This is a story of how a Baggins had an adventure, and found himself doing and saying things altogether unexpected. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
309:To think I should have lived to be goodmorninged by Belladonna Took's son, as if I was selling buttons at the door! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
310:And what would you do, if an uninvited dwarf came and hung his things up in your hall without a word of explanation? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
311:Books ought to have good endings.How would this do: and they all settled down and lived together happily ever after? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
312:For still there are so many things that I have never seen: in every wood in every spring there is a different green. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
313:But I am the real Strider, fortunately. I am Aragorn son of Arathorn; and if by life or death I can save you, I will. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
314:I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
315:Yes, I am white now,' said Gandalf. &
316:For so sworn good or evil an oath may not be broken and it shall pursue oathkeeper and oathbreaker to the world's end. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
317:Outside the ring of dancing warriors with spears and axes stood wolves at a respectful distance, watching and waiting. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
318:Together we will take the road that leads into the West, And far away will find a land where both our hearts may rest. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
319:His love for Frodo rose above all other thoughts, and forgetting his peril he cried aloud: &
320:If you're going to have a complicated story you must work to a map; otherwise you'll never make a map of it afterwards. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
321:And long there he lay, an image of the splendour of the Kings of Men in glory undimmed before the breaking of the world. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
322:We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
323:I am dreading the publication, for it will be impossible not to mind what is said. I have exposed my heart to be shot at. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
324:We wants it, we needs it. Must have the precious. They stole it from us. Sneaky little hobbitses. Wicked, tricksy, false! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
325:If you do not believe in a personal God, the question: &
326:Ónen i-estel edain, ú-chebin estel anim. (I gave Hope to the Dúnedain, I have kept none for myself.) (Gilraen's linnod) ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
327:Splendid! They used to go up like great lilies and snapdragons and laburnums of fire and hang in the twilight all evening! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
328:There was a fire in the wide hearth before them, and it was burning with a sweet smell, as if it were built of apple-wood. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
329:And it is not our part here to take thought only for a season, or for a few lives of Men, or for a passing age of the world. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
330:Such bees! Bilbo had never seen anything like them. "If one were to sting me," He thought "I should swell up as big as I am! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
331:Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory. If a soldier is imprisoned by the enemy, don't we consider it his duty to escape? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
332:Then holding the star aloft and the bright sword advanced, Frodo, hobbit of the Shire, walked steadily down to meet the eyes. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
333:evil labours with vast power and perpetual success - in vain: preparing always only the soil for unexpected good to sprout in. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
334:Gandalf thought of most things; and though he could not do everything, he could do a great deal for friends in a tight corner. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
335:O Elbereth! Gilthoniel! We still remember, we who dwell In this far land beneath the trees. Thy starlight on the Western Seas. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
336:You will notice already that Mr. Baggins was not quite so prosy as he liked to believe, also that he was very fond of flowers. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
337:Far over misty mountains cold To dungeons deep and caverns old We must away, ere break of day, To find our long-forgotten gold. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
338:For some time I lived in fear of receiving a letter signed &
339:The only just literary critic," he concluded, "is Christ, who admires more than does any man the gifts He Himself has bestowed. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
340:This is the ending. Now not day only shall be beloved, but night too shall be beautiful and blessed and all its fear pass away. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
341:Each of us embodies, in a particular tale and clothed in the garments of time & place, universal truth and everlasting life. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
342:It is ever so with the things that Men begin: there is a frost in Spring, or a blight in Summer, and they fail of their promise. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
343:Pay heed to the tales of old wives. It may well be that they alone keep in memory what it was once needful for the wise to know. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
344:Alas, not me, lord!" she said. "Shadow lies on me still. Look not to me for healing! I am a shieldmaiden and my hand is ungentle. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
345:Memory is not what the heart desires. That is only a mirror, be it clear as Kheled-zaram. Or so says the heart of Gimli the Dwarf. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
346:True education is a kind of never ending story‚ a matter of continual beginnings, of habitual fresh starts, of persistent newness. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
347:Arise now, arise, Riders of Théoden! Dire deeds awake, dark is it eastward. Let horse be bridled, horn be sounded! Forth Eorlingas! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
348:For the less even as for the greater there is some deed that he may accomplish but once only; and in that deed his heart shall rest. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
349:Stand by the grey stone when the thrush knocks, and the setting sun with the last light of Durin’s Day will shine upon the key-hole. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
350:Here you find us sitting on a field of victory, amid the plunder of armies, and you wonder how we came by a few well-earned comforts! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
351:I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
352:Let this be the hour when we draw swords together. Fell deeds awake. Now for wrath, now for ruin, and the red dawn. Forth, Eorlingas! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
353:Things are drawing towards the end now, unless I am mistaken. There is an unpleasant time just in front of you; but keep your heart up! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
354:Indeed in nothing is the power of the Dark Lord more clearly shown than in the estrangement that divides all those who still oppose him. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
355:A few melancholy birds were pipping and wailing, until the round red sun sank slowly into the western shadows; then an empty silence fell ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
356:For if joyful is the fountain that rises in the sun, its springs are in the wells of sorrow unfathomable at the foundations of the Earth. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
357:If you're referring to the incident with the dragon, I was barely involved. All I did was give your uncle a little nudge out of the door. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
358:I've always been impressed that we are here, surviving, because of the indomitable courage of quite small people against impossible odds. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
359:Without the high and noble the simple and vulgar is utterly mean; and without the simple and ordinary the noble and heroic is meaningless ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
360:I'll get there, if I leave everything but my bones behind," said Sam. "And I'll carry Mr. Frodo up myself, if it breaks my back and heart. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
361:Saruman," I said, standing away from him, "only one hand at a time can weild the One, and you know that well, so do not trouble to say we! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
362:Thank you, Sam," he said in a cracked whisper. "How far is there to go?" I don't know," said Sam, "because I don't know where we're going. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
363:And he took her in his arms and kissed her under the sunlit sky, and he cared not that they stood high upon the walls in the sight of many. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
364:But the enemy has the move, and he is about to open his full game. And pawns are as likely to see as much of it as any. Sharpen your blade! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
365:The Lord of the Rings is of course a fundamentally religious and Catholic work; unconsciously so at first, but consciously in the revision. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
366:The Nazgul they were; the Ringwraiths, the Enemy's most terribly servants; darkness went with them and they cried with the voices of death. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
367:But he that sows lies in the end shall not lack of a harvest, and soon he may rest from toil indeed, while others reap and sow in his stead. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
368:My political opinions lean more and more to Anarchy (philosophically understood, meaning abolition of control not whiskered men with bombs). ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
369:Yes, they are elves," Legolas said. "and they say that you breathe so loud they could shoot you in the dark." Sam hastily covered his mouth. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
370:Gandalf! I thought you were dead! But then I thought I was dead myself. Is everything sad going to come untrue? What's happened to the world? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
371:In sorrow we must go, but not in despair. Behold! we are not bound for ever to the circles of the world, and beyond them is more than memory. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
372:It is wisdom to recognize necessity when all other courses have been weighed, though as folly it may appear to those who cling to false hope. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
373:Sorry! I don't want any adventures, thank you. Not Today. Good morning! But please come to tea -any time you like! Why not tomorrow? Good bye! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
374:There are no safe paths in this part of the world. Remember you are over the Edge of the Wild now, and in for all sorts of fun wherever you go. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
375:Farewell we call to hearth and hall! Though wind may blow and rain may fall. We must away ere the break of day. Far over wood and mountain tall. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
376:I am rather tired, and no longer young enough to pillage the night to make up for the deficit of hours in the day... " JRR Tolkien, Letter
377:Creative fantasy, because it is mainly trying to do something else ... may open your hoard and let all the locked things fly away like cage-birds. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
378:Such is of the course of deeds that move the wheels of the world: small hands do them because they must, while the eyes of the great are elsewhere. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
379:Fantasy (in this sense) is, I think, not a lower but a higher form of Art, indeed the most nearly pure form, and so (when achieved) the most potent. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
380:I am in fact a hobbit (in all but size). I like gardens, trees and unmechanized farmlands; I smoke a pipe, and like good plain food (unrefrigerated). ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
381:My armor is like tenfold shields, my teeth are swords, my claws spears, the shock of my tail a thunderbolt, my wings a hurricane, and my breath death! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
382:He was as noble and fair in face as an elf-lord, as strong as a warrior, as wise as a wizard, as venerable as a king of dwarves, and as kind as summer. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
383:Of the twelve companions of Thorin, ten remained. Fili and Kili had fallen defending him with shield and body, for he was their mother’s elder brother. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
384:There are many powers in the world, for good or for evil. Some are greater than I am. Against some I have not yet been measured. But my time is coming. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
385:And if Sam considered himself lucky, Frodo knew he was more lucky himself; for there was not a hobbit in the Shire that was looked after with such care. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
386:How could such a large door be kept secret from everybody outside, apart from the dragon?" [Bilbo] asked. He was only a little hobbit you must remember. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
387:They were frightfully angry. Quite apart from the stones no spider has ever liked being called Attercop, and Tomnoddy of course is insulting to anybody. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
388:It gives me great pleasure, a good name. I always in writing start with a name. Give me a name and it produces a story, not the other way about normally. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
389:All your words are but to say: you are a woman, and your part is in the house. But... I can ride and wield blade, and I do not fear either pain or death. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
390:My advice to all who have the time or inclination to concern themselves with the international language movement would be: &
391:Then shouldering their burdens, they set off, seeking a path that would bring them over the grey hills of the Emyn Muil, and down into the Land of Shadow. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
392:There cannot be any &
393:Fool of a Took!" he growled. "This is a serious journey, not a hobbit walking-party. Throw yourself in next time, and then you will be no further nuisance. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
394:The world has changed. I see it in the water. I feel it in the Earth. I smell it in the air. Much that once was is lost, For none now live who remember it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
395:No, my heart will not yet despair. Gandalf fell and has returned and is with us. We may stand, if only on one leg, or at least be left still upon our knees. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
396:The one small garden of a free gardener was all his need and due, not a garden swollen to a realm; his own hands to use, not the hands of others to command. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
397:Then Aragorn was abashed, for he saw the elven-light in her eyes and the wisdom of many days; yet from that hour he loved Arwen Undómiel daughter of Elrond. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
398:Then Elrond and Galadriel rode on; for the Third Age was over and the Days of the Rings were passed and an end was come of the story and song of those times. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
399:O! Where are you going With beards all a-wagging? No knowing, no knowing What brings Mister Baggins, And Balin and Dwalin down into the valley in June ha! ha! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
400:Venice seemed incredibly lovely, elvishly lovely&
401:You must understand, young Hobbit, it takes a long time to say anything in Old Entish. And we never say anything unless it is worth taking a long time to say. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
402:A sister they had, Galadriel, most beautiful of all the house of Finwë; her hair was lit with gold as though it had caught in a mesh the radiance of Laurelin. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
403:Love not too well the work of thy hands and the devices of thy heart; and remember that the true hope of the Noldor lieth in the West, and cometh from the Sea. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
404:The washing-up was so dismally real that Bilbo was forced to believe the party of the night before had not been part of his bad dreams, as he had rather hoped. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
405:After some while Bilbo became impatient. "Well, what is it?" he said. "The answer's not a kettle boiling over, as you seem to think by the noise you are making. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
406:And now leave me in peace for a bit! I don't want to answer a string of questions while I am eating. I want to think!" "Good Heavens!" said Pippin. "At breakfast? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
407:He found himself wondering at times, especially in the autumn, about the wild lands, and strange visions of mountains that he had never seen came into his dreams. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
408:Indeed you did your best... I hope that it may be long before you find yourself in such a tight corner again between two such terrible old men. ~ Gandalf to Pippin ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
409:It [discovering Finnish] was like discovering a wine-cellar filled with bottles of amazing wine of a kind and flavour never tasted before. It quite intoxicated me. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
410:It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
411:My &
412:Now and again he spoke to those that served him and thanked them in their own language. They smiled at him and said laughing: &
413:Yet seldom do they fail of their seed, And that will lie in the dust and rot to spring up again in times and places unlooked-for. The deeds of Men will outlast us. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
414:You can make the Ring into an allegory of our own time, if you like: and allegory of the inevitable fate that waits for all attempts to defeat evil power by power. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
415:Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on? ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
416:I am wholly in favour of &
417:He knew that all the hazards and perils were now drawing together to a point: the next day would be a day of doom, the day of final effort or disaster, the last gasp. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
418:The romantic chivalric tradition takes, or at any rate has in the past taken, the young man's eye off women as they are, as companions in shipwreck not guiding stars. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
419:Already he was a very different hobbit from the one that had run out without a pocket-handkerchief from Bag-End long ago. He had not had a pocket-handkerchief for ages. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
420:Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the image and likeness of a Maker. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
421:For the trouble with the real folk of Faerie is that they do not always look like what they are; and they put on the pride and beauty that we would fain wear ourselves. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
422:In this Music [the singing of the angels in harmony] the World was begun; for Iluvatar made visible the song of the Ainur,and they beheld it as a light in the darkness. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
423:This thing all things devours: Birds, beasts, trees, flowers; Gnaws iron, bites steel; Grinds hard stones to meal; Slays king, ruins town, And beats high mountain down. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
424:The chief purpose of life, for any of us, is to increase according to our capacity our knowledge of God by all means we have, and to be moved by it to praise and thanks. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
425:Then hope unlooked-for came so suddenly to Eomer's heart, and with it the bite of care and fear renewed, that he said no more, but turned and went swiftly from the hall. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
426:There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
427:What did I tell you, Mr. Pippin?' said Sam, sheathing his sword. &
428:And thus it came to pass that the Silmarils found their long homes: one in the airs of heaven, and one in the fires of the heart of the world, and one in the deep waters. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
429:Ho! Tom Bombadil, Tom Bombadillo! By water, wood and hill, by reed and willow, By fire, sun and moon, harken now and hear us! Come, Tom Bombadil, for our need is near us! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
430:And it is not always good to be healed in body. Nor is it always evil to die in battle, even in bitter pain. Were I permitted, in this dark hour I would choose the latter. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
431:I have the hatred of apartheid in my bones; and most of all I detest the segregation or separation of Language and Literature. I do not care which of them you think White. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
432:Hobbits delighted in such things, if they were accurate; they liked to have books filled with things that they already knew, set out fair and square with no contradictions. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
433:It is the way of my people to use light words at such times and say less than they mean. We fear to say too much. It robs us of the right words when a jest is out of place. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
434:Their horses were of great stature, strong and clean-limbed; their gray coats glistened, their long tails flowed in the wind, their manes were braided on their proud necks. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
435:And there was Frodo, pale and worn, and yet himself again; and in his eyes there was peace now, neither strain of will, nor madness, nor any fear. His burden was taken away. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
436:For a while they stood there, like men on the edge of a sleep where nightmare lurks, holding it off, though they know that they can only come to morning through the shadows. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
437:The strongest must seek a way, say you? But I say: let a ploughman plough, but choose an otter for swimming, and for running light over grass and leaf, or over snow- an Elf! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
438:Tall ships and tall kings Three times three, What brought they from the foundered land Over the flowing sea? Seven stars and seven stones And one white tree. (The Two Towers) ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
439:Don't the great tales never end?" "No, they never end as tales," said Frodo. "But the people in them come, and go when their part's ended. Our part will end later ‚ or sooner. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
440:grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of the mind: out of all that has been seen or thought or read, that has long ago been forgotten, descending into the deeps. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
441:Nobody believes me when I say that my long book is an attempt to create a world in which a form of language agreeable to my personal aesthetic might seem real. But it is true. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
442:Stir not the bitterness in the cup that I mixed for myself,' said Denethor. &
443:The Dark Lord has Nine. But we have One, mightier than they: the White Rider. He has passed through the fire and the abyss, and they shall fear him. We will go where he leads. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
444:Your time may come. Do not be too sad, Sam. You cannot be always torn in two. You will have to be one and whole, for many years. You have so much to enjoy and to be, and to do. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
445:“Escaping goblins to be caught by wolves!” he said, and it became a proverb, though we now say out of the frying-pan into the fire’ in the same sort of uncomfortable situations. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
446:Few other griefs amid the ill chances of this world have more bitterness and shame for a man's heart than to behold the love of a lady so fair and brave that cannot be returned. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
447:We all long for Eden, and we are constantly glimpsing it: our whole nature at its best and least corrupted, its gentlest and most human, is still soaked with the sense of exile. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
448:Where did you go to, if I may ask?' said Thorin to Gandalf as they rode along. To look ahead,' said he. And what brought you back in the nick of time?' Looking behind,' said he. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
449:But do not despise the lore that has come down from distant years; for oft it may chance that old wives keep in memory word of things that once were needful for the wise to know. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
450:There is a place called heaven’ where the good here unfinished is completed; and where the stories unwritten, and the hopes unfulfilled, are continued. We may laugh together yet. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
451:For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
452:No language is justly studied merely as an aid to other purposes. It will in fact better serve other purposes, philological or historical, when it is studied for love, for itself. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
453:The greatest adventure is what lies ahead. Today and tomorrow are yet to be said.  The chances, the changes are all yours to make.  The mold of your life is in your hands to break. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
454:Well, here at last, dear friends, on the shores of the Sea comes the end of our fellowship in Middle-earth. Go in peace! I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
455:That's what I meant,' said Pippin. &
456:And she looked at him and saw the grave tenderness in his eyes, and yet knew, for she was bred among men of war, that here was one whom no Rider of the Mark could outmatch in battle. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
457:At my age I'm exactly the kind of person who has lived through one of the most quickly changing periods known to history. Surely there could never be in seventy years so much change. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
458:For I am the daughter of Elrond. I shall not go with him when he departs to the Havens: for mine is the choice of Luthien, and as she so have I chosen, both the sweet and the bitter. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
459:We may indeed in counsel point to the higher road, but we cannot compel any free creature to walk upon it. That leadeth to tyranny, which disfigureth good and maketh it seem hateful. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
460:I should have said Welsh has always attracted me. By its style and sound more than any other, ever though I first only saw it on coal trucks, I always wanted to know what it was about. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
461:And some things that should not have been forgotten were lost. History became legend. Legend became myth. And for two and a half thousand years, the ringÔªø passed out of all knowledge. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
462:His face was sad and stern because of the doom that was laid on him, and yet hope dwelt ever in the depths of his heart, from which mirth would arise at times like a spring from a rock. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
463:I can put it no plainer than by saying that Bilbo was meant to find the Ring, and not by its maker. In which case you also were meant to have it. And that may be an encouraging thought. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
464:The Hobbits are just rustic English people, made small in size because it reflects the generally small reach of their imagination - not the small reach of their courage or latent power. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
465:Gandalf, dwarves and Mr. Baggins! We are met together in the house of our friend and fellow conspirator, this most excellent and audacious hobbit may the hair on his toes never fall out! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
466:If you mean you think it is my job to go into the secret passage first, O Thorin Thrain’s son Oakenshield, may your beard grow ever longer, he said crossly, say so at once and have done! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
467:Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
468:Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
469:They must understand that ‚ Elrond and the Council, and the great Lords and Ladies with all their wisdom. Their plans have gone wrong. I can't be their Ring-bearer. Not without Mr. Frodo. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
470:And here he was, a little halfling from the Shire, a simple hobbit of the quiet countryside, expected to find a way where the great ones could not go, or dared not go. It was an evil fate. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
471:Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising I came singing into the sun, sword unsheathing. To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking: Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
472:That's the only place in all the lands we've ever heard of that we don't want to see any closer; and that's the one place we're trying to get to! And that's just where we can't get, nohow. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
473:Speak no evil of the Lady Galadriel!" said Aragorn sternly. "You know not what you say. There is in her and in this land, no evil, unless a man bring it hither himself. Then let him beware! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
474:Life is rather above the measure of us all (save for a very few perhaps). We all need literature that is above our measure&
475:And then all the host of Rohan burst into song, and they sang as they slew, for the joy of battle was on them, and the sound of their singing that was fair and terrible came even to the City. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
476:There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Il√∫vatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought, and they were with him before aught else was made. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
477:Did he say:"Hullo,Pippin!This is a pleasant surprise!"?No,indeed!He said:"Get up,you tom-fool of a Took!Where,in the name of wonder,in all this ruin is Treebeard?I want him.Quick" -Pippin Took ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
478:What do you fear, lady?" [Aragorn] asked. "A cage," [Éowyn] said. "To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
479:End? No, the journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path, one that we all must take. The grey rain-curtain of this world rolls back, and all turns to silver glass, and then you see it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
480:Ho! Ho! Ho! To the bottle I go To heal my heart and drown my woe Rain may fall, and wind may blow And many miles be still to go But under a tall tree will I lie And let the clouds go sailing by ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
481:If people were in the habit of refering to &
482:It cannot be seen, cannot be felt, Cannot be heard, cannot be smelt, It lies behind stars and under hills, And empty holes it fills, It comes first and follows after, Ends life, kills laughter. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
483:He is not half through yet, and to what he will come in the end not even Elrond can foretell. Not to evil, I think. He may become like a glass filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
484:I don't deny it," said Frodo, looking at Sam, who was now grinning. "I don't deny it, but I'll never believe you are sleeping again, whether you snore or not. I shall kick you hard to make sure. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
485:Leave him! I said. I never mean to. I am going with him, if he climbs to the Moon; and if any of these Black Riders try to stop him, they'll have Sam Gamgee to reckon with, I said. They laughed. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
486:When Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence, there was much talk and excitement in Hobbiton. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
487:Arise, arise, Riders of Théoden! Fell deeds awake, fire and slaughter! spear shall be shaken, shield be splintered, a sword-day, a red day, ere the sun rises! Ride now, ride now! Ride to Gondor! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
488:Go not to the Elves for counsel, for they will say both no and yes. Elves seldom give unguarded advice, for advice is a dangerous gift, even from the wise to the wise, and all courses may run ill. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
489:The world is indeed full of peril, and in it there are many dark places; but still there is much that is fair, and though in all lands love is now mingled with grief, it grows perhaps the greater. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
490:Middle-earth is our world. I have (of course) placed the action in a purely imaginary (though not wholly impossible) period of antiquity, in which the shape of the continental masses was different. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
491:Elves and Dragons! Cabbages and potatoes are better for me and you. Don't go getting mixed up in the business of your betters, or you'll land in trouble too big for you. ~Hamfast Gamgee (the Gaffer) ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
492:Orcs, and talking trees, and leagues of grass, and galloping riders, and glittering caves, and white towers and golden halls, and battles, and tall ships sailing, all these passed before Sam's mind. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
493:Instead of a Dark Lord, you would have a queen, not dark but beautiful and terrible as the dawn! Tempestuous as the sea, and stronger than the foundations of the earth! All shall love me and despair! ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
494:His rage passes description - the sort of rage that is only seen when rich folk that have more than they can enjoy suddenly lose something that they have long had but have never before used or wanted. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
495:Old Tom Bombadil is a merry fellow, Bright blue his jacket is, and his boots are yellow. None has ever caught him yet, for Tom, he is the Master: His songs are stronger songs, and his feet are faster. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
496:These folk are hewers of trees and hunters of beasts; therefore we are their unfriends, and if they will not depart we shall afflict them in all ways that we can." - The Silmarllion, JRR Tolkien ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
497:And amid all the splendours of the World, its vast halls and spaces, and its wheeling fires, Il√∫vatar chose a place for their habitation in the Deeps of Time and in the midst of the innumerable stars. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
498:I am a Christian‚ ¶so that I do not expect history to be anything but a long defeat though it contains (and in a legend may contain more clearly and movingly) some samples or glimpses of final victory. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
499:Come, Mr. Frodo!' he cried. &
500:Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Mind your P's and Q's. ~ J R R Tolkien,
2:See your road through. ~ J R R Tolkien,
3:Third time pays for all ~ J R R Tolkien,
4:Fire, fear, foes! Awake! ~ J R R Tolkien,
5:Over hill and under hill ~ J R R Tolkien,
6:We must do without hope. ~ J R R Tolkien,
7:My Precious, my Precious. ~ J R R Tolkien,
8:I'm going on an adventure! ~ J R R Tolkien,
9:Wraiths! Wraiths on wings! ~ J R R Tolkien,
10:All's well that ends better. ~ J R R Tolkien,
11:Handsome is as handsome does ~ J R R Tolkien,
12:I wisely started with a map. ~ J R R Tolkien,
13:Never laugh at live dragons. ~ J R R Tolkien,
14:No Victory Without Suffering ~ J R R Tolkien,
15:Short cuts make long delays. ~ J R R Tolkien,
16:The road goes ever on and on ~ J R R Tolkien,
17:The burned hand teaches best. ~ J R R Tolkien,
18:All shall love me and despair. ~ J R R Tolkien,
19:Don't go where I can't follow! ~ J R R Tolkien,
20:Often does hatred hurt itself. ~ J R R Tolkien,
21:What does your heart tell you? ~ J R R Tolkien,
22:Aiya Earendil Elenion Ancalima! ~ J R R Tolkien,
23:Farewell! I go to find the Sun! ~ J R R Tolkien,
24:Great heart will not be denied. ~ J R R Tolkien,
25:Tears unnumbered ye shall shed. ~ J R R Tolkien,
26:Above all shadows rides the sun. ~ J R R Tolkien,
27:Go not to the Elves for counsel, ~ J R R Tolkien,
28:Hush! Take no notice!" - Gandalf ~ J R R Tolkien,
29:I will not walk backward in life. ~ J R R Tolkien,
30:Little by little, one travels far ~ J R R Tolkien,
31:Not everyone who wanders is lost. ~ J R R Tolkien,
32:All that is gold does not glitter, ~ J R R Tolkien,
33:All that is gold does not glitter. ~ J R R Tolkien,
34:Fair speech may hide a foul heart. ~ J R R Tolkien,
35:I don't see why the likes o' thee ~ J R R Tolkien,
36:Not all those who wander are lost. ~ J R R Tolkien,
37:Slight changes simply make a blur. ~ J R R Tolkien,
38:Where will wants not, a way opens. ~ J R R Tolkien,
39:Do not spoil the wonder with haste! ~ J R R Tolkien,
40:Adventures make one late for supper. ~ J R R Tolkien,
41:Aure entuluva! day shall come again! ~ J R R Tolkien,
42:Courage is found in unlikely places. ~ J R R Tolkien,
43:Speak politely to an enraged dragon. ~ J R R Tolkien,
44:A pen is to me as a beak is to a hen. ~ J R R Tolkien,
45:For nothing is evil in the beginning. ~ J R R Tolkien,
46:I'd got hobbits on my hands hadn't I? ~ J R R Tolkien,
47:Memory is not what the heart desires. ~ J R R Tolkien,
48:Not idly do the leaves of Lorien fall ~ J R R Tolkien,
49:Oft hope is born when all is forlorn. ~ J R R Tolkien,
50:The treacherous are ever distrustful. ~ J R R Tolkien,
51:The wise speak only of what they know ~ J R R Tolkien,
52:I am in fact, a hobbit in all but size ~ J R R Tolkien,
53:What punishments of God are not gifts? ~ J R R Tolkien,
54:Faithful heart may have froward tongue. ~ J R R Tolkien,
55:I dislike allegory wherever I smell it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
56:out of the frying pan and into the fire ~ J R R Tolkien,
57:Deep roots are not reached by the frost. ~ J R R Tolkien,
58:Not all that have fallen are vanquished. ~ J R R Tolkien,
59:Renewed shall be blade that was broken, ~ J R R Tolkien,
60:A safe fairyland is untrue to all worlds. ~ J R R Tolkien,
61:Green are the leaves I leave in Mirkwood. ~ J R R Tolkien,
62:Help means ruin and saving means slaying. ~ J R R Tolkien,
63:May the hair on your toes never fall out! ~ J R R Tolkien,
64:Struck by lightning! Struck by lightning! ~ J R R Tolkien,
65:The greatest adventure is what lies ahead ~ J R R Tolkien,
66:To crooked eyes truth may wear a wry face ~ J R R Tolkien,
67:False hopes are more dangerous than fears. ~ J R R Tolkien,
68:Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory ~ J R R Tolkien,
69:Your lullaby would waken a drunken goblin! ~ J R R Tolkien,
70:Better mistrust undeserved than rash words. ~ J R R Tolkien,
71:Curse us and crush us, my precious is lost! ~ J R R Tolkien,
72:For even the very wise cannot see all ends. ~ J R R Tolkien,
73:Home is now behind you, the world is ahead! ~ J R R Tolkien,
74:I do not believe this darkness will endure. ~ J R R Tolkien,
75:I don't know, and I would rather not guess. ~ J R R Tolkien,
76:I have the hatred of apartheid in my bones. ~ J R R Tolkien,
77:The greatest adventure is what lies ahead. ~ J R R Tolkien,
78:There is no ship now that can bear me hence ~ J R R Tolkien,
79:Time doesn't seem to pass here: it just is. ~ J R R Tolkien,
80:Valour needs first strength, then a weapon. ~ J R R Tolkien,
81:It was a hobbit hole, and that means comfort ~ J R R Tolkien,
82:The doom lies in yourself, not in your name. ~ J R R Tolkien,
83:In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. ~ J R R Tolkien,
84:It is no bad thing celebrating a simple life. ~ J R R Tolkien,
85:Pippin: I didn't think it would end this way. ~ J R R Tolkien,
86:You aren't nearly through this adventure yet. ~ J R R Tolkien,
87:And he smote the Balrog upon the mountainside. ~ J R R Tolkien,
88:Don't put a lump of rock under my elbow again! ~ J R R Tolkien,
89:I am going with him, if he climbs to the Moon. ~ J R R Tolkien,
90:I'm a Roman Catholic! A devout Roman Catholic. ~ J R R Tolkien,
91:It is plain that we were meant to go together. ~ J R R Tolkien,
92:The Darkness has begun. There will be no dawn. ~ J R R Tolkien,
93:Wars are not favourable to delicate pleasures. ~ J R R Tolkien,
94:For it is easier to shout 'Stop', than to do it ~ J R R Tolkien,
95:It's a dangerous business, going out your door. ~ J R R Tolkien,
96:The road goes ever on and on.
   ~ J R R Tolkien, Bilbo Baggins,
97:On their deathbed men will speak true, they say. ~ J R R Tolkien,
98:He drew a deep breath. 'Well, I'm back,' he said. ~ J R R Tolkien,
99:If by my life or death I can protect you, I will. ~ J R R Tolkien,
100:I'm looking for someone to share in an adventure. ~ J R R Tolkien,
101:It is mine to give to whom I will, like my heart. ~ J R R Tolkien,
102:Moonlight drowns out all but the brightest stars. ~ J R R Tolkien,
103:Very potent influence on myself has been Finnish. ~ J R R Tolkien,
104:Adventures are not all pony-rides in May-sunshine. ~ J R R Tolkien,
105:Let the unseen days be. Today is more than enough. ~ J R R Tolkien,
106:A red sun rises. Blood has been spilled this night. ~ J R R Tolkien,
107:I have no help to send, therefore I must go myself. ~ J R R Tolkien,
108:Tell me, who are you, alone, yourself and nameless? ~ J R R Tolkien,
109:I warn you, if you bore me, I shall take my revenge. ~ J R R Tolkien,
110:Praise from the praise-worthy is beyond all rewards. ~ J R R Tolkien,
111:The praise of the praiseworthy is above all rewards. ~ J R R Tolkien,
112:True education is a kind of never-ending story . . . ~ J R R Tolkien,
113:If we all got angry together something might be done. ~ J R R Tolkien,
114:In doubt a man of worth will trust to his own wisdom. ~ J R R Tolkien,
115:Where there's life there's hope, and need of vittles. ~ J R R Tolkien,
116:You can only come to the morning through the shadows. ~ J R R Tolkien,
117:I have an unsatisfied desire to shoot well with a bow. ~ J R R Tolkien,
118:What do you fear, lady?' he asked. 'A cage,' she said. ~ J R R Tolkien,
119:I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations. ~ J R R Tolkien,
120:That was the most awkward Wednesday he ever remembered. ~ J R R Tolkien,
121:We are never late. We arrive precisely when we mean to. ~ J R R Tolkien,
122:The world is not in your books and maps, it's out there. ~ J R R Tolkien,
123:And yet their wills did not yield, and they struggled on. ~ J R R Tolkien,
124:Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens. ~ J R R Tolkien,
125:It never does to leave a live Dragon out of the equation. ~ J R R Tolkien,
126:You may not like my burglar, but please don't damage him. ~ J R R Tolkien,
127:A single dream is more powerful than a thousand realities. ~ J R R Tolkien,
128:Deeds will not be less valiant because they are unpraised. ~ J R R Tolkien,
129:Trolls simply detest the very sight of dwarves (uncooked). ~ J R R Tolkien,
130:He stands not alone. You would die before your stroke fell. ~ J R R Tolkien,
131:I don't feel any guilt complex about The Lord of the Rings. ~ J R R Tolkien,
132:I will not say, do not weep, for not all tears are an evil. ~ J R R Tolkien,
133:I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil. ~ J R R Tolkien,
134:There are other men, and other lives, and time still to be. ~ J R R Tolkien,
135:Do not scorn pity that is the gift of a gentle heart, Éowyn! ~ J R R Tolkien,
136:If this is victory, then our hands are too small to hold it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
137:I wished to be loved by another. But I desire no man's pity. ~ J R R Tolkien,
138:The war made me poignantly aware of the beauty of the world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
139:Bilbo saw that the moment had come when he must do something. ~ J R R Tolkien,
140:Even the smallest person can change the course of the future. ~ J R R Tolkien,
141:It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish. ~ J R R Tolkien,
142:Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. ~ J R R Tolkien,
143:There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. ~ J R R Tolkien,
144:The wolf that one hears is worse than the orc that one fears. ~ J R R Tolkien,
145:To be a cult figure in one's own lifetime is most unpleasant. ~ J R R Tolkien,
146:It is mine, I tell you. My own. My precious. Yes, my precious. ~ J R R Tolkien,
147:I will take the Ring", he said, "though I do not know the way. ~ J R R Tolkien,
148:So comes snow after fire, and even dragons have their endings. ~ J R R Tolkien,
149:There is some good in this world, and it's worth fighting for. ~ J R R Tolkien,
150:You have nice manners for a thief and a liar," said the dragon. ~ J R R Tolkien,
151:Let him go, you filth! Let him go! You will not touch him again! ~ J R R Tolkien,
152:"That's done it!" said Sam. "Now I've rung the front-door bell!" ~ J R R Tolkien,
153:For we put the thought of all that we love into all that we make. ~ J R R Tolkien,
154:I may be a burglar...but I'm an honest one, I hope, more or less. ~ J R R Tolkien,
155:It is useless to meet revenge with revenge; it will heal nothing. ~ J R R Tolkien,
156:A year shall I endure for every day that passes until your return. ~ J R R Tolkien,
157:his old life lay behind in the mists, dark adventure lay in front. ~ J R R Tolkien,
158:The world changes, and all that once was strong now proves unsure. ~ J R R Tolkien,
159:A friend of mine tells that I talk in shorthand and then smudge it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
160:All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. ~ J R R Tolkien,
161:Fear nothing! Have peace until the morning! Heed no nightly noises! ~ J R R Tolkien,
162:Go back! Fall into the nothingness that awaits you and your Master. ~ J R R Tolkien,
163:Go not to the Elves for counsel, for they will say both no and yes. ~ J R R Tolkien,
164:I am glad you are here with me. Here at the end of all things, Sam. ~ J R R Tolkien,
165:I have spoken words of hope. But only of hope. Hope is not victory. ~ J R R Tolkien,
166:I sang of leaves, of leaves of gold, and leaves of gold there grew. ~ J R R Tolkien,
167:Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. ~ J R R Tolkien,
168:Their 'magic' is Art, delivered from many of its human limitations. ~ J R R Tolkien,
169:You have to understand the good in things, to detect the real evil. ~ J R R Tolkien,
170:A hunted man sometimes wearies of distrust and longs for friendship. ~ J R R Tolkien,
171:If you don't know where you're going, you'll wind up somewhere else. ~ J R R Tolkien,
172:Let him not vow to walk in the dark, who has not seen the nightfall. ~ J R R Tolkien,
173:Your talk of sniffling riders with invisible noses has unsettled me. ~ J R R Tolkien,
174:A box without hinges, key, or lid, yet golden treasure inside is hid. ~ J R R Tolkien,
175:All have their worth and each contributes to the worth of the others. ~ J R R Tolkien,
176:It matters little who is the enemy, if we cannot beat off his attack. ~ J R R Tolkien,
177:The world was fair, the mountains tall In Elder Days before the fall. ~ J R R Tolkien,
178:Few there were who could change his courses by counsel. None by force. ~ J R R Tolkien,
179:It seemed like all the way to tomorrow and over it to the days beyond. ~ J R R Tolkien,
180:May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out. ~ J R R Tolkien,
181:O! Tril-lil-lil-lolly the valley is jolly, ha! ha! -Elves of Rivendell ~ J R R Tolkien,
182:Elen sila lumenn' omentielvo, a star shines on the hour of our meeting. ~ J R R Tolkien,
183:I'm in a position where it doesn't matter what people think of me now. ~ J R R Tolkien,
184:Is it nice, my preciousss? Is it juicy? Is it scrumptiously crunchable? ~ J R R Tolkien,
185:It simply isn't an adventure worth telling if there aren't any dragons. ~ J R R Tolkien,
186:Of all the things that men may heed 'Tis most of love they sing indeed. ~ J R R Tolkien,
187:The world is indeed full of peril and in it there are many dark places. ~ J R R Tolkien,
188:After all, I believe that legends and myths are largely made of 'truth'. ~ J R R Tolkien,
189:I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread. ~ J R R Tolkien,
190:I want to be a healer, and love all things that grow and are not barren. ~ J R R Tolkien,
191:Things will go as they will, and there is no need to hurry to meet them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
192:We set out to save the Shire, Sam and it has been saved - but not for me. ~ J R R Tolkien,
193:He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom. ~ J R R Tolkien,
194:Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. ~ J R R Tolkien, [T5],
195:Voiceless it cries, Wingless flutters, Toothless bites, Mouthless mutters. ~ J R R Tolkien,
196:A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. ~ J R R Tolkien,
197:Come, Mr. Frodo!' he cried. 'I can't carry it for you, but I can carry you. ~ J R R Tolkien,
198:Ultimately we've only got humanity to work with. It's only clay we've got. ~ J R R Tolkien,
199:We may stand, if only on one leg, or at least be left still upon our knees. ~ J R R Tolkien,
200:Hinder me? Thou fool. No living man may hinder me!" “But no living man am I! ~ J R R Tolkien,
201:There are older and fouler things than Orcs in the deep places of the world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
202:Thief, thief, thief! Baggins! We hates it, we hates it, we hates it forever! ~ J R R Tolkien,
203:Few can foresee whither their road will lead them, till they come to its end. ~ J R R Tolkien,
204:If you sit on the doorstep long enough, I daresay you will think of something ~ J R R Tolkien,
205:I put before you the one great thing to love on earth: the Blessed Sacrament. ~ J R R Tolkien,
206:There is no curse in Elvish, Entish or the tongues of Men for this treachery! ~ J R R Tolkien,
207:True courage is about knowing not when to take a life, but when to spare one. ~ J R R Tolkien,
208:He may become like a glass filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can. ~ J R R Tolkien,
209:It is perilous to study too deeply the arts of the Enemy, for good or for ill. ~ J R R Tolkien,
210:May the wind under your wings bear you where the sun sails and the moon walks. ~ J R R Tolkien,
211:Perilous to us all are the devices of an art deeper than we possess ourselves. ~ J R R Tolkien,
212:The burned hand teaches best. After that, advice about fire goes to the heart. ~ J R R Tolkien,
213:A wizard is never late, nor is he early, he arrives precisely when he means to. ~ J R R Tolkien,
214:Farewell! wherever you fare, till your eyries receive you at the journey’s end! ~ J R R Tolkien,
215:It is not the strength of the body that counts, but the strength of the spirit. ~ J R R Tolkien,
216:The world is full enough of hurts and mischances without wars to multiply them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
217:All my own small perception of beauty both in majesty and simplicity is founded. ~ J R R Tolkien,
218:Do not meddle in the affairs of Wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. ~ J R R Tolkien,
219:Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. ~ J R R Tolkien,
220:Many evil things there are that your strong walls and bright swords do not stay. ~ J R R Tolkien,
221:Trolls are slow in the uptake, and mighty suspicious about anything new to them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
222:Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. ~ J R R Tolkien,
223:History often resembles myth, because they are both ultimately of the same stuff. ~ J R R Tolkien,
224:So fair, so cold; like a morning of pale spring still clinging to winter's chill. ~ J R R Tolkien,
225:What course am I to take?" "Towards danger; but not too rashly, nor too straight. ~ J R R Tolkien,
226:And sometimes you didn't want to know the end… because how could the end be happy? ~ J R R Tolkien,
227:Look, up at the sky. There is a light, a beauty up there, that no shadow can touch ~ J R R Tolkien,
228:deep they delved us, fair they wrought us, high they builded us; but they are gone. ~ J R R Tolkien,
229:Don't tell us about dreams – dream dinners aren't any good and we can't share them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
230:Fear both the heat and the cold of your heart, and strive for patience, if you can. ~ J R R Tolkien,
231:We don't want any adventures here! You might try over the Hill or Across the Water. ~ J R R Tolkien,
232:Gandalf: Three hundred lives of men I have walked this earth and now I have no time. ~ J R R Tolkien,
233:And what do you wish?' he said at last. 'That what should be shall be,' she answered. ~ J R R Tolkien,
234:I shall claim full amends for every fall and stubbed toe, if you do not lead us well. ~ J R R Tolkien,
235:It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him. ~ J R R Tolkien,
236:The realm of Suaron is ended!' said Gandalf. 'The Ring-bearer has fulfilled his Quest ~ J R R Tolkien,
237:A man that flies from his fear may find that he has only taken a short cut to meet it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
238:Farewell! O Gandalf! May you ever appear where you are most needed and least expected! ~ J R R Tolkien,
239:For victory is victory, however small, nor is its worth only from what follows from it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
240:If this nice friendliness would spread about in Mordor, half our trouble would be over. ~ J R R Tolkien,
241:Living by faith includes the call to something greater than cowardly self-preservation. ~ J R R Tolkien,
242:Speak, or I will put a dint in your hat that even a wizard will find hard to deal with! ~ J R R Tolkien,
243:Advice is a dangerous gift, even from the wise to the wise, and all courses may run ill. ~ J R R Tolkien,
244:American English is essentially English after having been wiped off with a dirty sponge. ~ J R R Tolkien,
245:Oh! That was poetry!" said Pippin. "Do you really mean to start before the break of day? ~ J R R Tolkien,
246:The greater part of the truth is always hidden, in regions out of the reach of cynicism. ~ J R R Tolkien,
247:Where iss it, where iss it: my Precious, my Precious? It's ours, it is, and we wants it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
248:His grief he will not forget; but it will not darken his heart, it will teach him wisdom. ~ J R R Tolkien,
249:I wish I was at home in my nice hole by the fire, with the kettle just beginning to sing! ~ J R R Tolkien,
250:We meet again, at the turn of the tide. A great storm is coming, but the tide has turned. ~ J R R Tolkien,
251:Far, far below the deepest delvings of the dwarves, the world is gnawed by nameless things. ~ J R R Tolkien,
252:It needs but one foe to breed a war, and those who have not swords can still die upon them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
253:Touching your cap to the Squire may be damn bad for the Squire, but it's damn good for you. ~ J R R Tolkien,
254:And then alas! I let the matter reset, watching and waiting only, as we have too often done. ~ J R R Tolkien,
255:I don't want to be in a battle. But waiting on the edge of one I can't escape is even worse. ~ J R R Tolkien,
256:If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
257:It is not despair, for despair is only for those who see the end beyond all doubt. We do not. ~ J R R Tolkien,
258:it was easier to believe in the Dragon and less easy to believe in Thorin in these wild parts ~ J R R Tolkien,
259:Much evil must befall a country before it wholly forgets the Elves, if once they dwelt there. ~ J R R Tolkien,
260:You have been chosen, and you must therefore use such strength and heart and wits as you have. ~ J R R Tolkien,
261:But it seems that the wind is setting East, and the withering of all Woods may be drawing near. ~ J R R Tolkien,
262:End? No, the journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path... One that we all must take. ~ J R R Tolkien,
263:Over the field rang his clear voice calling: ‘Death! Ride, ride to ruin and the world’s ending! ~ J R R Tolkien,
264:People remember Longfellow wrote Hiawatha, quite forget he was a Professor of Modern Languages! ~ J R R Tolkien,
265:The birth, death, and resurrection of Jesus means that one day everything sad will come untrue. ~ J R R Tolkien,
266:A story must be told or there'll be no story, yet it is the untold stories that are most moving. ~ J R R Tolkien,
267:Being a cheerful hobbit, he had not needed hope, as long as despair could be postponed. (Of Sam) ~ J R R Tolkien,
268:Elvish singing is not a thing to miss, in June under the stars, not if you care for such things. ~ J R R Tolkien,
269:Faerie is a perilous land, and in it are pitfalls for the unwary, and dungeons for the overbold. ~ J R R Tolkien,
270:Frodo: Go back, Sam! I’m going to Mordor alone. Sam: Of course you are, and I’m coming with you! ~ J R R Tolkien,
271:I invented that little rhyme about 'One Ring to rule them all', I remember, in the bath one day. ~ J R R Tolkien,
272:Tomorrow we may come this way, And take the hidden paths that run Towards the Moon or to the Sun ~ J R R Tolkien,
273:Alive without breath, As cold as death; Never thirsty, ever drinking, All in mail never clinking. ~ J R R Tolkien,
274:Hammer and tongs! I am so torn between rage and joy, that if I do not burst, it will be a marvel! ~ J R R Tolkien,
275:There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark. ~ J R R Tolkien,
276:When he heard there was nothing to eat, he sat down and wept… “Why did I ever wake up!” he cried. ~ J R R Tolkien,
277:And its object is Art not power, sub-creation not domination and tyrannous re-forming of Creation. ~ J R R Tolkien,
278:How do you move on? You move on when your heart finally understands that there is no turning back. ~ J R R Tolkien,
279:No dragon can resist the fascination of riddling talk and of wasting time trying to understand it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
280:No half-heartedness and no worldly fear must turn us aside from following the light unflinchingly. ~ J R R Tolkien,
281:Don't adventures ever have an end? I suppose not. Someone else always has to carry on on the story. ~ J R R Tolkien,
282:The whole thing is quite hopeless, so it's no good worrying about tomorrow. It probably won't come. ~ J R R Tolkien,
283:The wide world is all about you: you can fence yourselves in, but you cannot for ever fence it out. ~ J R R Tolkien,
284:Don't leave me here alone! It's your Sam calling. Don't go where I can't follow! Wake up, Mr. Frodo! ~ J R R Tolkien,
285:I was talking aloud to myself. A habit of the old: they choose the wisest person present to speak to ~ J R R Tolkien,
286:What has roots as nobody sees, Is taller than trees Up, up it goes, And yet never grows? A mountain. ~ J R R Tolkien,
287:And the Ring is so heavy, Sam. I begin to see it in my mind all the time, like a great wheel of fire. ~ J R R Tolkien,
288:Evidently we look so much alike that your desire to make an incurable dent in my hat must be excused. ~ J R R Tolkien,
289:Dead men are not friends to living men, and give them no gifts. (Ghan-buri-Ghan, of allies during war) ~ J R R Tolkien,
290:Maybe the paths that you each shall tread are already laid before your feet though you do not see them ~ J R R Tolkien,
291:Well, you can go on looking forward," said Gandalf. "There may be many unexpected feasts ahead of you. ~ J R R Tolkien,
292:Courage will now be your best defence against the storm that is at hand-—that and such hope as I bring. ~ J R R Tolkien,
293:I give you this toast: To the Hobbits. May they outlast the Sarumans and see spring again in the trees. ~ J R R Tolkien,
294:We are plain quiet folk, and I have no use for adventures. Nasty, disturbing, and uncomfortable things. ~ J R R Tolkien,
295:Don't dip your beard in the foam, Father!" They cried to Thorin. "It is long enough without watering it! ~ J R R Tolkien,
296:Why O why did I ever leave my hobbit-hole?" said poor Mr. Baggins, bumping up and down on Bombur's back. ~ J R R Tolkien,
297:Shall we mourn here deedless forever a shadow-folk mist-haunting dropping vain tears in the thankless sea ~ J R R Tolkien,
298:Truly songs and tales fall utterly short of the reality, O Smaug the Chiefest and greatest of Calamities. ~ J R R Tolkien,
299:The Resurrection is the eucatastrophe of the story of the Incarnation - This story begins and ends in joy. ~ J R R Tolkien,
300:Art is the human process that produces by the way (it is not its only or ultimate object) Secondary Belief. ~ J R R Tolkien,
301:He [Bilbo] fought the real battle in the tunnel alone, before he ever saw the vast danger that lay in wait. ~ J R R Tolkien,
302:I wish life was not so short. Languages take such a time, and so do all the things one wants to know about. ~ J R R Tolkien,
303:One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
304:Where there are so many, all speech becomes a debate without end. But two together may perhaps find wisdom. ~ J R R Tolkien,
305:For you do not yet know the strengths of your hearts, and you cannot foresee what each may meet on the road. ~ J R R Tolkien,
306:With hope or without hope we will follow the trail of our enemies. And woe to them, if we prove the swifter! ~ J R R Tolkien,
307:And then her heart changed, or at least she understood it; and the winter passed, and the sun shone upon her. ~ J R R Tolkien,
308:Yes, I am here. And you are lucky to be here too after all the absurd things you've done since you left home. ~ J R R Tolkien,
309:I am looking for someone to share in an adventure that I am arranging, and it's very difficult to find anyone. ~ J R R Tolkien,
310:please don't cook me, kind sirs! I am a good cook myself, and cook better than I cook, if you see what I mean. ~ J R R Tolkien,
311:The quiet was so deep that their feet seemed to thump along while all the trees leaned over them and listened. ~ J R R Tolkien,
312:I sit beside the fire and think of people long ago, and of people who will see a world that I shall never know. ~ J R R Tolkien,
313:Let us remember that a traitor may betray himself and do good that he does not intend. It can be so, sometimes. ~ J R R Tolkien,
314:Why must you speak your thoughts? Silence, if fair words stick in your throat, would serve all our ends better. ~ J R R Tolkien,
315:Yes, I am white now,' said Gandalf. 'Indeed I am Saruman, one might almost say, Saruman as he should have been. ~ J R R Tolkien,
316:You ought not to be rude to an eagle, when you are only the size of a hobbit, and are up in hid eyrie at night! ~ J R R Tolkien,
317:Chip the glasses and crack the plates! / Blunt the knives and bend the forks! / That's what Bilbo Baggins hates. ~ J R R Tolkien,
318:The way is shut. It was made by those who are Dead, and the Dead keep it, until the time comes. The way is shut. ~ J R R Tolkien,
319:His love for Frodo rose above all other thoughts, and forgetting his peril he cried aloud: 'I'm coming Mr. Frodo! ~ J R R Tolkien,
320:I threw down my enemy, and he fell from the high place and broke the mountain-side where he smote it in his ruin. ~ J R R Tolkien,
321:Farewell, and may the blessing of Elves and Men and all Free Folk go with you. May the stars shine upon your faces! ~ J R R Tolkien,
322:Many are the strange chances of the world, and help oft shall come from the hands of the weak when the Wise falter. ~ J R R Tolkien,
323:This is a story of how a Baggins had an adventure, and found himself doing and saying things altogether unexpected. ~ J R R Tolkien,
324:To think I should have lived to be goodmorninged by Belladonna Took's son, as if I was selling buttons at the door! ~ J R R Tolkien,
325:And what would you do, if an uninvited dwarf came and hung his things up in your hall without a word of explanation? ~ J R R Tolkien,
326:Books ought to have good endings.How would this do: and they all settled down and lived together happily ever after? ~ J R R Tolkien,
327:For still there are so many things that I have never seen: in every wood in every spring there is a different green. ~ J R R Tolkien,
328:If you do not believe in a personal God, the question: 'What is the purpose of life?' is unaskable and unanswerable. ~ J R R Tolkien,
329:But I am the real Strider, fortunately. I am Aragorn son of Arathorn; and if by life or death I can save you, I will. ~ J R R Tolkien,
330:I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve. ~ J R R Tolkien,
331:For so sworn good or evil an oath may not be broken and it shall pursue oathkeeper and oathbreaker to the world's end. ~ J R R Tolkien,
332:Outside the ring of dancing warriors with spears and axes stood wolves at a respectful distance, watching and waiting. ~ J R R Tolkien,
333:Together we will take the road that leads into the West, And far away will find a land where both our hearts may rest. ~ J R R Tolkien,
334:If you're going to have a complicated story you must work to a map; otherwise you'll never make a map of it afterwards. ~ J R R Tolkien,
335:Ónen i-estel edain, ú-chebin estel anim. (I gave Hope to the Dúnedain, I have kept none for myself.) (Gilraen's linnod) ~ J R R Tolkien,
336:And long there he lay, an image of the splendour of the Kings of Men in glory undimmed before the breaking of the world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
337:We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner! ~ J R R Tolkien,
338:For some time I lived in fear of receiving a letter signed 'S. Gollum'. That would have been more difficult to deal with. ~ J R R Tolkien,
339:I am dreading the publication, for it will be impossible not to mind what is said. I have exposed my heart to be shot at. ~ J R R Tolkien,
340:We wants it, we needs it. Must have the precious. They stole it from us. Sneaky little hobbitses. Wicked, tricksy, false! ~ J R R Tolkien,
341:Splendid! They used to go up like great lilies and snapdragons and laburnums of fire and hang in the twilight all evening! ~ J R R Tolkien,
342:There was a fire in the wide hearth before them, and it was burning with a sweet smell, as if it were built of apple-wood. ~ J R R Tolkien,
343:And it is not our part here to take thought only for a season, or for a few lives of Men, or for a passing age of the world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
344:Each of us embodies, in a particular tale and clothed in the garments of time & place, universal truth and everlasting life. ~ J R R Tolkien,
345:It is not despair, for despair is only for those who see the end beyond all doubt. We do not.
   ~ J R R Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring,
346:Such bees! Bilbo had never seen anything like them. "If one were to sting me," He thought "I should swell up as big as I am! ~ J R R Tolkien,
347:Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory. If a soldier is imprisoned by the enemy, don't we consider it his duty to escape? ~ J R R Tolkien,
348:Then holding the star aloft and the bright sword advanced, Frodo, hobbit of the Shire, walked steadily down to meet the eyes. ~ J R R Tolkien,
349:evil labours with vast power and perpetual success - in vain: preparing always only the soil for unexpected good to sprout in. ~ J R R Tolkien,
350:Gandalf thought of most things; and though he could not do everything, he could do a great deal for friends in a tight corner. ~ J R R Tolkien,
351:O Elbereth! Gilthoniel! We still remember, we who dwell In this far land beneath the trees. Thy starlight on the Western Seas. ~ J R R Tolkien,
352:You will notice already that Mr. Baggins was not quite so prosy as he liked to believe, also that he was very fond of flowers. ~ J R R Tolkien,
353:Far over misty mountains cold To dungeons deep and caverns old We must away, ere break of day, To find our long-forgotten gold. ~ J R R Tolkien,
354:The only just literary critic," he concluded, "is Christ, who admires more than does any man the gifts He Himself has bestowed. ~ J R R Tolkien,
355:This is the ending. Now not day only shall be beloved, but night too shall be beautiful and blessed and all its fear pass away. ~ J R R Tolkien,
356:It is ever so with the things that Men begin: there is a frost in Spring, or a blight in Summer, and they fail of their promise. ~ J R R Tolkien,
357:Pay heed to the tales of old wives. It may well be that they alone keep in memory what it was once needful for the wise to know. ~ J R R Tolkien,
358:Alas, not me, lord!" she said. "Shadow lies on me still. Look not to me for healing! I am a shieldmaiden and my hand is ungentle. ~ J R R Tolkien,
359:Memory is not what the heart desires. That is only a mirror, be it clear as Kheled-zaram. Or so says the heart of Gimli the Dwarf. ~ J R R Tolkien,
360:Arise now, arise, Riders of Théoden! Dire deeds awake, dark is it eastward. Let horse be bridled, horn be sounded! Forth Eorlingas! ~ J R R Tolkien,
361:True education is a kind of never ending story — a matter of continual beginnings, of habitual fresh starts, of persistent newness. ~ J R R Tolkien,
362:For the less even as for the greater there is some deed that he may accomplish but once only; and in that deed his heart shall rest. ~ J R R Tolkien,
363:Stand by the grey stone when the thrush knocks, and the setting sun with the last light of Durin’s Day will shine upon the key-hole. ~ J R R Tolkien,
364:Here you find us sitting on a field of victory, amid the plunder of armies, and you wonder how we came by a few well-earned comforts! ~ J R R Tolkien,
365:I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. ~ J R R Tolkien,
366:Let this be the hour when we draw swords together. Fell deeds awake. Now for wrath, now for ruin, and the red dawn. Forth, Eorlingas! ~ J R R Tolkien,
367:Things are drawing towards the end now, unless I am mistaken. There is an unpleasant time just in front of you; but keep your heart up! ~ J R R Tolkien,
368:Indeed in nothing is the power of the Dark Lord more clearly shown than in the estrangement that divides all those who still oppose him. ~ J R R Tolkien,
369:A few melancholy birds were pipping and wailing, until the round red sun sank slowly into the western shadows; then an empty silence fell ~ J R R Tolkien,
370:For if joyful is the fountain that rises in the sun, its springs are in the wells of sorrow unfathomable at the foundations of the Earth. ~ J R R Tolkien,
371:If you're referring to the incident with the dragon, I was barely involved. All I did was give your uncle a little nudge out of the door. ~ J R R Tolkien,
372:I've always been impressed that we are here, surviving, because of the indomitable courage of quite small people against impossible odds. ~ J R R Tolkien,
373:Without the high and noble the simple and vulgar is utterly mean; and without the simple and ordinary the noble and heroic is meaningless ~ J R R Tolkien,
374:I'll get there, if I leave everything but my bones behind," said Sam. "And I'll carry Mr. Frodo up myself, if it breaks my back and heart. ~ J R R Tolkien,
375:Saruman," I said, standing away from him, "only one hand at a time can weild the One, and you know that well, so do not trouble to say we! ~ J R R Tolkien,
376:Thank you, Sam," he said in a cracked whisper. "How far is there to go?" I don't know," said Sam, "because I don't know where we're going. ~ J R R Tolkien,
377:And he took her in his arms and kissed her under the sunlit sky, and he cared not that they stood high upon the walls in the sight of many. ~ J R R Tolkien,
378:But the enemy has the move, and he is about to open his full game. And pawns are as likely to see as much of it as any. Sharpen your blade! ~ J R R Tolkien,
379:The Lord of the Rings is of course a fundamentally religious and Catholic work; unconsciously so at first, but consciously in the revision. ~ J R R Tolkien,
380:The Nazgul they were; the Ringwraiths, the Enemy's most terribly servants; darkness went with them and they cried with the voices of death. ~ J R R Tolkien,
381:But he that sows lies in the end shall not lack of a harvest, and soon he may rest from toil indeed, while others reap and sow in his stead. ~ J R R Tolkien,
382:My political opinions lean more and more to Anarchy (philosophically understood, meaning abolition of control not whiskered men with bombs). ~ J R R Tolkien,
383:Yes, they are elves," Legolas said. "and they say that you breathe so loud they could shoot you in the dark." Sam hastily covered his mouth. ~ J R R Tolkien,
384:Gandalf! I thought you were dead! But then I thought I was dead myself. Is everything sad going to come untrue? What's happened to the world? ~ J R R Tolkien,
385:In sorrow we must go, but not in despair. Behold! we are not bound for ever to the circles of the world, and beyond them is more than memory. ~ J R R Tolkien,
386:It is wisdom to recognize necessity when all other courses have been weighed, though as folly it may appear to those who cling to false hope. ~ J R R Tolkien,
387:Sorry! I don't want any adventures, thank you. Not Today. Good morning! But please come to tea -any time you like! Why not tomorrow? Good bye! ~ J R R Tolkien,
388:I am rather tired, and no longer young enough to pillage the night to make up for the deficit of hours in the day..." JRR Tolkien, Letter # 174 ~ J R R Tolkien,
389:There are no safe paths in this part of the world. Remember you are over the Edge of the Wild now, and in for all sorts of fun wherever you go. ~ J R R Tolkien,
390:Farewell we call to hearth and hall! Though wind may blow and rain may fall. We must away ere the break of day. Far over wood and mountain tall. ~ J R R Tolkien,
391:Creative fantasy, because it is mainly trying to do something else ... may open your hoard and let all the locked things fly away like cage-birds. ~ J R R Tolkien,
392:Such is of the course of deeds that move the wheels of the world: small hands do them because they must, while the eyes of the great are elsewhere. ~ J R R Tolkien,
393:Fantasy (in this sense) is, I think, not a lower but a higher form of Art, indeed the most nearly pure form, and so (when achieved) the most potent. ~ J R R Tolkien,
394:My advice to all who have the time or inclination to concern themselves with the international language movement would be: 'Back Esperanto loyally.' ~ J R R Tolkien,
395:There cannot be any 'story' without a fall - all stories are ultimately about the fall - at least not for human minds as we know them and have them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
396:I am in fact a hobbit (in all but size). I like gardens, trees and unmechanized farmlands; I smoke a pipe, and like good plain food (unrefrigerated). ~ J R R Tolkien,
397:My armor is like tenfold shields, my teeth are swords, my claws spears, the shock of my tail a thunderbolt, my wings a hurricane, and my breath death! ~ J R R Tolkien,
398:He was as noble and fair in face as an elf-lord, as strong as a warrior, as wise as a wizard, as venerable as a king of dwarves, and as kind as summer. ~ J R R Tolkien,
399:Of the twelve companions of Thorin, ten remained. Fili and Kili had fallen defending him with shield and body, for he was their mother’s elder brother. ~ J R R Tolkien,
400:There are many powers in the world, for good or for evil. Some are greater than I am. Against some I have not yet been measured. But my time is coming. ~ J R R Tolkien,
401:And if Sam considered himself lucky, Frodo knew he was more lucky himself; for there was not a hobbit in the Shire that was looked after with such care. ~ J R R Tolkien,
402:How could such a large door be kept secret from everybody outside, apart from the dragon?" [Bilbo] asked. He was only a little hobbit you must remember. ~ J R R Tolkien,
403:They were frightfully angry. Quite apart from the stones no spider has ever liked being called Attercop, and Tomnoddy of course is insulting to anybody. ~ J R R Tolkien,
404:All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost; the old that is strong does not wither, deep roots are not reached by the frost.
   ~ J R R Tolkien,
405:All your words are but to say: you are a woman, and your part is in the house. But... I can ride and wield blade, and I do not fear either pain or death. ~ J R R Tolkien,
406:I am wholly in favour of 'dull stodges'. A surprising large proportion prove 'educable': for which a primary qualification is the willingness to do work. ~ J R R Tolkien,
407:It gives me great pleasure, a good name. I always in writing start with a name. Give me a name and it produces a story, not the other way about normally. ~ J R R Tolkien,
408:Venice seemed incredibly lovely, elvishly lovely--to me like a dream of Old Gondor, or Pelargir of the Numenorean Ships, before the return of the Shadow. ~ J R R Tolkien,
409:Then shouldering their burdens, they set off, seeking a path that would bring them over the grey hills of the Emyn Muil, and down into the Land of Shadow. ~ J R R Tolkien,
410:Fool of a Took!" he growled. "This is a serious journey, not a hobbit walking-party. Throw yourself in next time, and then you will be no further nuisance. ~ J R R Tolkien,
411:The world has changed. I see it in the water. I feel it in the Earth. I smell it in the air. Much that once was is lost, For none now live who remember it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
412:No, my heart will not yet despair. Gandalf fell and has returned and is with us. We may stand, if only on one leg, or at least be left still upon our knees. ~ J R R Tolkien,
413:Then Aragorn was abashed, for he saw the elven-light in her eyes and the wisdom of many days; yet from that hour he loved Arwen Undómiel daughter of Elrond. ~ J R R Tolkien,
414:My 'Sam Gamgee' is indeed a reflexion of the English soldier, of the privates and batmen I knew in the 1914 war, and recognised as so far superior to myself. ~ J R R Tolkien,
415:Now and again he spoke to those that served him and thanked them in their own language. They smiled at him and said laughing: 'Here is a jewel among hobbits! ~ J R R Tolkien,
416:Then Elrond and Galadriel rode on; for the Third Age was over and the Days of the Rings were passed and an end was come of the story and song of those times. ~ J R R Tolkien,
417:The one small garden of a free gardener was all his need and due, not a garden swollen to a realm; his own hands to use, not the hands of others to command. ~ J R R Tolkien,
418:A sister they had, Galadriel, most beautiful of all the house of Finwë; her hair was lit with gold as though it had caught in a mesh the radiance of Laurelin. ~ J R R Tolkien,
419:O! Where are you going With beards all a-wagging? No knowing, no knowing What brings Mister Baggins, And Balin and Dwalin down into the valley in June ha! ha! ~ J R R Tolkien,
420:You must understand, young Hobbit, it takes a long time to say anything in Old Entish. And we never say anything unless it is worth taking a long time to say. ~ J R R Tolkien,
421:Love not too well the work of thy hands and the devices of thy heart; and remember that the true hope of the Noldor lieth in the West, and cometh from the Sea. ~ J R R Tolkien,
422:The washing-up was so dismally real that Bilbo was forced to believe the party of the night before had not been part of his bad dreams, as he had rather hoped. ~ J R R Tolkien,
423:After some while Bilbo became impatient. "Well, what is it?" he said. "The answer's not a kettle boiling over, as you seem to think by the noise you are making. ~ J R R Tolkien,
424:And now leave me in peace for a bit! I don't want to answer a string of questions while I am eating. I want to think!" "Good Heavens!" said Pippin. "At breakfast? ~ J R R Tolkien,
425:He found himself wondering at times, especially in the autumn, about the wild lands, and strange visions of mountains that he had never seen came into his dreams. ~ J R R Tolkien,
426:Indeed you did your best...I hope that it may be long before you find yourself in such a tight corner again between two such terrible old men. ~ Gandalf to Pippin ~ J R R Tolkien,
427:It [discovering Finnish] was like discovering a wine-cellar filled with bottles of amazing wine of a kind and flavour never tasted before. It quite intoxicated me. ~ J R R Tolkien,
428:It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to. ~ J R R Tolkien,
429:What did I tell you, Mr. Pippin?' said Sam, sheathing his sword. 'Wolves won't get him. That was an eye-opener, and no mistake! Nearly singed the hair off my head! ~ J R R Tolkien,
430:Yet seldom do they fail of their seed, And that will lie in the dust and rot to spring up again in times and places unlooked-for. The deeds of Men will outlast us. ~ J R R Tolkien,
431:You can make the Ring into an allegory of our own time, if you like: and allegory of the inevitable fate that waits for all attempts to defeat evil power by power. ~ J R R Tolkien,
432:Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on? ~ J R R Tolkien,
433:He knew that all the hazards and perils were now drawing together to a point: the next day would be a day of doom, the day of final effort or disaster, the last gasp. ~ J R R Tolkien,
434:I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend. ~ J R R Tolkien, The Two Towers,
435:The romantic chivalric tradition takes, or at any rate has in the past taken, the young man's eye off women as they are, as companions in shipwreck not guiding stars. ~ J R R Tolkien,
436:Already he was a very different hobbit from the one that had run out without a pocket-handkerchief from Bag-End long ago. He had not had a pocket-handkerchief for ages. ~ J R R Tolkien,
437:Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the image and likeness of a Maker. ~ J R R Tolkien,
438:For the trouble with the real folk of Faerie is that they do not always look like what they are; and they put on the pride and beauty that we would fain wear ourselves. ~ J R R Tolkien,
439:In this Music [the singing of the angels in harmony] the World was begun; for Iluvatar made visible the song of the Ainur,and they beheld it as a light in the darkness. ~ J R R Tolkien,
440:This thing all things devours: Birds, beasts, trees, flowers; Gnaws iron, bites steel; Grinds hard stones to meal; Slays king, ruins town, And beats high mountain down. ~ J R R Tolkien,
441:Stir not the bitterness in the cup that I mixed for myself,' said Denethor. 'Have I not tasted it now many nights upon my tongue, foreboding that worse lay in the dregs? ~ J R R Tolkien,
442:The chief purpose of life, for any of us, is to increase according to our capacity our knowledge of God by all means we have, and to be moved by it to praise and thanks. ~ J R R Tolkien,
443:Then hope unlooked-for came so suddenly to Eomer's heart, and with it the bite of care and fear renewed, that he said no more, but turned and went swiftly from the hall. ~ J R R Tolkien,
444:There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after. ~ J R R Tolkien,
445:And thus it came to pass that the Silmarils found their long homes: one in the airs of heaven, and one in the fires of the heart of the world, and one in the deep waters. ~ J R R Tolkien,
446:Ho! Tom Bombadil, Tom Bombadillo! By water, wood and hill, by reed and willow, By fire, sun and moon, harken now and hear us! Come, Tom Bombadil, for our need is near us! ~ J R R Tolkien,
447:And it is not always good to be healed in body. Nor is it always evil to die in battle, even in bitter pain. Were I permitted, in this dark hour I would choose the latter. ~ J R R Tolkien,
448:I have the hatred of apartheid in my bones; and most of all I detest the segregation or separation of Language and Literature. I do not care which of them you think White. ~ J R R Tolkien,
449:Hobbits delighted in such things, if they were accurate; they liked to have books filled with things that they already knew, set out fair and square with no contradictions. ~ J R R Tolkien,
450:It is the way of my people to use light words at such times and say less than they mean. We fear to say too much. It robs us of the right words when a jest is out of place. ~ J R R Tolkien,
451:Their horses were of great stature, strong and clean-limbed; their gray coats glistened, their long tails flowed in the wind, their manes were braided on their proud necks. ~ J R R Tolkien,
452:And there was Frodo, pale and worn, and yet himself again; and in his eyes there was peace now, neither strain of will, nor madness, nor any fear. His burden was taken away. ~ J R R Tolkien,
453:For a while they stood there, like men on the edge of a sleep where nightmare lurks, holding it off, though they know that they can only come to morning through the shadows. ~ J R R Tolkien,
454:The strongest must seek a way, say you? But I say: let a ploughman plough, but choose an otter for swimming, and for running light over grass and leaf, or over snow- an Elf! ~ J R R Tolkien,
455:Tall ships and tall kings Three times three, What brought they from the foundered land Over the flowing sea? Seven stars and seven stones And one white tree. (The Two Towers) ~ J R R Tolkien,
456:Don't the great tales never end?" "No, they never end as tales," said Frodo. "But the people in them come, and go when their part's ended. Our part will end later – or sooner. ~ J R R Tolkien,
457:grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of the mind: out of all that has been seen or thought or read, that has long ago been forgotten, descending into the deeps. ~ J R R Tolkien,
458:Nobody believes me when I say that my long book is an attempt to create a world in which a form of language agreeable to my personal aesthetic might seem real. But it is true. ~ J R R Tolkien,
459:That's what I meant,' said Pippin. 'We hobbits ought to stick together, and we will. I shall go, unless they chain me up. There must be someone with intelligence in the party. ~ J R R Tolkien,
460:The Dark Lord has Nine. But we have One, mightier than they: the White Rider. He has passed through the fire and the abyss, and they shall fear him. We will go where he leads. ~ J R R Tolkien,
461:Your time may come. Do not be too sad, Sam. You cannot be always torn in two. You will have to be one and whole, for many years. You have so much to enjoy and to be, and to do. ~ J R R Tolkien,
462:Escaping goblins to be caught by wolves!” he said, and it became a proverb, though we now say ‘out of the frying-pan into the fire’ in the same sort of uncomfortable situations. ~ J R R Tolkien,
463:Few other griefs amid the ill chances of this world have more bitterness and shame for a man's heart than to behold the love of a lady so fair and brave that cannot be returned. ~ J R R Tolkien,
464:We all long for Eden, and we are constantly glimpsing it: our whole nature at its best and least corrupted, its gentlest and most human, is still soaked with the sense of exile. ~ J R R Tolkien,
465:Where did you go to, if I may ask?' said Thorin to Gandalf as they rode along. To look ahead,' said he. And what brought you back in the nick of time?' Looking behind,' said he. ~ J R R Tolkien,
466:But do not despise the lore that has come down from distant years; for oft it may chance that old wives keep in memory word of things that once were needful for the wise to know. ~ J R R Tolkien,
467:For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach. ~ J R R Tolkien,
468:No language is justly studied merely as an aid to other purposes. It will in fact better serve other purposes, philological or historical, when it is studied for love, for itself. ~ J R R Tolkien,
469:There is a place called ‘heaven’ where the good here unfinished is completed; and where the stories unwritten, and the hopes unfulfilled, are continued. We may laugh together yet. ~ J R R Tolkien,
470:Well, here at last, dear friends, on the shores of the Sea comes the end of our fellowship in Middle-earth. Go in peace! I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil. ~ J R R Tolkien,
471:And she looked at him and saw the grave tenderness in his eyes, and yet knew, for she was bred among men of war, that here was one whom no Rider of the Mark could outmatch in battle. ~ J R R Tolkien,
472:At my age I'm exactly the kind of person who has lived through one of the most quickly changing periods known to history. Surely there could never be in seventy years so much change. ~ J R R Tolkien,
473:For I am the daughter of Elrond. I shall not go with him when he departs to the Havens: for mine is the choice of Luthien, and as she so have I chosen, both the sweet and the bitter. ~ J R R Tolkien,
474:We may indeed in counsel point to the higher road, but we cannot compel any free creature to walk upon it. That leadeth to tyranny, which disfigureth good and maketh it seem hateful. ~ J R R Tolkien,
475:And some things that should not have been forgotten were lost. History became legend. Legend became myth. And for two and a half thousand years, the ring passed out of all knowledge. ~ J R R Tolkien,
476:His face was sad and stern because of the doom that was laid on him, and yet hope dwelt ever in the depths of his heart, from which mirth would arise at times like a spring from a rock. ~ J R R Tolkien,
477:I can put it no plainer than by saying that Bilbo was meant to find the Ring, and not by its maker. In which case you also were meant to have it. And that may be an encouraging thought. ~ J R R Tolkien,
478:I should have said Welsh has always attracted me. By its style and sound more than any other, ever though I first only saw it on coal trucks, I always wanted to know what it was about. ~ J R R Tolkien,
479:Life is rather above the measure of us all (save for a very few perhaps). We all need literature that is above our measure--though we may not have sufficient energy for it all the time. ~ J R R Tolkien,
480:The Hobbits are just rustic English people, made small in size because it reflects the generally small reach of their imagination - not the small reach of their courage or latent power. ~ J R R Tolkien,
481:Gandalf, dwarves and Mr. Baggins! We are met together in the house of our friend and fellow conspirator, this most excellent and audacious hobbit—may the hair on his toes never fall out! ~ J R R Tolkien,
482:Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder. ~ J R R Tolkien,
483:If people were in the habit of refering to 'King George's council, Winston and his gang,' it would go a long way to clearing thought, and reducing the frightful landslide into Theyocracy. ~ J R R Tolkien,
484:Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. ~ J R R Tolkien,
485:They must understand that – Elrond and the Council, and the great Lords and Ladies with all their wisdom. Their plans have gone wrong. I can't be their Ring-bearer. Not without Mr. Frodo. ~ J R R Tolkien,
486:And here he was, a little halfling from the Shire, a simple hobbit of the quiet countryside, expected to find a way where the great ones could not go, or dared not go. It was an evil fate. ~ J R R Tolkien,
487:If you mean you think it is my job to go into the secret passage first, O Thorin Thrain’s son Oakenshield, may your beard grow ever longer,” he said crossly, “say so at once and have done! ~ J R R Tolkien,
488:Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising I came singing into the sun, sword unsheathing. To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking: Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall! ~ J R R Tolkien,
489:That's the only place in all the lands we've ever heard of that we don't want to see any closer; and that's the one place we're trying to get to! And that's just where we can't get, nohow. ~ J R R Tolkien,
490:Speak no evil of the Lady Galadriel!" said Aragorn sternly. "You know not what you say. There is in her and in this land, no evil, unless a man bring it hither himself. Then let him beware! ~ J R R Tolkien,
491:There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Ilúvatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought, and they were with him before aught else was made. ~ J R R Tolkien,
492:And then all the host of Rohan burst into song, and they sang as they slew, for the joy of battle was on them, and the sound of their singing that was fair and terrible came even to the City. ~ J R R Tolkien,
493:What do you fear, lady?" [Aragorn] asked. "A cage," [Éowyn] said. "To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire. ~ J R R Tolkien,
494:Did he say:"Hullo,Pippin!This is a pleasant surprise!"?No,indeed!He said:"Get up,you tom-fool of a Took!Where,in the name of wonder,in all this ruin is Treebeard?I want him.Quick" -Pippin Took ~ J R R Tolkien,
495:End? No, the journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path, one that we all must take. The grey rain-curtain of this world rolls back, and all turns to silver glass, and then you see it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
496:Ho! Ho! Ho! To the bottle I go To heal my heart and drown my woe Rain may fall, and wind may blow And many miles be still to go But under a tall tree will I lie And let the clouds go sailing by ~ J R R Tolkien,
497:It cannot be seen, cannot be felt, Cannot be heard, cannot be smelt, It lies behind stars and under hills, And empty holes it fills, It comes first and follows after, Ends life, kills laughter. ~ J R R Tolkien,
498:Arise, arise, Riders of Théoden! Fell deeds awake, fire and slaughter! spear shall be shaken, shield be splintered, a sword-day, a red day, ere the sun rises! Ride now, ride now! Ride to Gondor! ~ J R R Tolkien,
499:But you speak of Master Gandalf, as if he was in a story that had come to an end.' 'Yes, we do,' said Pippin sadly. 'The story seems to be going on, but I am afraid Gandalf has fallen out of it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
500:He is not half through yet, and to what he will come in the end not even Elrond can foretell. Not to evil, I think. He may become like a glass filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can. ~ J R R Tolkien,
501:I don't deny it," said Frodo, looking at Sam, who was now grinning. "I don't deny it, but I'll never believe you are sleeping again, whether you snore or not. I shall kick you hard to make sure. ~ J R R Tolkien,
502:Leave him! I said. I never mean to. I am going with him, if he climbs to the Moon; and if any of these Black Riders try to stop him, they'll have Sam Gamgee to reckon with, I said. They laughed. ~ J R R Tolkien,
503:When Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence, there was much talk and excitement in Hobbiton. ~ J R R Tolkien,
504:These folk are hewers of trees and hunters of beasts; therefore we are their unfriends, and if they will not depart we shall afflict them in all ways that we can." -- The Silmarllion, JRR Tolkien ~ J R R Tolkien,
505:What do you fear, lady?" [Aragorn] asked.
"A cage," [Éowyn] said. "To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire. ~ J R R Tolkien,
506:Come, Mr. Frodo!' he cried. 'I can't carry it for you, but I can carry you and it as well. So up you get! Come on, Mr. Frodo dear! Sam will give you a ride. Just tell him where to go, and he'll go ~ J R R Tolkien,
507:The world is indeed full of peril, and in it there are many dark places; but still there is much that is fair, and though in all lands love is now mingled with grief, it grows perhaps the greater. ~ J R R Tolkien,
508:Middle-earth is our world. I have (of course) placed the action in a purely imaginary (though not wholly impossible) period of antiquity, in which the shape of the continental masses was different. ~ J R R Tolkien,
509:Elves and Dragons! Cabbages and potatoes are better for me and you. Don't go getting mixed up in the business of your betters, or you'll land in trouble too big for you. ~Hamfast Gamgee (the Gaffer) ~ J R R Tolkien,
510:Orcs, and talking trees, and leagues of grass, and galloping riders, and glittering caves, and white towers and golden halls, and battles, and tall ships sailing, all these passed before Sam's mind. ~ J R R Tolkien,
511:Instead of a Dark Lord, you would have a queen, not dark but beautiful and terrible as the dawn! Tempestuous as the sea, and stronger than the foundations of the earth! All shall love me and despair! ~ J R R Tolkien,
512:And amid all the splendours of the World, its vast halls and spaces, and its wheeling fires, Ilúvatar chose a place for their habitation in the Deeps of Time and in the midst of the innumerable stars. ~ J R R Tolkien,
513:For myself, I find I become less cynical rather than more--remembering my own sins and follies; and realize that men's hearts are not often as bad as their acts, and very seldom as bad as their words. ~ J R R Tolkien,
514:His rage passes description - the sort of rage that is only seen when rich folk that have more than they can enjoy suddenly lose something that they have long had but have never before used or wanted. ~ J R R Tolkien,
515:Old Tom Bombadil is a merry fellow, Bright blue his jacket is, and his boots are yellow. None has ever caught him yet, for Tom, he is the Master: His songs are stronger songs, and his feet are faster. ~ J R R Tolkien,
516:I cannot,' said Merry. 'I have never seen them. I have never been outside of my own land before. And if I had known what the world outside was like, I don't think I should have had the heart to leave it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
517:Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick. ~ J R R Tolkien,
518:I am a Christian…so that I do not expect ‘history’ to be anything but a ‘long defeat’ — though it contains (and in a legend may contain more clearly and movingly) some samples or glimpses of final victory. ~ J R R Tolkien,
519:Rover did not know in the least where the moon's path led to, and at present he was much too frightened and excited to ask, and anyway he was beginning to get used to extraordinary things happening to him. ~ J R R Tolkien,
520:Still round the corner there may wait A new road or a secret gate And though I oft have passed them by A day will come at last when I Shall take the hidden paths that run West of the Moon, East of the Sun. ~ J R R Tolkien,
521:Who are you, Master?' he asked. 'Eh, what?' said Tom sitting up, and his eyes glinting in the gloom. 'Don't you know my name yet? That's the only answer. Tell me, who are you, alone, yourself and nameless? ~ J R R Tolkien,
522:Sleep! I feel the need of it, as never I thought any dwarf could , riding is tiring work. Yet my axe is restless in my hand. Give me a row of orc-necks and room to swing and all weariness will fall from me! ~ J R R Tolkien,
523:And that's the way of a real tale. Take any one that you're fond of. You may know, or guess, what kind of a tale it is, happy-ending or sad-ending, but the people in it don't know. And you don't want them to. ~ J R R Tolkien,
524:Ho! Ho! Ho! To the bottle I go
To heal my heart and drown my woe
Rain may fall, and wind may blow
And many miles be still to go
But under a tall tree will I lie
And let the clouds go sailing by ~ J R R Tolkien,
525:The most improper job of any man, even saints (who at any rate were at least unwilling to take it on), is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity. ~ J R R Tolkien,
526:I felt a curious thrill, as if something had stirred in me, half wakened from sleep. There was something very remote and strange and beautiful behind those words, if I could grasp it, far beyond ancient English. ~ J R R Tolkien,
527:But who knows what she spoke to the darkness, alone, in the bitter watches of the night, when all her life seemed shrinking, and the walls of her bower closing in about her, a hutch to trammel some wild thing in? ~ J R R Tolkien,
528:If you find that not many of the things you asked for have come, and not perhaps quite so many as sometimes, remember that this Christmas all over the world there are a terrible number of poor and starving people. ~ J R R Tolkien,
529:There is more in you of good than you know, child of the kindly West. Some courage and some wisdom, blended in measure. If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
530:No onslaught more fierce was ever seen in the savage world of beasts, where some desperate small creature armed with little teeth, alone, will spring upon a tower of horn and hide that stands above its fallen mate. ~ J R R Tolkien,
531:But no living man am I! You look upon a woman. Éowyn I am, Éomund's daughter. You stand between me and my lord and kin. Begone, if you be not deathless! For living or dark undead, I will smite you, if you touch him. ~ J R R Tolkien,
532:'Celtic' is a magic bag, into which anything may be put, and out of which almost anything may come. Anything is possible in the fabulous Celtic twilight, which is not so much a twilight of the gods as of the reason. ~ J R R Tolkien,
533:Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn't. They kept going because they were holding on to something.... That there's some good in the world, Mr. Frodo, and it's worth fighting for. ~ J R R Tolkien,
534:'Nonetheless day will bring hope to me,' said Aragorn. 'Is it not said that no foe has ever taken the Hornburg, if men defended it?' 'So the minstrels say,' said Éomer. 'Then let us defend it, and hope!' said Aragorn. ~ J R R Tolkien,
535:Hobbits are an unobtrusive but very ancient people, more numerous formerly than they are today; for they love peace and quiet and good tilled earth: a well-ordered and well-farmed countryside was their favourite haunt. ~ J R R Tolkien,
536:Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. ~ J R R Tolkien,
537:I will not give you counsel, saying do this, or do that. For not in doing or contriving, nor in choosing between this course and another, can I avail; but only in knowing what was and is, and in part also what shall be. ~ J R R Tolkien,
538:The War is not over (and the one that is, or the part of it, has been largely lost). But it is of course wrong to fall into such a mood, for Wars are always lost, and War always goes on; and it is no good growing faint. ~ J R R Tolkien,
539:We were born in a dark age out of due time (for us). But there is this comfort: otherwise we should not know, or so much love, what we do love. I imagine the fish out of water is the only fish to have an inkling of water. ~ J R R Tolkien,
540:Still round the corner there may wait
A new road or a secret gate
And though I oft have passed them by
A day will come at last when I
Shall take the hidden paths that run
West of the Moon, East of the Sun. ~ J R R Tolkien,
541:There I lay staring upward, while the stars wheeled over... Faint to my ears came the gathered rumor of all lands: the springing and the dying, the song and the weeping, and the slow everlasting groan of overburdened stone. ~ J R R Tolkien,
542:But you comfort me, Gimli, I'm glad to have you standing nigh with your stout legs and your hard axe. I wish there were more of your kin among us. But even more would I give for a hundred good archers of Mirkwood." - Legolas ~ J R R Tolkien,
543:I have talked quite long enough about my own follies. The thing is to finish the thing as devised and then let it be judged. But forgive me! It is written in my life-blood, such as that is, thick or thin; and I can no other. ~ J R R Tolkien,
544:But I have been too deeply hurt, Sam. I tried to save the Shire, and it has been saved, but not for me. It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: some one has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
545:I wish it need not have happened in my time," said Frodo. "So do I," said Gandalf, "and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. ~ J R R Tolkien,
546:You are a set of deceitful scoundrels! But bless you! I give in. I will take Gildor's advice. If the danger were not so dark, I should dance for joy. Even so, I cannot help feeling happy; happier than I have felt for a long time. ~ J R R Tolkien,
547:How do you pick up the threads of an old life? How do you go on, when in your heart, you begin to understand, there is no going back? There are some things that time cannot mend. Some hurts that go too deep...that have taken hold. ~ J R R Tolkien,
548:I sit beside the fire and think of all that I have seen, of meadow-flowers and butterflies in summers that have been; Of yellow leaves and gossamer in autumns that there were, with morning mist and silver sun and wind upon my hair. ~ J R R Tolkien,
549:Lazy Lob and crazy Cob are weaving webs to wind me. I am far more sweet than other meat, but still they cannot find me! Here am I, naughty little fly; you are fat and lazy. You cannot trap me, though you try, in your cobwebs crazy. ~ J R R Tolkien,
550:Never laugh at live dragons, Bilbo you fool!" he said to himself, and it became a favourite saying of his later, and passed into a proverb. "You aren't nearly through this adventure yet," he added, and that was pretty true as well. ~ J R R Tolkien,
551:Out of the darkness of my life, so much frustrated, I put before you the one great thing to love on earth: the Blessed Sacrament … There you will find romance, glory, honour, fidelity, and the true way of all your loves upon earth. ~ J R R Tolkien,
552:As she stood before Aragorn she paused suddenly and looked upon him, and her eyes were shining. And he looked down upon her fair face and smiled; but as he took the cup, his hand met hers, and he knew that she trembled at the touch. ~ J R R Tolkien,
553:I wish it need not have happened in my time," said Frodo.
"So do I," said Gandalf, "and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. ~ J R R Tolkien,
554:I would have things as they were in all the days of my life, and in the days of my longfathers before me: to be the Lord of this City in peace, and leave my chair to a son after me, who would be his own master and no wizard's pupil. ~ J R R Tolkien,
555:There was a willow hanging over the mill-pool and I learned to climb it. It belonged to a butcher on the Stratford Road, I think. One day they cut it down. They didn't do anything with it: the log just lay there. I never forgot that. ~ J R R Tolkien,
556:Suddenly Faramir stirred, and he opened his eyes, and he looked on Aragorn who bent over him; and a light of knowledge and love was kindled in his eyes, and he spoke softly. 'My lord, you called me. I come. What does the king command? ~ J R R Tolkien,
557:War must be, while we defend our lives against a destroyer who would devour all; but I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend. ~ J R R Tolkien,
558:My dear Frodo!’ exclaimed Gandalf. ‘Hobbits really are amazing creatures, as I have said before. You can learn all that there is to know about their ways in a month, and yet after a hundred years they can still surprise you at a pinch. ~ J R R Tolkien,
559:Dwarves are not heroes, but a calculating folk with a great idea of the value of money; some are tricky and treacherous and pretty bad lots; some are not but are decent enough people like Thorin and Company, if you don't expect too much. ~ J R R Tolkien,
560:After all, I believe that legends and myths are largely made of 'truth', and indeed present aspects of it that can only be received in this mode; and long ago certain truths and modes of this kind were discovered and must always reappear. ~ J R R Tolkien,
561:Most people have made this mistake of thinking Middle-earth is a particular kind of earth or is another planet of the science fiction sort but it's just an old fashioned word for this world we live in, as imagined surrounded by the Ocean. ~ J R R Tolkien,
562:There was some murmuring, but also some grins on the faces of the men looking on: the sight of their Captain sitting on the ground and eye to eye with a young hobbit, legs well apart, bristling with wrath, was one beyond their experience. ~ J R R Tolkien,
563:The future, good or ill, was not forgotten, but ceased to have any power over the present. Health and hope grew strong in them, and they were content with each good day as it came, taking pleasure in every meal, and in every word and song. ~ J R R Tolkien,
564:Then Morgoth stretching out his long arm towards Dor-lomin cursed Hurin and Morwen and their offspring, saying: 'Behold! The shadow of my thought shall lie upon them wherever they go, and my hate shall pursue them to the ends of the world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
565:I desired dragons with a profound desire. Of course, I in my timid body did not wish to have them in the neighborhood. But the world that contained even the imagination of Fáfnir was richer and more beautiful, at whatever the cost of peril. ~ J R R Tolkien,
566:Seek for the Sword that was broken In Imladris it dwells; There shall be counsels taken Stronger than Morgul-spells. There shall be shown a token That Doom is near at hand, For Isuldur's Bane shall waken, And the halfling forth shall stand. ~ J R R Tolkien,
567:Though here at journey's end I lie In darkness buried deep, Beyond all towers strong and high, Beyond all mountains steep, Above all shadows rides the Sun And Stars for ever dwell: I will not say the Day is done, Nor bid the Stars farewell. ~ J R R Tolkien,
568:he was for long my only audience... Only from him did I ever get the idea that my ‘stuff’ could be more than a private hobby. But for his interest and unceasing eagerness for more I should never have brought The L. of the R. to a conclusion. ~ J R R Tolkien,
569:My own dear mother was a martyr indeed, and it is not to everybody that God grants so easy a way to his great gifts as he did to Hilary and myself, giving us a mother who killed herself with labour and trouble to ensure us keeping the faith. ~ J R R Tolkien,
570:That was Thorin's style. He was an important dwarf. If he had been allowed, he would probably have gone on like this until he was out of breath, without telling anyone there anything that was not known already. But he was rudely interrupted. ~ J R R Tolkien,
571:Sam, clinging to Frodo's arm, collapsed on a step in the black darkness. 'Poor old Bill!' he said in a choking voice. 'Poor old Bill! Wolves and snakes! But the snakes were too much for him. I had to choose, Mr. Frodo. I had to come with you. ~ J R R Tolkien,
572:Some who have read the book, or at any rate have reviewed it, have found it boring, absurd, or contemptible, and I have no cause to complain, since I have similar opinions of their works, or of the kinds of writing that they evidently prefer. ~ J R R Tolkien,
573:The stars are far brighter Than gems without measure, The moon is far whiter Than silver in treasure; The fire is more shining On hearth in the gloaming Than gold won by mining, So why go a-roaming? O! Tra-la-la-lally Come back to the Valley. ~ J R R Tolkien,
574:The main mark of modern governments is that we do not know who governs, de facto any more than de jure. We see the politician and not his backer; still less the backer of the backer; or, what is most important of all, the banker of the backer. ~ J R R Tolkien,
575:When Summer lies upon the world, and in a noon of gold, Beneath the roof of sleeping leaves the dreams of trees unfold; When woodland halls are green and cool, and wind is in the West, Come back to me! Come back to me, and say my land is best! ~ J R R Tolkien,
576:Why was I chosen?' 'Such questions cannot be answered,' said Gandalf. 'You may be sure that it was not for any merit that others do not possess. But you have been chosen, and you must therefore use such strength and heart and wits as you have. ~ J R R Tolkien,
577:He loved mountains, or he had loved the thought of them marching on the edge of stories brought from far away; but now he was borne down by the insupportable weight of Middle-earth. He longed to shut out the immensity in a quiet room by a fire. ~ J R R Tolkien,
578:The way is shut. Then they halted and looked at him and saw that he lived still; but he did not look at them. The way is shut, his voice said again. It was made by those who are Dead, and the Dead keep it, until the time comes. The way is shut. ~ J R R Tolkien,
579:Arrow! Black arrow! I have saved you to the last. You have never failed me and I have always recovered you. I had you from my father and he from of old. If ever you came from the forges of the true king under the Mountain, go now and speed well! ~ J R R Tolkien,
580:Well, you have now, Sam, dear Sam,' said Frodo, and he lay back in Sam's gentle arms, closing his eyes, like a child at rest when night-fears are driven away by some loved voice or hand. Sam felt that he could sit like that in endless happiness. ~ J R R Tolkien,
581:You cannot pass," he said. The orcs stood still, and a dead silence fell. "I am a servant of the Secret Fire, wielder of the flame of Anor. You cannot pass. The dark fire will not avail you, flame of Udûn. Go back to the Shadow! You cannot pass. ~ J R R Tolkien,
582:He told them tales of bees and flowers, the ways of trees, and the strange creatures of the Forest, about the evil things and the good things, things friendly and things unfriendly, cruel things and kind things, and secrets hidden under brambles. ~ J R R Tolkien,
583:I wonder if people will ever say, 'Let's hear about Frodo and the Ring.' And they'll say 'Yes, that's one of my favorite stories. Frodo was really courageous, wasn't he, Dad?' 'Yes, my boy, the most famousest of hobbits. And that's saying a lot.' ~ J R R Tolkien,
584:And yet, Eomer, I say to you that she loves you more truly than me, for you she loves and knows; but in me she loves only a shadow and a thought: a hope of glory and great deeds, and lands far from the fields of Rohan. - Aragorn to Eomer, of Eowyn ~ J R R Tolkien,
585:In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort. ~ J R R Tolkien,
586:There is little or no magic about them, except the ordinary everyday sort which helps them to disappear quietly and quickly when large stupid folk like you and me come blundering along, making a noise like elephants which they can hear a mile off. ~ J R R Tolkien,
587:Fifteen birds in five firtrees, their feathers were fanned in a fiery breeze! But, funny little birds, they had no wings! O what shall we do with the funny little things? Roast 'em alive, or stew them in a pot; fry them, boil them and eat them hot? ~ J R R Tolkien,
588:Then Frodo came forward and took the crown from Faramir and bore it to Gandalf; and Aragorn knelt, and Gandalf set the White Crown upon his head and said: Now come the days of the King, and may they be blessed while the thrones of the Valar endure! ~ J R R Tolkien,
589:To whatever end. Where is the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing? They have passed like rain on the mountains. Like wind in the meadow. The days have gone down in the west. Behind the hills, into shadow. How did it come to this? ~ J R R Tolkien,
590:Criticism - however valid or intellectually engaging - tends to get in the way of a writer who has anything personal to say. A tightrope walker may require practice, but if he starts a theory of equilibrium he will lose grace (and probably fall off). ~ J R R Tolkien,
591:We are lost, lost,' said Gollum. 'No name, no business, no Precious, nothing. Only empty. Only hungry; yes, we are hungry. A few little fishes, nasty bony little fishes, for a poor creature, and they say death. So wise they are; so just, so very just ~ J R R Tolkien,
592:Every writer making a secondary world wishes in some measure to be a real maker, or hopes that he is drawing on reality: hopes that the peculiar quality of this secondary world (if not all the details) are derived from Reality, or are flowing into it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
593:He was kindhearted, in a way. You know the sort of kind heart: it made him uncomfortable more often than it made him do anything; and even when he did anything, it did not prevent him from grumbling, losing his temper and swearing (mostly to himself). ~ J R R Tolkien,
594:Some sang too that Thror and Thrain would come back one day and gold would flow in rivers, through the mountain-gates, and all that land would be filled with new song and new laughter. But this pleasant legend did not much affect their daily business. ~ J R R Tolkien,
595:The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began. Now far ahead the Road has gone, And I must follow, if I can, Pursuing it with eager feet, Until it joins some larger way Where many paths and errands meet. And whither then? I cannot say ~ J R R Tolkien,
596:If you want to know what cram is, I can only say that I don’t know the recipe; but it is biscuitish, keeps good indefinitely, is supposed to be sustaining, and is certainly not entertaining, being in fact very uninteresting except as a chewing exercise. ~ J R R Tolkien,
597:Go back?" he thought. "No good at all! Go sideways? Impossible! Go forward? Only thing to do! On we go!" So up he got, and trotted along with his little sword held in front of him and one hand feeling the wall, and his heart all of a patter and a pitter. ~ J R R Tolkien,
598:But the only measure that he knows is desire desire for power and so he judges all hearts. Into his heart the thought will not enter that any will refuse it that having the Ring we may seek to destroy it. If we seek this we shall put him out of reckoning. ~ J R R Tolkien,
599:Eastward the dawn rose, ridge behind ridge into the morning, and vanished out of eyesight into guess; it was no more than a glimmer blending with the hem of the sky, but it spoke to them, out of the memory and old tales, of the high and distant mountains. ~ J R R Tolkien,
600:It would be the death of you to come with me, Sam," said Frodo, "and I could not have borne that." "Not as certain as being left behind," said Sam. "But I am going to Mordor." "I know that well enough, Mr. Frodo. Of course you are. And I'm coming with you. ~ J R R Tolkien,
601:I desired dragons with a profound desire. Of course, I in my timid body did not wish to have them in the neighborhood. But the world that contained even the imagination of Fafnir was richer and more beautiful, at whatever the cost of peril. ~ J R R Tolkien, On Fairy-Stories,
602:If only that dratted wizard would leave young Frodo alone, perhaps he'll settle down and grow some hobbit-sense,' they said. And to all appearance the wizard did leave Frodo alone, and he did settle down, but the growth of hobbit-sense was not very noticable. ~ J R R Tolkien,
603:But fear no more! I would not take this thing, if it lay by the highway. Not were Minas Tirith falling in ruin and I alone could save her, so, using the weapon of the Dark Lord for her good and my glory. No, I do not wish for such triumphs, Frodo son of Drogo. ~ J R R Tolkien,
604:I stand in Minas Anor, the Tower of the Sun; and behold! the Shadow has departed! I will be a Shieldmaiden no longer, nor vie with the great Riders, nor take joy only in the songs of slaying. I will be a healer, and love all things that grow and are not barren. ~ J R R Tolkien,
605:Much of the same sort of degraded and filthy talk can still be heard among the orc-minded; dreary and repetitive with hatred and contempt, too long removed from good to retain even verbal vigour, save in the ears of those to whom only the squalid sounds strong. ~ J R R Tolkien,
606:The realm of fairy-story is wide and deep and high and filled with many things: all manner of beasts and birds are found there; shoreless seas and stars uncounted; beauty that is an enchantment, and an ever-present peril; both joy and sorrow as sharp as swords. ~ J R R Tolkien,
607:It is said by the Eldar that in water there lives yet the echo of the Music of the Ainur more than in any substance that is in this Earth; and many of the Children of Ilúvatar hearken still unsated to the voices of the Sea, and yet know not for what they listen. ~ J R R Tolkien,
608:He raised his staff. There was a roll of thunder. The sunlight was blotted out from the eastern windows; the whole hall became suddenly dark as night. The fire faded to sullen embers. Only Gandalf could be seen, standing white and tall before the blackened hearth. ~ J R R Tolkien,
609:Silver flow the streams from Celos to Erui In the green fields of Lebennin! Tall grows the grass there. In the wind from the Sea The white lilies sway, And the golden bells are shaken of mallos and alfirin In the green fields of Lebennin, In the wind from the Sea! ~ J R R Tolkien,
610:Upon the hearth the fire is red, Beneath the roof there is a bed; But not yet weary are our feet, Still round the corner we may meet A sudden tree or standing stone That none have seen but we alone. Tree and flower and leaf and grass, Let them pass! Let them pass! ~ J R R Tolkien,
611:I have never had much confidence in my own work, and even now when I am assured (still much to my grateful surprise) that it has value for other people, I feel diffident, reluctant as it were to expose my world of imagination to possibly contemptuous eyes and ears. ~ J R R Tolkien,
612:Now it is a strange thing, but things that are good to have and days that are good to spend are soon told about, and not much to listen to; while things that are uncomfortable, palpitating, and even gruesome, may make a good tale, and take a deal of telling anyway. ~ J R R Tolkien,
613:What have I got in my pocket?" he said aloud. He was talking to himself, but Gollum thought it was a riddle, and he was frightfully upset. "Not fair! not fair!" he hissed. "It isn't fair, my precious, is it, to ask us what it's got in it's nassty little pocketsess? ~ J R R Tolkien,
614:Farewell," they cried, "Wherever you fare till your eyries receive you at the journey's end!" That is the polite thing to say among eagles. "May the wind under your wings bear you where the sun sails and the moon walks," answered Gandalf, who knew the correct reply. ~ J R R Tolkien,
615:Take now this Ring,' he said; 'for thy labours and thy cares will be heavy, but in all it will support thee and defend thee from weariness. For this is the Ring of Fire, and herewith, maybe, thou shalt rekindle hearts to the valour of old in a world that grows chill. ~ J R R Tolkien,
616:I am looking for someone to share in an adventure that I am arranging, and it's very difficult to find anyone.' I should think so — in these parts! We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner! ~ J R R Tolkien,
617:I hope I never smell the smell of apples again!" said Fili. "My tub was full of ut. To smell apples everlastingly when you can scarcely move and are cold and sick with hunger is maddening. I could eat anything in the wide world now for hours on end - but not an apple! ~ J R R Tolkien,
618:Far more often [than asking the question 'Is it true?'] they [children] have asked me: 'Was he good? Was he wicked?' That is, they were far more concerned to get the Right side and the Wrong side clear. For that is a question equally important in History and in Faerie. ~ J R R Tolkien,
619:Elrond raised his eyes and looked at him, and Frodo felt his heart pierced by the sudden keenness of the glance. 'If I understand aright all that I have heard,' he said, 'I think that this task is appointed for you, Frodo; and that if you do not find a way, no one will. ~ J R R Tolkien,
620:After some time he felt for his pipe. It was not broken, and that was something. Then he felt for his pouch, and there was some tobacco in it, and that was something more. Then he felt for matches and he could not find any at all, and that shattered his hopes completely. ~ J R R Tolkien,
621:Do we walk in legends or on the green earth in the daylight?' A man may do both,' said Aragorn. 'For not we but those who come after will make the legends of our time. The green earth, say you? That is a mighty matter of legend, though you tread it under the light of day! ~ J R R Tolkien,
622:The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say ~ J R R Tolkien,
623:Frodo drew himself up, and again Sam was startled by his words and his stern voice. 'On the Precious? How dare you?' he said. 'Think! Would you commit your promise to that, Smeagol? It will hold you. But it is more treacherous than you are. It may twist your words. Beware! ~ J R R Tolkien,
624:It was at this point that Bilbo stopped. Going on from there was the bravest thing he ever did. The tremendous things that happened afterward were as nothing compared to it. He fought the real battle in the tunnel alone, before he ever saw the vast danger that lay in wait. ~ J R R Tolkien,
625:Bilbo lay with his eyes shut, gasping an taking pleasure in the feel of the fresh air again, and hardly noticing the excitement of the dwarves, or how they praised him and patted him on the back and put themseves and all their families for generations to come at his service. ~ J R R Tolkien,
626:Home is behind, the world ahead, And there are many paths to tread Through shadows to the edge of night, Until the stars are all alight. Then world behind and home ahead, We'll wander back and home to bed. Mist and twilight, cloud and shade, Away shall fade! Away shall fade! ~ J R R Tolkien,
627:I look East, West, North, South, and I do not see Sauron; but I see that Saruman has many descendants. We Hobbits have against them no magic weapons. Yet, my gentlehobbits, I give you this toast: To the Hobbits. May they outlast the Sarumans and see spring again in the trees. ~ J R R Tolkien,
628:There are many things in the deep waters; and seas and lands may change. And it is not our part here to take thought only for a season, or for a few lives of Men, or for a passing age of the world. We should seek a final end of this menace, even if we do not hope to make one. ~ J R R Tolkien,
629:There are truths, that are beyond us, transcendent truths, about beauty, truth, honor, etc. There are truths that man knows exist, but they cannot be seen - they are immaterial, but no less real, to us. It is only through the language of myth that we can speak of these truths. ~ J R R Tolkien,
630:And thou, Melkor, shalt see that no theme may be played that hath not its uttermost source in me, nor can any alter the music in my despite. For he that attempteth this shall prove but mine instrument in the devising of things more wonderful, which he himself hath not imagined. ~ J R R Tolkien,
631:Then Aragorn stooped and looked in her face, and it was indeed white as a lily, cold as frost, and hard as graven stone. But he bent and kissed her on the brow, and called her softly, saying: 'Éowyn Éomund's daughter, awake! For your enemy has passed away!' - Aragorn & Éowyn ~ J R R Tolkien,
632:No taste of food, no feel of water, no sound of wind, no memory of tree or grass or flower, no image of moon or star are left to me. I am naked in the dark, Sam, and there is no veil between me and the wheel of fire. I begin to see it even with my waking eyes, and all else fades. ~ J R R Tolkien,
633:Elrond's house was perfect, whether you liked food or sleep or story-telling or singing (or reading), or just sitting and thinking best, or a pleasant mixture of them all. Merely to be there was a cure for weariness. ... Evil things did not come into the secret valley of Rivendell. ~ J R R Tolkien,
634:This of course is the way to talk to dragons, if you don't want to reveal your proper name which is wise, and don't want to infuriate them by a flat refusal which is also very wise. No dragon can resist the fascination of riddling talk and of wasting time to trying to understand it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
635:Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back. But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy. Now I have taken my worst wound in this parting, even if I were to go this night straight to the Dark Lord. Alas for Gimli son of Glóin! ~ J R R Tolkien,
636:I am old, Gandalf. I don't look it, but I am beginning to feel it in my heart of hearts. Well-preserved indeed! Why, I feel all thin, sort of stretched, if you know what I mean: like butter that has been scraped over too much bread. That can't be right. I need a change, or something. ~ J R R Tolkien,
637:Then she fell on her knees, saying: 'I beg thee!' 'Nay, lady,' he said, and taking her by the hand he raised her. The he kissed her hand, and sprang into the saddle, and rode away, and did not look back; and only those who knew him well and were near to him saw the pain that he bore. ~ J R R Tolkien,
638:Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory. If a soldier is imprisioned by the enemy, don't we consider it his duty to escape?. . .If we value the freedom of mind and soul, if we're partisans of liberty, then it's our plain duty to escape, and to take as many people with us as we can! ~ J R R Tolkien,
639:Nearly all marriages, even happy ones, are mistakes: in the sense that almost certainly (in a more perfect world, or even with a little more care in this very imperfect one) both partners might be found more suitable mates. But the real soul-mate is the one you are actually married to. ~ J R R Tolkien,
640:Cold be hand and heart and bone, and cold be sleep under stone: never more to wake on stony bed, never, till the Sun fails and the Moon is dead. In the black wind the stars shall die, and still on gold here let them lie, till the dark lord lifts his hand over dead sea and withered land. ~ J R R Tolkien,
641:It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succour of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till. What weather they shall have is not ours to rule. ~ J R R Tolkien,
642:And he sang to them, now in the Elven tongue, now in the speech of the West, until their hearts, wounded with sweet words, overflowed, and their joy was like swords, and they passed in thought out to regions where pain and delight flow together and tears are the very wine of blessedness. ~ J R R Tolkien,
643:Most English-speaking people, for instance, will admit that cellar door is 'beautiful', especially if dissociated from its sense (and its spelling). More beautiful than, say, sky, and far more beautiful than beautiful. Well then, in Welsh for me cellar doors are extraordinarily frequent. ~ J R R Tolkien,
644:The enemy? His sense of duty was no less than yours, I deem. You wonder what his name is, where he came from. And if he was really evil at heart. What lies or threats led him on this long march from home. If he would not rather have stayed there in peace. War will make corpses of us all. ~ J R R Tolkien,
645:A nice pickle they were all in now: all neatly tied up in sacks, with three angry trolls (and two with burns and bashes to remember) sitting by them, arguing whether they should roast them slowly, or mince them fine and boil them, or just sit on them one by one and squash them into jelly. ~ J R R Tolkien,
646:Among the tales of sorrow and of ruin that came down to us from the darkness of those days there are yet some in which amid weeping there is joy and under the shadow of death light that endures. And of these histories most fair still in the ears of the Elves is the tale of Beren and Lúthien ~ J R R Tolkien,
647:Eomer said, 'How is a man to judge what to do in such times?' As he has ever judged,' said Aragorn. 'Good and evil have not changed since yesteryear, nor are they one thing among Elves and another among Men. It is a man's part to discern them, as much in the Golden Wood as in his own house. ~ J R R Tolkien,
648:I do not know what is happening. The reason of my waking mind tells me that great evil has befallen and we stand at the end of days. But my heart says nay; and all my limbs are light, and a hope and joy are come to me that no reason can deny. [...] I do not believe that darkness will endure! ~ J R R Tolkien,
649:Fairy tale does not deny the existence of sorrow and failure: the possibility of these is necessary to the joy of deliverance. It denies (in the face of much evidence, if you will) universal final defeat...giving a fleeting glimpse of Joy; Joy beyond the walls of the world, poignant as grief. ~ J R R Tolkien,
650:In one thing you have not changed, dear friend," said Aragorn: "you still speak in riddles." "What? In riddles?" said Gandalf. "No! For I was talking aloud to myself. A habit of the old: they choose the wisest person present to speak to; the long explanations needed by the young are wearying. ~ J R R Tolkien,
651:There was a little corner of his mind that was still his own, and light came through it, as though a chink in the dark: light out of the past. It was actually pleasant, I think, to hear a kindly voice agin, bringing up memories of wind, and trees, and sun on the grass, and such forgotten things. ~ J R R Tolkien,
652:Now I know what a piece of bacon feels like when it is suddenly picked out of the pan on a fork and put back on the shelf!" "No you don't!" he heard Dori answering, "because the bacon knows that it will get back in the pan sooner or later; and it is to be hoped we shan't. Also eagles aren't forks! ~ J R R Tolkien,
653:Faërie contains many things besides elves and fays, and besides dwarfs, witches, trolls, giants, or dragons; it holds the seas, the sun, the moon, the sky; and the earth, and all things that are in it: tree and bird, water and stone, wine and bread, and ourselves, mortal men, when we are enchanted. ~ J R R Tolkien,
654:Here ends the SILMARILLION. If it has passed from the high and the beautiful to darkness and ruin, that was of old the fate of Arda Marred; and if any change shall come and the Marring be amended, Manwë and Varda may know; but they have not revealed it, and it is not declared in the dooms of Mandos. ~ J R R Tolkien,
655:He was tall as a young tree, lithe, immensely strong, able swiftly to draw a great war-bow and shoot down a Nazgûl, endowed with the tremendous vitality of Elvish bodies, so hard and resistant to hurt that he went only in light shoes over rock or through snow, the most tireless of all the Fellowship. ~ J R R Tolkien,
656:He did not go much further, but sat down on the cold floor and gave himself up to complete miserableness, for a long while. He thought of himself frying bacon and eggs in his own kitchen at home - for he could feel inside that it was high time for some meal or other; but that only made him miserabler. ~ J R R Tolkien,
657:Straightening, I asked, "What do you believe in?"
"Old love songs, best friends, the collected works of J.R.R.Tolkien, crispy pork egg rolls with just the right amount of grease, the Big Boss and eternity."
"The Big Boss?"
Zachary pointed up, as if to heaven.

"Pious,"I teased. ~ Cynthia Leitich Smith,
658:In that hour of trial it was the love of his master that helped most to hold him firm; but also deep down in him lived still unconquered his plain hobbit-sense: he knew in the core of his heart that he was not large enough to bear such a burden, even if such visions were not a mere cheat to betray him. ~ J R R Tolkien,
659:Have you thought of an ending?' 'Yes , several, and all are dark and unpleasant,' said Frodo. 'Oh , that won't do!' said Bilbo. 'Books ought to have good endings. How would this do: and they all settled down and lived together happily ever after?' 'It will do well, if it ever comes to that,' said Frodo. ~ J R R Tolkien,
660:Being a cult figure in one's own lifetime I am afraid is not at all pleasant. However I do not find that it tends to puff one up: in my case at any rate it makes me feel extremely small and inadequate. But even the nose of a very modest idol cannot remain entirely untickled by the sweet smell of incense. ~ J R R Tolkien,
661:One has personally to come under the shadow of war to feel fully its oppression; but as the years go by it seems now often forgotten that to be caught in youth by 1914 was no less hideous an experience than to be involved in 1939 and the following years. By 1918 all but one of my close friends were dead. ~ J R R Tolkien,
662:My political opinions lean more and more to anarchy. The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. There is only one bright spot and that is the growing habit of disgruntled men of dynamiting factories and power stations. I hope that, encouraged now as patriotism, may remain a habit. ~ J R R Tolkien,
663:the association of children and fairy-stories is an accident of our domestic history. Fairy-stories have in the modern lettered world been relegated to the “nursery,” as shabby or old-fashioned furniture is relegated to the play-room, primarily because the adults do not want it, and do not mind if it is misused. ~ J R R Tolkien,
664:Supernatural is a dangerous and difficult word in any of its senses, looser or stricter. But to fairies it can hardly be applied, unless super is taken merely as a superlative prefix. For it is man who is, in contrast to fairies, supernatural; whereas they are natural, far more natural than he. Such is their doom. ~ J R R Tolkien,
665:Those were happier days, when there was still close friendship at times between folk of different race, even between Dwarves and Elves.' It was not the fault of the Dwarves that the friendship waned,' said Gimli. I have not heard that it was the fault of the Elves,' said Legolas. I have heard both,' said Gandalf[.] ~ J R R Tolkien,
666:The rule of no realm is mine. But all worthy things that are in peril as the world now stands, those are my care. And for my part, I shall not wholly fail in my task if anything that passes through this night can still grow fairer or bear fruit and flower again in days to come. For I too am a steward. Did you not know? ~ J R R Tolkien,
667:You renounce your friendship even in the hour of our need ' he said. 'Yet you were glad indeed to receive our aid when you came at last to these shores fainthearted loiterers and well-nigh emptyhanded. In huts on the beaches would you be dwelling still had not the Noldor carved out your haven and toiled upon your walls. ~ J R R Tolkien,
668:Goodbye, master, my dear! Forgive your Sam. He'll come back to this spot when the job's done - if he manages it. And then he'll not leave you again. Rest you quiet till I come; and may no foul creature come anigh you! And if the Lady could hear me and give me one wish, I would wish to come back and find you again. Good bye! ~ J R R Tolkien,
669:All your words are but to say: you are a woman, and your part is in the house. But when the men have died in battle and honour, you have leave to be burned in the house, for the men will need it no more. But I am of the House of Erol and not a serving-woman. I can ride and wield blade, and I do not fear either pain or death. ~ J R R Tolkien,
670:If you took this thing on yourself, unwilling, at others' asking, then you have pity and honour from me. And I marvel at you: to keep it hid and not to use it. You are a new people and a new world to me. Are all your kin of like sort? Your land must be a realm of peace and content, and there must gardners be in high hounour. ~ J R R Tolkien,
671:All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
A light from the shadows shall spring;
Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
The crownless again shall be king. ~ J R R Tolkien,
672:I am not a 'democrat' only because 'humility' and equality are spiritual principles corrupted by the attempt to mechanize and formalize them, with the result that we get not universal smallness and humility, but universal greatness and pride, till some Orc gets hold of a ring of power--and then we get and are getting slavery. ~ J R R Tolkien,
673:But to Sam the evening deepened to darkness as he stood at the Haven; and as he looked at the grey sea he saw only a shadow in the waters that was soon lost in the West. There he stood far into the night, hearing only the sigh and murmur of the waves on the shores of Middle-Earth, and the sound of them sank deep into his heart. ~ J R R Tolkien,
674:The Bagginses had lived in the neighbourhood of The Hill for time out of mind, and people considered them very respectable, not only because most of them were rich, but also because they never had any adventures or did anything unexpected: you could tell what a Baggins would say on any question without the bother of asking him. ~ J R R Tolkien,
675:But do you remember Gandalf’s words: Even Gollum may have something yet to do? But for him, Sam, I could not have destroyed the Ring. The Quest would have been in vain, even at the bitter end. So let us forgive him! For the Quest is achieved, and now all is over. I am glad you are here with me. Here at the end of all things, Sam ~ J R R Tolkien,
676:The Resurrection was the greatest ‘eucatastrophe’ possible in the greatest Fairy Story — and produces that essential emotion: Christian joy which produces tears because it is qualitatively so like sorrow, because it comes from those places where Joy and Sorrow are at one, reconciled, as selfishness and altruism are lost in Love. ~ J R R Tolkien,
677:The road must be trod, but it will be very hard. And neither strength nor wisdom will carry us far upon it. This quest may be attempted by the weak with as much hope as the strong. Yet it is oft the course of deeds that move the wheels of the world: Small hands do them because they must, while the eyes of the great are elsewhere. ~ J R R Tolkien,
678:But Sam turned to Bywater, and so came back up the Hill, as day was ending once more. And he went on, and there was yellow light, and fire within; and the evening meal was ready, and he was expected. And Rose drew him in, and set him in his chair, and put little Elanor upon his lap. He drew a deep breath. ‘Well, I’m back,’ he said ~ J R R Tolkien,
679:Somehow the killing of the giant spider, all alone by himself in the dark without the help of the wizard or the dwarves or of anyone else, made a great difference to Mr. Baggins. He felt a different person, and much fiercer and bolder in spite of an empty stomach, as he wiped his sword on the grass and put it back into its sheath. ~ J R R Tolkien,
680:He used often to say there was only one Road; that it was like a great river: its springs were at every doorstep, and every path was its tributary. 'It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door,' he used to say. 'You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to. ~ J R R Tolkien,
681:What a pity that Bilbo did not stab that vile creature, when he had a chance!' Pity? It was Pity that stayed his hand. Pity, and Mercy: not to strike without need. And he has been well rewarded, Frodo. Be sure that he took so little hurt from the evil, and escaped in the end, because he began his ownership of the Ring so. With Pity. ~ J R R Tolkien,
682:Now when Túrin learnt from Finduilas of what had passed, he was wrathful, and he said to Gwindor: 'In love I hold you for your rescue and sake-keeping. But now you have done ill to me, friend, to betray my right name, and call my doom upon me, from which I would lie hid.' But Gwindor answered: 'The doom lies in yourself, not in your name. ~ J R R Tolkien,
683:We are truth-speakers, we men of Gondor. We boast seldom, and then perform, or die in the attempt. "Not if I found it on the highway would I take it," I said. Even if I were such a man as to desire this thing, and even though I knew not clearly what this thing was when I spoke, still I should take those words as a vow, and be held by them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
684:For the rest, they shall represent the other Free Peoples of the World: Elves, Dwarves, and Men, Legolas shall be for the Elves; and Gimli son of Gloin for the Dwarves. They are willing to go at least to the passes of the Mountains, and maybe beyond. For Men you shall have Aragorn son of Arathorn, for the Ring of Isildur concerns him closely. ~ J R R Tolkien,
685:We are being at once wisely aware of our own frivolity if we avoid hitting and whacking and prefer 'striking' and 'smiting'; talk and chat and prefer 'speech' and 'discourse'; well-bred, brilliant, or polite noblemen (visions of snobbery columns in the Press, and fat men on the Riviera) and prefer the 'worthy, brave and courteous men' of long ago. ~ J R R Tolkien,
686:I must indeed abide the Doom of Men whether I will or nill: the loss and the silence. But I say to you, King of the Numenoreans, not till now have I understood the tale of your people and their fall. As wicked fools I scorned them, but I pity them at last. For if this is indeed, as the Elves say, the gift of the One to Men, it is bitter to receive. ~ J R R Tolkien,
687:I go now to the halls of waiting to sit beside my fathers, until the world is renewed. Since I leave now all gold and silver, and go where it is of little worth, I wish to part in friendship from you, and I would take back my words and deeds at the Gate. . . If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
688:Justice is not Healing. Healing cometh only by suffering and patience, and maketh no demand, not even for Justice. Justice worketh only within the bonds of things as they are... and therefore though Justice is itself good and desireth no further evil, it can but perpetuate the evil that was, and doth not prevent it from the bearing of fruit in sorrow. ~ J R R Tolkien,
689:Pippin glanced in some wonder at the face now close beside his own, for the sound of that laugh had been gay and merry. Yet in the wizard's face he saw at first only lines of care and sorrow; though as he looked more intently he perceived that under all there was a great joy: a fountain of mirth enough to set a kingdom laughing, were it to gush forth. ~ J R R Tolkien,
690:The dwarves of course are quite obviously, couldn't you say that in many ways they remind you of the Jews? Their words are Semitic obviously, constructed to be Semitic. Hobbits are just rustic English people, made small in size because it reflects (in general) the small reach of their imagination - not the small reach of their courage or latent power. ~ J R R Tolkien,
691:It's like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger, they were. And sometimes you didn't want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened? But in the end, it's only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. ~ J R R Tolkien,
692:We have sworn, and not lightly. This oath we will keep. We are threatened with many evils, and treason not least; but one thing is not said: that we shall suffer from cowardice, from cravens or the fear of cravens. Therefore I say that we will go on, and this doom I add: the deeds that we shall do shall be the matter of song until the last days of Arda. ~ J R R Tolkien,
693:The eyes were hollow and the carven head was broken, but about the high, stern forehead there was a coronal of silver and gold. A trailing plant with flowers like white stars had bound itself across the brows as if in reverence for the fallen king, and in the crevices of his stony hair yellow stonecrop gleamed. "They cannot conquer for ever!" said Frodo. ~ J R R Tolkien,
694:A sudden understanding, a pity mixed with horror, welled up in Bilbo's heart: a glimpse of endless unmarked days without light or hope of betterment, hard stone, cold fish, sneaking and whispering. All these thoughts passed in a flash of a second. He trembled. And then quite suddenly in another flash, as if lifted by a new strength and resolve, he leaped. ~ J R R Tolkien,
695:Still, I wonder if we shall ever be put into songs or tales. We're in one, of course; but I mean: put into words, you know, told by the fireside, or read out loud of a great big book with red and black letters, years and years afterwards. And people will say: 'Let's hear about Frodo and the Ring' and they'll say 'Oh yes, that's one of my favorite stories. ~ J R R Tolkien,
696:Surely you don’t disbelieve the prophecies, because you had a hand in bringing them about yourself? You don’t really suppose, do you, that all your adventures and escapes were managed by mere luck, just for your sole benefit? You are a very fine person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you; but you are only quite a little fellow in a wide world after all! ~ J R R Tolkien,
697:Mercy!" cried Gandalf. "If the giving of knowledge is to be the cure of your inquisitiveness, I shall spend all the rest of my days in answering you. What more should you like to know?" "The names of all the stars, and of all living things, and the whole history of Middle-Earth and Over-heave and of the Sundering Seas," laughed Pippin. "Of course! What less? ~ J R R Tolkien,
698:Smaug certainly looked asleep, almost dead and dark, with scarcely a snore more than a whiff of unseen steam, when Bilbo peeped once more from the entrance. He was just about to step out onto the floor when he caught a sudden thin ray of red from under the drooping lid of Smaug's left eye. He was only pretending to sleep! He was watching the tunnel entrance! ~ J R R Tolkien,
699:Burn, burn tree and fern! Shrivel and scorch! A fizzling torch To light the night for our delight, Ya hey! Bake and toast ‘em, fry and roast ‘em! till beards blaze, and eyes glaze; till hair smells and skins crack, fat melts, and bones black in cinders lie beneath the sky! So dwarves shall die, and light the night for our delight, Ya hey! Ya-harri-hey! Ya hoy! ~ J R R Tolkien,
700:The Lord of the Rings is of course a fundamentally religious and Catholic work; unconsciously so at first, but consciously in the revision. That is why I have not put in, or have cut out, practically all references to anything like 'religion', to cults or practices, in the imaginary world. For the religious element is absorbed into the story and the symbolism. ~ J R R Tolkien,
701:At last, Lady Evenstar, fairest in this world, and most beloved, my world is fading. Lo! we have gathered, and we have spent, and now the time of payment draws near." 'Arwen knew well what he intended, and long had foreseen it; nonetheless she was overborne by her grief. "Would you then, lord, before your time leave your people that live by your word?" she said. ~ J R R Tolkien,
702:That is the purpose for which you are called hither. Called, is say, though I have not called you to me, strangers from distant lands. You have come and are here met, in this very nick of time, by chance as it may seem. Yet it is not so. Believe rather that it is so ordered that we, who sit here, and none others, must now find counsel for the peril of the world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
703:It was just as the 1914 War burst on me that I made the discovery that 'legends' depend on the language to which they belong; but a living language depends equally on the 'legends' which it conveys by tradition. ... Volapuk, Esperanto, Ido, Novial, &c &c are dead, far deader than ancient unused languages, because their authors never invented any Esperanto legends. ~ J R R Tolkien,
704:Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men, doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them. In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. ~ J R R Tolkien,
705:The only cure for sagging or fainting faith is Communion. Though always Itself, perfect and complete and inviolate, the Blessed Sacrament does not operate completely and once for all in any of us. Like the act of Faith it must be continuous and grow by exercise. Frequency is of the highest effect. Seven times a week is more nourishing than seven times at intervals. ~ J R R Tolkien,
706:And now at last it comes. You will give me the Ring freely! In place of the Dark Lord you will set up a Queen. And I shall not be dark, but beautiful and terrible as the Morning and the Night! Fair as the Sea and the Sun and the Snow upon the Mountain! Dreadful as the Storm and the Lightning! Stronger than the foundations of the earth. All shall love me and despair! ~ J R R Tolkien,
707:Shadowfax tossed his head and cried aloud, as if a trumpet had summoned him to battle. Then he sprang forward. Fire flew from his feet; night rushed over him. As he fell slowly into sleep, Pippin had a strange feeling: he and Gandalf were still as stone, seated upon the statue of a running horse, while the world rolled away beneath his feet with a great noise of wind. ~ J R R Tolkien,
708:It was an evil doom that set her in his path. For she is a fair maiden, fairest lady of a house of queens. And yet I know not how I should speak of her. When I first looked on her and perceived her unhappiness, it seemed to me that I saw a white flower standing straight and proud, shapely as a lily and yet knew that it was hard, as if wrought by elf-wrights out of steel. ~ J R R Tolkien,
709:The dragon is withered, His bones are now crumbled; His armour is shivered, His splendour is humbled! Though sword shall be rusted, And throne and crown perish With strength that men trusted And wealth that they cherish, Here grass is still growing, And leaves are yet swinging, The white water flowing, And elves are yet singing Come! Tra-la-la-lally! Come back to the valley! ~ J R R Tolkien,
710:They arose in my mind as 'given' things, and as they came, separately, so too the links grew. An absorbing, though continually interrupted labour (especially, even apart from the necessities of life, since the mind would wing to the other pole and spread itself on the linguistics): yet always I had the sense of recording what was already 'there', somewhere: not of 'inventing'. ~ J R R Tolkien,
711:The woman turned and went slowly into the house. As she passed the doors she turned and looked back. Grave and thoughtful was her glance, as she looked on the king with cool pity in here eyes. Very fair was her face, and her long hair was like a river of gold. Slender and tall she was in her white robe girt with silver; but strong she seemed and stern as steel, a daughter of kings. ~ J R R Tolkien,
712:I remember nothing about it except a philological fact. My mother said nothing about the dragon, but pointed out that one could not say 'a green great dragon', but had to say 'a great green dragon'. I wondered why, and still do. The fact that I remember this is possibly significant, as I do not think I ever tried to write a story again for many years, and was taken up with language. ~ J R R Tolkien,
713:Clap! Snap! the black crack! Grip, grab! Pinch, nab! And down down to Goblin-town You go, my lad! Clash, crash! Crush, smash! Hammer and tongs! Knocker and gongs! Pound, pound, far underground! Ho, ho! my lad! Swish, smack! Whip crack! Batter and beat! Yammer and bleat! Work, work! Nor dare to shirk, While Goblins quaff, and Goblins laugh, Round and round far underground Below, my lad! ~ J R R Tolkien,
714:My name is growing all the time, and I’ve lived a very long, long time; so my name is like a story. Real names tell you the story of the things they belong to in my language, in the Old Entish as you might say. It is a lovely language, but it takes a very long time to say anything in it, because we do not say anything in it, unless it is worth taking a long time to say, and to listen to. ~ J R R Tolkien,
715:And still Meriadoc the hobbit stood there blinking through his tears, and no one spoke to him, indeed none seemed to heed him. He brushed away the tears, and stooped to pick up the green shield that Eowyn had given him, and he slung it at his back. Then he looked for his sword that he had let fall; for even as he struck his blow his arm was numbed, and now he could only use his left hand. ~ J R R Tolkien,
716:Thus Aragorn for the first time in the full light of day beheld Éowyn, Lady of Rohan, and thought her fair, fair and cold, like a morning of pale spring that is not yet come to womanhood. And she was now suddenly aware of him: tall heir of kings, wise with many winters, greycloaked, hiding a power that yet she felt. For a moment still as stone she stood, then turning swiftly she was gone. ~ J R R Tolkien,
717:Kings built tombs more splendid than the houses of the living and counted the names of their descent dearer than the names of their sons. Childless lords sat in aged halls musing on heraldry or in high cold towers asking questions of the stars. And so the kingdom of Gondor sank into ruin, the line of kings failed, the white tree withered and the rule of Gondor was given over to lesser men. ~ J R R Tolkien,
718:I knew that danger lay ahead, of course; but I did not expect to meet it in our own Shire. Can't a hobbit walk from the Water to the River in peace?" "But it is not your own Shire," said Gildor. "Others dwelt here before hobbits were; and others will dwell here again when hobbits are no more. The wide world is all about you: you can fence yourselves in, but you cannot for ever fence it out. ~ J R R Tolkien,
719:I should say that, in addition to my tree-love (it was originally called The Tree), it arose from my own pre-occupation with the Lord of the Rings, the knowledge that it would be finished in great detail or not at all, and the fear (near certainty) that it would be 'not at all'. The war had arisen to darken all horizons. But no such analyses are a complete explanation even of a short story. ~ J R R Tolkien,
720:My friend, you had horses, and deed of arms, and the free fields; but she, being born in the body of a maid, had a spirit and courage at least the match of yours. Yet she was doomed to wait upon an old man, whom she loved as a father, and watch him falling into a mean dishonoured dotage; and her part seemed to her more ignoble than that of the staff he leaned on. -Gandalf to Eomer, of Eowyn ~ J R R Tolkien,
721:Of course, it is likely enough, my friends,' he said slowly, 'likely enough that we are going to our doom: the last march of the Ents. But if we stayed home and did nothing, doom would find us anyway, sooner or later. That thought has long been growing in our hearts; and that is why we are marching now. It was not a hasty resolve. Now at least the last march of the Ents may be worth a song. ~ J R R Tolkien,
722:Haldir had gone on and was now climbing to the high flet. As Frodo prepared to follow him, he laid his hand upon the tree beside the ladder: never before had he been so suddenly and so keenly aware of the feel and texture of a tree's skin and of the life within it. He felt a delight in wood and the touch of it, neither as forester nor as carpenter; it was the delight of the living tree itself. ~ J R R Tolkien,
723:Here was one with an air of high nobility such as Aragorn at times revealed, less high perhaps, yet also less incalculable and remote: one of the Kings of Men born into a later time, but touched with the wisdom and sadness of the Eldar Race. He knew now why Beregond spoke his name with love. He was a captain that men would follow, that he would follow, even under the shadow of the black wings. ~ J R R Tolkien,
724:The mind that thought of light, heavy, grey, yellow, still, swift, also conceived of magic that would make heavy things light and able to fly, turn grey lead into yellow gold, and the still rock into a swift water. If it could do the one, it could do the other; it inevitably did both. When we can take green from grass, blue from heaven, and red from blood, we have already an enchanter's power. ~ J R R Tolkien,
725:Aragorn threw back his cloak. The elven-sheath glittered as he grasped it, and the bright blade of Andúril shone like a sudden flame as he swept it out. 'Elendil!' he cried. 'I am Aragorn, son of Arathorn, and am called Elessar, the Elfstone, Dúnadan, the heir of Isildur Elendil's son of Gondor. Here is the Sword that was Broken and is forged again! Will you aid me or thwart me? Choose swiftly! ~ J R R Tolkien,
726:Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men, doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. ~ J R R Tolkien,
727:I have claimed that Escape is one of the main functions of fairy-stories, and since I do not disapprove of them, it is plain that I do not accept the tone of scorn or pity with which 'Escape' is now so often used. Why should a man be scorned if, finding himself in prison, he tries to get out and go home? Or if he cannot do so, he thinks and talks about other topics than jailers and prison-walls? ~ J R R Tolkien,
728:Good Morning!” said Bilbo, and he meant it. The sun was shining, and the grass was very green. But Gandalf looked at him from under long bushy eyebrows that stuck out further than the brim of his shady hat. “What do you mean?” he said. “Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on? ~ J R R Tolkien,
729:There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tower high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach. ~ J R R Tolkien,
730:Gandalf! I thought you were dead! But then I thought I was dead myself. Is everything sad going to come untrue? What's happened to the world?" A great Shadow has departed," said Gandalf, and then he laughed and the sound was like music, or like water in a parched land; and as he listened the thought came to Sam that he had not heard laughter, the pure sound of merriment, for days upon days without count. ~ J R R Tolkien,
731:Gil-galad was an Elven-king. Of him the harpers sadly sing: the last whose realm was fair and free between the Mountains and the Sea. His sword was long, his lance was keen, his shining helm afar was seen; the countless stars of heaven's field were mirrored in his silver shield. But long ago he rode away, and where he dwelleth none can say; for into darkness fell his star in Mordor where the shadows are. ~ J R R Tolkien,
732:But it does not seem that I can trust anyone,' said Frodo. Sam looked at him unhappily. 'It all depends on what you want,' put in Merry. 'You can trust us to stick with you through thick and thin--to the bitter end. And you can trust us to keep any secret of yours--closer than you keep it yourself. But you cannot trust us to let you face trouble alone, and go off without a word. We are your friends, Frodo. ~ J R R Tolkien,
733:I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history – true or feigned– with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse applicability with allegory, but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author. ~ J R R Tolkien,
734:Farewell sweet earth and northern sky, for ever blest, since here did lie and here with lissom limbs did run beneath the Moon, beneath the Sun, Lúthien Tinúviel more fair than Mortal tongue can tell. Though all to ruin fell the world and were dissolved and backward hurled; unmade into the old abyss, yet were its making good, for this - the dusk, the dawn, the earth, the sea - that Lúthien for a time should be. ~ J R R Tolkien,
735:One tiny Hobbit against all the evil the world could muster. A sane being would have given up, but Samwise burned with a magnificent madness, a glowing obsession to surmount every obstacle, to find Frodo, destroy the Ring, and cleanse Middle Earth of its festering malignancy. He knew he would try again. Fail, perhaps. And try once more. A thousand, thousand times if need be, but he would not give up the quest. ~ J R R Tolkien,
736:For Isildur would not surrender it to Elrond and Círdan who stood by. They counselled him to cast it into the fire of Orodruin night at hand... But Isildur refused this counsel, saying: 'This I will have as weregild for my father's death, and my brother's. Was it not I that dealt the Enemy his death-blow?' And the Ring that he held seemed to him exceedingly fair to look on; and he would not suffer it to be destroyed. ~ J R R Tolkien,
737:And the ship went out into the High Sea and passed into the West, until at last on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a far green country under a swift sunrise. ~ J R R Tolkien,
738:She lifted up her hand and from the ring that she wore there issued a great light that illuminated her alone and left all else dark. She stood before Frodo seeming now tall beyond measurement, and beautiful beyond enduring, terrible and worshipful. Then she let her hand fall, and the light faded, and suddenly she laughed again, and lo! she was shrunken: a slender elf-woman, clad in simple white whose gentle voice was soft and sad. ~ J R R Tolkien,
739:I don't know how to say it, but after last night I feel different. I seem to see ahead, in a kind of way. I know we are going to take a very long road, into darkness; but I know I can't turn back. It isn't right to see Elves now, nor dragons, nor mountains, that I want - I don't rightly know what I want: but I have something to do before the end, and it lies ahead, not in the Shire. I must see it through, sir, if you understand me. ~ J R R Tolkien,
740:If your first Christmas tree is a wilting eucalyptus and if you're normally troubled by heat and sand... then, to have just at the age when imagination is opening out, suddenly find yourself in a quiet Warwickshire village, I think it engenders a particular love of what you might call central Midlands English countryside. Based on good water, stones and elm trees and small quiet rivers and so on, and of course, rustic people about. ~ J R R Tolkien,
741:There was a deep silence, only scraped on its surfaces by the faint quiver of empty seed-plumes, and broken grass-blades trembling in small air-movements they could not feel. 'Not a bird!' said Sam mournfully. 'No, no birds,' said Gollum. 'Nice birds!' He licked his teeth. 'No birds here. There are snakeses, wormses, things in the pools. Lots of things, lots of nasty things. No birds,' he ended sadly. Sam looked at him with distaste. ~ J R R Tolkien,
742:A great dread fell on him, as if he was awaiting the pronouncement of some doom that he had long foreseen and vainly hoped might after all never be spoken. An overwhelming longing to rest and remain at peace by Bilbo's side in Rivendell filled all his heart. At last with an effort he spoke, and wondered to hear his own words, as if some other will was using his small voice. "I will take the Ring," he said, "though I do not know the way. ~ J R R Tolkien,
743:Far over the Misty Mountains cold, To dungeons deep and caverns old, We must away, ere break of day, To seek our pale enchanted gold. The dwarves of yore made mighty spells, While hammers fell like ringing bells, In places deep, where dark things sleep, In hollow halls beneath the fells. The pines were roaring on the heights, The wind was moaning in the night, The fire was red, it flaming spread, The trees like torches blazed with light. ~ J R R Tolkien,
744:Is it not a strange fate that we should suffer so much fear and doubt for so small a thing? So small a thing! And I have seen it only for an instant in the house of Elrond! Could I not have a sight of it again?" Frodo looked up. His heart went suddenly cold. He caught the strange gleam in Boromir's eyes, yet his face was still kind and friendly. "It is best that it should lie hidden," he answered. "As you wish. I care not." said Boromir. ~ J R R Tolkien,
745:"We will make such a chase as shall be accounted a marvel among the Three Kindreds: Elves, Dwarves and Men. Forth the Three Hunters!" Like a deer he sprang away. Through the trees he sped. On and on he led them, tireless and swift, now that his mind was at last made up. The woods about the lake they left behind. Long slopes they climbed, dark, hard-edged against the sky already red with sunset. They passed away, grey shadows in a stony land. ~ J R R Tolkien,
746:I am in fact a Hobbit in all but size. I like gardens, trees, and unmechanized farmlands; I smoke a pipe, and like good plain food (unrefrigerated), but detest French cooking; I like, and even dare to wear in these dull days, ornamental waistcoats. I am fond of mushrooms (out of a field); have a very simple sense of humor (which even my appreciative critics find tiresome); I go to bed late and get up late (when possible). I do not travel much. ~ J R R Tolkien,
747:Man, Sub-creator, the refracted light through whom is splintered from a single White to many hues, and endlessly combined in living shapes that move from mind to mind. Though all the crannies of the world we filled with Elves and Goblins, though we dared to build Gods and their houses out of dark and light, and sowed the seed of dragons, 'twas our right (used or misused). The right has not decayed. We make still by the law in which we're made. ~ J R R Tolkien,
748:I should like to save the Shire, if I could - though there have been times when I thought the inhabitants too stupid and dull for words, and have felt that an earthquake or an invasion of dragons might be good for them. But I don't feel like that now. I feel that as long as the Shire lies behind, safe and comfortable, I shall find wandering more bearable: I shall know that somewhere there is a firm foothold, even if my feet cannot stand there again. ~ J R R Tolkien,
749:So, though there was still some store of weapons in the Shire, these were used mostly as trophies, hanging above hearths or on walls, or gathered into the museum at Michel Delving. The Mathom-house it was called; for anything that Hobbits had no immediate use for, but were unwilling to throw away, they called a mathom. Their dwellings were apt to become rather crowded with mathoms, and many of the presents that passed from hand to hand were of that sort. ~ J R R Tolkien,
750:His head was swimming, and he was far from certain even of the direction they had been going in when he had his fall. He guessed as well as he could, and crawled along for a good way, till suddenly his hand met what felt like a tiny ring of cold metal lying on the floor of the tunnel. It was a turning point in his career, but he did not know it. He put the ring in his pocket almost without thinking; certainly it did not seem of any particular use at the moment. ~ J R R Tolkien,
751:What really happens is that the story-maker proves a successful 'sub-creator'. He makes a Secondary World which your mind can enter. Inside it, what he relates is 'true': it accords with the laws of that world. You therefore believe it, while you are, as it were, inside. The moment disbelief arises, the spell is broken; the magic, or rather art, has failed. You are then out in the Primary World again, looking at the little abortive Secondary World from outside. ~ J R R Tolkien,
752:Fare well we call to hearth and hall Though wind may blow and rain may fall We must away ere break of day Over the wood and mountain tall To Rivendell where Elves yet dwell In glades beneath the misty fell Through moor and waste we ride in haste And wither then we cannot tell With foes ahead behind us dread Beneath the sky shall be our bed Until at last our toil be sped Our journey done, our errand sped We must away! We must away! We ride before the break of day! ~ J R R Tolkien,
753:The King beneath the mountains, The King of carven stone, The lord of silver fountains Shall come into his own! His crown shall be upholden, His harp shall be restrung, His halls shall echo golden To songs of yore re-sung. The woods shall wave on mountains. And grass beneath the sun; His wealth shall flow in fountains And the rivers golden run. The streams shall run in gladness, The lakes shall shine and burn, And sorrow fail and sadness At the Mountain-king’s return! ~ J R R Tolkien,
754:There was a solemn article in the local paper seriously advocating systematic exterminating of the entire German nation as the only proper course after military victory: because, if you please, they are rattlesnakes, and don't know the difference between good and evil! (What of the writer?) The Germans have just as much right to declare the Poles and Jews exterminable vermin, subhuman, as we have to select the Germans: in other words, no right, whatever they have done. ~ J R R Tolkien,
755:And when [Bëor] lay dead, of no wound or grief, but stricken by age, the Eldar saw for the first time the swift waning of the life of Men, and the death of weariness which they knew not in themselves; and they grieved greatly for the loss of their friends. But Bëor at the last had relinquished his life willingly and passed in peace; and the Eldar wondered much at the strange fate of Men, for in all their lore there was no account of it, and its end was hidden from them. ~ J R R Tolkien,
756:All the same, I should like it all plain and clear," said he obstinately, putting on his business manner (usually reserved for people who tried to borrow money off him), and doing his best to appear wise and prudent and professional and live up to Gandalf's recommendation. "Also I should like to know about risks, out-of-pocket expenses, time required and remuneration, and so forth"--by which he meant: "What am I going to get out of it ? and am I going to come back alive? ~ J R R Tolkien,
757:I come from under the hill, and under the hills and over the hills my paths led. And through the air. I am he that walks unseen. I am the clue-finder, the web-cutter, the stinging fly. I was chosen for the lucky number. I am he that buries his friends alive and drowns them and draws them alive again from the water. I came from the end of a bag, but no bag went over me. I am the friend of bears and the guest of eagles. I am Ringwinner and Luckwearer; and I am Barrel-rider. ~ J R R Tolkien,
758:Dear me! We Tooks and Brandybucks, we can't live long on the heights.' 'No,' said Merry. 'I can't. Not yet, at any rate. But at least, Pippin, we can now see them, and honour them. It is best to love first what you are fitted to love, I suppose: you must start somewhere and have some roots, and the soil of the Shire is deep. Still there are things deeper and higher; and not a gaffer could tend his garden in what he calls peace but for them, whether he knows about them or not. ~ J R R Tolkien,
759:Under the Mountain dark and tall The King has come unto his hall! His foe is dead, the Worm of Dread, And ever so his foes shall fall. The sword is sharp, the spear is long, The arrow swift, the Gate is strong; The heart is bold that looks on gold; The dwarves no more shall suffer wrong. The dwarves of yore made mighty spells, While hammers fells like ringing bells In places deep, where dark things sleep, In hollow halls beneath the fells. -from The Hobbit (Dwarves Battle Song) ~ J R R Tolkien,
760:Great engines crawled across the field; and in the midst was a huge ram, great as a forest-tree a hundred feet in length, swinging on mighty chains. Long had it been forging in the dark smithies of Mordor, and its hideous head, founded of black steel, was shaped in the likeness of a ravening wolf; on it spells of ruin lay. Grond they named it, in memory of the Hammer of the Underworld of old. Great beasts drew it, orcs surrounded it, and behind walked mountain-trolls to wield it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
761:Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. I have not much hope that Gollum can be cured before he dies, but there is a chance of it. And he is bound up with the fate of the Ring. My heart tells me that he has some part to play yet, for good or ill, before the end; and when that comes, the pity of Bilbo may rule the fate of many - yours not least. ~ J R R Tolkien,
762:One writes such a story [The Lord of the Rings] not out of the leaves of trees still to be observed, nor by means of botany and soil-science; but it grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mold of the mind: out of all that has been seen or thought or read, that has long ago been forgotten, descending into the deeps. No doubt there is much personal selection, as with a gardener: what one throws on one's personal compost-heap; and my mold is evidently made largely of linguistic matter. ~ J R R Tolkien,
763:Roads go ever ever on, Over rock and under tree, By caves where never sun has shone, By streams that never find the sea; Over snow by winter sown, And through the merry flowers of June, Over grass and over stone, And under mountains of the moon. Roads go ever ever on Under cloud and under star, Yet feet that wandering have gone Turn at last to home afar. Eyes that fire and sword have seen And horror in the halls of stone Look at last on meadows green And trees and hills they long have known ~ J R R Tolkien,
764:They hammered on the outer gate and called, but there was at first no answer; and then to their surprise someone blew a horn, and the lights in the windows went out. A voice shouted in the dark: 'Who's that? Be off! You can't come in. Can't you read the notice: No admittance between sundown and sunrise?' 'Of course we can't read the notice in the dark,' Sam shouted back. 'And if hobbits of the Shire are to be kept out in the wet on a night like this, I'll tear down your notice when I find it. ~ J R R Tolkien,
765:The Sword of Elendil was forged anew by Elvish smiths, and on its blade was traced a device of seven stars set between the crescent Moon and rayed Sun, and about them was written many runes; for Aragorn son of Arathorn was going to war upon the marches of Mordor. Very bright was that sword when it was made whole again; the light of the sun shone redly in it, and the light of the moon shone cold, its edge was hard and keen. And Aragorn gave it a new name and called it Andúril, Flame of the West. ~ J R R Tolkien,
766:Then the voices of the Ainur, like unto harps and lutes, and pipes and trumpets, and viols and organs, and like unto countless choirs singing with words, began to fashipn the theme of Iluvatar to a great music; and a sound arose of endless interchanging melodies woven in harmony that passed beyond hearing into the depths and into the heights, and the places of the dwelling of Iluvatar were filled to overflowing, and the music and the echo of the music went out into the Void, and it was not void. ~ J R R Tolkien,
767:Journey’s end In western lands beneath the Sun The flowers may rise in Spring, The trees may bud, the waters run, The merry finches sing. Or there maybe 'tis cloudless night, And swaying branches bear The Elven-stars as jewels white Amid their branching hair. Though here at journey's end I lie In darkness buried deep, Beyond all towers strong and high, Beyond all mountains steep, Above all shadows rides the Sun And Stars for ever dwell: I will not say the Day is done, Nor bid the Stars farewell.J. ~ J R R Tolkien,
768:Nay! Alas for us all! And for all that walk in the world in these after-days. For such is the way of it: to find and lose, as it seems to those whose boat is on the running stream. But I count you blessed [...] for your loss you suffer of your own free will, and you might have chosen otherwise. But you have not forsaken your companions, and the least reward that you shall have is that the memory of Lothlórien shall remain ever clear and unstained in your heart, and shall neither fade nor grow stale. ~ J R R Tolkien,
769:Where now are the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing? Where is the helm and the hauberk, and the bright hair flowing? Where is the harp on the harpstring, and the red fire glowing? Where is the spring and the harvest and the tall corn growing? They have passed like rain on the mountain, like a wind in the meadow; The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow. Who shall gather the smoke of the deadwood burning, Or behold the flowing years from the Sea returning? ~ J R R Tolkien,
770:I have in this War a burning private grudge — which would probably make me a better soldier at 49 than I was at 22: against that ruddy little ignoramus Adolf Hitler (for the odd thing about demonic inspiration and impetus is that it in no way enhances the purely intellectual stature: it chiefly affects the mere will). Ruining, perverting, misapplying, and making for ever accursed, that noble northern spirit, a supreme contribution to Europe, which I have ever loved, and tried to present in its true light. ~ J R R Tolkien,
771:Human stories are practically always about one thing, really, aren't they? Death. The inevitability of death. . . . . . (quoting an obituary) 'There is no such thing as a natural death. Nothing that ever happens to man is natural, since his presence calls the whole world into question. All men must die, but for every man his death is an accident, and even if he knows it he would sense to it an unjustifiable violation.' Well, you may agree with the words or not, but those are the key spring of The Lord Of The Rings ~ J R R Tolkien,
772:And Gandalf said: "This is your realm, and the heart of the greater realm that shall be. The Third Age of the world is ended, and the new age is begun; and it is your task to order its beginning and to preserve what must be preserved. For though much has been saved, much must now pass away; and the power of the Three Rings also is ended. And all the lands that you see, and those that lie round about them, shall be dwellings of Men. For the time comes of the Dominion of Men, and the Elder Kindred shall fade or depart. ~ J R R Tolkien,
773:We have come from God, and inevitably the myths woven by us, though they contain error, will also reflect a splintered fragment of the true light, the eternal truth that is with God. Indeed only by myth-making, only by becoming 'sub-creator' and inventing stories, can Man aspire to the state of perfection that he knew before the Fall. Our myths may be misguided, but they steer however shakily towards the true harbour, while materialistic 'progress' leads only to a yawning abyss and the Iron Crown of the power of evil. ~ J R R Tolkien,
774:Then, Éowyn of Rohan, I say to you that you are beautiful. In the valleys of our hills there are flowers fair and bright, and maidens fairer still; but neither flower nor lady have I seen till now in Gondor so lovely, and so sorrowful. It may be that only a few days are left ere darkness falls upon our world, and when it comes I hope to face it steadily; but it would ease my heart, if while the Sun yet shines, I could see you still. For you and I have both passed under the wings of the Shadow, and the same hand drew us back. ~ J R R Tolkien,
775:On two chairs beneath the bole of the tree and canopied by a living bough there sat, side by side, Celeborn and Galadriel... Very tall they were, and the Lady no less tall than the Lord; and they were grave and beautiful. They were clad wholly in white; and the hair of the Lady was of deep gold, and the hair of the Lord Celeborn was of silver long and bright; but no sign of age was upon them, unless it were in the depths of their eyes; for these were keen as lances in the starlight, and yet profound, the wells of deep memory. ~ J R R Tolkien,
776:Yet at the last Beren was slain by the Wolf that came from the gates of Angband, and he died in the arms of Tinúviel. But she chose mortality, and to die from the world, so that she might follow him; and it is sung that they met again beyond the Sundering Seas, and after a brief time walking alive once more in the green woods, together they passed, long ago, beyond the confines of this world. So it is that Lúthien Tinúviel alone of the Elf-kindred has died indeed and left the world, and they have lost her whom they most loved. ~ J R R Tolkien,
777:Gandalf: Confound it all, Samwise Gamgee. Have you been eavesdropping? Sam: I ain't been droppin' no eaves sir, honest. I was just cutting the grass under the window there, if you'll follow me. Gandalf: A little late for trimming the verge, don't you think? Sam: I heard raised voices. Gandalf: What did you hear? Speak. Sam: N-nothing important. That is, I heard a good deal about a ring, and a Dark Lord, and something about the end of the world, but... Please, Mr. Gandalf, sir, don't hurt me. Don't turn me into anything... unnatural. ~ J R R Tolkien,
778:If you have ever seen a dragon in a pinch, you will realize that this was only poetical exaggeration applied to any hobbit, even to Old Took's great-granduncle Bullroarer, who was so huge (for a hobbit) that he could ride a horse. He charged the ranks of the goblins of Mount Gram in the Battle of the Green Fields, and knocked their king Golfibul's head clean off with a wooden club. It sailed a hundred yards through the air and went down a rabbit-hole, and in this way the battle was won and the game of Golf was invented at the same moment. ~ J R R Tolkien,
779:But Sauron was not of mortal flesh, and though he was robbed now of that shape in which had wrought so great an evil, so that he could never again appear fair to the eyes of Men, yet his spirit arose out of the deep and passed as a shadow and a black wind over the sea, and came back to Middle-earth and to Mordor that was his home. There he took up again his great Ring in Barad-dur, and dwelt there, dark and silent, until he wrought himself a new guise, an image of malice and hatred made visible; and the Eye of Sauron the Terrible few could endure. ~ J R R Tolkien,
780:Are you in pain, Frodo?' said Gandalf quietly as he rode by Frodo's side. 'Well, yes I am,' said Frodo. 'It is my shoulder. The wound aches, and the memory of darkness is heavy on me. It was a year ago today.' 'Alas! there are some wounds that cannot be wholly cured,' said Gandalf. 'I fear it may be so with mine,' said Frodo. 'There is no real going back. Though I may come to the Shire, it will not seem the same; for I shall not be the same. I am wounded with knife, sting, and tooth, and a long burden. Where shall I find rest?' Gandalf did not answer. ~ J R R Tolkien,
781:I had a mind to make a body of more or less connected legend, ranging from the large and cosmogonic, to the level of romantic fairy-story - the larger founded on the lesser in contact with the earth, the lesser drawing splendour from the vast backcloths - which I could dedicate simply to: to England; to my country. ... I would draw some of the great tales in fullness, and leave many only placed in the scheme, and sketched. The cycles should be linked to a majestic whole, and yet leave scope for other minds and hands, wielding paint and music and drama. ~ J R R Tolkien,
782:For I am Saruman the Wise, Saruman Ring-maker, Saruman of Many Colours!' I looked then and saw that his robes, which had seemed white, were not so, but were woven of all colours, and if he moved they shimmered and changed hue so that the eye was bewildered. I liked white better,' I said. White!' he sneered. 'It serves as a beginning. White cloth may be dyed. The white page can be overwritten; and the white light can be broken.' In which case it is no longer white,' said I. 'And he that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom.' - Gandalf ~ J R R Tolkien,
783:Out of the darkness of my life, so much frustrated, I put before you the one great thing to love on earth: the Blessed Sacrament....There you will find romance, glory, honor, fidelity, and the true way of all your loves upon earth, and more than that: death: by the divine paradox, that which ends life, and demands the surrender of all, and yet by the taste (or foretaste) of which alone can what you seek in your earthly relationships (love, faithfulness, joy) be maintained, or take on that complexion of reality, of eternal endurance, that every man's heart desires ~ J R R Tolkien,
784:So it ends as I guessed it would,' his thoughts said, even as it fluttered away; and it laughed a little within him ere it fled, almost gay it seemed to be casting off all doubt and care and fear. And even as it winged away into forgetfulness it heard voices, and they seemed to be crying in some forgotten world far above: 'The eagles are coming! The eagles are coming!' For one moment more Pippin's thought hovered. "Bilbo! But no! That came in his tale, long long ago. This is my tale, and it ended now. Good-bye!' And his thought fled far away and his eyes saw no more. ~ J R R Tolkien,
785:One felt as if there was an enormous well behind them. Filled up with ages of memory and long, slow, steady thinking; but their surface was sparkling with the present : like sun shimmering on the outer leaves of a vast tree, or on the ripples of a very deep lake. I don’t know, but I t felt as if something that grew in the ground—asleep, you might say, or just feeling itself as something between roof-tip and leaf-tip, between deep earth and sky had suddenly waked up, and was considering you with the same slow care that it had given to its own inside affairs for endless years. ~ J R R Tolkien,
786:To the sea, to the sea! The white gulls are crying, The wind is blowing, and the white foam is flying. West, west away, the round sun is falling, Grey ship, grey ship, do you hear them calling, The voices of my people that have gone before me? I will leave, I will leave the woods that bore me; For our days are ending and our years failing. I will pass the wide waters lonely sailing. Long are the waves on the Last Shore falling, Sweet are the voices in the Lost Isle calling, In Eressea, in Elvenhome that no man can discover, Where the leaves fall not: land of my people forever! ~ J R R Tolkien,
787:If thou hadst thy will what wouldst thou reserve?" said Manwe. "Of all thy realm what dost thou hold dearest?" All have their worth," said Yavanna, "and each contributes to the worth of the others. But the kelvar can flee or defend themselves, whereas the olvar that grow cannot. And among these I hold trees dear. Long in the growing, swift shall they be in the felling, and unless they pay toll with fruit upon their bough little mourned in their passing. So I see in my thought, would that the trees might speak on behalf of all things that have roots, and punish those that wrong them! ~ J R R Tolkien,
788:And so it was settled. Sam Gamgee married Rose Cotton in the spring of 1420 (which was also famous for its weddings), and they came and lived at Bag End. And if Sam thought himself lucky, Frodo knew that he was more lucky himself; for there was not a hobbit in the Shire that was looked after with such care. When the labours or repair had all been planned and set going he took to a quiet life, writing a good deal and going through all his notes. He resigned the office of Deputy Mayor at the Free Fair that Midsummer, and dear old Will Whitfoot had another seven years of presiding at Banquets. ~ J R R Tolkien,
789:And you, Ringbearer' she said, turning to Frodo. 'I come to you last who are not last in my thoughts. For you I have prepared this.' She held up a small crystal phial: it glittered as she moved it and rays of white light sprang from her hand. 'In this phial,' she said,' is caught the light of Earendil's star, set amid the waters of my fountain. It will shine still brighter when night is about you. May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out. Frodo took the phial, and for a moment as it shone between them, he saw her again standing like a queen, great and beautiful. ~ J R R Tolkien,
790:The news today about 'Atomic bombs' is so horrifying one is stunned. The utter folly of these lunatic physicists to consent to do such work for war-purposes: calmly plotting the destruction of the world! Such explosives in men's hands, while their moral and intellectual status is declining, is about as useful as giving out firearms to all inmates of a gaol and then saying that you hope 'this will ensure peace'. But one good thing may arise out of it, I suppose, if the write-ups are not overheated: Japan ought to cave in. Well we're in God's hands. But He does not look kindly on Babel-builders. ~ J R R Tolkien,
791:I sit beside the fire and think
Of all that I have seen
Of meadow flowers and butterflies
In summers that have been

Of yellow leaves and gossamer
In autumns that there were
With morning mist and silver sun
And wind upon my hair

I sit beside the fire and think
Of how the world will be
When winter comes without a spring
That I shall ever see

For still there are so many things
That I have never seen
In every wood in every spring
There is a different green

I sit beside the fire and think
Of people long ago
And people that will see a world
That I shall never know

But all the while I sit and think
Of times there were before
I listen for returning feet
And voices at the door ~ J R R Tolkien,
792:Sometimes it's beautiful and we fall in love with all that story. Even after a thousand pages we don't want to leave the world the writer has made for us, or the make-believe people who live there. You wouldn't leave after two thousand pages, if there were two thousand. The Rings trilogy of J.R.R.Tolkien is a perfect example of this. A thousand pages of hobbits hasn't been enough for three generations of post-World War II fantasy fans; even when you add in that clumsy, galumphing dirigible of an epilogue, The Silmarillion, it hasn't been enough. Hence Terry Brooks, Piers Anthony, Robert Jordan, the questing rabbits of Watership Down, and half a hundred others. The writers of these books are creating the hobbits they still love and pine for; they are trying to bring Frodo and Sam back from the Grey Havens because Tolkien is no longer around to do it for them. ~ Stephen King,

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IN WEBGEN [10000/46]

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