classes ::: elements in the yoga,
children :::
branches ::: Offering, Self-Offering

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object:Offering
class:elements in the yoga

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [1] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
experiments
experiments
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Guru_Bhakti_Yoga
Heart_of_Matter
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_II
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Questions_And_Answers_1929-1931
Questions_And_Answers_1950-1951
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Savitri
The_Bible
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Lotus_Sutra
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
0_1960-07-23_-_The_Flood_and_the_race_-_turning_back_to_guide_and_save_amongst_the_torrents_-_sadhana_vs_tamas_and_destruction_-_power_of_giving_and_offering_-_Japa,_7_lakhs,_140000_per_day,_1_crore_takes_20_years
07.26_-_Offering_and_Surrender
1.01_-_The_Offering
1.2.09_-_Consecration_and_Offering
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1956-03-14_-_Dynamic_meditation_-_Do_all_as_an_offering_to_the_Divine_-_Significance_of_23.4.56._-_If_twelve_men_of_goodwill_call_the_Divine
1.whitman_-_Offerings
2.02_-_Surrender,_Self-Offering_and_Consecration

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0_1959-01-27
0_1959-10-06_-_Sri_Aurobindos_abode
0_1960-06-04
0_1960-07-23_-_The_Flood_and_the_race_-_turning_back_to_guide_and_save_amongst_the_torrents_-_sadhana_vs_tamas_and_destruction_-_power_of_giving_and_offering_-_Japa,_7_lakhs,_140000_per_day,_1_crore_takes_20_years
0_1960-11-12
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-06-02
0_1961-06-20
0_1961-06-24
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-21
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-11-14
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-03-30
0_1963-10-16
0_1963-11-20
0_1963-12-21
0_1964-03-28
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-10-24a
0_1965-02-27
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-08-07
0_1965-09-15b
0_1966-01-31
0_1966-06-02
0_1966-06-08
0_1966-12-20
0_1967-01-11
0_1967-04-15
0_1967-05-03
0_1967-05-06
0_1967-09-16
0_1967-09-30
0_1967-12-16
0_1968-02-14
0_1968-03-02
0_1968-08-10
0_1968-12-11
0_1969-04-26
0_1969-10-01
0_1970-02-21
0_1970-04-11
0_1970-04-18
0_1970-05-23
0_1971-04-28
0_1971-07-03
0_1972-01-15
0_1972-02-26
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-08-30
0_1972-10-07
0_1972-11-08
0_1973-03-10
02.01_-_A_Vedic_Story
02.01_-_The_World-Stair
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.10_-_Independence_and_its_Sanction
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.10_-_Two_Mystic_Poems_in_Modern_Bengali
02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.06_-_Here_or_Otherwhere
05.11_-_The_Soul_of_a_Nation
06.30_-_Sweet_Holy_Tears
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.25_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
07.26_-_Offering_and_Surrender
07.27_-_Equality_of_the_Body,_Equality_of_the_Soul
07.30_-_Sincerity_is_Victory
08.27_-_Value_of_Religious_Exercises
08.33_-_Opening_to_the_Divine
08.35_-_Love_Divine
09.01_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
09.04_-_The_Divine_Grace
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
1.002_-_The_Heifer
1.003_-_Family_of_Imran
1.005_-_The_Table
1.006_-_Livestock
1.00b_-_Introduction
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
10.13_-_Go_Through
1.01f_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_Isha_Upanishad
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_ON_THE_THREE_METAMORPHOSES
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Offering
1.022_-_The_Pilgrimage
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
10.24_-_Savitri
10.29_-_Gods_Debt
1.02_-_Karmayoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.048_-_Victory
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Narayana_appearance,_in_the_beginning_of_the_Kalpa,_as_the_Varaha_(boar)
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.05_-_Bhakti_Yoga
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_The_Belly_of_the_Whale
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_The_True_Doer_of_Works
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.060_-_The_Woman_Tested
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_Hymns_of_Parashara
1.06_-_Iconography
1.06_-_Magicians_as_Kings
1.06_-_Origin_of_the_four_castes
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.077_-_The_Unleashed
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_Hymn_of_Paruchchhepa
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.08_-_Adhyatma_Yoga
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_Departmental_Kings_of_Nature
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_Equality_and_the_Annihilation_of_Ego
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
11.06_-_The_Mounting_Fire
1.10_-_The_Image_of_the_Oceans_and_the_Rivers
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_The_Three_Purushas
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_On_lying.
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.14_-_Descendants_of_Prithu
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_Prayers
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.16_-_Dianus_and_Diana
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_The_Burden_of_Royalty
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_Dialogue_between_Prahlada_and_his_father
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Victory_of_the_Fathers
1.201_-_Socrates
12.01_-_This_Great_Earth_Our_Mother
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.2.09_-_Consecration_and_Offering
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_On_bodily_vigil_and_how_to_use_it_to_attain_spiritual_vigil_and_how_to_practise_it.
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.2.10_-_Opening
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Matter
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_Sacrifice_of_the_Kings_Son
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
1.3.02_-_Equality__The_Chief_Support
1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.32_-_Expounds_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Fiat_voluntas_tua_sicut_in_coelo_et_in_terra._Describes_how_much_is_accomplished_by_those_who_repeat_these_words_with_full_resolution_and_how_well
1.32_-_The_Ritual_of_Adonis
1.33_-_The_Gardens_of_Adonis
1.33_-_Treats_of_our_great_need_that_the_Lord_should_give_us_what_we_ask_in_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Panem_nostrum_quotidianum_da_nobis_hodie.
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.3_-_Mundaka_Upanishads
1.439
1.43_-_Dionysus
1.44_-_Demeter_and_Persephone
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.52_-_Family_-_Public_Enemy_No._1
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.55_-_The_Transference_of_Evil
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
17.01_-_Hymn_to_Dawn
17.03_-_Agni_and_the_Gods
17.04_-_Hymn_to_the_Purusha
17.05_-_Hymn_to_Hiranyagarbha
17.06_-_Hymn_of_the_Supreme_Goddess
17.08_-_Last_Hymn
17.09_-_Victory_to_the_World_Master
18.03_-_Tagore
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
19.08_-_Thousands
1913_10_07p
1914_06_09p
1914_06_28p
1914_08_04p
1914_08_05p
1914_08_06p
1914_08_08p
1914_08_13p
1914_08_18p
1914_08_20p
1914_08_24p
1914_10_10p
1914_10_25p
1914_11_09p
1915_11_02p
1917_04_01p
1917_04_07p
1918_07_12p
1919_09_03p
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-14_-_Plasticity_-_Conditions_for_knowing_the_Divine_Will_-_Illness_-_microbes_-_Fear_-_body-reflexes_-_The_best_possible_happens_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_True_knowledge_-_a_work_to_do_-_the_Ashram
1951-04-14_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Idea_of_sacrifice_-_Bahaism_-_martyrdom_-_Sleep-_forgetfulness,_exteriorisation,_etc_-_Dreams_and_visions-_explanations_-_Exteriorisation-_incidents_about_cats
1951-04-19_-_Demands_and_needs_-_human_nature_-_Abolishing_the_ego_-_Food-_tamas,_consecration_-_Changing_the_nature-_the_vital_and_the_mind_-_The_yoga_of_the_body__-_cellular_consciousness
1951-04-28_-_Personal_effort_-_tamas,_laziness_-_Static_and_dynamic_power_-_Stupidity_-_psychic_and_intelligence_-_Philosophies-_different_languages_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_Surrender_of_ones_being_and_ones_work
1953-03-25
1953-05-13
1953-05-20
1953-07-08
1953-12-30
1954-05-26_-_Symbolic_dreams_-_Psychic_sorrow_-_Dreams,_one_is_rarely_conscious
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-07_-_The_inner_warrior_-_Grace_and_the_Falsehood_-_Opening_from_below_-_Surrender_and_inertia_-_Exclusive_receptivity_-_Grace_and_receptivity
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-07-28_-_Money_-_Ego_and_individuality_-_The_shadow
1955-12-07_-_Emotional_impulse_of_self-giving_-_A_young_dancer_in_France_-_The_heart_has_wings,_not_the_head_-_Only_joy_can_conquer_the_Adversary
1956-01-04_-_Integral_idea_of_the_Divine_-_All_things_attracted_by_the_Divine_-_Bad_things_not_in_place_-_Integral_yoga_-_Moving_idea-force,_ideas_-_Consequences_of_manifestation_-_Work_of_Spirit_via_Nature_-_Change_consciousness,_change_world
1956-03-07_-_Sacrifice,_Animals,_hostile_forces,_receive_in_proportion_to_consciousness_-_To_be_luminously_open_-_Integral_transformation_-_Pain_of_rejection,_delight_of_progress_-_Spirit_behind_intention_-_Spirit,_matter,_over-simplified
1956-03-14_-_Dynamic_meditation_-_Do_all_as_an_offering_to_the_Divine_-_Significance_of_23.4.56._-_If_twelve_men_of_goodwill_call_the_Divine
1956-05-30_-_Forms_as_symbols_of_the_Force_behind_-_Art_as_expression_of_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Supramental_psychological_perfection_-_Division_of_works_-_The_Ashram,_idle_stupidities
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-08_-_How_to_light_the_psychic_fire,_will_for_progress_-_Helping_from_a_distance,_mental_formations_-_Prayer_and_the_divine_-_Grace_Grace_at_work_everywhere
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1957-01-23_-_How_should_we_understand_pure_delight?_-_The_drop_of_honey_-_Action_of_the_Divine_Will_in_the_world
1958-04-23_-_Progress_and_bargaining
1962_01_21
1970_03_02
1970_03_03
1970_03_09
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_On_-_On_-_Poet
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_III
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_XI_The_Story_of_the_Flood
1.bni_-_Raga_Ramkali
1.bs_-_The_moment_I_bowed_down
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Martins_Beach
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mysterious_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1.fs_-_Hero_And_Leander
1.fs_-_Punch_Song_(To_be_sung_in_the_Northern_Countries)
1.fs_-_The_Complaint_Of_Ceres
1.fs_-_The_Conflict
1.fs_-_The_Eleusinian_Festival
1.jh_-_O_My_Lord,_Your_dwelling_places_are_lovely
1.jk_-_Acrostic__-_Georgiana_Augusta_Keats
1.jk_-_Dedication_To_Leigh_Hunt,_Esq.
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Lines_On_Seeing_A_Lock_Of_Miltons_Hair
1.jm_-_Upon_this_earth,_the_land_of_the_Victorious_Ones
1.jr_-_A_World_with_No_Boundaries_(Ghazal_363)
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Otho
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VIII.
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.poe_-_Tamerlane
1.pp_-_Raga_Dhanashri
1.rajh_-_The_Word_Most_Precious
1.rb_-_A_Serenade_At_The_Villa
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rmpsd_-_Of_what_use_is_my_going_to_Kasi_any_more?
1.rmpsd_-_This_time_I_shall_devour_Thee_utterly,_Mother_Kali!
1.rt_-_Chain_Of_Pearls
1.rt_-_Endless_Time
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Flower
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_X_-_Let_Your_Work_Be,_Bride
1.rt_-_Unyielding
1.sig_-_I_look_for_you_early
1.snk_-_You_are_my_true_self,_O_Lord
1.srh_-_The_Royal_Song_of_Saraha_(Dohakosa)
1.stl_-_The_Divine_Dew
1.wby_-_News_For_The_Delphic_Oracle
1.whitman_-_Ages_And_Ages,_Returning_At_Intervals
1.whitman_-_City_Of_Orgies
1.whitman_-_In_Paths_Untrodden
1.whitman_-_Manhattan_Streets_I_Saunterd,_Pondering
1.whitman_-_Offerings
1.whitman_-_So_Long
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XV
1.ww_-_5-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_A_Flower_Garden_At_Coleorton_Hall,_Leicestershire.
1.ww_-_Book_Fourteenth_[conclusion]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Calais-_August_1802
1.ww_-_Lament_Of_Mary_Queen_Of_Scots
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_I-_Dedication-_To_the_Right_Hon.William,_Earl_of_Lonsdalee,_K.G.
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Morning_Of_The_Day_Appointed_For_A_General_Thanksgiving._January_18,_1816
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_To_Sir_George_Howland_Beaumont,_Bart_From_the_South-West_Coast_Or_Cumberland_1811
1.ww_-_Translation_Of_Part_Of_The_First_Book_Of_The_Aeneid
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
20.05_-_Act_III:_The_Return
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_The_Ordinary_Life_and_the_True_Soul
2.01_-_The_Picture
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.02_-_Indra,_Giver_of_Light
2.02_-_Surrender,_Self-Offering_and_Consecration
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_Agni,_the_Illumined_Will
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.07_-_The_Triangle_of_Love
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.1.01_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Sadhana
2.1.02_-_Combining_Work,_Meditation_and_Bhakti
2.10_-_On_Vedic_Interpretation
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.1.4_-_The_Lower_Vital_Being
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_Reality_and_the_Integral_Knowledge
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.02_-_Becoming_Conscious_in_Work
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.05_-_Creative_Activity
2.2.1_-_The_Prusna_Upanishads
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.2.3_-_The_Aitereya_Upanishad
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.02_-_Opening,_Sincerity_and_the_Mother's_Grace
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
25.12_-_AGNI
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.04_-_The_Way_of_Devotion
3.05_-_SAL
3.07_-_The_Ananda_Brahman
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
31.02_-_The_Mother-_Worship_of_the_Bengalis
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.2_-_Levels_of_the_Physical_Being
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.1_-_Food
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
3.3.1_-_Agni,_the_Divine_Will-Force
34.01_-_Hymn_To_Indra
34.09_-_Hymn_to_the_Pillar
3.4.1.06_-_Reading_and_Sadhana
34.10_-_Hymn_To_Earth
3.4.2_-_Guru_Yoga
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.04_-_The_Story_Of_Rishi_Yajnavalkya
37.06_-_Indra_-_Virochana_and_Prajapati
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_The_Principle_of_the_Integral_Yoga
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.10_-_The_Elements_of_Perfection
4.1.1.04_-_Foundations_of_the_Sadhana
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.18_-_THE_ASS_FESTIVAL
4.2.1.06_-_Living_in_the_Psychic
4.2.2.02_-_Conditions_for_the_Psychic_Opening
4.2.4.03_-_The_Psychic_Fire
4.2.4.04_-_The_Psychic_Fire_and_Some_Inner_Visions
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.2_-_Karma
5.1.01.9_-_Book_IX
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.13_-_The_Conquest_of_Knowledge
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_X
Diamond_Sutra_1
DS2
DS3
DS4
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
IS_-_Chapter_1
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_07_20
r1913_07_08
r1914_04_05
r1914_05_21
r1914_07_02
r1914_11_14
r1914_12_18
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
SB_1.1_-_Questions_by_the_Sages
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Book_of_Sand
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Micah
The_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_James
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Ephesians
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Immortal
The_Letter_to_the_Hebrews
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Pythagorean_Sentences_of_Demophilus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

elements_in_the_yoga
SIMILAR TITLES
as an offering
daily minimum offering
Offering
Self-Offering

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Offering ::: A gift to an entity (including ancestor spirits) made to acknowledge, appease, or curry favor. Can be as simple as a rubbing of hands and offering warmth to as elaborate as a full-scale ritual complete with tables and baskets of food and statues.

offering burnt sacrifices on the threshing-floor of

offering ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Offer ::: n. --> The act of an offerer; a proffering.
That which is offered, esp. in divine service; that which is presented as an expiation or atonement for sin, or as a free gift; a sacrifice; an oblation; as, sin offering.



TERMS ANYWHERE

1. Not inclined, willing, or ready; averse, reluctant, loath. 2. Offering resistance; stubborn or obstinate.

2. offerings (S. pujana; T. mchod pa phul ba; C. guangxiu gongyang 廣修供養)

abhaya&

abhidharmapitaka. (P. abhidhammapitaka; T. chos mngon pa'i sde snod; C. lunzang; J. ronzo; K. nonjang 論藏). The third of the three "baskets" (PItAKA) of the Buddhist canon (TRIPItAKA). The abhidharmapitaka derives from attempts in the early Buddhist community to elucidate the definitive significance of the teachings of the Buddha, as compiled in the SuTRAs. Since the Buddha was well known to have adapted his message to fit the predilections and needs of his audience (cf. UPAYAKAUsALYA), there inevitably appeared inconsistencies in his teachings that needed to be resolved. The attempts to ferret out the definitive meaning of the BUDDHADHARMA through scholastic interpretation and exegesis eventually led to a new body of texts that ultimately were granted canonical status in their own right. These are the texts of the abhidharmapitaka. The earliest of these texts, such as the PAli VIBHAnGA and PUGGALAPANNATTI and the SARVASTIVADA SAMGĪTIPARYAYA and DHARMASKANDHA, are structured as commentaries to specific sutras or portions of sutras. These materials typically organized the teachings around elaborate doctrinal taxonomies, which were used as mnemonic devices or catechisms. Later texts move beyond individual sutras to systematize a wide range of doctrinal material, offering ever more complex analytical categorizations and discursive elaborations of the DHARMA. Ultimately, abhidharma texts emerge as a new genre of Buddhist literature in their own right, employing sophisticated philosophical speculation and sometimes even involving polemical attacks on the positions of rival factions within the SAMGHA. ¶ At least seven schools of Indian Buddhism transmitted their own recensions of abhidharma texts, but only two of these canons are extant in their entirety. The PAli abhidhammapitaka of the THERAVADA school, the only recension that survives in an Indian language, includes seven texts (the order of which often differs): (1) DHAMMASAnGAnI ("Enumeration of Dharmas") examines factors of mentality and materiality (NAMARuPA), arranged according to ethical quality; (2) VIBHAnGA ("Analysis") analyzes the aggregates (SKANDHA), conditioned origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPADA), and meditative development, each treatment culminating in a catechistic series of inquiries; (3) DHATUKATHA ("Discourse on Elements") categorizes all dharmas in terms of the skandhas and sense-fields (AYATANA); (4) PUGGALAPANNATTI ("Description of Human Types") analyzes different character types in terms of the three afflictions of greed (LOBHA), hatred (DVEsA), and delusion (MOHA) and various related subcategories; (5) KATHAVATTHU ("Points of Controversy") scrutinizes the views of rival schools of mainstream Buddhism and how they differ from the TheravAda; (6) YAMAKA ("Pairs") provides specific denotations of problematic terms through paired comparisons; (7) PAttHANA ("Conditions") treats extensively the full implications of conditioned origination. ¶ The abhidharmapitaka of the SARVASTIVADA school is extant only in Chinese translation, the definitive versions of which were prepared by XUANZANG's translation team in the seventh century. It also includes seven texts: (1) SAMGĪTIPARYAYA[PADAsASTRA] ("Discourse on Pronouncements") attributed to either MAHAKAUstHILA or sARIPUTRA, a commentary on the SaMgītisutra (see SAnGĪTISUTTA), where sAriputra sets out a series of dharma lists (MATṚKA), ordered from ones to elevens, to organize the Buddha's teachings systematically; (2) DHARMASKANDHA[PADAsASTRA] ("Aggregation of Dharmas"), attributed to sAriputra or MAHAMAUDGALYAYANA, discusses Buddhist soteriological practices, as well as the afflictions that hinder spiritual progress, drawn primarily from the AGAMAs; (3) PRAJNAPTIBHAsYA[PADAsASTRA] ("Treatise on Designations"), attributed to MaudgalyAyana, treats Buddhist cosmology (lokaprajNapti), causes (kArana), and action (KARMAN); (4) DHATUKAYA[PADAsASTRA] ("Collection on the Elements"), attributed to either PuRnA or VASUMITRA, discusses the mental concomitants (the meaning of DHATU in this treatise) and sets out specific sets of mental factors that are present in all moments of consciousness (viz., the ten MAHABHuMIKA) or all defiled states of mind (viz., the ten KLEsAMAHABHuMIKA); (5) VIJNANAKAYA[PADAsASTRA] ("Collection on Consciousness"), attributed to Devasarman, seeks to prove the veracity of the eponymous SarvAstivAda position that dharmas exist in all three time periods (TRIKALA) of past, present, and future, and the falsity of notions of the person (PUDGALA); it also provides the first listing of the four types of conditions (PRATYAYA); (6) PRAKARAnA[PADAsASTRA] ("Exposition"), attributed to VASUMITRA, first introduces the categorization of dharmas according to the more developed SarvAstivAda rubric of RuPA, CITTA, CAITTA, CITTAVIPRAYUKTASAMSKARA, and ASAMSKṚTA dharmas; it also adds a new listing of KUsALAMAHABHuMIKA, or factors always associated with wholesome states of mind; (7) JNANAPRASTHANA ("Foundations of Knowledge"), attributed to KATYAYANĪPUTRA, an exhaustive survey of SarvAstivAda dharma theory and the school's exposition of psychological states, which forms the basis of the massive encyclopedia of SarvAstivAda-VaibhAsika abhidharma, the ABHIDHARMAMAHAVIBHAsA. In the traditional organization of the seven canonical books of the SarvAstivAda abhidharmapitaka, the JNANAPRASTHANA is treated as the "body" (sARĪRA), or central treatise of the canon, with its six "feet" (pAda), or ancillary treatises (pAdasAstra), listed in the following order: (1) PrakaranapAda, (2) VijNAnakAya, (3) Dharmaskandha, (4) PrajNaptibhAsya, (5) DhAtukAya, and (6) SaMgītiparyAya. Abhidharma exegetes later turned their attention to these canonical abhidharma materials and subjected them to the kind of rigorous scholarly analysis previously directed to the sutras. These led to the writing of innovative syntheses and synopses of abhidharma doctrine, in such texts as BUDDHAGHOSA's VISUDDHIMAGGA and ANURUDDHA's ABHIDHAMMATTHASAnGAHA, VASUBANDHU's ABHIDHARMAKOsABHAsYA, and SAMGHABHADRA's *NYAYANUSARA. In East Asia, this third "basket" was eventually expanded to include the burgeoning scholastic literature of the MAHAYANA, transforming it from a strictly abhidharmapitaka into a broader "treatise basket" or *sASTRAPItAKA (C. lunzang).

  A block, pile, table, stand, mound, platform, or other elevated structure on which to place or sacrifice offerings to a deity. 2. With reference to the uses, customs, dedication, or peculiar sanctity of the altar. 3. A place consecrated to devotional observances. altar’s, altars, altar-burnings, mountain-altars.

AggaNNasutta. (C. Xiaoyuan jing; J. Shoengyo; K. Soyon kyong 小經). In PAli, "Discourse on Origins" or "Sermon on Things Primeval"; the twenty-seventh sutta of the DĪGHANIKAYA (a separate DHARMAGUPTAKA recension appears as the fifth SuTRA in the Chinese translation of the DĪRGHAGAMA); the sutra provides a Buddhist account of the origins of the world and of human society. The Buddha preached the sermon at SAvatthi (sRAVASTĪ) to two ordinands, VAsettha and BhAradvAja, to disabuse them of the belief that the priestly brAhmana caste was superior to the Buddha's khattiya (KsATRIYA), or warrior, caste. The Buddha describes the fourfold caste system of traditional Indian society as a by-product of the devolution of sentient beings. In the beginning of the eon (KALPA), beings possess spiritual bodies that are luminous, able to travel through the air, and feed on joy. But out of greed for sensual gratification, they degenerate into physical beings with ever grosser propensities: e.g., the coarser the food they eat (first a cream on the surface of water, then creepers, then eventually rice), the coarser their bodies become, until the beings develop sex organs, begin to have intercourse, and in turn build dwellings in order to conceal their debauchery. As their bodies become ever more physical, their life spans in turn also decrease. Immorality, strife, and violence ensue until people finally realize they need a leader to save them from anarchy. They elect the first human king, named MahAsammata, who was also the first ksatriya. It was out of the ksatriya lineage deriving from this first king that the other three classes-brAhmana, vaisya, and sudra-also evolved. This account challenges the mainstream Indian belief that the brAhmana caste is congenitally superior (descending, it claims, from the mouth of the god BrahmA himself) and posits that the effort of moral and spiritual perfection, not the accident of birth, is the true standard of human superiority. Although the Buddhist tradition presumes that this sermon offers a distinctively Buddhistic account of the origin and development of both the universe and society, many of the topoi adopted in the story derive from Brahmanical cosmogonies, perhaps employed here as a satire of Brahmanical pretensions in Indian society. The scripture has also been treated by modern interpreters as offering an incipient Buddhist "environmentalism," wherein human actions, motivated by greed and lust, cause deleterious effects on the physical world, turning, for example, naturally growing rice into a rice that must be cultivated.

Agni-hotra: A fire offering.

Agnihotra (Sanskrit) Agnihotra [from agni fire + hotra oblation from the verbal root hu to sacrifice] Fire offering; an important Vedic sacrifice to Agni, consisting of milk, oil, and sour gruel, which the head of the family is expected to observe twice a day, before sunrise and after sunset. The priest who kindles the sacred fire is called agnihotri, also agnidhra.

Agnishtoma (Sanskrit) Agniṣṭoma [from agni fire + stoma praise, a hymn from the verbal root stu to praise, eulogize] Praise of Agni, fire; an ancient Vedic ceremony or sacrifice performed by a Brahmin desirous of obtaining svarga (heaven), who himself maintained the sacred fire. The offering to Indra and other deities was the soma. The ceremonies continued for five days, with 16 priests officiating. Although in later times it may have become merely a matter of form, originally the agnishtoma was connected with the initiation rites of the soma Mysteries.

ahiMsA. (T. 'tshe ba med pa; C. buhai; J. fugai; K. purhae 不害). In Sanskrit and PAli, "absence of harmful intentions," "harmlessness," "noninjury," or "nonviolence." The religious ideal and ethical injunction of "harmlessness" toward all living beings was shared in some fashion by several of the Indian sRAMAnA traditions, including the Buddhists as well as the JAINAs, who made it a central tenet of their religion. Some of the corollaries of this idea included the precept against killing, the injunction to refrain from physically and verbally abusing sentient beings, and vegetarianism. The Jainas were especially stringent in their interpretation of "harmlessness" toward all living creatures, demanding strict vegetarianism from their followers in order to avoid injuring sentient creatures, a requirement that the Buddha rejected when his rival in the order, DEVADATTA, proposed it in his list of austerities (see DHUTAnGA). The Buddha's view was that monks were a "field of merit" (PUnYAKsETRA) for the laity and should accept all offerings made to them, including meat, unless the monk knew that the animal had been killed specifically to feed him, for example. The voluntary vegetarianism that is now prevalent in both MahAyAna Buddhism and wider Indian Hindu culture is almost certainly a result of Jaina influence and constitutes that religion's most enduring contribution to Indian religion. Buddhism treated "absence of harmful intentions" as one of the forty-six mental factors (CAITTA) according to the SARVASTIVADA-VAIBHAsIKA school of ABHIDHARMA, one of the fifty-one according to the YOGACARA school, and one of the fifty-two CETASIKAs in the PAli ABHIDHAMMA. It is the opposite of "harmful intention" or "injury" (VIHIMSA, and is sometimes seen written as avihiMsA) and one of the states of mind comprising right intention (S. samyaksaMkalpa; P. sammAsankappa) in the noble eightfold path (ARYAstAnGIKAMARGA). "Absence of harmful intentions" is also traditionally taken to be a precondition for the cultivation of "compassion" (KARUnA). See VIHIMSA.

ah. (sapta hotráh) ::: the seven sacrificial energies or "Ladies of the offering", the powers of "the human sacrifice which has a sevenfold energy of its action because there is a sevenfold principle in our being which has to be fulfilled in its integral perfection".

  A legendary treasure city of South America believed to contain an abundance of gold, sought by the early Spanish Conquistadors. 2. Any place offering great wealth.

All your life must be an offering and a sacrifice to the Supreme ; your only object in action shall be to serve, to receive, to fulfil, to become a manifesting instrument of the Divine Shakti in her wor^. You must grow in the divine consciousness till there is no difference between your will and hers, no motive except her impulsion in you, no action that is not her conscious notion in you and through you.

altar ::: 1. A block, pile, table, stand, mound, platform, or other elevated structure on which to place or sacrifice offerings to a deity. 2. With reference to the uses, customs, dedication, or peculiar sanctity of the altar. 3. A place consecrated to devotional observances. altar"s, altars, altar-burnings, mountain-altars.

altarage ::: n. --> The offerings made upon the altar, or to a church.
The profit which accrues to the priest, by reason of the altar, from the small tithes.


altar ::: Altar Common to most religions, an altar is a table or other raised surface on which offerings are made to deities. Quarters, or Watchtowers are sometimes called Altars, e.g. the Earth Altar is the Altar in the 'Earth Quarter of a Circle'. See A Typical magical Rite.

Altar: Any place set aside for communicating with a god, with supernatural entities, or with the dead, by means of sacrifices or offerings.

Altar [from Latin altare from altus high] Usually an elevation of earth, stone, or wood for the worshiper to kneel on, or for the offering of sacrifices, or as the pedestal of an invisible divinity or its statue. In the Old Testament it appears as part of the furniture of the Jewish tabernacle, that sacred shrine of the Deity. This altar has horns at each end, which is said to symbolize the fecund cow — in common with the ideas of Hindus and ancients Egyptians — which again represents Mother Nature; so the connection with the Holy of Holies, which stands for the great Mother, resurrection, and birth, is apparent. In general the altar is the earthly throne or supposed seat of a deity; and its familiar metaphorical use suggests both this and also the idea of sacrifice. The altar has been taken over by Christendom, where it has become the communion table. It also has the idea of refuge and sanctuary, for it was commonly so used both with the Hebrews and the Classical ancients.

alternative ::: a. --> Offering a choice of two things.
Disjunctive; as, an alternative conjunction.
Alternate; reciprocal. ::: n. --> An offer of two things, one of which may be chosen, but not both; a choice between two things, so that if one is taken, the


alternativeness ::: n. --> The quality of being alternative, or of offering a choice between two.

amṛta. (P. amata; T.'chi med/bdud rtsi; C. ganlu; J. kanro; K. kamno 甘露). In Sanskrit, lit. "deathless" or "immortal"; used in mainstream Buddhist materials to refer to the "end" (NIstHA) of practice and thus liberation (VIMOKsA). The term is also used to refer specifically to the "nectar" or "ambrosia" of the TRAYASTRIMsA heaven, the drink of the divinities (DEVA) that confers immortality. It is also in this sense that amṛta is used as an epithet of NIRVAnA, since this elixir confers specific physical benefit, as seen in the descriptions of the serene countenance and clarity of the enlightened person. Moreover, there is a physical dimension to the experience of nirvAna, for the adept is said to "touch the 'deathless' element with his very body." Because amṛta is sweet, the term is also used as a simile for the teachings of the Buddha, as in the phrase the "sweet rain of dharma" (dharmavarsaM amṛtaM). The term is also used in Buddhism to refer generically to medicaments, viz., the five types of nectar (PANCAMṚTA) refer to the five divine foods that are used for medicinal purposes: milk, ghee, butter, honey, and sugar. AmṛtarAja (Nectar King) is the name of one of the five TATHAGATAs in tantric Buddhism and is identified with AMITABHA. In ANUTTARAYOGATANTRA, there are five types of amṛta and five types of mAMsa ("flesh") that are transformed in a KAPALA ("skull cup") into a special offering substance called nang mchod, the "inner offering," in Tibetan. Giving it to the deities in the MAndALA is a central feature in anuttarayogatantra practice (SADHANA) and ritual (VIDHI). The inner offering of important religious figures in Tibetan is often distilled into a pill (T. bdud rtsi ril bu) that is then given to followers to use. In tantric practices such as the visualization of VAJRASATTVA, the meditator imagines a stream of amṛta descending from the teacher or deity visualized on the top of the head; it descends into the body and purifies afflictions (KLEsA) and the residual impressions (VASANA) left by earlier negative acts.

Ananda. (T. Kun dga' bo; C. Anan[tuo]; J. Anan[da]; K. Anan[da] 阿難[陀]). In Sanskrit and PAli, literally "Bliss," the name of the Buddha's cousin, longtime attendant, and one of his chief disciples. According to tradition, in his previous life, he was a god in the TUsITA heaven, who was born on the same day and into the same sAKYA clan as the BODHISATTVA and future buddha who was born as prince SIDDHARTHA. Ananda was born as the son of Amṛtodana, the brother of king sUDDHODANA. He was thus the Buddha's cousin and the brother of DEVADATTA. When the Buddha returned to his home town of KAPILAVASTU in the second year after his enlightenment, many of the sAkyan men, such as Ananda and Devadatta, wished to renounce the householder life and become the Buddha's disciples as monks. Not long after his ordination, Ananda became a SROTAAPANNA upon hearing a sermon by PuRnA. The Buddha did not have a personal attendant for the first twenty years after his enlightenment, with various monks occasionally offering various services to him. But after two decades of these ad hoc arrangements, the Buddha finally asked for someone to volunteer to be his personal attendant; all the monks volunteered except Ananda, who said that he did not do so because the Buddha would choose the correct person regardless of who volunteered. The Buddha selected Ananda, who accepted on the following conditions: the Buddha was never to give him any special food or robes that he had received as gifts; the Buddha was not to provide him with a special monk's cell; and the Buddha was not to include him in dining invitations he received from the laity. Ananda made these conditions in order to prevent anyone from claiming that he received special treatment because of serving as the Buddha's attendant. In addition, he asked to be allowed to accept invitations on behalf of the Buddha; he asked to be allowed to bring to the Buddha those who came from great distances to see him; he asked to be able to bring any questions he had to the Buddha; and he asked that the Buddha repeat to him any doctrine that had been taught in his absence. Ananda saw these latter conditions as the true advantages of serving the Buddha. For the next twenty-five years, Ananda served the Buddha with great devotion, bringing him water, sweeping his cell, washing his feet, rubbing his body, sewing his robes, and accompanying him wherever he went. He guarded the Buddha's cell at night, carrying a staff and a torch, in order to make sure that his sleep was not disturbed and to be ready should the Buddha need him. As the Buddha grew older and more infirm, Ananda provided devoted care, despite the fact that the two were exactly the same age. Because Ananda was constantly in the Buddha's presence, he played a key role in many famous events of the early dispensation. For example, it was Ananda who, on behalf of MAHAPRAJAPATI, requested that women be allowed to enter the SAMGHA as nuns, persisting in his request despite the Buddha's initial refusal. He is therefore remembered especially fondly by the order of BHIKsUnĪs, and it is said that he often preached to nuns. In a famous tale reproduced in various sources, the daughter of a woman named MAtangī attempted to seduce Ananda with the help of her mother's magical powers, only to come to realize her wrongdoing with the intervention of the Buddha. Toward the end of his life, the Buddha mentioned to Ananda that a buddha could live for a KALPA or until the end of the kalpa if he were asked to do so. (See CAPALACAITYA.) Ananda, distracted by MARA, failed to request the Buddha to do so, despite the Buddha mentioning this three times. Ananda was chastised for this blunder at the first council (see infra). Ananda figures prominently in the account of the Buddha's last days in the MAHAPARINIBBANASUTTA, weeping at the knowledge that the Buddha was about to die and being consoled by him. Ananda was known for his extraordinary powers of memory; he is said to have heard all 84,000 sermon topics (82,000 taught by the Buddha and 2,000 taught by other disciples) and was able to memorize 15,000 stanzas without omitting a syllable. He therefore played a key role in the recitation of the Buddha's teachings at the first council (SAMGĪTI; see COUNCIL, FIRST) held at RAJAGṚHA shortly after the Buddha's death. However, MAHAKAsYAPA, who convened the council, specified that all five hundred monks in attendance must be ARHATs, and Ananda was not. On the night before the opening of the council, Ananda achieved the enlightenment of an arhat as he was lying down to sleep, as his head fell to the pillow and his feet rose from the ground. He is therefore famous for achieving enlightenment in none of the four traditional postures (ĪRYAPATHA): walking, standing, sitting, or lying down. As an arhat, Ananda was welcomed to the council, where he recounted all the words of the Buddha (except those concerning the VINAYA, or monastic rules, which were recited by UPALI). For this reason, most SuTRAs open with the words, "Thus have I heard" (EVAM MAYA sRUTAM); the "I" is usually Ananda. (For this reason, Ananda is also known in China as Duowen Diyi, "First in Vast Hearing" or "He Who Heard the Most.") After the Buddha's death, the order of monks brought five charges against Ananda: (1) the Buddha had said that after his passing, the monks could disregard the minor precepts, but Ananda failed to ask him which those were; thus, all the precepts had to be followed; (2) Ananda had once stepped on the Buddha's robe when sewing it; (3) Ananda had allowed women to honor the Buddha's naked body after his death and their tears had fallen on his feet; (4) Ananda failed to ask the Buddha to live on for the rest of the kalpa; and (5) Ananda urged the Buddha to admit women to the order. Ananda replied that he saw no fault in any of these deeds but agreed to confess them. According to FAXIAN, when Ananda was 120 years old, he set out from MAGADHA to VAIsALĪ in order to die. Seeking his relics (sARĪRA), AJATAsATRU followed him to the Rohīni River, while a group from VaisAlī awaited him on the other bank. Not wishing to disappoint either group, Ananda levitated to the middle of the river in the meditative posture, preached the dharma, and then meditated on the TEJOKASInA, which prompted his body to burst into flames, with the relics dividing into two parts, one landing on each bank of the river. Ananda has long been one of the most beloved figures in the history of Buddhism, in part because he was not the wisest of the Buddha's disciples but showed unstinting devotion to the Buddha, always seeking to understand him correctly and to bring his teachings to as many people as possible.

anchin kokkaho. (安鎭國家法). In Japanese, the "technique for pacifying the state." Japanese TENDAI priests often performed this ritual in the palace at the request of the emperor. Offerings were made to the deity fudo myoo (S. ACALANATHA-VIDYARAJA), who in return would quell the demons who were disturbing the peace of the state. A simplified version of this ritual known as kachin or chintaku is now commonly performed for laity at their homes.

Anthesteria (Greek) [from anthos flower] Flower festival; part of the Dionysion Mysteries celebrated from the 11th to the 13th of the month of Anthesterion (February-March). At Athens on the first day the casks of new wine were opened; on the second day a beaker of new wine was served to each guest at a public banquet and the wife of the Archon Basileus, representing the whole country, was married to Dionysos. These two days were considered of ill-omen, and the souls of the dead were thought to walk abroad. On the third day, offerings of cooked pulse were offered to Hermes as psychopomp and to the souls of the dead.

Anumati (Sanskrit) Anumati [from anu-man to approve, grant] Assent, permission, approbation; personified frequently as a goddess. The fifteenth day of the moon’s age “when one digit is deficient” (VP 2:8), a time said to be propitious for the offering of oblations to devas and pitris.

anumodana. (T. rjes su yi rang; C. suixi; J. zuiki; K. suhŭi 隨喜). In Sanskrit and PAli, "admiration" or "gratification," also written anumodanA; the act of taking delight in the virtuous acts of others, which, in contrast to the unwholesome emotion of envy (ĪRsYA), enables one also to accumulate virtue for oneself. It is considered an effective means of gaining merit (PUnYA) and figures as a standard component in MAHAYANA liturgies, including the three-part MahAyAna liturgy (TRISKANDHAKA) and the sevenfold PuJA (SAPTAnGAVIDHI). AnumodanA is also used in mainstream Buddhism to refer to the "benedictions" (C. zhouyuan) that monks recite after receiving a meal or a gift, which express thanks or "gratification" to the donors for their offerings.

a person whose office it is to perform religious rites, and esp. to make sacrificial offerings. priests, priest-wind"s.

Archana: Offering of flowers and sacred leaves, etc., at the time of Puja or worship, uttering the names of the object of worship.

Argha (Sanskrit) Argha [from the verbal root arh to be worthy of, merit] Worth, value; respectful reception of a guest of distinction by various offerings, such as flowers, durva grass, or water in a small boat-shaped vessel or container; often confused with the Chaldean Argha. See also ARGHYA

Arghya: Offering of water to Devatas and Rishis.

arya ::: an aspiring soul, one who rises to the noble aspiration and who does the great labour as an offering in order to arrive at the good and the bliss. [Ved.] ::: aryah [nominative]

Asokan pillars. Stone pillars erected or embellished during the reign of King AsOKA, many of which bear royal edicts attesting to the king's support of the "dharma" and putatively of Buddhism. Although later Buddhist records mention more than forty such pillars, less than half of these have been identified. At least some pillars predate Asoka's ascendance, but most were erected by the king to commemorate his pilgrimage to sacred Buddhist sites or as Buddhist memorials. One representative example, located at LauriyA Nandangaṛh, stands nearly forty feet tall and extends over ten feet below the ground. The heaviest may weigh up to 75,000 pounds. The pillar edicts form some of the earliest extant written records in the Indian subcontinent and typically avoid mentioning Buddhist philosophy, offering instead general support of dharma, or righteousness, and in some cases of the Buddhist SAMGHA. At one time, the pillars supported stone capitals in the form of animals such as the bull. One Asokan innovation was the use of lion capitals, the most famous being a lotus vase supporting a drum of four wheels and other animals, topped with four lions and a wheel (now missing). The use of lion symbolism may have been a direct reference to the sAKYA clan of the Buddha, which took the lion (siMha) as its emblem.

astamahopaputra. (T. nye ba'i sras chen brgyad; C. ba da pusa; J. hachidai bosatsu; K. p'al tae posal 八大菩薩). In Sanskrit, the "eight great associated sons"; a group of eight bodhisattvas also known as the AstAMAHABODHISATTVA or "eight great bodhisattvas"; they are KsITIGARBHA, AKAsAGARBHA, AVALOKITEsVARA, VAJRAPAnI, MAITREYA, SARVANĪVARAnAVIsKAMBHIN, SAMANTABHADRA, and MANJUsRĪ. Textual evidence for the grouping is found as early as the third century, the date of ZHI QIAN's Chinese translation of the Astabuddhakasutra (Fo shuo ba jixiangshen zhoujing). In earlier representations, they flank either sAKYAMUNI or AMITABHA. Their roles are laid out in the Astamandalakasutra, where the aims of their worship are essentially mundane-absolution from transgressions, fulfillment of desires, and protection from ills. The grouping is known throughout Asia, from northern India, where they first appeared in ELLORA, Ratnagiri, and NALANDA, and from there as far east as Japan and Indonesia-indeed, virtually anywhere MAHAYANA and tantric Buddhism flourished. They figure as a group in TANTRAs of various classes, where their number of arms corresponds to the main deity of the MAndALA and their colors correspond to the direction in which they are placed. In the mandala of the GUHYASAMAJATANTRA, they flank the central figure AKsOBHYA, who appears in the form of Vajradhṛk and his consort SparsavajrA. When each has a consort, the females are called the astapujAdevī ("eight offering goddesses"). There are four in the GuhyasamAjatantra mandala: RupavajrA, sabdavajrA, GandhavajrA, and RasavajrA. In the vajradhAtu mahAmandala, the group of bodhisattvas is expanded to sixteen.

asvamedha (Ashwamedha) ::: the offering of the horse. [Ved.]: the offering of the Life-Power with all its impulses, desires, enjoyments to the divine existence. [Later]: [a great sacrifice performed by an imperial sovereign and sometimes used as a means of empire-building.]

Atharva Veda (Sanskrit) Atharva Veda One of the principal Vedas, commonly known as the fourth; attributed to Atharvan or Atharva. The Rig-Veda states that he was the first to “draw forth fire” and institute its worship, as well as the offering of soma and prayers. Mythologically, Atharvan is represented as a prajapati, Brahma’s eldest son, instructed by his father in brahma-vidya: thus was he inspired to compose the Veda bearing his name. At a later period he is associated with Angiras and called the father of Agni. The Atharva-Veda, considered of later origin than the other three Vedas, comprises about 6000 verses, 760 being hymns, consisting of formulas and spells or incantations for counteracting diseases and calamities. The hymns are of slightly different character from those in the other Vedas: in addition to reverencing the gods, the worshiper himself is exalted and is supposed to receive benefits by reciting the mantras.

Atma-samarpana: Self-consecration; offering the self at the feet of the Lord.

A/UX "operating system" (Apple's UniX) {Apple}'s first version of {Unix} for {Macintosh} computers. A/UX merges the {Macintosh Finder} ({GUI}) with a Unix core, offering functions from both systems. It will run on some late-model {Motorola 68000} Macs, but not on the {Power Mac}. A/UX is based on {AT&T} Unix {System V}.2.2 with numerous extensions from V.3, V.4 and {BSD} 4.2/4.3. It also provides full {POSIX} compliance. A/UX 3.x.x incorporates {System 7} for the Macintosh, thus supporting the vast majority of Macintosh {applications}. System 7 and Unix are fully integrated under A/UX 3.x.x with the Unix file system being seen as a disk drive by the Finder. {jagubox's A/UX Home Page (http://jagubox.gsfc.nasa.gov/aux/Info/FAQ.auxl)}. (1997-12-13)

A/UX ::: (operating system) (Apple's UniX) Apple's first version of Unix for Macintosh computers. A/UX merges the Macintosh Finder (GUI) with a Unix core, offering functions from both systems. It will run on some late-model Motorola 68000 Macs, but not on the Power Macintosh.A/UX is based on AT&T Unix System V.2.2 with numerous extensions from V.3, V.4 and BSD 4.2/4.3. It also provides full POSIX compliance.A/UX 3.x.x incorporates System 7 for the Macintosh, thus supporting the vast majority of Macintosh applications. System 7 and Unix are fully integrated under A/UX 3.x.x with the Unix file system being seen as a disk drive by the Finder. . (1997-12-13)

BAhiya-DArucīriya. (C. Poxijia; J. Bakika; K. Pasaga 婆迦). A lay ARHAT (P. arahant), who is declared by the Buddha to be foremost among those of swift intuition (khippAbhiNNAnaM). According to PAli accounts, BAhiya was a merchant from the town of BAhiya (whence his toponym), who was engaged in maritime trade. He sailed seven times across the seas in search of profit and seven times returned home safely. On an eighth journey, however, he was shipwrecked and floated on a plank until he came ashore near the seaport town of SuppAraka. Having lost his clothes, he dressed himself in tree bark and went regularly to the town to beg for alms with a bowl. Impressed with his demeanor, the people of SuppAraka were exceedingly generous, offering him luxurious gifts and fine clothes, which he consistently refused. Over time, he came to be regarded by the populace as an arhat, and, infatuated with his growing fame, BAhiya also came to believe that he had attained that state of holiness. A BRAHMA god, who had been BAhiya's friend in a previous existence, convinced him out of kindness that he was mistaken and recommended that he seek out the Buddha in sRAVASTĪ (P. SAvatthi). The BrahmA god transported BAhiya to the city of RAJAGṚHA (P. RAjagaha) where the Buddha was then staying and told him to meet the Buddha during his morning alms round. BAhiya approached the Buddha and requested to be taught what was necessary for liberation, but the Buddha refused, saying that alms round was not the time for teaching. BAhiya persisted three times in his request, whereupon the Buddha consented. The Buddha gave him a short lesson in sensory restraint (INDRIYASAMVARA): i.e., "in the seen, there is only the seen; in the heard, only the heard; in what is thought, only the thought," etc. As he listened to the Buddha's terse instruction, BAhiya attained arhatship. As was typical for laypersons who had attained arhatship, BAhiya then requested to be ordained as a monk, but the Buddha refused until BAhiya could be supplied with a bowl and robe. BAhiya immediately went in search of these requisites but along the path encountered an ox, which gored him to death. Disciples who witnessed the event informed the Buddha, who from the beginning had been aware of BAhiya's impending demise. He instructed his disciples to cremate the body and build a reliquary mound (P. thupa, S. STuPA) over the remains; he then explained that BAhiya's destiny was such that he could not be ordained in his final life.

Balder, Baldr (Icelandic) The best, foremost; the sun god in Norse mythology, the son of Odin and Frigga and a favorite with gods and men. His mansion is Breidablick (broadview) whence he can keep watch over all the worlds. One of the lays of the Elder or Poetic Edda deals entirely with the death of the sun god, also mentioned in the principal poem Voluspa. Briefly stated: the gods were concerned when Balder was troubled with dreams of impending doom. Frigga therefore set out to exact a promise from all living things that none would harm Balder, and all readily complied. One thing only had been overlooked: the harmless-seeming mistletoe. Loki, the mischievous god (human mind), became aware of this, plucked the little plant, and from it fashioned a dart. He approached Hoder, the blind god (of darkness and ignorance) who was standing disconsolately by while the other gods were playfully hurling their weapons against the invulnerable sun god. Offering to guide his aim, Loki placed on Hoder’s bow the small but deadly “sorrow-dart.” Thus mind darkened by ignorance accomplished what nothing else could: the death of the bright deity of light. Balder must then travel to the house of Hel, queen of the realm of the dead. Odin, as Hermod, goes to plead with Hel for Balder’s return, and Hel agrees to release him on condition that all living things weep for him. Frigga resumes her weary round and implores all beings to mourn the sun god’s passing. All agree save one: Loki in the guise of an aged crone refuses to shed a tear. This single taint of perverseness in the human mind condemns Balder to remain in the realm of Hel until the following cycle is due to begin. Thus death is linked with the active human mind, Loki. As the bright sun god is placed on his pyre-ship, his loving wife Nanna (the moon goddess) dies of a broken heart and is placed beside him, but before the ship is set ablaze and cast adrift, Odin leaned over to whisper something in the dead sun god’s ear. This secret message must endure unknown to all until Balder’s return, when he and his dark twin Hoder will “build together on Ropt’s (Odin’s) sacred soil.”

bali1 ::: offering, oblation.

Bao'en fengben jing. (J. Hoonbubongyo; K. Poŭn pongbun kyong 報恩奉盆經). In Chinese, "Scripture for Offering Bowls to Requite Kindness." Along with the YULANBEN JING, the Bao'en fengben jing details the practice of the ghost festival (YULANBEN) and its mythology. These scriptures describe the pious efforts of Mulian (the Chinese transcription of the Sanskrit name MAUDGALYAYANA), one of the two main disciples of the Buddha, to save his mother from the tortures of her rebirth as a hungry ghost (PRETA). In this scripture, the Buddha explains to Mulian that if someone should make offerings to the SAMGHA in a bowl, the power of the order's meditative practices will be sufficient to save one's ancestors and loved ones from unfortunate rebirths (see APAYA, DURGATI).

'bar ba spun bdun. (barwa pündün). A group of seven Tibetan dharma protectors (DHARMAPALA), who are the commanders of the BTSAN (tsen) class of native Tibetan deities. They are chief among the native spirits who attempted to prevent the propagation of Buddhism in Tibet and were subdued by PADMASAMBHAVA, who accomplished this feat through meditating on HAYAGRĪVA, a wrathful tantric deity. Their chief is the dharmapAla TSI'U DMAR PO. An important place of worship of the 'bar ba spun bdun is in Dpal ti (Palti) near Yar 'brog mtsho (Lake Yardrok) and Rgyal rtse (Gyantse) in the Gtsang (Tsang) region of central Tibet. Seven temples, or btsan khang, were erected to house them, and travelers would stop and present offerings, from simple red flowers to elaborate red GTOR MA or a bla rdo (life stone). They are also known as dam can mched bdun, drag btsan mched bdun, btsan rgod 'bar ba, and btsan rgod zangs ri spun bdun.

bar bskor. (barkor) In Tibetan, "middle circuit"; the middle of three main ritual circuits in the Tibetan capital of LHA SA, skirting the outer walls of the JO KHANG temple and its surrounding structures. The other two circuits are the "inner circuit" (nang bskor) going around the central statue in the Jo khang, and the "sanctuary circuit" (gling bskor) around what used to be the limits of the city of Lha sa. The bar bskor is a major center for religious activity in the city, drawing devotees from all parts of the Tibetan Buddhist world to walk, prostrate, pray, and perform offerings around the ambulatory. It is also an important social venue and marketplace, where individuals meander through street vendors' stalls and modern Chinese department stores. Since the late 1980s, the bar bskor has become the stage for political protest, merging civil expression with religious and social ritual space.

Baresma(n) (Avestan), Barsum (Pahlavi), Barsam (Persian) [from the verbal root bares to grow upright] A wand of the Magi, who were instructed in the Vendidad to go to the tree “that is beautiful, high-growing, and mighty amongst the high-growing trees,” and after an invocation, to cut off a twig, “long as a plowshare, thick as a barley-corn. The faithful one, holding it in his left hand, shall not leave off keeping his eyes upon it, whilst he is offering up the sacrifice to Ahura-Mazda and to the Amesha-Spentas.” To this day the Parsis use the baresman, but have replaced the twigs of the scared tree with brass wires.

beidou qixing. (J. hokuto shichisho; K. puktu ch'ilsong 北斗七星). In Chinese, "seven stars of the Northern Dipper" (viz., the Big Dipper, or Ursa Major); Daoist divinities that are also prominent in Korean Buddhism, where they are typically known as the ch'ilsong. The cult of the seven stars of the Big Dipper developed within Chinese Buddhist circles through influence from indigenous Daoist schools, who worshipped these seven deities to guard against plague and other misfortunes. The apocryphal Beidou qixing yanming jing ("Book of the Prolongation of Life through Worshipping the Seven Stars of the Northern Dipper"), suggests a correlation between the healing buddha BHAIsAJYAGURU and the Big Dipper cult by addressing the seven-star TATHAGATAs (qixing rulai) with names that are very similar to Bhaisajyaguru's seven emanations. This indigenous Chinese scripture (see APOCRYPHA), which derives from an early Daoist text on Big Dipper worship, is certainly dated no later than the late thirteenth or early fourteenth centuries but may have been composed as early as the middle of the eighth century; it later was translated into Uighur, Mongolian, and Tibetan, as part of the Mongol Yuan dynasty's extension of power throughout the Central Asian region. Thanks to this scripture, the seven-star cult became associated in Buddhism with the prolongation of life. We know that seven-star worship had already been introduced into esoteric Buddhist ritual by at least the eighth century because of two contemporary manuals that discuss HOMA fire offerings to the seven stars: VAJRABODHI's (671-741) Beidou qixing niansong yigui ("Ritual Procedures for Invoking the Seven Stars of the Northern Dipper") and his disciple AMOGHAVAJRA's (705-774) Beidou qixing humo miyao yigui ("Esoteric Ritual Procedure for the Homa Offering to the Seven Stars of the Northern Dipper"). Renderings of DHARAnĪ sutras dedicated to the tathAgata TEJAPRABHA (Qixingguang Rulai), who is said to be master of the planets and the twenty-eight asterisms, are also attributed to Amoghavajra's translation bureau. Worship of the seven stars within esoteric Buddhist circles was therefore certainly well established in China by the eighth century during the Tang dynasty and probably soon afterward in Korean Buddhism. ¶ The worship of the Big Dipper in Korea may date as far back as the Megalithic period, as evidenced by the engraving of the Big Dipper and other asterisms on dolmens or menhirs. In the fourth-century Ji'an tombs of the Koguryo kingdom (37 BCE-668 CE), one of the traditional Three Kingdoms of early Korea, a mural of the Big Dipper is found on the north wall of tomb no. 1, along with an accompanying asterism of the six stars of Sagittarius (sometimes called the Southern Dipper) on the south wall; this juxtaposition is presumed to reflect the influence of the Shangqing school of contemporary Chinese Daoism. Court rituals to the seven stars and the tathAgata Tejaprabha date from the twelfth century during the Koryo dynasty. By at least the thirteen century, the full range of texts and ritual practices associated with the seven-star deities were circulating in Korea. At the popular level in Korea, the divinities of the Big Dipper were thought to control longevity, especially for children, and the ch'ilsong cult gained widespread popularity during the Choson dynasty (1392-1910). This popularization is in turn reflected in the ubiquity in Korean monasteries of "seven-stars shrines" (ch'ilsonggak), which were typically located in less-conspicuous locations along the outer perimeter of the monasteries and were worshipped primarily by the nonelite. Inside these shrines were hung seven-star paintings (T'AENGHWA), which typically depict the tathAgatas of the seven stars, with the tathAgata Tejaprabha presiding at the center. There are also several comprehensive ritual and liturgical manuals compiled during the Choson dynasty and Japanese colonial period in Korea that include rituals and invocations to the seven stars and Tejaprabha, most dedicated to the prolongation of life. Along with the mountain god (sansin), who also often has his own shrine in the monasteries of Korea, the role of the ch'ilsong in Korean Buddhism is often raised in the scholarship as an example of Buddhism's penchant to adapt beliefs and practices from rival religions. Although ch'ilsong worship has declined markedly in contemporary Korea, the ch'ilsokche, a worship ceremony dedicated to the tathAgata Tejaprabha, is occasionally held at some Buddhist monasteries on the seventh day of the seventh lunar month, with lay believers praying for good fortune and the prevention of calamity.

BhaddA-KundalakesA. (S. *BhadrA-KundalakesA; C. Batuo Juntuoluojuyiguo; J. Batsuda Gundarakuikoku; K. Palt'a Kundaraguiguk 拔陀軍陀羅拘夷國). A female ARHAT whom the Buddha declared foremost among his nun disciples in swift intuition (khippAbhiNNA). According to PAli sources, BhaddA was the daughter of the treasurer of RAjagaha (S. RAJAGṚHA). She witnessed once from her window a handsome thief named Sattuka being led off to execution and instantly fell in love with him. Pleading that she could not live without the young man, she persuaded her father to bribe the guard to release the thief into his custody. Sattuka was bathed and brought to the treasurer's home, where BhaddA bedecked in her finest jewelry waited upon him. Sattuka feigned love for her, all the while plotting to murder her for her jewelry. One day he informed her that he had once promised the deity of Robbers' Cliff that, if he were ever to escape punishment, he would make an offering to the god, and that now the time was at hand to fulfill his promise. BhaddA trusted him and, after preparing an offering for the deity, she accompanied Sattuka to the cliff adorned in her finest jewelry. Once they reached the edge of the cliff, he informed her of his real intentions, and without hesitation, she begged him to let her embrace him one last time. He agreed and, while feigning an embrace, BhaddA pushed him over the cliff to his death. The local deity commended her for her cleverness and presence of mind. BhaddA refused to return to her father's house after what had happened and joined the JAINA nuns' order. As part of her ascetic regime, she pulled out her hair with a palmyra comb, but it grew back in curls, hence her epithet KundalakesA, "Curly Hair." BhaddA was exceptionally intelligent and soon grew dissatisfied with Jain teachings. She wandered as a solitary mendicant, challenging all she encountered to debate and quickly proved her proficiency. Once she debated SAriputta (S. sARIPUTRA), one of the Buddha's two chief disciples, who answered all her questions. He then asked her, "One: What is that?," which left her speechless. She asked SAriputta to be her teacher, but he instead brought her before the Buddha, who preached her a sermon about it being better to know one verse bringing tranquillity than a thousand profitless verses. Hearing the Buddha's words, she immediately became an ARHAT and the Buddha personally ordained her as a nun in his order.

BhadracarīpranidhAna. (T. Bzang po spyod pa'i smon lam; C. Puxian pusa xingyuan zan; J. Fugen bosatsu gyogansan; K. Pohyon posal haengwon ch'an 普賢菩薩行願讚). In Sanskrit, "Vows of Good Conduct," the last section of the GAndAVYuHA in the AVATAMSAKASuTRA and one of the most beloved texts in all of MahAyAna Buddhism; also known as the SamantabhadracarīpranidhAnarAja. The BhadracarīpranidhAna focuses on the ten great vows (PRAnIDHANA) taken by SAMANTABHADRA to realize and gain access to the DHARMADHATU, which thereby enable him to benefit sentient beings. The ten vows are: (1) to pay homage to all the buddhas, (2) to praise the tathAgatas, (3) to make unlimited offerings, (4) to repent from one's transgressions in order to remove karmic hindrances (cf. KARMAVARAnA), (5) to take delight in others' merit, (6) to request the buddhas to turn the wheel of dharma (DHARMACAKRAPRAVARTANA), (7) to request the buddhas to continue living in the world, (8) always to follow the teachings of the Buddha, (9) always to comply with the needs of sentient beings, and (10) to transfer all merit to sentient beings for their spiritual edification. The text ends with a stanza wishing that sentient beings still immersed in evil be reborn in the PURE LAND of AMITABHA. The text was translated into Chinese in 754 by AMOGHAVAJRA (705-774). Other Chinese recensions appear in the Wenshushili fayuan jing ("Scripture on the Vows made by MANJUsRĪ"), translated in 420 by BUDDHABHADRA (359-429), which corresponds to the verse section from Ru busiyi jietuo jingjie Puxian xingyuan pin, the last roll of the forty-roll recension of the Huayan jing translated by PRAJNA in 798. (There is no corresponding version in either the sixty- or the eighty-roll translations of the Huajan jing.) The verses are also called the "Précis of the Huayan jing" (Lüe Huayan jing), because they are believed to constitute the core teachings of the AvataMsakasutra. In the main Chinese recension by Amoghavajra, the text consists of sixty-two stanzas, each consisting of quatrains with lines seven Sinographs in length, thus giving a total number of 1,736 Sinographs. In addition to the sixty-two core stanzas, Amoghavajra's version adds ten more stanzas of the Bada pusa zan ("Eulogy to the Eight Great Bodhisattvas") from the Badapusa mantuluo jing ("Scripture of the MAndALAs of the Eight Great Bodhisattvas") (see AstAMAHABODHISATTVA; AstAMAHOPAPUTRA). Buddhabhadra's version consists of forty-four stanzas with 880 Sinographs, each stanza consisting of a quatrain with lines five Sinographs in length. PrajNa's version contains fifty-two stanzas with each quatrain consisting of lines seven sinographs in length. There are five commentaries on the text attributed to eminent Indian exegetes, including NAGARJUNA, DIGNAGA, and VASUBANDHU, which are extant only in Tibetan translation. In the Tibetan tradition, the prayer is called the "king of prayers" (smon lam gyi rgyal po). It is incorporated into many liturgies; the opening verses of the prayer are commonly incorporated into a Tibetan's daily recitation.

BhaisajyarAja. (T. Sman gyi rgyal po; C. Yaowang pusa; J. Yakuo bosatsu; K. Yagwang posal 藥王菩薩). In Sanskrit, "Medicine King"; a BODHISATTVA brother and probable antecedent of the buddha BHAIsAJYAGURU. Like his younger brother Bhaisajyasamudgata (C. Yaoshang), BhaisajyarAja is mentioned in both the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra") as well as in the Foshuo Guan Yaowang Yaoshang er pusa jing ("Sutra Spoken by the Buddha on Visualizing the Two Bodhisattvas BhaisajyarAja and Bhaisajyasamudgata") translated into Chinese by KALAYAsAS between 424-442 CE. The appearance of the brothers in the Saddharmapundarīkasutra suggests that a cult of a medicine bodhisattva or buddha had developed in India by at least the third century CE. The Saddharmapundarīkasutra tells of the elder brother BhaisajyarAja offering his own body to a buddha by burning himself on a pyre, a fire that is said to have burned for twelve hundred years. As their own sutra (the Guan Yaowang Yaoshang er pusa jing) relates, the two brothers did not make their initial bodhisattva aspirations before a buddha, as would typically be the case, but in front of an as-yet unenlightened monk named Suryagarbha, though both have the buddhas of the ten directions in their headdresses. That sutra further describes the myriad benefits attained through visualization of the two, an indication that the bodhisattvas were evolving from models of behavior to emulate, as they are depicted in the Saddharmapundarīkasutra into objects of worship. With the rise of the cult of the buddha Bhaisajyaguru, however, the two bodhisattvas assumed subservient positions, becoming the two main figures in that buddha's group of seven acolytes. See also SHESHEN.

Bhutayajna: An offering to the sub-human creatures; one of the five daily sacrificial rites enjoined on the Hindu householder.

bleak ::: 1. Exposed to the elements; unsheltered and barren; desolate; cold and cutting; raw, windswept. 2. Offering little or no hope or encouragement.

blind alley ::: 1. A road, alley, etc. that is open only at one end. 2. A position or situation offering no hope of progress or improvement. 3. A situation in which no further progress can be made.

Offering ::: A gift to an entity (including ancestor spirits) made to acknowledge, appease, or curry favor. Can be as simple as a rubbing of hands and offering warmth to as elaborate as a full-scale ritual complete with tables and baskets of food and statues.

Brachia ::: (Heb. blessing). In Judaism, an offering of gratitude that praises God for a benefit conferred or a great event experienced. (See also shemonah esreh).

burn ::: 1. To be very eager; aflame with activity, as to be on fire. 2. To emit heat or light by as if by combustion; to flame.. 3. To give off light or to glow brightly. 4. To light; a candle; incense, etc.) as an offering. 5. To suffer punishment or death by or as if by fire; put to death by fire. 6. To injure, endanger, or damage with or as if with fire. 7. Fig. To be consumed with strong emotions; be aflame with desire; anger; etc. 8. To shine intensely; to seem to glow as if on fire. burns, burned, burnt, burning.

Burnouf, Eugène. (1801-1852). French orientalist and seminal figure in the development of Buddhist Studies as an academic discipline. He was born in Paris on April 8, 1801, the son of the distinguished classicist Jean-Louis Burnouf (1775-1844). He received instruction in Greek and Latin from his father and studied at the Lycée Louis-le-Grand. He entered the École des Chartes in 1822, receiving degrees in both letters and law in 1824. He then turned to the study of Sanskrit, both with his father and with Antoine Léonard de Chézy (1773-1832). In 1826, Burnouf published, in collaboration with the young Norwegian-German scholar Christian Lassen (1800-1876), Essai sur le pali ("Essay on PALI"). After the death of Chézy, Burnouf was appointed to succeed his teacher in the chair of Sanskrit at the Collège de France. His students included some of the greatest scholars of day; those who would contribute to Buddhist studies included Philippe Edouard Foucaux (1811-1894) and FRIEDRICH MAX MÜLLER. Shortly after his appointment to the chair of Sanskrit, the Société Asiatique, of which Burnouf was secretary, received a communication from BRIAN HOUGHTON HODGSON, British resident at the court of Nepal, offering to send Sanskrit manuscripts of Buddhist texts to Paris. The receipt of these texts changed the direction of Burnouf's scholarship for the remainder his life. After perusing the AstASAHASRIKAPRAJNAPARAMITA and the LALITAVISTARA, he decided to translate the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA. Having completed the translation, he decided to precede its publication with a series of studies. He completed only the first of these, published in 1844 as Introduction à l'histoire du Buddhisme indien. This massive work is regarded as the foundational text for the academic study of Buddhism in the West. It contains Burnouf's highly influential analyses of various aspects of Sanskrit Buddhism as he understood them from the works received from Hodgson. It also contains hundreds of pages of translations of previously unknown works, drawn especially from the DIVYAVADANA and the AVADANAsATAKA. Burnouf died, apparently of kidney failure, on May 28, 1852. His translation of the Saddharmapundarīka, Le Lotus de la bonne loi, appeared that same year.

Byodoin. (平等院). A famous Japanese temple located in Uji, south of Kyoto, now associated with the TENDAISHu and JoDOSHu sects. Byodoin is especially famous for its Phoenix Hall (Hoodo), which houses a magnificent image of AMITABHA made by the artist Jocho (d. 1057). The hall, the statue, and fifty-two other small sculptures of BODHISATTVAs making offerings of music to the central AmitAbha statue have been designated as national treasures. The Byodoin AmitAbha image is highly regarded as a representative piece of the refined art of the Fujiwara period (894-1185). Byodoin was originally a villa that belonged to the powerful regent Fujiwara no Michinaga (966-1027). The private villa was later transformed by Michinaga's son Yorimichi (992-1074) into a temple in 1052, and the Phoenix Hall was constructed the following year. Many halls dedicated to the buddha AmitAbha were built in this period by powerful aristocrats who were influenced by the growing belief in the notion of mappo (see MOFA), or "the demise of the dharma," wherein the only means of salvation was the practice of nenbutsu, the recitation of AmitAbha's name (see also NIANFO; BUDDHANUSMṚTI). The monk Myoson (d. 1063), originally the abbot of another temple called ONJoJI, was installed as the first abbot of Byodoin.

Cain (Hebrew) Qayin In the Bible, the son of Adam and Eve, and a tiller of the ground. Becoming jealous of the offering which his brother Abel presents to the Lord, Cain, according to the legend, slays him (Genesis 4). This allegory signifies that “Jehovah-Cain, the male part of Adam the dual man, having separated himself from Eve, creates in her ‘Abel,’ the first natural woman, and sheds the Virgin blood” (SD 2:388). Cain and Abel represent the third root-race or the “Separating Hermaphrodite” (SD 2:134).

candelabrum ::: n. --> A lamp stand of any sort.
A highly ornamented stand of marble or other ponderous material, usually having three feet, -- frequently a votive offering to a temple.
A large candlestick, having several branches.


catechise ::: v. t. --> To instruct by asking questions, receiving answers, and offering explanations and corrections, -- esp. in regard to points of religious faith.
To question or interrogate; to examine or try by questions; -- sometimes with a view to reproof, by eliciting from a person answers which condemn his own conduct.


Chalmers University of Technology ::: (body, education) A Swedish university founded in 1829 offering master of science and doctoral degrees. Research is carried out in the main engineering Five hundred faculty members work in more than 100 departments organised in nine schools. Chalmers collaborates with the University of G�teborg.Around 8500 people work and study on the Chalmers campus, including around 500 faculty members and some 600 teachers and doctoral students. About 4800 students licentiates are awarded. Some 40% of Sweden's engineers and architects are Chalmers graduates.About a thousand research projects are in progress and more than 1500 scientific articles and research reports are published every year. Chalmers is a partner in 80 EC research projects. .Address: S-412 96 G�teborg, Sweden. (1995-02-16)

Chalmers University of Technology "body, education" A Swedish university founded in 1829 offering master of science and doctoral degrees. Research is carried out in the main engineering sciences as well as in technology related mathematical and natural sciences. Five hundred faculty members work in more than 100 departments organised in nine schools. Chalmers collaborates with the University of Göteborg. Around 8500 people work and study on the Chalmers campus, including around 500 faculty members and some 600 teachers and doctoral students. About 4800 students follow the master degree programs. Every year 700 Masters of Science in Engineering and in Architecture graduate from Chalmers, and about 190 PhDs and licentiates are awarded. Some 40% of Sweden's engineers and architects are Chalmers graduates. About a thousand research projects are in progress and more than 1500 scientific articles and research reports are published every year. Chalmers is a partner in 80 EC research projects. {(http://chalmers.se/Home-E.html)}. Address: S-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden. (1995-02-16)

chantry ::: n. --> An endowment or foundation for the chanting of masses and offering of prayers, commonly for the founder.
A chapel or altar so endowed.


Chhinnamasta Tantrika (Sanskrit) Chinnamastā Tāntrika [from chinna severed + masta head] Buddhist tantric sect named for the goddess Chhinnamasta, represented with a decapitated head. In their highest initiation, the adept “must ‘cut off his own head with the right hand, holding it in the left.’ Three streams of blood gush out from the headless trunk. One of these is directed into the mouth of the decapitated head . . .; the other is directed toward the earth as an offering of the pure, sinless blood to mother Earth; and the third gushes toward heaven, as a witness for the sacrifice of ‘self-immolation.’ Now, this had a profound Occult significance which is known only to the initiated . . .” (BCW 4:265-6).

Citta. A lay follower of the Buddha, mentioned in PAli sources as being foremost among laymen who preached the DHARMA; also known as Cittagahapati. Citta was treasurer for the township of MacchikAsanda in the kingdom of KAsī. When he was born, the sky rained flowers of many hues, hence his name which means variegated color. Citta was converted to Buddhism when he encountered the elder MahAnAma (S. MAHANAMAN) while the latter was sojourning in MacchikAsanda. Citta was greatly impressed by the monk's demeanor and built a monastery for him in his park named AmbAtakArAma. There, listening to MahAnAma preach on the subject of the six senses, he attained to state of a nonreturner (ANAGAMIN). On one occasion, Citta visited the Buddha in the company of two thousand laypeople, bringing with him five hundred cartloads of offerings. When he bowed at the Buddha's feet, flowers in a variety of colors rained down from the heavens. Like MahAnAma, the Buddha preached a sermon on the six senses to him. Citta distributed offerings for a fortnight, the gods continuously refilling the carts. Citta was endowed with a great intellect and was a gifted speaker. His conversations with members of the order are recorded in the "Citta SaMyutta" of the PAli SAMYUTTANIKAYA, and he is also described as having refuted the views of non-Buddhist teachers, such as Nigantha NAtaputta (S. NIRGRANTHA-JNATĪPUTRA, viz., MahAvīra), the eminent JAINA teacher, and Acela Kassapa. Although he was not an ARHAT, he possessed the analytical knowledge (P. patisambhidA; S. PRATISAMVID) of a learner (P. sekha). It was for these aptitudes that he earned preeminence. On his deathbed, divinities visited him and encouraged him to seek rebirth as a heavenly king, but he refused, stating that such an impermanent reward was not his goal. He then preached to them, and to all the kinfolk who had gathered around him, before passing away. Together with HATTHAKA AlAVAKA, Citta is upheld as an ideal layman worthy of emulation.

CodeCenter ::: (Formerly Saber-C) A proprietary software development environment for C programs, offering an integrated toolkit for developing, testing, debugging and maintainance. (1994-12-23)

CodeCenter "programming" (Formerly {Saber-C}) A proprietary {software development environment} for {C} programs, offering an integrated toolkit for developing, testing, debugging and maintainance. (1994-12-23)

coherentism ::: There are two distinct types of coherentism. One refers to the coherence theory of truth, which restricts true sentences to those that cohere with some specified set of sentences. Someone's belief is true if and only if it is coherent with all or most of their other beliefs. Usually, coherence is taken to imply something stronger than mere consistency. Statements that are comprehensive and meet the requirements of Occam's razor are usually to be preferred. The second type of coherentism is the belief in the coherence theory of justification, an epistemological theory opposing foundationalism and offering a solution to the regress argument. In this epistemological capacity, it is a theory about how belief can be justified.

collection ::: n. --> The act or process of collecting or of gathering; as, the collection of specimens.
That which is collected
A gathering or assemblage of objects or of persons.
A gathering of money for charitable or other purposes, as by passing a contribution box for freewill offerings.
That which is obtained in payment of demands.
An accumulation of any substance.


Computer Associates International, Inc. ::: (company) (CA) A US software development company, founded in 1976. CA have purchased many other software companies, including Spectrum Software, Inc., Cheyenne Software, Platinum Technology, Inc., ASK Corporation. They produce a number of popular software packages, including Unicenter TNG and Ingres.They had an Initial Public Offering in 1981 valued at more than US$3.2M, had more than US$6B in revenue in 2000, and employ more than 17,000 people. .(20002-04-20)

Computer Associates International, Inc. "company" (CA) A US software development company, founded in 1976. CA have purchased many other software companies, including {Spectrum Software, Inc.}, {Cheyenne Software}, {Platinum Technology, Inc.}, {ASK Corporation}. They produce a number of popular software packages, including {Unicenter TNG} and {Ingres}. They had an {Initial Public Offering} in 1981 valued at more than US$3.2M, had more than US$6B in revenue in 2000, and employ more than 17,000 people. {(http://ca.com/)}. (20002-04-20)

confarreation ::: n. --> A form of marriage among the Romans, in which an offering of bread was made, in presence of the high priest and at least ten witnesses.

Consciousness which is waiting above us. To concentrate in the heart centre with the offering of oneself to the Divine and the aspiration for this inward opening and for the Presence in the heart is the first way and, if it can be done, the natural begin- ning ; for its result once obtained makes the spiritual path far more easy and safe than if one begins the other way.

:::   ‘Consecration" generally has a more mystical sense but this is not absolute. A total consecration signifies a total giving of one"s self; hence it is the equivalent of the word ``surrender"", not of the word (soumission} which always gives the impression that one accepts'' passively. You feel a flame in the wordconsecration"", a flame even greater than in the word offering''. To consecrate oneself isto give oneself to an action""; hence, in the yogic sense, it is to give oneself to some divine work with the idea of accomplishing the divine work.” Questions and Answers, MCW Vol. 4*.

‘Consecration’ generally has a more mystical sense but this is not absolute. A total consecration signifies a total giving of one’s self; hence it is the equivalent of the word surrender’’, not of the word (soumission} which always gives the impression that oneaccepts’’ passively. You feel a flame in the word consecration’’, a flame even greater than in the wordoffering’’. To consecrate oneself is ``to give oneself to an action’’; hence, in the yogic sense, it is to give oneself to some divine work with the idea of accomplishing the divine work.” Questions and Answers, MCW Vol. 4.

corban ::: n. --> An offering of any kind, devoted to God and therefore not to be appropriated to any other use; esp., an offering in fulfillment of a vow.
An alms basket; a vessel to receive gifts of charity; a treasury of the church, where offerings are deposited.


corsepresent ::: n. --> An offering made to the church at the interment of a dead body.

cybercrime as a service "security, legal" (CaaS) A kind of {software as a service} that involves performing illegal online activities ({cybercrime}) on behalf of others for money. Cybercrime as a service represents an evolution of online crime from the sale of illegal products such as {malware} and {exploit} kits to offering everything necessary to arrange a {cyber fraud} or to conduct a {cyber attack}. As well as providing malicious code, the service provider also rents out the {infrastructure} ({servers} and {network} connections) to control the distribution and operation of the malware, e.g., bullet-proof hosting or huge {botnets}. (2015-02-22)

dana. ::: a giving; an offering that a disciple gives to his Guru &

dAna. (T. sbyin pa; C. bushi; J. fuse; K. posi 布施). In Sanskrit and PAli, "giving," "generosity," or "charity"; one of the most highly praised of virtues in Buddhism and the foundational practice of the Buddhist laity, presumably because of its value in weaning the layperson from attachment to material possessions while providing essential material support to the SAMGHA. It is the chief cause of prosperity in future lives and rebirth as a divinity (DEVA) in one of the heavens of the sensuous realm (KAMADHATU). There are numerous stories in the AVADANA and JATAKA literatures that illustrate the virtues of giving, the most famous being that of Prince VisvaMtara (P. VESSANTARA), whose generosity was so profound that he gave away not only all his worldly possessions but even his wife and children. In other stories, BODHISATTVAs often give away their body or parts of their body (see DEHADANA; SHESHEN). The immediate karmic result of the practice of giving is said to be wealth in the future, especially as a divinity in one of the heavens. Giving, especially to the SAMGHA, is presumed to generate merit (PUnYA) that will accrue to the benefit of the donor in both this and future lifetimes; indeed, giving is the first in a standard list of meritorious acts, along with morality (sĪLA) and religious development (BHAVANA). In the "graduated discourse" (S. ANUPuRVIKATHA; P. ANUPUBBIKATHA) that the Buddha commonly used in instructing the laity, the discourse on giving (dAnakathA) was even more fundamental than the succeeding discourses on right conduct (sīlakathA) and the joys of rebirth in the heavens (svargakathA). Eight items are typically presumed to make appropriate offerings: food, water, clothing, vehicles, garlands, perfume, beds and dwellings, and lights. In yet another enumeration, there are three kinds of dAna: the "gift of material goods" (AMIsADANA); the gift of fearlessness (ABHAYADANA), and the "gift of the dharma" (DHARMADANA). Of all gifts, however, the greatest was said to be the "gift of the dharma" (dharmadAna), viz., spiritual instruction that will lead not just to better rebirths but to liberation from SAMSARA; it is this gift that the saMgha offers reciprocally to the laity. In MAHAYANA soteriology, giving is listed as the first of the six perfections (PARAMITA) cultivated on the bodhisattva path (see DANAPARAMITA). According to the PAli tradition, dAna is the first of ten perfections (P. pAramī). In some schools, a being who is incapable of even the modicum of detachment that is required to donate one's possessions through charity is thought to have eradicated his wholesome spiritual faculties (SAMUCCHINNAKUsALAMuLA; see also ICCHANTIKA) and to have lost for an indeterminate period any prospect of enlightenment.

database management system "database" (DBMS) A suite of programs which typically manage large structured sets of persistent data, offering ad hoc query facilities to many users. They are widely used in business applications. A database management system (DBMS) can be an extremely complex set of software programs that controls the organisation, storage and retrieval of data (fields, records and files) in a database. It also controls the security and integrity of the database. The DBMS accepts requests for data from the application program and instructs the operating system to transfer the appropriate data. When a DBMS is used, information systems can be changed much more easily as the organisation's information requirements change. New categories of data can be added to the database without disruption to the existing system. Data security prevents unauthorised users from viewing or updating the database. Using passwords, users are allowed access to the entire database or subsets of the database, called subschemas (pronounced "sub-skeema"). For example, an employee database can contain all the data about an individual employee, but one group of users may be authorised to view only payroll data, while others are allowed access to only work history and medical data. The DBMS can maintain the integrity of the database by not allowing more than one user to update the same record at the same time. The DBMS can keep duplicate records out of the database; for example, no two customers with the same customer numbers (key fields) can be entered into the database. {Query languages} and {report writers} allow users to interactively interrogate the database and analyse its data. If the DBMS provides a way to interactively enter and update the database, as well as interrogate it, this capability allows for managing personal databases. However, it may not leave an audit trail of actions or provide the kinds of controls necessary in a multi-user organisation. These controls are only available when a set of application programs are customised for each data entry and updating function. A business information system is made up of subjects (customers, employees, vendors, etc.) and activities (orders, payments, purchases, etc.). Database design is the process of deciding how to organize this data into record types and how the record types will relate to each other. The DBMS should mirror the organisation's data structure and process transactions efficiently. Organisations may use one kind of DBMS for daily transaction processing and then move the detail onto another computer that uses another DBMS better suited for random inquiries and analysis. Overall systems design decisions are performed by data administrators and systems analysts. Detailed database design is performed by database administrators. The three most common organisations are the {hierarchical database}, {network database} and {relational database}. A database management system may provide one, two or all three methods. Inverted lists and other methods are also used. The most suitable structure depends on the application and on the transaction rate and the number of inquiries that will be made. Database machines are specially designed computers that hold the actual databases and run only the DBMS and related software. Connected to one or more mainframes via a high-speed channel, database machines are used in large volume transaction processing environments. Database machines have a large number of DBMS functions built into the hardware and also provide special techniques for accessing the disks containing the databases, such as using multiple processors concurrently for high-speed searches. The world of information is made up of data, text, pictures and voice. Many DBMSs manage text as well as data, but very few manage both with equal proficiency. Throughout the 1990s, as storage capacities continue to increase, DBMSs will begin to integrate all forms of information. Eventually, it will be common for a database to handle data, text, graphics, voice and video with the same ease as today's systems handle data. See also: {intelligent database}. (1998-10-07)

database management system ::: (database) (DBMS) A suite of programs which typically manage large structured sets of persistent data, offering ad hoc query facilities to many users. They are widely used in business applications.A database management system (DBMS) can be an extremely complex set of software programs that controls the organisation, storage and retrieval of data (fields, the database. The DBMS accepts requests for data from the application program and instructs the operating system to transfer the appropriate data.When a DBMS is used, information systems can be changed much more easily as the organisation's information requirements change. New categories of data can be added to the database without disruption to the existing system.Data security prevents unauthorised users from viewing or updating the database. Using passwords, users are allowed access to the entire database or subsets of group of users may be authorised to view only payroll data, while others are allowed access to only work history and medical data.The DBMS can maintain the integrity of the database by not allowing more than one user to update the same record at the same time. The DBMS can keep duplicate records out of the database; for example, no two customers with the same customer numbers (key fields) can be entered into the database.Query languages and report writers allow users to interactively interrogate the database and analyse its data.If the DBMS provides a way to interactively enter and update the database, as well as interrogate it, this capability allows for managing personal databases. available when a set of application programs are customised for each data entry and updating function.A business information system is made up of subjects (customers, employees, vendors, etc.) and activities (orders, payments, purchases, etc.). Database and how the record types will relate to each other. The DBMS should mirror the organisation's data structure and process transactions efficiently.Organisations may use one kind of DBMS for daily transaction processing and then move the detail onto another computer that uses another DBMS better suited for data administrators and systems analysts. Detailed database design is performed by database administrators.The three most common organisations are the hierarchical database, network database and relational database. A database management system may provide one, most suitable structure depends on the application and on the transaction rate and the number of inquiries that will be made.Database machines are specially designed computers that hold the actual databases and run only the DBMS and related software. Connected to one or more accessing the disks containing the databases, such as using multiple processors concurrently for high-speed searches.The world of information is made up of data, text, pictures and voice. Many DBMSs manage text as well as data, but very few manage both with equal common for a database to handle data, text, graphics, voice and video with the same ease as today's systems handle data.See also: intelligent database. (1998-10-07)

Da Tang Xiyu ji. (J. Dai To Saiiki ki; K. Tae Tang Soyok ki 大唐西域). In Chinese, "The Great Tang Record of [Travels to] the Western Regions"; a travelogue of a pilgrimage to India by the Chinese translator and exegete XUANZANG (600/602-664) written in 646 at the request of the Tang emperor Taizong and edited by the monk Bianji (d. 652). Xuanzang was already a noted Buddhist scholiast in China when he decided to make the dangerous trek from China, through the Central Asian oases, to the Buddhist homeland of India. Xuanzang was especially interested in gaining access to the full range of texts associated with the YOGĀCĀRA school, only a few of which were then currently available in Chinese translation. He left on his journey in 627 and eventually spent fourteen years in India (629-643), where he traveled among many of the Buddhist sacred sites, collected manuscripts of Buddhist materials as yet untranslated into Chinese, and studied Sanskrit texts with various eminent teachers, most notably DHARMAPĀLA'S disciple sĪLABHADRA, who taught at the Buddhist university of NĀLANDĀ. The Da Tang xiyu ji provides a comprehensive overview of the different countries that Xuanzang visited during his travels in India and Central Asia, offering detailed descriptions of the geography, climate, customs, languages, and religious practices of these various countries. Xuanzang paid special attention to the different ways in which the teachings of Buddhism were cultivated in different areas of the Western Regions. The Da Tang xiyou ji thus serves as an indispensible tool in the study of the geography and Buddhist history of these regions. Xuanzang's travelogue was later fictionalized in the narrative Xiyou ji ("Journey to the West"), written c. 1592 during the Ming dynasty and attributed to Wu Cheng'en. The Xiyou ji is one of the greatest of Chinese vernacular novels and is deservedly famous for its fanciful accounts of the exploits of the monk-pilgrim, here called Sanzang (TREPItAKA), and especially of his protector, Monkey. See also CHENG WEISHI LUN.

defensible ::: a. --> Capable of being defended; as, a defensible city, or a defensible cause.
Capable of offering defense.


Denkoroku. (傳光録). In Japanese, "Record of the Transmission of the Light"; a text also known by its full title, Keizan osho denkoroku ("A Record of the Transmission of the Light by Master Keizan"). The anthology is attributed by Soto tradition to KEIZAN JoKIN, but was most probably composed posthumously by his disciples. The Denkoroku is a collection of pithy stories and anecdotes concerning fifty-two teachers recognized by the Japanese SoToSHu as the patriarchs of the school, accompanied by the author's own explanatory commentaries and concluding verses. Each chapter includes a short opening case (honsoku), which describes the enlightenment experience of the teacher; a longer section (called a kien) offering a short biography and history of the teacher, including some of his representative teachings and exchanges with students and other teachers; a prose commentary (teisho; C. TICHANG) by the author; and a concluding appreciatory verse (juko). The teachers discussed in the text include twenty-seven Indian patriarchs from MAHĀKĀsYAPA to PrajNātāra; six Chinese patriarchs from BODHIDHARMA through HUINENG; seventeen Chinese successors of Huineng in the CAODONG ZONG, from QINGYUAN XINGSI to TIANTONG RUJING; and finally the two Japanese patriarchs DoGEN KIGEN and Koun Ejo (1198-1280). The Denkoroku belongs to a larger genre of texts known as the CHUANDENG LU ("transmission of the lamplight records"), although it is a rigidly sectarian lineage history, discussing only the single successor to each patriarch with no treatment of any collateral lines.

deodate ::: n. --> A gift or offering to God.

devatā. (T. lha; C. tianshen; J. tenjin; K. ch'onsin 天神). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "state of being a divinity," referring to all classifications of heavenly beings or divinities (DEVA) in the abstract. Deriving from the principle that any being who is worshipped or to whom offerings are made may be called a devatā, the connotation of divinities was broadly expanded to include not only the higher gods of the heavenly realms (DEVALOKA) proper but also religious mendicants; domesticated animals; powerful earthly forces such as fire and wind; lesser gods such as NĀGAs, GANDHARVAs, and YAKsAs; and local ghosts and spirits, including devatās of homes, trees, and bodies of water. As Buddhism moved into new regions, various indigenous local deities thus came to be assimilated into the Buddhist pantheon by designating them as devatās.

devatāyoga. (T. lha'i rnal 'byor). In Sanskrit, "deity yoga"; tantric practice in which a deity (often a buddha or bodhisattva) is visualized in the presence of the practitioner, the deity is propitiated through offerings, prayers, and the recitation of MANTRA, and is then requested to bestow SIDDHIs. Two types are sometimes enumerated: one in which the deity is visualized in front of the practitioner and another in which the practitioner imagines himself or herself to be the deity. According to TSONG KHA PA, the practice of this latter type of deity yoga is the distinguishing characteristic of the VAJRAYĀNA, differentiating it from the PĀRAMITĀYĀNA. He argues that both forms of deity yoga are to be found in all classes of tantra: KRIYĀ, CARYĀ, YOGA, and ANUTTARAYOGA. Devatāyoga is a central feature of the two stages of anuttarayoga tantra (UTPATTIKRAMA and NIsPANNAKRAMA); in the former "generation" stage, guided by a SĀDHANA, the tāntrika visualizes a MAndALA, with its central and surrounding deities. Through meditation on ANĀTMAN (nonself) or suNYATĀ (emptiness), the practitioner imagines himself or herself to be the central deity of the mandala. In certain forms of practice, the practitioner will also imagine the entire mandala and its deities as residing within the practitioner's body. When the practitioner has developed the ability to visualize the mandala and its deities in minute detail, one moves to the second "completion" stage (nispannakrama), in which the complex of NĀdIs (channels) and CAKRAs (wheels) of the human body are utilized to achieve buddhahood.

Dharmaguptaka. (T. Chos sbas pa; C. Fazangbu/Tanwudebu; J. Hozobu/Donmutokubu; K. Popchangbu/Tammudokpu 法蔵部/曇無德部). In Sanskrit, "Adherents of Dharmagupta"; one of the eighteen traditional "mainstream" (that is, non-MAHĀYĀNA) schools of early Indian Buddhism. There are various theories on the origin of the school in Buddhist literature. The SARVĀSTIVĀDA treatise SAMAYABHEDOPARACANACAKRA states that the Dharmaguptaka separated from the MAHĪsĀSAKA school, one of the collateral branches of the Sarvāstivāda school (probably sometime around the late second or early first centuries BCE), while inscriptional evidence and Tibetan sources instead suggest it was one strand of the VIBHAJYAVĀDA (P. Vibhajjavāda) school, a collateral line of the STHAVIRANIKĀYA that was most active in KASHMIR-GANDHĀRA, and Sri Lanka. There is inscriptional evidence from the northwest of the Indian subcontinent for the continued existence of the school into the seventh century. The school is named after the eponymous teacher Dharmagupta (c. third century BCE), even though the school itself traces its lineage back to MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA (P. Mahāmoggallāna), one of the two main disciples of the Buddha. Unlike the typical tripartite division of the canon (TRIPItAKA), viz., SuTRAPItAKA, VINAYAPItAKA, and ABHIDHARMAPItAKA, the Dharmaguptaka canon is said to have consisted of five divisions, adding to the usual three a collection on BODHISATTVA doctrines and practices (BODHISATTVAPItAKA) and a DHĀRAnĪ collection (dhāranīpitaka). Some of the distinctive tenets of the school are (1) the Buddha is not included among the members of the SAMGHA and thus a gift given to him is superior to offerings made to the community as a whole; (2) there are four characteristics (CATURLAKsAnA) of compounded things-origination, maturation, decay, and extinction-of which the first three were conditioned (SAMSKṚTA) and the last unconditioned (ASAMSKṚTA); (3) the path of the buddhas and bodhisattvas is distinct from that of the sRĀVAKAs; (4) non-buddhists (TĪRTHIKA) cannot attain the five kinds of superknowledge (ABHIJNĀ); (5) the body of an ARHAT is free from the contaminants (ANĀSRAVA). Because of their views about the Buddha's superiority to the broader saMgha, the school also emphasized the extraordinary merit accruing from offerings made to a STuPA, which was considered to be the contemporary representation of the Buddha because of the relics (sARĪRA) it enshrined. Due to the convergence of some of the school's doctrines with those of the MAHĀSĀMGHIKA, it has been suggested that the school may have had its origins within the Sthaviranikāya but was subsequently influenced by MahāsāMghika ideas. One of the enduring influences of the Dharmaguptaka school in Buddhist history comes from its vinaya, which came to be adopted widely throughout East Asia; this so-called "Four-Part Vinaya" (SIFEN LÜ, *Dharmaguptaka vinaya) was translated into Chinese in 405 by BUDDHAYAsAS (c. fifth century CE) and is still used today in the East Asian Buddhist traditions. The recension of the DĪRGHĀGAMA (C. Chang Ahan jing) that was translated into Chinese in 413 CE by Buddhayasas and ZHU FONIAN is also attributed to the Dharmaguptaka school.

dharmasarīra. (T. chos sku'i ring bsrel; C. fa[shen] sheli; J. hosshinshari/hoshari; K. pop[sin] sari 法[身]舍利). In Sanskrit, "relics of the dharma [body]"; the Buddha's incorporeal relics, viz., his scriptures, verses, and doctrines, or the immutable truth "embodied" therein. "Relics" (sARĪRA) literally means "body," but in Buddhist usage comes to refer most often to the sacred physical relics found in the cremated remains of the Buddha or of an eminent monk. In contrast to these physical relics remaining after cremation, "the relics of the dharma [body]" refers to the corpus of Buddhist literature and/or the DHARMAVINAYA embodied therein that were left behind by the Buddha as his incorporeal legacy; therefore they can be worshiped as sarīra. As the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), for example, notes, "Wherever this sutra is spoken, read, recited, written out, or stored, one should build a STuPA of the seven jewels (RATNA), making it high, broad, and adorned. It is not necessary to place sarīra in it. Why is this? Within it already is the complete body of the TATHĀGATA. To this stupa one should make offerings of all kinds of flowers, incenses, beads, silk canopies, banners, vocal and instrumental music, honoring and praising it."

Dialled Number Identification Service "communications" (DNIS) A service that tells the recipient of a telephone call the telephone number dialled by the person making the call. It is used by call centres hosting multiple numbers, voicemail systems and ISPs offering shared dial-in services. Compare {ANI}, {Caller ID}. (2005-02-09)

Dialled Number Identification Service ::: (communications) (DNIS) A service that tells the recipient of a telephone call the telephone number dialled by the person making the call. It is used by call centres hosting multiple numbers, voicemail systems and ISPs offering shared dial-in services.Compare ANI, Caller ID.(2005-02-09)

dianyan. (J. tengen; K. choman 點眼). In Chinese, lit. "dotting the eyes," also known as "opening the eyes" (KAIYAN; T. spyan phye); a consecration ceremony for a buddha image (BUDDHĀBHIsEKA) that serves to make the icon come alive. The term refers to a ceremony, or series of ceremonies, that accompanies the installation of a buddha image or painting, which specifically involves dotting the pupils onto the inert eyes of the icon in order to animate it. Until this ceremony is performed, the icon remains nothing more than an inert block of wood or lump of clay; once its eyes are dotted, however, the image is thought to become invested with the power and charisma of a living buddha. The related term kaiyan has the same denotation, but may in some contexts it refer more broadly to "opening up the eyes" of an image by ritually dropping eye drops into its eyes. Both dianyan or kaiyan occurred in conjunction with esoteric Buddhist rituals. The Yiqie rulai anxiang sanmei yigui jing provides an elaborate set of instructions on how to consecrate buddha images, in which "dotting the eyes" accompanies the performance of other esoteric practices, such as MANTRA and MUDRĀ. When a bodhisattva wonders why buddha images are installed if the DHARMAKĀYA of a buddha has no physical form, the Buddha replies that images are used as an expedient for guiding neophytes who have first aroused the thought of enlightenment (BODHICITTOTPĀDA). In Korea, where this term choman is typically used for this ceremony rather than kaean (C. kaiyan), there were different "dotting the eyes" consecrations for different types of Buddhist images and requisites, including images of a buddha, ARHAT, the ten kings of hell (shiwang), and the kings of heaven, as well as in conjunction with ceremonies for erecting a STuPA or offering robes (KAsĀYA). Through these choman ceremonies, Buddhist artifacts are transformed from mere physical objects into spiritually sanctioned religious items imbued with spiritual efficacy. The Korean Chinon chip ("Mantra Anthology"), extant in several editions of which the oldest is dated 1476, includes a "mantra for dotting the eyes" (choman mun) along with its Sanskrit and Chinese transliterations. In Japan, this ceremony is usually called kaigen (C. kaiyan) rather than tengen. In Chinese CHAN texts, "dotting the eyes" of a buddha image is also sometimes used as a metaphor for a Chan adept's final achievement of awakening. See also NETRAPRATIstHĀPANA.

directory service "database, networking" A structured repository of information on people and resources within an organisation, facilitating management and communication. On a {LAN} or {WAN} the directory service identifies all aspects of the {network} including users, software, hardware, and the various rights and policies assigned to each. As a result applications can access information without knowing where a particular resource is physically located, and users interact oblivious to the network {topology} and {protocols}. To allow {heterogeneous networks} to share directory information the {ITU} proposed a common structure called {X.500}. However, its complexity and lack of seamless {Internet} support led to the development of {Lightweight Directory Access Protocol} (LDAP) which has continued to evolve under the aegis of the {IETF}. Despite its name {LDAP} is too closely linked to {X.500} to be "lightweight". {LDAP} was adopted by several companies such as {Netscape Communications Corporation} (Netscape Directory Server) and has become a {de facto standard} for directory services. Other LDAP compatible offerings include {Novell, Inc.}'s {Novell Directory Services} (NDS) and {Microsoft Corporation}'s {Active Directory}. The Netscape and Novell products are available for {Windows NT} and {Unix} {platforms}. {Novell Directory Services} also run on Novell platforms. {Microsoft Corporation}'s {Active Directory} is an integral part of {Microsoft's Windows 2000} and although it can interface with directory services running on other systems it is not available for other platforms. (2001-01-02)

Dpal ldan lha mo. (S. srīdevī). In Tibetan, "Glorious Goddess"; a literal translation of the Sanskrit name for a form of a female divinity ubiquitous in the northeast and mountainous regions of the Indian subcontinent. In her usual form, she has one face, is wrathful, holds a kadga (sword) and KAPĀLA (skull cup), and rides a barren mule above a churning ocean of blood. The mule has an eye in his rump, caused by an arrow shot by her husband after she killed their son and used his skin as a saddle. She is found in the retinue (parivāra) of the Sarvavighnavināyaka (Obstacle-Removing) MAHĀKĀLA, but as a central figure she is surrounded by a large retinue that includes the goddesses Ākāsāmbarā, Svayambhu-rājNī, and Nīlesvarī. She is always a supramundane (LOKOTTARA) being and is considered to be a protector of all Tibet; in this role she is seen as a wrathful form of TĀRĀ. In the DGE LUGS sect, she is an important protector, particularly as the main protectress of the DALAI LAMAS; she is propitiated daily in rituals and a THANG KA of her is always kept in the presence of the Dalai Lama. Each Dalai Lama would try to visit her sacred lake, LHA MO BLA MTSHO, at least once during his life to receive visions on the water's surface regarding his future activities and death, a tradition said to date back to the first Dalai Lama, DGE 'DUN GRUB. The lake is also believed to display signs concerning the future rebirth of the Dalai Lama and PAn CHEN LF. Most recently, in 1933 the regent of Tibet, Rwa sgreng Rin po che, saw visions in the lake that indicated the birthplace and circumstances of the fourteenth Dalai Lama. At Tibetan Buddhist temples, long lines of ordinary people are often seen at the chapel of Dpal ldan lha mo carrying small bottles of chang (barley beer) or black tea as offerings for her.

dravyayajna ::: material and physical offering.

dual boot "operating system" Any system offering the user the choice of two {operation systems} (OSes) under which to start a computer. A dual boot system allows the user to run programs for both operating systems on a single computer (though not simultaneously). The term "multiple boot" or "multiboot" extends the idea to more than two OSes. The OSes are generally unaware of each other's existence. They are installed on separate {hard disk} {partitions} or on separate disks. They may be able to access each other's files, possibly via some extra {driver} software if they use different {file systems}. The OSes need not be completely different - they might be different versions of {Microsoft Windows} (e.g. {Windows XP} and {Windows NT}) or {Linux} (e.g. {Debian} and {Fedora}). A dual boot system differs from an {emulator} such as {vmware}, which runs one or more OSes "on top" of the primary OS, using its resources. (2005-02-01)

dual boot ::: (operating system) Any system offering the user the choice of two operation systems (OSes) under which to start a computer. A dual boot system (though not simultaneously). The term multiple boot or multiboot extends the idea to more than two OSes.The OSes are generally unaware of each other's existence. They are installed on separate hard disk partitions or on separate disks. They may be able to access each other's files, possibly via some extra driver software if they use different file systems.The OSes need not be completely different - they might be different versions of Microsoft Windows (e.g. Windows XP and Windows NT) or Linux (e.g. Debian and Fedora).A dual boot system differs from an emulator such as vmware, which runs one or more OSes on top of the primary OS, using its resources.(2005-02-01)

Due diligence – A qualitative assessment of management’s character and capability. Comprehensive due diligence may also include an examination of the books and records, asset appraisals, reviews of the company's other debt obligations, legal and accounting affairs, internal controls, planned capital expenditures, and other matters that bear on the company's future success and prof­itability. Due diligence is a legal requirement before public offerings.

eldorado(s) ::: 1. A legendary treasure city of South America believed to contain an abundance of gold, sought by the early Spanish Conquistadors. 2. Any place offering great wealth.

EMU8000 ::: (multimedia, hardware, music) The Advanced WavEffect music synthesizer integrated circuit used on the SB AWE32 card.The EMU8000 is a sub-system offering high quality music synthesis and an effect engine which provides musical effects like reverb and chorus to MIDI playback. The EMU8000 supports up to 32 voices, and the effect amount for each voice can be controlled via MIDI. (1996-12-15)

EMU8000 "multimedia, hardware, music" The "{Advanced WavEffect}" music synthesizer {integrated circuit} used on the {SB AWE32} card. The EMU8000 is a sub-system offering high quality music synthesis and an "effect {engine}" which provides musical effects like reverb and chorus to {MIDI} playback. The EMU8000 supports up to 32 voices, and the effect amount for each voice can be controlled via MIDI. (1996-12-15)

erzhong gongyang. (J. nishu no kuyo; K. ijong kongyang 二種供養). In Chinese, "two kinds of offerings" (S. PuJĀ/pujanā). There are several lists. (1) The offering that is in accord with principle (LI gongyang), and the offering that is in accord with phenomena (SHI gongyang). The former is the "glorifying" of the three jewels (RATNATRAYA) by means of attaining spiritual realization and undertaking spiritual practice; the latter are offerings of material support. (2) The offering made to those who are freed from the fetters, or SAMYOJANA (chuchan gongyang), and the offering made to those who are still subject to the fetters (zaichan gongyang). (3) Material offerings (cai gongyang) and offerings of the DHARMA (fa gongyang): the former involves material goods; the latter involves the explication, promotion, implementation, and promulgation of the Buddhist teachings.

expiation ::: n. --> The act of making satisfaction or atonement for any crime or fault; the extinguishing of guilt by suffering or penalty.
The means by which reparation or atonement for crimes or sins is made; an expiatory sacrifice or offering; an atonement.
An act by which the treats of prodigies were averted among the ancient heathen.


ex-voto ::: n. --> An offering to a church in fulfillment of a vow.

Fahua jing lüeshu. (J. Hokekyo ryakusho; K. Pophwa kyong yakso 法華經略疏). In Chinese, "A Brief Commentary on the 'Lotus Sutra,'" the earliest extant Chinese commentary on the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, though there is considerable controversy regarding its authenticity. The text is attributed to DAOSHENG from the Liu-Song period (420-479), who was one of the direct disciples of the Kuchean translator KUMĀRAJĪVA. Daosheng claimed that the treatise combined the famous translator's lectures notes on the Saddharmapundarīkasutra with Daosheng's own insights. If authentic, this commentary would be Daosheng's only surviving work, offering a rare perspective into the way the Saddharmapundarīkasutra was understood and interpreted by Kumārajīva and his circle of adherents. Employing expressions found in the Chinese "Book of Changes" (Yijing), this commentary discusses the notions of "consummate perfection" (yuan) and a peculiar MAHĀYĀNA definition of the "middle way" (C. zhongdao, MADHYAMAPRATIPAD), notions that were further elaborated by subsequent TIANTAI and HUAYAN exegetes.

Fahua wubai wen lun. (J. Hokke gohyakumonron; K. Pophwa obaek mun non 法華五百問論). In Chinese, "Treatise on Five Hundred Questions Regarding the 'Lotus Sutra,'" in three rolls; text composed by JINGXI ZHANRAN (711-782) to refute the Chinese YOGĀCĀRA school's (see FAXIANG ZONG) interpretation of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA. It is so named because it contains roughly five hundred entries offering rejoinders (mainly from a TIANTAI position) against hypothetical Faxiang argumentations. Questions such as whether one's spiritual potential is determined and fixed (see GOTRA), whether consciousness is fundamentally defiled or innately immaculate, and the relation between the different Buddhist "vehicles" (YĀNA) have been addressed in this polemical work.

Fascination Bewitching, exercising a charm or spell over another person or an animal, consciously or unconsciously, either for good or ill, but more often the word has an evil implication. True fascination is never used by any of the right-hand path, for their working is invariably by arousing the innate spiritual, intellectual, and psychic powers inherent in others, and training the individual to take command of these powers. Fascination is exercised by snakes on birds, and by the human eye on beasts. It is used as an evil power by sorcerers, and is exercised more or less consciously by ordinary people upon each other. It is even taught today as an art for swaying the minds of customers, or more obviously by advertisements offering to confer occult powers for a fee.

First fruits: The offering of the first produce of the earth, the first animals killed or trapped in the hunting season, the firstlings of the flock, etc., to the gods most concerned with that particular activity which produced these first fruits, etc., or to the priests of those gods. In ancient days, the practice extended sometimes also to the first child of a man.

Fixed price - 1.the price that serves as a standard for the valuation of certain inventory accounts (i.e., raw materials, work in progress, and finished goods) in standard costing. OR 2. the price that must be charged under a contract regardless of production costs. Or 3. an economic concept utilized by governmental units establishing a fixed price for a price floor (below which the price is not legally allowed to fall) and price ceilings (above which the price is not legally allowed to rise) on certain regulated goods and services. Or 4. the price at which investment bankers agree to sell the issue to the investing public in a public offering of new security issues.

FreeHEP ::: An organisation offering a repository of software and related information for high energy physics applications.

FreeHEP An organisation offering a repository of software and related information for high energy physics applications.

freewill ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to free will; voluntary; spontaneous; as, a freewill offering.

Fu fazang yinyuan zhuan. (J. Fuhozo innenden; K. Pu popchang inyon chon 付法藏因傳). In Chinese, "History of the Transmission of the Dharma-Storehouse," a lineage history of the Indian Buddhist patriarchs, purportedly translated in 472 by Kinkara (d.u.) and Tanyao (fl. 450-490) of the Northern Wei dynasty, but now known to be an indigenous Chinese composition, in six rolls. The Fu fazang yinyuan zhuan outlines the history of the transmission of the dharma-storehouse (fazang), viz., the lineage of teachers, following the BUDDHA's PARINIRLĀnA, beginning with the first patriarch of the tradition, the elder MAHĀLĀsYAPA, and ending with the beheading of the putative twenty-fourth patriarch, SiMha bhiksu, at the hand of the tyrant Mihirakula, the king of Damila. This account of the Buddhist transmission lineage was adopted in TIANTAI ZHIYI's magnum opus MOHE ZHIGUAN and exerted much influence over the development of the transmission histories of the the TIANTAI ZONG and the CHAN ZONG (see CHUANDENG LU). Both the Tiantai and Chan schools thus hold this text in high esteem, as offering documentary evidence for their sectarian accounts of the Buddhist transmission lineage. Despite the wide influence of the Fu fazang yinyuan zhuan within Chinese Buddhism, however, the text seems not to be a translation of an Indian original but is instead a Chinese composition (see APOCRYPHA). As the discussions of the text in the DA TANG NIEDIAN LU and LIDAI SANBAO JI both suggest, the Fu fazang yinyuan zhuan may have been compiled in response to the persecution of Buddhism that occurred during the reign of the Northern Wei emperor Taiwu (r. 441-451). Later, after his successor, Emperor Wencheng (r. 452-465), had ascended to the throne and revived Buddhism, Tanyao and his collaborator Kinkara were inspired to compose this book at the cave site of Beitai in order to clarify definitively the orthodox lineage of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha. The book also largely resembles Chinese recensions of the biography of King AsOKA and thus probably could not have been a translation of an Indian text. Finally, many of the sources cited in the book are otherwise unknown and their authenticity is dubious. For all these reasons, it is now generally accepted that the text is of Chinese provenance.

Fumu enzhong jing. (J. Bumo onjugyo; K. Pumo ŭnjung kyong 父母恩重經). In Chinese, "The Scripture on the Profundity of Parental Kindness," an indigenous Buddhist scripture, composed in the seventh century that extols the virtues of filial piety (C. xiao). There are several different recensions of this sutra, including one discovered in the caves of DUNHUANG. The scripture denounces unfilial sons who, after their marriages, neglect and abuse their parents, and instead urges that they requite the kindness of their parents by making offerings at the ghost festival (C. YULANBEN; S. *ULLAMBANA) and by copying this scripture and reciting it out loud. This text seems to be related to other earlier Chinese APOCRYPHA, such as the Fumu enzhong nanbao jing ("The Scripture on the Difficulty of Requiting Parental Kindness") and the YULANPEN JING ("Ullambana Scripture"), and displays the possible influence of the indigenous Confucian tradition. The Fumu enzhong jing continues to be one of the most popular scriptures in East Asian Buddhism and is frequently cited in the Buddhist literature of China, Korea, and Japan.

FUSE ::: A DEC software development environment for ULTRIX, offering an integrated toolkit for developing, testing, debugging and maintenance.

FUSE A {DEC} {software development environment} for {ULTRIX}, offering an integrated toolkit for developing, testing, debugging and maintenance.

fuzangwu. (J. fukuzomotsu; K. pokchangmul 腹藏物). In Chinese, "interred objects," referring to items enshrined within the cavities of buddha images, a practice widespread in the Buddhist traditions of East Asia (if not throughout all of Buddhism). Typically the "lost-wax" casting process for creating iron or bronze images would leave a substantial cavity inside the image, in which could be interred such sacred objects as written or printed scriptures, DHĀRAnī, and MANTRA; smaller images of buddhas and bodhisattvas; information on the creation of the image, lists of sponsoring donors, and various dedications and vows; replicas of internal organs carved from wood or sown from cloth; or paddy rice, hulled rice, and soy beans as a form of permanent offering to the Buddha. The sealing of such things inside an image often took place as part of the consecration ritual for the image. Wooden images were also often carved in imitation of cast images in order to leave such an interment cavity. By serving as a repository of sacred objects, the image could thus serve not only as an object of worship but also play a role similar to that of a STuPA or CAITYA.

ganacakra. (T. tshogs kyi 'khor lo/tshogs). In Sanskrit, lit. "circle of assembly" or "feast"; originally, the term may have referred to an actual gathering of male and female tāntrikas engaging in antinomian behavior, including ingesting substances ordinarily deemed unclean, and sexual activities ordinarily deemed taboo. In Tibet, the ganacakra is typically a ritualized tantric liturgy, often performed by celibate monks, that involves visualizing impure substances and transforming them into a nectar (AMṚTA; PANCĀMṚTA), imagining the bliss of high tantric attainment, and mentally offering this to buddhas, bodhisattvas, and various deities (see T. TSHOGS ZHING) and to oneself visualized as a tantric deity. The ritual is regarded as a rapid means of accumulating the equipment (SAMBHĀRA) required for full enlightenment. In Tibet the word is inextricably linked with rituals for worshipping one's teacher (GURUYOGA) and in that context means an extended ritual performed on special days based on practices of highest yoga tantra (ANUTTARAYOGATANTRA). ¶ To start the ganacakra ritual, a large accumulation of food, including GTOR MA, bread, sweets, and fruit is placed near the altar, often supplemented by offerings from participants; a small plate with tiny portions of meat, a small container of an alcoholic beverage, and yogurt mixed with red jam is placed in a small container nearby. After visualizing one's teacher in the form of the entire pantheon of buddhas, bodhisattvas, and so on, the ganacakra consists of worship on the model of the BHADRACARĪPRAnIDHĀNA, i.e., the seven-branch worship (SAPTĀnGAVIDHI) of going for refuge, confessing transgressions, giving gifts, rejoicing, asking the teacher to turn the wheel of dharma, asking the buddhas not to pass into NIRVĀnA, and, finally, dedicating the merit to full enlightenment (see PARInĀMANĀ). Following this, the participants visualize the nectar (AMṚTA) and the bliss of high tantric attainment. Three participants then line up in front of the officiating master (VAJRĀCĀRYA) and ritually offer a plate with a gtor ma and other parts of the collected offerings, along with a tiny bit of meat, a slight taste of alcohol, and a drop of the mixed yogurt and jam. While singing tantric songs extolling the bliss of tantric attainment, the rest of the offerings are divided up equally among the other participants, who are also given a tiny bit of meat, a slight taste of alcohol, and a drop of the mixed yogurt and jam. The ganacakra forms the central part of the worship of the teacher (T. bla ma mchod pa) ritual and is a marker of religious identity in Tibetan Buddhism, because participants visualize their teacher in the form of the head of the particular sect, tradition, or monastery to which they are attached, with the historical buddha, and the tantric buddha telescoped into smaller and smaller figures in his heart; the entire pantheon of buddhas, bodhisattvas and so on are then arrayed around that form. A ganacakra is customarily performed at the end of a large ABHIsEKA (consecration) or teaching on TANTRA, where participants can number in the thousands.

Ganachakra ::: In Tantric practice this is a group gathering and laying out of an offering feast combined with ritual and festivities as part of a sadhana.

gandhaghatikā. (T. spos snod; C. xianglu; J. koro; K. hyangno 香爐). In Sanskrit, "censer," "incense burner"; a small stove with a perforated lid, both typically made of bronze or pottery, in which incense is burned as an offering during the performance of a ritual. In certain VINAYA traditions, such as the DHARMAGUPTAKA (see SIFEN LÜ), the censer is included in a list of eighteen requisites (S. astādasadravya; see PARIsKĀRA; NIsRAYA) that monks were allowed to keep, along with tooth cleaners, soap, the three robes, water bottle, begging bowl, sitting mat, walking staff, water filter, handkerchief, knife, fire starter, tweezers, sleeping hammock, sutras, vinaya texts, buddha images, and bodhisattva images.

gcod. (cho). A Tibetan term, from the verb "to cut" or "to sever;" a Tibetan tantric practice for severing attachment. The full name of the practice is bdud kyi gcod yul, or "the demon to be severed," and is a Tibetan tantric practice in which the meditator, through visualization, offers his or her body to an assembly of benevolent and malevolent deities as a means of accumulating merit and eliminating attachment to the body. The tradition of gcod, together with that of ZHI BYED or "pacification," is commonly classified among eight important tantric traditions and transmission lineages that spread throughout Tibet, the so-called "eight great conveyances that are lineages of achievement" (SGRUB BRGYUD SHING RTA CHEN PO BRGYAD). The practice was originally promulgated by the twelfth-century female adept MA GCIG LAB SGRON, who described it as a practice that severs (gcod) attachment to one's body, dualistic thinking, and conceptions of hope and fear. Although usually practiced by solitary meditators in isolated and frightening locations, gcod liturgies are also performed by monastic assemblies-both accompanied by the ritual music of the hand drum (see dAMARU) and the human leg-bone trumpet. The meditation, rooted in PRĀJNĀPĀRAMITĀ and MAHĀMUDRĀ, involves the visualized offering of the adept's body, flesh, blood, bones, and organs, as food for a vast assembly of beings, including local spirits and demons. It is also commonly used as a ritual for healing or protection.

Gektor ::: An offering to harmful entities in an effort to appease them. This type of working can be done prior to working in an area believed to have such entities so long as the offering is removed from the area before beginning any zone rites.

gift ::: v. t. --> Anything given; anything voluntarily transferred by one person to another without compensation; a present; an offering.
The act, right, or power of giving or bestowing; as, the office is in the gift of the President.
A bribe; anything given to corrupt.
Some quality or endowment given to man by God; a preeminent and special talent or aptitude; power; faculty; as, the gift of wit; a gift for speaking.


gnas skor ba. (nekorwa). In Tibetan, lit. "going around a [sacred] place," generally translated as "pilgrimage," a pervasive practice of Tibetan Buddhism. Tibetan pilgrimage is most often a communal practice, involving a group of persons of the same family, the same village, or the same monastery, in some cases led by one or more monks or lamas who provide information and religious instruction along the route. Pilgrimage is undertaken to accrue merit and to expiate transgressions, but it also plays an important social and economic role in Tibetan society. Once the pilgrimage begins, pilgrims will do everything possible not to turn back; failure to complete the journey is thought to be like breaking a vow. Pilgrims generally traverse the pilgrimage route on foot; it is said that more merit is accrued if one walks rather than travels on horseback. The length of the pilgrimage varies according to the distance traveled, the season, the number of mountain passes to be crossed, and the number of sites to be visited. The trip can sometimes take several years, especially if the pilgrims perform prostrations along the entire route. Pilgrims make offerings at the monasteries and temples they visit, both on behalf of themselves but also for relatives who have not made the journey. Monasteries offer pilgrims ceremonial scarves (kha btags), blessed pills, and sometimes also food and lodging. Among the most important destinations for pilgrims is the city of LHA SA. There are eight famous mountains and mountain ranges, including Mount KAILĀSA in western Tibet and Dag pa shel ri (the Crystal Mountain) in TSA RI, a site sacred to CAKRASAMVARA on the border with eastern Nepal, and further afield the sacred sites in India (BODHGAYĀ, SĀRNĀTH, etc.) and in China (WUTAISHAN, etc.). See also MAHĀSTHĀNA.

goffering ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Goffer

Going public (initial public offering IPO) - Refers to those activities and steps that relate to and are needed when offering a private company's shares to the public at large i.e. floating the private company on the stock exchange.

Golden handcuffs - Contractual agreement almost virtually assuring that the stockbroker will stay with the brokerage firm for a speci­fied time period. The incentive may be in the form of high commission rates, bonuses, participation in a forthcoming IPO (Initial Public Offering) of the brokerage firm itself, or other attractive fringe benefits. The contract may specify a penalty the broker will incur such as forfeiting past commissions if he or she leaves the brokerage firm before a specified date.

gongde yuan. (J. kudokuin; K. kongdok won 功德院). In Chinese, "merit cloister," a semiprivate Buddhist institution common during the Tang and Song dynasties. These merit cloisters were sometimes private monasteries established on the burial grounds of elite Chinese families; in many cases, however, they were not new temples at all but instead appendages to officially sanctioned monasteries. Once the merit cloister was established on the monastery's grounds, the family could then claim the entire monastery as its own, transfer title of its landed estate to the monastery-and, like a premodern tax shelter, avoid paying property taxes to the government-but still retain control over the entire property. Unlike public monasteries, where offerings made by private donors became the permanent property of the monastery, the merit cloister was a hybrid institution: donated lands were considered to be the monastery's property in the eyes of the government, but the families in reality retained effective control over the disposition of those lands, even using the tax-free income they generated to acquire still more property for the family. The family that established the merit cloister also retained control over the administration of the monastery, including the right to hire, and fire, the abbot. As one transnational example, Huiyinsi (Ocean Seal Monastery) in the Southern Song capital of Hangzhou effectively became a merit cloister for the ruling family of the Korean Koryo dynasty (918-1392). ŬICH'oN (1055-1101), the prominent monk and fourth son of the Koryo king Munjong (r. 1047-1083), studied at Huiyinsi with the Huayan teacher Jingyuan (1011-1088). After Ŭich'on's death, the Koryo dynasty continued to provide an annual stipend to Huiyinsi to maintain a virtual merit cloister for the deceased prince, and retained the authority at certain points in the monastery's history to appoint its abbot. Koryo support was so substantial and continuous that the monastery came to be better known by its nickname Gaolisi (Korea Monastery).

Groupwise "software, networking" A {workgroup} application suite offering {electronic mail} and diary scheduling from {Novell, Inc.}. It can operate on a number of {platforms}. Groupwise was previously known as {WordPerfect Office}, and is an extensible system suitable for {LAN} or {WAN} operation. {Mail gateway} software is available for a number of {protocols} including {SMTP}, allowing the exchange of mail with the {Internet}. (1995-09-23)

Groupwise ::: (software, networking) A workgroup application suite offering electronic mail and diary scheduling from Novell, Inc.. It can operate on a number of platforms.Groupwise was previously known as WordPerfect Office, and is an extensible system suitable for LAN or WAN operation. Mail gateway software is available for a number of protocols including SMTP, allowing the exchange of mail with the Internet. (1995-09-23)

GTK+ "graphics, interface, library, open source" ("The {GIMP} ToolKit", or incorrectly "{Gnu} ToolKit" or "Generic ToolKit") A {multi-platform} toolkit for creating {graphical user interfaces}. Offering a complete set of {widgets}, GTK+ is suitable for projects ranging from small one-off projects to complete application suites. GTK+ consists of the three parts; {GLib}, providing basic data structures, {event handling}, {threads}, etc., {Pango}, for {layout} and {rendering} of text, and {ATK}, providing interfaces for {accessibility}. {GTK+ Home (http://gtk.org/)}. (2003-12-03)

gtor ma. (torma). The Tibetan translation of the Sanskrit term bali (offering, tribute), an offering of food to propitiate a deity. There are ritual texts (S. balividhi) for constructing and offering gtor ma, differing based on the purpose of the offering and the status of the recipient. In Tibet the gtor ma is always a distinctive conical shape, and became a canvas for extremely ornate butter sculpture. The spectacular gtor ma ritual culminated in the gtor bzlog (tordok) or gtor rgyag (torgyak) on the last day of the Tibetan year, during which the monastic assembly would march out with the gtor ma. All negativities and bad spirits of the departing year are drawn to the offering, which is then hurled into a blazing pyre accompanied by a cacophony of instruments and the loud bangs of firecrackers. On the last of the fifteen days of festivities celebrating lo gsar (new year) in LHA SA, the bco lnga mchod pa competition to judge the best gtor ma was held; it is reported that some gtor ma were so high that ladders had to be used to reach the top; they were decorated with extremely ornate butter sculptures, including figures manipulated like puppets with hidden strings. There are a variety of gtor mas in Tibet, usually made of barley flour with butter if they are expected to last and be eaten, or with water if they are to be thrown out; they may be painted red if the recipient protector or deity is wrathful, and clear or whitish in color if in a peaceful form.

Haoma (Avestan) Hūm (Pahlavi) Homa (Persian) The Tree of Life; there are two haomas: the yellow or golden earthly haoma, which when prepared and used as an offering for sacrifice is the king of healing plants, the most sacred and powerful of all the offerings prescribed in the Mazdean scriptures. This haoma is equivalent to the Hindu soma — the sacred drink used in the temples, and is said to endow he who drinks it with the property of mind.

Hārītī. (T. 'Phrog ma; C. Guizimushen; J. Kishimojin; K. Kwijamosin 鬼子母神). In Sanskrit, Hārītī, "the mother of demons," is a ravenous demoness (alternatively called either a yaksinī or a rāksasī), who is said to eat children. At the pleading of her victims' distraught mothers, sĀKYAMUNI Buddha kidnapped one of Hārītī's own five hundred children and hid the child in his begging bowl (PĀTRA) so she would experience the same kind of suffering she had caused other parents; realizing the pain she had brought others prompted her to convert to Buddhism. Subsequently, Hārītī came to be recognized specifically as a protector of both pregnant women and children, and laywomen made pilgrimages to sites associated with her and her manifestations. More generally, Hārītī is also thought to protect the SAMGHA and, indeed, all sentient beings (SATTVA), from depredations by evil spirits. Monasteries may have a small shrine to Hārītī near the entrance gate or kitchen, where monks and nuns will leave a small offering of food to her before meals. She is often paired with her consort PāNcika (KUBERA), one of the twenty-eight YAKsA generals in VAIsRAVAnA's army, who fathered her five hundred children; indeed, all demons (yaksa) are said to be the "sons of Hārītī" (Hārītīputra). The couple is commonly depicted surrounded by young children, offering the laity a positive portrayal of marital fidelity and reproductive fecundity, which contrasts with the world-renouncing stereotypes of Buddhism.

havih ::: the offering, the divine food, the wine of delight and immortality. [Ved.]

havismah ::: the deva, lord of the divine offering. [Ved.]

Havyavahana (Sanskrit) Havyavāhana The fire of the gods; the sacrificial fire which receives offerings to the gods. In the Puranas, Suchi, the solar fire, is made its parent.

heave offering ::: --> An offering or oblation heaved up or elevated before the altar, as the shoulder of the peace offering. See Wave offering.

High Performance Serial Bus ::: (bus, standard) (Or IEEE 1394, FireWire, I-Link) A 1995 Macintosh/IBM PC serial bus interface standard offering high-speed communications and isochronous real-time data services.1394 can transfer data between a computer and its peripherals at 100, 200, or 400 Mbps, with a planed increase to 2 Gbps. Cable length is limited to 4.5 m but up to 16 cables can be daisy-chained yielding a total length of 72 m.It can daisy-chain together up to 63 peripherals in a tree-like structure (as opposed to SCSI's linear structure). It allows peer-to-peer device than SCSI cables but can supply up to 60 watts of power, allowing low-consumption devices to operate without a separate power cord.Some expensive camcorders have included this bus since Autumn 1995. It is expected to be used to carry SCSI, with possible application to home automation using repeaters.See also Universal Serial Bus, FC-AL.(2000-09-03)

High Performance Serial Bus "hardware, standard" (Or "{IEEE} 1394") A 1995 {Macintosh}/{IBM PC} {serial bus} interface {standard} offering {isochronous} {real-time} data transfer. 1394 can transfer data between a computer and its {peripherals} at 100, 200, or 400 {Mbps}, with a planed increase to 2 {Gbps}. Cable length is limited to 4.5 m but up to 16 cables can be daisy-chained yielding a total length of 72 m. It can {daisy-chain} together up to 63 peripherals in a tree-like structure (as opposed to {SCSI}'s linear structure). It allows peer-to-peer communication, e.g. between a {scanner} and a {printer}, without using system memory or the {CPU}. It is designed to support {plug-and-play} and {hot swapping}. Its six-wire cable is not only more convenient than SCSI cables but can supply up to 60 watts of power, allowing low-consumption devices to operate without a separate power cord. Some expensive camcorders included this bus from 1995. It is expected to be used to carry {SCSI}, with possible application to {home automation} using {repeaters}. {Sony} calls it {I-Link}, most people call it "FireWire". See also {Universal Serial Bus}, {FC-AL}. (2014-09-06)

Holocaust ::: (Gre. Entire Burnt Offering) A term used to refer to the genocidal Nazi policy of exterminating the Jews during World War II.

holocaust ::: n. --> A burnt sacrifice; an offering, the whole of which was consumed by fire, among the Jews and some pagan nations.
Sacrifice or loss of many lives, as by the burning of a theater or a ship. [An extended use not authorized by careful writers.]


Holy Water As practiced in the Roman Catholic Church the rite is virtually identical with that of the ancient Egyptians: the water which has been blessed or consecrated is used to sprinkle the worshipers and objects used in the church service. It was unquestionably adopted from the ancient Mysteries, and became a rite of external symbolic purification. In Egypt and pagan Rome, it “accompanied the rite of bread and wine. ‘Holy water was sprinkled by the Egyptian priest alike upon his gods’ images and the faithful. It was both poured and sprinkled. A brush has been found, supposed to have been used for that purpose, as at this day.’ (Bonwick’s Egyptian Belief [p. 418]) As to the bread, ‘the cakes of Isis . . . were placed upon the altar. Gliddon writes that they were “identical in shape with the consecrated cake of the Roman and Eastern Churches.” Melville assures us “the Egyptians marked this holy bread with St. Andrew’s cross.” The Presence bread was broken before being distributed by the priests to the people, and was supposed to become the flesh and blood of the Deity. The miracle was wrought by the hand of the officiating priest, who blessed the food. . . . Rouge tells us “the bread offerings bear the imprint of the fingers, the mark of consecration”.’ (Ibid, page 418)” (TG 144-5).

homa &

homa ::: the burned offering. [Ved.]

homa. (T. sbyin sreg; C. humo; J. goma; K. homa 護摩). In Sanskrit, "burnt offering," an esoteric Buddhist ritual in which various offerings are consigned to flames. In the older Brahmanical traditions of the Indian subcontinent, burnt offerings were made through the medium of the deity AGNI (the god of fire) to the Vedic gods, in exchange for the boon of cattle and other forms of wealth. These rituals were systematized first in the Brāhmanas, and subsequently in the Āranyaka literature, where the exoteric homa rituals were questioned and reconceptualized as inner worship. Buddhist TANTRA includes both an outer offering of grain and other materials into a fire, and an inner offering into the fire of transcendental wisdom. In the latter, the inner offering is done by visualizing a skull cup (KAPĀLA) atop a triangular fire in a hearth made of three skulls. Impure objects are visualized as melting into a bliss-producing nectar (AMṚTA) that is then offered to one's GURU and to oneself visualized as the meditation deity. In Tibetan Buddhism, a homa ritual is often performed at the end of a meditation retreat as a means of purification.

hotr (Hotri) ::: the priest of the sacrifice, he who calls and brings the gods and gives them the offering. [Ved.] ::: hota [nominative]

Hotri (Sanskrit) Hotṛ An offerer of an oblation with fire, or burnt offering; hence a sacrificer, a priest. As used in the Rig-Veda, one of the four kinds of officiating priests at a sacrifice: he who invokes the gods by reciting the mantras from the Rig-Veda. In the Anugita the plural is used symbolically for the seven senses, which are represented as being seven priests: “the senses supply the fire of mind (i.e., desire) with the oblations of external pleasures.” Thus these seven are the causes of emancipation (cf TG 146).

human mind and body and the remoulding of their inner life into the divine image, — what the Vedic seers called the birth of the Son by the sacrifice. It is in fact by a continual sacrifice or offering, a sacrifice of adoration and aspiration, of works, of thought and knowledge, of the mounting flame of the Godward will 'that we build ourselves into the being of this Infinite.

Human sacrifice: The ceremonial killing of a human being as an offering to a god or for other mystical or magical purposes.

Hypothesis: In general, an assumption, a supposition, a conjecture, a postulate, a condition, an antecedent, a contingency, a possibility, a probability, a principle, a premiss, a ground or foundation, a tentative explanation, a probable cause, a theoretical situation, an academic question, a specific consideration, a conceded statement, a theory or view for debate or action, a likely relation, the conditioning of one thing by another. In logic, the conditional clause or antecedent in a hypothetical proposition. Also a thesis subordinate to a more general one. In methodology, a principle offered as a conditional explanation of a fact or a group of facts; or again, a provisional assumption about the ground of certain phenomena, used as a guiding norm in making observations and experiments until verified or disproved by subsequent evidence. A hypothesis is conditional or provisional, because it is based on probable and insufficient arguments or elements; yet, it is not an arbitrary opinion, but a justifiable assumption with some foundation in fact, this accounts for the expectation of some measure of agreement between the logical conclusion or implications drawn from a hypothesis, and the phenomena which are known or which may be determined by further tests. A scientific hypothesis must be   proposed after the observations it must explain (a posteriori),   compatible with established theories,   reasonable and relevant,   fruitful in its applications and controllable,   general in terms and more fundamental than the statements it has to explain. A hypothesis is descriptive (forecasting the external circumstances of the event) or explanatory (offering causal accounts of the event). There are two kinds of explanatory hypotheses   the hypothesis of law (or genetic hypothesis) which attempts to determine the manner in which the causes or conditions of a phenomenon operate and   the hypothesis of cause (or causal hypothesis) which attempt to determine the causes or conditions for the production of the phenomenon. A working hypothesis is a preliminary assumption based on few, uncertain or obscure elements, which is used provisionally as a guiding norm in the investigation of certain phenomena. Often, the difference between a working hypothesis and a scientific hypothesis is one of degree; and in any case, a hypothesis is seldom verified completely with all its detailed implications. The Socratic Method of Hypothesis, as developed by Plato in the Phaedo particularly, consists in positing an assumption without questioning its value, for the purpose of determining and analyzing its consequences only when these are clearly debated and judged, the assumption itself is considered for justification or rejection. Usually, a real condition is taken as a ground for inferences, as the aim of the method is to attain knowledge or to favor action. Plato used more specially the word "hypothesis" for the assumptions of geometry (postulates and nominal definitions) Anstotle extended this use to cover the immediate principles of mathematics. It may be observed that the modern hypothetico-deductive method in logical and mathematical theories, is a development of the Socratic method stripped of its ontological implications and purposes.

IBM System/36 "computer" A mid-range {computer} introduced in 1983, which remained popular in the 1990s because of its low cost and high performance. Prices started in the $20k range for the small 5362 to $100+k for the expanded 5360. In 1994, IBM introduced the Advanced 36 for $9,000. The largest 5360 had 7MB of {RAM} and 1432MB of {hard disk}. The smallest 5362 had 256K of RAM and 30MB of hard disk. The Advanced 36 had 64MB of RAM and 4300MB of hard disk, but design issues limit the amount of storage that can actually be addressed by the {operating system}; underlying {microcode} allowed additional RAM to cache disk reads and writes, allowing the Advanced 36 to outperform the S/36 by 600 to 800%. There was only one operating system for the S/36: SSP ({System Support Product}). SSP consumed about 7-10MB of hard drive space. Computer programs on the S/36 reside in "libraries," and the SSP itself resides in a special system library called

IBM System/36 ::: (computer) A mid-range computer introduced in 1983, which remained popular in the 1990s because of its low cost and high performance. Prices started in the $20k range for the small 5362 to $100+k for the expanded 5360. In 1994, IBM introduced the Advanced 36 for $9,000.The largest 5360 had 7MB of RAM and 1432MB of hard disk. The smallest 5362 had 256K of RAM and 30MB of hard disk. The Advanced 36 had 64MB of RAM and 4300MB of to cache disk reads and writes, allowing the Advanced 36 to outperform the S/36 by 600 to 800%.There was only one operating system for the S/36: SSP (System Support Product). SSP consumed about 7-10MB of hard drive space. Computer programs on the S/36 reside in libraries, and the SSP itself resides in a special system library called

In 496 B.C., he began 14 years of travelling from state to state, offering his service. He was politely consulted by princes and dukes, but no one would put his moral doctrines into practice. He was even sent away from Ch'i, threatened in Sung, driven out of Sung and Wei, and surrounded between Ch'en and Ts'ai. When in difficulty, he exclaimed, "Heaven has endowed me with a moral destiny. What can Huan Tuei (who threatened him) do to me?" Eventually he retired to Lu to study, teach and write.

In a more restricted sense, svadha is also the sacrificial offering or oblation made to each god, and is thus allegorically represented as a daughter of Daksha and wife of at least one class of the pitris, the agnishvattas and the kumaras. A svadha was therefore considered the highest form of benediction at a sacrifice, the inmost meaning being that one’s own essence is laid on the altar of self-abnegations to the good of all. The inmost self is “placed” or “fixed” in its own vitality, which becomes the carrier, supporter, and maintainer of the inner spiritual power.

incensation ::: n. --> The offering of incense.

incense ::: 1. An aromatic substance, such as wood or a gum that is burned to produce a pleasant odour. 2. The smoke or odour produced by the burning of such a substance. 3. Fig. Offering; homage.

In each case, the name of the realm indicates the object of meditation of the beings reborn there. Hence, in the first, for example, the beings perceive only infinite space. Rebirth in these different spheres is based on mastery of the corresponding four immaterial meditative absorptions (ĀRuPYĀVACARADHYĀNA; ārupyasamāpatti) in the previous life. While the devas of the sensuous realm and the realm of subtle materiality come to have larger and ever more splendid bodies at the more advanced levels of their heavens, the devas of the immaterial realm do not have even the subtlest foundation in materiality; their existence is so refined that it is not even possible to posit exactly where they dwell spatially. In some schools, such as the Sarvāstivāda, the immaterial realm does not even exist as a discrete place: rather, when a being who has mastered the immaterial absorptions dies, he is reborn at the very same location where he passed away, except now he is "immaterial" or "formless" and thus invisible to coarser beings. According to the Theravāda, even a mind-made body (MANOMAYAKĀYA) is excluded from this realm, for the devas here possess only the mind base (MANĀYATANA), mental objects (P. dhammāyatana), the elements of mental consciousness (P. manoviNNānadhātu), and the element of mental objects (P. dhammadhātu), needing only three nutriments (ĀHĀRA) to survive-contact (P. phassa), mental cognition (P. manosaNcetana), and consciousness (P. viNNāna). The Buddha claims to have lived among the devas of the immaterial realm in certain of his previous lives, but without offering any detailed description of those existences. ¶ In all realms, devas are born apparitionally. In the sensuous realm, devas are born in their mother's lap, appearing as if they are already five to ten years old at birth; by contrast, devas of the subtle-materiality and immaterial realms appear not to need the aid of parents; those in the subtle-materiality realm appear fully grown, while those in the immaterial realm do not appear at all, because they have no form. It is also said that, when devas are reborn, they are aware of their prior existence and of the specific KARMAN that led to their rebirth in the heavenly realms. The different deva realms are also distinguished by differences in nutriment, sexuality, requisites, and life span. The devas of the lower heavens of the sensuous realm consume ordinary food; those in the upper spheres of the sensuous realm and the lower levels of the realm of subtle materiality feed only on sensory contact; the devas of the upper levels of the realm of subtle materiality feed only on contemplation; those in the immaterial realm feed on cognition alone. Sexual differentiation remains only in the sensuous realm: in the heaven of the four heavenly kings and the heaven of the thirty-three, the devas engage in physical copulation, the devas of the yāma heaven engage in sexual union by embracing one another, the devas of the tusita heaven by holding hands, those of the nirmānarati heaven by smiling at one another, and those of the paranirmitavasavartin heaven by exchanging a single glance. Clothes are said to be used in all deva worlds except in the immaterial realm. The life spans of devas in the sensuous realm range from five hundred years for the gods of the heaven of the four heavenly kings to one thousand years for the trāyastriMsa gods, two thousand years for the yāma gods, four thousand years for the tusita gods, eight thousand years for the nirmānarati gods, and sixteen thousand years for the paranirmitavasavartin gods. However, there is a range of opinion of what constitutes a year in these heavens. For example, it is said that in the tusita heaven, four hundred human years equal one day in the life of a god of that heaven. The life spans of devas in the realm of subtle materiality are measured in eons (KALPA). The life spans of devas in the immaterial realm may appear as essentially infinite, but even those divinities, like all devas, are subject to impermanence (ANITYA) and will eventually die and be subject to further rebirths once the salutary meditative deed that caused them to be reborn there has been exhausted. The sutras say that for a deva of the sensuous realm, there are five portents of his impending death: the garlands of flowers he wears begin to fade, his clothes become soiled and his palace dusty, he begins to perspire, his body becomes opaque and loses its luster, and his throne becomes uncomfortable. At that point, the deva experiences a vision of his next place of rebirth. This vision is said to be one of the most horrible sufferings in saMsāra, because of its marked contrast to the magnificence of his current life. There are also said to be four direct reasons why devas die: exhaustion of their life spans, their previous merit, their food, and the arising of anger. ¶ Rebirth as a deva is presumed to be the reward of virtuous karman performed in previous lives and is thus considered a salutary, if provisional, religious goal. In the "graduated discourse" (P. ANUPUBBIKATHĀ; S. ANUPuRVIKATHĀ) taught by the Buddha, for example, the Buddha uses the prospect of heavenly rebirth (svargakathā), and the pleasures accruing thereto, as a means of attracting laypersons to the religious life. Despite the many appealing attributes of these heavenly beings, such as their physical beauty, comfortable lives, and long life span, even heavenly existence is ultimately unsatisfactory because it does not offer a definitive escape from the continued cycle of birth and death (saMsāra). Since devas are merely enjoying the rewards of their previous good deeds rather than performing new wholesome karman, they are considered to be stagnating spiritually. This spiritual passivity explains why they must be reborn in lower levels of existence, and especially as human beings, in order to further their cultivation. For these reasons, Buddhist soteriological literature sometimes condemns religious practice performed solely for the goal of achieving rebirth as a deva. It is only certain higher level of devas, such as the devas belonging to the five pure abodes (suddhāvāsa), that are not subject to further rebirth, because they have already eliminated all the fetters (saMyojana) associated with that realm and are destined to achieve arhatship. Nevertheless, over the history of Buddhism, rebirth in heaven as a deva has been a more common goal for religious practice, especially among the laity, than the achievement of nirvāna. ¶ The sutras include frequent reference to "gods and men" (S. devamanusya; C. tianren) as the objects of the Buddha's teachings. Despite the fact that this is how most Buddhist traditions have chosen to translate the Sanskrit compound, "gods" here is probably meant to refer to the terrestrial divinities of "princes" or "kings," rather than heavenly beings; thus, the compound should be more properly (if, perhaps, pedantically) rendered "princes and peoples." Similarly, as the "divinities" of this world, buddhas, bodhisattvas, and arhats are also sometimes referred to as devas. See also DEVALOKA; DEVATĀ.

In human beings the pranic life-currents become impregnated with the manasic quality conferred by the agnishvattas. The lower elements of kama-prana are used in the blood offerings and sacrifices of voodoo rites and other forms of black magic:

Initial_Coin_Offering ::: (ICO ::: An unregulated means by which funds are raised for a new cryptocurrency venture. An Initial Coin Offering (ICO) is used by startups to bypass the rigorous and regulated capital-raising process required by venture capitalists or banks. In an ICO campaign, a percentage of the cryptocurrency is sold to early backers of the project in exchange for legal tender or other cryptocurrencies, but usually for Bitcoin. Also called an Initial Public Coin Offering (IPCO).

inspirational; offering or providing hope, encouragement, salvation, etc.

INTEGRAL YOGA ::: This yoga accepts the value of cosmic existence and holds it to be a reality; its object is to enter into a higher Truth-Consciousness or Divine Supramental Consciousness in which action and creation are the expression not of ignorance and imperfection, but of the Truth, the Light, the Divine Ānanda. But for that, the surrender of the mortal mind, life and body to the Higher Consciousnessis indispensable, since it is too difficult for the mortal human being to pass by its own effort beyond mind to a Supramental Consciousness in which the dynamism is no longer mental but of quite another power. Only those who can accept the call to such a change should enter into this yoga.

Aim of the Integral Yoga ::: It is not merely to rise out of the ordinary ignorant world-consciousness into the divine consciousness, but to bring the supramental power of that divine consciousness down into the ignorance of mind, life and body, to transform them, to manifest the Divine here and create a divine life in Matter.

Conditions of the Integral Yoga ::: This yoga can only be done to the end by those who are in total earnest about it and ready to abolish their little human ego and its demands in order to find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasyā needed too constant and intense.

Method in the Integral Yoga ::: To concentrate, preferably in the heart and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness. One can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is the beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one’s own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother’s Power and Presence.

Integral method ::: The method we have to pursue is to put our whole conscious being into relation and contact with the Divine and to call Him in to transform Our entire being into His, so that in a sense God Himself, the real Person in us, becomes the sādhaka of the sādhana* as well as the Master of the Yoga by whom the lower personality is used as the centre of a divine transfiguration and the instrument of its own perfection. In effect, the pressure of the Tapas, the force of consciousness in us dwelling in the Idea of the divine Nature upon that which we are in our entirety, produces its own realisation. The divine and all-knowing and all-effecting descends upon the limited and obscure, progressively illumines and energises the whole lower nature and substitutes its own action for all the terms of the inferior human light and mortal activity.

In psychological fact this method translates itself into the progressive surrender of the ego with its whole field and all its apparatus to the Beyond-ego with its vast and incalculable but always inevitable workings. Certainly, this is no short cut or easy sādhana. It requires a colossal faith, an absolute courage and above all an unflinching patience. For it implies three stages of which only the last can be wholly blissful or rapid, - the attempt of the ego to enter into contact with the Divine, the wide, full and therefore laborious preparation of the whole lower Nature by the divine working to receive and become the higher Nature, and the eventual transformation. In fact, however, the divine strength, often unobserved and behind the veil, substitutes itself for the weakness and supports us through all our failings of faith, courage and patience. It” makes the blind to see and the lame to stride over the hills.” The intellect becomes aware of a Law that beneficently insists and a Succour that upholds; the heart speaks of a Master of all things and Friend of man or a universal Mother who upholds through all stumblings. Therefore this path is at once the most difficult imaginable and yet in comparison with the magnitude of its effort and object, the most easy and sure of all.

There are three outstanding features of this action of the higher when it works integrally on the lower nature. In the first place, it does not act according to a fixed system and succession as in the specialised methods of Yoga, but with a sort of free, scattered and yet gradually intensive and purposeful working determined by the temperament of the individual in whom it operates, the helpful materials which his nature offers and the obstacles which it presents to purification and perfection. In a sense, therefore, each man in this path has his own method of Yoga. Yet are there certain broad lines of working common to all which enable us to construct not indeed a routine system, but yet some kind of Shastra or scientific method of the synthetic Yoga.

Secondly, the process, being integral, accepts our nature such as it stands organised by our past evolution and without rejecting anything essential compels all to undergo a divine change. Everything in us is seized by the hands of a mighty Artificer and transformed into a clear image of that which it now seeks confusedly to present. In that ever-progressive experience we begin to perceive how this lower manifestation is constituted and that everything in it, however seemingly deformed or petty or vile, is the more or less distorted or imperfect figure of some elements or action in the harmony of the divine Nature. We begin to understand what the Vedic Rishis meant when they spoke of the human forefathers fashioning the gods as a smith forges the crude material in his smithy.

Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in Nature, in the other it becomes swift and selfconscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and therefore of right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution.

Key-methods ::: The way to devotion and surrender. It is the psychic movement that brings the constant and pure devotion and the removal of the ego that makes it possible to surrender.

The way to knowledge. Meditation in the head by which there comes the opening above, the quietude or silence of the mind and the descent of peace etc. of the higher consciousness generally till it envelops the being and fills the body and begins to take up all the movements.
Yoga by works ::: Separation of the Purusha from the Prakriti, the inner silent being from the outer active one, so that one has two consciousnesses or a double consciousness, one behind watching and observing and finally controlling and changing the other which is active in front. The other way of beginning the yoga of works is by doing them for the Divine, for the Mother, and not for oneself, consecrating and dedicating them till one concretely feels the Divine Force taking up the activities and doing them for one.

Object of the Integral Yoga is to enter into and be possessed by the Divine Presence and Consciousness, to love the Divine for the Divine’s sake alone, to be tuned in our nature into the nature of the Divine, and in our will and works and life to be the instrument of the Divine.

Principle of the Integral Yoga ::: The whole principle of Integral Yoga is to give oneself entirely to the Divine alone and to nobody else, and to bring down into ourselves by union with the Divine Mother all the transcendent light, power, wideness, peace, purity, truth-consciousness and Ānanda of the Supramental Divine.

Central purpose of the Integral Yoga ::: Transformation of our superficial, narrow and fragmentary human way of thinking, seeing, feeling and being into a deep and wide spiritual consciousness and an integrated inner and outer existence and of our ordinary human living into the divine way of life.

Fundamental realisations of the Integral Yoga ::: The psychic change so that a complete devotion can be the main motive of the heart and the ruler of thought, life and action in constant union with the Mother and in her Presence. The descent of the Peace, Power, Light etc. of the Higher Consciousness through the head and heart into the whole being, occupying the very cells of the body. The perception of the One and Divine infinitely everywhere, the Mother everywhere and living in that infinite consciousness.

Results ::: First, an integral realisation of Divine Being; not only a realisation of the One in its indistinguishable unity, but also in its multitude of aspects which are also necessary to the complete knowledge of it by the relative consciousness; not only realisation of unity in the Self, but of unity in the infinite diversity of activities, worlds and creatures.

Therefore, also, an integral liberation. Not only the freedom born of unbroken contact of the individual being in all its parts with the Divine, sāyujya mukti, by which it becomes free even in its separation, even in the duality; not only the sālokya mukti by which the whole conscious existence dwells in the same status of being as the Divine, in the state of Sachchidananda ; but also the acquisition of the divine nature by the transformation of this lower being into the human image of the divine, sādharmya mukti, and the complete and final release of all, the liberation of the consciousness from the transitory mould of the ego and its unification with the One Being, universal both in the world and the individual and transcendentally one both in the world and beyond all universe.

By this integral realisation and liberation, the perfect harmony of the results of Knowledge, Love and Works. For there is attained the complete release from ego and identification in being with the One in all and beyond all. But since the attaining consciousness is not limited by its attainment, we win also the unity in Beatitude and the harmonised diversity in Love, so that all relations of the play remain possible to us even while we retain on the heights of our being the eternal oneness with the Beloved. And by a similar wideness, being capable of a freedom in spirit that embraces life and does not depend upon withdrawal from life, we are able to become without egoism, bondage or reaction the channel in our mind and body for a divine action poured out freely upon the world.

The divine existence is of the nature not only of freedom, but of purity, beatitude and perfection. In integral purity which shall enable on the one hand the perfect reflection of the divine Being in ourselves and on the other the perfect outpouring of its Truth and Law in us in the terms of life and through the right functioning of the complex instrument we are in our outer parts, is the condition of an integral liberty. Its result is an integral beatitude, in which there becomes possible at once the Ānanda of all that is in the world seen as symbols of the Divine and the Ānanda of that which is not-world. And it prepares the integral perfection of our humanity as a type of the Divine in the conditions of the human manifestation, a perfection founded on a certain free universality of being, of love and joy, of play of knowledge and of play of will in power and will in unegoistic action. This integrality also can be attained by the integral Yoga.

Sādhanā of the Integral Yoga does not proceed through any set mental teaching or prescribed forms of meditation, mantras or others, but by aspiration, by a self-concentration inwards or upwards, by a self-opening to an Influence, to the Divine Power above us and its workings, to the Divine Presence in the heart and by the rejection of all that is foreign to these things. It is only by faith, aspiration and surrender that this self-opening can come.

The yoga does not proceed by upadeśa but by inner influence.

Integral Yoga and Gita ::: The Gita’s Yoga consists in the offering of one’s work as a sacrifice to the Divine, the conquest of desire, egoless and desireless action, bhakti for the Divine, an entering into the cosmic consciousness, the sense of unity with all creatures, oneness with the Divine. This yoga adds the bringing down of the supramental Light and Force (its ultimate aim) and the transformation of the nature.

Our yoga is not identical with the yoga of the Gita although it contains all that is essential in the Gita’s yoga. In our yoga we begin with the idea, the will, the aspiration of the complete surrender; but at the same time we have to reject the lower nature, deliver our consciousness from it, deliver the self involved in the lower nature by the self rising to freedom in the higher nature. If we do not do this double movement, we are in danger of making a tamasic and therefore unreal surrender, making no effort, no tapas and therefore no progress ; or else we make a rajasic surrender not to the Divine but to some self-made false idea or image of the Divine which masks our rajasic ego or something still worse.

Integral Yoga, Gita and Tantra ::: The Gita follows the Vedantic tradition which leans entirely on the Ishvara aspect of the Divine and speaks little of the Divine Mother because its object is to draw back from world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation beyond it.

The Tantric tradition leans on the Shakti or Ishvari aspect and makes all depend on the Divine Mother because its object is to possess and dominate the world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation through it.

This yoga insists on both the aspects; the surrender to the Divine Mother is essential, for without it there is no fulfilment of the object of the yoga.

Integral Yoga and Hatha-Raja Yogas ::: For an integral yoga the special methods of Rajayoga and Hathayoga may be useful at times in certain stages of the progress, but are not indispensable. Their principal aims must be included in the integrality of the yoga; but they can be brought about by other means. For the methods of the integral yoga must be mainly spiritual, and dependence on physical methods or fixed psychic or psychophysical processes on a large scale would be the substitution of a lower for a higher action. Integral Yoga and Kundalini Yoga: There is a feeling of waves surging up, mounting to the head, which brings an outer unconsciousness and an inner waking. It is the ascending of the lower consciousness in the ādhāra to meet the greater consciousness above. It is a movement analogous to that on which so much stress is laid in the Tantric process, the awakening of the Kundalini, the Energy coiled up and latent in the body and its mounting through the spinal cord and the centres (cakras) and the Brahmarandhra to meet the Divine above. In our yoga it is not a specialised process, but a spontaneous upnish of the whole lower consciousness sometimes in currents or waves, sometimes in a less concrete motion, and on the other side a descent of the Divine Consciousness and its Force into the body.

Integral Yoga and other Yogas ::: The old yogas reach Sachchidananda through the spiritualised mind and depart into the eternally static oneness of Sachchidananda or rather pure Sat (Existence), absolute and eternal or else a pure Non-exist- ence, absolute and eternal. Ours having realised Sachchidananda in the spiritualised mind plane proceeds to realise it in the Supramcntal plane.

The suprcfhe supra-cosmic Sachchidananda is above all. Supermind may be described as its power of self-awareness and W’orld- awareness, the world being known as within itself and not out- side. So to live consciously in the supreme Sachchidananda one must pass through the Supermind.

Distinction ::: The realisation of Self and of the Cosmic being (without which the realisation of the Self is incomplete) are essential steps in our yoga ; it is the end of other yogas, but it is, as it were, the beginning of outs, that is to say, the point where its own characteristic realisation can commence.

It is new as compared with the old yogas (1) Because it aims not at a departure out of world and life into Heaven and Nir- vana, but at a change of life and existence, not as something subordinate or incidental, but as a distinct and central object.

If there is a descent in other yogas, yet it is only an incident on the way or resulting from the ascent — the ascent is the real thing. Here the ascent is the first step, but it is a means for the descent. It is the descent of the new coosdousness attain- ed by the ascent that is the stamp and seal of the sadhana. Even the Tantra and Vaishnavism end in the release from life ; here the object is the divine fulfilment of life.

(2) Because the object sought after is not an individual achievement of divine realisation for the sake of the individual, but something to be gained for the earth-consciousness here, a cosmic, not solely a supra-cosmic acbievement. The thing to be gained also is the bringing of a Power of consciousness (the Supramental) not yet organised or active directly in earth-nature, even in the spiritual life, but yet to be organised and made directly active.

(3) Because a method has been preconized for achieving this purpose which is as total and integral as the aim set before it, viz., the total and integral change of the consciousness and nature, taking up old methods, but only as a part action and present aid to others that are distinctive.

Integral Yoga and Patanjali Yoga ::: Cilia is the stuff of mixed mental-vital-physical consciousness out of which arise the movements of thought, emotion, sensation, impulse etc.

It is these that in the Patanjali system have to be stilled altogether so that the consciousness may be immobile and go into Samadhi.

Our yoga has a different function. The movements of the ordinary consciousness have to be quieted and into the quietude there has to be brought down a higher consciousness and its powers which will transform the nature.


  “In the oldest Egyptian imagery, as in the cosmogonic allegories of Kneph, the mundane snake, when typifying matter, is usually represented as contained within a circle; he lies straight across its equator, thus indicating that the universe of astral light, out of which the physical world evolved, while bounding the latter, is itself bound by Emepht, or the Supreme First Cause. . . . When the serpent represents eternity and immortality, it encircles the world, biting its tail, and thus offering no solution of continuity. It then becomes the astral light” (IU 157).

  "In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning — it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one"s being, one"s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred" and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge", it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

“In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning—it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one’s being, one’s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred’ and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge’, it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

IPO (Initial public offering) - The first / primary offering of stock/shares to the public via listing on a public stock exchange.

Jaina. In Sanskrit, lit., "followers of The Victor [JINA]"; one of the major early sects of Indian wandering religious (sRAMAnA), a movement in the fifth-century BCE that included Buddhism among its groups. One of the founders of Jainism, NIRGRANTHA-JNĀTĪPUTRA (P. Nigantha Nātaputta), who is also known by his title of MAHĀVĪRA (Great Victor) (d. c. 488 BCE), was a contemporary of the Buddha and figures prominently in Buddhist literature. The Buddhists classified the Jainas among the TĪRTHIKA groups, the adherents of non-Buddhist religions who are sometimes mistranslated as "heretics." The Jainas were the sramana group closest to Buddhism in its beliefs and practices, and the Buddha often used their teachings as a foil in order to present his own interpretations of important religious principles. Mahāvīra claimed to have achieved enlightenment and become one in a long line of jinas ("victors," e.g., over ignorance) or tīrthaMkaras ("ford-makers") going back through twenty-four generations to Pārsva; this notion of an enlightened lineage of spiritual leaders is found also in Buddhism's doctrine that the Buddha was the latest in a series of previous buddhas (see SAPTATATHĀGATA). The Jainas believed in a theory of KARMAN, as did the Buddhists, but treated karman as a physical substance created through previous unwholesome actions, which constrained the soul and hindered its ability to rise above the physical world to the highest sphere of being; although the Buddhists accepted the notion of moral causality, as did the Jainas, they redefined karman instead as mental intention (CETANĀ). In order to free the soul from the bonds created through past actions, the Jainas held that the body had therefore to be rigorously cleansed of this karmic substance. The foundation of this cleansing process was the five great vows, the basic Jaina code of moral discipline, which parallel the Buddhist five precepts (PANCAsĪLA). The Jainas also practiced more severe austerities than did the Buddhists, including a stricture requiring "non-harming" (AHIMSĀ) of living creatures, rather than Buddhism's somewhat more lenient prohibition against "killing" living creatures. The Jainas also demanded strict vegetarianism from their followers in order to avoid injuring sentient creatures, a requirement that the Buddha rejected when his rival in the order, DEVADATTA, proposed it in his list of austerities (see DHUTAnGA). The Buddha's view was that monks were a "field of merit" (PUnYAKsETRA) for the laity and it was be inappropriate to refuse offerings of meat made to them, except in a very limited number of specific situations (such as if the monk, for example, knew that the animal had been killed specifically to feed him). The vegetarianism that is now prevalent in both MAHĀYĀNA Buddhism and wider Indian Hindu culture is almost certainly a result of Jaina influence and constitutes that religion's most enduring contribution to Indian religion. One branch of the Jainas, the Digambara (lit. "Sky Clad"), took the prohibition against material possessions so strictly that their male adherents were forbidden from even wearing clothing; hence, the Jainas are often referred to in translations of Pāli materials as "naked ascetics." The Jainas were the only one of the six major sramana traditions to survive into the present day on the Indian subcontinent, until Buddhism was reintroduced in the twentieth century by B. R. AMBEDKAR (1891-1956). In Buddhist texts, the Jainas are most commonly referred to as NIRGRANTHA, literally "freed from all ties."

Jingtu ruiying zhuan. (J. Jodo zuioden; K. Chongt'o soŭng chon 浄土瑞應傳). In Chinese, "Legends of Auspicious Resonance in the PURE LAND"; attributed to the monks Wenshen (fl. c. nine CE) and Shaokang (d. 805), although their authorship remains a matter of debate. The Jingtu ruiying zhuan is a collection of forty-eight testimonials of rebirth in the pure land of SUKHĀVATĪ, offering proof that the prospect of rebirth there is a viable reason for faith in the salvific grace of AMITĀBHA Buddha. This text is one of the earliest examples of a genre of Buddhist literature called rebirth testimonials (wangsheng zhuan), which is unique to East Asia. The Jingtu ruiying zhuan also served as a prototype for later collections, such as the Jingtu wangsheng zhuan, attributed to Jiezhu (985-1077).

Jnanayajna: Dissemination of knowledge; the Sadhana for, and the attainment of, knowledge, conceived of as a offering or divine sacrifice; offering of the individual to the Supreme.

Juefan Huihong. (J. Kakuhan Eko; K. Kakpom Hyehong 覺範慧洪) (1071-1128). Chinese CHAN monk in the HUANGLONG PAI collateral line of the LINJI ZONG during the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127) and major proponent of "lettered Chan" (WENZI CHAN), which valorized belle lettres, and especially poetry, in the practice of Chan. Huihong entered the monastery after he was orphaned at fourteen, eventually passing the monastic examinations at age nineteen and receiving ordination at Tianwangsi in the eastern capital of Kaifeng. After studying the CHENG WEISHI LUN (*VijNaptimātratāsiddhi) for four years, he eventually began to study at LUSHAN with the Chan master Zhenjing Kewen (1025-1102), under whom he achieved enlightenment. Because of Huihong's close ties to the famous literati officials of his day, and especially with the statesman and Buddhist patron ZHANG SHANGYING (1043-1122), his own career was subject to many of the same political repercussions as his associates; indeed, Huihong himself was imprisoned, defrocked, and exiled multiple times in his life when his literati colleagues were purged. Compounding his problems, Huihong also suffered along with many other monks during the severe Buddhist persecution (see FANAN) that occurred during the reign of Emperor Huizong (r. 1100-1125). Even amid these trying political times, however, Huihong managed to maintain both his monastic vocation and his productive literary career. Huihong is in fact emblematic of many Chan monks during the Song dynasty, when Chan enters the mainstream of Chinese intellectual life: his practice of Chan was framed and conceptualized in terms that drew from his wide learning and profound erudition, tendencies that helped make Chan writings particularly appealing to wider Chinese literati culture. Huihong decried the bibliophobic tendencies in Chan that were epitomized in the aphorism that Chan "does not establish words and letters" (BULI WENZI) and advocated that Chan insights were made manifest in both Buddhist sutras as well as in the uniquely Chan genres of discourse records (YULU), genealogical histories (see CHUANDENG LU), and public-case anthologies (GONG'AN). Given his literary penchant, it is no surprise that Huihong was a prolific author. His works associated with Chan lineages include the CHANLIN SENGBAO ZHUAN ("Chronicles of the SAMGHA Jewel in the Chan Grove"), a collection of biographies of about a hundred eminent Chan masters important in the development of lettered Chan; and the Linjian lu ("Anecdotes from the Groves [of Chan]"), completed in 1107 and offering a record of Huihong's own encounters with fellow monks and literati and his reflections on Buddhist practice. Huihong also wrote two studies of poetics and poetic criticism, the Lengzhai yehua ("Evening Discourses from Cold Studio") and Tianchu jinluan ("Forbidden Cutlets from the Imperial Kitchen"), and numerous commentaries to Buddhist scriptures, including the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), SHOULENGYAN JING, and YUANJUE JING.

Ka (Egyptian) Ka plural kau. Equivalent to the astral double, model-body, or linga-sarira. The ancient Egyptians held that when a human being was born, the ka was born with him and remained with him throughout his life. Even after death it remained in the tomb with the corpse; it was popularly believed that the offerings placed on graves were made to perpetuate the ka. Furthermore, the gods possessed them, each deity being said to have many kau; thus in one text the god Ra is said to possess seven bau (souls) and 14 kau. Even cities were held to possess kau in the heaven world.

kaiyan. (J. kaigen; K. kaean 開眼). In Chinese, "opening the eyes," also known as "dotting the eyes" (DIANYAN); the ritual of consecrating a newly carved or cast buddha image (see BUDDHĀBHIsEKA). "Opening the eyes" refers to a ceremony, or series of ceremonies, that accompanies the installation of a buddha image or painting, which specifically involves either dotting the pupils of an image or ritually dropping eyedrops into its eyes, in order to animate it. After the image has been "enspirited" (rushen) by placing on the image embroidered five-colored thread, coins (to represent dragon's eyes), and a mirror, the formal ritual begins by making offerings of incense, flowers, and lamps or candles before the newly installed image; at the conclusion of the ceremony, while reciting various MANTRA, the pupils of the eyes of the image are dotted with ink, thus literally "opening" them. (For this reason, in Korea, the ritual is most commonly known as "dotting the eyes," or choman; see DIANYAN.) By thus opening the buddha-eye (foyan) through the performance of this ritual, the image is vested with numinous power, thus making it "come alive." In Japan, the term kaigen is generally used for this buddha-consecration ceremony rather than tengen. Kaigen is then divided into the kaigen of phenomena (ji; see SHI) and the kaigen of principle (ri; see LI), which refer respectively to ceremonies consecrating a buddha image or the scriptures that might be enshrined inside the image and ceremonies that imbue the image with spiritual charisma. The ritual is also known as "opening the light [of the eyes]" (kaiguang; kaiguangming), and other variations. See also NETRAPRATIstHĀPANA.

Kalikr.s.n.a (Kalikrishna; Kali krishna) ::: (also called Kr.s.n.akali) the Kalikrsna union of Kali and Kr.s.n.a, whether seen in the perception (darsana) of the external world or experienced in oneself in a spiritual realisation which is the basis of karma and kama1, where Kali as prakr.ti "take[s] up the whole nature into the law of her higher divine truth and act[s] in that law offering up the universal enjoyment of her action and being to the Anandamaya Ishwara" (Kr.s.n.a), while the individual soul (jiva) is "the channel of this action and offering".

kanhua Chan. (J. kannazen/kanwazen; K. kanhwa Son 看話禪). In Chinese, "Chan of investigating the topic of inquiry," or, more freely, "questioning meditation." The systematization of this meditative practice is commonly traced back to the writings of the Song-dynasty CHAN master DAHUI ZONGGAO. The kanhua Chan technique grew out of the growing interest in the study of "public cases" (GONG'AN), viz., old stories and anecdotes of Chan masters, which flourished during the Song dynasty. Dahui's teacher YUANWU KEQIN is also known to have lectured on numerous public cases, and his anthology of gong'an, along with his analysis of them, was recorded in the famous collection the BIYAN LU ("Blue Cliff Records"). Dahui further elaborated upon Yuanwu's investigation of public cases and applied this process to the practice of Chan meditation. In his lectures and letters (DAHUI PUJUE CHANSHI SHU), Dahui urged his students (many of whom were educated literati) to use the gong'an as a "topic of meditative inquiry" (HUATOU, K. hwadu), rather than interpret it from purely intellectual or conceptual perspectives. Perhaps the most famous huatou is the topic "no" (WU) attributed to the Chan master ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN: A monk asked Zhaozhou, "Does a dog have buddha-nature (FOXING), or not?" to which Zhaozhou replied "WU" ("no"; lit. "it does not have it"). (See WU GONG'AN; GOUZI WU FOXING.) (Because of the popularity of this one-word meditative topic, kanhua Chan is often interpreted to mean the investigation of the "critical phrase" or "keyword," in which the "keyword" "wu" is presumed to have been extracted from the longer gong'an exchange.) The investigation of this huatou starts by "investigating the meaning" (C. canyi; K. ch'amŭi) of the huatou: what could Zhaozhou have meant by answering "no" to this question, when the right answer should be "yes"? The mainstream of East Asian Buddhist doctrine insists that all sentient beings, including dogs, are inherently enlightened and thus do in fact possess the buddha-nature, so this question promotes inquiry. Examining what Zhaozhou might have meant by saying "no" has what Dahui termed "taste" (C. wei, K. mi), meaning intellectual interest. As one's intellectual inquiry into this question continues, however, the student is ultimately left with "doubt" (YIQING), viz., the inability of the (unenlightened) mind to understand Zhaozhou's motive in giving this response to the student's question. Doubt, Dahui says, renders the mind "puzzled, frustrated, and tasteless" (viz., lacking intellectual interest), just as if you were gnawing on an iron rod." Once doubt arises, there is no longer any conceptual support for the meditation, and the student moves on to "investigating the word" (C. canju; K. ch'amgu), viz., just sitting with the huatou wu and no longer trying to understand Zhaozhou's motive in offering this response. At this point, the huatou becomes a "live word" (C. huoju; K. hwalgu) that helps to free the mind from conceptualization and to lead the meditator forward toward liberation. As the sense of doubt becomes more and more intense, it finally "explodes" (C. po; K. p'a), bringing an end to the deluded processes of thought and removing the limiting point of view that is the self. Once the distinctions between self and other disintegrate, the meditator experiences the interconnection between himself or herself and all the phenomena in the universe (SHISHI WU'AI). Kanhua Chan, therefore, employs the inevitable doubt that a benighted person would have about the sayings of the enlightened Chan masters of old to create a powerful sense of inquiry that leads the meditator toward the experience of nonconceptualization and finally enlightenment. ¶ Dahui's system of kanhua Chan was first taught in Korea by POJO CHINUL, where it is known as kanhwa Son, and popularized by Chinul's successor, CHIN'GAK HYESIM. Kanhwa Son continues to be the most common contemplative technique practiced in Korean Son halls. Korean Son monks typically work on one hwadu-often Zhaozhou's "no"-for much of their career, continually deepening their experience of that topic. In China, after the Ming dynasty, kanhua Chan merged with the recitation of the buddha AMITĀBHA's name (NIANFO), so that Chan meditators would turn the recitation into a huatou by reflecting on the topic "Who is reciting the Buddha's name?" In Japanese Zen, due in large part to the efforts of HAKUIN EKAKU and his disciples, kannazen became widespread within the RINZAI ZEN tradition, where it was incorporated into an elaborate system of koan training, involving the systematic investigation of many different koans.

Kānksā-Revata. (P. Kankhā-Revata; T. Nam gru; C. Lipoduo; J. Ribata; K. Rip'ada 離婆多). An important ARHAT who was foremost among the Buddha's monk disciples in mastery of meditative absorption (JHĀNA; DHYĀNA). He is typically known as Kānksā-Revata (Doubting Revata), to distinguish him from several other REVATAs who appear in the literature, because, prior to his enlightenment, Revata was troubled by doubt concerning what was permissible and what was not. According to Pāli sources, he was born into a wealthy family in the city of Sāvitthi (S. sRĀVASTĪ). One day, he heard the Buddha preach in Kapilavatthu (S. KAPILAVASTU) and resolved to renounce the world and enter the order. He attained arahantship by relying on jhāna and his exceptional skill in these meditative states won him distinction. Revata had resolved to attain this distinction in a previous life as a brāhmana, when, during the time of Padumuttara Buddha, he heard the Buddha describe one of his disciples as preeminent in his attainment of jhāna. In another famous story, the mother of Uttara had been reborn as a hungry ghost (P. peta; S. PRETA) and after fifty-five years of wandering encountered Revata and begged him for relief. He relieved her suffering by making various offerings to the SAMGHA in her name.

kasmai devaya havisa vidhema ::: to what godhead shall we give (all our life and activities) as an offering. [RV 10.121; Svet. 4.13]

kattalai. ::: offerings made to a temple at regular times by a devotee

Kavyavahana (Sanskrit) Kavyavāhana [from kavya a class of pitris + vāhana vehicle, carrier] The vehicle or carrier of the kavyas, the transmitter of kavya influence or power. It often stands for the intellectual fire or vitality of the solar pitris. In Hinduism this conception becomes the sacrificial fire which receives and translates offerings to the pitris. In the Puranas, pavaka (electric fire) is made parent to kavyavahana, but it is not the coarse electric substance of prithivi (the physical world), but the electric vivifying vitality of mind or intelligence.

khutbah ::: n. --> An address or public prayer read from the steps of the pulpit in Mohammedan mosques, offering glory to God, praising Mohammed and his descendants, and the ruling princes.

klu. (lu). A class of Tibetan pre-Buddhist subteranean deities associated with water and infectious diseases such as leprosy. With the arrival of Buddhism, the klu were subsumed with the Indian NĀGA. They have the head and torso of humans but the tails of snakes. The klu are possibly related to the Chinese long, or dragon: long fly in the air, klu remain submerged in subterranean lakes, but both are associated with water. The klu must be propitiated before the construction of monasteries and other buildings in Tibet, in rituals that involve both peaceful offerings and displays of violent power. The klu combine with other classes of Tibetan deities to create composite entities: klu bdud, klu sman, klu btsan, klu srin, and the like.

kneeling and offering a taper, as the angel who

kongokai. (S. vajradhātu; T. rdo rje dbyings; C. jingang jie; K. kŭmgang kye 金剛界). In Japanese, "diamond realm" or "diamond world"; one of the two principal diagrams (MAndALA) used in the esoteric traditions of Japan (see MIKKYo), along with the TAIZoKAI ("womb realm"); the Sanskrit reconstruction for this diagram is *vajradhātumandala. The teachings of the kongokai are said to derive in part from two seminal scriptures of the esoteric traditions, the MAHĀVAIROCANĀBHISAMBODHISuTRA and SARVATATHĀGATATATTVASAMGRAHA, but its construction as a mandala relies on no known written instructions and more likely evolved pictorially. KuKAI (774-835), the founder of the SHINGONSHu, used the kongokai mandala in combination with the taizokai mandala in a variety of esoteric rituals designed to awaken the individual adept. However, Japanese TENDAI Buddhism as well as various SHUGENDo complexes also heavily incorporated their own rituals into the two mandalas. ¶ The kongokai consists of nine smaller, nearly square-shaped mandalas, or "assemblies" (J. e), some of which are sometimes isolated for worship and visualized independently. It is said that, by visualizing the mandala, the kongokai ultimately demonstrates that the universe as a whole is coextensive with the body of the DHARMAKĀYA or cosmic buddha, Mahāvairocana (SEE VAIROCANA). In the center of the mandala, Mahāvairocana sits on a lotus flower, surrounded by four female figures, who symbolize the four perfections. Immediately outside are four discs, each encompassing a directional buddha: AMITĀBHA to the west, AKsOBHYA to the east, AMOGHASIDDHI to the north, and RATNASAMBHAVA to the south. Each is, in turn, surrounded by four BODHISATTVAs. This ensemble of buddhas, bodhisattvas, and female figures is repeated in the first four mandala of outward trajectory and its structure repeated in the lower six. Below the center mandala is the mandala of physical objects, each representing the buddhas and bodhisattvas. The next one in outward trajectory are figures residing inside a three-pointed vajra, representing the sounds of the world. The fourth mandala displays all figures (excluding buddhas) in their female form, each exhibiting specific bodily movements. Arriving next at the upper-left mandala, the group is reduced to Mahāvairocana and four surrounding bodhisattvas. In the top-center mandala sits only a large Mahāvairocana. The last three mandalas in the outward spiral shift toward worldly affairs. The top right reveals passions and desire. In the next to last are horrific demons and deities. The last mandala represents consciousness. ¶ Looking at the depictions in the kongokai individually, the nine smaller mandalas are arrayed in a clockwise direction as follows. (1) The perfected-body assembly (jojinne) is the central assembly of the entire mandala. In the center of this assembly sits Mahāvairocana, displaying the gesture (MUDRĀ) of the wisdom fist (BODHYAnGĪMUDRĀ; J. chiken-in), surrounded by the four directional buddhas (Aksobhya, Ratnasambhava, Amitābha, and Amoghasiddhi), who embody four aspects of Mahāvairocana's wisdom. Each of these buddhas, including Mahāvairocana, is in turn attended by four bodhisattvas. (2) The SAMAYA assembly (J. sammayae; S. samayamandala) replaces the buddhas and bodhisattvas with physical objects, such as VAJRAS and lotuses. (3) The subtle assembly (J. misaime; S. suksmamandala) signifies the adamantine wisdom of Mahāvairocana. (4) In the offerings assembly (J. kuyo-e; S. pujāmandala), bodhisattvas make offerings to the five buddhas. (5) The four-mudrās assembly (J. shiinne; S. caturmudrāmandala) depicts only Mahāvairocana and four bodhisattvas. (6) The single-mudrā assembly (J. ichiinne; S. ekamudrāmandala) represents Mahāvairocana sitting alone in the gesture of wisdom. (7) In the guiding-principle assembly (J. rishu-e; S. nayamandala), VAJRASATTVA sits at the center, surrounded by four female figures, representing craving, physical contact, sexual desire, and fulfillment. (8) In the assembly of the descent into the three realms of existence (J. gozanze-e; S. trailokyavijayamandala), Vajrasattva assumes the ferocious appearance of Gosanze (TRAILOKYAVIJAYA). (9) The samaya of the descent into the three-realms assembly (J. gozanzesammayae; S. trailokyavijayasamaya mandala) has the same structure as the previous one. ¶ In one distinctively Shingon usage, the mandala was placed in the east and the kongokai stood in juxtaposition across from it. The initiate would then invite all buddhas, bodhisattvas, and divinities into the sacred space, invoking all of their power and ultimately unifying with them. In SHUGENDo, the two mandalas were often spatially superimposed over mountain geography or worn as robes on the practitioner while entering the mountain. See TAIZoKAI.

Kukkutārāma. (T. Bya gag kun ra; C. Jiyuansi; J. Keionji; K. Kyewonsa 鶏園寺). Major Indian Buddhist monastery, located to the southeast of the Mauryan capital of PĀtALIPUTRA (P. Pātaliputta, present-day Patna); founded by King AsOKA in the third century BCE, with YAsAS serving as abbot. The Chinese pilgrim XUANZANG visited the site of the monastery in the seventh century, but only the foundations remained. Asoka is said to have often visited the monastery to make offerings, but Pusyamitra, who founded the sunga dynasty in 183 BCE, destroyed the monastery when he invaded Pātaliputra and murdered many of its monks. Next to the monastery was a large reliquary named the Āmalaka STuPA, which is said to have been named after half an āmalaka fruit that Asoka gave as his final offering to the SAMGHA before his death; thanks, however, to the merit that accrued from the profound sincerity with which the king made even such a meager offering, Asoka recovered from his illness, and the seeds of the fruit were preserved in this stupa in commemoration of the miracle. The KAUKKUtIKA school, one of the three main subgroups of the MAHĀSĀMGHIKA branch of the mainstream Buddhist tradition, is said to have derived its name from this monastery.

kwāpā dya. A Newari term for the image of the central, nontantric, deity located on the ground floor shrine in a Newar monastery (BĀHĀ), most often located directly across from the main entryway. The term is likely derived from the Sanskrit kosthapāla, "guard," "watchman," and carries the meaning of "guardian of the SAMGHA," although the image does not generally function as a "guardian or protector deity." The shrine of the kwāpā dya is generally open to the public, and, although visitors are not normally permitted inside, they may view the image from the gate and make offerings through the shrine's attendant.

laver ::: n. --> A vessel for washing; a large basin.
A large brazen vessel placed in the court of the Jewish tabernacle where the officiating priests washed their hands and feet.
One of several vessels in Solomon&


Libations ::: Offerings of a liquid. Usually left on an altar or poured into the soil.

licitation ::: n. --> The act of offering for sale to the highest bidder.

luohan. (J. rakan; K. nahan 羅漢). In Chinese, ARHAT, referring to groups of venerated disciples of the Buddha who in their popular forms served as objects of cultic worship in East Asia. Countless paintings and statues of arhats were created, and legends and miracle stories concerning them circulated throughout the East Asian region. The arhats were commonly worshipped in groups of sixteen, eighteen, and five hundred, the last two of which developed without a canonical basis. Especially important was the cult of sixteen (later sometimes expanded to eighteen) arhat disciples (see sOdAsASTHAVIRA), whom the Buddha ordered to forgo PARINIRVĀnA and to continue to dwell in this world in order to preserve the Buddhist teachings until the coming of the future buddha, MAITREYA. Each of these arhats was assigned a residence and a retinue of disciples. Once Maitreya had advented on earth, the arhats would be charged with gathering the remaining relics of the current buddha sĀKYAMUNI and erecting one last STuPA to hold them, after which they would finally pass into PARINIRVĀnA. In China, arhat cults were popular particularly during the medieval period. Statues and paintings of arhats were enshrined throughout the land and Buddhists made offerings before those images. The Wuyue court even sponsored an annual summoning ritual of the five hundred arhats from the tenth century onward. The Song-dynasty court continued to sponsor the same ritual to pray for the welfare of the court and to ward off the evils. In Korea, the Koryo (918-1392) court performed a ritual for the five hundred arhats more than twenty-five times between 1053 and the end of the dynasty. The ritual was principally intended to pray for precipitation and protection from foreign invasion. This ritual even continued into the early Choson (1392-1910) period. Still today, most of the larger Korean monasteries will have on their campus an arhat hall (nahan chon), which enshrines paintings and/or images, typically of the group of sixteen. In Japan, the arhat cults were especially connected with the ZEN school. In particular, many monasteries associated with the SoToSHu have a hall dedicated to the arhats, which usually enshrines images of the sixteen, and the tradition engages in monthly and semiannual rituals dedicated to the arhats. In the Soto tradition, arhats are believed to play both salvific and apotropaic roles.

lustrate ::: v. t. --> To make clear or pure by means of a propitiatory offering; to purify.

Madhuparka: An offering for the Lord containing honey, curd, etc.

maghoni (Dakshina maghoni) ::: Daks.in.a (the Vedic goddess . in.a maghoni "whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distribute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion") in her plenitude; "the discernment in its fullness". [R.g Veda 2.11.21, etc.]

Mahāmaudgalyāyana. (P. Mahāmoggallāna; T. Mo'u 'gal gyi bu chen po; C. Mohemujianlian/Mulian; J. Makamokkenren/Mokuren; K. Mahamokkollyon/Mongnyon 摩訶目犍連/目連). An eminent ARHAT and one of the two chief disciples of the Buddha, often depicted together with his friend sĀRIPUTRA flanking the Buddha. Mahāmaudgalyāyana was considered supreme among the Buddha's disciples in supranormal powers (ṚDDHI). According to Pāli accounts, where he is called Moggallāna, he was older than the Buddha and born on the same day as sāriputra (P. Sāriputta). Both he and sāriputra were sons of wealthy families and were friends from childhood. Once, when witnessing a play, the two friends were overcome with a sense of the impermanence and the vanity of all things and decided to renounce the world as mendicants. They first became disciples of the agnostic SaNjaya Belatthiputta (SANJAYA VAIRĀtĪPUTRA), although later they took their leave and wandered the length and breadth of India in search of a teacher. Finding no one who satisfied them, they parted company, promising one another that if one should succeed he would inform the other. Later sāriputra met the Buddha's disciple, Assaji (S. AsVAJIT), who recited for him a précis of the Buddha's teachings, the so-called YE DHARMĀ verse, which immediately prompted sāriputra to attain the path of a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA). He repeated the stanza to Mahāmaudgalyāyana, who likewise immediately became a stream-enterer. The two friends thereupon resolved to take ordination as disciples of the Buddha and, together with five hundred disciples of their former teacher SaNjaya, proceeded to the Veluvana (S. VEnUVANAVIHĀRA) grove where the Buddha was residing. The Buddha ordained the entire group with the formula ehi bhikkhu pabbajjā ("Come forth, monks"; see EHIBHIKsUKĀ), whereupon all five hundred became arhats, except for sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana. Mahāmaudgalyāyana attained arhatship seven days after his ordination, while sāriputra reached the goal one week later. The Buddha declared sāriputra and Mahāmaudgalyāyana his chief disciples the day they were ordained, noting that they had both strenuously exerted themselves in countless previous lives for this distinction; they appear often as the bodhisattva's companions in the JĀTAKAs. sāriputra was chief among the Buddha's disciples in wisdom, while Mahāmaudgalyāyana was chief in mastery of supranormal powers. He could create doppelgängers of himself and transform himself into any shape he desired. He could perform intercelestial travel as easily as a person bends his arm, and the tradition is replete with the tales of his travels, such as flying to the Himālayas to find a medicinal plant to cure the ailing sāriputra. Mahāmaudgalyāyana said of himself that he could crush Mount SUMERU like a bean and roll up the world like a mat and twirl it like a potter's wheel. He is described as shaking the heavens of sAKRA and BRAHMĀ to dissuade them from their pride, and he often preached to the divinities in their abodes. Mahāmaudgalyāyana could see ghosts (PRETA) and other spirits without having to enter into meditative trance as did other meditation masters, and because of his exceptional powers the Buddha instructed him alone to subdue the dangerous NĀGA, Nandopananda, whose huge hood had darkened the world. Mahāmaudgalyāyana's powers were so immense that during a terrible famine, he offered to turn the earth's crust over to uncover the ambrosia beneath it; the Buddha wisely discouraged him, saying that such an act would confound creatures. Even so, Mahāmaudgalyāyana's supranormal powers, unsurpassed in the world, were insufficient to overcome the law of cause and effect and the power of his own former deeds, as the famous tale of his death demonstrates. A group of naked JAINA ascetics resented the fact that the people of the kingdom of MAGADHA had shifted their allegiance and patronage from them to the Buddha and his followers, and they blamed Mahāmaudgalyāyana, who had reported that, during his celestial and infernal travels, he had observed deceased followers of the Buddha in the heavens and the followers of other teachers in the hells. They hired a group of bandits to assassinate the monk. When he discerned that they were approaching, the eighty-four-year-old monk made his body very tiny and escaped through the keyhole. He eluded them in different ways for six days, hoping to spare them from committing a deed of immediate retribution (ĀNANTARYAKARMAN) by killing an arhat. On the seventh day, Mahāmaudgalyāyana temporarily lost his supranormal powers, the residual karmic effect of having beaten his blind parents to death in a distant previous lifetime, a crime for which he had previously been reborn in hell. The bandits ultimately beat him mercilessly, until his bones had been smashed to the size of grains of rice. Left for dead, Mahāmaudgalyāyana regained his powers and soared into the air and into the presence of the Buddha, where he paid his final respects and passed into NIRVĀnA at the Buddha's feet. ¶ Like many of the great arhats, Mahāmaudgalyāyana appears frequently in the MAHĀYĀNA sutras, sometimes merely listed as a member of the audience, sometimes playing a more significant role. In the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, he is one of the sRĀVAKA disciples who is reluctant to visit VIMALAKĪRTI. In the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, he is one of four arhats who understands the parable of the burning house and who rejoices in the teaching of the one vehicle (EKAYĀNA); later in the sutra, the Buddha prophesies his eventual attainment of buddhahood. Mahāmaudgalyāyana is additionally famous in East Asian Buddhism for his role in the apocryphal YULANBEN JING. The text describes his efforts to save his mother from the tortures of her rebirth as a ghost (preta). Mahāmaudgalyāyana (C. Mulian) is able to use his supranormal powers to visit his mother in the realm of ghosts, but the food that he offers her immediately bursts into flames. The Buddha explains that it is impossible for the living to make offerings directly to the dead; instead, one should make offerings to the SAMGHA in a bowl, and the power of their meditative practices will be able to save one's ancestors and loved ones from rebirths in the unfortunate realms (DURGATI).

Mahānāman. (P. Mahānāma; T. Ming chen; C. Mohenan; J. Makanan; K. Mahanam 摩訶男). The Sanskrit proper name of two significant disciples of the buddha. ¶ Mahānāman was one of the five ascetics (S. PANCAVARGIKA; P. paNcavaggiyā; alt. S. bhadravargīya) who was a companion of Prince SIDDHĀRTHA during his practice of austerities and hence one of the first disciples converted by the Buddha at the Deer Park (MṚGADĀVA) in ṚsIPATANA following his enlightenment. Together with his companions, Mahānāman heard the Buddha's first sermon, the "Setting in Motion the Wheel of Dharma" (S. DHARMACAKRAPRAVARTANASuTRA; P. DHAMMACAKKAPPAVATTANASUTTA), and he attained the state of a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA) three days later. He and the others became ARHATs while listening to the buddha preach the ANATTALAKKHAnASUTTA. Mahānāman later traveled to the town of Macchikāsanda, and, while he was out on alms rounds, the householder CITTA saw him. Citta was greatly impressed by Mahānāman's dignified deportment, and invited him to his house for an meal offering. Having served Mahānāman the morning meal and listened to his sermon, Citta was inspired to offer his pleasure garden Ambātakavana to Mahānāman as a gift to the SAMGHA, and built a monastery there. ¶ Another Mahānāman was also an eminent lay disciple, whom the Buddha declared to be foremost among laymen who offer choice alms food. According to the Pāli account, Mahānāman was Anuruddha's (S. ANIRUDDHA) elder brother and the Buddha's cousin. It was with Mahānāman's permission that Anuruddha joined the order with other Sākiyan (S. sĀKYA) kinsmen of the Buddha. Mahānāman was very generous in his support of the order. During a period of scarcity when the Buddha was dwelling at VeraNja, he supplied the monks with medicines for three periods of four months each. Mahānāman was keenly interested in the Buddha's doctrine and there are several accounts in the scriptures of his conversations with the Buddha. Once while the Buddha lay ill in the Nigrodhārāma, ĀNANDA took Mahānāman aside to answer his questions on whether concentration (SAMĀDHI) preceded or followed upon knowledge. Mahānāman attained the state of a once-returner (sakadāgāmi; S. SAKṚDĀGĀMIN), but his deception toward Pasenadi (S. PRASENAJIT), the king of Kosala (S. KOsALA), precipitated the eventual destruction of the Sākiya (S. sĀKYA) clan. Pasenadi had asked Mahānāman for the hand of a true Sākiyan daughter in marriage, but the latter, out of pride, instead sent Vāsabhakkhattiyā, a daughter born to him by a slave girl. To conceal the treachery, Mahānāman feigned to eat from the same dish as his daughter, thus convincing Pasenadi of her pure lineage. The ruse was not discovered until years later when Vidudabha, the son of Pasenadi and Vāsabhakkhattiyā, was insulted by his Sākiyan kinsmen who refused to treat him with dignity because of his mother's status as the offspring of a slave. Vidudabha vowed revenge and later marched against Kapilavatthu (S. KAPILAVASTU) and slaughtered all who claimed Sākiyan descent. ¶ Another Mahānāma was the c. fifth century author of the Pāli MAHĀVAMSA.

Mallā. (T. Gyad kyi yul; C. Moluo [guo]; J. Mara [koku]; K. Mara [kuk] 摩羅[國]). In the plural, the Sanskrit and Pāli name of the people in one of the sixteen countries (MAHĀJANAPADA) that flourished in northern India during the Buddha's lifetime. According to Pāli sources, the Mallā people were divided into two kingdoms, each with its own capital, Pāvā and Kusināra (S. KUsINAGARĪ). The inhabitants of the former city were named Pāveyyakā Mallā, while those of the latter were named Kosinārakā. The Buddha is described as having inaugurated a new assembly hall in Pāvā by offering a sermon there for the populace. This hall was located in the Ambavana grove, which belonged to CUNDA, the blacksmith. Later, in the final year of his life, the Buddha would accept his last meal of SuKARAMADDAVA (pork or possibly mushrooms) from Cunda, on account of which he would fall deathly ill with dysentery. From Cunda's residence in Pāvā, the Buddha made his way to Kusināra where, lying down between twin sāla (S. sĀLA) trees, he passed into parinibbāna (S. PARINIRVĀnA). When Ānanda laments the fact that the Buddha will pass away at such a "little mud-walled town, a backwoods town, a branch township," rather than a great city, the Buddha disabused him of this notion, telling him that Kusinagarī had previously been the magnificent capital named Kusāvatī of an earlier CAKRAVARTIN king named Sudarsana (P. Sudassana). The Buddha's body was cremated at the Makutabandhana shrine in Kusinagarī, after which the relics were removed to the assembly hall. There, the brāhmana Dona (S. DROnA) distributed them among the many claimants from different kingdoms and clans that were demanding their share. The Buddha claimed many disciples from the Mallā country as did his rival, the JAINA leader, Nigantha Nātaputta (S. NIRGRANTHA-JNĀTĪPUTRA). The Mallā belonged to the warrior caste (P. khattiya; S. KsATRIYA), although they are depicted in Buddhist texts as living amicably with their neighbors. In Greek accounts, they are called Malloi, a people who for a time successfully resisted attack by Alexander's forces. If this identification is correct, it would place their country in the area of modern Punjab.

Manes: In Roman mythology, the souls of the dead, residing in the nether world; they were worshipped with offerings of food and drink at the graves.

Manes (Latin) [from manus good] Deified ancestral spirits, the benevolent class of shades, as distinguished from the larvae and lemures, which were malevolent. The word seems originally to have denoted a class of titans, kabiri, or dhyanis, and to have ranked in the sequence of patriarchs, heroes, and manes, who acted as divine instructors of earlier races. But far later, in Roman usage, the name became degraded and applied to the better astral shades or denizens in kama-loka, which in so many lands have been propitiated by offerings as is still the case with some peoples. Sometimes they wear a retributive aspect, as in Vergil, where the painful purification of the shades before they can pass to Elysium is described: “Each of us suffers his own Manes” (Aeneid 6:743).

Mastaba (Arabic) [from maṣṭaba, stone bench] A long, low oblong ancient Egyptian structure, with sloping sides and flat top, used as a mortuary chapel and place for depositing offerings; it generally covered a sepulchral pit which led to the burial chamber, where the mummy was placed. “These tombs of the ancients were symbolical like the rest of their sacred edifices, and . . . this symbology points directly to the septenary division of man. But in death the order is revered; and while the Mastaba with its scenes of daily life painted on the walls, its table of offerings, to the Larva, the ghost, or ‘Linga-Sarira,’ was a memorial raised to the two Principles and Life which has quitted that which was a lower trio on earth; the Pit, the Passage, the Burial Chambers and the mummy in the Sarcophagus, were the objective symbols raised to the two perishable ‘principles,’ the personal mind and Kama, and the three imperishable, the higher Triad, now merged into one. This ‘One’ was the Spirit of the Blessed now resting in the Happy Circle of Aanroo” (TG 209).

Microsoft Project ::: (product) A Microsoft Windows program offering various project management tools. .(2003-07-02)

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mizuko kuyo. (水子供養). In Japanese, lit., "offering to a child of the waters," viz., "ceremony for an aborted fetus"; a memorial ceremony performed by women and their families on behalf of the spirits of aborted, miscarried, and stillborn fetuses. Abortion is legal and widely practiced in contemporary Japan and this ceremony has become increasingly common since the 1970s as a way both to placate the potentially malevolent spirit of an aborted fetus and to comfort the woman who chose to undertake the procedure. Images of the BODHISATTVA Jizo (KsITIGARBHA) in the form of a child are enshrined at temples, roadside shrines, or even family altars, and dedicated to the spirit of the fetus. In temples where this ceremony is common, small images of the bodhisattva are made available, which will then be typically garbed in either red bibs and caps or baby clothes so as to represent the fetus, with chanting performed and offerings made before the image. The mizuko kuyo ceremony was originally performed as an offering service to Jizo, the patron bodhisattva of children, but evolved during the Edo period in Japan into a ceremony for aborted fetuses or victims of infanticide, along the lines of other rituals performed for the ancestors of a family lineage. (Given the widespread famines of the time, some parents may have thought it better to offer children the prospect of a better rebirth than the suffering of continued starvation or unremitting sickness.) Because of this connection to Jizo, a hymn commonly sung at contemporary ceremonies is an indigenous Japanese Buddhist composition that calls on Jizo to protect the spirit of a deceased child and lead him or her to buddhahood. The mizuko kuyo may be performed at any time of the year but is especially prevalent on days dedicated to rituals for deceased ancestors, such as the Bon Festival in August.

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mudrā. (P. muddā; T. phyag rgya; C. yin; J. in; K. in 印). In Sanskrit, lit., "seal," "mark," or "sign"; but in Buddhist contexts it often refers to hand and arm "gestures" made during the course of ritual practice or depicted in images of buddhas, bodhisattvas, tantric deities, and other Buddhist images. Mudrās commonly associated with figures of the Buddha, such as the "gesture of fearlessness" (ABHAYAMUDRĀ), the "earth-touching gesture" (BHuMISPARsAMUDRĀ), the "wheel of the dharma gesture" (DHARMACAKRAMUDRĀ), and the "gesture of meditation" (DHYĀNAMUDRĀ), are found in the earliest Indian representations of sĀKYAMUNI. With the development of MAHĀYĀNA and VAJRAYĀNA iconography, the number of mudrās depicted in Buddhist art proliferated, until they numbered in the hundreds. They are a prominent feature in the vajrayāna artwork of the Himalayan region (northern India, Nepal, Tibet, and Bhutan) as well as early tantric images from Southeast Asia and the esoteric traditions of East Asia. Mudrās are also dynamic hand movements performed during the course of tantric ritual practice, where they may symbolize material offerings, enact forms of worship, or signify relationships with visualized deities. ¶ In a more specifically tantric denotation, the term mudrā is used to refer to a sexual consort, of which there are two types: the JNĀNAMUDRĀ (a visualized consort) and the KARMAMUDRĀ (an actual consort). The highest state of realization in certain tantric systems is called MAHĀMUDRĀ, the great seal. See also ABHAYAMUDRĀ; ANJALIMUDRĀ; BHuTAdĀMARAMUDRĀ; BODHYAnGĪMUDRĀ; DAINICHI KEN-IN; HuMKĀRAMUDRĀ; HoSHU-IN; ONGYo-IN; TARJANĪMUDRĀ; VARADAMUDRĀ; VITARKAMUDRĀ.

nabich'um. (). In Korean, "butterfly dance," a CHAKPoP ritual dance usually performed by Buddhist nuns during Korean Buddhist rituals, such as the YoNGSANJAE. This dance is typically performed outdoors in the central campus of a monastery and is often accompanied by ritual chanting (PoMP'AE; C. FANBAI) and traditional musical instruments. The pomp'ae chant requests the three jewels (RATNATRAYA) and protecting dragons (NĀGA) to attend the ceremony. Generally, the nabich'um is performed by two or four nuns in long, white robes with floor-length sleeves and yellow conical hats, thus resembling butterflies. The dance expresses a desire to transform oneself so as to lead all sentient beings to enlightenment. Nabich'um is quite slow, with subdued movements, and is performed without the feet of the dancer moving more than a step away from where the dance began. Nabich'um may also be performed as part of an offering of incense and flowers carried out by the dancers. Nabich'um is also sometimes performed without musical accompaniment.

NairaNjanā. (P. NeraNjarā; T. Ne ran dza na; C. Nilianchanhe; J. Nirenzenga; K. Niryonsonha 尼連禪河). Ancient name of the present-day Lilaja River, a tributary of the Ganges, located in the modern Indian state of Bihar; site of the Buddha's austerities and enlightenment. During a six-year period, from the time of his departure from the palace to his achievement of buddhahood, the BODHISATTVA Prince SIDDHĀRTHA practiced austerities at URUVILVĀ along the banks of this river. It was while bathing in this river during a period of intense self-mortification that the bodhisattva swooned from hunger, after which he concluded that extreme asceticism was not a viable path to liberation from suffering and continued rebirth. Sitting under a tree on the bank of the river, he accepted a bowl of milk porridge from a young woman named SUJĀTĀ, who mistook his gaunt visage for a YAKsA to whom the local village made offerings. He ate the meal and then cast the dish into the river, saying, "If I am to become a buddha today, may the dish float upstream." The plate floated upstream for some distance before disappearing into a whirlpool, descending down to the palace of a serpent king (NĀGA), where it landed on top of the bowls used by the previous buddhas, making a clicking sound. The bodhisattva spent the afternoon prior to the night of his enlightenment in a grove on the banks of the river. After his enlightenment, it was on the banks of this river that BRAHMĀ persuaded him to teach the dharma. The Buddha later converted the ascetic URUVILVĀ-KĀsYAPA, whose hermitage was located along this NairaNjanā River.

Naivedya: Edible offerings to the deity in a temple or household altar.

Namo Buddha. (T. Stag mo lus sbyin). Together with SVAYAMBHu and BODHNĀTH, one of the three major STuPAs of the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal. Located twenty-five miles (forty kilometers) southeast of Kathmandu, it is built at the putative site where a prince named Mahāsattva, a bodhisattva who was a previous rebirth of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha, sacrificed his life to feed a starving tigress. In some versions of the story, the prince came across a starving tigress and her hungry cubs and, in order to save their lives, jumped off a cliff, committing suicide so they could eat his flesh. In another version, commemorated on a rock carving near the stupa, the prince cut off pieces of his flesh and fed them to the tigress until he finally died. The stupa is said to be built over his bones, and the tigress's cave is nearby. The Tibetan name of the stupa means, "Offering the Body to the Tigress." The Nepali name is said to derive from the fact that there were once many tigers in the area; the residents would therefore repeat "namo Buddha" ("homage to the Buddha") for protection.

Nānatiloka Mahāthera. (1878-1957). A distinguished German THERAVĀDA monk and scholar. Born Anton Walter Florus Gueth in Wiesbaden, Germany, in 1878, Nānatiloka studied music at conservatories in Frankfurt and Paris and became a violinist. As a child, he became interested in religion, and, after attending a lecture on Theosophy in Berlin in 1899, he decided to travel to Asia. Traveling as a violinist, he toured Turkey, Egypt, and India. From India, he went to Sri Lanka and then to Burma. In 1903 he took ordination as a Buddhist novice (P. sāmanera; S. sRĀMAnERA) in Rangoon (Yangon) from bhikkhu Ānanda Metteyya, apparently the first German ever to be ordained. In the following year he took higher ordination (UPASAMPADĀ) as a monk (P. bhikkhu; S. BHIKsU). After his ordination, Nānatiloka moved to Sri Lanka in 1905. He traveled to Europe in 1910-1911, the first of many international tours, staying mostly in Switzerland, where he conducted the first Buddhist novice ordination (P. pabbajjā; cf. S. PRAVRAJITA) on European soil. In 1911, he returned to Sri Lanka and made his hermitage on an island infested with poisonous snakes in the middle of Ratgama Lake in southwestern Sri Lanka. When he arrived at the hermitage site, he was the only human on the island. People in the nearby town of Dodanduwa brought him offerings by boat every day. Soon, many Europeans came to be ordained by Nānatiloka at what became known as Island Hermitage. He was interned by the British during World War I as an enemy alien. In 1916, he was given a passport to return to Germany via the United States. He traveled to Honolulu and then on to China but was arrested in Chungking (Chongqing) and imprisoned in Hankow (Hankou) until 1919, when he was exchanged by the International Red Cross and sent back to Germany. He was unable to return to Sri Lanka in 1920 and so went on to Japan, where he served as a professor at Komazawa University. In 1926, Nānatiloka was finally able to return to Sri Lanka. Nānatiloka was interned again with other German nationals (including his student NĀnAPONIKA) during the Second World War and returned again to Sri Lanka in 1946. He was later naturalized as a Sri Lankan citizen. He founded the International Buddhist Union with LAMA ANAGARIKA GOVINDA, another student, to whom he gave his Buddhist name. Nānatiloka was viewed by the Sinhalese as a great religious practitioner; upon Nānatiloka's death in 1957, he received a cremation ceremony of the highest honor in Independence Square, with both the prime minister of Sri Lanka and the German ambassador attending. He published his most famous work, The Word of the Buddha, in 1906, as well as articles and books in both English and German, including Buddhist Dictionary, Guide through the Abhidhamma-Pitaka, and Path to Deliverance.

Naong Hyegŭn. (懶翁慧勤) (1320-1376). In Korean, "Old Lazybones, Earnest in Wisdom," an eminent Korean SoN master and pilgrim of the Koryo dynasty. Naong was a native of Yonghae in present-day North Kyongsang province and is said to have decided to become a monk after the traumatic death of a close friend in 1339. After his ordination by the monk Yoyon (d.u.) of the hermitage of Myojogam on Mt. Kongdok, Naong traveled from one monastery to the next until he settled down at the monastery of Hoeamsa in 1344. Four years later at Hoeamsa, Naong is said to have attained his first awakening. In 1347, he left for China where he met the Indian master ZHIKONG CHANXIAN (1289-1363; K. Chigong Sonhyon; S. *sunyadisya-Dhyānabhadra) at the monastery of Fayuansi in the Yuan-dynasty capital of Yanjing; later, Naong would receive dharma transmission from Zhikong. After studying under Zhikong, Naong visited the Chan master Pingshan Chulin (1279-1361) at Jingcisi in Hangzhou (present-day Zhejiang province). Naong is said to have later received Pingshan's chowrie (FUZI; VĀLAVYAJANA) as a sign of his spiritual attainment. Before his return to the Yuan capital of Yanjing in 1355, Naong made a pilgrimage to MT. PUTUOSHAN, where he made offerings to the bodhisattva AVALOKITEsVARA (GUANYIN). Upon his arrival back in Yanjing, he was appointed abbot of the monastery of Guangjisi by Emperor Xundi (r. 1333-1368). In 1358, Naong returned to Korea and three years later was invited to the royal palace, where he taught the king and queen. In 1370, Naong was appointed the royal preceptor (wangsa) and abbot of the influential monastery of SONGGWANGSA. Naong was viewed as a living buddha and eventually became the object of cultic worship: in the apocryphal Ch'isong kwangmyong kyong ("Book of Blazing Light"), which was widely disseminated in Korea in the sixteenth century, Naong is said to have been an emanation of sĀKYAMUNI Buddha himself. He spent the next few years revitalizing the community at his old monastery of Hoeamsa. Among his many disciples, MUHAK CHACH'O (1327-1405) is most famous.

navadharma. In Sanskrit, the "nine dharmas," also known as the NAVAGRANTHA ("nine books"); nine MAHĀYĀNA SuTRAs that are the object of particular devotion in the Newar Buddhist tradition of Nepal. The notion of a collection of nine books seems to have originated in the Newar community, although the nine sutras are all of Indian origin. The nine are the AstASĀHASRIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ, SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, LALITAVISTARA, LAnKĀVATĀRASuTRA, SUVARnAPRABHĀSOTTAMASuTRA, GAndAVYuHA, Tathāgataguhyasutra, SAMĀDHIRĀJASuTRA, and DAsABHuMIKASuTRA. Of these nine, the AstasāhasrikāprajNāpāramitā is granted the highest esteem, having its own cult and its own deity, the goddess PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ. These texts serve an important ritual function in Newar Buddhism, where they are said to represent the entire Mahāyāna corpus of SuTRA, sĀSTRA, and TANTRA. These texts are often recited during the religious services of monasteries, and a recitation of all nine texts is considered to be particularly auspicious. Some Newar Buddhist rituals (vrata) include offerings to the three jewels (RATNATRAYA), in which a priest will make a MAndALA for the GURU, the Buddha, the DHARMA, and the SAMGHA. These sutras of the nine dharmas are used in the creation of the dharmamandala, a powerful ritual symbol in Newar Buddhism. In this MAndALA, the center space is occupied by the AstasāhasrikāprajNāpāramitā. The fact that there are nine of these texts may derive from the need to have nine elements in the mandala. Different renditions of the dharmamandala indicate that the texts included in the navadharma may have changed over time; this particular set of nine sutras seems to date from the fifteenth century. Although these texts are held in particularly high regard, they are not the only authoritative texts in Newar Buddhism.

netrapratisthāpana. (P. akkhipujā; T. spyan dbye). In Sanskrit, "fixing the eyes," viz., "opening the eyes"; a consecration ceremony for a buddha image (BUDDHĀBHIsEKA), which serves to vivify the inert statue or painting, rendering it a hypostatization of the buddha. There are many versions of the ritual. In Southeast Asia, after making offerings to such Brahmanical protective divinities as INDRA, AGNI, or YAMA and conducting a purification ritual, the eyes of the image are painted in as the final act of preparing for its installation in a shrine. The ritual concludes with the recitation of a series of protective chants (PARITTA). The entire ritual often runs through the entire night, with the eyes "opened" around sunrise as the climax of the ritual. The Pāli form akkhipujā, lit. "ritual of [opening] the eyes," is attested by the late-fifth or early-sixth century, in the MAHĀVAMSA and BUDDHAGHOSA's SAMANTAPĀSĀDIKĀ. In Mahāyāna texts, such image consecration by painting in the eyes appears in the RATNAGUnASAMCAYAGĀTHĀ, which dates prior to the fifth century CE. See also PRATIstHĀ. For East Asian equivalents, see DIANYAN; KAIYAN.

Nirajana: Burning of camphor and the like; an offering or waving of camphor or any light before the deity during worship.

NSA line eater "messaging, tool" The National Security Agency trawling program sometimes assumed to be reading the net for the US Government's spooks. Most hackers describe it as a mythical beast, but some believe it actually exists, more aren't sure, and many believe in acting as though it exists just in case. Some netters put loaded phrases like "KGB", "Uzi", "nuclear materials", "Palestine", "cocaine", and "assassination" in their {sig blocks} to confuse and overload the creature. The {GNU} version of {Emacs} actually has a command that randomly inserts a bunch of insidious anarcho-verbiage into your edited text. There is a mainstream variant of this myth involving a "Trunk Line Monitor", which supposedly used speech recognition to extract words from telephone trunks. This one was making the rounds in the late 1970s, spread by people who had no idea of then-current technology or the storage, {signal-processing}, or {speech recognition} needs of such a project. On the basis of mass-storage costs alone it would have been cheaper to hire 50 high-school students and just let them listen in. Speech-recognition technology can't do this job even now (1993), and almost certainly won't in this millennium, either. The peak of silliness came with a letter to an alternative paper in New Haven, Connecticut, laying out the factoids of this Big Brotherly affair. The letter writer then revealed his actual agenda by offering - at an amazing low price, just this once, we take VISA and MasterCard - a scrambler guaranteed to daunt the Trunk Trawler and presumably allowing the would-be Baader-Meinhof gangs of the world to get on with their business. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-13)

ObjectCenter ::: A product offering similar facilities to CodeCenter for the C++ language, plus class browsing facilities etc (formerly Saber-C++).

ObjectCenter A product offering similar facilities to CodeCenter for the C++ language, plus class browsing facilities etc (formerly Saber-C++).

object-oriented database ::: (database) (OODB) A system offering DBMS facilities in an object-oriented programming environment. Data is stored as objects and can be interpreted only This is because an object can be retrieved directly without a search, by following its object id.The same programming language can be used for both data definition and data manipulation. The full power of the database programming language's type system can be used to model data structures and the relationship between the different data items.Multimedia applications are facilitated because the class methods associated with the data are responsible for its correct interpretation.OODBs typically provide better support for versioning. An object can be viewed as the set of all its versions. Also, object versions can be treated as full object-oriented application programs that have database needs will benefit from using an OODB.Ode is an example of an OODB built on C++. (1997-12-07)

object-oriented database "database" (OODB) A system offering {DBMS} facilities in an {object-oriented programming} environment. Data is stored as {objects} and can be interpreted only using the {methods} specified by its {class}. The relationship between similar objects is preserved ({inheritance}) as are references between objects. Queries can be faster because {joins} are often not needed (as in a {relational database}). This is because an object can be retrieved directly without a search, by following its object id. The same programming language can be used for both data definition and data manipulation. The full power of the database programming language's {type system} can be used to model {data structures} and the relationship between the different data items. {Multimedia} {applications} are facilitated because the {class} {methods} associated with the data are responsible for its correct interpretation. OODBs typically provide better support for {versioning}. An object can be viewed as the set of all its versions. Also, object versions can be treated as full fledged objects. OODBs also provide systematic support for {triggers} and {constraints} which are the basis of {active databases}. Most, if not all, object-oriented {application programs} that have database needs will benefit from using an OODB. {Ode} is an example of an OODB built on {C++}. (1997-12-07)

oblation ::: any offering made to a deity.

oblationer ::: n. --> One who makes an offering as an act worship or reverence.

oblation ::: n. --> The act of offering, or of making an offering.
Anything offered or presented in worship or sacred service; an offering; a sacrifice.
A gift or contribution made to a church, as for the expenses of the eucharist, or for the support of the clergy and the poor.


obvention ::: n. --> The act of happening incidentally; that which happens casually; an incidental advantage; an occasional offering.

of a prince regent of evil). In Leviticus, he is Azazel, the “goat of the sin offering.” In Isaiah he is

offering burnt sacrifices on the threshing-floor of

offering ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Offer ::: n. --> The act of an offerer; a proffering.
That which is offered, esp. in divine service; that which is presented as an expiation or atonement for sin, or as a free gift; a sacrifice; an oblation; as, sin offering.


offertory ::: n. --> The act of offering, or the thing offered.
An anthem chanted, or a voluntary played on the organ, during the offering and first part of the Mass.
That part of the Mass which the priest reads before uncovering the chalice to offer up the elements for consecration.
The oblation of the elements.
The Scripture sentences said or sung during the collection of the offerings.


Omer :::
Omer is a dry measure mentioned in the Torah; the measure of barley brought as an offering on the second day of Pesach, after which the grain of the new harvest is permitted to be eaten; the 49 day period of counting from the time of this offering until the festival of Shavuot. See Sefirat HaOmer


Omer ::: (Heb. sheaf) In Judaism, the sheaf of grain offering brought to the temple during Passover, on Nisan 16; thus also the name of the seven-week period between Passover/Pesach and Shavuot also known as the Sephirah. See also calendar.

Online Computer Library Center, Inc. "library" (OCLC) A nonprofit membership organisation offering computer-based services and research to libraries, educational organisations, and their users. OCLC operates the OCLC Cataloging PRISM service for cataloging and resource sharing, provides on-line reference systems for both librarians and end-users, and distributes on-line electronic journals. OCLC's goals are to increase the availability of library resources and reduce library costs for the fundamental public purpose of furthering access to the world's information. The OCLC library information network connects more than 10,000 36,000 libraries worldwide. Libraries use the OCLC System for cataloguing, interlibrary loan, collection development, bibliographic verification, and reference searching. Their most visible feature is the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC) WorldCat (the OCLC Online Union Catalog). {(http://oclc.org/)}. (2000-03-23)

Online Computer Library Center, Inc. ::: (library) (OCLC) A nonprofit membership organisation offering computer-based services and research to libraries, educational organisations, Their most visible feature is the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC) WorldCat (the OCLC Online Union Catalog). .(2000-03-23)

pāpadesanā. [alt. pāpasodhana] (P. pāpadesanā; T. sdig pa bshags pa; C. chanhui; J. sange; K. ch'amhoe 懺悔). In Sanskrit, "confession of transgressions," "atonement"; the confession of unvirtuous deeds, either privately in the presence of a real or visualized representation of a buddha, or communally as part of a confession ceremony, such as the fortnightly monastic confession (S. UPOsADHA; P. uposatha). Such confession also figures as a standard component in many MAHĀYĀNA and tantric liturgies. The Mahāyāna also deployed a confessional ritual designed for people burdened with heavy karmic obstructions who wished swiftly to attain complete, perfect enlightenment (ANUTTARASAMYAKSAMBODHI); this ritual involved chanting the names of thirty-five buddhas of the ten directions (dasadigbuddha, see DAsADIs) and making offerings before images of them. Regardless of the setting, the tenor of confession practice is to make public something that has been hidden; there is no tradition in Buddhism of a priest offering absolution of sins. According to standard theory of KARMAN, the seeds of an unsalutary deed can be removed only through suffering the effects of that deed or through destroying the seed through wisdom (PRAJNĀ). However, there is a general view in the Buddhist ethical systems that the strength of an unwholesome deed, especially one of a less heinous nature, can be diminished through its declaration and revelation.

parach'um. (囉). In Korean, "cymbal dance," a CHAKPoP ritual dance performed by Buddhist monks during such Korean Buddhist rites as the YoNGSANJAE, using a cymbal (para). This dance is supposedly performed in veneration of, and as an offering to, the Buddha. One of the types of parach'um is known as "thousand-handed cymbal dance" (ch'onsu para) and is performed while other monks chant in honor of the thousand-armed form of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA (see SĀHASRABHUJASĀHASRANETRĀVALOKITEsVARA). This dance is considered to be extremely masculine, owing to its confident and strong motions, and thus is almost always performed by monks. In this dance, an even number of dancers (generally between two and ten), dressed in ceremonial robes with long sleeves, grasp with both hands the two cymbals, which are larger than dinner plates. The dancers raise and lower the cymbals, bringing them clashing together in front of their bodies and over their heads. This sound is intended to lead sentient beings towards the path to buddhahood. The tempo is quicker than that of the butterfly dance (NABICH'UM), and, as the dancers turn, they also manipulate the shiny cymbals so that they flash beautifully.

parsonage ::: n. --> A certain portion of lands, tithes, and offerings, for the maintenance of the parson of a parish.
The glebe and house, or the house only, owned by a parish or ecclesiastical society, and appropriated to the maintenance or use of the incumbent or settled pastor.
Money paid for the support of a parson.


pātra. (P. patta; T. lhung bzed; C. bo; J. hachi; K. pal 鉢). In Sanskrit, "begging bowl" or "alms bowl," the bowl that monks, nuns, female probationers, and male and female novices use for gathering alms food (PIndAPĀTA). The bowl is one of the eight requisites (PARIsKĀRA) allowed the monk, and (along with robes), is the most visible possession of a monk. Because of its ubiquity in Buddhist monasticism, the bowl is an object of high practical and symbolic value within the tradition and thus figures prominently in Buddhist practice, institutions, and literature. There are rules of what materials bowls may, and may not, be made of. They are usually made of iron or clay and may be of three sizes, large, medium, or small. Offering food to monks is one of the primary means by which the laity may earn religious merit, and the bowl is symbolic of the close bonds of mutual support that are at the heart of monastic-lay relations. One of the most severe penalties the SAMGHA can administer to the laity, therefore, is to refuse their donations. This act of ultimate censure is called "overturning the bowl" (S. PĀTRANIKUBJANA), and is imposed on a layperson who has, for example, harmed the interests of the saMgha, abused monks or nuns, or spoken disparagingly of the Buddha, dharma, or saMgha. If the layperson makes amends, the saMgha ends its boycott by "turning the bowl upright" and receiving gifts from him or her again. In all traditions of Buddhism, the bowls of past masters have functioned as relics (and were sometimes enshrined). In some traditions, most famously that of the CHAN school, the bowl was passed on from teacher to student as a symbol of lineage and as an insignia of authority. See also TAKUHATSU.

pattidāna. [alt. patti] (cf. S. prāpti; C. de; J. toku; K. tŭk 得). In Pāli, lit. "assigned gift," referring to merit (P. puNNa, S. PUnYA) that has been obtained and then transferred (parivatta) to others; the term is thus often translated into English as the "transfer of merit." The "transfer of merit" is one of the most common practices in THERAVĀDA Buddhism, in which the merit from a particular virtuous deed can be directed toward another person specified by the agent. In doing so, the agent of the deed does not lose the karmic benefit of the virtuous deed and accumulates further virtue through the gift. In the Tirokuddasutta, a number of ghosts (P. peta, S. PRETA) cause a commotion in the palace of BIMBISĀRA after he serves a meal to the Buddha and his monks. The Buddha explains that they are former kinsmen of the king who have been reborn as ghosts, who can only be satiated by receiving merit. The king then offers alms to the Buddha and his monks the next day, verbally offering it to his relatives at the same time. The ghosts, who had been invisible, become visible and are seen receiving food and drink. When the king offers robes to the monks, they also receive robes. The transfer of merit is a practice found throughout the Buddhist world, based on the belief that the dead cannot directly receive offerings; instead, those offerings must be made to virtuous recipients, such as the Buddha or the members of the SAMGHA, with the merit of that deed then transferred to the departed. See also PARInĀMANĀ; PUnYĀNUMODANA.

Payasa: A liquid offering to gods prepared with rice (boiled), milk, ghee or melted butter, and sugar, with necessary spices; also known as Paramannam.

Pāyāsisutta. (C. Bisu jing; J. Heishukukyo; K. P'yesuk kyong 弊宿經). In Pāli, "Discourse to Pāyāsi," the twenty-third sutta of the DĪGHANIKĀYA (a separate DHARMAGUPTAKA recension appears as the seventh SuTRA in the Chinese translation of the DĪRGHĀGAMA); preached by the Buddha's disciple Kumārakassapa (S. KUMĀRA-KĀsYAPA) to Pāyāsi, governor of the town of Setabyā in Kosala (S. KOsALA) country. Pāyāsi held the wrong views that there is neither another world, nor life after death, nor consequences of good and bad actions. Kumārakassapa convinced him of his errors and converted him to Buddhism through the skillful use of similes. He then taught the governor the proper way to make offerings to the three jewels (S. RATNATRAYA) of the Buddha, the DHARMA, and the SAMGHA so that they would bear the greatest fruition of merit.

pāyattika. [alt. prāyascittika, pātayantika, etc.] (P. pācittiya; T. ltung byed; C. danduo; J. tanda; K. tant'a 單墮). In Sanskrit, lit. "requiring expiation," "transgression to be confessed," a lesser category of violations of the monastic code (PRĀTIMOKsA). Transgressions fall under three major headings: (1) those that result in "defeat" (PĀRĀJIKA), (2) those that are expiated through penance and probation imposed by the SAMGHA (SAMGHĀVAsEsA), and (3) those that are expiated simply by being confessed to another monk. The pāyattika constitute this last category. In the Pāli VINAYA, there are ninety-two acts that fall under this category, comprising a wide range of offenses, ranging from lying to digging in the earth, damaging a plant, lying down in the same lodging with a woman, not putting away bedding, sewing the robe of a nun who is not a relative, drinking alcohol, swimming for pleasure, offering food to a naked ascetic, staying more than two or three consecutive nights with an army, and hiding another monk's bowl as a joke. The term also appears in another category of transgressions, called "forfeiture" (S. NAIḤSARGIKAPĀYATTIKA; P. nissaggiyapācittiya), in which a monk or nun possesses an object that is prohibited or has been wrongly acquired; in that case, the object must be forfeited and the deed confessed.

pentecostals ::: n. pl. --> Offerings formerly made to the parish priest, or to the mother church, at Pentecost.

pentecost ::: n. --> A solemn festival of the Jews; -- so called because celebrated on the fiftieth day (seven weeks) after the second day of the Passover (which fell on the sixteenth of the Jewish month Nisan); -- hence called, also, the Feast of Weeks. At this festival an offering of the first fruits of the harvest was made. By the Jews it was generally regarded as commemorative of the gift of the law on the fiftieth day after the departure from Egypt.
A festival of the Roman Catholic and other churches in


phi. In Thai, "spirit"; used to refer to a diverse group of entities believed to have power over humans and thus requiring propitiation. In some cases, they are local demigods; in others, they are reincarnations of the dead. The category also includes the ghosts of the prominent dead as well as those who died mysterious or violent deaths. Phi inhabit trees, hills, water, the earth, and certain animals. "Spirit houses" are constructed for the phi, to which offerings are made.

Phra Malai. (P. Māleyya). A legendary arahant (S. ARHAT) and one of the most beloved figures in Thai Buddhist literature. According to legend, Phra Malai lived on the island of Sri Lanka and was known for his great compassion and supramundane abilities, including the power to fly to various realms of the Buddhist universe. On one of his visits to the hells, he alleviated the suffering of hell beings and then returned to the human realm to advise their relatives to make merit on their behalf. One day as he was on his alms round, he encountered a poor man who presented him with eight lotus blossoms. Phra Malai accepted the offering and then took the flowers to tāvatimsa (S. TRĀYASTRIMsA) heaven to present them at the Culāmani cetiya (S. caitya), where the hair relic of the Buddha is enshrined. Phra Malai then met the king of the gods, INDRA, and asked him various questions: why he had built the caitya, when the future buddha Metteya (S. MAITREYA) would come to pay respects to it, and how the other deities coming to worship had made sufficient merit to be reborn at such a high level. The conversation proceeded as one divinity after another arrived, with Indra's explanation of the importance of making merit by practicing DĀNA (generosity), observing the precepts and having faith. Eventually Metteya himself arrived and, after paying reverence to the chedi, asked Phra Malai about the people in the human realm. Phra Malai responded that there is great diversity in their living conditions, health, happiness, and spiritual faculties, but that they all hoped to meet Metteya in the future and hear him preach. Metteya in response told Phra Malai to tell those who wished to meet him to listen to the recitation of the entire VESSANTARA-JĀTAKA over the course of one day and one night, and to bring to the monastery offerings totaling a thousand flowers, candles, incense sticks, balls of rice, and other gifts. In the northern and northeastern parts of Thailand, this legend is recited in the local dialects (Lānnā Thai and Lao, respectively) as a preface to the performance or recitation of the Vessantara-Jātaka at an annual festival. In central and south Thailand, a variant of the legend emphasizing the suffering of the hell denizens was customarily recited at funeral wakes, a practice that is becoming less common in the twenty-first century.

Phyag chen zla ba'i 'od zer. (Chakchen Dawe Öser). In Tibetan, "Moonbeams of MAHĀMUDRĀ"; an encyclopedic treatise on the doctrine and practice of the great seal (mahāmudrā) composed by the sixteenth-century BKA' BRGYUD scholar DWAGS PO BKRA SHIS RNAM RGYAL. It is highly regarded as a sourcebook and meditation manual for the practice of mahāmudrā, offering many quotations from Indian and Tibetan sources. The work is divided into two major divisions: the first on the practice of sAMATHA and VIPAsYANĀ, the second on the practice of mahāmudrā.

pindapāta. (T. bsod snyoms; C. qishi; J. kotsujiki; K. kolsik 乞食). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "alms food" (or, according to other etymologies, "alms bowl"); the food received in the alms bowl (S. PĀTRA; P. patta) of a monk or nun; by extension, the "alms round" that monks and nuns make each morning to accept alms from the laity. There are numerous rules found in all Buddhist traditions concerning the proper ways of receiving and consuming alms food. In the Pāli VINAYA, for example, this food must be received and consumed between dawn and noon and may consist of five types: cooked rice, baked or roasted flour, pulse and rice, fish, and meat. The monk may not, on his own initiative, intimate to the donor that he desires food or a specific kind of food; indeed, the monk makes little if any acknowledgement of receiving the food, but simply accepts whatever is offered and continues along his route. In East Asia, and especially Japan, TAKUHATSU, lit., "carrying the bowl," is often conducted by a small group of monks who walk through the streets with walking staffs (KHAKKHARA) and bells that alert residents of their presence. Because East Asian Buddhism was generally a self-sufficient cenobitic tradition that did not depend on alms food for daily meals, monks on alms round would typically receive money or uncooked rice in their bowls as offerings from the laity. The alms round was one of the principal points of interaction between monastic and lay Buddhists, and theirs was a symbiotic relationship: monks and nuns would receive their sustenance from the laity by accepting their offerings, the laity would have the opportunity to generate merit (PUnYA) for themselves and their families by making offerings (DĀNA) to the monastics. Indeed, one of the most severe penalties the SAMGHA can administer to the laity is to refuse their donations; this act of censure is called "overturning the bowl" (see PĀTRANIKUBJANA).

Pindola-Bhāradvāja. (T. Bha ra dhwa dza Bsod snyoms len; C. Bintoulu Poluoduo zunzhe; J. Binzuruharada sonja; K. Pinduro Pallat'a chonja 賓頭盧頗羅墮尊者). Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of a prominent monk-disciple of the Buddha, born as the son of a brāhmana priest in the service of King Udāyana of Kausāmbī. He was a successful teacher of the Vedas, first encountering the Buddha when his travels took him to RĀJAGṚHA. Gluttonous by nature, he was impressed by all the offerings the Buddha's disciples received and so resolved to enter the order. For this reason, he carried with him an exceptionally large alms bowl (PĀTRA) made from a gourd. After he was finally able to conquer his avarice, he became an ARHAT and uttered his "lion's roar" (SIMHANĀDA) in the presence of the Buddha, for which reason he was declared the foremost lion's roarer (siMhanādin) among the Buddha's disciples. In a famous story found in several recensions of the VINAYA, the Buddha rebuked Pindola for performing the following miracle before a crowd. A rich merchant had placed a valuable sandalwood alms bowl (pātra) atop a pole and challenged any mendicant to retrieve it with a magical display. Encouraged by MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA, Pindola entered the contest and used his magical powers to rise into the air and retrieve the bowl. The Buddha rebuked Pindola for his crass exhibitionism, and ordered that the bowl be ground into sandalwood powder (presumably for incense). The incident was the occasion for the Buddha to pass the "rule of defeat" (PĀRĀJIKA), forbidding monks from displaying supernatural powers before the laity. Sanskrit sources state that the Buddha rebuked Pindola for his misdeed and ordered him not to live in JAMBUDVĪPA, but to move to aparagodānīya (see GODĀNĪYA) to proselytize (where he is said to reside with a thousand disciples). The Buddha also forbade him from entering PARINIRVĀnA so that he would remain in the world after the Buddha's demise and continue to serve as a field of blessings (PUnYAKsETRA) for sentient beings; for this reason, Pindola is also known in Chinese as the "World-Dwelling Arhat" (Zhushi Luohan). This is the reason why some traditions still today invoke his name for protection and why he is traditionally listed as the first of the sixteen ARHAT elders (sOdAsASTHAVIRA), who are charged by the Buddha with protecting his dispensation until the advent of the next buddha, MAITREYA. According to the DIVYĀVADĀNA, Pindola was given the principal seat at the third Buddhist council (SAMGĪTI) called by Emperor AsOKA (see COUNCIL, THIRD); at that point, he was already several hundred years old, with long white hair and eyebrows that he had to hold back in order to see. In China, DAO'AN of the Eastern Jin dynasty once had a dream of a white-haired foreign monk, with long, flowing eyebrows. Later, Master Dao'an's disciple LUSHAN HUIYUAN read the SARVĀSTIVĀDA VINAYA and realized that the monk whom his teacher had dreamed about was Pindola. From that point on, Dao'an offered Pindola food every day, and, for this reason, a picture or image of Pindola is often enshrined in monastic dining halls in China. This is also why Pindola was given another nickname in Chinese, the "Long-Browed Monk" (Changmei Seng). In CHANYUE GUANXIU's standard Chinese depiction of the sixteen arhats, Pindola-Bharadvāja is portrayed as squatting on a rock, holding a staff in his left hand, leaning on a rock with his right, with a text placed on his knees. In Tibetan iconography Pindola holds a pātra; other East Asian images depict him holding a text and either a chowrie (C. FUZI; S. VĀLAVYAJANA) or a pātra.

Pine ::: Program for Internet News & Email. A tool for reading, sending, and managing electronic messages. It was designed specifically with novice computer users in Pine uses Internet message protocols (e.g. RFC 822, SMTP, MIME, IMAP, NNTP) and runs under Unix and MS-DOS.The guiding principles for Pine's user-interface were: careful limitation of features, one-character mnemonic commands, always-present command menus, from the University of Washington community and a growing number of Internet sites has been encouraging.Pine's message composition editor, Pico, is also available as a separate stand-alone program. Pico is a very simple and easy-to-use text editor offering paragraph justification, cut/paste, and a spelling checker.Pine features on-line help; a message index showing a message summary which includes the status, sender, size, date and subject of messages; commands to archives via the Interactive Mail Access Protocol as defined in RFC 1176; access to Usenet news via NNTP or IMAP.Pine, Pico and UW's IMAP server are copyrighted but freely available.Unix Pine runs on Ultrix, AIX, SunOS, SVR4 and PTX. PC-Pine is available for Packet Driver, Novell LWP, FTP PC/TCP and Sun PC/NFS. A Microsoft Windows/WinSock version is planned, as are extensions for off-line use.Pine was originally based on Elm but has evolved much since (Pine Is No-longer Elm). Pine is the work of Mike Seibel, Mark Crispin, Steve Hubert, Sheryl Erez, David Miller and Laurence Lundblade (now at Virginia Tech) at the University of Washington Office of Computing and Communications. . (login as pinedemo).E-mail: , , .(21 Sep 93)

Pine Program for Internet News & Email. A tool for reading, sending, and managing electronic messages. It was designed specifically with novice computer users in mind, but can be tailored to accommodate the needs of "power users" as well. Pine uses {Internet} message {protocols} (e.g. {RFC 822}, {SMTP}, {MIME}, {IMAP}, {NNTP}) and runs under {Unix} and {MS-DOS}. The guiding principles for Pine's user-interface were: careful limitation of features, one-character mnemonic commands, always-present command menus, immediate user feedback, and high tolerance for user mistakes. It is intended that Pine can be learned by exploration rather than reading manuals. Feedback from the {University of Washington} community and a growing number of {Internet} sites has been encouraging. Pine's message composition editor, {Pico}, is also available as a separate stand-alone program. Pico is a very simple and easy-to-use {text editor} offering paragraph justification, cut/paste, and a spelling checker. Pine features on-line help; a message index showing a message summary which includes the status, sender, size, date and subject of messages; commands to view and process messages; a message composer with easy-to-use editor and spelling checker; an address book for saving long complex addresses and personal distribution lists under a nickname; message attachments via {Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions}; {folder} management commands for creating, deleting, listing, or renaming message folders; access to remote message folders and archives via the {Interactive Mail Access Protocol} as defined in {RFC 1176}; access to {Usenet} news via {NNTP} or {IMAP}. Pine, {Pico} and {UW}'s {IMAP} {server} are copyrighted but freely available. {Unix} Pine runs on {Ultrix}, {AIX}, {SunOS}, {SVR4} and {PTX}. PC-Pine is available for {Packet Driver}, {Novell LWP}, {FTP PC/TCP} and {Sun} {PC/NFS}. A {Microsoft Windows}/{WinSock} version is planned, as are extensions for off-line use. Pine was originally based on {Elm} but has evolved much since ("Pine Is No-longer Elm"). Pine is the work of Mike Seibel, Mark Crispin, Steve Hubert, Sheryl Erez, David Miller and Laurence Lundblade (now at Virginia Tech) at the University of Washington Office of Computing and Communications. {(ftp://ftp.cac.washington.edu/mail/pine.tar.Z)}. {(telnet://demo.cac.washington.edu/)} (login as "pinedemo"). E-mail: "pine@cac.washington.edu", "pine-info-request@cac.washington.edu", "pine-announce-request@cac.washington.edu". (21 Sep 93)

portal "web" A {website} that aims to be an entry point to the {web}, typically offering a {search engine} and/or links to useful pages, and possibly news or other services. These services are usually provided for free in the hope that users will make the site their default {home page} or at least visit it often. Popular examples are {Yahoo} and {MSN}. Most portals on the {Internet} exist to generate advertising income for their owners, others may be focused on a specific group of users and may be part of an {intranet} or {extranet}. Some may just concentrate on one particular subject, say technology or medicine, and are known as a {vertical portals}. (2001-07-07)

POSTGRES "database" An {active DBMS} developed at the {University of California at Berkeley} by a team led by Michael Stonebraker (1986-1994). Postgres was later taken by {Illustra} and developed into a commercial product, which in turn was bought by {Informix} and integrated into their product, {Universal Server}. {PostgreSQL} is a further development of the original POSTGRES code as a {free software} alternative to commercial {DBMS} vendor offerings. [Details? Reference? Relationship to {Ingres}?] (1999-07-04)

POSTGRES ::: (database) An active DBMS developed at the University of California at Berkeley by a team led by Michael Stonebraker (1986-1994). Postgres was later taken by Illustra and developed into a commercial product, which in turn was bought by Informix and integrated into their product, Universal Server.PostgreSQL is a further development of the original POSTGRES code as a free software alternative to commercial DBMS vendor offerings.[Details? Reference? Relationship to Ingres?] (1999-07-04)

prabhr.tha (prabhritha) ::: bringing forward; offering.

prasad&

pratisaMvid. (P. patisaMbhidā; T. so sor yang dag par rig pa; C. wu'ai jie; J. mugege; K. muae hae 無礙解). In Sanskrit, "analytical knowledge," of which there are four kinds: knowledge of (1) factors or phenomena (DHARMA), viz., one makes no mistakes in understanding causes, conditions, or the relationships pertaining between objects; (2) meaning (ARTHA), viz., to have no limitations with regard to the content, meaning, and analysis of one's teachings; (3) etymology or language (NIRUKTI), viz., the ability to comprehend all languages, including those of the divinities (DEVA) and other nonhuman beings (YAKsA, GANDHARVA, ASURA, GARUdA, KIMNARA, MAHORĀGA), and to penetrate the full range of etymological or linguistic expressions; and (4) eloquence (PRATIBHĀNA), viz., ease in offering explanations and/or the ability to inspire others with one's words. These four types of knowledge are associated with both the attainment of arhatship and the achievement of the ninth of the ten stages (DAsABHuMI) of the BODHISATTVA path. In Chinese, these were known as the "unconstrained knowledges" (wu'ai jie).

pravāranā. (P. pavāranā; T. dgag phye; C. zizi; J. jishi; K. chaja 自恣). In Sanskrit, "invitation" or "presentation," the monastic ceremony that marks the end of the annual rains retreat (VARsĀ). (The Tibetan translation denotes the "separation from prohibition" that accompanies the end of the rains retreat; the Chinese translation zizi has the connotation of "self-indulgence," suggesting that monks are then free to "follow their own bent.") The purity of the SAMGHA is reaffirmed by each monk by asking the community whether he committed any infraction of the code of discipline (PRĀTIMOKsA) during the period of the retreat. In the Southeast Asian traditions, the ceremony is held at the end of the rains retreat (varsā) on the full-moon day of the seventh or eighth lunar month (usually between September and November), at which time each monk resident at a monastery invites the monastic community to point out any wrongs he may have committed that were either seen, heard, or suspected. The pravāranā must be performed at a single site by all eligible members of a given saMgha, although if a monk is ill, he may dispatch his invitation through an intermediary. A monk guilty of an offense that has not been expiated may not participate. According to VINAYA strictures, the pravāranā ceremony may not be performed in the presence of the following kinds of persons: nuns, women in training to become nuns, male and female novices, persons who have seceded from the order, monastics guilty of a PĀRĀJIKA offense, monks who refuse to acknowledge their own wrongdoing (of three kinds), eunuchs, false monks who wear monastic attire without having been ordained, monks who have joined other religions, nonhumans, patricides, matricides, murderers of an ARHAT, seducers of nuns, schismatics, those who have shed the blood of a buddha, hermaphrodites, and laypersons. Traditionally on the pravāranā day, laypeople would come to the monastery and make offerings of necessary requisites to the monks throughout the day on behalf of their parents and deceased ancestors. The Chinese pilgrim YIJING (635-713) in his NANHAI JIGUI NEIFA ZHUAN describes pravāranā as an elaborate communal festival, with senior monks delivering protracted dharma lectures throughout the day and night; lamps were lit and flowers and incense offered as laypeople distributed gifts to the entire saMgha.

present ::: 1. To make an offering, present, or gift of; to offer, deliver, give. 2. To hand over or submit. presents, presented.

presentation ::: n. --> The act of presenting, or the state of being presented; a setting forth; an offering; bestowal.
exhibition; representation; display; appearance; semblance; show.
That which is presented or given; a present; a gift, as, the picture was a presentation.
The act of offering a clergyman to the bishop or ordinary for institution in a benefice; the right of presenting a


presentative ::: a. --> Having the right of presentation, or offering a clergyman to the bishop for institution; as, advowsons are presentative, collative, or donative.
Admitting the presentation of a clergyman; as, a presentative parsonage.
Capable of being directly known by, or presented to, the mind; intuitive; directly apprehensible, as objects; capable of apprehending, as faculties.


pretence ::: a. --> Alt. of Pretenceless ::: n. --> The act of laying claim; the claim laid; assumption; pretension.
The act of holding out, or offering, to others something false or feigned; presentation of what is deceptive or hypocritical;


proffering ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Proffer

propination ::: n. --> The act of pledging, or drinking first, and then offering the cup to another.

proposition ::: n. --> The act of setting or placing before; the act of offering.
That which is proposed; that which is offered, as for consideration, acceptance, or adoption; a proposal; as, the enemy made propositions of peace; his proposition was not accepted.
A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed; as, the propositions of Wyclif and Huss.
A complete sentence, or part of a sentence consisting


prostitution ::: n. --> The act or practice of prostituting or offering the body to an indiscriminate intercourse with men; common lewdness of a woman.
The act of setting one&


publication ::: n. --> The act of publishing or making known; notification to the people at large, either by words, writing, or printing; proclamation; divulgation; promulgation; as, the publication of the law at Mount Sinai; the publication of the gospel; the publication of statutes or edicts.
The act of offering a book, pamphlet, engraving, etc., to the public by sale or by gratuitous distribution.
That which is published or made known; especially, any


publication: The act of publishing a text. This usually involves printing up and offering the text for public consumption.

Public offering - The presenting new securities to the investing public, after registration requirements have been filed with the appropriate authorities.

Puja (Sanskrit) Pūjā [from the verbal root pūj to honor, worship] An offering of reverence and honor; veneration; homage and respect to superiors or to something held divine or sacred, whether made to living beings or even to idols.

puja &

pujā. (T. mchod pa; C. gongyang; J. kuyo; K. kongyang 供養). In Sanskrit, lit. "worship" and "offering"; any "ritual" at which offerings are made, or the offerings themselves. These offering rituals involve a number of standard liturgies, including those in three parts (TRISKANDHAKA) and seven parts (SAPTĀnGAVIDHI). In the MAHĀYĀNA, many pujās seem to derive from a simple three-part liturgy, which appeared in two forms. One form consisted of (1) the confession of transgressions (PĀPADEsANĀ), (2) the admiration of others' virtues (ANUMODANA), and (3) the dedication of merit (PARInĀMANĀ). The other consisted of (1) the confession of transgressions, (2) the admiration of others' virtue, and (3) the request to the buddhas to turn the wheel of the dharma (DHARMACAKRAPRAVARTANA). This tripartite ritual was eventually expanded to include seven sections: obeisance, offering, confession, admiration, supplication to the buddhas and bodhisattvas to teach the dharma, entreaty not to pass into PARINIRVĀnA, and dedication of any merit accrued by performing the preceding ritual to the enlightenment of all sentient beings. This sevenfold liturgy, presented most famously in the opening twelve stanzas of the BHADRACARĪPRAnIDHĀNA ("Vow of SAMANTABHADRA's Deeds"), the last section of the GAndAVYuHA in the AVATAMSAKASuTRA, became a standard part of many MAHĀYĀNA practices, often serving as a prolegomenon to a meditation session. This sevenfold liturgy became a common element of tantric pujās as well.

punyaksetra. (P. puNNakkhetta; T. bsod nams kyi zhing; C. futian; J. fukuden; K. pokch'on 福田). In Sanskrit, "field of merit," referring specifically to a recipient (a "field") that has a substantial potential to provide karmic compensation to a benefactor who "plants the seeds of merit" there by performing wholesome actions (KUsALA-KARMAN), especially through acts of charity (DĀNA). Traditionally, the Buddha, the SAMGHA as an institution, or individual monks and nuns were described as the primary fields of merit for the laity, and in this context these provide an "unsurpassed" (anuttara) "field of merit." By providing material support (dāna) such as food and robes' cloth (see KAtHINA) to the monastic order and its members, the laity in return would reap spiritual rewards (i.e., receiving religious instructions from the renunciants) as well as karmic rewards (viz. good fortune in this life and better rebirth in the next). The use of the term eventually expanded, as in the Chinese SANJIE JIAO (School of the Third Stage), to include one's parents, the poor, the sick, the community of monks and nuns, and ultimately all sentient beings, since serving any of them involves acts of charity that would lead to the accumulation of merit. Several pairs of fields of merit are variously described in the literature. (1) The merit field of the trainee, or sAIKsA (xueren tian), and the merit field of the accomplished adept, or AsAIKsA (wuxue ren tian). By making offerings to and supporting the spiritually accomplished (in this case, he who is "beyond training"-viz. an ARHAT), it is said that the merit accrued therefrom is greater than if the offering and support are given to someone less spiritually worthy. (2) The merit field associated with compassion (beitian) and the merit field associated with reverence (jingtian). In the Sanjie jiao school, for example, the former is exemplified by the act of giving (dāna) when it is undertaken with compassion (KARUnĀ), such as in the case of helping the indigent; the latter is exemplified by the act of giving when it is undertaken with reverence, such as in the case of providing for the spiritually accomplished. (3) The merit field associated with anticipation (youzuo futian) and the merit field that is free from anticipation (wuzuo futian). The former refers to undertaking the act of giving with an active wish or anticipation of specific rewards; the latter is undertaken with no such wish or anticipation-and, since it is considered to stem from an unadulterated motive, will generate greater rewards. (4) The merit field associated with reverence (jingtian) and the merit field associated with (requiting) benefaction (en tian). The former is the act of giving directed toward the three jewels (RATNATRAYA); the latter, toward one's parents, teachers, and other benefactors.

Purity, simple sincerity and capacity of an unegoistic, unmIxed self-offering without pretension or demand are the conditions of an entire opening of the psychic being.

quadragesimals ::: n. pl. --> Offerings formerly made to the mother church of a diocese on Mid-Lent Sunday.

Quetzalcoatl, Quetzocohuatl (Toltec, Nahautl?) The name of a great teacher, according to the traditions of the Toltecs, who came to them from Tullan or Yucatan and dwelt for twenty years among the people, teaching them to follow a virtuous life, to cease all wars and violent deeds of any kind, to abolish human and animal sacrifices and instead to give offerings of bread and flowers. He taught the people, likewise, the art of picture-writing and the science of the calendar and the artistry of the workers in metals for which Cholula later became famed.

raksā. [alt. rāksā] (P. rakkhā; T. srung ba; C. yonghu; J. ogo; K. ongho 擁護). In Sanskirt, "protection," "safeguard," referring to ritual actions or practices that are intended to ward off baleful and impure influences. These protective acts are often performed as a preliminary step in constructing a MAndALA, performing an initiation ritual (ABHIsEKA), or cultivating meditative practices. The ritual is performed by inviting or imagining deities who purify the body, speech, and mind of the practitioner, and remove all inner and outer obstacles and evils; a common form of the Tibetan ritual utilizes a distinctive form of propitiatory offering (S. bali) called a GTOR MA (torma), small conical cakes. The officiating tantric master (VAJRĀCĀRYA) attracts the negative forces (T. gegs) to the offering, where they are propitiated or bound and led away from the assembly. Setting up a "wheel of protection" is an integral part of many ANUTTARAYOGATANTRA ritual practices (SĀDHANA) (see RAKsĀCAKRA). A "protection cord" (raksāsutra; T. srung skud) is ritually embued with protective power by a tantric master and given to each supplicant at the start of an initiation ritual; this is a piece of string or a narrow strip of cloth, usually red, that is tied around the neck, arm, or the wrist to protect the wearer. Tibetan religious figures often give visitors a "protection cord" as a gift. Small amulets (T. ga'u) housing protective buddhas, relics, or tightly rolled copies of ritual invocations or mantras believed to be particularly efficacious against harm are also carried on a belt or around the neck. See also PARITTA; RATANASUTTA.

rapture ::: the state of being transported by a lofty emotion; ecstasy. rapture"s, rapture", rapture-drink, rapture-flowers, rapture-offering, rapture-thrill, world-rapture, heaven-rapture"s.

rationalisation: a defence mechanism whereby behaviour is explained and justified by offering a reason acceptable to the ego in place of the true reason.

Red herring – Is a slang term for a preliminary prospectus that outlines the important features of a new issue. This prospectus contains no selling price information or offering date.

Revata. (T. Nam gru; C. Lipoduo; J. Ribata; K. Ibada 離婆多). Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of an important ARHAT who was foremost among the Buddha's monk disciples in mastery of meditative absorption (DHYĀNA; P. JHĀNA). He is typically known as "doubting Revata" (KĀnKsĀ-REVATA; P. Kankhā-Revata), to distinguish him from several other Revatas who appear in the literature, because prior to his enlightenment he is said to have been troubled by doubt concerning what was permissible and what was not. According to the Pāli account, Revata was born into a wealthy family in the city of Sāvitthi (S. sRĀVASTĪ). One day he heard the Buddha preach in Kapilavatthu (S. KAPILAVASTU) and resolved to renounce the world and enter the order. He attained arhatship by relying on dhyāna, and his exceptional skill in these meditative states won him distinction. Revata had resolved to attain this distinction in a previous life as a brāhmana when, during the time of the buddha Padmottara, he heard the Buddha describe one of his disciples as preeminent in his attainment of dhyāna. In another famous story, the mother of Uttara had been reborn as a hungry ghost (S. PRETA, P. peta) and after fifty-five years of wandering, encountered Revata and begged him for relief. He relieved her suffering by making various offerings to the SAMGHA in her name. ¶ There was a later monk named Revata who played a major role at the second Buddhist council (SAMGĪTI; see COUNCIL, SECOND) held at VAIsĀLĪ. Some one hundred years after the death of the Buddha, the monk YAsAS was traveling in Vaisālī when he observed the monks there receiving alms in the form of gold and silver directly from the laity, in violation of the prohibition against monks' touching gold and silver. He also found that the monks had identified ten points in the VINAYA that were classified as violations but that they had determined were sufficiently minor to be ignored. Yasas challenged the monks on these practices, but when he refused to accept their bribes to keep quiet, they expelled him from the order. Yasas sought support of several respected monks in the west, including sĀnAKAVĀSĪN and Revata, and together they traveled to Vaisālī. Once there, Revata went to Sarvagāmin, the eldest monk of his era, who is said to have been a disciple of ĀNANDA, to question him about these ten points. At Revata's suggestion, a jury of eight monks was appointed to adjudicate, with four representatives selected from each party. Revata was selected as one of four from the party declaring the ten practices to be violations, and it was Revata who publically put the questions to Sarvagāmin. In each case, the senior monk said that the practice in question was a violation of the vinaya. Seven hundred monks then gathered to recite the vinaya. Those who did not accept the decision of the council held their own convocation, which they called the MAHĀSĀMGHIKA, or "Great Assembly." This event is sometimes said to have led to the first "great schism" within the mainstream Buddhist tradition, between the STHAVIRANIKĀYA, or Fraternity of the Elders, and the MahāsāMghika.

rohatsu sesshin. (臘八攝心). In Japanese, lit. "retreat on the eighth [day] of the last [month]," typically refering to an intensive week-long session of meditation (SESSHIN) that ends on the eighth day of the twelfth lunar month (rohatsu), the reputed day of the Buddha's enlightenment according to the East Asian calendar. The retreat begins with a ceremony on the first of the twelfth lunar month and ends on the morning of the eighth with another ceremony, which usually consists of a lecture by the abbot known as the rohatu jodo, and offerings made to an image of sĀKYAMUNI emerging from the mountains (shussan Shaka). (Cf. PRĀGBODHI[GIRI].) The rohatsu sesshin performed in the SAMGHA hall (SENGTANG) at ZEN monasteries often entails nonstop meditative practice with little or no sleep. See also YONGMAENG CHoNGJIN.

Rwa lo tsā ba Rdo rje grags. (Ra Lotsawa Dorje Drakpa) (1016-1128?). A prominent translator and YOGIN of the "later dissemination" (PHYI DAR) of Buddhism to Tibet. While still in his teens, he went to Nepal, where he received instructions and transmissions of a number of tantric cycles; he received the VAJRABHAIRAVA and VAJRAVĀRĀHĪ transmissions from the Nepalese master Bharo. Upon his return to Tibet, he attracted many students and received generous offerings from patrons, which he used for the support of the dharma; among his many projects was the rebuilding of BSAM YAS after it was destroyed by fire. He translated many tantric texts and is known especially for his translations of texts connected with YAMĀNTAKA. He also translated the KĀLACAKRATANTRA into Tibetan; the tradition deriving from his translation is known as the Rwa lugs. He was also a controversial figure, known to have little patience with those who opposed him; he is said to have used his tantric powers to "liberate" (i.e., kill) thirteen rivals, including according to some accounts, MAR PA's son DAR MA SDO SDE.

sacrificatory ::: n. --> Offering sacrifice.

Sacrifice: A ceremonial offering to a god, demon or other superhuman or supernatural being.

SACRIFICE. ::: Does noi so mucb indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one's being, one’s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘ making sacred ' and is used as an equivalent of yajna.

sacrifice ::: n. **1. The surrender to God or a deity, for the purpose of propitiation or homage, of some object of possession. Also applied fig. to the offering of prayer, thanksgiving, penitence, submission, or the like. 2. Forfeiture or surrender of something highly valued for the sake of one considered to have a greater value or claim. tree-of-sacrifice. v. 3.** To surrender or give up (something).

sacrifice ::: n. --> The offering of anything to God, or to a god; consecratory rite.
Anything consecrated and offered to God, or to a divinity; an immolated victim, or an offering of any kind, laid upon an altar, or otherwise presented in the way of religious thanksgiving, atonement, or conciliation.
Destruction or surrender of anything for the sake of something else; devotion of some desirable object in behalf of a higher


sacrifice ::: “Sacrifice means an inner offering to the Divine and the real spiritual sacrifice is a very joyful thing.” Letters on Yoga

Saddharmapundarīkasutra. (T. Dam pa'i chos padma dkar po'i mdo; C. Miaofa lianhua jing/Fahua jing; J. Myohorengekyo/Hokekyo; K. Myobop yonhwa kyong/Pophwa kyong 妙法蓮華經/法華經). In Sanskrit, "Sutra of the White Lotus of the True Dharma," and known in English simply as the "Lotus Sutra"; perhaps the most influential of all MAHĀYĀNA sutras. The earliest portions of the text were probably composed as early as the first or second centuries of the Common Era; the text gained sufficient renown in India that a number of chapters were later interpolated into it. The sutra was translated into Chinese six times and three of those translations are extant. The earliest of those is that made by DHARMARAKsA, completed in 286. The most popular is that of KUMĀRAJĪVA in twenty-eight chapters, completed in 406. The sutra was translated into Tibetan in the early ninth century. Its first translation into a European language was that of EUGÈNE BURNOUF into French in 1852. The Saddharmapundarīkasutra is perhaps most famous for its parables, which present, in various versions, two of the sutra's most significant doctrines: skill-in-means (UPĀYA) and the immortality of the Buddha. In the parable of the burning house, a father lures his children from a conflagration by promising them three different carts, but when they emerge they find instead a single, magnificent cart. The three carts symbolize the sRĀVAKA vehicle, the PRATYEKABUDDHA vehicle, and the BODHISATTVA vehicle, while the one cart is the "one vehicle" (EKAYĀNA), the buddha vehicle (BUDDHAYĀNA). This parable indicates that the Buddha's previous teaching of three vehicles (TRIYĀNA) was a case of upāya, an "expedient device" or "skillful method" designed to attract persons of differing capacities to the dharma. In fact, there is only one vehicle, the vehicle whereby all beings proceed to buddhahood. In the parable of the conjured city, a group of weary travelers take rest in a magnificent city, only to be told later that it is a magical creation. This conjured city symbolizes the NIRVĀnA of the ARHAT; there is in fact no such nirvāna as a final goal in Buddhism, since all will eventually follow the bodhisattva's path to buddhahood. The apparently universalistic doctrine articulated by the sutra must be understood within the context of the sectarian polemics in which the sutra seems to have been written. The doctrine of upāya is intended in part to explain the apparent contradiction between the teachings that appear in earlier sutras and those of the Saddharmapundarīkasutra. The former are relegated to the category of mere expedients, with those who fail to accept the consummate teaching of the Saddharmapundarīkasutra as the authentic word of the Buddha (BUDDHAVACANA) repeatedly excoriated by the text itself. In a device common in Mahāyāna sutras, the sutra itself describes both the myriad benefits that accrue to those who recite, copy, and revere the sutra, as well as the misfortune that will befall those who fail to do so. The immortality of the Buddha is portrayed in the parable of the physician, in which a father feigns death in order to induce his sons to commit to memory an antidote to poison. The apparent death of the father is compared to the Buddha's entry into nirvāna, something which he only pretended to do in order to inspire his followers. Elsewhere in the sutra, the Buddha reveals that he did not achieve enlightenment as the prince Siddhārtha who left his palace, but in fact had achieved enlightenment eons before; the well-known version of his departure from the palace and successful quest for enlightenment were merely a display meant to inspire the world. The immortality of the Buddha (and other buddhas) is also demonstrated when a great STuPA emerges from the earth. When the door to the funerary reliquary is opened, ashes and bones are not found, as would be expected, but instead the living buddha PRABHuTARATNA, who appears in his stupa whenever the Saddharmapundarīkasutra is taught. sĀKYAMUNI joins him on his seat, demonstrating another central Mahāyāna doctrine, the simultaneous existence of multiple buddhas. Other famous events described in the sutra include the miraculous transformation of a NĀGA princess into a buddha after she presents a gem to sākyamuni and the tale of a bodhisattva who immolates himself in tribute to a previous buddha. The sutra contains several chapters that function as self-contained texts; the most popular of these is the chapter devoted to the bodhisattva AVALOKITEsVARA, which details his ability to rescue the faithful from various dangers. The Saddharmapundarīkasutra was highly influential in East Asia, inspiring both a range of devotional practices as well as the creation of new Buddhist schools that had no Indian analogues. The devotional practices include those extolled by the sutra itself: receiving and keeping the sutra, reading it, memorizing and reciting it, copying it, and explicating it. In East Asia, there are numerous tales of the miraculous benefits of each of these practices. The practice of copying the sutra (or having it copied) was a particularly popular form of merit-making either for oneself or for departed family members. Also important, especially in China, was the practice of burning either a finger or one's entire body as an offering to the Buddha, emulating the self-immolation of the bodhisattva BHAIsAJYARĀJA in the twenty-third chapter (see SHESHEN). In the domain of doctrinal developments, the Saddharmapundarīkasutra was highly influential across East Asia, its doctrine of upāya providing the rationale for the systems of doctrinal taxonomies (see JIAOXIANG PANSHI) that are pervasive in East Asian Buddhist schools. In China, the sutra was the central text of the TIANTAI ZONG, where it received detailed exegesis by a number of important figures. The school's founder, TIANTAI ZHIYI, divided the sutra into two equal parts. In the first fourteen chapters, which he called the "trace teaching" (C. jimen, J. SHAKUMON), sākyamuni appears as the historical buddha. In the remaining fourteen chapters, which Zhiyi called the "origin teaching" (C. benmen, J. HONMON), sākyamuni reveals his true nature as the primordial buddha who achieved enlightenment many eons ago. Zhiyi also drew on the Saddharmapundarīkasutra in elucidating two of his most famous doctrines: the three truths (SANDI, viz., emptiness, the provisional, and the mean) and the notion of YINIAN SANQIAN, or "the trichiliocosm in an instant of thought." In the TENDAISHu, the Japanese form of Tiantai, the sutra remained supremely important, providing the scriptural basis for the central doctrine of original enlightenment (HONGAKU) and the doctrine of "achieving buddhahood in this very body" (SOKUSHIN JoBUTSU); in TAIMITSU, the tantric form of Tendai, sākyamuni Buddha was identified with MAHĀVAIROCANA. For the NICHIREN schools (and their offshoots, including SoKA GAKKAI), the Saddharmapundarīkasutra is not only its central text but is also considered to be the only valid Buddhist sutra for the degenerate age (J. mappo; see C. MOFA); the recitation of the sutra's title is the central practice in Nichiren (see NAMU MYoHoRENGEKYo). See also SADĀPARIBHuTA.

Sadhana is the opening of the consciousness to the Divine, the change of the present consciousness to the psychic and spiritual consciousness. In this yoga it means also the offering of all consciousness and its activities to the Divine for possession and use by the Divine and for transformation.

sādhana. (T. sgrub thabs; C. chengjiu fa; J. jojuho; K. songch'wi pop 成就法). In Sanskrit, "method" or "technique," used especially in reference to a tantric ritual designed to receive attainments (SIDDHI) from a deity. Tantric sādhanas generally take one of two forms. In the first, the deity (which may be a buddha, BODHISATTVA, or another deity) is requested to appear before the meditator and is then worshipped in the expectation of receiving blessings. In the other type of tantric sādhana, the meditator imagines himself or herself to be the deity at this very moment, that is, to have the exalted body, speech, and mind of an enlightened being. Tantric sādhanas tend to follow a fairly set sequence, whether they are simple or detailed. More elaborate sādhanas may include the recitation of a lineage of GURUs; the creation of a protection wheel guarded by wrathful deities to subjugate enemies; the creation of a body MAndALA, in which a pantheon of deities take residence at various parts of the meditator's body, etc. Although there are a great many variations of content and sequence, in many sādhanas, the meditator is instructed to imagine light radiating from the body, thus beckoning buddhas and bodhisattvas from throughout the universe. Visualizing these deities arrayed in the space, the meditator then performs a series of standard preliminary practices called the sevenfold service (SAPTĀnGAVIDHI), a standard component of sādhanas. The seven elements are (1) obeisance, (2) offering (often concluding with a gift of the entire physical universe with all its marvels), (3) confession of misdeeds, (4) admiration of the virtuous deeds of others, (5) entreaty to the buddhas not to pass into NIRVĀnA, (6) supplication of the buddhas and bodhisattvas to teach the dharma, and (7) dedication of the merit of performing the preceding toward the enlightenment of all beings. The meditator then goes for refuge to the three jewels (RATNATRAYA), creates the aspiration for enlightenment (BODHICITTA; BODHICITTOTPĀDA), the promise to achieve buddhahood in order to liberate all beings in the universe from suffering, and dedicates the merit from the foregoing and subsequent practices toward that end. The meditator next cultivates the four "boundless" attitudes (APRAMĀnA) of loving-kindness (MAITRĪ), compassion (KARUnĀ), empathetic joy (MUDITĀ), and equanimity or impartiality (UPEKsĀ), before meditating on emptiness (suNYATĀ) and reciting the purificatory mantra, oM svabhāvasuddhāḥ sarvadharmāḥ svabhāvasuddho 'haM ("OM, naturally pure are all phenomena, naturally pure am I"), understanding that emptiness is the primordial nature of everything, the unmoving world and the beings who move upon it. Out of this emptiness, the meditator next creates the mandala. The next step in the sādhana is for the meditator to animate the residents of the mandala by causing the actual buddhas and bodhisattvas, referred to as "wisdom beings" (JNĀNASATTVA), to descend and merge with their imagined doubles, the "pledge beings" (SAMAYASATTVA). Light radiates from the meditator's heart, drawing the wisdom beings to the mandala where, through offerings and the recitation of mantra, they are prompted to enter the residents of the mandala. With the preliminary visualization now complete, the stage is set for the central meditation of the sādhana, which varies depending upon the purpose of the sādhana. Generally, offerings and prayers are made to a sequence of deities and boons are requested from them, each time accompanied with the recitation of appropriate MANTRA. At the end of the session, the meditator makes mental offerings to the assembly before inviting them to leave, at which point the entire visualization, the palace and its residents, dissolve into emptiness. The sādhana ends with a dedication of the merit accrued to the welfare of all beings.

Sāgara. (T. Rgya mtsho; C. Suojieluo/Suoqieluo; J. Shakara [alt. Shakatsura]/Shagara; K. Sagalla/Sagara 娑竭羅/娑伽羅). In Sanskrit, "Ocean"; one of the eight dragon kings (NĀGA) who served as guardians of the BUDDHADHARMA. His name appears alongside those of the other seven dragon kings who were in the audience when the Buddha taught the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA. Sāgara is believed to be the dragon king of the ocean, who governs precipitation. He resides in a palace beneath the ocean that surrounds Mt. SUMERU. Sāgara occasionally appears as a flanking-attendant of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA. In his palace, Sāgara is said to store a MAnI jewel, which he sometimes offers to the bodhisattva. In the twelfth chapter of the Saddharmapundarīkasutra, Sāgara also appears as the father of the eight-year-old nāga princess who, by offering a jewel to the Buddha, instantaneously turns into a male, traverses the ten bodhisattva stages (BHuMI), and achieves buddhahood, evidence to some exegetes in the tradition that women have the capacity to achieve buddhahood.

Saharakshas (Sanskrit) Saharakṣas Strength preserving; commonly explained as the fire of the asuras or the sacrificial fire which receives the offerings to the rakshasas. In the Puranas, pavamana — the fire which is produced by friction — is represented as the parent of saharakshas.

sakra. (P. Sakka; T. Brgya byin; C. Di-Shi; J. Taishaku; K. Che-Sok 帝釋). Sanskrit name of a divinity who is often identified with the Vedic god INDRA (with whom he shares many epithets), although it is perhaps more accurate to describe him as a Buddhist (and less bellicose) version of Indra. Typically described in Buddhist texts by his full name and title as "sakra, the king of the gods" (sAKRO DEVĀNĀM INDRAḤ), he is the divinity (DEVA) who appears most regularly in Buddhist texts. sakra is chief of the gods of the heaven of the thirty-three (TRĀYASTRIMsA), located on the summit of Mount SUMERU. As such, he is a god of great power and long life, but is also subject to death and rebirth; the Buddha details in various discourses the specific virtues that result in rebirth as sakra. In both the Pāli canon and the MAHĀYĀNA sutras, sakra is depicted as the most devoted of the divine followers of the Buddha, descending from his heaven to listen to the Buddha's teachings and to ask him questions (and according to some accounts, eventually achieving the state of stream-enterer), and rendering all manner of assistance to the Buddha and his followers. In the case of the Buddha, this assistance was extended prior to his achievement of buddhahood, both in his previous lives (as in the story of Vessantara in the VESSANTARA JĀTAKA) and in his last lifetime as Prince SIDDHĀRTHA; when the prince cuts off his royal locks and throws them into the sky, proclaiming that he will achieve buddhahood if his locks remain there, it is sakra who catches them and installs them in a shrine in the heaven of the thirty-three. When the Buddha later visited the heaven of the thirty-three to teach the ABHIDHARMA to his mother MĀYĀ (who had been reborn there), sakra provided the magnificent ladder for his celebrated descent to JAMBUDVĪPA that took place at SĀMKĀsYA. When the Buddha was sick with dysentery near the end of his life, sakra carried his chamber pot. sakra often descends to earth disguised as a brāhmana in order to test the virtue of the Buddha's disciples, both monastic and lay, offering all manner of miraculous boons to those who pass the test. In the Pāli canon, a section of the SAMYUTTANIKĀYA consists of twenty-five short suttas devoted to him.

Sanjie jiao. (J. Sangaikyo/Sankaikyo; K. Samgye kyo 三階教). In Chinese, often translated as the "Three Stages School," but more probably referring to the "School of the Third Stage." The Sanjie jiao was a Chinese religious movement that was inspired by the influential teachings of the Chinese monk XINXING (540-594). The community shared Xinxing's belief in the decline of the DHARMA (MOFA) and the concomitant decay of one's potential or capacity (genji) for attaining buddhahood. According to the Three Stages teachings, the capacities of sentient beings are roughly divided into the so-called three stages (sanjie). The first two stages, now past, are those of the one vehicle (YISHENG; cf. EKAYĀNA) or three vehicles (TRIYĀNA), during which correct views about Buddhism were still present in the world. The current "third stage" (i.e., the present) was characterized instead by the proliferation of false views and prejudices. Because people during this degenerate age of the dharma were inevitably mistaken in their perceptions of reality, it was impossible for them to make any correct distinctions, whether between right and wrong, good and evil, ordained and lay. To counter these inveterate tendencies toward discrimination, Sanjie jiao adherents were taught instead to treat all things as manifestations of the buddha-nature (FOXING), leading to a "universalist teaching" (pufa) of Buddhism that was presumed to have supplanted all the previous teachings of the religion. Xinxing advocated that almsgiving (DĀNA) was the epitome of Buddhist practice during the degenerate age of the dharma and that the true perfection of giving (DĀNAPĀRAMITĀ) meant that all people, monks and laypeople alike, should be making offerings to relieve the suffering to those most in need, including the poor, the orphaned, and the sick. In its radical reinterpretation of the practice of giving in Buddhism, even animals were considered to be a more appropriate object of charity than were buddhas, bodhisattvas, monks, or the three jewels (RATNATRAYA); members of the community were even said to bow down to dogs. As the only reliable practice during this degenerate third stage, the Sanjie jiao community institutionalized giving in the form of an "inexhaustible storehouse cloister" (WUJINZANG YUAN). Donations made to the inexhaustible storehouse established by the Three Stages community at the monastery Huadusi in Chang'an would be distributed again during times of famine. The offerings were also used to fund the restoration of monasteries and the performance of religious services (i.e., the reverence field of merit, C. jingtian), and to provide alms to the poor (i.e., the compassion field of merit, C. beitian; see PUnYAKsETRA). The inexhaustible storehouse also came to serve as a powerful money-lending institution. The Three Stages community was labeled a heresy during the persecution of Buddhism during the Tang dynasty and, in 713, the Tang emperor Xuanzong (r. 712-756) issued an edict closing the inexhaustible storehouse due to charges of embezzlement; its scriptures were eventually labeled spurious (see APOCRYPHA) and dropped out of circulation, only to be rediscovered in the DUNHUANG manuscript cache. Despite these persecutions, the school continued to be influential for several more centuries.

saptādhikaranasamatha. (P. sattādhikaranasamatha; T. rtsod pa nye bar zhi ba bdun; C. qi miezheng fa; J. shichimetsujoho; K. ch'il myolchaeng pop 七滅諍法). In Sanskrit, "seven methods of settling disputes." In confronting monastic members who have transgressed the rules and regulations of the order (see PRĀTIMOKsA), or when there are disputes about meting out the appropriate sanctions for such infraction, the VINAYA outlines seven methods for dealing with the transgressors and resolving the differences, respectively. According to the CulAVAGGA section of the Pāli pātimokkha (using the Sanskrit name for each section): (1) SaMmukha-vinaya involves the appeal to scriptural and vinaya laws or to direct evidence of transgression. (2) Smṛti-vinaya relies on character witness, testimony of witness[es] of the infraction, and the memory of the transgressor himself if he or she has a clean record and is of trustworthy temperament. In the latter case, an otherwise trustworthy suspect who claims to have no memory of the infraction is presumed innocent. (3) Amudha-vinaya is resorting to insanity claims. "Temporary insanity" or the loss of judgment due to different causes at the time of the infraction is considered mitigating and even exculpatory. The transgressor is only brought to the monastic hearing when his sanity or consciousness is restored. (4) Tatsvabhāvaisīya-vinaya is the postponement of appropriate punishment after the transgressor has offered a voluntary confession. (5) Yadbhuyasikīya-vinaya is used when a suspect intransigently refuses to confess. It is the citing of contrary evidence to, and self-contradictions and variances in, the suspect's account. (6) PratijNākāraka-vinaya is the verdict of the majority through voting. Typically elder monks of renowned virtue are assembled for the vote. (7) Tṛnastāraka-vinaya is interpreted in two ways. One account explains this procedure as having the disputing parties each elect a senior representative to argue their respective cases. Another account has it that, in the case of ultimately irresolvable disputes, both parties should bow down to each other reverentially like "grass in the wind," offering apologies and divulging how oneself could have possibly been more culpable. The Tibetan translation (rtswa bkram pa lta bur 'os pa) suggests a procedure "that strews grass over it [as a covering]." See also ADHIKARAnAsAMATHA.

saptāngavidhi. (T. yan lag bdun pa'i cho ga; C. qizhi zuofa; J. shichishisaho; K. ch'ilchi chakpop 七支作法). In Sanskrit, "seven-branched worship," a common component of MAHĀYĀNA Buddhist liturgy, often performed as a means of accumulating merit at the beginning of a Mahāyāna or tantric ritual or meditation session. The list may include more than seven items, but its standard form includes: obeisance (vandanā), offering (pujana), confession of wrongdoing (PĀPADEsANĀ), admiration or rejoicing (ANUMODANA), requesting the buddhas to turn the wheel of dharma (dharmacakrapravartanacodana), requesting the buddhas not to pass into PARINIRVĀnA (aparinirvṛtādhyesana), and the dedication of merit (PARInĀMANĀ). Obeisance includes reciting the three refuges (TRIsARAnA) formula and praising the excellent qualities of the Buddha, DHARMA, and SAMGHA; the offering branch is expanded to include elaborate offerings to each of the senses, and, in tantric rituals, so-called inner and secret offerings. In the BHADRACARĪPRAnIDHĀNA, the final part of the GAndAVYuHA (and itself the final chapter of the AVATAMSAKASuTRA), the bodhisattva SAMANTABHADRA reveals the worship in its fullest Mahāyāna formulation: he prefaces his famous ten vows with a version in which he imagines, on each atom in the universe, as many buddhas and bodhisattvas as there are atoms in the universe, and before each atom he imagines beings, as many as there are atoms in the universe, making obeisance, offering, confessing, and so on.

sattvārtha. (T. sems can gyi don; C. raoyi youqing; J. nyoyakuujo; K. yoik yujong 饒益有情). In Sanskrit, the "welfare of sentient beings," a term that occurs in Buddhist morality in the phrase sattvārthakriyāsīla, "the precept of acting for the welfare of sentient beings," the third of the bodhisattva's "three sets of pure precepts" (trividhāni sīlāni, see sĪLATRAYA) as systematized in the BODHISATTVABHuMI. This set refers to practices that accrue to the welfare of others, in distinction to the saMvarasīla, or "restraining precepts," which refers to the HĪNAYĀNA rules of discipline (PRĀTIMOKsA) that help adepts restrain themselves from all types of unwholesome conduct; and practicing all types of virtuous deeds (kusaladharmasaMgrāhakasīla), which accumulates the various sorts of wholesome conduct. The welfare of sentient beings emphasizes a more active involvement in the lives of others through such deeds as nursing the sick, offering charity to the poor, protecting the helpless from harm, comforting the afflicted, and providing hospitality to travelers. It also includes more unusual forms of aid, such as using one's supranormal powers to reveal to potential transgressors the consequences of suffering in hell. The welfare of sentient beings is ultimately achieved by teaching them the dharma. In the case of the bodhisattva, sarvasattvārtha, the "welfare of all sentient beings," is one of the two goals that bodhisattvas have vowed to achieve, the other being buddhahood. It is said that by achieving buddhahood, the bodhisattva fulfills two aims or goals, his own welfare (SVĀRTHA) and the welfare of others (PARĀRTHA), the latter term being a synonym of sattvārtha. Of the three buddha bodies (BUDDHAKĀYA), the SAMBHOGAKĀYA and NIRMĀnAKĀYA are described as bodies that serve the welfare of others, and the DHARMAKĀYA is described as completing one's own aims or welfare.

Seder I, zeraim (seeds), 11 tractates: liturgy, tithes, inhibited mixtures of plants, animals and textiles, sabbatical year, produce offerings, first fruits.

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Shugendo. (修驗道). In Japanese, lit. the "Way of Cultivating Supernatural Power," a Japanese esoteric tradition that is focused on an intensive ascetic regiment of training in the mountains. Its practitioners claim as their founder EN NO OZUNU ([alt. En no Gyoja], En the Ascetic) (b. 634), a semilegendary ascetic from the mountains of KATSURAGISAN on the border between present-day Nara and osaka prefectures, who is venerated for his shamanic powers and for being the prototypical shugenja (lit. one who cultivates supernatural powers). Before it evolved into an independent religious entity, Shugendo was a wide-ranging set of religious practices that included elements drawn from many traditions, lineages, and institutions, including Japanese TENDAI (TIANTAI), SHINGON, Nara Buddhism, ZEN, PURE LAND movements, Daoism, and local indigenous beliefs. Its practitioners, who were known as YAMABUSHI (lit. those who lie down [or sleep] in the mountains), were largely itinerant, spending much of their time in the mountains, which Japanese regarded as numinous places that housed the spirits of the dead. Through severe austerities in the mountains, such as immersion under waterfalls, solitary confinement in caves, fasting, meditating, and the recitation of spells (MANTRA), practitioners strove to attain buddhahood in this very body (SOKUSHIN JoBUTSU) and accumulate power that would benefit others. As Shugendo evolved into a distinctive tradition during the mid- to late-Heian period (794-1185), Shugendo mountain centers either became linked with Tendai and Shingon institutions or continued to operate and expand independently. Mountains that were especially important to Shugendo included the Yoshino peaks in Nara prefecture, KUMANO in Wakayama prefecture, Haguro in Yamagata prefecture, Hiko in Kyushu, and Ishizuchi in Shikoku. During this period, the aristocratic nobility, including a long succession of monarchs and retired monarchs, patronized the Yoshino and Kumano mountains. Shugenja guided these visitors on pilgrimage and performed magical and religious rites for them. Pilgrimages became increasingly popular and became a significant source of revenue for many of these mountain centers. Under the temple regulations (J. jiin hatto) imposed by the shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616) at the start of the Tokugawa period (1600-1868), Shugendo sites were forced to align with either the Tendai Shugen branch of Honzan, administered by the temple of Shogoin, or the Shingon branch of Tozan, administered by Sanboin, both located in Kyoto. Itinerant practitioners largely settled down and began performing rituals and offering prayers in villages. Due to sectarian strife between the two schools, in 1707 the Tozan branch named as its founder Shobo (a.k.a. Rigen Daishi; 832-909), who had established Daigoji at Mt. Yoshino. Shugendo was proscribed in 1872 during the Meiji persecution of Buddhism, as the government tried to purge Shinto-affiliated traditions of their "foreign" elements. However, Shogoinryu, the primary branch of the Honzan school, was returned to the religious rolls in 1892. When religious freedom was restored in postwar Japan, many Shugendo institutions resumed their former rituals and traditions, although not to the same extent as they had previously. While a multitude of indigenous gods (KAMI), buddhas, and bodhisattvas have been venerated historically at Shugendo sites around Japan, Kongo Zao Gongen, a deity in the omine mountains who was venerated by En no Ozunu, gradually became the central deity in Shugendo. Other significant objects of worship include En no Ozunu himself, who is thought to have manifested himself as Hoki Bosatsu (the bodhisattva DHARMODGATA); Shobo, an incarnation of Nyoirin Kannon (Cintāmanicakra AVALOKITEsVARA); and Fudo Myoo (ACALANĀTHA-VIDYĀRĀJA), a wrathful DHARMAPĀLA of the VAJRAYĀNA pantheon.

shuilu hui. (J. suirikue; K. suryuk hoe 水陸會). In Chinese, "water and land assembly," a Buddhist ritual intended for universal salvation, although it was also sometimes directed only to deceased next of kin; the ceremony was also performed for a variety of this-worldly purposes, such as state protection (see HUGUO FOJIAO) and rain-making. The name "water and land" derives from its intent to save living creatures who inhabit the most painful domains of SAMSĀRA, whether in water or on land. The ceremony, which typically took seven days to complete, was held at two different sites, the inner altar and the outer altar. The main performance was held at the inner altar, which was divided into an upper hall and a lower hall. The enlightened beings-buddhas, BODHISATTVAs, ARHATs, and guardian deities of the three jewels (RATNATRAYA)-were invited and feted with offerings at the upper hall; the unenlightened beings, specifically beings subject to the six rebirth destinies (GATI), were invited and feted at the lower hall. Once summoned to the lower hall at the inner altar, the unenlightened assembly was divested of its afflictions (KLEsA), asked to pay homage to the enlightened assembly, and received offerings of both food and the dharma, which sent them on their way to the PURE LAND. According to the earliest extant records of the ceremony, none of which predate the Song period, the shuilu hui was first performed in 505 by the monk BAOZHI (418-514) at the behest of Emperor Wu (r. 502-549) of the Liang dynasty, with the VINAYA master and scriptural cataloguer SENGYOU (445-518) serving as chief celebrant. The same Song-period sources claim that the ceremony was revived by a monk during the Xianheng era (670-674), after its sudden disappearance following the collapse of the Liang dynasty. It was not until the tenth century, however, that there is independent confirmation in non-Buddhist sources of actual performances of the ceremony and it was not until the eleventh century that it seems to have achieved widespread popularity. According to the monk Zunshi (964-1032), the larger monasteries in the southeast of China maintained separate halls, called either shuilu tang or shuilu yuan, which were devoted entirely to the performance of the ceremony. In the Southern Song period, many of the largest monasteries throughout the realm had a "water and land hall" on their grounds. In Korea, the suryuk hoe was first performed in 971 and became popular during the early Choson dynasty, with the royal family being its main supporter. There are several Chinese and Korean manuals that provide directions for performing the ritual, including the Shuilu yiwen ("Ritual Text for the Water and Land Ceremony") in three rolls, written by a Song-dynasty layman in 1071. The canonical locus classicus for the practice is the story of Jalavāhana in the SUVARnAPRABHĀSOTTAMASuTRA.

Sigālovādasutta. (S. sīgālovādasutra; C. Shansheng jing; J. Zenshokyo; K. Sonsaeng kyong 善生經). In Pāli, "Instructions to Sigāla" (also known as the Singālovādasutta and Sigālakasutta); thirty-first discourse in the Pāli DĪGHANIKĀYA (several different recensions appear in Chinese translations, including a DHARMAGUPTAKA recension that is the sixteenth sutra in the DĪRGHĀGAMA, a SARVĀSTIVĀDA recension that is the 135th sutra in the MADHYAMĀGAMA, and other recensions as well in the EKOTTARĀGAMA and SAMYUKTĀGAMA); often interpreted within the tradition to offer the outlines of a code of conduct (VINAYA) for the laity. The buddha preached this discourse at Rājagaha (S. RĀJAGṚHA) to Sigāla [alt. Singāla], a young brāhmana householder. Following the wishes of his deceased father, it was Sigāla's practice to worship the six cardinal directions of east, south, west, north, nadir and zenith. The Buddha explains to him that the directions so worshipped are actually meant to symbolize, respectively, parents, teachers, wife and children, friends and associates, servants and workmen, and finally religious mendicants (sRAMAnA) and brāhmanas. True veneration thus consists of fulfilling one's incumbent responsibilities toward each of these six groups of people, responsibilities that should be reciprocated in turn by each group. For instance, students should minister to teachers by rising to greet them, waiting on them, paying intention to their instructions, serving them, and mastering what they are taught; teachers in turn should minister to their students by thoroughly instructing them, making sure they have understood, grounding them in essential skills, recommending them to colleagues, and offering them security. The Buddha also offers practical advice on how to follow a well-lived life as a layperson, such as avoiding six ways of squandering wealth (viz., alcoholism, wandering the streets at inappropriate times, attending fairs and shows, gambling, keeping bad company, laziness), each of which in turn has six dangers.

siksā. (P. sikkhā; T. bslab pa; C. xue; J. gaku; K. hak 學). In Sanskrit, "training," a general term for the practice of the dharma. It occurs in two major contexts. The first is the three trainings (TRIsIKsĀ), three overarching categories of Buddhist practice. They are (1) the training in higher morality (ADHIsĪLAsIKsĀ), which encompasses all forms of restraint of body and speech, including lay and monastic precepts that serve as the foundation for the cultivation of concentration and wisdom; (2) the training in higher meditation (ADHISAMĀDHIsIKsĀ, also called adhicittasiksā), which encompasses all forms of meditative practice directed toward the achievement of states of concentration; and (3) the training in higher wisdom (ADHIPRAJNĀsIKsĀ), which includes all study and meditation directed toward developing insight into the nature of reality. The second major denotation appears in the VINAYA, where the term siksā refers to the proper conduct of a monk, nun, novice, or layperson. In this context, siksā means behavior that conduces to following enjoined conduct. For laymen (UPĀSAKA) and laywomen (UPĀSIKĀ), for example, behavior conducive to keeping the five lay precepts (PANCAsĪLA) would include treating even old and discarded cloth from the robe of a monk or nun with respect, making offerings of food and other requisites to monks and nuns, and refraining from privileging any doctrine above the Buddha's teachings.

sngon 'gro. (ngondro). In Tibetan, lit "going before," viz., "preliminary practices"; referring generally to practices that are performed in order to establish proper motivation, to purify the mind of afflictions, and to remove obstacles before embarking upon tantric practice. Although present in all sects of Tibetan Buddhism, "preliminary practices" are especially associated with the RNYING MA and BKA' BRGYUD sects. One of the most famous presentations of the preliminary practices is found in the nineteenth-century Rnying ma pa work, the KUN BZANG BLA MA'I ZHAL LUNG ("Words of My Perfect Teacher") by DPAL SPRUL RIN PO CHE. The text first sets forth the "common preliminaries," reflections on central points of Buddhist doctrine, intended to turn one's interests away from SAMSĀRA and toward the wish for liberation from rebirth. These are: (1) the rarity of human birth, (2) the uncertainty of the time of death, (3) the causes and effect of actions, (4) and the sufferings incumbent in the six rebirth destinies (GATI) of SAMSĀRA. The "uncommon preliminary practice" entail the accumulation of a specific number (usually one hundred thousand) of specific practices. It is these practices that are intended to purify afflictions and remove obstacles. These are (1) recitation of the refuge formula while performing a hundred thousand prostrations; (2) cultivation of BODHICITTA (often in the form of a hundred thousand repetitions of a prayer); (3) recitation of the hundred-syllable MANTRA of the buddha VAJRASATTVA; (4) a hundred thousand offerings of a MAndALA; (5) the practice of GURU yoga through a hundred thousand repetitions of the name mantra of the guru. In each case, these practices are to be performed with the appropriate visualization. In order to complete the uncommon preliminary practices, disciples would often go on retreat, during which they would devote all their time to the practices.

sojae toryang. (消災道場). In Korean, "calamities-solving ritual"; one of the four most important annual rituals performed at court during the Koryo dynasty (918-1392), second only to the YoNDŬNGHOE (lantern ritual). The sojae toryang is a representative of the esoteric Buddhist rituals that became popular in Korea during the Koryo dynasty. The first record of the ritual's performance dates from 1046, the last from 1399, a short time after the demise of the dynasty. This ritual to prevent natural calamities probably derives originally not from Buddhist cosmology but from the theory of heavenly retribution that was foundational in traditional East Asian thought. Koryo's ritual system, modeled after that of Tang China, presumed that cosmological influences dominated human life and activities. Since droughts, floods, and epidemics were considered "calamities from Heaven" (Ch'onjae), and indicated Heaven's dissatisfaction with the quality of terrestrial governance, the sojae toryang sought to draw on various religious and astral powers in order to ward off these threats and to enhance the longevity of its royal sponsors. Koryo kings lavished riches on the monasteries whose monks performed these rituals, particularly when Koryo was threatened by foreign invasion or occupation. This concern explains why the majority of the recorded performances of the sojae toryang occurred during the reigns of kings Kojong (1231-1259), Wonjong (1259-1274), and Ch'ungnyol (1274-1308), who all ruled during the period of Mongol domination in Korea. During King Wonjong's thirteen-year reign, for example, the sojae toryang was performed twenty-three times, or about three times every two years. Historical sources provide little information on how the ritual was actually performed, but its conduct can be inferred from esoteric Buddhist sources. These sources require the monks to establish a purified ritual venue, install a buddha image there, and then make offerings of incense, flowers, and lanterns; once the site is prepared, they are then to recite various codes or spells (DHĀRAnĪ) in order to invoke the power of the BODHISATTVAs, the seven stars of the Big Dipper (see BEIDOU QIXING), the gods of the zodiacal mansions and the constellations, the sun and moon, etc., to overcome calamities and transform disasters into blessings. In the case of the Koryo dynasty, the ritual was always held at court, and the king himself was both participant and presider at the ritual, indicating the close association between court and the religion during this period in Korean history.

source code management "software" The use of software systems to help program developers keep track of version history of {source code} {modules} as well as {releases}, parallel versions ({code branches}), etc. The free {CVS} was an early example, mostly replaced by {Subversion} and {git}. {Perforce} is a powerful commercial product. {SCCS} was once popular on {Unix} and {VSS} is {Microsoft}'s offering. (2011-12-16)

sramana. (P. samana; T. dge sbyong; C. shamen; J. shamon; K. samun 沙門). In Sanskrit "renunciant," "mendicant," or "recluse," a term used in ancient India to refer to male religious of a number of different itinerant sects, including Buddhism, often associated with the warrior (KsATRIYA) caste, which challenged the hegemony of the brāhmana priests and mainstream Brahmanical religion deriving from the Vedas. Whereas the Brahmanical tradition traces itself back to a body of literature centered on the Vedas, the sramana movements instead derive from historical persons who all flourished around the sixth century BCE. Six different sramana groups are mentioned in the SĀMANNAPHALASUTTANTA of the DĪGHANIKĀYA, each representing different trends in Indian thought, including antinomianism (PuRAnA-KĀsYAPA); fatalism (MASKARIN-GOsĀLĪPUTRA of the ĀJĪVAKA school); materialism (AJITA-KEsAKAMBALA of the LOKĀYATA school); atomism (KAKUDA-KĀTYĀYANA); and agnosticism (SANJAYA-VAIRĀtĪPUTRA); the sixth group is the JAINA tradition of NIRGRANTHA JNĀTĪPUTRA, also known as MAHĀVĪRA, with which Buddhism shares many affinities. These six are typically referred to in Buddhist materials as the six "heterodox teachers" (TĪRTHIKA) and are consistently criticized by the Buddha for fostering wrong views (MITHYĀDṚstI). Some scholars suggest that these groups were loosely associated with a third phase in the development of pan-Indian religion called the āranyaka (forest dwellers) movement, where the highly specialized fire rituals (HOMA) set forth in the Brāhmanas for the propitiation of Vedic gods gave way to a more internalized form of spiritual praxis. These itinerant asetics or wanders were also called PARIVRĀJAKA (P. paribbājaka; "those who go forth into homelessness"), in direct contrast to the householders (GṚHASTHA) whose behavior was governed by the laws set down in dharmasāstras. Because so many of the beliefs and practices emblematic of the sramana movement have no direct Vedic antecedents, however, other scholars have proposed that the sramana groups may instead exemplify the resurfacing in Indian religion of aboriginal elements that had long been eclipsed by the imported rituals and beliefs that the Āryans brought with them to India. These doctrines, all of which have their parallels in Buddhism, include rebirth and transmigration (e.g., PUNARJANMAN); notions that actions have effect (e.g., KARMAN); asceticism (TAPAS, DHUTAnGA) and the search for ways of behavior that would not bind one to the round of SAMSĀRA; and liberation (MOKsA, VIMOKsA) as the goal of religious practice. In Buddhism, sramana is also used generically to refer to all monks, including the Buddha, whose epithets include sramana Gautama and Mahāsramana, "Great Renunciant." The term often occurs in the compound sramanabrāhmana (P. samanabrāhmana), "recluses and brāhmanas." This compound has a range of meanings. In some cases, it refers simply to those who practice and benefit from the Buddha's teachings. In other cases, it refers to non-Buddhist religious practitioners. In the edicts of AsOKA, the term is used to refer to those who are worthy of respect and offerings, with sramana taken to mean Buddhist monks (and possibly other ascetics) and brāhmana taken to mean brāhmana priests. The term sramana should be carefully distinguished from sRĀMAnERA (s.v.), a novice monk.

Sri Aurobindo: "Sacrifice means an inner offering to the Divine and the real spiritual sacrifice is a very joyful thing.” *Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: “So too when the seer of the house of Atri cries high to Agni, ‘O Agni, O Priest of the offering, loose from us the cords,’ he is using not only a natural, but a richly-laden image. He is thinking of the triple cord of mind, nerves and body by which the soul is bound as a victim in the great world-sacrifice, the sacrifice of the Purusha; he is thinking of the force of the divine Will already awakened and at work within him, a fiery and irresistible godhead that shall uplift his oppressed divinity and cleave asunder the cords of its bondage; he is thinking of the might of that growing Strength and inner Flame which receiving all that he has to offer carries it to its own distant and difficult home, to the high-seated Truth, to the Far, to the Secret, to the Supreme.” The Secret of the Veda

Sri Aurobindo: "The nature of Bhakti is adoration, worship, self-offering to what is greater than oneself; the nature of love is a feeling or a seeking for closeness and union. Self-giving is the character of both; both are necessary in the yoga and each gets its full force when supported by the other.” *Letters on Yoga

Sujātā. (T. Legs skyes ma; C. Xusheduo; J. Shujata; K. Susada 須闍多). The Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of a female lay disciple declared by the Buddha to be foremost among laywomen who had taken refuge in the three jewels (RATNATRAYA). According to the Pāli account, Sujātā was the daughter of a landowner named Senānī who lived in a village near Uruvelā. She had petitioned the spirit (YAKsA) of a banyan tree for a son and when she gave birth to a boy she resolved to make an offering of rice milk to the spirit in gratitude. On the day of her offering, she sent her servant Punnā to prepare a place beneath the tree. There, the servant encountered the bodhisattva SIDDHĀRTHA sitting in meditation, soon after he had decided to give up the practice of strict asceticism. Seeing the bodhisattva's emaciated body, the servant mistook him for the tree spirit and informed Sujātā of his physical presence. Sujātā prepared rice milk and offered it to the bodhisattva in a golden bowl. This offering was praised by the gods as important and praiseworthy, for it enabled the bodhisattva to regain his strength so that he could make the final push to achieve enlightenment as a perfect buddha (SAMYAKSAMBUDDHA). One of Sujātā's sons was YAsAS (P. Yasa), who became the Buddha's sixth convert after the enlightenment. Yasas attained arhatship and was ordained, after which he received alms at his parents' house in the company of the Buddha. At that time, having listened to the Buddha's sermon, Sujātā and Yasas' former wife became stream-enterers (SROTAĀPANNA) and took refuge in the three jewels, thus becoming the first female disciples to do so.

Sunahsepha (Sanskrit) Śunaḥśepha In ancient Hindu legend, for instance in the Ramayana, the son of the sage Richika, corresponding in some ways with the Hebrew Isaac. His father “sold him for one hundred cows to King Ambarisha, for a sacrifice and ‘burnt offering’ to Varuna, as a substitute for the kings’ son Rohita, devoted by his father to the god. When already stretched on the altar Sunasepha is saved by Rishi Visvamitra, who calls upon his own hundred sons to take the place of victim, and upon their refusal degrades them to the condition of Chandalas. After which the Sage teaches the victim a mantram the repetition of which brings the gods to his rescue; he then adopts Sunasepha for his elder son” (TG 313).

Supriyā. (P. Suppiyā; T. Rab dga' ba; C. Xupiye nü; J. Shubiyanyo; K. Subiyanyo 須毘耶女). Sanskrit name of an eminent lay disciple (UPĀSIKĀ) of the Buddha, whom he declared foremost among laywomen who comfort the sick. Supriyā lived in Vārānasī with her husband Supriya. Both were devoted followers of the Buddha and generous patrons of the order. Once, while visiting a monastery, Supriyā encountered a sick monk in need of meat broth. She sent a servant to market to fetch some meat but none was to be had in all of Vārānasī. She therefore cut a piece of flesh from her thigh and gave it to her servant to make into broth, after which, ill from her injury, she lay on her bed. Her husband rejoiced at her piety and invited the Buddha to the morning meal the next day. When the Buddha was informed of her deed, he praised her for her generosity and through his supranormal powers magically healed her wounds. As a consequence of Supriyā's offering, however, the Buddha passed a rule forbidding monks to eat human flesh, even when it is freely given.

Svadha: Offerings made to the manes; an exclamation made when offering oblations to the manes.

Svaha: An oblation or offering made to gods; an exclamation used in offering oblations to gods.

S-Video "multimedia" A {video} format offering a higher quality signal than {composite video}, but a lower quality than {component video}. This mid-level format divides the signal into two channels - {luminance} and {chrominance}. [Used where and for what?] (1998-06-25)

S-Video ::: (multimedia) A video format offering a higher quality signal than composite video, but a lower quality than component video. This mid-level format divides the signal into two channels - luminance and chrominance.[Used where and for what?] (1998-06-25)

swaha. ::: "it is offered"; a mantra used when offering oblations to the sacrificial fire

Swam-oo Ponnya-shin Pagoda. A gilded pagoda (Burmese, JEDI) located at the center of the Sagaing range of hills in Upper Burma (Myanmar). It is situated atop a prominence known as Dhammika Taung, or the "Hill of the Practitioners," because it has always been surrounded by monasteries suitable for study and meditation. The pagoda was built in 1332 by a royal minister named Ponnya (meaning "Brāhmana") shortly after Sagaing was made the Burmese capital. The minister had neglected to seek the king's permission prior to the monument's construction, and because its foundation buried two earlier pagodas, the king ordered the minister to be drowned. At the last moment the execution order was rescinded, for which reason the pagoda received the name, "Ponnya-shin," meaning, "Ponnya lives." Ponnya made it a practice of donating his first offering of alms during the period of the Buddhist rains retreat (VARsĀ) at this pagoda. For this reason it also became known as "Swam-oo," or "First alms-offering." To the present day, people pray at this pagoda to ward off any prospect of sudden death, and in Sagaing it is customary to make one's first donation of alms at the beginning of the Buddhist rains retreat season at this pagoda.

Take it in the right quantity (neither too much nor too little), without greed or repulsion, as the means given you by the Mother for the maintenance of the body, in the right spirit, offering it to the Divine in you.

tantra. (T. rgyud; C. tanteluo; J. dantokura; K. tant'ŭngna 檀特羅). In Sanskrit, lit. "continuum"; a term derived from the Sanskrit root √tan ("to stretch out," "to weave"), having the sense of an arrangement or a pattern (deployed not only in a ritual, but in military and political contexts as well). The term is thus used to name a manual or handbook that sets forth such arrangements, and is not limited to Buddhism or to Indian religions more broadly. Beyond this, the term is notoriously difficult to define. It can be said, however, that tantra does not carry the connotation of all things esoteric and erotic that it has acquired in the modern West. In Buddhism, the term tantra generally refers to a text that contains esoteric teachings, often ascribed to sĀKYAMUNI or another buddha. Even this, however, is problematic: there are esoteric texts that do not carry the term tantra in their title (such as the VAJRAsEKHARASuTRA), and there are nonesoteric texts in whose title the term tantra appears (such as the UTTARATANTRA). Scholars therefore tend to define tantra (in the textual sense) based on specific sets of elements contained in the texts. These include MANTRA, MAndALA, MUDRĀ, initiations (ABHIsEKA), fire sacrifices (HOMA), and feasts (GAnACAKRA), all set forth with the aim of gaining powers (SIDDHI), both mundane and supramundane. The mundane powers are traditionally enumerated as involving four activities: pacification of difficulties (sĀNTIKA), increase of wealth (PAUstIKA), control of negative forces (VAsĪKARAnA), and destruction of enemies (ABHICĀRA). The supramundane power is enlightenment (BODHI). The texts called tantras began to appear in India in the late seventh and early eighth centuries CE, often written in a nonstandard (some would say "corrupt") Sanskrit that included colloquial elements and regional terms. These anonymous texts (including such famous works as the GUHYASAMĀJATANTRA, the CAKRASAMVARATANTRA, and the HEVAJRATANTRA), typically provided mantras and instructions for drawing mandalas, among a variety of other elements, but their presentation and organization were usually not systematic; these texts came to serve as the "root tantra" for a cycle of related texts. The more systematic of these were the SĀDHANA (lit. "means of achievement"), a ritual manual by a named author, which set forth the specific practices necessary for the attainment of siddhi. The standard form was to create a mandala into which one invited a deity. The meditator would either visualize himself or herself as the deity or visualize the deity as appearing before the meditator. Various offerings would be made, mantras would be recited, and siddhis would be requested. Although scholars continue to explore the relation between the tantras and the MAHĀYĀNA sutras, tantric exegetes viewed the tantras, like the Mahāyāna sutras, as being the word of the Buddha (BUDDHAVACANA) and as setting forth forms of practice consistent with the bodhisattva vow and the quest for buddhahood, albeit more quickly than by the conventional path, via what came to be referred to as the VAJRA vehicle (VAJRAYĀNA). Thus, it was said that the Mahāyāna was divided into the pāramitānaya, the "mode of the perfections" set forth in the Mahāyāna sutras, and the mantranaya, the "mode of the mantras" set forth in the tantras. These two are also, although less commonly, known as the sutrayāna and the TANTRAYĀNA. In this context, then, the term "tantra" is often used by tantric exegetes in contrast to "sutra," which is taken to mean the corpus of exoteric teachings of the Buddha. For those who accept the tantras as the word of the Buddha, the term "sutras and tantras" would thus refer to the entirety of the Buddha's teachings. The corpus of tantras was eventually classified by late Indian Buddhist exegetes into a number of schemata, the most famous of which is the fourfold division into KRIYĀTANTRA, CARYĀTANTRA, YOGATANTRA, and ANUTTARAYOGATANTRA.

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The antithesis of these lofty ideas underlies the widespread prevalence of blood rites. In fact, the many blood ceremonials which mark and mar the records of so many peoples are often gross, cruel, and perverted, violating the sacredness of life by offering animal and human sacrifices. Several groups regard blood as one of the essential elements used in their numerous forms of initiations, oblations, invocations to ancestors and to spirits of various kinds. Their fixed belief that the demons or spirits invoked by these ceremonies are harmful if not propitiated, but will be gratified and nourished by the immaterial essence, savor, or fumes of the foods, alcohols, and blood offerings is not without some basis of fact; for the earth-bound kama-rupic entities and astral elementaries are attracted by, and do abstract the impalpable kama-pranic life-force from, the fumes and emanations of such offerings. These beliefs are consistent with much in the tribal customs and rites which attracts and revivifies evil entities in their own astral atmosphere. Customs like poison ordeals for so-called witches, and evil use of nature forces for injuring or destroying personal enemies, added to frequent evocations, make a vicious circle of cause and effect.

Theism: (Gr. theos, god) Is in general that type of religion or religious philosophy (see Religion, Philosophy of) which incorporates a conception of God as a unitary being; thus may be considered equivalent to monotheism. The speculation as to the relation of God to world gave rise to three great forms: God identified with world in pantheism (rare with emphasis on God); God, once having created the world, relatively disinterested in it, in deism (mainly an 18th cent, phenomenon); God working in and through the world, in theism proper. Accordingly, God either coincides with the world, is external to it (deus ex machina), or is immanent. The more personal, human-like God, the more theological the theism, the more appealing to a personal adjustment in prayer, worship, etc., which presuppose either that God, being like man, may be swayed in his decision, has no definite plan, or subsists in the very stuff man is made of (humanistic theism). Immanence of God entails agency in the world, presence, revelation, involvement in the historic process, it has been justified by Hindu and Semitic thinkers, Christian apologetics, ancient and modern metaphysical idealists, and by natural science philosophers. Transcendency of God removes him from human affairs, renders fellowship and communication in Church ways ineffectual, yet preserves God's majesty and absoluteness such as is postulated by philosophies which introduce the concept of God for want of a terser term for the ultimate, principal reality. Like Descartes and Spinoza, they allow the personal in God to fade and approach the age-old Indian pantheism evident in much of Vedic and post-Vedic philosophy in which the personal pronoun may be the only distinguishing mark between metaphysical logic and theology, similarly as in Hegel. The endowment postulated of God lends character to a theistic system of philosophy. Much of Hindu and Greek philosophy stresses the knowledge and ration aspect of the deity, thus producing an epistemological theism; Aristotle, in conceiving him as the prime mover, started a teleological one; mysticism is psychologically oriented in its theism, God being a feeling reality approachable in appropriate emotional states. The theism of religious faith is unquestioning and pragmatic in its attitude toward God; theology has often felt the need of offering proofs for the existence of God (see God) thus tending toward an ontological theism; metaphysics incorporates occasionally the concept of God as a thought necessity, advocating a logical theism. Kant's critique showed the respective fields of pure philosophic enquiry and theistic speculations with their past in historic creeds. Theism is left a possibility in agnosticism (q.v.). -- K.F.L.

“The nature of Bhakti is adoration, worship, self-offering to what is greater than oneself; the nature of love is a feeling or a seeking for closeness and union. Self-giving is the character of both; both are necessary in the yoga and each gets its full force when supported by the other.” Letters on Yoga

There is a conceptive self-extension of being which works itself out in the universe as substance or object of consciousness and which cosmic Mind and Life in their creative action represent through atomic division and aggregation as the thing we call Matter. But this Matter, like Mind and Life, is still Being or Brahman in its self-creative action. It is a form of the force of conscious Being, a form given by Mind and realised by Life. It holds within it as its own reality consciousness concealed from itself, involved and absorbed in the result of its own self-formation and th
   refore self-oblivious. And, however brute and void of sense it seems to us, it is yet, to the secret experience of the consciousness hidden within it, delight of being offering itself to this secret consciousness as object of sensation in order to tempt that hidden godhead out of its secrecy. Being manifest as substance, force of Being cast into form, into a figured selfrepresentation of the secret self-consciousness, delight offering itself to its own consciousness as an object,—what is this but Sachchidananda? Matter is Sachchidananda represented to His ownmental experience as a formal basis of objective knowledge, action and delight of existence.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 253


The shrines or temples were of simple construction, without adornment or statuary, the outstanding characteristic being the torii or gateway always present before a temple. The gateway was erected as a perch for the fowls offered to the deities, but the tori came to be regarded as an offering to the deities themselves, hence as many as desired might be erected in the vicinity of a temple.

Thorani. In Thailand and Laos, Phra Mae (Mother) Thorani or Nang (Lady) Thorani; a female deity depicted in mural depictions of the life of the Buddha. The name Thorani is the Thai and Lao pronunciation of the Sanskrit term DHĀRAnĪ, which, in addition to its common Buddhist denotation of "code" or "spell," also means "the earth," "soil," or "ground." In a variation of the story of STHĀVARĀ, as the future Buddha sat in meditation about to attain enlightenment, he was attacked by MĀRA and his minions. Māra taunted him, saying that the bodhisattva had no one to attest to his worthiness of becoming a buddha, whereas his vast retinue was present to attest that he, Māra, should be acknowledged as the awakened one. The Buddha then touched the earth with his right hand and summoned the earth to bear witness to his meritorious acts (see BHuMISPARsAMUDRĀ), particularly acts of giving (DĀNA), that he had performed in past existences. Lady Thorani then appeared from out of the earth in the form of a beautiful woman with long wet hair. As she wrung out her hair, all the water that had accumulated on the earth each time the Buddha offered donative libations during his myriad past lives became such a torrential deluge that it swept away Māra and all his minions. (Pouring a ceremonial libation of water is a common way to conclude many ceremonies and offering rituals in Southeast Asian Buddhism.) In paintings, Lady Thorani stands beneath the VAJRĀSANA of the Buddha while Māra and his retinue are off to either side, caught in the floodwaters. Central city shrines to Lady Thorani can be found in both Laos and northeastern Thailand, and in the past, it was common for households in northeastern Thailand to have a small shrine dedicated to Lady Thorani in their household compounds.

To arrive at this condition the important thing is a persistent aspiration, call and self-offering and a will to reject all in oneself or around that stands in the way. Difficulties there will always be at the beginning and for as long a time as is necessary for the change ; but they are bound to disappear if they are met by a settled faith, will and patience.

triple cord of mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "So too when the seer of the house of Atri cries high to Agni, ‘O Agni, O Priest of the offering, loose from us the cords," he is using not only a natural, but a richly-laden image. He is thinking of the triple cord of mind, nerves and body by which the soul is bound as a victim in the great world-sacrifice, the sacrifice of the Purusha; he is thinking of the force of the divine Will already awakened and at work within him, a fiery and irresistible godhead that shall uplift his oppressed divinity and cleave asunder the cords of its bondage; he is thinking of the might of that growing Strength and inner Flame which receiving all that he has to offer carries it to its own distant and difficult home, to the high-seated Truth, to the Far, to the Secret, to the Supreme.” *The Secret of the Veda

tshogs zhing. (tsok shing). In Tibetan, "field of assembly" or "field of accumulation"; the assembly of buddhas, bodhisattvas, and other deities visualized in meditation practice (and represented in Tibetan scroll paintings, or THANG KA). The term is generally glossed to mean "the field for the collection of merit" because the assembly of deities are the objects of various virtuous practices through which the meditator accumulates merit. The most common practice performed in the presence of the field of assembly would be the sevenfold offering (SAPTĀnGAVIDHI): obeisance (vandana), offering (pujana), confession of transgressions (PĀPADEsANĀ), rejoicing in others' virtues (ANUMODANA), requesting that the buddhas turn the wheel of the dharma (dharmacakrapravartanacodana), beseeching the buddhas not pass into NIRVĀnA (aparinirvṛtādhyesana), and the dedication (PARInĀMANĀ) of merit. In paintings of the field of assembly, the central figure is often depicted with previous figures in the lineage in a vertical line above, with various disciples on either side and protector deities at the bottom.

Tsong kha pa Blo bzang grags pa. (Tsong kha pa Losang Drakpa) (1357-1419). A Tibetan scholar and teacher venerated as the founder of the DGE LUGS sect of Tibetan Buddhism; typically known simply as Tsong kha pa. Born in the Tsong kha region of A mdo in northeastern Tibet, he received his initial lay vows under the fourth KARMA PA and began his religious education in the BKA' GDAMS tradition. In 1372, he traveled to central Tibet for further study. He became a disciple of the SA SKYA scholar Red mda' ba Gzhon nu blo gros (Rendawa Shonu Lodro, 1349-1412) but went on to study under many of the leading scholars of the day, including masters of various schools and sectarian affiliations. Another influential teacher was the lama Dbu ma pa (Umapa), from whom he received instructions on the KĀLACAKRATANTRA. He distinguished himself as a brilliant scholar and exegete of both SuTRA and TANTRA. According to his traditional biographies, Tsong kha pa experienced visions of Indian masters such as NĀGĀRJUNA and BUDDHAPĀLITA, who helped to clarify difficult points of doctrine. He is also said to have maintained a special relationship with MANJUsRĪ, the bodhisattva of wisdom, who appeared in visions throughout Tsong kha pa's life offering instruction and advice; Tsong kha pa is sometimes called 'Jam mgon, or "protected by MaNjusrī." Tsong kha pa's biographies speak of four major deeds undertaken during his lifetime. The first, in 1399, was his restoration of an image of the future buddha, MAITREYA. The second was a council to reform the code of VINAYA, convened in 1403 and attended by monks representing all sects of Tibetan Buddhism. The third was the Great Prayer Festival (SMON LAM CHEN MO) inaugurated in 1409 at the JO KHANG in LHA SA, in which he offered the ornaments of a SAMBHOGAKĀYA to the famous statue of JO BO SHĀKYAMUNI, celebrating the Buddha's performance of the sRĀVASTĪ MIRACLES. The festival became an important annual event, drawing thousands of participants from all quarters of the Tibetan Buddhist world. The fourth was the founding in 1409 of DGA' LDAN monastery, which would become one of principal religious institutions in the Lha sa region and seat of the leader of the Dge lugs sect. Tsong kha pa was an original and penetrating philosopher, who saw reason and intellectual development as key aspects of the path to enlightenment. Born during a period when the Tibetan Buddhist canon had been newly formulated, he sought a comprehensive explanation of the Buddhist path, with the PRĀSAnGIKA-MADHYAMAKA of BUDDHAPĀLITA and CANDRAKĪRTI as the highest philosophical view. His works are marked with a concern with systematic consistency, whether it be between sutra and tantra or PRAMĀnA and MADHYAMAKA. A prolific author, Tsong kha pa's works fill eighteen volumes. Among his best known writings are the LAM RIM CHEN MO ("Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment"), composed in 1402 at RWA SGRENG monastery, the SNGAGS RIM CHEN MO ("Great Treatise on the Stages of Mantra"), and the Drang nges LEGS BSHAD SNYING PO ("Essence of Eloquence on the Definitive and Interpretable"). Tsong kha pa called his system of religious practice the Bka' gdams gsar ma, or "New Bka' gdams," after the sect founded by the Bengali master ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNĀNA. His followers were later known as Dga' ldan pa (Gandenpa), "those of Dga' ldan," after the monastic seat established by Tsong kha pa. This was sometimes abbreviated as Dga' lugs pa, "those of the system of Dga' ldan," eventually evolving into the current name Dge lugs pa, "those of the system of virtue." Tsong kha pa's fame was greatly elevated through the political power of the Dge lugs sect after the establishment of the institution of the DALAI LAMA. His tomb at Dga' ldan became an important site of pilgrimage prior to its destruction during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Tsong kha pa's fame in Tibet was sufficiently great that he is commonly known simply as Rje rin po che, the "precious leader."

*ullambana. (T. yongs su skyob pa'i snod; C. yulanben; J. urabon; K. uranbun 盂蘭盆). A hypothetical BUDDHIST HYBRID SANSKRIT, Middle Indic, or perhaps even Iranian reconstruction of the Chinese term yulanben and sometimes interpreted to correspond to the Sanskrit avalambana (lit. "hanging downward," "suspended"); the term would then refer to the "ghost festival," a ritual that sought the salvation of condemned beings who were "suspended" in hell. This interpretation of yulan is questionable, however, since this connotation of the Sanskrit term avalambana is unknown in Indian Buddhist contexts. The Tibetan translation of yulanben as yongs su skyob pa'i snod, or "vessel of complete protection," also does not correspond to any of the connotations of "hanging down"; the Tibetan rendering does, however, seem to better fit an alternate explanation of the derivation of yulan(ben) as the Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit term ullumpana (sometimes wrongly transcribed as ullampana, ullambana, etc.), lit. "rescuing, extracting [from an unfortunate fate]." A more recent hypothesis concerning the transcription yulanben is that "yulan" is a transcription of the Sanskrit and Pāli term odana (cooked rice) and 'ben' a native word for bowl; the compound 'yulanben' is thus not a transcription of the hypothetical Sanskrit word *ullambana but actually means a "rice bowl," perhaps even a special kind of rice bowl for making offerings on the PRAVĀRAnĀ day. The Japanese BON FESTIVAL (alt. Obon) derives from this term ullambana; it is celebrated in either mid-July or mid-August to honor the spirits of deceased ancestors. During this three-day period, family members return to their ancestral homes to make offerings to their ancestors (who are thought to return on those days) and to clean the family grave sites. On the last night, the celebrants light paper lanterns and float them down the river (J. toro nagashi) to help light the spirits' way back. See also YULANBEN; YULANBEN JING.

Upananda. (T. Nye dga' po; C. Youbonantuo; J. Upananda; K. Ubanant'a 優波難陀). Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of a monk disciple of the Buddha, who was regularly chastised for his greed. There are numerous stories in the VINAYA of his attempts to procure the best and most of all offerings made to monks, and especially of robes and food. The Buddha typically rebukes Upananda for his misconduct, and then goes on to promulgate a new rule of conduct in order to deter monks from committing such transgressions in the future.

Upāyakausalyasutra. (T. Thabs la mkhas pa'i mdo; C. Dasheng fangbian hui; J. Daijo hoben'e; K. Taesŭng pangp'yon hoe 大乘方便會). In Sanskrit, "Skillful Means Sutra," an early MAHĀYĀNA sutra included in the RATNAKutASuTRA collection, where it is also known as the JNānottarabodhisattvaparipṛcchā. (In addition to the recension embedded in the 410 CE Chinese translation of the Ratnakuta, as transcribed above, there are also two other Chinese translations, one made in 285 CE, the other c. 980.) The first part of the sutra extols the virtues of the practice of "skillful means" (UPĀYAKAUsALYA), generally understood in this context to refer to the dedication of the merit from a virtuous deed, such as offerings made for the welfare and ultimate enlightenment of all beings. The sutra goes on to explain how apparently nonvirtuous acts, such as sexual misconduct, become virtues when performed by a bodhisattva with skillful means, noting, "Something that sends other sentient beings to hell sends the bodhisattva who is skilled in means to rebirth in the world of BRAHMĀ." Also recounted is the famous story of the Buddha's previous life as a ship captain, when he kills a potential murderer in order to save others' lives. In the second part of the sutra, the Buddha recounts the events of his life (see BAXIANG), from his entry into his mother's womb to his decision to teach the dharma as instances of his skillful means; none of these events are presented as the consequences of his own past nonvirtuous actions or indeed of any fault whatsoever on his part. For example, after his enlightenment, the Buddha has no hesitation to teach the dharma; nonetheless, he compels the god BRAHMĀ to descend from his heaven to implore the Buddha to teach. He forces this act so that beings who worship Brahmā will have faith in the Buddha and so that the myriad forms of the god Brahmā will generate BODHICITTA. The sutra concludes with a discussion of ten cases in the life of the Buddha in which he apparently undergoes suffering (such as a headache, backache, and being pierced by a thorn) that had previously been ascribed to his nonvirtuous deeds in a past life; in each case, these are instead explained as being examples of the Buddha's skillful means.

Uttarā-Nandamātā. An eminent laywoman declared by the Buddha to be foremost in the attainment of meditative power. According to Pāli accounts, she was the daughter of Punnaka, a servant of the wealthy man Sumana of Rājagaha (S. RĀGAGṚHA). Uttarā's family was devoted to the Buddha and, on one occasion, while listening to a sermon he was preaching, Uttarā and her parents became stream-enterers (P. sotāpanna; S. SROTAĀPANNA). When Sumana requested that Uttarā be betrothed to his son, he was at first refused on the grounds that his family was not Buddhist. Agreement was reached when Sumana promised that Uttarā would be supplied with sufficient requisites to continue her daily devotions to the Buddha. Her new husband, however, reneged on the agreement and refused to allow her to observe the uposatha (S. UPOsADHA) retreat day because she would have to refrain from intercourse for the night. In order that she could observe the uposatha, Uttarā requested money from her father-in-law so she could hire a courtesan named Sirimā to service her husband. According to legend, there subsequently ensued an incident that led to the enlightenment of the courtesan, her husband, and her father-in-law. It so happened that one day while Uttarā busied herself preparing a magnificent offering for the Buddha and his disciples, her husband was strolling hand in hand with Sirimā. Seeing his wife toiling, he smiled at her foolishness for not using her riches for herself. Uttarā saw her husband and likewise smiled at his foolishness for wasting his life in self-indulgence. Sirimā, misunderstanding their smiles, flew into a jealous rage and threw boiling oil at Uttarā. But through the power of Uttarā's compassion for Sirimā, the oil did not burn her, and, witnessing this miracle, Sirimā understood her mistake and begged forgiveness. Uttarā brought Sirimā to the Buddha, who preached to her, whereupon she became a once-returner (P. sakadāgamī; S. SAKṚDĀGĀMIN). Uttarā's husband and father-in-law, who also heard the sermon, became stream-enterers.

utterance ::: n. --> The act of uttering.
Sale by offering to the public.
Putting in circulation; as, the utterance of false coin, or of forged notes.
Vocal expression; articulation; speech.
Power or style of speaking; as, a good utterance.
The last extremity; the end; death; outrance.


vaiyāpṛtya(kara). [alt. vaiyāpatya(kara)] (P. veyyāvaccakara; T. zhal ta pa; C. zhishi/zhongzhu; J. shitsuji/shushu; K. chipsa/chungju 執事/衆主). In Sanskrit, lit. "one who performs service," viz., an "agent"; an administrative or supervisory officer who serves as "agent" for the SAMGHA in accepting donations from the laity and supervising the use of the financial items and valuables received by the monastery; this officer may also serve as a kind of personal assistant to the monks. The term vaiyāpṛtyakara appears in connection with the tenth rule of the "offenses involving forfeiture" (NIḤSARGIKA-PĀTAYANTIKA; P. nissaggiyapācittiya), where the "agent" is solicited to accept robe cloth on behalf of a monk; that agent may be either a Buddhist layman (UPĀSAKA) or an unordained monastic employee (ārāmika). In this role, the vaiyāpṛtyakara is closely related to the KALPIKĀRAKA, a lay "steward" or "surrogate," who receives donations on behalf of monks and converts them into appropriate requisites. There are also, however, references to ordained agents (vaiyāpṛtyakarabhiksu), who supervise the storage of offerings as robes and other gifts on behalf of the monks until they are ready to use them. DRAVYA MALLAPUTRA was singled out by the Buddha as preeminent among his monk disciples in providing such service to the community of monks (sanghasya veyyāvacca), specifically in apportioning lodging and distributing meals.

Vessantara. (S. Visvantara/VisvaMtara; T. Thams cad sgrol; C. Xudana; J. Shudainu/Shudaina; K. Sudaena 須大拏). Pāli name of a prince who is the subject of the most famous of all JĀTAKA tales; he was the BODHISATTVA's final existence before he took rebirth in TUsITA heaven, where he awaited the moment when he would descend into Queen MĀYĀ's womb to be born as Prince SIDDHĀRTHA and eventually become GAUTAMA Buddha. During his lifetime as Prince Vessantara, the bodhisattva (P. bodhisatta) fulfilled the perfection (P. pāramī; S. PĀRAMITĀ) of generosity (DĀNA; see also DĀNAPĀRAMITĀ). The story is found in Sanskrit in Āryasura's JĀTAKAMĀLĀ and Ksemendra's Avadānakalpalatā, with the same main features as in the Pāli version. The story enjoys its greatest popularity in Southeast Asia, so the Pāli version is described here. ¶ The bodhisattva was born as the crown prince of Sivirattha, the son of King SaNjaya and Queen Phusatī of the kingdom of Jetuttara. On the day of his birth, a white elephant named Paccaya was also born, who had the power to make rain. When Vessantara was sixteen, he married a maiden named Maddī, with whom he had a son and a daughter, Jāli and Kanhajinā. Once, when Kalinga was suffering a severe drought, brāhmanas from that kingdom requested that Vessantara give them his white elephant to alleviate their plight. Vessantara complied, handing over to them his elephant along with its accessories. The citizens of Jetuttara were outraged that he should deprive his own kingdom of such a treasure and demanded his banishment to the distant mountain of Vankagiri. His father, King SaNjaya, consented and ordered Vessantara to leave via the road frequented by highwaymen. Before his departure, Vessantara held a great almsgiving, in which he distributed seven hundred of every type of thing. Maddī insisted that she and her children accompany the prince, and they were transported out of the city on a grand carriage pulled by four horses. Four brāhmanas begged for his horses, which he gave. Gods then pulled his carriage until a brāhmana begged for his carriage. Thereafter, they traveled on foot. Along the way crowds gathered, some even offering their kingdoms for him to rule, so famous was he for his generosity. At Vankagiri, they lived in two hermitages, one for Vessantara and the other for his wife and children. These had been constructed for them by Vissakamma, architect of the gods. There, they passed four months until one day an old brāhmana named Jujaka arrived and asked for Jāli and Kanhajinā as slaves. Vessantara expected this to occur, so he sent his wife on an errand so that she would not be distressed at the sight of him giving their children away. Jujaka was cruel, and the children ran away to their father, only to be returned so that Vessantara's generosity could be perfected. When Maddī returned, she fainted at the news. Then, Sakka (sAKRA), king of the gods, assumed the form of a brāhmana and asked for Maddī; Vessantara gave his wife to the brāhmana. The earth quaked at the gift. Sakka immediately revealed his identity and returned Maddī, granting Vessantara eight boons. In the meantime, Jujaka, the cruel brāhmana, traveled to Jetuttara, where King SaNjaya bought the children for a great amount of treasure, including a seven-storied palace. Jujaka, however, died of overeating and left no heirs, so the treasure was returned to the king. Meanwhile, the white elephant was returned because the kingdom of Kalinga could not maintain him. A grand entourage was sent to Vankagiri to fetch Vessantara and Maddī, and when they returned amid great celebration they were crowned king and queen of Sivirattha. In order that Vessantara would be able to satisfy all who came for gifts, Sakka rained down jewels waist deep on the palace. When Vessantara died, he was born as a god in tusita heaven, where he awaited his last rebirth as Siddhattha Gotama, when he would become a buddha. ¶ As a depiction of the virtue of dāna, the story of Vessantara is one of the most important Buddhist tales in Thailand and throughout Southeast Asia and is depicted on murals throughout the region. Thai retellings of the Vessantara-Jātaka, known also as the Mahāchat, or "Great Jātaka," are found in the many Thai dialects and consist of thirteen chapters. The story is popular in Thailand's north and especially in the northeast, where virtually every monastery (excluding forest monasteries) holds a festival known as the Bun Phra Wet, usually in February or March, at which the entire story is recited in one day and one night. Laypeople assist in decorating their local monastery with trunks and branches of banana trees to represent the forest to which Vessantara was banished after giving away his kingdom's auspicious elephant. They also present offerings of flowers, hanging decorations, balls of glutinous rice, and money. The festival includes, among other things, a procession to the monastery that includes local women carrying long horizontal cloth banners on which the Vessantara story is painted. The merit earned by participating in the festival is linked to two beliefs: (1) that the participant will be reborn at the time of the future buddha, MAITREYA, known in Thai as Phra Si Ariya Mettrai (P. Ariya Metteyya), and (2) that the community, which remains primarily agricultural, will be blessed with sufficient rainfall.

Vibhanga. [alt. Vibhangappakarana]. In Pāli, "Analysis"; the second of the seven books that together constitute the ABHIDHAMMAPItAKA of the Pāli canon. Since most of this book concerns subject matter introduced in the abhidhammapitaka's first book, the DHAMMASAnGAnĪ, the Vibhanga is often spoken of as a supplement to, or a commentary on, the Dhammasanganī. The Vibhanga, however, applies different methods of analysis and includes a number of additional definitions and terms. The text is comprised of eighteen chapters (vibhanga), each of which presents a self-contained discourse on the following topics, in this order: the aggregates (P. khandha; S. SKANDHA), sense bases (ĀYATANA), elements (DHĀTU), truths (P. sacca; S. SATYA), faculties (INDRIYA), conditioned origination (P. paticcasamuppāda; S. PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA), foundations of mindfulness (P. SATIPAttHĀNA; S. SMṚTYUPASTHĀNA), right effort (P. sammappadhāna; S. SAMYAKPRAHĀnA), bases of psychic or supernatural powers (P. iddhipāda; S. ṚDDHIPĀDA), factors of enlightenment (P. bojjhanga; S. BODHYAnGA), the eightfold path (P. magga; S. MĀRGA), mental absorption (P. JHĀNA; S. DHYĀNA), the boundless states (P. appammaNNā; S. APRAMĀnA), training rules (P. sikkhāpada; S. sIKsĀPADA), analytical knowledges (P. patisambhidā; S. PRATISAMVID), various types of knowledge (P. Nāna; JNĀNA), minor topics (P. khuddhakavatthu), including an inventory of afflictions, and "the heart of the teaching" (P. dhammahadaya). Most, but not all, of these chapters are divided into three parts. First, they analyze the subject using the same method as the SUTTAs, often by simply quoting material directly from the suttas. Next, they analyze the subject using a typical ABHIDHARMA methodology-offering synonyms and numerical lists of categories, classes, and types of the phenomena. Finally, most treatments culminate in a catechistic series of inquiries (paNhāpucchaka). In this series of questions, the subject is analyzed by way of a set of "matrices" or "categories" (P. mātikā; S. MĀTṚKĀ) established in the Dhammasanganī. Many commentaries have been written on the Pāli Vibhanga, the most popular of which is BUDDHAGHOSA's SAMMOHAVINODANĪ, which was written in the fifth century.

Vicarious Atonement In Christian theology, the idea that God accepted the sacrifice of Jesus Christ as a substitution for the guilt incurred by man at the Fall, and that mankind will consequently escape punishment, provided that they accept by faith Jesus Christ’s sacrifice. The idea that by an atoning for evil done or sin committed, one undoes the past — broadened by Christian theology to include the doctrine of the vicarious atonement by some great spiritual being for the sins of others — is a theory rejected by the theosophic philosophy. To those who believe the Christian doctrine that every person was born into this world burdened with inevitable doom through Adam’s sin, such a compensatory doctrine seems to be necessary; but it discourages people’s faith in their own innate divinity and in their power thereby to effect their own spiritual and moral salvation, and violates our sense of justice by offering a way of avoiding the consequences of our own bad actions — which avoidance of sin already incurred is distinctly denied in several places in the New Testament where the ancient theosophical doctrine of karma is taught that as a man sows, that (and not something else) must he invariably reap. Vicarious atonement may be a distorted doctrine of reconciliation, in Christian notion reconciliation between God and man; also of the idea that the spiritual monad in man takes on itself the consequences for actions or “sins” committed by the less evolved human monad. Every human being is raised by the sacrifice made by the Christos within himself, so that whoever believes in and conforms his acts to his own spiritual nature, is “saved.”

victim ::: n. --> A living being sacrificed to some deity, or in the performance of a religious rite; a creature immolated, or made an offering of.
A person or thing destroyed or sacrificed in the pursuit of an object, or in gratification of a passion; as, a victim to jealousy, lust, or ambition.
A person or living creature destroyed by, or suffering grievous injury from, another, from fortune or from accident; as, the


videotex ::: An obsolete electronic service offering people the privilege of paying to read the weather on their television screens instead of having somebody read it to gorilla arm effect, this has been a cautionary tale to hackers ever since. See also vannevar.[Jargon File]

videotex An obsolete electronic service offering people the privilege of paying to read the weather on their television screens instead of having somebody read it to them for free while they brush their teeth. The idea bombed everywhere it wasn't government-subsidised, because by the time videotex was practical the installed base of personal computers could hook up to {time-sharing} services and do the things for which videotex might have been worthwhile better and cheaper. Videotex planners badly overestimated both the appeal of getting information from a computer and the cost of local intelligence at the user's end. Like the {gorilla arm} effect, this has been a cautionary tale to hackers ever since. See also {vannevar}. [{Jargon File}]

vidhi. (T. cho ga; C. yigui; J. giki; K. ŭigwe 儀軌). In Sanskrit, "rite"; a term that is used for Vedic and other rituals. In Buddhism, and in particular tantric Buddhism, vidhi is sometimes used interchangeably with PuJĀ but can also refer to those elements of a SĀDHANA that are more overtly ceremonial, such as the making of offerings, the drawing of MAndALA, the performance of MUDRĀ or of sacred dances, and the playing of music, as opposed to the more introspective elements of a sādhana, such as the practice of visualization, meditation, or the silent repetition of MANTRA.

Visākha. (P. Visākha; T. Sa ga; C. Pishequ; J. Bishakya; K. Pisago 舍佉). A wealthy merchant of RĀJAGṚHA and husband of the female ARHAT DHAMMADINNĀ; he should be distinguished from VIsĀKHĀ (s.v.), the foremost donor among laywomen. According to the Pāli account, Visākha accompanied King BIMBISĀRA on a visit to the Buddha during the latter's first sojourn at Rājagaha (RĀJAGṚHA) after his enlightenment. Upon hearing the Buddha preach, Visākha became a stream-enterer (SROTAĀPANNA) and, subsequently, a once-returner (SAKṚDĀGĀMIN) and a nonreturner (ANĀGĀMIN). Once he became a nonreturner, his behavior toward his wife Dhammadinnā changed, and once she learned the reason, Dhammadinnā requested permission to renounce the world and enter the order as a nun. Impressed by his wife's piety, he informed Bimbisāra, who arranged for her to be carried to the nunnery on a golden palanquin. After Dhammadinnā attained arhatship, Visākha asked her questions pertaining to dharma, all of which she expertly answered. He reported this to the Buddha, who praised her for her skill in teaching. Visākha and Dhammadinnā were husband and wife during the time of Phussa (S. Pusya) Buddha (the twenty-first of the thousand buddhas) when, as a treasurer, he had arranged an offering of alms for Phussa Buddha and his disciples. Visākha was a renowned teacher in his own right and is mentioned as one of seven lay disciples who each had five hundred followers.

votive ::: a. --> Given by vow, or in fulfillment of a vow; consecrated by a vow; devoted; as, votive offerings; a votive tablet.

vow, offering, dedication, gift (from an inferior to a superior), consecration, dedication to God, promise to God.

Wanshan tonggui ji. (J. Manzen dokishu; K. Manson tonggwi chip 萬善同歸集). In Chinese, "The Common End of Myriad Good Practices," in three rolls; a primer of Buddhist thought and practice composed by the Song-dynasty CHAN master YONGMING YANSHOU (904-975). Written largely in catechistic style, the Wanshan tonggui ji relies heavily upon scriptural quotations to answer questions raised concerning everything from meditation and making offerings of flowers to reciting the name of the buddha AMITĀBHA (see NIANFO). The overall message of the text is that all practices done properly return to the "true mark" of reality (shixiang), and this message is often interpreted as supporting the notion of "the unity of Chan and the teachings" (Chan jiao yizhi) and that of "sudden awakening (followed by) gradual cultivation" (DUNWU JIANXIU).

What I mean by surrender is this inner surrender of the mind and vital. There is, of course, the outer surrender also ::: the giving up of all that is found to conflict with the spirit or need of the sadhanS, the offering, the obedience to the guidance of the Divine, whether directly, if one has reached that stage, or through the psychic or to the guidance of the Guru.

Wolchongsa. (月精寺). In Korean, "Lunar Essence Monastery"; the fourth district monastery (PONSA) of the contemporary CHOGYE CHONG of Korean Buddhism, located on Odaesan (see WUTAISHAN) in Kangwon province. The monastery's history is closely linked to the VINAYA master CHAJANG (fl. c. 590-658). While Chajang was on pilgrimage at Wutaishan in China, he came across a mysterious old monk who interpreted a prophetic dream he had had and gave him relics (K. sari; S. sARĪRA) of the buddha to take back to Korea with him. Seven days later, a dragon told him to return to Odaesan in Korea to build a monastery; in 643, Chajang arrived at Odaesan, where he eventually constructed Wolchongsa. Wolchongsa's main shrine hall, Chokkwang chon (Calm Radiance Hall), enshrines an image of sĀKYAMUNI as well as a mysterious statue that was found in the diamond pond south of the monastery. This statue, delicately carved in a style common to the eleventh century, is believed to be of BHAIsAJYAGURU. In front of the main hall is a nine-story octagonal pagoda, fifty feet (15.2 meters) high, that was constructed in the tenth century. Skillfully carved and multiangled, it is representative of Koryo-era STuPAs. In front of the stupa is a seated BODHISATTVA, perhaps MANJUsRĪ, making an offering. The statue has been carved with detailed attention to ornamental accessories and clothing. The Chongmyol pogung (Precious Basilica of Calm Extinction) houses the relics of the Buddha that Chajang brought back to Korea and is one of four major shrine halls in Korea that does not enshrine a buddha image (the relics take the place of an image). One of Wolchongsa's most famous residents during the twentieth century was the monk HANAM CHUNGWoN (1876-1951), who helped save some of its buildings from soldiers who had been ordered to burn them down during the Korean War (seventeen buildings were unfortunately burned and had to be reconstructed). Sangwonsa, one of Wolchongsa's branch monasteries (MALSA), is famous among Korean monasteries for its spectacular scenery and is a popular tourist stop.

wu'ai xing. (J. mugegyo; K. muae haeng 無礙行). In Chinese, "unhindered action" or "unconstrained conduct"; one of the types of practice of a BODHISATTVA-MAHĀSATTVA, as expounded especially in the AVATAMSAKASuTRA, referring to a conduct that is not constrained by the restrictions of customary morality or mundane societal expectations. Other related terms that are described as unhindered include "unhindered physicality" (wu'ai shen), "unhindered SAMĀDHI" (wu'ai sanmei), "unhindered wisdom" (wu'ai zhi), "unhindered dharma" (wu'ai fa), "unhindered path" (wu'ai dao), etc. The actions of a bodhisattva-mahāsattva conform to those of the buddhas themselves and any merit forthcoming from them are freely transferred (huixiang) to other sentient beings to help them with their salvation; for this reason, their actions are free from any kinds of hindrances. The MAHĀYĀNASAMGRAHA (She Dasheng lun) also explains "unhindered action" as the merit of a buddha, which is obtained through the purest of wisdom. Unhindered action sometimes refers to a particular stage or practice of a bodhisattva-mahāsattva: the BODHISATTVABHuMI (Pusa shanjie jing) presents it as the tenth of the twelve conducts of a bodhisattva-mahāsattva, along with such advanced practices as the signless practice, untainted practice, practice-less practice, and contented practice. In this context, unhindered action refers to the stage where a bodhisattva cultivates the realm of reality (DHARMADHĀTU) that transcends all discrimination and teaches the true dharma (SADDHARMA) for the sake of innumerable sentient beings. This status is said to correspond specifically to the ninth of the ten bodhisattva stages (DAsABHuMI), and the bodhisattva on this stage is described as being endowed with four types of analytical knowledges (PRATISAMVID), which in Chinese were known as the four "unhindered knowledges" (C. si wu'ai jie): i.e., unhindered knowledge of (1) phenomena (DHARMA), viz., one makes no mistakes in one's teachings; (2) meaning (ARTHA), viz., to be unhindered with regard to the content and meaning of one's teachings; (3) etymology or language (NIRUKTI), viz., the ability to comprehend all languages; and (4) eloquence (PRATIBHĀNA), viz., ease in offering explanations. CHENGGUAN (738-839) states in his massive HUAYAN JING SHU ("Commentary to the AVATAMSAKASuTRA") that the bodhisattva is able to abide in unhindered action (lit. "unhindered abiding") because he no longer has any cognitive obstructions (JNEYĀVARAnA). The practice of unconstrained conduct has been a prominent, if controversial, feature of Korean Buddhism throughout its history. Several eminent Korean monks were known as practitioners of unconstrained conduct, including WoNHYO (617-686), Chinmuk (1562-1633), and KYoNGHo SoNGU (1849-1912), and they followed ways of life that disregarded the standards of conduct typically incumbent upon ordained monks.

wujinzang yuan. (J. mujinzoin; K. mujinjang won 無盡藏院). In Chinese, "inexhaustible storehouse cloister"; the emblematic institution of the Third Stage Sect (SANJIE JIAO), a major school of Buddhism during the Tang dynasty. The wujinzang yuan was established at Huadusi (Propagation and Salvation Monastery) in the capital Chang'an early in the Tang dynasty, probably between 618 and 627. The institution was based on the concept of "merit-sharing," i.e., that one could enter into the universal inexhaustible storehouse of the dharma realm, as articulated by the sect's founder XINXING (540-594), by offering alms to the wujinzang yuan on behalf of all sentient beings. By 713, when the Tang emperor Xuanzong (r. 712-756) issued an edict closing it due to charges of embezzlement, the wujinzang yuan had served as a major agency for promoting the sect for almost a century. Drawing on the AVATAMSAKASuTRA and the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, the sect interpreted the Sinographs wujin (inexhaustible) to mean that both the field of reverence-viz., the three jewels (RATNATRAYA)-and the field of compassion-viz., sentient beings-were inexhaustible. The wujinzang yuan, therefore, was the place where the sect's sixteen kinds of almsgiving (DĀNA) were to be practiced, through offerings made to (1) the buddha, (2) the dharma, (3) the saMgha, and (4) all sentient beings; (5) works that serve to ward off evil; (6) works that serve to do good; and offerings of (7) incense, (8) lamps, (9) the monks' baths, (10) bells and chants, (11) clothing, (12) dwellings, (13) beds and seats, (14) receptacles for food, (15) coal and fire, and (16) food and drink. There were two kinds of offerings made to the wujinzang yuan: (1) regular offerings collected in the form of a daily levy and (2) offerings received at particular times of the year. A Sanjie jiao text discovered at DUNHUANG says that a person is expected to offer one fen (a hundredth of a tael) of cash or one ge (a tenth of a pint) of grain per day, or thirty-six qian (a tenth of a Chinese ounce) or 3.6 dou (pecks) of grain per annum. However, the offerings were mostly made at specific times of the year, such as on the fourth day of the first lunar month, the day commemorating Xinxing's death, and the ULLAMBANA festival on the fifteenth day of the seventh lunar month. For those adherents who could not make offerings directly at Huadu monastery, the sect would temporarily open local branches, called "merit offices" (gongde chu), especially at the time of the Ullambana festival. The assets of the wujinzang yuan consisted for the most part of such tangible assets as money, cloth, gold and silver, and jade. The offerings were used, for example, to fund the restoration of monasteries and the performance of religious services (i.e., the reverence field of merit, jingtian), and to provide alms to the poor (i.e., the compassion field of merit, beitian; see PUnYAKsETRA). People could also receive loans from the wujinzang, a function comparable to today's microloans made to help raise people out of poverty. During the reign of Empress Wu, Fuxiansi in Luoyang was for a brief time also the site of a wujinzang yuan. See also XIANGFA JUEYI JING.

wuzhe hui. (J. mushae; K. much'a hoe 無遮會). In Chinese, "unrestricted assembly"; an assembly hosted by the reigning monarch to make offerings to clergy and laity regardless of their status or station in life. The assembly was typically held every five years and is therefore also known as the "five-year great assembly" (C. wunian dahui; S. paNcavārsikaparisad). The first such assembly is attributed to King AsOKA. Emperor Wu of the Liang dynasty (LIANG WUDI) is known to have held a wuzhe dahui in 529 for an assembly said to have numbered fifty thousand. The famous pilgrim XUANZANG also witnessed an unrestricted assembly during his travels along the SILK ROAD. In 596, Empress Suiko (554-628) held the first reported unrestricted assembly in Japan. In 732, HEZE SHENHUI organized an unrestricted great assembly (wuzhe dahui) at the monastery of DAYUNSI in Henan prefecture, where he attacked SHENXIU and his followers.

Xinxing. (J Shingyo; K. Sinhaeng 信行) (540-594). In Chinese, "Practice of Faith"; founder of the "Third-Stage Sect" (SANJIE JIAO), a school of popular Buddhism that flourished during the Tang dynasty. Born in Ye in presentday Henan province, Xinxing ordained as a novice monk by the age of seventeen, after which he wandered the country, studying Buddhism and reading such Buddhist scriptures as the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, and MAHĀPARINIRVĀnASuTRA. Feeling guilty for accepting from the laity offerings that he did not believe he deserved, Xinxing eventually abandoned monastic life, participating in various state labor projects and cultivating ascetic practices. He is also known to have bowed to all he met on the street, following the teachings of the SADĀPARIBHuTA chapter of the Saddharmapundarīkasutra. It is uncertain exactly when Xinxing established the Third-Stage Sect, but it was probably sometime around 587. In 589, at the behest of Emperor Wendi, he entered Chang'an, the capital city of the Sui dynasty, and stayed at Zhenjisi (Authentic Quiescence Monastery, later renamed Huadu monastery), where he promoted actively the teachings of the school until his death in 594. Xinxing had about three hundred followers, including Sengyong (543-631) and Huiru (d. c. 618). Due to the proscription of the sect during the Tang dynasty, only a few fragments of Xinxing's writings are extant. These include the Sanjie fofa ("Buddhadharma during the Third Stage"), in four rolls, and sections of the Duigen qixing fa ("Principles on Practicing in Response to the Sense-Bases") and the Ming Dasheng wujinzang fa ("Clarifying the Teaching of the Mahāyāna's Inexhaustible Storehouse"). ¶ Xinxing's teachings derive from the doctrines of the degenerate dharma (MOFA) and the buddha-nature (FOXING); they emphasize almsgiving (S. DĀNA) as an efficient salvific method, which contributed to the development of the school's distinctive institution, the WUJINZANG YUAN (inexhaustible storehouse cloister). Because people during the degenerate age (mofa) were inevitably mistaken in their perceptions of reality, it was impossible for them to make any meaningful distinctions, whether between right and wrong, good and evil, or ordained and lay. Instead, adherents were taught to treat all things as manifestations of the buddha-nature, leading to a "universalist" perspective on Buddhism that was presumed to have supplanted all the previous teachings of the religion. Xinxing asserted that almsgiving was the epitome of Buddhist practice during the degenerate age of the dharma and that the true perfection of giving (DĀNAPĀRAMITĀ) meant that all people, monks and laypeople alike, should be making offerings to relieve the suffering of those most in need, including the poor, the orphaned, and the sick. In its radical reinterpretation of the practice of giving in Buddhism, even animals were considered to be a more appropriate object of charity than were buddhas, bodhisattvas, monks, or the three jewels (RATNATRAYA). Particularly significant were offerings made to the inexhaustible storehouse cloister (Wujinzang yuan), which served the needs of the impoverished and suffering in society-especially offerings made on the anniversary of Xinxing's death. See also XIANGFA JUEYI JING.

yajna &

yajña ::: worship, devotion, prayer, praise; act of worship or devotion, offering, oblation, sacrifice; fire.

Ye shes 'od. (Yeshe Ö) (947-1024). A Tibetan king of the western region of GU GE credited with inspiring a revival of Buddhism that initiated the latter dissemination (PHYI DAR) of Buddhism in Tibet. He decried the state of Tibetan Buddhist practice, especially the practice of TANTRA, in a famous ordinance (bka' shog), complaining that people were engaging in murder and illicit sex under the guise of the tantric practices of "liberation" (grol) and "union" (sbyor). According to a famous story, Ye shes 'od was captured by a Gar log Turk chieftain while seeking to raise the capital necessary to invite ATIsA DĪPAMKARAsRĪJNĀNA to Tibet. He then sacrificed his own life by commanding his grandnephew BYANG CHUB 'OD to use whatever gold had been accumulated not as a ransom for his own release, but rather as an offering to the Indian scholar. Atisa was so moved by the king's act of selflessness that, despite his previous declinations, he agreed to make the journey north. Traditional accounts also suggest that Ye shes 'od sponsored a group of twenty-two young scholars to study Indian languages and tantric literature in Kashmir (see KASHMIR-GANDHĀRA), of whom only two survived: the translators RIN CHEN BZANG PO and RNGOG LEGS PA'I SHES RAB. Both the story of his noble death for the sake of Atisa's invitation and the story of his sponsorship of Rin chen bzang po present difficulties in chronology, suggesting that they are embellishments. He is also credited with inspiring the establishment of numerous religious institutions, including THO LING, NYAR MA, and TA PHO. He is also known as Lha bla ma (Lha Lama).

yi dam. In Tibetan, a term often translated as "meditational deity" or "tutelary deity." In the practice of Buddhist tantra, it is the enlightened being, whether male or female, peaceful or wrathful, who serves as the focus of one's SĀDHANA practice. One is also to visualize one's tantric teacher (VAJRĀCĀRYA) as this deity. The term is of uncertain origin and does not seem to be a direct translation of a Sanskrit term, although istadevatā is sometimes identified with the term. The etymology that is often given sees the term as an abbreviation of yid kyi dam tshig, meaning "commitment of the mind." Traditionally, the yi dam is selected by throwing a flower onto a MAndALA, with the deity upon whom the flower lands becoming the "chosen deity." However, when one receives a tantric initiation, the central deity of that tantra typically becomes the yi dam, with daily practices of offering and meditation often required. Through the propitiation of the deity and recitation of MANTRA, it is said that the deity will bestow accomplishments (SIDDHI). In the practice of DEVATĀYOGA, one meditates upon oneself as that deity in order to achieve buddhahood in the form of that deity. The yi dam is considered one of the three roots (rtsa gsum) of tantric practice, together with the GURU and the dĀKINĪ: the guru is considered to be the source of blessings; the yi dam, the source of accomplishments; and the dākinī, the source of activities. These three roots are considered the inner refuge, with the Buddha, DHARMA, and SAMGHA being the outer refuge, and the channels (NĀdĪ), winds (PRĀnA), and drops (BINDU) being the secret refuge.

Yongsanjae. (山齋). In Korean, "Vulture Peak Ceremony"; a Korean Buddhist rite associated with the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), which has been performed in Korea since the mid to late Koryo dynasty (918-1392). This elaborate ritual is a loose reenactment of the Saddharmapundarīkasutra and is intended to depict the process by which all beings, both the living and the dead, are led to enlightenment. Its performance often occurs in conjunction with the forty-ninth day ceremony (K. sasipku [il] chae; C. SISHIJIU [RI] ZHAI), which sends a deceased being in the intermediate transitional state (ANTARĀBHAVA) on to the next rebirth. The Yongsanjae is renowned for including the most complete repertoire of Buddhist chant and dance preserved in the Korean tradition. The rite may last for between one day and a week, although it is rare nowadays to see it extend beyond a single day; briefer productions lasting a couple of hours are sometimes staged for tourists. The Yongsanjae is protected through the Korean Cultural Property Protection Law as an intangible cultural asset (Muhyong Munhwajae, no. 50), and the group responsible for protecting and preserving the rite for the future consists of monks at the monastery of PONGWoNSA in Seoul, the headquarters of the T'AEGO CHONG. The monks at the monastery also train monks and nuns from other orders of Buddhism, as well as laypeople, in different components of the rite. In recent years, the dominant CHOGYE CHONG of Korean Buddhism has also begun to perform the Yongsanjae again, thanks to training from the Pongwonsa specialists in the tradition. ¶ The Yongsanjae is held in front of a large KWAEBUL (hanging painting) scroll depicting sĀKYAMUNI teaching at Vulture Peak (GṚDHRAKutAPARVATA), delivering the Saddharmapundarīkasutra to his followers. A day-long version of the ceremony starts with bell ringing and a procession escorting the attending spirits in a palanquin, which then proceeds to a ceremonial raising of the kwaebul. The rest of the day is made up of the following sequence of events: chanting spells (DHĀRAnĪ) to the bodhisattva AVALOKITEsVARA (K. Kwanseŭm posal); the cymbal dance, or PARACH'UM, as monks chant the Ch'onsu kyong (C. QIANSHOU JING) dedicated to the thousand-handed incarnation of Avalokitesvara (see SĀHASRABHUJASĀHASRANETRĀVALOKITEsVARA); PoMP'AE; purification of the ritual site (toryanggye), during which the butterfly dance, or NABICH'UM, is performed to entice the dead to attend the ceremony while the pomp'ae chants entreat the three jewels (RATNATRAYA) and dragons (NĀGA) to be present; the dharma drum dance, or PoPKOCH'UM, during which a large drum is beaten to awaken all sentient beings; a group prayer to the Buddha and bodhisattvas, where everyone in attendance has the chance to take refuge in the three jewels (ratnatraya); an offering of flowers and incense (hyanghwagye) to the Buddha and bodhisattvas is made by the nabich'um dancers, followed by offering chants; a chant hoping that the food offerings on the altar will be sufficient as the parach'um is performed again together with four dhāranī chants; placing the offerings on the altar while chanting continues; culminating in a transfer of merit (kongdokkye) to all the people in attendance, including sending off the spiritual guests of the ceremony. The siktang chakpop, an elaborate ceremonial meal, is then consumed. A recitation on behalf of the lay donors who funded the ceremony (hoehyang ŭisik) concludes the rite.

Yuimae. (C. Weimo hui; K. Yuma hoe 維摩會). In Japanese, "VIMALAKĪRTI ceremony." One of the three great ceremonies (Nankyo san[n]e) held in the ancient Japanese capital of Nara. In 656, when the senior courtier Nakatomi no Kamatari (an ancestor of the Fujiwara clan) became seriously ill, the Paekche nun Pommyong (J. Homyo) advised Empress Saimei to sponsor a reading of the "Inquiry about Illness" chapter of the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA in order to speed his recovery. The reading was successful and, out of gratitude, Kamatari and his family subsequently sponsored a lecture on the sutra in 658 to commemorate the construction of the new monastery of Sankaiji. This ceremony was transferred to the Hossoshu (C. FAXIANG ZONG) monastery of KoFUKUJI in Nara in 712, where it was held periodically every two to five years; it is now observed annually on the tenth day of the tenth lunar month. For seven days, a lecture on the Vimalakīrtinirdesa is offered to the public and offerings are made to the SAMGHA.

Yulanben jing. (T. 'Phags pa yongs su skyobs pa'i snod ces bya ba'i mdo; J. Urabongyo; K. Uranbun kyong 盂蘭盆經). In Chinese, "Book of the Yulan Vessel"; an influential indigenous Chinese Buddhist scripture (see APOCRYPHA), often known in English as the Ullambana Sutra or simply the Yulanben Sutra. Along with the BAO'EN FENGBEN JING ("Scripture for Offering Bowls to Repay Kindness"), the Yulanben jing details the practice of the ghost festival (YULANBEN) and its origin myth. Little is known about the provenance of either text. Both are now generally presumed to be indigenous Chinese works, although some scholars continue to maintain that they are of Indian or Central Asian origin. They are thought to have been composed sometime between the fourth and fifth centuries and were included in the Chinese Buddhist canon as early as the sixth century. The origin myth recounted in the scripture describes the pious efforts of Mulian (S. MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA), one of the two main disciples of the Buddha, to save his mother from the tortures of her rebirth as a hungry ghost (PRETA). The Buddha explains to Mulian that it is impossible for an individual on his own to save his ancestors from their suffering; instead, one should place offerings in a bowl for the entire SAMGHA of the ten directions, and these offerings will be sufficient to liberate up to seven generations of one's parents and ancestors from their unfortunate rebirths. At least six commentaries were written on the Yulanben jing, although only two survive, including an influential exegesis by GUIFENG ZONGMI. The Tibetan translation of the scripture, made in the Chinese outpost of DUNHUANG sometime in the early ninth century by 'GOS CHOS GRUB (C. Facheng; c. 755-849), is rendered directly from the Chinese recension and is extant in only three manuscript editions of the Tibetan canon (BKA' 'GYUR). See also YULANBEN.

yulanben. (T. yongs su skyob pa'i snod; J. urabon; K. uranbun 盂蘭盆). In Chinese, lit. "yulan vessel," referring to the "ghost festival." The Sinographs "yulan" have typically been interpreted by scholars to be a transcription of a hypothetical BUDDHIST HYBRID SANSKRIT, Middle Indic, or perhaps even Iranian form *ULLAMBANA, which is presumed to correspond to the Sanskrit avalambana (lit. "hanging downward," "suspended"); the term refers to the "Ghost Festival," a ritual that sought the salvation of beings condemned to the unfortunate fate of being "suspended" in hell. This explanation of yulan is questionable, however, since this connotation of the Sanskrit term avalambana is unknown in Indian Buddhist contexts. The Tibetan translation of yulanben as yongs su skyob pa'i snod, or "vessel of complete protection," also does not fit any connotations of "hanging down"; the Tibetan rendering does, however, seem to fit better an alternate explanation of the derivation of yulan(ben) as the Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit term ullumpana (sometimes mistakenly transcribed as ullumpana, ullumbana, etc.), lit. "rescuing, extracting [from an unfortunate fate]." The Sinograph "ben" ("bowl") is less problematic: it refers to the bowl in which offerings are placed during the PRAVĀRAnĀ festival in order to rescue one's ancestors from their unfortunate destinies. A more recent hypothesis is that "yulan" is a transcription of the Sanskrit and Pāli term odana (cooked rice) and "ben" a native word for bowl; the compound "yulanben" is thus not a transcription of the hypothetical Sanskrit word ullambana but actually means a "rice bowl," perhaps even a special kind of rice bowl for making offerings on the pravāranā day. The term yulanben is now used to refer to the "ghost festival," a popular ceremony in medieval China, Korea, and Japan, when offerings were made to the SAMGHA of the ten directions (DAsADIs) on behalf of one's ancestors. A bowl was filled with all kinds of flavorful foods and fruits and offered on behalf of seven generations of one's deceased parents and ancestors. The festival was held on the full moon of the seventh lunar month, when the saMgha performed the pravāranā ceremony, ending the summer rains retreat (VARsĀ). The origin myth and practices associated with the ghost festival are found in various sources, including popular stories known as BIANWEN and such Buddhist apocryphal scriptures as the YULANBEN JING and BAO'EN FENGBEN JING ("Sutra for Offering Bowls to Repay Kindness"). The Japanese BON FESTIVAL (alt. Obon) derives from this term; it is celebrated in either mid-July or mid-August in order to honor the spirits of one's deceased ancestors.

Zao gongen. (藏王權現). In Japanese, "Provisional Manifestation of the Matrix King," also known as Zao, Zao bosatsu, and Kongo Zao; proper name of a tutelary deity revered largely by followers of the Japanese SHUGENDo and SHINGONSHu traditions. Zao gongen is said to have revealed himself to the legendary Japanese ascetic EN NO GYoJA, the reputed founder of Shugendo, on Mt. Kinbu in Nara. Zao gongen is considered to be a BODHISATTVA who quells demons, as well as a NIRMĀnAKĀYA of the Buddha. Offerings and worship for Zao gongen are conducted at the hall of Zaodo on Mt. Kinbu. This wrathful deity is often depicted with three fearsome heads, with a three-pronged VAJRA in his right hand and his right leg suspended in the air.

Zaya Pandita. [alt. Jaya Pandita] (1599-1662). An important Mongolian monk of the DGE LUGS sect of Tibetan Buddhism. Born as the fifth son in a noble family of the Qoshot tribe, in 1615 he was selected by its leader to become a monk. He was sent to Tibet where he became a disciple of the first (also counted as the fourth) PAn CHEN LAMA, BLO BZANG CHOS KYI RGYAL MTSHAN, studying both the scholastic curriculum and the tantric curriculum. In 1639, after twenty-two years in Tibet, on the instructions of the Pan chen Lama and the fifth DALAI LAMA, he returned to his homeland, serving as a missionary among the Qoshot. During this period, he invented the todorxoi üzüg (clear script) for the transcription of the Oirad language. In 1650, he returned to Tibet to make offerings to the Dalai Lama and to visit the Pan chen Lama, and then continued his missionary work, going as far west as the Kalmyk region of the Volga. Zaya Pandita died while en route back to Tibet in 1662. He was a distinguished translator, translating 177 works from Tibetan into the Oirad language. The title of Zaya Pandita was given to masters of the five traditional sciences; there were at least two other important Mongolian monks who bore the title and had lines of incarnation. The monk described here can be distinguished by his Tibetan name, Nam kha'i rgya mtsho.

zhai. (J. sai; K. chae 齋). A polysemous Chinese term that means "fast," "purify," "make offerings to monks," "festival," or "vegetarian feast" (and often seen translated as "maigre feast"); it is also used to translate the Sanskrit term UPOsADHA. The traditional PRĀTIMOKsA prohibition against monks and nuns eating after noon was referred to in Chinese as zhai, hence its translation as "fast." In China, zhai came to refer generally to meals offered at Buddhist rituals and events and more specifically to vegetarian feasts held at monasteries throughout the country. Monasteries often maintained special funds to be used for such purposes. These vegetarian feasts and festivals served as one of the primary means through which the laity made offerings to the monastic community. One of the most famous of such festivals in East Asia was the "Ghost Festival" (YULANBEN).

Zuting shiyuan. (J. Sotei jion; K. Chojong sawon 祖庭事苑). In Chinese, "Garden of Matters from the Patriarchs' Hall," edited in eight rolls by Mu'an Shanxiang (d.u.) in 1108; the oldest encyclopedia of the Chinese CHAN tradition. This collection includes over 2,400 items related to Chan pedagogy, culled from Buddhist and secular stories, proverbs, numerological lists, personal names, local dialects, and so forth. Mu'an is said to have embarked on this project in response to the growing number of monks who were unable to understand the rich content and context of the many GONG'AN exchanges found in Chan literature. Mu'an's material is drawn from over twenty important Chan sources, such as the discourse records (YULU) of YUNMEN WENYAN, XUEDOU CHONGXIAN, and FAYAN WENYI, and YONGJIA XUANJUE's popular ZHENGDAO GE. The encyclopedia functions as a glossary for these works, offering explanations for their difficult technical terms and obscure names (which are not necessarily Chan or Buddhist in origin), and drawing his explanations from Buddhist, Confucian, and Daoist materials, as well as such secular sources. For example, the first roll of the encyclopedia provides a glossary of the Yunmen lu, which discusses the author Yunmen Wenyan, offers definitions of terms and explanations of names appearing in the text, drawing on sources ranging from the Shiji ("Book of History") to the AGAMA SuTRAs, and fills out the myriad numerical lists that appear in the text, such as the three vehicles (C. sansheng; S. TRIYĀNA), the three baskets of the canon (C. sanzang; S. TRIPItAKA), the eight teachings of Tiantai (see WUSHI BAJIAO), etc. Mu'an's exhaustive collection meticulously traces the source of each item and provides a detailed commentary on each. The Zuting shiyuan was republished in 1154, and numerous editions were published during the Tokugawa period in Japan.

Zynet Ltd. ::: (company) A UK Internet service provider offering full Internet Protocol connection by any reasonable means for any number of computers from individual dial-ups to leased line connections to entire networks.Zynet is a sister company of Minerva Software and thus claim a better than average understanding of the needs and idiosyncracies of Acorn systems and will be offering special services for education. .E-mail: .Telephone: +44 (1392) 426 160. Fax: +44 (1392) 421 762.Address: Minerva House, Baring Crescent, Exeter EX1 1TL, UK. (1995-01-31)

Zynet Ltd. "company" A UK {Internet service provider} offering full {Internet Protocol} connection by any reasonable means for any number of computers from individual {dial-ups} to {leased line} connections to entire networks. Zynet is a sister company of {Minerva Software} and thus claim a better than average understanding of the needs and idiosyncracies of {Acorn} systems and will be offering special services for education. {(http://zynet.co.uk/)}. E-mail: "zynet@zynet.co.uk". Telephone: +44 (1392) 426 160. Fax: +44 (1392) 421 762. Address: Minerva House, Baring Crescent, Exeter EX1 1TL, UK. (1995-01-31)



QUOTES [63 / 63 - 1500 / 2405]


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   17 Sri Aurobindo
   12 The Mother
   5 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   5 Sri Ramakrishna
   2 Sri Aurobindo
   2 Ramakrishna
   1 Valmiki
   1 SWAMI VIRAJANANDA
   1 Swami Saradananda
   1 SWAMI ABHEDANANDA
   1 Sri Ramakrishna
   1 Shinto-Gobusho
   1 Saint Justin Martyr
   1 Saint John Chrysostom
   1 Saint Bernard
   1 Saint Ambrose
   1 Rene Guenon
   1 Manu
   1 Lalla
   1 Joseph Campbell
   1 James Joyce
   1 Is. 40:18-19).
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Chatral Rinpoche
   1 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   1 Plato

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   56 Anonymous
   11 Esther Hicks
   10 Sri Aurobindo
   9 W Chan Kim
   9 Bren Brown
   7 Rick Riordan
   7 Elizabeth Gilbert
   7 Elie Wiesel
   7 Dan Simmons
   7 Cassandra Clare
   6 Sharon Salzberg
   6 Anne Lamott
   5 Walter Isaacson
   5 Thich Nhat Hanh
   5 The Mother
   5 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   5 Roxane Gay
   5 Ram Dass
   5 Mitch Albom
   5 Matthew Henry

1:The only offering you can make to God is your increasing awareness. ~ Lalla, trans. Coleman Barks
2:Everything offered to others is really an offering to oneself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
3:To remain free from thoughts is the best offering one can make to God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
4:To remain free from thoughts is the best offering one can make to God.
   ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, [T5],
5:The wise call by the name 'self-surrender' the offering of oneself to God through devotion. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
6:Why should human frailty fear to go to Mary? In her there is no austerity, nothing terrible: she is all sweetness, offering milk and wool to all. ~ Saint Bernard,
7:One can give not only one's soul, but all one's powers to the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Consecration and Offering,
8:Should I try meditation?

   It is not necessary if your work is a constant offering to the Divine.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I,
9:My solitude doesn't depend on the presence or absence of people; on the contrary, I hate who steals my solitude without, in exchange, offering me true company. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
10:Why is it that people are fed at religious feasts? It is the same as offering a sacrifice to God, who is the Living Fire in all creatures. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
11:The development of capacities is not only permissible but right, when it can be made part of the Yoga ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Consecration and Offering,
12:What offering should be made that we may attain to the Eternal? To find the Eternal thou must offer him thy body, thy mind and all thy possessions. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
13:[The Lord] teaches us to make prayer in common for all our brethren. For he did not say my Father who art in heaven, but our Father, offering petitions for the common body. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
14:What offering should be made that we may attain to the Eternal? To find the Eternal thou must offer him thy body, thy mind and all thy possessions. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
15:If you give God something, you receive it back a thousand times over. That is why after doing meritorious deeds one offers a handful of water to God. It is the symbol of offering the fruit to God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
16:For Sri Aurobindo's centenary, what is the best offering that I can personally make to Sri Aurobindo?

   Offer him your mind in all sincerity. 13 November 1970
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
17:Whatever you eat, eat after offering it mentally to Him; know that to be consecrated food, the gift of His mercy. This destroys any spiritually harmful properties that may be attached to the food. ~ SWAMI VIRAJANANDA,
18:Yoga means union with the Divine, and the union is effected through offering - it is founded on the offering of yourself to the Divine. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, (28 April),
19:A certain pride, a certain awe, withheld him from offering to God even one prayer at night, though he knew it was in God's power to take away his life while he slept and hurl his soul hellward ere he could beg for mercy. ~ James Joyce,
20:Even scrubbing the floor may be turned into worship if there is the remembrance of the Lord within. Done sacra mentally, every work is an offering to the Lord. He accepts it as He accepts a flower placed at the altar with devotion. ~ Swami Saradananda,
21:Thus seeing the supreme Spirit equally in all beings and all beings in the supreme Spirit, he, offering his soul in sacrifice, identifies himself with the Being who shines in his own splendour. ~ Manu, the Eternal Wisdom
22:You must work constantly, day and night devote your whole energy, and let the results remain in the hands of the Lord. Let every action of your daily life be a free offering to the world. Let us all work for others and die for others, ~ SWAMI ABHEDANANDA,
23:In an outburst of heavenly joy and ease
Life yields to the divinity within
And gives the rapture-offering of its all,
And the soul opens to felicity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Heavens of the Ideal,
24:To whom will you compare God? What image will you compare him to? As for an idol, a craftsman casts it, and a goldsmith overlays it with gold and fashions silver chains for it. A man too poor to present such an offering selects wood that will not rot ~ Is. 40:18-19).,
25:Let us add that nature is given its full significance only if it is looked at as offering us a means of rising up to the knowledge of divine truths, which is precisely the essential function which we have recognized in symbolism. ~ Rene Guenon, Symbols of Sacred Science
26:Man is given faith in himself, his ideas and his powers that he may work and create and rise to greater things and in the end bring his strength as a worthy offering to the altar of the Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
27:You must have a pure body with w/ to offer up the sacraments. If the people were forbidden to approach their victim unless they washed their clothes, do you, while foul in heart and body, dare to make supplication for others? Do you dare to make an offering for them? ~ Saint Ambrose,
28:The Spirit has made itself Matter in order to place itself there as an instrument for the well-being and joy, yogakṣema, of created beings, for a self. offering of universal physical utility and service. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Gnostic Being,
29:Even the smallest meanest work became
A sweet or glad and glorious sacrament,
An offering to the self of the great world
Or a service to the One in each and all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
30:In general the city of the ungodly is not ruled by God and is not obedient to him in offering sacrifice only to him, and in that city, as a consequence, the soul does not rightly and faithfully rule the body, nor does reason the vices. And so it lacks true justice. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
31:362. Limit not sacrifice to the giving up of earthly goods or the denial of some desires and yearnings, but let every thought and every work and every enjoyment be an offering to God within thee. Let thy steps walk in thy Lord, let thy sleep and waking be a sacrifice to Krishna.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human, Karma, [T1],
32: 11. O Divine Fire, thou art Aditi, the indivisible Mother to the giver of the sacrifice; thou art Bharati, voice of the offering, and thou growest by the word. Thou art Ila of the hundred winters wise to discern; O Master of the Treasure, thou art Saraswati who slays the python adversary. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, 1.03 - Hymns_of_Gritsamada,
33:...the conception of a Truth-consciousness supramental and divine, the invocation of the gods as powers of the Truth to raise man out of the falsehoods of the mortal mind, the attainment in and by this Truth of an immortal state of perfect good and felicity and the inner sacrifice and offering of what one has and is by the mortal to the Immortal as the means of the divine consummation.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret Of The Veda, [68],
34:7. Don't entertain such thoughts of imperfection, lack of qualities, etc. You are already perfect. Get rid of the ideas of imperfection and need for development. There is nothing to realize or annihilate. You are the Self. The ego does not exist. Pursue the enquiry and see if there is anything to be realised or annihilated. See if there is any mind to be controlled. Even the effort is being made by the mind which does not exist. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Surpassing Love and Grace An Offering from His Devotees,
35:There are four conditions for knowing the divine Will:
   The first essential condition: an absolute sincerity.
   Second: to overcome desires and preferences.
   Third: to silence the mind and listen.
   Fourth, to obey immediately when you receive the order. If you persist, you will perceive the Divine Will more and more clearly. But even before you know what it is, you can make an offering of your own will and you will see that all circumstances will be so arranged as to make you do the right thing
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
36:...to quiet the mind and get the spiritual experience it is necessary first to purify and prepare the nature. This sometimes takes many years. Work done with the right attitude is the easiest means for that - i.e. work done without desire or ego, rejecting all movements of desire, demand or ego when the come, done as an offering to the Divine Mother, with the remembrance of her and prayer to her to manifest her force and take up the action so that there too and not only in inner silence you can feel her presence and working.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
37:If you want to be a true doer of divine works, your first aim must be to be totally free from all desire and self-regarding ego. All your life must be an offering and a sacrifice to the Supreme; your only object in action shall be to serve, to receive, to fulfil, to become a manifesting instrument of the Divine Shakti in her works. You must grow in the divine consciousness till there is no difference between your will and hers, no motive except her impulsion in you, no action that is not her conscious action in you and through you.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
38:The Yoga must start with an effort or at least a settled turn towards this total concentration. A constant and unfailing will of consecration of all ourselves to the Supreme is demanded of us, an offering of our whole being and our many-chambered nature to the Eternal who is the All. The effective fullness of our concentration on the one thing needful to the exclusion of all else will be the measure of our self-consecration to the One who is alone desirable. But this exclusiveness will in the end exclude nothing except the falsehood of our way of seeing the world and our will's ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, [T5],
39:conditions of the psychic opening :::
For the opening of the psychic being, concentration on the Mother and self-offering to her are the direct way. The growth of Bhakti which you feel is the first sign of the psychic development. A sense of the Mother's presence or force or the remembrance of her supporting and strengthening you is the next sign. Eventually, the soul within begins to be active in aspiration and psychic perception guiding the mind to the right thoughts, the vital to the right movements and feelings, showing and rejecting all that has to be put away and turning the whole being in all its movements to the Divine alone. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - III,
40:If a division of works has to be made, it is between those that are nearest to the heart of the sacred flame and those that are least touched or illumined by it because they are more at a distance, or between the fuel that burns strongly or brightly and the logs that if too thickly heaped on the altar may impede the ardour of the fire by their damp, heavy and diffused abundance. But otherwise, apart from this division, all activities of knowledge that seek after or express Truth are in themselves rightful materials for a complete offering ; none ought necessarily to be excluded from the wide framework of the divine life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1, 141,
41:During this degenerate age in the outer world, there are many natural disasters due to the upsetting of the four elements. Also, demonic forces come with their many weapons to incite the fighting of wars. All of those forces have caused the world to come to ruin and led all to tremble - so terrified that their hair stands up on end. Still, the demonic forces find it necessary to come up with new types of weapons. If we were called on to confront them, there is no way we Dharma practitioners could defeat them. That is why we make supplication prayers to the three jewels, do the aspiration prayers, the offering prayers and the prayers of invocation. We are responsible for those activities. This is what I urge you to do. ~ Chatral Rinpoche,
42:When we are concentrated in mental movements or intellectual pursuits, why do we sometimes forget or lose touch with the Divine?

You lose it because your consciousness is still divided. The Divine has not settled in your mind; you are not wholly consecrated to the Divine Life. Otherwise you could concentrate to any extent upon such things and still you would have the sense of being helped and supported by the Divine. In all pursuits, intellectual or active, your one motto should be, Remember and Offer. Let whatever you do be done as an offering to the Divine. And this too will be an excellent discipline for you; it will prevent you from doing many foolish and useless things.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, [T0],
43:Sweet Mother,
One day in class you said, with your hands wide open, that we should give you everything, even our defects and vices and all the dirt in us. Is this the only way to get rid of them, and how can one do it?


One keeps one's defects because one hangs on to them as if they were something precious; one clings to one's vices as one clings to a part of one's body, and pulling out a bad habit hurts as much as pulling out a tooth. That is why one does not progress.

   Whereas if one generously makes an offering of one's defect, vice or bad habit, then one has the joy of making an offering and one receives in exchange the force to replace what has been given, by a better and truer vibration. 13 June 1960 ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother,
44:   There are also female energies; for the Deva is both Male and Female and the gods also are either activising souls or passively executive and methodising energies. Aditi, infinite Mother of the Gods, comes first; and there are besides five powers of the Truthconsciousness, - Mahi or Bharati, the vast Word that brings us all things out of the divine source; Ila, the strong primal word of the Truth who gives us its active vision; Saraswati, its streaming current and the word of its inspiration; Sarama, the Intuition, hound of heaven who descends into the cavern of the subconscient and finds there the concealed illuminations; Dakshina, whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distri bute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion. Each god, too, has his female energy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, 1.02 - The Doctrine of the Mystics,
45:Sri Ramakrishna has described the incident: "The Divine Mother revealed to me in the Kāli temple that it was She who had become everything. She showed me that everything was full of Consciousness. The image was Consciousness, the Altar was Consciousness, the water-vessels were Consciousness, the door-sill was Consciousness, the marble floor was Consciousness - all was Consciousness. I found everything inside the room soaked, as it were, in Bliss - the Bliss of God. I saw a wicked man in front of the Kāli temple; but in him also I saw the power of the Divine Mother vibrating. That was why I fed a cat with the food that was to be offered to the Divine Mother. I clearly perceived that all this was the Divine Mother - even the cat. The manager of the temple garden wrote to Mathur Bābu saying that I was feeding the cat with the offering intended for the Divine Mother. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna,
46:the importance and power of surrender :::
   Surrender is the decision taken to hand over the responsibility of your life to the Divine. Without this decision nothing is at all possible; if you do not surrender, the Yoga is entirely out of the question. Everything else comes naturally after it, for the whole process starts with surrender. You can surrender either through knowledge or through devotion. You may have a strong intuition that the Divine alone is the truth and a luminous conviction that without the Divine you cannot manage. Or you may have a spontaneous feeling that this line is the only way of being happy, a strong psychic desire to belong exclusively to the Divine: I do not belong to my self, you say, and give up the responsibility of your being to the Truth. Then comes self-offering: Here I am, a creature of various qualities, good and bad, dark and enlightened. I offer myself as I am to you, take me up with all my ups and downs, conflicting impulses and tendencies - do whatever you like with me.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
47:The triple way takes for its chosen instruments the three main powers of the mental soul-life of the human being. Knowledge selects the reason and the mental vision and it makes them by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of a Goddirected seeking its means for the greatest knowledge and the greatest vision of all, God-knowledge and God-vision. Its aim is to see, know and be the Divine. Works, action selects for its instrument the will of the doer of works; it makes life an offering of sacrifice to the Godhead and by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of subjection to the divine Will a means for contact and increasing unity of the soul of man with the divine Master of the universe. Devotion selects the emotional and aesthetic powers of the soul and by turning them all Godward in a perfect purity, intensity, infinite passion of seeking makes them a means of God-possession in one or many relations of unity with the Divine Being. All aim in their own way at a union or unity of the human soul with the supreme Spirit.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Principle of the Integral Yoga, 610 [T3],
48:Anyway, in instances of this kind, I think it is people's faith, above all, which saves them. When they have performed their little ceremony properly, they feel confident, "Oh! now it will be over, for she is satisfied." And because they feel confident, it helps them to react and the illness disappears. I have seen this very often in the street. There might be a small hostile entity there, but these are very insignificant things.
   In other cases, in some temples, there are vital beings who are more or less powerful and have made their home there. But what Sri Aurobindo means here is that there is nothing, not even the most anti-divine force, which in its origin is not the Supreme Divine. So, necessarily, everything goes back to Him, consciously or unconsciously. In the consciousness of the one who makes the offering it does not go to the Divine: it goes to the greater or smaller demon to whom he turns. But through everything, through the wood of the idol or even the ill-will of the vital adversary, ultimately, all returns to the Divine, since all comes from Him. Only, the one who has made the offering or the sacrifice receives but in proportion to his own consciousness... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956,
49:
   Sweet Mother, Just as there is a methodical progression of exercises for mental and physical education, isn't there a similar method to progress towards Sri Aurobindo's yoga?
It should vary with each individual.
Could you make a step-by-step programme for me to follow daily?

The mechanical regularity of a fixed programme is indispensable for physical, mental and vital development; but this mechanical rigidity has little or no effect on spiritual development where the spontaneity of an absolute sincerity is indispensable. Sri Aurobindo has written very clearly on this subject. And what he has written on it has appeared in The Synthesis Of Yoga.
   However, as an initial help to set you on the path, I can tell you: (1) that on getting up, before starting the day, it is good to make an offering of this day to the Divine, an offering of all that one thinks, all that one is, all that one will do; (2) and at night, before going to sleep, it is good to review the day, taking note of all the times one has forgotten or neglected to make an offering of one's self or one's action, and to aspire or pray that these lapses do not recur. This is a minimum, a very small beginning - and it should increase with the sincerity of your consecration. 31 March 1965
   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother, [T1],
50:the joy of progress :::
It is the will for progress and self-purification which lights the [psychic] fire. The will for progress. Those who have a strong will, when they turn it towards spiritual progress and purification, automatically light the fire within themselves.
And each defect one wants to cure or each progress one wants to make - if all that is thrown into the fire, it burns with a new intensity. And this is not an image, it is a fact in the subtle physical. One can feel the warmth of the flame, one can see in the subtle physical the light of the flame. And when there is something in the nature which prevents one from advancing and one throws it into this fire, it begins to burn and the flame becomes more intense....
How can one feel sweetness and joy when one is in difficulty?
Exactly, when the difficulty is egoistic or personal, if one makes an offering of it and throws it into the fire of purification, one immediately feels the joy of progress. If one does it sincerely, at once there is a welling up of joy.
That is obviously what ought to be done instead of despairing and lamenting. If one offers it up and aspires sincerely for transformation and purification, one immediately feels joy springing up in the depths of the heart. Even when the difficulty is a great sorrow, one may do this with much success. One realises that behind the sorrow, no matter how intense it may be, there is divine joy. ~ The Mother,
51:If the spirit of divine love can enter, the hardness of the way diminishes, the tension is lightened, there is a sweetness and joy even in the core of difficulty and struggle. The indispensable surrender of all our will and works and activities to the Supreme is indeed only perfect and perfectly effective when it is a surrender of love. All life turned into this cult, all actions done in the love of the Divine and in the love of the world and its creatures seen and felt as the Divine manifested in many disguises become by that very fact part of an integral Yoga.
   It is the inner offering of the heart's adoration, the soul of it in the symbol, the spirit of it in the act, that is the very life of the sacrifice. If this offering is to be complete and universal, then a turning of all our emotions to the Divine is imperative. This is the intensest way of purification for the human heart, more powerful than any ethical or aesthetic catharsis could ever be by its half-power and superficial pressure. A psychic fire within must be lit into which all is thrown with the Divine Name upon it. In that fire all the emotions are compelled to cast off their grosser elements and those that are undivine perversions are burned away and the others discard their insufficiencies, till a spirit of largest love and a stainless divine delight arises out of the flame and smoke and frankincense. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2, 165, [T2],
52:The mythological hero, setting forth from his common-day hut or castle, is lured, carried away, or else voluntarily proceeds, to the threshold of adventure. There he encounters a shadow presence that guards the passage. The hero may defeat or conciliate this power and go alive into the kingdom of the dark (brother-battle, dragon-battle; offering, charm), or be slain by the opponent and descend in death (dismemberment, crucifixion). Beyond the threshold, then, the hero journeys through a world of unfamiliar yet strangely intimate forces, some of which severely threaten him (tests), some of which give magical aid (helpers). When he arrives at the nadir of the mythological round, he undergoes a supreme ordeal and gains his reward. The triumph may be represented as the hero's sexual union with the goddess-mother of the world (sacred marriage), his recognition by the father-creator (father atonement), his own divinization (apotheosis), or again-if the powers have remained unfriendly to him-his theft of the boon he came to gain (bride-theft, fire-theft); intrinsically it is an expansion of consciousness and therewith of being (illumination, transfiguration, freedom). The final work is that of the return. If the powers have blessed the hero, he now sets forth under their protection (emissary); if not, he flees and is pursued (transformation flight, obstacle flight). At the return threshold the transcendental powers must remain behind; the hero re-emerges from the kingdom of dread (return, resurrection). The boon that he brings restores the world (elixir). ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, The Keys,
53:You say that you feel you have returned to your old life and that you have fallen from that state of spiritual consciousness in which you remained for some time. And you ask whether it comes from the fact that Sri Aurobindo and myself have withdrawn our protection and our help because you had been unable to fulfil your promise.

It is a mistake to think that anything at all has been withdrawn by us. Our help and our protection are with you as always, but it would be more correct to say that both your inability to feel our help and your inability to keep your promise are the simultaneous effects of the same cause.

Remember what I wrote to you when you went to Calcutta to fetch your family: do not let any influence come in between you and the Divine. You did not pay sufficient attention to this warning: you have allowed an influence to interfere strongly between you and your spiritual life; your devotion and your faith have been seriously shaken by this. As a consequence, you became afraid and you did not find the same joy in your offering to the Divine Cause; and also, quite naturally, you fell back into your ordinary consciousness and your old life.

You are quite right, nevertheless, not to let yourself be discouraged. Whatever the fall, it is always possible not only to get up again but also to rise higher and to reach the goal. Only a strong aspiration and a constant will are needed.

You have to take a firm resolution to let nothing interfere with your ascent towards the Divine Realisation. And then the success is certain.

Be assured of our unfailing help and protection. 3 February 1931 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother - I,
54:
   How can one "learn of pure delight"?

First of all, to begin with, one must through an attentive observation grow aware that desires and the satisfaction of desires give only a vague, uncertain pleasure, mixed, fugitive and altogether unsatisfactory. That is usually the starting-point.

   Then, if one is a reasonable being, one must learn to discern what is desire and refrain from doing anything that may satisfy one's desires. One must reject them without trying to satisfy them. And so the first result is exactly one of the first observations stated by the Buddha in his teaching: there is an infinitely greater delight in conquering and eliminating a desire than in satisfying it. Every sincere and steadfast seeker will realise after some time, sooner or later, at times very soon, that this is an absolute truth, and that the delight felt in overcoming a desire is incomparably higher than the small pleasure, so fleeting and mixed, which may be found in the satisfaction of his desires. That is the second step.

   Naturally, with this continuous discipline, in a very short time the desires will keep their distance and will no longer bother you. So you will be free to enter a little more deeply into your being and open yourself in an aspiration to... the Giver of Delight, the divine Element, the divine Grace. And if this is done with a sincere self-giving - something that gives itself, offers itself and expects nothing in exchange for its offering - one will feel that kind of sweet warmth, comfortable, intimate, radiant, which fills the heart and is the herald of Delight.    After this, the path is easy.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
55:
   Are not offering and surrender to the Divine the same thing?


They are two aspects of the same thing, but not altogether the same. One is more active than the other. They do not belong to quite the same plane of existence.

For example, you have decided to offer your life to the Divine, you take that decision. But all of a sudden, something altogether unpleasant, unexpected happens to you and your first movement is to react and protest. Yet you have made the offering, you have said once for all: "My life belongs to the Divine", and then suddenly an extremely unpleasant incident happens (that can happen) and there is something in you that reacts, that does not want it. But here, if you want to be truly logical with your offering, you must bring forward this unpleasant incident, make an offering of it to the Divine, telling him very sincerely: "Let Your will be done; if You have decided it that way, it will be that way." And this must be a willing and spontaneous adhesion. So it is very difficult.

Even for the smallest thing, something that is not in keeping with what you expected, what you have worked for, instead of an opposite reaction coming in - spontaneously, irresistibly, you draw back: "No, not that" - if you have made a complete surrender, a total surrender, well, it does not happen like that: you are as quiet, as peaceful, as calm in one case as in the other. And perhaps you had the notion that it would be better if it happened in a certain way, but if it happens differently, you find that this also is all right. You might have, for example, worked very hard to do a certain thing, so that something might happen, you might have given much time, much of your energy, much of your will, and all that not for your own sake, but, say, for the divine work (that is the offering); now suppose that after having taken all this trouble, done all this work, made all these efforts, it all goes just the other way round, it does not succeed. If you are truly surrendered, you say: "It is good, it is all good, it is all right; I did what I could, as well as I could, now it is not my decision, it is the decision of the Divine, I accept entirely what He decides." On the other hand, if you do not have this deep and spontaneous surrender, you tell yourself: "How is it? I took so much trouble to do a thing which is not for a selfish purpose, which is for the Divine Work, and this is the result, it is not successful!" Ninety-nine times out of a hundred, it is like that.

True surrender is a very difficult thing.

~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953, 52,
56:Concentration is a gathering together of the consciousness and either centralising at one point or turning on a single object, e.g., the Divine; there can be also be a gathered condition throughout the whole being, not at a point. In meditation it is not indispensable to gather like this, one can simply remain with a quiet mind thinking of one subject or observing what comes in the consciousness and dealing with it. ... Of this true consciousness other than the superficial there are two main centres, one in the heart (not the physical heart, but the cardiac centre in the middle of the chest), one in the head. The concentration in the heart opens within and by following this inward opening and going deep one becomes aware of the soul or psychic being, the divine element in the individual. This being unveiled begins to come forward, to govern the nature, to turn it and all its movements towards the Truth, towards the Divine, and to call down into it all that is above. It brings the consciousness of the Presence, the dedication of the being to the Highest and invites the descent into our nature of a greater Force and Consciousness which is waiting above us. To concentrate in the heart centre with the offering of oneself to the Divine and the aspiration for this inward opening and for the Presence in the heart is the first way and, if it can be done, the natural beginning; for its result once obtained makes the spiritual path far more easy and safe than if one begins the other ways.
   That other way is the concentration in the head, in the mental centre. This, if it brings about the silence of the surface mind, opens up an inner, larger, deeper mind within which is more capable of receiving spiritual experience and spiritual knowledge. But once concentrated here one must open the silent mental consciousness upward and in the end it rises beyond the lid which has so long kept it tied in the body and finds a centre above the head where it is liberated into the Infinite. There it begins to come into contact with the universal Self, the Divine Peace, Light, Power, Knowledge, Bliss, to enter into that and become that, to feel the descent of these things into the nature. To concentrate in the head with the aspiration for quietude in the mind and the realisation of the Self and Divine above is the second way of concentration. It is important, however, to remember that the concentration of the consciousness in the head in only a preparation for its rising to the centre above; otherwise, one may get shut up in one's own mind and its experiences or at best attain only to a reflection of the Truth above instead of rising into the spiritual transcendence to live there. For some the mental concentration is easier, for some the concentration in the heart centre; some are capable of doing both alternatively - but to begin with the heart centre, if one can do it, is the most desirable.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
57:THE WAND
   THE Magical Will is in its essence twofold, for it presupposes a beginning and an end; to will to be a thing is to admit that you are not that thing.
   Hence to will anything but the supreme thing, is to wander still further from it - any will but that to give up the self to the Beloved is Black Magick - yet this surrender is so simple an act that to our complex minds it is the most difficult of all acts; and hence training is necessary. Further, the Self surrendered must not be less than the All-Self; one must not come before the altar of the Most High with an impure or an imperfect offering. As it is written in Liber LXV, "To await Thee is the end, not the beginning."
   This training may lead through all sorts of complications, varying according to the nature of the student, and hence it may be necessary for him at any moment to will all sorts of things which to others might seem unconnected with the goal. Thus it is not "a priori" obvious why a billiard player should need a file.
   Since, then, we may want "anything," let us see to it that our will is strong enough to obtain anything we want without loss of time.
   It is therefore necessary to develop the will to its highest point, even though the last task but one is the total surrender of this will. Partial surrender of an imperfect will is of no account in Magick.
   The will being a lever, a fulcrum is necessary; this fulcrum is the main aspiration of the student to attain. All wills which are not dependent upon this principal will are so many leakages; they are like fat to the athlete.
   The majority of the people in this world are ataxic; they cannot coordinate their mental muscles to make a purposed movement. They have no real will, only a set of wishes, many of which contradict others. The victim wobbles from one to the other (and it is no less wobbling because the movements may occasionally be very violent) and at the end of life the movements cancel each other out. Nothing has been achieved; except the one thing of which the victim is not conscious: the destruction of his own character, the confirming of indecision. Such an one is torn limb from limb by Choronzon.
   How then is the will to be trained? All these wishes, whims, caprices, inclinations, tendencies, appetites, must be detected, examined, judged by the standard of whether they help or hinder the main purpose, and treated accordingly.
   Vigilance and courage are obviously required. I was about to add self-denial, in deference to conventional speech; but how could I call that self-denial which is merely denial of those things which hamper the self? It is not suicide to kill the germs of malaria in one's blood.
   Now there are very great difficulties to be overcome in the training of the mind. Perhaps the greatest is forgetfulness, which is probably the worst form of what the Buddhists call ignorance. Special practices for training the memory may be of some use as a preliminary for persons whose memory is naturally poor. In any case the Magical Record prescribed for Probationers of the A.'.A.'. is useful and necessary.
   Above all the practices of Liber III must be done again and again, for these practices develop not only vigilance but those inhibiting centres in the brain which are, according to some psychologists, the mainspring of the mechanism by which civilized man has raised himself above the savage.
   So far it has been spoken, as it were, in the negative. Aaron's rod has become a serpent, and swallowed the serpents of the other Magicians; it is now necessary to turn it once more into a rod.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Book 4, The Wand,
58:The principle of Yoga is the turning of one or of all powers of our human existence into a means of reaching the divine Being. In an ordinary Yoga one main power of being or one group of its powers is made the means, vehicle, path. In a synthetic Yoga all powers will be combined and included in the transmuting instrumentation.
   In Hathayoga the instrument is the body and life. All the power of the body is stilled, collected, purified, heightened, concentrated to its utmost limits or beyond any limits by Asana and other physical processes; the power of the life too is similarly purified, heightened, concentrated by Asana and Pranayama. This concentration of powers is then directed towards that physical centre in which the divine consciousness sits concealed in the human body. The power of Life, Nature-power, coiled up with all its secret forces asleep in the lowest nervous plexus of the earth-being,-for only so much escapes into waking action in our normal operations as is sufficient for the limited uses of human life,-rises awakened through centre after centre and awakens, too, in its ascent and passage the forces of each successive nodus of our being, the nervous life, the heart of emotion and ordinary mentality, the speech, sight, will, the higher knowledge, till through and above the brain it meets with and it becomes one with the divine consciousness.
   In Rajayoga the chosen instrument is the mind. our ordinary mentality is first disciplined, purified and directed towards the divine Being, then by a summary process of Asana and Pranayama the physical force of our being is stilled and concentrated, the life-force released into a rhythmic movement capable of cessation and concentrated into a higher power of its upward action, the mind, supported and strengthened by this greater action and concentration of the body and life upon which it rests, is itself purified of all its unrest and emotion and its habitual thought-waves, liberated from distraction and dispersion, given its highest force of concentration, gathered up into a trance of absorption. Two objects, the one temporal, the other eternal,are gained by this discipline. Mind-power develops in another concentrated action abnormal capacities of knowledge, effective will, deep light of reception, powerful light of thought-radiation which are altogether beyond the narrow range of our normal mentality; it arrives at the Yogic or occult powers around which there has been woven so much quite dispensable and yet perhaps salutary mystery. But the one final end and the one all-important gain is that the mind, stilled and cast into a concentrated trance, can lose itself in the divine consciousness and the soul be made free to unite with the divine Being.
   The triple way takes for its chosen instruments the three main powers of the mental soul-life of the human being. Knowledge selects the reason and the mental vision and it makes them by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of a Goddirected seeking its means for the greatest knowledge and the greatest vision of all, God-knowledge and God-vision. Its aim is to see, know and be the Divine. Works, action selects for its instrument the will of the doer of works; it makes life an offering of sacrifice to the Godhead and by purification, concentration and a certain discipline of subjection to the divine Will a means for contact and increasing unity of the soul of man with the divine Master of the universe. Devotion selects the emotional and aesthetic powers of the soul and by turning them all Godward in a perfect purity, intensity, infinite passion of seeking makes them a means of God-possession in one or many relations of unity with the Divine Being. All aim in their own way at a union or unity of the human soul with the supreme Spirit.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Self-Perfection, The Principle of the Integral Yoga, 609,
59:summary of the entire process of psychic awakening :::
You have asked what is the discipline to be followed in order to convert the mental seeking into a living spiritual experience. The first necessity is the practice of concentration of your consciousness within yourself. The ordinary human mind has an activity on the surface which veils the real Self. But there is another, a hidden consciousness within behind the surface one in which we can become aware of the real Self and of a larger deeper truth of nature, can realise the Self and liberate and transform the nature. To quiet the surface mind and begin to live within is the object of this concentration. Of this true consciousness other then the superficial there are two main centres, one in the heart (not the physical heart, but the cardiac centre in the middle of the chest), one in the head. The concentration in the heart opens within and by following this inward opening and going deep one becomes aware of the soul or psychic being, the divine element in the individual. This being unveiled begins to come forward, to govern the nature, to turn it an d all its movements towards the Truth, towards the Divine, and to call down into it all that is above. It brings the consciousness of the Presence, the dedication of the being to the Highest and invites the descent into our nature of a greater Force and Consciousness which is waiting above us. To concentrate in the heart centre with the offering of oneself to the Divine and the aspiration for this inward opening and for the Presence in the heart is the first way and, if it can be done, the natural beginning; for its result once obtained makes the spiritual path far more easy and safe than if one begins the other way.
   That other way is the concentration in the head, in the mental centre. This, if it brings about the silence of the surface mind, opens up an inner, larger, deeper mind within which is more capable of receiving spiritual experience and spiritual knowledge. But once concentrated here one must open the silent mental consciousness upward to all that is above mind. After a time one feels the consciousness rising upward and it the end it rises beyond the lid which has so long kept it tied in the body and finds a centre above the head where it is liberated into the Infinite. There it behind to come into contact with the universal Self, the Divine Peace, Light, Power, Knowledge, Bliss, to enter into that and become that, to feel the descent of these things into the nature. To concentrate in the head with the aspiration for quietude in the mind and the realisation of the Self and Divine above is the second way of concentration. It is important, however, to remember that the concentration of the consciousness in the head is only a preparation for its rising to the centre above; otherwise, one may get shut up in one's own mind and its experiences or at best attain only to a reflection of the Truth above instead of rising into the spiritual transcendence to live there. For some the mental consciousness is easier, for some the concentration in the heart centre; some are capable of doing both alternatively - but to begin with the heart centre, if one can do it, is the more desirable.
   The other side of the discipline is with regard to the activities of the nature, of the mind, of the life-self or vital, of the physical being. Here the principle is to accord the nature with the inner realisation so that one may not be divided into two discordant parts. There are here several disciplines or processes possible. One is to offer all the activities to the Divine and call for the inner guidance and the taking up of one's nature by a Higher Power. If there is the inward soul-opening, if the psychic being comes forward, then there is no great difficulty - there comes with it a psychic discrimination, a constant intimation, finally a governance which discloses and quietly and patiently removes all imperfections, bring the right mental and vital movements and reshapes the physical consciousness also. Another method is to stand back detached from the movements of the mind, life, physical being, to regard their activities as only a habitual formation of general Nature in the individual imposed on us by past workings, not as any part of our real being; in proportion as one succeeds in this, becomes detached, sees mind and its activities as not oneself, life and its activities as not oneself, the body and its activities as not oneself, one becomes aware of an inner Being within us - inner mental, inner vital, inner physical - silent, calm, unbound, unattached which reflects the true Self above and can be its direct representative; from this inner silent Being proceeds a rejection of all that is to be rejected, an acceptance only of what can be kept and transformed, an inmost Will to perfection or a call to the Divine Power to do at each step what is necessary for the change of the Nature. It can also open mind, life and body to the inmost psychic entity and its guiding influence or its direct guidance. In most cases these two methods emerge and work together and finally fuse into one. But one can being with either, the one that one feels most natural and easy to follow.
   Finally, in all difficulties where personal effort is hampered, the help of the Teacher can intervene and bring above what is needed for the realisation or for the immediate step that is necessary.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II, 6, {871},
60:[an Integral conception of the Divine :::
   But on that which as yet we know not how shall we concentrate? And yet we cannot know the Divine unless we have achieved this concentration of our being upon him. A concentration which culminates in a living realisation and the constant sense of the presence of the One in ourselves and in all of which we are aware, is what we mean in Yoga by knowledge and the effort after knowledge. It is not enough to devote ourselves by the reading of Scriptures or by the stress of philosophical reasoning to an intellectual understanding of the Divine; for at the end of our long mental labour we might know all that has been said of the Eternal, possess all that can be thought about the Infinite and yet we might not know him at all. This intellectual preparation can indeed be the first stage in a powerful Yoga, but it is not indispensable : it is not a step which all need or can be called upon to take. Yoga would be impossible, except for a very few, if the intellectual figure of knowledge arrived at by the speculative or meditative Reason were its indispensable condition or a binding preliminary. All that the Light from above asks of us that it may begin its work is a call from the soul and a sufficient point of support in the mind. This support can be reached through an insistent idea of the Divine in the thought, a corresponding will in the dynamic parts, an aspiration, a faith, a need in the heart. Any one of these may lead or predominate, if all cannot move in unison or in an equal rhythm. The idea may be and must in the beginning be inadequate; the aspiration may be narrow and imperfect, the faith poorly illumined or even, as not surely founded on the rock of knowledge, fluctuating, uncertain, easily diminished; often even it may be extinguished and need to be lit again with difficulty like a torch in a windy pass. But if once there is a resolute self-consecration from deep within, if there is an awakening to the soul's call, these inadequate things can be a sufficient instrument for the divine purpose. Therefore the wise have always been unwilling to limit man's avenues towards God; they would not shut against his entry even the narrowest portal, the lowest and darkest postern, the humblest wicket-gate. Any name, any form, any symbol, any offering has been held to be sufficient if there is the consecration along with it; for the Divine knows himself in the heart of the seeker and accepts the sacrifice.
   But still the greater and wider the moving idea-force behind the consecration, the better for the seeker; his attainment is likely to be fuller and more ample. If we are to attempt an integral Yoga, it will be as well to start with an idea of the Divine that is itself integral. There should be an aspiration in the heart wide enough for a realisation without any narrow limits. Not only should we avoid a sectarian religious outlook, but also all onesided philosophical conceptions which try to shut up the Ineffable in a restricting mental formula. The dynamic conception or impelling sense with which our Yoga can best set out would be naturally the idea, the sense of a conscious all-embracing but all-exceeding Infinite. Our uplook must be to a free, all-powerful, perfect and blissful One and Oneness in which all beings move and live and through which all can meet and become one. This Eternal will be at once personal and impersonal in his self-revelation and touch upon the soul. He is personal because he is the conscious Divine, the infinite Person who casts some broken reflection of himself in the myriad divine and undivine personalities of the universe. He is impersonal because he appears to us as an infinite Existence, Consciousness and Ananda and because he is the fount, base and constituent of all existences and all energies, -the very material of our being and mind and life and body, our spirit and our matter. The thought, concentrating on him, must not merely understand in an intellectual form that he exists, or conceive of him as an abstraction, a logical necessity; it must become a seeing thought able to meet him here as the Inhabitant in all, realise him in ourselves, watch and take hold on the movement of his forces. He is the one Existence: he is the original and universal Delight that constitutes all things and exceeds them: he is the one infinite Consciousness that composes all consciousnesses and informs all their movements; he is the one illimitable Being who sustains all action and experience; his will guides the evolution of things towards their yet unrealised but inevitable aim and plenitude. To him the heart can consecrate itself, approach him as the supreme Beloved, beat and move in him as in a universal sweetness of Love and a living sea of Delight. For his is the secret Joy that supports the soul in all its experiences and maintains even the errant ego in its ordeals and struggles till all sorrow and suffering shall cease. His is the Love and the Bliss of the infinite divine Lover who is drawing all things by their own path towards his happy oneness. On him the Will can unalterably fix as the invisible Power that guides and fulfils it and as the source of its strength. In the impersonality this actuating Power is a self-illumined Force that contains all results and calmly works until it accomplishes, in the personality an all wise and omnipotent Master of the Yoga whom nothing can prevent from leading it to its goal. This is the faith with which the seeker has to begin his seeking and endeavour; for in all his effort here, but most of all in his effort towards the Unseen, mental man must perforce proceed by faith. When the realisation comes, the faith divinely fulfilled and completed will be transformed into an eternal flame of knowledge.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Consecration, 82-83 [T1],
61:To what gods shall the sacrifice be offered? Who shall be invoked to manifest and protect in the human being this increasing godhead?

Agni first, for without him the sacrificial flame cannot burn on the altar of the soul. That flame of Agni is the seven-tongued power of the Will, a Force of God instinct with Knowledge. This conscious and forceful will is the immortal guest in our mortality, a pure priest and a divine worker, the mediator between earth and heaven. It carries what we offer to the higher Powers and brings back in return their force and light and joy into our humanity.

Indra, the Puissant next, who is the power of pure Existence self-manifested as the Divine Mind. As Agni is one pole of Force instinct with knowledge that sends its current upward from earth to heaven, so Indra is the other pole of Light instinct with force which descends from heaven to earth. He comes down into our world as the Hero with the shining horses and slays darkness and division with his lightnings, pours down the life-giving heavenly waters, finds in the trace of the hound, Intuition, the lost or hidden illuminations, makes the Sun of Truth mount high in the heaven of our mentality.

Surya, the Sun, is the master of that supreme Truth, - truth of being, truth of knowledge, truth of process and act and movement and functioning. He is therefore the creator or rather the manifester of all things - for creation is out-bringing, expression by the Truth and Will - and the father, fosterer, enlightener of our souls. The illuminations we seek are the herds of this Sun who comes to us in the track of the divine Dawn and releases and reveals in us night-hidden world after world up to the highest Beatitude.

Of that beatitude Soma is the representative deity. The wine of his ecstasy is concealed in the growths of earth, in the waters of existence; even here in our physical being are his immortalising juices and they have to be pressed out and offered to all the gods; for in that strength these shall increase and conquer.

Each of these primary deities has others associated with him who fulfil functions that arise from his own. For if the truth of Surya is to be established firmly in our mortal nature, there are previous conditions that are indispensable; a vast purity and clear wideness destructive of all sin and crooked falsehood, - and this is Varuna; a luminous power of love and comprehension leading and forming into harmony all our thoughts, acts and impulses, - this is Mitra; an immortal puissance of clear-discerning aspiration and endeavour, - this is Aryaman; a happy spontaneity of the right enjoyment of all things dispelling the evil dream of sin and error and suffering, - this is Bhaga. These four are powers of the Truth of Surya. For the whole bliss of Soma to be established perfectly in our nature a happy and enlightened and unmaimed condition of mind, vitality and body are necessary. This condition is given to us by the twin Ashwins; wedded to the daughter of Light, drinkers of honey, bringers of perfect satisfactions, healers of maim and malady they occupy our parts of knowledge and parts of action and prepare our mental, vital and physical being for an easy and victorious ascension.

Indra, the Divine Mind, as the shaper of mental forms has for his assistants, his artisans, the Ribhus, human powers who by the work of sacrifice and their brilliant ascension to the high dwelling-place of the Sun have attained to immortality and help mankind to repeat their achievement. They shape by the mind Indra's horses, the chariot of the Ashwins, the weapons of the Gods, all the means of the journey and the battle. But as giver of the Light of Truth and as Vritra-slayer Indra is aided by the Maruts, who are powers of will and nervous or vital Force that have attained to the light of thought and the voice of self-expression. They are behind all thought and speech as its impellers and they battle towards the Light, Truth and Bliss of the supreme Consciousness.

There are also female energies; for the Deva is both Male and Female and the gods also are either activising souls or passively executive and methodising energies. Aditi, infinite Mother of the Gods, comes first; and there are besides five powers of the Truthconsciousness, - Mahi or Bharati, the vast Word that brings us all things out of the divine source; Ila, the strong primal word of the Truth who gives us its active vision; Saraswati, its streaming current and the word of its inspiration; Sarama, the Intuition, hound of heaven who descends into the cavern of the subconscient and finds there the concealed illuminations; Dakshina, whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distribute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion. Each god, too, has his female energy.

All this action and struggle and ascension is supported by Heaven our Father and Earth our Mother Parents of the Gods, who sustain respectively the purely mental and psychic and the physical consciousness. Their large and free scope is the condition of our achievement. Vayu, master of life, links them together by the mid-air, the region of vital force. And there are other deities, - Parjanya, giver of the rain of heaven; Dadhikravan, the divine war-horse, a power of Agni; the mystic Dragon of the Foundations; Trita Aptya who on the third plane of existence consummates our triple being; and more besides.

The development of all these godheads is necessary to our perfection. And that perfection must be attained on all our levels, - in the wideness of earth, our physical being and consciousness; in the full force of vital speed and action and enjoyment and nervous vibration, typified as the Horse which must be brought forward to upbear our endeavour; in the perfect gladness of the heart of emotion and a brilliant heat and clarity of the mind throughout our intellectual and psychical being; in the coming of the supramental Light, the Dawn and the Sun and the shining Mother of the herds, to transform all our existence; for so comes to us the possession of the Truth, by the Truth the admirable surge of the Bliss, in the Bliss infinite Consciousness of absolute being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, The Doctrine of the Mystics,
62:This, in short, is the demand made on us, that we should turn our whole life into a conscious sacrifice. Every moment and every movement of our being is to be resolved into a continuous and a devoted self-giving to the Eternal. All our actions, not less the smallest and most ordinary and trifling than the greatest and most uncommon and noble, must be performed as consecrated acts. Our individualised nature must live in the single consciousness of an inner and outer movement dedicated to Something that is beyond us and greater than our ego. No matter what the gift or to whom it is presented by us, there must be a consciousness in the act that we are presenting it to the one divine Being in all beings. Our commonest or most grossly material actions must assume this sublimated character; when we eat, we should be conscious that we are giving our food to that Presence in us; it must be a sacred offering in a temple and the sense of a mere physical need or self-gratification must pass away from us. In any great labour, in any high discipline, in any difficult or noble enterprise, whether undertaken for ourselves, for others or for the race, it will no longer be possible to stop short at the idea of the race, of ourselves or of others. The thing we are doing must be consciously offered as a sacrifice of works, not to these, but either through them or directly to the One Godhead; the Divine Inhabitant who was hidden by these figures must be no longer hidden but ever present to our soul, our mind, our sense. The workings and results of our acts must be put in the hands of that One in the feeling that that Presence is the Infinite and Most High by whom alone our labour and our aspiration are possible. For in his being all takes place; for him all labour and aspiration are taken from us by Nature and offered on his altar. Even in those things in which Nature is herself very plainly the worker and we only the witnesses of her working and its containers and supporters, there should be the same constant memory and insistent consciousness of a work and of its divine Master. Our very inspiration and respiration, our very heart-beats can and must be made conscious in us as the living rhythm of the universal sacrifice.
   It is clear that a conception of this kind and its effective practice must carry in them three results that are of a central importance for our spiritual ideal. It is evident, to begin with, that, even if such a discipline is begun without devotion, it leads straight and inevitably towards the highest devotion possible; for it must deepen naturally into the completest adoration imaginable, the most profound God-love. There is bound up with it a growing sense of the Divine in all things, a deepening communion with the Divine in all our thought, will and action and at every moment of our lives, a more and more moved consecration to the Divine of the totality of our being. Now these implications of the Yoga of works are also of the very essence of an integral and absolute Bhakti. The seeker who puts them into living practice makes in himself continually a constant, active and effective representation of the very spirit of self-devotion, and it is inevitable that out of it there should emerge the most engrossing worship of the Highest to whom is given this service. An absorbing love for the Divine Presence to whom he feels an always more intimate closeness, grows upon the consecrated worker. And with it is born or in it is contained a universal love too for all these beings, living forms and creatures that are habitations of the Divine - not the brief restless grasping emotions of division, but the settled selfless love that is the deeper vibration of oneness. In all the seeker begins to meet the one Object of his adoration and service. The way of works turns by this road of sacrifice to meet the path of Devotion; it can be itself a devotion as complete, as absorbing, as integral as any the desire of the heart can ask for or the passion of the mind can imagine.
   Next, the practice of this Yoga demands a constant inward remembrance of the one central liberating knowledge, and a constant active externalising of it in works comes in too to intensify the remembrance. In all is the one Self, the one Divine is all; all are in the Divine, all are the Divine and there is nothing else in the universe, - this thought or this faith is the whole background until it becomes the whole substance of the consciousness of the worker. A memory, a self-dynamising meditation of this kind, must and does in its end turn into a profound and uninterrupted vision and a vivid and all-embracing consciousness of that which we so powerfully remember or on which we so constantly meditate. For it compels a constant reference at each moment to the Origin of all being and will and action and there is at once an embracing and exceeding of all particular forms and appearances in That which is their cause and upholder. This way cannot go to its end without a seeing vivid and vital, as concrete in its way as physical sight, of the works of the universal Spirit everywhere. On its summits it rises into a constant living and thinking and willing and acting in the presence of the Supramental, the Transcendent. Whatever we see and hear, whatever we touch and sense, all of which we are conscious, has to be known and felt by us as That which we worship and serve; all has to be turned into an image of the Divinity, perceived as a dwelling-place of his Godhead, enveloped with the eternal Omnipresence. In its close, if not long before it, this way of works turns by communion with the Divine Presence, Will and Force into a way of Knowledge more complete and integral than any the mere creature intelligence can construct or the search of the intellect can discover.
   Lastly, the practice of this Yoga of sacrifice compels us to renounce all the inner supports of egoism, casting them out of our mind and will and actions, and to eliminate its seed, its presence, its influence out of our nature. All must be done for the Divine; all must be directed towards the Divine. Nothing must be attempted for ourselves as a separate existence; nothing done for others, whether neighbours, friends, family, country or mankind or other creatures merely because they are connected with our personal life and thought and sentiment or because the ego takes a preferential interest in their welfare. In this way of doing and seeing all works and all life become only a daily dynamic worship and service of the Divine in the unbounded temple of his own vast cosmic existence. Life becomes more and more the sacrifice of the eternal in the individual constantly self-offered to the eternal Transcendence. It is offered in the wide sacrificial ground of the field of the eternal cosmic Spirit; and the Force too that offers it is the eternal Force, the omnipresent Mother. Therefore is this way a way of union and communion by acts and by the spirit and knowledge in the act as complete and integral as any our Godward will can hope for or our soul's strength execute.
   It has all the power of a way of works integral and absolute, but because of its law of sacrifice and self-giving to the Divine Self and Master, it is accompanied on its one side by the whole power of the path of Love and on the other by the whole power of the path of Knowledge. At its end all these three divine Powers work together, fused, united, completed, perfected by each other.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, The Sacrifice, the Triune Path and the Lord of the Sacrifice [111-114],
63:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step.

But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.

Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.

*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection.

You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, *I am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: *I have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages.

In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything.

It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM.

My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.

All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.

These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness.

And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed.

And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.

My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal.

Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967

~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, The Mother to Mona Sarkar, [T0],

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:The horizon leans forward, offering you space to place new steps of change. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
2:Meditation is offering your genuine presence to yourself in every moment. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
3:When you make something you are always offering some choices and denying others. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
4:As God is propitiated by the blood of a hundred bulls, so also is he by the smallest offering of incense. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
5:Every moment is a moment of grace, every hour an offering; not to share them would mean to betray them. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
6:When you stop giving and offering something to the rest of the world, it's time to turn out the lights. ~ george-burns, @wisdomtrove
7:Offer a vibration that matches your desire rather than offering a vibration that keeps matching what-is. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
8:Theology sits rouged at the window and courts philosophy's favor, offering to sell her charms to it. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
9:We ought not to be looking for a place to hide, but a place to give ourselves as an offering to God. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
10:No coffee can be good in the mouth that does not first send a sweet offering of odor to the nostrils. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
11:To be fully seen by somebody, then, and be loved anyhow - this is a human offering that can border on miraculous. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
12:It doesn't matter what product or service you're offering; there is unlimited ability to improve the quality of anything. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
13:A true friend encourages us, comforts us, supports us like a big easy chair, offering us a safe refuge from the world. ~ h-jackson-brown-jr, @wisdomtrove
14:It is only work that is done as freewill offering to humanity and to nature that does not bring with it any binding attachment. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
15:Do not miss the opportunity of offering even a single drop into the ocean of merit or a grain atop the mountain of the roots of beneficial activity. ~ dogen, @wisdomtrove
16:We always enter markets where the leaders are not doing a great job, so we can go in and disrupt them by offering better quality services. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
17:I love stirring the pot. I love giving big companies a run for their money - especially if they're offering expensive, poor-quality products. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
18:I've always thought that people need to feel good about themselves and I see my role as offering support to them, to provide some light along the way. ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
19:As a Christian I take it for granted that human history will some day end; and I am offering Omniscience no advice as to the best date for that consummation. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
20:Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time. ~ albert-camus, @wisdomtrove
21:Gratitude is an offering precious in the sight of God, and it is one that the poorest of us can make and be not poorer but richer for having made it. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
22:Believe to the end, even if all men went astray and you were left the only one faithful; bring your offering even then and praise God in your loneliness. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
23:The (stock) market is there only as a reference point to see if anybody is offering to do anything foolish. When we invest in stocks, we invest in businesses. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
24:If life is not a celebration, why remember it ? If life - mine or that of my fellow man - is not an offering to the other, what are we doing on this earth? ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
25:To show great love for God and our neighbor we need not do great things. It is how much love we put in the doing that makes our offering something beautiful for God. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
26:So when that Angel of the darker Drink, at last shall find you by the river-brink, And, offering his Cup, invite your Soul forth to your Lips to quaff-you shall not shrink. ~ omar-khayyam, @wisdomtrove
27:I'm lost in the middle of my birthday. I want my friends, their touch, with the earth's last love. I will take life's final offering, I will take the last human blessing. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
28:Novelists are people who have discovered that they can dampen their neuroses by writing make-believe. We will keep on doing that no matter what, while offering loftier explanations. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
29:As you think, you vibrate. And it is your vibrational offering that equals your point of attraction. So what you are thinking and what is coming back to you is always a vibrational match. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
30:The offering of [the body] is called a spiritual sacrifice because it is freely sacrificed through the Spirit, the Christian being uninfluenced by the constrainst of the Low or the fear of hell. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
31:Both gangs have been bad sports, so see if at least one can't redeem themselves by offering no alibis, but cooperate with the winner, for no matter which one it is the poor fellow is going to need it. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
32:You're offering a great service. People are tuning in. So continue to find great people, continue to do what you're doing. And do it better than your rivals. I know that's easier said than done... ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
33:The moment you wake up, right away, you can smile... You are aware that a new day is beginning, that life is offering you twenty-four brand new hours to live, and that that's the most precious of gifts. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
34:Our hearts are the shrine; that is where God should be installed. Our good thoughts are the flowers to worship Him. Good deeds form the worship, good words form the hymns and love forms the offering. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
35:If grief or anger arises, Let there be grief or anger. This is the Buddha in all forms,Sun Buddha, Moon Buddha, Happy Buddha, Sad Buddha. It is the universe offering all things to awaken and open our heart. ~ jack-kornfield, @wisdomtrove
36:Of all the gods, Death only craves not gifts: Nor sacrifice, nor yet drink-offering poured Avails; no altars hath he, nor is soothed By hymns of praise. From him alone of all The powers of heaven Persuasion holds aloof. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
37:We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness and affection ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
38:There is nothing worse than an idle hour, with no occupation offering. People who have many such hours are simply animals waiting docilely for death. We all come to that state soon or late. It is the curse of senility. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
39:I respect self-giving and I've tried to lead my life with that as the ideal. But real self-giving is when we take our being, that which is most precious to us, and we throw it into eternity with a total sense of offering. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
40:When God puts love and compassion in your heart toward someone, He’s offering you an opportunity to make a difference in that person’s life. You must learn to follow that love. Don’t ignore it. Act on it. Somebody needs what you have. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
41:I think the Messianic concept, which is the Jewish offering to mankind, is a great victory. What does it mean? It means that history has a sense, a meaning, a direction; it goes somewhere, and necessarily in a good direction&
42:We must choose between the violence of adults and the smiles of children. Between the ugliness of hate and the will to oppose it. Between inflicting suffering and humiliation on our fellow man and offering him the solidarity and hope he deserves. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
43:The basic rule [of writing] given us was simple and heartbreaking. A story to be effective had to convey something from the writer to the reader, and the power of its offering was the measure of its excellence. Outside of that, there were no rules. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
44:Without the Spirit of God we can do nothing. We are as ships without wind or chariots without steeds. Like branches without sap, we are withered. Like coals without fire, we are useless. As an offering without the sacrificial flame, we are unaccepted. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
45:There is nothing in all of the Universe more important for anyone to understand than how the vibration they are offering is matching the vibrations of their desires, and the way you feel is your indicator of whether you are allowing your connection to Source or not. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
46:The offering up or cleaning up ego stuff is called purification. Purification is the act of letting go. This is done out of discriminative awareness. That is, you understand that you are an entity passing through a life in which the entire drama is an offering for your awakening. ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
47:We shall draw nearer to God, not by trying to avoid the sufferings inherent in all loves, but by accepting them and offering them to Him; throwing away all defensive armour. If our hearts need to be broken, and if He chooses this as the way in which they should break, so be it. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
48:One must not think that a person who is suffering is not praying. He is offering up his sufferings to God, and many a time he is praying much more truly than one who goes away by himself and meditates his head off, and, if he has squeezed out a few tears, thinks that is prayer. ~ teresa-of-avila, @wisdomtrove
49:Economic power is exercised by means of a positive, by offering men a reward, an incentive, a payment, a value; political power is exercised by means of a negative, by the threat of punishment, injury, imprisonment, destruction. The businessman's tool is values; the bureaucrat's tool is fear. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
50:No one is as capable of gratitude as one who has emerged from the kingdom of night. We know that every moment is a moment of grace, every hour an offering; not to share them would mean to betray them. Our lives no longer belong to us alone; they belong to all those who need us desperately. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
51:The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life and has determined my whole career; yet it depended on so small a circumstance as my uncle offering to drive me 30 miles to Shrewsbury, which few uncles would have done, and on such a trifle as the shape of my nose. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
52:He would have felt safe if alongside the Dentrassis' underwear, the piles of Sqornshellous mattresses and the man from Betelgeuse holding up a small yellow fish and offering to put it in his ear he had been able to see just a small packet of cornflakes. But he couldn't, and he didn't feel safe. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
53:Life consists in learning to live on one's own, spontaneous, freewheeling: to do this one must recognize what is one's own-be familiar and at home with oneself. This means basically learning who one is, and learning what one has to offer to the contemporary world, and then learning how to make that offering valid. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
54:Prayer is never an acceptable substitute for obedience. The sovereign Lord accepts no offering from His creatures that is not accompanied by obedience. To pray for revival while ignoring or actually flouting the plain precept laid down in the Scriptures is to waste a lot of words and get nothing for our trouble. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
55:For if Men are to be precluded from offering their Sentiments on a matter, which may involve the most serious and alarming consequences, that can invite the consideration of Mankind, reason is of no use to us; the freedom of Speech may be taken away, and dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep, to the Slaughter. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
56:Love is trusting, accepting, and believing, without guarantee. Love is patient and waits, but it's an active waiting, not a passive one. For it is continually offering itself in a mutual revealing, a mutual sharing. Love is spontaneous and craves expression through joy, through beauty, through truth, even through tears. ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
57:Perhaps no custom reveals our character as a Nation so clearly as our celebration of Thanksgiving Day. Rooted deeply in our Judeo-Christian heritage, the practice of offering thanksgiving underscores our unshakable belief in God as the foundation of our Nation and our firm reliance upon Him from Whom all blessings flow. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
58:You are the creator of your own life experience, and as the creator of your experience, it is important to understand that it is not by virtue of your action, not by virtue of your doing, it is not even by virtue of what you are saying that you are creating. You are creating by virtue of the thoughts that you are offering. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
59:In the '90s, we are all our own gurus, offering truth to each other. My message is that we all have a truth inside of us that we must tell. The synchronicity of life is all about becoming clear, knowing what that truth is, watching and taking advantage of the opportunity to express that truth, and knowing how to present it. ~ james-redfield, @wisdomtrove
60:If we face our unpleasant feelings with care, affection, and nonviolence, we can transform them into a kind of energy that is healthy and has the capacity to nourish us. By the work of mindful observation, our unpleasant feelings can illuminate so much for us, offering us insight and understanding into ourselves and society. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
61:What it comes down to, I believe, is that mentoring often involves telling people what they need to hear, rather than what they want to hear. When you are able to be humbly honest with someone about a situation with which you have personal experience-even if you risk angering or hurting that person-you are offering the most valuable gift of all. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
62:There is not really any courage at all in attacking hoary or antiquated things, any more than in offering to fight one's grandmother. The really courageous man is he who defies tyrannies young as the morning and superstitions fresh as the first flowers. The only true free-thinker is he whose intellect is as much free from the future as from the past. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
63:The only cross in all of history that was turned into an altar was the cross on which Jesus Christ died. It was a Roman cross. They nailed Him on it, and God, in His majesty and mystery, turned it into an altar. The Lamb who was dying in the mystery and wonder of God was turned into the Priest who offered Himself. No one else was a worthy offering. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
64:There have been times when I could have succumbed to some form of bribe, or could have had my way by offering one. But ever since that night in Dover prison I have never been tempted to break my vow.. My Parents always drummed into me that all you have life is your reputation: you may be very rich, but if you lose your good name you'll never be happy. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
65:The saints are sinners still. Our best tears need to be wept over, the strongest faith is mixed with unbelief, our most flaming love is cold compared with what Jesus deserves, and our intensest zeal still lacks the full fervor which the bleeding wounds and pierced heart of the crucified might claim at our hands. Our best things need a sin offering, or they would condemn us. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
66:In the long run the answer to all those who object to the doctrine of hell, is itself a question: What are you asking God to do? To wipe out their past sins and, at all costs, to give them a fresh start, smoothing every difficulty and offering every miraculous help? But He has done so, on Calvary. To forgive them? They will not be forgiven. To leave them alone? Alas, I am afraid that is what He does. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
67:You have sole ownership of your vision. And the Universe will give you what you want within your vision. What happens with most people is that they muddy their vision with "reality". Their vision becomes full of not only what they want but what everybody else thinks about what they want, too. Your work is to clarify and purify your vision so that the vibration that you are offering can then be answered. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
68:Communication is an offering. When you tell someone your truth, you must release your expectation of what the other person should do with it. They may thank you profusely, love you forever, argue with you, or ignore you. It doesn't matter. Of course we hope the gift will be received with appreciation and thanks. But if it isn't we must not dictate. We've done our part, and we must trust the universe to do the rest. ~ alan-cohen, @wisdomtrove
69:My parents were only one part of my lineage. I also met a number of mentors, one of whom I nicknamed "Socrates" after the ancient Greek, and wrote about in my first book, Way of the Peaceful Warrior. That book emerged in 1980, as a result of travels around the world and decades of preparation, eventually leading to 15 other books written over the years, culminating in my newest offering, The Four Purposes of Life. ~ dan-millman, @wisdomtrove
70:Prayer is a relationship; half the job is mine. If I want transformation, but can't even be bothered to articulate what, exactly, I'm aiming for, how will it ever occur? Half the benefit of prayer is in the asking itself, in the offering of a clearly posed and well-considered intention. If you don't have this, all your pleas and desires are boneless, floppy, inert; they swirl at your feet in a cold fog and never lift. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
71:My opinion is that we have, in the person of Da Free John, a Spiritual Master and religious genius of the ultimate degree. I assure you I do not mean that lightly. I am not tossing out high-powered phrases to &
72:Children, when we go to the temple, do not hurry to have darshan, then make some offering and return home in a hurry. We should stand there patiently in silence for some time and try to visualize the beloved deity in our hearts. If possible, we should sit down and meditate. At each step, remember to do japa. Amma doesn't say that the offerings and worship are not necessary, but of all the offerings we make, what the Lord wants most is our hearts! ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
73:I do not think I exaggerate when I say that some of us put our offering in the plate with a kind of triumphant bounce as much as to say: "There - now God will feel better!" I am obliged to tell you that God does not need anything you have. He does not need a dime of your money. It is your own spiritual welfare at stake in such matters as these. You have the right to keep what you have all to yourself - but it will rust and decay, and ultimately ruin you. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
74:Children, we may go to the temple, reverently circumambulate the sanctum sanctorum and put our offering in the charity box, but on our way out if we kick the beggar at the door, where is our devotion? Compassion towards the poor is our duty to God. Mother is not saying that we should give money to every beggar that sits in front of a temple, but do not despise them. Pray for them as well. When we hate others, it is our own mind that becomes impure. Equality of vision is God. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
75:He saw merchants trading, princes hunting, mourners wailing for their dead, whores offering themselves, physicians trying to help the sick, priests determining the most suitable day for seeding, lovers loving, mothers nursing their children—and all of this was not worthy of one look from his eye, it all lied, it all stank, it all stank of lies, it all pretended to be meaningful and joyful and beautiful, and it all was just concealed putrefaction. The world tasted bitter. Life was torture ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
76:The things that most deserve our gratitude we just take for granted. Without air we cannot live for more than a minute or two. Everyday we are breathing in and breathing out, but do we ever feel grateful to the air? If we do not drink water, we cannot survive. Even our body is composed to a large extent of water.But do we give any value to water? Every morning when we open our eyes, we see the sun blessingfully offering us light and life-energy, which we badly need. But are we grateful to the sun? ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
77:The friends of Job appear on the scene as advisers and "consolers," offering Job the fruits of their moral scientia. But when Job insists that his sufferings have no explanation and that he cannot discover the reason for them through conventional ethical concepts, his friends turn into accusers, and curse Job as a sinner. Thus, instead of consolers, they become torturers by virtue of their very morality, and in so doing, while claiming to be advocates of God, they act as instruments of the devil. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
78:There is a lot of difference between offering a garland of flowers bought from a shop and one that we make out of flowers picked from our home garden. When we plant the flowers, water them, pick the flowers, make the garland and take it to the temple, thoughts of God alone live in our minds. The Lord accepts anything offered to Him with intense Love. When we buy a garland at a store and place it on the deity it is only a ceremonial act while the other is a garland of pure devotion and an act of love. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
79:Children, we are told to make an offering at the temple or at the feet of the guru, not because the Lord or guru is in need of wealth or anything else. Real offering is the act of surrendering the mind and the intellect. How can it be done? We cannot offer our minds as they are, but only the things to which our minds are attached. Today our minds are greatly attached to money and other worldly things. By placing such thoughts at the feet of the Lord, we are offering Him our heart. This is the principle behind giving charities. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
80:Action that is inspired from aligned thought is joyful action. Action that is offered from a place of contradicted thought is hard work that is not satisfying and does not yield good results. When you really feel like jumping into action, that is a clear sign that your vibration is pure and you are not offering contradicting thoughts to your own desire. When you are having a hard time making yourself do something, or when the action you offer does not produce the results you are seeking, it is always because you are offering thoughts in opposition to your desire. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
81:You see, you do not have to launch an intention, and then hold doggedly to that thought, and only that thought, in order for the universe to bring it in. It's not like casting out there with your great line, and hooking on to this fish of something that you want, and then having to keep tension on it in every moment, or it will shake off and get away from you. It isn't like that at all. It is that once you have launched your intention, the universe is yielding it to you, and unless you are offering a vibration that opposes it, it is going to come into your experience. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
82:In offering to you, my countrymen, these counsels of an old and affectionate friend, I dare not hope they will make the strong and lasting impression I could wish; that they will control the usual current of the passions, or prevent our nation from running the course which has hitherto marked the destiny of nations. ... moderate the fury of party spirit, to warn against the mischiefs of foreign intrigue, to guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism; this hope will be a full recompense for the solicitude for your welfare, by which they have been dictated. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
83:It's no use telling us that something was &
84:As you are moving through your experience, and the idea of something that you want is born within you, you don't have to singularly think about that until it comes about. You can launch an idea, and never think about it again, and the universe will yield it to you, because if you have gathered enough contrast to give birth to the desire, it is yours, in other words there is enough energy to bring it to you. But what often happens with people is that they have this contrasting experience which launches this desire, the non- physical energy is answering it, and so the desire is being answered, but then they're noticing "it isn't happening, it's not coming", they're offering thoughts that are in opposition to it which keep holding it apart. ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
85:Ideas have become far more important to us than action - ideas so cleverly expressed in books by the intellectuals in every field. The more cunning, the more subtle, those ideas are the more we worship them and the books that contain them.  We are those books, we are those ideas, so heavily conditioned are we by them.  We are forever discussing ideas and ideals and dialectically offering opinions.  Every religion has its dogma, its formula, its own scaffold to reach the gods, and when inquiring into the beginning of thought we are questioning the importance of this whole edifice of ideas.  We have separated ideas from action because ideas are always of the past and action is always the present - that is, living is always the present.  We are afraid of living and therefore the past, as ideas, has become so important to us.       ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Such a Saint, such an offering. ~ George Herbert,
2:They never asked, I kept offering. ~ Jack Kerouac,
3:Offering a hand up is not a hand-out. ~ Clara Barton,
4:Food should be a love offering. ~ Swami Satchidananda,
5:You look like an offering to a pagan god ~ Meghan March,
6:Damn it, woman, stop offering to kill me! ~ D B Reynolds,
7:There's no kindness in offering false hope. ~ Naomi Novik,
8:We have heeded no wisdom offering guidance. ~ Dora Russell,
9:wandered by like death in blue jeans, offering sex ~ Ron Hall,
10:I see 'Ahab's Wife' as offering an alternative vision to ~ Moby,
11:Ask before offering advice or reassurance. ~ Marshall B Rosenberg,
12:offering, and hope all the while that he would not ~ Dean F Wilson,
13:All that we do without offering it to God is wasted. ~ John Vianney,
14:I've turned down shows offering large amounts of money. ~ Kevin Hart,
15:Please don't embarrass yourself by offering an opinion. ~ John Boyne,
16:Food, the southern offering on the altar of crisis. ~ Charlaine Harris,
17:Give me your hand,” she says, offering hers. “Hurry now. ~ Megan Abbott,
18:I have only one offering to give, a broken heart. ~ Ethel Lilian Voynich,
19:I’m just offering because I noticed that Tory was drinking. ~ Pepper Pace,
20:We do a stewardship series every Sunday...at offering time. ~ Johnny Hunt,
21:I don’t like offering up my son like ransom,” Charles muttered, ~ Anonymous,
22:It’s throat punch Thursday, and I’m offering free tickets. ~ Lani Lynn Vale,
23:His tongue rubbed over hers, offering comfort and reassurance. ~ Jory Strong,
24:I'm offering a special prize for the first Buick on the moon. ~ George Carlin,
25:south of the Danube, by offering a spoonful of sherbet ~ Patrick Leigh Fermor,
26:I'm totally unworthy of this love which you are offering to me. ~ Iris Murdoch,
27:Families are also about offering endless possibilities for pain. ~ Pinki Virani,
28:Offering to help me implies I'm in distress. I'm not currently. ~ Myra McEntire,
29:Empathy is a hand thick with scars offering you a bandage. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
30:If offering a criticism, accompany it with one potential solution. ~ John Herrick,
31:I should have been sending up flares, instead I was offering smiles. ~ Lisa Unger,
32:I will always be here, in the offering and people I left behind. ~ Jennifer Niven,
33:I quite enjoy more teamwork and offering something up into the mix. ~ Ciaran Hinds,
34:Everything offered to others is really an offering to oneself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
35:I am mad the way young girls are mad,
with an offering, an offering. ~ Anne Sexton,
36:Meditation is offering your genuine presence to yourself in every moment. ~ Nhat Hanh,
37:Offering democracy to an Arab is like bringing a horse to a steakhouse. ~ Jeff Cooper,
38:Forgiveness is a tough thing. Both in the offering…and the accepting. ~ Charles Martin,
39:14 For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. ~ Anonymous,
40:Italy was offering her the most priceless of all possessions—her own soul. ~ E M Forster,
41:It's easy to maintain your integrity when no one is offering to buy it out. ~ Marc Maron,
42:This is how you start to get respect, by offering something that you have. ~ Mitch Albom,
43:Nothing says you care for me better than offering to torture my enemies. ~ Maria V Snyder,
44:Your best teacher is the person offering you your greatest challenge. ~ Cheryl Richardson,
45:If you've ever made change in the offering plate, you might be a redneck. ~ Jeff Foxworthy,
46:marriage meant offering daily salvation to a man standing on the gallows ~ Keigo Higashino,
47:The horizon leans forward, offering you space to place new steps of change. ~ Maya Angelou,
48:14For by one offering He has perfected forever those who are being dsanctified. ~ Anonymous,
49:Beware the stranger offering gifts, as true for man as it is for fish, ~ Richard Paul Evans,
50:It's wrong to criticize government without offering a possible alternative. ~ Jacque Fresco,
51:Meditation is offering your genuine presence to yourself in every moment. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
52:Monsieur Django, I presume?” Duke Ellington said, offering his hand. “Monsieur ~ Mitch Albom,
53:To remain free from thoughts is the best offering one can make to God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
54:When you make something you are always offering some choices and denying others. ~ Brian Eno,
55:If you keep offering to have sex with me, I'm going to think you like me. ~ Marshall Thornton,
56:It is not enough to criticize society without offering a workable alternative. ~ Jacque Fresco,
57:when i speak to you
i speak as though
i am offering a rose
in your hand. ~ Sanober Khan,
58:Will you be my slave?"
"No,"Praline said.
"But thank you for offering. ~ Marshall Thornton,
59:You know what really gives you satisfaction? Offering others what you have to give. ~ Mitch Albom,
60:It is in work done as an offering to the Divine that the consciousness develops best. ~ The Mother,
61:She leaned toward me, offering her neck, and I kissed her just behind her ear. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
62:The Lord hates that which is forced; which is paying a tax rather than an offering. ~ Thomas Watson,
63:By offering a reward, a principal signals to the agent that the task is undesirable. ~ Daniel H Pink,
64:Dear Lord, I am offering You the sacrifice of trust tonight. Give me Your peace, I pray. ~ Anonymous,
65:To remain free from thoughts is the best offering one can make to God.
   ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, [T5],
66:It’s like the devil offering up your deepest desire for the low, low price of your soul ~ Meghan March,
67:...you know I wanted a Madonna, not a whore - I made you sacred offering you my words... ~ John Geddes,
68:connections—offering, for instance, new ultra-fast delivery for sites willing to pay extra, ~ Anonymous,
69:indeed, the hour is coming when whoever kills you will think he is offering service to God. ~ Anonymous,
70:offering silent tribute to the unwillingness of any bureaucracy to go out of business. By ~ Scott Turow,
71:The muse, or the inspiration, does not just show up, it requires sweat as an offering. ~ James Altucher,
72:You should be careful offering a man like me whatever I want. I’m not afraid to take it. ~ Meghan March,
73:A fast is not necessarily something we offer God, but it assists us in offering ourselves ~ Jen Hatmaker,
74:How did Rue end up on that stage with nothing but the wind offering to take her place? ~ Suzanne Collins,
75:I hear the singing of the lives of women. They clear mystery, the offering, and pride. ~ Muriel Rukeyser,
76:It is very difficult to live among people you love and hold back from offering them advice. ~ Anne Tyler,
77:True worship has less to do with offering sacrifices than with being a sacrifice ourselves. ~ Mike Mason,
78:He remembered what the old man had said about offering something you didn’t even have yet. ~ Paulo Coelho,
79:you, Connie.” Mrs. Concord quickly poured coffee for the three of us, offering cream and sugar ~ J B Lynn,
80:He’s simply offering good companionship for the short time allotted to us on this earth. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
81:Oh well, darling, everyone dies, but what we are offering you is a chance to die with style! ~ Lola St Vil,
82:She thanked me for not trying to make what I did seem less by offering a lot of excuses. ~ Stephen Chbosky,
83:Think long and hard before offering your heart to someone who can only accept it part-time ~ Ellen Hopkins,
84:Yes, I do realize. Saint is offering me... the world. But a world without him is nothing now. ~ Katy Evans,
85:How exactly did Rue end up on stage with nothing but the wind offering to take her place? ~ Suzanne Collins,
86:I hear the singing of the lives of women. The clear mystery, the offering, and the pride. ~ Muriel Rukeyser,
87:Clocks indeed must have their sacrifice: what is death but an offering to time and eternity? ~ Truman Capote,
88:Corpses are incapable of offering informed consent, and are hence no better than vibrators. ~ Seanan McGuire,
89:Get naked with your truth, offering the world your greatest gift: your authentic self. ~ Gabrielle Bernstein,
90:True love is like the sun, shining with its own light, and offering that light to everyone. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
91:I’ll earn her friendship before offering her my life. It’s hers anyway. She just needs to take it. ~ J Daniels,
92:String and spit and wire and a voice on the radio offering a loom on which to spin his dreams. ~ Anthony Doerr,
93:that will we have been csanctified †through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. ~ Anonymous,
94:Forgiveness is the intentional act or process of pardoning or offering absolution unto another. ~ Asa Don Brown,
95:Some families are an odd melting pot of strangers with the occasional offering of obligation. ~ Donna Lynn Hope,
96:State Department official accused of offering 'quid pro quo' in [Hillary] Clinton email scandal. ~ Donald Trump,
97:The Victorians lost a few workers in everything they built, rather like a votive offering. ~ Christopher Fowler,
98:As God is propitiated by the blood of a hundred bulls, so also is he by the smallest offering of incense. ~ Ovid,
99:BBJ customers value long-range capability and cabin size, and this product offering enhances both. ~ Steven Hill,
100:Nothing is more fun than fucking and drinking, I don’t know what is your God offering in heaven. ~ M F Moonzajer,
101:though he offered himself once for all, yet that one offering thus becomes a continual offering. ~ Matthew Henry,
102:The wise call by the name 'self-surrender' the offering of oneself to God through devotion. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
103:Chicago is a sort of journalistic Yellowstone Park, offering haven to a last herd of fantastic bravos. ~ Ben Hecht,
104:Even a few moments of offering lovingkindness can reconnect you with the purity of your loving heart. ~ Tara Brach,
105:Just the other day in the Underground I enjoyed the pleasure of offering my seat to three ladies. ~ G K Chesterton,
106:The wise call by the name 'self-surrender' the offering of oneself to God through devotion. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
107:Donald Trump has spent his entire campaign offering a dog whistle to his most hateful supporters. ~ Hillary Clinton,
108:Will you stop meddling in my love life?” I growled.
“I'm not meddling. I'm offering commentary. ~ Ilona Andrews,
109:You can't simultaneously control people, while offering them guaranteed freedom as their birthright. ~ Laurel Dewey,
110:Giving men marriage tips is a little like offering Vikings a free booklet titled How Not to Pillage. ~ Robert Wright,
111:In giving customers free use of the credit card, it’s as if the stores are offering free puppies. ~ George A Akerlof,
112:offering a vision for how great a customer’s life could be if they engage your products or services. ~ Donald Miller,
113:Every moment is a moment of grace, every hour an offering; not to share them would mean to betray them. ~ Elie Wiesel,
114:I will sacrifice a freewill offering to you; I will praise your name, O Lord, for it is good. (Ps. 54:6) ~ Beth Moore,
115:Look what the cat drug in.”
“If I were you, I wouldn’t mention pussy, unless you’re offering some. ~ Jennifer Foor,
116:Offering thanks in the midst of tragedy is an American tradition, . even during a bloody Civil War. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
117:setting the frame, telling the story, revealing the intrigue, offering the prize, nailing the hookpoint, ~ Oren Klaff,
118:Art only survives by striking a chord in someone’s heart and offering solace and reassurance. ~ Hannah Mary Rothschild,
119:A simple offering from a willing heart is capable of restoring hope. Be still; listen; administer mercy. ~ Renee Swope,
120:It takes a certain kind of man willing to work long, grueling hours in a career offering few rewards. ~ Jon Michaelsen,
121:I want you now so awfully, No longer jealous-green, I bring myself as offering Up to the guillotine. ~ Osip Mandelstam,
122:She hadn’t meant to get trapped in a conversation. That was the trouble with offering help to old people. ~ Libba Bray,
123:He honestly expected her to believe that she could make a bad offering and her ancestors wouldn't mind. ~ Helen Oyeyemi,
124:It's probably more fulfilling for me to be offering what I offer than it is for the people who receive it. ~ Wayne Dyer,
125:Offer a vibration that matches your desire rather than offering a vibration that keeps matching what-is. ~ Esther Hicks,
126:Favour fresh, real food. You can be assured that you are offering your body anti-inflammatory nutrician. ~ Deepak Chopra,
127:I’m on break. Would you like to give me a blow job?” “Oh, um, well, thank you for offering. But, no. ~ Marshall Thornton,
128:Just the other day in the Underground I enjoyed the pleasure of offering my seat to three ladies. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
129:Theology sits rouged at the window and courts philosophy's favor, offering to sell her charms to it. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
130:Theology sits rouged at the window and courts philosophy's favor, offering to sell her charms to it. ~ S ren Kierkegaard,
131:Work means offering a valuable product or service – and that work has to inspire people to pay you for it. ~ Paul Jarvis,
132:He took his own saber by the blade and handed it to Alek, pommel first, as if offering it to a victor. ~ Scott Westerfeld,
133:The plant kingdom covers the entire earth, offering our senses great pleasure and the delights of summer. ~ Carl Linnaeus,
134:I don’t burn, but if you’re offering to rub your hands all over my body, I sure as hell wouldn’t stop you. ~ Ashlan Thomas,
135:I’m Dexter O’Neil, Mrs. Brannick,” Dex said, offering his hand to shake. “And I’m hoping you’ll adopt me. ~ Rachel Hawkins,
136:No coffee can be good in the mouth that does not first send a sweet offering of odor to the nostrils. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
137:I hear there are now Knightsbridge clinics offering semicolonic irrigation – but for many it may be too late. ~ Lynne Truss,
138:It isn't money itself that causes the trouble, but the use of money as votive offering and pagan ornament. ~ Lewis H Lapham,
139:My life’s complicated, Kale.”
“And I’m offering you a night away from it. Don’t you at least deserve that? ~ A L Jackson,
140:Offering Dragons quarter is no good, they regrow all their parts and come on again. They have to be killed. ~ John Berryman,
141:and the camp swarmed with well-provisioned sutlers and Austrian Jews offering all sorts of tempting wares. The ~ Leo Tolstoy,
142:Part of the skill of saying no is to shut up afterward and not babble on, offering material for an argument. ~ Judith Martin,
143:She would give him everything. She would do anything to take away his pain, including offering up herself. ~ Sylvain Reynard,
144:There are scores of books offering 'solutions' to sprawl. Their authors would do well to read this book. ~ Witold Rybczynski,
145:and the moon rises to take its place in the sky, offering light and guidance to those searching for their way. ~ Sejal Badani,
146:I seek only friends who bleed and sweat and laugh and cry. Don’t fear your humanity; it is your best offering. ~ Jen Hatmaker,
147:Prepare thy soul calmly to obey; such offering will be more acceptable to God than every other sacrifice. ~ Pietro Metastasio,
148:I brought my face up and put my head back, baring my neck to the wind like a lover, to the rain like an offering. ~ Iain Banks,
149:that grace was offering someone the opposite of what they deserve. Life’s just full of opportunities for that. ~ Rachel Hollis,
150:{The cleansing of spiritual contamination} is accomplished by offering one's talent, resources, and life to the world. ~ Laozi,
151:There's a difference between charity and love," I said. "What we're offering is love. Love lasts forever. ~ Susan Beth Pfeffer,
152:The essence of leadership is not giving things or even providing visions. It is offering oneself and one's spirit. ~ Lee Bolman,
153:- he took her in his arms and cradled her; offering her not God's comfort but his own, merely human, consolation. ~ Alan Brennert,
154:Loving kindness is the practice of offering to oneself and others wishes to be happy, peaceful, healthy, strong ~ Sharon Salzberg,
155:Offerings?” Piper guessed. “Yes,” Nico said. “If you wanted your ancestors to appear, you had to make an offering. ~ Rick Riordan,
156:Well, once I did 'Grease,' everyone was offering me studio pictures in a similar vein - you know, popcorn movie. ~ Randal Kleiser,
157:when you love someone, you find out what they need, and you take pleasure in offering it to them the best you can… ~ Katy Regnery,
158:Giving a witch your body fluids is akin to slicing off a choice cut of your buttocks and offering it to a werewolf. ~ Kevin Hearne,
159:We know that every moment is a moment of grace, every hour an offering; not to share them would mean to betray them. ~ Elie Wiesel,
160:When it comes to misfortune, we are all selfish at heart, offering up the same prayers: not me, not mine. Not yet. ~ Simon Beckett,
161:Why run around offering water?
There's a sea in every house.
If anyone is thirsty,
by hook or crook, he'll drink. ~ Kabir,
162:If something’s worth doing, then it’s worth doing properly, even if it is only offering a biscuit with a cup of tea. ~ Hazel Gaynor,
163:Oh, Liana,” he said gravel-deep, shaking his head. “You have no idea what you’re offering. What you’re asking for. ~ Juliette Cross,
164:Punching goblins, replied Sprockett soothingly, while offering short-term relief, has no long-term beneficial value ~ Jasper Fforde,
165:Setting the frame Telling the story Revealing the intrigue Offering the prize Nailing the hookpoint Getting a decision ~ Oren Klaff,
166:I know now it doesn't matter how well I say grace
if I am sitting at a table where I am offering no bread to eat ~ Andrea Gibson,
167:Most Muslims don't want to live in some Taliban-style utopia, which is what bin Laden and allied groups are offering. ~ Peter Bergen,
168:The reading of literature opens our eyes, offering us new perspectives on things that we can evaluate and adopt. ~ Alister E McGrath,
169:When we share Christ, the Truth behind our transformation, we are offering people an opportunity to be transformed. ~ David Jeremiah,
170:And when you love someone, you find out what they need, and you take pleasure in offering it to them the best you can… ~ Katy Regnery,
171:Her voice was an offering from God and a temptation from hell, a tone so potent it could corrupt a man, or save him. ~ Pepper Winters,
172:Stopping the endless pursuit of getting somewhere else is the perhaps most beautiful offering we can make to our spirit. ~ Tara Brach,
173:To be fully seen by somebody, then, and be loved anyhow - this is a human offering that can border on miraculous. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
174:We don't compete in the world by offering tax advantages to a few that we don't give to all our citizens and businesses ~ Ed Miliband,
175:It doesn't matter what product or service you're offering; there is unlimited ability to improve the quality of anything. ~ Tom Peters,
176:Most of the sacrifices involved tearing out the heart, offering it to the sun and, with some blood, also to the idols ~ Michael Harner,
177:You poke at evil with a stick," Valerie had said, offering chilling advice they'd never forget. "Never use your fingers. ~ Gregg Olsen,
178:I've always wanted my offering to have broad appeal and work for a diverse range of women with different lifestyles. ~ Roksanda Ilincic,
179:One can give not only one’s soul, but all one’s powers to the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Consecration and Offering,
180:The way you kiss, the way you sing. The way you tell me everything. Will you take my heart? i´m offering it to you... ~ Angela Morrison,
181:To give to the Divine what one has in excess is not an offering. One should give at least something out of what one needs. ~ The Mother,
182:Venn was like a devilish older sibling, offering that brotherly combination of wholly unreliable and utterly trustworthy. ~ Tom Rachman,
183:...all this time I've been worshiping you - when other men wanted to kiss you, I've been offering the praise of my lips... ~ John Geddes,
184:Hookers in Times Square, God bless 'em, are offering a Mitt Romney Special. For an extra $20 they'll change positions. ~ David Letterman,
185:Satan was offering them freedom without responsibility, freedom without consequences, and there can be no such thing. ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
186:If people read 'Tomorrow' and feel that it is offering them some view of my own household, they would be very, very wrong. ~ Graham Swift,
187:Life isn't about trying to be an expert in everything. It's about being an expert in one thing and offering it to the world. ~ Bo S nchez,
188:Men in your position have women offering themselves in the hopes that they will get somewhere professionally, or socially. ~ James Franco,
189:The time may come when not offering this substantially more effective nutritional approach will be considered malpractice. ~ Joel Fuhrman,
190:Through the Offering you are allowing others to love you. And you are teaching others to love through what you offer them. ~ Paulo Coelho,
191:All you have to do is ask for it.” It’s like the devil offering up your deepest desire for the low, low price of your soul. ~ Meghan March,
192:He's a leader and is offering lessons in beautiful football. He has something different to any other player in the world. ~ Diego Maradona,
193:Imagination is a gift waiting to be opened. A writer must peel back the wrapping and share that offering with the world. ~ Mark Rubinstein,
194:Real magic can never be made by offering someone else's liver. You must tear out your own, and not expect to get it back. ~ Peter S Beagle,
195:Screw you," I told him in a low voice. "Are you offering?” "From what I've heard, there isn't much to screw," I shot back. ~ Richelle Mead,
196:The only way to live free, the only way to live your life as an offering of love, is to feel everything fully and live open. ~ David Deida,
197:The Spirit is speaking strongly to me for you to place a $50 offering on the altar, when you do, God will do a now miracle. ~ Steve Munsey,
198:the strategic price you set for your offering must not only attract buyers in large numbers but also help you to retain them. ~ W Chan Kim,
199:Your enthusiasm becomes their enthusiasm; your lukewarm presentation becomes their lukewarm interest in what you're offering. ~ Bill Walsh,
200:And Ellie, if Fin is offering his heart to you, it’s just a formality because believe me when I say you already have it. ~ Rachel Higginson,
201:Crackers!” said Dumbledore enthusiastically, offering the end of a large silver noisemaker to Snape, who took it reluctantly. ~ J K Rowling,
202:Sears is offering free $10 gift cards to the first few hundred shoppers. So that may have something to do with the early crowd. ~ Dan Jones,
203:The narrator welcomes new students to his school by offering to tell them who the easy teachers are, or who the good ones are. ~ Pat Conroy,
204:There's a McDonalds in Hong Kong & they're offering couples the opportunity to get married. You can have a McWedding. ~ Chelsea Handler,
205:...instead of offering me a Garibaldi biscuit, she asked me with that faint lisp of hers, to 'have some squashed flies, George'. ~ H G Wells,
206:It's hard to look at [Donald] Trump as a hopeful sign because, in his own way, he is offering false solutions to many problems. ~ Jane Mayer,
207:Should I try meditation?

   It is not necessary if your work is a constant offering to the Divine.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I,
208:Still, Luce held firm to the belief that quiet and solitude were good for you, offering peace, or at least hope for peace. ~ Charles Frazier,
209:There has been enough blood in the Balkans. Serbia is offering its hand. Let us turn to the future and not deal with the past. ~ Ivica Dacic,
210:You could approach someone worlds apart from you by offering them, like a handshake, a simple truth from their own lives. ~ Danielle Bennett,
211:An enormous amount of direct advertising from pharmaceutical companies are offering a kind of instantaneous solution to problems. ~ Leon Kass,
212:Life is offering you infinite paths! To get stuck in one path is nothing but shallowness! Go deep, discover other lanes! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
213:Ring the bells that still can ring, Forget your perfect offering, There’s a crack in everything, That’s how the light gets in. ~ Louise Penny,
214:She should submit to him in love and without fear, giving her body to him like a holy offering and making their bed an altar. ~ Tiffany Reisz,
215:writing is a gift. Offering someone the chance to read your writing is akin to giving a bit of your soul to someone else. ~ Mary Alice Monroe,
216:Human approval is one of our most treasured idols, and the offering we must lay at its hungry feet is keeping others comfortable. ~ Bren Brown,
217:I go to the movies a lot, and I regret when I see some actor that I used to like, to find them offering no more surprises. ~ Catherine Deneuve,
218:I hear Jesus telling us to stop negotiating with Him, to stop offering something we think we have in exchange for His blessings. ~ Larry Crabb,
219:Other people showed love by offering compliments; Abby offered pity. It was not an attractive quality, in her children’s opinion. ~ Anne Tyler,
220:Ring the bells that still can ring; forget your perfect offering. There is a crack in everything; that’s how the light gets in. ~ Arielle Ford,
221:scholar and alchemist named Johann Georg Faustus travels the country offering to conjure up demons, if not Lucifer himself.” I ~ Nancy Bilyeau,
222:Trust completely in God, and when He brings you to a new opportunity of adventure, offering it to you, see that you take it. ~ Oswald Chambers,
223:When you come to another with love in your heart, asking nothing, only offering that love, you create miraculous relationships. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
224:I think of the Dalai Lama as a doctor of the mind offering medicine and specific counsel and cures in the way a great doctor would. ~ Pico Iyer,
225:Ladies, your self-worth is like your price tag. If he's not offering what your worth, he can't have you. No bargains, no sales. ~ Keshia Chante,
226:our lives have a way of eddying back on themselves, offering us the same view over and over, daring us to get it right just once. ~ Jess Walter,
227:She only wants my happiness,” Jessica murmured, offering him a reassuring smile from beneath the brim of her straw bonnet. “It may ~ Sylvia Day,
228:The best thing that you can do to this world is to be joyous. Being joyful, is the greatest offering you can make to the world. ~ Jaggi Vasudev,
229:If God is jealous herein, we should be so, afraid of offering any worship to God otherwise than as he has appointed in his word. ~ Matthew Henry,
230:Screw you," I told him in a low voice.
"Are you offering?”
"From what I've heard, there isn't much to screw," I shot back. ~ Richelle Mead,
231:The enormity of what she’s doing, of what she’s offering to do, hits me and I feel myself starting to shake. ‘Thank you,’ I whisper. ~ B A Paris,
232:Educating our children is an offering of love we make to the God who was so gracious to bestow them upon us in the first place. ~ Sarah Mackenzie,
233:I have come with one medicinal herb that I am offering as a remedy to India's problems. And that medicinal herb is 'development'. ~ Narendra Modi,
234:Partnership is giving, taking, learning, teaching, offering the greatest possible benefit while doing the least possible harm. ~ Octavia E Butler,
235:There is a difference between offering a service and being willing to serve. They may both include giving but only one is generous. ~ Simon Sinek,
236:almanacs, or what was left of them when those pages making incorrect predictions and offering unhelpful advice had been torn out. ~ China Mi ville,
237:The best colleges admit only successful students, offering no evidence the college itself forged the students' late success. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
238:We have heeded no wisdom offering guidance. Only by learning to love one another can our world be saved. Only love can conquer all. ~ Dora Russell,
239:A deeper intimacy with God sharpens our awareness of sin, which causes a stronger need for grace and a freer offering of mercy. ~ Alisa Hope Wagner,
240:I am not trying to change the world. I am just offering my gift that God gave me, and if somebody is moved by it, that's beautiful. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
241:In his self-offering on the Cross, Jesus, as it were, brings all the sin of the world deep within the love of God and wipes it away. ~ Benedict XVI,
242:It is only work that is done as freewill offering to humanity and to nature that does not bring with it any binding attachment. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
243:Many crores of rupees are squandered in this country by way offering gratitude to God and bribing Him to gain greater and greater wealth. ~ Periyar,
244:Systems that adapt themselves to your individuality without offering you genuine choice are systems with unlimited power to control you. ~ Todd Rose,
245:I have made to God the offering you made to me of your heart and have asked him to unite mine with yours in that of Our Lord. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
246:Instead of drifting away from God, you'll be firmly anchored, able to swim against the tide, offering living water to all you meet. ~ Craig Groeschel,
247:Parents are temporary custodians, keeping watch and offering love and trying to leave the child better than they found him. ~ Cynthia D Aprix Sweeney,
248:There is only one winning strategy. It is to carefully define the target market and direct a superior offering to that target market. ~ Philip Kotler,
249:she’s offering me more cryptic phrases with a depth to them that even the top-ranked philosophers would have a difficult time decoding. ~ Kayla Krantz,
250:the idea to other handset manufacturers. Even though he was offering something for free, it was a tough sell. The mobile phone world had ~ Steven Levy,
251:To critique sexist images without offering alternatives is an incomplete intervention. Critique in and of itself does not lead to change. ~ bell hooks,
252:When we go... to bear witness to life on the streets, we're offering ourselves. Not blankets, not food, not clothes, just ourselves. ~ Bernie Glassman,
253:I'd rather enjoy the money, and then be buried, offering my body back to the flora and fauna of which I have dined my whole life. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
254:In offering one’s opinion, one must first ascertain whether or not the recipient is in the right frame of mind to receive counsel. ~ Yamamoto Tsunetomo,
255:Poor Pudge. Oh, poor poor Pudge. Do you want me to climb into bed with you and cuddle?"
"Well since you're offering--"
"NO! UP! NOW! ~ John Green,
256:Radio affects most intimately, person-to-person, offering a world of unspoken communication between writer-speaker and the listener. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
257:These services seem, at first, to be offering nice-to-have vitamins, but once the habit is established, they provide an ongoing pain remedy. ~ Nir Eyal,
258:The Universe does not know if the vibration you are offering is because of what you are imagining, or because of what you are observing. ~ Esther Hicks,
259:I love reading scripts and offering notes and opinions. I'd like to be an advocate for the emerging filmmakers whom I'm working with. ~ Barbara Crampton,
260:In her experience it was very difficult to offer a man affection and kindness without giving him the impression you were also offering a lay. ~ Joe Hill,
261:Netflix changed the economics of offering niches and, in doing so, reshaped our understanding about what people actually want to watch. ~ Chris Anderson,
262:Obedience to a confessor is the most acceptable offering which we can make to God, and the most secure way of doing the divine will. ~ Alphonsus Liguori,
263:Offering sex for money is not a profession that glorifies women; it is a profession born of desperation, poverty, alienation, and loneliness. ~ Ann Rule,
264:Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in. ~ Leonard Cohen,
265:Ring the bells that still can ring. Forget your perfect offering. There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in. Philip ~ Brennan Manning,
266:The power of the new mass media made Grant’s illness a national spectacle, with his doctors offering twice-daily updates on his condition. ~ Ron Chernow,
267:There were things I wished I'd said
And done
But it is too late now
So I go
Heavy with my offering
This book, this book ~ Dorothea Lasky,
268:A book being read is a transaction between author & reader, a sharing, giving, taking & a reimagining of the author's offering. ~ Mark Rubinstein,
269:A mathematician starts with a problem and creates a solution; a consultant starts by offering a “solution” and creates a problem. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
270:Art consists in making others feel what we feel, in freeing them from themselves, by offering them our own personality as a liberation. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
271:Many of his coworkers on Luna had made lucrative side businesses offering plastic surgery, melatonin adjustments, and body reconstruction ~ Marissa Meyer,
272:No place is perfect, but I admire Oahu for its offering of the tropical and the urban, and then its Asian-inflected culture and cuisines. ~ Chang Rae Lee,
273:offering her—and her body—everything she needs. Inappropriate behavior in barns, change rooms, and oh-my-gawd phone sex with a cowboy. Six ~ Vivian Arend,
274:God's mapmakers give no thought to their own desires or security. Instead, they eagerly spill themselves out as a fragrant offering to heaven. ~ Eric Ludy,
275:I hadn't been in Vegas 20 minutes when I got word that the bookmakers were offering three to one that Frank wouldn't show for my wedding. ~ Sammy Davis Jr,
276:Life's lessons aren't always new. Often they're the same old worn-out truths offering us greater depths of wisdom and understanding. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
277:Often, instead of offering empathy, we have a strong urge to give advice or reassurance and to explain our own position or feeling. ~ Marshall B Rosenberg,
278:Sometimes offering support and making yourself available when the child or adolescent is ready to talk can be the most helpful you can be. ~ Timothy Carey,
279:02 And walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savour. ~ Anonymous,
280:Prayer is not a way of making use of God; prayer is a way of offering ourselves to God in order that He should be able to make use of us. ~ William Barclay,
281:Books can be mirrors, too, offering a reflection of our worst selves for appraisal; lessons tucked between pages, just waiting to be learned. ~ Alice Feeney,
282:Do not miss the opportunity of offering even a single drop into the ocean of merit or a grain atop the mountain of the roots of beneficial activity. ~ Dogen,
283:I am unbalanced — but I am not mad with snow. I am mad the way young girls are mad, with an offering, an offering… I burn the way money burns. ~ Anne Sexton,
284:I'm delighted to be coming back to Formula 1 after a two-year break, and I'm grateful to Lotus Renault GP for offering me this opportunity. ~ Kimi Raikkonen,
285:In typically generous fashion, Crick was offering Nirenberg the opportunity to step into history as the man who had cracked the genetic code. ~ Matthew Cobb,
286:None of the teams that actually probably were offering me a job from the getgo, actually in spring training, are in the playoffs right now. ~ Pedro Martinez,
287:We always enter markets where the leaders are not doing a great job, so we can go in and disrupt them by offering better quality services. ~ Richard Branson,
288:You're going to take on this responsibility. And the way I see it, taking on the responsibility for something means offering it salvation. ~ Haruki Murakami,
289:Be more humble than a blade of grass, more tolerant than a tree, always offering respect onto others and never expecting any in return ~ Chaitanya Mahaprabhu,
290:Some yogīs perfectly worship the demigods by offering different sacrifices to them, and some offer sacrifices in the fire of the Supreme Brahman. ~ Anonymous,
291:They're always going, don't deal with terrorists. Let's deal with them. What's Allah offering you boys, 100 virgins? We'll give you 50 slags. ~ Frankie Boyle,
292:Always beware of people offering you one-time money. That only works in an election year. How are you going to permanently pay for education? ~ Kinky Friedman,
293:And offering higher wages just means you get more applicants, not that you get better applicants or can better sift the great from the mediocre. ~ Laszlo Bock,
294:He, who had once been the declared optimist, had not once expressed hope. Now it was she who was offering it to him. And it might be false hope ~ Eudora Welty,
295:I taste the idea of grocery shopping without strangers taking food they disapprove of out of my cart or offering me unsolicited nutrition advice. ~ Roxane Gay,
296:My friends tell me that I have a tendency to point out problems without offering solutions, but they never tell me what I should do about it. ~ Daniel Gilbert,
297:Obedience to a confessor is the most acceptable offering which we can make to God, and the most secure way of doing the divine will. ~ Saint Alphonsus Liguori,
298:Be aware of me always, adore me, make every act an offering to me, and you shall come to me; this I promise; for you are dear to me. ~ Krishna Dwaipayana Vyasa,
299:For the Divine to function through you, it is important to make every breath, every pulsation in the body, and your very existence an offering. ~ Jaggi Vasudev,
300:It’s like a fidget spinner.” Then the offering dropped to the ground, tossed aside. The wind had moved on. “Those get boring fast,” said Darnell. ~ John August,
301:Books can be mirrors, too, offering a reflection of our worst selves for appraisal; lessons tucked between the pages, just waiting to be learned. ~ Alice Feeney,
302:her outstretched hand jutting into the engine room, offering the life-sized figure of Nike that stood in her palm, like, Here, have some Victory! ~ Rick Riordan,
303:I love stirring the pot. I love giving big companies a run for their money - especially if they're offering expensive, poor-quality products. ~ Richard Branson,
304:I’m quite certain offering to carry out a contract killing violates at least two of Emily Post’s etiquette rules.”--Sloane Barrett, Killer Curves ~ Naima Simone,
305:The natural man cannot but resist the Lord's offering to help him; yet that resistance is infallibly overcome in the elect, by converting grace. ~ Thomas Boston,
306:The truth is, you don't get satisfaction from those things. You know what really gives you satisfaction? ...Offering others what you have to give. ~ Mitch Albom,
307:Useful things are important. People don’t just value practical information, they share it. Offering practical value helps make things contagious. ~ Jonah Berger,
308:God wants us to receive everything that life was meant to teach. Then we take what we’ve learned, and it becomes our offering to God and to mankind. ~ Amy Harmon,
309:Philosophers, as things now stand, are all too fond of offering criticism from on high instead of studying and understanding things from within. ~ Edmund Husserl,
310:This woman had undone me. Unchinked all the armor I hadn’t even realized had been there until it toppled to the ground.
An offering at her feet. ~ A L Jackson,
311:Would you like to hear it?" she asked, and I nodded, unsure what she was offering me, but certain that I needed anything she was willing to give me. ~ Neil Gaiman,
312:I’m not trying to win her hand. I’m offering her mine, and everything that comes with it, hoping she’ll take it and decide she wants to keep it. ~ Stephanie Garber,
313:My friends tell me that I have a tendency to point out problems without offering solutions, but they never tell me what I should do about it. ~ Daniel Todd Gilbert,
314:Of offering more than what I can deliver, I have a bad habit, it is true. But I have to offer more than I can deliver, To be able to deliver what I do. ~ Ken Kesey,
315:Since all wealth ultimately comes from God, His people ought to acknowledge His primacy by offering Him the best of their wealth, time, and abilities. ~ Max Anders,
316:How precious a book is in light of the offering, in the light of the one who has the privilege of this offering. The library tells you of this offering ~ Louis Kahn,
317:Stepping out of the busyness, stopping our endless pursuit of getting somewhere else, is perhaps the most beautiful offering we can make to our spirit. ~ Tara Brach,
318:As long as they keep offering me some good parts and so forth - there are some parts out there that fit me pretty well - I'll keep going for a while. ~ Robert Duvall,
319:If women are often frustrated because men do not respond to their troubles by offering matching troubles, men are often frustrated because women do. ~ Deborah Tannen,
320:Need some help?” Mike raised an eyebrow. “Are you offering?” “Nah. I just like to ask people if they need help and then watch their hopes get crushed. ~ Peter Clines,
321:Our peaceful hearts change the situation, disrupting the story in which hate comes naturally and offering an experience that suggests a new one. ~ Charles Eisenstein,
322:What offering should be made that we may attain to the Eternal? To find the Eternal thou must offer him thy body, thy mind and all thy possessions. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
323:But I'm going to be a real good boy and take it day by day and try to concentrate on what's most important to me, and that's offering women a service. ~ John Galliano,
324:I realized that people don't quite understand what I do when I was the new kid on the block and a lot of Hollywood was offering me fairly cheesy projects. ~ DJ Shadow,
325:I've had to come to grips with a God that fits my own experience, which is, my God could not be offering protection and not have protected my boy. ~ Elizabeth Edwards,
326:Remember, there’s always someone out there willing to sell eyeballs to advertisers by offering a guaranteed audience of people looking for validation. ~ David McRaney,
327:The picture is like a prayer, an offering, and hopefully an opening through which to seek what we don't know, or already know and should take seriously. ~ Emmet Gowin,
328:What offering should be made that we may attain to the Eternal? To find the Eternal thou must offer him thy body, thy mind and all thy possessions. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
329:By offering individuals ownership and control of their health care coverage, we return control to the patients; and that is exactly where it should be. ~ Chris Chocola,
330:Generosity is an activity that loosens us up. By offering whatever we can - a dollar, a flower, a word of encouragement - we are training in letting go. ~ Pema Chodron,
331:I'd blow someone for a valium," I said in Jacob's ear.
"Maybe he's got one... but try offering a hand-job first so you retain some leverage. ~ Jordan Castillo Price,
332:That which leads us to the performance of duty by offering pleasure as its reward, is not virtue, but a deceptive copy and imitation of virtue. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
333:The development of capacities is not only permissible but right, when it can be made part of the Yoga ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Consecration and Offering,
334:The urge to fall to the ground, rip my heart out of my chest and hold it out like a sacred offering was overwhelming. /Take it! Take it all!/ I’d cry. ~ Mariana Zapata,
335:I could feel the day offering itself to me, and I wanted nothing more than to be in the moment-but which moment? Not that one, or that one, or that one. ~ Billy Collins,
336:I'm an amateur at music and an amateur at most things. I like the idea of offering some music and some records and a website to people who feel perplexed. ~ Ezra Furman,
337:It makes me feel both strong and weak at the same time, like I could lean too much on him, on the support he’s offering, and lose myself behind him. After ~ Sara Raasch,
338:Truth was, he was scared – it would be stupid not to be. But he was more scared of what it would mean if he sought the safety that Dom was offering. He ~ Sloane Kennedy,
339:A man who opens a door for a woman or gives up his seat for her-even offering to carry something! Those are country manners that never go out of style. ~ Andie MacDowell,
340:As a Christian I take it for granted that human history will some day end; and I am offering Omniscience no advice as to the best date for that consummation. ~ C S Lewis,
341:Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time. ~ Albert Camus,
342:Gabriel actually laughed. "Luckily for Philippa, she's beautiful enought that another man will come along who has the balls to accept what she's offering. ~ Eloisa James,
343:My life was a disaster, but there were still books. Lots and lots of books. A refuge. A solace. Each one offering the possibility of a new beginning. Had ~ Beth Pattillo,
344:There are all sorts of books offering advice on how to deal with life-threatening situations, but where's the advice on dealing with embarrassing ones? ~ Ellen DeGeneres,
345:Next day Hitler again made a “fabulous speech” to the Reichstag, this time formally offering peace to Britain and France (now that Poland no longer existed ~ David Irving,
346:Someone can have the best intentions,' Markov said, 'but offering the wrong advice, the wrong help at the wrong time, can be worse than not helping at all. ~ Tonya Hurley,
347:Whenever you see some business person quoted complaining about how he or she can't find workers with the necessary skills, ask what wage they're offering. ~ Paul Krugman,
348:You do not delight in burnt offering.   17 The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit,    A broken and a contrite heart—    These, O God, You will not despise. ~ Anonymous,
349:Don’t shut it off,” he said, his heart getting hotter than he could stand. “Your righteous tears are collected by angels and given to God as a gift offering. ~ Lucian Bane,
350:For a man who finds life tolerable only by staying on the surface of himself, it is natural to be satisfied with offering no more than his surface to others. ~ Paul Auster,
351:He didn't intend to pay for anything. He just had to remember not to offer. Not offering to pay for things made it easier to not actually pay for them. ~ Marshall Thornton,
352:I don't think I am scared of intimacy, but I am frightened of making a mistake. offering more than I have, or expecting more than you can give. - Matt Sedon ~ Nick Bantock,
353:Nurturing is not complex. It's simply being tuned in to the thing or person before you and offering small gestures toward what it needs at that time. ~ Mary Anne Radmacher,
354:There was a time when I used to walk into the room and own it, or at least believe in what I was offering, but I hadn’t felt that confidence in a long time. ~ Karina Halle,
355:For a man who finds life tolerable only by staying on the surface of himself, it is natural to be satisfied with offering no more than this surface to others. ~ Paul Auster,
356:If you don't leave your past in the past, it'll destroy your future. You've got to live for what today's offering, not for what yesterday took away from you. ~ Jill Shalvis,
357:I would think that counted as offering resistance," Will said. "Eating one's son-in-law, that is. Though I suppose everyone has their family altercations. ~ Cassandra Clare,
358:Real magic can never be made by offering up someone else’s liver. You must tear out your own, and not expect to get it back. The true witches know that.” A ~ Peter S Beagle,
359:Believe to the end, even if all men went astray and you were left the only one faithful; bring your offering even then and praise God in your loneliness. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
360:By Such And Such An Offering
38
By such and such an offering
To Mr. So and So,
The web of live woven—
So martyrs albums show!
~ Emily Dickinson,
361:If life is not a celebration, why remember it ? If life --- mine or that of my fellow man --- is not an offering to the other, what are we doing on this earth? ~ Elie Wiesel,
362:I've seen the player who will inherit my place in Argentinian football and his name is Messi... He's a leader and is offering classes in beautiful football. ~ Diego Maradona,
363:Lia whispered, "I don't snore."
And the thief angled his gaze warm to hers, offering his lazy smile. "Aye, love, but if you did, I'd still treasure every one. ~ Shana Abe,
364:Nugget?" said Micah, offering a lump to Toby.
"Thanks," said Toby. He took a bite and chewed thoughtfully.
"I think maybe it is a squirrel." He said. ~ Ridley Pearson,
365:Believe to the end, even if all men went astray and you were left the only one faithful; bring your offering even then and praise God in your loneliness. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
366:But for all its benefits in offering moral guidance and meaning in life, in today’s secular world religion alone is no longer adequate as a basis for ethics. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
367:Maybe Burke was offering tactical advice. Do this, then do that. But Reacher couldn’t understand the semaphore. And he felt it would likely be superfluous anyway. ~ Lee Child,
368:Of offering more than what I can deliver,
I have a bad habit, it is true.
But I have to offer more than I can deliver,
To be able to deliver what I do. ~ Ken Kesey,
369:the hour is coming when whoever kills you will think he is offering service to God. 3And they will do these things because they have not known the Father, nor me. ~ Anonymous,
370:The thing is, dressing up, going to church, dropping a twenty in the offering plate, those things are all well and good, but that doesn't make you a Christian. ~ Matthew West,
371:I know there isn’t anything I can say right now to make it better, so I just hold her, offering her the one thing I wish she would take and never let go of. Me. ~ Harper Sloan,
372:The (stock) market is there only as a reference point to see if anybody is offering to do anything foolish. When we invest in stocks, we invest in businesses. ~ Warren Buffett,
373:Guide my feet on my path, as I honor the old wisdom
Guide my hands in offering, as I honor the old Gods Guide my heart in strength, as I honor the old ways. ~ Morgan Daimler,
374:I could feel the day offering itself to me,
and I wanted nothing more
than to be in the moment-but which moment?
Not that one, or that one, or that one, ~ Billy Collins,
375:on vacation. Leave a message. “Still here. No movement inside, far as I can tell. View’s partially blocked by a large window sign. Bank’s offering free checking, ~ Alan Jacobson,
376:Their female family members weren’t offering sex for money, and they had no tattoos or drug habits, so they could conclude that a roving killer was no danger to them. ~ Ann Rule,
377:First, I learned how to make tea," he said finally, speaking more to himself than to her. "When humans wish to help, they are forever offering each other tea. ~ Margaret Rogerson,
378:Morphine is like a religious zealot on a mission; it searches for body parts to convert, offering milk-and-honeyed dreams to flow sluggishly through your veins. ~ Andrew Davidson,
379:Puja (worship) is offering to God, prathana (prayer) is demanding from God. When we pray by offering all our karma and even ourselves to God, the prayer fruitifies. ~ Mahesh Babu,
380:This is why you must love life: one day you're offering up your social security number to the Russian Mafia; two weeks later you're using the word calve as a verb. ~ Maria Semple,
381:But while her world was soft and comfortable, offering everything I could ever want, it all came too easy. There was something to be said for patience and hard work. ~ Alyson Noel,
382:Influencing others is not a matter of outsmarting them. It is a matter of discerning what they truly want and offering it to them in a mutually beneficial package. ~ Dale Carnegie,
383:I still look to music to heal and bind; I still think the musician can be a trusted object offering his fellow-man solace but also a reminder of human excellence. ~ Yehudi Menuhin,
384:There are people who are younger than I who are more uptight than I am. It's not necessarily an age thing. I mean nobody is offering me 20-year old leads any more. ~ Ewan McGregor,
385:True generosity is an offering; given freely and out of pure love. No strings attached. No expectations. Time and love are the most valuable possession you can share. ~ Suze Orman,
386:An elementary requirement for the intelligent investor is an ability to resist the blandishments of salesmen offering new common-stock issues during bull markets. ~ Benjamin Graham,
387:He pressed it. “Doesn't your father’s theory of war include winning over the other side by offering sweets? No? An oversight, I think. I wonder… might I bribe you? ~ Marie Rutkoski,
388:A library takes the gift of reading one step further by offering personalized learning opportunities second to none, a powerful antidote to the isolation of the Web. ~ Julie Andrews,
389:But if everyone was made to look perfect, then no one would be special because being special meant being different, by offering something that wasn't on offer elsewhere. ~ Matt Haig,
390:My solitude doesn’t depend on the presence or absence of people; on the contrary, I hate who steals my solitude without, in exchange, offering me true company. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
391:The holy book he’d spent so much of his life preaching from had one cruel flaw: it was not very good at offering encouragement or hope to those who weren’t religious. ~ Michel Faber,
392:To show great love for God and our neighbor we need not do great things. It is how much love we put in the doing that makes our offering something beautiful for God. ~ Mother Teresa,
393:At the sight of a Sanza brother offering cards, every guard in the room took a step back; some of them visibly struggled with the idea of raising their crossbows again. ~ Scott Lynch,
394:Her compact, curvaceous body was laid out like some kind of offering to a pagen god. As someone who had once been a pagen god, he knew what he was talking about . . . ~ Thea Harrison,
395:My parents couldn't handle my energy so they enrolled me in every sport the school was offering. I didn't resent it because I loved sports and picked them up easily. ~ Channing Tatum,
396:One of the best ways to probe whether you can trust the advice that a theory is offering you is to look for anomalies—something that the theory cannot explain ~ Clayton M Christensen,
397:there are far too many mouths here but not enough of them are worth what you’re offering give yourself to a few and to those few give heavily - invest in the right people ~ Rupi Kaur,
398:A poem by Leonard Cohen says it well: Ring the bells that still can ring. Forget your perfect offering. There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in. ~ Brennan Manning,
399:Breathing involves a continual oscillation between exhaling and inhaling, offering ourselves to the world at one moment and drawing the world into ourselves at the next. ~ David Abram,
400:Mara, that's the life I want to give you. That's what I'm offering you. I want to fill you life with color and warmth. I want to fill it with light. Give me a chance ~ Francine Rivers,
401:offering increased productivity, increased revenue, or decreased waste are powerful associations with the need for a business (or an individual) to survive and thrive. ~ Donald Miller,
402:One of the best ways to probe whether you can trust the advice that a theory is offering you is to look for anomalies—something that the theory cannot explain. ~ Clayton M Christensen,
403:Silence, it appears, is not the opposite of sound. It is another world altogether, literally offering a deeper level of thought, a journey to the bedrock of the self. ~ Michael Finkel,
404:turned out Queen Metaneira was there with her family and her household guards, offering sacrifices to the gods in celebration of the birth of her newest son, Demophoon. ~ Rick Riordan,
405:With abstract work, I never was quite sure what it was that felt right about the painting, but I did know that I responded to it and I liked whatever it was offering me. ~ Kurt Wagner,
406:A picture is like a prayer; you're offering a prayer to get something, and in a sense it's like a gift of God because you have practically no control-at least I don't. ~ Harry Callahan,
407:Don't you see? Your mortal heart shines like a candle flame and I, like one of those hapless black moths you used to leave as an offering, am helpless before its lure. ~ Robin LaFevers,
408:Here was a young man, one who’d surely seen his share of horror working in this line of business, and here I was, a small, slender girl, offering to be his strength. ~ Kerri Maniscalco,
409:I had a lovely, feral, free childhood - out and then come back when you're hungry or it gets too dark. I feel slightly cruel that I'm not offering my children the same. ~ Olivia Colman,
410:Members of trusting teams admit weaknesses and mistakes, take risks in offering feedback and assistance, and focus time and energy on important issues, not politics. ~ Patrick Lencioni,
411:We must learn to die daily to the known and limited, accepting our outer lives are but an offering to the inner spirit. Then everyday will be a new birth into eternity. ~ David Frawley,
412:a book is both medic and medicine at once. It makes a diagnosis as well as offering therapy. Putting the right novels to the appropriate ailments: that’s how I sell books. ~ Nina George,
413:Breathing involves a continual oscillation between exhaling and inhaling, offering ourselves to the world at one moment and drawing the world into ourselves at the next... ~ David Abram,
414:Donald Trump is reinforcing harmful stereotypes and offering a dog whistle to his most hateful supporters. It's a disturbing preview of what kind of president he'd be. ~ Hillary Clinton,
415:He wasn’t offering me love. He wasn’t even offering friendship. What he was offering was a good old-fashioned fuck with his body that had been carved by artists in heaven. ~ Helen Hardt,
416:I don't know whether the future or 2018 exists or not, but if it exists, I'm offering a show to a museum in Australia titled "Time Reversed." Time is going backwards. ~ Hiroshi Sugimoto,
417:In the area of robotics and in the area of connectivity, technology is offering us things that we are vulnerable to - and we have to have a better response than a shrug. ~ Sherry Turkle,
418:A good Catholic meddles in politics, offering the best of himself, so that those who govern can govern. But what is the best that we can offer to those who govern? Prayer! ~ Pope Francis,
419:And he made love to her, offering his body in both tenderness and anger, unsure which was the best way to pass her bits of his soul so that she could patch her own with it ~ Jodi Picoult,
420:Offering forceful and dire warnings, Bannon told the president: “This Russian story is a third-tier story, but you fire Comey and it’ll be the biggest story in the world. ~ Michael Wolff,
421:Simply turning our focus to the customer and offering them a heroic role in a meaningful story is enough to radically change the way we talk about, and even do, business. ~ Donald Miller,
422:The fear of failure is so great, it is no wonder that the desire to do right by one's children has led to a whole library of books offering advice on how to raise them ~ Bruno Bettelheim,
423:Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. 2And  k walk in love,  l as Christ loved us and  m gave himself up for us, a  n fragrant  o offering and sacrifice to God. ~ Anonymous,
424:I know it's a crock of shit. I ain't offering you happily-ever-after. I'm offering you... happily-maybe-sometimes-ever-after. Sort of. You know, with warts and shit." -Thayer ~ Wally Lamb,
425:I think modern medicine has become like a prophet offering a life free of pain. It is nonsense. The only thing I know that truly heals people is unconditional love. ~ Elisabeth Kubler Ross,
426:The new Pirates! builds on that legacy delivering an even more powerful and fun experience to players... and is still unmatched in offering a blend of genres in one great game. ~ Sid Meier,
427:What she wanted was to donate to the world a good Maud Martha. That was the offering, the bit of art, that could not come from any other. She would polish and hone that. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks,
428:About sacrifice and the offering of sacrifices, sacrificial animals think quite differently from those who look on: but they have never been allowed to have their say. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
429:Acceptance with God is the great thing we should desire and aim at in all our religious services, particularly in the Lord's supper, which is our eating of the sin-offering. ~ Matthew Henry,
430:Denying people the right of return to their homeland, and at the same time offering this right to others who have no connection to the land, is a model of undemocratic practice. ~ Ilan Papp,
431:Is there any Mantra prescribed for giving up the fruits of Japa?The Mother said, "Don't say 'Giving up the fruits of Japa'; say 'offering the fruits of Japa.'" ~ Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi,
432:I want to talk. I talk to everybody, and it pisses me off when they interpret to talk back. I sometimes think of offering money to friends to buy their turn in a conversation. ~ Jim Carroll,
433:Malachi Chapter 1 The Jews despise the Lord by offering polluted bread upon the altar and by sacrificing animals with blemishes—The Lord’s name will be great among the Gentiles. ~ Anonymous,
434:A hundred years later and someone gazes upon you as if you were heaven itself, but you know in your heart of hearts that it’s not heaven you’re offering them, it’s hell. ~ Laurell K Hamilton,
435:But once I acclimated and really used fame for what it was offering me as a tool to serve my life purpose of inspiring and contributing, then it started to get fun again. ~ Alanis Morissette,
436:I know. And I'm Sorry. People will disappoint you, Gemma. The question to ask is whether you can learn to live with the disappointment and move on. I'm offering you a new world. ~ Libba Bray,
437:I've always done what I thought was good if I could live on what they were offering-and sometimes if I couldn't. So even when I was broke, my career didn't lack for interest. ~ Sam Waterston,
438:I will remember the hours of kisses our lips raw with love and how you offered me your cunt your soul your insides and how I answered offering you whatever was left of me, ~ Charles Bukowski,
439:Just like his smile, she had a bad feeling his pancakes would be addictive. He was a big, scary-looking guy offering homemade breakfast. Talk about checking all the right boxes. ~ Anne Marsh,
440:The ruggers followed me all the way to the cafeteria. I felt like the Pied Piper, except that the rats probably weren't offering to share protein-rich snacks with him. ~ Justine Larbalestier,
441:You’re offering to help us against those things down there, when it seems to me that you’d want to be down there with them, looking up at us, waiting for the dinner bell to ring. ~ M R Carey,
442:It’s fine,” she said, and began to fix him a cup of coffee as a peace offering before remembering that serving him the motel’s brand could be categorized as aggravated assault. ~ K B Spangler,
443:Lord, I have too long given the devil a foothold. (Eph. 4:27) Please help me to stop offering him so many opportunities to bring defeat into my life. Your plan for me is victory. ~ Beth Moore,
444:my only journey of concern was to be like the sun, to make it through the day offering as much light and warmth and consistency for others as I could—one single day. Each day. ~ Camron Wright,
445:While it may not be a simple act, offering forgiveness not only has the power to heal relationships, it strengthens the well-being of those who give this life-changing gift. ~ Debbie Macomber,
446:A great tactician creates plans. A good tactician recognizes the soundness of a plan presented to him. A fair tactician must see the plan succeed before offering approval. Those ~ Timothy Zahn,
447:For Sri Aurobindo's centenary, what is the best offering that I can personally make to Sri Aurobindo?

   Offer him your mind in all sincerity. 13 November 1970
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
448:I'm lost in the middle of my birthday. I want my friends, their touch, with the earth's last love. I will take life's final offering, I will take the last human blessing. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
449:24Then fire came out from before the LORD and consumed the burnt offering and the portions of fat on the altar; and when all the people saw it, they shouted and fell on their faces. ~ Anonymous,
450:I think that modern medicine has become like a prophet offering a life free of pain. It is nonsense. The only thing I know that truly heals people is unconditional love. ~ Elisabeth K bler Ross,
451:The most that any one of us can seem to do is to fashion something–an object or ourselves–and drop it into the confusion, make an offering of it, so to speak, to the life force. ~ Ernest Becker,
452:Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, good liberals both, pursued power by offering their candidacies as opportunities for Americans to document their innocence of the nation's past. ~ Shelby Steele,
453:It is Christ offering the opportunity of a lifetime: “I have come into the world as light, to prevent anyone who believes in me from staying in the dark any more” (John 12:46). ~ Brennan Manning,
454:The Dark Passenger had been very quiet through this whole thing so far, contenting himself with a disinterested smirk from time to time and offering no really cogent observations. ~ Jeff Lindsay,
455:To work with Kaz on this kind of project is a fascinating process...He seems to be Dogen himself when offering the translations that we Western collaborators then refine with him. ~ Joan Halifax,
456:Yoga means union with the Divine, and the union is effected through offering - it is founded on the offering of yourself to the Divine. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, (28 April),
457:Are you married?”
“Not that I know of.”
Her nose scrunched adorably. “Fiancee? Girlfriend? Friends with benefits?”
My gaze fell to her plump lips. “You offering or asking? ~ Aly Martinez,
458:One of the best things about being a Yankee is that you have guys like Whitey Ford, Phil Rizzuto, Ron Guidry and Reggie Jackson wandering around the locker room offering you advice. ~ Derek Jeter,
459:You broke me once, Iggy. I’ll never let you break me again. I need you to protect my kids and I'm selfish enough to take the help you're offering, but that's all I want from you. ~ Sidney Halston,
460:Mercy is radical kindness. Mercy means offering or being offered aid in desperate straits. Mercy is not deserved. It involves absolving the unabsolvable, forgiving the unforgiveable. ~ Anne Lamott,
461:the moment indifference took over, life began to subside. Few men rose out of it: most lost all impulse toward activity and ended by offering death at least a halfhearted welcome. ~ Larry McMurtry,
462:We are offering to the American public a line of delicious Italian-American foods. They will be available through the Internet, shopping networks and national store distribution. ~ Rocco DiSpirito,
463:Compassion and pity are not the same: pity is looking down on someone, feeling sorry for them and offering nothing; compassion is seeing their pain and offering them understanding. ~ Jasinda Wilder,
464:I am a work in progress Dressed in the fabric of a world unfolding Offering me intricate patterns of questions Rhythms that never come clean And strengths that you still haven't seen ~ Ani DiFranco,
465:If you're going to be a great guide to what's great for consumers, and, indirectly, for investors, you've got to be very careful about who you contract with and what you're offering. ~ Robert Reich,
466:She could imagine the view: her ass displayed lewdly, the plump lips of her sex visible beneath. It was a rude position, almost cruel in its offering, but she had to make it worse. ~ Pepper Winters,
467:Meditation is offering your genuine presence to yourself in every moment. It’s the capacity to recognize clearly that every moment is a gift of life, a gift from the Earth and sky. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
468:Niima: center of the galaxy, repository of manifold cultures, offering to its myriad inhabitants a never-ending succession of entertainment, education, and enjoyable distractions. ~ Alan Dean Foster,
469:There are those two German brothers offering to pay gold for stories," the golden imp said. "And there's a human in France who is looking for the same thing. And one in Denmark. ~ James Riley,
470:This fall, Alibaba Group Holdings will go public on the New York Stock Exchange, and it could raise $20 billion, according to Bloomberg News, making it the largest stock offering in U.S. ~ Anonymous,
471:Nothing says you care for me better than offering to torture my enemies." He grinned. "No sense doing things halfhearted. And to think, some girls have to endure listening to poetry. ~ Maria V Snyder,
472:A man's life is an offering to Yahweh. Nothing more. Nothing less. If Yahweh decrees that you shall be consumed, so be it. If he decrees that you are to be triumphant, so be that." "And ~ Cliff Graham,
473:Aside from the poor example it sets, the federal government enables reckless spending on public-employee pensions by offering hope of assistance from Washington if things get bad enough. ~ Devin Nunes,
474:Jesus Christ is our great peace-offering; for he made himself a sacrifice, not only to atone for sin, and so to save us from the curse, but to purchase a blessing for us, and all good. ~ Matthew Henry,
475:Let each citizen remember at the moment he is offering his vote...that he is executing one of the most solemn trusts in human society for which he is accountable to God and his country. ~ Samuel Adams,
476:People are tired of the status quo. You see that in various movements in and out of our the Republicans party, but most candidates are offering hollow rhetoric, not specific solutions. ~ Carly Fiorina,
477:Thus seeing the supreme Spirit equally in all beings and all beings in the supreme Spirit, he, offering his soul in sacrifice, identifies himself with the Being who shines in his own splendour. ~ Manu,
478:1Therefore† be imitators of God as dear †children. 2And †walk in love, †as Christ also has loved us and given Himself for us, an offering and a sacrifice to God †for a sweet-smelling aroma. ~ Anonymous,
479:A society that thinks the choice between ways of living is just a choice between equally eligible 'lifestyles' turns universities into academic cafeterias offering junk food for the mind. ~ George Will,
480:In matters of commerce the fault of the Dutch Is offering too little and asking too much. The French are with equal advantage content, So we clap on Dutch bottoms just twenty per cent. ~ George Canning,
481:I ached for news of report cards, parent-teacher meetings, doctors’ visits. I had to plead with the children for information. I knew only what they told me, and they weren’t offering much. ~ Shulem Deen,
482:Keep your eyes open. Look at the world without prejudice, pay attention to your sources, and decide for yourself where the truth lies. That is the greatness of the path I'm offering you. ~ Javier Sierra,
483:The cash turned heavy in my hands offering salvation as well as condemnation. Was it wrong to use someone else’s money if I needed it? Who had the power to justify who deserved it most? ~ Pepper Winters,
484:The novel is a spiritual drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt and reason, offering a complex narrative steeped with ethical debates of God, free will and morality. Since ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
485:I'm fishing for men with a certain kind of bait, and the bait that I am offering is not a candy; it's a very specific thing that I'm offering, which is a deep gospel and a deep conversion. ~ Larry Norman,
486:Prevailing prayer is that which secures an answer. Saying prayers is not offering prevailing prayer. The prevalence of prayer does not depend so much on quantity as on quality. ~ Charles Grandison Finney,
487:A man is deficient in understanding until he perceives that there is a whole cycle of evolution possible within himself: repeating endlessly, offering opportunities for personal development. ~ Idries Shah,
488:Sol! Take your daughter, your only daughter Rachel, whom you love, and go to the world called Hyperion and offer her there as a burnt offering at one of the places of which I shall tell you. ~ Dan Simmons,
489:You know that I am not one of those individuals who neglect their body in order to turn it into an offering for their soul; my soul would not at all have appreciated such a sacrifice. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
490:Another reason is that the letters are almost always funny, offering readers the spectacle of some pompous self-celebrator given ample ironic room in which to parade his self-solicited hurt. ~ Paul Fussell,
491:Mankind’s chief hope of escaping the wrath of whatever divinities were then abroad lay in some magical rite, senseless but powerful, or in some offering made at the cost of pain and grief. ~ Edith Hamilton,
492:Sol! Take your daughter, your only daughter, Rachel, whom you love, and go to the world called Hyperion and offer her there as a burnt offering at one of the places of which I shall tell you. ~ Dan Simmons,
493:And I would heal them.” That’s a different offer from: “And I would forgive them.” It’s a different offer from: “And I will give them a place in heaven.” No, Jesus is offering healing to us. ~ John Eldredge,
494:By the time I'm nine I know the world is a dangerous place. I've heard whispers about razorblades in apples, about Charlie Manson and his family. But no one is offering any clear information. ~ Nick Flynn,
495:By the time I'm nine I know the world is a dangerous place.  I've heard whispers about razorblades in apples, about Charlie Manson and his family.  But no one is offering any clear information. ~ Nick Flynn,
496:Nothing says you care for me better than offering to torture my enemies."

He grinned. "No sense doing things halfhearted. And to think, some girls have to endure listening to poetry. ~ Maria V Snyder,
497:The trend of offering individualized education plans, curricula, and lessons is going to help students tremendously. “Teaching to the middle” is one of the saddest concepts I've ever heard about. ~ Mike Lee,
498:The way you feel is simply, clearly, and always the indicator of the vibrational balance between your desires and your vibrational offering, which, from your vantage point, you have launched. ~ Esther Hicks,
499:This room
is very powerful:
Buddha, golden,
holding down one side;
the primordial
Great Mother, black,
offering her
bead
of mitochondria
holding down
the other. ~ Alice Walker,
500:war had become “a spectacle.” It had transformed itself into a kind of “spectator sport,” one offering “the added thrill that it is real for someone, but not, happily, for the spectator. ~ Andrew J Bacevich,
501:Would you put it past Darth Sullivan to figure out a way to haunt you postmortem? He’s probably holding staff meetings in the afterworld. Offering up performance evaluations. Issuing dictates. ~ Chloe Neill,
502:But few have spoken of the actual pleasure derived from giving to someone, from creating something, from finishing a task, form offering unexpected help almost invisibly and anonymously. ~ Paul Lester Wiener,
503:If my wife finds comfort in trite Gispy homilies, I have no objection to your offering them. However, if you ever kiss her again, no matter how platonic the fashion, I'll make a eunuch of you. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
504:If you offer a loaf of bread to a starving man in exchange for his soul, who is at fault if he takes it? Him for not choosing the harder road, or you for not offering him another alternative? ~ Ruth Cardello,
505:No doubt Noah offered his wife that olive branch. Forty days in a boat with those animals to clean up after? A peace offering likely all that stood between their marriage and bloody murder. ~ Gregory Maguire,
506:over time, offering loving kindness to all beings everywhere, including ourselves, unites us to one another so that we know that we can not go forward forgetting those left behind." Page 62 ~ Sharon Salzberg,
507:Third, following from this, the liturgical practice of the offering indicates that Christian worship—which is a foretaste of the new creation—embodies a new economy, an alternative economy. ~ James K A Smith,
508:We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, ~ Bren Brown,
509:He had to be joking. “You can’t be asking me to marry you.”
He sighed with annoyance. “I am a duke. I’m not asking you to marry me. I am offering to marry you. It’s a different thing entirely. ~ Tessa Dare,
510:Mexico is offering a $3.8 million reward for information leading to the capture of the escaped billionaire drug lord, El Chapo. Mexico said they'll get the money by borrowing it from El Chapo. ~ Conan O Brien,
511:He sat on one side of a love seat, leaving space to sit beside him. Was it an invitation? Or a gesture of kindness, in that he was offering me the room's larger couch? WHY WAS THIS SO HARD? ~ Stephanie Perkins,
512:He was a master at offering practical, rational advice to any member who was in pain, but he did so with an absence of emotion. His advice was well-intentioned, but was delivered without feeling. ~ Jonice Webb,
513:I am a work in progress
Dressed in the fabric of a world unfolding
Offering me intricate patterns of questions
Rhythms that never come clean
And strengths that you still haven't seen ~ Ani DiFranco,
514:I don't keep mistresses; it's far too much trouble. I'm offering to marry you, although I might regret it. And if you think the Lim family disapproved of your marriage, wait until you meet mine. ~ Yangsze Choo,
515:Is the buying-your-own-drinks thing what you use to give guys the polite brush-off, and now you’re just offering me the seat because you feel sorry for me, or do I actually have a chance here? ~ Chanel Cleeton,
516:Pride. Never pretend you are not a knight of attempt to diminish yourself because you deem it will make others more comfortable. We show others the most respect by offering the best of ourselves. ~ Ethan Hawke,
517:Sol! Take your daughter, your only daughter Rachel, whom you love, and go to the world called Hyperion and offer her there as a burnt offering at one of the places of which I shall tell you.” And ~ Dan Simmons,
518:6Among the smooth stones of the stream Is your portion; They, they, are your lot! Even to them you have poured a drink offering, You have offered a grain offering. Should I receive comfort in these? ~ Anonymous,
519:A list of birds seen on a given day is also a form of prayer, a thanksgiving for being alive at a certain time and place. Posting that list online is a 21st-century form of a votive offering. ~ Brian Kimberling,
520:He was a clown-prince version of Jimmy Stewart in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Trump believed, offering catnip to deep American ire and resentment, that one man could be bigger than the system. ~ Michael Wolff,
521:I learned from teaching. If you are perceived by the student to be belittling them or purely criticizing them without offering up words of encouragement and support, they shut down and discredit you. ~ Tim Gunn,
522:In an outburst of heavenly joy and ease
Life yields to the divinity within
And gives the rapture-offering of its all,
And the soul opens to felicity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Heavens of the Ideal,
523:It is an old custom of these people to pick up a stone and toss it on the pile. Perhaps it is a symbolical lightening of the load they carry, perhaps a small offering to the gods of the trails. ~ Louis L Amour,
524:The argument that making contraceptives available to young people would prevent teen pregnancies is ridiculous. That's like offering a cookbook as a cure to people who are trying to lose weight. ~ Jerry Falwell,
525:The offering of [the body] is called a spiritual sacrifice because it is freely sacrificed through the Spirit, the Christian being uninfluenced by the constrainst of the Low or the fear of hell. ~ Martin Luther,
526:I want to ask you to place a significant seed in God's soil and see it work for you. Just as a special sacrifice was offered on the Day of Atonement, let me ask you to bring a very special offering. ~ Benny Hinn,
527:The trick is to find an attractive market that interests you enough to keep you improving your offering every single day. Finding that market is mostly a matter of patience and active exploration. ~ Josh Kaufman,
528:I am a total coffee snob and bore. If anyone makes the mistake of offering me 'a coffee' they tend to regret it - I'm worse than Mariah Carey, and the hot milk rider is completely non-negotiable. ~ Rachel Johnson,
529:The more evolved you are the less you will agree or disagree with others, and the more you will gently sift through the fullness of what people are offering and gratefully take only what you need. ~ Bryant McGill,
530:When we feel haunted, it is the pull of our own home we're experiencing, but a more upsetting possibility is that the past has become homeless, and we are offering it a place to inhabit in the present. ~ Yiyun Li,
531:You're offering a great service. People are tuning in. So continue to find great people, continue to do what you're doing. And do it better than your rivals. I know that's easier said than done. ~ Richard Branson,
532:All service should be regarded as an offering to God, and every opportunity to serve should be welcomed as a gift from God. When service is done in this spirit, it will lead to self- realization. ~ Sathya Sai Baba,
533:Everybody's got an opinion. Leaders are paid to make a decision. The difference between offering an opinion and making a decision is the difference between working for the leader and being the leader. ~ Bill Walsh,
534:Every day, you are to offer your life to God for His service. You do not serve Him in your spare time or with your leftover resources. The way you live your life for God is your offering to Him. ~ Richard Blackaby,
535:...from schools to universities to research institutes, we teach about origins in disconnected fragments. We seem incapable of offering a unified account of how things came to be the way they are. ~ David Christian,
536:Looming visage noble American colonel. Courageous, renown of history, Colonel Sanders, image forever accompanied odor of sacrificial meat. Eternal flame offering wind savory perfume roasted flesh. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
537:Surviving is some kind of sin, like floating up off the dunking stool like a witch. You have to be permanently écorchée, heart-on-sleeve, offering up organs and body parts like a medieval female saint. ~ Roxane Gay,
538:The moment you wake up, right away, you can smile... You are aware that a new day is beginning, that life is offering you twenty-four brand new hours to live, and that that's the most precious of gifts. ~ Nhat Hanh,
539:It can't really be you," he said. "I know it can't."

"Why not?" Isobel asked, offering him a rueful smile. "I mean, don't you think it's at all romantic, the idea that love could conquer death? ~ Kelly Creagh,
540:Using what you make every day is the best way to improve the quality of what you’re offering. Nothing will help you find ways to make your offer better than being its most avid and demanding customer. ~ Josh Kaufman,
541:16. For thou desirest not sacrifice; else would I give it: thou delightest not in burnt offering. 17. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise. ~ Anonymous,
542:As a bonus tip, remember that once you know the blueprint for your team members or a family member, you can always practice giving by offering them simple little gifts or reminders to help them grow. ~ Vishen Lakhiani,
543:In Buddhist culture, offering food to the monk symbolizes the action of goodness, and if you have no opportunity to support the practice of spirituality, then you are somehow left in the realm of darkness. ~ Nhat Hanh,
544:Look, I'm the DD tonight, but I'm offering to be more than just your driver. I'll be your bodyguard, and your bartender, and most importantly, your friend. I promise to look out for you tonight, Wellsy. ~ Elle Kennedy,
545:Look, I’m the DD tonight, but I’m offering to be more than just your driver. I’ll be your bodyguard, and your bartender, and most importantly, your friend. I promise to look out for you tonight, Wellsy. ~ Elle Kennedy,
546:The Biblical world-view is the only one that accepts the reality of evil and suffering while giving both the cause and the purpose, while offering God-given strength and sustenance in the midst of it. ~ Ravi Zacharias,
547:unless you are in sync with the Source within you, the behavior that you’re offering is not inspired—it is motivated. It is not coming from Source; it is coming from the spinoff of Man’s conscious mind. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
548:Analytics are people. And relevance, in terms of offering targeted messages and experiences, is a form of showing respect for your customer’s time and interests. So is discretion regarding their privacy. ~ Kate O Neill,
549:Sed tamen ut fuso taurorum sanguine centum,  Sic capitur minimo thuris honore deux. - As God is propitiated by the blood of a hundred bulls, so also is he by the smallest offering of incense. ~ Ovid, Tristium, II. 75,
550:Although many seniors are happy with the generous drug coverage they have from their former employers, the number of companies offering that kind of coverage has decreased by one-third since the mid-1980s. ~ Jim Gerlach,
551:Chain of envy linked them, showing each what was lacking in life, but offering also the consolation that happiness was present right next door, in the life of a neighbour, an element of the same society. ~ Aravind Adiga,
552:To get your prospects and clients to see you or your business as offering them a superior benefit or advantage that no other competitor offers them is the essence of a unique selling proposition (USP). You ~ Jay Abraham,
553:Wanting to change, to improve, a person's situation means offering him, for difficulties in which he is practiced and experienced, other difficulties that will find him perhaps even more bewildered. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
554:That’s really sweet.”
He grinned and reached for a plate.
“Then I believe my mission is accomplished.” Laughing softly so I didn’t wake up Cage, I walked over and took the plate he was offering to me. ~ Abbi Glines,
555:The atonement is a multifaceted event-Jesus is shown providing surety for our debt to God, mediating the enmity between us and God, and offering Himself as a substitute to suffer God's judgment in our place. ~ R C Sproul,
556:This was our rhythm, our worship: give and take, gift and receive, honor and entrust. Making love to this man wasn’t just an expression of my feelings for him or a carnal, physical need—it was an offering. ~ Rachael Wade,
557:But my dear young lady," he said offering a cigarette, "who ever said I have a poor opinion of women? On the contrary, I have a very high opinion of women, and the more I see of them the more I like them. ~ Frank O Connor,
558:great sport, during their few idle hours, of sitting in the house’s green-shuttered windows and watching the doings at headquarters through opera glasses, then offering commentary to passing police officials. ~ Caleb Carr,
559:The circular which was distributed to attract subscribers to the Bank's initial stock offering explained: "The Bank hath benefit of interest on all the moneys which it, the Bank, creates out of nothing. ~ G Edward Griffin,
560:The philosophical implication of race-thinking is that by offering us the mystery of heredity as an explanation, it diverts our attention from the social and intellectual factors that make up personality. ~ Jacques Barzun,
561:Whatever a man sacrifice in this world as an offering or as an oblation for a whole year in order to gain merit, the whole of it is not worth a quarter (a farthing); reverence shown to the righteous is better. ~ Anonymous,
562:Work is where we build character. Work is where we create value with our lives and lift up our own souls. Work, properly understood, is the sacred practice of offering up our talents for the service of others. ~ Ben Sasse,
563:Our hearts are the shrine; that is where God should be installed. Our good thoughts are the flowers to worship Him. Good deeds form the worship, good words form the hymns and love forms the offering. ~ Mata Amritanandamayi,
564:Christian culture has too often offered women a push toward contentment that can numb us to our own desires, without offering the tools to discern whether those desires could be good or Holy-Spirit-inspired. ~ Katelyn Beaty,
565:If grief or anger arises, Let there be grief or anger. This is the Buddha in all forms,Sun Buddha, Moon Buddha, Happy Buddha, Sad Buddha. It is the universe offering all things to awaken and open our heart. ~ Jack Kornfield,
566:When that which I have chosen to focus upon in this moment evokes love or joy or appreciation, I am, in that moment, offering my greatest value to myself, to my current object of attention and to All-That-Is. ~ Esther Hicks,
567:As you learn about the brain and consider all of the information we’re offering here, don’t forget about the simple and the obvious, the little things you already know. Common sense can take you a long way. ~ Daniel J Siegel,
568:If those civil rights groups are going into those orphanages and offering to look after those children, then they have every right to make a stink about it. But they're not. They're not offering a solution. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
569:On your knees, you donkey,” he said. That’s a ring you’re offering her.”
Donchen fell to one knee, smiling crookedly.
“That ring has been in his family for ten generations,” Mug said. “Hint, bloody hint. ~ Frank Tuttle,
570:We both may be killed by the Muslims," he told Manu, "and must put our purity to the ultimate test, so that we know that we are offering the purest of sacrifices, and we should now both start sleeping naked. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
571:What if Jesus was not offering his followers an ethical system to follow, but rather was inviting them to enter into a life of love that transcends ethics, a life of liberty that dwells beyond religious laws? ~ Peter Rollins,
572:Influencing others is not a matter of outsmarting them. It is a matter of discerning what they truly want and offering it to them in a mutually beneficial package. “He knows so little and accomplishes so much, ~ Dale Carnegie,
573:Listen, God can’t bless what you won’t do. You haven’t been taught correctly. Prosperity doesn’t just come from giving an offering. It’s good to be a giver. But you must also be a thinker, a planner, and a worker. ~ T D Jakes,
574:offering no concessions to countries such as the US and UK that have repeatedly led efforts to censure Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council over its slow progress to investigate alleged abuses. In response, Mr ~ Anonymous,
575:You will never be allowed to buy the really good IPOs at the initial offering price. The hot IPOs are snapped up by the big institutional investors or the very best wealthy clients of the underwriting firm. ~ Burton G Malkiel,
576:Part of truly loving our kids, and giving them what they need, means offering them clear and consistent boundaries, creating predictable structure in their lives, as well as having high expectations for them. ~ Daniel J Siegel,
577:These should be encircled by offering goddesses; And surrounded, too, by subjects who rob people’s hearts By playing lutes, flutes, drums, and cymbals,53 All of which creates a symphony of most melodious tunes. ~ Thupten Jinpa,
578:...all these things were part of the business of dreams. He had learned not to laugh at the advertisements offering to teach writing, cartooning, engineering, to add inches to the biceps and to develop the bust ~ Nathanael West,
579:Demonstrating faith and optimism in the child or adolescent's ability to work things out in their own time and in their own way can be very difficult but it is possible to do this while also offering assistance. ~ Timothy Carey,
580:I don’t like corpses in that way unless they’ve been reanimated,” said Jack. “Corpses are incapable of offering informed consent, and are hence no better than vibrators.” “I wish that didn’t make so much sense, ~ Seanan McGuire,
581:In writing with detail, you are turning to face the world. It is a deeply political act, because you are not staying in the heat of your own emotions. You are offering up some good solid bread for the hungry. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
582:Meanwhile, after polling its employees in search of incentives that will bring more female hires, Apple will in January begin offering to pay for egg-freezing for their female employees (like Facebook already does). ~ Anonymous,
583:Oh, God," I said.
"No, it's Dexter," he replied, offering me his hand, which I ignored.
He glanced behind him, then back at me. "I'll see you soon," he said, and grinned at
me.
"Like hell," I replied, ~ Sarah Dessen,
584:We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness and affection. ~ Bren Brown,
585:and the creation, in the world and above the world, that once was at variance with itself, is knit together in friendship: and we ... are made to join in the angels' song, offering the worship of their praise. ~ Gregory of Nyssa,
586:The time to recognize the power of community is here again. Not as some romanticized renaissance from times past, but as a necessarily new and innovative response to "life as it is offering itself to us." ~ Judith Hanson Lasater,
587:The truth of faith is not articulated in offering reasons for suffering, but rather in drawing alongside those who suffer, standing with them, and standing up for them. This is pastoral care at its most luminous. ~ Peter Rollins,
588:He smiles and it isn’t a smile of sadness.  It’s one of acceptance.  And right then and there, I know without a doubt that I don’t deserve this man, but I’ll fight like hell to be worthy of the love he’s offering.  ~ Harper Sloan,
589:If you have your choice about how to be turned into a vampire, I strongly suggest that you do not post an ad on the supernatural version of Craigslist offering cash to any creature of the night willing to bite you. ~ Molly Harper,
590:Removed from 'Gmail' doesn't necessarily mean removed from all Google servers. In fact, your old emails are the data set from which Google models our behaviors - the real product it is offering its advertisers. ~ Douglas Rushkoff,
591:should think it sounds beneficent. I’m offering you a title and fortune. All you have to do is lie back in the dark, then spend nine months swelling up like a tick. What could possibly deter any woman from accepting? ~ Tessa Dare,
592:Now, like, I’m President. It would be pretty hard for some drug guy to come into the White House and start offering it up, you know? I bet if they did, I hope I would say, ‘Hey, get lost. We don’t want any of that. ~ George W Bush,
593:Sending the goat out into the desert to Azazel, was not an offering to the damnable goat demon, but rather it was a banishment of Israel’s sin to the realm of chaos outside Yahweh’s kingdom—the same realm of Azazel. ~ Brian Godawa,
594:Your impulse to protect me conflicts with my need to protect my self-respect. Sorry. Besides. I have this vaguely uneasy feeling you're offering to protect me from you. That's not doing me a kindness -- that's coercion. ~ Joe Hill,
595:I don't let any personal views about religion cause me to want to take away something that's offering the patient comfort. I never want to take away something when I don't have anything better to offer him in a way. ~ Irvin D Yalom,
596:Of all the gods, Death only craves not gifts: Nor sacrifice, nor yet drink-offering poured Avails; no altars hath he, nor is soothed By hymns of praise. From him alone of all The powers of heaven Persuasion holds aloof. ~ Aeschylus,
597:Scientific thinking explores and redraws the world, gradually offering us better and better images of it, teaching us to think in ever more effective ways. Science is a continual exploration of ways of thinking. Its ~ Carlo Rovelli,
598:The record seems to suggest that a society begins to rely heavily on leisure-and especially on passive leisure-only when it has become incapable of offering meaningful productive occupation to its members. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
599:We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness and affection ~ Brene Brown,
600:Why is Nigerian spam so sloppy? If you’ve gotten an email from a prince offering to split millions of dollars with you, you may have noticed all the misspellings and other telltale clues that it can’t possibly be real. ~ Seth Godin,
601:All the ladies can feel sexy and have fun in my clothing and that makes me feel like I am offering something truly unique to the people who have been gracious enough to show me such love and support over the years. ~ Jennifer Hudson,
602:Baseball is a slow, sluggish game, with frequent and trivial interruptions, offering the spectator many opportunities to reflect at leisure upon the situation on the field: This is what a fan loves most about the game ~ Edward Abbey,
603:I have a website because it's an interesting tool, very - and quite unexpectedly - useful for my work. It's become an archive and a fairly complete on-line portfolio, as well as offering an opportunity to write a little. ~ John Howe,
604:Sometimes I think they're all ridiculous. There I was, a sensible person with thoughts in my head, offering a solution. And they wouldn't listen. What aggravation, to believe I can help and yet not be allowed. -Dashti ~ Shannon Hale,
605:The fallen hazel-nuts, Stripped late of their green sheaths, The grapes, red-purple, Their berries Dripping with wine, Pomegranates already broken, And shrunken fig, And quinces untouched, I bring thee as offering. ~ Hilda Doolittle,
606:There is nothing worse than an idle hour, with no occupation offering. People who have many such hours are simply animals waiting docilely for death. We all come to that state soon or late. It is the curse of senility. ~ H L Mencken,
607:What I generally get from being in Africa is a sense of warmth and openness. As a stranger, you are always welcomed into people's homes and people are always offering you food. That generosity is incredibly touching. ~ Naomie Harris,
608:For by a single offering He has forever completely cleansed and perfected those who are consecrated and made holy.… He then goes on to say, And their sins and their lawbreaking I will remember no more. HEBREWS 10:14, 17 ~ Joyce Meyer,
609:Of course, it was the United States and Israel that had rejected diplomacy and the PLO that had been offering compromise for years, but Lewis’s reversal of the facts was quite normal and unchallenged in the mainstream. ~ Noam Chomsky,
610:The fact that radio is so hopeless at delivering data makes it an uncluttered medium, offering the basic story without the detailed trappings. But it does mean that if data is important, radio is probably not your place. ~ Evan Davis,
611:A certain pride, a certain awe, withheld him from offering to God even one prayer at night, though he knew it was in God's power to take away his life while he slept and hurl his soul hellward ere he could beg for mercy. ~ James Joyce,
612:A rebel she was, but not of the kind he understood - a rebel who desired, not a wider dwelling-room, but equality beside the man she loved. For Italy was offering her the most priceless of all possessions - her own soul. ~ E M Forster,
613:As a man, this child would be one’s offering to the future races of men. The burden of his upbringing, wherever it fell: however tiresome or onerous, was of no importance compared with his living grasp of the future. ~ Dorothy Dunnett,
614:Change is nature’s way of offering us the opportunity to explore the parameters of our humanity and potential. Don’t fight it, embrace it. There is a magical experience awaiting those who embrace this natural process. ~ Steve Maraboli,
615:It is namely distinctly stated in Scripture and handed down by tradition that the first commandments communicated to us did not include any law at all about burnt offering and sacrifice. ~ Maimonides, Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190),
616:Rather, the offering is an expression of gratitude. It is a symbolic but concrete indication that the “commerce” between God and humanity is not a contract but a covenant, which traffics not in commodities but gifts. ~ James K A Smith,
617:The guerrilla is obsessed with benefits. Whenever offering a product or service, she focuses on how it will benefit the consumer and builds everything—the product, the delivery, the marketing—around that benefit. ~ Jay Conrad Levinson,
618:A certain pride, a certain awe, withheld him from offering to God even one prayer at night, though he knew it was in God's power to take away his life while he slept and hurl his soul hellward ere he could beg for mercy. ~ James Joyce,
619:Now, like, I'm President. It would be pretty hard for some drug guy to come into the White House and start offering it up, you know?...I bet if they did, I hope I would say, 'Hey, get lost. We don't want any of that.' ~ George H W Bush,
620:Taking what was the most raw and broken inside us and offering it to the other as a show of what we can’t heal on our own. It’s the most simple and heartbreaking of vulnerabilities...to admit that you need someone else. ~ Katie McGarry,
621:Longevity is perhaps the best single measure of the physical quality of life. (If you’re dead, there’s little you can do to be happy.) This is a precious offering from science to humanity -nothing less than the gift of life. ~ Carl Sagan,
622:Now, radical forward thinking is offering hope for the future: Replacement body parts to order. A team of scientists in California believe that if you can design them on a computer, you should be able to print them out. ~ Stephen Hawking,
623:Rahab pondered the thought. “I don’t suppose a pomegranate or a fig as an offering would have the same effect on our hearts. To see an innocent life taken in our place is much more humbling than offering Adonai fruit. ~ Jill Eileen Smith,
624:I respect self-giving and I've tried to lead my life with that as the ideal. But real self-giving is when we take our being, that which is most precious to us, and we throw it into eternity with a total sense of offering. ~ Frederick Lenz,
625:Science and reason liberate us from the shackles of superstition by offering us a framework for understanding our shared humanity. Ultimately, we all have the capacity to treasure life and enrich the world in incalculable ways. ~ Gad Saad,
626:Any name, any form, any symbol, any offering has been held to be sufficient if there is the consecration along with it; for the Divine knows himself in the heart of the seeker and accepts the sacrifice. ~ Sri AurobindoThe Synthesis of Yoga,
627:For most of our history, straight white men have been involved in a witness protection program that guards their identities and absolves them of their crimes while offering them a future free of past encumbrances and sins. ~ Robin DiAngelo,
628:Given the high potential for free riding, an offering’s reputation must be earned on day one, because brand building increasingly relies heavily on word-of-mouth recommendations spreading rapidly through our networked society. ~ W Chan Kim,
629:I move past the scaffolding and walk down the steps, hearing one language after another, rich, harsh, mysterious, strong. This is what we bring to the temple, not prayer or chant or slaughtered rams. Our offering is language. ~ Don DeLillo,
630:Even if the Bush Administration had flung open the gates to stem-cell research years ago, we would not be at the point of offering treatment today. Christopher Reeve would still have been taken from us. But we would be closer. ~ Patti Davis,
631:Hegelian dialectic, or problem, reaction, solution. This method basically involves fabricating or intensify a problem, offering a draconian solution, then settling for a “compromise” that nevertheless furthers the intended goal. ~ Jim Marrs,
632:I think that digital is offering many great possibilities for cinematographers. Particularly in urban cityscapes and low light photography its allowing us to render what we actually see with our eyes; which is interesting. ~ Seamus McGarvey,
633:It is in the act of offering our hearts in faith that something in us transforms... proclaiming that we no longer stand on the sidelines but are leaping directly into the center of our lives, our truth, our full potential. ~ Sharon Salzberg,
634:More often than not he wore jeans with at least half a dozen holes, flip-flops that made him look like he was heading to the beach and a T-shirt, usually with a snarky saying. Today’s offering was “Heavily armed, easily pissed. ~ Maya Banks,
635:Prioritizing listening to their child or adolescent is extremely important. It can be very hard to listen to someone who is upset or troubled without offering advice or suggestions or otherwise telling him or her what to do. ~ Timothy Carey,
636:Whether you're six or sixty, if you go on a diet and lifestyle program and feel constrained, you're likely to go off it sooner or later. Offering a spectrum of choices is much more effective; then, you feel free and empowered. ~ Dean Ornish,
637:Countries compete in offering easy working conditions to their banks. In many jurisdictions, you can deposit money anonymously with no questions asked, even if the accepting bank knows that it derives from criminal activities. ~ Thomas Pogge,
638:Moss is selected to be the emblem of maternal love, because, like that love, it glads the heart when the winter of adversity overtakes us, and when summer friends have deserted us. —HENRIETTA DUMONT, The Floral Offering ~ Vanessa Diffenbaugh,
639:The gnostic understands Christ’s message not as offering a set of answers, but as encouragement to engage in a process of searching: “seek and inquire about the ways you should go, since there is nothing else as good as this. ~ Elaine Pagels,
640:They vie with one another in offering attractive, “informative” accounts and images of the world. They are free to speculate on the facts, to bring new facts into being, to demand answers to their own contrived questions. ~ Daniel J Boorstin,
641:What is the context in which your product or service is used? What happens before, during, and after? Can you identify the pain points? How can you eliminate these pain points through a complementary product or service offering? ~ W Chan Kim,
642:Get the point?" I asked, offering the boys a triumphant smile.
Gabriel, Zeb, and Dick stared at me, aghast.
"What? Sarcastic postkill comeback. Isn't that what you're supposed to do in situations like this?
Too harsh? ~ Molly Harper,
643:I went to bed at twenty minutes after one that night, and still the networks were on the air, rehashing the landing, replaying the interviews, offering taped “live” coverage of something that was no more alive than a nightmare. ~ Robert Crais,
644:Let us add that nature is given its full significance only if it is looked at as offering us a means of rising up to the knowledge of divine truths, which is precisely the essential function which we have recognized in symbolism. ~ Ren Gu non,
645:Pleased to meet you." Sage said, offering his hand. "The pleasure is all mine," Rayna Purred. "Unless ofcourse, it's all Clea's which is even better." Sage smiled and might have even blushed a bit, which was highly entertaining. ~ Hilary Duff,
646:Since we have received everything from the Gods, and it is right to pay the giver some tithe of his gifts, we pay such a tithe of possessions in votive offering, of bodies in gifts of (hair and) adornment, and of life in sacrifices. ~ Sallust,
647:My God, I choose everything, I will not be a Saint by halves, I am not afraid of suffering for Thee, I only fear one thing, and that is to do my own will. Accept the offering of my will, for I choose all that Thou willest. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
648:. . . the literature of imaginatiion, even when tragic, is reassuring, not necessarily in the sense of offering nostalgic comfort, but because it offers a world large enough to contain alternatives and therefore offers hope. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
649:When you give your heart and you give it to God, where your treasure is, that's where your heart is. And so you put your heart in your hand which is in the form of monetary- or money, or offering, and you say, 'God! Here it is!' ~ Steve Munsey,
650:Bypassing lawyers, regulators, and the agencies and personnel responsible for enforcing it, President Trump—with Bannon’s low, intense voice behind him, offering a rush of complex information—signed what was put in front of him. ~ Michael Wolff,
651:When people seek to fulfill their callings by glorifying God in their work, praising Him for their gifts and abilities, and seeing both their efforts and its products as an offering to Him, then work is an act of worship to God. ~ Steve Corbett,
652:But that's what you're doing, isn't it? You're part of the fight just as much as the Shadowhunters on the ship—and I know you can take some of my strength, I've heard of warlocks doing that—so I'm offering. Take it. It's yours. ~ Cassandra Clare,
653:I don’t think it’s funny when a stranger calls me a fat bitch no matter what they’re offering to do for me. I don’t think it’s funny that I’m not allowed to say that my feelings are hurt. Feelings aren’t an absence of strength. ~ Gabourey Sidibe,
654:It also occurred to him that perhaps this only meant that the less he saw of people, the more kindly he felt toward them, and that this might explain his current mild exasperation with his many condolence-offering acquaintances. ~ Helen Simonson,
655:Pleased to meet you." Sage said, offering his hand. "The pleasure is all mine," Rayna Purred. "Unless ofcourse, it's all Clea's which is even better."
Sage smiled and might have even blushed a bit, which was highly entertaining. ~ Hilary Duff,
656:There is nothing original I can offer this child. I am obligated to make an offering, however, a virgin to the gods, a stuffed animal to a new baby. If I lay this gift on the altar, will you promise me I’ll never get pregnant? I ~ Jami Attenberg,
657:To My Mother
To-day's your natal day,
Sweet flowers I bring;
Mother, accept, I pray,
My offering.
And may you happy live,
And long us bless;
Receiving as you give
Great happiness.
~ Christina Georgina Rossetti,
658:Various Eastern fathers referred to the practice of married priests in their churches, offering each one of us elements for a further careful evaluation of the choice of the Latin church to connect celibacy to ordained priesthood. ~ Angelo Scola,
659:In Anglo-Saxon times, according to Crippen, it was customary for someone offering a drink to say, “Wassail!” and for the recipient to respond “Drinkhail!” and for the participants to repeat the exercise until comfortably horizontal. ~ Bill Bryson,
660:I swear to you, Nora Grey, on this day, from now and forever, to give myself to you. I am yours. My love, my body, my soul—I place in your possession and protection.” He held out the ring, a single offering, a binding promise. ~ Becca Fitzpatrick,
661:If we are truly created equal than truly the love we commit to one another must be equal as well, this ruling will strengthen all of our communities by offering to all same sex couples the dignity of marriage across this great land. ~ Barack Obama,
662:Then there’s the third way proffered by the Lord of Discipline, which is beyond both hierarchy and territory. That is to do the work and give it to Him. Do it as an offering to God.   Give the act to me. Purged of hope and ego, ~ Steven Pressfield,
663:The offering of only one narrow slice of ourselves is especially pernicious on social networks like Facebook and Instagram, where we show others a glowing highlight reel of our lives, but hide the not-so-pretty behind-the-scenes parts. ~ Anonymous,
664:For me, romance isn't an over-the-top act. It's someone offering to help and to support me. Or if that person thinks I'm making the wrong decision, he'll tell me. I want him to be honest, because being that honest takes a lot of guts. ~ Thora Birch,
665:I believe everyone deserves grace, Clara. What you will have to ask yourself is if you should offer that grace from near or from afar. Offering grace does not mean offering your heart. That, my darlin’, must be protected at all cost. ~ Mia Sheridan,
666:I had dreamed of something so different from what reality was now offering up, but that dream had been a blind man's vision. That dream was a miracle. The morning was fading. And I remembered yet again that I was a tourist here. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
667:Many assume that offering a reward will help people to jump-start a healthy habit, which will then persist after the reward fades away. Not so. Often, as soon as the reward stops (and sometimes before it stops), the behavior stops. ~ Gretchen Rubin,
668:There prevails still a subtle form of legalism which would rob the Saviour of his crown of glory, earned by the cross, and would make of him a second Moses, offering us the stones of the law instead of the life-bread of the gospel. ~ Geerhardus Vos,
669:When are you most afraid? When the teacher hands out the test? When the popular people walk your way? When you think about the future? Even in your most fearful moments, Jesus is with you, offering a peace you can’t find anywhere else. ~ Max Lucado,
670:When God puts love and compassion in your heart toward someone, He’s offering you an opportunity to make a difference in that person’s life. You must learn to follow that love. Don’t ignore it. Act on it. Somebody needs what you have. ~ Joel Osteen,
671:When I came to know Mrs. Marcet personally; how often I cast my thoughts backward, delighting to connect the past and the present; how often, when sending a paper to her as a thank you offering, I thought of my first instructress. ~ Michael Faraday,
672:A new helicopter service called Gotham Air is now offering users cheap flights from Manhattan to JFK or Newark airports that start at just $99. If there's two words I trust together in the same sentence, it's 'cheap' and 'helicopter.' ~ Jimmy Fallon,
673:Being a spectator of calamities taking place in another country is a quintessential modern experience, the cumulative offering by more than a century and a half’s worth of those professional, specialized tourists known as journalists. ~ Susan Sontag,
674:Forests, beyond offering us their plainly utilitarian wealth, have to perform vast physiological functions in the great economy of nature, by contributing predominantly in the empire of vegetation to the liberation of oxygen. ~ Ferdinand von Mueller,
675:God wants us to receive everything that life was meant to teach. Then we take what we've learned, and it becomes our offering to God and to mankind. But we have to live in order to learn. And sometimes we have to fight in order to live. ~ Amy Harmon,
676:In the immense cathedral which is the universe of God, each person, whether scholar or manual laborer, is called to act as the priest of his whole life--to take all that is human, and to turn it into an offering and a hymn of glory. ~ Paul Evdokimov,
677:Lord, I’m so grateful for second chances. I’ve messed up so many times and in so many ways. Sometimes I want to hide in the corner. But You’re a God of do-overs. Thank You for redeeming even the worst situation and offering me new chances. ~ Various,
678:Ready to hit the sack?"
She choked on the last slide of her ice cream and cleared her throat, "With you?"
... "You offering?"
"No! I'm not offering." She pushed to her feet and then with a softer tone added, "Are you asking? ~ Robin Bielman,
679:Obedience is far better than sacrifice. He is much more interested in your listening to him than in your offering the fat of rams to him. 23 For rebellion is as bad as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as bad as worshiping idols. ~ Anonymous,
680:This was all of it, no doubt, the strange passing feeling that had come to me in the boat. Age. Vanity. The impossibility of accepting the new versions of oneself that life kept offering. The impossibility of the old version’s vanishing. ~ Sue Miller,
681:By offering a second chance. One last chance. Don’t get me wrong, I believe in using your head. But not in spending too much time in there. Fear lives in the head. And courage lives in the heart. The job is to get from one to the other. ~ Louise Penny,
682:Man is given faith in himself, his ideas and his powers that he may work and create and rise to greater things and in the end bring his strength as a worthy offering to the altar of the Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
683:Prayer is not just a tangential or peripheral part of corporate worship. In ancient Israel, the primary function of worship was the offering of prayer. And so it should be in our churches today. Our sanctuaries should be houses of prayer. ~ R C Sproul,
684:The moment you wake up, right away, you can smile. That’s a smile of enlightenment. You are aware that a new day is beginning, that life is offering you twenty-four brand-new hours to live, and that that’s the most precious of gifts. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
685:To be engrossed by something outside the rational mind, the mind that so frequently has its head up its own ass--seeing things in such a narrow and darkly narcissistic way that it presents a colo-rectal theology, offering hope to no one. ~ Anne Lamott,
686:whatever he was touting was the best thing he had ever produced. I liked him. When he was restored to the throne at Apple, we put him on the cover of Time, and soon thereafter he began offering me his ideas for a series we were doing ~ Walter Isaacson,
687:What is a photograph? For me, a fragment of quick-silver, a lucid dream, a scribbled note from the subconscious to be deciphered, perhaps, over years. It is a monologue trying to become a conversation, an offering, an alibi, a salute. ~ Eva Rubinstein,
688:Even the smallest meanest work became
A sweet or glad and glorious sacrament,
An offering to the self of the great world
Or a service to the One in each and all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
689:I think the Messianic concept, which is the Jewish offering to mankind, is a great victory. What does it mean? It means that history has a sense, a meaning, a direction; it goes somewhere, and necessarily in a good direction--the Messiah. ~ Elie Wiesel,
690:I think the Buddha presents an image of someone who believes in self-control. I think he's offering, perhaps, a critique of the romantic idea of the passions being this wonderful source of life or vitality that define you or your writing. ~ Pankaj Mishra,
691:she was offering me a glimpse into a crowded life, rather like those women who value one largely as a reflector, and to whom one has to pay one’s dues for being allowed to join them for a minute or two on their brilliant upward progress. ~ Anita Brookner,
692:The moment we see a pop artifact offering even a sliver of something different—say, a woman who isn’t a size zero or who doesn't treat a man as the center of the universe—we cling to it desperately because that representation is all we have. ~ Roxane Gay,
693:The primeval man in offering the first garland to his maiden thereby transcended the brute. He became human in thus rising above the crude necessities of nature. He entered the realm of art when he perceived the subtle use of the useless. ~ Kakuz Okakura,
694:Look at how far astray the man’s adoration had led him—so many misguided betrayals, each of them a burnt offering at the altar of her memory. But now you could sense the dawning realization that he had built a flawed temple to a false god. ~ Dan Fesperman,
695:Navajo Police lieutenant Joe Leaphorn, retired, paused for effect, pushing away the plate of toast crumbs and empty packets of grape jelly so he could rest his forearms on the table. “Wouldn’t you think she’d be offering to do me a favor? ~ Anne Hillerman,
696:Sometimes I know part of me is still a ghost, walking next to my mother, looking for something to make an offering to, holding her hand. Either this feeling means that part of me is dead, or that she's alive, somewhere inside of me. ~ Terese Marie Mailhot,
697:By offering an education centered on values, the faculty in Catholic schools can create an interactive setting between parents and students that is geared toward long-term healthy character and scholastic development for all enrolled children. ~ Mark Foley,
698:Kornblum was, nevertheless, unable to resist offering that final criticism to his erstwhile pupil on his performance that night. “Never worry about what you are escaping from,” he said. “Reserve your anxieties for what you are escaping to. ~ Michael Chabon,
699:The Spirit has made itself Matter in order to place itself there as an instrument for the well-being and joy, yogakṣema, of created beings, for a self. offering of universal physical utility and service. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Gnostic Being,
700:The number of snitches in drug cases has soared in recent years, partly because the government has tempted people to “cooperate” with law enforcement by offering cash, putting them “on payroll,” and promising cuts of seized drug assets, ~ Michelle Alexander,
701:When he was restored to the throne at Apple, we put him on the cover of Time, and soon thereafter he began offering me his ideas for a series we were doing on the most influential people of the century. He had launched his “Think Different ~ Walter Isaacson,
702:While offering to the Lord the results of Mr. Cowper’s hallucination, or declaring it was Love that lifted her, Jean Louise shared the warmness that prevails among diverse individuals who find themselves in the same boat for one hour each week. ~ Harper Lee,
703:11[†]For from the rising of the sun to its setting my name  q will be [2] great among the nations, and in every place incense will be offered to my name, and a pure offering. For my name  q will be great among the nations, says the LORD of hosts. ~ Anonymous,
704:I threw the baseball I held after all. Not hard and it didn’t even hit him but it almost did.
His eyes went wide with surprise.
“So you weren’t really offering me a target?”
He gave a small laugh. “I didn’t think you’d take me up on it. ~ Kasie West,
705:I was thinking of making a drawing of Malik,” she said. “He will be standing on a field of battle, taking off his helm and showing his pale skin. The soldiers around will be dropping their weapons and offering him medicine.” Aedan laughed. ~ Jonathan Renshaw,
706:Be creative. Don`t be worried about what you are doing - one has to do many things - but do everything creatively, with devotion. Then your work becomes worship. Then whatsoever you do is a prayer. And whatsoever you do is an offering at the altar. ~ Rajneesh,
707:Being attentive to inequality and not tone deaf to it. But offering prescriptions that are actually going to help folks in communities that feel forgotten. That's going to be our most important strategy. And I think we can successfully do that. ~ Barack Obama,
708:Pure generosity emerges when we give without the need for our offering to be received in a certain way. That’s why the best kind of generosity comes from inner abundance, rather than from feeling deficient and hollow, starved for validation. ~ Sharon Salzberg,
709:Though his book vigorously promotes strong privacy, Miller notes that people routinely trade personal information for convenience or a few dollars of savings, even offering names of “friends and families” to commercial users, if it benefits them. ~ David Brin,
710:You are the richest chocolate, the most decadent dessert, the smoothest coffee, and the most intoxicating wine.” He kisses his way down my throat and circles each of my nipples with his tongue. My body melts and I arch my back, offering more. ~ Sarah Castille,
711:Qualification and discovery whiteboards” – Use these boards early in the process to assess your lead, size up your prospect’s needs and make sure your offering fits. This conversation sets up your subsequent “why-change” and “solution” whiteboards. ~ Anonymous,
712:We must choose between the violence of adults and the smiles of children. Between the ugliness of hate and the will to oppose it. Between inflicting suffering and humiliation on our fellow man and offering him the solidarity and hope he deserves. ~ Elie Wiesel,
713:And the vulnerability doesn’t go away even if we’re trained and experienced in offering and getting feedback. Experience does, however, give us the advantage of knowing that we can survive the exposure and uncertainty, and that it’s worth the risk. ~ Bren Brown,
714:If it be the pleasure of Heaven that my country shall require the poor offering of my life, the victim shall be ready, at the appointed hour of sacrifice, come when that hour may. But while I do live, let me have a country, and that a free country! ~ John Adams,
715:I swear to you, Nora Grey, on this day, from now and forever, to give myself to you. I am yours. My love, my body, my soul—I place in your possession and protection.” He held out the ring, a single offering, a binding promise. ~ Patch + Nora ~ Becca Fitzpatrick,
716:January/February issue, James Fallows examined the consequences—namely, lost wars—of the growing distance between the American public and the country’s armed forces. All civilians, from the president on down, are getting in the habit of offering the ~ Anonymous,
717:Marco Rubio said he was personally open over a long period of time to offering a path to citizenship for immigrants here illegally. Rubio's work on a comprehensive immigration bill is one of his biggest vulnerabilities with Republican primary voters. ~ Ted Cruz,
718:You are the owner of all that you perceive. But you can't perceive apart from your vibration. Feel your way, little-by-little, into a greater sense of abundance by looking for the treasures that the Universe is offering you on a day-to-day basis. ~ Esther Hicks,
719:An iceberg means it’s tens of millions of years old and has calved from a glacier. (This is why you must love life: one day you’re offering up your social security number to the Russia Mafia; two weeks later you’re using the word calve as a verb.) ~ Maria Semple,
720:As the humanities and liberal arts are downsized, privatized, and commodified, higher education finds itself caught in the paradox of claiming to invest in the future of young people while offering them few intellectual, civic, and moral supports. ~ Henry Giroux,
721:AT&T is now offering a new service that allows you to pay your bills through your TV screen by using your remote control. So instead of saying, "The check's in the mail," people are going to say, "Hey, I wanted to pay, but I couldn't find the remote." ~ Jay Leno,
722:Perceived Value determines how much your customers will be willing to pay for what you’re offering. The higher the perceived value of your offering, the more you’ll be able to charge for it, which significantly improves your chances of succeeding. ~ Josh Kaufman,
723:A great tactician creates plans. A good tactician recognizes the soundness of a plan presented to him. A fair tactician must see the plan succeed before offering approval. Those with no tactical ability at all may never understand or accept it. Nor ~ Timothy Zahn,
724:In his self-offering on the Cross, Jesus, as it were, brings all the sin of the world deep within the love of God and wipes it away. Accepting the Cross, entering into fellowship with Christ, means entering the realm of transformation and expiation. ~ Benedict XVI,
725:She would be a mentor and an inspiration to girls like herself, the quiet ones who'd sleepwalked their way through high school, knowing nothing except that they couldn't possibly be happy with any of the choices the world seemed to be offering them. ~ Tom Perrotta,
726:Ah yes, the dreaded one-way system. . . He and Nancy had laughed later, imagining Dante redesigning Purgatory into a one-way system offering occasional glimpses of St. Peter and the pearly gates over two separate sets of dividing concrete barriers. ~ Helen Simonson,
727:The basic rule [of writing] given us was simple and heartbreaking. A story to be effective had to convey something from the writer to the reader, and the power of its offering was the measure of its excellence. Outside of that, there were no rules. ~ John Steinbeck,
728:Nothing is as fast as the speed of trust. Nothing is as fulfilling as a relationship of trust. Nothing is as inspiring as an offering of trust. Nothing is as profitable as the economics of trust. Nothing has more influence than a reputation of trust. ~ Stephen Covey,
729:Real crying usually lasts two minutes or less, but may continue for five. After that point, the child is merely complaining... I would require him to stop the protest crying, usually by offering him a little more of whatever caused the original tears. ~ James Dobson,
730:During the warm season (August 8 and 9), Maine is a true vacation paradise, offering visitors a chance to jump into crystal-clear mountain lakes and see if they can get back out again before their bodily tissue is frozen as solid as a supermarket turkey. ~ Dave Barry,
731:>Question:  When would these affirmations offer a positive vibration? Answer:  When they are true for you! When you state something that is not true for you, you are offering a negative vibration because the statement activates doubt within you. ~ Michael J Losier,
732:I’m offering you a title and fortune. All you have to do is lie back in the dark, then spend nine months swelling up like a tick. What could possibly deter any woman from accepting?”
“What, indeed. Perhaps a disinclination to feeling like a broodmare. ~ Tessa Dare,
733:Loneliness itself is material for sacrifice. The very longings themselves can be offered to Him who understands perfectly. The transformation into something He can use for the good of others takes place only when the offering is put into his hands. ~ Elisabeth Elliot,
734:...she knew in her heart that nature has a preference for a particular order: parents die, then children die. But it was a harsh design, offering little relief from pain, for being in accord with it means that the fortunate find themselves orphaned. ~ Charles Frazier,
735:The Universe does not know whether the vibration that you're offering is because of something you're observing or something you're remembering or something that you are imagining. It just receives the vibration and answers it with things that match it. ~ Esther Hicks,
736:23Therefore if you are presenting your offering at the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24leave your offering there before the altar and go; first be reconciled to your brother, and then come and present your offering. ~ Anonymous,
737:Now he could see that it wasn’t charity Gansey was offering. It was just truth.

And something else: friendship of the unshakable kind. Friendship you could swear on. That could be busted nearly to breaking and come back stronger than before. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
738:Our thoughts and desires are based in hope, but our behaviors are based in fear. This misalignment often causes a feeling of hopelessness and continues the cycle of feeding outdated ideologies and Guru genres offering gimmicks to anesthetize the pain. ~ Steve Maraboli,
739:The value of the sport and the value of sports in general, with the life lessons, the ups and downs. The depth of the life experience, what athletes are actually offering to us when they come out and play, if you look at a season and go moment by moment. ~ Willi Smith,
740:We must choose between the violence of adults and the smiles of children, between the ugliness of hate and the will to oppose it. Between inflicting suffering and humiliation on our fellow man and offering him the solidarity and hope he deserves. Or not. ~ Elie Wiesel,
741:You spent the afternoon offering me nuts.” “I was being considerate—you might have experienced a change in tastes after being bitten. Haven’t you heard of werewolves?” “An angry squirrel is hardly a werewolf.” “One never knows. Magic is growing unruly.” “We ~ K M Shea,
742:Hip hop scholarship must strive to reflect the form it interrogates, offering the same features as the best hip hop: seductive rhythms, throbbing beats, intelligent lyrics, soulful samples, and a sense of joy that is never exhausted in one sitting. ~ Michael Eric Dyson,
743:... In a free society, skeptics are the watchdogs against irrationalism - the consumer advocates of ideas. Debunking is not simply the divestment of bunk; its utility is in offering a better alternative, along with a lesson on how thinking goes wrong. ~ Michael Shermer,
744:I nudged my head into his shoulder. "Thanks for offering to come over."
"you realize that trying to keep your distance from me will not lessen my affection for you," he said.
"i guess?" i said.
"all efforts to save me from you will fail," he said. ~ John Green,
745:We are the offspring of history, and must establish our own paths in this most diverse and interesting of conceivable universes—one indifferent to our suffering, and therefore offering us maximum freedom to thrive, or to fail, in our own chosen way. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
746:Every time you give a parent a sense of success or of empowerment, you're offering it to the baby indirectly. Because every time a parent looks at that baby and says 'Oh, you're so wonderful,' that baby just bursts with feeling good about themselves. ~ T Berry Brazelton,
747:found the world a puzzling thing: it asked little of them, and they answered with little, and yet it ridiculed their offering. Such a paradox they could not understand, and therefore sank into listless indifference, or shiftlessness, or reckless bravado. ~ W E B Du Bois,
748:If there were only any peace in Egypt I should like it better," said Mrs. Allerton. "But you can never be alone anywhere. Someone is always pestering you for money, or offering you donkeys, or beads, or expeditions to native villages, or duck shooting. ~ Agatha Christie,
749:Meditation on Savitri, August 12, 2020, Wednesday.Offering its little squares and cubes of wordAs figured substitutes for reality,A mummified mnemonic alphabet,It helped the unseeing Force to read her works. ~ Sri Aurobindo, (1993). Savitri, Sri Aurobindo Ashram, p. 242,
750:Religion begins by offering magical aid to harassed and bewildered men; it culminates by giving to a people that unity of morals and belief which seems so favorable to statesmanship and art; it ends by fighting suicidally in the lost cause of the past. For ~ Will Durant,
751:Without the Spirit of God we can do nothing. We are as ships without wind or chariots without steeds. Like branches without sap, we are withered. Like coals without fire, we are useless. As an offering without the sacrificial flame, we are unaccepted. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
752:You can take a thing when no one's looking. But defending it, even with all the advantage on your side, is no easy task,' Madoc told her with a laugh. She looked up to find him offering her a hand. 'Power is much easier to acquire than it is to hold on to. ~ Holly Black,
753:You can take a thing when no one’s looking. But defending it, even with all the advantage on your side, is no easy task,” Madoc told her with a laugh. She looked up to find him offering her a hand. “Power is much easier to acquire than it is to hold on to. ~ Holly Black,
754:You can think of spiritual practice as a kind of spiritual re-parenting ... You're offering yourself the two qualities that make up good parenting: understanding - seeing yourself for who you truly are - and relating to what you see with unconditional love. ~ Tara Brach,
755:Half the benefit of prayer is in the asking itself, in the offering of a clearly posed and well-considered intention. If you don’t have this, all your pleas and desires are boneless, floppy, inert; they swirl at your feet in a cold fog and never lift. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
756:Yet even as the wind stirs your petals, flowers fall. My flowers are eternal, my songs live forever. I lift them in offering; I, a singer. I cast them to the wind, I spill them. The flowers become gold, they come to dwell inside the palace of eternity. ~ Jacqueline Carey,
757:Dost though even know what would become of me?...Friends would disown me. It is our way. I would be alone!"

"No," he said unexpectdly. He turned and held his hand to her, palm upward, empty, a simple masculine offering. "Maddygirl. With...me. ~ Laura Kinsale,
758:The truth is Canada is a cloud-cuckoo-land, an insufferably rich country governed by idiots, its self-made problems offering comic relief to the ills of the real world out there, where famine and racial strife and vandals in office are the unhappy rule. ~ Mordecai Richler,
759:your mother
is in the habit of
offering more love
than you can carry


your father is absent


you are a war
the border between two countries
the collateral damage
the paradox that joins the two
but also splits them apart ~ Rupi Kaur,
760:Dr Rahmat thrust his hand between her legs, tried to kiss her and suggested that there was time for a quick one.'

'Meaning sexual intercourse?' Sir Hector was clearly not about to take the view that my client was offering his patient a small sherry. ~ John Mortimer,
761:Extravagant love, as in every generation before us, has been ridiculed and scorned. it is seen as wasteful and reckless overspending. But extravagant love, the offering of everything, the emptying of the pockets of our life, is the essence of true Christianity. ~ Eric Ludy,
762:Here was the traditional device by which those in charge of any social order mobilize and discipline a recalcitrant population—offering the adventure and rewards of military service to get poor people to fight for a cause they may not see clearly as their own. ~ Howard Zinn,
763:Some argue that our success is short-lived and temporary. So, we now need to make efforts to constantly expand the player base by offering services and titles that can appeal, not only to those who have never played games, but also to those who play them hard. ~ Satoru Iwata,
764:The best way of preventing violence does not consist in forbidding objects, or even rivalistic desire, as the tenth commandment does, but in offering to people the model that will protect them from mimetic rivalries rather than involving them in these rivalries. ~ Ren Girard,
765:Peace offering?” I heard Elec say. When I turned around, to my mortification, he was standing there with a dick in his hands. Not any dick. My dick. My vibrator. My purple life-sized rubber penis. Elec waved it. “Nothing says I’m sorry like a dick and a smile. ~ Penelope Ward,
766:The forest is a peculiar organism of unlimited kindness and benevolence that makes no demands for its sustenance and extends generously the products of its life activity; it affords protection to all beings, offering shade even to the axe-man who destroys it. ~ Gautama Buddha,
767:Delicately he put the tiny needle to its task upon the revolving record. A thin and rasping Vienna waltz poured forth from the metal horn. I laughed to see it, this sweet invention, set before them like an offering. Was the waltz like incense rising in the air? But ~ Anne Rice,
768:I'm sure at one point I will do some acting again, but it would have to be the right thing. I'm not going to do it just because people are offering it to me. Not for those box-office, bullshit, money, noncreative people. But I'll do it when it's right to do it. ~ Lenny Kravitz,
769:The paper tiger hero, James Bond, offering the whites a triumphant image of themselves, is saying what many whites want desperately to hear reaffirmed: I am still the White Man, lord of the land, licensed to kill, and the world is still an empire at my feet. ~ Eldridge Cleaver,
770:A man who is fearless, who is really in revolt, struggling to find out what it means to learn, to love—such a man does not ask if it is one process or three. We are so clever with words, and we think that by offering explanations we have solved the problem. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
771:Because I've always aspired to direct and produce, I've literally worked with about 200 directors and countless producers, so what I appreciate is how, through osmosis and through actually asking questions and through people offering wisdom, there's a lot in there. ~ Malik Yoba,
772:But tomorrow, dawn will come the way I picture her, barefoot and disheveled, standing outside my window in one of the fragile cotton dresses of the poor. She will look in at me with her thin arms extended, offering a handful of birdsong and a small cup of light. ~ Billy Collins,
773:It’s true our lives can pass small and unnoticed by the masses, and we are no less dignified for having lived quietly. In fact, I’ve come to believe there’s something noble about doing little with your life save offering love to a person who is offering it back. ~ Donald Miller,
774:Neither explaining suffering nor offering a program for the elimination of suffering, Lamentations keeps company with the extensive biblical witness that gives dignity to suffering by insisting that God enters our suffering and is companion to our suffering. ~ Eugene H Peterson,
775:Ranerio wrapped his hand around mine, guiding my fingers like Lucius had done when he'd shown me the latch behind the dressing-room door mirror. But while the warrior I loved had been offering me an escape route, the pacifist was trying to show me how to fight. ~ Beth Fantaskey,
776:Every place is now God's temple, and His people can as truly serve Him in their daily employments as in His house. They are to be always "ministering," offering the spiritual sacrifice of prayer and praise, and presenting themselves a "living sacrifice. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
777:Finding a seat in the back, she worshipped with the early service congregation, eyes closed, arms held wide, her heart offering it all to the One who wooed her with love and grace. Unconditional and uncompromising. Perfectly done on His part, not so much hers. But ~ Rachel Hauck,
778:- "I once knew a girl who loved tigers so much she almost became one herself.” Because I am little, and my love of tigers comes directly from him, I believe he is talking about me, offering me a fairy tale in which I can imagine myself—and will, for years and years. ~ T a Obreht,
779:I think that if your approach is one where you don't want to alienate anybody, you're going to have to soften the viewpoint or the information that you're offering to such an extent that it doesn't have the power to make any difference. You have to take that risk. ~ Eddie Vedder,
780:The only thing I need is the chance she’s now willing to give me. I can finally show her the man I am now. I can make up for all the hurt I’ve caused her. All the pain. I’ll earn her friendship before offering her my life. It’s hers anyway. She just needs to take it. ~ J Daniels,
781:History is not, of course, a cookbook offering pretested recipes. It teaches by analogy, not by maxims. It can illuminate the consequences of actions in comparable situations, yet each generation must discover for itself what situations are in fact comparable. ~ Henry A Kissinger,
782:It is an absolute magic, and the magic has little to do with what Shakespeare has to say. You can memorize every cool quote and be as clueless as you were before reading. So it is not Shakespeare’s offering that invokes this evolution. The secret, the magic, is YOU! ~ Laura Bates,
783:Sixty-three percent of our university students are female. But you still see violations of women's rights in Iran. A Muslim man can have up to four wives. He can divorce his wife without offering any reason, while it is quite difficult for a woman to get a divorce. ~ Shirin Ebadi,
784:Offering

I made a poem going
to sleep last night, woke
in sunlight, it was clean forgotten.

If it was any good, gods
of the great darkness
where sleep goes and farther
death goes, you not named,
then as true offering
accept it. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
785:And though many women might enjoy the offering of such compliments, I did not want him to love me based on temporal things like a smile or voice or presence, things that could vanish through mood or an unexpected cloud. He must love me for the sake of love alone . . . ~ Nancy Moser,
786:Christianity has from its beginning portrayed itself as a gospel of peace, a way of reconciliation (with God, with other creatures), and a new model of human community, offering the 'peace which passes understanding' to a world enmeshed in sin and violence. (1) ~ David Bentley Hart,
787:He would always be something sharp and deadly on the inside, something that could be used to destroy, but every blade needs a sheath and every gun needs a holster to protect it. I had no problem offering myself up as the thing that kept this particular weapon secure. ~ Jay Crownover,
788:I’m sorry I moved in on your date. It was a total violation of bro code, and for that, I’m offering you one free swing at me. Just make sure to stay away from my nose, because I’ve broken that motherfucker way too many times and I’m scared one day it won’t heal right. ~ Elle Kennedy,
789:Once we know that the entire physical world around us, all of creation, is both the hiding place and the revelation place for God, this world becomes home, safe, enchanted, offering grace to any who look deeply. I call that kind of deep and calm seeing “contemplation. ~ Richard Rohr,
790:That includes Randal’s wolf or beast forms. But it doesn’t really matter, as he can still use his natural strength and speed. And I’m not in the same league as a werewolf on those terms.” “Randal is especially brutal, too,” Gordon said, offering me no help whatsoever. ~ Steve McHugh,
791:The moment I bowed down offering the prayers of passion The thought of temples and mosques vanished Bulleh danced oblivious of the world, to win his Friend and lost all his false ego One look of the Teacher changed Bulleh forever

~ Bulleh Shah, The moment I bowed down
,
792:This weird thing happens when you're in a movie that has some level of success. People start offering you all kinds of things, and they just expect you to do them because they'll be good for your career. It's not about the project's integrity or anything like that. ~ Kristen Stewart,
793:It is not enough to say prayers: we must become, be prayer, prayer incarnate. All of life, each act, each act, every gesture, even the smile of the human face, must become a hymn of adoration, an offering, a prayer. One should offer not what one has but what one is. ~ Paul Evdokimov,
794:Paying It Forward is about spontaneously offering favors, not needing to say yes when someone asks too much of you. And also, it’s about kindness rather than niceness. There’s a difference. Kindness is spontaneous and real. Niceness just mostly wants to be liked. ~ Catherine Ryan Hyde,
795:Strangely, meanness pays more than offering constructive and interesting commentary. Every season I think, "This is the last season. I'm not gonna read tomorrow morning. Forget it." The first thing when I wake up - quite late, usually - I am craving the newspaper. ~ Nicolas Ghesquiere,
796:This is your fault. F*cking flirting with another guy in front of me, practically offering up your p*ssy to him. But it's not yours to give away, is it? That's right, baby, it's not. Your f*cking p*ssy belongs to me, and I'm going to make sure everyone know that it's taken. ~ K I Lynn,
797:Yes, you can get a man to do just about anything, and you know it. So, what are you going to attract him into doing? Buying you a nice house? Giving you the space to guide your own life? Or, offering his deepest gifts to you and all beings while opening his heart to God? ~ David Deida,
798:And the largest piece was buried beneath a pile of offal Ziller had gathered along the bridle paths of Central Park. Naturally, as the days wore on, the exhibition began to engage senses other than sight and touch, offering somewhat of a challenge to olfactory aesthetics. ~ Tom Robbins,
799:I do not see anything especially dystopian in offering some relatively unproductive people a minimum income as an incentive to leave the workforce. As long as the result is more opportunity and higher incomes for those who do want to work hard and advance their situation. ~ Martin Ford,
800:thing. All I’m offering is a clean bed in a sleepy colony town, in the home of two awesome gentlemen who love it when I bring houseguests. Also, three dogs who will lick your face and be your best friends forever. And my Ba makes the best fucking waffles in the galaxy. ~ Becky Chambers,
801:. . . the final page of any novel is a destination, the creation of form offering the illusion of inevitability, the denial of chaos. We don’t love novels because they are like life, but because they are unlike it—deftly organized, filled with the satisfaction of shape. ~ Patricia Hampl,
802:To be engrossed by something outside ourselves is a powerful antidote for the rational mind, the mind that so frequently has its head up its own ass—seeing things in such a narrow and darkly narcissistic way that it presents a colo-rectal theology, offering hope to no one. ~ Anne Lamott,
803:I’d be at work, where people respected my opinions,” said Nick. “And then I’d come home and it was like I was the village idiot. I’d pack the dishwasher the wrong way. I’d pick the wrong clothes for the children. I stopped offering to help. It wasn’t worth the criticism. ~ Liane Moriarty,
804:I have been told by people close to Trump that "Brexit Britain" is the only foreign policy issue that interests him, because he thinks the UK referendum paved the way for him. He hopes to help Britain leave the EU, and possibly to damage the EU, by offering a trade deal. ~ Anne Applebaum,
805:It's tough to say no to peace, to the comfort of it. All through history, people have traded wealth, children, land, and lives to buy it.

But peace can't be bought, can it, chief, prime minister? The only ones offering to sell it always want something more. They lie. ~ Jim Butcher,
806:To become a doctor, you spend so much time in the tunnels of preparation--head down, trying not to screw up, just going from one day to the next--that it is a shock to find yourself at the other end, with someone shaking your hand and offering you a job. But the day comes. ~ Atul Gawande,
807:When you grow up, as I have, in the shadow of Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and others, success is defined as the total global transformation of a market. To achieve that, you need low prices and an attractive offering. It's about trying to make a positive impact on a big scale. ~ Reed Hastings,
808:Where is the church when it hurts? If the church is doing its job—binding wounds, comforting the grieving, offering food to the hungry—I don't think people will wonder so much where God is when it hurts. They'll know where God is: in the presence of God's people on earth. ~ Philip Yancey,
809:But Paying It Forward is about spontaneously offering favors, not needing to say yes when someone asks too much of you. And also, it’s about kindness rather than niceness. There’s a difference. Kindness is spontaneous and real. Niceness just mostly wants to be liked. ~ Catherine Ryan Hyde,
810:How ‘bout you, Jena?” He leaned closer, speaking in an exaggerated whisper. “We could go somewhere private. I know you probably got some scars from being shot, but you can’t see a scar in the dark, right?”
The dickwad was offering her a pity fuck in a darkened room? ~ Susannah Sandlin,
811:How ‘bout you, Jena?” He leaned closer, speaking in an exaggerated whisper. “We could go somewhere private. I know you probably got some scars from being shot, but you can’t see a scar in the dark, right?”
The dickwad was offering her a pity fuck in a darkened room? ~ Susannah Sandlin,
812:I dinna normally answer the door."

"Ah," Strath said, offering a charming smile as he whipped off his hat. "You are doing a fine job thus far. Well done, Mrs. Pitcairn."

She eyed Strath the way a cat might eye a snake. "It dinna take much in the way o'talent. ~ Karen Hawkins,
813:It was not a big smile, not particularly bold or polite or ironic or glib, not asking for anything or offering anything, not stringy or careless, not, in short, like any smile I had ever experienced before. But such a smile! You could burn a hole in the world with that smile. ~ Meg Rosoff,
814:To be engrossed by something outside ourselves is a powerful antidote for the rational mind, the mind that so frequently has its head up its own ass - seeing things in such a narrow and darkly narcissistic way that it presents a colo-rectal theology, offering hope to no one. ~ Anne Lamott,
815:A sore pain troubles me day and night, and I cannot sleep; I long for the meeting with my Beloved, and my father's house gives me pleasure no more. The gates of the sky are opened, the temple is revealed: I meet my husband, and leave at His feet the offering of my body and my mind. ~ Kabir,
816:I believe in nurturing creativity and offering a haven for creators, enabling them to develop their ideas to the fullest. With more and more talented creators being drawn to Cirque in an environment that fulfills them, these are ideal to continue developing great new shows. ~ Guy Laliberte,
817:Ryder cocked an eyebrow. “So that’s how you get men do your bidding.”
She laughed, still looking into Tiny’s eyes. “By calling them good boy and offering them treats?”
Ryder smiled. Her laugh made him happy. Hell, just looking at the woman made him happy. “Works for me. ~ Amy Andrews,
818:To be a deep listener, one of the first things we have to do is give up the need and the desire to give advice. Knowing answers does not require stating them; there are times when offering answers is not helpful, as when a person is in the middle of their own learning process. ~ John Earle,
819:We shall draw nearer to God, not by trying to avoid the sufferings inherent in all loves, but by accepting them and offering them to Him; throwing away all defensive armour. If our hearts need to be broken, and if He chooses this as the way in which they should break, so be it. ~ C S Lewis,
820:But tomorrow, dawn will come the way I picture her,
barefoot and disheveled, standing outside my window
in one of the fragile cotton dresses of the poor.
She will look in at me with her thin arms extended,
offering a handful of birdsong and a small cup of light. ~ Billy Collins,
821:I’m offering you my pain. My blood. My pleasure. I’m offering you the right to whip and fuck. To debase and harm. I’m offering to fight your needs with my own. I’m willing to join you in the darkness and find pleasure in excruciating pain. I’m willing to be your monster, Q. ~ Pepper Winters,
822:The offering up or cleaning up ego stuff is called purification. Purification is the act of letting go. This is done out of discriminative awareness. That is, you understand that you are an entity passing through a life in which the entire drama is an offering for your awakening. ~ Ram Dass,
823:don’t have to give in to those things that would keep you from the life God has for you—you may have in your past, but you don’t have to in your future. You can begin again! Jesus is sending away your accusers and offering you a new chance today. Today can be a brand-new start. ~ Joyce Meyer,
824:Have you had this place inspected?” he asked. “The house is ready to fall off its timbers. I couldn’t risk coming in here without offering a quick prayer to Butyakengo.”
“Who?”
“A Gypsy protective spirit.” He smiled at her. “But now that I’m here, I’ll take my chances. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
825:To create - a role, a poem, picture, music, a rapture in stone: great. But not for her.

What she wanted was to donate to the world a good Maud Martha. That was the offering, the bit of art, that could not come from any other.

She would polish and hone that. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks,
826:Ring the bells that still can ring, Forget your perfect offering, There’s a crack in everything, That’s how the light gets in.’ ‘What an extraordinary poem. Ruth Zardo?’ ‘Leonard Cohen. Clara used it in her piece. She wrote it on the wall behind the three of you, like graffiti. ~ Louise Penny,
827:GRATIANO
I have a wife I love. I wish she were in heaven so she could appeal to some power to make this dog Jew change his mind.

NERISSA
It’s nice you’re offering to sacrifice her behind her back. That wish of yours could start quite an argument back at home. ~ William Shakespeare,
828:I had staked all on Gussie making a favourable impression on his hostess, basing my confidence on the fact that he was one of those timid, obsequious, teacup-passing, thin-bread- and-butter-offering, yes-men whom women of my Aunt Dahlia's type nearly always like at first sight. ~ P G Wodehouse,
829:Marketing and sales isn’t about trying to persuade, coerce, or manipulate people into buying your services. It’s about putting yourself out in front of, and offering your services to, those whom you are meant to serve—people who already need and are looking for your services. In ~ Michael Port,
830:And he paused, aware at last of the gathering weight of the silence. Fourteen images stared at him, without any of them offering a word in response.

Bakst said sharply, "You have talked of freedom. You have it!"

Then, uncertainly, he said, "Isn't that what you want? ~ Isaac Asimov,
831:I ask Andrew if he would mind offering some advice to younger people about how to live. He thinks they should ask themselves, What are my values? How do I want to live my life? What do I care about? And then, Does my living situation feed that or does it take away from that? Oh, ~ Bella DePaulo,
832:In this silence of the white Host, carried in the Monstrance, are all His words; there is His whole life given in offering to the Father for each of us; there is also the glory of the glorified body, which started with the Resurrection, and still continues in Heavenly union. ~ Pope John Paul II,
833:When Penny left a banana on her desk as an offering, Jude rejected it. She refused it by putting it on Penny's work chair, so when Penny went to write, she sat on it. As tiny passive-aggressive revenges went, it was adorable, and it killed Penny that they couldn't laugh about it. ~ Mary H K Choi,
834:Hamlet is not offering you hypocritical advice against revenge; it is reminding you that the choice really is yours to make! No matter what kind of social prison we are placed in, we are all empowered to make choices that are rooted in what we want, and not what others expect of us. ~ Laura Bates,
835:If you survive, you have to prove it was that bad; or else, they think you are.
Surviving is some kind of sin, like floating up off the dunking stool like a witch. You have to be permanently écorchée, heart-on-sleeve, offering up organs and body parts like a medieval female saint. ~ Roxane Gay,
836:[...] little Belgium once again busy at what she does best, tamely offering her battlefield-ready lowlands to boots, hooves, iron wheels, waiting to be first to go under before a future no one in Europe has the clairvoyance to imagine as anything more than an exercise for clerks. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
837:One of the unfortunate things about creative writing courses is that they make people impatient. People feel that they have prepared themselves and that they must now do it. In fact there are positive incentives for doing so - universities are offering degrees for writing novels. ~ Robert Dessaix,
838:I do think that the long poem speaks for an inner need for continuity. We live in a time of so many losses, disruptions, and distractions, that the need for a sense of the ongoing is quite real. The long poem is very satisfying in offering the psyche a model of coherence. ~ Alison Hawthorne Deming,
839:In the name of friendship you should make sure your door is always open to listen. Don't feel you need to provide unsolicited possible solutions, answers or even ideas. Listening without judgment and offering assistance when asked should be enough. That's friendship's high calling. ~ Amy Dickinson,
840:The goal of human freedom is not in freedom itself, nor it is in man, but in God. By giving man freedom, God has yielded to man a piece of His Divine authority, but with the intention that man himself would voluntarily bring it as a sacrifice to God, a most perfect offering. ~ Theophan the Recluse,
841:You’re playing with fire, little girl,” he says quietly. “I’m not one of your toys, and I’m not interested in what you’re offering.”
“I’m not offering anything.” I retort, even though his words sting. “I like my men more…refined.”
His grin calls my bluff. “You sure about that? ~ Lauren Layne,
842:People find hope, comfort, or confidence in making the sign of the cross or not walking under a ladder, just as you find hope and confidence in offering a pennant to the witch. Magic exists in the minds of those who believe in it, not in its actual influence on reality. ~ Thomas Olde Heuvelt,
843:...maybe just once in this life someone loves us for the us we don't even know how to be yet. And if we lose him too early--in the name of all the promises in the world: a new job, a new city, an old love offering us happily ever after--we may just lose that chance to be our best self. ~ Laura Dave,
844:The basic paradox about sex is that it always seems to be offering more than it can deliver. A glimpse of a girl undressing through a lighted bedroom window induces a vision of ecstatic delight, but in the actual process of persuading the girl into bed, the vision somehow evaporates. ~ Colin Wilson,
845:I am never very forward in offering spiritual consolation to any one in distress or disease. I believe that such resources, to be of any service, must be self-evolved in the first instance. I am something of the Quaker's mind in this, and am inclined to wait for the spirit. ~ Samuel Taylor Coleridge,
846:I’ll be asking if I was faithful to my gifts, to the needs I saw around me, and to the ways I engaged those needs with my gifts—faithful, that is, to the value, rightness, and truth of offering the world the best I had, as best I could. For helping me understand this—and for imbuing ~ Parker J Palmer,
847:Many a morning and evening found Mother and me meditating before an improvised shrine, offering flowers dipped in fragrant sandalwood paste. With frankincense and myrrh as well as our united devotions, we honored the divinity which had found full expression in Lahiri Mahasaya. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
848:Mrs. Caillaux bought a gun, practiced with it at the gunsmith’s shop, then went to the editor’s office and fired six times. In her testimony, offering an unintended metaphor for what was soon to befall Europe, she said, “These pistols are terrible things. They go off by themselves.” She ~ Erik Larson,
849:She has stepped out into a different night, a different town altogether, one of those first-person-shooter towns that you can drive around in seemingly forever, but never away from. The only humanity visible are virtual extras in the distance, none offering any of the help she needs. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
850:The third thing I repeat to myself, even if the person who is offering feedback is skilled and it’s a productive conversation, but I’m still reeling because it’s hard to hear, is “This is the path to mastery, this is the path to mastery,” or “These people care about this as much as I do. ~ Bren Brown,
851:It is a beautiful offering to Me when you lay down your judgement and choose compassion. When you love others the way I love you, when you hold back the consequences they could have deserved, and when you treat them the way you’d like to be treated, the you shall receive mercy as well. ~ Angela Thomas,
852:It was almost Christmas, and a Santa Claus in a vacant lot was offering to appear in pictures for five dollars. The trim on his suit was mangy, as if it had been dug out of a dumpster, yet young mothers queued ten deep on the sidewalk, holding the hands of kids waiting to get in. ~ Garth Risk Hallberg,
853:I want her needy and spread wide, showing me what will always and only be mine. Smiling and offering herself to me. My own personal sex toy, my sweet slut. I never thought of that before either and those words I would have thought before to be disrespectful or negative are now beautiful. ~ Celia Aaron,
854:One must not think that a person who is suffering is not praying. He is offering up his sufferings to God, and many a time he is praying much more truly than one who goes away by himself and meditates his head off, and, if he has squeezed out a few tears, thinks that is prayer. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
855:The church is not a booster organization. We’re telling people a serious message about their condition before God, and about the tremendous news of the new life God is offering them in Christ. And we’re inviting them to enter into that life by dire and desperate means—repentance and faith. ~ Anonymous,
856:The more you know, the more easily you will develop your own philosophies about child rearing. When you have your facts straight, and when you have a parenting plan, you will be able to respond with confidence to those who are well-meaning but offering contrary or incorrect advice. ~ Elizabeth Pantley,
857:cover of Time, and soon thereafter he began offering me his ideas for a series we were doing on the most influential people of the century. He had launched his “Think Different” campaign, featuring iconic photos of some of the same people we were considering, and he found the endeavor ~ Walter Isaacson,
858:My father told me once that we are on earth to learn. God wants us to receive everything that life was meant to teach. Then we take what we've learned, and it becomes our offering to God and to mankind. But we have to live in order to learn. And sometimes we have to fight in order to live. ~ Amy Harmon,
859:My father told me once that we are on earth to learn. God wants us to receive everything that life was meant to teach. Then we take what we’ve learned, and it becomes our offering to God and to mankind. But we have to live in order to learn. And sometimes we have to fight in order to live. ~ Amy Harmon,
860:Rather than demanding our rights and creating for ourselves a world where we feel safe and accepted, we need to see the deep spiritual needs of the world and concern ourselves with offering people hope through Jesus Christ. That’s what being a living sacrifice is all about. Third, ~ John F MacArthur Jr,
861:Economic power is exercised by means of a positive, by offering men a reward, an incentive, a payment, a value; political power is exercised by means of a negative, by the threat of punishment, injury, imprisonment, destruction. The businessman's tool is values; the bureaucrat's tool is fear. ~ Ayn Rand,
862:He shows us that our lives are about love and not performance. He extends mercy rather than demands. So even when we fall short in the eyes of others, we can still be confident standing tall in his. And we can lift others up by offering them true grace rather than our personal guidelines. ~ Holley Gerth,
863:It's true that over-apologizing interrupts the flow of conversation and irritates the person who has to stop and offer reassurance, like, "No, it's fine, don't worry about it." But far greater than the challenge of toning down unnecessary "sorrys" is offering an apology when one is due. ~ Harriet Lerner,
864:No one is as capable of gratitude as one who has emerged from the kingdom of night. We know that every moment is a moment of grace, every hour an offering; not to share them would mean to betray them. Our lives no longer belong to us alone; they belong to all those who need us desperately. ~ Elie Wiesel,
865:Emboldened by the progress the Republican National Committee has made to ensure we are effectively engaging the Hispanic community year-round. It's important our party listens to voters' concerns and shares our proven principles, offering real solutions to the issues facing all communities. ~ Marco Rubio,
866:Pierre Bordieu was right: "The all powerful is he who does not wait but makes others wait. Absolute power is the power to make oneself unpredictable and deny other people any reasonable anticipation, to place them in total uncertainty by offering no scope for their capacity to predict." ~ Michael Jackson,
867:I would have dismissed [the email] as spam, except for the first word: urgent. People stopped flinging that word around like confetti after the Rising. Somehow, the potential for missing the message that zombies just ate your mom made offering to give people a bigger dick seem less important. ~ Mira Grant,
868:President Obama clearly cannot run on his record. All he's offering is more of the same. That's not good. Look at the economy. It's stagnating. And so, what they're now going to try and do is bring this campaign down to little things, distractions, distortions, smear, fear, anger, frustration. ~ Paul Ryan,
869:The first half-truth is that the issue of work-life balance is a “women’s problem.” If we define it that way, then it is up to women to find or at least implement the solution. The second is that employers can make room for caregiving by offering flextime and part-time arrangements. ~ Anne Marie Slaughter,
870:Adrian kept sending me e-mails, asking me to rescue him (while also offering unsolicited dating advice). Ms. Terwilliger continued her passive aggressive attempts to teach me magic. Eddie continued in his fierce dedication to Jill. And Angeline continued her not-so-subtle advances on Eddie. ~ Richelle Mead,
871:A truly scientific philosophy will be more humble, more piecemeal, more arduous, offering less glitter of outward mirage to flatter fallacious hopes, but more indifferent to fate, and more capable of accepting the world without the tyrannous imposition of our human and temporary demands. ~ Bertrand Russell,
872:Greet the sky and live, blossom!... Yet even as the wind stirs your petals, flowers fall. My flowers are eternal, my songs live forever. I lift them in offering; I, a singer. I cast them to the wind, I spill them. The flowers become gold, they come to dwell inside the palace of eternity. ~ Jacqueline Carey,
873:Hence it will not do for the Landlord to possess too fine a nature.... He must have no idiosyncracies, no particular bents or tendencies to this or that, but a general, uniform, and healthy development, such as his portly person indicates, offering himself equally on all sides to men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
874:In art and life we're always reading bodies and behaviors (and skies and skylines or whatever), constructing brief and shifting coherences, and I guess I want to capture that process of characterization and re-characterization instead of offering up a few stable, easily-summarized individuals. ~ Ben Lerner,
875:I am not offering God as a theory to compete with scientific theories about the universe. Rather I am saying that those self-contained, secular theories provide evidence for theologically neutral premises in philosophical arguments leading to a conclusion that has theistic significance. ~ William Lane Craig,
876:I am not offering this is a critique of the internet, its just that there are a lot of factors involved. It does offer plenty of possibilities. It also has, it can have, a cheapening effect and I think both exist and I think its true of everything. You could say that about the printing press. ~ Noam Chomsky,
877:Right now, American government has stepped back from offering any kinds of protection for human rights and public health. And the fossil fuel industry thinks that they have just absolute free rein to go for it. The one thing in the way is public opposition. It's civil society. It's activism. ~ Annie Leonard,
878:Clay considered offering up the fact that it wasn’t just Saga coming to her rescue, but a wine-swilling ghoul, an amnesiac daeva, and a half-blind ettin were along for the ride as well. Then again, if something sounded ridiculous in your head, then voicing it aloud rarely did it any favours. ~ Nicholas Eames,
879:Dost though even know what would become of me? Thou dost not." She exhaled sharply. "Friends would disown me. It is our way. I would be alone!"

"No," he said unexpectedly. He turned and held his hand to her, palm upward, empty, a simple masculine offering. "Maddygirl. With...me. ~ Laura Kinsale,
880:GENESIS 22 [†]After these things  k God tested Abraham and said to him, “Abraham!” And he said, “Here I am.” 2[†]He said, “Take your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love, and go to  l the land of Moriah, and offer him there as a burnt offering on one of the mountains of which I shall tell you. ~ Anonymous,
881:In high-tax New York, in high-tax California, the governors of those states are constantly offering tax breaks, tax exemptions to any number of companies if they will locate in those states. The left does it all the time. We point it out every time we learn about it because it's hypocritical. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
882:The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life and has determined my whole career; yet it depended on so small a circumstance as my uncle offering to drive me 30 miles to Shrewsbury, which few uncles would have done, and on such a trifle as the shape of my nose. ~ Charles Darwin,
883:You can't actually hire us. Check out the room you're in. We don't need your money... That cat's lunch costs more than most government salaries... We can't even spend all the money we have. In fact, it should be us offering you money, just to get rid of some of it. Want some money? - Dan ~ C Alexander London,
884:Microsoft is still living down its disastrous introduction of Clippy, a ghastly piece of artificial intelligence - I'm using that term very loosely - that would observe people's behavior as they worked on a document and try to bust in, offering 'advice' that tended to be spectacularly useless ~ Clive Thompson,
885:And if I don’t help you?”

Jace spread his hands wide. The rune tattoos on his palms stood out stark and black. “Maybe nothing. Maybe a visit from the Silent City.”

Magnus’s voice was honey poured over shards of ice. “That’s quite a choice you’re offering me, little Shadowhunter. ~ Cassandra Clare,
886:He would have felt safe if alongside the Dentrassis' underwear, the piles of Sqornshellous mattresses and the man from Betelgeuse holding up a small yellow fish and offering to put it in his ear he had been able to see just a small packet of cornflakes. But he couldn't, and he didn't feel safe. ~ Douglas Adams,
887:This is the sacrifice of Christians: we, being many, are one body in Christ. And this also is the sacrifice which the Church continually celebrates in the sacrament of the altar, known to the faithful, in which she teaches that she herself is offered in the offering she makes to God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
888:Arete is simply excellence and the striving for excellence in all things,” said Odysseus. “Arete simply means the act of offering all actions as a sort of sacrament to excellence, of devoting one’s life to finding excellence, identifying it when it offers itself, and achieving it in your own life. ~ Dan Simmons,
889:I work my way through the rest of my dates, but I'm only there in body. The boys usually give up after the first hour; it's difficult to have a conversation all by yourself. My ratings plummet, but at least my air-time is minimal now, I'm not offering much in the way of entertainment these days. ~ Siobhan Davis,
890:Mann was profoundly influenced by two philosophers, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, who returned to the most ancient of all philosophical questions - "How to live?" - and whose writings offered novel perspectives for considering that question (much more perspective-offering than rigorous argument!) ~ Philip Kitcher,
891:There are more people at Obama's table offering ideas than there were five years ago, but when it came to facing up to the Republicans' threat to force a double-dip recession if they didn't get their millionaires' tax cut, they still amounted to nothing. And therein lies our fundamental problem. ~ Eric Alterman,
892:Mercy is radical kindness. Mercy means offering or being offered aid in desperate straits. Mercy is not deserved. It involves absolving the unabsolvable, forgiving the unforgivable. Mercy brings us to the miracle of apology, given and accepted, to unashamed humility when we have erred or forgotten. ~ Anne Lamott,
893:The thing about being selfish is that you don't care if someone is at your feet begging you to stay with him, offering you the world, his heart and soul. It doesn't matter. You'll do whatever you want to do. What you need to do for yourself. Nothing matters but what you want. What you think you need. ~ Mia Asher,
894:Where has this book been? The Culture Engine demystifies the what and how of driving your company's culture to produce transformational business outcomes. Chris Edmonds operationalizes culture while offering practical tools necessary to align your people and gain profound competitive advantage. ~ Joseph Michelli,
895:Frigidity is desire imagined by a woman who doesnt desire the man offering himself to her. Its the desire of a woman for a man who hasnt yet come to her, whom she doesnt yet know. Shes faithful to this stranger even before she belongs to him. Frigidity is the non-desire for whatever is not him. ~ Marguerite Duras,
896:God's careful instructions for building the tabernacle in Exodus 31 remind us that his perfection sets the standard for whatever we create in his name. Whatever we happen to make-not only in the visual arts, but in all the arts-we should make it as well as we can, offering God our very best. ~ Philip Graham Ryken,
897:teeth. It was her offering which Aivas was rejecting. ‘Of course,’ and she brightened, ‘we could keep some around to study and learn from, couldn’t we?’ She saw the horror and disgust of some of her colleagues. ‘No, I guess we couldn’t. Ah, well, back to microscope. My 98th batch of trials today. ~ Anne McCaffrey,
898:Have you noticed the words which Old Testament people use when someone important calls them by name? They don't say "What?" or "Yes?" They answer with the curious sentence, "Here I am". So much is in that sentence: readiness to respond, a willing servitude, an offering of oneself to the other. ~ Walter Wangerin Jr,
899:I use to think being a warning was not meant to be apart of anyone's life purpose. However, how could you teach anything in life, without the deepest understanding of what not to do? Personally, I don't want someone offering advice, unless they have been to hell and back with a map and a compass. ~ Shannon L Alder,
900:Science now finds itself in paradoxical strife with society: admired but mistrusted; offering hope for the future but creating ambiguous choice; richly supported yet unable to fulfill all its promise; boasting remarkable advances but criticized for not serving more directly the goals of society. ~ J Michael Bishop,
901:Any man who criticizes my suicide and passes judgment on me with an expression of superiority, declaring (without offering the least help) that I should have gone on living my full complement of days, is assuredly a prodigy among men quite capable of tranquilly urging the Emperor to open a fruit shop. ~ Osamu Dazai,
902:Empathy is a respectful understanding of what others are experiencing. Instead of offering empathy, we often have a strong urge to give advice or reassurance and to explain our own position or feeling. Empathy, however, calls upon us to empty our mind and listen to others with our whole being. ~ Marshall B Rosenberg,
903:If you want a man to trust you, ask him for a favor. Most people get this part wrong. They try to win people over by offering something to them, but humans instinctively recoil from those who help them. They like the people that they help far better, even if the favor granted is as small as a cigarette. ~ Kim Wright,
904:I was quite eager to work, anytime somebody was offering me a job, if I liked the role. Because I was always very discriminating from the very beginning, in the sense that I had absolutely no problem saying no to jobs when they came along if somehow they didn't fit into my universe - whatever that was. ~ Karen Allen,
905:Suffering Servant, and I quote, ‘But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities… And they made his grave with the wicked… Yet, when his soul makes an offering for guilt, he shall see his offspring; he shall prolong his days; the will of the Lord shall prosper in his hand. ~ Brian Godawa,
906:The internet has spawned people for whom knowingness is more important than knowledge. It equips you with the illusion of offering knowledge instantly - and quite easily - so you can read a few articles on a few subjects and feel well informed but not actually know any of those subjects in any depth. ~ Pankaj Mishra,
907:The world can use more light and less noise. More solvers and fewer blamers. More folks showing a better way and fewer folks complaining about how much better things used to be. More folks offering help and fewer folks wringing their hands about the problems. More hope bringers and fewer hope killers. ~ Steve Goodier,
908:Are you okay?” she asked.
“I’m fine. I’m totally up for going to Bird’s party.”
“I don’t think so. Not this late. How could you not see a baseball coming at you?”
“It happened so fast.”
“Are you hungry? I could fix something--”
She had to really be worried if she was offering to cook. ~ Rachel Hawthorne,
909:When he stood before her naked, he couldn't believe this beautiful woman, with the pale skin, flaming auburn hair, and eyes the color of spring hay, lay waiting for him.
Phoebe's cheeks flushed a pretty pink. "You look like you're hungry and ready to eat the proffered offering."
"I am, and I will. ~ Elle James,
910:6So Moses gave a commandment, and they caused it to be proclaimed throughout the camp, saying, “Let neither man nor woman do any more work for the offering of the sanctuary.” And the people were restrained from bringing, 7for the material they had was sufficient for all the work to be done—indeed too †much. ~ Anonymous,
911:Knowing the identity of the One to whom we speak in prayer is vital for offering up petitions that are pleasing to God. We have seen that although Jesus grants us the privilege of calling Him “friend” (John 15:15), we dare not let that allow us to view Him, the Father, or the Holy Spirit merely as a friend. ~ Anonymous,
912:My team and I persuaded Darden Restaurants, the parent company behind chains like Olive Garden and Red Lobster, to make changes to the kinds of food it offered and how it was prepared. They pledged to revamp their menus, cutting calories, reducing sodium, and offering healthier options for kids’ meals. ~ Michelle Obama,
913:So many Americans are angry and frustrated these days—vulnerable to loss of job and health care and home, without a shred of economic security—they’re easy prey for demagogues offering big lies. Yet the only antidote for big lies is big truth—told relentlessly and powerfully. You must be armed with it. ~ Robert B Reich,
914:Visitors offering their condolences, thinking to comfort me, said "Life goes on." What nonsense, I thought, of course it doesn't. It's death that goes on; Ian is dead now and will be dead tomorrow and next year and forever. There's no end to that. But perhaps there will be an end to the sorrow of it. ~ Mary Ann Shaffer,
915:Why? Why should the bond between a people and their baseball team be so intense? Fenway Park is a part of it, offering a physical continuum to the bond, not only because Papi can stand in the same batter's box as Teddy Ballgame, but also because a son might sit in the same wooden-slat seat as his father. ~ Tom Verducci,
916:Crossing the line—such as sharing your personal information—is not acceptable. Neither is pumping your client for intimate info (as salacious as the details might be!) that they don’t want to share. And you don’t need to be offering free advice, either professional or personal. You are not their shrink. ~ Tabatha Coffey,
917:He raised his bottle. “Well, if you ever want to go diving when you’re off duty, let me know.” “I’m not looking for a relationship, Mr. Carver. I’m here to solve a murder.” He opened his front door to go inside. “Who said anything about a relationship? I’m just offering a no-strings recreational dive.” A ~ Toni Anderson,
918:Marriage is a core component of the patriarchal system. According to Gerda Lerner's research on ancient societies, a woman could achieve at least some status, and with that, better treatment and privileges, through preserving her only capital – her virginity – and eventually offering it to just one man. ~ Jenny Nordberg,
919:when our Twenty-Second-Century forefathers created the Servicer Program, offering lifelong community service in lieu of prison for criminals judged harmless enough to walk among the free, were they progressive or retrogressive in implementing a seven-hundred-year-old system which had never actually existed? ~ Ada Palmer,
920:She put her hand on the back of his arm and squeezed. She hoped he read that squeeze as /Thank you for caring/ and not /God, I'm horny, we should really screw sometime./ In her experience it was very difficult to offer a man affection and kindness without giving him the impression you were also offering a lay. ~ Joe Hill,
921:We couldn't free ourselves into the present. Instead we wanted to think about setting other people free. We wanted to think about their unhappiness. We used their wretchedness to mask our own. And our wretchedness was our inability to take the simple good things life was offering us and be glad to have them. ~ Ian McEwan,
922:By offering the educated a semblance of freedom he made the denial of real freedom even more painful and humiliating. The intelligentsia sought to avenge their betrayed hopes; the Tsar strove to tame their restive spirit; and, so, semi-liberal reforms gave way to repression and repression bred rebellion. ~ Isaac Deutscher,
923:The emperor, chosen by the Roman senate, who had been promoted, degraded, insulted, restored, again degraded, and again insulted, was finally abandoned to his fate; but when the Gothic king withdrew his protection, he was restrained, by pity or contempt, from offering any violence to the person of Attalus. ~ Edward Gibbon,
924:Other than when dealing with exception-unsafe legacy code (which we'll discuss later in this Item), offering no exception safety guarantee should be an option only if your crack team of requirements analysts has identified a need for your application to leak resources and run with corrupt data structures. As ~ Scott Meyers,
925:Then, completely unbidden, a series of images flashed through my mind. Roger drumming on the steering wheel. Roger sleeping next to me in bed, the blanket falling of his shoulder. Watching me carefully as we drove through a rain-soaked Kansas night, asking me to talk to him. Offering me the last french fry. ~ Morgan Matson,
926:It would be a primal offering of food from man to woman and a satisfyingly primitive declaration of intent. However, he mused, one could never be sure these days who would be offended by being handed a dead mallard bleeding from a breast full of tooth-breaking shot and sticky about the neck with dog saliva. ~ Helen Simonson,
927:I would that ye should come unto Christ, who is the Holy One of Israel, and partake of his salvation, and the power of his redemption. Yea, come unto him, and offer your whole souls as an offering unto him, and continue in fasting and praying, and endure to the end; and as the Lord liveth ye will be saved. ~ Joseph Smith Jr,
928:Several researchers have found that companies that spend the most time offering guidance on quarterly earnings deliver significantly lower long-term growth rates than companies that offer guidance less frequently. (One reason: The earnings-obsessed companies typically invest less in research and development.) ~ Daniel H Pink,
929:Stop judging life! Look at every event as blessed. It is offering you the fastest track to get onto your highest, happiest and most successful state. Your soul is working it all out perfectly. When you accept this you will make life amendments easily and lovingly. Then the pain stops and the joyous creation begins. ~ Melanie,
930:These women who love and adore the men in their lives and recognise the potential for goodness that exists in all men might still feel like crying sometimes, because for all the love they offer the world’s men, the hate those men are capable of offering back can be heartbreaking and soul-destroying. Instead ~ Clementine Ford,
931:The show [Shots Fired] is an autopsy of our criminal justice system, a space where the conversation surrounding the issues in our country is offering a seat at the table to all the voices to be heard, a murder mystery, and grassroots look at our own humanity as we move through the parts and pieces of the story. ~ Aisha Hinds,
932:This job has been given to me to do. Therefore, it is a gift. Therefore, it is a privilege. Therefore, it is an offering I may make to God. Therefore, it is to be done gladly, if it is done for Him. Here, not somewhere else, I may learn God’s way. In this job, not in some other, God looks for faithfulness. ~ Elisabeth Elliot,
933:By May, the four largest phone companies had promised to make it technologically possible to text 911 anywhere in the country, for local response services that want that option. Already some locations within cities like Los Angeles and Greenville, S.C., are offering the service with at least one telephone carrier. ~ Anonymous,
934:Simon’s horse was defective, or possibly a genius that had worked out that Simon could not possibly control it. It went off for a wander in the woods, with Simon on its back alternately pleading, threatening, and offering bribes. If Simon’s horse could read his every thought, then Simon’s horse was a sadist. ~ Cassandra Clare,
935:You go on by doing the best you can. You go on by being generous. You go on by being true. You go on by offering comfort to others who can't go on. You go on by allowing the unbearable days to pass and allowing the pleasure in other days. You go on by finding a channel for your love and another for your rage. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
936:She liked to scatter hope," Minerva said, taking his offering.
"Pardon?"
"Snowdrops. They represent hope. The first flowers in the spring. Hope for a new beginning." She took a sniff of the delicate blossoms and then shyly glanced over at him. "Perhaps you were meant to be here today. To find your hope. ~ Elizabeth Boyle,
937:The distinguishing feature of karma yoga is that even though you may offer the fruits of your work to the benefit of others, you honestly do not have any expectations whatsoever that you will gain anything from that offering. In this way work itself is important to you, and eventually the work becomes art. In ~ Richard Freeman,
938:The Hindu deity Hanuman offers a similar example of devotional service. Every act he performs becomes an offering to Rama (God). His service brings him to the very edge of unitive love. How powerful his vision: “When I know who I am, I am you,” he says, kneeling before Rama, “when I don’t know who I am, I serve you. ~ Ram Dass,
939:While it is okay to go past date three to get sex, be reluctant to do so. We’re living in a day and age when three dates is more than enough time for a girl to prove she’s worthy. If she’s not giving you sex, she either needs to put in more effort by offering to take you out or doing a bang-up job pleasing you orally. ~ Roosh V,
940:But, really, why does anyone create? You feel a...a restlessness inside, a need to make something new, something no one has ever seen before. You want to add to the beauty and the richness of the world with a gift, an offering that is uniquely yours. It's an act of selfishness and generosity, all rolled into one. ~ Bruce Coville,
941:Over the course of the summer, he taught the children to eat foods they had never known, to sharpen and use knives, to carve their own spoons, to make knots and play Indian games and- every time they cut a branch off a living tree- to cut away a small lock of their own hair, to leave as an offering of thanks. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
942:Procrastination is something you do yourself. You know: "I gotta sharpen these pencils before I start. I got 20 pencils, they're looking kinda dull." Well, the pencils aren't calling you and alluring you and inviting you and offering you anything. They're just sitting there. You're the one who's procrastinating. ~ Michael Chabon,
943:The cost side of a company’s business model ensures that it creates a leap in value for itself in the form of profit—that is, the price of the offering minus the cost of production. It is the combination of exceptional utility, strategic pricing, and target costing that allows companies to achieve value innovation—a ~ W Chan Kim,
944:The presidential candidates are offering prescriptions for everything from Iraq to healthcare, but listen closely. Their fixes are situational and incremental. Meanwhile, the underlying structural problems in American politics and government are systemic and prevent us from solving our most intractable challenges. ~ Larry Sabato,
945:The unfortunate truth is that many of us, instead of offering total forgiveness, pray something like this Irish Prayer: May those who love us, love us; And those who don’t love us May God turn their hearts; And if He doesn’t turn their hearts, May He turn their ankles, So we’ll know them by their limping. People ~ John C Maxwell,
946:You go on by doing the best you can. You go on by being generous. You go on by being true. You go on by offering comfort to others who can’t go on. You go on by allowing the unbearable days to pass and by allowing the pleasure in other days. You go on by finding a channel for your love and another for your rage. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
947:I worked with [Creative Digital Studios] this month to complete the cover of my third novel, Surfing the Seconds. Their creative skills are the best I've ever seen. They are extremely professional, offering support at every step in the design process, and the books they touch come out looking unique and beautiful. ~ Vincent Lowry,
948:Life consists in learning to live on one's own, spontaneous, freewheeling: to do this one must recognize what is one's own-be familiar and at home with oneself. This means basically learning who one is, and learning what one has to offer to the contemporary world, and then learning how to make that offering valid. ~ Thomas Merton,
949:Brokerage firms and their executives cannot use threats regarding research activities as a way to obtain investment banking business. The threat to drop research coverage if Piper were not selected as the lead underwriter for a secondary offering was totally inappropriate and undermines the integrity of the market. ~ Mary Schapiro,
950:Father Mike was popular with the church widows. They liked to crowd around him, offering him cookies and bathing in his beatific essence. Part of this essence came from Father Mike's perfect contentment at being five foot four. His shortness had a charitable aspect to it, as though he had given away his height. ~ Jeffrey Eugenides,
951:Potent Quotes “Whatever you do, or eat, or give, or offer in adoration, let it be an offering to me; and whatever you suffer, suffer it for me. Thus you shall be free from the bonds of Karma which yield fruits that are evil and good; and with your soul one in renunciation you shall be free and come to me.”—Bhagavad Gita ~ Ram Dass,
952:The problem with Wal-Mart is that it's a business model premised on offering the customer low prices at any cost - any cost to society, any cost to workers. They've got a lot of competition and have influenced people to follow their model through simply providing a model that is so successful at making profits. ~ Liza Featherstone,
953:What are you offering now?” I asked suspiciously. “Just me, my friendship. Just me, and the now-and-then right to kiss you, hold your hand, touch your hair, and take you to the movies, and listen to your dreams because you listen to mine, and be silly once in a while, build a past we’ll enjoy rememberings—that’s all. ~ V C Andrews,
954:You can’t get anything worth having for nothing,” Darnay declared, offering his guest a fill of tobacco from his pouch, “and faith is worth having—it’s the only thing that can save us now, when the whole world has straws in its hair. Faith is worth working for.” Bulloch considered this while he filled his pipe. “To ~ D E Stevenson,
955:If we offer something to Bangladesh, it's obvious that Bangladesh is offering something to us. And why shouldn't Bangladesh be able to keep its promises? Economically it's full of resources and can stand on its feet. Politically it seems to me led by trained people. The refugees who took shelter here are going home. ~ Indira Gandhi,
956:I had loved Kitty -I would always love Kitty. But I had lived with her a kind of queer half-life, hiding from my own true self. Since then I had refused to love at all, had become - or so I thought - a creature beyond passion, driving others to their secret, humiliating confessions of lust; but never offering my own. ~ Sarah Waters,
957:Nor is it simply the small socialist gatherings Joe attends, though he hates to be a joiner, can’t stand to be part of a group, even for a cause he believes in like this one, sitting earnest and cross-legged on someone’s mildewed carpet and just listening, just taking information in, not offering anything of his own. ~ Meg Wolitzer,
958:pretend that the world could not—would not—strike with no notice, offering up a loss that could take a person’s breath away. Of course it can, she thought, and you know it better than just about anybody. We only pretend it can’t, a minute or two at a time, to help us get up and out of the house in the morning. ~ Catherine Ryan Hyde,
959:The first thing they saw on leaving the elevator was a long concrete wall with over fifty doors in it offering lavatory facilities for all of fifty major life forms. Nevertheless, like every parking lot in the Galaxy throughout the entire history of parking lots, this parking lot smelled predominantly of impatience. ~ Douglas Adams,
960:Some are perfectly satisfied with what they have; they eat, drink, impregnate their wives, and take life as it comes. Others can never forget that they are being cheated; that life tempts them to struggle by offering them the essence of sex, of beauty, of success; and that she always seems to pay in counterfeit money. ~ Colin Wilson,
961:True worship is the living human being, who has become a total answer to God, shaped by God's healing and transforming word. And true priesthood is therefore the ministry of word and sacrament that transforms people in to an offering to God and makes the cosmos into praise and thanksgiving to the Creator and Redeemer. ~ Benedict XVI,
962:As champions of green jobs, we're asking questions that progressives should like, like "How are we going to avoid baking the planet," and "How are we going to create jobs for ordinary Americans?" Meanwhile, we're offering solutions that conservative should like. I'm not calling for more welfare; I'm calling for more work. ~ Van Jones,
963:For if Men are to be precluded from offering their Sentiments on a matter, which may involve the most serious and alarming consequences, that can invite the consideration of Mankind, reason is of no use to us; the freedom of Speech may be taken away, and dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep, to the Slaughter. ~ George Washington,
964:When you judge yourself for needing help, you judge those you are helping. When you attach value to giving help, you attach value to needing help. The danger of tying your self-worth to being a helper is feeling shame when you have to ask for help. Offering help is courageous and compassionate, but so is asking for help. ~ Bren Brown,
965:362. Limit not sacrifice to the giving up of earthly goods or the denial of some desires and yearnings, but let every thought and every work and every enjoyment be an offering to God within thee. Let thy steps walk in thy Lord, let thy sleep and waking be a sacrifice to Krishna.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human, Karma, [T1],
966:Griffin’s mother loathed grading papers, too, of course. Who didn’t? But she was meticulous about correcting errors, offering style and content suggestions in the margins, asking pointed, often insulting, questions (How long did you work on this?) and then answering them herself (Not long, one hopes, given the result). ~ Richard Russo,
967:I've read about myself and my husband and my family, to the point where they've called my parents, they've called my brothers, offering money to tell stories. They call friends of mine. I'd just like for them to just ... don't badger us. Don't scrutinize us. We have children and they have to live, too. It's not fair. ~ Whitney Houston,
968:The Canadian debt-to-GDP ratio will continue to decrease every year, including the first three years under the Liberal government. That is what we're focused on. We know we need to invest in the kind of long-term growth and short-term job creation that Canadians expect, and Liberals the only party offering to do that. ~ Justin Trudeau,
969:This food won't be wasted; after the offering ceremony, Balinese families are always allowed to eat their own donations to the gods, since the offering is more metaphysical than literal. The way the Balinese see it, God takes what belongs to God - the gesture - while man takes what belongs to man - the food itself. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
970:We almost made it that time. A little courage on someone’s part and we might have made it. We were swollen and ripe for an instant together, ready for picking, offering our store to each other’s hesitant fingers . . . a little tender courage at that rare right instant, and things might well have turned out differently. . . ~ Ken Kesey,
971:Well, you’re all mine now, Blake. We can handle anything; we will or won’t be charity cases together. I don’t think he’s offering to diaper you and buy you a wagon. Maybe just a cup of coffee?” She touched his hair.
He softened. “Together makes this easier to swallow. I guess there’s no harm in talking to the man. ~ Debra Anastasia,
972:I can't run no more with that lawless crowd while the killers in high places say their prayers out loud. But they've summoned, they've summoned up a thundercloud and they're going to hear from me. Ring the bells that still can ring Forget your perfect offering There is a crack in everything That's how the light gets in. ~ Leonard Cohen,
973:Perhaps no custom reveals our character as a Nation so clearly as our celebration of Thanksgiving Day. Rooted deeply in our Judeo-Christian heritage, the practice of offering thanksgiving underscores our unshakable belief in God as the foundation of our Nation and our firm reliance upon Him from Whom all blessings flow. ~ Ronald Reagan,
974:If we face our unpleasant feelings with care, affection, and nonviolence, we can transform them into a kind of energy that is healthy and has the capacity to nourish us. By the work of mindful observation, our unpleasant feelings can illuminate so much for us, offering us insight and understanding into ourselves and society. ~ Nhat Hanh,
975:God responds to prayer because when we look away from ourselves to Christ as our only hope, that gives the Father an occasion to magnify the glory of his grace in the all-providing work of his Son. Similarly, fasting is peculiarly suited to glorify God in this way. It is fundamentally an offering of emptiness to God in hope. ~ John Piper,
976:What a dazzlingly generous, gloriously unpredictable book! Maggie Nelson shows us what it means to be real, offering a way of thinking that is as challenging as it is liberating. She invites us to 'pay homage to the transitive' and enjoy 'a becoming in which one never becomes.' Reading The Argonauts made me happier and freer. ~ Eula Biss,
977:When one gives whatever one can without restraint, the barriers of individuality break down. It no longer becomes possible to tell whether it is the student offering himself to the teacher, or the teacher offering herself to the student. One sees only two immaculate beings, reflecting one another like a pair of brilliant mirrors. ~ Laozi,
978:He was powerless to stop himself. His lips peeled off his teeth as his muscles churned and his hips thrashed against her. Drenched in sweat, head spinning, mindless, breathless, he took everything she was offering him. Took it and demanded more, becoming an animal as she became one, too, until they were nothing but wildness. He ~ J R Ward,
979:But postmortems offering rational explanations for how a pussy-grabbing goblin managed to gain the White House over an experienced woman have mostly glossed over one of the well-worn dynamics in play: A competent woman losing a job to an incompetent man is not an anomalous Election Day surprise; it is Tuesday in America. ~ Rebecca Traister,
980:Companies watch what consumers are doing like a hawk. Just as one letter to a politician can signal an insipient problem, for companies, a trend where people are beginning to switch away from one of their key products to a rival offering on the basis of either claims or real improvements on performance, that's significant. ~ John Elkington,
981:In the '90s, we are all our own gurus, offering truth to each other. My message is that we all have a truth inside of us that we must tell. The synchronicity of life is all about becoming clear, knowing what that truth is, watching and taking advantage of the opportunity to express that truth, and knowing how to present it. ~ James Redfield,
982:Offering a lady a chair was one way of showing that this work was appreciated, and that strength and brute force—at which men generally tended to excel—was not the only thing that counted. Respect for ladies tamed men, and there were many men who were sorely in need of taming; that was well known, said Mma Ramotswe. ~ Alexander McCall Smith,
983:The difference between social media and a social life is the difference between eating a marshmallow Peep and dining on a tomahawk-cut rib eye: one is substantial and nutritious; the other is just a momentarily satisfying puff of sweetened air, offering no long-term benefits. I can enjoy the fluff, but I can’t subsist on it. ~ Jen Lancaster,
984:I felt - and I still feel - that one flower is enough. In sadhana if one truly gets one thing, say, devotion, or sincerity, then all else comes through it. The question is whether one really aspires for them and whether the time has come. This is not to say that sincere people did not benefit by this offering of flowers. They did. ~ Anonymous,
985:Thank you,” Trez said roughly. “Save the gratitude for if I bring back something worth having.” “That’s not what I’m talking about.” Rehv leaned down, offering his dagger hand. “Anything I got is yours.” Trez had to blink hard. Then pass his hand over his eyes. “Your friendship’s all I need, my man. ’Cuz it’s pretty damn priceless. ~ J R Ward,
986:There are books that are suitable for a million people, others for only a hundred. There are even remedies—I mean books—that were written for one person only… A book is both medic and medicine at once. It makes a diagnosis as well as offering therapy. Putting the right novels to the appropriate ailments: that’s how I sell books. ~ Nina George,
987:Some people think the theists get off easy by offering eternal life, but in my experience it is awfully difficult to reconcile the death of a child with the idea of a loving God. As a Christian, I knew what to say, but I don’t think my words made much of a difference. What mattered most was just being there and sharing the hurt. ~ Tony Campolo,
988:And most of all, most emphatically of all, they hated how her favorite means of connecting was commiseration. “Oh, poor you!” she would say. “You’re looking so tired!” Or “You must be feeling so lonely!” Other people showed love by offering compliments; Abby offered pity. It was not an attractive quality, in her children’s opinion. ~ Anne Tyler,
989:closed at $1.19 per share. Weighing the evidence objectively, the intelligent investor should conclude that IPO does not stand only for “initial public offering.” More accurately, it is also shorthand for: It’s Probably Overpriced, Imaginary Profits Only, Insiders’ Private Opportunity, or Idiotic, Preposterous, and Outrageous. ~ Benjamin Graham,
990:For so it usually happens in the world. Righteous men are regarded as sinners and vice versa. No one in the whole world is a sinner except the man who has the Word and believes in Christ. But those who persecute and hate the Word are the righteous ones. As Christ says (cf. John 16:2): “They think they are offering God a service. ~ Martin Luther,
991:Loneliness comes over us sometimes as a sudden tide. It is one of the terms of our humanness, and, in a sense, therefore, incurable. Yet I have found peace in my loneliest times not only through acceptance of the situation, but through making it an offering to God, who can transfigure it into something for the good of others. ~ Elisabeth Elliot,
992:People always try to palm me weed when I'm always talking about how I don't smoke weed. But they always try to ... and when they stop offering me weed, then I'm going to feel kind of out of touch, like: "What did I do wrong that you won't offer me drugs that I don't do?" Because I'll trade those drugs out for drugs that I do do. ~ Doug Stanhope,
993:The Bible is silent on offering any constructive case for same-sex marriage because the Bible’s definition of marriage prohibits the very concept of same-sex marriage. Looking at all that the Bible says on marriage, same-sex marriage simply isn’t fathomable without contorting and twisting the Bible beyond the bounds of reason. ~ Russell D Moore,
994:The secret to understanding me is, I'm not trying to be anybody other than who I actually am. People want candid, refreshing leadership. And I've always tried to go with solutions. You know, I've always tried to say, here's how we get our economy growing, here's why we get our debt under control. That's what Mitt Romney is offering. ~ Paul Ryan,
995:What if a man save my life with a draught that was prepared to poison me? The providence of the issue does not at all discharge the obliquity of the intent. And the same reason holds good even in religion itself. It is not the incense, or the offering that is acceptable to God, but the purity and devotion of the worshipper. ~ Seneca the Younger,
996:Arjuna, ignore the onslaught of external stimuli and focus between your eyebrows, regulating inhalation and exhalation at the nostrils, to liberate yourself from fear, desire and anger, and discover me within you, I who receive and consume every offering of your yagnas.—Bhagavad Gita: Chapter 5, verses 27 to 29 (paraphrased). ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
997:As an actor you're only as good as the things you're offered. And there just weren't any female directors offering me things. So when you dissect that, you realize there aren't women offering you things because they don't have the opportunities. I work to raise money for women's cancers; I use my voice for violence against women. ~ Nicole Kidman,
998:What ministries is your family involved in?” replied the pastor. The father couldn’t name any. “That might be your problem,” said the pastor. “The world is offering your daughter a more compelling story than you are. In the world she sees adventure and purpose. Here at church you have treated her as a receptacle of information.” The ~ J D Greear,
999:First spouses, I have learned, don't ever really go away--even if you aren't speaking to them anymore. They are phantoms who dwell in the corners of our new love stories, never entirely vanishing from sight, materializing in our minds whenever they please, offering up unwelcome comments or bits of painfully accurate criticism. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1000:{God's] presence is not contingent upon our feeling it. It simply is. We must learn to remember this and calm ourselves. By His apparent 'absence', He is leading us to a more mature level of consciousness, self-offering, and love. He is leading us from the love of God for the sake of His gifts to love of God for His own sake. ~ Monks of New Skete,
1001:I left him thinking it over. If I were a bookie, I should feel justified in offering a hundred to eight against."
"You can't have approached him properly. I might have known you would muck it up," said young Bingo. Which, considering what I had been through for his sake, struck me as a good bit sharper than the serpent's tooth. ~ P G Wodehouse,
1002:The greatest need for our time is for the church to become what it has seldom been: the body of Christ with its face to the world, loving others regardless of religion or culture, pouring itself out in a life of service, offering hope to a frightened world, and presenting itself as a real alternative to the existing arrangement. ~ Brennan Manning,
1003:The philosophers say that the passions are too lively, too fiery; in truth they are weak and languid. All around one sees the mass of men endure the persecution of a few masters and the despotism of prejudices without offering the slightest resistance... their passions are too weak to permit them to derive audacity from despair. ~ Charles Fourier,
1004:A great biography should, like the close of a great drama, leave behind it a feeling of serenity. We collect into a small bunch the flowers, the few flowers, which brought sweetness into a life, and present it as an offering to an accomplished destiny. It is the dying refrain of a completed song, the final verse of a finished poem. ~ Andre Maurois,
1005:Here is the interesting twist:[McLeod] Campbell came to his views through reading Jonathan Edwards who suggested at one point in his ruminations on the atonement that Christ could have offered up a perfect act of penitence instead of punishment, and that this would have been an acceptable offering suitable to remit our sinfulness. ~ Oliver D Crisp,
1006:I have written a new book called 'The Golden Motorcycle Gang.' The premise of the book is taken from actual events in my life. My life has been dedicated to inspiring and motivating others to live their highest vision of their ideal life and offering transformational trainings that help people succeed in all aspects of their lives. ~ Jack Canfield,
1007:Madness finished telling us about their house in the middle of the street, and Bananarama came on offering to be our Venus, our fire at our desire. Win gave me a little jab. “The word ‘Venus.’ ” “What?” I shouted. “When I was young,” Win said, “I thought they were singing, ‘I’m your penis.’ It confused me.” “Thanks for sharing.” The ~ Harlan Coben,
1008:That we need only to recognize GOD intimately present with us, to address ourselves to Him every moment, that we may beg His assistance for knowing His will in things doubtful, and for rightly performing those which we plainly see He requires of us, offering them to Him before we do them, and giving Him thanks when we have done. ~ Brother Lawrence,
1009:For every one hundred young boys watching Pornhub.com, there would be one or two who could be recruited into their ranks. That meant potentially tens of thousands in the Middle East and South Asia alone. Offering them a virtuous life, a family, weapons of war, and a mission would give even the most restless losers a place in life. ~ Malcolm W Nance,
1010:I love you, my brother, whoever you are - whether you worship in a church, kneel in your temple, or pray in your mosque. You and I are children of one faith, for the diverse paths of religion are fingers of the loving hand of the one supreme being, a hand extended to all, offering completeness of spirit to all, eager to receive all. ~ Khalil Gibran,
1011:Never did I trust Fortune, even when she seemed to be offering peace. All those blessings which she kindly bestowed on me – money, public office, influence – I relegated to a place from which she could take them back without disturbing me. Between them and me, I have kept a wide gap, and so she has merely taken them, not torn them from me. ~ Seneca,
1012:His lectures were always well attended, and not just because he imparted so much wisdom and knowledge: he also managed to do it with humour. It had taken Danny some time to realize that the professor enjoyed provoking discussion and argument by offering up outrageous statements to see what reaction he would arouse from his students. ~ Jeffrey Archer,
1013:In the enthusiasm for Mexico's auto boom - 3.2 million cars were produced here last year in 18 factories - the question of labor conditions often is overlooked. Industry analysts and experts say most of these jobs provide above-average employment for Mexicans, offering insurance, overtime and other benefits in state-of-the-art factories. ~ Anonymous,
1014:Micromanaging erodes people's confidence, making them overly dependennt on their leaders. Well-meaning leaders inadvertently sabotage their teams by rushing to the rescue and offering too much help. A leader needs to balance assistance with wu wei, backing off long enough to let people learn from their mistakes and develop competence. ~ Diane Dreher,
1015:So talked a while with Sarr about his cats—the usual subject of conversation, especially because, now that summer’s coming, they’re bringing in dead things every night. Field mice, moles, shrews, birds, even a little garter snake. They don’t eat them, just lay them out on the porch for the Poroths to see—sort of an offering, I guess. ~ H P Lovecraft,
1016:you would not want to mask your own feelings, pretending to feel different from how you really feel. For pretending in this way does nothing to change your vibrational point of attraction. The only way you can do so is to change your vibrational offering, and when you do change your vibrational offering, the way you feel changes, too. ~ Esther Hicks,
1017:Led by myself and two colleagues, the course offers a newly developed model of spiritual direction that draws on both the age-old wisdom of the church and more recent perspectives. I call it the Passion/Wisdom Model of Spiritual Direction, and I see it as offering the opportunity for our interior worlds and supernatural reality to meet. ~ Larry Crabb,
1018:WITH THIS BOOK I respectfully invoke the heroic, aggrieved souls wandering in the boundless bright-red sorghum fields of my hometown. As your unfilial son, I am prepared to carve out my heart, marinate it in soy sauce, have it minced and placed in three bowls, and lay it out as an offering in a field of sorghum. Partake of it in good health! ~ Mo Yan,
1019:I wasn't offering her pity," Mrs. Caswell said impatiently. "Tragedies don't interest me, tragedies and heartbreaks are all alike, what matters is how a person meets them, how they survive them. Given the inevitability of losses and disappointments in life, that's where the challenge is and the uniqueness. I was offering her sympathy. ~ Dorothy Gilman,
1020:The girls? We sacrificed them to the water spirit, sir. We used their bodies as an offering. They cried and carried on like crazy."
Kien's scouts drew their bayonets. Lien held them back.
"Stop! Don't. Perhaps these guys might also want to cry like crazy as the girls did before they died. They won't want to die immediately, will they? ~ B o Ninh,
1021:The idea that a book can advise a woman how to capture a man is touchingly naive. Books advising men how to capture a woman are far less common, perhaps because few men are willing to admit to such a difficulty. For both sexes, I recommend a good novel, offering scenarios you might learn from, if only because they reflect a lot of doubt. ~ Roger Ebert,
1022:Whom are you going to dance with?' asked Mr. Knightley. She hesitated a moment and then replied, 'With you, if you will ask me.' Will you?' said he, offering his hand. Indeed I will. You have shown that you can dance, and you know we are not really so much brother and sister as to make it at all improper.' Brother and sister! no, indeed. ~ Jane Austen,
1023:A gift is like a seed; it is not an impressive thing. It is what can grow from the seed that is impressive. If we wait until our seed becomes a tree before we offer it, we will wait and wait, and the seed will die from lack of planting.... The miracle is not just the gift; the miracle is in the offering, for if we do not offer, who will? ~ Wayne Muller,
1024:Jeff Jenks showed up to say he was sorry but not really - some men are incapable of offering a sincere apology, Max realized; something in their nature refuses it, so instead they frame it as an accident, a misunderstanding, or a "sorry you're so upset" sort of thing that placed subtle blame on the other person for making such a big deal. ~ Nick Cutter,
1025:The narratives of many creative people position their work as exclusively an individual pursuit. To ensure that you are optimizing your potential, consider recasting this narrative: Are you taking best advantage of the help that others can offer, and, more important, are you offering to others all the help you are capable of providing? ~ Jocelyn K Glei,
1026:Can you imagine the restaurant host removing his tuxedo coat and offering it to me? Jesus does. We’re not talking about an ill-fitting, leftover jacket. He offers a robe of seamless purity and dons my patchwork coat of pride, greed, and selfishness. “He changed places with us” (Gal. 3:13). He wore our sin so we could wear his righteousness. ~ Max Lucado,
1027:doing them – and the amazing times you had on them – ought to be punishable by death. He has never said this to anyone though, so any time he gets offered, there is an awkward moment after he declines. The person offering clearly wonders whether he or she is being judged, and Parlabane reciprocally wonders whether he is too. With ~ Christopher Brookmyre,
1028:Maybe I should off myself right now and come join you."
Cordy frowned. "Why?"
"Well," said Lex, "it's no picnic over here in the land of the living. The whole town hates me, Mom and Dad probably despise me, there's an angry, murderous bitch tearing up the country, I've got your death to avenge and no one's offering ME any hard candy. ~ Gina Damico,
1029:to him, to Krishna, to God. To use your daily life and work as a conscious spiritual path means relinquishing your attachment to the fruits of the actions, to how they come out. Instead of doing it for a reward or a result, you do your work as an offering, out of love for God. Through love for God, your work becomes an expression of devotion, ~ Ram Dass,
1030:And I cannot help but wonder as we navigate the realms of our own manufacture, will we remember how to cherish one another, or will these realms turn out to be far too self-referential, a kind of beautifully furnished tomb, a mind loop, a mirror reflecting a mirror-offering a vista that can only induce dizziness, longing, and loneliness? ~ Rikki Ducornet,
1031:Here’s what’s interesting—especially for those who automatically think, You should feel like a terrible friend! or A little shame will help you keep your act together next time. When we feel shame, we are most likely to protect ourselves by blaming something or someone, rationalizing our lapse, offering a disingenuous apology, or hiding out. ~ Bren Brown,
1032:I spend up to two hours a day on correspondence. Hearing from fans on the Internet and being able to directly respond to the fan base is exciting. You can cut out the middle man like the fan club... before a recent appearance in Tyler, Texas, I had fans reaching out on MySpace offering their lake house, Mavericks tickets. It was amazing. ~ Josh Henderson,
1033:The leaves do not change color from the blighting touch of the frost, but from the process of natural decay. They fall when the fruit has been ripened and their work is done. And their splendid change of coloring is but their graceful and beautiful surrender of life, when they have finished their summer offering of service to God and man. ~ Tryon Edwards,
1034:The maitrakh met her gaze steadily, her alien face unreadable.

'Are you offering me your help?' Leia asked.

'There is honor in you, Lady Vader,' the maitrakh said, her voice quiet. 'For the life and honor of my thirdson, I will go with you. Perhaps we will die together.'

Leia nodded, her heart aching. 'Perhaps we will. ~ Timothy Zahn,
1035:We are killers, you and I', he said. 'Killers one, killers all. And each death we bring is a prayer. An offering to Our Lady of Blessed Murder. Death as a mercy. Death as a warning. Death as an end unto itself. All of these, ours to know and gift unto the world. The wolf does not pity the lamb. The storm begs no forgiveness of the drowned. ~ Jay Kristoff,
1036:A nation founded on the idea that all men are created equal and endowed with inalienable rights and offering asylum to anyone suffering from persecution is a beacon to the world. This is America at its best: a nation that welcomes dissent, protects free speech, nurtures invention, and makes possible almost unbelievable growth and prosperity. ~ Jill Lepore,
1037:Do you find yourself in a dry place today? Don’t look back toward the land of your bondage, or even to the place where God miraculously saved you from your enemies. Those seasons are over and he is now offering you a great opportunity. He is longing to reveal his sovereignty to you by providing for you in this most hot and dry place. ~ Amy Layne Litzelman,
1038:Hasan Pasha also gave the green light for Turks and Greeks to take whatever action they pleased against any Albanians they found: killing them was not a crime. Continuing his march, he executed all the Albanians he encountered, setting fire to a monastery where other were hiding and offering five sequins for every Albanian head brought him. ~ Mark Mazower,
1039:I think... you know, collaboration, in general - no matter movies, television or Broadway - is offering of what you can bring to the table and also fighting what you think the important battles are. Not everything is going to make it in there. Not everything is going to work. You have to collaborate. And you have to be a good listener. ~ Kristin Chenoweth,
1040:Miss Fields," said a servant, stepping into the room and closing the door, "There is a visitor for you. Are you in?"

Clare blinked. "Yes, obviously."

"Ah. Miss Fields, I should advise -- you may be in without being 'in', if you prefer," he said, offering her a tray. There was a calling card on it; Arthur Conan Doyle, Edinburgh. ~ Sam Starbuck,
1041:Whatever you do in life must be done as a service to the Divine and nobody else. ~ ~ The MotherWhatever you eat, make it an offering to the Lord. You are to think that God resides in the body in the form of fire and that the food you eat is given as an oblation to the fire. At His command you are performing an internal sacrifice ceremony. SWAMI SARADANANDA,
1042:A Muslim man can have up to four wives. He can divorce his wife without offering any reason, while it is quite difficult for a woman to get a divorce. The testimony of two women is equal to that of one man. Any woman who wishes to travel needs the written permission of her husband. And the number of unemployed women is four times that of men. ~ Shirin Ebadi,
1043:I reject karma and rebirth not only because I find them unintelligible, but because I believe they obscure and distort what the Buddha was trying to say. Rather than offering the balm of consolation, the Buddha encouraged us to peer deep and unflinchingly into the heart of the bewildering and painful experience that life can so often be. ~ Stephen Batchelor,
1044:keeps kissing my feverish flesh, licking, nibbling, and I just let him explore, offering myself up as his sexual guinea pig. He’s tasting every inch of me, his mouth moving tentatively over the ripples of my abs, my hips, my pecs. I moan when he licks one of my nipples, and he peeks up at me, his lips curving. “You like that.” I manage a nod. ~ Sarina Bowen,
1045:Miss Moore speaks slowly, deliberately. "I know because I read." She pulls back and stands, hands on hips, offering us a challenge. "May I suggest that you all read? And often. Believe me, it's nice to have something to talk about other than the weather and the Queen's health. Your mind is not a cage. It's a garden. And it requires cultivating. ~ Libba Bray,
1046:Necessity, they say, is the mother of invention, but fear too, is not barren of ingenious suggestions."

"Nice little saloon, isn't it" I said, as if noticing it for the first time.

"At noon I gave no orders for change of course, and the mates whiskers grew much concerned and seemed to be offering themselves to my unduly notice. ~ Joseph Conrad,
1047:Trained counselors would help them work through their problems and local rock bands would give concerts. And all the while, older teens would be alongside these troubled kids, offering them hope. His friend Sally Spencer, head of Youth Assisting Youth, called this being proactive. “We’re saving lives,” she liked to say. He was all for that. ~ Sheila Roberts,
1048:She turned, and saw a great white moon looking at her over the hill. And her breast opened to it, she was cleaved like a transparent jewel to its light. She stood filled with the full moon, offering herself. Her two breasts opened to make way for it, her body opened wide like a quivering anemone, a soft, dilated invitation touched by the moon. ~ D H Lawrence,
1049:When a Were moves in like that it means they're offering support. Cat and canine weres are very touch-feely and bird Were have a whole elaborate protocol for brush ad flutter. Snake Weres like to get right up into your aura and breather in your face, all but rubbing noses like Eskimos. And let's not even talk about Werespiders. I shivered. ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
1050:He offered her his hand once more, and the wide, flat palm beckoned.
Hades, offering pomegranate seeds.
If she took it, everything would change. Everything would be different.
There would be no going back. Though, somewhere in her mind, she knew there was no going back anyway.
Clutching her dress together, she took his hand. ~ Sarah MacLean,
1051:I began my ministry with some zeal, endeavouring to improve the lives of my flock by launching a little campaign to have the alehouse open only three days in the week instead of seven, and offering--as a nobler recompense--two extra church services. Sadly this little initiative was answered, in certain quarters, with something like hostility. ~ Matthew Kneale,
1052:In the vibration of appreciation all things come to you. You don't have to make anything happen. From what you are living, amplify the things you appreciate so that it sit he dominate vibration you are offering and then only those things that are a vibrational match to that can come to you. Then sit back and know, "You ain't seen nothing yet!!! ~ Esther Hicks,
1053:Lainie blurted, “Hank and Kyle wanna share me. Like, at-the-same-time type of sharing me.”

“Holy freakin’ shit.” Tanna’s big gray eyes went comically wide. “They’re offering you a threesome? With them?”
...
“Please tell me you said yes, Lainie.”

Her gaze flew to Tanna’s. “You’re not appalled?”

“Hell, no. I’m jealous. ~ Lorelei James,
1054:One can generally say this about men: that they are ungrateful, fickle, simulators and deceivers, avoiders of danger, greedy for gain; and while you work for their good they are completely yours, offering you their blood, their property, their lives, and their sons when danger is far away; but when it comes nearer to you, they turn away. ~ Niccolo Machiavelli,
1055:What it comes down to, I believe, is that mentoring often involves telling people what they need to hear, rather than what they want to hear. When you are able to be humbly honest with someone about a situation with which you have personal experience—even if you risk angering or hurting that person—you are offering the most valuable gift of all. ~ John Wooden,
1056:You are the son of a kind, strong, and engaged Father, a Father wise enough to guide you in the Way, generous enough to provide for your journey, offering to walk with you every step. This is perhaps the hardest thing for us to believe—really believe, down deep in our hearts, so that it changes us forever, changes the way we approach each day. ~ John Eldredge,
1057:And so, Paris. Dexter trudges meekly along in the wake of the Good Ship Rita, staring and nodding where these things are required and occasionally offering a sharp and witty comment, like, “Wow,” and “Uh-huh,” as Rita trammels through the pent-up lust for Paris that has surged in her all these many years and now, at last, has found consummation. ~ Jeff Lindsay,
1058:Best ever was filming in Barcelona last year, and I had a couple of scenes with De Niro. He's a very shy man. Speaks so quietly that people tend to bend down and adopt the same tone, almost the same voice, whenever they talk to him - watching, you'd think someone's offering to carry out a hit for him when they're just offering him a cup of coffee. ~ Toby Jones,
1059:Most of the parents who came to the school were full-time mothers and housewives; most of the villagers offering their opinions were retired, elderly and male. It was another enactment of the ancient dialogue, its lines written centuries ago, between the entreating voices of women, and the oblivious, overbearing dismissiveness of old men. ~ Richard Lloyd Parry,
1060:Right worship, the kind that is pleasing to God, acknowledges the grace that is in Jesus Christ not only with our lips but also with our lives. Christ’s own sacrifice makes possible the right kind of offering and proper worship: the sacrifice of the whole of our lives, a thanksgiving existence that proceeds from a mood of gratitude. Worship ~ Kevin J Vanhoozer,
1061:The only cross in all of history that was turned into an altar was the cross on which Jesus Christ died. It was a Roman cross. They nailed Him on it, and God, in His majesty and mystery, turned it into an altar. The Lamb who was dying in the mystery and wonder of God was turned into the Priest who offered Himself. No one else was a worthy offering. ~ A W Tozer,
1062:Be creative in that sense and your creativity will become an offering to God. God has given you so many gifts, Garima; something HAS to be done just in deep thankfulness. But remember: with no motive, not as a means but as an end unto itself. Art for art's sake, and creation for creation's sake, and love for love's sake, and prayer for prayer's sake. ~ Rajneesh,
1063:See what I mean,” I raised my hand into the air as if offering proof. “He’s pissed and all he can think about are assholes. It’s like two prizes in one.”

“You’re sick.”

“As in rad?” I asked. “Like…you’re totally sick, dude.”

“As in demented,” Gabe said.I scoffed, watching as he opened the gate on the SUV. “Everyone’s a critic. ~ Ethan Day,
1064:Yeah…I need to nip this Dean idea in the bud. I don’t know why he’s so eager to jump into bed with me again, but I’m confident he’ll get over it eventually. The guy has the attention span of a fruit fly, and the affection-giving habits of a puppy, offering his sexual devotion to whoever happens to be holding the treat. By which I mean the vagina. ~ Elle Kennedy,
1065:In A Life That Says Welcome, Karen Ehman writes about offering hospitality, not entertainment. She says: Entertaining puts the emphasis on you and how you can impress others. Offering hospitality puts the emphasis on others and strives to meet their physical and spiritual needs so that they feel refreshed, not impressed, when they leave your home. ~ Melanie Dale,
1066:Whom are you going to dance with?' asked Mr. Knightley.
She hesitated a moment and then replied, 'With you, if you will ask me.'
Will you?' said he, offering his hand.
Indeed I will. You have shown that you can dance, and you know we are not really so much brother and sister as to make it at all improper.'
Brother and sister! no, indeed. ~ Jane Austen,
1067:But we see something else: the nobility of a soul that has suffered to the point almost of erasure, and still it struggles to be whole, present, giving. Growing in love, deepening in understanding. Cudjo’s wisdom becomes so apparent, toward the end of his life, that neighbors ask him to speak to them in parables. Which he does. Offering peace. ~ Zora Neale Hurston,
1068:Hence a certain tension between religion and society marks the higher stages of every civilization. Religion begins by offering magical aid to harassed and bewildered men; it culminates by giving to a people that unity of morals and belief which seems so favorable to statesmanship and art; it ends by fighting suicidally in the lost cause of the past. ~ Will Durant,
1069:This did not have to be the case, because the faith was, from its very beginnings, greater, broader, and deeper. Even today faith in creation is not unreal; even today it is reasonable; even from the perspective of the data of the natural sciences it is the "better hypothesis," offering a fuller and better explanation than any of the other theories. ~ Benedict XVI,
1070:A good library’s existence is a potential step forward for a community. If hate and fear have ignorance at their core, maybe the library can curb their effects, if only by offering ideas and neutrality. It’s a safe place to explore, to meet with other minds, to touch other centuries, religions, races, and learn what you truly think about the world. ~ Josh Hanagarne,
1071:zombie.” Reyna stared at him. “What?” “His name is Jules-Albert. He’s French.” “A...French zombie?” “Hades isn’t the greatest dad, but occasionally he has these want-to-know-my-son moments. I guess he thought the zombie was a peace offering. He said Jules-Albert could be my chauffeur.” The corner of Reyna’s mouth twitched. “A French zombie chauffeur. ~ Rick Riordan,
1072:It is I who should be offering my assistance to you in this time of crisis,” he murmured. “Do contact me if you hear from Signorina Minorita. And of course, I am at your disposal if you think of anything I can do for you.”
Cass could think of several things she’d like Dubois to do, like stick his head in a canal and leave it there, but she kept quiet. ~ Fiona Paul,
1073:There is not really any courage at all in attacking hoary or antiquated things, any more than in offering to fight one’s grandmother. The really courageous man is he who defies tyrannies young as the morning and superstitions fresh as the first flowers. The only true free-thinker is he whose intellect is as much free from the future as from the past. ~ G K Chesterton,
1074:we are all born from the same celestial seed; all of us have the same father, from which the earth, the mother who feeds us, receives clear drops of rain, producing from them bright wheat and lush trees, and the human race, and the species of beasts, offering up the foods with which all bodies are nourished, to lead a sweet life and generate offspring ~ Carlo Rovelli,
1075:His goal as a doctor was always “trying to identify what happened in the past” of an addict that made them find everyday life unbearable, and to help them overcome it by offering compassion and helping them to build a good life as an alternative. Now they were asking: If this is the goal of all good doctors, why can’t it be the goal of government policy? ~ Johann Hari,
1076:My mentality, uncontrollable and wanton as always, whispered to me a scheme so magnificent and daring that I shrank from the very thought of what I was hearing. "Stop!" I cried imploringly to my god-like mind. "This is madness." But still I listened to the counsel of my brain. It was offering me the opportunity to Save the World Through Degeneracy. ~ John Kennedy Toole,
1077:There have been times when I could have succumbed to some form of bribe, or could have had my way by offering one. But ever since that night in Dover prison I have never been tempted to break my vow.. My Parents always drummed into me that all you have life is your reputation: you may be very rich, but if you lose your good name you'll never be happy. ~ Richard Branson,
1078:To see a Confederate flag flying outside someone’s home or in the back window of a pickup truck is about as accurate a warning system as a man could hope for, like the engine light coming on in your car a few miles before something may or may not blow up; it’s a caution before trouble starts, offering a clean window of time in which to make a run for it. ~ Attica Locke,
1079:So, your best defense is knowledge. It really is power, as they say...The more you know, the more easily you will develop your own philosophies about child rearing. When you have your facts straight, and when you have a parenting plan, you will be able to respond with confidence to those who are well-meaning but offering contrary or incorrect advice. ~ Elizabeth Pantley,
1080:The "door of faith" (Acts 14:27) is always open for us, ushering us into the life of communion with God and offering entry into his Church. It is possible to cross that threshold when the word of God is proclaimed and the heart allows itself to be shaped by transforming grace. To enter through that door is to set out on a journey that lasts a lifetime. ~ Pope Benedict XVI,
1081:When we approach legal reform work, we can ask questions like: Will this provide actual relief to people facing violence or harm or will it primarily be a symbolic change? Will this divide our constituency by offering relief only to people with certain privileged statuses (such as people with lawful immigration status, people with jobs, married people, etc.)? ~ Dean Spade,
1082:African films should be thought of as offering as many different points of view as the film of any other different continent. Nobody would say that French film is all European film, or Italian film is all European film. And in the same way that those places have different filmmakers that speak to different issues, all the countries in Africa have that too. ~ Elvis Mitchell,
1083:Designers provide ways into—and out of—the flood of words by breaking up text into pieces and offering shortcuts and alternate routes through masses of information. (...) Although many books define the purpose of typography as enhancing the readability of the written word, one of design’s most humane functions is, in actuality, to help readers avoid reading. ~ Ellen Lupton,
1084:Storm sky in August. Gusts of hot wind. Black clouds. Yet in the East is a delicate, transparent band of blue sky. Impossible to look at it. Its presence is a torture for the eyes and for the soul, because beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time. ~ Albert Camus,
1085:There is not really any courage at all in attacking hoary or antiquated things, any more than in offering to fight one's grandmother. The really courageous man is he who defies tyrannies young as the morning and superstitions fresh as the first flowers. The only true free-thinker is he whose intellect is as much free from the future as from the past. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1086:This is a—a proposal of marriage?” he asked me, and there was the very smallest trace of a smile at the corner of his mouth, something I had never seen before. “I suppose so,” I said, blushing again. “And, as you see, I’m doing it properly, on my knees.” “This would, however, be a partnership of equals you’re offering, I imagine?” “Undoubtedly.” (448-49) ~ Juliet Marillier,
1087:But surrender also means your back's to the wall and saying, "Okay, I give up." But rather it's a joyful self-offering. When you come to the point of realizing that "I never get it right. I always make a mess of things; I can't do anything right. Let him do it." And then you ask his power to do it through you and you find suddenly that it works that way. ~ Goswami Kriyananda,
1088:Sharing food is a metaphor for all giving. When we offer someone food, we are not just giving that person something to eat; we are giving far more. We give strength, health, beauty, clarity of mind, and even life, because none of those things would be possible without food. So when we feed another, this is what we are offering: the substance of life itself. ~ Sharon Salzberg,
1089:She watched as Michael stripped and walked toward the bed, his erection standing proud. The bed dipped as he got in the other side. She rolled toward him, and he pulled her into his arms. His skin was cool against hers, making her nipples bead. She wrapped her arms around him and pressed herself against him, offering him her heat.
Offering him everything. ~ Sarah Mayberry,
1090:From the point of view of a mayfly, human beings are stolid, boring, almost entirely immovable, offering hardly a hint that they ever do anything. From the point of view of a star, a human being is a tiny flash, one of billions of brief lives flickering tenuously on the surface of a strangely cold, anomalously solid, exotically remote sphere of silicate and iron. ~ Carl Sagan,
1091:there is a type of flower that can bloom only in the desert of doubt. Faith that we elect to profess in the absence of certainty is an offering that is entirely free, unconditioned, and utterly authentic. Such a gesture represents our considered and chosen response to the universe, our assent to what we find beautiful and worthy and deserving of our risk. We ~ Terryl L Givens,
1092:It's a cocktail-party circuit in D.C., That guy who couldn't master the guitar and get in a band and get laid, he ends up there. Gary Condit make sense to me. He's away from his family, he's in D.C. - if he was a car dealer in the [San Fernando] Valley somewhere out there, he'd be the guy who was trying to get laid by offering you the free undercoating package. ~ Dennis Miller,
1093:Neil freshened our coffee and passed her the platter of picked-over pastries, offering, “Have some.” She noticed, as I knew she would, that the bagels were untouched. She asked everyone, “What’s the matter? You don’t like Jew food?” I would normally bristle at such a comment, but as Barb herself was Jewish, she could say such things with impunity—and often did. ~ Michael Craft,
1094:We find that the child who does not yet have language at his command, the child under two and a half, will be able to cooperate with our education if we go easy on the "blocking" techniques, the outright prohibitions, the "no's" and go heavy on "substitution" techniques, that is, the redirection or certain impulses and the offering of substitute satisfactions. ~ Selma Fraiberg,
1095:After Bottle Rocket, I started getting acting work. People started offering me roles in movies. It wasn't something that I thought about as a kid growing up in Texas. Actually, maybe I would have thought of it as a possibility, but it seemed so crazily far-fetched to think that you could work in movies that I really didn't ever quite imagine it. It was just lucky. ~ Owen Wilson,
1096:God spoke to me clearly and said, 'Did I give my son Jesus on the cross expecting nothing in return?' God bankrupted heaven and gave the best gift he could give. He gave the best offering he could give. What did God need? He needed sons and daughters, he gave the very thing he needed. You can bring God a gift fully expecting something in return. Get to the phone!' ~ Paul Crouch,
1097:Exhilaration—is Within
383
Exhilaration—is within—
There can no Outer Wine
So royally intoxicate
As that diviner Brand
The Soul achieves—Herself—
To drink—or set away
For Visitor—Or Sacrament—
'Tis not of Holiday
To stimulate a Man
Who hath the Ample Rhine
Within his Closet—Best you can
Exhale in offering.
~ Emily Dickinson,
1098:They went around the room, Marin murmuring “Grapes,” but offering no reason when it was her turn. But when another girl said pineapple, Marin paid attention, curious about the choice. “Because it’s prickly on the outside and impossible to cut through. But once you get to the fruit, it’s worth the trouble,” the girl explained. “So don’t always believe what you see. ~ Sejal Badani,
1099:Highly complementary airline alliances and mergers can bring important benefits to passengers by connecting networks, offering new services and generating efficiencies across the aviation value chain. However, this has to take place within a competitive environment. It is vital that the economic benefits of an airline alliance or merger are passed on to passengers. ~ Neelie Kroes,
1100:This is Tez Jones,” I said. “He’s a police detective from Tampa.”
“Oh, my,” said Martha, blinking up at him. “Is something wrong?”
“Nope,” said Tez, grinning at her and offering a saucy wink. “I’m just the boyfriend.”
“Well, then.” She sized him up, and nodded.“It’s about time Elizabeth found someone who deserved her.”
“I worship at her dainty feet. ~ Michele Bardsley,
1101:Americans have long felt that NATO isn't doing its job and that the Europeans aren't contributing enough. Trump has accelerated the decline in Atlantic solidarity by offering open contempt for NATO allies as well. The future of NATO now very much depends on Europeans. Can you begin to identify security threats, prepare yourselves and arm yourselves without the US? ~ Anne Applebaum,
1102:He released my body, and I slumped down the wall, my butt colliding with the hardwood floor as I looked up at him with blurry vision. "What just happened?"

Zane Smirked then leaned down, offering me his massive hand. "Demonstration. You want him to kiss you like that. You're welcome. Also, next time a guy tries to kiss you who isn't Lincoln, you slap him. ~ Rachel Van Dyken,
1103:Religion deals with the highest levels of meaning. As a result, it can interpret each life or each event in a context that runs from the beginning of time to future eternity. Religion is thus uniquely capable of offering high-level meaning to human life. Religion
may not always be the best way to make life meaningful, but it is probably the most reliable way. ~ Roy F Baumeister,
1104:This is a—a proposal of marriage?” he asked me, and there was the very smallest trace of a smile at the corner of his mouth, something I had never seen before.
“I suppose so,” I said, blushing again. “And, as you see, I’m doing it properly, on my knees.”
“This would, however, be a partnership of equals you’re offering, I imagine?”
“Undoubtedly.” (448-49) ~ Juliet Marillier,
1105:I am laying out a specific agenda that will make more progress, get more jobs with rising incomes, get us to universal health care coverage, get us to universal pre-k, paid family leave and the other elements of what I think will build a strong economy, that will ensure Americans keep making progress. That's what I'm offering and that's what I will do as president. ~ Hillary Clinton,
1106:The morning of the offering, NYSE officials on the floor passed out silver bells emblazoned with NYX on the handle. Traders were told to ring them with abandon at the open. While they were billed as a shiny memento, their true purpose—to drown out the expected chorus of boos and catcalls from disaffected specialists—spoke volumes about the turmoil behind the scenes. ~ Scott Patterson,
1107:Offering And Rebuff
I could love you
as dry roots love rain.
I could hold you
as branches in the wind
brandish petals.
Forgive me for speaking so soon.
Let your heart look
on white sea spray
and be lonely.
Love is a fool star.
You and a ring of stars
may mention my name
and then forget me.
Love is a fool star.
~ Carl Sandburg,
1108:There in the city's steam-and-smoke-smudged harbor is the most extraordinary sight of all: a great copper-clad lady with a torch in one hand and a book in the other. It is not a statesman or a god or a war hero who welcomes us to this new world. It is but an ordinary woman lighting the way- a lady offering us the liberty to pursue our dreams if we've the courage to begin. ~ Libba Bray,
1109:(1) identifying what their customers wanted (to be seen and heard), (2) defining their customers’ challenge (that people didn’t recognize their hidden genius), and (3) offering their customers a tool they could use to express themselves (computers and smartphones). Each of these realizations are pillars in ancient storytelling and critical for connecting with customers. ~ Donald Miller,
1110:It was enough when Werner was a boy, wasn't it? A world of wildflowers blooming up through the shapes of rusty cast-off parts. A world of berries and carrot peels and Frau Elena's fairy tales. Of the sharp smell of tar, and trains passing, and bees humming in the window boxes. String and spit and wire and a voice on the radio offering a loom on which to spin his dreams. ~ Anthony Doerr,
1111:I will love you forever,” I murmured, and he stroked the hair off of my forehead.
I will hold you to that.” His face was grim and his voice was sober—he
touched my handprint of chaos as he said it, and I knew in my bones that it was a solemn vow, and not a sweet or a kind offering of love at all. Green would make me live if he had to crack the foundations of the world. ~ Amy Lane,
1112:Non-violence is a great principle in theory, but its practice often leads to greater violence in future. The principle of offering ‘your other check’ does not work in reality most of the times. Violence can be controlled only with greater violence. It is rightly said in the Bible, ‘He who spares the rod, hates his son, but he who loves him is careful to discipline him’. ~ Awdhesh Singh,
1113:We keep waiting to be crowned,
Waiting for the world to judge us worthy of offering our brightest, most empowered and beautiful stuff.
But that won’t happen.
Your next certification or ordination or degree will do nothing for your expression in the world until you accept how unspeakably worthy and valuable you already are to be here and share yourself with us. ~ Jacob Nordby,
1114:We rarely quote nowadays to appeal to authority... though we quote sometimes to display our sapience and erudition. Some authors we quote against. Some we quote not at all, offering them our scrupulous avoidance, and so make them part of our "white mythology." Other authors we constantly invoke, chanting their names in cerebral rituals of propitiation or ancestor worship. ~ Ihab Hassan,
1115:Innovation has stalled in the banking industry. While the rest of the world is in the digital age, banking remains stagnant. We are here to change this and bring banking to the 21st century. We will ensure our customers feel involved in the progress of this bank and are offering them a truly enjoyable banking experience – different from anything they have experienced before. ~ Jay Sidhu,
1116:The history of the patriarchs is filled with such missteps and moral failures. How could these be our moral examples? The answer: Biblical faith, unlike other kinds, is not primarily about emulating moral examples. The Bible is a history of God offering his grace to people who do not deserve it nor seek it nor ever fully appreciate it after they have been saved by it. ~ Timothy J Keller,
1117:To summarize the two most common mistakes we make in relationships: 1. A man tries to change a woman’s feelings when she is upset by becoming Mr. Fix-It and offering solutions to her problems that invalidate her feelings. 2. A woman tries to change a man’s behavior when he makes mistakes by becoming the home-improvement committee and offering unsolicited advice or criticism. ~ John Gray,
1118:For this can be said of men in general: that they are ungrateful, fickle, hypocrites and dissemblers, avoiders of dangers, greedy for gain; and while you benefit them, they are entirely yours, offering you their blood, their goods, their life, their children,...when need is far away, but when you actually become needy, they turn away. (translated by Wayne A. Rebhorn) ~ Niccol Machiavelli,
1119:We went back and forth, week after week, as I remember it. I was stubborn and so was she. I had a point of view and she did, too. In between disputes, I continued to play the piano and she continued to listen, offering a stream of corrections. I gave her little credit for my improvement as a player. She gave me little credit for improving. But still, the lessons went on. ~ Michelle Obama,
1120:Hence the sterile, uninspiring futility of a great many theoretical discussions of ethics, and the resentment which many people feel towards such discussions: moral principles remain in their minds as floating abstractions, offering them a goal they cannot grasp and demanding that they reshape their souls in its image, thus leaving them with a burden of undefinable moral guilt. ~ Ayn Rand,
1121:I discovered a version of the sinner's prayer that increased my faith far more than the one that I had said years earlier...In this version, there were no formulas, no set phrases that promised us safe passage across the abyss. There was only our tattered trust that the Spirit who had given us life would not leave us in the wilderness without offering us life again. ~ Barbara Brown Taylor,
1122:The traditional units of strategic analysis—company and industry—have little explanatory power when it comes to analyzing how and why blue oceans are created.
(..)
The most appropriate unit of analysis for explaining the creation of blue oceans is the strategic move—the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market creating business offering. ~ W Chan Kim,
1123:When problems arise, you will usually find two types of people: whiners and winners. Whiners obstruct progress; they spend hours complaining about this point or that, without offering positive solutions. Winners acknowledge the existence of the problem, but they try to offer practical ideas that can help resolve the matter in a manner that is satisfactory to both parties. ~ George Foreman,
1124:An alliance is like a chain. It is not made stronger by adding weak links to it. A great power like the United States gains no advantage and it loses prestige by offering, indeed peddling, its alliances to all and sundry. An alliance should be hard diplomatic currency, valuable and hard to get, and not inflationary paper from the mimeograph machine in the State Department. ~ Walter Lippmann,
1125:In offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, the priest is totally assimilated to Jesus crucified. This the Father sees; this the angels see; it is only men who do not see it. The depth of the impression of the wounds of Jesus in the heart and in the soul of the priest is proportionate to his degree of abandonment to the embrace of Jesus, who desires only to unite him to Himself. ~ Anonymous,
1126:Krishnamurti, a great Indian sage, once said: “You can take a piece of wood that you brought back from your garden, and each day present it with a flower. At the end of a month you will adore it, and the idea of not giving it an offering will be a sin.” In other words, everything that you are used to, once done long enough, starts to seem natural, even though it might not be. ~ Julien Smith,
1127:Told ye I knew how to kiss a lass, right an’ proper,” he said simply and offering his elbow, gave her a charming smile that reached all the way to his intense, absurdly long-lashed eyes. “And now that we’ve settled the matter once and hopefully not for all, why don’t we go find you those eggs.” “And you accuse my betrothed of being an… an arse,” she said. “Former betrothed. ~ Danelle Harmon,
1128:The saints are sinners still. Our best tears need to be wept over, the strongest faith is mixed with unbelief, our most flaming love is cold compared with what Jesus deserves, and our intensest zeal still lacks the full fervor which the bleeding wounds and pierced heart of the crucified might claim at our hands. Our best things need a sin offering, or they would condemn us. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
1129:This is old age, he thought sadly. He was sad because he had expected aging and the gradual extinction of his passions to bring a brightening and easing of his life, to take him a step nearer to harmony and mature peace of soul, and now age seemed to be disappointing and cheating him by offering nothing but this weary, gray, joyless emptiness, this feeling of chronic satiation ~ Hermann Hesse,
1130:You could dress it up with a sequined headband,” Magnus suggested, offering his boyfriend something blue and sparkly. “Just a thought.” “Resist the urge, Alec.” Simon was sitting on the edge of a low wall with Maia beside him, though she appeared to be deep in conversation with Aline. “You’ll look like Olivia Newton-John in Xanadu.” “There are worse things,” Magnus observed. ~ Cassandra Clare,
1131:Please stop making excuses for that shitheel, would you? He confessed because everyone in the entire firm saw it, and he knew you were going to find out sooner or later.” She put her arm around me and squeezed. “He’s a crap boyfriend and a crap guy in general. Please just let him go and move on. Please, please don’t go back to him. He’s offering you a golden opportunity right now. ~ Elle Casey,
1132:Alas!... what is it, valiant knight, save an offering of sacrifice to a demon of vain glory, and a passing through the fire of Moloch? What remains to you as a prize of all the blood you have spilled, of all the travail and pain you have endured, of all the tears which your deeds have caused, when death hath broken the strong man's spear, and overtaken the speed of his war-horse? ~ Walter Scott,
1133:The Lord Jesus Christ Himself is our perfect example, and He knew no divided life. In the Presence of His Father He lived on earth without strain from babyhood to His death on the cross. God accepted the offering of His total life, and made no distinction between act and act. "I do always the things that please him," was His brief summary of His own life as it related to the Father. ~ A W Tozer,
1134:With infinite life comes an infinite list of relatives. Grandparents never die, nor do great grandparents, great-aunts…and so on, back through the generations, all alive and offering advice. Sons never escape from the shadows of their fathers. Nor do daughters of their mothers. No one ever comes into his own…Such is the cost of immortality. No person is whole. No person is free. ~ Alan Lightman,
1135:And no matter how hard he tries, he simply can’t picture himself walking into a police station and offering information that ties him to some other shooting…certainly not with his felony arrest record. Free advice he gives to any prospective client who walks through the door: don’t volunteer anything to a cop that he didn’t ask for in the first place. Keep your fucking mouth shut. ~ Attica Locke,
1136:Deshani regales them with tales of her misogynist assistant, who can’t manage to hide how disgusted he is to be reporting to a woman, and her own delight in offering him a demotion if he’d prefer a male boss. It’s sharp and funny, and Eddison gets the feeling that the only reason the idiot hasn’t been fired is because Deshani finds him entertaining. It’s a little disturbing. It’s ~ Dot Hutchison,
1137:Your God would never punish you for being a human being: this life itself is your penance...But it is also more than that: it is a crucible for transformation. Each trial, every loss, is an opportunity for you to meet suffering with love and make of it an offering, a prayer. The minute you lift your pain like a candle the darkness vanishes, and mercy comes rushing in to heal you. ~ Mirabai Starr,
1138:Want a sugar cube?" he asks in his old seductive voice. That's how we met, with Finnick offering me sugar. Surrounded by horses and chariots, costumed and painted for the crowds, before we were allies. Before I had any idea what made him tick. The memory actually coaxes a smile out of me. "Here, it improves the taste," he says in his real voice, plunking three cubes into my cup. ~ Suzanne Collins,
1139:Despite myself, I could feel my eyes filling with tears and I turned my head so that she couldn’t see my face. Isabella turned off the light on the bedside table and stayed there, sitting close to me in the dark, listening to the weeping of a miserable drunk, asking no questions, offering no opinion, offering nothing other than her company and her kindness, until I fell asleep. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
1140:Our dreams are little stories or puzzles that we must solve to be free, Sebastian said. He was reading out loud from Wilson's notebook. My dream is me offering me a solution to the conundrum of my life. My dream is me offering me something that I need and my responsibility to myself is to try to understand what it means. Our dreams are a thin curtain between survival and extinction. ~ Miriam Toews,
1141:The soldier, above all other men, is required to perform the highest act of religious offering-sacrifice. In battle and in the face of danger and death he discloses those divine attributes which his amke gave when he created in his own image. No physical courage and no brute instincts can take the place of the divine annunciation and spiritual gift which will alone sustain him. ~ Douglas MacArthur,
1142:Four times a year, the program's street team sifts through police records and its own intelligence to determine, with actuarial detachment, the 50 people in Richmond most likely to shoot someone and to be shot themselves.ONS tracks them and approaches the most lethal (and vulnerable) on the list, offering them a spot in a program that includes a stipend to turn their lives around. While ~ Anonymous,
1143:I didn’t want to listen to Rook offering me roses whose perfume would make me forget all my childhood memories, or diamonds that would make me care for nothing but gems ever after, or goose down that would steal away my dreams. I knew that part of him existed, but I didn’t want to see it. And that sentiment was more dangerous than all the enchantments he could offer me combined. ~ Margaret Rogerson,
1144:I would do anything for you.” His eyes locked onto mine in the dashboard lights, intense and a little hurt. “What is it going to take for you to believe me? To trust me? You want my background checked? Do it. You want my credit score? Awesome. My bank account? I’ll add you on. You have my word, my body, my time, and I’m standing here offering my last name. What else can I give you? ~ Rebecca Yarros,
1145:Oh! I’m going to do good things for my child. Balony! That’s all ego. Just work on yourself And: Everytime you work on yourself, you get calmer you hear more you sense more you are more you’re more present What are you offering a child? not a set of social roles passing in the night. . . . youre offering a child here and now — ness The treasure of consciousness The treasure of awareness. ~ Ram Dass,
1146:If the iPhone gained traction, RIM’s senior executives believed, it would be with consumers who cared more about YouTube and other Internet escapes than efficiency and security. RIM’s core business customers valued BlackBerry’s secure and efficient communication systems. Offering mobile access to broader Internet content, says Mr. Conlee, “was not a space where we parked our business. ~ Sean Silcoff,
1147:I lean over you, your equal, offering you a mirror for your perfect nothingness, for your shadows which are neither light nor absence of light, for this void which contemplates. To all that which you are, and, for our language, are not, I add a consciousness. I make you experience your supreme identity as a relationship, I name you and define you. You become a delicious passivity. ~ Maurice Blanchot,
1148:Few places in American culture have made as effective a case for entrepreneurship than hip-hop. Hip-hop tells young people that our society is offering very limited options for youth. And that while society points to a radical decline in living wage jobs for youth and meaningful and affordable education, hip-hop is offering an alternative legitimate economy that is giving youth hope. ~ Bakari Kitwana,
1149:Just as we're all students throughout life, we're all teachers. In fact, we learn best by offering what we desire for ourselves to as many individuals as we can, as frequently as we can.....Following this line of thinking, it's imperative that we make deliberate effort to increase our inspirational energy, as this will lead us to being both a spiritual learner and teacher simultaneously. ~ Wayne Dyer,
1150:Meanwhile the 7th Armoured Division had charged ahead to cut off Tobruk. Two Australian brigades hurried on from Bardia to complete the siege. Tobruk also surrendered, offering up another 25,000 prisoners, 208 guns, eighty-seven armoured vehicles and fourteen Italian army prostitutes who were sent back to a convent in Alexandria where they languished miserably for the rest of the war. ~ Antony Beevor,
1151:You could dress it up with a sequined headband,” Magnus suggested, offering his boyfriend something blue and sparkly. “Just a thought.”
“Resist the urge, Alec.” Simon was sitting on the edge of a low wall with Maia beside him, though she appeared to be deep in conversation with Aline. “You’ll look like Olivia Newton-John in Xanadu.”
“There are worse things,” Magnus observed. ~ Cassandra Clare,
1152:They're hungry for this, I realized. Even after they've seen what he can do, even after watching their own people die. The Darkling wasn’t just offering them an end to war, but an end to weakness. After all these long years of terror and suffering, he would give them something that had seemed permanently beyond their grasp: victory. And despite their fear, they loved him for it. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
1153:Many of the people who voted for Trump were people who voted for Obama eight years ago. You remember, of course, his message was "hope and change." People wanted change, for good reasons, and they wanted hope. Disillusioned with what took place, they turned to someone else who was offering hope and change. When they're disillusioned with that, it depends on what activists and others do. ~ Noam Chomsky,
1154:The need for apologies and repair is a singularly human one---both on the giving and receiving ends. We are hardwired to seek justice and fairness (however we see it), so the need to receive a sincere apology that's due is deeply felt. We are also imperfect humans and prone to error and defensiveness, so the challenge of offering a heartfelt apology permeates almost every relationship. ~ Harriet Lerner,
1155:Cold demanded a sharper, simpler view of things: in those temperatures death hovered at the margins, offering clarity, providing precision. But it blurred things, too: the border between dreams and wakefulness, the way it pulled life from fingers and toes, and released them reluctantly, temporarily. The way the wind came, like news from another, more tenuous world, and stirred the trees. ~ Anthony Doerr,
1156:Men who shared the load at home seemed just as pressed for time as their wives, and torn between the demands of career and small children...But the majority of men did not share the load at home. Some refused outright. Others refused more passively, often offering a loving shoulder to lean on, an understanding ear as their working wife faced the conflict they both saw as hers. ~ Arlie Russell Hochschild,
1157:The subject who speaks is situated in relation to the other. This privilege of the other ceases to be incomprehensible once we admit that the first fact of existence is neither being in itself nor being for itself but being for the other, in other words, that human existence is a creature. By offering a word, the subject putting himself forward lays himself open and, in a sense, prays. ~ Claudia Rankine,
1158:This is frequently the position of believers now — they are called to perils and temptations altogether untried: at such seasons let them imitate Jacob’s example by offering sacrifices of prayer unto God, and seeking His direction; let them not take a step until they have waited upon the Lord for His blessing: then they will have Jacob’s companion to be their friend and helper. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
1159:And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God, waiting from that time until his enemies should be made a footstool for his feet. For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified. ~ Anonymous,
1160:Mann and Joyce are very different, and yet their fiction often appeals to the same people: Harry Levin taught a famous course on Joyce, Proust, and Mann, and Joseph Campbell singled out Joyce and Mann as special favorites. To see them as offering "possibilities for living", as I do, isn't to identify any distinctive commonality. After all, many great authors would fall under that rubric. ~ Philip Kitcher,
1161:Women have been brought up with the false sense that they have all the options in the world. We don’t understand that the culture really isn’t offering us all of these options – there still are very strong pressures to conform. We have to step outside the culture to be able to make choices that will really give us what we want. But we lack the psychic mechanisms to do this, to really choose. ~ Dalma Heyn,
1162:Somewhere, the imaginary little shoulder angel and devil were having a conversation on their respective sides, the angel offering a gentle warning that this might not be a good idea, given all the drama, the complications. But the little devil, with its pudgy belly and pointy ears, was so comical that Holly almost laughed when he rolled his eyes at the angel and whispered, "Oh, whatever". ~ Melissa Senate,
1163:Why are you offering me ten thousand dollars a month for babysitting? You didn’t pay the nannies that. It’s ridiculous. For ten thousand a month, you should not only get child care, you should get your house cleaned, your laundry done, your tires rotated, and if I were you, I’d insist on nightly blow jobs. Did you think I wouldn’t notice that you’re still trying to keep your thumb on me? ~ Jennifer Crusie,
1164:Both were not mental but physical illnesses. She was well aware of this, and would ask how that mended matters, as the feeling was there all the same, and was not removed by knowing the cause. She had a larger religious toleration than a person would have who had never questioned, and the manner of recommending religion was always that of offering comfort, not fiercely enforcing a duty. ~ Elizabeth Gaskell,
1165:Genuine faith is not some weapon that shields us from the storms of life while pronouncing judgement upon others, but neither is it wholly self-destructive. Rather, it is a weapon that both shields and lacerates the one who wields it, offering comfort to the distressed and distress to the comforted. To advocate this kingdom of love, mercy and truth involves self-sacrifice and self-critique. ~ Peter Rollins,
1166:I look for you early, my rock and my refuge, offering you worship morning and night; before your vastness I come confused and afraid for you see the thoughts of my heart. What could the heart and tongue compose, or spirit's strength within me to suit you? But song soothes you and so I'll give praise to your being as long as your breath-in-me moves.

~ Solomon ibn Gabirol, I look for you early
,
1167:A subject to which few intellectuals ever give a thought is the right to be a vagrant, the freedom to wander. Yet vagrancy is a deliverance, and life on the open road is the essence of freedom. To have the courage to smash the chains with which modern life has weighted us (under the pretext that it was offering us more liberty), then to take up the symbolic stick and bundle and get out. ~ Isabelle Eberhardt,
1168:I can't stomach any kind of notion that serious fiction is good for us, because I don't believe that everything that's wrong with the world has a cure, and even if I did, what business would I, who feel like the sick one, have in offering it? It's hard to consider literature a medicine; sooner or later the therapeutically minded reader will end up fingering reading itself as the sickness. ~ Jonathan Franzen,
1169:8When he said above, “You have neither desired nor taken pleasure in sacrifices and offerings and burnt offerings and sin offerings” (these are offered according to the law), 9†then he added, “Behold, I have come to do your will.” He does away with the first in order to establish the second. 10†And by that will we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. ~ Anonymous,
1170:Looking at the parable of the poor widow who gave her last coins to the offering, I considered what it is to give God everything, to truly give him significant pieces of yourself until you have given him your all. To give so much that all that is left is to be with him. I think of how the world measures the depth of our giving by what we hand over, but Jesus measures it by what we hold on to. ~ Carolyn Weber,
1171:When he was restored to the throne at Apple, we put him on the cover of Time, and soon thereafter he began offering me his ideas for a series we were doing on the most influential people of the century. He had launched his “Think Different” campaign, featuring iconic photos of some of the same people we were considering, and he found the endeavor of assessing historic influence fascinating. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1172:The idea of being the Substitute in offering an atonement to satisfy the demands of God’s law for others was something Christ understood as His mission from the moment He entered this world and took upon Himself a human nature. He came from heaven as the gift of the Father for the express purpose of working out redemption as our Substitute, doing for us what we could not possibly do for ourselves. ~ R C Sproul,
1173:IMPROVE. You wanted that ONE job, that ONE scholarship, that TV show, that book, to sell your company, to sell your product, whatever. And they said, no. Take a hard look at the product. Can you improve your offering? Can you take a step back and improve what you are doing? Maybe you can and maybe you can’t. But brainstorm first. What are the ten things you can do to improve what you are doing? ~ James Altucher,
1174:my mother the sparrow
my mother the nest
my mother the branches
my mother the leaves
my mother the tree who cut and whittled herself to build me
a boat offering safe passage
my eyes watch our slow sailing reflection in the water
in its stillness, it's almost impossible to tell
if the tiny yellow lights scattered across its surface are
mirrored stars or crocodile eyes ~ Sabrina Benaim,
1175:When Scott and I started, every time we performed we wrote a whole new bit. We didn't know this wasn't the way things were done because we were just starting. But we needed the new material anyway. And it's nice, every time that Matt Besser does the show he does a whole new bit. And it's nice to offer up a place where people can be that experimental while offering some solid, proven comedy as well. ~ B J Porter,
1176:In the long run the answer to all those who object to the doctrine of hell, is itself a question: What are you asking God to do? To wipe out their past sins and, at all costs, to give them a fresh start, smoothing every difficulty and offering every miraculous help? But He has done so, on Calvary. To forgive them? They will not be forgiven. To leave them alone? Alas, I am afraid that is what He does. ~ C S Lewis,
1177:Giving material goods is one form of generosity, but one can extend an attitude of generosity into all one's behavior. Being kind, attentive, and honest in dealing with others, offering praise where it is due, giving comfort and advice where they are needed, and simply sharing one's time with someone - all these are forms of generosity, and they do not require any particular level of material wealth. ~ Dalai Lama,
1178:A subject to which few intellectuals ever give a thought is the right to be a vagrant, the freedom to wander. Yet vagrancy is a deliverance, and life on the open road is the essence of freedom. To have the courage to smash the chains with which modern life has weighted us (under the pretext that it was offering us more liberty), then to take up the symbolic stick and bundle and get out. ~ Isabelle Eberhardt,
1179:Nonetheless, some scholars find value in conspiracy theories because they allow us to vent and give voice to hidden fears. “I view these things as a way of framing the world, of offering us narratives,” Professor Fenster said. “And they’re not necessarily a bad thing. Conspiracy theories are something that’s available in American discourse as a way of telling stories, as a way of explaining who we are. ~ Anonymous,
1180:Please, Karish, all this temptation before you.” I nodded at all the pretty people around us. “Something’s going to burst.”
He smiled. No, leered. “You offering to do something about it?”
I reached back for one of the dishes on the table and found a wicked-looking knife. I raised it and cocked a suggestive brow.
He paled. “You’re a sick, sick woman.”
“Still think you’re going to like me? ~ Moira J Moore,
1181:There’s a big confusion in this country over what we want versus what we need,” Morrie said. “You need food, you want a chocolate sundae. You have to be honest with yourself. You don’t need the latest sports car, you don’t need the biggest house. “The truth is, you don’t get satisfaction from those things. You know what really gives you satisfaction?” What? “Offering others what you have to give.” You ~ Mitch Albom,
1182:I find Hollywood gives these pat stories, and they're reassuring stories, and I don't really want to give people that. Hollywood does all that work. I'm offering, sometimes, an alternative to that. The answers aren't black-and-white. There may not even be answers in certain instances. The ground is not necessarily solid, either. So you've got to keep awake the whole time, even after the movie is over. ~ Terry Gilliam,
1183:She kisses him, lips parted, slow and sexy, lightly touching his lips with her tongue, offering wonders that would rock his world, while delivering nothing. Open mouthed, seductive, warm, inviting and … dangerous. Even I can feel the explosive sexual energy held in check behind her bare feather of a touch. She’s making sure he feels it, slapping him in the face with all she could offer—but isn’t. ~ Karen Marie Moning,
1184:You have sole ownership of your vision. And the Universe will give you what you want within your vision. What happens with most people is that they muddy their vision with “reality”. Their vision becomes full of not only what they want but what everybody else thinks about what they want, too. Your work is to clarify and purify your vision so that the vibration that you are offering can then be answered. ~ Esther Hicks,
1185:So the Buddha is presenting awakening not as a single mystical experience that may come upon us at some meditation, some private moment of transcendence, but rather as a new engagement with life. He is offering us a relationship to the world that is more sensitized to suffering and the causes of suffering, and he gives rise to the possibility of another kind of culture, another kind of civilization. ~ Stephen Batchelor,
1186:To sweat is to pray, to make an offering of your innermost self. Sweat is holy water, prayer beads, pearls of liquid that release your past. Sweat is an ancient and universal form of self healing, whether done in the gym, the sauna, or the sweat lodge. I do it on the dance floor. The more you dance, the more you sweat. The more you sweat, the more you pray. The more you pray, the closer you come to ecstasy. ~ Gabrielle,
1187:I think that a young state, like a young virgin, should modestly stay at home, and wait the application of suitors for an alliance with her; and not run about offering her amity to all the world; and hazarding their refusal. Our virgin is a jolly one; and tho at present not very rich, will in time be a great fortune, and where she has a favorable predisposition, it seems to me well worth cultivating. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
1188:My god, people are selling their work and people are reading it! The horror! That MFA programs have to advertise that they'll let you write YA or fantasy or what-have-you is just absurd, but we do, because the presumption is that they're closed to that sort of thing. You're offering an MFA in creative writing? Teach people how to write well, worry about that part, let the writers come up with the stories. ~ Tod Goldberg,
1189:While cooking demands your entire attention, it also rewards you with endlessly sensual pleasures... The seductive softness of chocolate beginning to melt from solid to liquid. The tug of sauce against the spoon when it thickens in teh pan, and the lovely lightness of Parmesan drifting from the grater in gossamer flakes. Time slows down in teh kitchen, offering up an entire universe of small satisfactions. ~ Ruth Reichl,
1190:Daytime television, you can tell who’s watching by the three kinds of commercials. Either it’s clinics for drying out drunks. Or it’s law firms who want to settle injury suits. Or it’s schools offering mail-order vocational degrees to make you a bookkeeper. A private detective. Or a locksmith. If you’re watching daytime television, this is your new demographic. You’re a drunk. Or a cripple. Or an idiot. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1191:For example, two people might be cooking the same meal and using exactly the same ingredients, but one is pouring Love into what he does and the other is merely trying to fill his belly. The result will be completely different, even though Love is not something that can be seen or weighed. The person making the Offering is always rewarded. The more he shares out his affection, the more his affection grows. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1192:Going against the customs of the Court and high society that consider it normal to make the lower classes wait indefinitely, Hazrat Mahal has never been able to accept this disregard for others, this manner of monopolising their time....this tendency to make them waste their lives, just out of indifference. She knows very well that for those who have nothing, offering their time is proof of their devotion. ~ Keniz Mourad,
1193:The hippies had in mind something that they wanted, and were calling it freedom, but in the final analysis freedom is a purely negative goal. It just says something is bad. Hippies weren't really offering any alternatives other than colorful short-term ones, and some of these were looking more and more like pure degeneracy. Degeneracy can be fun but it's hard to keep up as a serious lifetime occupation. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
1194:I am as much deserving of judgment as any other alien to the covenant.” She said, “Do we not all labor under the conflict of flesh and spirit? Is this not what makes us human?” Was she offering him an excuse? Was she trying to tell him something? “It is what makes us human,” he said. “But what makes us holy and separated unto Yahweh, when we have such blackened hearts?” “Faith,” she said. “It is all I have. ~ Brian Godawa,
1195:In this rumble example, the leader is not oversharing or disclosing inappropriately as a mechanism for hotwiring connection or trust with other people. There’s also no fake vulnerability. Fake vulnerability can look like a leader telling us that we can ask questions but not taking the time to create the psychological safety to do it, or not offering a pause in the conversation for anyone else to speak at all. ~ Bren Brown,
1196:I would that our farmers when they cut down a forest felt some of that awe which the old Romans did when they came to thin, or letin the light to, a consecrated grove (lucum conlucare), that is, would believe that it is sacred to some god. The Roman made an expiatory offering, and prayed, Whatever god or goddess thou art to whom this grove is sacred, be propitious to me, my family, and children, etc. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1197:One who loves Krishna will give Him whatever He wants, and he avoids offering anything which is undesirable or unasked for. Thus, meat, fish and eggs should not be offered to Krishna...Vegetables, grains, fruits, milk and water are the proper foods for human beings and are prescribed by Lord Krishna Himself. Whatever else you eat, can not be offered to Him, since He will not accept it. ~ A C Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada,
1198:Vitamin C is the world’s best natural antibiotic, antiviral, antitoxin and antihistamine. This book’s recurring emphasis on vitamin C might suggest that I am offering a song with only one verse. Not so. As English literature concentrates on Shakespeare, so orthomolecular (megavitamin) therapy concentrates on vitamin C. Let the greats be given their due. The importance of vitamin C cannot be overemphasised. ~ Andrew W Saul,
1199:Ethnographers served in many ways as the primary interpreters of their peoples to the modern outsiders who governed them. They recast in language understandable to these outsiders the rationale behind the customary ways. They were thus useful to the colonial rulers by offering information that could make the governors more cognizant of what they could and could not do (or should not do) in their administration. ~ Anonymous,
1200:He paused leaning over to lay his lips on hers, “It’s time to feel again. Let me save you from yourself. You were drowning when I found you, but I’m not letting you go, not without a fight.” He kissed her sweetly and moved back standing up and over her. Lena looked up at his out stretched hand.
“Take my hand Lena.” He offered and she knew he meant it in a way that went far beyond offering to help her stand. ~ Ella Frank,
1201:Humanity is only capable of worshipping Self — thus, it is necessary, that when people are persuaded to pay honor to an elected Divinity, they should be well and comfortably assured in their own minds that they are but offering homage to an Image of Self placed before them in a deified or heroic form. This satisfies the natural idolatrous cravings of Egotism, and this is all that priests or teachers desire. ~ Marie Corelli,
1202:True courtesy,” he continued, “earns the name. It is courtesy that is truthful. When the plebeian kneels to the monarch, he is offering his neck. He offers it because he knows his ruler can take it if he wishes. Common people like that say-or rather, they used to say, in older and better times—that I have no love of truth. But the truth is that it is precisely truth that I love, an open acknowledgment of fact. ~ Gene Wolfe,
1203:I took my time, running my fingers along the spines of books, stopping to pull a title from the shelf and inspect it. A sense of well-being flowed through me as I circled the ground floor. It was better than meditation or a new pair of shoes- or even chocolate. My life was a disaster, but there were still books. Lots and lots of books. A refuge. A solace. Each one offering the possibility of a new beginning. ~ Beth Pattillo,
1204:I, too, have felt that the war goes on and on. When my son, Ian, died at El Alamein-- side by side with... visitors offering their condolences, thinking to comfort me, said, "Life goes on." What nonsense, I thought, of course it doesn't. It's death that goes on; Ian is dead now and will be dead tomorrow and nexe year and forever. There's no end to that. But perhaps there will be an end to the sorrow of it. ~ Mary Ann Shaffer,
1205:We have our faith. We have our work. Our work is to bring God into this world. Look what has been done to this world and its people in this Godless century. It is a horror. Our task is to redeem this horror. We cannot redeem it by offering people ambiguity.” “I try to redeem it through my art.” “An artist redeems through his art?” He seemed astonished by that idea. “Acts redeem, Asher. Acts.” “Art is also acts. ~ Chaim Potok,
1206:Are you enjoying yourself this evening, Miss Greene?"
She nodded, thinking it safe now to face him.
"Good," he said, offering her a wicked grin when her eyes lifted to his. "I believe all young women, especially those timid and retiring ones like yourself, should embark on new horizons... try new things, if you will. I undoubtedly approve and, in fact, encourage you to indulge your most wicked fantasies. ~ Olivia Parker,
1207:In the story of the Garden this took place in the cool of the day: that is, at night. And Adam, when he left the Garden where life was to have been eucharistic—an offering of the world in thanksgiving to God—Adam led the whole world, as it were, into darkness. In one of the beautiful pieces of Byzantine hymnology Adam is pictured sitting outside, facing Paradise, weeping. It is the figure of man himself. ~ Alexander Schmemann,
1208:There is certainly no single remedy for this condition and I am offering no panacea. But it seems reasonable to believe — and I do believe — that the more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us the less taste we shall have for the destruction of our race. Wonder and humility are wholesome emotions, and they do not exist side by side with a lust for destruction. ~ Rachel Carson,
1209:I’ve come to realize this isn’t “real” and there’s no substitute for actual interaction. The difference between social media and a social life is the difference between eating a marshmallow Peep and dining on a tomahawk-cut rib eye: one is substantial and nutritious; the other is just a momentarily satisfying puff of sweetened air, offering no long-term benefits. I can enjoy the fluff, but I can’t subsist on it. ~ Jen Lancaster,
1210:Men are terrified of a woman's depth of love and the energy that moves as a woman's sexuality and emotions. And, at the same time, men want nothing more in this life than to merge completely with a woman's devotional love and wild energy. Only as a man outgrows his fear can he handle a woman's tremendous love-energy without running. And only such a man is worthy of your devotional offering in a committed intimacy. ~ David Deida,
1211:Stories of how businesses rise and fall strike a chord with readers by offering what the human mind needs: a simple message of triumph and failure that identifies clear causes and ignores the determinative power of luck and the inevitability of regression. These stories induce and maintain an illusion of understanding, imparting lessons of little enduring value to readers who are all too eager to believe them. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
1212:To conclude wars decisively and achieve prewar aims, the victor must defeat, and often even humiliate militarily, an enemy and force the loser to abandon prewar behavior before offering a magnanimous peace. “Humiliate,” here, does not mean to gratuitously insult or ridicule a prostrate enemy but rather to show him that the wages of his unprovoked aggression are the end of his ability to make war on others. ~ Victor Davis Hanson,
1213:Given the changing realities of class in our nation, widening gaps between the rich and poor, and the continued feminization of poverty, we desperately need a mass-based radical feminist movement that can build on the strength of the past, including the positive gains generated by reforms, while offering meaningful interrogation of existing feminist theory that was simply wrongminded while offering us new strategies. ~ bell hooks,
1214:I continually disappoint Miles in offering him little of variety in my clothing," he said. "The opportunity to manage yours has put him in alt." "He doesn't c-care for that g-gown," she mumbled. "Did he tell you so? The knave." "N-Not in so many words." "Nevertheless, for offending you I shall have him strapped to the yardarm for a thorough lashing." "Y-You won't." "I won't. It's true."

-Luc & Arabella ~ Katharine Ashe,
1215:We’ve seen parents successfully use a variant of this approach when an infant cries to be fed. Instead of immediately feeding the crying child, the mother lets the child know that the signal has been received but then waits for her or him to quiet down before offering the breast or the bottle. Again, it’s hard to ignore the cries at first, and we realize that to some parents it sounds too cruel to even try. But ~ Roy F Baumeister,
1216:You can tell the real Christians by their acts. They are the ones serving, the ones loving, the ones sharing whatever they have. They are withholding judgment, offering compassion, being that light they want to see in the world. They are the hands and the feet of God on earth, vessels of holiness, chalices of generosity. The next time someone calls himself a Christian, look for these qualities for the living proof. ~ Jan Phillips,
1217:What advice do you have for writers working on their first novels?If you feel called to write a book, consider it a gift. Look around you. What assistance is the universe offering you as support? I was given an amazing mentor, a poet, Eleanor Drewry Dolan, who taught me the importance of every word. To my utter amazement, there were times she found it necessary to consult three dictionaries to evaluate one word. ~ Kathleen Grissom,
1218:Alibaba took its IPO to investors in a roadshow, having priced the offering at between $60 and $66 a share. This could value the Chinese e-commerce firm at around $160 billion when it lists in New York, which is close to Amazon’s current market valuation. With reports that its order book is already full, Alibaba is likely to raise $20 billion or more on its stockmarket debut, and possibly be the most lucrative IPO ever. ~ Anonymous,
1219:If you've got somebody's aspects in your experience that you don't like, there's only one reason they're there. You keep evoking them with your attention to them. Without knowing about Law of Attraction, you have - through your old habit of observation - achieved vibrational harmony with the parts of them that you do not like, and you keep summoning those parts from them by your constant vibrational offering of them. ~ Esther Hicks,
1220:In Washington and Moscow they are saying, 'Man has finally come of age; he doesn't need paternalistic help.' Which is another way of saying, 'We have abolished that help, and in its place we will rule,' offering no help at all: taking but not giving, ruling but not obeying, telling but not listening, taking life and not giving it. The slayers govern now, without interference; the dreams of mankind have become empty. ~ Philip K Dick,
1221:Violence maims not only the body but also the mind and spirit. As Pierre Bourdieu has argued, it lies "on the side of belief and persuasion." If we are to counter violence by offering young people ways to think differently about their world and the choices before them, they must be empowered to recognize themselves in any analysis of violence, and in doing so to acknowledge that it speaks to their lives meaningfully. ~ Henry Giroux,
1222:I use a lot of specific places in my songs - traditionally, a lot from Minneapolis and St. Paul, where I grew up. Most people, especially when you get into international touring, have not been there. So you say, "Well, isn't it risky to talk about the corner of Franklin Avenue and Lyndale?" If you do it right, someone should say, "God, I know a corner like that." Offering specific details to describe something universal. ~ Craig Finn,
1223:...the conception of a Truth-consciousness supramental and divine, the invocation of the gods as powers of the Truth to raise man out of the falsehoods of the mortal mind, the attainment in and by this Truth of an immortal state of perfect good and felicity and the inner sacrifice and offering of what one has and is by the mortal to the Immortal as the means of the divine consummation.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret Of The Veda, [68],
1224:Yes, Cabbage: prison diplomacy. It’s called offering the newcomer a very warm welcome. You can tell Mares that I made lots of friends at two in the morning on the first night and continued making friends in the back of the laundry room and if I didn’t make friends there they would shove me into an industrial tumble-dryer and spin me around a few times until I was dizzy enough to make lots of friends at the same time. ~ Jonathan Dunne,
1225:The notion that the fulfilment of prayer has been determined from eternity, that it was originally included in the plan of creation, is the empty, absurd fiction of a mechanical mode of thought, which is in absolute contradiction with the nature of religion. Whether God decides on the fulfilment of my prayer now, on the immediate occasion of my offering it, or whether he did decide on it long ago, is the same thing. ~ Ludwig Feuerbach,
1226:Therefore 'Christ hath tasted death for every man:' not only for all kinds of men, as some vainly talk, but for every one, of all kinds; the benefit of whose offering is not only extended to such, who have the distinct outward knowledge of his death and sufferings, as the same is declared in the scriptures, but even unto those who are necessarily excluded from the benefit of this knowledge by some inevitable accident. ~ Robert Barclay,
1227:When I was young I once found a book in a Dutch translation, 'The leaves of Grass'. It was the first time a book touched me by its feeling of freedom and open spaces, the way the poet spoke of the ocean by describing a drop of water in his hand. Walt Whitman was offering the world an open hand (now we call it democracy) and my 'Monument for Walt Whitman' became this open hand with mirrors, so you can see inside yourself. ~ Karel Appel,
1228:He sent His own Son in the likeness of sinful man as an offering for sin. And He condemned sin in the flesh [subdued it and overcame it in the person of His own Son], [Lev 7:37] 4so that the [righteous and just] requirement of the Law might be fulfilled in us who do not live our lives in the ways of the flesh [guided by worldliness and our sinful nature], but [live our lives] in the ways of the Spirit [guided by His power]. ~ Anonymous,
1229:I try to stop myself from getting frustrated. I'm not a hundred percent successful, but I'm a thousand times better than I used to be. Anyone who's angry, nasty or rude is really offering a plea to be loved. I play a game with myself, trying to convert them from what I call low-energy emotions that drain us - frustration, irritation, anger and impatience - into high-energy emotions that sustain us - love, caring, kindness. ~ Wayne Dyer,
1230:Delta's plan to upgrade JFK facilities will improve our customers' travel experience and make it more efficient and enjoyable to travel through one of the world's premier international gateways. Our customers should make no mistake that Delta is committed to New York and that this summer's expansion at JFK is an important step in offering enhanced service to customers in most every direction we serve from New York City. ~ Jim Whitehurst,
1231:Hegelian dialectic—a psychological tool used to manipulate the masses. In this case, you create a problem, wait for the reaction, and then offer the solution. What people historically fail to realize, though, is that those offering the solution are the same people who caused the problem in the first place. They also fail to realize that no matter what the solution is, it always ends up providing its creators with more power. ~ Brad Thor,
1232:Normally I suppose I would have felt like kicking Chutsky for offering up Dexter’s tender skin on the altar of unnecessary danger. But as it happened, I agreed—just this once. It was clear to me that someone with a little bit of common sense should tag along, and looking around our gathering, counting everyone, that left me. “That’s right,” I said. “Besides, we can always call in for backup if it gets sticky.” Apparently, ~ Jeff Lindsay,
1233:The Minimalist Technology Screen To allow an optional technology back into your life at the end of the digital declutter, it must: Serve something you deeply value (offering some benefit is not enough). Be the best way to use technology to serve this value (if it’s not, replace it with something better). Have a role in your life that is constrained with a standard operating procedure that specifies when and how you use it. ~ Cal Newport,
1234:I think deep down, this planet yearns for the days of the British Empire again. They long once more to be treated that badly, that politely. We did far worse things than you can possibly dream of, but we did it with that certainly gentlemanly swagger... Dreadfully sorry, but we seem to have crushed your entire continent's infrastructure. Allow me to make it up to you by offering you a job 4,000 miles away. No, no, I insist. ~ John Oliver,
1235:Prayer is a relationship; half the job is mine. If I want transformation, but can't even be bothered to articulate what, exactly, I'm aiming for, how will it ever occur? Half the benefit of prayer is in the asking itself, in the offering of a clearly posed and well-considered intention. If you don't have this, all your pleas and desires are boneless, floppy, inert; they swirl at your feet in a cold fog and never lift. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1236:Prayer is a relationship; half the job is mine. If I want transformation, but can’t even be bothered to articulate what, exactly, I’m aiming for, how will it ever occur? Half the benefit of prayer is in the asking itself, in the offering of a clearly posed and well-considered intention. If you don’t have this, all your pleas and desires are boneless, floppy, inert; they swirl at your feet in a cold fog and never lift. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1237:What no one tells you is that when someone you love dies, you lose them twice. Once to death, the second time to acceptance, and you don’t walk that long, dark passage between the two alone. Grief takes every shuffling, unwilling step with you, offering a seductive bouquet of memories that can only blossom south of sanity. You can stay there, nose buried in the petals of the past. But you’re never really alive again. ~ Karen Marie Moning,
1238:What advice do you have for writers working on their first novels?

If you feel called to write a book, consider it a gift. Look around you. What assistance is the universe offering you as support? I was given an amazing mentor, a poet, Eleanor Drewry Dolan, who taught me the importance of every word. To my utter amazement, there were times she found it necessary to consult three dictionaries to evaluate one word. ~ Kathleen Grissom,
1239:You’ll be five-and-thirty this year, Griffy.” “Yes. Which makes me much too old to be called ‘Griffy.’ ” “More to the point, I am fifty-eight. I need grandchildren before my decline. It’s not right for two generations of the family to be drooling at the same time.” “Your decline?” He laughed. “Tell me, Mother, how can I hasten that happy process? Other than offering a firm push.” Her eyebrow arched in amusement. “Just try it. ~ Tessa Dare,
1240:Loans are easier than equity. I generally think that offering debt is better than offering equity. When you offer F&F members equity, they are legally your business partners. Do you really want Uncle Freddy as a business partner? It’s better to treat such investments as loans. But if your F&F members insist on equity, try to make it nonvoting stock, so they can’t insist on being consulted on every management decision. ~ Brian Cohen,
1241:Real scientists are required to play by the rules without exception. Creationists follow the rules of science only so long as it is expedient. Then they resort to miracles. But resorting to miracles is not offering an explanation: it is asserting that no real explanation exists. Whenever creationists resort to miracles, they are admitting that their system cannot account for the facts of nature; it cannot explain the world. ~ Frank Zindler,
1242:A prince, therefore, ought always to take counsel, but only when he wishes and not when others wish; he ought rather to discourage every one from offering advice unless he asks it; but, however, he ought to be a constant inquirer, and afterwards a patient listener concerning the things of which he inquired; also, on learning that any one, on any consideration, has not told him the truth, he should let his anger be felt. ~ Niccol Machiavelli,
1243:family, however, inculcates a collaborative environment: people working and growing together. They share openly, offering whatever they have without a thought to what they’ll get in return. They demonstrate humility and respect because they have nothing to prove and nothing to gain in one-upping others. They trust the Spirit to work as he wills, and they can support each other even if they don’t see eye-to-eye on everything. ~ Wayne Jacobsen,
1244:The voice, sounding more than ever to Sol like some cut-rate holie director’s shallow idea of what God’s voice should sound like, came again: “Sol! You must listen well. The future of humankind depends upon your obedience in this matter. You must take your daughter, your daughter Rachel whom you love, and go to the world called Hyperion and offer her there as a burnt offering at one of the places of which I shall tell you.” And ~ Dan Simmons,
1245:I would stare at the statue’s distant shape, perhaps daring it to do something—strike me down if it wanted, or show some other sign of sentience—and, after an uneventful interregnum, I would turn away, never with satisfaction. The statue seemed to mock me with its muteness and its immobility, as though offering the promise, if of anything, not of redemption, but rather of a reckoning, and at a time of its choosing, not of mine. ~ Barry Eisler,
1246:The government’s primary concern is the continuity of government, not the people, or their lives and families. Take a look at what they did following Katrina. Thousands of people showed up offering help, food, supplies and medical care, all for free. FEMA sent them all away while people suffered and died in their homes. When official help did arrive, it was too little, too late, and people were required to leave their pets behind. ~ D F Capps,
1247:We are all divine spirits, helping others on conscious and unconscious levels. The past, present, and future exist simultaneously—all lives, all events have already occurred—leaving you with memories of illusions that you pluck from the recesses of your mind. You have reached enlightenment because you have never left it. So, you have the ability to act as an angel, reaching out to others, offering miracles and love, now. ~ Elizabeth M Herrera,
1248:A poem of his own in honor of the late empress formed, unbidden, in his brain. A Degtiar empress named Lisbet Trapped a satrap lord neatly in his net. Enticed into treason For all the wrong reasons, He’ll soon have a crash with his kismet. He choked down a genuinely horrible impulse to bounce down to the center of the dell and declaim his poetic offering to the assembled haut multitude, just to see what would happen. Mia ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1249:He wrenches out of my grip and plants both palms on my chest to shove me onto my back. My dick sails up and slaps my navel, and he groans at the sight before wrapping his fingers around my shaft. “Can I…” His voice comes out in a rush. “Can I suck you off?” Holy mother of God. I’m caught in some kind of fever dream. I have to be, because there’s no other explanation for why my best friend is offering to put his mouth on my dick. ~ Sarina Bowen,
1250:I can’t stop looking at her, because I can’t stop remembering what it was like to touch her. I can’t forget the way she felt beneath me, or how perfect her mouth tasted, or how when she all but begged me to take her, it had been the hardest thing in my life to say no. Even harder to try to explain to her that I didn’t deserve what she was offering. Because the shitty part of all this is, I want to deserve a girl like Chloe Bellamy. ~ Anonymous,
1251:The whole scene gave Ashley a fierce ache in the center of her chest. Everything her eyes came across spoke to how these two men lived in some kind of world where hardship was the constant, with only these tiny spaces between heartbeats offering some kind of peace. She saw an apartment that housed two men who lived whatever life they could in the confines of that small space because everything else was no good for anyone. ~ Sheldon Lee Compton,
1252:A Harris/Harvard School of Public Health poll of 1989 showed that most Americans (61 percent) favored a Canadian-type health system, in which the government was the single payer to doctors and hospitals, bypassing the insurance companies, and offering universal medical coverage to everyone. Neither the Democratic nor the Republican party adopted that as its program, although both insisted they wanted to “reform” the health system. ~ Howard Zinn,
1253:The holy book he’d spent so much of his life preaching from had one cruel flaw: it was not very good at offering encouragement or hope to those who weren’t religious. With God, nothing shall be impossible, proclaimed Luke, and that message, which Peter had always thought was the most joyously positive reassurance you could wish for, now turned itself over like a dying insect, and became Without God, everything shall be impossible. ~ Michel Faber,
1254:The idea . . . that Christianity brought a new ethical code into the world is a grave error. If it had done so, then we would have to conclude that all who first preached it wholly misunderstood their own message: for all of them, its founder, His precursor, His apostles, came demanding repentance and offering forgiveness, a demand and an offer both meaningless except on the assumption of a moral law already known and already broken. ~ C S Lewis,
1255:My amusement with the Fifty Shades series only goes so far. The books are, essentially, a detailed primer for how to successfully engage in a controlling, abusive relationship. The trilogy represents the darkest kind of fairy tale, one where controlling, obsessive, and borderline abusive tendencies are made to seem intensely desirable by offering the reader big heaping spoonfuls of sweet, sweet sex sugar to make the medicine go down. ~ Roxane Gay,
1256:Crackers!” said Dumbledore enthusiastically, offering the end of a large silver noisemaker to Snape, who took it reluctantly and tugged. With a bang like a gunshot, the cracker flew apart to reveal a large, pointed witch’s hat topped with a stuffed vulture. Harry, remembering the boggart, caught Ron’s eye and they both grinned; Snape’s mouth thinned and he pushed the hat toward Dumbledore, who swapped it for his wizard’s hat at once. ~ J K Rowling,
1257:Honesty is the only way with anyone, when you’ll be so close as to be living inside each other’s skins. So . . . is this Ekaterin another passing fancy?” The Count hesitated, his eyes crinkling. “Or is she the one who will love my son forever and fiercely—hold his household and estates with integrity—stand beside him through danger, and dearth, and death—and guide my grandchildren’s hands when they light my funeral offering? ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1258:The Byzantine governor assembled an army considerably larger than that of the Normans and rebels. He then sent a herald to the opposing camp offering either the Normans’ safe return to Lombard territory or battle. In response, an enormous Norman knight smashed his mailed fist on the head of the Byzantine herald’s horse; the horse fell dead on the spot. (Yes, this actually happened, historians agree.)23 The battle began the next day. ~ Rodney Stark,
1259:I wear silk -- the cover to uncover --
because silk is what I want you to think of.
But I dislike the cloth. It is too stern.

So tell me anything but track me like a climber
for here is the eye, here is the jewel,
here is the excitement the nipple learns.

I am unbalanced -- but I am not mad with snow.
I am mad the way young girls are mad,
with an offering, an offering...

I burn the way money burns. ~ Anne Sexton,
1260:Often I lose myself in the constellation of my own ideas, forever searching for point of illumination. But no matter where I look, I find you, shinning and bright, offering me what ever it is I seek, you are my one single star. My sun, my moon, my guide and direction, I know as long as I have you, I'll never lose my way. Even if I can not touch you, I know I will see you, feel you, from anywhere. If I need you I know where to find you ~ Vaddey Ratner,
1261:In contrast, compassion manifests in us as the offering of kindness rather than withdrawal. Because compassion is a state of mind that is itself open, abundant and inclusive, it allows us to meet pain more directly. With direct seeing, we know that we are not alone in our suffering and that no one need feel alone when in pain. Seeing our oneness is the beginning of compassion, and it allows us to reach beyond aversion and separation. ~ Sharon Salzberg,
1262:Mostly things are not that way, that simple and pure, with so much focus given to each syllable of life as life sings itself. But that kind of attention is the prize. To be engrossed by something outside ourselves is a powerful antidote for the rational mind, the mind that so frequently has its head up its own ass--seeing things in such a narrow and darkly narcissistic way that it presents a colo-rectal theology, offering hope to no one. ~ Anne Lamott,
1263:Save me from the curse that lies dark across the modern clergy: the curse of compromise, of imitation, of professionalism. Save me from the error of judging a church by its size, its popularity or the amount of its yearly offering. Help me to remember that I am a prophet—not a promoter, not a religious manager, but a prophet. Let me never become a slave to crowds. Heal my soul of carnal ambitions and deliver me from the itch for publicity. ~ A W Tozer,
1264:Black as--the centre of an eye, the centre, a blackness
that sucks at light. I love your vigilance

Night, first mother of songs, give me the voice to sing of you
in those fingers lies the bridle of the four winds.

Crying out, offering words of homage to you, I am
only a shell where the ocean is still sounding.

But I have looked too long into human eyes.
Reduce me now to ashes--Night, like a black sun. ~ Marina Tsvetaeva,
1265:If America spent as much money offering opportunities to every sixteen- to twenty-six-year-old as we spend locking them up for minor offenses that further cut them off from a positive future, we could end poverty in a generation or two. When young people find a true pathway to opportunity and a caring community, they become excellent parents determined to give their children the world of opportunities they lacked in their own childhood.” It ~ Jim Marrs,
1266:Setting out some honey shortbread cookies to go with the lemonade, she flashed on memories of her grandmother, offering refreshments to anyone who was lucky enough to come through the kitchen door. As a working farm, Bella Vista was always busy with workers, some seasonal and others permanent. 'In my kitchen, everyone is family,' Bubbie used to say, beaming as the orchard workers, mechanics or gardeners gladly wolfed down her baked goods. ~ Susan Wiggs,
1267:Pluck this little flower and take it, delay not! I fear lest it
droop and drop into the dust.

I may not find a place in thy garland, but honour it with a touch of
pain from thy hand and pluck it. I fear lest the day end before I am
aware, and the time of offering go by.

Though its colour be not deep and its smell be faint, use this flower
in thy service and pluck it while there is time.

~ Rabindranath Tagore, Flower
,
1268:Put to use in the laboratories of basic science, creativity results in. new discoveries and inventions, which produce industries offering new products. Since they are new, demand for them must be stimulated, and the creation of new wants results in further industrial expansion; but since constant industrial expansion depletes and exhausts natural resources, scientists are paid to find new ones so that America itself will not become exhausted. ~ Anonymous,
1269:Deconstructing the man box and the harm it causes every body, male, female, and otherwise, begins with challenging that idea and offering, in its place, the reality of our actual bodies. To build equitable relationships and societies, to create a world free of unwanted violence, to tackle the masculinity crisis—we must first acknowledge how we each are failing, right now, to see the full spectrum of humanity in ourselves and in others. ~ Thomas Page McBee,
1270:Mother, I shall weave a chain of pearls for thy neck
with my tears of sorrow.

The stars have wrought their anklets of light to deck thy feet,
but mine will hang upon thy breast.

Wealth and fame come from thee
and it is for thee to give or to withhold them.
But this my sorrow is absolutely mine own,
and when I bring it to thee as my offering
thou rewardest me with thy grace.

~ Rabindranath Tagore, Chain Of Pearls
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1271:My opinion is that we have, in the person of Da Free John, a Spiritual Master and religious genius of the ultimate degree. I assure you I do not mean that lightly. I am not tossing out high-powered phrases to 'hype' the works of Da Free John. I am simply offering to you my own considered opinion: Da Free John's teaching is, I believe, unsurpassed by that of any other spiritual Hero, of any period, of any place, of any time, of any persuasion. ~ Ken Wilber,
1272:The easiest way to deal with potential opponents is to buy them off. Most elected autocrats begin by offering leading political, business, or media figures public positions, favors, perks, or outright bribes in exchange for their support or, at least, their quiet neutrality. Cooperative media outlets may gain privileged access to the president, while friendly business executives may receive profitable concessions or government contracts. ~ Steven Levitsky,
1273:We begin by exploring how peak performance is related to the notion of peak experience, both at the individual and group level. Following an explanation of our research methodology, we present the observation data from our study interpolated with our analyses. Based on these analyses, we propose a model of collective virtuosity in organizations and conclude by explaining limitations of our research and offering directions for further research. ~ Anonymous,
1274:Trust me, no one wants a perfect friend who can’t offer a minute of transparency. We can get that on Pinterest. Our souls ache for real people in real homes with real kids and real lives. We may carefully curate online identities with well-chosen pictures and selective information, but doing so leaves us starving for something true. I seek only friends who bleed and sweat and laugh and cry. Don’t fear your humanity; it is your best offering. ~ Jen Hatmaker,
1275:As we explore the nature of our gift, our goal is to move toward this kind of giving: cheerful giving that flows gently and easily, kingly giving that flows surely from who we are. As we encounter the questions—Who are we ? What do we love ?—the gift we bring will be easy, because our gift naturally emerges from who we are. The offering we bring is ourselves, just as we are. Our gift is our true nature. There can be no greater gift than this. ~ Wayne Muller,
1276:Do you understand what I’m offering you?"
"Do you understand that it’s not 1815?"
"It’s not unusual for Masters to have Consorts."
"Yes, and your current Consort’s in my kitchen right now. If you need . . . relieving, talk to her."
"As much as it pains me to say it, Amber isn’t you."
"I don’t even know what that means. Should I—What? Be flattered that while you don’t like me, you’re willing to sacrifice just to get into my pants? ~ Chloe Neill,
1277:Matthias examined the posters. "One hundred thousand kruge!" He shot a disbelieving glower at Kaz. "You're hardly worth that."
The hint of a smile tugged at Kaz's lips. "As the market wills it."
"Tell me about it," said Jesper. "They're only offering thirty thousand for me."
"Your lives are at stake," said Wylan. "How can you act like this is a competition?"
"We're stuck in a tomb, merchling. You take the action where you find it. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
1278:Women have endeavored to guide men to love because patriarchal thinking has sanctioned this work even as it has undermined it by teaching men to refuse guidance…A useful gift all love’s practitioners can give is the offering of forgiveness. It not only allows us to move away from blame, from seeing others as the cause of our sustained lovelessness, but it enables us to experience agency, to know we can be responsible for giving and finding love. ~ bell hooks,
1279:A whore should be judged by the same criteria as other professionals offering services for pay — such as dentists, lawyers, hairdressers, physicians, plumbers, etc. Is she professionally competent? Does she give good measure? Is she honest with her clients?
It is pos