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--- WIKI
Immanuel Kant (, ; ; 22 April 1724 12 February 1804) was an influential German philosopher in the Age of Enlightenment. In his doctrine of transcendental idealism, he argued that space, time, and causation are mere sensibilities; "things-in-themselves" exist, but their nature is unknowable. In his view, the mind shapes and structures experience, with all human experience sharing certain structural features. In one of his major works, the Critique of Pure Reason (1781; second edition 1787), he drew a parallel to the Copernican revolution in his proposition that worldly objects can be intuited a priori ('beforehand'), and that intuition is therefore independent from objective reality. Kant believed that reason is also the source of morality, and that aesthetics arise from a faculty of disinterested judgment. Kant's views continue to have a major influence on contemporary philosophy, especially the fields of epistemology, ethics, political theory, and post-modern aesthetics. He attempted to explain the relationship between reason and human experience and to move beyond the failures of traditional philosophy and metaphysics. He wanted to put an end to what he saw as an era of futile and speculative theories of human experience, while resisting the skepticism of thinkers such as David Hume. He regarded himself as showing the way past the impasse between rationalists and empiricists, and is widely held to have synthesized both traditions in his thought. Kant was an exponent of the idea that perpetual peace could be secured through universal democracy and international cooperation. He believed that this would be the eventual outcome of universal history, although it is not rationally planned. The nature of Kant's religious ideas continues to be the subject of philosophical dispute, with viewpoints ranging from the impression that he was an initial advocate of atheism who at some point developed an ontological argument for God, to more critical treatments epitomized by Schopenhauer, who criticized the imperative form of Kantian ethics as "theological morals" and the "Mosaic Decalogue in disguise", and Nietzsche, who claimed that Kant had "theologian blood" and was merely a sophisticated apologist for traditional Christian faith. Kant published other important works on ethics, religion, law, aesthetics, astronomy, and history. These include the Universal Natural History (1755), the Critique of Practical Reason (1788), the Metaphysics of Morals (1797), the Critique of Judgment (1790), which looks at aesthetics and teleology, and Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason (1793).
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compatibilism ::: Also known as "soft determinism" and championed by David Hume, is a theory that holds that free will and determinism are compatible. According to Hume, free will should not be understood as an absolute ability to have chosen differently under exactly the same inner and outer circumstances. Rather, it is a hypothetical ability to have chosen differently if one had been differently psychologically disposed by some different beliefs or desires. Hume also maintains that free acts are not uncaused (or mysteriously self-caused as Immanuel Kant would have it) but caused by people's choices as determined by their beliefs, desires, and by their characters. While a decision making process exists in Hume's determinism, this process is governed by a causal chain of events.

Critique of Pure Reason: (Ger. Kritik der reinen Vernunft) The first of three Critiques written by Immanuel Kant (1781) in which he undertook a critical examination of pure reason, its nature and limits, with a view to exhibiting a criterion for judging the validity of propositions of metaphysics. The first Critique was followed by the Critique of Practical Reason (1788), and the Critique of Judgment (1790). See Kantianism. -- O.F.K.

German idealism ::: A movement in idealism centered in Germany and traditionally beginning with Immanuel Kant's notion of transcendental idealism. Many prominent exponents include Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Johann Gottlieb Fichte, and Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling.

kantian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Immanuel Kant, the German philosopher; conformed or relating to any or all of the philosophical doctrines of Immanuel Kant. ::: n. --> A follower of Kant; a Kantist.

Kantianism ::: The philosophy of Immanuel Kant, a German philosopher born in Königsberg, Germany (now Kaliningrad, Russia). The terms Kantianism or Kantian can refer to contemporary positions in philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ethics.

Kant, Immanuel: (1724-1804), born and died in Königsberg. Studied the Leibniz-Wolffian philosoohv under Martin Knutzen. Also studied and taught astronomy (see Kant-Laplace hypothesis), mechanics and theology. The influence of Newton's physics and Lockean psychology vied with his Leibnizian training. Kant's personal life was that of a methodic pedant, touched with Rousseauistic piety and Prussian rigidity. He scarcely travelled 40 miles from Königsberg in his life-time, disregarded music, had little esteem for women, and cultivated few friends apart from the Prussian officials he knew in Königsberg. In 1755, he became tutor in the family of Count Kayserling. In 1766, he was made under-librarian, and in 1770 obtained the chair of logic and metaphysics at the University of Königsberg. Heine has made classical the figure of Kant appearing for his daily walk with clock-like regularity. But his very wide reading compensated socially for his narrow range of travel, and made him an interesting coversationalist as well as a successful teacher. Kantianism: The philosophy of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804); also called variously, the critical philosophy, criticism, transcendentalism, or transcendental idealism. Its roots lay in the Enlightenment; but it sought to establish a comprehensive method and doctrine of experience which would undercut the rationalistic metaphysics of the 17th and 18th centuries. In an early "pre-critical" period, Kant's interest centered in evolutionary, scientific cosmology. He sought to describe the phenomena of Nature, organic as well as inorganic, as a whole of interconnected natural laws. In effect he elaborated and extended the natural philosophy of Newton in a metaphysical context drawn from Christian Wolff and indirectly from Leibniz.

Legal Philosophy: Deals with the philosophic principles of law and justice. The origin is to be found in ancient philosophy. The Greek Sophists criticized existing laws and customs by questioning their validity: All human rules are artificial, created by enactment or convention, as opposed to natural law, based on nature. The theory of a law of nature was further developed by Aristotle and the Stoics. According to the Stoics the natural law is based upon the eternal law of the universe; this itself is an outgrowth of universal reason, as man's mind is an offshoot of the latter. The idea of a law of nature as being innate in man was particularly stressed and popularized by Cicero who identified it with "right reason" and already contrasted it with written law that might be unjust or even tyrannical. Through Saint Augustine these ideas were transmitted to medieval philosophy and by Thomas Aquinas built into his philosophical system. Thomas considers the eternal law the reason existing in the divine mind and controlling the universe. Natural law, innate in man participates in that eternal law. A new impetus was given to Legal Philosophy by the Renaissance. Natural Jurisprudence, properly so-called, originated in the XVII. century. Hugo Grotius, Thomas Hobbes, Benedictus Spinoza, John Locke, Samuel Pufendorf were the most important representatives of that line of thought. Grotius, continuing the Scholastic tradition, particularly stressed the absoluteness of natural hw (it would exist even if God did not exist) and, following Jean Bodin, the sovereignty of the people. The idea of the social contract traced all political bodies back to a voluntary compact by which every individual gave up his right to self-government, or rather transferred it to the government, abandoning a state of nature which according to Hobbes must have been a state of perpetual war. The theory of the social compact more and more accepts the character of a "fiction" or of a regulative idea (Kant). In this sense the theory means that we ought to judge acts of government by their correspondence to the general will (Rousseau) and to the interests of the individuals who by transferring their rights to the commonwealth intended to establish their real liberty. Natural law by putting the emphasis on natural rights, takes on a revolutionary character. It played a part in shaping the bills of rights, the constitutions of the American colonies and of the Union, as well as of the French declaration of the rights of men and of citizens. Natural jurisprudence in the teachings of Christian Wolff and Thomasius undergoes a kind of petrification in the vain attempt to outline an elaborate system of natural law not only in the field of international or public law, but also in the detailed regulations of the law of property, of contract, etc. This sort of dogmatic approach towards the problems of law evoked the opposition of the Historic School (Gustav Hugo and Savigny) which stressed the natural growth of laws ind customs, originating from the mysterious "spirit of the people". On the other hand Immanuel Kant tried to overcome the old natural law by the idea of a "law of reason", meaning an a priori element in all existing or positive law. In his definition of law ("the ensemble of conditions according to which everyone's will may coexist with the will of every other in accordance with a general rule of liberty"), however, as in his legal philosophy in general, he still shares the attitude of the natural law doctrine, confusing positive law with the idea of just law. This is also true of Hegel whose panlogism seemed to lead in this very direction. Under the influence of epistemological positivism (Comte, Mill) in the later half of the nineteenth century, legal philosophy, especially in Germany, confined itself to a "general theory of law". Similarily John Austin in England considered philosophy of law concerned only with positive law, "as it necessarily is", not as it ought to be. Its main task was to analyze certain notions which pervade the science of law (Analytical Jurisprudence). In recent times the same tendency to reduce legal philosophy to logical or at least methodological tasks was further developed in attempting a pure science of law (Kelsen, Roguin). Owing to the influence of Darwinism and natural science in general the evolutionist and biological viewpoint was accepted in legal philosophy: comparative jurisprudence, sociology of law, the Freirecht movement in Germany, the study of the living law, "Realism" in American legal philosophy, all represent a tendency against rationalism. On the other hand there is a revival of older tendencies: Hegelianism, natural law -- especially in Catholic philosophy -- and Kantianism (beginning with Rudolf Stammler). From here other trends arose: the critical attitude leads to relativism (f.i. Gustav Radbruch); the antimetaphysical tendency towards positivism -- though different from epistemological positivism -- and to a pure theory of law. Different schools of recent philosophy have found their applications or repercussions in legal philosophy: Phenomenology, for example, tried to intuit the essences of legal institutions, thus coming back to a formalist position, not too far from the real meaning of analytical jurisprudence. Neo-positivism, though so far not yet explicitly applied to legal philosophy, seems to lead in the same direction. -- W.E.

Political Philosophy: That branch of philosophy which deals with political life, especially with the essence, origin and value of the state. In ancient philosophy politics also embraced what we call ethics. The first and most important ancient works on Political Philosophy were Plato's Politeia (Republic) and Aristotle's Politics. The Politeia outlines the structure and functions of the ideal state. It became the pattern for all the Utopias (see Utopia) of later times. Aristotle, who considers man fundamentally a social creature i.e. a political animal, created the basis for modern theories of government, especially by his distinction of the different forms of government. Early Christianity had a rather negative attitude towards the state which found expression in St. Augustine's De Civitate Dei. The influence of this work, in which the earthly state was declared to be civitas diaboli, a state of the devil, was predominant throughout the Middle Ages. In the discussion of the relation between church and empire, the main topic of medieval political philosophy, certain authors foreshadowed modern political theories. Thomas Aquinas stressed the popular origin of royal power and the right of the people to restrict or abolish that power in case of abuse; William of Ockham and Marsiglio of Padua held similar views. Dante Alighieri was one of the first to recognize the intrinsic value of the state; he considered the world monarchy to be the only means whereby peace, justice and liberty could be secured. But it was not until the Renaissance that, due to the rediscovery of the individual and his rights and to the formation of territorial states, political philosophy began to play a major role. Niccolo Machiavelli and Jean Bodin laid the foundation for the new theories of the state by stressing its independence from any external power and its indivisible sovereignty. The theory of popular rights and of the right of resistance against tyranny was especially advocated by the "Monarchomachi" (Huguenots, such as Beza, Hotman, Languet, Danaeus, Catholics such as Boucher, Rossaeus, Mariana). Most of them used the theory of an original contract (see Social Contract) to justify limitations of monarchical power. Later, the idea of a Natural Law, independent from divine revelation (Hugo Grotius and his followers), served as an argument for liberal -- sometimes revolutionary -- tendencies. With the exception of Hobbes, who used the contract theory in his plea for absolutism, almost all the publicists of the 16th and 17th century built their liberal theories upon the idea of an original covenant by which individuals joined together and by mutual consent formed a state and placed a fiduciary trust in the supreme power (Roger Williams and John Locke). It was this contract which the Pilgrim Fathers translated into actual facts, after their arrival in America, in November, 1620, long before John Locke had developed his theorv. In the course of the 17th century in England the contract theory was generally substituted for the theory of the divine rights of kings. It was supported by the assumption of an original "State of Nature" in which all men enjoyed equal reciprocal rights. The most ardent defender of the social contract theory in the 18th century was J. J. Rousseau who deeply influenced the philosophy of the French revolution. In Rousseau's conception the idea of the sovereignty of the people took on a more democratic aspect than in 17th century English political philosophy which had been almost exclusively aristocratic in its spirit. This tendency found expression in his concept of the "general will" in the moulding of which each individual has his share. Immanuel Kant who made these concepts the basis of his political philosophy, recognized more clearly than Rousseau the fictitious character of the social contract and treated it as a "regulative idea", meant to serve as a criterion in the evaluation of any act of the state. For Hegel the state is an end in itself, the supreme realization of reason and morality. In marked opposition to this point of view, Marx and Engels, though strongly influenced by Hegel, visualized a society in which the state would gradually fade away. Most of the 19th century publicists, however, upheld the juristic theory of the state. To them the state was the only source of law and at the same time invested with absolute sovereignty: there are no limits to the legal omnipotence of the state except those which are self imposed. In opposition to this doctrine of unified state authority, a pluralistic theory of sovereignty has been advanced recently by certain authors, laying emphasis upon corporate personalities and professional groups (Duguit, Krabbe, Laski). Outspoken anti-stateism was advocated by anarchists such as Kropotkin, etc., by syndicalists and Guild socialists. -- W.E.

The general superiority of theology in this system over the admittedly distinct discipline of philosophy, makes it impossible for unaided reason to solve certain problems which Thomism claims are quite within the province of the latter, e.g., the omnipotence of God, the immortality of the soul. Indeed the Scotist position on this latter question has been thought by some critics to come quite close to the double standard of truth of Averroes, (q.v.) namely, that which is true in theology may be false in philosophy. The univocal assertion of being in God and creatures; the doctrine of universal prime matter (q.v.) in all created substances, even angels, though characteristically there are three kinds of prime matter); the plurality of forms in substances (e.g., two in man) giving successive generic and specific determinations of the substance; all indicate the opposition of Scotistic metaphysics to that of Thomism despite the large body of ideas the two systems have in common. The denial of real distinction between the soul and its faculties; the superiority of will over intellect, the attainment of perfect happiness through a will act of love; the denial of the absolute unchangeableness of the natural law in view of its dependence on the will of God, acts being good because God commanded them; indicate the further rejection of St. Thomas who holds the opposite on each of these questions. However the opposition is not merely for itself but that of a voluntarist against an intellectualist. This has caused many students to point out the affinity of Duns Scotus with Immanuel Kant. (q.v.) But unlike the great German philosopher who relies entirely upon the supremacy of moral consciousness, Duns Scotus makes a constant appeal to revelation and its order of truth as above all philosophy. In his own age, which followed immediately upon the great constructive synthesis of Saints Albert, Bonaventure, and Thomas, this lesser light was less a philosopher because he and his School were incapable of powerful synthesis and so gave themselves to analysis and controversy. The principal Scotists were Francis of Mayron (d. 1327) and Antonio Andrea (d. 1320); and later John of Basoles, John Dumbleton, Walter Burleigh, Alexander of Alexandria, Lychetus of Brescia and Nicholas de Orbellis. The complete works with a life of Duns Scotus were published in 1639 by Luke Wadding (Lyons) and reprinted by Vives in 1891. (Paris) -- C.A.H.

transcendental idealism ::: The philosophy of Immanuel Kant and later Kantian and German idealist philosophers, according to which human experience is not of things as they are in themselves, but of those things as they appear to human beings. It differs from standard (empirical) idealism in that it does not claim that the objects of human experience would be in any sense within the mind. The idea is that whenever humans experience something, they experience it as it is for themselves: the object is real as well as mind-independent, but is, in a sense, altered by people's cognition (by the categories and the forms of sensibility, space and time). Transcendental idealism denies that people could have knowledge of the thing in itself; the opposite view is sometimes called transcendental realism.



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1:If the truth shall kill them, let them die. ~ Immanuel Kant,
2:The master is himself an animal and needs a master. ~ Immanuel Kant,
3:Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life." ~ Immanuel Kant,
4:Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life.
   ~ Immanuel Kant,
5:Although there is a difference of procedure between a Shaman of the Tungas and a Catholic prelate of Europe or between a coarse and sensual Vogul and a Puritan Independent of Connecticut, there is no difference in the principle of their creeds; for they all belong to the same category of people whose religion consists not in becoming better, but in believing in and carrying out certain arbitrary regulations. Only those who believe that the worship of God consists in aspiring to a better life differ from the first because they recognize quite another and certainly a loftier principle uniting all men of good faith in an invisible temple which alone can be the universal temple. ~ Immanuel Kant,
6:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study
   Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work.
   The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation.
   Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law.
   Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner.
   Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems.
   Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy.
   The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick.
   The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism.
   Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled.
   The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism.
   The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment.
   The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece.
   Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good.
   The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices.
   The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita.
   The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment.
   The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science.
   The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals.
   Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style.
   The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other.
   The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion.
   Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind.
   The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism.
   The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley.
   The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics.
   The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues.
   Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language.
   Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment.
   Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject.
   Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick.
   The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism.
   The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical.
   The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy.
   The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master.
   The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy.
   The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium.
   Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy.
   Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years.
   Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students.
   The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students.
   The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition.
   Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation.
   Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism.
   Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism.
   First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism.
   Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics.
   The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah.
   The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject.
   The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Great minds think for themselves. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
2:Look closely. The beautiful may be small. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
3:The hand is the visible part of the brain. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
4:Reason can never prove the existence of God. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
5:The death of dogma is the birth of morality. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
6:Perpetual peace is only found in the graveyard. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
7:Nothing is divine but what is agreeable to reason. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
8:It is never too late to become reasonable and wise. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
9:Standing armies shall in time be totally abolished. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
10:He who has made great moral progress ceases to pray. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
11:An action, to have moral worth, must be done from duty. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
12:Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination.  ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
13:Act in such a way that you will be worthy of being happy. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
14:Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination.   ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
15:Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
16:Duty is the necessity to act out of reverence for the law. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
17:Man must be disciplined, for he is by nature raw and wild. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
18:The wise man can change his mind; the stubborn one, never. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
19:We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
20:Maturity is having the courage to use one's own intelligence! ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
21:If justice perishes, human life on Earth has lost its meaning. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
22:It is through education that all the good in the world arises. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
23:Laws always lose in energy what the government gains in extent. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
24:With men, the state of nature is not a state of peace, but war. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
25:The possession of power inevitably spoils the free use of reason. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
26:We are not rich by what we possess but by what we can do without. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
27:Ours is an age of criticism, to which everything must be subjected. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
28:The human heart refuses to believe in a universe without a purpose. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
29:Notion without intuition is empty, intuition without notion is blind. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
30:If man makes himself a worm he must not complain when he is trodden on. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
31:Live your life as though your every act were to become a universal law. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
32:Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
33:God, freedom, and immortality are untenable in the light of pure reason. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
34:I have no knowledge of myself as I am, but merely as I appear to myself. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
35:I am an investigator by inclination. I feel a great thirst for knowledge. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
36:Freedom can never be comprehended, nor even can insight into it be gained. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
37:Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
38:Freedom is that faculty that enlarges the usefulness of all other faculties. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
39:Happiness, though an indefinite concept, is the goal of all rational beings. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
40:Two things awe me most, the starry sky above me and the moral law within me. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
41:Rules for Happiness: something to do, someone to love, something to hope for. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
42:Nature, when left to universal laws, tends to produce regularity out of chaos. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
43:One who makes himself a worm cannot complain afterwards if people step on him. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
44:Reason should investigate its own parameters before declaring its omniscience. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
45:The bad thing of war is, that it makes more evil people than it can take away. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
46:Life is the faculty of spontaneous activity, the awareness that we have powers. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
47:Physicians think they do a lot for a patient when they give his disease a name. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
48:Act that your principle of action might safely be made a law for the whole world. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
49:Every human being should always be treated as an end and never as a mere instrument. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
50:Nature even in chaos cannot proceed otherwise than regularly and according to order. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
51:Each according to his own way of seeing things, seek one goal, that is gratification. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
52:Nature does nothing in vain, and in the use of means to her goals she is not prodigal. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
53:Our intellect does not draw its laws from nature, but it imposes its laws upon nature. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
54:The greatest human quest is to know what one must do in order to become a human being. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
55:From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
56:If a man is often the subject of conversation he soon becomes the subject of criticism. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
57:Physicians think they are doing something for you by labeling what you have as a disease. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
58:One is not rich by what one owns, but more by what one is able to do without with dignity. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
59:Experience without theory is blind, but theory without experience is mere intellectual play. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
60:It is not God's will merely that we should be happy, but that we should make ourselves happy ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
61:The busier we are, the more acutely we feel that we live, the more conscious we are of life. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
62:The enjoyment of power inevitably corrupts the judgment of reason, and perverts its liberty. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
63:There are two things that don't have to mean anything, one is music and the other is laughter. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
64:Always regard every man as an end in himself, and never use him merely as a means to your ends. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
65:An action is essentially good if the motive of the agent be good, regardless of the consequences. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
66:All human knowledge thus begins with intuitions, proceeds thence to concepts, and ends with ideas. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
67:But a lie is a lie, and in itself intrinsically evil, whether it be told with good or bad intents. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
68:Is it reasonable to assume a purposiveness in all the parts of nature and to deny it to the whole? ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
69:Fallacious and misleading arguments are most easily detected if set out in correct syllogistic form. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
70:There is no virtue in penance and fasting which waste the body; they are only fanatical and monkish. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
71:The business of philosophy is not to give rules, but to analyze the private judgments of common reason. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
72:For peace to reign on Earth, humans must evolve into new beings who have learned to see the whole first. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
73:Art does not want the representation of a beautiful thing, but the representation of something beautiful. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
74:But although all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it arises from experience. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
75:Beauty presents an indeterminate concept of Understanding, the sublime an indeterminate concept of Reason. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
76:Act only according to that maxim whereby you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
77:Sincerity is the indispensable ground of all conscientiousness, and by consequence of all heartfelt religion. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
78:Space and time are the framework within which the mind is constrained to construct its experience of reality. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
79:Innocence is indeed a glorious thing; but, unfortunately, it does not keep very well and is easily led astray. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
80:Psychologists have hitherto failed to realize that imagination is a necessary ingredient of perception itself. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
81:What are the aims which are at the same time duties? They are perfecting of ourselves, the happiness of others. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
82:In every department of physical science there is only so much science, properly so-called, as there is mathematics. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
83:Morality is not the doctrine of how we may make ourselves happy, but how we may make ourselves worthy of happiness. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
84:In law a man is guilty when he violates the rights of others. In ethics, he is guilty if he only thinks of doing so. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
85:Thrift is care and scruple in the spending of one's means. It is not a virtue and it requires neither skill nor talent. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
86:Freedom in the practical sense is the independence of the power of choice from necessitation by impulses of sensibility. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
87:Have patience awhile; slanders are not long-lived. Truth is the child of time; erelong she shall appear to vindicate thee. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
88:It is not necessary that whilst I live I live happily; but it is necessary that so long as I live I should live honourably. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
89:God put a secret art into the forces of Nature so as to enable it to fashion itself out of chaos into a perfect world system. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
90:Imagination is a powerful agent for creating, as it were, a second nature out of the material supplied to it by actual nature. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
91:If education is to develop human nature so that it may attain the object of its being, it must involve the exercise of judgment. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
92:Genius is the ability to independently arrive at and understand concepts that would normally have to be taught by another person. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
93:Philosophy stands in need of a science which shall determine the possibility, principles, and extent of human knowledge à priori. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
94:It is therefore correct to say that the senses do not err — not because they always judge rightly, but because they do not judge at all. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
95:Even a man's exact imitation of the song of the nightingale displeases us when we discover that it is a mimicry, and not the nightingale. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
96:The wish to talk to God is absurd. We cannot talk to one we cannot comprehend — and we cannot comprehend God; we can only believe in Him. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
97:All our knowledge begins with the senses, proceeds then to the understanding, and ends with reason. There is nothing higher than reason.   ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
98:The more we come in contact with animals and observe their behaviour, the more we love them, for we see how great is their care of the young. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
99:Man's duty is to improve himself; to cultivate his mind; and, when he finds himself going astray, to bring the moral law to bear upon himself. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
100:Without man and his potential for moral progress, the whole of reality would be a mere wilderness, a thing in vain, and have no final purpose. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
101:Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
102:Even philosophers will praise war as ennobling mankind, forgetting the Greek who said: &
103:The light dove, cleaving the air in her free flight, and feeling its resistance, might imagine that its flight would be still easier in empty space. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
104:There is a limit where the intellect fails and breaks down, and this limit is where the questions concerning God and freewill and immortality arise. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
105:The science of mathematics presents the most brilliant example of how pure reason may successfully enlarge its domain without the aid of experience. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
106:Man's greatest concern is to know how he shall properly fill his place in the universe and correctly understand what he must be in order to be a man. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
107:Why were a few, or a single one, made at all, if only to exist in order to be made eternally miserable, which is infinitely worse than non-existence? ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
108:The inscrutable wisdom through which we exist is not less worthy of veneration in respect to what it denies us than in respect to what it has granted. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
109:..is the union of two people of different sexes with a view to the mutual possession of each other's sexual attributes for the duration of their lives. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
110:It is by his activities and not by enjoyment that man feels he is alive. In idleness we not only feel that life is fleeting, but we also feel lifeless. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
111:Reason does not work instinctively, but requires trial, practice, and instruction in order to gradually progress from one level of insight to another.  ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
112:Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
113:We find that the more a cultivated reason devotes itself to the aim of enjoying life and happiness, the further does man get away from true contentment. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
114:Religion is too important a matter to its devotees to be a subject of ridicule. If they indulge in absurdities, they are to be pitied rather than ridiculed. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
115:Philosophical knowledge is the knowledge gained by reason from concepts; mathematical knowledge is the knowledge gained by reason from the construction of concepts. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
116:Beneficence is a duty; and he who frequently practices it, and sees his benevolent intentions realized comes, at length, really to love him to whom he has done good. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
117:Time is not an empirical concept. For neither co-existence nor succession would be perceived by us, if the representation of time did not exist as a foundation a priori. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
118:All the interests of my reason, speculative as well as practical, combine in the three following questions: 1. What can I know? 2. What ought I to do? 3. What may I hope? ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
119:The greatest problem for the human species, the solution of which nature compels him to seek, is that of attaining a civil society which can administer justice universally. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
120:Act in such a way that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, never merely as a means to an end, but always at the same time as an end. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
121:The ultimate destiny of the human race is the greatest moral perfection, provided that it is achieved through human freedom, whereby alone man is capable of the greatest happiness. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
122:The instruction of children should aim gradually to combine knowing and doing. Among all sciences mathematics seems to be the only one of a kind to satisfy this aim most completely. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
123:At some future day it will be proved, I cannot say when and where, that the human soul is, while in earth life, already in an uninterrupted communication with those living in another world. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
124:Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind.  The understanding can intuit nothing, the senses can think nothing. Only through their union can knowledge arise. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
125:The ideal of the supreme being is nothing but a regulative principle of reason which directs us to look upon all connection in the world as if it originated from an all-sufficient necessary cause. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
126:All thought must, directly or indirectly, by way of certain characters, relate ultimately to intuitions, and therefore, with us, to sensibility, because in no other way can an object be given to us. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
127:Most men use their knowledge only under guidance from others because they lack the courage to think independently using their own reasoning abilities. It takes intellectual daring to discover the truth. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
128:We assume a common sense as the necessary condition of the universal communicability of our knowledge, which is presupposed in every logic and every principle of knowledge that is not one of scepticism. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
129:If we knew that god exists, such knowledge would make morality impossible. For, if we acted morally from fear or fright, or confident of a reward, then this would not be moral. It would be enlightened selfishness. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
130:We ourselves introduce that order and regularity in the appearance which we entitle "nature". We could never find them in appearances had we not ourselves, by the nature of our own mind, originally set them there. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
131:Man desired concord; but nature knows better what is good for his species; she desires discord. Man wants to live easy and content; but nature compels him to leave ease... and throw himself into roils and labours. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
132:I learned to honour human beings, and I would find myself far more useless than the common labourer if I did not believe that this consideration could impart to all others a value establishing the rights of humanity. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
133:Freedom is the alone unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity; and is independence on the will and co-action of every other in so far as this consists with every other person's freedom. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
134:If man is not to stifle his human feelings, he must practise kindness towards animals, for he who is cruel to animals becomes hard also in his dealings with men. We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals.  ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
135:Feminine traits are called weaknesses. People joke about them; fools ridicule them; but reasonable persons see very well that those traits are just the tools for the management of men, and for the use of men for female designs. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
136:Things which we see are not by themselves what we see ... It remains completely unknown to us what the objects may be by themselves and apart from the receptivity of our senses. We know nothing but our manner of perceiving them. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
137:Whereas the beautiful is limited, the sublime is limitless, so that the mind in the presence of the sublime, attempting to imagine what it cannot, has pain in the failure but pleasure in contemplating the immensity of the attempt. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
138:In the natural state, no concept of God can arise, and the false one which one makes for himself is harmful. Hence the theory of natural religion can be true only where there is no science; therefore it cannot bind all men together. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
139:Cruelty to animals is contrary to man's duty to himself, because it deadens in him the feeling of sympathy for their sufferings, and thus a natural tendency that is very useful to morality in relation to other human beings is weakened. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
140:Freedom is independence of the compulsory will of another, and in so far as it tends to exist with the freedom of all according to a universal law, it is the one sole original inborn right belonging to every man in virtue of his humanity. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
141:Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed immaturity... No thing is required for this enlightenment except freedom; and the freedom in question is the least harmful of all, namely, the freedom to use reason publicly in all matters. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
142:Human reason has this peculiar fate that in one species of its knowledge it is burdened by questions which, as prescribed by the very nature of reason itself, it is not able to ignore, but which, as transcending all its powers, it is also not able to answer. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
143:We must rid ourselves of the notion that space and time are actual qualities in things in themselves . . . all bodies, together with the space in which they are, must be considered nothing but mere representations in us, and exist nowhere but in our thoughts. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
144:Perhaps a revolution can overthrow autocratic despotism and profiteering or power-grabbing oppression, but it can never truly reform a manner of thinking; instead, new prejudices, just like the old ones they replace, will serve as a leash for the great unthinking mass. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
145:I feel a complete thirst for knowledge and an eager unrest to go further in it as well as satisfaction at every acquisition. There was a time when I believed that this alone could constitute the honour of mankind, and I had contempt for the ignorant rabble who know nothing. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
146:Reason must approach nature in order to be taught by it. It must not, however, do so in the character of a pupil who listens to everything that the teacher chooses to say, but of an appointed judge who compels the witness to answer questions which he has himself formulated. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
147:The evil effect of science upon men is principally this, that by far the greatest number of those who wish to display a knowledge of it accomplish no improvement at all of the understanding, but only a perversity of it, not to mention that it serves most of them as a tool of vanity. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
148:If an offender has committed murder, he must die. In this case, no possible substitute can satisfy justice. For there is no parallel between death and even the most miserable life, so that there is no equality of crime and retribution unless the perpetrator is judicially put to death. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
149:Both love of mankind, and respect for their rights are duties; the former however is only a conditional, the latter an unconditional, purely imperative duty, which he must be perfectly certain not to have transgressed who would give himself up to the secret emotions arising from benevolence. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
150:Often war is waged only in order to show valor; thus an inner dignity is ascribed to war itself, and even some philosophers have praised it as an ennoblement of humanity, forgetting the pronouncement of the Greek who said, &
151:The history of the human race, viewed as a whole, may be regarded as the realization of a hidden plan of nature to bring about a political constitution, internally, and for this purpose, also externally perfect, as the only state in which all the capacities implanted by her in mankind can be fully developed. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
152:Two things fill the mind with ever increasing wonder and awe. The more often and the more intensely the mind of thought is drawn to them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. Morality is not properly the doctrine of how we may make ourselves happy, but how we may make ourselves worthy of happiness. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
153:Reason in a creature is a faculty of widening the rules and purposes of the use of all its powers far beyond natural instinct; it acknowledges no limits to its projects. Reason itself does not work instinctively, but requires trial, practice, and instruction in order gradually to progress from one level of insight to another. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
154:Ours is an age of criticism, to which everything must be subjected. The sacredness of religion, and the authority of legislation, are by many regarded as grounds for exemption from the examination by this tribunal, But, if they are exempted, and cannot lay claim to sincere respect, which reason accords only to that which has stood the test of a free and public examination. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
155:Christianity possesses the great advantage over Judaism of being represented as coming from the mouth of the first Teacher not as a statutory but as a moral religion, and as thus entering into the closest relation with reason so that, through reason, it was able of itself, without historical learning, to be spread at all times and among all peoples with the greatest trustworthiness. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
156:If you punish a child for being naughty, and reward him for being good, he will do right merely for the sake of the reward; and when he goes out into the world and finds that goodness is not always rewarded, nor wickedness always punished, he will grow into a man who only thinks about how he may get on in the world, and does right or wrong according as he finds advantage to himself. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
157:. . . as to moral feeling, this supposed special sense, the appeal to it is indeed superficial when those who cannot think believe that feeling will help them out, even in what concerns general laws: and besides, feelings which naturally differ infinitely in degree cannot furnish a uniform standard of good and evil, nor has any one a right to form judgments for others by his own feelings.  ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
158:No-one can compel me to be happy in accordance with his conception of the welfare of others, for each may seek his happiness in whatever way he sees fit, so long as he does not infringe upon the freedom of others to pursue a similar end which can be reconciled with the freedom of everyone else within a workable general law? i.e. he must accord to others the same right as he enjoys himself. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
159:... as soon as we examine suicide from the standpoint of religion we immediately see it in its true light. We have been placed in this world under certain conditions and for specific purposes. But a suicide opposes the purpose of his creator; he arrives in the other world as one who has deserted his post; he must be looked upon as a rebel against God. God is our owner; we are his property; his providence works for our good. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
160:This spirit of freedom is expanding even where it must struggle against the external obstacles of governments that misunderstand their own function. Such governments are illuminated by the example that the existence of freedom need not give cause for the least concern regarding public order and harmony in the commonwealth. If only they refrain from inventing artifices to keep themselves in it, men will gradually raise themselves from barbarism. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
161:We come no nearer the infinitude of the creative power of God, if we enclose the space of its revelation within a sphere described with the radius of the Milky Way, than if we were to limit it to a ball an inch in diameter. All that is finite, whatever has limits and a definite relation to unity, is equally far removed from the infinite... Eternity is not sufficient to embrace the manifestations of the Supreme Being, if it is not combined with the infinitude of space. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Beneficence is a duty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
2:Immanuel Kant"
"Noch wal ~ Hugo Claus,
3:Nothing happens by blind chance. ~ Immanuel Kant,
4:Se não ama, faça como se amasse. ~ Immanuel Kant,
5:Great minds think for themselves. ~ Immanuel Kant,
6:Honesty is better than any policy. ~ Immanuel Kant,
7:The only thing permanent is change. ~ Immanuel Kant,
8:There is nothing higher than reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
9:All perception is colored by emotion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
10:Art is purposiveness without purpose. ~ Immanuel Kant,
11:Freedom is the opposite of necessity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
12:Do the right thing because it is right. ~ Immanuel Kant,
13:Ingratitude is the essence of vileness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
14:Woman wants control, man self-control . ~ Immanuel Kant,
15:Human reason is by nature architectonic. ~ Immanuel Kant,
16:Prudence approaches, conscience accuses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
17:Prudence reproaches; conscience accuses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
18:Look closely. The beautiful may be small. ~ Immanuel Kant,
19:The hand is the visible part of the brain. ~ Immanuel Kant,
20:All our knowledge begins with the senses... ~ Immanuel Kant,
21:I am myself by inclination an investigator. ~ Immanuel Kant,
22:If the truth shall kill them, let them die. ~ Immanuel Kant,
23:If the truth shall kill them, let them die. ~ Immanuel Kant,
24:Reason can never prove the existence of God. ~ Immanuel Kant,
25:The death of dogma is the birth of morality. ~ Immanuel Kant,
26:Do what is right, though the world may perish. ~ Immanuel Kant,
27:Maximum individuality within maximum community ~ Immanuel Kant,
28:Perpetual Peace is only found in the graveyard. ~ Immanuel Kant,
29:Tudo o que não puder contar como fez, não faça! ~ Immanuel Kant,
30:The two great dividers are religion and LANGUAGE ~ Immanuel Kant,
31:Thinking in pictures precedes thinking in words. ~ Immanuel Kant,
32:Dignity is a value that creates irreplaceability. ~ Immanuel Kant,
33:Everything in nature acts in conformity with law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
34:Give me matter and i will build a world out of it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
35:Nothing is divine but what is agreeable to reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
36:Phantasie ist unser guter Genius oder unser Dämon. ~ Immanuel Kant,
37:El sabio puede cambiar de opinión. El necio, nunca. ~ Immanuel Kant,
38:He who has made great moral progress ceases to pray ~ Immanuel Kant,
39:It is never too late to become reasonable and wise. ~ Immanuel Kant,
40:Standing armies shall in time be totally abolished. ~ Immanuel Kant,
41:The great mass of people are worthy of our respect. ~ Immanuel Kant,
42:By a lie, a man... annihilates his dignity as a man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
43:The master is himself an animal and needs a master. ~ Immanuel Kant,
44:You only know me as you see me, not as I actually am ~ Immanuel Kant,
45:...[F]reedom... is a property of all rational beings. ~ Immanuel Kant,
46:So act that anything you do may become universal law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
47:All our knowledge falls with the bounds of experience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
48:He who would know the world must first manufacture it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
49:Immanuel Kant, autor subversivo en tiempos de sinrazón ~ Lorenzo Silva,
50:Quem não sabe o que procura, quando acha não encontra. ~ Immanuel Kant,
51:Riches ennoble a man's circumstances, but not himself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
52:Treat people as an end, and never as a means to an end ~ Immanuel Kant,
53:What can I know? What ought I to do? What may I hope? ~ Immanuel Kant,
54:An action, to have moral worth, must be done from duty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
55:Give me matter, and I will construct a world out of it! ~ Immanuel Kant,
56:Happiness is not an ideal of reason, but of imagination. ~ Immanuel Kant,
57:I had to deny knowledge in order to make room for faith. ~ Immanuel Kant,
58:Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life ~ Immanuel Kant,
59:Act in such a way that you will be worthy of being happy. ~ Immanuel Kant,
60:Habe den Mut, dich deines eigenen Verstandes zu bedienen. ~ Immanuel Kant,
61:never wish to see a just cause defended with unjust means ~ Immanuel Kant,
62:Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life. ~ Immanuel Kant,
63:Better the whole people perish than that injustice be done ~ Immanuel Kant,
64:Duty is the necessity to act out of reverence for the law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
65:Man must be disciplined, for he is by nature raw and wild. ~ Immanuel Kant,
66:The wise man can change his mind; the stubborn one, never. ~ Immanuel Kant,
67:Man must be disciplined, for he is by nature raw and wild.. ~ Immanuel Kant,
68:Dare to know! Have the courage to use your own intelligence! ~ Immanuel Kant,
69:Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life.
   ~ Immanuel Kant,
70:We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals. ~ Immanuel Kant,
71:It is beyond doubt that all knowledge begins with experience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
72:Maturity is having the courage to use one's own intelligence! ~ Immanuel Kant,
73:Procrastination is hardly more evil than grasping impatience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
74:If justice perishes, human life on Earth has lost its meaning. ~ Immanuel Kant,
75:The real is not given to us, but put to us by way of a riddle. ~ Immanuel Kant,
76:But only he who, himself enlightened, is not afraid of shadows. ~ Immanuel Kant,
77:It is precisely in knowing its limits that philosophy consists. ~ Immanuel Kant,
78:Laws always lose in energy what the government gains in extent. ~ Immanuel Kant,
79:With men, the state of nature is not a state of peace, but war. ~ Immanuel Kant,
80:Immanuel Kant would've made a lousy lawyer, but a great judge! ~ Stephen Gillers,
81:The possession of power inevitably spoils the free use of reason ~ Immanuel Kant,
82:Humanity is at its greatest perfection in the race of the whites. ~ Immanuel Kant,
83:Religion is the recognition of all our duties as divine commands. ~ Immanuel Kant,
84:The only thing that is good without qualification is a good will. ~ Immanuel Kant,
85:The possession of power inevitably spoils the free use of reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
86:We are not rich by what we possess but by what we can do without. ~ Immanuel Kant,
87:Animals... are there merely as a means to an end. That end is man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
88:Melancholy characterizes those with a superb sense of the sublime. ~ Immanuel Kant,
89:El mundo de ningún modo se hundirá porque haya menos hombres malos. ~ Immanuel Kant,
90:Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-incurred immaturity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
91:Human beings are never to be treated as a means but always as ends. ~ Immanuel Kant,
92:It is beyond a doubt that all our knowledge begins with experience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
93:It is through good education that all the good in the world arises. ~ Immanuel Kant,
94:Ours is an age of criticism, to which everything must be subjected. ~ Immanuel Kant,
95:The human heart refuses To believe in a universe Without a purpose. ~ Immanuel Kant,
96:All so-called moral interest consists simply in respect for the law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
97:Always treat people as ends in themselves, never as means to an end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
98:There can be no doubt that all our knowledge begins with experience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
99:Denken zonder ervaring is leeg, maar ervaring zonder denken is blind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
100:Der Ausgang des Menschen aus seiner selbstverschuldeten Unmündigkeit. ~ Immanuel Kant,
101:From the crooked timber of humanity, a straight board cannot be hewn. ~ Immanuel Kant,
102:From the crooked timber of humanity, never was a straight thing made. ~ Immanuel Kant,
103:Notion without intuition is empty, intuition without notion is blind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
104:I had therefore to remove knowledge, in order to make room for belief. ~ Immanuel Kant,
105:La ciencia es conocimiento organizado. La sabiduría es vida organizada ~ Immanuel Kant,
106:Out of the crooked timber of humanity no straight thing was ever made. ~ Immanuel Kant,
107:Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made ~ Immanuel Kant,
108:Three things tell a man: his eyes, his friends and his favorite quotes ~ Immanuel Kant,
109:We are enriched not by what we possess, but by what we can do without. ~ Immanuel Kant,
110:Experience may teach us what is, but never that it cannot be otherwise. ~ Immanuel Kant,
111:If man makes himself a worm he must not complain when he is trodden on. ~ Immanuel Kant,
112:Live your life as though your every act were to become a universal law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
113:Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was even made. ~ Immanuel Kant,
114:Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made. ~ Immanuel Kant,
115:Das Lachen ist der Gesundheit zuträglich, denn es fördert die Verdauung. ~ Immanuel Kant,
116:God, freedom, and immortality are untenable in the light of pure reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
117:I have no knowledge of myself as I am, but merely as I appear to myself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
118:Pensamentos sem conteúdos são vazios, intuições sem conceitos são cegas. ~ Immanuel Kant,
119:the cultivation of reason leads humanity sooner to misery than happiness ~ Immanuel Kant,
120:Dwell with yourself, and you will know how short your household stuff is. ~ Immanuel Kant,
121:I am an investigator by inclination. I feel a great thirst for knowledge. ~ Immanuel Kant,
122:Man relates to material things through direct insight rather than reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
123:By a lie a man throws away and as it were annihilates his dignity as a man ~ Immanuel Kant,
124:Freedom can never be comprehended, nor even can insight into it be gained. ~ Immanuel Kant,
125:Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
126:Happiness, though an indefinite concept, is the goal of all rational beings ~ Immanuel Kant,
127:Man must develop his tendency towards the good. ~ Immanuel Kant, Thoughts on Education, #12,
128:Une politique valable ne peut faire un pas sans rendre hommage à la morale. ~ Immanuel Kant,
129:Freedom is that faculty that enlarges the usefulness of all other faculties. ~ Immanuel Kant,
130:Have the courage to use your own reason- That is the motto of enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
131:The world will by no means perish by a diminution in the number of evil men. ~ Immanuel Kant,
132:Two things awe me most, the starry sky above me and the moral law within me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
133:By a lie a man throws away, and as it were, annihilates his dignity as a man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
134:If I am to constrain you by any law, it must be one by which I am also bound. ~ Immanuel Kant,
135:I'm no syllogism incarnate, but my wife makes me look like Immanuel Kant. ~ Claudia Cardinale,
136:Puoi conoscere il cuore di un uomo già dal modo in cui egli tratta le bestie. ~ Immanuel Kant,
137:Rules for Happiness: something to do, someone to love, something to hope for. ~ Immanuel Kant,
138:Rules for happiness: something to do, someone to love, something to hope for. ~ Immanuel Kant,
139:Agisci in modo da considerare l’umanità come scopo, e mai come semplice mezzo. ~ Immanuel Kant,
140:Give a man everything he wants and at that moment everything is not everything ~ Immanuel Kant,
141:Nature, when left to universal laws, tends to produce regularity out of chaos. ~ Immanuel Kant,
142:One who makes himself a worm cannot complain afterwards if people step on him. ~ Immanuel Kant,
143:Reason should investigate its own parameters before declaring its omniscience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
144:The bad thing of war is, that it makes more evil people than it can take away. ~ Immanuel Kant,
145:Immanuel Kant once said, “Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life. ~ Anonymous,
146:Life is the faculty of spontaneous activity, the awareness that we have powers. ~ Immanuel Kant,
147:Only the descent into the hell of self-knowledge can pave the way to godliness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
148:Patience is the strength of the weak, impatience is the weakness of the strong. ~ Immanuel Kant,
149:Physicians think they do a lot for a patient when they give his disease a name. ~ Immanuel Kant,
150:Act so that the maxim of your act could be made the principle of a universal law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
151:Act that your principle of action might safely be made a law for the whole world. ~ Immanuel Kant,
152:A lie is the abandonment and, as it were, the annihilation of the dignity by man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
153:All appearances are real and negatio; sophistical: All reality must be sensation. ~ Immanuel Kant,
154:Toute intuition sans concept n'aboutit pas
Tout concept sans intuition est vide ~ Immanuel Kant,
155:In the mere concept of one thing it cannot be found any character of its existence. ~ Immanuel Kant,
156:No nation shall forcibly interfere with the constitution and government of another. ~ Immanuel Kant,
157:Every human being should always be treated as an end and never as a mere instrument. ~ Immanuel Kant,
158:If justice perishes, then it is no longer worthwhile for men to live upon the earth. ~ Immanuel Kant,
159:Nature even in chaos cannot proceed otherwise than regularly and according to order. ~ Immanuel Kant,
160:The existence of the Bible is the greatest blessing which humanity ever experienced. ~ Immanuel Kant,
161:the work is dry, obscure, opposed to all ordinary notions, and moreover long-winded. ~ Immanuel Kant,
162:...whose true object is to shed the clearest light on every step which reason takes. ~ Immanuel Kant,
163:Each according to his own way of seeing things, seek one goal, that is gratification. ~ Immanuel Kant,
164:Aydınlanma, insanın kendi suçuyla düşmüş olduğu ergin olmama durumundan kurtulmasıdır. ~ Immanuel Kant,
165:Have the courage to use your own understanding!" - that is the motto of enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
166:Nature does nothing in vain, and in the use of means to her goals she is not prodigal. ~ Immanuel Kant,
167:Our intellect does not draw its laws from nature, but it imposes its laws upon nature. ~ Immanuel Kant,
168:The greatest human quest is to know what one must do in order to become a human being. ~ Immanuel Kant,
169:act as if the maxim of your action were to become by your will a general law of nature. ~ Immanuel Kant,
170:A single line in the Bible has consoled me more than all the books I ever read besides. ~ Immanuel Kant,
171:From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. ~ Immanuel Kant,
172:If a man is often the subject of conversation he soon becomes the subject of criticism. ~ Immanuel Kant,
173:If God should really speak to man, man could still never know that it was God speaking. ~ Immanuel Kant,
174:Immaturity is the incapacity to use one's intelligence without the guidance of another. ~ Immanuel Kant,
175:...[P]hysics... [is] the philosophy of nature, so far as it is based on empirical laws. ~ Immanuel Kant,
176:We are enriched not by what we possess, but by what we can do without. IMMANUEL KANT ~ Christopher Ryan,
177:Conscience is an instinct to pass judgment upon ourselves in accordance with moral laws. ~ Immanuel Kant,
178:From such crooked timber as humanity is made of, no straight thing was ever constructed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
179:Physicians think they are doing something for you by labeling what you have as a disease ~ Immanuel Kant,
180:Among all nations, through the darkest polytheism glimmer some faint sparks of monotheism. ~ Immanuel Kant,
181:An organized product of nature is that in which all the parts are mutually ends and means. ~ Immanuel Kant,
182:iI Tempo non è altro che la forma dell'intuizione di noi stessi e del nostro stato interno ~ Immanuel Kant,
183:Jeg skal alltid handle slik at den regelen jeg handler etter kunne gjelde som allmenn lov. ~ Immanuel Kant,
184:One is not rich by what one owns, but more by what one is able to do without with dignity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
185:Always recognize that human individuals are ends, and do not use them as means to your end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
186:Simply to acquiesce in skepticism can never suffice to overcome the restlessness of reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
187:All natural capacities of a creature are destined to evolve completely to their natural end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
188:Experience without theory is blind, but theory without experience is mere intellectual play. ~ Immanuel Kant,
189:It is not God's will merely that we should be happy, but that we should make ourselves happy ~ Immanuel Kant,
190:[R]eason is... given to us as a practical faculty, that is, as one that influences the will. ~ Immanuel Kant,
191:The busier we are, the more acutely we feel that we live, the more conscious we are of life. ~ Immanuel Kant,
192:The enjoyment of power inevitably corrupts the judgment of reason, and perverts its liberty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
193:The enjoyment of power inevitably corrupts the judgement of reason, and perverts its liberty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
194:The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries. ~ Immanuel Kant,
195:How then is perfection to be sought? Wherein lies our hope? In education, and in nothing else. ~ Immanuel Kant,
196:Man desires concord; but nature know better what is good for his species; she desires discord. ~ Immanuel Kant,
197:Settle, for sure and universally, what conduct will promote the happiness of a rational being. ~ Immanuel Kant,
198:Suicide is not abominable because God prohibits it; God prohibits it because it is abominable. ~ Immanuel Kant,
199:THERE ARE TWO THINGS that don't have to mean anything, one is music and the other is laughter. ~ Immanuel Kant,
200:Con las piedras que con duro intento los críticos te lanzan, bien puedes erigirte un monumento. ~ Immanuel Kant,
201:Metaphysics is a dark ocean without shores or lighthouse, strewn with many a philosophic wreck. ~ Immanuel Kant,
202:Act so as to use humanity, yourself and others, always as an end and never as a means to an end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
203:Treaty of Peace Shall Be Held Valid in Which There Is Tacitly Reserved Matter for a Future War”; ~ Immanuel Kant,
204:Two things strike me dumb: the infinite starry heavens, and the sense of right and wrong in man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
205:An action is essentially good if the motive of the agent be good, regardless of the consequences. ~ Immanuel Kant,
206:Freedom is the alone unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
207:All human knowledge begins with intuitions, proceeds from thence to concepts, and ends with ideas. ~ Immanuel Kant,
208:But a lie is a lie, and in itself intrinsically evil, whether it be told with good or bad intents. ~ Immanuel Kant,
209:Heaven has given human beings three things to balance the odds of life: hope, sleep, and laughter. ~ Immanuel Kant,
210:Is it reasonable to assume a purposiveness in all the parts of nature and to deny it to the whole? ~ Immanuel Kant,
211:Fallacious and misleading arguments are most easily detected if set out in correct syllogistic form. ~ Immanuel Kant,
212:Out of timber so crooked as that from which man is
made nothing entirely straight can be carved . ~ Immanuel Kant,
213:Sesuatu untuk dikerjakan, seseorang untuk dicintai, sesuatu untuk diharapkan.
Itulah kebahagiaan. ~ Immanuel Kant,
214:There is no virtue in penance and fasting which waste the body; they are only fanatical and monkish. ~ Immanuel Kant,
215:The spirit of trade cannot coexist with war, and sooner or later this spirit dominates every people. ~ Immanuel Kant,
216:We can never, even by the strictest examination, get completely behind the secret springs of action. ~ Immanuel Kant,
217:all human cognition begins with intuitions, proceeds from thence to conceptions, and ends with ideas. ~ Immanuel Kant,
218:In all judgements by which we describe anything as beautiful, we allow no one to be of another opinion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
219:Lo que nos enriquece no es lo que poseemos, sino aquello de lo que podemos prescindir. IMMANUEL KANT ~ Christopher Ryan,
220:The business of philosophy is not to give rules, but to analyze the private judgments of common reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
221:For peace to reign on Earth, humans must evolve into new beings who have learned to see the whole first. ~ Immanuel Kant,
222:...I am never to act otherwise than so that I could also will that my maxim should become universal law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
223:Innocence is a splendid thing, only it has the misfortune not to keep very well and to be easily misled. ~ Immanuel Kant,
224:Laughter is an affect resulting from the sudden transformation of a heightened expectation into nothing. ~ Immanuel Kant,
225:Art does not want the representation of a beautiful thing, but the representation of something beautiful. ~ Immanuel Kant,
226:But although all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it arises from experience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
227:The public use of one’s reason must always be free, and it alone can bring about enlightenment among men. ~ Immanuel Kant,
228:...Act upon a maxim which, at the same time, involves its own universal validity for every rational being. ~ Immanuel Kant,
229:Beauty presents an indeterminate concept of Understanding, the sublime an indeterminate concept of Reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
230:Obra como si la máxima de tu acción pudiera ser erigida, por tu voluntad, en ley universal de la naturaleza ~ Immanuel Kant,
231:all duties depend as regards the kind of obligation (not the object of their action) upon the one principle. ~ Immanuel Kant,
232:La belleza artística no consiste en representar una cosa bella, sino en la bella representación de una cosa. ~ Immanuel Kant,
233:things which as effects presuppose others as causes cannot be reciprocally at the same time causes of these. ~ Immanuel Kant,
234:When I could have used a wife, I could not support one; and when I could support one, I no longer needed any ~ Immanuel Kant,
235:Act only according to that maxim whereby you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
236:I ought never to act except in such a way that I could also will that my maxim should become a universal law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
237:Sincerity is the indispensable ground of all conscientiousness, and by consequence of all heartfelt religion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
238:Space and time are the framework within which the mind is constrained to construct its experience of reality. ~ Immanuel Kant,
239:The nice thing about living in a small town is that when you don't know what you're doing, someone else does. ~ Immanuel Kant,
240:Act only according to that maxim by which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
241:Handle nur nach derjenigen Maxime, durch die du zugleich wollen kannst, dass sie ein allgemeines Gesetz werde. ~ Immanuel Kant,
242:Innocence is indeed a glorious thing; but, unfortunately, it does not keep very well and is easily led astray. ~ Immanuel Kant,
243:Psychologists have hitherto failed to realize that imagination is a necessary ingredient of perception itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
244:But, though all our knowledge begins with experience, it by no means follows that all arises out of experience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
245:What are the aims which are at the same time duties? They are perfecting of ourselves, the happiness of others. ~ Immanuel Kant,
246:A society that is not willing to demand a life of somebody who has taken somebody else’s life is simply immoral. ~ Immanuel Kant,
247:Söylediklerimizden çok,
söylemediklerimize pişman oluruz.
Dile getirilmemiş düşünce ;
gidilmemiş yoldur. ~ Immanuel Kant,
248:In every department of physical science there is only so much science, properly so-called, as there is mathematics. ~ Immanuel Kant,
249:In law a man is guilty when he violates the rights of others. In ethics he is guilty if he only thinks of doing so. ~ Immanuel Kant,
250:Morality is not the doctrine of how we may make ourselves happy, but how we may make ourselves worthy of happiness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
251:The main point of enlightenment is man's release from his self-caused immaturity, primarily in matters of religion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
252:Handle so, daß die Maxime deines Willens jederzeit zugleich als Prinzip einer allgemeinen Gesetzgebung gelten könne. ~ Immanuel Kant,
253:The question is not so much whether there is life on Mars as whether it will continue to be possible to live on Earth ~ Immanuel Kant,
254:...by saying that the former was only concerned with quality, the latter only with quantity, mistook cause for effect. ~ Immanuel Kant,
255:Tan sólo por la educación puede el hombre llegar a ser hombre. El hombre no es más que lo que la educación hace de él. ~ Immanuel Kant,
256:There is a reality, but we humans can’t fully know it: we have no access to what Immanuel Kant called “das Ding an sich. ~ Max Tegmark,
257:Freedom in the practical sense is the independence of the power of choice from necessitation by impulses of sensibility ~ Immanuel Kant,
258:Thrift is care and scruple in the spending of one's means. It is not a virtue and it requires neither skill nor talent. ~ Immanuel Kant,
259:Have patience awhile; slanders are not long-lived. Truth is the child of time; erelong she shall appear to vindicate thee. ~ Immanuel Kant,
260:It is difficult for the isolated individual to work himself out of the immaturity which has become almost natural for him. ~ Immanuel Kant,
261:It is not necessary that whilst I live I live happily; but it is necessary that so long as I live I should live honourably. ~ Immanuel Kant,
262:It is not without cause that men feel the burden of their existence, though they are themselves the cause of those burdens. ~ Immanuel Kant,
263:Morality is not properly the doctrine of how we may make ourselves happy, but how we may make ourselves worthy of happiness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
264:What might be said of things in themselves, separated from all relationship to our senses, remains for us absolutely unknown ~ Immanuel Kant,
265:God put a secret art into the forces of Nature so as to enable it to fashion itself out of chaos into a perfect world system. ~ Immanuel Kant,
266:no one can be compelled by law to be beneficent (though he may be taxed and this money then distributed in welfare payments), ~ Immanuel Kant,
267:Have the courage to use your own reason- That is the motto of enlightenment. "Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals" (1785) ~ Immanuel Kant,
268:Imagination is a powerful agent for creating, as it were, a second nature out of the material supplied to it by actual nature. ~ Immanuel Kant,
269:...[T]o be unfaithful to my maxim of prudence may often be very advantageous to me, although to abide by it is certainly safer. ~ Immanuel Kant,
270:If education is to develop human nature so that it may attain the object of its being, it must involve the exercise of judgment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
271:„… lietuvių tauta privalo būti išsaugota, nes joje slypi raktas visoms mįslėms – ne tik filologijos, bet ir istorijos — įminti”. ~ Immanuel Kant,
272:***Three Conditions of Happiness*** If you have work to do If you have someone you love If You have hope Then You are Happy now! ~ Immanuel Kant,
273:Genius is the ability to independently arrive at and understand concepts that would normally have to be taught by another person. ~ Immanuel Kant,
274:Philosophy stands in need of a science which shall determine the possibility, principles, and extent of human knowledge à priori. ~ Immanuel Kant,
275:All false art, all vain wisdom, lasts its time but finally destroys itself, and its highest culture is also the epoch of its decay. ~ Immanuel Kant,
276:He who is cruel to animals becomes hard also in his dealings with men. We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals. ~ Immanuel Kant,
277:It is often necessary to make a decision on the basis of knowledge sufficient for action but insufficient to satisfy the intellect. ~ Immanuel Kant,
278:I have therefore found it necessary to deny knowledge, in order to make room for faith."
Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason ~ Immanuel Kant,
279:A learned woman might just as well have a beard, for that expresses in a more recognizable form the profundity for which she strives. ~ Immanuel Kant,
280:The history of nature . . . begins with good, for it is God's work; the history of freedom begins with badness, for it is man's work. ~ Immanuel Kant,
281:Have the courage to use your own reason- That is the motto of enlightenment.
"Foundations of the Metaphysics of
Morals" (1785) ~ Immanuel Kant,
282:The yellow Indians do have a meagre talent. The Negroes are far below them, and at the lowest point are a part of the American people. ~ Immanuel Kant,
283:Human reason goes forth inexorably to such questions as cannot be answered by any experiential use of reason or principles based on it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
284:Japan has more specialists of Immanuel Kant than Germany does
[RIS 2016 Lecture on A Young Muslim's Guide to the Modern World] ~ Seyyed Hossein Nasr,
285:Nothing can possibly be conceived in the world, or even out of it, which can be called good, without qualification, except a good will. ~ Immanuel Kant,
286:All our knowledge begins with the senses, proceeds then to the understanding, and ends with reason. There is nothing higher than reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
287:It is therefore correct to say that the senses do not err — not because they always judge rightly, but because they do not judge at all. ~ Immanuel Kant,
288:[A ruler is merely] the trustee of the rights of other men and he must always stand in dread of having in some way violated these rights. ~ Immanuel Kant,
289:Even a man's exact imitation of the song of the nightingale displeases us when we discover that it is a mimicry, and not the nightingale. ~ Immanuel Kant,
290:Innocence is indeed a glorious thing, only, on the other hand, it is very sad that it cannot well maintain itself, and is easily seduced. ~ Immanuel Kant,
291:... Lithuanian nation must be saved, as it is the key to all the riddles - not only philology, but also in history - to solve the puzzle. ~ Immanuel Kant,
292:The wish to talk to God is absurd. We cannot talk to one we cannot comprehend — and we cannot comprehend God; we can only believe in Him. ~ Immanuel Kant,
293:are—and yet refer to something permanent, which must, therefore, be distinct from all my representations and external to me, the existence ~ Immanuel Kant,
294:[Aristotle formal logic thus far (1787)] has not been able to advance a single step, and hence is to all appearances closed and completed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
295:Coloro che dicono che il mondo andrà sempre così come è andato finora contribuiscono a far sì che l’oggetto della loro predizione si avveri ~ Immanuel Kant,
296:A categorical imperative would be one which represented an action as objectively necessary in itself, without reference to any other purpose. ~ Immanuel Kant,
297:Even philosophers will praise war as ennobling mankind, forgetting the Greek who said: 'War is bad in that it begets more evil than it kills. ~ Immanuel Kant,
298:I assert that, in any particular natural science, one encounters genuine scientific substance only to the extent that mathematics is present. ~ Immanuel Kant,
299:the doctrine of morals is an autonomy of practical reason, while the doctrine of virtue is at the same time an autocracy of practical reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
300:The more we come in contact with animals and observe their behaviour, the more we love them, for we see how great is their care of the young. ~ Immanuel Kant,
301:Arrogance is, as it were, a solicitation on the part of one seeking honor for followers, whom he thinks he is entitled to treat with contempt. ~ Immanuel Kant,
302:Even philosophers will praise war as ennobling mankind, forgetting the Greek who said: 'War is bad in that it begets more evil than it kills.' ~ Immanuel Kant,
303:L’uomo deve mostrare bontà di cuore verso gli animali, perché chi usa essere crudele verso di essi è altrettanto insensibile verso gli uomini. ~ Immanuel Kant,
304:Man's duty is to improve himself; to cultivate his mind; and, when he finds himself going astray, to bring the moral law to bear upon himself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
305:The outcome of an act commonly influences our judgment about its rightness, even though the former was uncertain, while the latter is certain. ~ Immanuel Kant,
306:Without man and his potential for moral progress, the whole of reality would be a mere wilderness, a thing in vain, and have no final purpose. ~ Immanuel Kant,
307:Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. ~ Immanuel Kant,
308:Of all the arts poetry (which owes its origin almost entirely to genius and will least be guided by precept or example) maintains the first rank. ~ Immanuel Kant,
309:There is something splendid about innocence; but what is bad about it, in turn, is that it cannot protect itself very well and is easily seduced. ~ Immanuel Kant,
310:It is impossible to conceive anything at all in the world, or even out of it, which can be taken as good without qualification, except a good will. ~ Immanuel Kant,
311:The science of mathematics presents the most brilliant example of how pure reason may successfully enlarge its domain without the aid of experience ~ Immanuel Kant,
312:Agisci in modo da considerare l'umanità, sia nella tua persona, sia nella persona di ogni altro, sempre anche come scopo, e mai come semplice mezzo. ~ Immanuel Kant,
313:Nature is beautiful because it looks like Art; and Art can only be called beautiful if we are conscious of it as Art while yet it looks like Nature. ~ Immanuel Kant,
314:The light dove, cleaving the air in her free flight, and feeling its resistance, might imagine that its flight would be still easier in empty space. ~ Immanuel Kant,
315:There is a limit where the intellect fails and breaks down, and this limit is where the questions concerning God and freewill and immortality arise. ~ Immanuel Kant,
316:Tutto ciò che è stato scritto dagli uomini sulle donne deve essere ritenuto sospetto dal momento che essi sono ad un tempo giudici e parti in causa. ~ Immanuel Kant,
317:Man's greatest concern is to know how he shall properly fill his place in the universe and correctly understand what he must be in order to be a man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
318:Why were a few, or a single one, made at all, if only to exist in order to be made eternally miserable, which is infinitely worse than non-existence? ~ Immanuel Kant,
319:The inscrutable wisdom through which we exist is not less worthy of veneration in respect to what it denies us than in respect to what it has granted. ~ Immanuel Kant,
320:In what way will our remote posterity be able to cope with the enormous accumulation of historical records which a few centuries will bequeath to them? ~ Immanuel Kant,
321:It is by his activities and not by enjoyment that man feels he is alive. In idleness we not only feel that life is fleeting, but we also feel lifeless. ~ Immanuel Kant,
322:Nobody can claim himself to be practically proficient in a science and yet disdain its theory without revealing himself to be an ignoramus in his area. ~ Immanuel Kant,
323:Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them. ~ Immanuel Kant,
324:Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one's understanding without guidance from another. ~ Immanuel Kant,
325:No state at war with another state should engage in hostilities of such a kind as to render mutual confidence impossible when peace will have been made. ~ Immanuel Kant,
326:We find that the more a cultivated reason devotes itself to the aim of enjoying life and happiness, the further does man get away from true contentment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
327:The touchstone of everything that can be concluded as a law for a people lies in the question whether the people could have imposed such a law on itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
328:A great part, perhaps the greatest part, of the business of our reason consists in the analysation of the conceptions which we already possess of objects. ~ Immanuel Kant,
329:It is presumed that there exists a great unity in nature, in respect of the adequacy of a single cause to account for many different kinds of consequences. ~ Immanuel Kant,
330:Religion is too important a matter to its devotees to be a subject of ridicule. If they indulge in absurdities, they are to be pitied rather than ridiculed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
331:What would proceed from a continual promotion of living force, which does not let itself climb above a certain grade, other than a rapid death from delight? ~ Immanuel Kant,
332:War seems to be ingrained in human nature, and even to be regarded as something noble to which man is inspired by his love of honor, without selfish motives. ~ Immanuel Kant,
333:Freedom is alone the unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity; and is independent of the will and co-action of every other… ~ Immanuel Kant,
334:Marriage...is the union of two people of different sexes with a view to the mutual possession of each other's sexual attributes for the duration of their lives. ~ Immanuel Kant,
335:Philosophical knowledge is knowledge which reason gains from concepts; mathematical knowledge is knowledge which reason gains from the construction of concepts. ~ Immanuel Kant,
336:Act in such a way that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of another, always at the same time as an end and never simply as a means. ~ Immanuel Kant,
337:A nation is not (like the ground on which it is located) a possession. It is a society of men whom no one other than the nation itself can command or dispose of. ~ Immanuel Kant,
338:The function of the true state is to impose the minimum restrictions and safeguard the maximum liberties of the people, and it never regards the person as a thing. ~ Immanuel Kant,
339:Beneficence is a duty; and he who frequently practices it, and sees his benevolent intentions realized comes, at length, really to love him to whom he has done good. ~ Immanuel Kant,
340:Philosophical knowledge is the knowledge gained by reason from concepts ; mathematical knowledge is the knowledge gained by reason from the construction of concepts. ~ Immanuel Kant,
341:Upon the solution of this problem, or upon sufficient proof of the impossibility of synthetical knowledge a priori, depends the existence or downfall of metaphysics. ~ Immanuel Kant,
342:...[H]uman reason in its pure use, so long as it was not critically examined, has first tried all possible wrong ways before it succeeded in finding the one true way. ~ Immanuel Kant,
343:The crux of his new philosophy is this: What assurance do we have that our a priori (rational) thoughts have in reality a relation to objects that exist apart from us? ~ Immanuel Kant,
344:Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority... Supere aude! Dare to use your own understanding!is thus the motto of the Enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
345:Time is not an empirical concept. For neither co-existence nor succession would be perceived by us, if the representation of time did not exist as a foundation a priori. ~ Immanuel Kant,
346:All the interests of my reason, speculative as well as practical, combine in the three following questions: 1. What can I know? 2. What ought I to do? 3. What may I hope? ~ Immanuel Kant,
347:The greatest problem for the human species, the solution of which nature compels him to seek, is that of attaining a civil society which can administer justice universally. ~ Immanuel Kant,
348:Law And Freedom without Violence (Anarchy) Law And Violence without Freedom (Despotism) Violence without Freedom And Law (Barbarism) Violence with Freedom And Law (Republic) ~ Immanuel Kant,
349:Act in such a way that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, never merely as a means to an end, but always at the same time as an end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
350:Aus so krummen Holze, als woraus der Mensch gemacht ist, kann nichts ganz Gerades gezimmert werden. Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing can ever be made. ~ Immanuel Kant,
351:The infinitude of creation is great enough to make a world, or a Milky Way of worlds, look in comparison with it what a flower or an insect does in comparison with the Earth. ~ Immanuel Kant,
352:Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the oftener and more steadily we reflect on them: the starry heavens above and the moral law within. ~ Immanuel Kant,
353:The will is conceived as a faculty of determining oneself to action in accordance with the conception of certain laws. And such a faculty can be found only in rational beings. ~ Immanuel Kant,
354:Immanuel Kant’s “categorical imperative” says that individual actions are to be judged according to whether we would be pleased if everyone in society took the same action. ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
355:The true religion is to be posited not in the knowledge or confession of what God allegedly does or has done for our salvation, but in what we must do to become worthy of this. ~ Immanuel Kant,
356:it was the duty of philosophy to destroy the illusions which had their origin in misconceptions, whatever darling hopes and valued expectations may be ruined by its explanations. ~ Immanuel Kant,
357:The existence of the Bible, as a book for the people, is the greatest benefit which the human race has ever experienced. Every attempt to belittle it is a crime against humanity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
358:The universal and lasting establishment of peace constitutes not merely a part, but the whole final purpose and end of the science of right as viewed within the limits of reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
359:Anarchy is law and freedom without force.
Despotism is law and force without freedom.
Barbarism force without freedom and law.
Republicanism is force with freedom and law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
360:The ultimate destiny of the human race is the greatest moral perfection, provided that it is achieved through human freedom, whereby alone man is capable of the greatest happiness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
361:Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the oftener and more steadily we reflect on them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
362:The instruction of children should aim gradually to combine knowing and doing. Among all sciences mathematics seems to be the only one of a kind to satisfy this aim most completely. ~ Immanuel Kant,
363:Law And Freedom without Violence (Anarchy)
Law And Violence without Freedom (Despotism)
Violence without Freedom And Law (Barbarism)
Violence with Freedom And Law (Republic) ~ Immanuel Kant,
364:Morality, on the other hand, as Immanuel Kant insisted, is ultimately practical: though it matters morally what we think and feel, morality is, at its heart, about what we do. ~ Kwame Anthony Appiah,
365:In man (as the only rational creature on earth) those natural capacities which are directed to the use of his reason are to be fully developed only in the race, not in the individual. ~ Immanuel Kant,
366:Immanuel Kant lived with knowledge as with his lawfully wedded wife, slept with it in the same intellectual bed for forty years and begot an entire German race of philosophical systems. ~ Stefan Zweig,
367:To a high degree we are, through art and science, cultured. We are civilized - perhaps too much for our own good - in all sorts of social grace and decorum. But to consider ourselves as ~ Immanuel Kant,
368:Two things fill my mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the reflection dwells on them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
369:Hence we may at once dismiss as easily foreseen but futile objection, “that by our admitting the ideality of space and of time the whole sensible world would be turned into mere illusion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
370:I express the principle of one's freedom as a human being in this formula: No one can compel me (in accordance with his beliefs about the welfare of others) to be happy after his fashion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
371:If we could see ourselves... as we really are, we should see ourselves in a world of spiritual natures, our community which neither began at birth nor will end with the death of the body. ~ Immanuel Kant,
372:The people naturally adhere most to doctrines which demand the least self-exertion and the least use of their own reason, and which can best accommodate their duties to their inclinations. ~ Immanuel Kant,
373:Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the mind of thought is drawn to them: the starry heavens above and the moral law within. ~ Immanuel Kant,
374:At some future day it will be proved, I cannot say when and where, that the human soul is, while in earth life, already in an uninterrupted communication with those living in another world. ~ Immanuel Kant,
375:Every man is to be respected as an absolute end in himself; and it is a crime against the dignity that belongs to him as a human being, to use him as a mere means for some external purpose. ~ Immanuel Kant,
376:Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind. The understanding can intuit nothing, the senses can think nothing. Only through their unison can knowledge arise. ~ Immanuel Kant,
377:The means employed by Nature to bring about the development of all the capacities of men is their antagonism in society, so far as this is, in the end, the cause of a lawful order among men. ~ Immanuel Kant,
378:Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind... The understanding can intuit nothing, the senses can think nothing. Only through their union can knowledge arise. ~ Immanuel Kant,
379:To the cosmological question, therefore, respecting the quantity of the world, the first and negative answer is, that the world has no first beginning in time, and no extreme limit in space. ~ Immanuel Kant,
380:Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and reverence the more often and more steadily one reflects on them, the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
381:I express the principle of one's freedom as a human being in this formula: No one can compel me (in accordance with his beliefs about the welfare of others) to be happy after his own fashion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
382:The whole interest of my reason, whether speculative or practical, is concentrated in the three following questions: What can I know? What should I do? What may I hope? (Critique of Pure Reason ~ Immanuel Kant,
383:Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the mind of thought is drawn to them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
384:The schematicism by which our understanding deals with the phenomenal world ... is a skill so deeply hidden in the human soul that we shall hardly guess the secret trick that Nature here employs. ~ Immanuel Kant,
385:The ideal of the supreme being is nothing but a regulative principle of reason which directs us to look upon all connection in the world as if it originated from an all-sufficient necessary cause. ~ Immanuel Kant,
386:All thought must, directly or indirectly, by way of certain characters, relate ultimately to intuitions, and therefore, with us, to sensibility, because in no other way can an object be given to us. ~ Immanuel Kant,
387:An appeal to the consent of the common sense of mankind cannot be allowed, for that is a witness whose authority depends merely upon rumor. Says Horace: Quodcunque ostendis mihi sic, incredulus odi. ~ Immanuel Kant,
388:Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more seriously reflection concentrates upon them: the starry heaven above me and the moral law within me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
389:The greatest evil that can oppress civilized peoples derives from wars, not, indeed, so much from actual present or past wars, as from the never-ending and constantly increasing arming for future war. ~ Immanuel Kant,
390:If there is any science man really needs it is the one I teach, of how to occupy properly that place in creation that is assigned to man, and how to learn from it what one must be in order to be a man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
391:Most men use their knowledge only under guidance from others because they lack the courage to think independently using their own reasoning abilities. It takes intellectual daring to discover the truth. ~ Immanuel Kant,
392:We assume a common sense as the necessary condition of the universal communicability of our knowledge, which is presupposed in every logic and every principle of knowledge that is not one of skepticism. ~ Immanuel Kant,
393:Natural science physics contains in itself synthetical judgments a priori, as principles. ... Space then is a necessary representation a priori, which serves for the foundation of all external intuitions. ~ Immanuel Kant,
394:Human freedom is realised in the adoption of humanity as an end in itself, for the one thing that no-one can be compelled to do by another is to adopt a particular end. - 'Metaphysical Principles of Virtue ~ Immanuel Kant,
395:Intuition and concepts constitute... the elements of all our knowledge, so that neither concepts without an intuition in some way corresponding to them, nor intuition without concepts, can yield knowledge. ~ Immanuel Kant,
396:...[W]e must admit that... law must be valid, not merely for men, but for all rational creatures generally, not merely under certain contingent conditions or with exceptions, but with absolute necessity... ~ Immanuel Kant,
397:I class the principle of moral feeling under that of happiness, because every empirical interest promises to contribute to our well-being by the agreeableness that a thing affords, whether profit be regarded. ~ Immanuel Kant,
398:The science of mathematics presents the most brilliant example of how pure reason may successfully enlarge its domain without the aid of experience. ~ Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason (1781) Tr. Max Müller (1881) p. 610.,
399:...[I]f I know that it is only by this process that the intended operation can be performed, then to say that if I fully will the operation, I also will the action required for it, is an analytical proposition... ~ Immanuel Kant,
400:If we knew that god exists, such knowledge would make morality impossible. For, if we acted morally from fear or fright, or confident of a reward, then this would not be moral. It would be enlightened selfishness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
401:Man desired concord; but nature knows better what is good for his species; she desires discord. Man wants to live easy and content; but nature compels him to leave ease... and throw himself into roils and labors. ~ Immanuel Kant,
402:We ourselves introduce that order and regularity in the appearance which we entitle "nature". We could never find them in appearances had we not ourselves, by the nature of our own mind, originally set them there. ~ Immanuel Kant,
403:I learned to honor human beings, and I would find myself far more useless than the common laborer if I did not believe that this consideration could impart to all others a value establishing the rights of humanity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
404:When the tremulous radiance of a summer night fills with twinkling stars and the moon itself is full, I am slowly drawn into a state of enhanced sensitivity made of friendship and disdain for the world and eternity ~ Immanuel Kant,
405:We have no reason for assuming the form of such a thing to be still partly dependent on blind mechanism, for with such confusion of heterogeneous principles every reliable rule for estimating things would disappear. ~ Immanuel Kant,
406:It is an empirical judgement [to say] that I perceive and judge an object with pleasure. But it is an a priori judgement [to say] that I find it beautiful, i.e. I attribute this satisfaction necessarily to every one. ~ Immanuel Kant,
407:That Logic has advanced in this sure course, even from the earliest times, is apparent from the fact that, since Aristotle, it has been unable to advance a step, and thus to all appearance has reached its completion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
408:The sum total of all possible knowledge of God is not possible for a human being, not even through a true revelation. But it is one of the worthiest inquiries to see how far our reason can go in the knowledge of God. ~ Immanuel Kant,
409:War itself requires no particular motivation, but appears to be ingrained in human nature and is even valued as something noble; indeed, the desire for glory inspires men to it, even independently of selfish motives. ~ Immanuel Kant,
410:Zwei Dinge erfüllen das Gemüt mit immer neuer und zunehmender Bewunderung und Ehrfurcht, je öfter und anhaltender sich das Nachdenken damit beschäftigt: der gestirnte Himmel über mir und das moralische Gesetz in mir. ~ Immanuel Kant,
411:Always regard every man as an end in himself, and never use him merely as a means to your ends [i.e., respect that each person has a life and purpose that is their own; do not treat people as objects to be exploited]. ~ Immanuel Kant,
412:...When he puts a thing on a pedestal and calls it beautiful, he demands the same delight from others. He judges not merely for himself, but for all men, and then speaks of beauty as if it were the property of things. ~ Immanuel Kant,
413:A philosophical attempt to work out a universal history according to a natural plan directed to achieving the civic union of the human race must be regarded as possible and, indeed, as contributing to this end of Nature. ~ Immanuel Kant,
414:Freedom is the alone unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity; and is independence on the will and co-action of every other in so far as this consists with every other person's freedom. ~ Immanuel Kant,
415:Human reason, in one sphere of its cognition, is called upon to consider questions, which it cannot decline, as they are presented by its own nature, but which it cannot answer, as they transcend every faculty of the mind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
416:If man is not to stifle his human feelings, he must practice kindness towards animals, for he who is cruel to animals becomes hard also in his dealings with men. We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals. ~ Immanuel Kant,
417:If we were to suppose that mankind never can or will be in a better condition, it seems impossible to justify by any kind of theodicy the mere fact that such a race of corrupt beings could have been created on earth at all. ~ Immanuel Kant,
418:The desire which a man has for a woman is not directed towards her because she is a human being, but because she is a woman ; that she is a human being is of no concern to the man; only her sex is the object of his desires. ~ Immanuel Kant,
419:I freely admit that the remembrance of David Hume was the very thing that many years ago first interrupted my dogmatic slumber and gave a completely different direction to my researches in the field of speculative philosophy ~ Immanuel Kant,
420:A man who has tasted with profound enjoyment the pleasure of agreeable society will eat with a greater appetite than he who rode horseback for two hours. An amusing lecture is as useful for health as the exercise of the body. ~ Immanuel Kant,
421:For how is it possible, says that acute man, that when a concept is given me, I can go beyond it and connect with it another which is not contained in it, in such a manner as if that latter necessarily belonged to the former? ~ Immanuel Kant,
422:I freely admit that the remembrance of David Hume was the very thing that many years ago first interrupted my dogmatic slumber and gave a completely different direction to my researches in the field of speculative philosophy. ~ Immanuel Kant,
423:In the universal stillness of nature and the calmness of the senses the immortal spirit’s hidden faculty of cognition speaks an ineffable language and provides undeveloped concepts that can certainly be felt but not described. ~ Immanuel Kant,
424:Feminine traits are called weaknesses. People joke about them; fools ridicule them; but reasonable persons see very well that those traits are just the tools for the management of men, and for the use of men for female designs. ~ Immanuel Kant,
425:Since the human race's natural end is to make steady cultural progress, its moral end is to be conceived as progressing toward the better. And this progress may well be occasionally interrupted, but it will never be broken off. ~ Immanuel Kant,
426:Things which we see are not by themselves what we see ... It remains completely unknown to us what the objects may be by themselves and apart from the receptivity of our senses. We know nothing but our manner of perceiving them. ~ Immanuel Kant,
427:Whereas the beautiful is limited, the sublime is limitless, so that the mind in the presence of the sublime, attempting to imagine what it cannot, has pain in the failure but pleasure in contemplating the immensity of the attempt ~ Immanuel Kant,
428:The only quality necessary for being a citizen (i.e., a co-legislator), other than the natural one (that he is neither a child nor a woman), is that he be his own master, consequently that he have some property to support himself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
429:In the natural state no concept of God can arise, and the false one which one makes for himself is harmful. Hence the theory of natural religion can be true only where there is no science; therefore it cannot bind all men together. ~ Immanuel Kant,
430:Our understanding is a faculty of concepts, i.e., a discursive understanding, for which it must of course be contingent what and how different might be the particular that can be given to it in nature and brought under its concepts. ~ Immanuel Kant,
431:cruelty to animals is contrary to man's duty to himself, because it deadens in him the feeling of sympathy for their sufferings, and thus a natural tendency that is very useful to morality in relation to other human beings is weakened. ~ Immanuel Kant,
432:All trades, arts, and handiworks have gained by division of labor... Where the different kinds of work are not distinguished and divided, where everyone is a jack-of-all-trades, there manufactures remain still in the greatest barbarism. ~ Immanuel Kant,
433:Aristotle can be regarded as the father of logic. But his logic is too scholastic, full of subtleties, and fundamentally has not been of much value to the human understanding. It is a dialectic and an organon for the art of disputation. ~ Immanuel Kant,
434:...in its practical purpose the footpath of freedom is the only one on which it is possible to make use of reason in our conduct. Hence it is as impossible for the subtlest philosophy as for the commonest reasoning to argue freedom away. ~ Immanuel Kant,
435:Freedom is independence of the compulsory will of another, and in so far as it tends to exist with the freedom of all according to a universal law, it is the one sole original inborn right belonging to every man in virtue of his humanity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
436:In the kingdom of ends everything has either a price or a dignity. What has a price can be replaced by something else as its equivalent; what on the other hand is raised above all price and therefore admits of no equivalent has a dignity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
437:A league of a special sort must . . . be established, one that we can call a league of peace, which will be distinguished from a treaty of peace because the latter seeks merely to stop one war, while the former seeks to end all wars forever. ~ Immanuel Kant,
438:Inexperienced in the course of world affairs and incapable of being prepared for all the chances that happen in it, I ask myself only 'Can you also will that your maxim should become a universal law?' Where you cannot it is to be rejected... ~ Immanuel Kant,
439:When a thoughtful human being has overcome incentives to vice and is aware of having done his bitter duty, he finds himself in a state that could be called happiness, a state of contentment and peace of mind in which virtue is its own reward. ~ Immanuel Kant,
440:Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed immaturity. Nothing is required for this enlightenment except freedom; and the freedom in question is the least harmful of all, namely, the freedom to use with and publicly in all matters. ~ Immanuel Kant,
441:After death the soul possesses self-consciousness, otherwise, it would be the subject of spiritual death, which has already been disproved. With this self-consciousness necessarily remains personality and the consciousness of personal identity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
442:Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed immaturity...No thing is required for this enlightenment.. .except freedom; and the freedom in question is the least harmful of all, namely, the freedom to use reason publicly in all matters. ~ Immanuel Kant,
443:It is of great consequence to have previously determined the concept that one wants to elucidate through observation before questioning experience about it; for one finds in experience what one needs only if one knows in advance what to look for. ~ Immanuel Kant,
444:But, above all, it will confer an inestimable benefit on morality and religion, by showing that all the objections urged against them may be silenced for ever by the Socratic method, that is to say, by proving the ignorance of the objector. ~ Immanuel Kant,
445:The essence of things is not altered by their external relations, and that which, abstracting from these, alone constitutes the absolute worth of man is also that by which he must be judged, whoever the judge may be, and even by the Supreme Being. ~ Immanuel Kant,
446:The only objects of practical reason are therefore those of good and evil. For by the former is meant an object necessarily desired according to a principle of reason; by the latter one necessarily shunned, also according to a principle of reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
447:To appeal to common sense when insight and science fail, and no sooner—this is one of the subtle discoveries of modern times, by means of which the most superficial ranter can safely enter the lists with the most thorough thinker and hold his own. ~ Immanuel Kant,
448:....Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination, resting solely on empirical grounds, and it is vain to expect that these should define an action by which one could attain the totality of a series of consequences which is really endless. ~ Immanuel Kant,
449:Immanuel Kant believed that we humans, because we are so emotionally complex, go through two puberties in life. The first puberty is when our bodies become mature enough for sex; the second puberty is when our minds becomes mature enough for sex. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
450:A person born blind cannot frame the smallest conception of darkness, because he has none of light. The savage knows nothing of poverty, because he does not know wealth and the ignorant has no conception of his ignorance, because he has none of knowledge. ~ Immanuel Kant,
451:There was a German philosopher who is very well known, his name was Immanuel Kant, and he said there are two things that don’t have to mean anything, one is music and the other is laughter. Don’t have to mean anything that is, in order to give us deep pleasure. ~ John Cage,
452:Human reason has this peculiar fate that in one species of its knowledge it is burdened by questions which, as prescribed by the very nature of reason itself, it is not able to ignore, but which, as transcending all its powers, it is also not able to answer. ~ Immanuel Kant,
453:By a lie a man throws away and, as it were, annihilates his dignity as a man. A man who himself does not believe what he tells another ... has even less worth than if he were a mere thing. ... makes himself a mere deceptive appearance of man, not man himself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
454:Democracy is necessarily despotism, as it establishes an executive power contrary to the general will; all being able to decide against one whose opinion may differ, the will of all is therefore not that of all: which is contradictory and opposite to liberty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
455:Las cuestiones de si el universo tiene un principio en el tiempo y de si está limitado en el espacio fueron posteriormente examinadas de forma extensiva por el filósofo Immanuel Kant en su monumental (y muy oscura) obra, Crítica de la razón pura, publicada en 1781. ~ Anonymous,
456:If I have a book that thinks for me, a pastor who acts as my conscience, a physician who prescribes my diet, and so on... then I have no need to exert myself. I have no need to think, if only I can pay; others will take care of that disagreeable business for me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
457:Faulheit und Feigheit sind die Ursachen, warum ein so großer Teil der Menschen, nachdem sie die Natur längst von fremder Leitung frei gesprochen, dennoch gerne zeitlebens unmündig bleiben; und warum es anderen so leicht wird, sich zu deren Vormündern aufzuwerfen. ~ Immanuel Kant,
458:If, like Hume, I had all manner of adornment in my power, I would still have reservations about using them. It is true that some readers will be scared off by dryness. But isn't it necessary to scare off some if in their case the matter would end up in bad hands? ~ Immanuel Kant,
459:My object is to persuade all those who think metaphysics worth studying that it is absolutely necessary to pause a moment and, disregarding all that has been done, to propose first the preliminary question, “Whether such a thing as metaphysics be at all possible? ~ Immanuel Kant,
460:To assume that the ruler cannot ever err or that he cannot be ignorant of something would be to portray him as blessed with divine inspiration and as elevated above the rest of humanity. Hence freedom of the pen . . . is the sole protector of the people's rights. ~ Immanuel Kant,
461:Men will not understand ... that when they fulfil their duties to men, they fulfil thereby God's commandments; that they are consequently always in the service of God, as long as their actions are moral, and that it is absolutely impossible to serve God otherwise. ~ Immanuel Kant,
462:Dogmatism is thus the dogmatic procedure of pure reason without previous criticism of its own powers, and in opposing this procedure, we must not be supposed to lend any countenance to that loquacious shallowness which arrogates to itself the name of popularity, nor ~ Immanuel Kant,
463:All appearances have a determinate magnitude (the relation of which to another assignable). The infinite does not appear as such, likewise not the simple. For the appearances are included between two boundaries (points) and are thus themselves determinate magnitudes. ~ Immanuel Kant,
464:Every beginning is in time, and every limit of extension in space. Space and time, however, exist in the world of sense only. Hence phenomena are only limited in the world conditionally, the world itself, however, is limited neither conditionally nor unconditionally. ~ Immanuel Kant,
465:True politics cannot take a single step without first paying homage to morals, and while politics itself is a difficult art, its combination with morals is no art at all; for morals cuts the Gordian knot which politics cannot solve as soon as the two are in conflict. ~ Immanuel Kant,
466:Perhaps a revolution can overthrow autocratic despotism and profiteering or power-grabbing oppression, but it can never truly reform a manner of thinking; instead, new prejudices, just like the old ones they replace, will serve as a leash for the great unthinking mass ~ Immanuel Kant,
467:The world of sense, if it is limited, lies necessarily within the infinite void. If we ignore this, and with it, space in general, as an a priori condition of the possibility of phenomena, the whole world of sense vanishes, which alone forms the object of our enquiry. ~ Immanuel Kant,
468:Perhaps a revolution can overthrow autocratic despotism and profiteering or power-grabbing oppression, but it can never truly reform a manner of thinking; instead, new prejudices, just like the old ones they replace, will serve as a leash for the great unthinking mass. ~ Immanuel Kant,
469:Enlightenment is man's exodus from his self-incurred tutelage. Tutelage is the inability to use one's understanding without the guidance of another person..'Dare to Know'(sapere aude) Have the courage to use your own understanding;this is the motto of the Enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
470:People who read mainly the Grounding and the Critique often criticize Kant for having his head in the clouds and for not being convincingly capable of dealing with concrete cases. A reading of the Metaphysics of Morals will show anyone how unfounded such criticisms are. ~ Immanuel Kant,
471:Man, and in general every rational being, exists as an end in himself, not merely as a means for arbitrary use by this or that will: he must in all his actions, whether they are directed to himself or to other rational beings, always be viewed at the same time as an end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
472:Our knowledge springs from two fundamental sources of the mind; the first is the capacity of receiving representations (receptivity for impressions), the second is the power of knowing an object through these representations (spontaneity [in the production] of concepts). ~ Immanuel Kant,
473:Through laziness and cowardice a large part of mankind, even after nature has freed them from alien guidance, gladly remain immature. It is because of laziness and cowardice that it is so easy for others to usurp the role of guardians. It is so comfortable to be a minor! ~ Immanuel Kant,
474:...[T]he sublimity and intrinsic dignity of the command in duty are so much the more evident, the less the subjective impulses favor it and the more they oppose it, without being able in the slightest degree to weaken the obligation of the law or to diminish its validity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
475:I feel a complete thirst for knowledge and an eager unrest to go further in it as well as satisfaction at every acquisition. There was a time when I believed that this alone could constitute the honor of mankind, and I had contempt for the ignorant rabble who know nothing. ~ Immanuel Kant,
476:Now I say: man and generally any rational being exists as an end in himself, not merely as a means to be arbitrarily used by this or that will, but in all his actions, whether they concern himself or other rational beings, must always be regarded at the same time as an end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
477:Reason must approach nature in order to be taught by it. It must not, however, do so in the character of a pupil who listens to everything that the teacher chooses to say, but of an appointed judge who compels the witness to answer questions which he has himself formulated. ~ Immanuel Kant,
478:If the intuition must conform to the nature of the objects, I do not see how we can know anything of them a priori. If, on the other hand, the object conforms to the nature of our faculty of intuition, I can then easily conceive the possibility of such an a priori knowledge. ~ Immanuel Kant,
479:The arts of speech are rhetoric and poetry. Rhetoric is the art of transacting a serious business of the understanding as if it were a free play of the imagination; poetry that of conducting a free play of the imagination as if it were a serious business of the understanding. ~ Immanuel Kant,
480:The sight of a being who is not graced by any touch of a pure and good will but who yet enjoys an uninterrupted prosperity can never delight a rational and impartial spectator. Thus a good will seems to constitute the indispensable condition of being even worthy of happiness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
481:In his essay, ‘Perpetual Peace,’ the philosopher, Immanuel Kant, argued that perpetual peace would eventually come to the world in one of two ways, by human insight or by conflicts and catastrophes of a magnitude that left humanity no other choice. We are at such a juncture. ~ Henry Kissinger,
482:The sight of a being who is not adorned with a single feature of a pure and good will, enjoying unbroken prosperity, can never give pleasure to an impartial rational spectator. Thus a good will appears to constitute the indispensable condition even of being worthy of happiness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
483:Everything goes past like a river and the changing taste and the various shapes of men make the whole game uncertain and delusive. Where do I find fixed points in nature, which cannot be moved by man, and where I can indicate the markers by the shore to which he ought to adhere? ~ Immanuel Kant,
484:In his essay, ‘Perpetual Peace,’ the philosopher, Immanuel Kant, argued that perpetual peace would eventually come to the world in one of two ways, by human insight or by conflicts and catastrophes of a magnitude that left humanity no other choice. We are at such a juncture. ~ Henry A Kissinger,
485:In the metaphysical elements of aesthetics the various nonmoral feelings are to be made use of; in the elements of moral metaphysics the various moral feelings of men, according to the differences in sex, age, education, and government, of races and climates, are to be employed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
486:Nature has willed that man should, by himself, produce everything that goes beyond the mechanical ordering of his animal existence, and that he should partake of no other happiness or perfection than that which he himself, independently of instinct, has created by his own reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
487:Our reason has this peculiar fate that, with reference to one class of its knowledge, it is always troubled with questions which cannot be ignored, because they spring from the very nature of reason, and which cannot be answered, because they transcend the powers of human reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
488:Ghost stories are always listened to and well received in private, but pitilessly disavowed in public. For my own part, ignorant as I am of the way in which the human spirit enters the world and the way in which he goes out of it, I dare not deny the truth of many such narratives. ~ Immanuel Kant,
489:Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his self-imposed immaturity.…1 Nothing is required for this enlightenment … except freedom; and the freedom in question is the least harmful of all, namely, the freedom to use reason publicly in all matters. —IMMANUEL KANT, “What Is Enlightenment? ~ Jon Meacham,
490:The evil effect of science upon men is principally this, that by far the greatest number of those who wish to display a knowledge of it accomplish no improvement at all of the understanding, but only a perversity of it, not to mention that it serves most of them as a tool of vanity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
491:Criticism alone can sever the root of materialism, fatalism, atheism, free-thinking, fanaticism, and superstition, which can be injurious universally; as well as of idealism and skepticism, which are dangerous chiefly to the Schools, and hardly allow of being handed on to the public. ~ Immanuel Kant,
492:Human reason has the peculiar fate in one species of its cognitions that it is burdened with questions which it cannot dismiss, since they are given to it as problems by the nature of reason itself, but which it also cannot answer, since they transcend every capacity of human reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
493:If an offender has committed murder, he must die. In this case, no possible substitute can satisfy justice. For there is no parallel between death and even the most miserable life, so that there is no equality of crime and retribution unless the perpetrator is judicially put to death. ~ Immanuel Kant,
494:Thus he has two standpoints from which he can consider himself...: first, as belonging to the world of sense, under the laws of nature (heteronomy), and, second, as belonging to the intelligible world under laws which, independent of nature, are not empirical but founded only on reason. ~ Immanuel Kant,
495:Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his self-imposed immaturity.…1 Nothing is required for this enlightenment … except freedom; and the freedom in question is the least harmful of all, namely, the freedom to use reason publicly in all matters. —IMMANUEL KANT, “What Is Enlightenment?” The ~ Jon Meacham,
496:There are such manifold forms of nature; there are many modifications of the general transcendental concepts of nature that are left undetermined by the laws furnished by pure intellect a priori because these laws only concern the general possibility of nature as an object of the senses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
497:Moral Teleology supplies the deficiency in physical Teleology , and first establishes a Theology ; because the latter, if it did not borrow from the former without being observed, but were to proceed consistently, could only found a Demonology , which is incapable of any definite concept. ~ Immanuel Kant,
498:The sceptics, a kind of nomads, despising all settled culture of the land, broke up from time to time all civil society. Fortunately their number was small, and they could not prevent the old settlers from returning to cultivate the ground afresh, though without any fixed plan or agreement. ~ Immanuel Kant,
499:Both love of mankind, and respect for their rights are duties; the former however is only a conditional, the latter an unconditional, purely imperative duty, which he must be perfectly certain not to have transgressed who would give himself up to the secret emotions arising from benevolence. ~ Immanuel Kant,
500:But freedom is a mere Idea, the objective reality of which can in no wise be shown according to the laws of nature, and consequently not in any possible experience; and for this reason it can never be comprehended or understood, because we cannot support it by any sort of example or analogy. ~ Immanuel Kant,
501:There is needed, no doubt, a body of servants (ministerium) of the invisible church, but not officials (officiales), in other words, teachers but not dignitaries, because in the rational religion of every individual there does not yet exist a church as a universal union (omnitudo collectiva). ~ Immanuel Kant,
502:For if phenomena are things by themselves, freedom cannot be saved. Nature in that case is the complete and sufficient cause determining every event, and its condition is always contained in that series of phenomena only which, together with their effect, are necessary under the law of nature. ~ Immanuel Kant,
503:Parents usually educate their children merely in such a manner than however bad the world may be, they may adapt themselves to its present conditions. But they ought to give them an education so much better than this, that a better condition of things may thereby be brought about by the future. ~ Immanuel Kant,
504:I shall never forget my mother, for it was she who planted and nurtured the first seeds of good within me. She opened my heart to the lasting impressions of nature; she awakened my understanding and extended my horizon and her percepts exerted an everlasting influence upon the course of my life. ~ Immanuel Kant,
505:The rights of men must be held sacred, however great the cost of sacrifice may be to those in power. Here one cannot go halfway, cooking up hybrid, pragmatically-conditioned rights (which are somewhere between the right and the expedient); instead, all politics must bend its knee before morality... ~ Immanuel Kant,
506:Was nicht ein Gegenstand der Erfahrung sein kann, dessen Erkenntniß wäre hyperphysisch, und mit dergleichen haben wir hier gar nicht zu thun, sondern mit der Naturerkenntniß, deren Realität durch Erfahrung bestätigt werden kann, on sie gleich a priori möglich ist und vor aller Erfahrung hervorgeht. ~ Immanuel Kant,
507:All trades, arts, and handiwork have gained by division of labor, namely, when, instead of one man doing everything, each confines himself to a certain kind of work distinct from others in the treatment it requires, so as to be able to perform it with greater facility and in the greatest perfection. ~ Immanuel Kant,
508:Second among the crimina carnis contra naturam is intercourse sexus homogenii/ where the object of sexual inclination continues, indeed, to be human, but is changed since the sexual congress is not heterogeneous but homogeneous, i.e., when a woman satisfies her impulse on a woman, or a man on a man. ~ Immanuel Kant,
509:Often war is waged only in order to show valor; thus an inner dignity is ascribed to war itself, and even some philosophers have praised it as an ennoblement of humanity, forgetting the pronouncement of the Greek who said, 'War is an evil in as much as it produces more wicked men than it takes away.' ~ Immanuel Kant,
510:What does it avail, one will say, that this man has so much talent, that he is so active therewith, and that he exerts thereby a useful influence over the community, thus having a great worth both in relation to his own happy condition and to the benefit of others, if he does not possess a good will? ~ Immanuel Kant,
511:...[N]ature generally in the distribution of her capacities has adapted the means to the end... [so nature's] true destination must be to produce a will, not merely good as a means to something else, but good in itself, for which reason was... imparted to us as a practical... absolutely necessary... faculty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
512:The history of the human race, viewed as a whole, may be regarded as the realization of a hidden plan of nature to bring about a political constitution, internally, and for this purpose, also externally perfect, as the only state in which all the capacities implanted by her in mankind can be fully developed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
513:There will always be some people who think for themselves, even among the self-appointed guardians of the great mass who, after having thrown off the yoke of immaturity themselves, will spread about them the spirit of a reasonable estimate of their own value and of the need for every man to think for himself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
514:Only by what a man does heedless of enjoyment, in complete freedom and independently of what he can produce passively from the hand of nature, does he give absolute worth to his existence, as the real existence of a person. Happiness, with all its plethora of pleasures, is far from being an unconditioned good. ~ Immanuel Kant,
515:From this it follows incontestably, that pure concepts of the understanding never admit of a transcendental, but only of an empirical use, and that the principles of the pure understanding can only be referred, as general conditions of a possible experience, to objects of the senses, never to things in themselves… ~ Immanuel Kant,
516:if adversity and hopeless grief have quite taken away the taste for life; if an unfortunate man, strong of soul and more indignant about his fate than despondent or dejected, wishes for death and yet preserves his life without loving it, not from inclination or fear but from duty, then his maxim has moral content. ~ Immanuel Kant,
517:The greatest and perhaps only utility of all philosophy of pure reason is thus only negative, namely that it does not serve for expansion, as an organon, but rather, as a discipline, serves for the determination of boundaries, and instead of discovering truth it has only the silent merit of guarding against errors ~ Immanuel Kant,
518:Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the mind of thought is drawn to them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me... Morality is not properly the doctrine of how we may make ourselves happy, but how we may make ourselves worthy of happiness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
519:Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed nonage. Nonage is the inability to use one's own understanding without another's guidance. This nonage is self-imposed if its cause lies not in lack of understanding but in indecision and lack of courage to use one's own mind without another's guidance. Dare to know! ~ Immanuel Kant,
520:...Ethical laws cannot be thought of as emanating originally merely from the will of this superior being as statutes, which, had he not first commanded them, would perhaps not be binding, for then they would not be ethical laws and the duty proper to them would not be the free duty of virtue but the coercive duty of law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
521:For morality, with regard to its principles of public right (hence in relation to a political code which can be known a priori), has the peculiar feature that the less it makes its conduct depend upon the end it envisages (whether this be a physical or moral advantage), the more it will in general harmonise with this end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
522:It is different with the transcendental division of a phenomenon. How far that may extend is not a matter of experience, but a principle of reason, which never allows us to consider the empirical regressus in the decomposition of extended bodies, according to the nature of these phenomena, as at any time absolutely completed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
523:Reason in a creature is a faculty of widening the rules and purposes of the use of all its powers far beyond natural instinct; it acknowledges no limits to its projects. Reason itself does not work instinctively, but requires trial, practice, and instruction in order gradually to progress from one level of insight to another. ~ Immanuel Kant,
524:A science of all these possible kinds of space [the higher dimensional ones] would undoubtedly be the highest enterprise which a finite understanding could undertake in the field of geometry... If it is possible that there could be regions with other dimensions, it is very likely that God has somewhere brought them into being. ~ Immanuel Kant,
525:The character of the species, as it is indicated by the experience of all ages and all peoples, is this: that taken collectively (the human race as one whole), it is a multitude of persons, existing successively and side by side, who cannot do without associating peacefully and yet cannot avoid constantly offending one another. ~ Immanuel Kant,
526:...[M]oral instruction, although containing much that is convincing for the reason, ...accomplishes... little... [because] the teachers themselves have not got their own notions clear, and when they endeavor to make up for this by raking up motives of moral goodness from every quarter, trying to make their physic right strong, they spoil it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
527:For human reason, without any instigations imputable to the mere vanity of great knowledge, unceasingly progresses, urged on by its own feeling of need, towards such questions as cannot be answered by any empirical application of reason, or principles derived therefrom; and so there has ever really existed in every man some system of metaphysics. ~ Immanuel Kant,
528:It is the Land of Truth (enchanted name!), surrounded by a wide and stormy ocean, the true home of illusion, where many a fog bank and ice, that soon melts away, tempt us to believe in new lands, while constantly deceiving the adventurous mariner with vain hopes, and involving him in adventures which he can never leave, yet never bring to an end. ~ Immanuel Kant,
529:Thus there is an analogy between the juridical relation of human actions and the mechanical relation of moving forces. I never can do anything to another man without giving him a right to do the same to me on the same conditions; just as no body can act with its moving force on another body without thereby causing the other to react equally against it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
530:We must not, however, begin with theology. The religion which is founded merely on theology can never contain anything of morality. Hence we derive no other feelings from it but fear on the one hand, and hope of reward on the other, and this produces merely a superstitious cult. Morality, then, must come first and theology follow; and that is religion. ~ Immanuel Kant,
531:Imitation finds no place at all in morality, and examples serve only for encouragement, that is, they put beyond doubt the feasibility of what the law commands, they make visible that which the practical rule expresses more generally, but they can never authorize us to set aside the true original which lies in reason, and to guide ourselves by examples. ~ Immanuel Kant,
532:The light dove, in free flight cutting through the air the resistance of which it feels, could get the idea that it could do even better in airless space. Likewise, Plato abandoned the world of the senses because it posed so many hindrances for the understanding, and dared to go beyond it on the wings of the ideas, in the empty space of pure understanding. ~ Immanuel Kant,
533:The sacredness of religion, and the authority of legislation, are by many regarded as grounds of exemption from the examination of this tribunal. But, if they on they are exempted, they become the subjects of just suspicion, and cannot lay claim to sincere respect, which reason accords only to that which has stood the test of a free and public examination.] ~ Immanuel Kant,
534:For now we see that when we conceive ourselves as free we transfer ourselves into the world of understanding as members of it, and recognise the autonomy of the will with its consequence, morality; whereas, if we conceive ourselves as under obligation we consider ourselves as belonging to the world of sense, and at the same time to the world of understanding. ~ Immanuel Kant,
535:Individual men and even entire peoples give little thought to the fact that while each according to this own ways pursues his own ends—often at cross purposes with each other—they unconsciously proceed toward an unknown natural end, as if following a guiding thread; and they work to promote an end they would set little store by, even if they were aware of it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
536:An action done from duty has its moral worth, not in the purpose to be attained by it, but in the maxim according with which it is decided upon; it depends therefore, not on the realization of the object of action, but solely on the principle of volition in accordance with which, irrespective of all objects of the faculty of desire, the action has been performed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
537:For if the question is absurd in itself and demands unnecessary answers, then, besides the embarrassment of the one who proposes it, it also has the disadvantage of misleading the incautious listener into absurd answers, and presenting the ridiculous sight (as the ancients said) of one person milking a billy-goat while the other holds a sieve underneath. (A58/B82) ~ Immanuel Kant,
538:It must be freely admitted that there is a sort of circle here from which it seems impossible to escape. In the order of efficient causes we assume ourselves free, in order that in the order of ends we may conceive ourselves as subject to these laws because we have attributed to ourselves freedom of will; for freedom and self-legislation of will are both autonomy... ~ Immanuel Kant,
539:In traditional forms of the doctrine of original sin, human beings are said to have inherited two moral liabilities from their first ancestors, Adam and Eve. One is guilt: we are said to share in the guilt of the first sin that our ancestors committed. The other is corruption, a perversion of motivation that is itself evil and makes people likelier to do wrong deeds. ~ Immanuel Kant,
540:Nature does nothing in vain, and in the use of means to her goals she is not prodigal. Her giving to man reason and the freedom of the will which depends upon it is clear indication of her purpose. Man accordingly was not to be guided by instinct, not nurtured and instructed with ready-made knowledge; rather, he should bring forth everything out of his own resources. ~ Immanuel Kant,
541:No one may force anyone to be happy according to his manner of imagining the well-being of other men; instead, everyone may seek his happiness in the way that seems good to him as long as he does not infringe on the freedom of others to pursue a similar purpose, when such freedom may coexist with the freedom of every other man according to a possible and general law. ~ Immanuel Kant,
542:...Freedom of the will is of a wholly unique nature in that an incentive can determine the will to an action only so far as the individual has incorporated it into his maxim (has made it the general rule in accordance with which he will conduct himself); only thus can an incentive, whatever it may be, co-exist with the absolute spontaneity of the will (i.e., freedom). ~ Immanuel Kant,
543:What is more, we cannot do morality a worse service than by seeing to derive it from examples. Every example of it presented to me must first itself be judged by moral principles in order to decide if it is fit to serve as an original example...even the Holy One of the gospel must first be compared with our ideal of moral perfection before we can recognize him to be such. ~ Immanuel Kant,
544:Ours is an age of criticism, to which everything must be subjected. The sacredness of religion, and the authority of legislation, are by many regarded as grounds for exemption from the examination by this tribunal, But, if they are exempted, and cannot lay claim to sincere respect, which reason accords only to that which has stood the test of a free and public examination. ~ Immanuel Kant,
545:Don't Shoot is a work of moral philosophy that reads like a crime novel - Immanuel Kant meets Joseph Wambaugh. It's a fascinating, inspiring, and wonderfully well written story of one man's quest to solve a problem no one thought could be solved: the scourge of inner city gang violence This is a vitally important work that has the potential to usher in a new era in policing. ~ John Seabrook,
546:To behold virtue in her proper form is nothing else but to contemplate morality stripped of all admixture of sensible things and of every spurious ornament of reward or self-love. How much she then eclipses everything else that appears charming to the affections, every one may readily perceive with the least exertion of his reason, if it be not wholly spoiled for abstraction. ~ Immanuel Kant,
547:Falsehood, ingratitude, injustice, the puerility of the ends which we ourselves look upon as great and momentous… these all so contradict the idea of what men might be if they only would, and are so at variance with our active wish to see them better, that, to avoid hating where one cannot love, it seems but a slight sacrifice to forego all the joys of fellowship with our kind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
548:Christianity possesses the great advantage over Judaism of being represented as coming from the mouth of the first Teacher not as a statutory but as a moral religion, and as thus entering into the closest relation with reason so that, through reason, it was able of itself, without historical learning, to be spread at all times and among all peoples with the greatest trustworthiness. ~ Immanuel Kant,
549:If you punish a child for being naughty, and reward him for being good, he will do right merely for the sake of the reward; and when he goes out into the world and finds that goodness is not always rewarded, nor wickedness always punished, he will grow into a man who only thinks about how he may get on in the world, and does right or wrong according as he finds advantage to himself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
550:Laziness and cowardice explain why so many men. . . remain under a life-long tutelage and why it is so easy for some men to set themselves up as the guardians of all the rest. . . If I have a book which understands for me, a pastor who has a conscience for me, a doctor who decides my diet, I need not trouble myself. If I am willing to pay, I need not think. Others will do it for me. ~ Immanuel Kant,
551:We now concern ourselves with a labor less spectacular but nevertheless not unrewarding: that of making the terrain for these majestic moral edifices level and firm enough to be built upon; for under this ground there are all sorts of passageways, such as moles might have dug, left over from reason's vain but confident treasure hunting, that make every building insecure. (A319/B377) ~ Immanuel Kant,
552:...Reason should take on anew the most difficult of all its tasks, namely, that of self-knowledge, and to institute a court of justice, by which reason may secure its rightful claims while dismissing all its groundless pretensions, and this not by mere decrees but according to its own eternal and unchangeable laws; and this court is none other than the critique of pure reason itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
553:The pre-eminent good which we call moral can therefore consist in nothing else than the conception of law in itself, which certainly is only possible in a rational being, in so far as this conception, and not the expected effect, determines the will. This is a good which is already present in the person who acts accordingly, and we have not to wait for it to appear first in the result. * ~ Immanuel Kant,
554:High towers, and metaphysically-great men resembling them, round both of which there is commonly much wind, are not for me. My place is the fruitful bathos, the bottom-land, of experience; and the word transcendental, does not signify something passing beyond all experience, but something that indeed precedes it a priori, but that is intended simply to make cognition of experience possible. ~ Immanuel Kant,
555:No-one can compel me to be happy in accordance with his conception of the welfare of others, for each may seek his happiness in whatever way he sees fit, so long as he does not infringe upon the freedom of others to pursue a similar end which can be reconciled with the freedom of everyone else within a workable general law ? i.e. he must accord to others the same right as he enjoys himself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
556:Enlightenment is man's release from his self incurred tutelage.
Tutelage is man's inability to make use of his understanding without direction from another.
Self-incurred is this tutelage when its cause lies not in lack of reason but in lack of resolution and courage to use it without direction from another.
" Have courage to use your own reason" that's the motto of enlightenment . ~ Immanuel Kant,
557:Deaths, births, and marriages, considering how much they are separately dependent on the freedom of the human will, should seem to be subject to no law according to which any calculation could be made beforehand of their amount; and yet the yearly registers of these events in great countries prove that they go on with as much conformity to the laws of nature as the oscillations of the weather. ~ Immanuel Kant,
558:. . . as to moral feeling, this supposed special sense, the appeal to it is indeed superficial when those who cannot think believe that feeling will help them out, even in what concerns general laws: and besides, feelings which naturally differ infinitely in degree cannot furnish a uniform standard of good and evil, nor has any one a right to form judgments for others by his own feelings. . . . ~ Immanuel Kant,
559:Enlightenment is man's release from his self-incurred tutelage. Tutelage is man's inability to make use of his understanding without direction from another. Self-incurred is this tutelage when its cause lies not in lack of reason but in lack of resolution and courage to use it without direction from another. Sapere aude! 'Have courage to use your own reason!'- that is the motto of enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
560:Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the more often and steadily we reflect upon them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. I do not seek or conjecture either of them as if they were veiled obscurities or extravagances beyond the horizon of my vision; I see them before me and connect them immediately with the consciousness of my existence. ~ Immanuel Kant,
561:Under a nonrepublican constitution, where subjects are not citizens, the easiest thing in the world to do is to declare war. Here the ruler is not a fellow citizen, but the nation's owner, and war does not affect his table, his hunt, his places of pleasure, his court festivals, and so on. Thus, he can decide to go to war for the most meaningless of reasons, as if it were a kind of pleasure party... ~ Immanuel Kant,
562:De las tres formas de Estado, la democracia es, en el sentido propio de la palabra, necesariamente un despotismo, porque crea un poder ejecutivo en el que todos deciden sobre alguien y, en su caso, contra alguien (es decir, contra quien no esté de acuerdo con los demás), con lo que deciden todos, que no son realmente todos. Esto es una contradicción de la voluntad general consigo misma y con la libertad. ~ Immanuel Kant,
563:Immanuel Kant, un uomo lontanissimo dall'irrazionalismo, osservò una volta che "dal legno storto dell'umanità non si è mai cavata una cosa diritta". È questo il motivo per cui nessuna soluzione perfetta è possibile nelle cose umane - non già soltanto in pratica, ma in linea di principio - e ogni serio tentativo di metterla in atto è destinato con ogni probabilità a produrre sofferenza, delusione e fallimento. ~ Isaiah Berlin,
564:Here I shall add that the concept of change, and with it the concept of motion, as change of place, is possible only through and in the representation of time. & Motion, for example, presupposes the perception of something movable. But space considered in itself contains nothing movable; consequently motion must be something which is found in space only through experience -in other words, is an empirical datum. ~ Immanuel Kant,
565:If it were possible for us to have so deep an insight into a man's character as shown both in inner and in outer actions, that every, even the least, incentive to these actions and all external occasions which affect them were so known to us that his future conduct could be predicted with as great a certainty as the occurrence of a solar or lunar eclipse, we could nevertheless still assert that the man is free. ~ Immanuel Kant,
566:Two things fill the mind with renewed and increasing awe and reverence the more often and the more steadily that they are meditated on: the starry skies above me and the moral law inside me. I have not to search for them and conjecture them as though they were veiled in darkness or were in the transcendent region beyond my horizon; I see them before me and connect them directly with the consciousness of my existence ~ Immanuel Kant,
567:Les esprits qui ont le sentiment du sublime sont entraînés insensiblement vers les sentiments élevés de l’amitié, du mépris du monde, de l’éternité, par le calme et le silence d’une soirée d’été, alors que la lumière tremblante des étoiles perce les ombres de la nuit, et que la lune solitaire paraît à l’horizon. Le jour brillant inspire l’ardeur du travail et le sentiment de la joie. Le sublime émeut, le beau charme. ~ Immanuel Kant,
568:As nature has uncovered from under this hard shell the seed for which she most tenderly cares - the propensity and vocation to free thinking - this gradually works back upon the character of the people, who thereby gradually become capable of managing freedom; finally, it affects the principles of government, which finds it to its advantage to treat men, who are now more than machines, in accordance with their dignity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
569:Since the narrower or wider community of the peoples of the earth has developed so far that a violation of rights in one place is felt throughout the world, the idea of a cosmopolitan right is not fantastical, high-flown or exaggerated notion. It is a complement to the unwritten code of the civil and international law, necessary for the public rights of mankind in general and thus for the realization of perpetual peace. ~ Immanuel Kant,
570:In the kingdom of ends everything has either a price or a dignity. Whatever has a price can be replaced by something else as its equivalent; on the other hand, whatever is above all price, and therefore admits of no equivalent, has a dignity. But that which constitutes the condition under which alone something can be an end in itself does not have mere relative worth, i.e., price, but an intrinsic worth, i.e., a dignity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
571:There used to be big men in the world, men of mind and power and imagination. There was St Paul and Einstein and Shakespeare…’ He had several lists of names from the past that he would rattle off grandly at such times, and they always gave me a sense of wonder to hear. ‘There was Julius Caesar and Tolstoy and Immanuel Kant. But now it’s all robots. Robots and the pleasure principle. Everybody’s head is a cheap movie show. ~ Walter Tevis,
572:...as soon as we examine suicide from the standpoint of religion we immediately see it in its true light. We have been placed in this world under certain conditions and for specific purposes. But a suicide opposes the purpose of his creator; he arrives in the other world as one who has deserted his post; he must be looked upon as a rebel against God. God is our owner; we are his property; his providence works for our good. ~ Immanuel Kant,
573:Enthusiasm is always connected with the senses, whatever be the object that excites it. The true strength of virtue is serenity of mind, combined with a deliberate and steadfast determination to execute her laws. That is the healthful condition of the moral life; on the other hand, enthusiasm, even when excited by representations of goodness, is a brilliant but feverish glow which leaves only exhaustion and languor behind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
574:That kings should be philosophers, or philosophers kings is neither to be expected nor to be desired, for the possession of power inevitably corrupts reason's free judgment. However, that kings or sovereign peoples (who rule themselves by laws of equality) should not allow the class of philosophers to disappear or to be silent, but should permit them to speak publicly is indispensable to the enlightenment of their affairs. ~ Immanuel Kant,
575:Enlightenment is man's leaving his self-caused immaturity. Immaturity is the incapacity to use one's intelligence without the guidance of another. Such immaturity is self-caused if it is not caused by lack of intelligence, but by lack of determination and courage to use one's intelligence without being guided by another. Sapere Aude! Have the courage to use your own intelligence! is therefore the motto of the enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
576:It was imagined that experiments in education were not necessary; and that, whether any thing in it was good or bad, could be judged of by the reason. But this was a great mistake; experience shows very often that results are produced precisely the opposite to those which had been expected. We also see from experiment that one generation cannot work out a complete plan of education. ~ Immanuel Kant, in his university lectures "On Pedagogy",
577:I am a humanist because I think humanity can, with constant moral guidance, create reasonably decent societies. I think that young people who want to understand the world can profit from the works of Plato and Socrates, the behaviour of the three Thomases, Aquinas, More and Jefferson — the austere analyses of Immanuel Kant and the political leadership of Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Roosevelt. [The World Is My Home (1991)] ~ James A Michener,
578:Our age is the age of criticism, to which everything must be subjected. The sacredness of religion, and the authority of legislation, are by many regarded as grounds of exemption from the examination of this tribunal. But, if they on they are exempted, they become the subjects of just suspicion, and cannot lay claim to sincere respect, which reason accords only to that which has stood the test of a free and public examination.] ~ Immanuel Kant,
579:Under Small’s influence Jefferson came to share Immanuel Kant’s 1784 definition of the spirit of the era: “Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his self-imposed immaturity,” Kant wrote.21 “Immaturity is the inability to use one’s understanding without guidance from another. This immaturity is self-imposed when its cause lies not in lack of understanding, but in lack of resolve and courage to use it without guidance from another. ~ Jon Meacham,
580:Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed nonage. Nonage is the inability to use one's own understanding without another's guidance. This nonage is self-imposed if its cause lies not in lack of understanding but in indecision and lack of courage to use one's own mind without another's guidance. Dare to know! (Sapere aude.) "Have the courage to use your own understanding," is therefore the motto of the enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
581:Hannah Arendt in her study of totalitarianism borrowed from Immanuel Kant the concept of radical evil, of evil that's so evil that in the end it destroys itself, it's so committed to evil and it's so committed to hatred and cruelty that it becomes suicidal. My definition of it is the surplus value that's generated by totalitarianism. It means you do more violence, more cruelty than you absolutely have to to stay in power. ~ Christopher Hitchens,
582:Enlightenment is the emancipation of man from a state of self-imposed tutelage... of incapacity to use his own intelligence without external guidance. Such a state of tutelage I call 'self-imposed' if it is due, not to lack of intelligence, but to lack of courage or determination to use one's own intelligence without the help of a leader. Sapere aude! Dare to use your own intelligence! This is the battle-cry of the Enlightenment. ~ Immanuel Kant,
583:A Critique of pure Reason, i.e. of our faculty of judging a priori according to principles, would be incomplete, if the Judgement, which as a cognitive faculty also makes claim to such principles, were not treated as a particular part of it; although its principles in a system of pure Philosophy need form no particular part between the theoretical and the practical, but can be annexed when needful to one or both as occasion requires. ~ Immanuel Kant,
584:To know what questions may reasonably be asked is already a great and necessary proof of sagacity and insight. For if a question is absurd in itself and calls for unnecessary answers, it not only brings disgrace to the person raising it, but may prompt an incautious listener to give absurd answers, thus presenting, as the ancients said, the laughable spectacle of one person milking a he-goat, and another holding the sieve underneath. ~ Immanuel Kant,
585:As a matter of fact, no other language in the world has received such praise as the Lithuanian language. The garlands of high honour have been taken to Lithuanian people for inventing, elaborating, and introducing the most highly developed human speech with its beautiful and clear phonology. Moreover, according to comparative philology, the Lithuanian language is best qualified to represent the primitive Aryan civilization and culture". ~ Immanuel Kant,
586:For Immanuel Kant, the term anthropology embraced all the human sciences, and laid the foundation of familiar knowledge we need, to build solidly grounded ideas about the moral and political demands of human life. Margaret Mead saw mid-twentieth-century anthropology as engaged in a project no less ambitious than Kant's own, and her Terry Lectures on Continuities in Cultural Evolution provide an excellent point to enter into her reflections. ~ Margaret Mead,
587:Would it not therefore be wiser in moral concerns to acquiesce in the judgement of common reason, or at most only to call in philosophy for the purpose of rendering the system of morals more complete and intelligible, and its rules more convenient for use (especially for disputation), but not so as to draw off the common understanding from its happy simplicity, or to bring it by means of philosophy into a new path of inquiry and instruction? ~ Immanuel Kant,
588:This spirit of freedom is expanding even where it must struggle against the external obstacles of governments that misunderstand their own function. Such governments are illuminated by the example that the existence of freedom need not give cause for the least concern regarding public order and harmony in the commonwealth. If only they refrain from inventing artifices to keep themselves in it, men will gradually raise themselves from barbarism. ~ Immanuel Kant,
589:For if we regard space and time as properties that must, as regards their possibility, be found in things in themselves, [...] then we really cannot blame the good Bishop Berkeley for degrading bodies to mere illusion. Nay, even our own existence, which would thus be made dependent on the self-subsistent reality of a non-entity such as time, would, along with this time, be changed into mere illusion - an absurdity of which hitherto no one has been guilty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
590:By putting the spotlight on the female child and framing her as the ideal of beauty, he condemns the mature woman to invisibility. In fact, the modern Western man enforces Immanuel Kant's nineteenth-century theories: To be beautiful, women have to appear childish and brainless. When a woman looks mature and self-assertive, or allows her hips to expand, she is condemned ugly. Thus, the walls of the European harem separate youthful beauty from ugly maturity. ~ Fatema Mernissi,
591:Skepticism is thus a resting-place for human reason, where it can reflect upon its dogmatic wanderings and make survey of the region in which it finds itself, so that for the future it may be able to choose its path with more certainty. But it is no dwelling-place for permanent settlement. Such can be obtained only through perfect certainty in our knowledge, alike of the objects themselves and of the limits within which all our knowledge of objects is enclosed. ~ Immanuel Kant,
592:One cannot avoid a certain feeling of disgust, when one observes the actions of man displayed on the great stage of the world. Wisdom is manifested by individuals here and there; but the web of human history as a whole appears to be woven from folly and childish vanity, often, too, from puerile wickedness and love of destruction: with the result that at the end one is puzzled to know what idea to form of our species which prides itself so much on its advantages. ~ Immanuel Kant,
593:Even if, by some especially unfortunate fate or by the niggardly provision of stepmotherly nature, [the good will] should be wholly lacking in the power to accomplish its purpose; if with the greatest effort it should yet achieve nothing, and only the good will should remain (not, to be sure, as a mere wish but as the summoning of all the means in our power), yet would it, like a jewel, still shine by its own light as something which has its full value in itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
594:A good will is good not because of what it performs or effects, not by its aptness for the attainment of some proposed end, but simply by virtue of the volition - that is, it is good in itself, and considered by itself is to be esteemed much higher than all that can be brought about by it in favor of any inclination, nay, even of the sum-total of all inclinations... like a jewel, it would still shine by its own light, as a thing which has its whole value in itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
595:We come no nearer the infinitude of the creative power of God, if we enclose the space of its revelation within a sphere described with the radius of the Milky Way, than if we were to limit it to a ball an inch in diameter. All that is finite, whatever has limits and a definite relation to unity, is equally far removed from the infinite... Eternity is not sufficient to embrace the manifestations of the Supreme Being, if it is not combined with the infinitude of space. ~ Immanuel Kant,
596:Manners or etiquette ('accessibility, affability, politeness, refinement, propriety, courtesy, and ingratiating and captivating behavior') call for no large measure of moral determination and cannot, therefore, be reckoned as virtues. Even though manners are no virtues, they are a means of developing virtue.... The more we refine the crude elements in our nature, the more we improve our humanity and the more capable it grows of feeling the driving force of virtuous principles. ~ Immanuel Kant,
597:B626
Sein ist offenbar kein reales Prädikat, d.i. ein Begriff von irgend etwas, was zu dem Begriffe eines Dinges, oder gewisser Bestimmungen an sich selbst...

B627
Und so enthält das Wirkliche nichts mehr, als das bloss Mögliche. Hundert wirkliche Thaler enthalten nicht das mindeste mehr, als hundert mögliche...

Aber in meinem Vermögenszustande ist
mehr bei hundert wirklichen Thalern, als bei dem blossen Begriffe derselben, ( d.i. ihrer Moeglichkeit ). ~ Immanuel Kant,
598:Even if a civil society were to be dissolved by the consent of all its members (e.g., if a people inhabiting an island decided to separate and disperse throughout the world), the last murderer remaining in prison would first have to be executed, so that each has done to him what his deeds deserve and blood guilt does not cling to the people for not having insisted upon this punishment; for otherwise the people can be regarded as collaborators in his public violation of justice. ~ Immanuel Kant,
599:160Any change makes me apprehensive, even if it offers the greatest promise of improving my condition, and I am persuaded by this natural instinct of mine that I must take heed if I wish that the threads which the Fates spin so thin and weak in my case to be spun to any length. My great thanks, to my well-wishers and friends, who think so kindly of me as to undertake my welfare, but at the same time a most humble request to protect me in my current condition from any disturbance. ~ Immanuel Kant,
600:Reason must approach nature with the view, indeed, of receiving information from it, not, however, in the character of a pupil, who listens to all that his master chooses to tell him, but in that of a judge, who compels the witnesses to reply to those questions which he himself thinks fit to propose. To this single idea must the revolution be ascribed, by which, after groping in the dark for so many centuries, natural science was at length conducted into the path of certain progress. ~ Immanuel Kant,
601:...[R]eason of itself, independent on all experience, ordains what ought to take place, that accordingly actions of which perhaps the world has hitherto never given an example, the feasibility even if which might be very much doubted by one who founds everything on experience, are nevertheless inflexibly commanded by reason; that, for example, even though there might never yet have been a sincere friend, yet not a whit the less is pure sincerity in friendship required of every man... ~ Immanuel Kant,
602:[S]uppose the mind of [a] friend of humanity were clouded over with his own grief, extinguishing all sympathetic participation in the fate of others; he still has the resources to be beneficent to those suffering distress, but the distress of others does not touch him because he is sufficiently busy with his own; and now, where no inclination any longer stimulates him to it, he tears himself out of his deadly insensibility and does the action without any inclination, solely from duty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
603:All crimina carnis contra naturam debase the human condition below that of the animal, and make man unworthy of his humanity; he then no longer deserves to be a person, and such conduct is the most ignoble and degraded that a man can engage in, with regard to the duties he has towards himself. Suicide is certainly the most dreadful thing that a man can do to himself, but is not so base and ignoble as these crimina carnis contra naturam which are the most contemptible acts a man can commit. ~ Immanuel Kant,
604:Nothing can better express the feelings of the scientist towards the great unity of the laws of nature than in Immanuel Kant's words: "Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing awe: the stars above me and the moral law within me."... Would he, who did not yet know of the evolution of the world of organisms, be shocked that we consider the moral law within us not as something given, a priori, but as something which has arisen by natural evolution, just like the laws of the heavens? ~ Konrad Lorenz,
605:Beneficence is a duty. He who frequently practices it, and sees his benevolent intentions realized, at length comes really to love him to whom he has done good. When, therefore, it is said, "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself," it is not meant, thou shalt love him first and do him good in consequence of that love, but, thou shalt do good to thy neighbor; and this thy beneficence will engender in thee that love to mankind which is the fulness and consummation of the inclination to do good. ~ Immanuel Kant,
606:But to unite in a permanent religious institution which is not to be subject to doubt before the public even in the lifetime of one man, and thereby to make a period of time fruitless in the progress of mankind toward improvement, thus working to the disadvantage of posterity - that is absolutely forbidden. For himself (and only for a short time) a man may postpone enlightenment in what he ought to know, but to renounce it for posterity is to injure and trample on the rights of mankind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
607:The problem of organizing a state, however hard it may seem, can be solved even for a race of devils, if only they are intelligent. The problem is: "Given a multitude of rational beings requiring universal laws for their preservation, but each of whom is secretly inclined to exempt himself from them, to establish a constitution in such a way that, although their private intentions conflict, they check each other, with the result that their public conduct is the same as if they had no such intentions. ~ Immanuel Kant,
608:Deficiency in judgement is properly that which is called stupidity; and for such a failing we know no remedy. A dull or narrow-minded person, to whom nothing is wanting but a proper degree of understanding, may be improved by tuition, even so far as to deserve the epithet of learned. But as such persons frequently labour under a deficiency in the faculty of judgement, it is not uncommon to find men extremely learned who in the application of their science betray a lamentable degree this irremediable want.] ~ Immanuel Kant,
609:...[M]an and generally any rational being exists as an end in himself, not merely as a means to be arbitrarily used by this or that will, but in all his actions, whether they concern himself or other rational beings, must always be regarded at the same time as an end... [R]ational beings... are called persons, because their very nature points them out as ends in themselves, that is, as something which must not be used merely as means, and so far therefore restricts freedom of action (and is an object of respect). ~ Immanuel Kant,
610:The disease of the hypochondriac consists in this: that certain bodily sensations do not so much indicate a really existing disease in the body as rather merely excite apprehensions of its existence: and human nature is so constituted – a trait which the animal lacks – that it is able to strengthen or make permanent local impressions simply by paying attention to them, whereas an abstraction – whether produced on purpose or by other diverting occupations – lessen these impressions, or even effaces them altogether. ~ Immanuel Kant,
611:Those who thought they could distinguish philosophy from mathematics by saying that the former was concerned with quality only, the latter with quantity only, mistook effect for cause. It is owing to the form of mathematical knowledge that it can refer to quanta only, because it is only the concept of quantities that admits of construction, that is, of a priori representation in intuition, while qualities cannot be represented in any but empirical intuition. ~ Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason (1781) Tr. Max Müller (1881) p. 612.,
612:Il difetto di giudizio è propriamente quello che si chiama stupidità, difetto cui non c'è modo di arrecare rimedio. Una testa ottusa o limitata, alla quale non manchi altro che un conveniente grado di intelletto […], si può ben armare mediante l'insegnamento fino a farne magari un dotto. Ma, poiché in tal caso di solito avviene che sia sempre in difetto di giudizio […], non è raro il caso di uomini assai dotti, i quali nell'uso della loro scienza lasciano spesso scorgere quel tal difetto, che non si lascia mai correggere. ~ Immanuel Kant,
613:It is said that the spirits of the night are alarmed when they catch sight of the executioner’s sword: how then must they be alarmed when they are confronted by Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason! This book is the sword with which deism was put to death in Germany. Frankly, in comparison with us Germans, you French are tame and moderate. You have at most been able to kill a king . . . Immanuel Kant has stormed . . . heaven, he has put the whole crew to the sword, the Supreme Lord of the world swims unproven in his own blood. ~ Heinrich Heine,
614:The usual touchstone of whether what someone asserts is mere persuasion or at least a subjective conviction, i.e., firm belief, is betting. Often someone pronounces his propositions with such confident and inflexible defiance that he seems to have entirely laid aside all concern for error. A bet disconcerts him. Sometimes he reveals that he is persuaded enough for one ducat but not for ten. For he would happily bet one, but at ten he suddenly becomes aware of what he had not previously noticed, namely that it is quite possible that he has erred. ~ Immanuel Kant,
615:Mathematics, natural science, laws, arts, even morality, etc. do not completely fill the soul; there is always a space left over reserved for pure and speculative reason, the emptiness of which prompts us to seek in vagaries, buffooneries, and mysticism for what seems to be employment and entertainment, but what actually is mere pastime undertaken in order to deaden the troublesome voice of reason, which, in accordance with its nature, requires something that can satisfy it and does not merely subserve other ends or the interests of our inclinations. ~ Immanuel Kant,
616:The state of peace among men living side by side is not the natural state (status naturalis); the natural state is one of war. This does not always mean open hostilities, but at least an unceasing threat of war. A state of peace, therefore, must be established, for in order to be secured against hostility it is not sufficient that hostilities simply be not committed; and, unless this security is pledged to each by his neighbor (a thing that can occur only in a civil state), each may treat his neighbor, from whom he demands this security, as an enemy.3 ~ Immanuel Kant,
617:Even the song of birds, which we can bring under no musical rule, seems to have more freedom, and therefore more for taste, than a song of a human being which is produced in accordance with all the rules of music; for we very much sooner weary of the latter, if it is repeated often and at length. Here, however, we probably confuse our participation in the mirth of a little creature that we love, with the beauty of its song; for if this were exactly imitated by man (as sometimes the notes of the nightingale are) it would seem to our ear quite devoid of taste. ~ Immanuel Kant,
618:Since in early youth it cannot be known what ends are likely to occur to us in the course of life, parents seek to have their children taught a great many things, and provide for their skill in the use of means for all sorts of arbitrary ends, of none of which can they determine whether it may not perhaps hereafter be an object to determine their pupil, but which it is at all events possible that he might aim at; and this anxiety is so great that they commonly neglect to form and correct their judgement on the value of the things which may be chosen as ends. ~ Immanuel Kant,
619:The domestic Relations are founded on Marriage, and Marriage is founded upon the natural Reciprocity or intercommunity (commercium) of the Sexes. [This ' usus ' is either natural, by which human beings may reproduce their own kind, or unnatural, which, again, refers either to a person of the same sex or to an animal of another species than man. These transgressions of all Law, as ' crimina carnis contra naturam,' are even 'not to be named;' and as wrongs against all Humanity in the Person they cannot be saved, by any limitation or exception whatever, from entire reprobation.] ~ Immanuel Kant,
620:But where only a free play of our presentational powers is to be sustained, as in the case of pleasure gardens, room decoration, all sorts of useful utensils, and so on, any regularity that has an air of constraint is [to be] avoided as much as possible. That is why the English taste in gardens, or the baroque taste in furniture, carries the imagination's freedom very far, even to the verge of the grotesque, because it is precisely this divorce from any constraint of a rule that the case is posited where taste can show its greatest perfection in designs made by the imagination. ~ Immanuel Kant,
621:This can never become popular, and, indeed, has no occasion to be so; for fine-spun arguments in favour of useful truths make just as little impression on the public mind as the equally subtle objections brought against these truths. On the other hand, since both inevitably force themselves on every man who rises to the height of speculation, it becomes the manifest duty of the schools to enter upon a thorough investigation of the rights of speculative reason, and thus to prevent the scandal which metaphysical controversies are sure, sooner or later, to cause even to the masses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
622:But under a constitution where the subject is not a citizen, and which is therefore not republican, it is the simplest thing in the world to go to war. For the head of state is not a fellow citizen, but the owner of the state, and a war will not force him to make the slightest sacrifice so far as his banquets, hunts, pleasure palaces and court festivals are concerned. He can thus decide on war, without any significant reason, as a kind of amusement, and unconcernedly leave it to the diplomatic corps (who are always ready for such purposes) to justify the war for the sake of propriety. ~ Immanuel Kant,
623:LOS LÍMITES MORALES DEL MERCADO En el reino de los fines todo tiene un precio o una dignidad. Aquello que tiene precio puede ser sustituido por algo equivalente; en cambio, lo que se halla por encima de todo precio y, por tanto, no admite nada equivalente, eso tiene una dignidad. IMMANUEL KANT[20] Si pagamos a un niño un dólar por leerse un libro, como se ha intentado en ciertos colegios, no solo le creamos la expectativa de que leer le puede aportar dinero, también corremos el riesgo de privar al niño para siempre del valor de la lectura. Los mercados no son inocentes. MICHAEL SANDEL[21 ~ Jean Tirole,
624:(On the seeming futility of metaphysics) Why then has nature afflicted our reason with the restless striving for such a path, as if it were one of reason's most important occupations? Still more, how little cause have we to place trust in our reason if in one of the most important parts of our desire for knowledge it does not merely forsake us but even entices us with delusions and in the end betrays us!

Or if the path has merely eluded us so far, what indications may we use that might lead us to hope that in renewed attempts we will be luckier than those who have gone before us? ~ Immanuel Kant,
625:To be beneficent when we can is a duty; and besides this, there are many minds so sympathetically constituted that, without any other motive of vanity or self-interest, they find a pleasure in spreading joy around them, and can take delight in the satisfaction of others so far as it is their own work. But I maintain that in such a case an action of this kind, however proper, however amiable it may be, has nevertheless no true moral worth, but is on a level with other inclinations. . . . For the maxim lacks the moral import, namely, that such actions be done from duty, not from inclination. ~ Immanuel Kant,
626:[It] is nevertheless better than the theological concept, of deriving morality from a divine, all-perfect will, not merely because we do not intuit this perfection, but can derive it solely from our concepts, of which morality is the foremost one, but because if we do not do this (which, if we did, would be a crude circle in explanation), the concept of his will that is left over to us, the attributes of the desire for glory and domination, bound up with frightful representations of power and vengeance, would have to make a foundation for a system of morals that is directly opposed to morality. ~ Immanuel Kant,
627:...[T]here is no art in being intelligible if one renounces all thoroughness of insight; but also it produces a disgusting medley of compiled observations and half-reasoned principles. Shallow pates enjoy this because it can be used for everyday chat, but the sagacious find in it only confusion, and being unsatisfied and unable to help themselves, they turn away their eyes, while philosophers, who see quite well through this delusion, are little listened to when they call men off for a time from this pretended popularity in order that they might be rightfully popular after they have attained a definite insight. ~ Immanuel Kant,
628:An age cannot bind itself and ordain to put the succeeding one into such a condition that it cannot extend its (at best very occasional) knowledge , purify itself of errors, and progress in general enlightenment. That would be a crime against human nature, the proper destination of which lies precisely in this progress and the descendants would be fully justified in rejecting those decrees as having been made in an unwarranted and malicious manner.

The touchstone of everything that can be concluded as a law for a people lies in the question whether the people could have imposed such a law on itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
629:But there are also remarkable differences between the two. The Beautiful in nature is connected with the form of the object, which consists in having boundaries. The Sublime, on the other hand, is to be found in a formless object, so far as in it or by occasion of it boundlessness is represented, and yet its totality is also present to thought. Thus the Beautiful seems to be regarded as the presentation of an indefinite concept of Understanding; the Sublime as that of a like concept of Reason. Therefore the satisfaction in the one case is bound up with the representation of quality, in the other with that of quantity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
630:Job says what he thinks and feels, and how every person would likely feel in his position. His friends, on the other hand, talk as if they were secretly being watched by the powerful Ruler whose case is open to their verdict, and as if, in making their verdict, they cared more about winning His favor than about the truth. This trickery of maintaining something just to keep up appearances, contrary to their true beliefs, feigning a conviction they did not have, stands in stark contrast to Job’s candor, which is so far removed from flattery that it borders on audacity, but nevertheless casts him in a very favorable light. ~ Immanuel Kant,
631:One age cannot bind itself, and thus conspire, to place a succeeding one in a condition whereby it would be impossible for the later age to expand its knowledge (particularly where it is so very important), to rid itself of errors, and generally to increase its enlightenment. That would be a crime against human nature, whose essential destiny lies precisely in such progress; subsequent generations are thus completely justified in dismissing such agreements as unauthorized and criminal. The criterion of everything that can be agreed upon as a law by a people lies in this question: Can a people impose such a law on itself? ~ Immanuel Kant,
632:Such is the genesis of these general convictions of mankind, so far as they depend on rational grounds; and this public property not only remains undisturbed, but is even raised to greater importance, by the doctrine that the schools have no right to arrogate to themselves a more profound insight into a matter of general human concernment than that to which the great mass of men, ever held by us in the highest estimation, can without difficulty attain, and that the schools should, therefore, confine themselves to the elaboration of these universally comprehensible and, from a moral point of view, amply satisfactory proofs. ~ Immanuel Kant,
633:[Standing armies] constantly threaten other nations with war by giving the appearance that they are prepared for it, which goads nations into competing with one another in the number of men under arms, and this practice knows no bounds. And since the costs related to maintaining peace will in this way finally become greater than those of a short war, standing armies are the cause of wars of aggression that are intended to end burdensome expenditures. Moreover, paying men to kill or be killed appears to use them as mere machines and tools in the hands of another (the nation), which is inconsistent with the rights of humanity. ~ Immanuel Kant,
634:...new prejudices will serve as well as old ones to harness the great unthinking masses.

For this enlightenment, however, nothing is required but freedom, and indeed the most harmless among all the things to which this term can properly be applied. It is the freedom to make public use of one's reason at every point. But I hear on all sides, 'Do not argue!' The Officer says: 'Do not argue but drill!' The tax collector: 'Do not argue but pay!' The cleric: 'Do not argue but believe!' Only one prince in the world says, 'Argue as much as you will, and about what you will, but obey!' Everywhere there is restriction on freedom. ~ Immanuel Kant,
635:La sencillez y sobriedad de la naturaleza promueven y configuran en el hombre sólo nociones comunes y una tosca honestidad. La coacción artificial y la opulencia de la organización civil [de la sociedad] dan lugar a hombres ingeniosos y razonadores, si bien en ocasiones también a locos (Narren) y tramposos (Betrüger), y genera la sabia u honesta apariencia que permite carecer tanto de entendimiento como de honradez, siempre que el bello velo que el decoro extiende sobre las secretas dolencias (Gebrechen) de la cabeza o del corazón sea tupido y suficientemente tejido.
Immanuel Kant, Ensayo sobre las enfermedades de la cabeza ~ Immanuel Kant,
636:Ce dernier talent correspond proprement à ce qu’on appelle l’âme ; car exprimer et rendre universellement communicable ce qu’il y a d’indicible dans l’état d’esprit associé à une certaine représentation – et ce, que l’expression relève du langage, de la peinture ou de la plastique -, cela requiert un pouvoir d’appréhender le jeu si fugace de l’imagination et de le synthétiser dans un concept qui se peut communiquer sans la contrainte de règles (un concept qui, précisément pour cette raison, est original et fait apparaître en même temps une règle nouvelle qui n’a pu résulter d’aucun principe ou d’aucun exemple qui l’eusse précédée). ~ Immanuel Kant,
637:All rational knowledge is either material, and concerns some objects, or formal, and is occupied only with the form of understanding and reason itself and with the universal rules of thinking, without regard to distinctions among objects.

formal philosophy is called logic. Material philosophy, however, which has to do with definite object objects and the laws to which they are subject, is divided into two parts. This is because these laws are either laws of nature or laws of freedom. The science of the former is called physics, and that of the latter ethics. The former is also called theory of nature and the latter theory of morals. ~ Immanuel Kant,
638:follows.—If, as is inevitably the case under this constitution, the consent of the citizens is required to decide whether or not war is to be declared, it is very natural that they will have great hesitation in embarking on so dangerous an enterprise. For this would mean calling down on themselves all the miseries of war, such as doing the fighting themselves, supplying the costs of the war from their own resources, painfully making good the ensuing devastation, and, as the crowning evil, having to take upon themselves a burden of debt which will embitter peace itself and which can never be paid off on account of the constant threat of new wars. ~ Immanuel Kant,
639:Space is only the form of external intuition, and not a real object that could be perceived externally, nor is it a correlate of phenomena, but the form of phenomena themselves. Space, therefore, cannot exist absolutely (by itself) as something determining the existence of things, because it is no object, but only the form of possible objects. Things, therefore, as phenomenal, may indeed determine space, that is, impart reality to one or other of its predicates (quality and relation); but space, on the other side, as something existing by itself, cannot determine the reality of things in regard to quantity or form, because it is nothing real in itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
640:As long ago as 1795, in an essay titled Perpetual Peace, Immanuel Kant worked out what such deterrence ultimately leads to: “A war, therefore, which might cause the destruction of both parties at once … would permit the conclusion of a perpetual peace only upon the vast burial-ground of the human species.”22 (Kant’s book title came from an innkeeper’s sign featuring a cemetery—not the type of perpetual peace most of us strive for.) Deterrence acts as only a temporary solution to the Hobbesian temptation to strike first, allowing both Leviathans to go about their business in relative peace, settling for small proxy wars in swampy Third World countries. ~ Michael Shermer,
641:Deists and theists both believe in the existence of a personal God. The deist, Immanuel Kant said, believes in a God, but theists believe in a living God, an acting God, such as is seen in the familiar biblical stories, while deists do not. So with regard to the intervention and presence of God in human life, deists believe much as atheists do—except old-fashioned deists often held the belief that God has a moral claim upon human lives and even that “in the end” they would stand before his judgment. In practical terms, however, contemporary deists are indistinguishable from atheists. The often rather intense moral interest of earlier deists2 has now vanished. ~ Dallas Willard,
642:It is a remark which needs no subtle reflection to make, but which we may assume that even the commonest understanding can make, although it be after its fashion by an obscure discernment of judgment which it calls feeling, that all the 'ideas' that come to us involuntarily (as those of the senses) do not enable us to know objects otherwise than as they affect us; so that what they may be in themselves remains unknown to us, and consequently that as regards 'ideas' of this kind even with the closest attention and clearness that the understanding can apply to them, we can by them only attain to the knowledge of appearances, never to that of things in themselves. ~ Immanuel Kant,
643:Laziness and cowardice are the reasons why so great a portion of mankind, after nature has long since discharged them from external direction (naturaliter maiorennes), nevertheless remains under lifelong tutelage, and why it is so easy for others to set themselves up as their guardians. It is so easy not to be of age. If I have a book which understands for me, a pastor who has a conscience for me, a physician who decides my diet, and so forth, I need not trouble myself. I need not think, if I can only pay - others will easily undertake the irksome work for me.

That the step to competence is held to be very dangerous by the far greater portion of mankind... ~ Immanuel Kant,
644:Reality—according to the most stringent interpretation of the scientific data—is created by or at least correlative with the observer. It is in this light that natural philosophy needs now to be reinterpreted, with science placing a new emphasis on those special properties of life that make it fundamental to material reality. Yet even back then in the eighteenth century, Immanuel Kant, ahead of his time, said that “we must rid ourselves of the notion that space and time are actual qualities in things in themselves . . . all bodies, together with the space in which they are, must be considered nothing but mere representations in us, and exist nowhere but in our thoughts. ~ Robert Lanza,
645:Although there is a difference of procedure between a Shaman of the Tungas and a Catholic prelate of Europe or between a coarse and sensual Vogul and a Puritan Independent of Connecticut, there is no difference in the principle of their creeds; for they all belong to the same category of people whose religion consists not in becoming better, but in believing in and carrying out certain arbitrary regulations. Only those who believe that the worship of God consists in aspiring to a better life differ from the first because they recognize quite another and certainly a loftier principle uniting all men of good faith in an invisible temple which alone can be the universal temple. ~ Immanuel Kant,
646:...We find that the more a cultivated reason applies itself with deliberate purpose to the enjoyment of life and happiness, so much the more does the man fail of true satisfaction... even from the sciences... they find that they have, in fact, only brought more trouble on their shoulders rather than gained in happiness; and they end by envying rather than despising the more common stamp of men who keep closer to the guidance of mere instinct, and do not allow their reason much influence on their conduct... [T]here lies at the root of these judgments the idea that our existence has a different and far nobler end, for which, and not for happiness, reason is properly intended... ~ Immanuel Kant,
647:Here then we see philosophy brought to a critical position, since it has to be firmly fixed, notwithstanding that it has nothing to support it in heaven or earth. Here it must show its purity as absolute director of its own laws, not the herald of those which are whispered to it by an implanted sense or who knows what tutelary nature. Although these may be better than nothing, yet they can never afford principles dictated by reason, which must have their source wholly a priori and thence their commanding authority, expecting everything from the supremacy of the the law and due respect for it, nothing from inclination, or else condemning the man to self-contempt and inward abhorrence. ~ Immanuel Kant,
648:A man abandoned by himself on a desert island would adorn neither his hut nor his person; nor would he seek for flowers, still less would he plant them, in order to adorn himself therewith. It is only in society that it occurs to him to be not merely a man, but a refined man after his kind (the beginning of civilization). For such do we judge him to be who is both inclined and apt to communicate his pleasure to others, and who is not contented with an object if he cannot feel satisfaction in it in common with others. Again, every one expects and requires from every one else this reference to universal communication of pleasure, as it were from an original compact dictated by humanity itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
649:What then is it which justifies virtue or the morally good disposition, in making such lofty claims? It is nothing less than the privilege it secures to the rational being of participating in the giving of universal laws, by which it qualifies him to be a member of a possible kingdom of ends, a privilege to which he was already destined by his own nature as being an end in himself, and on that account legislating in the kingdom of ends; free as regards all laws of physical nature, and obeying those only which he himself gives, and by which his maxims can belong to a system of universal law, to which at the same time he submits himself. For nothing has any worth except what the law assigns it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
650:...[R]eason issues its commands unyieldingly, without promising anything to the inclinations, and, as it were, with disregard and contempt for these claims, which are so impetuous and at the same time so plausible, and which will not allow themselves to be suppressed by any command. Hence there arises a natural dialectic, that is, a disposition to argue against these strict laws of duty and to question their validity, or at least their purity and strictness; and, if possible, to make them more accordant with our wishes and inclinations, that is to say, to corrupt them at their very source and entirely to destroy their worth-a thing which even common practical reason cannot ultimately call good. ~ Immanuel Kant,
651:It is difficult for the isolated individual to work himself out of the immaturity which has become almost natural for him. He has even become fond of it and for the time being is incapable of employing his own intelligence, because he has never been allowed to make the attempt. Statutes and formulas, these mechanical tools of a serviceable use, or rather misuse, of his natural faculties, are the ankle-chains of a continuous immaturity. Whoever threw it off would make an uncertain jump over the smallest trench because he is not accustomed to such free movement. Therefore there are only a few who have pursued a firm path and have succeeded in escaping from immaturity by their own cultivation of the mind. ~ Immanuel Kant,
652:Now the ground of this evil cannot be placed, as is so commonly done, in man's senses and the natural inclinations to evil (rather do they afford the occasion for what the moral disposition in its power can manifest, namely, virtue); we cannot, must not even be considered responsible for their existence since they are not implanted in us and we are not their authors. We are accountable, however, for the propensity to evil, which, as it affects the morality of the subject, is to be found in him as a free-acting being and for which it must be possible to hold him accountable as the offender--this, too, despite the fact that this propensity is so deeply rooted in the will that we are forced to say that it is to be found in man by nature. ~ Immanuel Kant,
653:By this freedom the will of a rational being, as belonging to the sensuous world, recognizes itself to be, like all other efficient causes, necessarily subject to the laws of causality, while in practical matters, in its other aspect as a being in itself, it is conscious of its existence as determinable in an intelligible order of things. It is conscious of this not by virtue of a particular intuition of itself but because of certain dynamic laws which determine its causality in the world of sense, for it has been sufficiently proved in another place that if freedom is attributed to us, it transfers us into an intelligible order of things."

―from Critique of Practical Reason . Translated, with an Introduction by Lewis White Beck, p. 43. ~ Immanuel Kant,
654:[To think for oneself] is the maxim of a reason never passive. The tendency to such passivity, and therefore to heteronomy of reason, is called prejudice; and the greatest prejudice of all is to represent nature as not subject to the rules that the understanding places at its basis by means of its own essential law, i.e. is superstition. Deliverance from superstition is called enlightenment; because although this name belongs to deliverance from prejudices in general, yet superstition especially (in sensu eminenti) deserves to be called a prejudice. For the blindness in which superstition places us, which it even imposes on us as an obligation, makes the need of being guided by others, and the consequent passive state of our reason, peculiarly noticeable. ~ Immanuel Kant,
655:Metaphysics... is nothing but the inventory of all we possess through pure reason, ordered systematically. Nothing here can escape us, because what reason brings forth entirely out of itself cannot be hidden, but is brought to light by reason itself as soon as reason's common principle has been discovered. The perfect unity of this kind of cognition, and the fact that it arises solely out of pure concepts without any influence that would extend or increase it from experience or even particular intuition, which would lead to a determinate experience, make this unconditioned completeness not only feasible but also necessary. Tecum habita, et noris quam sit tibi curta supellex. Dwell in your own house, and you will know how simple your possessions are. - Persius ~ Immanuel Kant,
656:Objectively (i.e., in theory) there is utterly no conflict between morality and politics. But subjectively (in the self-seeking inclinations of men, which, because they are not based on maxims of reason, must not be called the [sphere of] practice [Praxis]) this conflict will always remain, as well it should; for it serves as the whetstone of virtue, whose true courage (according to the principle, “tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito”)35 in the present case consists not so much in resolutely standing up to the evils and sacrifices that must be taken on; rather, it consists in detecting, squarely facing, and conquering the deceit of the evil principle in ourselves, which is the more dangerously devious and treacherous because it excuses all our transgressions with an appeal to human nature’s frailty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
657:We have seen, therefore, that I am not allowed even to *assume*, for the sake of the necessary practical use of my reason *God, freedom, immortality*, unless at the same time *I deprive* speculative reason of its pretensions to transcendent insights. Reason, namely, in order to arrive at these, must employ principles which extend only to objects of possible experience, and which, if in spite of this they are applied also to what cannot be an object of experience, actually always change this into an appearance, thus rendering all practical *expansion* of pure reason impossible. Hence I had to suspend *knowledge* in order to make room for *belief*. For the dogmatism of metaphysics without a preceding critique of pure reason, is the source of all that disbelief which opposes morality and which is always very dogmatic. ~ Immanuel Kant,
658:The first impression of the writings of Mr. J. J. Rousseau received by a knowledgeable reader, who is reading for something more than vanity or to kill time, is that he is encountering a lucidity of mind, a noble impulse of genius and a sensitive soul of such a high level that perhaps never an author of whatever epoch or of whatever people has been able to possess in combination.
The impression that immediately follows is bewilderment over the strange and contradictory opinions, which so oppose those which are in general circulation that one can easily come to the suspicion that the author, by virtue of his extraordinary talent, wishes to show off only the force of his bewitching wit and through the magic of rhetoric make himself something apart who through captivating novelties stands out among all rivals at wit. ~ Immanuel Kant,
659:La propia guerra, sin embargo, no necesita ningún motivo especial, sino que parece que está inserta en la naturaleza humana e, incluso, parece estar considerada como algo noble, a lo que el hombre tiende por un impulso de honor desprovisto de egoísmo, de modo que tanto los salvajes americanos como los europeos en la época de la caballería estiman que el coraje guerrero tiene un gran valor natural, no sólo cuando hay guerra -lo cual es razonable- sino que estiman también valioso que haya guerra, y con frecuencia se han comenzado guerras para mostrar simplemente aquel coraje, con lo que le dan a la guerra una dignidad intrínseca, hasta el punto de que algunos filósofos alaban la guerra como un cierto ennoblecimiento de la humanidad, olvidándose del dicho de aquel griego: "lo malo de la guerra es que hace más gente mala que la que se lleva". ~ Immanuel Kant,
660:If, of course, there is neither freedom nor any moral law based on freedom, but only a state in which everything that happens or can happen simply obeys the mechanical workings of nature, politics would mean the art of utilising nature for the government of men, and this would constitute the whole of practical wisdom; the concept of right would then be only an empty idea. But if we consider it absolutely necessary to couple the concept of right with politics, or even to make it a limiting condition of politics, it must be conceded that the two are compatible. And I can indeed imagine a moral politician, i.e. someone who conceives of the principles of political expediency in such a way that they can co-exist with morality, but I cannot imagine a political moralist, i.e. one who fashions his morality to suit his own advantage as a statesman. ~ Immanuel Kant,
661:A good will is good not because of what it effects, or accomplishes, not because of its fitness to attain some intended end, but good just by its willing, i.e. in itself; and, considered by itself, it is to be esteemed beyond compare much higher than anything that could ever be brought about by it in favor of some inclinations, and indeed, if you will, the sum of all inclinations. Even if by some particular disfavor of fate, or by the scanty endowment of a stepmotherly nature, this will should entirely lack the capacity to carry through its purpose; if despite its greatest striving it should still accomplish nothing, and only the good will were to remain (not of course, as a mere wish, but as the summoning of all means that are within our control); then, like a jewel, it would still shine by itself, as something that has full worth in itself". ~ Immanuel Kant,
662:Enlightenment thought was marked by two great attempts to ground ethics in something other than tradition. One belonged to the Scottish enlightenment – David Hume and Adam Smith – who sought it in emotion: the natural sympathy of human beings for one another.[8] The other was constructed by Immanuel Kant on the basis of reason. It was illogical to prescribe one ethical rule for some people and another for others. Reason is universal, argued Kant; therefore an ethic of reason would provide for universal respect (“Treat each person as an end in himself”).[9] Neither succeeded. In the twentieth century, villages and townships where Jews had lived for almost a thousand years witnessed their mass murder or deportation to the extermination camps with little or no protest. Neither Kantian reason nor Humean emotion were strong enough to inoculate Europe against genocide. ~ Jonathan Sacks,
663:A will whose maxims necessarily coincide with the laws of autonomy is a holy will, good absolutely. The dependence of a will not absolutely good on the principle of autonomy (moral necessitation) is obligation. This, then, cannot be applied to a holy being. The objective necessity of actions from obligation is called duty. From what has just been said, it is easy to see how it happens that, although the conception of duty implies subjection to the law, we yet ascribe a certain dignity and sublimity to the person who fulfills all his duties. There is not, indeed, any sublimity in him, so far as he is subject to the moral law; but inasmuch as in regard to that very law he is likewise a legislator, and on that account alone subject to it, he has sublimity. We have also shown above that neither fear nor inclination, but simply respect for the law, is the spring which can give actions a moral worth. ~ Immanuel Kant,
664:The world outside of me has no meaning independent of my thinking it. (pauses to look) I look out of the window. A garden. Trees. Grass. A young woman in a chair reading a book. I think: chair. So she is sitting. I think: book. So she is reading. Now the young woman touches her hair where it's come undone. But how can we be sure there is a world of phenomena, a woman reading in a garden? Perhaps the only thing that's real is my sensory experience, which has the form of a woman reading- in a universe which is in fact empty! But Immanuel Kant says- no! Because what I perceive as reality includes concepts which I cannot experience through the senses. Time and space. Cause and effect. Relations between things. Without me there is something wrong with this picture. The trees, the grass, the woman are merely- oh, she's coming! (nervously)- she's coming in here-! I say, don't leave!-where are you going? ~ Tom Stoppard,
665:In 2003, while working on my third book of poetry, I read an essay on Wheatley written by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., in The New Yorker. It was an excerpt from his soon-to-be-published book, a treatment of Wheatley juxtaposed against the racism of Enlightenment scholars such as Immanuel Kant, and more specifically, Thomas Jefferson. As someone who explored American history in my poetry, I found Gates’s thesis fascinating: He believed Wheatley was important in dispelling derisive eighteenth-century notions about black humanity; her poetry had rebutted Kant’s ordering of the nations with Africans down at the very bottom. Because of Wheatley’s important symbolism for black humanity, Thomas Jefferson’s negative response to Wheatley’s poetry—“[t]he compositions published under her name are below the dignity of criticism”—was a symbol as well. It meant that the struggle for black equality on all fronts was not yet won. ~ Jesmyn Ward,
666:Hume’s purported fideism had serious impact on some religious thinkers. One of these, the German philosopher J. G. Hamann, decided that Hume, intentionally or not, was the greatest voice of religious orthodoxy—for insisting that there was no rational basis for religious belief, and that there was no rational evidence for Christianity. When the Dialogues appeared, Hamann became quite excited; he translated the first and last dialogues into German so that Immanuel Kant might read them and become a serious Christian. Hamann’s use of Hume as the voice of orthodoxy led the great Danish theologian Soren Kierkegaard to become the most important advocate of fideistic Christianity in the nineteenth century. So, although most of Hume’s influence has been in creating doubts and leading thinkers to question accepted religious views, he also played an important role in the development of fideistic orthodoxy, culminating in Kierkegaard’s views. ~ David Hume,
667:A man shouldn’t claim to know even himself as he really is by knowing himself through inner sensation—i.e. by introspection. For since he doesn’t produce himself (so to speak) or get his concept of himself a priori but only empirically, it is natural that he gets his knowledge of himself through inner sense and consequently only through how his nature appears and how his consciousness is affected. But beyond the character of his own subject, which is made up out of these mere appearances, he necessarily assumes something else underlying it, namely his I as it is in itself. Thus in respect to mere perception and receptivity to sensations he must count himself as belonging to the sensible world; but in respect to whatever pure activity there may be in himself (which reaches his consciousness directly and not by affecting the inner or outer senses) he must count himself as belonging to the intellectual world—though he doesn’t know anything more about it. ~ Immanuel Kant,
668:It falls into this difficulty without any fault of its own. It begins with principles, which cannot be dispensed with in the field of experience, and the truth and sufficiency of which are, at the same time, insured by experience. With these principles it rises, in obedience to the laws of its own nature, to ever higher and more remote conditions. But it quickly discovers that, in this way, its labours must remain ever incomplete, because new questions never cease to present themselves; and thus it finds itself compelled to have recourse to principles which transcend the region of experience, while they are regarded by common sense without distrust. It thus falls into confusion and contradictions, from which it conjectures the presence of latent errors, which, however, it is unable to discover, because the principles it employs, transcending the limits of experience, cannot be tested by that criterion. The arena of these endless contests is called Metaphysic. ~ Immanuel Kant,
669:A man reduced to despair by a series of misfortunes feels wearied of life, but is still so far in possession of his reason that he can ask himself whether it would not be contrary to his duty to himself to take his own life. Now he inquires whether the maxim of his action could become a universal law of nature. His maxim is: From self-love I adopt it as a principle to shorten my life when its longer duration is likely to bring more evil than satisfaction. It is asked then simply whether this principle founded on self-love can become a universal law of nature. Now we see at once that a system of nature of which it should be a law to destroy life by means of the very feeling whose special nature it is to impel to the improvement of life would contradict itself, and therefore could not exist as a system of nature; hence that maxim cannot possibly exist as a universal law of nature, and consequently would be wholly inconsistent with the supreme principle of all duty. ~ Immanuel Kant,
670:Despite the great wealth of words which European languages possess, the thinker finds himself often at a loss for an expression exactly suited to his conception, for want of which he is unable to make himself intelligible either to others or to himself. To coin new words is a pretension to legislation in language which is seldom successful; and, before recourse is taken to so desperate an expedient, it is advisable to examine the dead and learned languages, with the hope and the probability that we may there meet with some adequate expression of the notion we have in our minds. In this case, even if the original meaning of the word has become somewhat uncertain, from carelessness or want of caution on the part of the authors of it, it is always better to adhere to and confirm its proper meaning– even although it may be doubtful whether it was formerly used in exactly this sense– than to make our labour vain by want of sufficient care to render ourselves intelligible. ~ Immanuel Kant,
671:[A man] finds in himself a talent which with the help of some culture might make him a useful man in many respects. But he finds himself in comfortable circumstances and prefers to indulge in pleasure rather than to take pains in enlarging and improving his happy natural capacities. He asks, however, whether his maxim of neglect of his natural gifts, besides agreeing with his inclination to indulgence, agrees also with what is called duty. He sees then that a system of nature could indeed subsist with such a universal law, [where] men... let their talents rest and resolve to devote their lives merely to idleness, amusement, and propagation of their species - in a word, to enjoyment; but he cannot possibly will that this should be a universal law of nature, or be implanted in us as such by a natural instinct. For, as a rational being, he necessarily wills that his faculties be developed, since they serve him, and have been given him, for all sorts of possible purposes. ~ Immanuel Kant,
672:I maintain that in every special natural doctrine only so much science proper is to be met with as mathematics; for... science proper, especially of nature, requires a pure portion, lying at the foundation of the empirical, and based upon à priori knowledge of natural things. ...the conception should be constructed. But the cognition of the reason through construction of conceptions is mathematical. A pure philosophy of nature in general, namely, one that only investigates what constitutes a nature in general, may thus be possible without mathematics; but a pure doctrine of nature respecting determinate natural things (corporeal doctrine and mental doctrine), is only possible by means of mathematics; and as in every natural doctrine only so much science proper is to be met with therein as there is cognition à priori, a doctrine of nature can only contain so much science proper as there is in it of applied mathematics. ~ Immanuel Kant, Preface, The Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (1786) Tr. Ernest Belfort Bax (1883).,
673:When an upright man is in the greatest distress, which he might have avoided if he could only have disregarded duty, is he not sustained by the consciousness that he has maintained humanity in its proper dignity in his own person and honoured it, that he has no reason to be ashamed of himself in his own sight, or to dread the inward glance of self-examination? This consolation is not happiness, it is not even the smallest part of it, for no one would wish to have occasion for it, or would, perhaps, even desire a life in such circumstances. But he lives, and he cannot endure that he should be in his own eyes unworthy of life. This inward peace is therefore merely negative as regards what can make life pleasant; it is, in fact, only the escaping the danger of sinking in personal worth, after everything else that is valuable has been lost. It is the effect of a respect for something quite different from life, something in comparison and contrast with which life with all its enjoyment has no value. He still lives only because it is his duty, not because he finds anything pleasant in life. ~ Immanuel Kant,
674:Así, pues, el valor de todos los objetos que podemos obtener por medio de nuestras acciones es siempre condicionado. Los seres cuya existencia no descansa en nuestra voluntad, sino en la naturaleza, tienen, empero, si son seres irracionales, un valor meramente relativo, como medios, y por eso se llaman cosas; en cambio, los seres racionales llámanse personas porque su naturaleza los distingue ya como fines en sí mismos, esto es, como algo que no puede ser usado meramente como medio, y, por tanto, limita en ese sentido todo capricho (y es un objeto del respeto). Estos no son, pues, meros fines subjetivos, cuya existencia, como efecto de nuestra acción, tiene un valor para nosotros, sino que son fines objetivos, esto es, cosas cuya existencia es en sí misma un fin, y un fin tal, que en su lugar no puede ponerse ningún otro fin para el cual debieran ellas servir de medios, porque sin esto no hubiera posibilidad de hallar en parte alguna nada con valor absoluto; mas si todo valor fuere condicionado y, por tanto, contingente, no podría encontrarse para la razón ningún principio práctico supremo. ~ Immanuel Kant,
675:5. "Ningún estado debe inmiscuirse en la constitución y gobierno de otro de forma violenta".
Pues, ¿qué le daría derecho a ello? ¿El escándalo, quizás, que ese Estado esté dando a los súbditos de otro Estado? Pero ese escándalo puede servir más bien de advertencia, al mostrar la gran desgracia que un pueblo se ha atraído sobre sí por vivir en un Estado sin leyes. Además, el mal ejemplo que una persona libre da a otra persona no es, como scandalum acceptum (escándalo aceptado), ninguna ofensa.

Esto, sin embargo, no se podría aplicar si un Estado se dividiera en dos partes como consecuencia de una disensión interna, representando cada parte a un Estado distinto pero reivindicando cada uno todo el conjunto. En este caso, si un tercer Estado presta ayuda a uno de ellos, no se podría considerar injerencia en la constitución del otro (pues en ese caso éste es una anarquía). Pero mientras no esté solucionada esta lucha interna, la injerencia de potencias extranjeras sería una violación de los derechos de un pueblo que sólo está luchando contra una enfermedad interna y que no depende de ningún otro Estado. ~ Immanuel Kant,
676:THIRD DEFINITIVE ARTICLE OF PERPETUAL PEACE
III. The rights of men, as citizens of the world, shall be limited to the conditions of universal hospitality.
We are speaking here, as in the previous articles, not of philanthropy, but of right; and in this sphere hospitality signifies the claim of a stranger entering foreign territory
to be treated by its owner without hostility. The latter may send him away again if this can be done without causing his death; but, so long as he conducts himself peaceably, he must not be treated as an enemy. It is not a right to be treated as a guest to which the stranger can lay claim-a special friendly compact on his behalf would be required to make him for a given time an actual inmate-but he has a right of visitation. This right to present themselves to society belongs to all mankind in virtue of our common right of possession of the surface of the earth on which, as it is a globe, we cannot be infinitely scattered, and must in the end reconcile ourselves to existence side by side: at the same time, originally no one individual had more right than another to live in any one particular spot. ~ Immanuel Kant,
677:The principle of private happiness, however, is the most objectionable, not merely because it is false, and experience contradicts the supposition that prosperity is always proportioned to good conduct, nor yet merely because it contributes nothing to the establishment of morality - since it is quite a different thing to make a prosperous man and a good man, or to make one prudent and sharp-sighted for his own interests, and to make him virtuous - but because the springs it provides for morality are such as rather undermine it and destroy its sublimity, since they put the motives to virtue and to vice in the same class, and only teach us to make a better calculation, the specific difference between virtue and vice being entirely extinguished. On the other hand, as to moral being, this supposed special sense, the appeal to it is indeed superficial when those who cannot think believe that feeling will help them out, even in what concerns general laws; and besides, feelings which naturally differ infinitely in degree cannot furnish a uniform standard of good and evil, nor has anyone a right to form judgments for others by his own feelings... ~ Immanuel Kant,
678:[A man], who is in prosperity, while he sees that others have to contend with great wretchedness and that he could help them, thinks: What concern is it of mine? Let everyone be as happy as Heaven pleases, or as he can make himself; I will take nothing from him nor even envy him, only I do not wish to contribute anything to his welfare or to his assistance in distress! Now no doubt, if such a mode of thinking were a universal law, the human race might very well subsist, and doubtless even better than in a state in which everyone talks of sympathy and good-will, or even takes care occasionally to put it into practice, but, on the other side, also cheats when he can, betrays the rights of men, or otherwise violates them. But although it is possible that a universal law of nature might exist in accordance with that maxim, it is impossible to will that such a principle should have the universal validity of a law of nature. For a will which resolved this would contradict itself, inasmuch as many cases might occur in which one would have need of the love and sympathy of others, and in which, by such a law of nature, sprung from his own will, he would deprive himself of all hope of the aid he desires. ~ Immanuel Kant,
679:...[A]ll the elements which belong to the notion of happiness are altogether empirical, that is, they must be borrowed from experience, and nevertheless the idea of happiness requires an absolute whole, a maximum of welfare in my present and all future circumstances. Now it is impossible that the most clear-sighted and at the same time most powerful being (supposed finite) should frame to himself a definite conception of what he really wills in this. Does he will riches, how much anxiety, envy, and snares might he not thereby draw upon his shoulders? Does he will knowledge and discernment, perhaps it might prove to be only an eye so much the sharper to show him so much the more fearfully the evils that are now concealed from him and that cannot be avoided, or to impose more wants on his desires, which already give him concern enough. Would he have long life? Who guarantees to him that it would not be a long misery? Would he at least have health? How often has uneasiness of the body restrained from excesses into which perfect health would have allowed one to fall, and so on? In short, he is unable, on any principle, to determine with certainty what would make him truly happy; because to do so he would need to be omniscient. ~ Immanuel Kant,
680:STANKEVICH The world outside of me has no meaning independent of my thinking it. (pauses to look) I look out of the window. A garden. Trees. Grass. A young woman in a chair reading a book. I think: chair. So she is sitting. I think: book. So she is reading. Now the young woman touches her hair where it's come undone. But how can we be sure there is a world of phenomena, a woman reading in a garden? Perhaps the only thing that's real is my sensory experience, which has the form of a woman reading- in a universe which is in fact empty! But Immanuel Kant says- no! Because what I perceive as reality includes concepts which I cannot experience through the senses. Time and space. Cause and effect. Relations between things. Without me there is something wrong with this picture. The trees, the grass, the woman are merely- oh, she's coming! (nervously)- she's coming in here-! I say, don't leave!-where are you going?
MICHAEL Father's looking for me anyway. . .(gloomily) I've had to ask him to settle a few debts here and there in the world of appearances, so now he's been busy getting me a job.
Liubov enters from the garden, with her book.
LIUBOV Oh!-(noticing Stankevich) Excuse me-
MICHAEL Nobody seems to understand Stankevich and I are engaged in a life-or-death struggle over material forces to unite our spirit with the Universal ~ Tom Stoppard,
681:3. ‘Standing armies (miles perpetuus) will gradually be abolished altogether.’ For they constantly threaten other states with war by the very fact that they are always prepared for it. They spur on the states to outdo one another in arming unlimited numbers of soldiers, and since the resultant costs eventually make peace more oppressive than a short war, the armies are themselves the cause of wars of aggression which set out to end burdensome military expenditure. Furthermore, the hiring of men to kill or to be killed seems to mean using them as mere machines and instruments in the hands of someone else (the state), which cannot easily be reconciled with the rights of man in one’s own person. It is quite a different matter if the citizens undertake voluntary military training from time to time in order to secure themselves and their fatherland against attacks from outside. But it would be just the same if wealth rather than soldiers were accumulated, for it would be seen by other states as a military threat; it might compel them to mount preventive attacks, for of the three powers within a state—the power of the army, the power of alliance and the power of money—the third is probably the most reliable instrument of war. It would lead more often to wars if it were not so difficult to discover the amount of wealth which another state possesses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
682:Except to the most avid seekers of wisdom, Stoicism is either unknown or misunderstood. Indeed, it would be hard to find a word dealt a greater injustice at the hands of the English language than “Stoic.” To the average person, this vibrant, action-oriented, and paradigm-shifting way of living has become shorthand for “emotionlessness.” Given the fact that the mere mention of philosophy makes most nervous or bored, “Stoic philosophy” on the surface sounds like the last thing anyone would want to learn about, let alone urgently need in the course of daily life. What a sad fate for a philosophy that even one of its occasional critics, Arthur Schopenhauer, would describe as “the highest point to which man can attain by the mere use of his faculty of reason.” Our goal with this book is to restore Stoicism to its rightful place as a tool in the pursuit of self-mastery, perseverance, and wisdom: something one uses to live a great life, rather than some esoteric field of academic inquiry. Certainly, many of history’s great minds not only understood Stoicism for what it truly is, they sought it out: George Washington, Walt Whitman, Frederick the Great, Eugène Delacroix, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Thomas Jefferson, Matthew Arnold, Ambrose Bierce, Theodore Roosevelt, William Alexander Percy, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Each read, studied, quoted, or admired the Stoics. ~ Ryan Holiday,
683:However, one can also cognize the existence of the thing prior to the perception of it, and therefore cognize it comparatively a priori, if only it is connected with some perceptions in accordance with the principles of their empirical connection (the analogies). For in that case the existence of the thing is still connected with our perceptions in a possible experience, and with the guidance of the analogies we can get from our actual perceptions to the thing in the series of possible perceptions. Thus we cognize the existence of a magnetic matter penetrating all bodies from the perception of attracted iron filings, although an immediate perception of this matter is impossible for us given the construction of our organs. For in accordance with the laws of sensibility and the context of our perceptions we could also happen upon the immediate empirical intuition of it in an experience of if our senses, the crudeness of which does not affect the form of possible experience in general, were finer. Thus wherever perception and whatever is appended to it in accordance with empirical laws reaches, there too reaches our cognition of the existence of things. If we do not being with experience, or proceed in accordance with laws of the empirical connection of appearances, then we are only making a vain display of wanting to discover or research the existence of any thing. ~ Immanuel Kant,
684:STANKEVICH The world outside of me has no meaning independent of my thinking it. (pauses to look) I look out of the window. A garden. Trees. Grass. A young woman in a chair reading a book. I think: chair. So she is sitting. I think: book. So she is reading. Now the young woman touches her hair where it's come undone. But how can we be sure there is a world of phenomena, a woman reading in a garden? Perhaps the only thing that's real is my sensory experience, which has the form of a woman reading- in a universe which is in fact empty! But Immanuel Kant says- no! Because what I perceive as reality includes concepts which I cannot experience through the senses. Time and space. Cause and effect. Relations between things. Without me there is something wrong with this picture. The trees, the grass, the woman are merely- oh, she's coming! (nervously)- she's coming in here-! I say, don't leave!-where are you going?
MICHAEL Father's looking for me anyway. . .(gloomily) I've had to ask him to settle a few debts here and there in the world of appearances, so now he's been busy getting me a job.
Liubov enters from the garden, with her book.
LIUBOV Oh!-(noticing Stankevich) Excuse me-
MICHAEL Nobody seems to understand Stankevich and I are engaged in a life-or-death struggle over material forces to unite our spirit with the Universal- and he has to go to Moscow tomorrow! ~ Tom Stoppard,
685:Finer feeling, which we now wish to consider, is chiefly of two kinds: the feeling of the *sublime* and that of the *beautiful*. The stirring of each is pleasant, but in different ways. The sight of a mountain whose snow-covered peak rises above the clouds, the description of a raging storm, or Milton's portrayal of the infernal kingdom, arouse enjoyment but with horror; on the other hand, the sight of flower strewn meadows, valleys with winding brooks and covered with grazing flocks, the description of Elysium, or Homer's portrayal of the girdle of Venus, also occasion a pleasant sensation but one that is joyous and smiling. In order that the former impression could occur to us in due strength, we must have *a feeling of the sublime*, and, in order to enjoy the latter well, *a feeling of the beautiful*. Tall oaks and lonely shadows in a sacred grove are sublime; flower beds, low hedges and trees trimmed in figures are beautiful. Night is sublime; day is beautiful. Temperaments that possess a feeling for the sublime are drawn gradually, by the quiet stillness of a summer evening as the shimmering light of the stars breaks through the brown shadows of night and the lonely moon rises into view, into high feelings of friendship, of disdain for the world, of eternity. The shining day stimulates busy fervor and a feeling of gaiety. The sublime *moves*, the beautiful *charms*. ~ Immanuel Kant,
686:If now we attend to ourselves on occasion of any transgression of duty, we shall find that we in fact do not will that our maxim should be universal law, for that is impossible for us; on the contrary, we will that the opposite should remain a universal law, only we assume the liberty of making an exception in our own favor or (just for this time only) in favor of our inclination. Consequently, if we considered all cases from one and the same point of view, namely, that of reason, we should find a contradiction in our own will, namely, that a certain principle should be objectively necessary as a universal law, and yet subjectively should not be universal, but admit of exceptions. As, however, we at one moment regard our action from the point of view of a will wholly conformed to reason, and then again look at the same action from the point of view of a will affected by inclination, there is not really any contradiction, but an antagonism of inclination to the precept of reason, whereby the universality of the principle is changed into mere generality, so that the practical principle of reason shall meet the maxim half way. Now, although this cannot be justified in our own impartial judgement, yet it proves that we do really recognize the validity of the categorical imperative and (with all respect for it) only allow ourselves a few exceptions which we think unimportant and forced from us. ~ Immanuel Kant,
687:That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt. For how should the faculty of knowledge be called into activity, if not by objects which affect our senses and which, on the one hand, produce representations by themselves or on the other, rouse the activity of our understanding to compare, connect, or separate them and thus to convert the raw material of our sensible impressions into knowledge of objects, which we call experience? With respect to time, therefore, no knowledge within us is antecedent to experience, but all knowledge begins with it.
But though all our knowledge begins with experience, is does not follow that it all arises from experience. For it is quite possible that even our empirical knowledge is a compound of that which we perceive through impressions, and of that which our own faculty of knowledge (incited by sense impressions) supplies from itself, a supplement which we do not distinguish from that raw material until long practice and rendered us capable of separating one from the other.
It is therefore a question which deserves at least closer investigation and cannot be disposed of at first sight: Whether there is any knowledge independent of all experience and even of all impressions of the senses? Such knowledge is called 'a priori' and is distinguished from empirical knowledge, which has its source 'a posteriori', that is, in experience... ~ Immanuel Kant,
688:[A man] finds himself forced by necessity to borrow money. He knows that he will not be able to repay it, but sees also that nothing will be lent to him unless he promises stoutly to repay it in definite time. He desires to make this promise, but he has still so much conscience as to ask himself: Is it not unlawful and inconsistent with duty to get out of a difficulty in this way? Suppose, however, that he resolves to do so, then the maxim of his action would be expressed thus: When I think myself in want of money, I will borrow money and promise to repay it, although I know that I never can do so. Now this principle of self-love or of one's own advantage may perhaps be consistent with my whole future welfare; but the question now is, Is it right? I change then the suggestion of self-love into a universal law, and state the question thus: How would it be if my maxim were a universal law? Then I see at once that it could never hold as a universal law of nature, but would necessarily contradict itself. For supposing it to be a universal law that everyone when he thinks himself in a difficulty should be able to promise whatever he pleases, with the purpose of not keeping his promise, the promise itself would become impossible, as well as the end that one might have in view in it, since no one would consider that anything was promised to him, but would ridicule all such statements as vain pretenses. ~ Immanuel Kant,
689:4. “National Debts Shall Not Be Contracted with a View to the External Friction of States”; This expedient of seeking aid within or without the state is above suspicion when the purpose is domestic economy (e.g., the improvement of roads, new settlements, establishment of stores against unfruitful years, etc.). But as an opposing machine in the antagonism of powers, a credit system which grows beyond sight and which is yet a safe debt for the present requirements — because all the creditors do not require payment at one time — constitutes a dangerous money power. This ingenious invention of a commercial people [England] in this century is dangerous because it is a war treasure which exceeds the treasures of all other states; it cannot be exhausted except by default of taxes (which is inevitable), though it can be long delayed by the stimulus to trade which occurs through the reaction of credit on industry and commerce. This facility in making war, together with the inclination to do so on the part of rulers—an inclination which seems inborn in human nature — is thus a great hindrance to perpetual peace. Therefore, to forbid this credit system must be a preliminary article of perpetual peace all the more because it must eventually entangle many innocent states in the inevitable bankruptcy and openly harm them. They are therefore justified in allying themselves against such a state and its measures. ~ Immanuel Kant,
690:It is true, no doubt, that this principle of the necessary unity of apperception is itself an identical and therefore an analytic proposition; but it shows, nevertheless, the necessity of a synthesis of the manifold given in an intuition, a synthesis without which it would be impossible to think the thoroughgoing identity of self-consciousness. For through the *I*, as a simple representation, nothing manifold is given; only in intuition, which is distinct from this representation, can a manifold be given, and then, through *combination*, be thought in one consciousness. An understanding in which through self-consciousness all the manifold would be given at the same time would be one that *intuits*; our understanding can do nothing but *think*, and must seek intuition in the senses. I am conscious, therefore, of the identical self with respect to the manifold of the representations that are given to me in an intuition, because I call them one and all *my* representations, as constituting *one* intuition. This means that I am conscious *a priori* of a necessary synthesis of them, which is called the original synthetic unity of apperception, and under which all representations given to me must stand, but under which they must also be brought by means of a synthesis.”

—from Critique of Pure Reason . Translated, edited, and with an Introduction by Marcus Weigelt, based on the translation by Max Müller, pp. 128-129 ~ Immanuel Kant,
691:[At the beginning of modern science], a light dawned on all those who study nature. They comprehended that reason has insight only into what it itself produces according to its own design; that it must take the lead with principles for its judgments according to constant laws and compel nature to answer its questions, rather than letting nature guide its movements by keeping reason, as it were, in leading-strings; for otherwise accidental observations, made according to no previously designed plan, can never connect up into a necessary law, which is yet what reason seeks and requires. Reason, in order to be taught by nature, must approach nature with its principles in one hand, according to which alone the agreement among appearances can count as laws, and, in the other hand, the experiments thought in accordance with these principles - yet in order to be instructed by nature not like a pupil, who has recited to him whatever the teacher wants to say, but like an appointed judge who compels witnesses to answer the questions he puts to them. Thus even physics owes the advantageous revolution in its way of thinking to the inspiration that what reason would not be able to know of itself and has to learn from nature, it has to seek in the latter (though not merely ascribe to it) in accordance with what reason itself puts into nature. This is how natural science was first brought to the secure course of a science after groping about for so many centuries. ~ Immanuel Kant,
692:I. Of the difference between Pure and Empirical Knowledge That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt. For how is it possible that the faculty of cognition should be awakened into exercise otherwise than by means of objects which affect our senses, and partly of themselves produce representations, partly rouse our powers of understanding into activity, to compare, to connect, or to separate these, and so to convert the raw material of our sensuous impressions into a knowledge of objects, which is called experience? In respect of time, therefore, no knowledge of ours is antecedent to experience, but begins with it. But, though all our knowledge begins with experience, it by no means follows that all arises out of experience. For, on the contrary, it is quite possible that our empirical knowledge is a compound of that which we receive through impressions, and that which the faculty of cognition supplies from itself (sensuous impressions giving merely the occasion), an addition which we cannot distinguish from the original element given by sense, till long practice has made us attentive to, and skilful in separating it. It is, therefore, a question which requires close investigation, and not to be answered at first sight, whether there exists a knowledge altogether independent of experience, and even of all sensuous impressions. Knowledge of this kind is called a priori, in contradistinction to empirical knowledge, which has its sources a posteriori, that is, in experience. ~ Immanuel Kant,
693:There is no freedom, but everything in the world takes place entirely according to nature....Transcendental freedom is therefore opposed to the law of causality, and represents such a connection of successive states of effective causes, that no unity of experience is possible with it. It is therefore an empty fiction of the mind, and not to be met with in any experience.
We have, therefore, nothing but nature, in which we must try to find the connection and order of cosmical events. Freedom (independence) from the laws of nature is no doubt a deliverance from restraint, but also from the guidance of all rules. For we cannot say that, instead of the laws of nature, laws of freedom may enter into the causality of the course of the world, because, if determined by laws, it would not be freedom, but nothing else but nature. Nature, therefore, and transcendental freedom differ from each other like legality and lawlessness. The former, no doubt, imposes upon the understanding the difficult task of looking higher and higher for the origin of events in the series of causes, because their causality is always conditioned. In return for this, however, it promises a complete and well-ordered unity of experience; while, on the other side, the fiction of freedom promises, no doubt, to the enquiring mind, rest in the chain of causes, leading him up to an unconditioned causality, which begins to act by itself, but which, as it is blind itself, tears the thread of rules by which alone a complete and coherent experience is possible. ~ Immanuel Kant,
694:In the physical constitution of an organized being, that is, a being adapted suitably to the purposes of life, we assume it as a fundamental principle that no organ for any purpose will be found but what is also the fittest and best adapted for that purpose. Now in a being which has reason and a will, if the proper object of nature were its conservation, its welfare, in a word, its happiness, then nature would have hit upon a very bad arrangement in selecting the reason of the creature to carry out this purpose. For all the actions which the creature has to perform with a view to this purpose, and the whole rule of its conduct, would be far more surely prescribed to it by instinct, and that end would have been attained thereby much more certainly that it ever can be by reason. Should reason have been communicated to this favored creature over and above, it must only have served it to contemplate the happy constitution of its nature, to admire it, to congratulate itself thereon, and to feel thankful for it to the beneficent cause, but not that it should subject its desires to that weak and delusive guidance, and meddle bunglingly with the purpose of nature. In a word, nature would have taken care that reason should not break forth into practical exercise, nor have the presumption, with its weak insight, to think out for itself the plan of happiness and the means of attaining it. Nature would not only have taken on herself the choice of the ends but also of the means, and with wise foresight would have entrusted both to instinct. ~ Immanuel Kant,
695:The history of Immanuel Kant's life is difficult to portray, for he had neither life nor history. He led a mechanical, regular, almost abstract bachelor existence in a little retired street of Königsberg, an old town on the north-eastern frontier of Germany. I do not believe that the great clock of the cathedral performed in a more passionless and methodical manner its daily routine than did its townsman, Immanuel Kant. Rising in the morning, coffee-drinking, writing, reading lectures, dining, walking, everything had its appointed time, and the neighbors knew that it was exactly half-past three o'clock when Kant stepped forth from his house in his grey, tight-fitting coat, with his Spanish cane in his hand, and betook himself to the little linden avenue called after him to this day the "Philosopher's Walk." Summer and winter he walked up and down it eight times, and when the weather was dull or heavy clouds prognosticated rain, the townspeople beheld his servant, the old Lampe, trudging anxiously behind Kant with a big umbrella under his arm, like an image of Providence.

What a strange contrast did this man's outward life present to his destructive, world-annihilating thoughts! In sooth, had the citizens of Königsberg had the least presentiment of the full significance of his ideas, they would have felt far more awful dread at the presence of this man than at the sight of an executioner, who can but kill the body. But the worthy folk saw in him nothing more than a Professor of Philosophy, and as he passed at his customary hour, they greeted him in a friendly manner and set their watches by him. ~ Heinrich Heine,
696:Even as to himself, a man cannot pretend to know what he is in himself from the knowledge he has by internal sensation. For as he does not as it were create himself, and does not come by the conception of himself a priori but empirically, it naturally follows that he can obtain his knowledge even of himself only by the inner sense, and consequently only through the appearances of his nature and the way in which his consciousness is affected. At the same time, beyond these characteristics of his own subject, made up of mere appearances, he must necessarily suppose something else as their basis, namely, his ego, whatever its characteristics in itself may be... Now man really finds in himself a faculty by which he distinguishes himself from everything else, even from himself as affected by objects, and that is reason. This being pure spontaneity is even elevated above the understanding. For although the latter is a spontaneity and does not, like sense, merely contain intuitions that arise when we are affected by things (and are therefore passive), yet it cannot produce from its activity any other conceptions than those which merely serve to bring the intuitions of sense under rules, and thereby to unite them in one consciousness, and without this use of the sensibility it could not think at all; whereas, on the contrary, reason shows so pure a spontaneity in the case of what I call "ideas" [Ideal Conceptions] that it thereby far transcends everything that the sensibility can give it, and exhibits its most important function in distinguishing the world of sense from that of understanding, and thereby prescribing the limits of the understanding itself. ~ Immanuel Kant,
697:Two things fill the mind with every new and increasing wonder and awe, the oftener and the more steadily I reflect upon them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. I do not merely conjecture them and seek them as if they were obscured in darkness or in the transcendent region beyond my horizon: I see them before me, and I connect them directly with the consciousness of my own existence. The starry heavens begin at the place I occupy in the external world of sense, and they broaden the connection in which I stand into an unbounded magnitude of worlds beyond worlds and systems of systems and into the limitless times of their periodic motion, their beginning and duration. The latter begins at my invisible self, my personality, and exhibits me in a world which has true infinity but which only the understanding can trace - a world in which I recognise myself as existing in a universal and necessary ( and not, as in the first case, only contingent) connection, and thereby also in connection with all those visible worlds. The former view of a countless multitude of worlds annihilates, as it were, my importance as an 'animal creature' which must give back to the planet (a mere speck in the universe) the matter fro which it came, matter which is for a little time endowed with vital force, we know not how. The latter, on the contrary, infinitely raises my worth as that of an 'intelligence' by my being a person in whom the moral law reveals to me a life independent of all animality and even of the whole world of sense, at least so far as it may be inferred from the final destination assigned to my existence by this law, a destination which is not restricted to the conditions and boundaries of this life but reaches into the infinite. ~ Immanuel Kant,
698:[Jesus] claims that not the observance of outer civil or statutory churchly duties but the pure moral disposition of the heart alone can make man well-pleasing to God (Matthew V, 20-48); … that injury done one’s neighbor can be repaired only through satisfaction rendered to the neighbor himself, not through acts of divine worship (V, 24). Thus, he says, does he intend to do full justice to the Jewish law (V, 17); whence it is obvious that not scriptural scholarship but the pure religion of reason must be the law’s interpreter, for taken according to the letter, it allowed the very opposite of all this. Furthermore, he does not leave unnoticed, in his designations of the strait gate and the narrow way, the misconstruction of the law which men allow themselves in order to evade their true moral duty, holding themselves immune through having fulfilled their churchly duty (VII, 13). He further requires of these pure dispositions that they manifest themselves also in works (VII, 16) and, on the other hand, denies the insidious hope of those who imagine that, through invocation and praise of the Supreme Lawgiver in the person of His envoy, they will make up for their lack of good works and ingratiate themselves into favor (VII, 21). Regarding these works he declares that they ought to be performed publicly, as an example for imitation (V, 16), and in a cheerful mood, not as actions extorted from slaves (VI, 16); and that thus, from a small beginning in the sharing and spreading of such dispositions, religion, like a grain of seed in good soil, or a ferment of goodness, would gradually, through its inner power, grow into a kingdom of God (XIII, 31-33). ~ Immanuel Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Book IV, Part 1, Section 1, “The Christian religion as a natural religion,” as translated by Theodore M. Greene,
699:On the other hand, the moral law, although it gives no such prospect, does provide a fact absolutely inexplicable from any data of the world of sense or from the whole compass of the theoretical use of reason, and this fact points to a pure intelligible world―indeed, it defines it positively and enable us to know something of it, namely a law.

This law gives to the sensible world, as sensuous nature (as this concerns rational beings), the form of an intelligible world, i.e., the form of supersensuous nature, without interfering with the mechanism of the former. Nature, in the widest sense of the word, is the existence of things under laws. The sensuous nature of rational beings in general is their existence under empirically conditioned laws, and therefore it is, from the point of view of reason, heteronomy. The supersensuous nature of the same beings, on the other hand, is their existence according to laws which are independent of all empirical conditions and which therefore belong to the autonomy of pure reason. And since the laws, according to which the existence of things depends on cognition, are practical, supersensuous nature, so far as we can form a concept of it, is nothing else than nature under the autonomy of the pure practical reason. The law of this autonomy is the moral law, and it, therefore, is the fundamental law of supersensuous nature and of a pure world of the understanding, whose counterpart must exist in the world of sense without interfering with the laws of the latter. The former could be called the archetypal world (*natura archetypa*) which we know only by reason; the latter, on the other hand, could be called the ectypal world (*natura ectypa*), because it contains the possible effect of the idea of the former as the determining ground of the will."

―from Critique of Practical Reason . Translated, with an Introduction by Lewis White Beck, p. 44. ~ Immanuel Kant,
700:2. The Ontological Argument Nothing greater than God can be conceived (this is stipulated as part of the definition of “God”). It is greater to exist than not to exist. If we conceive of God as not existing, then we can conceive of something greater than God (from 2). To conceive of God as not existing is not to conceive of God (from 1 and 3). It is inconceivable that God not exist (from 4). God exists. This argument, first articulated by Saint Anselm (1033–1109), the Archbishop of Canterbury, is unlike any other, proceeding purely on the conceptual level. Everyone agrees that the mere existence of a concept does not entail that there are examples of that concept; after all, we can know what a unicorn is and at the same time say, “Unicorns don’t exist.” The claim of The Ontological Argument is that the concept of God is the one exception to this generalization. The very concept of God, when defined correctly, entails that there is something that satisfies that concept. Although most people suspect that there is something wrong with this argument, it’s not so easy to figure out what it is. FLAW: It was Immanuel Kant who pinpointed the fallacy in The Ontological Argument—it is to treat “existence” as a property, like “being fat” or “having ten fingers.” The Ontological Argument relies on a bit of wordplay, assuming that “existence” is just another property, but logically it is completely different. If you really could treat “existence” as just part of the definition of the concept of God, then you could just as easily build it into the definition of any other concept. We could, with the wave of our verbal magic wand, define a trunicorn as “a horse that (a) has a single horn on its head, and (b) exists.” So, if you think about a trunicorn, you’re thinking about something that must, by definition, exist; therefore, trunicorns exist. This is clearly absurd: we could use this line of reasoning to prove that any figment of our imagination exists. ~ Rebecca Goldstein,
701:A similar experiment may be tried in metaphysics as regards the *intuition* of objects. If the intuition had to conform to the constitution of objects, I would not understand how we could know anything of them *a priori*; but if the object (as object of the senses) conformed to the constitution of our faculty of intuition, I could very well conceive such a possibility. As, however, I cannot rest in these intuitions if they are to become knowledge, but have to refer them as representations, to something as their object, and must determine this object through them, I can assume either that the *concepts* through which I arrive at this determination also conform to the object, and I would again be as perplexed about how I can know anything about it *a priori*; or else that the objects, or what is the same thing, the *experience* in which alone they are known (as objects that are given to us), conform to those concepts. In the latter case, I recognize an easier solution because experience itself is a kind of knowledge that requires understanding; and this understanding has its rules which I must presuppose as existing within me even before objects are given to me, and hence *a priori*. These rules are expressed in *a priori* concepts to which all objects of experience must necessarily conform, and with which they must agree. With regard to objects, insofar as they are thought merely through reason and thought indeed as necessary, and which can never, at least not in the way in which reason thinks them, be given in experience, the attempts at thinking them (for they must admit of being thought) will subsequently furnish an excellent touchstone of what we are adopting as our new method of thought, namely, that we know of things *a priori* only that which we ourselves put into them."

―from Critique of Pure Reason . Preface to the Second Edition. Translated, edited, and with an Introduction by Marcus Weigelt, based on the translation by Max Müller, pp. 18-19 ~ Immanuel Kant,
702:Metaphysics, a completely isolated and speculative branch of rational knowledge which is raised above all teachings of experience and rests on concepts only (not, like mathematics, on their application to intuition), in which reason therefore is meant to be its own pupil, has hitherto not had the good fortune to enter upon the secure path of a science, although it is older than all other sciences, and would survive even if all the rest were swallowed up in the abyss of an all-destroying barbarism. Reason in metaphysics, even if it tries, as it professes, only to gain *a priori* insight into those laws which are confirmed by our most common experience, is constantly being brought to a standstill, and we are obliged again and again to retrace our steps, as they do not lead us where we want to go. As to unanimity among its participants, there is so little of it in metaphysics that it has rather become an arena that would seem especially suited for those who wish to exercise themselves in mock fights, where no combatant has as yet succeeded in gaining even an inch of ground that he could call his permanent possession. There cannot be any doubt, therefore, that the method of metaphysics has hitherto consisted in a mere random groping, and, what is worst of all, in groping among mere concepts.

What, then, is the reason that this secure scientific course has not yet been found? Is this, perhaps, impossible? Why, in that case, should nature have afflicted our reason with the restless aspiration to look for it, and have made it one of its most important concerns? What is more, how little should we be justified in trusting our reason, with regard to one of the most important objects of which we desire knowledge, it not only abandons us, but lures us on by delusions, and in the end betrays us! Or, if hitherto we have only failed to meet with the right path, what indications are there to make us hope that, should we renew our search, we shall be more successful than others before us?"

―from Critique of Pure Reason . Preface to the Second Edition. Translated, edited, and with an Introduction by Marcus Weigelt, based on the translation by Max Müller, p. 17 ~ Immanuel Kant,
703:The concept of happiness is not one which man abstracts more or less from his instincts and so derives from his animal nature. It is, on the contrary, a mere idea of a state, and one to which he seeks to make his actual state of being adequate under purely empirical conditions--an impossible task. He projects this idea himself, and, thanks to his intellect, and its complicated relations with imagination and sense, projects it in such different ways, and even alters his concept so often, that were nature a complete slave to his elective will, it would nevertheless be utterly unable to adopt any definite, universal and fixed law by which to accommodate itself to this fluctuating concept and so bring itself into accord with the end that each individual arbitrarily sets before himself. But even if we sought to reduce this concept to the level of the true wants of nature in which our species is in complete and fundamental accord, or, trying the other alternative, sought to increase to the highest level man's skill in reaching his imagined ends, nevertheless what man means by happiness, and what in fact constitutes his peculiar ultimate physical end, as opposed to the end of freedom, would never be attained by him. For his own nature is not so constituted as to rest or be satisfied in any possession or enjoyment whatever. Also external nature is far from having made a particular favorite of man or from having preferred him to all other animals as the object of its beneficence. For we see that in its destructive operations--plague, famine, flood, cold, attacks from animals great and small, and all such things--it has as little spared him as any other animal. But, besides all this, the discord of inner natural tendencies betrays man into further misfortunes of his own invention, and reduces other members of his species, through the oppression of lordly power, the barbarism of wars, and the like, to such misery, while he himself does all he can to work ruin to his race, that, even with the utmost goodwill on the part of external nature, its end, supposing it were directed to the happiness of our species, would never be attained in a system of terrestrial nature, because our own nature is not capable of it. Man, therefore, is ever but a link in the chain of nature's ends. ~ Immanuel Kant,
704:The purpose of this critique of pure speculative reason consists in the attempt to change the old procedure of metaphysics, and to bring about a complete revolution after the example set by geometers and investigators of nature. This critique is a treatise on the method, not a system of the science itself; but nevertheless it marks out the whole plan of this science, both with regard to its limits and with regard to its inner organization. For it is peculiar to pure speculative reason that it is able, indeed bound, to measure its own powers according to the different ways in which it chooses its objects for thought, and to enumerate exhaustively the different ways of choosing its problems, thus tracing a complete outline of a system of metaphysics. This is due to the fact that, with regard to the first point, nothing can be attributed to objects in *a priori* knowledge, except what the thinking subject takes from within itself; while, with regard to the second point, pure reason, as far as its principles of knowledge are concerned, forms a separate and independent unity, in which, as in an organized body, every member exists for the sake of all the others, and all the others exist for the sake of the one, so that no principle can be safely applied in *one* relation unless it has been carefully examined in *all* its relations to the whole use of pure reason. Hence, too, metaphysics has this singular advantage, an advantage which cannot be shared by any other rational science which has to deal with objects (for *logic* deals only with the form of thought in general), that if by means of this critique it has been set upon the secure course of a science, it can exhaustively grasp the entire field of knowledge pertaining to it, and can thus finish its work and leave it to posterity as a capital that can never be added to, because it has to deal only with principles and with the limitations of their use, as determined by these principles themselves. And this completeness becomes indeed an obligation if metaphysics is to be a fundamental science, of which we must be able to say, *nil actum reputants, si quid superesset agendum* [to think that nothing was done for as long as something remained to be done]."

―from Critique of Pure Reason . Preface to the Second Edition. Translated, edited, and with an Introduction by Marcus Weigelt, based on the translation by Max Müller, pp. 21-22 ~ Immanuel Kant,
705:reading :::
   50 Philosophy Classics: List of Books Covered:
   1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958)
   2. Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics (4th century BC)
   3. AJ Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936)
   4. Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011)
   5. Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981)
   6. Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1952)
   7. Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789)
   8. Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1911)
   9. David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980)
   10. Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002)
   11. Cicero - On Duties (44 BC)
   12. Confucius - Analects (5th century BC)
   13. Rene Descartes - Meditations (1641)
   14. Ralph Waldo Emerson - Fate (1860)
   15. Epicurus - Letters (3rd century BC)
   16. Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966)
   17. Harry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005)
   18. Sam Harris - Free Will (2012)
   19. GWF Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1803)
   20. Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927)
   21. Heraclitus - Fragments (6th century)
   22. David Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748)
   23. William James - Pragmatism (1904)
   24. Daniel Kahneman - Thinking: Fast and Slow (2011)
   25. Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
   26. Soren Kierkegaard - Fear and Trembling (1843)
   27. Saul Kripke - Naming and Necessity (1972)
   28. Thomas Kuhn - The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962)
   29. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Theodicy (1710)
   30. John Locke - An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690)
   31. Marshall McLuhan - The Medium is the Massage (1967)
   32. Niccolo Machiavelli - The Prince (1532)
   33. John Stuart Mill - On Liberty (1859)
   34. Michel de Montaigne - Essays (1580)
   35. Iris Murdoch - The Sovereignty of Good (1970)
   36. Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil (1886)
   37. Blaise Pascal - Pensees (1670)
   38. Plato - The Republic (4th century BC)
   39. Karl Popper - The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934)
   40. John Rawls - A Theory of Justice (1971)
   41. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The Social Contract (1762)
   42. Bertrand Russell - The Conquest of Happiness (1920)
   43. Michael Sandel - Justice (2009)
   44. Jean Paul Sartre - Being and Nothingness (1943)
   45. Arthur Schopenhauer - The World as Will and Representation (1818)
   46. Peter Singer - The Life You Can Save (2009)
   47. Baruch Spinoza - Ethics (1677)
   48. Nassim Nicholas - Taleb The Black Swan (2007)
   49. Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosophical Investigations (1953)
   50. Slavoj Zizek - Living In The End Times (2010)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Philosophy Classics,
706:Our critique is not opposed to the *dogmatic procedure* of reason in its pure knowledge as science (for science must always be dogmatic, that is, derive its proof from secure *a priori* principles), but only to *dogmatism*, that is, to the presumption that it is possible to make any progress with pure (philosophical) knowledge from concepts according to principles, such as reason has long been in the habit of using, without first inquiring in what way, and by what right, it has come to posses them. Dogmatism is therefore the dogmatic procedure of pure reason, *without a preceding critique of its own powers*; and our opposition to this is not intended to defend that loquacious shallowness which arrogates to itself the name of popularity, much less that skepticism which makes short work of the whole of metaphysics. On the contrary, our critique is meant to form a necessary preparation in support of metaphysics as a thorough science, which must necessarily be carried out dogmatically and strictly systematically, so as to satisfy all the demands, no so much of the public at large, as of the Schools. This is an indispensable demand for it has undertaken to carry out its work entirely *a priori*, and thus to carry it out to the complete satisfaction of speculative reason. In the execution of this plan, as traced out by the critique, that is, in a future system of metaphysics, we shall have to follow the strict method of the celebrated Wolff, the greatest of all dogmatic philosophers. He was the first to give an example (and by his example initiated, in Germany, that spirit of thoroughness which is not yet extinct) of how the secure course of a science could be attained only through the lawful establishment of principles, the clear determination of concepts, the attempt at strictness of proof and avoidance of taking bold leaps in our inferences. He was therefore most eminently qualified to give metaphysics the dignity of a science, if it had only occurred to him to prepare his field in advance by criticism of the organ, that is, of pure reason itself―an omission due not so much to himself as to the dogmatic mentality of his age, about which the philosophers of his own, as well as of all previous times, have no right to reproach one another. Those who reject both the method of Wolff and the procedure of the critique of pure reason can have no other aim but to shake off the fetters of *science* altogether, and thus to change work into play, certainty into opinion and philosophy into philodoxy."

―from Critique of Pure Reason . Preface to the Second Edition. Translated, edited, and with an Introduction by Marcus Weigelt, based on the translation by Max Müller, pp. 28-29 ~ Immanuel Kant,
707:Our knowledge springs from two fundamental sources of our mind; the first is to receive representations (receptivity of impressions), the second is the faculty of knowing an object through these representations (spontaneity of concepts). Through the first an object is *given* to us, through the second the object is *thought* in relation to that representation (which is a mere determination of the mind). Intuition and concepts constitute, therefore, the elements of all our knowledge, so that neither concepts without an intuition in some way corresponding to them, nor intuition without concepts can yield knowledge. Both are either pure or empirical. They are empirical when they contain sensation (sensation presupposes the actual presence of the object). They are *pure* when no sensation is mixed in with the representation. Sensation may be called the matter of sensible knowledge. Pure intuition, therefore, contains only the form under which something is intuited, and the pure concepts contains only the form of thinking an object in general. Pure intuitions and pure concepts alone are possible *a priori*, empirical intuitions and empirical concepts only *a posteriori*.

We call *sensibility* the *receptivity* of our mind to receive representations insofar as it is in some wise affected, while the *understanding*, on the other hand, is our faculty of producing representations by ourselves, or the *spontaneity* of knowledge. We are so constituted that our intuition can never be other than *sensible*; that is, it contains only the mode in which we are affected by objects. The faculty, on the contrary, which enables us to *think* the object of sensible intuition is the *understanding*. Neither of these properties is to be preferred to the other. Without sensibility no object would be given to us, without understanding no object would be thought. Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind. It is, therefore, just as necessary to make our concepts sensible (i.e., to add the object to them in intuition) as to make our intuitions understandable (i.e., to bring them under concepts). These two faculties or capacities cannot exchange their functions. The understanding cannot intuit anything, the senses cannot think anything. Only from their union can knowledge arise. But this is no reason for confounding their respective contributions; rather, it gives us a strong reason for carefully separating and distinguishing the one from the other. We therefore distinguish the science of the rules of sensibility in general, i.e., aesthetic, from the science of the rules of the understanding in general, i.e., logic."

―Transcendental Doctrine of Elements. Transcendental Logic: The Idea of a Transcendental Logic ~ Immanuel Kant,
708:This experiment succeeds as hoped and promises to metaphysics, in its first part, which deals with those *a priori* concepts to which the corresponding objects may be given in experience, the secure course of a science. For by thus changing our point of view, the possibility of *a priori* knowledge can well be explained, and, what is still more, the laws which *a priori* lie at the foundation of nature, as the sum total of the objects of experience, may be supplied with satisfactory proofs, neither of which was possible within the procedure hitherto adopted. But there arises from this deduction of our faculty of knowing *a priori*, as given in the first part of metaphysics, a somewhat startling result, apparently most detrimental to that purpose of metaphysics which has to be treated in its second part, namely the impossibly of using this faculty to transcend the limits of possible experience, which is precisely the most essential concern of the science of metaphysics. But here we have exactly the experiment which, by disproving the opposite, establishes the truth of the first estimate of our *a priori* rational knowledge, namely, that it is directed only at appearances and must leave the thing in itself as real for itself but unknown to us. For that which necessarily impels us to to go beyond the limits of experience and of all appearances is the *unconditioned*, which reason rightfully and necessarily demands, aside from everything conditioned, in all things in themselves, so that the series of conditions be completed. If, then, we find that, under the supposition that our empirical knowledge conforms to objects as things in themselves, the unconditioned *cannot be thought without contradiction*, while under the supposition that our representation of things as they are given to us does not conform to them as things in themselves, but, on the contrary, that these objects as appearance conform to our mode of representation, then *the contradiction vanishes*; and if we find, therefore, that the unconditioned cannot be encountered in things insofar as we are acquainted with them (insofar as they are given to us), but only in things insofar as we are not acquainted with them, that is, insofar as they are things in themselves; then it becomes apparent that what we at first assumed only for the sake of experiment is well founded. However, with speculative reason unable to make progress in the field of the supersensible, it is still open to us to investigate whether in reason's practical knowledge data may not be found which would enable us to determine that transcendent rational concept of the unconditioned, so as to allow us, in accordance with the wish of metaphysics, to get beyond the limits of all possible experience with our *a priori* knowledge, which is possible in practical matters only. Within such a procedure, speculative reason has always at least created a space for such an expansion, even if it has to leave it empty; none the less we are at liberty, indeed we are summoned, to fill it, if we are able to do so, with practical *data* of reason."

―from Critique of Pure Reason . Preface to the Second Edition. Translated, edited, and with an Introduction by Marcus Weigelt, based on the translation by Max Müller, pp. 19-21 ~ Immanuel Kant,
709:76. David Hume – Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau – On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile – or, On Education, The Social Contract
78. Laurence Sterne – Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy
79. Adam Smith – The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations
80. Immanuel Kant – Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace
81. Edward Gibbon – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography
82. James Boswell – Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D.
83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier – Traité Élémentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry)
84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison – Federalist Papers
85. Jeremy Bentham – Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions
86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Faust; Poetry and Truth
87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier – Analytical Theory of Heat
88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel – Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History
89. William Wordsworth – Poems
90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Poems; Biographia Literaria
91. Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice; Emma
92. Carl von Clausewitz – On War
93. Stendhal – The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love
94. Lord Byron – Don Juan
95. Arthur Schopenhauer – Studies in Pessimism
96. Michael Faraday – Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity
97. Charles Lyell – Principles of Geology
98. Auguste Comte – The Positive Philosophy
99. Honoré de Balzac – Père Goriot; Eugenie Grandet
100. Ralph Waldo Emerson – Representative Men; Essays; Journal
101. Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter
102. Alexis de Tocqueville – Democracy in America
103. John Stuart Mill – A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography
104. Charles Darwin – The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography
105. Charles Dickens – Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times
106. Claude Bernard – Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine
107. Henry David Thoreau – Civil Disobedience; Walden
108. Karl Marx – Capital; Communist Manifesto
109. George Eliot – Adam Bede; Middlemarch
110. Herman Melville – Moby-Dick; Billy Budd
111. Fyodor Dostoevsky – Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov
112. Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Three Stories
113. Henrik Ibsen – Plays
114. Leo Tolstoy – War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales
115. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger
116. William James – The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism
117. Henry James – The American; The Ambassadors
118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche – Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power
119. Jules Henri Poincaré – Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method
120. Sigmund Freud – The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis
121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces ~ Mortimer J Adler,
710:It will be seen how there can be the idea of a special science, the *critique of pure reason* as it may be called. For reason is the faculty which supplies the *principles* of *a priori* knowledge. Pure reason therefore is that which contains the principles of knowing something entirely *a priori*. An *organon* of pure reason would be the sum total of the principles by which all pure *a priori* knowledge can be acquired and actually established. Exhaustive application of such an organon would give us a system of pure reason. But as this would be a difficult task, and as at present it is still doubtful whether indeed an expansion of our knowledge is possible here at all, we may regard a science that merely judges pure reason, its sources and limits, as the *propaedeutic* to the system of pure reason. In general, it would have to be called only a *critique*, not a *doctrine* of pure reason. Its utility, in regard to speculation, would only be negative, for it would serve only to purge rather than to expand our reason, and, which after all is a considerable gain, would guard reason against errors. I call all knowledge *transcendental* which deals not so much with objects as with our manner of knowing objects insofar as this manner is to be possible *a priori*. A system of such concepts would be called *transcendental philosophy*. But this is still, as a beginning, too great an undertaking. For since such a science must contain completely both analytic and synthetic *a priori* knowledge, it is, as far as our present purpose is concerned, much too comprehensive. We will be satisfied to carry the analysis only so far as is indispensably necessary in order to understand in their whole range the principles of *a priori* synthesis, with which alone we are concerned. This investigation, which properly speaking should be called only a transcendental critique but not a doctrine, is all we are dealing with at present. It is not meant to expand our knowledge but only to correct it, and to become the touchstone of the value, or lack of value, of all *a priori* knowledge. Such a critique is therefore the preparation, as far as possible, for a new organon, or, if this should turn out not to be possible, for a canon at least, according to which, thereafter, the complete system of a philosophy of pure reason, whether it serve as an expansion or merely as a limitation of its knowledge, may be carried out both analytically and synthetically. That such a system is possible, indeed that it need not be so comprehensive as to cut us off from the hope of completing it, may already be gathered from the fact that it would have to deal not with the nature of things, which is inexhaustible, but with the understanding which makes judgments about the nature of things, and with this understanding again only as far as its *a priori* knowledge is concerned. The supply of this *a priori* knowledge cannot be hidden from us, as we need not look for it outside the understanding, and we may suppose this supply to prove sufficiently small for us to record completely, judge as to its value or lack of value and appraise correctly. Still less ought we to expect here a critique of books and systems of pure reason, but only the critique of the faculty of pure reason itself. Only once we are in possession of this critique do we have a reliable touchstone for estimating the philosophical value of old and new works on this subject. Otherwise, an unqualified historian and judge does nothing but pass judgments upon the groundless assertions of others by means of his own, which are equally groundless. ~ Immanuel Kant,
711:It must be *possible* for the *I think* to accompany all my representations: for otherwise something would be represented within me that could not be thought at all, in other words, the representation would either be impossible, or at least would be nothing to me. That representation which can be given prior to all thought is called *intuition*, and all the manifold of intuition has, therefore, a necessary relation to the *I think* in the same subject in which this manifold of intuition is found. This representation (the *I think*), however, is an act of *spontaneity*, that is, it cannot be considered as belonging to sensibility. I call it *pure apperception*, in order to distinguish it from empirical apperception, as also from original apperception, because it is that self-consciousness which, by producing the representations, *I think* (which must be capable of accompanying all other representations, and which is one and the same in all consciousness), cannot itself be accompanied by any further representations. I also call the unity of apperception the *transcendental* unity of self-consciousness, in order to indicate that *a priori* knowledge can be obtained from it. For the manifold representations given in an intuition would not one and all be *my* representations, if they did not all belong to one self-consciousness. What I mean is that, as my representations (even though I am not conscious of them as that), they must conform to the condition under which alone they *can* stand together in one universal self-consciousness, because otherwise they would not one and all belong to me. From this original combination much can be inferred.

The thoroughgoing identity of the apperception of a manifold that is given in intuition contains a synthesis of representations, and is possible only through the consciousness of this synthesis. For the empirical consciousness which accompanies different representations is itself dispersed and without reference to the identity of the subject. Such a reference comes about, not simply through my accompanying every representation with consciousness, but through my *adding* one representation to another and being conscious of the synthesis of them. Only because I am able to combine a manifold of given representations *in one consciousness* is it possible for me to represent to myself the *identity of the consciousness in these representations*, that is, only under the presupposition of some *synthetic* unity of apperception is the *analytic* unity of apperception possible. The thought that the representations given in intuition belong one and all *to me*, is therefore the same as the thought that I unite them in one self-consciousness, or can at least do so; and although that thought itself is not yet the consciousness of the synthesis of representations, it nevertheless presupposes the possibility of this synthesis. In other words, it is only because I am able to comprehend the manifold of representations in one consciousness that I call them one and all *my* representations. For otherwise I should have as many-coloured and varied a self as I have representations of which I am conscious. Synthetic unity of the manifold of intuitions, as given *a priori*, is thus the ground of the identity of apperception itself, which precedes *a priori* all *my* determinate thought. Combination, however, does not lie in the objects, and cannot be borrowed from them by perception and thus first be taken into the understanding. It is, rather, solely an act of the understanding, which itself is nothing but the faculty of combining *a priori* and of bringing the manifold of given representations under the unity of apperception; and the principle of this unity is, in fact, the supreme principle of all human knowledge."

—from Critique of Pure Reason . Translated, edited, and with an Introduction by Marcus Weigelt, based on the translation by Max Müller, pp. 124-128 ~ Immanuel Kant,
712:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study
   Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work.
   The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation.
   Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law.
   Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner.
   Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems.
   Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy.
   The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick.
   The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism.
   Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled.
   The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism.
   The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment.
   The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece.
   Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good.
   The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices.
   The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita.
   The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment.
   The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science.
   The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals.
   Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style.
   The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other.
   The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion.
   Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind.
   The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism.
   The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley.
   The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics.
   The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues.
   Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language.
   Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment.
   Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject.
   Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick.
   The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism.
   The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical.
   The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy.
   The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master.
   The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy.
   The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium.
   Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy.
   Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years.
   Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students.
   The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students.
   The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition.
   Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation.
   Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism.
   Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism.
   First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism.
   Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics.
   The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah.
   The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject.
   The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants #reading list,

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The noun immanuel kant has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Kant, Immanuel Kant ::: (influential German idealist philosopher (1724-1804))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun immanuel_kant

1 sense of immanuel kant                        

Sense 1
Kant, Immanuel Kant
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher
     => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
       => intellectual, intellect
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun immanuel_kant
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun immanuel_kant

1 sense of immanuel kant                        

Sense 1
Kant, Immanuel Kant
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun immanuel_kant

1 sense of immanuel kant                        

Sense 1
Kant, Immanuel Kant
  -> philosopher
   => nativist
   => Cynic
   => eclectic, eclecticist
   => empiricist
   => epistemologist
   => esthetician, aesthetician
   => ethicist, ethician
   => existentialist, existentialist philosopher, existential philosopher
   => gymnosophist
   => libertarian
   => mechanist
   => moralist
   => naturalist
   => necessitarian
   => nominalist
   => pluralist
   => pre-Socratic
   => realist
   => Scholastic
   => Sophist
   => Stoic
   => transcendentalist
   => yogi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Abelard, Peter Abelard, Pierre Abelard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaxagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arendt, Hannah Arendt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristotle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Averroes, ibn-Roshd, Abul-Walid Mohammed ibn-Ahmad Ibn-Mohammed ibn-Roshd
   HAS INSTANCE=> Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bentham, Jeremy Bentham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bergson, Henri Bergson, Henri Louis Bergson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bruno, Giordano Bruno
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buber, Martin Buber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cassirer, Ernst Cassirer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cleanthes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Comte, Auguste Comte, Isidore Auguste Marie Francois Comte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Condorcet, Marquis de Condorcet, Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas Caritat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Confucius, Kongfuze, K'ung Futzu, Kong the Master
   HAS INSTANCE=> Democritus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Derrida, Jacques Derrida
   HAS INSTANCE=> Descartes, Rene Descartes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dewey, John Dewey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diderot, Denis Diderot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diogenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Empedocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epictetus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epicurus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haeckel, Ernst Heinrich Haeckel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hartley, David Hartley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heraclitus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herbart, Johann Friedrich Herbart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herder, Johann Gottfried von Herder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hobbes, Thomas Hobbes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hume, David Hume
   HAS INSTANCE=> Husserl, Edmund Husserl
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hypatia
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, William James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kant, Immanuel Kant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kierkegaard, Soren Kierkegaard, Soren Aabye Kierkegaard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lao-tzu, Lao-tse, Lao-zi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leibniz, Leibnitz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Locke, John Locke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lucretius, Titus Lucretius Carus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lully, Raymond Lully, Ramon Lully
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mach, Ernst Mach
   HAS INSTANCE=> Machiavelli, Niccolo Machiavelli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maimonides, Moses Maimonides, Rabbi Moses Ben Maimon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malebranche, Nicolas de Malebranche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marcuse, Herbert Marcuse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Karl Marx
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mead, George Herbert Mead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, John Mill, John Stuart Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, James Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montesquieu, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu, Charles Louis de Secondat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, G. E. Moore, George Edward Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Occam, William of Occam, Ockham, William of Ockham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Origen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ortega y Gasset, Jose Ortega y Gasset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parmenides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pascal, Blaise Pascal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Peirce, Charles Peirce, Charles Sanders Peirce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Perry, Ralph Barton Perry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plato
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plotinus
   => Popper, Karl Popper, Sir Karl Raimund Popper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pythagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Quine, W. V. Quine, Willard Van Orman Quine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Radhakrishnan, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Sir Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Reid, Thomas Reid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schopenhauer, Arthur Schopenhauer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schweitzer, Albert Schweitzer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Socrates
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spencer, Herbert Spencer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spengler, Oswald Spengler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spinoza, de Spinoza, Baruch de Spinoza, Benedict de Spinoza
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steiner, Rudolf Steiner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stewart, Dugald Stewart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Teilhard de Chardin, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thales, Thales of Miletus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Theophrastus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Weil, Simone Weil
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whitehead, Alfred North Whitehead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Sir Bernard Williams, Bernard Arthur Owen Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wittgenstein, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Ludwig Josef Johan Wittgenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Xenophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Citium
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Elea




--- Grep of noun immanuel_kant
immanuel kant



IN WEBGEN [10000/19041]

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Wikipedia - Attila Zsivoczky -- Hungarian decathlete
Wikipedia - Audio codec
Wikipedia - Audio Video Standard -- Video codec
Wikipedia - Australian Competition and Consumer Commission v Baxter Healthcare Pty Ltd -- 2007 High Court of Australia decision
Wikipedia - Australian honours and awards system -- Orders, decorations, and medals of Australia
Wikipedia - Australian Honours Order of Wearing -- positioning of Australian Orders, Decorations and Medals
Wikipedia - Australia TradeCoast -- Economic development area of Brisbane
Wikipedia - Austrian Decoration for Science and Art
Wikipedia - Automated decision support
Wikipedia - Autumn Equinox: Amethyst Deceivers
Wikipedia - Avignon Papacy -- period during which the pope decided to live in Avignon, France rather than in Rome
Wikipedia - Avraham Mordechai Alter
Wikipedia - Awards and decorations of the United States government -- Civilian awards of the U.S. federal government
Wikipedia - A Warm December -- 1973 film by Sidney Poitier
Wikipedia - Baby Boy Horry -- American decedent
Wikipedia - Baby Tooth Survey -- Survey examining levels of radioactive material absorbed into the deciduous teeth of children
Wikipedia - Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women -- 1991 book by Susan Faludi
Wikipedia - Back to December -- 2010 single by Taylor Swift
Wikipedia - BackupHDDVD -- AACS decryption software
Wikipedia - Balamand declaration
Wikipedia - Balfour Declaration -- A letter written by Arthur Balfour in support of a "national home for the Jewish people"
Wikipedia - Ba Nam Sadec -- Vietnamese actress and singer
Wikipedia - Bankura horse -- Horse made from terracotta or clay in Panchmura Village, West Bengal, India. Originally used for ritual purposes, now used for decoration.
Wikipedia - Banna'i -- Use of glazed tiles alternating with plain brick for decorative purposes
Wikipedia - Baranyai's theorem -- Theorem that deals with the decompositions of complete hypergraphs
Wikipedia - Barbarossa decree -- Criminal order issued by the Wehrmacht during World War II
Wikipedia - Barebone's Parliament -- English parliament, Jul to Dec 1653
Wikipedia - Barmen Declaration
Wikipedia - Barnstar -- Painted object or image, often in the shape of a five-pointed star but occasionally in a circular "wagon wheel" style, used to decorate a barn in some parts of the United States
Wikipedia - Barry King (decathlete) -- British decathlete
Wikipedia - Bart Decrem -- American entrepreneur
Wikipedia - Barthe DeClements -- American author
Wikipedia - Bartosz Chajdecki -- Polish composer
Wikipedia - Basile Rolnin -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Bastien Auzeil -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Batavian Republic -- Dutch predecessor state, 1795-1806
Wikipedia - Battle of Actium -- decisive confrontation of the Final War of the Roman Republic
Wikipedia - Battle of Bagdoura -- Battle of the Berber Revolt; decisive Berber victory
Wikipedia - Battle of Batih -- Battle of the Khmelnytsky Uprising fought by Poland-Lithuania vs the Zaporozhian Cossacks and Crimean Khanate; decisive Cossack-Crimean victory
Wikipedia - Battle of Boyaca -- Decisive battle in Bolivar's campaign to liberate New Granada
Wikipedia - Battle of Chaeronea (338 BC) -- Battle in 338 BCE at which Philip II of Macedon decisively defeats the Greek city-states
Wikipedia - Battle of Changping -- Battle where the Qin state decisively defeats the Zhao state
Wikipedia - Battle of Chapakchur -- Decisive battle between Kara Koyunlu and Aq Qoyunlu Turkomans
Wikipedia - Battle of Didgori -- 1121 battle where the Kingdom of Georgia decisively defeated the Great Seljuq Empire
Wikipedia - Battle of Dien Bien Phu -- Decisive Viet Minh victory over the French near the end of the First Indochina War
Wikipedia - Battle of Goychay -- Battle in 1918 in the Caucasus that the Ottoman-Azeri force won decisively
Wikipedia - Battle of Guadalete -- Battle between the Visigothic Kingdom and the Umayyad Caliphate; decisive Umayyad victory leads to the fall of the Visigothic Kingdom and the Umayyad conquest of the peninsula
Wikipedia - Battle of Helm's Deep -- Decisive battle in Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings"
Wikipedia - Battle of Jengland -- Battle between the Duchy of Brittany and West Francia; decsive Breton victory
Wikipedia - Battle of Karnal -- Decisive battle of the Afsharid invasion of India
Wikipedia - Battle of KoniggrM-CM-$tz -- Decisive battle of the Austro-Prussian War
Wikipedia - Battle of Lechfeld -- Otto I of Germany decisively defeat the Magyars led by Bulcsu
Wikipedia - Battle of Legnano -- Middle ages battle; Lombard League decisively defeats the Holy Roman Empire
Wikipedia - Battle of Meloria (1284) -- Naval battle between Pisa and Genoa; decisive Genoan victory
Wikipedia - Battle of Mycale -- Battle that decisively ended Xerxes's invasion of Greece
Wikipedia - Battle of Nancy -- Decisive Burgundian defeat in the Burgundian Wars, 5 January 1477
Wikipedia - Battle of Oldendorf -- Battle (1633) during the Thirty Years' War which resulted in a decisive victory for the Swedish army over the Holy Roman Empire army
Wikipedia - Battle of Ortona -- World War II battle in Ortona, Italy in December 1943
Wikipedia - Battle of Pharsalus -- Decisive battle of Caesar's Civil War
Wikipedia - Battle of Pirot -- Decisive battle in the Serbo-Bulgarian War
Wikipedia - Battle of Pliska -- Battle between the First Bulgarian Empire and the Eastern Roman Empire; decisive Bulgarian victory
Wikipedia - Battle of Red Cliffs -- Sun Quan and Liu Bei decisively defeat Cao Cao in 208
Wikipedia - Battle of San Jacinto -- Decisive battle of the Texas Revolution
Wikipedia - Battle of Sentinum -- Decisive battle of the Third Samnite War
Wikipedia - Battle of Singapore -- World War II battle; decisive Japanese victory
Wikipedia - Battle of Warka -- Battle between Poland-Lithuania and Sweden; decisive Polish victory
Wikipedia - Battle of Wittstock -- Battle (1636) during the Thirty Years' War in which a Swedish-allied army decisively defeated a combined Imperial-Saxon army
Wikipedia - Battle of Yad Mordechai -- 1948 battle in the Middle East
Wikipedia - Battle of Yamen -- 1279 naval battle between the Song dynasty and the Mongol Yuan dynasty; decisive Yuan victory
Wikipedia - Baxter v. Montana -- Montana Supreme Court decision ruling physician-assisted dying is not illegal
Wikipedia - Bayes estimator -- Estimator or decision rule that minimizes the posterior expected value of a loss function
Wikipedia - BCD (character encoding) -- Six-bit Binary-Coded Decimal codes
Wikipedia - BCI CitiRider -- Double decker bus, produced since 2015
Wikipedia - Beadwork -- Decoration technique
Wikipedia - Bear Party -- 1952 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Beat GM-CM-$hwiler -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Beatification -- Recognition accorded by the Catholic Church of a deceased person's entrance into heaven
Wikipedia - Beau Jocque -- American zydeco accordionist, singer, and songwriter
Wikipedia - Below Deck Mediterranean -- Television series
Wikipedia - Below Deck Sailing Yacht -- American reality television series
Wikipedia - Below Deck -- 2013 reality television series
Wikipedia - Benders' decomposition
Wikipedia - Beniamino Poserina -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Benjamin Gregory -- British decathlete
Wikipedia - Benjamin Jensen -- Norwegian decathlete
Wikipedia - Ben Landeck -- British playwright
Wikipedia - Berkeley SkyDeck -- Startup accelerator and incubator
Wikipedia - Berlin Declaration (1945) -- 1945 historical document
Wikipedia - Berlin Decree
Wikipedia - Bernard Decoux -- French gymnast
Wikipedia - Bernartice (Trutnov District) -- Village in Trutnov District of Hradec Kralove Region
Wikipedia - Berthold II, Count of Andechs
Wikipedia - Bertil Fasten -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Bertil Ohlson -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Bert Laeyendecker -- Dutch sociologist
Wikipedia - Beta decay transition -- Physical phenomenom
Wikipedia - Beta decay -- Type of radioactive decay
Wikipedia - Bettina Schieferdecker -- East German artistic gymnast
Wikipedia - BettyLou DeCroce -- Member of the New Jersey General Assembly
Wikipedia - Beverley Dunn (set decorator) -- Australian set decorator
Wikipedia - Bhlmann decompression algorithm
Wikipedia - Bhopal-Indore AC Double Decker Express -- AC train service
Wikipedia - Bible conspiracy theory -- Conspiracy theory that what is known about the Bible is a deception to suppress ancient truths
Wikipedia - Big Decisions -- Single by My Morning Jacket
Wikipedia - Bilevel rail car -- Railway carriage with two levels (double decker)
Wikipedia - Bill Maher: The Decider -- 2007 stand-up comedy special by Bill Maher
Wikipedia - Bill of attainder -- Legislative act declaring a particular person guilty
Wikipedia - Bill Toomey -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Billy Liar (song) -- 2004 single by The Decemberists
Wikipedia - Binary coded decimal
Wikipedia - Binary-coded decimal
Wikipedia - Binary decision diagrams
Wikipedia - Binary decision diagram
Wikipedia - Binary decoder
Wikipedia - Bindi (decoration) -- Dot worn on the center of the forehead
Wikipedia - Biodegradable plastic -- Plastics that can be decomposed by the action of living organisms
Wikipedia - Biodegradation -- Decomposition by living organisms
Wikipedia - Biogas -- Gases produced by decomposing organic matter
Wikipedia - Biological immortality -- State in which the rate of mortality from senescence is stable or decreasing
Wikipedia - Bi-quinary coded decimal -- Numeral encoding scheme
Wikipedia - Bitcoin -- Decentralized cryptocurrency
Wikipedia - Bjorgvin Holm -- Icelandic decathlete
Wikipedia - Bjorn Barrefors -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Black & Decker Workmate -- The Workmate is a general purpose, portable workbench
Wikipedia - Black Madonna -- Artistic deciption of Virgin Mary with Infant Jesus as a black
Wikipedia - Blanket stitch -- Deep, widely-spaced buttonhole stitch used to prevent raveling of raw edges or as a decoration
Wikipedia - BlM-CM-% Jungfrun M-CM-^Vstra Lighthouse -- Decommissioned lighthouse in Oskarshamn, Sweden
Wikipedia - Blue Deckert -- American actor
Wikipedia - Blueshift -- Decrease in wavelength of electromagnetic radiation
Wikipedia - BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making -- Open-access scientific journal
Wikipedia - Boatswain -- Supervisor of a ship's deck department
Wikipedia - Bob Adams (decathlete) -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Bob Altena -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Bob Dechert -- Canadian former Member of Parliament
Wikipedia - Bob Mathias -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Body Without Soul -- 1996 film by Wiktor Grodecki
Wikipedia - Bog -- Type of wetland that accumulates peat due to incomplete decomposition of plant matter
Wikipedia - Boldt Decision
Wikipedia - Bologna declaration
Wikipedia - Bombardier Double-deck Coach -- Bi-level passenger rail car
Wikipedia - Book of Nursery and Mother Goose Rhymes -- 1955 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Boozoo Chavis -- American zydeco musician, singer and songwriter
Wikipedia - Borg (cluster manager) -- Google software, predecessor of Kubernetes
Wikipedia - Boris Ivanov (athlete) -- Soviet decathlete
Wikipedia - Boris Skossyreff -- Russian adventurer and self-declared King of Andorra
Wikipedia - Bothriomyrmex decapitans -- Species of ant
Wikipedia - Botroseya Church bombing -- Suicide bombing on 11 December 2016 inside a Coptic church in Cairo, Egypt
Wikipedia - Bounded growth -- function increasing at a decreasing rate of increase
Wikipedia - Boxing Day -- 26 December
Wikipedia - Braarudosphaera bigelowii -- A dodecahedron shaped coccolithophore.
Wikipedia - Bradley McStravick -- British decathlete
Wikipedia - Bremsstrahlung -- Electromagnetic radiation produced by the deceleration of a charged particle when deflected by another charged particle
Wikipedia - Brenda MacGibbon -- Canadian mathematician, statistician and decision scientist
Wikipedia - Brent Newdick -- New Zealand decathlete
Wikipedia - Brent Spence Bridge -- Double decker, bridge that carries Interstates 71 and 75 across the Ohio River between Covington, KY and Cincinnati, OH
Wikipedia - Brian Andrew Hills -- Physiologist who worked on decompression theory
Wikipedia - Briginshaw v Briginshaw -- Prominent Australian High Court case decided in 1938
Wikipedia - British Broadcasting Company -- British commercial radio broadcaster (1922-1926); predecessor to BBC
Wikipedia - Bronchodilator -- Substance that decreases resistance in respiratory airways and increases airflow to the lungs
Wikipedia - Bronston v. United States -- 1972 U.S. Supreme Court decision holding that literally truthful testimony is not perjury
Wikipedia - Bronze Star Medal -- United States military decoration for wartime meritorious service or valor
Wikipedia - Brooklyn Decker -- American model and actress
Wikipedia - Brothers Volcano -- A submarine volcano in the Kermadec Arc, north east of New Zealand
Wikipedia - Bruce Weintraub -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Bruno Decarli -- German actor
Wikipedia - Bruno Decc -- Brazilian film director and writer
Wikipedia - Brushing (e-commerce) -- Deceitful technique used in e-commerce to boost seller ratings
Wikipedia - Bryan Clay -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Bryan Dechart -- American actor, Twitch streamer and YouTuber
Wikipedia - Bryan DeCorso -- Canadian professional golfer
Wikipedia - Bryson DeChambeau -- American professional golfer
Wikipedia - Buckleria madecassea -- Species of plume moth
Wikipedia - Buckwheat Zydeco -- American accordionist
Wikipedia - Buhlmann decompression algorithm -- Algorithm for modelling of inert gases entering and leaving body tissues in solution as pressure changes
Wikipedia - Bullrun (decryption program)
Wikipedia - Bundy Report -- 1960s New York City school decentralization proposal
Wikipedia - Burstiness -- Intermittent increases and decreases in activity
Wikipedia - Business decision mapping
Wikipedia - Buying Decision Process
Wikipedia - Buying decision process
Wikipedia - Byford Dolphin diving bell accident -- Explosive decompression of an occupied saturation chamber
Wikipedia - Cabells' Predatory Reports -- Proprietary list of deceptive, predatory academic journals
Wikipedia - Cabinet of Bangladesh -- Decision-making body of Bangladesh
Wikipedia - Cabinet of Eswatini -- Decision-making body of the Eswatini government
Wikipedia - Cabinet of New Zealand -- Central decision-making forum of the New Zealand Government
Wikipedia - Cabinet of Pakistan -- Decision-making body of the Government of Pakistan
Wikipedia - Cabinet of the United Kingdom -- Decision-making body of the UK government
Wikipedia - Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam
Wikipedia - Caitlyn Jenner -- American reality television personality and retired Olympic decathlete champion
Wikipedia - Caldecot Chubb -- American film producer
Wikipedia - Caldecott Medal -- Annual U. S. children's book illustrator award
Wikipedia - Caldecott MRT station -- MRT station in Singapore
Wikipedia - Caldecott Tunnel
Wikipedia - Calliandra decrescens -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Caltech Submillimeter Observatory -- Decommissioned radio telescope in Hawaii, USA
Wikipedia - Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness
Wikipedia - Camille Decoppet -- Swiss politician
Wikipedia - Campbell v MGN Ltd -- 2004 House of Lords decision on privacy in English law
Wikipedia - Camponotus decipiens -- Species of ant
Wikipedia - Camponotus longideclivis -- Species of ant
Wikipedia - Canadian Forces' Decoration -- Canadian award bestowed upon members of the Canadian Armed Forces
Wikipedia - Canal+ Decale -- French pay television channel
Wikipedia - Canonization -- Act by which churches declare that a person who has died is a saint
Wikipedia - Canopy bed -- Decorative bed somewhat similar to a four-poster bed
Wikipedia - Cantor's intersection theorem -- On decreasing nested sequences of non-empty compact sets
Wikipedia - Caparison -- Cloth covering laid over a horse or other animal for protection and decoratio
Wikipedia - Capital Cities/ABC Inc. -- predecessor to Walt Disney Television
Wikipedia - Capital punishment in Delaware -- Declared unconstitutional in 2016
Wikipedia - Captain Gumbo -- Dutch zydeco and Cajun music band
Wikipedia - Capture of Fort William and Mary -- Battle during the American Revolutionary War on December 14, 1774
Wikipedia - Card sharp -- Person who uses skill and deception to win at poker or other card games
Wikipedia - Car float -- Unpowered barge with railroad tracks mounted on its deck
Wikipedia - Carl Biddiscombe -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Carl Decaluwe -- Belgian politician
Wikipedia - Carlo Butti -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Carlos Chinin -- Brazilian decathlete
Wikipedia - Carlos Decotelli -- Brazilian economist and professor
Wikipedia - Carlos O'Connell -- Irish decathlete
Wikipedia - Carl R. Deckard -- American inventor
Wikipedia - Carl Wilhelm von Heideck -- German general (1788-1861)
Wikipedia - Carmella DeCesare -- American model
Wikipedia - Carnation Co v Quebec (Agricultural Marketing Board) -- Constitutional decision of the Supreme Court of Canada
Wikipedia - Carpatolechia decorella -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Carrick mat -- Flat woven decorative knot
Wikipedia - Carrion -- Dead and decaying flesh of an animal
Wikipedia - Carter v Canada (AG) -- Decision of the Supreme Court of Canada
Wikipedia - Casa dei Tre Oci, Venice -- Neo-gothic palace on the island of Giudecca, Venice, Italy
Wikipedia - Cassette deck
Wikipedia - Catalan declaration of independence -- Internationally unrecognised October 2017 announcement by which the Parliament of Catalonia unilaterally declared the independence of Catalonia from Spain
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Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia external links cleanup from December 2012
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia introduction cleanup from December 2017
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia introduction cleanup from December 2018
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia introduction cleanup from December 2019
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia introduction cleanup from December 2020
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia list cleanup from December 2015
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia pages needing cleanup from December 2012
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia spam cleanup from December 2012
Wikipedia - Category:Wikipedia spam cleanup from December 2015
Wikipedia - Catfishing -- Deceptive online social network presence
Wikipedia - Catholic funeral -- Service of the Church that accompanies a deceased person and his entourage
Wikipedia - Catholic-Orthodox Joint declaration of 1965
Wikipedia - Catus Decianus -- 1st century AD procurator of Roman Britain
Wikipedia - CC-PP game -- A theoretical concept in resource allocation to explain economic decision-making
Wikipedia - Cedric Dubler -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Ceilings of the Natural History Museum, London -- Decorated ceilings
Wikipedia - Census of India -- Decennial census mandated by the 1948 Census of India Act
Wikipedia - Centered decagonal number
Wikipedia - Centered dodecahedral number
Wikipedia - Central Committee of the South African Communist Party -- Decision making-structure of the South African Communist Party
Wikipedia - Cephalotes decoloratus -- Species of ant
Wikipedia - Cephalotes decolor -- Species of ant
Wikipedia - Ceramic art -- Decorative objects made from clay and other raw materials by the process of pottery
Wikipedia - Certiorari -- Court process to seek judicial review of a decision of a lower court
Wikipedia - Cevennes National Park -- French national park in Lozere, Gard, Ardeche and Aveyron
Wikipedia - Chad Smith (athlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Chaim Mordechai Katz
Wikipedia - Chalica -- Unitarian Universalist holiday in December
Wikipedia - Chalumeau -- Woodwind instrument; predecessor of modern clarinet
Wikipedia - Champion Film Company -- Early American film company, a predecessor to Universal Pictures
Wikipedia - Chang Singchow -- Chinese decathlete
Wikipedia - Chariot burial -- Tombs where deceased are buried with their chariot
Wikipedia - Charles Blomfield (artist) -- British born New Zealand decorator, artist and music teacher (1848-1926)
Wikipedia - Charles Carroll of Carrollton -- American planter and signatory of the Declaration of Independence
Wikipedia - Charles Dechamps -- French actor
Wikipedia - Charles Deckert -- French gymnast
Wikipedia - Charles Edgar Buckeridge -- English church decorative artist
Wikipedia - Charles F. Widdecke -- U.S. Marine Corps Major General
Wikipedia - Charles Lomberg -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Charles Wesley Shilling -- US Navy physician and decompression and hyperbaric medicine researcher
Wikipedia - Charlotte Woodward Pierce -- Only woman to sign the Declaration of Sentiments and live to see the 19th Amendment passed
Wikipedia - Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant -- Decommissioned nuclear power plant in Ukraine
Wikipedia - Cheryl-Lynn Vidal -- Belize government prodecutor lawyer
Wikipedia - Chief mate -- Licensed mariner and head of the deck department of a merchant ship
Wikipedia - Chiel Warners -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Chinese telegraph code -- Four-digit decimal character encoding for electrically telegraphing messages written with Chinese characters
Wikipedia - Choice -- Deciding between multiple options
Wikipedia - Cholesky decomposition
Wikipedia - Chris Boyles -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Chris Horodecki -- Canadian mixed martial artist
Wikipedia - Chris Huffins -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Christian Gugler -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Christian Plaziat -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Christmas cracker -- Table decorations that make a snapping sound when pulled
Wikipedia - Christmas decoration -- Decorations used during the Christmas period
Wikipedia - Christmas Flood of 1717 -- December 1717 North Sea storm
Wikipedia - Christmas lights -- Decorative lighting used at Christmastime
Wikipedia - Christmas tree -- Decorated tree used to symbolise festive cheer
Wikipedia - Christmas -- Holiday originating in Christianity, usually December 25
Wikipedia - Christophe Decarnin -- French fashion designer
Wikipedia - Christopher deCharms
Wikipedia - Christopher Randolph (decathlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Chris Vincent (motorcycle sidecar racer)
Wikipedia - Chubby Carrier -- American zydeco musician
Wikipedia - Chukat -- Hebrew for "decree"
Wikipedia - Church covenant -- Declaration in which their duties as church members towards God and their fellow believers are outlined
Wikipedia - Church of the East -- An Eastern Christian Church that in 410 organised itself within the Sasanid Empire and in 424 declared its leader independent of other Christian leaders; from the Persian Empire it spread to other parts of Asia in late antiquity and the Middle Ages
Wikipedia - Cindy Carr -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - CineForm -- Open source video codec
Wikipedia - Cipher -- Algorithm for encrypting and decrypting information
Wikipedia - Circle of Deception -- 1960 film
Wikipedia - City Council of Tampere -- Highest decision-making organ in the Finnish city of Tampere
Wikipedia - City Hall, Norwich -- Art Deco building in Norwich, England
Wikipedia - City Municipality of Slovenj Gradec -- City municipality of Slovenia
Wikipedia - City Stadium (Molodechno) -- Sports stadium in Belarus
Wikipedia - Civic Crown -- Second-highest ancient Roman military decoration
Wikipedia - Civil awards and decorations
Wikipedia - CivilWarLand in Bad Decline -- Collection of George Saunders short stories published 1992-1995
Wikipedia - C. J. Chenier -- American zydeco musician, singer and songwriter
Wikipedia - Classic Maya collapse -- decline of classic Maya civilization
Wikipedia - Claston Bernard -- Jamaican decathlete
Wikipedia - Claude E. Carpenter -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Claudelle Deckert -- German actress and model
Wikipedia - Claudio Escauriza -- Paraguayan decathlete
Wikipedia - Claus Marek -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Clear the Decks -- 1929 film
Wikipedia - Client-Side Decoration
Wikipedia - Client-side decoration
Wikipedia - Clifford Brooks (athlete) -- Barbadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Clifton Chenier -- American Zydeco accordion player and singer
Wikipedia - Climate emergency declaration -- Emergency proclaimed due to climate change
Wikipedia - Clinical decision support system
Wikipedia - Clive Longe -- British decathlete
Wikipedia - Cluster decay -- Nuclear decay in which an atomic nucleus emits a small cluster of neutrons and protons
Wikipedia - Clustered file system -- Decentralized filesystem
Wikipedia - Clyde Coffman -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - CMLL Super Viernes (December 2012) -- Mexican professional wrestling show series
Wikipedia - Cochylimorpha decolorella -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Codec 2
Wikipedia - Codecademy -- Online code-learning platform
Wikipedia - Codecasa -- Italian luxury super yacht building firm
Wikipedia - CodeCombat -- 2013 educational video game
Wikipedia - Codec -- Device or software for encoding or decoding a digital data stream
Wikipedia - Coffin birth -- Expulsion of a nonviable fetus through the vaginal opening of the decomposing body of a deceased pregnant woman as a result of the increasing pressure of intra-abdominal gases.
Wikipedia - Cohn-Brandt-Cohn (CBC) Film Sales Corporation -- Former American film studio; predecessor to Columbia Pictures
Wikipedia - Colin Boreham -- British decathlete
Wikipedia - Color blindness -- Inability or decreased ability to see colour or colour differences
Wikipedia - Columbia TriStar Television -- American television production and distribution studio; predecessor to Sony Pictures Television
Wikipedia - Combat Infantryman Badge -- United States Army decoration
Wikipedia - Command Decision (film) -- 1948 film by Sam Wood
Wikipedia - Command Decision (novel) -- Book by William Wister Haines
Wikipedia - Commendation Medal -- Mid-level United States military decoration
Wikipedia - Communications Decency Act -- Attempt by the United States Congress to regulate pornographic material on the Internet
Wikipedia - Comparison of video codecs
Wikipedia - Compost -- organic matter that has been decomposed
Wikipedia - Computer Decisions -- computer magazine, monthly, 1970s & 1980s
Wikipedia - Computer says no -- Decision making based on data but without common sense
Wikipedia - Conditional-access module -- Content decryption key
Wikipedia - Confronted animals -- Decorative motif of two animals facing each other
Wikipedia - Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia -- Congenital hemolytic anemia characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, and resulting from a decrease in the number of red blood cells (RBCs) in the body and a less than normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood
Wikipedia - Con O'Callaghan (decathlete) -- Irish decathlete
Wikipedia - Consensus decision-making -- Making decisions based on a group's approval
Wikipedia - Consent decree
Wikipedia - Conservatism (diving) -- Approach to risk reduction for decompression
Wikipedia - Consolidation of Labor Laws -- Decree which governs labor relations in Brazil
Wikipedia - Constant Bucher -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Constantinos Decavallas -- Greek modernist architect
Wikipedia - Conus decolrobertoi -- Species of sea snail
Wikipedia - Conus decoratus -- Species of sea snail
Wikipedia - Conus kermadecensis -- Species of sea snail
Wikipedia - Conus madecassinus -- Species of sea snail
Wikipedia - Converter/descrambler -- Device that decodes a Cable TV signal
Wikipedia - Cope and stick -- Frame and panel technique for decorating doors, wainscoting, cabinets, furniture, and homes
Wikipedia - Cornelia Ludecke -- Polar researcher, author
Wikipedia - Cornice -- Horizontal decorative molding that crowns a building or furniture
Wikipedia - Cornus kousa -- Species of small deciduous tree commonly known as kousa dogwood
Wikipedia - Correa decumbens -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Council of the European Union decisions on designer drugs
Wikipedia - Council -- Group of people who come together to consult, deliberate, or make decisions
Wikipedia - Countdown (2019 film) -- 2019 film by Justin Dec
Wikipedia - Countdown -- Decreasing count indicating the time (typically in seconds) remaining before an event is scheduled to occur
Wikipedia - Counts of Andechs
Wikipedia - Coup d'etat of December Twelfth -- 1979 coup d'etat in South Korea that brought Chun Doo-hwan to power
Wikipedia - Coupe-decale -- Ivorian dance music genre
Wikipedia - Cour nationale du droit d'asile -- French administrative court that reviews appeals from decisions of the OFPRA
Wikipedia - COVID-19 pandemic cases in December 2020 -- Number of cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Wikipedia - COVID-19 pandemic deaths in December 2020 -- Number of cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Wikipedia - Crassula decumbens -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Cretan hieroglyphs -- Undecyphered bronze-age Cretan writing system
Wikipedia - Crew resource management -- Aircrew training concept to improve communication and decision-making
Wikipedia - Cross-cultural differences in decision-making
Wikipedia - Cross for the Four Day Marches -- Dutch decoration
Wikipedia - Cross of Honour of the German Mother -- Nazi German decoration honouring mothers of large families
Wikipedia - Cross "For the Capture of Praga" -- 18th c. military decoration awarded by the Russian Empire during the KoM-EM-^[ciuszko Uprising
Wikipedia - Crow Boy -- 1956 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Cryptanalysis of the Enigma -- Decryption of the cipher of the Enigma machine
Wikipedia - Curtis Beach -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Cut-off -- Modified and decorated jacket worn in biker, metal and punk subcultures
Wikipedia - C variable types and declarations
Wikipedia - Cycle for Declamation -- Song cycle by Priaulx Rainier
Wikipedia - Cyclodecene -- Cycloalkene
Wikipedia - Cylindrical algebraic decomposition -- Decomposing n-space into cells in which each of a set of polynomials has constant sign
Wikipedia - Czarface Meets Ghostface -- Collaborative studio album by 7L, Esoteric, Ghostface Killah and Inspectah Deck
Wikipedia - Czechoslovakia -- 1918-1992 country in Central Europe, predecessor of the Czech Republic and Slovakia
Wikipedia - DAF SB220 -- Full-size single-decker bus chassis produced by DAF Bus International
Wikipedia - Daisuke Ikeda (decathlete) -- Japanese decathlete
Wikipedia - Dalton Junction rail crash -- night mail train crash 28 December 1869
Wikipedia - Damian Warner -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Damjan Sitar -- Slovenian decathlete
Wikipedia - Dan DeCarlo -- American cartoonist
Wikipedia - Daniel Decker -- Puerto Rican composer
Wikipedia - Daniel F. Galouye -- Deceased American science fiction writer.
Wikipedia - Daniel Robert -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Danie Theron Medal -- Military decoration of the Republic of South Africa
Wikipedia - Danny Neudecker -- American pair skater
Wikipedia - Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition -- algorithm for solving linear programming problems with special structure
Wikipedia - Dare House -- Art deco building in Chennai, India
Wikipedia - Dario Simoni -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Dariusz Ludwig -- Polish decathlete
Wikipedia - Darjah Utama Temasek -- Civil awards and decorations of Singapore
Wikipedia - Darrell Silvera -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Dashing in December -- 2020 film directed by Jake Helgren
Wikipedia - Daud Ali -- American historian of Indian decent
Wikipedia - Daum (studio) -- Maker of decorative glass in Nancy, France
Wikipedia - Dave Edstrom -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Dave Johnson (decathlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Dave Steen (decathlete) -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - David Bigham -- British decathlete
Wikipedia - David DeCoste -- American politician
Wikipedia - David DeCoteau -- American-Canadian film director and producer
Wikipedia - David di Donatello for Best Sets and Decorations -- Annual Italian film award
Wikipedia - David Gervasi -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - David Gomez Martinez -- Spanish decathlete
Wikipedia - David Klech -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - David Mewes -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - David M. Gaedecke -- American Air Force general
Wikipedia - David Uzochukwu -- Austrian-Nigerian photographer, born December 10, 1998
Wikipedia - Day of Reconciliation -- Public holiday in South Africa on 16 December
Wikipedia - D-Day naval deceptions -- Operations Taxable, Glimmer and Big Drum were tactical military deceptions conducted on 6 June 1944
Wikipedia - Dead drop -- Method of espionage tradecraft
Wikipedia - Deadly Deception: General Electric, Nuclear Weapons and Our Environment -- 1991 film
Wikipedia - Dean Barton-Smith -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Death and state funeral of Kim Jong-il -- Funeral In December 2011
Wikipedia - Deaths in December 1997 -- Notable deaths
Wikipedia - Deaths in December 2015 -- Notable deaths
Wikipedia - Deaths in December 2017 -- Notable deaths
Wikipedia - Deaths in December 2018 -- Deaths
Wikipedia - Deaths in December 2019 -- Notable deaths
Wikipedia - Deaths in December 2020 -- Notable deaths
Wikipedia - DEC-10
Wikipedia - DEC 3000 AXP
Wikipedia - DEC 4000 AXP
Wikipedia - DEC 7000/10000 AXP
Wikipedia - Decade box -- Electronic test equipment
Wikipedia - Decade (log scale)
Wikipedia - Decadence (TV series) -- Australian television documentary series
Wikipedia - decadence
Wikipedia - Deca-Dence -- 2020 anime television series
Wikipedia - Decadence -- A perceived decay in standards, morals, dignity, religious faith, or skill at governing
Wikipedia - Decadent Movement
Wikipedia - Decadent movement
Wikipedia - Decadent
Wikipedia - Decade of Behavior
Wikipedia - Decade of the Mind -- Neuroscience advancement initiative
Wikipedia - Decades of the New World
Wikipedia - Decade (solitaire) -- Patience card game
Wikipedia - Decades (TV network) -- American digital television network
Wikipedia - Decade -- Period of 10 years
Wikipedia - Decadiomus -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Decagonal number
Wikipedia - Decagon -- shape with ten sides
Wikipedia - Decagram (geometry) -- 10-pointed star polygon
Wikipedia - Decahedron
Wikipedia - Decaisnina signata -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - DeCal (disambiguation)
Wikipedia - Decalobanthus mammosus -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Decalogue
Wikipedia - DEC Alpha -- 64-bit RISC microprocessor
Wikipedia - Decameron Nights (1924 film) -- 1924 film
Wikipedia - Decameron
Wikipedia - Decamethonium
Wikipedia - Decane -- Alkane hydrocarbon; component of gasoline (petrol) and kerosene
Wikipedia - Decani Monastery
Wikipedia - Decantha borkhausenii -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Decanus -- Ancient Roman junior NCO rank
Wikipedia - Decan -- city in Kosovo
Wikipedia - Decan -- Groups of stars in Ancient Egyptian astronomy
Wikipedia - Decapitated (band) -- Polish death metal band
Wikipedia - Decapitation strike -- military strategy
Wikipedia - Decapitation -- Total separation of the head from the body
Wikipedia - Decapod anatomy -- The entire structure of a decapod crustacean
Wikipedia - Decapoda -- Order of crustaceans
Wikipedia - Decapolis
Wikipedia - Decapping complex -- Eukaryotic protein complex that removes the 5' cap on mRNA
Wikipedia - Decarboxylation
Wikipedia - Decarthria -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Decarthron -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Decatastrophizing -- Cognitive restructuring technique to treat cognitive distortions
Wikipedia - Decathexis
Wikipedia - Decathlon (retailer) -- French sporting goods retailer
Wikipedia - Decathlon -- Athletic track and field competition
Wikipedia - Decatur, Alabama -- City in Alabama, United States
Wikipedia - Decatur Boulevard -- Street in Las Vegas, Nevada
Wikipedia - Decatur Correctional Center -- Prison for women in Decatur, Illinois
Wikipedia - Decatur Creek -- Creek in Worcester, New York, United States
Wikipedia - Decatur Dorsey -- American soldier in the American Civil War (1836-1891)
Wikipedia - Decatur Independent School District -- Public school district in Texas
Wikipedia - Decatur Public Schools District 61 -- School district in Macon County, Illinois
Wikipedia - Decatur "Bucky" Trotter -- American politician
Wikipedia - Decaturville crater -- Impact crater in Missouri, United States
Wikipedia - DeCavalcante crime family -- Italian-American organized crime family
Wikipedia - Decay constant
Wikipedia - Decay (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Decay (professional wrestling) -- Professional wrestling stable
Wikipedia - Decay scheme -- A graphical presentation of all the transitions occurring in a decay of a radioactive substance
Wikipedia - Decay theory
Wikipedia - Decazeville -- Commune in Occitanie, France
Wikipedia - DEC BATCH-11/DOS-11
Wikipedia - Decca Aitkenhead
Wikipedia - Deccan Archaeological and Cultural Research Institute -- Non-profit organisation operating in the Deccan region of India
Wikipedia - Deccan Charters -- Indian aviation company
Wikipedia - Deccan Chronicle -- Indian English-language daily newspaper
Wikipedia - Deccan Herald -- Karnataka newspaper
Wikipedia - Deccani Muslims -- Ethno geographical community
Wikipedia - Deccan Medal -- East India Company medal for campaigns of 1778-84
Wikipedia - Deccanodon -- Genus of prozostrodontian cynodonts
Wikipedia - Deccan painting -- Form of miniature painting
Wikipedia - Deccan Plateau -- Very large plateau in India
Wikipedia - Deccan Radio -- Community radio station in Hyderabad, India
Wikipedia - Deccan Sultanates
Wikipedia - Deccan sultanates -- Former states in India
Wikipedia - Deccan TV -- Indian Telugu-language TV channel
Wikipedia - Decca Records -- US/British record label
Wikipedia - Decebal Traian Remes -- Romanian politician
Wikipedia - Decebalus (cicada) -- Genus of insects
Wikipedia - Deceit
Wikipedia - Deceiver of the People -- 1921 film
Wikipedia - Deceleration parameter
Wikipedia - Deceleron
Wikipedia - Decellia bimaculipennis -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - December 10 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 11 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 12 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 13 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 14 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 14
Wikipedia - December 15-17, 2020 nor'easter -- Category 4 North American nor'easter in 2020
Wikipedia - December 15 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 15
Wikipedia - December 16 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 17 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 18 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 1900 -- List of events that occurred in December 1900
Wikipedia - December 1901 -- List of events that occurred in December 1901
Wikipedia - December 1902 -- List of events that occurred in December 1902
Wikipedia - December 1909 -- List of events that occurred in December 1909
Wikipedia - December 1910 -- Month of 1910
Wikipedia - December 1911 -- Month of 1911
Wikipedia - December 1912 -- Month of 1912
Wikipedia - December 1913 -- Month of 1913
Wikipedia - December 1914 -- Month of 1914
Wikipedia - December 1915 -- Month of 1915
Wikipedia - December 1916 -- Month in 1916
Wikipedia - December 1917 coup d'etat -- December 1917 coup d'etat
Wikipedia - December 1917 -- Month in 1917
Wikipedia - December 1918 -- Month in 1918
Wikipedia - December 1920 -- Month of 1920
Wikipedia - December 1921 -- Month of 1921
Wikipedia - December 1922 -- Month of 1922
Wikipedia - December 1923 -- Month of 1923
Wikipedia - December 1924 -- Month of 1924
Wikipedia - December 1925 -- Month of 1925
Wikipedia - December 1926 -- Month of 1926
Wikipedia - December 1927 -- Month of 1927
Wikipedia - December 1928 -- Month of 1928
Wikipedia - December 1929 -- Month of 1929
Wikipedia - December 1930 -- Month of 1930
Wikipedia - December 1931 -- Month of 1931
Wikipedia - December 1932 -- Month of 1932
Wikipedia - December 1933 -- Month of 1933
Wikipedia - December 1934 -- Month of 1934
Wikipedia - December 1935 -- Month of 1935
Wikipedia - December 1936 -- Month of 1936
Wikipedia - December 1937 -- Month of 1937
Wikipedia - December 1938 -- Month of 1938
Wikipedia - December 1939 -- Month of 1939
Wikipedia - December 1940 -- Month of 1940
Wikipedia - December 1941 -- Month of 1941
Wikipedia - December 1942 -- Month of 1942
Wikipedia - December 1943 -- Month of 1943
Wikipedia - December 1944 -- Month of 1944
Wikipedia - December 1945 -- Month of 1945
Wikipedia - December 1946 -- Month of 1946
Wikipedia - December 1947 -- Month of 1947
Wikipedia - December 1948 -- Month of 1948
Wikipedia - December 1949 -- Month of 1949
Wikipedia - December 1950 -- Month of 1950
Wikipedia - December 1953 -- Month of 1953
Wikipedia - December 1954 -- Month of 1954
Wikipedia - December 1955 -- Month of 1955
Wikipedia - December 1959 -- Month of 1959
Wikipedia - December 1960 -- Month of 1960
Wikipedia - December 1961 -- Month of 1961
Wikipedia - December 1962 -- Month of 1962
Wikipedia - December, 1963 (Oh, What a Night) -- 1975 single by the Four Seasons
Wikipedia - December 1963 -- Month of 1963
Wikipedia - December 1964 South Vietnamese coup -- Coup by General NguyM-aM-;M-^En Khanh
Wikipedia - December 1964 -- Month of 1964
Wikipedia - December 1965 -- Month of 1965
Wikipedia - December 1966 -- Month of 1966
Wikipedia - December 1967 -- Month of 1967
Wikipedia - December 1968 -- Month of 1968
Wikipedia - December 1969 nor'easter -- Strong winter storm that affected the northeastern US
Wikipedia - December 1970 -- Month of 1970
Wikipedia - December 1971 -- Month of 1971
Wikipedia - December 1972 -- Month of 1972
Wikipedia - December 1973 -- Month of 1973
Wikipedia - December 1980 -- Month of 1980
Wikipedia - December 19 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 19
Wikipedia - December 1 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 2001 riots in Argentina -- Period of civil unrest in Argentina
Wikipedia - December (2008 film) -- 2008 drama film directed by Selton Mello
Wikipedia - December 2008 Northeastern United States ice storm -- American natural disaster
Wikipedia - December 2011 Nigeria clashes -- 2011 incident in Nigeria
Wikipedia - December 2013 Spuyten Duyvil derailment -- Passenger commuter train accident that killed four
Wikipedia - December 2013 Volgograd bombings -- Two suicide bombings in the city of Volgograd, Volgograd Oblast, Southern Russia
Wikipedia - December 2014 Sinjar offensive
Wikipedia - December 2015 Hindu Kush earthquake -- Earthquake
Wikipedia - December 2016 Aden suicide bombings
Wikipedia - December 2016 Baghdad bombings
Wikipedia - December 2016 Jakarta protests -- Mass protest by Islamist group in Indonesia
Wikipedia - December 2017 Kabul suicide bombing
Wikipedia - December 2018 airstrikes in Gandarshe -- Airstrikes against Al-Shabaab in Somalia
Wikipedia - December 2020 Afghanistan attacks -- Targeted killings by insurgents in December 2020
Wikipedia - December 20 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 21 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 21
Wikipedia - December 22 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 23 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 23
Wikipedia - December 24 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 25 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 26 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 27 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 28 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 29 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 2 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 30, 2009 Iranian pro-government rallies -- Iranian rallies
Wikipedia - December 30 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 31 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 3 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) -- Day in Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar
Wikipedia - December 4 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 4
Wikipedia - December 5 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 5
Wikipedia - December 6 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 6
Wikipedia - December 7 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 7
Wikipedia - December 8 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December 9 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)
Wikipedia - December Avenue (band) -- Filipino indie pop band formed in 2007
Wikipedia - December Avenue discography -- Discography of December Avenue
Wikipedia - December Bride -- Television series
Wikipedia - December (Collective Soul song) -- 1995 single by Collective Soul
Wikipedia - December Festival Hurdle -- Hurdle horse race in Ireland
Wikipedia - December Gold Cup -- Steeplechase horse race in Britain
Wikipedia - December Heat -- 2008 film
Wikipedia - December Novices' Chase -- Steeplechase horse race in Britain
Wikipedia - December solstice -- Astronomical phenomenon; solstice that occurs each December, typically between the 20th and the 22nd day of the month according to the Gregorian calendar
Wikipedia - December (The Moody Blues album) -- 2003 studio album by The Moody Blues
Wikipedia - December to Dismember (2006) -- 2006 World Wrestling Entertainment pay-per-view event
Wikipedia - December -- Twelfth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars
Wikipedia - Decembrist revolt -- |1825 revolt and attempted coup in the Russian Empire
Wikipedia - Decemviri -- A 10-man commission in the Roman Republic
Wikipedia - Decent interval -- Theory regarding the end of the Vietnam War
Wikipedia - Decentius -- Roman emperor from 350 to 353
Wikipedia - Decentraland
Wikipedia - Decentralisation in Ukraine -- Government reforms in Ukraine since 2014
Wikipedia - Decentralisation
Wikipedia - Decentralised planning
Wikipedia - Decentralised system
Wikipedia - Decentralist Party of the South -- A political party in Peru
Wikipedia - Decentralist Social Force Party -- Political party in Peru
Wikipedia - Decentralization
Wikipedia - Decentralized application -- Type of computer application
Wikipedia - Decentralized autonomous organization -- Computer network organization model
Wikipedia - Decentralized computing
Wikipedia - Decentralized finance -- Peer-to-peer finance
Wikipedia - Decentralized identifiers
Wikipedia - Decentralized planning (economics)
Wikipedia - Decentralized Privacy-Preserving Proximity Tracing -- Proximity contact tracing protocol
Wikipedia - Decentralized wastewater system -- Processes to convey, treat and dispose or reuse wastewater from small communities and alike
Wikipedia - Decentralized
Wikipedia - Decepticon -- Faction of sentient robots from the Transformers universe
Wikipedia - Deception (1932 film) -- 1932 film
Wikipedia - Deception (2018 TV series) -- 2018 US crime procedural drama television series
Wikipedia - Deception: Betraying the Peace Process -- Book by Itamar Marcus
Wikipedia - Deception (criminal law) -- Legal term of art used in the definition of statutory offences in England and Wales and Northern Ireland
Wikipedia - Deception in Islam
Wikipedia - Deception (in psychological research)
Wikipedia - Deception Island -- Active volcanic island in the South Shetland archipelago
Wikipedia - Deception: Oo Pel Dan Myin -- 2018 Burmese drama film
Wikipedia - Deception Pass -- Strait between Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands on Puget Sound
Wikipedia - Deception -- Act of propagating beliefs of things that are not true, or not the whole truth
Wikipedia - Deceptive
Wikipedia - Decerebration -- Surgical elimination of cerebral brain function
Wikipedia - Decernotinib -- Chemical compound
Wikipedia - Decet Romanum Pontificem
Wikipedia - Deceuninck-Quick-Step -- Belgian cycling team
Wikipedia - DEC Firefly
Wikipedia - Decha Kraisart -- Thai motorcycle racer
Wikipedia - Dechen Wangmo (politician) -- Bhutanese politician
Wikipedia - Dechert -- International law firm
Wikipedia - Dechko Uzunov -- Bulgarian painter
Wikipedia - Dechlorane plus -- Polychlorinated flame retardant
Wikipedia - Dechrau Canu, Dechrau Canmol -- Television series
Wikipedia - Dechristianisation of France during the French Revolution
Wikipedia - Dechristianization of France during the French Revolution -- Anti-Christian policy during the French Revolution
Wikipedia - Decia gens -- Ancient Roman family
Wikipedia - Decian persecution
Wikipedia - Deciates -- Ligurian tribe
Wikipedia - Deciban
Wikipedia - Decibel watt -- SI measurement of signal strength and intensity
Wikipedia - Decibel -- Logarithmic unit expressing the ratio of a physical quantity
Wikipedia - Decidability (logic)
Wikipedia - Decidability problems
Wikipedia - Decidable language
Wikipedia - Decidable set
Wikipedia - Deciduous teeth -- First set of teeth in diphyodonts
Wikipedia - Deciduous trees
Wikipedia - Deciduous
Wikipedia - Decile
Wikipedia - Decima Flottiglia MAS -- Italian naval commando frogman unit of the Fascist era
Wikipedia - Decima (game engine) -- Video game engine
Wikipedia - Decimal128 floating-point format
Wikipedia - Decimal32 floating-point format
Wikipedia - Decimal64 floating-point format
Wikipedia - Decimal computer
Wikipedia - Decimal data type
Wikipedia - Decimal Day -- 15 February 1971, when the UK and Ireland adopted decimal currency
Wikipedia - Decimal degrees -- Angular measurements, typically for latitude and longitude
Wikipedia - Decimal digit
Wikipedia - Decimal floating point -- decimal representation of real numbers in computing
Wikipedia - Decimalisation -- Process of converting a currency from a non-decimal denominations to a decimal system
Wikipedia - Decimal numeral system
Wikipedia - Decimal point
Wikipedia - Decimal prefix
Wikipedia - Decimal representation -- Expression of every real number as a sequence of digits
Wikipedia - Decimal separator
Wikipedia - Decimals
Wikipedia - Decimal time
Wikipedia - Decimal -- Numeral system with ten as its base
Wikipedia - Decima Moore -- Singer and actress
Wikipedia - Decimation (comics)
Wikipedia - Decimation (Roman army) -- Traditional military punishment
Wikipedia - Decima -- Ten-line stanza of poetry
Wikipedia - Decimeter
Wikipedia - Decimetre -- Unit of length
Wikipedia - Decimia gens -- Ancient Roman family
Wikipedia - Decimus Burton -- British architect
Wikipedia - Decimus Haterius Agrippa -- Early 1st century AD Roman plebeian tribune, praetor and consul
Wikipedia - Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus -- Roman general, politician and assassin of Julius Caesar
Wikipedia - Decimus Junius Silanus Torquatus -- Roman Senator, consul AD 53
Wikipedia - Decimus Laberius -- 1st century BC Roman eques and writer of mimes (farces)
Wikipedia - Decimus Laelius Balbus (consul 46) -- 1st century AD Roman senator and delator (informer)
Wikipedia - Decimus Valerius Asiaticus (consul 35) -- Roman consul in 35 and 46 AD
Wikipedia - Decimus Valerius Asiaticus (Legatus of Gallia Belgica) -- 1st century AD Roman Senator who served as a Legatus of Gallia Belgica
Wikipedia - Decinnamoyltaxinine J -- Chemical compound
Wikipedia - Decio Azzolini (seniore) -- 16th-century Catholic cardinal
Wikipedia - Decio Pavani -- Italian gymnast
Wikipedia - Decio Vinciguerra
Wikipedia - Decipher, Inc. -- American game publisher
Wikipedia - Decipherment of ancient Egyptian scripts -- Research by J.-F. Champollion et al. in the 19th century
Wikipedia - Decipherment of rongorongo -- Attempts to understand Easter Island script
Wikipedia - Decipherment
Wikipedia - Decipher
Wikipedia - DECIPHER -- Biological database
Wikipedia - Decipium -- Proposed chemical element.
Wikipedia - Decision aids
Wikipedia - Decisional balance sheet -- Tool for representing pros and cons
Wikipedia - Decision analysis
Wikipedia - Decision at Sundown -- 1957 film by Budd Boetticher
Wikipedia - Decision boundary
Wikipedia - Decision downloading
Wikipedia - Decision engineering
Wikipedia - Decisiones: Unos ganan, otros pierden -- 2019 American television series by Telemundo
Wikipedia - Decisiones -- Colombian-American telenovela
Wikipedia - Decision fatigue -- Deteriorating quality of decisions made by an individual after a long session of decision making
Wikipedia - Decision field theory
Wikipedia - Decision intelligence -- Subfield of machine learning
Wikipedia - Decision list
Wikipedia - Decision-making paradox
Wikipedia - Decision making process
Wikipedia - Decision-making software
Wikipedia - Decision-making tools
Wikipedia - Decision-making unit
Wikipedia - Decision making
Wikipedia - Decision-making -- Cognitive process resulting in choosing a course of action
Wikipedia - Decision Model and Notation -- Standard published by the Object Management Group
Wikipedia - Decision problems
Wikipedia - Decision problem -- Yes/no problem in computer science
Wikipedia - Decision procedure
Wikipedia - Decision quality
Wikipedia - Decision rules
Wikipedia - Decision Sciences
Wikipedia - Decision science
Wikipedia - Decisions (song) -- 2012 single by Borgore featuring Miley Cyrus
Wikipedia - Decision support systems
Wikipedia - Decision support system
Wikipedia - Decision-support
Wikipedia - Decision table
Wikipedia - Decision theology -- The belief by some evangelical denominations of Christianity that individuals must make a conscious decision to "accept" and follow Christ
Wikipedia - Decision theory
Wikipedia - Decision tree complexity
Wikipedia - Decision tree learning -- Machine learning algorithm
Wikipedia - Decision trees
Wikipedia - Decision Tree
Wikipedia - Decision tree -- Decision support tool
Wikipedia - Decisive victory
Wikipedia - Decius (emperor)
Wikipedia - Decius -- Roman emperor from 249 to 251
Wikipedia - DEC J-11
Wikipedia - Deckard Cain -- Fictional character from the ''Diablo'' universe
Wikipedia - Deck building game
Wikipedia - Deck (building) -- Surface similar to a floor, but typically constructed outdoors and connected to a building
Wikipedia - Deck decompression chamber -- Hyperbaric chamber suitable for surface decompression or emergency use at a dive site
Wikipedia - Decked Out -- Television series
Wikipedia - Decker Island -- Island in California
Wikipedia - Decker Press -- Poetry publishing house in Illinois, United States
Wikipedia - Decker Towers -- Building in Burlington, Vermont, United States
Wikipedia - Deck gun -- Naval artillery mounted on the deck of a submarine
Wikipedia - Deck of cards
Wikipedia - Decks Creek -- Creek in New York, United States
Wikipedia - Deck (ship) -- Part of a ship or boat
Wikipedia - Deck the Halls with Wacky Walls -- 1983 American animated Christmas special
Wikipedia - Deck Wars -- Television series
Wikipedia - Declana -- Genus of insects
Wikipedia - Declan Breathnach -- Irish Fianna Fail politician
Wikipedia - Declan Bree -- Irish independent politician
Wikipedia - Declan Burke -- UK-based Irish musician
Wikipedia - Declan Burns -- Irish sprint canoer
Wikipedia - Declan Cassidy -- Irish television and film director
Wikipedia - Declan Coulter -- Irish hurler
Wikipedia - Declan de Barra -- Irish writer and musician
Wikipedia - Declan (disambiguation)
Wikipedia - Declan Fogarty -- Irish retired sportsperson
Wikipedia - Declan Hughes (writer) -- Irish novelist, playwright, and screenwriter
Wikipedia - Declan Kelly (businessman) -- Businessman
Wikipedia - Declan Kiberd -- Irish writer and scholar
Wikipedia - Declan Lowney -- Irish film and television director
Wikipedia - Declan McCullagh -- American entrepreneur, journalist, and software engineer.
Wikipedia - Declan McKenna -- English singer-songwriter and musician (born 1998)
Wikipedia - Declan Meagher -- Irish obstetrician (1921-208)
Wikipedia - Declan Michael Laird -- Scottish actor
Wikipedia - Declan Mulholland -- character actor
Wikipedia - Declan Walsh (journalist) -- Irish writer and journalist
Wikipedia - Declan
Wikipedia - Declaration and Address -- Founding document for a religious association
Wikipedia - Declaration and forfeiture -- cricket regulations
Wikipedia - Declaration (anthology)
Wikipedia - Declaration (computer programming)
Wikipedia - Declaration (computer science)
Wikipedia - Declaration (law) -- Authoritative establishment of fact by a court of law
Wikipedia - Declaration of Boulogne -- Declaration about the nature and purpose of the Esperanto movement and the Fundamento as a basis for the Esperanto language; authored by L. L. Zamenhof and approved at the First World Esperanto Congress, Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1905
Wikipedia - Declaration of Breda
Wikipedia - Declaration of Geneva
Wikipedia - Declaration of Helsinki -- document outlining the ethics of human medical experimentation
Wikipedia - Declaration of Independence (film) -- 1938 film
Wikipedia - Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Crimea -- 2014 declaration of Crimean independence and intent to join Russia
Wikipedia - Declaration of Independence of Ukraine -- Ukrainian secession from the USSR
Wikipedia - Declaration of Independence (Trumbull)
Wikipedia - Declaration of Independence
Wikipedia - Declaration of Indulgence -- Pair of proclamations made by James II in 1687
Wikipedia - Declaration of martial law in Russell County, Alabama -- Martial law in Alabama, United States
Wikipedia - Declaration of Neutrality -- 1955 Austrian law declaring the country's permanent neutrality
Wikipedia - Declaration of nullity
Wikipedia - Declaration of Pillnitz
Wikipedia - Declaration of Reasonable Doubt
Wikipedia - Declaration of Religious Harmony -- State declaration in Singapore
Wikipedia - Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen -- Foundational document of the French Revolution
Wikipedia - Declaration of the Rights of the Child -- Declaration adopted in 1959 by the United Nations General Assembly
Wikipedia - Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen
Wikipedia - Declaration of war by the United States -- Aspect of U.S. law, government, and military
Wikipedia - Declaration of war -- Formal announcement by which one state goes to war against another
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Common Language
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination -- Declaration adopted in 1963 by the United Nations General Assembly
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women -- Human rights proclamation issued by the United Nations General Assembly
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women -- Declaration adopted in 1993 by the United Nations General Assembly
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples -- United Nations General Assembly resolution adopted in 1960
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Rights of Disabled Persons -- Declaration adopted in 1975 by the United Nations General Assembly
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples -- Declaration adopted in 2007 by the United Nations General Assembly
Wikipedia - Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities -- Declaration adopted in 1992 by the United Nations General Assembly
Wikipedia - Declaration reflects use
Wikipedia - Declarations of State Land in the West Bank -- Designating occupied territory as "state land"
Wikipedia - Declaration to the French People -- position statement of the Paris Commune
Wikipedia - Declarative knowledge
Wikipedia - Declarative language
Wikipedia - Declarative learning
Wikipedia - Declarative memory
Wikipedia - Declarative programming language
Wikipedia - Declarative programming
Wikipedia - Declaratory judgement
Wikipedia - Declared dead in absentia
Wikipedia - Declared death in absentia
Wikipedia - Declared monuments of Hong Kong -- Heritage sites in Hong Kong
Wikipedia - Declassee -- 1925 film
Wikipedia - Declension
Wikipedia - Declination -- Astronomical coordinate analogous to latitude
Wikipedia - Decline and abolition of the poor law system -- Change in English welfare system
Wikipedia - Decline and Fall... of a Birdwatcher -- 1968 film by John Krish
Wikipedia - Decline and Fall of the American Programmer
Wikipedia - Decline and Fall of the Freudian Empire -- 1985 book by Hans Eysenck
Wikipedia - Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Wikipedia - Decline and Fall (TV series) -- 2017 BBC television series
Wikipedia - Decline and Fall -- 1928 book by Evelyn Waugh
Wikipedia - Decline and modernization of the Ottoman Empire -- The period of the Ottoman empire
Wikipedia - Decline in amphibian populations -- Ongoing mass extinction of amphibian species worldwide
Wikipedia - Decline in insect populations -- Ecological trend
Wikipedia - Decline of an Empire (film)
Wikipedia - Decline of Buddhism in the Indian subcontinent
Wikipedia - Decline of Christianity in various countries -- Phenomenon of decreasing Christian affiliation in the Western world
Wikipedia - Decline of Christianity
Wikipedia - Decline of Detroit -- Urban decay of Detroit
Wikipedia - Decline of Greco-Roman polytheism
Wikipedia - Decline of Hellenistic polytheism
Wikipedia - Decline of the Byzantine Empire
Wikipedia - Decline of the Roman Empire
Wikipedia - Decline to State -- A no-party (independent) designation in California voting registration
Wikipedia - Declinia -- Family of beetles
Wikipedia - Declivocondyloides loebli -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - DECmate
Wikipedia - DEC Multia -- Desktop computers
Wikipedia - DECnet
Wikipedia - Decocidio -- Hacker group
Wikipedia - Decodable text
Wikipedia - Deco Dawson -- Canadian experimental filmmaker
Wikipedia - Decode (semiotics)
Wikipedia - Decoding Chomsky -- 2016 book by Chris Knight
Wikipedia - Decoding COVID-19 -- 2020 PBS film documentary about the 2019-2020 COVID-19 pandemic
Wikipedia - Decoding methods
Wikipedia - Decoding (semiotics)
Wikipedia - Decoding the Universe
Wikipedia - Decoglurant -- Chemical compound
Wikipedia - Decogmus -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Decoherence
Wikipedia - Decolonial
Wikipedia - Decolonisation of Africa -- 1950s-70s independence of African colonies from Western European powers
Wikipedia - Decolonisation of Asia
Wikipedia - Decolonisation of Oceania -- Independence of Oceanic countries from colonial rule
Wikipedia - Decolonisation
Wikipedia - Decolonising the Mind -- Book by NgM-EM-)gM-DM-) wa Thiong'o
Wikipedia - Decolonization of Asia -- Mostly 20th-century independence of Asian countries from Western European powers
Wikipedia - Decolonization of knowledge -- Process of undoing colonial legacies in knowledge
Wikipedia - Decolonization of the Americas -- Process by which the countries in the Americas gained their independence from European rule
Wikipedia - Decolonization -- Process of leaving colonial rule, mostly occurring during the 20th century
Wikipedia - Decommissioned highway -- Road which is no longer in use, or route no longer officially authorized or maintained
Wikipedia - Decommunization -- Process of dismantling the legacies of the communist state establishments, culture, and psychology
Wikipedia - Decompiler
Wikipedia - Decompile
Wikipedia - Decomposer
Wikipedia - Decomposition (computer science)
Wikipedia - Decomposition method (queueing theory)
Wikipedia - Decomposition of a module -- Abstract algebra concept
Wikipedia - Decomposition of time series
Wikipedia - Decomposition -- The process in which organic substances are broken down into simpler organic matter
Wikipedia - Decomposure -- Canadian electronic music musician
Wikipedia - Decompression algorithms -- Decompression algorithms
Wikipedia - Decompression algorithm -- Procedure to calculate the decompression needed for a given dive profile
Wikipedia - Decompression (altitude) -- Reduction in ambient pressure due to ascent above sea level
Wikipedia - Decompression buoy
Wikipedia - Decompression chamber -- Hyperbaric pressure vessel for human occupation used in diving operations to decompress divers
Wikipedia - Decompression cylinder -- Scuba cylinder carrying decompression gas
Wikipedia - Decompression diving -- Diving where the diver incurs a decompression obligation
Wikipedia - Decompression (diving) -- The reduction of ambient pressure on underwater divers after hyperbaric exposure and the elimination of dissolved gases from the diver's tissues
Wikipedia - Decompression equipment -- Equipment used by divers to facilitate decompression
Wikipedia - Decompression gas -- Oxygen-rich gas used for accelerated decompression
Wikipedia - Decompression illness -- Disorders arising from ambient pressure reduction
Wikipedia - Decompression (physics) -- Reduction of pressure or compression
Wikipedia - Decompression practice -- Techniques and procedures for safe decompression of divers
Wikipedia - Decompression Schedule -- A specified ascent rate and series of increasingly shallower decompression stops
Wikipedia - Decompression schedule -- A specified ascent rate and series of increasingly shallower decompression stops
Wikipedia - Decompression sickness -- Disorder caused by dissolved gases in the tissues forming bubbles during reduction of the surrounding pressure
Wikipedia - Decompression status -- The theoretical level of inert gas content of the body tissues
Wikipedia - Decompression stop -- A period a diver must spend at constant depth during ascent from a dive to eliminate absorbed inert gases
Wikipedia - Decompression tables -- Tabulated data that allow divers to determine a decompression schedule for a given dive profile and breathing gas
Wikipedia - Decompression theory -- Theoretical modelling of decompression physiology
Wikipedia - Decompression trapeze -- Horizontal bars suspended at decompression stop depths
Wikipedia - Decompressive craniectomy -- Neurosurgical procedure to treat swelling
Wikipedia - Decongestant -- Drug to relieve nasal congestion
Wikipedia - Deconica coprophila -- Species of fungus
Wikipedia - Deconsecration -- Act of removing a religious blessing
Wikipedia - Deconstructed club -- Experimental electronic music genre
Wikipedia - Deconstructing Harry -- 1997 film by Woody Allen
Wikipedia - Deconstruction (building)
Wikipedia - Deconstruction (disambiguation)
Wikipedia - Deconstructionism
Wikipedia - Deconstruction -- An approach to understanding the relationship between text and meaning
Wikipedia - Deconstructivism -- Architectural movement
Wikipedia - DecoPac, Inc. -- US cake decorating product company
Wikipedia - Decoradrillia harlequina -- Species of sea snail
Wikipedia - Decorating of the Bride -- Painting by Paja Jovanovic
Wikipedia - Decoration Day (Appalachia and Liberia) -- A living tradition of group ancestor veneration observances focused on the maintenance and decoration of cemeteries and grave markers in Appalachia, Liberia, and other areas where Appalachian people migrated
Wikipedia - Decoration For Impeccable Service -- Award of the Russian Federation
Wikipedia - Decoration for Officers of the Royal Naval Reserve -- Medal
Wikipedia - Decoration of Honour for Services to the Republic of Austria -- Meritorious service award
Wikipedia - Decoration "For Beneficence" -- Decoration of Russia
Wikipedia - Decorations Act, 1975 -- Constitution of Pakistan
Wikipedia - Decorative arts
Wikipedia - Decorator pattern
Wikipedia - DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum -- Contemporary art museum in Lincoln, Mass.
Wikipedia - Decoria Township, Blue Earth County, Minnesota -- Township in Minnesota, United States
Wikipedia - Decoritidae -- Extinct family of molluscs
Wikipedia - Decorrelation -- Process of reducing correlation within one or more signals
Wikipedia - Decortica -- New Zealand rock band
Wikipedia - Decorum
Wikipedia - Decoupage -- Art of decorating an object
Wikipedia - Decoupling for body-focused repetitive behaviors
Wikipedia - Decoupling of wages from productivity -- End of the historical linkage between gross national product and wages
Wikipedia - Decouvertes Gallimard -- A collection of illustrated, pocket-sized books on a variety of subjects
Wikipedia - Decoy (1934 film) -- 1934 film
Wikipedia - Decoy cells -- Virally infected epithelial cells found in urine
Wikipedia - Decoy (chess)
Wikipedia - Decoy effect -- Phenomenon in marketing
Wikipedia - Decoy
Wikipedia - DECpc AXP 150
Wikipedia - DEC PDP-10
Wikipedia - DEC PDP-11
Wikipedia - DEC Prism
Wikipedia - DEC Professional (computer)
Wikipedia - Decrease in DNA Methylation I (DDM1) -- Plant gene
Wikipedia - Decree 770 -- Romanian natalist decree
Wikipedia - Decree 900 -- 1952 Guatemalan land-reform law
Wikipedia - Decree (canon law)
Wikipedia - Decree (Catholic canon law)
Wikipedia - Decree-law 3,199 -- 1941 decree-law in Brazil
Wikipedia - Decree nisi
Wikipedia - Decree of Basis and Guarantees -- De facto constitution of Costa Rica from 1841 to 1842
Wikipedia - Decree of Canopus
Wikipedia - Decree of Diopeithes -- Decree instituted by the opponents of Pericles in an attempt to discredit Anaxagoras
Wikipedia - Decree of Praise
Wikipedia - Decree of War to the Death -- Simon Bolivar's declaration of no quarter
Wikipedia - Decree on separation of church from state and school from church
Wikipedia - Decree -- Rule of law usually issued by a head of state
Wikipedia - Decretales Gregorii IX
Wikipedia - Decretalist
Wikipedia - Decretals of Gregory IX
Wikipedia - Decretals
Wikipedia - Decretal
Wikipedia - Decretist
Wikipedia - Decretum Gelasianum -- Roman Catholic ecclesiastical text traditionally attributed to Pope Gelasius I
Wikipedia - Decretum Gratiani -- Collection of Roman Catholic canon law compiled and written by Gratian in the 12th century
Wikipedia - Decretum laudis
Wikipedia - Decriminalization of non-medical cannabis in the United States -- Legalization of marijuana in the United States
Wikipedia - Decriminalization
Wikipedia - Decryption key
Wikipedia - Decryption
Wikipedia - DECserver -- a product line of terminal servers
Wikipedia - DeCSS haiku -- Poem that describes the DeCSS algorithm
Wikipedia - DeCSS -- Free open-source program to decode DVDs with encryption
Wikipedia - DECstation
Wikipedia - DECsystem-10
Wikipedia - DECSYSTEM-20
Wikipedia - DEC Systems Research Center
Wikipedia - DECsystem
Wikipedia - DEC T-11
Wikipedia - Dectaflur -- Fluoride-containing substance
Wikipedia - DECtalk
Wikipedia - DECtape
Wikipedia - Dectes -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Dectocera -- Genus of moths
Wikipedia - Dectodesis -- Genus of insects
Wikipedia - Deculturalization
Wikipedia - Decuman -- 8th-century Christian saint
Wikipedia - Decurion (administrative)
Wikipedia - Decussation -- Crossing of anatomical elements
Wikipedia - DECUS -- Independent computer user group related to Digital Equipment Corporation
Wikipedia - DEC VAX
Wikipedia - DECwindows
Wikipedia - Decyl glucoside -- Non-ionic surfactant
Wikipedia - Decyl(triphenyl)phosphonium -- Chemical compound
Wikipedia - Decynium-22 -- Cationic derivative of quinoline
Wikipedia - Dedecinar, Bigadic -- Village in Turkey
Wikipedia - Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project -- Global sustainable energy consortium
Wikipedia - Deir ez-Zor offensive (December 2014)
Wikipedia - Dekalog: Two -- 1988 second part of the television series The Decalogue directed by Krzysztof KieM-EM-^[lowski
Wikipedia - Dekoratie voor Trouwe Dienst -- South African military decoration for Boer officers of the Second Boer War
Wikipedia - Deliberative assembly -- Organization that uses parliamentary procedure to make decisions
Wikipedia - Deltote deceptoria -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Democratic centralism -- Method of leadership in which political decisions reached by the party are binding upon all members of the party
Wikipedia - Denial and deception
Wikipedia - Denise Rose -- Deceased British military police detective
Wikipedia - Dennis Dart -- British rear-engined single-decker midibus
Wikipedia - Dennis DeConcini -- Democratic U.S. Senator from Arizona
Wikipedia - Dennis Dragon -- A three-axle step-entrance double-decker bus
Wikipedia - Dennis Duigan -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Dennis Leyckes -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Dennis Trident 2 -- 2-axle low-floor double-decker bus
Wikipedia - Dennis Trident 3 -- Low floor tri-axle double-decker bus
Wikipedia - Densely packed decimal -- an efficient system of binary encoding for decimal digits used in decimal floating point
Wikipedia - Department of the Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service
Wikipedia - Depreciation -- Decrease in asset values, or the allocation of cost thereof
Wikipedia - Devil on Deck -- 1932 film
Wikipedia - Devon Williams (decathlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Dewey decimal classification
Wikipedia - Dewey Decimal Classification -- Library classification system
Wikipedia - Dewey Decimal System
Wikipedia - DezsM-EM-^Q Szabo (athlete) -- Hungarian decathlete
Wikipedia - Diapering -- Decorative pattern
Wikipedia - Dick Emberger -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Dick Whittington and His Cat (book) -- 1950 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Disappearance of Bethany Decker -- American woman who went missing in 2011
Wikipedia - Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio
Wikipedia - Disdyakis dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Disinformation -- False information spread deliberately to deceive
Wikipedia - Distinguished Conduct Medal (Natal) -- Military decoration for bravery in Natal
Wikipedia - Distinguished Flying Cross (United Kingdom) -- Military decoration of the United Kingdom
Wikipedia - Distinguished Flying Cross (United States) -- Military decoration awarded to any officer or enlisted member of the United States Armed Forces
Wikipedia - Distributed generation -- Decentralised electricity generation
Wikipedia - Distributed social network -- Internet social networking service that is decentralized and distributed across distinct providers
Wikipedia - Dive computer -- Instrument to record dive profile and calculate decompression obligations in real time
Wikipedia - DiveMax -- Mobile application for planning no-decompression dives.
Wikipedia - Diver lift -- Movable platform for lifting a diver from the water to deck level
Wikipedia - Dive tables -- Tabulated data that allow divers to determine a decompression schedule for a given dive profile and breathing gas
Wikipedia - DNA Doe Project -- American organization formed to identify deceased persons using forensic genealogy
Wikipedia - Doctor Ahrendt's Decision -- 1960 film
Wikipedia - Document type definition -- Set of markup declarations that define a document type for an SGML-family markup language
Wikipedia - Dodecadenia -- Genus of plants
Wikipedia - Dodecagonal number
Wikipedia - Dodecagon -- Polygon with 12 edges
Wikipedia - Dodecagram -- star polygon
Wikipedia - Dodecahedral conjecture -- Theorem on the minimal volume of cells in the Voronoi decomposition of packed spheres
Wikipedia - Dodecahedral number
Wikipedia - Dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Dodecaibidion -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Dodecaphonic
Wikipedia - Dodecaphony
Wikipedia - Dodechariesthes erlangeri -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Dodecocerus -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Dodecosini -- Tribe of beetles
Wikipedia - Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid
Wikipedia - Doha Declaration
Wikipedia - Dolby Digital Plus -- Audio codec
Wikipedia - Dolby TrueHD -- Advanced lossless multi-channel audio codec
Wikipedia - Dolichoderus decollatus -- Species of ant
Wikipedia - Domain decomposition methods
Wikipedia - Dominik Distelberger -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - Dominik Siedlaczek -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - Dominion of Ceylon -- Predecessor state of Sri Lanka
Wikipedia - Domitia Decidiana -- Wife of Gnaeus Julius Agricola and Tacitus
Wikipedia - Donald's Decision -- 1942 Donald Duck cartoon
Wikipedia - Donation of Constantine -- Forged Roman imperial decree
Wikipedia - Donets-Krivoy Rog Soviet Republic -- Former self-declared state
Wikipedia - Dorree Cooper -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Double-deck aircraft
Wikipedia - Double-deck elevator -- Elevator with two cabs stacked on top of each other
Wikipedia - Double-decker bus -- Bus that has two levels or decks
Wikipedia - Double electron capture -- Mode of radioactive decay
Wikipedia - Douglas Fernandez -- Venezuelan decathlete
Wikipedia - Doug Pirini -- New Zealand decathlete
Wikipedia - Draft:Brian Snedecor -- American politician
Wikipedia - Draft:Chill and Binge -- Single destination for users to decide what to watch online
Wikipedia - Draft:Jawsuayai Sor.Dechaphan -- Thai Muay Thai fighter
Wikipedia - Draft:Kleros -- Open source decentralized justice platform
Wikipedia - Draft:Rush-art -- Movement in decorative art
Wikipedia - Dr. Alien -- 1989 sci-fi comedy film directed by David DeCoteau
Wikipedia - Dramane Sereme -- Malian decathlete
Wikipedia - Dressing overall -- Decorating a ship with (signal) flags
Wikipedia - Dristan -- Nasal decongestant medication
Wikipedia - Duke of Decazes -- Title of French nobility
Wikipedia - Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori -- Quote from Horace's Odes
Wikipedia - Dulce et Decorum est -- 1920 poem by Wilfred Owen
Wikipedia - Dulcian -- Renaissance predecessor of the bassoon
Wikipedia - Dunlop v R -- Decision of the Supreme Court of Canada
Wikipedia - Dunmore's Proclamation -- Governor of Colony of Virginia in 1775 declared martial law and promised freedom for slaves
Wikipedia - Durban Declaration -- Affirmation that HIV causes AIDS
Wikipedia - Dushdi Mala Medal -- Thai civil decoration
Wikipedia - Dutch disease -- The apparent causal relationship between the increase in the economic development of a specific sector and a decline in other sectors
Wikipedia - DV -- Magnetic tape-based consumer and broadcast videocassette format for camcorders and video codec
Wikipedia - Dwayne Dopsie -- American Zydeco musician
Wikipedia - Dying declaration
Wikipedia - Dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy
Wikipedia - Dynamic Resolution Adaptation -- Audio codec standard
Wikipedia - Dypsis decipiens -- species of plant in the family Arecaceae
Wikipedia - Dysbaric osteonecrosis -- Ischemic bone disease caused by decompression bubbles
Wikipedia - Dysspastus undecimpunctella -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Earth Charter -- An international declaration of values and principles for building a just, sustainable, peaceful global society
Wikipedia - Eastern Question -- Decline of Ottoman Empire and its effect on the balance of power
Wikipedia - East Lancs Cityzen -- A double-decker bus body that was built on the Scania N113 chassis by East Lancashire Coachbuilders
Wikipedia - East Lancs E Type -- Double deck bus bodywork
Wikipedia - East Lancs Myllennium Lolyne -- Type of twin-axle low-floor double-decker bus body built on the Dennis Trident 2 chassis by East Lancashire Coachbuilders
Wikipedia - East Lancs Myllennium Lowlander -- double-decker bus body built on the DAF/VDL DB250 chassis
Wikipedia - East Lancs Myllennium Vyking -- A type of double-decker bus body built on the Volvo B7TL chassis by East Lancashire Coachbuilders
Wikipedia - East Lancs Myllennium -- A type of single-decker bus body manufactured by East Lancashire Coachbuilders on DAF SB220, Dennis Dart SLF, MAN 14.220 and Scania OmniTown chassis.
Wikipedia - East Lancs Nordic -- Low-floor double-decker bus
Wikipedia - East Lancs Pyoneer -- A type of double-decker bus body built on the Volvo Olympian, Dennis Arrow and Volvo B10M by East Lancashire Coachbuilders
Wikipedia - East Lancs Spryte -- A low floor single-decker bus body built by East Lancashire Coachbuilders
Wikipedia - East Lancs Vyking -- A type of double-decker bus body built by East Lancashire Coachbuilders
Wikipedia - Eberhard Stroot -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Ecclesiastical decoration
Wikipedia - Economic voting -- Political science perspective emphasizing the role of the economy in voting decisions
Wikipedia - Ecstasies: Deciphering the Witches' Sabbath -- 1989 book by Carlo Ginzburg
Wikipedia - Ectoedemia decentella -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Ed de Noorlander -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Eddie's Attic -- Music club in Decatur, Georgia
Wikipedia - Edgars EriM-EM-^FM-EM-! -- Latvian decathlete and bobsledder
Wikipedia - Edict of Toleration (Hawaii) -- Decree allowing the establishment of Catholicism in Hawaii
Wikipedia - Editorial independence -- Freedom of editors to make decisions
Wikipedia - Edmond Decottignies -- French weightlifter
Wikipedia - Edson deCastro
Wikipedia - Eduard Mikhan -- Belarusian decathlete
Wikipedia - Edvard Natvig -- Norwegian decathlete
Wikipedia - Edward Bingham -- Decorated Irish-born British naval officer
Wikipedia - Edward Coyne (priest) -- Irish Jesuit, economist and sociologist, founder of the predecessor of National College of Ireland
Wikipedia - Edward D. Thalmann -- American hyperbaric medicine specialist and decompression researcher
Wikipedia - Edward L. Deci
Wikipedia - Edward Ray Robinson -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Eef Kamerbeek -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Efficiency Decoration
Wikipedia - Egg taphonomy -- Study of the decomposition and fossilization of eggs
Wikipedia - Eigendecomposition
Wikipedia - Eigenvalue decomposition
Wikipedia - Eileen M. Decker -- Former United States Attorney for the Central District of California
Wikipedia - Eisenhower Decides To Run -- 2000 book by historian William B. Pickett
Wikipedia - Elachista deceptricula -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Elachista rudectella -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - El Castillo del Terror (December 2008) -- 2008 International Wrestling Revolution Group event
Wikipedia - Eldridge v British Columbia (AG) -- Supreme Court of Canada decision
Wikipedia - Electroplating -- Creation of protective or decorative metallic coating on other metal with electric current
Wikipedia - Element (software) -- Decentralised, encrypted chat and collaboration software powered by the Matrix protocol
Wikipedia - Elias Sveinsson -- Icelandic decathlete
Wikipedia - Elisabeth Hardy -- Bletchley Park decoder
Wikipedia - Elke Decker -- German athletics competitor
Wikipedia - Elmar RM-CM-$hn -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Elmo Savola -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Elm -- Genus of flowering, deciduous tree in the family Ulmaceae
Wikipedia - Elshad Akhadov -- Decorated Azerbaijani soldier deceased in 1993
Wikipedia - Eltjo Schutter -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Embroidery stitch -- Decorative stitch used primarily in embroidery
Wikipedia - Embroidery -- Art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with needle and thread or yarn
Wikipedia - Emerson Norton -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Emile Dechaineux -- Royal Australian Navy officer
Wikipedia - Emile Kuri -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Emirate of Transjordan -- Predecessor of the Kingdom
Wikipedia - Emotional Decompression Chamber -- album by Digitalis Purpurea
Wikipedia - Emotions in decision-making
Wikipedia - Empis decora -- Species of insect
Wikipedia - Empis dedecor -- Species of insect
Wikipedia - Enamelled glass -- Glass which has been decorated with vitreous enamel
Wikipedia - Endecja
Wikipedia - End SARS -- Decentralized social movement against police brutality in Nigeria
Wikipedia - English cricket team in South Africa in 1888-89 -- Cricket team that toured South Africa from December 1888 to March 1889
Wikipedia - Enhanced Variable Rate Codec B
Wikipedia - Enhanced Variable Rate Codec
Wikipedia - Enneadecagon -- Polygon with 19 edges
Wikipedia - Enneadecahedron
Wikipedia - Enrico Decleva -- Italian historian
Wikipedia - Enrique Aguirre -- Argentine decathlete
Wikipedia - en:Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Wikipedia - Environmental impact assessment -- Assessment of the environmental consequences of a decision before action
Wikipedia - Enzyme inhibitor -- Molecule that binds to an enzyme and decreases its activity
Wikipedia - Eotrigonobalanus -- Genus of deciduous trees
Wikipedia - Epergne -- Decorative centerpiece
Wikipedia - Equivalent air depth -- Method of comparing decompression requirements for air and a given nitrox mix
Wikipedia - Ergo decedo -- Logical fallacy
Wikipedia - Eric Decker
Wikipedia - Erik Andersson (athlete) -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Erik Surjan -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Erki Nool -- Estonian decathlete and politician
Wikipedia - Ernest DeCouto -- Speaker of the House of Assembly of Bermuda
Wikipedia - Ernesto Betancourt -- Cuban decathlete
Wikipedia - Ernst Gerspach -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Ernst Heinrich Karl von Dechen -- German geologist
Wikipedia - Erwin Huber (athlete) -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Erwin Reimer -- Chilean decathlete
Wikipedia - Esa Jokinen -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Estate tax in the United States -- A tax on the transfer of the property of a deceased person
Wikipedia - Esther and Mordecai -- 1685 painting by Aert de Gelder
Wikipedia - Estonian Declaration of Independence -- Founding act of the Republic of Estonia from 1918
Wikipedia - Eternal Decision -- American thrash metal band
Wikipedia - Ethical Decalogue
Wikipedia - Ethical decision
Wikipedia - Ethmia decaryanum -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Ethmia dodecea -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase -- Protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens
Wikipedia - Euchorthippus declivus -- Species of grasshopper
Wikipedia - Eugene Martineau (athlete) -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Eugenio Balanque -- Cuban decathlete
Wikipedia - Eugen Uuemaa -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Eulogy -- Speech in praise of a person, usually recently deceased
Wikipedia - Eupithecia dechkanata -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Eupithecia decipiens -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Eupithecia decorata -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Eupithecia decrepita -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Eupithecia indecisa -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Eupithecia indecora -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Eupterote decolorata -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement -- Post-Brexit agreement of December 2020
Wikipedia - Euxoa decora -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Evangelical Church of Hesse Electorate-Waldeck -- Church in Germany
Wikipedia - Evaristo Ortega Zarate -- Mexican crime journalist who has been declared "missing" since 19 April 2010
Wikipedia - Everett Ellis -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Evidence-based education -- Use of empirical evidence to make policy and practice decisions in education
Wikipedia - Evidence-based practice -- Practice that relies on evidence to form arguments for guidance and decision-making
Wikipedia - Executive Decision -- 1996 American action film
Wikipedia - Exoteleia dodecella -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Exponential decay -- Probability density
Wikipedia - Factorization -- (Mathematical) decomposition into a product
Wikipedia - FADEC
Wikipedia - Fagus sylvatica -- Species of deciduous tree
Wikipedia - Fajr decade -- Iranian multi-day holiday
Wikipedia - Falcon 9 flight 20 -- Falcon 9 space launch that occurred on 22 December 2015 at 01:29 UTC
Wikipedia - False vacuum decay
Wikipedia - Family Business (game) -- dedicated deck card game
Wikipedia - Family Health Care Decisions Act -- New York law
Wikipedia - Fantasy sport -- Game based on imaginary ownership of real sport teams decided by real world performance and its analysis
Wikipedia - Fatal Deception: Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald -- 1993 television film directed by Robert Dornhelm
Wikipedia - Fay Babcock -- Hollywood set decorator
Wikipedia - Feast of the Immaculate Conception -- Christian feast on December 8 and public holiday in some countries
Wikipedia - Feather Mountain (book) -- 1952 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Fedir Laukhin -- Ukrainian decathlete
Wikipedia - Felipe dos Santos (athlete) -- Brazilian decathlete
Wikipedia - Ferenc Decsey -- Hungarian sports shooter
Wikipedia - Fernanda Decnop -- Brazilian sailor
Wikipedia - Fernest Arceneaux -- American zydeco musician
Wikipedia - Ferulic acid decarboxylase -- Decarboxylase enzymes
Wikipedia - Festivus -- Secular holiday celebrated December 23
Wikipedia - Festoon -- Decoration of a wreath or garland hanging from two points
Wikipedia - Fetotomy -- Veterinary operation that dissects a deceased fetus for delivery
Wikipedia - Fidelis Obikwu -- English decathlete
Wikipedia - Fidelity Medallion -- United States military decoration
Wikipedia - Fifty pence (British coin) -- British decimal coin; half of one pound sterling
Wikipedia - Fijian honours system -- Orders, decorations, and medals of Fiji
Wikipedia - Filicium decipiens -- A species of plant in the family Sapindaceae
Wikipedia - Final Resolution (December 2008) -- 2008 Total Nonstop Action Wrestling pay-per-view event
Wikipedia - Final Stab -- 2001 film by David DeCoteau
Wikipedia - Financial literacy -- Possession of skills and knowledge to make informed and effective financial decisions
Wikipedia - Finial -- Element marking the top or end of some object; decorative feature
Wikipedia - First declension
Wikipedia - First Indian National Army -- Indian National Army as it existed between February and December 1942
Wikipedia - First Spanish Republic -- Political regime that existed in Spain between 11 February 1873 and 29 December 1874
Wikipedia - Fish in the Air -- 1948 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Fisk Generating Station -- Decommissioned electric power generating plant
Wikipedia - Five-pointed star -- Geometrically a regular concave decagon, is a common ideogram in modern culture
Wikipedia - Flava Works Inc. v. Gunter -- 2012 US decision on copyright infringement
Wikipedia - Flight deck -- Landing/take off surface of an aircraft carrier
Wikipedia - Flipism -- A pseudophilosophy under which all decisions are made by flipping a coin
Wikipedia - Float (parade) -- Decorated platform which is a component of many festive parades
Wikipedia - Floral Decorations for Bananas -- Poem by Wallace Stevens
Wikipedia - Florian Schonbeck -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Fly High, Fly Low -- 1958 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - FOCAL (programming language) -- Programming language used on DEC PDP-series machines
Wikipedia - Forbush decrease
Wikipedia - Forecastle -- Upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast
Wikipedia - Foreign exchange market -- Global decentralized trading of international currencies
Wikipedia - Forest green -- Average color of the leaves of the trees of a temperate zone deciduous forest
Wikipedia - Forgery -- Process of making, adapting, or imitating objects to deceive
Wikipedia - Forward declaration
Wikipedia - Fotis Kosmas -- Greek hurdler and decathlete
Wikipedia - Fox Film -- Former American film production company; predecessor to 20th Century Fox
Wikipedia - Fox Went out on a Chilly Night: An Old Song -- 1962 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Francesca Lo Schiavo -- Italian set decorator
Wikipedia - Francisco Javier Benet -- Spanish decathlete
Wikipedia - Francois Decrombecque -- French racewalker
Wikipedia - Francoise Decharne -- French sports shooter
Wikipedia - Francois Gourmet -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Franco Sar -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Frank Busemann -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Frank DeCicco -- American mobster (1935-1986)
Wikipedia - Frank Decker (medium)
Wikipedia - Frank E. Hughes -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Frank Muller -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Frank R. McKelvy -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Frans Decker -- 18th-century painter
Wikipedia - Fraud -- Intentional deception made for personal gain or to damage another individual
Wikipedia - Fraunhofer FDK AAC -- An open-source AAC codec
Wikipedia - Fraxinus excelsior -- Species of deciduous tree in the family Oleaceae
Wikipedia - Fred Dixon (athlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Freddy Herbrand -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Frederic Xhonneux -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Fred J. Rode -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Fred M. MacLean -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Fredrik Samuelsson (decathlete) -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Fred Samara -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Freeboard (nautical) -- Distance from the waterline to the upper deck level of a ship
Wikipedia - FreeCodeCamp -- Non-profit organization
Wikipedia - Free to Decide -- 1996 single by The Cranberries
Wikipedia - Freezing -- phase transition in which a liquid turns into a solid due to a decrease in thermal energy
Wikipedia - French coup of December 1851
Wikipedia - French declaration of war on Germany (1939) -- French declaration of war on Germany WWII
Wikipedia - French-Soviet Joint Declaration of June 30, 1966 -- Cooperation in foreign affairs, science, and technology between the Soviet Union and France and Russia and France from 1966
Wikipedia - Friedel Schirmer -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Fritz Nussbaum -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Fritz Vogelsang -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - From Dawn to Decadence
Wikipedia - FTC v. Balls of Kryptonite -- 2009 enforcement action over deceptive business practices
Wikipedia - Fuller's earth -- Any clay material that can decolorise oil or other liquids
Wikipedia - Functional decomposition
Wikipedia - Fundamento de Esperanto -- 1905 book by L. L. Zamenhof, describing the basic grammar and vocabulary of Esperanto; the only obligatory authority over the language, according to the Declaration of Boulogne
Wikipedia - Fusaea decurrens -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - F. W. Doberck & son -- Danish decorative metal manufacturer
Wikipedia - Gabriel Bechir -- French set decorator
Wikipedia - Gallai-Edmonds decomposition -- Partition of the vertices of a graph into subsets satisfying certain properties
Wikipedia - GaM-CM-+l Querin -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Game theory -- The study of mathematical models of strategic interaction between rational decision-makers
Wikipedia - Gamma ray -- Energetic electromagnetic radiation arising from radioactive decay of atomic nuclei
Wikipedia - Gandhi cap -- White coloured sidecap, pointed in front and back and having a wide band, worn in India
Wikipedia - Garden of Eden (cellular automaton) -- Type of pattern that has no predecessors
Wikipedia - Garrett Lewis -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Garrick Medecin -- Short story by Joseph Bouchardy
Wikipedia - Gary Fettis -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Gary Kinder -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Gaston Medecin -- Monegasque athlete
Wikipedia - Gatwick Airport drone incident -- Aviation incident in December 2018
Wikipedia - Gebhard Buchel -- Liechtenstein decathlete
Wikipedia - Gella Vandecaveye -- Belgian judoka
Wikipedia - Gemmy Industries -- American outdoor decor products company
Wikipedia - Geneivat da'at -- Jewish legal concept meaning "dishonest misrepresentation" or "deception"
Wikipedia - Generalized singular value decomposition -- Name of two different techniques based on the singular value decomposition
Wikipedia - Generation III reactor -- Class of nuclear reactors with improved safety over its predecessors
Wikipedia - Geno Delafose -- American zydeco accordionist and singer
Wikipedia - Geoffroea decorticans -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Geoff Smith (decathlete) -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - George Decker -- 22nd Chief of Staff of the United States Army
Wikipedia - George DeTitta Jr. -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - George Gaines (set decorator) -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - George Montgomery (set decorator) -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - George Sawley -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief -- Event on December 23, 1783
Wikipedia - George W. Snedecor
Wikipedia - Georg Groddeck
Wikipedia - Georg Werthner -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - Georni Jaramillo -- Venezuelan decathlete
Wikipedia - Gerard James -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - German Workers' Party -- predecessor of the Nazi Party
Wikipedia - Gernot Kellermayr -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - Gerry Moro -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Gert Herunter -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - GES-2 (Moscow) -- Decommissioned Russian power station
Wikipedia - Ghazni Minarets -- Former elaborately decorated minaret towers located in Ghazni city, Afghanistan
Wikipedia - Gheorghe Csegezi -- Romanian decathlete
Wikipedia - Gilles Gemise-Fareau -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Gillespie and the Guards -- 1957 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Giudecca Canal -- Canal in Venice, Italy
Wikipedia - Giuseppe Occhialini -- Italian physicist, who contributed to the discovery of the pion or pi-meson decay
Wikipedia - Glass mosaic -- Traditional Burmese mosaic made with pieces of glass, used to embellish decorative art, structures, and furniture
Wikipedia - Glutamate decarboxylase
Wikipedia - Glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia -- Hypothesis that decreased glutamatergic signalling is involved in schizophrenia
Wikipedia - GNUnet -- A framework for decentralized, peer-to-peer networking which is part of the GNU Project
Wikipedia - Goa, Daman and Diu -- Goa, Daman, and Diu is a union territory of India from 19 December 1961 .
Wikipedia - Godless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists -- The deconversion story of former evangelical minister, Dan Barker.
Wikipedia - Golden Bull of 1242 -- Edict proclaiming Gradec (Zagreb) a royal free city
Wikipedia - Golden Bull of Rimini -- 13th-century imperial decree, that conformed the territorial acquisition of the Teutonic Order
Wikipedia - Gong Guohua -- Chinese decathlete
Wikipedia - Gonystylus decipiens -- Species of ramin tree
Wikipedia - Gonzales v. Raich -- decision by the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that homegrown cannabis may be criminalized even if state law allows its medicinal use
Wikipedia - Gonzalo Barroilhet -- Chilean decathlete
Wikipedia - Good Conduct Medal (Vietnam) -- Military decoration of South Vietnam
Wikipedia - Good governance -- Effective public decision making and institutions
Wikipedia - Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja Gonzalez -- Decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union
Wikipedia - Goran Waxberg -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Gorogoa -- 2017 puzzle game released in December
Wikipedia - Gossan -- Intensely oxidized, weathered or decomposed rock
Wikipedia - Graaff Electric Lighting Works -- Decomissioned historical power plant in Cape Town, South Africa
Wikipedia - Grace Gregory -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Gradient factor in decompression modelling -- Gradient factor in decompression modelling
Wikipedia - Gradient factor -- Method for adjusting conservatism of decompression algorithms
Wikipedia - Graduated Electronic Decelerator
Wikipedia - Grand Cross of the Iron Cross -- Decoration for victorious generals of the Prussian Army and its allies
Wikipedia - Grand Cross of Valour -- Military decoration of Rhodesia
Wikipedia - Grand Duchy of Finland -- Predecessor state of modern Finland
Wikipedia - Grass Crown -- Highest ancient Roman military decoration
Wikipedia - Gravy Deco -- 1995 compilation album by Robyn Hitchcock
Wikipedia - Great Barrington Declaration -- COVID-19-related open letter
Wikipedia - Great dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Great dodecahemicosahedron -- Polyhedron with 22 faces
Wikipedia - Great Recession -- Early 21st-century global economic decline
Wikipedia - Great snub icosidodecahedron -- Polyhedron with 92 faces
Wikipedia - Great stellated dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Great Union Day -- National holiday in Romania, celebrated on 1 December
Wikipedia - Greco Deco -- Architectural style
Wikipedia - Green Boots -- Unidentified deceased mountain climber
Wikipedia - Green Eyes (children's book) -- 1954 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Greenfield status -- Term used after a decommissioned site is restored to its original condition prior to any development
Wikipedia - Grevillea decipiens -- Species of shrub in the family Proteaceae native to Western Australia
Wikipedia - Grevillea decora -- Species of shrub in the family Proteaceae native to Queensland, Australia
Wikipedia - Grevillea decurrens -- Species of shrub in the family Proteaceae native to northern Australia
Wikipedia - Grievances of the United States Declaration of Independence -- 27 colonial grievances listed in the Declaration of Independence
Wikipedia - GroM-CM-^_welzheim Nuclear Power Plant -- Decommissioned nuclear power plant in Germany
Wikipedia - Groovy Decay -- 1982 album by Robyn Hitchcock
Wikipedia - Gross indecency
Wikipedia - Ground Assault Badge of the Luftwaffe -- World War II German military decoration
Wikipedia - Group decision-making
Wikipedia - GSM Interworking Profile -- DECT profile
Wikipedia - GUADEC
Wikipedia - Guerra de Titanes (December 2018) -- 2018 Lucha Libre AAA World Wide event
Wikipedia - Guido Kratschmer -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Gunnar Fredriksen -- Norwegian decathlete
Wikipedia - Gunnar Hagen -- Norwegian decathlete
Wikipedia - Gunnar Nixon -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Gyula Decsi -- Hungarian politician and jurist
Wikipedia - Gzip -- GNU file compression/decompression tool
Wikipedia - Hadi Sepehrzad -- Iranian decathlete
Wikipedia - Hakea decurrens -- Species of plant in the family Proteaceae from Australia
Wikipedia - Haldane's decompression model -- Decompression model developed by John Scott Haldane
Wikipedia - Half-life of knowledge -- Metric measuring the decay of knowledge
Wikipedia - Halfpenny (British decimal coin) -- Demonetised unit of currency that was worth one two-hundredth of a pound sterling
Wikipedia - Halfpenny (British pre-decimal coin) -- Pre-decimal unit of currency that equalled half of a penny or 1M-bM-^AM-^D480 of a pound sterling
Wikipedia - Hal Gausman -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Halizah -- Process by which a childless widow and a brother of her deceased husband may avoid the duty to marry
Wikipedia - Hallaton Helmet -- Decorated iron Roman cavalry parade helmet
Wikipedia - Hamdi Dhouibi -- Tunisian decathlete
Wikipedia - Hamlet on the Holodeck -- "Hamlet on the Holodeck" is a 1997 book by [[Janet Murray|Janet H. Murray]] that theorizes cyberdrama.
Wikipedia - Hammerbeam roof -- A decorative, open timber roof truss typical of English Gothic architecture
Wikipedia - Hanford Site -- Decommissioned nuclear production complex in Washington, United States
Wikipedia - Hans-Heinrich Sievert -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Hans-Joachim Perk -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Hans Makart -- Austrian academic history painter, designer, and decorator (1840-1884)
Wikipedia - Hans Muchitsch -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - Hansruedi Kunz -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Hans Van Alphen -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Hapalodectes -- Extinct genus of mammals
Wikipedia - Hapalodectidae -- Extinct family of mammals
Wikipedia - Harrison Williams (athlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Harry Frieda -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Harry Goelitz -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Healthcare proxy -- Legal instrument with which a patient appoints an agent to legally make healthcare decisions on their behalf
Wikipedia - Healy (volcano) -- Submarine volcano in New Zealand's Kermadec Islands
Wikipedia - Heath High School shooting -- December 1, 1997 school massacre in Kentucky, USA
Wikipedia - Hector Thomas -- Venezuelan decathlete
Wikipedia - Hedbergia decurva -- Species of flowering plants in the broomrape family Orobanchaceae
Wikipedia - Hedwig of Andechs
Wikipedia - Heegaard splitting -- Decomposition of a compact oriented 3-manifold by dividing it into two handlebodies
Wikipedia - Heikki LeppM-CM-$nen -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Heinkel He 113 -- German deception involving prototype aircraft during WW2
Wikipedia - Heliopsis decumbens -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Hellinsia madecasseus -- Species of plume moth
Wikipedia - Helmholtz decomposition -- Certain vector fields are the sum of an irrotational and a solenoidal vector field
Wikipedia - Helmut Bonnet -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Hendecagon -- shape with eleven sides
Wikipedia - Hendecagram -- 11-pointed star polygon
Wikipedia - Hendecahedron
Wikipedia - Henri Decoin -- French film director
Wikipedia - Henrik DagM-CM-%rd -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Henry Davis Sleeper -- antiquarian and interior decorator
Wikipedia - Henry Fisherman -- 1949 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Henry Grace -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Henry Lindblad -- Swedish pole vaulter and decathlete
Wikipedia - Heptadecagon -- Polygon with 17 edges
Wikipedia - Heptadecahedron
Wikipedia - Herald & Review -- Newspaper based in Decatur, Illinois
Wikipedia - Herbal tea -- Beverage made from infusing or decocting plant material in hot water
Wikipedia - Herbert Wessel -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Hercule Meriadec, Duke of Rohan-Rohan -- French aristocrat
Wikipedia - Her Decision -- 1918 film
Wikipedia - Hermann Dechant -- Austrian musician
Wikipedia - Hermann Lemperle -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Herman Timme -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Hernan Alzamora -- Peruvian hurdler and decathlete
Wikipedia - Hernan Figueroa -- Chilean decathlete
Wikipedia - Heuristics in judgment and decision making
Wikipedia - Heuristics in judgment and decision-making -- Simple strategies or mental processes involved in making quick decisions
Wikipedia - Hexadecachoron
Wikipedia - Hexadecagon -- Polygon with 16 edges
Wikipedia - Hexadecahedron
Wikipedia - Hexadecimal floating point
Wikipedia - Hexadecimal floating-point
Wikipedia - Hexadecimal time
Wikipedia - Hexadecimal -- Base 16 numerical system
Wikipedia - Hex dump -- Hexadecimal view of computer data
Wikipedia - Hierarchical Decision Process
Wikipedia - Hillel J. Einhorn -- American psychologist and decision theorist (1941-1987)
Wikipedia - Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens -- Decorative arts museum in Washington, D.C.
Wikipedia - HinodechM-EM-^M Station -- Railway station in Yokohama, Japan
Wikipedia - Hippa -- Genus of decapod crustaceans
Wikipedia - Hiromasa Tanaka -- Japanese decathlete
Wikipedia - Histidine decarboxylase -- Enzyme that converts histidine to histamine
Wikipedia - Historian's fallacy -- Assumption that decision makers of the past viewed events from the same perspective and having the same information as those subsequently analyzing the decision
Wikipedia - History of decompression research and development -- A chronological list of notable events in the history of diving decompression.
Wikipedia - History of the British canal system -- The building, use, decline and restoration of artificial waterways in the United Kingdom
Wikipedia - History of the British penny (1901-1970) -- History of the pre-decimal British penny during the 20th century
Wikipedia - History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Wikipedia - Hit the Deck (1930 film) -- 1930 film
Wikipedia - Hit the Deck (1955 film) -- 1955 film
Wikipedia - Hit the Deck (musical) -- Musical
Wikipedia - HMS Decoy (1894) -- Daring-class destroyer
Wikipedia - HMS Decoy (H75) -- D-class destroyer
Wikipedia - HMS Naiad (F39) -- UK Royal Navy Leander-class frigate decommissioned in 1987
Wikipedia - HMS Porpoise (1804) -- Former Mercantile Quarter decked Sloop Lord Melville (Store ship)
Wikipedia - Ho Henh PhM-FM-0M-FM-!c -- Vietnamese decathlete
Wikipedia - Holmium-magnesium-zinc quasicrystal -- Dodecahedral quasicrystal
Wikipedia - Holodeck -- Star Trek device
Wikipedia - Holt Manufacturing Company -- Defunct American tractor company, predecessor to Caterpillar Tractor Company
Wikipedia - Home Interiors and Gifts -- American decorating accessories manufacturer
Wikipedia - Homelo Vi -- Tongan decathlete
Wikipedia - Honoris Crux Gold -- South African military decoration for bravery
Wikipedia - Hope Memorial Bridge -- Art deco truss bridge crossing the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio, US
Wikipedia - Hoplojana indecisa -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Horithyatira decorata -- Species of false owlet moth
Wikipedia - Horst Beyer (decathlete) -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Hour of Decision (film) -- 1957 British mystery film directed by C.M. Pennington-Richards
Wikipedia - House of Andechs
Wikipedia - House painter and decorator
Wikipedia - Houses from the Sea -- 1960 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Howard Bristol -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - How to Make Good Decisions and Be Right All the Time
Wikipedia - How We Decide -- Book by Jonah Lehrer
Wikipedia - Hubcap -- Decorative disk on an automobile wheel that covers at least a central portion of the wheel
Wikipedia - Hubert Indra -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Huffyuv -- Lossless video codec
Wikipedia - Hugh Hunt -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Hugo Barth -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Human decontamination -- Is the process of cleansing the human body to remove contamination by hazardous materials including chemicals, radioactive substances, and infectious material.
Wikipedia - Humanity Has Declined -- Light novels and anime
Wikipedia - Hypokinesia -- Decreased movement due to basal ganglia dysfunction
Wikipedia - Hypotelorism -- Abnormally decreased distance between two body parts, usually the eyes
Wikipedia - Hypotia decembralis -- Species of insect
Wikipedia - I Am a Man! -- Civil rights declaration
Wikipedia - Ian C. Eddy -- Decorated submarine commander
Wikipedia - Ian Whittaker -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - IBM 7070 -- Decimal computer introduced by IBM in 1958
Wikipedia - IBM BladeCenter -- Blade server architecture by IBM
Wikipedia - IBM hexadecimal floating point
Wikipedia - Ica stones -- Decorated andesite stones found in Ica Province, Peru
Wikipedia - ICC Awards of the Decade -- ICC Awards of the Decade
Wikipedia - Icelandic Commonwealth -- Predecessor state of Iceland
Wikipedia - Ichthyosaura randeckensis -- Species of fossil salamander
Wikipedia - Icosidodecahedron
Wikipedia - I Couldn't Become a Hero, So I Reluctantly Decided to Get a Job. -- Japanese light novel, manga, and anime series
Wikipedia - IDEC Corporation -- Japanese manufacturer of industrial automation products
Wikipedia - IDEC SPORT -- Sailing vessel
Wikipedia - Ignace Heinrich -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Ignacio Aldecoa
Wikipedia - Igor M-EM- arM-DM-^Mevic -- Serbian bobsledder and decathlete
Wikipedia - I Hate December -- Single by American band Ivy
Wikipedia - Iivari YrjolM-CM-$ -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Illuminated manuscript -- Manuscript in which the text is supplemented by the addition of decoration
Wikipedia - Illyrian deciduous forests -- Terrestrial ecoregion of Europe
Wikipedia - Ilulissat Declaration -- Arctic inter-governmental conference
Wikipedia - Ilya Shkurenyov -- Russian decathlete
Wikipedia - Imatra shooting -- Shooting incident in Imatra, Finland, on 3-4 December 2016
Wikipedia - Impartiality -- Principle of justice holding that decisions should be based on objective criteria
Wikipedia - Impeller -- Rotor used to increase (or decrease in case of turbines) the pressure and flow of a fluid or gas
Wikipedia - Imprimatur -- Declaration authorizing publication of a book
Wikipedia - Impurity of the land of the nations -- Rabbinic decree declaring land outside the Land of Israel to be ritually impure
Wikipedia - Inch by Inch (children's book) -- 1961 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Increment and decrement operators
Wikipedia - Indecency
Wikipedia - Indecent assault
Wikipedia - Indecent exposure -- Public indecency involving nudity of some sort
Wikipedia - Indecent Proposal -- 1993 film by Adrian Lyne
Wikipedia - Indecision Records -- Record label
Wikipedia - Indecline -- Unitedstatesian anarchist art collective
Wikipedia - Independence Commemorative Decoration -- Civil decoration of Rhodesia
Wikipedia - Independence Decoration (Rhodesia) -- Civil decoration of Rhodesia
Wikipedia - IndieAuth -- Decentralized authentication protocol using OAuth 2.0
Wikipedia - Indrek Kaseorg -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Indrek Turi -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Infamy Speech -- December 8, 1941 speech by FDR on the bombing of Pearl Harbor
Wikipedia - Inferior Decorator -- 1948 Donald Duck cartoon
Wikipedia - Informed Decision -- American Thoroughbred racehorse
Wikipedia - Ingmar Vos -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Ingo GM-CM-$dechens -- German politician
Wikipedia - Inishmore Lighthouse -- Decommissioned lighthouse in the Aran Islands, Ireland
Wikipedia - Inlay (guitar) -- Decorative material set into the wooden surface
Wikipedia - In re Ah Yup -- 1878 landmark court decision
Wikipedia - Inside Bill's Brain: Decoding Bill Gates -- 2019 docu-series on Netflix
Wikipedia - Instruction decoder
Wikipedia - Insulin degludec -- Ultralong-acting basal insulin analogue
Wikipedia - Integer factorization -- Decomposition of an integer into a product
Wikipedia - Interactive Application System -- old DEC operating system
Wikipedia - Interactive fiction -- Nonlinear narratives set by audience decisions
Wikipedia - Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation -- An oceanographic/meteorological phenomenon similar to the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), but occurring in a wider area of the Pacific
Wikipedia - Interlace (art) -- Decorative element of bands or portions of other motifs looped, braided, and knotted in complex geometric patterns
Wikipedia - International Cooperation Administration -- Predecessor of the U.S. Agency for International Development
Wikipedia - International Journal of Information Technology > Decision Making
Wikipedia - Internet fraud -- A type of fraud or deception which makes use of the Internet to defraud victims
Wikipedia - Internet Low Bitrate Codec -- Audio coding format
Wikipedia - Internet Speech Audio Codec -- Audio codec standard
Wikipedia - Intestacy -- Condition of the estate of a person who dies without having made a valid will or other binding declaration
Wikipedia - Intuitive decision-making
Wikipedia - Inverse beta decay
Wikipedia - In-water recompression -- In-water treatment for decompression sickness
Wikipedia - Iphigenie Decaux-Milet-Moreau -- 19th-century French painter
Wikipedia - Ira E. McMillian -- Decorated World War II commander
Wikipedia - Irish Republic -- Revolutionary state that declared its independence from Great Britain (UKGBI); 1919-1922
Wikipedia - Iron Cross -- Military decoration in the Kingdom of Prussia, and later in the German Empire (1870-1918) and Nazi Germany
Wikipedia - ISIL beheading incidents -- Decapitation by Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant
Wikipedia - Israeli Declaration of Independence -- 1948 declaration of Israel's independence
Wikipedia - Issyk inscription -- Undeciphered archaeological text
Wikipedia - Italian playing cards -- Playing card deck used in Italy
Wikipedia - It Doesn't Matter (Wyclef Jean song) -- 2000 single by Wyclef Jean featuring The Rock & Melky Sedeck
Wikipedia - Iterative Viterbi decoding
Wikipedia - It's Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers -- Essay parodying fans of autumn
Wikipedia - Jaakko Ojaniemi -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Jack Mills (art director) -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Jack Rosendaal -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Jack Stephens (set decorator) -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Jack Stubbs -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Jacob Minah -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Jacques Cretaine -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Jacques Decaux -- French sports shooter
Wikipedia - Jacques De Decker -- Belgian playwright
Wikipedia - Jagan Hames -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Jagua tattoo -- Temporary form of skin decoration
Wikipedia - James H. DeCoursey Jr. -- American politician
Wikipedia - James Shupe -- First person in the U.S. to be legally declared non-binary.
Wikipedia - James Stewart (decathlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - James W. Payne -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Jamie Adjetey-Nelson -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Jan Deckers
Wikipedia - Janek LedeckM-CM-= -- Czech musician
Wikipedia - Janek M-CM-^Uiglane -- Estonian decathlete (born 1994)
Wikipedia - Jan Felix Knobel -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Jangy Addy -- Liberian decathlete
Wikipedia - Janice Blackie-Goodine -- Canadian set decorator
Wikipedia - Jan Sniadecki
Wikipedia - Jason deCaires Taylor -- British sculptor and creator of the world's first underwater sculpture park
Wikipedia - Jean-Claude Decaux -- French businessman
Wikipedia - Jean-Claude Decosse -- French racewalker
Wikipedia - Jean Decety
Wikipedia - Jean, duc Decazes -- French yacht racer
Wikipedia - Jean-Francois Champollion -- French classical scholar, decipherer of Egyptian hieroglyphs
Wikipedia - Jean-Marie Dedecker -- Belgian politician, judo coach
Wikipedia - Jean Medecin -- French lawyer and politician
Wikipedia - Jean-Michel Huon de Kermadec -- French Navy officer
Wikipedia - Jean Morzadec -- French singer-songwriter
Wikipedia - Jean-Pierre Schoebel -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Jeff Bannister -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Jeff Bennett (athlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Jennifer Decker -- French actress
Wikipedia - Jeremy Decerle -- French politician
Wikipedia - Jerry Wunderlich -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Jersey upline -- A buoyed line deployed at the end of a dive and tied off to the bottom to serve as a position control during decompression
Wikipedia - Jessie James Decker -- American country pop singer
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Wikipedia - JiM-EM-^Yi Ryba -- Czech decathlete
Wikipedia - Jim Erickson -- American-Canadian set decorator
Wikipedia - Jim Poynter -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Jim Wooding -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - JindM-EM-^YichM-EM-/v Hradec -- Town in the Czech Republic
Wikipedia - JLG/JLG - Self-Portrait in December -- 1995 film
Wikipedia - Janis Dimza -- Latvian decathlete
Wikipedia - Janis Karlivans -- Latvian decathlete
Wikipedia - Janis Lanka -- Latvian decathlete
Wikipedia - Joachim Kirst -- East German decathlete
Wikipedia - Joao Vaz -- Portuguese painter and decorator
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Wikipedia - Johan Decavele -- Belgian historian and archivist
Wikipedia - Johannes Erm -- Estonian decathlete
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Wikipedia - Johannes-R.-Becher-Medaille -- East-German decoration
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Wikipedia - John Beresford, 5th Baron Decies -- Anglo-Irish army officer
Wikipedia - John Bonar -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - John Caldecott -- English businessman, astronomer and meteorologist
Wikipedia - John Chadwick -- British linguist and classical scholar who deciphered Linear B
Wikipedia - John Crist -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - John Decatur Messick
Wikipedia - John Delafose -- American zydeco musician
Wikipedia - John F. Kennedy Memorial Bridge -- Single-deck cantilever bridge that carries southbound I-65 across the Ohio River at Louisville
Wikipedia - John H. Anderson -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - John Lomas (RAF officer) -- Decoder and civil servant
Wikipedia - John N. Deck
Wikipedia - John P. Austin -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - John Records Landecker -- American disk jockey (born 1947)
Wikipedia - John Scott Haldane -- Scottish physiologist and decompression researcher
Wikipedia - John Sturtevant -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - John W. Brown (set decorator) -- American art director
Wikipedia - John Zdechlik -- American composer
Wikipedia - Joint Declaration of Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill
Wikipedia - Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification -- 1999 text resulting from an extensive ecumenical dialogue
Wikipedia - JoM-EM->e Brodnik -- Slovenian decathlete
Wikipedia - Jon Arnar Magnusson -- Icelandic decathlete
Wikipedia - Jonathan Adler -- American potter, interior decorater, and author
Wikipedia - Jora Singh -- Indian decathlete
Wikipedia - Joris Hendrickx -- Belgian sidecarcross racer
Wikipedia - Josef Hipp -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Jose Luis de Jesus -- Puerto Rican self-declared messiah
Wikipedia - Joseph Decaisne -- French botanist and agronomist (1807-1882)
Wikipedia - Joseph Decroze -- French gymnast
Wikipedia - Josie MacAvin -- Irish set decorator
Wikipedia - Journal of Behavioral Decision Making -- Academic journal
Wikipedia - Journey Cake, Ho! -- 1954 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Jozsef Bakai -- Hungarian decathlete
Wikipedia - Juanita (children's book) -- 1948 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Jubel (song) -- 2013 single by Klingande featuring Lucie Decarne
Wikipedia - Judgement -- Decision making; evaluation of evidence to make a decision
Wikipedia - Judgment and Decision Making -- Bimonthly peer-reviewed psychology journal covering decision making
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Wikipedia - Judy Farr (set decorator) -- British art director and set decorator
Wikipedia - Julia Garcia-Valdecasas -- Spanish politician
Wikipedia - Julien Medecin -- Monegasque architect
Wikipedia - Julie Sondra Decker -- American writer, YouTube personality and activist
Wikipedia - Julio Santos (athlete) -- Portuguese decathlete
Wikipedia - Jurgen Hingsen -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Juris Laipenieks -- Chilean decathlete
Wikipedia - Justification (theology) -- God's righteous act of declaring the ungodly to be righteous, through faith in Christ's atoning sacrifice
Wikipedia - Kaiama Declaration -- Declaration of ijaw youth district in control for minerals resources
Wikipedia - Kai Kazmirek -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Kalamkari -- Traditional textile decoration technique of Andhra Pradesh combining hand-painting and block-printing on mordanted fabric
Wikipedia - Kamil DamaM-EM-!ek -- Czech decathlete
Wikipedia - Kardec (film) -- Portuguese-language 2019 drama film on Netflix
Wikipedia - Kardecist Spiritism
Wikipedia - Karen DeCrow -- American lawyer and feminist
Wikipedia - Kargil War -- undeclared war between India and Pakistan
Wikipedia - Karl Robert Saluri -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Karl Vilmundarson -- Icelandic decathlete
Wikipedia - Kasparov versus the World -- Game of chess played in 1999 over the Internet over 4 months, with Garry Kasparov (White) against the rest of the world (Black) in consultation, with the World Team moves decided by plurality vote; Kasparov won after 62 moves
Wikipedia - Katie Ledecky
Wikipedia - Katsuhiko Matsuda -- Japanese decathlete
Wikipedia - Kavod HaBriyot -- Concept of Halakha (Jewish law) originating in the Talmud which permits exceptions to Rabbinic decrees under certain circumstances
Wikipedia - KAXT-CD -- Decades TV station in San Francisco
Wikipedia - Kaysie Lackey -- Food artist and cake decorating instructor
Wikipedia - KDEC (AM) -- Radio station in Decorah, Iowa
Wikipedia - KDHK -- Radio station in Decorah, Iowa
Wikipedia - KDKR -- Radio station in Decatur, Texas
Wikipedia - Kebedech Tekleab -- Ethiopian painter and poet
Wikipedia - Keisuke Ushiro -- Japanese decathlete
Wikipedia - Keith DeCandido -- American science fiction and fantasy writer
Wikipedia - Kelly Sue DeConnick -- American writer
Wikipedia - Ken Decaria -- American politician
Wikipedia - Kenneth Brown (interior designer) -- American interior designer and decorator
Wikipedia - Kenyon Medal -- Civil decoration
Wikipedia - Kermadecia pronyensis -- Species of plant in the family Proteaceae endemic to New Caledonia
Wikipedia - Kermadecia -- Genus of plants in the family Proteaceae endemic to New Caledonia
Wikipedia - Kermadec Plate -- a long, narrow tectonic plate west of the Kermadec Trench
Wikipedia - Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone -- A convergent plate boundary that stretches from the North Island of New Zealand northward
Wikipedia - Kermadec Trench -- A linear ocean trench in the south Pacific north west of New Zealand
Wikipedia - Kevin Mayer -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Kew Cottages -- A decommissioned special development school and residential service in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Wikipedia - Kim Kun-woo -- South Korean decathlete
Wikipedia - Kingdom of Bohemia -- Monarchy in Central Europe, predecessor of modern Czech Republic
Wikipedia - Kip Janvrin -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Kiradech Aphibarnrat -- Thai professional golfer
Wikipedia - Kirazuri -- Ukiyoe printing technique also applied to paper decoration
Wikipedia - Kirby Deater-Deckard -- American developmental psychologist
Wikipedia - Klaus Ambrosch -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - Klaus Grogorenz -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Klaus Isekenmeier -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - K-Lite Codec Pack -- Collection of audio and video codecs for Microsoft Windows
Wikipedia - KMPX -- Estrella TV station in Decatur, Texas
Wikipedia - Knowledge and Decisions -- Book by Thomas Sowell
Wikipedia - Kodecyte -- Modified living cell
Wikipedia - Koech Kiprop -- Kenyan decathlete
Wikipedia - Korean decimal classification
Wikipedia - Kristjan Rahnu -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Kristjan Rosenberg -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Kryha -- Device for encryption and decryption
Wikipedia - Kurt Ludecke -- German nationalist and early Nazi
Wikipedia - KVIK -- Radio station in Decorah, Iowa
Wikipedia - Kyle Cranston -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - La Coupole (Paris) -- Art deco brasserie in Montparnasse
Wikipedia - Lada Engchawadechasilp -- Thai American
Wikipedia - Lady Tetley's Decree -- 1920 film
Wikipedia - Lagarith -- Open source lossless video codec
Wikipedia - La Giudecca -- Term used In Southern Italy and Sicily to identify any urban district (or a portion of a village) where Jewish communities dwelled
Wikipedia - Laini Taylor -- American young-adult fantasy writer born December 11,1971
Wikipedia - Lakhudiyar Caves -- Indian caves decorated with prehistoric paintings
Wikipedia - Lampshade -- Decorative or functional shade placed over the light source of a lamp
Wikipedia - Land claim -- Legal declaration of desired control over an area
Wikipedia - Lanthanide contraction -- Decrease of ionic radii across the lanthanide series
Wikipedia - Laramie State Bank Building -- A former bank and Chicago landmark built in the Art Deco style
Wikipedia - Larbi Bourrada -- Algerian decathlete
Wikipedia - Larch -- genus of deciduous conifers in the family Pinaceae
Wikipedia - Larix decidua -- Species of conifer in the pine family Pinaceae
Wikipedia - L'Armendeche Lighthouse -- Lighthouse in VendM-CM-)e, France
Wikipedia - Lars Warming -- Danish decathlete
Wikipedia - Latin declension
Wikipedia - Latrodectus umbukwane -- Species of spider
Wikipedia - Latrodectus -- Genus of arachnids
Wikipedia - Latte art -- Type of decoration on coffee
Wikipedia - Laura Overdeck -- American maths education entrepreneur
Wikipedia - Laurent Hernu -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Laurentius Nicolaas Deckers -- Dutch politician
Wikipedia - Lava lamp -- Decorative lamp
Wikipedia - Law of Spikelets -- 1932 Soviet decree on theft of grain from collective farms
Wikipedia - Laws of Deception -- 1997 film by Joey Travolta
Wikipedia - Laws of the Indies -- Set of decrees issued by the Spanish Crown for the American and the Philippine possessions of its empire
Wikipedia - LDAC (codec)
Wikipedia - Leaf mold -- Product of slow decomposition of deciduous leaves
Wikipedia - League of Nations -- 20th-century intergovernmental organisation, predecessor to the United Nations
Wikipedia - Lecithocera decaryella -- Species of moth in genus Lecithocera
Wikipedia - Lecithocera decorosa -- Species of moth in genus Lecithocera
Wikipedia - Lee Fu-an -- Taiwanese decathlete
Wikipedia - Lee Gwang-ik -- South Korean decathlete
Wikipedia - Legal research in the United States -- The process of identifying and retrieving information to support legal arguments and decisions
Wikipedia - Legna Verdecia -- Cuban judoka
Wikipedia - Leif Dahlgren -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Leonel Suarez -- Cuban decathlete
Wikipedia - Leonid Andreev (athlete) -- Uzbekistani pole vaulter and decathlete
Wikipedia - Leonid Rogozov -- Soviet doctor who performed an auto-appendectomy
Wikipedia - Leon Kristopher Smith -- New Zealand Army soldier, recipient of the New Zealand Gallantry Decoration
Wikipedia - Lerwick Declaration -- 2013 announcement by the Scottish Government regarding decentralisation of power to the Scottish islands
Wikipedia - Leslie Pope -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Leszek Podhorodecki -- Polish historian, writer, and teacher
Wikipedia - Letters Patent Constituting the Office of Governor-General of New Zealand -- Royal decree in New Zealand
Wikipedia - Levirate marriage -- Marriage in which the brother of a deceased man is obliged to marry his brother's widow
Wikipedia - Lexical decision task
Wikipedia - Leyland Atlantean -- Rear engined double decker bus
Wikipedia - Leyland-DAB Lion -- A mid-engined double-decker bus
Wikipedia - Leyland National -- British step-floor single-decker bus (built 1972-1985)
Wikipedia - Leyland Olympian -- A 2-axle and 3-axle double-decker bus chassis manufactured by Leyland
Wikipedia - LGBT-free zone -- Region declared to be free of "LGBT ideology"
Wikipedia - LHDC (codec)
Wikipedia - Libavcodec
Wikipedia - Libertarian socialist decentralisation
Wikipedia - Libertarian socialist decentralization
Wikipedia - Libvpx -- Codec library implementing VP8 and VP9 encoders and decoders
Wikipedia - Licitar -- Decorated honey biscuit from Croatia and Slovenia
Wikipedia - Lien Ying Chow -- Deceased Singaporean businessperson
Wikipedia - Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness -- Phrase in the United States Declaration of Independence
Wikipedia - Life Model Decoy
Wikipedia - Lifesaving Medal -- US decoration from the Coast Guard
Wikipedia - Liliane de Kermadec -- French film director
Wikipedia - Lim Chin Siong -- Deceased Singaporean politician
Wikipedia - Linda DeScenna -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Lindsey Decker -- American artist
Wikipedia - Lionel Fournier -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Lion (picture book) -- 1957 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Liquid Sex Decay (album) -- 1997 studio album by Liquid Sex Decay
Wikipedia - Lisa Dean -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - List of 2009 all-decade Sports Illustrated awards and honors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Ant & Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Art Deco architecture -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Art Deco buildings in Tulsa, Oklahoma -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Art Deco theaters in Metro Manila -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Atlantic Coast Line Railroad predecessors -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of best-selling singles of the 2000s (decade) in the United Kingdom -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of biases in judgment and decision making
Wikipedia - List of biases in judgment and decision-making
Wikipedia - List of Birdy the Mighty: Decode episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of British champions in decathlon/heptathlon -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of British Railways steam locomotives as of 31 December 1967 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of civil awards and decorations
Wikipedia - List of codecs -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decades, centuries, and millennia -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decades
Wikipedia - List of decapod crustaceans of Dominica -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decathlon national champions (men) -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Deccan Chargers cricketers -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of December Bride episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decision-making processes
Wikipedia - List of Decker episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decommissioned ships of the Chilean Navy -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decommissioned ships of the Finnish Navy -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decommissioned ships of the Hellenic Navy -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decommissioned ships of the Italian Navy -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decommissioned ships of the Philippine Navy -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of decommissioned ships of the South African Navy -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of deconstructionists
Wikipedia - List of decorative stones -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Dewey Decimal classes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of films condemned by the Legion of Decency -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of formerly unidentified decedents -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of highest military decorations -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of intelligence and espionage-related awards and decorations -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of isomers of decane -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of isomers of dodecane -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of isomers of tetradecane -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of isomers of tridecane -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of isomers of undecane -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Jewelpet Kira Deco! episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Kamen Rider Decade episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2010 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2012 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2013 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2014 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2015 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2016 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2017 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2018 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2019 -- Wikipedia list
Wikipedia - List of killings by law enforcement officers in the United States, December 2020 -- Wikipedia list
Wikipedia - List of landmark court decisions in the United States -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of LMS locomotives as of 31 December 1947 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of LNER locomotives as of 31 December 1947 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of longest-running radio programmes -- Regular broadcasts made for decades
Wikipedia - List of Magic: The Gathering theme decks
Wikipedia - List of military awards and decorations of the Gulf War -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of military awards and decorations of the international military intervention against ISIL -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of military awards and decorations of World War II -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of military decorations -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of most populous cities in Florida by decade -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of most populous cities in the United States by decade -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of national sidecarcross champions -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Norfolk Southern Railway predecessor railroads -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of office holders of the United Kingdom and predecessor states -- wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of open-source codecs -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of orders, decorations, and medals of the Principality of Serbia -- medals of the Principality of Serbia
Wikipedia - List of Pennsylvania Railroad predecessor railroads -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of people declared personae non gratae in Azerbaijan -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of people declared persona non grata -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of people declared venerable by Pope Francis
Wikipedia - List of people declared venerable by Pope John Paul II
Wikipedia - List of people declared venerable by Pope Paul VI
Wikipedia - List of pornographic performers by decade -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of predecessors of sovereign states in Africa -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of predecessors of sovereign states in Asia -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of predecessors of sovereign states in Europe -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of predecessors of sovereign states in North America -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of predecessors of sovereign states in Oceania -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of predecessors of sovereign states in South America -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of programs broadcast by Decades -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of recurring characters in The Suite Life on Deck -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of researchers in underwater diving -- Notable developers of diving technology, and published researchers in diving medicine and physiology, including decompression theory
Wikipedia - List of senators of Ardeche -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1801 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1807 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1811 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1864 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1865 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1869 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1870 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1872 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1874 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1876 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1877 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1879 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1882 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1884 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1886 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1898 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1899 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1902 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1904 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1905 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1906 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1908 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1910 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1912 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1913 -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1918 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1919 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1920 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1921 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1922 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1923 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1926 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1927 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1930 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1931 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1932 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1933 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1934 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1935 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1937 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1938 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1939 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1940 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1941 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1942 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1943 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1944 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1945 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1946 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1947 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1948 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1949 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1950 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1952 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1954 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1955 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1956 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1957 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1958 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1959 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1960 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1962 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1963 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1964 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1965 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1966 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1967 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1968 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1969 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1970 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1971 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1972 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1973 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1974 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1975 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1976 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1977 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1978 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1979 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1980 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1981 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1982 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1983 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1984 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1985 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1986 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1987 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1988 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1989 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1990 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1991 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1992 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1993 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1994 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1995 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1996 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1997 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1998 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 1999 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2000 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2001 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2002 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2003 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2004 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2005 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2006 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2007 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2008 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2009 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2010 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2011 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2012 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2013 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2014 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2015 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2016 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2017 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of ship decommissionings in 2018 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Simplifly Deccan destinations -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of socialist states -- List of self-declared socialist states
Wikipedia - List of Star Trek: Lower Decks characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of state leaders in 18th-century British south Asia and its predecessor states -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of statements undecidable in ZFC
Wikipedia - List of The Suite Life on Deck episodes -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of thinkers influenced by deconstruction
Wikipedia - List of undecidable problems -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unidentified decedents in California -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unidentified decedents in the United States -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of vessels lost on the Haak Sand on 24 December 1811 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of winners of J2 League and predecessors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of winners of J3 League and predecessors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of winners of the EFL League One and predecessors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of winners of the EFL League Two and predecessors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of winners of the Scottish League One and predecessors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of winners of the Scottish League Two and predecessors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of wins by Kwantum-Decosol-Yoko and its successors -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of wound decorations -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - Lists of landmark court decisions -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - Little Red Decides -- 1918 film by Jack Conway
Wikipedia - LM-CM-)opold Marien -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Lobelia deckenii -- species of plant in the family Campanulaceae
Wikipedia - Lokrume helmet fragment -- A decorated fragment from a 10th-century Viking helmet
Wikipedia - Lombardic capitals -- Type of decorative capital letter
Wikipedia - London Controlling Section -- British strategic deception unit during WW2
Wikipedia - Lorine Niedecker
Wikipedia - Lost Decade (Japan)
Wikipedia - Louis GallouM-CM-)dec -- French geographer
Wikipedia - Louis Majorelle -- French furniture maker, decorator, and artist-craftsman
Wikipedia - Lower Caldecote -- Hamlet in Bedfordshire, England
Wikipedia - Low-protein diet -- Diet in which people decrease their intake of protein
Wikipedia - Luciano Paccagnella -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Lucien Dechaineux -- 20th-century Australian painter
Wikipedia - Ludeca of Mercia -- 9th-century King of Mercia
Wikipedia - LU decomposition
Wikipedia - LudM-DM-^[k Pernica (decathlete) -- Czech decathlete
Wikipedia - Luigi Ghedina (painter) -- Italian decorative painter and decorator
Wikipedia - Luiz Alberto de Araujo -- Brazilian decathlete
Wikipedia - Lupah Sug -- Predecessor state of the Sultanate of Sulu (12th century c.e. -1405 c.e.)
Wikipedia - Luristan bronze -- Small cast objects decorated with bronze sculptures from the Early Iron Age found in Iran
Wikipedia - Lusaka Manifesto -- 1969 declaration of African heads of state on human rights and white supremacy rule
Wikipedia - Lutetia -- Roman city, predecessor of Paris
Wikipedia - Lyle Stevik -- Formerly unidentified decedent
Wikipedia - Lyuben Doychev -- Bulgarian decathlete
Wikipedia - Mabo v Queensland (No 2) -- 1992 High Court of Australia decision which overturned "terra nullius" and recognised native title
Wikipedia - Macauley Island -- A volcanic island in New Zealand's Kermadec Islands
Wikipedia - Madecacesta -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Madecassia -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Madecassina -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Madecastalia -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Madeline's Madeline -- 2018 film directed by Josephine Decker
Wikipedia - Madis Kallas -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Magdalena Sniadecka-Kotarska -- Polish, professor, ethno-political researcher and diplomat
Wikipedia - Magic: The Gathering deck types
Wikipedia - Magnetic declination
Wikipedia - Maha Vir Chakra -- Military decoration in India
Wikipedia - Mahlabatini Declaration of Faith
Wikipedia - Maicel Uibo -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Maison de Soul -- American zydeco record label
Wikipedia - Major Arcana -- Trump cards of tarot decks in occult practices
Wikipedia - Majority decision
Wikipedia - Majority rule -- Decision rule that selects alternatives which have a majority
Wikipedia - Majuro Declaration -- Initiative of the Pacific Islands Forum
Wikipedia - Maksim Andraloits -- Belarusian decathlete
Wikipedia - Malcolm Webster Ford -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - MAN 24.3x0 -- Low-floor 3-axle double-decker bus chassis built for right-hand drive markets
Wikipedia - Management information system -- Information system used for decision-making
Wikipedia - Mandela Way T-34 Tank -- Decommissioned Soviet tank now decorating a London neighbourhood
Wikipedia - Mandragora (film) -- 1997 film from Wiktor Grodecki
Wikipedia - Manes -- Chthonic deities sometimes thought to represent souls of deceased loved ones
Wikipedia - Manfred Bock -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Manfred Pflugbeil -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Manfred Tiedtke -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Manifest Decimation -- Power Trip album
Wikipedia - Manifesto -- Published declaration of principles and intentions of an individual or group
Wikipedia - Manipur (princely state) -- Predecessor of the modern Indian state Manipur
Wikipedia - Mantas M-EM- ilkauskas -- Lithuanian decathlete
Wikipedia - Marcel Dost -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Marco Baffi -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Marco Rossi (athlete) -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Marcus Lollius Paulinus Decimus Valerius Asiaticus Saturninus -- Roman Senator and powerful figure during the late 1st century and early 2nd century
Wikipedia - Marcus Nilsson (decathlete) -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Marek LukaM-EM-! -- Czech decathlete
Wikipedia - Margaret Alcorn -- New Zealand interior decorator
Wikipedia - Margit Haider-Dechant -- Austrian classical pianist
Wikipedia - Maria Esther Aguilar Cansimbe -- Mexican crime journalist who has been declared "missing"
Wikipedia - Maria Fidecaro -- Italian physicist
Wikipedia - Mariner's cap -- Cap with a soft dark blue or white crown and a stiff dark visor, often decorated with braid
Wikipedia - Marine spatial planning -- A multiple user process to make informed and coordinated decisions about sustainable use of marine resources
Wikipedia - Mario Anibal -- Portuguese decathlete
Wikipedia - Markov decision process
Wikipedia - Markus Kahma -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Marla Graff Decker -- American judge from Virginia
Wikipedia - Mars Climate Orbiter -- Robotic space probe launched by NASA on December 11, 1998
Wikipedia - Marshall Capital -- Single decker bus bodywork
Wikipedia - Martina Gedeck -- German actress
Wikipedia - Martin Otte -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Martin P. Hottel -- Decorated World War II commander
Wikipedia - Martin Wyldeck -- British actor
Wikipedia - Mary Beth Decker -- American model
Wikipedia - Mary Deconge -- American mathematician
Wikipedia - Mary DeDecker -- American botanist and conservationist
Wikipedia - Mary Jo Baedecker -- American geochemist
Wikipedia - Maschke's theorem -- Concerns the decomposition of representations of a finite group into irreducible pieces
Wikipedia - Mask -- Any full or partial face covering, whether ceremonial, protective, decorative, or used as disguise
Wikipedia - Massimo Bertocchi -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Massive resistance -- Strategy declared by U.S. Senator Harry F. Byrd to resist public school desegregation in Virginia
Wikipedia - Master Quality Authenticated -- Audio codec
Wikipedia - Masters of Deception -- Hacker group
Wikipedia - Material fact -- A fact, the suppression of which would reasonably result in a different decision
Wikipedia - Matrix decomposition
Wikipedia - Matthew McEwen -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Maurice Bardeche -- French literary critic and neo-fascist writer
Wikipedia - Maurice Boulanger -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Maurice Smith (decathlete) -- Jamaican decathlete
Wikipedia - Mausoleum -- Monument enclosing the interment space or burial chamber of a deceased person or people
Wikipedia - Max Wehrli (athlete) -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - MAZ-203 -- Belarus manufactured low-floor single-decker bus
Wikipedia - McDonnell Douglas MD-12 -- Planned double-deck wide-body airliner, never produced
Wikipedia - M-CM-^Alvaro Burrell -- Spanish decathlete
Wikipedia - M-CM-^Sscar Gonzalez (decathlete) -- Spanish decathlete
Wikipedia - M-CM-^Vrn Clausen -- Icelandic decathlete
Wikipedia - McNamara fallacy -- Making a decision based solely on quantitative observations (or metrics) and ignoring all others
Wikipedia - MCV DD103 -- Low-floor double-decker bus body built by MCV Bus & Coach
Wikipedia - MCV Evolution -- Single decker bus bodywork
Wikipedia - MCV Stirling -- Single decker bus bodywork
Wikipedia - MCW Metrobus -- A two and three-axle double-decker bus
Wikipedia - M-DM-^@ina-kari -- Persian type of interior decoration with cut mirrors
Wikipedia - M-DM-^Puro GaM-EM-!par -- Croatian decathlete
Wikipedia - Meander (art) -- Decorative border motif constructed from a continuous line popular in Greek and Roman art
Wikipedia - Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence -- Purported and unproven colonial declaration of independence document
Wikipedia - Medal for Gallantry and Merit for Members of the Eastern Peoples -- Nazi German decoration for Eastern volunteers
Wikipedia - Medal of Freedom (1945) -- American civil decoration awarded 1946-1961
Wikipedia - Medal of Merit in Labour -- Spanish civil decoration
Wikipedia - Medal "For the Defence of Leningrad" -- Military decoration of the Soviet Union
Wikipedia - Medal "For the Defence of Odessa" -- Military decoration of the Soviet Union
Wikipedia - Medal "For the Defence of Stalingrad" -- Military decoration of the Soviet Union
Wikipedia - Medal "For the Defence of the Caucasus" -- Military decoration of the Soviet Union
Wikipedia - Medal ribbon -- Military decoration
Wikipedia - Me declaro culpable -- Mexican telenovela
Wikipedia - Megachile decemsignata -- Species of leafcutter bee (Megachile)
Wikipedia - Megachile deceptoria -- Species of leafcutter bee (Megachile)
Wikipedia - Megachile deceptrix -- Species of leafcutter bee (Megachile)
Wikipedia - Megadrought -- Prolonged drought lasting two decades or longer
Wikipedia - Melaleuca decussata -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Melania Decuseara -- Romanian diver
Wikipedia - Melanoplus decorus -- Species of grasshopper
Wikipedia - Melissa Deckman -- American political scientist
Wikipedia - Melita Rodeck -- American architect
Wikipedia - Mentec PDP-11 -- Computer company focused on DEC's PDP-11
Wikipedia - Mephentermine -- Formerly used in Wyamine nasal decongestant inhalers and before that as a stimulant in psychiatry.
Wikipedia - Mercedes-Benz O405 -- Single-decker bus manufactured by Mercedes-Benz (1983-2001)
Wikipedia - Meritorious Service Cross -- Meritorious service decoration in Canada
Wikipedia - Meritorious Service Medal (United Kingdom) -- British military decoration
Wikipedia - Mesembrina decipiens -- Species of house flies
Wikipedia - Messenger RNA decapping -- Removal of the 5' cap structure on mRNA
Wikipedia - Metachanda declinata -- Species of moth in genus Metachanda
Wikipedia - Methyllysine -- Derivative of the amino acid residue lysine where the sidechain ammonium group has been methylated one or more times.
Wikipedia - Metro Manila Transit Corporation Double-Decker Bus -- Type of bus
Wikipedia - Mezuzah -- In Judaism, parchment contained in a decorative case, inscribed with Torah verses, placed on right sides of doors and doorposts
Wikipedia - MI 09 -- Type of double-decker, dual-voltage electric multiple unit trainsets operated on the French RER A line
Wikipedia - MI 2N -- Type of double-decker, dual-voltage electric multiple unit trainsets operated on the French RER network
Wikipedia - Michael Kohnle -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Michael Schrader -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Michael Yeung -- Deceased Roman Catholic prelate
Wikipedia - Michel Decoust -- French composer and conductor
Wikipedia - Michele Rufenacht -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Michigan Algorithm Decoder
Wikipedia - Microbiota decussata -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Microdes decora -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Microeconomics -- Branch of economics that studies the behavior of individual households and firms in making decisions on the allocation of limited resources
Wikipedia - Midge Decter -- American journalist and author
Wikipedia - Midibus -- Single decker buses (length 8-11 metres)
Wikipedia - Midy's theorem -- On decimal expansions of fractions with prime denominator and even repeat period
Wikipedia - Migo Adecer -- Filipino-Australian singer, songwriter, dancer, model, and actor
Wikipedia - Miguel Valle -- Cuban decathlete
Wikipedia - Mikael Olander -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Mikalai Shubianok -- Belarusian decathlete
Wikipedia - Mike Dechaine -- American professional pool player
Wikipedia - Mike Gonzales -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Mike Maczey -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Mike Ramos -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Mike Smith (decathlete) -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Mikhail Medved -- Ukrainian decathlete
Wikipedia - Mikk-Mihkel Arro -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Mikko Halvari -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Mikk Pahapill -- Estonian decathlete
Wikipedia - Milan Decree
Wikipedia - Military awards and decorations
Wikipedia - Military deception
Wikipedia - Military Service Medal (South Vietnam) -- Military decoration of South Vietnam
Wikipedia - Miller's recurrence algorithm -- Procedure for calculating a rapidly decreasing solution of a linear recurrence relation
Wikipedia - Millikin University -- Private university in Decatur, Illinois, United States
Wikipedia - Millwork (building material) -- Decorative woodmill-produced products for building construction
Wikipedia - MIMA v Haji Ibrahim -- Court decision
Wikipedia - Mindset -- Term in decision theory and general systems theory
Wikipedia - Miner's figure -- Christmas decoration
Wikipedia - Minimal decency -- Ethical requirement in the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant
Wikipedia - Minimax -- Decision rule used for minimizing the possible loss for a worst case scenario
Wikipedia - Ministerial order -- Decree made by a ministry
Wikipedia - Miracles in December (song) -- 2013 single by Exo
Wikipedia - Mirko Spada -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Miro Ronac -- Peruvian decathlete
Wikipedia - Missile Badge -- Military decoration of the US Air Force for qualified missile personnel
Wikipedia - Miss X (decedent) -- Unidentified decedent
Wikipedia - MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems
Wikipedia - MM-CM-)daille de la Famille francaise -- French civil decoration honouring mothers of large families.
Wikipedia - MM-CM-)decins Sans Frontieres -- International humanitarian medical non-governmental organization
Wikipedia - Modeling chocolate -- A chocolate paste used for decoration
Wikipedia - Modified condition/decision coverage
Wikipedia - Modikwe Dikobe -- Deceased writer and activist in South Africa
Wikipedia - Module:HTMLDecode
Wikipedia - Mohamed Mansour Salah -- Qatari decathlete
Wikipedia - Molding (decorative) -- Class of decorative elements in the ornamentation
Wikipedia - Monetary Policy Committee (United Kingdom) -- Committee of the Bank of England that decides the United Kingdom's official interest rate
Wikipedia - Morality -- Differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper
Wikipedia - Moral particularism -- The view that there are no moral principles and that moral judgement can be found only as one decides particular cases, either real or imagined
Wikipedia - Mordecai ben Nissan -- A Karaite Jewish scholar who lived at Krasnoi-Ostrog, Poland, in the 17th and 18th centuries
Wikipedia - Mordecai Cary -- Irish Anglican bishop (1687-1751)
Wikipedia - Mordecai Ezekiel -- American economist
Wikipedia - Mordecai Kaplan -- Lithuanian American rabbi
Wikipedia - Mordecai Lincoln -- Uncle of Abraham Lincoln
Wikipedia - Mordecai Najar -- 15th-century rabbi
Wikipedia - Mordecai Schreiber -- American Reform rabbi and an author
Wikipedia - Mordecai Sheftall Cemetery -- Old Jewish cemetery in Savannah, Georgia
Wikipedia - Mordecai
Wikipedia - Mordecai Wyatt Johnson -- Pastor and president of Howard University
Wikipedia - Mordechai Avniel -- Israeli artist
Wikipedia - Mordechai Ben-Ari
Wikipedia - Mordechai Elgrably -- Israeli politician
Wikipedia - Mordechai Eliyahu
Wikipedia - Mordechai Elon -- Israeli Religious Zionist rabbi
Wikipedia - Mordechai Hager -- Grand Rabbi of Vizhnitz
Wikipedia - Mordechai Kislev
Wikipedia - Mordechai Nessyahu
Wikipedia - Mordechai Shapiro -- American singer, songwriter and entertainer
Wikipedia - Mordechai Tzvi Maneh -- Russian artist, writer and poet
Wikipedia - Mordechai Vanunu -- Israeli activist
Wikipedia - Mordechai Yissachar Ber Leifer -- American rabbi
Wikipedia - Mordechai Yosef Leiner -- Polish rabbi
Wikipedia - Moshe Decter -- American activist for Israeli causes
Wikipedia - Moshe Mordechai Epstein
Wikipedia - Moshe Yosef Mordechai Meyuchas -- Chief Rabbi of Israel
Wikipedia - Mother Heroine -- Soviet decoration honouring mothers of large families.
Wikipedia - Motion to quash -- Request to invalidate a court decision or proceeding
Wikipedia - Motivated reasoning -- Using emotionally-biased reasoning to produce justifications or make decisions
Wikipedia - Moyra Caldecott
Wikipedia - Mr. Penny's Race Horse -- 1957 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Mr. T. W. Anthony Woo -- 1952 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Msikaba Bridge -- A cable-stayed steel deck bridge
Wikipedia - MSU Lossless Video Codec -- Video codec
Wikipedia - Multinational Character Set -- DEC character encoding used on VT220 terminals
Wikipedia - Multinational Force and Observers Medal -- International military decoration
Wikipedia - Multiple-criteria decision analysis
Wikipedia - Munehiro Kaneko -- Japanese decathlete
Wikipedia - Municipal disinvestment -- urban planning process in which a municipal entity decides to abandon or neglect an area
Wikipedia - Municipality of Dobrova-Polhov Gradec -- Municipality of Slovenia
Wikipedia - Murder by Decree -- 1979 film by Bob Clark
Wikipedia - Murder of Alisha Heinrich -- Formerly unidentified American decedent
Wikipedia - Murder of John Lennon -- Murder committed 8 December 1980
Wikipedia - Murder of the Lawson family -- Jimmel destroys Kevin in ping pong, December 25, 2020 Colorado, USA
Wikipedia - Muscle fatigue -- Decline in ability of a muscle to generate force
Wikipedia - Music for December -- 1995 film
Wikipedia - M-value (decompression) -- Maximum inert gas supersaturation allowed for a tissue in decompression theory
Wikipedia - MV Naomh Eanna -- Decommissioned Irish ferry vessel
Wikipedia - My Great Predecessors
Wikipedia - Mykhaylo Storozhenko -- Soviet decathlete
Wikipedia - My Toot Toot -- Zydeco song written by Sidney Simien
Wikipedia - Nacht und Nebel -- Directive issued by Adolf Hitler on 7 December 1941
Wikipedia - Nadech Kugimiya -- Thai-Austrian actor and model
Wikipedia - Nadir El Fassi -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Nadjmeddin Farabi -- Iranian decathlete
Wikipedia - Nandrolone decanoate -- Anabolic steroid
Wikipedia - Nannosquilla decemspinosa -- Species of crustacean
Wikipedia - Napoleon Illakowicz -- Polish painter and decorator
Wikipedia - Nassau Agreement -- Treaty negotiated between United States and United Kingdom 22 December 1962
Wikipedia - Nastagio degli Onesti -- Character from Boccaccio's Decameron (V, 8)
Wikipedia - Nathan December -- American musician
Wikipedia - Nathan Williams (Zydeco) -- American zydeco musician
Wikipedia - National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics -- U.S. federal agency; predecessor to NASA
Wikipedia - National Comics Publications, Inc. v. Fawcett Publications, Inc. -- 1951 decision by United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
Wikipedia - National Emergency Concerning the Southern Border of the United States -- National Emergency declared by Donald Trump
Wikipedia - National Legion of Decency -- Defunct American moral pressure group
Wikipedia - National Office Bearers of the Bharatiya Janata Party -- Central decision-making assembly of the Bharatiya Janata Party
Wikipedia - National Organization for Decent Literature -- Defunct American moral pressure group
Wikipedia - Naturalistic decision making
Wikipedia - Naturalistic decision-making
Wikipedia - Naval Air Station Pensacola shooting -- December 6, 2019 terrorist attack at Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida
Wikipedia - Necessity and Urgency Decree -- Emergency decree issued by the President of Argentina
Wikipedia - Necromancy -- Magic involving communication with the deceased
Wikipedia - Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide -- American television comedy series
Wikipedia - Nemacerota decorata -- Species of false owlet moth
Wikipedia - Neoplan Skyliner -- Double deck coach
Wikipedia - Nero AAC Codec
Wikipedia - Nested Context Language -- Declarative authoring language for hypermedia documents
Wikipedia - Neural decoding -- Hypothetical reconstruction of information from the brain
Wikipedia - Nevsun Resources Ltd v Araya -- Canadian legal decision
Wikipedia - Newfoundland National Convention -- 1946-48 forum established to decide the constitutional future of Newfoundland
Wikipedia - New Routemaster -- Hybrid diesel-electric double-decker bus
Wikipedia - Newton Stone -- Undeciphered script
Wikipedia - New Year's Eve -- Holiday celebrated on 31 December
Wikipedia - New Zealand royal honours system -- Orders, decorations, and medals of New Zealand
Wikipedia - Nick Caldecott -- British stage actor
Wikipedia - Nicklas Wiberg -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Nidec -- Japanese electric motor company
Wikipedia - Niels Pittomvils -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Night of Decadence
Wikipedia - Night of Decision -- 1956 film
Wikipedia - Nihil obstat -- Latin phrase; declaration of no objection
Wikipedia - Niklas Kaul -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Nikolay Afanasyev (athlete) -- Russian decathlete
Wikipedia - Nikolay Averyanov (decathlete) -- Russian decathlete
Wikipedia - Nippon Decimal Classification
Wikipedia - No decision -- Sports statistic
Wikipedia - Nodeclipse
Wikipedia - No Decompression Limit -- Depth-time exposure limit for which no decompression stops are required
Wikipedia - Nonsense-mediated decay -- Elimination of mRNA with premature stop codons in eukaryotes
Wikipedia - Noocracy -- System of governance where decision making is in the hands of philosophers
Wikipedia - Nordic Field Biathlon -- Nordic combined skiing and shooting sport using fullbore rifles, considered the predecessor of modern olympic biathlon
Wikipedia - Nordstrom's theory of gravitation -- Predecessor to the theory of relativity
Wikipedia - Norman Muller -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Northern Counties Palatine -- British step-entrance double-decker bus body built by Northern Counties
Wikipedia - Northern Epirote Declaration of Independence -- 1914 declaration of independence
Wikipedia - Northwestern Syria offensive (December 2019-March 2020) -- Military operation of the Syrian civil war
Wikipedia - No-stop limit -- Diving bottom time beyond which obligatory decompression stops are incurred
Wikipedia - Nostra aetate -- Catholic Declaration on the Relation of the Church with Non-Christian Religions
Wikipedia - Not Angels But Angels -- 1994 film by Wiktor Grodecki
Wikipedia - Not Quite Decent -- 1929 film by Irving Cummings
Wikipedia - Nova N 176 -- Undeciphered manuscript codex written in the Mongolian Khitan large script
Wikipedia - Nuclear Decommissioning Authority -- Public body sponsored by the United Kingdom Government
Wikipedia - Nuclear Liabilities Fund -- Fund to cover decommissioning of nuclear power stations in the UK
Wikipedia - Nvidia PureVideo -- Nvidia's hardware SIP core that performs video decoding
Wikipedia - Nyctibatrachus deccanensis -- Species of frog
Wikipedia - Nyssodectes -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Objet d'art -- Small works of decorative art that are not functional
Wikipedia - Oblatio vitae -- Category under which a person may be declared Blessed in Catholic canonization
Wikipedia - Observation deck -- Elevated sightseeing platform
Wikipedia - Obtaining services by deception -- Criminal offence in the Republic of Ireland
Wikipedia - Ocean acidification -- Ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth's oceans, caused by the uptake of carbon dioxide
Wikipedia - Octadecagon -- Polygon with 18 edges
Wikipedia - Octadecahedron
Wikipedia - Octadecyltrichlorosilane -- Organometallic chemical
Wikipedia - October-December 2020 Polish protests -- Protests in 2020
Wikipedia - Octobriana -- Russian comic superheroine created by Petr SadeckM-CM-= and based on the artistic works of Bohumil KoneM-DM-^MnM-CM-= and ZdenM-DM-^[k Burian
Wikipedia - Oil depletion -- Decline in oil production of a well, oil field, or geographic area
Wikipedia - O. J. Simpson murder case -- Criminal trial decided October 3, 1995, in United States
Wikipedia - Old Swiss Confederacy -- Confederation of cantons (1291-1798) that was a predecessor state of the Helvetic Republic
Wikipedia - Oleg Veretelnikov -- Uzbekistani decathlete
Wikipedia - Oleksandr Yurkov -- Ukrainian decathlete and coach
Wikipedia - Oleksiy Kasyanov -- Ukrainian decathlete
Wikipedia - Oliver Cromwell's head -- Decapitated head of English revolutionary leader Oliver Cromwell
Wikipedia - Oliver Emert -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Olle Bexell -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Olli Reikko -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - On Formally Undecidable Propositions of Principia Mathematica and Related Systems
Wikipedia - OODA loop -- Observe-orient-decide-act cycle
Wikipedia - Open Casket -- controversial Dana Schutz painting depicting deceased Emmett Till in an open casket
Wikipedia - OpenID -- Open and decentralized authentication protocol standard
Wikipedia - Open top bus -- Bus, usually a double-decker bus, without a roof
Wikipedia - Operation Barclay -- World War II deception operation in support of the Allied invasion of Sicily in July 1943
Wikipedia - Operation Bodyguard -- World War II deception plan during the build-up to the 1944 Normandy landings
Wikipedia - Operation Copperhead -- 1944 military deception operation
Wikipedia - Operation Fortitude -- Military deception operation during the build-up to the 1944 Normandy landings
Wikipedia - Operation Hardboiled -- 1942 military deception operation
Wikipedia - Operation Ironside -- 1944 military deception operation
Wikipedia - Operation Mincemeat -- British deception operation
Wikipedia - Operation Pastel -- Planned deception operation for the invasion of Japan during WW2
Wikipedia - Optare Esteem -- A low-floor single-decker bus body
Wikipedia - Optare MetroDecker -- Double-decker bus
Wikipedia - Optare Olympus -- Double-decker bus
Wikipedia - Optare Spectra -- Double decker bus bodywork
Wikipedia - Optare Tempo -- Full-size rigid single-deck bus built by Optare
Wikipedia - Optare Vecta -- Single decker bus bodywork
Wikipedia - Optare Visionaire -- An open top double-decker bus body built by Optare
Wikipedia - Optimal decision
Wikipedia - Oracle machine -- Abstract machine used to study decision problems
Wikipedia - Orarion -- Long, narrow stole decorated with crosses worn by deacons and subdeacons of the Eastern Orthodox church
Wikipedia - Order-6 dodecahedral honeycomb -- Regular geometrical object in hyperbolic space
Wikipedia - Order of Freedom (Bosnia and Herzegovina) -- Decoration of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Wikipedia - Order of Kutuzov -- Military decoration of the USSR
Wikipedia - Order of Maternal Glory -- Soviet decoration honouring mothers of large families.
Wikipedia - Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany -- Federal decoration of Germany
Wikipedia - Order of Osmanieh -- Civil and military decoration of the Ottoman Empire
Wikipedia - Order of Parental Glory -- Russian decoration honouring parents of large families.
Wikipedia - Order of Saint Catherine the Great Martyr -- Russian state decoration
Wikipedia - Order of St. George -- Highest purely military decoration of the Russian Federation
Wikipedia - Order of the Patriotic War -- Military decoration of the Soviet Union
Wikipedia - Order of the Red Banner -- Military decoration of the Soviet Union
Wikipedia - Order of the White Eagle (Poland) -- Polish decoration of merit
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Andorra -- Andorran honours system
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Belarus -- List of Belarussian honours.
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Brazil -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Bulgaria
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Canada -- Canadian honours system
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Italy
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Jamaica -- National honour system of Jamaica
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Poland
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Russia -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of Serbia
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of the Holy See -- Papal Orders and decoration of merit of the Holy See
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of the Philippines -- Philippine honors system
Wikipedia - Orders, decorations, and medals of the United Kingdom
Wikipedia - Orders of magnitude (time) -- Decimal quantities of a base unit of time
Wikipedia - Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission -- Volunteer panel to advise the state government on higher education policy decisions
Wikipedia - Orenberg (Upland) -- Mountain of Waldeck-Frankenberg, Hesse, Germany
Wikipedia - Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Wikipedia - Ornamental plant -- Plant that is grown for decorative purposes
Wikipedia - Ornament (music) -- Musical flourishes that are not necessary to carry the overall line of the melody (or harmony), but serve instead to decorate or "ornament" that line
Wikipedia - Ornithine decarboxylase
Wikipedia - Oskar Gerber -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Osteoporosis -- Bone resorption disease characterized by the thinning of bone tissue and decreased mechanical strength
Wikipedia - Osvaldo Wenzel -- Chilean decathlete
Wikipedia - Oto Rebula -- Serbian decathlete
Wikipedia - Otto Anderson -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Ottoman Decline Thesis -- Historical narrative
Wikipedia - Ottoman illumination -- Painted or drawn decorative art in books or sheets
Wikipedia - Outlaw -- Person declared as outside the protection of the law
Wikipedia - Overglaze decoration -- Method of decorating pottery
Wikipedia - Oxidative decarboxylation -- chemical reaction
Wikipedia - Oxygen window in diving decompression -- Physiological effect of oxygen metabolism on the total dissolved gas concentration in venous blood
Wikipedia - Oxyptilus epidectis -- Species of plume moth
Wikipedia - P3P -- Obsolete communications protocol allowing websites to declare their intended use of information they collect about web browser users
Wikipedia - Paavo YrjolM-CM-$ -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Pacific decadal oscillation -- robust, recurring pattern of ocean-atmosphere climate variability centered over the mid-latitude Pacific basin
Wikipedia - Packed binary-coded decimal
Wikipedia - Packed decimal
Wikipedia - Pakistan Declaration -- 1933 book by Choudhry Rahmat Ali
Wikipedia - Pakistan Idol (season 1) -- Premiered on Geo on 6 December 2013
Wikipedia - Palazzo Foscari (Giudecca 795) -- Gothic-style palace on the Giudecca island, Venice, Italy
Wikipedia - Palmette -- A decorative motif based on the fan-shaped leaves of a palm tree
Wikipedia - Palmyra offensive (December 2016)
Wikipedia - Pamela Cornell -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Panagiotis Epitropopoulos -- Greek decathlete
Wikipedia - Pandectists -- 19th-century German legal scholars
Wikipedia - Pangrapta decoralis -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Panicum decompositum -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Panmunjom Declaration -- 2018 peace and denuclearisation agreement between North and South Korea
Wikipedia - Paolo Casarsa -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Papal decree
Wikipedia - Papal election, December 1187
Wikipedia - Papal regalia and insignia -- Official items of attire and decoration proper to the Pope
Wikipedia - Papua New Guinea honours system -- Orders, decorations, and medals of Papua New Guinea
Wikipedia - Paradox of tolerance -- Logical paradox in decision-making theory
Wikipedia - Param Vir Chakra -- India's highest military decoration
Wikipedia - Parathyroidectomy -- Surgical removal of one or more of the parathyroid glands
Wikipedia - Parka decipiens -- Devonian fossil, possibly of an extinct Charophyte alga
Wikipedia - Parrotia persica -- Species of deciduous tree in the family Hamamelidaceae
Wikipedia - Partial fraction decomposition -- Decomposition of a rational fraction into a sum of simpler fractions
Wikipedia - Partially observable Markov decision process -- Generalization of a Markov decision process
Wikipedia - Participative decision-making in organizations
Wikipedia - Participative decision-making
Wikipedia - Partition (number theory) -- Decomposition of an integer as a sum of positive integers
Wikipedia - Pascal Behrenbruch -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Paternalistic deception -- Deception that is apparently performed for the deceived individual's own good
Wikipedia - Patrick Vetterli -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Paul Brouardel -- French pathologist, hygienist, and member of the AcadM-CM-)mie Nationale de MM-CM-)decine
Wikipedia - Paul Dedecker -- Belgian mathematician
Wikipedia - Paul Herman (athlete) -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Paul Huldschinsky -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Paul Meier (athlete) -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Paulownia tomentosa -- Species of deciduous tree classified in its own family
Wikipedia - Paul S. Fox -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Pau Tonnesen -- Spanish decathlete
Wikipedia - Pavel Andreev -- Uzbekistani decathlete
Wikipedia - Pavlo Tarnovetskyy -- Soviet decathlete
Wikipedia - Pawel Wiesiolek -- Polish decathlete
Wikipedia - PDP-8/E -- 1970 model of the DEC PDP-8 line of minicomputers
Wikipedia - Peace for our time -- Phrase used by Neville Chamberlain in his 30 September 1938 speech about the Munich Agreement and the Anglo-German Declaration
Wikipedia - Peace of Nikolsburg -- Peace treaty signed on 31 December 1621
Wikipedia - Pear Deck
Wikipedia - Peat swamp forest -- Tropical moist forests where waterlogged soil prevents dead leaves and wood from fully decomposing
Wikipedia - Peat -- Accumulation of partially decayed vegetation
Wikipedia - Pediodectes -- Genus of insects
Wikipedia - Pedro da Silva (athlete) -- Brazilian decathlete
Wikipedia - Peer-to-peer -- Type of decentralized and distributed network architecture
Wikipedia - Peirce decomposition -- Decomposition method in algebra
Wikipedia - Pelle Rietveld -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Pema Dechen -- Bhutanese queen
Wikipedia - Penn v Lord Baltimore -- Judicial decision of Lord Hardwicke LC
Wikipedia - Penny (British decimal coin) -- Unit of currency equalling one-hundredth of a pound sterling
Wikipedia - Penny (British pre-decimal coin) -- British pre-decimal coin worth 1/240th of a pound sterling
Wikipedia - Pentadecagon -- Polygon with 15 edges
Wikipedia - Pentadecahedron
Wikipedia - Pentakis dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Percy Spark -- British decathlete
Wikipedia - Peroslav Ferkovic -- Croatian decathlete
Wikipedia - Persicaria decipiens -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Peter Dedecker -- Belgian politician
Wikipedia - Peter Hadfield -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Peter Henry (bobsledder) -- New Zealand bobsledder and decathlete
Wikipedia - Peter Howitt (set decorator) -- English set decorator
Wikipedia - Peter Hudecki -- Canadian animator
Wikipedia - Peter James (set decorator) -- English set decorator
Wikipedia - Peter Mullins -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Peter Winter (athlete) -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Peter Young (set decorator) -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Petra Bockle -- Rapper, songwriter and singer of Seychellois and Kenyan decent
Wikipedia - Petri Keskitalo -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Phalera (military decoration)
Wikipedia - Pheidole decepticon -- Species of ant
Wikipedia - Philip M. Jefferies -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Philippe Bobin -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Philipp Huber -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Philippine Airlines Flight 434 -- Flight on December 11, 1994 that was damaged by a bomb
Wikipedia - Philippines campaign (1941-1942) -- Battle fought 8 December 1941 - 8 May 1942
Wikipedia - Photon decoupling
Wikipedia - Phyllis Gates -- American secretary and interior decorator
Wikipedia - Physiology of decompression -- The physiological basis for decompression theory and practice
Wikipedia - Pierce LePage -- Canadian decathlete
Wikipedia - Pierre-Alexandre Vial -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Pierre Decazes -- French actor
Wikipedia - Pierre DeCelles -- Canadian animator
Wikipedia - Pierre SprM-CM-)cher -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Pierre Waldeck-Rousseau
Wikipedia - Piet Biesiadecki -- American bobsledder
Wikipedia - Pilot error -- Decision, action or inaction by a pilot of an aircraft
Wikipedia - Pinchas Mordechai Teitz -- Rabbi and teacher (b. 1908, d. 1995)
Wikipedia - Pion decay constant -- Physical constant
Wikipedia - Pioneering Spirit (ship) -- Very large platform installation/decommissioning and pipelay vessel
Wikipedia - Pixlet -- Video codec
Wikipedia - Plaxton Panorama -- Double decker coach bodywork
Wikipedia - Playing card suit -- Categories into which the cards of a deck are divided
Wikipedia - Play With Me (children's book) -- 1956 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Police action -- Military action taken without a declaration of war
Wikipedia - Police Decoration for Gallantry (Rhodesia) -- Gallantry medal of Rhodesia
Wikipedia - Policy-based evidence making -- The commissioning of research in order to support a policy which has already been decided upon
Wikipedia - Policy -- Principle or protocol to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes
Wikipedia - Political risk -- Probability of adverse effects to businesses and governments as a result of political decisions
Wikipedia - Pollinator decline
Wikipedia - Polychrome brickwork -- Use of bricks of different colours for decoration
Wikipedia - Poop deck -- Deck that forms the roof of a cabin built in the aft part of the superstructure of a ship
Wikipedia - Pope Celestine V -- Catholic Pope (July-December 1294)
Wikipedia - Population decline -- Reduction in number of a human population caused by events such as long-term demographic trends
Wikipedia - Populus grandidentata -- Species of decidous tree native to North America
Wikipedia - Populus tremuloides -- Species of deciduous tree native to cooler areas of North America
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 13
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 14
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 16
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 21
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 23
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 29
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 3
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 5
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholic Church/Patron Archive/December 9
Wikipedia - Portal:Catholicism/Patron Archive/December 1
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 1994
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 1995
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 1996
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 1997
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 1998
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 1999
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2000
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2001
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2002
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2003
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2004
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2005
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2006
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2007
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2008
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2009
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2010
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2011
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2012
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2013
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2014
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2015
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2016
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2017
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2018
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2019
Wikipedia - Portal:Current events/December 2020
Wikipedia - Portillo moment -- Declaration of UK electoral result
Wikipedia - Positio -- Document or collection of documents used in the process by which a person is declared Venerable
Wikipedia - Positive deconstruction
Wikipedia - Positron emission -- Radioactive decay in which a proton is converted into a neutron while releasing a positron and an electron neutrino
Wikipedia - Potemkin village -- Structure built solely to deceive others into thinking that a situation is better than it really is
Wikipedia - Prague Declaration -- A declaration signed on 3 June 2008
Wikipedia - Predecessor states
Wikipedia - Preservative -- Additive designed to prevent decomposition
Wikipedia - President Haudecoeur -- 1940 film
Wikipedia - Presidential directive -- instruction or declaration issued by the President of the United States
Wikipedia - Presumption of death -- Declaring person legally dead absent direct proof
Wikipedia - Price limit -- Established amount of increase or decrease of a price in a given trading day
Wikipedia - Priestly Code -- Body of laws expressed in the Torah which do not form part of the Holiness Code, the Covenant Code, the Ritual Decalogue, or the Ethical Decalogue
Wikipedia - Primary decomposition -- In algebra, expression of an ideal as the intersection of ideals of a specific type
Wikipedia - Primula sect. Dodecatheon {{DISPLAYTITLE:''Primula'' sect. ''Dodecatheon'' -- Primula sect. Dodecatheon {{DISPLAYTITLE:''Primula'' sect. ''Dodecatheon''
Wikipedia - Princess Helena of Waldeck and Pyrmont
Wikipedia - Principle of deferred decision
Wikipedia - Proclamation -- Official declaration
Wikipedia - Prodromos Korkizoglou -- Greek decathlete
Wikipedia - Prof: Alan Turing Decoded -- 2015 biography of Alan Turing
Wikipedia - Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada v Northwest Territories (Commissioner) -- Supreme Court of Canada decision
Wikipedia - Profound Decisions
Wikipedia - Proper generalized decomposition
Wikipedia - Propuesta Indecente -- 2013 single by Romeo Santos
Wikipedia - Prostanthera decussata -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Protea decurrens -- South African shrub
Wikipedia - Proton decay -- Hypothetical decay process of a nucleon (proton or neutron) into non-nucleons (anything else)
Wikipedia - Pruning (decision trees)
Wikipedia - Pseudectatomma -- Genus of ants
Wikipedia - Pseudectatosia -- Genus of beetles
Wikipedia - Pseuderosia desmierdechenoni -- Species of hook-tip moth
Wikipedia - Pseudo-Isidorian Decretals
Wikipedia - Psilocybin decriminalization in the United States -- Movement to decriminalize psilocybin in the United States
Wikipedia - Psychopomp -- Entity believed to escort deceased souls to an afterlife
Wikipedia - Pterotopteryx dodecadactyla -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Pteruges -- Decorative feather-like leather or fabric strips worn around the hips and arms of Roman and Greek warriors and soldiers
Wikipedia - Public Health Emergency of International Concern -- Formal declaration by the World Health Organization
Wikipedia - Public Health Service Smallpox Eradication Campaign Ribbon -- Decoration of the US Public Health Service
Wikipedia - Public policy of the United States -- Derived from a collection of laws, executive decisions, and legal precedents
Wikipedia - Pueblo Deco architecture -- Architectural movement
Wikipedia - Pueblo de Los M-CM-^Angeles -- predecessor to modern Los Angeles
Wikipedia - Puente Blanco -- Historic railway bridge deck arch bridge in Quebradillas, Puerto Rico
Wikipedia - Purple Heart -- United States military decoration
Wikipedia - Pusan East (K-9) Air Base -- Decommissioned air base in Busan, South Korea
Wikipedia - Puss in Boots (Brown book) -- 1952 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Putrefaction -- Post-mortem stage of decomposition of animal matter
Wikipedia - Pyle stop -- A series of short deep decompression stops in addition to the standard profile
Wikipedia - Pyotr Kozhevnikov -- Soviet decathlete
Wikipedia - Pyrolysis -- Thermal decomposition of materials at elevated temperatures in an inert atmosphere
Wikipedia - Pysanka -- Egg decorating tradition in Slavic countries
Wikipedia - Qasr Al-Mshatta -- Early Islamic castle with decorated facade
Wikipedia - Qi Haifeng -- Chinese decathlete
Wikipedia - QR decomposition
Wikipedia - Quadrature decoder
Wikipedia - Quantum decoherence -- Loss of quantum coherence
Wikipedia - Quantum praedecessores -- 12th-century papal bull issued by Pope Eugenius III
Wikipedia - Quarterdeck -- Raised deck behind the main mast of a sailing ship
Wikipedia - Quartodecimanism -- The custom of early Christians observing the Lord's Supper (Eucharist)
Wikipedia - Quartodeciman
Wikipedia - Queen's Gallantry Medal -- United Kingdom decoration awarded for exemplary acts of bravery
Wikipedia - Queen's Gambit Declined
Wikipedia - Queenstown suppressed indecency case -- Sexual assault case by a New Zealand celebrity, 2011-2014
Wikipedia - Quillwork -- Works decorated with overlays of porcupine quills or feathers
Wikipedia - Quilt -- Bedcover made of multiple layers of fabric sewn together, usually stitched in decorative patterns
Wikipedia - Rackett -- Renaissance predecessor of the bassoon
Wikipedia - Radar jamming and deception
Wikipedia - Radioactive decay -- Method of decay in atomic nuclei
Wikipedia - Radu GavrilaM-EM-^_ -- Romanian decathlete
Wikipedia - Rafer Johnson -- American decathlete and actor
Wikipedia - Raid on Scarborough, Hartlepool and Whitby -- Attack by the Imperial German Navy on 16 December 1914
Wikipedia - Raimo Pihl -- Swedish decathlete
Wikipedia - Rain chain -- Decorative chain guiding water falling from a roof.
Wikipedia - Rainer Pottel -- East German decathlete
Wikipedia - Ralph S. Hurst -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Ramesh Rushantha -- Sri Lankan singer and deckhand
Wikipedia - Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000 TV series) -- Television series (2000-2001)
Wikipedia - Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) -- British television series (1969-1970)
Wikipedia - Randecker Maar Observatory for Bird and Insect Migration
Wikipedia - Randecker Maar Research Station -- Animal research station
Wikipedia - Randecker Maar -- crater and nature reserve in the German alps
Wikipedia - Randolph Caldecott
Wikipedia - Ranitidine -- Medication that decreases stomach acid
Wikipedia - Raoul Island -- A volcano in the Kermadec Islands, New Zealand
Wikipedia - Rape by deception -- Perpetrator obtains the victim's agreement by deception
Wikipedia - RaphaM-CM-+l Bretton -- Set decorator
Wikipedia - Ratio decompression -- Rule of thumb for estimating a decompression schedule for a given set of breathing gases
Wikipedia - Rattan Nath Sharma -- a decorated senior Indian army officer
Wikipedia - Raul Duany -- Cuban decathlete
Wikipedia - Ravdangiin Dechinmaa -- Mongolian judoka
Wikipedia - Ray Moyer -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Razvigor Yankov -- Bulgarian decathlete
Wikipedia - Rebecca Waldecker -- German mathematician
Wikipedia - Recognition primed decision
Wikipedia - Recompression chamber -- A hyperbaric chamber used to treat divers suffering from decompression illness
Wikipedia - Recreational Dive Planner -- A PADI no-decompression dive table also available as a circular slide rule and electronic calculator
Wikipedia - Redecilla del Camino
Wikipedia - Redectis vitrea -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Reduced gradient bubble model -- An algorithm by Bruce Wienke for modelling inert gases leaving the body during decompression in mixed dissolved and bubble phases
Wikipedia - Referendums related to the European Union -- List of referendums related to the European Union and its predecessor, the European Communities
Wikipedia - Reflex bradycardia -- Decrease in heart rate in response to the baroreceptor reflex, one of the body's homeostatic mechanisms for preventing abnormal increases in blood pressure.
Wikipedia - Reg Allen (set decorator) -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Regents Center -- Arena at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa
Wikipedia - Regular dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Reich Chancellery meeting of 12 December 1941 -- Encounter between Adolf Hitler and the highest-ranking officials of the Nazi Party
Wikipedia - Reichstag Fire Decree -- 1933 decree in Nazi Germany that abolished key civil liberties for citizens
Wikipedia - Reinforced condition/decision coverage
Wikipedia - Relaxed code-excited linear prediction -- Audio codec standard
Wikipedia - Remember December -- 2010 single by Demi Lovato
Wikipedia - RenM-CM-) Schmidheiny -- Swiss bobsledder and decathlete
Wikipedia - Repeating decimal -- Decimal representation of a number whose digits are periodic
Wikipedia - Representative democracy -- Democracy where citizens elect a small set of people to represent them in decision making
Wikipedia - Republic of Kosova -- 1991-1999 self-declared state in southeastern Europe
Wikipedia - Requiem -- Mass celebrated for the repose of deceased persons' souls
Wikipedia - Reredos -- Altarpiece, or a screen or decoration behind the altar in a church
Wikipedia - Responsa -- Body of written legal decisions and rulings
Wikipedia - Reticule (handbag) -- Small handbag, originally with a drawstring closure, and often decorated with beadwork
Wikipedia - Reversible cellular automaton -- Cellular automaton in which every configuration has a unique predecessor.
Wikipedia - Revolution of 11 September 1852 -- State of Buenos Aires declares independence
Wikipedia - Rex Harvey -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - RhodeCode
Wikipedia - Rhombic dodecahedral honeycomb
Wikipedia - Rhombic dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Rhombicosidodecahedron
Wikipedia - Ricardo Chandeck -- Panamanian sports shooter
Wikipedia - Rice's theorem -- All non-trivial, semantic properties of programs are undecidable
Wikipedia - Rick Deckard
Wikipedia - Rick Simpson -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Rick Sloan -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Rick Wanamaker -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Rico Freimuth -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Rider-Waite-Smith tarot deck
Wikipedia - Rider-Waite tarot deck
Wikipedia - Ridgewood Reservoir -- Decommissioned reservoir in New York City
Wikipedia - Ridvan -- Twelve-day festival in the BahaM-JM-
Wikipedia - Rifat Artikov -- Uzbek decathlete
Wikipedia - Rigs-to-Reefs -- Program for converting decommissioned offshore oil and petroleum rigs into artificial reefs
Wikipedia - Rina Dechter -- Computer scientist
Wikipedia - Rio Declaration on Environment and Development
Wikipedia - Rise and Decline of the Third Reich -- 1974 grand strategy wargame set during World War II
Wikipedia - Rising declarative
Wikipedia - Ritual Decalogue -- List of laws at Exodus 34:11-26
Wikipedia - River of Deceit
Wikipedia - R (March) v Secretary of State for Health -- UK judicial review quashing a decision on the grounds of material error of fact
Wikipedia - RM-CM-)douane Youcef -- Algerian decathlete
Wikipedia - RM-CM-)gis Ghesquiere -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Robert Couturier (architect) -- French architect and decorator
Wikipedia - Robert Decherd -- American businessman
Wikipedia - Robert De Vestel -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Robert de Wit -- Dutch decathlete
Wikipedia - Robert Drumheller -- American set decorator
Wikipedia - Robert F. Godec -- American career diplomat
Wikipedia - Robert Potter (American politician, died 1842) -- Legislator, cabinet member, and signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence
Wikipedia - Robert Radecke -- German composer and conductor
Wikipedia - Robert Sinclair Knox -- Decorated British soldier from Northern Ireland
Wikipedia - Robert ZmM-DM-^[lik -- Czech decathlete
Wikipedia - Rob Muzzio -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Robust decision
Wikipedia - Robyn Decker -- American soccer defender
Wikipedia - Roger Lespagnard -- Belgian decathlete
Wikipedia - Roguelike deck-building game
Wikipedia - Roland Ansieau -- French art deco graphic artist
Wikipedia - Rolf SchlM-CM-$fli -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Romain Barras -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Roman dodecahedron -- Small hollow object made of bronze or stone, with a dodecahedral shape
Wikipedia - Roman Gastaldi -- Argentine decathlete
Wikipedia - Roman military decorations and punishments
Wikipedia - Roman Razbeyko -- Russian decathlete
Wikipedia - Rongorongo -- Undeciphered texts of Easter Island
Wikipedia - Rosemary DeCamp -- Actress
Wikipedia - Rosetta Stone decree -- Decree passed by a council of priests, inscribed on the Rosetta Stone
Wikipedia - Rosette (decoration)
Wikipedia - Rosie Ledet -- American zydeco accordionist, singer and songwriter
Wikipedia - Rough consensus -- Term used in consensus decision-making
Wikipedia - Royal Decree of Graces of 1815 -- Legal order approved by the Spanish Crown
Wikipedia - Royal Family Order of King Olav V of Norway -- Norwegian royal decoration
Wikipedia - Royal Family Orders of the United Kingdom -- Decorations conferred by the British sovereign to their female relations
Wikipedia - Royal family order -- Decoration conferred by the head of a royal family to their female relations
Wikipedia - Royal Gold Cup -- Gold cup decorated with enamel and pearls made for the French royal family at the end of the 14th century
Wikipedia - Royal Victorian Medal -- British decoration
Wikipedia - RTAudio -- Audio codec standard
Wikipedia - RTVideo -- Video codec
Wikipedia - Ruby Ross Wood -- American interior decorator
Wikipedia - Rudy Bourguignon -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Ruedi Mangisch -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Rufinus (decretist)
Wikipedia - Rule by decree
Wikipedia - Ruling class -- Social class of a given society that decides upon and sets that society's political agenda
Wikipedia - Ruse de guerre -- Strategy or act regarding use of military deception
Wikipedia - Russ Hodge -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Russian Cross -- Sudden population decline in Russia
Wikipedia - Rust Belt -- Region in the US affected by industrial decline
Wikipedia - Ruyi (scepter) -- Curved decorative scepter or talisman
Wikipedia - R v Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, ex parte A -- House of Lords appeal where a decision was quashed because it had taken into account a factual mistake
Wikipedia - R v Edwards Books and Art Ltd -- Supreme Court of Canada decision
Wikipedia - R v Zora -- Canadian legal decision
Wikipedia - Ryan Harlan -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Ryszard Horodecki -- Polish physicist
Wikipedia - Ryszard Skowronek -- Polish decathlete
Wikipedia - Sabir Ali -- Indian decathlete
Wikipedia - Saddle shoe -- Casual footwear with saddle shapped decorative panel
Wikipedia - Safety stop -- Optional decompression stop to reduce decompression stress
Wikipedia - Saint Stephen's Day -- 26 December in the Western church
Wikipedia - Salle Gaston MM-CM-)decin -- Sports arena in Monaco
Wikipedia - Salvita Decorte -- Indonesian actress and model
Wikipedia - Salyut 4 -- Salyut space station launched on December 26, 1974
Wikipedia - Sandor Munkacsy -- Hungarian decathlete
Wikipedia - Sandro Brogini -- Italian decathlete
Wikipedia - Santia Deck -- American athlete
Wikipedia - Santiago do CacM-CM-)m Railway Station -- Disused railway station in Portugal notable for its exterior decoration
Wikipedia - Santiago Lorenzo -- Argentine decathlete
Wikipedia - Sarah Munroe Three-Decker -- Historic house
Wikipedia - Satisficing -- Cognitive heuristic of searching for an acceptable decision
Wikipedia - Saturnalia -- ancient Roman festival in honour of the god Saturn held on December 17th and later expanded with festivities through December 25th
Wikipedia - Saudi National Day -- Anniversary of the Declaration of the Unification of Saudi Arabia
Wikipedia - Savoy Declaration -- Doctrinal statement for English Congregationalists
Wikipedia - Scania Metropolitan -- Double deck bus, produced 1973-79
Wikipedia - Scania OmniDekka -- A double-decker bus built by East Lancashire Coachbuilders
Wikipedia - Scarecrow -- Human-like decoy or mannequin placed in fields
Wikipedia - Schefflera decagyna -- Species of flowering plant
Wikipedia - Schefflera decaphylla -- Species of plant
Wikipedia - Schism v. United States -- 2003 US Federal Circuit court decision
Wikipedia - Schistostege decussata -- Species of moth
Wikipedia - Schur decomposition
Wikipedia - Scopula declinata -- Species of geometer moth in subfamily Sterrhinae
Wikipedia - Scopula decolor -- Species of geometer moth in subfamily Sterrhinae
Wikipedia - Scopula decorata -- Species of geometer moth in subfamily Sterrhinae
Wikipedia - Scopula subdecorata -- Species of geometer moth in subfamily Sterrhinae
Wikipedia - Scott Ferrier -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Scott Slimon -- English set decorator
Wikipedia - Sea of Crete -- Southern part of the Aegean Sea, north of Crete, east of Kythera, Antikythera, and the Ionian Sea, southeast of the Myrtoan Sea, south of the Cyclades, and west of the Dodecanese islands
Wikipedia - Sebastian Knabe -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Sebka -- Decorative motif in Islamic architecture
Wikipedia - Second Great Fire of London -- Air raid by Germany against London 29-30 December 1940
Wikipedia - Second mate -- Licensed member of the deck department of a merchant ship holding a Second Mates Certificate of Competency
Wikipedia - Sedecion of Byzantium
Wikipedia - Self-deception
Wikipedia - Self-decoration camouflage -- Camouflage by attaching local materials to one's body
Wikipedia - Semantic decision table
Wikipedia - Senegalia senegal -- Species of deciduous tree
Wikipedia - Seppo Suutari -- Finnish decathlete
Wikipedia - Sepp Zeilbauer -- Austrian decathlete
Wikipedia - Sergey Kuznetsov (athlete) -- Russian decathlete
Wikipedia - Sergey Sviridov -- Russian decathlete
Wikipedia - Sergey Zhelanov -- Soviet decathlete
Wikipedia - Serial decimal
Wikipedia - Service Star (Congo) -- Civil decoration in the Congo Free State
Wikipedia - Service star -- Military decoration
Wikipedia - Seven-segment display -- Form of electronic display device for displaying decimal numerals
Wikipedia - Severin Moser -- Swiss decathlete
Wikipedia - Sewa Padakkama -- Sri Lankan military awards and decorations for service to the nation
Wikipedia - Shakman Decrees -- Federal court orders regarding government employment in Chicago
Wikipedia - Shared decision-making
Wikipedia - Shari Decter Hirst -- Canadian politician
Wikipedia - Sheldon Blockburger -- American decathlete
Wikipedia - Sherman Minton Bridge -- Double-deck through arch bridge spanning the Ohio River at Louisville, carrying I-64
Wikipedia - Shielding effect -- Decrease in attraction between an electron and the nucleus
Wikipedia - Shilling (British coin) -- British pre-decimalisation coin
Wikipedia - Shosuke Suzuki -- Japanese decathlete
Wikipedia - Shout (Ant & Dec song) -- 1997 single by Ant & Dec
Wikipedia - Shrimp -- Decapod crustaceans
Wikipedia - Shuffling -- Procedure used to randomize a deck of playing cards
Wikipedia - Shuliavka Republic -- Self-declared entity in Shuliavka neighborhood, Kiev
Wikipedia - Shumi Dechasa -- Bahraini athlete
Wikipedia - Sidecar (cocktail) -- Cocktail traditionally made with cognac, orange liqueur and lemon
Wikipedia - Sidecar file
Wikipedia - Sidecar -- One-wheeled device attached to a two wheeled vehicle to make the whole a three wheeled vehicle
Wikipedia - Siege of Adrianople (1912-1913) -- Decisive battle during the First Balkan War
Wikipedia - Siege of KrujM-CM-+ (1450) -- Ottoman siege of a League of LezhM-CM-+-held town; Decisive LezhM-CM-+ victory
Wikipedia - Siegfried Stark -- East German decathlete
Wikipedia - Siegfried Wentz -- German decathlete
Wikipedia - Signing of the United States Declaration of Independence -- none
Wikipedia - Simon Shirley -- Australian decathlete
Wikipedia - Simplifly Deccan -- Defunct Indian airline
Wikipedia - Single-deck bus -- Bus with a single deck for passengers
Wikipedia - Singular value decomposition -- Matrix decomposition
Wikipedia - Sino-British Joint Declaration -- International treaty regarding the handover of Hong Kong from United Kingdom to China
Wikipedia - Sinployea decorticata -- Extinct species of land snail
Wikipedia - Siren (codec)
Wikipedia - Six-hour day -- Experiments of working 6 hours a day, which resulted in decreases in sick leave, better self-reported health, as well as an increase in productivity.
Wikipedia - Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle -- 2005 manifesto issued by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation
Wikipedia - Skipper John's Cook -- 1952 Caldecott picture book
Wikipedia - Sky100 -- Observation deck in Kowloon, Hong Kong
Wikipedia - SkyDeck Music -- American record label and print publisher
Wikipedia - Sky Television (1984-1990) -- British satellite television company predecessor to British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB)
Wikipedia - Slaven Dizdarevic -- Slovak decathlete
Wikipedia - Slidecasting
Wikipedia - Slum -- Highly populated urban residential area consisting mostly of decrepit housing units
Wikipedia - Smallbone Deceased -- 1950 mystery novel by Michael Gilbert
Wikipedia - Small icosicosidodecahedron -- Polyhedron
Wikipedia - Small stellated dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Smart contract -- Transaction on a decentralized platform
Wikipedia - SM-CM-)bastien Levicq -- French decathlete
Wikipedia - Snappy (compression) -- Fast data compression and decompression library written in C++ by Google
Wikipedia - SNCF Class Z 58000 -- Type of double-decker, dual-voltage electric multiple unit trainsets operated on the French RER network
Wikipedia - Snedecor Award -- Statistical award
Wikipedia - Snood (headgear) -- Coarse, decorative hairnet
Wikipedia - Snub dodecahedron
Wikipedia - Snub icosidodecahedron
Wikipedia - Social Decay -- 1932 film
Wikipedia - Society for Indecency to Naked Animals
Wikipedia - Sociocracy -- System of governance using consent-based decision making among equivalent individuals and organizing based on cybernetic principles
Wikipedia - Socioeconomic decile -- Key measure of socioeconomic status
Wikipedia - Sock puppet account -- Online identity used for purposes of deception
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 12, 1871 -- 19th-century total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 12, 1909 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 13, 1936 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 13, 1974 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 14, 1917 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 14, 1955 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 14, 2001 -- 21st-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 14, 2020 -- Total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 15, 1982 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 15, 2039 -- Future total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 16, 2047 -- Future partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 16, 2085 -- Future annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 17, 2066 -- Future total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 2, 1937 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 2, 1956 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 22, 1870 -- 19th-century total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 22, 1889 -- 19th-century total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 23, 1908 -- 20th-century total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 24, 1916 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 24, 1927 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 24, 1973 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 24, 1992 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 25, 1935 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 25, 1954 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 25, 2000 -- 20th-century partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 26, 2019 -- 21st-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 26, 2038 -- Future total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 26, 2057 -- Future total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 27, 2065 -- Future partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 27, 2084 -- Future total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 3, 1918 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
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Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 4, 1983 -- 20th-century annular solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 4, 2002 -- 21st-century total solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 4, 2021 -- Future solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 5, 2029 -- Future partial solar eclipse
Wikipedia - Solar eclipse of December 6, 2067 -- Future total solar eclipse
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Wikipedia - Stephen Decatur High School (Decatur, Illinois) -- Former school in Illinois
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Wikipedia - Template talk:DEC microprocessors
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Wikipedia - Template talk:Orders, decorations, and medals of Wikipedia
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