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branches ::: Taoism

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Ch. 01 ::: Sentence 1
Beck ::: The Way that can be described is not the absolute Way; the name that can be given is not the absolute name.
Blackney ::: There are ways but the Way is uncharted; There are names but not nature in words:
Bynner ::: Existence is beyond the power of words To define: Terms may be used But are none of them absolute.
Byrn ::: The tao that can be described is not the eternal Tao. The name that can be spoken is not the eternal Name.
Chan ::: The Tao that can be told of is not the eternal Tao; The name that can be named is not the eternal name.
Cleary ::: A way can be a guide, but not a fixed path; names can be given, but not permanent labels.
Crowley ::: The Dao-Path is not the All-Dao. The Name is not the Thing named.
Hansen ::: To guide what can be guided is not constant guiding. To name what can be named is not constant naming.
LaFargue ::: The Tao that can be told is not the invariant Tao the names that can be named are not the invariant Names.
Legge ::: The Tao that can be trodden is not the enduring and unchanging Tao. The name that can be named is not the enduring and unchanging name.
Lindauer ::: A tao that one can tao Is not the entire tao A name that one can name Is not the entire name.
LinYutan ::: The Tao the can be told of Is not the Absolute Tao; The Names that can be given Are not Absolute Names.
Mabry ::: The Tao that can be described in words is not the true Tao The Name that can be named is not the true Name.
McDonald ::: The way that can be told of is hardly an eternal, absolute, unvarying one; the name that can be coded and given is no absolute name.
Merel ::: The Way that can be experienced is not true; The world that can be constructed is not real.
Mitchell ::: The Tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao The name that can be named is not the eternal Name.
Muller ::: The Tao that can be followed is not the eternal Tao. The name that can be named is not the eternal name.
Red Pine ::: The way that becomes a way is not the Immortal Way the name that becomes a name is not the Immortal Name
Ta-Kao ::: The Tao that can be expressed is not the eternal Tao; The name that can be defined is not the unchanging name.
Walker ::: Tao is beyond words and beyond understanding. Words may be used to speak of it, but they cannot contain it.
Wieger ::: The principle that can be enunciated is not the one that always was. The being that can be named is not the one that was at all times.
World ::: The infinity that can be conceived is not the everlasting Infinity. The infinity that can be described is not the perpetual Infinity.
Wu ::: Tao can be talked about, but not the Eternal Tao; Names can be named, but not the Eternal name.


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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [1] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
Taoist_canon
SEE ALSO


AUTH
Chuang_Tzu
Han-shan
Lao_Tzu
Lu_Tung_Pin
Sun_Buer

BOOKS
Chuang_Tzu_-_Poems
Infinite_Library
Tao_Te_Ching
The_Book_of_Chuang_Tzu
The_I_Ching_or_Book_of_Changes
The_Secret_of_the_Golden_Flower
Toward_the_Future

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.ct_-_Creation_and_Destruction
1.ct_-_Distinguishing_Ego_from_Self
1.ct_-_Goods_and_Possessions
1.ct_-_Letting_go_of_thoughts
1.ct_-_One_Legged_Man
1.ct_-_Surrendering

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.ct_-_Creation_and_Destruction
1.ct_-_Distinguishing_Ego_from_Self
1.ct_-_Goods_and_Possessions
1.ct_-_Letting_go_of_thoughts
1.ct_-_One_Legged_Man
1.ct_-_Surrendering
2.18_-_January_1939
3.10_-_The_New_Birth
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1

PRIMARY CLASS

subject
SIMILAR TITLES
Taoism

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Taoism ::: A group of Chinese religious and philosophical traditions. Philosophical Taoism emphasizes various themes found in the Daodejing and Zhuangzi such as "nonaction" (wu wei), emptiness, detachment, receptiveness, spontaneity, the strength of softness, the relativism of human values, and the search for a long life. Religious Taoism is not clearly separated from philosophy, but incorporates a number of supernatural beliefs in gods, ghosts, ancestral spirits, and practices such as Taoist alchemy and qigong.

Taoism ::: A philosophical school of thought, originating in China, that emphasizes a lifestyle aligned with the Tao.

Taoism, however, became too mystical, and Confucianism too formalistic. "Hundred schools" grew and flourished, many in direct opposition to Taoism and Confucianism. There was Mohism (Mo, founded by Mo Tzu, between 500 and 396 B.C.) which rejected formalism in favor of "benefit" and "utility" which are to be promoted through universal love (chien ai), practical observation and application, and obedience to the will of Heaven. There was Neo-Mohism (Mo che, 300 B.C.) which, in trying to prove the thesis of Mohism, developed an intricate system of logic. There was Sophism (ming chia, 400 B.C.) which displayed much sophistry about terms and concepts, particularly about the relationship between substance and quality (chien pai). There was Legalism (fa chia, 500-200 B.C.) which advocated law, statecraft, and authority as effective instruments of government. finally, there was the Yin Yang school (400-200 B.C.) which emphasized yin and yang as the two fundamental principles, always contrasting but complementary, and underlying all conceivable objects, qualities, situations, and relationships. It was this school that provided a common ground for the fusion of ancient divergent philosophical tendencies in medieval China.

Taoism: See Tao chia and Chinese philosophy. Tao shu: The essence of Tao, or the axis of Tao at the center of which all Infinities converge and all distinctions disappear. (Chuang Tzu, between 399 and 295 B.C.). -- W.T.C.

Taoism: The Chinese religion founded on the esoteric interpretation of the teachings of the Yellow Emperor and Lao Tzu, which assimilated the yin-yang philosophy (see yin), the practice of alchemy, and the worship of natural objects and immortals, and which became highly elaborated through the incorporation of a great many elements of Buddhism.

taoism ::: n. --> One of the popular religions of China, sanctioned by the state.


TERMS ANYWHERE

(a) The active or male principle (yang) and the passive or female principle (yin), which are the products of Tao and which produce the myriad of things. (Taoism.)

(b) Absence of desire and egotism. (Taoism) -- W.T.C.

(b) Completeness of life, that is, "all desires reach a proper harmony." (Taoism.) -- W.T.C.

(b) Emptiness of mind in the sense of absolute peace and purity (Taoism), and also in the sense of "not allowing what is already in the mind to disturb what is coming into the mind." (Hsun Tzu, c 335-c 288 B.C.) -- W.T.C.

(b) Nourishing life through breath control. (Taoism). -- W.T.C.

(b) Religion, especially used in tsung chiao. K'ung Chiao (Confucianism) and Tao Chiao (Taoism) may either mean (a) the ethical, political, and philosophical teachings of Confucius and Lao Tzu respectively and their followers, or (b) the state cult of the worship of Heaven and ancestors and the folk religion of nature and spirit worship, respectively. -- W.T.C.

Taoism ::: A group of Chinese religious and philosophical traditions. Philosophical Taoism emphasizes various themes found in the Daodejing and Zhuangzi such as "nonaction" (wu wei), emptiness, detachment, receptiveness, spontaneity, the strength of softness, the relativism of human values, and the search for a long life. Religious Taoism is not clearly separated from philosophy, but incorporates a number of supernatural beliefs in gods, ghosts, ancestral spirits, and practices such as Taoist alchemy and qigong.

Taoism ::: A philosophical school of thought, originating in China, that emphasizes a lifestyle aligned with the Tao.

Taoism, however, became too mystical, and Confucianism too formalistic. "Hundred schools" grew and flourished, many in direct opposition to Taoism and Confucianism. There was Mohism (Mo, founded by Mo Tzu, between 500 and 396 B.C.) which rejected formalism in favor of "benefit" and "utility" which are to be promoted through universal love (chien ai), practical observation and application, and obedience to the will of Heaven. There was Neo-Mohism (Mo che, 300 B.C.) which, in trying to prove the thesis of Mohism, developed an intricate system of logic. There was Sophism (ming chia, 400 B.C.) which displayed much sophistry about terms and concepts, particularly about the relationship between substance and quality (chien pai). There was Legalism (fa chia, 500-200 B.C.) which advocated law, statecraft, and authority as effective instruments of government. finally, there was the Yin Yang school (400-200 B.C.) which emphasized yin and yang as the two fundamental principles, always contrasting but complementary, and underlying all conceivable objects, qualities, situations, and relationships. It was this school that provided a common ground for the fusion of ancient divergent philosophical tendencies in medieval China.

Taoism: See Tao chia and Chinese philosophy. Tao shu: The essence of Tao, or the axis of Tao at the center of which all Infinities converge and all distinctions disappear. (Chuang Tzu, between 399 and 295 B.C.). -- W.T.C.

Taoism: The Chinese religion founded on the esoteric interpretation of the teachings of the Yellow Emperor and Lao Tzu, which assimilated the yin-yang philosophy (see yin), the practice of alchemy, and the worship of natural objects and immortals, and which became highly elaborated through the incorporation of a great many elements of Buddhism.

Buddhism ::: The teachings of Gautama the Buddha. Buddhism today is divided into two branches, the Northern andthe Southern. The Southern still retains the teachings of the "Buddha's brain," the "eye doctrine," that isto say his outer philosophy for the general world, sometimes inadequately called the doctrine of formsand ceremonies. The Northern still retains his "heart doctrine" -- that which is hid, the inner life, theheart-blood, of the religion: the doctrine of the inner heart of the teaching.The religious philosophy of the Buddha-Sakyamuni is incomparably nearer to the ancient wisdom, theesoteric philosophy of the archaic ages, than is Christianity. Its main fault today is that teachers later thanthe Buddha himself carried its doctrines too far along merely formal or exoteric lines; yet, with all that, tothis day it remains the purest and holiest of the exoteric religions on earth, and its teachings evenexoterically are true -- once they are properly understood. They need but the esoteric key in interpretationof them. As a matter of fact, the same may be said of all the great ancient world religions. Christianity,Brahmanism, Taoism, and others all have the same esoteric wisdom behind the outward veil of theexoteric formal faith.

Ch'eng Ming-tao: (Ch'eng Hou, Ch'eng Po-tun, 1032-1086) Served as government official both in the capital and in various counties with excellent records in social and educational achievements. For decades he studied Taoism and Buddhism but finally repudiated them. Together with his brother, he developed new aspects of Confucianism and became the greatest Confucian since Mencius and a leader of Neo-Confucianism (li hsueh). His works and those of his brother, called Erh Ch'eng Ch'uan-shu (complete works of the Ch'eng brothers), number 107 chuans, in 14 Chinese volumes. -- W.T.C.

Chinese Philosophy: Confucianism and Taoism have been the dual basis of Chinese thought, with Buddhism presenting a strong challenge in medieval times. The former two, the priority of either of which is still controversial, rivaled each other from the very beginning to the present day. Taoism (tao chia) opposed nature to man, glorifying Tao or the Way, spontaneity (tzu jan), "inaction" (wu wei) in the sense of non-artificiality or following nature, simplicity (p'u), "emptiness," tranquillity and enlightenment, all dedicated to the search for "long life and lasting vision" (in the case of Lao Tzu, 570 B.C.?), for "preserving life and keeping the essence of our being intact" (in the case of Yang Chu, c. 440-360 B.C.), and for "companionship with nature" (in the case of Chuang Tzu, between 399 and 295 B.C.). The notes of the "equality of things and opinions" (ch'i wu) and the "spontaneous and unceasing transformation of things" (tzu hua) were particularly stressed in Chuang Tzu.

Chuang Tzu (Chinese) Chinese philosopher (late 4th century b.c.) who, with Lao Tzu and Kuan Tzu, is regarded as one of the patriarchs of Taoism. He wrote a work under his name which treats of the tao and its relation to the universe and man, and gives directions for the conduct of human life.

Ch'uan hsing: Preservation of one's original nature. (Taoism.) -- W.T.C.

Ch'uan sheng: (a) Preservation of life, by the suppression of desires. (Taoism.)

dao. (J. do; K. to 道). In Chinese, Lit. "way" or "path"; a polysemous term in Chinese, which in Buddhist texts is used variously as the translation for terms related to "path" (MARGA) and "awakening" (BODHI); thus, "cultivating the way" (xiudao) means "practicing Buddhism" and "entering the way" (rudao) comes to be used as the equivalency in Chinese Buddhist texts for the idea of attaining enlightenment. But dao also has numerous other usages, including as a translation for the DHARMA as teachings (dao or daofa), the dharmas as factors (e.g., daopin for the BODHIPAKsIKADHARMA), and the realms of rebirth (e.g., edao as one of the translations of unfortunate destinies, viz., DURGATI or APAYA). In the premodern period, dao is also one of the closer Chinese equivalents for what in the West would simply be called "religion," so that the compound DAOREN ("person of the way") refers more generally to an accomplished adherent of a religion; in DAOSU, the term refers generically to a "religious" (dao) or renunciant, especially in distinction to a layperson (su), etc. The term is still often seen transcribed in English as tao or Tao, using the older Wade-Giles transcription. In East Asian Buddhist texts, dao only rarely refers to the religious tradition of Daoism/Taoism.

(e) One who "regards nature as the essential, the character of Tao (te) as the basis, Tao as the way, and follows the indications of changes." (Taoism) -- W.T.C.

hacker humour ::: A distinctive style of shared intellectual humour found among hackers, having the following marked characteristics:1. Fascination with form-vs.-content jokes, paradoxes, and humour having to do with confusion of metalevels (see meta). One way to make a hacker laugh: hold a red index card in front of him/her with GREEN written on it, or vice-versa (note, however, that this is funny only the first time).2. Elaborate deadpan parodies of large intellectual constructs, such as specifications (see write-only memory), standards documents, language descriptions (see INTERCAL), and even entire scientific theories (see quantum bogodynamics, computron).3. Jokes that involve screwily precise reasoning from bizarre, ludicrous, or just grossly counter-intuitive premises.4. Fascination with puns and wordplay.5. A fondness for apparently mindless humour with subversive currents of intelligence in it - for example, old Warner Brothers and Rocky & Bullwinkle Humour that combines this trait with elements of high camp and slapstick is especially favoured.6. References to the symbol-object antinomies and associated ideas in Zen Buddhism and (less often) Taoism. See has the X nature, Discordianism, zen, ha ha only serious, AI koan.See also filk and retrocomputing. If you have an itchy feeling that all 6 of these traits are really aspects of one thing that is incredibly difficult to traits are also recognizable (though in a less marked form) throughout science-fiction fandom. (1995-12-18)

hacker humour A distinctive style of shared intellectual humour found among hackers, having the following marked characteristics: 1. Fascination with form-vs.-content jokes, paradoxes, and humour having to do with confusion of metalevels (see {meta}). One way to make a hacker laugh: hold a red index card in front of him/her with "GREEN" written on it, or vice-versa (note, however, that this is funny only the first time). 2. Elaborate deadpan parodies of large intellectual constructs, such as specifications (see {write-only memory}), standards documents, language descriptions (see {INTERCAL}), and even entire scientific theories (see {quantum bogodynamics}, {computron}). 3. Jokes that involve screwily precise reasoning from bizarre, ludicrous, or just grossly counter-intuitive premises. 4. Fascination with puns and wordplay. 5. A fondness for apparently mindless humour with subversive currents of intelligence in it - for example, old Warner Brothers and Rocky & Bullwinkle cartoons, the Marx brothers, the early B-52s, and Monty Python's Flying Circus. Humour that combines this trait with elements of high camp and slapstick is especially favoured. 6. References to the symbol-object antinomies and associated ideas in Zen Buddhism and (less often) Taoism. See {has the X nature}, {Discordianism}, {zen}, {ha ha only serious}, {AI koan}. See also {filk} and {retrocomputing}. If you have an itchy feeling that all 6 of these traits are really aspects of one thing that is incredibly difficult to talk about exactly, you are (a) correct and (b) responding like a hacker. These traits are also recognizable (though in a less marked form) throughout {science-fiction fandom}. (1995-12-18)

Hsuan hsueh: The system of profound and mysterious doctrines, with special reference to Taoism from the third to the fifth centuries A.D. -- W.T.C.

In the meantime, Taoism degenerated and identified itself with the lowest forms of religious worship. Its naturalistic philosophy was carried to the point of fatalistic mechanism in Lieh Tzu (c. 300 A.D.) and was made the theoretical basis for alchemy and the search for longevity in Ko Hung (c. 268-c. 334 A.D.). In Kuo Hsiang (c. 312 A.D.), however, the true spirit of Taoism revived. He restored and developed the Taoist doctrines of naturalism and spontaneous transformation to a position of dignity.

Kwei (Chinese) Also Kuei. Generally, evil spirits or demons; used in Taoism in connection with yin, referring to beings supposed to be connected with the dark side of nature. Yin is regarded as a universal kwei divisible into myriads of particles. Union of the kwei and shen causes life, activity; their separation causes death. Man is likewise composed of a kwei and shen, the kwei representing the dark side of his nature.

Language of Science: See Scientific Empiricism II B 1. Lao Tzu: Whether the founder of Taoism (tao chia) was the same as Li Erh and Li An, whether he lived before or after Confucius, and whether the Tao Te Ching (Eng. trans.: The Canon of Reason and Virtue by P. Carus, The Way and Its Power by A. Waley, etc.) contains his teachings are controversial. According to the Shih Chi (Historical Records), he was a native of Chu (in present Honan), land of romanticism in the south, and a custodian of documents whom Confucius went to consult on rituals. Thus he might have been a priest-teacher who, by advocating the doctrine of "inaction", attempted to preserve the declining culture of his people, the suppressed people of Yin, while Confucius worked hard to promote the culture of the ruling people of Chou. -- W.T.C.

Mind Palace ::: A tertiary chakra along the Front Channel of the etheric body corresponding to the navel: the place where the soul was connected to physical form. This is the center of consciousness in some systems such as Taoism.

Na Chia: In Taoism, the coordination and interlocking of the Ten Celestial Stems with the Eight Elements (pa kua), to the end that the first Stem, which is the embodiment of the active or male cosmic force, and the second Stem, which is the reservoir of the passive or female cosmic force, gather in the center and the highest point in the universe.

neo-Confucianism ::: A form of Confucianism primarily developed during the Song dynasty, as a response to the dominance of Taoism and Buddhism at the time. Neo-Confucians such as Zhu Xi recognized that the Confucianism lacked a thorough metaphysical system, and so synthesized one based on previous Confucian concepts. There were many competing views within the Neo-Confucian community, but overall, a system emerged that resembled both the Buddhist and Taoist thought of the time.

nontheism ::: The absence of belief in both the existence and non-existence of a deity (or deities, or other numinous phenomena). The word is often employed as a blanket term for all belief systems that are not essentially theistic, including atheism (both strong and weak) and agnosticism, as well as certain Eastern religions like Confucianism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism.

Pa Kua ::: Also "Bagua". Eight trigrams in Taoism that are used to represent fundamental principles of reality. A method of structuring and explaining the components that make up conscious experience through a Taoist lens.

San chiao: The three systems, doctrines, philosophies, or religions of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism. -- W.T.C.

Shen (Chinese) In Taoism, when employed in relation to yang, it refers to the celestial or spiritual, hence the gods; in relation to man it is generally translated soul. Yang is defined as a supreme, universal shen — living, creating, dividing itself into an infinite number of shen — depositing the shen in the various beings of the worlds. “The shen are omnipresent; it is they which perform the unfathomable work of the Yang and the Yin. These two vital breaths (of the universe) create the beings; their peregrinating hwun (or shen) are the causes of the changes (in nature), from which, accordingly, we may learn the actions and manners of the kwei and the shen” (I Ching, Hi-ts’ze 1).

Tao chiao: The Chinese name of Taoism (q.v.).

taoism ::: n. --> One of the popular religions of China, sanctioned by the state.

The most strange development was Ch'an (Meditation, Zen, c. 500). It is basically a method of "direct intuition into the heart to find Buddha-nature," a method based, on the one hand, on the eightfold negation of production and extinction, annihilation and permanence, unity and diversity, and coming and departing, and, on the other hand, on the affirmation of the reality of the Buddha-nature in all things. Its sole reliance on meditation was most un-Chinese, but it imposed on the Chinese mind a severe mental and spiritual discipline which was invigorating as well as fascinating. For this reason, it exerted tremendous influence not only on Taoism which had much in common with it and imitated it in every way, but also on Neo-Confucianism, which stood in diametrical opposition to it.

Ti chih tse: 'The pattern of the Lord' by which is meant the political and social regulations instituted by the supreme ruler or emperor on high. (Taoism). -- H.H.

T’ien jen: Chinese for heavenly man, understood as a human being “who is not separated from The Natural.” (Taoism)

T'ien jen: The heavenly man, one "who is not separated from The Natural." (Taoism). -- W.T.C.

T'ung: Mere identity, or sameness, especially in social institutions and standards, which is inferior to harmony (ho) in which social distinctions and differences are in complete concord. (Confucianism). Agreement, as in "agreement with the superiors" (shang t'ung). The method of agreement, which includes identity, generic relationship, co-existence, and partial resemblance. "Identity means two substances having one name. Generic relationship means inclusion in the same whole. Both being in the same room is a case of co-existence. Partial resemblance means having some points of resemblance." See Mo chi. (Neo-Mohism). --W.T.C. T'ung i: The joint method of similarities and differences, by which what is present and what is absent can be distinguished. See Mo chi. --W.T.C. Tung Chung-shu: (177-104 B.C.) was the leading Confucian of his time, premier to two feudal princes, and consultant to the Han emperor in framing national policies. Firmly believing in retribution, he strongly advocated the "science of catastrophic and anomalies," and became the founder and leader of medieval Confucianism which was extensively confused with the Yin Yang philosophy. Extremely antagonistic towards rival schools, he established Confucianism as basis of state religion and education. His best known work, Ch-un-ch'iu Fan-lu, awaits English translation. --W.T.C. Turro y Darder, Ramon: Spanish Biologist and Philosopher. Born in Malgrat, Dec. 8 1854. Died in Barcelona, June 5, 1926. As a Biologist, his conclusions about the circulation of the blood, more than half a century ago, were accepted and verified by later researchers and theorists. Among other things, he showed the insufficiency and unsatisfactoriness of the mechanistic and neomechanistic explanations of the circulatory process. He was also the first to busy himself with endocrinology and bacteriological immunity. As a philosopher Turro combated the subjectivistic and metaphysical type of psychology, and circumscribed scientific investigation to the determination of the conditions that precede the occurrence of phenomena, considering useless all attempt to reach final essences. Turro does not admit, however, that the psychical series or conscious states may be causally linked to the organic series. His formula was: Physiology and Consciousness are phenomena that occur, not in connection, but in conjunction. His most important work is Filosofia Critica, in which he has put side by side two antagonistic conceptions of the universe, the objective and the subjectne conceptions. In it he holds that, at the present crisis of science and philosophy, the business of intelligence is to realize that science works on philosophical presuppositions, but that philosophy is no better off with its chaos of endless contradictions and countless systems of thought. The task to be realized is one of coming together, to undo what has been done and get as far as the original primordial concepts with which philosophical inquiry began. --J.A.F. Tychism: A term derived from the Greek, tyche, fortune, chance, and employed by Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) to express any theory which regards chance as an objective reality, operative in the cosmos. Also the hypothesis that evolution occurs owing to fortuitous variations. --J.J.R. Types, theory of: See Logic, formal, § 6; Paradoxes, logical; Ramified theory of types. Type-token ambiguity: The words token and type are used to distinguish between two senses of the word word.   Individual marks, more or less resembling each other (as "cat" resembles "cat" and "CAT") may (1) be said to be "the same word" or (2) so many "different words". The apparent contradiction therby involved is removed by speaking of the individual marks as tokens, in contrast with the one type of which they are instances. And word may then be said to be subject to type-token ambiguity. The terminology can easily be extended to apply to any kind of symbol, e.g. as in speaking of token- and type-sentences.   Reference: C. S. Peirce, Collected Papers, 4.517. --M.B. Tz'u: (a) Parental love, kindness, or affection, the ideal Confucian virtue of parents.   (b) Love, kindness in general. --W.T.C. Tzu hua: Self-transformation or spontaneous transformation without depending on any divine guidance or eternal agency, but following the thing's own principle of being, which is Tao. (Taoism). --W.T.C. Tzu jan: The natural, the natural state, the state of Tao, spontaneity as against artificiality. (Lao Tzu; Huai-nan Tzu, d. 122 B.C.). --W.T.C. U

Wu Wei (Chinese) Inaction, inactivity; quiescence, placidity. Used in Taoism in relation to the tao of man, the idea being that “Heaven is emptiness” and by practicing wu wei (inaction) and becoming “empty” one becomes at one with heaven or tao. Reminiscent of the highly mystical import of the Buddhist sunyata (Sanskrit, “emptiness,” “void”). In all such words the difficulty is in finding ordinary language to convey the thought. There is not an absolutely empty point of space in all infinitude; what seems to the human senses to be cosmic vacuity is actually complete or absolute fullness, a pleroma as the Gnostics said. Cosmic sunyata or wu wei is emptiness simply because it lacks the lowest forms of matter — forms and bodies which are like the spume or bubbles on the sea of cosmic reality, which to human senses is empty because invisible, intangible, and not subject to sense perception.

Yang ch’i: In Taoism, nourishing life through breath control. In Confucianism, nourishing one’s vital force, the basis of the human body, by the practice of benevolence, righteousness, and uprightness, and the obedience of the moral law.

Yang (Chinese) The bright aspect — as the sunny side of a hill — in contrast to yin, the dark side. In mystic Chinese literature and in Taoism, yang is associated with the masculine aspect, while yin refers to the feminine aspect. Thus tao is regarded as the interaction of the revolving changes produced by the yang and yin: yang referring to immaterial, celestial force and substance; yin, to material equivalents.

Zen Buddhism ::: A fusion of Mahayana Buddhism and Taoism, practiced chiefly in China and Japan. It places great importance on moment-by-moment awareness and 'seeing deeply into the nature of things' by direct experience. The name derives from the Sanskrit word dhyana referring to a particular meditative state.



QUOTES [6 / 6 - 65 / 65]


KEYS (10k)

   1 Zhuang Zhou
   1 Sheila M. Burke
   1 Ken Wilber
   1 Frederick Lenz
   1 Alan Watts
   1 ?

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   13 Alan W Watts
   10 Frederick Lenz
   3 Alan Watts
   2 Robert M Pirsig
   2 Kakuz Okakura
   2 Benjamin Hoff

1:Taoism is simply the complete acceptance of yourself as you are right in this moment." ~ Sheila M. Burke,
2:Taoism has no rules. It's a suggestion for perceiving life in its wholeness, without unnecessary categorization, yet enjoying the beauty of categorization." ~ Frederick Lenz,
3:Taoism is a way of liberation, which never comes by means of revolution, since it is notorious that most revolutions establish worse tyrannies than they destroy." ~ Alan Watts,
4:When the heart is right 'for' and 'against' are forgotten." ~ Zhuang Zhou, influential Chinese philosopher, lived around the 4th century BC, credited with writing—in part or in whole—a work known by his name, the Zhuangzi, one of the foundational texts of Taoism, Wikipedia,
5:To take the last issue, the difficult issue, first. The first great Dharma systems, East and West, all arose, without exception, in the so-called "axial period" (Karl Jaspers), that rather extraordinary period beginning around the 6th century B.C. (plus or minus several centuries), a period that saw the birth of Gautama Buddha, Lao Tzu, Confucius, Moses, Plato, Patanjali—a period that would soon give way, over the next few centuries, to include Ashvaghosa, Nagarjuna, Plotinus, Jesus, Philo, Valentinus…. Virtually all of the major tenets of the perennial philosophy were first laid down during this amazing era (in Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity….) ~ Ken Wilber, Integral Life, right-bucks,
6:In the Judeo-Christian tradition, it is called 'the resurrection body ' and 'the glorified body.' The prophet Isaiah said, 'The dead shall live, their bodies shall rise' (Isa. 26:19). St. Paul called it 'the celestial body' or 'spiritual body ' (soma pneumatikon) (I Corinthians 15:40). In Sufism it is called 'the most sacred body ' (wujud al-aqdas) and 'supracelestial body ' (jism asli haqiqi). In Taoism, it is called 'the diamond body,' and those who have attained it are called 'the immortals' and 'the cloudwalkers.' In Tibetan Buddhism it is called 'the light body.' In Tantrism and some schools of yoga, it is called 'the vajra body,' 'the adamantine body,' and 'the divine body.' In Kriya yoga it is called 'the body of bliss.' In Vedanta it is called 'the superconductive body.' In Gnosticism and Neoplatonism, it is called 'the radiant body.' In the alchemical tradition, the Emerald Tablet calls it 'the Glory of the Whole Universe' and 'the golden body.' The alchemist Paracelsus called it 'the astral body.' In the Hermetic Corpus, it is called 'the immortal body ' (soma athanaton). In some mystery schools, it is called 'the solar body.' In Rosicrucianism, it is called 'the diamond body of the temple of God.' In ancient Egypt it was called 'the luminous body or being' (akh). In Old Persia it was called 'the indwelling divine potential' (fravashi or fravarti). In the Mithraic liturgy it was called 'the perfect body ' (soma teilion). In the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo, it is called 'the divine body,' composed of supramental substance. In the philosophy of Teilhard de Chardin, it is called 'the ultrahuman'.
   ~ ?, http://herebedragons.weebly.com/homo-lumen.html,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Taoism is the way of water. The most frequent element or symbol refered to in Lao Tzu's wrtings is the symbol of water. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
2:The essence of Taoism is really expressed by these few words. Taoism is the way of the child, the way of the fool, the way of someone who doesn't need to be noticed. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
3:There’s a concept in Taoism, wei wu wei', which is often translated as action without action' or effortless doing'. I prefer to think of it more in the sense of action that does not involve struggle or excessive effort'. ~ leo-babauta, @wisdomtrove
4:Different Chinese philosophers, writing probably in 5-4 centuries B.C., presented some major ideas and a way of life that are nowadays known under the name of Taoism, the way of correspondence between man and the tendency or the course of natural world. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
5:But the transformation of consciousness undertaken in Taoism and Zen is more like the correction of faulty perception or the curing of a disease. It is not an acquisitive process of learning more and more facts or greater and greater skills, but rather an unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. As Lao-tzu said, "The scholar gains every day, but the Taoist loses every day. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Taoism is the gentle way. The path of least resistence. ~ Frederick Lenz,
2:"Taoism furnished the basis for aesthetic ideals, Zen made them practical." ~ Kakuzo Okakura,
3:"Let your mind wander in the pure and simple. Be one with the infinite. Let all things take their course." ~ Zhuangzi#taoism,
4:[Taoism] isn't a process of learning more facts or greater skills, it is the unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. ~ Alan Watts,
5:Taoism is the way of water. The most frequent element or symbol refered to in Lao Tzu's wrtings is the symbol of water. ~ Frederick Lenz,
6:Taoism shows us how to deal with life and death by realizing everything here is transitory but its substance is eternal. ~ Frederick Lenz,
7:Taoism was an active power during the Shin dynasty, that epoch of Chinese unification from which we derive the name China. ~ Kakuz Okakura,
8:Some people think Taoism means not doing anything, just going on with your life. That has little or nothing to do with Taoism. ~ Frederick Lenz,
9:Taoism is the profoundest nonconformism that has ever been evolved anywhere in the world, at any time in history; essentially it is rebellion. ~ Osho,
10:Taoism is not a religion, although perhaps it has been made into one by some people. Lao Tsu's way of life occurs in any spiritual philosophy. ~ Frederick Lenz,
11:I'm not even sure that Buddhism is a religion really. It seems like more of just a spiritual practice, I'd compare it more to Taoism than religion. ~ Sienna McQuillen,
12:Taoism extols the virtue of flexibility. What survives on earth is what effortlessly adapts to the changing environment and changing circumstances. ~ Ernie J Zelinski,
13:Taoism has no rules. It's a suggestion for preceiving life in its wholeness, without unnessary categorization, yet enjoying the beauty of categorization. ~ Frederick Lenz,
14:Taoism is a way of liberation, which never comes by means of revolution, since it is notorious that most revolutions establish worse tyrannies than they destroy. ~ Alan W Watts,
15:If you are interested in Taoism, I would suggest that you read the Way of Life by Lao Tsu, the founder of Taoism. I personally prefer the Witter Brynner translation. ~ Frederick Lenz,
16:The essence of Taoism is really expressed by these few words. Taoism is the way of the child, the way of the fool, the way of someone who doesn't need to be noticed. ~ Frederick Lenz,
17:For Taoism concerns itself with unconventional knowledge, with the understanding of life directly, instead of in the abstract, linear terms of representational thinking. ~ Alan W Watts,
18:Lao Tsu found Taoism easy to reconcile withthe world of human beings, which is interesting because with all the nature imagery, one might think it was in some way antithetical to contempory life. ~ Frederick Lenz,
19:Everyone is groping and grasping,” he says. “People are turning to Buddhism, Christianity, self-help, and Taoism. CEOs and billionaires run around with their spiritual masters and visit meditation rooms. ~ Anonymous,
20:I don't try to define the cosmos, I know it's unknowable, but I can understand my place in the world and my place in the universe through a mixture of Taoism, Catholicism, Zen or whatever I have at hand. ~ Guillermo del Toro,
21:I’ve been reading about Buddhism. And Taoism. I haven’t decided between them.” “But…” Hazel looked mystified. “Aren’t you a Greek goddess?” Iris crossed her arms. “Don’t try to put me in a box, demigod! I’m not defined by my past. ~ Rick Riordan,
22:Taoism means streching your being, becoming both a man and a woman and joining within yourself, to be the heavens themselves, to stretch your awareness beyond the breaking point until all opposites are reconciled within yourself. ~ Frederick Lenz,
23:The teachings of Osho, in fact, encompass many religions, but he is not defined by any of them. He is an illuminating speaker on Zen, Taoism, Tibetan Buddhism, Christianity and ancient Greek philosophy... and also a prolific author. ~ Nevill Drury,
24:Jung's work is not only a psychology of the person, but a philosophy of the world, having much in common with Chinese Taoism and Buddhism, which refuse to make a definitive "cut" between internal and external worlds. ~ David Tacy, The Darkening Spirit,
25:Taoism has fostered both material and mental progress, both technological development and awareness of the potential dangers of that very development, always striving to encourage balance between the material and spiritual sides of humankind. ~ Sun Tzu,
26:Different Chinese philosophers, writing probably in 5-4 centuries B.C., presented some major ideas and a way of life that are nowadays known under the name of Taoism, the way of correspondence between man and the tendency or the course of natural world. ~ Alan Watts,
27:To be precise: there is no spiritual path outside the following traditions or religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism and Taoism; but Hinduism is closed for those who have not been born into a Hindu caste, and Taoism is inaccessible. ~ Titus Burckhardt,
28:All of Chinese thinking - Confucianism, Taoism, as well as Buddhism - contains the idea that in the course of life, man will shape harmoniously those psychic and physical predispositions that he received as capital assets by unifying them and giving them form from within a center. ~ Richard Wilhelm,
29:The doctrinal differences between Hinduism and Buddhism and Taoism are not anywhere near as important as doctrinal differences among Christianity and Islam and Judaism. Holy wars are not fought over them because verbalized statements about reality are never presumed to be reality itself. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
30:…the doctrinal differences between Hinduism and Buddhism and Taoism are not anywhere near as important as doctrinal differences among Christianity and Islam and Judaism. Holy wars are not fought over them because verbalized statements about reality are never presumed to be reality itself. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
31:If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.     —Lao Tzu; ancient Chinese philosopher, founder of Taoism, could have been one guy or a mythical compilation of many, nobody really knows for sure I ~ Jen Sincero,
32:To Taoism that which is absolutely still or absolutely perfect is absolutely dead, for without the possibility of growth and change there can be no Tao. In reality there is nothing in the universe which is completely perfect or completely still; it is only in the minds of men that such concepts exist. ~ Alan W Watts,
33:Taoism, Confucianism, and Zen are expressions of a mentality which feels completely at home in this universe, and which sees man as an integral part of his environment. Human intelligence is not an imprisoned spirit from afar but an aspect of the whole intricately balanced organism of the natural world [...]. ~ Alan W Watts,
34:Taoism is simply the complete acceptance of yourself as you are right in this moment. It's about rolling with the changes, whether they are perceived as good or bad. Tao reminds us to live life through good actions (important for past karma and karma you are presently creating); through practicing things that engage our mind, body, and spirit. ~ Sheila Burke,
35:Why can't we simply borrow what is useful to us from Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, especially Zen, as we borrow from Christianity, science, American Indian traditions and world literature in general, including philosophy, and let the rest go hang? Borrow what we need but rely principally upon our own senses, common sense and daily living experience. ~ Edward Abbey,
36:Taoism as the "art of being in the world," for it deals with the present—ourselves. It is in us that God meets with Nature, and yesterday parts from to-morrow. The Present is the moving Infinity, the legitimate sphere of the Relative. Relativity seeks Adjustment; Adjustment is Art. The art of life lies in a constant readjustment to our surroundings. ~ Kakuz Okakura,
37:The Divine Wisdom, the true Theosophy... is not, as some think, a diluted version of Hinduism, or Buddhism, or Taoism, or of any special religion. It is Esoteric Christianity as truly as it is Esoteric Buddhism, and belongs equally to all religions, exclusively to none. Foreword ~ Annie Besant, [Esoteric Christianity: Or, The Lesser Mysteries by Annie Besant], (1914),
38:We cast aside our three core ideas—Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism—and that was a mistake. We were taught Marxist revolutionary ideas from 1949 to 1978.” He paused and watched his wife and daughter snapping photographs at the boat’s railing, an orange sun sinking behind the buildings. “We spent thirty years on what we now know was a disaster,” he said. ~ Evan Osnos,
39:I N TAOISM there’s a famous saying that goes, “The Tao that can be spoken is not the ultimate Tao.” Another way you could say that, although I’ve never seen it translated this way, is, “As soon as you begin to believe in something, then you can no longer see anything else.” The truth you believe in and cling to makes you unavailable to hear anything new. ~ Pema Ch dr n,
40:It is true that in Taoism and Tantric Buddhism there are what appear to be techniques or 'practices' of sexual relationship[.] Their use is the consequence rather than the cause of a certain inner attitude, since they suggest themselves almost naturally to partners who take their love as it comes, contemplatively, and are in no hurry to grasp anything from it. ~ Alan W Watts,
41:Though there are exceptions, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism tend to stress desirable states of consciousness, escaping the fretful, self-aware state of mind that so often makes everyday living a burden. For mystics from the Abrahamic faiths, however, the inward odyssey is also an upward odyssey, a quest for personal and vital communion with an infinite Being. ~ David C Downing,
42:What is most necessary for people and what is given us in great abundance, are experiences, especially experiences of the forces within us. This is our most essential food, our most essential wealth. If we consciously receive all this abundance, the universe will pour into us what is called life in Judaism, spirit in Christianity, light in Islam, power in Taoism. ~ Jacob Needleman,
43:But the transformation of consciousness undertaken in Taoism and Zen is more like the correction of faulty perception or the curing of a disease. It is not an acquisitive process of learning more and more facts or greater and greater skills, but rather an unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. As Lao-tzu said, "The scholar gains every day, but the Taoist loses every day. ~ Alan Watts,
44:But the transformation of consciousness undertaken in Taoism and Zen is more like the correction of faulty perception or the curing of a disease. It is not an acquisitive process of learning more and more facts or greater and greater skills, but rather an unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. As Lao-tzu said, "The scholar gains every day, but the Taoist loses every day. ~ Alan W Watts,
45:Lao Tzu wrote: “Know the personal, yet keep to the impersonal: Accept the world as it is. Then the Tao will be luminous inside you, and you will return to the Uncarved Block.” There is so much philosophy packed into this verse that it summarizes central teachings about happiness from three great ancient traditions: those not only from Taoism, but also from Buddhism and Stoicism ~ Lou Marinoff,
46:The law of non-interference with nature. — The law of non-interference with nature is a basic principle of Taoism [stating] that one should be in harmony with, not rebellion against, the fundamental laws of the universe. Preserve yourself by following the natural bends of things and don’t interfere. Remember never to assert your self against nature; never be in frontal opposition to any problems, but to control it by swinging with it. ~ Bruce Lee,
47:I used to think that you could find peace and it would always be there. And there is a sense of that. But even in the worst moments, catch yourself and remember that within the storm of misfortune there is good fortune. Just get in practice with what they call in Taoism the Wu-wei; the non-action and becoming the observer of it. Just notice and stay at peace with it. I must have admit, that I still have those really disrupting moments. ~ Wayne Dyer,
48:Taoism, on the other hand, is generally a pursuit of older men, and especially of men who are retiring from active life in the community. Their retirement from society is a kind of outward symbol of an inward liberation from the bounds of conventional patterns of thought and conduct. For Taoism concerns itself with unconventional knowledge, with the understanding of life directly, instead of in the abstract, linear terms of representational thinking. ~ Alan W Watts,
49:But Taoism must on no account be understood as a revolution against convention, although it has sometimes been used as a pretext for revolution. Taoism is a way of liberation, which never comes by means of revolution, since it is notorious that most revolutions establish worse tyrannies than they destroy. To be free from convention is not to spurn it but not to be deceived by it. It is to be able to use it as an instrument instead of being used by it. ~ Alan W Watts,
50:The most important things in life can't be seen with the eyes. Ideas can't be seen. Love can't be seen. Honor can't be seen. This isn't a new concept. Judaism and Christianity and Islam and Buddhism and Taoism have all taught for thousands of years that the highest forms of reality are invisible. God is invisible, and he created the universe. Our souls are invisible, and they give life to our bodies. Angels are invisible, and they're the most powerful of God's creatures. ~ Anthony DeStefano,
51:I maintain that Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Sikhism, Taoism, and Zoroastrianism all hold up love as an ideal, seek to benefit humanity through spiritual practice, and strive to make their followers better people. All religions teach moral precepts for the advancement of mind, body, speech, and action: do not lie or steal or take others’ lives, and so on. Unselfishness is the common foundation laid down by all great spiritual teachers. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
52:The alternative-the complex apporach-is total Taoist. In Taoism there is no inherent order. 'The world started with one, and the one became two, and the two became many, and the many led to myriad things.' The universe in Taoism is perceived as vast, amorphous, and ever-changing. You can never nail it down. The elements always stay the same, yet they're always rearranging themselves. So it's like a kaleidoscope: the world is a matter of patterns that change, that partly repeat, but never quite repeat, that are always new and different. ~ M Mitchell Waldrop,
53:The Pooh Way

"By the time it came to the edge of the Forest the stream had grown up, so that it was almost a river, and, being grown-up, it did not run and jump and sparkle along as it used to do when it was younger, but moved more slowly. For it knew now where it was going, and it said to itself, "There is no hurry. We shall get there some day."

Now we come to what would be called the most characteristic element of Taoism-in-action. In Chinese, it is known as Wu Wei. It is also the most characteristic element of Pooh-in-action. ~ Benjamin Hoff,
54:According to tradition, the originator of Taoism, Lao-tzu, was an older contemporary of Kung Fu-tzu, or Confucius, who died in 479 B.C.1 Lao-tzu is said to have been the author of the Tao Te Ching, a short book of aphorisms, setting forth the principles of the Tao and its power or virtue (Te e). But traditional Chinese philosophy ascribes both Taoism and Confucianism to a still earlier source, to a work which lies at the very foundation of Chinese thought and culture, dating anywhere from 3000 to 1200 B.C. This is the I Ching, or Book of Changes. ~ Alan W Watts,
55:Zen Buddhism is a way and a view of life which does not belong to any of the formal categories of modern Western thought. It is not religion or philosophy; it is not a psychology or a type of science. It is an example of what is known in India and China as a “way of liberation,” and is similar in this respect to Taoism, Vedanta, and Yoga. As will soon be obvious, a way of liberation can have no positive definition. It has to be suggested by saying what it is not, somewhat as a sculptor reveals an image by the act of removing pieces of stone from a block. ~ Alan W Watts,
56:The apprenticeship to passivity—I know nothing more contrary to our habits. (The modern age begins with two hysterics: Don Quixote and Luther.) If we make time, produce and elaborate it, we do so out of our repugnance to the hegemony of essence and to the contemplative submission it presupposes. Taoism seems to me wisdom’s first and last word: yet I resist it, my instincts reject it, as they refuse to endure anything—the heredity of revolt is too much for us. Our disease? Centuries of attention to time, the idolatry of becoming. What recourse to China or India will heal us? ~ Emil M Cioran,
57:Oh wondrous,' murmured Lin Chung. 'Oh, water, mistress of earth, valley spirit, eternal feminine!'
'Taoism again?' Phryne leaned close to hear what he was whispering.
'From the "Tao Te Ching." The old Master should have seen this. All made by water, the female, cold, moon principle.'
'Yin,' said Phryne. 'This is the womb of the earth.'
'Indeed.' He took her hand. 'Completely foreign to all male, hot, sun creatures.'
'Like you?'
'Like me. Yang can only admire and tremble.'
'Come along.' She led him into the centre of the huge space. 'We don't want to get lost in the earthmother's insides. ~ Kerry Greenwood,
58:For Lao-tzu’s Taoism is the philosophical equivalent of jujitsu, or judo, which means the way of gentleness. Its basis is the principle of Tao, which may be translated the Way of Nature. But in the Chinese language the word which we render as “nature” has a special meaning not found in its English equivalent. Translated literally, it means “self-so.” For to the Chinese, nature is what works and moves by itself without having to be shoved about, wound up, or controlled by conscious effort. Your heart beats “self-so,” and, if you would give it half a chance, your mind can function “self-so”—though most of us are much too afraid of ourselves to try the experiment. ~ Alan W Watts,
59:To take the last issue, the difficult issue, first. The first great Dharma systems, East and West, all arose, without exception, in the so-called “axial period” (Karl Jaspers), that rather extraordinary period beginning around the 6th century B.C. (plus or minus several centuries), a period that saw the birth of Gautama Buddha, Lao Tzu, Confucius, Moses, Plato, Patanjali—a period that would soon give way, over the next few centuries, to include Ashvaghosa, Nagarjuna, Plotinus, Jesus, Philo, Valentinus…. Virtually all of the major tenets of the perennial philosophy were first laid down during this amazing era (in Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity….) ~ Ken Wilber, Integral Life, right-bucks,
60:What is the book (or books) you’ve given most as a gift, and why? Or what are one to three books that have greatly influenced your life? Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl. He introduces the insights that he learned from surviving imprisonment in a Nazi concentration camp. He outlines methods to discover deep meaning and purpose in life. The Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. His 81 Zen teachings are the foundation for the religion of Taoism, aimed at understanding “the way of virtues.” Lao Tzu’s depth of teachings are complicated to decode and provide foundations for wisdom. Mind Gym by Gary Mack is a book that strips down the esoteric nature of applied sport psychology. Gary introduces a variety of mindset training principles and makes them extremely easy to understand and practice. What purchase of $ 100 or less has most positively impacted your life in the last six months (or in recent memory)? A book for my son: Inch and Miles, written by coach John Wooden. We read it together on a regular basis. The joy that I get from hearing him understand Coach Wooden’s insights is fantastically rewarding. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
61:The natural world gives us many examples of the great effectiveness of this way. The Chinese philosophy of which judo itself is an expression—Taoism—drew attention to the power of water to overcome all obstacles by its gentleness and pliability. It showed how the supple willow survives the tough pine in a snowstorm, for whereas the unyielding branches of the pine accumulate snow until they crack, the springy boughs of the willow bend under its weight, drop the snow, and jump back again. If, when swimming, you are caught in a strong current, it is fatal to resist. You must swim with it and gradually edge to the side. One who falls from a height with stiff limbs will break them, but if he relaxes like a cat he will fall safely. A building without 'give' in its structure will easily collapse in storm or earthquake, and a car without the cushioning of tires and springs will soon come apart on the road. The mind has just the same powers, for it has give and can absorb shocks like water or a cushion. But this giving way to an opposing force is not at all the same thing as running away. A body of water does not run away when you push it; it simply gives at the point of the push and encloses your hand. A shock absorber does not fall down like a bowling-pin when struck; it gives, and yet stays in the same place. To run away is the only defense of something rigid against an overwhelming force. Therefore the good shock absorber has not only 'give,' but also stability or 'weight. ~ Alan W Watts,
62:In Asia, we say that there are three sources of energy--sexual, breath, and spirit...You need to know how to reestablish the balance, or you may act irresponsibly. According to Taoism and buddhism, there are practices to help reestablish that balance, such as meditation or martial arts. You can learn the ways to channel your sexual energy into deep realizations in the domains of art and meditation. The second source of energy is khi, breath energy. Life can be described as a process of burning. In order to burn, every cell in our body needs nutrition and oxygen...Some people cultivate their khi by refraining from smoking and talking, or by practicing conscious breathing after talking a lot...The third soruce of energy is than, spirit energy. When you don't sleep at night, you lose some of this kind of energy. Your nervous system becomes exhausted and you cannot sutdy or practice meditation well, or make good decisions. You don't have a clear mind because of lack of sleep or from worrying too much. Worry and anxiety drain this source of energy. So don't worry. Don't stay up too late. Keep your nervous system healthy. Prevent anxiety. These kinds of practices cultivate the third source of energy. You need this source of energy to practice meditation well. A spritual breakthrough requires the power of your spirit energy, which comes about through concentration and knowing how to preserve this source of energy. When you have strong spirit energy, you only have to focus it on an object, and you will have a breakthrough. If you don't have than, the light of your concentration will not shine brightly, because the light emitted is very weak," (35-36). ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
63:In the Judeo-Christian tradition, it is called 'the resurrection body ' and 'the glorified body.' The prophet Isaiah said, 'The dead shall live, their bodies shall rise' (Isa. 26:19). St. Paul called it 'the celestial body' or 'spiritual body ' (soma pneumatikon) (I Corinthians 15:40). In Sufism it is called 'the most sacred body ' (wujud al-aqdas) and 'supracelestial body ' (jism asli haqiqi). In Taoism, it is called 'the diamond body,' and those who have attained it are called 'the immortals' and 'the cloudwalkers.' In Tibetan Buddhism it is called 'the light body.' In Tantrism and some schools of yoga, it is called 'the vajra body,' 'the adamantine body,' and 'the divine body.' In Kriya yoga it is called 'the body of bliss.' In Vedanta it is called 'the superconductive body.' In Gnosticism and Neoplatonism, it is called 'the radiant body.' In the alchemical tradition, the Emerald Tablet calls it 'the Glory of the Whole Universe' and 'the golden body.' The alchemist Paracelsus called it 'the astral body.' In the Hermetic Corpus, it is called 'the immortal body ' (soma athanaton). In some mystery schools, it is called 'the solar body.' In Rosicrucianism, it is called 'the diamond body of the temple of God.' In ancient Egypt it was called 'the luminous body or being' (akh). In Old Persia it was called 'the indwelling divine potential' (fravashi or fravarti). In the Mithraic liturgy it was called 'the perfect body ' (soma teilion). In the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo, it is called 'the divine body,' composed of supramental substance. In the philosophy of Teilhard de Chardin, it is called 'the ultrahuman'.
   ~ ?, http://herebedragons.weebly.com/homo-lumen.html,
64:Also by Alan Watts The Spirit of Zen (1936) The Legacy of Asia and Western Man (1937) The Meaning of Happiness (1940) The Theologica Mystica of St. Dionysius (1944) (translation) Behold the Spirit (1948) Easter: Its Story and Meaning (1950) The Supreme Identity (1950) The Wisdom of Insecurity (1951) Myth and Ritual in Christianity (1953) The Way of Zen (1957) Nature, Man, and Woman (1958) “This Is It” and Other Essays on Zen and Spiritual Experience (1960) Psychotherapy East and West (1961) The Joyous Cosmology: Adventures in the Chemistry of Consciousness (1962) The Two Hands of God: The Myths of Polarity (1963) Beyond Theology: The Art of Godmanship (1964) The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are (1966) Nonsense (1967) Does It Matter?: Essays on Man’s Relation to Materiality (1970) Erotic Spirituality: The Vision of Konarak (1971) The Art of Contemplation (1972) In My Own Way: An Autobiography 1915–1965 (1972) Cloud-hidden, Whereabouts Unknown: A Mountain Journal (1973) Posthumous Publications Tao: The Watercourse Way (unfinished at the time of his death in 1973, published in 1975) The Essence of Alan Watts (1974) Essential Alan Watts (1976) Uncarved Block, Unbleached Silk: The Mystery of Life (1978) Om: Creative Meditations (1979) Play to Live (1982) Way of Liberation: Essays and Lectures on the Transformation of the Self (1983) Out of the Trap (1985) Diamond Web (1986) The Early Writings of Alan Watts (1987) The Modern Mystic: A New Collection of Early Writings (1990) Talking Zen (1994) Become Who You Are (1995) Buddhism: The Religion of No-Religion (1995) The Philosophies of Asia (1995) The Tao of Philosophy (1995) Myth and Religion (1996) Taoism: Way Beyond Seeking (1997) Zen and the Beat Way (1997) Culture of Counterculture (1998) Eastern Wisdom: What Is Zen?, What Is Tao?, An Introduction to Meditation (2000) Eastern Wisdom, Modern Life: Collected Talks: 1960–1969 (2006) ~ Alan W Watts,
65:We see three men standing around a vat of vinegar. Each has dipped his finger into the vinegar and has tasted it. The expression on each man's face shows his individual reaction. Since the painting is allegorical, we are to understand that these are no ordinary vinegar tasters, but are instead representatives of the "Three Teachings" of China, and that the vinegar they are sampling represents the Essence of Life. The three masters are K'ung Fu-tse (Confucius), Buddha, and Lao-tse, author of the oldest existing book of Taoism. The first has a sour look on his face, the second wears a bitter expression, but the third man is smiling.

To Kung Fu-tse (kung FOOdsuh), life seemed rather sour. He believed that the present was out step with the past, and that the government of man on earth was out of harmony with the Way of Heaven, the government of, the universe. Therefore, he emphasized reverence for the Ancestors, as well as for the ancient rituals and ceremonies in which the emperor, as the Son of Heaven, acted as intermediary between limitless heaven and limited earth. Under Confucianism, the use of precisely measured court music, prescribed steps, actions, and phrases all added up to an extremely complex system of rituals, each used for a particular purpose at a particular time. A saying was recorded about K'ung Fu-tse: "If the mat was not straight, the Master would not sit." This ought to give an indication of the extent to which things were carried out under Confucianism.

To Buddha, the second figure in the painting, life on earth was bitter, filled with attachments and desires that led to suffering. The world was seen as a setter of traps, a generator of illusions, a revolving wheel of pain for all creatures. In order to find peace, the Buddhist considered it necessary to transcend "the world of dust" and reach Nirvana, literally a state of "no wind." Although the essentially optimistic attitude of the Chinese altered Buddhism considerably after it was brought in from its native India, the devout Buddhist often saw the way to Nirvana interrupted all the same by the bitter wind of everyday existence.

To Lao-tse (LAOdsuh), the harmony that naturally existed between heaven and earth from the very beginning could be found by anyone at any time, but not by following the rules of the Confucianists. As he stated in his Tao To Ching (DAO DEH JEENG), the "Tao Virtue Book," earth was in essence a reflection of heaven, run by the same laws - not by the laws of men. These laws affected not only the spinning of distant planets, but the activities of the birds in the forest and the fish in the sea. According to Lao-tse, the more man interfered with the natural balance produced and governed by the universal laws, the further away the harmony retreated into the distance. The more forcing, the more trouble. Whether heavy or fight, wet or dry, fast or slow, everything had its own nature already within it, which could not be violated without causing difficulties. When abstract and arbitrary rules were imposed from the outside, struggle was inevitable. Only then did life become sour.

To Lao-tse, the world was not a setter of traps but a teacher of valuable lessons. Its lessons needed to be learned, just as its laws needed to be followed; then all would go well. Rather than turn away from "the world of dust," Lao-tse advised others to "join the dust of the world." What he saw operating behind everything in heaven and earth he called Tao (DAO), "the Way."

A basic principle of Lao-tse's teaching was that this Way of the Universe could not be adequately described in words, and that it would be insulting both to its unlimited power and to the intelligent human mind to attempt to do so. Still, its nature could be understood, and those who cared the most about it, and the life from which it was inseparable, understood it best. ~ Benjamin Hoff,

IN CHAPTERS [16/16]



   5 Psychology
   5 Philosophy
   3 Occultism
   1 Integral Yoga


   5 Carl Jung
   5 Aldous Huxley
   2 Jordan Peterson


   5 The Perennial Philosophy
   2 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious
   2 Maps of Meaning
   2 Aion


1.01 - Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  42 Erwin Rousselle, "Spiritual Guidance in Contemporary Taoism."
  43 R. Bernoulli, "Zur Symbolik geometrischer Figuren und Zahlen," pp. 397ff.

1.01 - MAPS OF EXPERIENCE - OBJECT AND MEANING, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  Buddhism speaks of what is usually called in English an eightfold path. In Chinese Taoism the Tao is
  usually also rendered way by Arthur Waley and others, though I understand that the character

1.01 - THAT ARE THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  From Taoism we pass to that Mahayana Buddhism which, in the Far East, came to be so closely associated with Taoism, borrowing and bestowing until the two came at last to be fused in what is known as Zen. The Lankavatara Sutra, from which the following extract is taken, was the scripture which the founder of Zen Buddhism expressly recommended to his first disciples.
  Those who vainly reason without understanding the truth are lost in the jungle of the Vijnanas (the various forms of relative knowledge), running about here and there and trying to justify their view of ego-substance.

1.03 - The Sephiros, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  Truth, linked with Thoth, is another Egyptian corres- pondence. Uranus, as the starry heavens, and Hermes as the Logos and the Transmitter of the influence from Keser, also are attri butions. In Taoism, the positive Yang would correspond to this Sephirah.
  Chokmah is the vital energizing element of existence,
  --
  1 bought Divine, which is Chokmah. Binah is Maya, the universal power of Illusion, Kwan Yin of Chinese Budd- hism, the Ym of Taoism, the goddess Kali of the orthodox
  Hindu religions and the Great Sea wherefrom we are sprung.

1.03 - The Syzygy - Anima and Animus, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  1 Erwin Rousselle, "Seelische Fiihrung im lebenden Taoismus," PI. I, pp. 150, 170.
  Rousselle calls the spinning woman the "animal soul." There is a saying that

1.04 - GOD IN THE WORLD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  It is in the literature of Mahayana and especially of Zen Buddhism that we find the best account of the psychology of the man for whom Samsara and Nirvana, time and eternity, are one and the same. More systematically perhaps than any other religion, the Buddhism of the Far East teaches the way to spiritual Knowledge in its fulness as well as in its heights, in and through the world as well as in and through the soul. In this context we may point to a highly significant fact, which is that the incomparable landscape painting of China and Japan was essentially a religious art, inspired by Taoism and Zen Buddhism; in Europe, on the contrary, landscape painting and the poetry of nature worship were secular arts which arose when Christianity was in decline, and derived little or no inspiration from Christian ideals.
  Blind, deaf, dumb!
  --
  That Nirvana and Samsara are one is a fact about the nature of the universe; but it is a fact which cannot be fully realized or directly experienced, except by souls far advanced in spirituality. For ordinary, nice, unregenerate people to accept this truth by hearsay, and to act upon it in practice, is merely to court disaster. All the dismal story of antinomianism is there to warn us of what happens when men and women make practical applications of a merely intellectual and unrealized theory that all is God and God is all. And hardly less depressing than the spectacle of antinomianism is that of the earnestly respectable well-rounded life of good citizens who do their best to live sacramentally, but dont in fact have any direct acquaintance with that for which the sacramental activity really stands. Dr. Oman, in his The Natural and the Supernatural, writes at length on the theme that reconciliation to the evanescent is revelation of the eternal; and in a recent volume, Science, Religion and the Future, Canon Raven applauds Dr. Oman for having stated the principles of a theology, in which there could be no ultimate antithesis between nature and grace, science and religion, in which, indeed, the worlds of the scientist and the theologian are seen to be one and the same. All this is in full accord with Taoism and Zen Buddhism and with such Christian teachings as St. Augustines Ama et fac quod vis and Father Lallemants advice to theocentric contemplatives to go out and act in the world, since their actions are the only ones capable of doing any real good to the world. But what neither Dr. Oman nor Canon Raven makes sufficiently clear is that nature and grace, Samsara and Nirvana, perpetual perishing and eternity, are really and experientially one only to persons who have fulfilled certain conditions. Fac quod vis in the temporal world but only when you have learnt the infinitely difficult art of loving God with all your mind and heart and your neighbor as yourself. If you havent learnt this lesson, you will either be an antinomian eccentric or criminal or else a respectable well-rounded-lifer, who has left himself no time to understand either nature or grace. The Gospels are perfectly clear about the process by which, and by which alone, a man may gain the right to live in the world as though he were at home in it: he must make a total denial of selfhood, submit to a complete and absolute mortification. At one period of his career, Jesus himself seems to have undertaken austerities, not merely of the mind, but of the body. There is the record of his forty days fast and his statement, evidently drawn from personal experience, that some demons cannot be cast out except by those who have fasted much as well as prayed. (The Cur dArs, whose knowledge of miracles and corporal penance was based on personal experience, insists on the close correlation between severe bodily austerities and the power to get petitionary prayer answered in ways that are sometimes supernormal.) The Pharisees reproached Jesus because he came eating and drinking, and associated with publicans and sinners; they ignored, or were unaware of, the fact that this apparently worldly prophet had at one time rivalled the physical austerities of John the Baptist and was practising the spiritual mortifications which he consistently preached. The pattern of Jesus life is essentially similar to that of the ideal sage, whose career is traced in the Oxherding Pictures, so popular among Zen Buddhists. The wild ox, symbolizing the unregenerate self, is caught, made to change its direction, then tamed and gradually transformed from black to white. Regeneration goes so far that for a time the ox is completely lost, so that nothing remains to be pictured but the full-orbed moon, symbolizing Mind, Suchness, the Ground. But this is not the final stage. In the end, the herdsman comes back to the world of men, riding on the back of his ox. Because he now loves, loves to the extent of being identified with the divine object of his love, he can do what he likes; for what he likes is what the Nature of Things likes. He is found in company with wine-bibbers and butchers; he and they are all converted into Buddhas. For him, there is complete reconciliation to the evanescent and, through that reconciliation, revelation of the eternal. But for nice ordinary unregenerate people the only reconciliation to the evanescent is that of indulged passions, of distractions submitted to and enjoyed. To tell such persons that evanescence and eternity are the same, and not immediately to qualify the statement, is positively fatalfor, in practice, they are not the same except to the saint; and there is no record that anybody ever came to sanctity, who did not, at the outset of his or her career, behave as if evanescence and eternity, nature and grace, were profoundly different and in many respects incompatible. As always, the path of spirituality is a knife-edge between abysses. On one side is the danger of mere rejection and escape, on the other the danger of mere acceptance and the enjoyment of things which should only be used as instruments or symbols. The versified caption which accompanies the last of the Oxherding Pictures runs as follows.
  Even beyond the ultimate limits there extends a passageway,

1.05 - THE HOSTILE BROTHERS - ARCHETYPES OF RESPONSE TO THE UNKNOWN, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  Chinese smiths form an integral part of the traditions later inherited by Chinese Taoism and alchemy).
  But what the smelter, smith and alchemist have in common is that all three lay claim to a particular

1.06 - The Three Schools of Magick 1, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  Let the reader, therefore, beware most seriously of trying to get a grasp of this subject by means of siren analogies. Taoism has as little to do with the Tao Teh King as the Catholic Church with the Gospel.
  The Tao Teh King inculcates conscious inaction, or rather unconscious inaction, with the object of minimizing the disorder of the world. A few quotations from the text should make the essence of the doctrine clear.[10]

1.07 - TRUTH, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  To these unavoidable paradoxes some spiritual writers have chosen to add deliberate and calculated enormities of languagehard sayings, exaggerations, ironic or humorous extravagances, designed to startle and shock the reader out of that self-satisfied complacency which is the original sin of the intellect. Of this second kind of paradox the masters of Taoism and Zen Buddhism were particularly fond. The latter, indeed, made use of paralogisms and even of nonsense as a device for taking the kingdom of heaven by violence. Aspirants to the life of perfection were encouraged to practice discursive meditation on some completely non-logical formula. The result was a kind of reductio ad absurdum of the whole self-centred and world-centred discursive process, a sudden breaking through from reason (in the language of scholastic philosophy) to intuitive intellect, capable of a genuine insight into the divine Ground of all being. This method strikes us as odd and eccentric; but the fact remains that it worked to the extent of producing in many persons the final metanoia, or transformation of consciousness and character.
  Zens use of almost comic extravagance to emphasize the philosophic truths it regarded as most important is well illustrated in the first of the extracts cited above. We are not intended seriously to imagine that an Avatar preaches in order to play a practical joke on the human race. But meanwhile what the author has succeeded in doing is to startle us out of our habitual complacency about the home-made verbal universe in which we normally do most of our living. Words are not facts, and still less are they the primordial Fact. If we take them too seriously, we shall lose our way in a forest of entangling briars. But if, on the contrary, we dont take them seriously enough, we shall remain unaware that there is a way to lose or a goal to be reached. If the Enlightened did not preach, there would be no deliverance for anyone. But because human minds and human languages are what they are, this necessary and indispensable preaching is beset with dangers. The history of all the religions is similar in one important respect; some of their adherents are enlightened and delivered, because they have chosen to react appropriately to the words which the founders have let fall; others achieve a partial salvation by reacting with partial appropriateness; yet others harm themselves and their fellows by reacting with a total inappropriatenessei ther ignoring the words altogether or, more often, taking them too seriously and treating them as though they were identical with the Fact to which they refer.

1.08 - RELIGION AND TEMPERAMENT, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  So far as the achievement of mans final end is concerned, it is as much of a handicap to be an extreme cerebrotonic or an extreme viscerotonic as it is to be an extreme somatotonic. But whereas the cerebrotonic and the viscerotonic cannot do much harm except to themselves and those in immediate contact with them, the extreme somatotonic, with his native aggressiveness, plays havoc with whole societies. From one point of view civilization may be defined as a complex of religious, legal and educational devices for preventing extreme somatotonics from doing too much mischief, and for directing their irrepressible energies into socially desirable channels. Confucianism and Chinese culture have sought to achieve this end by inculcating filial piety, good manners and an amiably viscerotonic epicureanism the whole reinforced somewhat incongruously by the cerebrotonic spirituality and restraints of Buddhism and classical Taoism. In India the caste system represents an attempt to subordinate military, political and financial power to spiritual authority; and the education given to all classes still insists so strongly upon the fact that mans final end is unitive knowledge of God that even at the present time, even after nearly two hundred years of gradually accelerating Europeanization, successful somatotonics will, in middle life, give up wealth, position and power to end their days as humble seekers after enlightenment. In Catholic Europe, as in India, there was an effort to subordinate temporal power to spiritual authority; but since the Church itself exercised temporal power through the agency of political prelates and mitred business men, the effort was never more than partially successful. After the Reformation even the pious wish to limit temporal power by means of spiritual authority was completely abandoned. Henry VIII made himself, in Stubbss words, the Pope, the whole Pope, and something more than the Pope, and his example has been followed by most heads of states ever since. Power has been limited only by other powers, not by an appeal to first principles as interpreted by those who are morally and spiritually qualified to know what they are talking about. Meanwhile, the interest in religion has everywhere declined and even among believing Christians the Perennial Philosophy has been to a great extent replaced by a metaphysic of inevitable progress and an evolving God, by a passionate concern, not with eternity, but with future time. And almost suddenly, within the last quarter of a century, there has been consummated what Sheldon calls a somatotonic revolution, directed against all that is characteristically cerebrotonic in the theory and practice of traditional Christian culture. Here are a few symptoms of this somatotonic revolution.
  In traditional Christianity, as in all the great religious formulations of the Perennial Philosophy, it was axiomatic that contemplation is the end and purpose of action. Today the great majority even of professed Christians regard action (directed towards material and social progress) as the end, and analytic thought (there is no question any longer of integral thought, or contemplation) as the means to that end.

1.14 - Bibliography, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  Rousselle, Erwin. "Seelische Fiihrung im lebenden Taoismus,"
  Eranos-Jahrbuch 1933 (Zurich, 1934), 135-99-

1.24 - RITUAL, SYMBOL, SACRAMENT, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  Because of this indwelling of the Logos, writes Mr. Kenneth Saunders in his valuable study of the Fourth Gospel, the Gita and the Lotus Sutra, all things have a reality. They are sacraments, not illusions like the phenomenal word of the Vedanta. That the Logos is in things, lives and conscious minds, and they in the Logos, was taught much more emphatically and explicitly by the Vedantists than by the author of the Fourth Gospel; and the same idea is, of course, basic in the theology of Taoism. But though all things in fact exist at the intersection between a divine manifestation and a ray of the unmanifest Godhead, it by no means follows that everyone always knows that this is so. On the contrary, the vast majority of human beings believe that their own selfness and the objects around them possess a reality in themselves, wholly independent of the Logos. This belief leads them to identify their being with their sensations, cravings and private notions and in its turn this self-identification with what they are not effectively walls them off from divine influence and the very possibility of deliverance. To most of us on most occasions things are not symbols and actions are not sacramental; and we have to teach ourselves, consciously and deliberately, to remember that they are.
  The world is imprisoned in its own activity, except when actions are performed as worship of God. Therefore you must perform every action sacramentally (as if it were yajna, the sacrifice that, in its divine Logos-essence, is identical with the Godhead to whom it is offered), and be free from all attachment to results.

2.18 - January 1939, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   The Tibetans are more familiar with occultism than with spirituality. The Europeans are more taken up with these occult things. They either believe everything or nothing. That explains their attraction for Tibet, Bhutan and other places with occult atmosphere. Nowadays stories and novels are being written with these themes. Japanese Zen Buddhism, and Chinese Taoism have also attracted their attention.
   I also wrote some stories but they are lost; the white ants have finished them and with them has perished my future fame as a story-teller. (Laughter)

3.10 - The New Birth, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  above all in the philosophies and religions of India, in Chinese Taoism,
  and in the Zen Buddhism of Japan. From the point of view of psychology,

6.0 - Conscious, Unconscious, and Individuation, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  of Taoism and of Zen Buddhism. 150 Miss X's interest in Eastern
  philosophy was due to the deep impression which a better
  --
  Rousselle, Erwin. "Spiritual Guidance in Contemporary Taoism."
  In: Spiritual Disciplines. (Papers from the Eranos Yearbooks, 4),
  --
  China, Taoism in, 8
  Chinese: alchemy, 293; philosophy,

Talks With Sri Aurobindo 1, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  the same as in Taoism and Buddhism. But it is not really Nothing. What we
  can say is that no attri bute of Being can be posited of it. Taoism says that
  Non-Being is Everything rather than Nothing. By the affirmative path you

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun taoism

The noun taoism has 4 senses (no senses from tagged texts)
                  
1. Taoism ::: (a Chinese sect claiming to follow the teaching of Lao-tzu but incorporating pantheism and sorcery in addition to Taoism)
2. Taoism ::: (religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu)
3. Taoism, Hsuan Chiao ::: (popular Chinese philosophical system based in teachings of Lao-tzu but characterized by a pantheism of many gods and the practices of alchemy and divination and magic)
4. Taoism, Daoism ::: (philosophical system developed by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu advocating a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events)


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun taoism

4 senses of taoism                          

Sense 1
Taoism
   => sect, religious sect, religious order
     => religion, faith, organized religion
       => institution, establishment
         => organization, organisation
           => social group
             => group, grouping
               => abstraction, abstract entity
                 => entity

Sense 2
Taoism
   => religion, faith, organized religion
     => institution, establishment
       => organization, organisation
         => social group
           => group, grouping
             => abstraction, abstract entity
               => entity

Sense 3
Taoism, Hsuan Chiao
   => religion, faith, religious belief
     => belief
       => content, cognitive content, mental object
         => cognition, knowledge, noesis
           => psychological feature
             => abstraction, abstract entity
               => entity
     => theological virtue, supernatural virtue
       => cardinal virtue
         => virtue
           => good, goodness
             => morality
               => quality
                 => attribute
                   => abstraction, abstract entity
                     => entity

Sense 4
Taoism, Daoism
   => philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory
     => doctrine, philosophy, philosophical system, school of thought, ism
       => belief
         => content, cognitive content, mental object
           => cognition, knowledge, noesis
             => psychological feature
               => abstraction, abstract entity
                 => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun taoism
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun taoism

4 senses of taoism                          

Sense 1
Taoism
   => sect, religious sect, religious order

Sense 2
Taoism
   => religion, faith, organized religion

Sense 3
Taoism, Hsuan Chiao
   => religion, faith, religious belief

Sense 4
Taoism, Daoism
   => philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun taoism

4 senses of taoism                          

Sense 1
Taoism
  -> sect, religious sect, religious order
   => sisterhood
   => Albigenses, Cathars, Cathari
   => High Church, High Anglican Church
   => Abecedarian
   => Amish sect
   => Karaites
   => Shiah, Shia, Shiah Islam
   => Sunni, Sunni Islam
   => Shivaism, Sivaism
   => Shaktism, Saktism
   => Vaishnavism, Vaisnavism
   => Haredi
   => Hare Krishna, International Society for Krishna Consciousness, ISKCON
   => Jainism
   => Taoism
   => Kokka Shinto, Kokka
   => Shuha Shinto, Shua
   => brethren
   => order, monastic order
   => Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends, Quakers
   => Shakers, United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing
   => Waldenses, Vaudois
   => Zurvanism

Sense 2
Taoism
  -> religion, faith, organized religion
   => church, Christian church
   => Judaism, Hebraism, Jewish religion
   => Hinduism, Hindooism
   => Taoism
   => Buddhism
   => Khalsa
   => Scientology, Church of Scientology
   => Shinto
   => established church
   => sect, religious sect, religious order
   => cult
   => cult

Sense 3
Taoism, Hsuan Chiao
  -> religion, faith, religious belief
   => apophatism
   => cataphatism
   => doctrine of analogy, analogy
   => cult, cultus, religious cult
   => cult
   => ecclesiasticism
   => mysticism, religious mysticism
   => nature worship
   => revealed religion
   => theism
   => paganism, pagan religion, heathenism
   => Christianity, Christian religion
   => Hinduism, Hindooism
   => Brahmanism, Brahminism
   => Jainism
   => Sikhism
   => Buddhism
   => Taoism, Hsuan Chiao
   => Shinto, Shintoism
   => Manichaeism, Manichaeanism
   => Mithraism, Mithraicism
   => Zoroastrianism, Mazdaism
   => Bahaism
   => shamanism, Asian shamanism
   => shamanism
   => Wicca

Sense 4
Taoism, Daoism
  -> philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory
   => aesthetic, esthetic
   => Aristotelianism, peripateticism
   => conceptualism
   => Confucianism
   => deconstruction, deconstructionism
   => empiricism, empiricist philosophy, sensationalism
   => environmentalism
   => existentialism, existential philosophy, existentialist philosophy
   => determinism
   => formalism
   => hereditarianism
   => idealism
   => intuitionism
   => logicism
   => materialism, physicalism
   => mechanism
   => mentalism
   => nativism
   => naturalism
   => Neoplatonism
   => nominalism
   => operationalism
   => Platonism, realism
   => pragmatism
   => probabilism
   => rationalism
   => realism, naive realism
   => relativism
   => Scholasticism
   => semiotics, semiology
   => sensualism, sensationalism
   => solipsism
   => Stoicism
   => subjectivism
   => Taoism, Daoism
   => teleology
   => traditionalism
   => vitalism




--- Grep of noun taoism
taoism



IN WEBGEN [10000/97]

Wikipedia - Bixia Yuanjun -- Goddess in Taoism
Wikipedia - Category:Taoism
Wikipedia - Chu (Taoism) -- Taoist name for various religious practices
Wikipedia - Daoism-Taoism romanization issue -- Issue concerning the conversion of the Chinese concept of Tao into English
Wikipedia - Dragon Gate Taoism
Wikipedia - Five Precepts (Taoism)
Wikipedia - History of Taoism
Wikipedia - Korean Taoism
Wikipedia - Laozi -- Legendary Chinese figure, attributed to the 6th century, regarded as the author of the Tao Te Ching and founder of Taoism
Wikipedia - Li Hong (Taoist eschatology) -- A messianic figure in religious Taoism prophesied to appear at the end of the world cycle to rescue the chosen people
Wikipedia - Longmen Taoism
Wikipedia - Neo-Taoism
Wikipedia - Neotaoism
Wikipedia - Philosophical Taoism
Wikipedia - Pu (Taoism)
Wikipedia - Quanzhen School -- School of Taoism
Wikipedia - Quanzhen Taoism
Wikipedia - Shanrendao -- A Confucian-Taoism religious movement in northeast China
Wikipedia - Taoism and death
Wikipedia - Taoism in Hong Kong
Wikipedia - Taoism in Japan
Wikipedia - Taoism in Korea -- Overview of Taoism in Korea
Wikipedia - Taoism in Malaysia
Wikipedia - Taoism in Singapore
Wikipedia - Taoism in Vietnam
Wikipedia - Taoism
Wikipedia - Template talk:Taoism
Wikipedia - Ten Precepts (Taoism)
Wikipedia - Three teachings -- Term referring to Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism collectively, considered as a harmonious aggregate
Wikipedia - Three Treasures (Taoism)
Wikipedia - Xian (Taoism)
Wikipedia - Yao Taoism
Wikipedia - Zhengyi Taoism
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/21494515-the-story-of-chinese-taoism
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/726715.Sufism_and_Taoism
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9199249-essential-writings-of-taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category_talk:Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Mantra#Mantras_in_Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Reincarnation#Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Religious_cosmology#Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Shambhala_Buddhism#Elements_of_B.C3.B6n.2C_Taoism.2C_Confucianism.2C_and_Shinto
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Three_Jewels#In_Jainism_and_Taoism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Women_as_theological_figures#Taoism
Kheper - Taoism-unitive_state -- 19
Kheper - circulation_of_light -- 35
Kheper - definition -- 23
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Kheper - Tan_Tiens -- 13
Kheper - Taoism -- 22
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wiki.auroville - Taoism
Dharmapedia - Taoism
Psychology Wiki - Meditation#Taoism
Psychology Wiki - Taoism
Occultopedia - taoism
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/Taoism
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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:History_of_Taoism
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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:De-Taoismus.ogg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_dragon,_image,_and_demon;_or,_The_three_religions_of_China-_Confucianism,_Buddhism,_and_Taoism,_giving_an_account_of_the_mythology,_idolatry,_and_demonolatry_of_the_Chinese_(1887)_(14760951946).jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Taoism
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