classes ::: subject,
children :::
branches ::: Zen, Zen Koans, Zen Masters, Zen Proverb, Zen Scriptures

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Zen
object:Zen Buddhism
class:subject
link:https://terebess.hu/zen/index.html
concepts:original face,

--- bookchapters Zen
  A Study Of Dogen His Philosophy and Religion

  Big Mind, Big Heart
   Big Mind (non-dual)
   Big Mind (ten perfections)

  Branching Streams flow in the darkness

  Cold Mountain
   The Poems of Cold Mountain

  Crow With No Mouth Ikkyu

  God Emptiness and the True Self

  Introduction Zen Buddhism

  Japanese Spirituality

  Manual of Zen Buddhism

  Mysticism Christian and Buddhist

  Rice Eyes Enlightenment in Dogens Kitchen

  Skeletons

  Studies in the Lankavatara

  The Blue Cliff Record
   1.01 - The Highest Meaning of the Holy Truths
   1.02 - The Ultimate Path is Without Difficulty
   1.03 - Master Ma is Unwell
   1.04 - Te Shan Carrying His Bundle
   1.05 - Hsueh Feng's Grain of Rice
   1.06 - Yun Men's Every Day is a Good Day
   1.07 - Hui Ch'ao Asks about Buddha
   1.21 - Chih Men's Lotus Flower, Lotus Leaves

  The Book of Equanimity

  The Compass of Zen

  The Diamond Sutra
   DS1
   :DS2
   :DS3
   :DS4

  The Gateless Gate
   :CASE 1 - JOSHUS DOG
   :CASE 2 - HYAKUJOS FOX
   :CASE 3 - GUTEIS FINGER
   :CASE 4 - WAKUANS WHY NO BEARD?
   :CASE 5 - KYOGENS MAN HANGING IN THE TREE
   :CASE 6 - THE BUDDHAS FLOWER

  The Training of the Zen Buddhist Monk

  The Zen Koan as a means of Attaining Enlightenment

  The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma
   :1.02 - Outline of Practice
   :1.03 - Bloodstream Sermon
   :1.04 - Wake-Up Sermon

  Treasury of the True Dharma Eye Zen Master Dogens Shobo Genzo

  Unborn The Life and Teachings of Zen Master Bankei

  Zen Letters Teachings of Yuanwu

  Zen Mind, Beginners Mind

--- authbooks Zen
  Bankei
    Unborn The Life and Teachings of Zen Master Bankei
    ZEN - Peter Haskel - Translations from the Record of Bankei.txt

  Bodhidharma
    The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma
    Manual of Zen Buddhism
    NL - Red Pine - The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma North Point Press (1987).txt
    NL - Red Pine - The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma-North Point Press (1987).txt
    ZEN - Andrew Ferguson - Did Bodhidharma Meet Emperor Liang Wu Di?.txt
    ZEN - Bernard Faure - From Bodhidharma to Daruma The Hidden Life of a Zen Patriarch.txt

  Burton Watson
    NL - Burton Watson - The Lotus Sutra Columbia University Press.txt
    NL - Taigu Ryokan - a statement on begging for food (trans. Burton Watson).txt
    ZEN - BURTON WATSON - The Zen Teachings of Master Lin-chi.txt
    ZEN - Han-shan - COLD MOUNTAIN 100 poems (trans. Burton Watson).txt

  Cheng Kuan
    The Sweet Dews of Chan Zen
    NL - Cheng Kuan - The Sweet Dews of Chan Zen.txt

  Chong Go

  Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki
    Introduction Zen Buddhism
    The Zen Koan as a means of Attaining Enlightenment
    Mysticism Christian and Buddhist
    The Training of the Zen Buddhist Monk
    Studies in the Lankavatara
    Japanese Spirituality
    Manual of Zen Buddhism
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - Introduction Zen Buddhism.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - Japanese Spirituality.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - Manual of Zen Buddhism.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - mysticism christian and buddhist.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - Shin Buddhism.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - Studies in the Lankavatara.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - The Lankavatara Sutra A Mahayana Text.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - The Training of the Zen Buddhist Monk.txt
    NL - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - The Zen Koan as a means of Attaining Enlightenment.txt
    ZEN - Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki - Manual of Zen Buddhism.txt

  Dogen
    Treasury of the True Dharma Eye Zen Master Dogens Shobo Genzo
    A Study Of Dogen His Philosophy and Religion
    Rice Eyes Enlightenment in Dogens Kitchen
    NL - Dogen - Rice Eyes Enlightenmet in Dogens Kitchen Tai Sheridan.txt
    NL - Dogen - Shobogenzo complete.txt
    NL - Dogen - Shobogenzo The Treasure House of the Eye of the True Teaching (trans. Rev. Hubert Nearman).txt
    NL - Masao Abe - A Study Of Dogen His Philosophy and Religion.txt
    NL - Miriam L. Levering - Dogen's Raihaitokuzui and Women Teaching in Sung Chan.txt
    NL - Steven Heine - Dogen and the Koan Tradition A Tale of Two Shobogenzo Texts .txt
    ZEN - Arai-women-Dogen-ZenRitual.1.txt
    ZEN - Arai-women-Dogen-ZenRitual.txt
    ZEN - Carl Bielefeldt - Dogens Manuals of Zen Meditation.txt
    ZEN - Dogen-s-Appropriation-of-Lotus-Sutra-Ground-and-Space.txt
    ZEN - Gudo Wafu Nishijima - GAKU DO YO JIN SHU Practical Advice On Pursuing the Buddhist Truth from Master Dogen.txt
    ZEN - HeineDogenCanon.1.txt
    ZEN - Koans-in-the-Dogen-tradition.1.txt
    ZEN - Koans-in-the-Dogen-tradition.txt
    ZEN - Omori Sagen - The Art of a Zen Master Hosokawa Dogen.txt
    ZEN - Steven Heine - Did-Dogen-Go-to-China.txt

  Genpo Roshi
    Big Mind, Big Heart
    NL - Dennis Genpo Merzel Genpo Roshi - Big Mind Big Heart Finding Your Way Big Mind Publishing (2007) clean.txt

  Gudo Wafu Nishijima
    NL - Gudo Wafu Nishijima - How To Practice Zazen.txt
    NL - Gudo Wafu Nishijima - Understanding the Shobogenzo.txt
    ZEN - Gudo Wafu Nishijima - GAKU DO YO JIN SHU Practical Advice On Pursuing the Buddhist Truth from Master Dogen.txt
    ZEN - Gudo Wafu Nishijima - Japanese Buddhism and The Meiji Restoration.txt
    ZEN - Gudo Wafu Nishijima - The Relation Between the Autonomic Nervous System and Buddhism.txt

  Hakuin Ekaku
    NL - Hakuin Ekaku - Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin Shambhala (2012) (trans. Norman Waddell).txt

  Han-shan
    Cold Mountain
    ZEN - Han-shan - COLD MOUNTAIN 100 poems (trans. Burton Watson).txt

  Hsuan Hua
    NL - Hsuan Hua - Chan Handbook.txt
    NL - Hsuan Hua - Sitting in Chan.txt
    ZEN - Great Master Yung Chia - Song of Enlightenment (comm. Tripitaka Master Hsuan Hua) (trans. International Institute For The Translation of Buddhist Texts).txt

  Huang Po
    The Blue Cliff Record

  Hui-Neng
    The Diamond Sutra and The Sutra of Hui-Neng

  Hu-Shih
    ZEN - Hu-Shih - An Appeal for a Systematic Search in Japan for Long-Hidden Tang Dynasty Source Materials of the Early History of Zen Buddhism.txt
    ZEN - Hu-Shih - Zen-in-China.txt

  Ikkyu
    Skeletons
    Crow With No Mouth Ikkyu
    NL - Ikkyu - Skeletons (trans. Csontvazdalocskak).txt
    ZEN - ALEXANDER KABANOFF - Ikkyu and Koans.txt

  Ishikara Rikizan

  Izumi Shikibu

  Jiang Wu
    NL - Jiang Wu - BUILDING A DHARMA TRANSMISSION MONASTERY IN SEVENTEENTHCENTURY CHINA: THE CASE OF MOUNT HUANGBO.txt
    NL - Jiang Wu - Enlightenment-in-Dispute.txt
    NL - Jiang Wu - Leaving for the Rising Sun The Historical Background of Yinyuan Longqis Migration to Japan in 1654.txt
    NL - Jiang Wu - Zen Sand The Book of Capping Phrases for Kan Practive.txt

  Jianzhi Sengcan

  John Daido Loori
    NL - John Daido Loori - Mountain Record of Zen Talks.txt
    NL - John Daido Loori - The Heart of Being Moral and Ethical Teachings of Zen Buddhism.txt
    NL - John Daido Loori - The True Dharma Eye Zen Master Dgens THREE HUNDRED KANS WITH COMMENTARY AND VERSE (trans. Kazuaki Tanahashi and John Daido Loori).txt
    ZEN - John Daido Loori - Moshans Nature of the Summit Mountain.txt
    ZEN - John Daido Loori - Straight Ahead An Interview with John Daido Loori.txt

  Joshu Sasaki Roshi
    NL - Joshu Sasaki Roshi - About-Zazen.txt
    NL - Joshu Sasaki Roshi - Buddha-is-the-Center-of-Gravity.txt
    ZEN - Joshu Sasaki Roshi - About-Zazen.1.txt

  Katsuki Sekida

  Kodo Sawaki

  Kosho Uchiyama
    Opening the Hand of Thought: Foundations of Zen Buddhist Practice
    ZEN - Kosho Uchiyama Roshi - Approach to Zen The Reality of Zazen Modern Civilization and Zen.txt

  Masao Abe
    God Emptiness and the True Self
    A Study Of Dogen His Philosophy and Religion
    NL - Masao Abe - A Study Of Dogen His Philosophy and Religion.txt
    NL - Masao Abe - God Emptiness and the True Self.txt

  Matsuo Basho

  Michel Mohr
    NL - Michel Mohr - Damo.txt
    NL - Michel Mohr - Imagining Indian Zen Toreis Commentary on the Ta-mo-to-lo chan ching and the Rediscovery of Early Meditation Techniques during the Tokugawa Era.txt
    NL - Michel Mohr - Japanese-Zen-Schools-and-the-Transition-to-Meiji.txt
    NL - Michel Mohr - Monastic Tradition and Lay Practice from the Perspective of Nantenbo.txt
    NL - Michel Mohr - Parents.txt
    ZEN - MICHEL MOHR - Emerging from Nonduality Koan Practice in the Rinzai Tradition since Hakuin.txt
    ZEN - Michel Mohr - The Use of Traps and Snares Shaku Sen Revisited.txt

  Miriam L. Levering
    NL - Miriam L. Levering - Dahui Zonggao The Image Created by His Stories about Himself and by His Teaching Style.txt
    NL - Miriam L. Levering - Dogen's Raihaitokuzui and Women Teaching in Sung Chan.txt
    NL - Miriam L. Levering - Pure Land Practices.txt

  Mumonkan
    The Gateless Gate
    NL - Mumonkan - The Gateless Gate (trans. Eiichi Shimomisse).txt
    ZEN - Ishii Shudo - The Wu-men kuan (J. Mumonkan) The Formation, Propagation, and Characteristics of a Classic Zen Koan Text (trans. Albert Welter).txt
    ZEN - MUMONKAN - Gateless Gate.txt
    ZEN - Mumonkan_-_The_Gateless_Gate (trans. Eiichi Shimomisse).txt
    ZEN - R. H. Blyth - MUMONKAN The Zen Masterpiece.txt
    ZEN - Zenkei Shibayama - Rinzai Zen Zen Comments on the Mumonkan.txt

  Nakamura Hajime
    NL - Nakamura Hajime - Chan.txt
    NL - Nakamura Hajime - INTUITIVE AWARENESS ISSUES IN EARLY MYSTICISM.txt
    NL - Nakamura Hajime - THE GOAL OF MEDITATION.txt

  Nichiren

  Nozawa Boncho

  Red Pine
    Cold Mountain
    The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma
    NL - Red Pine - Diamond Sutra.txt
    NL - Red Pine - Diamond-Sutra.txt
    NL - Red Pine, John Blofeld - The Collected Songs of Cold Mountain (Han Shan) Copper Canyon Press (2000).txt
    NL - Red Pine, John Blofeld - The Collected Songs of Cold Mountain (Han Shan) -Copper Canyon Press (2000).txt
    NL - Red Pine - Tao Te Ching By Lao zi-Mercury House (1996).txt
    NL - Red Pine - The Heart Sutra Counterpoint (2005).txt
    NL - Red Pine - The Heart Sutra-Counterpoint (2005).txt
    NL - Red Pine - The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma North Point Press (1987).txt
    NL - Red Pine - The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma-North Point Press (1987).txt

  Saigyo

  Saisei Muro

  Santoka Taneda

  Shunryu Suzuki
    Zen Mind, Beginners Mind
    Branching Streams flow in the darkness
    NL - Shunryu Suzuki - Branching Streams flow in the darkness.txt
    NL - Shunryu Suzuki - Branching-Streams-flow-in-the-darkness.txt
    NL - Shunryu Suzuki - Branching streams flow in the darkness, Zen talks on the Sandokai.txt
    NL - Shunryu Suzuki - Not Always So.txt
    NL - Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginners Mind.txt
    NL - Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind.txt

  Steven Heine
    NL - Steven Heine - Dogen and the Koan Tradition A Tale of Two Shobogenzo Texts .txt
    NL - Steven Heine - Soto Zen and THe Inari Cult.txt
    NL - Steven Heine - ZEN MASTERS.txt
    ZEN - Steven Heine - A Critical Survey of Works on Zen since Yampolsky.txt
    ZEN - Steven Heine - Did-Dogen-Go-to-China.txt
    ZEN - Steven Heine - Introduction Canon and Canonicity in the History of the Zen Literary Tradition.txt
    ZEN - Steven Heine - Ishii Shds Contri butions to Dgen Studies Examining Chinese Influences on the Kana a.txt
    ZEN - Steven HEINE - The Dgen Canon Dgens Pre-Shbgenz Writings and the Question of Change in His Later Works.txt
    ZEN - Steven Heine - Unintended Baggage? Rethinking Yuanwu Keqins View of the Role of Language in Chan Gongan Discourse.txt
    ZEN - STEVEN HEINE - Visions, Divisions, Revisions The Encounter between Iconoclasm and Supernaturalism in Koan Cases about Mount Wu-t'ai.txt

  Taigu Ryokan
    NL - Taigu Ryokan - a statement on begging for food (trans. Burton Watson).txt
    NL - Taigu Ryokan - Stevens.txt
    NL - Taigu Ryokan - Tanahashi.txt

  Taisen Deshimaru

  Thomas Cleary
    NL - Thomas Cleary - Samurai Wisdom Lessons From Japans Warrior Culture.txt
    NL - Thomas Cleary - Secret of the Golden Flower.txt
    NL - Thomas Cleary - Tao Te Ching.txt
    NL - Thomas Cleary - The Blue Cliff Record.txt
    NL - Thomas Cleary - Understanding Reality by Chang Po tuan.txt
    ZEN - Mus Kokushi - DREAM CONVERSATIONS on Buddhism and Zen (trans. Thomas Cleary).txt

  Wangsong Xingxiu
    The Book of Equanimity

  Wendi Leigh Adamek
    NL - Wendi Leigh Adamek - A Niche of Their Own.txt
    NL - Wendi Leigh Adamek - Revisiting Questions about Female Disciples.txt
    NL - Wendi Leigh Adamek - Robes Purple and Gold Transmission of the Robe in the "Lidai fabao ji" (Record of the Dharma-Jewel through the Ages).txt
    NL - Wendi Leigh Adamek - The Lidai fabao ji (Record of the Dharma-Jewel through the Ages).txt

  Yong Zhi
    ZEN - Yong Zhi - Human Actions Illustrated in Zens Ox-Herding Pictures.txt
    ZEN - Yong Zhi - The Poetic Transmission of Zen Buddhism.txt

  Yuanwu Keqin
    The Blue Cliff Record
    ZEN - Steven Heine - Unintended Baggage? Rethinking Yuanwu Keqins View of the Role of Language in Chan Gongan Discourse.txt




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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [8] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
Han-shan_-_Poems
Masaoka_Shiki
Song_of_Enlightment
Taigen_Dan_Leighton
Zen_Buddhism_-_The_Essential_Books
Zen_Buddhism_-_The_Essential_Books
Zen_Koans
Zen_Masters
Zen_Scriptures
SEE ALSO


AUTH
Bankei
Bodhidharma
Burton_Watson
Cheng_Kuan
Chiao_Jan
Chong_Go
Choshu_Ueda
Daisetsu_Teitaro_Suzuki
Dogen
Ejo
Genpo_Roshi
Gudo_Wafu_Nishijima
Hakuin_Ekaku
Han-shan
Hsuan_Hua
Huang_Po
Huineng
Hung-chih_Cheng-chueh
Hu-Shih
Ikkyu
Ishikara_Rikizan
Jiang_Wu
Jianzhi_Sengcan
John_Daido_Loori
Joshu_Sasaki_Roshi
Jusammi_Chikako
Katsuki_Sekida
Kobayashi_Issa
Kodo_Sawaki
Kosho_Uchiyama
Linji_Yixuan
Masao_Abe
Matsuo_Basho
Michel_Mohr
Miriam_L._Levering
Nakamura_Hajime
Nichiren
Nozawa_Boncho
Red_Pine
Ryuzan
Saigyo
Saisei_Muro
Santoka_Taneda
Shunryu_Suzuki
Steven_Heine
Taigu_Ryokan
Taisen_Deshimaru
Thomas_Cleary
Wangsong_Xingxiu
Wendi_Leigh_Adamek
Wumen_Huikai
Yong_Zhi
Yosa_Buson
Yuanwu_Keqin

BOOKS
A_Study_Of_Dogen_His_Philosophy_and_Religion
Basho_-_Poems
Big_Mind,_Big_Heart
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
Branching_Streams_flow_in_the_darkness
City_of_God
Cold_Mountain
Crow_With_No_Mouth__Ikkyu
Cultivating_the_Empty_Field__The_Silent_Illumination_of_Zen_Master_Hongzhi
Dogen_-_Poems
Education_in_the_New_Age
Enchiridion_text
Evolution_II
Flow_-_The_Psychology_of_Optimal_Experience
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
God_Emptiness_and_the_True_Self
Heart_of_Matter
Infinite_Library
Introduction_Zen_Buddhism
Japanese_Spirituality
Life_without_Death
Manual_of_Zen_Buddhism
Meditation__The_First_and_Last_Freedom
Mixed_Collection
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
Mysticism_Christian_and_Buddhist
Opening_the_Hand_of_Thought__Foundations_of_Zen_Buddhist_Practice
Process_and_Reality
Rice_Eyes_Enlightenment_in_Dogens_Kitchen
Ryokan_-_Poems
Skeletons
Sky_Above
Studies_in_the_Lankavatara
Swampl_and_Flowers__The_Letters_and_Lectures_of_Zen_Master_Ta_Hui
Synergetics_-_Explorations_in_the_Geometry_of_Thinking
The_Blue_Cliff_Records
the_Book
The_Book_of_Equanimity
The_Book_of_Gates
The_Compass_of_Zen
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Comedy
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Future_of_Man
The_Gateless_Gate
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Republic
The_Sweet_Dews_of_Chan_Zen
The_Three_Pillars_of_Zen
The_Training_of_the_Zen_Buddhist_Monk
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Yoga_Sutras
The_Zen_Koan_as_a_means_of_Attaining_Enlightenment
The_Zen_Teaching_of_Bodhidharma
This_is_It_&_Other_Essays_on_Zen_&_Spiritual_Experience
Toward_the_Future
Treasury_of_the_True_Dharma_Eye__Zen_Master_Dogens_Shobo_Genzo
Unborn__The_Life_and_Teachings_of_Zen_Master_Bankei
Unfathomable_Depths__Drawing_Wisdom_for_Today_from_a_Classical_Zen_Poem
Wild_Ivy__A_Spiritual_Autobiography_of_Zen_Master_Hakuin
Zen_Letters__Teachings_of_Yuanwu
Zen_Mind,_Beginners_Mind
Zenrin-Kushu

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1.02_-_To_Zen_Monks_Kin_and_Koku
1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle__Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina__Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora__Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli
1.dz_-_A_Zen_monk_asked_for_a_verse_-
1.dz_-_Zazen
1.hcyc_-_19_-_Walking_is_Zen,_sitting_is_Zen_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_4_-_Once_we_awaken_to_the_Tathagata-Zen_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.he_-_Hakuins_Song_of_Zazen
1.he_-_The_Form_of_the_Formless_(from_Hakuins_Song_of_Zazen)

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.bd_-_A_deluded_Mind
1.bd_-_Endless_Ages
1.bd_-_The_Greatest_Gift
1.bd_-_You_may_enter
1.dz_-_A_Zen_monk_asked_for_a_verse_-
1.dz_-_Ching-chings_raindrop_sound
1.dz_-_Coming_or_Going
1.dz_-_Enlightenment_is_like_the_moon
1.dz_-_Impermanence
1.dz_-_In_the_stream
1.dz_-_I_wont_even_stop
1.dz_-_Joyful_in_this_mountain_retreat
1.dz_-_Like_tangled_hair
1.dz_-_One_of_fifteen_verses_on_Dogens_mountain_retreat
1.dz_-_One_of_six_verses_composed_in_Anyoin_Temple_in_Fukakusa,_1230
1.dz_-_On_Non-Dependence_of_Mind
1.dz_-_The_track_of_the_swan_through_the_sky
1.dz_-_The_Western_Patriarchs_doctrine_is_transplanted!
1.dz_-_The_whirlwind_of_birth_and_death
1.dz_-_Treading_along_in_this_dreamlike,_illusory_realm
1.dz_-_True_person_manifest_throughout_the_ten_quarters_of_the_world
1.dz_-_Viewing_Peach_Blossoms_and_Realizing_the_Way
1.dz_-_Wonderous_nirvana-mind
1.dz_-_Worship
1.dz_-_Zazen
1.hs_-_Heres_A_Message_for_the_Faithful
1.hs_-_I_settled_at_Cold_Mountain_long_ago,
1.hs_-_The_Road_To_Cold_Mountain
1.mb_-_a_bee
1.mb_-_a_caterpillar
1.mb_-_a_cicada_shell
1.mb_-_a_cold_rain_starting
1.mb_-_a_field_of_cotton
1.mb_-_all_the_day_long
1.mb_-_a_monk_sips_morning_tea
1.mb_-_a_snowy_morning
1.mb_-_as_they_begin_to_rise_again
1.mb_-_a_strange_flower
1.mb_-_autumn_moonlight
1.mb_-_awake_at_night
1.mb_-_Bitter-tasting_ice_-
1.mb_-_blowing_stones
1.mb_-_by_the_old_temple
1.mb_-_cold_night_-_the_wild_duck
1.mb_-_Collection_of_Six_Haiku
1.mb_-_coolness_of_the_melons
1.mb_-_dont_imitate_me
1.mb_-_first_day_of_spring
1.mb_-_first_snow
1.mb_-_Fleas,_lice
1.mb_-_four_haiku
1.mb_-_from_time_to_time
1.mb_-_heat_waves_shimmering
1.mb_-_how_admirable
1.mb_-_how_wild_the_sea_is
1.mb_-_im_a_wanderer
1.mb_-_In_this_world_of_ours,
1.mb_-_it_is_with_awe
1.mb_-_long_conversations
1.mb_-_midfield
1.mb_-_moonlight_slanting
1.mb_-_morning_and_evening
1.mb_-_None_is_travelling
1.mb_-_now_the_swinging_bridge
1.mb_-_old_pond
1.mb_-_on_buddhas_deathbed
1.mb_-_on_the_white_poppy
1.mb_-_on_this_road
1.mb_-_passing_through_the_world
1.mb_-_souls_festival
1.mb_-_spring_rain
1.mb_-_staying_at_an_inn
1.mb_-_stillness
1.mb_-_taking_a_nap
1.mb_-_temple_bells_die_out
1.mb_-_the_butterfly
1.mb_-_the_clouds_come_and_go
1.mb_-_the_morning_glory_also
1.mb_-_The_Narrow_Road_to_the_Deep_North_-_Prologue
1.mb_-_the_oak_tree
1.mb_-_the_passing_spring
1.mb_-_the_petals_tremble
1.mb_-_the_squid_sellers_call
1.mb_-_the_winter_storm
1.mb_-_this_old_village
1.mb_-_under_my_tree-roof
1.mb_-_ungraciously
1.mb_-_what_fish_feel
1.mb_-_when_the_winter_chysanthemums_go
1.mb_-_winter_garden
1.mb_-_with_every_gust_of_wind
1.mb_-_wont_you_come_and_see
1.mb_-_wrapping_the_rice_cakes
1.mb_-_you_make_the_fire
1.tr_-_At_Dusk
1.tr_-_At_Master_Do's_Country_House
1.tr_-_Begging
1.tr_-_Blending_With_The_Wind
1.tr_-_Down_In_The_Village
1.tr_-_Dreams
1.tr_-_First_Days_Of_Spring_-_The_sky
1.tr_-_For_Children_Killed_In_A_Smallpox_Epidemic
1.tr_-_Have_You_Forgotten_Me
1.tr_-_How_Can_I_Possibly_Sleep
1.tr_-_In_A_Dilapidated_Three-Room_Hut
1.tr_-_In_My_Youth_I_Put_Aside_My_Studies
1.tr_-_In_The_Morning
1.tr_-_I_Watch_People_In_The_World
1.tr_-_Like_The_Little_Stream
1.tr_-_Midsummer
1.tr_-_My_Cracked_Wooden_Bowl
1.tr_-_My_legacy
1.tr_-_No_Luck_Today_On_My_Mendicant_Rounds
1.tr_-_No_Mind
1.tr_-_Orchid
1.tr_-_Reply_To_A_Friend
1.tr_-_Returning_To_My_Native_Village
1.tr_-_Rise_Above
1.tr_-_Slopes_Of_Mount_Kugami
1.tr_-_Stretched_Out
1.tr_-_Teishin
1.tr_-_The_Lotus
1.tr_-_The_Plants_And_Flowers
1.tr_-_The_Thief_Left_It_Behind
1.tr_-_The_Way_Of_The_Holy_Fool
1.tr_-_The_Wind_Has_Settled
1.tr_-_The_Winds_Have_Died
1.tr_-_This_World
1.tr_-_Though_Frosts_come_down
1.tr_-_Three_Thousand_Worlds
1.tr_-_To_Kindle_A_Fire
1.tr_-_To_My_Teacher
1.tr_-_Too_Lazy_To_Be_Ambitious
1.tr_-_When_All_Thoughts
1.tr_-_When_I_Was_A_Lad
1.tr_-_White_Hair
1.tr_-_Wild_Roses
1.tr_-_Yes,_Im_Truly_A_Dunce
1.tr_-_You_Do_Not_Need_Many_Things
1.tr_-_You_Stop_To_Point_At_The_Moon_In_The_Sky
1.wh_-_Moon_and_clouds_are_the_same
1.wh_-_One_instant_is_eternity
1.wh_-_Ten_thousand_flowers_in_spring,_the_moon_in_autumn
1.wh_-_The_Great_Way_has_no_gate

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.01_-_Letters_from_the_Mother_to_Her_Son
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
0_1960-10-11
0_1960-10-25
0_1961-01-22
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-08-18
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-03-11
0_1963-02-23
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-02-26
0_1964-08-05
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-10-14
0_1965-04-07
0_1965-07-10
0_1965-07-24
0_1965-08-07
0_1965-09-15b
0_1965-09-25
0_1965-11-03
0_1965-11-27
0_1967-05-03
0_1967-10-04
0_1967-12-30
0_1968-02-07
0_1968-10-26
0_1968-11-09
0_1969-04-09
0_1969-07-30
0_1969-08-09
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-10-11
0_1969-12-24
0_1970-03-07
0_1970-03-14
0_1970-03-28
0_1970-04-15
0_1970-06-03
0_1970-10-21
0_1970-10-31
0_1971-01-30
0_1971-12-11
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-26
0_1972-09-06
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.09_-_Sectarianism_or_Loyalty
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
04.01_-_The_Divine_Man
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.45_-_To_the_Heights-XLV
05.18_-_Man_to_be_Surpassed
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
08.02_-_Order_and_Discipline
100.00_-_Synergy
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Path_of_Later_On
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
10.24_-_Savitri
1.02_-_BEFORE_THE_CITY-GATE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Outline_of_Practice
1.02_-_Substance_Is_Eternal
1.02_-_The_Great_Process
1.02_-_The_Pit
1.02_-_THE_QUATERNIO_AND_THE_MEDIATING_ROLE_OF_MERCURIUS
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_To_Zen_Monks_Kin_and_Koku
1.02_-_What_is_Psycho_therapy?
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
10.33_-_On_Discipline
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_HOW_THE_.TRUE_WORLD._ULTIMATELY_BECAME_A_FABLE
1.04_-_Narayana_appearance,_in_the_beginning_of_the_Kalpa,_as_the_Varaha_(boar)
1.04_-_Sounds
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_First_Circle,_Limbo__Virtuous_Pagans_and_the_Unbaptized._The_Four_Poets,_Homer,_Horace,_Ovid,_and_Lucan._The_Noble_Castle_of_Philosophy.
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_To_the_Priest_of_Rytan-ji
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Five_Dreams
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Third_Circle__The_Gluttonous._Cerberus._The_Eternal_Rain._Ciacco._Florence.
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_Phlegyas._Philippo_Argenti._The_Gate_of_the_City_of_Dis.
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.098_-_The_Transformation_from_Human_to_Divine
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Stead_and_Maskelyne
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_A_STREET
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.13_-_A_Dream
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_The_Wood_of_Thorns._The_Harpies._The_Violent_against_themselves._Suicides._Pier_della_Vigna._Lano_and_Jacopo_da_Sant'_Andrea.
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Victory_Over_Death
1.15_-_Index
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_The_Value_of_Philosophy
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.19_-_NIGHT
1.19_-_The_Curve_of_the_Rational_Age
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.21_-_My_Theory_of_Astrology
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Fifth_Bolgia__Peculators._The_Elder_of_Santa_Zita._Malacoda_and_other_Devils.
1.22_-_How_to_Learn_the_Practice_of_Astrology
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_On_meekness,_simplicity,_guilelessness_which_come_not_from_nature_but_from_habit,_and_about_malice.
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.26_-_Continues_the_description_of_a_method_for_recollecting_the_thoughts._Describes_means_of_doing_this._This_chapter_is_very_profitable_for_those_who_are_beginning_prayer.
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_The_Eighth_Bolgia__Evil_Counsellors._Ulysses_and_Diomed._Ulysses'_Last_Voyage.
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle__Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina__Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora__Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli
1.33_-_Count_Ugolino_and_the_Archbishop_Ruggieri._The_Death_of_Count_Ugolino's_Sons.
1.34_-_Fourth_Division_of_the_Ninth_Circle,_the_Judecca__Traitors_to_their_Lords_and_Benefactors._Lucifer,_Judas_Iscariot,_Brutus,_and_Cassius._The_Chasm_of_Lethe._The_Ascent.
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.3.5.02_-_Man_and_the_Supermind
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.45_-_Unserious_Conduct_of_a_Pupil
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Reincarnation
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Family_-_Public_Enemy_No._1
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.60_-_Between_Heaven_and_Earth
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.64_-_The_Burning_of_Human_Beings_in_the_Fires
1.66_-_Vampires
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.71_-_Morality_2
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.83_-_Epistola_Ultima
19.24_-_The_Canto_of_Desire
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-05-19_-_Mind_and_its_workings,_thought-forms_-_Adverse_conditions_and_Yoga_-_Mental_constructions_-_Illness_and_Yoga
1929-06-09_-_Nature_of_religion_-_Religion_and_the_spiritual_life_-_Descent_of_Divine_Truth_and_Force_-_To_be_sure_of_your_religion,_country,_family-choose_your_own_-_Religion_and_numbers
1951-03-10_-_Fairy_Tales-_serpent_guarding_treasure_-_Vital_beings-_their_incarnations_-_The_vital_being_after_death_-_Nightmares-_vital_and_mental_-_Mind_and_vital_after_death_-_The_spirit_of_the_form-_Egyptian_mummies
1951-03-24_-_Descent_of_Divine_Love,_of_Consciousness_-_Earth-_a_symbolic_formation_-_the_Divine_Presence_-_The_psychic_being_and_other_worlds_-_Divine_Love_and_Grace_-_Becoming_consaious_of_Divine_Love_-_Finding_ones_psychic_being_-_Responsibility
1953-05-13
1953-05-20
1953-07-01
1953-08-12
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1956-06-27_-_Birth,_entry_of_soul_into_body_-_Formation_of_the_supramental_world_-_Aspiration_for_progress_-_Bad_thoughts_-_Cerebral_filter_-_Progress_and_resistance
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1958-05-14_-_Intellectual_activity_and_subtle_knowing_-_Understanding_with_the_body
1958-09-24_-_Living_the_truth_-_Words_and_experience
1965_09_25
1969_12_18
1.anon_-_Others_have_told_me
1.bd_-_A_deluded_Mind
1.bd_-_Endless_Ages
1.bd_-_The_Greatest_Gift
1.bd_-_You_may_enter
1.dz_-_A_Zen_monk_asked_for_a_verse_-
1.dz_-_Ching-chings_raindrop_sound
1.dz_-_Coming_or_Going
1.dz_-_Enlightenment_is_like_the_moon
1.dz_-_Impermanence
1.dz_-_In_the_stream
1.dz_-_I_wont_even_stop
1.dz_-_Joyful_in_this_mountain_retreat
1.dz_-_Like_tangled_hair
1.dz_-_One_of_fifteen_verses_on_Dogens_mountain_retreat
1.dz_-_One_of_six_verses_composed_in_Anyoin_Temple_in_Fukakusa,_1230
1.dz_-_On_Non-Dependence_of_Mind
1.dz_-_The_track_of_the_swan_through_the_sky
1.dz_-_The_Western_Patriarchs_doctrine_is_transplanted!
1.dz_-_The_whirlwind_of_birth_and_death
1.dz_-_Treading_along_in_this_dreamlike,_illusory_realm
1.dz_-_True_person_manifest_throughout_the_ten_quarters_of_the_world
1.dz_-_Viewing_Peach_Blossoms_and_Realizing_the_Way
1.dz_-_Wonderous_nirvana-mind
1.dz_-_Worship
1.dz_-_Zazen
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Dagon
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Vault
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_Polaris
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Cats_of_Ulthar
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Evil_Clergyman
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_History_of_the_Necronomicon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Martins_Beach
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Other_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Slaying_of_the_Monster
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Strange_High_House_in_the_Mist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Street
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Terrible_Old_Man
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Genius
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Ode_an_die_Freude
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Invincible_Armada
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fua_-_The_Simurgh
1.hcyc_-_16_-_When_I_consider_the_virtue_of_abusive_words_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_19_-_Walking_is_Zen,_sitting_is_Zen_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_22_-_I_have_entered_the_deep_mountains_to_silence_and_beauty_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_31_-_Holding_truth_and_rejecting_delusion_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_32_-_They_miss_the_Dharma-treasure_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_41_-_People_say_it_is_positive_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_4_-_Once_we_awaken_to_the_Tathagata-Zen_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_56_-_The_hungry_are_served_a_kings_repast_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.he_-_Hakuins_Song_of_Zazen
1.he_-_Past,_present,_future-_unattainable
1.he_-_The_Form_of_the_Formless_(from_Hakuins_Song_of_Zazen)
1.he_-_The_monkey_is_reaching
1.he_-_You_no_sooner_attain_the_great_void
1.hs_-_Heres_A_Message_for_the_Faithful
1.hs_-_I_settled_at_Cold_Mountain_long_ago,
1.hs_-_The_Road_To_Cold_Mountain
1.is_-_A_Fisherman
1.is_-_a_well_nobody_dug_filled_with_no_water
1.is_-_Every_day,_priests_minutely_examine_the_Law
1.is_-_Form_in_Void
1.is_-_I_Hate_Incense
1.is_-_Ikkyu_this_body_isnt_yours_I_say_to_myself
1.is_-_inside_the_koan_clear_mind
1.is_-_Like_vanishing_dew
1.is_-_Many_paths_lead_from_the_foot_of_the_mountain,
1.is_-_only_one_koan_matters
1.is_-_sick_of_it_whatever_its_called_sick_of_the_names
1.is_-_The_vast_flood
1.is_-_To_write_something_and_leave_it_behind_us
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jkhu_-_A_Visit_to_Hattoji_Temple
1.jkhu_-_Gathering_Tea
1.jkhu_-_Living_in_the_Mountains
1.jkhu_-_Rain_in_Autumn
1.jkhu_-_Sitting_in_the_Mountains
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Robin_Hood
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Song_Of_Four_Faries
1.jk_-_Stanzas._In_A_Drear-Nighted_December
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jlb_-_History_Of_The_Night
1.jr_-_Not_Here
1.jr_-_Only_Breath
1.jr_-_The_Ravings_Which_My_Enemy_Uttered_I_Heard_Within_My_Heart
1.jr_-_When_I_Am_Asleep_And_Crumbling_In_The_Tomb
1.jwvg_-_The_Godlike
1.ki_-_Autumn_wind
1.ki_-_Buddha_Law
1.ki_-_Dont_weep,_insects
1.ki_-_First_firefly
1.ki_-_From_burweed
1.ki_-_Just_by_being
1.ki_-_Never_forget
1.ki_-_Reflected
1.ki_-_Where_there_are_humans
1.lovecraft_-_Fact_And_Fancy
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Laeta-_A_Lament
1.lovecraft_-_Psychopompos-_A_Tale_in_Rhyme
1.lovecraft_-_Theodore_Roosevelt
1.mb_-_a_bee
1.mb_-_a_caterpillar
1.mb_-_a_cicada_shell
1.mb_-_a_cold_rain_starting
1.mb_-_a_field_of_cotton
1.mb_-_all_the_day_long
1.mb_-_a_monk_sips_morning_tea
1.mb_-_a_snowy_morning
1.mb_-_as_they_begin_to_rise_again
1.mb_-_a_strange_flower
1.mb_-_autumn_moonlight
1.mb_-_awake_at_night
1.mb_-_Bitter-tasting_ice_-
1.mb_-_blowing_stones
1.mb_-_by_the_old_temple
1.mb_-_cold_night_-_the_wild_duck
1.mb_-_Collection_of_Six_Haiku
1.mb_-_coolness_of_the_melons
1.mb_-_dont_imitate_me
1.mb_-_first_day_of_spring
1.mb_-_first_snow
1.mb_-_Fleas,_lice
1.mb_-_four_haiku
1.mb_-_from_time_to_time
1.mb_-_heat_waves_shimmering
1.mb_-_how_admirable
1.mb_-_how_wild_the_sea_is
1.mb_-_im_a_wanderer
1.mb_-_In_this_world_of_ours,
1.mb_-_it_is_with_awe
1.mb_-_long_conversations
1.mb_-_midfield
1.mb_-_moonlight_slanting
1.mb_-_morning_and_evening
1.mb_-_None_is_travelling
1.mb_-_now_the_swinging_bridge
1.mb_-_old_pond
1.mb_-_on_buddhas_deathbed
1.mb_-_on_the_white_poppy
1.mb_-_on_this_road
1.mb_-_passing_through_the_world
1.mb_-_souls_festival
1.mb_-_spring_rain
1.mb_-_staying_at_an_inn
1.mb_-_stillness
1.mb_-_taking_a_nap
1.mb_-_temple_bells_die_out
1.mb_-_the_butterfly
1.mb_-_the_clouds_come_and_go
1.mb_-_the_morning_glory_also
1.mb_-_The_Narrow_Road_to_the_Deep_North_-_Prologue
1.mb_-_the_oak_tree
1.mb_-_the_passing_spring
1.mb_-_the_petals_tremble
1.mb_-_the_squid_sellers_call
1.mb_-_the_winter_storm
1.mb_-_this_old_village
1.mb_-_under_my_tree-roof
1.mb_-_ungraciously
1.mb_-_what_fish_feel
1.mb_-_when_the_winter_chysanthemums_go
1.mb_-_winter_garden
1.mb_-_with_every_gust_of_wind
1.mb_-_wont_you_come_and_see
1.mb_-_wrapping_the_rice_cakes
1.mb_-_you_make_the_fire
1.msd_-_Barns_burnt_down
1.msd_-_When_bird_passes_on
1.ms_-_Old_Creek
1.ms_-_Snow_Garden
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Archys_Song_From_Charles_The_First_(A_Widow_Bird_Sate_Mourning_For_Her_Love)
1.pbs_-_A_Vision_Of_The_Sea
1.pbs_-_A_Widow_Bird_Sate_Mourning_For_Her_Love
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Dark_Spirit_of_the_Desart_Rude
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Satire_On_Satire
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Hymn_of_Pan
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_Invocation_To_Misery
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_That_time_is_dead_for_ever,_child!
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_The_cold_earth_slept_below
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_Among_The_Euganean_Hills
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_On_Hearing_The_News_Of_The_Death_Of_Napoleon
1.pbs_-_Love-_Hope,_Desire,_And_Fear
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Ode_to_the_West_Wind
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_The_Medusa_Of_Leonardo_da_Vinci_In_The_Florentine_Gallery
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_II.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IV.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VIII.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Song._Hope
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Pine_Forest_Of_The_Cascine_Near_Pisa
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Sensitive_Plant
1.pbs_-_The_Tower_Of_Famine
1.pbs_-_The_Two_Spirits_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_The_Zucca
1.pbs_-_To_Harriet_--_It_Is_Not_Blasphemy_To_Hope_That_Heaven
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Invitation
1.pc_-_Autumns_Cold
1.pc_-_Lute
1.pc_-_Staying_at_Bamboo_Lodge
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_2
1.poe_-_Elizabeth
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_The_Bells
1.rb_-_A_Light_Woman
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_Bishop_Orders_His_Tomb_at_Saint_Praxed's_Church,_Rome,_The
1.rb_-_By_The_Fire-Side
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_Holy-Cross_Day
1.rb_-_Love_Among_The_Ruins
1.rb_-_Nationality_In_Drinks
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_III_-_Evening
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_I_-_Morning
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Englishman_In_Italy
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_The_Glove
1.rb_-_The_Laboratory-Ancien_Rgime
1.rb_-_The_Pied_Piper_Of_Hamelin
1.rmr_-_Black_Cat_(Schwarze_Katze)
1.rmr_-_Elegy_X
1.rt_-_Urvashi
1.rwe_-_Blight
1.rwe_-_Good-bye
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Merlin_I
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_Rubies
1.rwe_-_Song_of_Nature
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.ryz_-_Clear_in_the_blue,_the_moon!
1.sca_-_Happy,_indeed,_is_she_whom_it_is_given_to_share_this_sacred_banquet
1.ss_-_Its_something_no_on_can_force
1.ss_-_Most_of_the_time_I_smile
1.ss_-_Outside_the_door_I_made_but_dont_close
1.ss_-_Paper_windows_bamboo_walls_hedge_of_hibiscus
1.ss_-_This_bodys_lifetime_is_like_a_bubbles
1.ss_-_To_glorify_the_Way_what_should_people_turn_to
1.ss_-_Trying_to_become_a_Buddha_is_easy
1.tr_-_At_Dusk
1.tr_-_At_Master_Do's_Country_House
1.tr_-_Begging
1.tr_-_Blending_With_The_Wind
1.tr_-_Down_In_The_Village
1.tr_-_Dreams
1.tr_-_First_Days_Of_Spring_-_The_sky
1.tr_-_For_Children_Killed_In_A_Smallpox_Epidemic
1.tr_-_Have_You_Forgotten_Me
1.tr_-_How_Can_I_Possibly_Sleep
1.tr_-_In_A_Dilapidated_Three-Room_Hut
1.tr_-_In_My_Youth_I_Put_Aside_My_Studies
1.tr_-_In_The_Morning
1.tr_-_I_Watch_People_In_The_World
1.tr_-_Like_The_Little_Stream
1.tr_-_Midsummer
1.tr_-_My_Cracked_Wooden_Bowl
1.tr_-_My_legacy
1.tr_-_No_Luck_Today_On_My_Mendicant_Rounds
1.tr_-_No_Mind
1.tr_-_Orchid
1.tr_-_Reply_To_A_Friend
1.tr_-_Returning_To_My_Native_Village
1.tr_-_Rise_Above
1.tr_-_Slopes_Of_Mount_Kugami
1.tr_-_Stretched_Out
1.tr_-_Teishin
1.tr_-_The_Lotus
1.tr_-_The_Plants_And_Flowers
1.tr_-_The_Thief_Left_It_Behind
1.tr_-_The_Way_Of_The_Holy_Fool
1.tr_-_The_Wind_Has_Settled
1.tr_-_The_Winds_Have_Died
1.tr_-_This_World
1.tr_-_Though_Frosts_come_down
1.tr_-_Three_Thousand_Worlds
1.tr_-_To_Kindle_A_Fire
1.tr_-_To_My_Teacher
1.tr_-_Too_Lazy_To_Be_Ambitious
1.tr_-_When_All_Thoughts
1.tr_-_When_I_Was_A_Lad
1.tr_-_White_Hair
1.tr_-_Wild_Roses
1.tr_-_Yes,_Im_Truly_A_Dunce
1.tr_-_You_Do_Not_Need_Many_Things
1.tr_-_You_Stop_To_Point_At_The_Moon_In_The_Sky
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_Anashuya_And_Vijaya
1.wby_-_Baile_And_Aillinn
1.wby_-_Coole_Park_1929
1.wby_-_Cuchulains_Fight_With_The_Sea
1.wby_-_Easter_1916
1.wby_-_Meditations_In_Time_Of_Civil_War
1.wby_-_The_Gift_Of_Harun_Al-Rashid
1.wby_-_The_Living_Beauty
1.wby_-_The_Madness_Of_King_Goll
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_I
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_II
1.wby_-_To_A_Friend_Whose_Work_Has_Come_To_Nothing
1.wby_-_Who_Goes_With_Fergus?
1.whitman_-_A_Boston_Ballad
1.whitman_-_Faces
1.whitman_-_Manhattan_Streets_I_Saunterd,_Pondering
1.whitman_-_Respondez!
1.whitman_-_Salut_Au_Monde
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_The_Great_City
1.whitman_-_To_Think_Of_Time
1.whitman_-_Washingtons_Monument,_February,_1885
1.wh_-_Moon_and_clouds_are_the_same
1.wh_-_One_instant_is_eternity
1.wh_-_Ten_thousand_flowers_in_spring,_the_moon_in_autumn
1.wh_-_The_Great_Way_has_no_gate
1.ww_-_Address_To_Kilchurn_Castle,_Upon_Loch_Awe
1.ww_-_An_Evening_Walk
1.ww_-_A_Whirl-Blast_From_Behind_The_Hill
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Composed_Near_Calais,_On_The_Road_Leading_To_Ardres,_August_7,_1802
1.ww_-_Extempore_Effusion_upon_the_Death_of_James_Hogg
1.ww_-_Ode
1.ww_-_Song_Of_The_Wandering_Jew
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Passing_of_the_Elder_Bards
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_To_A_Butterfly_(2)
1.yb_-_Clinging_to_the_bell
1.yb_-_In_a_bitter_wind
1.yb_-_Miles_of_frost
1.yb_-_Mountains_of_Yoshino
1.yb_-_Short_nap
1.yb_-_The_late_evening_crow
1.yb_-_This_cold_winter_night
1.ym_-_Gone_Again_to_Gaze_on_the_Cascade
1.ym_-_Just_Done
1.ym_-_Mad_Words
1.ym_-_Nearing_Hao-pa
1.ym_-_Pu-to_Temple
1.ym_-_Wrapped,_surrounded_by_ten_thousand_mountains
2.00_-_BIBLIOGRAPHY
2.01_-_On_Books
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_The_Tale_of_the_Vampires_Kingdom
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
21.01_-_The_Mother_The_Nature_of_Her_Work
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.17_-_December_1938
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.2.1.01_-_The_World's_Greatest_Poets
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
3.02_-_The_Formulae_of_the_Elemental_Weapons
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Physical_World_and_its_Connection_with_the_Soul_and_Spirit-Lands
3.06_-_Thought-Forms_and_the_Human_Aura
3.07_-_ON_PASSING_BY
3.08_-_Of_Equilibrium
3.1.02_-_A_Theory_of_the_Human_Being
3.10_-_The_New_Birth
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.12_-_Pondicherry_Cyclone
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
3.5.04_-_Justice
3-5_Full_Circle
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.02_-_The_Integral_Perfection
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.05_-_The_Passion_Of_Love
4.07_-_THE_UGLIEST_MAN
4.08_-_THE_VOLUNTARY_BEGGAR
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.2_-_Karma
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
6.03_-_Extraordinary_And_Paradoxical_Telluric_Phenomena
6.04_-_The_Plague_Athens
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.02_-_Courage
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.06_-_The_Simple_Life
7.09_-_Right_Judgement
7.10_-_Order
7.13_-_The_Conquest_of_Knowledge
7.15_-_The_Family
Aeneid
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
Avatars_of_the_Tortoise
Big_Mind_(non-dual)
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
CASE_1_-_JOSHUS_DOG
CASE_2_-_HYAKUJOS_FOX
CASE_3_-_GUTEIS_FINGER
CASE_4_-_WAKUANS_WHY_NO_BEARD?
CASE_5_-_KYOGENS_MAN_HANGING_IN_THE_TREE
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
Cratylus
Diamond_Sutra_1
DS4
Emma_Zunz
ENNEAD_01.02_-_Of_Virtues.
ENNEAD_02.07_-_About_Mixture_to_the_Point_of_Total_Penetration.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_Is_Everywhere_Present_As_a_Whole.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Jaap_Sahib_Text_(Guru_Gobind_Singh)
Kafka_and_His_Precursors
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.04_-_LIBERATION
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Meno
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Tablet_1_-
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Circular_Ruins
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Ephesians
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Gold_Bug
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Pythagorean_Sentences_of_Demophilus
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Waiting
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

canon
list
proverb
reading_list
subject
SIMILAR TITLES
Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
Cultivating the Empty Field The Silent Illumination of Zen Master Hongzhi
Introduction Zen Buddhism
Manual of Zen Buddhism
Opening the Hand of Thought Foundations of Zen Buddhist Practice
Swampl and Flowers The Letters and Lectures of Zen Master Ta Hui
The Compass of Zen
The Sweet Dews of Chan Zen
The Three Pillars of Zen
The Training of the Zen Buddhist Monk
The Zen Koan as a means of Attaining Enlightenment
The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma
This is It & Other Essays on Zen & Spiritual Experience
Treasury of the True Dharma Eye Zen Master Dogens Shobo Genzo
Unborn The Life and Teachings of Zen Master Bankei
Unfathomable Depths Drawing Wisdom for Today from a Classical Zen Poem
Wild Ivy A Spiritual Autobiography of Zen Master Hakuin
Zen
Zen Buddhism - The Essential Books
Zen Koans
Zen Letters Teachings of Yuanwu
Zen Masters
Zen Mind, Beginners Mind
Zen Proverb
Zenrin-Kushu
Zen Scriptures

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Zen ::: A school of Buddhism which emphasizes direct experiential insight into the nature of reality: the non-dual state of awareness, and living one's life in accordance with this realization. On this site we will also refer to Zen techniques as a way of shifting awareness to the non-dual through polar elimination of archetypes and forceful deconstruction of the momentary self.

Zen Buddhism ::: A fusion of Mahayana Buddhism and Taoism, practiced chiefly in China and Japan. It places great importance on moment-by-moment awareness and 'seeing deeply into the nature of things' by direct experience. The name derives from the Sanskrit word dhyana referring to a particular meditative state.

Zen Buddhism: The Japanese “mediation school” of Buddhism, based on the theories of the “universality of Buddha-nature” and the possibility of “becoming a Buddha in this very body.” It teaches the way of attaining Buddhahood fundamentally by meditation.

Zend also means “The ‘rendering of the esoteric into exoteric sentences,’ the veil used to conceal the correct meaning of the Zen-(d)-zar texts, the sacerdotal language in use among the initiates of archaic India. Found now in several undecipherable inscriptions, it is still used and studied unto this day in the secret communities of the Eastern adepts, and called by them — according to the locality — Zend-zar and Brahma- or Deva-Bhashya” (BCW 4:517-8n). See also ZEND-AVESTA; AVESTA; SENZAR

Zendavesta: (from Middle Persian Zend u Avista, "commentary and text") The Commentary, still used today as sacred scripture among the Parsis (see Zoroastrianism), on the basic text which was composed by the followers of Zarathustra (q.v.), but had become unintelligible due to its archaic nature. -- K.F.L.

Zend-Avesta (Pahlavi) [from Old Persian zend commentary, interpretation + aba-ta the law] The writings of the religion of the Parsis, still used by them as the basis of their faith. The Parsis themselves call this collection of documents the Avesta; Zend was principally used by the Parsis to denote the Pahlavi translations and commentaries on the Avesta.

Zend; Zend-Avesta. See: Avesta.

Zendo 善導. See SHANDAO

Zend, Zand (Pahlavi) Zantay (Avestan) [from the verbal root zan cognition, knowledge cf Old Persian dan] Commentary, interpretation, explanation; in the Occident, Zend refers to a language in which the Avesta is written, but modern Parsi scholars and older Pahlavi books speak of the language and writing as Avesta. Blavatsky links Zend with Zensar or Senzar, the mystery-language of the initiates.

Zen'eji 善慧地. See SĀDHUMATĪ

Zen'e 善慧. See SUMEDHA

Zengen shosenshu tojo 禪源諸詮集都序. See CHANYUAN ZHUQUANJI DUXU

Zengetsu Kankyu 禪月貫休. See CHANYUE GUANXIU

Zengetsu shu 禪月集. See CHANYUE JI

Zengshangxin jing 增上心經. See VITAKKASAntHĀNASUTTA

Zengyi ahan jing 增壹阿含經. See EKOTTARĀGAMA, AnGUTTARANIKĀYA

Zenith One of six cardinal points, the others being the four points of the compass and the nadir; these are symbolized by the number six and by the svastika. They are not fixed points, but directions relative to a central point which represents the observer.

Zenith: The point opposite to the nadir; the point directly overhead, through which the prime vertical and meridian circles pass.

Zenkan sakushin 禪關策進. See CHANGUAN CEJIN

Zen [Kehoe, B., "Zen and the Art of the Internet", February 1992.] [{Jargon File}]

Zenke kikan 禪家龜鑑. See SoNGA KWIGAM

Zenkenritsubibasha 善見律毘婆沙. See SAMANTAPĀSĀDIKĀ

Zenken 禪賢. See ZHIKONG CHANXIAN

Zenkoji

Zenkoji. (善光寺). In Japanese, "Monastery of the Radiance of Goodness"; located in modern-day Nagano. According to the Zenkoji engi, the monastery was built at the beginning of the seventh century by a certain Honda Yoshimitsu to enshrine a famous Amida (AMITĀBHA) triad. In the ancient Indian kingdom of VAIsĀLĪ, a merchant by the name of Somachattra is said to have warded off epidemic demons and cured his daughter by invoking the name of the buddha Amitābha ten times. Somachattra was so moved by the appearance of Amitābha and his two attendants AVALOKITEsVARA and MAHĀSTHĀMAPRĀPTA in the sky that he asked the Buddha for an icon to be made in their likeness. The triad was then forged with special gold from the dragon king's palace and worshipped as a living manifestation of Amitābha and his attendants. Somachattra was later reborn as King Song (r. 523-553) of the Korean kingdom of Paekche. The triad first traveled to Paekche to aid King Song, after which it was taken to Japan. Honda Yoshimitsu is said to have discovered the triad in the Naniwa Canal and enshrined it in his house, which was later transformed into a magnificent buddha hall by Empress Kogyoku (r. 642-645). With support from the Hojo bakufu, a Zenkoji cult proliferated especially during the Kamakura period and onwards, and numerous replicas of the "original" (Shinano) Zenkoji triad were made and enshrined in Shin ("New") Zenkoji temples. For centuries, the (Shinano) Zenkoji in Nagano remained under the control of another powerful TENDAISHu monastery known as MIIDERA. Zenkoji was devastated by fire in 1179, but legendary accounts testify to the miraculous escape of the "original" triad, which now remains as a secret buddha (HIBUTSU) image largely unavailable for public viewing. After the Japanese monk IPPEN's visit to Zenkoji, several Shin Zenkoji temples also came to be associated with his tradition, the JISHu.

Zenmon kishiki 禪門規式. See CHANMEN GUISHI

Zenmon satsuyo 禪門撮要. See SoNMUN CH'WARYO

Zenmui 善無畏. See sUBHAKARASIMHA

Zennyakyo 善夜經. See BHADRAKĀRĀTRĪ

Zen'on shingi 禪苑清規. See CHANYUAN QINGGUI

Zeno of Elea: (about 490-430 B.C.) Disciple of Parmenides, defended the doctrine of his master that only changeless "Being" is real by indirect proofs exposing the logical absurdities involved in the opposite view, namely that plurality and change are real. Zeno's famous arguments against the possibility of motion were intended as proofs that motion was full of contradictions and that it could not therefore serve as a principle for the explanation of all phenomena, as the atomists, Heraclitus, Empedocles and others had taught. -- M.F.

Zeno the Stoic: (c. 340-265 B.C.) A native of Cyprus and the founder of the Stoic School in Athens. His philosophy was built on the principle that reality is a rational order in which nature is controlled by laws of Reason, interpreted in the vein of pantheism. Men's lives are guided by Providence against which it is futile to resist and to which wise men willingly submit. -- R.B.W.

Zenpiyohokyo 禪秘要法經. See CHAN MIYAOFA JING

Zenrai 善來. See SĀGATA

Zenrin hokun 禪林寶訓. See CHANLIN BAOXUN

Zenrin kushu

Zenrin kushu. (禪林句集). In Japanese, "Phrase Collection of the ZEN Grove"; a lengthy collection of more than four thousand Zen phrases-specifically capping phrases (JAKUGO) or appended phrases (AGYO)-culled from Buddhist SuTRAs, discourse records (YULU), koan collections (see C. GONG'AN), and various Chinese belletristic classics. The collection was edited by a certain Ijushi in 1688. Ijushi's collection is based on a shorter phrase book entitled the Kuzoshi, compiled by the Zen master Toyo Eicho (1428-1504) of the MYoSHINJI lineage of the RINZAISHu. Beginning with single-character phrases, the Zen phrases in the Zenrin kushu are sequentially organized according to their number of Sinographs. The Zenrin kushu is one of the most commonly used collections in Japanese koan training today.

Zenrin shokisen

Zenrin shokisen. (禪林象器箋). In Japanese, "A Composition on the Images and Utensils of the Zen Grove"; compiled by the ZEN historian MUJAKU DoCHu in the RINZAISHu; a comprehensive catalogue of regulations, events, utensils, and accoutrements used by the Zen (C. CHAN) tradition. The preface was prepared by Mujaku in 1741. More than just a simple catalogue, Mujaku's Zenrin shokisen also meticulously notes the possible origin and history of each catalogued item and also expounds upon the significance of its implementation during his day, making it an invaluable tool for the study of Zen in practice. His research is based on an exhaustive list of sources (a total of 488 selections) beginning with sutras and commentaries to Chinese and Japanese classics, lamplight histories (see CHUANDENG LU), and poetry. A handwritten copy of the text is currently housed at MYoSHINJI in Kyoto.

Zenrin soboden 禪林僧寶傳. See CHANLIN SENGBAO ZHUAN

Zensai 善. See SUVARsAKA

Zenshogakusen 前正覺山. See PRĀGBODHI(GIRI)

Zenshokyo 善生經. See SIGĀLOVĀDASUTTA

Zensho 善星. See SUNAKsATRA

Zenshu. (J) (禪宗). In Japanese, the school, lineage, or tradition of CHAN. See ZEN.

Zenshu

Zenshu Yoka shu 禪宗永嘉集. See CHANZONG YONGJIA JI

Zen

Zentralstelle für Jüdische Auswanderung ::: "Central Office for Jewish Emigration"—Set up in Vienna on August 26, 1938, under Adolf Eichmann.

Zen'yo 禪要. See CHANYAO, GAOFENG HESHANG CHANYAO

Zenzai 善財. See SUDHANA

Zenzar, Zendzar. See ZEND; SENZAR

Zen. (禪). In Japanese, "Meditation"; the Japanese strand of the broader East Asian CHAN school, which includes Chinese Chan, Korean SoN, and Vietnamese THIỀN. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese term Chan, which in turn is a transcription of the Sanskrit term DHYĀNA, or meditative absorption. More specifically, Zen denotes the Japanese Buddhist traditions that trace their origins back to the Chinese Chan school, or CHAN ZONG. Currently three major traditions in Japan, RINZAISHu, SoToSHu, and oBAKUSHu, refer to themselves as Zen schools, and are thus known collectively as the Zen tradition (J. ZENSHu; C. CHAN ZONG). The Rinzaishu was first transmitted to Japan in the late twelfth century by MYoAN EISAI (1141-1215), who visited China twice and received training and certification in the Chinese LINJI ZONG. By the end of the Kamakura period, some twenty-one different Rinzai lineages had been transmitted to Japan. The Rinzai school came to be associated with the meditative practice of contemplating Zen "cases" (J. koan; C. GONG'AN; see also J. kanna Zen; C. KANHUA CHAN). The foundation of the Sotoshu is attributed to DoGEN KIGEN (1200-1253), who is credited with transmitting the CAODONG ZONG of the Chinese CHAN teacher TIANTONG RUJING (1162-1227). Dogen is said to have taught the technique of "just sitting" (SHIKAN TAZA), through which the mind would become stabilized and concentrated in a state of full clarity and alertness, free from any specific content. During the Tokugawa period, the Soto school developed into one of the largest Buddhist sects in Japan through the mandatory parish system (DANKA SEIDO), in which every household was required to register as a member of a local Buddhist temple. By the middle of the eighteenth century, there were more than 17,500 Soto temples across the country. The obakushu was founded by the émigré Chinese CHAN master YINYUAN LONGXI (J. Ingen Ryuki; 1592-1673), who traveled to Japan in 1654/1655 to escape the succession wars and political turmoil that had accompanied the fall of the Ming dynasty. The obaku school introduced exotic contemporary Chinese customs and monastic practices to the Japanese Zen Buddhism of the time. Although it remained much smaller than the Rinzai and Soto Zen traditions, the presence of the obaku school compelled the monks of its two larger rivals to reevaluate their own practices and to initiate a series of important reform movements within their respective traditions (see IN'IN EKISHI). In the modern era, largely through the efforts of such towering intellectual figures as DAISETZ TEITARO SUZUKI (1870-1966), NISHIDA KITARo (1870-1945), and NISHITANI KEIJI (1900-1991), the term Zen has also come to connote a "pure experience" (junsui keiken) that transcends language and thought, which is sometimes argued to be the unique property of the Japanese people and their culture (cf. KYOTO SCHOOL). The cavalier way in which the term Zen is now deployed in generic Western writings (e.g., the myriad "Zen in the Art of" books) often has little to do with the traditional perspectives of the Zen tradition found in either Japan or the rest of East Asia. As in the case of Chan, in more common parlance, Zen can also denote the particular teaching style of a Zen master and is often expressed as "so-and-so's Zen." See also entries on the SoToSHu, RINZAISHu, and oBAKUSHu and on specific Japanese Zen masters and monasteries.

zenana ::: n. --> The part of a dwelling appropriated to women.

zenbo 禪房/禪坊. See PRAHĀnAsĀLĀ

zenchishiki 善知識. See KALYĀnAMITRA

zend-avesta ::: n. --> The sacred writings of the ancient Persian religion, attributed to Zoroaster, but chiefly of a later date.

zendik ::: n. --> An atheist or unbeliever; -- name given in the East to those charged with disbelief of any revealed religion, or accused of magical heresies.

zend ::: n. --> Properly, the translation and exposition in the Huzv/resh, or literary Pehlevi, language, of the Avesta, the Zoroastrian sacred writings; as commonly used, the language (an ancient Persian dialect) in which the Avesta is written.

zendo

zendo. (禪堂). In Japanese, "meditation hall." See SENGTANG.

zendo 禪堂. See SENGTANG

zenercards ::: Zener Cards These consisted of five designs (now generally described as ESP symbols) being a plus sign, a square, a circle, a set of three wavy lines and a five-pointed star. The symbols were printed in black ink, on cards similar in size to, and resembling, playing cards. Joseph Banks Rhine (1895-1980), Professor of Psychology at Duke University in the USA, used Zener cards (designed in the early 1930s by a colleague, perceptual psychologist Karl Zener) when conducting his experiments.

zengenten 善現天. See SUDṚsA

zengon 善根. See KUsALAMuLA

zengo 漸悟. See JIANWU

zengshangding xue 增上定學. See ADHISAMĀDHIsIKsĀ

zengshangguo 增上果. See ADHIPATIPHALA

zengshanghui xue 增上慧學. See ADHIPRAJNĀsIKsĀ

zengshangjie xue 增上戒學. See ADHIsĪLAsIKsĀ

zengshangman 增上慢. See ADHIMĀNA

zengshang yuan 增上縁. See ADHIPATIPRATYAYA

zengyi 增益. See SAMĀROPA

zengzhang tian 增長天. See VIRudHAKA

zenick ::: n. --> A South African burrowing mammal (Suricata tetradactyla), allied to the civets. It is grayish brown, with yellowish transverse stripes on the back. Called also suricat.

zenik ::: n. --> See Zenick.

zen'i seppo 漸爲法. See ANUPUBBIKATHĀ

zenithal ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the zenith.

zenith ::: n. --> That point in the visible celestial hemisphere which is vertical to the spectator; the point of the heavens directly overhead; -- opposed to nadir.
hence, figuratively, the point of culmination; the greatest height; the height of success or prosperity.


zenith of Heaven with the aeon Sophia beside

zen "jargon" To figure out something by meditation or by a sudden flash of enlightenment. Originally applied to {bugs}, but occasionally applied to problems of life in general. "How'd you figure out the buffer allocation problem?" "Oh, I zenned it." Contrast {grok}, which connotes a time-extended version of zenning a system. Compare {hack mode}. See also {guru}. (1996-09-17)

zen ::: (jargon) To figure out something by meditation or by a sudden flash of enlightenment. Originally applied to bugs, but occasionally applied to problems of life in general. How'd you figure out the buffer allocation problem? Oh, I zenned it.Contrast grok, which connotes a time-extended version of zenning a system. Compare hack mode. See also guru. (1996-09-17)

zenji 禪師. See CHANSHI

zenkenten 善見天. See SUDARsANA

zenmana 染末那. See KLIstAMANAS

zennanshi 善男子. See KULAPUTRA

zennyonin 善女人. See KULADUHITṚ

ZENO ::: U Rochester 1978. Euclid with asynchronous message-passing. Preliminary ZENO Language Description, J.E. Ball et al, SIGPLAN Notices 14(9):17-34 (Sep 1979).

ZENO U Rochester 1978. Euclid with asynchronous message-passing. "Preliminary ZENO Language Description", J.E. Ball et al, SIGPLAN Notices 14(9):17-34 (Sep 1979).

zenrai bisshu 善來苾芻. See EHIBHIKsUKĀ

zenshinshari 全身舍利. See QUANSHEN SHELI

zenshi 禪支. See DHYĀNĀnGA

zenshu/zenshu 漸修. See JIANXIU

zenshu 善趣. See SUGATI

zenzei 善逝. See SUGATA

zen 善. See KUsALA

zen 染. See SAMKLEsA


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. Spirited and original; daring; bold. 2. Fearlessly, often recklessly daring; bold; defiant; insolent; brazen; unrestrained by convention or propriety.

Achilles argument: Zeno of Elea used a reductio ad absurdum argument against the possibility of motion. He urged that if we assume it possible we are led to the absurdity that Achilles, the fastest runner in Greece, could not catch a proverbially slow tortoise. The alleged grounds for this are that during the time, t1 - t2, which it takes Achilles to traverse the distance between his position and that of the tortoise at time t1, the latter even at his slow rate of speed would have moved on a finite distance farther. -- C.A.B.

adopted ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Adopt ::: a. --> Taken by adoption; taken up as one&

adopt ::: v. t. --> To take by choice into relationship, as, child, heir, friend, citizen, etc.; esp. to take voluntarily (a child of other parents) to be in the place of, or as, one&

advantage ::: n. --> Any condition, circumstance, opportunity, or means, particularly favorable to success, or to any desired end; benefit; as, the enemy had the advantage of a more elevated position.
Superiority; mastery; -- with of or over.
Superiority of state, or that which gives it; benefit; gain; profit; as, the advantage of a good constitution.
Interest of money; increase; overplus (as the thirteenth in the baker&


after-sails ::: n. --> The sails on the mizzenmast, or on the stays between the mainmast and mizzenmast.

agrarian ::: a. --> Pertaining to fields, or lands, or their tenure; esp., relating to an equal or equitable division of lands; as, the agrarian laws of Rome, which distributed the conquered and other public lands among citizens.
Wild; -- said of plants growing in the fields. ::: n.


AI koan "humour" /A-I koh'an/ One of a series of pastiches of Zen teaching riddles created by {Danny Hillis} at the {MIT AI Lab} around various major figures of the Lab's culture. See also {ha ha only serious}, {mu}. In reading these, it is at least useful to know that {Marvin Minsky}, {Gerald Sussman}, and Drescher are {AI} researchers of note, that {Tom Knight} was one of the {Lisp machine}'s principal designers, and that {David Moon} wrote much of Lisp Machine Lisp. * * * A novice was trying to fix a broken Lisp machine by turning the power off and on. Knight, seeing what the student was doing, spoke sternly: "You cannot fix a machine by just power-cycling it with no understanding of what is going wrong." Knight turned the machine off and on. The machine worked. * * * One day a student came to Moon and said: "I understand how to make a better garbage collector. We must keep a reference count of the pointers to each cons." Moon patiently told the student the following story:   "One day a student came to Moon and said: `I understand   how to make a better garbage collector... [Pure reference-count garbage collectors have problems with circular structures that point to themselves.] * * * In the days when Sussman was a novice, Minsky once came to him as he sat hacking at the PDP-6. "What are you doing?", asked Minsky. "I am training a randomly wired neural net to play Tic-Tac-Toe", Sussman replied. "Why is the net wired randomly?", asked Minsky. "I do not want it to have any preconceptions of how to play", Sussman said. Minsky then shut his eyes. "Why do you close your eyes?", Sussman asked his teacher. "So that the room will be empty." At that moment, Sussman was enlightened. * * * A disciple of another sect once came to Drescher as he was eating his morning meal. "I would like to give you this personality test", said the outsider, "because I want you to be happy." Drescher took the paper that was offered him and put it into the toaster, saying: "I wish the toaster to be happy, too." (1995-02-08)

air hole ::: --> A hole to admit or discharge air; specifically, a spot in the ice not frozen over.
A fault in a casting, produced by a bubble of air; a blowhole.


alien ::: a. --> Not belonging to the same country, land, or government, or to the citizens or subjects thereof; foreign; as, alien subjects, enemies, property, shores.
Wholly different in nature; foreign; adverse; inconsistent (with); incongruous; -- followed by from or sometimes by to; as, principles alien from our religion. ::: n.


Amal: “I believe this phrase—like ‘The sun-eyed Guardians and the Golden Sphinx’—refers to the denizens of the Supermind just as do the lines mentioning ‘the belt of the unchanging Truth’ and ‘the presence of the Ineffable’. The earlier words—‘The gold ridge of the world-dream’—point to the overmind. In the same context the words ‘Between the slayer and the saviour fires’ remind us of the closing lines of the sonnet ‘Nirvana’ which ends with lines:

American Telephone and Telegraph, Inc. "company, telecommunications, Unix" (AT&T) One of the largest US telecommunications providers, also noted for being the birthplace of the {Unix} {operating system} and the {C} and {C++} programming languages. AT&T was incorporated in 1885, but traces its lineage to Alexander Graham Bell and his invention of the telephone in 1876. As parent company of the former {Bell System}, AT&T's primary mission was to provide telephone service to virtually everyone in the United States. In its first 50 years, AT&T established subsidiaries and allied companies in more than a dozen other countries. It sold these interests in 1925 and focused on achieving its mission in the United States. It did, however, continue to provide international long distance service. The Bell System was dissolved at the end of 1983 with AT&T's divestiture of the Bell telephone companies. AT&T split into three parts in 1996, one of which is {Lucent Tecnologies}, the former systems and equipment portion of AT&T (including Bell Laboratories). See also {3DO}, {Advanced RISC Machine}, {Berkeley Software Distribution}, {Bell Laboratories}, {Concurrent C}, {Death Star}, {dinosaurs mating}, {InterNIC}, {System V}, {Nawk}, {Open Look}, {rc}, {S}, {Standard ML of New Jersey}, {Unix International}, {Unix conspiracy}, {USG Unix}, {Unix System Laboratories}. {AT&T Home (http://att.com/)}. (2002-06-21)

amphiscians ::: n. pl. --> The inhabitants of the tropic, whose shadows in one part of the year are cast to the north, and in the other to the south, according as the sun is south or north of their zenith.

aniline ::: n. --> An organic base belonging to the phenylamines. It may be regarded as ammonia in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced by the radical phenyl. It is a colorless, oily liquid, originally obtained from indigo by distillation, but now largely manufactured from coal tar or nitrobenzene as a base from which many brilliant dyes are made. ::: a.

anticivic ::: n. --> Opposed to citizenship.

anticivism ::: n. --> Opposition to the body politic of citizens.

Apache Software Foundation "open source, body" (ASF) A consortium that manages the development of the {Apache} {web server}, dozens of {XML}- and {Java}-based projects (under the name {Jakarta}), the {Ant} build tool, the {Geronimo} {J2EE} server, the {SpamAssassin} anti-{SPAM} tool, and much more. {Apache Home (http://apache.org/)}. (2005-01-26)

aristocracy ::: n. --> Government by the best citizens.
A ruling body composed of the best citizens.
A form a government, in which the supreme power is vested in the principal persons of a state, or in a privileged order; an oligarchy.
The nobles or chief persons in a state; a privileged class or patrician order; (in a popular use) those who are regarded as superior to the rest of the community, as in rank, fortune, or


ascendent ::: a. --> Rising toward the zenith; above the horizon.
Rising; ascending.
Superior; surpassing; ruling.


athenian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Athens, the metropolis of Greece. ::: n. --> A native or citizen of Athens.

Aufklärung: In general, this German word and its English equivalent Enlightenment denote the self-emancipation of man from mere authority, prejudice, convention and tradition, with an insistence on freer thinking about problems uncritically referred to these other agencies. According to Kant's famous definition "Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority, which is the incapacity of using one's understanding without the direction of another. This state of minority is caused when its source lies not in the lack of understanding, but in the lack of determination and courage to use it without the assistance of another" (Was ist Aufklärung? 1784). In its historical perspective, the Aufklärung refers to the cultural atmosphere and contrlbutions of the 18th century, especially in Germany, France and England [which affected also American thought with B. Franklin, T. Paine and the leaders of the Revolution]. It crystallized tendencies emphasized by the Renaissance, and quickened by modern scepticism and empiricism, and by the great scientific discoveries of the 17th century. This movement, which was represented by men of varying tendencies, gave an impetus to general learning, a more popular philosophy, empirical science, scriptural criticism, social and political thought. More especially, the word Aufklärung is applied to the German contributions to 18th century culture. In philosophy, its principal representatives are G. E. Lessing (1729-81) who believed in free speech and in a methodical criticism of religion, without being a free-thinker; H. S. Reimarus (1694-1768) who expounded a naturalistic philosophy and denied the supernatural origin of Christianity; Moses Mendelssohn (1729-86) who endeavoured to mitigate prejudices and developed a popular common-sense philosophy; Chr. Wolff (1679-1754), J. A. Eberhard (1739-1809) who followed the Leibnizian rationalism and criticized unsuccessfully Kant and Fichte; and J. G. Herder (1744-1803) who was best as an interpreter of others, but whose intuitional suggestions have borne fruit in the organic correlation of the sciences, and in questions of language in relation to human nature and to national character. The works of Kant and Goethe mark the culmination of the German Enlightenment. Cf. J. G. Hibben, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, 1910. --T.G. Augustinianism: The thought of St. Augustine of Hippo, and of his followers. Born in 354 at Tagaste in N. Africa, A. studied rhetoric in Carthage, taught that subject there and in Rome and Milan. Attracted successively to Manicheanism, Scepticism, and Neo-Platontsm, A. eventually found intellectual and moral peace with his conversion to Christianity in his thirty-fourth year. Returning to Africa, he established numerous monasteries, became a priest in 391, Bishop of Hippo in 395. Augustine wrote much: On Free Choice, Confessions, Literal Commentary on Genesis, On the Trinity, and City of God, are his most noted works. He died in 430.   St. Augustine's characteristic method, an inward empiricism which has little in common with later variants, starts from things without, proceeds within to the self, and moves upwards to God. These three poles of the Augustinian dialectic are polarized by his doctrine of moderate illuminism. An ontological illumination is required to explain the metaphysical structure of things. The truth of judgment demands a noetic illumination. A moral illumination is necessary in the order of willing; and so, too, an lllumination of art in the aesthetic order. Other illuminations which transcend the natural order do not come within the scope of philosophy; they provide the wisdoms of theology and mysticism. Every being is illuminated ontologically by number, form, unity and its derivatives, and order. A thing is what it is, in so far as it is more or less flooded by the light of these ontological constituents.   Sensation is necessary in order to know material substances. There is certainly an action of the external object on the body and a corresponding passion of the body, but, as the soul is superior to the body and can suffer nothing from its inferior, sensation must be an action, not a passion, of the soul. Sensation takes place only when the observing soul, dynamically on guard throughout the body, is vitally attentive to the changes suffered by the body. However, an adequate basis for the knowledge of intellectual truth is not found in sensation alone. In order to know, for example, that a body is multiple, the idea of unity must be present already, otherwise its multiplicity could not be recognized. If numbers are not drawn in by the bodily senses which perceive only the contingent and passing, is the mind the source of the unchanging and necessary truth of numbers? The mind of man is also contingent and mutable, and cannot give what it does not possess. As ideas are not innate, nor remembered from a previous existence of the soul, they can be accounted for only by an immutable source higher than the soul. In so far as man is endowed with an intellect, he is a being naturally illuminated by God, Who may be compared to an intelligible sun. The human intellect does not create the laws of thought; it finds them and submits to them. The immediate intuition of these normative rules does not carry any content, thus any trace of ontologism is avoided.   Things have forms because they have numbers, and they have being in so far as they possess form. The sufficient explanation of all formable, and hence changeable, things is an immutable and eternal form which is unrestricted in time and space. The forms or ideas of all things actually existing in the world are in the things themselves (as rationes seminales) and in the Divine Mind (as rationes aeternae). Nothing could exist without unity, for to be is no other than to be one. There is a unity proper to each level of being, a unity of the material individual and species, of the soul, and of that union of souls in the love of the same good, which union constitutes the city. Order, also, is ontologically imbibed by all beings. To tend to being is to tend to order; order secures being, disorder leads to non-being. Order is the distribution which allots things equal and unequal each to its own place and integrates an ensemble of parts in accordance with an end. Hence, peace is defined as the tranquillity of order. Just as things have their being from their forms, the order of parts, and their numerical relations, so too their beauty is not something superadded, but the shining out of all their intelligible co-ingredients.   S. Aurelii Augustini, Opera Omnia, Migne, PL 32-47; (a critical edition of some works will be found in the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Vienna). Gilson, E., Introd. a l'etude de s. Augustin, (Paris, 1931) contains very good bibliography up to 1927, pp. 309-331. Pope, H., St. Augustine of Hippo, (London, 1937). Chapman, E., St. Augustine's Philos. of Beauty, (N. Y., 1939). Figgis, J. N., The Political Aspects of St. Augustine's "City of God", (London, 1921). --E.C. Authenticity: In a general sense, genuineness, truth according to its title. It involves sometimes a direct and personal characteristic (Whitehead speaks of "authentic feelings").   This word also refers to problems of fundamental criticism involving title, tradition, authorship and evidence. These problems are vital in theology, and basic in scholarship with regard to the interpretation of texts and doctrines. --T.G. Authoritarianism: That theory of knowledge which maintains that the truth of any proposition is determined by the fact of its having been asserted by a certain esteemed individual or group of individuals. Cf. H. Newman, Grammar of Assent; C. S. Peirce, "Fixation of Belief," in Chance, Love and Logic, ed. M. R. Cohen. --A.C.B. Autistic thinking: Absorption in fanciful or wishful thinking without proper control by objective or factual material; day dreaming; undisciplined imagination. --A.C.B. Automaton Theory: Theory that a living organism may be considered a mere machine. See Automatism. Automatism: (Gr. automatos, self-moving) (a) In metaphysics: Theory that animal and human organisms are automata, that is to say, are machines governed by the laws of physics and mechanics. Automatism, as propounded by Descartes, considered the lower animals to be pure automata (Letter to Henry More, 1649) and man a machine controlled by a rational soul (Treatise on Man). Pure automatism for man as well as animals is advocated by La Mettrie (Man, a Machine, 1748). During the Nineteenth century, automatism, combined with epiphenomenalism, was advanced by Hodgson, Huxley and Clifford. (Cf. W. James, The Principles of Psychology, Vol. I, ch. V.) Behaviorism, of the extreme sort, is the most recent version of automatism (See Behaviorism).   (b) In psychology: Psychological automatism is the performance of apparently purposeful actions, like automatic writing without the superintendence of the conscious mind. L. C. Rosenfield, From Beast Machine to Man Machine, N. Y., 1941. --L.W. Automatism, Conscious: The automatism of Hodgson, Huxley, and Clifford which considers man a machine to which mind or consciousness is superadded; the mind of man is, however, causally ineffectual. See Automatism; Epiphenomenalism. --L.W. Autonomy: (Gr. autonomia, independence) Freedom consisting in self-determination and independence of all external constraint. See Freedom. Kant defines autonomy of the will as subjection of the will to its own law, the categorical imperative, in contrast to heteronomy, its subjection to a law or end outside the rational will. (Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, § 2.) --L.W. Autonomy of ethics: A doctrine, usually propounded by intuitionists, that ethics is not a part of, and cannot be derived from, either metaphysics or any of the natural or social sciences. See Intuitionism, Metaphysical ethics, Naturalistic ethics. --W.K.F. Autonomy of the will: (in Kant's ethics) The freedom of the rational will to legislate to itself, which constitutes the basis for the autonomy of the moral law. --P.A.S. Autonymy: In the terminology introduced by Carnap, a word (phrase, symbol, expression) is autonymous if it is used as a name for itself --for the geometric shape, sound, etc. which it exemplifies, or for the word as a historical and grammatical unit. Autonymy is thus the same as the Scholastic suppositio matertalis (q. v.), although the viewpoint is different. --A.C. Autotelic: (from Gr. autos, self, and telos, end) Said of any absorbing activity engaged in for its own sake (cf. German Selbstzweck), such as higher mathematics, chess, etc. In aesthetics, applied to creative art and play which lack any conscious reference to the accomplishment of something useful. In the view of some, it may constitute something beneficent in itself of which the person following his art impulse (q.v.) or playing is unaware, thus approaching a heterotelic (q.v.) conception. --K.F.L. Avenarius, Richard: (1843-1896) German philosopher who expressed his thought in an elaborate and novel terminology in the hope of constructing a symbolic language for philosophy, like that of mathematics --the consequence of his Spinoza studies. As the most influential apostle of pure experience, the posltivistic motive reaches in him an extreme position. Insisting on the biologic and economic function of thought, he thought the true method of science is to cure speculative excesses by a return to pure experience devoid of all assumptions. Philosophy is the scientific effort to exclude from knowledge all ideas not included in the given. Its task is to expel all extraneous elements in the given. His uncritical use of the category of the given and the nominalistic view that logical relations are created rather than discovered by thought, leads him to banish not only animism but also all of the categories, substance, causality, etc., as inventions of the mind. Explaining the evolution and devolution of the problematization and deproblematization of numerous ideas, and aiming to give the natural history of problems, Avenarius sought to show physiologically, psychologically and historically under what conditions they emerge, are challenged and are solved. He hypothesized a System C, a bodily and central nervous system upon which consciousness depends. R-values are the stimuli received from the world of objects. E-values are the statements of experience. The brain changes that continually oscillate about an ideal point of balance are termed Vitalerhaltungsmaximum. The E-values are differentiated into elements, to which the sense-perceptions or the content of experience belong, and characters, to which belongs everything which psychology describes as feelings and attitudes. Avenarius describes in symbolic form a series of states from balance to balance, termed vital series, all describing a series of changes in System C. Inequalities in the vital balance give rise to vital differences. According to his theory there are two vital series. It assumes a series of brain changes because parallel series of conscious states can be observed. The independent vital series are physical, and the dependent vital series are psychological. The two together are practically covariants. In the case of a process as a dependent vital series three stages can be noted: first, the appearance of the problem, expressed as strain, restlessness, desire, fear, doubt, pain, repentance, delusion; the second, the continued effort and struggle to solve the problem; and finally, the appearance of the solution, characterized by abating anxiety, a feeling of triumph and enjoyment.   Corresponding to these three stages of the dependent series are three stages of the independent series: the appearance of the vital difference and a departure from balance in the System C, the continuance with an approximate vital difference, and lastly, the reduction of the vital difference to zero, the return to stability. By making room for dependent and independent experiences, he showed that physics regards experience as independent of the experiencing indlvidual, and psychology views experience as dependent upon the individual. He greatly influenced Mach and James (q.v.). See Avenarius, Empirio-criticism, Experience, pure. Main works: Kritik der reinen Erfahrung; Der menschliche Weltbegriff. --H.H. Averroes: (Mohammed ibn Roshd) Known to the Scholastics as The Commentator, and mentioned as the author of il gran commento by Dante (Inf. IV. 68) he was born 1126 at Cordova (Spain), studied theology, law, medicine, mathematics, and philosophy, became after having been judge in Sevilla and Cordova, physician to the khalifah Jaqub Jusuf, and charged with writing a commentary on the works of Aristotle. Al-mansur, Jusuf's successor, deprived him of his place because of accusations of unorthodoxy. He died 1198 in Morocco. Averroes is not so much an original philosopher as the author of a minute commentary on the whole works of Aristotle. His procedure was imitated later by Aquinas. In his interpretation of Aristotelian metaphysics Averroes teaches the coeternity of a universe created ex nihilo. This doctrine formed together with the notion of a numerical unity of the active intellect became one of the controversial points in the discussions between the followers of Albert-Thomas and the Latin Averroists. Averroes assumed that man possesses only a disposition for receiving the intellect coming from without; he identifies this disposition with the possible intellect which thus is not truly intellectual by nature. The notion of one intellect common to all men does away with the doctrine of personal immortality. Another doctrine which probably was emphasized more by the Latin Averroists (and by the adversaries among Averroes' contemporaries) is the famous statement about "two-fold truth", viz. that a proposition may be theologically true and philosophically false and vice versa. Averroes taught that religion expresses the (higher) philosophical truth by means of religious imagery; the "two-truth notion" came apparently into the Latin text through a misinterpretation on the part of the translators. The works of Averroes were one of the main sources of medieval Aristotelianlsm, before and even after the original texts had been translated. The interpretation the Latin Averroists found in their texts of the "Commentator" spread in spite of opposition and condemnation. See Averroism, Latin. Averroes, Opera, Venetiis, 1553. M. Horten, Die Metaphysik des Averroes, 1912. P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin, 2d ed., Louvain, 1911. --R.A. Averroism, Latin: The commentaries on Aristotle written by Averroes (Ibn Roshd) in the 12th century became known to the Western scholars in translations by Michael Scottus, Hermannus Alemannus, and others at the beginning of the 13th century. Many works of Aristotle were also known first by such translations from Arabian texts, though there existed translations from the Greek originals at the same time (Grabmann). The Averroistic interpretation of Aristotle was held to be the true one by many; but already Albert the Great pointed out several notions which he felt to be incompatible with the principles of Christian philosophy, although he relied for the rest on the "Commentator" and apparently hardly used any other text. Aquinas, basing his studies mostly on a translation from the Greek texts, procured for him by William of Moerbecke, criticized the Averroistic interpretation in many points. But the teachings of the Commentator became the foundation for a whole school of philosophers, represented first by the Faculty of Arts at Paris. The most prominent of these scholars was Siger of Brabant. The philosophy of these men was condemned on March 7th, 1277 by Stephen Tempier, Bishop of Paris, after a first condemnation of Aristotelianism in 1210 had gradually come to be neglected. The 219 theses condemned in 1277, however, contain also some of Aquinas which later were generally recognized an orthodox. The Averroistic propositions which aroused the criticism of the ecclesiastic authorities and which had been opposed with great energy by Albert and Thomas refer mostly to the following points: The co-eternity of the created word; the numerical identity of the intellect in all men, the so-called two-fold-truth theory stating that a proposition may be philosophically true although theologically false. Regarding the first point Thomas argued that there is no philosophical proof, either for the co-eternity or against it; creation is an article of faith. The unity of intellect was rejected as incompatible with the true notion of person and with personal immortality. It is doubtful whether Averroes himself held the two-truths theory; it was, however, taught by the Latin Averroists who, notwithstanding the opposition of the Church and the Thomistic philosophers, gained a great influence and soon dominated many universities, especially in Italy. Thomas and his followers were convinced that they interpreted Aristotle correctly and that the Averroists were wrong; one has, however, to admit that certain passages in Aristotle allow for the Averroistic interpretation, especially in regard to the theory of intellect.   Lit.: P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin au XIIIe Siecle, 2d. ed. Louvain, 1911; M. Grabmann, Forschungen über die lateinischen Aristotelesübersetzungen des XIII. Jahrhunderts, Münster 1916 (Beitr. z. Gesch. Phil. d. MA. Vol. 17, H. 5-6). --R.A. Avesta: See Zendavesta. Avicehron: (or Avencebrol, Salomon ibn Gabirol) The first Jewish philosopher in Spain, born in Malaga 1020, died about 1070, poet, philosopher, and moralist. His main work, Fons vitae, became influential and was much quoted by the Scholastics. It has been preserved only in the Latin translation by Gundissalinus. His doctrine of a spiritual substance individualizing also the pure spirits or separate forms was opposed by Aquinas already in his first treatise De ente, but found favor with the medieval Augustinians also later in the 13th century. He also teaches the necessity of a mediator between God and the created world; such a mediator he finds in the Divine Will proceeding from God and creating, conserving, and moving the world. His cosmogony shows a definitely Neo-Platonic shade and assumes a series of emanations. Cl. Baeumker, Avencebrolis Fons vitae. Beitr. z. Gesch. d. Philos. d. MA. 1892-1895, Vol. I. Joh. Wittman, Die Stellung des hl. Thomas von Aquino zu Avencebrol, ibid. 1900. Vol. III. --R.A. Avicenna: (Abu Ali al Hosain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina) Born 980 in the country of Bocchara, began to write in young years, left more than 100 works, taught in Ispahan, was physician to several Persian princes, and died at Hamadan in 1037. His fame as physician survived his influence as philosopher in the Occident. His medical works were printed still in the 17th century. His philosophy is contained in 18 vols. of a comprehensive encyclopedia, following the tradition of Al Kindi and Al Farabi. Logic, Physics, Mathematics and Metaphysics form the parts of this work. His philosophy is Aristotelian with noticeable Neo-Platonic influences. His doctrine of the universal existing ante res in God, in rebus as the universal nature of the particulars, and post res in the human mind by way of abstraction became a fundamental thesis of medieval Aristotelianism. He sharply distinguished between the logical and the ontological universal, denying to the latter the true nature of form in the composite. The principle of individuation is matter, eternally existent. Latin translations attributed to Avicenna the notion that existence is an accident to essence (see e.g. Guilelmus Parisiensis, De Universo). The process adopted by Avicenna was one of paraphrasis of the Aristotelian texts with many original thoughts interspersed. His works were translated into Latin by Dominicus Gundissalinus (Gondisalvi) with the assistance of Avendeath ibn Daud. This translation started, when it became more generally known, the "revival of Aristotle" at the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century. Albert the Great and Aquinas professed, notwithstanding their critical attitude, a great admiration for Avicenna whom the Arabs used to call the "third Aristotle". But in the Orient, Avicenna's influence declined soon, overcome by the opposition of the orthodox theologians. Avicenna, Opera, Venetiis, 1495; l508; 1546. M. Horten, Das Buch der Genesung der Seele, eine philosophische Enzyklopaedie Avicenna's; XIII. Teil: Die Metaphysik. Halle a. S. 1907-1909. R. de Vaux, Notes et textes sur l'Avicennisme Latin, Bibl. Thomiste XX, Paris, 1934. --R.A. Avidya: (Skr.) Nescience; ignorance; the state of mind unaware of true reality; an equivalent of maya (q.v.); also a condition of pure awareness prior to the universal process of evolution through gradual differentiation into the elements and factors of knowledge. --K.F.L. Avyakta: (Skr.) "Unmanifest", descriptive of or standing for brahman (q.v.) in one of its or "his" aspects, symbolizing the superabundance of the creative principle, or designating the condition of the universe not yet become phenomenal (aja, unborn). --K.F.L. Awareness: Consciousness considered in its aspect of act; an act of attentive awareness such as the sensing of a color patch or the feeling of pain is distinguished from the content attended to, the sensed color patch, the felt pain. The psychologlcal theory of intentional act was advanced by F. Brentano (Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte) and received its epistemological development by Meinong, Husserl, Moore, Laird and Broad. See Intentionalism. --L.W. Axiological: (Ger. axiologisch) In Husserl: Of or pertaining to value or theory of value (the latter term understood as including disvalue and value-indifference). --D.C. Axiological ethics: Any ethics which makes the theory of obligation entirely dependent on the theory of value, by making the determination of the rightness of an action wholly dependent on a consideration of the value or goodness of something, e.g. the action itself, its motive, or its consequences, actual or probable. Opposed to deontological ethics. See also teleological ethics. --W.K.F. Axiologic Realism: In metaphysics, theory that value as well as logic, qualities as well as relations, have their being and exist external to the mind and independently of it. Applicable to the philosophy of many though not all realists in the history of philosophy, from Plato to G. E. Moore, A. N. Whitehead, and N, Hartmann. --J.K.F. Axiology: (Gr. axios, of like value, worthy, and logos, account, reason, theory). Modern term for theory of value (the desired, preferred, good), investigation of its nature, criteria, and metaphysical status. Had its rise in Plato's theory of Forms or Ideas (Idea of the Good); was developed in Aristotle's Organon, Ethics, Poetics, and Metaphysics (Book Lambda). Stoics and Epicureans investigated the summum bonum. Christian philosophy (St. Thomas) built on Aristotle's identification of highest value with final cause in God as "a living being, eternal, most good."   In modern thought, apart from scholasticism and the system of Spinoza (Ethica, 1677), in which values are metaphysically grounded, the various values were investigated in separate sciences, until Kant's Critiques, in which the relations of knowledge to moral, aesthetic, and religious values were examined. In Hegel's idealism, morality, art, religion, and philosophy were made the capstone of his dialectic. R. H. Lotze "sought in that which should be the ground of that which is" (Metaphysik, 1879). Nineteenth century evolutionary theory, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and economics subjected value experience to empirical analysis, and stress was again laid on the diversity and relativity of value phenomena rather than on their unity and metaphysical nature. F. Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra (1883-1885) and Zur Genealogie der Moral (1887) aroused new interest in the nature of value. F. Brentano, Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis (1889), identified value with love.   In the twentieth century the term axiology was apparently first applied by Paul Lapie (Logique de la volonte, 1902) and E. von Hartmann (Grundriss der Axiologie, 1908). Stimulated by Ehrenfels (System der Werttheorie, 1897), Meinong (Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werttheorie, 1894-1899), and Simmel (Philosophie des Geldes, 1900). W. M. Urban wrote the first systematic treatment of axiology in English (Valuation, 1909), phenomenological in method under J. M. Baldwin's influence. Meanwhile H. Münsterberg wrote a neo-Fichtean system of values (The Eternal Values, 1909).   Among important recent contributions are: B. Bosanquet, The Principle of Individuality and Value (1912), a free reinterpretation of Hegelianism; W. R. Sorley, Moral Values and the Idea of God (1918, 1921), defending a metaphysical theism; S. Alexander, Space, Time, and Deity (1920), realistic and naturalistic; N. Hartmann, Ethik (1926), detailed analysis of types and laws of value; R. B. Perry's magnum opus, General Theory of Value (1926), "its meaning and basic principles construed in terms of interest"; and J. Laird, The Idea of Value (1929), noteworthy for historical exposition. A naturalistic theory has been developed by J. Dewey (Theory of Valuation, 1939), for which "not only is science itself a value . . . but it is the supreme means of the valid determination of all valuations." A. J. Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic (1936) expounds the view of logical positivism that value is "nonsense." J. Hessen, Wertphilosophie (1937), provides an account of recent German axiology from a neo-scholastic standpoint.   The problems of axiology fall into four main groups, namely, those concerning (1) the nature of value, (2) the types of value, (3) the criterion of value, and (4) the metaphysical status of value.   (1) The nature of value experience. Is valuation fulfillment of desire (voluntarism: Spinoza, Ehrenfels), pleasure (hedonism: Epicurus, Bentham, Meinong), interest (Perry), preference (Martineau), pure rational will (formalism: Stoics, Kant, Royce), apprehension of tertiary qualities (Santayana), synoptic experience of the unity of personality (personalism: T. H. Green, Bowne), any experience that contributes to enhanced life (evolutionism: Nietzsche), or "the relation of things as means to the end or consequence actually reached" (pragmatism, instrumentalism: Dewey).   (2) The types of value. Most axiologists distinguish between intrinsic (consummatory) values (ends), prized for their own sake, and instrumental (contributory) values (means), which are causes (whether as economic goods or as natural events) of intrinsic values. Most intrinsic values are also instrumental to further value experience; some instrumental values are neutral or even disvaluable intrinsically. Commonly recognized as intrinsic values are the (morally) good, the true, the beautiful, and the holy. Values of play, of work, of association, and of bodily well-being are also acknowledged. Some (with Montague) question whether the true is properly to be regarded as a value, since some truth is disvaluable, some neutral; but love of truth, regardless of consequences, seems to establish the value of truth. There is disagreement about whether the holy (religious value) is a unique type (Schleiermacher, Otto), or an attitude toward other values (Kant, Höffding), or a combination of the two (Hocking). There is also disagreement about whether the variety of values is irreducible (pluralism) or whether all values are rationally related in a hierarchy or system (Plato, Hegel, Sorley), in which values interpenetrate or coalesce into a total experience.   (3) The criterion of value. The standard for testing values is influenced by both psychological and logical theory. Hedonists find the standard in the quantity of pleasure derived by the individual (Aristippus) or society (Bentham). Intuitionists appeal to an ultimate insight into preference (Martineau, Brentano). Some idealists recognize an objective system of rational norms or ideals as criterion (Plato, Windelband), while others lay more stress on rational wholeness and coherence (Hegel, Bosanquet, Paton) or inclusiveness (T. H. Green). Naturalists find biological survival or adjustment (Dewey) to be the standard. Despite differences, there is much in common in the results of the application of these criteria.   (4) The metaphysical status of value. What is the relation of values to the facts investigated by natural science (Koehler), of Sein to Sollen (Lotze, Rickert), of human experience of value to reality independent of man (Hegel, Pringle-Pattlson, Spaulding)? There are three main answers:   subjectivism (value is entirely dependent on and relative to human experience of it: so most hedonists, naturalists, positivists);   logical objectivism (values are logical essences or subsistences, independent of their being known, yet with no existential status or action in reality);   metaphysical objectivism (values   --or norms or ideals   --are integral, objective, and active constituents of the metaphysically real: so theists, absolutists, and certain realists and naturalists like S. Alexander and Wieman). --E.S.B. Axiom: See Mathematics. Axiomatic method: That method of constructing a deductive system consisting of deducing by specified rules all statements of the system save a given few from those given few, which are regarded as axioms or postulates of the system. See Mathematics. --C.A.B. Ayam atma brahma: (Skr.) "This self is brahman", famous quotation from Brhadaranyaka Upanishad 2.5.19, one of many alluding to the central theme of the Upanishads, i.e., the identity of the human and divine or cosmic. --K.F.L.

avesta ::: n. --> The Zoroastrian scriptures. See Zend-Avesta.

A. V. Vasihev, Space, Time, Motion, translated by H. M. Lucas and C. P. Sanger, with an introduction by Bertrand Russell, London. 1924, and New York, 1924. Religion, Philosophy of: The methodic or systematic investigation of the elements of religious consciousness, the theories it has evolved and their development and historic relationships in the cultural complex. It takes account of religious practices only as illustrations of the vitality of beliefs and the inseparableness of the psychological from thought reality in faith. It is distinct from theology in that it recognizes the priority of reason over faith and the acceptance of creed, subjecting the latter to a logical analysis. As such, the history of the Philosophy of Religion is coextensive with the free enquiry into religious reality, particularly the conceptions of God, soul, immortality, sin, salvaition, the sacred (Rudolf Otto), etc., and may be said to have its roots in any society above the pre-logical, mythological, or custom-controlled level, first observed in Egypt, China, India, and Greece. Its scientific treatment is a subsidiary philosophic discipline dates from about Kant's Religion innerhalb der Grenzen der reinen Vernunft and Hegel's Philosophie der Religion, while in the history of thought based on Indian and Greek speculation, sporadic sallies were made by all great philosophers, especially those professing an idealism, and by most theologians.

azo- ::: --> A combining form of azote
Applied loosely to compounds having nitrogen variously combined, as in cyanides, nitrates, etc.
Now especially applied to compounds containing a two atom nitrogen group uniting two hydrocarbon radicals, as in azobenzene, azobenzoic, etc. These compounds furnish many artificial dyes. See Diazo-.


azobenzene ::: n. --> A substance (C6H5.N2.C6H5) derived from nitrobenzene, forming orange red crystals which are easily fusible.

Banach-Tarski paradox "mathematics" It is possible to cut a solid ball into finitely many pieces (actually about half a dozen), and then put the pieces together again to get two solid balls, each the same size as the original. This {paradox} is a consequence of the {Axiom of Choice}. (1995-03-29)

bandana ::: n. --> A species of silk or cotton handkerchief, having a uniformly dyed ground, usually of red or blue, with white or yellow figures of a circular, lozenge, or other simple form.
A style of calico printing, in which white or bright spots are produced upon cloth previously dyed of a uniform red or dark color, by discharging portions of the color by chemical means, while the rest of the cloth is under pressure.


barque ::: n. --> Formerly, any small sailing vessel, as a pinnace, fishing smack, etc.; also, a rowing boat; a barge. Now applied poetically to a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.
Same as 3d Bark, n.


batzen ::: pl. --> of Batz

bedizenment ::: n. --> That which bedizens; the act of dressing, or the state of being dressed, tawdrily.

bedizen ::: v. t. --> To dress or adorn tawdrily or with false taste.

benzene ::: n. --> A volatile, very inflammable liquid, C6H6, contained in the naphtha produced by the destructive distillation of coal, from which it is separated by fractional distillation. The name is sometimes applied also to the impure commercial product or benzole, and also, but rarely, to a similar mixed product of petroleum.

benzine ::: n. --> A liquid consisting mainly of the lighter and more volatile hydrocarbons of petroleum or kerosene oil, used as a solvent and for cleansing soiled fabrics; -- called also petroleum spirit, petroleum benzine. Varieties or similar products are gasoline, naphtha, rhigolene, ligroin, etc.
Same as Benzene.


benzol ::: n. --> An impure benzene, used in the arts as a solvent, and for various other purposes. See Benzene.

BIFF /bif/ (Or "B1FF", from {Usenet}) The most famous {pseudo}, and the prototypical {newbie}. Articles from BIFF are characterised by all uppercase letters sprinkled liberally with bangs, typos, "cute" misspellings (EVRY BUDY LUVS GOOD OLD BIFF CUZ HE'S A K00L DOOD AN HE RITES REEL AWESUM THINGZ IN CAPITULL LETTRS LIKE THIS!!!), use (and often misuse) of fragments of {chat} abbreviations, a long {sig block} (sometimes even a {doubled sig}), and unbounded naivete. BIFF posts articles using his elder brother's VIC-20. BIFF's location is a mystery, as his articles appear to come from a variety of sites. However, {BITNET} seems to be the most frequent origin. The theory that BIFF is a denizen of BITNET is supported by BIFF's (unfortunately invalid) {electronic mail address}: "BIFF@BIT.NET". [1993: Now It Can Be Told! My spies inform me that BIFF was originally created by Joe Talmadge "jat@cup.hp.com", also the author of the infamous and much-plagiarised "Flamer's Bible". The BIFF filter he wrote was later passed to Richard Sexton, who posted BIFFisms much more widely. Versions have since been posted for the amusement of the net at large. - ESR] [{Jargon File}] (1997-09-22)

blinkenlights /blink'*n-li:tz/ Front-panel diagnostic lights on a computer, especially a {dinosaur}. Derives from the last word of the famous blackletter-Gothic sign in mangled pseudo-German that once graced about half the computer rooms in the English-speaking world. One version ran in its entirety as follows: ACHTUNG! ALLES LOOKENSPEEPERS! Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken. Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen. Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlichten. This silliness dates back at least as far as 1959 at Stanford University and had already gone international by the early 1960s, when it was reported at London University's ATLAS computing site. There are several variants of it in circulation, some of which actually do end with the word "blinkenlights". In an amusing example of turnabout-is-fair-play, German hackers have developed their own versions of the blinkenlights poster in fractured English, one of which is reproduced here:             ATTENTION This room is fullfilled mit special electronische equippment. Fingergrabbing and pressing the cnoeppkes from the computers is allowed for die experts only! So all the "lefthanders" stay away and do not disturben the brainstorming von here working intelligencies. Otherwise you will be out thrown and kicked anderswhere! Also: please keep still and only watchen astaunished the blinkenlights. See also {geef}. [{Jargon File}]

borough ::: n. --> In England, an incorporated town that is not a city; also, a town that sends members to parliament; in Scotland, a body corporate, consisting of the inhabitants of a certain district, erected by the sovereign, with a certain jurisdiction; in America, an incorporated town or village, as in Pennsylvania and Connecticut.
The collective body of citizens or inhabitants of a borough; as, the borough voted to lay a tax.
An association of men who gave pledges or sureties to the


brasen ::: a. --> Same as Brazen.

brazen ::: a. --> Pertaining to, made of, or resembling, brass.
Sounding harsh and loud, like resounding brass.
Impudent; immodest; shameless; having a front like brass; as, a brazen countenance. ::: v. t. --> To carry through impudently or shamelessly; as, to


brazen-browed ::: a. --> Shamelessly impudent.

brazened ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Brazen

brazenfaced ::: a. --> Impudent; shameless.

brazenface ::: n. --> An impudent or shameless person.

brazening ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Brazen

brazenly ::: adv. --> In a bold, impudent manner.

brazenness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being brazen.

brazen ::: shameless and bold; marked by flagrant and insolent audacity.

break 1. To cause to be {broken}. "Your latest patch to the editor broke the paragraph commands." 2. (Of a program) To stop temporarily, so that it may debugged. The place where it stops is a "{breakpoint}". 3. To send an {EIA-232} break (two character widths of line high) over a {serial line}. 4. [Unix] To strike whatever key currently causes the tty driver to send SIGINT to the current process. Normally, break, delete or {control-C} does this. 5. "break break" may be said to interrupt a conversation (this is an example of verb doubling). This usage comes from radio communications, which in turn probably came from landline telegraph/teleprinter usage, as badly abused in the Citizen's Band craze. 6. {pipeline break}. 7. {break statement}. [{Jargon File}] (2004-03-24)

Brouwer, Luitzen Egbertus Jan: (1881-) Dutch mathematician. Professor of mathematics at the University of Amsterdam, 1912-. Besides his work in topology, he is known for important contributions to the philosophy and foundations of mathematics. See Mathematics and Intuitionism (mathematical)). -- A.C.

bumkin ::: n. --> A projecting beam or boom; as: (a) One projecting from each bow of a vessel, to haul the fore tack to, called a tack bumpkin. (b) One from each quarter, for the main-brace blocks, and called brace bumpkin. (c) A small outrigger over the stern of a boat, to extend the mizzen.

burgeois ::: n. --> See 1st Bourgeois.
A burgess; a citizen. See 2d Bourgeois.


burgess ::: n. --> An inhabitant of a borough or walled town, or one who possesses a tenement therein; a citizen or freeman of a borough.
One who represents a borough in Parliament.
A magistrate of a borough.
An inhabitant of a Scotch burgh qualified to vote for municipal officers.


bushwhacker ::: n. --> One accustomed to beat about, or travel through, bushes.
A guerrilla; a marauding assassin; one who pretends to be a peaceful citizen, but secretly harasses a hostile force or its sympathizers.


Byzantine "jargon, architecture" A term describing any system that has so many labyrinthine internal interconnections that it would be impossible to simplify by separation into loosely coupled or linked components. The city of Byzantium, later renamed Constantinople and then Istanbul, and the Byzantine Empire were vitiated by a bureaucratic overelaboration bordering on lunacy: quadruple banked agencies, dozens or even scores of superfluous levels and officials with high flown titles unrelated to their actual function, if any. Access to the Emperor and his council was controlled by powerful and inscrutable eunuchs and by rival sports factions. [Edward Gibbon, "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire"]. (1999-01-15)

Zendavesta: (from Middle Persian Zend u Avista, "commentary and text") The Commentary, still used today as sacred scripture among the Parsis (see Zoroastrianism), on the basic text which was composed by the followers of Zarathustra (q.v.), but had become unintelligible due to its archaic nature. -- K.F.L.

Zen [Kehoe, B., "Zen and the Art of the Internet", February 1992.] [{Jargon File}]

Zeno of Elea: (about 490-430 B.C.) Disciple of Parmenides, defended the doctrine of his master that only changeless "Being" is real by indirect proofs exposing the logical absurdities involved in the opposite view, namely that plurality and change are real. Zeno's famous arguments against the possibility of motion were intended as proofs that motion was full of contradictions and that it could not therefore serve as a principle for the explanation of all phenomena, as the atomists, Heraclitus, Empedocles and others had taught. -- M.F.

Zeno the Stoic: (c. 340-265 B.C.) A native of Cyprus and the founder of the Stoic School in Athens. His philosophy was built on the principle that reality is a rational order in which nature is controlled by laws of Reason, interpreted in the vein of pantheism. Men's lives are guided by Providence against which it is futile to resist and to which wise men willingly submit. -- R.B.W.

CAM-PC "hardware" A {cellular automata} circuit board which is a hardware implementation from {Automatrix} of the {MIT} {CAM-6} machine. It comes with dozens of experiments and applications. {(http://automatrix.com/campc/index.html)}. (1995-04-21)

Carnap, Rudolf: (1891-) successively Privatdozent at the University of Vienna, Professor of Philosophy at the German University of Prague, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Chicago (since 1936); one of the leading representatives of the positivism of the Vienna Circle and subsequently of Scientific Empiricism (q.v.); co-editor of The Journal of Unified Science (previously: Erkenntnis).

censor ::: n. --> One of two magistrates of Rome who took a register of the number and property of citizens, and who also exercised the office of inspector of morals and conduct.
One who is empowered to examine manuscripts before they are committed to the press, and to forbid their publication if they contain anything obnoxious; -- an official in some European countries.
One given to fault-finding; a censurer.
A critic; a reviewer.


cheeky ::: --> a Brazen-faced; impudent; bold.

chiclet keyboard "hardware, abuse" A {keyboard} with a small, flat rectangular or lozenge-shaped rubber or plastic keys that look like pieces of Chiclets chewing gum. Used especially to describe the original {IBM PCjr} keyboard. Vendors unanimously liked these because they were cheap, and a lot of early {portable} and {laptop computers} were launched with them. Customers rejected the idea with almost equal unanimity, and chiclets are not often seen on anything larger than a digital watch any more. [{Jargon File}] (1997-05-16)

chilian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Chili. ::: n. --> A native or citizen of Chili.
Alt. of Chiliarch


chloranil ::: n. --> A yellow crystalline substance, C6Cl4.O2, regarded as a derivative of quinone, obtained by the action of chlorine on certain benzene derivatives, as aniline.

citicism ::: n. --> The manners of a cit or citizen.

citiner ::: n. --> One who is born or bred in a city; a citizen.

citizen ::: a person owing loyalty to and entitled by birth or naturalization to the protection of a state or nation. citizens.

citizeness ::: n. --> A female citizen.

citizen ::: n. --> One who enjoys the freedom and privileges of a city; a freeman of a city, as distinguished from a foreigner, or one not entitled to its franchises.
An inhabitant of a city; a townsman.
A person, native or naturalized, of either sex, who owes allegiance to a government, and is entitled to reciprocal protection from it.
One who is domiciled in a country, and who is a citizen,


citizenship ::: n. --> The state of being a citizen; the status of a citizen.

cit ::: n. --> A citizen; an inhabitant of a city; a pert townsman; -- used contemptuously.

city ::: n. --> A large town.
A corporate town; in the United States, a town or collective body of inhabitants, incorporated and governed by a mayor and aldermen or a city council consisting of a board of aldermen and a common council; in Great Britain, a town corporate, which is or has been the seat of a bishop, or the capital of his see.
The collective body of citizens, or inhabitants of a city.


civic ::: a. --> Relating to, or derived from, a city or citizen; relating to man as a member of society, or to civil affairs.

civic ::: of, relating to, or belonging to a city, a citizen, or citizenship; municipal or civil.

civil ::: a. --> Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state.
Subject to government; reduced to order; civilized; not barbarous; -- said of the community.
Performing the duties of a citizen; obedient to government; -- said of an individual.
Having the manners of one dwelling in a city, as opposed to


civillty ::: n. --> The state of society in which the relations and duties of a citizen are recognized and obeyed; a state of civilization.
A civil office, or a civil process
Courtesy; politeness; kind attention; good breeding; a polite act or expression.


civism ::: n. --> State of citizenship.

Cleanthes: (c. 310-230 B.C.) Zeno's disciple and one of the most prominent thinkers of the Stoic School. Of his writings only a hymn to Zeus is extant. -- R.B.W.

CLiCC "language" A {Common Lisp} to {C} compiler by Heinz Knutzen "hk@informatik.uni-kiel.de", Ulrich Hoffman "uho@informatik.uni-kiel.de" and Wolfgang Goerigk "wg@informatik.uni-kiel.de". CLiCC is meant to be used as a supplement to existing {CLISP} systems for generating {portable} {applications}. Target {C} code must be linked with the CLiCC {run-time library} to produce an {executable}. Version 0.6.2 conforms to a subset of {Common Lisp} and {CLOS} called {CL_0} or {CommonLisp_0} and based on {CLtL1}. It runs with {Lucid Lisp}, {AKCL} or {CLISP}. Work on {CLtL2} and {ANSI-CL} conformance is in progress. {(ftp://ftp.informatik.uni-kiel.de/pub/kiel/apply/)}. (1994-01-04)

client ::: n. --> A citizen who put himself under the protection of a man of distinction and influence, who was called his patron.
A dependent; one under the protection of another.
One who consults a legal adviser, or submits his cause to his management.


coal tar ::: --> A thick, black, tarry liquid, obtained by the distillation of bituminous coal in the manufacture of illuminating gas; used for making printer&

cog ::: v. t. --> To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat.
To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; as, to cog in a word; to palm off.
To furnish with a cog or cogs. ::: v. i.


comet ::: a celestial body that travels around the sun, usually in a highly elliptical orbit: thought to consist of a solid frozen nucleus part of which vaporizes on approaching the sun to form a gaseous luminous coma and a long luminous tail.

constituency ::: n. --> A body of constituents, as the body of citizens or voters in a representative district.

consul ::: n. --> One of the two chief magistrates of the republic.
A senator; a counselor.
One of the three chief magistrates of France from 1799 to 1804, who were called, respectively, first, second, and third consul.
An official commissioned to reside in some foreign country, to care for the commercial interests of the citizens of the appointing government, and to protect its seamen.


cosenage ::: n. --> See Cozenage.

cosen ::: v. t. --> See Cozen.

Cosmopolis: (Cosmopolitan) A type of universalism, derived first from the Cynic doctrine of the cosmopolis which proclaimed that the family and the city were artificial and that the wise man was the cosmopolitan. Taught also by the Cyrenaics. Later with the Stoics it came to mean a franchise of world citizenship with no differences as to class and race, a doctrine not always followed by the Roman Stoics. See Cynics, Cyrenaics, Stoicism. -- E.H.

cosmopolite ::: n. --> One who has no fixed residence, or who is at home in every place; a citizen of the world. ::: a. --> Having no fixed residence; at home in any place; free from local attachments or prejudices; not provincial; liberal.
Common everywhere; widely spread; found in all parts


country ::: adv. --> A tract of land; a region; the territory of an independent nation; (as distinguished from any other region, and with a personal pronoun) the region of one&

cozenage ::: n. --> The art or practice of cozening; artifice; fraud.

cozened ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Cozen

cozener ::: n. --> One who cheats or defrauds.

cozening ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Cozen

cozen ::: v. t. --> To cheat; to defraud; to beguile; to deceive, usually by small arts, or in a pitiful way. ::: v. i. --> To deceive; to cheat; to act deceitfully.

CPU Wars /C-P-U worz/ A 1979 large-format comic by Chas Andres chronicling the attempts of the brainwashed androids of IPM (Impossible to Program Machines) to conquer and destroy the peaceful denizens of HEC (Human Engineered Computers). This rather transparent allegory featured many references to {ADVENT} and the immortal line "Eat flaming death, minicomputer mongrels!" (uttered, of course, by an IPM stormtrooper). It is alleged that the author subsequently received a letter of appreciation on IBM company stationery from the head of IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Laboratories (then, as now, one of the few islands of true hackerdom in the IBM archipelago). The lower loop of the B in the IBM logo, it is said, had been carefully whited out. See {eat flaming death}. [{Jargon File}]

crocein ::: n. --> A name given to any one of several yellow or scarlet dyestuffs of artificial production and complex structure. In general they are diazo and sulphonic acid derivatives of benzene and naphthol.

crossjack ::: n. --> The lowest square sail, or the lower yard of the mizzenmast.

dandy ::: n. --> One who affects special finery or gives undue attention to dress; a fop; a coxcomb.
A sloop or cutter with a jigger on which a lugsail is set.
A small sail carried at or near the stern of small boats; -- called also jigger, and mizzen.
A dandy roller. See below.


decitizenize ::: v. t. --> To deprive of the rights of citizenship.

denaturalize ::: v. t. --> To render unnatural; to alienate from nature.
To renounce the natural rights and duties of; to deprive of citizenship; to denationalize.


denization ::: n. --> The act of making one a denizen or adopted citizen; naturalization.

denizenation ::: n. --> Denization; denizening.

denizenize ::: v. t. --> To constitute (one) a denizen; to denizen.

denizen ::: n. --> A dweller; an inhabitant.
One who is admitted by favor to all or a part of the rights of citizenship, where he did not possess them by birth; an adopted or naturalized citizen.
One admitted to residence in a foreign country. ::: v. t.


denizenship ::: n. --> State of being a denizen.

denizens ::: inhabitants; occupants; residents, especially of plants or animals and people established in a place to which they are not native.

denize ::: v. t. --> To make a denizen; to confer the rights of citizenship upon; to naturalize.

Dialectic: (Gr. dia + legein, discourse) The beginning of dialectic Aristotle is said to have attributed to Zeno of Elea. But as the art of debate by question and answer, its beginning is usually associated with the Socrates of the Platonic dialogues. As conceived by Plato himself, dialectic is the science of first principles which differs from other sciences by dispensing with hypotheses and is, consequently, "the copingstone of the sciences" -- the highest, because the clearest and hence the ultimate, sort of knowledge. Aristotle distinguishes between dialectical reasoning, which proceeds syllogistically from opinions generally accepted, and demonstrative reasoning, which begins with primary and true premises; but he holds that dialectical reasoning, in contrast with eristic, is "a process of criticism wherein lies the path to the principles of all inquiries." In modern philosophy, dialectic has two special meanings. Kant uses it as the name of that part of his Kritik der reinen Vernunft which deals critically with the special difficulties (antinomies, paralogisms and Ideas) arising out of the futile attempt (transcendental illusion) to apply the categories of the Understanding beyond the only realm to which they can apply, namely, the realm of objects in space and time (Phenomena). For Hegel, dialectic is primarily the distinguishing characteristic of speculative thought -- thought, that is, which exhibits the structure of its subject-matter (the universal, system) through the construction of synthetic categories (synthesis) which resolve (sublate) the opposition between other conflicting categories (theses and antitheses) of the same subject-matter. -- G.W.C.

diamonded ::: a. --> Having figures like a diamond or lozenge.
Adorned with diamonds; diamondized.


diamond ::: n. --> A precious stone or gem excelling in brilliancy and beautiful play of prismatic colors, and remarkable for extreme hardness.
A geometrical figure, consisting of four equal straight lines, and having two of the interior angles acute and two obtuse; a rhombus; a lozenge.
One of a suit of playing cards, stamped with the figure of a diamond.


diazo- ::: --> A combining form (also used adjectively), meaning pertaining to, or derived from, a series of compounds containing a radical of two nitrogen atoms, united usually to an aromatic radical; as, diazo-benzene, C6H5.N2.OH.

(d) In Locke: the simple mode of an idea is the manner of thinking in which one idea is taken several times over, e.g. a dozen; mixed modes of ideas are those types of ideation in which various non-similar simple ideas are combined by the mind so as to produce a complex idea which does not represent a substance: e.g. obligation, drunkenness.

diphenyl ::: n. --> A white crystalline substance, C6H5.C6H5, obtained by leading benzene through a heated iron tube. It consists of two benzene or phenyl radicals united.

Discordianism "recreation" /dis-kor'di-*n-ism/ The veneration of {Eris}, also known as Discordia; widely popular among hackers. Discordianism was popularised by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson's novel "Illuminatus!" as a sort of self-subverting Dada-Zen for Westerners - it should on no account be taken seriously but is far more serious than most jokes. Consider, for example, the Fifth Commandment of the Pentabarf, from "Principia Discordia": "A Discordian is Prohibited of Believing What he Reads." Discordianism is usually connected with an elaborate conspiracy theory/joke involving millennia-long warfare between the anarcho-surrealist partisans of Eris and a malevolent, authoritarian secret society called the Illuminati. See {Religion}, {Church of the SubGenius}, and {ha ha only serious}. [{Jargon File}] (1997-04-12)

disenfranchise ::: v. t. --> To disfranchise; to deprive of the rights of a citizen.

disfranchisement ::: n. --> The act of disfranchising, or the state disfranchised; deprivation of privileges of citizenship or of chartered immunities.

disfranchise ::: v. t. --> To deprive of a franchise or chartered right; to dispossess of the rights of a citizen, or of a particular privilege, as of voting, holding office, etc.

dizened ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Dizen

dizening ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Dizen

dizen ::: v. t. --> To dress; to attire.
To dress gaudily; to overdress; to bedizen; to deck out.


dozen ::: pl. --> of Dozen ::: n. --> A collection of twelve objects; a tale or set of twelve; with or without of before the substantive which follows.
An indefinite small number.


dozens ::: pl. --> of Dozen

dozenth ::: a. --> Twelfth.

DWIM /dwim/ [acronym, "Do What I Mean" (not what I say)] 1. Able to guess, sometimes even correctly, the result intended when bogus input was provided. 2. The BBNLISP/INTERLISP function that attempted to accomplish this feat by correcting many of the more common errors. See {hairy}. 3. Occasionally, an interjection hurled at a balky computer, especially when one senses one might be tripping over legalisms (see {legalese}). Warren Teitelman originally wrote DWIM to fix his typos and spelling errors, so it was somewhat idiosyncratic to his style, and would often make hash of anyone else's typos if they were stylistically different. Some victims of DWIM thus claimed that the acronym stood for "Damn Warren's Infernal Machine!'. In one notorious incident, Warren added a DWIM feature to the command interpreter used at {Xerox PARC}. One day another hacker there typed "delete *$" to free up some disk space. (The editor there named backup files by appending "$" to the original file name, so he was trying to delete any backup files left over from old editing sessions.) It happened that there weren't any editor backup files, so DWIM helpfully reported "*$ not found, assuming you meant 'delete *'". It then started to delete all the files on the disk! The hacker managed to stop it with a {Vulcan nerve pinch} after only a half dozen or so files were lost. The disgruntled victim later said he had been sorely tempted to go to Warren's office, tie Warren down in his chair in front of his workstation, and then type "delete *$" twice. DWIM is often suggested in jest as a desired feature for a complex program; it is also occasionally described as the single instruction the ideal computer would have. Back when proofs of program correctness were in vogue, there were also jokes about "DWIMC" (Do What I Mean, Correctly). A related term, more often seen as a verb, is DTRT (Do The Right Thing); see {Right Thing}. [{Jargon File}]

Ease General purpose parallel programming language, combining the process constructs of CSP and the distributed data structures of Linda. "Programming with Ease: Semiotic Definition of the Language", S.E. Zenith, "zenith-steven@yale.edu" Yale U TR-809, Jul 1990.

ELIZA "artificial intelligence" A famous program by {Joseph Weizenbaum}, which simulated a Rogerian psychoanalyst by rephrasing many of the patient's statements as questions and posing them to the patient. It worked by simple {pattern recognition} and substitution of key words into canned phrases. It was so convincing, however, that there are many anecdotes about people becoming very emotionally caught up in dealing with ELIZA. All this was due to people's tendency to attach to words meanings which the computer never put there. See also {ELIZA effect}. (1997-09-13)

endenizen ::: v. t. --> To admit to the privileges of a denizen; to naturalize.

endenize ::: v. t. --> To endenizen.

enfranchisement ::: n. --> Releasing from slavery or custody.
Admission to the freedom of a corporation or body politic; investiture with the privileges of free citizens.


enfranchise ::: v. t. --> To set free; to liberate from slavery, prison, or any binding power.
To endow with a franchise; to incorporate into a body politic and thus to invest with civil and political privileges; to admit to the privileges of a freeman.
To receive as denizens; to naturalize; as, to enfranchise foreign words.


exalt ::: v. t. --> To raise high; to elevate; to lift up.
To elevate in rank, dignity, power, wealth, character, or the like; to dignify; to promote; as, to exalt a prince to the throne, a citizen to the presidency.
To elevate by prise or estimation; to magnify; to extol; to glorify.
To lift up with joy, pride, or success; to inspire with delight or satisfaction; to elate.


excellent ::: a. --> Excelling; surpassing others in some good quality or the sum of qualities; of great worth; eminent, in a good sense; superior; as, an excellent man, artist, citizen, husband, discourse, book, song, etc.; excellent breeding, principles, aims, action.
Superior in kind or degree, irrespective of moral quality; -- used with words of a bad significance. ::: adv.


expatriate ::: v. t. --> To banish; to drive or force (a person) from his own country; to make an exile of.
Reflexively, as To expatriate one&


fas 1. Frankenstein Cross Assemblers. A reconfigurable assembler package, especially suited for 8-bit processors, consisting of a base assembler module and a {yacc} parser, for each {microprocessor}, to handle {mnemonics} and addressing. Second party parser modules available from many sites. Base assembler and yacc parser modules by Mark Zenier. FTP: ftp.njit.edu/pub/msdos/frankasm/frankasm.zoo. 2. FAS. A general purpose language sponsored by the Finnish government in the 70's and 80's.

ferrarese ::: a. --> Pertaining to Ferrara, in Italy. ::: n., sing. & pl. --> A citizen of Ferrara; collectively, the inhabitants of Ferrara.

Flash Lights Impressively "programming, humour" (FLI) /FLY/ A joke {assembly language} instruction first documented in the late 1970s in "The Hackers Dictionary". The FLI instruction was frequently referred to by engineers when {minicomputers} such as the DEC {PDP-8}, {PDP-11} and some early {microcomputers} such as the {IMSAI} and {Altair} had dozens of front panel lights. "When the computer is about to do some long I/O operation, stick in a FLI so the accountants won't think the machine has hung again." (2004-08-23)

flat-cap ::: n. --> A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

fluo- ::: --> A combining form indicating fluorine as an ingredient; as in fluosilicate, fluobenzene.

FORWISS Bayerische Forschungszentrum fuer Wissensbasierte Systeme (Bavarian research centre for knowledge-based systems) in Passau.

free-denizen ::: v. t. --> To make free.

freezable ::: a. --> Capable of being frozen.

freeze To lock an evolving software distribution or document against changes so it can be released with some hope of stability. Carries the strong implication that the item in question will "unfreeze" at some future date. There are more specific constructions on this term. A "feature freeze", for example, locks out modifications intended to introduce new features but still allows bugfixes and completion of existing features; a "code freeze" connotes no more changes at all. At {Sun Microsystems} and elsewhere, one may also hear references to "code slush" - that is, an almost-but-not-quite frozen state. [{Jargon File}]

frorn ::: p. a. --> Frozen.

frory ::: a. --> Frozen; stiff with cold.
Covered with a froth like hoarfrost.


frost ::: v. i. --> The act of freezing; -- applied chiefly to the congelation of water; congelation of fluids.
The state or temperature of the air which occasions congelation, or the freezing of water; severe cold or freezing weather.
Frozen dew; -- called also hoarfrost or white frost.
Coldness or insensibility; severity or rigidity of character.


frozen ::: made into, covered with, or surrounded by ice. Also fig.

frozenness ::: n. --> A state of being frozen.

frozen ::: p. p. --> of Freeze ::: a. --> Congealed with cold; affected by freezing; as, a frozen brook.
Subject to frost, or to long and severe cold; chilly; as, the frozen north; the frozen zones.


furzen ::: a. --> Furzy; gorsy.

galiot ::: n. --> A small galley, formerly used in the Mediterranean, built mainly for speed. It was moved both by sails and oars, having one mast, and sixteen or twenty seats for rowers.
A strong, light-draft, Dutch merchant vessel, carrying a mainmast and a mizzenmast, and a large gaff mainsail.


gall ::: n. --> The bitter, alkaline, viscid fluid found in the gall bladder, beneath the liver. It consists of the secretion of the liver, or bile, mixed with that of the mucous membrane of the gall bladder.
The gall bladder.
Anything extremely bitter; bitterness; rancor.
Impudence; brazen assurance.
An excrescence of any form produced on any part of a plant by insects or their larvae. They are most commonly caused by small


gelid ::: a. --> Cold; very cold; frozen.

gentleman ::: n. --> A man well born; one of good family; one above the condition of a yeoman.
One of gentle or refined manners; a well-bred man.
One who bears arms, but has no title.
The servant of a man of rank.
A man, irrespective of condition; -- used esp. in the plural (= citizens; people), in addressing men in popular assemblies, etc.


G. Gentzen, Die Widerspruchsfreiheit der Stufenlogik, Mathematische Zeitschrift, vol. 4l (1936), pp. 357-366.

glacial ::: a. --> Pertaining to ice or to its action; consisting of ice; frozen; icy; esp., pertaining to glaciers; as, glacial phenomena.
Resembling ice; having the appearance and consistency of ice; -- said of certain solid compounds; as, glacial phosphoric or acetic acids.


glade ::: n. --> An open passage through a wood; a grassy open or cleared space in a forest.
An everglade.
An opening in the ice of rivers or lakes, or a place left unfrozen; also, smooth ice.


glark /glark/ To figure something out from context. "The System III manuals are pretty poor, but you can generally glark the meaning from context." Interestingly, the word was originally "glork"; the context was "This gubblick contains many nonsklarkish English flutzpahs, but the overall pluggandisp can be glorked [sic] from context" (David Moser, quoted by Douglas Hofstadter in his "Metamagical Themas" column in the January 1981 "Scientific American"). It is conjectured that hackish usage mutated the verb to "glark" because {glork} was already an established jargon term. Compare {grok}, {zen}. [{Jargon File}]

Glasgow Haskell Compiler "language" (GHC) A {Haskell} 1.2 compiler written in Haskell by the AQUA project at {Glasgow University}, headed by Simon Peyton Jones "simonpj@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk" throughout the 1990's [started?]. GHC can generate either {C} or {native code} for {SPARC}, {DEC} {Alpha} and other platforms. It can take advantage of features of {gcc} such as global register variables and has an extensive set of optimisations. GHC features an extensible I/O system based on a "{monad}", in-line {C} code, fully fledged {unboxed} data types, incrementally-updatable {arrays}, {mutable reference types}, {generational garbage collector}, {concurrent} {threads}. Time and space {profiling} is also supported. It requires {GNU} gcc 2.1+ and {Perl}. GHC runs on {Sun-4}, {DEC Alpha}, {Sun-3}, {NeXT}, {DECstation}, {HP-PA} and {SGI}. {Glasgow FTP (ftp://ftp.dcs.glasgow.ac.uk/pub/haskell/glasgow/)}. {Yale (ftp://nebula.cs.yale.edu/pub/haskell/glasgow/)}. {Sweden (ftp://ftp.cs.chalmers.se/pub/haskell/glasgow/)}. {Papers (ftp://ftp.dcs.glasgow.ac.uk/pub/glasgow-fp)}. ["Imperative functional programming", Peyton Jones & Wadler, POPL '93]. ["Unboxed data types as first-class citizens", Peyton Jones & Launchbury, FPCA '91]. ["Profiling lazy functional languages", Sansom & Peyton Jones, Glasgow workshop '92]. ["Implementing lazy functional languages on stock hardware", Peyton Jones, Journal of Functional Programming, Apr 1992]. E-mail: "glasgow-haskell-request@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk". (1999-01-05)

glazen ::: a. --> Resembling glass; glasslike; glazed.

GMD "company, history" A former German research centre. Full name: "GMD - Forschungszentrum Informationstechnik GmbH" (German National Research Center for Information Technology). Before April 1995, GMD stood for "Gesellschaft für Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung" - National Research Center for Computer Science, it is retained for historical reasons. In 2000-2001 GMD was integrated into the {FhG} (Fraunhofer Society for the Advancement of Applied Research). The gmd.de website says (in German): "GMD (Forschungszentrum Informationstechnik GmbH, before March 1995: Gesellschaft für Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung mbH) no longer exists!" Address: PO Box 1316, D-53731 Sankt Augustin 1, Germany (1995-04-10)

goblin ::: A grotesque sprite or elf that is mischievous or malicious toward people. goblins, goblin-wizened.

goblin ::: a grotesque sprite or elf that is mischievous or malicious toward people. goblins, goblin-wizened.

Gorgon ::: Greek myth any of three winged monstrous sisters, Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa, who had live snakes for hair, huge teeth, and brazen claws. A glance at Medusa who was slain by Perseus) turned the beholder to stone.

gorgon ::: greek myth any of three winged monstrous sisters, Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa, who had live snakes for hair, huge teeth, and brazen claws. A glance at Medusa who was slain by Perseus) turned the beholder to stone.

grok /grok/, /grohk/ (From the novel "Stranger in a Strange Land", by Robert A. Heinlein, where it is a Martian word meaning literally "to drink" and metaphorically "to be one with") 1. To understand, usually in a global sense. Connotes intimate and exhaustive knowledge. Contrast {zen}, which is similar supernal understanding experienced as a single brief flash. See also {glark}. 2. Used of programs, may connote merely sufficient understanding. "Almost all C compilers grok the "void" type these days." [{Jargon File}] (1995-01-31)

hacker humour A distinctive style of shared intellectual humour found among hackers, having the following marked characteristics: 1. Fascination with form-vs.-content jokes, paradoxes, and humour having to do with confusion of metalevels (see {meta}). One way to make a hacker laugh: hold a red index card in front of him/her with "GREEN" written on it, or vice-versa (note, however, that this is funny only the first time). 2. Elaborate deadpan parodies of large intellectual constructs, such as specifications (see {write-only memory}), standards documents, language descriptions (see {INTERCAL}), and even entire scientific theories (see {quantum bogodynamics}, {computron}). 3. Jokes that involve screwily precise reasoning from bizarre, ludicrous, or just grossly counter-intuitive premises. 4. Fascination with puns and wordplay. 5. A fondness for apparently mindless humour with subversive currents of intelligence in it - for example, old Warner Brothers and Rocky & Bullwinkle cartoons, the Marx brothers, the early B-52s, and Monty Python's Flying Circus. Humour that combines this trait with elements of high camp and slapstick is especially favoured. 6. References to the symbol-object antinomies and associated ideas in Zen Buddhism and (less often) Taoism. See {has the X nature}, {Discordianism}, {zen}, {ha ha only serious}, {AI koan}. See also {filk} and {retrocomputing}. If you have an itchy feeling that all 6 of these traits are really aspects of one thing that is incredibly difficult to talk about exactly, you are (a) correct and (b) responding like a hacker. These traits are also recognizable (though in a less marked form) throughout {science-fiction fandom}. (1995-12-18)

hack mode "jargon" Engaged in {hack}ing. A Zen-like state of total focus on The Problem that may be achieved when one is hacking (this is why every good hacker is part mystic). Ability to enter such concentration at will correlates strongly with wizardliness; it is one of the most important skills learned during {larval stage}. Sometimes amplified as "deep hack mode". Being yanked out of hack mode (see {priority interrupt}) may be experienced as a physical shock, and the sensation of being in hack mode is more than a little habituating. The intensity of this experience is probably by itself sufficient explanation for the existence of hackers, and explains why many resist being promoted out of positions where they can code. See also {cyberspace}. Some aspects of hackish etiquette will appear quite odd to an observer unaware of the high value placed on hack mode. For example, if someone appears at your door, it is perfectly okay to hold up a hand (without turning one's eyes away from the screen) to avoid being interrupted. One may read, type, and interact with the computer for quite some time before further acknowledging the other's presence (of course, he or she is reciprocally free to leave without a word). The understanding is that you might be in {hack mode} with a lot of delicate state in your head, and you dare not {swap} that context out until you have reached a good point to pause. See also {juggling eggs}. [{Jargon File}] (1996-07-31)

ha ha only serious (SF fandom, originally as mutation of HHOK, "Ha Ha Only Kidding") A phrase (often seen abbreviated as HHOS) that aptly captures the flavour of much hacker discourse. Applied especially to parodies, absurdities, and ironic jokes that are both intended and perceived to contain a possibly disquieting amount of truth, or truths that are constructed on in-joke and self-parody. The {Jargon File} contains many examples of ha-ha-only-serious in both form and content. Indeed, the entirety of hacker culture is often perceived as ha-ha-only-serious by hackers themselves; to take it either too lightly or too seriously marks a person as an outsider, a {wannabee}, or in {larval stage}. For further enlightenment on this subject, consult any Zen master. See also {AI koan}. [{Jargon File}]

hail ::: n. --> Small roundish masses of ice precipitated from the clouds, where they are formed by the congelation of vapor. The separate masses or grains are called hailstones.
A wish of health; a salutation; a loud call. ::: v. i. --> To pour down particles of ice, or frozen vapors.


hailstone ::: n. --> A single particle of ice falling from a cloud; a frozen raindrop; a pellet of hail.

half-tounue ::: n. --> A jury, for the trial of a foreigner, composed equally of citizens and aliens.

handle 1. "programming, operating system" A simple item of data that identifies a resource. For example, a {Unix} file handle identifies an open file and associated data such as whether it was opened for read or write and the current read/write position. On the {Macintosh}, a handle is a pointer to a pointer to some dynamically-allocated memory. The extra level of indirection allows on-the-fly {memory compaction} or {garbage collection} without invalidating application program references to the allocated memory. 2. "jargon" An alias used intended to conceal a user's true identity in an electronic message. The term is common on Citizen's Band and other amateur radio but, in that context usually means the user's real name as {FCC} rules forbid concealing one's identity. Use of grandiose handles is characteristic of {crackers}, {weenies}, {spods}, and other lower forms of network life; true hackers travel on their own reputations. Compare {nick}. [{Jargon File}] 3. "networking" {domain handle}. (2004-07-20)

harmony ::: n. --> The just adaptation of parts to each other, in any system or combination of things, or in things, or things intended to form a connected whole; such an agreement between the different parts of a design or composition as to produce unity of effect; as, the harmony of the universe.
Concord or agreement in facts, opinions, manners, interests, etc.; good correspondence; peace and friendship; as, good citizens live in harmony.


has the X nature (From Zen Buddhist koans of the form "Does an X have the Buddha-nature?") Common hacker construction for "is an X", used for humorous emphasis. "Anyone who can't even use a program with on-screen help embedded in it truly has the {loser} nature!" See also {the X that can be Y is not the true X}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-01-11)

hatchment ::: n. --> A sort of panel, upon which the arms of a deceased person are temporarily displayed, -- usually on the walls of his dwelling. It is lozenge-shaped or square, but is hung cornerwise. It is used in England as a means of giving public notification of the death of the deceased, his or her rank, whether married, widower, widow, etc. Called also achievement.
A sword or other mark of the profession of arms; in general, a mark of dignity.


height ::: 1. A high point or position. 2. Elevation above a given level, as of the sun or a star above the horizon; altitude. Also fig. 3. The highest or most advanced degree, material or immaterial; the zenith. heights.

heisenbug "jargon" /hi:'zen-buhg/ (From Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle in quantum physics) A bug that disappears or alters its behaviour when one attempts to probe or isolate it. (This usage is not even particularly fanciful; the use of a debugger sometimes alters a program's operating environment enough that buggy code, such as that which relies on the values of uninitialised memory, behaves quite differently.) In {C}, nine out of ten heisenbugs result from uninitialised {auto variables}, {fandango on core} phenomena (especially corruption of the malloc {arena}) or errors that {smash the stack}. Opposite: {Bohr bug}. See also {mandelbug}, {schroedinbug}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-28)

hemiprotein ::: n. --> An insoluble, proteid substance, described by Schutzenberger, formed when albumin is heated for some time with dilute sulphuric acid. It is apparently identical with antialbumid and dyspeptone.

herrnhuter ::: n. --> One of the Moravians; -- so called from the settlement of Herrnhut (the Lord&

high ::: v. i. --> To hie.
To rise; as, the sun higheth. ::: superl. --> Elevated above any starting point of measurement, as a line, or surface; having altitude; lifted up; raised or extended in the direction of the zenith; lofty; tall; as, a high mountain, tower, tree;


hubby ::: a. --> Full of hubs or protuberances; as, a road that has been frozen while muddy is hubby.

hydrocarbon ::: n. --> A compound containing only hydrogen and carbon, as methane, benzene, etc.; also, by extension, any of their derivatives.

hydrophlorone ::: n. --> A white, crystalline benzene derivative, C8H10O2, obtained by the reduction of phlorone.

hydroquinone ::: n. --> A white crystalline substance, C6H4(OH)2, obtained by the reduction of quinone. It is a diacid phenol, resembling, and metameric with, pyrocatechin and resorcin. Called also dihydroxy benzene.

icefall ::: n. --> A frozen waterfall, or mass of ice resembling a frozen waterfall.

ice ::: n. --> Water or other fluid frozen or reduced to the solid state by cold; frozen water. It is a white or transparent colorless substance, crystalline, brittle, and viscoidal. Its specific gravity (0.92, that of water at 4¡ C. being 1.0) being less than that of water, ice floats.
Concreted sugar.
Water, cream, custard, etc., sweetened, flavored, and artificially frozen.
Any substance having the appearance of ice; as, camphor ice.


indenizened ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Indenizen

indenizening ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Indenizen

indenizen ::: v. t. --> To invest with the privileges of a denizen; to naturalize.

In Kant: (1) Empirical apperception (Ger. empirische Apperzeption). The consciousness of the concrete actual self with its changing states; sometimes, simply, the "inner sense". (2) Transcendental apperception (Ger. transzendentale Apperzeption). The pure, original, unchangeable consciousness which is the necessary condition of experience as such and the ultimate foundation of the synthetic unity of experience. (See Kantianism). -- O.F.K.

  (In later Hinduism) “The Preserver.” The second member of the Trimurti, along with Brahma the Creator and Shiva the Destroyer. 2. (In popular Hinduism) a deity believed to have descended from heaven to earth in several incarnations, or avatars, varying in number from nine to twenty-two, but always including animals. His most important human incarnation is the Krishna of the Bhagavad-Gita. 3. “The Pervader,” one of a half-dozen solar deities in the Rig-Veda, daily traversing the sky in three strides, morning, afternoon, and night.

intercitizenship ::: n. --> The mutual right to civic privileges, in the different States.

Internet Relay Chat "chat, messaging" (IRC) /I-R-C/, occasionally /*rk/ A {client-server} {chat} system of large (often worldwide) networks. IRC is structured as networks of {Internet} {servers}, each accepting connections from {client} programs, one per user. The IRC community and the {Usenet} and {MUD} communities overlap to some extent, including both {hackers} and regular folks who have discovered the wonders of computer networks. Some {Usenet} jargon has been adopted on IRC, as have some conventions such as {emoticons}. There is also a vigorous native jargon (see the entry for "{chat}"). The largest and first IRC network is {EFNet}, with a smaller breakaway network called the {Undernet} having existed since 1992, and dozens of other networks having appeared (and sometimes disappeared) since. See also {nick}, {bot}, {op}. {Yahoo's IRC index (http://yahoo.com/Computers_and_Internet/Internet/Chat/IRC/)}. (1998-01-25)

In the Ideen and in later works, Husserl applied the epithet "transcendental" to consciousness as it is aside from its (valid and necessary) self-apperception as in a world. At the same time, he restricted the term "psychic" to subjectivity (personal subjects, their streams of consciousness, etc.) in its status as worldly, animal, human subjectivity. The contrast between transcendental subjectivity and worldly being is fundamental to Husserl's mature concept of pure phenomenology and to his concept of a universal phenomenological philosophy. In the Ideen, this pure phenomenology, defined as the eidetic science of transcendental subjectivity, was contrasted with psychology, defined as the empirical science of actual subjectivity in the world. Two antitheses are involved, however eidetic versus factual, and transcendental versus psychic. Rightly, they yield a four-fold classification, which Husserl subsequently made explicit, in his Formale und Transzendentale Logik (1929), Nachwort zu meinen Ideen (1930), and Meditations Cartesiennes (1931). In these works, he spoke of psychology as including all knowledge of worldly subjectivity while, within this science, he distinguished an empirical or matter-of-fact pure psychology and an eidetic pure psychology. The former is "pure" only in the way phenomenology, as explicitly conceived in the first edition of the Logische Untersuchungen, is pure: actual psychic subjectivity is abstracted as its exclusive theme, objects intended in the investigated psychic processes are taken only as the latter's noematic-intentional objects. Such an abstractive and self-restraining attitude, Husserl believed, is necessary, if one is to isohte the psychic in its purity and yet preserve it in its full intentionality. The instituting and maintaining of such an attitude is called "psychological epoche"; its effect on the objects of psychic consciousness is called "psychological reduction." As empiricism, this pure psychology describes the experienced typical structures of psychic processes and of the typical noematic objects belonging inseparably to the latter by virtue of their intrinsic intentionality. Description of typical personalities and of their habitually intended worlds also lies within its province. Having acquired empirical knowledge of the purely psychic, one may relax one's psychological epoche and inquire into the extrapsychic circumstances under which, e.g., psychic processes of a particulai type actually occur in the world. Thus an empirical pure intentional psychology would become part of a concrete empirical science of actual psychophysical organisms.

In this broad sense contingency appears always to imply a reference to some basis in relation to which a given thing may be said to be contingent, and in view of the two referents most commonly employed it is possible to distinguish two chief types: (1) logical contingency, and (2) physical contingency. The first is contingency with respect to the laws of logic, the second contingency with respect to the laws of nature. A given state of affairs, e.g., the existence of a snowflake with a given shape, is logically contingent in that the laws of logic do not suffice to establish that such a thing does or does not exist. This same state of affairs would not ordinarily be held to be physically contingent, however, for, although the laws of nature alone do not suffice to determine that there is such a snowflake, still it would be held on the general hypothesis of determinism that, given the specific conditions under which the water was frozen, it was determined by physical laws that a snowflake would exist and that it would have this shape and no other.

ionian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Ionia or the Ionians; Ionic. ::: n. --> A native or citizen of Ionia.

ivs {INRIA} Videoconferencing System. A {video-conferencing} tool for the {Internet} based on the {H.261} {video compression} {standard}. {(http://zenon.inria.fr:8003/rodeo/personnel/Thierry.Turletti/ivs.html)}. (1994-11-16)

Jon Postel "person" (Jonathan Bruce Postel, 1943 - 1998-10-16) /p*-stel'/ One of the {Internet}'s founding fathers. Jon's name is prominent on many of the fundamental {standards} on which the Internet is built, such as {UDP}. He ran {IANA} for as long as anybody could remember, in fact for most of the time he *was* IANA. He wrote {STD 1}, {STD 2} and several dozen other {RFCs}. His friend {Vinton Cerf} noted his passing in {RFC 2468}. (1998-10-21)

Kant, Immanuel: (1724-1804), born and died in Königsberg. Studied the Leibniz-Wolffian philosoohv under Martin Knutzen. Also studied and taught astronomy (see Kant-Laplace hypothesis), mechanics and theology. The influence of Newton's physics and Lockean psychology vied with his Leibnizian training. Kant's personal life was that of a methodic pedant, touched with Rousseauistic piety and Prussian rigidity. He scarcely travelled 40 miles from Königsberg in his life-time, disregarded music, had little esteem for women, and cultivated few friends apart from the Prussian officials he knew in Königsberg. In 1755, he became tutor in the family of Count Kayserling. In 1766, he was made under-librarian, and in 1770 obtained the chair of logic and metaphysics at the University of Königsberg. Heine has made classical the figure of Kant appearing for his daily walk with clock-like regularity. But his very wide reading compensated socially for his narrow range of travel, and made him an interesting coversationalist as well as a successful teacher. Kantianism: The philosophy of Immanuel Kant (1724-1804); also called variously, the critical philosophy, criticism, transcendentalism, or transcendental idealism. Its roots lay in the Enlightenment; but it sought to establish a comprehensive method and doctrine of experience which would undercut the rationalistic metaphysics of the 17th and 18th centuries. In an early "pre-critical" period, Kant's interest centered in evolutionary, scientific cosmology. He sought to describe the phenomena of Nature, organic as well as inorganic, as a whole of interconnected natural laws. In effect he elaborated and extended the natural philosophy of Newton in a metaphysical context drawn from Christian Wolff and indirectly from Leibniz.

ketch ::: n. --> An almost obsolete form of vessel, with a mainmast and a mizzenmast, -- usually from one hundred to two hundred and fifty tons burden.
A hangman. See Jack Ketch. ::: v. t. --> To catch.


laser printer "printer" A non-impact high-resolution printer which uses a rotating disk to reflect laser beams to form an electrostatic image on a selenium imaging drum. The developer drum transfers toner from the toner bin to the charged areas of the imaging drum, which then transfers it onto the paper into which it is fused by heat. Toner is dry ink powder, generally a plastic heat-sensitive polymer. Print resolution currently (2001) ranges between 300 and 2400 dots per inch (DPI). Laser printers using chemical photoreproduction techniques can produce resolutions of up to 2400 DPI. Print speed is limited by whichever is slower - the printer hardware (the "engine speed"), or the software {rendering} process that converts the data to be printed into a {bit map}. The print speed may exceed 21,000 lines per minute, though printing speed is more often given in pages per minute. If a laser printer is rated at 12 pages per minute (PPM), this figure would be true only if the printer is printing the same data on each of the twelve pages, so that the bit map is identical. This speed however, is rarely reached if each page contains different codes, text, and graphics. In 2001, Xerox's Phaser 1235 and 2135 (with Okidata engines) could print up to 21 colour ppm at 1200x1200 DPI using a single-pass process. Colour laser printers can reach 2400 DPI easily (e.g. an HP LaserJet 8550). Some printers with large amounts of RAM can print at engine speed with different text pages and some of the larger lasers intended for graphics design work can print graphics at full engine speed. Although there are dozens of retail brands of laser printers, only a few {original equipment manufacturers} make {print engines}, e.g. {Canon}, {Ricoh}, {Toshiba}, and {Xerox}. (2002-01-06)

laver ::: n. --> A vessel for washing; a large basin.
A large brazen vessel placed in the court of the Jewish tabernacle where the officiating priests washed their hands and feet.
One of several vessels in Solomon&


Legal Philosophy: Deals with the philosophic principles of law and justice. The origin is to be found in ancient philosophy. The Greek Sophists criticized existing laws and customs by questioning their validity: All human rules are artificial, created by enactment or convention, as opposed to natural law, based on nature. The theory of a law of nature was further developed by Aristotle and the Stoics. According to the Stoics the natural law is based upon the eternal law of the universe; this itself is an outgrowth of universal reason, as man's mind is an offshoot of the latter. The idea of a law of nature as being innate in man was particularly stressed and popularized by Cicero who identified it with "right reason" and already contrasted it with written law that might be unjust or even tyrannical. Through Saint Augustine these ideas were transmitted to medieval philosophy and by Thomas Aquinas built into his philosophical system. Thomas considers the eternal law the reason existing in the divine mind and controlling the universe. Natural law, innate in man participates in that eternal law. A new impetus was given to Legal Philosophy by the Renaissance. Natural Jurisprudence, properly so-called, originated in the XVII. century. Hugo Grotius, Thomas Hobbes, Benedictus Spinoza, John Locke, Samuel Pufendorf were the most important representatives of that line of thought. Grotius, continuing the Scholastic tradition, particularly stressed the absoluteness of natural hw (it would exist even if God did not exist) and, following Jean Bodin, the sovereignty of the people. The idea of the social contract traced all political bodies back to a voluntary compact by which every individual gave up his right to self-government, or rather transferred it to the government, abandoning a state of nature which according to Hobbes must have been a state of perpetual war. The theory of the social compact more and more accepts the character of a "fiction" or of a regulative idea (Kant). In this sense the theory means that we ought to judge acts of government by their correspondence to the general will (Rousseau) and to the interests of the individuals who by transferring their rights to the commonwealth intended to establish their real liberty. Natural law by putting the emphasis on natural rights, takes on a revolutionary character. It played a part in shaping the bills of rights, the constitutions of the American colonies and of the Union, as well as of the French declaration of the rights of men and of citizens. Natural jurisprudence in the teachings of Christian Wolff and Thomasius undergoes a kind of petrification in the vain attempt to outline an elaborate system of natural law not only in the field of international or public law, but also in the detailed regulations of the law of property, of contract, etc. This sort of dogmatic approach towards the problems of law evoked the opposition of the Historic School (Gustav Hugo and Savigny) which stressed the natural growth of laws ind customs, originating from the mysterious "spirit of the people". On the other hand Immanuel Kant tried to overcome the old natural law by the idea of a "law of reason", meaning an a priori element in all existing or positive law. In his definition of law ("the ensemble of conditions according to which everyone's will may coexist with the will of every other in accordance with a general rule of liberty"), however, as in his legal philosophy in general, he still shares the attitude of the natural law doctrine, confusing positive law with the idea of just law. This is also true of Hegel whose panlogism seemed to lead in this very direction. Under the influence of epistemological positivism (Comte, Mill) in the later half of the nineteenth century, legal philosophy, especially in Germany, confined itself to a "general theory of law". Similarily John Austin in England considered philosophy of law concerned only with positive law, "as it necessarily is", not as it ought to be. Its main task was to analyze certain notions which pervade the science of law (Analytical Jurisprudence). In recent times the same tendency to reduce legal philosophy to logical or at least methodological tasks was further developed in attempting a pure science of law (Kelsen, Roguin). Owing to the influence of Darwinism and natural science in general the evolutionist and biological viewpoint was accepted in legal philosophy: comparative jurisprudence, sociology of law, the Freirecht movement in Germany, the study of the living law, "Realism" in American legal philosophy, all represent a tendency against rationalism. On the other hand there is a revival of older tendencies: Hegelianism, natural law -- especially in Catholic philosophy -- and Kantianism (beginning with Rudolf Stammler). From here other trends arose: the critical attitude leads to relativism (f.i. Gustav Radbruch); the antimetaphysical tendency towards positivism -- though different from epistemological positivism -- and to a pure theory of law. Different schools of recent philosophy have found their applications or repercussions in legal philosophy: Phenomenology, for example, tried to intuit the essences of legal institutions, thus coming back to a formalist position, not too far from the real meaning of analytical jurisprudence. Neo-positivism, though so far not yet explicitly applied to legal philosophy, seems to lead in the same direction. -- W.E.

level/line fallacy (LLF) ::: The confusing of a level in a line with the line itself. There are two major versions of the level/line fallacy: fixation, where a level in a line is glorified and absolutized, and thus the entire line is frozen at the level where the confusion originally occurred; and repression, where a level in a line is denied or suppressed and thus the entire line is suppressed.

lines ::: Relatively independent streams or capacities that proceed through levels of development. Howard Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences is one example of the study of developmental lines. There is evidence for over a dozen developmental lines, including cognitive, moral, self-identity, aesthetic, kinesthetic, linguistic, musical, and mathematical. Integral Theory generally classifies these lines according to one of three types: cognitive lines (as studied by Jean Piaget, Robert Kegan, Kurt Fischer, etc.); selfrelated lines (e.g., morals, self-identity, needs, etc.); and capacities or talents (e.g., musical capacity, kinesthetic capacity, introspective capacity). Cognitive development is necessary but not sufficient for development in the self-related lines and appears to be necessary for most of the capacities.

link-dead Said of a {MUD} character who has frozen in place because of a dropped network connection. [{Jargon File}] (1995-01-24)

Linux "operating system" ("Linus Unix") /li'nuks/ (but see below) An implementation of the {Unix} {kernel} originally written from scratch with no proprietary code. The kernel runs on {Intel} and {Alpha} hardware in the general release, with {SPARC}, {PowerPC}, {MIPS}, {ARM}, {Amiga}, {Atari}, and {SGI} in active development. The SPARC, PowerPC, ARM, {PowerMAC} - {OSF}, and 68k ports all support {shells}, {X} and {networking}. The Intel and SPARC versions have reliable {symmetric multiprocessing}. Work on the kernel is coordinated by Linus Torvalds, who holds the copyright on a large part of it. The rest of the copyright is held by a large number of other contributors (or their employers). Regardless of the copyright ownerships, the kernel as a whole is available under the {GNU} {General Public License}. The GNU project supports Linux as its kernel until the research {Hurd} kernel is completed. This kernel would be no use without {application programs}. The GNU project has provided large numbers of quality tools, and together with other {public domain} software it is a rich Unix environment. A compilation of the Linux kernel and these tools is known as a Linux distribution. Compatibility modules and/or {emulators} exist for dozens of other computing environments. The kernel version numbers are significant: the odd numbered series (e.g. 1.3.xx) is the development (or beta) kernel which evolves very quickly. Stable (or release) kernels have even major version numbers (e.g. 1.2.xx). There is a lot of commercial support for and use of Linux, both by hardware companies such as {Digital}, {IBM}, and {Apple} and numerous smaller network and integration specialists. There are many commercially supported distributions which are generally entirely under the GPL. At least one distribution vendor guarantees {Posix} compliance. Linux is particularly popular for {Internet Service Providers}, and there are ports to both parallel supercomputers and {embedded} {microcontrollers}. {Debian} is one popular {open source} distribution. The pronunciation of "Linux" has been a matter of much debate. Many, including Torvalds, insist on the short I pronunciation /li'nuks/ because "Linus" has an /ee/ sound in Swedish (Linus's family is part of Finland's 6% ethnic-Swedish minority) and Linus considers English short /i/ to be closer to /ee/ than English long /i:/ dipthong. This is consistent with the short I in words like "linen". This doesn't stop others demanding a long I /li:'nuks/ following the english pronunciation of "Linus" and "minus". Others say /li'niks/ following {Minix}, which Torvalds was working on before Linux. {More on pronunciation (/pub/misc/linux-pronunciation)}. {LinuxHQ (http://linuxhq.com/)}. {slashdot (http://slashdot.org/)}. {freshmeat (http://freshmeat.net/)}. {Woven Goods (http://fokus.gmd.de/linux/)}. {Linux Gazette (http://ssc.com/lg)}. {funet Linux Archive (ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/Linux)}, {US mirror (ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/)}, {UK Mirror (ftp://sunsite.doc.ic.ac.uk/packages/Linux/)}. (2000-06-09)

litotes ::: n. --> A diminution or softening of statement for the sake of avoiding censure or increasing the effect by contrast with the moderation shown in the form of expression; as, " a citizen of no mean city," that is, of an illustrious city.

losange ::: n. --> See Lozenge.

losenger ::: n. --> A flatterer; a deceiver; a cozener.

losing ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Lose ::: a. --> Given to flattery or deceit; flattering; cozening. ::: v. t.

lozenged ::: a. --> Alt. of Lozenge-shaped

lozenge ::: n. --> A diamond-shaped figure usually with the upper and lower angles slightly acute, borne upon a shield or escutcheon. Cf. Fusil.
A form of the escutcheon used by women instead of the shield which is used by men.
A figure with four equal sides, having two acute and two obtuse angles; a rhomb.
Anything in the form of lozenge.
A small cake of sugar and starch, flavored, and often


lozenge-shaped ::: a. --> Having the form of a lozenge or rhomb.

lozengy ::: a. --> Divided into lozenge-shaped compartments, as the field or a bearing, by lines drawn in the direction of the bend sinister.

Main works: Die Crenzen d. naturwiss. Begriffsbildung, 1896; Kultur u. Naturtwissenchaften, 1899; Philos. d. Lebens, 1920. -- K.F.L.

mascled ::: a. --> Composed of, or covered with, lozenge-shaped scales; having lozenge-shaped divisions.

mascle ::: n. --> A lozenge voided.

Massively Multiplayer Online Game (MMOG, MMO) Any game that allows dozens, hundreds or even thousands of players to interact with a game via the {Internet}. Typically the game runs on a central {server farm} and players access it via a {personal computer}, {game console} or mobile phone. The most popular genre is the Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG), of which {World of Warcraft} is probably the most popular example. Note that an MMOG is not necessarily a _massive_ game (though often they are based in large, complex worlds), their distinguishing characteristic is the number of players. (2012-05-30)

mesitylene ::: n. --> A colorless, fragrant liquid, C6H3(CH3)3, of the benzene series of hydrocarbons, obtained by distilling acetone with sulphuric acid.

met- ::: --> A prefix meaning between, with, after, behind, over, about, reversely; as, metachronism, the error of placing after the correct time; metaphor, lit., a carrying over; metathesis, a placing reversely.
Other; duplicate, corresponding to; resembling; hence, metameric; as, meta-arabinic, metaldehyde.
That two replacing radicals, in the benzene nucleus, occupy the relative positions of 1 and 3, 2 and 4, 3 and 5, 4 and 6, 5 and 1, or 6 and 2; as, metacresol, etc. See Ortho-, and Para-.


metaxylene ::: n. --> That variety of xylene, or dimethyl benzene, in which the two methyl groups occupy the meta position with reference to each other. It is a colorless inf/ammable liquid.

metic ::: n. --> A sojourner; an immigrant; an alien resident in a Grecian city, but not a citizen.

militia ::: n. --> In the widest sense, the whole military force of a nation, including both those engaged in military service as a business, and those competent and available for such service; specifically, the body of citizens enrolled for military instruction and discipline, but not subject to be called into actual service except in emergencies.
Military service; warfare.


mirbane ::: n. --> See Nitrobenzene.

mizzen ::: a. --> Hindmost; nearest the stern; as, the mizzen shrouds, sails, etc. ::: n. --> The hindmost of the fore and aft sails of a three-masted vessel; also, the spanker.

mizzenmast ::: n. --> The hindmost mast of a three-masted vessel, or of a yawl-rigged vessel.

money ::: n. --> A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.
Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in


Motion: (Lat. moveo, move) Difference in space. Change of place. Erected into a universal principle by Heraclitus. Denied as a possibility by Parmenides and Zeno. Subdivided by Aristotle into alteration or change in shape, and augmentation or diminution or change in size. In realism: exclusively a property of actuality. -- J.K.F.

mu 1. "networking" The {country code} for Mauritius. 2. "philosophy" /moo/ The correct answer to the classic trick question "Have you stopped beating your wife yet?". Assuming that you have no wife or you have never beaten your wife, the answer "yes" is wrong because it implies that you used to beat your wife and then stopped, but "no" is worse because it suggests that you have one and are still beating her. According to various Discordians and Douglas Hofstadter the correct answer is usually "mu", a Japanese word alleged to mean "Your question cannot be answered because it depends on incorrect assumptions". Hackers tend to be sensitive to logical inadequacies in language, and many have adopted this suggestion with enthusiasm. The word "mu" is actually from Chinese, meaning "nothing"; it is used in mainstream Japanese in that sense, but native speakers do not recognise the Discordian question-denying use. It almost certainly derives from overgeneralisation of the answer in the following well-known Rinzei Zen teaching riddle: A monk asked Joshu, "Does a dog have the Buddha nature?" Joshu retorted, "Mu!" See also {has the X nature}, {AI Koan}. [Douglas Hofstadter, "Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid"]. [{Jargon File}] (2000-11-22)

mufti ::: n. --> An official expounder of Mohammedan law.
Citizen&


nadir ::: n. --> That point of the heavens, or lower hemisphere, directly opposite the zenith; the inferior pole of the horizon; the point of the celestial sphere directly under the place where we stand.
The lowest point; the time of greatest depression.


Nanna o.d. Seelenleben d. Pflanzen, 1848;

naphthalene ::: n. --> A white crystalline aromatic hydrocarbon, C10H8, analogous to benzene, and obtained by the distillation of certain bituminous materials, such as the heavy oil of coal tar. It is the type and basis of a large number of derivatives among organic compounds. Formerly called also naphthaline.

nationalize ::: v. t. --> To make national; to make a nation of; to endow with the character and habits of a nation, or the peculiar sentiments and attachment of citizens of a nation.

naturalization ::: n. --> The act or process of naturalizing, esp. of investing an alien with the rights and privileges of a native or citizen; also, the state of being naturalized.

naturalize ::: v. t. --> To make natural; as, custom naturalizes labor or study.
To confer the rights and privileges of a native subject or citizen on; to make as if native; to adopt, as a foreigner into a nation or state, and place in the condition of a native subject.
To receive or adopt as native, natural, or vernacular; to make one&


neapolitan ::: a. --> Of of pertaining to Naples in Italy. ::: n. --> A native or citizen of Naples.

nebulosity ::: n. --> The state or quality of being nebulous; cloudiness; hazeness; mistiness; nebulousness.
The stuff of which a nebula is formed.
A nebula.


nehushtan ::: n. --> A thing of brass; -- the name under which the Israelites worshiped the brazen serpent made by Moses.

Nightmare File System Pejorative hackerism for {Sun}'s {Network File System} (NFS). In any nontrivial network of Suns where there is a lot of NFS {cross-mount}ing, when one Sun goes down, the others often freeze up. Some machine tries to access the down one, and (getting no response) repeats indefinitely. This causes it to appear dead to some messages (what is actually happening is that it is locked up in what should have been a brief excursion to a higher {spl} level). Then another machine tries to reach either the down machine or the pseudo-down machine, and itself becomes pseudo-down. The first machine to discover the down one is now trying both to access the down one and to respond to the pseudo-down one, so it is even harder to reach. This situation snowballs very quickly, and soon the entire network of machines is frozen - worst of all, the user can't even abort the file access that started the problem! Many of NFS's problems are excused by partisans as being an inevitable result of its {stateless}ness, which is held to be a great feature (critics, of course, call it a great {misfeature}). {ITS} partisans are apt to cite this as proof of {Unix}'s alleged bogosity; ITS had a working NFS-like shared file system with none of these problems in the early 1970s. See also {broadcast storm}. [{Jargon File}]

nitro- ::: --> A combining form or an adjective denoting the presence of niter.
A combining form (used also adjectively) designating certain compounds of nitrogen or of its acids, as nitrohydrochloric, nitrocalcite; also, designating the group or radical NO2, or its compounds, as nitrobenzene.


nitrobenzene ::: n. --> A yellow aromatic liquid (C6H5.NO2), produced by the action of nitric acid on benzene, and called from its odor imitation oil of bitter almonds, or essence of mirbane. It is used in perfumery, and is manufactured in large quantities in the preparation of aniline. Fornerly called also nitrobenzol.

nitrobenzole ::: n. --> See Nitrobenzene.

NLX "hardware, standard" A low-profile, low {TCO} {motherboard} design created jointly by {Intel Corp.}, {IBM}, {DEC} and other PC vendors. In contrast to the traditional single-board design, NLX uses a {riser} card to carry {PCI}, {ISA} and {AGP} {bus} data (despite {Intel}'s stated intent to rid PC motherboards of the {ISA} {bus} by 2000). Version 1.2 of NLX is the final specification, and was frozen in March 1997. Minor modifications appear in the form of "Engineering Change Requests". {(http://teleport.com/~nlx/)}. {Intel (http://intel.com/design/motherboard/nlx.htm)}. ["NLX Motherboard Specification", various, pub. Intel Corp. 1997] (1998-09-21)

noncombatant ::: n. --> Any person connected with an army, or within the lines of an army, who does not make it his business to fight, as any one of the medical officers and their assistants, chaplains, and others; also, any of the citizens of a place occupied by an army; also, any one holding a similar position with respect to the navy.

notify ::: v. t. --> To make known; to declare; to publish; as, to notify a fact to a person.
To give notice to; to inform by notice; to apprise; as, the constable has notified the citizens to meet at the city hall; the bell notifies us of the time of meeting.


Nuprl /nyu p*rl/ Nearly Ultimate PRL. A system for interactive creation of formal mathematics, including definitions and proofs. It has an extremely rich type system, including dependent functions, products, sets, quotients and universes. Types are first-class citizens. It is built on {Franz Lisp} and {Edinburgh ML}. ["Implementing Mathematics in the Nuprl Proof Development System", R.L. Constable et al, P-H 1986]. (1994-12-13)

octane ::: n. --> Any one of a group of metametric hydrocarcons (C8H18) of the methane series. The most important is a colorless, volatile, inflammable liquid, found in petroleum, and a constituent of benzene or ligroin.

opulent ::: a. --> Having a large estate or property; wealthy; rich; affluent; as, an opulent city; an opulent citizen.

orthoxylene ::: n. --> That variety of xylene in which the two methyl groups are in the ortho position; a colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon resembling benzene.

outbrazen ::: v. t. --> To bear down with a brazen face; to surpass in impudence.

overhead ::: adv. --> Aloft; above; in or attached to the ceiling or roof; in the story or upon the floor above; in the zenith.

oxybenzene ::: n. --> Hydroxy benzene. Same as Phenol.

ozena ::: n. --> A discharge of fetid matter from the nostril, particularly if associated with ulceration of the soft parts and disease of the bones of the nose.

package ::: n. --> Act or process of packing.
A bundle made up for transportation; a packet; a bale; a parcel; as, a package of goods.
A charge made for packing goods.
A duty formerly charged in the port of London on goods imported or exported by aliens, or by denizens who were the sons of aliens.


para- ::: --> A prefix signifying alongside of, beside, beyond, against, amiss; as parable, literally, a placing beside; paradox, that which is contrary to opinion; parachronism.
A prefix denoting: (a) Likeness, similarity, or connection, or that the substance resembles, but is distinct from, that to the name of which it is prefixed; as paraldehyde, paraconine, etc.; also, an isomeric modification. (b) Specifically: (Organ. Chem.) That two groups or radicals substituted in the benzene nucleus are opposite, or in the


Parallelism, psychophysical: (Cr parallelos, from para, beside -- allelon, of one another). A dualistic solution of the mind body problem (see Mind-body relation) which asserts, in its extreme form, a perfect one-to-one correlation between the system of physical events in nature and the system of psychical events in mind. In its more moderate and restricted form, parallelism asserts only a correlation between all psychoses (mental events in an individual mind) and all or some neuroses (neural events in the individual's body). Thus there may exist physico-chemical and even neural processes in the body having no psychical correlates The term parallelism was introduced by Fechner (Zend-Avesta, Bk III, ch XIX, D) but the doctrine appeared in Spinoza (Ethics, Bk II, prop. 7 schol. and props. 11 and 12) -- L.W.

pastille ::: n. --> A small cone or mass made of paste of gum, benzoin, cinnamon, and other aromatics, -- used for fumigating or scenting the air of a room.
An aromatic or medicated lozenge; a troche.
See Pastel, a crayon.


pdksh Version 4.9 interpreter Simon J. Gerraty "sjg@zen.void.oz.au" comp.sources.misc volume 4 It is not intended to be the ultimate shell but rather a usable ksh work alike. conformance: Almost identical to ksh88, but missing arrays E-mail: Simon J Gerraty "sjg@melb.bull.oz.au" (zen.void.oz.au is down) ports: Sun, 386bsd, ? 1993-10-11

pelican ::: n. --> Any large webfooted bird of the genus Pelecanus, of which about a dozen species are known. They have an enormous bill, to the lower edge of which is attached a pouch in which captured fishes are temporarily stored.
A retort or still having a curved tube or tubes leading back from the head to the body for continuous condensation and redistillation.


peppermint ::: n. --> An aromatic and pungent plant of the genus Mentha (M. piperita), much used in medicine and confectionery.
A volatile oil (oil of peppermint) distilled from the fresh herb; also, a well-known essence or spirit (essence of peppermint) obtained from it.
A lozenge of sugar flavored with peppermint.


Perl "language, tool" A {high-level} programming language, started by {Larry Wall} in 1987 and developed as an {open source} project. It has an eclectic heritage, deriving from the ubiquitous {C} programming language and to a lesser extent from {sed}, {awk}, various {Unix} {shell} languages, {Lisp}, and at least a dozen other tools and languages. Originally developed for {Unix}, it is now available for many {platforms}. Perl's elaborate support for {regular expression} matching and substitution has made it the {language of choice} for tasks involving {string manipulation}, whether for text or binary data. It is particularly popular for writing {CGI scripts}. The language's highly flexible syntax and concise regular expression operators, make densely written Perl code indecipherable to the uninitiated. The syntax is, however, really quite simple and powerful and, once the basics have been mastered, a joy to write. Perl's only {primitive} data type is the "scalar", which can hold a number, a string, the undefined value, or a typed reference. Perl's {aggregate} data types are {arrays}, which are ordered lists of {scalars} indexed by {natural numbers}, and hashes (or "{associative arrays}") which are unordered lists of scalars indexed by strings. A reference can point to a scalar, array, hash, {function}, or {filehandle}. {Objects} are implemented as references "{blessed}" with a {class} name. Strings in Perl are {eight-bit clean}, including {nulls}, and so can contain {binary data}. Unlike C but like most Lisp dialects, Perl internally and dynamically handles all memory allocation, {garbage collection}, and type {coercion}. Perl supports {closures}, {recursive functions}, {symbols} with either {lexical scope} or {dynamic scope}, nested {data structures} of arbitrary content and complexity (as lists or hashes of references), and packages (which can serve as classes, optionally inheriting {methods} from one or more other classes). There is ongoing work on {threads}, {Unicode}, {exceptions}, and {backtracking}. Perl program files can contain embedded documentation in {POD} (Plain Old Documentation), a simple markup language. The normal Perl distribution contains documentation for the language, as well as over a hundred modules (program libraries). Hundreds more are available from The {Comprehensive Perl Archive Network}. Modules are themselves generally written in Perl, but can be implemented as interfaces to code in other languages, typically compiled C. The free availability of modules for almost any conceivable task, as well as the fact that Perl offers direct access to almost all {system calls} and places no arbitrary limits on data structure size or complexity, has led some to describe Perl, in a parody of a famous remark about {lex}, as the "Swiss Army chainsaw" of programming. The use of Perl has grown significantly since its adoption as the language of choice of many {web} developers. {CGI} interfaces and libraries for Perl exist for several {platforms} and Perl's speed and flexibility make it well suited for form processing and on-the-fly {web page} creation. Perl programs are generally stored as {text} {source} files, which are compiled into {virtual machine} code at run time; this, in combination with its rich variety of data types and its common use as a glue language, makes Perl somewhat hard to classify as either a "{scripting language}" or an "{applications language}" -- see {Ousterhout's dichotomy}. Perl programs are usually called "Perl scripts", if only for historical reasons. Version 5 was a major rewrite and enhancement of version 4, released sometime before November 1993. It added real {data structures} by way of "references", un-adorned {subroutine} calls, and {method} {inheritance}. The spelling "Perl" is preferred over the older "PERL" (even though some explain the language's name as originating in the acronym for "Practical Extraction and Report Language"). The program that interprets/compiles Perl code is called "perl", typically "/usr/local/bin/perl" or "/usr/bin/perl". {(http://perl.com/)}. {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:comp.lang.perl.announce}, {news:comp.lang.perl.misc}. ["Programming Perl", Larry Wall and Randal L. Schwartz, O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. Sebastopol, CA. ISBN 0-93715-64-1]. ["Learning Perl" by Randal L. Schwartz, O'Reilly & Associates, Inc., Sebastopol, CA]. [{Jargon File}] (1999-12-04)

perpendicular ::: a. --> Exactly upright or vertical; pointing to the zenith; at right angles to the plane of the horizon; extending in a right line from any point toward the center of the earth.
At right angles to a given line or surface; as, the line ad is perpendicular to the line bc. ::: n.


Persian Philosophy: Persia was a vast empire before the time of Alexander the Great, embracing not only most of the orientnl tribes of Western Asia but also the Greeks of Asia Minor, the Jews and the Egyptians. If we concentrate on the central section of Persia, three philosophic periods may be distinguished Zoroastrianism (including Mithraism and Magianism), Manichaeanism, and medieval Persian thought. Zarathustra (Or. Zoroaster) lived before 600 B.C. and wrote the Avesta, apparently in the Zend language. It is primarily religious, but the teaching that there are two ultimate principles of reality, Ormazd, the God of Light and Goodness, and Ahriman, God of Evil and Darkness, is of philosophic importance. They are eternally fighting Mitra is the intermediary between Ormazd and man. In the third century A. D., Mani of Ecbatana (in Media) combined this dualism of eternal principles with some of the doctrines of Christianity. His seven books are now known only through second-hand reports of Mohammedan (Abu Faradj Ibn Ishaq, 10th c., and Sharastani, 12th c.) and Christian (St. Ephrem, 4th c., and Bar-Khoni, 7th c.) writers. St Augustine of Hippo (354-430 A.D.) has left several works criticizing Manichaeism, which he knew at first-hand. From the ninth century onward, many of the great Arabic philosophers are of Persian origin. Mention might be made of the epicureanism of the Rubaiyat of the Persian poet, Omar Kayyam, and the remarkable metaphysical system of Avicenna, i.e. Ibn Sina (11th c.), who was born in Persia. -- V.J.B.

petalism ::: n. --> A form of sentence among the ancient Syracusans by which they banished for five years a citizen suspected of having dangerous influence or ambition. It was similar to the ostracism in Athens; but olive leaves were used instead of shells for ballots.

phene ::: n. --> Benzene.

phenose ::: n. --> A sweet amorphous deliquescent substance obtained indirectly from benzene, and isometric with, and resembling, dextrose.

phenylene ::: n. --> A hypothetic radical (C6H4) occurring in certain derivatives of benzene; as, phenylene diamine.

phenyl ::: n. --> A hydrocarbon radical (C6H5) regarded as the essential residue of benzene, and the basis of an immense number of aromatic derivatives.

piperaceous ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the order of plants (Piperaceae) of which the pepper (Piper nigrum) is the type. There are about a dozen genera and a thousand species, mostly tropical plants with pungent and aromatic qualities.

Platonism as a political philosophy finds its best known exposition in the theory of the ideal state in the Republic. There, Plato described a city in which social justice would be fully realized. Three classes of men are distinguished: the philosopher kings, apparently a very small group whose education has been alluded to above, who would be the rulers because by nature and by training they were the best men for the job. They must excel particularly in their rational abilities: their special virtue is philosophic wisdom; the soldiers, or guardians of the state, constitute the second class; their souls must be remarkable for the development of the spirited, warlike element, under the control of the virtue of courage; the lowest class is made up of the acquisitive group, the workers of every sort whose characteristic virtue is temperance. For the two upper classes, Plato suggested a form of community life which would entail the abolition of monogamous marriage, family life, and of private property. It is to be noted that this form of semi-communism was suggested for a minority of the citizens only (Repub. III and V) and it is held to be a practical impossibility in the Laws (V, 739-40), though Plato continued to think that some form of community life is theoretically best for man. In Book VIII of the Republic, we find the famous classification of five types of political organization, ranging from aristocracy which is the rule of the best men, timocracy, in which the rulers are motivated by a love of honor, oligarchy, in which the rulers seek wealth, democracy, the rule of the masses who are unfit for the task, to tyranny, which is the rule of one man who may have started as the champion of the people but who governs solely for the advancement of his own, selfish interests.

poecile ::: n. --> Same as Poicile.
The frescoed porch or gallery in Athens where Zeno taught.


Political Personalism: The doctrine that the state is under obligation to provide opportunity to each citizen for the highest possible physical, mental, and spiritual development, because personality is the supreme achievement of the social order. A movement in France represented by the journal Esprit. -- R.T.F.

politics ::: n. --> The science of government; that part of ethics which has to do with the regulation and government of a nation or state, the preservation of its safety, peace, and prosperity, the defense of its existence and rights against foreign control or conquest, the augmentation of its strength and resources, and the protection of its citizens in their rights, with the preservation and improvement of their morals.
The management of a political party; the conduct and


POP-2 Robin POPplestone, Edinburgh, 1967. An innovative language incorporating many of Landin's ideas, including streams, closures, and functions as first-class citizens. ALGOL-like syntax. The first implementation was named Multi-POP, based on a REVPOL function written in POP-1, producing the reverse-polish form as output. "POP-2 Papers", R.M. Burstall et al, Oliver & Boyd 1968. "Programming in POP-2", R.M. Burstall et al, Edinburgh U Press 1971. "POP-2 User's Manual", R. Popplestone, Mach Intell 2, E. Dale et al eds, Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh 1968.

Population ::: The entire group to which research is hoping to generalize (e.g., males, adults, U.S. citizens).

posse comitatus ::: --> The power of the county, or the citizens who may be summoned by the sheriff to assist the authorities in suppressing a riot, or executing any legal precept which is forcibly opposed.
A collection of people; a throng; a rabble.


poyntel ::: n. --> Paving or flooring made of small squares or lozenges set diagonally.

prehnitic ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or designating, a tetrabasic acid of benzene obtained as a white crystalline substance; -- probably so called from the resemblance of the wartlike crystals to the mammillae on the surface of prehnite.

proglet /prog'let/ [UK] A short extempore program written to meet an immediate, transient need. Often written in BASIC, rarely more than a dozen lines long and containing no subroutines. The largest amount of code that can be written off the top of one's head, that does not need any editing, and that runs correctly the first time (this amount varies significantly according to one's skill and the language one is using). Compare {toy program}, {noddy}, {one-liner wars}. [{Jargon File}]

proletary ::: n. --> A citizen of the lowest class, who served the state, not with property, but only by having children; hence, a common person.

proscription ::: n. --> The act of proscribing; a dooming to death or exile; outlawry; specifically, among the ancient Romans, the public offer of a reward for the head of a political enemy; as, under the triumvirate, many of the best Roman citizens fell by proscription.
The state of being proscribed; denunciation; interdiction; prohibition.


prudhomme ::: n. --> A trustworthy citizen; a skilled workman. See Citation under 3d Commune, 1.

prytaneum ::: n. --> A public building in certain Greek cities; especially, a public hall in Athens regarded as the home of the community, in which official hospitality was extended to distinguished citizens and strangers.

pumpkin "jargon" A humourous term for the {token} - the object (notional or real) that gives its possessor (the "pumpking" or the "pumpkineer") exclusive access to something, e.g. applying {patches} to a master copy of {source} (for which the pumpkin is called a "patch pumpkin"). Chip Salzenberg "chip@perl.com" wrote: David Croy once told me once that at a previous job, there was one tape drive and multiple systems that used it for backups. But instead of some high-tech exclusion software, they used a low-tech method to prevent multiple simultaneous backups: a stuffed pumpkin. No one was allowed to make backups unless they had the "backup pumpkin". (1999-02-23)

quarrel ::: n. --> An arrow for a crossbow; -- so named because it commonly had a square head.
Any small square or quadrangular member
A square of glass, esp. when set diagonally.
A small opening in window tracery, of which the cusps, etc., make the form nearly square.
A square or lozenge-shaped paving tile.
A glazier&


quirites ::: n. pl. --> Roman citizens.

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal "humour" Back in the good old days - the "Golden Era" of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called "Real Men" and "Quiche Eaters" in the literature). During this period, the Real Men were the ones that understood computer programming, and the Quiche Eaters were the ones that didn't. A real computer programmer said things like "DO 10 I=1,10" and "ABEND" (they actually talked in capital letters, you understand), and the rest of the world said things like "computers are too complicated for me" and "I can't relate to computers - they're so impersonal". (A previous work [1] points out that Real Men don't "relate" to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.) But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow Real Men out of the water playing Asteroids and Pac-Man, and anyone can buy and even understand their very own Personal Computer. The Real Programmer is in danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with {TRASH-80s}. There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is made clear, it will give these kids something to aspire to -- a role model, a Father Figure. It will also help explain to the employers of Real Programmers why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings). LANGUAGES The easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use {Fortran}. Quiche Eaters use {Pascal}. Nicklaus Wirth, the designer of Pascal, gave a talk once at which he was asked how to pronounce his name. He replied, "You can either call me by name, pronouncing it 'Veert', or call me by value, 'Worth'." One can tell immediately from this comment that Nicklaus Wirth is a Quiche Eater. The only parameter passing mechanism endorsed by Real Programmers is call-by-value-return, as implemented in the {IBM 370} {Fortran-G} and H compilers. Real programmers don't need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a {keypunch}, a {Fortran IV} {compiler}, and a beer. Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran. Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran. Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran. Real Programmers do {Artificial Intelligence} programs in Fortran. If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in {assembly language}. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing. STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING The academics in computer science have gotten into the "structured programming" rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily understood if the programmer uses some special language constructs and techniques. They don't all agree on exactly which constructs, of course, and the examples they use to show their particular point of view invariably fit on a single page of some obscure journal or another - clearly not enough of an example to convince anyone. When I got out of school, I thought I was the best programmer in the world. I could write an unbeatable tic-tac-toe program, use five different computer languages, and create 1000-line programs that WORKED. (Really!) Then I got out into the Real World. My first task in the Real World was to read and understand a 200,000-line Fortran program, then speed it up by a factor of two. Any Real Programmer will tell you that all the Structured Coding in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming: Real Programmers aren't afraid to use {GOTOs}. Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused. Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting. Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 {nanoseconds} in the middle of a tight loop. Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious. Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using {assigned GOTOs}. Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Wirth (the above-mentioned Quiche Eater) actually wrote an entire book [2] contending that you could write a program based on data structures, instead of the other way around. As all Real Programmers know, the only useful data structure is the Array. Strings, lists, structures, sets - these are all special cases of arrays and can be treated that way just as easily without messing up your programing language with all sorts of complications. The worst thing about fancy data types is that you have to declare them, and Real Programming Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name. OPERATING SYSTEMS What kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M. Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right down to it, Unix is a glorified video game. People don't do Serious Work on Unix systems: they send jokes around the world on {UUCP}-net and write adventure games and research papers. No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great programmer can write JCL without referring to the manual at all. A truly outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte {core dump} without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.) OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is encouraged. The best way to approach the system is through a keypunch. Some people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken. PROGRAMMING TOOLS What kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back in the days when computers had front panels, this was actually done occasionally. Your typical Real Programmer knew the entire bootstrap loader by memory in hex, and toggled it in whenever it got destroyed by his program. (Back then, memory was memory - it didn't go away when the power went off. Today, memory either forgets things when you don't want it to, or remembers things long after they're better forgotten.) Legend has it that {Seymore Cray}, inventor of the Cray I supercomputer and most of Control Data's computers, actually toggled the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer. One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had crashed in the middle of saving some important work. Jim was able to repair the damage over the phone, getting the user to toggle in disk I/O instructions at the front panel, repairing system tables in hex, reading register contents back over the phone. The moral of this story: while a Real Programmer usually includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies. In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a single keypunch. The Real Programmer in this situation has to do his work with a "text editor" program. Most systems supply several text editors to select from, and the Real Programmer must be careful to pick one that reflects his personal style. Many people believe that the best text editors in the world were written at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center for use on their Alto and Dorado computers [3]. Unfortunately, no Real Programmer would ever use a computer whose operating system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse. Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - {Emacs} and {VI} being two. The problem with these editors is that Real Programmers consider "what you see is what you get" to be just as bad a concept in Text Editors as it is in women. No the Real Programmer wants a "you asked for it, you got it" text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise. It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining games to play with TECO is to type your name in as a command line and try to guess what it does. Just about any possible typing error while talking with TECO will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine. For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary {object code} directly, using a wonderful program called SUPERZAP (or its equivalent on non-IBM machines). This works so well that many working programs on IBM systems bear no relation to the original Fortran code. In many cases, the original source code is no longer available. When it comes time to fix a program like this, no manager would even think of sending anything less than a Real Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called "job security". Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers: Fortran preprocessors like {MORTRAN} and {RATFOR}. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming. Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps. Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient. Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5]. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORK Where does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real Programmer would be caught dead writing accounts-receivable programs in {COBOL}, or sorting {mailing lists} for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!). Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers. Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions. It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies. Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles. Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft by heart. With a combination of large ground-based Fortran programs and small spacecraft-based assembly language programs, they are able to do incredible feats of navigation and improvisation - hitting ten-kilometer wide windows at Saturn after six years in space, repairing or bypassing damaged sensor platforms, radios, and batteries. Allegedly, one Real Programmer managed to tuck a pattern-matching program into a few hundred bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter. The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances. As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, however, a black cloud has formed on the Real Programmer horizon. It seems that some highly placed Quiche Eaters at the Defense Department decided that all Defense programs should be written in some grand unified language called "ADA" ((C), DoD). For a while, it seemed that ADA was destined to become a language that went against all the precepts of Real Programming - a language with structure, a language with data types, {strong typing}, and semicolons. In short, a language designed to cripple the creativity of the typical Real Programmer. Fortunately, the language adopted by DoD has enough interesting features to make it approachable -- it's incredibly complex, includes methods for messing with the operating system and rearranging memory, and Edsgar Dijkstra doesn't like it [6]. (Dijkstra, as I'm sure you know, was the author of "GoTos Considered Harmful" - a landmark work in programming methodology, applauded by Pascal programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language. The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing there's enough money in it. There are several Real Programmers building video games at Atari, for example. (But not playing them - a Real Programmer knows how to beat the machine every time: no challenge in that.) Everyone working at LucasFilm is a Real Programmer. (It would be crazy to turn down the money of fifty million Star Trek fans.) The proportion of Real Programmers in Computer Graphics is somewhat lower than the norm, mostly because nobody has found a use for computer graphics yet. On the other hand, all computer graphics is done in Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAY Generally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be doing for fun anyway (although he is careful not to express this opinion out loud). Occasionally, the Real Programmer does step out of the office for a breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room: At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it. At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper. At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand. At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying "Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary." In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time. THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITAT What sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done. The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are: Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office. Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush. Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages. Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969. Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine. Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions. Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.) The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time doesn't bother the Real Programmer - it gives him a chance to catch a little sleep between compiles. If there is not enough schedule pressure on the Real Programmer, he tends to make things more challenging by working on some small but interesting part of the problem for the first nine weeks, then finishing the rest in the last week, in two or three 50-hour marathons. This not only impresses the hell out of his manager, who was despairing of ever getting the project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general: No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night). Real Programmers don't wear neckties. Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes. Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9]. A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire {ASCII} (or EBCDIC) code table. Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee. THE FUTURE What of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same outlook on life as their elders. Many of them have never seen a computer with a front panel. Hardly anyone graduating from school these days can do hex arithmetic without a calculator. College graduates these days are soft - protected from the realities of programming by source level debuggers, text editors that count parentheses, and "user friendly" operating systems. Worst of all, some of these alleged "computer scientists" manage to get degrees without ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers? From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, despite all the efforts of Pascal programmers the world over. Even more subtle tricks, like adding structured coding constructs to Fortran have failed. Oh sure, some computer vendors have come out with Fortran 77 compilers, but every one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be. Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real Programmer - two different and subtly incompatible user interfaces, an arcane and complicated teletype driver, virtual memory. If you ignore the fact that it's "structured", even 'C' programming can be appreciated by the Real Programmer: after all, there's no type checking, variable names are seven (ten? eight?) characters long, and the added bonus of the Pointer data type is thrown in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

Reichenbach, Hans: Born Sept. 26, 1891, Hamburg, Germany. Successively Privatdozent at the College of Engineering at Stuttgart, Professor of philosophy in the universities of Berlin, Istanbul (1933-1938), University of California at Los Angeles (since 1938); the leading figure of the Berlin group in the development of recent logical empiricism. See Scientific Empiricism.

Reliability, Availability, Serviceability "systems, design, hardware, software" (RAS) Three key attributes of a computing system design. See {reliability}, {availability}, and {serviceability}. The term "RAS" is fairly common in the computing industry (particularly computers and storage) as computing becomes more fundamental. For example, a vehicle may depend on dozens of computers, and the consequences of the failure can be significant (e.g., an ambulance's engine won't start). (2000-08-13)

repatriate ::: to restore or return to the country of birth, citizenship, or origin. Also fig.

republic ::: a political system in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who can elect people to represent them. Also fig.

respectable ::: a. --> Worthy of respect; fitted to awaken esteem; deserving regard; hence, of good repute; not mean; as, a respectable citizen.
Moderate in degree of excellence or in number; as, a respectable performance; a respectable audience.


retene ::: n. --> A white crystalline hydrocarbon, polymeric with benzene. It is extracted from pine tar, and is also found in certain fossil resins.

rosedrop ::: n. --> A lozenge having a rose flavor.
A kind of earring.
A ruddy eruption upon the nose caused by drinking ardent spirits; a grog blossom.


sadda ::: n. --> A work in the Persian tongue, being a summary of the Zend-Avesta, or sacred books.

saic ::: n. --> A kind of ketch very common in the Levant, which has neither topgallant sail nor mizzen topsail.

santalum ::: n. --> A genus of trees with entire opposite leaves and small apetalous flowers. There are less than a dozen species, occurring from India to Australia and the Pacific Islands. See Sandalwood.

Scheler, Max (1874-1928) was originally a disciple of Rudolf Eucken, but joined early -- at the University of Munich -- the Husserl circle of phenomenologists, of which school he became one of the leading exponents. Moving from Kantianism and Eucken-personalism into phenomenology, he later espoused successively positions which may be called a synthesis between phenomenology and Catholic philosophy, sociological dynamism, and ideo-realistic humanism. He was the psychologist, ethicist, and religious and social philosopher of the phenomenological movement. In common with other phenomenologists, Scheler's doctrine begins with the assertion of an inherent correlation of the essences of objects with the essences of intentional experience. His unique contributions lie in the comprehensiveness of his vision, in his interpretation of the value-qualities of being; of emotional experience, especially love, as the key for the disclosure of being; of a hierarchy of concrete ("material" as against formal) values; of an analysis of "resentment" as a thorough grudge (rancour) perverted emotional attitude towards the values of life; of his definition of "person" as the concrete unity of acts; of his acknowledgment of total personality beyond individual persons; of his definition of "ethos" as a preferential system of values determinative for the validity of any specific thought-form; of his development of the sociology of knowledge as a distinct discipline within cultural sociology; and of his working out of a philosophical anthropology showing man's position in and towards the whole of being. His most important works include: Die transzendentale und die psychologische Methode (1900); Der Formalismus in der Ethik und die materiale Wertethik (1916); Vom Ewigen in Menschen (1921); Wesen und Formen der Sympathie (1923); Schriften zur Soziologie und Weltanschauungslehre (3 vols., 1923-1924); Die Wissensformen und dte Gesellschaft (1926); Die Stellung des Menschen in Kosmos (1928); Philosophische Weltanschauung (1929); Zur Ethik und Erkenntnislehre (1933).

seditious ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to sedition; partaking of the nature of, or tending to excite, sedition; as, seditious behavior; seditious strife; seditious words.
Disposed to arouse, or take part in, violent opposition to lawful authority; turbulent; factious; guilty of sedition; as, seditious citizens.


senates ::: assemblies or councils of citizens having the highest deliberative and legislative functions in a government.

sere ::: a. --> [OE. seer, AS. sear (assumed) fr. searian to wither; akin to D. zoor dry, LG. soor, OHG. sor/n to to wither, Gr. a"y`ein to parch, to dry, Skr. /ush (for sush) to dry, to wither, Zend hush to dry. Ã152. Cf. Austere, Sorrel, a.] Dry; withered; no longer green; -- applied to leaves.
Dry; withered. Same as Sear. ::: n.


shameless ::: a. --> Destitute of shame; wanting modesty; brazen-faced; insensible to disgrace.
Indicating want of modesty, or sensibility to disgrace; indecent; as, a shameless picture or poem.


shifter ::: n. --> One who, or that which, shifts; one who plays tricks or practices artifice; a cozener.
An assistant to the ship&


ship ::: n. --> Pay; reward.
Any large seagoing vessel.
Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix.
A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.


SimCity "games" {Maxis Software}'s simulation game which lets you design and build your own city, which must be administered well if it is to thrive. Land must be zoned, transportation systems built, and police and fire protection provided. Once you've zoned some land, and provided electrical power, the simulation takes over, and simcitizens move in. If you perform your mayoral duties poorly, however, they will move out again. If you don't provide enough police, crime will rise and sims will vote with their feet. Try to save money on fire protection, and your city may burn to the ground. There is no predefined way to win the game, building the largest city you can is just one possible strategy. SimCity runs on {Archimedes}, {Amiga}, {Atari ST}, {IBM PC} and {Macintosh}. There was also a {NeWS} version for {Sun} {SPARC} {workstations} running {OpenWindows}. {SimCity 2000} is an upgrade of SimCity. (1995-06-11)

SLIP 1. {Serial Line Internet Protocol}. 2. Symmetric LIst Processsor. Early 1960's list processing subroutine package for {Fortran} by J. Weizenbaum. Later also embedded in {MAD} and {ALGOL}. ["Symmetric List Processor", J. Weizenbaum CACM 6:524-544(1963). Sammet 1969, p.387].

Socrates: (c. 470-399 B.C.) Was one of the most influential teachers of philosophy. The son of an Athenian stone cutter, named Sophroniscus, and of a mid-wife, Socrates learned his father's trade, but, in a sense, practised his mother's. Plato makes him describe himself as one who assists at the birth of ideas. With the exception of two periods of military service, he remained in Athens all his life. He claimed to be guided by a daimon which warned him against what was wrong, and Plato suggests that Socrates enjoyed mystic experiences. Much of his tirne was spent in high-minded philosophic discussion with those he chanced to meet in the public places of Athens. The young men enjoyed his easy methods of discussion and delighted in his frequent quizzing of the Sophists. He was eventually charged in the Athenian citizen court with being irreligious and corrupting the young. Found guilty, he submitted to the court and drank the poison which ended the life of one of the greatest of Athenians. He wrote nothing and is known through three widely divergent contemporary accounts. Aristophanes has caricatured him in the Clouds, Xenophon has described him, with personal respect but little understanding of his philosophical profundity; Plato's dialogues idealize him and probably develop the Socratic philosophy far beyond the original thought of his master. Socrates personifies the Athenian love of reason and of moderation; he probably taught that virtue is knowledge and that knowledge is only true when it reaches the stage of definition. See Socratic method. -- V.J.B.

spitzenburgh ::: n. --> A kind of red and yellow apple, of medium size and spicy flavor. It originated at Newtown, on Long Island.

squads ::: mil. The smallest military formations, typically comprising a dozen soldiers, used esp. as a drill formation.

Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language "language" (SAIL) Dan Swinehart & Bob Sproull, Stanford AI Project, 1970. A large ALGOL 60-like language for the DEC-10 and DEC-20. Its main feature is a symbolic data system based upon an associative store (originally called LEAP). Items may be stored as unordered sets or as associations (triples). Processes, events and interrupts, contexts, backtracking and record garbage collection. Block- structured macros. "Recent Developments in SAIL - An ALGOL-based Language for Artificial Intelligence", J. Feldman et al, Proc FJCC 41(2), AFIPS (Fall 1972). (See MAINSAIL). The Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language used at {SAIL} (the place). It was an ALGOL 60 derivative with a coroutining facility and some new data types intended for building search trees and association lists. A number of interesting software systems were coded in SAIL, including early versions of {FTP} and {TeX} and a document formatting system called {PUB}. In 1978, there were half a dozen different operating systems for the PDP-10: WAITS (Stanford), ITS (MIT), TOPS-10 (DEC), CMU TOPS-10 (CMU), TENEX (BBN), and TOPS-20 (DEC, after TENEX). SAIL was ported from {WAITS} to {ITS} so that {MIT} researchers could make use of software developed at {Stanford University}. Every port usually required the rewriting of I/O code in each application. [{Jargon File}] (2001-06-22)

stoic ::: adj. 1. Of or pertaining to the school of philosophy founded by Zeno, who taught that people should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity. n. 2. A member or adherent of the Stoic school of philosophy. Stoic"s.

stoic ::: n. --> A disciple of the philosopher Zeno; one of a Greek sect which held that men should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and should submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity, by which all things are governed.
Hence, a person not easily excited; an apathetic person; one who is apparently or professedly indifferent to pleasure or pain.
Alt. of Stoical


Stoic School: Founded by Zeno (of Citium, in Cyprus) in the year 308 B.C. in Athens. For Stoicism virtue alone is the only good and the virtuous man is the one who has attained happiness through knowledge, as Socrites had taught. The virtuous man thus finds happiness in himself and is independent of the external world which he has succeeded in overcoming by mastering himself, his passions and emotions. As for the Stoic conception of the universe as a whole, their doctrine is pantheistic. All things and all natural laws follow by a conscious determination from the basic World Reason, and it is this rational order by which, according to Stoicism, the wise man seeks to regulate his life as his highest duty. -- M.F.

summit ::: 1. The highest point or part, as of a hill, a line of travel, or any object; top; apex. 2. The highest state or degree; acme; zenith. 3. The highest point of attainment or aspiration. summits, summit-glories, crypt-summit, seer-summit. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

tetrol ::: n. --> A hypothetical hydrocarbon, C4H4, analogous to benzene; -- so called from the four carbon atoms in the molecule.

TeX "publication" /tekh/ An extremely powerful {macro}-based text formatter written by {Donald Knuth}, very popular in academia, especially in the computer-science community (it is good enough to have displaced {Unix} {troff}, the other favoured formatter, even at many {Unix} installations). The first version of TeX was written in the programming language {SAIL}, to run on a {PDP-10} under Stanford's {WAITS} {operating system}. Knuth began TeX because he had become annoyed at the declining quality of the typesetting in volumes I-III of his monumental "Art of Computer Programming" (see {Knuth}, also {bible}). In a manifestation of the typical hackish urge to solve the problem at hand once and for all, he began to design his own typesetting language. He thought he would finish it on his sabbatical in 1978; he was wrong by only about 8 years. The language was finally frozen around 1985, but volume IV of "The Art of Computer Programming" has yet to appear as of mid-1997. (However, the third edition of volumes I and II have come out). The impact and influence of TeX's design has been such that nobody minds this very much. Many grand hackish projects have started as a bit of {toolsmithing} on the way to something else; Knuth's diversion was simply on a grander scale than most. {Guy Steele} happened to be at Stanford during the summer of 1978, when Knuth was developing his first version of TeX. When he returned to {MIT} that fall, he rewrote TeX's {I/O} to run under {ITS}. TeX has also been a noteworthy example of free, shared, but high-quality software. Knuth offers monetary awards to people who find and report a bug in it: for each bug the award is doubled. (This has not made Knuth poor, however, as there have been very few bugs and in any case a cheque proving that the owner found a bug in TeX is rarely cashed). Though well-written, TeX is so large (and so full of cutting edge technique) that it is said to have unearthed at least one bug in every {Pascal} system it has been compiled with. TeX fans insist on the correct (guttural) pronunciation, and the correct spelling (all caps, squished together, with the E depressed below the baseline; the mixed-case "TeX" is considered an acceptable {kluge} on {ASCII}-only devices). Fans like to proliferate names from the word "TeX" - such as TeXnician (TeX user), TeXhacker (TeX programmer), TeXmaster (competent TeX programmer), TeXhax, and TeXnique. Several document processing systems are based on TeX, notably {LaTeX} Lamport TeX - incorporates document styles for books, letters, slides, etc., {jadeTeX} uses TeX as a backend for printing from {James' DSSSL Engine}, and {Texinfo}, the {GNU} document processing system. Numerous extensions to TeX exist, among them {BibTeX} for bibliographies (distributed with LaTeX), {PDFTeX} modifies TeX to produce {PDF} and {Omega} extends TeX to use the {Unicode} character set. For some reason, TeX uses its own variant of the {point}, the {TeX point}. See also {Comprehensive TeX Archive Network}. {(ftp://labrea.stanford.edu/tex/)}. E-mail: "tug@tug.org" (TeX User's group, Oregon, USA). (2002-03-11)

thaw ::: v. i. --> To melt, dissolve, or become fluid; to soften; -- said of that which is frozen; as, the ice thaws.
To become so warm as to melt ice and snow; -- said in reference to the weather, and used impersonally.
Fig.: To grow gentle or genial. ::: v. t.


thawy ::: a. --> Liquefying by heat after having been frozen; thawing; melting.

  The highest point or part, as of a hill, a line of travel, or any object; top; apex. 2. The highest state or degree; acme; zenith. 3. The highest point of attainment or aspiration. summits, summit-glories, crypt-summit, seer-summit. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

The most notable of these more powerful but rarer phenomena are those which attend the power of exterioration of our cons- ciousness for various lands of action otherwise and elsewhere than in the physical body, communication in the psychical body or some emanation or reproduction of it, oftenest, though by no means necessarily, during sleep or trance and the setting up of relations or communtcatioo by various means rvith the denizens of another plane of existence.

The most strange development was Ch'an (Meditation, Zen, c. 500). It is basically a method of "direct intuition into the heart to find Buddha-nature," a method based, on the one hand, on the eightfold negation of production and extinction, annihilation and permanence, unity and diversity, and coming and departing, and, on the other hand, on the affirmation of the reality of the Buddha-nature in all things. Its sole reliance on meditation was most un-Chinese, but it imposed on the Chinese mind a severe mental and spiritual discipline which was invigorating as well as fascinating. For this reason, it exerted tremendous influence not only on Taoism which had much in common with it and imitated it in every way, but also on Neo-Confucianism, which stood in diametrical opposition to it.

The Platonic philosophy of art and aesthetics stresses, as might be expected, the value of the reasonable imitation of Ideal realities rather than the photographic imitation of sense things and individual experiences. All beautiful things participate in the Idea of beauty (Symposium and Phaedrus). The artist is frequently described as a man carried away by his inspiration, akin to the fool; yet art requires reason and the artist must learn to contemplate the world of Ideas. Fine art is not radically distinguished from useful art. In both the Republic and the Laws, art is subordinated to the good of the state, and those forms of art which are effeminate, asocial, inimical to the morale of the citizens, are sternly excluded from the ideal state.

The study of society, societal relations. Originally called Social Physics, meaning that the methods of the natural sciences were to be applied to the study of society. Whereas the pattern originally was physics and the first sociologists thought that it was possible to find laws of nature in the social realm (Quetelet, Comte, Buckle), others turned to biological considerations. The "organic" conception of society (Lilienfeld, Schaeffle) treated society as a complex organism, the evolutionists, Gumplowicz, Ratzenhofer, considered the struggle between different ethnic groups the basic factor in the evolution of social structures and institutions. Other sociologists accepted a psychological conception of society; to them psychological phenomena (imitation, according to Gabriel Tarde, consciousness of kind, according to F. H. Giddings) were the basic elements in social interrelations (see also W. McDougall, Alsworth Ross, etc.). These relations themselves were made the main object of sociological studies by G. Simmel, L. Wiese, Howard Becker. A kind of sociological realism was fostered by the French sociologist, Emile Durkheim, and his school. They considered society a reality, the group-mind an actual fact, the social phenomena "choses sociales". The new "sociology of knowledge", inaugurated by these French sociologists, has been further developed by M. Scheler, K. Mannheim and W. Jerusalem. Recently other branches of social research have separated somewhat from sociology proper: Anthropogeography, dealing with the influences of the physical environment upon society, demography, social psychology, etc. Problems of the methodology of the social sciences have also become an important topic of recent studies. -- W.E.

thionaphthene ::: n. --> A double benzene and thiophene nucleus, C8H6S, analogous to naphthalene, and like it the base of a large series of derivatives.

thiophene ::: n. --> A sulphur hydrocarbon, C4H4S, analogous to furfuran and benzene, and acting as the base of a large number of substances which closely resemble the corresponding aromatic derivatives.

thioxene ::: n. --> Any one of three possible metameric substances, which are dimethyl derivatives of thiophene, like the xylenes from benzene.

This opposition of natural sciences (Naturwissenschaften) and cultural or socio-historical sciences (Geistestvtssenschaften) is characteristic of idealistic philosophies of history, especially of the modern German variety. See Max Weber, Gesamm. Aufrätze z. Sozio u. Sozialpolitik, 1922; W. Windelband, Geschichte u. Naturwissenschaft, 1894; H. Rickert, Die Grenzen d. Naturwiss. Begriffsbildung, eine logische Einleitung i. d. histor. Wissenschaften, 1899; Dilthey (q.v.); E. Troeltsch, Der Histortsmus u. s. Probleme, 1922; E. Spranger, Die Grundlagen d. Geschichteswissensch., 1905.

thrave ::: n. --> Twenty-four (in some places, twelve) sheaves of wheat; a shock, or stook.
The number of two dozen; also, an indefinite number; a bunch; a company; a throng.


threap ::: v. t. --> To call; to name.
To maintain obstinately against denial or contradiction; also, to contend or argue against (another) with obstinacy; to chide; as, he threaped me down that it was so.
To beat, or thrash.
To cozen, or cheat. ::: v. i.


thunk "programming" /thuhnk/ 1. "A piece of coding which provides an address", according to P. Z. Ingerman, who invented thunks in 1961 as a way of binding {actual parameters} to their formal definitions in {ALGOL 60} {procedure} calls. If a procedure is called with an expression in the place of a {formal parameter}, the compiler generates a thunk which computes the expression and leaves the address of the result in some standard location. 2. The term was later generalised to mean an expression, frozen together with its {environment} (variable values), for later evaluation if and when needed (similar to a "{closure}"). The process of unfreezing these thunks is called "forcing". 3. A {stubroutine}, in an {overlay} programming environment, that loads and jumps to the correct overlay. Compare {trampoline}. There are a couple of onomatopoeic myths circulating about the origin of this term. The most common is that it is the sound made by data hitting the {stack}; another holds that the sound is that of the data hitting an {accumulator}. Yet another suggests that it is the sound of the expression being unfrozen at argument-evaluation time. In fact, according to the inventors, it was coined after they realised (in the wee hours after hours of discussion) that the type of an argument in {ALGOL 60} could be figured out in advance with a little {compile-time} thought, simplifying the evaluation machinery. In other words, it had "already been thought of"; thus it was christened a "thunk", which is "the past tense of "think" at two in the morning". 4. ({Microsoft Windows} programming) {universal thunk}, {generic thunk}, {flat thunk}. [{Jargon File}] (1997-10-11)

TMRCie /tmerk'ee/, (MIT) A denizen of {TMRC}.

TMS 9900 "processor" One of the first true 16-bit {microprocessors}, released by {Texas Instruments} in June 1976 (the first are probably {National Semiconductor} {IMP-16} or {AMD-2901} {bit slice processors} in 16-bit configuration). It was designed as a single chip version of the {TI 990} {minicomputer} series, much like the {Intersil 6100} was a single chip {PDP-8}, and the {Fairchild 9440} and {Data General mN601} were both one chip versions of {Data General}'s {Nova}. Unlike the IMS 6100, however, the TMS 9900 had a mature, well thought out design. It had a 15-bit {address space} and two internal 16 bit {registers}. One unique feature was that all user {registers} were actually kept in memory - this included {stack pointers} and the {program counter}. A single workspace {register} pointed to the 16 {register set} in {RAM}, so when a subroutine was entered or an {interrupt} was processed, only the single workspace register had to be changed - unlike some {CPUs} which required dozens or more register saves before acknowledging a {context switch}. This was feasible at the time because {RAM} was often faster than the {CPUs}. A few modern designs, such as the {INMOS} {transputer}, use this same design using {caches} or {rotating buffers}, for the same reason of faster {context switch}es. Other chips of the time, such as the {650x} series had a similar philosophy, using {index registers}, but the TMS 9900 went the farthest in this direction. That wasn't the only positive feature of the chip. It had good {interrupt} handling features and very good instruction set. Serial I/O was available through address lines. In typical comparisons with the {Intel 8086}, the TMS9900 had smaller and faster programs. The only disadvantage was the small {address space} and need for fast {RAM}. Despite very poor support from Texas Instruments, the TMS 9900 had the potential at one point to surpass the {Intel 8086} in popularity. (1994-11-30)

toluene ::: n. --> A hydrocarbon, C6H5.CH3, of the aromatic series, homologous with benzene, and obtained as a light mobile colorless liquid, by distilling tolu balsam, coal tar, etc.; -- called also methyl benzene, phenyl methane, etc.

Transcendental: (Ger. transzendental) In Kant's Philosophy: Adjective applied to the condition of experience or anything relating thereto. Thus transcendental knowledge is possible while transcendent knowledge is not. In the Dialectic, however, the term transcendental is often used where one would expect transcendent. -- A.C.E.

Transcendental Illusion: (Kant Ger. transzendentaler Schein) An illusion resulting from the tendency of the mmd to accept the a priori forms of reason, valid only in experience, as constituting the nature of ultimate reality. Thus we are led, according to Kant, to think Ideas, such as God, World, and Soul, though we cannot know them. See Kantianism. -- O.F.K.

Transcendental method: (In Kant) The analysis of the conditions (a priori forms of intuition, categories of the understanding, ideals of reason) that make possible human experience and knowledge. See Kantianism. Transcendental Object: (Kant, Ger. transzendentale Objekt) The pure rational 'x' which Kant defines as the general form of object or the object as such. It is not a particular concrete object, but the ideal objective correlate of pure consciousness as such. It is the object which the mind seeks to know in each empirical cognition. See Kantianism. -- O.F.K.

trierarch ::: n. --> The commander of a trireme.
At Athens, one who (singly, or jointly with other citizens) had to fit out a trireme for the public service.


troche ::: n. --> A medicinal tablet or lozenge; strictly, one of circular form.

trochiscus ::: n. --> A kind of tablet or lozenge; a troche.

truly ::: adv. --> In a true manner; according to truth; in agreement with fact; as, to state things truly; the facts are truly represented.
Exactly; justly; precisely; accurately; as, to estimate truly the weight of evidence.
Sincerely; honestly; really; faithfully; as, to be truly attached to a lover; the citizens are truly loyal to their prince or their country.
Conformably to law; legally; legitimately.


twelve ::: a. --> One more that eleven; two and ten; twice six; a dozen. ::: n. --> The number next following eleven; the sum of ten and two, or of twice six; twelve units or objects; a dozen.
A symbol representing twelve units, as 12, or xii.


vertex ::: n. --> A turning point; the principal or highest point; top; summit; crown; apex.
The top, or crown, of the head.
The zenith, or the point of the heavens directly overhead.
The point in any figure opposite to, and farthest from, the base; the terminating point of some particular line or lines in a figure or a curve; the top, or the point opposite the base.


vertical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the vertex; situated at the vertex, or highest point; directly overhead, or in the zenith; perpendicularly above one.
Perpendicular to the plane of the horizon; upright; plumb; as, a vertical line. ::: n.


vesuvine ::: n. --> A trade name for a brown dyestuff obtained from certain basic azo compounds of benzene; -- called also Bismarck brown, Manchester brown, etc.

Vint Cerf "person" (Vinton G. Cerf) The co-inventor with {Bob Kahn} of the {Internet} and its base {protocol}, {TCP/IP}. Like {Jon Postel}, he was crucial in the development of many higher-level protocols, and has written several dozen {RFCs} since the late 1960s. Vinton Cerf is senior vice president of Internet Architecture and Technology for {MCI WorldCom}. His team of architects and engineers design advanced Internet frameworks for delivering a combination of data, information, voice and video services for business and consumer use. In December 1997, President Clinton presented the U.S. National Medal of Technology to Cerf and his partner, Robert E. Kahn, for founding and developing the Internet. Prior to rejoining MCI in 1994, Cerf was vice president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI). As vice president of MCI Digital Information Services from 1982-1986, he led the engineering of {MCI Mail}, the first commercial e-mail service to be connected to the Internet. During his tenure from 1976-1982 with the U.S. Department of {Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency} (DARPA), Cerf played a key role leading the development of Internet and Internet-related data packet and security technologies. Cerf served as founding president of the {Internet Society} from 1992-1995 and is currently chairman of the Board. Cerf is a member of the U.S. Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) and the Advisory Committee for Telecommunications (ACT) in Ireland. Cerf is a recipient of numerous awards and commendations in connection with his work on the Internet. In December 1994, People magazine identified Cerf as one of that year's "25 Most Intriguing People." In addition to his work on behalf of MCI and the Internet, Cerf serves as technical advisor to production for "Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict," the number one television show in first-run syndication. He also made a special guest appearance in May 1998. Cerf also holds an appointment as distinguished visiting scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he is working on the design of an interplanetary Internet. Cerf holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Stanford University and Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from UCLA. He also holds honorary Doctorate degrees from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich; Lulea University of Technology, Sweden; University of the Balearic Islands, Palma; Capitol College and Gettysburg College. {(http://mci.com/cerfsup/)}. (1999-02-25)

vishnu ::: 1. (In later Hinduism) "The Preserver.” The second member of the Trimurti, along with Brahma the Creator and Shiva the Destroyer. 2. (In popular Hinduism) a deity believed to have descended from heaven to earth in several incarnations, or avatars, varying in number from nine to twenty-two, but always including animals. His most important human incarnation is the Krishna of the Bhagavad-Gita. 3. "The Pervader,” one of a half-dozen solar deities in the Rig-Veda, daily traversing the sky in three strides, morning, afternoon, and night.

WAITS /wayts/ The mutant cousin of {TOPS-10} used on a handful of systems at {SAIL} up to 1990. There was never an "official" expansion of WAITS (the name itself having been arrived at by a rather sideways process), but it was frequently glossed as "West-coast Alternative to ITS". Though WAITS was less visible than ITS, there was frequent exchange of people and ideas between the two communities, and innovations pioneered at WAITS exerted enormous indirect influence. The early screen modes of {Emacs}, for example, were directly inspired by WAITS's "E" editor - one of a family of editors that were the first to do "real-time editing", in which the editing commands were invisible and where one typed text at the point of insertion/overwriting. The modern style of multi-region windowing is said to have originated there, and WAITS alumni at XEROX PARC and elsewhere played major roles in the developments that led to the XEROX Star, the Macintosh, and the Sun workstations. {Bucky bits} were also invented there thus, the ALT key on every IBM PC is a WAITS legacy. One notable WAITS feature seldom duplicated elsewhere was a news-wire interface that allowed WAITS hackers to read, store, and filter AP and UPI dispatches from their terminals; the system also featured a still-unusual level of support for what is now called "multimedia" computing, allowing analog audio and video signals to be switched to programming terminals. Ken Shoemake adds: Some administrative body told us we needed a name for the operating system, and that "SAIL" wouldn't do. (Up to that point I don't think it had an official name.) So the anarchic denizens of the lab proposed names and voted on them. Although I worked on the OS used by CCRMA folks (a parasitic subgroup), I was not writing WAITS code. Those who were, proposed "SAINTS", for (I think) Stanford AI New Time-sharing System. Thinking of ITS, and AI, and the result of many people using one machine, I proposed the name WAITS. Since I invented it, I can tell you without fear of contradiction that it had no official meaning. Nevertheless, the lab voted that as their favorite; upon which the disgruntled system programmers declared it the "Worst Acronym Invented for a Time-sharing System"! But it was in keeping with the creative approach to acronyms extant at the time, including self-referential ones. For me it was fun, if a little unsettling, to have an "acronym" that wasn't. I have no idea what the voters thought. :) [{Jargon File}] (2003-11-17)

wardroom ::: n. --> A room occupied as a messroom by the commissioned officers of a war vessel. See Gunroom.
A room used by the citizens of a city ward, for meetings, political caucuses, elections, etc.


water ice ::: --> Water flavored, sweetened, and frozen, to be eaten as a confection.

weazen ::: a. --> Thin; sharp; withered; wizened; as, a weazen face.

weazeny ::: a. --> Somewhat weazen; shriveled.

wizened ::: a. --> Dried; shriveled; withered; shrunken; weazen; as, a wizened old man.

wizen-faced ::: a. --> Having a shriveled, thin, withered face.

wizen ::: v. i. --> To wither; to dry. ::: a. --> Wizened; thin; weazen; withered. ::: n.

Works: Versuch einer Transzendentalphilosophie, 1790-92; Versuch einer neuen Logik oder Theorie des Denkens, 1794.

xylene ::: n. --> Any of a group of three metameric hydrocarbons of the aromatic series, found in coal and wood tar, and so named because found in crude wood spirit. They are colorless, oily, inflammable liquids, C6H4.(CH3)2, being dimethyl benzenes, and are called respectively orthoxylene, metaxylene, and paraxylene. Called also xylol.

yankee ::: n. --> A nickname for a native or citizen of New England, especially one descended from old New England stock; by extension, an inhabitant of the Northern States as distinguished from a Southerner; also, applied sometimes by foreigners to any inhabitant of the United States. ::: a.

zenana ::: n. --> The part of a dwelling appropriated to women.

zend-avesta ::: n. --> The sacred writings of the ancient Persian religion, attributed to Zoroaster, but chiefly of a later date.

zendik ::: n. --> An atheist or unbeliever; -- name given in the East to those charged with disbelief of any revealed religion, or accused of magical heresies.

zend ::: n. --> Properly, the translation and exposition in the Huzv/resh, or literary Pehlevi, language, of the Avesta, the Zoroastrian sacred writings; as commonly used, the language (an ancient Persian dialect) in which the Avesta is written.

zenick ::: n. --> A South African burrowing mammal (Suricata tetradactyla), allied to the civets. It is grayish brown, with yellowish transverse stripes on the back. Called also suricat.

zenik ::: n. --> See Zenick.

zenithal ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the zenith.

zenith ::: n. --> That point in the visible celestial hemisphere which is vertical to the spectator; the point of the heavens directly overhead; -- opposed to nadir.
hence, figuratively, the point of culmination; the greatest height; the height of success or prosperity.


zen "jargon" To figure out something by meditation or by a sudden flash of enlightenment. Originally applied to {bugs}, but occasionally applied to problems of life in general. "How'd you figure out the buffer allocation problem?" "Oh, I zenned it." Contrast {grok}, which connotes a time-extended version of zenning a system. Compare {hack mode}. See also {guru}. (1996-09-17)

ZENO U Rochester 1978. Euclid with asynchronous message-passing. "Preliminary ZENO Language Description", J.E. Ball et al, SIGPLAN Notices 14(9):17-34 (Sep 1979).



QUOTES [80 / 80 - 1328 / 1328]


KEYS (10k)

   32 Dogen Zenji
   11 Zen Proverb
   5 Zen proverb
   4 Dōgen Zenji
   3 Shunryu Suzuki
   2 Kodo Sawaki
   2 D.T. Suzuki
   1 Zen Saying
   1 Zen Master So Sahn
   1 Zen Koan
   1 Zenkei Shibayama 1894-1974
   1 Zendavesta
   1 Tōyō Eichō
   1 Socrates
   1 Ray Bradbury
   1 Osho
   1 Koun Yamada
   1 Karen Maezen Miller
   1 John Bradshaw
   1 Gregory of Nazianzen
   1 Gene Clark
   1 Frederick Lenz
   1 Frank Zappa
   1 Eckhart Tolle
   1 Dogen Zenji?
   1 Dogen Zenji
   1 Benjamin Franklin
   1 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  106 Jonathan Franzen
   86 Arnold Schwarzenegger
   60 John Katzenbach
   47 Zen proverb
   40 Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
   30 Jentezen Franklin
   28 Dogen Zenji
   28 Anonymous
   21 Jeff Zentner
   18 Mehmet Murat ildan
   13 Zen Proverb
   11 Zen Cho
   10 Frederick Lenz
   9 Thomas Jefferson
   9 Shinzen Young
   9 Karen Maezen Miller
   8 David Zinczenko
   8 Albert Szent Gyorgyi
   7 Tara Janzen
   7 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

1:Let go, or be dragged. ~ Zen proverb,
2:Let go, or be dragged." ~ Zen proverb,
3:In Zen we have no gurus." ~ Frederick Lenz,
4:Zen has no business with ideas." ~ D.T. Suzuki,
5:Zen is an effort to become alert and awake." ~ Osho,
6:Water which is too pure, has no fish.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
7:Zen is nothing to get excited about." ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
8:What was never lost, can never be found.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
9:A true Zen saying: "Nothing is what I want." ~ Frank Zappa,
10:No snowflake ever falls in the wrong place.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
11:Zen practice is to open up our small mind." ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
12:Better to see the face than to hear the name.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
13:Every perception is an opportunity for satori." ~ Zen proverb,
14:We teach ourselves; Zen merely points the way." ~ D.T. Suzuki,
15:When you can do nothing,
what can you do? ~ Zen proverb,
16:A zen master's life is one continuous mistake." ~ Dōgen Zenji,
17:Nothing is exactly as it seems nor is it otherwise.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
18:When you reach the top of the mountain, keep climbing.
   ~ Zen Koan,
19:Since it is all too clear, it takes time to grasp it.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
20:Sometimes, simply by sitting, the soul collects wisdom. ~ Zen Proverb,
21:Better to sit all night than to go to bed with a dragon.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
22:I have lived with several Zen masters-all of them cats." ~ Eckhart Tolle,
23:Touch the hole in your life, and there flowers will bloom. ~ Zen Proverb,
24:Zen is not an art; it's not a religion. It's a realization." ~ Gene Clark,
25:A Zen master's life is one continuous mistake." ~ Dogen Zenji,
26:Today is the eighth day of the month, tomorrow is the thirteenth.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
27:A zen master's life is one continuous mistake.
   ~ Dogen Zenji,
28:If Truth isn't right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?" ~ Zen Saying,
29:I am very discouraged. What should I do? Master says, 'encourage others.'
   ~ Zen Proverb,
30:The practice of Zen is forgetting the self in the act of uniting with something." ~ Koun Yamada,
31:Children are natural Zen masters; their world is brand new in each and every moment." ~ John Bradshaw,
32:Zen is not some kind of excitement, but concentration on our usual everyday routine." ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
33:When you are deluded and full of doubt, even a thousand books of scripture are not enough ~ Zen proverb,
34:You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you. ~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing,
35:If you know that the arising thought is itself unreal delusion, you are already free. ~ Zen Master So Sahn,
36:Zen teaches nothing; it merely enables us to wake up and become aware. It does not teach, it points." ~ D.T. Suzuki,
37:If you understand, things are just as they are. If you do not understand, things are just as they are. ~ Zen Proverb,
38:When an ordinary man attains knowledge he is a sage; when a sage attains understanding, he is an ordinary man." ~ Zen Proverb,
39:Stop and look around you. Allow yourself to reorient so that you are no longer pulled along by the stream of events. ~ Zen Master,
40:When you look forward into time, it seems like forever. When you look back, it appears time has passed in a flash.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
41:Zen in its essence is the art of seeing into the nature of one's being, and it points the way from bondage to freedom." ~ D.T. Suzuki,
42:Zen teaches that if we can open up to the inevitability of our demise, we can begin to transform and lighten up about it." ~ Allen Klein,
43:The true purpose [of Zen] is to see things as they are, to observe things as they are, and to let everything go as it goes." ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
44:The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart, and head, and hands." ~ Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance),
45:The only Zen you can find on the tops of mountains is the Zen you bring up there." ~ Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance),
46:The way of Zen is to become independent and strong. Don't rely on others for perceptions of life and truth. Do it individually." ~ Frederick Lenz,
47:If you want to travel the Way of Buddhas and Zen masters, then expect nothing, seek nothing, and grasp nothing." ~ Dogen Zenji,
48:Mind is the great illusionist; the body is the City of Great Illusion; and names are its garments." ~ Hu Hai, (720-814) Chinese Zen master, Wikipedia.,
49:Zen does not confuse spirituality with thinking about God while one is peeling potatoes. Zen spirituality is just to peel the potatoes." ~ Alan W. Watts,
50:Not thinking about anything is Zen. Once you know this, walking, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is Zen. ~ Bodhidharma,
51:slapping at the flies
slapping at the mosquitoes
slapping at myself ~ Santoka Taneda, Mountain Tasting: Zen Haiku, 351,
52:When you are deluded and full of doubt, even a thousand books of scripture are not enough. When you have realized understanding, even one word is too much." ~ Zen saying.,
53:To believe that you can end decades of tyranny of the ego by reading lots of books is like believing that you can satisfy your appetite by reading lots of menus. ~ Zen Fi ,
54:Zen questioning is a very gentle questioning. It is the kind of questioning that the Colorado River asks the Grand Canyon over centuries and centuries. ~ Taigen Dan Leighton,
55:The mind of the beginner is empty, free of the habits of the expert, ready to accept, to doubt, and open to all the possibilities." ~ Shunryu Suzuki (Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind),
56:Zen is not a religion. There is no room for a cult. There is no dependence on a teacher. There is only learning how to use your own mind and making it strong." ~ Frederick Lenz,
57:animal, or human being. Knowing how deeply our lives intertwine, We vow to not abuse the great truth of the Three Treasures." ~ Stephanie Kaza, Professor, practicing Soto Zen Buddhist, Wik.,
58:If you think your body and mind are two, that is wrong; if you think that they are one, that is also wrong. Our body and mind are both two and one. ~ Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind Beginners Mind,
59:A luminous moon the wind in the pine a long evening a transcendent view; But what is the meaning of this? What is the meaning of life? ~ John Kerecz. How to start a stress-releasing zen journey,
60:The three elements of creativity are thus: loving, knowing, and doing - or heart, mind, and hands - or, as Zen Buddhist teaching has it; great faith, great question, and great courage." ~ Eric Maisel,
61:The mind is a clear and polished mirror and our continual duty is to keep it pure and never allow dust to gather upon its face. ~ Saving of the School of Zen, the Eternal Wisdom
62:You look at where you're going and where you are and it never makes sense, but then you look back at where you've been and a pattern seems to emerge." ~ Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance),
63:The whole effort of Jesus or a Buddha or a Bodhidharma is nothing but how to undo that which society has done to you." ~ Osho, (1931 - 1990), Indian godman, Wikipedia. Quote from "ZEN the Path of Paradox,", (2001).,
64:If you are really desirous of mastering Zen, it is necessary for you to give up you life and plunge right into the pit of death." ~ Yekiwo, Zen master. Quote from "Zen and Japanese Culture" by Daisetz T. Suzuki, 1959,
65:Zen is all inclusive. It never denies, it never says no to anything. It accepts everything and transforms it into a higher reality." ~ Osho, (1931 - 1990), Indian godman, Wikipedia. Quote from "Zen the Path of Paradox,", (2001).,
66:Zen is a liberation from time. For if we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality." ~ Alan Watts,
67:Zen is a path of liberation. It liberates you. It is freedom from the first step to the last. You are not required to follow any rules; you are required to find out your own rules and your own life in the light of awareness." ~ Osho,
68:Why do you so earnestly seek the truth in distant places? Look for delusions and truth in the bottom of your own hearts." ~ Taigu Ryokan, (1758-1831) eccentric Sōtō Zen Buddhist monk, remembered for his poetry and calligraphy, Wikipedia.,
69:Sleeping, eating, working, meditating. Believing yourself to be an ego means you think you are doing all these things. Then you start to think you should be doing other things to be in a better position. Trapped in a lifelong poisonous loop. ~ Zen Fi ,
70:Real enlightenment is always with you, so there is no need for you to stick to it or even think about it. Because it is always with you, difficulty itself is enlightenment. Your busy life itself is enlightened activity. ." ~ Shunryu Suzuki, (1904-1971), Zen master, Wikipedia.,
71:If you would spend all your time - walking, standing, sitting or lying down - learning to halt the concept-forming activities of your own mind, you could be sure of ultimately attaining your goal." ~ Huang Po, (d. 850), an influential Chinese master of Zen Buddhism, Wikipedia.,
72:As long as you are clinging to the idea of self and trying to improve your practice or find something out, trying to create an improved, better self, then your practice has gone astray." ~ Shunryu Suzuki, (1904-1971), Japanesse Zen master. Came to the U.S. in 1954. See Wikipedia.,
73:The Buddha, the Godhead, resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of the mountain, or in the petals of a flower. To think otherwise is to demean the Buddha - which is to demean oneself. ~ Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values,
74:But when you're in front of an audience and you make them laugh at a new idea, you're guiding the whole being for the moment. No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It's very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open, completely themselves when that message hits the brain and the laugh begins. That's when new ideas can be implanted. If a new idea slips in at that moment, it has a chance to grow. ~ George Carlin,
75:Don't confuse having no violence in your heart with having no violence in the real world, if required. Your duty may or may not include violence, but let us not forget that there are indeed occasions where violence ends violence or, I should say, reflecting the messiness and microscopically incremental nature of Eros: there are occasions where violence replaces a grosser violence with a subtler violence, a lesser devil on the way to a vaguely greater good. The Zen-inspired code of the Samurai warrior is still as good a guide as any: the best fight is not to fight; the real sword is no sword-but if you think that means a Samurai warrior never used his sword, you are tad naive, I fear. ~ Ken Wilber?,
76:You should not be tilted sideways, backwards, or forwards. You should be sitting straight up as if you were supporting the sky with your head. This is not just form or breathing. It expresses the key point of Buddhism. It is a perfect expression of your Buddha nature. If you want true understanding of Buddhism, you should practice this way.

   These forms are not a means of obtaining the right state of mind. To take this posture itself is the purpose of our practice. When you have this posture, you have the right state of mind, so there is no need to try to attain some special state.

   When you try to attain something, your mind starts to wander about somewhere else. When you do not try to attain anything, you have your own body and mind right here. A Zen master would say, "Kill the Buddha!" Kill the Buddha if the Buddha exists somewhere else. Kill the Buddha, because you should resume your own Buddha nature. Doing something is expressing our own nature. We do not exist for the sake of something else. We exist for the sake of ourselves. This is the fundamental teaching expressed in the forms we observe. ~ Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind Beginners Mind,
77:Recommended Reading
David Foster Wallace - Infinite Jest
DH Lawrence - The Rainbow
Gabriel Garcia Marquez - Love in the Time of Cholera
Karl Ove Knausgaard - My Struggle
Virginia Woolf - To The Lighthouse
Ben Lerner - The Topeka School
Sally Rooney - Conversations With Friends
Nell Zink - The Wallcreeper
Elena Ferrante - The Days of Abandonment
Jack Kerouac - Dharma Bums
Walt Whitman - Leaves of Grass
Michael Murphy - Golf in the Kingdom
Barbara Kingsolver - Prodigal Summer
Albertine Sarrazin - Astragal
Rebecca Solnit - The Faraway Nearby
Michael Paterniti - Love and Other Ways of Dying
Rainer Maria Rilke - Book of Hours
James Baldwin - Another Country
Roberto Calasso - Ka
Translation by S. Radhakrishan - Principle Upanisads
Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism
Translation by Georg Feuerstein - Yoga Sutra
Richard Freeman - The Mirror of Yoga
Translation by S. Radhakrishan - The Bhagavad Gita
Shrunyu Suzuki - Zen Mind Beginner's Mind
Heinrich Zimmer - Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization
Sogyal Rinpoche - The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying
Joseph Campbell - Myths of Light
Joseph Campbell - The Hero With A Thousand Faces
Sri Aurobindo - Savitri
Thomas Meyers - Anatomy Trains
Wendy Doniger - The Hindus ~ Jason Bowman, http://www.jasonbowmanyoga.com/recommended-reading,
78:Why Ubuntu: If I were you I'd just install Ubuntu into a dual-boot partition (the Ubuntu website has instructions for this) and learn as you go. Ubuntu is similar enough to Windows that you should be able to start using it right away without much difficulty.
   For running your Python scripts you'll want to drop into the shell (Ctrl + Alt + T If memory serves me right). As you become more comfortable with Ubuntu, you can start using the shell more and more. The shell is what gives you access to the power of Unix; every time you need to do something tedious and repetitive, try to find out how to do it through the shell.
   Eventually you will find yourself using the shell constantly. You'll wonder how you ever managed without it, and deride other operating systems for their lack of sensible programming tools. One day you'll realise that desktop window managers are a needless distraction. You start using xmonad or awesomewm. Eventually you realise that this, too, is a bastardisaton of the Unix vision and start using tmux exclusively. Then suddenly it hits you - every computer, every operating system, no matter how insignificant or user-friendly, has the Unix nature. All of them are merely streams from where you can ssh back into the ocean of Unix. Having achieved enlightenment you are equally content using an iPad as your main work computer, using powershell in Windows or SSH into a Digital Ocean droplet from your parent's computer. This is the Zen of Unix.
   ~ JohnyTex, https://www.reddit.com/r/learnprogramming/comments/38zytg/is_it_worth_my_time_to_learn_linux_while_learning,
79:Self-Abuse by Drugs
Not a drop of alcohol is to be brought into this temple.
Master Bassui (1327-1387)1
(His dying instructions: first rule)
In swinging between liberal tolerance one moment and outraged repression the next,
modern societies seem chronically incapable of reaching consistent attitudes about
drugs.
Stephen Batchelor2
Drugs won't show you the truth. Drugs will only show you what it's like to be on drugs.
Brad Warner3

Implicit in the authentic Buddhist Path is sila. It is the time-honored practice
of exercising sensible restraints [Z:73-74]. Sila's ethical guidelines provide the
bedrock foundation for one's personal behavior in daily life. At the core of every
religion are some self-disciplined renunciations corresponding to sila. Yet, a profound irony has been reshaping the human condition in most cultures during the
last half century. It dates from the years when psychoactive drugs became readily
available. During this era, many naturally curious persons could try psychedelic
short-cuts and experience the way their consciousness might seem to ''expand.'' A
fortunate few of these experimenters would become motivated to follow the nondrug meditative route when they pursued various spiritual paths.
One fact is often overlooked. Meditation itself has many mind-expanding, psychedelic properties [Z:418-426]. These meditative experiences can also stimulate a
drug-free spiritual quest.
Meanwhile, we live in a drug culture. It is increasingly a drugged culture, for which overprescribing physicians must shoulder part of the blame. Do
drugs have any place along the spiritual path? This issue will always be hotly
debated.4
In Zen, the central issue is not whether each spiritual aspirant has the ''right''
to exercise their own curiosity, or the ''right'' to experiment on their own brains in
the name of freedom of religion. It is a free country. Drugs are out there. The real
questions are:
 Can you exercise the requisite self-discipline to follow the Zen Buddhist Path?
 Do you already have enough common sense to ask that seemingly naive question,

''What would Buddha do?'' (WWBD).
~ James Austin, Zen-Brain_Reflections,_Reviewing_Recent_Developments_in_Meditation_and_States_of_Consciousness,
80:reading :::
   50 Spiritual Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Muhammad Asad - The Road To Mecca (1954)
   St Augustine - Confessions (400)
   Richard Bach - Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1970)
   Black Elk Black - Elk Speaks (1932)
   Richard Maurice Bucke - Cosmic Consciousness (1901)
   Fritjof Capra - The Tao of Physics (1976)
   Carlos Castaneda - Journey to Ixtlan (1972)
   GK Chesterton - St Francis of Assisi (1922)
   Pema Chodron - The Places That Scare You (2001)
   Chuang Tzu - The Book of Chuang Tzu (4th century BCE)
   Ram Dass - Be Here Now (1971)
   Epictetus - Enchiridion (1st century)
   Mohandas Gandhi - An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth (1927)
   Al-Ghazzali - The Alchemy of Happiness (1097)
   Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet (1923)
   GI Gurdjieff - Meetings With Remarkable Men (1960)
   Dag Hammarskjold - Markings (1963)
   Abraham Joshua Heschel - The Sabbath (1951)
   Hermann Hesse - Siddartha (1922)
   Aldous Huxley - The Doors of Perception (1954)
   William James - The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902)
   Carl Gustav Jung - Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1955)
   Margery Kempe - The Book of Margery Kempe (1436)
   J Krishnamurti - Think On These Things (1964)
   CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters (1942)
   Malcolm X - The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964)
   Daniel C Matt - The Essential Kabbalah (1994)
   Dan Millman - The Way of the Peaceful Warrior (1989)
   W Somerset Maugham - The Razor's Edge (1944)
   Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness (1975)
   Michael Newton - Journey of Souls (1994)
   John O'Donohue - Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (1998)
   Robert M Pirsig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974)
   James Redfield - The Celestine Prophecy (1994)
   Miguel Ruiz - The Four Agreements (1997)
   Helen Schucman & William Thetford - A Course in Miracles (1976)
   Idries Shah - The Way of the Sufi (1968)
   Starhawk - The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess (1979)
   Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind (1970)
   Emanuel Swedenborg - Heaven and Hell (1758)
   Teresa of Avila - Interior Castle (1570)
   Mother Teresa - A Simple Path (1994)
   Eckhart Tolle - The Power of Now (1998)
   Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism (1973)
   Neale Donald Walsch - Conversations With God (1998)
   Rick Warren - The Purpose-Driven Life (2002)
   Simone Weil - Waiting For God (1979)
   Ken Wilber - A Theory of Everything (2000)
   Paramahansa Yogananda - Autobiography of a Yogi (1974)
   Gary Zukav - The Seat of the Soul (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Spirital Classics (2017 Edition),

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:In Zen we have no gurus. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
2:Zen has no business with ideas. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
3:To Zen, time and eternity are one. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
4:A zen master's life is one continuous mistake. ~ dogen, @wisdomtrove
5:The idea of Zen is to catch life as it flows. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
6:We teach ourselves; Zen merely points the way. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
7:Zen has nothing to do with letters, words, or sutras. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
8:Old Zen was the reduction of concepts to absurdity. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
9:This is Zen, and in Zen, as we all know ... anything goes! ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
10:There is really only one Zen Master ... and that's yourself. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
11:The real Zen of the old Chinese masters was wu-shih, or "no fuss." ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
12:Everything is a thought within one ‘big mind’ as the Zen masters say. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
13:Old Zen is the way of nothingness, the way of having a good time. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
14:Zen phrase says The instant you speak about a thing you miss the mark. ~ fritjof-capra, @wisdomtrove
15:Zen insight is not our awareness, but Being's awareness of itself in us. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
16:When other sects speak well of Zen, the first thing that they praise is its poverty. ~ dogen, @wisdomtrove
17:In a certain sense, Zen is feeling life instead of feeling something about life. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
18:Zen is about breaking out of your ideas and experiencing life and not ideas. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
19:Zen Makes use, to a great extent, of poetical expressions; Zen is wedded to poetry. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
20:Zen is the way of splitting the self again and again, untilt there is nothing left. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
21:In Zen you are learning how to make new realities, to build things inside your mind. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
22:Zen is meditation, the actual experience of life directly, immediately with no buffers. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
23:In life as well as in art Zen never wastes energy in stopping to explain; it only indicates. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
24:Zen masters say you cannot see your reflection in running water, only in still water. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
25:To remain caught up in ideas and words about Zen is, as the old masters say, to stink of Zen. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
26:Zen is the study of mind in all of its manifestations. The purpose of Zen is to be happy. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
27:If Zen has any preference it is for glass that is plain, has no color, and is "just glass." ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
28:We can see unmistakably  that there is an inner relationship between Zen and the warrior's life. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
29:Zen is a very quick path to enlightenment and development of the mind and all its facilities. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
30:I'm a Zen Master. I'm an occult teacher. I teach people how to become that, how to be perfect. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
31:According to Zen philosophy each human being has two minds, a finite mind and an infinite mind. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
32:Zen approaches it from the practical side of life-that is, to work out Enlightenment in life itself. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
33:Zen teaches nothing; it merely enables us to wake up and become aware. It does not teach, it points. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
34:The truth of Zen is the truth of life, and life means to live, to move, to act, not merely to reflect. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
35:Naturally, the Zen Master Rama philosophy is to have a high state of awareness and material success. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
36:People who practice Zen correctly are not spaced-out or unrealistic. They are balanced and grounded. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
37:There is no letter of the law to follow in Zen. There is a lot of etiquette, but there are no rules. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
38:Zen was an attempt to get back to the purest teachings of the Buddha -enlightenment without strings. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
39:Zen is the path that focuses the most upon meditation. It is almost exclusively a path of meditation. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
40:If you want to travel the Way of Buddhas and Zen masters, then expect nothing, seek nothing, and grasp nothing. ~ dogen, @wisdomtrove
41:If you want to travel the Way of Buddhas and Zen masters, then expect nothing, seek nothing, and grasp nothing.” ~ dogen, @wisdomtrove
42:Life, according to Zen, ought to be lived as a bird flies through the air, or as a fish swims in the water. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
43:The whole point of Zen is to suspend the rules we have superimposed on things and to see the world as it is ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
44:The light is already there. In Zen Buddhism there's a little speck of dust on the mirror, and that's us. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
45:Zen is a way of liberation, concerned not with discovering what is good or bad or advantageous, but what is. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
46:There is a sense of competition in Zen. You are competing with your thoughts and trying to overcome them. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
47:My blogging life is basically goalless. I like the zen nature of that, and paradoxically, it improves results. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
48:Until we recognize the SELF that exists apart from who we think we are - we cannot know the Ch'an ( ZEN ) MIND. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
49:The word impossible contains the word possible' What's that&
50:Zen professes itself to be the spirit of Buddhism, but in fact it is the spirit of all religions and philosophies. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
51:In Zen, poverty is voluntary, and considered not really as poverty so much as simplicity, freedom, unclutteredness. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
52:Not thinking about anything is Zen. Once you know this, walking, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is Zen. ~ bodhidharma, @wisdomtrove
53:Zen in it's essence is the art of seeing into the nature of one's being, and it points the way from bondage to freedom. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
54:Not to be bound by rules, but to be creating one's own rules-this is the kind of life which Zen is trying to have us live. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
55:There is a beautiful flow to the study of Zen. If it is not making you happier, then you are not practicing correctly. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
56:Personal experience, therefore, is everything in Zen. No ideas are intelligible to those who have no backing of experience. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
57:According to Zen Buddhist cosmology there are ten thousand different states of mind to view and understand life through. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
58:Zen doesn't believe in the reconciliation of opposites because from the point of view of Zen, there is no point of view. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
59:As the Japanese Zen masters say, Don't seek the truth; just drop your opinions. Drop your theories; don't seek the truth. ~ anthony-de-mello, @wisdomtrove
60:If there is anything Zen strongly emphasizes it is the attainment of freedom; that is, freedom from all unnatural encumbrances. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
61:The study of Zen is a retraining. It is a series of new ways, not just one way, to learn to use your mind more efficiently. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
62:To be a good Zen Buddhist it is not enough to follow the teaching of its founder; we have to experience the Buddha's experience. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
63:A long walk and grooming with a well-mannered dog is a Zen experience that leaves you refreshed and in a creative frame of mind. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
64:Both Zen and mysticsm have this beautiful quality of happiness and laughter, which I think is so necessary in our modern age. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
65:The Zen master walks in his garden, alone. There is no traffic there. There is no shopping there. There are only the flowers. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
66:You're not listening to the Zen master, what he is saying outwardly, but even more importantly... what he is saying inwardly. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
67:If you study the writings of the mystics, you will always find things in them that appear to be paradoxes, as in Zen, particularly. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
68:.. does not confuse spirituality with thinking about God while one is peeling potatoes. Zen spirituality is just to peel the potatoes. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
69:The Zen master can see precisely what it will take to cause your awareness to become free. But the Zen master can't do it for you. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
70:A person who undertakes the study of Zen and learns concentration and meditation is like a gymnast. You become a gymnast of the mind. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
71:Zen is consciousness unstructured by particular form or particular system, a trans-cultural, trans-religious, transformed consciousness. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
72:In Zen the emphasis is on meditation and developing your body, mind and spirit to find inner peace, strength, clarity and enlightenment. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
73:Zen is a study. It's a discipline. It involves the active use of will to make things happen or not happen. These are the secrets of power. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
74:The way of nothingness is the way of Zen. It is just a term. The contemplation of nothingness or everythingness is where everything starts. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
75:When I say that Zen is life, I mean that Zen is not to be confined within conceptualization, that Zen is what makes conceptualization possible. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
76:Zen is discipline - the discipline of living life, the discipline of taking a breath, the discipline of not knowing and not trying to know. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
77:Zen is Tantric Buddhism, Vajrayana is tantric Buddhism - these are various forms of it. Tantric Buddhism simply means cutting to the chase. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
78:Zen is the fastest method I know of, aside from mysticism, of dissolving the fixations people have about spiritual practice and themselves. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
79:Zen has nothing to teach us in the way of intellectual analysis; nor has it any set doctrines which are imposed on its followers for acceptance. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
80:Find a teacher of Tantric Zen and study with them because it is transference of awareness, a sharing of the perception of the beauty of life. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
81:This would be a Zen-like state of productivity, in which you deal with what’s present from a perspective that is both detached and fully engaged. ~ david-allen, @wisdomtrove
82:Zen has lost its zip, if you will, or its nothingness and has become ritualistic Its established in monastaries with strict codes of koan study. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
83:HELLO! Look at me. HELLO! I am so ZEN. This is BLOOD. This is NOTHING. Hello. Everything is nothing, and it's so cool to be ENLIGHTENED. Like me. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
84:Meditation is the way the mind is. That's why in Zen they call it the natural state, which means you don't have to go and do anything to meditate. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
85:Now when I speak about Zen, I have a problem, in the sense that the Zen of today has lost the essence, in my estimation, of what I call "old Zen." ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
86:Facts of experience are valued in Zen more than representations, symbols, and concepts-that is to say, substance is everything in Zen and form nothing. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
87:Zen is a very fast path to enlightenment, fast in comparison to some other paths, not fast for the person who practices it. There is no sense of speed. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
88:If you're very liberal, then you should go and find a very liberal Zen teacher, a liberal interpretation of the doctrines of the Soto or Rinzai schools. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
89:In the study of Zen you can learn how to strengthen and clarify your finite mind. Your finite mind is like a muscle; when exercised it becomes stronger. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
90:In Zen, actions speak louder than words. Doing is more important than knowing, and knowledge which cannot be translated into action is of little worth. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
91:The person who's in the Zen monastery, who's doing a kind of poor job at meditating and a half-ass job cleaning the gardens is not doing very good yoga. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
92:Both light and dark are eternity. Human beings assign relative values to colors, but beyond the relative, there just is - what in Zen we call "suchness". ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
93:From my own personal encounters and studies with both Tantric and Zen Buddhist monks, I have found them to be humorous, warm, charming, and compassionate. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
94:The theory of Zen is non-competition. But that is not really true at all. People who practice Zen are very competitive. They are competing against emptiness. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
95:Zen is not a religion. There is no room for a cult. There is no dependence on a teacher. There is only learning how to use your own mind and making it strong. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
96:The whole aim of Zen is not to make foolproof statements about experience, but to come to direct grips with reality without the mediation of logical verbalizing. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
97:With Zen we do it more through slight of hand, a very subtle and delicate shift in consciousness, which shifts the world. It's kind of done from the inside out. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
98:Zen is a very quick path. Zen is the path of meditation. The word Zen means emptiness or fullness, meditation. Meditation is the quickest path to enlightenment. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
99:A Zen master is someone whose life is one with enlightenment and self-discovery. They can never be separated from that. They've been essentially mastered by Zen. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
100:The emphasis is on meditation in Tantric Zen. The experience of meditation in formal practice, zazen, where you're sitting down and meditating and concentrating. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
101:In Zen there is a sense of blending, of stepping out of your body and mind and gaining access to powers and abilities that are far beyond the minds of mortal men. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
102:In Zen we study the will. We learn how to cultivate it, to accumulate will. We use it to direct our actions, and we don't overuse it or abuse it - that's a waste. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
103:How hard, then, and yet how easy it is to understand Zen! Hard because to understand it is not to understand it; easy because not to understand it is to understand it. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
104:Through the study of Zen you can learn to move from lower to higher states of mind at will. Higher states of mind offer you a much more accurate picture of reality. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
105:In advanced Zen a person comes to realize that the existence of things and their ability to perceive them correctly is completely dependent upon their state of mind. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
106:It is in Zen practice that you gain power, balance and wisdom. The battles that you fight are within your own mind. That is where the real victories and defeats are. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
107:The path of Zen is not easy. It's wonderful. It's beautiful beyond compare. You will experience more ecstasy and beauty than most people will in a thousand lifetimes. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
108:We have two eyes to see two sides of things, but there must be a third eye which will see everything at the same time and yet not see anything. That is to understand Zen. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
109:In Zen, and in other forms of self discovery, we do have a transference that occurs where psychically, information, blocks of attention, are transferred to the student. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
110:In Zen we classify ten thousand different states of mind, different ways of seeing life. There is something beyond the ten thousand states of mind that we call nirvana. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
111:The ten thousand states of mind that we talk about in Zen are all levels of perception. You can think of each of the ten thousand states of mind as a dimensional plane. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
112:Zen was a reaction. Just as Buddha came into the world and spoke against the fall of Vedanta, so Buddhism lost its essence and became ritual. Zen was a reaction to that. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
113:There are monasteries in Japan where they teach Zen with rules, more rules than you can imagine, and you might feel comfortable with that. I don't teach that type of Zen. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
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115:We call it the transmission of the lamp in Zen. That's when we take enlightened states of mind and literally, you can transfer them, just like you can hand somebody flowers. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
116:If you are around a lot of human beings who are filled with jealousy and anger and rage and desire, it filters into the mind. Zen is writing a new program to run in the mind. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
117:The truth of Zen, just a little bit of it, is what turns one's humdrum life, a life of monotonous, uninspiring commonplaceness, into one of art, full of genuine inner creativity. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
118:The truth of Zen, just a little bit of it, is what turns one’s humdrum life, a life of monotonous, uninspiring commonplaceness, into one of art, full of genuine inner creativity. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
119:The basic idea of Zen is to come in touch with the inner workings of our being, and to do so in the most direct way possible, without resorting to anything external or superadded. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
120:Have the right attitude in advanced practice. Feel that you are always a beginner in Zen. They refer to it as "beginners mind". I feel I am a beginner, always; because it's true. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
121:Studying with a teacher doesn't simply mean going to an occasional seminar or Zen retreat. It means fully applying yourself to what the teacher says, most of which is not verbal. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
122:There is competition in Zen. Let's not be ridiculous.  There is competition in everything in life; being a winner in Zen means, competing and winning in the world of enlightenment. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
123:In Zen, there is nothing to explain, nothing to learn, nothing to enrich human knowledge. If knowledge does not arise in man, it is not his own, it is like a borrowed foreign adornment. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
124:Zen is not attained by mirror-wiping mediation, but by self-forgetfulness in the existential &
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127:In the old days, Zen was not really practiced so much in a monastery. The Zen Master usually lived up on a top of the mountain or the hill or in the forest or sometimes in the village. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
128:I teach Zen, tantric mysticism, jnana yoga, bhakti yoga, Tibetan mysticism, occultism and psychic development. I also teach poetry and literature, film and many other different things. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
129:Meryl Streep is expert at only using the requisite amount of energy to express her character, not an ounce too little or too much. She's Zen and doesn't know she's Zen. That's very Zen! ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
130:As a dialectical teacher, I have had many lives where I have taught Zen and Tibetan Buddhism and mysticism. I teach in many different modalites. But the theme that unites them - is love. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
131:Bodhidharma who brought Zen from India to the Orient, taught a very pure Zen - in that it was pure Zen. He wanted to show that the way still existed and wanted to get back to its essence. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
132:Work in a place that feels good to you. Select the best of that which is available. The Zen of working is just to do it, not to worry about it. Feel you would be doing it without the money. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
133:If you're very, very conservative and you like that sort of practice, go find a very conservative Zen master and just do traditional Japanese practice, which is not that traditional actually. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
134:In the advanced practice, the relationship between the Zen master and the student becomes very terse. The Zen master will expect things of the student because the student is in graduate school. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
135:The Zen Master was constantly attempting to break up concepts that people had about what it was like to be a spiritual teacher. We have a traditional image. Each Zen master was a complete character. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
136:When you visit the Zen Monasteries, one of the first things required is that you bring a donation. They have to pay for those monasteries. The upkeep is fantastic.  The monks have to be fed, and so on. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
137:If I am asked If I am asked, then, what Zen teaches, I would answer, Zen teaches nothing. Whatever teachings there are in Zen, they come out of one's own mind. We teach ourselves; Zen merely points the way. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
138:In Zen you practice zazen, mindfulness and other forms of introspection to find out who you are and what you want, to balance your spirit, develop willpower, increase your sense of humor and gain wisdom. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
139:A well known Los Angeles newspaper referred to a small group of gentlemen who live up on a mountain and practice Zen as &
140:Different schools of Zen have evolved, principally the Rinzai and Soto orders. A whole hierarchy has developed for the teaching and practice of Zen. Zen has become, to a certain degree, institutionalized. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
141:There are two primary ways of studying Zen. Either an individual will enter into a Zen monastery and study with a Zen master there, or they will study with a Zen master who lives in the contemporary world. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
142:Zen perceives and feels, and does not abstract and meditate. Zen penetrates and is finally lost in the immersion. Meditation, on the other hand, is outspokenly dualistic and consequently inevitably superficial. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
143:A simple fishing boat in the midst of the rippling waters is enough to awaken in the mind of the beholder a sense of vastness of the sea and at the same time of peace and contentment - the Zen sense oof the alone. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
144:If the Zen master sees that it will cause a person to progress, he will ask that person to do a task. The task is charged with power if it's performed properly. It's a koan between yourself and the Zen Master. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
145:Zen professes to be the spirit of Buddhism, but in fact it is the spirit of all religions and philosophies. When Zen is thoroughly understood, absolute peace of mind is attained, and a man lives as he should live. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
146:Zen is a liberation from time. For if we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
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148:The study of Zen is the study of energy, power, knowledge and balance. It is the science of energy conservation and control. We use energy to aid others, to see beauty, to discover love where we saw no love at all. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
149:Deluded beings think that if they get in a battle with a Zen Master or with a Don Juan, that it's going enhance their life if they win. You can never take power from someone else any more than you can take sunlight. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
150:The productivity of people requires continuous learning, as the Japanese have taught us. It requires adoption in the West of the specific Japanese Zen concept where one learns to do better what one already does well. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
151:The claim of the Zen followers that they are transmitting the essence of Buddhism is based on their belief that Zen takes hold of the enlivening spirit of the Buddha, stripped of all its historical and doctrinal garments. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
152:Each of the small enlightenments that a Zen practitioner has, which are known in Zen as "Satori experiences," provides deeper insights into the nature of existence and helps a person prepare for complete enlightenment. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
153:The life of Zen begins, therefore, in a disillusion with the pursuit of goals which do not really exist the good without the bad, the gratification of a self which is no more than an idea, and the morrow which never comes. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
154:Among the most remarkable features characterizing Zen we find these: spirituality, directness of expression, disregard of form or conventionalism, and frequently an almost wanton delight in going astray from respectability. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
155:In Old Zen, the Zen Master would do literally anything to break down the concept of what the study was. He would present conflicting codes all the time, just to shake this fixation people had on how to attain liberation. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
156:That's a waste of time. If you really understand Zen... you can use any book. You could use the Bible. You could use Alice in Wonderland. You could use the dictionary, because... the sound of the rain needs no translation. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
157:A Zen student asked his roshi the most important element of Zen.The roshi replied, "Attention." "Yes, thank you," the student replied. "But can you tell me the second most important element?"And the roshi replied, "Attention." ~ dan-millman, @wisdomtrove
158:The way of Zen is to become independent and strong. Don't rely on others for perceptions of life and truth. Do it individually. Go to a teacher of Zen to learn how to do that, not to get answers for individual life situations. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
159:Zen is the spirit of a man. Zen believes in his inner purity and goodness. Whatever is superadded or violently torn away, injures the wholesomeness of the spirit. Zen, therefore, is emphatically against all religious conventionalism. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
160:The Hindu philosophers teach that the oneness of being, which they call Brahman, is a primal, formless awareness dreaming itself to be all the forms of life. The Zen masters say that everything is a thought arising within one ‘big mind’. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
161:This is what Zen means by being detached—not being without emotion or feeling, but being one in whom feeling is not sticky or blocked, and through whom the experiences of the world pass like the reflections of birds flying over water. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
162:Old Zen was very funny; there was a great deal of humor and happiness. Zen today seems much drier. While there's a certain amount of humor, it seems to lack that total intensity because humor is one of the primary tools for liberation. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
163:Just like there are different roads that lead to different places, so there are different levels of awareness that lead to different places and we shift in and out of them. These are the ten thousand states of mind that we study in Zen. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
164:The Zen masters compare being awake to &
165:Although profoundly "inconsequential," the Zen experience has consequences in the sense that it may be applied in any direction, to any conceivable human activity, and that wherever it is so applied it lends an unmistakable quality to the work. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
166:Zen opens a man's eyes to the greatest mystery as it is daily and hourly performed; it enlarges the heart to embrace eternity of time and infinity of space in its every palpitation; it makes us live in the world as if walking in the garden of Eden ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
167:In deep self-acceptance grows a compassionate understanding. As one Zen master said when I asked if he ever gets angry, &
168:It is only in the last 800 years that the rules have come into being and conservative Zen has surfaced. It is not particularly popular in Japan at all. Hardly anybody practices Zen any more because it's just too strict; there are too many rules. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
169:I was talking to a Zen master the other day and he said, "You shall be my disciple."I looked at him and said, "Who was Buddha's teacher?" He looked at me in a very odd way for a moment and then he burst into laughter and handed me a piece of clover. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
170:One Zen master said, The whole universe is my true personality. This is a very wonderful saying... If you want to see what you truly are, open the window, and everything you see is in fact the expression of your inner reality. Can you embrace all of it? ~ adyashanti, @wisdomtrove
171:I may discuss contemporary cinema, how to shop at a mall without losing energy, how to use the power of mind to increase career and academic success, the Zen of sports, reincarnation, karma, sex, the experience of "suchness" or a new book by Stephen King. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
172:The practice of Zen is to eat, breathe, cook, carry water, and scrub the toilet — to infuse every act of body, speech, and mind — with mindfulness, to illuminate every leaf and pebble, every heap of garbage, every path that leads to our mind's return home. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
173:Zen, in its essence is the art of seeing into the nature of one's own being, and it points the way from bondage to freedom. By making us drink right from the fountain of life it liberates us from all the yokes under which we finite beings are usually suffering in this world. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
174:I raise my hand; I take a book from the other side of this desk; I hear the boys playing ball outside my window; I see the clouds blown away beyond the neighboring woods:-in all these I am practicing Zen, I am living Zen. No worldly discussion is necessary, or any explanation. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
175:Perhaps there is after all nothing mysterious in Zen. Everything is open to your full view. If you eat your food and keep yourself cleanly dressed and work on the farm to raise your rice or vegetables, you are doing all that is required of you on this earth, and the infinite is realized in you. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
176:Suzuki's works on Zen Buddhism are among the best contributions to the knowledge of living Buddhism... We cannot be sufficiently grateful to the author, first for the fact of his having brought Zen closer to Western understanding, and secondly for the manner in which he has achieved this task. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
177:Zen wants us to acquire an entirely new point of view whereby to look into the mysteries of life and the secrets of nature. This is because Zen has come to the definite conclusion that the ordinary logical process of reasoning is powerless to give final satisfaction to our deepest spiritual needs. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
178:Mystics of all traditions claim that if we become conscious of our essential nature, we will realize that in reality, there is only one of us. There is one Self experiencing itself to be many individual selves. There is one Big Mind, as the Zen masters say, within which the dream of life is arising. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
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180:Prophecy is rash, but it may be that the publication of D.T. Suzuki's first Essays in Zen Buddhism in 1927 will seem to future generations as great an intellectual event as William of Moerbeke's Latin translations of Aristotle in the thirteenth century or Marsiglio Ficino's of Plato in the fifteenth. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
181:Not thinking about anything is zen. Once you know this, walking, standing, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is zen. To know that the mind is empty is to see the buddha... . Using the mind to reality is delusion. Not using the mind to look for reality is awareness. Freeing oneself from words is liberation. ~ bodhidharma, @wisdomtrove
182:As far as the content goes, there is none in either Satori or Zen that can be described or presented or demonstrated for your intellectual appreciation. For Zen has no business with ideas, and Satori is a kind of inner perception – not the perception, indeed, of a single individual object but the perception of Reality itself, so to speak. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
183:A Zen master was walking with one of his students who asked him: ‘How can I awaken?’ The master was quiet for a moment and then he replied: ‘Can you hear that babbling brook? … Enter there.’ The master is telling him to become profoundly conscious of what he’s already experiencing, by ‘entering’ into his sensual experience in the present moment. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
184:He had a tremendous propensity for getting lost when driving. This was largely because of his method of Zen navigation, which was simply to find any car that looked as if it knew where it was going and follow it. The results were more often surprising than successful, but he felt it was worth it for the sake of the few occasions when it was both. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
185:The thing about Zen is that it pushes contradictions to their ultimate limit where one has to choose between madness and innocence. Zen suggests that we may be driving toward one or the other on a cosmic scale. Driving toward them because, one way or the other, as madmen or innocents, we are already there. It might be good to open our eyes and see. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
186:Zen enriches no one. There is no body to be found. The birds may come and circle for a while in the place where it is thought to be. But they soon go elsewhere. When they are gone, the "nothing," the "no-body" that was there, suddenly appears. That is Zen. It was there all the time but the scavengers missed it, because it was not their kind of prey. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
187:The thing about Zen is that it pushes contradictions to their ultimate limit where one has to choose between madness and innocence. And Zen. suggests that we may be driving toward one or the other on a cosmic scale. Driving toward them because, one way or the other, as madmen or innocents, we are already there. It might be good to open our eyes and see. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
188:Zen abhors repetition or imitation of any kind, for it kills. For the same reason Zen never explains, but only affirms. Life is fact and no explanation is necessary or pertinent. To explain is to apologize, and why should we apologize for living? To live—is that not enough? Let us then live, let us affirm! Herein lies Zen in all its purity and in all its nudity as well. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
189:Essentially Satori is a sudden experience, and it is often described as a "turning over" of the mind, just as a pair of scales will suddenly turn over when a sufficient amount of material has been poured into one pan to overbalance the weight in the other. Hence it is an experience which generally occurs after a long and concentrated effort to discover the meaning of Zen. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
190:The great lesson from the true mystics, from the Zen monks, and now also from the Humanistic and Transpersonal psychologists – that the sacred is in the ordinary, that it is to be found in one's daily life, in one's neighbours, friends, and family, in one's back yard ... To be looking elsewhere for miracles is to me a sure sign of ignorance that everything is sacred. ~ abraham-maslow, @wisdomtrove
191:But the transformation of consciousness undertaken in Taoism and Zen is more like the correction of faulty perception or the curing of a disease. It is not an acquisitive process of learning more and more facts or greater and greater skills, but rather an unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. As Lao-tzu said, "The scholar gains every day, but the Taoist loses every day. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
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193:The basic idea of Zen is to come in touch with the inner workings of our being, and to do this in the most direct way possible, without resorting to anything external or superadded. Therefore, anything that has the semblance of an external authority is rejected by Zen. Absolute faith is placed in a man's own inner being. For whatever authority there is in Zen, all comes from within. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
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195:Zen purposes to discipline the mind itself, to make it its own master, through an insight into its proper nature. This getting into the real nature of one's own mind or soul is the fundamental object of Zen Buddhism. Zen, therefore, is more than meditation and Dhyana in its ordinary sense. The discipline of Zen consists in opening the mental eye in order to look into the very reason of existence. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
196:Zen is really extraordinarily simple as long as one doesn't try to be cute about it or beat around the bush! Zen is simply the sensation and the clear understanding ... that there is behind the multiplicity of events and creatures in this universe simply one energy - and it appears as you, and everything is it. The practice of Zen is to understand that one energy so as to "feel it in your bones. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
197:If a person opens his mouth to say affirmation or denial, he is lost. Zen is gone. But keeping silence does not go away. The stone on the ground is silent, the blossoming flower under the window is also silent, but they do not understand Zen. There must be some way to find the silence and the speech to be the same, ie. denial and affirmation to be unified in a higher form of utterance. We do that, so we have met Zen. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
198:In the assemblies of the enlightened ones there have been many cases of mastering the Way bringing forth the heart of plants and trees; this is what awakening the mind for enlightenment is like. The fifth patriarch of Zen was once a pine-planting wayfarer; Rinzai worked on planting cedars and pines on Mount Obaku. . . . Working with plants, trees, fences and walls, if they practice sincerely they will attain enlightenment. ~ dogen, @wisdomtrove
199:There is something rejuvenating in the possession of Zen. The spring flowers look prettier, and the mountain stream runs cooler and more transparent. The subjective revolution that brings about this state of things cannot be called abnormal. When life becomes more enjoyable and its expense broadens to include the universe itself, there must be something in ‘satori’ that is quite precious and well worth one’s striving after. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
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201:This acquisition of a new viewpoint in Zen is called ‘Satori’ (‘Wu’ in Chinese) and its verb form is ‘Satoru’. Without it there is no Zen, for the life of Zen begins with the ‘opening of Satori’; ‘Satori’ may be defined as intuitive looking-in, in contradistinction to intellectual and logical understanding. Whatever the definition, ‘Satori’ means the unfolding of a new world hitherto unperceived in the confusion of the dualistic mind. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
202:But when you're in front of an audience and you make them laugh at a new idea, you're guiding the whole being for the moment. No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It's very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open, completely themselves when that message hits the brain and the laugh begins. That's when new ideas can be implanted. If a new idea slips in at that moment, it has a chance to grow. ~ george-carlin, @wisdomtrove
203:As mindfulness stabilizes, you will rest more and more as awareness itself. Awareness contains mind-objects, a general term for any mental content, including perceptions, thoughts, desires, memories, emotions, and so on. Although mind-objects may dance busily with each other, awareness itself is never disturbed. Awareness is a kind of screen on which mind-objects register, like—in the Zen saying—the reflections on a pond of geese flying overhead. But awareness is never sullied or rattled by the passing show. In your brain, the neural patterns ~ rick-hanson, @wisdomtrove
204:Tranquility… involves not acting based on the feeling tone. For example, you don’t automatically move toward something just because it is pleasant. In the words of the Third Zen Patriarch: ‘The Great Way is not difficult for those who have no preferences’. Set aside a period of your day—even just a minute long—to consciously release preferences for or against anything. Then extend this practice to more and more of your day. Your actions will be guided increasingly by your values and virtues, not by desires that are reactions to positive or negative feeling tones. ~ rick-hanson, @wisdomtrove
205:I have my own way to walk and for some reason or other Zen is right in the middle of it wherever I go. So there it is, with all its beautiful purposelessness, and it has become very familiar to me though I do not know "what it is." Or even if it is an "it." Not to be foolish and multiply words, I'll say simply that it seems to me that Zen is the very atmosphere of the Gospels, and the Gospels are bursting with it. It is the proper climate for any monk, no matter what kind of monk he may be. If I could not breathe Zen I would probably die of spiritual asphyxiation. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
206:The idea of Zen is to catch life as it flows. There is nothing extraordinary or mysterious about Zen. I raise my hand ; I take a book from the other side of the desk ; I hear the boys playing ball outside my window; I see the clouds blown away beyond the neighbouring wood: — in all these I am practising Zen, I am living Zen. No wordy discussions is necessary, nor any explanation. I do not know why — and there is no need of explaining, but when the sun rises the whole world dances with joy and everybody’s heart is filled with bliss. If Zen is at all conceivable, it must be taken hold of here. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
207:If there is anything Zen strongly emphasizes it is the attainment of freedom; that is, freedom from all unnatural encumbrances. Meditation is something artificially put on; it does not belong to the native activity of the mind. Upon what do the fowls of the air meditate? Upon what do the fish in the water meditate? They fly; they swim. Is not that enough? Who wants to fix his mind on the unity of God and man, or on the nothingness of life? Who wants to be arrested in the daily manifestations of his life-activity by such meditations as the goodness of a divine being or the everlasting fire of hell? ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove

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1:ordained Zen monk, ~ Michael Pollan,
2:Day after day the sun. ~ Zen proverb,
3:"Sit like a mountain." ~ Zen proverb,
4:Essays in Zen Buddhism ~ Alan W Watts,
5:Let go, or be dragged. ~ Zen proverb,
6:"Let go, or be dragged." ~ Zen proverb,
7:"The ordinary is sacred." ~ Zen proverb,
8:In Zen we have no gurus. ~ Frederick Lenz,
9:Let the dead bury the dead. ~ Zen proverb,
10:"The obstacle is the path." ~ Zen proverb,
11:What you possess, you lose. ~ Zen proverb,
12:Here it is. My moment of zen. ~ Jon Stewart,
13:No seed ever sees the flower. ~ Zen proverb,
14:Zen has no business with ideas. ~ D T Suzuki,
15:Zen is the vehicle of reality. ~ Jim Harrison,
16:Salta y la red aparecerá. CITA ZEN ~ Anonymous,
17:"Zen is laughter, laughter Zen." ~ Zen proverb,
18:Clouds gone,the mountain appears. ~ Zen proverb,
19:If I ’ad known zen what I know now. ~ Lee Child,
20:Tantric Zen is a state of mind ~ Frederick Lenz,
21:To Zen, time and eternity are one. ~ D T Suzuki,
22:Zen and the Art of Motorcycle ~ Richard Dawkins,
23:She has a passionate hunger for youth. ~ Zen Cho,
24:What are you, Zen Master Fang? ~ Charlaine Harris,
25:Be calm. Be Zen. You are Buddha. ~ James Patterson,
26:Water which is too pure, has no fish. ~ Zen proverb,
27:Love was like swallowing a cili padi whole. ~ Zen Cho,
28:"Zen is an effort to become alert and awake." ~ Osho,
29:Zen is poetry; poetry is Zen. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
30:A zen master's life is one continuous mistake. ~ Dogen,
31:"Expect nothing. Appreciate everything." ~ Zen proverb,
32:The world is won by those who let it go. ~ Zen proverb,
33:Water which is too pure, has no fish.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
34:What was never lost, can never be found. ~ Zen proverb,
35:Zen movement is a meditative practice. ~ Bryant McGill,
36:Where you are right now is where you are. ~ Zen proverb,
37:For Zen students, a weed is a treasure. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
38:When the shoe fits, the foot is forgotten. ~ Zen proverb,
39:A true Zen saying: "Nothing is what I want. ~ Frank Zappa,
40:No snowflake ever falls in the wrong place. ~ Zen proverb,
41:What was never lost, can never be found.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
42:"Zen is simply the expression of truth." ~ Jack Kornfield,
43:Before I had studied Zen for thirty years, ~ Li Ching Yuen,
44:"The tighter you squeeze, the less you have." ~ Zen proverb,
45:We teach ourselves; Zen merely points the way. ~ D T Suzuki,
46:Zen is all about self-study/knowledge and self-help! ~ Mika,
47:"Inner surrender leads to the highest truth." ~ Zen proverb,
48:No snowflake ever falls in the wrong place.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
49:"No snowflake ever falls in the wrong place."– ~ Zen proverb,
50:The quieter you become, the more you can hear. ~ Zen proverb,
51:Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance ~ Natalie Goldberg,
52:Leap and the net will catch you.
Zen quote ~ Angela Jeffs,
53:"When nothing is done, nothing is left undone." ~ Zen proverb,
54:"Zen practice is to open up our small mind." ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
55:Better to see the face than to hear the name.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
56:Cartas de un maestro de zen (Dharma, 1998).» ~ Timothy Ferriss,
57:"Don't seek the truth; just drop your opinions." ~ Zen proverb,
58:When you can do nothing,
what can you do? ~ Zen proverb,
59:A zen master's life is one continuous mistake.
   ~ Dogen Zenji,
60:He would gaze at her with intrigued longan seed eyes. ~ Zen Cho,
61:Zen Judaism: For You, a Little Enlightenment, ~ Parker J Palmer,
62:Be a master of the mind, not mastered by the mind. ~ Zen proverb,
63:How i long to seeamong dawn flowersthe face of God. ~ Basho #zen,
64:I consider writing a legitimate Zen practice. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
65:The purpose of Zen is the perfection of character. ~ Yamada Koun,
66:To be calm is the highest achievement of the self. ~ Zen Proverb,
67:Zen is the unsymbolization of the world. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
68:Nothing is exactly as it seems nor is it otherwise. ~ Zen proverb,
69:"Be a master of the mind, not mastered by the mind." ~ Zen proverb,
70:If you say you had a zen moment, you already didn't. ~ Alec Sulkin,
71:"To understand everything is to forgive everything." ~ Zen proverb,
72:Zen aims at freedom but its practice is disciplined. ~ Gary Snyder,
73:Zen has nothing to do with letters, words, or sutras. ~ D T Suzuki,
74:Zen is to have the heart and soul of a little child. ~ Takuan Soho,
75:In Tantric Zen it doesn't matter but it does ... . ~ Frederick Lenz,
76:Nothing is exactly as it seems nor is it otherwise.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
77:Old Zen was the reduction of concepts to absurdity. ~ Frederick Lenz,
78:When you reach the top of the mountain, keep climbing.
   ~ Zen Koan,
79:"Zen is to have the heart and soul of a little child." ~ Takuan Sōhō,
80:Zen life is not to make himself but to grow that way. ~ Alan W Watts,
81:Better to sit all night than to go to bed with a dragon. ~ Zen proverb,
82:Can you see time?No.Then you should stop looking for it. ~ Zen proverb,
83:Since it is all too clear, it takes time to grasp it.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
84:Sometimes, simply by sitting, the soul collects wisdom. ~ Zen Proverb,
85:There is no need to have a deep understanding of Zen. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
86:Zen is everywhere.... But for you, Zen is right here. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
87:"High understanding comes from not understanding at all." ~ Zen proverb,
88:wisdom? As the Zen texts explain, “To live in trusting ~ Jack Kornfield,
89:I can speak four dialects, but none of them is fairy language. ~ Zen Cho,
90:The zen of housecleaning allows one to reach inner peace. ~ Robert Crais,
91:Better to sit all night than to go to bed with a dragon.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
92:I have lived with several Zen masters — all of them cats. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
93:Touch the hole in your life, and there flowers will bloom. ~ Zen Proverb,
94:Zen is not about eliminating thoughts but illuminating them. ~ Gerald May,
95:"A donkey carrying a pile of holy books is still a donkey." ~ Zen proverb,
96:I have lived with several Zen masters -- all of them cats. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
97:The secret of zen is just two words: not... always... so. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
98:Zen Buddhism is a discipline where belief isn't necessary. ~ David Sylvian,
99:Zen is the purest of meditations: just sit silently, doing nothing. ~ Osho,
100:"Can you see time? No. Then you should stop looking for it." ~ Zen proverb,
101:Fans inside computers were not Zen-like; they distracted. ~ Walter Isaacson,
102:This is Zen, and in Zen, as we all know ... anything goes! ~ Frederick Lenz,
103:Be content with what you have. Rejoice in the way things are.' ~ Zen proverb,
104:"Be content with what you have.Rejoice in the way things are." ~ Zen proverb,
105:¿Qué sucede con el puño si la mano se abre? Proverbio Zen ~ Carlos Monsiv is,
106:"The moment we desire to be something, we are no longer free." ~ Zen proverb,
107:There is really only one Zen Master ... and that's yourself. ~ Frederick Lenz,
108:Oh, fuck Zen,” she muttered. “I’ll get enlightened when I die. ~ Thea Harrison,
109:What are acquaintance for, if not to supply the pleasures of gossip? ~ Zen Cho,
110:It is dreadful when people are good-looking and pay attention to you. ~ Zen Cho,
111:Resignation to unhappiness didn't come naturally—she had to learn it. ~ Zen Cho,
112:The real Zen of the old Chinese masters was wu-shih, or "no fuss." ~ Alan Watts,
113:A good memory, I'm sure," Zen returned. "But a memory nonetheless. ~ Kate Angell,
114:"The foolish reject what they see.The wise reject what they think." ~ Zen proverb,
115:"The real Zen of the old Chinese masters was wu-shih, or 'no fuss.'" ~ Alan Watts,
116:He who conquers others is strong. He who conquers himself is mighty. ~ Zen proverb,
117:If you are not afraid of dying, there is nothing you cannot achieve. ~ Zen proverb,
118:Old Zen is the way of nothingness, the way of having a good time. ~ Frederick Lenz,
119:Today is the eighth day of the month, tomorrow is the thirteenth.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
120:"Zen is really just a reminder to stay alive and to be awake." ~ Peter Matthiessen,
121:Zen martini: A martini with no vermouth at all. And no gin, either. ~ P J O Rourke,
122:A similar question in the Zen tradition is this: “If not now, when? ~ Eckhart Tolle,
123:"Do not mistake the finger pointing at the moon for the moon itself." ~ Zen proverb,
124:What Is Zen?: Plain Talk for a Beginner’s Mind by Norman Fischer. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
125:What is perfect? From the Zen mind, perfection is not being there. ~ Frederick Lenz,
126:What is that Zen saying of yours, Rose? ‘Let go or be dragged’? ~ Kimberly McCreight,
127:Whether I'm a good wife doesn't have anything to do with what he was like. ~ Zen Cho,
128:I'm relaxed, Belk. I call it Zen and the art of not giving a shit. ~ Michael Connelly,
129:When the pupil is ready to learn, a teacher will appear —Zen proverb ~ Colleen Collins,
130:Zen phrase says The instant you speak about a thing you miss the mark. ~ Fritjof Capra,
131:I might go anywhere and do any magic I pleased if I were Peter, not Prunella. ~ Zen Cho,
132:Zen has no secrets other than seriously thinking about life and death. ~ Takeda Shingen,
133:A wild beast may wound your body, but an evil friend will wound your mind. ~ Zen proverb,
134:He tapped into the Zen of ignorance, the enlightenment of absurdity. ~ Christopher Moore,
135:The only Zen you find on tops of mountains is the Zen you bring there. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
136:You see what you are thinking and feeling, seldom what you are looking at. ~ Zen proverb,
137:Zen insight is not our awareness, but Being's awareness of itself in us. ~ Thomas Merton,
138:executive. KOBUN CHINO. A St Zen master in California who became Jobs’s ~ Walter Isaacson,
139:I learned that you can stand up for yourself and still maintain your zen! ~ Doreen Virtue,
140:I am very discouraged. What should I do? Master says, 'encourage others.'
   ~ Zen Proverb,
141:In Tantric Zen there is no rule. There is only your immediate experience. ~ Frederick Lenz,
142:She flung the door open with a flourish, revealing a scene of utter pandemonium. ~ Zen Cho,
143:Sitting quietly, doing nothing, spring comes, and the grass grows by itself. ~ Zen Proverb,
144:Sitting quietly, doing nothing, spring comes, and the grass grows by itself. ~ Zen proverb,
145:"When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you." ~ Zen proverb,
146:Zen is like soap. First you wash with it, and then you wash off the soap. ~ Yamaoka Tesshu,
147:An old Zen rule of thumb is not to answer until one has been asked three times. ~ Joko Beck,
148:I want to weep for lack of such a noble concept -- a soldier's right to refuse. ~ Carlo Zen,
149:"You see what you are thinking and feeling, seldom what you are looking at." ~ Zen proverb,
150:As the Zen Buddhist saying goes, how you do anything is how you do everything. ~ Simon Sinek,
151:He had tapped into the Zen of ignorance, the enlightenment of absurdity. ~ Christopher Moore,
152:I have lived with several Zen masters — all of them cats. ~ Eckhart Tolle#EckhartTolle​ #Zen,
153:"Taoism furnished the basis for aesthetic ideals, Zen made them practical." ~ Kakuzo Okakura,
154:When other sects speak well of Zen, the first thing that they praise is its poverty. ~ Dogen,
155:In a certain sense, Zen is feeling life instead of feeling something about life. ~ Alan Watts,
156:Zen is about breaking out of your ideas and experiencing life and not ideas. ~ Frederick Lenz,
157:Baseball is one of the most beautiful games. It is. It is a very Zen-like game. ~ Jim Jarmusch,
158:I came to think of it as a kind of zen practice: the Zen of not fucking up. ~ Sebastian Junger,
159:I feel I'm pretty zen and laid back. I don't have a lot of rage in my real life. ~ Stark Sands,
160:The practice of Zen is forgetting the self in the act of uniting with something. ~ Yamada Koun,
161:You are truly zen when you can wipe your ass with the words you have written down. ~ Anonymous,
162:I felt like a fox backed into a corner, with the yelping of the hounds coming closer. ~ Zen Cho,
163:"In a certain sense, Zen is feeling life instead of feeling something about life." ~ Alan Watts,
164:The wise adapt themselves to circumstances, as water molds itself to the pitcher. ~ Zen proverb,
165:All is vanity, says the Bible. All is now, says Zen, All is dust, says the desert. ~ Phil Knight,
166:And it’s like that Zen saying: ‘When the student is ready, the teacher will appear. ~ Mike Wells,
167:Zen Makes use, to a great extent, of poetical expressions; Zen is wedded to poetry. ~ D T Suzuki,
168:I guess Zen is a day like this when you are part of the air and remember things ~ Stephen Chbosky,
169:I just had to stay cool. Zen. No punching in the face. Punching would not be Zen. ~ Ilona Andrews,
170:Rebirth entailed a true death, the severing of one's memory and the loss of one's self. ~ Zen Cho,
171:The best of the best were graduates of the two-year Zen-Nippon Chick Sexing School, ~ Joshua Foer,
172:At my Rolling Stones' tour, the camera was a protection. I used it in a Zen way. ~ Annie Leibovitz,
173:A zen couch potato is a person who contemplates the nature of televised existence. ~ Richard Helms,
174:May we exist like a lotus, At home in the muddy water. Thus we bow to life as it is. ~ Zen Proverb,
175:The lesson seems almost Zen: you live longer only when you stop trying to live longer. ~ Anonymous,
176:Zen is very easy! It's like touching your nose when you wash your face in the morning! ~ Seungsahn,
177:Zen teaches that our approach to today determines our whole approach to life. ~ Philip Toshio Sudo,
178:my favorite Zen saying,” said Dee. “Once you’re born, the worst has already happened. ~ Rudy Rucker,
179:The only Zen you can find on the tops of mountains is the Zen you bring up there. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
180:Can we cut the Zen crap for a moment?" I ask. "I'm trying to beat this bag to a pulp. ~ Mari Mancusi,
181:Children are natural Zen masters; their world is brand new in each and every moment. ~ John Bradshaw,
182:It’s kind of like a Zen thing. Like playing the piano, or being a centipede in Heaven. ~ Peter Watts,
183:Zen is the way of splitting the self again and again, untilt there is nothing left. ~ Frederick Lenz,
184:Any good athletic is always in a state of perpetual training, as is the Zen student. ~ Frederick Lenz,
185:I’ll aim to make it black as the devil, hot as hell, pure as an angel, and sweet as love. ~ Carlo Zen,
186:In Zen you are learning how to make new realities, to build things inside your mind. ~ Frederick Lenz,
187:It gets kind of zen after awhile, life is a journey, time is a river, the door is ajar. ~ Jim Butcher,
188:The lesson seems almost Zen: you live longer only when you stop trying to live longer. ~ Atul Gawande,
189:Zen is not some kind of excitement, but concentration on our usual everyday routine. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
190:But a woman should not marry where there is no respect. Respect is the most important thing. ~ Zen Cho,
191:How many Zen masters does it take to screw in a light bulb? The plum tree in the garden! ~ Brad Warner,
192:It's a kind of zen question: if you write a book and no one reads it, is it really a book? ~ Lee Child,
193:So, I guess Zen is a day like this when you are part of the air and remember things. ~ Stephen Chbosky,
194:Tantric Zen leads to illumination and fun right here and now, which is why I like it. ~ Frederick Lenz,
195:Before enlightenment, chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment, chop wood carry water. ~ Zen proverb,
196:I don't know how much you know about Zen, but you'll know less when I'm done with you. ~ Frederick Lenz,
197:That’s essentially what Zen practice is about: functioning from moment to moment. ~ Charlotte Joko Beck,
198:The lesson seems almost Zen: you live longer only when you stop trying to live longer. * ~ Atul Gawande,
199:There is no beginning and there is no end to time. There is only your perception of time. ~ Zen proverb,
200:Tirando cenizas sobre el Buda (La Liebre de Marzo, 1991), del maestro zen Seung Sahn, ~ Timothy Ferriss,
201:Zen gives you tremendous dignity. There is no authority anywhere. Freedom is utter and ultimate. ~ Osho,
202:"A flower does not think of competing to the flower next to it. It just blooms." ~ Sensei Ogui, Zen Shin,
203:He who controls others may be powerful, but he who has mastered himself is mightier still. ~ Zen proverb,
204:In Tantric Zen you can be humorous and make fun of anything or you can be very serious. ~ Frederick Lenz,
205:You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you. ~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing,
206:Zen is meditation, the actual experience of life directly, immediately with no buffers. ~ Frederick Lenz,
207:Zen master Seng-tsan taught that true freedom is being “without anxiety about imperfection. ~ Tara Brach,
208:In life as well as in art Zen never wastes energy in stopping to explain; it only indicates. ~ Alan Watts,
209:It takes a wise man to learn from his mistakes, but an even wiser man to learn from others. ~ Zen proverb,
210:The only zen thoughts you can find on a mountain summit are those you brought yourself. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
211:Those who sit perfectly physically usually take more time to obtain the true way of Zen. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
212:We enter a discipline like Zen practice so that we can learn to live in a sane way. ~ Charlotte Joko Beck,
213:"When you are deluded and full of doubt,even a thousand books of scripture are not enough." ~ Zen proverb,
214:Zen masters say you cannot see your reflection in running water, only in still water. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
215:as the Zen saying goes, ‘If you take care of your mind, you take care of the world.’  ~ Arianna Huffington,
216:In life as well as in art, Zen never wastes energy in stopping to explain; it only indicates. ~ Alan Watts,
217:The birds always find their way to their nests. The river always finds its way to the ocean. ~ Zen proverb,
218:To remain caught up in ideas and words about Zen is, as the old masters say, to stink of Zen. ~ Alan Watts,
219:You are having a baby,' he said.

'I certainly hope it turns out to be a baby,' I agreed. ~ Zen Cho,
220:Zen is the study of mind in all of its manifestations. The purpose of Zen is to be happy. ~ Frederick Lenz,
221:Dan di hadapan kekuasaan, hal paling mudah yang mesti dilakukan, adalah merawat baik-baik ingatan. ~ Zen RS,
222:I thought: if I die, I hope I get reincarnated into a mosquito so I can bite that fucker kau-kau. ~ Zen Cho,
223:Tantric Zen is the exploration of everything, since everything is a part of enlightenment. ~ Frederick Lenz,
224:"The Zen Way is demanding, but it leads to the depths, to the light of clearly seeing what is." ~ Myokyo-ni,
225:"This is the Zen approach: nothing is there to be done. There is nothing to do. One has just to be." ~ Osho,
226:If Zen has any preference it is for glass that is plain, has no color, and is "just glass." ~ Thomas Merton,
227:I feel like I'm being too Zen. I'm inhaling too much patchouli and incense. It's embarrassing. ~ Jimmy Fallon,
228:Smile, breathe and go slowly." - Thich Nhat Hanh, Vietnamese Zen monk, author and peace activist. ~ Nhat Hanh,
229:We can see unmistakeably that there is an inner relationship between Zen and the warrior's life. ~ D T Suzuki,
230:This was all she needed – a dead guy who talked like some Zen master trying to be her therapist. ~ Jen Minkman,
231:When you try to stay on the surface of the water, you sink; but when you try to sink, you float. ~ Zen proverb,
232:Zen is a very quick path to enlightenment and development of the mind and all its facilities. ~ Frederick Lenz,
233:I don't think I'm competing with anyone. I don't mean to sound Zen, but genuinely, when I stopped ~ Vidya Balan,
234:I'm a Zen Master. I'm an occult teacher. I teach people how to become that, how to be perfect. ~ Frederick Lenz,
235:Zen. It was like the word that ends the spell. The kill that turns the witch back into a princess ~ Jan Ellison,
236:Zen provides a structure that supports our exploring the practice and the teachings for ourselves. ~ Jean Smith,
237:According to Zen philosophy each human being has two minds, a finite mind and an infinite mind. ~ Frederick Lenz,
238:It is a mother's duty to teach her daughters about the uses of blood, particularly a magical daughter. ~ Zen Cho,
239:This time, let us hope you will get to be old," she said. "It is a great suffering to know youth only. ~ Zen Cho,
240:We know the sound of two hands clapping. But what is the sound of one hand clapping? – A Zen Kōan ~ J D Salinger,
241:For Zen students a weed is a treasure. With this attitude, whatever you do, life becomes an art. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
242:Great doubt: great awakening. Little doubt: little awakening. No doubt: no awakening. —ZEN MAXIM ~ Timothy Ferris,
243:La «filosofía del budismo Zen» se alimenta de un «filosofar sobre» y «con» el budismo Zen. Tiene ~ Byung Chul Han,
244:There's something Zen-like about the way I work - it's like raking gravel in a Zen Buddhist garden. ~ Chuck Close,
245:When mind and action are separate, zen is lost. We keep the two in sync by paying attention. ~ Philip Toshio Sudo,
246:Zen and Buddhism have produced martial arts, because of the Buddhist injunction against weapons. ~ Frederick Lenz,
247:Zen approaches it from the practical side of life-that is, to work out Enlightenment in life itself. ~ D T Suzuki,
248:Zen is the game of insight, the game of discovering who you are beneath the social masks. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
249:Zen teaches nothing; it merely enables us to wake up and become aware. It does not teach, it points. ~ D T Suzuki,
250:A thief running away like mad from a ferocious watch-dog may be a splendid example of Zen. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
251:I feel much more comfortable either up in a tree, or underwater. That's where I feel the most zen. ~ Margot Robbie,
252:I've been in these tabloids for 14 years now, and at some point you just become a Zen master of it all ~ Brad Pitt,
253:The truth of Zen is the truth of life, and life means to live, to move, to act, not merely to reflect. ~ D T Suzuki,
254:If you realize that all things change, there is nothing you will try to hold on to. ~ Zen proverb#LetGo #change #zen,
255:In Japanese art, space assumed a dominant role and its position was strengthened by Zen concepts. ~ Stephen Gardiner,
256:Zen practice asks you not to worry about who you 'should' become. Find out who you are right now. ~ Brenda Shoshanna,
257:If you understand, things are just as they are. If you do not understand, things are just as they are. ~ Zen Proverb,
258:Naturally, the Zen Master Rama philosophy is to have a high state of awareness and material success. ~ Frederick Lenz,
259:People who practice Zen correctly are not spaced-out or unrealistic. They are balanced and grounded. ~ Frederick Lenz,
260:Siew Tsin had not given much thought to what happened in the afterlife until the afterlife happened to her. ~ Zen Cho,
261:There is no letter of the law to follow in Zen. There is a lot of etiquette, but there are no rules. ~ Frederick Lenz,
262:This is beautifully expressed in the Zen saying “The snow falls, each flake in its appropriate place. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
263:Zen masters always say that you cannot see your reflection in running water, only in still water. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
264:Zen was an attempt to get back to the purest teachings of the Buddha -enlightenment without strings. ~ Frederick Lenz,
265:I don't lack confidence. I don't sweat. I don't want to get too Zen on you, but I have to run my own race. ~ Brad Grey,
266:Zen is the path that focuses the most upon meditation. It is almost exclusively a path of meditation. ~ Frederick Lenz,
267:He was a typical specimen of the younger son in avid pursuit of mediocrity with which the Theurgist’s teemed: ~ Zen Cho,
268:I am still raw. I say I may be back. You know what lies are for. Even in your Zen heaven we shan't meet. ~ Sylvia Plath,
269:If you want to travel the Way of Buddhas and Zen masters, then expect nothing, seek nothing, and grasp nothing. ~ D gen,
270:If you want to travel the Way of Buddhas and Zen masters, then expect nothing, seek nothing, and grasp nothing. ~ Dogen,
271:Tantric Zen, and the people who practice it, of course, make some people feel extremely uncomfortable. ~ Frederick Lenz,
272:Life, according to Zen, ought to be lived as a bird flies through the air, or as a fish swims in the water. ~ D T Suzuki,
273:of the Zen masters might have been excellent in their own time—and might still be the best, if ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
274:She had still had the loved child's belief that it would not be allowed for anything too bad to happen to her. ~ Zen Cho,
275:The whole point of Zen is to suspend the rules we have superimposed on things and to see the world as it is ~ Alan Watts,
276:Why, all the greatest magic comes down to blood," said Mak Genggang. "And who knows blood better than a woman? ~ Zen Cho,
277:Zen is not interested in high-flown statements; it wants its pupil to bite his apple and not discuss it. ~ Anne Bancroft,
278:Nothing weaker than water.Nothing stronger than rock.Still, a slow flow of water can cut through mountains. ~ Zen Proverb,
279:The light is already there. In Zen Buddhism there's a little speck of dust on the mirror, and that's us. ~ Frederick Lenz,
280:the Zen masters always say that you cannot see your reflection in running water, only in still water. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
281:Zen is a way of liberation, concerned not with discovering what is good or bad or advantageous, but what is. ~ Alan Watts,
282:There is a sense of competition in Zen. You are competing with your thoughts and trying to overcome them. ~ Frederick Lenz,
283:The word impossible contains the word possible' What's that-- some Zen thing?' I think Star Trek. Mr. Spock. ~ Dean Koontz,
284:"Time passes quickly and opportunity is lost. Each of us must strive to awaken. Do not squander your lives." ~ Zen proverb,
285:When I am old I shall become an itinerant poet and wear a straw hat and never worry about love again.   Tuesday, ~ Zen Cho,
286:Zen is magic. It gives you the key to open the miraculous. And the miraculous is in you and the key is also in you. ~ Osho,
287:Courage is not the absence of fear; courage is and grows out of the willingness to experience fear. ~ Ezra Bayda, Being Zen,
288:My blogging life is basically goalless. I like the zen nature of that, and paradoxically, it improves results. ~ Seth Godin,
289:One has to adopt a sort of Zen calm, in which you know you wrote the best book that you could at the time. ~ Daniel Handler,
290:"The whole point of Zen is to suspend the rules we have superimposed on things and to see the world as it is." ~ Alan Watts,
291:The Zen people from Ancient China, "When you're walking, just walk." It turns out to be the hardest thing. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
292:Until we recognize the SELF that exists apart from who we think we are - we cannot know the Ch'an ( ZEN ) MIND ~ D T Suzuki,
293:"Zen is a way of liberation, concerned not with discovering what is good or bad or advantageous, but what is." ~ Alan Watts,
294:"Zen is not some special state, it is our normal condition, silent, peaceful, awake, without agitation." ~ Taisen Deshimaru,
295:"Zen is really extraordinarily simple as long as one doesn't try to be cute about it or beat around the bush!" ~ Alan Watts,
296:Zen pretty much comes down to three things -- everything changes; everything is connected; pay attention. ~ Jane Hirshfield,
297:From the Zen view all beings are in the grip of the three poisons, greed, anger and delusion (ignorance). ~ Brenda Shoshanna,
298:"There is a Zen poem that says, 'If you ask where the flowers come from, even the God of Spring doesn't know.'" ~ Alan Watts,
299:You may have a million desires to be in other places, doing other things, but you are not there, you are here. ~ Zen proverb,
300:A female may be poor or delicate or a spinster, but it does seem ill-advised of Miss Liddiard to combine all three. ~ Zen Cho,
301:[A] life passed amid the feuds and rivalries of a girls' school had left Prunella not wholly unprepared for battle. ~ Zen Cho,
302:Prunella took to the ballrooms of London in the spirit of ruthless calculation of a general entering a battlefield. ~ Zen Cho,
303:The beauty of Zen is found in simplicity and tranquility, in a sense of the all-embracing harmony of things. ~ Thich Thien An,
304:this quintessential Zen statement: “There is no right and no wrong, but right is right and wrong is wrong. ~ Joseph Goldstein,
305:Zen Hugs - the hugs that you would get, if we were there, if we could hug you, but we aren't, and we can't. ~ Mercedes Lackey,
306:Honestly.I don't understand Zen.It seems if you don't answer properly,or if you are rude,people get enlightened. ~ Jerry Pinto,
307:I have a bit of a struggle with some aspects of or forms of Buddhism, but Zen I find to be mainly congenial. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
308:unless you can explain Zen in words that a fisherman will comprehend, you don’t know what you’re talking about. ~ Jeff Bridges,
309:You should sit and meditate for 20 minutes, unless you're too busy, then you should sit and meditate or an hour. ~ Zen proverb,
310:It is necessary to have a very liberal and simultaneously very conservative mentality to practice Tantric Zen. ~ Frederick Lenz,
311:I wish the enemy would hesitate to shoot when they see me, but you can't expect humanitarianism on the battlefield. ~ Carlo Zen,
312:Let me give you a wonderful Zen practice. Wake up in the morning...look in the mirror, and laugh at yourself. ~ Bernie Glassman,
313:"The beauty of Zen is found in simplicity and tranquility, in a sense of the all-embracing harmony of things." ~ Thich Thien-An,
314:Throwing away Zen mind is correct Zen mind. Only keep the question, 'What is the best way of helping other people?' ~ Seungsahn,
315:Until today, it really pissed me off that I'd become this totally centered Zen Master and nobody had noticed. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
316:What I term Zen, old Zen, the original face of Zen, new Zen, pure Zen, or Tantric Zen is - Zen in its essence. ~ Frederick Lenz,
317:You can watch a clock tick. You can witness a sunrise or a sunset, but that is not time. That is simply movement. ~ Zen proverb,
318:Zen professes itself to be the spirit of Buddhism, but in fact it is the spirit of all religions and philosophies. ~ D T Suzuki,
319:In Zen, poverty is voluntary, and considered not really as poverty so much as simplicity, freedom, unclutteredness. ~ Alan Watts,
320:It gets sort of Zen after a while,” Butters said brightly. “Life is a journey. Time is a river. The door is a jar. ~ Jim Butcher,
321:Not thinking about anything is Zen. Once you know this, walking, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is Zen. ~ Bodhidharma,
322:slapping at the flies
slapping at the mosquitoes
slapping at myself ~ Santoka Taneda, Mountain Tasting: Zen Haiku, 351,
323:The word impossible contains the word possible'
What's that-- some Zen thing?'
I think Star Trek. Mr. Spock. ~ Dean Koontz,
324:When you look forward into time, it seems like forever. When you look back, it appears time has passed in a flash. ~ Zen proverb,
325:"Let me give you a wonderful Zen practice. Wake up in the morning...look in the mirror, and laugh at yourself." ~ Bernie Glassman,
326:Not thinking about anything is Zen. Once you know this, walking, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is Zen. ~ Bodhidharma,
327:It’s been said that golf is a Zen activity. I’d argue that if golfers were practicing Zen, they wouldn’t keep score. ~ Tom Robbins,
328:Most assuredly Zen is a religion, but it is a religion without scripture, without doctrine or dogma and without sin. ~ Howard Fast,
329:"Not thinking about anything is Zen. Once you know this, walking, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is Zen." ~ Bodhidharma,
330:Tantric Zen is the awareness of the infinitude of all things. To gain that awareness, to be it, is enlightenment. ~ Frederick Lenz,
331:The Zen expression “Kill the Buddha!” means to kill any concept of the Buddha as something apart from oneself. ~ Peter Matthiessen,
332:If you want a certain thing, first be a certain person.Then obtaining that certain thing will no longer be a concern. ~ Zen proverb,
333:The first time she saw the boy across the classroom, Ah Lee knew she was in love because she tasted durian on her tongue. ~ Zen Cho,
334:The path of Tao is not that of sudden enlightenment. It is not like Zen. Zen is sudden enlightenment, Tao is gradual growth. ~ Osho,
335:The real goal of Zen is to find a way of life that's easy and undramatic. Strong attachments lead to upset and drama. ~ Brad Warner,
336:When you look forward into time, it seems like forever. When you look back, it appears time has passed in a flash.
   ~ Zen Proverb,
337:A time of uncertainty, of not knowing exactly where we're headed, or what kind of choice to make is a Zen moment. ~ Brenda Shoshanna,
338:A Zen master, when asked where he would go after he died, replied, 'To Hell, for that's where help is needed most.' ~ Philip Kapleau,
339:little absent from everything in the way of a Zen Master actually who realizes that everything is indifferent anyway, ~ Jack Kerouac,
340:The geographical pilgrimage is the symbolic acting out of an inner journey. THOMAS MERTON, Mystics and Zen Masters ~ Ian Morgan Cron,
341:While I had cancer, I wrote these twenty-two personal essays about how I lived my life backed by Zen and writing. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
342:Zen in it's essence is the art of seeing into the nature of one's being, and it points the way from bondage to freedom. ~ D T Suzuki,
343:"Let me give you a wonderful Zen practice. Wake up in the morning . . . look in the mirror, and laugh at yourself." ~ Bernie Glassman,
344:The damnable thing about Damerell, thought Zacharias, was that he never failed to observe precisely what you would conceal. ~ Zen Cho,
345:The renowned seventh-century Zen master Seng-tsan taught that true freedom is being "without anxiety about imperfection. ~ Tara Brach,
346:There are few times that I feel more at peace, more in tune, more Zen, if you will, than when I force myself to unplug. ~ Harlan Coben,
347:Your immediate experience is Tantric Zen. How aware are you of your immediate experience? - Probably not that aware. ~ Frederick Lenz,
348:Not to be bound by rules, but to be creating one's own rules-this is the kind of life which Zen is trying to have us live. ~ D T Suzuki,
349:There is a beautiful flow to the study of Zen. If it is not making you happier, then you are not practicing correctly. ~ Frederick Lenz,
350:Zen people love Buddha so tremendously that they can even play jokes upon him. It is out of great love; they are not afraid. ~ Rajneesh,
351:I'm a poet who practices Zen. And it's not, I'm somebody who practices Zen who writes poetry. There's no separation for me. ~ Sam Hamill,
352:... it is strange to know you would be cast off by the people who greet you so warmly, if they knew the whole truth about you. ~ Zen Cho,
353:Personal experience, therefore, is everything in Zen. No ideas are intelligible to those who have no backing of experience. ~ D T Suzuki,
354:Tantric Zen is more suited for this age that we live in. It give you rules, but in a gentle way. It's not as demanding. ~ Frederick Lenz,
355:According to Zen Buddhist cosmology there are ten thousand different states of mind to view and understand life through. ~ Frederick Lenz,
356:Always now - just now - come into being. Always now - just now - give yourself to death. Practicing this is Zen practice. ~ Soko Morinaga,
357:In the beginner’s mind, there are many possibilities,” said Zen monk Shunryu Suzuki. “In the expert’s mind, there are few. ~ Austin Kleon,
358:The feeling is all in all, as Faust declares; all our theorization fails to touch reality. ~ D.T. Suzuki, An Introduction to Zen Buddhism,
359:Zen doesn't believe in the reconciliation of opposites because from the point of view of Zen, there is no point of view. ~ Frederick Lenz,
360:Christopher, like most people, didn't like his universe being unfathomable, so I doubted that a Zen koan would help him. ~ Scarlett Thomas,
361:I steeled myself for the next response. I knew it was going to be one of the Zen life lessons. [...] Instead he kissed me. ~ Richelle Mead,
362:tangerine clam, and a professional desktop computer that suggested a Zen ice cube. Like bell-bottoms that turn up in the ~ Walter Isaacson,
363:Zen says everything is divine so how can anything be special? All is special. Nothing is non-special so nothing can be special. ~ Rajneesh,
364:Zen students see themselves as athletes. Their competitive sport is enlightenment; only with enlightenment do we compete. ~ Frederick Lenz,
365:But for the first time, I had a religious identity. I had come home. And so I called myself a Zen Buddhist at the age of 18. ~ M Scott Peck,
366:But one may like someone enough to kiss them without liking them enough to confide in them. The two are quite different emotions. ~ Zen Cho,
367:In Zen brush-painting, the circle is a master's problem. It represents everything and nothing, and in so doing, the universe. ~ Mike Todd Jr,
368:The study of Zen is a retraining. It is a series of new ways, not just one way, to learn to use your mind more efficiently. ~ Frederick Lenz,
369:To say one is revolutionary is a little like saying one is a Zen Buddhist - if you say you are, you probably aren't. ~ Lawrence Ferlinghetti,
370:Zen is not a philosophy, it is poetry. It does not propose, it simply persuades. It does not argue, it simply sings its own song. ~ Rajneesh,
371:I steeled myself for the next response. I knew it was going to be one of the Zen life lessons. [...]
Instead he kissed me. ~ Richelle Mead,
372:To be a good Zen Buddhist it is not enough to follow the teaching of its founder; we have to experience the Buddha's experience. ~ D T Suzuki,
373:You're not listening to the Zen master, what he is saying outwardly, but even more importantly...what he is saying inwardly. ~ Frederick Lenz,
374:A long walk and grooming with a well-mannered dog is a Zen experience that leaves you refreshed and in a creative frame of mind. ~ Dean Koontz,
375:As the Japanese Zen masters say, “Don't seek the truth; just drop your opinions”. Drop your theories; don't seek the truth. ~ Anthony de Mello,
376:As the Zen master Suzuki Roshi put it, “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few. ~ Pema Ch dr n,
377:Both Zen and mysticsm have this beautiful quality of happiness and laughter, which I think is so necessary in our modern age. ~ Frederick Lenz,
378:Forever is not an idea or a concept, it is reality. All of the things here come from forever. We call forever nirvana in Zen. ~ Frederick Lenz,
379:Hell was hot and full of unkind people in a hurry; there was far too much red tape; and the bureaucrats were all shockingly corrupt. ~ Zen Cho,
380:Like the moon on the water, in a way. When you confront a Zen master, what you're really seeing are not his limitations but yours. ~ Pico Iyer,
381:Tantric Zen is not being kinky; nor is it being conservative and austere. It is eclectic. It is a real mixture of all things. ~ Frederick Lenz,
382:"The truth of Zen, just a little bit of it, is what turns one's humdrum life into one of art, full of genuine inner creativity." ~ D.T. Suzuki,
383:The Zen master walks in his garden, alone. There is no traffic there. There is no shopping there. There are only the flowers. ~ Frederick Lenz,
384:Zacharias, my dear, I do not believe I am misled by partiality when I say you are impossible to miss in this room,” said Lady Wythe. ~ Zen Cho,
385:Zen is all-inclusive. It never denies, it never says no to anything; it accepts everything and transforms it into a higher reality. ~ Rajneesh,
386:Zen- Dojo Tozan was not in Sarnen or Thu but somewhere between the two, not in a village but in the tall grass and blue flowers. ~ Ann Patchett,
387:Zen is non-serious. Zen has a tremendous sense of humor. No other religion has evolved so much that it can have that sense of humor. ~ Rajneesh,
388:If you study the writings of the mystics, you will always find things in them that appear to be paradoxes, as in Zen, particularly. ~ Alan Watts,
389:In Zen we do everything perfectly. We feel that our outer actions are a reflection of our inner state. We call it mindfulness. ~ Frederick Lenz,
390:triangle offense, that aligned perfectly with the values of selflessness and mindful awareness I’d been studying in Zen Buddhism. ~ Phil Jackson,
391:When it came to producing a state of focus, quiet contentment, and inner peace, Zen meditation ran a very distant second to caffeine. ~ Joe Hill,
392:Being good-looking and interesting and having the heavy-lidded gaze of a romantic tapir does not excuse writing a foolish book. Perhaps ~ Zen Cho,
393:Zen Buddhism does not preach. Sermons remain words. It waits until people feel stifled and insecure, driven by a secret longing. ~ Eugen Herrigel,
394:Zen says: be empty. Look without any idea. Look into the nature of things but with no idea, with no prejudice, with no presupposition. ~ Rajneesh,
395:"If you study the writings of the mystics, you will always find things in them that appear to be paradoxes, as in Zen, particularly." ~ Alan Watts,
396:In the Zen Way we focus upon each breath, each day, each moment and experience it totally. One complete breath brings the next. ~ Brenda Shoshanna,
397:It's pre-photography, a fossilization of time, Americans have done the Zen garden to death. I wanted to do something different. ~ Hiroshi Sugimoto,
398:Just be ordinary and nothing special. Eat your food, move your bowels, pass water, and when you're tired go lie down. ~ Zen proverb (Linji Yixuan),
399:What is Tantric Zen? Well, I don't think I can give you a straight answer, since I don't happen to be a very straight Zen master. ~ Frederick Lenz,
400:When words cease to correspond with facts it is time for us to part with words and return to facts. ~ D.T. Suzuki, An Introduction to Zen Buddhism,
401:"Zen has no goal; it is a traveling without point, with nowhere to go. To travel is to be alive, but to get somewhere is to be dead." ~ Alan Watts,
402:Zen is just a lifestyle, your everyday life. It is doing your best at your job, relationships, health, hobbies, and other daily activities! ~ Mika,
403:Zen probably won’t solve a single one of our problems. What it might do is help us relate differently to what we consider problems. ~ Barry Graham,
404:At Patagonia, making a profit is not the goal because the Zen master would say profits happen 'when you do everything else right'. ~ Yvon Chouinard,
405:The aunts’ conception of the right to privacy went far enough to allow you to close the toilet door when you were peeing, but no further. ~ Zen Cho,
406:The Zen master can see precisely what it will take to cause your awareness to become free. But the Zen master can't do it for you. ~ Frederick Lenz,
407:En la mente del principiante hay muchas posibilidades; en la del experto hay pocas.   SHUNRYU SUZUKI, Mente zen, mente de principiante ~ Phil Knight,
408:I consider writing practice a true Zen practice because it all comes back at you. You can't fool anyone because it's on the page. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
409:If you're claiming to be the Supreme Being (even if you're not doing a very good job at it), I wish you were a bit more mentally mature. ~ Carlo Zen,
410:I met a man of Zen once”, said the snake, “and he gave a koan “Coal is black says the Englishman. I protest; coal is not black. ~ Shailendra Gulhati,
411:In the last five years I used to go to Zen practice once a month, but since I assumed the post of prime minister it's been much harder. ~ Shinzo Abe,
412:To practice Zen Buddhism is to train oneself to eliminate hatred, anger and selfishness and to develop loving-kindness towards all. ~ Thich Thien An,
413:"Be in Zen meditation whether you are working or sitting; be essentially at peace whether you are speaking, silent, active or still." ~ Dahui Zonggao,
414:For a celebrity he has an awful excess of sensibility, and is very anxious about one's opinion of him. Perhaps it comes of being an artist. ~ Zen Cho,
415:In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s mind there are few. —Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind ~ Phil Knight,
416:I should advise you not to stop there, but set fire to his house, too, and sell his children to pirates. That is the only way he will learn ~ Zen Cho,
417:Steve Jobs, for instance, adopted the Zen Buddhist concept of “beginner’s mind,” the ability to see a situation as if for the first time. ~ Anonymous,
418:"The adept in Zen is one who manages to be human with the same artless grace and absence of inner conflict with which a tree is a tree." ~ Alan Watts,
419:The whole zen attitude is to bring to your notice the fact that there is no effort to be made. The zen attitude is that of effortlessness. ~ Rajneesh,
420:Zen is less the study of doctrine than a set of tools for discovering what can be known when the world is looked at with open eyes. ~ Jane Hirshfield,
421:A person who undertakes the study of Zen and learns concentration and meditation is like a gymnast. You become a gymnast of the mind. ~ Frederick Lenz,
422:"But don't think and reflect unnecessarily, compulsively, from sheer force of nervous habit. In Zen, they call this having a leaky mind." ~ Alan Watts,
423:In Zen we strive to bring both the mind and the body into perfect combination, so that there is no intrinsic difference between them. ~ Frederick Lenz,
424:Zen does not confuse spirituality with thinking about God while one is peeling potatoes. Zen spirituality is just to peel the potatoes. ~ Alan W Watts,
425:Zen is influenced by Daoism, which is not so much a nature-religion in the animistic sense as a nature-philosophy in a cosmic sense. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
426:These are new worlds, Zen. We don't have to be what we were any more. We can be anything that we want. We can be humans together. - Nova ~ Philip Reeve,
427:Well, for one thing, in the tradition of Zen that I've practiced, there is no prayerful worship and there is no affirmation of a deity. ~ Leonard Cohen,
428:Zen... does not confuse spirituality with thinking about God while one is peeling potatoes. Zen spirituality is just to peel the potatoes. ~ Alan Watts,
429:Zen is not morality, it is aesthetics. It does not impose a code of morality. it does not give you any commandments: do this, don't do that. ~ Rajneesh,
430:Not Christian or Jew or Muslim, not Hindu, Buddhist, Sufi or zen. Not any religion or cultural system. I am not of the East, nor of the West.... ~ Rumi,
431:You may wonder which came first: the skill or the hard work. But that's a moot point. The Zen master cleans his own studio. So should you. ~ Twyla Tharp,
432:Zen is consciousness unstructured by particular form or particular system, a trans-cultural, trans-religious, transformed consciousness. ~ Thomas Merton,
433:Zen teaches that once we can open up to the inevitability of our demise, we can begin to transform that situation and lighten up about it. ~ Allen Klein,
434:In Zen the emphasis is on meditation and developing your body, mind and spirit to find inner peace, strength, clarity and enlightenment. ~ Frederick Lenz,
435:Logic presumes a separation of subject from object; therefore logic is not final wisdom.This is Zen. This is my motorcycle maintenance. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
436:This is the Zen approach: nothing is there to be done. There is nothing to do. One has just to be. Have a rest, and be ordinary and be natural.  . ~ Osho,
437:This is the Zen approach: nothing is there to be done. There is nothing to do. One has just to be. Have a rest and be ordinary and be natural. ~ Rajneesh,
438:Your amoral ingenuity in the pursuit of your interest is perfectly shocking,” said Zacharias severely. “Yes, isn’t it?” said Prunella, pleased. ~ Zen Cho,
439:To practice Zen or the Martial Arts, you must live intensely, wholeheartedly, without reserve - as if you might die in the next instant ~ Taisen Deshimaru,
440:Zen has no theory. It is a non-theoretical approach into reality. It has no doctrine and no dogma - hence it has no church, no priest, no pope. ~ Rajneesh,
441:Zen is a study. It's a discipline. It involves the active use of will to make things happen or not happen. These are the secrets of power. ~ Frederick Lenz,
442:I find the training of the mind that Zen puts people through is by far to me, the most interesting, one of the most interesting disciplines. ~ Robert Greene,
443:The mind is a clear and polished mirror and our continual duty is to keep it pureand never allow dust to gather upon its face. ~ Saving of the School of Zen,
444:The way of nothingness is the way of Zen. It is just a term. The contemplation of nothingness or everythingness is where everything starts. ~ Frederick Lenz,
445:When I say that Zen is life, I mean that Zen is not to be confined within conceptualization, that Zen is what makes conceptualization possible. ~ D T Suzuki,
446:Zen is discipline - the discipline of living life, the discipline of taking a breath, the discipline of not knowing and not trying to know. ~ Frederick Lenz,
447:Zen is Tantric Buddhism, Vajrayana is tantric Buddhism - these are various forms of it. Tantric Buddhism simply means cutting to the chase. ~ Frederick Lenz,
448:Zen is the fastest method I know of, aside from mysticism, of dissolving the fixations people have about spiritual practice and themselves. ~ Frederick Lenz,
449:Zen has nothing to teach us in the way of intellectual analysis; nor has it any set doctrines which are imposed on its followers for acceptance. ~ D T Suzuki,
450:Find a teacher of Tantric Zen and study with them because it is transference of awareness, a sharing of the perception of the beauty of life. ~ Frederick Lenz,
451:For me, whenever I'm physical it spins my mind and whenever there's a lot going on I put my gloves on or I wrestle somebody and I feel zen. ~ Steven R McQueen,
452:I’m here, but I’m not here. I’m in two places at once. It goes against Einstein’s theorem, but what the hell. Call it the Zen of the killer. ~ Haruki Murakami,
453:Are you going? What shall you wear?"
"I shall go in what I am standing in," said Mak Genggang. "A witch is always appropriate whatever her attire. ~ Zen Cho,
454:In fact, in many ways my mother was quite hippy-dippy, serving macrobiotic food and reading 'Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.' ~ Kristin Scott Thomas,
455:This would be a Zen-like state of productivity, in which you deal with what’s present from a perspective that is both detached and fully engaged. ~ David Allen,
456:What is Zen? Zen is looking at things with the eye of God, that is, becoming the thing's eyes so that it looks at itself with our eyes. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
457:No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It's very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open. ~ George Carlin,
458:Your arrows do not carry,’ observed the Master, ‘because they do not reach far enough spiritually.’ Eugen Herrigel Zen and the Art of Archery ~ Michael E Gerber,
459:And the question of Wester religion,” Flattery said, “is: What lies beyond death? But the question of the Zen master is: What lies beyond waking? ~ Frank Herbert,
460:There are some Buddhist philosophers (a branch referred to as Zen) who say that sometimes a bad thing happens to prevent a worse thing happening, ~ Kate Atkinson,
461:Zen has lost its zip, if you will, or its nothingness and has become ritualistic Its established in monastaries with strict codes of koan study. ~ Frederick Lenz,
462:ALRIGHT then, be a Zen monk. But you wait and see. You'll be happy and bright. You'll laugh. People will envy and ridicule you. You won't care. (sigh) ~ Lew Welch,
463:In zen, it is a cardinal sin to waste time. To waste time is to squander the here and now, which, if you think about it, is all that we have. ~ Philip Toshio Sudo,
464:One master defines Zen as the art of feeling the polar star in the southern sky. Truth can be reached only through the comprehension of opposites. ~ Kakuz Okakura,
465:Our goal isn't contentment in and of itself. We're not after a mystical state of Zen. Our goal is to be content for the glory and honor of God. ~ Stephen Altrogge,
466:HELLO! Look at me. HELLO! I am so ZEN. This is BLOOD. This is NOTHING. Hello. Everything is nothing, and it's so cool to be ENLIGHTENED. Like me. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
467:Now when I speak about Zen, I have a problem, in the sense that the Zen of today has lost the essence, in my estimation, of what I call "old Zen." ~ Frederick Lenz,
468:Zen is attained only when “self-intoxication” is abandoned and the “drunkard” is really awakened to his deeper self. ~ D.T. Suzuki, An Introduction to Zen Buddhism,
469:Facts of experience are valued in Zen more than representations, symbols, and concepts-that is to say, substance is everything in Zen and form nothing. ~ D T Suzuki,
470:I have lived with several Zen masters — all of them cats. Even ducks have taught me important spiritual lessons. Just watching them is a meditation. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
471:Meditation is the way the mind is. That's why in Zen they call it the natural state, which means you don't have to go and do anything to meditate. ~ Frederick Lenz,
472:Psychoanalysis and Zen, in my private psychic geometry, are equal to nicotine. They are anti-existential. Nicotine quarantines one out of existence. ~ Norman Mailer,
473:Sometimes I wonder if anything that happens to us is ever a mistake. The Zen masters say, “There is absolutely nothing wrong with this moment. ~ Catherine Ryan Hyde,
474:Zen cuts straight through the Quidditch match in progress and almost gets taken down by a Beater hurling a Nerf quaffle right at his machopartes. ~ Megan McCafferty,
475:The secret of Soto Zen is just two words: not always so.... In Japanese, it's two words, three words in English. That is the secret of our practice. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
476:"The Zen I know pulls the rug out from anything I land on as the truth and blissfully blows away dangerous moments of intelligence and understanding." ~ Thomas Moore,
477:Zen: 'I kinda went about it all wrong last night, didn't I?
Melody: 'Kinda? It was a total fustercluck.'

<actual word used> ~ Megan McCafferty,
478:Green politics at its worst amounts to a sort of Zen fascism; less extreme, it denounces growth and seeks to stop the world so that we can all get off. ~ Chris Patten,
479:Her opinion is that she did not struggle her way to the august age of forty-three only to have the dignity accorded to her years snatched away from her. But ~ Zen Cho,
480:I'd rather feel something for real than pretend it's not what it is. Which Zen guy said "If you want to drown, do not torture yourself with shallow water"? ~ A S King,
481:I have developed a Zen-like approach to the operating systems that people use: 'When you're ready, the right operating system will appear in your life. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
482:What attracted me to Zen was my first teacher, Tim McCarthy. He was extremely genuine. It wasn't even really a Zen thing, that sort of came along later. ~ Brad Warner,
483:Zen is the only religion in the world that teaches sudden enlightenment. It says that enlightenment takes no time, it can happen in a single, split second. ~ Rajneesh,
484:Affection there had always been between them, whatever their disagreements—and there had been more of these than Zacharias had permitted Sir Stephen to know. ~ Zen Cho,
485:I brought seaweed snacks from home,' chimed in another kid. "Seaweed got iron, right?"
'I don't think the teachers meant that kind of iron,' said Hui Ann. ~ Zen Cho,
486:It's a relationship like to a crusty Zen master, or something like that. And it is really like another entity because you cannot predict the answers. ~ Terence McKenna,
487:She had a thick aura of battle around her, and her face was almost doll-like, it was so pleasant to look at. Vacant blue eyes, blond hair tinged dark gray. ~ Carlo Zen,
488:The goal is to get so comfortable and relaxed with your instrument, or process, that you can just get Zen with it and let the music flow without thinking, ~ Ed Catmull,
489:After macrobiotics, Zen, and channeling, the "poor Vanishing Indian" is once more the subject of "deep and meaningful conversation" in the high rises. ~ Mary Brave Bird,
490:In Zen, actions speak louder than words. Doing is more important than knowing, and knowledge which cannot be translated into action is of little worth. ~ Thich Thien An,
491:Something awful must’ve happened on the surface, Damy thought. He squeezed his forearm, looking at the animated tattoo there, the mark of the strike teams. ~ Raeden Zen,
492:The bookcases were lined with titles, hundreds of books shelved by subject in alphabetical order.-Everything from aberrant behavior to the mysteries of zen. ~ Tami Hoag,
493:Zen is a very fast path to enlightenment, fast in comparison to some other paths, not fast for the person who practices it. There is no sense of speed. ~ Frederick Lenz,
494:If you're very liberal, then you should go and find a very liberal Zen teacher, a liberal interpretation of the doctrines of the Soto or Rinzai schools. ~ Frederick Lenz,
495:In the study of Zen you can learn how to strengthen and clarify your finite mind. Your finite mind is like a muscle; when exercised it becomes stronger. ~ Frederick Lenz,
496:The vast flood Rolls onward But yield yourself, And it floats you upon it. [2669.jpg] -- from Zen and Zen Classics, by R. H. Blyth

~ Ikkyu, The vast flood
,
497:When you find nothing, Morris said, it means you're eliminating what surrounds the something.
Is that a Zen thing? Eve questioned.
If not, it should be. ~ J D Robb,
498:When you find nothing,” Morris said, “it means you’re eliminating what surrounds the something.” “Is that a Zen thing?” Eve questioned. “If not, it should be. ~ J D Robb,
499:Both light and dark are eternity. Human beings assign relative values to colors, but beyond the relative, there just is - what in Zen we call "suchness". ~ Frederick Lenz,
500:Crowdsourcing is the ultimate disruptor of distribution because in a most Zen-like fashion, the content is controlled by everyone and no one at the same time. ~ Jay Samit,
501:I have always admired your refusal, in the pursuit of your convictions, ever to be constrained by considerations of humanity—much less of ordinary good manners. ~ Zen Cho,
502:Personal experience, therefore, is everything in Zen. No ideas are intelligible to those who have no backing of experience. ~ D.T. Suzuki, An Introduction to Zen Buddhism,
503:The person who's in the Zen monastery, who's doing a kind of poor job at meditating and a half-ass job cleaning the gardens is not doing very good yoga. ~ Frederick Lenz,
504:From my own personal encounters and studies with both Tantric and Zen Buddhist monks, I have found them to be humorous, warm, charming, and compassionate. ~ Frederick Lenz,
505:Other dragons are bastards. I moved out of my mother's cave after my mother tried to rip my guts out.
Granted, I had tried to steal her Tiara of Clairvoyance. ~ Zen Cho,
506:When we finally allow ourselves to be with what we’d rather avoid—which is simply not feeling good—then our very drama becomes the path to freedom. ~ Ezra Bayda, Being Zen,
507:So when we sit we concentrate on our breathing, and we become a swinging door, and we do something we should do, something we must do. This is     Zen practice. ~ Anonymous,
508:only one koan matters you [1796.jpg] -- from Crow With No Mouth: Fifteenth Century Zen Master Ikkyu, Translated by Stephen Berg

~ Ikkyu, only one koan matters
,
509:Zen questioning is a very gentle questioning. It is the kind of questioning that the Colorado River asks the Grand Canyon over centuries and centuries. ~ Taigen Dan Leighton,
510:The theory of Zen is non-competition. But that is not really true at all. People who practice Zen are very competitive. They are competing against emptiness. ~ Frederick Lenz,
511:Those who are already adept at some disciplines of the body will find that the study of Zen and meditation will give you much more control than you now have. ~ Frederick Lenz,
512:Zen questioning is a very gentle questioning. It is the kind of questioning that the Colorado River asks the Grand Canyon over centuries and centuries. ~ Taigen Dan Leighton,
513:How hard, then, and yet how easy it is to understand Zen! Hard because to understand it is not to understand it; easy because not to understand it is to understand ~ Anonymous,
514:Sports and athletics can be a path in Zen, in concordance with daily practice of zazen meditation. You need to move with your spirit, not just with your body. ~ Frederick Lenz,
515:You grow, learn, and the more I can sit in silence and be comfortable with myself, the more I can make noise, as ironic and Zen Buddhist and satanic as it sounds! ~ Nikki Sixx,
516:Zen is not a religion. There is no room for a cult. There is no dependence on a teacher. There is only learning how to use your own mind and making it strong. ~ Frederick Lenz,
517:By emphasizing doubt rather than belief, perplexity rather than certainty, and questions rather than answers, Zen practice granted me the freedom to imagine. ~ Stephen Batchelor,
518:Tantric Zen, at first, does not appear to have a method. In Tantric Zen, you could meditate on a Brillo box or you could meditate on the clear light of reality. ~ Frederick Lenz,
519:The whole aim of Zen is not to make foolproof statements about experience, but to come to direct grips with reality without the mediation of logical verbalizing. ~ Thomas Merton,
520:With Zen we do it more through slight of hand, a very subtle and delicate shift in consciousness, which shifts the world. It's kind of done from the inside out. ~ Frederick Lenz,
521:Zen is a very quick path. Zen is the path of meditation. The word Zen means emptiness or fullness, meditation. Meditation is the quickest path to enlightenment. ~ Frederick Lenz,
522:Zen Master Doc The says that when sitting in meditation, one should sit upright, giving birth to this thought, “Sitting here is like sitting on the Bodhi spot. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
523:A Zen master is someone whose life is one with enlightenment and self-discovery. They can never be separated from that. They've been essentially mastered by Zen. ~ Frederick Lenz,
524:He was, in his way, as close to a Zen master as I've ever had, and all of us who fell under his influence began with his style and eventually ended up with our own. ~ Nora Ephron,
525:Our product is still totally DeepArcher?”
“Which is…”
“Like ‘departure’, only you pronounce it DeepArcher?”
Zen thing,” Maxine guesses.
“Weed thing. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
526:The emphasis is on meditation in Tantric Zen. The experience of meditation in formal practice, zazen, where you're sitting down and meditating and concentrating. ~ Frederick Lenz,
527:The Zen Gnostics claim forty billion followers,” he rumbled. “But what kind of religion is that, eh? No churches. No priests. No holy books. No concept of sin.” Dur ~ Dan Simmons,
528:In Zen there is a sense of blending, of stepping out of your body and mind and gaining access to powers and abilities that are far beyond the minds of mortal men. ~ Frederick Lenz,
529:In Zen we study the will. We learn how to cultivate it, to accumulate will. We use it to direct our actions, and we don't overuse it or abuse it - that's a waste. ~ Frederick Lenz,
530:Since the decision to become a parent is invariably self-interested, it is my belief that a parent's obligation is to the child, and the child's obligation is to itself. ~ Zen Cho,
531:Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind by Shunryu Suzuki, Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda, and Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism by Chögyam Trungpa. They ~ Walter Isaacson,
532:How hard, then, and yet how easy it is to understand Zen! Hard because to understand it is not to understand it; easy because not to understand it is to understand it. ~ D T Suzuki,
533:As the famous Zen master Dogen has said: To study Buddhism is to study the self. To study the self is to forget the self. To forget the self is to be one with others. ~ Mark Epstein,
534:Leo Babauta’s brilliant little book Zen Habits helps you think your way through this problem. His program is simple: Attempt to create only one significant work a year. ~ Seth Godin,
535:Ni kršćanin, ni jevrejin, ni musliman, ni hindu, ni budist, ni zen. Ni iz koje vjere i kulture. Niti sam s Istoka niti sa Zapada. Moje je mjesto bezmjesnost, trag bestraga... ~ Rumi,
536:The greater the doubt, the greater the awakening; the smaller the doubt, the smaller the awakening. No doubt, no awakening. —C.-C. Chang, The Practice of Zen ~ Bessel A van der Kolk,
537:The true purpose of Zen is to see things as they are, to observe things as they are, and to let everything go as it goes. Zen practice is to open up our small mind. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
538:Through the study of Zen you can learn to move from lower to higher states of mind at will. Higher states of mind offer you a much more accurate picture of reality. ~ Frederick Lenz,
539:All success in sports and athletics, from the Zen point of view, comes from the mind. No matter what kind of shape your body is in, there is disharmony in the being. ~ Frederick Lenz,
540:In advanced Zen a person comes to realize that the existence of things and their ability to perceive them correctly is completely dependent upon their state of mind. ~ Frederick Lenz,
541:in Japanese Zen, that idea of not being constrained by what we already know is called “beginner’s mind.” And people practice for years to recapture and keep ahold of it. ~ Ed Catmull,
542:It is in Zen practice that you gain power, balance and wisdom. The battles that you fight are within your own mind. That is where the real victories and defeats are. ~ Frederick Lenz,
543:Where’s Murray?” he asked. Their developer always traveled with them to the Block on mornings during the peak season. “Murray isn’t coming with us today,” Hans said. “Is ~ Raeden Zen,
544:Zen master, Shunryu Suzuki said, “The mind of the beginner is empty, free of the habits of the expert, ready to accept, to doubt, and open to all the possibilities. ~ Gavin de Becker,
545:It is not good to talk about Zen, because Zen is nothingness... If you talk about it, you are always lying, and if you don't talk about it, no one knows it is there. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
546:Shameless, impudent, meddling females, who presumed to set at naught the Society’s prohibition on women’s magic, and duped the common people with their potions and cantrips! ~ Zen Cho,
547:The path of Zen is not easy. It's wonderful. It's beautiful beyond compare. You will experience more ecstasy and beauty than most people will in a thousand lifetimes. ~ Frederick Lenz,
548:We have two eyes to see two sides of things, but there must be a third eye which will see everything at the same time and yet not see anything. That is to understand Zen. ~ D T Suzuki,
549:What is Zen? Simple, simple, so simple. Infinite gratitude toward all things past; infinite service to all things present; infinite responsibility to all things future. ~ Huston Smith,
550:Zen is a special transmission outside the scriptures,With no reliance on words and letters.A direct pointing to the human mind,And the realization of enlightenment. ~ John Daido Loori,
551:I am an architect. I try to feel the transparency in contemporary buildings and I try to understand the transparency in Zen poetry. I just want to mix all those things. ~ Luis Gonzalez,
552:I am not a big technology person. I don't go on the Internet really much at all. Drawing is like a zen thing; it's private, which in this day and age is harder to come by. ~ Tim Burton,
553:There's a place where everything comes together and where it's all the same. That state of mind, in which all things are the same, is the state of mind of Tantric Zen. ~ Frederick Lenz,
554:Zen is not some fancy, special art of living. Our teaching is just to live, always in reality, in its exact sense. To make our effort, moment after moment, is our way. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
555:In Zen, and in other forms of self discovery, we do have a transference that occurs where psychically, information, blocks of attention, are transferred to the student. ~ Frederick Lenz,
556:In Zen we classify ten thousand different states of mind, different ways of seeing life. There is something beyond the ten thousand states of mind that we call nirvana. ~ Frederick Lenz,
557:The ten thousand states of mind that we talk about in Zen are all levels of perception. You can think of each of the ten thousand states of mind as a dimensional plane. ~ Frederick Lenz,
558:When we put our keys down, we should be conscious of putting them down. When we pick them up, we should be conscious of picking them up. That's all there is to zen. ~ Philip Toshio Sudo,
559:You come back to the beginning. That's why in the "Searching for the Ox" sequence, at the very end of that sequence of the Zen paintings, we're back in the world again. ~ Frederick Lenz,
560:In Zen Buddhism an action is considered good when it brings happiness and well-being to oneself and others, evil when it brings suffering and harm to oneself and others. ~ Thich Thien An,
561:Tantric Zen is all about the practice of zazen meditation. If you meditate well, you'll be in very powerful states of mind and then it really doesn't matter what you do. ~ Frederick Lenz,
562:Zen was a reaction. Just as Buddha came into the world and spoke against the fall of Vedanta, so Buddhism lost its essence and became ritual. Zen was a reaction to that. ~ Frederick Lenz,
563:There are monasteries in Japan where they teach Zen with rules, more rules than you can imagine, and you might feel comfortable with that. I don't teach that type of Zen. ~ Frederick Lenz,
564:If you want to study Zen, you should forget all your previous ideas and just practice zazen and see what kind of experience you have in your practice. That is naturalness. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
565:I was very attracted to the way that Zen did not go into the imagination land. And now I've forgotten what your first question was and how we were going to tie this together. ~ Brad Warner,
566:Near Tokyo lived a great Samurai warrior, now old, who decided to teach Zen Buddhism to young people. In spite of his age, the legend was that he could defeat any adversary. ~ Paulo Coelho,
567:Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: ‘When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called Religion. ~ Richard Dawkins,
568:In Tantric Zen, career, relationships, the type of insurance you have - all things are part of your evolution, your awareness, your experience of the suchness of existence. ~ Frederick Lenz,
569:If you think your body and mind are two, that is wrong; if you think that they are one, that is also wrong. Our body and mind are both two and one. ~ Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind Beginners Mind,
570:... I thought with all this freedom and self-discovery and expression of our love stuff that we could finally stop with the whole Zen master wisdom and practical advice crap. ~ Richelle Mead,
571:We call it the transmission of the lamp in Zen. That's when we take enlightened states of mind and literally, you can transfer them, just like you can hand somebody flowers. ~ Frederick Lenz,
572:If you are around a lot of human beings who are filled with jealousy and anger and rage and desire, it filters into the mind. Zen is writing a new program to run in the mind. ~ Frederick Lenz,
573:I slipped it into your papers to see if you would notice.” The Zen master Ikkyu was once asked to write a distillation of the highest wisdom. He wrote only one word: Attention. ~ Jenny Offill,
574:The truth of Zen, just a little bit of it, is what turns one's humdrum life, a life of monotonous, uninspiring commonplaceness, into one of art, full of genuine inner creativity. ~ D T Suzuki,
575:A small stock trader is like a small hedge fund manager, zen monk, psychologist, intelligence officer, sniper, sportsman, poker player, risk manager, analyst, and economist, all in one. ~ Mika,
576:If you have the sense of participation in sports or athletics, of being a player, then you are not really into the Zen mind. In Zen mind there is no sense of self in the play. ~ Frederick Lenz,
577:The basic idea of Zen is to come in touch with the inner workings of our being, and to do so in the most direct way possible, without resorting to anything external or superadded. ~ D T Suzuki,
578:You cannot be born and you cannot die. You will exist in a universe that goes on forever. That is the ultimate horror from the Zen point of view. You could be unhappy forever. ~ Frederick Lenz,
579:For Zen, man is the goal; man is the end unto himself. God is not something above humanity, God is something hidden within humanity. Man is carrying God in himself as a potentiality. ~ Rajneesh,
580:Goodbye," said Siew Tsin.
"See you next time," said Lady Meng, more accurately.
"Will you remember me when I come again?"
"Of course," said Lady Meng. "I miss you every time. ~ Zen Cho,
581:His Zen is genetic. You should meet his parents. You could rob them at gunpoint and they would still ask you to dinner and make sure you got everything valuable in the house, ~ Rachel Higginson,
582:I recommend, for many people, the study of computer science. Our natural resource in America is the mind. The mindset in computer science is very similar to the mindset in Zen. ~ Frederick Lenz,
583:Zen is a totally different kind of religion. It brings humanness to religion. It is not bothered about anything superhuman; its whole concern is how to make ordinary life a blessing. ~ Rajneesh,
584:Have the right attitude in advanced practice. Feel that you are always a beginner in Zen. They refer to it as "beginners mind". I feel I am a beginner, always; because it's true. ~ Frederick Lenz,
585:If a young Steve Jobs had taken his own advice and decided to only pursue work he loved, we would probably find him today as one of the Los Altos Zen Center’s most popular teachers. ~ Cal Newport,
586:Short nap -- waking, spring was gone. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Yosa Buson, Short nap
,
587:Studying with a teacher doesn't simply mean going to an occasional seminar or Zen retreat. It means fully applying yourself to what the teacher says, most of which is not verbal. ~ Frederick Lenz,
588:Surfing soothes me, it's always been a kind of Zen experience for me. The ocean is so magnificent, peaceful, and awesome. The rest of the world disappears for me when I'm on a wave. ~ Paul Walker,
589:Frank meditates?”
She grinned. “How’d you think he got that laid-back? We’ve got the only Zen security guard in London. Only he’s really a butterfly dreaming he’s a security guard. ~ Mike Carey,
590:Someone who wants to attain enlightenment must be brave. He must rush into the crowd of enemies with a dagger. In the practice of Zen, enemies are our delusive thoughts and passions. ~ Yamada Koun,
591:The first step in working with difficulties in everyday life is developing the understanding that our difficulties are, in fact, an important part in our path of awakening. ~ Ezra Bayda, Zen Heart,
592:If you were just you, you would be happy. But of course, you don't know who or what you are. So how can you possibly be happy? That is why you have got to study Zen...or something. ~ Frederick Lenz,
593:It’s true that lightness and joy have returned to my life. I attribute it mostly to my Zen practice and to my time in the monastery. Playfulness is back . I note it with gratitude. ~ Frederick Marx,
594:Most people put the cart before the horse, which is an interesting way to go through life. They approach everything directly. In Zen we approach everything backwards or inside out. ~ Frederick Lenz,
595:There is a very deep satisfaction born of being able to occupy a space without an agenda—to enjoy the inner equanimity of just being, however and wherever we find ourselves. ~ Ezra Bayda, Zen Heart,
596:There is competition in Zen. Let's not be ridiculous. There is competition in everything in life; being a winner in Zen means, competing and winning in the world of enlightenment. ~ Frederick Lenz,
597:The three elements of creativity are thus: loving, knowing, and doing - or heart, mind, and hands - or, as Zen Buddhist teaching has it; great faith, great question, and great courage. ~ Eric Maisel,
598:The samurais were very interested in Zen because they admired the tremendous precision that the Zen Masters had, their lack of fear and pain and their absolute lack of fear of death. ~ Frederick Lenz,
599:“The three elements of creativity are thus: loving, knowing, and doing – or heart, mind, and hands – or, as Zen Buddhist teaching has it; great faith, great question, and great courage.” ~ Eric Maisel,
600:You have to begin to develop a repertory of jokes, multi-plane spiritual jokes, the sort of things the Zen masters tell each other when they're asleep. These are the secret teachings. ~ Frederick Lenz,
601:Zen is not “attained” by mirror-wiping mediation, but by “self-forgetfulness in the existential 'present' of life here and now.” We do not “come”, we “are.” Don't strive to become, but be. ~ Bruce Lee,
602:In the old days, Zen was not really practiced so much in a monastery. The Zen Master usually lived up on a top of the mountain or the hill or in the forest or sometimes in the village. ~ Frederick Lenz,
603:I teach Zen, tantric mysticism, jnana yoga, bhakti yoga, Tibetan mysticism, occultism and psychic development. I also teach poetry and literature, film and many other different things. ~ Frederick Lenz,
604:It is hard to produce work in New York. You kind of have to center yourself - do some Zen meditation exercises and just focus. It is very distracting, and money, of course, is an issue. ~ Toyin Odutola,
605:The aim of Zen training is to attain the state of consciousness which occurs when the individual ego is emptied of itself and becomes identified with the infinite reality of all things. ~ Anne Bancroft,
606:You're full of shit,” Miss Stickyfoot said disdainfully. Cadbury said, “That proves I understand Zen. Do you see? Or perhaps the fact is that you don't actually understand Zen yourself. ~ Philip K Dick,
607:A Zen master used to say, It is clear and so it is hard to see. A dunce once searched for a fire with a lighted lantern. Had he known what fire was, he could have cooked his rice much sooner. ~ Rajneesh,
608:I had been reading this book about Zen Koan philosophy, and it was talking about the right here and the right now, and how important it is, and I was really trying to get there in my life. ~ Sammy Hagar,
609:In the Zen of sports and athletics, we seek to bring discipline and control into our physical movements, but at the same time to eliminate the self that gets in the way of perfect play. ~ Frederick Lenz,
610:It's a horrible and wonderful battle with yourself, to stay calm, stay in the moment. My coach said, "Stay here, not at the target. Don't be down there." It's why they call it the Zen art. ~ Geena Davis,
611:Tantric Zen is for the individual who is in love with both the finite and the infinite, who gets a kick out of this weird transitory world and at the same time, wants to step beyond it. ~ Frederick Lenz,
612:As a dialectical teacher, I have had many lives where I have taught Zen and Tibetan Buddhism and mysticism. I teach in many different modalites. But the theme that unites them - is love. ~ Frederick Lenz,
613:Autumn wind -- mountain's shadow wavers. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Kobayashi Issa, Autumn wind
,
614:But that was the trouble with children, Sir Stephen reflected. They were confoundedly liable to pattern themselves upon one’s conduct, when one would rather they simply did what they were told. ~ Zen Cho,
615:I think that that's why artists make art - it is difficult to put into words unless you are a poet. What it takes is being open to the flow of universal creativity. The Zen artists knew this. ~ Alex Grey,
616:I was a linear thinker, and according to Zen linear thinking is nothing but a delusion, one of the many that keep us unhappy. Reality is nonlinear, Zen says. No future, no past. All is now. ~ Phil Knight,
617:Meryl Streep is expert at only using the requisite amount of energy to express her character, not an ounce too little or too much. She's Zen and doesn't know she's Zen. That's very Zen! ~ Frederick Lenz,
618:The Power of Less: The Fine Art of Limiting Yourself to the Essential . . . in Business and in Life, Essential Zen Habits: Mastering the Art of Change, Briefly, and several other books. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
619:Think of Zen, of the Void, of Good and Evil and you are bound hand and foot. Think only and entirely and completely of what you are doing at the moment and you are free as a bird. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
620:To practice Zen means to realize one's existence in the beauty and clarity of this present moment, rather than letting life unravel in useless daydreaming of the past and future. ~ John Daishin Buksbazen,
621:Bodhidharma who brought Zen from India to the Orient, taught a very pure Zen - in that it was pure Zen. He wanted to show that the way still existed and wanted to get back to its essence. ~ Frederick Lenz,
622:In Zen, such a glimpse is called satori. Satori is a moment of Presence, a brief stepping out of the voice in your head, the thought processes, and their reflection in the body as emotion. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
623:"In Zen they say: 'Don't seek the truth. Just cease to cherish opinions.' What does that mean? Let go of identification with your mind. Who you are beyond the mind then emerges by itself." ~ Eckhart Tolle,
624:From burweed, such a butterfly was born? [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Kobayashi Issa, From burweed
,
625:inside the koan clear mind gashes the great darkness [1796.jpg] -- from Crow With No Mouth: Fifteenth Century Zen Master Ikkyu, Translated by Stephen Berg

~ Ikkyu, inside the koan clear mind
,
626:You prep, you prep, you prep. And on the day that you film, you let all of that go. I try to achieve emptiness as much as possible - the Zen thing - to let the deal come out of that nothing. ~ Jeff Bridges,
627:Barn's burnt down -- now I can see the moon. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Masahide, Barns burnt down
,
628:I was a linear thinker, and according to Zen linear thinking is nothing but a delusion, one of the many that keep us unhappy. Reality is nonlinear, Zen says. No future, no past. All is now. In ~ Phil Knight,
629:Just so we're clear, I'm not zen by any stretch of the imagination. However, what I've read about change being the only constant is a concept that I can grab onto and have used quite a lot. ~ Patrick Fabian,
630:Sometimes it's just a zen thing and it means shutting the noise out and forming a plan and realizing that as long as it's not going to kill you then you just need to breathe and move past it, ~ Chuck Wendig,
631:Sometimes people come up and they get infatuated with some little brief imagistic poem or something, and they say, "Oh, I really like your Zen poems." And I say, "Which ones are not Zen poems?" ~ Sam Hamill,
632:This particular school of Zen has always considered itself the Marines of the spiritual world, so it has a kind of bias against conceptual thinking in favor of a very rigorous physical life. ~ Leonard Cohen,
633:Work in a place that feels good to you. Select the best of that which is available. The Zen of working is just to do it, not to worry about it. Feel you would be doing it without the money. ~ Frederick Lenz,
634:Harmonizing opposites by going back to their source is the distinctive quality of the Zen attitude, the Middle Way: embracing contradictions, making a synthesis of them, achieving balance. ~ Taisen Deshimaru,
635:she was attempting to deploy enchantments of her own — the fiancé, the ordinary hobbies and the sensible office job were so many sigils to ward off chaos. It was not an ineffective magic. It worked ~ Zen Cho,
636:First firefly, why turn away -- it's Issa. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Kobayashi Issa, First firefly
,
637:If you're very, very conservative and you like that sort of practice, go find a very conservative Zen master and just do traditional Japanese practice, which is not that traditional actually. ~ Frederick Lenz,
638:Reflected in the dragonfly's eye -- mountains. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Kobayashi Issa, Reflected
,
639:The door is ajar,” the dashboard said. “It won’t shut up,” I explained to him. “It gets sort of Zen after a while,” Butters said brightly. “Life is a journey. Time is a river. The door is a jar. ~ Jim Butcher,
640:A well known Los Angeles newspaper referred to a small group of gentlemen who live up on a mountain and practice Zen as 'the Zen cult'. The cult phenomenon is definitely journalistically 'in'. ~ Frederick Lenz,
641:There are different pathways - be it Zen, tantra, karma yoga, or jnana yoga. Different ways have been devised to do the same thing for different types of people according to their temperament. ~ Frederick Lenz,
642:And finally, be assured that Zen asks nothing even as it promises nothing. One can be a Protestant Zen Buddhist, a Catholic Zen Buddhist or a Jewish Zen Buddhist. Zen is a quiet thing. It listens. ~ Howard Fast,
643:In the advanced practice, the relationship between the Zen master and the student becomes very terse. The Zen master will expect things of the student because the student is in graduate school. ~ Frederick Lenz,
644:No matter what verbal space you try to enclose Zen in, it resists, and spills over... the Zen attitude is that words and truth are incompatible, or at least that no words can capture truth. ~ Douglas Hofstadter,
645:In a bitter wind a solitary monk bends to words cut in stone [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, In a bitter wind
,
646:In certain Zen monasteries, it's a cardinal rule, if not the only serious enforced discipline, that when one monk calls out 'Hi!' to another monk, the latter must call back 'Hi!' without thinking. ~ J D Salinger,
647:Miles of frost -- on the lake the moon's my own. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Yosa Buson, Miles of frost
,
648:The future of humanity will move closer and closer toward the approach of Zen, because the meeting of the East and West is possible only through something like Zen, which is earthly and yet unearthly. ~ Rajneesh,
649:Think of yourself as your own Zen Master. Such masters would beat their pupils and deliberately lead them to points of maximum doubt and inner tension, knowing such moments precede enlightenment. ~ Robert Greene,
650:I seemed to recall some words from an old Zen master, something like, "My Zen cuts down mountains." My rejection of Buddhism was a cutting down of mountains; that is precisely how it felt to me. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
651:Walking is, in fact, a tremendous bore. But I liked watching Chloe walk. I know that sounds queer, but a dog derives such pleasure from this simple activity. It made me Zen-happy to watch her. Back ~ Harlan Coben,
652:Zen is mind-less activity, that is, Mind-ful activity, and it may often be advisable to emphasize the mind, and say, Take care of the thoughts and the actions will take care of themselves. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
653:Zen is the most scientific method to inquire into your consciousness. It takes you beyond mind into a space called no-mind. No self, but pure awareness, and you have a taste of eternity and immortality. ~ Rajneesh,
654:I made a photograph of a garden in Kyoto, the Zen garden, which is a rectangle. But a photograph taken from any one point will not show, well it shows a rectangle, but not with ninety degree angles. ~ David Hockney,
655:Never forget: we walk on hell, gazing at flowers. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Kobayashi Issa, Never forget
,
656:The simplest pattern is the clearest. Content with an ordinary life, you can show all people the way back to their own true nature. ~ Lao TzuWay in the lake (by Evgeni Dinev)#zen #laotzu #quote #photography #nature,
657:Having plants and flowers in my space makes me feel very calm and Zen. For me, its important to meditate every morning to be very clear in the head, and nature really helps me do the same thing. ~ Nicola Formichetti,
658:The Zen Master was constantly attempting to break up concepts that people had about what it was like to be a spiritual teacher. We have a traditional image. Each Zen master was a complete character. ~ Frederick Lenz,
659:If you look at the world today, there are as many solutions as there are problems. I think that is a big part of creativity. That's why I started Urban Zen. Because I wanted to dress and address people. ~ Donna Karan,
660:Robert M. Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: ‘When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called Religion. ~ Richard Dawkins,
661:The Japanese have become so smitten with the Western condiment - its texture as silky as a kimono, its tang as understated as the tang of Zen - that today they have a word for mayonnaise junkie: mayora. ~ Tom Robbins,
662:Haiku is a particularly Zen form of poetry; for Zen detests egoism in the form of calculated effects or self-glorification of any sort. The author of haiku should be absent, and only the haiku present. ~ Anne Bancroft,
663:Tantric Zen is for someone who is really broad-minded. It is Bodhidharma's Zen, your Zen, my Zen. Which doesn't mean I have a problem with Japanese Zen. Most Japanese Zen is minding your p's and q's. ~ Frederick Lenz,
664:When bird passes on -- like moon, a friend to water. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Masahide, When bird passes on
,
665:But ironically, now having seen those qualities made incarnate, Lergen realized that the highest form of the Imperial Army's desires was simply another way to describe a monster. And it filled him with fear. ~ Carlo Zen,
666:Clinging to the bell, he dozes so peacefully, this new butterfly [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, Clinging to the bell
,
667:If I am asked If I am asked, then, what Zen teaches, I would answer, Zen teaches nothing. Whatever teachings there are in Zen, they come out of one's own mind. We teach ourselves; Zen merely points the way. ~ D T Suzuki,
668:If you try to grasp Zen in movement, it goes into stillness. If you try to grasp Zen in stillness, it goes into movement. It is like a fish hidden in a spring, drumming up waves and dancing independently. ~ Linji Yixuan,
669:The late evening crow of deep autumn longing suddenly cries out [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, The late evening crow
,
670:When you visit the Zen Monasteries, one of the first things required is that you bring a donation. They have to pay for those monasteries. The upkeep is fantastic. The monks have to be fed, and so on. ~ Frederick Lenz,
671:Zen Master Dogen has pointed out that anxiety, when accepted, is the driving force to enlightenment in that it lays bare the human dilemma at the same time that it ignites our desire to break out of it. ~ Philip Kapleau,
672:In Zen you practice zazen, mindfulness and other forms of introspection to find out who you are and what you want, to balance your spirit, develop willpower, increase your sense of humor and gain wisdom. ~ Frederick Lenz,
673:Different schools of Zen have evolved, principally the Rinzai and Soto orders. A whole hierarchy has developed for the teaching and practice of Zen. Zen has become, to a certain degree, institutionalized. ~ Frederick Lenz,
674:I used to try to hypnotize myself into a Zen-like state of resignation at the outset. It doesn't work, not for this grasshopper. I have my own process, as they say. I call it the motherfucker process. ~ Matthew B Crawford,
675:Zen is not effort. Effort is tension, effort is work, effort is to achieve something. Zen is not something to achieve. You are already that. Just relax, relax so deeply that you become a revelation to yourself. ~ Rajneesh,
676:A recently deceased American Zen master and navy veteran, John Daido Loori, used to say that those who think Buddhism is just about stillness end up sitting very silently up to their necks in their own shit. ~ Mark Epstein,
677:So I'm skeptical and cynical about the whole thing and it's only if something seems to be genuine that I would pursue it. That's why I've stuck with Zen for so long and not gone on to some other path with it. ~ Brad Warner,
678:There are two primary ways of studying Zen. Either an individual will enter into a Zen monastery and study with a Zen master there, or they will study with a Zen master who lives in the contemporary world. ~ Frederick Lenz,
679:Zen perceives and feels, and does not abstract and meditate. Zen penetrates and is finally lost in the immersion. Meditation, on the other hand, is outspokenly dualistic and consequently inevitably superficial. ~ D T Suzuki,
680:As your skills increase, you will see your unique style become firm and recognizable. Guard it, nurture it, and cherish it, for your style expresses you. As with the Zen master-archer, the target is yourself. ~ Betty Edwards,
681:I don't try to define the cosmos, I know it's unknowable, but I can understand my place in the world and my place in the universe through a mixture of Taoism, Catholicism, Zen or whatever I have at hand. ~ Guillermo del Toro,
682:A simple fishing boat in the midst of the rippling waters is enough to awaken in the mind of the beholder a sense of vastness of the sea and at the same time of peace and contentment - the Zen sense oof the alone. ~ D T Suzuki,
683:If the Zen master sees that it will cause a person to progress, he will ask that person to do a task. The task is charged with power if it's performed properly. It's a koan between yourself and the Zen Master. ~ Frederick Lenz,
684:In the West, we think of sports and athletics as individual achievement, the thrill of victory, the agony of defeat; it all revolves around the ego. This has nothing to do with the Zen of sports and athletics. ~ Frederick Lenz,
685:There's kind of a Zen aspect to bowling. The pins are either staying up or down before you even throw your arm back. It's kind of a mind-set. You want to be in this perfect mind-set before you released the ball. ~ Jeff Bridges,
686:"Dispelling dread isn't a matter of trying to forget about washing dishes. It is realizing that in actual fact you only have one dish to wash, ever: this one; only one step to take, ever: this one. And that is Zen." ~ Alan Watts,
687:English version by Steven Heine
"Mind itself is buddha" -- difficult to practice, but easy to explain;
"No mind, no buddha" -- difficult to explain, but easy to practice.

~ Dogen, A Zen monk asked for a verse -
,
688:Many paths lead from the foot of the mountain, But at the peak We all gaze at the Single bright moon. [2669.jpg] -- from Zen and Zen Classics, by R. H. Blyth

~ Ikkyu, Many paths lead from the foot of the mountain,
,
689:Mountains of Yoshino -- shedding petals, swallowing clouds. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Yosa Buson, Mountains of Yoshino
,
690:Suzuki also frequently quotes a sentence of Eckhart’s: “The eye wherein I see God is the same eye wherein God sees me” (Suzuki, Mysticism: East and West, p. 50) as an exact expression of what Zen means by Prajna. ~ Thomas Merton,
691:The statement brought up the old anger and confusion, followed by the accustomed guilt, that he should be so ungrateful as to resent the man who had rescued him from bondage. And yet he did resent Sir Stephen, even now. ~ Zen Cho,
692:Wabi means spare, impoverished; simple and functional. It connotes a transcendence of fad and fashion. The spirit of wabi imbues all the Zen arts, from calligraphy to karate, from the tea ceremony to Zen archery. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
693:And the Yak, they can afford to move so fucking slow, man, they’ll wait years and years. Give you a whole life, just so you’ll have more to lose when they come and take it away. Patient like a spider. Zen spiders. ~ William Gibson,
694:Zen is a liberation from time. For if we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality. ~ Alan Watts,
695:"Zen is liberation from time. For if we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality." ~ Alan Watts,
696:As Sandra would say, all I felt was Zen. But not Quinn. Quinn was not Zen. He was the opposite of Zen. I’d made a mental note to look up what the opposite of the word Zen was, thinking it should be something like “zook ~ Penny Reid,
697:Commander, I always used to consider that you had a definite anti-authoritarian streak in you.” “Sir?” “It seems that you have managed to retain this even though you are authority.” “Sir?” “That’s practically zen. ~ Terry Pratchett,
698:The study of Zen is the study of energy, power, knowledge and balance. It is the science of energy conservation and control. We use energy to aid others, to see beauty, to discover love where we saw no love at all. ~ Frederick Lenz,
699:This cold winter night, that old wooden-head Buddha would make a nice fire [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yosa Buson, This cold winter night
,
700:Zen is a kind of unlearning. It teaches you how to drop that which you have learned, how to become unskillful again, how to become a child again, how to start existing without mind again, how to be here without any mind. ~ Rajneesh,
701:Zen is a path of liberation. It liberates you. It is freedom from the first step to the last. You are not required to follow any rules; you are required to find out your own rules and your own life in the light of awareness. ~ Osho,
702:Deluded beings think that if they get in a battle with a Zen Master or with a Don Juan, that it's going enhance their life if they win. You can never take power from someone else any more than you can take sunlight. ~ Frederick Lenz,
703:So I was first exposed to this guy Tim McCarthy, and he's talking about Zen, but deeper than that he was a genuine person. I thought maybe he's someone I can trust and follow this thing he's talking about all the time. ~ Brad Warner,
704:The productivity of people requires continuous learning, as the Japanese have taught us. It requires adoption in the West of the specific Japanese Zen concept where one learns to do better what one already does well. ~ Peter Drucker,
705:"Zen is a liberation from time. For if we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality." ~ Alan Watts,
706:Zen is a liberation from time. For if we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and the future are abstractions without any concrete reality. ~ Alan W Watts,
707:Watermelons and Zen students grow pretty much the same way. Long periods of sitting till they ripen and grow all juicy inside, but when you knock them on the head to see if they're ready sounds like nothing's going on. ~ Peter Levitt,
708:What a mother hen I am become!” he said soberly. “If I were my old self I should not start at every shadow, and be alarmed when you stumble, but one’s anxiety rises in proportion to one’s incapacity to do anything about it. ~ Zen Cho,
709:As Zie Zen’s ashes flew on the wind, so did the time of those who had been born in freedom, caged in Silence, only to see it fall. Now . . . now it was the time of those who had been born in Silence, fought for freedom. ~ Nalini Singh,
710:Doing one thing at a time” is how one Zen Master defined the essence of Zen. Doing one thing at a time means to be total in what you do, to give it your complete attention.This is surrendered action — empowered action. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
711:The claim of the Zen followers that they are transmitting the essence of Buddhism is based on their belief that Zen takes hold of the enlivening spirit of the Buddha, stripped of all its historical and doctrinal garments. ~ D T Suzuki,
712:"The whole essence of Zen consists in walking along the razor's edge of Now — to be so utterly, so completely present that no problem, no suffering, nothing that is not who you are in your essence, can survive in you." ~ Eckhart Tolle,
713:"Zen is a path of liberation. It liberates you. It is freedom from the first step to the last. You are not required to follow any rules; you are required to find out your own rules and your own life in the light of awareness." ~ Osho,
714:Each of the small enlightenments that a Zen practitioner has, which are known in Zen as "Satori experiences," provides deeper insights into the nature of existence and helps a person prepare for complete enlightenment. ~ Frederick Lenz,
715:Hornergy' is Zen's term for the indomitable athletic edge powered by sexual restraint. The basketball, baseball and football teams haven't had a winning season in years. The table-tennis team, however, is undefeated. ~ Megan McCafferty,
716:That's a waste of time. If you really understand Zen... you can use any book. You could use the Bible. You could use Alice in Wonderland. You could use the dictionary, because... the sound of the rain needs no translation. ~ Alan Watts,
717:The life of Zen begins, therefore, in a disillusion with the pursuit of goals which do not really exist the good without the bad, the gratification of a self which is no more than an idea, and the morrow which never comes. ~ Alan Watts,
718:Vegetarianism and Zen Buddhism, meditation and spirituality, acid and rock—Jobs rolled together, in an amped-up way, the multiple impulses that were hallmarks of the enlightenment-seeking campus subculture of the era. ~ Walter Isaacson,
719:Zen professes itself to be the spirit of Buddhism, but in fact it is the spirit of all religions and philosophies. When Zen is thoroughly understood, absolute peace of mind is attained, and a man lives as he ought to live. ~ D T Suzuki,
720:Among the most remarkable features characterizing Zen we find these: spirituality, directness of expression, disregard of form or conventionalism, and frequently an almost wanton delight in going astray from respectability. ~ D T Suzuki,
721:Ikkyu this body isn't yours I say to myself wherever I am I'm there [1796.jpg] -- from Crow With No Mouth: Fifteenth Century Zen Master Ikkyu, Translated by Stephen Berg

~ Ikkyu, Ikkyu this body isnt yours I say to myself
,
722:Tantric Zen is the original Zen, Zen without rules, Zen without form. Zen can certainly take rules and form. So Tantric Zen might have some rules and form, but it would remain formless even though it had rules and form. ~ Frederick Lenz,
723:What sets Tibetan Buddhism apart from other Buddhist traditions—such as the Zen Buddhism of Japan or the Theravada tradition in Sri Lanka—is that while Tibetans aim to become enlightened, they don’t want to enter Nirvana. ~ Scott Carney,
724:But dispelling this dread isn’t a matter of trying to forget about washing dishes, it is realizing that in actual fact you only have one dish to wash, ever: this one; only one step to take, ever: this one. And that is Zen. ~ Alan W Watts,
725:In Old Zen, the Zen Master would do literally anything to break down the concept of what the study was. He would present conflicting codes all the time, just to shake this fixation people had on how to attain liberation. ~ Frederick Lenz,
726:I came to California in 1970 and so many people were asking if I was a Buddhist or knew Zen theory, asking if I was enlightened already or not. So I said, "Yes, I am enlightened," and then I studied quickly to catch up. ~ Hiroshi Sugimoto,
727:I am inclined to follow Robert M. Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: ‘When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called Religion. ~ Richard Dawkins,
728:We take life for granted, sleepwalking until a shattering event knocks us awake. Zen says, don't wait until the car accident, the cancer diagnosis, or the death of a loved one to get your priorities straight. Do it now. ~ Philip Toshio Sudo,
729:Zen lives in the present. The Whole teaching is: how to be in the present; how to get out of the past which is no more and how not to get involved in the future which is not yet, and just to be rooted, centered, in that which is. ~ Rajneesh,
730:To write something and leave it behind us, It is but a dream. When we awake we know There is not even anyone to read it. [2669.jpg] -- from Zen and Zen Classics, by R. H. Blyth

~ Ikkyu, To write something and leave it behind us
,
731:And then certainly, whatsoever you do - your character, your behaviour - is yours, authentically yours. It has your signature on it. Then you are not a carbon copy, you are original. The Zen people call it finding the original face. ~ Rajneesh,
732:Commander, I always used to consider that you had a definite anti-authoritarian streak in you.”
“Sir?”
“It seems that you have managed to retain this even though you are authority.”
“Sir?”
“That’s practically zen. ~ Terry Pratchett,
733:The way of Zen is to become independent and strong. Don't rely on others for perceptions of life and truth. Do it individually. Go to a teacher of Zen to learn how to do that, not to get answers for individual life situations. ~ Frederick Lenz,
734:Today we can see many different forms of Buddhism, such as Zen and Theravada Buddhism. All these different aspects are practices of Buddha's teachings, and all are equally precious; they are just different presentations. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
735:You know I've been in these tabloids for years now. And at some point you just become a Zen master of it all. Most of these stories, you get probably 2 percent real fruit juice and the rest is just garbage with no nutritional value. ~ Brad Pitt,
736:Everyone was losing things, leaving things behind, clinging to old memories as they rushed into the future. Everyone was a passenger on a runaway train. It was true that Zen would be going farther than most. But at least he didn’t ~ Philip Reeve,
737:I did Urban Zen for myself, to make clothes for me and my friends, a similar philosophy to when I started Donna Karan. Except this time I hope it will stay that way so that I will be able to support young designers and mentor them. ~ Donna Karan,
738:She is reading Zen, Krishnamurti, and Jung, asking herself questions she has never had the courage to explore. Suddenly, the shackles which have bound her are beginning to snap, as personal revelation replaces orthodoxy. ~ Terry Tempest Williams,
739:What writing practice, like Zen practice does is bring you back to the natural state of mind…The mind is raw, full of energy, alive and hungry. It does not think in the way we were brought up to think-well-mannered, congenial. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
740:Zen practice is about not getting high on anything and in so doing getting high on absolutely everything. We then find that everything we encounter - bliss or nonbliss - possesses a tremendous depth and beauty that we usually miss. ~ Brad Warner,
741:Zen is the spirit of a man. Zen believes in his inner purity and goodness. Whatever is superadded or violently torn away, injures the wholesomeness of the spirit. Zen, therefore, is emphatically against all religious conventionalism. ~ D T Suzuki,
742:I was reading Charlotte Bronte, and Jane was being serenaded by Mr. Rochester. (I see the source of all my problems: a Bronte was completely the wrong thing to be reading, unless it were an Anne. I should have been reading George Eliot.) ~ Zen Cho,
743:Many coping strategies have a Zen simplicity. Instead of resolving chaos, find beauty and happiness amid chaos. I am reminded of a friend who said that when she found out her husband couldn’t fill her needs, she changed her needs; ~ Andrew Solomon,
744:The teachings of Osho, in fact, encompass many religions, but he is not defined by any of them. He is an illuminating speaker on Zen, Taoism, Tibetan Buddhism, Christianity and ancient Greek philosophy... and also a prolific author. ~ Nevill Drury,
745:The tree is stripped, All color, fragrance gone, Yet already on the bough, Uncaring spring! [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Ikkyu, Form in Void
,
746:This is what Zen means by being detached—not being without emotion or feeling, but being one in whom feeling is not sticky or blocked, and through whom the experiences of the world pass like the reflections of birds flying over water. ~ Alan Watts,
747:In Zen Buddhism, the greater your doubt, the greater will be your enlightenment. That is why doubt can be a good thing. If you are too sure, if you always have conviction, then you may be caught in your wrong perception for a long time. ~ Nhat Hanh,
748:The ego doesn’t know that mind and mental positions have nothing to do with who you are because the ego is the unobserved mind itself. In Zen they say: “Don’t seek the truth. Just cease to cherish opinions.” What does that mean? Let ~ Eckhart Tolle,
749:What writing practice, like Zen practice does is bring you back to the natural state of mind...The mind is raw, full of energy, alive and hungry. It does not think in the way we were brought up to think-well-mann ered, congenial. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
750:So what I liked about Zen was that it never goes off into the realm of imagination land, or if it does occasionally, the good teachers will openly address it specifically as only imagination. Both of my teachers were very good at that. ~ Brad Warner,
751:Zen Buddhist scholar Daisetz T. Suzuki said, "If one really wishes to be master of an art, technical knowledge of it is not enough. One has to transcend technique so that the art becomes an "artless art" growing out of the Unconscious. ~ Dov Seidman,
752:In deep self-acceptance grows a compassionate understanding. As one Zen master said when I asked if he ever gets angry, 'Of course I get angry, but then a few minutes later I say to myself, 'What's the use of this,' and I let it go.' ~ Jack Kornfield,
753:It looked like all forest spirits—tall, pointy ears, big smile. It didn't look male or female. Forest spirits don't have this concept. They say male or female has no meaning. They don't like to follow rules. Like I said, they are very lazy. ~ Zen Cho,
754:Real Freedom is to not feel limited when wearing this Zen robe, this troublesome formal robe. Similarly, in our busy life we should wear this civilization without being bothered by it, without ignoring it, without being caught by it. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
755:You can do anything you like - really - but this Sci-Fi is absolutely disciplined, it's Zen, you have to be absolutely focused in an area. You have to zone into an area and you then you can achieve when you get there. It's really weird! ~ Danny Boyle,
756:Zen master, Shunryu Suzuki said, “The mind of the beginner is empty, free of the habits of the expert, ready to accept, to doubt, and open to all the possibilities.” People enjoying so-called beginner’s luck prove this all the time. ~ Gavin de Becker,
757:Practice entails experiencing being broken - the experience of suffering and dissatisfaction in the many forms in our life-Zen Buddhism"Practice is this life, and realization is this life, and this life is revealed right here and now." ~ Maezumi Roshi,
758:The ultimate purpose of Zen,' I remembered the roshi telling me, 'is not in the going away from the world but in the coming back. Zen is not just a matter of gaining enlightenment; it's a matter of acting in a world of love and compassion. ~ Pico Iyer,
759:The ultimate purpose of Zen," I remembered the röshi telling me, "is not in the going away from the world but in the coming back. Zen is not just a matter of gaining enlightenment; it's a matter of acting in a world of love and compassion. ~ Pico Iyer,
760:You can't ever tell people you think you are pretty. Even if you are pretty you have to flutter and be modest. Fortunately here nobody thinks I am pretty, so my thinking I am pretty is almost an act of defiance; it makes me feel quite noble. ~ Zen Cho,
761:Name the colors, blind the eye” is an old Zen saying, illustrating that the intellect’s habitual ways of branding and labeling creates a terrible experiential loss by displacing the vibrant, living reality with a steady stream of labels. ~ Robert Lanza,
762:Old Zen was very funny; there was a great deal of humor and happiness. Zen today seems much drier. While there's a certain amount of humor, it seems to lack that total intensity because humor is one of the primary tools for liberation. ~ Frederick Lenz,
763:"Do you suppose that God takes himself seriously? I know a Zen master, Joshu Sasaki, who has let it be known that the best form of meditation is to stand up with your hands on your hips and roar with laughter for ten minutes every morning." ~ Alan Watts,
764:Happiness only comes when you let go of who you think you are. If you think you're wealthy and powerful and noble and truthful or horrible and demonic, whatever it may be, it's all a waste of time. Take it from the Zen Master. He knows. ~ Frederick Lenz,
765:Just like there are different roads that lead to different places, so there are different levels of awareness that lead to different places and we shift in and out of them. These are the ten thousand states of mind that we study in Zen. ~ Frederick Lenz,
766:Buddha Law, Shining In a leaf dew. [2115.jpg] -- from A Box of Zen: Haiku the Poetry of Zen, Koans the Lessons of Zen, Sayings the Wisdom of Zen, Edited by Manuela Dunn Mascetti / Edited by Timothy Hugh Barrett

~ Kobayashi Issa, Buddha Law
,
767:Zen jogging. I wasn't wearing that many clothes because --that's part of the process. You're meant to commune with the elements. Normally I wouldn't have worn my jeans, but I put them on because I know the English are a modest people. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
768:Although profoundly "inconsequential," the Zen experience has consequences in the sense that it may be applied in any direction, to any conceivable human activity, and that wherever it is so applied it lends an unmistakable quality to the work. ~ Alan Watts,
769:according to Zen philosophy, the giver, the beggar, and the alms money itself all form part of an important chain of equilibrium. The person doing the begging does so because he’s needy, but the person doing the giving also does so out of need. ~ Paulo Coelho,
770:So you could say in a very simple way that the real concern of Zen is to realize—not merely rationally but in one’s bones—that the world inside your skin and the world outside your skin are all one world and one being, one self. And you are it. ~ Alan W Watts,
771:The moment a person loses the capacity to think, to question, Tanya considers them no longer human but a machine. And that is why the individual Tanya Degurechaff reveres thought, loves debate, and sneers at dogmatism from the bottom of her heart. ~ Carlo Zen,
772:There’s a Zen saying I often cite that goes, “Before enlightenment, chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment, chop wood, carry water.” The point: Stay focused on the task at hand rather than dwelling on the past or worrying about the future. ~ Phil Jackson,
773:Me preparé para la respuesta. Sabía que sería una lección de vida Zen. Algo
sobre la fuerza interior y la perseverancia, sobre como las decisiones que
tomamos hoy, influyen el futuro o alguna otra tontería.
En lugar de eso, él me besó. ~ Richelle Mead,
774:The overwhelmed, unresponsive senses ravaged by agony left no option other than flailing in pain. Strangled by these things, it easily lost consciousness. Fully free of the emotions of a human who hadn't wept in ages, the body sobbed instinctively. ~ Carlo Zen,
775:To get the clearest and most efficient understanding of a thing, therefore, it must be experienced personally. Especially when the thing is concerned with life itself, personal experience is an absolute necessity. ~ D.T. Suzuki, An Introduction to Zen Buddhism,
776:Zen opens a man's eyes to the greatest mystery as it is daily and hourly performed; it enlarges the heart to embrace eternity of time and infinity of space in its every palpitation; it makes us live in the world as if walking in the garden of Eden ~ D T Suzuki,
777:Fish sense, applied in the field, is what the old Zen masters would call enlightenment: simply the ability to see what's right there in front of you without having to sift through a lot of thoughts and theories and, yes, expensive fishing tackle. ~ John Gierach,
778:sick of it whatever it's called sick of the names I dedicate every pore to what's here [1796.jpg] -- from Crow With No Mouth: Fifteenth Century Zen Master Ikkyu, Translated by Stephen Berg

~ Ikkyu, sick of it whatever its called sick of the names
,
779:It is only in the last 800 years that the rules have come into being and conservative Zen has surfaced. It is not particularly popular in Japan at all. Hardly anybody practices Zen any more because it's just too strict; there are too many rules. ~ Frederick Lenz,
780:I was talking to a Zen master the other day and he said, "You shall be my disciple."I looked at him and said, "Who was Buddha's teacher?" He looked at me in a very odd way for a moment and then he burst into laughter and handed me a piece of clover. ~ Alan Watts,
781:Rock slab seat legs folded sitting alone Not loathing noise not savoring silence The carefree clouds concur [2472.jpg] -- from A Quiet Room: The Poetry of Zen Master Jakushitsu, Translated by Arthur Braverman

~ Jakushitsu, Sitting in the Mountains
,
782:Just by being, I'm here -- In snow-fall. [2115.jpg] -- from A Box of Zen: Haiku the Poetry of Zen, Koans the Lessons of Zen, Sayings the Wisdom of Zen, Edited by Manuela Dunn Mascetti / Edited by Timothy Hugh Barrett

~ Kobayashi Issa, Just by being
,
783:Writing doesn't come easily to anyone, I think, certainly not to me. But pressure and practice does lend a certain fluency, I think - the more sentences you write, the more sentences you have written, if that slightly Zen confection makes any sense. ~ Adam Gopnik,
784:Just look at that. That evil grin. She looks thrilled. She’s so happy to have a place to fight. Without a doubt, she’s going to end up being the most horrible person I know. And she’ll probably also be one of my most reliable friends on the battlefield. ~ Carlo Zen,
785:Saying yes requires first and foremost paying attention to the no, the inner contraction we feel toward all that we would like to be different, all that we reject and push away, whether it be in ourselves, in the world, or in another person. ~ Ezra Bayda, Zen Heart,
786:Those who can adapt to the sudden paradigm shift and new environment do. Obey the rules. Search for the loopholes. Sneer at the guidelines despite being bound by them. In the end, everyone learns that rules are necessary to make the system run smoothly. ~ Carlo Zen,
787:No se puede comprender el zen a través de los libros y conferencias. Se trata de descubrir en nosotros el origen de la vida manifestada. No podemos nutrirnos de la imagen de la manzana, ni podemos saber sin tocarla si el agua está caliente o fría. ~ Taisen Deshimaru,
788:One Zen master said, The whole universe is my true personality. This is a very wonderful saying... If you want to see what you truly are, open the window, and everything you see is in fact the expression of your inner reality. Can you embrace all of it? ~ Adyashanti,
789:How could you die and not be old enough to hear about premarital sex? How could you die and still not be allowed to fall in love or be honest? Surely not everything had to wait for university and a good job. Passion and truth had to trump even those things. ~ Zen Cho,
790:...my life itself couldn't very conceivably be less Zenful than it is, and what little I've been able to apprehend - I pick that verb with care - of the Zen experience has been a by-result of following my own rather natural path of extreme Zenlessness. ~ J D Salinger,
791:Una vez comprendida la fuerza innata para purificarse a uno mismo y purificar el ambiente será dado actuar correctamente y aprender de quienes nos rodean. Y podrá convertirse uno en persona amistosa con los demás. Éste es el mérito de la práctica del Zen. ~ Anonymous,
792:I've done a fair amount of that stuff... when we did 'Lord of the Rings' the transformation sequence from Smeagol to Gollum was a 19-hour make-up job. You have to have a kind of zen button that you press and allow the mind to be focused in a certain way. ~ Andy Serkis,
793:Messing with people's lives is quite honestly a lot of fun, but it's completely unacceptable for me to be on the receiving end like this. Why can't I decide how to live my own life? Isn't my existence as an individual the least I should be able to control? ~ Carlo Zen,
794:The practice of Zen is to eat, breathe, cook, carry water, and scrub the toilet — to infuse every act of body, speech, and mind — with mindfulness, to illuminate every leaf and pebble, every heap of garbage, every path that leads to our mind's return home. ~ Nhat Hanh,
795:Buddha activity doesn't mean radiating light and elevating yourself up a thousand feet in the air. That's not the point. The point is, as Zen is always saying - and Tibetans understand this also very well - every activity becomes perfect Buddha activity. ~ Tenzin Palmo,
796:It wasn't so much that she and Penn set out to practice Zen marriage equality and perfect-balance parenting. It was just that there was way more to do than two could manage, but by their both filling every spare moment, some of what needed to got done. ~ Laurie Frankel,
797:The Chatham’s lobby décor was modern, serene, and understated—dignified hipster meets Tibetan monk—but the heavy police presence outside the sparkling glass doors was ruining the carefully curated Zen atmosphere. Even the potted orchids looked stressed out. ~ P J Tracy,
798:Jesus," for example, speaks in sayings as cryptic and compelling as Zen koans: Jesus said, "If you bring forth what is within you, what you bring forth will save you. If you do not bring forth what is within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you. ~ Anonymous,
799:To an experienced Zen Buddhist, asking if one believes in Zen or one believes in the Buddha, sounds a little ludicrous, like asking if one believes in air or water. Similarly Quality is not something you believe in, Quality is something you experience. ~ Robert M Pirsig,
800:Bowerman’s strategy for running the mile was simple. Set a fast pace for the first two laps, run the third as hard as you can, then triple your speed on the fourth. There was a Zen-like quality to this strategy, because it was impossible. And yet it worked. ~ Phil Knight,
801:He growled and stood up. “There is a knocking without,” he said.
“Without what?” said the Fool.
“Without the door, idiot.”
The Fool gave him a worried look. “A knocking without a door?” he said suspiciously. “This isn’t some kind of Zen, is it? ~ Terry Pratchett,
802:Did I ever mention I used to be a delivery driver too? I was. I can read a map. What’s more, using a brilliant mixture of zen navigation, Aristotelian logic, and pure rage I can get you your package and/or delicious sandwich relatively close to on-time. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
803:I may discuss contemporary cinema, how to shop at a mall without losing energy, how to use the power of mind to increase career and academic success, the Zen of sports, reincarnation, karma, sex, the experience of "suchness" or a new book by Stephen King. ~ Frederick Lenz,
804:Zen is not a particular state but the normal state: silent, peaceful, unagitated. In Zazen neither intention, analysis, specific effort nor imagination take place. It's enough just to be without hypocrisy, dogmatism, arrogance - embracing all opposites. ~ Taisen Deshimaru,
805:Though it depends on the time and place, putting on a silly grin and countering a joke with a joke has its merits. Clowning around can ease nerves and serve as a tool for employing some of humanity's highly developed linguistic abilities: criticism and cursing. ~ Carlo Zen,
806:I'm not really hip to too much of the Zen or the Buddhist point of view, but you see I don't have to be because I just know that they're all the same, it's all the same, it's just whichever one you want to take and it happens that I'm taking the Hindu one. ~ George Harrison,
807:Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh is one of the most beloved Buddhist teachers in the West, a rare combination of mystic, poet, scholar, and activist. His luminous presence and the simple, compassionate clarity of his writings have touched countless lives. ~ Joanna Macy,
808:Like vanishing dew, a passing apparition or the sudden flash of lightning -- already gone -- thus should one regard one's self. [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Ikkyu, Like vanishing dew
,
809:There is a Zen story about a man and a horse.7 The horse is galloping quickly, and it appears that the rider is urgently heading somewhere important. A bystander along the road calls out, “Where are you going?” and the rider replies, “I don’t know! Ask the horse! ~ Anonymous,
810:We must first understand that both our pain and our suffering are truly our path, our teacher. While this understanding doesn’t necessarily entail liking our pain or our suffering, it does liberate us from regarding them as enemies we have to conquer. ~ Ezra Bayda, Being Zen,
811:Before one studies Zen, mountains are mountains and waters are waters; after a first glimpse into the truth of Zen, mountains are no longer mountains and waters are no longer waters; after enlightenment, mountains are once again mountains and waters once again waters. ~ D gen,
812:I began to realize that an intuitive understanding and consciousness was more significant than abstract thinking and intellectual logical analysis,” he later said. His intensity, however, made it difficult for him to achieve inner peace; his Zen awareness was ~ Walter Isaacson,
813:According to Zen legend, when a visitor asked the fifteenth-century master Ikkyu to write down a maxim of “the highest wisdom,” Ikkyu wrote one word: “Attention.” The visitor asked, irritably, “Is that all?” This time, Ikkyu wrote two words: “Attention. Attention. ~ John Horgan,
814:A great Zen master said just before he died, "From the bathtub, to the bathtub, I have uttered stuff and nonsense." The bathtub in which the baby is washed at birth, the bathtub in which the corpse is washed before burial, all this time I have said much nonsense. ~ Alan W Watts,
815:Such a Zen dialogue is basically a contest, but it’s really an anti-contest. It’s a kind of reverse or paradoxical contest. It works like this: two people talk, and the first one who speaks from the ego loses. The one who wants to win is certainly going to lose. ~ Shinzen Young,
816:You like the gentleman, then?" said Muna.
"I don't dislike him," said Henrietta unpromisingly.
[...]
"I don't dislike cabbage," Muna found herself saying, "but I should not consider marrying it. Not disliking seems a poor foundation for future happiness. ~ Zen Cho,
817:I started running ultras to become a better person. I thought if you could run 100 miles you'd be in this Zen state. You'd be the Buddha, bringing peace and a smile to the world. It didn't work in my case. I'm the same old punk-ass as before, but there's always hope. ~ Jenn Shelton,
818:Rei Shimura Books in Order The Salaryman’s Wife Zen Attitude The Flower Master The Floating Girl The Bride’s Kimono The Samurai’s Daughter The Pearl Diver The Typhoon Lover Girl In A Box Shimura Trouble The Convenience Boy And Other Stories Of Japan The Kizuna Coast ~ Sujata Massey,
819:As Sandra would say, all I felt was Zen.

But not Quinn. Quinn was not Zen. He was the opposite of Zen. I’d made a mental note to look up what the opposite of the word Zen was, thinking it should be something like ‘Zook’ or ‘Z-oh-shit!’

Or maybe it was Zinn. ~ Penny Reid,
820:In a few Zen monasteries, every monk has to start his morning with laughter, and has to end his night with laughter - the first thing and the last thing! You try it. . . For no reason! Because there is no reason. Simply, you are again there, still alive - it is a miracle! ~ Rajneesh,
821:We have been teaching together [with Kaz] now for more than twenty years in sesshins, in international travel programs in Japan and China, as well as intensives on Buddhism that focus on the work of Zen Master Dogen and Ryokan, as well as on many of the Mahayana sutras. ~ Joan Halifax,
822:Walking is Zen, sitting is Zen; Speaking or silent, active or quiet, the essence is at peace. Even facing the sword of death, our mind is unmoved; Even drinking poison, our mind is quiet.

~ Hsuan Chueh of Yung Chia, 19 - Walking is Zen, sitting is Zen (from The Shodoka)
,
823:Where there are humans You'll find flies, And Buddhas. [2115.jpg] -- from A Box of Zen: Haiku the Poetry of Zen, Koans the Lessons of Zen, Sayings the Wisdom of Zen, Edited by Manuela Dunn Mascetti / Edited by Timothy Hugh Barrett

~ Kobayashi Issa, Where there are humans
,
824:Zazen is seated meditation-the opposite of contemplation-the emptying of the mind of all thoughts in order simply to be. In the midst of all evil, not a thought is aroused in the mind-this is called za. Seeing into one's Self-nature, not being moved at all-this is called Zen. ~ Huineng,
825:Don't weep, insects -- Lovers, stars themselves, Must part. [2115.jpg] -- from A Box of Zen: Haiku the Poetry of Zen, Koans the Lessons of Zen, Sayings the Wisdom of Zen, Edited by Manuela Dunn Mascetti / Edited by Timothy Hugh Barrett

~ Kobayashi Issa, Dont weep, insects
,
826:As Tanya gazes at the enemy unit through her binoculars, shells plow the earth right where they were meant to, turning people into fertilizer. In other words, this is the correct way of waging war—taking organic life and rendering it past tense through the use of ammunitions. ~ Carlo Zen,
827:Zen, in its essence is the art of seeing into the nature of one's own being, and it points the way from bondage to freedom. By making us drink right from the fountain of life it liberates us from all the yokes under which we finite beings are usually suffering in this world. ~ D T Suzuki,
828:Behind the sometimes seemingly random or even chaotic succession of events in our lives as well as in the world lies concealed the unfolding of a higher order and purpose. This is beautifully expressed in the Zen saying “The snow falls, each flake in its appropriate place. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
829:If you ask Zen people they will say; tea is not something that you pour with unawareness and drink like any other drink. It is not a drink, it is meditation; it is prayer. So they listen to the kettle creating a melody, and in that listening they become more silent, more alert. ~ Rajneesh,
830:I work out because that's my job, but what I enjoy about it, beyond the vanity, is the Zen of it. I like getting out of my head, and one great way to do that is to sweat your face off. And to know that, if you're thinking of anything else, you're not working intensely enough. ~ Chris Pine,
831:All of us should treasure his (John Dillinger) Oriental wisdom and his preaching of a Zen-like detachment, as exemplified by his constant reminder to clerks, tellers, or others who grew excited by his presence in their banks: 'Just lie down on the floor and keep calm. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
832:I raise my hand; I take a book from the other side of this desk; I hear the boys playing ball outside my window; I see the clouds blown away beyond the neighboring woods:-in all these I am practicing Zen, I am living Zen. No worldly discussion is necessary, or any explanation. ~ D T Suzuki,
833:When Zen masters say `effortlessness` they are referring to the state when your enlightenment is well rooted. Now there is no need of any effort; now you can be relaxed and at ease, it will grow on its own accord. It will bring much foliage, and many flowers, and many blessings. ~ Rajneesh,
834:When I go visit my brother monks in Japan and sit down with other Zen Masters, they look at my crazy clothes and my strange expression, but they feel the power that emanates from my dedication to the practice. So they are comfortable with me, yet they're very uncomfortable. ~ Frederick Lenz,
835:I don't give a damn about power and money per se. Really, I don't. I may be a selfish bastard, but I'm incredibly cool about shit like that. I could be a Zen saint. The one thing I do have, though, is curiosity. I want to see what I can do out there in the big, tough world. ~ Haruki Murakami,
836:My comic sense, although deliberately Americanized, is, in its intent, much closer related to the crazy wisdom of Zen monks and the goofy genius of Taoist masters than it is to, say, the satirical gibes on Saturday Night Live. It has both a literary and a metaphysical function. ~ Tom Robbins,
837:her parents had few friends, avoided social engagement, were awkward when they couldn’t avoid it, and spent most of their time reading, playing music, doing punishing exercise, or, like crazy Zen monks, sitting for hours in the garden or on the terrace doing absolutely nothing. ~ Mark Helprin,
838:Clear in the blue, the moon! Icy water to the horizon, Defining high, low. Startled, The dragon uncoils about the billows. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Ryuzan, Clear in the blue, the moon!
,
839:A month alone behind closed doors forgotten books, remembered, clear again. Poems come, like water to the pool Welling, up and out, from perfect silence [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Yuan Mei, Just Done
,
840:Buddhist concept of mindfulness means precisely a way of being in which one is fully concentrated on everything one is doing at any given moment, whether it is planting a seed or cleaning a room or eating. Or as a Zen master has said: “When I sleep I sleep, when I eat I eat …” 10. ~ Erich Fromm,
841:One has to reach to the absolute state of awareness: that is Zen. You cannot do it every morning for a few minutes or for half an hour and then forget all about it. It has to become like your heartbeat. You have to sit in it, you have to walk in it. Yes, you have even to sleep in it. ~ Rajneesh,
842:The entrance into Zen is the grasping of one's essential nature. It is absolutely impossible, however, to come to a clear understanding of our essential nature by any intellectual or philosophical method. It is accomplished only by the experience of self-realization through zazen. ~ Yamada Koun,
843:ZEN is MEDITATION. ARCHY is Social Order. ZENARCHY is the Social Order which springs from Meditation. As a doctrine, it holds Universal Enlightenment a prerequisite to abolition of the State, after which a State will inevitably vanish. Or - that failing - nobody will give a damn. ~ Kerry Thornley,
844:Every man now is responsible to create a buddhafield around himself, an energy field that goes on becoming bigger and bigger. Create as many vibrations of laughter, joy, celebration, as possible; dance, sing, let the whole of humanity by and by catch the fire of Zen and the wind of Zen. ~ Rajneesh,
845:Magic ran in the family. Even her mother's second cousin, who was adopted, did small spells on the side. She sold these from a stall in Kota Bharu. Her main wares were various types of fruit fried in batter, but if you bought five pisang or cempedak goreng, she threw in a jampi for free. ~ Zen Cho,
846:Roy had communicated, days earlier, to the Zen master that I was a drunk - unreliable - either faint-hearted or vicious - therefore during the cerimony, don't ask Bukowski for the rings because Bukowski might not be there. or he might loose the rings, or vomit, or loose Bukowski ~ Charles Bukowski,
847:The Way of the Worrier 1. Don’t Be a Jerk 2. (And/But . . .) When Necessary, Hide the Zen 3. Meditate 4. The Price of Security Is Insecurity—Until It’s Not Useful 5. Equanimity Is Not the Enemy of Creativity 6. Don’t Force It 7. Humility Prevents Humiliation 8. Go Easy with the Internal ~ Dan Harris,
848:Three aspects of Zen have been critical to me as a leader: 1. GIVING UP CONTROL Suzuki writes, “If you want to obtain perfect calmness in your zazen, you should not be bothered by the various images you find in your mind. Let them come and let them go. Then they will be under control. ~ Phil Jackson,
849:Zen has an expression, "nothing special." When you understand "nothing special," you realize that everything is special. Everything's special and nothing's special. Everything's spiritual and nothing's spiritual. It's how you see, it's what eyes you're looking through, that matters. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
850:Zacharias’s study bore the marks of his predecessors, whose taste had run decidedly stoicheiotical. They had had a fondness for skulls with burning lights in their eye sockets, crystal balls in which mysterious shapes came and went, and dark velvet window curtains traced with obscure runes. ~ Zen Cho,
851:When I'm looking for Zen and I'm not saying this facetiously at all - I would really rather surf, scuba dive, or fly my plane. And, when I feel tension about the grind of work, it's not getting the money to make films versus making films that constitutes the grind, it's all this stuff. ~ Edward Norton,
852:Apart from the underlying mystery of all things, there is also another possible specific mystery in this situation: Why did I become so interested in Buddhism, Zen and so on? I seem to have a Buddhist voice in my head, and someone asked me about this recently, saying he was intrigued. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
853:In the early '60s there was very little reliable information on Tibetan Buddhism. I was living in London and I had joined the Buddhist Society. For the most part, people there were either interested in Theravada or Zen Buddhism. There was almost no one into Tibetan Buddhism at that time. ~ Tenzin Palmo,
854:Detrás de la sucesión aparentemente aleatoria o hasta caótica de sucesos que acontecen en la vida y también en el mundo yace oculto el desenvolvimiento de un orden y un propósito superiores. El proverbio Zen lo expresa bellamente: "La nieve cae copo por copo, cada uno en su lugar preciso ~ Eckhart Tolle,
855:At times, Zen does get into some Buddhist Cosmology. Nishijima Roshi, my main teacher would talk about that and almost every time immediately say that it was only one way of looking at it. Whenever addressing realms of Heaven or Hell, he'd also address that it was just a psychological state. ~ Brad Warner,
856:I like Catch-22, Gravity’s Rainbow and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, for instance, because the authors of those three surrealistic novels—Joseph Heller, Thomas Pynchon and Robert Pirsig—invented their own rules, knowing that the old ones wouldn’t do the job they had in mind. ~ William Zinsser,
857:Meditation has become such a common element of business training that more than a thousand Googlers attended a training program called, Search Inside Yourself. Google even hosts bimonthly silent ‘mindful lunches’, which began after Zen monk and writer, Thich Nhat Hanh, visited Google in 2011. ~ Brian Tracy,
858:Sam Keen points out that Zen masters spend years to reach an enlightenment that every natural child already knows—the total incarnation of sleeping when you’re tired and eating when you’re hungry. What irony that this state of Zen-like bliss is programmatically and systematically destroyed. ~ John Bradshaw,
859:Suzuki's works on Zen Buddhism are among the best contributions to the knowledge of living Buddhism... We cannot be sufficiently grateful to the author, first for the fact of his having brought Zen closer to Western understanding, and secondly for the manner in which he has achieved this task. ~ D T Suzuki,
860:A temple, hidden, treasured in the mountain's cleft Pines, bamboo such a subtle flavor: The ancient Buddha sits there, wordless The welling source speaks for him. [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Yuan Mei, Pu-to Temple
,
861:I was focused on getting shut-eye, confident that sleep and I would spoon the fuck out of each other until the sun rose the following morning. I channeled Buddha for my inner Zen, humming my way toward unconscious bliss. It was either that, or grab my vibrator and participate in a ménage à moi. ~ Max Monroe,
862:Hope springs eternal and all that, yet isn't it a fact that when we give up and quit hoping; genuinely, sincerely quit hoping, things usually change for the better? Zen masters say that when we become convinced that the human situation is hopeless, we approach serenity, the ideal state of mind. ~ Tom Robbins,
863:One might have thought you had never met my aunt Georgiana,” said Rollo, with the steeliness of despair. “She is the one with the false curls and glowing eyes and smoke rising from her jaws. Do not you recollect her?”
“She did strike me as possessing unusual force of character,” admitted Damerell. ~ Zen Cho,
864:Zen wants us to acquire an entirely new point of view whereby to look into the mysteries of life and the secrets of nature. This is because Zen has come to the definite conclusion that the ordinary logical process of reasoning is powerless to give final satisfaction to our deepest spiritual needs. ~ D T Suzuki,
865:To design for compactness and orthogonality, start from zero. Zen teaches that attachment leads to suffering; experience with software design teaches that attachment to unnoticed assumptions leads to non-orthogonality, noncompact designs, and projects that fail or become maintenance nightmares. ~ Eric S Raymond,
866:Two things stand out: The zen-like demeanor of the Japanese amidst such a huge disaster, and the realization that if there is a place on earth that I want to be with my family and friends (current and extended), when (God forbid) such a disaster ever struck again, then it's this country, Japan. ~ Jake Adelstein,
867:I'm not an ascetic and please don't use the word zen, which is so lightly bandied about these days. Being zen . . . It's shameful to talk in such a way. I haven't become an ascetic but I'm not going to build up another collection. I'm going to create my new environment. I already know what I want. ~ Pierre Berge,
868:Buddhism, was not just some passing fancy or youthful dabbling. He embraced it with his typical intensity, and it became deeply ingrained in his personality. “Steve is very much Zen,” said Kottke. “It was a deep influence. You see it in his whole approach of stark, minimalist aesthetics, intense ~ Walter Isaacson,
869:Having been thus “straightened out,” Corporals Kurst and Harald became rebellious, but they weren’t disciplined outright—key word outright. After the company commander and the second lieutenant mentioned that they simply couldn’t take care of them on the front lines, the pair was assigned to the rear. ~ Carlo Zen,
870:People say that practicing Zen is difficult, but there is a misunderstanding as to why. It is not difficult because it is hard to sit in the cross- legged position, or to attain enlightenment. It is difficult because it is hard to keep our mind pure and our practice pure in its fundamental sense. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
871:Prophecy is rash, but it may be that the publication of D.T. Suzuki's first Essays in Zen Buddhism in 1927 will seem to future generations as great an intellectual event as William of Moerbeke's Latin translations of Aristotle in the thirteenth century or Marsiglio Ficino's of Plato in the fifteenth. ~ D T Suzuki,
872:The secret of Zen masters is discovering the path of return to such moments, and knowing how to pave the way for such moments to arise. The masters know how to use the dazzling light of those moments to illuminate the journey of return, the journey that begins from nowhere and has no destination. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
873:my lute set aside on the little table lazily I meditate on cherishing feelings the reason I don't bother to strum and pluck? there's a breeze over the strings and it plays itself [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Po Chu-i, Lute
,
874:We should work like the rain.The rain just falls. It doesn’t ask, Am I making a nice sound down below? Or, Will the plants be glad to see me? Will they be grateful? The rain just falls, one raindrop after another. Millions and billions of raindrops, only falling.This is the open secret of Zen. ~ Jakusho Kwong Roshi,
875:If future history is not to be just one damned thing after another in space, then what we really have to do is in some way overcome this linear experience of time that makes all existence a quest for something that will never be found.And philosophies such as Zen seem to hint that this is possible. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
876:Writing isn’t necessarily a gift it is a passion. You can write a one page masterpiece to 99 pages of crap. What keeps you coming back is that Zen moment when you enlightened your own self with a few cleverly arranged words and saved yourself a $200 trip to the shrink, by simply buying a #2 pencil. ~ Shannon L Alder,
877:I have a deep-seated distrust and even contempt for people who are driven by ambition to conquer the world … those who cannot control themselves and produce vast amounts of crap that no one cares about. I find it unattractive. I like the Zen artists: they’d do some work, and then they’d stop for a while. ~ Saul Leiter,
878:Trying to become a Buddha is easy but ending delusions is hard how many moonlit nights have I sat and felt the cold before dawn [2615.jpg] -- from The Zen Works of Stonehouse: Poems and Talks of a 14th Century Chinese Hermit, Translated by Red Pine

~ Shiwu (Stonehouse), Trying to become a Buddha is easy
,
879:With the near-death or clinical near-death phenomenon some people who are brought back from 'death' have reported being alive the entire time they were 'dead.' This phenomenon occurs among people with a wide diversity of religious belief and no religious belief at all - from atheists to Zen Buddhists. ~ John Ankerberg,
880:I could say I believe in every drop of rain that . . . Well, I believe life is a Zen koan, that is, an unsolvable riddle. But the contemplation of that riddle--even though it cannot be solved--is, in itself, transformative. And if the contemplation is of high enough quality, you can merge with the divine. ~ Tom Robbins,
881:The point is that each mental state, each moment of mind, is composed of a shifting array of properties that combine to flavor and define that state. There is a nice pithy Zen saying that makes the point: To her lover, a beautiful women is a delight; to an ascetic, a distraction; to a wolf, a good meal. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
882:Zen, on the other hand, is not so dogmatically sterile, though there are certainly traces and more than traces of this austerity. However, with Zen we have not only the void, but the fertile void. The ink lines in a sumi-e painting show this fertility of the void ever ready to brim over into existence. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
883:Do not do that again," he said stiffly. "Don't kiss me back then," I retorted. He stared at me for what seemed like forever. "I don't give 'Zen lessons' to hear myself talk. I don't give them because you're another student. I'm doing this to teach you control." "You're doing a great job," I said bitterly. ~ Richelle Mead,
884:...when you are constantly prevailing upon the kindness of strangers-as a hitchhiker must-it keeps you in a positive frame of mind. Call it Zen and the Art of Hitchhiking. The Way of the Lift. The chrysanthemum and the Thumb. Heady on beer and the sound of my own voice, the aphorisms spilled out unchecked. ~ Will Ferguson,
885:Many of the customers here are traveling all over the world so they need multiple types of clothes. That's one thing about Urban Zen - it is seasonless and it is timeless. So it's not about the fashion of a moment saying, "I have to have it now." It's something that you become a part of...sort of like a sari. ~ Donna Karan,
886:Once we awaken to the Tathagata-Zen, The six noble deeds and the ten thousand good actions Are already complete within us. In our dream we see the six levels of illusion clearly; After we awaken the whole universe is empty.

~ Hsuan Chueh of Yung Chia, 4 - Once we awaken to the Tathagata-Zen (from The Shodoka)
,
887:Taoism, Confucianism, and Zen are expressions of a mentality which feels completely at home in this universe, and which sees man as an integral part of his environment. Human intelligence is not an imprisoned spirit from afar but an aspect of the whole intricately balanced organism of the natural world [...]. ~ Alan W Watts,
888:There is a Zen story about a man riding a horse that is galloping very quickly. Another man, standing alongside the road, yells at him, "Where are you going?" and the man on the horse yells back, "I don't know. Ask the horse." I think that is our situation. We are riding many horses that we cannot control. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
889:There was a famous Zen master whom people would seek out to become enlightened. He was strict and would occupy people with things having nothing to do with seeking enlightenment. You see, that is the only way to achieve enlightenment; by not focusing on achieving it. Then, one day it will just come to you. ~ Masaaki Hatsumi,
890:Zen goes directly to your own experience of the oneness of the universe, of your interconnectedness with all things. You learn to distrust whatever you clung to in your old sense of separation, and that realization can be the most liberating thing in your life, a freedom beyond anything you could have imagined. ~ Jean Smith,
891:As we said, Zen masters talk about Emptiness all the time! But they have a practice and a methodology (zazen) which allows them to discover the transcendental referent via their own developmental signified, and thus their words (the signifiers) remain grounded in experiential, reproducible, fallibilist criteria. ~ Ken Wilber,
892:A walk with a two-year-old is very Zen; it is not about the end but the journey. He needs to pet the dog someone is walking; to roll down the slight incline to the church basement, and then roll again, and again, and again; to remind me of the place where the wasps (he calls them bees) live, then zoom past it. ~ Marc Aronson,
893:Past, present, future: unattainable, Yet clear as the moteless sky. Late at night the stool's cold as iron, But the moonlit window smells of plum. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Hakuin, Past, present, future- unattainable
,
894:Until today, it really pissed me off that I'd become this totally centered Zen Master, and nobody had noticed. Still, i'm doing the little FAX thing. I write little HAIKU things and FAX them around to everyone. When i pass people in the hall at work, I get toally ZEN right in everyone's hostile little FACE. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
895:Until today, it really pissed me off that I'd become this totally centered Zen Master and nobody had noticed. Still, I'm doing the little FAX thing. I write little HAIKU things and FAX them around to everyone. When I pass people in the hall at work, I get totally ZEN right in everyone's hostile little FACE. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
896:Well, I would have to say as a Christian that I believe any belief system, any world view, whether its Zen Buddhism or Hinduism or dialectical materialism for that matter, Marxism, that keeps persons captive and keeps them from coming to faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, yes, is a demonstration of satanic power. ~ Albert Mohler,
897:Not thinking about anything is zen. Once you know this, walking, standing, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is zen. To know that the mind is empty is to see the buddha.... Using the mind to reality is delusion. Not using the mind to look for reality is awareness. Freeing oneself from words is liberation. ~ Bodhidharma,
898:Philosophy is speculation, Zen is participation. Participate in the night leaving, participate in the evening coming, participate in the stars and participate in the clouds; make participation your lifestyle and the whole existence becomes such a joy, such an ecstasy. You could not have dreamed of a better universe. ~ Rajneesh,
899:For some people, being a Zen monk is the perfect expression. For others, drinking beer and calling meditation hogwash is the perfect expression. Some teachers will tell you to sweep the floor mindfully, and others will tell you that your mindful sweeping is only a dream. Life is wonderfully playful and diverse. ~ Joan Tollifson,
900:The Zen way of calligraphy is to write in the most straightforward, simple way as if you were a beginner, not trying to make something skillful or beautiful, but simply writing with full attention as if you were discovering what you were writing for the first time; then your full nature will be in your writing. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
901:Thomas had followed his passion to the Zen Mountain Monastery, believing, as many do, that the key to happiness is identifying your true calling and then chasing after it with all the courage you can muster. But as Thomas experienced that late Sunday afternoon in the oak forest, this belief is frighteningly naïve. ~ Cal Newport,
902:a well nobody dug filled with no water ripples and a shapeless weightless man drinks oh green green willow wonderfully red flower but I know the colors are not there [1796.jpg] -- from Crow With No Mouth: Fifteenth Century Zen Master Ikkyu, Translated by Stephen Berg

~ Ikkyu, a well nobody dug filled with no water
,
903:I got interested in Zen when I was a teenage beatnik on the streets of San Francisco. And it was my interest in Zen, in part, that got me into the Marine Corps, because that was a ticket to Asia. So I spent a couple of years on Okinawa and began reading and thinking about how I wanted to go about conducting my life. ~ Sam Hamill,
904:Do not do that again," he said stiffly.
"Don't kiss me back then," I retorted.
He stared at me for what seemed like forever. "I don't give 'Zen lessons' to hear myself talk. I don't give them because you're another student. I'm doing this to teach you control."
"You're doing a great job," I said bitterly. ~ Richelle Mead,
905:We took a bus to the nearby monastery of one of the last great Tang dynasty Chan masters, Yun-men. Yun-men was known for his pithy 'one word' Zen. When asked 'What is the highest teaching of the Buddha?' he replied: 'An appropriate statement.' On another occasion, he answered: 'Cake.' I admired his directness. ~ Stephen Batchelor,
906:We took a bus to the nearby monastery of one of the last great Tang dynasty Chan masters, Yun-men. Yun-men was known for his pithy “one word” Zen. When asked “What is the highest teaching of the Buddha?” he replied: “An appropriate statement.” On another occasion, he answered: “Cake.” I admired his directness. ~ Stephen Batchelor,
907:I use a Bruce Lee technique: "The way of no way". He had the idea that he would learn everything, so that whoever he had to fight, he could improvise anything. The best way of starting a gig is just to not think of anything - to clear your mind, not in an empty Zen state, but more just to go on and see where you go. ~ Eddie Izzard,
908:I think about death a lot, I really do, because I can't believe I won't exist. It's the ego isn't it? I feel that I should retreat into a better form of Zen Buddhism than this kind of ego-dominated thing. But I don't know, I mean, I want to come back as a tree but I suspect that it's just not going to happen, is it? ~ Kate Atkinson,
909:The monkey is reaching For the moon in the water. Until death overtakes him He'll never give up. If he'd let go the branch and Disappear in the deep pool, The whole world would shine With dazzling pureness. [1799.jpg] -- from Essential Teachings of Zen Master Hakuin, by Norman Waddell

~ Hakuin, The monkey is reaching
,
910:There is a director who should make 'Silver Surfer' - he is mentally committed to it. He's doing another movie now. What's most important to me about this guy, first, is that he's incredible with visuals. But he's also a spiritual guy, a Zen Buddhist. ... Galactus is a force of nature, not a being. That's all I'm saying. ~ Avi Arad,
911:An elegant simplicity is an understated, organic aesthetic that contrasts with the excess of consumerist lifestyles. Drawing from influences ranging from Zen to the Quakers, it celebrates natural materials and clean, functional expressions, such as are found in many of the hand-made arts and crafts from this community. ~ Duane Elgin,
912:Look at the moon before you point or speak Illuminating the sky an unstained round light If your face doesn't possess the monk's discerning eye You become blinded by evening rains of autumn [2472.jpg] -- from A Quiet Room: The Poetry of Zen Master Jakushitsu, Translated by Arthur Braverman

~ Jakushitsu, Rain in Autumn
,
913:What’s that mean?” Eddie asked. “I hate it when you start up with your Zen Buddhist shit, Roland.” “It means I don’t know,” Roland said. “Who is this man Zen Buddhist? Is he wise like me?” Eddie looked at Roland for a long, long time before deciding the gunslinger was making one of his rare jokes. “Ah, get outta here... ~ Stephen King,
914:After all, what Buddhism offers as a solution is universalised indifference - a learning of how to withdraw from too much empathy. This is why Buddhism can so easily turn into the very opposite of universal compassion: the advocacy of a ruthless military attitude, which is what the fate of Zen Buddhism aptly demonstrates. ~ Slavoj i ek,
915:CONTENTS Epigraph Characters Introduction: How This Book Came to Be CHAPTER ONE Childhood: Abandoned and Chosen CHAPTER TWO Odd Couple: The Two Steves CHAPTER THREE The Dropout: Turn On, Tune In . . . CHAPTER FOUR Atari and India: Zen and the Art of Game Design CHAPTER FIVE The Apple I: Turn On, Boot Up, Jack In . . . ~ Walter Isaacson,
916:The Zen masters have the right idea-no pain no gain: thwack a silly nebbish and he'll remember it far longer and more indelibly than any words you muster at him. Not absolutely everything can or should have to be explained, and particularly not to everybody. But a concussion is a value-judgment anyone gets the point of. ~ Kenny Smith,
917:Wrapped, surrounded by ten thousand mountains, Cut off, no place to go.... Until you're here, there's no way to get here. Once you're here, there's no way to go. [2159.jpg] -- from The Poetry of Zen: (Shambhala Library), Edited by Sam Hamill / Edited by J. P. Seaton

~ Yuan Mei, Wrapped, surrounded by ten thousand mountains
,
918:I learned more than one lesson at the 2006 Western States. One I hadn’t been expecting: No matter what you do, there are going to be haters out there. My Zen self tells me they’re no worse than people who idolize you for the wrong reasons. What people think about you doesn’t really matter. The trick is to be true to yourself. ~ Scott Jurek,
919:Neither seeking fame nor grieving my poverty I hide deep in the mountain far from worldly dust. Year ending cold sky who will befriend me? Plum blossom on a new branch wrapped in moonlight [2472.jpg] -- from A Quiet Room: The Poetry of Zen Master Jakushitsu, Translated by Arthur Braverman

~ Jakushitsu, Living in the Mountains
,
920:cuando uno ve las cosas sin percibir el fondo de naturaleza de Buda, todo parece tener forma de sufrimiento. Mas cuando se comprende el fondo de la existencia, uno se da cuenta de que el mismo sufrimiento es nuestra forma de vivir, de prolongar la vida. Por eso, en el Zen recalcamos a veces el desequilibrio o desorden de la vida. ~ Anonymous,
921:It took me a long time to reach the decision to retire, actually, from the Art Ensemble. But it seemed more important to me to share the vitality of Aikido and the vitality of Zen training with people, even though it would be a smaller number of people, it seemed to give them something that could last and improve their lives. ~ Joseph Jarman,
922:Everything was coming together by coming apart . . . It is the most difficult Zen practice to leave people to their destiny, even though it's painful - just loving them, and breathing with them, and distracting them in a sweet way, and laughing with them . . . if something was not my problem, I probably did not have the solution. ~ Anne Lamott,
923:Bodhidharma brought Zen Buddhism from India to China. He was well known for being fierce and uncompromising. There is a story about how he kept nodding off during meditation, so he cut off his eyelids. When he threw them on the ground, they turned into a tea plant, and then he realized he could simply drink the tea to stay awake! ~ Pema Ch dr n,
924:It was not a world Siew Tsin would have chosen to live in. But she did not want to be reborn, either, anymore than Junsheng did, anymore than all the other spirits showering gold and favours on hell officials so that they could stay where they were. Rebirth entailed a true death, the severing of one's memory and the loss of one's self. ~ Zen Cho,
925:If your creativity comes out of your silence, out of your Zen, out of your meditations, then it is authentic, original. If it comes only as an occupation because you are feeling lost and there is nothing to do - a long holiday, so you start doing something... That is not coming out of your silences, it is coming out of your crazy mind. ~ Rajneesh,
926:The whole essence of Zen consists in walking along the razor's edge of Now - to be so utterly, so completely present that no problem, no suffering, nothing that is not who you are in your essence, can survive in you. In the Now, in the absence of time, all your problems dissolve. Suffering needs time; it cannot survive in the Now. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
927:The Zen Buddhists have another way of saying pretty much the same thing: meditation is not something you think about; meditation is something you do. Same with well-being. No matter what ails you, you are not going to think your way out of it or read your way out of it. Living well is something you do. So then it’s not something we ~ John J Ratey,
928:To the branch's edge and the leaf's under surface be most attentive Its pervasive aroma envelopes people far away The realms of form and function can't contain it Spring leaks profusely through the basket [2472.jpg] -- from A Quiet Room: The Poetry of Zen Master Jakushitsu, Translated by Arthur Braverman

~ Jakushitsu, Gathering Tea
,
929:CONTENTS Epigraph Characters Introduction: How This Book Came to Be CHAPTER ONE Childhood: Abandoned and Chosen CHAPTER TWO Odd Couple: The Two Steves CHAPTER THREE The Dropout: Turn On, Tune In . . . CHAPTER FOUR Atari and India: Zen and the Art of Game Design CHAPTER FIVE The Apple I: Turn On, Boot Up, Jack In . . . CHAPTER SIX ~ Walter Isaacson,
930:The British are a peculiar race. My grandfather was transported to Malaya because they needed tin, and yet I’ve never once met a Briton to whom the thought had occurred that perhaps I spoke English because I am from one of their colonies. It is as if I were a piece of chess in a game played by people who never look down at their fingers. ~ Zen Cho,
931:The Taoist and Zen conception of perfection... the dynamic nature of their philosophy laid more stress upon the process through which perfection was sought than upon perfection itself. True beauty could be discovered only by one who mentally completed the incomplete. The virility of life and art lay in its possibilities for growth. ~ Kakuz Okakura,
932:To other scientists, the scientist who corrects a colleague’s error, or cites good reasons for seriously doubting his or her conclusions, performs a noble deed, like a Zen master who boxes the ears of a novice straying from the meditative path, although scientists correct one another more as equals than as master and student. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
933:It's something no on can force besides knowing it's there there's nothing to know the moon shines bright above the flowering plum but who can look past the blossoms [2615.jpg] -- from The Zen Works of Stonehouse: Poems and Talks of a 14th Century Chinese Hermit, Translated by Red Pine

~ Shiwu (Stonehouse), Its something no on can force
,
934:[I]t is typical of Zen that its style of action has the strongest feeling of commitment, of "follow-through." It enters into everything wholeheartedly and freely without having to keep an eye on itself. It does not confuse spirituality with thinking about God while one is peeling potatoes. Zen spirituality is just to peel the potatoes. ~ Alan W Watts,
935:Zen is a single step—the journey of one single step. You can call it the last step or the first step, it doesn’t matter. It is the first and it is the last, the alpha and the omega. The whole teaching of Zen consists of only one thing: how to take a jump into nothingness, how to come to the very end of your mind, which is the end of the world. ~ Osho,
936:A master's handiwork cannot be measured But still priests wag their tongues explaining the "Way" and babbling about "Zen." This old monk has never cared for false piety And my nose wrinkles at the dark smell of incense before the Buddha. [1795.jpg] -- from Wild Ways: Zen Poems of Ikkyu, Translated by John Stevens

~ Ikkyu, I Hate Incense
,
937:The famous Zen parable about the master for whom, before his studies, mountains were only mountains, but during his studies mountains were no longer mountains, and afterward mountains were again mountains could be interpreted as an allegory about [the perpetual paradox that when one is closest to a destination one is also the farthest). ~ Rebecca Solnit,
938:The woman leant forward, her eyes flashing, a smile both triumphant and tender curving her mouth.
"You are *my* daughter," she said. "Can there be any doubt that you will be brilliant -- audacious -- and free?"
The vision disappeared. She had been so vital, so overflowing with life and energy, that her going seemed to leave the room dark. ~ Zen Cho,
939:Fighting for one's freedom, struggling towards being free, is like struggling to be a poet or a good Christian or a good Jew or a good Muslim or good Zen Buddhist. You work all day long and achieve some kind of level of success by nightfall, go to sleep and wake up the next morning with the job still to be done. So you start all over again. ~ Maya Angelou,
940:finally I went over to an old cook in the doorway of the kitchen and asked him “Why did Bodhidharma come from the West?” (Bodhidharma was the Indian who brought Buddhism eastward to China.) “I don’t care,” said the old cook, with lidded eyes, and I told Japhy and he said, “Perfect answer, absolutely perfect. Now you know what I mean by Zen. ~ Jack Kerouac,
941:The Buddha, the Godhead, resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of the mountain, or in the petals of a flower. To think otherwise is to demean the Buddha - which is to demean oneself. ~ Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values,
942:Walking is Zen, sitting is Zen. Then what will be the quality? Watchfully alert, joyously unmotivated, centered, loving, flowing, one walks. And the walking is sauntering. Loving, alert, watchful, one sits, unmotivated - not sitting for anything in particular, just enjoying how beautiful just sitting doing nothing is, how relaxing, how restful. ~ Rajneesh,
943:Boredom has been used as a technique, it is a device. In Zen, boredom is used as a device: you are bored to death, and you are not allowed to escape. You are not to go outside, you are not to entertain yourself, you are not to do, you are not to talk, you are not to read novels and detective stories. No thrill. No possibility to escape anywhere. ~ Rajneesh,
944:We have much to beg forgiveness for,” Annys said. For once her expression was soft, her hawk-like eyes downcast.“We all do,” I said, “if not for this, than something else.”“That's very… Zen of you,” Master Dogan said. I laughed. “Don't get used to it. I'm pretty sure it's a near-death thing and will pass, but let's enjoy it while we can. ~ Christina Garner,
945:What Zen communicates is an awareness that is potentially already there but is not conscious of itself. Zen is then not Kerygma but realization, not revelation but consciousness, not news from the Father who sends His Son into this world, but awareness of the ontological ground of our own being here and now, right in the midst of the world. ~ Thomas Merton,
946:Suzuki had just finished giving a talk to a group of Zen students when someone in the audience said, “You’ve been talking about Buddhism for nearly an hour, and I haven’t been able to understand a thing you said. Could you say one thing about Buddhism I can understand?” After the laughter died down, Suzuki replied calmly, “Everything changes. ~ Phil Jackson,
947:They miss the Dharma-treasure; They lose accumulated power; And this disaster follows directly upon dualistic thinking. So Zen is the complete realization of mind, The complete cutting off of delusion, The power of wise vision penetrating directly to the unborn.

~ Hsuan Chueh of Yung Chia, 32 - They miss the Dharma-treasure (from The Shodoka)
,
948:It’s been said that the entire philosophical foundation of Zen is contained in three small words: “Not always so.” If you want to stop emotional eating (which means you’ll eat only out of physical hunger, which means you’ll eventually be the right weight for your body) you must become willing to apply those three words to your own beliefs. THE ~ Martha N Beck,
949:The Way of the Worrier 1. Don’t Be a Jerk 2. (And/But . . .) When Necessary, Hide the Zen 3. Meditate 4. The Price of Security Is Insecurity—Until It’s Not Useful 5. Equanimity Is Not the Enemy of Creativity 6. Don’t Force It 7. Humility Prevents Humiliation 8. Go Easy with the Internal Cattle Prod 9. Nonattachment to Results 10. What Matters Most? ~ Dan Harris,
950:I tried Zen and Ching, numerology, tarot cards and astrology. I tried to look back into the Bible, and could not find anything. At this time I did not know anything about Islam, and then, what I regarded as a miracle occurred. My brother had visited the mosque in Jerusalem, and was greatly impressed that while on the one hand it throbbed with life. ~ Cat Stevens,
951:To learn to be without desire you must desire that. Better to do as you please: sing idleness. Floating clouds, and water idly running -- Where's their source? In all the vastness of the sea and sky, you'll never find it. [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Yuan Mei, Mad Words
,
952:Why can't we simply borrow what is useful to us from Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, especially Zen, as we borrow from Christianity, science, American Indian traditions and world literature in general, including philosophy, and let the rest go hang? Borrow what we need but rely principally upon our own senses, common sense and daily living experience. ~ Edward Abbey,
953:The hungry are served a king's repast, And they cannot eat. The sick meet the king of doctors; Why don't they recover? The practice of Zen in this greedy world -- This is the power of wise vision. The lotus lives in the midst of the fire; It is never destroyed.

~ Hsuan Chueh of Yung Chia, 56 - The hungry are served a kings repast (from The Shodoka)
,
954:He had a tremendous propensity for getting lost when driving. This was largely because of his method of “Zen” navigation, which was simply to find any car that looked as if it knew where it was going and follow it. The results were more often surprising than successful, but he felt it was worth it for the sake of the few occasions when it was both. ~ Douglas Adams,
955:As far as vocal preparation goes, it's really an interesting thing for such a fragile instrument and using it properly is like walking a tightrope. I have learned not to do extensive warm-ups. It's really more of a cerebral mind-body connection Zen hippy thing, just knowing your body and figuring out if I do that then I will be able to speak tomorrow. ~ Davey Havok,
956:Many centuries after the Buddha, the Chinese Chan (Zen) patriarch Yunmen (c. 860–949) was asked: “What are the teachings of an entire lifetime?” Yunmen replied: “An appropriate statement.”6 For Yunmen, what counts is whether your words and deeds are an appropriate response to the situation at hand, not whether they accord with an abstract truth. ~ Stephen Batchelor,
957:Zen enriches no one. There is no body to be found. The birds may come and circle for a while in the place where it is thought to be. But they soon go elsewhere. When they are gone, the "nothing," the "no-body" that was there, suddenly appears. That is Zen. It was there all the time but the scavengers missed it, because it was not their kind of prey. ~ Thomas Merton,
958:En la meditación zen, por ejemplo, se intenta alcanzar la pura negatividad del «no-...», es decir, el vacío, liberándose del Algo atosigante que se impone. La negatividad del «no-...» constituye un proceso extremadamente activo, a saber, es todo menos pasividad. Es un ejercicio que consiste en alcanzar en sí mismo un punto de soberanía, en ser centro. ~ Byung Chul Han,
959:My ethics, my sense of morality, my work ethic, my sense of compassion for suffering humanity, all of that comes directly out of the practice of poetry, as does my Buddhist practice. Poetry is a very important element in the history of Buddhism in general and in Zen in particular. It was really Zen that motivated me to change the way I perceive the world. ~ Sam Hamill,
960:The thing about Zen is that it pushes contradictions to their ultimate limit where one has to choose between madness and innocence. And Zen. suggests that we may be driving toward one or the other on a cosmic scale. Driving toward them because, one way or the other, as madmen or innocents, we are already there. It might be good to open our eyes and see. ~ Thomas Merton,
961:The most important part of the practice is for the question to remain alive and for your whole body and mind to become a question. In Zen they say that you have to ask with the pores of your skin and the marrow of your bones. A Zen saying points out: Great questioning, great awakening; little questioning, little awakening; no questioning, no awakening. ~ Martine Batchelor,
962:When you're hurrying around too quickly," he had said, "there's a part of the world you can't see. If, for example, you're taking a wrong direction in your life, it's only when you stop and look at things clearly that you can revise your direction and take a more proper course. Then message of Zen is that in order to find ourselves, we've got to learn to stop. ~ Pico Iyer,
963:The tabloids wanted to know whether the dragon was receiving benefits. The gossip magazines claimed to have found a woman who was bearing the dragon's baby. The fashion magazines did spreads on draconian style. This apparently consisted of gaunt models with sunken eyes, swathed in clouds of chiffon and arranged in awkwardly erotic positions on piles of gold coins. ~ Zen Cho,
964:On these matters of specific fact, like is the mushroom an extraterrestrial and that sort of thing, I haven't the faintest idea. The mushroom itself is such a mercurial, elusive, Zen sort of personality that I never believe a word it says. I simply entertain its notions and try and sort through them, and I found that to be the most enriching approach to it. ~ Terence McKenna,
965:It looked like something some genius of metalwork—one of those little Zen guys who works only by the light of dawn and can beat a club sandwich of folded steels into something with the cutting edge of a scalpel and the stopping-power of a sex-crazed rhinoceros on bad acid—had made and then retired in tears because he’d never, ever, do anything so good again. ~ Terry Pratchett,
966:Someone once inquired of a Far Eastern Zen master, who had a great serenity and peace about him no matter what pressures he faced, "How do you maintain that serenity and peace?" He replied, "I never leave my place of meditation." He meditated early in the morning and for the rest of the day, he carried the peace of those moments with him in his mind and heart. ~ Stephen Covey,
967:I live part-time in a cabin in Colorado up in the mountains and part-time on a ranch in central Texas - but do I really know how to go brand a cow, or do I really know how to go rappelling down a cliff? No. I do the recreational, half-assed version of all these manly activities and then try to keep that kind of Zen masculinity, like, "I'm a man of nature." ~ David Gordon Green,
968:I am reading a terrible sententious book called The Wedding of Herbert Mimnaugh. Firstly, what sort of a name is Herbert and why would a parent with any trace of natural affection wish to afflict their child with such a name? Herbert's parents do not feature prominently in the book when this choice alone makes it obvious that they are the most interesting people in it. ~ Zen Cho,
969:Steve Jobs’s attitude toward wealth was complex. He was an antimaterialistic hippie who capitalized on the inventions of a friend who wanted to give them away for free, and he was a Zen devotee who made a pilgrimage to India and then decided that his calling was to create a business. And yet somehow these attitudes seemed to weave together rather than conflict. ~ Walter Isaacson,
970:The rest of the house had a casual California boho-beach vibe, with its distressed wood floors, ivory furniture, and gauzy curtains, but the bedroom was very Zen. Decorated in a cool palette of sage greens and charcoal grays, with a floor-to-ceiling window along one wall that looked over a tiny tranquility garden of stones and succulents, it was my little oasis. ~ J T Geissinger,
971:In the words of Chinese Zen master Layman P’ang (c. 740–808 A.D.): My daily affairs are quite ordinary; but I’m in total harmony with them. I don’t hold on to anything, don’t reject anything; nowhere an obstacle or conflict. Who cares about wealth and honor? Even the poorest thing shines. My miraculous power and spiritual activity: drawing water and carrying wood. ~ George Leonard,
972:Korea's first Zen Master-poet wrote simple yet elegant poetry of the world he inhabited, both physically and spiritually, and of daily insights-a pause along the way for a deep clear breath, a moon-viewing moment, a seasonal note or a farewell poem to a departing monk. His poems speak softly and clearly, like hearing a temple bell that was struck a thousand years ago. ~ Sam Hamill,
973:One of the main lessons of Zen is that we ordinarily see the world through a haze of preconceptions and fixed ideas that proceed from our desires. To achieve enlightenment, we must follow the Zen teaching not merely to let go of desire and attachment, but to experience reality exactly as it is—without the preconceptions and the fixed ideas getting in the way. This ~ Eric S Raymond,
974:Studying texts and stiff meditation can make you lose your Original Mind. A solitary tune by a fisherman, though, can be an invaluable treasure. Dusk rain on the river, the moon peeking in and out of the clouds; Elegant beyond words, he chants his songs night after night. [1795.jpg] -- from Wild Ways: Zen Poems of Ikkyu, Translated by John Stevens

~ Ikkyu, A Fisherman
,
975:The first point is that about impermanence. Bliss, peace, happiness, as well as their counterparts pain, chaos, and misery, are all transient phenomena, subject to conditions, arising and passing like the weather. As Zen says, the ten thousand joys and the ten thousand sorrows march through our lives according to the laws of reality that have always been in place. ~ Daniel M Ingram,
976:The image of the Zen philosopher is the monk up in the green, quiet hills, or in a beautiful temple on some rocky cliff. The Stoics are the antithesis of this idea. Instead, they are the man in the marketplace, the senator in the Forum, the brave wife waiting for her soldier to return from battle, the sculptor busy in her studio. Still, the Stoic is equally at peace. ~ Ryan Holiday,
977:If I was asked to get rid of the Zen aesthetic and just keep one quality necessary to create art, I would say it's trust. When you learn to trust yourself implicitly, you no longer need to prove something through your art. You simply allow it to come out, to be as it is. This is when creating art becomes effortless. It happens just as you grow your hair. It grows. ~ John Daido Loori,
978:Zen abhors repetition or imitation of any kind, for it kills. For the same reason Zen never explains, but only affirms. Life is fact and no explanation is necessary or pertinent. To explain is to apologize, and why should we apologize for living? To live—is that not enough? Let us then live, let us affirm! Herein lies Zen in all its purity and in all its nudity as well. ~ D T Suzuki,
979:Last month, Dean Sheeter (whose name usually transports Franny when I mention it) approached me with his gracious smile and bull whip, and I am now lecturing to the faculty, their wives, and a few oppressively-deep type undergraduates every Friday on Zen and Mahayana Buddhism. A feat, I haven’t a doubt, that will eventually earn me the Eastern Philosophy Chair in Hell. ~ J D Salinger,
980:Essentially Satori is a sudden experience, and it is often described as a "turning over" of the mind, just as a pair of scales will suddenly turn over when a sufficient amount of material has been poured into one pan to overbalance the weight in the other. Hence it is an experience which generally occurs after a long and concentrated effort to discover the meaning of Zen. ~ Alan Watts,
981:But the transformation of consciousness undertaken in Taoism and Zen is more like the correction of faulty perception or the curing of a disease. It is not an acquisitive process of learning more and more facts or greater and greater skills, but rather an unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. As Lao-tzu said, "The scholar gains every day, but the Taoist loses every day. ~ Alan Watts,
982:Sanity and enlightenment...I've been reading a new book Dogen's Genjo Koan: Three Commentaries, and it contains a commentary on Genjo Koan by Shunryu Suzuki, the author who wrote Zen Mind, Beginners Mind. He doesn't mention sanity at all but I think that one possible definition of enlightenment would be a kind of profound sanity, where being insane is no longer an option. ~ Brad Warner,
983:[F]or Zen there is no duality, no conflict between the natural element of chance and the human element of control. The constructive powers of the human mind are no more artificial than the formative actions of plants or bees, so that from the standpoint of Zen it is no contradiction to say that artistic technique is discipline in spontaneity and spontaneity in discipline. ~ Alan W Watts,
984:I am infinitely saddened to find myself suddenly surrounded in the west by a sense of terrible loss of nerve, a retreat from knowledge into–into what? Into Zen Buddhism; into falsely profound questions … into extrasensory perception and mystery. They do not lie along the line of what we are now able to know if we devote ourselves to it: an understanding of man himself. ~ Jacob Bronowski,
985:Prunella had once thought life in London would be all flirting and balls and dresses, hitting attentive suitors on the shoulder with a fan, and breakfasting late upon bowls of chocolate. She sighed now for her naïveté. Little had she known life in London was in fact all hexes and murder and thaumaturgical politics, and she would always be rising early for some reason or other! ~ Zen Cho,
986:This constant play of nature – one season comes, then goes, another one comes, then goes – is what life is all about. It’s not about some grand goal. Zen does not believe in that. Zen says, nirvana or moksha is simply a matter of perspective. If you can eat when you are eating, if you can sleep when you are sleeping, you are jivan-mukta, a liberated soul. You are enlightened. ~ Om Swami,
987:But the transformation of consciousness undertaken in Taoism and Zen is more like the correction of faulty perception or the curing of a disease. It is not an acquisitive process of learning more and more facts or greater and greater skills, but rather an unlearning of wrong habits and opinions. As Lao-tzu said, "The scholar gains every day, but the Taoist loses every day. ~ Alan W Watts,
988:All the time. A few months ago I came really close to losing it, I was getting really paranoid. And then I started a new job, things fixed themselves. I can't turn my back on the situation and ignore it. If tomorrow I say: "Okay, I've had enough, we're stopping everything" it won't change anything. Might as well try to accept it and stay zen as I have no control over it. ~ Robert Pattinson,
989:The secret of this kind of climbing, is like Zen. Don't think. Just dance along. It's the easiest thing in the world, actually easier than walking on flat ground which is monotonous. The cute little problems present themselves at each step and yet you don't hesitate and you find yourself on some other boulder you picked out for no special reason at all, just like zen.~ Japhy ~ Jack Kerouac,
990:Every day, priests minutely examine the Law And endlessly chant complicated sutras. Before doing that, though, they should learn How to read the love letters sent by the wind and rain, the snow and moon. [bk1sm.gif] -- from Ikkyu and the Crazy Cloud Anthology: A Zen Poet of Medieval Japan, by Ikkyu / Translated by Sonya Arutzen

~ Ikkyu, Every day, priests minutely examine the Law
,
991:Music comes closest to meditation. Music is a way towards meditation and the most beautiful way. Meditation is the art of hearing the soundless sound, the art of hearing the music of silence – what Zen people call the sound of one hand clapping. And silence has a music of its own, it is not dead, it is very much alive, it is tremendously alive. In fact, nothing is more alive than silence. ~ Osho,
992:The basic idea of Zen is to come in touch with the inner workings of our being, and to do this in the most direct way possible, without resorting to anything external or superadded. Therefore, anything that has the semblance of an external authority is rejected by Zen. Absolute faith is placed in a man's own inner being. For whatever authority there is in Zen, all comes from within. ~ D T Suzuki,
993:A whole life without speaking, "a thunderous silence" that was Wei-ma's Way. And here is a place where no monk can preach. I understand now what T'ao Ch'ien, enlightened, said, he couldn't say. It's so clear, here, this water my teacher. [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Yuan Mei, Gone Again to Gaze on the Cascade
,
994:The secret of this kind of climbing, is like Zen. Don't think. Just dance along. It's the easiest thing in the world, actually easier than walking on flat ground which is monotonous. The cute little problems present themselves at each step and yet you don't hesitate and you find yourself on some other boulder you picked out for no special reason at all, just like zen.~ Jack Kerouac Japhy ~ Jack Kerouac,
995:I heard Zen teacher one time talking about abortion, and he was saying the way that abortion makes bad karma is any time the person involved pretends that there's not a cost to the choice, one way or the other; whether you get it or don't get it, there's a cost. That's just basic responsibility, to admit that there's a cost. And the bad karma is when you pretend that the thing is free. ~ George Saunders,
996:Most of the time I smile old men can relax my mind is free of troubles nothing but mountains meet my eyes the P'eng soars into the sky a leopard blends into mist I'm more like the flowering plum I wait for the year-end cold [2615.jpg] -- from The Zen Works of Stonehouse: Poems and Talks of a 14th Century Chinese Hermit, Translated by Red Pine

~ Shiwu (Stonehouse), Most of the time I smile
,
997:I can pinpoint the moment when my first band recorded, when I was 14 and 15 years old. I always enjoyed writing songs and playing, but there was something about going in and capturing it that felt very Zen and perfect for me. A light switch went on and I just realized that's where my musical capacity was the most suited. I just followed on blind faith that that was like a calling for me. ~ John Congleton,
998:So I’ve held on to Catholicism or Zen, as practices, as fantasy futures, as possible identities. But when I actually dare to lower myself down into this emptiness—no, that sounds entirely too dualistic and willful and “courageous”—but when this seeing suddenly happens and thought relaxes, Zen drops completely away, and something much deeper is contacted, some entirely other way of being. ~ Joan Tollifson,
999:This deep not-knowing, in this case the Second Patriarch’s inability to find his anguished mind, takes the notion of agnosticism down to another depth. One might call it a contemplative depth. Such deep agnostic metaphors are likewise found in such terms as wu hsin (no mind), and wu nien (no thought), as well as in the more popular “don’t know mind” of the Korean Zen master Seung Sahṇ ~ Stephen Batchelor,
1000:Zen is really just a reminder to stay alive and to be awake. We tend to daydream all the time, speculating about the future and dwelling on the past. Zen practice is about appreciating your life in this moment. If you are truly aware of five minutes a day, then you are doing pretty well. We are beset by both the future and the past, and there is no reality apart from the here and now. ~ Peter Matthiessen,
1001:One view of photography is that it is a zen-like act which captures reality with its pants down - so that the vital click shows the anatomy bare. In this, the photographer is invisible but essential. A computer releasing the shutter would always miss the special moment that the human sensibility can register. For this work, the photographer's instinct is his aid, his personality a hindrance. ~ Peter Brook,
1002:I'm a practicing Zen Buddhist and I'm influenced by my readings in that tradition, such as the notion that everyone is born a perfect being and we spend most of our lives with a clouded vision trying to realize our perfection," he says. At critical moments in the book, T.S. registers his inkling of this realization. When he makes his maps, it feels like taking down dictation from the universe. ~ Reif Larsen,
1003:The future is just your hope, expectation. And when this life is not fulfilling you start looking further, beyond death. All these are fictions just for you to survive somehow. But this survival is not how you are supposed to be. Existence has not given you birth just to live in hopes. You can be really ecstatic this moment, and there is no other moment. Meditation is, Zen is living now and here. ~ Rajneesh,
1004:Regarding R. H. Blyth: Blyth's four volume Haiku became especially popular at this time [1950's] because his translations were based on the assumption that the haiku was the poetic expression of Zen. Not surprisingly, his books attracted the attention of the Beat school, most notably writers such as Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder and Jack Kerouac, all of whom had a prior interest in Zen. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
1005:The practice of Zen mind is beginner's mind. The innocence of the first inquiry—what am I?—is needed throughout Zen practice. The mind of the beginner is empty, free of the habits of the expert, ready to accept, to doubt, and open to all the possibilities. It is the kind of mind which can see things as they are, which step by step and in a flash can realize the original nature of everything. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
1006:Epigraph Characters Introduction: How This Book Came to Be CHAPTER ONE Childhood: Abandoned and Chosen CHAPTER TWO Odd Couple: The Two Steves CHAPTER THREE The Dropout: Turn On, Tune In . . . CHAPTER FOUR Atari and India: Zen and the Art of Game Design CHAPTER FIVE The Apple I: Turn On, Boot Up, Jack In . . . CHAPTER SIX The Apple II: Dawn of a New Age CHAPTER SEVEN Chrisann and Lisa: He Who ~ Walter Isaacson,
1007:Zen is really extraordinarily simple as long as one doesn't try to be cute about it or beat around the bush! Zen is simply the sensation and the clear understanding ... that there is behind the multiplicity of events and creatures in this universe simply one energy -- and it appears as you, and everything is it. The practice of Zen is to understand that one energy so as to "feel it in your bones. ~ Alan Watts,
1008:Zen purposes to discipline the mind itself, to make it its own master, through an insight into its proper nature. This getting into the real nature of one's own mind or soul is the fundamental object of Zen Buddhism. Zen, therefore, is more than meditation and Dhyana in its ordinary sense. The discipline of Zen consists in opening the mental eye in order to look into the very reason of existence. ~ D T Suzuki,
1009:A very enjoyable meditation on the curious thing called 'Zen' -not the Japanese religious tradition but rather the Western clich of Zen that is embraced in advertising, self-help books, and much more. . . . Yamada, who is both a scholar of Buddhism and a student of archery, offers refreshing insight into Western stereotypes of Japan and Japanese culture, and how these are received in Japan. ~ Alexander Gardner,
1010:What interests me is to paint the kind of antisensitivity that impregnates modern civilization. I think art since Cezanne has become extremely romantic and unrealistic, feeding on art. It is Utopian. It has less and less to do with the world. It looks inward - neo-Zen and all that. Pop Art looks out into the world. It doesn't look like a painting of something, it looks like the thing itself. ~ Roy Lichtenstein,
1011:I think I can pinpoint the moment when my first band recorded, when I was 14 and 15 years old. I always enjoyed writing songs and playing, but there was something about going in and capturing it that felt very Zen and perfect for me. A light switch went on and I just realized that's where my musical capacity was the most suited. I just followed on blind faith that that was like a calling for me. ~ John Congleton,
1012:One famous Zen master actually described spiritual practice as “one mistake after another,” which is to say, one opportunity after another to learn. It is from “difficulties, mistakes, and errors” that we actually learn. To live life is to make a succession of errors. Understanding this can bring us great ease and forgiveness for ourselves and others—we are at ease with the difficulties of life. ~ Jack Kornfield,
1013:Since before anyone remembers it has been clear shining like silver though the moonlight penetrates it and the wind ruffles it no trace of either remains Today I would not dare to expound the secret of the stream bed But I can tell you that the blue dragon is coiled there. [2207.jpg] -- from Roaring Stream: A New Zen Reader, Edited by Nelson Foster / Edited by Josh Shoemaker

~ Muso Soseki, Old Creek
,
1014:A handful of men working within the Zen sect of Buddhism created gardens in fifteenth-century Japan which were, and still are, far more than merely an aesthetic expression. And what is left of the earlier Mogul gardens in India suggests that their makers were acquainted with what lay behind the flowering of the Sufi movement in High Asia and so sought to add further dimensions to their garden scenes. ~ Russell Page,
1015:It is true, the Zen-man’s contempt for conventional and formalistic social custom is a healthy phenomenon, but it is healthy only because it presupposes a spiritual liberty based on freedom from passion, egotism and self-delusion. A pseudo-Zen attitude which seeks to justify a complete moral collapse with a few rationalizations based on the Zen Masters is only another form of bourgeois self-deception. ~ Thomas Merton,
1016:I think real enlightenment is total sanity, a kind of acceptance of what actually is. It does involve a kind of different way of looking at things. As I've done this Zen practice for years and years, I've acquired what I realize is an almost upside down view of life compared to what most people think, which is just what I used to think it was too. It's not really an insane view, at least I hope it's not. ~ Brad Warner,
1017:Buddha is said to have given a "silent sermon" once during which he held up a flower and gazed at it. After a while, one of those present, a monk called Mahakasyapa, began to smile. He is said to have been the only one who had understood the sermon. According to legend, that smile (that is to say, realization) was handed down by twenty-eight successive masters and much later became the origin of Zen. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
1018:That is a goal, to step out on stage and to actually be present. Honestly alive and present. Although, it doesn't always happen. We're fallible, we're imperfect. That's what a lot of books are written about; that's what a lot of religions have sought after is that kind of zen mentality of just being totally neutral and open and vulnerable to all of the forces in the universe without being attached to them. ~ Dan Mangan,
1019:When Dae Ju first came to Zen Master Ma-jo, the Master asked him, "What do you want from me?" Dae Ju said, "I want you to teach me the Dharma." "What a fool you are!" said Ma-jo. "You have the great- est treasure in the world within you, and yet you go around asking other people for help. What good is this? I have noth- ing to give you." Dae Ju bowed and said, "Please, Master, tell me what this treasure is. ~ Anonymous,
1020:If you are thinking, you can't understand Zen. Anything that can be written in a book, anything that can be said - all this is thinking . . . but if you read with a mind that has cut off all thinking, then Zen books, sutras and Bibles are all the truth. So is the barking of a dog or the crowing of a rooster. All things are teaching you at every moment, and these sounds are even better teaching than Zen books. ~ Seungsahn,
1021:If you exchanged wedding vows, tape them to your bathroom mirror and read them aloud to yourself every morning along with the ritual brushing of teeth. It's not realistic to believe that you will live your promises as a daily practice -- unless you're a saint or a highly evolved Zen Buddhist. Not where marriage is concerned. But you can make a practice of returning to your vows when the going gets rough. ~ Harriet Lerner,
1022:Just before Ninakawa passed away, Zen-master Ikkyu visited him. “Shall I lead you on?” Ikkyu asked. Ninakawa replied: “I came here alone and I go alone. What help could you be to me?” Ikkyu answered: “If you think you really come and go, that is your delusion. Let me show you the path on which there is no coming and no going.” With his words, Ikkyu had revealed the path so clearly that Ninakawa smiled and passed away ~ Osho,
1023:La gente, especialmente la gente joven, piensa que la libertad consiste en hacer lo que a cada uno le da la gana, que en el Zen no se necesitan reglas. Pero para nosotros es absolutamente necesario guardar ciertas reglas. Esto no significa estar siempre bajo control. Mientras se siguen reglas hay siempre oportunidad de liberarse. Tratar de obtener la libertad sin tener conciencia de las reglas no significa nada. ~ Anonymous,
1024:Zen, like life, defies exact definition, but its essence is the experience, moment by moment, of our own existence -- a natural, spontaneous encounter, unclouded by the suppositions and expectations that come between us and reality. It is, if you like, a paring down of life until we see it as it really is, free from our illusions; it is merely a divestment of ourselves until we recognize our own true nature. ~ David Fontana,
1025:It’s interesting to look at your children as line-in Zen masters who can put their finger on places where you’re resistant, or thinking narrowly, in ways noone else can. You can either lose your mind and your authenticity in the process of reacting to all that stuff, or you can use it as the perfect opportunity to grow and nourish your children by attending to what is deepest and best in them and in yourself. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
1026:Like a Zen master, she reduced to the essences: I do not need to walk around the Museum of Fine Arts; I do not need to be pushed around the MFA in the chair; I do not need the MFA at all, because its treasures, as I love them, are imprinted in my memory; and if they are wrongly memorized-a lily where there are tulips, the boy's torn hat rakish at the wrong angle-then this only makes the pictures the more mine. ~ Claire Messud,
1027:When I was working at Omega, I took this Zen retreat, where you're quiet, you don't say anything for a week, and this guy there said, "You're going to be enlightened at the end of this week, that's my goal." I was the engineer, so I was recording everything at it was happening, but I was also participating, because I felt like it. So at the end of it, I did understand what enlightenment was, one-hundred percent. ~ Larkin Grimm,
1028:A belligerent samurai, an old Japanese tale goes, once challenged a Zen master to explain the concept of heaven and hell. But the monk replied with scorn, “You’re nothing but a lout— I can’t waste my time with the likes of you!” His very honor attacked, the samurai flew into a rage and, pulling his sword from its scabbard, yelled, “I could kill you for your impertinence.”“That,” the monk calmly replied, “is hell. ~ Daniel Goleman,
1029:In an isolated space, humans would submit to power and authority, while those in dominant positions would wield it without restriction. Analysis of this phenomenon, known as "obedience to authority," yielded shocking results. Surprisingly, this deference had nothing to do with a person's rationality, sensibility, or personality but instead the product of remarkable deindividuation triggered by the assignment of roles. ~ Carlo Zen,
1030:In the assemblies of the enlightened ones there have been many cases of mastering the Way bringing forth the heart of plants and trees; this is what awakening the mind for enlightenment is like. The fifth patriarch of Zen was once a pine-planting wayfarer; Rinzai worked on planting cedars and pines on Mount Obaku. . . . Working with plants, trees, fences and walls, if they practice sincerely they will attain enlightenment. ~ Dogen,
1031:Vegetarianism and Zen Buddhism, meditation and spirituality, acid and rock—Jobs rolled together, in an amped-up way, the multiple impulses that were hallmarks of the enlightenment-seeking campus subculture of the era. And even though he barely indulged it at Reed, there was still an undercurrent of electronic geekiness in his soul that would someday combine surprisingly well with the rest of the mix. Robert Friedland ~ Walter Isaacson,
1032:The secret of this kind of climbing,” said Japhy, “is like Zen. Don’t think. Just dance along. It’s the easiest thing in the world, actually easier than walking on flat ground which is monotonous. The cute little problems present themselves at each step and yet you never hesitate and you find yourself on some other boulder you picked out for no special reason at all, just like Zen.” Which it was. We didn’t talk much now. ~ Jack Kerouac,
1033:I have sort of a Zen body philosophy, I'm sort of like: we're one weight one day, we're one weight another day, and some day our body just doesn't even exist at all! It's just a vessel I've been given to move through this life. I think about my body as a tool to do the stuff I need to do, but not the be all and end all of my existence. Which sounds like I spent a week at a meditation retreat, but it's genuinely how I feel. ~ Lena Dunham,
1034:There is something rejuvenating in the possession of Zen. The spring flowers look prettier, and the mountain stream runs cooler and more transparent. The subjective revolution that brings about this state of things cannot be called abnormal. When life becomes more enjoyable and its expense broadens to include the universe itself, there must be something in *satori* that is quite precious and well worth one's striving after. ~ D T Suzuki,
1035:The worst thing was that even if you did your own job, if your teammate failed to do theirs, you could be blown away along with them. And yet, if you focused only on strengthening your own defenses, someone else could get killed. All we could do was trust our teammates, and those who failed were mercilessly culled. We'd been thrown into an extreme situation that was just like the front lines. In the end, we barely slept at all. ~ Carlo Zen,
1036:Zen says that if you drop knowledge - and within knowledge everything is included; your name, your identity, everything, because this has been given to you by others - if you drop all that has been given by others, you will have a totally different quality to your being: innocence. This will be a crucifixion of the persona, the personality, and there will be a resurrection of your innocence. You will become a child again, reborn. ~ Rajneesh,
1037:Poem by Stonehouse

"I was a Zen monk who didn't know Zen
so I chose the woods for the years I had left
a robe made of patches over my body
a belt of bamboo around my waist
mountains and streams explain Bodhidharma's meaning
flower smiles and birdsongs reveal the hidden key
sometimes I sit on a flat-topped rock
after midnight cloudless nights when the moon fills the sky"

Translated by Red Pine ~ Red Pine,
1038:Some of the gardeners, Nanao said, worked according to the precepts of Muso Soseki, others according to other Japanese Zen masters; others still to Fu Hsi, the legendary inventor of the Chinese system of geomancy called feng shui; others to Persian gardening gurus, including Omar Khayyam; or to Leopold or Jackson, or other early American ecologists, like the nearly forgotten biologist Oskar Schnelling; and so on. These ~ Kim Stanley Robinson,
1039:Lone mountain dominating three provinces White clouds cover a green peak Summit soaring to great heights Old temple nearly a thousand years A monk meditates alone in a moonlit hall A monkey cries in the mist in an old tree Saying to worldly folk: "Come here; free yourselves of karmic dust." [2472.jpg] -- from A Quiet Room: The Poetry of Zen Master Jakushitsu, Translated by Arthur Braverman

~ Jakushitsu, A Visit to Hattoji Temple
,
1040:The concept of minimalism is to relax. Like a Zen monk in training, it is something that brings equilibrium to the heart. I don't necessarily think it has any problems, but if I were to force myself to name one, I would say that since the minimalist feeling already includes its own universe, I think it might kill the drive that we would otherwise have to commit the physically impossible and attempt to travel into outer space. ~ Takashi Murakami,
1041:If we had the consciousness of a cat or a dog, we would have it in us to become perfect Zen masters. We could gnaw on a bone, take a nap, play with a spider until we killed it, get our litter just right, and be innocently and serenely present. Meaning would mean nothing to us, nor would we need it to mean anything. We would be free, and we would be spared. But, we are human beings, and we posses that odd duck – human consciousness. ~ Eric Maisel,
1042:I nevertheless understood at that second the ancient obsession of the God-fearing for another kind of fear: the thrill of exorcism, the mindless whirl of Dervish possession, and the almost erotic surrender of seance, speaking in tongues, and Zen Gnostic trance. I realized at that instant just how surely the affirmation of demons or the summoning of Satan somehow can affirm the reality of their mystic antithesis -the God of Abraham. ~ Dan Simmons,
1043:Meditation can occur anywhere. You don’t have to run for a cushion.(In fact, at many Zen centers, it’s usual for people to practice meditation while working, walking, or eating as well as while sitting. ) Meditation is simply collecting the mind. While driving a car, you can collect the mind. In a conversation with your boss, you can collect the mind. While preparing an apple pie or writing a letter, you can collect the mind. [  ] ~ Anonymous,
1044:Indeed, it seems the prescription for highest software productivity is almost a Zen paradox; if you want the most efficient production, you must give up trying to make programmers produce. Handle their subsistence, give them their heads, and forget about deadlines. To a conventional manager this sounds crazily indulgent and doomed — but it is exactly the recipe with which the open-source culture is now clobbering its competition. ~ Eric S Raymond,
1045:In the potential of absurdity, hiding in the disparate combination of the various different subjects which in themselves are nothing but daily items equally in the exclusive representation of a normal item taken out of their usual context, is by far the most radical - in its effect comparable to a Japanese Zen koan - paradox to be witnessed, which modern art has produced, one of the most forceful impulses that generated from it. ~ Antoni Tapies,
1046:(I saw in the mist a little village of a few tiled roofs and joyfully admired it.) There's a stream, and there's bamboo, there's mulberry and hemp. Mist-hid, clouded hamlet, a mild, tranquil place. Just a few tilled acres. Just a few tiled roofs. How many lives would I have to live, to get that simple. [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Yuan Mei, Nearing Hao-pa
,
1047:Here’s a typical list: Song of Solomon (for Michael Jordan), Things Fall Apart (Bill Cartwright), Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (John Paxson), The Ways of White Folks (Scottie Pippen), Joshua: A Parable for Today (Horace Grant), Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind (B.J. Armstrong), Way of the Peaceful Warrior (Craig Hodges), On the Road (Will Perdue), and Beavis & Butt-Head: This Book Sucks (Stacey King). Some players read every ~ Phil Jackson,
1048:If a factory is torn down but the rationality which produced it is left standing, then that rationality will simply produce another factory. If a revolution destroys a government, but the systematic patterns of thought that produced that government are left intact, then those patterns will repeat themselves. . . . There’s so much talk about the system. And so little understanding. —ROBERT PIRSIG, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance ~ Anonymous,
1049:Emperor Wu asked Bodhidharma, the founder of Zen Buddhism in China, how much merit he had earned by building temples all over the country. Bodhidharma said, “None whatsoever.” But if you wash one dish in mindfulness, if you build one small temple while dwelling deeply in the present moment — not wanting to be anywhere else, not caring about fame or recognition — the merit from that act will be boundless, and you will feel very happy. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1050:I make sure I have the best: I figure you could spend $800 on an outfit you wear three times, but with your hair it's there all the time. I also think it is really important to look after your colour once it's been done. I try and give my hair a really nourishing mask every so often to combat against all the styling. I also love to have beauty treatments that really benefit, like massages. t's divine to get up and feel all zen and relaxed. ~ Cat Deeley,
1051:This body's lifetime is like a bubble's may as well let things go plans and events seldom agree who can step back doesn't worry we blossom and fade like flowers we gather and part like clouds earthly thoughts I forgot long ago withering away on a mountain peak [2615.jpg] -- from The Zen Works of Stonehouse: Poems and Talks of a 14th Century Chinese Hermit, Translated by Red Pine

~ Shiwu (Stonehouse), This bodys lifetime is like a bubbles
,
1052:These belief systems have to be dropped. Then understanding arises; then readiness to explore, then innocence, arises. Then you are surrounded by a sense of mystery, awe, wonder. Then life is no longer a known thing, it is an adventure. It is so mysterious that you can go on exploring; there is no end to it. And you never create any belief, you remain in a state of not-knowing. On that not-knowing state Sufis insist very much, and so do Zen masters. ~ Osho,
1053:If a factory is torn down but the rationality which produced it is left standing, then that rationality will simply produce another factory. If a revolution destroys a government, but the systematic patterns of thought that produced that government are left intact, then those patterns will repeat themselves. . . . There’s so much talk about the system. And so little understanding. —ROBERT PIRSIG, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance ~ Donella H Meadows,
1054:The struggle between good and evil / is the primal disease of the mind,” wrote the sixth-century Zen master Seng-ts’an, who knew what he was talking about. It is all too easy to see ourselves as fighting on God’s side, to identify our ideology with what is best for the world and use it to justify crusades, pogroms, or preemptive attacks. Projecting evil onto the world makes me unassailably right—a position as dangerous in politics as in marriage. ~ Anonymous,
1055:Much, much more important, though, Seymour had already begun to believe (and I agreed with him, as far as I was able to see the point) that education by any name would smell as sweet, and maybe much sweeter, if it didn't begin with a quest for knowledge at all but with a quest, as Zen would put it, for no-knowledge. Dr. Suzuki says somewhere that to be in a state of pure consciousness- satori- is to be with God before he said, Let there be light. ~ J D Salinger,
1056:planteamiento. Era un pensador lineal y, según el zen, el pensamiento lineal no es más que una ilusión, una de las muchas que nos hacen infelices. Según el zen, la realidad no es lineal. No hay futuro, no hay pasado. Todo es ahora. Daba la sensación de que en todas las religiones el yo fuera un obstáculo, un enemigo. Y sin embargo el zen declara claramente que el yo no existe. El yo es un espejismo, un sueño febril, y nuestra obstinada creencia en ~ Phil Knight,
1057:But when you're in front of an audience and you make them laugh at a new idea, you're guiding the whole being for the moment. No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It's very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open, completely themselves when that message hits the brain and the laugh begins. That's when new ideas can be implanted. If a new idea slips in at that moment, it has a chance to grow. ~ George Carlin,
1058:an evening sitting under the eaves of the pines at night sleeping in Bamboo Lodge the sky so clear you'd say it was drugs meditation so deep, thought I'd gone home to the hills but Clever can't beat Stupid and Quick won't match Quiet Untoiling-ness! (you just can't pave the Way) that's it! the Gate of Mystery! [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Po Chu-i, Staying at Bamboo Lodge
,
1059:But when you're in front of an audience and you make them laugh at a new idea, you're guiding the whole being for the moment. No one is ever more him/herself than when they really laugh. Their defenses are down. It's very Zen-like, that moment. They are completely open, completely themselves when that message hits the brain and the laugh begins. That's when new ideas can be implanted. If a new idea slips in at that moment, it has a chance to grow. ~ George Carlin,
1060:Even if it doesn't have anything to do with the current mission, that human tendency toward certain modes of thinking must be important for mental stability.
We need to believe in freedom, fairness, and the market. Humans are political animals by nature.
If that's the case... we should act politically as well, competing freely and fairly in the market.
...
Conversely, in an environment where there is no market, there's no need to play fair. ~ Carlo Zen,
1061:NOLAN BUSHNELL. Founder of Atari and entrepreneurial role model for Jobs. BILL CAMPBELL. Apple marketing chief during Jobs’s first stint at Apple and board member and confidant after Jobs’s return in 1997. EDWIN CATMULL. A cofounder of Pixar and later a Disney executive. KOBUN CHINO. A Sōtō Zen master in California who became Jobs’s spiritual teacher. LEE CLOW. Advertising wizard who created Apple’s “1984” ad and worked with Jobs for three decades. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1062:We will be entering the beautiful world of a Zen master's no-mind. Sosan is the third Zen Patriarch. Nothing much is known about him- this is as it should be, because history records only violence. History does not record silence- it cannot record it. All records are of disturbance. Whenever someone becomes really silent, he disappears from all records, he is no more a part of our madness. So it is as it should be.

Ch. 1: The Great Way Is Not Difficult ~ Osho,
1063:A deluded mind is hell.
Without delusions.
the mind is the country of the Buddhas.
When the mind creates the idea of the mind.
people are deluded and in hell.

Those established on the path to Buddhahood
dont use the mind to create the idea
of the mind and so are always
in the country of the Buddhas.

Bodhidharma



From: The Wisdom of the Zen Masters

Edited: Timothy Freke

~ Bodhidharma, A deluded Mind
,
1064:In a Zen retreat we have a format for working with these quicksilver changes: we sit with them, we pay attention to them... Being steady with mindfulness as an anchor for all the changes we go through is the way we practice forbearance. And you can employ this same method anywhere anytime: just pay close attention to the details of what is going on internally and externally. Don't flinch, don't run away. Trust what happens. Take your stand there." (71) ~ Norman Fischer,
1065:Her bulk seemed to fill the world, blocking out the horizon and casting a shadow over the magicians huddled on the wall. The enchantment appeared to encompass everything upon her person, for as she grew, so did the fronds of seaweed draped over her, and the pretty amber pendant on her breast expanded till it was itself the height and breadth of a grown man.
"Midsommer!" roared Lord Burrow. "Look to your wife!"
"He can hardly miss her", remarked Prunella. ~ Zen Cho,
1066:I’ve always enjoyed this time, early in the morning, gazing intently at a pure white canvas. “Canvas Zen” is my term for it. Nothing is painted there yet, but it’s more than a simple blank space. Hidden on that white canvas is what must eventually emerge. As I look more closely, I discover various possibilities, which congeal into a perfect clue as to how to proceed. That’s the moment I really enjoy. The moment when existence and nonexistence coalesce. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1067:There is a story in Zen circles about a man and a horse. The horse is galloping quickly, and it appears that the man on the horse is going somewhere important. Another man standing alongside the road, shouts, «Where are you going?» and the first man replies, «I don't know! Ask the horse!» This is also our story. We are riding a horse, and we don't know where we are going and we can't stop. The horse is our habit energy pulling us along, and we are powerless. ~ Nhat Hanh,
1068:Zen's greatest contribution is to give you an alternative to the serious man. The serious man has made the world, the serious man has made all the religions. He has created all the philosophies, all the cultures, all the moralities; everything that exists around you is a creation of the serious man. Zen has dropped out of the serious world. It has created a world of its own which is very playful, full of laughter, where even great masters behave like children. ~ Rajneesh,
1069:The koan is not a conundrum to be solved by a nimble wit. It is not a verbal psychiatric device for shocking the disintegrated ego of a student into some kind of stability. Nor, in my opinion, is it ever a paradoxical statement except to those who view it from outside. When the koan is resolved it is realized to be a simple and clear statement made from the state of consciousness which it has helped to awaken. —from The Zen Koan, by Ruth Fuller Sasaki ~ James Ishmael Ford,
1070:It's pretentious to say, but my art is like a little Zen story, a story with a question mark at the end. People can take from it what they need. If somebody says, "Your art is very funny," I say, "You are totally right." If somebody says, "Your art is very sad," I say, "You are totally right." In Japan they say, "Your art is very Japanese, you even look Japanese.Your great-grandfather was most surely a Japanese man." And I say, "You are totally right." ~ Christian Boltanski,
1071:Instead of Gnostics, we have Existentialists and God-is-dead theologians, instead of Neo-Platonists, devotees of Zen, instead of desert hermits, heroin addicts and Beats (who also, oddly enough, seem averse to washing), instead of mortification of the flesh, sado-masochistic pornography; as for our public entertainments, the fare offered by television is still a shade less brutal than that provided by the Amphitheatre, but only a shade and may not be so for long. ~ W H Auden,
1072:Laughter. Yes, laughter is the Zen attitude towards death and towards life too, because life and death are not separate. Whatsoever is your attitude towards life will be your attitude towards death, because death comes as the ultimate flowering of life. Life exists for death. Life exists through death. Without death there will be no life at all. Death is not the end but the culmination, the crescendo. Death is not the enemy it is the friend. It makes life possible. ~ Rajneesh,
1073:Jared had his back to the wall, which Kami thought was a reflex when he was uncomfortable. She wanted to shield him. “He was doing some—Zen jogging,” she claimed. Jared flicked her an incredulous glance. “Yes,” he said slowly. “Zen jogging. I wasn’t wearing that many clothes because—that’s part of the process. You’re meant to commune with the elements. Normally, I wouldn’t have worn my jeans, but I put them on because I know the English are a modest people. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
1074:paralyze the cities. It was a completely different environment from the age when a single storm could devastate farms, wash people away, and leave entire families destitute. Hence, the gods took care not to intervene more than the humans wanted, and because of that, they were being forgotten. It was essential to encourage mankind’s self-reliance so they could develop higher-order cognition. Yet for the longest time, no one foresaw this would lead to a lack of faith. ~ Carlo Zen,
1075:Attn: Service Corps, Imperial Army General Staff Office We guide him always, abandon him never, go where there is no path, never yielding, forever on the battlefield. Everything we do, we do for victory. We seek mages for the worst battlefields, the smallest rewards, days darkened by a forest of swords and hails of bullets, and constant danger with no guarantee of survival. To those who return go the glory and the honor. General Staff Office 601st Formation Committee ~ Carlo Zen,
1076:Everyone holds a luminous jewel, all embrace a precious gem; if you do not turn your attention around and look within, you will wander from home with a hidden treasure. Have you not heard it said, “In the ear it is like the great and small sounds in an empty valley, none not complete; in the eye it is like myriad images under a thousand suns, none able to avoid casting shadows”? If you seek it outside of sense experience, you will hinder the living meaning of Zen. ~ Thomas Cleary,
1077:I nudged myself closer to the ledge and closed my eyes and thought 'Oh what a life this is, why do we have to be born in the first place, and only so we can have our poor gentle flesh laid out to such impossible horrors as huge mountains and rock and empty space,' and with horror I remembered the famous Zen saying, 'When you get to the top of a mountain, keep climbing.' The saying made my hair stand on end; it had been such cute poetry sitting on Alvah's straw mats. ~ Jack Kerouac,
1078:Jared had his back to the wall, which Kami thought was a reflex when he was uncomfortable. She wanted to shield him. “He was doing some—Zen jogging,” she claimed.
Jared flicked her an incredulous glance. “Yes,” he said slowly. “Zen jogging. I wasn’t wearing that many clothes because—that’s part of the process. You’re meant to commune with the elements. Normally, I wouldn’t have worn my jeans, but I put them on because I know the English are a modest people. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
1079:Her kids and I tease her remorselessly about her devotion to cleaning, but of course it’s Hiroko’s deeper cleanliness—her freedom from second thoughts, from the need to gossip, from malice or the hunger for complexity—that is one of her sovereign gifts. Dusting is how she clears her head. Cohen himself, asked about his Zen training, explained, “It’s just house cleaning. From time to time the dust and the dirty clothes accumulate in the corners and it’s time to clean up. ~ Pico Iyer,
1080:CONTENTS Characters Introduction: How This Book Came to Be CHAPTER ONE Childhood: Abandoned and Chosen CHAPTER TWO Odd Couple: The Two Steves CHAPTER THREE The Dropout: Turn On, Tune In . . . CHAPTER FOUR Atari and India: Zen and the Art of Game Design CHAPTER FIVE The Apple I: Turn On, Boot Up, Jack In . . . CHAPTER SIX The Apple II: Dawn of a New Age CHAPTER SEVEN Chrisann and Lisa: He Who Is Abandoned . . . CHAPTER EIGHT Xerox and Lisa: Graphical User Interfaces ~ Walter Isaacson,
1081:Everyone needs a spiritual guide: a minister, rabbi, counselor, wise friend, or therapist. My own wise friend is my dog. He has deep knowledge to impart. He makes friends easily and doesn't hold a grudge. He enjoys simple pleasures and takes each day as it comes. Like a true Zen master he eats when he is hungry and sleeps when he is tired. He's not hung up about sex. Best of all, he befriends me with an unconditional love that human beings would do well to imitate. ~ Gary A Kowalski,
1082:here's my snowy crown time's tinted decrepitude there's the frost in the courtyard autumn's glittery breath now I'm sick and just watching my wife pick cure-alls then I'm frozen waiting for the maid to comb my hair without the body what use fame? worldly things I've put aside tranquilly I delve my heart determined now to learn from Empty Boats! [2158.jpg] -- from A Drifting Boat: Chinese Zen Poetry, Edited by J. P. Seaton / Edited by Dennis Maloney

~ Po Chu-i, Autumns Cold
,
1083:KOBUN CHINO. A St Zen master in California who became Jobs’s spiritual teacher. LEE CLOW. Advertising wizard who created Apple’s “1984” ad and worked with Jobs for three decades. DEBORAH “DEBI” COLEMAN. Early Mac team manager who took over Apple manufacturing. TIM COOK. Steady, calm, chief operating officer hired by Jobs in 1998; replaced Jobs as Apple CEO in August 2011. EDDY CUE. Chief of Internet services at Apple, Jobs’s wingman in dealing with content companies. A ~ Walter Isaacson,
1084:No hay que juntarse con malas compañías, no hay que juntarse con compañías despreciables. Júntate con buenas compañías, júntate con compañías nobles.   Guishan, el maestro zen clásico, escribió en sus famosas Admoniciones: «La compañía de los buenos es como caminar entre el rocío y la niebla; aunque a uno no le mojen la ropa, ésta termina por empaparse de humedad. La familiaridad con el mal aumenta el conocimiento y los puntos de vista erróneos, creando mal día y noche.» ~ Gautama Buddha,
1085:The trick here was indifference, I decided as I took my sweet time coming down the stairs. Act cool. Detached.
Something potent and violent boiled inside me and I strained every nerve in my body to keep it on its chain. I could do this. I just had to stay cool. Zen. No punching in the face. Punching would not be Zen.
The stairs ended. I wished I knew the jackass who’d made the staircase so short. I’d throw him down the damn steps so he could count them with his head. ~ Ilona Andrews,
1086:Zen brings creativity. And remember, if you want to be one with the creator, you will have to learn some ways of creativity. The only way to be one with the creator is to be in some moment of creativity, when you are lost. The potter is lost in making his pottery; the potter is lost while working on the wheel. The painter is lost while painting. The dancer is lost; there is no dancer, only the dance remains. Those are the peak moments, where you touch God, where God touches you. ~ Rajneesh,
1087:People kill and a re killed because they cling too tightly to their own beliefs and ideologies. [...] The second precept of the Order of Interbeing, founded within the Zen Buddhist tradition during the was in Vietnam, is about letting go of views: "Do not think the knowledge you presently possess is changeless, absolute truth. Avoid being narrow-minded and bound to present views. Learn and practice nonattachment from views in order to be open to receive others' viewpoints. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1088:I shared the details of Steve Jobs’s story, because when it comes to finding fulfilling work, the details matter. If a young Steve Jobs had taken his own advice and decided to only pursue work he loved, we would probably find him today as one of the Los Altos Zen Center’s most popular teachers. But he didn’t follow this simple advice. Apple Computer was decidedly not born out of passion, but instead was the result of a lucky break—a “small-time” scheme that unexpectedly took off. ~ Cal Newport,
1089:I see a vision of a great rucksack revolution thousands or even millions of young Americans wandering around with rucksacks, going up to mountains to pray, making children laugh and old men glad, making young girls happy and old girls happier, all of 'em Zen Lunatics who go about writing poems that happen to appear in their heads for no reason and also by being kind and also by strange unexpected acts keep giving visions of eternal freedom to everybody and to all living creatures. ~ Gary Snyder,
1090:I began researching and writing what I intended as a book-length essay entitled Fascination and Liberation, exploring the question of whether there is a conflict between creativity and the Eastern form of enlightenment. I don't know if I'll ever finish that essay, because I had an experience, after I'd written two or three chapters, in which it seemed to me that my psychic antibodies decisively rejected Buddhism. Interestingly, the rejection felt as if it happened in Zen terms. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
1091:The moment they hear what she says, her subordinates erupt together in laughter and whistles; none of them looks worried. They all wear cheerful smiles that say, Let's give it to 'em!
Well, even if it's nothing more than pre-sortie bravado, I'm glad they have wherewithal to put on a brave face. It means they trust me enough not to complain in my presence.
A superior who isn't trusted by their subordinates is liable to be dismissed for lack of management ability, so this is key. ~ Carlo Zen,
1092:an open-plan cubicle kind of thing-working, doing something, writing some Lisp program. And he'd come shuffling in with his ceramic mug of beer, bare feet, and he'd just stand behind me. I'd say hi. And he'd grunt or say nothing. He'd just stand there watching me type. At some
point I'd do something and he'd go, "Ptthh, wrong!" and he'd walk away. So that was kind of getting thrown in the deep end. It was like the Zen approach-the master hit me with a stick, now I must meditate. ~ Peter Seibel,
1093:I see a vision of a great rucksack revolution thousands or even millions of young Americans wandering around with rucksacks, going up to mountains to pray, making children laugh and old men glad, making young girls happy and old girls happier, all of 'em Zen Lunatics who go about writing poems that happen to appear in their heads for no reason and also by being kind and also by strange unexpected acts keep giving visions of eternal freedom to everybody and to all living creatures ... ~ Jack Kerouac,
1094:[EM] Forster was the only living writer whom he would have described as his master. In other people’s books he found examples of style which he wanted to imitate and learn from. In Forster he found a key to the whole art of writing. The Zen masters of archery—of whom, in those days, Christopher had never heard—start by teaching you the mental attitude with which you must pick up the bow. A Forster novel taught Christopher the mental attitude with which he must pick up the pen. ~ Christopher Isherwood,
1095:I didn't mean for you to take that the wrong way," He said abruptly. Mae stared at him in amazement. So, for that matter, did Jamie. "What?" "Demons don't touch anyone without a reason," Nick went on, his eyes shut again. "You can imagine what kind of reasons we usually have. I don't like--not anyone--I didn't mean anything by it." "Oh," said Jamie. "Oh, that's okay! That's fine. I understand. I am filled to the brim with understanding and, and acceptance! I'm very Zen like that. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
1096:I know just enough about myself to know I cannot settle for one of those simplifications which indignant people seize upon to make understandable a world too complex for their comprehension. Astrology, health food, flag waving, bible thumping, Zen, nudism, nihilism—all of these are grotesque simplifications which small dreary people adopt in the hope of thereby finding The Answer, because the very concept that maybe there is no answer, never has been, never will be, terrifies them. ~ John D MacDonald,
1097:My mother maintained the sort of parental mind-set that I now recognize as brilliant and nearly impossible to emulate - kind of unflappable Zen neutrality... She wasn't quick to judge and she wasn't quick to meddle. Instead, she monitored our moods and bore benevolent witness to whatever travails or triumphs a day might bring... When we'd done something great, we received just enough praise to know she was happy with us, but never so much that it became the reason we did what we did. ~ Michelle Obama,
1098:When there is great doubt,” says a Zen aphorism that Kusan Sunim kept repeating, “then there is great awakening.” This is the key. The depth of any understanding is intimately correlated with the depth of one’s confusion. Great awakening resonates at the same “pitch” as great doubt. So rather than negate such doubt by replacing it with belief, which is the standard religious procedure, Zen encourages you to cultivate that doubt until it “coagulates” into a vivid mass of perplexity. ~ Stephen Batchelor,
1099:They fill the bottom with nuts and whatever else monkeys like to eat. In the night, a monkey climbs out of the trees and slips his hand down the long neck. He grabs the sweets and his hand makes a fist. That means it’s too big to get back up the narrow neck and he’s trapped. In the morning the villagers come around and hit him on the head.” He looked at me for a moment. “It’s a Zen story, of course,” he said, smiling again. “The point is—if you want to be free, all you have to do is let go. ~ Terry Hayes,
1100:Many experts lose the creativity and imagination of the less informed. They are so intimately familiar with known patterns that they may fail to recognize or respect the importance of the new wrinkle. The process of applying expertise is, after all, the editing out of unimportant details in favor of those known to be relevant. Zen master, Shunryu Suzuki said, “The mind of the beginner is empty, free of the habits of the expert, ready to accept, to doubt, and open to all the possibilities. ~ Gavin de Becker,
1101:Though frosts come down
night after night,
what does it matter?
they melt in the morning sun.
Though the snow falls
each passing year,
what does it matter?
with spring days it thaws.
Yet once let them settle
on a mans head,
fall and pile up,
go on piling up
then the new year
may come and go,
but never youll see them fade away
Ryokan

translated by Burton Watson
From the book Ryokan: Zen Monk-Poet of Japan.
~ Taigu Ryokan, Though Frosts come down
,
1102:You no sooner attain the great void Than body and mind are lost together. Heaven and Hell -- a straw. The Buddha-realm, Pandemonium -- shambles. Listen: a nightingale strains her voice, serenading the snow. Look: a tortoise wearing a sword climbs the lampstand. Should you desire the great tranquility, Prepare to sweat white beads. [1506.jpg] -- from Zen Poetry: Let the Spring Breeze Enter, Translated by Lucien Stryk / Translated by Takashi Ikemoto

~ Hakuin, You no sooner attain the great void
,
1103:To glorify the Way what should people turn to to words and deeds that agree but oceans of greed never fill up and sprouts of delusion keep growing a plum tree in bloom purifies a recluse a patch of potatoes cheers a lone monk but those who follow rules in their huts never see the Way or get past the mountain [2615.jpg] -- from The Zen Works of Stonehouse: Poems and Talks of a 14th Century Chinese Hermit, Translated by Red Pine

~ Shiwu (Stonehouse), To glorify the Way what should people turn to
,
1104:Each lesson with him would be concluded by a half-hour session of meditation zazen, sitting Zen. It was to free my mind, to achieve what he termed the Void. What exasperated him, though, was my inability to master this. It was hard to think of nothing and yet not to think at all. Try as I might, I found it elusive. It frustrated me, as I wanted to show him that I could accomplish what appeared to me to be the easiest thing of all. Surely I had done enough of that in school to make me an expert? ~ Tan Twan Eng,
1105:I didn't mean for you to take that the wrong way," He said abruptly. Mae stared at him in amazement. So, for that matter, did Jamie.
"What?"
"Demons don't touch anyone without a reason," Nick went on, his eyes shut again. "You can imagine what kind of reasons we usually have. I don't like--not anyone--I didn't mean anything by it."
"Oh," said Jamie. "Oh, that's okay! That's fine. I understand. I am filled to the brim with understanding and, and acceptance! I'm very Zen like that. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
1106:A famous Japanese Zen master, Hakuun Yasutani Roshi, said that unless you can explain Zen in words that a fisherman will comprehend, you don’t know what you’re talking about. Some fifty years ago a UCLA professor told me the same thing about applied mathematics. We like to hide from the truth behind foreign-sounding words or mathematical lingo. There’s a saying: The truth is always encountered but rarely perceived. If we don’t perceive it, we can’t help ourselves and we can’t much help anyone else. ~ Jeff Bridges,
1107:Whatever the tasks, do them slowly and with ease, in mindfulness. Don’t do any task in order to get it over with. Resolve to do each job in a relaxed way, with all your attention. Enjoy and be one with your work. Without this, the day of mindfulness will be of no value at all. The feeling that any task is a nuisance will soon disappear if it is done in mindfulness. Take the example of the Zen Masters. No matter what task or motion they undertake, they do it slowly and evenly, without reluctance. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1108:Zen replaces all objects of belief with one single thing: reality itself. We believe only in this universe. We don't believe in the afterlife. We don't believe in the sovereignty of nations. We don't believe in money or power or fame. We don't believe in our idols. We don't believe in our positions or our possessions. We don't believe we can be insulted, or that our honor or the honor of our family, our nation or our faith can be offended. We don't believe in Buddha. We just believe in reality. Just this. ~ Brad Warner,
1109:I have more things going on right now than I can actually do without the invention of a cloning device. It is great! But it does give me many opportunities to practice trying to learn the lesson of being more Zen. I tend to worry about each "emergency" or unforeseen complication on all my projects. But there are so many! All of life is unforeseen! So I am learning that is the cycle of life - everything is cyclical and temporary and to get ok with that someday could be my greatest achievement. ~ Kristin Bauer van Straten,
1110:So the most difficult thing is always to keep your beginner's mind. There is no need to have a deep understanding of Zen. Even though you read much Zen literature, you must read each sentence with a fresh mind. You should not say, "I know what Zen is," or "I have attained enlightenment." This is also the real secret of the arts: always be a beginner. Be very very careful about this point. If you start to practice zazen, you will begin to appreciate your beginner's mind. It is the secret of Zen practice. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
1111:The story of the Zen Master whose only response was always "Is that so?" shows the good that comes through inner nonresistance to events, that is to say, being at one with what happens. The story of the man whose comment was invariably a laconic "Maybe" illustrates the wisdom of nonjudgment, and the story of the ring points to the fact of impermanence which, when recognized, leads to nonattachment. Nonresistance, nonjudgement, and nonattachment are the three aspects of true freedom and enlightened living. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
1112:What do you mean, the police were suspicious because you weren’t wearing enough clothes?” Ash demanded, staring coldly at Jared. “Where were your clothes?"
"He was doing some—Zen jogging,” she claimed.
Jared flicked her an incredulous glance. “Yes,” he said slowly. “Zen jogging. I wasn’t wearing that many clothes because—that’s part of the process. You’re meant to commune with the elements. Normally, I wouldn’t have worn my jeans, but I put them on because I know the English are a modest people. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
1113:Among the educated young there is therefore a startling and unprecedented interest in the transformation of human consciousness. All over the Western world publishers are selling millions of books dealing with Yoga, Vedanta, Zen Buddhism, and the chemical mysticism of psychedelic drugs, and I have come to believe that the whole “hip” subculture, however misguided in some of its manifestations, is the earnest and responsible effort of young people to correct the self–destroying course of industrial civilization. ~ Alan W Watts,
1114:It’s true that while instructors and schools offer courses in everything from cooking and how to wear a kimono to yoga and Zen meditation, you’ll be hard-pressed to find classes on how to tidy. The general assumption, in Japan at least, is that tidying doesn’t need to be taught but rather is picked up naturally. Cooking skills and recipes are passed down as family traditions from grandmother to mother to daughter, yet one never hears of anyone passing on the family secrets of tidying, even within the same household. ~ Marie Kond,
1115:Hidden in all good fortune is misfortune. And in all misfortune is good fortune. It's never going to stay the same as long you are in the world or unless you die while you are alive and become an enlightened Zen Master. But those people don't exist. When you study their lives, you find that they had the same struggles as the rest of us. It's not so much about being able to always have calm. Calmness isn't just the absence of noise or troubles. It's being able to find calm within yourself when other stuff is going on. ~ Wayne Dyer,
1116:He reached into his jacket pocket. Over the years, people had often commented on his ability to produce exactly the right item from his pockets at exactly the right time. Some had speculated that his pockets were extensions of the TARDIS, others had guessed he was just lucky. But then, they’d never read Yeltstrom’s Karma and Flares: The Importance of Fashion Sense to the Modern Zen Master.
They didn’t appreciate the things a sentient life-form could achieve, if he was totally at one with the lining of his jacket. ~ Lawrence Miles,
1117:In an interview that a Benedictine monk had with His Holiness in Scotland, he asked the Dalai Lama, “Do you think your sitting on the mountain will be of any good to these twentieth-century people?” The Dalai Lama answered him right away, “Of course. Definitely it is good.” It’s good because places of meditation are charged with the feeling and the sound of the cricket, or the breathing of the whale, or just our Zen breathing, and this creates a very powerful life force that affects the life of our environment. ~ Jakusho Kwong Roshi,
1118:This is shaping up even worse than you anticipated. Still, you feel a measure of detachment, as if you had suffered everything already and this were just a flashback. You wish that you had paid more attention when a woman you met at Heartbreak told you about Zen meditation. Think of all of this as an illusion. She can't hurt you. Nothing can hurt the samurai wh enters combat fully resolved to die. You have already accepted the inevitability of termination, as they say. Still, you'd rather not have to sit through this. ~ Jay McInerney,
1119:I felt I was drawing close to that age, that place in life, where you realize one day what you'd told yourself was a Zen detachment turns out to be naked fear. You'd had one serious love relationship in your life and it had ended in tragedy, and the tragedy had broken something inside you. But instead of trying to repair the broken place, or at least really stop and look at it, you skated and joked. You had friends, you were a decent citizen. You hurt no one. And your life was somehow just about half of what it could be. ~ Roland Merullo,
1120:Everything comes down to how work is outsourced. There are more options out there than the subpar you-get-what-you-pay-for. The saying "Every man to his trade" is true in the same way as the Ricardian formulation of comparative advantage*. Tanya's quiet voice is a good excuse to delegate this job.

Ricardian formulation of comparative advantage - Also known as the comparative cost theory. The basis of commerce theory. To put it in extremely simple terms, it says that everyone should make what they are good at and trade it. ~ Carlo Zen,
1121:Martin Silenus made an expansive gesture. “I was baptized a Lutheran,” he said. “A subset which no longer exists. I helped create Zen Gnosticism before any of your parents were born. I have been a Catholic, a revelationist, a neo-Marxist, an interface zealot, a Bound Shaker, a satanist, a bishop in the Church of Jake’s Nada, and a dues-paying subscriber to the Assured Reincarnation Institute. Now, I am happy to say, I am a simple pagan.” He smiled at everyone. “To a pagan,” he concluded, “the Shrike is a most acceptable deity. ~ Dan Simmons,
1122:A koan is like a riddle that’s supposed to help you toward enlightenment in Zen Buddhism. For my answer, I wrote about this guy Banzan. He was walking through the market on day when he overheard someone ask a butcher for his best piece of meat. The butcher answered, “Everything in my shop is the best. You cannot find a piece of meat that is not the best.” Upon hearing this, Banzan realized that there is no best and no worst, that those judgments have no real meaning because there is only was is, and poof, he reached enlightenment. ~ John Green,
1123:But the solution to the riddle of life and space and time lies outside space and time. For, as it should be abundantly clear by now, nothing inside a frame can state, or even ask, anything about that frame. The solution, then, is not the finding of an answer to the riddle of existence, but the realization that there is no riddle. This is the essence of the beautiful, almost Zen Buddhist closing sentences of the Tracticus: "For an answer which cannot be expressed the question too cannot be expressed. The riddle does not exist." ~ Paul Watzlawick,
1124:If you understand real practice, then archery or other activities can be zen. If you don't understand how to practice archery in its true sense, then even though you practice very hard, what you acquire is just technique. It won't help you through and through. Perhaps you can hit the mark without trying, but without a bow and arrow you cannot do anything. If you understand the point of practice, then even without a bow and arrow the archery will help you. How you get that kind of power or ability is only through right practice. ~ Shunryu Suzuki,
1125:Zen is to religion what a Japanese "rock garden" is to a garden. Zen knows no god, no afterlife, no good and no evil, as the rock-garden knows no flowers, herbs or shrubs. It has no doctrine or holy writ: its teaching is transmitted mainly in the form of parables as ambiguous as the pebbles in the rock-garden which symbolise now a mountain, now a fleeting tiger. When a disciple asks "What is Zen?", the master's traditional answer is "Three pounds of flax" or "A decaying noodle" or "A toilet stick" or a whack on the pupil's head. ~ Arthur Koestler,
1126:Finally, one just has to shut up, sit down, and write. That is painful. Writing is so simple, basic, and austere. There are no fancy gadgets to make it more attractive. Our monkey minds would much rather discuss our resistances with a friend at a lovely restaurant or go to a therapist to work out our writing blocks. We like to complicate simple tasks. There is a Zen saying: “Talk when you talk, walk when you walk, and die when you die.” Write when you write. Stop battling yourself with guilt, accusations, and strong-arm threats. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
1127:I watch the group as Lawrence speaks. Its not always easy to remember that these people aren't like me: they look and sound awake, but they're not. They are asleep and dreaming. sleepwalking and sleeptalking. Their words make sense to them. inside their dreamworld, but from my perspective it's mostly mumbling. They seldom express a lucid thought or formulate a coherent question. In several minutes of uninterrupted discourse on Zen. Lawrence has not said anything that I recognize as being related to the topic of awaking from delusion. ~ Jed McKenna,
1128:We should live every day like people who have just been rescued from dying on the moon. We are on Earth now, and we need to enjoy walking on this precious, beautiful planet. Zen Master Linji said, “The miracle is not to walk on water or fire. The miracle is to walk on the earth.” I cherish that teaching. I enjoy just walking, even in busy places like airports and railway stations. Walking like that, with each step caressing our Mother Earth, we can inspire other people to do the same. We can enjoy every minute of our lives. Finding ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1129:On a whim, Pisit calls the monk back to ask what he thinks of all this, and Western culture in general. After his drubbing just now he is in a Zen-ish sort of mood, not to say downright sarcastic: 'Actually, the West is Culture of Emergency: Twisters in Texas, earthquakes in California, windchill in Chicago, drought, flood, famine, epidemics, war on everything - watch out for that meteor and how much longer does the sun really have? Of course, if you didn't believe you could control everything, there wouldn't be an emergency, would there? ~ John Burdett,
1130:Paper windows bamboo walls hedge of hibiscus when guests arrive wormwood soup serves as tea the poor people I meet are mostly content rare is the rich man who isn't vain or wasteful I move my bookstand to read sutras by moonlight I honor the buddhas with a vase of wild flowers everyone says Tushita Heaven is fine but how can it match this old hut of mine [2615.jpg] -- from The Zen Works of Stonehouse: Poems and Talks of a 14th Century Chinese Hermit, Translated by Red Pine

~ Shiwu (Stonehouse), Paper windows bamboo walls hedge of hibiscus
,
1131:I thought, man, if you could run 100 miles, you'd be in this Zen state. You'd be the f**king Buddha. Bringing peace and a smile to the world. In my case, it didn't work. I'm the same old punk ass as ever. But there's always this hope that it'll turn you into the person you want to be. You know, like a better, more peaceful person. And when I'm out on a long run, the only thing in life that matters is finishing the run. For once, my brain isn't going 'bleh bleh bleh bleh.' Everything just quiets down, and the only thing going on is pure flow ~ Jenn Shelton,
1132:Ah,’ said the Doctor.
He reached into his jacket pocket. Over the years, people had often commented on his ability to produce exactly the right item from his pockets at exactly the right time. Some had speculated that his pockets were extensions of the TARDIS, others had guessed he was just lucky. But then, they’d never read Yeltstrom’s Karma and Flares: The Importance of Fashion Sense to the Modern Zen Master.
They didn’t appreciate the things a sentient life-form could achieve, if he was totally at one with the lining of his jacket. ~ Lawrence Miles,
1133:In this way, our life may appear as a series of mistakes. One could call them “problems” or “challenges,” but in some ways “mistakes” is better. One famous Zen master actually described spiritual practice as “one mistake after another,” which is to say, one opportunity after another to learn. It is from “difficulties, mistakes, and errors” that we actually learn. To live life is to make a succession of errors. Understanding this can bring us great ease and forgiveness for ourselves and others—we are at ease with the difficulties of life. But ~ Jack Kornfield,
1134:It’s four o’clock, guys. I’m going up to watch Oprah. Unless the shop catches fire or we’re under massive zombie invasion, I don’t exist for the next hour. On second thought, don’t bother me if it’s zombies – I’ll deal with them later. Today’s a special episode on how to make peace with people who piss you off. And I definitely need to find my Zen. (Bubba)
Your Zen’s shooting stuff, Bubba. Embrace your inner violence. (Mark)
Fine, then. My inner violence says I’ll cut your throat if you bother me until Oprah ends, so sod off. (Bubba) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1135:Outside the door I made but don't close I glimpse the movements of unfamiliar birds a handful of jade is worth a whole mountain but gold can't buy a lifetime of freedom the sound of icy falls on a dawnlit snowy ridge the sight of distant peaks through leafless autumn woods mist lifts from ancient cedars and days last forever right and wrong don't get past the clouds [2615.jpg] -- from The Zen Works of Stonehouse: Poems and Talks of a 14th Century Chinese Hermit, Translated by Red Pine

~ Shiwu (Stonehouse), Outside the door I made but dont close
,
1136:There is a Zen story about a man and a horse.7 The horse is galloping quickly, and it appears that the rider is urgently heading somewhere important. A bystander along the road calls out, “Where are you going?” and the rider replies, “I don’t know! Ask the horse!” This is also our life story. Many of us are riding a horse, but we don’t know where we are going, and we can’t stop. The horse is our “habit energy,” the relentless force of habit that pulls us along, that we are often unaware of and feel powerless to change. We are always running. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1137:Once upon a time an academic scientist went to visit a Zen Master, famous for being very wise. After greeting the scholar, the master offered him tea. As they sat together, the monk began to pour the tea into the scholar's cup. He poured until the tea overflowed onto the saucer, then the table and finally onto the floor.

When the scholar could not stand it any more, he blurted out: "Stop, stop, can't you see the cup is full?" To which the Zen Master replied: "Yes, I can, and until your mind is empty, you will not hear what I have to say. ~ Jeffrey Armstrong,
1138:She could hear her heart beating. And in her head, in time with the beat, resounded the opening fanfare of Janáček’s Sinfonietta. Soft, silent breezes played across the green meadows of Bohemia. She was aware that she had become split in two. Half of her continued to press the dead man’s neck with utter coolness. The other half was filled with fear. She wanted to drop everything and get out of this room now. I’m here, but I’m not here. I’m in two places at once. It goes against Einstein’s theorem, but what the hell. Call it the Zen of the killer. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1139:There is no one way to salvation, whatever the manner in which a man may proceed. All forms and variations are governed by the eternal intelligence of the Universe that enables a man to approach perfection. It may be in the arts of music and painting or it may be in commerce, law, or medicine. It may be in the study of war or the study of peace. Each is as important as any other. Spiritual enlightenment through religious meditation such as Zen or in any other way is as viable and functional as any "Way."... A person should study as they see fit. ~ Miyamoto Musashi,
1140:Unfortunately his Zen training never quite produced in him a Zen-like calm or inner serenity, and that too is part of his legacy. He was often tightly coiled and impatient, traits he made no effort to hide. Most people have a regulator between their mind and mouth that modulates their brutish sentiments and spikiest impulses. Not Jobs. He made a point of being brutally honest. "My job is to say when something sucks rather than sugar coat it," he said. This made him charismatic and inspiring, yet also, to use the technical term, an asshole at times. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1141:We live in a supermarket of ideas, faiths, practices, theories, ideologies, and much else besides. Never in human history have there been so many movements and ideas struggling to attract our attention. Added to this, the Western world is swamped by material goods and the Western mind is dominated by the goal of material success. In all this confusion, Zen stands out as a voice of sanity. It represents a different way of seeing the world, one based upon the rediscovery of who we really are and have always been, through revealing to us our true nature. ~ David Fontana,
1142:Zen Buddhism is a way and a view of life which does not belong to any of the formal categories of modern Western thought. It is not religion or philosophy; it is not a psychology or a type of science. It is an example of what is known in India and China as a “way of liberation,” and is similar in this respect to Taoism, Vedanta, and Yoga. As will soon be obvious, a way of liberation can have no positive definition. It has to be suggested by saying what it is not, somewhat as a sculptor reveals an image by the act of removing pieces of stone from a block. ~ Alan W Watts,
1143:There is a very interesting Hindu teacher by the name of Krishnamurti whom many of you may know about. He tells people that all of their religious inquiry, their yoga practices, their reading religious books, and so on, are nothing but the perpetuation of egocentricity on a very refined and highbrow level. Therefore he encourages disciples who studiously avoid reading any kind of philosophical or edifying book. They are reduced to reading mystery stories and they become devoted nondisciples. What a clever bind that is! It is the same as the Zen technique. ~ Alan W Watts,
1144:When I consider the virtue of abusive words, I find the scandal-monger is my good teacher. If we do not become angry at gossip, We have no need for powerful endurance and compassion. To be mature in Zen is to be mature in expression, And full-moon brilliance of dhyana and prajna Does not stagnate in emptiness. Not only can I take hold of complete enlightenment by myself, But all Buddha-bodies, like sands of the Ganges, Can become awakened in exactly the same way.

~ Hsuan Chueh of Yung Chia, 16 - When I consider the virtue of abusive words (from The Shodoka)
,
1145:He was a polite, thoughtful boy, who could spend hours in one spot, staring at the purple mountains against the clear blue sky, lost in his own thoughts and emotions. It was said of him that he had a monk’s vocation, and that in Japan he would have been a novice in a Zen monastery. Although the Oomoto faith discouraged proselytizing, Takao surreptitiously preached his religion to Heideko and his children, but Ichimei was the only one who practiced it with fervor, because it fit in with his character and with the concept of life that he had had since childhood. ~ Isabel Allende,
1146:The saying "no self, no problem" probably comes from Zen. In their cultures, where Buddhism is kind of taken for granted, as well as karma, causality, former and future life, and the possibility for becoming enlightened, then it's safe to skirt the danger of nihilism, which would be, I don't exist because Buddha said I have no self, and therefore I have no problem because I don't exist. That would be a bad misunderstanding. But in those cultures, it would not be as easy to have that understanding as it would be here in the west, where we really are nihilistic. ~ Robert Thurman,
1147:Your True Self is who you objectively are from the beginning, in the mind and heart of God, "the face you had before you were born," as the Zen masters say. It is your substantial self, your absolute identify, which can never be gained nor lost by any technique, group affiliation, morality, or formula whatsoever. The surrendering of our false self, which we have usually taken for our absolute identity, yet is merely a relative identity, is the necessary suffering needed to find "the pearl of great price" that is always hidden inside this lovely but passing shell. ~ Richard Rohr,
1148:I have my own way to walk and for some reason or other Zen is right in the middle of it wherever I go. So there it is, with all its beautiful purposelessness, and it has become very familiar to me though I do not know "what it is." Or even if it is an "it." Not to be foolish and multiply words, I'll say simply that it seems to me that Zen is the very atmosphere of the Gospels, and the Gospels are bursting with it. It is the proper climate for any monk, no matter what kind of monk he may be. If I could not breathe Zen I would probably die of spiritual asphyxiation. ~ Thomas Merton,
1149:The leprechaun, according to legend, can be forced to yield up its treasure if you can keep watching it without letting your attention wander for so much as a moment. This has so much in common with experiences in meditation that Zen masters in America use it as a metaphor for meditative practice. There’s an important lesson here: glamour is hardly limited to the realm of Faery. Most human beings live most of their lives under its spell, chasing after treasures that—like the golden coins in countless fairy tales—turn to dried leaves the moment one looks away. ~ John Michael Greer,
1150:I work in several different groups of pictures which act on and with each other - ranging from several abstracted manners to a form for the surreal. I have been called a preacher - but, in reality, I'm more generally philosophical. I have never made an abstracted photograph without content. An educated background in Zen influences all of my photographs. It has been said that my work resembles, more closely than any photographer, Le Douanier Rousseau - working in a fairly isolated area and feeding mostly on myself - I feel that I am a primitive photographer. ~ Ralph Eugene Meatyard,
1151:Heade’s calm is unsteady, storm-stirred; we respond in our era to its hint of the nervous and the fearful. His weather is interior weather, in a sense, and he perhaps was, if far from the first to portray a modern mood, an ambivalent mood tinged with dread and yet imbued with a certain lightness.The mood could even be said to be religious: not an aggressive preachment of God’s grandeur but a kind of Zen poise and acceptance, represented by the small sedentary or plodding foreground figures that appear uncannily at peace as the clouds blacken and the lightning flashes. ~ John Updike,
1152:Not Christian or Jew or Muslim, not Hindu, Buddhist, sufi, or zen. Not any religion or cultural system. I am not from the East or the West, not out of the ocean or up from the ground, not natural or ethereal, not composed of elements at all. I do not exist, am not an entity in this world or the next, did not descend from Adam or Eve or any origin story. My place is placeless, a trace of the traceless. Neither body or soul. I belong to the beloved, have seen the two worlds as one and that one call to and know, first, last, outer, inner, only that breath breathing human being. ~ Rumi,
1153:The reign of such a one-dimensional reality does not mean that materialism rules, and that the spiritual, metaphysical, and bohemian occupations are petering out. On the contrary, there is a great deal of “Worship together this week,” “Why not try God,” Zen, existentialism, and beat ways of life, etc. But such modes of protest and transcendence are no longer contradictory to the status quo and no longer negative. They are rather the ceremonial part of practical behaviorism, its harmless negation, and are quickly digested by the status quo as part of its healthy diet. ~ Herbert Marcuse,
1154:Before you begin meditation take several slow, deep breaths. Hold your body erect, allowing your breathing to become normal again. Many thoughts will crowd into your mind, ignore them, letting them go. If they persist be aware of them with the awareness which does not think. In other words, think non-thinking. Zen meditation is not physical culture, nor is it a method to gain something material. It is peacefulness and blessedness itself. It is the actualization of truth and wisdom. In your meditation you yourself are the mirror reflecting the solution of your problems. ~ Jack Kornfield,
1155:You're always striving for a place of Zen. Or a flow state, where you kind of transcend reality and you go to the other place. It's when everything is in sync, and everyone is connecting with one another. Everything is going perfectly. You lose yourself. It's the ultimate form of meditation where it's an out - of - body experience. Afterward you come back to Earth and you're like, 'What just happened? We just did something awesome!' It's this energy in the room when you know you're nailing it and you know everyone else is feeling it too. That's why theater is so awesome. ~ Evan Rachel Wood,
1156:The Zen Master warns: 'If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him!' This admonition points up that no meaning that comes from outside of ourselves is real. The Buddhahood of each of us has already been obtained. We need only recognize it. Philosophy, religion, patriotism, all are empty idols. The only meaning in our lives is what we each bring to them. Killing the Buddha on the road means destroying the hope that anything outside of ourselves can be out master. No one is any bigger than anyone else. There are no mothers or fathers for grown-ups, only sisters and brothers. ~ Sheldon B Kopp,
1157:su realidad no solo malgasta la vida, sino que también la acorta. El yo es la descarada mentira que nos contamos a diario y la felicidad requiere ver más allá de dicha mentira, desenmascararla. «Estudiar el yo es olvidar el yo», decía Dogen, un maestro zen del siglo XIII. La voz interior, las voces externas, todo es lo mismo. No hay líneas divisorias. Sobre todo cuando se compite. La victoria, según el zen, «llega cuando nos olvidamos del yo y del adversario, que son las dos mitades de un todo. Todo esto se expone con claridad meridiana en el libro Zen en el arte del tiro con arco: ~ Phil Knight,
1158:There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches. Every minority, be it Baptist/Unitarian, Irish/Italian/Octogenarian/Zen Buddhist, Zionist/Seventh-day Adventist, Women's Lib/Republican, Mattachine/FourSquareGospel feels it has the will, the right, the duty to douse the kerosene, light the fuse. Every dimwit editor who sees himself as the source of all dreary blanc-mange plain porridge unleavened literature, licks his guillotine and eyes the neck of any author who dares to speak above a whisper or write above a nursery rhyme. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1159:There is a favorite story, frequently told by the Zen masters, of the Buddha, preaching: of how he held up a single lotus, that simple gesture being his whole sermon. Only one member of his audience, however, caught the message, a monk named Mahākāśyapa, who is regarded now as the founder of the Zen sect. And the Buddha, noticing, gave him a knowing nod, then preached a verbal sermon for the rest: a sermon for those who required meaning, still entrapped in the net of ideas; yet pointing beyond, to escape from the net and to the way that some of them, one day or another, might find. ~ Joseph Campbell,
1160:Zen & The Art Of Poetry
Letting the mind go,
letting the pen, the breath,
the movement of images in & out
of the mouth
go calm, go rhythmic
as the rise & fall of waves,
as one sits in the lotus position
over the world,
holding the pen so lightly
that it scarcely stains the page,
holding the breath
in the glowing cage of the ribs,
until the heart
is only a living lantern
fueled by breath,
& the pen writes
what the heart wills
& the whole world goes out,
goes black,
but for the hard, clear stars
below.
~ Erica Jong,
1161:The problem with all students, he said, is that they inevitably stop somewhere. They hear an idea and they hold on to it until it becomes dead; they want to flatter themselves that they know the truth. But true Zen never stops, never congeals into such truths. That is why everyone must constantly be pushed to the abyss, starting over and feeling their utter worthlessness as a student. Without suffering and doubts, the mind will come to rest on clichés and stay there, until the spirit dies as well. Not even enlightenment is enough. You must continually start over and challenge yourself. ~ Robert Greene,
1162:Here's an example: someone says, "Master, please hand me the knife," and he hands them the knife, blade first. "Please give me the other end," he says. And the master replies, "What would you do with the other end?" This is answering an everyday matter in terms of the metaphysical. When the question is, "Master, what is the fundamental principle of Buddhism?" Then he replies, "There is enough breeze in this fan to keep me cool." That is answering the metaphysical in terms of the everyday, and that is, more or less, the principle zen works on. The mundane and the sacred are one and the same. ~ Alan Watts,
1163:If you take a mental case into a Zen monastery, they put him in isolation for three weeks; nobody talks to him—just the opposite of psychoanalysis—nobody talks to him, nobody listens to him. They just keep him isolated; somebody goes, absolutely silently, and puts the food there, comes back. He has to live with himself for three weeks … and miracles have been happening down the ages. Just putting him there for three weeks in isolation, slowly he cools down—no psychoanalysis, no therapy, just isolation. In fact, he was suffering too much from people, from the stress of being in a crowd continually. ~ Osho,
1164:The idea of Zen is to catch life as it flows. There is nothing extraordinary or mysterious about Zen. I raise my hand ; I take a book from the other side of the desk ; I hear the boys playing ball outside my window; I see the clouds blown away beyond the neighbouring wood: — in all these I am practising Zen, I am living Zen. No wordy discussions is necessary, nor any explanation. I do not know why — and there is no need of explaining, but when the sun rises the whole world dances with joy and everybody’s heart is filled with bliss. If Zen is at all conceivable, it must be taken hold of here. ~ D T Suzuki,
1165:CES only recently evolved to become a carefully controlled form of brain stimulation called transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), where a computer shapes the exact electrical waves that can change your brain activity the most, with more precision than ever before. We use it for brain upgrades at the 40 Years of Zen neurofeedback facility because it can help new neurons grow more quickly and insulate themselves to carry more electrical current. Another less evolved but similar technique is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). You can buy tDCS machines online for $100. ~ Dave Asprey,
1166:There is a quality about Bev that evokes a Zen master. She says things that would seem too simple, were they not coming from someone who has earned the right to say them. No one could have worked harder toward a goal; yet about her unfair defeat, she said, “In the end, it’s better to feel at peace with yourself.” No one could have created more whole-body transformations over the course of a decade—changes she literally had to eat, sleep, and breathe every day—yet after being denied recognition in what would have been an especially humiliating way for most women, she remained philosophical. ~ Gloria Steinem,
1167:When one of the emperors of China asked Bodhidharma (the Zen master who brought Zen from India to China) what enlightenment was, his answer was, “Lots of space, nothing holy.” Meditation is nothing holy. Therefore there’s nothing that you think or feel that somehow gets put in the category of “sin.” There’s nothing that you can think or feel that gets put in the category of “bad.” There’s nothing that you can think or feel that gets put in the category of “wrong.” It’s all good juicy stuff—the manure of waking up, the manure of achieving enlightenment, the art of living in the present moment. ~ Pema Ch dr n,
1168:If there is anything Zen strongly emphasizes it is the attainment of freedom; that is, freedom from all unnatural encumbrances. Meditation is something artificially put on; it does not belong to the native activity of the mind. Upon what do the fowls of the air meditate? Upon what do the fish in the water meditate? They fly; they swim. Is not that enough? Who wants to fix his mind on the unity of God and man, or on the nothingness of life? Who wants to be arrested in the daily manifestations of his life-activity by such meditations as the goodness of a divine being or the everlasting fire of hell? ~ D T Suzuki,
1169:Here's an example: someone says, "Master, please hand me the knife," and he hands them the knife, blade first. "Please give me the other end," he says. And the master replies, "What would you do with the other end?" This is answering an everyday matter in terms of the metaphysical.

When the question is, "Master, what is the fundamental principle of Buddhism?" Then he replies, "There is enough breeze in this fan to keep me cool." That is answering the metaphysical in terms of the everyday, and that is, more or less, the principle zen works on. The mundane and the sacred are one and the same. ~ Alan W Watts,
1170:The world we imagine seems as real as the ones we’ve experienced. We suffuse the model with the emotional values of past realities. And in the thrall of that vision (call it “the plan,” writ large), we go forth and take action. If things don’t go according to the plan, revising such a robust model may be difficult. In an environment that has high objective hazards, the longer it takes to dislodge the imagined world in favor of the real one, the greater the risk. In nature, adaptation is important; the plan is not. It’s a Zen thing. We must plan. But we must be able to let go of the plan, too. ~ Laurence Gonzales,
1171:Zen teacher Lewis Richmond tells the story of hearing Shunryu Suzuki sum up Buddhism in two words. Suzuki had just finished giving a talk to a group of Zen students when someone in the audience said, “You’ve been talking about Buddhism for nearly an hour, and I haven’t been able to understand a thing you said. Could you say one thing about Buddhism I can understand?” After the laughter died down, Suzuki replied calmly, “Everything changes.” Those words, Suzuki said, contain the basic truth of existence: Everything is always in flux. Until you accept this, you won’t be able to find true equanimity. ~ Phil Jackson,
1172:The central feature of the practice of meditation and hard work known as Zen is that, as Matthiessen says, it “has no patience with mysticism, far less the occult.” Nor does it have any time with moralism, the prescriptions or distortions we would impose on the world, obscuring it from our view. It asks, it insists rather, that we take this moment for what it is, undistracted, and not cloud it with needless worries of what might have been or fantasies of what might come to be. It is, essentially, a training in the real…”the Universe itself is the scripture of Zen." Pico Iyer from introduction. ~ Peter Matthiessen,
1173:I am tired of this city. I am tired of its pagan pretensions and false histories. Hyperion is a poet’s world devoid of poetry. Keats itself is a mixture of tawdry, false classicism and mindless, boomtown energy. There are three Zen Gnostic assemblies and four High Muslim mosques in the town, but the real houses of worship are the countless saloons and brothels, the huge marketplaces handling the fiberplastic shipments from the south, and the Shrike Cult temples where lost souls hide their suicidal hopelessness behind a shield of shallow mysticism. The whole planet reeks of mysticism without revelation. ~ Dan Simmons,
1174:Thomas had followed his passion to the Zen Mountain Monastery, believing, as many do, that the key to happiness is identifying your true calling and then chasing after it with all the courage you can muster. But as Thomas experienced that late Sunday afternoon in the oak forest, this belief is frighteningly naïve. Fulfilling his dream to become a full-time Zen practitioner did not magically make his life wonderful. As Thomas discovered, the path to happiness—at least as it concerns what you do for a living—is more complicated than simply answering the classic question “What should I do with my life?” A ~ Cal Newport,
1175:The point is obvious. There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches. Every minority, be it Baptist/Unitarian, Irish/Italian/Octogenarian/Zen Buddhist, Zionist/Seventh-day Adventist, Women’s Lib/Republican, Mattachine/Four Square Gospel feels it has the will, the right, the duty to douse the kerosene, light the fuse. Every dimwit editor who sees himself as the source of all dreary blanc-mange plain-porridge unleavened literature licks his guillotine and eyes the neck of any author who dares to speak above a whisper or write above a nursery rhyme. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1176:Consistent or inconsistent, no one is exempt from the mystery of the self. Probably we are all inconsistent. Te world is just too complicated for a person to be able to afford the luxury of reconciling all of his beliefs with each other. Tension and confusion are important in a world where many decisions must be made quickly. Miguel de Unamuno once said, 'If a person never contradicts himself, it must be that he says nothing.' I would say that we all are in the same boast as the Zen master who, after contradicting himself several times in a row, said to the confused Doko, 'I cannot understand myself. ~ Douglas R Hofstadter,
1177:Consistent or inconsistent, no one is exempt from the mystery of the self. Probably we are all inconsistent. The world is just too complicated for a person to be able to afford the luxury of reconciling all of his beliefs with each other. Tension and confusion are important in a world where many decisions must be made quickly. Miguel de Unamuno once said, 'If a person never contradicts himself, it must be that he says nothing.' I would say that we all are in the same boast as the Zen master who, after contradicting himself several times in a row, said to the confused Doko, 'I cannot understand myself.'. ~ Douglas R Hofstadter,
1178:You see, religion is really a kind of second womb. It’s designed to bring this extremely complicated thing, which is a human being, to maturity, which means to be self-motivating, self-acting. But the idea of sin puts you in a servile condition throughout your life. MOYERS: But that’s not the Christian idea of creation and the Fall. CAMPBELL: I once heard a lecture by a wonderful old Zen philosopher, Dr. D. T. Suzuki. He stood up with his hands slowly rubbing his sides and said, “God against man. Man against God. Man against nature. Nature against man. Nature against God. God against nature—very funny religion! ~ Joseph Campbell,
1179:The body,” Rinzai (d. 876) tells us, “does not know how to discourse or to listen to a discourse ... This which is unmistakably perceivable right where you are, absolutely identifiable yet without form - this is what listens to the discourse.” Here the Chinese master, along with Kabir and the rest, is echoing the Surangama Sutra (a pre-Zen Indian scripture) which teaches that it’s absurd to suppose that we see with our eyes, or hear with our ears: it’s because these have melted together, and vanished into the absolute Emptiness of our “original bright and charming Face,” that experience of any sort is possible. ~ Douglas E Harding,
1180:Nothing was ever in tune. People just blindly grabbed at whatever there was: communism, health foods, zen, surfing, ballet, hypnotism, group encounters, orgies, biking, herbs, Catholicism, weight-lifting, travel, withdrawal, vegetarianism, India, painting, writing, sculpting, composing, conducting, backpacking, yoga, copulating, gambling, drinking, hanging around, frozen yogurt, Beethoven, Back, Buddha, Christ, TM, H, carrot juice, suicide, handmade suits, jet travel, New York City, and then it all evaporated and fell apart. People had to find things to do while waiting to die. I guess it was nice to have a choice. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1181:If fear hinders us even in grade school, no wonder it takes such discipline—some people even call it a practice—to turn off that inner critic in adulthood and return to a place of openness. In Korean Zen, the belief that it is good to branch out beyond what we already know is expressed in a phrase that means, literally, “not know mind.” To have a “not know mind” is a goal of creative people. It means you are open to the new, just as children are. Similarly, in Japanese Zen, that idea of not being constrained by what we already know is called “beginner’s mind.” And people practice for years to recapture and keep ahold of it. ~ Ed Catmull,
1182:Name the colors, blind the eye” is an old Zen saying, illustrating that the intellect’s habitual ways of branding and labeling creates a terrible experiential loss by displacing the vibrant, living reality with a steady stream of labels. It is the same way with space, which is solely the conceptual mind’s way of clearing its throat, of pausing between identified symbols. At any rate, the subjective truth of this is now supported by actual experiments (as we saw in the quantum theory chapters) that strongly suggest distance (space) has no reality whatsoever for entangled particles, no matter how great their apparent separation. ~ Robert Lanza,
1183:I confess that I felt something closer to exaltation than fear. Something inexplicable was happening. Forged in Jesuit logic and tempered in the cold bath of science. I nevertheless understood at that second the ancient obsession of the God-fearing for another kind of fear: the thrill of exorcism, the mindless whirl of Dervish possession, the puppet-dance ritual of Tarot, and the almost erotic surrender of séance, speaking in tongues, and Zen Gnostic trance. I realized at that instant just how surely the affirmation of demons or the summoning of Satan somehow can affirm the reality of their mystic antithesis – the God of Abraham. ~ Dan Simmons,
1184:There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches. Every minority, be it Baptist/Unitarian, Irish/Italian/Octogenarian/Zen Buddhist, Zionist/Seventh-day Adventist, Women's Lib/Republican, Mattachine/FourSquareGospel feels it has the will, the right, the duty to douse the kerosene, light the fuse. Every dimwit editor who sees himself as the source of all dreary blanc-mange plain porridge unleavened literature, licks his guillotine and eyes the neck of any author who dares to speak above a whisper or write above a nursery rhyme. ~ Ray Bradbury, Afterword to the 1979 edition of Fahrenheit 451,
1185:Indeed, wherever the Nondual traditions would appear – traditions uniting and integrating the Ascending and Descending paths, in the East and in the West – we find a similar set of themes expressed so constantly as to border on mathematical precision. From Tantra to Zen, from the Neoplatonists to Sufism, from Shaivism to Kegon, stated in a thousands different ways and in a hundred different contexts, nonetheless the same essential word would ring out from the Nondual Heart: the Many returning to and embracing the One is Good, and is known as wisdom; the One returning to and embracing the Many is Goodness, and is known as compassion. ~ Ken Wilber,
1186:Not Christian or Jew or Muslim, not Hindu
Buddhist, sufi, or zen. Not any religion
or cultural system. I am not from the East
or the West, not out of the ocean or up
from the ground, not natural or ethereal, not
composed of elements at all. I do not exist,
am not an entity in this world or in the next,
did not descend from Adam and Eve or any
origin story. My place is placeless, a trace
of the traceless. Neither body or soul.
I belong to the beloved, have seen the two
worlds as one and that one call to and know,
first, last, outer, inner, only that
breath breathing human being.
~ Jalaluddin Rumi, Only Breath
,
1187:Many Buddhists understand the Round of birth-and-death quite literally as a process of reincarnation, wherein the karma which shapes the individual does so again and again in life after life until, through insight and awakening, it is laid to rest. But in Zen, and in other schools of the Mahayana, it is often taken in a more figurative way, as that the process of rebirth is from moment to moment, so that one is being reborn so long as one identifies himself with a continuing ego which reincarnates itself afresh at each moment of time. Thus the validity and interest of the doctrine does not require acceptance of a special theory of survival. ~ Alan W Watts,
1188:A belligerent samurai, an old Japanese tale goes, once challenged a Zen master to explain the concept of heaven and hell. But the monk replied with scorn, “You’re nothing but a lout— I can’t waste my time with the likes of you!” His very honor attacked, the samurai flew into a rage and, pulling his sword from its scabbard, yelled, “I could kill you for your impertinence.”“That,” the monk calmly replied, “is hell.” Startled at seeing the truth in what the master pointed out about the fury that had him in its grip, the samurai calmed down, sheathed his sword , and bowed, thanking the monk for the insight. “And that,” said the monk, “is heaven. ~ Daniel Goleman,
1189:Byron Howard, one of our directors at Disney, told me that when he was learning to play the guitar, a teacher taught him the phrase, “If you think, you stink.” The idea resonated with him—and it informs his work as a director to this day. “The goal is to get so comfortable and relaxed with your instrument, or process, that you can just get Zen with it and let the music flow without thinking,” he told me. “I notice the same thing when I storyboard. I do my best work when I’m zipping through the scene, not overthinking, not worrying if every drawing is perfect, but just flowing with and connecting to the scene—sort of doing it by the seat of my pants. ~ Ed Catmull,
1190:All societies are about the maintenance of boundaries. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a stockbroker in New York, a Zen monk in Kyoto, a Hasid in Jerusalem—your society is held together by boundaries and definitions. And anything which dissolves those boundaries and introduces relativity into cultural modeling is felt to be threatening, because we like to believe that our reality is somehow sanctioned; that this is how it should be. But, in fact, that’s just a cultural judgment. All cultures think that their culture represents a sanctioned reality. It doesn’t. It just represents the current download of their linguistic enterprise. ~ Terence McKenna, Evolving Times,
1191:Wordly fools search for exotic masters.
not realizing that their own mind is the master.





The greatest gift to others
is to freely relinquish yourself.





When the mind is always moving, you travel
from one hell to the next hell.





If you use your mind to try and understand reality.
you will understand neither your mind nor reality.

If you try and understand reality without using your mind.
you will understand both your mind and reality.



Bodhidharma

From: The Wisdom of the Zen Masters

Edited: Timothy Freke
~ Bodhidharma, The Greatest Gift
,
1192:If I'm going to test myself, I want to do it in the biggest field there is - the nation. I want to see how high I can climb, how much power I can exercise in this insanely huge bureaucratic system."

"Sounds like a game."

"It is a game. I don't give a damn about power and money per se. Really, I don't. I may be a selfish bastard, but I'm incredibly cool about shit like that. I could be a Zen saint. The one thing I do have, though, is curiosity. I want to see what I can do out there in the big, tough world."

"And you have no use for 'ideals' I suppose?"

"None. Life doesn't require ideals. It requires standards of action. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1193:Charlotte Joko Beck, Zen teacher and author, teaches that the “secret” of spiritual life is the capacity to “… return to that which we have spent a lifetime hiding from, to rest in the bodily experience of the present moment—even if it is a feeling of being humiliated, of failing, of abandonment, of unfairness.” Through the sacred art of pausing, we develop the capacity to stop hiding, to stop running away from our experience. We begin to trust in our natural intelligence, in our naturally wise heart, in our capacity to open to whatever arises. Like awakening from a dream, in the moment of pausing our trance recedes and Radical Acceptance becomes possible. ~ Tara Brach,
1194:Everything was fine with the Zen lunatics.... There was wisdom in it all, as you'll see if you take a walk some night on a suburban street and pass house after house on both sides of the street each with the lamplight of the living room, shining golden, and inside the little blue square of the television, each family riveting its attention on probably one show; nobody talking; silence in the yards; dogs barking at you because you pass on human feet instead of on wheels. You'll see what I mean, when it begins to appear like everybody in the world is soon going to be thinking the same way and the zen lunatics have long joined dust, laughter on their dust lips. ~ Jack Kerouac,
1195:It’s not about living in a sleek loft with three pieces of designer furniture. It’s not daring, nor dramatic, nor even all that difficult. What is minimalism then? It’s eliminating the excess. It’s asking “why” before you buy. It’s embracing the concept of enough. It’s living lightly and gracefully on the Earth. It’s uncovering who you are when all of the logos, brand names, and clutter are stripped away. It’s simple, it’s ordinary, and it’s accessible to everyone—from singles to families, teenagers to retirees. I’m reminded of the saying, “Zen is chopping wood and carrying water.” In other words, the world of enlightenment is none other than our everyday world. ~ Francine Jay,
1196:There is a story in Zen circles about a man and a horse. The horse is galloping quickly, and it appears that the man on the horse is going somewhere important. Another man, standing alongside the road, shouts, "Where are you going?"and the first man replies, "I don't know! Ask the horse!" This is also our story. We are riding a horse, we don't know where we are going, and we can't stop. The horse is our habit energy pulling us along, and we are powerless. We are always running,and it has become a habit. We struggle all the time, even during our sleep. We are at war within ourselves, and we can easily start a war with others. We have to learn the art of stopping. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1197:When you understand that form is the form of the formless, Your coming-and-going takes place nowhere else but where you are. When you understand that thought is the thought of the thought-less. Your singing-and-dancing is no other than the voice of the Dharma. How boundless is the sky of Samadhi! How refreshingly bright is the moon of the Fourfold Wisdom! Being so is there anything you lack? As the Absolute presents itself before you The place where you stand is the Land of the Lotus, And your person -- the body of the Buddha. [2139.jpg] -- from Essays in Zen Buddhism, First Series, by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki

~ Hakuin, The Form of the Formless (from Hakuins Song of Zazen)
,
1198:Todos los idiotas van por la vida pensando que son especiales, haciendo suyo ese engreimiento solipsista según el cual piensas que todo gira alrededor de ti, únicamente de ti. ¿Se nace con esta idea? Probablemente. Cuando descubres la empatía, se supone que abandonas lo anterior, pero tengo mis dudas de que sea posible hacerlo. Los monjes zen se pasan toda la vida intentándolo, pero es difícil. Siempre existe la posibilidad, por muy remota que pueda parecer, de que lo único verdaderamente importante es lo que está en tu mente, que tú eres la estrella de espectáculo, que todos los demás son simples personajes secundarios y que después de que tú mueras, todo dejará de existir. ~ Nick Sagan,
1199:The search for the exotic, the strange, the unusual, the uncommon has often taken the form of pilgrimages, of turning away from the world, the 'Journey to the East,' to another country or to a different religion. The great lesson from the true mystics, from the Zen monks, and now also from the Humanistic and Transpersonal psychologists -- that the sacred is in the ordinary, that it is to be found in one's daily life, in one's neighbors, friends, and family, in one's back yard, and that travel may be a flight from confronting the sacred -- this lesson can be easily lost. To be looking elsewhere for miracles is to me a sure sign of ignorance that everything is miraculous. ~ Abraham H Maslow,
1200:He and Egan also spoke for hours on the phone many nights. One topic they wrestled with was his belief, which came from his Buddhist studies, that it was important to avoid attachment to material objects. Our consumer desires are unhealthy, he told her, and to attain enlightenment you need to develop a life of nonattachment and nonmaterialism. He even sent her a tape of Kobun Chino, his Zen teacher, lecturing about the problems caused by craving and obtaining things. Egan pushed back. Wasn’t he defying that philosophy, she asked, by making computers and other products that people coveted? “He was irritated by the dichotomy, and we had exuberant debates about it,” Egan recalled. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1201:Don't confuse having no violence in your heart with having no violence in the real world, if required. Your duty may or may not include violence, but let us not forget that there are indeed occasions where violence ends violence or, I should say, reflecting the messiness and microscopically incremental nature of Eros: there are occasions where violence replaces a grosser violence with a subtler violence, a lesser devil on the way to a vaguely greater good. The Zen-inspired code of the Samurai warrior is still as good a guide as any: the best fight is not to fight; the real sword is no sword-but if you think that means a Samurai warrior never used his sword, you are tad naive, I fear. ~ Ken Wilber?,
1202:As we let go and still see others suffer, the heart fills with compassion. So much suffering is human-caused. We awaken to a poignancy and tenderness beyond our own personal injuries. One Zen master calls this caring “the tears of the way.” Our personal suffering diminishes, but our awareness of the sorrow and pain in the world grows stronger. Our heart is open and we feel connected to all things.

Resting in the peaceful heart, we weep at the folly of so many who live in the suffering of greed, hatred, and delusion, who have lost their way. And, all unbidden, we act. When a child falls into the street, everyone rushes to pull him from danger. When we see suffering, we respond. ~ Jack Kornfield,
1203:I consider Yoda to be just about the most evil character that I’ve ever seen in the history of literature. I have gotten people into tongue-tied snits unable to name for me one scene in which Yoda is ever helpful to anybody, or says anything that’s genuinely wise. 'Do or do not, there is no try.' Up yours, you horrible little oven mitt! 'Try' is how human beings get better. That’s how people learn, they try some of their muscles, or their Force mechanism heads in the right direction, that part gets reinforced and rewarded with positive feedback, which you never give. And parts of it get repressed by saying, 'No, that you will not do!' It is abhorrent, junior high school Zen. It’s cartoon crap. ~ David Brin,
1204:My thoughts turn to something I read once, something the Zen Buddhists believe. They say that an oak tree is brought into creation by two forces at the same time. Obviously, there is the acorn from which it all begins, the seed which holds all the promise and potential, which grows into a tree. Everybody can see that. But only a few can recognize that there is anther force operating here as well-the future tree itself, which wants so badly to exist that it pulls the acorn into being, drawing the seedling forth with longing out of the void, guiding the evolution from nothingness to maturity. In this respect, say the Zens, it is the oak tree that creates the very acorn from which it was born. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1205:Eckhardt witnessed many systematic traders spending great deal of time searching for the “good” places to enter. He cautioned against it: “It just seems to be part of human nature to focus on the most hopeful point of the trading cycle. Our research indicated that liquidations are vastly more important than initiations. If you initiate purely randomly, you do surprisingly well with a good liquidation criterion.”11 Dennis actually challenged the Turtles to randomly enter the market and then manage their trades after getting in. That was a real Zen moment for many Turtles. If they applied appropriate risk management, they could handle the worst that came down the pike once they were in any trade. ~ Michael W Covel,
1206:She gave me another side-eyed glance but didn’t speak. “The first is ‘How did it make you feel?’ in reference to my time on the Lois McKendrick as a crewman.” “Classic Zen,” she said. “Interesting approach.” “What?” “The question. It’s a classic question from an ancient Buddhist school of meditation. He didn’t ask you to answer it, did he.” It wasn’t a question. “No, I’m not supposed to answer it. Just feel it.” She grinned. I could see her teeth gleaming in her reflection. “It’s phrased to break your focus, to give your mind a split second of a break from overthinking. To put you in touch with yourself in ways that most of us find difficult. Tai chi does the same thing using the movements as focus. ~ Nathan Lowell,
1207:The caterpillars were a problem, however. Fat, fuzzy and complacent, they sat upon his vegetables in veritable hordes, ignoring him until he addressed one directly.

“Good morning, sir,” he said.

The caterpillar paused the busy movement of its jaws to reply:
“Pleasant weather, this, eh?”

It was an ideal summer’s day. The skies stretched out in endless blue overhead, unmarred by a single wisp of cloud; the fresh scent of greenery and earth rose into the nostrils, imparting a lively pleasure in being alive and outdoors.

“You seem troubled, sir, if you don’t mind me saying so,” said the caterpillar.

Zacharias experienced a brief internal struggle, but decided upon candour. ~ Zen Cho,
1208:C'è un punto oltre il quale l'addestramento e la pratica non possono portare. Zeami, lo straordinario
drammaturgo e regista di teatro Noh del quattordicesimo secolo, che era anche sacerdote zen, ha parlato
di questo momento come di una “sorpresa”. È la sorpresa di scoprire di non aver più bisogno di un sé, la
sorpresa di ritrovarsi una cosa sola col proprio lavoro in un movimento pieno di fluida disciplina e grazia.
Allora si capisce che cosa vuol dire essere una palla d'argilla che gira sul tornio, un trucciolo bianco
sollevato dalla punta dello scalpello o una delle molte mani di Kannon, Bodhisattva della Compassione. A
questo punto è possibile essere liberi, nel lavoro e dal lavoro. ~ Gary Snyder,
1209:Alcohol doesn't console," she wrote. "All it replaces is the lack of God." It does not necessarily follow, however, that if and when a substance vacates the spot (renunciation), God rushes in to fill it. For some, the emptiness itself is God; for others, the space must stay empty. "Lots of space, nothing holy": one Zen master's definition of enlightenment. For Emerson, dreams and drunkenness were but the "semblance and counterfeit" of an "oracular genius." Therein lies their danger: they mimic-- often quite well-- the "flames and generosities of the heart." I suppose he is advocating, in his "sermon", which steadily displace the God of theology with one of Nature, what we might now term "a natural high. ~ Maggie Nelson,
1210:Nothing was ever in tune. People just blindly grabbed at whatever there was: communism, health foods, zen, surfing, ballet, hypnotism, group encounters, orgies, biking, herbs, Catholicism, weight-lifting, travel, withdrawal, vegetarianism, India, painting, writing, sculpting, composing, conducting, backpacking, yoga, copulating, gambling, drinking, hanging around, frozen yogurt, Beethoven, Bach, Buddha, Christ, TM, H, carrot juice, suicide, handmade suits, jet travel, New York City, and then it all evaporated and fell apart. People had to find things to do while waiting to die. I guess it was nice to have a choice. I took my choice. I raised the fifth of vodka and drank it straight. The Russians knew something. ~ Anonymous,
1211:Everything was fine with the Zen Lunatics, the nut wagon was too far away to hear us. But there was a wisdom in it all, as you'll see if you take a walk some night on a suburban street and pass house after house on both sides of the street each with the lamplight of the living room, shining golden, and inside the little blue square of the television, each living family riveting its attention on probably one show; nobody talking; silence in the yards; dogs barking at you because you pass on human feet instead of on wheels. You'll see what I mean, when it begins to appear like everybody in the world is soon going to be thinking the same way and the Zen Lunatics have long joined dust, laughter on their dust lips. ~ Jack Kerouac,
1212:you don’t understand

the protoknowledge we’re born with, coded into our cells:

soon soon soon enough we die. Even before we’ve seen

the breast, we’re crying to the world that we want;

and the world doles out its milkiness in doses. We

want, we want, we want, and if we don’t then

that’s what we want: abstemiousness is only

hunger translated into another language. Yes

there’s pain and and heartsore rue and suffering, but

there’s no such thing as “anti-pleasure”: it’s pleaure

that the anchorite takes in his bleak cave

and Thoreau in his bean rows and cabin. For Thoreau,

the Zen is: wanting less is wanting more.

Of less. ~ Albert Goldbarth,
1213:There’s the story of the two men who visit a Zen master. The first man says: “I’m thinking of moving to this town. What’s it like?” The Zen master says: “What was your old town like?” The first man says: “It was dreadful. Everyone was hateful. I hated it.” The Zen master says: “This town is very much the same. I don’t think you should move here.” The first man left and a second man came in. The second man said: “I’m thinking of moving to this town. What’s it like?” The Zen master said: “What was your old town like?” The second man said: “It was wonderful. Everyone was friendly and I was happy. Just interested in a change now.” The Zen master said: “This town is very much the same. I think you will like it here. ~ James Altucher,
1214:Most of us in our thinking are wandering from this to that to the other thing, and are constantly distracted. And Zen is the opposite of that. It’s being completely here, fully in the present. And you know when you’re completely concentrated, you’re not really aware of your own existence. It’s rather the same as the sense of sight. If you see your eyes, that is to say if you see spots in front of your eyes, or something on the lens of the eye, then you’re not seeing properly. To the degree to which you’re seeing properly, you’re unaware of your eyes. In the same way, if your clothes fit well, you’re unaware of them on your body. And if you’re completely concentrated on what you’re doing, you’re unaware of yourself. ~ Alan W Watts,
1215:Indeed, whoever imagines he has explained Zen has in fact only explained it away; it can no more be bound by a definition than the wind can be shut in a box without ceasing to be wind. Thus any attempt to write on Zen may seem an absurdity from the beginning, but that is only so if either reader or writer imagines that Zen can be contained in a set of ideas. A book about London is in no sense London itself, and no sane person would dream of thinking that it is. Yet apparently intelligent people often make the equally ridiculous mistake of identifying a philosophical system, a dogma, a creed, with Ultimate Truth, imagining that they have found that Truth embraced in a set of propositions which appeals to their reason. There ~ Alan W Watts,
1216:I had worked for a newspaper of sorts, word got around, and I became editor of our local school newspaper, The Drum. I don't recall being given any choice in this matter; I think I was simply appointed. My second-in-command, Danny Emond, had even less interest in the paper than I did. Danny just liked the idea that Room 4, where we did our work, was near the girls' bathroom. "Someday I'll just go crazy and hack my way in there, Steve," he told me on more than one occasion. "Hack, hack, hack." Once he added, perhaps in an effort to justify himself: "The prettiest girls in school pull up their skirts in there." This struck me as so fundamentally stupid it might actually be wise, like a Zen Koan or an early story by John Updike. ~ Stephen King,
1217:[We] have a tendency during meetings to let our minds run wild and cycle through a plethora of thoughts about the past and the future, destroying any aspirations for Zen-like calm and preventing us from being in the here and now: Did I turn off the stove? What will I do for lunch? When do I need to leave here in order to get to where I need to be next?
What if you could rely on others in your life to handle these things and you could narrow your attentional filter to that which is right before you, happening right now?...A professional musician friend... describes this state as "happily lost." He doesn't need to look at his calendar more than a day in advance, allowing each day to be filled with wonder and possibility. ~ Daniel J Levitin,
1218:being attached to any one philosophy or religion
dwelling on moot differences and wanting to fit in
despite the path all are led Home in time
following an alternative pathway is certainly no crime
Krishna, Buddha, Allah or Zohar Kabbalah
devoted nonviolently, one is led to Nirvana
Hindu Sages, Zen Masters or Christian Mystics
many tongues, but identical truth spoken from their lips
mentioning Self or no-self or God is Father or Mother
according to their culture emphasizing one method or another
allness vs. nothingness, meditation vs. prayer
devotion in practice is all you should care
when Truth reveals itself you're beyond all conception
then not a single man-made word will hold any traction ~ Jarett Sabirsh,
1219:As a matter of face, Zen is at present most fashionable in America among those who are least concerned with moral discipline. Zen has, indeed, become for us a symbol of moral revolt. It is true, the Zen-man's contempt for conventional and formalistic social custom is a healthy phenomenon, but it is healthy only because it presupposes a spiritual liberty based on freedom from passion, egotism and self-delusion. A pseudo-Zen attitude which seeks to justify a complete moral collapse with a few rationalizations based on the Zen Masters is only another form of bourgeois self-deception. It is not an expression of healthy revolt, but only another aspect of the same lifeless and inert conventionalism against which it appears to be protesting. ~ Thomas Merton,
1220:Joyful in this mountain retreat yet still feeling melancholy,
Studying the Lotus Sutra every day,
Practicing zazen singlemindedly;
What do love and hate matter
When Im here alone,
Listening to the sound of the rain
late in this autumn evening.

Drifting pitifully in the whirlwind of birth and death,
As if wandering in a dream,
In the midst of illusion I awaken to the true path;
There is one more matter I must not neglect,
But I need not bother now,
As I listen to the sound of the evening rain
Falling on the roof of my temple retreat
In the deep grass of Fukakusa.

From: The Zen Poetry of Dogen: Verses from the Mountain of Eternal Peace By: Steven Heine

~ Dogen, Joyful in this mountain retreat
,
1221:Jon Stone spoke thirteen languages and was fluent in six, French being one. He spoke it so well the girls thought he was a native Parisian pretending to be an American. This ability to blend with the natives was a valuable tool when Jon plied his trade. Jon eased from the bed. Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors lined the back of his house, ten-foot-tall, custom-designed monsters so Jon could Zen on the view. Golden lights glittered to the horizon, ruby flashes marked ghetto-bird prowlers, jets descending toward LAX were strung like pearls across a tuxedo black sky. The doors were heavy as trucks, but silent as silk when they slid open. Jon stepped out and went to the pool. Pike was a silhouette cutout, backlit by the city as Jon swaggered close. “What ~ Robert Crais,
1222:But, Foley, my lad, it isn't beauty per se that makes wire-walking Zen or makes it art. It's the extremity of the risks that are assumed by each exquisite gesture, each impossible somersault. Here's a more extreme version of the dangerous beauty bullfights used to possess before the matadors became preening cowards and stacked the desk against the beasts. We only rise above mediocrity when there's something at stake, and I mean something more consequential than money or reputation. The great value of a high-wire act is that it has no practical value. The fact that so much skill and effort and courage can be directed into something so ostensibly useless is what makes it useful. That's what affords it the power to lift us out of context and carry us-elsewhere. ~ Tom Robbins,
1223:When we talk about the theology of 'God is Dead,' this means that the notion of God must be dead in order for God to reveal himself as a reality. The theologians, if they only use concepts, and not direct experience, are not very helpful. The same goes for nirvana, which is something to be touched and lived and not discussed and described. We have notions that distort truth, reality. A Zen master said the following to a large assembly: 'My friends, every time I use the word Buddha, I suffer. I am allergic to it. Every time I do it, I have to go to the bathroom and rinse my mouth three times in succession.' He said this in order to help his disciples not to get caught up in the notion of Buddha. The Buddha is one thing, but the notion of Buddha is another. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1224:See the whole thing is a world full of rucksack wanderers, Dharma Bums refusing to subscribe to the general demand that they consume production and therefore have to work for the privilege of consuming... all of them imprisoned in a system of work, produce, consume, work, produce, consume, I see a vision of a great rucksack revolution thousands or even millions of young Americans wandering around with rucksacks, going up to mountains to pray, making children laugh and old men glad, making young girls happy and old girls happier, all of 'em Zen Lunatics who go about writing poems that happen to appear in their heads for no reason and also by being kind and also by strange unexpected acts keep giving visions of eternal freedom to everybody and to all living creatures... ~ Jack Kerouac,
1225:It’s like chopping down a huge tree of immense girth. You won’t accomplish it with one swing of your axe. If you keep chopping away at it, though, and do not let up, eventually, whether it wants to or not, it will suddenly topple down. When that time comes, you could round up everyone you could find and pay them to hold the tree up, but they wouldn’t be able to do it. It would still come crashing to the ground…. But if the woodcutter stopped after one or two strokes of his axe to ask the third son of Mr. Chang, “Why doesn’t this tree fall?” And after three or four more strokes stopped again to ask the fourth son of Mr. Li, “Why doesn’t this tree fall?” he would never succeed in felling the tree. It is no different for someone who is practicing the Way. —ZEN MASTER HAKUIN ~ Robert Greene,
1226:Thomas Merton, of course, constitutes a special threat to Christians, because he presents himself as a contemplative Christian monk, and his work has already affected the vitals of Roman Catholicism, its monasticism. Shortly before his death, Father Merton wrote an appreciative introduction to a new translation of the Bhagavad Gita, which is the spiritual manual or “Bible” of all Hindus, and one of the foundation blocks of monism or Advaita Vedanta. The Gita, it must be remembered, opposes almost every important teaching of Christianity. His book on the Zen Masters, published posthumously, is also noteworthy, because the entire work is based on a treacherous mistake: the assumption that all the so-called “mystical experiences” in every religion are true. He should have known better. ~ Seraphim Rose,
1227:But I've since realized that I'm fine with my anxious-ass, can't-touch-my-toes life. In my soul, I am not chill, and I do not want to be calm, and no part of me aspires to Zen. Sure, through yoga I learned to take time for myself, and I learned how to deep-breathe through pain, but the most valuable thing yoga taught me was that I'm not built to be a yogi -- and that's the only mantra I need.

For anyone who wants to be a yogi but hears the internal cries of "Oh my God, I hate this so much" from start to finish? Fuck it. Oh man, fuck it all the way back to wherever you bought your mat from. There are other outlets for your energy, other ways to carve out some peace. Nobody here needs to force themselves into downward dog when they'd rather be walking super-fast around the mall. ~ Anne T Donahue,
1228:In the same way, all things in the universe-the sun, the moon, the stars, mountains, rivers, people, and so forth- have different names and forms, but they are all made from the same substance. The universe is organized into pairs of opposites: light and darkness, man and woman, sound and silence, good and bad. But all these opposites are mutual, because they are made from the same substance. Their names and their forms are different, but their substance is the same. Names and forms are made by your thinking. If you are not thinking and have no attachment to name and form, then all substance is one. Your don't-know mind cuts off all think- ing. This is your substance. The substance of this Zen stick and your own substance are the same. You are this stick; this stick is you." The student said ~ Anonymous,
1229:Jobs’s engagement with Eastern spirituality, and especially Zen Buddhism, was not just some passing fancy or youthful dabbling. He embraced it with his typical intensity, and it became deeply ingrained in his personality. “Steve is very much Zen,” said Kottke. “It was a deep influence. You see it in his whole approach of stark, minimalist aesthetics, intense focus.” Jobs also became deeply influenced by the emphasis that Buddhism places on intuition. “I began to realize that an intuitive understanding and consciousness was more significant than abstract thinking and intellectual logical analysis,” he later said. His intensity, however, made it difficult for him to achieve inner peace; his Zen awareness was not accompanied by an excess of calm, peace of mind, or interpersonal mellowness. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1230:[A]s glaring and staring do not clarify the eyesight, and as straining to hear does not sharpen the ears, mental 'trying' does not enhance understanding. [...] On being told that this is wrong, the mind will even make efforts not to make efforts.
This can come to an end only when it is clearly seen that all these efforts are as futile as trying to leap into the air and fly, as struggling to sleep, or as forcing an erection of the sexual member. Everyone is familiar with the contradiction of trying to recollect a forgotten name, and though it happens again and again, we never seem to trust the memory to supply the information spontaneously. Yet this is one of the most common forms of what is known in Zen Buddhism as satori - the effortless, spontaneous and sudden dawning of a realization. ~ Alan W Watts,
1231:I think US/UK genre has become more open to “diverse” writers and writing; there’s a genuine interest in reading work from countries outside the US/UK and hearing voices that have been historically shut out, but at the same time, people are quite lazy. That sounds harsh, but I include myself in it — your tastes are shaped by what you’ve read and watched before, and it takes a little effort to understand stories that use a different voice, that follow different storytelling conventions, that are trying to subvert the dominant paradigm. There’s a quite large group of people who are “yay diversity” in theory, but I think the number of people who have then said to themselves, “OK, if I’m committed to this, I need to start reading outside my comfort zone and making an effort” is maybe a little smaller. ~ Zen Cho,
1232:We have almost all had the experience of gazing at the full moon. But those of us who are neither astronomers nor astronauts are unlikely to have scheduled moongazing appointments. For Zen Buddhists in Japan, however, every year, on the fifteenth day of the eighth month of the traditional Japanese lunisolar calendar, followers gather at nightfall around specially constructed cone-shaped viewing platforms, where for several hours prayers are read aloud which use the moon as a springboard for reflections on Zen ideas of impermanence, a ritual known as tsukimi. Candles are lit and white rice dumplings (tsukimi dango) are prepared and shared out among strangers in an atmosphere at once companionable and serene, a feeling thereby supported by a ceremony, by architecture, by good company and by food. ~ Alain de Botton,
1233:Sosan is the third Zen Patriarch. Nothing much is known about him – this is as it should be, because history records only violence. History does not record silence – it cannot record it. All records are of disturbance. Whenever someone becomes really silent, he disappears from all records, he is no more a part of our madness. So it is as it should be.

Sosan remained a wandering monk his whole life. He never stayed anywhere; he was always passing, going, moving. He was a river; he was not a pond, static. He was a constant movement. That is the meaning of Buddha’s wanderers: not only in the outside world but in the inside world also they should be homeless –
because whenever you make a home you become attached to it. They should remain rootless; there is no home for them except this whole universe. ~ Osho,
1234:Meaning, though, changes with time; text with context. What am I to do? There was a time, as in the minutes after we learned of my father’s death, when those words or words roughly like them, uttered in panic, escaped my mother’s lips. Today, after so many years of lonely meditation, and so many conversations with me that describe but a fraction of those meditations, and so many outings and travels with her Bon Sisters and other friends to explore beyond those meditations, my mother says the words with new meaning. Today she asks the question with what Zen Buddhists call “beginner’s mind.” A lack of preconception, a reflexive resistance to rutted thinking. A life-sustaining curiosity that takes each moment as a fresh start. What am I to do? has become, for my seventy-seven-year-old mother, What might I do? ~ Eric Liu,
1235:I took my bottle and went to my bedroom. I undressed down to my shorts and went to bed. Nothing was ever in tune. People just blindly grabbed at whatever there was: communism, health foods, zen, surfing, ballet, hypnotism, group encounters, orgies, biking, herbs, Catholicism, weight-lifting, travel, withdrawal, vegetarianism, India, painting, writing, sculpting, composing, conducting, backpacking, yoga, copulating, gambling, drinking, hanging around, frozen yogurt, Beethoven, Bach, Buddha, Christ, TM, H, carrot juice, suicide, handmade suits, jet travel, New York City, and then it all evaporated and fell apart. People had to find things to do while waiting to die. I guess it was nice to have a choice.

I took my choice. I raised the fifth of vodka and drank it straight. The Russians knew something. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1236:There is a Zen story (very funny — ha-ha) about a monk who, having failed to achieve “enlightenment” (brain-change) through the normal Zen methods, was told by his teacher to think of nothing but an ox. Day after day after day, the monk thought of the ox, visualized the ox, meditated on the ox. Finally, one day, the teacher came to the monk’s cell and said, “Come out here — I want to talk to you.” “I can’t get out,” the monk said. “My horns won’t fit through the door.” I can’t get out . . . At these words, the monk was “enlightened.” Never mind what “enlightenment” means, right now. The monk went through some species of brain change, obviously. He had developed the delusion that he was an ox, and awakening from that hypnoidal state he saw through the mechanism of all other delusions and how they robotize us. EXERCIZES ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
1237:In one marijuana experience, my informant became aware of the presence and, in a strange way, the in-appropriateness of this silent "watcher," who responds with interest and occasional critical comment to the kaleidoscopic dream imagery of the marijuana experience but is not part of it. "Who are you?" my informant silently asked it. "Who wants to know?" it replied, making the experience very like a Sufi or Zen parable. But my informant's question is a deep one. I would suggest the observer is a small part of the critical faculties of the left hemisphere, functioning much more in psychedelic than in dream experiences, but present to a degree in both. However, the ancient query, "Who is it who asks the question?" is still unanswered; perhaps it is another component of the left cerebral hemisphere. An asymmetry in the temporal lobes ~ Anonymous,
1238:[Once Ummon asked a lesser light Are you a gardener> Yes it replied Why have turnips no roots> Ummon asked the gardener who could not reply Because said Ummon rainwater is plentiful] I think about this for a moment. Ummon’s koan is not difficult now that I am regaining the knack of listening for the shadow of substance beneath the words. The little Zen parable is Ummon’s way of saying, with some sarcasm, that the answer lies within science and within the antilogic which scientific answers so often provide. The rainwater comment answers everything and nothing, as so much of science has for so long. As Ummon and the other Masters teach, it explains why the giraffe evolved a long neck but never why the other animals did not. It explains why humankind evolved to intelligence, but not why the tree near the front gate refused to. ~ Dan Simmons,
1239:A big, tough samurai once went to see a little monk. “Monk,” he barked, in a voice accustomed to instant obedience, “teach me about heaven and hell!” The monk looked up at the mighty warrior and replied with utter disdain, “Teach you about heaven and hell? I couldn’t teach you about anything. You’re dumb. You’re dirty. You’re a disgrace, an embarrassment to the samurai class. Get out of my sight. I can’t stand you.” The samurai got furious. He shook, red in the face, speechless with rage. He pulled out his sword, and prepared to slay the monk. Looking straight into the samurai’s eyes, the monk said softly, “That’s hell.” The samurai froze, realizing the compassion of the monk who had risked his life to show him hell! He put down his sword and fell to his knees, filled with gratitude. The monk said softly, “And that’s heaven.” ZEN PARABLE ~ Fred Kofman,
1240:Zen wishes to storm this citadel of topsy-turvydom and to show that we live psychologically or biologically and not logically. ~ D.T. Suzuki, An Introduction to Zen BuddhismZen Words for the Heart: Hakuin's Commentary on the Heart Sutra by Hakuin and Norman Waddell ★★★★ 1/2 "Hakuin Zenji (1689-1769) was one of the most important of all Japanese Zen masters" ad amzn.to/2ZexAsyZen: Zen For Beginners a Beginners Guide to Mindfulness and Meditation by Daniel D'apollonio ★★★★ 1/2 "easy-to-follow steps guaranteed to help you bring the essence of Zen into your everyday life" ad amzn.to/2SLOQRB@Zer0Books Glad to hear it sold out. Here's to it happening again with this run. 🍻@Zer0Books Reminds me of Belters from the Expanse. They developed physical gestures in their language after being in space suits for generations. Guess we're kind of virtual space suits these days,
1241:sophisticated reader that he is simply referring to magical aspects of sexual activity that were bound to be misunderstood by the general public anyway. His attitude being: if only a handful of individuals will ever understand what is being written, write it in such a way that it will never go out of print. The modern reader must also bear in mind that the transcendent nature of spiritual subject matter often can only be represented by images terrible and strange. Language is not representative of reality. That Crowley was a master of metaphor is unarguable. But what is more significant is his ability to utilize words and images in the same manner as the Zen Master's Koan; expressing what appears technically to be a logical formula of language in such a way as to force the mind of the reader to deal with realities that transcend logic. The Hindu Goddess ~ Christopher S Hyatt,
1242:Through endless ages, the mind has never changed

It has not lived or died, come or gone, gained or lost.

It isnt pure or tainted, good or bad, past or future.
true or false, male or female. It isnt reserved for
monks or lay people, elders to youths, masters or
idiots, the enlightened or unenlightened.

It isnt bound by cause and effect and doesnt
struggle for liberation. Like space, it has no form.

You cant own it and you cant lose it. Mountains.
rivers or walls cant impede it. But this mind is
ineffable and difficult to experience. It is not the
mind of the senses. So many are looking for this

mind, yet it already animates their bodies.

It is theirs, yet they dont realize it.



Bodhidharma

From: The Wisdom of the Zen Masters

Edited: Timothy Freke

~ Bodhidharma, Endless Ages
,
1243:if my memory serves me right, here is my genealogical line: Boccaccio, Petronius, Rabelais, Whitman, Emerson, Thoreau, Maeterlinck, Romain Rolland, Plotinus, Heraclitus, Nietzsche, Dostoievsky (and other Russian writers of the Nineteenth Century), the ancient Greek dramatists, theElizabethan dramatists (excluding Shakespeare), Theodore Dreiser, Knut Hamsun, D. H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Thomas Mann, Elie Faure, Oswald Spengler, Marcel Proust, Van Gogh, the Dadaists and Surrealists, Balzac, Lewis Carroll, Nijinsky, Rimbaud, Blaise Cendrars, Jean Giono, Celine, everything I read on Zen Buddhism, everything I read about China, India, Tibet, Arabia, Africa, and of course the Bible, the men who wrote it and especially the men who made the King James version, for it was the language of the Bible rather than its “message” which I got first and which I will never shake off. ~ Henry Miller,
1244:I have no understanding why but I believe washing her was one of the most profound things I’ve done in my life. There must be a reason why so many religions insist on the practice. Obviously, sanitation and health. But aside from that? Maybe because it’s the final act of devotion. I know no other possible answer. In Jewish tradition, it’s considered the only act of giving/ kindness that expects no gift in return. Somehow it seems the perfect bookend with wedding. In a Zen wedding like ours, we bow to each other at the altar . Marriage should be a partnership based on deep mutual respect and equality. In death, we figuratively bow to our beloved again by cleaning the body. The greatest number of photographs I have of Tracy are from our wedding. They surround me now. They too are part of our time together. They too remind me of my final opportunity to love her body. ~ Frederick Marx,
1245:In this entre-nous spirit, then, old confidant before we join the others, the grounded everywhere, including, I’m sure, the middle-aged hot-rodders who insist on zooming us to the moon, the Dharma Bums, the makers of cigarette filters for thinking men, the Beat and the Sloppy and the Petulant, the chosen cultists, all the lofty experts who know so well what we should or shouldn’t do with our poor little sex organs, all the bearded, proud, unlettered young men and unskilled guitarists and Zen-killers and incorporated aesthetic Teddy boys who look down their thoroughly unenlightened noses at this splendid planet where (please don’t shut me up) Kilroy, Christ, and Shakespeare all stopped – before we join these others, I privately say to you, old friend (unto you, really, I’m afraid), please accept from me this unpretentious bouquet of very early-blooming parentheses: (((()))). ~ J D Salinger,
1246:Cuando la Maga preguntaba por cuestiones como la filosofía Zen (eran cosas que podían ocurrir en el club, donde se hablaba siempre de nostalgias, de sapiencias tan lejanas como para que se las creyera fundamentales, de anversos de medallas, del otro lado de la luna siempre), Gregorovius se esforzaba por explicarle los rudimentos de la metafísica mientras Oliveira sorbía su pernod y los miraba gozándolos. Era insensato querer explicarle algo a la Maga. Fauconnier tenía razón, para gentes como ella el misterio empezaba precisamente con la explicación. La Maga oía hablar de inmanencia y trascendencia y abría unos ojos preciosos que le cortaban la metafísica a Gregorovius. Al final llegaba a convencerse de que había comprendido el Zen, y suspiraba fatigada. Solamente Oliveira se daba cuenta de que la Maga se asomaba a cada rato a esas grandes terrazas sin tiempo que todos ellos buscaban dialécticamente. ~ Julio Cort zar,
1247:One time, when we'd been discussing martial arts, Murphy told me that eventually, no-one can teach you anything more about them. Once you reach that state of knowledge, the only way to keep learning and increasing your own skill is to teach what you know to others. That's why she teaches a children's class and a rape-defence course every spring and fall at one of her neighbourhood's community centres.
It sounded kind of flaky-Zen to me at the time, but Hell's bells, she'd been right. Once upon a time, it would have taken me an hour, if not more, to attain the proper frame of mind. In the course of teaching Molly to meditate, though, I had found myself going over the basics again for the first time in years, and understanding them with a deeper and richer perspective than I'd had when I was her age. I'd been getting almost as much insight and new understanding of my knowledge from teaching Molly as she'd been learning from me. ~ Jim Butcher,
1248:Meditation does not have to be long or complicated for you to receive its benefits. If you haven’t done it before, I suggest you begin by meditating for five minutes a day. A good time to engage in this practice is in the morning just after you’ve awakened, but you can do it at any time that works for you. Find a comfortable position where you are sitting with your spine straight. Close your eyes and concentrate on your breath. Just follow your breath in and out for five minutes. If you find that you have started to think of something other than your breath during those five minutes, gently pull yourself back to concentrating on your breath. What you are seeking is five minutes of relaxed, easy focus on your breath. In, out, in, out, in, out. Summarizing how important this centeredness practice is, the Zen master Pao-chih simply said, “If the mind is never aroused toward objects, then wherever you walk is the site of enlightenment. ~ Anonymous,
1249:One more point must be made with regard to the general conditions of learning an art. One does not begin to learn an art directly, but indirectly, as it were. One must learn a great number of other — and often seemingly disconnected things — before one starts with the art itself. An apprentice in carpentry begins by learning how to plane wood; an apprentice in the art of piano playing begins by practicing scales; an apprentice in the Zen art of archery begins by doing breathing exercises. 1 If one wants to become a master in any art, one's whole life must be devoted to it, or at least related to it. One's own person becomes an instrument in the practice of the art, and must be kept fit, according to the specific functions it has to fulfill. With regard to the art of loving, this means that anyone who aspires to become a master in this art must begin by practicing discipline, concentration and patience throughout every phase of his life. ~ Erich Fromm,
1250:He invited the Indian scholar Paramartha to come and set up a Translation Bureau for Buddhist texts, and the scholar stayed for twenty-three years. He invited the great Bodhidharma, the twenty-eighth patriarch after the Shakyamuni Buddha, to come from Kanchipuram in India, near the Temple of the Golden Lizard, but their meeting was disappointing. The Emperor asked Bodhidharma what merit he had accumulated by building monasteries and stupas in his kingdom. “No merit” was the reply. He asked what was the supreme meaning of sacred truth. “The expanse of emptiness. Nothing sacred.” Finally, the Emperor pointed at Bodhidharma and said, “Who is that before Us?” “Don’t know,” said Bodhidharma. The Emperor didn’t understand. So Bodhidharma left Ch’ien-k’ang and wandered until he came to the Shao-lin Monastery, where he sat motionless for nine years facing a wall, and then transmitted his teachings, the origin of Ch’an in China and Japanese Zen. ~ Eliot Weinberger,
1251:Yet what keeps me from dissolving right now into a complete fairy-tale shimmer is this solid truth, a truth which has veritably built my bones over the last few years - I was not rescued by a prince; I was the administrator of my own rescue.
My thoughts turn to something I read once, something the Zen Buddhists believe. They say that an oak tree is brought into creation by two forces at the same time. Obviously, there is the acorn from which it all begins, the seed which holds all the promise and potential, which grows into the tree. Everybody can see that. But only a few can recognize that there is another force operating here as well - the future tree itself, which wants so badly to exist that it pulls the acorn into being, drawing the seedling forth with longing out of the void, guiding the evolution from nothingness to maturity. In this respect, say the Zens, it is the oak tree that creates the very acorn from which it was born. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1252:Something can be moving in one direction, smoothly, swiftly, something like a ball, or, oh, say, A LIFE, and then a bat swings, at the perfect moment, swings true, and hits that something, and it constricts...And its energy is reversed, and it fires off in the opposite direction, completely the other way to what has been, to what seems meant to be...But here's the lesson: The ball—the life, whatever—is STILL THERE. The energy hasn't destroyed it, the impact, the explosion, hasn't erased it from the world. It still exists, it's just in a different place altogether. A place it didn't expect to end up in...All the time, when I batted, I felt like it was meditation, like it was control. Like, swinging the bat at the perfect time, before you even see the ball—like that was a metaphor for something, for some kind of Zen peacefulness. What I didn't realize was: I got the metaphor wrong. I was not the bat. I was the ball. THAT—that is the lesson of the batting cage. ~ Nick Lake,
1253:Jobs's intensity was also evident in his ability to focus. He would set priorities, aim his laser attention on them, and filter out distractions. If something engaged him- the user interface for the original Macintosh, the design of the iPod and iPhone, getting music companies into the iTunes Store-he was relentless. But if he did not want to deal with something - a legal annoyance, a business issue, his cancer diagnosis, a family tug- he would resolutely ignore it. That focus allowed him to say no. He got Apple back on track by cutting all except a few core products. He made devices simpler by eliminating buttons, software simpler by eliminating features, and interfaces simpler by eliminating options.
He attributed his ability to focus and his love of simplicity to his Zen training. It honed his appreciation for intuition, showed him how to filter out anything that was distracting or unnecessary, and nurtured in him an aesthetic based on minimalism. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1254:A belligerent samurai, an old Japanese tale goes, once challenged a Zen master to explain the concept of heaven and hell. But the monk replied with scorn, “You’re nothing but a lout—I can’t waste my time with the likes of you!” His very honor attacked, the samurai flew into a rage and, pulling his sword from its scabbard, yelled, “I could kill you for your impertinence.” “That,” the monk calmly replied, “is hell.” Startled at seeing the truth in what the master pointed out about the fury that had him in its grip, the samurai calmed down, sheathed his sword, and bowed, thanking the monk for the insight. “And that,” said the monk, “is heaven.” The sudden awakening of the samurai to his own agitated state illustrates the crucial difference between being caught up in a feeling and becoming aware that you are being swept away by it. Socrates’s injunction “Know thyself” speaks to this keystone of emotional intelligence: awareness of one’s own feelings as they occur. ~ Daniel Goleman,
1255:For a long time I didn’t have a defined Dana doctrine to describe this approach; it was more a ball of string. Then one morning at a hotel I came back to my room for bed after a speaking event, and the hotel staff had placed a Zen card with a Buddhist saying on my pillow (this will make Gutfeld roll his eyes). It read, “Say little. But when you speak, utter gentle words that touch the heart. Be truthful. Express kindness. Abstain from vanity. This is the way.” I had an “Aha!” moment when I read those words, because it captured how I was trying to live my life most productively and happily. I carried the card with me for months until I tacked it in my medicine cabinet, and I still see it every morning and night when I brush my teeth. The card is a little worn, but its message never gets old. In the morning it helps set my intention for the day, and at night it reminds me to forgive myself if I haven’t lived up to it (usually because I’ve let Bob Beckel push my buttons). ~ Dana Perino,
1256:Do you remember that piece of footage on the local news, just as the first tower comes down, woman runs in off the street into a store, just gets the door closed behind her, and here comes this terrible black billowing, ash, debris, sweeping through the streets, gale force past the window. . .that was the moment, Maxi. Not when 'everything changed.' When everything was revealed. No grand Zen illumination, but a rush of blackness and death. Showing us exactly what we've become, what we've been all the time."

"And what we've always been is. . .?"

"Is living on borrowed time. Getting away cheap. Never caring about who's paying for it, who's starving somewhere else all jammed together so we can have cheap food, a house, a yard in the burbs. . .planetwide, more every day, the payback keeps gathering. And meantime the only help we get from the media is boo hoo the innocent dead. Boo fuckin hoo. You know what? All the dead are innocent. There's no uninnocent dead. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
1257:A belligerent samurai, an old Japanese tale goes, once challenged a Zen master to explain the concept of heaven and hell. The monk replied with scorn, "You're nothing but a lout - I can't waste my time with the likes of you!"
His very honor attacked, the samurai flew into a rage and, pulling his sword from its scabbard, yelled "I could kill you for your impertinence."
"That," the monk calmly replied, "is hell."
Startled at seeing the truth in what the master pointed out about the fury that had him in its grip, the samurai calmed down, sheathed his sword, and bowed, thanking the monk for the insight.
"And that,"said the monk "is heaven."

The sudden awakening of the samurai to his own agitated state illustrates the crucial difference between being caught up in a feeling and becoming aware that you are being swept away by it. Socrates's injunction "Know thyself" speaks to the keystone of emotional intelligence: awareness of one's own feelings as they occur. ~ Daniel Goleman,
1258:graphics for the Mac intosh. CHRISANN BRENNAN. Jobs’s girlfriend at Homestead High, mother of his daughter Lisa. LISA BRENNAN-JOBS. Daughter of Jobs and Chrisann Brennan, born in 1978; became a writer in New York City. NOLAN BUSHNELL. Founder of Atari and entrepreneurial role model for Jobs. BILL CAMPBELL. Apple marketing chief during Jobs’s first stint at Apple and board member and confidant after Jobs’s return in 1997. EDWIN CATMULL. A cofounder of Pixar and later a Disney executive. KOBUN CHINO. A St Zen master in California who became Jobs’s spiritual teacher. LEE CLOW. Advertising wizard who created Apple’s “1984” ad and worked with Jobs for three decades. DEBORAH “DEBI” COLEMAN. Early Mac team manager who took over Apple manufacturing. TIM COOK. Steady, calm, chief operating officer hired by Jobs in 1998; replaced Jobs as Apple CEO in August 2011. EDDY CUE. Chief of Internet services at Apple, Jobs’s wingman in dealing with content companies. ANDREA “ANDY” CUNNINGHAM. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1259:I don’t have custody. Wayne is just—We’re on good terms about our son. It’s not an issue.” “Got a number where we can reach him?” “Yes, but he’s on a plane right now. He visited for the Fourth. He’s headed back this evening.” “You sure about that? How do you know he boarded the plane?” “I’m sure he had nothing to do with this, if that’s what you’re asking. We’re not fighting over our son. My ex is the most harmless and easygoing man you’ve ever met.” “Oh, I don’t know. I’ve met some pretty easygoing fellas. I know a guy up in Maine who leads a Buddhist-themed therapy group, teaches people about managing their temper and addictions through Transcendental Meditation. The only time this guy ever lost his composure was the day his wife served him with a restraining order. First he lost his Zen, then he lost two bullets in the back of her head. But that Buddhist-themed therapy group he runs sure is popular on his cell block in Shawshank. Lotta guys with anger-management issues in there. ~ Joe Hill,
1260:Osho was very generous with his genius. When I went to Poona in 1988, he answered a question of mine. “Rumi says, ‘I want burning, burning.’ What does this burning have to do with my own possible enlightenment?” “You have asked a very dangerous question, Coleman. Burning has nothing to do with your enlightenment. This work you have done with Rumi is beautiful. It has to be, because it is coming out of Rumi’s love. But for you these poems can become ecstatic self-hypnosis.” He pretty much nailed me to the floor with that one. Sufism is good, but end up with Zen. It was a fine hit he gave me. I am still drawn to the Sufi longing and love-madness, but clarity is coming up strong on the inside. I have not assimilated his wisdom yet, but I mean to. I am very grateful to him. But it is not wisdom for everyone. Osho crafted his words to suit the individual. Ecstatic self-hypnosis might be just the thing for someone else. He was showing me a daylight beyond any beloved darkness, an ecstatic sobriety beyond any drunkenness. ~ Rumi,
1261:The empty-mindedness of chi sao applies to all activities we may perform, such as dancing. If the dancer has any idea at all of displaying his art well, he ceases to be a good dancer, for his mind stops with every movement he goes through. In all things, it is important to forget your mind and become one with the work at hand. When the mind is tied up, it feels inhibited in every move it makes and nothing will be accomplished with any sense of spontaneity. The wheel revolves when it is not too tightly attached to the axle. When it is too tight, it will never move on. As the Zen saying goes: “Into a soul absolutely free from thoughts and emotion, even the tiger finds no room to insert its fierce claws.” In chi sao the mind is devoid of all fear, inferiority complexes, viscous feeling, etc., and is free from all forms of attachment, and it is master of itself, it knows no hindrances, no inhibitions, no stoppages, no clogging, no stickiness. It then follows its own course like water; it is like the wind that blows where it lists. ~ Bruce Lee,
1262:When we sleep on someone else's pillow, we sometimes find ourselves having that person's dreams. If a married couple switches sides of the bed, for example, he will have her dreams for a while and she will have his. Nothing of the sort occurs in a hotel bed, naturally, for the simple reason that no one person has slept there long enough to leave a psychic imprint. Is the connection to the bedding place or to the space below it? Perhaps we draw up trans-neurological info-bits from the underworld to form dreams the way that exposed metal draws down oxygen molecules from the air to form rust. Dreams, the, may be a form of psychic oxidation. Each morning, the greasy rag of wakefulness wipes us clean. Sooner or later, however, we rust completely through, at which point we lose tensility, conductivity, and clear definition; turn senile or go bonkers; fade away. If we applied the rag more rigorously, this might not happen. which is why the message of Miho's Zen monks-the message of mystic masters everywhere-was and is, "Wake up! Wake up! ~ Tom Robbins,
1263:Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Bodhidharma, Sosan – they are the Masters of this law of reverse effect. And this is the difference between Yoga and Zen. Yoga makes every effort and Zen makes no effort, and Zen is truer than any Yoga. But Yoga appeals, because as far as you are concerned doing is easy – howsoever hard, but doing is easy.

Non-doing is difficult. If someone says, ”Don’t do anything,” you are at a loss. You again ask, ”What to do?” If someone says, ”Don’t do anything,” that is the most difficult thing for you. It should not be so if you understand.

Non-doing does not require any qualification. Doing may require qualification, doing may require practice. Non-doing requires no practice. That’s why Zen says enlightenment can happen in a single moment – because it is not a question of how to bring it, it is a question of how to allow it. It is just like sleep: you relax and it is there, you relax and it pops up. It is struggling within your heart to come up. You are not allowing it because you have too much activity on the surface. ~ Osho,
1264:Conta um velho conto japonês que, certo dia, um aguerrido samurai desafiou um mestre de zen a explicar-lhe os conceitos de Céu e Inferno. Mas o monge respondeu-lhe, trocista: “Não passas de um estúpido e eu não posso perder tempo com gente da tua laia!”

Ofendido na sua honra, o samurai encheu-se de raiva e, puxando da espada, gritou: “Podia matar-te pela tu impertinência”.”Isto”, replicou calmamente o monge, “é o Inferno”. Sobressaltado ao ver a verdade naquilo que o mestre lhe dizia a respeito da fúria que o dominava, o samurai acalmou-se, devolveu a espada à bainha e fez uma vénia, agradecendo ao monge aquela lição. “E isso”, disse o monge, “é o Céu”.

O súbito despertar do samurai para o seu próprio estado de agitação ilustra a diferença crucial entre ser-se apanhado por uma vaga de sensações e tomar consciência de que se está a ser arrastado por ela. A injunção de Sócratres” Conhece-te a ti mesmo” refere-se a esta pedra angular da inteligência emocional: a consciência dos nossos próprios sentimentos no instante em que eles ocorrem. ~ Daniel Goleman,
1265:The meaning of living in fidelity to the present moment, neither retreating to the past nor anticipating the future, is wonderfully illustrated by a Zen story about a monk being pursued by a ferocious tiger. The monk raced to the edge of a cliff, glanced back, and saw the growling tiger about to spring. The monk spotted a rope dangling over the edge of the cliff. He grabbed it and began shinnying down the side of the cliff out of the clutches of the tiger. Whew! Narrow escape. The monk then looked down and saw a quarry of jagged rocks five hundred feet below. He looked up and saw the tiger poised atop the cliff with bared claws. Just then, two mice began to nibble at the rope. What to do? The monk saw a strawberry within arm’s reach, growing out of the face of the cliff. He plucked it, ate it, and exclaimed, “Yum! That’s the best strawberry I’ve ever tasted in my entire life.” If he had been preoccupied with the rock below (the future) or the tiger above (the past), he would have missed the strawberry God was giving him in the present moment. Children ~ Brennan Manning,
1266:Dharma Bums refusing to subscribe to the general demand that they consume production and therefore have to work for the privilege of consuming, all that crap they didn’t really want anyway such as refrigerators, TV sets, cars, at least new fancy cars, certain hair oils and deodorants and general junk you finally always see a week later in the garbage anyway, all of them imprisoned in a system of work, produce, consume, work, produce, consume, I see a vision of a great rucksack revolution thousands or even millions of young Americans wandering around with rucksacks, going up to mountains to pray, making children laugh and old men glad, making young girls happy and old girls happier, all of ’em Zen Lunatics who go about writing poems that happen to appear in their heads for no reason and also by being kind and also by strange unexpected acts keep giving visions of eternal freedom to everybody and to all living creatures, that’s what I like about you Goldbook and Smith, you two guys from the East Coast which I thought was dead.” “We thought the West Coast was dead! ~ Jack Kerouac,
1267:The hardest thing to do in talking to a woman was taking the first step, but the most important thing to do was not to think. Not thinking is more difficult than it sounds, and yet, with women, one should never think. Never. It simply won't do. The first few times in approaching girls, during my lycée years, I had thought too much, hesitated, and as a result, flailed and failed. But even so, I discovered that all the childhood bullying directed at me had toughened me, making me believe that being rejected was better than not having the chance to be rejected at all. Thus it was that I approached girls, and now women, with such Zen negation of all doubt and fear the Buddha would approve. Sitting down next to Lana and thinking of nothing, I merely followed my instincts and my first three principles in talking to a woman: do not ask for permission; do not say hello; and do not let her speak first… Fourth principle: give a woman the chance to reject something else besides me… which gave me a few seconds to say something while she focused on (the original offer). ~ Viet Thanh Nguyen,
1268:The court is my escape and my paradise. I love basketball. I love the way you can be exhausted and sweaty and running with nine other guys, and yet, at the risk of sounding overly Zen, you are still so wonderfully alone. On the court, nothing bothers me. I see things a few seconds before they actually happen. I love anticipating a teammate’s cut and then throwing a bounce pass between two defenders. I love the rebound, boxing out, figuring angles and positioning myself, willing the ball into my hands. I love dribbling without looking down, the feel, the sense of trust, of control, almost as though the ball were on a leash. I love catching the pass, locking my eyes on the front rim, sliding my fingers into the grooves, raising the ball above my head, cocking my wrist as I begin to leap. I love the feel as I release the shot at the apex of the jump, the way my fingertips stay on the leather until the last possible moment, the way I slowly come back to the ground, the way the ball moves in an arc toward the rim, the way the bottom of the net dances when the ball goes swish. I ~ Harlan Coben,
1269:Assim, pois, meu velho confidente, num espírito de congraçamento, antes que nos juntemos aos demais - os que estão encalhados aí por toda parte, inclusive, estou certo, os loucos do volante de meia-idade que insistem em nos mandar para a Lua, os vagabundos que se crêem iluminados por Buda, os fabricantes de cigarros com filtros para homens que sabem escolher o melhor, os beatniks, os mal-ajambrados e os petulantes, os adeptos de cultos obscuros, todos os imponentes peritos que tão bem sabem o que devemos ou não fazer com nossos humildes órgãos sexuais, todos os jovens barbudos, orgulhosos e iletrados, bem como os guitarristas sem talento, os assassinos do budismo zen e os delinquentes juvenis de roupas padronizadas, todos esses que, do alto da sua infinita ignorância, olham para este esplêndido planeta onde (por favor, não me interrompa agora) passaram o Biriba, Cristo e Shakespeare -, antes de nos juntarmos a todos eles, eu muito particularmente lhe peço, velho amigo (para dizer a verdade, quase imploro), que aceite de mim este despretensioso buquê de recém-desabrochados parênteses: ((((())))). ~ J D Salinger,
1270:Zen master is not trying to give you ideas about life; he is trying to give you life itself, to make you realize life in and around you, to make you live it instead of being a mere spectator, a mere pedant absorbed in the dry bones of something which the life has long deserted. A symphony is not explained by a mathematical analysis of its notes; the mystery of a woman’s beauty is not revealed by a postmortem dissection; and no one ever understood the wonder of a bird on the wing by stuffing it and putting it in a glass case. To understand these things, you must live and move with them as they are alive. The same is true of the universe: no amount of intellectual analysis will explain it, for philosophy and science can only reveal its mechanism, never its meaning or, as the Chinese say, its Tao. “What is the Tao?” A Zen master answers, “Usual life is the very Tao.” “How does one bring oneself into accord with it?” “If you try to accord with it, you will get away from it.” For to imagine that there is a “you” separate from life which somehow has to accord with life is to fall straight into the trap. ~ Alan W Watts,
1271:What is the book (or books) you’ve given most as a gift, and why? Or what are one to three books that have greatly influenced your life? Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl. He introduces the insights that he learned from surviving imprisonment in a Nazi concentration camp. He outlines methods to discover deep meaning and purpose in life. The Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. His 81 Zen teachings are the foundation for the religion of Taoism, aimed at understanding “the way of virtues.” Lao Tzu’s depth of teachings are complicated to decode and provide foundations for wisdom. Mind Gym by Gary Mack is a book that strips down the esoteric nature of applied sport psychology. Gary introduces a variety of mindset training principles and makes them extremely easy to understand and practice. What purchase of $ 100 or less has most positively impacted your life in the last six months (or in recent memory)? A book for my son: Inch and Miles, written by coach John Wooden. We read it together on a regular basis. The joy that I get from hearing him understand Coach Wooden’s insights is fantastically rewarding. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1272:our lives. First, we’ll look at practicing the power of being present. Which sounds a lot cooler, hipper, New Age, and Zen than I intend, because what I’m talking about, as you’ll see, is simply a fundamental awareness of God’s presence in each moment of our lives. The second area is one you may know but don’t practice regularly: taking a Sabbath. Notice I said “taking” instead of “observing” the Sabbath. Knowing how to rest, to unplug, to unwind is as much a spiritual discipline as prayer or fasting. As weird as it may sound, God commands us to rest. It’s not an option to keep going at the pace, intensity, and speed at which most of us live our lives. Busyness will remain the standard for many people for years to come. But we’re called to a different standard, a way of prioritizing our time that may seem weird to everyone around us. When we follow Jesus, we’re about our Father’s business, not about the world’s busyness. Check your watch. It’s time to get weird. Chapter 2 NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. — HENRY D ~ Craig Groeschel,
1273:Two monks were once travelling together down a wet and muddy road. The rain was torrential, making it almost impossible to walk along the path. As the two men were trudging along, a beautiful girl dressed in silk appeared. She was unable to cross the path and looked distressed.

“Let me help you”, said the older monk. He picked her up and carried her over the mud. His younger male companion did not utter a word that night until they reached their lodging temple. Then after hours of restrained conversation, the younger monk exclaimed: “We monks do not touch females; it is too tempting for us and can create a bad outcome”. The older monk looked into the younger monks eyes and said, “I left the girl on the road. Are you still carrying her?”

This ancient Zen story illustrates beautifully how so many of us are trapped in the habit of constantly “re-living” the past in our minds, thus dishonouring the present moment. The young monk wasted hours distressing himself with judgment, speculation, anxiety, resentment and ultimately self-perpetuated unhappiness as a direct result of not being mindful. ~ Christopher Dines,
1274:In Korean Zen, the belief that it is good to branch out beyond what we already know is expressed in a phrase that means, literally, “not know mind.” To have a “not know mind” is a goal of creative people. It means you are open to the new, just as children are. Similarly, in Japanese Zen, that idea of not being constrained by what we already know is called “beginner’s mind.” And people practice for years to recapture and keep ahold of it. When a new company is formed, its founders must have a startup mentality—a beginner’s mind, open to everything because, well, what do they have to lose? (This is often something they later look back upon wistfully.) But when that company becomes successful, its leaders often cast off that startup mentality because, they tell themselves, they have figured out what to do. They don’t want to be beginners anymore. That may be human nature, but I believe it is a part of our nature that should be resisted. By resisting the beginner’s mind, you make yourself more prone to repeat yourself than to create something new. The attempt to avoid failure, in other words, makes failure more likely. ~ Ed Catmull,
1275:I’ve always been a slow learner in some areas of my life.mostly the areas known as myself. Or maybe I should say ‘selves.’because the fact is, I’ve never, even as a child, felt I’m only one self, only one person. I’ve always felt I’m quite a few more than one. For example, there’s my jokey self, there’s my morose and fed-up self,there’s my lewd and disgusting self. There’s my clever-clogs self, and my fading-violet-who-cant-make-up-her-mind-about-anything self. There’s my untidy-clothes-everywhere-all-over-my-room self, and my manically tidy self when I want my room to be minimalist and Zen to the nth degree. There’s my confidant, arrogant self and my polite and reasonable and good listener self. There’s my self-righteous self and my wickedly bad self, my flaky self and my bsentimental self. There are selfs I like and selfs I don’t like.there’s my little-girl selfnwhonlikes to play silly games and there’s my old-woman self when I’m quite sure I’m eighty and edging towards geriatric.
The self I show in action at any moment depends on where I am, who I’m with, the circumstances of the situation and the mood I’m in. ~ Aidan Chambers,
1276:Alex Honnold, free solo climbing phenom: The Last of the Mohicans soundtrack Rolf Potts, author of Vagabonding and others: ambitones like The Zen Effect in the key of C for 30 minutes, made by Rolfe Kent, the composer of music for movies like Sideways, Wedding Crashers, and Legally Blonde Matt Mullenweg, lead developer of WordPress, CEO of Automattic: “Everyday” by A$AP Rocky and “One Dance” by Drake Amelia Boone, the world’s most successful female obstacle course racer: “Tonight Tonight” by the Smashing Pumpkins and “Keep Your Eyes Open” by NEEDTOBREATHE Chris Young, mathematician and experimental chef: Paul Oakenfold’s “Live at the Rojan in Shanghai,” Pete Tong’s Essential Mix Jason Silva, TV and YouTube philosopher: “Time” from the Inception soundtrack by Hans Zimmer Chris Sacca: “Harlem Shake” by Baauer and “Lift Off” by Jay Z and Kanye West, featuring Beyoncé. “I can bang through an amazing amount of email with the Harlem Shake going on in the background.” Tim Ferriss: Currently I’m listening to “Circulation” by Beats Antique and “Black Out the Sun” by Sevendust, depending on whether I need flow or a jumpstart. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1277:You should not be tilted sideways, backwards, or forwards. You should be sitting straight up as if you were supporting the sky with your head. This is not just form or breathing. It expresses the key point of Buddhism. It is a perfect expression of your Buddha nature. If you want true understanding of Buddhism, you should practice this way.

   These forms are not a means of obtaining the right state of mind. To take this posture itself is the purpose of our practice. When you have this posture, you have the right state of mind, so there is no need to try to attain some special state.

   When you try to attain something, your mind starts to wander about somewhere else. When you do not try to attain anything, you have your own body and mind right here. A Zen master would say, "Kill the Buddha!" Kill the Buddha if the Buddha exists somewhere else. Kill the Buddha, because you should resume your own Buddha nature. Doing something is expressing our own nature. We do not exist for the sake of something else. We exist for the sake of ourselves. This is the fundamental teaching expressed in the forms we observe. ~ Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind Beginners Mind,
1278:In the traditional descriptions of the progress of meditation, beginning practice always involves coming to terms with the unwanted, unexplored, and disturbing aspects of our being. Although we try any number of supposedly therapeutic maneuvers, say the ancient Buddhist psychological texts, there is but one method of successfully working with such material—by wisely seeing it. As Suzuki Roshi, the first Zen master of the San Francisco Zen Center, put it in a talk entitled “Mind Weeds”: We say, “Pulling out the weeds we give nourishment to the plant.” We pull the weeds and bury them near the plant to give it nourishment. So even though you have some difficulty in your practice, even though you have some waves while you are sitting, those waves themselves will help you. So you should not be bothered by your mind. You should rather be grateful for the weeds, because eventually they will enrich your practice. If you have some experience of how the weeds in your mind change into mental nourishment, your practice will make remarkable progress. You will feel the progress. You will feel how they change into self-nourishment. . . . This is how we practice Zen.11 ~ Mark Epstein,
1279:i've been reading whitman, you know what he says, cheer up slaves, and horrify foreign despots, he means that's the attitude for the bard, the zen lunacy bard of old desert paths, see the whole thing is a world full of rucksack wanderers, dharma bums refusing to subscribe to the general demand that they consume production and there have to work for the privilege of consuming, all that crap they didn't really want anyway such as refrigerators, tv sets, cars, at least new fancy cars, certain hair oils and deodorants and general junk you finally always see a week later in the garbage anyway, all of them imprisoned in a system of work, produce, consume, work, produce, consume, i see a vision of a great rucksack revolution thousands or even millions of young americans wandering around with rucksacks, going up into the mountains to pray, making children laugh and old men glad, making young girls happy and old girls happier, all of 'em zen lunatics who go about writing poems that happen to appear in their heads for no reason and also by being kind and also by strange unexpected acts keep giving visions of eternal freedom to everybody and to all living creatures ~ Jack Kerouac,
1280:When Lana was finished, the audience clapped, whistled, and stomped, but I sat silent and stunned as she bowed and gracefully withdrew, so disarmed I could not even applaud. As the Poet introduced the next performer, all I heard was "bang bang," and when Lana returned to the table reserved for all the performers, with the seat next to her left empty by the singer who had replaced her, I told Bon I would be back in ten minutes. I heard him say, Don't do it, you stupid bastard, but without further thought I began my walk across the lounge. The hardest thing to do in talking to a woman was taking the first step, but the most important thing to do was not to think. Not thinking is more difficult than it sounds, and yet, with women, one should never think. Never. It simply won't do. The first few times in approaching girls, during my lycée years, I had thought too much, hesitated, and as a result, flailed and failed. But even so, I discovered that all the childhood bullying directed at me had toughened me, making me believe that being rejected was better than not having the chance to be rejected at all. Thus it was that I approached girls, and now women, with such Zen negation of all doubt and fear the Buddha would approve. ~ Viet Thanh Nguyen,
1281:Because I exist, you exist. Because I exist, the pebbles and the distant clouds exist. If all of these don’t truly exist, how can I?
- The existence of a speck of dust makes everything else possible. If dust does not exist, neither does the universe, nor you, nor I.” I am happy to be on this earth.
--The river reflects everything in herself. Thanks to the river’s flow, the flux of life is possible. And death lies within life, because without death there could be no life. Let us welcome the flow. Let us welcome impermanence and non-self.
-- Thanks to impermanence and non-self, we have the beautiful world praised by Zen poets — the sheen of banana trees, the tall and perfumed areca trees reaching to the sun.
-- The earth is filled with dust. Our eyes are filled with dust. There is no need to seek a Pure Land somewhere else. We only need lift our heads and see the moon and the stars.
--The essential quality is awareness. If we open our eyes, we will see. I am sure that heaven has areca, starfruit, lime, and grapefruit trees.
-- I laugh when I think how I once sought paradise as a realm outside of the world of birth and death. It is right in the world of birth and death that the miraculous truth is revealed. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1282:Win spread his hands. “But why? What about the winner do we want to emulate? His ability to blind himself to anything but the pursuit of empty aggrandizement? His ego-inflating obsession with wearing a hunk of metal around his neck? His willingness to sacrifice anything, including people, in order to best another human being on a lump of AstroTurf for a cheesy statuette?” He looked up at Myron, his always serene face suddenly lost. “Why do we applaud this selfishness, this self-love?” “Competitive drive isn’t a bad thing, Win. You’re talking about extremes.” “But it is the extremists we admire most. By its nature, what you call ‘competitive drive’ leads to extremism and destroys all in its path.” “You’re being simplistic, Win.” “It is simple, my friend.” They both settled back. Myron stared up at the exposed beams. After some time, he said, “You have it wrong.” “How so?” Myron wondered how to explain it. “When I played basketball,” he began, “I mean, when I really got into it and reached these levels you’re talking about—I barely thought about the score. I barely thought about my opponent or about beating somebody. I was alone. I was in the zone. This is going to sound stupid, but playing at the top of my game was almost Zen-like.” Win ~ Harlan Coben,
1283:translated by Richard B. Clarke Practice of Meditation by Zen Master Dogen TRUTH is perfect and complete in itself. It is not something newly discovered; it has always existed. Truth is not far away; it is ever present. It is not something to be attained since not one of your steps leads away from it. Do not follow the ideas of others, but learn to listen to the voice within yourself. Your body and mind will become clear and you will realize the unity of all things. The slightest movement of your dualistic thought will prevent you from entering the palace of meditation and wisdom. The Buddha meditated for six years, Bodhidharma for nine. The practice of meditation is not a method for the attainment of realization—it is enlightenment itself. Your search among books, word upon word, may lead you to the depths of knowledge, but it is not the way to receive the reflection of your true self. When you have thrown off your ideas as to mind and body, the original truth will fully appear. Zen is simply the expression of truth; therefore longing and striving are not the true attitudes of Zen. To actualize the blessedness of meditation you should practice with pure intention and firm determination. Your meditation room should be clean and quiet. Do not dwell in ~ Jack Kornfield,
1284:Suppose two astronauts go to the moon. When they arrive, they have an accident and find out that they have only enough oxygen for two days. There is no hope of someone coming from Earth in time to rescue them. They have only two days to live. If you asked them at that moment, "What is your deepest wish?" they would answer, "To be back home walking on the beautiful planet Earth." That would be enough for them; they would not want anything else. They would not want to be the head of a large corporation, a big celebrity or president of the United States. They would not want anything except to be back on Earth - to be walking on Earth, enjoying every step, listening to the sounds of nature and holding the hand of their beloved while contemplating the moon.

We should live every day like people who have just been rescued from the moon. We are on Earth now, and we need to enjoy walking on this precious beautiful planet. The Zen master Lin Chi said, "The miracle is not to walk on water but to walk on the Earth." I cherish that teaching. I enjoy just walking, even in busy places like airports and railway stations. In walking like that, with each step caressing our Mother Earth, we can inspire other people to do the same. We can enjoy every minute of our lives. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1285:Imagine two astronauts go to the moon, and while they’re there, there’s an accident and their ship can’t take them back to Earth. They have only enough oxygen for two days. There is no hope of someone coming from Earth in time to rescue them. They have only two days to live. If you were to ask them at that moment, “What is your deepest wish?” they would answer, “To be back home walking on our beautiful planet Earth.” That would be enough for them; they wouldn’t want anything else. They wouldn’t think of being the head of a large corporation, a famous celebrity, or the president of the United States. They wouldn’t want anything but to be back here—walking on Earth, enjoying every step, listening to the sounds of nature, or holding the hand of their beloved while contemplating the moon at night. We should live every day like people who have just been rescued from dying on the moon. We are on Earth now, and we need to enjoy walking on this precious, beautiful planet. Zen Master Linji said, “The miracle is not to walk on water or fire. The miracle is to walk on the earth.” I cherish that teaching. I enjoy just walking, even in busy places like airports and railway stations. Walking like that, with each step caressing our Mother Earth, we can inspire other people to do the same. We can enjoy every minute of our lives. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
1286:In any case, there are all of those chores that most of us can’t avoid: cleaning, straightening, raking leaves, shopping for groceries, driving the children to various activities, preparing food, washing dishes, washing the car, commuting, performing the routine, repetitive aspects of our jobs. This is the “in-between time,” the stuff we have to take care of before getting on to the things that count. But if you stop to think about it, most of life is “in between.” When goal orientation comes to dominate our thoughts, little that seems to really count is left. During the usual nonplayoff year, the actual playing time for a National Football League team is sixteen hours. For the players, does this mean that the other 8,744 hours of the year are “in between”? Does all time take its significance only in terms of the product, the bottom line? And if winning, as the saying goes, is the only thing, does that mean that even the climactic hours achieve their worth merely through victory? There’s another way of thinking about it. Zen practice is ostensibly organized around periods of sitting in meditation and chanting. Yet every Zen master will tell you that building a stone wall or washing dishes is essentially no different from formal meditation. The quality of a Zen student’s practice is defined just as much by how he or she sweeps ~ George Leonard,
1287:Western rational thought is not an innate human characteristic; it is learned and is the great achievement of Western civilization. In the villages of India, they never learned it. They learned something else, which is in some ways just as valuable but in other ways is not. That’s the power of intuition and experiential wisdom. Coming back after seven months in Indian villages, I saw the craziness of the Western world as well as its capacity for rational thought. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things—that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it. Zen has been a deep influence in my life ever since. At one point I was thinking about going to Japan and trying to get into the Eihei-ji monastery, but my spiritual advisor urged me to stay here. He said there is nothing over there that isn’t here, and he was correct. I learned the truth of the Zen saying that if you are willing to travel around the world to meet a teacher, one will appear next door. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1288:is your treasure. It is precisely what is making you ask the question at this very moment. Everything is stored in this precious treasure-house of yours. It is there at your disposal, you can use it as you wish, nothing is lacking. You are the master of everything. Why, then, are you running away from yourself and seeking for things outside?" Upon hearing these words, Dae Ju attained enlighten- ment. 22. The Moon of Clear Mind One Sunday evening, after a Dharrna talk at the Providence Zen Center, a student asked Seung Sahn Soen-sa, "How can I get beyond just verbalizing the question 'What am I?' " Soen-sa said, "You want this question to grow. This mind is no good. This is attachment thinking. You must cut off this thinking, and only do hard training. It is not important for the question to grow. What is important is one moment of clear mind. Clear mind is before thinking. If you experience this mind, you have already attained enlightenment. If you experience this for a short t i m e - e v e n for one moment-this is enlightenment. All the rest of the time you may be think- ing, but you shouldn't worry about this thinking. It is just your karma. You must not be attached to this thinking. You must not force it to stop or force clear mind to grow. It will grow by itself, as your karma gradually disappears. "Clear mind is like the full moon in the sky. Sometimes ~ Anonymous,
1289:Even though they were not fervent about their faith, Jobs’s parents wanted him to have a religious upbringing, so they took him to the Lutheran church most Sundays. That came to an end when he was thirteen. In July 1968 Life magazine published a shocking cover showing a pair of starving children in Biafra. Jobs took it to Sunday school and confronted the church’s pastor. “If I raise my finger, will God know which one I’m going to raise even before I do it?” The pastor answered, “Yes, God knows everything.” Jobs then pulled out the Life cover and asked, “Well, does God know about this and what’s going to happen to those children?” “Steve, I know you don’t understand, but yes, God knows about that.” Jobs announced that he didn’t want to have anything to do with worshipping such a God, and he never went back to church. He did, however, spend years studying and trying to practice the tenets of Zen Buddhism. Reflecting years later on his spiritual feelings, he said that religion was at its best when it emphasized spiritual experiences rather than received dogma. “The juice goes out of Christianity when it becomes too based on faith rather than on living like Jesus or seeing the world as Jesus saw it,” he told me. “I think different religions are different doors to the same house. Sometimes I think the house exists, and sometimes I don’t. It’s the great mystery. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1290:Buddhist meditation takes this untrained, everyday mind as its natural starting point, and it requires the development of one particular attentional posture—of naked, or bare, attention. Defined as “the clear and single-minded awareness of what actually happens to us and in us at the successive moments of perception,”1 bare attention takes this unexamined mind and opens it up, not by trying to change anything but by observing the mind, emotions, and body the way they are. It is the fundamental tenet of Buddhist psychology that this kind of attention is, in itself, healing: that by the constant application of this attentional strategy, all of the Buddha’s insights can be realized for oneself. As mysterious as the literature on meditation can seem, as elusive as the koans of the Zen master sometimes sound, there is but one underlying instruction that is critical to Buddhist thought. Common to all schools of thought, from Sri Lanka to Tibet, the unifying theme of the Buddhist approach is this remarkable imperative: “Pay precise attention, moment by moment, to exactly what you are experiencing, right now, separating out your reactions from the raw sensory events.” This is what is meant by bare attention: just the bare facts, an exact registering, allowing things to speak for themselves as if seen for the first time, distinguishing any reactions from the core event. ~ Mark Epstein,
1291:Ao relacionar-se com o mundo objetivo, por intermédio de suas faculdades, o mundo exterior torna-se real para o homem, e de fato é só o “amor” que faz o homem verdadeiramente crer na realidade do mundo objetivo a ele extrínseco. Sujeito e objeto não podem ser separados . “O olho transformou-se em olho humano quando seu objeto se converteu em um objeto humano, social, criado pelo homem e a este destinado... Eles [os sentidos] se relacionam com a coisa devido a esta, mas a coisa em si mesma é uma relação humana objetiva para si própria e para o homem, e vice-versa. A necessidade e o gozo perderam, assim, seu caráter egoísta, e a natureza perdeu sua mera utilidade pelo fato de sua utilização ter-se transformado em utilização humana. (Com efeito, só posso relacionar-me de maneira humana com uma coisa quando esta se relaciona de maneira humana com o homem)”
Esta última afirmação é quase exatamente a mesma feita no pensamento do budismo Zen, assim como por Goethe. De fato o pensamento de Goethe, Hegel e Marx se acha intimamente ligado ao do Zen. O que há de comum neles é a ideia do homem superar a cisão entre sujeito e objeto; o objeto é um objeto, mas no entanto cessa de ser objeto , e nesta nova abordagem o homeme se funde com o objeto, conquanto ele e o objeto continuem a ser dois. O homem ao relacionar-se humanamente com o mundo objetivo, supera a alienação de si mesmo. ~ Erich Fromm,
1292:The Obstacles That Lie Before Us There is an old Zen story about a king whose people had grown soft and entitled. Dissatisfied with this state of affairs, he hoped to teach them a lesson. His plan was simple: He would place a large boulder in the middle of the main road, completely blocking entry into the city. He would then hide nearby and observe their reactions. How would they respond? Would they band together to remove it? Or would they get discouraged, quit, and return home? With growing disappointment, the king watched as subject after subject came to this impediment and turned away. Or, at best, tried halfheartedly before giving up. Many openly complained or cursed the king or fortune or bemoaned the inconvenience, but none managed to do anything about it. After several days, a lone peasant came along on his way into town. He did not turn away. Instead he strained and strained, trying to push it out of the way. Then an idea came to him: He scrambled into the nearby woods to find something he could use for leverage. Finally, he returned with a large branch he had crafted into a lever and deployed it to dislodge the massive rock from the road. Beneath the rock were a purse of gold coins and a note from the king, which said: “The obstacle in the path becomes the path. Never forget, within every obstacle is an opportunity to improve our condition.” What holds you back? ~ Ryan Holiday,
1293:Recommended Reading
David Foster Wallace - Infinite Jest
DH Lawrence - The Rainbow
Gabriel Garcia Marquez - Love in the Time of Cholera
Karl Ove Knausgaard - My Struggle
Virginia Woolf - To The Lighthouse
Ben Lerner - The Topeka School
Sally Rooney - Conversations With Friends
Nell Zink - The Wallcreeper
Elena Ferrante - The Days of Abandonment
Jack Kerouac - Dharma Bums
Walt Whitman - Leaves of Grass
Michael Murphy - Golf in the Kingdom
Barbara Kingsolver - Prodigal Summer
Albertine Sarrazin - Astragal
Rebecca Solnit - The Faraway Nearby
Michael Paterniti - Love and Other Ways of Dying
Rainer Maria Rilke - Book of Hours
James Baldwin - Another Country
Roberto Calasso - Ka
Translation by S. Radhakrishan - Principle Upanisads
Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism
Translation by Georg Feuerstein - Yoga Sutra
Richard Freeman - The Mirror of Yoga
Translation by S. Radhakrishan - The Bhagavad Gita
Shrunyu Suzuki - Zen Mind Beginner's Mind
Heinrich Zimmer - Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization
Sogyal Rinpoche - The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying
Joseph Campbell - Myths of Light
Joseph Campbell - The Hero With A Thousand Faces
Sri Aurobindo - Savitri
Thomas Meyers - Anatomy Trains
Wendy Doniger - The Hindus ~ Jason Bowman, http://www.jasonbowmanyoga.com/recommended-reading,
1294:Ancient tradition has a saying: 'The infinitely distant is the return.' Among the maxims of Zen that point in the same direction is the statement that the 'great revelation,' acquired through a series of mental and spiritual crises, consists in the recognition that 'no one and nothing 'extraordinary' exists in the beyond'; only the real exists. Reality is, however, lived in a state in which 'there is no subject of the experience nor any object that is experienced,' and under the sign of a type of absolute presence, 'the immanent making itself transcendent and the transcendent immanent.' The teaching is that at the point at which one seeks the Way, one finds oneself further from it, the same being valid for the perfection and 'realization' of the self. The cedar in the courtyard, a cloud casting its shadow on the hills, falling rain, a flower in bloom, the monotonous sound of waves: all these 'natural' and banal facts can suggest absolute illumination, the satori. As mere facts they are without meaning, finality, or intention, but as such they have an absolute meaning. Reality appears this way, in the pure state of 'things being as they are.' The moral counterpart is indicated in sayings such as: 'The pure and immaculate ascetic does not enter nirvana, and the monk who breaks the rules does not go to hell,' or: 'You have no liberation to seek from bonds, because you have never been bound. ~ Julius Evola,
1295:As Zacharias approached his conveyance, the scope of the undertaking to which he had agreed began to dawn upon him.

The chaise that was to bear him and Prunella to Fobdown Purlieu was indeed waiting. It was doubtful whether it was capable of doing anything else.

Turrill was a good-humoured man on the whole, whose anxieties about driving the Sorcerer Royal had been eased by Mr. Wythe’s being as pleasant-spoken and openhanded a gentleman as he had ever met (“Even if he is black as coal, I am sure that is none of his fault, and it would be a dull world if God had cut us all from the same pattern”). It was no wonder he felt hardly used upon this occasion, however, and Zacharias was not surprised to be addressed in terms of reproach.

“You hadn’t ought to have done it, sir,” said the coachman. “You may turn me into a frog for it, but I must speak my mind, and I say you hadn’t ought to have done it. If I had not given satisfaction, you had only to say the word and I should have hopped to it, not wishing to offend any gentleman of such a liberal disposition as yourself, and not being such a fool as to desire to vex a sorcerer besides. There was no call to go a-magicking the chaise—and where you got the squashes for it out of season, I am sure I don’t know.”

“Neither do I,” said Zacharias, bending down to examine what had previously been a wheel, and was now an enormous squash. ~ Zen Cho,
1296:Zen has been called the "religion before religion," which is to say that anyone can practice, including those committed to another faith. And that phrase evokes that natural religion of our early childhood, when heaven and a splendorous earth were one. But soon the child's clear eye is clouded over by ideas and opinions, preconceptions and abstractions. Not until years later does an instinct come that a vital sense of mystery has been withdrawn. The sun glints through the pines, and the heart is pierced in a moment of beauty and strange pain, like a memory of paradise. After that day, at the bottom of each breath, there is a hollow place filled with longing. We become seekers without knowing that we seek, and at first, we long for something "greater" than ourselves, something apart and far away. It is not a return to childhood, for childhood is not a truly enlightened state. Yet to seek one's own true nature is "a way to lead you to your long lost home." To practice Zen means to realize one's existence moment after moment, rather than letting life unravel in regret of the past and daydreaming of the future. To "rest in the present" is a state of magical simplicity...out of the emptiness can come a true insight into our natural harmony all creation. To travel this path, one need not be a 'Zen Buddhist', which is only another idea to be discarded like 'enlightenment,' and like 'the Buddha' and like 'God. ~ Peter Matthiessen,
1297:Cuando el gran maestro Zen Roshi Taji estaba en su lecho de muerte, sus discípulos mayores se congregaron a su lado. Uno de ellos recordó que a Roshi le encantaba un cierto tipo de pastel y dedicó medio día a recorrer las pastelerías de Tokio buscándolo, a fin de ofrecérselo al maestro en ese momento final. Con una sonrisa lánguida, Roshi aceptó un trozo y comenzó a masticarlo lentamente. A medida que se iba debilitando, sus discípulos se fueron acercando y, finalmente, le preguntaron si tenía unas últimas palabras para ellos. “Sí”, respondió Roshi. Los discípulos se inclinaron ansiosos sobre el lecho: “¡Por favor, dínoslas!”. “¡Pero, caramba, este pastel está delicioso!”, y, diciendo esas palabras, expiró. Un maestro Zen no habla de Dios, no habla de la muerte, no habla del más allá. Habla sobre el momento inmediato. Estaba masticando un trozo de pastel, y esa era la realidad. En ese momento, eso era lo real. Lo inmediato es lo real. La respuesta es muy inesperada: “¡Pero, caramba, este pastel está delicioso!”, muy presente. No pueden imaginar a Ramakrishna diciendo eso, ni a un cristiano o a un musulmán. Imposible. Solamente a un maestro Zen… En ese momento, Dios es el sabor delicioso en su boca. Esa es la verdad en ese momento. No hay nada más que la verdad de ese momento. Ni siquiera en su lecho de muerte aplica un maestro Zen algún sistema de creencia; no trae la mente a la situación. Permanece fiel a lo que sea que es. ~ Osho,
1298:Chicago Zen
Now tidy your house,
dust especially your living room
and do not forget to name
all your children.
II
Watch your step. Sight may strike you
blind in unexpected places.
The traffic light turns orange
on 57th and Dorchester, and you stumble,
you fall into a vision of forest fires,
enter a frothing Himalayan river,
rapid, silent.
On the 14th floor,
Lake Michigan crawls and crawls
in the window. Your thumbnail
cracks a lobster louse on the windowpane
from your daughter's hair
and you drown, eyes open,
towards the Indies, the antipodes.
And you, always so perfectly sane.
III
Now you know what you always knew:
the country cannot be reached
by jet. Nor by boat on jungle river,
hashish behind the Monkey-temple,
nor moonshot to the cratered Sea
of Tranquillity, slim circus girls
on a tightrope between tree and tree
with white parasols, or the one
and only blue guitar.
Nor by any
other means of transport,
migrating with a clean valid passport,
no, not even by transmigrating
without any passport at all,
but only by answering ordinary
black telephones, questions
walls and small children ask,
and answering all calls of nature.
IV
Watch your step, watch it, I say,
especially at the first high
threshold,
and the sudden low
one near the end
of the flight
of stairs,
and watch
for the last
step that's never there.
~ A. K. Ramanujan,
1299:I'm profoundly attracted to classical Zen literature, I have the gall to lecture on it and the literature of Mahayana Buddhism one night a week at college, but my life itself couldn't very conceivably be less Zenful than it is, and what little I've been able to apprehend - I pick that verb with care - of the Zen experience has been a by-result of following my own rather natural path of extreme Zenlessness. Largely because Seymour himself literally begged me to do so, and I never knew him to be wrong in these matters.) Happily for me, and probably for everybody, I don't believe it's really necessary to bring Zen into this. The method of marble-shooting that Seymour, by sheer intuition, was recommending to me can be related, I'd say, legitimately and un-Easternly, to the fine art of snapping a cigarette end into a small wastebasket from across a room. An art, I believe, of which most male smokers are true masters only when either they don't care a hoot whether or not the butt goes into the basket or the room has been cleared of eyewitnesses, including, quite so to speak, the cigarette snapper himself. I'm going to try hard not to chew on that illustration, delectable as I find it, but I do think it proper to append - to revert momentarily to curb marbles - that after Seymour himself shot a marble, he would be all smiles when he heard a responsive click of glass striking glass, but it never appeared to be clear to him whose winning click it was. And it's also a fact that someone almost invariably had to pick up the marble he'd won and hand it to him. ~ J D Salinger,
1300:Why Ubuntu: If I were you I'd just install Ubuntu into a dual-boot partition (the Ubuntu website has instructions for this) and learn as you go. Ubuntu is similar enough to Windows that you should be able to start using it right away without much difficulty.
   For running your Python scripts you'll want to drop into the shell (Ctrl + Alt + T If memory serves me right). As you become more comfortable with Ubuntu, you can start using the shell more and more. The shell is what gives you access to the power of Unix; every time you need to do something tedious and repetitive, try to find out how to do it through the shell.
   Eventually you will find yourself using the shell constantly. You'll wonder how you ever managed without it, and deride other operating systems for their lack of sensible programming tools. One day you'll realise that desktop window managers are a needless distraction. You start using xmonad or awesomewm. Eventually you realise that this, too, is a bastardisaton of the Unix vision and start using tmux exclusively. Then suddenly it hits you - every computer, every operating system, no matter how insignificant or user-friendly, has the Unix nature. All of them are merely streams from where you can ssh back into the ocean of Unix. Having achieved enlightenment you are equally content using an iPad as your main work computer, using powershell in Windows or SSH into a Digital Ocean droplet from your parent's computer. This is the Zen of Unix.
   ~ JohnyTex, https://www.reddit.com/r/learnprogramming/comments/38zytg/is_it_worth_my_time_to_learn_linux_while_learning,
1301:This is great. But what I’m grasping at is an idea about a subtler goal. This thinking owes a lot to conversations with Manjula Waldron of Ohio State University, an engineering professor who also happens to be a hospital chaplain. This feels embarrassingly Zen-ish for me to spout, being a short, hypomanic guy with a Brooklyn accent, but here goes: Maybe the goal isn’t to maximize the contrast between a low baseline and a high level of activation. Maybe the idea is to have both simultaneously. Huh? Maybe the goal would be for your baseline to be something more than the mere absence of activation, a mere default, but to instead be an energized calm, a proactive choice. And for the ceiling to consist of some sort of equilibrium and equanimity threading through the crazed arousal. I have felt this a few times playing soccer, inept as I am at it, where there’s a moment when, successful outcome or not, every physiological system is going like mad, and my body does something that my mind didn’t even dream of, and the two seconds when that happened seemed to take a lot longer than it should have. But this business about the calm amid the arousal isn’t just another way of talking about “good stress” (a stimulating challenge, as opposed to a threat). Even when the stressor is bad and your heart is racing in crisis, the goal should be to somehow make the fraction of a second between each heartbeat into an instant that expands in time and allows you to regroup. There, I have no idea what I’m talking about, but I think there might be something important lurking there. Enough said. ~ Robert M Sapolsky,
1302:Want to Read
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Zen in the Art of WritingZen in the Art of Writing by Ray Bradbury
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Zen in the Art of Writing Quotes (showing 1-30 of 90)
“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”
― Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing
tags: writing 5923 likes Like
“I have never listened to anyone who criticized my taste in space travel, sideshows or gorillas. When this occurs, I pack up my dinosaurs and leave the room.”
― Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing
tags: humour, individuality, science-fiction 5858 likes Like
“Every morning I jump out of bed and step on a landmine. The landmine is me. After the explosion, I spend the rest of the day putting the pieces together.”
― Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing
tags: chaos, construction, creative-process, destruction, writers, writing 220 likes Like
“That's the great secret of creativity. You treat ideas like cats: you make them follow you.”
― Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing
tags: cats, creativity, ideas 195 likes Like
“You grow ravenous. You run fevers. You know exhilarations. You can't sleep at night, because your beast-creature ideas want out and turn you in your bed. It is a grand way to live.”
― Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing
tags: ideas, writing 191 likes Like
“Plot is no more than footprints left in the snow after your characters have run by on their way to incredible destinations.”
― Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing ~ Ray Bradbury,
1303:Well-being is the state of having arrived at the full development of reason: reason not in the sense of a merely intellectual judgment, but in that of grasping truth by “letting things be” (to use Heidegger’s term) as they are. Well-being is possible only to the degree to which one has overcome one’s narcissism; to the degree to which one is open, responsive, sensitive, awake, empty (in the Zen sense). Well-being means to be fully related to man and nature affectively, to overcome separateness and alienation, to arrive at the experience of oneness with all that exists—and yet to experience myself at the same time as the separate entity I am, as the individual. Well-being means to be fully born, to become what one potentially is; it means to have the full capacity for joy and for sadness or, to put it still differently, to awake from the half-slumber the average man lives in, and to be fully awake. If it is all that, it means also to be creative; that is, to react and to respond to myself, to others, to everything that exists—to react and to respond as the real, total man I am to the reality of everybody and everything as he or it is. In this act of true response lies the area of creativity, of seeing the world as it is and experiencing it as my world, the world created and transformed by my creative grasp of it, so that the world ceases to be a strange world “over there” and becomes my world. Well-being means, finally, to drop one’s Ego, to give up greed, to case chasing after the preservation and the aggrandizement of the Ego, to be and to experience one’s self in the act of being, not in having, preserving, coveting, using. ~ Erich Fromm,
1304:I remember a vivid talk by the Japanese Zen philosopher Dr. Daisetz T. Suzuki that opened with an unforgettable contrast of the Occidental and Oriental understandings of the God-man-nature mystery. Commenting first on the Biblical view of the state of man following the Fall in Eden, “Man,” he observed, “is against God, Nature is against God, and Man and Nature are against each other. God’s own likeness (Man), God’s own creation (Nature) and God himself - all three are at war.” Then, expounding the Oriental view, “Nature,” he said, “is the bosom whence we come and whither we go.” “Nature produces Man out of itself; Man cannot be outside of Nature.” “I am in Nature and Nature is in me.” The Godhead as highest Being is to be comprehended, he continued, as prior to creation, “in whom there was yet neither Man nor Nature.” “As soon as a name is given, the Godhead ceases to be Godhead. Man and Nature spring up and we get caught in the maze of abstract conceptual vocabulary.”

We in the West have named our God; or rather, we have had the Godhead named for us in a book from a time and place that are not our own. And we have been taught to have faith not only in the absolute existence of this metaphysical fiction, but also in its relevance to the shaping of our lives. In the great East, on the other hand, the accent is on experience: on one’s own experience, furthermore, not a faith in someone else’s. And the various disciplines taught are of ways to the attainment of unmistakable experiences - ever deeper, ever greater - of one’s own identity with whatever one knows as “divine”: identity, and beyond that, then, transcendence. ~ Joseph Campbell,
1305:MY BOSS SENDS me home because of all the dried blood on my pants, and I am overjoyed.
The hole punched through my cheek doesn’t ever heal. I’m going to work, and my punched-out eye sockets are two swollen-up black bagels around the little piss holes I have left to see through. Until today, it really pissed me off that I’d become this totally centered Zen Master and nobody had noticed. Still, I’m doing the little FAX thing. I write little HAIKU things and FAX them around to everyone. When I pass people in the hall at work, I get totally ZEN right in everyone’s hostile little FACE.
Worker bees can leave
Even drones can fly away
The queen is their slave

You give up all your worldly possessions and your car and go live in a rented house in the toxic waste part of town where late at night, you can hear Marla and Tyler in his room, calling each other hum; butt wipe.
Take it, human butt wipe.
Do it, butt wipe.
Choke it down. Keep it down, baby.
Just by contrast, this makes me the calm little center of the world.
Me, with my punched-out eyes and dried blood in big black crusty stains on my pants, I’m saying HELLO to everybody at work. HELLO! Look at me. HELLO! I am so ZEN. This is BLOOD. This is NOTHING. Hello. Everything is nothing, and it’s so cool to be ENLIGHTENED. Like me.
Sigh.
Look. Outside the window. A bird.
My boss asked if the blood was my blood.
The bird flies downwind. I’m writing a little haiku in my head.

Without just one nest
A bird can call the world home
Life is your career

I’m counting on my fingers: five, seven, five. The blood, is it mine? Yeah, I say. Some of it. This is a wrong answer. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1306:Coming back to America was, for me, much more of a cultural shock than going to India. The people in the Indian countryside don’t use their intellect like we do, they use their intuition instead, and their intuition is far more developed than in the rest of the world. Intuition is a very powerful thing, more powerful than intellect, in my opinion. That’s had a big impact on my work. Western rational thought is not an innate human characteristic; it is learned and is the great achievement of Western civilization. In the villages of India, they never learned it. They learned something else, which is in some ways just as valuable but in other ways is not. That’s the power of intuition and experiential wisdom. Coming back after seven months in Indian villages, I saw the craziness of the Western world as well as its capacity for rational thought. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things—that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it. Zen has been a deep influence in my life ever since. At one point I was thinking about going to Japan and trying to get into the Eihei-ji monastery, but my spiritual advisor urged me to stay here. He said there is nothing over there that isn’t here, and he was correct. I learned the truth of the Zen saying that if you are willing to travel around the world to meet a teacher, one will appear next door. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1307:Coming back to America was, for me, much more of a cultural shock than going to India. The people in the Indian countryside don’t use their intellect like we do, they use their intuition instead, and their intuition is far more developed than in the rest of the world. Intuition is a very powerful thing, more powerful than intellect, in my opinion. That’s had a big impact on my work. Western rational thought is not an innate human characteristic; it is learned and is the great achievement of Western civilization. In the villages of India, they never learned it. They learned something else, which is in some ways just as valuable but in other ways is not. That’s the power of intuition and experiential wisdom. Coming back after seven months in Indian villages, I saw the craziness of the Western world as well as its capacity for rational thought. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things—that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it. Zen has been a deep influence in my life ever since. At one point I was thinking about going to Japan and trying to get into the Eihei-ji monastery, but my spiritual advisor urged me to stay here. He said there is nothing over there that isn’t here, and he was correct. I learned the truth of the Zen saying that if you are willing to travel around the world to meet a teacher, one will appear next door. Jobs ~ Walter Isaacson,
1308:The system can be paralyzed in yet another way. Every feedback system needs a margin of “lag” or error. If we try to make a thermostat absolutely accurate–that is, if we bring the upper and lower limits of temperature very close together in an attempt to hold the temperature at a constant 70 degrees–the whole system will break down. For to the extent that the upper and lower limits coincide, the signals for switching off and switching on will coincide! If 70 degrees is both the lower and upper limit the “go” sign will also be the “stop” sign; “yes” will imply “no” and “no” will imply “yes.” Whereupon the mechanism will start “trembling,” going on and off, on and off, until it shakes itself to pieces. The system is too sensitive and shows symptoms which are startlingly like human anxiety. For when a human being is so self-conscious, so self-controlled that he cannot let go of himself, he dithers or wobbles between opposites. This is precisely what is meant in Zen by going round and round on “the wheel of birth-and-death,” for the Buddhist samsara is the prototype of all vicious circles. We saw that when the furnace responds too closely to the thermostat, it cannot go ahead without also trying to stop, or stop without also trying to go ahead. This is just what happens to the human being, to the mind, when the desire for certainty and security prompts identification between the mind and its own image of itself. It cannot let go of itself. It feels that it should not do what it is doing, and that it should do what it is not doing. It feels that it should not be what it is, and be what it isn’t. Furthermore, the effort to remain always “good” or “happy” is like trying to hold the thermostat to a constant 70 degrees by making the lower limit the same as the upper. ~ Alan W Watts,
1309:Why are we as helpless, or more so, than our ancestors were in facing the chaos that interferes with happiness? There are at least two good explanations for this failure. In the first place, the kind of knowledge—or wisdom—one needs for emancipating consciousness is not cumulative. It cannot be condensed into a formula; it cannot be memorized and then routinely applied. Like other complex forms of expertise, such as a mature political judgment or a refined aesthetic sense, it must be earned through trial-and-error experience by each individual, generation after generation. Control over consciousness is not simply a cognitive skill. At least as much as intelligence, it requires the commitment of emotions and will. It is not enough to know how to do it; one must do it, consistently, in the same way as athletes or musicians who must keep practicing what they know in theory. And this is never easy. Progress is relatively fast in fields that apply knowledge to the material world, such as physics or genetics. But it is painfully slow when knowledge is to be applied to modify our own habits and desires. Second, the knowledge of how to control consciousness must be reformulated every time the cultural context changes. The wisdom of the mystics, of the Sufi, of the great yogis, or of the Zen masters might have been excellent in their own time—and might still be the best, if we lived in those times and in those cultures. But when transplanted to contemporary California those systems lose quite a bit of their original power. They contain elements that are specific to their original contexts, and when these accidental components are not distinguished from what is essential, the path to freedom gets overgrown by brambles of meaningless mumbo jumbo. Ritual form wins over substance, and ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
1310:After finishing their main course and dessert, she and Cady prepared her extra dish. Sophia had decided to make the girls' favorite dinner- beef tenderloin with peppercorn sauce. Soon enough they were plating and rushing back and forth to the huge banquet table set up in the courtyard. Pouring wine and adjusting garnishes and offering smiles to the judges.
The ambience of this meal was Sophia's idea of romance. The table was draped with ivory linen and topped with glass jars of flowers. Bouquets of Rosa rugosa and Queen Anne's lace were nestled among votives and bottles of wine. The local glassblower had provided an assortment of pottery dishes and hand-blown goblets. Strands of white lights dangled from the surrounding trees.
She and Elliott and the girls plated together, having reached some sort of exhausted Zen state. Emilia scooped the risotto, Elliott placed the salmon on top, Sophia added the three tiny sides shaped with a round cookie cutter. Elliott drizzled his sauce onto the final product. He brushed his shoulder against Sophia each time, needing that physical connection. The plates looked exquisite, artistic. Perfect.
She tried to ignore the overwhelming stress of the moment and focus on the food. Cady and Emilia added garnishes- fresh herbs and flowers. And Cady had a whole sheet of candied violets ready to sprinkle on their dessert. It made Elliott laugh and tease them all about being a family of garden sprites. When they finally got to the head of the table and faced a sea of critics, Sophia felt confident about their choices. They'd prepared a beautiful meal that successfully showcased Elliott's love for Scottish tradition, local Vermont products, and the Brown family's love of fresh vegetables and herbs. All the components meshed together into one cohesive meal. ~ Penny Watson,
1311:Nothingness is the fragrance of the beyond. It is the opening of the heart to the transcendental. It is the unfoldment of the one-thousand-petalled lotus. It is man's destiny. Man is complete only when he has come to this fragrance, when he has come to this absolute nothingness inside his being, when this nothingness has spread all over him, when he is just a pure sky, unclouded. This nothingness is what Buddha calls nirvana. First we have to understand what this nothingness actually is, because it is not just empty; it is full, it is overflowing. Never for a single moment think that nothingness is a negative state, an absence, no. Nothingness is simply no-thingness. Things disappear, only the ultimate substance remains. The identity of "yes" and "no" is the secret of nothingness. Nothingness is not identical with "no", nothingness is the identity of "yes" and "no", where polarities are no more polarities, where opposites are no more opposites. When you make love to a woman or to a man, the point of orgasm is the point of nothingness. At that moment the woman is no more a woman and the man is no more a man. Those forms have disappeared. That polarity between man and woman is no more there; it is utterly relaxed. They have both melted into each other. They have unformed themselves, they have gone into a state which cannot be defined. The identity of yes and no is the secret of emptiness, nothingness, nirvana. Emptiness is not just empty; it is a presence, it is the ultimate peak of consciousness.a very solid presence. If you want to know it you will have to go into life, into some situation where yes and no meet, then you will know it. Where the body and the soul meet, when the world and God meet, where opposites are no longer opposites only then will you have a taste of it. The taste of it is the taste of Tao, of Zen, of Hassidism, of Yoga. ~ Osho,
1312:Each person is born with an unencumbered spot, free of expectation and regret, free of ambition and embarrassment, free of fear and worry; an umbilical spot of grace where we were each first touched by God. It is this spot of grace that issues peace. Psychologists call this spot the Psyche, Theologians call it the Soul, Jung calls it the Seat of the Unconscious, Hindu masters call it Atman, Buddhists call it Dharma, Rilke calls it Inwardness, Sufis call it Qalb, and Jesus calls it the Center of our Love.

To know this spot of Inwardness is to know who we are, not by surface markers of identity, not by where we work or what we wear or how we like to be addressed, but by feeling our place in relation to the Infinite and by inhabiting it. This is a hard lifelong task, for the nature of becoming is a constant filming over of where we begin, while the nature of being is a constant erosion of what is not essential. Each of us lives in the midst of this ongoing tension, growing tarnished or covered over, only to be worn back to that incorruptible spot of grace at our core.

When the film is worn through, we have moments of enlightenment, moments of wholeness, moments of Satori as the Zen sages term it, moments of clear living when inner meets outer, moments of full integrity of being, moments of complete Oneness. And whether the film is a veil of culture, of memory, of mental or religious training, of trauma or sophistication, the removal of that film and the restoration of that timeless spot of grace is the goal of all therapy and education.

Regardless of subject matter, this is the only thing worth teaching: how to uncover that original center and how to live there once it is restored. We call the filming over a deadening of heart, and the process of return, whether brought about through suffering or love, is how we unlearn our way back to God ~ Mark Nepo,
1313:Also by Alan Watts The Spirit of Zen (1936) The Legacy of Asia and Western Man (1937) The Meaning of Happiness (1940) The Theologica Mystica of St. Dionysius (1944) (translation) Behold the Spirit (1948) Easter: Its Story and Meaning (1950) The Supreme Identity (1950) The Wisdom of Insecurity (1951) Myth and Ritual in Christianity (1953) The Way of Zen (1957) Nature, Man, and Woman (1958) “This Is It” and Other Essays on Zen and Spiritual Experience (1960) Psychotherapy East and West (1961) The Joyous Cosmology: Adventures in the Chemistry of Consciousness (1962) The Two Hands of God: The Myths of Polarity (1963) Beyond Theology: The Art of Godmanship (1964) The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are (1966) Nonsense (1967) Does It Matter?: Essays on Man’s Relation to Materiality (1970) Erotic Spirituality: The Vision of Konarak (1971) The Art of Contemplation (1972) In My Own Way: An Autobiography 1915–1965 (1972) Cloud-hidden, Whereabouts Unknown: A Mountain Journal (1973) Posthumous Publications Tao: The Watercourse Way (unfinished at the time of his death in 1973, published in 1975) The Essence of Alan Watts (1974) Essential Alan Watts (1976) Uncarved Block, Unbleached Silk: The Mystery of Life (1978) Om: Creative Meditations (1979) Play to Live (1982) Way of Liberation: Essays and Lectures on the Transformation of the Self (1983) Out of the Trap (1985) Diamond Web (1986) The Early Writings of Alan Watts (1987) The Modern Mystic: A New Collection of Early Writings (1990) Talking Zen (1994) Become Who You Are (1995) Buddhism: The Religion of No-Religion (1995) The Philosophies of Asia (1995) The Tao of Philosophy (1995) Myth and Religion (1996) Taoism: Way Beyond Seeking (1997) Zen and the Beat Way (1997) Culture of Counterculture (1998) Eastern Wisdom: What Is Zen?, What Is Tao?, An Introduction to Meditation (2000) Eastern Wisdom, Modern Life: Collected Talks: 1960–1969 (2006) ~ Alan W Watts,
1314:Distance changes utterly when you take the world on foot. A mile becomes a long way, two miles literally considerable, ten miles whopping, fifty miles at the very limits of conception. The world, you realize, is enormous in a way that only you and a small community of fellow hikers know. Planetary scale is your little secret.

Life takes on a neat simplicity, too. Time ceases to have any meaning. When it is dark, you go to bed, and when it is light again you get up, and everything in between is just in between. It’s quite wonderful, really.

You have no engagements, commitments, obligations, or duties; no special ambitions and only the smallest, least complicated of wants; you exist in a tranquil tedium, serenely beyond the reach of exasperation, “far removed from the seats of strife,” as the early explorer and botanist William Bartram put it. All that is required of you is a willingness to trudge.

There is no point in hurrying because you are not actually going anywhere. However far or long you plod, you are always in the same place: in the woods. It’s where you were yesterday, where you will be tomorrow. The woods is one boundless singularity. Every bend in the path presents a prospect indistinguishable from every other, every glimpse into the trees the same tangled mass. For all you know, your route could describe a very large, pointless circle. In a way, it would hardly matter.

At times, you become almost certain that you slabbed this hillside three days ago, crossed this stream yesterday, clambered over this fallen tree at least twice today already. But most of the time you don’t think. No point. Instead, you exist in a kind of mobile Zen mode, your brain like a balloon tethered with string, accompanying but not actually part of the body below. Walking for hours and miles becomes as automatic, as unremarkable, as breathing. At the end of the day you don’t think, “Hey, I did sixteen miles today,” any more than you think, “Hey, I took eight-thousand breaths today.” It’s just what you do. ~ Bill Bryson,
1315:The word zen itself is a Japanese mispronunciation of the Chinese word ch’an, which, in turn, is a Chinese mispronunciation of the Sanskrit dhyana, meaning “contemplation, meditation.” Contemplation, however, of what?

Let us imagine ourselves for a moment in the lecture hall where I originally presented the material for this chapter. Above, we see the many lights. Each bulb is separate from the others, and we may think of them, accordingly, as separate from each other. Regarded that way, they are so many empirical facts; and the whole universe seen that way is called in Japanese ji hokkai, “the universe of things.”

But now, let us consider further. Each of those separate bulbs is a vehicle of light, and the light is not many but one. The one light, that is to say, is being displayed through all those bulbs; and we may think, therefore, either of the many bulbs or of the one light. Moreover, if this or that bulb went out, it would be replaced by another and we should again have the same light. The light, which is one, appears thus through many bulbs.

Analogously, I would be looking out from the lecture platform, seeing before me all the people of my audience, and just as each bulb seen aloft is a vehicle of light, so each of us below is a vehicle of consciousness. But the important thing about a bulb is the quality of its light. Likewise, the important thing about each of us is the quality of his consciousness. And although each may tend to identify himself mainly with his separate body and its frailties, it is possible also to regard one’s body as a mere vehicle of consciousness and to think then of consciousness as the one presence here made manifest through us all. These are but two ways of interpreting and experiencing the same set of present facts. One way is not truer than the other. They are just two ways of interpreting and experiencing: the first, in terms of the manifold of separate things; the second, in terms of the one thing that is made manifest through this manifold. And as, in Japanese, the first is known as ji hokkai, so the second is ri hokkai, the absolute universe. ~ Joseph Campbell,
1316:Poshlust,” or in a better transliteration poshlost, has many nuances, and evidently I have not described them clearly enough in my little book on Gogol, if you think one can ask anybody if he is tempted by poshlost. Corny trash, vulgar clichés, Philistinism in all its phases, imitations of imitations, bogus profundities, crude, moronic, and dishonest pseudo-literature—these are obvious examples. Now, if we want to pin down poshlost in contemporary writing, we must look for it in Freudian symbolism, moth-eaten mythologies, social comment, humanistic messages, political allegories, overconcern with class or race, and the journalistic generalities we all know. Poshlost speaks in such concepts as “America is no better than Russia” or “We all share in Germany’s guilt.” The flowers of poshlost bloom in such phrases and terms as “the moment of truth,” “charisma,” “existential” (used seriously), “dialogue” (as applied to political talks between nations), and “vocabulary” (as applied to a dauber). Listing in one breath Auschwitz, Hiroshima, and Vietnam is seditious poshlost. Belonging to a very select club (which sports one Jewish name—that of the treasurer) is genteel poshlost. Hack reviews are frequently poshlost, but it also lurks in certain highbrow essays. Poshlost calls Mr. Blank a great poet and Mr. Bluff a great novelist. One of poshlost’s favorite breeding places has always been the Art Exhibition; there it is produced by so-called sculptors working with the tools of wreckers, building crankshaft cretins of stainless steel, Zen stereos, polystyrene stinkbirds, objects trouvés in latrines, cannonballs, canned balls. There we admire the gabinetti wall patterns of so-called abstract artists, Freudian surrealism, roric smudges, and Rorschach blots—all of it as corny in its own right as the academic “September Morns” and “Florentine Flowergirls” of half a century ago. The list is long, and, of course, everybody has his bête noire, his black pet, in the series. Mine is that airline ad: the snack served by an obsequious wench to a young couple—she eyeing ecstatically the cucumber canapé, he admiring wistfully the hostess. And, of course, Death in Venice. You see the range. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1317:All beings are primarily Buddhas. It is like water and ice: There is no ice apart from water; There are no Buddhas apart from beings. Not knowing how close the truth is to them, Beings seek for it afar -- what a pity! They are like those who, being in the midst of water, Cry out for water, feeling thirst. They are like the son of the rich man, Who, wandering away from his father, Goes astray amongst the poor. It is all due to their ignorance That beings transmigrate in the darkness Of the Six Paths of existence. When they wander from darkness to darkness, How can they ever be free from birth-and-death? As for the Dhyana practice as taught in the Mahayana, No amount of praise can exhaust its merits. The Six Paramitas--beginning with the Giving, Observing the Precepts, And other good deeds, variously enumerated, Such as Nembutsu, Repentance, Moral Training, and so on -- All are finally reducible to the practice of Dhyana. The merit of Dhyana practice, even during a single sitting, Erases the countless sins accumulated in the past. Where then are the Evil Paths to misguide us? The Pure Land cannot be far away. Those who, for once, listening to the Dharma In all humility, Praise it and faithfully follow it, Will be endowed with innumerable merits. But how much more so when you turn your eyes within yourselves And have a glimpse into your self-nature! You find that the self-nature is no-nature - The truth permitting no idle sophistry. For you, then, open the gate leading to the oneness of cause and effect; Before you, then, lies a straight road of non-duality and non-trinity. When you understand that form is the form of the formless, Your coming-and-going takes place nowhere else but where you are. When you understand that thought is the thought of the thought-less. Your singing-and-dancing is no other than the voice of the Dharma. How boundless is the sky of Samadhi! How refreshingly bright is the moon of the Fourfold Wisdom! Being so is there anything you lack? As the Absolute presents itself before you The place where you stand is the Land of the Lotus, And your person -- the body of the Buddha. [2139.jpg] -- from Essays in Zen Buddhism, First Series, by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki

~ Hakuin, Hakuins Song of Zazen
,
1318:Self-Abuse by Drugs
Not a drop of alcohol is to be brought into this temple.
Master Bassui (1327-1387)1
(His dying instructions: first rule)
In swinging between liberal tolerance one moment and outraged repression the next,
modern societies seem chronically incapable of reaching consistent attitudes about
drugs.
Stephen Batchelor2
Drugs won't show you the truth. Drugs will only show you what it's like to be on drugs.
Brad Warner3

Implicit in the authentic Buddhist Path is sila. It is the time-honored practice
of exercising sensible restraints [Z:73-74]. Sila's ethical guidelines provide the
bedrock foundation for one's personal behavior in daily life. At the core of every
religion are some self-disciplined renunciations corresponding to sila. Yet, a profound irony has been reshaping the human condition in most cultures during the
last half century. It dates from the years when psychoactive drugs became readily
available. During this era, many naturally curious persons could try psychedelic
short-cuts and experience the way their consciousness might seem to ''expand.'' A
fortunate few of these experimenters would become motivated to follow the nondrug meditative route when they pursued various spiritual paths.
One fact is often overlooked. Meditation itself has many mind-expanding, psychedelic properties [Z:418-426]. These meditative experiences can also stimulate a
drug-free spiritual quest.
Meanwhile, we live in a drug culture. It is increasingly a drugged culture, for which overprescribing physicians must shoulder part of the blame. Do
drugs have any place along the spiritual path? This issue will always be hotly
debated.4
In Zen, the central issue is not whether each spiritual aspirant has the ''right''
to exercise their own curiosity, or the ''right'' to experiment on their own brains in
the name of freedom of religion. It is a free country. Drugs are out there. The real
questions are:
 Can you exercise the requisite self-discipline to follow the Zen Buddhist Path?
 Do you already have enough common sense to ask that seemingly naive question,

''What would Buddha do?'' (WWBD).
~ James Austin, Zen-Brain_Reflections,_Reviewing_Recent_Developments_in_Meditation_and_States_of_Consciousness,
1319:We feel that our actions are voluntary when they follow a decision, and involuntary when they happen without decision. But if decision itself were voluntary, every decision would have to be preceded by a decision to decide–an infinite regression which fortunately does not occur. Oddly enough, if we had to decide to decide, we would not be free to decide. We are free to decide because decision “happens.” We just decide without having the faintest understanding of how we do it. In fact, it is neither voluntary nor involuntary. To “get the feel” of this relativity is to find another extraordinary transformation of our experience as a whole, which may be described in either of two ways. I feel that I am deciding everything that happens, or, I feel that everything, including my decisions, is just happening spontaneously. For a decision–the freest of my actions-just happens like hiccups inside me or like a bird singing outside me. Such a way of seeing things is vividly described by a modern Zen master, the late Sokei-an Sasaki: One day I wiped out all the notions from my mind. I gave up all desire. I discarded all the words with which I thought and stayed in quietude. I felt a little queer–as if I were being carried into something, or as if I were touching some power unknown to me … and Ztt! I entered. I lost the boundary of my physical body. I had my skin, of course, but I felt I was standing in the center of the cosmos. I spoke, but my words had lost their meaning. I saw people coming towards me, but all were the same man. All were myself! I had never known this world. I had believed that I was created, but now I must change my opinion: I was never created; I was the cosmos; no individual Mr. Sasaki existed.7 It would seem, then, that to get rid of the subjective distinction between “me” and “my experience”–through seeing that my idea of myself is not myself–is to discover the actual relationship between myself and the “outside” world. The individual, on the one hand, and the world, on the other, are simply the abstract limits or terms of a concrete reality which is “between” them, as the concrete coin is “between” the abstract, Euclidean surfaces of its two sides. Similarly, the reality of all “inseparable opposites”–life and death, good and evil, pleasure and pain, gain and loss–is that “between” for which we have no words. ~ Alan W Watts,
1320:reading :::
   50 Spiritual Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Muhammad Asad - The Road To Mecca (1954)
   St Augustine - Confessions (400)
   Richard Bach - Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1970)
   Black Elk Black - Elk Speaks (1932)
   Richard Maurice Bucke - Cosmic Consciousness (1901)
   Fritjof Capra - The Tao of Physics (1976)
   Carlos Castaneda - Journey to Ixtlan (1972)
   GK Chesterton - St Francis of Assisi (1922)
   Pema Chodron - The Places That Scare You (2001)
   Chuang Tzu - The Book of Chuang Tzu (4th century BCE)
   Ram Dass - Be Here Now (1971)
   Epictetus - Enchiridion (1st century)
   Mohandas Gandhi - An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth (1927)
   Al-Ghazzali - The Alchemy of Happiness (1097)
   Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet (1923)
   GI Gurdjieff - Meetings With Remarkable Men (1960)
   Dag Hammarskjold - Markings (1963)
   Abraham Joshua Heschel - The Sabbath (1951)
   Hermann Hesse - Siddartha (1922)
   Aldous Huxley - The Doors of Perception (1954)
   William James - The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902)
   Carl Gustav Jung - Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1955)
   Margery Kempe - The Book of Margery Kempe (1436)
   J Krishnamurti - Think On These Things (1964)
   CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters (1942)
   Malcolm X - The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964)
   Daniel C Matt - The Essential Kabbalah (1994)
   Dan Millman - The Way of the Peaceful Warrior (1989)
   W Somerset Maugham - The Razor's Edge (1944)
   Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness (1975)
   Michael Newton - Journey of Souls (1994)
   John O'Donohue - Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (1998)
   Robert M Pirsig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974)
   James Redfield - The Celestine Prophecy (1994)
   Miguel Ruiz - The Four Agreements (1997)
   Helen Schucman & William Thetford - A Course in Miracles (1976)
   Idries Shah - The Way of the Sufi (1968)
   Starhawk - The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess (1979)
   Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind (1970)
   Emanuel Swedenborg - Heaven and Hell (1758)
   Teresa of Avila - Interior Castle (1570)
   Mother Teresa - A Simple Path (1994)
   Eckhart Tolle - The Power of Now (1998)
   Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism (1973)
   Neale Donald Walsch - Conversations With God (1998)
   Rick Warren - The Purpose-Driven Life (2002)
   Simone Weil - Waiting For God (1979)
   Ken Wilber - A Theory of Everything (2000)
   Paramahansa Yogananda - Autobiography of a Yogi (1974)
   Gary Zukav - The Seat of the Soul (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Spirital Classics (2017 Edition),
1321:After a moment or two a man in brown crimplene looked in at us, did not at all like the look of us and asked us if we were transit passengers. We said we were. He shook his head with infinite weariness and told us that if we were transit passengers then we were supposed to be in the other of the two rooms. We were obviously very crazy and stupid not to have realized this. He stayed there slumped against the door jamb, raising his eyebrows pointedly at us until we eventually gathered our gear together and dragged it off down the
corridor to the other room. He watched us go past him shaking his head in wonder and sorrow at the stupid futility of the human condition in general and ours in particular, and then closed the door behind us.

The second room was identical to the first. Identical in all respects other than one, which was that it had a hatchway let into one wall. A large vacant-looking girl was leaning through it with her elbows on the counter and her fists jammed up into her cheekbones. She was watching some flies crawling up the wall, not with any great interest because they were not doing anything unexpected, but at least they were doing something. Behind her was a table stacked with biscuits, chocolate bars, cola, and a pot of coffee, and we headed straight towards this like a pack of stoats.

Just before we reached it, however, we were suddenly headed off by a man in blue crimplene, who asked us what we thought we were doing in there. We explained that we were transit passengers on our way to Zaire, and he looked at us as if we had completely taken leave of our senses.
'Transit passengers? he said. 'It is not allowed for transit passengers to be in here.'
He waved us magnificently away from the snack counter, made us pick up all our gear again, and herded us back through the door and away into the first room where, a minute later, the man in the brown crimplene found us again.

He looked at us. Slow incomprehension engulfed him, followed by sadness, anger, deep frustration and a sense that the world had been created specifically to cause him vexation. He leaned back against the wall, frowned, closed his eyes and pinched the bridge of his nose.
'You are in the wrong room,' he said simply. `You are transit passengers. Please go to the other room.'

There is a wonderful calm that comes over you in such situations, particularly when there is a refreshment kiosk involved. We nodded, picked up our gear in a Zen-like manner and made our way back down the corridor to the second room. Here the man in blue crimplene accosted us once more but we patiently explained to him that he could fuck off. ~ Douglas Adams,
1322:Though it’s best not to be born a chicken at all, it is especially bad luck to be born a cockerel. From the perspective of the poultry farmer, male chickens are useless. They can’t lay eggs, their meat is stringy, and they’re ornery to the hens that do all the hard work of putting food on our tables. Commercial hatcheries tend to treat male chicks like fabric cutoffs or scrap metal: the wasteful but necessary by-product of an industrial process. The sooner they can be disposed of—often they’re ground into animal feed—the better. But a costly problem has vexed egg farmers for millennia: It’s virtually impossible to tell the difference between male and female chickens until they’re four to six weeks old, when they begin to grow distinctive feathers and secondary sex characteristics like the rooster’s comb. Until then, they’re all just indistinguishable fluff balls that have to be housed and fed—at considerable expense. Somehow it took until the 1920s before anyone figured out a solution to this costly dilemma. The momentous discovery was made by a group of Japanese veterinary scientists, who realized that just inside the chick’s rear end there is a constellation of folds, marks, spots, and bumps that to the untrained eye appear arbitrary, but when properly read, can divulge the sex of a day-old bird. When this discovery was unveiled at the 1927 World Poultry Congress in Ottawa, it revolutionized the global hatchery industry and eventually lowered the price of eggs worldwide. The professional chicken sexer, equipped with a skill that took years to master, became one of the most valuable workers in agriculture. The best of the best were graduates of the two-year Zen-Nippon Chick Sexing School, whose standards were so rigorous that only 5 to 10 percent of students received accreditation. But those who did graduate earned as much as five hundred dollars a day and were shuttled around the world from hatchery to hatchery like top-flight business consultants. A diaspora of Japanese chicken sexers spilled across the globe. Chicken sexing is a delicate art, requiring Zen-like concentration and a brain surgeon’s dexterity. The bird is cradled in the left hand and given a gentle squeeze that causes it to evacuate its intestines (too tight and the intestines will turn inside out, killing the bird and rendering its gender irrelevant). With his thumb and forefinger, the sexer flips the bird over and parts a small flap on its hindquarters to expose the cloaca, a tiny vent where both the genitals and anus are situated, and peers deep inside. To do this properly, his fingernails have to be precisely trimmed. In the simple cases—the ones that the sexer can actually explain—he’s looking for a barely perceptible protuberance called the “bead,” about the size of a pinhead. If the bead is convex, the bird is a boy, and gets thrown to the left; concave or flat and it’s a girl, sent down a chute to the right. ~ Joshua Foer,
1323:Desconfía de lo que te digo. Desconfía con la mirada del investigador, no con la del incrédulo. Pero desconfía de lo que digo. Desconfía con la mentalidad de un buscador, no con la de un escéptico. Pero desconfía de lo que digo. Desconfía con el corazón abierto y el deseo de aprender, no con la soberbia del que cree que todo lo sabe. Pero desconfía de lo que digo. Desconfía de mí, pero no de ti. Recuerdo un cuento zen: Un alumno fue a ver a su maestro y le dijo: –Maestro, quiero que me enseñes las cosas más importantes. El maestro le respondió: –Para conocer las cosas más importantes tienes que conocer primero las cosas cotidianas. Aquéllas con las que te cruzas todos los días. Tú cruzas este río cuatro o más veces cada día, para entrar y salir del pueblo. Si te preguntaras qué es un río, ¿sabrías qué contestarte? El alumno no entendía muy bien hacia dónde apuntaba su pregunta, pero de todas formas le dijo a su maestro todas las cosas que sabía sobre los ríos. Cuando finalizó su explicación, el maestro le lanzó una nueva pregunta: –¿Sólo eso? El alumno, después de reflexionar durante unos segundos, le dijo otra veintena de cosas sobre los ríos. –¿Sólo eso? —repitió el maestro. Y preguntando, preguntando… el maestro consiguió que el alumno le dijera muchas más cosas. Finalmente el maestro le dijo: –Mira, allá arriba, en la montaña, nace este río… y termina allá abajo, en el mar. Ahora ve y recórrelo. Cuando al hacerte a ti mismo la pregunta, no necesites poner la respuesta en palabras, sabrás lo que es un río. Supongo que por eso te invito a desconfiar, yo ni siquiera he recorrido en su totalidad este río que es el camino espiritual. He leído mucho, he explorado bastante, he experimentado todas las cosas que propongo. Con lo aprendido he hecho lo mejor que podía hacer: contarte por lo menos las cosas que sé de este camino para así invitarte a recorrerlo. Pero es obvio que no será suficiente. Si quieres encontrar tus respuestas, deberás recorrerlo tú mismo. Me pregunto cómo terminar lo que desde el principio pretende ser tan sólo un punto de partida. Me parece que debo, otra vez, recurrir al Talmud, sesenta tomos de texto en los que se registra toda la sabiduría del pueblo judío y las palabras más elaboradas de sus guías más reconocidos. Cada una de las páginas del Talmud está nominada, lleva una letra que la identifica, ya que en hebreo los números se remplazaban por letras (alef es 1, bet es 2 y así… ). Pues bien, la primera página del Talmud lleva, según la tradición, la letra bet (la del número 2). La primera página es pues… la segunda. No es un error, es un símbolo. En el último capítulo del último tomo, uno de los rabinos escribe al lector: Y no te ufanes de haber leído hasta aquí, ni de haberlo comprendido todo, porque te sigue faltando entender la página uno del primer tomo. El conocimiento de lo espiritual, al igual que la vida, está en constante cambio. Posiblemente, como en la parábola talmúdica, cuando lleguemos al final nos daremos cuenta de que aún nos falta terminar de comprender el principio. Para seguir avanzando en el camino espiritual, hay que ser capaz de aceptar con humildad esta paradoja. ~ Anonymous,
1324:The contemporary Christian Church, precisely, has understood them in this' 'wrong way, to the letter, 'like the Jews,' exoterically, not esoterically. Nevertheless to say 'like the Jews' is an error. One would have to say 'as the Jews want.' Because they also possess an exotericism, for their masses, represented by the Torah and Talmud, and an esotericism, in the Cabala (which means: 'Received Tradition'), in the Zohar ('brightness'), the Merkaba or Chariot being the most secret part of the Cabala which only initiated rabbis know and use as the powerful tool of their magic. We have already said that the Cabala reached them from elsewhere, like everything else, in the Middle Ages, even though they tell us otherwise, using and transforming it in concordance with their Archetype. The Hasidim, from Poland, represent an exclusively esoteric sect of Judaism.

Islam also has its esoteric magic, represented by Sufism and the sect of the Assassins, Hassanists, oflran. They interpret the Koran symbolically. And it was because of contact with this sect of the 'Old Man of the Mountain' that the Templars felt compelled to secede more and more from the direction of Rome, centering themselves in their Esoteric Kristianity and Mystery of the Gral. This was also why Rome destroyed them, like the esoteric Cathars (katharos = pure in Greek), the Bogomils, the Manichees and the gnostics.

In the Church of Rome, called Catholic, there only remains a soulless ritual of the Mass, as a liturgical shell that no longer reaches the Symbol, which no longer touches it, no longer puts it into action. The Nordic contribution has been lost, destroyed by prejudice and the ethnological persecution of Nordicism, Germanism and the complete surrender to Judaism.

Zen Buddhism preserves the esotericism of Buddha. In Japan Shinto and Zen are practiced by a racially superior warrior caste, the Samurai. The most esoteric side of Hinduism is found in Tantrism, especially in the Kaula or Kula Order.

So understood, esotericism is what goes beyond the exterior form and the masses, the physical, and puts an elite in contact with invisible superior forces. In my case, the condition that paralysed me in the midst of dreaming and left me without means to influence the phenomena. The visible is symbol of invisible forces (Archetypes, Gods). By means of an esoteric knowledge, of an initiation in this knowledge, a hierarchic minority can make contact with these invisible forces, being able to act on the Symbol, dynamizing and controlling the physical phenomena that incarnate them. In my case: to come to control the involuntary process which, without knowing how, was controlling me, to be able to guide it, to check or avoid it. Jung referred to this when he said 'if someone wisely faces the Archetype, in whatever place in the world, he acquires universal validity because the Archetype is one and indivisible'.

And the means to reach this spiritual world, 'on the other side of the mirror,' is Magic, Rite, Ritual, Ceremony. All religions have possessed them, even the Christian, as we have said. And the Rite is not something invented by humans but inspired by 'those from beyond,' Jung would say by the Collective Unconscious. ~ Miguel Serrano,
1325:Sevilebilmek için hayatını riske atmak gerektiğini düşündü.
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Annecik ciddi bir ses tonuyla "Sanat asla mutluluktan doğmaz" dedi.
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...ve çocuk bir resmin, bir heykelin veya hikayenin, sevilen birinin yerini alabileceğini sanacak kadar aptal.
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...bu yüzden eğer bunu okumanın sizi kurtaracağını sanıyorsanız...
Herhangi bir şeyin sizi kurtaracağını sanıyorsanız...
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...Bence annesi ölene dek bir erkeğin hayatındaki diğer kadıınların hiçbiri metres olmaktan öteye geçemez.
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...Tamamlayamadığım şeylerle dolu hayatımda, bir tamamlanmamış olay daha.
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Hayatımın, Zen Budizmi öğrencilerine meditasyon yapmaları için ödev olarak verilen ve mantıksal çözümü olmayan problemlerden hiçbir farkı yok.
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Radyoda, duran aracın polise bildirildiği söylendi.
Annecik radyonun sesini köledi. "Kahretsin" dedi. "Lütfen bizden bahsetmediklerini söyle bana."
"Metalik sarı bir Duster'dan söz ediyorlar" dedi çocuk. "Bu bizim arabamız."
Annecik, "Bu senin ne kadar az şey bildiğini gösteriyor" dedi.
Kendi kapısını açtı ve çocuğa sürücü tarafına geçip arabadan inmesini söyledi. Yanlarından hızla geçen araçları kontrol etti. Ve, "Bu bizim arabamız değil" dedi.
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"Dünyayı parçalara ayırdık" diyor, "ama parçalarla ne yapacağımızı bilemiyoruz..."
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"Vaktimizin çoğunu başkalarının yarattığı şeyleri yargılayarak geçirdiğimizden, kendimiz hiçbir şey yaratamadık."
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...hissettiğimden daha zavallı bir şey görmek iyi geliyor.
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Her bağımlılık aynı sorunu çözmek için bulunmuş bir yöntemdir, dedi. Uyuşturucular, obezite, alkol veya seks, huzuru bulmak için kullanılan farklı farklı yöntemlerdi. Bildiklerimizden kaçmak için. Eğitimimizden. Elmayı ısırmış olmaktan.
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İnsanlar dünyanın güvenli ve düzenli bir yer olması için yıllarca çalışırlardı. Ama hiç kimse bunun ne kadar sıkıcı olabileceğinin farkında değildi. Bütün dünyanın parsellendiğini, hız limitleri konduğunu, bölümlere ayrıldığını, vergilendirildiğini ve düzenlendiğini, bütün insanların sınavlardan geçirildiğini, fişlendiğini, nerede oturduğunun ne yaptığının kaydının yapıldığını düşünün. Hiç kimseye macera yaşayacak bir alan kalmadı, satın alınabilenler hariç. Lunaparka gitmek, Film izlemek gibi. Ama yine de bunlar sahte heyecanlardı. Dinozorların çocukları yemeyeceğini bilirsiniz. Büyük bir sahte afetin olma şansı bile oy çoğunluğuyla ortadan kaldırıldı. Gerçek afet veya risk ihtimali olmadığından, Gerçek kurtuluş şansı da ortadan kalkmış oldu. Gerçek mutluluk yok. Gerçek heyecan yok. Eğlence, keşif, buluş yok.
Bizi koruyan kanunlar aslında bizi can sıkıntısına mahkum etmekten başka bir işe yaramazlar.
Gerçek karmaşaya ulaşamadığımız sürece, asla gerçekten huzurlu olamayacağız.
Her şey berbat bir hal almadığı sürece yoluna da girmeyecek.
Bunlar Anneciğin ona anlattığı şeylerdi.
"Keşfedilmemiş tek alan, elle tutulamayanların dünyasıdır. Bunun dışındaki her şey çok sıkı örülmüştür" derdi.
Çok fazla kanunun içinde hapsolmuş durumdayız.
Elle tutulamayanlar derken interneti, filmleri, müziği, hikayeleri, sanatı, dedikoduları, bilgisayar programlarını, yani gerçek olmayan her şeyi kastediyordu. Sanal gerçeklikten bahsediyordu. Yalandan inanılan şeylerden. Kültürden.
Gerçekdışı şeyler, gerçeklikten daha güçlüdür.
Çünkü sadece elle tutulamayan fikirler, mefhumlar, inanışlar ve fanteziler kalır. Taşlar ufalanır. Ağaçlar çürür. İnsanlar da maalesef ölürler.
Fakat bir düşünce, bir rüya, bir efsane gibi aslında son derece kırılgan şeyler yaşarlar da yaşarlar.
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"...Beni mahkum etmeniz çok gereksizdi. Bürokrasiniz ve kanunlarımız dünyayı temiz ve güvenli bir toplama kampına çevirdi" diye b ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1326:George Mumford, a Newton-based mindfulness teacher, one such moment took place in 1993, at the Omega Institute, a holistic learning center in Rhinebeck, New York. The center was hosting a retreat devoted to mindfulness meditation, the clear-your-head habit in which participants sit quietly and focus on their breathing. Leading the session: meditation megastar Jon Kabat-Zinn. Originally trained as a molecular biologist at MIT, Kabat-Zinn had gone on to revolutionize the meditation world in the 1970s by creating a more secularized version of the practice, one focused less on Buddhism and more on stress reduction and other health benefits. After dinner one night, Kabat-Zinn was giving a talk about his work, clicking through a slide show to give the audience something to look at. At one point he displayed a slide of Mumford. Mumford had been a star high school basketball player who’d subsequently hit hard times as a heroin addict, Kabat-Zinn explained. By the early 1980s, however, he’d embraced meditation and gotten sober. Now Mumford taught meditation to prison inmates and other unlikely students. Kabat-Zinn explained how they were able to relate to Mumford because of his tough upbringing, his openness about his addiction — and because, like many inmates, he’s African-American. Kabat-Zinn’s description of Mumford didn’t seem to affect most Omega visitors, but one participant immediately took notice: June Jackson, whose husband had just coached the Chicago Bulls to their third consecutive NBA championship. Phil Jackson had spent years studying Buddhism and Native American spirituality and was a devoted meditator. Yet his efforts to get Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, and their teammates to embrace mindfulness was meeting with only limited success. “June took one look at George and said, ‘He could totally connect with Phil’s players,’ ’’ Kabat-Zinn recalls. So he provided an introduction. Soon Mumford was in Chicago, gathering some of the world’s most famous athletes in a darkened room and telling them to focus on their breathing. Mumford spent the next five years working with the Bulls, frequently sitting behind the bench, as they won three more championships. In 1999 Mumford followed Phil Jackson to the Los Angeles Lakers, where he helped turn Kobe Bryant into an outspoken adherent of meditation. Last year, as Jackson began rebuilding the moribund New York Knicks as president, Mumford signed on for a third tour of duty. He won’t speak about the specific work he’s doing in New York, but it surely involves helping a new team adjust to Jackson’s sensibilities, his controversial triangle offense, and the particular stress that comes with compiling the worst record in the NBA. Late one April afternoon just as the NBA playoffs are beginning, Mumford is sitting at a table in O’Hara’s, a Newton pub. Sober for more than 30 years, he sips Perrier. It’s Marathon Monday, and as police begin allowing traffic back onto Commonwealth Avenue, early finishers surround us, un-showered and drinking beer. No one recognizes Mumford, but that’s hardly unusual. While most NBA fans are aware that Jackson is serious about meditation — his nickname is the Zen Master — few outside his locker rooms can name the consultant he employs. And Mumford hasn’t done much to change that. He has no office and does no marketing, and his recently launched website, mindfulathlete.org, is mired deep in search-engine results. Mumford has worked with teams that have won six championships, but, one friend jokes, he remains the world’s most famous completely unknown meditation teacher. That may soon change. This month, Mumford published his first book, The Mindful Athlete, which is part memoir and part instruction guide, and he has agreed to give a series of talks and book signings ~ Anonymous,
1327:Lauds And Plants (Xiv)
<i>Like a bridge over troubled water, I will lay me down
Simon & Garfunkel</i>
what does the world know of you and me
together what does it know of us together
why should it care
if separated we should depend on substanceless
memories and make much of moments
gone into the timeless
not far from where you are now is still a beach
at the side of a Bay of Islands township circumspect
of history and tourism
white board roofs and walls salt-white sunlight
abutting the beach a road of residentials
front row of a summer place
we came there in mid-winter torn from a hibernating
cover by a need to distance ourselves
from a nest sullied by unrest
impending ill-health and the threat of a Damoclean
future pressing us into temporary exile
from the hill-encircled city
inclined but unable to be lovers we walked
the open streets of the town and promenaded
the beach front road accompanied
by an old black dog who picked us up and posed
for our photographs looking up understandingly
into our bewildered eyes
along the harsh sanded tideline heaped with shell
and a wrack of pebble-smooth green glass fragments
coin-sized and shaped
the worn pieces of china plate and crockery
10
cameoed still with gull's eye glimpses of willow
pattern blue and white
others with roseate reminders of a durable
past of generations of meals and afternoon
teas the beach was homelily
haunted by endurance we sat on yellow ochred
rocks at one end beneath a small cliff
and looked across the bay
towards the treaty house handsomer than
though somehow not so self-important as
the gravure tourist brochures
advising us we were now part of the country's
history during our stay at least as significant
if not in our own eyes
then in those of the quietly possessive locals
as the bullet pocked walls of the oldest church
the hill-top high flagpole
lopped down by a rebellious Maori and re-erected
several times to the alternate chagrin
and amusement of the settlers
on the far side of the bay we found a long white
beach empty of visitors and walked our apprehensions
down and underfoot
for the day I have the photo of you fawn slacked
and mohair scarved as chic as Laurent model
perched upon a log
walking we talked of things in front of us there
and then the instantaneous gossip of being
opened our minds to the mild
onrush of winter sunlight and the keen
salt-edged breeze on the verge of gusts
you sketched shells and stark branches
seated
11
in charcoal or sepia ink which I inscribed
with almost appropriate imitation senryu
skeptical zen tyros
I read Wu Cheng-en in a paperback translation
Witheford’s third book of hermetic verse
and you Waley’s versions
of never-at-home-except-to-convalesce Po Chu-I
our English landlady told us with fevered eyes
and parched carping voice
that D.H.L. was filthy and so was sex
her husband made us over-seasoned meals
with an off season enthusiasm
we had to cross the road when an old horse farted
back at us from a sparse field even here were
disturbed stomachs and minds
all this so little to recall so less than nothing
to the world was our first time alone
together released a while
from the terrible slavery of money minting hours</