classes ::: Education, injunction, everyday, the School, the Student, verb,
children ::: MISSING NAME - related to why read Savitri and Savitri (ode), Mortimers Reading list (1972 edition), reading list (100), reading list (AI), reading list (Elon Musks), reading list (joshs), reading list (Science)
branches ::: goodreads, read, reading lists, read Savitri, Recommended Reading, speed reading, to read

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:read

--- NOTES
2020-08-27 - so I have lost, partially, the urge to study Savitri. Is it too difficult? or have a dropped in consciousness? As it falls away the urge to read TSOY and TLD is increasing. Perhaps the book is rejecting me? It would be worthy to read those others, certainly. But still I want to at least read some.

--- QUOTES
  My child, every day you are going to read Savitri ~ The Mother
  One should read Sri Aurobindo and know the answer. ~ The Mother

When you find a writer who really is saying something to you, read everything that writer has written and you will get more education and depth of understanding out of that than reading a scrap here and a scrap there and elsewhere. Then go to people who influenced that writer, or those who were related to him, and your world builds together in an organic way that is really marvelous. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero's Journey: Joseph Campbell on His Life & Works

Sit in a room and read--and read and read. And read the right books by the right people. Your mind is brought onto that level, and you have a nice, mild, slow-burning rapture all the time. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth



Dont just teach your children to read
Teach them to question what they read.
Teach them to question everything. ~ George Carlin


--- FOOTER
see also ::: reading lists, read Savitri,
subject class:Education
class:injunction
class:everyday
class:the School
class:the Student
word class:verb




see also ::: reading_lists, read_Savitri

questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
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if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [53] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
100_Best_Spiritual_Books_of_the_Century
50_Philosophy_Reading_List
50_Psychology_Reading_List
50_Self-Help_Reading_List
50_Spiritual_Reading_List
An_Informal_Integral_Canon
Anonymous_Reading_List
Anton_Book_list
A_Summers_Reading_List
Best_Philosophy_Books
Best_Spiritual_Books
book_list_found_on_google_docs
Buddhism_(books)
Buddhist_Classics
canon
Carolinas_books
collaboration
Epic_Poetry_(by_alpha)
Epic_Poetry_(ranked)
Essential_Books_of_Computer_Science
Holy_Books
How_to_Study_-_Not_a_bad_skill_to_have
It_does_not_matter_if_you_understand_it_-_Savitri,_read_it_always.
Jordan_Peterson_-_Great_Books
Joshs_complete_reading_list
Joshs_reading_list
Kennys_Books
Mortimers_Reading_list_(1972_edition)
Niamh_Dempsey_books_list
online_books_on_drugs
reading_list_(100)
reading_list_(AI)
reading_list_(Elon_Musks)
reading_list_(joshs)
reading_list_(Science)
Reading_&_Writing_-_The_Critique
Recommended_Reading
References_(SES)
Resources_for_Spiral_Wizards
Samis_Books
speed_reading
study
Taoist_canon
The_cyborgs_and_cybernetics_syllabus
The_Most_Influential_Books_in_History
The_Western_Canon_-_The_Books_and_School_of_the_Ages
Tibetan_Buddhist_canon
to_read
Zen_Buddhism_-_The_Essential_Books
Zen_Scriptures
SEE ALSO

reading_lists
read_Savitri

AUTH

BOOKS
A_Brief_History_of_Everything
A_Garden_of_Pomegranates_-_An_Outline_of_the_Qabalah
Big_Mind,_Big_Heart
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
books_(quotes)
City_of_God
Cybernetics,_or_Control_and_Communication_in_the_Animal_and_the_Machine
DND_DM_Guide_5E
Enchiridion_text
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Essays_of_Schopenhauer
Evolution_II
Faust
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Hopscotch
How_to_Free_Your_Mind_-_Tara_the_Liberator
How_to_think_like_Leonardo_Da_Vinci
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Infinite_Library
Integral_Spirituality
Kena_and_Other_Upanishads
Know_Yourself
Kosmic_Consciousness
Let_Me_Explain
Letters_On_Poetry_And_Art
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Life_without_Death
Mantras_Of_The_Mother
Metamorphoses
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
old_bookshelf
On_Education
On_Interpretation
On_the_Free_Choice_of_the_Will
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_02
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_03
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_04
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1929-1931
Questions_And_Answers_1950-1951
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Ready_Player_One
Savitri
Sex_Ecology_Spirituality
Sri_Aurobindo_or_the_Adventure_of_Consciousness
Synergetics_-_Explorations_in_the_Geometry_of_Thinking
The_Act_of_Creation
The_Alchemy_of_Happiness
The_Archetypes_and_the_Collective_Unconscious
the_Book
the_Book_of_God
The_Book_of_Lies
The_Book_of_Miracle
The_Categories
The_Divine_Comedy
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Divinization_of_Matter__Lurianic_Kabbalah,_Physics,_and_the_Supramental_Transformation
The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Future_of_Man
The_Golden_Bough
The_Gospel_of_Sri_Ramakrishna
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Integral_Yoga
The_Ladder_of_Divine_Ascent
The_Lotus_Sutra
The_Odyssey
The_Phenomenon_of_Man
The_Republic
The_Science_of_Knowing
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
the_Stack
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols
Walden,_and_On_The_Duty_Of_Civil_Disobedience

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
0.00_-_To_the_Reader
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
04.07_-_Readings_in_Savitri
10.25_-_How_to_Read_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
1.03_-_Reading
1.07_-_ON_READING_AND_WRITING
1.34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after_the_reception_of_the_Most_Holy_Sacrament.
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
1.4_-_Readings_in_the_Taittiriya_Upanishad
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-26_-_On_reading_books_-_gossip_-_Discipline_and_realisation_-_Imaginary_stories-_value_of_-_Private_lives_of_big_men_-_relaxation_-_Understanding_others_-_gnostic_consciousness
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1956-11-07_-_Thoughts_created_by_forces_of_universal_-_Mind_Our_own_thought_hardly_exists_-_Idea,_origin_higher_than_mind_-_The_Synthesis_of_Yoga,_effect_of_reading
1.bs_-_One_Thread_Only
1.dz_-_Treading_along_in_this_dreamlike,_illusory_realm
1.fs_-_Breadth_And_Depth
1.jk_-_Song._Hush,_Hush!_Tread_Softly!
1.jk_-_Sonnet._A_Dream,_After_Reading_Dantes_Episode_Of_Paulo_And_Francesca
1.jk_-_Sonnet_On_Sitting_Down_To_Read_King_Lear_Once_Again
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Before_Re-Read_King_Lear
1.jwvg_-_To_The_Kind_Reader
1.lovecraft_-_On_Reading_Lord_Dunsanys_Book_Of_Wonder
1.okym_-_11_-_Here_with_a_Loaf_of_Bread_beneath_the_Bough
1.rt_-_(84)_It_is_the_pang_of_separation_that_spreads_throughout_the_world_(from_Gitanjali)
1.wb_-_Reader!_of_books!_of_heaven
1.whitman_-_Thou_Reader
1.whitman_-_To_The_Reader_At_Parting
1.whitman_-_When_I_Read_The_Book
1.whitman_-_Who_Is_Now_Reading_This?
1.ww_-_9_-_The_big_doors_of_the_country_barn_stand_open_and_ready
2.1.1.04_-_Reading,_Yogic_Force_and_the_Development_of_Style
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
3.4.1.06_-_Reading_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.07_-_Reading_and_Real_Knowledge
3.4.1.08_-_Novel-Reading_and_Sadhana

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
Liber

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.00_-_Publishers_Note_A
0_0.01_-_Introduction
00.01_-_The_Approach_to_Mysticism
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00a_-_Participants_in_the_Evening_Talks
000_-_Humans_in_Universe
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.00_-_The_Wellspring_of_Reality
0.00_-_To_the_Reader
0.01f_-_FOREWARD
0.01_-_I_-_Sri_Aurobindos_personality,_his_outer_retirement_-_outside_contacts_after_1910_-_spiritual_personalities-_Vibhutis_and_Avatars_-__transformtion_of_human_personality
0.01_-_Letters_from_the_Mother_to_Her_Son
0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga
0.02_-_II_-_The_Home_of_the_Guru
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature
0.03_-_III_-_The_Evening_Sittings
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.04_-_The_Systems_of_Yoga
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.06_-_INTRODUCTION
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_DARK_NIGHT_OF_THE_SOUL
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.01_-_A_Yoga_of_the_Art_of_Life
01.01_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_The_Age_of_Sri_Aurobindo
01.01_-_The_New_Humanity
01.01_-_The_One_Thing_Needful
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_Natures_Own_Yoga
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Creative_Soul
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Rationalism
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.03_-_Yoga_and_the_Ordinary_Life
01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine
01.04_-_The_Intuition_of_the_Age
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_Rabindranath_Tagore:_A_Great_Poet,_a_Great_Man
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.06_-_On_Communism
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.07_-_Blaise_Pascal_(1623-1662)
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
01.09_-_The_Parting_of_the_Way
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.10_-_Principle_and_Personality
01.11_-_Aldous_Huxley:_The_Perennial_Philosophy
01.11_-_The_Basis_of_Unity
01.12_-_Goethe
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
01.13_-_T._S._Eliot:_Four_Quartets
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.13_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.14_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1954-08-25_-_what_is_this_personality?_and_when_will_she_come?
0_1955-04-04
0_1955-06-09
0_1955-10-19
0_1956-03-19
0_1956-04-04
0_1956-05-02
0_1956-09-14
0_1956-10-08
0_1956-12-26
0_1957-04-09
0_1957-07-03
0_1957-12-21
0_1958-01-01
0_1958-02-03b_-_The_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-03-07
0_1958-05-10
0_1958-06-06_-_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-07-06
0_1958-08-07
0_1958-08-30
0_1958-10-10
0_1958-10-17
0_1958-10-25_-_to_go_out_of_your_body
0_1958-11-04_-_Myths_are_True_and_Gods_exist_-_mental_formation_and_occult_faculties_-_exteriorization_-_work_in_dreams
0_1958-11-08
0_1958-11-11
0_1958-11-14
0_1958-11-15
0_1958-11-22
0_1958-12-04
0_1958-12-24
0_1958_12_-_Floor_1,_young_girl,_we_shall_kill_the_young_princess_-_black_tent
0_1959-01-06
0_1959-01-21
0_1959-01-27
0_1959-01-31
0_1959-03-10_-_vital_dagger,_vital_mass
0_1959-03-26_-_Lord_of_Death,_Lord_of_Falsehood
0_1959-04-07
0_1959-05-19_-_Ascending_and_Descending_paths
0_1959-05-25
0_1959-05-28
0_1959-06-03
0_1959-06-07
0_1959-06-09
0_1959-06-25
0_1959-10-06_-_Sri_Aurobindos_abode
0_1959-10-15
0_1960-01-28
0_1960-01-31
0_1960-03-07
0_1960-04-07
0_1960-04-13
0_1960-04-14
0_1960-05-06
0_1960-05-21_-_true_purity_-_you_have_to_be_the_Divine_to_overcome_hostile_forces
0_1960-05-24_-_supramental_flood
0_1960-05-28_-_death_of_K_-_the_death_process-_the_subtle_physical
0_1960-06-04
0_1960-06-07
0_1960-07-23_-_The_Flood_and_the_race_-_turning_back_to_guide_and_save_amongst_the_torrents_-_sadhana_vs_tamas_and_destruction_-_power_of_giving_and_offering_-_Japa,_7_lakhs,_140000_per_day,_1_crore_takes_20_years
0_1960-07-26_-_Mothers_vision_-_looking_up_words_in_the_subconscient
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
0_1960-08-20
0_1960-09-20
0_1960-10-02a
0_1960-10-08
0_1960-10-11
0_1960-10-19
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-10-25
0_1960-10-30
0_1960-11-05
0_1960-11-08
0_1960-11-12
0_1960-11-15
0_1960-11-26
0_1960-12-02
0_1960-12-13
0_1960-12-17
0_1960-12-20
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-01-07
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-12
0_1961-01-17
0_1961-01-19
0_1961-01-22
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-01-27
0_1961-01-29
0_1961-01-31
0_1961-02-04
0_1961-02-07
0_1961-02-11
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-02-28
0_1961-03-04
0_1961-03-07
0_1961-03-11
0_1961-03-14
0_1961-03-17
0_1961-03-21
0_1961-03-27
0_1961-04-07
0_1961-04-08
0_1961-04-12
0_1961-04-15
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-04-22
0_1961-04-25
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-05-12
0_1961-05-19
0_1961-05-23
0_1961-06-02
0_1961-06-06
0_1961-06-20
0_1961-06-24
0_1961-07-04
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-07-15
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-07-26
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-08-11
0_1961-08-18
0_1961-08-25
0_1961-09-03
0_1961-09-16
0_1961-09-23
0_1961-09-28
0_1961-09-30
0_1961-10-02
0_1961-10-15
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-05
0_1961-11-06
0_1961-11-07
0_1961-11-12
0_1961-11-16a
0_1961-12-16
0_1961-12-20
0_1961-12-23
0_1962-01-09
0_1962-01-12_-_supramental_ship
0_1962-01-15
0_1962-01-21
0_1962-01-24
0_1962-01-27
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-02-06
0_1962-02-09
0_1962-02-13
0_1962-02-17
0_1962-02-24
0_1962-02-27
0_1962-03-03
0_1962-03-06
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-03-13
0_1962-04-03
0_1962-04-13
0_1962-04-28
0_1962-05-13
0_1962-05-15
0_1962-05-18
0_1962-05-22
0_1962-05-24
0_1962-05-27
0_1962-05-29
0_1962-05-31
0_1962-06-02
0_1962-06-06
0_1962-06-09
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-06-23
0_1962-06-27
0_1962-06-30
0_1962-07-04
0_1962-07-07
0_1962-07-14
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-07-31
0_1962-08-04
0_1962-08-08
0_1962-08-11
0_1962-08-14
0_1962-08-28
0_1962-08-31
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-09-08
0_1962-09-15
0_1962-09-18
0_1962-09-22
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-09-29
0_1962-10-06
0_1962-10-12
0_1962-10-16
0_1962-10-24
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-10-30
0_1962-11-10
0_1962-11-14
0_1962-11-17
0_1962-11-20
0_1962-11-23
0_1962-11-27
0_1962-11-30
0_1962-12-08
0_1962-12-15
0_1962-12-19
0_1962-12-22
0_1962-12-25
0_1962-12-28
0_1963-01-02
0_1963-01-09
0_1963-01-12
0_1963-01-14
0_1963-01-18
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-02-19
0_1963-02-23
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-03-09
0_1963-03-13
0_1963-03-16
0_1963-03-19
0_1963-03-23
0_1963-03-27
0_1963-03-30
0_1963-04-20
0_1963-05-03
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-05-15
0_1963-05-18
0_1963-05-25
0_1963-05-29
0_1963-06-03
0_1963-06-08
0_1963-06-12
0_1963-06-15
0_1963-06-22
0_1963-06-29
0_1963-07-03
0_1963-07-06
0_1963-07-10
0_1963-07-13
0_1963-07-17
0_1963-07-20
0_1963-07-24
0_1963-07-27
0_1963-07-31
0_1963-08-07
0_1963-08-10
0_1963-08-13b
0_1963-08-17
0_1963-08-21
0_1963-08-24
0_1963-08-28
0_1963-09-04
0_1963-09-21
0_1963-09-25
0_1963-09-28
0_1963-10-03
0_1963-10-05
0_1963-10-16
0_1963-10-19
0_1963-11-04
0_1963-11-20
0_1963-11-23
0_1963-11-27
0_1963-11-30
0_1963-12-07_-_supramental_ship
0_1963-12-11
0_1963-12-14
0_1963-12-18
0_1963-12-21
0_1963-12-31
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-08
0_1964-01-15
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-01-22
0_1964-01-25
0_1964-01-29
0_1964-01-31
0_1964-02-05
0_1964-02-22
0_1964-02-26
0_1964-03-04
0_1964-03-07
0_1964-03-11
0_1964-03-14
0_1964-03-18
0_1964-03-25
0_1964-03-28
0_1964-04-04
0_1964-04-08
0_1964-04-14
0_1964-05-28
0_1964-06-04
0_1964-06-28
0_1964-07-15
0_1964-07-18
0_1964-07-22
0_1964-07-25
0_1964-07-28
0_1964-07-31
0_1964-08-05
0_1964-08-08
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-08-14
0_1964-08-19
0_1964-08-26
0_1964-08-29
0_1964-09-12
0_1964-09-16
0_1964-09-18
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-09-30
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-10-10
0_1964-10-14
0_1964-10-17
0_1964-10-24a
0_1964-10-24b
0_1964-10-30
0_1964-11-12
0_1964-11-14
0_1964-11-21
0_1964-11-25
0_1964-11-28
0_1964-12-02
0_1964-12-07
0_1965-01-12
0_1965-02-24
0_1965-03-03
0_1965-03-06
0_1965-03-10
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-03-27
0_1965-04-10
0_1965-04-17
0_1965-04-21
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0_1965-05-19
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-02
0_1965-06-05
0_1965-06-09
0_1965-06-12
0_1965-06-14
0_1965-06-18_-_supramental_ship
0_1965-06-23
0_1965-06-26
0_1965-06-30
0_1965-07-03
0_1965-07-07
0_1965-07-10
0_1965-07-14
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0_1965-07-21
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0_1965-08-18
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0_1965-09-08
0_1965-09-11
0_1965-09-15a
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0_1965-09-22
0_1965-09-25
0_1965-10-13
0_1965-10-16
0_1965-10-30
0_1965-11-03
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0_1965-11-15
0_1965-11-20
0_1965-11-23
0_1965-11-27
0_1965-12-07
0_1965-12-10
0_1965-12-15
0_1965-12-18
0_1965-12-25
0_1965-12-28
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0_1966-01-19
0_1966-01-22
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-01-31
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0_1966-02-19
0_1966-02-26
0_1966-03-02
0_1966-03-04
0_1966-03-09
0_1966-03-19
0_1966-03-26
0_1966-04-06
0_1966-04-16
0_1966-04-20
0_1966-04-23
0_1966-04-24
0_1966-04-27
0_1966-04-30
0_1966-05-14
0_1966-05-18
0_1966-05-22
0_1966-06-02
0_1966-06-04
0_1966-06-08
0_1966-06-11
0_1966-06-25
0_1966-07-23
0_1966-07-27
0_1966-08-03
0_1966-08-13
0_1966-08-15
0_1966-08-17
0_1966-08-19
0_1966-08-24
0_1966-08-27
0_1966-08-31
0_1966-09-03
0_1966-09-07
0_1966-09-14
0_1966-09-17
0_1966-09-21
0_1966-09-28
0_1966-09-30
0_1966-10-05
0_1966-10-08
0_1966-10-22
0_1966-11-03
0_1966-11-09
0_1966-11-12
0_1966-11-15
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-11-23
0_1966-11-26
0_1966-11-30
0_1966-12-07
0_1966-12-17
0_1966-12-20
0_1966-12-21
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0_1967-01-21
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0_1967-04-15
0_1967-04-19
0_1967-04-22
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0_1967-05-06
0_1967-05-10
0_1967-05-13
0_1967-05-17
0_1967-05-20
0_1967-05-24
0_1967-05-27
0_1967-06-03
0_1967-06-07
0_1967-06-14
0_1967-06-17
0_1967-06-24
0_1967-07-05
0_1967-07-12
0_1967-07-15
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-07-26
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0_1967-08-12
0_1967-08-15
0_1967-08-19
0_1967-08-26
0_1967-09-03
0_1967-09-06
0_1967-09-13
0_1967-09-16
0_1967-09-23
0_1967-09-30
0_1967-10-04
0_1967-10-07
0_1967-10-11
0_1967-10-14
0_1967-10-19
0_1967-10-21
0_1967-10-25
0_1967-10-28
0_1967-10-30
0_1967-11-08
0_1967-11-10
0_1967-11-15
0_1967-11-22
0_1967-11-25
0_1967-11-29
0_1967-12-06
0_1967-12-16
0_1967-12-20
0_1967-12-27
0_1967-12-30
0_1968-01-06
0_1968-01-10
0_1968-01-12
0_1968-01-17
0_1968-01-27
0_1968-02-03
0_1968-02-07
0_1968-02-14
0_1968-02-20
0_1968-02-28
0_1968-03-02
0_1968-03-13
0_1968-03-16
0_1968-03-20
0_1968-03-23
0_1968-03-30
0_1968-04-10
0_1968-04-13
0_1968-04-23
0_1968-04-24
0_1968-04-27
0_1968-05-02
0_1968-05-04
0_1968-05-18
0_1968-05-22
0_1968-05-29
0_1968-06-03
0_1968-06-12
0_1968-06-15
0_1968-06-26
0_1968-06-29
0_1968-07-03
0_1968-07-06
0_1968-07-10
0_1968-07-17
0_1968-07-20
0_1968-07-24
0_1968-07-27
0_1968-08-07
0_1968-08-22
0_1968-08-28
0_1968-08-30
0_1968-09-04
0_1968-09-07
0_1968-09-11
0_1968-09-14
0_1968-09-25
0_1968-09-28
0_1968-10-16
0_1968-10-26
0_1968-10-30
0_1968-11-06
0_1968-11-09
0_1968-11-23
0_1968-12-04
0_1968-12-11
0_1968-12-14
0_1968-12-18
0_1968-12-21
0_1968-12-25
0_1969-01-04
0_1969-01-08
0_1969-01-18
0_1969-01-22
0_1969-01-29
0_1969-02-01
0_1969-02-05
0_1969-02-08
0_1969-02-15
0_1969-02-19
0_1969-02-22
0_1969-03-08
0_1969-03-12
0_1969-03-15
0_1969-03-19
0_1969-03-26
0_1969-04-02
0_1969-04-05
0_1969-04-09
0_1969-04-12
0_1969-04-16
0_1969-04-19
0_1969-04-23
0_1969-04-26
0_1969-04-30
0_1969-05-03
0_1969-05-17
0_1969-05-21
0_1969-05-24
0_1969-05-28
0_1969-05-31
0_1969-06-11
0_1969-06-25
0_1969-06-28
0_1969-07-19
0_1969-07-23
0_1969-07-26
0_1969-07-30
0_1969-08-02
0_1969-08-06
0_1969-08-09
0_1969-08-16
0_1969-08-20
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-08-27
0_1969-08-30
0_1969-09-03
0_1969-09-13
0_1969-09-17
0_1969-09-20
0_1969-09-24
0_1969-10-01
0_1969-10-08
0_1969-10-11
0_1969-10-18
0_1969-10-25
0_1969-10-29
0_1969-11-01
0_1969-11-05
0_1969-11-12
0_1969-11-15
0_1969-11-19
0_1969-11-22
0_1969-11-29
0_1969-12-03
0_1969-12-06
0_1969-12-10
0_1969-12-13
0_1969-12-17
0_1969-12-20
0_1969-12-24
0_1969-12-31
0_1970-01-01
0_1970-01-03
0_1970-01-07
0_1970-01-10
0_1970-01-17
0_1970-01-28
0_1970-01-31
0_1970-02-07
0_1970-02-11
0_1970-02-18
0_1970-02-25
0_1970-03-04
0_1970-03-07
0_1970-03-14
0_1970-03-18
0_1970-03-25
0_1970-03-28
0_1970-04-04
0_1970-04-11
0_1970-04-18
0_1970-04-22
0_1970-05-02
0_1970-05-09
0_1970-05-13
0_1970-05-20
0_1970-05-23
0_1970-05-27
0_1970-05-30
0_1970-06-03
0_1970-06-06
0_1970-06-10
0_1970-06-13
0_1970-06-17
0_1970-06-27
0_1970-07-01
0_1970-07-04
0_1970-07-08
0_1970-07-11
0_1970-07-22
0_1970-07-25
0_1970-07-29
0_1970-08-01
0_1970-08-05
0_1970-09-02
0_1970-09-05
0_1970-09-09
0_1970-09-16
0_1970-09-19
0_1970-09-23
0_1970-09-26
0_1970-09-30
0_1970-10-03
0_1970-10-07
0_1970-10-10
0_1970-10-14
0_1970-10-17
0_1970-10-21
0_1970-10-24
0_1970-10-28
0_1970-10-31
0_1970-11-04
0_1970-11-07
0_1970-11-11
0_1970-11-14
0_1970-11-18
0_1970-11-25
0_1970-11-28
0_1970-12-02
0_1971-01-16
0_1971-01-17
0_1971-01-27
0_1971-01-30
0_1971-02-03
0_1971-02-06
0_1971-02-10
0_1971-02-13
0_1971-02-20
0_1971-02-24
0_1971-03-03
0_1971-03-06
0_1971-03-10
0_1971-03-13
0_1971-03-17
0_1971-03-31
0_1971-04-07
0_1971-04-14
0_1971-04-17
0_1971-04-21
0_1971-04-28
0_1971-05-05
0_1971-05-08
0_1971-05-12
0_1971-05-15
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0_1971-05-22
0_1971-05-26
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0_1971-06-05
0_1971-06-09
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0_1971-08-14
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0_1971-09-04
0_1971-09-11
0_1971-09-18
0_1971-09-22
0_1971-10-16
0_1971-10-20
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0_1971-10-27
0_1971-10-30
0_1971-11-10
0_1971-11-20
0_1971-11-24
0_1971-11-27
0_1971-12-04
0_1971-12-11
0_1971-12-18
0_1971-12-25
0_1971-12-29b
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0_1972-01-15
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0_1972-01-29
0_1972-02-01
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0_1972-02-16
0_1972-02-22
0_1972-02-23
0_1972-02-26
0_1972-03-08
0_1972-03-10
0_1972-03-11
0_1972-03-15
0_1972-03-22
0_1972-03-25
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-03-29b
0_1972-04-03
0_1972-04-04
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-08
0_1972-04-13
0_1972-04-26
0_1972-05-06
0_1972-05-13
0_1972-05-17
0_1972-05-26
0_1972-05-31
0_1972-06-14
0_1972-06-17
0_1972-06-21
0_1972-06-24
0_1972-07-12
0_1972-07-19
0_1972-07-22
0_1972-08-09
0_1972-09-13
0_1972-09-20
0_1972-10-07
0_1972-10-18
0_1972-12-02
0_1972-12-06
0_1972-12-10
0_1972-12-23
0_1973-01-10
0_1973-01-20
0_1973-01-24
0_1973-02-08
0_1973-02-14
0_1973-02-28
0_1973-03-10
0_1973-03-14
0_1973-04-07
0_1973-04-10
0_1973-04-14
02.01_-_A_Vedic_Story
02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth
02.01_-_The_World-Stair
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life
02.03_-_The_Shakespearean_Word
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.04_-_The_Right_of_Absolute_Freedom
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_The_Integral_Yoga_and_Other_Yogas
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_George_Seftris
02.07_-_India_One_and_Indivisable
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.09_-_Two_Mystic_Poems_in_Modern_French
02.10_-_Independence_and_its_Sanction
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_Hymn_to_Darkness
02.11_-_New_World-Conditions
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_Mysticism_in_Bengali_Poetry
02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.13_-_Rabindranath_and_Sri_Aurobindo
02.14_-_Appendix
02.14_-_Panacea_of_Isms
02.14_-_The_World-Soul
02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.01_-_The_Malady_of_the_Century
03.01_-_The_New_Year_Initiation
03.02_-_Aspects_of_Modernism
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.04_-_The_Other_Aspect_of_European_Culture
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.04_-_Towardsa_New_Ideology
03.05_-_Some_Conceptions_and_Misconceptions
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.06_-_The_Pact_and_its_Sanction
03.07_-_Some_Thoughts_on_the_Unthinkable
03.07_-_The_Sunlit_Path
03.09_-_Buddhism_and_Hinduism
03.11_-_Modernist_Poetry
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
03.13_-_Human_Destiny
03.15_-_Towards_the_Future
03.16_-_The_Tragic_Spirit_in_Nature
04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame
04.01_-_The_Divine_Man
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.02_-_Human_Progress
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.04_-_To_the_Heights_IV
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.06_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.06_-_To_Be_or_Not_to_Be
04.07_-_Readings_in_Savitri
04.07_-_To_the_Heights_VII_(Mahakali)
04.23_-_To_the_Heights-XXIII
04.37_-_To_the_Heights-XXXVII
05.01_-_At_the_Origin_of_Ignorance
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
05.01_-_The_Destined_Meeting-Place
05.02_-_Gods_Labour
05.02_-_Of_the_Divine_and_its_Help
05.02_-_Physician,_Heal_Thyself
05.02_-_Satyavan
05.03_-_Of_Desire_and_Atonement
05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri
05.03_-_The_Body_Natural
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.08_-_An_Age_of_Revolution
05.09_-_Varieties_of_Religious_Experience
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.13_-_Darshana_and_Philosophy
05.14_-_The_Sanctity_of_the_Individual
05.17_-_Evolution_or_Special_Creation
05.30_-_Theres_a_Divinity
05.32_-_Yoga_as_Pragmatic_Power
05.33_-_Caesar_versus_the_Divine
05.34_-_Light,_more_Light
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.03_-_Types_of_Meditation
06.06_-_Earth_a_Symbol
06.08_-_The_Individual_and_the_Collective
06.11_-_The_Steps_of_the_Soul
06.14_-_The_Integral_Realisation
06.19_-_Mental_Silence
06.20_-_Mind,_Origin_of_Separative_Consciousness
06.25_-_Individual_and_Collective_Soul
06.27_-_To_Learn_and_to_Understand
06.29_-_Towards_Redemption
06.30_-_Sweet_Holy_Tears
06.31_-_Identification_of_Consciousness
06.35_-_Second_Sight
06.36_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
07.01_-_Realisation,_Past_and_Future
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.02_-_The_Spiral_Universe
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.06_-_Record_of_World-History
07.07_-_Freedom_and_Destiny
07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness
07.10_-_Diseases_and_Accidents
07.11_-_The_Problem_of_Evil
07.12_-_This_Ugliness_in_the_World
07.13_-_Divine_Justice
07.14_-_The_Divine_Suffering
07.17_-_Why_Do_We_Forget_Things?
07.18_-_How_to_get_rid_of_Troublesome_Thoughts
07.20_-_Why_are_Dreams_Forgotten?
07.21_-_On_Occultism
07.22_-_Mysticism_and_Occultism
07.26_-_Offering_and_Surrender
07.29_-_How_to_Feel_that_we_Belong_to_the_Divine
07.31_-_Images_of_Gods_and_Goddesses
07.36_-_The_Body_and_the_Psychic
07.37_-_The_Psychic_Being,_Some_Mysteries
07.38_-_Past_Lives_and_the_Psychic_Being
07.40_-_Service_Human_and_Divine
07.41_-_The_Divine_Family
07.44_-_Music_Indian_and_European
07.45_-_Specialisation
08.01_-_Choosing_To_Do_Yoga
08.02_-_Order_and_Discipline
08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest
08.04_-_Doing_for_Her_Sake
08.07_-_Sleep_and_Pain
08.08_-_The_Mind_s_Bazaar
08.09_-_Spirits_in_Trees
08.13_-_Thought_and_Imagination
08.14_-_Poetry_and_Poetic_Inspiration
08.16_-_Perfection_and_Progress
08.17_-_Psychological_Perfection
08.20_-_Are_Not_The_Ascetic_Means_Helpful_At_Times?
08.24_-_On_Food
08.25_-_Meat-Eating
08.27_-_Value_of_Religious_Exercises
08.28_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
08.32_-_The_Surrender_of_an_Inner_Warrior
08.34_-_To_Melt_into_the_Divine
08.38_-_The_Value_of_Money
09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
09.04_-_The_Divine_Grace
09.05_-_The_Story_of_Love
09.07_-_How_to_Become_Indifferent_to_Criticism?
09.08_-_The_Modern_Taste
09.11_-_The_Supramental_Manifestation_and_World_Change
09.12_-_The_True_Teaching
09.14_-_Education_of_Girls
09.16_-_Goal_of_Evolution
100.00_-_Synergy
10.01_-_A_Dream
10.01_-_Cycles_of_Creation
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_Lord_of_Time
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.04_-_Transfiguration
10.07_-_The_Demon
10.07_-_The_World_is_One
1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation
10.09_-_Education_as_the_Growth_of_Consciousness
1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality
1.00a_-_DIVISION_A_-_THE_INTERNAL_FIRES_OF_THE_SHEATHS.
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00b_-_DIVISION_B_-_THE_PERSONALITY_RAY_AND_FIRE_BY_FRICTION
1.00b_-_Introduction
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00d_-_Introduction
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00g_-_Foreword
1.00_-_Introduction_to_Alchemy_of_Happiness
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks
1.00_-_PRELUDE_AT_THE_THEATRE
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
10.10_-_A_Poem
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought
10.12_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Love
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
10.14_-_Night_and_Day
1.01_-_About_the_Elements
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.01_-_Economy
1.01f_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_Hatha_Yoga
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Isha_Upanishad
1.01_-_Maitreya_inquires_of_his_teacher_(Parashara)
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES
1.01_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_first_meeting,_December_1918
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_On_Love
1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_Proem
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Sets_down_the_first_line_and_begins_to_treat_of_the_imperfections_of_beginners.
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Castle
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_Dark_Forest._The_Hill_of_Difficulty._The_Panther,_the_Lion,_and_the_Wolf._Virgil.
1.01_-_The_Ego
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration
1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Lord_of_hosts
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_The_Offering
1.01_-_The_Path_of_Later_On
1.01_-_The_Rape_of_the_Lock
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.01_-_The_Three_Metamorphoses
1.01_-_The_Unexpected
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
1.01_-_Who_is_Tara
1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World
1.02.1_-_The_Inhabiting_Godhead_-_Life_and_Action
1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_-_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World
1.02.2.2_-_Self-Realisation
10.22_-_Short_Notes_-_5-_Consciousness_and_Dimensions_of_View
1.02.3.1_-_The_Lord
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
1.02.4.2_-_Action_and_the_Divine_Will
1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes
10.24_-_Savitri
10.25_-_How_to_Read_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame
10.26_-_A_True_Professor
10.27_-_Consciousness
1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary
1.02_-_BEFORE_THE_CITY-GATE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_Fire_over_the_Earth
1.02_-_Groups_and_Statistical_Mechanics
1.02_-_In_the_Beginning
1.02_-_Isha_Analysis
1.02_-_Karmayoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara
1.02_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_second_meeting,_March_1921
1.02_-_Of_certain_spiritual_imperfections_which_beginners_have_with_respect_to_the_habit_of_pride.
1.02_-_On_detachment
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_On_the_Service_of_the_Soul
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_Skillful_Means
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_Substance_Is_Eternal
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_The_Age_of_Individualism_and_Reason
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Descent._Dante's_Protest_and_Virgil's_Appeal._The_Intercession_of_the_Three_Ladies_Benedight.
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law
1.02_-_The_Great_Process
1.02_-_The_Human_Soul
1.02_-_The_Magic_Circle
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara
1.02_-_The_Pit
1.02_-_The_Principle_of_Fire
1.02_-_THE_QUATERNIO_AND_THE_MEDIATING_ROLE_OF_MERCURIUS
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial
1.02_-_The_Ultimate_Path_is_Without_Difficulty
1.02_-_The_Virtues
1.02_-_The_Vision_of_the_Past
1.02_-_THE_WITHIN_OF_THINGS
1.02_-_To_Zen_Monks_Kin_and_Koku
1.02_-_What_is_Psycho_therapy?
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
1.031_-_Intense_Aspiration
10.33_-_On_Discipline
10.34_-_Effort_and_Grace
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.036_-_The_Rise_of_Obstacles_in_Yoga_Practice
1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_APPRENTICESHIP_AND_ENCULTURATION_-_ADOPTION_OF_A_SHARED_MAP
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Eternal_Presence
1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_Japa_Yoga
1.03_-_Man_-_Slave_or_Free?
1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell
1.03_-_Measure_of_time,_Moments_of_Kashthas,_etc.
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_Of_some_imperfections_which_some_of_these_souls_are_apt_to_have,_with_respect_to_the_second_capital_sin,_which_is_avarice,_in_the_spiritual_sense
1.03_-_On_exile_or_pilgrimage
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY
1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita
1.03_-_Some_Aspects_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.03_-_Some_Practical_Aspects
1.03_-_Spiritual_Realisation,_The_aim_of_Bhakti-Yoga
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_Tara,_Liberator_from_the_Eight_Dangers
1.03_-_The_Coming_of_the_Subjective_Age
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_THE_EARTH_IN_ITS_EARLY_STAGES
1.03_-_The_End_of_the_Intellect
1.03_-_The_Gate_of_Hell._The_Inefficient_or_Indifferent._Pope_Celestine_V._The_Shores_of_Acheron._Charon._The
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Psychic_Prana
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Sunlit_Path
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_The_Tale_of_the_Alchemist_Who_Sold_His_Soul
1.03_-_The_Two_Negations_2_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Ascetic
1.03_-_The_Void
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_A_Leader
1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Communion
1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_Homage_to_the_Twenty-one_Taras
1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Narayana_appearance,_in_the_beginning_of_the_Kalpa,_as_the_Varaha_(boar)
1.04_-_Nothing_Exists_Per_Se_Except_Atoms_And_The_Void
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_Reality_Omnipresent
1.04_-_Relationship_with_the_Divine
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_Sounds
1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Control_of_Psychic_Prana
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Fork_in_the_Road
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Need_of_Guru
1.04_-_The_Origin_and_Development_of_Poetry.
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Qabalah__The_Best_Training_for_Memory
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_To_the_Priest_of_Rytan-ji
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.04_-_Wherefore_of_World?
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.056_-_Lack_of_Knowledge_is_the_Cause_of_Suffering
1.057_-_The_Four_Manifestations_of_Ignorance
1.05_-_Adam_Kadmon
1.05_-_AUERBACHS_CELLAR
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Consciousness
1.05_-_Definition_of_the_Ludicrous,_and_a_brief_sketch_of_the_rise_of_Comedy.
1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_Knowledge_by_Aquaintance_and_Knowledge_by_Description
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_Morality_and_War
1.05_-_MORALITY_AS_THE_ENEMY_OF_NATURE
1.05_-_On_painstaking_and_true_repentance_which_constitute_the_life_of_the_holy_convicts;_and_about_the_prison.
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana
1.05_-_Prayer
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_The_Belly_of_the_Whale
1.05_-_The_Creative_Principle
1.05_-_The_Destiny_of_the_Individual
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_The_New_Consciousness
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_The_Principle_of_Earth
1.05_-_The_Second_Circle__The_Wanton._Minos._The_Infernal_Hurricane._Francesca_da_Rimini.
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_The_Ways_of_Working_of_the_Lord
1.05_-_True_and_False_Subjectivism
1.05_-_Vishnu_as_Brahma_creates_the_world
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Work_and_Teaching
1.060_-_Tracing_the_Ultimate_Cause_of_Any_Experience
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_A_Summary_of_my_Phenomenological_View_of_the_World
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Confutation_Of_Other_Philosophers
1.06_-_Definition_of_Tragedy.
1.06_-_Dhyana
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Five_Dreams
1.06_-_Gestalt_and_Universals
1.06_-_Hymns_of_Parashara
1.06_-_Incarnate_Teachers_and_Incarnation
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_Magicians_as_Kings
1.06_-_Man_in_the_Universe
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_gluttony.
1.06_-_On_Induction
1.06_-_On_remembrance_of_death.
1.06_-_ON_THE_PALE_CRIMINAL
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_On_Work
1.06_-_Origin_of_the_four_castes
1.06_-_PIG_AND_PEPPER
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_Psycho_therapy_and_a_Philosophy_of_Life
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Breaking_of_the_Limits
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Four_Powers_of_the_Mother
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.06_-_The_Transformation_of_Dream_Life
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.06_-_WITCHES_KITCHEN
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.070_-_The_Seven_Stages_of_Perfection
1.075_-_Self-Control,_Study_and_Devotion_to_God
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Jnana_Yoga
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.07_-_On_Dreams
1.07_-_On_mourning_which_causes_joy.
1.07_-_On_Our_Knowledge_of_General_Principles
1.07_-_ON_READING_AND_WRITING
1.07_-_Past,_Present_and_Future
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_Raja-Yoga_in_Brief
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Continuity_of_Consciousness
1.07_-_The_Ego_and_the_Dualities
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Fire_of_the_New_World
1.07_-_The_Fourth_Circle__The_Avaricious_and_the_Prodigal._Plutus._Fortune_and_her_Wheel._The_Fifth_Circle__The_Irascible_and_the_Sullen._Styx.
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_THE_.IMPROVERS._OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Infinity_Of_The_Universe
1.07_-_The_Literal_Qabalah_(continued)
1.07_-_The_Magic_Wand
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Process_of_Evolution
1.07_-_The_Prophecies_of_Nostradamus
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_2
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.080_-_Pratyahara_-_The_Return_of_Energy
1.081_-_The_Application_of_Pratyahara
1.083_-_Choosing_an_Object_for_Concentration
1.08_-_Adhyatma_Yoga
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_Departmental_Kings_of_Nature
1.08_-_Independence_from_the_Physical
1.08_-_Information,_Language,_and_Society
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_Phlegyas._Philippo_Argenti._The_Gate_of_the_City_of_Dis.
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_Stead_and_the_Spirits
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_The_Magic_Sword,_Dagger_and_Trident
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.08_-_The_Splitting_of_the_Human_Personality_during_Spiritual_Training
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Discovery
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.08_-_Wherein_is_expounded_the_first_line_of_the_first_stanza,_and_a_beginning_is_made_of_the_explanation_of_this_dark_night
1.094_-_Understanding_the_Structure_of_Things
1.096_-_Powers_that_Accrue_in_the_Practice
1.097_-_Sublimation_of_Object-Consciousness
1.099_-_The_Entry_of_the_Eternal_into_the_Individual
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_A_System_of_Vedic_Psychology
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_Equality_and_the_Annihilation_of_Ego
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_Legend_of_Lakshmi
1.09_-_Man_-_About_the_Body
1.09_-_Of_the_signs_by_which_it_will_be_known_that_the_spiritual_person_is_walking_along_the_way_of_this_night_and_purgation_of_sense.
1.09_-_(Plot_continued.)_Dramatic_Unity.
1.09_-_PROMENADE
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_Taras_Ultimate_Nature
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
1.09_-_The_Chosen_Ideal
1.09_-_The_Crown,_Cap,_Magus-Band
1.09_-_The_Furies_and_Medusa._The_Angel._The_City_of_Dis._The_Sixth_Circle__Heresiarchs.
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
1.09_-_The_Secret_Chiefs
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
1.09_-_WHO_STOLE_THE_TARTS?
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
1.1.02_-_Sachchidananda
1.1.02_-_The_Aim_of_the_Integral_Yoga
11.02_-_The_Golden_Life-line
1.1.03_-_Brahman
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
1.1.04_-_The_Self_or_Atman
11.04_-_The_Triple_Cord
1.1.05_-_The_Siddhis
11.06_-_The_Mounting_Fire
1.107_-_The_Bestowal_of_a_Divine_Gift
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
1.10_-_Aesthetic_and_Ethical_Culture
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Farinata_and_Cavalcante_de'_Cavalcanti._Discourse_on_the_Knowledge_of_the_Damned.
1.10_-_Fate_and_Free-Will
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Harmony
1.10_-_Laughter_Of_The_Gods
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_The_Absolute_of_the_Being
1.10_-_The_descendants_of_the_daughters_of_Daksa_married_to_the_Rsis
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Magical_Garment
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_The_Methods_and_the_Means
1.10_-_THE_NEIGHBORS_HOUSE
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Roughly_Material_Plane_or_the_Material_World
1.10_-_The_Scolex_School
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.1.1.01_-_Three_Elements_of_Poetic_Creation
1.1.1.03_-_Creative_Power_and_the_Human_Instrument
1.1.1.07_-_Aspiration,_Opening,_Recognition
11.13_-_In_these_Fateful_Days
11.14_-_Our_Finest_Hour
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Legend_of_Dhruva,_the_son_of_Uttanapada
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_On_Intuitive_Knowledge
1.11_-_(Plot_continued.)_Reversal_of_the_Situation,_Recognition,_and_Tragic_or_disastrous_Incident_defined_and_explained.
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Influence_of_the_Sexes_on_Vegetation
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.1.1_-_The_Mind_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
1.11_-_The_Seven_Rivers
1.11_-_The_Soul_or_the_Astral_Body
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.11_-_Woolly_Pomposities_of_the_Pious_Teacher
1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Dhruva_commences_a_course_of_religious_austerities
1.12_-_Further_Magical_Aids
1.12_-_GARDEN
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_Independence
1.12_-_Love_The_Creator
1.12_-_ON_THE_FLIES_OF_THE_MARKETPLACE
1.12_-_The_Astral_Plane
1.12_-_The_Divine_Work
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Herds_of_the_Dawn
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_'quantitative_parts'_of_Tragedy_defined.
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_A_Dream
1.13_-_And_Then?
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.13_-_Knowledge,_Error,_and_Probably_Opinion
1.13_-_On_despondency.
1.13_-_(Plot_continued.)_What_constitutes_Tragic_Action.
1.13_-_Posterity_of_Dhruva
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.14_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTEENTH
1.14_-_Descendants_of_Prithu
1.14_-_FOREST_AND_CAVERN
1.14_-_IMMORTALITY_AND_SURVIVAL
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_Noise
1.14_-_On_the_clamorous,_yet_wicked_master-the_stomach.
1.14_-_ON_THE_FRIEND
1.14_-_(Plot_continued.)_The_tragic_emotions_of_pity_and_fear_should_spring_out_of_the_Plot_itself.
1.14_-_Postscript
1.14_-_The_Book_of_Magic_Formulae
1.14_-_The_Limits_of_Philosophical_Knowledge
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Sand_Waste_and_the_Rain_of_Fire._The_Violent_against_God._Capaneus._The_Statue_of_Time,_and_the_Four_Infernal_Rivers.
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_The_Supermind_as_Creator
1.14_-_The_Suprarational_Beauty
1.14_-_The_Victory_Over_Death
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_Index
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_Sex_Morality
1.15_-_SILENCE
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Supramental_Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_Supreme_Truth-Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.15_-_The_Value_of_Philosophy
1.15_-_The_Violent_against_Nature._Brunetto_Latini.
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.1.5_-_Thought_and_Knowledge
1.15_-_Truth
1.16_-_Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Evocational_Magic
1.16_-_Dianus_and_Diana
1.16_-_Guidoguerra,_Aldobrandi,_and_Rusticucci._Cataract_of_the_River_of_Blood.
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_MARTHAS_GARDEN
1.16_-_(Plot_continued.)_Recognition__its_various_kinds,_with_examples
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_THE_ESSENCE_OF_THE_DEMOCRATIC_IDEA
1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood
1.16_-_The_Season_of_Truth
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_Geryon._The_Violent_against_Art._Usurers._Descent_into_the_Abyss_of_Malebolge.
1.17_-_God
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_On_poverty_(that_hastens_heavenwards).
1.17_-_On_Teaching
1.17_-_Practical_rules_for_the_Tragic_Poet.
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.17_-_The_Burden_of_Royalty
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Divine_Soul
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Spiritus_Familiaris_or_Serving_Spirits
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_Asceticism
1.18_-_DONJON
1.18_-_Evocation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_Mind_and_Supermind
1.18_-_On_insensibility,_that_is,_deadening_of_the_soul_and_the_death_of_the_mind_before_the_death_of_the_body.
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_The_Eighth_Circle,_Malebolge__The_Fraudulent_and_the_Malicious._The_First_Bolgia__Seducers_and_Panders._Venedico_Caccianimico._Jason._The_Second_Bolgia__Flatterers._Allessio_Interminelli._Thais.
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Importance_of_our_Conventional_Greetings,_etc.
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_Dialogue_between_Prahlada_and_his_father
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
1.19_-_Life
1.19_-_NIGHT
1.19_-_On_sleep,_prayer,_and_psalm-singing_in_chapel.
1.19_-_ON_THE_ADDERS_BITE
1.19_-_ON_THE_PROBABLE_EXISTENCE_AHEAD_OF_US_OF_AN_ULTRA-HUMAN
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.19_-_The_Curve_of_the_Rational_Age
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Practice_of_Magical_Evocation
1.19_-_The_Third_Bolgia__Simoniacs._Pope_Nicholas_III._Dante's_Reproof_of_corrupt_Prelates.
1.19_-_The_Victory_of_the_Fathers
1.19_-_Thought,_or_the_Intellectual_element,_and_Diction_in_Tragedy.
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.201_-_Socrates
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth
12.01_-_This_Great_Earth_Our_Mother
1.2.02_-_Qualities_Needed_for_Sadhana
12.02_-_The_Stress_of_the_Spirit
1.2.03_-_Purity
1.2.03_-_The_Interpretation_of_Scripture
1.2.04_-_Sincerity
1.2.05_-_Aspiration
12.05_-_The_World_Tragedy
1.2.06_-_Rejection
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.2.09_-_Consecration_and_Offering
12.09_-_The_Story_of_Dr._Faustus_Retold
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_HOW_MAY_WE_CONCEIVE_AND_HOPE_THAT_HUMAN_UNANIMIZATION_WILL_BE_REALIZED_ON_EARTH?
1.20_-_On_bodily_vigil_and_how_to_use_it_to_attain_spiritual_vigil_and_how_to_practise_it.
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_Talismans_-_The_Lamen_-_The_Pantacle
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.20_-_The_Fourth_Bolgia__Soothsayers._Amphiaraus,_Tiresias,_Aruns,_Manto,_Eryphylus,_Michael_Scott,_Guido_Bonatti,_and_Asdente._Virgil_reproaches_Dante's_Pity.
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.20_-_Visnu_appears_to_Prahlada
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
1.2.10_-_Opening
1.2.1.11_-_Mystic_Poetry_and_Spiritual_Poetry
1.2.11_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_Chih_Men's_Lotus_Flower,_Lotus_Leaves
1.21_-_Families_of_the_Daityas
1.21_-_FROM_THE_PRE-HUMAN_TO_THE_ULTRA-HUMAN,_THE_PHASES_OF_A_LIVING_PLANET
1.2.1_-_Mental_Development_and_Sadhana
1.21_-_My_Theory_of_Astrology
1.21_-_ON_FREE_DEATH
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Spiritual_Aim_and_Life
1.21_-_WALPURGIS-NIGHT
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.22_-_Ciampolo,_Friar_Gomita,_and_Michael_Zanche._The_Malabranche_quarrel.
1.22__-_Dominion_over_different_provinces_of_creation_assigned_to_different_beings
1.22_-_EMOTIONALISM
1.22_-_How_to_Learn_the_Practice_of_Astrology
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_On_the_many_forms_of_vainglory.
1.22_-_(Poetic_Diction_continued.)_How_Poetry_combines_elevation_of_language_with_perspicuity.
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.2.2_-_The_Place_of_Study_in_Sadhana
1.22_-_The_Problem_of_Life
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.23_-_DREARY_DAY
1.23_-_Epic_Poetry.
1.23_-_Escape_from_the_Malabranche._The_Sixth_Bolgia__Hypocrites._Catalano_and_Loderingo._Caiaphas.
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.23_-_Our_Debt_to_the_Savage
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.23_-_THE_MIRACULOUS
1.2.3_-_The_Power_of_Expression_and_Yoga
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Describes_how_vocal_prayer_may_be_practised_with_perfection_and_how_closely_allied_it_is_to_mental_prayer
1.24_-_(Epic_Poetry_continued.)_Further_points_of_agreement_with_Tragedy.
1.24_-_Necromancy_and_Spiritism
1.24_-_On_Beauty
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.2.4_-_Speech_and_Yoga
1.24_-_The_Advent_and_Progress_of_the_Spiritual_Age
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Critical_Objections_brought_against_Poetry,_and_the_principles_on_which_they_are_to_be_answered.
1.25_-_Describes_the_great_gain_which_comes_to_a_soul_when_it_practises_vocal_prayer_perfectly._Shows_how_God_may_raise_it_thence_to_things_supernatural.
1.25_-_DUNGEON
1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_Kinks_in_Time
1.25_-_On_Religion
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.25_-_Vanni_Fucci's_Punishment._Agnello_Brunelleschi,_Buoso_degli_Abati,_Puccio_Sciancato,_Cianfa_de'_Donati,_and_Guercio_Cavalcanti.
1.26_-_Continues_the_description_of_a_method_for_recollecting_the_thoughts._Describes_means_of_doing_this._This_chapter_is_very_profitable_for_those_who_are_beginning_prayer.
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_The_Eighth_Bolgia__Evil_Counsellors._Ulysses_and_Diomed._Ulysses'_Last_Voyage.
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_Guido_da_Montefeltro._His_deception_by_Pope_Boniface_VIII.
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.27_-_Succession_to_the_Soul
1.27_-_The_Sevenfold_Chord_of_Being
1.28_-_Describes_the_nature_of_the_Prayer_of_Recollection_and_sets_down_some_of_the_means_by_which_we_can_make_it_a_habit.
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.28_-_Supermind,_Mind_and_the_Overmind_Maya
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_Concerning_heaven_on_earth,_or_godlike_dispassion_and_perfection,_and_the_resurrection_of_the_soul_before_the_general_resurrection.
1.29_-_Continues_to_describe_methods_for_achieving_this_Prayer_of_Recollection._Says_what_little_account_we_should_make_of_being_favoured_by_our_superiors.
1.29_-_Geri_del_Bello._The_Tenth_Bolgia__Alchemists._Griffolino_d'_Arezzo_and_Capocchino._The_many_people_and_the_divers_wounds
1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
1.3.01_-_Peace__The_Basis_of_the_Sadhana
13.02_-_A_Review_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Life
1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm
13.04_-_A_Note_on_Supermind
1.3.04_-_Peace
1.3.05_-_Silence
13.06_-_The_Passing_of_Satyavan
13.07_-_The_Inter-Zone
13.08_-_The_Return
1.30_-_Adonis_in_Syria
1.30_-_Concerning_the_linking_together_of_the_supreme_trinity_among_the_virtues.
1.30_-_Describes_the_importance_of_understanding_what_we_ask_for_in_prayer._Treats_of_these_words_in_the_Paternoster:_Sanctificetur_nomen_tuum,_adveniat_regnum_tuum._Applies_them_to_the_Prayer_of_Quiet,_and_begins_the_explanation_of_them.
1.30_-_Do_you_Believe_in_God?
1.30_-_Other_Falsifiers_or_Forgers._Gianni_Schicchi,_Myrrha,_Adam_of_Brescia,_Potiphar's_Wife,_and_Sinon_of_Troy.
1.3.1.02_-_The_Object_of_Our_Yoga
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.31_-_Continues_the_same_subject._Explains_what_is_meant_by_the_Prayer_of_Quiet._Gives_several_counsels_to_those_who_experience_it._This_chapter_is_very_noteworthy.
1.31_-_The_Giants,_Nimrod,_Ephialtes,_and_Antaeus._Descent_to_Cocytus.
1.32_-_Expounds_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Fiat_voluntas_tua_sicut_in_coelo_et_in_terra._Describes_how_much_is_accomplished_by_those_who_repeat_these_words_with_full_resolution_and_how_well
1.32_-_How_can_a_Yogi_ever_be_Worried?
1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle__Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina__Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora__Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli
1.32_-_The_Ritual_of_Adonis
1.33_-_Count_Ugolino_and_the_Archbishop_Ruggieri._The_Death_of_Count_Ugolino's_Sons.
1.33_-_The_Gardens_of_Adonis
1.33_-_Treats_of_our_great_need_that_the_Lord_should_give_us_what_we_ask_in_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Panem_nostrum_quotidianum_da_nobis_hodie.
1.3.4.01_-_The_Beginning_and_the_End
1.3.4.02_-_The_Hour_of_God
1.3.4.04_-_The_Divine_Superman
1.34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after_the_reception_of_the_Most_Holy_Sacrament.
1.34_-_Fourth_Division_of_the_Ninth_Circle,_the_Judecca__Traitors_to_their_Lords_and_Benefactors._Lucifer,_Judas_Iscariot,_Brutus,_and_Cassius._The_Chasm_of_Lethe._The_Ascent.
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.3.5.01_-_The_Law_of_the_Way
1.3.5.02_-_Man_and_the_Supermind
1.3.5.03_-_The_Involved_and_Evolving_Godhead
1.3.5.04_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness
1.3.5.05_-_The_Path
1.35_-_Attis_as_a_God_of_Vegetation
1.35_-_Describes_the_recollection_which_should_be_practised_after_Communion._Concludes_this_subject_with_an_exclamatory_prayer_to_the_Eternal_Father.
1.35_-_The_Tao_2
1.36_-_Quo_Stet_Olympus_-_Where_the_Gods,_Angels,_etc._Live
1.36_-_Treats_of_these_words_in_the_Paternoster__Dimitte_nobis_debita_nostra.
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,_and_the_many_ways_in_which_we_shall_find_consolation_in_it.
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.38_-_Treats_of_the_great_need_which_we_have_to_beseech_the_Eternal_Father_to_grant_us_what_we_ask_in_these_words:_Et_ne_nos_inducas_in_tentationem,_sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Explains_certain_temptations._This_chapter_is_noteworthy.
1.39_-_Continues_the_same_subject_and_gives_counsels_concerning_different_kinds_of_temptation._Suggests_two_remedies_by_which_we_may_be_freed_from_temptations.135
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
14.02_-_Occult_Experiences
1.4.02_-_The_Divine_Force
14.03_-_Janaka_and_Yajnavalkya
1.4.03_-_The_Guru
14.04_-_More_of_Yajnavalkya
14.05_-_The_Golden_Rule
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
14.07_-_A_Review_of_Our_Ashram_Life
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.40_-_Coincidence
1.40_-_Describes_how,_by_striving_always_to_walk_in_the_love_and_fear_of_God,_we_shall_travel_safely_amid_all_these_temptations.
1.40_-_The_Nature_of_Osiris
1.41_-_Isis
1.42_-_Osiris_and_the_Sun
1.42_-_This_Self_Introversion
1.42_-_Treats_of_these_last_words_of_the_Paternoster__Sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Amen._But_deliver_us_from_evil._Amen.
1.439
1.43_-_Dionysus
1.43_-_The_Holy_Guardian_Angel_is_not_the_Higher_Self_but_an_Objective_Individual
1.44_-_Demeter_and_Persephone
1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_The_Corn-Mother_and_the_Corn-Maiden_in_Northern_Europe
1.45_-_Unserious_Conduct_of_a_Pupil
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.4_-_Readings_in_the_Taittiriya_Upanishad
15.03_-_A_Canadian_Question
15.04_-_The_Mother_Abides
15.05_-_Twin_Prayers
15.06_-_Words,_Words,_Words...
15.07_-_Souls_Freedom
15.08_-_Ashram_-_Inner_and_Outer
15.09_-_One_Day_More
1.50_-_A.C._and_the_Masters;_Why_they_Chose_him,_etc.
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.51_-_Homeopathic_Magic_of_a_Flesh_Diet
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Family_-_Public_Enemy_No._1
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_Mother-Love
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.54_-_Types_of_Animal_Sacrament
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.55_-_The_Transference_of_Evil
1.56_-_Marriage_-_Property_-_War_-_Politics
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Do_Angels_Ever_Cut_Themselves_Shaving?
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.59_-_Geomancy
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
1.60_-_Between_Heaven_and_Earth
1.60_-_Knack
1.61_-_Power_and_Authority
1.62_-_The_Elastic_Mind
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.63_-_The_Interpretation_of_the_Fire-Festivals
1.64_-_The_Burning_of_Human_Beings_in_the_Fires
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.65_-_Man
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.66_-_Vampires
1.67_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Custom
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.68_-_The_Golden_Bough
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
1.69_-_Original_Sin
17.01_-_Hymn_to_Dawn
17.02_-_Hymn_to_the_Sun
17.03_-_Agni_and_the_Gods
17.04_-_Hymn_to_the_Purusha
17.07_-_Ode_to_Darkness
1.70_-_Morality_1
17.11_-_A_Prayer
1.71_-_Morality_2
1.72_-_Education
1.73_-_Monsters,_Niggers,_Jews,_etc.
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.76_-_The_Gods_-_How_and_Why_they_Overlap
1.77_-_Work_Worthwhile_-_Why?
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
1.79_-_Progress
18.01_-_Padavali
18.02_-_Ramprasad
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.80_-_Life_a_Gamble
1.81_-_Method_of_Training
1.83_-_Epistola_Ultima
19.02_-_Vigilance
19.04_-_The_Flowers
1912_11_19p
1912_11_28p
1912_12_11p
1913_02_08p
1913_02_12p
1913_07_23p
1913_08_17p
1913_11_28p
1914_01_04p
1914_01_07p
1914_01_08p
1914_01_10p
1914_01_11p
1914_01_19p
1914_02_22p
1914_03_10p
1914_04_10p
1914_04_13p
1914_05_09p
1914_05_16p
1914_06_11p
1914_06_22p
1914_06_27p
1914_06_28p
1914_07_04p
1914_07_06p
1914_07_07p
1914_07_19p
1914_08_04p
1914_08_06p
1914_09_04p
1914_09_05p
1914_10_07p
1914_10_11p
1914_10_23p
1914_11_03p
1914_11_15p
1914_11_16p
1915_03_04p
1915_04_19p
1915_05_24p
1916_01_15p
1916_11_28p
1916_12_08p
1916_12_24p
1916_12_25p
1917_03_27p
1918_07_12p
1920_06_22p
1929-04-07_-_Yoga,_for_the_sake_of_the_Divine_-_Concentration_-_Preparations_for_Yoga,_to_be_conscious_-_Yoga_and_humanity_-_We_have_all_met_in_previous_lives
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-05-05_-_Intellect,_true_and_wrong_movement_-_Attacks_from_adverse_forces_-_Faith,_integral_and_absolute_-_Death,_not_a_necessity_-_Descent_of_Divine_Consciousness_-_Inner_progress_-_Memory_of_former_lives
1929-05-12_-_Beings_of_vital_world_(vampires)_-_Money_power_and_vital_beings_-_Capacity_for_manifestation_of_will_-_Entry_into_vital_world_-_Body,_a_protection_-_Individuality_and_the_vital_world
1929-05-19_-_Mind_and_its_workings,_thought-forms_-_Adverse_conditions_and_Yoga_-_Mental_constructions_-_Illness_and_Yoga
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-06-09_-_Nature_of_religion_-_Religion_and_the_spiritual_life_-_Descent_of_Divine_Truth_and_Force_-_To_be_sure_of_your_religion,_country,_family-choose_your_own_-_Religion_and_numbers
1929-06-16_-_Illness_and_Yoga_-_Subtle_body_(nervous_envelope)_-_Fear_and_illness
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-08-04_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Personality_and_surrender_-_Desire_and_passion_-_Spirituality_and_morality
1931_11_24p
1937_10_23p
1938_08_17p
1950-12-23_-_Concentration_and_energy
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1950-12-28_-_Correct_judgment.
1951-01-04_-_Transformation_and_reversal_of_consciousness.
1951-01-11_-_Modesty_and_vanity_-_Generosity
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-01-15_-_Sincerity_-_inner_discernment_-_inner_light._Evil_and_imbalance._Consciousness_and_instruments.
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-02-03_-_What_is_Yoga?_for_what?_-_Aspiration,_seeking_the_Divine._-_Process_of_yoga,_renouncing_the_ego.
1951-02-05_-_Surrender_and_tapasya_-_Dealing_with_difficulties,_sincerity,_spiritual_discipline_-_Narrating_experiences_-_Vital_impulse_and_will_for_progress
1951-02-08_-_Unifying_the_being_-_ideas_of_good_and_bad_-_Miracles_-_determinism_-_Supreme_Will_-_Distinguishing_the_voice_of_the_Divine
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-15_-_Dreams,_symbolic_-_true_repose_-_False_visions_-_Earth-memory_and_history
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-19_-_Exteriorisation-_clairvoyance,_fainting,_etc_-_Somnambulism_-_Tartini_-_childrens_dreams_-_Nightmares_-_gurus_protection_-_Mind_and_vital_roam_during_sleep
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-02-24_-_Psychic_being_and_entity_-_dimensions_-_in_the_atom_-_Death_-_exteriorisation_-_unconsciousness_-_Past_lives_-_progress_upon_earth_-_choice_of_birth_-_Consecration_to_divine_Work_-_psychic_memories_-_Individualisation_-_progress
1951-02-26_-_On_reading_books_-_gossip_-_Discipline_and_realisation_-_Imaginary_stories-_value_of_-_Private_lives_of_big_men_-_relaxation_-_Understanding_others_-_gnostic_consciousness
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-03_-_Hostile_forces_-_difficulties_-_Individuality_and_form_-_creation
1951-03-05_-_Disasters-_the_forces_of_Nature_-_Story_of_the_charity_Bazar_-_Liberation_and_law_-_Dealing_with_the_mind_and_vital-_methods
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-03-12_-_Mental_forms_-_learning_difficult_subjects_-_Mental_fortress_-_thought_-_Training_the_mind_-_Helping_the_vital_being_after_death_-_ceremonies_-_Human_stupidities
1951-03-14_-_Plasticity_-_Conditions_for_knowing_the_Divine_Will_-_Illness_-_microbes_-_Fear_-_body-reflexes_-_The_best_possible_happens_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_True_knowledge_-_a_work_to_do_-_the_Ashram
1951-03-17_-_The_universe-_eternally_new,_same_-_Pralaya_Traditions_-_Light_and_thought_-_new_consciousness,_forces_-_The_expanding_universe_-_inexpressible_experiences_-_Ashram_surcharged_with_Light_-_new_force_-_vibrating_atmospheres
1951-03-19_-_Mental_worlds_and_their_beings_-_Understanding_in_silence_-_Psychic_world-_its_characteristics_-_True_experiences_and_mental_formations_-_twelve_senses
1951-03-22_-_Relativity-_time_-_Consciousness_-_psychic_Witness_-_The_twelve_senses_-_water-divining_-_Instinct_in_animals_-_story_of_Mothers_cat
1951-03-24_-_Descent_of_Divine_Love,_of_Consciousness_-_Earth-_a_symbolic_formation_-_the_Divine_Presence_-_The_psychic_being_and_other_worlds_-_Divine_Love_and_Grace_-_Becoming_consaious_of_Divine_Love_-_Finding_ones_psychic_being_-_Responsibility
1951-03-26_-_Losing_all_to_gain_all_-_psychic_being_-_Transforming_the_vital_-_physical_habits_-_the_subconscient_-_Overcoming_difficulties_-_weakness,_an_insincerity_-_to_change_the_world_-_Psychic_source,_flash_of_experience_-_preparation_for_yoga
1951-03-29_-_The_Great_Vehicle_and_The_Little_Vehicle_-_Choosing_ones_family,_country_-_The_vital_being_distorted_-_atavism_-_Sincerity_-_changing_ones_character
1951-03-31_-_Physical_ailment_and_mental_disorder_-_Curing_an_illness_spiritually_-_Receptivity_of_the_body_-_The_subtle-physical-_illness_accidents_-_Curing_sunstroke_and_other_disorders
1951-04-02_-_Causes_of_accidents_-_Little_entities,_helpful_or_mischievous-_incidents
1951-04-05_-_Illusion_and_interest_in_action_-_The_action_of_the_divine_Grace_and_the_ego_-_Concentration,_aspiration,_will,_inner_silence_-_Value_of_a_story_or_a_language_-_Truth_-_diversity_in_the_world
1951-04-07_-_Origin_of_Evil_-_Misery-_its_cause
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-14_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Idea_of_sacrifice_-_Bahaism_-_martyrdom_-_Sleep-_forgetfulness,_exteriorisation,_etc_-_Dreams_and_visions-_explanations_-_Exteriorisation-_incidents_about_cats
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1951-04-19_-_Demands_and_needs_-_human_nature_-_Abolishing_the_ego_-_Food-_tamas,_consecration_-_Changing_the_nature-_the_vital_and_the_mind_-_The_yoga_of_the_body__-_cellular_consciousness
1951-04-21_-_Sri_Aurobindos_letter_on_conditions_for_doing_yoga_-_Aspiration,_tapasya,_surrender_-_The_lower_vital_-_old_habits_-_obsession_-_Sri_Aurobindo_on_choice_and_the_double_life_-_The_old_fiasco_-_inner_realisation_and_outer_change
1951-04-23_-_The_goal_and_the_way_-_Learning_how_to_sleep_-_relaxation_-_Adverse_forces-_test_of_sincerity_-_Attitude_to_suffering_and_death
1951-04-26_-_Irrevocable_transformation_-_The_divine_Shakti_-_glad_submission_-_Rejection,_integral_-_Consecration_-_total_self-forgetfulness_-_work
1951-04-28_-_Personal_effort_-_tamas,_laziness_-_Static_and_dynamic_power_-_Stupidity_-_psychic_and_intelligence_-_Philosophies-_different_languages_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_Surrender_of_ones_being_and_ones_work
1951-05-03_-_Money_and_its_use_for_the_divine_work_-_problems_-_Mastery_over_desire-_individual_and_collective_change
1951-05-07_-_A_Hierarchy_-_Transcendent,_universal,_individual_Divine_-_The_Supreme_Shakti_and_Creation_-_Inadequacy_of_words,_language
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1951-05-14_-_Chance_-_the_play_of_forces_-_Peace,_given_and_lost_-_Abolishing_the_ego
1953-04-01
1953-04-08
1953-04-29
1953-05-06
1953-05-13
1953-05-20
1953-05-27
1953-06-03
1953-06-10
1953-06-17
1953-06-24
1953-07-01
1953-07-08
1953-07-15
1953-07-22
1953-07-29
1953-08-05
1953-08-12
1953-08-19
1953-08-26
1953-09-16
1953-09-23
1953-09-30
1953-10-07
1953-10-14
1953-10-21
1953-10-28
1953-11-04
1953-11-11
1953-11-25
1953-12-09
1953-12-23
1953-12-30
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1954-02-10_-_Study_a_variety_of_subjects_-_Memory_-Memory_of_past_lives_-_Getting_rid_of_unpleasant_thoughts
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-03-03_-_Occultism_-_A_French_scientists_experiment
1954-03-24_-_Dreams_and_the_condition_of_the_stomach_-_Tobacco_and_alcohol_-_Nervousness_-_The_centres_and_the_Kundalini_-_Control_of_the_senses
1954-04-14_-_Love_-_Can_a_person_love_another_truly?_-_Parental_love
1954-04-28_-_Aspiration_and_receptivity_-_Resistance_-_Purusha_and_Prakriti,_not_masculine_and_feminine
1954-05-05_-_Faith,_trust,_confidence_-_Insincerity_and_unconsciousness
1954-05-12_-_The_Purusha_-_Surrender_-_Distinguishing_between_influences_-_Perfect_sincerity
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-05-26_-_Symbolic_dreams_-_Psychic_sorrow_-_Dreams,_one_is_rarely_conscious
1954-06-02_-_Learning_how_to_live_-_Work,_studies_and_sadhana_-_Waste_of_the_Energy_and_Consciousness
1954-06-16_-_Influences,_Divine_and_other_-_Adverse_forces_-_The_four_great_Asuras_-_Aspiration_arranges_circumstances_-_Wanting_only_the_Divine
1954-06-23_-_Meat-eating_-_Story_of_Mothers_vegetable_garden_-_Faithfulness_-_Conscious_sleep
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-07_-_The_inner_warrior_-_Grace_and_the_Falsehood_-_Opening_from_below_-_Surrender_and_inertia_-_Exclusive_receptivity_-_Grace_and_receptivity
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-07-21_-_Mistakes_-_Success_-_Asuras_-_Mental_arrogance_-_Difficulty_turned_into_opportunity_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Conversion_of_men_governed_by_adverse_forces
1954-07-28_-_Money_-_Ego_and_individuality_-_The_shadow
1954-08-04_-_Servant_and_worker_-_Justification_of_weakness_-_Play_of_the_Divine_-_Why_are_you_here_in_the_Ashram?
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-08-18_-_Mahalakshmi_-_Maheshwari_-_Mahasaraswati_-_Determinism_and_freedom_-_Suffering_and_knowledge_-_Aspects_of_the_Mother
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1954-09-08_-_Hostile_forces_-_Substance_-_Concentration_-_Changing_the_centre_of_thought_-_Peace
1954-09-15_-_Parts_of_the_being_-_Thoughts_and_impulses_-_The_subconscient_-_Precise_vocabulary_-_The_Grace_and_difficulties
1954-09-22_-_The_supramental_creation_-_Rajasic_eagerness_-_Silence_from_above_-_Aspiration_and_rejection_-_Effort,_individuality_and_ego_-_Aspiration_and_desire
1954-09-29_-_The_right_spirit_-_The_Divine_comes_first_-_Finding_the_Divine_-_Mistakes_-_Rejecting_impulses_-_Making_the_consciousness_vast_-_Firm_resolution
1954-10-06_-_What_happens_is_for_the_best_-_Blaming_oneself_-Experiences_-_The_vital_desire-soul_-Creating_a_spiritual_atmosphere_-Thought_and_Truth
1954-11-03_-_Body_opening_to_the_Divine_-_Concentration_in_the_heart_-_The_army_of_the_Divine_-_The_knot_of_the_ego_-Streng_thening_ones_will
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-08_-_Cosmic_consciousness_-_Clutching_-_The_central_will_of_the_being_-_Knowledge_by_identity
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1954-12-22_-_Possession_by_hostile_forces_-_Purity_and_morality_-_Faith_in_the_final_success_-Drawing_back_from_the_path
1954-12-29_-_Difficulties_and_the_world_-_The_experience_the_psychic_being_wants_-_After_death_-Ignorance
1955-02-09_-_Desire_is_contagious_-_Primitive_form_of_love_-_the_artists_delight_-_Psychic_need,_mind_as_an_instrument_-_How_the_psychic_being_expresses_itself_-_Distinguishing_the_parts_of_ones_being_-_The_psychic_guides_-_Illness_-_Mothers_vision
1955-02-16_-_Losing_something_given_by_Mother_-_Using_things_well_-_Sadhak_collecting_soap-pieces_-_What_things_are_truly_indispensable_-_Natures_harmonious_arrangement_-_Riches_a_curse,_philanthropy_-_Misuse_of_things_creates_misery
1955-02-23_-_On_the_sense_of_taste,_educating_the_senses_-_Fasting_produces_a_state_of_receptivity,_drawing_energy_-_The_body_and_food
1955-03-02_-_Right_spirit,_aspiration_and_desire_-_Sleep_and_yogic_repose,_how_to_sleep_-_Remembering_dreams_-_Concentration_and_outer_activity_-_Mother_opens_the_door_inside_everyone_-_Sleep,_a_school_for_inner_knowledge_-_Source_of_energy
1955-03-09_-_Psychic_directly_contacted_through_the_physical_-_Transforming_egoistic_movements_-_Work_of_the_psychic_being_-_Contacting_the_psychic_and_the_Divine_-_Experiences_of_different_kinds_-_Attacks_of_adverse_forces
1955-03-30_-_Yoga-shakti_-_Energies_of_the_earth,_higher_and_lower_-_Illness,_curing_by_yogic_means_-_The_true_self_and_the_psychic_-_Solving_difficulties_by_different_methods
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1955-04-13_-_Psychoanalysts_-_The_underground_super-ego,_dreams,_sleep,_control_-_Archetypes,_Overmind_and_higher_-_Dream_of_someone_dying_-_Integral_repose,_entering_Sachchidananda_-_Organising_ones_life,_concentration,_repose
1955-04-27_-_Symbolic_dreams_and_visions_-_Curing_pain_by_various_methods_-_Different_states_of_consciousness_-_Seeing_oneself_dead_in_a_dream_-_Exteriorisation
1955-05-04_-_Drawing_on_the_universal_vital_forces_-_The_inner_physical_-_Receptivity_to_different_kinds_of_forces_-_Progress_and_receptivity
1955-05-18_-_The_Problem_of_Woman_-_Men_and_women_-_The_Supreme_Mother,_the_new_creation_-_Gods_and_goddesses_-_A_story_of_Creation,_earth_-_Psychic_being_only_on_earth,_beings_everywhere_-_Going_to_other_worlds_by_occult_means
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1955-06-08_-_Working_for_the_Divine_-_ideal_attitude_-_Divine_manifesting_-_reversal_of_consciousness,_knowing_oneself_-_Integral_progress,_outer,_inner,_facing_difficulties_-_People_in_Ashram_-_doing_Yoga_-_Children_given_freedom,_choosing_yoga
1955-06-15_-_Dynamic_realisation,_transformation_-_The_negative_and_positive_side_of_experience_-_The_image_of_the_dry_coconut_fruit_-_Purusha,_Prakriti,_the_Divine_Mother_-_The_Truth-Creation_-_Pralaya_-_We_are_in_a_transitional_period
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1955-06-29_-_The_true_vital_and_true_physical_-_Time_and_Space_-_The_psychics_memory_of_former_lives_-_The_psychic_organises_ones_life_-_The_psychics_knowledge_and_direction
1955-07-06_-_The_psychic_and_the_central_being_or_jivatman_-_Unity_and_multiplicity_in_the_Divine_-_Having_experiences_and_the_ego_-_Mental,_vital_and_physical_exteriorisation_-_Imagination_has_a_formative_power_-_The_function_of_the_imagination
1955-07-13_-_Cosmic_spirit_and_cosmic_consciousness_-_The_wall_of_ignorance,_unity_and_separation_-_Aspiration_to_understand,_to_know,_to_be_-_The_Divine_is_in_the_essence_of_ones_being_-_Realising_desires_through_the_imaginaton
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1955-08-03_-_Nothing_is_impossible_in_principle_-_Psychic_contact_and_psychic_influence_-_Occult_powers,_adverse_influences;_magic_-_Magic,_occultism_and_Yogic_powers_-Hypnotism_and_its_effects
1955-08-17_-_Vertical_ascent_and_horizontal_opening_-_Liberation_of_the_psychic_being_-_Images_for_discovery_of_the_psychic_being_-_Sadhana_to_contact_the_psychic_being
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1955-10-05_-_Science_and_Ignorance_-_Knowledge,_science_and_the_Buddha_-_Knowing_by_identification_-_Discipline_in_science_and_in_Buddhism_-_Progress_in_the_mental_field_and_beyond_it
1955-10-12_-_The_problem_of_transformation_-_Evolution,_man_and_superman_-_Awakening_need_of_a_higher_good_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_earths_history_-_Setting_foot_on_the_new_path_-_The_true_reality_of_the_universe_-_the_new_race_-_...
1955-10-19_-_The_rhythms_of_time_-_The_lotus_of_knowledge_and_perfection_-_Potential_knowledge_-_The_teguments_of_the_soul_-_Shastra_and_the_Gurus_direct_teaching_-_He_who_chooses_the_Infinite...
1955-10-26_-_The_Divine_and_the_universal_Teacher_-_The_power_of_the_Word_-_The_Creative_Word,_the_mantra_-_Sound,_music_in_other_worlds_-_The_domains_of_pure_form,_colour_and_ideas
1955-11-02_-_The_first_movement_in_Yoga_-_Interiorisation,_finding_ones_soul_-_The_Vedic_Age_-_An_incident_about_Vivekananda_-_The_imaged_language_of_the_Vedas_-_The_Vedic_Rishis,_involutionary_beings_-_Involution_and_evolution
1955-11-09_-_Personal_effort,_egoistic_mind_-_Man_is_like_a_public_square_-_Natures_work_-_Ego_needed_for_formation_of_individual_-_Adverse_forces_needed_to_make_man_sincere_-_Determinisms_of_different_planes,_miracles
1955-11-16_-_The_significance_of_numbers_-_Numbers,_astrology,_true_knowledge_-_Divines_Love_flowers_for_Kali_puja_-_Desire,_aspiration_and_progress_-_Determining_ones_approach_to_the_Divine_-_Liberation_is_obtained_through_austerities_-_...
1955-11-23_-_One_reality,_multiple_manifestations_-_Integral_Yoga,_approach_by_all_paths_-_The_supreme_man_and_the_divine_man_-_Miracles_and_the_logic_of_events
1955-12-07_-_Emotional_impulse_of_self-giving_-_A_young_dancer_in_France_-_The_heart_has_wings,_not_the_head_-_Only_joy_can_conquer_the_Adversary
1955-12-14_-_Rejection_of_life_as_illusion_in_the_old_Yogas_-_Fighting_the_adverse_forces_-_Universal_and_individual_being_-_Three_stages_in_Integral_Yoga_-_How_to_feel_the_Divine_Presence_constantly
1955-12-28_-_Aspiration_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Enthusiasm_and_gratitude_-_Aspiration_is_in_all_beings_-_Unlimited_power_of_good,_evil_has_a_limit_-_Progress_in_the_parts_of_the_being_-_Significance_of_a_dream
1956-01-04_-_Integral_idea_of_the_Divine_-_All_things_attracted_by_the_Divine_-_Bad_things_not_in_place_-_Integral_yoga_-_Moving_idea-force,_ideas_-_Consequences_of_manifestation_-_Work_of_Spirit_via_Nature_-_Change_consciousness,_change_world
1956-01-11_-_Desire_and_self-deception_-_Giving_all_one_is_and_has_-_Sincerity,_more_powerful_than_will_-_Joy_of_progress_Definition_of_youth
1956-01-18_-_Two_sides_of_individual_work_-_Cheerfulness_-_chosen_vessel_of_the_Divine_-_Aspiration,_consciousness,_of_plants,_of_children_-_Being_chosen_by_the_Divine_-_True_hierarchy_-_Perfect_relation_with_the_Divine_-_India_free_in_1915
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-02-08_-_Forces_of_Nature_expressing_a_higher_Will_-_Illusion_of_separate_personality_-_One_dynamic_force_which_moves_all_things_-_Linear_and_spherical_thinking_-_Common_ideal_of_life,_microscopic
1956-02-15_-_Nature_and_the_Master_of_Nature_-_Conscious_intelligence_-_Theory_of_the_Gita,_not_the_whole_truth_-_Surrender_to_the_Lord_-_Change_of_nature
1956-02-22_-_Strong_immobility_of_an_immortal_spirit_-_Equality_of_soul_-_Is_all_an_expression_of_the_divine_Will?_-_Loosening_the_knot_of_action_-_Using_experience_as_a_cloak_to_cover_excesses_-_Sincerity,_a_rare_virtue
1956-03-07_-_Sacrifice,_Animals,_hostile_forces,_receive_in_proportion_to_consciousness_-_To_be_luminously_open_-_Integral_transformation_-_Pain_of_rejection,_delight_of_progress_-_Spirit_behind_intention_-_Spirit,_matter,_over-simplified
1956-03-21_-_Identify_with_the_Divine_-_The_Divine,_the_most_important_thing_in_life
1956-03-28_-_The_starting-point_of_spiritual_experience_-_The_boundless_finite_-_The_Timeless_and_Time_-_Mental_explanation_not_enough_-_Changing_knowledge_into_experience_-_Sat-Chit-Tapas-Ananda
1956-04-04_-_The_witness_soul_-_A_Gita_enthusiast_-_Propagandist_spirit,_Tolstoys_son
1956-04-11_-_Self-creator_-_Manifestation_of_Time_and_Space_-_Brahman-Maya_and_Ishwara-Shakti_-_Personal_and_Impersonal
1956-04-18_-_Ishwara_and_Shakti,_seeing_both_aspects_-_The_Impersonal_and_the_divine_Person_-_Soul,_the_presence_of_the_divine_Person_-_Going_to_other_worlds,_exteriorisation,_dreams_-_Telling_stories_to_oneself
1956-04-25_-_God,_human_conception_and_the_true_Divine_-_Earthly_existence,_to_realise_the_Divine_-_Ananda,_divine_pleasure_-_Relations_with_the_divine_Presence_-_Asking_the_Divine_for_what_one_needs_-_Allowing_the_Divine_to_lead_one
1956-05-02_-_Threefold_union_-_Manifestation_of_the_Supramental_-_Profiting_from_the_Divine_-_Recognition_of_the_Supramental_Force_-_Ascent,_descent,_manifestation
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-05-30_-_Forms_as_symbols_of_the_Force_behind_-_Art_as_expression_of_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Supramental_psychological_perfection_-_Division_of_works_-_The_Ashram,_idle_stupidities
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1956-06-20_-_Hearts_mystic_light,_intuition_-_Psychic_being,_contact_-_Secular_ethics_-_True_role_of_mind_-_Realise_the_Divine_by_love_-_Depression,_pleasure,_joy_-_Heart_mixture_-_To_follow_the_soul_-_Physical_process_-_remember_the_Mother
1956-06-27_-_Birth,_entry_of_soul_into_body_-_Formation_of_the_supramental_world_-_Aspiration_for_progress_-_Bad_thoughts_-_Cerebral_filter_-_Progress_and_resistance
1956-07-04_-_Aspiration_when_one_sees_a_shooting_star_-_Preparing_the_bodyn_making_it_understand_-_Getting_rid_of_pain_and_suffering_-_Psychic_light
1956-07-11_-_Beauty_restored_to_its_priesthood_-_Occult_worlds,_occult_beings_-_Difficulties_and_the_supramental_force
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-08_-_How_to_light_the_psychic_fire,_will_for_progress_-_Helping_from_a_distance,_mental_formations_-_Prayer_and_the_divine_-_Grace_Grace_at_work_everywhere
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-09-05_-_Material_life,_seeing_in_the_right_way_-_Effect_of_the_Supermind_on_the_earth_-_Emergence_of_the_Supermind_-_Falling_back_into_the_same_mistaken_ways
1956-09-19_-_Power,_predominant_quality_of_vital_being_-_The_Divine,_the_psychic_being,_the_Supermind_-_How_to_come_out_of_the_physical_consciousness_-_Look_life_in_the_face_-_Ordinary_love_and_Divine_love
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1956-10-03_-_The_Mothers_different_ways_of_speaking_-_new_manifestation_-_new_element,_possibilities_-_child_prodigies_-_Laws_of_Nature,_supramental_-_Logic_of_the_unforeseen_-_Creative_writers,_hands_of_musicians_-_Prodigious_children,_men
1956-10-10_-_The_supramental_race__in_a_few_centuries_-_Condition_for_new_realisation_-_Everyone_must_follow_his_own_path_-_Progress,_no_two_paths_alike
1956-10-17_-_Delight,_the_highest_state_-_Delight_and_detachment_-_To_be_calm_-_Quietude,_mental_and_vital_-_Calm_and_strength_-_Experience_and_expression_of_experience
1956-10-24_-_Taking_a_new_body_-_Different_cases_of_incarnation_-_Departure_of_soul_from_body
1956-10-31_-_Manifestation_of_divine_love_-_Deformation_of_Love_by_human_consciousness_-_Experience_and_expression_of_experience
1956-11-07_-_Thoughts_created_by_forces_of_universal_-_Mind_Our_own_thought_hardly_exists_-_Idea,_origin_higher_than_mind_-_The_Synthesis_of_Yoga,_effect_of_reading
1956-11-14_-_Conquering_the_desire_to_appear_good_-_Self-control_and_control_of_the_life_around_-_Power_of_mastery_-_Be_a_great_yogi_to_be_a_good_teacher_-_Organisation_of_the_Ashram_school_-_Elementary_discipline_of_regularity
1956-11-21_-_Knowings_and_Knowledge_-_Reason,_summit_of_mans_mental_activities_-_Willings_and_the_true_will_-_Personal_effort_-_First_step_to_have_knowledge_-_Relativity_of_medical_knowledge_-_Mental_gymnastics_make_the_mind_supple
1956-11-28_-_Desire,_ego,_animal_nature_-_Consciousness,_a_progressive_state_-_Ananda,_desireless_state_beyond_enjoyings_-_Personal_effort_that_is_mental_-_Reason,_when_to_disregard_it_-_Reason_and_reasons
1956-12-05_-_Even_and_objectless_ecstasy_-_Transform_the_animal_-_Individual_personality_and_world-personality_-_Characteristic_features_of_a_world-personality_-_Expressing_a_universal_state_of_consciousness_-_Food_and_sleep_-_Ordered_intuition
1956-12-12_-_paradoxes_-_Nothing_impossible_-_unfolding_universe,_the_Eternal_-_Attention,_concentration,_effort_-_growth_capacity_almost_unlimited_-_Why_things_are_not_the_same_-_will_and_willings_-_Suggestions,_formations_-_vital_world
1956-12-19_-_Preconceived_mental_ideas_-_Process_of_creation_-_Destructive_power_of_bad_thoughts_-_To_be_perfectly_sincere
1956-12-26_-_Defeated_victories_-_Change_of_consciousness_-_Experiences_that_indicate_the_road_to_take_-_Choice_and_preference_-_Diversity_of_the_manifestation
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1957-01-23_-_How_should_we_understand_pure_delight?_-_The_drop_of_honey_-_Action_of_the_Divine_Will_in_the_world
1957-02-07_-_Individual_and_collective_meditation
1957-02-13_-_Suffering,_pain_and_pleasure_-_Illness_and_its_cure
1957-02-20_-_Limitations_of_the_body_and_individuality
1957-03-06_-_Freedom,_servitude_and_love
1957-03-08_-_A_Buddhist_story
1957-03-13_-_Our_best_friend
1957-03-15_-_Reminiscences_of_Tlemcen
1957-03-20_-_Never_sit_down,_true_repose
1957-03-22_-_A_story_of_initiation,_knowledge_and_practice
1957-03-27_-_If_only_humanity_consented_to_be_spiritualised
1957-04-03_-_Different_religions_and_spirituality
1957-04-10_-_Sports_and_yoga_-_Organising_ones_life
1957-04-17_-_Transformation_of_the_body
1957-05-01_-_Sports_competitions,_their_value
1957-05-08_-_Vital_excitement,_reason,_instinct
1957-05-15_-_Differentiation_of_the_sexes_-_Transformation_from_above_downwards
1957-05-29_-_Progressive_transformation
1957-06-05_-_Questions_and_silence_-_Methods_of_meditation
1957-06-12_-_Fasting_and_spiritual_progress
1957-06-26_-_Birth_through_direct_transmutation_-_Man_and_woman_-_Judging_others_-_divine_Presence_in_all_-_New_birth
1957-07-03_-_Collective_yoga,_vision_of_a_huge_hotel
1957-07-09_-_Incontinence_of_speech
1957-07-10_-_A_new_world_is_born_-_Overmind_creation_dissolved
1957-07-17_-_Power_of_conscious_will_over_matter
1957-07-24_-_The_involved_supermind_-_The_new_world_and_the_old_-_Will_for_progress_indispensable
1957-07-31_-_Awakening_aspiration_in_the_body
1957-08-07_-_The_resistances,_politics_and_money_-_Aspiration_to_realise_the_supramental_life
1957-08-21_-_The_Ashram_and_true_communal_life_-_Level_of_consciousness_in_the_Ashram
1957-08-28_-_Freedom_and_Divine_Will
1957-09-04_-_Sri_Aurobindo,_an_eternal_birth
1957-09-11_-_Vital_chemistry,_attraction_and_repulsion
1957-09-18_-_Occultism_and_supramental_life
1957-09-25_-_Preparation_of_the_intermediate_being
1957-10-02_-_The_Mind_of_Light_-_Statues_of_the_Buddha_-_Burden_of_the_past
1957-10-09_-_As_many_universes_as_individuals_-_Passage_to_the_higher_hemisphere
1957-10-16_-_Story_of_successive_involutions
1957-10-23_-_The_central_motive_of_terrestrial_existence_-_Evolution
1957-10-30_-_Double_movement_of_evolution_-_Disappearance_of_a_species
1957-11-13_-_Superiority_of_man_over_animal_-_Consciousness_precedes_form
1957-11-27_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_in_The_Life_Divine_-_Individual_and_cosmic_evolution
1957-12-04_-_The_method_of_The_Life_Divine_-_Problem_of_emergence_of_a_new_species
1957-12-11_-_Appearance_of_the_first_men
1957-12-18_-_Modern_science_and_illusion_-_Value_of_experience,_its_transforming_power_-_Supramental_power,_first_aspect_to_manifest
1958-01-01_-_The_collaboration_of_material_Nature_-_Miracles_visible_to_a_deep_vision_of_things_-_Explanation_of_New_Year_Message
1958-01-08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_of_exposition_-_The_mind_as_a_public_place_-_Mental_control_-_Sri_Aurobindos_subtle_hand
1958-01-15_-_The_only_unshakable_point_of_support
1958-01-22_-_Intellectual_theories_-_Expressing_a_living_and_real_Truth
1958-02-05_-_The_great_voyage_of_the_Supreme_-_Freedom_and_determinism
1958-02-12_-_Psychic_progress_from_life_to_life_-_The_earth,_the_place_of_progress
1958-02-19_-_Experience_of_the_supramental_boat_-_The_Censors_-_Absurdity_of_artificial_means
1958-02-26_-_The_moon_and_the_stars_-_Horoscopes_and_yoga
1958-03-05_-_Vibrations_and_words_-_Power_of_thought,_the_gift_of_tongues
1958-03-12_-_The_key_of_past_transformations
1958-03-19_-_General_tension_in_humanity_-_Peace_and_progress_-_Perversion_and_vision_of_transformation
1958-03-26_-_Mental_anxiety_and_trust_in_spiritual_power
1958-04-02_-_Correcting_a_mistake
1958-04-09_-_The_eyes_of_the_soul_-_Perceiving_the_soul
1958-04-16_-_The_superman_-_New_realisation
1958-05-07_-_The_secret_of_Nature
1958-05-14_-_Intellectual_activity_and_subtle_knowing_-_Understanding_with_the_body
1958-05-28_-_The_Avatar
1958-06-04_-_New_birth
1958-06-11_-_Is_there_a_spiritual_being_in_everybody?
1958-06-18_-_Philosophy,_religion,_occultism,_spirituality
1958-06-25_-_Sadhana_in_the_body
1958-07-09_-_Faith_and_personal_effort
1958-07-30_-_The_planchette_-_automatic_writing_-_Proofs_and_knowledge
1958-08-06_-_Collective_prayer_-_the_ideal_collectivity
1958-08-13_-_Profit_by_staying_in_the_Ashram_-_What_Sri_Aurobindo_has_come_to_tell_us_-_Finding_the_Divine
1958-08-15_-_Our_relation_with_the_Gods
1958-08-27_-_Meditation_and_imagination_-_From_thought_to_idea,_from_idea_to_principle
1958-09-03_-_How_to_discipline_the_imagination_-_Mental_formations
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958-09-17_-_Power_of_formulating_experience_-_Usefulness_of_mental_development
1958_09_19
1958-09-24_-_Living_the_truth_-_Words_and_experience
1958-10-01_-_The_ideal_of_moral_perfection
1958_10_03
1958_10_10
1958_10_17
1958-10-22_-_Spiritual_life_-_reversal_of_consciousness_-_Helping_others
1958_10_24
1958-10-29_-_Mental_self-sufficiency_-_Grace
1958_11_07
1958-11-12_-_The_aim_of_the_Supreme_-_Trust_in_the_Grace
1958_11_14
1958-11-26_-_The_role_of_the_Spirit_-_New_birth
1958_11_28
1958_12_05
1960_01_27
1960_03_09
1960_05_25
1960_11_10
1960_11_12?_-_49
1960_11_13?_-_50
1961_02_02
1961_03_17_-_56
1961_04_26_-_59
1961_05_22?
1961_07_18
1962_01_12
1962_02_27
1962_05_24
1962_10_06
1962_10_12
1963_03_06
1964_03_25
1964_09_16
1965_01_12
1965_05_29
1965_09_25
1965_12_25
1965_12_26?
1967-05-24.1_-_Defining_the_Divine
1969_08_31_-_141
1969_09_07_-_145
1969_09_14
1969_10_01?_-_166
1969_12_08
1970_01_03
1970_01_21
1970_01_24
1970_02_01
1970_02_02
1970_02_04
1970_02_11
1970_02_12
1970_02_27?
1970_03_09
1970_04_07
1970_04_22_-_482
1970_04_28
1970_04_30
1970_05_15
1970_05_21
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_A_Birthday
1.ac_-_Adela
1.ac_-_Leah_Sublime
1.ac_-_Power
1.ac_-_The_Garden_of_Janus
1.ac_-_The_Neophyte
1.ac_-_The_Priestess_of_Panormita
1.ac_-_The_Twins
1.ac_-_The_Wizard_Way
1.ami_-_Selfhood_can_demolish_the_magic_of_this_world_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.anon_-_But_little_better
1.anon_-_Enuma_Elish_(When_on_high)
1.anon_-_Less_profitable
1.anon_-_Others_have_told_me
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_II
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_VII
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_XI_The_Story_of_the_Flood
1.anon_-_The_Poem_of_Antar
1.anon_-_The_Poem_of_Imru-Ul-Quais
1.anon_-_The_Seven_Evil_Spirits
1.ap_-_The_Universal_Prayer
1.asak_-_Beg_for_Love
1.bd_-_Endless_Ages
1.bni_-_Raga_Ramkali
1.bs_-_Look_into_Yourself
1.bs_-_Love_Springs_Eternal
1.bs_-_One_Point_Contains_All
1.bs_-_One_Thread_Only
1.bts_-_The_Bent_of_Nature
1.dz_-_Treading_along_in_this_dreamlike,_illusory_realm
1f.lovecraft_-_A_Reminiscence_of_Dr._Samuel_Johnson
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Azathoth
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Collapsing_Cosmoses
1f.lovecraft_-_Dagon
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_H.P._Lovecrafts
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_Ibid
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Vault
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Book
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Cats_of_Ulthar
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Doom_That_Came_to_Sarnath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Evil_Clergyman
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Ghost-Eater
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_History_of_the_Necronomicon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Little_Glass_Bottle
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Grave-Yard
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Other_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Secret_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Slaying_of_the_Monster
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Strange_High_House_in_the_Mist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Street
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Terrible_Old_Man
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_The_White_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Till_A_the_Seas
1f.lovecraft_-_Two_Black_Bottles
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Breadth_And_Depth
1.fs_-_Cassandra
1.fs_-_Count_Eberhard,_The_Groaner_Of_Wurtembert._A_War_Song
1.fs_-_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_A_Young_Man
1.fs_-_Elysium
1.fs_-_Fantasie_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Feast_Of_Victory
1.fs_-_Female_Judgment
1.fs_-_Fridolin_(The_Walk_To_The_Iron_Factory)
1.fs_-_Genius
1.fs_-_Hero_And_Leander
1.fs_-_Human_Knowledge
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Nadowessian_Death-Lament
1.fs_-_Ode_To_Joy_-_With_Translation
1.fs_-_Odysseus
1.fs_-_Parables_And_Riddles
1.fs_-_Punch_Song_(To_be_sung_in_the_Northern_Countries)
1.fs_-_Rapture_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Resignation
1.fs_-_Shakespeare's_Ghost_-_A_Parody
1.fs_-_The_Alpine_Hunter
1.fs_-_The_Antique_To_The_Northern_Wanderer
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Battle
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Complaint_Of_Ceres
1.fs_-_The_Count_Of_Hapsburg
1.fs_-_The_Cranes_Of_Ibycus
1.fs_-_The_Dance
1.fs_-_The_Driver
1.fs_-_The_Eleusinian_Festival
1.fs_-_The_Favor_Of_The_Moment
1.fs_-_The_Fight_With_The_Dragon
1.fs_-_The_Glove_-_A_Tale
1.fs_-_The_Gods_Of_Greece
1.fs_-_The_Hostage
1.fs_-_The_Ideal_And_The_Actual_Life
1.fs_-_The_Ideals
1.fs_-_The_Infanticide
1.fs_-_The_Invincible_Armada
1.fs_-_The_Lay_Of_The_Bell
1.fs_-_The_Lay_Of_The_Mountain
1.fs_-_The_Pilgrim
1.fs_-_The_Power_Of_Song
1.fs_-_The_Proverbs_Of_Confucius
1.fs_-_The_Ring_Of_Polycrates_-_A_Ballad
1.fs_-_The_Secret
1.fs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Love
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fs_-_To_Laura_At_The_Harpsichord
1.fs_-_To_Laura_(Mystery_Of_Reminiscence)
1.hcyc_-_34_-_They_roar_with_Dharma-thunder_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_49_-_Just_baby_lions_follow_the_parent_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_4_-_Once_we_awaken_to_the_Tathagata-Zen_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_52_-_From_my_youth_I_piled_studies_upon_studies_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_Roll_the_Dharma_thunder_(from_The_Song_of_Enlightenment)
1.hs_-_I_settled_at_Cold_Mountain_long_ago,
1.hs_-_Not_Worth_The_Toil!
1.hs_-_O_Saghi,_pass_around_that_cup_of_wine,_then_bring_it_to_me
1.hs_-_Rubys_Heart
1.hs_-_Spring_and_all_its_flowers
1.hs_-_Sweet_Melody
1.hs_-_The_Bird_Of_Gardens
1.hs_-_The_Essence_of_Grace
1.hs_-_The_Garden
1.hs_-_The_Good_Darkness
1.hs_-_The_path_consists_of_neither_words_nor_deeds
1.hs_-_The_Rose_Has_Flushed_Red
1.hs_-_To_Linger_In_A_Garden_Fair
1.hs_-_True_Love
1.hs_-_When_he_admits_you_to_his_presence
1.ia_-_Reality
1.ia_-_Wild_Is_She,_None_Can_Make_Her_His_Friend
1.is_-_Every_day,_priests_minutely_examine_the_Law
1.is_-_Form_in_Void
1.is_-_Like_vanishing_dew
1.is_-_To_write_something_and_leave_it_behind_us
1.jda_-_My_heart_values_his_vulgar_ways_(from_The_Gitagovinda)
1.jh_-_Lord,_Where_Shall_I_Find_You?
1.jk_-_Acrostic__-_Georgiana_Augusta_Keats
1.jk_-_A_Thing_Of_Beauty_(Endymion)
1.jk_-_Calidore_-_A_Fragment
1.jk_-_Dawlish_Fair
1.jk_-_Dedication_To_Leigh_Hunt,_Esq.
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Fancy
1.jk_-_Hither,_Hither,_Love
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_III
1.jk_-_Imitation_Of_Spenser
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Lines_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Highlands_After_A_Visit_To_Burnss_Country
1.jk_-_Meg_Merrilies
1.jk_-_Ode_To_A_Nightingale
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Psyche
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jk_-_On_Visiting_The_Tomb_Of_Burns
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Song._Hush,_Hush!_Tread_Softly!
1.jk_-_Song._I_Had_A_Dove
1.jk_-_Song_Of_The_Indian_Maid,_From_Endymion
1.jk_-_Sonnet._A_Dream,_After_Reading_Dantes_Episode_Of_Paulo_And_Francesca
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_After_Dark_Vapors_Have_Oppressd_Our_Plains
1.jk_-_Sonnet_I._To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Sonnet_On_Sitting_Down_To_Read_King_Lear_Once_Again
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Day_Is_Gone
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_The_Nile
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VIII._To_My_Brothers
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VII._To_Solitude
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Before_Re-Read_King_Lear
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Disgust_Of_Vulgar_Superstition
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Shakespeares_Poems,_Facing_A_Lovers_Complaint
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Space_At_The_End_Of_Chaucers_Tale_Of_The_Floure_And_The_Lefe
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Upon_The_Top_Of_Ben_Nevis
1.jk_-_Sonnet_X._To_One_Who_Has_Been_Long_In_City_Pent
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XVI._To_Kosciusko
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XV._On_The_Grasshopper_And_Cricket
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanza._Written_At_The_Close_Of_Canto_II,_Book_V,_Of_The_Faerie_Queene
1.jk_-_Teignmouth_-_Some_Doggerel,_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_Saint_Mark._A_Fragment
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_The_Gadfly
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jk_-_To_Hope
1.jk_-_To_Some_Ladies
1.jk_-_To_The_Ladies_Who_Saw_Me_Crowned
1.jk_-_What_The_Thrush_Said._Lines_From_A_Letter_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jlb_-_Cosmogonia_(&_translation)
1.jlb_-_Emerson
1.jlb_-_Everness_(&_interpretation)
1.jlb_-_Limits
1.jlb_-_Plainness
1.jlb_-_Simplicity
1.jlb_-_Susana_Soca
1.jlb_-_The_Recoleta
1.jm_-_I_Have_forgotten
1.jm_-_The_Song_of_the_Twelve_Deceptions
1.jr_-_Book_1_-_Prologue
1.jr_-_come
1.jr_-_Every_day_I_Bear_A_Burden
1.jr_-_Fasting
1.jr_-_God_is_what_is_nearer_to_you_than_your_neck-vein,
1.jr_-_I_Have_Fallen_Into_Unconsciousness
1.jr_-_I_Will_Beguile_Him_With_The_Tongue
1.jr_-_Late,_By_Myself
1.jr_-_Lovers
1.jr_-_Seeking_the_Source
1.jr_-_The_Self_We_Share
1.jr_-_The_Time_Has_Come_For_Us_To_Become_Madmen_In_Your_Chain
1.jr_-_Today,_like_every_other_day,_we_wake_up_empty
1.jr_-_Two_Friends
1.jr_-_Two_Kinds_Of_Intelligence
1.jr_-_What_I_want_is_to_see_your_face
1.jr_-_You_and_I_have_spoken_all_these_words
1.jwvg_-_A_Symbol
1.jwvg_-_Book_Of_Proverbs
1.jwvg_-_Epitaph
1.jwvg_-_Ever_And_Everywhere
1.jwvg_-_In_A_Word
1.jwvg_-_Proximity_Of_The_Beloved_One
1.jwvg_-_The_Friendly_Meeting
1.jwvg_-_The_Muses_Mirror
1.jwvg_-_The_Pupil_In_Magic
1.jwvg_-_The_Reckoning
1.jwvg_-_The_Sea-Voyage
1.jwvg_-_The_Wanderer
1.jwvg_-_To_The_Kind_Reader
1.kbr_-_Dohas_(Couplets)_I_(with_translation)
1.kbr_-_Friend,_Wake_Up!_Why_Do_You_Go_On_Sleeping?
1.kbr_-_Having_Crossed_The_River
1.kbr_-_Having_crossed_the_river
1.kbr_-_Looking_At_The_Grinding_Stones_-_Dohas_(Couplets)_I
1.kbr_-_My_Swan,_Let_Us_Fly
1.kbr_-_Poem_9
1.kbr_-_The_Guest_Is_Inside_You,_And_Also_Inside_Me
1.kbr_-_The_Guest_is_inside_you,_and_also_inside_me
1.kbr_-_The_Lord_Is_In_Me
1.kbr_-_The_Lord_is_in_Me
1.kbr_-_The_Spiritual_Athlete_Often_Changes_The_Color_Of_His_Clothes
1.lb_-_Ancient_Air_(39)
1.lb_-_Before_The_Cask_of_Wine
1.lb_-_Chiang_Chin_Chiu
1.lb_-_Drinking_in_the_Mountains
1.lb_-_Endless_Yearning_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_For_Wang_Lun
1.lb_-_In_Spring
1.lb_-_Lament_of_the_Frontier_Guard
1.lb_-_Leave-Taking_Near_Shoku
1.lb_-_She_Spins_Silk
1.lb_-_The_River-Merchant's_Wife:_A_Letter
1.lla_-_Learning_the_scriptures_is_easy
1.lla_-_The_way_is_difficult_and_very_intricate
1.lovecraft_-_An_Epistle_To_Rheinhart_Kleiner,_Esq.,_Poet-Laureate,_And_Author_Of_Another_Endless_Day
1.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Halloween_In_A_Suburb
1.lovecraft_-_Lifes_Mystery
1.lovecraft_-_On_Reading_Lord_Dunsanys_Book_Of_Wonder
1.lovecraft_-_Poemata_Minora-_Volume_II
1.lovecraft_-_Psychopompos-_A_Tale_in_Rhyme
1.lovecraft_-_The_Ancient_Track
1.lovecraft_-_The_Bride_Of_The_Sea
1.lovecraft_-_The_Outpost
1.lovecraft_-_The_Peace_Advocate
1.lovecraft_-_The_Poe-ets_Nightmare
1.lovecraft_-_The_Rose_Of_England
1.lovecraft_-_The_Teutons_Battle-Song
1.lovecraft_-_Waste_Paper-_A_Poem_Of_Profound_Insignificance
1.lr_-_An_Adamantine_Song_on_the_Ever-Present
1.mb_-_by_the_old_temple
1.mb_-_O_my_friends
1.mb_-_winter_garden
1.mm_-_Of_the_voices_of_the_Godhead
1.mm_-_Set_Me_on_Fire
1.mm_-_The_devil_also_offers_his_spirit
1.mm_-_Three_Golden_Apples_from_the_Hesperian_grove_(from_Atalanta_Fugiens)
1.ms_-_Hui-nengs_Pond
1.ms_-_No_End_Point
1.ms_-_Old_Creek
1.nmdv_-_He_is_the_One_in_many
1.okym_-_11_-_Here_with_a_Loaf_of_Bread_beneath_the_Bough
1.okym_-_53_-_With_Earths_first_Clay_They_did_the_Last_Man_knead
1.okym_-_70_-_Indeed,_indeed,_Repentance_oft_before
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_An_Ode,_Written_October,_1819,_Before_The_Spaniards_Had_Recovered_Their_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Asia_-_From_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_A_Vision_Of_The_Sea
1.pbs_-_Bigotrys_Victim
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Chorus_from_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Dark_Spirit_of_the_Desart_Rude
1.pbs_-_Despair
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_(Excerpt)
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_The_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_Adonis
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Supposed_To_Be_An_Epithalamium_Of_Francis_Ravaillac_And_Charlotte_Corday
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Thoughts_Come_And_Go_In_Solitude
1.pbs_-_From
1.pbs_-_Ghasta_Or,_The_Avenging_Demon!!!
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_HERE_I_sit_with_my_paper
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Castor_And_Pollux
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Minerva
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Moon
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_Invocation_To_Misery
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Lines_--_Far,_Far_Away,_O_Ye
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_The_cold_earth_slept_below
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_Among_The_Euganean_Hills
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_During_The_Castlereagh_Administration
1.pbs_-_Love
1.pbs_-_Love-_Hope,_Desire,_And_Fear
1.pbs_-_Marenghi
1.pbs_-_Mariannes_Dream
1.pbs_-_Matilda_Gathering_Flowers
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Music_And_Sweet_Poetry
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Naples
1.pbs_-_Ode_to_the_West_Wind
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_An_Icicle_That_Clung_To_The_Grass_Of_A_Grave
1.pbs_-_On_The_Medusa_Of_Leonardo_da_Vinci_In_The_Florentine_Gallery
1.pbs_-_O_That_A_Chariot_Of_Cloud_Were_Mine!
1.pbs_-_Ozymandias
1.pbs_-_Passage_Of_The_Apennines
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_II.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IV.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IX.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VI.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_Vi_(Excerpts)
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VII.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VIII.
1.pbs_-_Revenge
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Saint_Edmonds_Eve
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_Sister_Rosa_-_A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_Song_From_The_Wandering_Jew
1.pbs_-_Song._Translated_From_The_Italian
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_Lift_Not_The_Painted_Veil_Which_Those_Who_Live
1.pbs_-_The_Boat_On_The_Serchio
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cloud
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Devils_Walk._A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_The_Irishmans_Song
1.pbs_-_The_Magnetic_Lady_To_Her_Patient
1.pbs_-_The_Mask_Of_Anarchy
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Sunset
1.pbs_-_The_Tower_Of_Famine
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_The_Two_Spirits_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_The_Wandering_Jews_Soliloquy
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_The_Woodman_And_The_Nightingale
1.pbs_-_To_Edward_Williams
1.pbs_-_To_Ianthe
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Recollection
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Wollstonecraft_Godwin
1.pbs_-_To_The_Lord_Chancellor
1.pbs_-_Ugolino
1.pbs_-_When_A_Lover_Clasps_His_Fairest
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_2
1.poe_-_A_Paean
1.poe_-_A_Valentine
1.poe_-_Dreamland
1.poe_-_Elizabeth
1.poe_-_Enigma
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_Lenore
1.poe_-_Sonnet-_Silence
1.poe_-_Tamerlane
1.poe_-_The_Bells
1.poe_-_The_Conversation_Of_Eiros_And_Charmion
1.poe_-_The_Haunted_Palace
1.poe_-_Ulalume
1.rajh_-_The_Word_Most_Precious
1.rb_-_A_Light_Woman
1.rb_-_Andrea_del_Sarto
1.rb_-_An_Epistle_Containing_the_Strange_Medical_Experience_of_Kar
1.rb_-_A_Pretty_Woman
1.rb_-_A_Toccata_Of_Galuppi's
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_Bishop_Orders_His_Tomb_at_Saint_Praxed's_Church,_Rome,_The
1.rb_-_By_The_Fire-Side
1.rb_-_Childe_Roland_To_The_Dark_Tower_Came
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_De_Gustibus
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_Garden_Francies
1.rb_-_Holy-Cross_Day
1.rb_-_In_A_Gondola
1.rb_-_In_Three_Days
1.rb_-_Introduction:_Pippa_Passes
1.rbk_-_He_Shall_be_King!
1.rb_-_Love_Among_The_Ruins
1.rb_-_Memorabilia
1.rb_-_Mesmerism
1.rb_-_My_Last_Duchess
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_I_-_Morning
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_IV_-_Night
1.rb_-_Porphyrias_Lover
1.rb_-_Protus
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Boy_And_the_Angel
1.rb_-_The_Englishman_In_Italy
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_The_Glove
1.rb_-_The_Guardian-Angel
1.rb_-_The_Last_Ride_Together
1.rb_-_The_Pied_Piper_Of_Hamelin
1.rb_-_Times_Revenges
1.rb_-_Two_In_The_Campagna
1.rb_-_Waring
1.rmd_-_Raga_Basant
1.rmpsd_-_O_Death!_Get_away-_what_canst_thou_do?
1.rmr_-_Autumn_Day
1.rmr_-_A_Walk
1.rmr_-_Childhood
1.rmr_-_Dedication
1.rmr_-_Dedication_To_M...
1.rmr_-_Elegy_IV
1.rmr_-_Elegy_X
1.rmr_-_Fear_of_the_Inexplicable
1.rmr_-_God_Speaks_To_Each_Of_Us
1.rmr_-_Greek_Love-Talk
1.rmr_-_Parting
1.rmr_-_Sacrifice
1.rmr_-_Sense_Of_Something_Coming
1.rmr_-_Spanish_Dancer
1.rmr_-_Sunset
1.rmr_-_Telling_You_All
1.rmr_-_The_Alchemist
1.rmr_-_The_Sonnets_To_Orpheus_-_Book_2_-_I
1.rmr_-_The_Sonnets_To_Orpheus_-_Book_2_-_XIII
1.rmr_-_The_Sonnets_To_Orpheus_-_XXV
1.rt_-_(103)_In_one_salutation_to_thee,_my_God_(from_Gitanjali)
1.rt_-_(80)_I_am_like_a_remnant_of_a_cloud_of_autumn_(from_Gitanjali)
1.rt_-_(84)_It_is_the_pang_of_separation_that_spreads_throughout_the_world_(from_Gitanjali)
1.rt_-_Accept_me,_my_lord,_accept_me_for_this_while
1.rt_-_A_Hundred_Years_Hence
1.rt_-_At_The_Last_Watch
1.rt_-_Authorship
1.rt_-_Brahm,_Viu,_iva
1.rt_-_Broken_Song
1.rt_-_Death
1.rt_-_Defamation
1.rt_-_Dream_Girl
1.rt_-_Farewell
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Friend
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_Keep_Me_Fully_Glad
1.rt_-_Let_Me_Not_Forget
1.rt_-_Light
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_II_-_Come_To_My_Garden_Walk
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LII_-_Tired_Of_Waiting
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LVI_-_The_Evening_Was_Lonely
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_XXII_-_I_Shall_Gladly_Suffer
1.rt_-_Maran-Milan_(Death-Wedding)
1.rt_-_Maya
1.rt_-_One_Day_In_Spring....
1.rt_-_On_The_Nature_Of_Love
1.rt_-_Roaming_Cloud
1.rt_-_Salutation
1.rt_-_Shyama
1.rt_-_Signet_Of_Eternity
1.rt_-_Song_Unsung
1.rt_-_Still_Heart
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_61_-_70
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_71_-_80
1.rt_-_The_Champa_Flower
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LIX_-_O_Woman
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXIV_-_I_Spent_My_Day
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXXIX_-_I_Often_Wonder
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXXXI_-_Why_Do_You_Whisper_So_Faintly
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_X_-_Let_Your_Work_Be,_Bride
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XX_-_Day_After_Day_He_Comes
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XXVIII_-_Your_Questioning_Eyes
1.rt_-_The_Home
1.rt_-_The_Homecoming
1.rt_-_The_Journey
1.rt_-_The_Kiss
1.rt_-_The_Merchant
1.rt_-_The_Rainy_Day
1.rt_-_The_Tame_Bird_Was_In_A_Cage
1.rt_-_The_Wicked_Postman
1.rt_-_This_Dog
1.rt_-_Ungrateful_Sorrow
1.rvd_-_How_to_Escape?
1.rwe_-_Bacchus
1.rwe_-_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Boston
1.rwe_-_Boston_Hymn
1.rwe_-_Celestial_Love
1.rwe_-_Days
1.rwe_-_Dmonic_Love
1.rwe_-_Etienne_de_la_Boce
1.rwe_-_Flower_Chorus
1.rwe_-_Forebearance
1.rwe_-_From_the_Persian_of_Hafiz_I
1.rwe_-_Good-bye
1.rwe_-_Heroism
1.rwe_-_Initial_Love
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_My_Garden
1.rwe_-_Nature
1.rwe_-_Nemesis
1.rwe_-_Ode_To_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Saadi
1.rwe_-_Sursum_Corda
1.rwe_-_The_Adirondacs
1.rwe_-_The_Humble_Bee
1.rwe_-_The_Poet
1.rwe_-_The_Rhodora_-_On_Being_Asked,_Whence_Is_The_Flower?
1.rwe_-_The_Romany_Girl
1.rwe_-_The_Sphinx
1.rwe_-_The_Titmouse
1.rwe_-_The_World-Soul
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.rwe_-_To_Eva
1.rwe_-_Voluntaries
1.rwe_-_Wealth
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.rwe_-_Worship
1.sb_-_Cut_brambles_long_enough
1.sb_-_Gathering_the_Mind
1.sca_-_When_You_have_loved,_You_shall_be_chaste
1.sfa_-_Let_the_whole_of_mankind_tremble
1.sfa_-_Prayer_Inspired_by_the_Our_Father
1.sig_-_Come_to_me_at_dawn,_my_beloved,_and_go_with_me
1.sig_-_Lord_of_the_World
1.sig_-_You_are_wise_(from_From_Kingdoms_Crown)
1.sjc_-_Dark_Night
1.sjc_-_I_Entered_the_Unknown
1.sjc_-_Not_for_All_the_Beauty
1.sjc_-_Song_of_the_Soul_That_Delights_in_Knowing_God_by_Faith
1.sjc_-_The_Fountain
1.snt_-_How_is_it_I_can_love_You
1.snt_-_You,_oh_Christ,_are_the_Kingdom_of_Heaven
1.ss_-_Paper_windows_bamboo_walls_hedge_of_hibiscus
1.stav_-_I_Live_Without_Living_In_Me
1.stav_-_On_Those_Words_I_am_for_My_Beloved
1.stl_-_My_Song_for_Today
1.stl_-_The_Divine_Dew
1.tc_-_After_Liu_Chai-Sangs_Poem
1.tm_-_A_Practical_Program_for_Monks
1.tm_-_Follow_my_ways_and_I_will_lead_you
1.tr_-_The_Lotus
1.tr_-_You_Do_Not_Need_Many_Things
1.wb_-_Of_the_Sleep_of_Ulro!_and_of_the_passage_through
1.wb_-_Reader!_of_books!_of_heaven
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_Aedh_Wishes_For_The_Cloths_Of_Heaven
1.wby_-_Among_School_Children
1.wby_-_Anashuya_And_Vijaya
1.wby_-_A_Prayer_For_My_Daughter
1.wby_-_A_Prayer_For_My_Son
1.wby_-_A_Song_From_The_Player_Queen
1.wby_-_A_Woman_Young_And_Old
1.wby_-_Baile_And_Aillinn
1.wby_-_Blood_And_The_Moon
1.wby_-_Colonel_Martin
1.wby_-_Colonus_Praise
1.wby_-_Coole_Park_1929
1.wby_-_Coole_Park_And_Ballylee,_1931
1.wby_-_Crazy_Jane_On_God
1.wby_-_Crazy_Jane_Reproved
1.wby_-_Cuchulains_Fight_With_The_Sea
1.wby_-_Death
1.wby_-_Demon_And_Beast
1.wby_-_Ego_Dominus_Tuus
1.wby_-_Fiddler_Of_Dooney
1.wby_-_He_Remembers_Forgotten_Beauty
1.wby_-_Her_Praise
1.wby_-_He_Thinks_Of_His_Past_Greatness_When_A_Part_Of_The_Constellations_Of_Heaven
1.wby_-_His_Bargain
1.wby_-_John_Kinsellas_Lament_For_Mr._Mary_Moore
1.wby_-_Lapis_Lazuli
1.wby_-_Long-Legged_Fly
1.wby_-_Loves_Loneliness
1.wby_-_Meditations_In_Time_Of_Civil_War
1.wby_-_Meru
1.wby_-_Michael_Robartes_And_The_Dancer
1.wby_-_Nineteen_Hundred_And_Nineteen
1.wby_-_Parting
1.wby_-_Politics
1.wby_-_Presences
1.wby_-_Roger_Casement
1.wby_-_September_1913
1.wby_-_Shepherd_And_Goatherd
1.wby_-_Supernatural_Songs
1.wby_-_The_Ballad_Of_The_Foxhunter
1.wby_-_The_Black_Tower
1.wby_-_The_Circus_Animals_Desertion
1.wby_-_The_Crazed_Moon
1.wby_-_The_Double_Vision_Of_Michael_Robartes
1.wby_-_The_Folly_Of_Being_Comforted
1.wby_-_The_Fool_By_The_Roadside
1.wby_-_The_Ghost_Of_Roger_Casement
1.wby_-_The_Gift_Of_Harun_Al-Rashid
1.wby_-_The_Happy_Townland
1.wby_-_The_Host_Of_The_Air
1.wby_-_The_Mother_Of_God
1.wby_-_The_New_Faces
1.wby_-_The_Old_Pensioner.
1.wby_-_The_Phases_Of_The_Moon
1.wby_-_The_Pilgrim
1.wby_-_The_Players_Ask_For_A_Blessing_On_The_Psalteries_And_On_Themselves
1.wby_-_The_Rose_Tree
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_Introduction
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Song_Of_The_Happy_Shepherd
1.wby_-_The_Song_Of_Wandering_Aengus
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_II
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_III
1.wby_-_The_Wild_Swans_At_Coole
1.wby_-_Three_Marching_Songs
1.wby_-_To_A_Child_Dancing_In_The_Wind
1.wby_-_To_Ireland_In_The_Coming_Times
1.wby_-_Two_Songs_From_A_Play
1.wby_-_Under_The_Moon
1.wby_-_Under_The_Round_Tower
1.wby_-_Vacillation
1.wby_-_What_Then?
1.wby_-_What_Was_Lost
1.wby_-_When_You_Are_Old
1.wby_-_Where_My_Books_go
1.whitman_-_A_Broadway_Pageant
1.whitman_-_A_Carol_Of_Harvest_For_1867
1.whitman_-_After_an_Interval
1.whitman_-_After_The_Sea-Ship
1.whitman_-_American_Feuillage
1.whitman_-_A_Noiseless_Patient_Spider
1.whitman_-_As_A_Strong_Bird_On_Pinious_Free
1.whitman_-_As_Consequent,_Etc.
1.whitman_-_As_I_Ebbd_With_the_Ocean_of_Life
1.whitman_-_A_Sight_in_Camp_in_the_Daybreak_Gray_and_Dim
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_As_I_Walk_These_Broad,_Majestic_Days
1.whitman_-_As_The_Time_Draws_Nigh
1.whitman_-_Beginners
1.whitman_-_Bivouac_On_A_Mountain_Side
1.whitman_-_Brother_Of_All,_With_Generous_Hand
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Words
1.whitman_-_Come_Up_From_The_Fields,_Father
1.whitman_-_Crossing_Brooklyn_Ferry
1.whitman_-_Elemental_Drifts
1.whitman_-_Europe,_The_72d_And_73d_Years_Of_These_States
1.whitman_-_Faces
1.whitman_-_France,_The_18th_Year_Of_These_States
1.whitman_-_Full_Of_Life,_Now
1.whitman_-_I_Hear_America_Singing
1.whitman_-_In_Cabind_Ships_At_Sea
1.whitman_-_I_Sing_The_Body_Electric
1.whitman_-_Lessons
1.whitman_-_Mediums
1.whitman_-_Miracles
1.whitman_-_Myself_And_Mine
1.whitman_-_Now_List_To_My_Mornings_Romanza
1.whitman_-_O_Captain!_My_Captain!
1.whitman_-_On_The_Beach_At_Night
1.whitman_-_O_Sun_Of_Real_Peace
1.whitman_-_Out_of_the_Cradle_Endlessly_Rocking
1.whitman_-_Passage_To_India
1.whitman_-_Pioneers!_O_Pioneers!
1.whitman_-_Poem_Of_Remembrance_For_A_Girl_Or_A_Boy
1.whitman_-_Poems_Of_Joys
1.whitman_-_Prayer_Of_Columbus
1.whitman_-_Race_Of_Veterans
1.whitman_-_Recorders_Ages_Hence
1.whitman_-_Respondez!
1.whitman_-_Rise,_O_Days
1.whitman_-_Salut_Au_Monde
1.whitman_-_Sea-Shore_Memories
1.whitman_-_Sing_Of_The_Banner_At_Day-Break
1.whitman_-_Song_For_All_Seas,_All_Ships
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_II
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_III
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_IX
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_LI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_V
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XIV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XL
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLVII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XVI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXIV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXXI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXXIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Exposition
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Universal
1.whitman_-_Sparkles_From_The_Wheel
1.whitman_-_Spirit_Whose_Work_Is_Done
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.whitman_-_The_Centerarians_Story
1.whitman_-_The_Indications
1.whitman_-_There_Was_A_Child_Went_Forth
1.whitman_-_The_Ship_Starting
1.whitman_-_The_Sleepers
1.whitman_-_The_Wound_Dresser
1.whitman_-_Thick-Sprinkled_Bunting
1.whitman_-_Thou_Orb_Aloft_Full-Dazzling
1.whitman_-_Thou_Reader
1.whitman_-_To_Old_Age
1.whitman_-_To_Oratists
1.whitman_-_To_The_Leavend_Soil_They_Trod
1.whitman_-_To_The_Man-of-War-Bird
1.whitman_-_To_The_Reader_At_Parting
1.whitman_-_To_Think_Of_Time
1.whitman_-_Vigil_Strange_I_Kept_on_the_Field_one_Night
1.whitman_-_Voices
1.whitman_-_Weave_In,_Weave_In,_My_Hardy_Life
1.whitman_-_What_Think_You_I_Take_My_Pen_In_Hand?
1.whitman_-_When_I_Read_The_Book
1.whitman_-_When_Lilacs_Last_in_the_Dooryard_Bloomd
1.whitman_-_Whoever_You_Are,_Holding_Me_Now_In_Hand
1.whitman_-_Who_Is_Now_Reading_This?
1.whitman_-_Years_Of_The_Modern
1.ww_-_0-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons_-_Dedication
1.ww_-_1-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_24_-_Walt_Whitman,_a_cosmos,_of_Manhattan_the_son
1.ww_-_2_-_Houses_and_rooms_are_full_of_perfumes,_the_shelves_are_crowded_with_perfumes
1.ww_-_2-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_3_-_I_have_heard_what_the_talkers_were_talking,_the_talk_of_the_beginning_and_the_end
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_4-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_5_-_I_believe_in_you_my_soul,_the_other_I_am_must_not_abase_itself_to_you
1.ww_-_5-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_6-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_7-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_9_-_The_big_doors_of_the_country_barn_stand_open_and_ready
1.ww_-_Address_To_A_Child_During_A_Boisterous_Winter_By_My_Sister
1.ww_-_Address_To_My_Infant_Daughter
1.ww_-_Address_To_The_Scholars_Of_The_Village_School_Of_---
1.ww_-_Advance__Come_Forth_From_Thy_Tyrolean_Ground
1.ww_-_A_Flower_Garden_At_Coleorton_Hall,_Leicestershire.
1.ww_-_A_Gravestone_Upon_The_Floor_In_The_Cloisters_Of_Worcester_Cathedral
1.ww_-_A_Morning_Exercise
1.ww_-_And_Is_It_Among_Rude_Untutored_Dales
1.ww_-_An_Evening_Walk
1.ww_-_A_Night-Piece
1.ww_-_A_noiseless_patient_spider
1.ww_-_A_Prophecy._February_1807
1.ww_-_Argument_For_Suicide
1.ww_-_Artegal_And_Elidure
1.ww_-_A_Whirl-Blast_From_Behind_The_Hill
1.ww_-_A_Wren's_Nest
1.ww_-_Beggars
1.ww_-_Behold_Vale!_I_Said,_When_I_Shall_Con
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourteenth_[conclusion]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Ninth_[Residence_in_France]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Twelfth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_]
1.ww_-_British_Freedom
1.ww_-_By_Moscow_Self-Devoted_To_A_Blaze
1.ww_-_By_The_Side_Of_The_Grave_Some_Years_After
1.ww_-_Composed_During_A_Storm
1.ww_-_Composed_In_The_Valley_Near_Dover,_On_The_Day_Of_Landing
1.ww_-_Composed_Upon_Westminster_Bridge,_September_3,_1802
1.ww_-_Daffodils
1.ww_-_Dion_[See_Plutarch]
1.ww_-_Epitaphs_Translated_From_Chiabrera
1.ww_-_Even_As_A_Dragons_Eye_That_Feels_The_Stress
1.ww_-_Extempore_Effusion_upon_the_Death_of_James_Hogg
1.ww_-_Feelings_Of_The_Tyrolese
1.ww_-_Fidelity
1.ww_-_For_The_Spot_Where_The_Hermitage_Stood_On_St._Herbert's_Island,_Derwentwater.
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_Guilt_And_Sorrow,_Or,_Incidents_Upon_Salisbury_Plain
1.ww_-_Hail-_Zaragoza!_If_With_Unwet_eye
1.ww_-_Hart-Leap_Well
1.ww_-_Her_Eyes_Are_Wild
1.ww_-_I_Know_an_Aged_Man_Constrained_to_Dwell
1.ww_-_Incident_Characteristic_Of_A_Favorite_Dog
1.ww_-_Inside_of_King's_College_Chapel,_Cambridge
1.ww_-_In_The_Pass_Of_Killicranky
1.ww_-_Invocation_To_The_Earth,_February_1816
1.ww_-_It_Is_No_Spirit_Who_From_Heaven_Hath_Flown
1.ww_-_Laodamia
1.ww_-_Lines_Composed_a_Few_Miles_above_Tintern_Abbey
1.ww_-_Lines_Left_Upon_The_Seat_Of_A_Yew-Tree,
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_In_Early_Spring
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_On_A_Blank_Leaf_In_A_Copy_Of_The_Authors_Poem_The_Excursion,
1.ww_-_Lucy_Gray_[or_Solitude]
1.ww_-_Maternal_Grief
1.ww_-_Matthew
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803
1.ww_-_Michael-_A_Pastoral_Poem
1.ww_-_Mutability
1.ww_-_November_1813
1.ww_-_O_Captain!_my_Captain!
1.ww_-_Ode
1.ww_-_Ode_on_Intimations_of_Immortality
1.ww_-_Ode_to_Duty
1.ww_-_Personal_Talk
1.ww_-_Power_Of_Music
1.ww_-_Repentance
1.ww_-_Resolution_And_Independence
1.ww_-_Ruth
1.ww_-_Siege_Of_Vienna_Raised_By_Jihn_Sobieski
1.ww_-_Simon_Lee-_The_Old_Huntsman
1.ww_-_Song_at_the_Feast_of_Brougham_Castle
1.ww_-_Song_Of_The_Spinning_Wheel
1.ww_-_Stanzas
1.ww_-_Star-Gazers
1.ww_-_Stone_Gate_Temple_in_the_Blue_Field_Mountains
1.ww_-_Stray_Pleasures
1.ww_-_The_Affliction_Of_Margaret
1.ww_-_The_Brothers
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IX-_Book_Eighth-_The_Parsonage
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Fairest,_Brightest,_Hues_Of_Ether_Fade
1.ww_-_The_Farmer_Of_Tilsbury_Vale
1.ww_-_The_Fountain
1.ww_-_The_French_Army_In_Russia,_1812-13
1.ww_-_The_Green_Linnet
1.ww_-_The_Highland_Broach
1.ww_-_The_Horn_Of_Egremont_Castle
1.ww_-_The_Idiot_Boy
1.ww_-_The_Idle_Shepherd_Boys
1.ww_-_The_Kitten_And_Falling_Leaves
1.ww_-_The_Last_Of_The_Flock
1.ww_-_The_Last_Supper,_by_Leonardo_da_Vinci,_in_the_Refectory_of_the_Convent_of_Maria_della_GraziaMilan
1.ww_-_The_Morning_Of_The_Day_Appointed_For_A_General_Thanksgiving._January_18,_1816
1.ww_-_The_Oak_And_The_Broom
1.ww_-_The_Old_Cumberland_Beggar
1.ww_-_The_Pet-Lamb
1.ww_-_The_Prelude,_Book_1-_Childhood_And_School-Time
1.ww_-_The_Primrose_of_the_Rock
1.ww_-_The_Prioresss_Tale_[from_Chaucer]
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Shepherd,_Looking_Eastward,_Softly_Said
1.ww_-_The_Sparrow's_Nest
1.ww_-_The_Tables_Turned
1.ww_-_The_Thorn
1.ww_-_The_Two_Thieves-_Or,_The_Last_Stage_Of_Avarice
1.ww_-_The_Virgin
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_First
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Fourth
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Third
1.ww_-_The_Waterfall_And_The_Eglantine
1.ww_-_The_Wishing_Gate_Destroyed
1.ww_-_To_a_Highland_Girl_(At_Inversneyde,_upon_Loch_Lomond)
1.ww_-_To_A_Sexton
1.ww_-_To_A_Young_Lady_Who_Had_Been_Reproached_For_Taking_Long_Walks_In_The_Country
1.ww_-_To_Dora
1.ww_-_To_Joanna
1.ww_-_To_May
1.ww_-_To--_On_Her_First_Ascent_To_The_Summit_Of_Helvellyn
1.ww_-_To_Sir_George_Howland_Beaumont,_Bart_From_the_South-West_Coast_Or_Cumberland_1811
1.ww_-_To_The_Daisy
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_Flower
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_Flower_(Second_Poem)
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_(John_Dyer)
1.ww_-_To_The_Small_Celandine
1.ww_-_To_The_Spade_Of_A_Friend_(An_Agriculturist)
1.ww_-_To_The_Supreme_Being_From_The_Italian_Of_Michael_Angelo
1.ww_-_Translation_Of_Part_Of_The_First_Book_Of_The_Aeneid
1.ww_-_Tribute_To_The_Memory_Of_The_Same_Dog
1.ww_-_Troilus_And_Cresida
1.ww_-_Upon_The_Punishment_Of_Death
1.ww_-_Vaudracour_And_Julia
1.ww_-_Vernal_Ode
1.ww_-_View_From_The_Top_Of_Black_Comb
1.ww_-_When_To_The_Attractions_Of_The_Busy_World
1.ww_-_Written_in_London._September,_1802
1.ww_-_Written_With_A_Pencil_Upon_A_Stone_In_The_Wall_Of_The_House,_On_The_Island_At_Grasmere
1.ww_-_Written_With_A_Slate_Pencil_On_A_Stone,_On_The_Side_Of_The_Mountain_Of_Black_Comb
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Revisited
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Visited
1.yni_-_Hymn_from_the_Heavens
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
20.03_-_Act_I:The_Descent
20.04_-_Act_II:_The_Play_on_Earth
20.05_-_Act_III:_The_Return
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Isha_Upanishad__All_that_is_world_in_the_Universe
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_On_the_Concept_of_the_Archetype
2.01_-_Proem
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE_AND_THE_POINT
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.01_-_THE_CHILD_WITH_THE_MIRROR
2.01_-_The_Mother
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Path
2.01_-_The_Picture
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Therapeutic_value_of_Abreaction
2.01_-_The_Two_Natures
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.01_-_War.
2.02_-_Atomic_Motions
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Evolutionary_Creation_and_the_Expectation_of_a_Revelation
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_Indra,_Giver_of_Light
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_The_Monstrance
2.02_-_The_Mother_Archetype
2.02_-_THE_SCINTILLA
2.02_-_The_Status_of_Knowledge
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.02_-_UPON_THE_BLESSED_ISLES
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_Renunciation
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Mother-Complex
2.03_-_The_Purified_Understanding
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_Absence_Of_Secondary_Qualities
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_On_Art
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.04_-_The_Living_Church_and_Christ-Omega
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_Aspects_of_Sadhana
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_Infinite_Worlds
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_Renunciation
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_The_Holy_Oil
2.05_-_The_Tale_of_the_Vampires_Kingdom
2.05_-_Universal_Love_and_how_it_leads_to_Self-Surrender
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_ON_THE_RABBLE
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Disciplines_of_Knowledge
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_Ten_Internal_and_Ten_External_Sefirot
2.07_-_The_Cup
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Release_from_Subjection_to_the_Body
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.07_-_The_Upanishad_in_Aphorism
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_Concentration
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_Memory,_Self-Consciousness_and_the_Ignorance
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_The_Branches_of_The_Archetypal_Man
2.08_-_The_God_of_Love_is_his_own_proof
2.08_-_The_Release_from_the_Heart_and_the_Mind
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.09_-_Memory,_Ego_and_Self-Experience
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.09_-_THE_NIGHT_SONG
2.09_-_The_Pantacle
2.09_-_The_Release_from_the_Ego
2.0_-_Reincarnation_and_Karma
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.1.01_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Sadhana
2.1.01_-_The_Parts_of_the_Being
2.1.02_-_Classification_of_the_Parts_of_the_Being
2.1.02_-_Combining_Work,_Meditation_and_Bhakti
21.02_-_Gods_and_Men
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
21.03_-_The_Double_Ladder
2.10_-_Conclusion
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.10_-_On_Vedic_Interpretation
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.10_-_The_Primordial_Kings__Their_Shattering
2.10_-_The_Realisation_of_the_Cosmic_Self
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.1.1.04_-_Reading,_Yogic_Force_and_the_Development_of_Style
2.11_-_On_Education
2.11_-_The_Boundaries_of_the_Ignorance
2.11_-_The_Guru
2.11_-_The_Modes_of_the_Self
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_The_Shattering_And_Fall_of_The_Primordial_Kings
2.11_-_THE_TOMB_SONG
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_ON_SELF-OVERCOMING
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.12_-_The_Origin_of_the_Ignorance
2.1.2_-_The_Vital_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.2_-_Study
2.1.3.3_-_Reading
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_Kingdom-The_Seventh_Sefira
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_Psychic_Presence_and_Psychic_Being_-_Real_Origin_of_Race_Superiority
2.13_-_The_Book
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.3_-_Discipline
2.1.4.4_-_Homework
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_Faith
2.14_-_On_Movements
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
2.1.4_-_The_Lower_Vital_Being
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.14_-_The_Passive_and_the_Active_Brahman
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.1.5.5_-_Other_Subjects
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_ON_IMMACULATE_PERCEPTION
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_Reality_and_the_Integral_Knowledge
2.15_-_The_Lamen
2.16_-_ON_SCHOLARS
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.16_-_The_Magick_Fire
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.05_-_On_the_Inspiration_and_Writing_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.07_-_On_the_Verse_and_Structure_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_ON_POETS
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.17_-_The_Soul_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_Knowledge_of_the_Scientist_and_the_Yogi
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.19_-_The_Planes_of_Our_Existence
2.19_-_THE_SOOTHSAYER
2.2.01_-_The_Outer_Being_and_the_Inner_Being
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.02_-_Becoming_Conscious_in_Work
2.2.02_-_Consciousness_and_the_Inconscient
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
2.2.03_-_The_Science_of_Consciousness
2.2.04_-_Practical_Concerns_in_Work
2.20_-_Nov-Dec_1939
2.20_-_ON_REDEMPTION
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.2.1.01_-_The_World's_Greatest_Poets
2.21_-_1940
2.2.1_-_Cheerfulness_and_Happiness
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_ON_HUMAN_PRUDENCE
2.21_-_The_Ladder_of_Self-transcendence
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.21_-_The_Three_Heads,_The_Beard_and_The_Mazela
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_1941-1943
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.22_-_THE_STILLEST_HOUR
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_Life_Sketch_of_A._B._Purani
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.23_-_Supermind_and_Overmind
2.2.3_-_The_Aitereya_Upanishad
2.23_-_The_Conditions_of_Attainment_to_the_Gnosis
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.24_-_Back_to_Back__Face_to_Face__and_The_Process_of_Sawing_Through
2.24_-_Gnosis_and_Ananda
2.24_-_Note_on_the_Text
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_Mercies_and_Judgements_of_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_Samadhi
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.26_-_The_Supramental_Descent
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_Hathayoga
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.2.9.02_-_Plato
2.2.9.03_-_Aristotle
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_Opening,_Sincerity_and_the_Mother's_Grace
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.03_-_The_Mother's_Presence
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother
2.3.06_-_The_Mother's_Lights
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
2.3.08_-_The_Physical_Consciousness
2.3.1.08_-_The_Necessity_and_Nature_of_Inspiration
2.3.1.09_-_Inspiration_and_Understanding
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
2.3.1.10_-_Inspiration_and_Effort
2.3.1.20_-_Aspiration
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.3.1_-_Svetasvatara_Upanishad
2.3.2_-_Desire
2.3.3_-_Anger_and_Violence
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
2.4.3_-_Problems_in_Human_Relations
26.01_-_Vedic_Hymns
26.05_-_Modern_Poets
26.06_-_Ashram_Poets
26.07_-_Dhammapada
27.03_-_The_Great_Holocaust_-_Chhinnamasta
29.03_-_In_Her_Company
29.06_-_There_is_also_another,_similar_or_parallel_story_in_the_Veda_about_the_God_Agni,_about_the_disappearance_of_this
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
3.00.1_-_Foreword
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.07_-_The_Poet_and_the_Yogi
30.08_-_Poetry_and_Mantra
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.16_-_Tagore_the_Unique
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
30.18_-_Boris_Pasternak
3.01_-_Fear_of_God
3.01_-_Forms_of_Rebirth
3.01_-_Hymn_to_Matter
3.01_-_Love_and_the_Triple_Path
3.01_-_Proem
3.01_-_Sincerity
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_The_Mercurial_Fountain
3.01_-_The_Principles_of_Ritual
3.01_-_The_Soul_World
3.01_-_THE_WANDERER
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
3.02_-_Aridity_in_Prayer
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_Nature_And_Composition_Of_The_Mind
3.02_-_ON_THE_VISION_AND_THE_RIDDLE
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Formulae_of_the_Elemental_Weapons
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Motives_of_Devotion
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.02_-_The_Soul_in_the_Soul_World_after_Death
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.03_-_The_Naked_Truth
3.03_-_The_Soul_Is_Mortal
3.03_-_The_Spirit_Land
3.04_-_BEFORE_SUNRISE
3.04_-_Folly_Of_The_Fear_Of_Death
3.04_-_Immersion_in_the_Bath
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Flowers
3.04_-_The_Formula_of_ALHIM
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.04_-_The_Way_of_Devotion
3.05_-_Cerberus_And_Furies,_And_That_Lack_Of_Light
3.05_-_ON_VIRTUE_THAT_MAKES_SMALL
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.05_-_The_Divine_Personality
3.05_-_The_Formula_of_I.A.O.
3.05_-_The_Physical_World_and_its_Connection_with_the_Soul_and_Spirit-Lands
3.06_-_Charity
3.06_-_Death
3.06_-_The_Delight_of_the_Divine
3.06_-_The_Sage
3.06_-_Thought-Forms_and_the_Human_Aura
3.07.2_-_Finding_the_Real_Source
3.07_-_ON_PASSING_BY
3.07_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Soul
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Of_Equilibrium
3.08_-_ON_APOSTATES
3.08_-_Purification
3.08_-_The_Mystery_of_Love
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_THE_RETURN_HOME
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
3.1.01_-_Distinctive_Features_of_the_Integral_Yoga
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_Asceticism_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.02_-_The_Mother-_Worship_of_the_Bengalis
3.1.03_-_A_Realistic_Adwaita
31.03_-_The_Trinity_of_Bengal
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
3.1.04_-_Transformation_in_the_Integral_Yoga
31.06_-_Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
31.08_-_The_Unity_of_India
31.09_-_The_Cause_of_Indias_Decline
3.10_-_Of_the_Gestures
3.10_-_ON_THE_THREE_EVILS
3.10_-_Punishment
3.10_-_The_New_Birth
31.10_-_East_and_West
3.1.15_-_Rebirth
3.1.16_-_The_Triumph-Song_of_Trishuncou
3.11_-_Epilogue
3.11_-_Of_Our_Lady_Babalon
3.11_-_ON_THE_SPIRIT_OF_GRAVITY
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.1_-_The_Transformation_of_the_Physical
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.1.24_-_In_the_Moonlight
3.1.2_-_Levels_of_the_Physical_Being
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.1.3_-_Difficulties_of_the_Physical_Being
3.13_-_THE_CONVALESCENT
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.15_-_Of_the_Invocation
3.15_-_THE_OTHER_DANCING_SONG
3.16.1_-_Of_the_Oath
3.16.2_-_Of_the_Charge_of_the_Spirit
3.16_-_THE_SEVEN_SEALS_OR_THE_YES_AND_AMEN_SONG
3.17_-_Of_the_License_to_Depart
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
3.2.01_-_On_Ideals
3.2.01_-_The_Newness_of_the_Integral_Yoga
32.01_-_Where_is_God?
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
32.03_-_In_This_Crisis
3.2.03_-_Jainism_and_Buddhism
3.2.03_-_To_the_Ganges
3.2.04_-_Sankhya_and_Yoga
3.2.04_-_The_Conservative_Mind_and_Eastern_Progress
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.05_-_Our_Ideal
32.05_-_The_Culture_of_the_Body
3.2.06_-_The_Adwaita_of_Shankaracharya
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
3.2.09_-_The_Teachings_of_Some_Modern_Indian_Yogis
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
32.12_-_The_Evolutionary_Imperative
3.2.1_-_Food
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
3.3.01_-_The_Superman
3.3.02_-_All-Will_and_Free-Will
33.02_-_Subhash,_Oaten:_atlas,_Russell
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.04_-_Deoghar
33.05_-_Muraripukur_-_II
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.07_-_Alipore_Jail
33.08_-_I_Tried_Sannyas
33.09_-_Shyampukur
33.10_-_Pondicherry_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.12_-_Pondicherry_Cyclone
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
33.15_-_My_Athletics
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.3.2_-_Doctors_and_Medicines
3.3.3_-_Specific_Illnesses,_Ailments_and_Other_Physical_Problems
3.4.01_-_Evolution
3.4.02_-_The_Inconscient
34.03_-_Hymn_To_Dawn
3.4.03_-_Materialism
34.09_-_Hymn_to_the_Pillar
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.05_-_Fiction-Writing_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.06_-_Reading_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.07_-_Reading_and_Real_Knowledge
3.4.1.08_-_Novel-Reading_and_Sadhana
34.10_-_Hymn_To_Earth
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.4.2_-_Guru_Yoga
3.4.2_-_The_Inconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.5.01_-_Aphorisms
3.5.01_-_Science
3.5.02_-_Thoughts_and_Glimpses
35.03_-_Hymn_To_Bhavani
3.5.03_-_Reason_and_Society
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.09_-_THE_SIT_SUKTA
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.02_-_The_Story_of_Jabala-Satyakama
37.03_-_Satyakama_And_Upakoshala
37.04_-_The_Story_Of_Rishi_Yajnavalkya
37.05_-_Narada_-_Sanatkumara_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
37.06_-_Indra_-_Virochana_and_Prajapati
37.07_-_Ushasti_Chakrayana_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.02_-_The_Reincarnating_Soul
3.7.1.03_-_Rebirth,_Evolution,_Heredity
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.1.05_-_The_Significance_of_Rebirth
3.7.1.06_-_The_Ascending_Unity
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.08_-_Karma
3.7.1.09_-_Karma_and_Freedom
3.7.1.10_-_Karma,_Will_and_Consequence
3.7.1.11_-_Rebirth_and_Karma
3.7.1.12_-_Karma_and_Justice
3.7.2.01_-_The_Foundation
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
38.01_-_Asceticism_and_Renunciation
38.02_-_Hymns_and_Prayers
38.04_-_Great_Time
38.05_-_Living_Matter
38.06_-_Ravana_Vanquished
3.8.1.02_-_Arya_-_Its_Significance
3.8.1.04_-_Different_Methods_of_Writing
3.8.1.06_-_The_Universal_Consciousness
39.08_-_Release
39.11_-_A_Prayer
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
40.01_-_November_24,_1926
40.02_-_The_Two_Chains_Of_The_Mother
4.01_-_Circumstances
4.01_-_Conclusion_-_My_intellectual_position
4.01_-_INTRODUCTION
4.01_-_Introduction
4.01_-_Prayers_and_Meditations
4.01_-_Proem
4.01_-_Sweetness_in_Prayer
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_THE_HONEY_SACRIFICE
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_Difficulties
4.02_-_Divine_Consolations.
4.02_-_Existence_And_Character_Of_The_Images
4.02_-_GOLD_AND_SPIRIT
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.02_-_THE_CRY_OF_DISTRESS
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION_OF_THE_KING
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_LEECH
4.04_-_The_Perfection_of_the_Mental_Being
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.05_-_The_Instruments_of_the_Spirit
4.05_-_The_Passion_Of_Love
4.06_-_Purification-the_Lower_Mentality
4.06_-_RETIRED
4.07_-_Purification-Intelligence_and_Will
4.07_-_THE_UGLIEST_MAN
4.08_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Spirit
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.08_-_THE_VOLUNTARY_BEGGAR
4.09_-_REGINA
4.09_-_THE_SHADOW
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
41.03_-_Bengali_Poems_of_Sri_Aurobindo
4.10_-_AT_NOON
4.1.1.05_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Yoga
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.11_-_THE_WELCOME
4.1.2.03_-_Preparation_for_the_Supramental_Change
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.12_-_THE_LAST_SUPPER
4.12_-_The_Way_of_Equality
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.13_-_ON_THE_HIGHER_MAN
4.13_-_The_Action_of_Equality
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.14_-_The_Power_of_the_Instruments
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.16_-_AMONG_DAUGHTERS_OF_THE_WILDERNESS
4.17_-_The_Action_of_the_Divine_Shakti
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.03_-_The_Birth_of_Sin
4.2.04_-_Epiphany
4.20_-_The_Intuitive_Mind
4.2.1.01_-_The_Importance_of_the_Psychic_Change
4.21_-_The_Gradations_of_the_supermind
4.2.1_-_The_Right_Attitude_towards_Difficulties
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.22_-_The_supramental_Thought_and_Knowledge
4.2.3.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Coming_to_the_Front
4.2.3.02_-_Signs_of_the_Psychic's_Coming_Forward
4.2.3.04_-_Means_of_Bringing_Forward_the_Psychic
4.2.3.05_-_Obstacles_to_the_Psychic's_Emergence
4.23_-_The_supramental_Instruments_--_Thought-process
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.2.4.01_-_The_Psychic_Touch_or_Influence
4.2.4.02_-_The_Psychic_Condition
4.2.4.10_-_Psychic_Yearning
4.2.4.11_-_Psychic_Intensity
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.2.5.01_-_Psychisation_and_Spiritualisation
4.2.5.03_-_The_Psychic_and_Spiritual_Movements
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.25_-_Towards_the_supramental_Time_Vision
4.26_-_The_Supramental_Time_Consciousness
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.1.04_-_The_Disappearance_of_the_I_Sense
4.3.1.07_-_The_Self_Experienced_on_Various_Planes
4.3.1.09_-_The_Self_and_Life
4.3.1.10_-_Experiences_of_Infinity,_Oneness,_Unity
4.3.1_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_the_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.3.2.04_-_Degrees_in_the_Higher_Consciousness
4.3.2.05_-_The_Higher_Planes_and_the_Supermind
4.3.2.06_-_Levels_of_the_Higher_Mind
4.3.2_-_Attacks_by_the_Hostile_Forces
4.3.3_-_Dealing_with_Hostile_Attacks
4.3_-_Bhakti
4.4.1.04_-_The_Order_of_Ascent_and_Descent
4.4.1.06_-_Ascent_and_Descent_and_Problems_of_the_Lower_Nature
4.4.2.01_-_Contact_with_the_Above
4.4.2.02_-_Ascension_or_Rising_above_the_Head
4.4.2.07_-_Ascent_and_Going_out_of_the_Body
4.4.2.08_-_Fixing_the_Consciousness_Above
4.42_-_Chapter_Two
4.4.3.03_-_Preparatory_Experiences_and_Descent
4.4.3.04_-_The_Order_of_Descent_into_the_Being
4.43_-_Chapter_Three
4.4.4.05_-_The_Descent_of_Force_or_Power
4.4.4.07_-_The_Descent_of_Light
4.4.5.03_-_Descent_and_Other_Experiences
4.4.6.01_-_Sensations_in_the_Inner_Centres
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.01_-_Message
5.01_-_Proem
5.01_-_The_Dakini,_Salgye_Du_Dalma
5.02_-_Against_Teleological_Concept
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.02_-_THE_STATUE
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.04_-_Formation_Of_The_World
5.04_-_Supermind_and_the_Life_Divine
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.04_-_Three_Dreams
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.05_-_THE_OLD_ADAM
5.05_-_The_War
5.06_-_Origins_And_Savage_Period_Of_Mankind
5.06_-_Supermind_in_the_Evolution
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.07_-_Mind_of_Light
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.5_-_The_Book_of_Achilles
5.1.01.6_-_The_Book_of_the_Chieftains
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.01.9_-_Book_IX
5.1.01_-_Terminology
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.1.03_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_Hostile_Beings
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.02_-_Aryan_Origins_-_The_Elementary_Roots_of_Language
5.2.02_-_The_Meditations_of_Mandavya
5.3.04_-_Roots_in_M
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5.4.02_-_Occult_Powers_or_Siddhis
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.01_-_Proem
6.01_-_THE_ALCHEMICAL_VIEW_OF_THE_UNION_OF_OPPOSITES
6.02_-_Great_Meteorological_Phenomena,_Etc
6.02_-_STAGES_OF_THE_CONJUNCTION
6.03_-_Extraordinary_And_Paradoxical_Telluric_Phenomena
6.04_-_THE_MEANING_OF_THE_ALCHEMICAL_PROCEDURE
6.04_-_The_Plague_Athens
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.06_-_Remembrances
6.06_-_SELF-KNOWLEDGE
6.07_-_Myself_and_My_Creed
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.08_-_Intellectual_Visions
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
6.09_-_Imaginary_Visions
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.02_-_Courage
7.02_-_The_Mind
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.03_-_The_Heart
7.04_-_The_Vital
7.05_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
7.06_-_The_Body_(the_Physical)
7.06_-_The_Simple_Life
7.07_-_Prudence
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.09_-_Right_Judgement
7.11_-_Building_and_Destroying
7.12_-_The_Giver
7.13_-_The_Conquest_of_Knowledge
7.14_-_Modesty
7.15_-_The_Family
7.16_-_Sympathy
7.2.05_-_Moon_of_Two_Hemispheres
7.3.10_-_The_Lost_Boat
7.4.03_-_The_Cosmic_Dance
7.5.52_-_The_Unseen_Infinite
7.5.64_-_The_Iron_Dictators
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
A_God's_Labour
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
A_Secret_Miracle
Avatars_of_the_Tortoise
Averroes_Search
Big_Mind_(non-dual)
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Proverbs
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
CASE_5_-_KYOGENS_MAN_HANGING_IN_THE_TREE
Chapter_III_-_WHEREIN_IS_RELATED_THE_DROLL_WAY_IN_WHICH_DON_QUIXOTE_HAD_HIMSELF_DUBBED_A_KNIGHT
Chapter_II_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_FIRST_SALLY_THE_INGENIOUS_DON_QUIXOTE_MADE_FROM_HOME
Chapter_I_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_CHARACTER_AND_PURSUITS_OF_THE_FAMOUS_GENTLEMAN_DON_QUIXOTE_OF_LA_MANCHA
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
Deutsches_Requiem
Diamond_Sutra_1
DM_2_-_How_to_Meditate
DS2
DS3
DS4
Emma_Zunz
ENNEAD_01.01_-_The_Organism_and_the_Self.
ENNEAD_01.02_-_Concerning_Virtue.
ENNEAD_01.03_-_Of_Dialectic,_or_the_Means_of_Raising_the_Soul_to_the_Intelligible_World.
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_01.05_-_Does_Happiness_Increase_With_Time?
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_01.08_-_Of_the_Nature_and_Origin_of_Evils.
ENNEAD_02.01_-_Of_the_Heaven.
ENNEAD_02.02_-_About_the_Movement_of_the_Heavens.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.05_-_Of_the_Aristotelian_Distinction_Between_Actuality_and_Potentiality.
ENNEAD_02.06_-_Of_Essence_and_Being.
ENNEAD_02.07_-_About_Mixture_to_the_Point_of_Total_Penetration.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.03_-_Continuation_of_That_on_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.04_-_Of_Our_Individual_Guardian.
ENNEAD_03.05_-_Of_Love,_or_Eros.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.08b_-_Of_Nature,_Contemplation_and_Unity.
ENNEAD_03.09_-_Fragments_About_the_Soul,_the_Intelligence,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_04.01_-_Of_the_Being_of_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Problems_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.05_-_Psychological_Questions_III._-_About_the_Process_of_Vision_and_Hearing.
ENNEAD_04.06a_-_Of_Sensation_and_Memory.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_04.09_-_Whether_All_Souls_Form_a_Single_One?
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.04_-_How_What_is_After_the_First_Proceeds_Therefrom;_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_05.05_-_That_Intelligible_Entities_Are_Not_External_to_the_Intelligence_of_the_Good.
ENNEAD_05.06_-_The_Superessential_Principle_Does_Not_Think_-_Which_is_the_First_Thinking_Principle,_and_Which_is_the_Second?
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_05.09_-_Of_Intelligence,_Ideas_and_Essence.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Euthyphro
Ex_Oblivione
First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Thessalonians
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gods_Script
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
IS_-_Chapter_1
Kafka_and_His_Precursors
Liber
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.01_-_GNOSIS
LUX.04_-_LIBERATION
LUX.06_-_DIVINATION
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Meno
MoM_References
Partial_Magic_in_the_Quixote
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_01_13
r1912_01_14
r1912_01_15
r1912_01_20
r1912_01_22
r1912_01_27
r1912_01_28
r1912_02_06
r1912_02_08
r1912_07_01
r1912_07_03
r1912_07_14
r1912_07_15
r1912_07_19
r1912_07_20
r1912_07_21
r1912_11_14b
r1912_11_19a
r1912_11_29
r1912_12_03b
r1912_12_05
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r1913_01_29
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r1913_06_16
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r1913_06_16b
r1913_06_23
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r1913_09_17
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r1914_01_02
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r1914_01_11
r1914_01_15
r1914_03_13
r1914_03_14
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r1914_04_28
r1914_05_01
r1914_05_14
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r1914_05_28
r1914_06_01
r1914_06_10
r1914_06_15
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r1915_01_02
r1915_01_03
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r1915_01_07b
r1915_01_08
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r1917_03_11
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r1917_09_08
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r1918_02_17
r1918_02_19
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r1918_02_24
r1918_02_25
r1918_03_07
r1918_03_15
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r1918_04_21
r1918_04_30
r1918_05_04
r1918_05_05
r1918_05_07
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r1918_05_23
r1918_05_24
r1918_06_01
r1918_06_14
r1919_06_24
r1919_06_25
r1919_06_27
r1919_06_28
r1919_06_29
r1919_06_30
r1919_07_01
r1919_07_02
r1919_07_03
r1919_07_07
r1919_07_10
r1919_07_14
r1919_07_15
r1919_07_19
r1919_07_20
r1919_07_22
r1919_07_25
r1919_07_26
r1919_07_29
r1919_07_30
r1919_08_01
r1919_08_03
r1919_08_04
r1919_08_11
r1919_08_18
r1919_08_20
r1919_08_27
r1919_09_02
r1920_02_04
r1920_02_07a
r1920_02_19
r1920_02_22
r1920_02_24
r1920_02_28
r1920_02_29
r1920_03_01
r1920_03_02
r1920_03_03
r1920_03_06
r1920_03_08
r1920_06_07
r1920_06_12
r1920_06_21
r1920_10_19
r1927_01_03
r1927_01_09
r1927_01_10
r1927_01_12
r1927_01_14
r1927_01_15
r1927_01_17
r1927_01_19
r1927_01_20
r1927_01_23
r1927_01_25
r1927_01_29
r1927_04_09b
r1927_07_30_-_Record_of_Drishti
r1927_10_25
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
SB_1.1_-_Questions_by_the_Sages
Sophist
Story_of_the_Warrior_and_the_Captive
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablet_1_-
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_026-050
Talks_051-075
Talks_076-099
Talks_100-125
Talks_125-150
Talks_151-175
Talks_176-200
Talks_225-239
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Book_of_Sand
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Micah
The_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Book_(short_story)
The_Circular_Ruins
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Ephesians
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Philippians
The_Essentials_of_Education
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Fearful_Sphere_of_Pascal
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_Timothy
The_First_Epistle_of_Peter
The_First_Letter_of_John
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Gold_Bug
The_Golden_Sentences_of_Democrates
The_Golden_Verses_of_Pythagoras
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Great_Sense
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_House_of_Asterion
The_Immortal
The_Last_Question
The_Letter_to_the_Hebrews
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Mirror_of_Enigmas
The_Monadology
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Second_Epistle_of_Paul_to_Timothy
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians
The_Waiting
The_Wall_and_the_BOoks
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Valery_as_Symbol
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

class
curriculum
everyday
injunction
list
quote
read
reading_list
read_it_always
Savitri
the_School
the_Student
trigram
SIMILAR TITLES
50 Philosophy Reading List
50 Psychology Reading List
50 Self-Help Reading List
50 Spiritual Reading List
Anonymous Reading List
A Summers Reading List
Books With a Goodreads Average Rating of 4.3 and Above
everyday you are going to read Savitri
goodreads
goodreads - authlist
goodreads - authlist 43k
goodreads - booklist
how to read Savitri
how to read Savitri always
It does not matter if you understand it - Savitri, read it always.
Joshs complete reading list
Joshs reading list
MISSING NAME - related to why read Savitri and Savitri (ode)
Mortimers Reading list (1972 edition)
read
reading list (100)
reading list (AI)
reading list (Elon Musks)
reading list (joshs)
reading lists
reading list (Science)
Reading & Writing - The Critique
read it always
read Savitri
Ready Player One
Recommended Reading
speed reading
the Place where everything is already complete
to read
unknown - reading Savitri
Why am I not reading Savitri always
Why does one read Savitri
Why read The Life Divine

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

readability ::: n. --> The state of being readable; readableness.

readable ::: a. --> Such as can be read; legible; fit or suitable to be read; worth reading; interesting.

readdress ::: v. t. --> To address a second time; -- often used reflexively.

readeption ::: n. --> A regaining; recovery of something lost.

readept ::: v. t. --> To regain; to recover.

reader ::: n. --> One who reads.
One whose distinctive office is to read prayers in a church.
One who reads lectures on scientific subjects.
A proof reader.
One who reads manuscripts offered for publication and advises regarding their merit.
One who reads much; one who is studious.


readership ::: n. --> The office of reader.

read-eval-print loop "language, LISP, programming" (REPL) A programming {structure} within {LISP} which repeatedly reads a {form} from the {user}, evaluates it, and displays the result. A read-eval-print {loop} forms the basis of the {Top-Level} {shell} that programmers of the LISP family of languages interact with. In many dialects of LISP a very simple REPL could be implemented as: (loop (print (eval (read)))). (2003-06-23)

read-eval-print loop ::: (language, LISP, programming) (REPL) A programming structure within LISP which repeatedly reads a form from the user, evaluates it, and displays the result.A read-eval-print loop forms the basis of the Top-Level shell that programmers of the LISP family of languages interact with.In many dialects of LISP a very simple REPL could be implemented as: (loop (print (eval (read)))). (2003-06-23)

readily ::: adv. --> In a ready manner; quickly; promptly.
Without delay or objection; without reluctance; willingly; cheerfully.


readiness ::: n. --> The state or quality of being ready; preparation; promptness; aptitude; willingness.

reading ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Read ::: n. --> The act of one who reads; perusal; also, printed or written matter to be read.
Study of books; literary scholarship; as, a man of extensive reading.


readjournment ::: n. --> The act of readjourning; a second or repeated adjournment.

readjourn ::: v. t. --> To adjourn a second time; to adjourn again.

readjuster ::: n. --> One who, or that which, readjusts; in some of the States of the United States, one who advocates a refunding, and sometimes a partial repudiation, of the State debt without the consent of the State&

readjustment ::: n. --> A second adjustment; a new or different adjustment.

readjust ::: v. t. --> To adjust or settle again; to put in a different order or relation; to rearrange.

readmission ::: n. --> The act of admitting again, or the state of being readmitted; as, the readmission of fresh air into an exhausted receiver; the readmission of a student into a seminary.

readmittance ::: n. --> Allowance to enter again; a second admission.

readmit ::: v. t. --> To admit again; to give entrance or access to again.

read ::: n. --> Rennet. See 3d Reed. ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Read ::: v. t.

read-only user "jargon" Describes a {luser} who uses computers almost exclusively for reading {Usenet}, {bulletin boards}, and/or {electronic mail}, rather than writing code or purveying useful information. See {twink}, {terminal junkie}, {lurker}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-28)

read-only user ::: (jargon) Describes a luser who uses computers almost exclusively for reading Usenet, bulletin boards, and/or electronic mail, rather than writing code or purveying useful information.See twink, terminal junkie, lurker.[Jargon File] (1995-02-28)

readopt ::: v. t. --> To adopt again.

readorn ::: v. t. --> To adorn again or anew.

readvance ::: v. i. --> To advance again.

readvertency ::: n. --> The act of adverting to again, or of reviewing.

ready for the Day of Judgment.”

ready-made ::: a. --> Made already, or beforehand, in anticipation of need; not made to order; as, ready-made clothing; ready-made jokes.

ready ::: superl. --> Prepared for what one is about to do or experience; equipped or supplied with what is needed for some act or event; prepared for immediate movement or action; as, the troops are ready to march; ready for the journey.
Fitted or arranged for immediate use; causing no delay for lack of being prepared or furnished.
Prepared in mind or disposition; not reluctant; willing; free; inclined; disposed.


ready-witted ::: a. --> Having ready wit.

Reader’s Encyclopedia, “Araf.”

Reade, Winwood. The Martyrdom of Man. Intro, by

README file ::: (convention) An introduction traditionally included in the top-level directory of a Unix source distribution, containing a pointer to more detailed be named README, or READ.ME, or rarely ReadMe or readme.txt or some other variant.In the Macintosh and IBM PC worlds, software is not usually distributed in source form, and the README is more likely to contain user-oriented material like last-minute documentation changes, error workarounds, and restrictions.The README convention probably follows the famous scene in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures In Wonderland in which Alice confronts magic munchies labelled Eat Me and Drink Me.[Jargon File] (1995-02-28)

README file "convention, documentation" A {text file} traditionally included in the top-level {directory} of a {software} distribution, containing pointers to {documentation}, credits, revision history, notes, etc. Originally found in {Unix} source distributions, the convention has spread to many other products. The file may be named README, READ.ME, ReadMe or readme.txt or some other variant. In the {Macintosh} and {IBM PC} worlds, software is not usually distributed in source form, and the README is more likely to contain user-oriented material like last-minute documentation changes, error workarounds, and restrictions. The README convention probably follows the famous scene in Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures In Wonderland" in which Alice confronts magic munchies labeled "Eat Me" and "Drink Me". [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-28)

Read-Only Memory ::: (storage) (ROM) A type of data storage device which is manufactured with fixed contents. In its most general sense, the term might be used for any a printed book; however, the term is most often applied to semiconductor integrated circuit memories, of which there are several types, and CD-ROM.ROM is inherently non-volatile storage - it retains its contents even when the power is switched off, in contrast to RAM.ROM is often used to hold programs for embedded systems since these usually have a fixed purpose. ROM is also used for storage of the lowest level bootstrap software (firmware) in a computer.See also Programmable Read-Only Memory. (1995-05-09)

Read-Only Memory "storage" (ROM) A type of data storage device which is manufactured with fixed contents. In its most general sense, the term might be used for any storage system whose contents cannot be altered, such as a gramophone record or a printed book; however, the term is most often applied to {semiconductor} {integrated circuit} memories, of which there are several types, and {CD-ROM}. ROM is inherently {non-volatile storage} - it retains its contents even when the power is switched off, in contrast to {RAM}. ROM is often used to hold programs for {embedded systems} since these usually have a fixed purpose. ROM is also used for storage of the lowest level {bootstrap} software (firmware) in a computer. See also {Programmable Read-Only Memory}. (1995-05-09)


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. An intense, painful feeling of repugnance, fear and shock. 2. Something or someone that inspires dislike; dread; fright; something horrible.

1. Brings out of a folded state; spreads or opens out. 2. Discloses or lays open to the view; displays. Also fig.

1. Not inclined, willing, or ready; averse, reluctant, loath. 2. Offering resistance; stubborn or obstinate.

1. That unfolds, discloses, or develops. 2. Spreading out or laying open to view; revealing; displaying. unfoldings. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as a n.)

1. To open or spread out from a rolled-up state; to uncoil. 2. To lay open; display; reveal. 3. To become open or spread out. Also fig. unrolls, unrolled.

1. Walking upon or over. 2. Pressing beneath the feet; trampling. treadings.

a b c ::: --> The first three letters of the alphabet, used for the whole alphabet.
A primer for teaching the alphabet and first elements of reading.
The simplest rudiments of any subject; as, the A B C of finance.


  A body of mystical Jewish teachings based on an interpretation of hidden meanings in the Hebrew Scriptures. Among its central doctrines are, all creation is an emanation from the Deity and the soul exists from eternity. 2. Any secret or occult doctrine or science. 3.”Esoteric system of interpretation of the Hebrew scriptures based on the assumption that every word, letter, number, and accent in them has an occult meaning. The system, oral at first, claimed great antiquity, but was really the product of the Middle Ages, arising in the 7th century and lasting into the 18th. It was popular chiefly among Jews, but spread to Christians as well. (Col. Enc). Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo’s Works

abominate ::: v. t. --> To turn from as ill-omened; to hate in the highest degree, as if with religious dread; loathe; as, to abominate all impiety.

aread ::: v. t. --> Alt. of Areed

abroad ::: 1. Broadly, widely, at large, over a broad or wide surface; widely apart, with the parts or limbs wide spread. 2. At large; freely moving about.

abroad ::: adv. --> At large; widely; broadly; over a wide space; as, a tree spreads its branches abroad.
Without a certain confine; outside the house; away from one&


acceptive ::: a. --> Fit for acceptance.
Ready to accept.


acescent ::: a. --> Turning sour; readily becoming tart or acid; slightly sour. ::: n. --> A substance liable to become sour.

acockbill ::: adv. --> Hanging at the cathead, ready to let go, as an anchor.
Topped up; having one yardarm higher than the other.


acontia ::: n. pl. --> Threadlike defensive organs, composed largely of nettling cells (cnidae), thrown out of the mouth or special pores of certain Actiniae when irritated.

adansonia ::: n. --> A genus of great trees related to the Bombax. There are two species, A. digitata, the baobab or monkey-bread of Africa and India, and A. Gregorii, the sour gourd or cream-of-tartar tree of Australia. Both have a trunk of moderate height, but of enormous diameter, and a wide-spreading head. The fruit is oblong, and filled with pleasantly acid pulp. The wood is very soft, and the bark is used by the natives for making ropes and cloth.

adread ::: v. t. & i. --> To dread.

address ::: v. --> To aim; to direct.
To prepare or make ready.
Reflexively: To prepare one&


adj. 1. Not imprisoned or enslaved; being at liberty. 2. Unconstrained; unconfined. 3. Unobstructed; clear. 4. Ready or generous in using or giving; liberal; lavish. 5. Exempt from external authority, interference, restriction, etc., as a person or one"s will, thought, choice, action, etc.; independent; unrestricted. 6. Exempt or released from something specified that controls, restrains, burdens, etc. (usually followed by from or of). 7. Given readily or in profusion. freer, thought-free, world-free. *adv. *8. In a free manner; without constraints; unimpeded. v. 9. To make free; set at liberty; release from bondage, imprisonment, or restraint. 10. To disengage or clear something from an entanglement. 11. To relieve or rid of a burden, an inconvenience or an obligation. freed. set free. Released; liberated; freed.

adrad ::: p. a. --> Put in dread; afraid.

adroit ::: a. --> Dexterous in the use of the hands or in the exercise of the mental faculties; exhibiting skill and readiness in avoiding danger or escaping difficulty; ready in invention or execution; -- applied to persons and to acts; as, an adroit mechanic, an adroit reply.

adroitness ::: n. --> The quality of being adroit; skill and readiness; dexterity.

advisable ::: a. --> Proper to be advised or to be done; expedient; prudent.
Ready to receive advice.


ae ::: --> Alt. of Ae
A diphthong in the Latin language; used also by the Saxon writers. It answers to the Gr. ai. The Anglo-Saxon short ae was generally replaced by a, the long / by e or ee. In derivatives from Latin words with ae, it is mostly superseded by e. For most words found with this initial combination, the reader will therefore search under the letter E.


aerophoby ::: n. --> Dread of a current of air.

affability ::: n. --> The quality of being affable; readiness to converse; courteousness in receiving others and in conversation; complaisant behavior.

aforesaid ::: a. --> Said before, or in a preceding part; already described or identified.

  A foundation or groundwork. (of something material or immaterial). 2. That which is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

agave ::: n. --> A genus of plants (order Amaryllidaceae) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A. Americana), wrongly called Aloe. It is from ten to seventy years, according to climate, in attaining maturity, when it produces a gigantic flower stem, sometimes forty feet in height, and perishes. The fermented juice is the pulque of the Mexicans; distilled, it yields mescal. A strong thread and a tough paper are made from the leaves, and the wood has many uses.

agile ::: a. --> Having the faculty of quick motion in the limbs; apt or ready to move; nimble; active; as, an agile boy; an agile tongue.

agreeable ::: a. --> Pleasing, either to the mind or senses; pleasant; grateful; as, agreeable manners or remarks; an agreeable person; fruit agreeable to the taste.
Willing; ready to agree or consent.
Agreeing or suitable; conformable; correspondent; concordant; adapted; -- followed by to, rarely by with.
In pursuance, conformity, or accordance; -- in this sense used adverbially for agreeably; as, agreeable to the order of the


agrise ::: v. i. --> To shudder with terror; to tremble with fear. ::: v. t. --> To shudder at; to abhor; to dread; to loathe.
To terrify; to affright.


alacrity ::: n. --> A cheerful readiness, willingness, or promptitude; joyous activity; briskness; sprightliness; as, the soldiers advanced with alacrity to meet the enemy.

already ::: 1. Core Meaning: an adverb indicating that something has happened before now. 2. Happened in the past before a particular time, or will have happened by or before a particular time in the future. 3. Unexpectedly early.

already ::: adv. --> Prior to some specified time, either past, present, or future; by this time; previously.

aleberry ::: n. --> A beverage, formerly made by boiling ale with spice, sugar, and sops of bread.

algaroba ::: n. --> The Carob, a leguminous tree of the Mediterranean region; also, its edible beans or pods, called St. John&

algonkin ::: n. --> One of a widely spread family of Indians, including many distinct tribes, which formerly occupied most of the northern and eastern part of North America. The name was originally applied to a group of Indian tribes north of the River St. Lawrence.

alkaloid ::: a. --> Alt. of Alkaloidal ::: n. --> An organic base, especially one of a class of substances occurring ready formed in the tissues of plants and the bodies of animals.

“All aspects of the omnipresent Reality have their fundamental truth in the Supreme Existence. Thus even the aspect or power of Inconscience, which seems to be an opposite, a negation of the eternal Reality, yet corresponds to a Truth held in itself by the self-aware and all-conscious Infinite. It is, when we look closely at it, the Infinite’s power of plunging the consciousness into a trance of self-involution, a self-oblivion of the Spirit veiled in its own abysses where nothing is manifest but all inconceivably is and can emerge from that ineffable latency. In the heights of Spirit this state of cosmic or infinite trance-sleep appears to our cognition as a luminous uttermost Superconscience: at the other end of being it offers itself to cognition as the Spirit’s potency of presenting to itself the opposites of its own truths of being,—an abyss of non-existence, a profound Night of inconscience, a fathomless swoon of insensibility from which yet all forms of being, consciousness and delight of existence can manifest themselves,—but they appear in limited terms, in slowly emerging and increasing self-formulations, even in contrary terms of themselves; it is the play of a secret all-being, all-delight, all-knowledge, but it observes the rules of its own self-oblivion, self-opposition, self-limitation until it is ready to surpass it. This is the Inconscience and Ignorance that we see at work in the material universe. It is not a denial, it is one term, one formula of the infinite and eternal Existence.” The Life Divine

allonge ::: v. --> A thrust or pass; a lunge.
A slip of paper attached to a bill of exchange for receiving indorsements, when the back of the bill itself is already full; a rider. ::: v. i. --> To thrust with a sword; to lunge.


alloxan ::: n. --> An oxidation product of uric acid. It is of a pale reddish color, readily soluble in water or alcohol.

“All that manifested from the Eternal has already been arranged in worlds or planes of its own nature, planes of subtle Matter, planes of Life, planes of Mind, planes of Supermind, planes of the triune luminous Infinite. But these worlds or planes are not evolutionary but typal. A typal world is one in which some ruling principle manifests itself in its free and full capacity and energy and form are plastic and subservient to its purpose. Its expressions are therefore automatic and satisfying and do not need to evolve; they stand so long as need be and do not need to be born, develop, decline and disintegrate.” Essays Divine and Human

alternate ::: a. --> Being or succeeding by turns; one following the other in succession of time or place; by turns first one and then the other; hence, reciprocal.
Designating the members in a series, which regularly intervene between the members of another series, as the odd or even numbers of the numerals; every other; every second; as, the alternate members 1, 3, 5, 7, etc. ; read every alternate line.
Distributed, as leaves, singly at different heights of


Amal: “They are beautiful feminine beings of subtle worlds—the vital planes. They correspond to what the Greeks spoke of as nymphs. They are to be distinguished from other such beings—the nereids (river nymphs) and the oreads (mountain nymphs). The most beautiful among them was Urvasie whom King Pururavas made his wife thus saving her from the grasp of a giant demon.”

ambidexter ::: a. --> Using both hands with equal ease. ::: n. --> A person who uses both hands with equal facility.
A double-dealer; one equally ready to act on either side in party disputes.
A juror who takes money from both parties for giving


ambidexterity ::: n. --> The quality of being ambidextrous; the faculty of using both hands with equal facility.
Versatility; general readiness; as, ambidexterity of argumentation.
Double-dealing.
A juror&


ambo ::: n. --> A large pulpit or reading desk, in the early Christian churches.

amidships ::: adv. --> In the middle of a ship, with regard to her length, and sometimes also her breadth.

ampliative ::: a. --> Enlarging a conception by adding to that which is already known or received.

amplitude ::: n. --> State of being ample; extent of surface or space; largeness of dimensions; size.
Largeness, in a figurative sense; breadth; abundance; fullness.
Of extent of capacity or intellectual powers.
Of extent of means or resources.
The arc of the horizon between the true east or west point and the center of the sun, or a star, at its rising or setting.


anagram ::: n. --> Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law. ::: v. t.

ANANDA. ::: Delight; essential principle of delight; bliss; spiritual ecstasy; the bliss of the Spirit which is the secret source· and support of all existence.
Ānanda is the secret delight from which all things are born, by which all is sustained in existence and to which all can rise in the spiritual culmination.
It is the Divine Bliss which comes from above. It is not joy or pleasure, but something self-existent, pure and quite beyond what any joy or pleasure can be.
Something greater than peace or joy, something that, like Truth and Light, is the very nature of the supramental Divine. It can come by frequent inrushes or descents, partially or for a time, but it cannot -remain in the system so long as the system has not been prepared for it.
It can come not only with its fullest intensity but with a more enduring persistence when the mind is at peace and the heart delivered from ordinary joy and sorrow. If the mind and heart are restless, changeful, unquiet, Ānanda of a kind may come, but it is mixed with vital excitement and cannot abide. One must get peace and calm fixed in the consciousness first, then there is a solid basis on which Ānanda can spread itself and in its turn become an enduring part of the consciousness and the nature.
Ānanda (ascension into) ::: It is quite impossible to ascend to the real Ānanda plane (except in a profound trance), until after the supramental consciousness has been entered, realised and possessed; but it is quite possible and normal to feel some form of Ānanda consciousness on any level. This consciousness, wherever it is felt, is a derivation from the Ānanda plane, but it is very much diminished in power and modified to suit the lesser power of receptivity of the inferior levels.
Ānanda (divine) in the physical ::: self-existent in its essence, its manifestation is dependent only on an inner union with the Divine.
Ānanda (of the Brahman) ::: there is an absoluteness of immutable ecstasy in it, a concentrated intensity of silent and inalienable rapture.


And still we can recognise at once in the Overmind the original cosmic Maya, not a Maya of Ignorance but a Maya of Knowledge, yet a Power which has made the Ignorance possible, even inevitable. For if each principle loosed into action must follow its independent line and carry out its complete consequences, the principle of separation must also be allowed its complete course and arrive at its absolute consequence; this is Overmind in its descent reaches a line which divides the cosmic Truth from the cosmic Ignorance; it is the line at which it becomes possible for Consciousness-Force, emphasising the separateness of each independent movement created by Overmind and hiding or darkening their unity, to divide Mind by an exclusive concentration from the overmental source. There has already been a similar separation of Overmind from its supramental source, but with a transparency in the veil which allows a conscious transmission and maintains a certain luminous kinship; but here the veil is opaque and the transmission of the Overmind motives to the Mind is occult and obscure. Mind separated acts as if it were an independent principle, and each mental being, each basic mental idea, power, force stands similarly on its separate self; if it communicates with or combines or contacts others, it is not with the catholic universality of the overmind movement, on a basis of underlying oneness, but as independent units joining to form a separate constructed whole. It is by this movement that we pass from the cosmic Truth into the cosmic Ignorance. The cosmic Mind on this level, no doubt, comprehends its own unity, but it is not aware of its own source and foundation in the Spirit or can only comprehend it by the intelligence, not in any enduring experience; it acts in itself as if by its own right and works out what it receives as material without direct communication with the source from which it receives it. Its units also act in ignorance of each other and of the cosmic whole except for the knowledge that they can get by contact and communication,—the basic sense of identity and the mutual penetration and understanding that comes from it are no longer there. All the actions of this Mind Energy proceed on the opposite basis of the Ignorance and its divisions and, although they are the results of a certain conscious knowledge, it is a partial knowledge, not a true and integral self-knowledge, nor a true and integral world-knowledge. This character persists in Life and in subtle Matter and reappears in the gross material universe which arises from the final lapse into the Inconscience. …

"A new humanity means for us the appearance, the development of a type or race of mental beings whose principle of mentality would be no longer a mind in the Ignorance seeking for knowledge but even in its knowledge bound to the Ignorance, a seeker after Light but not its natural possessor, open to the Light but not an inhabitant of the Light, not yet a perfected instrument, truth-conscious and delivered out of the Ignorance. Instead, it would be possessed already of what could be called a mind of Light, a mind capable of living in the truth, capable of being truth-conscious and manifesting in its life a direct in place of an indirect knowledge. Its mentality would be an instrument of the Light and no longer of the Ignorance. At its highest it would be capable of passing into the supermind and from the new race would be recruited the race of supramental beings who would appear as the leaders of the evolution in earth-nature. Even, the highest manifestations of a mind of Light would be an instrumentality of the supermind, a part of it or a projection from it, a stepping beyond humanity into the superhumanity of the supramental principle. Above all, its possession would enable the human being to rise beyond the normalities of his present thinking, feeling and being into those highest powers of the mind in its self-exceedings which intervene between our mentality and supermind and can be regarded as steps leading towards the greater and more luminous principle. This advance like others in the evolution might not be reached and would naturally not be reached at one bound, but from the very beginning it would be inevitable: the pressure of the supermind creating from above out of itself the mind of Light would compel this certainty of the eventual outcome.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

“A new humanity means for us the appearance, the development of a type or race of mental beings whose principle of mentality would be no longer a mind in the Ignorance seeking for knowledge but even in its knowledge bound to the Ignorance, a seeker after Light but not its natural possessor, open to the Light but not an inhabitant of the Light, not yet a perfected instrument, truth-conscious and delivered out of the Ignorance. Instead, it would be possessed already of what could be called a mind of Light, a mind capable of living in the truth, capable of being truth-conscious and manifesting in its life a direct in place of an indirect knowledge. Its mentality would be an instrument of the Light and no longer of the Ignorance. At its highest it would be capable of passing into the supermind and from the new race would be recruited the race of supramental beings who would appear as the leaders of the evolution in earth-nature. Even, the highest manifestations of a mind of Light would be an instrumentality of the supermind, a part of it or a projection from it, a stepping beyond humanity into the superhumanity of the supramental principle. Above all, its possession would enable the human being to rise beyond the normalities of his present thinking, feeling and being into those highest powers of the mind in its self-exceedings which intervene between our mentality and supermind and can be regarded as steps leading towards the greater and more luminous principle. This advance like others in the evolution might not be reached and would naturally not be reached at one bound, but from the very beginning it would be inevitable: the pressure of the supermind creating from above out of itself the mind of Light would compel this certainty of the eventual outcome.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

anglophobia ::: n. --> Intense dread of, or aversion to, England or the English.

anoint ::: v. t. --> To smear or rub over with oil or an unctuous substance; also, to spread over, as oil.
To apply oil to or to pour oil upon, etc., as a sacred rite, especially for consecration. ::: p. p. --> Anointed.


Anybody can do that merely by a little practice ; anybody who observes his own thoughts, feelings, actions, has begun doing it already. In yoga, we nwke the division complete, that is all.

aplustre ::: n. --> An ornamental appendage of wood at the ship&

appalled ::: filled or overcome with horror, consternation, or fear, resulting in the loss of courage in the face of something dreadful.

apparent ::: readily seen; exposed to sight; open to view. 2. Capable of being easily perceived or understood; plain or clear; obvious; visible.

appreciative ::: a. --> Having or showing a just or ready appreciation or perception; as, an appreciative audience.

apprehensive ::: a. --> Capable of apprehending, or quick to do so; apt; discerning.
Knowing; conscious; cognizant.
Relating to the faculty of apprehension.
Anticipative of something unfavorable&


apron ::: n. --> An article of dress, of cloth, leather, or other stuff, worn on the fore part of the body, to keep the clothes clean, to defend them from injury, or as a covering. It is commonly tied at the waist by strings.
Something which by its shape or use suggests an apron;
The fat skin covering the belly of a goose or duck.
A piece of leather, or other material, to be spread before a person riding on an outside seat of a vehicle, to defend him from the


Apsaras ::: Amal: “They are beautiful feminine beings of subtle worlds—the vital planes. They correspond to what the Greeks spoke of as nymphs. They are to be distinguished from other such beings—the nereids (river nymphs) and the oreads (mountain nymphs). The most beautiful among them was Urvasie whom King Pururavas made his wife thus saving her from the grasp of a giant demon.”

apt ::: a. --> Fit or fitted; suited; suitable; appropriate.
Having an habitual tendency; habitually liable or likely; -- used of things.
Inclined; disposed customarily; given; ready; -- used of persons.
Ready; especially fitted or qualified (to do something); quick to learn; prompt; expert; as, a pupil apt to learn; an apt scholar.


aptitude ::: n. --> A natural or acquired disposition or capacity for a particular purpose, or tendency to a particular action or effect; as, oil has an aptitude to burn.
A general fitness or suitableness; adaptation.
Readiness in learning; docility; aptness.


aptly ::: adv. --> In an apt or suitable manner; fitly; properly; pertinently; appropriately; readily.

aptness ::: n. --> Fitness; suitableness; appropriateness; as, the aptness of things to their end.
Disposition of the mind; propensity; as, the aptness of men to follow example.
Quickness of apprehension; readiness in learning; docility; as, an aptness to learn is more observable in some children than in others.
Proneness; tendency; as, the aptness of iron to rust.


areed ::: v. t. --> To tell, declare, explain, or interpret; to divine; to guess; as, to aread a riddle or a dream.
To read.
To counsel, advise, warn, or direct.
To decree; to adjudge.


artocarpous ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the breadfruit, or to the genus Artocarpus.

artotyrite ::: n. --> One of a sect in the primitive church, who celebrated the Lord&

aspersion ::: n. --> A sprinkling, as with water or dust, in a literal sense.
The spreading of calumniations reports or charges which tarnish reputation, like the bespattering of a body with foul water; calumny.


assamar ::: n. --> The peculiar bitter substance, soft or liquid, and of a yellow color, produced when meat, bread, gum, sugar, starch, and the like, are roasted till they turn brown.

assay ::: n. --> Trial; attempt; essay.
Examination and determination; test; as, an assay of bread or wine.
Trial by danger or by affliction; adventure; risk; hardship; state of being tried.
Tested purity or value.
The act or process of ascertaining the proportion of a particular metal in an ore or alloy; especially, the determination of


"As soon as we become aware of the Self, we are conscious of it as eternal, unborn, unembodied, uninvolved in its workings: it can be felt within the form of being, but also as enveloping it, as above it, surveying its embodiment from above, adhyaksa; it is omnipresent, the same in everything, infinite and pure and intangible for ever. This Self can be experienced as the Self of the individual, the Self of the thinker, doer, enjoyer, but even so it always has this greater character; its individuality is at the same time a vast universality or very readily passes into that, and the next step to that is a sheer transcendence or a complete and ineffable passing into the Absolute. The Self is that aspect of the Brahman in which it is intimately felt as at once individual, cosmic, transcendent of the universe. The realisation of the Self is the straight and swift way towards individual liberation, a static universality, a Nature-transcendence. At the same time there is a realisation of Self in which it is felt not only sustaining and pervading and enveloping all things, but constituting everything and identified in a free identity with all its becomings in Nature. Even so, freedom and impersonality are always the character of the Self. There is no appearance of subjection to the workings of its own Power in the universe, such as the apparent subjection of the Purusha to Prakriti. To realise the Self is to realise the eternal freedom of the Spirit.” The Life Divine

“As soon as we become aware of the Self, we are conscious of it as eternal, unborn, unembodied, uninvolved in its workings: it can be felt within the form of being, but also as enveloping it, as above it, surveying its embodiment from above, adhyaksa; it is omnipresent, the same in everything, infinite and pure and intangible for ever. This Self can be experienced as the Self of the individual, the Self of the thinker, doer, enjoyer, but even so it always has this greater character; its individuality is at the same time a vast universality or very readily passes into that, and the next step to that is a sheer transcendence or a complete and ineffable passing into the Absolute. The Self is that aspect of the Brahman in which it is intimately felt as at once individual, cosmic, transcendent of the universe. The realisation of the Self is the straight and swift way towards individual liberation, a static universality, a Nature-transcendence. At the same time there is a realisation of Self in which it is felt not only sustaining and pervading and enveloping all things, but constituting everything and identified in a free identity with all its becomings in Nature. Even so, freedom and impersonality are always the character of the Self. There is no appearance of subjection to the workings of its own Power in the universe, such as the apparent subjection of the Purusha to Prakriti. To realise the Self is to realise the eternal freedom of the Spirit.” The Life Divine

astonishment ::: n. --> The condition of one who is stunned. Hence: Numbness; loss of sensation; stupor; loss of sense.
Dismay; consternation.
The overpowering emotion excited when something unaccountable, wonderful, or dreadful is presented to the mind; an intense degree of surprise; amazement.
The object causing such an emotion.


ASTROLOGY. ::: Many astrological predictions come true, quite a mass of them, if one takes all together. But it does not follow that the stars rule our destiny; the stars merely record a destiny that has been already formed, they are a hieroglyph, not a Force, - or if their action constitutes a force, it is a transmitting energy, not an originating Power. Someone is there who has determined or something is there which is Fate, let us say; the stars are only indications. The astrologers themselves say that there are two forces, daiva and puruṣakāra, fate and individual energy, and the individual energy can modify and even frustrate fate. Moreover, the stars often indicate several fatepossibilities; for example, that one may die in mid-age, but that if that determination can be overcome, one can live to a predictable old age. Finally, cases are seen in which the predictions of the horoscope fulfil themselves with great accuracy up to a certain age, then apply no more. This often happens when the subject turns away from the ordinary to the spiritual life. If the turn is very radical, the cessation of predictability may be immediate; otherwise certain results may still last on for a time ; but there is no longer the sure inevitability.

athenaeum ::: n. --> A temple of Athene, at Athens, in which scholars and poets were accustomed to read their works and instruct students.
A school founded at Rome by Hadrian.
A literary or scientific association or club.
A building or an apartment where a library, periodicals, and newspapers are kept for use.


atrip ::: adv. --> Just hove clear of the ground; -- said of the anchor.
Sheeted home, hoisted taut up and ready for trimming; -- said of sails.
Hoisted up and ready to be swayed across; -- said of yards.


audience ::: a. --> The act of hearing; attention to sounds.
Admittance to a hearing; a formal interview, esp. with a sovereign or the head of a government, for conference or the transaction of business.
An auditory; an assembly of hearers. Also applied by authors to their readers.


AU should be done quietly from within — working, speaking, reading, writing as part of real consciousness — not with the dispersed and unquiet movement of the ordinary consciousness.

await ::: v. t. --> To watch for; to look out for.
To wait on, serve, or attend.
To wait for; to stay for; to expect. See Expect.
To be in store for; to be ready or in waiting for; as, a glorious reward awaits the good. ::: v. i.


awe ::: n. --> Dread; great fear mingled with respect.
The emotion inspired by something dreadful and sublime; an undefined sense of the dreadful and the sublime; reverential fear, or solemn wonder; profound reverence. ::: v. t. --> To strike with fear and reverence; to inspire with awe; to


awful ::: 1. Inspiring fear; terrible, dreadful, appalling, awe-inspiring. 2. Extremely impressive. 3. Profoundly inspired by a feeling of fearful wonderment or reverence.

awfulness ::: n. --> The quality of striking with awe, or with reverence; dreadfulness; solemnity; as, the awfulness of this sacred place.
The state of being struck with awe; a spirit of solemnity; profound reverence.


azyme ::: n. --> Unleavened bread.

azymite ::: n. --> One who administered the Eucharist with unleavened bread; -- a name of reproach given by those of the Greek church to the Latins.

backsight ::: n. --> The reading of the leveling staff in its unchanged position when the leveling instrument has been taken to a new position; a sight directed backwards to a station previously occupied. Cf. Foresight, n., 3.

baker ::: v. i. --> One whose business it is to bake bread, biscuit, etc.
A portable oven in which baking is done.


bakery ::: n. --> The trade of a baker.
The place for baking bread; a bakehouse.


bake ::: v. t. --> To prepare, as food, by cooking in a dry heat, either in an oven or under coals, or on heated stone or metal; as, to bake bread, meat, apples.
To dry or harden (anything) by subjecting to heat, as, to bake bricks; the sun bakes the ground.
To harden by cold. ::: v. i.


baking ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Bake ::: n. --> The act or process of cooking in an oven, or of drying and hardening by heat or cold.
The quantity baked at once; a batch; as, a baking of bread.


ballooning spider ::: --> A spider which has the habit of rising into the air. Many kinds ( esp. species of Lycosa) do this while young by ejecting threads of silk until the force of the wind upon them carries the spider aloft.

bannock ::: n. --> A kind of cake or bread, in shape flat and roundish, commonly made of oatmeal or barley meal and baked on an iron plate, or griddle; -- used in Scotland and the northern counties of England.

barm ::: n. --> Foam rising upon beer, or other malt liquors, when fermenting, and used as leaven in making bread and in brewing; yeast.
The lap or bosom.


bar ::: n. --> A piece of wood, metal, or other material, long in proportion to its breadth or thickness, used as a lever and for various other purposes, but especially for a hindrance, obstruction, or fastening; as, the bars of a fence or gate; the bar of a door.
An indefinite quantity of some substance, so shaped as to be long in proportion to its breadth and thickness; as, a bar of gold or of lead; a bar of soap.
Anything which obstructs, hinders, or prevents; an


barrel ::: n. --> A round vessel or cask, of greater length than breadth, and bulging in the middle, made of staves bound with hoops, and having flat ends or heads.
The quantity which constitutes a full barrel. This varies for different articles and also in different places for the same article, being regulated by custom or by law. A barrel of wine is 31/ gallons; a barrel of flour is 196 pounds.
A solid drum, or a hollow cylinder or case; as, the barrel


bastard ::: n. --> A "natural" child; a child begotten and born out of wedlock; an illegitimate child; one born of an illicit union.
An inferior quality of soft brown sugar, obtained from the sirups that / already had several boilings.
A large size of mold, in which sugar is drained.
A sweet Spanish wine like muscadel in flavor.
A writing paper of a particular size. See Paper.
Lacking in genuineness; spurious; false; adulterate; --


batch ::: v. t. --> The quantity of bread baked at one time.
A quantity of anything produced at one operation; a group or collection of persons or things of the same kind; as, a batch of letters; the next batch of business.


baton ::: n. --> A staff or truncheon, used for various purposes; as, the baton of a field marshal; the baton of a conductor in musical performances.
An ordinary with its ends cut off, borne sinister as a mark of bastardy, and containing one fourth in breadth of the bend sinister; -- called also bastard bar. See Bend sinister.


batten ::: v. t. --> To make fat by plenteous feeding; to fatten.
To fertilize or enrich, as land.
To furnish or fasten with battens.
The movable bar of a loom, which strikes home or closes the threads of a woof. ::: v. i.


batter ::: v. t. --> To beat with successive blows; to beat repeatedly and with violence, so as to bruise, shatter, or demolish; as, to batter a wall or rampart.
To wear or impair as if by beating or by hard usage.
To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.
A semi-liquid mixture of several ingredients, as, flour, eggs, milk, etc., beaten together and used in cookery.


bread ::: a. --> To spread. ::: n. --> An article of food made from flour or meal by moistening, kneading, and baking.
Food; sustenance; support of life, in general.


breadbasket ::: n. --> The stomach.

breadcorn ::: --> Corn of grain of which bread is made, as wheat, rye, etc.

breaded ::: a. --> Braided

breaden ::: a. --> Made of bread.

breadfruit ::: n. --> The fruit of a tree (Artocarpus incisa) found in the islands of the Pacific, esp. the South Sea islands. It is of a roundish form, from four to six or seven inches in diameter, and, when baked, somewhat resembles bread, and is eaten as food, whence the name.
The tree itself, which is one of considerable size, with large, lobed leaves. Cloth is made from the bark, and the timber is used for many purposes. Called also breadfruit tree and bread tree.


breadless ::: a. --> Without bread; destitute of food.

breadroot ::: n. --> The root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta), found near the Rocky Mountains. It is usually oval in form, and abounds in farinaceous matter, affording sweet and palatable food.

breadstuff ::: n. --> Grain, flour, or meal of which bread is made.

breadth ::: 1. The measure or the second largest dimension of a plane or solid figure; width. 2. Freedom from narrowness or restraint; liberality. 3. Tolerance; broadmindedness. breadths.

breadth ::: a. --> Distance from side to side of any surface or thing; measure across, or at right angles to the length; width.

breadthless ::: a. --> Without breadth.

breadthways ::: ads. --> Breadthwise.

breadthwinner ::: n. --> The member of a family whose labor supplies the food of the family; one who works for his living.

breadthwise ::: ads. --> In the direction of the breadth.

bead ::: n. --> A prayer.
A little perforated ball, to be strung on a thread, and worn for ornament; or used in a rosary for counting prayers, as by Roman Catholics and Mohammedans, whence the phrases to tell beads, to at one&


beaten ::: --> of Beat ::: a. --> Made smooth by beating or treading; worn by use.
Vanquished; conquered; baffled.
Exhausted; tired out.
Become common or trite; as, a beaten phrase.


bedspread ::: n. --> A bedquilt; a counterpane; a coverlet.

beebread ::: n. --> A brown, bitter substance found in some of the cells of honeycomb. It is made chiefly from the pollen of flowers, which is collected by bees as food for their young.

Being or a Presence — sometimes one of these, sometimes several of them or all together. The movement of ascension has diffe- rent results ; it may liberate the consciousness so that one feels no longer in he body, but above it or else spread in wideness with the body whether almost non-existent or only a point in one’s free expanse. It may enable the being or some part of the being to go out from the body and move elsewhere, and this action is usually accompanied by some kind of partial Samadhi or else a complete trance. Or, it may result in empowering the cons- ciousness, no longer limited by the body and the habits of the external nature, to go within, to enter the inner mental depths, the inner vital, the inner (subtle) physical, the psychic, to become aware of its inmost psychic self or its inner mental, vital, and subtle physical being, and it may be, to move and live in the domains, the planes, the worlds that correspond to these parts of the nature. It is the repeated and constant ascent of the lower consciousness that enables the mind, the vital, the physical to come into touch with the higher planes up to the Supramental and get impregnated with their light and power and influence.

belt ::: 1. Any encircling or transverse band, strip, or stripe characteristically distinguished from the surface it crosses. 2. An elongated region having distinctive properties or characteristics and long in proportion to its breadth. 3. A zone or district.

bend ::: v. t. --> To strain or move out of a straight line; to crook by straining; to make crooked; to curve; to make ready for use by drawing into a curve; as, to bend a bow; to bend the knee.
To turn toward some certain point; to direct; to incline.
To apply closely or with interest; to direct.
To cause to yield; to render submissive; to subdue.
To fasten, as one rope to another, or as a sail to its yard or stay; or as a cable to the ring of an anchor.


berberine ::: n. --> An alkaloid obtained, as a bitter, yellow substance, from the root of the barberry, gold thread, and other plants.

bermuda grass ::: --> A kind of grass (Cynodon Dactylon) esteemed for pasture in the Southern United States. It is a native of Southern Europe, but is now wide-spread in warm countries; -- called also scutch grass, and in Bermuda, devil grass.

bespread ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Bespread ::: v. t. --> To spread or cover over.

bespreading ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Bespread

bete noire ::: --> Something especially hated or dreaded; a bugbear.

bethlehem ::: n. --> A hospital for lunatics; -- corrupted into bedlam.
In the Ethiopic church, a small building attached to a church edifice, in which the bread for the eucharist is made.


bibliophobia ::: n. --> A dread of books.

bibulous ::: v. t. --> Readily imbibing fluids or moisture; spongy; as, bibulous blotting paper.
Inclined to drink; addicted to tippling.


bier ::: n. --> A handbarrow or portable frame on which a corpse is placed or borne to the grave.
A count of forty threads in the warp or chain of woolen cloth.


bifilar ::: a. --> Two-threaded; involving the use of two threads; as, bifilar suspension; a bifilar balance.

bigamy ::: n. --> The offense of marrying one person when already legally married to another.

big ::: superl. --> Having largeness of size; of much bulk or magnitude; of great size; large.
Great with young; pregnant; swelling; ready to give birth or produce; -- often figuratively.
Having greatness, fullness, importance, inflation, distention, etc., whether in a good or a bad sense; as, a big heart; a big voice; big looks; to look big. As applied to looks, it indicates haughtiness or pride.


biscuit ::: n. --> A kind of unraised bread, of many varieties, plain, sweet, or fancy, formed into flat cakes, and bakes hard; as, ship biscuit.
A small loaf or cake of bread, raised and shortened, or made light with soda or baking powder. Usually a number are baked in the same pan, forming a sheet or card.
Earthen ware or porcelain which has undergone the first baking, before it is subjected to the glazing.
A species of white, unglazed porcelain, in which vases,


blackthorn ::: n. --> A spreading thorny shrub or small tree (Prunus spinosa), with blackish bark, and bearing little black plums, which are called sloes; the sloe.
A species of Crataegus or hawthorn (C. tomentosa). Both are used for hedges.


blancard ::: n. --> A kind of linen cloth made in Normandy, the thread of which is partly blanches before it is woven.

blazer ::: n. --> One who spreads reports or blazes matters abroad.

board ::: n. --> A piece of timber sawed thin, and of considerable length and breadth as compared with the thickness, -- used for building, etc.
A table to put food upon.
Hence: What is served on a table as food; stated meals; provision; entertainment; -- usually as furnished for pay; as, to work for one&


bobbin ::: n. --> A small pin, or cylinder, formerly of bone, now most commonly of wood, used in the making of pillow lace. Each thread is wound on a separate bobbin which hangs down holding the thread at a slight tension.
A spool or reel of various material and construction, with a head at one or both ends, and sometimes with a hole bored through its length by which it may be placed on a spindle or pivot. It is used to hold yarn or thread, as in spinning or warping machines, looms, sewing


bolt ::: n. --> A shaft or missile intended to be shot from a crossbow or catapult, esp. a short, stout, blunt-headed arrow; a quarrel; an arrow, or that which resembles an arrow; a dart.
Lightning; a thunderbolt.
A strong pin, of iron or other material, used to fasten or hold something in place, often having a head at one end and screw thread cut upon the other end.
A sliding catch, or fastening, as for a door or gate; the


bonnet ::: n. --> A headdress for men and boys; a cap.
A soft, elastic, very durable cap, made of thick, seamless woolen stuff, and worn by men in Scotland.
A covering for the head, worn by women, usually protecting more or less the back and sides of the head, but no part of the forehead. The shape of the bonnet varies greatly at different times; formerly the front part projected, and spread outward, like the mouth of a funnel.


bookholder ::: n. --> A prompter at a theater.
A support for a book, holding it open, while one reads or copies from it.


bookish ::: a. --> Given to reading; fond of study; better acquainted with books than with men; learned from books.
Characterized by a method of expression generally found in books; formal; labored; pedantic; as, a bookish way of talking; bookish sentences.


bookstand ::: n. --> A place or stand for the sale of books in the streets; a bookstall.
A stand to hold books for reading or reference.


bookworm ::: n. --> Any larva of a beetle or moth, which is injurious to books. Many species are known.
A student closely attached to books or addicted to study; a reader without appreciation.


boun ::: a. --> Ready; prepared; destined; tending. ::: v. t. --> To make or get ready.

bowknot ::: n. --> A knot in which a portion of the string is drawn through in the form of a loop or bow, so as to be readily untied.

bowne ::: v. t. --> To make ready; to prepare; to dress.

brachycephalous ::: a. --> Having the skull short in proportion to its breadth; shortheaded; -- in distinction from dolichocephalic.

Brahman or of the Self docs not usually come at the beginning of a sadhana or in the first years or for many years. It comes so to a very few. Most would say that a slow development is the best one can hope for in the first years and only when the nature is ready and fully concentrated towards the Divine can the definitive experience come. To some rapid prepdhitory experiences can come at a comparatively early stage, but even they cannot escape the labour of the consciousness which will make these experiences culminate in the realisation that is enduring and complete. It is not a question of liking or disliking, it is a matter of fact and truth and experience. It is the fact that people who arc cheerful and ready to go step by step, even by slow steps if need be, do actually march faster and more surely than those who are impatient and in haste.

braid ::: v. t. --> To weave, interlace, or entwine together, as three or more strands or threads; to form into a braid; to plait.
To mingle, or to bring to a uniformly soft consistence, by beating, rubbing, or straining, as in some culinary operations.
To reproach. [Obs.] See Upbraid.
Deceitful. ::: n.


branchy ::: a. --> Full of branches; having wide-spreading branches; consisting of branches.

brayer ::: n. --> An implement for braying and spreading ink in hand printing.
One that brays like an ass.


breede ::: n. --> Breadth.

brewis ::: n. --> Broth or pottage.
Bread soaked in broth, drippings of roast meat, milk, or water and butter.


brick ::: n. --> A block or clay tempered with water, sand, etc., molded into a regular form, usually rectangular, and sun-dried, or burnt in a kiln, or in a heap or stack called a clamp.
Bricks, collectively, as designating that kind of material; as, a load of brick; a thousand of brick.
Any oblong rectangular mass; as, a brick of maple sugar; a penny brick (of bread).
A good fellow; a merry person; as, you &


bridgeboard ::: n. --> A notched board to which the treads and risers of the steps of wooden stairs are fastened.
A board or plank used as a bridge.


bright ::: 1. Emitting or reflecting light readily or in large amounts; shining; radiant. 2. Magnificent; glorious. 3. Favourable or auspicious. 4. Fig. Characterized by happiness or gladness; full of promise and hope. 5. Distinct and clear to the mind, etc. 6. Intensely clear and vibrant in tone or quality. 7. Polished; glistening as with brilliant color. brighter, brightest, bright-hued, bright-pinioned, flame-bright, moon-bright, pearl-bright, sun-bright.

brimful ::: a. --> Full to the brim; completely full; ready to overflow.

bristle ::: n. --> A short, stiff, coarse hair, as on the back of swine.
A stiff, sharp, roundish hair. ::: v. t. --> To erect the bristles of; to cause to stand up, as the bristles of an angry hog; -- sometimes with up.
To fix a bristle to; as, to bristle a thread.


broad ::: 1. Wide in extent from side to side; of great breadth. 2. Of vast extent; spacious. 3. Broad in scope; extensive. 4. Clear and open; full; (said of daylight, etc.). broad-based, broad-flung.

broad-horned ::: a. --> Having horns spreading widely.

broadness ::: n. --> The condition or quality of being broad; breadth; coarseness; grossness.

broadspread ::: a. --> Widespread.

broadspreading ::: a. --> Spreading widely.

broad ::: superl. --> Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; -- opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad.
Extending far and wide; extensive; vast; as, the broad expanse of ocean.
Extended, in the sense of diffused; open; clear; full.
Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; -- applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending


broadwise ::: adv. --> Breadthwise.

brocade ::: a thick, rich fabric woven with a raised design, often using gold or silver threads. brocades.

brocade ::: n. --> Silk stuff, woven with gold and silver threads, or ornamented with raised flowers, foliage, etc.; -- also applied to other stuffs thus wrought and enriched.

broideries ::: embroidered needle-work designs in gold, silver, and other threads on cloth.

bull brier ::: --> A species of Smilax (S. Pseudo-China) growing from New Jersey to the Gulf of Mexico, which has very large tuberous and farinaceous rootstocks, formerly used by the Indians for a sort of bread, and by the negroes as an ingredient in making beer; -- called also bamboo brier and China brier.

burl ::: v. t. --> To dress or finish up (cloth); to pick knots, burs, loose threads, etc., from, as in finishing cloth. ::: n. --> A knot or lump in thread or cloth.
An overgrown knot, or an excrescence, on a tree; also, veneer made from such excrescences.


BURNING SENSATION. ::: If one brings down more Force or Light than some part of the being is ready for and that part resists or if there is a struggle between descending and adverse forces in the body, then these things can take place.

burr ::: n. --> Any rough or prickly envelope of the seeds of plants, whether a pericarp, a persistent calyx, or an involucre, as of the chestnut and burdock. Also, any weed which bears burs.
The thin ridge left by a tool in cutting or shaping metal. See Burr, n., 2.
A ring of iron on a lance or spear. See Burr, n., 4.
The lobe of the ear. See Burr, n., 5.
The sweetbread.


bushy ::: a. --> Thick and spreading, like a bush.
Full of bushes; overgrowing with shrubs.


busk ::: n. --> A thin, elastic strip of metal, whalebone, wood, or other material, worn in the front of a corset. ::: v. t. & i. --> To prepare; to make ready; to array; to dress.
To go; to direct one&


buxom ::: a. --> Yielding; pliable or compliant; ready to obey; obedient; tractable; docile; meek; humble.
Having the characteristics of health, vigor, and comeliness, combined with a gay, lively manner; stout and rosy; jolly; frolicsome.


byssaceous ::: a. --> Byssuslike; consisting of fine fibers or threads, as some very delicate filamentous algae.

byssus ::: n. --> A cloth of exceedingly fine texture, used by the ancients. It is disputed whether it was of cotton, linen, or silk.
A tuft of long, tough filaments which are formed in a groove of the foot, and issue from between the valves of certain bivalve mollusks, as the Pinna and Mytilus, by which they attach themselves to rocks, etc.
An obsolete name for certain fungi composed of slender threads.


cabbala ::: 1 A body of mystical Jewish teachings based on an interpretation of hidden meanings in the Hebrew Scriptures. Among its central doctrines are, all creation is an emanation from the Deity and the soul exists from eternity. 2. Any secret or occult doctrine or science. 3. "Esoteric system of interpretation of the Hebrew scriptures based on the assumption that every word, letter, number, and accent in them has an occult meaning. The system, oral at first, claimed great antiquity, but was really the product of the Middle Ages, arising in the 7th century and lasting into the 18th. It was popular chiefly among Jews, but spread to Christians as well. (Col. Enc.)” Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works

cadence ::: 1. Balanced, rhythmic flow, as of poetry or oratory. 2. Music. A sequence of notes or chords that indicates the momentary or complete end of a composition, section, phrase, etc. 3. The flow or rhythm of events. 4. A recurrent rhythmical series; a flow, esp. the pattern in which something is experienced. 5. A slight falling in pitch of the voice in speaking or reading. cadences.

cadence ::: n. --> The act or state of declining or sinking.
A fall of the voice in reading or speaking, especially at the end of a sentence.
A rhythmical modulation of the voice or of any sound; as, music of bells in cadence sweet.
Rhythmical flow of language, in prose or verse.
See Cadency.
Harmony and proportion in motions, as of a well-managed


call our mind ; in fact they come to us from a vast mental space or ether either as mind-waves of mind-force that carry a sigoi^cance which takes shape in our personal mind or as thought-formations ready made which we adopt and call ours.

candle ::: n. --> A slender, cylindrical body of tallow, containing a wick composed of loosely twisted linen of cotton threads, and used to furnish light.
That which gives light; a luminary.


candroy ::: n. --> A machine for spreading out cotton cloths to prepare them for printing.

canker ::: n. --> A corroding or sloughing ulcer; esp. a spreading gangrenous ulcer or collection of ulcers in or about the mouth; -- called also water canker, canker of the mouth, and noma.
Anything which corrodes, corrupts, or destroy.
A disease incident to trees, causing the bark to rot and fall off.
An obstinate and often incurable disease of a horse&


cannel coal ::: --> A kind of mineral coal of a black color, sufficiently hard and solid to be cut and polished. It burns readily, with a clear, yellow flame, and on this account has been used as a substitute for candles.

cannulated ::: a. --> Hollow; affording a passage through its interior length for wire, thread, etc.; as, a cannulated (suture) needle.

cantillation ::: n. --> A chanting; recitation or reading with musical modulations.

caoutchouc ::: n. --> A tenacious, elastic, gummy substance obtained from the milky sap of several plants of tropical South America (esp. the euphorbiaceous tree Siphonia elastica or Hevea caoutchouc), Asia, and Africa. Being impermeable to liquids and gases, and not readly affected by exposure to air, acids, and alkalies, it is used, especially when vulcanized, for many purposes in the arts and in manufactures. Also called India rubber (because it was first brought from India, and was formerly used chiefly for erasing pencil marks) and gum elastic. See

carene ::: n. --> A fast of forty days on bread and water.

caret ::: n. --> A mark [^] used by writers and proof readers to indicate that something is interlined above, or inserted in the margin, which belongs in the place marked by the caret.
The hawkbill turtle. See Hawkbill.


carob ::: n. --> An evergreen leguminous tree (Ceratania Siliqua) found in the countries bordering the Mediterranean; the St. John&

carpet ::: n. --> A heavy woven or felted fabric, usually of wool, but also of cotton, hemp, straw, etc.; esp. a floor covering made in breadths to be sewed together and nailed to the floor, as distinguished from a rug or mat; originally, also, a wrought cover for tables.
A smooth soft covering resembling or suggesting a carpet. ::: v. t.


cash ::: n. --> A place where money is kept, or where it is deposited and paid out; a money box.
Ready money; especially, coin or specie; but also applied to bank notes, drafts, bonds, or any paper easily convertible into money
Immediate or prompt payment in current funds; as, to sell goods for cash; to make a reduction in price for cash. ::: v. t.


catch-basin ::: n. --> A cistern or vault at the point where a street gutter discharges into a sewer, to catch bulky matters which would not pass readily through the sewer.

catchword ::: n. --> Among theatrical performers, the last word of the preceding speaker, which reminds one that he is to speak next; cue.
The first word of any page of a book after the first, inserted at the right hand bottom corner of the preceding page for the assistance of the reader. It is seldom used in modern printing.
A word or phrase caught up and repeated for effect; as, the catchword of a political party, etc.


catholicism ::: n. --> The state or quality of being catholic or universal; catholicity.
Liberality of sentiment; breadth of view.
The faith of the whole orthodox Christian church, or adherence thereto.
The doctrines or faith of the Roman Catholic church, or adherence thereto.


caudle ::: n. --> A kind of warm drink for sick persons, being a mixture of wine with eggs, bread, sugar, and spices. ::: v. t. --> To make into caudle.
Too serve as a caudle to; to refresh.


cerago ::: n. --> Beebread.

cerate ::: n. --> An unctuous preparation for external application, of a consistence intermediate between that of an ointment and a plaster, so that it can be spread upon cloth without the use of heat, but does not melt when applied to the skin.

cerium ::: n. --> A rare metallic element, occurring in the minerals cerite, allanite, monazite, etc. Symbol Ce. Atomic weight 141.5. It resembles iron in color and luster, but is soft, and both malleable and ductile. It tarnishes readily in the air.

chain stitch ::: --> An ornamental stitch like the links of a chain; -- used in crocheting, sewing, and embroidery.
A stitch in which the looping of the thread or threads forms a chain on the under side of the work; the loop stitch, as distinguished from the lock stitch. See Stitch.


chalaza ::: n. --> The place on an ovule, or seed, where its outer coats cohere with each other and the nucleus.
A spiral band of thickened albuminous substance which exists in the white of the bird&


Chance ::: Madhav: “Chance, erratic happening, is only an appearance. It is not the governing truth or feature of this existence. What look like unregulated result is really an effect foreseeable by an Intelligence higher than the mental reason; in fact, it is part of a process initiated and conducted by a divine wisdom, prajna, that rules the universe. What passes for chance is a purposive movement permitted and contained in the larger operations of the Law.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

chappion ::: n. --> One who engages in any contest; esp. one who in ancient times contended in single combat in behalf of another&

characterized by an attitude of ready accessibility (especially about one"s actions or purposes); without concealment; not secretive.

charlotte ::: n. --> A kind of pie or pudding made by lining a dish with slices of bread, and filling it with bread soaked in milk, and baked.

charpie ::: n. --> Straight threads obtained by unraveling old linen cloth; -- used for surgical dressings.

chaser ::: n. --> One who or that which chases; a pursuer; a driver; a hunter.
Same as Chase gun, esp. in terms bow chaser and stern chaser. See under Bow, Stern.
One who chases or engraves. See 5th Chase, and Enchase.
A tool with several points, used for cutting or finishing screw threads, either external or internal, on work revolving in a lathe.


cheirosophy ::: n. --> The art of reading character as it is delineated in the hand.

chekmak ::: n. --> A turkish fabric of silk and cotton, with gold thread interwoven.

chink ::: n. --> A small cleft, rent, or fissure, of greater length than breadth; a gap or crack; as, the chinks of wall.
A short, sharp sound, as of metal struck with a slight degree of violence.
Money; cash. ::: v. i.


circumfuse ::: v. t. --> To pour round; to spread round.

circumfusile ::: a. --> Capable of being poured or spread round.

circumfusion ::: n. --> The act of pouring or spreading round; the state of being spread round.

clapbread ::: n. --> Alt. of Clapcake

clapcake ::: n. --> Oatmeal cake or bread clapped or beaten till it is thin.

clart ::: v. t. --> To daub, smear, or spread, as with mud, etc.

cleat ::: n. --> A strip of wood or iron fastened on transversely to something in order to give strength, prevent warping, hold position, etc.
A device made of wood or metal, having two arms, around which turns may be taken with a line or rope so as to hold securely and yet be readily released. It is bolted by the middle to a deck or mast, etc., or it may be lashed to a rope.


cleavage ::: n. --> The act of cleaving or splitting.
The quality possessed by many crystallized substances of splitting readily in one or more definite directions, in which the cohesive attraction is a minimum, affording more or less smooth surfaces; the direction of the dividing plane; a fragment obtained by cleaving, as of a diamond. See Parting.
Division into laminae, like slate, with the lamination not necessarily parallel to the plane of deposition; -- usually


clerk ::: n. --> A clergyman or ecclesiastic.
A man who could read; a scholar; a learned person; a man of letters.
A parish officer, being a layman who leads in reading the responses of the Episcopal church service, and otherwise assists in it.
One employed to keep records or accounts; a scribe; an accountant; as, the clerk of a court; a town clerk.
An assistant in a shop or store.


clew ::: n. --> Alt. of Clue
To direct; to guide, as by a thread.
To move of draw (a sail or yard) by means of the clew garnets, clew lines, etc.; esp. to draw up the clews of a square sail to the yard.


clue ::: n. --> A ball of thread, yarn, or cord; also, The thread itself.
That which guides or directs one in anything of a doubtful or intricate nature; that which gives a hint in the solution of a mystery.
A lower corner of a square sail, or the after corner of a fore-and-aft sail.
A loop and thimbles at the corner of a sail.
A combination of lines or nettles by which a hammock is suspended.


clumsy ::: superl. --> Stiff or benumbed, as with cold.
Without skill or grace; wanting dexterity, nimbleness, or readiness; stiff; awkward, as if benumbed; unwieldy; unhandy; hence; ill-made, misshapen, or inappropriate; as, a clumsy person; a clumsy workman; clumsy fingers; a clumsy gesture; a clumsy excuse.


coarse ::: superl. --> Large in bulk, or composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture; gross; thick; rough; -- opposed to fine; as, coarse sand; coarse thread; coarse cloth; coarse bread.
Not refined; rough; rude; unpolished; gross; indelicate; as, coarse manners; coarse language.


cobweb ::: n. --> The network spread by a spider to catch its prey.
A snare of insidious meshes designed to catch the ignorant and unwary.
That which is thin and unsubstantial, or flimsy and worthless; rubbish.
The European spotted flycatcher.


cocket ::: n. --> Pert; saucy.
A customhouse seal; a certified document given to a shipper as a warrant that his goods have been duly entered and have paid duty.
An office in a customhouse where goods intended for export are entered.
A measure for bread.


cocoon ::: n. --> An oblong case in which the silkworm lies in its chrysalis state. It is formed of threads of silk spun by the worm just before leaving the larval state. From these the silk of commerce is prepared.
The case constructed by any insect to contain its larva or pupa.
The case of silk made by spiders to protect their eggs.
The egg cases of mucus, etc., made by leeches and other worms.


coming ::: p. pr & vb. n. --> of Come ::: a. --> Approaching; of the future, especially the near future; the next; as, the coming week or year; the coming exhibition.
Ready to come; complaisant; fond.


communicative ::: a. --> Inclined to communicate; ready to impart to others.

comparation ::: n. --> A making ready; provision.

compile ::: v. t. --> To put together; to construct; to build.
To contain or comprise.
To put together in a new form out of materials already existing; esp., to put together or compose out of materials from other books or documents.
To write; to compose.


CONCENTRATION ::: Fixing the consciousness in one place or on one object and in a single condition.

A gathering together of the consciousness and either centralising at one point or turning on a single object, e.g. the Divine; there can also be a gathered condition throughout the whole being, not at a point.

Concentration is necessary, first to turn the whole will and mind from the discursive divagation natural to them, following a dispersed movement of the thoughts, running after many-branching desires, led away in the track of the senses and the outward mental response to phenomena; we have to fix the will and the thought on the eternal and real behind all, and this demands an immense effort, a one-pointed concentration. Secondly, it is necessary in order to break down the veil which is erected by our ordinary mentality between ourselves and the truth; for outer knowledge can be picked up by the way, by ordinary attention and reception, but the inner, hidden and higher truth can only be seized by an absolute concentration of the mind on its object, an absolute concentration of the will to attain it and, once attained, to hold it habitually and securely unite oneself with it.

Centre of Concentration: The two main places where one can centre the consciousness for yoga are in the head and in the heart - the mind-centre and the soul-centre.

Brain concentration is always a tapasyā and necessarily brings a strain. It is only if one is lifted out of the brain mind altogether that the strain of mental concentration disappears.

At the top of the head or above it is the right place for yogic concentration in reading or thinking.

In whatever centre the concentration takes place, the yoga force generated extends to the others and produces concentration or workings there.

Modes of Concentration: There is no harm in concentrating sometimes in the heart and sometimes above the head. But concentration in either place does not mean keeping the attention fixed on a particular spot; you have to take your station of consciousness in either place and concentrate there not on the place, but on the Divine. This can be done with eyes shut or with eyes open, according as it best suits.

If one concentrates on a thought or a word, one has to dwell on the essential idea contained in the word with the aspiration to feel the thing which it expresses.

There is no method in this yoga except to concentrate, preferably in the heart, and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force to transform the consciousness; one can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is a beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be.

Powers (three) of Concentration ::: By concentration on anything whatsoever we are able to know that thing, to make it deliver up its concealed secrets; we must use this power to know not things, but the one Thing-in-itself. By concentration again the whole will can be gathered up for the acquisition of that which is still ungrasped, still beyond us; this power, if it is sufficiently trained, sufficiently single-minded, sufficiently sincere, sure of itself, faithful to itself alone, absolute in faith, we can use for the acquisition of any object whatsoever; but we ought to use it not for the acquisition of the many objects which the world offers to us, but to grasp spiritually that one object worthy of pursuit which is also the one subject worthy of knowledge. By concentration of our whole being on one status of itself we can become whatever we choose ; we can become, for instance, even if we were before a mass of weaknesses and fears, a mass instead of strength and courage, or we can become all a great purity, holiness and peace or a single universal soul of Love ; but we ought, it is said, to use this power to become not even these things, high as they may be in comparison with what we now are, but rather to become that which is above all things and free from all action and attributes, the pure and absolute Being. All else, all other concentration can only be valuable for preparation, for previous steps, for a gradual training of the dissolute and self-dissipating thought, will and being towards their grand and unique object.

Stages in Concentration (Rajayogic) ::: that in which the object is seized, that in which it is held, that in which the mind is lost in the status which the object represents or to which the concentration leads.

Concentration and Meditation ::: Concentration means fixing the consciousness in one place or one object and in a single condition Meditation can be diffusive,e.g. thinking about the Divine, receiving impressions and discriminating, watching what goes on in the nature and acting upon it etc. Meditation is when the inner mind is looking at things to get the right knowledge.

vide Dhyāna.


conculcate ::: v. t. --> To tread or trample under foot.

confarreation ::: n. --> A form of marriage among the Romans, in which an offering of bread was made, in presence of the high priest and at least ten witnesses.

conformable ::: a. --> Corresponding in form, character, opinions, etc.; similar; like; consistent; proper or suitable; -- usually followed by to.
Disposed to compliance or obedience; ready to follow direstions; submissive; compliant.
Parallel, or nearly so; -- said of strata in contact.


consubstantiation ::: n. --> An identity or union of substance.
The actual, substantial presence of the body of Christ with the bread and wine of the sacrament of the Lord&


contain ::: 1. To be capable of holding. 2. To halt the spread or development of; check, esp. of opposition. 3. To hold or keep within limits; restrain. contained, contains, containing, all-containing, All-containing.

Co-ordination and harmonisation of parts is absent in many ; it is a thing that has to be attained to or built up. Moreover at a certain stage in sSdhana there is almost always a disparity or opposition between the parts that are already turned towards the Truth and are capable of experience and others that are not and pull one down to a lower level. The opposition is not equally acute in all cases, but in one degree or another it is almost uni- versal. Co-ordinadon and univeisaUsation can be satisfactorily done only when this is overcome. Till then oscillations are inevitable.

cosmic mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Nevertheless, the fact of this intervention from above, the fact that behind all our original thinking or authentic perception of things there is a veiled, a half-veiled or a swift unveiled intuitive element is enough to establish a connection between mind and what is above it; it opens a passage of communication and of entry into the superior spirit-ranges. There is also the reaching out of mind to exceed the personal ego limitation, to see things in a certain impersonality and universality. Impersonality is the first character of cosmic self; universality, non-limitation by the single or limiting point of view, is the character of cosmic perception and knowledge: this tendency is therefore a widening, however rudimentary, of these restricted mind areas towards cosmicity, towards a quality which is the very character of the higher mental planes, — towards that superconscient cosmic Mind which, we have suggested, must in the nature of things be the original mind-action of which ours is only a derivative and inferior process.” *The Life Divine

"If we accept the Vedic image of the Sun of Truth, . . . we may compare the action of the Higher Mind to a composed and steady sunshine, the energy of the Illumined Mind beyond it to an outpouring of massive lightnings of flaming sun-stuff. Still beyond can be met a yet greater power of the Truth-Force, an intimate and exact Truth-vision, Truth-thought, Truth-sense, Truth-feeling, Truth-action, to which we can give in a special sense the name of Intuition; . . . At the source of this Intuition we discover a superconscient cosmic Mind in direct contact with the supramental Truth-Consciousness, an original intensity determinant of all movements below it and all mental energies, — not Mind as we know it, but an Overmind that covers as with the wide wings of some creative Oversoul this whole lower hemisphere of Knowledge-Ignorance, links it with that greater Truth-Consciousness while yet at the same time with its brilliant golden Lid it veils the face of the greater Truth from our sight, intervening with its flood of infinite possibilities as at once an obstacle and a passage in our seeking of the spiritual law of our existence, its highest aim, its secret Reality.” The Life Divine

"There is one cosmic Mind, one cosmic Life, one cosmic Body. All the attempt of man to arrive at universal sympathy, universal love and the understanding and knowledge of the inner soul of other existences is an attempt to beat thin, breach and eventually break down by the power of the enlarging mind and heart the walls of the ego and arrive nearer to a cosmic oneness.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"[The results of the opening to the cosmic Mind:] One is aware of the cosmic Mind and the mental forces that move there and how they work on one"s mind and that of others and one is able to deal with one"s own mind with a greater knowledge and effective power. There are many other results, but this is the fundamental one.” Letters on Yoga

"The cosmic consciousness has many levels — the cosmic physical, the cosmic vital, the cosmic Mind, and above the higher planes of cosmic Mind there is the Intuition and above that the overmind and still above that the supermind where the Transcendental begins. In order to live in the Intuition plane (not merely to receive intuitions), one has to live in the cosmic consciousness because there the cosmic and individual run into each other as it were, and the mental separation between them is already broken down, so nobody can reach there who is still in the separative ego.” Letters on Yoga*


covering ::: n. **1. Anything that veils, screens, disguises or shuts from sight. 2. Something that covers or is laid, placed, or spread over or upon something else. v. 3. Protecting or shielding from harm, loss, or danger. coverings.**

cover ::: n. 1. Fig. Something, such as darkness, that screens, conceals, or disguises. v. 2. To spread over a surface to protect or conceal or warm something. 3. To hide from view or knowledge; conceal. covers, covered, covering.

crabbed ::: 1. Difficult to understand; complicated; obscure. 2. Difficult to read; cramped; as crabbed handwriting.

credulous ::: disposed to believe too readily, esp. without proper or adequate evidence; gullible.

creepers ::: plants that spread by means of stems that creep or climb; vines.

crouch ::: 1. To stoop, especially with the knees bent esp. in fear, humility or submission. 2. (of animals) to lie close to the ground, in fear, readiness for action etc. crouches, crouched, crouching.

daub ::: 1. Fig. To smear or spread or apply (paint, mud, etc.), esp. carelessly.

dreadful ::: full of or inspiring dread. dreadfully.

dread ::: n. **1. Profound fear; terror. 2. An object of fear, awe, or reverence. v. 3. To be in fear or terror of. 4. To anticipate with alarm, distaste, or reluctance. adj. 5. Fearful terrible; causing terror. 6. Held in awe or reverential fear. Dread, dreads, dreaded.**

Death has no separate existence by itself, it is only a result of the principle of decay in the body and that principle is there already — it is part of the physical nature. At the same time it is not inevitable ; if one could have the ’necessary consciousness and force, decay and death is not inevitable. But to bring that consciousness and force into the whole of the material nature is the most diflicult thing of all — at any rate, in such a way as to annul the decay principle.

descend ::: “The word ‘descend’ has various meanings according to the context—I used it here in the sense of the psychic being coming down into the human consciousness and body ready for it.” Letters on Yoga

difficult ::: 1. Hard to do or accomplish; demanding considerable effort or skill; arduous. 2. Not easily or readily done; requiring much labour, skill, or planning to be performed successfully. 3. Hard to understand or solve; perplexing, puzzling, obscure.

dire ::: 1. Causing or involving great fear or suffering; dreadful; terrible. 2. Indicating trouble, disaster, misfortune, or the like. 3. Urgent; desperate. direr.

Divine is already there immanent mthin us, ourselves are that in our inmost reality and it is this reality that we have to mani- fest *, it is that which constitutes the urge towards the divine living and makes necessary the creation of the life divine even in this material existence,

DRY PERIOD. ::: There is a long stage of preparation neces- sary in order to arrive at the moer psychologic^ condition in which the doors of experience can open and one can walk from vista to vista — though even then new gates may present them- selves and refuse to open until all is ready. This period can be dry and desert-like unless one has the ardour of self-introspec- tion and self-conquest and finds every step of the effort and struggle interesting or unless one has or gets the secret of trust and self-giving which secs the hand of the Divine in every step of the path and even in the difficulty the grace or the guidance.

Such interval periods come to all and cannot be avoided.

The main thing is to meet them with quietude and not become restless, depressed or despondent. A constant fire can be there only when a certain stage has been reached, that is when one is always inside consciously living in the psychic being, but for that all this preparation of the mind, vital, physical is necessary.

For this fire belongs to the psychic and one cannot command it always merely by the mind's effort. The psychic has to be fully liberated and that is what the Force is working to make fully possible.

The difficulty comes when either the vital with its desires or the physical with its past habitual movements comes in — as they do with almost everyone. It is then that the dryness and difficulty of spontaneous aspiration come. This dryness is a well- known obstacle in all sadhana. But one has to persist and not be discouraged. If one keep? the will fixed even in these barren periods, they pass and after their passage a greater force of aspiration and experience becomes possible.

Dryness comes usually when the vital dislikes a movement or' condition or the refusal of its desires and starts non-co-operation.

But sometimes it is a condition that has to be crossed through, e.g. the neutral or dry quietude which sometimes comes when the ordinary movements have been thrown out but nothing positive has yet come to take their place, i.e, peace, joy, a higher know- ledge or force or action.


[Editor"s note:] The line in its final form now reads:

[Editor’s note:] The line in its final form now reads:

EMANATION. ::: An emanation of the Mother is something of her consciousness and power put forth from her which, so long as it is in play, is held in close connection with her and, when its play is no longer required, is withdrawn back into its source, but can always be put out and brought into play once more. But also the detaining thread of connection can be severed and loosened and that came iorth as am tTnanation can

expanding ::: adj. 1. That opens up or out; unfolds. 2. That unfolds or develops; spreads out. 3. That increases in bulk, extent, volume, etc.

extended ::: 1. Spread out or elongated in breadth or length. 2. Fully extended or stretched forth. 3. Widespread or extensive; having extension or spatial magnitude.

extraordinarily difficult to read or comprehend; obscure; incomprehensible.

fibre ::: 1. A filamentous substance; a web of thread-like tissue such as composes living tissue generally. 2. That which fundamentally constitutes the strength of a thing; sinew; stuff; character. fibres, fibred.

Fire supporting the individual evolution on the earth and the psychic being is the soul-coosciousoess developing itself or rather its manifestation from life to life with the mind, vital and body as Its instruments until all is ready for the union with the

fluid ::: changing readily; shifting; not fixed, stable, or rigid.

form ::: “Form is the basic means of manifestation and without it it may be said that the manifestation of anything is not complete. Even if the Formless logically precedes Form, yet it is not illogical to assume that in the Formless, Form is inherent and already existent in a mystic latency, otherwise how could it be manifested?” Letters on Yoga

FORM. ::: Form is the basic means of manifestation and with- out it, it may be said that the manifestation of anything is not complete. Even if the Formless logically precedes the Form, yet it is not illogical to assume that in the Formless, Form is inherent and already existent in a mystic latency, otherwise how could it be manifested? For any other process would be the creation of the non-existent, not manifestation.

formidable ::: 1. Arousing fear, dread, or alarm. 2. Of discouraging or awesome strength, size, difficulty, etc.; intimidating. 3. Arousing feelings of awe or admiration because of grandeur, strength, etc. 4. Of great strength; forceful; powerful.

:::   "For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

“For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

For they arc pot men devc/oping upwards /roni (he animal (o the divine and struggling against their lower natures, but beings already fulfilled and satisfied with themselves.

fringe ::: 1. A decorative border of thread, cord, or the like, usually hanging loosely from a ravelled edge or strip. 2. Anything resembling or suggesting this. 3. An outer edge; margin; periphery. fringes, fringed.

Fury ::: One of the avenging deities, dread goddesses with snakes twined in their hair, sent from Tartarus to avenge wrong and punish crime: in later accounts, three in number (Tisiphone, Megaera, Alecto). Hence, an avenging or tormenting infernal spirit. Fury’s.

fury ::: one of the avenging deities, dread goddesses with snakes twined in their hair, sent from Tartarus to avenge wrong and punish crime: in later accounts, three in number (Tisiphone, Megaera, Alecto). Hence, an avenging or tormenting infernal spirit. Fury"s.

future. Things future are already accomplished to know- ledge and vision on higher planes of mind.

Guiding Unv of experience ::: The guiding law of spiritual experience can only come by an opening of human conscious~ ness to the Divine Consciousness ; there must be the power to receive in us the working and command and dynamic presence of the Divine Shakti and surrender ourselves to her control ; it is that surrender and that control which bring tbs guidance. But the surrender is not sure, there is so absolute certitude of the guidance so long as we are besieged by mind fonnaljons and life impulses and instigations of ego which may easily betray us into the bands of a false experience. This danger can only be countered by the opening of a now nine^tenths concealed inmost soul or psychic being that is already there but not commonly active within. That is the inner light we must Uberate ; for the light of thb inmost soul is our one sure illumioation so long as we walk still amidst the siege of the Ignorance and the Truth-

  Here an ampler ether spreads over the plains and clothes them in purple light, and they have a sun of their own and their own stars.

:::   Here an ampler ether spreads over the plains and clothes them in purple light, and they have a sun of their own and their own stars.

history ::: “History teaches us nothing; it is a confused torrent of events and personalities or a kaleidoscope of changing institutions. We do not seize the real sense of all this change and this continual streaming forward of human life in the channels of Time. What we do seize are current or recurrent phenomena, facile generalisations, partial ideas. We talk of democracy, aristocracy and autocracy, collectivism and individualism, imperialism and nationalism, the State and the commune, capitalism and labour; we advance hasty generalisations and make absolute systems which are positively announced today only to be abandoned perforce tomorrow; we espouse causes and ardent enthusiasms whose triumph turns to an early disillusionment and then forsake them for others, perhaps for those that we have taken so much trouble to destroy. For a whole century mankind thirsts and battles after liberty and earns it with a bitter expense of toil, tears and blood; the century that enjoys without having fought for it turns away as from a puerile illusion and is ready to renounce the depreciated gain as the price of some new good. And all this happens because our whole thought and action with regard to our collective life is shallow and empirical; it does not seek for, it does not base itself on a firm, profound and complete knowledge. The moral is not the vanity of human life, of its ardours and enthusiasms and of the ideals it pursues, but the necessity of a wiser, larger, more patient search after its true law and aim.” The Human Cycle etc.

Hostile Forces have a certain self-chosen function ::: it is to test the condition of the individual, of the work, of the earth itself and their readiness for the spiritual descent and fulfilment.

Human nature is shot through in all its stuff with the thread of the ego ; even when one tries to get away from it, it is in front or could be behind all the thoughts and actions like a shadow. To see that is the first step, to discern the falsity and absurdity of the ego-movements is the second, to discourage and refuse it at each step is the third ; but it goes entirely only when one sees, experiences and lives the One in everything and equally everywhere.

“I certainly won’t have ‘attracted’ [in place of ‘allured’]—there is an enormous difference between the force of the two words and merely ‘attracted by the Ecstasy’ would take away all my ecstasy in the line—nothing so tepid can be admitted. Neither do I want ‘thrill’ [in place of ‘joy’] which gives a false colour—precisely it would mean that the ecstasy was already touching him with its intensity which is far from my intention.

**"I certainly won"t have ‘attracted" [in place of ‘allured"] — there is an enormous difference between the force of the two words and merely ‘attracted by the Ecstasy" would take away all my ecstasy in the line — nothing so tepid can be admitted. Neither do I want ‘thrill" [in place of ‘joy"] which gives a false colour — precisely it would mean that the ecstasy was already touching him with its intensity which is far from my intention.Your statement that ‘joy" is just another word for ‘ecstasy" is surprising. ‘Comfort", ‘pleasure", ‘joy", ‘bliss", ‘rapture", ‘ecstasy" would then be all equal and exactly synonymous terms and all distinction of shades and colours of words would disappear from literature. As well say that ‘flashlight" is just another word for ‘lightning" — or that glow, gleam, glitter, sheen, blaze are all equivalents which can be employed indifferently in the same place. One can feel allured to the supreme omniscient Ecstasy and feel a nameless joy touching one without that Joy becoming itself the supreme Ecstasy. I see no loss of expressiveness by the joy coming in as a vague nameless hint of the immeasurable superior Ecstasy.” Letters on Savitri*

ideal ::: Madhav: “What is not yet achieved on earth but what must be achieved because it presses for expression from above is cherished in the aspiration and thought of man as an Ideal. It is a truth from the higher regions of existence that seeks to formulate itself in this world. It clothes itself in the form of an Idea, organises itself in the human mind through a series of perceptions and leaps of thought as an Ideal to be realised and goes on exerting pressure on the evolving spirit of man to actualise it in life as a working factor. Progress is effected by these translations of the ideal into the actual.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. III.

idea ::: Madhav: “Each form in Creation is governed by the Real-Idea which has impelled it into existence. Behind every object in manifestation, every formation that comes into being, there is a truth which demands fulfilment in and through it. It is a truth from the Being of the Divine that seeks expression. Each truth that so urges to manifest forms itself into a source-Idea, a concentration of the perception and the power to effectuate it. This Idea is always there in the depths of every manifestation ruling its forms and its movements according to its Will in execution. All formation and activities proceed according to the law of this indwelling Truth-Idea.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

(I) if he uses them during his sadhana solely to train him* self in possessing things without attachment or desire and leam to use them rightly, in harmony with the Divine Will, with a proper handling, a just organisation, arrangement and measure — or, (2) if he has already attained a true freedom from desire and attachment and is not in the least moved or affected in any way by loss or withholding or deprival.

I know by wWch the taking up of sadbaoa by the Dmne becomes a sensible fact before the preparation of the nature is done. In other methods the Divine action may be felt from time to time, but it remains mostly behind the veil till all is ready. In some the ditioe action Is not recognised ; all must be done by (apioya. In most there is a mixing of the two ::: the iapas>3 finally calling the direct help and intervention. The idea and experience of the Divine doing all belong to the Yoga based on surrender. But whatever way is followed, the one thing to be done is to be faithful and go on to the end.

Immediate past. A greater readiness of essential doubt and sceptical reserve ; a habit of mental activity as a necessity of the nature which makes it more difScuIt to achiere a complete mental silence ; a stronger turn towards outside things bom of the plenitude of active life ; a habit of mental and vital self- assertion and sometimes an aggressively vigUant independence which renders difficult any completeness of internal surrender even to a greater Ught and Knowledge, even to the dirine influ- ence — these are frequent obstacles.

In a sense each man is a colonist here from the Kingdom of the Spirit. His original and permanent home is there on the Divine summits; he has come to establish on earth the rule of the Spirit.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

inconscience ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Inconscience is an inverse reproduction of the supreme superconscience: it has the same absoluteness of being and automatic action, but in a vast involved trance; it is being lost in itself, plunged in its own abyss of infinity.” *The Life Divine

   "All aspects of the omnipresent Reality have their fundamental truth in the Supreme Existence. Thus even the aspect or power of Inconscience, which seems to be an opposite, a negation of the eternal Reality, yet corresponds to a Truth held in itself by the self-aware and all-conscious Infinite. It is, when we look closely at it, the Infinite"s power of plunging the consciousness into a trance of self-involution, a self-oblivion of the Spirit veiled in its own abysses where nothing is manifest but all inconceivably is and can emerge from that ineffable latency. In the heights of Spirit this state of cosmic or infinite trance-sleep appears to our cognition as a luminous uttermost Superconscience: at the other end of being it offers itself to cognition as the Spirit"s potency of presenting to itself the opposites of its own truths of being, — an abyss of non-existence, a profound Night of inconscience, a fathomless swoon of insensibility from which yet all forms of being, consciousness and delight of existence can manifest themselves, — but they appear in limited terms, in slowly emerging and increasing self-formulations, even in contrary terms of themselves; it is the play of a secret all-being, all-delight, all-knowledge, but it observes the rules of its own self-oblivion, self-opposition, self-limitation until it is ready to surpass it. This is the Inconscience and Ignorance that we see at work in the material universe. It is not a denial, it is one term, one formula of the infinite and eternal Existence.” *The Life Divine

"Once consciousnesses separated from the one consciousness, they fell inevitably into Ignorance and the last result of Ignorance was Inconscience.” Letters on Yoga

*inconscience.



inconscient ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Inconscient and the Ignorance may be mere empty abstractions and can be dismissed as irrelevant jargon if one has not come in collision with them or plunged into their dark and bottomless reality. But to me they are realities, concrete powers whose resistance is present everywhere and at all times in its tremendous and boundless mass.” *Letters on Savitri

". . . in its actual cosmic manifestation the Supreme, being the Infinite and not bound by any limitation, can manifest in Itself, in its consciousness of innumerable possibilities, something that seems to be the opposite of itself, something in which there can be Darkness, Inconscience, Inertia, Insensibility, Disharmony and Disintegration. It is this that we see at the basis of the material world and speak of nowadays as the Inconscient — the Inconscient Ocean of the Rigveda in which the One was hidden and arose in the form of this universe — or, as it is sometimes called, the non-being, Asat.” Letters on Yoga

"The Inconscient itself is only an involved state of consciousness which like the Tao or Shunya, though in a different way, contains all things suppressed within it so that under a pressure from above or within all can evolve out of it — ‘an inert Soul with a somnambulist Force".” Letters on Yoga

"The Inconscient is the last resort of the Ignorance.” Letters on Yoga

"The body, we have said, is a creation of the Inconscient and itself inconscient or at least subconscient in parts of itself and much of its hidden action; but what we call the Inconscient is an appearance, a dwelling place, an instrument of a secret Consciousness or a Superconscient which has created the miracle we call the universe.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga :::

"The Inconscient is a sleep or a prison, the conscient a round of strivings without ultimate issue or the wanderings of a dream: we must wake into the superconscious where all darkness of night and half-lights cease in the self-luminous bliss of the Eternal.” The Life Divine

"Men have not learnt yet to recognise the Inconscient on which the whole material world they see is built, or the Ignorance of which their whole nature including their knowledge is built; they think that these words are only abstract metaphysical jargon flung about by the philosophers in their clouds or laboured out in long and wearisome books like The Life Divine. Letters on Savitri :::

   "Is it really a fact that even the ordinary reader would not be able to see any difference between the Inconscient and Ignorance unless the difference is expressly explained to him? This is not a matter of philosophical terminology but of common sense and the understood meaning of English words. One would say ‘even the inconscient stone" but one would not say, as one might of a child, ‘the ignorant stone". One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. What is true is that the ordinary reader might not be familiar with the philosophical content of the word Inconscient and might not be familiar with the Vedantic idea of the Ignorance as the power behind the manifested world. But I don"t see how I can acquaint him with these things in a single line, even with the most. illuminating image or symbol. He might wonder, if he were Johnsonianly minded, how an Inconscient could be teased or how it could wake Ignorance. I am afraid, in the absence of a miracle of inspired poetical exegesis flashing through my mind, he will have to be left wondering.” Letters on Savitri

  **inconscient, Inconscient"s.**


indefinable ::: impossible to define, describe, or analyze; not readily identified, analysed, or determined.

INSTRUMENT. ::: To be able to receive the Divine Power and let it act through you in the things of the outward life, there are three necessary conditions ::: (I) Quietude, equality — not to be disturbed by anything that happens, to keep the mind still and firm, seeing the play of forces, but itself tranquil. (2) Absolute faith — faith that what is for the best will happen, but also that if one can make oneself a true instrument, the fruit will be that which one's will guided by the Divine Light sees as the thing to be done. (3) Receptivity — the power to receive the Divine Force and to feel its presence and the presence of the Mother in it and allow it to work, guiding one’s sight and will and action.

If this power and presence can be felt and this plasticity made the habit of the consciousness in action, — but plasticity to the Divine Force alone without bringing in any foreign clement, — the eventual result is sure.

Conditions to become an instrument of the Divine ::: A receptive silence of the mind, an effacemenl of the mental ego and the reduction of the mental being to the position of a witness, a close find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity ; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasya needed too constant and intense.


INTEGRAL YOGA ::: This yoga accepts the value of cosmic existence and holds it to be a reality; its object is to enter into a higher Truth-Consciousness or Divine Supramental Consciousness in which action and creation are the expression not of ignorance and imperfection, but of the Truth, the Light, the Divine Ānanda. But for that, the surrender of the mortal mind, life and body to the Higher Consciousnessis indispensable, since it is too difficult for the mortal human being to pass by its own effort beyond mind to a Supramental Consciousness in which the dynamism is no longer mental but of quite another power. Only those who can accept the call to such a change should enter into this yoga.

Aim of the Integral Yoga ::: It is not merely to rise out of the ordinary ignorant world-consciousness into the divine consciousness, but to bring the supramental power of that divine consciousness down into the ignorance of mind, life and body, to transform them, to manifest the Divine here and create a divine life in Matter.

Conditions of the Integral Yoga ::: This yoga can only be done to the end by those who are in total earnest about it and ready to abolish their little human ego and its demands in order to find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasyā needed too constant and intense.

Method in the Integral Yoga ::: To concentrate, preferably in the heart and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness. One can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is the beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one’s own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother’s Power and Presence.

Integral method ::: The method we have to pursue is to put our whole conscious being into relation and contact with the Divine and to call Him in to transform Our entire being into His, so that in a sense God Himself, the real Person in us, becomes the sādhaka of the sādhana* as well as the Master of the Yoga by whom the lower personality is used as the centre of a divine transfiguration and the instrument of its own perfection. In effect, the pressure of the Tapas, the force of consciousness in us dwelling in the Idea of the divine Nature upon that which we are in our entirety, produces its own realisation. The divine and all-knowing and all-effecting descends upon the limited and obscure, progressively illumines and energises the whole lower nature and substitutes its own action for all the terms of the inferior human light and mortal activity.

In psychological fact this method translates itself into the progressive surrender of the ego with its whole field and all its apparatus to the Beyond-ego with its vast and incalculable but always inevitable workings. Certainly, this is no short cut or easy sādhana. It requires a colossal faith, an absolute courage and above all an unflinching patience. For it implies three stages of which only the last can be wholly blissful or rapid, - the attempt of the ego to enter into contact with the Divine, the wide, full and therefore laborious preparation of the whole lower Nature by the divine working to receive and become the higher Nature, and the eventual transformation. In fact, however, the divine strength, often unobserved and behind the veil, substitutes itself for the weakness and supports us through all our failings of faith, courage and patience. It” makes the blind to see and the lame to stride over the hills.” The intellect becomes aware of a Law that beneficently insists and a Succour that upholds; the heart speaks of a Master of all things and Friend of man or a universal Mother who upholds through all stumblings. Therefore this path is at once the most difficult imaginable and yet in comparison with the magnitude of its effort and object, the most easy and sure of all.

There are three outstanding features of this action of the higher when it works integrally on the lower nature. In the first place, it does not act according to a fixed system and succession as in the specialised methods of Yoga, but with a sort of free, scattered and yet gradually intensive and purposeful working determined by the temperament of the individual in whom it operates, the helpful materials which his nature offers and the obstacles which it presents to purification and perfection. In a sense, therefore, each man in this path has his own method of Yoga. Yet are there certain broad lines of working common to all which enable us to construct not indeed a routine system, but yet some kind of Shastra or scientific method of the synthetic Yoga.

Secondly, the process, being integral, accepts our nature such as it stands organised by our past evolution and without rejecting anything essential compels all to undergo a divine change. Everything in us is seized by the hands of a mighty Artificer and transformed into a clear image of that which it now seeks confusedly to present. In that ever-progressive experience we begin to perceive how this lower manifestation is constituted and that everything in it, however seemingly deformed or petty or vile, is the more or less distorted or imperfect figure of some elements or action in the harmony of the divine Nature. We begin to understand what the Vedic Rishis meant when they spoke of the human forefathers fashioning the gods as a smith forges the crude material in his smithy.

Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in Nature, in the other it becomes swift and selfconscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and therefore of right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution.

Key-methods ::: The way to devotion and surrender. It is the psychic movement that brings the constant and pure devotion and the removal of the ego that makes it possible to surrender.

The way to knowledge. Meditation in the head by which there comes the opening above, the quietude or silence of the mind and the descent of peace etc. of the higher consciousness generally till it envelops the being and fills the body and begins to take up all the movements.
Yoga by works ::: Separation of the Purusha from the Prakriti, the inner silent being from the outer active one, so that one has two consciousnesses or a double consciousness, one behind watching and observing and finally controlling and changing the other which is active in front. The other way of beginning the yoga of works is by doing them for the Divine, for the Mother, and not for oneself, consecrating and dedicating them till one concretely feels the Divine Force taking up the activities and doing them for one.

Object of the Integral Yoga is to enter into and be possessed by the Divine Presence and Consciousness, to love the Divine for the Divine’s sake alone, to be tuned in our nature into the nature of the Divine, and in our will and works and life to be the instrument of the Divine.

Principle of the Integral Yoga ::: The whole principle of Integral Yoga is to give oneself entirely to the Divine alone and to nobody else, and to bring down into ourselves by union with the Divine Mother all the transcendent light, power, wideness, peace, purity, truth-consciousness and Ānanda of the Supramental Divine.

Central purpose of the Integral Yoga ::: Transformation of our superficial, narrow and fragmentary human way of thinking, seeing, feeling and being into a deep and wide spiritual consciousness and an integrated inner and outer existence and of our ordinary human living into the divine way of life.

Fundamental realisations of the Integral Yoga ::: The psychic change so that a complete devotion can be the main motive of the heart and the ruler of thought, life and action in constant union with the Mother and in her Presence. The descent of the Peace, Power, Light etc. of the Higher Consciousness through the head and heart into the whole being, occupying the very cells of the body. The perception of the One and Divine infinitely everywhere, the Mother everywhere and living in that infinite consciousness.

Results ::: First, an integral realisation of Divine Being; not only a realisation of the One in its indistinguishable unity, but also in its multitude of aspects which are also necessary to the complete knowledge of it by the relative consciousness; not only realisation of unity in the Self, but of unity in the infinite diversity of activities, worlds and creatures.

Therefore, also, an integral liberation. Not only the freedom born of unbroken contact of the individual being in all its parts with the Divine, sāyujya mukti, by which it becomes free even in its separation, even in the duality; not only the sālokya mukti by which the whole conscious existence dwells in the same status of being as the Divine, in the state of Sachchidananda ; but also the acquisition of the divine nature by the transformation of this lower being into the human image of the divine, sādharmya mukti, and the complete and final release of all, the liberation of the consciousness from the transitory mould of the ego and its unification with the One Being, universal both in the world and the individual and transcendentally one both in the world and beyond all universe.

By this integral realisation and liberation, the perfect harmony of the results of Knowledge, Love and Works. For there is attained the complete release from ego and identification in being with the One in all and beyond all. But since the attaining consciousness is not limited by its attainment, we win also the unity in Beatitude and the harmonised diversity in Love, so that all relations of the play remain possible to us even while we retain on the heights of our being the eternal oneness with the Beloved. And by a similar wideness, being capable of a freedom in spirit that embraces life and does not depend upon withdrawal from life, we are able to become without egoism, bondage or reaction the channel in our mind and body for a divine action poured out freely upon the world.

The divine existence is of the nature not only of freedom, but of purity, beatitude and perfection. In integral purity which shall enable on the one hand the perfect reflection of the divine Being in ourselves and on the other the perfect outpouring of its Truth and Law in us in the terms of life and through the right functioning of the complex instrument we are in our outer parts, is the condition of an integral liberty. Its result is an integral beatitude, in which there becomes possible at once the Ānanda of all that is in the world seen as symbols of the Divine and the Ānanda of that which is not-world. And it prepares the integral perfection of our humanity as a type of the Divine in the conditions of the human manifestation, a perfection founded on a certain free universality of being, of love and joy, of play of knowledge and of play of will in power and will in unegoistic action. This integrality also can be attained by the integral Yoga.

Sādhanā of the Integral Yoga does not proceed through any set mental teaching or prescribed forms of meditation, mantras or others, but by aspiration, by a self-concentration inwards or upwards, by a self-opening to an Influence, to the Divine Power above us and its workings, to the Divine Presence in the heart and by the rejection of all that is foreign to these things. It is only by faith, aspiration and surrender that this self-opening can come.

The yoga does not proceed by upadeśa but by inner influence.

Integral Yoga and Gita ::: The Gita’s Yoga consists in the offering of one’s work as a sacrifice to the Divine, the conquest of desire, egoless and desireless action, bhakti for the Divine, an entering into the cosmic consciousness, the sense of unity with all creatures, oneness with the Divine. This yoga adds the bringing down of the supramental Light and Force (its ultimate aim) and the transformation of the nature.

Our yoga is not identical with the yoga of the Gita although it contains all that is essential in the Gita’s yoga. In our yoga we begin with the idea, the will, the aspiration of the complete surrender; but at the same time we have to reject the lower nature, deliver our consciousness from it, deliver the self involved in the lower nature by the self rising to freedom in the higher nature. If we do not do this double movement, we are in danger of making a tamasic and therefore unreal surrender, making no effort, no tapas and therefore no progress ; or else we make a rajasic surrender not to the Divine but to some self-made false idea or image of the Divine which masks our rajasic ego or something still worse.

Integral Yoga, Gita and Tantra ::: The Gita follows the Vedantic tradition which leans entirely on the Ishvara aspect of the Divine and speaks little of the Divine Mother because its object is to draw back from world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation beyond it.

The Tantric tradition leans on the Shakti or Ishvari aspect and makes all depend on the Divine Mother because its object is to possess and dominate the world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation through it.

This yoga insists on both the aspects; the surrender to the Divine Mother is essential, for without it there is no fulfilment of the object of the yoga.

Integral Yoga and Hatha-Raja Yogas ::: For an integral yoga the special methods of Rajayoga and Hathayoga may be useful at times in certain stages of the progress, but are not indispensable. Their principal aims must be included in the integrality of the yoga; but they can be brought about by other means. For the methods of the integral yoga must be mainly spiritual, and dependence on physical methods or fixed psychic or psychophysical processes on a large scale would be the substitution of a lower for a higher action. Integral Yoga and Kundalini Yoga: There is a feeling of waves surging up, mounting to the head, which brings an outer unconsciousness and an inner waking. It is the ascending of the lower consciousness in the ādhāra to meet the greater consciousness above. It is a movement analogous to that on which so much stress is laid in the Tantric process, the awakening of the Kundalini, the Energy coiled up and latent in the body and its mounting through the spinal cord and the centres (cakras) and the Brahmarandhra to meet the Divine above. In our yoga it is not a specialised process, but a spontaneous upnish of the whole lower consciousness sometimes in currents or waves, sometimes in a less concrete motion, and on the other side a descent of the Divine Consciousness and its Force into the body.

Integral Yoga and other Yogas ::: The old yogas reach Sachchidananda through the spiritualised mind and depart into the eternally static oneness of Sachchidananda or rather pure Sat (Existence), absolute and eternal or else a pure Non-exist- ence, absolute and eternal. Ours having realised Sachchidananda in the spiritualised mind plane proceeds to realise it in the Supramcntal plane.

The suprcfhe supra-cosmic Sachchidananda is above all. Supermind may be described as its power of self-awareness and W’orld- awareness, the world being known as within itself and not out- side. So to live consciously in the supreme Sachchidananda one must pass through the Supermind.

Distinction ::: The realisation of Self and of the Cosmic being (without which the realisation of the Self is incomplete) are essential steps in our yoga ; it is the end of other yogas, but it is, as it were, the beginning of outs, that is to say, the point where its own characteristic realisation can commence.

It is new as compared with the old yogas (1) Because it aims not at a departure out of world and life into Heaven and Nir- vana, but at a change of life and existence, not as something subordinate or incidental, but as a distinct and central object.

If there is a descent in other yogas, yet it is only an incident on the way or resulting from the ascent — the ascent is the real thing. Here the ascent is the first step, but it is a means for the descent. It is the descent of the new coosdousness attain- ed by the ascent that is the stamp and seal of the sadhana. Even the Tantra and Vaishnavism end in the release from life ; here the object is the divine fulfilment of life.

(2) Because the object sought after is not an individual achievement of divine realisation for the sake of the individual, but something to be gained for the earth-consciousness here, a cosmic, not solely a supra-cosmic acbievement. The thing to be gained also is the bringing of a Power of consciousness (the Supramental) not yet organised or active directly in earth-nature, even in the spiritual life, but yet to be organised and made directly active.

(3) Because a method has been preconized for achieving this purpose which is as total and integral as the aim set before it, viz., the total and integral change of the consciousness and nature, taking up old methods, but only as a part action and present aid to others that are distinctive.

Integral Yoga and Patanjali Yoga ::: Cilia is the stuff of mixed mental-vital-physical consciousness out of which arise the movements of thought, emotion, sensation, impulse etc.

It is these that in the Patanjali system have to be stilled altogether so that the consciousness may be immobile and go into Samadhi.

Our yoga has a different function. The movements of the ordinary consciousness have to be quieted and into the quietude there has to be brought down a higher consciousness and its powers which will transform the nature.


intelligence ::: “Intelligence does not depend on the amount one has read, it is a quality of the mind. Study only gives it material for its work as life also does. There are people who do not know how to read and write who are more intelligent than many highly educated people and understand life and things better. On the other hand, a good intelligence can improve itself by reading because it gets more material to work on and grows by exercise and by having a wider range to move in. But book-knowledge by itself is not the real thing, it has to be used as a help to the intelligence but it is often only a help to stupidity or ignorance—ignorance because knowledge of facts is a poor thing if one cannot see their true significance.” Letters on Yoga

  "In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning — it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one"s being, one"s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred" and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge", it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

“In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning—it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one’s being, one’s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred’ and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge’, it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

“In the way that one treads with the greater Light above, even every difficulty gives its help and has its value and Night itself carries in it the burden of the Light that has to be.” Letters on Yoga

invade ::: 1. To enter forcefully as an enemy; go into with hostile intent. 2. To enter as if to take possession. 3. To permeate. 4. To penetrate; spread into or over. invades, invaded, invading.

“Is it really a fact that even the ordinary reader would not be able to see any difference between the Inconscient and Ignorance unless the difference is expressly explained to him? This is not a matter of philosophical terminology but of common sense and the understood meaning of English words. One would say ‘even the inconscient stone’ but one would not say, as one might of a child, ‘the ignorant stone’. One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. What is true is that the ordinary reader might not be familiar with the philosophical content of the word Inconscient and might not be familiar with the Vedantic idea of the Ignorance as the power behind the manifested world. But I don’t see how I can acquaint him with these things in a single line, even with the most. illuminating image or symbol. He might wonder, if he were Johnsonianly minded, how an Inconscient could be teased or how it could wake Ignorance. I am afraid, in the absence of a miracle of inspired poetical exegesis flashing through my mind, he will have to be left wondering.” Letters on Savitri

“I tread your little hillock called green earth”

I tread your little hillock called green earth

"It [death] has no separate existence by itself, it is only a result of the principle of decay in the body and that principle is there already — it is part of the physical nature. At the same time it is not inevitable; if one could have the necessary consciousness and force, decay and death is not inevitable. But to bring that consciousness and force into the whole of the material nature is the most difficult thing of all — at any rate, in such a way as to annul the decay principle.” Letters on Yoga

“It [death] has no separate existence by itself, it is only a result of the principle of decay in the body and that principle is there already—it is part of the physical nature. At the same time it is not inevitable; if one could have the necessary consciousness and force, decay and death is not inevitable. But to bring that consciousness and force into the whole of the material nature is the most difficult thing of all—at any rate, in such a way as to annul the decay principle.” Letters on Yoga

It is this which explains many of the phenomena of clair- voyance, clairaudience, etc. ; for these phenomena are only the exceptional admission of the waking mentality into a limited sensitiveness to what might be called the image memory of the subtle ether,' by which not only the signs of all things past and present, but even those of things future can be seized ; for things future are already accomplished to knowledge and vision on higher planes of mind and their images can be reflected upon mind in the present. But these things which are exceptional to the w’aking mentality, difficult and to be perceived only by the pos- session of a special power or else after assiduous training, are natural to the dream-state of trance consciousness in which the subliminal mind is free. And that mind can al^o take cognizance

Its treacherous elements spread like slippery grains

"It [the Cosmic Spirit] uses Truth and Falsehood, Knowledge and Ignorance and all the other dualities as elements in the manifestation and works out what has to be worked out till all is ready for a higher working.” Letters on Yoga*

“It [the Cosmic Spirit] uses Truth and Falsehood, Knowledge and Ignorance and all the other dualities as elements in the manifestation and works out what has to be worked out till all is ready for a higher working.” Letters on Yoga

Jhumur: “– There is a very clear pattern, in a way, in the darkness. It follows a certain line of action just like an idea governs a line of action and proceeds expression. Even in the Inconscient there is a force that works itself out. This is also an expression of the supreme force that has involved itself and works its way out in a supremely slow conscious way and knows exactly how it wants to grow, that is why it controls so much of the universe because it has spread itself along very clearly worked out lines.”

"Kali is Krishna revealed as dreadful Power & wrathful Love. She slays with her furious blows the self in body, life & mind in order to liberate it as spirit eternal.” Essays Divine and Human

“Kali is Krishna revealed as dreadful Power & wrathful Love. She slays with her furious blows the self in body, life & mind in order to liberate it as spirit eternal.” Essays Divine and Human

Karma ::: Madhav: “Each action produces a result and the action of today is often plagued by the reaction of yesterday.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

largeness ::: large or extensive in breadth or importance, comprehensiveness or magnitude. largenesses.

lightly ::: 1. Easily, readily; without trouble or effort. 2. With little weight or force; gently.

loom ::: an apparatus for making thread or yarn into cloth by weaving strands together at right angles.

Madhav: “Moment is the sequence of Time. Each moment records what is happening at that point. It relates to the present. The Ray of the Eternal interrupts the movement of Time for a while and lights up things that are not yet manifest. It gives a peep into the future. The Ray of the Eternal is able to do it because the future is already present in the vision of the Eternal.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “Our time is divided into past, present, future, but there is a level where Time is continuous. The past, the present and the future are spread out as a map, undivided; in one glance one can see everything.” Sat-Sang Vol. IX

Madhav: “Rose, here, signifies Divine Love. It is deathless because it is immortal. They are realms of pure Love. Read Sri Aurobindo in his sonnet, Light: . . . in my heart where blooms deathless rose.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “The allusion is to the Vamana Avatar in Indian mythology. Vamana the Dwarf, Lilliputian in form, asks for a boon of three steps of land from the king. The king readily agrees. Suddenly the Dwarf assumes a stupendous shape and occupies both the worlds of earth and heaven and asks where he should place his third step. The king is obliged to offer his head. The Titan yields to the Divine in the form of Vamana.

Madhav: The Name is a Power. It stands for a particular formulation of Consciousness and Force and when uttered—audibly or otherwise—acts like a spring summoning all that it represents into action.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

Madhav: “… the perfect beings—the archetypes that project themselves in the form of Ideals on the mental horizons of man….” Readings in Savitri Vol. I.

Madhav: “The powers that create and fashion this world in accordance with the Truth with which they are charged, are not involved, lost in the world-movement. They stand above, governing, shaping, directing the growing world-complex. They know precisely what takes place and why. They are not misled by appearances of phenomena; each event is seen by them as developing from its veiled cause which they perceive undeceived by apparent sequences on the surface.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. II.

Madhav: “The wheel of determinism in material Nature turns mechanically without any saving sensation, it moves under the pressure of a gathered momentum without questioning; it is immaterial in its operations without the slightest breath of the warmth of life. All circumstances are cogs in this wheel of Fate that revolves relentlessly. It is only a force of will from an existence beyond the domain of this mechanism that can hold the movement, change its direction and displace the instrumental condition.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

Madhav: “This creation is an ordered manifestation of the Divine. There is a central Will, expressing the originating Truth-vision, impelling the whole movement. But also there are special emanations from the Divine charged with specific tasks in the organisation and maintenance of the emerging creation. These are the gods and goddesses, deities, Powers and Personalities that are in charge of their respective domains, on different levels of existence. Each world has its own guardians entrusted by the Supreme Creative Spirit with the work of building and furthering the manifestation of the particular Truth-principle that pushes for expression in that world-formula.” Readings in Savitri Vol. I.

Madhav: “This is a very important line. Name, secret name, name of a God, name of a Deity, name of the Divine, is a key to the Power, the qualities that are embodied in that Form. So, when that Name is uttered, all that Power, all that consciousness, is evoked. That is why the Seers keep this Name secret, give it only to those who are ready, who have been initiated, who have purified themselves.” The Book of the Divine Mother

manifest ::: v. 1. To show or demonstrate plainly; reveal, display. manifested. adj. 2. Readily noticed or perceived; evident; obvious; apparent; plain; visible. manifesting.

Material consciousness ::: It is mostly subconscienl, but part of it that is conscious is mechanical, inertly moved by habits or by the forces of the lower nature- Always repeating the same unintelligent and unenlightened movements, it is attached to the routine and established rule of what already exists, unwilling to change, unwilling to receive the Light or obey the higher Force.

Matter, and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind Is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power ; if it acts it is through these Werior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arri- val of the descendiag Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal Itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being ::: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life. It is indeed so that life and mind involved In Matter have realised themselves here ; for only what is involved can evolve, otherwise there could be no emergence. ■■

maturity ::: the state of being complete in natural growth or development; perfect or ready.

Medical treatment is sometimes a necessity. If one can cure by the Force it is the best ; but if for some reason the body is not able to respond to the Force (e.g. owing to doubt, lassitude or discouragement or for inability to react against the disease), then the aid of medical treatment becomes necessary. It is not that the Force ceases to act and leaves all to the medicines, — it will continue to act through the consciousness but take the support of the Irealntent so as to act directly on the resistance in the body, which responds more readily to physical means in its ordinary consciousness. ‘

mesh ::: 1. Any of the open spaces in a net or network; an interstice. 2. The cords, threads, or wires surrounding these spaces. Often used in the plural. meshes, black-meshed.

mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The ‘Mind" in the ordinary use of the word covers indiscriminately the whole consciousness, for man is a mental being and mentalises everything; but in the language of this yoga the words ‘mind" and ‘mental" are used to connote specially the part of the nature which has to do with cognition and intelligence, with ideas, with mental or thought perceptions, the reactions of thought to things, with the truly mental movements and formations, mental vision and will, etc., that are part of his intelligence.” *Letters on Yoga

"Mind in its essence is a consciousness which measures, limits, cuts out forms of things from the indivisible whole and contains them as if each were a separate integer.” The Life Divine

"Mind is an instrument of analysis and synthesis, but not of essential knowledge. Its function is to cut out something vaguely from the unknown Thing in itself and call this measurement or delimitation of it the whole, and again to analyse the whole into its parts which it regards as separate mental objects.” The Life Divine

"The mind proper is divided into three parts — thinking Mind, dynamic Mind, externalising Mind — the former concerned with ideas and knowledge in their own right, the second with the putting out of mental forces for realisation of the idea, the third with the expression of them in life (not only by speech, but by any form it can give).” Letters on Yoga

"The difference between the ordinary mind and the intuitive is that the former, seeking in the darkness or at most by its own unsteady torchlight, first, sees things only as they are presented in that light and, secondly, where it does not know, constructs by imagination, by uncertain inference, by others of its aids and makeshifts things which it readily takes for truth, shadow projections, cloud edifices, unreal prolongations, deceptive anticipations, possibilities and probabilities which do duty for certitudes. The intuitive mind constructs nothing in this artificial fashion, but makes itself a receiver of the light and allows the truth to manifest in it and organise its own constructions.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"He [man] has in him not a single mentality, but a double and a triple, the mind material and nervous, the pure intellectual mind which liberates itself from the illusions of the body and the senses, and a divine mind above intellect which in its turn liberates itself from the imperfect modes of the logically discriminative and imaginative reason.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"Our mind is an observer of actuals, an inventor or discoverer of possibilities, but not a seer of the occult imperatives that necessitate the movements and forms of a creation. . . .” *The Life Divine

"The human mind is an instrument not of truth but of ignorance and error.” Letters on Yoga

"For Mind as we know it is a power of the Ignorance seeking for Truth, groping with difficulty to find it, reaching only mental constructions and representations of it in word and idea, in mind formations, sense formations, — as if bright or shadowy photographs or films of a distant Reality were all that it could achieve.” The Life Divine

The Mother: "The true role of the mind is the formation and organization of action. The mind has a formative and organizing power, and it is that which puts the different elements of inspiration in order for action, for organizing action. And if it would only confine itself to that role, receiving inspirations — whether from above or from the mystic centre of the soul — and simply formulating the plan of action — in broad outline or in minute detail, for the smallest things of life or the great terrestrial organizations — it would amply fulfil its function. It is not an instrument of knowledge. But is can use knowledge for action, to organize action. It is an instrument of organization and formation, very powerful and very capable when it is well developed.” Questions and Answers 1956, MCW Vol. 8.*


mobile ::: 1. Flowing freely. 2. Changeable or changing easily in expression, mood, purpose, etc. 3. Capable of moving or of being moved readily from place to place. mobility.

moonbelts ::: broad bands or stripes characteristically distinguished from the surface they cross; tracts or districts long in proportion to their breadths. Also, zones or districts, usually with defining term denoting the principal characteristic.

mother, universal ::: Sri Aurobindo: "What people mean by the formless svarûpa of the Mother, — they means usually her universal aspect. It is when she is experienced as a universal Existence and Power spread through the universe in which and by which all live. When one feels that Presence one begins to feel a universal peace, light, power, bliss without limits — that is her svarûpa.” *The Mother

   "The Mahashakti, the universal Mother, works out whatever is transmitted by her transcendent consciousness from the Supreme and enters into the worlds that she has made; her presence fills and supports them with the divine spirit and the divine all-sustaining force and delight without which they could not exist.” The Mother


Name ::: “Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

name ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

net ::: 1. A bag or other contrivance of strong thread or cord worked into an open, meshed fabric, for catching fish, birds, or other animals. 2. Anything serving to catch or ensnare. cloud-net, drag-net.

night ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Night is the symbol of the Ignorance or Avidya in which men live just as Light is the symbol of Truth and Knowledge.” *Letters on Yoga
"In the way that one treads with the greater Light above, even every difficulty gives its help and has its value and Night itself carries in it the burden of the Light that has to be.” Letters on Yoga **Night, Night"s.


No doubt, the Supermind has also acted in the history of the world but always through the Overmind. It is the direct descent of the Supramental Consciousness and Power that alone can utterly re-create life in terms of the Spirit. For, in the Overmind there is already the play of possibilities which marks the beginning of this lower triple world of Mind, Life and Matter in which we have our existence. And whenever there is this play and not the spontaneous and infallible working of the innate Truth of the Spirit, there is the seed of distortion and ignorance. Not that the Overmind is a field of ignorance; but it is the border-line between the Higher and the Lower, for, the play of possibilities, of separate even if not yet divided choice, is likely to lead to deviation from the Truth of things.

obscure ::: 1. Not bright or lustrous; dull or darkish, as colour or appearance. 2. Hidden, secret, or remote. 3. Not clearly understood or expressed; ambiguous or vague. 4. Not readily noticed or seen; inconspicuous. 5. So faintly perceptible as to lack clear delineation; indistinct. 6. Gloomy, dark, clouded, or dim. 7. Pertaining to darkness. obscurest.

o"errun ::: to spread or swarm over destructively. See **overthrow.**

One starts by an intense idea and wiJf to know or readi the

“On the surface of life all appears to be a game of Chance. There is no certainty about any movement; ups and downs, vicissitudes, cataclysms, actions, passions and thoughts crowd in medley and it is impossible to anticipate or regulate them with any definiteness. But a deeper scrutiny reveals a pattern behind all the apparent workings of Chance. What looks like Chance is itself a part of the process; it is called Chance because the particular operation does not take place within the framework of the laws erected by the limited empirical mind; there is really no Chance in the working out of the divine Intention that is this Universe.” Readings in Savitri Vol. III.

"Our thoughts are not really created within ourselves independently in the small narrow thinking machine we call our mind; in fact, they come to us from a vast mental space or ether either as mind-waves or waves of mind-force that carry a significance which takes shape in our personal mind or as thought-formations ready-made which we adopt and call ours. Our outer mind is blind to this process of Nature; but by the awakening of the inner mind we can become aware of it.” Letters on Yoga

“Our thoughts are not really created within ourselves independently in the small narrow thinking machine we call our mind; in fact, they come to us from a vast mental space or ether either as mind-waves or waves of mind-force that carry a significance which takes shape in our personal mind or as thought-formations ready-made which we adopt and call ours. Our outer mind is blind to this process of Nature; but by the awakening of the inner mind we can become aware of it.” Letters on Yoga

outspread ::: spread out; extended.

overflowed ::: 1. Flowed or ran over the top, brim, or banks. Also fig. **2. Spread or covered over; flooded. overflowing.**

palpable ::: 1. Capable of being handled, touched, or felt; tangible. 2. Readily or plainly seen, heard, perceived, etc.; obvious; evident.

pamful, first, because it is obscure and docs not understand and, secondly, because there arc parts of it that want to be left to their crude notions and not to change. That is why the inter- vention of a psychic attitude is so heJpfuI. For the psychic has the happy confidence, the ready understanding and response, the spontaneous surrender ; it knows that the touch of the Guru is meant to help and not to hurt, or, like Radha in the poem, that whatever the Beloved does is meant to lead to the Divine

panic ::: a sudden overwhelming fear, with or without cause, that produces hysterical or irrational behaviour, and that often spreads quickly through a group of persons or animals.

parallels ::: having comparable parts, analogous aspects, or readily recognized similarities.

perused ::: read or examined, typically with great care. perusing.

Physical fatigue in sSdhana ::: It may come from ( 1 ) receiv- ing more than the physical is ready to assimilate. The cure is then quiet rest in conscious immobility receiving the forces but not for any other purpose than tbe recuperation of the strength and energy. (2) It may be due to the passivity taking the form of inertia ; inertia brings the consciousness dotvn towards the ordinary physical level which is soon fatigued and prone to tamas. The cure here is to get back into the true consciousness and to rest there, not in inertia. (3) It may be due to mere overstrain of the body — not giving enough sleep or repose. The body is the support of the yoga, but its energy is not inexhaustible and needs to be husbanded ; it can be kept up by drawing on the universal vital Force but that reinforcement too has its limits.

PHYSICAL FATIGUE. ::: It may come from receiving more than the physical is ready to assimilate. It may be due to the passivity taking the form of inertia ; inertia brings the consciousness down towards the ordinary physical level which is soon fatigued and prone to tamas. It may be due to mere oveistrain of the body — not giving it enough sleep or repose,

pored ::: 1. Meditated deeply; pondered. 2. Read or studied carefully and attentively. pores, poring.

prepare ::: to make ready beforehand for a specific purpose, as for an event or occasion. prepares, prepared, preparing.

:::   "Progress: to be ready, at every minute, to give up all one is and all one has in order to advance on the way.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

“Progress: to be ready, at every minute, to give up all one is and all one has in order to advance on the way.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

protean ::: readily taking on varied shapes, forms, or meanings.

Psychic awakening means the conscious action of the psychic from behind. When it comes to the front, it invades the mind and vital and body and psychidscs their movement. It comes best by aspiration and an unquestioning and entire turning and surrender to the Mother. But also it sometimes comes of itself when the ddhara is ready.

reign ::: n. 1. Dominating power or influence. 2. Exercise of sovereign power, as by a monarch. 3. Poet. Dominance or widespread influence in a specific sphere. v. 4. To exercise sovereign power. 5. To be predominant or prevalent. reigns, reigned.

resource ::: a source of supply, support, or aid, esp. one that can be readily drawn upon when needed.

responsive ::: responding esp. readily and sympathetically to appeals, efforts, influences.

Samadbi or Yogic trance retires to increasing depths accord* lag as it dran^ farther and farther away from the nonnal or waking state and enters into degrees of consciousness less and less communicable to the waking mind, less and less ready to receive a summons from the waking world. Beyond a certain point the trance becomes complete and it is then almost or quite impossible to awaken or calf back the soul that has receded into them ; it can only come back by its own will or at most by a violent shock of physical appeal dangerous to the sj'stem owing to the abrupt upheaval of return. There are said to be supreme states of trance in which the soul persisting for too long a lime cannot return ; for it loses its hold on the cord which binds it to the consciousness of life, and the body is left, maintained indeed in its set position, not dead by dissolution, but incapable of recovering the ensouled life which had rnhahifed it. finally, the Yogin acquires at a certain stage of development the power of abandoning his body definitively without the ordinary pheno- mena of death, by an act of will, or by a process of withdrawing the pranic life-force through the gate of the upward life-current

scant ::: 1. Barely sufficient; limited; inadequately supplied; in short supply. 2. Limited in size, quantity, or breadth.

self-diffusing ::: diffusing. Pouring or sending forth as from a centre of dispersion; spreading abroad over a surface, or through a space or region; spreading widely, shedding abroad, dispersing, disseminating.

Self-existent transcendent Love spreading itself over all, turn- ing’ everywhere to contain, embrace, unite, help, upraise towards love and bliss and oneness, becomes cosmic divine Love.

“Self-will in thought and action has, we have already seen, to be quite renounced if we would be perfect in the way of divine works; it has equally to be renounced if we are to be perfect in divine knowledge. This self-will means an egoism in the mind which attaches itself to its preferences, its habits, its past or present formations of thought and view and will because it regards them as itself or its own, weaves around them the delicate threads of I-ness’’ andmy-ness’’ and lives in them like a spider in its web. It hates to be disturbed, as a spider hates attack on its web, and feels foreign and unhappy if transplanted to fresh view-points and formations as a spider feels foreign in another web than its own. This attachment must be entirely excised from the mind.” The Synthesis of Yoga

sensuous ::: 1. Of, relating to; derived from, affected or perceived by the senses. Readily affected through the senses; highly appreciative of the pleasures of sensation. sensuous-hearted.

serpent ::: “On the other hand, Pranayama awakens the coiled-up serpent of the Pranic dynamism in the vital sheath and opens to the Yogin fields of consciousness, ranges of experience, abnormal faculties denied to the ordinary human life while it puissantly intensifies such normal powers and faculties as he already possesses. These advantages can be farther secured and emphasised by other subsidiary processes open to the Hathayogin.” The Synthesis of Yoga

serviceable ::: capable of or ready for service; usable; capable of giving good service,; durable; useful.

sheaths ::: Madhav: “The physical is not the only body encasing the soul. Ensouling it, as it were, and subtler than it, is the vital body; finer than the vital is the mental body; still finer is the causal body and the finest of them all is the body of bliss. All these bodies, each subtler than the other, are termed sheaths in view of their functions as so many coverings of the being at the core.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

She made her life his world for him to tread

shot ::: spread or streaked with colour.

  "Sincerity means to lift all the movements of the being to the level of the highest consciousness and realisation already attained.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 14.

“Sincerity means to lift all the movements of the being to the level of the highest consciousness and realisation already attained.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 14.

SINCERITY. ::: SiDcezity means to lilt all the movements of the being to the level of the highest consciousness and realisation already attained.

“So the possibility of the sunlit path is not a discovery or original invention of mine. The very first books on yoga I read more than thirty years ago spoke of the dark and sunlit way and emphasised the superiority of the latter over the former.” Letters on Yoga

sow ::: to implant, introduce, in one; promulgate; seek spread; propagate; disseminate. sows, sowed, sown, sowing.

span ::: n. 1. A very small extent, distance or space. 2. The complete duration or extent of a person"s life. 3. The extent or measure of space between two points or extremities, as of a bridge or roof; the breadth. spans. v. 4. To stretch or extend across, over, around, as a bridge or an arch. Also transf. or fig. **spanned, spanning.**

spread ::: 1. To extend or cause to extend over a larger expanse of space or time. Also fig. 2. To become stretched out or extended; expand, as in growth. 3. To be distributed or dispersed (a substance or a number of things) over a certain or area; to be scattered. 4. To spread out or open from a closed or folded state, like sails. 5. To distribute and expand widely. spreads, far-spread.

spider ("s)-web ::: the web that is spun by a spider, made of interlaced threads of viscous fluid that harden on exposure to air.

sprawl ::: n. 1. A straggling spread. v. 2. To move or crawl awkwardly and with effort with the aid of all the limbs; scramble. sprawls, sprawling.

Sri Aurobindo: "Form is the basic means of manifestation and without it it may be said that the manifestation of anything is not complete. Even if the Formless logically precedes Form, yet it is not illogical to assume that in the Formless, Form is inherent and already existent in a mystic latency, otherwise how could it be manifested?” *Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "History teaches us nothing; it is a confused torrent of events and personalities or a kaleidoscope of changing institutions. We do not seize the real sense of all this change and this continual streaming forward of human life in the channels of Time. What we do seize are current or recurrent phenomena, facile generalisations, partial ideas. We talk of democracy, aristocracy and autocracy, collectivism and individualism, imperialism and nationalism, the State and the commune, capitalism and labour; we advance hasty generalisations and make absolute systems which are positively announced today only to be abandoned perforce tomorrow; we espouse causes and ardent enthusiasms whose triumph turns to an early disillusionment and then forsake them for others, perhaps for those that we have taken so much trouble to destroy. For a whole century mankind thirsts and battles after liberty and earns it with a bitter expense of toil, tears and blood; the century that enjoys without having fought for it turns away as from a puerile illusion and is ready to renounce the depreciated gain as the price of some new good. And all this happens because our whole thought and action with regard to our collective life is shallow and empirical; it does not seek for, it does not base itself on a firm, profound and complete knowledge. The moral is not the vanity of human life, of its ardours and enthusiasms and of the ideals it pursues, but the necessity of a wiser, larger, more patient search after its true law and aim.” *The Human Cycle etc.

Sri Aurobindo: "Intelligence does not depend on the amount one has read, it is a quality of the mind. Study only gives it material for its work as life also does. There are people who do not know how to read and write who are more intelligent than many highly educated people and understand life and things better. On the other hand, a good intelligence can improve itself by reading because it gets more material to work on and grows by exercise and by having a wider range to move in. But book-knowledge by itself is not the real thing, it has to be used as a help to the intelligence but it is often only a help to stupidity or ignorance — ignorance because knowledge of facts is a poor thing if one cannot see their true significance.” Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "On the other hand, Pranayama awakens the coiled-up serpent of the Pranic dynamism in the vital sheath and opens to the Yogin fields of consciousness, ranges of experience, abnormal faculties denied to the ordinary human life while it puissantly intensifies such normal powers and faculties as he already possesses. These advantages can be farther secured and emphasised by other subsidiary processes open to the Hathayogin.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "So the possibility of the sunlit path is not a discovery or original invention of mine. The very first books on yoga I read more than thirty years ago spoke of the dark and sunlit way and emphasised the superiority of the latter over the former.” *Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: “So too when the seer of the house of Atri cries high to Agni, ‘O Agni, O Priest of the offering, loose from us the cords,’ he is using not only a natural, but a richly-laden image. He is thinking of the triple cord of mind, nerves and body by which the soul is bound as a victim in the great world-sacrifice, the sacrifice of the Purusha; he is thinking of the force of the divine Will already awakened and at work within him, a fiery and irresistible godhead that shall uplift his oppressed divinity and cleave asunder the cords of its bondage; he is thinking of the might of that growing Strength and inner Flame which receiving all that he has to offer carries it to its own distant and difficult home, to the high-seated Truth, to the Far, to the Secret, to the Supreme.” The Secret of the Veda

Sri Aurobindo: "The wideness comes when one exceeds or begins to exceed the individual consciousness and spread out towards the universal. But the psychic can be active even in the individual consciousness.” *Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘descend" has various meanings according to the context — I used it here in the sense of the psychic being coming down into the human consciousness and body ready for it.” Letters on Yoga

stars ::: “But it does not follow that the stars rule our destiny; the stars merely record a destiny that has been already formed, they are a hieroglyph, not a Force,—or if their action constitutes a force, it is a transmitting energy, not an originating Power. Someone is there who has determined or something is there which is Fate, let us say; the stars are only indicators.” Letters on Yoga

stars ::: Sri Aurobindo: "But it does not follow that the stars rule our destiny; the stars merely record a destiny that has been already formed, they are a hieroglyph, not a Force, — or if their action constitutes a force, it is a transmitting energy, not an originating Power. Someone is there who has determined or something is there which is Fate, let us say; the stars are only indicators.” Letters on Yoga

straggling ::: 1. Straying or falling behind others. 2. Proceeding or spreading out in a scattered or irregular group.

strands ::: lines or strings consisting of a complex of fibers or filaments that are twisted together to form a thread or a rope or a cable.

strewn ::: scattered, spread widely; disseminated.

string ::: 1. Any series of things arranged or connected in a line or following closely one after another. 2. The vibrating element that produces sound in string instruments and is composed of lengths of a flexible material kept under tension so that they may vibrate freely, but controllably, made of gut, fibre, wire, etc. 3. Slender cords or thick threads used for binding or tying; lines or something resembling this. Also fig. **strings, heart-strings, heart-strings", apron strings (see apron).**

study ::: n. 1. A room furnished with books and intended or equipped for studying or writing. 2. The pursuit of knowledge, as by reading, observation, or research. v. 3. To examine closely; scrutinize. Also fig. studies, studied, studying.

substratum ::: 1. A foundation or groundwork. (of something material or immaterial). 2. That which is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.)

subtle Matter ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Much more than half our thoughts and feelings are not our own in the sense that they take form out of ourselves; of hardly anything can it be said that it is truly original to our nature. A large part comes to us from others or from the environment, whether as raw material or as manufactured imports; but still more largely they come from universal Nature here or from other worlds and planes and their beings and powers and influences; for we are overtopped and environed by other planes of consciousness, mind planes, life planes, subtle matter planes, from which our life and action here are fed, or fed on, pressed, dominated, made use of for the manifestation of their forms and forces.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"Mind therefore is held by the Hindus to be a species of subtle matter in which ideas are waves or ripples, and it is not limited by the physical body which it uses as an instrument.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

"All that manifested from the Eternal has already been arranged in worlds or planes of its own nature, planes of subtle Matter, planes of Life, planes of Mind, planes of Supermind, planes of the triune luminous Infinite. But these worlds or planes are not evolutionary but typal. A typal world is one in which some ruling principle manifests itself in its free and full capacity and energy and form are plastic and subservient to its purpose. Its expressions are therefore automatic and satisfying and do not need to evolve; they stand so long as need be and do not need to be born, develop, decline and disintegrate.” Essays Divine and Human*


" Suffering is not inflicted as a punishment for sin or for hostility — that is a wrong idea. Suffering comes like pleasure and good fortune as an inevitable part of life in the ignorance. The dualities of pleasure and pain, joy and grief, good fortune and ill-fortune are the inevitable results of the ignorance which separates us from our true consciousness and from the Divine. Only by coming back to it can we get rid of suffering. Karma from the past lives exists, much of what happens is due to it, but not all. For we can mend our karma by our own consciousness and efforts. But the suffering is simply a natural consequence of past errors, not a punishment, just as a burn is the natural consequence of playing with fire. It is part of the experience by which the soul through its instruments learns and grows until it is ready to turn to the Divine.” Letters on Yoga

“ Suffering is not inflicted as a punishment for sin or for hostility—that is a wrong idea. Suffering comes like pleasure and good fortune as an inevitable part of life in the ignorance. The dualities of pleasure and pain, joy and grief, good fortune and ill-fortune are the inevitable results of the ignorance which separates us from our true consciousness and from the Divine. Only by coming back to it can we get rid of suffering. Karma from the past lives exists, much of what happens is due to it, but not all. For we can mend our karma by our own consciousness and efforts. But the suffering is simply a natural consequence of past errors, not a punishment, just as a burn is the natural consequence of playing with fire. It is part of the experience by which the soul through its instruments learns and grows until it is ready to turn to the Divine.” Letters on Yoga

SUPERMIND (DESCENT). The process is a, spiritual evolutionary process, concentrated into a brief period. As we envisage it, it must manifest m a few first and then spread, but is not likely to overpower the earth in a moment.

Supermind is an eternal reality o£ the divine Being and the divine Nature. In its own plane it already and always exists and possesses its own essential Jaw of being ; it has not to be created or to emerge or evolve into existence out of involution in Matter or out of non-existence, as it might seem to the view of mind which itself seems to its own view to have so emerged from life and Matter or to have evolved out of an involution in life and Matter. The nature of Supermind is always the same, a being of knowledge, proceeding from truth to truth, creating or rather manifesting ^vbaf has to be manifested by the power of a pre-existent knowledge, not by hazard but by a self-existent destiny in the being itself, a necessity of the thing in itself and therefore inevitable. Its 'manifestation of the divine life will also be inevitable ; its own life on its oum plane is divine and, if

"Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

“Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

tassel ::: a decoration, an adornment, consisting of a hanging bunch of threads tied firmly at one end and loose at the other end.

treading

tread ::: n. 1. A mark made by treading, as in snow. 2. The act, manner, or sound of treading or stepping. 3. The sound of footsteps. v. **4. To walk on, over, or along. Also fig. 5. To trample or crush underfoot. treads, treading.**

tendril ::: A twisting, threadlike structure by which a twining plant grasps an object or a plant for support. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.).

tendril ::: a twisting, threadlike structure by which a twining plant grasps an object or a plant for support. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as an adj.).

terrible ::: 1. Extremely formidable. 2. Causing great fear or alarm; dreadful.

texture ::: 1. The characteristic structure of the interwoven or intertwined threads, strands, or the like, that make up a textile fabric. Also fig. 2.* *The distinctive character or quality of something.

"That is the way things come, only one does not notice. Thoughts, ideas, happy inventions etc., etc., are always wandering about (in thought-waves or otherwise), seeking a mind that may embody them. One mind takes, looks, rejects — another takes, looks, accepts. Two different minds catch the same thought-form or thought-wave, but the mental activities being different, make different results out of them. Or it comes to one and he does nothing, then it walks off saying, ‘O this unready animal!" and goes to another who promptly welcomes it and it settles into expression with a joyous bubble of inspiration, illumination or enthusiasm of original discovery or creation and the recipient cries proudly, ‘I, I have done this". Ego, sir! ego! You are the recipient, the conditioning medium, if you like — nothing more.” Letters on Yoga

“That is the way things come, only one does not notice. Thoughts, ideas, happy inventions etc., etc., are always wandering about (in thought-waves or otherwise), seeking a mind that may embody them. One mind takes, looks, rejects—another takes, looks, accepts. Two different minds catch the same thought-form or thought-wave, but the mental activities being different, make different results out of them. Or it comes to one and he does nothing, then it walks off saying, ‘O this unready animal!’ and goes to another who promptly welcomes it and it settles into expression with a joyous bubble of inspiration, illumination or enthusiasm of original discovery or creation and the recipient cries proudly, ‘I, I have done this’. Ego, sir! ego! You are the recipient, the conditioning medium, if you like—nothing more.” Letters on Yoga

that way, it becomes ready for the moment when the psychic has only (o give a slight pusli for it to fa!! away in each field of its activity from its loosened roots.

thread ::: n. 1. A fine cord of flax, cotton, or other fibrous material spun out to considerable length, especially when composed of two or more filaments twisted together. 2. Any fine line, stream, mark, or piece. 3. Fig. Likened to a thread in passing (one"s way) through or over (something). 4. Something having the fineness or slenderness of a filament, as a thin continuous stream of liquid, a fine line of colour, etc. threads. *v. 5. To make one"s way, as through a passage or between obstacles. 6. To pass (thread, film, magnetic tape, etc.) through (something. Also fig. 7. To pervade. *threaded, threading.

"The Absolute neither creates nor is created, — in the current sense of making or being made; we can speak of creation only in the sense of the Being becoming in form and movement what it already is in substance and status.” *The Life Divine

“The Absolute neither creates nor is created,—in the current sense of making or being made; we can speak of creation only in the sense of the Being becoming in form and movement what it already is in substance and status.” The Life Divine

The condition of the souls that retire into the psychic world is entirely static, each withdraws into himself and is not inter- acting with the others. When they come out of their trance, they are ready to go down into a new life, but meanwhile they do not act upon the earth life. There are other beings, guardians of the psychic world, but they are concerned only with the psychic world itself and the return of the souls to reincarnation, not with the earth.

“The cosmic consciousness has many levels—the cosmic physical, the cosmic vital, the cosmic Mind, and above the higher planes of cosmic Mind there is the Intuition and above that the overmind and still above that the supermind where the Transcendental begins. In order to live in the Intuition plane (not merely to receive intuitions), one has to live in the cosmic consciousness because there the cosmic and individual run into each other as it were, and the mental separation between them is already broken down, so nobody can reach there who is still in the separative ego.” Letters on Yoga

"The cosmic consciousness is that in which the limits of ego, personal mind and body disappear and one becomes aware of a cosmic vastness which is or filled by a cosmic spirit and aware also of the direct play of cosmic forces, universal mind forces, universal life forces, universal energies of Matter, universal overmind forces. But one does not become aware of all these together; the opening of the cosmic consciousness is usually progressive. It is not that the ego, the body, the personal mind disappear, but one feels them as only a small part of oneself. One begins to feel others too as part of oneself or varied repetitions of oneself, the same self modified by Nature in other bodies. Or, at the least, as living in the larger universal self which is henceforth one"s own greater reality. All things in fact begin to change their nature and appearance; one"s whole experience of the world is radically different from that of those who are shut up in their personal selves. One begins to know things by a different kind of experience, more direct, not depending on the external mind and the senses. It is not that the possibility of error disappears, for that cannot be so long as mind of any kind is one"s instrument for transcribing knowledge, but there is a new, vast and deep way of experiencing, seeing, knowing, contacting things; and the confines of knowledge can be rolled back to an almost unmeasurable degree. The thing one has to be on guard against in the cosmic consciousness is the play of a magnified ego, the vaster attacks of the hostile forces — for they too are part of the cosmic consciousness — and the attempt of the cosmic Illusion (Ignorance, Avidya) to prevent the growth of the soul into the cosmic Truth. These are things that one has to learn from experience; mental teaching or explanation is quite insufficient. To enter safely into the cosmic consciousness and to pass safely through it, it is necessary to have a strong central unegoistic sincerity and to have the psychic being, with its divination of truth and unfaltering orientation towards the Divine, already in front in ::: —the nature.” Letters on Yoga*

“The cosmic consciousness is that in which the limits of ego, personal mind and body disappear and one becomes aware of a cosmic vastness which is or filled by a cosmic spirit and aware also of the direct play of cosmic forces, universal mind forces, universal life forces, universal energies of Matter, universal overmind forces. But one does not become aware of all these together; the opening of the cosmic consciousness is usually progressive. It is not that the ego, the body, the personal mind disappear, but one feels them as only a small part of oneself. One begins to feel others too as part of oneself or varied repetitions of oneself, the same self modified by Nature in other bodies. Or, at the least, as living in the larger universal self which is henceforth one’s own greater reality. All things in fact begin to change their nature and appearance; one’s whole experience of the world is radically different from that of those who are shut up in their personal selves. One begins to know things by a different kind of experience, more direct, not depending on the external mind and the senses. It is not that the possibility of error disappears, for that cannot be so long as mind of any kind is one’s instrument for transcribing knowledge, but there is a new, vast and deep way of experiencing, seeing, knowing, contacting things; and the confines of knowledge can be rolled back to an almost unmeasurable degree. The thing one has to be on guard against in the cosmic consciousness is the play of a magnified ego, the vaster attacks of the hostile forces—for they too are part of the cosmic consciousness—and the attempt of the cosmic Illusion (Ignorance, Avidya) to prevent the growth of the soul into the cosmic Truth. These are things that one has to learn from experience; mental teaching or explanation is quite insufficient. To enter safely into the cosmic consciousness and to pass safely through it, it is necessary to have a strong central unegoistic sincerity and to have the psychic being, with its divination of truth and unfaltering orientation towards the Divine, already in front in—the nature.” Letters on Yoga

“The difference between the ordinary mind and the intuitive is that the former, seeking in the darkness or at most by its own unsteady torchlight, first, sees things only as they are presented in that light and, secondly, where it does not know, constructs by imagination, by uncertain inference, by others of its aids and makeshifts things which it readily takes for truth, shadow projections, cloud edifices, unreal prolongations, deceptive anticipations, possibilities and probabilities which do duty for certitudes. The intuitive mind constructs nothing in this artificial fashion, but makes itself a receiver of the light and allows the truth to manifest in it and organise its own constructions.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"The Divine Grace is there ready to act at every moment, but it manifests as one grows out of the Law of Ignorance into the Law of Light, and it is meant, not as an arbitrary caprice, however miraculous often its intervention, but as a help in that growth and a Light that leads and eventually delivers.” Letters on Yoga

“The Divine Grace is there ready to act at every moment, but it manifests as one grows out of the Law of Ignorance into the Law of Light, and it is meant, not as an arbitrary caprice, however miraculous often its intervention, but as a help in that growth and a Light that leads and eventually delivers.” Letters on Yoga

The Divine Grace is there ready to act at every moment, but it manifests as one grows out of the Law of Ignorance into the

The genera! Divine WII in Ihc universe is for ilic progressive manifestation in the unis'crse. But that is the genera! will — it admits the uithdrawa! of individual souls who are not ready to persevere in the world.

::: "The Gods, as has already been said, are in origin and essence permanent Emanations of the Divine put forth from the Supreme by the Transcendent Mother, the Adya Shakti; in their cosmic action they are Powers and Personalities of the Divine each with his independent cosmic standing, function and work in the universe. They are not impersonal entities but cosmic Personalities, although they can and do ordinarily veil themselves behind the movement of impersonal forces.” Letters on Yoga

“The Gods, as has already been said, are in origin and essence permanent Emanations of the Divine put forth from the Supreme by the Transcendent Mother, the Adya Shakti; in their cosmic action they are Powers and Personalities of the Divine each with his independent cosmic standing, function and work in the universe. They are not impersonal entities but cosmic Personalities, although they can and do ordinarily veil themselves behind the movement of impersonal forces.” Letters on Yoga

"The gospel of true supermanhood gives us a generous ideal for the progressive human race and should not be turned into an arrogant claim for a class or individuals. It is a call to man to do what no species has yet done or aspired to do in terrestrial history, evolve itself consciously into the next superior type already half foreseen by the continual cyclic development of the world-idea in Nature"s fruitful musings . . . .” The Supramental Manifestation*

“The gospel of true supermanhood gives us a generous ideal for the progressive human race and should not be turned into an arrogant claim for a class or individuals. It is a call to man to do what no species has yet done or aspired to do in terrestrial history, evolve itself consciously into the next superior type already half foreseen by the continual cyclic development of the world-idea in Nature’s fruitful musings ….” The Supramental Manifestation

"The inner vision is an open door on higher planes of consciousness beyond the physical mind which gives room for a wider truth and experience to enter and act upon the mind. It is not the only or the most important door, but it is one which comes readiest to very many if not most and can be a very powerful help.” Letters on Yoga

“The inner vision is an open door on higher planes of consciousness beyond the physical mind which gives room for a wider truth and experience to enter and act upon the mind. It is not the only or the most important door, but it is one which comes readiest to very many if not most and can be a very powerful help.” Letters on Yoga

“The integral Knowledge is something that is already there in the integral Reality: it is not a new or still non-existent thing that has to be created, acquired, learned, invented or built up by the mind; it must rather be discovered or uncovered, it is a Truth that is self-revealed to a spiritual endeavour: for it is there veiled in our deeper and greater self; it is the very stuff of our own spiritual consciousness, and it is by awaking to it even in our surface self that we have to possess it. There is an integral self-knowledge that we have to recover and, because the world-self also is our self, an integral world-knowledge. A knowledge that can be learned or constructed by the mind exists and has its value, but that is not what is meant when we speak of the Knowledge and the Ignorance.” The Life Divine

  The Mother: ‘There are four Asuras. Two have already been converted, and the other two, the Lord of Death and the Lord of Falsehood, made an attempt at conversion by taking on a physical body – they have been intimately associated with my life. The story of these Asuras would be very interesting to recount. . . the Lord of Death disappeared; he lost his physical body, and I don"t know what has become of him. As for the other, the Lord of Falsehood, the one who now rules over this earth, he tried hard to be converted but he found it disgusting!

The Mother: ‘There are four Asuras. Two have already been converted, and the other two, the Lord of Death and the Lord of Falsehood, made an attempt at conversion by taking on a physical body—they have been intimately associated with my life. The story of these Asuras would be very interesting to recount. . . the Lord of Death disappeared; he lost his physical body, and I don’t know what has become of him. As for the other, the Lord of Falsehood, the one who now rules over this earth, he tried hard to be converted but he found it disgusting!

The Mother: “Transformation. The change by which all the elements and all the movements of the being become ready to manifest the supramental Truth.”

"The mystic feels real and present, even ever present to his experience, intimate to his being, truths which to the ordinary reader are intellectual abstractions or metaphysical speculations.” Letters on Savitri

“The mystic feels real and present, even ever present to his experience, intimate to his being, truths which to the ordinary reader are intellectual abstractions or metaphysical speculations.” Letters on Savitri

"The sense of free will, illusion or not, is a necessary machinery of the action of Nature, necessary for man during his progress, and it would be disastrous for him to lose it before he is ready for a higher truth. If it be said, as it has been said, that Nature deludes man to fulfil her behests and that the idea of a free individual will is the most powerful of these delusions, then it must also be said that the delusion is for his good and without it he could not rise to his full possibilities.” Essays on the Gita

“The sense of free will, illusion or not, is a necessary machinery of the action of Nature, necessary for man during his progress, and it would be disastrous for him to lose it before he is ready for a higher truth. If it be said, as it has been said, that Nature deludes man to fulfil her behests and that the idea of a free individual will is the most powerful of these delusions, then it must also be said that the delusion is for his good and without it he could not rise to his full possibilities.” Essays on the Gita

The soul, on the contrary, is something. that comes down into birth and passes through death — although it does not itself die, for it is immortal — from one state to another, from the earth plane to other planes and back again to the earth'cxisteoce. ft goes on with this progression from life to life through an evolu- tion which leads it up to the human state and evolves through it all a being of itself which we call the psychic being that sup- ports the evolution and develops a physical, a vital, a mental human consciousness as its instruments of world-experience and of a disguised, imperfect, but growing self-expression. All this it does from behind a veil showing something of its divine self only in so far as the imperfection of the instrumental being will allow it. But a time comes when it is able to prepare to come out from behind the veil, take command and turn all the instru- mental nature towards a divine fulfilment. This is the beginning of the true spiritual life. The soul is able now to make itself ready for a higher evolution of manifested consciousness than the mental human — it can pass from the mental to the spiritual and through degrees of the spiritual to the supramental state. _ ,

"The Unknowable, — not absolutely unknowable, but beyond mental knowledge, — can only be a higher degree in the intensity of being of that Something, a degree beyond the loftiest summit attainable by mental beings, and, if it were known as it must be known to itself, that discovery would not destroy entirely what is given us by our supreme possible knowledge but rather carry it to a higher fulfilment and larger truth of what it has already gained by self-vision and self-experience.” The Life Divine

“The Unknowable,—not absolutely unknowable, but beyond mental knowledge,—can only be a higher degree in the intensity of being of that Something, a degree beyond the loftiest summit attainable by mental beings, and, if it were known as it must be known to itself, that discovery would not destroy entirely what is given us by our supreme possible knowledge but rather carry it to a higher fulfilment and larger truth of what it has already gained by self-vision and self-experience.” The Life Divine

::: "The use of the word Power has already been explained — it can be applied to whatever or whoever exercises a conscious power in the cosmic field and has authority over the world-movement or some movement in it.” Letters on Yoga

“The use of the word Power has already been explained—it can be applied to whatever or whoever exercises a conscious power in the cosmic field and has authority over the world-movement or some movement in it.” Letters on Yoga

The wall is indeed the wall of the ego which is based on the insistent identification of oneself with the outer personality and its movements. It is that identification which is the key-stone of the limitation and bondage from which the outer being su/Tcrs, prevenUng expansion, self-knowledge, spiritual freedom. But still the wall must not be prematurely broken down, because that may lead to a disruption or confusion or invasion of either part by the movements of the two separated worlds before they are ready to harmonise. A certain separation is necessary for some time after one has become aware of these two parts of the being as existing together. The force of the Yoga must be given time to make the necessary adjustments and openings, and to take the being inward and then from this inward poise to work on the outer nature.

The Zero is not a negative Void. It exceeds the farthest conception of the mind and strikes it as a blank though it is full in a way that is beyond human comprehension.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. I.

This opening is a throwing wide of all the nature on ail its levels and in all its parts to receive into itself without limits the greater divine Consciousness which is there already above and behind and englobing this mortal half-conscious existence.

This yoga is a spiritual battle ; hs sery attempt raises all sorts of adverse forces and one must be ready to face difficulties, suflerinss, reverses of aU sorts in a calm unflinching spirit The difficulties that come are orders and tests and if one meets them in the right spirit one comes out stronar and spirituaUj* pmrer and greater. No misfortui^ can come, the adverse forces cannot touch or be victorioas nnless there is some defect in oneself.

tide ::: fig. 1. Something that fluctuates like the waters of the tide. 2. A time or season. Often used in combination: eventide; Christmastide. 3. A widespread tendency or movement. tides.

tinsel ::: 1. A glittering metallic substance, as copper or brass, in thin sheets, used in pieces, strips, threads, etc. to produce a sparkling effect cheaply. 2. Something sparkling or showy but basically valueless.

"To me, for instance, consciousness is the very stuff of existence and I can feel it everywhere enveloping and penetrating the stone as much as man or the animal. A movement, a flow of consciousness is not to me an image but a fact. If I wrote "His anger climbed against me in a stream", it would be to the general reader a mere image, not something that was felt by me in a sensible experience; yet I would only be describing in exact terms what actually happened once, a stream of anger, a sensible and violent current of it rising up from downstairs and rushing upon me as I sat in the veranda of the Guest-House, the truth of it being confirmed afterwards by the confession of the person who had the movement. This is only one instance, but all that is spiritual or psychological in Savitri is of that character. What is to be done under these circumstances? The mystical poet can only describe what he has felt, seen in himself or others or in the world just as he has felt or seen it or experienced through exact vision, close contact or identity and leave it to the general reader to understand or not understand or misunderstand according to his capacity. A new kind of poetry demands a new mentality in the recipient as well as in the writer.” Letters on Savitri

“To me, for instance, consciousness is the very stuff of existence and I can feel it everywhere enveloping and penetrating the stone as much as man or the animal. A movement, a flow of consciousness is not to me an image but a fact. If I wrote ’His anger climbed against me in a stream’, it would be to the general reader a mere image, not something that was felt by me in a sensible experience; yet I would only be describing in exact terms what actually happened once, a stream of anger, a sensible and violent current of it rising up from downstairs and rushing upon me as I sat in the veranda of the Guest-House, the truth of it being confirmed afterwards by the confession of the person who had the movement. This is only one instance, but all that is spiritual or psychological in Savitri is of that character. What is to be done under these circumstances? The mystical poet can only describe what he has felt, seen in himself or others or in the world just as he has felt or seen it or experienced through exact vision, close contact or identity and leave it to the general reader to understand or not understand or misunderstand according to his capacity. A new kind of poetry demands a new mentality in the recipient as well as in the writer.” Letters on Savitri

tracery ::: any delicate, interlacing work of lines, threads, etc., as in carving or embroidery; network. Also fig.

tragic ::: 1. Dreadful, calamitous, disastrous, or fatal. 2. Of, pertaining to, characterized by, or of the nature of tragedy. 3. Relating to or characteristic of dramatic tragedy or tragedies; very sad; especially involving grief or death or destruction.

tramp ::: 1. A firm, heavy, resounding tread. 2. A journey, often long, on foot, a march.

trample ::: 1. To tread or walk heavily or noisily; to stamp. 2. To beat down with the feet so as to crush, bruise, or destroy; tramp on. 3. To treat harshly or ruthlessly. Also fig. trampled, trampling.

trampled ::: inflicted injury or beat down as if by reading heavily; oppressed.

Trance and illness ::: The violent breaking of a trance might have a bad result, though It would not necessarily produce a disaster. But there is the possibility that If the conscious being goes out of the body in an absoluely complete trance, the thread which connects it with the body might be broken or else cut by some adverse force and it would not be able to return into the physical frame. Apart from any such fatal possibility there might be a shock which might produce a temporary disorder or even some kind of lesion ; as a rule, however, a shock would be the only consequence.

transformation ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Transformation means that the higher consciousness or nature is brought down into the mind, vital and body and takes the place of the lower. There is a higher consciousness of the true self, which is spiritual, but it is above; if one rises above into it, then one is free as long as one remains there, but if one comes down into or uses mind, vital or body — and if one keeps any connection with life, one has to do so, either to come down and act from the ordinary consciousness or else to be in the self but use mind, life and body, then the imperfections of these instruments have to be faced and mended — they can only be mended by transformation.” *Letters on Yoga

  "‘Transformation" is a word that I have brought in myself (like ‘supermind") to express certain spiritual concepts and spiritual facts of the integral yoga. People are now taking them up and using them in senses which have nothing to do with the significance which I put into them. Purification of the nature by the ‘influence" of the Spirit is not what I mean by transformation; purification is only part of a psychic change or a psycho-spiritual change — the word besides has many senses and is very often given a moral or ethical meaning which is foreign to my purpose.” *Letters on Yoga

"It is indeed as a result of our evolution that we arrive at the possibility of this transformation. As Nature has evolved beyond Matter and manifested Life, beyond Life and manifested Mind, so she must evolve beyond Mind and manifest a consciousness and power of our existence free from the imperfection and limitation of our mental existence, a supramental or truth-consciousness and able to develop the power and perfection of the spirit. Here a slow and tardy change need no longer be the law or manner of our evolution; it will be only so to a greater or less extent so long as a mental ignorance clings and hampers our ascent; but once we have grown into the truth-consciousness its power of spiritual truth of being will determine all. Into that truth we shall be freed and it will transform mind and life and body. Light and bliss and beauty and a perfection of the spontaneous right action of all the being are there as native powers of the supramental truth-consciousness and these will in their very nature transform mind and life and body even here upon earth into a manifestation of the truth-conscious spirit. The obscurations of earth will not prevail against the supramental truth-consciousness, for even into the earth it can bring enough of the omniscient light and omnipotent force of the spirit conquer. All may not open to the fullness of its light and power, but whatever does open must that extent undergo the change. That will be the principle of transformation.” The Supramental Manifestation

The Mother: "Transformation. The change by which all the elements and all the movements of the being become ready to manifest the supramental Truth.”

"One thing you must know and never forget: in the work of transformation all that is true and sincere will always be kept; only what is false and insincere will disappear.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.


TRANSFORMATION. ::: The change by which all the ele- ments and all the movements of the being become ready to manifest the supramental Truth.

tree of cosmos ::: the tree with its roots above (in the heavens) and its branches spread downward. A common metaphor in many spiritual traditions.

tremendous ::: 1. Dreadful or awful, as in character or effect; exciting fear; frightening; terrifying. 2. Extraordinarily great in size, amount, or intensity. 3. Extraordinary in excellence.

triple cord of mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "So too when the seer of the house of Atri cries high to Agni, ‘O Agni, O Priest of the offering, loose from us the cords," he is using not only a natural, but a richly-laden image. He is thinking of the triple cord of mind, nerves and body by which the soul is bound as a victim in the great world-sacrifice, the sacrifice of the Purusha; he is thinking of the force of the divine Will already awakened and at work within him, a fiery and irresistible godhead that shall uplift his oppressed divinity and cleave asunder the cords of its bondage; he is thinking of the might of that growing Strength and inner Flame which receiving all that he has to offer carries it to its own distant and difficult home, to the high-seated Truth, to the Far, to the Secret, to the Supreme.” *The Secret of the Veda

trodden ::: walked or trampled in, on, over, or across (something). (Also, pp. of tread.)

trod ::: pt. and pp. of tread.

Truth’s shadow and not its body. Mind does not Jive in Truth or only seeks after it and grasps at best some threads from its robe ; the Supermiod lives in Truth and its native substance, form and expression ; it has not to seek after It, but possesses it always automatically and is what it possesses. This is very heart of the difference.

Two things render that culmination more facile than it would otherwise be. Overmind in the descent towards material creation has originated modifications of itself,—Intuition especially with its penetrative lightning flashes of truth lighting up local points and stretches of country in our consciousness,—which can bring the concealed truth of things nearer to our comprehension, and, by opening ourselves more widely first in the inner being and then as a result in the outer surface self also to the messages of these higher ranges of consciousness, by growing into them, we can become ourselves also intuitive and overmental beings, not limited by the intellect and sense, but capable of a more universal comprehension and a direct touch of truth in its very self and body. In fact flashes of enlightenment from these higher ranges already come to us, but this intervention is mostly fragmentary, casual or partial; we have still to begin to enlarge ourselves into their likeness and organise in us the greater Truth activities of which we are potentially capable. But, secondly, Overmind, Intuition, even Supermind not only must be, as we have seen, principles inherent and involved in the Inconscience from which we arise in the evolution and inevitably destined to evolve, but are secretly present, occult actively with flashes of intuitive emergence in the cosmic activity of Mind, Life and Matter. It is true that their action is concealed and, even when they emerge, it is modified by the medium, material, vital, mental in which they work and not easily recognisable. Supermind cannot manifest itself as the Creator Power in the universe from the beginning, for if it did, the Ignorance and Inconscience would be impossible or else the slow evolution necessary would change into a rapid transformation scene. Yet at every step of the material energy we can see the stamp of inevitability given by a supramental creator, in all the development of life and mind the play of the lines of possibility and their combination which is the stamp of Overmind intervention. As Life and Mind have been released in Matter, so too must in their time these greater powers of the concealed Godhead emerge from the involution and their supreme Light descend into us from above. …

unreadable; not legible; impossible or hard to read or decipher because of poor handwriting, faded print, etc.

unreadable :::

Usually there cannot but be a mixture of these two ways until the consciousness is ready to be entirely open, entirely submit- ted to the Divine’s organisation of all its action. It is then that all responsibility disappears and there is no personal burden.

weave ::: 1. To make (cloth) by interlacing threads on a loom. 2. To introduce as an element or detail into a connected whole. 3. Fig. To contrive (something complex or elaborate) in the mind. 4. To move or proceed in a winding course or from side to side. weaves, weaving.

weft ::: 1. The horizontal threads interlaced through the warp in a woven fabric; woof. 2. Something woven, like fabric. Also fig. marvel-wefts, wonder-weft.

"We know the Divine and become the Divine, because we are That already in our secret nature.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“We know the Divine and become the Divine, because we are That already in our secret nature.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“We may rely, if on nothing else, on the evolutionary urge and, if on no other greater hidden Power, on the manifest working and drift or intention in the World-Energy we call Nature to carry mankind at least as far as the necessary next step to be taken, a self-preserving next step: for the necessity is there, at least some general recognition of it has been achieved and of the thing to which it must eventually lead the idea has been born and the body of it is already calling for its creation.” The Human Cycle, etc.

"We speak of the evolution of Life in Matter, the evolution of Mind in Matter; but evolution is a word which merely states the phenomenon without explaining it. For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

“We speak of the evolution of Life in Matter, the evolution of Mind in Matter; but evolution is a word which merely states the phenomenon without explaining it. For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

“What people mean by the formless svarûpa of the Mother,—they means usually her universal aspect. It is when she is experienced as a universal Existence and Power spread through the universe in which and by which all live. When one feels that Presence one begins to feel a universal peace, light, power, bliss without limits—that is her svarûpa.” The Mother

When it enters the psychic world, it begins to assimilate the essence of its experience and by that assimilation is formed the future psychic personality in accordance with the fixation already made. When this assimilation is over, it is ready for a new birth ; but' the less developed beings do not work out the whole thing for themselves, there are beings and forces of the higher world who have that svork.

wideness ::: “The wideness comes when one exceeds or begins to exceed the individual consciousness and spread out towards the universal. But the psychic can be active even in the individual consciousness.” Letters on Yoga

willing ::: cheerfully consenting or ready.

will, self ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Self-will in thought and action has, we have already seen, to be quite renounced if we would be perfect in the way of divine works; it has equally to be renounced if we are to be perfect in divine knowledge. This self-will means an egoism in the mind which attaches itself to its preferences, its habits, its past or present formations of thought and view and will because it regards them as itself or its own, weaves around them the delicate threads of I-ness'' andmy-ness"" and lives in them like a spider in its web. It hates to be disturbed, as a spider hates attack on its web, and feels foreign and unhappy if transplanted to fresh view-points and formations as a spider feels foreign in another web than its own. This attachment must be entirely excised from the mind.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

Without the Grace of the Divine nothing can be done, but for the full Grace to manifest the sadhaka must make himself ready.

world-energy ::: Sri Aurobindo: "We may rely, if on nothing else, on the evolutionary urge and, if on no other greater hidden Power, on the manifest working and drift or intention in the World-Energy we call Nature to carry mankind at least as far as the necessary next step to be taken, a self-preserving next step: for the necessity is there, at least some general recognition of it has been achieved and of the thing to which it must eventually lead the idea has been born and the body of it is already calling for its creation.” *The Human Cycle, etc.

world-knowledge ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The integral Knowledge is something that is already there in the integral Reality: it is not a new or still non-existent thing that has to be created, acquired, learned, invented or built up by the mind; it must rather be discovered or uncovered, it is a Truth that is self-revealed to a spiritual endeavour: for it is there veiled in our deeper and greater self; it is the very stuff of our own spiritual consciousness, and it is by awaking to it even in our surface self that we have to possess it. There is an integral self-knowledge that we have to recover and, because the world-self also is our self, an integral world-knowledge. A knowledge that can be learned or constructed by the mind exists and has its value, but that is not what is meant when we speak of the Knowledge and the Ignorance.” *The Life Divine

YOGI AND SADHAKA. ::: The yogi is one who is already established In realisation ; the sadhaka is one who -is getting or still trying to get realisation.

Yogin, already possessed of the highest supra-cosmic knowledge and experience in the state of irance. is able in the waling state to acquire directly whatever knowledge and exercise, whatever mastery may be useful or necessary to bis activities in the objec- tive world. For the andent system of Rajajoga aimed not only

Yogin fields of consciousness, ranges of experience, abnormal faculties denied to the ordinary human life while it puissantly intensifies such normal powers and faculties as he already pos- sesses. These advantages can be further secured and emphasised by other subsidiary processes open to the Hatha Yogin.



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   17 The Mother
   11 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   9 Sri Aurobindo
   5 Sri Ramakrishna
   4 Georg C Lichtenberg
   3 Voltaire
   3 Our Lady how this thread
   3 Groucho Marx
   3 C S Lewis
   3 Anonymous
   3 Epictetus
   2 Saint Ambrose
   2 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   2 Oscar Wilde
   2 Neville Goddard
   2 Miyamoto Musashi
   2 Leo Tolstoy
   2 Henry David Thoreau
   2 Friedrich Nietzsche
   2 Ernest Cline
   2 Buddha
   2 Angelus Silesius
   2 Albert Einstein
   2 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   2 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   2 Dogen Zenji
   1 Zen Master So Sahn
   1 Zenkei Shibayama 1894-1974
   1 Zen Fi
   1 Yamamoto Tsunetomo
   1 Winston Churchill
   1 William Shakespeare
   1 William James
   1 William Butler Yeats
   1 William Blake
   1 Wei Wu Wei
   1 Vicktor Hugo
   1 Ursula K. Le Guin
   1 Toni Morrison
   1 Thomas Jefferson
   1 Thomas Ehrlich
   1 Thomas Carlyle
   1 Thomas a Kempis
   1 Thomas A Kempis
   1 Thich Nhat Hanh
   1 The Mother
   1 Tao Te Ching
   1 Susan Sontag
   1 Sufi Saying
   1 Sri Sarada Devi
   1 Sir Francis Bacon
   1 Shunryu Suzuki
   1 Shiki
   1 Seungsahn
   1 Seneca
   1 Samael Aun Weor
   1 Salvador Dali
   1 Saint John of the Cross
   1 Saint Isidore of Seville
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   1 Saint Athanasius of Alexandria
   1 Robert Burton
   1 Robert Burns
   1 Richard P Feynman
   1 Rene Descartes
   1 Raymond Chandler
   1 Ramakrishna
   1 Publilius Syrus
   1 Pliny the Elder
   1 Pino
   1 Philokalia
   1 P.D. Ouspensky
   1 Our Lady to Fr. Stefano Gobbi
   1 Our Lady to Father Stefano Gobbi
   1 Mooji
   1 Miguel Angel Ruiz
   1 Michel de Montaigne
   1 Ludwig Wittgenstein
   1 Louise Colet
   1 Lilly Wachowski
   1 Letter of Barnabas
   1 Lauren Klarfeld
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   1 Jn. 6:51).
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   1 Jeffrey J Kripal
   1 Japanese Proverb
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   1 Ikkyu
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   1 George Bernard Shaw
   1 Fran Lebowitz
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   1 Ernest Hemingway
   1 Deuteronomy
   1 Charles M. Schulz in "Peanuts
   1 Carlos Fuentes
   1 Carl Jung
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   1 Bertrand Russell
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   38 Anonymous
   17 George Herbert
   12 William Shakespeare
   12 Jane Austen
   8 Victor Hugo
   8 John Green
   7 J K Rowling
   7 Benjamin Franklin
   6 Will Smith
   6 Unknown
   6 Toba Beta
   6 Suzanne Collins
   6 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   6 James Joyce
   6 Italo Calvino
   6 Harper Lee
   6 Dave Barry
   5 Theodore Roosevelt
   5 Terry Pratchett
   5 Stephen King

1:We read to know we are not alone. ~ C S Lewis,
2:Not now, I am trying to read my book! ~ Pino, Ergo Proxy,
3:Think before you speak. Read before you think. ~ Fran Lebowitz,
4:Don't classify me, read me. I'm a writer, not a genre. ~ Carlos Fuentes,
5:I read so I can live more than one life in more than one place. ~ Anne Tyler,
6:A little I can read. ~ William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, act 1 scene 2,
7:Some people read only because they are too lazy to think. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
8:Where the press is free, and everyone is able to read, all is safe. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
9:When reading, only read. When eating, only eat. When thinking, only think." ~ Seungsahn,
10:It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations. ~ Winston Churchill,
11:A book read by a thousand different people is a thousand different books. ~ Andrei Tarkovsky,
12:Both read the Bible day and night, but thou read black where I read white.
   ~ William Blake,
13:Why read? Because we are given more than we are. ~ James V. Schall, Another Sort of Learning,
14:Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
15:Tolle, lege: take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
16:Soft winds, serene moon, I calmly read the true words of no letters. ~ Zenkei Shibayama 1894-1974,
17:Learn how to read the love letters send by the wind and rain, the snow and moon. ~ Ikkyu, 1394-1481,
18:Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world. ~ Voltaire,
19:Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world.
   ~ Voltaire,
20:Whatever sentence will bear to be read twice, we may be sure was thought twice.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
21:The man of taste will read only what is good; but the statesman will permit both bad and good. ~ Voltaire,
22:To read means to borrow; to create out of one's readings is paying off one's debts. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
23:We speak to God when we pray; we listen to Him when we read the Scriptures. ~ Saint Ambrose, [T5],
24:Read Sri Aurobindo and follow his discipline. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother - I,
25:If there's a book that you want to read, but it hasn't been written yet, then you must write it. ~ Toni Morrison,
26:True glory consists in doing what deserves to be written; in writing what deserves to be read. ~ Pliny the Elder,
27:I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train. ~ Oscar Wilde,
28:It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it. ~ Oscar Wilde,
29:Educate yourself, welcome life's messiness, read Chekhov, avoid becoming an architect at all costs. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
30:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. ~ The Mother, Mother to Mona Sarkar on Savitri, [T5],
31:I had no ambition to be a writer because the books I read were too good, my standards were too high.
   ~ Haruki Murakami,
32:The buying of more books than one can read is nothing less than the soul reaching toward infinity...
   ~ A Edward Newton,
33:The test of a writer is whether you want to read him again years after he should by the rules be dated. ~ Raymond Chandler,
34:Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write.
   ~ H G Wells,
35:What should I read at present?

   Sri Aurobindo's books.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
36:My child, every day you are going to read Savitri
   ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, [T0],
37:Do not read to satisfy curiosity or to pass the time, but study such things as move your heart to devotion. ~ Thomas a Kempis,
38:I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
39:However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them?
   ~ Buddha,
40:One should read Sri Aurobindo and know the answer.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I, [T0],
41:I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. ~ Groucho Marx,
42:To every declarative sentence you hear, read, think or utter, add "or not' to it and you'll never encounter a falsehood." ~ Anon.,
43:It is good to read a Dvine Teaching.
It is better to learn it.
The best is to live it. ~ The Mother,
44:Don't just teach your children to read...
Teach them to question what they read.
Teach them to question everything. ~ George Carlin,
45:... we should read for power. Man reading should be man intensely alive. The book should be a ball of light in one's hand.
   ~ Ezra Pound,
46:What expression, when you read it, will make you sad when you are happy and happy when you are sad? Answer: 'THIS TOO, WILL PASS'." ~ Sufi Saying,
47:No language exists that cannot be misused... Every Interpretation is hypothetical, for it is a mere attempt to read an unfamiliar text. ~ Carl Jung,
48:Read a lot. Expect something big, something exalting or deepening from a book. No book is worth reading that isn't worth re-reading.
   ~ Susan Sontag,
49:The world is a great book, of which they that never stir from home read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
50:You can read sacred books and yet be far away from the Divine; and you can read the most stupid productions and be in touch with the Divine. ~ The Mother,
51:It is of no use to read the scriptures without viveka and vairagya, there is no attainment of spirituality. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
52:If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.
   ~ Albert Einstein,
53:What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
54:Thanks be to the Gospel, by means of which we also, who did not see Christ when he came into this world, seem to be with him when we read his deeds. ~ Saint Ambrose,
55:I'm re-reading Savitri.

   Lucky man! I would love to read it again. And the more you read, the more marvellous it becomes.
   ~ The Mother,
56:That which others hear or read of, I felt and practised myself; they get their knowledge by books, I mine by melancholizing. ~ Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy,
57:It is always the same question: have you really read all those books? My answer is always the same: a library is a sign of desire, not of accomplishment. ~ Jeffrey J Kripal,
58:Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. ~ Groucho Marx, The Essential Groucho: Writings For By And About Groucho Marx ,
59:How long do You want me to read and study?

   Four hours of concentrated study a day is enough.
   ~ The Mother, More Answers From The Mother, [T5],
60:If it is permissible to write plays that are not intended to be seen, I should like to see who can prevent me from writing a book no one can read. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg, [T5],
61:Intelligence does not depend on the amount one has read, it is a quality of the mind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, The Place of Study in Sadhana,
62:Despite the enormous quantity of books, how few people read! And if one reads profitably, one would realize how much stupid stuff the vulgar herd is content to swallow every day. ~ Voltaire
63:To any artist, worthy of the name, all in nature is beautiful, because his eyes, fearlessly accepting all exterior truth, read there, as in an open book, all the inner truth. ~ Auguste Rodin,
64:On the day we call the day of the sun, all who dwell in the city or country gather in the same place. The memoirs of the apostles and the writings of the prophets are read. ~ Saint Justin Martyr,
65:He [the child] does not despise real woods because he has read of enchanted woods: the reading makes all real woods a little enchanted. ~ C S Lewis, "On Three Ways of Writing for Children" (1952),
66:Q:Should we read Gita once in a while?
M:Always.
Q:May we read the Bible?
M:The Bible and the Gita are the same. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks, 164, [T5],
67:I wrote the books I should have liked to read. That's always been my reason for writing. People won't write the books I want, so I have to do it for myself. ~ C S Lewis, quoted by Roger Lancelyn Green,
68:He has read everything, learned everything, practised everything, who has renounced his desires and lives without any straining of hope. ~ Hitopadesha, the Eternal Wisdom
69:Read the gospel attentively and you will see that Jesus sacrificed even charity for prayer. And do you know why? To teach us that, without God, we are too poor to help the poor. ~ Mother Teresa of Calcutta,
70:Sit in a room and read--and read and read. And read the right books by the right people. Your mind is brought onto that level, and you have a nice, mild, slow-burning rapture all the time. ~ Joseph Campbell,
71:It is of great advantage to the student of any subject to read the original memoirs on that subject, for science is always most completely assimilated when it is in the nascent state... ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
72:The ideal reader of my novels is a lapsed Catholic and failed musician, short-sighted, color-blind, auditorily biased, who has read the books that I have read. He should also be about my age. ~ Anthony Burgess,
73:People who have read a good deal rarely make great discoveries. I do not say this in excuse of laziness, but because invention presupposes an extensive independent contemplation of things. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
74:Let us read it thus: even if you do turn your face away from us, Lord, its light is still imprinted upon us. We hold it in our hearts and our innermost feelings are transformed by its light. ~ Saint Ambrose of Milan,
75:The perceptible world is even like some communal book tied to creation by a chain so that anyone who wishes may read in it the wisdom of God. ~ Bernard of Clairvaux, Monastic Sermons (Sermon 9 'Concnerning Romans 1:20'),
76:Words are not cubicles for truth telling. Words do not allow us to touch the face of God or define the contours of the soul." ~ Kilroy J. Oldster "Dead Toad Scrolls,", (2016). A series of meditative essays [Worth a read.],
77:To read too much is bad for thought. The greatest thinkers I have met among the savants whom I have studied were precisely those who were the least learned. ~ Liehtemberg, the Eternal Wisdom
78:I am not sure that I exist, actually. I am all the writers that I have read, all the people that I have met, all the women that I have loved; all the cities I have visited. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
79:Sit in a room and read--and read and read. And read the right books by the right people. Your mind is brought onto that level, and you have a nice, mild, slow-burning rapture all the time. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth,
80:An Interview with a Carmelite Nun and Prayer as Relationship with.. ~ THIS WEEK ONLY, save 30% off the Collected Works of St. John of the Cross with the promo code CarmelCast. Mother Celine recalls that when she first read St...,
81:The greatest fear that human beings experience is not death, which is inevitable, but consideration of the distinct possibility of living a worthless life." ~ Kilroy J. Oldster, "Dead Toad Scrolls,", (2016). [IMHO, worth a read],
82:I am wont to visit My elect in two ways -- by temptation and by consolation. To them I read two lessons daily -- one reproving their vices, the other exhorting them to progress in virtue. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
83:Do not interpret all things you read according to the literal sense, for philosophers when they write anything too excellent for the vulgar to know, expressed it enigmatically that the sons of Art only might understand it. ~ John French,
84:Amongst the friends of Allah (Awliya), the Qur'an is considered as a love letter from Allah, which inevitably is read continuously to remind them of their Beloved. ~ Dr Tahir al Qadri, @Sufi_Path
85:If your mind is happy, then you happy anywhere you go. When wisdom awakens within you, you will see Truth wherever you look. Truth is all there is. It's like when you've learned how to read, you can then read anywhere you go. ~ Ajahn Chah,
86:It would be very surprising if a church constructed by the hands of man should be full of symbols while the universe would not be infinitely full of them. They must be read. ~ Simone Weil, 'The First Condition for the Work of a Free Person',
87:Write My words in your heart and meditate on them earnestly, for in time of temptation they will be very necessary. What you do not understand when you read, you will learn in the day of visitation. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
88:At hazard he read by arrow-leaps of Thought
That hit the mark by guess or luminous chance, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 02.06,
89:She [St. Catherine of Siena] moves and touches me so deeply that every time I read her life, I have to hold the book in one hand and a handkerchief in the other to staunch the tears that it makes me shed continually. ~ Saint Anthony Mary Claret,
90:My heart feels arid, sad and gloomy, Mother.

   Why don't you try to read something beautiful and interesting and turn your attention away from yourself? That is the best remedy.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
91:Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book. ~ John Green, The Fault in Our Stars,
92:A life in which the supernatural truths would be read in every kind of work, in every active labour, in all festivals, and all hierarchical and social relations, in all art, in all science, in all philosophy. ~ Simone Weil, First and Last Notebooks 173,
93:There is only one sin and it is: weakness. When I was a boy, I read Milton's Paradise Lost. The only good man I had any respect for was Satan. The only saint is that person who never weakens, faces everything, and determines die game. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
94:Therefore when you try to learn more knowledge and you read more books, all you're doing is adding on to the garbage pail. Of course most of you realize, the highest truth is to delete, not to add. To get rid of the things you believe in now. ~ Robert Adams,
95:There is a reflective property in matter. It is a mirror tarnished, clouded by our breath. It is only necessary to clean the mirror and to read the symbols that are written in matter from all eternity. ~ Simone Weil, 'The First Condition for the Work of a Free Person',
96:As one has to learn to read... so one must learn to feel in all things, first and almost solely, the obedience of the universe to God. It is truly an apprenticeship; and like every apprenticeship it calls for time and effort. ~ Simone Weil, 'Love of God & Affliction' 180,
97:Drop out of school before your mind rots from exposure to our mediocre educational system. Forget about the Senior Prom and go to the library and educate yourself if you've got any guts. Some of you like Pep rallies and plastic robots who tell you what to read. ~ Frank Zappa,
98:A writer who wishes to be read by posterity must not be averse to putting hints which might give rise to whole books, or ideas for learned discussions, in some corner of a chapter so that one should think he can afford to throw them away by the thousand. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
99:Indeed, consciousness itself may be a fundamental property of matter, if so then there was no such thing as a 'pre-conscious" universe. ~ Donna Lu, (technical reporter) article "What is Reality," in magazine "New Scientist" Feb. 1-7, 2020, Special Issue. [IMHO: Worth a read].,
100:As one has to learn to read, or to practice a trade, so one must learn to feel in all things, first and almost solely, the obedience of the universe to God… As soon as we feel this obedience with our whole being, we see God. ~ Simone Weil, On Science, Necessity & the Love of God,
101:We were made in the image and likeness of our Creator, endowed with intellect and reason… In this way, continuously contemplating the beauty of creatures, through them as if they were letters and words, we could read God's wisdom and providence over all things. ~ Basil of Cesarea,
102:If someone wants to study the law and find out what gives it its force (it is the bond of love, for whoever loves his neighbour has fulfilled the law) let him read in the psalms how love led one man to undergo great dangers to wipe out the shame of his entire people. ~ Saint Ambrose,
103:The Inconscient could not read without man's mind
The mystery of the world its sleep has made:
Man is its key to unlock a conscious door. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Eternal Day, The Soul's Choice and the Supreme Consummation,
104:A man should hear a little music, read a little poetry, and see a fine picture every day of his life, in order that worldly cares may not obliterate the sense of the beautiful which God has implanted in the human soul.
   ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
105:Men are guided by their own nature, whether good or bad; there is no gainsaying that. But in the world, there are always some who get intoxicated when they hear of God, and shed tears of joy when they read of God. Such men are true Bhaktas. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
106:Yes, yes; you've read thousands of books but you've never tried to read your own self; you rush into your temples, into your mosques, but you have never tried to enter your own heart; futile are all your battles with the devil for you have never tried to fight your own desires. ~ Bulleh Shah,
107:If a man does not read with an intense desire to know the truth renouncing for its sake all that is vain and frivolous and even that which is essential if needs be, mere reading will only inspire him with pedantry, presumption and egoism. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
108:(Joan,1941) She wrote me a letter asking,"How can I read it?,Its so hard." I told her to start at the beginning and read as far as you can get until you're lost. Then start again at the beginning and keep working through until you can understand the whole book. And thats what she did ~ Richard P Feynman,
109:May your coming year be filled with magic and dreams and good madness. I hope you read some fine books and kiss someone who thinks you're wonderful, and don't forget to make some art ~ write or draw or build or sing or live as only you can. And I hope, somewhere in the next year, you surprise yourself. ~ Neil Gaiman,
110:May the sacred page be a book for you, so that you may hear, may the globe of the earth be a book for you so that you may see; in these books only those who know letters read these things; in the whole world, even the fool can read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, On the Psalms 45.7,
111:Writing isn't about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid, or making friends. In the end, it's about enriching the lives of those who will read your work, and enriching your own life, as well. It's about getting up, getting well, and getting over. Getting happy, okay? Getting happy. ~ Stephen King,
112:May your coming year be filled with magic and dreams and good madness. I hope you read some fine books and kiss someone who thinks you're wonderful, and don't forget to make some art - write or draw or build or sing or live as only you can. And I hope, somewhere in the next year, you surprise yourself.
   ~ Neil Gaiman,
113:Declare your jihad on thirteen enemies you cannot see -egoism, arrogance, conceit, selfishness, greed, lust, intolerance, anger, lying, cheating, gossiping and slandering. If you can master and destroy them, then you will be read to fight the enemy you can see. ~ Abu Hamid al-Ghazali,
114:You have either to train the memory by practising to remember - or if you cannot do that, try only to understand, read much and let the memory remember what it can. There are people who have a bad memory but they succeed in their studies in spite of it.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
115:Some people say that they cannot read Qur'an, or that they read with mistakes. Allahﷻ has special angels for this. These angels correct the mistakes in your reading of Qur'an & then take it to the presence of Allahﷻ. ~ Mawlana Sheikh Mehmet Adil al-Haqqani Al-Naqshabandi, @Sufi_Path
116:I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in life. And I am horribly limited. ~ Sylvia Plath,
117:Some people read books in order to find God. Yet there is great book, the very appearance of created things. Look above you; look below you! Note it; read it! God, whom you wish to find, never wrote that book with ink. He set before your eyes the things He had made. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
118:I read [in certain Platonic books] that God the Word was born not of flesh nor of blood, nor of the will of man nor of the will of the flesh, but of God (Jn 1.13). But that the Word was made flesh and lived among us (Jn 1.14) I did not read there. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, Confessions 13.9.14,
119:Obeying the Eternal's deep command
They have built in the material front of things
This wide world-kindergarten of young souls
Where the infant spirit learns through mind and sense
To read the letters of the cosmic script ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
120:As when the mantra sinks in Yoga's ear,
Its message enters stirring the blind brain
And keeps in the dim ignorant cells its sound;
The hearer understands a form of words
And, musing on the index thought it holds,
He strives to read it with the l ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Call to the Quest,
121:Better are those who have read than those who have studied little; preferable those who possess what they have read to those who have read and forgotten; more meritorious those who understand than those who know by heart; those to be more highly valued who do their duty than those who merely know it. ~ Laws of Mann, the Eternal Wisdom
122:First of all, each one has a soul, and secondly, we have the luminously strong sup port of the Mother. It is the nature of the Divine that even if you don't think of Him He thinks of you. It is true, very true; because you are part of the Divine. Only you have to concentrate consciously on that part, that portion; then gradually it will increase. ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, To Read Sri Aurobindo,
123:Let us not believe that it is enough to read without unction, to speculate without devotion, to investigate without wonder, to observe without joy, to act without godly zeal, to know without love, to understand without humility, to strive without divine grace, or to reflect as a mirror without divinely inspired wisdom. ~ Saint Bonaventure, The Journey of the Mind into God / Feast Day July 15th,
124:They made figures of brass, and tried to induce souls to indwell them. In some accounts we read that they succeeded; Friar Bacon was credited with one such Homunculus; so was Albertus Magnus, and, I think, Paracelsus. "He had, at least, a devil in his long sword 'which taught him all the cunning pranks of past and future mountebanks, ~ Aleister Crowley, Moonchild,
125:Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Sir Francis Bacon, The Essays,
126:Sometimes I reread my favorite books from back to front. I start with the last chapter and read backward until I get to the beginning. When you read this way, characters go from hope to despair, from self-knowledge to doubt. In love stories, couples start out as lovers and end as strangers. Coming-of-age books become stories of losing your way. Your favorite characters come back to life. ~ Nicola Yoon, Everything, Everything
127:When the human race learns to read the language of symbolism, a great veil will fall from the eyes of men. They shall then know truth and, more than that, they shall realize that from the beginning truth has been in the world unrecognized, save by a small but gradually increasing number appointed by the Lords of the Dawn as ministers to the needs of human creatures struggling co regain their consciousness of divinity. ~ Manly P Hall,
128:When you find a writer who really is saying something to you, read everything that writer has written and you will get more education and depth of understanding out of that than reading a scrap here and a scrap there and elsewhere. Then go to people who influenced that writer, or those who were related to him, and your world builds together in an organic way that is really marvelous. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero's Journey: Joseph Campbell on His Life & Works,
129:I once read a good aphorism from Buckminster Fuller: 'We are not nouns,' he says, pointedly; 'we are verbs.' People who are content with rigid images of others are thinking of themselves and others as nouns, as things. Those who keep trying to get closer to others, to understand and appreciate them more all the time, are verbs: active, creative, dynamic, able to change themselves and to make changes in the world around them. ~ Eknath Easwaran, from Conquest of Mind,
130:The best protection against propaganda of any sort is the recognition of it for what it is. Only hidden and undetected oratory is really insidious. What reaches the heart without going through the mind is likely to bounce back and put the mind out of business. Propaganda taken in that way is like a drug you do not know you are swallowing. The effect is mysterious; you do not know afterwards why you feel or think the way you do. ~ Mortimer Jerome Adler, How to Read a Book,
131:I pray to the unknown gods that some man-even a single man, tens of centuries ago-has perused and read that book. If the honor and wisdom and joy of such a reading are not to be my own, then let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my own place be in hell. Let me be tortured and battered and annihilated, but let there be one instant, one creature, wherein thy enormous Library may find its justification. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel,
132:To read great books does not mean one becomes 'bookish'; it means that something of the terrible insight of Dostoevsky, of the richly-charged imagination of Shakespeare, of the luminous wisdom of Goethe, actually passes into the personality of the reader; so that in contact with the chaos of ordinary life certain free and flowing outlines emerge, like the forms of some classic picture, endowing both people and things with a grandeur beyond what is visible to the superficial glance.
   ~ John Cowper Powys,
133:Help yourself during this troubled period by reading holy books. This reading provides excellent food for the soul and conduces to great progress along the path of perfection. By no means is it inferior to what we obtain through prayer and holy meditation. In prayer and meditation it is ourselves who speak to the Lord, while in holy reading it is God who speaks to us. Before beginning to read, raise your mind to the Lord and implore Him to guide your mind Himself, to speak to your heart and move your will. ~ Saint Padre Pio,
134:[Comedies], in the ancient world, were regarded as of a higher rank than tragedy, of a deeper truth, of a more difficult realization, of a sounder structure, and of a revelation more complete. The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read, not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man.... Tragedy is the shattering of the forms and of our attachments to the forms; comedy, the wild and careless, inexhaustible joy of life invincible. ~ Joseph Campbell,
135:MESSAGES FOR CENTRES AND ORGANISATIONS (Suggested programme for a study group)
   1. Prayer (Sri Aurobindo, Mother - grant us your help in our endeavour to understand your teaching.)
   2. Reading of Sri Aurobindo's book.
   3. A moment of silence.
   4. One question can be put by whoever wants to put a question on what has been read.
   5. Answer to the question.
   6. No general discussion. This is not the meeting of a group but simply a class for studying Sri Aurobindo's books. 31 October 1942
   ~ The Mother,
136:I was in Nashville, Tennesee last year. After the show I went to a Waffle House. I'm not proud of it, I was hungry. And I'm alone, I'm eating and I'm reading a book, right? Waitress walks over to me: 'Hey, whatcha readin' for?' Isn't that the weirdest fuckin' question you've ever heard? Not what am I reading, but what am I reading FOR? Well, godammit, ya stumped me! Why do I read? Well . . . hmmm . . . I dunno . . . I guess I read for a lot of reasons and the main one is so I don't end up being a fuckin' waffle waitress. ~ Bill Hicks,
137:To read Savitri is to witness a tremendous adventure in the interior realms; to witness and participate in a multidimensional quest. Because Savitri is cast in the mould of epic poetry or mahakavya, the requisite state of mind is one of openness and humility, similar to that of prayer. Each word and each phrase should ring in a 'solitude and an immensity', be heard in the 'listening spaces of the soul' and the 'inner acoustic space', and be seized by the deeper self when the mantric evocations come into effect. ~ Murali Sivaramakrishnan,
138:I would say that my most interesting experience with the earlier techniques was the realization that when you make cut-ups you do not get simply random juxtapositions of words, that they do mean something, and often that these meanings refer to some future event. I've made many cut-ups and then later recognized that the cut-up referred to something that I read later in a newspaper or a book, or something that happened... Perhaps events are pre-written and pre-recorded and when you cut word lines the future leaks out. ~ William S Burroughs,
139:Give yourself unto reading. The man who never reads will never be read; he who never quotes will never be quoted. He who will not use the thoughts of other men's brains, proves that he has no brains of his own. You need to read.
   . . .
   We are quite persuaded that the very best way for you to be spending your leisure time, is to be either reading or praying. You may get much instruction from books which afterwards you may use as a true weapon in your Lord and Master's service. Paul cries, "Bring the books" - join in the cry.
   ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
140:When any government, or any church for that matter, undertakes to say to its subjects, 'This you may not read, this you may not see, this you are forbidden to know,' the end result is tyranny and oppression, no matter how holy the motives. Mighty little force is needed to control a man whose mind has been hoodwinked; contrariwise, no amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. No, not the rack, not fission bombs, not anything--you can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him.
   ~ Robert Heinlein, If This Goes On, (1940).,
141:I think a good way to conceive of sacred space is as a playground. If what you're doing seems like play, you are in it. But you can't play with my toys, you have to have your own. Your life should have yielded some. Older people play with life experiences and realizations or with thoughts they like to entertain. In my case, I have books I like to read that don't lead anywhere. One great thing about growing old is that nothing is going to lead to anything. Everything is of the moment ~ Joseph Campbell, A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living,
142:Plays, farces, spectacles, gladiators, strange beasts, medals, pictures, and other such opiates, these were for ancient peoples the bait toward slavery, the price of their liberty, the instruments of tyranny. By these practices and enticements the ancient dictators so successfully lulled their subjects under the yoke, that the stupefied peoples, fascinated by the pastimes and vain pleasures flashed before their eyes, learned subservience as naively, but not so creditably, as little children learn to read by looking at bright picture books. ~ Étienne de La Boétie
143:To take symbolism seriously is to accept the 'analogy of being' between different levels of reality... More than the sum of its parts, the figure is the appearing-to-us of an infinite depth that cannot be fully revealed in time. Every symbol is a kind of gestalt, in which a universal meaning can be glimpsed. Eventually, every created thing can be seen as a manifestation of its own interior essence, and the world is transformed into a radiant book to be read with eyes sensitive to spiritual light. ~ Stratford Caldecott, Beauty for Truth's Sake: On the Re-enchantment of Education,
144:Reading is merely a substitute for one's own thoughts. A man allows his thoughts to be put into leading-strings.

Further, many books serve only to show how many wrong paths there are, and how widely a man may stray if he allows himself to be led by them. But he who is guided by his genius, that is to say, he who thinks for himself, who thinks voluntarily and rightly, possesses the compass wherewith to find the right course. A man, therefore, should only read when the source of his own thoughts stagnates; which is often the case with the best of minds. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
145:Arguably, the best advice for a serious student is to read a few hundred carefully selected books. An orgy of reading 30 or 40 first-rate books in a month ranks at the top of the usual list of human pleasures. If you wish, as an undergraduate, you could do it. You have time and energy, and with luck, you have the curiosity and courage to risk a month or two. Read Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire, Berkeley, Hegel, Marx, and Kanetz. Or you could just play Frisbee on the Plaza of the Americas. Life is choice and there is much to learn. Not making a choice is a choice. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study,
146:I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound or stab us. If the book we're reading doesn't wake us up with a blow to the head, what are we reading for? So that it will make us happy, as you write? Good Lord, we would be happy precisely if we had no books, and the kind of books that make us happy are the kind we could write ourselves if we had to. But we need books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us. That is my belief.
   ~ Franz Kafka,
147:There are three kinds of devotees: superior, mediocre, and inferior. The inferior devotee says, 'God is out there.' According to him God is different from His creation. The mediocre devotee says: 'God is the Antaryami, the Inner Guide. God dwells in everyone's heart.' The mediocre devotee sees God in the heart. But the superior devotee sees that God alone has become everything; He alone has become the twenty-four cosmic principles. He finds that everything, above and below, is filled with God.

Read the Gita, the Bhagavata, and the Vedanta, and you will understand all this. Is not God in His creation? ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
148:I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert... Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings;
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.
~ Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ozymandias,
149:There is only one Ethics, as there is only one geometry. But the majority of men, it will be said, are ignorant of geometry. Yes, but as soon as they begin to apply themselves a little to that science, all are in agreement. Cultivators, workmen, artisans have not gone through courses in ethics; they have not read Cicero or Aristotle, but the moment they begin to think on the subject they become, without knowing it, the disciples of Cicero. The Indian dyer, the Tartar shepherd and the English sailor know what is just and what is injust. Confucius did not invent a system of ethics as one invents a system of physics. He had discovered it in the heart of all mankind. ~ Voltaire, the Eternal Wisdom
150:14. Rescue from Without:The hero may have to be brought back from his supernatural adventure by assistance from without. That is to say, the world may have to come and get him. For the bliss of the deep abode is not lightly abandoned in favor of the self-scattering of the wakened state. 'Who having cast off the world,' we read, 'would desire to return again? He would be only there.' And yet, in so far as one is alive, life will call. Society is jealous of those who remain away from it, and will come knocking at the door. If the hero... is unwilling, the disturber suffers an ugly shock; but on the other hand, if the summoned one is only delayed-sealed in by the beatitude of the state of perfect being (which resembles death)-an apparent rescue is effected, and the adventurer returns. ~ Joseph Campbell,
151:so you distill these stories great authors distill stories and we have soties that are very very very old they are usually religious stories they could be fairy tales because some people ahve traced fairy tales back 10 000 years ... a story that has been told for 10000 years is a funny kind of story its like people have remembered it and obviously modified it, like a game of telephone that has gone on for generations and all that is left is what people remember and maybe they remember whats important, because you tend to remember what's important and its not necessarily the case that you know what the hell it means ... and you dont genereally know what a book that you read means not if its profound it means more than you can understand because otherwise why read it? ~ Jordan Peterson, Maps of Meaning 2017 - 1,
152:If you develop steady study habits, regular reviews will help you avoid cramming for exams. It will also help you avoid test anxiety and make you more effective. Reviewing your notes on a regular basis may seem like empty repetition. Arguably, at its best, it is a ritual for thinking, it is an opportunity to make connections, it affords time to absorb information and a methodically means for reflecting on what it all means. Read difficult stuff two, three, or more times until you understand the material. If you understand the material you can explain it to Mom or a stranger, to the resident specialist or the village idiot. If you are having problems, get help immediately. Meet with your instructor after class, find an alternate text to supplement required readings, or hire a tutor. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study,
153:5. When in Doubt ::: Read the Syllabus - Read Ahead - Ask Questions: Read the correlated readings (designed to mesh with that lecture) before you come to class. The whole point of correlated readings is to prepare you for the lecture. If the readings are completed at the appropriate time you will have a 'Big Picture' framed by a general narrative and suspended by an ongoing line of argument. These readings should help you establish a set of expectations as well as some unsettling questions. The lectures should help you connect ideas you have read about and, with any luck, they should help you call key issues into question. Your job is to arrive at an understanding you call your own and can defend to a critical audience. Beginning to end, you are the center of your education. You know where to begin. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study,
154:I have read your account of your sadhana. There is nothing to say, I think, - for it is all right - except that the most important thing for you is to develop the psychic fire in the heart and the aspiration for the psychic being to come forward as the leader of the sadhana. When the psychic does so, it will show you the 'undetected ego-knots' of which you speak and loosen them or burn them in the psychic fire. This psychic development and the psychic change of mind, vital and physical consciousness is of the utmost importance because it makes safe and easy the descent of the higher consciousness and the spiritual transformation without which the supramental must always remain far distant. Powers etc. have their place, but a very minor one so long as this is not done.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - III,
155:This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to everyone that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body. ~ Walt Whitman,
156:When I am working on a book or a story I write every morning as soon after first light as possible. There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that. When you stop you are as empty, and at the same time never empty but filling, as when you have made love to someone you love. Nothing can hurt you, nothing can happen, nothing means anything until the next day when you do it again. It is the wait until the next day that is hard to get through. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
157:
   Often, when I read Sri Aurobindo's works or listen to His words, I am wonderstruck: how can this eternal truth, this beauty of expression escape people? It is really strange that He is not yet recognised, at least as a supreme creator, a pure artist, a poet par excellence! So I tell myself that my judgments, my appreciations are influenced by my devotion for the Master - and everyone is not devoted. I do not think this is true. But then why are hearts not yet enchanted by His words?

Who can understand Sri Aurobindo? He is as vast as the universe and his teaching is infinite...
   The only way to come a little close to him is to love him sincerely and give oneself unreservedly to his work. Thus, each one does his best and contributes as much as he can to that transformation of the world which Sri Aurobindo has predicted. 2 December 1964
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 396,
158:[E]very man hath liberty to write, but few ability. Heretofore learning was graced by judicious scholars, but now noble sciences are vilified by base and illiterate scribblers, that either write for vain-glory, need, to get money, or as Parasites to flatter and collogue with some great men, they put out trifles, rubbish and trash. Among so many thousand Authors you shall scarce find one by reading of whom you shall be any whit better, but rather much worse; by which he is rather infected than any way perfected...
   What a catalogue of new books this year, all his age (I say) have our Frankfurt Marts, our domestic Marts, brought out. Twice a year we stretch out wits out and set them to sale; after great toil we attain nothing...What a glut of books! Who can read them? As already, we shall have a vast Chaos and confusion of Books, we are oppressed with them, our eyes ache with reading, our fingers with turning. For my part I am one of the number-one of the many-I do not deny it... ~ Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy,
159:The fourth condition is study. One must cultivate the mind, know what others have thought, open the mental being to this impact of the higher vibrations of knowledge. A mental knowledge is not tantamount to realization, it is true, but still one must know mentally where one is going, what has happened to others, how they have achieved, what are the hindrances and the helping points. This education of oneself by study, study of spiritual writings, suddhydya as it is called, a disciplined reading and incorporation of the knowledge contained in scriptures and authentic texts - that is a very important part. Even when you don't understand a text, still if you persist at it, the force that is in that book creates certain new grooves in your brain and the second or the third time when you read it, it begins to make some meaning. This is the meaning of studying, of exposing your mind to the constant vibrations of higher levels of knowledge. Incidentally, the mind gets developed, a mental climate is created, a climate of spiritual culture.
   ~ M P Pandit, The Advent 1981, 30,
160:
   Sweet Mother, Sri Aurobindo has said somewhere that if one surrenders to the Divine Grace, it will do everything for us. Therefore, what value has tapasya?

If you want to know what Sri Aurobindo has said on a given subject, you must at least read all that he has written on that subject. You will then see that he has apparently said the most contradictory things. But when one has read everything, and understood a little, one perceives that all the contradictions complement each other and are organised and unified into an integral synthesis. Here is another quotation from Sri Aurobindo which will show you that your question is based on ignorance. There are many others which you can read with interest and which will make your intelligence more supple: 'If there is not a complete surrender, then it is not possible to adopt the baby cat attitude; it becomes mere tamasic passivity calling itself surrender. If a complete surrender is not possible in the beginning, it follows that personal effort is necessary.' 16 December 1964
   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother, 308,
161:So the devotion must be accompanied by another movement, that is, gratitude. This feeling of gratitude that the Divine exists, this gratefulness, full of wonder, that truly fills your heart with a sublime delight, because the Divine exists, because there is something in the universe that is the Divine, and there is not merely the monstrosity that we see—because there is the Divine, because the Divine is there.

And each time any least thing puts you in contact with this sublime reality of the Divine existence, your heart is filled with so intense and wonderful a delight, such gratefulness as is of all things the most delectable in taste.

Nothing can give you a delight equal to that of gratitude. You hear a bird singing, you see a flower, you look at a child, you witness an act of generosity, you read a beautiful sentence, you stand before a sunset, it does not matter what the thing is— all on a sudden it comes upon you, a kind of emotion, but so deep, so intense, because the world manifests the Divine, because there is something behind the world which is the Divine. ~ The Mother,
162:DEFEAT
Defeat, my Defeat, my solitude and my aloofness;
You are dearer to me than a thousand triumphs,
And sweeter to my heart than all world-glory.
Defeat, my Defeat, my self-knowledge and my defiance,
Through you I know that I am yet young and swift of foot
And not to be trapped by withering laurels.
And in you I have found aloneness
And the joy of being shunned and scorned.
Defeat, my Defeat, my shining sword and shield,
In your eyes I have read
That to be enthroned is to be enslaved,
And to be understood is to be leveled down,
And to be grasped is but to reach one's fullness
And like a ripe fruit to fall and be consumed.
Defeat, my Defeat, my bold companion,
You shall hear my songs and my cries and my silences,
And none but you shall speak to me of the beating of wings,
And urging of seas,
And of mountains that burn in the night,
And you alone shall climb my steep and rocky soul.
Defeat, my Defeat, my deathless courage,
You and I shall laugh together with the storm,
And together we shall dig graves for all that die in us,
And we shall stand in the sun with a will,
And we shall be dangerous. ~ Kahlil Gibran,
163:About the only law that I think relates to the genre is that you should not try to explain, to find neat explanations for what happens, and that the object of the thing is to produce a sense of the uncanny. Freud in his essay on the uncanny wrote that the sense of the uncanny is the only emotion which is more powerfully expressed in art than in life, which I found very illuminating; it didn't help writing the screen-play, but I think it's an interesting insight into the genre. And I read an essay by the great master H.P. Lovecraft where he said that you should never attempt to explain what happens, as long as what happens stimulates people's imagination, their sense of the uncanny, their sense of anxiety and fear. And as long as it doesn't, within itself, have any obvious inner contradictions, it is just a matter of, as it were, building on the imagination (imaginary ideas, surprises, etc.), working in this area of feeling. I think also that the ingeniousness of a story like this is something which the audience ultimately enjoys; they obviously wonder as the story goes on what's going to happen, and there's a great satisfaction when it's all over not having been able to have anticipated the major development of the story, and yet at the end not to feel that you have been fooled or swindled. ~ Stanley Kubrick,
164:A book like this, a problem like this, is in no hurry; we both, I just as much as my book, are friends of lento. It is not for nothing that I have been a philologist, perhaps I am a philologist still, that is to say, A TEACHER OF SLOW READING:- in the end I also write slowly. Nowadays it is not only my habit, it is also to my taste - a malicious taste, perhaps? - no longer to write anything which does not reduce to despair every sort of man who is 'in a hurry'. For philology is that venerable art which demands of its votaries one thing above all: to go aside, to take time, to become still, to become slow - it is a goldsmith's art and connoisseurship of the WORD which has nothing but delicate, cautious work to do and achieves nothing if it does not achieve it lento. But precisely for this reason it is more necessary than ever today, by precisely this means does it entice and enchant us the most, in the midst of an age of 'work', that is to say, of hurry, of indecent and perspiring haste, which wants to 'get everything done' at once, including every old or new book:- this art does not so easily get anything done, it teaches to read WELL, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before and aft, with reservations, with doors left open, with delicate eyes and fingers...My patient friends, this book desires for itself only perfect readers and philologists: LEARN to read me well! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
165:... Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas, by his contrivance, the most ignorant person, at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, might write books in philosophy, poetry, politics, laws, mathematics, and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study." He then led me to the frame, about the sides, whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty feet square, placed in the middle of the room. The superfices was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a die, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered, on every square, with paper pasted on them; and on these papers were written all the words of their language, in their several moods, tenses, and declensions; but without any order. The professor then desired me "to observe; for he was going to set his engine at work." The pupils, at his command, took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of the words was entirely changed. He then commanded six-and-thirty of the lads, to read the several lines softly, as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys, who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn, the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down. ~ Jonathan Swift, Gullivers Travels,
166:In a traditional German toilet, the hole into which shit disappears after we flush is right at the front, so that shit is first laid out for us to sniff and inspect for traces of illness. In the typical French toilet, on the contrary, the hole is at the back, i.e. shit is supposed to disappear as quickly as possible. Finally, the American (Anglo-Saxon) toilet presents a synthesis, a mediation between these opposites: the toilet basin is full of water, so that the shit floats in it, visible, but not to be inspected.

It is clear that none of these versions can be accounted for in purely utilitarian terms: each involves a certain ideological perception of how the subject should relate to excrement. Hegel was among the first to see in the geographical triad of Germany, France and England an expression of three different existential attitudes: reflective thoroughness (German), revolutionary hastiness (French), utilitarian pragmatism (English). In political terms, this triad can be read as German conservatism, French revolutionary radicalism and English liberalism.

The point about toilets is that they enable us not only to discern this triad in the most intimate domain, but also to identify its underlying mechanism in the three different attitudes towards excremental excess: an ambiguous contemplative fascination; a wish to get rid of it as fast as possible; a pragmatic decision to treat it as ordinary and dispose of it in an appropriate way. It is easy for an academic at a round table to claim that we live in a post-ideological universe, but the moment he visits the lavatory after the heated discussion, he is again knee-deep in ideology.
~ Slavoj Žižek,
167:For invincible reasons of homogeneity and coherence, the fibers of cosmogenesis require to be prolonged in ourselves far more deeply than flesh and bone. We are not being tossed about and drawn along in the vital current merely by the material surface of our being. But like a subtle fluid, space-time, having drowned our bodies, penetrates our soul. It fills it and impregnates it. It mingles with its powers, until the soul soon no longer knows how to distinguish space-time from its own thoughts. Nothing can escape this flux any longer, for those who know how to see, even though it were the summit of our being, because it can only be defined in terms of increases of consciousness. For is not the very act by which the fine point of our mind penetrates the absolute a phenomenon of emergence? In short, recognized at first in a single point of things, then inevitably having spread to the whole of the inorganic and organic volume of matter, whether we like it or not evolution is now starting to invade the psychic zones of the world.... The human discovers that, in the striking words of Julian Huxley, we are nothing else than evolution become conscious of itself. It seems to me that until it is established in this perspective, the modern mind...will always be restless. For it is on this summit and this summit alone that a resting place and illumination await us.... All evolution becomes conscious of itself deep within us.... Not only do we read the secret of its movements in our slightest acts, but to a fundamental extent we hold it in our own hands: responsible for its past and its future. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon of Man,
168:
   Should not one be born with a great aspiration?

No, aspiration is a thing to be developed, educated, like all activities of the being. One may be born with a very slight aspiration and develop it so much that it becomes very great. One may be born with a very small will and develop it and make it strong. It is a ridiculous idea to believe that things come to you like that, through a sort of grace, that if you are not given aspiration, you don't have it - this is not true. It is precisely upon this that Sri Aurobindo has insisted in his letter and in the passage I am going to read to you in a minute. He says you must choose, and the choice is constantly put before you and constantly you must choose, and if you do not choose, well, you will not be able to advance. You must choose; there is no "force like that" which chooses for you, or chance or luck or fate - this is not true. Your will is free, it is deliberately left free and you have to choose. It is you who decide whether to seek the Light or not, whether to be the servitor of the Truth or not - it is you. Or whether to have an aspiration or not, it is you who choose. And even when you are told, "Make your surrender total and the work will be done for you", it is quite all right, but to make your surrender total, every day and at every moment you must choose to make your surrender total, otherwise you will not do it, it will not get done by itself. It is you who must want to do it. When it is done, all goes well, when you have the Knowledge also, all goes well, and when you are identified with the Divine, all goes even better, but till then you must will, choose and decide. Don't go to sleep lazily, saying, "Oh! The work will be done for me, I have nothing to do but let myself glide along with the stream." Besides, it is not true, the work is not done by itself, because if the least little thing thwarts your little will, it says, "No, not that!..." Then?
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
169:The capacity for visions, when it is sincere and spontaneous, can put you in touch with events which you are not capable of knowing in your outer consciousness.... There is a very interesting fact, it is that somewhere in the terrestrial mind, somewhere in the terrestrial vital, somewhere in the subtle physical, one can find an exact, perfect, automatic recording of everything that happens. It is the most formidable memory one could imagine, which misses nothing, forgets nothing, records all. And if you are able to enter into it, you can go backward, you can go forward, and in all directions, and you will have the "memory" of all things - not only of things of the past, but of things to come. For everything is recorded there.

   In the mental world, for instance, there is a domain of the physical mind which is related to physical things and keeps the memory of physical happenings upon earth. It is as though you were entering into innumerable vaults, one following another indefinitely, and these vaults are filled with small pigeon-holes, one above another, one above another, with tiny doors. Then if you want to know something and if you are conscious, you look, and you see something like a small point - a shining point; you find that this is what you wish to know and you have only to concentrate there and it opens; and when it opens, there is a sort of an unrolling of something like extremely subtle manuscripts, but if your concentration is sufficiently strong you begin to read as though from a book. And you have the whole story in all its details. There are thousands of these little holes, you know; when you go for a walk there, it is as though you were walking in infinity. And in this way you can find the exact facts about whatever you want to know. But I must tell you that what you find is never what has been reported in history - histories are always planned out; I have never come across a single "historical" fact which is like history.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951, 109 [T7],
170:So then let the Adept set this sigil upon all the Words he hath writ in the book of the Works of his Will. And let him then end all, saying: Such are the Words!2 For by this he maketh proclamation before all them that be about his Circle that these Words are true and puissant, binding what he would bind, and loosing what he would loose. Let the Adept perform this ritual right, perfect in every part thereof, once daily for one moon, then twice, at dawn and dusk, for two moons; next thrice, noon added, for three moons; afterwards, midnight making up his course, for four moons four times every day. Then let the Eleventh Moon be consecrated wholly to this Work; let him be instant in constant ardour, dismissing all but his sheer needs to eat and sleep.3 For know that the true Formula4 whose virtue sufficed the Beast in this Attainment, was thus:

INVOKE OFTEN

So may all men come at last to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel: thus sayeth The Beast, and prayeth his own Angel that this Book be as a burning Lamp, and as a living Spring, for Light and Life to them that read therein.

1. There is an alternative spelling, TzBA-F, where the Root, "an Host," has the value of 93. The Practicus should revise this Ritual throughout in the Light of his personal researches in the Qabalah, and make it his own peculiar property. The spelling here suggested implies that he who utters the Word affirms his allegiance to the symbols 93 and 6; that he is a warrior in the army of Will, and of the Sun. 93 is also the number of AIWAZ and 6 of The Beast.
2. The consonants of LOGOS, "Word," add (Hebrew values) to 93 [reading the Sigma as Samekh = 60; reading it as Shin = 300 gives 333], and ΕΠΗ, "Words" (whence "Epic") has also that value; ΕΙ∆Ε ΤΑ ΕΠΗ might be the phrase here intended; its number is 418. This would then assert the accomplishment of the Great Work; this is the natural conclusion of the Ritual. Cf. CCXX, III, 75.
3. These needs are modified during the process of Initiation both as to quantity and quality. One should not become anxious about one's phyiscal or mental health on à priori grounds, but pay attention only to indubitable symptoms of distress should such arise. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber Samekh,
171:"Will it take long for the Supermind which is involved in material Nature to emerge into the outer consciousness and bring visible results?"
   That depends on the state of consciousness from which one answers, for... For the human consciousness, obviously, I think it will take quite a long time. For another consciousness it will be relatively very fast, and for yet another consciousness, it is already accomplished. It is an accomplished fact. But in order to become aware of this, one must be able to enter into another state of consciousness than the ordinary physical consciousness.
   Sri Aurobindo has spoken - I believe I have read it to you, I think it's in The Synthesis of Yoga - of the true mind, the true vital and the true physical or subtle physical, and he has said that they co-exist with the ordinary mind, vital and physical, and that in certain conditions one may enter into contact with them, and then one becomes aware of the difference between what really is and the appearances of things.
   Well, for a developed consciousness, the Supermind is already realised somewhere in a domain of the subtle physical, it already exists there visible, concrete, and expresses itself in forms and activities. And when one is in tune with this domain, when one lives there, one has a very strong feeling that this world would only have to be condensed, so to say, for it to become visible to all. What would then be interesting would be to develop this inner perception which would put you into contact with the supramental truth which is already manifested, and is veiled for you only for want of appropriate organs to enter into relation with it.
   It is possible that those who are conscious of their dreams may have dreams of a new kind which put them into contact with that world, for it is accessible to the subtle physical of all those who have the corresponding organs in themselves. And there is necessarily a subtle influence of this physical on outer matter, if one is ready to receive impressions from it and admit them into one's consciousness. That's all.
   Now, if nobody has any questions to ask, well, we shall remain silent.
   Something to say, over there? (Mother looks at a disciple.) Oh! he is burning to speak! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956,
172:Countless books on divination, astrology, medicine and other subjects
Describe ways to read signs. They do add to your learning,
But they generate new thoughts and your stable attention breaks up.
Cut down on this kind of knowledge - that's my sincere advice.

You stop arranging your usual living space,
But make everything just right for your retreat.
This makes little sense and just wastes time.
Forget all this - that's my sincere advice.

You make an effort at practice and become a good and knowledgeable person.
You may even master some particular capabilities.
But whatever you attach to will tie you up.
Be unbiased and know how to let things be - that's my sincere advice.

You may think awakened activity means to subdue skeptics
By using sorcery, directing or warding off hail or lightning, for example.
But to burn the minds of others will lead you to lower states.
Keep a low profile - that's my sincere advice.

Maybe you collect a lot of important writings,
Major texts, personal instructions, private notes, whatever.
If you haven't practiced, books won't help you when you die.
Look at the mind - that's my sincere advice.

When you focus on practice, to compare understandings and experience,
Write books or poetry, to compose songs about your experience
Are all expressions of your creativity. But they just give rise to thinking.
Keep yourself free from intellectualization - that's my sincere advice.

In these difficult times you may feel that it is helpful
To be sharp and critical with aggressive people around you.
This approach will just be a source of distress and confusion for you.
Speak calmly - that's my sincere advice.

Intending to be helpful and without personal investment,
You tell your friends what is really wrong with them.
You may have been honest but your words gnaw at their heart.
Speak pleasantly - that's my sincere advice.

You engage in discussions, defending your views and refuting others'
Thinking that you are clarifying the teachings.
But this just gives rise to emotional posturing.
Keep quiet - that's my sincere advice.

You feel that you are being loyal
By being partial to your teacher, lineage or philosophical tradition.
Boosting yourself and putting down others just causes hard feelings.
Have nothing to do with all this - that's my sincere advice.
~ Longchenpa, excerpts from 30 Pieces of Sincere Advice
,
173:Who could have thought that this tanned young man with gentle, dreamy eyes, long wavy hair parted in the middle and falling to the neck, clad in a common coarse Ahmedabad dhoti, a close-fitting Indian jacket, and old-fashioned slippers with upturned toes, and whose face was slightly marked with smallpox, was no other than Mister Aurobindo Ghose, living treasure of French, Latin and Greek?" Actually, Sri Aurobindo was not yet through with books; the Western momentum was still there; he devoured books ordered from Bombay and Calcutta by the case. "Aurobindo would sit at his desk," his Bengali teacher continues, "and read by the light of an oil lamp till one in the morning, oblivious of the intolerable mosquito bites. I would see him seated there in the same posture for hours on end, his eyes fixed on his book, like a yogi lost in the contemplation of the Divine, unaware of all that went on around him. Even if the house had caught fire, it would not have broken this concentration." He read English, Russian, German, and French novels, but also, in ever larger numbers, the sacred books of India, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, although he had never been in a temple except as an observer. "Once, having returned from the College," one of his friends recalls, "Sri Aurobindo sat down, picked up a book at random and started to read, while Z and some friends began a noisy game of chess. After half an hour, he put the book down and took a cup of tea. We had already seen him do this many times and were waiting eagerly for a chance to verify whether he read the books from cover to cover or only scanned a few pages here and there. Soon the test began. Z opened the book, read a line aloud and asked Sri Aurobindo to recite what followed. Sri Aurobindo concentrated for a moment, and then repeated the entire page without a single mistake. If he could read a hundred pages in half an hour, no wonder he could go through a case of books in such an incredibly short time." But Sri Aurobindo did not stop at the translations of the sacred texts; he began to study Sanskrit, which, typically, he learned by himself. When a subject was known to be difficult or impossible, he would refuse to take anyone's word for it, whether he were a grammarian, pandit, or clergyman, and would insist upon trying it himself. The method seemed to have some merit, for not only did he learn Sanskrit, but a few years later he discovered the lost meaning of the Veda. ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure of Consciousness,
174:Our culture, the laws of our culture, are predicated on the idea that people are conscious. People have experience; people make decisions, and can be held responsible for them. There's a free will element to it. You can debate all that philosophically, and fine, but the point is that that is how we act, and that is the idea that our legal system is predicated on. There's something deep about it, because you're subject to the law, but the law is also limited by you, which is to say that in a well-functioning, properly-grounded democratic system, you have intrinsic value. That's the source of your rights. Even if you're a murderer, we have to say the law can only go so far because there's something about you that's divine.

Well, what does that mean? Partly it means that there's something about you that's conscious and capable of communicating, like you're a whole world unto yourself. You have that to contribute to everyone else, and that's valuable. You can learn new things, transform the structure of society, and invent a new way of dealing with the world. You're capable of all that. It's an intrinsic part of you, and that's associated with the idea that there's something about the logos that is necessary for the absolute chaos of the reality beyond experience to manifest itself as reality. That's an amazing idea because it gives consciousness a constitutive role in the cosmos. You can debate that, but you can't just bloody well brush it off. First of all, we are the most complicated things there are, that we know of, by a massive amount. We're so complicated that it's unbelievable. So there's a lot of cosmos out there, but there's a lot of cosmos in here, too, and which one is greater is by no means obvious, unless you use something trivial, like relative size, which really isn't a very sophisticated approach.

Whatever it is that is you has this capacity to experience reality and to transform it, which is a very strange thing. You can conceptualize the future in your imagination, and then you can work and make that manifest-participate in the process of creation. That's one way of thinking about it. That's why I think Genesis 1 relates the idea that human beings are made in the image of the divine-men and women, which is interesting, because feminists are always criticizing Christianity as being inexorably patriarchal. Of course, they criticize everything like that, so it's hardly a stroke of bloody brilliance. But I think it's an absolute miracle that right at the beginning of the document it says straightforwardly, with no hesitation whatsoever, that the divine spark which we're associating with the word, that brings forth Being, is manifest in men and women equally. That's a very cool thing. You got to think, like I said, do you actually take that seriously? Well, what you got to ask is what happens if you don't take it seriously, right? Read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. That's the best investigation into that tactic that's ever been produced. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
175:The Mother once described the characteristics of the unity-body, of the future supramental body, to a young Ashramite: 'You know, if there is something on that window-sill and if I [in a supramental body] want to take it, I stretch out my hand and it becomes - wow! - long, and I have the thing in my hand without even having to get up from my chair ... Physically, I shall be able to be here and there at the same time. I shall be able to communicate with many people at the same time. To have something in my hand, I'll just have to wish for it. I think about something and I want it and it is already in my hand. With this transformed body I shall be free of the fetters of ignorance, pain, of mortality and unconsciousness. I shall be able to do many things at the same time. The transparent, luminous, strong, light, elastic body won't need any material things to subsist on ... The body can even be lengthened if one wants it to become tall, or shrunk when one wants it to be small, in any circumstances ... There will be all kinds of changes and there will be powers without limit. And it won't be something funny. Of course, I am giving you somewhat childish examples to tease you and to show the difference. 'It will be a true being, perfect in proportion, very, very beautiful and strong, light, luminous or else transparent. It will have a supple and malleable body endowed with extraordinary capacities and able to do everything; a body without age, a creation of the New Consciousness or else a transformed body such as none has ever imagined ... All that is above man will be within its reach. It will be guided by the Truth alone and nothing less. That is what it is and more even than has ever been conceived.'895 This the Mother told in French to Mona Sarkar, who noted it down as faithfully as possible and read it out to her for verification. The supramental body will not only be omnipotent and omniscient, but also omnipresent. And immortal. Not condemned to a never ending monotonous immortality - which, again, is one of our human interpretations of immortality - but for ever existing in an ecstasy of inexhaustible delight in 'the Joy that surpasses all understanding.' Moment after moment, eternity after eternity. For in that state each moment is an eternity and eternity an ever present moment. If gross matter is not capable of being used as a permanent coating of the soul in the present phase of its evolution, then it certainly is not capable of being the covering of the supramental consciousness, to form the body that has, to some extent, been described above. This means that the crux of the process of supramental transformation lies in matter; the supramental world has to become possible in matter, which at present still is gross matter. - Sri Aurobindo and the Mother were supramentalized in their mental and vital, but their enormous problem was the supramentalization of the physical body, consisting of the gross matter of the Earth. As the Mother said: 'It is matter itself that must change so that the Supramental may manifest. A new kind of matter no longer corresponding with Mendeleyev's periodic table of the elements? Is that possible?
   ~ Georges Van Vrekhem,
176:Apotheosis ::: One of the most powerful and beloved of the Bodhisattvas of the Mahayana Buddhism of Tibet, China, and Japan is the Lotus Bearer, Avalokiteshvara, "The Lord Looking Down in Pity," so called because he regards with compassion all sentient creatures suffering the evils of existence. To him goes the millionfold repeated prayer of the prayer wheels and temple gongs of Tibet: Om mani padme hum, "The jewel is in the lotus." To him go perhaps more prayers per minute than to any single divinity known to man; for when, during his final life on earth as a human being, he shattered for himself the bounds of the last threshold (which moment opened to him the timelessness of the void beyond the frustrating mirage-enigmas of the named and bounded cosmos), he paused: he made a vow that before entering the void he would bring all creatures without exception to enlightenment; and since then he has permeated the whole texture of existence with the divine grace of his assisting presence, so that the least prayer addressed to him, throughout the vast spiritual empire of the Buddha, is graciously heard. Under differing forms he traverses the ten thousand worlds, and appears in the hour of need and prayer. He reveals himself in human form with two arms, in superhuman forms with four arms, or with six, or twelve, or a thousand, and he holds in one of his left hands the lotus of the world.

Like the Buddha himself, this godlike being is a pattern of the divine state to which the human hero attains who has gone beyond the last terrors of ignorance. "When the envelopment of consciousness has been annihilated, then he becomes free of all fear, beyond the reach of change." This is the release potential within us all, and which anyone can attain-through herohood; for, as we read: "All things are Buddha-things"; or again (and this is the other way of making the same statement) : "All beings are without self."

The world is filled and illumined by, but does not hold, the Bodhisattva ("he whose being is enlightenment"); rather, it is he who holds the world, the lotus. Pain and pleasure do not enclose him, he encloses them-and with profound repose. And since he is what all of us may be, his presence, his image, the mere naming of him, helps. "He wears a garland of eight thousand rays, in which is seen fully reflected a state of perfect beauty.

The color of his body is purple gold. His palms have the mixed color of five hundred lotuses, while each finger tip has eighty-four thousand signet-marks, and each mark eighty-four thousand colors; each color has eighty-four thousand rays which are soft and mild and shine over all things that exist. With these jewel hands he draws and embraces all beings. The halo surrounding his head is studded with five hundred Buddhas, miraculously transformed, each attended by five hundred Bodhisattvas, who are attended, in turn, by numberless gods. And when he puts his feet down to the ground, the flowers of diamonds and jewels that are scattered cover everything in all directions. The color of his face is gold. While in his towering crown of gems stands a Buddha, two hundred and fifty miles high." - Amitayur-Dhyana Sutra, 19; ibid., pp. 182-183. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, Apotheosis,
177:On that spring day in the park I saw a young woman who attracted me. She was tall and slender, elegantly dressed, and had an intelligent and boyish face. I liked her at once. She was my type and began to fill my imagination. She probably was not much older than I but seemed far more mature, well-defined, a full-grown woman, but with a touch of exuberance and boyishness in her face, and this was what I liked above all .

   I had never managed to approach a girl with whom I had fallen in love, nor did I manage in this case. But the impression she made on me was deeper than any previous one had been and the infatuation had a profound influence on my life.

   Suddenly a new image had risen up before me, a lofty and cherished image. And no need, no urge was as deep or as fervent within me as the craving to worship and admire. I gave her the name Beatrice, for, even though I had not read Dante, I knew about Beatrice from an English painting of which I owned a reproduction. It showed a young pre-Raphaelite woman, long-limbed and slender, with long head and etherealized hands and features. My beautiful young woman did not quite resemble her, even though she, too, revealed that slender and boyish figure which I loved, and something of the ethereal, soulful quality of her face.

   Although I never addressed a single word to Beatrice, she exerted a profound influence on me at that time. She raised her image before me, she gave me access to a holy shrine, she transformed me into a worshiper in a temple.

   From one day to the next I stayed clear of all bars and nocturnal exploits. I could be alone with myself again and enjoyed reading and going for long walks.

   My sudden conversion drew a good deal of mockery in its wake. But now I had something I loved and venerated, I had an ideal again, life was rich with intimations of mystery and a feeling of dawn that made me immune to all taunts. I had come home again to myself, even if only as the slave and servant of a cherished image.

   I find it difficult to think back to that time without a certain fondness. Once more I was trying most strenuously to construct an intimate "world of light" for myself out of the shambles of a period of devastation; once more I sacrificed everything within me to the aim of banishing darkness and evil from myself. And, furthermore, this present "world of light" was to some extent my own creation; it was no longer an escape, no crawling back to -nether and the safety of irresponsibility; it was a new duty, one I had invented and desired on my own, with responsibility and self-control. My sexuality, a torment from which I was in constant flight, was to be transfigured nto spirituality and devotion by this holy fire. Everything :brk and hateful was to be banished, there were to be no more tortured nights, no excitement before lascivious picures, no eavesdropping at forbidden doors, no lust. In place of all this I raised my altar to the image of Beatrice, :.. and by consecrating myself to her I consecrated myself to the spirit and to the gods, sacrificing that part of life which I withdrew from the forces of darkness to those of light. My goal was not joy but purity, not happiness but beauty, and spirituality.

   This cult of Beatrice completely changed my life.

   ~ Hermann Hesse, Demian,
178:HOW CAN I READ SAVITRI?
An open reply by Dr Alok Pandey to a fellow devotee

A GIFT OF LOVE TO THE WORLD
Most of all enjoy Savitri. It is Sri Aurobindo's gift of Love to the world. Read it from the heart with love and gratitude as companions and drown in its fiery bliss. That is the true understanding rather than one that comes by a constant churning of words in the head.

WHEN
Best would be to fix a time that works for you. One can always take out some time for the reading, even if it be late at night when one is done with all the daily works. Of course, a certain receptivity is needed. If one is too tired or the reading becomes too mechanical as a ritual routine to be somehow finished it tends to be less effective, as with anything else. Hence the advice is to read in a quiet receptive state.

THE PACE
As to the pace of reading it is best to slowly build up and keep it steady. To read a page or a passage daily is better than reading many pages one day and then few lines or none for days. This brings a certain discipline in the consciousness which makes one receptive. What it means is that one should fix up that one would read a few passages or a page or two daily, and then if an odd day one is enjoying and spontaneously wants to read more then one can go by the flow.

COMPLETE OR SELECTIONS?
It is best to read at least once from cover to cover. But if one is not feeling inclined for that do read some of the beautiful cantos and passages whose reference one can find in various places. This helps us familiarise with the epic and the style of poetry. Later one can go for the cover to cover reading.

READING ALOUD, SILENTLY, OR WRITING DOWN?
One can read it silently. Loud reading is needed only if one is unable to focus with silent reading. A mantra is more potent when read subtly. I am aware that some people recommend reading it aloud which is fine if that helps one better. A certain flexibility in these things is always good and rigid rules either ways are not helpful.

One can also write some of the beautiful passages with which one feels suddenly connected. It is a help in the yoga since such a writing involves the pouring in of the consciousness of Savitri through the brain and nerves and the hand.

Reflecting upon some of these magnificent lines and passages while one is engaged in one\s daily activities helps to create a background state for our inner being to get absorbed in Savitri more and more.

HOW DO I UNDERSTAND THE MEANING? DO I NEED A DICTIONARY?
It is helpful if a brief background about the Canto is known. This helps the mind top focus and also to keep in sync with the overall scene and sense of what is being read.

But it is best not to keep referring to the dictionary while reading. Let the overall sense emerge. Specifics can be done during a detailed reading later and it may not be necessary at all. Besides the sense that Sri Aurobindo has given to many words may not be accurately conveyed by the standard dictionaries. A flexibility is required to understand the subtle suggestions hinted at by the Master-poet.

In this sense Savitri is in the line of Vedic poetry using images that are at once profound as well as commonplace. That is the beauty of mystic poetry. These are things actually experienced and seen by Sri Aurobindo, and ultimately it is Their Grace that alone can reveal the intrinsic sense of this supreme revelation of the Supreme. ~ Dr Alok Pandey,
179:
   Sometimes while reading a text one has ideas, then Sweet Mother, how can one distinguish between the other person's idea and one's own?


Oh! This, this doesn't exist, the other person's idea and one's own idea.
   Nobody has ideas of his own: it is an immensity from which one draws according to his personal affinity; ideas are a collective possession, a collective wealth.
   Only, there are different stages. So there is the most common level, the one where all our brains bathe; this indeed swarms here, it is the level of "Mr. Everybody". And then there is a level that's slightly higher for people who are called thinkers. And then there are higher levels still - many - some of them are beyond words but they are still domains of ideas. And then there are those capable of shooting right up, catching something which is like a light and making it come down with all its stock of ideas, all its stock of thoughts. An idea from a higher domain if pulled down organises itself and is crystallised in a large number of thoughts which can express that idea differently; and then if you are a writer or a poet or an artist, when you make it come lower down still, you can have all kinds of expressions, extremely varied and choice around a single little idea but one coming from very high above. And when you know how to do this, it teaches you to distinguish between the pure idea and the way of expressing it.
   Some people cannot do it in their own head because they have no imagination or faculty for writing, but they can do it through study by reading what others have written. There are, you know, lots of poets, for instance, who have expressed the same idea - the same idea but with such different forms that when one reads many of them it becomes quite interesting to see (for people who love to read and read much). Ah, this idea, that one has said it like this, that other has expressed it like that, another has formulated it in this way, and so on. And so you have a whole stock of expressions which are expressions by different poets of the same single idea up there, above, high above. And you notice that there is an almost essential difference between the pure idea, the typal idea and its formulation in the mental world, even the speculative or artistic mental world. This is a very good thing to do when one loves gymnastics. It is mental gymnastics.
   Well, if you want to be truly intelligent, you must know how to do mental gymnastics; as, you see, if you want really to have a fairly strong body you must know how to do physical gymnastics. It is the same thing. People who have never done mental gymnastics have a poor little brain, quite over-simple, and all their life they think like children. One must know how to do this - not take it seriously, in the sense that one shouldn't have convictions, saying, "This idea is true and that is false; this formulation is correct and that one is not and this religion is the true one and that religion is false", and so on and so forth... this, if you enter into it, you become absolutely stupid.
   But if you can see all that and, for example, take all the religions, one after another and see how they have expressed the same aspiration of the human being for some Absolute, it becomes very interesting; and then you begin... yes, you begin to be able to juggle with all that. And then when you have mastered it all, you can rise above it and look at all the eternal human discussions with a smile. So there you are master of the thought and can no longer fly into a rage because someone else does not think as you, something that's unfortunately a very common malady here.
   Now, there we are. Nobody has any questions, no?
   That's enough? Finished! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955,
180:The true Mantra must come from within OR it must be given by a Guru

Nobody can give you the true mantra. It's not something that is given; it's something that wells up from within. It must spring from within all of a sudden, spontaneously, like a profound, intense need of your being - then it has power, because it's not something that comes from outside, it's your very own cry.

I saw, in my case, that my mantra has the power of immortality; whatever happens, if it is uttered, it's the Supreme that has the upper hand, it's no longer the lower law. And the words are irrelevant, they may not have any meaning - to someone else, my mantra is meaningless, but to me it's full, packed with meaning. And effective, because it's my cry, the intense aspiration of my whole being.

A mantra given by a guru is only the power to realize the experience of the discoverer of the mantra. The power is automatically there, because the sound contains the experience. I saw that once in Paris, at a time when I knew nothing of India, absolutely nothing, only the usual nonsense. I didn't even know what a mantra was. I had gone to a lecture given by some fellow who was supposed to have practiced "yoga" for a year in the Himalayas and recounted his experience (none too interesting, either). All at once, in the course of his lecture, he uttered the sound OM. And I saw the entire room suddenly fill with light, a golden, vibrating light.... I was probably the only one to notice it. I said to myself, "Well!" Then I didn't give it any more thought, I forgot about the story. But as it happened, the experience recurred in two or three different countries, with different people, and every time there was the sound OM, I would suddenly see the place fill with that same light. So I understood. That sound contains the vibration of thousands and thousands of years of spiritual aspiration - there is in it the entire aspiration of men towards the Supreme. And the power is automatically there, because the experience is there.

It's the same with my mantra. When I wanted to translate the end of my mantra, "Glory to You, O Lord," into Sanskrit, I asked for Nolini's help. He brought his Sanskrit translation, and when he read it to me, I immediately saw that the power was there - not because Nolini put his power into it (!), God knows he had no intention of "giving" me a mantra! But the power was there because my experience was there. We made a few adjustments and modifications, and that's the japa I do now - I do it all the time, while sleeping, while walking, while eating, while working, all the time.[[Mother later clarified: "'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't MY mantra, it's something I ADDED to it - my mantra is something else altogether, that's not it. When I say that my mantra has the power of immortality, I mean the other, the one I don't speak of! I have never given the words.... You see, at the end of my walk, a kind of enthusiasm rises, and with that enthusiasm, the 'Glory to You' came to me, but it's part of the prayer I had written in Prayers and Meditations: 'Glory to You, O Lord, all-triumphant Supreme' etc. (it's a long prayer). It came back suddenly, and as it came back spontaneously, I kept it. Moreover, when Sri Aurobindo read this prayer in Prayers and Meditations, he told me it was very strong. So I added this phrase as a kind of tail to my japa. But 'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't my spontaneous mantra - it came spontaneously, but it was something written very long ago. The two things are different."

And that's how a mantra has life: when it wells up all the time, spontaneously, like the cry of your being - there is no need of effort or concentration: it's your natural cry. Then it has full power, it is alive. It must well up from within.... No guru can give you that. ~ The Mother, Agenda, May 11 1963,
181:Death & Fame

When I die

I don't care what happens to my body throw ashes in the air, scatter 'em in East River bury an urn in Elizabeth New Jersey, B'nai Israel Cemetery

But I want a big funeral St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Mark's Church, the largest synagogue in Manhattan

First, there's family, brother, nephews, spry aged Edith stepmother 96, Aunt Honey from old Newark,

Doctor Joel, cousin Mindy, brother Gene one eyed one ear'd, sister-in-law blonde Connie, five nephews, stepbrothers & sisters their grandchildren, companion Peter Orlovsky, caretakers Rosenthal & Hale, Bill Morgan--

Next, teacher Trungpa Vajracharya's ghost mind, Gelek Rinpoche, there Sakyong Mipham, Dalai Lama alert, chance visiting America, Satchitananda Swami Shivananda, Dehorahava Baba, Karmapa XVI, Dudjom Rinpoche, Katagiri & Suzuki Roshi's phantoms Baker, Whalen, Daido Loorie, Qwong, Frail White-haired Kapleau Roshis, Lama Tarchen --

Then, most important, lovers over half-century Dozens, a hundred, more, older fellows bald & rich young boys met naked recently in bed, crowds surprised to see each other, innumerable, intimate, exchanging memories

"He taught me to meditate, now I'm an old veteran of the thousandday retreat --"

"I played music on subway platforms, I'm straight but loved him he loved me"

"I felt more love from him at 19 than ever from anyone"

"We'd lie under covers gossip, read my poetry, hug & kiss belly to belly arms round each other"

"I'd always get into his bed with underwear on & by morning my skivvies would be on the floor"

"Japanese, always wanted take it up my bum with a master"

"We'd talk all night about Kerouac & Cassady sit Buddhalike then sleep in his captain's bed."

"He seemed to need so much affection, a shame not to make him happy"

"I was lonely never in bed nude with anyone before, he was so gentle my stomach shuddered when he traced his finger along my abdomen nipple to hips-- "

"All I did was lay back eyes closed, he'd bring me to come with mouth & fingers along my waist"

"He gave great head"

So there be gossip from loves of 1948, ghost of Neal Cassady commin-gling with flesh and youthful blood of 1997 and surprise -- "You too? But I thought you were straight!"

"I am but Ginsberg an exception, for some reason he pleased me."

"I forgot whether I was straight gay queer or funny, was myself, tender and affectionate to be kissed on the top of my head, my forehead throat heart & solar plexus, mid-belly. on my prick, tickled with his tongue my behind"

"I loved the way he'd recite 'But at my back allways hear/ time's winged chariot hurrying near,' heads together, eye to eye, on a pillow --"

Among lovers one handsome youth straggling the rear

"I studied his poetry class, 17 year-old kid, ran some errands to his walk-up flat, seduced me didn't want to, made me come, went home, never saw him again never wanted to... "

"He couldn't get it up but loved me," "A clean old man." "He made sure I came first"

This the crowd most surprised proud at ceremonial place of honor--

Then poets & musicians -- college boys' grunge bands -- age-old rock star Beatles, faithful guitar accompanists, gay classical con-ductors, unknown high Jazz music composers, funky trum-peters, bowed bass & french horn black geniuses, folksinger fiddlers with dobro tamborine harmonica mandolin auto-harp pennywhistles & kazoos

Next, artist Italian romantic realists schooled in mystic 60's India, Late fauve Tuscan painter-poets, Classic draftsman Massa-chusets surreal jackanapes with continental wives, poverty sketchbook gesso oil watercolor masters from American provinces

Then highschool teachers, lonely Irish librarians, delicate biblio-philes, sex liberation troops nay armies, ladies of either sex

"I met him dozens of times he never remembered my name I loved him anyway, true artist"

"Nervous breakdown after menopause, his poetry humor saved me from suicide hospitals"

"Charmant, genius with modest manners, washed sink, dishes my studio guest a week in Budapest"

Thousands of readers, "Howl changed my life in Libertyville Illinois"

"I saw him read Montclair State Teachers College decided be a poet-- "

"He turned me on, I started with garage rock sang my songs in Kansas City"

"Kaddish made me weep for myself & father alive in Nevada City"

"Father Death comforted me when my sister died Boston l982"

"I read what he said in a newsmagazine, blew my mind, realized others like me out there"

Deaf & Dumb bards with hand signing quick brilliant gestures

Then Journalists, editors's secretaries, agents, portraitists & photo-graphy aficionados, rock critics, cultured laborors, cultural historians come to witness the historic funeral Super-fans, poetasters, aging Beatnicks & Deadheads, autograph-hunters, distinguished paparazzi, intelligent gawkers

Everyone knew they were part of 'History" except the deceased who never knew exactly what was happening even when I was alive
February 22, 1997
~ Allen Ginsberg,
182:Mother, how to change one's consciousness?
   Naturally, there are many ways, but each person must do it by the means accessible to him; and the indication of the way usually comes spontaneously, through something like an unexpected experience. And for each one, it appears a little differently.
   For instance, one may have the perception of the ordinary consciousness which is extended on the surface, horizontally, and works on a plane which is simultaneously the surface of things and has a contact with the superficial outer side of things, people, circumstances; and then, suddenly, for some reason or other - as I say for each one it is different - there is a shifting upwards, and instead of seeing things horizontally, of being at the same level as they are, you suddenly dominate them and see them from above, in their totality, instead of seeing a small number of things immediately next to yourself; it is as though something were drawing you above and making you see as from a mountain-top or an aeroplane. And instead of seeing each detail and seeing it on its own level, you see the whole as one unity, and from far above.
   There are many ways of having this experience, but it usually comes to you as if by chance, one fine day.
   Or else, one may have an experience which is almost its very opposite but which comes to the same thing. Suddenly one plunges into a depth, one moves away from the thing one perceived, it seems distant, superficial, unimportant; one enters an inner silence or an inner calm or an inward vision of things, a profound feeling, a more intimate perception of circumstances and things, in which all values change. And one becomes aware of a sort of unity, a deep identity which is one in spite of the diverse appearances.
   Or else, suddenly also, the sense of limitation disappears and one enters the perception of a kind of indefinite duration beginningless and endless, of something which has always been and always will be.
   These experiences come to you suddenly in a flash, for a second, a moment in your life, you don't know why or how.... There are other ways, other experiences - they are innumerable, they vary according to people; but with this, with one minute, one second of such an existence, one catches the tail of the thing. So one must remember that, try to relive it, go to the depths of the experience, recall it, aspire, concentrate. This is the startingpoint, the end of the guiding thread, the clue. For all those who are destined to find their inner being, the truth of their being, there is always at least one moment in life when they were no longer the same, perhaps just like a lightning-flash - but that is enough. It indicates the road one should take, it is the door that opens on this path. And so you must pass through the door, and with perseverance and an unfailing steadfastness seek to renew the state which will lead you to something more real and more total.
   Many ways have always been given, but a way you have been taught, a way you have read about in books or heard from a teacher, does not have the effective value of a spontaneous experience which has come without any apparent reason, and which is simply the blossoming of the soul's awakening, one second of contact with your psychic being which shows you the best way for you, the one most within your reach, which you will then have to follow with perseverance to reach the goal - one second which shows you how to start, the beginning.... Some have this in dreams at night; some have it at any odd time: something one sees which awakens in one this new consciousness, something one hears, a beautiful landscape, beautiful music, or else simply a few words one reads, or else the intensity of concentration in some effort - anything at all, there are a thousand reasons and thousands of ways of having it. But, I repeat, all those who are destined to realise have had this at least once in their life. It may be very fleeting, it may have come when they were very young, but always at least once in one's life one has the experience of what true consciousness is. Well, that is the best indication of the path to be followed.
   One may seek within oneself, one may remember, may observe; one must notice what is going on, one must pay attention, that's all. Sometimes, when one sees a generous act, hears of something exceptional, when one witnesses heroism or generosity or greatness of soul, meets someone who shows a special talent or acts in an exceptional and beautiful way, there is a kind of enthusiasm or admiration or gratitude which suddenly awakens in the being and opens the door to a state, a new state of consciousness, a light, a warmth, a joy one did not know before. That too is a way of catching the guiding thread. There are a thousand ways, one has only to be awake and to watch.
   First of all, you must feel the necessity for this change of consciousness, accept the idea that it is this, the path which must lead to the goal; and once you admit the principle, you must be watchful. And you will find, you do find it. And once you have found it, you must start walking without any hesitation.
   Indeed, the starting-point is to observe oneself, not to live in a perpetual nonchalance, a perpetual apathy; one must be attentive.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956, [T6],
183:For instance, a popular game with California occultists-I do not know its inventor-involves a Magic Room, much like the Pleasure Dome discussed earlier except that this Magic Room contains an Omniscient Computer.
   To play this game, you simply "astrally project" into the Magic Room. Do not ask what "astral projection" means, and do not assume it is metaphysical (and therefore either impossible, if you are a materialist, or very difficult, if you are a mystic). Just assume this is a gedankenexperiment, a "mind game." Project yourself, in imagination, into this Magic Room and visualize vividly the Omniscient Computer, using the details you need to make such a super-information-processor real to your fantasy. You do not need any knowledge of programming to handle this astral computer. It exists early in the next century; you are getting to use it by a species of time-travel, if that metaphor is amusing and helpful to you. It is so built that it responds immediately to human brain-waves, "reading" them and decoding their meaning. (Crude prototypes of such computers already exist.) So, when you are in this magic room, you can ask this Computer anything, just by thinking of what you want to know. It will read your thought, and project into your brain, by a laser ray, the correct answer.
   There is one slight problem. The computer is very sensitive to all brain-waves. If you have any doubts, it registers them as negative commands, meaning "Do not answer my question." So, the way to use it is to start simply, with "easy" questions. Ask it to dig out of the archives the name of your second-grade teacher. (Almost everybody remembers the name of their first grade teacher-imprint vulnerability again-but that of the second grade teacher tends to get lost.)
   When the computer has dug out the name of your second grade teacher, try it on a harder question, but not one that is too hard. It is very easy to sabotage this machine, but you don't want to sabotage it during these experiments. You want to see how well it can be made to perform.
   It is wise to ask only one question at a time, since it requires concentration to keep this magic computer real on the field of your perception. Do not exhaust your capacities for imagination and visualization on your first trial runs.
   After a few trivial experiments of the second-grade-teacher variety, you can try more interesting programs. Take a person toward whom you have negative feelings, such as anger, disappointment, feeling-of-betrayal, jealousy or whatever interferes with the smooth, tranquil operation of your own bio-computer. Ask the Magic Computer to explain that other person to you; to translate you into their reality-tunnel long enough for you to understand how events seem to them. Especially, ask how you seem to them.
   This computer will do that job for you; but be prepared for some shocks which might be disagreeable at first. This super-brain can also perform exegesis on ideas that seem obscure, paradoxical or enigmatic to us. For instance, early experiments with this computer can very profitably turn on asking it to explain some of the propositions in this book which may seem inexplicable or perversely wrong-headed to you, such as "We are all greater artists than we realize" or "What the Thinker thinks, the Prover proves" or "mind and its contents are functionally identical."
   This computer is much more powerful and scientifically advanced than the rapture-machine in the neurosomatic circuit. It has total access to all the earlier, primitive circuits, and overrules any of them. That is, if you put a meta-programming instruction into this computer; it will relay it downward to the old circuits and cancel contradictory programs left over from the past. For instance, try feeding it on such meta-programming instructions as: 1. I am at cause over my body. 2. I am at cause over my imagination. 3.1 am at cause over my future. 4. My mind abounds with beauty and power. 5.1 like people, and people like me.
   Remember that this computer is only a few decades ahead of present technology, so it cannot "understand" your commands if you harbor any doubts about them. Doubts tell it not to perform. Work always from what you can believe in, extending the area of belief only as results encourage you to try for more dramatic transformations of your past reality-tunnels.
   This represents cybernetic consciousness; the programmer becoming self-programmer, self-metaprogrammer, meta-metaprogrammer, etc. Just as the emotional compulsions of the second circuit seem primitive, mechanical and, ultimately, silly to the neurosomatic consciousness, so, too, the reality maps of the third circuit become comic, relativistic, game-like to the metaprogrammer. "Whatever you say it is, it isn't, " Korzybski, the semanticist, repeated endlessly in his seminars, trying to make clear that third-circuit semantic maps are not the territories they represent; that we can always make maps of our maps, revisions of our revisions, meta-selves of our selves. "Neti, neti" (not that, not that), Hindu teachers traditionally say when asked what "God" is or what "Reality" is. Yogis, mathematicians and musicians seem more inclined to develop meta-programming consciousness than most of humanity. Korzybski even claimed that the use of mathematical scripts is an aid to developing this circuit, for as soon as you think of your mind as mind 1 , and the mind which contemplates that mind as mind2 and the mind which contemplates mind2 contemplating mind 1 as mind3, you are well on your way to meta-programming awareness. Alice in Wonderland is a masterful guide to the metaprogramming circuit (written by one of the founders of mathematical logic) and Aleister Crowley soberly urged its study upon all students of yoga. ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Prometheus Rising,
184:How to Meditate
Deep meditation is a mental procedure that utilizes the nature of the mind to systematically bring the mind to rest. If the mind is given the opportunity, it will go to rest with no effort. That is how the mind works.
Indeed, effort is opposed to the natural process of deep meditation. The mind always seeks the path of least resistance to express itself. Most of the time this is by making more and more thoughts. But it is also possible to create a situation in the mind that turns the path of least resistance into one leading to fewer and fewer thoughts. And, very soon, no thoughts at all. This is done by using a particular thought in a particular way. The thought is called a mantra.
For our practice of deep meditation, we will use the thought - I AM. This will be our mantra.
It is for the sound that we will use I AM, not for the meaning of it.
The meaning has an obvious significance in English, and I AM has a religious meaning in the English Bible as well. But we will not use I AM for the meaning - only for the sound. We can also spell it AYAM. No meaning there, is there? Only the sound. That is what we want. If your first language is not English, you may spell the sound phonetically in your own language if you wish. No matter how we spell it, it will be the same sound. The power of the sound ...I AM... is great when thought inside. But only if we use a particular procedure. Knowing this procedure is the key to successful meditation. It is very simple. So simple that we will devote many pages here to discussing how to keep it simple, because we all have a tendency to make things more complicated. Maintaining simplicity is the key to right meditation.
Here is the procedure of deep meditation: While sitting comfortably with eyes closed, we'll just relax. We will notice thoughts, streams of thoughts. That is fine. We just let them go by without minding them. After about a minute, we gently introduce the mantra, ...I AM...
We think the mantra in a repetition very easily inside. The speed of repetition may vary, and we do not mind it. We do not intone the mantra out loud. We do not deliberately locate the mantra in any particular part of the body. Whenever we realize we are not thinking the mantra inside anymore, we come back to it easily. This may happen many times in a sitting, or only once or twice. It doesn't matter. We follow this procedure of easily coming back to the mantra when we realize we are off it for the predetermined time of our meditation session. That's it.
Very simple.
Typically, the way we will find ourselves off the mantra will be in a stream of other thoughts. This is normal. The mind is a thought machine, remember? Making thoughts is what it does. But, if we are meditating, as soon as we realize we are off into a stream of thoughts, no matter how mundane or profound, we just easily go back to the mantra.
Like that. We don't make a struggle of it. The idea is not that we have to be on the mantra all the time. That is not the objective. The objective is to easily go back to it when we realize we are off it. We just favor the mantra with our attention when we notice we are not thinking it. If we are back into a stream of other thoughts five seconds later, we don't try and force the thoughts out. Thoughts are a normal part of the deep meditation process. We just ease back to the mantra again. We favor it.
Deep meditation is a going toward, not a pushing away from. We do that every single time with the mantra when we realize we are off it - just easily favoring it. It is a gentle persuasion. No struggle. No fuss. No iron willpower or mental heroics are necessary for this practice. All such efforts are away from the simplicity of deep meditation and will reduce its effectiveness.
As we do this simple process of deep meditation, we will at some point notice a change in the character of our inner experience. The mantra may become very refined and fuzzy. This is normal. It is perfectly all right to think the mantra in a very refined and fuzzy way if this is the easiest. It should always be easy - never a struggle. Other times, we may lose track of where we are for a while, having no mantra, or stream of thoughts either. This is fine too. When we realize we have been off somewhere, we just ease back to the mantra again. If we have been very settled with the mantra being barely recognizable, we can go back to that fuzzy level of it, if it is the easiest. As the mantra refines, we are riding it inward with our attention to progressively deeper levels of inner silence in the mind. So it is normal for the mantra to become very faint and fuzzy. We cannot force this to happen. It will happen naturally as our nervous system goes through its many cycles ofinner purification stimulated by deep meditation. When the mantra refines, we just go with it. And when the mantra does not refine, we just be with it at whatever level is easy. No struggle. There is no objective to attain, except to continue the simple procedure we are describing here.

When and Where to Meditate
How long and how often do we meditate? For most people, twenty minutes is the best duration for a meditation session. It is done twice per day, once before the morning meal and day's activity, and then again before the evening meal and evening's activity.
Try to avoid meditating right after eating or right before bed.
Before meal and activity is the ideal time. It will be most effective and refreshing then. Deep meditation is a preparation for activity, and our results over time will be best if we are active between our meditation sessions. Also, meditation is not a substitute for sleep. The ideal situation is a good balance between meditation, daily activity and normal sleep at night. If we do this, our inner experience will grow naturally over time, and our outer life will become enriched by our growing inner silence.
A word on how to sit in meditation: The first priority is comfort. It is not desirable to sit in a way that distracts us from the easy procedure of meditation. So sitting in a comfortable chair with back support is a good way to meditate. Later on, or if we are already familiar, there can be an advantage to sitting with legs crossed, also with back support. But always with comfort and least distraction being the priority. If, for whatever reason, crossed legs are not feasible for us, we will do just fine meditating in our comfortable chair. There will be no loss of the benefits.
Due to commitments we may have, the ideal routine of meditation sessions will not always be possible. That is okay. Do the best you can and do not stress over it. Due to circumstances beyond our control, sometimes the only time we will have to meditate will be right after a meal, or even later in the evening near bedtime. If meditating at these times causes a little disruption in our system, we will know it soon enough and make the necessary adjustments. The main thing is that we do our best to do two meditations every day, even if it is only a short session between our commitments. Later on, we will look at the options we have to make adjustments to address varying outer circumstances, as well as inner experiences that can come up.
Before we go on, you should try a meditation. Find a comfortable place to sit where you are not likely to be interrupted and do a short meditation, say ten minutes, and see how it goes. It is a toe in the water.
Make sure to take a couple of minutes at the end sitting easily without doing the procedure of meditation. Then open your eyes slowly. Then read on here.
As you will see, the simple procedure of deep meditation and it's resulting experiences will raise some questions. We will cover many of them here.
So, now we will move into the practical aspects of deep meditation - your own experiences and initial symptoms of the growth of your own inner silence. ~ Yogani, Deep Meditation,
185:Chapter 18 - Trapped in a Dream

(A guy is playing a pinball machine, seemingly the same guy who rode with him in the back of the boat car. This part is played by Richard Linklater, aka, the director.)

Hey, man.

Hey.

Weren't you in a boat car? You know, the guy, the guy with the hat? He gave me a ride in his car, or boat thing, and you were in the back seat with me?

I mean, I'm not saying that you don't know what you're talking about, but I don't know what you're talking about.

No, you see, you guys let me off at this really specific spot that you gave him directions to let me off at, I get out, and end up getting hit by a car, but then, I just woke up because I was dreaming, and later than that, I found out that I was still dreaming, dreaming that I'd woken up.

Oh yeah, those are called false awakenings. I used to have those all the time.

Yeah, but I'm still in it now. I, I can't get out of it. It's been going on forever, I keep waking up, but, but I'm just waking up into another dream. I'm starting to get creeped out, too. Like I'm talking to dead people. This woman on TV's telling me about how death is this dreamtime that exists outside of life. I mean, (desperate sigh) I'm starting to think that I'm dead.

I'm gonna tell you about a dream I once had. I know that's, when someone says that, then usually you're in for a very boring next few minutes, and you might be, but it sounds like, you know, what else are you going to do, right? Anyway, I read this essay by Philip K. Dick.

What, you read it in your dream?

No, no. I read it before the dream. It was the preamble to the dream. It was about that book, um Flow My Tears the Policeman Said. You know that one?

Uh, yeah yeah, he won an award for that one.

Right, right. That's the one he wrote really fast. It just like flowed right out of him. He felt he was sort of channeling it, or something. But anyway, about four years after it was published, he was at this party, and he met this woman who had the same name as the woman character in the book. And she had a boyfriend with the same name as the boyfriend character in the book, and she was having an affair with this guy, the chief of police, and he had the same name as the chief of police in his book. So she's telling him all of this stuff from her life, and everything she's saying is right out of his book. So that's totally freaking him out, but, what can he do?

And then shortly after that, he was going to mail a letter, and he saw this kind of, um, you know, dangerous, shady looking guy standing by his car, but instead of avoiding him, which he says he would have usually done, he just walked right up to him and said, "Can I help you?" And the guy said, "Yeah. I, I ran out of gas." So he pulls out his wallet, and he hands him some money, which he says he never would have done, and then he gets home and thinks, wait a second, this guy, you know, he can't get to a gas station, he's out of gas. So he gets back in his car, he goes and finds the guy, takes him to the gas station, and as he's pulling up at the gas station, he realizes, "Hey, this is in my book too. This exact station, this exact guy. Everything."

So this whole episode is kind of creepy, right? And he's telling his priest about it, you know, describing how he wrote this book, and then four years later all these things happened to him. And as he's telling it to him, the priest says, "That's the Book of Acts. You're describing the Book of Acts." And he's like, "I've never read the Book of Acts." So he, you know, goes home and reads the Book of Acts, and it's like uncanny. Even the characters' names are the same as in the Bible. And the Book of Acts takes place in 50 A.D., when it was written, supposedly. So Philip K. Dick had this theory that time was an illusion and that we were all actually in 50 A.D., and the reason he had written this book was that he had somehow momentarily punctured through this illusion, this veil of time, and what he had seen there was what was going on in the Book of Acts.

And he was really into Gnosticism, and this idea that this demiurge, or demon, had created this illusion of time to make us forget that Christ was about to return, and the kingdom of God was about to arrive. And that we're all in 50 A.D., and there's someone trying to make us forget that God is imminent. And that's what time is. That's what all of history is. It's just this kind of continuous, you know, daydream, or distraction.

And so I read that, and I was like, well that's weird. And than that night I had a dream and there was this guy in the dream who was supposed to be a psychic. But I was skeptical. I was like, you know, he's not really a psychic, you know I'm thinking to myself. And then suddenly I start floating, like levitating, up to the ceiling. And as I almost go through the roof, I'm like, "Okay, Mr. Psychic. I believe you. You're a psychic. Put me down please." And I float down, and as my feet touch the ground, the psychic turns into this woman in a green dress. And this woman is Lady Gregory.

Now Lady Gregory was Yeats' patron, this, you know, Irish person. And though I'd never seen her image, I was just sure that this was the face of Lady Gregory. So we're walking along, and Lady Gregory turns to me and says, "Let me explain to you the nature of the universe. Now Philip K. Dick is right about time, but he's wrong that it's 50 A.D. Actually, there's only one instant, and it's right now, and it's eternity. And it's an instant in which God is posing a question, and that question is basically, 'Do you want to, you know, be one with eternity? Do you want to be in heaven?' And we're all saying, 'No thank you. Not just yet.' And so time is actually just this constant saying 'No' to God's invitation. I mean that's what time is. I mean, and it's no more 50 A.D. than it's two thousand and one. And there's just this one instant, and that's what we're always in."

And then she tells me that actually this is the narrative of everyone's life. That, you know, behind the phenomenal difference, there is but one story, and that's the story of moving from the "no" to the "yes." All of life is like, "No thank you. No thank you. No thank you." then ultimately it's, "Yes, I give in. Yes, I accept. Yes, I embrace." I mean, that's the journey. I mean, everyone gets to the "yes" in the end, right?

Right.

So we continue walking, and my dog runs over to me. And so I'm petting him, really happy to see him, you know, he's been dead for years. So I'm petting him and I realize there's this kind of gross oozing stuff coming out of his stomach. And I look over at Lady Gregory, and she sort of coughs. She's like [cough] [cough] "Oh, excuse me." And there's vomit, like dribbling down her chin, and it smells really bad. And I think, "Well, wait a second, that's not just the smell of vomit," which is, doesn't smell very good, "that's the smell of like dead person vomit." You know, so it's like doubly foul. And then I realize I'm actually in the land of the dead, and everyone around me is dead. My dog had been dead for over ten years, Lady Gregory had been dead a lot longer than that. When I finally woke up, I was like, whoa, that wasn't a dream, that was a visitation to this real place, the land of the dead.

So what happened? I mean how did you finally get out of it?

Oh man. It was just like one of those like life altering experiences. I mean I could never really look at the world the same way again, after that.

Yeah, but I mean like how did you, how did you finally get out of the dream? See, that's my problem. I'm like trapped. I keep, I keep thinking that I'm waking up, but I'm still in a dream. It seems like it's going on forever. I can't get out of it, and I want to wake up for real. How do you really wake up?

I don't know, I don't know. I'm not very good at that anymore. But, um, if that's what you're thinking, I mean you, you probably should. I mean, you know if you can wake up, you should, because you know someday, you know, you won't be able to. So just, um ... But it's easy. You know. Just, just wake up. ~ Waking Life,
186:
   Can a Yogi attain to a state of consciousness in which he can know all things, answer all questions, relating even to abstruse scientific problems, such as, for example, the theory of relativity?


Theoretically and in principle it is not impossible for a Yogi to know everything; all depends upon the Yogi.

   But there is knowledge and knowledge. The Yogi does not know in the way of the mind. He does not know everything in the sense that he has access to all possible information or because he contains all the facts of the universe in his mind or because his consciousness is a sort of miraculous encyclopaedia. He knows by his capacity for a containing or dynamic identity with things and persons and forces. Or he knows because he lives in a plane of consciousness or is in contact with a consciousness in which there is the truth and the knowledge.

   If you are in the true consciousness, the knowledge you have will also be of the truth. Then, too, you can know directly, by being one with what you know. If a problem is put before you, if you are asked what is to be done in a particular matter, you can then, by looking with enough attention and concentration, receive spontaneously the required knowledge and the true answer. It is not by any careful application of theory that you reach the knowledge or by working it out through a mental process. The scientific mind needs these methods to come to its conclusions. But the Yogi's knowledge is direct and immediate; it is not deductive. If an engineer has to find out the exact position for the building of an arch, the line of its curve and the size of its opening, he does it by calculation, collating and deducing from his information and data. But a Yogi needs none of these things; he looks, has the vision of the thing, sees that it is to be done in this way and not in another, and this seeing is his knowledge.

   Although it may be true in a general way and in a certain sense that a Yogi can know all things and can answer all questions from his own field of vision and consciousness, yet it does not follow that there are no questions whatever of any kind to which he would not or could not answer. A Yogi who has the direct knowledge, the knowledge of the true truth of things, would not care or perhaps would find it difficult to answer questions that belong entirely to the domain of human mental constructions. It may be, he could not or would not wish to solve problems and difficulties you might put to him which touch only the illusion of things and their appearances. The working of his knowledge is not in the mind. If you put him some silly mental query of that character, he probably would not answer. The very common conception that you can put any ignorant question to him as to some super-schoolmaster or demand from him any kind of information past, present or future and that he is bound to answer, is a foolish idea. It is as inept as the expectation from the spiritual man of feats and miracles that would satisfy the vulgar external mind and leave it gaping with wonder.

   Moreover, the term "Yogi" is very vague and wide. There are many types of Yogis, many lines or ranges of spiritual or occult endeavour and different heights of achievement, there are some whose powers do not extend beyond the mental level; there are others who have gone beyond it. Everything depends on the field or nature of their effort, the height to which they have arrived, the consciousness with which they have contact or into which they enter.

   Do not scientists go sometimes beyond the mental plane? It is said that Einstein found his theory of relativity not through any process of reasoning, but through some kind of sudden inspiration. Has that inspiration anything to do with the Supermind?

The scientist who gets an inspiration revealing to him a new truth, receives it from the intuitive mind. The knowledge comes as a direct perception in the higher mental plane illumined by some other light still farther above. But all that has nothing to do with the action of Supermind and this higher mental level is far removed from the supramental plane. Men are too easily inclined to believe that they have climbed into regions quite divine when they have only gone above the average level. There are many stages between the ordinary human mind and the Supermind, many grades and many intervening planes. If an ordinary man were to get into direct contact even with one of these intermediate planes, he would be dazzled and blinded, would be crushed under the weight of the sense of immensity or would lose his balance; and yet it is not the Supermind.

   Behind the common idea that a Yogi can know all things and answer all questions is the actual fact that there is a plane in the mind where the memory of everything is stored and remains always in existence. All mental movements that belong to the life of the earth are memorised and registered in this plane. Those who are capable of going there and care to take the trouble, can read in it and learn anything they choose. But this region must not be mistaken for the supramental levels. And yet to reach even there you must be able to silence the movements of the material or physical mind; you must be able to leave aside all your sensations and put a stop to your ordinary mental movements, whatever they are; you must get out of the vital; you must become free from the slavery of the body. Then only you can enter into that region and see. But if you are sufficiently interested to make this effort, you can arrive there and read what is written in the earth's memory.

   Thus, if you go deep into silence, you can reach a level of consciousness on which it is not impossible for you to receive answers to all your questions. And if there is one who is consciously open to the plenary truth of the supermind, in constant contact with it, he can certainly answer any question that is worth an answer from the supramental Light. The queries put must come from some sense of the truth and reality behind things. There are many questions and much debated problems that are cobwebs woven of mere mental abstractions or move on the illusory surface of things. These do not pertain to real knowledge; they are a deformation of knowledge, their very substance is of the ignorance. Certainly the supramental knowledge may give an answer, its own answer, to the problems set by the mind's ignorance; but it is likely that it would not be at all satisfactory or perhaps even intelligible to those who ask from the mental level. You must not expect the supramental to work in the way of the mind or demand that the knowledge in truth should be capable of being pieced together with the half-knowledge in ignorance. The scheme of the mind is one thing, but Supermind is quite another and it would no longer be supramental if it adapted itself to the exigencies of the mental scheme. The two are incommensurable and cannot be put together.

   When the consciousness has attained to supramental joys, does it no longer take interest in the things of the mind?

The supramental does not take interest in mental things in the same way as the mind. It takes its own interest in all the movements of the universe, but it is from a different point of view and with a different vision. The world presents to it an entirely different appearance; there is a reversal of outlook and everything is seen from there as other than what it seems to the mind and often even the opposite. Things have another meaning; their aspect, their motion and process, everything about them, are watched with other eyes. Everything here is followed by the supermind; the mind movements and not less the vital, the material movements, all the play of the universe have for it a very deep interest, but of another kind. It is about the same difference as that between the interest taken in a puppet-play by one who holds the strings and knows what the puppets are to do and the will that moves them and that they can do only what it moves them to do, and the interest taken by another who observes the play but sees only what is happening from moment to moment and knows nothing else. The one who follows the play and is outside its secret has a stronger, an eager and passionate interest in what will happen and he gives an excited attention to its unforeseen or dramatic events; the other, who holds the strings and moves the show, is unmoved and tranquil. There is a certain intensity of interest which comes from ignorance and is bound up with illusion, and that must disappear when you are out of the ignorance. The interest that human beings take in things founds itself on the illusion; if that were removed, they would have no interest at all in the play; they would find it dry and dull. That is why all this ignorance, all this illusion has lasted so long; it is because men like it, because they cling to it and its peculiar kind of appeal that it endures.

   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, 93?
,
187:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step.

But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.

Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.

*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection.

You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, *I am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: *I have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages.

In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything.

It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM.

My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.

All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.

These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness.

And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed.

And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.

My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal.

Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967

~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, The Mother to Mona Sarkar, [T0],
188:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.
The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.
The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.
It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.
As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.

And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.

It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!
This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.
My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?

A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.
Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.

Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.
If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.
First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!
Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"
I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.
Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.
These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."
Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.
If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'
The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passage

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
Versatur urna serius ocius
Sors exitura et nos in aeternum
Exilium impositura cymbae.

Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?
And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'
We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?
And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.
I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!

"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,
'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'
Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,
Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vain
Upon the axis of its pain,
Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,
Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."

Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.
But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!

'Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:History! Read it and weep! ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
2:This book is to be read in bed. ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
3:We read to know we are not alone. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
4:The book you don't read won't help. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
5:To read is to voyage through time. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
6:To learn to read is to light a fire. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
7:Read less, study less, but think more ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
8:Read, read read. Read everything. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
9:I can read minds, but I'm illiterate. ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
10:The dice cannot read their own spots. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
11:I have read your book, and I disapprove. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
12:Teach them to question what they read. ~ george-carlin, @wisdomtrove
13:A book which people praise and don't read. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
14:Don’t just teach your children to read… ~ george-carlin, @wisdomtrove
15:We read books to find out who we are. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
16:You are in every line I have ever read. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
17:Because I don't believe everything I read. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
18:Let blockheads read what blockheads wrote. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
19:Romances I ne'er read like those I have seen. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
20:The more you read, the more things you will know. ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
21:I love to read. My education is self-inflicted ~ groucho-marx, @wisdomtrove
22:When I want to read a novel, I write one. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
23:I don't like to read books. They muss up my mind. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
24:I want leisure to read—an immense amount. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
25:Other guys read Playboy. I read annual reports. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
26:Travel. Read. Ask. Read. Learn. Read. Connect. Read. ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
27:God! that one might read the book of fate. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
28:I am a part of everything that I have read. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
29:Read a lot, write a lot is the great commandment. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
30:To read a novel is a difficult and complex art. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
31:If you want to be changed, read a good book. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
32:I like to read books. I like to listen to music. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
33:I read, much of the night, and go south in the winter. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
34:When you read the Bible, it's as though it reads you. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
35:Every object tells a story if you know how to read it. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
36:Every book is a children's book if the kid can read! ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
37:How well he's read, to reason against reading! ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
38:I read to be taken out of myself, to become ecstatic. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
39:Our job is to read things that are not yet on the page. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
40:People who read the tabloids deserve to be lied to. ~ jerry-seinfeld, @wisdomtrove
41:Some people read so little they have rickets of the mind. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
42:People talk of situations, read books, repeat quotations. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
43:We read many books, because we cannot know enough people. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
44:I love to read the way people love to watch television. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
45:&
46:There are some people who read too much: The bibliobibuli. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
47:It's not an accident that successful people read more books. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
48:Soon, books will read you while you are reading them. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
49:I am rather more apt to read old books than new ones. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
50:Literacy is so you can read the operating instructions. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
51:Men must read for amusement as well as for knowledge. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
52:Read the Bible. Work hard and honestly. And don't complain. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
53:We expect some new disaster with each newspaper we read. ~ abraham-lincoln, @wisdomtrove
54:We read the world wrong and say that it deceives us. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
55:Begin to read a book that will help you move toward your dream. ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
56:I hate the idea that you ought to read the whole of anybody. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
57:Let the man who would hear God speak, read Holy Scriptures. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
58:The only wat to get better at writing is to write. And read. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
59:To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
60:When we read too fast or too slowly, we understand nothing. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
61:I can read minds. But it's pointless because I'm illiterate. ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
62:If someone wrote it and it had a peculiar twist, I've read it. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
63:I read only to please myself, and enjoy only what suits my taste. ~ voltaire, @wisdomtrove
64:Don't read a book and be a follower; read a book and be a student. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
65:I do not read a book; I hold a conversation with the author. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
66:If I could always read, I should never feel the want of company. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
67:It is best to read the weather forecast before praying for rain. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
68:Odd, the way the less the Bible is read the more it is translated ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
69:You have to be a speedy reader 'cause there's so, so much to read! ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
70:A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
71:Don Quixote — I read that every year, as some do the Bible. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
72:I mean it's the writing, not the being read, that excites me. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
73:The great mass of humanity should never learn to read or write. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
74:By the time you read this, you'll be older than you remember. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
75:I don't read economic forecasts. I don't read the funny papers. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
76:You who read me, are You sure of understanding my language? ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
77:A person who does not read is no better than one cannot read. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
78:Clearly one must read every good book at least once every ten years. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
79:If we could read the secret history of our enemies. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
80:I would read Playboy more often, but my glasses keep steaming up. ~ george-burns, @wisdomtrove
81:Read a little. Meditate more. Think of God all the time. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
82:Read and Re-Read&
83:Those who will not read are no better off than those who cannot read. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
84:Every time someone turns on a TV, I go in the other room and read. ~ groucho-marx, @wisdomtrove
85:I can read in red. I can read in blue. I can read in pickle color too. ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
86:If you can't read, it's going to be hard to realize dreams. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
87:If you love to read, you can learn anything you really want to know. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
88:Read the book you do honestly feel a wish and curiosity to read. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
89:writing is the profound pleasure and being read the superficial. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
90:You should only read what is truly good or what is frankly bad. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
91:In the harsh face of life faith can read a bracing gospel. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
92:The books that influence the world are those that it has not read. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
93:If you want to read a perfect book there is only one way: write it. ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
94:Our high respect for a well read person is praise enough for literature. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
95:What is written without effort is in general read without pleasure. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
96:Better not read books in which you make acquaintance of the devil. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
97:I have read the Aeneid through more often than I have read any long poem. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
98:I love you now as I write this, and I love you now as you read this ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
99:I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
100:To read a poem in January is as lovely as to go for a walk in June ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
101:But it is one thing to read about dragons and another to meet them. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
102:I could read the great books but the great books don't interest me. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
103:Night has patterns that can be read less by the living than by the dead. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
104:A learned fool is one who has read everything and simply remembered it. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
105:Books have to be read it is the only way of discovering what they contain. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
106:I do not read advertisements. I would spend all of my time wanting things. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
107:People disagreeing everywhere you look makes you wanna stop and read a book. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
108:The best leaders are the most dedicated learners. Read great books daily. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
109:The success of a science fiction writer is if he can write a good read. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
110:It isn’t what the book costs. It’s what it will cost you if you don’t read it. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
111:What is read twice is usually remembered more than what is once written. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
112:Both read the Bible day and night, but thou read black where I read white. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
113:I've read the last page of the Bible. It's all going to turn out all right. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
114:The more I read, the more I acquire, the more certain I am that I know nothing. ~ voltaire, @wisdomtrove
115:Here I am, an old man in a dry month, Being read to by a boy, waiting for rain. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
116:I read the book of Job last night, I don't think God comes out well in it. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
117:What a writer's obituary should read - he wrote the books, then he died. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
118:Writing is a divine art, and the more I write and read the more I love it. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
119:A million candles have burned themselves out. Still I read on. (Montresor) ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
120:I kept always two books in my pocket, one to read, one to write in. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
121:I would sooner read a timetable or a catalog than nothing at all. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
122:Properly read, the Bible is the most potent force for atheism ever conceived. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
123:Read no history: nothing but biography, for that is life without theory. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
124:You're never too old, too wacky, too wild, to pick up a book and read to a child. ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
125:I never desire to converse with a man who has written more than he has read. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
126:Often on a wet day I begin counting up; what I've read; what I haven't read. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
127:People who read your ideas tend to think that your writings reflect your life. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
128:Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories.