classes ::: subject,
children :::
branches ::: Architectural Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Genetic Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Robotics Engineering, Software Engineering, Structural Engineering, Sub-molecular Engineering, Systems Engineering

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Engineering
class:subject

see also :::

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [17] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
Architectural_Engineering
Chemical_Engineering
Civil_Engineering
Computer_Engineering
Electrical_Engineering
Environmental_Engineering
Genetic_Engineering
Industrial_Engineering
Materials_Engineering
Mechanical_Engineering
Mechanical_Engineering
Mechatronics_Engineering
Metallurgical_Engineering
Robotics_Engineering
Software_Engineering
Structural_Engineering
Sub-molecular_Engineering
Systems_Engineering
SEE ALSO


AUTH
Gottfried_Wilhelm_Leibniz
Paul_Dirac

BOOKS

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
000_-_Humans_in_Universe
07.20_-_Why_are_Dreams_Forgotten?
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.439
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Exposition
2.09_-_SEVEN_REASONS_WHY_A_SCIENTIST_BELIEVES_IN_GOD
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
33.02_-_Subhash,_Oaten:_atlas,_Russell
3-5_Full_Circle
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
Talks_500-550
The_Act_of_Creation_text
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers

PRIMARY CLASS

subject
SIMILAR TITLES
Architectural Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Engineering
Environmental Engineering
Genetic Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Materials Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Mechatronics Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Robotics Engineering
Software Engineering
Structural Engineering
Sub-molecular Engineering
Systems Engineering

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

engineering ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Engineer ::: n. --> Originally, the art of managing engines; in its modern and extended sense, the art and science by which the mechanical properties of matter are made useful to man in structures and machines; the occupation and work of an engineer.


TERMS ANYWHERE

A :::black_box_model ::: or more specifically, a black box financial model is a catch-all term used to describe a computer program designed to transform various data into useful investment strategies. In science, computing and engineering, a black box is a device, system or object which can be viewed in terms of its inputs and outputs, without any knowledge of its internal workings. Its implementation is opaque or "black." Almost anything might be referred to as a black box: a transistor, an algorithm or even the human brain. The opposite of a black box is a system where the inner components or logic are available for inspection, which is most commonly referred to as a white box (which can also come be called a "clear box" or a "glass box").

Acknowledgements ::: (introduction) Many thanks to the hundreds of , mirror site maintainers and the maintainers of the following resources from which some entries originate:Mike Sendall's STING Software engineering glossary , 1993-10-13,Bill Kinnersley's v2.2, 1994-01-15,Mark Hopkins' catalogue of Free Compilers and Interpreters v6.4, 1994-02-28,The on-line hacker Jargon File v3.0.0, 1993-07-27,Internet Users' Glossary (RFC 1392, FYI 18), Jan 1993.John Cross's computer glossary, 1994-11-01.John Bayko's Great Microprocessors of the Past and Present, v4.0.0, 1994-08-18.Electronic Commerce Dictionary. (1997-08-01)

Acknowledgements "introduction" Many thanks to the thousands of {contributors (contributors.html)} and especially to the Guest Editors, mirror site maintainers and the maintainers of the following resources from which some entries originate: Mike Sendall's STING Software engineering glossary "sendall@dxpt01.cern.ch", 1993-10-13, Bill Kinnersley's {Language List (http://people.ku.edu/~nkinners/LangList/Extras/langlist.htm)} v2.2, 1994-01-15, Mark Hopkins' catalogue of Free Compilers and Interpreters v6.4, 1994-02-28, The on-line hacker {Jargon File} v3.0.0, 1993-07-27, Internet Users' Glossary (RFC 1392, FYI 18), Jan 1993. John Cross's computer glossary, 1994-11-01. John Bayko's Great Microprocessors of the Past and Present, v4.0.0, 1994-08-18. {Electronic Commerce Dictionary}. (2014-09-11)

Ada "language" (After {Ada Lovelace}) A {Pascal}-descended language, designed by Jean Ichbiah's team at {CII Honeywell} in 1979, made mandatory for Department of Defense software projects by the Pentagon. The original language was standardised as "Ada 83", the latest is "{Ada 95}". Ada is a large, complex, {block-structured} language aimed primarily at {embedded} applications. It has facilities for {real-time} response, {concurrency}, hardware access and reliable run-time error handling. In support of large-scale {software engineering}, it emphasises {strong typing}, {data abstraction} and {encapsulation}. The type system uses {name equivalence} and includes both {subtypes} and {derived types}. Both fixed and {floating-point} numerical types are supported. {Control flow} is fully bracketed: if-then-elsif-end if, case-is-when-end case, loop-exit-end loop, goto. Subprogram parameters are in, out, or inout. Variables imported from other packages may be hidden or directly visible. Operators may be {overloaded} and so may {enumeration} literals. There are user-defined {exceptions} and {exception handlers}. An Ada program consists of a set of packages encapsulating data objects and their related operations. A package has a separately compilable body and interface. Ada permits {generic packages} and subroutines, possibly parametrised. Ada support {single inheritance}, using "tagged types" which are types that can be extended via {inheritance}. Ada programming places a heavy emphasis on {multitasking}. Tasks are synchronised by the {rendezvous}, in which a task waits for one of its subroutines to be executed by another. The conditional entry makes it possible for a task to test whether an entry is ready. The selective wait waits for either of two entries or waits for a limited time. Ada is often criticised, especially for its size and complexity, and this is attributed to its having been designed by committee. In fact, both Ada 83 and Ada 95 were designed by small design teams to be internally consistent and tightly integrated. By contrast, two possible competitors, {Fortran 90} and {C++} have both become products designed by large and disparate volunteer committees. See also {Ada/Ed}, {Toy/Ada}. {Home of the Brave Ada Programmers (http://lglwww.epfl.ch/Ada/)}. {Ada FAQs (http://lglwww.epfl.ch/Ada/FAQ/)} (hypertext), {text only (ftp://lglftp.epfl.ch/pub/Ada/FAQ)}. {(http://wuarchive.wustl.edu/languages/ada/)}, {(ftp://ajpo.sei.cmu.edu/)}, {(ftp://stars.rosslyn.unisys.com/pub/ACE_8.0)}. E-mail: "adainfo@ajpo.sei.cmu.edu". {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.lang.ada}. {An Ada grammar (ftp://primost.cs.wisc.edu/)} including a lex scanner and yacc parser is available. E-mail: "masticol@dumas.rutgers.edu". {Another yacc grammar and parser for Ada by Herman Fischer (ftp://wsmr-simtel20.army.mil/PD2:"ADA.EXTERNAL-TOOLS"GRAM2.SRC)}. An {LR parser} and {pretty-printer} for {Ada} from NASA is available from the {Ada Software Repository}. {Adamakegen} generates {makefiles} for {Ada} programs. ["Reference Manual for the Ada Programming Language", ANSI/MIL STD 1815A, US DoD (Jan 1983)]. Earlier draft versions appeared in July 1980 and July 1982. ISO 1987. [{Jargon File}] (2000-08-12)

ADDD "tool" A Depository of Development Documents. A {public domain} Software Engineering Environment from {GMD} developed as part of the {STONE} project. (1995-02-03)

ADDD ::: (tool) A Depository of Development Documents.A public domain Software Engineering Environment from GMD developed as part of the STONE project. (1995-02-03)

Advantage Gen "language, software" A {CASE} tool for {rapid application development} which generates code from graphical {business process models}. Formerly called Information Engineering Facility (IEF) and produced by {Texas Instruments}, it was then bought by {Sterling Software, Inc.} who renamed it to COOL:Gen to fit into their COOL line of products. {Computer Associates International, Inc.} then acquired {Sterling Software, Inc.}, and renamed the tool "Advantage Gen". In 2003, CA are supporting Advantage Gen and adding support for {J2EE}/{EJB}, enhanced web enablement, {Web services} and {.Net}. {(http://www3.ca.com/Solutions/Product.asp?ID=256)}. (2003-06-23)

AED {Automated Engineering Design}

ALADIN ::: 1. (language) A Language for Attributed Definitions.2. (tool) An interactive mathematics system for the IBM 360.[A Conversational System for Engineering Assistance: ALADIN, Y. Siret, Proc Second Symp Symb Algebraic Math, ACM Mar 1971]. (1995-04-13)

ALADIN 1. "language" {A Language for Attributed Definitions}. 2. "tool" An interactive mathematics system for the {IBM 360}. ["A Conversational System for Engineering Assistance: ALADIN", Y. Siret, Proc Second Symp Symb Algebraic Math, ACM Mar 1971]. (1995-04-13)

algorithmic efficiency ::: A property of an algorithm which relates to the number of computational resources used by the algorithm. An algorithm must be analyzed to determine its resource usage, and the efficiency of an algorithm can be measured based on usage of different resources. Algorithmic efficiency can be thought of as analogous to engineering productivity for a repeating or continuous process.

Also mechatronic engineering. ::: A multidisciplinary branch of engineering that focuses on the engineering of both electrical and mechanical systems, and also includes a combination of robotics, electronics, computer, telecommunications, systems, control, and product engineering.[218][219]

Application Configuration Access Protocol ::: (protocol) (ACAP) A protocol which enhances IMAP by allowing the user to set up address books, user options, and other data for universal access. because the Internet Engineering Task Force has not yet approved the final specification. This was expected early in 1997.[Your E-Mail Is Obsolete, Byte, Feb 1997]. (1997-05-03)

Application Configuration Access Protocol "protocol" (ACAP) A {protocol} which enhances {IMAP} by allowing the user to set up {address books}, user options, and other data for universal access. Currently (Feb 1997) no Internet proprietary products have implemented ACAP because the {Internet Engineering Task Force} has not yet approved the final specification. This was expected early in 1997. ["Your E-Mail Is Obsolete", Byte, Feb 1997]. (1997-05-03)

application lifecycle management "programming" (ALM) A combination of {software engineering}, {requirements management}, {architecture}, {coding}, {testing}, {tracking} and {release management}. (2009-06-10)

ASSET {Asset Source for Software Engineering Technology}

Asset Source for Software Engineering Technology "project" (ASSET) A programme to promote software {reuse} by the US {DoD}. See also {ASSET Reuse Library}. (1996-08-19)

Asset Source for Software Engineering Technology ::: (project) (ASSET) A programme to promote software reuse by the US DoD.See also ASSET Reuse Library. (1996-08-19)

AutoCAD ::: (CAD, product) A CAD software package for mechanical engineering, marketed by Autodesk, Inc. (1994-11-09)

AutoCAD "product, tool" A {CAD} {software} package for mechanical engineering, marketed by {Autodesk, Inc.} (1994-11-09)

Automated Engineering Design "language" (AED) (Or "ALGOL Extended for Design") A systems language for the {IBM 7090} and {IBM 360} developed at {MIT} System Laboratory ca. 1965 by a team led by Douglas T. Ross (now at {Softech}). AED is an extension of {ALGOL 60} with {records} ("plexes"), pointers, and {dynamic allocation}. {DYNAMO II} was written in AED, as was the first {BCPL} {compiler}. Versions: AED-0, AED-1, AED-JR. ["The Automated Engineering Design (AED) Approach to Generalized Computer-Aided Design", D.T. Ross, Proc ACM 22nd Natl Conf, 1967]. [Sammet 1969 and 1978]. (1995-03-26)

Automated Engineering Design ::: (language) (AED) (Or ALGOL Extended for Design) A systems language for the IBM 7090 and IBM 360 developed at MIT System Laboratory ca. 1965 by a team records (plexes), pointers, and dynamic allocation. DYNAMO II was written in AED, as was the first BCPL compiler.Versions: AED-0, AED-1, AED-JR.[The Automated Engineering Design (AED) Approach to Generalized Computer-Aided Design, D.T. Ross, Proc ACM 22nd Natl Conf, 1967].[Sammet 1969 and 1978]. (1995-03-26)

autonomous robot ::: A robot that performs behaviors or tasks with a high degree of autonomy. Autonomous robotics is usually considered to be a subfield of artificial intelligence, robotics, and information engineering.[37]

AverStar "company" The US software engineering company that developed {Hal}, under their former name, "Intermetrics". Other products include {CS-4}, {Red}, {Mwave Developers Toolkit} ({multimedia} for {IBM PC}), {cross-compilers} for {C} and {C++}; {Ada '83}, {Ada 95}, and {SAMeDL}. AverStar also supply {client/server} systems; custom software applications and {turnkey} systems; independent verification and validation; {CAE} integration technology; languages and compilers: {Ada}, {C}, {C++}, {HDLs} ({MHDL}), {Modula}, {SPL/1}. Address: Intermetrics, Inc., 733 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Telephone: +1 (617) 661 1840. Fax: +1 (617) 868 2843. Address: 7918 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, Va 22102, USA. Telephone: +1 (703) 827-2606. Fax: +1 (703) 827-5560. Also Houston, TX, Huntington Beach, CA, Warminster, PA, and others. {AverStar Home (http://averstar.com/)}. (2003-02-17)

AverStar ::: (company) The US software engineering company that developed Hal, under their former name, Intermetrics. Other products include CS-4, Red, Mwave validation; CAE integration technology; languages and compilers: Ada, C, C++, HDLs (MHDL), Modula, SPL/1.Address: Intermetrics, Inc., 733 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Telephone: +1 (617) 661 1840. Fax: +1 (617) 868 2843.Address: 7918 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, Va 22102, USA. Telephone: +1 (703) 827-2606. Fax: +1 (703) 827-5560.Also Houston, TX, Huntington Beach, CA, Warminster, PA, and others. .(2003-02-17)

Berard Object and Class Specifier "tool, object-oriented, modeling" (BOCS) An {object-oriented} {CASE} tool released by US company, {Berard Software Engineering} on 1993-07-05. BOCS helps users document and model a system and its underlying objects. It includes libraries to manage {requirements}, object and {class} specifications and graphical models. [Computerworld, 1993-07-05, p63]. (2015-06-17)

Berkeley EDIF200 ::: translator-building toolkitWendell C. Baker and Prof A. Richard Newton of the Electronics Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley.Version 7.6. Restriction: no-profit without permission. . (1990-07-01)

Berkeley EDIF200 translator-building toolkit Wendell C. Baker and Prof A. Richard Newton of the Electronics Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the {University of California, Berkeley}. Version 7.6. Restriction: no-profit without permission. {(ftp://ic.berkeley.edu/pub/edif)}. (1990-07-01)

beta testing "programming" Evaluation of a pre-release (potentially unreliable) version of a piece of {software} (or possibly {hardware}) by making it available to selected users ("beta testers") before it goes on general distribution. Beta testign aims to discover {bugs} that only occur in certain environments or under certain patterns of use, while reducing the volume of feedback to a manageable level. The testers benefit by having earlier access to new products, features and fixes. Beta testing may be preceded by "alpha testing", performed in-house by a handful of users (e.g. other developers or friends), who can be expected to give rapid, high quality feedback on design and {usability}. Once the product is considered to be usable for its intended purpose it then moves on to "beta testing" by a larger, but typically still limited, number of ordinary users, who may include external customers. Some companies such as {Google} or {Degree Jungle (http://www.degreejungle.com/rankings/best-online-colleges)} stretch the definition, claiming their products are "in beta" for many months by millions of users. The term derives from early 1960s terminology for {product cycle} checkpoints, first used at {IBM} but later standard throughout the industry. "{Alpha test}" was the {unit test}, {module test} or {component test} phase; "Beta Test" was initial {system test}. These themselves came from earlier A- and B-tests for hardware. The A-test was a feasibility and manufacturability evaluation done before any commitment to design and development. The B-test was a demonstration that the engineering model functioned as specified. The C-test (corresponding to today's beta) was the B-test performed on early samples of the production design. (2013-06-09)

binary prefix "unit" (Or "IEC prefix") A prefix used with a {unit} of {data} to mean multiplication by a power of 1024. Binary prefixes are most often used with "{byte}" (e.g. "{kilobyte}") but also with {bit} (e.g. "{megabit}"). For example, the term {kilobyte} has historically been used to mean 1024 {bytes}, and {megabyte} to mean 1,048,576 bytes. The multipliers 1024 and 1,048,576 are powers of 1024, which is itself a power of two (1024 = 2^10). It is this factor of two that gives the name "binary prefix". This is in contrast to a {decimal prefix} denoting a power of 1000, which is itself a power of ten (1000 = 10^3). Decimal prefixes are used in science and engineering and are specified in widely adopted {SI} standards. Note that the actual prefix - kilo or mega - is the same, it is the interpretation that differs. The difference between the two interpretations increases with each multiplication, so while 1000 and 1024 differ by only 2.4%, 1000^6 and 1024^6 differ by 15%. The 1024-based interpretation of prefixes is often still used informally and especially when discussing the storage capacity of {random-access memory}. This has lead to storage device manufacturers being accused of false marketing for using the decimal interpretation where customers might assume the larger, historical, binary interpretation. In an attempt to clarify the distinction, in 1998 the {IEC} specified that kilobyte, megabyte, etc. should only be used for powers of 1000 (following SI). They specified new prefixes for powers of 1024 containing "bi" for "binary": {kibibyte}, {mebibyte}, etc.; an idea originally propsed by {IUPAC}. IEC also specified new abbreviations Ki, Mi, etc. for the new prefixes. Many other standards bodies such as {NIST}, {IEEE} and {BIPM} support this proposal but as of 2013 its use is rare in non-technical circles. Specific units of IEC 60027-2 A.2 and ISO/IEC 80000 IEC prefix Representations Customary prefix Name Symbol Base 2 Base Base 10 Name Symbol   1024 (approx) kibi Ki 2^10 1024^1 1.02x10^3 kilo k, K mebi Mi 2^20 1024^2 1.05x10^6 mega M gibi Gi 2^30 1024^3 1.07x10^9 giga G tebi Ti 2^40 1024^4 1.10x10^12 tera T pebi Pi 2^50 1024^5 1.13x10^15 peta P exbi Ei 2^60 1024^6 1.15x10^18 exa   E zebi Zi 2^70 1024^7 1.18x10^21 zetta Z yobi Yi 2^80 1024^8 1.21x10^24 yotta Y (2013-11-04)

Bioinformatics ::: is the application of computational technology to handle the rapidly growing repository of information related to molecular biology. Bioinformatics combines different fields of study, including computer sciences, molecular biology, biotechnology, statistics and engineering. It is particularly useful for managing and analyzing large sets of data, such as those generated by the fields of genomics and proteomics.

BMASF ::: Basic Module Algebra Specification Language? Design of a Specification Language by Abstract Syntax Engineering, J.C.M. Baeten et al, in LNCS 490, pp.363-394.

BMASF Basic Module Algebra Specification Language? "Design of a Specification Language by Abstract Syntax Engineering", J.C.M. Baeten et al, in LNCS 490, pp.363-394.

BOCS ::: Berard Object and Class Specifier, an Object-oriented CASE tool from Berard Software Engineering.

bogon filter /boh'gon fil'tr/ Any device, software or hardware, that limits or suppresses the flow and/or emission of bogons. "Engineering hacked a bogon filter between the {Cray} and the {VAXen}, and now we're getting fewer dropped packets." See also {bogosity}.

bogon filter ::: /boh'gon fil'tr/ Any device, software or hardware, that limits or suppresses the flow and/or emission of bogons. Engineering hacked a bogon filter between the Cray and the VAXen, and now we're getting fewer dropped packets. See also bogosity.

BPR {Business Process Re-engineering}

brute force ::: (programming) A primitive programming style in which the programmer relies on the computer's processing power instead of using his own intelligence heavy-handed, tedious way, full of repetition and devoid of any elegance or useful abstraction (see also brute force and ignorance).The canonical example of a brute-force algorithm is associated with the travelling salesman problem (TSP), a classical NP-hard problem:Suppose a person is in, say, Boston, and wishes to drive to N other cities. In what order should the cities be visited in order to minimise the distance travelled?The brute-force method is to simply generate all possible routes and compare the distances; while guaranteed to work and simple to implement, this algorithm is consider, and for N = 1000 - well, see bignum). Sometimes, unfortunately, there is no better general solution than brute force. See also NP-complete.A more simple-minded example of brute-force programming is finding the smallest number in a large list by first using an existing program to sort the list in ascending order, and then picking the first number off the front.Whether brute-force programming should actually be considered stupid or not depends on the context; if the problem is not terribly big, the extra CPU time algorithm may imply more long-term complexity cost and bug-chasing than are justified by the speed improvement.When applied to cryptography, it is usually known as brute force attack.Ken Thompson, co-inventor of Unix, is reported to have uttered the epigram When in doubt, use brute force. He probably intended this as a ha ha only serious, cleverness is often a difficult one that requires both engineering savvy and delicate aesthetic judgment.[Jargon File] (1995-02-14)

brute force "programming" A primitive programming style in which the programmer relies on the computer's processing power instead of using his own intelligence to simplify the problem, often ignoring problems of scale and applying naive methods suited to small problems directly to large ones. The term can also be used in reference to programming style: brute-force programs are written in a heavy-handed, tedious way, full of repetition and devoid of any elegance or useful abstraction (see also {brute force and ignorance}). The {canonical} example of a brute-force algorithm is associated with the "{travelling salesman problem}" (TSP), a classical {NP-hard} problem: Suppose a person is in, say, Boston, and wishes to drive to N other cities. In what order should the cities be visited in order to minimise the distance travelled? The brute-force method is to simply generate all possible routes and compare the distances; while guaranteed to work and simple to implement, this algorithm is clearly very stupid in that it considers even obviously absurd routes (like going from Boston to Houston via San Francisco and New York, in that order). For very small N it works well, but it rapidly becomes absurdly inefficient when N increases (for N = 15, there are already 1,307,674,368,000 possible routes to consider, and for N = 1000 - well, see {bignum}). Sometimes, unfortunately, there is no better general solution than brute force. See also {NP-complete}. A more simple-minded example of brute-force programming is finding the smallest number in a large list by first using an existing program to sort the list in ascending order, and then picking the first number off the front. Whether brute-force programming should actually be considered stupid or not depends on the context; if the problem is not terribly big, the extra CPU time spent on a brute-force solution may cost less than the programmer time it would take to develop a more "intelligent" algorithm. Additionally, a more intelligent algorithm may imply more long-term complexity cost and bug-chasing than are justified by the speed improvement. When applied to {cryptography}, it is usually known as {brute force attack}. {Ken Thompson}, co-inventor of {Unix}, is reported to have uttered the epigram "When in doubt, use brute force". He probably intended this as a {ha ha only serious}, but the original {Unix} {kernel}'s preference for simple, robust and portable {algorithms} over {brittle} "smart" ones does seem to have been a significant factor in the success of that {operating system}. Like so many other tradeoffs in software design, the choice between brute force and complex, finely-tuned cleverness is often a difficult one that requires both engineering savvy and delicate aesthetic judgment. [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-14)

bus "architecture, networking" A set of electrical conductors (wires, PCB tracks or connections in an {integrated circuit}) connecting various "stations", which can be {functional units} in a computer or {nodes} in a {network}. A bus is a {broadcast} channel, meaning that each station receives every other station's transmissions and all stations have equal access to the bus. Various schemes have been invented to solve the problem of collisions: multiple stations trying to transmit at once, e.g. {CSMA/CD}, {bus master}. The term is almost certainly derived from the electrical engineering term "bus bar" - a substantial, rigid power supply conductor to which several connections are made. This was once written "'bus bar" as it was a contraction of "omnibus bar" - a connection bar "for all", by analogy with the passenger omnibus - a conveyance "for all". {More on derivation (/pub/misc/omnibus.html)}. There are busses both within the {CPU} and connecting it to external {memory} and {peripheral} devices. The data bus, address bus and control signals, despite their names, really constitute a single bus since each is useless without the others. The width of the data bus is usually specified in {bits} and is the number of parallel connectors. This and the {clock rate} determine the bus's data rate (the number of {bytes} per second which it can carry). This is one of the factors limiting a computer's performance. Most current {microprocessors} have 32-bit busses both internally and externally. 100 or 133 {megahertz} bus clock rates are common. The bus clock is typically slower than the processor clock. Some processors have internal busses which are wider than their external busses (usually twice the width) since the width of the internal bus affects the speed of all operations and has less effect on the overall system cost than the width of the external bus. Various bus designs have been used in the {PC}, including {ISA}, {EISA}, {Micro Channel}, {VL-bus} and {PCI}. Other peripheral busses are NuBus, TURBOchannel, VMEbus, MULTIBUS and STD bus. See also {bus network}. {Ukranian (http://open-taxi.com/mynews/~adrian/10)}. (2010-07-10)

bus ::: (architecture) One of the sets of conductors (wires, PCB tracks or connections in an integrated circuit) connecting the various functional units in despite their names, really constitute a single bus since each is useless without the others.The width of the data bus, i.e. the number of parallel connectors, and its clock rate determine its data rate (the number of bytes per second which it can or 133 megahertz bus clock rates are common. The bus clock is typically slower than the processor clock.Some processors have internal busses which are wider than their external busses (usually twice the width) since the width of the internal bus affects the speed of all operations and has less effect on the overall system cost than the width of the external bus.Various bus designs have been used in the PC, including ISA, EISA, Micro Channel, VL-bus and PCI. Other peripheral busses are NuBus, TURBOchannel, VMEbus, MULTIBUS and STD bus.Some networks are implemented as a bus at the physical layer, e.g. Ethernet - a one-bit bus operating at 10 (or later 100) megabits per second.The term is almost certainly derived from the electrical engineering term bus bar - a substantial, rigid power supply conductor to which several connections bar - a connection bar for all, by analogy with the passenger omnibus - a conveyance for all. .(2000-03-20)

Business Process Re-engineering "business" (BPR) Any radical change in the way in which an organisation performs its business activities. BPR involves a fundamental re-think of the business processes followed by a redesign of business activities to enhance all or most of its critical measures - costs, quality of service, staff dynamics, etc. (1999-09-27)

Business Process Re-engineering ::: (business) (BPR) Any radical change in the way in which an organisation performs its business activities. BPR involves a fundamental re-think of the or most of its critical measures - costs, quality of service, staff dynamics, etc. (1999-09-27)

CADRE "company" The US {software engineering} vendor which merged with {Bachman Information Systems} to form {Cayenne Software} in July 1996. (1998-02-08)

CADRE ::: (company) The US software engineering vendor which merged with Bachman Information Systems to form Cayenne Software in July 1996. (1998-02-08)

CAE ::: 1. (operating system) Common Applications Environment.2. (application) Computer Aided Engineering.

CAE 1. "operating system" {Common Applications Environment}. 2. "application" {Computer Aided Engineering}.

CAiSE ::: Conference on Advanced Information Systems Engineering.

CAiSE Conference on Advanced Information Systems Engineering.

Capabilities Maturity Model ::: (software) (CMM) The Software Engineering Institute's model of software engineering that specifies five levels of maturity of the processes of a expanded to cover other areas including Human Resources and Software Acquitition.The levels - focii - and key process areas are:Level 1 Initial - Heroes - None.Level 2 Repeatable - Project Management - Software Project Planning, Software Project Tracking and Oversight, Software Subcontract Management, Software Quality Assurance, Software Configuration Management, Requirements Management.Level 3 Defined - Engineering Process - Organisation Process Focus, Organisation Process Definition, Peer Reviews, Training Program, Inter-group Coordination, Software Product Engineering, Integrated Software Management.Level 4 Managed - Product and Process Quality - Software Quality Management, Quantitative Process Management.Level 5 Optimising - Continuous Improvement - Process Change Management, Technology Change Management, Defect Prevention.[Reference?](2001-04-28)

Capability Maturity Model "software" (CMM) The {Software Engineering Institute}'s model of {software engineering} that specifies five levels of maturity of the processes of a software organisation. CMM offers a framework for evolutionary process improvement. Originally applied to software development (SE-CMM), it has been expanded to cover other areas including Human Resources and Software Acquitition. The levels - focii - and key process areas are: Level 1 Initial - Heroes - None. Level 2 Repeatable - Project Management - Software Project Planning, Software Project Tracking and Oversight, Software Subcontract Management, Software Quality Assurance, Software Configuration Management, Requirements Management. Level 3 Defined - Engineering Process - Organisation Process Focus, Organisation Process Definition, Peer Reviews, Training Program, Inter-group Coordination, Software Product Engineering, Integrated Software Management. Level 4 Managed - Product and Process Quality - Software Quality Management, Quantitative Process Management. Level 5 Optimising - Continuous Improvement - Process Change Management, Technology Change Management, Defect Prevention. {(http://www.sei.cmu.edu/cmm/cmm.html)}. (2001-04-28)

CASE ::: 1. Computer Aided Software Engineering.2. Common Application Service Element.

CASE 1. {Computer Aided Software Engineering}. 2. {Common Application Service Element}.

CATE ::: Computer Aided Test Engineering: CASE methods applied to electronics testing and linked to CAE

CATE {Computer Aided Test Engineering}

CA-Telon ::: (application) A Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tool for designing, generating and maintaining COBOL and PL/I application programs. Telon was developed by Pansophic Systems who were bought by Computer Associates in 1991, whereupon it was renamed CA-Telon.It supports high-level, non-prodedural design and prototyping, combined with automatic code generation. There are mainframe and PC versions. The generated COBOL applications can execute in AIX, HP-UX, VSE, OS/400 for the AS/400, PC-DOS, or OS/2.(2000-01-19)

CA-Telon "application" A {Computer Aided Software Engineering} (CASE) tool for designing, generating and maintaining {COBOL} and {PL/I} {application programs}. Telon was developed by {Pansophic} Systems who were bought by {Computer Associates} in 1991, whereupon it was renamed CA-Telon. It supports high-level, non-{prodedural} design and prototyping, combined with automatic {code generation}. There are {mainframe} and {PC} versions. The generated COBOL applications can execute in {AIX}, {HP-UX}, {VSE}, {OS/400} for the {AS/400}, {PC-DOS}, or {OS/2}. (2000-01-19)

CDL ::: 1. Computer Definition [Design?] Language. A hardware description language. Computer Organisation and Microprogramming, Yaohan Chu, P-H 1970.2. Command Definition Language. Portion of ICES used to implement commands. Sammet 1969, p.618-620.3. Compiler Description Language. C.H.A. Koster, 1969. Intended for implementation of the rules of an affix grammar by recursive procedures. A C.H.A. Koster, LNCS 47, Springer 1977, pp.341-351. Using the CDL Compiler Compiler, C.H.A. Koster, 1974. Versions: CDL2, CDLM used at Manchester.4. Common Design Language. Common Design Language, IBM, Software Engineering Inst, Sept 1983.5. Control Definition Language. Ideas which contributed to Smalltalk.[Control Structures for Programming Languges, David A. Fisher, PhD Thesis, CMU 1970].

CDL 1. Computer Definition [Design?] Language. A hardware description language. "Computer Organisation and Microprogramming", Yaohan Chu, P-H 1970. 2. Command Definition Language. Portion of ICES used to implement commands. Sammet 1969, p.618-620. 3. Compiler Description Language. C.H.A. Koster, 1969. Intended for implementation of the rules of an affix grammar by recursive procedures. A procedure may be a set of tree-structured alternatives, each alternative is executed until one successfully exits. Used in a portable COBOL-74 compiler from MPB, mprolog system from SzKI, and the Mephisto chess computer. "CDL: A Compiler Implementation Language", in Methods of Algorithmic Language Implementation, C.H.A. Koster, LNCS 47, Springer 1977, pp.341-351. "Using the CDL Compiler Compiler", C.H.A. Koster, 1974. Versions: CDL2, CDLM used at Manchester. 4. Common Design Language. "Common Design Language", IBM, Software Engineering Inst, Sept 1983. 5. Control Definition Language. Ideas which contributed to Smalltalk. ["Control Structures for Programming Languges", David A. Fisher, PhD Thesis, CMU 1970].

CGI 1. "web" {Common Gateway Interface}. 2. "graphics" {computer-generated imagery}. 3. "company" A French {software engineering} vendor in the US. 4. "company" {Computer Generation Incorporated}.

CGI ::: 1. (World-Wide Web) Common Gateway Interface.2. (graphics) computer-generated imagery.3. (company) A French software engineering vendor in the US.4. (company) Computer Generation Incorporated.

Chalmers University of Technology ::: (body, education) A Swedish university founded in 1829 offering master of science and doctoral degrees. Research is carried out in the main engineering Five hundred faculty members work in more than 100 departments organised in nine schools. Chalmers collaborates with the University of G�teborg.Around 8500 people work and study on the Chalmers campus, including around 500 faculty members and some 600 teachers and doctoral students. About 4800 students licentiates are awarded. Some 40% of Sweden's engineers and architects are Chalmers graduates.About a thousand research projects are in progress and more than 1500 scientific articles and research reports are published every year. Chalmers is a partner in 80 EC research projects. .Address: S-412 96 G�teborg, Sweden. (1995-02-16)

Chalmers University of Technology "body, education" A Swedish university founded in 1829 offering master of science and doctoral degrees. Research is carried out in the main engineering sciences as well as in technology related mathematical and natural sciences. Five hundred faculty members work in more than 100 departments organised in nine schools. Chalmers collaborates with the University of Göteborg. Around 8500 people work and study on the Chalmers campus, including around 500 faculty members and some 600 teachers and doctoral students. About 4800 students follow the master degree programs. Every year 700 Masters of Science in Engineering and in Architecture graduate from Chalmers, and about 190 PhDs and licentiates are awarded. Some 40% of Sweden's engineers and architects are Chalmers graduates. About a thousand research projects are in progress and more than 1500 scientific articles and research reports are published every year. Chalmers is a partner in 80 EC research projects. {(http://chalmers.se/Home-E.html)}. Address: S-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden. (1995-02-16)

clone ::: (jargon) 1. An exact copy of a product, made legally or illegally, from documentation or by reverse engineering, and usually cheaper.E.g. PC clone: a PC-BUS/ISA, EISA, VESA, or PCI compatible x86-based microcomputer (this use is sometimes misspelled klone or PClone). These invariably have much more bang per buck than the IB PCM they resemble.E.g. Unix clone: An operating system designed to deliver a Unix-like environment without Unix licence fees or with additional mission-critical features such as support for real-time programming.2. (chat) A clonebot.[Jargon File](2000-06-15)

clone "jargon" 1. An exact copy of a product, made legally or illegally, from {documentation} or by {reverse engineering}, and usually cheaper. E.g. "PC clone": a PC-BUS/{ISA}, {EISA}, {VESA}, or {PCI} compatible {x86}-based {microcomputer} (this use is sometimes misspelled "klone" or "PClone"). These invariably have much more bang per buck than the {IB PCM} they resemble. E.g. "Unix clone": An {operating system} designed to deliver a {Unix}-like environment without Unix licence fees or with additional "mission-critical" features such as support for {real-time} programming. 2. "chat" A {clonebot}. [{Jargon File}] (2000-06-15)

COGO "application" A subsystem of {ICES} aimed at {coordinate geometry} problems in civil engineering. ["Engineer's Guide to ICES COGO I", R67-46, CE Dept MIT, Aug 1967]. (1995-01-04)

COGO ::: A subsystem of ICES aimed at coordinate geometry problems in Civil Engineering.[Engineer's Guide to ICES COGO I, R67-46, CE Dept MIT (Aug 1967)]. (1995-01-04)

Common Internet File System "protocol" (CIFS) An {Internet} {file system} {protocol}, based on {Microsoft}'s {SMB}. Microsoft has given CIFS to the {Internet Engineering Task Force} (IETF) as an Internet Draft. CIFS is intended to complement existing protocols such as {HTTP}, {FTP}, and {NFS}. CIFS runs on top of {TCP/IP} and uses the Internet's {Domain Name Service} (DNS). It is optimised to support the slower speed {dial-up} connections common on the Internet. CIFS is more flexible than FTP. FTP operations are carried out on entire files whereas CIFS is aimed at routine data access and incorporates high-performance multi-user read and write operations, {locking}, and file-sharing semantics. CIFS is probably closest in functionality to NFS. NFS gives random access to files and directories, but is {stateless}. With CIFS, once a file is open, state about the current access to that file is stored on both the client and the server. This allows changes on the server side to be notified to the clients that are interested. {Microsoft Overview (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/fileio/base/cifs_smb_protocol_overview.asp)}. {SNIA page (http://snia.org/tech_activities/CIFS/)}. {CIFS: A Common Internet File System, Paul Leach and Dan Perry (http://microsoft.com/Mind/1196/CIFS.htm)}. {IETF Specification. CIFS version 1 (ftp://ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-leach-cifs-v1-spec-01.txt)}. (2003-03-12)

Common Internet File System ::: (protocol) (CIFS) An Internet file system protocol, based on Microsoft's SMB. Microsoft has given CIFS to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as an Internet Draft. CIFS is intended to complement existing protocols such as HTTP, FTP, and NFS.CIFS runs on top of TCP/IP and uses the Internet's Domain Name Service (DNS). It is optimised to support the slower speed dial-up connections common on the Internet.CIFS is more flexible than FTP. FTP operations are carried out on entire files whereas CIFS is aimed at routine data access and incorporates high-performance multi-user read and write operations, locking, and file-sharing semantics.CIFS is probably closest in functionality to NFS. NFS gives random access to files and directories, but is stateless. With CIFS, once a file is open, state server. This allows changes on the server side to be notified to the clients that are interested. . . . .(2003-03-12)

Computer Aided Engineering "application" (CAE) The use of {software} to help with all phases of engineering design work. Like {computer aided design}, but also involving the conceptual and analytical design steps and extending into {Computer-Integrated Manufacturing} (CIM). (1994-10-28)

Computer Aided Engineering ::: (application) (CAE) Use of computers to help with all phases of engineering design work. Like computer aided design, but also involving the conceptual and analytical design steps.[Does it include manufacturing? Example systems?] (1994-10-28)

Computer Aided Design "application" (CAD) The part of {CAE} concerning the drawing or physical layout steps of engineering design. Often found in the phrase "CAD/CAM" for ".. manufacturing". (1994-11-30)

Computer Aided Design ::: (application) (CAD) The part of CAE concerning the drawing or physical layout steps of engineering design. Often found in the phrase CAD/CAM for .. manufacturing. (1994-11-30)

Computer Aided Software Engineering ::: (programming) (CASE, or assisted) A technique for using computers to help with one or more phases of the software life-cycle, including the Adopting the CASE approach to building and maintaining systems involves software tools and training for the developers who will use them. (1996-05-10)

Computer Aided Software Engineering "programming" (CASE, or "- assisted -") A technique for using computers to help with one or more phases of the {software life-cycle}, including the systematic analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of software. Adopting the CASE approach to building and maintaining systems involves software tools and training for the developers who will use them. (1996-05-10)

Computer Aided Test Engineering "testing, electronics" (CATE) {CASE} methods applied to electronics testing and linked to {CAE}. (2007-05-03)

Computer-Assisted Software Engineering {Computer-Aided Software Engineering}

computer-automated design (CAutoD) ::: Design automation usually refers to electronic design automation, or Design Automation which is a Product Configurator. Extending Computer-Aided Design (CAD), automated design and computer-automated design[101][102][103] are concerned with a broader range of applications, such as automotive engineering, civil engineering,[104][105][106][107] composite material design, control engineering,[108] dynamic system identification and optimization,[109] financial systems, industrial equipment, mechatronic systems, steel construction,[110] structural optimisation,[111] and the invention of novel systems. More recently, traditional CAD simulation is seen to be transformed to CAutoD by biologically inspired machine learning,[112] including heuristic search techniques such as evolutionary computation,[113][114] and swarm intelligence algorithms.[115]

computer science ::: The theory, experimentation, and engineering that form the basis for the design and use of computers. It involves the study of algorithms that process, store, and communicate digital information. A computer scientist specializes in the theory of computation and the design of computational systems.[116]

computer vision ::: An interdisciplinary scientific field that deals with how computers can be made to gain high-level understanding from digital images or videos. From the perspective of engineering, it seeks to automate tasks that the human visual system can do.[117][118][119]

Constructive Cost Model "programming" (COCOMO) A method for estimating the cost of a {software} package, proposed by Dr Barry Boehm. The Basic COCOMO Model estimates the effort required to develop software in three modes of development ({Organic Mode}, {Semidetached Mode}, or {Embedded Mode}) using only {DSIs} as an input. The Basic model is good for quick estimates. The Intermediate Model extends the Basic Model with an {Effort Adjustment Factor} (EAF) and different coefficients for the effort equation. The user supplies settings for cost drivers that determine the effort and duration of the software projects. It also allows DSI values and cost drivers to be chosen for individual components instead of for the system as a whole. The Detailed COCOMO Model uses effort multipliers for each phase of the project and provides a three-level product hierarchy and has some other capabilities such as a procedure for adjusting the phase distribution of the development schedule. ["Software Engineering Economics", B. Boehm, Prentice-Hall, 1981]. (1996-05-29)

Constructive Cost Model ::: (programming) (COCOMO) A method for evaluating the cost of a software package proposed by Dr Barry Boehm. There are a number of different types:The Basic COCOMO Model estimates the effort required to develop software in three modes of development (Organic Mode, Semidetached Mode, or Embedded Mode) using only DSIs as an input. The Basic model is good for quick, early, and rough order of magnitude estimates.The Intermediate COCOMO Model an extension of the Basic COCOMO model. The Intermediate model uses an Effort Adjustment Factor (EAF) and slightly different components. DSI values and cost drivers can be chosen for individual components instead of for the system as a whole.The Detailed COCOMO Model differs from the Intermediate COCOMO model in that it uses effort multipliers for each phase of the project. These phase dependent product hierarchy and has some other capabilities such as a procedure for adjusting the phase distribution of the development schedule.[Software Engineering Economics, B. Boehm, Prentice-Hall, 1981]. (1996-05-29)

Contextually Communicating Sequential Processes ::: (CCSP) A notation based on CSP.[Contextually Communicating Sequential Processes - A Software Engineering Approach, M. Hull et al, Software Prac & Exp 16(9):845-864 (Sept 1986)]. (1994-11-01)

Contextually Communicating Sequential Processes "language" (CCSP) A notation based on {CSP}. ["Contextually Communicating Sequential Processes - A Software Engineering Approach", M. Hull et al, Software Prac & Exp 16(9):845-864, Sept 1986]. (1994-11-01)

control theory ::: In control systems engineering is a subfield of mathematics that deals with the control of continuously operating dynamical systems in engineered processes and machines. The objective is to develop a control model for controlling such systems using a control action in an optimum manner without delay or overshoot and ensuring control stability.

coupling "programming, hardware" The degree to which components depend on one another. There are two types of coupling, "tight" and "loose". Loose coupling is desirable for good {software engineering} but tight coupling may be necessary for maximum performance. Coupling is increased when the data exchanged between components becomes larger or more complex. (1996-08-01)

cybernetics "robotics" /si:`b*-net'iks/ The study of control and communication in living and man-made systems. The term was first proposed by {Norbert Wiener} in the book referenced below. Originally, cybernetics drew upon electrical engineering, mathematics, biology, neurophysiology, anthropology, and psychology to study and describe actions, feedback, and response in systems of all kinds. It aims to understand the similarities and differences in internal workings of organic and machine processes and, by formulating abstract concepts common to all systems, to understand their behaviour. Modern "second-order cybernetics" places emphasis on how the process of constructing models of the systems is influenced by those very systems, hence an elegant definition - "applied epistemology". Related recent developments (often referred to as {sciences of complexity}) that are distinguished as separate disciplines are {artificial intelligence}, {neural networks}, {systems theory}, and {chaos theory}, but the boundaries between those and cybernetics proper are not precise. See also {robot}. {The Cybernetics Society (http://cybsoc.org)} of the UK. {American Society for Cybernetics (http://asc-cybernetics.org/)}. {IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society (http://isye.gatech.edu/ieee-smc/)}. {International project "Principia Cybernetica" (http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be/DEFAULT.html)}. ["Cybernetics, or control and communication in the animal and the machine", N. Wiener, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1948] (2002-01-01)

cybernetics ::: (robotics) /si:`b*-net'iks/ The study of control and communication in living and man-made systems.The term was first proposed by Norbert Wiener in the book referenced below. Originally, cybernetics drew upon electrical engineering, mathematics, biology, processes and, by formulating abstract concepts common to all systems, to understand their behaviour.Modern second-order cybernetics places emphasis on how the process of constructing models of the systems is influenced by those very systems, hence an elegant definition - applied epistemology.Related recent developments (often referred to as sciences of complexity) that are distinguished as separate disciplines are artificial intelligence, neural networks, systems theory, and chaos theory, but the boundaries between those and cybernetics proper are not precise.See also robot. of the UK. . . .Usenet newsgroup: .[Cybernetics, or control and communication in the animal and the machine, N. Wiener, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1948](2002-01-01)

Darwin 1. "operating system" An {operating system} based on the {FreeBSD} version of {Unix}, running on top of a {microkernel} ({Mach} 3.0 with darwin 1.02) that offers advanced networking, services such as the {Apache} {web server}, and support for both {Macintosh} and Unix {file systems}. Darwin was originally released in March 1999. It currently runs on {PowerPC} based Macintosh computers, and, in October 2000, was being ported to {Intel} processor-based computers and compatible systems by the Darwin community. 2. "programming, tool" A general purpose structuring tool of use in building complex {distributed systems} from diverse components and diverse component interaction mechanisms. Darwin is being developed by the Distributed Software Engineering Section of the Department of Computing at {Imperial College}. It is in essence a {declarative} binding language which can be used to define hierarchic compositions of interconnected components. Distribution is dealt with orthogonally to system structuring. The language allows the specification of both static structures and dynamic structures which evolve during execution. The central abstractions managed by Darwin are components and services. Bindings are formed by manipulating references to services. The {operational semantics} of Darwin is described in terms of the {Pi-calculus}, {Milner}'s calculus of mobile processes. The correspondence between the treatment of names in the Pi-calculus and the management of service references in Darwin leads to an elegant and concise Pi-calculus model of Darwin's {operational semantics}. The model has proved useful in arguing the correctness of Darwin implementations and in designing extensions to Darwin and reasoning about their behaviour. {Distributed Software Engineering Section (http://www-dse.doc.ic.ac.uk/)}. {Darwin publications (http://scorch.doc.ic.ac.uk/dse-papers/darwin/)}. E-mail: Jeff Magee "jnm@doc.ic.ac.uk", Naranker Dulay "nd@doc.ic.ac.uk". 3. {Core War}. (2003-08-08)

DAU /dow/ [German Fidonet] D"ummster Anzunehmender User. A German acronym for stupidest imaginable user. From the engineering-slang GAU for Gr"osster Anzunehmender Unfall (worst foreseeable accident), especially of a LNG tank farm plant or something with similarly disastrous consequences. In popular German, GAU is used only to refer to worst-case nuclear accidents such as a core meltdown. See {cretin}, {loser} and {weasel}. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-06)

DAU ::: /dow/ [German Fidonet] Dummster Anzunehmender User. A German acronym for stupidest imaginable user. From the engineering-slang GAU for Grosster GAU is used only to refer to worst-case nuclear accidents such as a core meltdown.See cretin, loser and weasel.[Jargon File] (1994-12-06)

D. C. Power Lab ::: The former site of SAIL. This name was very funny because the obvious connection to electrical engineering was nonexistent - the lab was named after a Donald C. Power. Compare Marginal Hacks.[But did DCP's parents realise the joke?][Jargon File]

D. C. Power Lab The former site of {SAIL}. This name was very funny because the obvious connection to electrical engineering was nonexistent - the lab was named after a Donald C. Power. Compare {Marginal Hacks}. [But did DCP's parents realise the joke?] [{Jargon File}]

degrees of freedom: A number of related concepts in physics, mechanics, engineering and statistics regarding the independence/interdependence of parameters. Informally, any parameters/variables whose value can occur or be set independently of the values of other parameters/variables count as one degree of freedom towards the (total) number of degrees of freedom of the whole system.

delta ::: 1. A quantitative change, especially a small or incremental one (this use is general in physics and engineering). I just doubled the speed of my program! What was the delta on program size? About 30 percent. (He doubled the speed of his program, but increased its size by only 30 percent.)2. [Unix] A diff, especially a diff stored under the set of version-control tools called SCCS (Source Code Control System) or RCS (Revision Control System). See change management.3. A small quantity, but not as small as epsilon. The jargon usage of delta and epsilon stems from the traditional use of these letters in mathematics for very Common constructions include within delta of ---, within epsilon of ---: that is, close to and even closer to.[Jargon File](2000-08-02)

delta 1. A quantitative change, especially a small or incremental one (this use is general in physics and engineering). "I just doubled the speed of my program!" "What was the delta on program size?" "About 30 percent." (He doubled the speed of his program, but increased its size by only 30 percent.) 2. [Unix] A {diff}, especially a {diff} stored under the set of version-control tools called SCCS (Source Code Control System) or RCS (Revision Control System). See {change management}. 3. A small quantity, but not as small as {epsilon}. The jargon usage of {delta} and {epsilon} stems from the traditional use of these letters in mathematics for very small numerical quantities, particularly in "epsilon-delta" proofs in limit theory (as in the differential calculus). The term {delta} is often used, once {epsilon} has been mentioned, to mean a quantity that is slightly bigger than {epsilon} but still very small. "The cost isn't epsilon, but it's delta" means that the cost isn't totally negligible, but it is nevertheless very small. Common constructions include "within delta of ---", "within epsilon of ---": that is, "close to" and "even closer to". [{Jargon File}] (2000-08-02)

Department of Defense "body" (DoD) The US military body responsible for sponsoring many software engineering standards. (1996-05-29)

Department of Defense ::: (body) (DoD) The US military body responsible for sponsoring many software engineering standards. (1996-05-29)

design ::: (process) The approach that engineering (and some other) disciplines use to specify how to create or do something. A successful design must satisfies a meets implicit or explicit requirements on performance and resource usage (it is efficient enough).A design may also have to satisfy restrictions on the design process itself, such as its length or cost, or the tools available for doing the design.In the software life-cycle, design follows requirements analysis and is followed by implementation.[Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications, 2nd ed., Grady Booch]. (1996-12-08)

design "process" The approach that engineering (and some other) disciplines use to specify how to create or do something. A successful design must satisfies a (perhaps informal) {functional specification} (do what it was designed to do); conforms to the limitations of the target medium (it is possible to implement); meets implicit or explicit requirements on performance and resource usage (it is efficient enough). A design may also have to satisfy restrictions on the design process itself, such as its length or cost, or the tools available for doing the design. In the {software life-cycle}, design follows {requirements analysis} and is followed by implementation. ["Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications", 2nd ed., Grady Booch]. (1996-12-08)

design recovery "process" A subtask of {reverse engineering} in which domain knowledge, external information, and deduction of fuzzy reasoning are added to the observations of the subject system to identify meaningful higher level abstractions beyond those obtained directly by examining the system itself. In other words, design recovery aims to work out what a system or component was designed to do rather than just examining its subcomponents and their interrelationships. (1996-12-08)

design recovery ::: (process) A subtask of reverse engineering in which domain knowledge, external information, and deduction of fuzzy reasoning are added to the observations of the subject system to identify meaningful higher level abstractions beyond those obtained directly by examining the system itself.In other words, design recovery aims to work out what a system or component was designed to do rather than just examining its subcomponents and their interrelationships. (1996-12-08)

Developmental Test and Evaluation ::: (programming) (DT&E) Activity which focuses on the technological and engineering aspects of a system or piece of equipment. (1996-05-13)

Developmental Test and Evaluation "programming" (DT&E) Activity which focuses on the technological and engineering aspects of a system or piece of equipment. (1996-05-13)

Domain Analysis "systems analysis" 1. Determining the operations, data objects, properties and {abstractions} appropriate for designing solutions to problems in a given {domain}. 2. The {domain engineering} activity in which domain knowledge is studied and formalised as a domain definition and a domain specification. A {software reuse} approach that involves combining software components, subsystems, etc., into a single application system. 3. The process of identifying, collecting organising, analysing and representing a {domain model} and software architecture from the study of existing systems, underlying theory, emerging technology and development histories within the domain of interest. 4. The analysis of systems within a domain to discover commonalities and differences among them. (1997-12-26)

Domain Analysis ::: (systems analysis) 1. Determining the operations, data objects, properties and abstractions appropriate for designing solutions to problems in a given domain.2. The domain engineering activity in which domain knowledge is studied and formalised as a domain definition and a domain specification. A software reuse approach that involves combining software components, subsystems, etc., into a single application system.3. The process of identifying, collecting organising, analysing and representing a domain model and software architecture from the study of existing systems, underlying theory, emerging technology and development histories within the domain of interest.4. The analysis of systems within a domain to discover commonalities and differences among them. (1997-12-26)

domain engineering ::: (systems analysis) 1. The development and evolution of domain specific knowledge and artifacts to support the development and evolution of systems in the domain. Domain engineering includes engineering of domain models, components, methods and tools and may also include asset management.2. The engineering process of analysing and modelling a domain, designing and modelling a generic solution architecture for a product line within that domain, implementing and using reusable components of that architecture and maintaining and evolving the domain, architecture and implementation models.3. A reuse-based approach to defining the scope (domain definition), specifying the structure (domain architecture) and building the Assets (requirements, applications. Domain engineering can include domain definition, domain analysis, developing the domain architecture domain implementation.

domain engineering "systems analysis" 1. The development and evolution of {domain} specific knowledge and artifacts to support the development and evolution of systems in the domain. Domain engineering includes engineering of {domain models}, components, methods and tools and may also include {asset management}. 2. The engineering process of analysing and modelling a domain, designing and modelling a generic solution architecture for a product line within that domain, implementing and using reusable components of that architecture and maintaining and evolving the domain, architecture and implementation models. 3. A reuse-based approach to defining the scope ({domain definition}), specifying the structure ({domain architecture}) and building the Assets (requirements, designs, software code, documentation) for a class of systems, subsystems or applications. Domain engineering can include domain definition, domain analysis, developing the domain architecture domain implementation.

domain selection "systems analysis" The prioritisation and selection of one or more {domains} for which specific {software reuse} engineering projects are to be initiated. (1997-12-26)

domain selection ::: (systems analysis) The prioritisation and selection of one or more domains for which specific software reuse engineering projects are to be initiated. (1997-12-26)

Domain Software Engineering Environment "programming" (DSEE) A proprietary {CASE} framework and {configuration management} system from {Apollo}. (1996-05-29)

Domain Software Engineering Environment ::: (programming) (DSEE) A proprietary CASE framework and configuration management system from Apollo. (1996-05-29)

DSEE {Domain Software Engineering Environment}

EAST ::: A Eureka project developing a software engineering platform. (1994-12-07)

EAST A {Eureka} project developing a {software engineering} {platform}. (1994-12-07)

ECP ::: 1. Engineering Change Proposal.2. Enhanced Capabilities Port.3. Extended Capabilities Port.4. Extended Concurrent Prolog. (1997-12-01)

ECP 1. {Engineering Change Proposal}. 2. {Enhanced Capabilities Port}. 3. {Extended Capabilities Port}. 4. {Extended Concurrent Prolog}. (1997-12-01)

Edward Yourdon ::: (person) A software engineering consultant, widely known as the developer of the Yourdon method of structured systems analysis and design, as well as software technology trends and products in the United States and several other countries around the world.Ed Yourdon received a B.S. in Applied Mathematics from MIT, and has done graduate work at MIT and at the Polytechnic Institute of New York. He has been in Buenos Aires, Argentina and has received numerous honors and awards from other universities and professional societies around the world.He has worked in the computer industry for 30 years, including positions with DEC and General Electric. Earlier in his career, he worked on over 25 different mainframe computers, and was involved in a number of pioneering computer projects involving time-sharing and virtual memory.In 1974, he founded the consulting firm, Yourdon, Inc.. He is currently immersed in research in new developments in software engineering, such as object-oriented software development and system dynamics modelling.Ed Yourdon is the author of over 200 technical articles; he has also written 19 computer books, including a novel on computer crime and a book for the general Portugese, Dutch, French, German, and other languages, and his articles have appeared in virtually all of the major computer journals.He is a regular keynote speaker at major computer conferences around the world, and serves as the conference Chairman for Digital Consulting's SOFTWARE WORLD software industry opportunities in the former Soviet Union, and a member of the expert advisory panel on CASE acquisition for the U.S. Department of Defense.Mr. Yourdon was born on a small planet at the edge of one of the distant red-shifted galaxies. He now lives in the Center of the Universe (New York City) with his wife, three children, and nine Macintosh computers, all of which are linked together through an Appletalk network. (1995-04-16)

Edward Yourdon "person" A {software engineering} consultant, widely known as the developer of the "{Yourdon method}" of structured systems analysis and design, as well as the co-developer of the Coad/Yourdon method of {object-oriented analysis} and design. He is also the editor of three software journals - American Programmer, Guerrilla Programmer, and Application Development Strategies - that analyse software technology trends and products in the United States and several other countries around the world. Ed Yourdon received a B.S. in Applied Mathematics from {MIT}, and has done graduate work at MIT and at the Polytechnic Institute of New York. He has been appointed an Honorary Professor of {Information Technology} at Universidad CAECE in Buenos Aires, Argentina and has received numerous honors and awards from other universities and professional societies around the world. He has worked in the computer industry for 30 years, including positions with {DEC} and {General Electric}. Earlier in his career, he worked on over 25 different {mainframe} computers, and was involved in a number of pioneering computer projects involving {time-sharing} and {virtual memory}. In 1974, he founded the consulting firm, {Yourdon, Inc.}. He is currently immersed in research in new developments in software engineering, such as object-oriented software development and {system dynamics} modelling. Ed Yourdon is the author of over 200 technical articles; he has also written 19 computer books, including a novel on {computer crime} and a book for the general public entitled Nations At Risk. His most recent books are Object-Oriented Systems Development (1994), Decline and Fall of the American Programmer (1992), Object-Oriented Design (1991), and Object-Oriented Analysis (1990). Several of his books have been translated into Japanese, Russian, Chinese, Spanish, Portugese, Dutch, French, German, and other languages, and his articles have appeared in virtually all of the major computer journals. He is a regular keynote speaker at major computer conferences around the world, and serves as the conference Chairman for Digital Consulting's SOFTWARE WORLD conference. He was an advisor to Technology Transfer's research project on software industry opportunities in the former Soviet Union, and a member of the expert advisory panel on CASE acquisition for the U.S. Department of Defense. Mr. Yourdon was born on a small planet at the edge of one of the distant red-shifted galaxies. He now lives in the Center of the Universe (New York City) with his wife, three children, and nine Macintosh computers, all of which are linked together through an Appletalk network. (1995-04-16)

Eiffel "language" An {object-oriented} language produced by {Bertrand Meyer} in 1985. Eiffel has {classes} with {multiple inheritance} and {repeated inheritance}, {deferred class}es (like {Smalltalk}'s {abstract class}), and {clusters} of classes. Objects can have both {static types} and {dynamic types}. The dynamic type must be a descendant of the static (declared) type. {Dynamic binding} resolves {multiple inheritance} clashes. It has flattened forms of classes, in which all of the inherited features are added at the same level and {generic class}es parametrised by type. Other features are {persistent objects}, {garbage collection}, {exception} handling, {foreign language interface}. Classes may be equipped with {assertions} (routine preconditions and postconditions, class {invariants}) implementing the theory of "{Design by Contract}" and helping produce more reliable software. Eiffel is compiled to {C}. It comes with libraries containing several hundred classes: data structures and {algorithms} (EiffelBase), graphics and user interfaces (EiffelVision) and language analysis (EiffelLex, EiffelParse). The first release of Eiffel was release 1.4, introduced at the first {OOPSLA} in October 1986. The language proper was first described in a University of California, Santa Barbara report dated September 1985. Eiffel is available, with different libraries, from several sources including {Interactive Software Engineering}, USA (ISE Eiffel version 3.3); Sig Computer GmbH, Germany (Eiffel/S); and {Tower, Inc.}, Austin (Tower Eiffel). The language definition is administered by an open organisation, the Nonprofit International Consortium for Eiffel (NICE). There is a standard kernel library. An {Eiffel source checker} and compiler {front-end} is available. See also {Sather}, {Distributed Eiffel}, {Lace}, {shelf}. E-mail: "queries@eiffel.com". ["Eiffel: The Language", Bertrand Meyer, P-H 1992]. (1998-11-15)

Eiffel ::: (language) An object-oriented language produced by Bertrand Meyer in 1985. Eiffel has classes with multiple inheritance and repeated inheritance, inherited features are added at the same level and generic classes parametrised by type.Other features are persistent objects, garbage collection, exception handling, foreign language interface. Classes may be equipped with assertions (routine preconditions and postconditions, class invariants) implementing the theory of Design by Contract and helping produce more reliable software.Eiffel is compiled to C. It comes with libraries containing several hundred classes: data structures and algorithms (EiffelBase), graphics and user interfaces (EiffelVision) and language analysis (EiffelLex, EiffelParse).The first release of Eiffel was release 1.4, introduced at the first OOPSLA in October 1986. The language proper was first described in a University of California, Santa Barbara report dated September 1985.Eiffel is available, with different libraries, from several sources including Interactive Software Engineering, USA (ISE Eiffel version 3.3); Sig Computer GmbH, Germany (Eiffel/S); and Tower, Inc., Austin (Tower Eiffel).The language definition is administered by an open organisation, the Nonprofit International Consortium for Eiffel (NICE). There is a standard kernel library.An Eiffel source checker and compiler front-end is available.Latest version: 4.2, as of 1998-10-28.Latest version: ISE Eiffel version 3.3.See also Sather, Distributed Eiffel, Lace, shelf.E-mail: .[Eiffel: The Language, Bertrand Meyer, P-H 1992]. (1998-11-15)

elegant (From Mathematics) Combining simplicity, power, and a certain ineffable grace of design. Higher praise than "clever", "winning" or even {cuspy}. The French aviator, adventurer, and author Antoine de Saint-Exup'ery, probably best known for his classic children's book "The Little Prince", was also an aircraft designer. He gave us perhaps the best definition of engineering elegance when he said "A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away." [{Jargon File}] (1994-11-29)

engineering ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Engineer ::: n. --> Originally, the art of managing engines; in its modern and extended sense, the art and science by which the mechanical properties of matter are made useful to man in structures and machines; the occupation and work of an engineer.

engineer ::: n. --> A person skilled in the principles and practice of any branch of engineering. See under Engineering, n.

One who manages as engine, particularly a steam engine; an engine driver.
One who carries through an enterprise by skillful or artful contrivance; an efficient manager. ::: v. t.


Enterprise Resource Planning "application, business" (ERP) Any {software} system designed to support and automate the business processes of medium and large businesses. This may include manufacturing, distribution, personnel, project management, payroll, and financials. ERP systems are accounting-oriented information systems for identifying and planning the {enterprise}-wide resources needed to take, make, distribute, and account for customer orders. ERP systems were originally extensions of {MRP II} systems, but have since widened their scope. An ERP system also differs from the typical MRP II system in technical requirements such as {relational database}, use of {object oriented programming} language, {computer aided software engineering} tools in development, {client/server} {architecture}, and {open system} {portability}. {JBOPS} are the major producers of ERP software. {"ERP Systems - Using IT to gain a competitive advantage", Shankarnarayanan S. (http://expressindia.com/newads/bsl/advant.htm)}. (1999-07-27)

Enterprise Resource Planning ::: (application, business) (ERP) Any software system designed to support and automate the business processes of medium and large businesses. This may include manufacturing, distribution, personnel, project management, payroll, and financials.ERP systems are accounting-oriented information systems for identifying and planning the enterprise-wide resources needed to take, make, distribute, and of object oriented programming language, computer aided software engineering tools in development, client/server architecture, and open system portability.JBOPS are the major producers of ERP software. ERP Systems - Using IT to gain a competitive advantage, Shankarnarayanan S. . (1999-07-27)

ESML ::: Extended Systems Modelling Language: a real-time software engineering methodology based on RTSA.

Extended Systems Modelling Language "language" (ESML) A {real-time} software engineering methodology based on {RTSA}. (2009-05-11)

Faster LEX ::: (language) (FLEX) A reimplementation of the Lex scanner generator, by Vern Paxson .Flex++ produces C++ and aflex produces Ada.FTP flex-2.3.8.tar.Z from a GNU archive site or .[The FLEX Scanner Generator, Vern Paxson , Systems Engineering, LBL, CA].[Home? Current version?](2003-12-16)

Faster LEX "language" (FLEX) A reimplementation of the {Lex} {scanner generator}, by Vern Paxson "vern@ee.lbl.gov". {Flex++} produces {C++} and {aflex} produces {Ada}. FTP flex-2.3.8.tar.Z from a {GNU archive site} or {(ftp://ftp.ee.lbl.gov/pub/flex-2.4.3.tar.Z)}. ["The FLEX Scanner Generator", Vern Paxson "vern@ee.lbl.gov", Systems Engineering, LBL, CA]. [Home? Current version?] (2003-12-16)

feature learning ::: In machine learning, feature learning or representation learning[143] is a set of techniques that allows a system to automatically discover the representations needed for feature detection or classification from raw data. This replaces manual feature engineering and allows a machine to both learn the features and use them to perform a specific task.

Financial engineering - Application of economic principles to the dynamics of securities markets, especially for the purpose of structuring, pricing, and managing the risk of financial contracts.

floating-point "programming, mathematics" A number representation consisting of a {mantissa}, M, an {exponent}, E, and a {radix} (or "base"). The number represented is M*R^E where R is the radix. In science and engineering, {exponential notation} or {scientific notation} uses a radix of ten so, for example, the number 93,000,000 might be written 9.3 x 10^7 (where ^7 is superscript 7). In computer hardware, floating point numbers are usually represented with a radix of two since the mantissa and exponent are stored in binary, though many different representations could be used. The {IEEE} specify a {standard} representation which is used by many hardware floating-point systems. Non-zero numbers are {normalised} so that the {binary point} is immediately before the most significant bit of the mantissa. Since the number is non-zero, this bit must be a one so it need not be stored. A fixed "bias" is added to the exponent so that positive and negative exponents can be represented without a sign bit. Finally, extreme values of exponent (all zeros and all ones) are used to represent special numbers like zero and positive and negative {infinity}. In programming languages with {explicit typing}, floating-point types are introduced with the keyword "float" or sometimes "double" for a higher precision type. See also {floating-point accelerator}, {floating-point unit}. Opposite: {fixed-point}. (2008-06-13)

Foonly 1. The {PDP-10} successor that was to have been built by the Super Foonly project at the {Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory} along with a new operating system. The intention was to leapfrog from the old DEC {time-sharing} system SAIL was then running to a new generation, bypassing TENEX which at that time was the {ARPANET} {standard}. {ARPA} funding for both the Super Foonly and the new operating system was cut in 1974. Most of the design team went to DEC and contributed greatly to the design of the PDP-10 model KL10. 2. The name of the company formed by Dave Poole, one of the principal Super Foonly designers, and one of hackerdom's more colourful personalities. Many people remember the parrot which sat on Poole's shoulder and was a regular companion. 3. Any of the machines built by Poole's company. The first was the F-1 (a.k.a. Super Foonly), which was the computational engine used to create the graphics in the movie "TRON". The F-1 was the fastest PDP-10 ever built, but only one was ever made. The effort drained Foonly of its financial resources, and the company turned toward building smaller, slower, and much less expensive machines. Unfortunately, these ran not the popular {TOPS-20} but a TENEX variant called Foonex; this seriously limited their market. Also, the machines shipped were actually wire-wrapped engineering prototypes requiring individual attention from more than usually competent site personnel, and thus had significant reliability problems. Poole's legendary temper and unwillingness to suffer fools gladly did not help matters. By the time of the Jupiter project cancellation in 1983, Foonly's proposal to build another F-1 was eclipsed by the {Mars}, and the company never quite recovered. See the {Mars} entry for the continuation and moral of this story. [{Jargon File}]

forward engineering "process" The traditional process of moving from high-level abstractions and logical, implementation-independent designs to the physical implementation of a system. Contrast {reverse engineering}. (1996-10-02)

forward engineering ::: (process) The traditional process of moving from high-level abstractions and logical, implementation-independent designs to the physical implementation of a system.Contrast reverse engineering. (1996-10-02)

frame language ::: A technology used for knowledge representation in artificial intelligence. Frames are stored as ontologies of sets and subsets of the frame concepts. They are similar to class hierarchies in object-oriented languages although their fundamental design goals are different. Frames are focused on explicit and intuitive representation of knowledge whereas objects focus on encapsulation and information hiding. Frames originated in AI research and objects primarily in software engineering. However, in practice the techniques and capabilities of frame and object-oriented languages overlap significantly.

fuzzy logic A superset of {Boolean logic} dealing with the concept of partial truth -- {truth values} between "completely true" and "completely false". It was introduced by Dr. Lotfi Zadeh of {UCB} in the 1960's as a means to model the uncertainty of {natural language}. Any specific theory may be generalised from a discrete (or "crisp") form to a continuous (fuzzy) form, e.g. "fuzzy calculus", "fuzzy differential equations" etc. Fuzzy logic replaces Boolean truth values with degrees of truth which are very similar to probabilities except that they need not sum to one. Instead of an assertion pred(X), meaning that X definitely has the property associated with {predicate} "pred", we have a truth function truth(pred(X)) which gives the degree of truth that X has that property. We can combine such values using the standard definitions of fuzzy logic: truth(not x) = 1.0 - truth(x) truth(x and y) = minimum (truth(x), truth(y)) truth(x or y) = maximum (truth(x), truth(y)) (There are other possible definitions for "and" and "or", e.g. using sum and product). If truth values are restricted to 0 and 1 then these functions behave just like their Boolean counterparts. This is known as the "extension principle". Just as a Boolean predicate asserts that its argument definitely belongs to some subset of all objects, a fuzzy predicate gives the degree of truth with which its argument belongs to a {fuzzy subset}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.ai.fuzzy}. E-mail servers: "fuzzynet@aptronix.com", "rnalib@its.bldrdoc.gov", "fuzzy-server@til.com". {(ftp://ftp.hiof.no/pub/Fuzzy)}, {(ftp://ntia.its.bldrdoc.gov/pub/fuzzy)}. {FAQ (ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet-by-group/comp.answers/fuzzy-logic)}. {James Brule, "Fuzzy systems - a tutorial", 1985 (http://life.anu.edu.au/complex_systems/fuzzy.html)}. {STB Software Catalog (http://krakatoa.jsc.nasa.gov/stb/catalog.html)}, includes a few fuzzy tools. [H.J. Zimmerman, "Fuzzy Sets, Decision Making and Expert Systems", Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1987]. ["Fuzzy Logic, State of the Art", Ed. R. Lowen, Marc Roubens, Theory and Decision Library, D: System theory, Knowledge Engineering and Problem Solving 12, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1993, ISBN 0-7923-2324-6]. (1995-02-21)

fuzzy logic ::: A superset of Boolean logic dealing with the concept of partial truth -- truth values between completely true and completely false. It was introduced by Dr. Lotfi Zadeh of UCB in the 1960's as a means to model the uncertainty of natural language.Any specific theory may be generalised from a discrete (or crisp) form to a continuous (fuzzy) form, e.g. fuzzy calculus, fuzzy differential equations of truth that X has that property. We can combine such values using the standard definitions of fuzzy logic: truth(not x) = 1.0 - truth(x)truth(x and y) = minimum (truth(x), truth(y)) Boolean counterparts. This is known as the extension principle.Just as a Boolean predicate asserts that its argument definitely belongs to some subset of all objects, a fuzzy predicate gives the degree of truth with which its argument belongs to a fuzzy subset.Usenet newsgroup: comp.ai.fuzzy.E-mail servers: , . , . . . , includes a few fuzzy tools.[H.J. Zimmerman, Fuzzy Sets, Decision Making and Expert Systems, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1987].[Fuzzy Logic, State of the Art, Ed. R. Lowen, Marc Roubens, Theory and Decision Library, D: System theory, Knowledge Engineering and Problem Solving 12, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1993, ISBN 0-7923-2324-6]. (1995-02-21)

GEI ::: A German software engineering company.

GEI A German software engineering company.

Genegineering: Advanced genetic engineering, often used to biomod operatives, constructs, or other organisms; a Progenitor specialty.

Generic Security Service Application Programming Interface ::: (security, programming) (GSS-API) An application level interface (API) to system security services. It provides a generic interface to services which may be provided by a variety of different security mechanisms. Vanilla GSS-API supports security contexts between two entities (known as principals).GSS-API is a draft internet standard which is being developed in the Common Authentication Technology Working Group (cat-wg) of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).Initial specifications for GSS-API appeared in RFC 1508 and RFC 1509. Subsequent revisions appeared in several draft standards documents. . (1996-05-19)

Generic Security Service Application Programming Interface "security, programming" (GSS-API) An application level interface ({API}) to system security services. It provides a generic interface to services which may be provided by a variety of different security mechanisms. {Vanilla} GSS-API supports {security contexts} between two entities (known as "principals"). GSS-API is a draft internet standard which is being developed in the {Common Authentication Technology Working Group} (cat-wg) of the {Internet Engineering Task Force} (IETF). Initial specifications for GSS-API appeared in {RFC 1508} and {RFC 1509}. Subsequent revisions appeared in several draft standards documents. {(http://dstc.qut.edu.au/~barton/work/project.html)}. (1996-05-19)

Genetically modified organism (GMO) - any organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods and are also widely used in scientific research and to produce goods other than food.

Genetic engineering - the manipulation of DNA to produce new types of organisms, usually by inserting or deleting genes. See /r/geneticengineering

Geoengineering - the deliberate large-scale manipulation of an environmental process that affects the earth's climate, in an attempt to counteract the effects of global warming. See /r/Geoengineering

Geographic Information System ::: (application) (GIS) A computer system for capturing, storing, checking, integrating, manipulating, analysing and displaying data related to positions on holds data about a particular kind of feature (e.g. roads). Each feature is linked to a position on the graphical image of a map.Layers of data are organised to be studied and to perform statistical analysis (i.e. a layer of customer locations could include fields for Name, Address, local authority and public utility management, environmental, resource management, engineering, business, marketing, and distribution. . . (1995-12-21)

Geographic Information System "application" (GIS) A computer system for capturing, storing, checking, integrating, manipulating, analysing and displaying data related to positions on the Earth's surface. Typically, a GIS is used for handling maps of one kind or another. These might be represented as several different layers where each layer holds data about a particular kind of feature (e.g. roads). Each feature is linked to a position on the graphical image of a map. Layers of data are organised to be studied and to perform statistical analysis (i.e. a layer of customer locations could include fields for Name, Address, Contact, Number, Area). Uses are primarily government related, town planning, local authority and public utility management, environmental, resource management, engineering, business, marketing, and distribution. {GIS dictionary (http://geo.ed.ac.uk/root/agidict/html/welcome.html)}. {(http://ncl.ac.uk/~ngraphic/wotzagis.html)}. (1995-12-21)

Goddard, Dwight. (1861-1939). American popularizer of Buddhism and author of the widely read A Buddhist Bible. He was born in Massachusetts and educated in both theology and mechanical engineering. Following the death of his first wife, he enrolled at Hartford Theological Seminary and was ordained as a minister in the Congregational Church. He went to China as a missionary and it was there that he visited his first Buddhist monastery. After holding pastoral positions in Massachusetts and Chicago, he left the ministry to become a mechanical engineer. An invention that he sold to the government made him independently wealthy and allowed him to retire in 1913. He traveled to China several times in the 1920s, where he met a Lutheran minister who was seeking to promote understanding between Buddhists and Christians. Goddard first learned of Zen Buddhism from a Japanese friend in New York in 1928 and later traveled to Japan where he met DAISETZ TEITARO SUZUKI and practiced ZAZEN for eight months in Kyoto. Upon his return to America, Goddard attempted in 1934 to form an American Buddhist community, called the Followers of the Buddha. With property in Vermont and California, the organization was to include a celibate monkhood, called the Homeless Brothers, supported by lay members. Goddard also published a Buddhist magazine, Zen, A Magazine of Self-Realization, before bringing out, with his own funds, what would become his most famous work, A Buddhist Bible, in 1932. The purpose of the anthology was to "show the unreality of all conceptions of the personal ego" and inspire readers to follow the path to buddhahood. It was Goddard's conviction that Buddhism was the religion most capable of meeting the problems of European civilization. Commercially published in 1938, the contents of A Buddhist Bible were organized by the language of a text's origins and contained works that had not been translated into English before. The works came mostly from Chinese, translated by the Chinese monk Wai-tao, in collaboration with Goddard. Tibetan selections were drawn from W. Y. EVANS-WENTZ. A Buddhist Bible is not without its eccentricities. For example, Goddard rearranged the VAJRACCHEDIKĀPRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀSuTRA ("Diamond Sutra") into a more "sensible" order, and he included in his anthology a classic of Chinese philosophy, the Daode jing (Tao te ching). Goddard also composed his own treatise to provide practical guidance in meditation, which he felt was difficult for Europeans and Americans. As one of the first anthologies of Buddhist texts widely available in the West, and especially because it was one of the few that included MAHĀYĀNA works, A Buddhist Bible remained widely read for decades after its publication.

GRAS ::: A public domain graph-oriented database system for software engineering applications from RWTH Aachen.

GRAS A {public domain} {graph-oriented database} system for {software engineering} applications from {RWTH Aachen}.

GRASPIN ::: An Esprit project to develop a personal software engineering environment to support the construction and verification of distributed and non-sequential software systems.

GRASPIN An Esprit project to develop a personal software engineering environment to support the construction and verification of distributed and non-sequential software systems.

Hewlett-Packard ::: (HP) Hewlett-Packard designs, manufactures and services electronic products and systems for measurement, computation and communications. The company's products and services are used in industry, business, engineering, science, medicine and education in approximately 110 countries.HP was founded in 1939 and employs 96600 people, 58900 in the USA. They have manufacturing and R&D establishments in 54 cities in 16 countries and HP's stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange and the Pacific, Tokyo, London, Frankfurt, Zurich and Paris exchanges.Quarterly sales $6053M, profits $347M (Aug 1994). . (1994-09-26)

Hewlett-Packard (HP) Hewlett-Packard designs, manufactures and services electronic products and systems for measurement, computation and communications. The company's products and services are used in industry, business, engineering, science, medicine and education in approximately 110 countries. HP was founded in 1939 and employs 96600 people, 58900 in the USA. They have manufacturing and R&D establishments in 54 cities in 16 countries and approximately 600 sales and service offices in 110 countries. Their revenue (in 1992/1993?) was $20.3 billion. The Chief Executive Officer is Lewis E. Platt. HP's stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange and the Pacific, Tokyo, London, Frankfurt, Zurich and Paris exchanges. Quarterly sales $6053M, profits $347M (Aug 1994). {(http://hp.com/home.html)}. (1994-09-26)

Hewlett-Packard Visual Engineering Environment (HP VEE) A package similar in intention to {LabVIEW}, running on {Unix} {workstations} under {OSF}/{Motif}. (1997-05-12)

Hewlett-Packard Visual Engineering Environment ::: (HP VEE) A package similar in intention to LabVIEW, running on Unix workstations under OSF/Motif. (1997-05-12)

High Performance Computing and Communications ::: (HPCC) High performance computing includes scientific workstations, supercomputer systems, high speed networks, special purpose and experimental systems software with all components well integrated and linked over a high speed network.[Grand Challenges 1993: High Performance Computing and Communications, Committee on Physical, Mathematical and Engineering Sciences of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology.]

High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) High performance computing includes scientific workstations, supercomputer systems, high speed networks, special purpose and experimental systems, the new generation of large scale parallel systems, and application and systems software with all components well integrated and linked over a high speed network. ["Grand Challenges 1993: High Performance Computing and Communications", Committee on Physical, Mathematical and Engineering Sciences of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology.]

hole model "electronics" A {model} of semiconductor behaviour in which {donors} contribute a positive charge equal in magnitude to the charge of an {electron}, and {acceptors} contribute space for such a charge within the crystal lattice. The hole model was proposed well before electrons were discovered and described. Much of {electronics}, especially at the engineering level, continues to consider {current} as flowing from positive to negative. (1995-10-05)

hole model ::: (electronics) A model of semiconductor behaviour in which donors contribute a positive charge equal in magnitude to the charge of an electron, electronics, especially at the engineering level, continues to consider current as flowing from positive to negative. (1995-10-05)

HP VEE ::: Hewlett-Packard Visual Engineering Environment

HP VEE {Hewlett-Packard Visual Engineering Environment}

hydraulics ::: n. --> That branch of science, or of engineering, which treats of fluids in motion, especially of water, its action in rivers and canals, the works and machinery for conducting or raising it, its use as a prime mover, and the like.

IBM 1130 ::: (computer) A computer introduced by IBM in 1965. It was their cheapest computer to date, and was aimed at price-sensitive, computing-intensive technical markets like education and engineering. It notably included inexpensive disk storage. Non-IBM clones were produced. .(2005-01-17)

IBM 1130 "computer" A computer introduced by {IBM} in 1965. It was their cheapest computer to date, and was aimed at price-sensitive, computing-intensive technical markets like education and engineering. It notably included inexpensive disk storage. Non-IBM {clones} were produced. {IBM 1130 Enthusiasts (http://ibm1130.org/)}. (2005-01-17)

ICES ::: Integrated Civil Engineering System. Subsystems include COGO, STRUDL, BRIDGE, LEASE, PROJECT, ROADS and TRANSET. Internal languages include ICETRAN and CDL. An Integrated Computer System for Engineering Problem Solving, D. Roos, Proc SJCC 27(2), AFIPS (Spring 1965). Sammet 1969, pp.615-620.

ICES Integrated Civil Engineering System. Subsystems include COGO, STRUDL, BRIDGE, LEASE, PROJECT, ROADS and TRANSET. Internal languages include ICETRAN and CDL. "An Integrated Computer System for Engineering Problem Solving", D. Roos, Proc SJCC 27(2), AFIPS (Spring 1965). Sammet 1969, pp.615-620.

ICONIX Software Engineering, Inc. ::: (company) Makers of ICONIX PowerTools, software development tools, and the first CD-ROM training course in object-oriented methods. ICONIX started operating in 1984. .Address: 2800 28th Street, Suite 320, Santa Monica, CA 90405, USA. Telephone: +1 (310) 458 0092 (1995-04-30)

ICONIX Software Engineering, Inc. "company" Makers of {ICONIX PowerTools}, software development tools, and the first {CD-ROM} training course in {object-oriented} methods. ICONIX started operating in 1984. {(http://biap.com/iconix/)}. Address: 2800 28th Street, Suite 320, Santa Monica, CA 90405, USA. Telephone: +1 (310) 458 0092 (1995-04-30)

IEPG {Internet Engineering and Planning Group}

IESG {Internet Engineering Steering Group}

IETF {Internet Engineering Task Force}

Ikeda Daisaku. (池田大作) (b. 1928). Third president of SoKA GAKKAI, Japan's largest lay Buddhism organization, which is considered one of Japan's "new religions." Ikeda also helped found Soka Gakkai International (SGI), which in 2008 claimed twelve million members in 192 countries and territories. He is a prolific author, who also founded a number of institutions, including Soka University, the Komeito political party, the Institute of Oriental Philosophy, and the Tokyo Fuji Art Museum. Ikeda was born on January 2, 1928, in the Ota Ward of Tokyo, to parents who cultivated and sold seaweed. After graduating from Fuji Junior College, he took employment under Toda Josei (1900-1958), the second president of Soka Gakkai. Ikeda received intensive mentoring from Toda and accompanied him on most of his travels. Ikeda also helped carry out Toda's propagation (shakubuku) campaigns. Ikeda served as the third president of Soka Gakkai from 1960 to 1979 until disagreements with the NICHIREN SHoSHu priesthood, notably its head priest, Nikken (b. 1922), led to his resignation from the organization. In 1991, poor relations with the priesthood culminated in his excommunication. While remaining as Soka Gakkai's spiritual leader, Ikeda has additionally served as the president of SGI since its founding in 1975. Throughout his career with Soka Gakkai and SGI, Ikeda has met with both criticism and praise. At times, the organization's aggressive proselytizing efforts have made Ikeda and Soka Gakkai objects of suspicion, and its political activities have led to several scandals: the 1956 "osaka incident" in which he was charged with election fraud after engineering the election of a Komeito party member; and a 1979 controversy over the suppression of several publications that criticized Ikeda and Soka Gakkai. At the same time, Ikeda is respected as a leader on human rights and peace issues. He has been a strong supporter of the United Nations and has engaged in discussions with political leaders around the world. The expansive growth of both Soka Gakkai and SGI can in large measure be attributed to his leadership.

Imperial Software Technology "company" A {software engineering} company which emerged from {Imperial College} in about 1982. It enjoys a world-wide reputation for technical excellence as a software product and technology provider in the Open Systems market. Its flagship product is {X-Designer}, the award-winning {graphical user interface builder}. It also has considerable expertise in the {Z} language and {Formal Methods}. {(http://ist.co.uk/)}. (1995-11-23)

Imperial Software Technology ::: (company) A software engineering company which emerged from Imperial College in about 1982. It enjoys a world-wide reputation for technical interface builder. It also has considerable expertise in the Z language and Formal Methods. . (1995-11-23)

indicator diagram: A type of diagrams used in engineering to measure the work done through the area in the diagram.

Information Engineering Facility {Advantage Gen}

Information Engineering Facility ::: COOL:Gen

Information Systems Factory (ISF) An equivalent to an {SEE}. [{Simultaneous Engineering Environment} or {Software Engineering Environment}?] (2000-12-30)

Information Systems Factory ::: (ISF) An equivalent to an SEE.[Simultaneous Engineering Environment or Software Engineering Environment?](2000-12-30)

In physics, mechanics and engineering, derivatives are commonly taken with respect to time: such as velocity and accelration.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) The world's largest technical professional society, based in the USA. Founded in 1884 by a handful of practitioners of the new electrical engineering discipline, today's Institute has more than 320,000 members who participate in its activities in 147 countries. The IEEE sponsors technical conferences, symposia and local meetings worldwide, publishes nearly 25% of the world's technical papers in electrical, electronics and computer engineering and computer science, provides educational programs for its members and promotes standardisation. Areas covered include aerospace, computers and communications, biomedical technology, electric power and consumer electronics. {(http://ieee.org/)}. {Gopher (gopher://gopher.ieee.org/)}. {(ftp://ftp.ieee.org/)}. E-mail file-server: "fileserver-help@info.ieee.org". { IEEE Standards Process Automation (SPA) System (http://stdsbbs.ieee.org/)}, {telnet (telnet:stdsbbs.ieee.org)} [140.98.1.11]. (1995-03-10)

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. ::: (IEEE) The world's largest technical professional society, based in the USA. Founded in 1884 by a handful of practitioners of the new electrical engineering standardisation. Areas covered include aerospace, computers and communications, biomedical technology, electric power and consumer electronics. . . .E-mail file-server: . , (1995-03-10)

Integrated Project Support Environment "software" (IPSE) A set of management and technical tools to support software development, usually integrated in a coherent framework, equivalent to a {Software Engineering Environment}. (1999-04-26)

Integrated Project Support Environment ::: (software) (IPSE) A set of management and technical tools to support software development, usually integrated in a coherent framework, equivalent to a Software Engineering Environment. (1999-04-26)

Interactive Development Environments "company" (IDE) A US {software engineering} company. (1996-03-04)

Interactive Development Environments ::: (company) (IDE) A US software engineering company. (1996-03-04)

Interactive Software Engineering ::: (company) (ISE) The company set up by Bertrand Meyer, now its president, to develop and distribute Eiffel, the language which he created. ISE also organises the TOOLS conference (Technology of Object-Oriented Languages and Systems). .E-mail: Telephone: +1 (805) 685 1006.Address: Santa Barbara, Goleta CA, USA. (1995-12-28)

Interactive Software Engineering "company" (ISE) The company set up by {Bertrand Meyer}, now its president, to develop and distribute {Eiffel}, the language which he created. ISE also organises the {TOOLS} conference (Technology of Object-Oriented Languages and Systems). {(http://eiffel.com/)}. E-mail: info@eiffel.com. Telephone: +1 (805) 685 1006. Address: Santa Barbara, Goleta CA, USA. (1995-12-28)

Internet Architecture Board (IAB) The technical body that oversees the development of the {Internet} suite of {protocols}. It has two task forces: the {Internet Engineering Task Force} and the {Internet Research Task Force}. "IAB" previously stood for Internet Activities Board. (1994-12-06)

Internet Architecture Board ::: (IAB) The technical body that oversees the development of the Internet suite of protocols. It has two task forces: the Internet Engineering Task Force and the Internet Research Task Force.IAB previously stood for Internet Activities Board. (1994-12-06)

Internet Engineering and Planning Group (IEPG) {(http://iepg.org/)}.

Internet Engineering and Planning Group ::: (IEPG) .

Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG) A body composed of the {Internet Engineering Task Force} Area Directors and the IETF Chair. It provides the first technical review of {Internet} standards and is responsible for day-to-day "management" of the IETF. (1994-12-08)

Internet Engineering Steering Group ::: (IESG) A body composed of the Internet Engineering Task Force Area Directors and the IETF Chair. It provides the first technical review of Internet standards and is responsible for day-to-day management of the IETF. (1994-12-08)

Internet Engineering Task Force ::: (networking, standard, body) (IETF) The IETF is a large, open international community of network designers, operators, vendors and researchers the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) for final approval. The IETF meets three times a year and extensive minutes are included in the IETF Proceedings.The IETF Secretariat, run by The Corporation for National Research Initiatives with funding from the US government, maintains an index of Internet-Drafts whereas RFCs are maintained by The Internet Architecture Board. . (1999-01-27)

Internet Engineering Task Force "networking, standard, body" (IETF) The IETF is a large, open international community of network designers, operators, vendors and researchers whose purpose is to coordinate the operation, management and evolution of the {Internet} and to resolve short- and mid-range {protocol} and architectural issues. It is a major source of proposals for {protocol} {standards} which are submitted to the {Internet Architecture Board} (IAB) for final approval. The IETF meets three times a year and extensive minutes are included in the IETF Proceedings. The IETF Secretariat, run by The {Corporation for National Research Initiatives} with funding from the US government, maintains an index of {Internet-Drafts} whereas {RFCs} are maintained by The {Internet Architecture Board}. {(http://ietf.org)}. (1999-01-27)

Internet-Draft (I-D) A draft working document of the {Internet Engineering Task Force}, its Areas, and its Working Groups. As the name implies, Internet-Drafts are purely discussion documents with no formal status. They are valid for a maximum of six months and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any time. Very often, an I-D is a precursor to a {Request For Comments}. (1994-12-08)

Internet-Draft ::: (I-D) A draft working document of the Internet Engineering Task Force, its Areas, and its Working Groups. As the name implies, Internet-Drafts are purely months and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any time. Very often, an I-D is a precursor to a Request For Comments. (1994-12-08)

Internet "networking" 1. With a lower-case "i", any set of {networks} interconnected with {routers}. 2. With an upper-case "I", the world's collection of interconnected networks. The Internet is a three-level {hierarchy} composed of {backbone networks}, {mid-level networks}, and {stub networks}. These include commercial (.com or .co), university (.ac or .edu) and other research networks (.org, .net) and military (.mil) networks and span many different physical networks around the world with various {protocols}, chiefly the {Internet Protocol}. Until the advent of the {web} in 1990, the Internet was almost entirely unknown outside universities and corporate research departments and was accessed mostly via {command line} interfaces such as {telnet} and {FTP}. Since then it has grown to become a ubiquitous aspect of modern information systems, becoming highly commercial and a widely accepted medium for all sort of customer relations such as advertising, brand building and online sales and services. Its original spirit of cooperation and freedom have, to a great extent, survived this explosive transformation with the result that the vast majority of information available on the Internet is free of charge. While the web (primarily in the form of {HTML} and {HTTP}) is the best known aspect of the Internet, there are many other {protocols} in use, supporting applications such as {electronic mail}, {chat}, {remote login} and {file transfer}. There were 20,242 unique commercial domains registered with {InterNIC} in September 1994, 10% more than in August 1994. In 1996 there were over 100 {Internet access providers} in the US and a few in the UK (e.g. the {BBC Networking Club}, {Demon}, {PIPEX}). There are several bodies associated with the running of the Internet, including the {Internet Architecture Board}, the {Internet Assigned Numbers Authority}, the {Internet Engineering and Planning Group}, {Internet Engineering Steering Group}, and the {Internet Society}. See also {NYsernet}, {EUNet}. {The Internet Index (http://openmarket.com/intindex)} - statistics about the Internet. (2015-03-26)

Internet ::: (networking) (Note: capital I). The Internet is the largest internet (with a small i) in the world. It is a three level hierarchy composed of (.org, .net) and military (.mil) networks and span many different physical networks around the world with various protocols, chiefly the Internet Protocol.Until the advent of the World-Wide Web in 1990, the Internet was almost entirely unknown outside universities and corporate research departments and was accessed this explosive transformation with the result that the vast majority of information available on the Internet is free of charge.While the web (primarily in the form of HTML and HTTP) is the best known aspect of the Internet, there are many other protocols in use, supporting applications such as electronic mail, Usenet, chat, remote login, and file transfer.There were 20,242 unique commercial domains registered with InterNIC in September 1994, 10% more than in August 1994. In 1996 there were over 100 Internet access providers in the US and a few in the UK (e.g. the BBC Networking Club, Demon, PIPEX).There are several bodies associated with the running of the Internet, including the Internet Architecture Board, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, the Internet Engineering and Planning Group, Internet Engineering Steering Group, and the Internet Society.See also NYsernet, EUNet. - statistics about the Internet.(2000-02-21)

Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) The IRTF is chartered by the {Internet Architecture Board} to consider long-term {Internet} issues from a theoretical point of view. It has Research Groups, similar to {Internet Engineering Task Force} Working Groups, which are each tasked to discuss different research topics. Multi-cast audio/video conferencing and {privacy enhanced mail} are samples of IRTF output. (1994-12-08)

ISEE ::: Integrated Software Engineering Environment - equivalent to SEE.

ISEE Integrated {Software Engineering Environment} - equivalent to {SEE}.

ISE {Interactive Software Engineering}

Ivan Sutherland Ivan E. Sutherland is widely known for his pioneering contributions. His 1963 MIT PhD thesis, {Sketchpad}, opened the field of computer graphics. His 1966 work, with Sproull, on a head-mounted display anticipated today's {virtual reality} by 25 years. He co-founded {Evans and Sutherland}, which manufactures the most advanced computer image generators now in use. As head of Computer Science Department of {Caltech} he helped make {integrated circuit} design an acceptable field of academic study. Dr. Sutherland is on the boards of several small companies and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, the {ACM} and {IEEE}. He received the {ACM}'s {Turing Award} in 1988. He is now Vice President and Fellow of {Sun Microsystems} Laboratories in Mountain View, CA, USA. (1994-11-16)

John Vincent Atanasoff "person" John Vincent Atanasoff, 1903-10-04 - 1995-06-15. An American mathemetical physicist, and the inventor of the electronic {digital computer}. Between 1937 and 1942 he built the {Atanasoff-Berry Computer} with {Clifford Berry}, at the {Iowa State University}. Atanasoff was born on 1903-10-04 in Hamilton, New York. In 1925, he got a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Florida. In 1926 he received a Master's degree in Maths from Iowa State University. He received a PhD as a theoretical physicist from the University of Wisconsin in 1930. While an associate professor of mathematics and physics at Iowa State University, Atanasoff began to envision a {digital} computational device, believing {analogue} devices to be too restrictive. Whilst working on his electronic {digital computer}, Atanasoff was introduced to a graduate student named {Clifford Berry}, who helped him build the {computer}. The first prototype of the {Atanasoff-Berry Computer} was demonstrated in December 1939. Although no patent was awarded for the new {computer}, in 1973 US District Judge Earl R. Larson declared Atanasoff the inventor of the digital computer (declaring the {ENIAC} patent invalid). Atanasoff was awarded the National Medal of {Technology} by US President Bush on 1990-11-13. He died following a stroke on 1995-06-15. {John Vincent Atanasoff and the Birth of the Digital Computer (http://cs.iastate.edu/jva/jva-archive.shtml)}. ["Atanasoff Forgotten Father of the Computer", C. R. Mollenhoff, Iowa State University Press 1988]. (2001-10-03)

John Vincent Atanasoff ::: (person) John Vincent Atanasoff, 1903-10-04 - 1995-06-15. An American mathemetical physicist, and the inventor of the electronic digital computer. Between 1937 and 1942 he built the Atanasoff-Berry Computer with Clifford Berry, at the Iowa State University.Atanasoff was born on 1903-10-04 in Hamilton, New York. In 1925, he got a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of University. He received a PhD as a theoretical physicist from the University of Wisconsin in 1930.While an associate professor of mathematics and physics at Iowa State University, Atanasoff began to envision a digital computational device, electronic digital computer, Atanasoff was introduced to a graduate student named Clifford Berry, who helped him build the computer.The first prototype of the Atanasoff-Berry Computer was demonstrated in December 1939. Although no patent was awarded for the new computer, in 1973 US District Judge Earl R. Larson declared Atanasoff the inventor of the digital computer (declaring the ENIAC patent invalid).Atanasoff was awarded the National Medal of Technology by US President Bush on 1990-11-13. He died following a stroke on 1995-06-15. .[Atanasoff Forgotten Father of the Computer, C. R. Mollenhoff, Iowa State University Press 1988].(2001-10-03)

KEE Knowledge Engineering Environment. Frame-based expert system. Supports dynamic inheritance, {multiple inheritance}, polymorphism. Classes, meta-classes and objects are all treated alike. A class is an instance of a meta-class. Can control rules for merging of each field when multiple inheritance takes place. Methods are written in LISP. Actions may be triggered when fields are accessed or modified. Extensive GUI integrates with objects. Can easily make object updates to be reflected on display or display selections to update fields. This can in turn trigger other methods or inference rules which may then update other parts of the display. Intellicorp, for TI Explorer. "The Role of Frame-Based Representation in Reasoning", R. Fikes et al, CACM 28(9):904- 920 (Sept 1985).

KEE ::: Knowledge Engineering Environment. Frame-based expert system. Supports dynamic inheritance, multiple inheritance, polymorphism. Classes, meta-classes and parts of the display. Intellicorp, for TI Explorer. The Role of Frame-Based Representation in Reasoning, R. Fikes et al, CACM 28(9):904- 920 (Sept 1985).

kludge ::: (jargon) /kluhj/ (From the old Scots kludgie meaning an outside toilet) A Scottish engineering term for anything added in an ad hoc (and possibly engineers met Americans and the meaning, spelling and pronunciation of kludge became confused with that of kluge.The spelling kludge was apparently popularised by the Datamation cited below which defined it as An ill-assorted collection of poorly matching parts, forming a distressing whole.The result of this tangled history is a mess; in 1993, many (perhaps even most) hackers pronounce the word /klooj/ but spell it kludge (compare the pronunciation drift of mung). Some observers consider this appropriate in view of its meaning.[How to Design a Kludge, Jackson Granholme, Datamation, February 1962, pp. 30-31].[Jargon File] (1998-12-09)

kludge "jargon" /kluhj/ (From the old Scots "kludgie" meaning an outside toilet) A Scottish engineering term for anything added in an ad hoc (and possibly unhygenic!) manner. At some point during the Second World War, Scottish engineers met Americans and the meaning, spelling and pronunciation of kludge became confused with that of "{kluge}". The spelling "kludge" was apparently popularised by the "Datamation" cited below which defined it as "An ill-assorted collection of poorly matching parts, forming a distressing whole." The result of this tangled history is a mess; in 1993, many (perhaps even most) hackers pronounce the word /klooj/ but spell it "kludge" (compare the pronunciation drift of {mung}). Some observers consider this appropriate in view of its meaning. ["How to Design a Kludge", Jackson Granholme, Datamation, February 1962, pp. 30-31]. [{Jargon File}] (1998-12-09)

Knowledge_engineering ::: is a field of artificial intelligence (AI) that creates rules to apply to data in order to imitate the thought process of a human expert. It looks at the structure of a task or a decision to identify how a conclusion is reached. A library of problem-solving methods and the collateral knowledge used for each can then be created and served up as problems to be diagnosed by the system. The resulting software could then assist in diagnosis, trouble-shooting and solving issues either on its own or in a support role to a human agent.   :::BREAKING DOWN 'Knowledge Engineering'  Knowledge engineering sought to transfer the expertise of problem-solving human experts into a program that could take in the same data and come to the same conclusion. This approach is referred to as the transfer process and it dominated early knowledge engineering attempts. It fell out of favor, however, as scientists and programmers realized that the knowledge being used by humans in decision making is not always explicit. While many decisions can be traced back to previous experience on what worked, humans draw on parallel pools of knowledge that don’t always appear logically connected to the task at hand. Some of what CEOs and star investors refer to as gut feeling or intuitive leaps is better described as analogous reasoning and nonlinear thinking. These modes of thought don’t lend themselves to direct, step-by-step decision trees and may require pulling in sources of data that appear to cost more to bring in and process than it is worth.   The transfer process has been left behind in favor of a modeling process. Instead of attempting to follow the step-by-step process of a decision, knowledge engineering is focused on creating a system that will hit upon the same results as the expert without following the same path or tapping the same information sources. This eliminates some of the issues of tracking down the knowledge being used for nonlinear thinking, as the people doing it are often not aware of the information they are pulling on. As long as the conclusions are comparable, the model works. Once a model is consistently coming close to the human expert, it can then be refined. Bad conclusions can be traced back and debugged, and processes that are creating equivalent or improved conclusions can be encouraged.

knowledge engineering (KE) ::: All technical, scientific, and social aspects involved in building, maintaining, and using knowledge-based systems.

Knowledge Query and Manipulation Language "language, protocol, artificial intelligence" (KQML) A language and {protocol}, based on {SGML}, for exchanging {information} and {knowledge}, proposed in 1993(?). Work on KQML is led(?) by Tim Finin "finin@umbc.edu" of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Lab for Advanced Information Technology. It is part of the {ARPA} {Knowledge Sharing Effort}. The KQML message format and protocol can be used to interact with an intelligent system, either by an {application program}, or by another intelligent system. KQML's "performatives" are operations that agents perform on each other's knowledge and {goal} stores. Higher-level interactions such as {contract nets} and negotiation are built using these. KQML's "communication facilitators" coordinate the interactions of other agents to support knowledge sharing. Experimental prototype systems support concurrent engineering, intelligent design, intelligent planning, and scheduling. {(http://cs.umbc.edu/kqml/)}. (1999-09-28)

Knowledge Query and Manipulation Language ::: (language, protocol, artificial intelligence) (KQML) A language and protocol, based on SGML, for exchanging information and knowledge, proposed in 1993(?).Work on KQML is led(?) by Tim Finin of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Lab for Advanced Information Technology. It is part of the ARPA Knowledge Sharing Effort.The KQML message format and protocol can be used to interact with an intelligent system, either by an application program, or by another intelligent system. negotiation are built using these. KQML's communication facilitators coordinate the interactions of other agents to support knowledge sharing.Experimental prototype systems support concurrent engineering, intelligent design, intelligent planning, and scheduling. . (1999-09-28)

Knowledge Systems Laboratory ::: (KSL) An artificial intelligence research laboratory within the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University. Current work focuses on knowledge computational environments for modelling physical devices, architectures for adaptive intelligent systems, and expert systems for science and engineering. (1994-12-06)

Knowledge Systems Laboratory (KSL) An {artificial intelligence} research laboratory within the Department of Computer Science at {Stanford University}. Current work focuses on {knowledge representation} for sharable engineering knowledge bases and systems, computational environments for modelling physical devices, architectures for adaptive intelligent systems, and {expert systems} for science and engineering. (1994-12-06)

Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan "body, education" (KTH, Royal Institute of Art and Technology) A Swedish university founded in 1827 that is strong in engineering and computing (e.g. {AI}, {Virtual Reality}). In 1998 KTH had nearly 11,000 undergraduate students, 1,300 postgraduate students, and 2,900 staff, making it the largest of Sweden's six universitites of technology. {(http://kth.se/index-eng.html)}. Address: Stockholm, Sweden. (2001-03-18)

Kungliga Tekniska H�gskolan ::: (body, education) (KTH, Royal Institute of Art and Technology) A Swedish university founded in 1827 that is strong in engineering and computing (e.g. AI, postgraduate students, and 2,900 staff, making it the largest of Sweden's six universitites of technology. .Address: Stockholm, Sweden.(2001-03-18)

Laboratory INstrument Computer "computer" (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by {Wesley Clark}, {Charles Molnar}, Severo Ornstein and others at the {Lincoln Laboratory Group}, to facilitate scientific research. With its {digital logic} and {stored programs}, the LINC is accepted by the {IEEE Computer Society} to be the World's first {interactive} {personal computer}. The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 {Average Response Computer}, and was designed for individual use. Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the {National Institute of Health}, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962. In January 1963, the project moved to {MIT}, and then to {Washington University} (in St. Louis) in 1964. The LINC had a simple {operating system}, four "knobs" (which was used like a {mouse}), a {Soroban keyboard} (for alpha-numeric data entry), two {LINCtape} drives and a small {CRT} display. It originally had one {kilobit} of {core memory}, but this was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of {Digital Equipment Corporation} (DEC) hardware modules. Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially. After the introduction of the {PDP-8}, {Dick Clayton} at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well. In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate {TTL logic} into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached. Due to the success of the LINC-8, {Spear, Inc.} produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the {public domain}). The interesting thing about the Spear {micro-LINC 300} was that it used {MECL} II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates. In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT {Computer Museum} where it was put on display. {LINC/8, PDP-12 (http://faqs.org/faqs/dec-faq/pdp8/section-7.html)}. {Lights out for last LINC (http://rleweb.mit.edu/publications/currents/6-1linc.HTM)}. ["Computers and Automation", Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

Laboratory INstrument Computer ::: (computer) (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by Wesley Clark, Charles Molnar, Severo Ornstein and others at the Lincoln stored programs, the LINC is accepted by the IEEE Computer Society to be the World's first interactive personal computer.The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 Average Response Computer, and was designed for individual use.Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the National Institute of Health, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962.In January 1963, the project moved to MIT, and then to Washington University (in St. Louis) in 1964.The LINC had a simple operating system, four knobs (which was used like a mouse), a Soroban keyboard (for alpha-numeric data entry), two LINCtape drives was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) hardware modules.Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially.After the introduction of the PDP-8, Dick Clayton at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well.In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate TTL logic into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached.Due to the success of the LINC-8, Spear, Inc. produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the public domain). The interesting thing about the Spear micro-LINC 300 was that it used MECL II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates.In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT Computer Museum where it was put on display. . .[Computers and Automation, Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench "tool" (LabVIEW) A package from National Instruments Corp originally developed to provide a {graphical user interface} to instruments connected by the {IEEE 488} (GPIB) bus. It has powerful graphical editing facilities for defining and interconnecting "virtual instruments". (1996-04-24)

Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench ::: (tool) (LabVIEW) A package from National Instruments Corp originally developed to provide a graphical user interface to instruments connected by the IEEE 488 (GPIB) bus. It has powerful graphical editing facilities for defining and interconnecting virtual instruments. (1996-04-24)

LabVIEW {Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench}

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory "body" (LLNL) A research organaisatin operated by the {University of California} under a contract with the US Department of Energy. LLNL was founded on 2 September 1952 at the site of an old World War II naval air station. The Lab employs researchers from many scientific and engineering disciplines. Some of its departments are the National Ignition Facility, the Human Genome Center, the ASCI Tera-Scale Computing partnership, the Computer Security Technology Center, and the Site 300 Experimental Test Facility. Other research areas are Astronomy and Astrophysics, Atmospheric Science, Automation and Robotics, Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Energy Research, Engineering, Environmental Science, Fusion, Geology and Geophysics, Health, Lasers and Optics, Materials Science, National Security, Physics, Sensors and Instrumentation, Space Science. LLNL also works with industry in research and licensing projects. At the end of fiscal year 1995, the lab had signed agreements for 193 cost-shared research projects involving 201 companies and worth nearly $600m. {(http://llnl.gov/)}. Address: Fremont, California, USA. (1996-10-30)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ::: (body) (LLNL) A research organaisatin operated by the University of California under a contract with the US Department of Energy. LLNL was founded on 2 September 1952 at the site of an old World War II naval air station.The Lab employs researchers from many scientific and engineering disciplines. Some of its departments are the National Ignition Facility, the Human Genome Optics, Materials Science, National Security, Physics, Sensors and Instrumentation, Space Science.LLNL also works with industry in research and licensing projects. At the end of fiscal year 1995, the lab had signed agreements for 193 cost-shared research projects involving 201 companies and worth nearly $600m. .Address: Fremont, California, USA. (1996-10-30)

learning curve "jargon" A graph showing some measure of the cost of performing some action against the number of times it has been performed. The term probably entered engineering via the aircraft industry in the 1930s, where it was used to describe plots showing the cost of making some particular design of aeroplane against the number of units made. The term is also used in psychology to mean a graph showing some measure of something learned against the number of trials. The psychology graphs normally slope upward whereas the manufacturing ones normally slope downward but they are both usually steep to start with and then level out. {Marketroids} often misuse the term to mean the amount of time it takes to learn to use something ("reduce the learning curve") or the ease of learning it ("easy learning curve"). The phrase "steep learning curve" is sometimes used incorrectly to mean "hard to learn" whereas of course it implies rapid learning. {Engineering (http://computerworld.com/cwi/story/0,1199,NAV47-68-85-1942_STO61762,00.html)}. {Psychology (http://sun.science.wayne.edu/~wpoff/cor/mem/opereinf.html)}. (2002-01-22)

machine vision (MV) ::: The technology and methods used to provide imaging-based automatic inspection and analysis for such applications as automatic inspection, process control, and robot guidance, usually in industry. Machine vision is a term encompassing a large number of technologies, software and hardware products, integrated systems, actions, methods and expertise. Machine vision as a systems engineering discipline can be considered distinct from computer vision, a form of computer science. It attempts to integrate existing technologies in new ways and apply them to solve real world problems. The term is the prevalent one for these functions in industrial automation environments but is also used for these functions in other environments such as security and vehicle guidance.

magic bullet "jargon" (Or "silver bullet" from vampire legends) A term widely used in software engineering for a supposed quick, simple cure for some problem. E.g. "There's no silver bullet for this problem". (1999-01-13)

magic bullet ::: (jargon) (Or silver bullet from vampire legends) A term widely used in software engineering for a supposed quick, simple cure for some problem. E.g. There's no silver bullet for this problem. (1999-01-13)

magnetostrictive delay line "storage, history" An early storage device that used tensioned wires of nickel alloy carrying longitudinal waves produced and detected electromagnetically. They had better storage behaviour than {mercury delay lines}. [H. Epstein and O.B. Stram, "A High Performance Magnetostriction-Sonic Delay Line," Transactions, Institute of Radio Engineers, Professional Group on Ultrasonic Engineering, 1957, pp. 1-24]. (2002-11-08)

magnetostrictive delay line ::: (storage, history) An early storage device that used tensioned wires of nickel alloy carrying longitudinal waves produced and detected electromagnetically.They had better storage behaviour than mercury delay lines.[H. Epstein and O.B. Stram, A High Performance Magnetostriction-Sonic Delay Line, Transactions, Institute of Radio Engineers, Professional Group on Ultrasonic Engineering, 1957, pp. 1-24].(2002-11-08)

mailing list "messaging" (Often shortened in context to "list") An {electronic mail address} that is an alias (or {macro}, though that word is never used in this connection) which is expanded by a {mail exploder} to yield many other e-mail addresses. Some mailing lists are simple "reflectors", redirecting mail sent to them to the list of recipients. Others are filtered by humans or programs of varying degrees of sophistication; lists filtered by humans are said to be "moderated". The term is sometimes used, by extension, for the people who receive e-mail sent to such an address. Mailing lists are one of the primary forms of hacker interaction, along with {Usenet}. They predate {Usenet}, having originated with the first {UUCP} and {ARPANET} connections. They are often used for private information-sharing on topics that would be too specialised for or inappropriate to public {Usenet} groups. Though some of these maintain almost purely technical content (such as the {Internet Engineering Task Force} mailing list), others (like the "sf-lovers" list maintained for many years by Saul Jaffe) are recreational, and many are purely social. Perhaps the most infamous of the social lists was the eccentric bandykin distribution; its latter-day progeny, {lectroids} and {tanstaafl}, still include a number of the oddest and most interesting people in hackerdom. Mailing lists are easy to create and (unlike {Usenet}) don't tie up a significant amount of machine resources (until they get very large, at which point they can become interesting torture tests for mail software). Thus, they are often created temporarily by working groups, the members of which can then collaborate on a project without ever needing to meet face-to-face. There are several programs to automate mailing list maintenance, e.g. {Listserv}, {Listproc}, {Majordomo}. Requests to subscribe to, or leave, a mailing list should ALWAYS be sent to the list's "-request" address (e.g. ietf-request@cnri.reston.va.us for the IETF mailing list). This prevents them being sent to all recipients of the list and ensures that they reach the maintainer of the list, who may not actually read the list. [{Jargon File}] (2001-04-27)

maintenance "programming" The modification of a software product, after delivery, to correct faults, to improve performance or other attributes, or to adapt the product to a changed environment. Maintenance is an important part of the {software life-cycle}. It is expensive in manpower and resources, and one of the aims of {software engineering} is to reduce its cost. (1996-12-27)

maintenance ::: (programming) The modification of a software product, after delivery, to correct faults, to improve performance or other attributes, or to adapt the product to a changed environment.Maintenance is an important part of the software life-cycle. It is expensive in manpower and resources, and one of the aims of software engineering is to reduce its cost. (1996-12-27)

Margaret Hamilton "person" (born 1936-08-17) A {computer scientist}, {systems engineer} and business owner, credited with coining the term {software engineering}. Margaret Hamilton published over 130 papers, proceedings and reports about the 60 projects and six major programs in which she has been involved. In 1965 she became Director of Software Programming at MIT's {Charles Stark Draper Laboratory} and Director of the Software Engineering Division of the {MIT Instrumentation Laboratory}, which developed on-board {flight software} for the Apollo space program. At {NASA}, Hamilton pioneered the Apollo on-board guidance software that navigated to and landed on the Moon and formed the basis for software used in later missions. At the time, programming was a hands-on, engineering descipline; computer science and software engineering barely existed. Hamilton produced innovations in {system design} and software development, enterprise and {process modelling}, development paradigms, {formal systems modelling languages}, system-oriented objects for systems modelling and development, {automated life-cycle environments}, {software reliability}, {software reuse}, {domain analysis}, correctness by built-in language properties, open architecture techniques for robust systems, full {life-cycle automation}, {quality assurance}, {seamless integration}, {error detection and recovery}, {man-machine interface} systems, {operating systems}, {end-to-end testing} and {life-cycle management}. She developed concepts of {asynchronous software}, {priority scheduling} and {Human-in-the-loop} decision capability, which became the foundation for modern, ultra-reliable software design. The Apollo 11 moon landing would have aborted when spurious data threatened to overload the computer, but thanks to the innovative asynchronous, priority based scheduling, it eliminated the unnecessary processing and completed the landing successfully. In 1986, she founded {Hamilton Technologies, Inc.}, developed around the {Universal Systems Language} and her systems and software design {paradigm} of {Development Before the Fact} (DBTF). (2015-03-08)

Mars A legendary tragic failure, the archetypal Hacker Dream Gone Wrong. Mars was the code name for a family of PDP-10 compatible computers built by Systems Concepts (now, The SC Group): the multi-processor SC-30M, the small uniprocessor SC-25M, and the never-built superprocessor SC-40M. These machines were marvels of engineering design; although not much slower than the unique {Foonly} F-1, they were physically smaller and consumed less power than the much slower DEC KS10 or Foonly F-2, F-3, or F-4 machines. They were also completely compatible with the DEC KL10, and ran all KL10 binaries (including the operating system) with no modifications at about 2--3 times faster than a KL10. When DEC cancelled the Jupiter project in 1983, Systems Concepts should have made a bundle selling their machine into shops with a lot of software investment in PDP-10s, and in fact their spring 1984 announcement generated a great deal of excitement in the PDP-10 world. {TOPS-10} was running on the Mars by the summer of 1984, and {TOPS-20} by early fall. Unfortunately, the hackers running Systems Concepts were much better at designing machines than at mass producing or selling them; the company allowed itself to be sidetracked by a bout of perfectionism into continually improving the design, and lost credibility as delivery dates continued to slip. They also overpriced the product ridiculously; they believed they were competing with the KL10 and VAX 8600 and failed to reckon with the likes of Sun Microsystems and other hungry startups building workstations with power comparable to the KL10 at a fraction of the price. By the time SC shipped the first SC-30M to Stanford in late 1985, most customers had already made the traumatic decision to abandon the PDP-10, usually for VMS or Unix boxes. Most of the Mars computers built ended up being purchased by {CompuServe}. This tale and the related saga of {Foonly} hold a lesson for hackers: if you want to play in the {Real World}, you need to learn Real World moves. [{Jargon File}]

mechanism design ::: A field in economics and game theory that takes an engineering approach to designing economic mechanisms or incentives, toward desired objectives, in strategic settings, where players act rationally. Because it starts at the end of the game, then goes backwards, it is also called reverse game theory. It has broad applications, from economics and politics (markets, auctions, voting procedures) to networked-systems (internet interdomain routing, sponsored search auctions).

Mekhes ::: Customs duty. ::: Mekorot ::: Sources of Fountains; Israel's semiprivate water engineering company.

MERISE ::: Methode d'Etude et de Realisation Informatique pour les Systemes d'Enteprise.A software engineering method popular in France; many IPSEs are based on it. (1995-01-24)

MERISE Methode d'Etude et de Realisation Informatique pour les Systemes d'Enteprise. A software engineering method popular in France; many {IPSEs} are based on it. (1995-01-24)

Micro Channel Architecture ::: (architecture) (MCA) IBM's proprietary 32-bit bus, used in high-end PS/2 personal computers. Micro Channel is designed for multiprocessing. It eliminates *not* compatible with either EISA or XT bus architecture so older cards cannot be used with it.As with the ROM BIOS in the first IBM PCs, figuring out the Micro Channel's secrets has been an arduous task of reverse engineering ever since the PS/2 line was announced. Consequently, the MCA has never become as wide spread as the competing EISA standard. (1996-08-16)

Micro Channel Architecture "architecture" (MCA) {IBM}'s proprietary 32-bit {bus}, used in high-end {PS/2} {personal computers}. Micro Channel is designed for {multiprocessing}. It eliminates potential conflicts that arise when installing new peripheral devices. MCA is *not* compatible with either {EISA} or {XT bus architecture} so older cards cannot be used with it. As with the {ROM} {BIOS} in the first {IBM PCs}, figuring out the Micro Channel's secrets has been an arduous task of {reverse engineering} ever since the PS/2 line was announced. Consequently, the MCA has never become as wide spread as the competing {EISA} standard. (1996-08-16)

Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation ::: (body) (MCC) One of the first, and now one of the largest, US computer industry research and development consortia.Founded in late 1982 by major computer and semiconductor manufacturers, MCC's membership has diversified to include a broad range of high-profile corporations and development agencies and leading universities, allows MCC's partners to maximise the benefit of scarce research and development resources.Some of the technical areas in which MCC has distinguished itself are:System Architecture and Design (optimise hardware and software design, provide for scalability and interoperability, allow rapid prototyping for improved time-to-market, and support the re-engineering of existing systems for open systems).Advanced Microelectronics Packaging and Interconnection (smaller, faster, more powerful, and cost-competitive).Hardware Systems Engineering (tools and methodologies for cost-efficient, up-front design of advanced electronic systems, including modelling and design-for-test techniques to improve cost, yield, quality, and time-to-market).Environmentally Conscious Technologies (process control and optimisation tools, information management and analysis capabilities, and non-hazardous material alternatives supporting cost-efficient production, waste minimisation, and reduced environmental impact).Distributed Information Technology (managing and maintaining physically distributed corporate information resources on different platforms, building blocks for the national information infrastructure, networking tools and services for integration within and between companies, and electronic commerce).Intelligent Systems (systems that intelligently support business processes and enhance performance, including decision support, data management, forecasting and prediction). .Address: Austin, Texas, USA. (1995-04-25)

Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation "body" (MCC) One of the first, and now one of the largest, US computer industry research and development consortia. Founded in late 1982 by major computer and semiconductor manufacturers, MCC's membership has diversified to include a broad range of high-profile corporations from electronics, computers, aerospace, semiconductors, and related industries, reflecting the full range of companies vital to the life cycle of {Information Technology} products. Active involvement of small- and medium-sized firms and technology users, along with well-established alliances with government research and development agencies and leading universities, allows MCC's partners to maximise the benefit of scarce research and development resources. Some of the technical areas in which MCC has distinguished itself are: System Architecture and Design (optimise hardware and software design, provide for scalability and interoperability, allow rapid prototyping for improved time-to-market, and support the re-engineering of existing systems for open systems). Advanced Microelectronics Packaging and Interconnection (smaller, faster, more powerful, and cost-competitive). Hardware Systems Engineering (tools and methodologies for cost-efficient, up-front design of advanced electronic systems, including modelling and design-for-test techniques to improve cost, yield, quality, and time-to-market). Environmentally Conscious Technologies (process control and optimisation tools, information management and analysis capabilities, and non-hazardous material alternatives supporting cost-efficient production, waste minimisation, and reduced environmental impact). Distributed {Information Technology} (managing and maintaining physically distributed corporate information resources on different {platforms}, building blocks for the {national information infrastructure}, networking tools and services for integration within and between companies, and electronic commerce). Intelligent Systems (systems that "intelligently" support business processes and enhance performance, including {decision support}, {data management}, forecasting and prediction). {(http://mcc.com/)}. Address: Austin, Texas, USA. (1995-04-25)

Micro Interpreter for Knowledge Engineering ::: (artificial intelligence, tool) (MIKE) An expert system shell for teaching purposes, with forward chaining, backward chaining, and user-definable conflict resolution strategies. MIKE is written in Edinburgh Prolog.Version 2.03.[BYTE, Oct 1990]. .Contact: Marc Eisenstadt, HCRL, Open University. (1995-01-10)

Micro Interpreter for Knowledge Engineering "artificial intelligence, tool" (MIKE) An {expert system shell} for teaching purposes, with {forward chaining}, {backward chaining}, and user-definable {conflict resolution} strategies. MIKE is written in {Edinburgh Prolog}. Version 2.03. [BYTE, Oct 1990]. {(ftp://hcrl.open.ac.uk/pub/software/src/MIKE-v2.03)}. Contact: Marc Eisenstadt, HCRL, {Open University}. (1995-01-10)

MIKE {Micro Interpreter for Knowledge Engineering}

MIMIC "language" An early language designed by J.H. Andrews of the NIH in 1967 for solving engineering problems such as differential equations that would otherwise have been done on an {analog computer}. ["MIMIC, An Alternative Programming Language for Industrial Dynamics, N.D. Peterson, Socio-Econ Plan Sci. 6, Pergamon 1972]. (1995-01-19)

MIMIC ::: (language) An early language designed by J.H. Andrews of the NIH in 1967 for solving engineering problems such as differential equations that would otherwise have been done on an analog computer.[MIMIC, An Alternative Programming Language for Industrial Dynamics, N.D. Peterson, Socio-Econ Plan Sci. 6, Pergamon 1972]. (1995-01-19)

MITRE Corporation ::: (body) A US federally funded R&D center, spun off in 1958 from the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (also an FFRDC). MITRE is a non-profit corporation chartered to do R&D in the public interest.MITRE were responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight of SAGE.MITRE does not stand for MIT Research and Engineering, though it could have. . (1999-12-16)

MITRE Corporation "body" A US federally funded R&D center, spun off in 1958 from the {MIT Lincoln Laboratory} (also an FFRDC). MITRE is a non-profit corporation chartered to do R&D in the public interest. MITRE were responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight of {SAGE}. MITRE does not stand for MIT Research and Engineering, though it could have. {(http://mitre.org/)}. (1999-12-16)

MSG.84 "language" A language for the {functional specification} and module design phases of the {software life cycle}, first presented in Berzins and Gray's 1985 paper. Not unlike {PDL}. ["Analysis and design in MSG.84: formalizing functional specifications", Valdis Berzins, Michael Gray, Volume 11 Issue 8, IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Aug 1985]. (2003-05-15)

MSG.84 ::: (language) A language for the functional specification and module design phases of the software life cycle, first presented in Berzins and Gray's 1985 paper. Not unlike PDL.[Analysis and design in MSG.84: formalizing functional specifications, Valdis Berzins, Michael Gray, Volume 11 Issue 8, IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Aug 1985].(2003-05-15)

Murphy's Law "humour" (Or "Sod's Law") The correct, *original* Murphy's Law reads: "If there are two or more ways to do something, and one of those ways can result in a catastrophe, then someone will do it." This is a principle of defensive design, cited here because it is usually given in mutant forms less descriptive of the challenges of design for {lusers}. For example, you don't make a two-pin plug symmetrical and then label it "THIS WAY UP"; if it matters which way it is plugged in, then you make the design asymmetrical (see also the anecdote under {magic smoke}). Edward A. Murphy, Jr. was one of the engineers on the rocket-sled experiments that were done by the US Air Force in 1949 to test human acceleration tolerances (USAF project MX981). One experiment involved a set of 16 accelerometers mounted to different parts of the subject's body. There were two ways each sensor could be glued to its mount, and somebody methodically installed all 16 the wrong way around. Murphy then made the original form of his pronouncement, which the test subject (Major John Paul Stapp) quoted at a news conference a few days later. Within months "Murphy's Law' had spread to various technical cultures connected to aerospace engineering. Before too many years had gone by variants had passed into the popular imagination, changing as they went. Most of these are variants on "Anything that can go wrong, will"; this is sometimes referred to as {Finagle's Law}. The memetic drift apparent in these mutants clearly demonstrates Murphy's Law acting on itself! [{Jargon File}] (1998-02-14)

Murphy's Law ::: (humour) (Or Sod's Law) The correct, *original* Murphy's Law reads: If there are two or more ways to do something, and one of those ways can result in plugged in, then you make the design asymmetrical (see also the anecdote under magic smoke).Edward A. Murphy, Jr. was one of the engineers on the rocket-sled experiments that were done by the US Air Force in 1949 to test human acceleration tolerances around. Murphy then made the original form of his pronouncement, which the test subject (Major John Paul Stapp) quoted at a news conference a few days later.Within months Murphy's Law' had spread to various technical cultures connected to aerospace engineering. Before too many years had gone by variants had passed Finagle's Law. The memetic drift apparent in these mutants clearly demonstrates Murphy's Law acting on itself![Jargon File] (1998-02-14)

natural language processing (NLP) ::: A subfield of computer science, information engineering, and artificial intelligence concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages, in particular how to program computers to process and analyze large amounts of natural language data.

Neptune ::: A hypertext system for computer assisted software engineering, developed at Tektronix.

Neptune A hypertext system for computer assisted software engineering, developed at Tektronix.

neuromorphic engineering

NLX ::: (hardware, standard) A low-profile, low TCO motherboard design created jointly by Intel Corp., IBM, DEC and other PC vendors. In contrast to the bus data (despite Intel's stated intent to rid PC motherboards of the ISA bus by 2000).Version 1.2 of NLX is the final specification, and was frozen in March 1997. Minor modifications appear in the form of Engineering Change Requests. . .[NLX Motherboard Specification, various, pub. Intel Corp. 1997] (1998-09-21)

NLX "hardware, standard" A low-profile, low {TCO} {motherboard} design created jointly by {Intel Corp.}, {IBM}, {DEC} and other PC vendors. In contrast to the traditional single-board design, NLX uses a {riser} card to carry {PCI}, {ISA} and {AGP} {bus} data (despite {Intel}'s stated intent to rid PC motherboards of the {ISA} {bus} by 2000). Version 1.2 of NLX is the final specification, and was frozen in March 1997. Minor modifications appear in the form of "Engineering Change Requests". {(http://teleport.com/~nlx/)}. {Intel (http://intel.com/design/motherboard/nlx.htm)}. ["NLX Motherboard Specification", various, pub. Intel Corp. 1997] (1998-09-21)

Open Distributed System Architecture (ODSA) A research program sponsored by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. [Details?] (1995-02-09)

Open Distributed System Architecture ::: (ODSA) A research program sponsored by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.[Details?] (1995-02-09)

Pansophic ::: A US Software Engineering company.

Pansophic A US Software Engineering company.


   engineering notation - A floating point system in which numbers are expressed as products consisting of a number greater than one multiplied by an appropriate power of ten that is some multiple of three.



plasmid ::: n. --> A piece of DNA, usually circular, functioning as part of the genetic material of a cell, not integrated with the chromosome and replicating independently of the chromosome, but transferred, like the chromosome, to subsequent generations. In bacteria, plasmids often carry the genes for antibiotic resistance; they are exploited in genetic engineering as the vehicles for introduction of extraneous DNA into cells, to alter the genetic makeup of the cell. The cells thus altered may produce desirable proteins which are extracted and used; in

Post-scarcity - an alternative form of economics or social engineering in which goods, services and information are universally accessible. See /r/postscarcity

PROSE ::: 1. PROblem Solution Engineering. Numerical problems including differentiation and integration. Computing in Calculus, J. Thames, Research/Development 26(5) (May 1975).2. A constraints-and-sequencing system similar to Kaleidoscope. Reflexive Constraints for Dynamic Knowledge Bases, P. Berlandier et al in Proc First Intl CS Conf '88: AI: Theory and Appls, Dec 1988.

PROSE 1. PROblem Solution Engineering. Numerical problems including differentiation and integration. "Computing in Calculus", J. Thames, Research/Development 26(5) (May 1975). 2. A constraints-and-sequencing system similar to Kaleidoscope. "Reflexive Constraints for Dynamic Knowledge Bases", P. Berlandier et al in Proc First Intl CS Conf '88: AI: Theory and Appls, Dec 1988.

Quality Systems & Software Ltd. ::: (company) The company which produced the DOORS requirements engineering tool. They also provide consultancy as Requirements Engineering Ltd. .E-mail: Ian Alexander . (1995-11-11)

Quality Systems & Software Ltd. "company" The company which produced the {DOORS} requirements engineering tool. They also provide consultancy as Requirements Engineering Ltd. {(http://qss.co.uk/)}. E-mail: Ian Alexander "iany@easynet.co.uk", Amanda Haisman-Baker "100023.44@compuserve.com". (1995-11-11)

RAISE {Rigorous Approach to Industrial Software Engineering}

RAISE Specification Language "language" (RSL) (RAISE = Rigorous Approach to Industrial Software Engineering). A wide-spectrum specification and design language developed by {ESPRIT} Project 315 at {CRI} A/S, Denmark. Systems may be modular, {concurrent} and {nondeterministic}. Specifications may be {applicative} or {imperative}, explicit or implicit, abstract or concrete. ["The RAISE Specification Language", RAISE Language Group, P-H 1992, ISBN 0-13-752833-7]. (2007-10-02)

Rapid Application Development "programming" (RAD) A loose term for any {software life-cycle} designed to give faster development and better results and to take maximum advantage of recent advances in development software. RAD is associated with a wide range of approaches to software development: from hacking away in a {GUI builder} with little in the way of analysis and design to complete {methodologies} expanding on an {information engineering} framework. Some of the current RAD techniques are: {CASE} tools, {iterative life-cycles}, {prototyping}, {workshops}, {SWAT teams}, {timebox development}, and {Re-use} of applications, templates and code. {RAD at BSO/Den Haag (http://riv.nl/origin/company/denhaag/RAD.HTM)}. ["Rapid Application Development", James Martin]. (1995-09-23)

Rapid Application Development ::: (programming) (RAD) A loose term for any software life-cycle designed to give faster development and better results and to take maximum advantage of recent advances in development software.RAD is associated with a wide range of approaches to software development: from hacking away in a GUI builder with little in the way of analysis and design to complete methodologies expanding on an information engineering framework.Some of the current RAD techniques are: CASE tools, iterative life-cycles, prototyping, workshops, SWAT teams, timebox development, and Re-use of applications, templates and code. .[Rapid Application Development, James Martin]. (1995-09-23)

reconnoitre ::: v. t. --> To examine with the eye to make a preliminary examination or survey of; esp., to survey with a view to military or engineering operations.
To recognize.


Reengineering - Redesigning business processes. such as product design, to improve efficiency in the organisation.

re-engineering ::: The examination and modification of a system to reconstitute it in a new form and the subsequent implementation of the new form. . (1994-12-23)

re-engineering The examination and modification of a system to reconstitute it in a new form and the subsequent implementation of the new form. {(http://erg.abdn.ac.uk/users/brant/sre)}. (1994-12-23)

Regenerative medicine - deals with the "process of replacing, engineering or regenerating human cells, tissues or organs to restore or establish normal function".

Reichenbach, Hans: Born Sept. 26, 1891, Hamburg, Germany. Successively Privatdozent at the College of Engineering at Stuttgart, Professor of philosophy in the universities of Berlin, Istanbul (1933-1938), University of California at Los Angeles (since 1938); the leading figure of the Berlin group in the development of recent logical empiricism. See Scientific Empiricism.

Remedial Design ::: A phase of remedial action that follows the remedial investigation/ feasibility study and includes development of engineering drawings and specifications for a site cleanup.



Requirements Acquisition and Controlled Evolution ::: (programming, project) (RACE) A back to basics approach to requirements engineering. The method, is being pieced together through a series of Checkland and Wilson's Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) and this forms the core of the method. (1995-11-21)

Requirements Acquisition and Controlled Evolution "programming, project" (RACE) A "back to basics" approach to {requirements engineering}. The method, is being pieced together through a series of intermediate research studies. In essence, the approach has been to establish requirements for RACE, identify individual techniques that meet those requirements, experiment with the combined use of the techniques, and finally assemble the method. In practice, RACE has been influenced significantly by Checkland and Wilson's {Soft Systems Methodology} (SSM) and this forms the core of the method. (1995-11-21)

Requirements Engineering "programming" The task of capturing, structuring, and accurately representing the user's {requirements} so that they can be correctly embodied in systems which meet those requirements (i.e. are of good quality). {DOORS} is one product to help with this task. (1995-11-11)

Requirements Engineering ::: (programming) The task of capturing, structuring, and accurately representing the user's requirements so that they can be correctly embodied in systems which meet those requirements (i.e. are of good quality).DOORS is one product to help with this task. (1995-11-11)

Reverse engineering - A method of analysing a product's design by taking apart the product.

reverse engineering ::: (system, product, design) The process of analysing an existing system to identify its components and their interrelationships and create representations maintainability or to produce a copy of a system without access to the design from which it was originally produced.For example, one might take the executable code of a computer program, run it to study how it behaved with different input and then attempt to write a program be reverse engineered by an unscrupulous company wishing to make unlicensed copies of a popular chip. (1995-10-06)

reverse engineering "systems, product, design" The process of analysing an existing system to identify its components and their interrelationships and create representations of the system in another form or at a higher level of {abstraction}. Reverse engineering is usually undertaken in order to redesign the system for better maintainability or to produce a copy of a system without access to the design from which it was originally produced. For example, one might take the {executable code} of a computer program, run it to study how it behaved with different inputs and then attempt to write a program which behaved identically (or better). An {integrated circuit} might also be reverse engineered by an unscrupulous company wishing to make unlicensed copies of a popular chip. (1995-10-06)

robotics ::: An interdisciplinary branch of science and engineering that includes mechanical engineering, electronic engineering, information engineering, computer science, and others. Robotics deals with the design, construction, operation, and use of robots, as well as computer systems for their control, sensory feedback, and information processing.

RSL ::: RAISE Specification Language. (RAISE = Rigorous Approach to Industrial Software Engineering). A wide-spectrum specification and design language developed by nondeterministic. Specifications may be applicative or imperative, explicit or implicit, abstract or concrete.[The RAISE Specification Language, RAISE Language Group, P-H 1992, ISBN 0-13-752833-7].

RTEE ::: Real Time Engineering Environment: a set of CASE tools produced by Westmount Technology B.V.

RTEE Real Time Engineering Environment: a set of CASE tools produced by Westmount Technology B.V.

samurai A hacker who hires out for legal cracking jobs, snooping for factions in corporate political fights, lawyers pursuing privacy-rights and First Amendment cases, and other parties with legitimate reasons to need an electronic locksmith. In 1991, mainstream media reported the existence of a loose-knit culture of samurai that meets electronically on BBS systems, mostly bright teenagers with personal micros; they have modelled themselves explicitly on the historical samurai of Japan and on the "net cowboys" of William Gibson's {cyberpunk} novels. Those interviewed claim to adhere to a rigid ethic of loyalty to their employers and to disdain the vandalism and theft practiced by criminal crackers as beneath them and contrary to the hacker ethic; some quote Miyamoto Musashi's "Book of Five Rings", a classic of historical samurai doctrine, in support of these principles. See also {Stupids}, {social engineering}, {cracker}, {hacker ethic}, and {dark-side hacker}. [{Jargon File}]

samurai ::: A hacker who hires out for legal cracking jobs, snooping for factions in corporate political fights, lawyers pursuing privacy-rights and First Amendment Musashi's Book of Five Rings, a classic of historical samurai doctrine, in support of these principles.See also Stupids, social engineering, cracker, hacker ethic, and dark-side hacker.[Jargon File]

Science and Engineering Research Council ::: (body) (SERC) Formerly the largest of the five research councils funded by the British Government through the Office of Science and Technology. SERC Daresbury Laboratory, near Warrington; the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Cambridge and the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh.In April 1994 SERC was split into the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. SERC's remote Biotechnology and Biological Sciences RC. The two major SERC laboratories - Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and Daresbury Laboratory are now independent. . (1994-12-15)

Science and Engineering Research Council "body" (SERC) Formerly the largest of the five research councils funded by the British Government through the Office of Science and Technology. SERC funded higher education research in science and engineering, including computing and was responsible for the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, near Oxford; the Daresbury Laboratory, near Warrington; the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Cambridge and the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh. In April 1994 SERC was split into the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. SERC's remote sensing efforts have been transferred to the Natural Environment RC and its biotechnology efforts merged with the Agriculture and Food RC to make the new Biotechnology and Biological Sciences RC. The two major SERC laboratories - {Rutherford Appleton Laboratory} and Daresbury Laboratory are now independent. {(http://unixfe.rl.ac.uk/serc/serc.html)}. (1994-12-15)

SDL ::: Specification and Design Language.Defined by the ITU-T (recommendation Z100) to provide a tool for unambiguous specification and description of the behaviour of telecommunications systems. semantics. A system is specified as a set of interconnected abstract machines which are extensions of the Finite State Machine (FSM).1. System Software Development Language. System software for the B1700. System Software Development Language Reference Manual, 1081346, Burroughs Corp (Dec 1974).2. Specification and Description Language. ITU-T. Specification language with both graphical and character-based syntaxes for defining interacting extended Systems Engineering Using SDL, R. Saracco et al, N-H 1989. Available from Verilog, MD. (See XDL).3. Shared Dataspace Language. A Shared Dataspace Language Supporting Large-Scale Concurrency, G. Roman et al, Proc 8th Intl Conf Distrib Comp Sys, IEEE 1988, pp.265-272.4. Structure Definition Language. Used internally by DEC to define and generate the symbols used for VAX/VMS internal data structures in various languages.5. System Description Language. language used by the Eiffel/S implementation of Eiffel to assemble clusters into a system. (see Lace).

SDL Specification and Design Language. Defined by the {ITU-T} (recommendation Z100) to provide a tool for unambiguous specification and description of the behaviour of telecommunications systems. The area of application also includes process control and real-time applications. SDL provides a Graphic Representation (SDL/GR) and a textual Phrase Representation (SDL/PR), which are equivalent representations of the same semantics. A system is specified as a set of interconnected {abstract machines} which are extensions of the {Finite State Machine} (FSM). 1. System Software Development Language. System software for the B1700. "System Software Development Language Reference Manual", 1081346, Burroughs Corp (Dec 1974). 2. Specification and Description Language. {ITU-T}. Specification language with both graphical and character-based syntaxes for defining interacting extended finite state machines. Used to specify discrete interactive systems such as industrial process control, traffic control, and telecommunication systems. Proc Plenary Assembly, Melbourne 14-1988-11-25, Fasc X.1, CCITT. "Telecommunications Systems Engineering Using SDL", R. Saracco et al, N-H 1989. Available from Verilog, MD. (See XDL). 3. Shared Dataspace Language. "A Shared Dataspace Language Supporting Large-Scale Concurrency", G. Roman et al, Proc 8th Intl Conf Distrib Comp Sys, IEEE 1988, pp.265-272. 4. Structure Definition Language. Used internally by DEC to define and generate the symbols used for VAX/VMS internal data structures in various languages. 5. System Description Language. language used by the Eiffel/S implementation of Eiffel to assemble clusters into a system. (see Lace).

SE ::: 1. (software) software engineering.2. IBM Systems Engineer. (1998-07-08)

SE 1. "software" {software engineering}. 2. {IBM Systems Engineer}. (1998-07-08)

SEE ::: 1. Simultaneous Engineering Environment.2. Software Engineering Environment. (1999-04-26)

SEE 1. {Simultaneous Engineering Environment}. 2. {Software Engineering Environment}. (1999-04-26)

SEI ::: Software Engineering Institute.(Carnegie Mellon University).

SEI Software Engineering Institute. (Carnegie Mellon University).

Semi-Automatic Ground Environment ::: (project) (SAGE) The computer system of the old US Norad air defence system. SAGE was ground-breaking in many ways, such as being one of the first very large software projects and the first real-time system.MIT Lincoln Laboratory developed SAGE and MITRE Corporation was responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight. , , .[Confirm? Dates? Connection with MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics?] (1999-12-16)

Semi-Automatic Ground Environment "project" (SAGE) The computer system of the old US Norad air defence system. SAGE was ground-breaking in many ways, such as being one of the first very large software projects and the first {real-time} system. {MIT Lincoln Laboratory} developed SAGE and {MITRE Corporation} was responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight. {(http://togger.com/)}, {(http://jps.net/ethelen/sage.html)}, {(http://eskimo.com/%7Ewow-ray/sage28.html)}. [Confirm? Dates? Connection with MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics?] (1999-12-16)

SENDIT ::: Systems Engineering for Network Debugging, Integration and Test. A two-year European Commission funded project to produce software tools for distributed applications running on networks of microcontrollers. (1994-07-21)

SENDIT Systems Engineering for Network Debugging, Integration and Test. A two-year European Commission funded project to produce software tools for distributed applications running on networks of microcontrollers. (1994-07-21)

SERC {Science and Engineering Research Council}

Setup costs – Refers to expenses incurred each time a batch is produced. It consists of engineering cost of setting up the production runs or machines, paperwork cost of processing the work order, and ordering cost to provide raw materials for the batch.

simulation "simulation, systems" Attempting to predict aspects of the behaviour of some system by creating an approximate (mathematical) model of it. This can be done by physical modelling, by writing a special-purpose computer program or using a more general simulation package, probably still aimed at a particular kind of simulation (e.g. structural engineering, fluid flow). Typical examples are aircraft flight simlators or electronic circuit simulators. A great many {simulation languages} exist, e.g. {Simula}. See also {emulation}, {Markov chain}. (1995-02-23)

Simultaneous Engineering Environment (SEE) A {CAE} framework from {DAZIX}. (1994-11-03)

Simultaneous Engineering Environment ::: (SEE) A CAE framework from DAZIX. (1994-11-03)

Skel-ML A parallel variant of {ML} using {skeletons} being developed (April 1994) as part of Tore Bratvold's PhD in the Department of Computing and Electronic Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK. Programs are written in a subset of {Standard ML}, and parallelism is extracted from the use of certain {higher-order functions}. The SkelML compiler uses profiling information together with skeleton performance models to distinguish useful from non-useful parallelism. An important feature is the ability to perform transformations between skeletons to improve performance. Skeletons currently supported are map, filter, fold, pipe (implicitly extracted from function application) and various combinations of these. See also {paraML}. E-mail: Tore A Bratvold "tore@cee.hw.ac.uk".

Skel-ML ::: A parallel variant of ML using skeletons being developed (April 1994) as part of Tore Bratvold's PhD in the Department of Computing and Electronic Engineering, (implicitly extracted from function application) and various combinations of these.See also paraML.E-mail: Tore A Bratvold .

social engineering "jargon, security" A term used among {crackers} and {samurai} for cracking techniques that rely on weaknesses in {wetware} rather than software; the aim is to trick people into revealing passwords or other information that compromises a target system's security. Classic scams include phoning up a mark who has the required information and posing as a field service tech or a fellow employee with an urgent access problem. See also the {tiger team} story in the {patch} entry. [{Jargon File}] (2006-11-22)

social engineering ::: Term used among crackers and samurai for cracking techniques that rely on weaknesses in wetware rather than software; the aim is to trick people into information and posing as a field service tech or a fellow employee with an urgent access problem. See also the tiger team story in the patch entry.[Jargon File]

Softlab "company" A {software engineering} company strong in the UK and Germany. [Details?]

Softlab ::: (company) A software engineering company strong in the UK and Germany.[Details?]

software ::: A collection of data or computer instructions that tell the computer how to work. This is in contrast to physical hardware, from which the system is built and actually performs the work. In computer science and software engineering, computer software is all information processed by computer systems, programs and data. Computer software includes computer programs, libraries and related non-executable data, such as online documentation or digital media.

Software AG "company" A German {software engineering} company that started with the {ADABAS} {database}. {Natural} is their {4GL} development environment, {EntireX} is their {DCOM} for {Unix} and {IBM}. {BOLERO}, is an {object-oriented} development environment and {application server} specially made for Electronic Business applications. {(http://softwareag.com/)}. Mailing-list: "sag-l@uafsysb.uark.edu". (1999-03-06)

Software AG ::: (company) A German software engineering company that started with the ADABAS database. Natural is their 4GL development environment, EntireX is their DCOM for Unix and IBM. BOLERO, is an object-oriented development environment and application server specially made for Electronic Business applications. .Mailing-list: . (1999-03-06)

Software Engineering Environment (SEE) A set of management and technical tools to support software development, usually integrated in a coherent framework; equivalent to an {IPSE}. (1994-11-03)

Software Engineering Environment ::: (SEE) A set of management and technical tools to support software development, usually integrated in a coherent framework; equivalent to an IPSE. (1994-11-03)

software engineering "programming" (SE) A systematic approach to the analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of {software}. It often involves the use of {CASE} tools. There are various models of the {software life-cycle}, and many {methodologies} for the different phases. (1994-11-03)

software engineering ::: (programming) (SE) A systematic approach to the analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of software. It often involves the use of CASE tools. There are various models of the software life-cycle, and many methodologies for the different phases. (1994-11-03)

software engineering ::: The application of engineering to the development of software in a systematic method.[285][286][287]

Software Productivity Centre "body" (SPC) A non-profit organisation based in Vancouver, BC, Canada with the mandate to assist software developers to improve their {software engineering} process. (1998-10-13)

Software Productivity Centre ::: (body) (SPC) A non-profit organisation based in Vancouver, BC, Canada with the mandate to assist software developers to improve their software engineering process. (1998-10-13)

software ::: (programming) (Or computer program, program, code) The instructions executed by a computer, as opposed to the physical device on which they run (the hardware).The term was coined by the eminent statistician, John Tukey.Programs stored on non-volatile storage built from integrated circuits (e.g. ROM or PROM) are usually called firmware.Software can be split into two main types - system software and application software or application programs. System software is any software required to specific to any particular application. Examples of system software would include the operating system, compilers, editors and sorting programs.Examples of application programs would include an accounts package or a CAD program. Other broad classes of application software include real-time software, business software, scientific and engineering software, embedded software, personal computer software and artificial intelligence software.Software includes both source code written by humans and executable machine code produced by assemblers or compilers. It does not usually include the data (formulae and macros) and data. There are also various intermediate compiled or semi-compiled, forms of software such as library files and byte-code.Some claim that documentation (both paper and electronic) is also software. Others go further and define software to be programs plus documentation though this does not correspond with common usage.The noun program describes a single, complete and more-or-less self-contained list of instructions, often stored in a single file, whereas code and to suggest an interest in the implementation details whereas software is more of a user's term.(2002-07-21)

software "programming" (Or "computer program", "program", "code") The instructions executed by a computer, as opposed to the physical device on which they run (the "{hardware}"). The term was coined by the eminent statistician, {John Tukey}. Programs stored on {non-volatile storage} built from {integrated circuits} (e.g. {ROM} or {PROM}) are usually called {firmware}. Software can be split into two main types - {system software} and application software or {application programs}. System software is any software required to support the production or execution of application programs but which is not specific to any particular application. Examples of system software would include the {operating system}, {compilers}, editors and sorting programs. Examples of application programs would include an accounts package or a {CAD} program. Other broad classes of application software include {real-time} software, {business software}, scientific and engineering software, {embedded software}, personal computer software and {artificial intelligence} software. Software includes both {source code} written by humans and executable {machine code} produced by {assemblers} or {compilers}. It does not usually include the data processed by programs unless this is in a format such as {multimedia} which depends on the use of computers for its presentation. This distinction becomes unclear in cases such as {spread sheets} which can contain both instructions (formulae and {macros}) and data. There are also various intermediate compiled or {semi-compiled}, forms of software such as {library} files and {byte-code}. Some claim that {documentation} (both paper and electronic) is also software. Others go further and define software to be programs plus documentation though this does not correspond with common usage. The noun "program" describes a single, complete and more-or-less self-contained list of instructions, often stored in a single {file}, whereas "code" and "software" are uncountable nouns describing some number of instructions which may constitute one or more programs or part thereof. Most programs, however, rely heavily on various kinds of {operating system} software for their execution. The nounds "code" and "software" both refer to the same thing but "code" tends to suggest an interest in the implementation details whereas "software" is more of a user's term. (2002-07-21)

speech recognition ::: An interdisciplinary subfield of computational linguistics that develops methodologies and technologies that enables the recognition and translation of spoken language into text by computers. It is also known as automatic speech recognition (ASR), computer speech recognition or speech to text (STT). It incorporates knowledge and research in the linguistics, computer science, and electrical engineering fields.

spiral model "programming" A {software life-cycle} model which supposes incremental development, using the {waterfall model} for each step, with the aim of managing risk. In the spiral model, developers define and implement features in order of decreasing priority. [Barry Boehm, "A Spiral Model of Software Development and Enhancement", ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, August 1986]. [Barry Boehm "A Spiral Model of Software Development and Enhancement" IEEE Computer, vol.21,

spiral model ::: (programming) A software life-cycle model which supposes incremental development, using the waterfall model for each step, with the aim of managing risk. In the spiral model, developers define and implement features in order of decreasing priority.[Barry Boehm, A Spiral Model of Software Development and Enhancement, ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, August 1986].[Barry Boehm A Spiral Model of Software Development and Enhancement IEEE Computer, vol.21,

SSADM ::: A software engineering method and toolset required by some UK government agencies.

SSADM A software engineering method and toolset required by some UK government agencies.

Staff authority – Refers to the power to give advice, support, and service to line departments. Staff managers do not command others. Examples of staff authority are found in personnel, purchasing, engineering, and finance.

STRESS ::: STRuctual Engineering Systems Solver.A system for structural analysis problems in Civil Engineering. STRESS was superseded by STRUDL.[STRESS: A User's Manual, S.J. Fenves et al, MIT Press 1964].[Sammet 1969, p. 612]. (1995-01-31)

STRESS STRuctual Engineering Systems Solver. A system for structural analysis problems in Civil Engineering. STRESS was superseded by {STRUDL}. ["STRESS: A User's Manual", S.J. Fenves et al, MIT Press 1964]. [Sammet 1969, p. 612]. (1995-01-31)

structured analysis ::: One of a number of requirements analysis methods used in software engineering.

structured analysis One of a number of requirements analysis methods used in software engineering.

structured design "programming" (SD) One of a number of systematic {top-down design} techniques used in {software engineering}, usually after {structured analysis}. (1995-04-28)

structured design ::: (programming) (SD) One of a number of systematic top-down design techniques used in software engineering, usually after structured analysis. (1995-04-28)

STRUDL ::: STRUctured Design Language.Dynamic and finite-element analysis, steel and concrete structures. Subsystem of ICES. [ICES STRUDL-II Engineering User's Manual, R68-91, CE Dept MIT (Nov 1968) Sammet 1969, p.613].

STRUDL STRUctured Design Language. Dynamic and {finite-element analysis}, steel and concrete structures. Subsystem of {ICES}. ["ICES STRUDL-II Engineering User's Manual", R68-91, CE Dept MIT (Nov 1968) Sammet 1969, p.613].

superintelligence ::: A hypothetical agent that possesses intelligence far surpassing that of the brightest and most gifted human minds. Superintelligence may also refer to a property of problem-solving systems (e.g., superintelligent language translators or engineering assistants) whether or not these high-level intellectual competencies are embodied in agents that act within the physical world. A superintelligence may or may not be created by an intelligence explosion and be associated with a technological singularity.

Synthetic biology - the design and construction of biological devices and systems for useful purposes. It is an area of biological research and technology that combines biology and engineering, thus often overlapping with bioengineering and biomedical engineering. It encompasses a variety of different approaches, methodologies, and disciplines with a focus on engineering biology and biotechnology. See /r/Synthetic_Biology

Tbl ::: 1. A language by M.E. Lesk for formatting tables, implemented as a preprocessor to nroff. (1994-11-01)2. Table Building Language. A simple language by Robert Freiburghouse of MIT which combines user-defined actions into an abstract machine. It can be used to build table-driven predictive parsers and code generators in the MULTICS Fortran compiler and several PL/I compilers, including VAX-11 PL/I.[Engineering A Compiler: VAX-11 Code Generation and Optimisation, P. Anklam et al, Digital Press 1977]. (1994-11-01)

Tbl 1. A language by M.E. Lesk for formatting tables, implemented as a {preprocessor} to {nroff}. (1994-11-01) 2. Table Building Language. A simple language by Robert Freiburghouse of {MIT} which combines user-defined actions into an {abstract machine}. It can be used to build table-driven predictive {parsers} and {code generators} in the {MULTICS} {Fortran} compiler and several {PL/I} compilers, including {VAX}-11 PL/I. ["Engineering A Compiler: VAX-11 Code Generation and Optimisation", P. Anklam et al, Digital Press 1977]. (1994-11-01)

T-carrier system ::: (communications) A series of wideband digital data transmission formats originally developed by the Bell System and used in North America and Japan.The basic unit of the T-carrier system is the DS0, which has a transmission rate of 64 Kbps, and is commonly used for one voice circuit.Originally the 1.544 megabit per second T1 format carried 24 pulse-code modulated, time-division multiplexed speech signals each encoded in 64 kilobit circuits channels carry multiple T1 channels multiplexed, resulting in transmission rates of up to 44.736 Mbps.The T-carrier system uses in-band signaling or bit-robbing, resulting in lower transmission rates than the E-carrier system. It uses a restored polar signal with 303-type data stations.Asynchronous signals can be transmitted via a standard which encodes each change of level into three bits; two which indicate the time (within the current indicates the direction of the transition. Although wasteful of line bandwidth, such use is usually only over small distances.T1 lines are made free of direct current signal components by in effect capacitor coupling the signal at the transmitter and restoring that lost component with a slicer at the receiver, leading to the description restored polar.[Telecommunications Transmission Engineering, Vol. 2, Facilities, AT&T, 1977].(2001-04-08)

T-carrier system "communications" A series of wideband digital data transmission formats originally developed by the {Bell System} and used in North America and Japan. The basic unit of the T-carrier system is the {DS0}, which has a transmission rate of 64 Kbps, and is commonly used for one {voice circuit}. Originally the 1.544 megabit per second {T1} format carried 24 pulse-code modulated, time-division multiplexed speech signals each encoded in 64 kilobit per second streams, leaving 8 kilobits per second of framing information which facilitates the synchronisation and demultiplexing at the receiver. {T2} and {T3} circuits channels carry multiple T1 channels multiplexed, resulting in transmission rates of up to 44.736 Mbps. The T-carrier system uses {in-band signaling}, resulting in lower transmission rates than the {E-carrier system}. It uses a restored polar signal with {303-type} data stations. Asynchronous signals can be transmitted via a standard which encodes each change of level into three bits; two which indicate the time (within the current synchronous frame) at which the transition occurred, and the third which indicates the direction of the transition. Although wasteful of line bandwidth, such use is usually only over small distances. T1 lines are made free of direct current signal components by in effect capacitor coupling the signal at the transmitter and restoring that lost component with a "slicer" at the receiver, leading to the description "restored polar". [Telecommunications Transmission Engineering, Vol. 2, Facilities, AT&T, 1977]. (2001-04-08)

Technology of Object-Oriented Languages and Systems "event" (TOOLS) One of the oldest {object-oriented} conferences, with 18 published proceedings volumes. TOOLS is organised by {Interactive Software Engineering}. (1995-12-29)

Technology of Object-Oriented Languages and Systems ::: (event) (TOOLS) One of the oldest object-oriented conferences, with 18 published proceedings volumes. TOOLS is organised by Interactive Software Engineering. (1995-12-29)

Thang stong rgyal po. (Tangtong Gyalpo) (1361-1485). A great adept famed throughout the Tibetan Buddhist world for his illustrious career as a YOGIN and teacher, as well as his many contributions to the fields of engineering, metallurgy, temple construction, and the performing arts. His biographies credit him with a life span of 124 years, during which he traveled widely throughout Tibet and the Himālayan regions, including India, Ladakh, Mongolia, China, and Bhutan. As a youth he studied under numerous masters and spent much of early life in meditation retreat. He received, and is said to have mastered, the corpus of teachings of the SHANG PA BKA' BRGYUD sect as well as the BYANG GTER (Northern Treasure) tradition of the RNYING MA. He is venerated as a treasure revealer (GTER STON) who extracted treasure teachings (GTER MA) from the CHIMS PHU retreat complex near BSAM YAS monastery, from STAG TSHANG in Bhutan, and the region of TSA RI in southern Tibet. His best known teachings include instructions on the system known as "severance" (GCOD) and a visionary meditation SĀDHANA based on the bodhisattva of compassion AVALOKITEsVARA called 'Gro don mkha' khyab ma ("The Benefit of Others, Vast as Space"), which continues to be practiced by Tibetan Buddhists of many sectarian affiliations. Thang stong rgyal po is also remembered for his construction of iron chain-link bridges throughout Tibet and Bhutan-an activity inspired directly by visions of Avalokitesvara. For this reason, he is often called Lcags zam pa, literally the "Iron Bridge Man," and his lineage the "Iron Bridge" (lcags zam) tradition. He is most commonly depicted as holding links of iron chains in one hand. Thang stong rgyal po founded numerous geomantically important religious structures, including the great STuPA of GCUNG RI BO CHE in western Tibet, which became an important seat of the master's tradition, and the ZLUM BRTSEGS temple in Bhutan. Thang stong rgyal po is also traditionally acknowledged as the father of the Tibetan performing arts, with his image commonly displayed prior to theatrical performances.

The Mythical Man-Month "publication" Fred Brooks's excellent 1975 book on {software engineering}. See also {Brooks's Law}. ["The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering", Fred Brooks, Addison-Wesley, 1975, ISBN 0-201-00650-2]. (1996-06-20)

The Mythical Man-Month ::: (publication) Fred Brooks's excellent 1975 book on software engineering.See also Brooks's Law.[The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, Fred Brooks, Addison-Wesley, 1975, ISBN 0-201-00650-2]. (1996-06-20)

Tool Builder Kit "tool" (TBK) A product from {IPSYS} which allows users to develop {CASE} tools appropriate to any {software engineering} {methodology}. (1996-05-08)

Tool Builder Kit ::: (tool) (TBK) A product from IPSYS which allows users to develop CASE tools appropriate to any software engineering methodology. (1996-05-08)

top-level domain "networking" The last and most significant component of an {Internet} {fully qualified domain name}, the part after the last ".". For example, {host} wombat.doc.ic.ac.uk is in top-level domain "uk" (for United Kingdom). Every other country has its own top-level domain, including ".us" for the U.S.A. Within the .us domain, there are subdomains for the fifty states, each generally with a name identical to the state's postal abbreviation. These are rarely used however. Within the .uk domain, there is a .ac.uk subdomain for academic sites and a .co.uk domain for commercial ones. Other top-level domains may be divided up in similar ways. In the US and some other countries, the following top-level domains are used much more widely than the country code: .com - commercial bodies .edu - educational institutions .gov - U. S. government .mil - U. S. armed services .net - network operators .org - other organisations Since the rapid commercialisation of the Internet in the 1990s the ".com" domain has become particularly heavily populated with every company trying to register its company name as a subdomain of .com, e.g. "netscape.com" so as to make it easy for customers to guess or remember the {URL} of the comany's {home page}. United Nations entities use the domain names of the countries where they are located. The UN headquarters facility in New York City, for example, is un.org. Several new top-level domains are about to be added (Oct 1997): .nom - individual people .rec - recreational organisations .firm - businesses such as law, accounting, engineering .store - commercial retail companies .ent - entertainment facilities and organisations (1997-10-08)

Tree Transformation Language ::: (functional language, rule-based language) (TXL) A hybrid functional language and rule-based language developed by J.R. Cordy rapidly prototyping new languages and language processors. It uses structural transformation based on term rewriting.TXL has been particularly successful in software engineering tasks such as design recovery, refactoring, and reengineering. Most recently it has been applied to artificial intelligence tasks such as recognition of hand-written mathematics, and to transformation of structured documents in XML.TXL takes as input an arbitrary context-free grammar in extended BNF-like notation, and a set of show-by-example transformation rules to be applied to inputs parsed using the grammar. TXL supports the notion of agile parsing, the ability to tailor the grammar to each particular task using grammar overrides.Current version: FreeTXL 10.3, as of 2003-10-26. .[TXL: A Rapid Prototyping System for Programming Language Dialects, J.R. Cordy, C.D.; Halpern and D. Promislow, Computer Languages, Vol. 16, No. 1, January 1991, pp 97-107][Source Transformation in Software Engineering using the TXL Transformation System, J.R. Cordy, T.R. Dean, A.J. Malton and K.A. Schneider, Journal of Information and Software Technology, Vol. 44, No. 13, October 2002, pp 827-837][Recognizing Mathematical Expressions Using Tree Transformation, R. Zanibbi, D. Blostein and J.R. Cordy, IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis & Machine Intelligence, Vol. 24, No. 11, November 2002, pp 1455-1467][Agile Parsing in TXL, T.R. Dean, J.R. Cordy, A.J. Malton and K.A. Schneider, Journal of Automated Software Engineering, Vol. 10, No. 4, October 2003, pp 311-336](2003-11-04)

Tree Transformation Language "functional programming" (TXL) A hybrid {functional language} and {rule-based language} developed by J.R. Cordy "cordy@cs.queensu.ca" et al of {Queen's University}, Canada in 1988. TXL is suitable for performing {source to source analysis} and transformation and for {rapid prototyping} of new languages and language processors. It uses {structural transformation} based on {term rewriting}. TXL has been particularly successful in {software engineering} tasks such as {design recovery}, {refactoring}, and {reengineering}. Most recently it has been applied to {artificial intelligence} tasks such as recognition of hand-written mathematics, and to transformation of {structured documents} in {XML}. TXL takes as input an arbitrary {context-free grammar} in {extended BNF}-like notation, and a set of {show-by-example} transformation rules to be applied to inputs {parsed} using the grammar. TXL supports the notion of {agile parsing}, the ability to tailor the grammar to each particular task using "grammar overrides". {TXL Home (http://txl.ca/)}. ["TXL: A Rapid Prototyping System for Programming Language Dialects", J.R. Cordy, C.D.; Halpern and D. Promislow, Computer Languages, Vol. 16, No. 1, January 1991, pp 97-107] ["Source Transformation in Software Engineering using the TXL Transformation System", J.R. Cordy, T.R. Dean, A.J. Malton and K.A. Schneider, Journal of Information and Software Technology, Vol. 44, No. 13, October 2002, pp 827-837] ["Recognizing Mathematical Expressions Using Tree Transformation", R. Zanibbi, D. Blostein and J.R. Cordy, IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis & Machine Intelligence, Vol. 24, No. 11, November 2002, pp 1455-1467] ["Agile Parsing in TXL", T.R. Dean, J.R. Cordy, A.J. Malton and K.A. Schneider, Journal of Automated Software Engineering, Vol. 10, No. 4, October 2003, pp 311-336] (2003-11-04)

TSEE ::: Technical and Engineering Environment: part of the RTEE toolset.

TSEE Technical and Engineering Environment: part of the RTEE toolset.

Tunny Emulator "hardware, cryptography" A special-purpose computer designed at {Bletchley Park} (UK) based upon the reverse engineering of the Lorenz Cypher. The Lorenz Cypher was used by the German army to encrypt high command orders for transmission via teleprinter (the {Enigma} was a field-use cypher). Once the key to a message was discovered (by the computer {Colossus}) the Tunny machine would be set to decrypt the message. The process took about four days from intercept to printout. The original Tunny machine was built about 1943 and scrapped after the war. In 2011 a working model was re-built at Bletchley Park where it is on display. (2012-03-25)

Unified Modeling Language "language" (UML) A non-proprietary, third generation {modelling language}. The Unified Modeling Language is an open method used to specify, visualise, construct and document the artifacts of an {object-oriented} software-intensive system under development. The UML represents a compilation of "best engineering practices" which have proven successful in modelling large, complex systems. UML succeeds the concepts of {Booch}, {OMT} and {OOSE} by fusing them into a single, common and widely usable modelling language. UML aims to be a standard modelling language which can model {concurrent} and distributed systems. UML is not an {industry standard}, but is taking shape under the auspices of the {Object Management Group} (OMG). OMG has called for information on object-oriented methodologies, that might create a rigorous software modelling language. Many industry leaders have responded in earnest to help create the standard. See also: {STP}, {IDE}. {OMG UML Home (http://uml.org/)}. {Rational UML Resource Center (http://rational.com/uml/index.jsp)}. (2002-01-03)

Unified Modeling Language ::: (language) (UML) A non-proprietary, third generation modelling language. The Unified Modeling Language is an open method used to specify, visualise, system under development. The UML represents a compilation of best engineering practices which have proven successful in modelling large, complex systems.UML succeeds the concepts of Booch, OMT and OOSE by fusing them into a single, common and widely usable modelling language. UML aims to be a standard modelling language which can model concurrent and distributed systems.UML is not an industry standard, but is taking shape under the auspices of the Object Management Group (OMG). OMG has called for information on object-oriented methodologies, that might create a rigorous software modelling language. Many industry leaders have responded in earnest to help create the standard.See also: STP, IDE. . .(2002-01-03)

UNIFORM ::: An intermediate language developed for reverse engineering both COBOL and Fortran.[The REDO Compendium, H. van Zuylen ed, Wiley 1993]. (1994-12-06)

UNIFORM An intermediate language developed for reverse engineering both {COBOL} and {Fortran}. ["The REDO Compendium", H. van Zuylen ed, Wiley 1993]. (1994-12-06)

University of Twente ::: (body, education) A university in the east of The Netherlands for technical and social sciences. It was founded in 1961, making it one of the Computer Science; Electrical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Philosophy of science, Technology and Society; Educational Technology. . (1995-04-16)

University of Twente "body, education" A university in the east of The Netherlands for technical and social sciences. It was founded in 1961, making it one of the youngest universities in The Netherlands. It has 7000 students studying Applied Educational Science; Applied Mathematics; Applied Physics; Chemical Technology; Computer Science; Electrical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Philosophy of science, Technology and Society; Educational Technology. {(http://nic.utwente.nl/uthomuk.htm)}. (1995-04-16)

Value engineering - A procedure designed to reduce and avoid unnecessary costs before production begins.

Vannevar Bush "person" Dr. Vannevar Bush, 1890-1974. The man who invented {hypertext}, which he called {memex}, in the 1930s. Bush did his undergraduate work at Tufts College, where he later taught. His masters thesis (1913) included the invention of the Profile Tracer, used in surveying work to measure distances over uneven ground. In 1919, he joined {MIT}'s Department of Electrical Engineering, where he stayed for twenty-five years. In 1932, he was appointed vice-president and dean. At this time, Bush worked on optical and photocomposition devices, as well as a machine for rapid selection from banks of microfilm. Further positions followed: president of the Carnegie Institute in Washington, DC (1939); chair of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (1939); director of Office of Scientific Research and Development. This last role was as presidential science advisor, which made him personally responsible for the 6,000 scientists involved in the war effort. During World War II, Bush worked on radar antenna profiles and the calculation of artillery firing tables. He proposed the development of an {analogue computer}, which later became the {Rockefeller Differential Analyser}. Bush is the pivotal figure in hypertext research. His ground-breaking 1945 paper, "As We May Think," speculated on how a machine might be created to assist human reasoning, and introduced the idea of an easily accessible, individually configurable storehouse of knowledge. This machine, which he dubbed "memex," in various ways anticipated {hypermedia} and the {World Wide Web} by nearly half a century. {Electronic Labyrinth article (http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/elab/hfl0034.html)}. {Bush's famous article, "As We May Think" (http://theatlantic.com/unbound/flashbks/computer/bushf.htm)}. (2001-06-17)

vannevar ::: (jargon) /van'*-var/ A bogus technological prediction or a foredoomed engineering concept, especially one that fails by implicitly assuming that limit on areal density for integrated circuits that was in fact less than the routine densities of 5 years later.[Jargon File](2000-02-29)

vannevar "jargon" /van'*-var/ A bogus technological prediction or a foredoomed engineering concept, especially one that fails by implicitly assuming that technologies develop linearly, incrementally, and in isolation from one another when in fact the learning curve tends to be highly nonlinear, revolutions are common, and competition is the rule. The prototype was Vannevar Bush's prediction of "electronic brains" the size of the Empire State Building with a Niagara-Falls-equivalent cooling system for their tubes and relays, a prediction made at a time when the semiconductor effect had already been demonstrated. Other famous vannevars have included {magnetic-bubble memory}, {LISP machines}, {videotex}, and a paper from the late 1970s that computed a purported ultimate limit on areal density for {integrated circuits} that was in fact less than the routine densities of 5 years later. [{Jargon File}] (2000-02-29)

Verilog SA "company" A French {real-time software engineering} company. (1999-04-16)

Verilog SA ::: (company) A French real-time software engineering company. (1999-04-16)

Very useful in physics and engineering. The Fourier coefficients, that is, the coefiicients of the above series can be found by

ViewPoints ::: (programming) A framework for distributed and concurrent software engineering which provides an alternative approach to traditional centralised software development environments.Decentralised process models are used to drive consistency checking and conflict resolution. The process models use pattern matching on local development Communication between such process models facilitates the decentralised management of explicitly defined consistency constraints.[Ulf Leonhardt] (1995-03-27)

ViewPoints "programming" A framework for distributed and {concurrent} software engineering which provides an alternative approach to traditional centralised software development environments. Decentralised process models are used to drive consistency checking and conflict resolution. The process models use pattern matching on local development histories to determine the particular state of the development process, and employ rules to trigger situation-dependent assistance to the user. Communication between such process models facilitates the decentralised management of explicitly defined consistency constraints. [Ulf Leonhardt] (1995-03-27)

Vint Cerf "person" (Vinton G. Cerf) The co-inventor with {Bob Kahn} of the {Internet} and its base {protocol}, {TCP/IP}. Like {Jon Postel}, he was crucial in the development of many higher-level protocols, and has written several dozen {RFCs} since the late 1960s. Vinton Cerf is senior vice president of Internet Architecture and Technology for {MCI WorldCom}. His team of architects and engineers design advanced Internet frameworks for delivering a combination of data, information, voice and video services for business and consumer use. In December 1997, President Clinton presented the U.S. National Medal of Technology to Cerf and his partner, Robert E. Kahn, for founding and developing the Internet. Prior to rejoining MCI in 1994, Cerf was vice president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI). As vice president of MCI Digital Information Services from 1982-1986, he led the engineering of {MCI Mail}, the first commercial e-mail service to be connected to the Internet. During his tenure from 1976-1982 with the U.S. Department of {Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency} (DARPA), Cerf played a key role leading the development of Internet and Internet-related data packet and security technologies. Cerf served as founding president of the {Internet Society} from 1992-1995 and is currently chairman of the Board. Cerf is a member of the U.S. Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) and the Advisory Committee for Telecommunications (ACT) in Ireland. Cerf is a recipient of numerous awards and commendations in connection with his work on the Internet. In December 1994, People magazine identified Cerf as one of that year's "25 Most Intriguing People." In addition to his work on behalf of MCI and the Internet, Cerf serves as technical advisor to production for "Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict," the number one television show in first-run syndication. He also made a special guest appearance in May 1998. Cerf also holds an appointment as distinguished visiting scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he is working on the design of an interplanetary Internet. Cerf holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Stanford University and Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from UCLA. He also holds honorary Doctorate degrees from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich; Lulea University of Technology, Sweden; University of the Balearic Islands, Palma; Capitol College and Gettysburg College. {(http://mci.com/cerfsup/)}. (1999-02-25)

Vint Cerf ::: (person) (Vinton G. Cerf) The co-inventor with Bob Kahn of the Internet and its base protocol, TCP/IP. Like Jon Postel, he was crucial in the development of many higher-level protocols, and has written several dozen RFCs since the late 1960s.Vinton Cerf is senior vice president of Internet Architecture and Technology for MCI WorldCom. His team of architects and engineers design advanced Internet frameworks for delivering a combination of data, information, voice and video services for business and consumer use.In December 1997, President Clinton presented the U.S. National Medal of Technology to Cerf and his partner, Robert E. Kahn, for founding and developing the Internet.Prior to rejoining MCI in 1994, Cerf was vice president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI). As vice president of MCI Digital Information Services from 1982-1986, he led the engineering of MCI Mail, the first commercial e-mail service to be connected to the Internet.During his tenure from 1976-1982 with the U.S. Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Cerf played a key role leading the development of Internet and Internet-related data packet and security technologies.Cerf served as founding president of the Internet Society from 1992-1995 and is currently chairman of the Board. Cerf is a member of the U.S. Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) and the Advisory Committee for Telecommunications (ACT) in Ireland.Cerf is a recipient of numerous awards and commendations in connection with his work on the Internet. In December 1994, People magazine identified Cerf as one of that year's 25 Most Intriguing People.In addition to his work on behalf of MCI and the Internet, Cerf serves as technical advisor to production for Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict, visiting scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he is working on the design of an interplanetary Internet.Cerf holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Stanford University and Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from UCLA. He also Zurich; Lulea University of Technology, Sweden; University of the Balearic Islands, Palma; Capitol College and Gettysburg College. . (1999-02-25)

Virtual Software Factory "programming, tool" (VSF) A product from {Systematica} which allows users to develop {CASE} tools appropriate to any software engineering methodology. (1997-06-09)

Virtual Software Factory ::: (programming, tool) (VSF) A product from Systematica which allows users to develop CASE tools appropriate to any software engineering methodology. (1997-06-09)

Watcom International ::: (company) A provider of application development tools and IBM PC-based SQL database servers.Founded in 1974, Watcom initially focused on scientific and engineering markets establishing itself as a supplier of programming and information tools worldwide, serving customers in 60 countries with highly regarded products such as WATFOR-77 for mainframes, minicomputers and PCs.Since the introduction of Watcom C in 1988, the company has emerged as an industry leader in optimising compilers for 16 and 32-bit Intel-based IBM PCs.Moving into the client/server market in 1992, Watcom introduced Watcom SQL, including SQL database servers for multi-user networks and single-user Series. In June, 1993, Watcom launched VX*REXX, an integrated visual development environment for OS/2.In February 1994, Watcom became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Powersoft Corporation which merged with Sybase Inc. on 13 February 1995. Today the company addresses a broad range of application developers, including corporate MIS professionals, system integrators, VARs and independent software vendors.Watcom has strategic relationships with IBM, Lotus, Microsoft, Intel and Novell. Based on its academic roots, Watcom maintains a research relationship with the nearby University of Waterloo.Watcom's products include the Watcom SQL databases, Watcom C/C++, and Watcom VX*REXX 2.1.Ian McPhee is President and Chief Executive Officer, David Boswell is Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Craig Dynes is Vice President of Finance and David Yach is Vice President of Development.Headquarters: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. (1995-04-18)

Watcom International "company" A provider of application development tools and {IBM PC}-based {SQL} {database} {servers}. Founded in 1974, Watcom initially focused on scientific and engineering markets establishing itself as a supplier of programming and information tools worldwide, serving customers in 60 countries with highly regarded products such as {WATFOR}-77 for {mainframes}, {minicomputers} and {PCs}. Since the introduction of {Watcom C} in 1988, the company has emerged as an industry leader in optimising compilers for 16 and 32-bit {Intel-based} {IBM PCs}. Moving into the {client/server} market in 1992, Watcom introduced {Watcom SQL}, including {SQL} {database} {servers} for multi-user networks and single-user {stand-alone} applications. The product has since been incorporated into {Powersoft}'s {PowerBuilder} development environment and the {Powersoft Enterprise Series}. In June, 1993, Watcom launched {VX*REXX}, an integrated visual development environment for {OS/2}. In February 1994, Watcom became a wholly-owned subsidiary of {Powersoft Corporation} which merged with {Sybase Inc.} on 13 February 1995. Today the company addresses a broad range of application developers, including corporate {MIS} professionals, system integrators, {VARs} and independent software vendors. Watcom has strategic relationships with {IBM}, {Lotus}, {Microsoft}, {Intel} and {Novell}. Based on its academic roots, Watcom maintains a research relationship with the nearby {University of Waterloo}. Watcom's products include the {Watcom SQL} {databases}, {Watcom C/C++}, and {Watcom VX*REXX} 2.1. Ian McPhee is President and Chief Executive Officer, David Boswell is Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Craig Dynes is Vice President of Finance and David Yach is Vice President of Development. Headquarters: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. (1995-04-18)

Westmount "company" A Dutch software engineering vendor of {RTEE} and other products. (1998-04-27)

Westmount ::: (company) A Dutch software engineering vendor of RTEE and other products. (1998-04-27)

winchester ::: (hardware) An informal generic term for floating-head magnetic disk drives in which the read-write head planes over the disk surface on an air cushion.The name arose because the original 1973 engineering prototype for what later became the IBM 3340 featured two 30-megabyte volumes; 30--30 became Winchester rifle (in the latter, the first 30 referred to caliber and the second to the grain weight of the charge).[Jargon File] (1994-12-06)

winchester "hardware" An informal generic term for floating head {magnetic disk} drives in which the read-write head planes over the disk surface on an air cushion. The name arose because the original 1973 engineering prototype for what later became the {IBM 3340} featured two 30-megabyte volumes; 30--30 became "Winchester" when somebody noticed the similarity to the common term for a famous Winchester rifle (in the latter, the first 30 referred to caliber and the second to the grain weight of the charge). [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-06)

Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) A well-regarded, small engineering college. Address: Worcester, MA, USA. (1995-03-01)

Worcester Polytechnic Institute ::: (WPI) A well-regarded, small engineering college.Address: Worcester, MA, USA. (1995-03-01)

XperCASE ::: A structure diagram editor for developing, re-engineering, maintaining and documenting programs, developed by Siemens AG, Austria. It runs under Microsoft Windows. .E-Mail: . (1994-12-01)

XperCASE A structure diagram editor for developing, re-engineering, maintaining and documenting programs, developed by {Siemens} AG, Austria. It runs under {Microsoft Windows}. {(ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/computing/systems/ibmpc/simtel/windows3/xperspx1.zip)}. E-Mail: "100141.2120@compuserve.com". (1994-12-01)

Xv++ ::: A library of classes from Interface Engineering, Stevenage, providing a C++ Application Programmer's Interface to the XView toolkit.

Xv++ A library of classes from Interface Engineering, Stevenage, providing a C++ Application Programmer's Interface to the XView toolkit.

Yourdon, Inc. ::: (company) The company founded in 1974 by Edward Yourdon to provide educational, publishing, and consulting services in state-of-the-art software computer books on a wide range of software engineering topics; many of these classics are used as standard university computer science textbooks. (1995-04-16)

Yourdon, Inc. "company" The company founded in 1974 by {Edward Yourdon} to provide educational, publishing, and consulting services in state-of-the-art software engineering technology. Over the next 12 years, the company grew to a staff of over 150 people, with offices throughout North America and Europe. As CEO of the company, Yourdon oversaw an operation that trained over 250,000 people around the world; the company was sold in 1986 and eventually became part of {CGI}, the French software company that is now part of {IBM}. The publishing division, Yourdon Press (now part of Prentice Hall), has produced over 150 technical computer books on a wide range of software engineering topics; many of these "classics" are used as standard university computer science textbooks. (1995-04-16)

Yourdon methodology "programming" The {software engineering} {methodology} developed by {Edward Yourdon} and colleagues in the 1970s and 1980s. "Yourdon methodology" is a generic term for all of the following methodologies: {Yourdon/Demarco}, {Yourdon/Constantine}, {Coad/Yourdon}. (1995-04-07)

Yourdon methodology ::: (programming) The software engineering methodology developed by Edward Yourdon and colleagues in the 1970s and 1980s. Yourdon methodology is a generic term for all of the following methodologies: Yourdon/Demarco, Yourdon/Constantine, Coad/Yourdon. (1995-04-07)



QUOTES [7 / 7 - 1065 / 1065]


KEYS (10k)

   2 Peter J Carroll
   2 Alfred Korzybski
   1 Wikipedia
   1 Nikola Tesla
   1 Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   43 Anonymous
   32 Walter Isaacson
   12 Peter Thiel
   11 Ashlee Vance
   10 Bill Gates
   9 Robert A Heinlein
   8 Noam Chomsky
   8 Gene Kim
   7 Neil deGrasse Tyson
   7 Neal Stephenson
   7 Laszlo Bock
   7 Ben Horowitz
   6 Pedro Domingos
   6 Dale Carnegie
   6 Christopher McDougall
   5 Kevin Mitnick
   5 Frederick P Brooks Jr
   5 Eric Ries
   5 Elon Musk
   5 Cathy O Brien

1:The occult priest should be capable of instructing anyone in the procedures of emotional engineering. The main methods are the gnostic ones of casting oneself into a frenzied ecstacy, stilling the mind to a point of absolute quiescence, and evoking the laughter of the gods by combining laughter with the contemplation of paradox.
   ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
2:A superintelligence is a hypothetical agent that possesses intelligence far surpassing that of the brightest and most gifted human minds. Superintelligence may also refer to a property of problem-solving systems (e.g., superintelligent language translators or engineering assistants) whether or not these high-level intellectual competencies are embodied in agents that act in the world.
   ~ Wikipedia,
3:If the magician wishes to put himself into or out of any emotional state, then he should be provided with the techniques to accomplish this. The process requires no justification
   - that he wills it is sufficient. One cannot escape emotional experience in a human incarnation, and it is preferable to adopt a master rather than a slave relationship to it. The occult priest should be capable of instructing anyone in the procedures of emotional engineering. The main methods are the gnostic ones of casting oneself into a frenzied ecstacy, stilling the mind to a point of absolute quiescence, and evoking the laughter of the gods by combining laughter with the contemplation of paradox. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
4:Every human acheivement, be it a scientific discovery, a picture, a statue, a temple, a home or a bridge, has to be conceived in the mind first-the plan thought out-before it can be made a reality, and when anything is to be attempted that involves any number of individuals-methods of coordination have to be considered-the methods have to be the best suited for such undertakings are engineering methods-the engineering of an idea towards a complete realization. Every engineer has to know the materials with which he has to work and the natural laws of these materials, as discovered by observation and experiment and formulated by mathematics and mechanics else he can not calculate the forces at his disposal; he can not compute the resistance of his materials; he can not determine the capacity and requirements of his power plant; in short, he can not make the most profitable use of his resources. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
5:The scientists, all of them, have their duties no doubt, but they do not fully use their education if they do not try to broaden their sense of responsibility toward all mankind instead of closing themselves up in a narrow specialization where they find their pleasure. Neither engineers nor other scientific men have any right to prefer their own personal peace to the happiness of mankind; their place and their duty are in the front line of struggling humanity, not in the unperturbed ranks of those who keep themselves aloof from life. If they are indifferent, or discouraged because they feel or think that they know that the situation is hopeless, it may be proved that undue pessimism is as dangerous a "religion" as any other blind creed. Indeed there is very little difference in kind between the medieval fanaticism of the "holy inquisition," and modern intolerance toward new ideas. All kinds of intellect must get together, for as long as we presuppose the situation to be hopeless, the situation will indeed be hopeless. The spirit of Human Engineering does not know the word "hopeless"; for engineers know that wrong methods are alone responsible for disastrous results, and that every situation can be successfully handled by the use of proper means. The task of engineering science is not only to know but to know how. Most of the scientists and engineers do not yet realize that their united judgment would be invincible; no system or class would care to disregard it. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
6:My method is different. I do not rush into actual work. When I get an idea, I start at once building it up in my imagination. I change the construction, make improvements and operate the device in my mind. It is absolutely immaterial to me whether I run my turbine in thought or test it in my shop. I even note if it is out of balance. There is no difference whatever; the results are the same. In this way I am able to rapidly develop and perfect a conception without touching anything. When I have gone so far as to embody in the invention every possible improvement I can think of and see no fault anywhere, I put into concrete form this final product of my brain. Invariably my device works as I conceived that it should, and the experiment comes out exactly as I planned it. In twenty years there has not been a single exception. Why should it be otherwise? Engineering, electrical and mechanical, is positive in results. There is scarcely a subject that cannot be examined beforehand, from the available theoretical and practical data. The carrying out into practice of a crude idea as is being generally done, is, I hold, nothing but a waste of energy, money, and time. My early affliction had however, another compensation. The incessant mental exertion developed my powers of observation and enabled me to discover a truth of great importance. I had noted that the appearance of images was always preceded by actual vision of scenes under peculiar and generally very exceptional conditions, and I was impelled on each occasion to locate the original impulse. After a while this effort grew to be almost automatic and I gained great facility in connecting cause and effect. Soon I became aware, to my surprise, that every thought I conceived was suggested by an external impression. Not only this but all my actions were prompted in a similar way. In the course of time it became perfectly evident to me that I was merely an automation endowed with power OF MOVEMENT RESPONDING TO THE STIMULI OF THE SENSE ORGANS AND THINKING AND ACTING ACCORDINGLY.

   ~ Nikola Tesla, The Strange Life of Nikola Tesla,
7:64 Arts
   1. Geet vidya: art of singing.
   2. Vadya vidya: art of playing on musical instruments.
   3. Nritya vidya: art of dancing.
   4. Natya vidya: art of theatricals.
   5. Alekhya vidya: art of painting.
   6. Viseshakacchedya vidya: art of painting the face and body with color
   7. Tandula­kusuma­bali­vikara: art of preparing offerings from rice and flowers.
   8. Pushpastarana: art of making a covering of flowers for a bed.
   9. Dasana­vasananga­raga: art of applying preparations for cleansing the teeth, cloths and painting the body.
   10. Mani­bhumika­karma: art of making the groundwork of jewels.
   11. Aayya­racana: art of covering the bed.
   12. Udaka­vadya: art of playing on music in water.
   13. Udaka­ghata: art of splashing with water.
   14. Citra­yoga: art of practically applying an admixture of colors.
   15. Malya­grathana­vikalpa: art of designing a preparation of wreaths.
   16. Sekharapida­yojana: art of practically setting the coronet on the head.
   17. Nepathya­yoga: art of practically dressing in the tiring room.
   18. Karnapatra­bhanga: art of decorating the tragus of the ear.
   19. Sugandha­yukti: art of practical application of aromatics.
   20. Bhushana­yojana: art of applying or setting ornaments.
   21. Aindra­jala: art of juggling.
   22. Kaucumara: a kind of art.
   23. Hasta­laghava: art of sleight of hand.
   24. Citra­sakapupa­bhakshya­vikara­kriya: art of preparing varieties of delicious food.
   25. Panaka­rasa­ragasava­yojana: art of practically preparing palatable drinks and tinging draughts with red color.
   26. Suci­vaya­karma: art of needleworks and weaving.
   27. Sutra­krida: art of playing with thread.
   28. Vina­damuraka­vadya: art of playing on lute and small drum.
   29. Prahelika: art of making and solving riddles.
   30. Durvacaka­yoga: art of practicing language difficult to be answered by others.
   31. Pustaka­vacana: art of reciting books.
   32. Natikakhyayika­darsana: art of enacting short plays and anecdotes.
   33. Kavya­samasya­purana: art of solving enigmatic verses.
   34. Pattika­vetra­bana­vikalpa: art of designing preparation of shield, cane and arrows.
   35. Tarku­karma: art of spinning by spindle.
   36. Takshana: art of carpentry.
   37. Vastu­vidya: art of engineering.
   38. Raupya­ratna­pariksha: art of testing silver and jewels.
   39. Dhatu­vada: art of metallurgy.
   40. Mani­raga jnana: art of tinging jewels.
   41. Akara jnana: art of mineralogy.
   42. Vrikshayur­veda­yoga: art of practicing medicine or medical treatment, by herbs.
   43. Mesha­kukkuta­lavaka­yuddha­vidhi: art of knowing the mode of fighting of lambs, cocks and birds.
   44. Suka­sarika­pralapana: art of maintaining or knowing conversation between male and female cockatoos.
   45. Utsadana: art of healing or cleaning a person with perfumes.
   46. Kesa­marjana­kausala: art of combing hair.
   47. Akshara­mushtika­kathana: art of talking with fingers.
   48. Dharana­matrika: art of the use of amulets.
   49. Desa­bhasha­jnana: art of knowing provincial dialects.
   50. Nirmiti­jnana: art of knowing prediction by heavenly voice.
   51. Yantra­matrika: art of mechanics.
   52. Mlecchita­kutarka­vikalpa: art of fabricating barbarous or foreign sophistry.
   53. Samvacya: art of conversation.
   54. Manasi kavya­kriya: art of composing verse
   55. Kriya­vikalpa: art of designing a literary work or a medical remedy.
   56. Chalitaka­yoga: art of practicing as a builder of shrines called after him.
   57. Abhidhana­kosha­cchando­jnana: art of the use of lexicography and meters.
   58. Vastra­gopana: art of concealment of cloths.
   59. Dyuta­visesha: art of knowing specific gambling.
   60. Akarsha­krida: art of playing with dice or magnet.
   61. Balaka­kridanaka: art of using children's toys.
   62. Vainayiki vidya: art of enforcing discipline.
   63. Vaijayiki vidya: art of gaining victory.
   64. Vaitaliki vidya: art of awakening master with music at dawn.
   ~ Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger, Sexual Secrets,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:The greatest engineering is the engineering of men. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
2:You can do reverse engineering, but you can’t do reverse hacking. ~ francis-crick, @wisdomtrove
3:Science can amuse and fascinate us all, but it is engineering that changes the world. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
4:Man is a creative animal, doomed to strive toward a goal, engaged in full-time engineering. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
5:In the hands of a genius, engineering turns to magic, philosophy becomes poetry, and science pure imagination. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
6:The advance of genetic engineering makes it quite conceivable that we will begin to design our own evolutionary progress. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
7:I don't spend my time pontificating about high-concept things; I spend my time solving engineering and manufacturing problems. ~ elon-musk, @wisdomtrove
8:To strive consciously for an object and to engage in engineering - that is, incessantly and eternally to make new roads, wherever they may lead. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
9:I have no degree in biochemistry, neither do I have one in mechanical engineering, as the Army saw fit to terminate both courses before they were finished. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
10:George Washington was quite a farmer. He was a farmer, Civil Engineer and gentleman. He made enough at civil engineering to indulge in both the other luxuries. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
11:Recession doesn't deserve the right to exist. There are just too many things to be done in science and engineering to be bogged down by temporary economic dislocations. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
12:In engineering, that only is great which achieves. It matters not what the intention is, he who in the day of battle is not victorious is not saved by his intention. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
13:About 15 percent of one’s financial success is due to one’s technical knowledge and about 85 percent is due to skill in human engineering—to personality and the ability to lead people. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
14:We are intelligent atoms. We are intelligent organic structures. We can change who we are. We can heal ourselves. With genetic engineering, we are considering changing the physiological structure of the body. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
15:Even in such technical lines as engineering, about 15% of one's financial success is due one's technical knowledge and about 85% is due to skill in human engineering, to personality and the ability to lead people. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
16:Bicycles are pieces of art. You get that combination of kinetic engineering, but then, besides the welds, the paint jobs, the kind of the sculpture of it all is quite beautiful. Bikes have such great lines, and all different styles. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
17:The inspirational value of the space program is probably of far greater importance to education than any input of dollars... A whole generation is growing up which has been attracted to the hard disciplines of science and engineering by the romance of space. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
18:The engineering is long gone in most PC companies. In the consumer electronics companies, they don't understand the software parts of it. And so you really can't make the products that you can make at Apple anywhere else right now. Apple's the only company that has everything under one roof. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
19:At Tesla, we’ve never spent any money on advertising. We’ve put all our money into R&D, engineering, design, and manufacturing to build the best car possible. When we consider spending money, we ask, &
20:Atlantis was a highly evolved civilization where the sciences and arts were far more advanced than one might guess. Atlantis was technologically advanced in genetic engineering, computer science, inter-dimensional physics, and artistically developed with electronic music and crystal art forms. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
21:With the subsequent strong support from cybernetics , the concepts of systems thinking and systems theory became integral parts of the established scientific language, and led to numerous new methodologies and applications - systems engineering, systems analysis, systems dynamics, and so on. ~ fritjof-capra, @wisdomtrove
22:Science is dangerous. There is no question but that poison gas, genetic engineering, and nuclear weapons and power stations are terrifying. It may be that civilization is falling apart and the world we know is coming to an end. In that case, why no turn to religion and look forward to the Day of Judgment, ... [being] lifted into eternal bliss ... [and] watching the scoffers and disbelievers writhe forever in torment. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
23:Leonardo did not pursue science and engineering in order to dominate nature, as Francis Bacon would advocate a century later, but always tried to learn as much as possible from nature. He was in awe of the beauty he saw in the complexity of natural forms, patterns, and processes, and aware that nature’s ingenuity was far superior to human design. Accordingly, he often used natural processes and structures as models for his own designs. ~ fritjof-capra, @wisdomtrove
24:I will build a car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family, but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one - and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in God's great open spaces. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Software engineering economics. ~ Barry Boehm,
2:I knew it had to do with engineering, ~ Anonymous,
3:Engineering stimulates the mind. ~ Bruce Dickinson,
4:Engineering is a creative practice. ~ Cory Arcangel,
5:Copying is about reverse-engineering. ~ Austin Kleon,
6:I do engineering, not religion. ~ Daniel J Bernstein,
7:Engineering, this is ops! Status report! ~ David Mack,
8:Style is engineering that gives you freedom. ~ Chris Bangle,
9:The engineering is secondary to the vision. ~ Cynthia Ozick,
10:Architecture begins where engineering ends. ~ Walter Gropius,
11:Bold objects require conservative engineering. ~ James E Webb,
12:we really fucked up the engineering on this ~ Walter Isaacson,
13:I like engineering, but I love the creative input. ~ John Dykstra,
14:Engineering is easy. People are hard.” — Bill Coughran ~ Anonymous,
15:Engineering without imagination sinks to a trade. ~ Herbert Hoover,
16:Lyrics (Taylor Engineering) - Your Bookmark on Location ~ Anonymous,
17:Engineering is not quite as important as imagination. ~ Satoru Iwata,
18:Engineering is too important to wait for science. ~ Benoit Mandelbrot,
19:Engineering is the art or science of making practical. ~ Samuel Florman,
20:copy of an aerial photo from the engineering department. ~ John Sandford,
21:Code reuse is the Holy Grail of Software Engineering. ~ Douglas Crockford,
22:Don't ask me to put up a shelf, but I love engineering. ~ Bruce Dickinson,
23:We don’t matriculate engineering as a major for females, ~ Denise Kiernan,
24:The greatest engineering is the engineering of men. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
25:The more physics you have the less engineering you need. ~ Ernest Rutherford,
26:Engineering is easy - it's the people problems that are hard. ~ Temple Grandin,
27:freedom of expression is great for art, but lousy for engineering. ~ Mark Lutz,
28:Software is a great combination between artistry and engineering. ~ Bill Gates,
29:Engineering is the closest thing to magic that exists in the world. ~ Elon Musk,
30:You can do reverse engineering, but you can’t do reverse hacking. ~ Francis Crick,
31:I don't know technology and engineering. I don't know accounting. ~ Bernard Ebbers,
32:Social engineering bypasses all technologies, including firewalls. ~ Kevin Mitnick,
33:I was going to engineering school but fell in love with physics. ~ Leonard Susskind,
34:Engineering Research Facility in Quantico have not been foremost ~ Patricia Cornwell,
35:Engineering is a jeans and hoodie culture, and sales is more formal. ~ Susan Wojcicki,
36:The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
37:One person's "paranoia" is another person's "engineering redundancy." ~ Marcus J Ranum,
38:Aviation is the branch of engineering that is least forgiving of mistakes. ~ Freeman Dyson,
39:Every living thing, never forget, is a wonder of atomic engineering. Indeed, ~ Bill Bryson,
40:Software engineering is not about right and wrong but only better and worse ~ Ellen Ullman,
41:Social Engineering - The art of replacing what works with what sounds good. ~ Thomas Sowell,
42:Computer science was then generally a subdepartment of electrical engineering, ~ Ellen Ullman,
43:If I were 21 years old, I would go into biotechnology or genetic engineering. ~ Larry Ellison,
44:I look most like myself... when I'm wearing my black, nerdy engineering glasses. ~ Junot Diaz,
45:Three Chilean engineering students have designed a bicycle that cannot be stolen. ~ Anonymous,
46:No one expected a first year engineering student to build the perfect bridge. ~ Janet Evanovich,
47:The purpose of software engineering is to control complexity, not to create it. ~ Jon L Bentley,
48:What's nice about having an engineering degree is everybody thinks you are smart. ~ Ato Essandoh,
49:Engineering, I think you can pick up. [A data scientist's] curiosity is built-in ~ Scott Nicholson,
50:No engineering technology is remotely as complicated in its workings as the cell. ~ W Brian Arthur,
51:One man's 'magic' is another man's engineering. 'Supernatural' is a null word. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
52:One man’s “magic” is another man’s engineering. “Supernatural” is a null word. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
53:Skype has a great engineering team, which I like to describe as 'all of Estonia.' ~ Marc Andreessen,
54:The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art.” —Leonardo da Vinci ~ Katy Bowman,
55:communication engineering began with Gauss, Wheatstone, and the first telegraphers. ~ Norbert Wiener,
56:Science can amuse and fascinate us all, but it is engineering that changes the world. ~ Isaac Asimov,
57:Technology and Heterogeneous Engineering: The Case of Portuguese Expansion John Law ~ Wiebe E Bijker,
58:The world's first university chair in engineering was founded in Glasgow in 1840.2'x ~ Thomas Sowell,
59:Art and design are not luxuries, nor somehow incompatible with science and engineering. ~ Bran Ferren,
60:I saw in the logs that you’ve ordered engineering crews to modify the HADES IV missiles. ~ Ken Lozito,
61:Standard engineering delivers artifacts; exploratory engineering delivers knowledge. ~ K Eric Drexler,
62:When the possibility of profit enters the situation, the engineering problem changes. ~ Dexter Palmer,
63:He was raised by wolves", she said, "wolves with pressing engineering diagrams to draw. ~ Sam Starbuck,
64:I believe in the unlimited power of women in the context of science and engineering. ~ Elizabeth Holmes,
65:I came to speak ill of Swedish engineering, and so diddled myself out of a Nobel Prize. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
66:American science and engineering was even more sexist than it is today,” Jennings said. ~ Walter Isaacson,
67:photosynthesis: a feat of chemical engineering underpinning creation’s entire cathedral. ~ Richard Powers,
68:What made Manhattan Manhattan was the underground infrastructure, that engineering marvel. ~ Andrew Cuomo,
69:Enlightened social engineering is required to face situations that demand global action now. ~ John Goodlad,
70:I studied engineering in the national university, the Universidad Autonoma, in San Ildefonso. ~ Carlos Slim,
71:Never forget that the word that best describes reliable science is not consensus, but engineering. ~ Vox Day,
72:A classic engineering mistake and one I've made is confusing what is hard and what is valuable. ~ Max Levchin,
73:Once confined to fantasy and science fiction, time travel is now simply an engineering problem. ~ Michio Kaku,
74:Genetic engineering is a result of science advancement, so I don't think that in itself is bad. ~ Hideo Kojima,
75:It is impossible to work in information technology without also engaging in social engineering. ~ Jaron Lanier,
76:growth on the consumer Internet sits precisely at the intersection of engineering and human nature. ~ Anonymous,
77:Man is a creative animal, doomed to strive toward a goal, engaged in full-time engineering. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
78:Never in the annals of software engineering was so much owed by so many to so few lines of code ~ Martin Fowler,
79:I think the ethics and morals of genetic engineering are very complicated. It intrigues me. ~ Roger Spottiswoode,
80:Software Engineering might be science; but that's not what I do. I'm a hacker, not an engineer. ~ Jamie Zawinski,
81:There’s a saying in engineering: You can build things cheap, fast, or right, but not all three. ~ Temple Grandin,
82:Those braces are a goddamn feat of engineering genius,” he said. “You take after your old man. ~ Jeannette Walls,
83:... engineering is a basic instinct in man, the expression of which is existentially fulfilling. ~ Samuel Florman,
84:Our engineering departments build freeways which destroy a city or a landscape, in the process. ~ Arthur Erickson,
85:A great feat of engineering is an object of perpetual interest to people bent on self-destruction ~ Michael Chabon,
86:Anyone with an engineering frame of mind will look at [accounting standards] and want to throw up. ~ Charlie Munger,
87:Engineering isn't about perfect solutions; it's about doing the best you can with limited resources. ~ Randy Pausch,
88:Basically, if I have no intention of using a service then I won't bother reverse-engineering it. ~ Jon Lech Johansen,
89:He remained in engineering and did more and more poorly at it until the middle of his senior year, ~ Neal Stephenson,
90:Political engineering,” a term popularized by a young Pentagon analyst named Chuck Spinney in the 1970s, ~ Anonymous,
91:That was smart, that was engineering: never reinvent something that you can buy down the street. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
92:My father was a professor of civil engineering at MIT, and my mother taught high school English. ~ Eric Allin Cornell,
93:We must turn away from an attitude of nature-as-engineering-object to one of humble partnership. ~ Charles Eisenstein,
94:For every scientific (or engineering) action, there is an equal and opposite social reaction. ~ Norman Ralph Augustine,
95:Plagiarism is trying to pass someone else's work off as your own. Copying is about reverse-engineering. ~ Austin Kleon,
96:The Mississippi River will always have its own way; no engineering skill can persuade it to do otherwise. ~ Mark Twain,
97:Writers acquire their technique by spotting, savoring, and reverse-engineering examples of good prose. ~ Steven Pinker,
98:The Romans spent the next 200 years using their great engineering skill to construct ruins all over Europe. ~ Dave Barry,
99:Until we could figure out how to sell and make the product, it wasn’t worth spending any engineering time on. ~ Eric Ries,
100:Teachers need to be more inspirational. But it's also up to engineering to make itself more interesting. ~ Bruce Dickinson,
101:Basically, if reverse engineering is banned, then a lot of the open source community is doomed to fail. ~ Jon Lech Johansen,
102:In 1978, I entered Tohoku University, into the Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Technology. ~ Koichi Tanaka,
103:Incurable diseases will eventually
force mankind to justify
disruptive nanotech and genetic engineering. ~ Toba Beta,
104:In science, technology, engineering and mathematics, men far outnumber women in the classroom and the boardroom. ~ Weili Dai,
105:It is more than an engineering job, efficient or inefficient. It is pre-eminently a place of moral leadership. ~ Jon Meacham,
106:Software Engineering is that part of Computer Science which is too difficult for the Computer Scientist. ~ Friedrich L Bauer,
107:There has been a substitution of ideology for fact and scientific and engineering data in this administration. ~ Vinton Cerf,
108:With the advent of genetic engineering the time required for the evolution of new species may literally collapse. ~ Dee Hock,
109:adding this to the long list of engineering problems that can be waved away by tacking on the prefix “nano-. ~ Randall Munroe,
110:First law of engineering, Leonidas,” Granadica sent. “If you can’t fix it, you’re not using a big enough hammer. ~ John Ringo,
111:Most people who sneer at technology would starve to death if the engineering infrastructure were removed. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
112:Spread the truth-the laws of economics are like the laws of engineering. One set of laws works everywhere. ~ Lawrence Summers,
113:Aggression, like every other part of human behavior we take for granted, is a challenging engineering problem! ~ Steven Pinker,
114:India has the opportunity to be a leader in genetic engineering, It has institutions that no other country has. ~ Nina Fedoroff,
115:In enterprise software companies, the two most important positions tend to be VP of sales and VP of engineering. ~ Ben Horowitz,
116:The engineering of consent is the very essence of the democratic process, the freedom to persuade and suggest. ~ Edward Bernays,
117:We may simply not be wise enough to do some of the kinds of engineering things that people are talking about doing. ~ Leon Kass,
118:Yeah," he said, rolling his eyes. "Because when I think 'game architect' and 'engineering,' I think 'extrovert. ~ Cathy Yardley,
119:A country's competitiveness starts not on the factory floor or in the engineering lab. It starts in the classroom. ~ Lee Iacocca,
120:It is a simple feat of scientific electrical engineering — only expensive — blind, faint-hearted, doubting world. ~ Nikola Tesla,
121:Software will get to be somewhat more mature, ah, but it will never be as predictable as most areas of engineering. ~ Bill Gates,
122:Millennias old lies can be gradually accepted as truth.
This is the real ultimate power of historical engineering. ~ Toba Beta,
123:In the hands of a genius, engineering turns to magic, philosophy becomes poetry, and science pure imagination. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
124:The fewer moving parts, the better." "Exactly. No truer words were ever spoken in the context of engineering. ~ Christian Cantrell,
125:There is a reason all past management revolutions have been led by engineers: management is human systems engineering. ~ Eric Ries,
126:What we usually consider as impossible are simply engineering problems... there's no law of physics preventing them. ~ Michio Kaku,
127:What we usually consider are impossible are simply engineering problems ... there's no law of physics preventing them ~ Michio Kaku,
128:The best atrocity engineering is conducted, thought Albrecht, never so much by the participant, but by the enabler. ~ Kane X Faucher,
129:Leonardo Da Vinci combined art and science and aesthetics and engineering, that kind of unity is needed once again. ~ Ben Shneiderman,
130:Piecemeal social engineering resembles physical engineering in regarding the ends as beyond the province of technology. ~ Karl Popper,
131:It's an ancient and honorable term for the final step in any engineering project. Turn it on, see if it smokes. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
132:I've never seen a job being done by a five-hundred-person engineering team that couldn't be done better by fifty people. ~ Gordon Bell,
133:The lovable bulldog is a feat of human genetic engineering so extreme that it requires special health care and maintenance ~ Anonymous,
134:Environmental spending creates jobs in engineering, manufacturing, construction, materials, operations and maintenance. ~ Keith Ellison,
135:Innovation can be sparked by engineering talent, but it must be combined with business skills to set the world afire. ~ Walter Isaacson,
136:One of the great inventions of the twentieth century was the studied, methodical engineering of myth for political ends. ~ Caryl Rivers,
137:The 19th century was the great period of engineering, thanks to the railways, thanks to lots of discoveries in metallurgy. ~ Joe Harris,
138:The central activity of engineering, as distinguished from science, is the design of new devices, processes and systems. ~ Myron Tribus,
139:Japan, newly emerging on the world scene in the late nineteenth century, sought its science and engineering in Scotland. ~ Thomas Sowell,
140:people overestimate the relative difficulty of science and engineering, because the challenges of those fields are obvious ~ Peter Thiel,
141:The advance of genetic engineering makes it quite conceivable that we will begin to design our own evolutionary progress. ~ Isaac Asimov,
142:The heel is engineering in itself. This little thing that supports the human weight has to have a precise balance. ~ Christian Louboutin,
143:There’s just one other twist. Googlers working in engineering or product management can nominate themselves for promotion. ~ Laszlo Bock,
144:An important re-engineering principle is that companies should focus on their core competence and outsource everything else. ~ Bill Gates,
145:Egyptian engineering was superior to anything known to the Greeks or Romans, or to Europe before the Industrial Revolution; ~ Will Durant,
146:I don't know why I always liked aerospace engineering. I was in the 10th grade when I figured that's what I wanted to do. ~ Kalpana Chawla,
147:I don't spend my time pontificating about high-concept things; I spend my time solving engineering and manufacturing problems. ~ Elon Musk,
148:To define it rudely but not ineptly, engineering is the art of doing for 10 shillings what any fool can do for a pound ~ Duke of Wellington,
149:Most of our competitors were one-product wonders... They would do their one product, but never get their engineering sorted out. ~ Bill Gates,
150:I suspect any worries about genetic engineering may be unnecessary. Genetic mutations have always happened naturally, anyway. ~ James Lovelock,
151:Engineering and mixing are absolutely key. Once a song is done, for me personally, it's usually two or three days to get the mix down. ~ Dr Dre,
152:I think a craft becomes an art form when the space of possible solutions becomes so huge that engineering can't carry you through. ~ Bill Budge,
153:Maybe after the first dozen times it happened, the Universal Union should have started engineering for space defenestration. NICK ~ John Scalzi,
154:I went to a school that's predominantly computer science and engineering. So, there's a real shortage of hot girls, let's say. ~ Joe Manganiello,
155:The Web is now philosophical engineering. Physics and the Web are both about the relationship between the small and the large. ~ Tim Berners Lee,
156:More than a discipline or a body of knowledge, engineering is a verb, an action word, a way of approaching a problem.” Scott Whitmire ~ Anonymous,
157:I would staple a green card to the diploma of anyone that graduates with a degree in the physical sciences or engineering in the U.S. ~ John Doerr,
158:Much of the engineering of computers takes place in silence, while engineers pace in hallways or sit alone and gaze at blank pages. ~ Tracy Kidder,
159:I have succeeded in getting my actual work down to thirty minutes a day. That leaves me eighteen hours for engineering. ~ Charles Proteus Steinmetz,
160:Productivity is most important by engineering management rules, but enjoyment is most important for engineers. One stems from the other. ~ Rob Pike,
161:Resilience engineering tells us that we should routinely inject faults into the system, doing them frequently, to make them less painful. ~ Gene Kim,
162:You can be creative in anything - in math, science, engineering, philosophy - as much as you can in music or in painting or in dance. ~ Ken Robinson,
163:[Dea07] J. Dean, “Software Engineering Advice from Building Large-Scale Distributed Systems”, Stanford CS297 class lecture, Spring 2007. ~ Betsy Beyer,
164:I think one problem we've had is that people who are smart and creative and innovative as engineers went into financial engineering. ~ Walter Isaacson,
165:The switch from 'steam engines' to 'heat engines' signals the transition from engineering practice to theoretical science. ~ Hans Christian von Baeyer,
166:good academic students were discouraged from taking technical courses, even if the student intended to study engineering at university. ~ Jacquie McNish,
167:He informed Byrdie that his social engineering ambitions betrayed all the delusions of grandeur that you might expect from the son of a poet. ~ Nell Zink,
168:It takes analytical skills worthy of a degree in civil engineering to understand when and where one is allowed to leave a car in Montreal. ~ Kathy Reichs,
169:Engineering is the application of scientific principles toward practical ends. If the engineering isn't practical, it's bad engineering. ~ Steve McConnell,
170:I was attracted to things that combined art and science equally. I've always been equally interested in art design, science and engineering. ~ Bran Ferren,
171:The biggest engineering companies, like Schlumberger, Halliburton and others, have technology they spent billions of dollars developing. ~ Vagit Alekperov,
172:I loved history in my school days, and I have always been a voracious reader. But in India, you end up doing MBA, engineering or medicine. ~ Amish Tripathi,
173:In the course of their jobs, they will come across systems they’ve never seen before, so they need to have strong reverse engineering skills. ~ Betsy Beyer,
174:The key to social engineering is influencing a person to do something that allows the hacker to gain access to information or your network. ~ Kevin Mitnick,
175:Apple was destined to be: poetry connected to engineering, arts and creativity intersecting with technology, design that’s bold and simple. ~ Walter Isaacson,
176:I never studied sculpture, engineering or architecture. In fact, after college I applied to seven art schools and was rejected by all seven. ~ Janet Echelman,
177:I've always said I don't want to have kids. I don't want a kid at all, but I do like reverse-engineering myself; managing and parenting myself. ~ Fiona Apple,
178:I went to engineering school, I went to physics class. I said, 'Screw this, I don't want to be here. I'd much rather be at a club playing music. ~ Huey Lewis,
179:It seems I have been chasing goals placed before me - the NFL, a career in engineering, and now a space station orbiting high above the Earth. ~ Leland Melvin,
180:Proper accounting is like engineering. You need a margin of safety. Thank God we don't design bridges and airplanes the way we do accounting. ~ Charlie Munger,
181:In the next decade we plan to create the first gender balance engineering school in Africa. We believe women should be part of the solution. ~ Patrick Awuah Jr,
182:My train was late, slowed by the usual Sunday engineering work. I got home in the early evening. I remember that I had a bloody good long shit. ~ Julian Barnes,
183:Where others saw America in lovely columns, marvels of engineering, and refined democrats, Dad saw only masks concealing the heralds of woe. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
184:Engineering is not only study of 45 subjects but it is moral studies of intellectual life. Make things as simple as possible..but not simpler. ~ Albert Einstein,
185:There's nothing I believe in more strongly than getting young people interested in science and engineering, for a better tomorrow, for all humankind. ~ Bill Nye,
186:Ferris had created more than simply an engineering novelty. Like the inventors of the elevator, he had conjured an entirely new physical sensation. ~ Erik Larson,
187:The environmental crisis has deep spiritual, philosophical, and religious roots and causes. It is not merely the result of bad engineering. ~ Seyyed Hossein Nasr,
188:The science and engineering of programming just isn’t good enough to produce flawless software, and that isn’t going to change anytime soon. The ~ Bruce Schneier,
189:Feedback is an engineering principle," Adam's email to me ended. 'And all engineering is devoted to trying to keep the thing you are building stable. ~ Jon Ronson,
190:One fall day in Boston, a tall mechanical engineering student named Joe entered the student union at Harvard University. He was all ambition and acne ~ Dan Ariely,
191:Thanks to the very best in Microsoft/Intel engineering, it crashes every time you exhale too hard in its general vicinity.
--Fanboy on his computer ~ Barry Lyga,
192:Business ethics has always had problems that are distinct from those of other professions, such as medicine, law, engineering, dentistry, or nursing. ~ Peter Singer,
193:You have the insanity that is geo-engineering which is a case in which you say the planet is heating up. Let's spray some aerosol and cool it down. ~ Jonathon Keats,
194:There's an old joke that you know you're in heaven if the cooks are Italian and the engineering is German. If it's the other way around you're in hell. ~ David Byrne,
195:To strive consciously for an object and to engage in engineering -- that is, incessantly and eternally to make new roads, wherever they may lead. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
196:All the traditional STEM fields, the science, technology, engineering, and math fields, are stoked when you dream big in an agency such as NASA. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
197:As a child, however, I knew so many African Americans working in science, math, and engineering that I thought that’s just what black folks did. ~ Margot Lee Shetterly,
198:The story of civilization is, in a sense, the story of engineering-that long and arduous struggle to make the forces of nature work for man's good. ~ L Sprague de Camp,
199:We need all hands on deck, and that means clearing hurdles for women and girls as they navigate careers in science, technology, engineering, and math. ~ Michelle Obama,
200:For decades engineers have stood accused that their buildings do not have any cultural value. We have attempted to liberate engineering of this accusation. ~ Fritz Todt,
201:I was always intrigued when I was growing up, and then in engineering school, with the idea of a perpetual machine. I think of the Wal-Mart culture as that. ~ Mike Duke,
202:Transhumanism is the ethics and science of using things like biological and genetic engineering to transform our bodies and make us a more powerful species. ~ Dan Brown,
203:As a child, however, I knew so many African Americans working in science, math, and engineering that I thought that’s just what black folks did. My ~ Margot Lee Shetterly,
204:In order to express the reality of my past, I would have to reach a public whose point of reference was deliberately distorted through social engineering. ~ Cathy O Brien,
205:Climate protection creates sustainability and jobs in the real economy - in construction, in the production of heavy machinery and in systems engineering. ~ Sigmar Gabriel,
206:Companies like I.B.M. have offered women scholarships to study engineering for years, and women engineers routinely get higher starting salaries than men. ~ Warren Farrell,
207:I didn't write because in the corps I took mining engineering of all things and, you know, they, they graduate a mining engineer as a sort of an illiterate. ~ Rube Goldberg,
208:Social pressure is the fascism of the democracies. Fascism is the democracy of the ruthless. Social engineering is the opiate of romantic intellectuals. ~ Michael D O Brien,
209:What's gotten in the way of education in the United States is a theory of social engineering that says there is ONE RIGHT WAY to proceed with growing up. ~ John Taylor Gatto,
210:Engineering -nature is engineering, so is culture, science is right behind, only chaos is not an engineer- and, along with it, the furious need to reproduce. ~ Elena Ferrante,
211:I worked with such concentration and focus and I had hundreds of obscure engineering or programming things in my head. I was just real exceptional in that way ~ Steve Wozniak,
212:At MakerBot, we joke that if we were engineers we would still be on our first prototype. There's something about just 'Doing it”iteration is a way of engineering. ~ Bre Pettis,
213:My father was a master carpenter and builder. Architectural design, engineering design, mechanical design, three-dimensional views, that was my shtick, my forte. ~ Bobby Seale,
214:The most troublesome problem which confronts social engineering is how to provide for the untalented and, what is equally important, how to provide against them. ~ Eric Hoffer,
215:The question of engineering should be of interest not only to those of us who are engineers, but to the entire public which lives in an engineering world ~ Karl Taylor Compton,
216:I've had training in electronics engineering, of all things, and in languages. But I've never taken any degree, something I share with Lewis Mumford, I think. ~ Murray Bookchin,
217:Lee knew that the key to victory lay not only in terms of engineering or mathematics, but in a crew’s ability to adjust psychologically to the unexpected. ~ James D Hornfischer,
218:Your consciousness is like a tiny stowaway on a transatlantic steamship, taking credit for the journey without acknowledging the massive engineering underfoot. ~ David Eagleman,
219:Aeronautical engineering texts do not define the goal of their field as making “machines that fly so exactly like pigeons that they can fool even other pigeons. ~ Stuart Russell,
220:Those statues were exquisitely carved, without exception; that was what the Egyptians were really good at, along with organized religion and civil engineering. ~ Jonathan Stroud,
221:Each time I look at you, I marvel at the feat of organic engineering that’s allowed you to create such a fortification within a perfect composition of female flesh. ~ Joey W Hill,
222:PayPal once rejected a candidate who aced all the engineering tests because for fun, the guy said that he liked to play hoops. That single sentence lost him the job. ~ Max Levchin,
223:So the first step in improving the quality of life consists in
engineering daily activities so that one gets the most rewarding experiences from them. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
224:Any person or organization depends ultimately on public approval, and is therefore faced with the problem of engineering the public's consent to a program or goal. ~ Edward Bernays,
225:Biological engineering is not necessarily understanding systems but rather, I want to be able to design and build biological systems to perform particular applications. ~ Drew Endy,
226:Science Technology Engineering and Math is still necessary to know if you dream of being a filmmaker. Filmmaking is an art form, but with the use of STEM. - Kailin Gow. ~ Kailin Gow,
227:Any impatient student of mathematics or science or engineering who is irked by having algebraic symbolism thrust on him should try to get on without it for a week. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
228:Considering the current sad state of our computer programs, software development is clearly still a black art, and cannot yet be called an engineering discipline. ~ William J Clinton,
229:I've always disliked words like inspiration. Writing is probably like a scientist thinking about some scientific problem, or an engineer about an engineering problem. ~ Doris Lessing,
230:Only when I began studying chemical engineering at Oregon Agricultural College did I realize that I myself might discover something new about the nature of the world. ~ Linus Pauling,
231:Recession doesn't deserve the right to exist. There are just too many things to be done in science and engineering to be bogged down by temporary economic dislocations. ~ Walt Disney,
232:The path to the CEO's office should not be through the CFO's office, and it should not be through the marketing department. It needs to be through engineering and design. ~ Elon Musk,
233:Unfortunately, the two camps often talk past each other. They speak different languages: machine learning speaks probability, and knowledge engineering speaks logic. ~ Pedro Domingos,
234:The addition of an amount of a Royal Cubit onto the measure of a day (based on ancient Egyptian Engineering) corresponds with a complete one week period of creation. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
235:Government has ceased to mean upholding and reinforcing the traditional rights and morals of the governed; it now means compulsion in the service of social engineering. ~ Joseph Sobran,
236:If geek means you're willing to study things, and if you think science and engineering matter, I plead guilty. If your culture doesn't like geeks, you are in real trouble. ~ Bill Gates,
237:In engineering, that only is great which achieves. It matters not what the intention is, he who in the day of battle is not victorious is not saved by his intention. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
238:Any impatient student of mathematics or science or engineering who is irked by having algebraic symbolism thrust upon him should try to get along without it for a week. ~ Eric Temple Bell,
239:I was taking chemical engineering. But I went into the army after that. When I came out of the army, I was a different person. I met a lot of good jazz players in the army. ~ Mose Allison,
240:Historically, the British have always been rather wary of grand engineering projects - perhaps understandably, given that many of them have been delivered late and over budget. ~ Evan Davis,
241:I was in school studying civil engineering. A guy approached me on the street and said that I had a interesting look-very exotic. He told me I should try to be in the industry. ~ Thuy Trang,
242:The Reservoir plan is an engineering mechanism applied to the field of economics, and in its essence it has nothing to do with democracy or any other political philosophy. ~ Benjamin Graham,
243:And I suppose you're going to operate the hermium processors when the civis are all sixed? Got an engineering degree in between combat tours and ****ing your cousins, did you? ~ Amie Kaufman,
244:If you've found some way to educate yourself about engineering, stocks, or whatever it is, good employers will have some type of exam or interview and see a sample of your work. ~ Bill Gates,
245:In my fool hardy youth, when my friends were dreaming of heroic deeds in the realms of engineering and law, finance and national politics, I dreamt of becoming a librarian. ~ Alberto Manguel,
246:Software engineering is the establishment and use of sound engineering principles to obtain economically software that is reliable and works on real machines efficiently. ~ Friedrich L Bauer,
247:In this kind of social climate, it’s easy to grow up thinking that women don’t get involved in tech or science or medicine or engineering, because who among us really ever has? Of ~ Sam Maggs,
248:I remember him telling me that engineering was the highest level of importance you could reach in the world,” Steve Wozniak later recalled. “It takes society to a new level. ~ Walter Isaacson,
249:It is not US law that prohibits Iranian nationals from applying and enrolling in UMass’s engineering and natural sciences graduate programs; it is UMass itself that is doing that. ~ Anonymous,
250:Problems in human engineering will receive during the coming years the same genius and attention which the nineteenth century gave to the more material forms of engineering. ~ Thomas A Edison,
251:Let's not be optimistic in the irreversibly irresponsible way that tends to happen with the crazies of geo-engineering. But let's talk about what sorts of changes we can make. ~ Jonathon Keats,
252:I don’t know how to do that, and I don’t want to think about that.” It is a challenging problem. It’s harder to engineer a system to do it, but engineering is a one-time difficulty. ~ Anonymous,
253:In 1989 I retired from Bell Laboratories to become a full-time writer. Not that I didn't enjoy my engineering career, but rather I liked being a novelist just a bit better. ~ Dennis L McKiernan,
254:The process of shaping opinion, attitudes, and perceptions was termed the 'engineering of consent' by one of the founders of the modern public relations industry, Edward Bernays. ~ Noam Chomsky,
255:Having federal officials, whether judges, bureaucrats, or congressmen, impose a new definition of marriage on the people is an act of social engineering profoundly hostile to liberty. ~ Ron Paul,
256:Science is the study of what Is, Engineering builds what Will Be. The scientist merely explores that which exists, while the engineer creates what has never existed before. ~ Theodore von Karman,
257:He told us to go back to the roots of the original 1984 Macintosh, an all-in-one consumer appliance,” recalled Schiller. “That meant design and engineering had to work together. ~ Walter Isaacson,
258:I've always written. I'm from an older generation of programmers [who] did not come out of engineering. [A]ll sorts of people were drawn in from the social sciences and humanities. ~ Ellen Ullman,
259:This book is like an engineering masterpiece, can't be bad ! No matter what it will always be the greatest of all.

See this link for more information:
jeffabbott.com.panic ~ Jeff Abbott,
260:To this end, Google always strives to staff its SRE teams with a mix of engineers with traditional software development experience and engineers with systems engineering experience. ~ Betsy Beyer,
261:I have long aspired to make our company a noble prototype of industry, penetrating in science, reliable in engineering, creative in aesthetics and wholesomely prosperous in economics. ~ Edwin Land,
262:Social engineering is using deception, manipulation and influence to convince a human who has access to a computer system to do something, like click on an attachment in an e-mail. ~ Kevin Mitnick,
263:The purpose of a business is to get and keep a customer. Without customers, no amount of engineering wizardry, clever financing, or operations expertise can keep a company going. ~ Theodore Levitt,
264:There is nothing in machinery, there is nothing in embankments and railways and iron bridges and engineering devices to oblige them to be ugly. Ugliness is the measure of imperfection. ~ H G Wells,
265:there’s no money for research. Or for art, for that matter, or engineering. Everything goes to policing—to the army, the coming war. I suppose the city will begin to deteriorate. ~ Kristin Cashore,
266:I am so old, I entered engineering school with a slide rule. And I left engineering school with a calculator. I can still use a slide rule but it's not a skill you especially need anymore. ~ Bill Nye,
267:about 15 percent of one’s financial success is due to one’s technical knowledge and about 85 percent is due to skill in human engineering—to personality and the ability to lead people. ~ Dale Carnegie,
268:The world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better... with hands... with tools... with horse sense and science and engineering. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
269:Genetic engineering and such products as Monsanto’s “Terminator” seeds, which cannot reproduce, could conceivably give that company proprietary control over the food crops. Glyphosate-based ~ Jim Marrs,
270:about 15 percent of one’s financial success is due to one’s technical knowledge and about 85 percent is due to skill in human engineering – to personality and the ability to lead people. ~ Dale Carnegie,
271:A top-notch engineer is worth three hundred times or more than an average engineer.… I’d rather lose an entire incoming class of engineering graduates than one exceptional technologist.”75 ~ Laszlo Bock,
272:Over the course of my coverage of this topic, I am convinced that CAP falls far short of giving a complete picture of the engineering tradeoffs behind building scalable, distributed systems. ~ Anonymous,
273:ST Engineering, the only South-East Asian firm in SIPRI’s top 100 defence manufacturers, has sold over 100 Bronco (or Warthog) armoured troop carriers to the British, for use in Afghanistan. ~ Anonymous,
274:Techniques such as genetic engineering, psychoactive drugs and electronic control of the brain make possible a transformation of the species into docile, fully-obedient, 'safe' organisms. ~ William Sims,
275:In the first 27 years of my life, I never had written a single non-technical word. I went to engineering college and went to business school. I never knew I could write fiction of any form. ~ Karan Bajaj,
276:I think we can question whether degrees are antediluvian. Online learning has flexibility. Why not master courses in energy, writing, communications, and engineering and get a credential? ~ Anant Agarwal,
277:Science, math and engineering can give you the exhilarating power to become not mere spectators or consumers, but the active explorers, makers and doers who will help invent the future. ~ Susan Hockfield,
278:the business and marketing functions of a startup should be considered as important as engineering and product development and therefore deserve an equally rigorous methodology to guide them. ~ Eric Ries,
279:Asian countries produce eight times as many engineering bachelors as the United States, and the number of U.S. students graduating at the masters and PhD levels in these areas is declining. ~ Mark Kennedy,
280:But not only medicine, engineering, and painting are arts; living itself is an art in fact, the most important and at the same time the most difficult and complex art to be practiced by man. ~ Erich Fromm,
281:ENIAC (electronic numerical integrator and calculator) developed by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, soon followed. ~ Anonymous,
282:The hallmark of the Renaissance was its holistic quality as all fields of art, engineering, science and culture shared the same exciting spirit and many of the same intellectual principles. ~ Joel Garreau,
283:A good scientist is a person with original ideas. A good engineer is a person who makes a design that works with as few original ideas as possible. There are no prima donnas in engineering. ~ Freeman Dyson,
284:Innovation requires having at least three things: a great idea, the engineering talent to execute it, and the business savvy (plus deal-making moxie) to turn it into a successful product. ~ Walter Isaacson,
285:The companies that didn’t suffer, including Netflix, knew how to design for reliability; they understood resilience, spreading data across zones, and a whole lot of reliability engineering. ~ Mike Loukides,
286:I suppose the reason I chose electrical engineering was because I had always been interested in electricity, involving myself in such projects as building radios from the time I was a child. ~ Koichi Tanaka,
287:Business is not just doing deals; business is having great products, doing great engineering, and providing tremendous service to customers. Finally, business is a cobweb of human relationships. ~ Ross Perot,
288:Hey, if I had my choice for social engineering, I'd declare an automatic R-rating for any movie that depicts television commercials. There's a truly dangerous influence on our children. ~ Marshall Herskovitz,
289:I didnt know what architecture was except that I lived in a house. I dont even think that I knew the word for a long time. My dad funneled me into engineering because it was his background. ~ Antoine Predock,
290:I wanted to further my education, so I went on to get a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and came back and served about ten years in the Canadian Navy as what we call a combat systems engineer. ~ Marc Garneau,
291:Kids at the school, which launched a year and a half ago, aren't called students but "innovators." They receive a hardcore focus on STEM skills (that's science, technology, engineering and math). ~ Anonymous,
292:The neutrality and clarity of an engineering drawing is a better model for teaching about art than all the uncontrollable drivel about the cabbala and metaphysics and the ecstasy of sainthood. ~ George Grosz,
293:At the fourth grade level, girls at the same percentages of boys say they're interested in careers in engineering or math or astrophysics, but by eighth grade that has dropped precipitously. ~ Chelsea Clinton,
294:Engineering is the art of the practical and depends more on the total state of the art than it does on the individual engineer. When railroading time comes you can railroad—but not before. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
295:Genetic engineering is not really something new. Human beings have been fiddling with genes for as long as ten thousand years. That’s how long they have been growing plants and herding animals. ~ Isaac Asimov,
296:If the twentieth century was shaped by warring ideologies, and the twenty-first was a battle of digital languages, our present age is defined by duelling approaches to oceanic city engineering. ~ Sam J Miller,
297:A system needs to be alive and workable even when other people than the first enthusiasts start using it. Reinvention and revolution are enthusiast stuff. Invention and evolution are engineering. ~ Erik Naggum,
298:My father always said that you cannot graft a culture of science and engineering onto an Iron Age society. And so it’s proving.’ Bisesa studied him. ‘You’ll have to tell me about your father. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
299:One hundred years from now, our engineering may seem as archaic as the techniques used by medieval cathedral builders seem to today's civil engineers, while our craftsmanship will still be honored. ~ Anonymous,
300:Genetic engineering in bacteria is easy. Their genomes are small, and it’s very simple to persuade bacteria to absorb new genes. You can generate genetically engineered bacteria in just a few days. ~ Nessa Carey,
301:social engineering”—the casual or calculated manipulation of people to influence them to do things they would not ordinarily do. And convincing them without raising the least hint of suspicion. ~ Kevin D Mitnick,
302:Software engineering has this in common with having children: the labor before the birth is painful and difficult, but the labor after the birth is where you actually spend most of your effort. Yet ~ Betsy Beyer,
303:An engineering manager who can’t code is not going to be able to lead a team at Google. But of the behaviors that differentiated the very best, technical input made the smallest difference to teams. ~ Laszlo Bock,
304:...governments, including free and democratic governments, are not really friendly to freedom and democracy. They abhor any rule of law that limits their powers and penchant for social engineering. ~ George Jonas,
305:In engineering, people have a big margin of safety. But in the financial world, people don't give a damn about safety. They let it balloon and balloon and balloon. It's aided by false accounting. ~ Charlie Munger,
306:Engineering, medicine, business, architecture and painting are concerned not with the necessary but with the contingent - not with how things are but with how they might be - in short, with design. ~ Herbert Simon,
307:Someone will always want to mobilize Death on a massive scale for economic Domination or revenge. And the task, taken As a task, appeals to the imagination. The military is an engineering profession. ~ Robert Hass,
308:(There is a saying among women scientists who attend highly specialized engineering universities, where the girl-to-guy ratio is decidedly in their favor: “The odds are good, but the goods are odd.”) ~ Michio Kaku,
309:Trade has always existed, but we used to defend our strategic interests. Could you imagine the United States allowing French engineering giant Alstom to purchase General Electric? I don't think so. ~ Marine Le Pen,
310:I studied chemical engineering. I was a good student, but these were the hard times of the depression, my scholarship came to an end, and it was necessary to work to supplement the family income. ~ Jack Steinberger,
311:There are hopes that carbon nanotube-based materials could provide the required strength—adding this to the long list of engineering problems that can be waved away by tacking on the prefix “nano-. ~ Randall Munroe,
312:man is pre-eminently a creative animal, predestined to strive consciously for an object and to engage in engineering—that is, incessantly and eternally to make new roads, wherever they may lead. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
313:More than that, the iPod became the essence of everything Apple was destined to be: poetry connected to engineering, arts and creativity intersecting with technology, design that’s bold and simple. ~ Walter Isaacson,
314:Unless you took courses in architecture, engineering, or pre-med, the rest of your liberal arts education hardly prepares you for life as the business warrior and champion you envision yourself to be. ~ Gene Simmons,
315:Conservatives have a deeper intellect and tend to have occupations of the brain in fields like engineering, science, and economics. Liberals, on the other hand, tend to flock to occupations of the heart. ~ Dick Armey,
316:Anyone being flown to a distant city for heart-bypass surgery has conceded, tacitly at least, that we have learned a few things about physics, geography, engineering, and medicine since the time of Moses. ~ Sam Harris,
317:I was always fascinated by engineering. Maybe it was an attempt maybe to get my father's respect or interest, or maybe it was just a genetic love of technology, but I was always trying to build things. ~ James Cameron,
318:My background educationally is physics and economics, and I grew up in sort of an engineering environment - my father is an electromechanical engineer. And so there were lots of engineery things around me. ~ Elon Musk,
319:GPS timing is incredibly precise; of all the problems in engineering, it’s one of the only ones in which engineers have been forced to include both special and general relativity in their calculations. ~ Randall Munroe,
320:I always say prepare to be a coach to anybody who wants to be a coach. At 24 years of age when I left engineering to become full time in football, I made sure that I was never going back to engineering. ~ Alex Ferguson,
321:Rome was not simply the thuggish younger sibling of classical Greece, committed to engineering, military efficiency and absolutism, whereas the Greeks preferred intellectual inquiry, theatre and democracy. ~ Mary Beard,
322:That’s how they made them years ago, before metal strings, before they knew how to brace a long neck. It’s incredible. There’s more careful engineering in that swan neck than in any three cathedrals. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
323:The machine code of the genes is uncannily computer-like. Apart from differences in jargon, the pages of a molecular biology journal might be interchanged with those of a computer engineering journal. ~ Richard Dawkins,
324:I think of modern marriage as a car strangely fashioned out of an old abandoned horse carriage, built upon the framework of a mule cart. All the original engineering is still there, underneath it all. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
325:Let's face it: Engineering companies in general have more men than women. Google has tried really hard to recruit women. On the other hand, we have a standard. Google tries to recruit the best engineers. ~ Susan Wojcicki,
326:The social and physical construction of suburban America really was quite complex. It was a very elaborate system, and clearly a massive social engineering project that has changed U.S. society enormously. ~ Noam Chomsky,
327:By engineering a system where people keep one another in check with the surveillance technology, this faceless, leaderless state is able to last for many millennia, keeping Earth free from superintelligence. ~ Max Tegmark,
328:I hated science in high school. Technology? Engineering? Math? Why would I ever need this? Little did I realize that music was also about science, technology, engineering and mathematics, all rolled into one. ~ Mickey Hart,
329:I'm an engineer by trade so I've always been interested in engineering and technology but also I've a strong interest in self build and off-grid properties and how it would affect us in terms of lifestyle. ~ Andy Griffiths,
330:I think through education, belief in God, and good engineering, our children become a lot better at what they're doing than we did, and that starts with the very first sign of life on the face of this earth. ~ Evel Knievel,
331:Science, enabled by engineering, empowered by NASA, tells us not only that we are in the universe but that the universe is in us. And for me, that sense of belonging elevates, not denigrates, the ego. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
332:Technology” does not necessarily mean “science and engineering.” Techne, the Greek word from which “technology” derives, means, after all, “useful knowledge,” or “organized skill,” rather than “engineering. ~ Peter F Drucker,
333:Software is definitely engineering. It's different in that we take on novel tasks every time. It's not like building a certain bridge that is virtually identical to some previous bridge or some previous building. ~ Bill Gates,
334:We are intelligent atoms. We are intelligent organic structures. We can change who we are. We can heal ourselves. With genetic engineering, we are considering changing the physiological structure of the body. ~ Frederick Lenz,
335:In any hard discipline, whether it be gardening, structural engineering, or Russian,” the philosopher and motorcycle mechanic Matthew Crawford writes, “one submits to things that have their own intractable ways. ~ David Brooks,
336:Now that I'm on Broadway, it's like NASA engineering with the costumes. I was very grateful for the slightly more high-tech ones in my show, 'Venus in Fur'; our costume designer Anita Yavich is kind of a genius. ~ Nina Arianda,
337:The Presidency is not merely an administrative office. That’s the least of it. It is more than an engineering job, efficient or inefficient. It is pre-eminently a place of moral leadership. —FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT ~ Jon Meacham,
338:Tyler solved the equations easily, writing out orderly explanations for every step. He was studying mechanical engineering, set to graduate near the top of his class, and soon after would start a PhD at Purdue. ~ Tara Westover,
339:...all these things were part of the business of dreams. He had learned not to laugh at the advertisements offering to teach writing, cartooning, engineering, to add inches to the biceps and to develop the bust ~ Nathanael West,
340:Hedonic Engineering -- The human nervous system studying and improving itself: intelligence studying and improving intelligence. Why be depressed, dumb, and agitated when you can be happy, smart, and tranquil? ~ Robert J Wilson,
341:The engineering was certainly the same: both depended on loosening your grip on your own desires, putting aside what you wanted and appreciating what you got, being patient and forgiving and undemanding. ~ Christopher McDougall,
342:They say there were birds who used to soar through the skies like planes.It seems strange that a small animal could achieve anything as complex as human engineering, but the possibility is too enticing to ignore. ~ Tahereh Mafi,
343:Engineering is not a science. Science studies particular events to find general laws. Engineering design makes use of the laws to solve particular practical problems. In this it is more closely related to art or craft. ~ Ove Arup,
344:Engineering problems are under-defined, there are many solutions, good, bad and indifferent. The art is to arrive at a good solution. This is a creative activity, involving imagination, intuition and deliberate choice. ~ Ove Arup,
345:Even in such technical lines as engineering, about 15% of one's financial success is due one's technical knowledge and about 85% is due to skill in human engineering, to personality and the ability to lead people. ~ Dale Carnegie,
346:Protein engineering is a technology of molecular machines - of molecular machines that are part of replicators - and so it comes from an area that already raises some of the issues that nanotechnology will raise. ~ K Eric Drexler,
347:There is nothing essentially bad about the idea of renewable energy, but when it is enforced by dogmatic ideologues wholly ignorant of both science and engineering, it is potentially both dangerous and ruinous. ~ James E Lovelock,
348:You had to make a camera look like it's traveling at 300 mph, but you couldn't make it actually travel at 300 mph so you had to slow everything down and build devices to do that. So you were constantly engineering. ~ John Dykstra,
349:Growing up in India, I knew all I needed to change the world was one good opportunity, and I prepared myself for it. When that opportunity came - in the form of the chance to earn an engineering degree - I was ready. ~ Naveen Jain,
350:One of the most significant things they did to help change the outcomes of deployments was to have all Facebook engineers, engineering managers, and architects rotate through on-call duty for the services they built. By ~ Gene Kim,
351:With engineering, I view this year's failure as next year's opportunity to try it again. Failures are not something to be avoided. You want to have them happen as quickly as you can so you can make progress rapidly. ~ Gordon Moore,
352:Everybody should be ashamed who uses the wonders of science and engineering without thinking and having mentally realized not more of it than a cow realizes of the botany of the plants which it eats with pleasure. ~ Albert Einstein,
353:They say there were birds who used to soar through the skies like planes.
It seems strange that a small animal could achieve anything as complex as human engineering, but the possibility is too enticing to ignore. ~ Tahereh Mafi,
354:A good sermon is an engineering operation by which a chasm is bridged so that the spiritual goods on one side-the 'unsearchable riches of Christ' - are actually transported into personal lives upon the other. ~ Harry Emerson Fosdick,
355:And you’re overthinking things, Charming.  Do the math.  Naked, interested man, check.  Wet, willing woman, double check.  Now insert part A into slot B and we can move on to the engineering portion of our quiz today. ~ Jane Cousins,
356:Christiaan Huygens became simultaneously adept in languages, drawing, law, science, engineering, mathematics and music. His interests and allegiances were broad. “The world is my country,” he said, “science my religion. ~ Carl Sagan,
357:I am simply pointing out that at the rate at which we are going the whole genetic engineering technology will end up in the hands of the political system to be used for the complete control and subjugation of man. ~ U G Krishnamurti,
358:The idea that those in authority know best—that they are engaged in social engineering on behalf of people who do not understand what is good for them—was not born in 1945, but it flourished in the decades that followed. ~ Tony Judt,
359:was right then that I knew I’d called the wrong person. I should have dialed Oscar, my slightly younger brother, instead. He was the levelheaded one in my life, the basketball player studying mechanical engineering. ~ Mariana Zapata,
360:I didn't finish high school, but I went to a special school for producers and musicians, a three year course for engineering, producing and learning all the tricks. So now I have my producing degree and certification. ~ Martin Garrix,
361:There is a lot of interest in the arts, music, theatre, filmmaking, engineering, architecture and software design. I think we have now transitioned the modern-day version of the entrepreneur into the creative economy. ~ John Baldacci,
362:Innovation can also increase risk, new things always do; therefore the engineering teams must understand that with freedom comes responsibility, ownership and accountability for the new stuff they produce and/or implement. ~ Anonymous,
363:I started off in architecture, and I just couldn't fit into the vibe there. I just felt more at home in the Art Department, so I just ended up there. But I would be an architect if it didn't require so much engineering. ~ Larkin Grimm,
364:The cloning of humans is on most of the lists of things to worry about from Science, along with behaviour control, genetic engineering, transplanted heads, computer poetry and the unrestrained growth of plastic flowers. ~ Lewis Thomas,
365:The public should know that the liability issues here have yet to be resolved, or even raised. If you're a farmer and you're growing a genetically engineering food crop, those genes are going to flow to the other farm. ~ Jeremy Rifkin,
366:Engineering stimulates the mind. Kids get bored easily. They have got to get out and get their hands dirty: make things, dismantle things, fix things. When the schools can offer that, you'll have an engineer for life. ~ Bruce Dickinson,
367:He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology, so he built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. ~ Walter Isaacson,
368:Her life seemed to her a great engineering work scarcely begun. Lately more excavation than construction had occurred. She had lost a sense of her own invincibility. In that way she was no longer archetypically American. ~ Marge Piercy,
369:Leibniz had little engineering skill and did not surround himself with those who did. So, like many great theorists who lacked practical collaborators, he was unable to produce reliably working versions of his device. ~ Walter Isaacson,
370:Nuclear weapons need large facilities, but genetic engineering can be done in a small lab. You can't regulate every lab in the world. The danger is that either by accident or design, we create a virus that destroys us. ~ Stephen Hawking,
371:Fifty years is ample time in which to change a world and its people almost beyond recognition. All that is required for the task are a sound knowledge of social engineering, a clear sight of the intended goal—and power. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
372:She half-remembered a summer's night in Michigan when she was a girl. She had feared she would fall into the sky. "Oh, it's not just us. This is a... cooperative project ofmany galaxies. That's what we mainly do--engineering. ~ Anonymous,
373:Twiggy being made. More than half were rejected. Jobs erupted. With his face flushed, he began shouting and sputtering about firing everyone who worked there. Bob Belleville, the head of the Mac engineering team, gently ~ Walter Isaacson,
374:Both social engineering and technical attacks played a big part in what I was able to do. It was a hybrid. I used social engineering when it was appropriate, and exploited technical vulnerabilities when it was appropriate. ~ Kevin Mitnick,
375:I still haven't heard anything from Apple about my hacks. There is a tool based on my work reverse-engineering Apple's FairPlay called jhymn that's been hosted on a U.S. server for over a year and nothing has happened. ~ Jon Lech Johansen,
376:Within weeks of the product’s introduction, both university-based engineering teams and do-it-yourself innovators had hacked into the Kinect and posted YouTube videos of robots that were now able to see in three dimensions.4 ~ Martin Ford,
377:I happen to love engineering. I love figuring things out in a spatial sense, that whole realm of working with mechanical parts, and the relationship of the parts, and things like ratios and the speeds of particular objects. ~ Arthur Ganson,
378:The gap between the best software engineering practice and the average practice is very wide—perhaps wider than in any other engineering discipline. A tool that disseminates good practice would be important. — Fred Brooks ~ Steve McConnell,
379:What I'm trying to do is bring certain of those engineering values into the design process, such that when you think about form you're already incorporating those performance criteria in the process of the generation of forms. ~ Neri Oxman,
380:Building on our successful partnership, we can now bring together the best of Microsoft's software engineering with the best of Nokia's product engineering, award-winning design, and global sales, marketing and manufacturing. ~ Stephen Elop,
381:During the war years I worked on the development of radar and other radio systems for the R.A.F. and, though gaining much in engineering experience and in understanding people, rapidly forgot most of the physics I had learned. ~ Martin Ryle,
382:I started out in engineering. I was a geophysical engineer. Throughout the course of my life I've done a lot of strange jobs, and the effect has been to make me think a little more skeptically about our capitalist society. ~ George Saunders,
383:My grandfather on my mother's side was a professor of mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; my other grandfather was a lawyer, and one time Speaker of the Tennessee House of Representatives. ~ Kenneth G Wilson,
384:Full employment is a socially hazardous goal. In effect, it aspires to restore through political expedients the pre-industrial state of toil that science, engineering, technology and modern management are pledged to overcome. ~ Louis O Kelso,
385:I used to be a chemical-engineering student, but I started studying acting, and I went for a cattle call, up against hundreds of people. They tore me down because I was too tall. They said "How tall are you?" "6'5"." "Next." ~ Dolph Lundgren,
386:Millions of people were inspired by the Apollo Program. I was five years old when I watched Apollo 11 unfold on television, and without any doubt it was a big contributor to my passions for science, engineering, and exploration. ~ Jeff Bezos,
387:Bear in mind that we [ with Edward Herman] did not devise the terms "manufacture of consent" and "engineering of consent." We borrowed them from leading figures in the media, public relations industry, and academic scholarship. ~ Noam Chomsky,
388:By separating the function of adaptation from the function of maintaining the integrity of individual genes, sex allows much greater diversity while still keeping genes whole. Sex is not only fun, it is good engineering practice. ~ Seth Lloyd,
389:The dollar is the final term in almost every equation which arises in the practice of engineering in any or all of its branches, except qualifiedly as to military and naval engineering, where in some cases cost may be ignored. ~ Henry R Towne,
390:Crossrail is a prime example of infrastructure. It is a rather deadly word, but I think it is exciting stuff, the civil engineering which makes Britain tick - the bridges, tunnels, power and water networks, which bind us together. ~ Evan Davis,
391:even in such technical lines as engineering, about 15 percent of one’s financial success is due to one’s technical knowledge and about 85 percent is due to skill in human engineering – to personality and the ability to lead people. ~ Anonymous,
392:To Monsieur Eiffel the Engineer, the brave builder of so gigantic and original a specimen of modern Engineering from one who has the greatest respect and admiration for all Engineers including the Great Engineer the Bon Dieu. ~ Thomas A Edison,
393:You have to do every detail on every bloody piece of the building. You have to know how the engineering works. You have to know how the fittings go together. You have to master the mechanical, electrical, acoustical - everything. ~ Frank Gehry,
394:All he knows is that something stepped in front of him, blocking his way, until in time he gave up on things, he gave up studying engineering and he gave up on the idea of traveling. He sat down in his life. And there he remained. ~ Mitch Albom,
395:I knew about viscosity, but I’d heard about it in a course in physical chemistry, not in physics. Step by step, the questions I asked led me into the world of mechanical engineering. A reductionist path, yes, but a different one. ~ Steven Vogel,
396:To make an embarrassing admission, I like video games. That's what got me into software engineering when I was a kid. I wanted to make money so I could buy a better computer to play better video games. Nothing like saving the world. ~ Elon Musk,
397:We need to understand why in a society so dependent on technology, a society that benefits so richly from the results of engineering, a society that rewards engineers so well, engineering isn’t perceived as a desirable profession. ~ Bill Bryson,
398:When I was working in my first job engineering construction, what I liked the most was working with architects and making buildings that had this creative side coming from the architect and that were making them a big success. ~ Bernard Arnault,
399:My undergraduate degree is in engineering. I have a Ph.D. in biochemistry with an emphasis on renewable energy resources. And we are running out of the fossil fuel stuff. Not to mention wreaking great harm through climate change. ~ David Baldacci,
400:At their best, at their most creative, science and engineering are attributes of liberty-noble expressions of man's God-given right to investigate and explore the universe without fear of social or political or religious reprisals. ~ David Sarnoff,
401:Despite being an engineer, Musk’s father was something of a Luddite and dismissive of the machine. Elon recounted that “he said it was just for games and that you’d never be able to do real engineering on it. I just said, ‘Whatever. ~ Ashlee Vance,
402:Engineering training deals with the exact sciences. That sort of exactness makes for truth and conscience. It might be good for the world if more men had that sort of mental start in life even if they did not pursue the profession. ~ Herbert Hoover,
403:Bicycles are pieces of art. You get that combination of kinetic engineering, but then, besides the welds, the paint jobs, the kind of the sculpture of it all is quite beautiful. Bikes have such great lines, and all different styles. ~ Robin Williams,
404:Software is a great combination between artistry and engineering. When you finally get done and get to appreciate what you have done it is like a part of yourself that you've put together. I think a lot of the people here feel that way. ~ Bill Gates,
405:The real world is far too complex and unpredictable to make something like the idea of humanity controlling its own evolution or engineering itself - well, I wouldn't say impossible but it should be approached with a degree of caution. ~ Ken MacLeod,
406:Engineers do engineering, i.e. they build bridges. So engineering needs engineers. The economy does NOT need economists. Economists do not make economy, but they try it and that is why we have so much problems with some financial models. ~ Steve Keen,
407:If you're running an engineering or finance company, all companies depend on ideas and ingenuity. I think the principles of creative leadership apply everywhere, whether it's an advertising company or whether you're running a hospital. ~ Ken Robinson,
408:Whether you're studying electrical engineering or poetry, college is not about maximizing income, it's about becoming a better and more informed observer of the universe. And for me, at least, that what's leads to a more fulfilling life. ~ John Green,
409:I never believed 9/11, because I had engineering training at GA Tech, and I could tell when a building is being blown up by explosives. Any fool can look at those films and see the buildings aren't falling down, they're blowing up. ~ Paul Craig Roberts,
410:I would say that the evocative qualities of music are usually put there in post-production in the reverb. It's really not much about the musicians as the engineering. It's post-production that's being done by the musician at the time. ~ Stephin Merritt,
411:No matter that astronauts and cosmonauts had perished in precisely designed and carefully tested machines. Solid engineering could always provide a safety margin, because the engineers believed, there was complete safety in numbers. ~ William E Burrows,
412:Software engineering is the part of computer science which is too difficult for the computer scientist. ~ Friedrich Bauer, "Software Engineering." Information Processing: Proceedings of the IFIP Congress 1971, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, August 23-28, 1971.,
413:software engineering is very much governed by human behavior through the people developing software. Thus, we cannot expect to find any formal rules or laws in software engineering except perhaps when focusing on specific technical aspects. ~ Anonymous,
414:What is a bow and arrow? It is the beginning of the end. It is the winding path that grows to the roaring road of war. It is a plaything and a weapon and a triumph in human engineering. It is the first faint stirring of an atom bomb. ~ Clifford D Simak,
415:With genetic engineering, we will be able to increase the complexity of our DNA, and improve the human race. But it will be a slow process, because one will have to wait about 18 years to see the effect of changes to the genetic code. ~ Stephen Hawking,
416:I do quite like Gehry's Guggenheim. But where in Bilbao it's seen as an outgrowth of years of investment in urban design and engineering, in Britain it's seen as the catalyst for urban regeneration rather than the icing on the cake. ~ David Chipperfield,
417:If we taught music the way we try to teach engineering, in an unbroken four year course, we could end up with all theory and no music. When we study music, we start to practice from the beginning, and we practice for the entire time. ~ Charles Kettering,
418:If you assume continuity, you can open the well-stocked mathematical toolkit of continuous functions and differential equations, the saws and hammers of engineering and physics for the past two centuries (and the foreseeable future). ~ Benoit Mandelbrot,
419:I got very good on the telephone tricks too. Like calling up a company and find out that the plant was going to building a new addition and getting hold of the engineering office and getting the secretary to give me the direct extension. ~ Robert Greene,
420:Persons who reach the higher rungs in business management, selling, engineering, religious work, writing, acting, and in every other pursuit get there by following conscientiously and continuously a plan for self-development and growth. ~ David J Schwartz,
421:Birds in flight fascinate me. I admire eagles and falcons. I’m inspired by a feather but also its color, its graphics, its weightlessness and its engineering. It’s so elaborate. In fact I try and transpose the beauty of a bird to women. ~ Alexander McQueen,
422:Chuck Rossi, Director of Release Engineering at Facebook, described, “All the code supporting every feature we’re planning to launch over the next six months has already been deployed onto our production servers. All we need to do is turn it on. ~ Gene Kim,
423:Companies want to innovate. Companies that don't innovate wither on the vine. The connection between STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and the financial stability of a nation is what needs to established. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
424:I am going to design, in a great hurry, and I believe to build a station after my own fancy; that is, with engineering roofs, etc. etc. It is at Paddington, in cutting, and admitting of no exterior, all interior and all roofed in. ~ Isambard Kingdom Brunel,
425:Movies are a powerful medium. People think you are your character. I've had plenty of people who think I'm Drago. They don't know about the chemical engineering part of my personality. They don't know about the geek part of my personality. ~ Dolph Lundgren,
426:There is no one area of chemical engineering that specifically helped me in my career as an astronaut, it was more the general education in engineering. Also, it was a very difficult and rigorous course. So, it made me strong and resourceful. ~ Leroy Chiao,
427:When Angkorian society began, Paris and London were not much more than elaborate villages. Europe was crawling with barbarians, and here were the Khmer engineering sophisticated irrigation systems and constructing the biggest temple in the world. ~ Kim Fay,
428:People are not relativistic when it comes to matters of science, engineering, and technology; rather, they are relativistic and pluralistic in matters of religion and ethics.” 37 In short, they apply their postmodern skepticism selectively ~ Nancy R Pearcey,
429:Scientists at MIT and engineering schools all across America say that they could improve the fuel economy standards for the existing set of vehicles by 10 miles per gallon using existing technology, without compromising safety or comfort at all. ~ Ed Markey,
430:By claiming that they can contribute to software engineering, the soft scientists make themselves even more ridiculous. (Not less dangerous, alas!) In spite of its name, software engineering requires (cruelly) hard science for its support. ~ Edsger W Dijkstra,
431:The design process in engineering is not different in principle from that in architecture, or fashion, or music for that matter. It is a form of composition, of expression, and as such it is open to all the creativity we associate with these. ~ W Brian Arthur,
432:There are fewer Arabs in Tel Aviv, one of the largest cities in the Middle East, than there are in Chicago, the largest city in the American Midwest. How do you accomplish such a remarkable feat of social engineering without massive violence? ~ Max Blumenthal,
433:Persons who reach the higher rungs in business management, selling, engineering, religious work, writing, acting & in every other pursuit get there by following conscientiously & continuously a plan for self-development & growth. ~ David J Schwartz,
434:I hoping to make it [decision] sometime next week. I love the academics at Tech. I can get a great degree there in engineering. Georgia has the ability to win it all next season. I think I can play early at both schools. It's going to be tough. ~ Calvin Johnson,
435:I use minimal software to make my music - a wav editor and a calculator for my beats to make sure everything falls on mathematical precision. If you were just mapping this out visually, it works by math. I guess it's slightly engineering influenced. ~ Girl Talk,
436:Liberals say they are for civil liberties and personal freedom, but they continue to advocate government regulation of business, redistribution of wealth, and various forms of social engineering to manipulate human relationships and attitudes. ~ Richard Ebeling,
437:My latter schooldays and my university days were during the war, when science - physics, in particular - was a very important and glamorous subject. A lot of us felt that if we couldn't get into science, we might try engineering or medicine. ~ John Henry Carver,
438:Now the main areas of higher education that still enjoy considerable financial support from government are subjects like engineering and science and the research ringfence which is the basic minimum to protect Britain's scientific competitiveness. ~ Vince Cable,
439:The aim of human rights, if I may borrow a term from engineering, is to move beyond the design and drawing-board phase, to move beyond thinking and talking about the foundations stones - to laying those foundation stones, inch by inch, together. ~ Mary Robinson,
440:Writing a class without its contract would be similar to producing an engineering component (electrical circuit, VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) chip, bridge, engine...) without a spec. No professional engineer would even consider the idea. ~ Bertrand Meyer,
441:Despite the crapehangers, romanticists, and anti-intellectuals, the world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better. With hands... with tools... with horse sense and science and engineering. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
442:I've said this before elsewhere: There are plenty of opportunities to make a six-figure salary by attacking projects that would typically not be worth the time of a small engineering team. One person with a broad skill set can tackle it economically. ~ Anonymous,
443:Perhaps the best reason to consider the hard sciences is that, well, one study suggests science, engineering, medicine, and dentistry graduates live longer than arts graduates (or law grads). So whatever money you make you can keep a bit longer. ~ Warren Farrell,
444:I hire people who can do their jobs and who will advise me of things they don't agree with. The worst thing you can do is get in a room with 14 people who say, "OK!" Then you really are making decisions about engineering and finance and other areas. ~ Roger Ailes,
445:I love the quietness of the library, the gateway to knowledge, to the French language and medieval history and hydraulic engineering and fairy tales, learning in a very primitive form: books, something that's quickly giving way to modern technology. ~ Mary Kubica,
446:When you get really big, you’ll need to decide whether to organize the entire company around functions (for example, sales, marketing, product management, engineering) or around missions—self-contained business units that contain multiple functions. ~ Ben Horowitz,
447:I have run engineering since day one at Oracle, and I still run engineering. I hold meetings every week with the database team, the middle ware team, the applications team. I run engineering and I will do that until the board throws me out of there. ~ Larry Ellison,
448:Today's water institutions-the policies and laws, government agencies and planning and engineering practices that shape patterns of water use-are steeped in a supply-side management philosophy no longer appropriate to solving today's water problems. ~ Sandra Postel,
449:When the sales guys run the company, the product guys don’t matter so much, and a lot of them just turn off,” Jobs said. Larry Page felt the same: “The best leaders are those with the deepest understanding of the engineering and product design.”34 ~ Walter Isaacson,
450:Right. Mars has about the same day as Earth, so a twenty-four-hour orbit does the trick here too. Then you just drop a cable down through the atmosphere—’ ‘The engineering details of that,’ Frank said dryly, ‘are left as an exercise for the reader. ~ Terry Pratchett,
451:See,” said Gizmo, “we’re all starting out with some tools already forged, when it comes to what we expect of each other. One thing you learn in engineering, you have to understand something before you can change it, or you just get a big mess. ~ Mike Reeves McMillan,
452:Strategic coordination, or coherence, is not ad hoc mutual adjustment. It is coherence imposed on a system by policy and design. More specifically, design is the engineering of fit among parts, specifying how actions and resources will be combined. ~ Richard P Rumelt,
453:Computer science is neither mathematics nor electrical engineering. ~ Alan Perlis (1968) title of article "Computer Science is neither Mathematics nor Electrical Engineering" in: A. Finerman (Hg.), University Education in Computing Science, New York, London, pp. 69-77,
454:I have always made a point in my romances of basing my so-called inventions upon a groundwork of actual fact, and of using in their construction methods and materials which are not entirely without the pale of contemporary engineering skill and knowledge. ~ Jules Verne,
455:There's a snobbery at work in architecture. The subject is too often treated as a fine art, delicately wrapped in mumbo-jumbo. In reality, it's an all-embracing discipline taking in science, art, maths, engineering, climate, nature, politics, economics. ~ Norman Foster,
456:Some says that genetic engineering is within the scope of the God! Well, it was so, that area would have been encircled with the impassable high walls! Mankind cannot lose its time with this kind of religious craps! Genetic engineering is our garden! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
457:The time to talk about it [genetic engineering to improve a baby's genes] in schools and churches and magazines and debate societies is now. If you wait, five years from now the gene doctor will be hanging out the MAKE A SMARTER BABY sign down the street. ~ Arthur Caplan,
458:A wizard,” Long echoed, thoughtfully. “Odd word to use in connection with computers. I’ve always found there to be so much … flimflam about wizards, and I can’t see how one could get away with that in computer engineering. But perhaps that’s my own innocence. ~ R A MacAvoy,
459:The way to be successful in the software world is to come up with breakthrough software, and so whether it's Microsoft Office or Windows, its pushing that forward. New ideas, surprising the marketplace, so good engineering and good business are one in the same. ~ Bill Gates,
460:Okay, engineering is not quite the right word, as it implies some larger degree of understanding than we have. We are perhaps engineering Earth only in the way that your infant is “engineering” your home media system when she sticks cookies in the DVD slot. ~ David Grinspoon,
461:Sporting competitions seem to be what we obsess over, frankly. So if we can put engineering, science, technology into a format of healthy, fun competition, we can attract all sorts of kids that might not see the kind of activity we do as accessible or rewarding. ~ Dean Kamen,
462:investigations revealed that even in such technical lines as engineering, about 15 percent of one’s financial success is due to one’s technical knowledge and about 85 percent is due to skill in human engineering – to personality and the ability to lead people. ~ Dale Carnegie,
463:One of the really remarkably beneficial aspects of genetic engineering is that much of the previous methodology for controlling pests and so forth is through chemicals that affect a very broad spectrum of insects, for example, or fungicides that control fungi. ~ Nina Fedoroff,
464:Stop for a second to behold the miracle of engineering that these hand-held, networked computers represent—the typical CPU in a modern smartphone is ten times more powerful than the Cray-1 supercomputer installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1976. ~ Anthony M Townsend,
465:The inspirational value of the space program is probably of far greater importance to education than any input of dollars... A whole generation is growing up which has been attracted to the hard disciplines of science and engineering by the romance of space. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
466:Genetic engineering is having a serious impact on the food we eat, on the environment, and on farmers. To ensure we can maximize benefits and minimize hazards, Congress must provide a comprehensive regulatory framework for all genetically engineered products. ~ Dennis Kucinich,
467:Russia and China also cooperate in mechanical engineering, high-speed railway transportation, lumber processing, nuclear energy production and so on. We have built the Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant. Two units are already operational and are showing good results. ~ Vladimir Putin,
468:Nonetheless, the research budgets of the Department of Defense are under enormous stress-and they are extremely important because they support more than 40 percent of all federal funding for engineering schools across the country. So the threat was and is real. ~ Charles M Vest,
469:Googlers working in engineering or product management can nominate themselves for promotion.xlv Interestingly enough, we found that women are less likely to nominate themselves for promotion, but that when they do, they are promoted at slightly higher rates than men. ~ Laszlo Bock,
470:Law 3: Practice consciousness engineering. Extraordinary minds understand that their growth depends on two things: their models of reality and their systems for living. They carefully curate the most empowering models and systems and frequently update themselves. ~ Vishen Lakhiani,
471:Very few people can communicate with one another. The only language that's not subject to interpretation is mathematics, chemistry, basic science, engineering principles, and applied agriculture. But other than that, many systems today are subject to interpretation. ~ Jacque Fresco,
472:The descent of sport into spectacle is not unique to the age of genetic engineering. But it illustrates how performance-enhancing technologies, genetic or otherwise, can erode the part of athletic and artistic performance that celebrates natural talents and gifts. ~ Michael J Sandel,
473:Social engineering is using manipulation, influence and deception to get a person, a trusted insider within an organization, to comply with a request, and the request is usually to release information or to perform some sort of action item that benefits that attacker. ~ Kevin Mitnick,
474:I'd be like, alright, I don't know anything about sales. So I would search for sales on Amazon, get the three top-rated books and just go at it. I did that for marketing, finance, product, engineering. If there was one thing that was really important for me, that was it. ~ Drew Houston,
475:Lorenzo de' Medici seeks highly skilled, aesthetically oriented individual to conceive and implement several major public projects. You are a generalist with sound training in structural engineering, synthesis of pigments and Christian iconography. Some climbing involved ~ Michelangelo,
476:Similarly for marking exercises, quantitative exercises, maybe not so much in mathematics, but certainly problem sets in physics, chemistry, and engineering and things like that where answers and methods are clear cut, absolutely. I would like to see that done online. ~ David Gelernter,
477:There are call centres, credit card sales. Be open-minded and things work out.’ ‘Finish engineering and join a call centre?’ ‘Dude, don’t be so shocked. We, like millions of other students, are the losers in the Great Indian Education Race. Be happy with whatever you get. ~ Chetan Bhagat,
478:It was supposed to be a surprise," I tell her.  "She's getting her wedding dress fitted, and I thought it would be nice if all of the baby furniture was delivered and I set up the nursery.  Obviously, I didn't know that assembling furniture takes a damn engineering degree. ~ Sabrina Paige,
479:Truly winning the war on cancer requires individual responsibility for our food choices; as long as we wait for the next pharmaceutical breakthrough or genetic engineering miracle to save us, we won’t use the considerable power we already possess to end this scourge. In ~ T Colin Campbell,
480:If in the end Erso’s research moves us closer to engineering a weapon for the battle station, then you will have not only my gratitude, but also that of Supreme Chancellor Palpatine and the Republic itself.” Krennic restrained a smile. “We all play our part, Vice Chancellor. ~ James Luceno,
481:I ... have two vocations: chess and engineering. If I played chess only, I believe that my success would not have been significantly greater. I can play chess well only when I have fully convalesced from chess and when the 'hunger for chess' once more awakens within me. ~ Mikhail Botvinnik,
482:It is the process of design, in which diverse parts of the “given-world” of the scientist and the “made-world” of the engineer are reformed and assembled into something the likes of which Nature had not dreamed, that divorces engineering from science and marries it to art. ~ Henry Petroski,
483:What is innovation if not our ticket to every business interest in the world? Its the ticket to solving the worlds problems - the energy problems, the pollution problems, the global warming problems. If it isnt for science and engineering, how will we compete in the new world? ~ David Pogue,
484:A.E.G., the German General Electric, signed Szilard on as a paid consultant and actually built one of the Einstein-Szilard refrigerators, but the magnetic pump was so noisy compared to even the noisy conventional compressors of the day that it never left the engineering lab. ~ Richard Rhodes,
485:The best thing that ever happened to me is that nothing happened in writing. I ended up working for engineering companies, and that's where I found my material, in the everyday struggle between capitalism and grace. Being broke and tired, you don't come home your best self. ~ George Saunders,
486:I think like we’re just not educating people in this kind of general way. You should have a pretty broad engineering and scientific background. You should have some leadership training and a bit of MBA training or knowledge of how to run things, organize stuff, and raise money. ~ Ashlee Vance,
487:Sociopath" was one of the most useful concepts that Miriam's Memetic Engineering Task Force had imported from the United States: Erasmus's Propaganda Ministry had been working overtime to raise awareness of it as an Anti-Democratic Problem: "People who think People are Things. ~ Charles Stross,
488:tower was constantly changing as each floor rotated separately from the others, an engineering accomplishment powered by solar panels and wind turbines located between each floor. Sometimes it resembled an hourglass, sometimes an elegant vase. Now it looked like a twisted ribbon. ~ Lee Strauss,
489:technologies like big data and analytics, high-speed communications, and rapid prototyping have augmented the contributions made by more abstract and data-driven reasoning, and in turn have increased the value of people with the right engineering, creative, or design skills. ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
490:The first step to take is to become aware that love is an art, just as living is an art; if we want to learn how to love we must proceed in the same way we have to proceed if we want to learn any other art, say music, painting, carpentry, or the art of medicine or engineering. What ~ Erich Fromm,
491:My engineering training taught me to be a systems thinker. I looked at companies as "systems" and saw work as a system of tasks - that needed to be reengineered. I was also focused on operations, getting things done and built. My engineering training taught me to be a pragmatist. ~ James A Champy,
492:Reverse-engineering problem: It is easier to predict how an ice cube would melt into a puddle than, looking at a puddle, to guess the shape of the ice cube that may have caused it. This “inverse problem” makes narrative disciplines and accounts (such as histories) suspicious. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
493:The future is better than the past. Despite the crepe hangers, romanticists, and anti-intellectuals, the world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better. With hands ... with tools ... with horse sense and science and engineering. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
494:If you start from a belief that the most knowledgeable person on earth does not have even one percent of the total knowledge on earth, that shoots down social engineering, economic central planning, judicial activism, and innumerable other ambitious notions favored by the political left. ~ Thomas Sowell,
495:It is why so many graduate students in science and engineering at American graduate schools - still the best in the world - are from other countries. The corollary, one that the United States sometimes fails to grasp, is that abandoning science is the road back into poverty and backwardness. ~ Anonymous,
496:The land looks flat from above, but these Chinese rice paddies are terraced for a better yield. Farmers have created these “steps” in China and the Philippines for as long as two millennia; they’re considered a marvel of ancient engineering. (JIALIANG GAO/GETTY IMAGES. ZUBIN LI/GETTY IMAGES) ~ Anonymous,
497:We will always have STEM with us. Some things will drop out of the public eye and will go away, but there will always be science, engineering and technology. And there will always, always be mathematics. Everything is physics and math. ~ Katherine Johnson, "Katherine Johnson: A Lifetime of STEM" (2013).,
498:Every orchid or rose or lizard or snake is the work of a dedicated and skilled breeder. There are thousands of people, amateurs and professionals, who devote their lives to this business. Now imagine what will happen when the tools of genetic engineering become accessible to these people. ~ Freeman Dyson,
499:The engineering is long gone in most PC companies. In the consumer electronics companies, they don't understand the software parts of it. And so you really can't make the products that you can make at Apple anywhere else right now. Apple's the only company that has everything under one roof. ~ Steve Jobs,
500:I believe that the time has arrived for medical investigation of the problems of manned rocket flight, for it will not be the engineering problems but rather the limits of the human frame that will make the final decision as to whether manned space flight will eventually become a reality. ~ Wernher von Braun,
501:With the subsequent strong support from cybernetics , the concepts of systems thinking and systems theory became integral parts of the established scientific language, and led to numerous new methodologies and applications -- systems engineering, systems analysis, systems dynamics, and so on. ~ Fritjof Capra,
502:Today, without its exotic carapace, the exterior is a reddish brick within which the arches and buttresses that made such a feat of engineering possible are clearly visible. They have their own beauty; through such structural expertise the Pantheon has been in constant use for 1,875 years. ~ Elizabeth Speller,
503:Atlantis was a highly evolved civilization where the sciences and arts were far more advanced than one might guess. Atlantis was technologically advanced in genetic engineering, computer science, inter-dimensional physics, and artistically developed with electronic music and crystal art forms. ~ Frederick Lenz,
504:I know our congressmen hasn't done it, has anybody put a server in their basement? Oh boy, Hillary Clinton's only - Hillary Clinton's only experience in cyber security involves her criminal scheme to violate federal law, engineering a massive cover up and putting the entire nation in harm's way. ~ Donald Trump,
505:Within the overall structure of a project there is always room for individuality and craftsmanship… One hundred years from now, our engineering may seem as archaic as the techniques used by medieval cathedral builders seem to today’s civil engineers, while our craftsmanship will still be honored. ~ Cal Newport,
506:You go to a technology conference or an engineering conference, there are very few women there. At the same time it's a blessing in the fact that you do get noticed. People tend to remember you as the only woman in the room 'who said that', or the only woman in the room who was an engineer. ~ Padmasree Warrior,
507:I studied engineering at MIT. There, the late, great physicist Philip Morrison introduced me to the idea that, in any system, there exists the inevitability that an event will occur which is completely unrelated to anything that preceded it. It completely changed my perception of "impossible." ~ Tohoru Masamune,
508:[A Bugatti Veyron is] quite the most stunning piece of automotive engineering ever created....At a stroke then, the Veyron has rendered everything I’ve ever said about any other car obsolete. It’s rewritten the rule book, moved the goalposts and in the process, given Mother Nature a bloody nose. ~ Jeremy Clarkson,
509:We may discover resources on the moon or Mars that will boggle the imagination, that will test our limits to dream. And the fascination generated by further exploration will inspire our young people to study math, and science, and engineering and create a new generation of innovators and pioneers. ~ George W Bush,
510:Advertising isnt just the disruption of aesthetics, the insults to your intelligence and the interruption of your train of thought. At every company that sells ads, a significant portion of their engineering team spends their day tuning data mining, writing better code to collect all your personal data. ~ Jan Koum,
511:For a moment in the 1980s, it seemed like knowledge engineering was about to take over the world, with companies and countries making massive investments in it. But disappointment soon set in, and machine learning began its inexorable rise, at first quietly, and then riding a roaring wave of data. ~ Pedro Domingos,
512:Konstantin Tsiolkovsky (1857–1935), a reclusive, near-deaf, self-taught rural schoolteacher who, working alone and having almost no contact with the wider scientific community, invented ingenious engineering designs for multistage rockets, orbiting space colonies, and interplanetary craft. Though ~ David Grinspoon,
513:The benefits of medical research are real - but so are the potential horrors of genetic engineering and embryo manipulation. We devise heart transplants, but do little for the 15 million who die annually of malnutrition and related diseases. Our cleverness has grown prodigiously - but not our wisdom. ~ Martin Ryle,
514:The Email Phishing Hack:  Phishing refers to a social engineering method used by hackers to gain what should be confidential information from unwitting victims. Phishing works in this way: the hacker sends an official-looking email to the target, purporting to be from the a legitimate institution that ~ Mike Mason,
515:But I’ve never seen the Icarus story as a lesson about the limitations of humans. I see it as a lesson about the limitations of wax as an adhesive. The cold of Titan is just an engineering problem. With the right refitting, and the right heat sources, a Cessna 172 could fly on Titan—and so could we. ~ Randall Munroe,
516:Today when a man gets married he gets a home, a housekeeper, a cook, a cheering squad and another paycheck. When a woman marries, she gets a boarder. To define it rudely but not ineptly, engineering is the art of doing that well with one dollar, which any bungler can do with two after a fashion. ~ Duke of Wellington,
517:In engineering or medical science, a deep understanding of uncertainty can be a matter of life and death. In politics, over-confidence is often the norm; uncertainty is seen as weakness when really it is a vital part of decision making. In this respect, science delivers an important lesson in humility. In ~ Brian Cox,
518:Checklists turn out...to be among the basic tools of the quality and productivity revolution in aviation, engineering, construction - in virtually every field combining high risk and complexity. Checklists seem lowly and simplistic, but they help fill in for the gaps in our brains and between our brains. ~ Atul Gawande,
519:The present Luddism over genetic engineering may die a natural death as the computer-illiterate generation is superseded.... I fear that, if the green movement's high-amplitude warnings over GMOs turn out to be empty, people will be dangerously disinclined to listen to other and more serious warnings. ~ Richard Dawkins,
520:A high degree of intelligence yes in no other creature in the natural world. That's why nature shuns us and why we subconsciously hate her and seek to obliterate her. High intelligence leads to the concept of progress. Progress leads to nuclear weapons, bio-engineering chaos and ultimately to annihilation. ~ Dean Koontz,
521:Fashion is not just about what we wear, but...fashion is also a business. It is an art, it's a career that involves science, engineering, accounting and so much more. People can learn about the math behind Charles James' designs, and think, 'Maybe I should pay closer attention to geometry this semester' ~ Michelle Obama,
522:The difference in inclination between the two upper shafts in the Great Pyramid of Giza was coherently engineered with its dimensions and not separately therefrom. In other words, the engineering application of the shafts is an indivisible element from the whole geometrical shape of the pyramid itself. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
523:In ways that we have barely begun to understand, trillions upon trillions of reflexive chemical reactions add up to a mobile, thinking, decision-making you—or, come to that, a rather less reflective but still incredibly organized dung beetle. Every living thing, never forget, is a wonder of atomic engineering. ~ Bill Bryson,
524:In Lagos there's a really strong case to resurrect strong parts. Embedded in all of it are some amazing pieces of planning, amazing pieces of engineering and interaction. For instance, the campus of Lagos University is stunningly beautiful, efficient and generous, and that needs to be recognised and preserved. ~ Rem Koolhaas,
525:But rather than the decrease in reports of cannibalism one might expect to find in modern times, the opposite turns out to be true. The greatest number of cannibalism-related deaths in China came as a direct result of Mao Zedong’s “The Great Leap Forward” (1958–1961), a disastrous attempt at utopian engineering. ~ Bill Schutt,
526:There are certainly lots of jobs in computer coding, but coding doesn't really require advanced mathematics. And engineering jobs, they vary widely in the amount of demand that we actually need. So, you know, the number of people for whom the job description includes Newton's calculus is not perhaps that high. ~ Anya Kamenetz,
527:Good engineering estimates are possible only if you have two things: good information and good engineers. If the specs are crap, and a programmer is asked to conjure up a number based on an incomprehensible whiteboard scribbling, everyone should know exactly what they’re getting: a fuzzy scribble of an estimate. ~ Scott Berkun,
528:Mea culpa, mea culpa. MIT and Wharton and University of Chicago created the financial engineering instruments, which, like Samson and Delilah, blinded every CEO. They didn't realize the kind of leverage they were doing and they didn't understand when they were really creating a real profit or a fictitious one. ~ Paul Samuelson,
529:It is pure mythology that women cannot perform as well as men in science, engineering and mathematics. In my experience, the opposite is true: Women are often more adept and patient at untangling complex problems, multitasking, seeing the possibilities in new solutions and winning team support for collaborative action. ~ Weili Dai,
530:But however sanguine you might be about the proposition that we have already ravaged the natural world, which we surely have, it is another thing entirely to consider the possibility that we have only provoked it, engineering first in ignorance and then in denial a climate system that will now go to war with us ~ David Wallace Wells,
531:To graduate, Miller added, all Olin students “must complete a yearlong engineering design project in small teams with a corporate sponsor that provides financial support for each project. The projects require a corporate liaison engineer and often involve nondisclosure agreements and new product development.” Olin ~ Thomas L Friedman,
532:We have grown accustomed to the wonders of clean water, indoor plumbing, laser surgery, genetic engineering, artificial joints, replacement body parts, and the much longer lives that accompany them. Yet we should remember that the vast majority of humans ever born died before the age of 10 from an infectious disease. ~ S Jay Olshansky,
533:Yet the story of how we have kept the space station cool—a huge chunk of metal flying through space getting roasted by the unfiltered sun for forty-five minutes out of every ninety while its enormous solar arrays generate electricity—is a story of an engineering triumph with important implications for future spaceflight. ~ Scott Kelly,
534:By 1929 a handful of farsighted flight pioneers had concluded that “aviation could not progress until planes could fly safely day or night in almost any kind of weather.” Foremost among these was Dr. Jimmy Doolittle, recently armed with a PhD in aeronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In ~ Winston Groom,
535:I think people all over the institution recognize that different ways of understanding are valuable. Artists may think in a different way than biologists or chemists, but you can learn something from that. It is true that the arts at MIT don't have the same amount of funding or same status as the sciences or engineering. ~ Alan Lightman,
536:GE’s lab is like a mini United Nations. Every engineering team looks like one of those multiethnic Benetton ads. But this was not affirmative action at work; it was a brutal meritocracy. When you are competing in the global technology Olympics every day, you have to recruit the best talent from anywhere you can find it. ~ Thomas L Friedman,
537:There is something indefinable in an entrepreneur, and I saw that in Steve," he said. " He was interested not just in engineering, but also the business aspects. I taught him that if you act like you can do something, then it will work. I told him, " Pretend to be completely in control and people will assume that you are. ~ Walter Isaacson,
538:In fact when you combine stem cell technology with the technology known as tissue engineering you can actually grow up entire organs, so as you suggest that sometime in the future you get in an auto accident and lose your kidney, we'd simply take a few skin cells and grow you up a new kidney. In fact this has already been done. ~ Robert Lanza,
539:market-driven pressures plus an engineering-driven company yield ever-increasing features, complexity, and confusion. But even companies that do intend to search for human needs are thwarted by the severe challenges of the product development process, in particular, the challenges of insufficient time and insufficient money. ~ Donald A Norman,
540:The fact is that humans have been shaping the genetics of what they eat for thousands of years. Genetic engineering simply speeds up the process that used to take generations. Preventing people from getting things like golden rice or disease-resistant cassava destroys human life, and does not spare the environment in any way. ~ Annalee Newitz,
541:The Presidency is not merely an administrative office. Thats the least of it. It is more than an engineering job, efficient or inefficient. It is pre-eminently a place of moral leadership. All our great Presidents were leaders of thought at times when certain historic ideas in the life of the nation had to be clarified. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt,
542:We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. So medicine, law, business, engineering... these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love... these are what we stay alive for. ~ Walt Whitman,
543:He knows no physics or engineering to make the world real to him… no paintings to show him how others have enjoyed it… no music except television jingles… no history except tales from a desperate mother… no friends to give him a joke or make him know himself more moderately. He’s a modern citizen for whom society doesn’t exist. ~ Peter Shaffer,
544:If engineering cannot tell us what our houses should look like, nor in a pluralistic and non-deferential world can precedent or tradition, we must be free to pursue all stylistic options. We should acknowledge that the question of what is beautiful is both impossible to elucidate and shameful and even undemocratic to mention. ~ Alain de Botton,
545:We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering – these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love – these are what we stay alive for. ~ Robin Williams,
546:Yes, the world is changing, and will continue to do so. But that does not mean we should stop the search for timeless principles. Think of it this way: While the practices of engineering continually evolve and change, the laws of physics remain relatively fixed. I like to think of our work as a search for timeless principles— ~ James C Collins,
547:A firm belief that things were more likely than not to go wrong was another characteristic of Sir Gavin’s approach to life, induced no doubt by his own regrets. Indeed, he could not be entirely absolved from suspicion of rather enjoying the worst when it happened: at times almost of engineering disaster of a purely social kind. ~ Anthony Powell,
548:As a young designer explained to me bluntly: "Everyone upstairs is dumb," referring to the floor above the engineering lair at the 156 University office where customer support, administrators and salespeople sat. My first impulse was to laugh at his ridiculous, blithe dismissiveness, until I realized that it wasn't very funny. ~ Katherine Losse,
549:He only wishes there were something that would heal the scars in his mind, which he can still feel. He sees his mind now as an archipelago of islands that he labors to build bridges between - and while he's had great success engineering the most spectacular of bridges, he suspects there are some islands that he'll never reach. ~ Neal Shusterman,
550:The reason our country looks the way it does is through social engineering that distinctly benefits suburban communities, exurban communities, and often white residents. And we are socially engineered in such a way as to, often unconsciously and unintentionally, but sometimes intentionally, perpetuate this divisive inequality. ~ Richard Benjamin,
551:This is the philosophy of YAGNI: “You aren’t going to need it.” There is wisdom in this message, since over-engineering is often much worse than under-engineering. On the other hand, when you discover that you truly do need an architectural boundary where none exists, the costs and risks can be very high to add such a boundary. ~ Robert C Martin,
552:Those with engineering skills will build tomorrow's genius computers. But those with the ability to create knowledge of any kind will be the ones who are best able to extract great value from them. The way to create value in the age of genius machines will be to compile and disseminate knowledge that other people will find useful. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
553:Tsiolkovsky had no need for a lathe or a drill because he produced his results using the traditional tools of design engineering: pen and ink. He didn’t develop rockets; instead, he developed the rocket equation. He didn’t build liquid-fuel rocket engines; instead, he showed that liquid fuels would offer the highest performance. ~ K Eric Drexler,
554:Because the thing about viruses is that they're easily manipulated. The DNA they inject doesn't have to be destructive. It can be replaced with almost any kind of DNA you want, and it can be programmed to only replace certain parts of the host's genetic code. In other words, viruses are perfect vectors for genetic engineering. ~ Christian Cantrell,
555:Energy Engineering started first in IIT Kharagpur in 1983 and mine was the third batch. It was definitely not a popular course. It was basically an amalgamation of nuclear, mechanical, chemical engineering, etc. But I don't think it was a big factor because if we look, most of them joined the IT sectors and not the energy sector. ~ Ramon Magsaysay,
556:If you're serious about being an architect, you've got to learn how to take responsibility. It's not fluff. You have to do every detail on every bloody piece of the building. You have to know how the engineering works. You have to know how the fittings go together. You have to master the mechanical, electrical, acoustical - everything. ~ Frank Gehry,
557:Cohn wrote a joke for Trump to use at the Gridiron Dinner: “We’ve made enormous progress on the wall. All the drawings are done. All the excavating’s done. All the engineering is done. The only thing we’ve been stumbling with is we haven’t been able to figure out how to stretch the word ‘Trump’ over 1,200 miles.” Trump wouldn’t use it. ~ Bob Woodward,
558:his gut kept telling him that there was some kind of connection between the capacity to love and the capacity to love running. The engineering was certainly the same: both depended on loosening your grip on your own desires, putting aside what you wanted and appreciating what you got, being patient and forgiving and undemanding. ~ Christopher McDougall,
559:In addition to the problem of teacher competency there is the malignancy of statist-driven political conformity, ideological indoctrination, social engineering, and academic experimentation that have suffused public schools with such agendas as multiculturalism, global warming, and the distortion of American history, among other things.22 ~ Mark R Levin,
560:Such an AI might also be able to produce a detailed blueprint for how to bootstrap from existing technology (such as biotechnology and protein engineering) to the constructor capabilities needed for high-throughput atomically precise manufacturing that would allow inexpensive fabrication of a much wider range of nanomechanical structures. ~ Nick Bostrom,
561:We are reaping the fruits of ten thousand, fifty thousand years of sowing of the fields of mind. And it is being dropped into our laps for us to create human-machine interfacing, control of genetic material, redefinition of social reality, re engineering of languages, revisioning of the planetary ecology, all these things fall upon us. ~ Terence McKenna,
562:Bushnell agreed. “There is something indefinable in an entrepreneur, and I saw that in Steve,”he said. “He was interested not just in engineering, but also the business aspects. I taught him that if you act like you can do something, then it will work. I told him, ‘Pretend to be completely in control and people will assume that you are. ~ Walter Isaacson,
563:I'm against ObamaCare, which is imposing radical change, and I would be against a conservative imposing radical change.... I don't think right-wing social engineering is any more desirable than left-wing social engineering... I don't think imposing radical change from the right or the left is a very good way for a free society to operate. ~ Newt Gingrich,
564:Malevich, Lissitsky, Kandinsky, Tatlin, Pevsner, Rodchenko... all believed in the social role of art... Their works were like hinged doors, connecting activity with activity. Art with engineering; music with painting; poetry with design; fine art with propaganda; photographs with typography; diagrams with action; the studio with the street. ~ John Berger,
565:The prerequisite that people have a scientific or engineering degree or a medical degree limits the number of female astronauts. Right now, still, we have about 20 per cent of people who have that prerequisite who are female. So hey, girls: Embrace the very fun career of science and technology. Look at computer science. That's what I did. ~ Julie Payette,
566:Bushnell agreed. “There is something indefinable in an entrepreneur, and I saw that in Steve,” he said. “He was interested not just in engineering, but also the business aspects. I taught him that if you act like you can do something, then it will work. I told him, ‘Pretend to be completely in control and people will assume that you are. ~ Walter Isaacson,
567:Sometimes I wonder what would have happened if I sucked ass. What if I couldn’t skate? Couldn’t shoot? What if I’d grown up to be a scrawny twig with the coordination of a Kleenex box? Or if I’d been into art or music or chemical engineering?

He probably would’ve had a coronary. Or maybe convinced my mother to give me up for adoption. ~ Elle Kennedy,
568:Bushnell agreed. “There is something indefinable in an entrepreneur, and I saw that in Steve,” he said. “He was interested not just in engineering, but also the business aspects. I taught him that if you act like you can do something, then it will work. I told him, ‘Pretend to be completely in control and people will assume that you are.’  ~ Walter Isaacson,
569:How can he explain such sadness when she is supposed to make him happy? The truth is he cannot explain it himself. All he knows is that something stepped in front of him, blocking his way, until in time he gave up on things, he gave up studying engineering and he gave up on the idea of traveling. He sat down in his life. And there he remained. ~ Mitch Albom,
570:the matter in our machines, roads, buildings and other engineering projects appears on track to soon overtake all living matter on Earth. In other words, even without an intelligence explosion, most matter on Earth that exhibits goal-oriented properties may soon be designed rather than evolved. This new third kind of goal-oriented behavior has ~ Max Tegmark,
571:Being smart in the arts is the same as being smart in engineering is the same as being smart in writing is the same as being smart in anything, really. It's the ability to manipulate all the pieces of the puzzle in your mind, try to fit them together, and when they don't fit quite right... you sand the edges/corners and make them all fit. ~ Gerald Jay Sussman,
572:Phyllis is one of the tunnel boring machines for Crossrail and one of the most extraordinary characters I met, visiting some of the most exciting infrastructure in Britain. Crossrail is the new railway which will run from West to East right across London. It is the biggest engineering project in Europe - and Phyllis herself is not exactly dainty. ~ Evan Davis,
573:I do believe in God, but I think it's very healthy for a believer to spend time in the pragmatism of agnosticism, and I think God appreciates agnostics trying to make a science of it and going, "I will not believe any further than that." I enjoy that kind of engineering mind. In no way did it ever feel blasphemous to me as a man of faith. ~ Matthew McConaughey,
574:build creative digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness, imagination, and sustained innovation. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology, so he built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. ~ Walter Isaacson,
575:The occult priest should be capable of instructing anyone in the procedures of emotional engineering. The main methods are the gnostic ones of casting oneself into a frenzied ecstacy, stilling the mind to a point of absolute quiescence, and evoking the laughter of the gods by combining laughter with the contemplation of paradox.
   ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
576:I feel just as creative focusing on just the sounds and getting the photographic representation of where the sounds should be. But it's all the same bag of bones for me. It's hard for me to compartmentalize production and engineering, and that's why I can't produce things unless I'm also recording. It's very tactile. I need my hands in the dirt. ~ John Congleton,
577:Like just about everything else conjured up in the past century, the underground subway system of the modern city is an unfathomable engineering miracle covered in several inches of filth, urine, and spray paint. Despite being a certified member of the human race, I'll never fully understand why miracles of this magnitude are treated so casually. ~ Gene Doucette,
578:He saw a presentation given by John Allspaw and his colleague Paul Hammond that flipped the world on its head. Allspaw and Hammond ran the IT Operations and Engineering groups at Flickr. Instead of fighting like cats and dogs, they talked about how they were working together to routinely do ten deploys a day! This is in a world when most IT organizations ~ Gene Kim,
579:It's clearly a crisis of two things: of consciousness and conditioning. We have the technological power, the engineering skills to save our planet, to cure disease, to feed the hungry, to end war; But we lack the intellectual vision, the ability to change our minds. We must decondition ourselves from 10,000 years of bad behavior. And, it's not easy. ~ Terence McKenna,
580:Dad and Mom were frustrated artists - Dad wanted to study engineering or architecture and Mom wanted to be an actress - but the world was a different place when they were young so Dad became a public works foreman and Mom became a stay-at-home mom. When I said I wanted to be a writer, they were thrilled. They did everything in their power to support me. ~ Eden Robinson,
581:I'm from the generation that's always been recording, from the very beginning. I learned to play the guitar on the four-track. I started listening to music at a time when people were doing recording at home, when the discussion about songwriting correlated to the discussion about producing and engineering. I think that's a description of my generation. ~ Sufjan Stevens,
582:No. I'm not from outer space or the future. And this is not magic, just science, pure engineering. Magic, religion, the occult --all of it-- they are all excuses to not believe that wonders are possible here on Earth. I don't want to be magic. I want people to understand that things they never even dreamed of are possible. I want to be believed, Louisa. ~ Samantha Hunt,
583:I think it is fair to assume that there are a large number of idiots in any given random collection of citizens of any country. The exact proportion of idiots is subjective. For instance, in some cultures, anyone who listens to Pink Floyd and was not born in the 1960s may be considered an idiot. Entire Indian engineering colleges would be idiots in this case. ~ Anonymous,
584:No one, not even Wick, knew why the Company hadn't seen the day coming when Mord would transform from their watchdog to their doom - why they hadn't destroyed Mord while they still held that power. Now it was too late, for not only had Mord become a behemouth but by some magic of engineering extorted from the company, he had learned to levitate, to fly. ~ Jeff VanderMeer,
585:officials gained their posts by demonstrating their knowledge of the Confucian classics; they had no reason to be versed in hydraulic engineering per se. In other words, there was a dangerously narrow view of what qualified a man for a government position (although in some ways the appointment of ministers in modern Western democracies is not so different). ~ Philip Ball,
586:Science has discovered much. The engineering is wonderful, epicycles and all. And yet, as we look at this vast, elaborate structure built on layer and layer of complex constituents, can we help but be reminded of the Land of Oz. Have we found the Emerald City? Is this what we were searching for? Is this the ultimate fabric of reality? Is this all there is? ~ Walker Evans,
587:When our small research group moved from MIT to Dartmouth College years ago, one of the Dartmouth engineering professors watched us in seminars for a while, and then dropped by our offices. “You people are different,” he said. “You ask different kinds of questions. You see things I don’t see. Somehow you come at the world in a different way. How? Why? ~ Donella H Meadows,
588:All my days are themed. Monday is managementTuesday is product, engineering, and design. Wednesday is marketing, growth, and communications. Thursday is partnership and developers. Friday is company and cultureOn the days beginning with T, I start at Twitter in the morning, then go to Square in the afternoon. Sundays are for strategySaturday is a day off. ~ Jack Dorsey,
589:However, a real implementation may still have to include code to handle the case where something happens that was assumed to be impossible, even if that handling boils down to printf("Sucks to be you") and exit(666) — i.e., letting a human operator clean up the mess [93]. (This is arguably the difference between computer science and software engineering.) ~ Martin Kleppmann,
590:They take seats across the head end of the table, which is wide enough for a Last Supper tableau. In the Jesus position is a really big chair. It is the kind of thing you’d get if you went to a Finnish designer with a shaved head, rimless glasses, and twin Ph.D.s in semiotics and civil engineering, wrote him a blank check, and asked him to design a throne. ~ Neal Stephenson,
591:If you can distill the essence of GE's stock behavior over the past twenty years, then you can apply it to financial engineering. You can estimate the risk of holding the stock over the next twenty years. You can estimate how many shares of the stock to buy for your portfolio. You can calculate the proper value of options you want to trade on the stock. ~ Beno t B Mandelbrot,
592:..."The glass isn't half-empty or half-full. What you're looking at is half a pint of depreciable assets sitting in a pint of capital infrastructure that can be amortized over two accounting periods."
...
"Is there an engineering one?"
...
"Yes! It's quite simple: That's half a pint, all that's wrong is the glass is twice as big as it needs to be. ~ Charles Stross,
593:Engineering is a great profession. There is the satisfaction of watching a figment of the imagination emerge through the aid of science to a plan on paper. Then it moves to realization in stone or metal or energy. Then it brings homes to men or women. Then it elevates the standard of living and adds to the comforts of life. This is the engineer's high privilege. ~ Herbert Hoover,
594:While THE NEW COOL takes the reader inside a season, limns a team and coaching staff, and masterfully recounts a gripping competition, this is anything but your conventional sports book. And not simply because the 'big game' is...a curious robotics contest. Like the kids he vividly captures, Neal Bascomb has himself performed a masterful bit of engineering here. ~ L Jon Wertheim,
595:I see nothing wrong ethically with the idea of correcting single gene defects through genetic engineering. But I am concerned about any other kind of intervention, for anything else would be an experiment, which would impose our will on future generations and take unreasonable chances with their welfare ... Thus such intervention is beyond the scope of consideration. ~ Ian Wilmut,
596:The required techniques of effective reasoning are pretty formal, but as long as programming is done by people that don't master them, the software crisis will remain with us and will be considered an incurable disease. And you know what incurable diseases do: they invite the quacks and charlatans in, who in this case take the form of Software Engineering gurus. ~ Edsger Dijkstra,
597:The day when the scientist, no matter how devoted, may make significant progress alone and without material help is past. This fact is most self-evident in our work. Instead of an attic with a few test tubes, bits of wire and odds and ends, the attack on the atomic nucleus has required the development and construction of great instruments on an engineering scale. ~ Ernest Lawrence,
598:I will build a car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family, but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one... ~ Henry Ford,
599:… what society overwhelmingly asks for is snake oil. Of course, the snake oil has the most impressive names — otherwise you would be selling nothing — like “Structured Analysis and Design”, “Software Engineering”, “Maturity Models”, “Management Information Systems”, “Integrated Project Support Environments” “Object Orientation” and “Business Process Re-engineering”. ~ Edsger Dijkstra,
600:Marc Andreessen (here) long ago referred to the above double-/triple-threat concept, citing Scott’s writing, as “even the secret formula to becoming a CEO. All successful CEOs are like this.” He reiterated that you could also cultivate this in school by getting unusual combinations of degrees, like engineering + MBA, law degree + MBA, or undergrad physics + economics. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
601:principles of a problem. What are the physics of it? How much time will it take? How much will it cost? How much cheaper can I make it? There’s this level of engineering and physics that you need to make judgments about what’s possible and interesting. Elon is unusual in that he knows that, and he also knows business and organization and leadership and governmental issues. ~ Ashlee Vance,
602:Do we pour $40 billion into grandiose Louisiana engineering projects or do we instead put up no trespassing- signs in the areas below sea level? All are hard choices with various merits and pains. The important thing, however, is for America to decide whether the current policy of inaction is really the way we want to deal with the worst natural disaster in our history. ~ Douglas Brinkley,
603:The angles of the Great Pyramid's upper two shafts were chosen carefully to reflect the length of the base diagonal insomuch that they were tweaked to conserve the value of their difference in addition to the average thereof. I am sure that this was an ingenious solution which were devised to enable some Engineering application that uses both of the shafts in its process! ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
604:The Difference Engine stands—for a replica works today, in the Science Museum in London—as a milestone of what could be achieved in precision engineering. In the composition of its alloys, the exactness of its dimensions, the interchangeability of its parts, nothing surpassed this segment of an unfinished machine. Still, it was a curio. And it was as far as Babbage could go. ~ James Gleick,
605:Good product managers focus the team on revenue and customers. Bad product managers focus the team on how many features competitors are building. Good product managers define good products that can be executed with a strong effort. Bad product managers define good products that can’t be executed or let engineering build whatever they want (that is, solve the hardest problem). ~ Ben Horowitz,
606:The thing about Markham that keeps it off my radar is that it pretty much doesn’t have a single team that I can bet on, or against. I’m not saying that reflects negatively on Markham as an institution; it is known for turning out leaders in fields as diverse as the sciences, math, engineering, and the arts. That’s all well and good, but it doesn’t get you into a bowl game. ~ David Rosenfelt,
607:Franklin D. Roosevelt observed during the 1932 campaign, “The Presidency is not merely an administrative office. That’s the least of it. It is more than an engineering job, efficient or inefficient. It is pre-eminently a place of moral leadership. All our great Presidents were leaders of thought at times when certain historic ideas in the life of the nation had to be clarified. ~ Jon Meacham,
608:In time, almost all men and women will become worthless as producers of goods, food, services, and more machines, as sources of practical ideas in the areas of economics, engineering, and probably medicine, too. So—if we can’t find reasons and methods for treasuring human beings because they are human beings, then we might as well, as has so often been suggested, rub them out. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
609:The optimization of cosmic darkness and of Earth's location within the dark universe that sacrifices neither the material needs of human beings nor their capacity to gain knowledge about the universe reflects masterful engineering at a level far beyond human capability- and even imagination. It testifies of a supernatural, superintelligent, superpowerful, fully deliberate Creator. ~ Hugh Ross,
610:the path of technological progress and its human consequences are determined not simply by advances in science and engineering but also, and more decisively, by the influence of technology on the costs of producing and consuming goods and services. A competitive marketplace guarantees that more efficient modes of production and consumption will win out over less efficient ones. ~ Nicholas Carr,
611:I was this Swedish kid who came over here to study engineering, but I got into movies, and suddenly I'm in this 'Rocky' picture with Sylvester Stallone. And then the movie comes out, and it's a big hit, and I'm famous. Like, world famous. I wasn't thinking of ruling Hollywood; I was thinking of just trying to make it to the next day, trying to figure out what the hell happened. ~ Dolph Lundgren,
612:The optimization of cosmic darkness and of Earth's location within the dark universe that sacrifices neither the material needs of human beings nor their capacity to gain knowledge about the universe reflects masterful engineering at a level far beyond human capability- and even imagination. It testifies of a supernatural, superintelligent, superpowerful, fully deliberate Creator. ~ Hugh Jackman,
613:Indeed, the most important part of engineering work-and also of other scientific work-is the determination of the method of attacking the problem, whatever it may be, whether an experimental investigation, or a theoretical calculation. ... It is by the choice of a suitable method of attack, that intricate problems are reduced to simple phenomena, and then easily solved. ~ Charles Proteus Steinmetz,
614:The Role of the Launch Coordination Engineer Our Launch Coordination Engineering team is composed of Launch Coordination Engineers (LCEs), who are either hired directly into this role, or are SREs with hands-on experience running Google services. LCEs are held to the same technical requirements as any other SRE, and are also expected to have strong communication and leadership skills ~ Betsy Beyer,
615:I was relaxing in my parents' swimming pool with my brother, Peter. I asked him how the engineering business was going, and he reciprocated: 'How's the ministry world going?' 'Okay,' I said, 'except that a couple of weeks ago I realized that I don't know why Jesus had to die.' Then Peter, without skipping a beat, without even a moment's hesitation, said, 'Well, neither did Jesus.' ~ Brian D McLaren,
616:Vigil couldn't quite put his finger on it, but his gut kept telling him that there was some kind of connection between the capacity to love and the capacity to love running. The engineering was certainly the same: both depended on loosening your grip on your own desires, putting aside what you wanted and appreciating what you got, being patient and forgiving and undemanding. ~ Christopher McDougall,
617:Vigil couldn’t quite put his finger on it, but his gut kept telling him that there was some kind of connection between the capacity to love and the capacity to love running. The engineering was certainly the same: both depended on loosening your grip on your own desires, putting aside what you wanted and appreciating what you got, being patient and forgiving and undemanding. ~ Christopher McDougall,
618:A superintelligence is a hypothetical agent that possesses intelligence far surpassing that of the brightest and most gifted human minds. Superintelligence may also refer to a property of problem-solving systems (e.g., superintelligent language translators or engineering assistants) whether or not these high-level intellectual competencies are embodied in agents that act in the world.
   ~ Wikipedia,
619:The programs and planning are buried inside innocuous-sounding entities like the Pentagon’s Center for National and Nuclear Leadership Command Capability, FEMA’s Special Programs Division, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Balanced Survivability Assessment branch, or the Joint System Engineering and Integration Office (JSEIO) at the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). To ~ Garrett M Graff,
620:[He] coluldn't quite put his finger on it, but his gut kept telling him that there was some kind of connection between the capacity to love and the capacity to love *running*. The engineering was certainly the same: both depended on loosening your grip on your own desires, putting aside what you wanted and appreciating what you got, being patient and forgiving and undemanding. ~ Christopher McDougall,
621:The fallacy that dynamic processes must be modeled as if the system is in continuous equilibrium is probably the most important reason for the intellectual failure of neoclassical economics. Mathematics, science and engineering developed tools long ago to model outside of equilibrium processes. This dynamic approach to thinking about the economy should become second nature to economists. ~ Steve Keen,
622:Our yearning for democracy is accompanied by a no less profound yearning for peace. And the media also faced the task of historical engineering to establish this required truth. We therefore have phenomena called 'peace missions' and the 'peace process'. These are terms that apply to whatever the United States happens to be doing or advocating at some moment... in short, 'War is Peace'. ~ Noam Chomsky,
623:A deeper understanding of natural (contrasted to engineering) systems reveals positive feedback as one of the intrinsic characteristics by which many natural systems—from atoms to galaxies, cells to organisms, social systems to whole populations, single concepts to cognitive systems and whole languages—manage to live and evolve. ~ Erich Jantsch, Evolution and Consciousness - Human Systems in Transition,
624:At the Automatica robot and automation fair in Munich this week the organisers devoted a whole section to so-called “service robots”. Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for manufacturing, engineering and automation demonstrated a Care-O-bot that sweeps office floors and empties bins. Pal Robotics showed Stockbot, which walks the aisles in a shop or warehouse to check inventory at night. ~ Anonymous,
625:DevOps and its resulting technical, architectural, and cultural practices represent a convergence of many philosophical and management movements (including): Lean, Theory of Constraints, Toyota production system, resilience engineering, learning organizations, safety culture, Human factors, high-trust management cultures, servant leadership, organizational change management, and Agile methods. ~ Gene Kim,
626:We can achieve the utmost in economies by engineering knowledge; we can conquer new fields by research; we can build plants and machines that shall stand among the wonders of the world; but unless we put the right man in the right place-unless we make it possible for our workers and executives alike to enjoy a sense of satisfaction in their jobs, our efforts will have been in vain. ~ Edward Stettinius Jr,
627:What this means in road (and bridge, and tunnel) building is not just obvious but as well documented as anything in transportation engineering: “If you build it, they will come.” If you build more lanes on the expressway, more cars and trucks will use it. If you’re lucky, congestion remains as bad as it was before you spent $50 million trying to relieve it; if you’re not, it gets worse. ~ Samuel I Schwartz,
628:The Beatitudes simply cannot be “good news” if they are understood as a set of “how-tos” for achieving blessedness. They would then only amount to a new legalism. They would not serve to throw open the kingdom—anything but. They would impose a new brand of Phariseeism, a new way of closing the door—as well as some very gratifying new possibilities for the human engineering of righteousness. ~ Dallas Willard,
629:Building the bomb was the single most expensive engineering project in the history of the United States. It began in 1942, and by the time the bomb was tested, inside the White Sands Proving Ground in the New Mexico high desert on July 16, 1945, the bomb’s price tag, adjusted for inflation, was $28,000,000,000. The degree of secrecy maintained while building the bomb is almost inconceivable. ~ Annie Jacobsen,
630:But how, from the viewpoint of a Martian, did man differ from other animals? Would a race that could levitate and god knows what else be impressed by engineering? If so would the Aswan Dam or a thousand miles of coral reef win first prize? Man's self awareness, sheer conceit. There was no way to prove that sperm whales and sequoias were not philosophers and poets exceeding any human merit? ~ Robert A Heinlein,
631:Charm took effect, and even progressed. Markus came out of it elegantly. He was smiling with his least Swedish smile possible, almost a kind of Spanish smile. He strung out some tasty anecdotes, skillfully mixed in cultural and personal references, successfully managed transitions from the intimate to the general. He gracefully unfurled a fine piece of engineering known as “man of the world. ~ David Foenkinos,
632:Nanotechnology will enable the design of nanobots: robots designed at the molecular level, measured in microns (millionths of a meter), such as “respirocytes” (mechanical red-blood cells).33 Nanobots will have myriad roles within the human body, including reversing human aging (to the extent that this task will not already have been completed through biotechnology, such as genetic engineering). ~ Ray Kurzweil,
633:Good product managers crisply define the target, the “what” (as opposed to the “how”), and manage the delivery of the “what.” Bad product managers feel best about themselves when they figure out “how.” Good product managers communicate crisply to engineering in writing as well as verbally. Good product managers don’t give direction informally. Good product managers gather information informally. ~ Ben Horowitz,
634:Not sleeping enough, which for a portion of the population is a voluntary choice, significantly modifies your gene transcriptome—that is, the very essence of you, or at least you as defined biologically by your DNA. Neglect sleep, and you are deciding to perform a genetic engineering manipulation on yourself each night, tampering with the nucleic alphabet that spells out your daily health story. ~ Matthew Walker,
635:The dismantling of the vast and wholly parasitic armaments industry had given an unprecedented—sometimes, indeed, unhealthy—boost to the world economy. No longer were vital raw materials and brilliant engineering talents swallowed up in a virtual black hole—or, even worse, turned to destruction. Instead, they could be used to repair the ravages and neglect of centuries, by rebuilding the world. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
636:Sloppy language and sloppy ways go together. Those who are truly educated have learned more than the sciences, the humanities, law, engineering, and the arts. They carry with them a certain polish that marks them as loving the better qualities of life, a culture that adds luster to the mundane world of which they are apart, a patina that puts a quiet glow on what otherwise might be base metal. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
637:Enlightened social engineering is required to face situations that demand global action now. Education is a long-term solution. Parents and the general public must be reached also Otherwise, children and youth enrolled in globally oriented programs may find themselves in conflict with values assumed in the home. And then the educational institution frequently comes under scrutiny and must pull back. ~ John Goodlad,
638:In testing primality of very large numbers chosen at random, the chance of stumbling upon a value that fools the Fermat test is less than the chance that cosmic radiation will cause the computer to make an error in carrying out a "correct" algorithm. Considering an algorithm to be inadequate for the first reason but not for the second illustrates the difference between mathematics and engineering. ~ Harold Abelson,
639:And it wasn’t just the subjugation of human beings that distressed her but the level of daily, almost casual brutality. Even for routine punishments there were blood-stained stakes, lead-tipped whips. She’s always rather admired the Romans, for their literacy, their order, their engineering, their respect for the law. Now, she was finding, she’d never fully imagined this side of their civilisation. ~ Stephen Baxter,
640:Deep in the nanoscale-size range, however, engineering encounters ultimate, atomic constraints on the size of even the simplest devices. Gears, shafts, and bearings, for example, can’t be made smaller than a few nanometers in diameter, simply because mechanical components must contain enough layers of atoms to provide suitable shapes, surfaces, and mechanical properties for the devices to function. ~ K Eric Drexler,
641:Global warming is a big problem, and to solve it we have to stop listening to disinformation. We have to pay attention to our science and harness the power of our engineering. Rome may not be burning, but Greenland is melting, and we are still fiddling. We all need a better understanding of what science really is, how to recognize real science when we see it, and how to separate it from the garbage. ~ Naomi Oreskes,
642:connect creativity with technology, so he built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. He and his colleagues at Apple were able to think differently: They developed not merely modest product advances based on focus groups, but whole new devices and services that consumers did not yet know they needed. He was not a model boss or human being, tidily ~ Walter Isaacson,
643:Education in my family was not merely emphasized, it was our raison d'être. Virtually all of our aunts and uncles had Ph.D.s in science or engineering, and it was taken for granted that the next generation of Chu's were to follow the family tradition. When the dust had settled, my two brothers and four cousins collected three MDs, four Ph.D.s and a law degree. I could manage only a single advanced degree. ~ Steven Chu,
644:futurism” as a new academic discipline. It’s an interdisciplinary field combining mathematics, engineering, art, technology, economics, design, history, geography, biology, theology, physics, and philosophy. As a futurist, my job is not to spread prophecies, but rather to collect data, identify emerging trends, develop strategies, and calculate the probabilities of various scenarios occurring in the future. ~ Amy Webb,
645:Whether Musk was a founder of Tesla in the purest sense of the word is irrelevant at this point. There would be no Tesla to talk about today were it not for Musk’s money, marketing savvy, chicanery, engineering smarts, and indomitable spirit. Tesla was, in effect, willed into existence by Musk and reflects his personality as much as Intel, Microsoft, and Apple reflect the personalities of their founders. ~ Ashlee Vance,
646:Dyson says: It is no good creating the most beautiful products if you produce them shoddily. It is no good having the most innovative engineering solution if the consumers can’t be certain it will be delivered on time. It is no good if inconsistent production means that a great idea is not translated into a polished product. The original idea is only 2 percent of the journey. You mustn’t neglect the rest. ~ Matthew Syed,
647:Everyday I became more convinced that good literature has little or nothing to do with trivial fancies such as “inspiration” or “having something to tell” and more with the engineering of language, with the architecture of narrative , with the painting of texture, with the timrbres and colors of the staging. With the cinematography of words, and the music that can be produced by an orchestra of ideas ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
648:And one day, very soon in fact, Adi would be an adolescent. An adolescent son of a clerk. A miserable thing to be in this country. He would have to forget all his dreams and tell himself that what he wanted to do was engineering. It's the only hope, everyone would tell him. Engineering, Adi would realize, is every mother's advice to her son, a father's irrevocable decision, a boy's first foreboding of life. ~ Manu Joseph,
649:It's clearly a crisis of two things: of consciousness and conditioning. These are the two things that the psychedelics attack. We have the technological power, the engineering skills to save our planet, to cure disease, to feed the hungry, to end war; But we lack the intellectual vision, the ability to change our minds. We must decondition ourselves from 10,000 years of bad behavior. And, it's not easy. ~ Terence McKenna,
650:It was in the back of my mind, even while I was going to school, but it wasn't until I was at university studying engineering that I thought, well what do I really want to do? And I kind of came back to that and I said, well the degrees I'm trying to get are going to qualify me to apply. And so, that's what I did after I finished my, or after I was getting my doctorates. That's when I first applied to NASA. ~ Leroy Chiao,
651:Advancement of Teaching uncovered a most important and significant fact - a fact later confirmed by additional studies made at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. These investigations revealed that even in such technical lines as engineering, about 15 percent of one's financial success is due to one's technical knowledge and about 85 percent is due to skill in human engineering-to personality and the ability ~ Anonymous,
652:I feel very strongly that history is about everything. It isn't just about politics or the military or social issues. If art, music, engineering, science, medicine, finance, the world of architecture and technology - if those are left out, then you're not getting a full sense of the human condition. History is human and we human beings are involved in all kinds of things and that's part of our humanity. ~ David McCullough,
653:I think actually if you take the analogy with other areas of engineering, and increasingly of science and even mathematics, you can see people do not have to learn the vast number of formulae they used to learn. Instead, they have to learn to use the computer effectively. This frees them, I feel, to understand concepts and the foundations while they’re learning the mechanics of the application of the theory. ~ C A R Hoare,
654:Cause nobody's the slightest idea who we are, or who we were, not even we ourselves – except, that is, in the glimmer of a moment of fair business between strangers, or the nod of knowing and agreement between friends. Other than these, we go out anonymous into the insect air and all we are is the dust of colour, brief engineering of wings towards a glint of light on a blade of grass or a leaf in a summer dark. ~ Ali Smith,
655:Shipping first time code is like going into debt. A little debt speeds development so long as it is paid back promptly with a rewrite. The danger occurs when the debt is not repaid. Every minute spent on not-quite-right code counts as interest on that debt. Entire engineering organizations can be brought to a standstill under the debt load of an unconsolidated implementation, object-oriented or otherwise. ~ Ward Cunningham,
656:The very notion that millions of workers displaced by the re-engineering and automation of the agricultural, manufacturing, and service sectors can be retrained to be scientists, engineers, technicians, executives, consultants, teachers, lawyers and the like, and then somehow find the appropriate number of job openings in the very narrow high-tech sector, seems at best a pipe dream, and at worst a delusion. ~ Jeremy Rifkin,
657:Holmes, too, continued to embrace an exalted image of herself. In her acceptance speech at Glamour magazine’s Women of the Year Awards at Carnegie Hall, she held herself up as a role model for young women. “Do everything you can to be the best in science and math and engineering,” she urged them. “It’s that that our little girls will see when they start to think about who do they want to be when they grow up. ~ John Carreyrou,
658:Five of my father’s seven siblings made their bones as engineers or technologists, and some of his best buddies—David Woods, Elijah Kent, Weldon Staton—carved out successful engineering careers at Langley. Our next-door neighbor taught physics at Hampton University. Our church abounded with mathematicians. Supersonics experts held leadership positions in my mother’s sorority, and electrical engineers sat ~ Margot Lee Shetterly,
659:They self-righteously advocate public policies that obligate future generations’ labor and resources to their own real and perceived benefit, empowering governmental abuse via social engineering and economic depredation. They disguise the delinquency as compassionate and premised on good intentions, often insisting their objectives will improve the prospects of those most severely burdened by them—“the children. ~ Mark R Levin,
660:In the judgment of design engineers, the ordinary means of communicating with a computer are entirely inadequate. [...] Graphical communication in some form or other is of vital importance in engineering as that subject is now conducted; we must either provide the capability in our computer systems, or take on the impossible task of training up a future race of engineers conditioned to think in a different way. ~ Maurice Wilkes,
661:The first step toward the management of disease was replacement of demon theories and humours theories by the germ theory. That very step, the beginning of hope, in itself dashed all hopes of magical solutions. It told workers that progress would be made stepwise, at great effort, and that a persistent, unremitting care would have to be paid to a discipline of cleanliness. So it is with software engineering today. ~ Fred Brooks,
662:...there was some kind of connection between the capacity to love and the capacity to love *running*. The engineering was certainly the same: both depended on loosening your grip on your own desires, putting aside what you wanted and appreciating what you've got, being patient and forgiving and... undemanding...maybe we shouldn't be surprised that getting better at one could make you better at the other. ~ Christopher McDougall,
663:What if someone had the potential to discover a formula to unlock the mysteries of the universe wanted to become a pulp fiction writer?
What if someone who had the potential to create unparalleled gastronomic delicacies had his heart set on civil engineering?
There is what we desire to do, and what we are able to do. When those two things don't coincide, which path should we pursue to find happiness? ~ Hiroshi Sakurazaka,
664:Suicide creates his own society: to shut yourself off from other people in some dingy, rented box and stare, like Melville's Bartleby, day in and day out at the dead wall outside your window is in itself a rejection of the world which is said to be rejecting you. It is a way of saying, like Bartleby, 'I prefer not to' to every offer and every possibility, which is a condition no amount of social engineering will cure. ~ Al lvarez,
665:Science is dangerous. There is no question but that poison gas, genetic engineering, and nuclear weapons and power stations are terrifying. It may be that civilization is falling apart and the world we know is coming to an end. In that case, why no turn to religion and look forward to the Day of Judgment, ... [being] lifted into eternal bliss ... [and] watching the scoffers and disbelievers writhe forever in torment. ~ Isaac Asimov,
666:There is no one "root of all evil" in software development. Design is hard in many ways. People tend to underestimate the intellectual and practical difficulties involved in building a significant system involving software. It is not and will not be reduced to a simple mechanical "assembly line" process. Creativity, engineering principles, and evolutionary change are needed to create a satisfactory large system. ~ Bjarne Stroustrup,
667:Logically, gambling shouldn’t evoke much anticipatory dopamine, given the astronomical odds against winning. But the behavioral engineering—the 24-7 activity and lack of time cues, the cheap alcohol pickling fronto-cortical judgment, the manipulations to make you feel like today is your lucky day—distorts and shifts the perception of the odds into a range where dopamine pours out and, oh, why not, let’s try again. ~ Robert M Sapolsky,
668:In 1965–66, as compared to 1950–51, installed capacity of electricity was 4.5 times higher, the number of town and villages electrified was 14 times higher, hospital beds 2.5 times higher, enrolment in schools was a little less than three times higher and, very importantly, admission capacity in technical education (engineering and technology) at the degree and diploma levels was higher by 6 and 8.5 times respectively. ~ Bipan Chandra,
669:I think one of the changes of our consciousness of how things come into being, of how things are made and how they work . . . is the change from an engineering paradigm, which is to say a design paradigm, to a biological paradigm, which is a cultural and evolutionary one. In lots and lots of areas now, people say, How do you create the conditions at the bottom to allow the growth of the things you want to happen?—Brian Eno ~ Katie Salen,
670:one of the first things you learn when you run an engineering organization is that a good quality assurance organization cannot build a high-quality product, but it can tell you when the development team builds a low quality product. Similarly, a high quality human resources organization cannot make you a well-managed company with a great culture, but it can tell you when you and your managers are not getting the job done. ~ Ben Horowitz,
671:This book intends to make the case for explanation by reduction to physics and mechanical engineering, to this alternative realm of explanation: not to alternative explanations but to explanations of phenomena with which the biologist’s classical chemical reductionism just doesn’t help. As we’ll see, this realm not only explains different phenomena but provides information that makes wonderfully satisfying intuitive sense. ~ Steven Vogel,
672:Systems thinking plays a dominant role in a wide range of fields from industrial enterprise and armaments to esoteric topics of pure science. Innumerable publications, conferences, symposia and courses are devoted to it. Professions and jobs have appeared in recent years which, unknown a short while ago, go under names such as systems design, systems analysis, systems engineering and others. ~ Ludwig von Bertalanffy, General System Theory,
673:And this is Liam,” Erin said with less enthusiasm.
“I’m twelve. But I’m mature for my age. In case you felt like dating a younger man.”
“Mature?” Erin snorted. “You still play with Legos.”
“Just practicing for my future in engineering.” His voice cracked in an unintended squeak. “Mam says one day girls are gonna fall for my intelligence.” Liam wiggled those brows toward me. “Better get me while I’m still available. ~ Jenny B Jones,
674:And this is Liam," Erin said with leass enthusiasm.
"I'm twelve. But I'm mature for my age. In case you felt like dating a younger man."
"Mature?" Erin snorted. "You still play with Legos."
"Just practicing for my future in engineering." His voice cracked in an unintended squeak. "Mam says one day girls are gonna fall for my intelligence." Liam wiggled those brows toward me. "Better get me while I'm still available. ~ Jenny B Jones,
675:That is the future, and it is probably nearer than we think. But our primary problem as universities is not engineering that future. We must rise above the obsession with quantity of information and speed of transmission, and recognize that the key issue for us is our ability to organize this information once it has been amassed - to assimilate it, find meaning in it, and assure its survival for use by generations to come. ~ Vartan Gregorian,
676:Wuxi Engineering Complex wasn’t detailed by a team, it was detailed by one woman, using, of course, feedback from the departments that would be using the building.” I gape. “Exactly,” she says, smiling. “A team would not have constructed the building as a unit, but as a series of connected, but compromised and adjusted, ideas.” “It can’t be done. It had to have taken years.” “It did take over two years, but it can be done. ~ Maureen F McHugh,
677:For decades engineers have stood accused that their buildings do not have any cultural value. We have attempted to liberate engineering of this accusation. As National Socialists we are dedicated to working with boldness, but also with love of the Volk and our landscape in mind. These roads do not serve transportation alone, they also bind our Fatherland. In these highways our engineering will reflect the National Socialist movement. ~ Fritz Todt,
678:I learned years later that my gratitude practice actually helped me form new neural pathways. The hippie rituals of positive affirmations are not just baloney. Gratitude doesn’t exist only in your mind—you have to feel it in your whole being. Feelings are the shadows of thoughts. When we have negative thoughts, our emotions mirror them with anxiety. You can often see what you are thinking by reverse engineering and studying your feelings. ~ Jewel,
679:Computer science... differs from physics in that it is not actually a science. It does not study natural objects. Neither is it, as you might think, mathematics; although it does use mathematical reasoning pretty extensively. Rather, computer science is like engineering; it is all about getting something to do something, rather than just dealing with abstractions, as in the pre-Smith geology. ~ Richard Feynman, Feynman Lectures on Computation, 1970,
680:Engineers want to produce something,” said Wallach. “I didn’t go to school for six years just to get a paycheck. I thought that if this is what engineering’s all about, the hell with it.” He went to night school, to get a master’s in business administration. “I was always looking for the buck. I’d get the M.B.A., go back to New York, and make some money,” he figured. But he didn’t really want to do that. He wanted to build computers. ~ Tracy Kidder,
681:I'm not afraid of you. I'm not afraid of anything."
"Yes, you are, on both counts. You're afraid of everything. In England there are castles with stone walls that go up over a hundred feet, built during a time when it was the strength of your fortress that won battles. Each time I look at you, I marvel at the feat of organic engineering that's allowed you to create such a fortification within a perfect composition of female flesh. ~ Joey W Hill,
682:When I started I had no knowledge of films whatsoever. I was an engineering major at Stanford. And I found out as a senior that they had two film critics on the Stanford Daily, and they got free passes to all the theaters in Palo Alto. So I thought, I'll do that, and I became a film critic. And then I became interested in films. But I had no time to study anything in that area because I was a senior, just finishing up as engineering. ~ Roger Corman,
683:One can expect the human race to continue attempting systems just within or just beyond our reach; and software systems are perhaps the most intricate and complex of man's handiworks. The management of this complex craft will demand our best use of new languages and systems, our best adaptation of proven engineering management methods, liberal doses of common sense, and a God-given humility to recognize our fallibility and limitations. ~ Fred Brooks,
684:The trauma of 9/11 stimulated infinite possibilities for worry - some quite plausible, but most inspired by remote what-if fantasies. A society bingeing on fear makes itself vulnerable to far more profound forms of destruction than terror attacks. The "terrorism war", like a nostalgic echo of the cold war, is using these popular fears to advance a different agenda - the re-engineering of American life through permanent mobilization. ~ William Greider,
685:Leonardo did not pursue science and engineering in order to dominate nature, as Francis Bacon would advocate a century later, but always tried to learn as much as possible from nature. He was in awe of the beauty he saw in the complexity of natural forms, patterns, and processes, and aware that nature’s ingenuity was far superior to human design. Accordingly, he often used natural processes and structures as models for his own designs. ~ Fritjof Capra,
686:In an effort to teach myself self-restraint and self-control, I decided that until I completed my engineering degree, I would wear only white saris, refrain from sweets, sleep on a mat and take baths with cold water. I aimed to become self-sufficient; I would be my best friend and my worst enemy. I didn’t know then that such a quote already existed in the Bhagavad Gita where Krishna says, ‘Atma aiva hi atmano bandhu aatma aiva ripu atmanah’. ~ Sudha Murty,
687:Fred T-H uses some well done plumbing pictures to explain why Queues Don’t Fix Overload: So when I rant about/against queues, it’s because queues will often be (but not always) applied in ways that totally mess up end-to-end principles for no good reason. It’s because of bad system engineering, where people are trying to make an 18-wheeler go through a straw and wondering why the hell things go bad. In the end the queue just makes things worse. ~ Anonymous,
688:Technothinkers tend to have an “engineering mind”—to put it less politely, they have autistic tendencies. While they don’t usually wear ties, these types tend, of course, to exhibit all the textbook characteristics of nerdiness—mostly lack of charm, interest in objects instead of persons, causing them to neglect their looks. They love precision at the expense of applicability. And they typically share an absence of literary culture. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
689:But let it be clear that I consider human cities as a fully natural phenomenon, on a par with the mega-structures that other ecosystem engineers build for their societies—the only difference being that whereas ants, termites, corals, and beavers have been maintaining their roles at a stably modest level for millions of years, the scale of human ecosystem engineering has grown by several orders of magnitude over just a few thousand years. ~ Menno Schilthuizen,
690:No one can believe I might have a brain. Because I'm really tall, I'm really blonde, I have big muscles, and kill people for a living. There you go. If anybody's going to be assumed to be stupid, it's me. I don't know what my IQ score is, but I did study for five years at college. And I'm proud of my chemical engineering degree. I haven't done anything with it, but it's a card up your sleeve for later in life. It's nice to have, just in case. ~ Dolph Lundgren,
691:The comic edge of Ghostbusters will always be the same. It's still treating the supernatural with a totally mundane sensibility. In the world of ghostbusting, there are certain givens. You're always going to have some new invented technology, some pseudo-science that sounds right because we drop enough familiar terms from physics and engineering, and pseudo-methodology, something that people will think they may have read something about before. ~ Harold Ramis,
692:The community certainly included black English professors, like my mother, as well as black doctors and dentists, black mechanics, janitors, and contractors, black cobblers, wedding planners, real estate agents, and undertakers, several black lawyers, and a handful of black Mary Kay salespeople. As a child, however, I knew so many African Americans working in science, math, and engineering that I thought that’s just what black folks did. ~ Margot Lee Shetterly,
693:When I went to Harvard Law School I became interested in the connection between legal standards for safety and automobile engineering design. At that time, it was all blamed on a "nut behind the wheel," so-called, the driver. But I knew that the vehicle had a great deal to do with that because I had come across some Air Force-sponsored studies at medical schools. The Air Force found they were losing more men on the highways than in the Korean War. ~ Ralph Nader,
694:And Spaceship Earth, that glorious and bloody circus, continued its four-billion-year-long spiral orbit about the Sun; the engineering, I must admit, was so exquisite that none of the passengers felt any motion at all. Those on the dark side of the ship mostly slept and voyaged into worlds of freedom and fantasy; those on the light side moved about the tasks appointed for them by their rulers, or idled waiting for the next order from above. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
695:Companies kept stricter control of their labour costs, increasingly contracting out production in industrial businesses and re-engineering middle-management. Computerisation and improved communications then sped the process up, making it easier for companies to export jobs abroad, to reshape them so that they could be done by less skilled contract workers, or to eliminate them entirely. This has all resulted in a more rootless and flexible labour force. ~ Anonymous,
696:Cause nobody's the slightest idea who we are, or who we were, not even we ourselves
- except, that is, in the glimmer of a moment of fair business between strangers, or the nod of knowing and agreement between friends.
Other than these, we go out anonymous into the insect air and all we are is the dust of colour, brief engineering of wings towards a glint of light on a blade of grass or a leaf in a summer dark.

Azide Smith, How to be Both ~ Zadie Smith,
697:I will build a car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family, but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one - and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in God's great open spaces. ~ Henry Ford,
698:In fact, the science of thermodynamics began with an analysis, by the great engineer Sadi Carnot, of the problem of how to build the best and most efficient engine, and this constitutes one of the few famous cases in which engineering has contributed to fundamental physical theory. Another example that comes to mind is the more recent analysis of information theory by Claude Shannon. These two analyses, incidentally, turn out to be closely related. ~ Richard P Feynman,
699:I think re-engineering or restructuring or downsizing or rightsizing or whatever you want to call it, it's basically firing, has gone way too far. Employees, as I've talked to them across the country, feel that they are not respected, they are not valued, they are worried about their jobs. They simply feel that the company is no longer loyal to them. Why should they be loyal to the company, they ask me. Why should I go the extra mile? Why should I care? ~ Robert Reich,
700:I will build a motorcar for the multitude. It will be large enough for the family but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one—and enjoy with his family the blessings of hours of pleasure in God’s great open spaces. ~ John C Maxwell,
701:The so-called ‘crank’ may be quite original in his ideas. … Invention, however, in the engineering sense involves originality; but not that alone, if the results are to be of value. There is imagination more or less fertile, but with it a knowledge of what has been done before, carried perhaps by the memory, together with a sense of the present or prospective needs in art or industry. Necessity is not always the mother of invention. It may be prevision. ~ Elihu Thomson,
702:The way Elon talks about this is that you always need to start with the first principles of a problem. What are the physics of it? How much time will it take? How much will it cost? How much cheaper can I make it? There’s this level of engineering and physics that you need to make judgments about what’s possible and interesting. Elon is unusual in that he knows that, and he also knows business and organization and leadership and governmental issues.” Some ~ Ashlee Vance,
703:The hard work and big money you used to spend on frequent purchases of print and TV advertising now move to repeated engineering expenses and product failures. If anything, marketing is more time-consuming and expensive than it used to be. You’re just spending the money earlier in the process (and repeating the process more often). This is worth highlighting: The Purple Cow is not a cheap shortcut. It is, however, your best (perhaps only) strategy for growth. ~ Seth Godin,
704:First of all, try to have the highest of ethics and to be open and truthful about things, not hiding. If you have to hide something for company reasons, at least explain what you're doing. Don't mislead people. Know in your heart that you are a good person with good goals because that will carry over to your own self-confidence and your belief in your engineering abilities. Always seek excellence: make your product better than the average person would. ~ Jessica Livingston,
705:Renegade scientists and totalitarian loonies are not the folks most likely to abuse genetic engineering. You and I are-not because we are bad but because we want to do good. In a world dominated by competition, parents understandably want to give their kids every advantage. ... The most likely way for eugenics to enter into our lives is through the front door as nervous parents ... will fall over one another to be first to give Junior a better set of genes. ~ Arthur Caplan,
706:Nobody can understand the greatness of the thirteenth century, who does not realize that it was a great growth of new things produced by a living thing. In that sense it was really bolder and freer than what we call the renaissance, which was a resurrection of old things discovered in a dead thing... and the Gospel according to St. Thomas... was a new thrust like the titanic thrust of Gothic engineering; and its strength was in a God that makes all things new. ~ G K Chesterton,
707:Our federal income tax law defines the tax y to be paid in terms of the income x; it does so in a clumsy enough way by pasting several linear functions together, each valid in another interval or bracket of income. An archeologist who, five thousand years from now, shall unearth some of our income tax returns together with relics of engineering works and mathematical books, will probably date them a couple of centuries earlier, certainly before Galileo and Vieta. ~ Hermann Weyl,
708:Since then I’ve come to believe you don’t always have to use things you love, and it’s not always so practical to be so practical. Now that I’ve grown up, I realize that all that delicious dilettantism pays its way as much as any degree in medicine or engineering, by making me remember every day—whenever I pick up a book or watch the Science Channel or try to read a map of Asia for no particular reason—that life is amazing and there is no end to the wonder of it. ~ Barbara Sher,
709:In engineering, as in other creative arts, we must learn to do analysis to support our efforts in synthesis. One cannot build a beautiful and functional bridge without a knowledge of steel and dirt, and a considerable mathematical technique for using this knowledge to compute the properties of structures. Similarly, one cannot build a beautiful computer system without a deep understanding of how to "previsualize" the process generated by the code one writes. ~ Gerald Jay Sussman,
710:It is reasonable to expect that leading a divine conspiracy will require journalists, writers, artists, and scholars to carefully, accurately, and courageously expose the follies of our social institutions in government, business, religion, art, economics, engineering, medicine, law, finance, security, and education. This is where our Christian universities play perhaps the central role, if administrating the common flourishing is to occur in any meaningful way. ~ Dallas Willard,
711:The tree still celebrates its essential treeness through song, as nature will do whatever we impose on her. Birds still sing their ancient songs in the middle of a bustling city, with all its cacophony of man-made sounds. Dry leaves still rustle like dice even when growing against concrete or hewn stone. Out of a tiny crack in a pavement will crawl a perfectly formed insect, a creature of curves and protrusions amidst a linear world of man’s engineering. ~ Alexander McCall Smith,
712:As patriarchy enforces a temperamental imbalance of personality traits between the sexes, its educational institutions, segregated or co-educational, accept a cultural programing toward the generally operative division between “masculine” and “feminine” subject matter, assigning the humanities and certain social sciences (at least in their lower or marginal branches) to the female—and science and technology, the professions, business and engineering to the male. Of ~ Kate Millett,
713:There are fields of scientific work...which have been explored from the different sides of pure mathematics, statistics, electrical engineering, and neurophysiology...in which every single notion receives a separate and different name from each group, and in which important work has been triplicated or quadruplicated, while still other important work is delayed by the unavailability in one field of results that may have already become classical in the next field. ~ Norbert Wiener,
714:Isn’t there a black box data reorder in every book?” asked Mrs. Malaprop. “We could analyze the tea lemon tree.” “Usually,” I replied, “but engineering contracts have to be spread around the BookWorld, and the construction of Book Data Recorders was subcontracted to James McGuffin and Co. of the Suspense genre, so they have a tendency to go missing until dramatically being found right at the end of an investigation. It’s undoubtedly suspenseful, but a little useless. ~ Jasper Fforde,
715:Leonardo da Vinci had such a playful curiosity. If you read his notebooks, you'll see he's curious about what the tongue of a woodpecker looks like, but also why the sky is blue, or how an emotion forms on somebody's lips. He understood the beauty of everything. I've admired Leonardo my whole life, both as a kid who loved engineering - he was one of the coolest engineers in history - and then as a college student, when I travelled to see his notebooks and paintings. ~ Walter Isaacson,
716:The other dynamic keeping the stock market up - both for technology stocks and others - is that companies are using a lot of their income for stock buybacks and to pay out higher dividends, not make new investment,. So to the extent that companies use financial engineering rather than industrial engineering to increase the price of their stock you're going to have a bubble. But it's not considered a bubble, because the government is behind it, and it hasn't burst yet. ~ Michael Hudson,
717:Dictionaries, manuals, grammars, study guides and topic notes, classical authors and the entire book trade in de Viris, Quintus-Curtius, Sallust, and Livy peacefully crumbled to dust on the shelves of the old Hachette publishing house; but introductions to mathematics, textbooks on civil engineering, mechanics, physics, chemistry, astronomy, courses in commerce, finance, industrial arts- whatever concerned the market tendencies of the day - sold by the millions of copies. ~ Jules Verne,
718:Challenger was lost because NASA came to believe its own propaganda. The agency's deeply impacted cultural hubris had it that technology-engineering-would always triumph over random disaster if certain rules were followed. The engineers-turned-technocrats could not bring themselves to accept the psychology of machines with abandoning the core principle of their own faith: equations, geometry, and repetition-physical law, precision design, and testing-must defy chaos. ~ William E Burrows,
719:Hillary’s act as a jilted wife was a deliberate “division decision.” Knowing the Clintons and social engineering tactics, the illusion was created to separate her from Bill in the public eye so that she would eventually run for President as intended. Just as Bill went into the office of President as a “Democrat” to make the public feel they had a change from “Republicans” leading them into the New World Order, Hillary would be the illusion of change from male Presidents. ~ Cathy O Brien,
720:And there is no use in saying that if we can invent the nuclear bomb and fly to the moon, we can solve hunger and related problems of land use. Epic feats of engineering require only a few brilliant technicians and a lot of money. But feeding a world of people year to year for a long time requires cultures of husbandry fitted to the nature of millions of unique small places—precisely the kind of cultures that industrialism has purposely disvalued, uprooted, and destroyed. ~ Wendell Berry,
721:To paraphrase Robin Williams’s compelling teacher character in Dead Poets Society: We don’t study poetry to get an “A,” to graduate, to get a job, to make money, to meet material needs. Rather, “we read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. So medicine, law, business, engineering . . . these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love . . . these are what we stay alive for. ~ Ben Sasse,
722:But the 20th century suffered "two" ideologies that led to genocides. The other one, Marxism, had no use for race, didn't believe in genes and denied that human nature was a meaningful concept. Clearly, it's not an emphasis on genes or evolution that is dangerous. It's the desire to remake humanity by coercive means (eugenics or social engineering) and the belief that humanity advances through a struggle in which superior groups (race or classes) triumph over inferior ones. ~ Steven Pinker,
723:Most astronauts are very down-to-earth people. Many of us, three-quarters, have an engineering degree, and we have a very Cartesian, rational approach to things. You don't go and get swept off your feet. That's not your job and that's not why you're hired. So if you get so mesmerized that you forget to do what you're supposed to do, whether it's to open the cargo door of the space shuttle or configure something inside, then you should not be there as a professional operator. ~ Julie Payette,
724:Now I do not think software managers have less inherent courage and firmness than chefs, nor than other engineering managers. But false scheduling to match the patron's desired date is much more common in our discipline than elsewhere in engineering. It is very difficult to make a vigorous, plausible, and job-risking defense of an estimate that is derived by no quantitative method, supported by little data, and certified chiefly by the hunches of the managers. Clearly ~ Frederick P Brooks Jr,
725:If you go back to a century ago, the major problems of electrical and mechanical engineering had to do with how to place a huge gun on a moving platform, namely a ship, designing it to be able to hit a moving object, another ship, so naval gunnery. That was the most advanced problem in metallurgy, electrical and mechanical engineering, and so on. England and Germany put huge efforts into it, the United States less so. Out of associated innovations comes the automotive industry. ~ Noam Chomsky,
726:Lady — very slowly, and with a voice perhaps hardly articulate, carrying on, at the same time, her engineering works on a wider scale. “Well, I don’t exactly want to leave you.” And so the matter was settled: settled with much propriety and satisfaction; and both the lady and gentleman would have thought, had they ever thought about the matter at all, that this, the sweetest moment of their lives, had been graced by all the poetry by which such moments ought to be hallowed. ~ Anthony Trollope,
727:So I think a humanities major who also did a lot of computer science, economics, psychology, or other sciences can be quite valuable and have great career flexibility,’’ Katz said. ‘‘But you need both, in my view, to maximize your potential. And an economics major or computer science major or biology or engineering or physics major who takes serious courses in the humanities and history also will be a much more valuable scientist, financial professional, economist or entrepreneur. ~ Anonymous,
728:Let's also make sure that a high school diploma puts our kids on a path to a good job. Right now, countries like Germany focus on graduating their high school students with the equivalent of a technical degree from one of our community colleges, so that they're ready for a job. At schools like P-TECh in Brooklyn ... students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate degree in computers or engineering. We need to give every American student opportunities like this. ~ Barack Obama,
729:Worship isn't destructive, Martin. I know that.
I don't. I only know it's the core of his life. What else has he got? He can hardly read. He knows no physics or engineering to make to world real for him. No paintings to show him how others have enjoyed it. No music except television jingles. No history except tales from a desperate mother. No friends. Not one kid to give him a joke, or make him know himself more moderately. He's a modern citizen for whom society doesn't exist. ~ Peter Shaffer,
730:Reality isn’t the most pleasant of atmospheres, Lieutenant. But we like to think we’re engineered for it. It’s a pretty fine piece of engineering, the kind an engineer can respect. Drag in an obsession and reality can’t tolerate it. Something has to give; if reality goes, your fine piece of engineering is left with nothing to operate on. Nothing it was designed to operate on. So it operates badly. So kick the obsession out; start functioning the way you were designed to function. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
731:Although driverless cars will displace millions of jobs, they will also save many lives. Today, decisions about implementing technologies are made largely on the basis of profitability and efficiency, but there is an obvious need for a new moral calculus. The devil, however, is in more than the details. As with nuclear weapons and nuclear power, artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, and robotics will have society-wide consequences, both intended and unintended, in the next decade. ~ John Markoff,
732:If artificial intelligence and engineering can take us there, why not? Provided the engineered creatures are under human supervision, provided they have no way of acquiring autonomy and turning against us, and provided we will not have the means to program robots such that they can destroy the world, why not? It must be added that there are several dark scenarios regarding not so much future robots as future AI programs that do have doomsday potential and that need to be watched for. ~ Ant nio R Dam sio,
733:Oh, I’m real. I’m the story of Sheresa. I write a little bit of the fiction of me every day. You see what I’m talking about? Then once you have the boundaries of history and fiction secure, where does everything else fall? Somewhere in between the two. History holds up one side of our lives and fiction the other. Mother, father. Birth, death, and in between, that’s where you find religion. That’s where you find art, science, engineering. It’s where things get made from belief and memory. ~ Samantha Hunt,
734:We can change our thinking. Rather than viewing the chemical adulteration of our environment and our bodies as the inevitable practice of convenience and progress, we can decide that cancer is inconvenient and toxic pollution archaic and primitive. We can start seeing the creation of carcinogens as the result of outmoded technologies. We can demand green engineering and green chemistry. We can let our systems of industry and agriculture know that they are suffering from a design flaw. ~ Sandra Steingraber,
735:Get a degree in mechanical engineering, Hiro. Get a pilot’s license, Hiro. Learn meditation and hypnosis, Hiro. Slip your roommate out of prison, Hiro. Drive thousands of clones and humans around in space, Hiro. Sit on your butt for four hundred years, Hiro.’
That’s what they told me. Not once did they say, Get shot and chased and stabbed by crazed crewmates, Hiro!”
“To be fair, you were one of the people doing the chasing, crazed at the time too,” Maria said.
“Semantics,” he said. ~ Mur Lafferty,
736:Shin told me that the EDA spent decades engineering a special strain of weed that helps people focus and enhances their ability to play videogames! Once they had it perfected, that was when the government finally started legalizing it in the States.” He raised his arms in victory. “This ganja is part of the war effort! I love it!” He broke into song, and Shin immediately joined him. “ ‘America. Fuck yeah. Comin’ to save the motherfuckin’ day, yeah!’ ” They broke up into another laughing fit. ~ Ernest Cline,
737:Invention and entrepreneurship isn't about pure technology. Most people take whatever they see in front of them and relate it to something they understand. For at least ten years after Ford started building cars, people called them horseless carriages. It wasn't obvious to call it a car. They used to call the radio 'the wireless.' Innovation is much more about changing people and their perceptions and their attitudes and their willingness to accept change than it is about physics and engineering. ~ Dean Kamen,
738:Almost sixty years ago, just after midnight, a few feet from the river where they danced, a wonder of modern engineering occurred: overnight, the Berlin Wall arose. It was the night of August 15, 1961. Berliners awoke on the sixteenth to this marvel, more of a fence at first, concrete posts driven into the streets and festooned with barbed wire. They knew trouble would come but expected it in degrees. Life so often arrives all of a sudden. And who knows which side you will find yourself on? ~ Andrew Sean Greer,
739:Because of its origins and guiding principles, symbolist machine learning is still closer to the rest of AI than the other schools. If computer science were a continent, symbolist learning would share a long border with knowledge engineering. Knowledge is traded in both directions— manually entered knowledge for use in learners, induced knowledge for addition to knowledge bases— but at the end of the day the rationalist-empiricist fault line runs right down that border, and crossing it is not easy. ~ Pedro Domingos,
740:Work is a means; it is not an end. And for any tasks that can be performed or eliminated by a capital instrument, human labor is not the best means... Furthermore, we have science, engineering and management - the three disciplines - that really plan and control the production of goods and services, trying to eliminate labor. Who the hell is government to come along and try to create labor? The people who are producing wealth are trying to eliminate toil, while the politicians are trying to create it. ~ Louis O Kelso,
741:College football is no more of a minor league than, say, the universities' schools of journalism, engineering or music are. We can argue at another time whether football should occupy the same space on campus as those disciplines, but for now, it does. The critical point is that a coach is less concerned with preparing athletes for the next level than he is with molding them to fit a system that helps him win games, keep his job and, eventually, move on to a position with a more prestigious program. ~ William C Rhoden,
742:I think something quite dreadful has been happening to criticism in the arts, particularly in America, during the last twenty years. In an age which is so much dominated by technological advance, the methods and even the jargon of science and engineering have mistakenly been adopted not only by fringe disciplines like psychology and social studies but by many arts scholars who should have known better.

from "In Defense of the Artist" in Signposts to Criticism of Children's Literature (1983) ~ Susan Cooper,
743:I fingered through Amy Breslyn’s file and skimmed her corporate bio by the hazy glow of the street light. Her corporate portrait showed a round woman with light brown hair, pale skin, a soft face, and the sad eyes of someone who lost her only child for reasons no sane person could understand. If she wore makeup, I could not see it. She was as anonymous as a blur in a crowd except for the fact this particular blur possessed a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from UCLA. I tucked her picture into my pocket. When ~ Robert Crais,
744:When I became the NASA administrator — or before I became the NASA administrator — Barack Obama charged me with three things. One was he wanted me to help re-inspire children to want to get into science and math, he wanted me to expand our international relationships, and third, and perhaps foremost, he wanted me to find a way to reach out to the Muslim world and engage much more with dominantly Muslim nations to help them feel good about their historic contribution to science … and math and engineering. ~ Charles Bolden,
745:right now that will take you a giant step closer to your goal of getting rich. Make sure it’s something scary, something that you’d really rather not do because it’s super uncomfy, something that makes you feel like you might puke, e.g., renting the massive space for your new handbag company, flying across the country and figuring out how to get yourself in front of the guy who’s hiring for that engineering job that you’re perfect for, cold-calling ten prospective clients, hiring a new full-time employee, etc. ~ Jen Sincero,
746:The engineer and historian of engineering Henry Petroski presents a very elegant point. Had the Titanic not had that famous accident, as fatal as it was, we would have kept building larger and larger ocean liners and the next disaster would have been even more tragic. So the people who perished were sacrificed for the greater good; they unarguably saved more lives than were lost. The story of the Titanic illustrates the difference between gains for the system and harm to some of its individual parts. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
747:By 1905, Tesla ran out of money and was forced to lay off the Wardenclyffe workers and shut down the facility. Newspapers decried it as his “million dollar folly,” to which Tesla responded, “It is a simple feat of scientific electrical engineering, only expensive ... blind, faint-hearted doubting world.” His malaise couldn’t snuff his imagination and love of his work, however. He refocused his efforts on commercially viable machinery and—in 1906, on his 50th birthday—presented a 200-horsepower bladeless turbine ~ Sean Patrick,
748:Grapes is a sustained indictment about a natural world despoiled by a grievous range of causes—natural disaster, poor land-use practices, rapacious acquisitiveness, and technological arrogance. Failure of genetic engineering and industrialized nature “hangs over the State like a great sorrow,” Steinbeck laments in chapter 25, and the “failure . . . that topples all our successes” stems from misconceived values— manipulating nature and misunderstanding man’s delicate place as a species in the biotic community. ~ John Steinbeck,
749:Engaging specialists in interpreting ancient artifacts in Egypt is absolutely necessary in establishing a credible hypothesis. Without their input, there cannot be a comprehensive understanding of the past. For instance, the pyramids on the Giza Plateau were built not by Egyptologists or archaeologists but by engineers and craftsmen. It is not surprising, therefore, that Egyptologists overlook engineering features and nuances that would be recognized immediately by those who are trained in those disciplines. ~ Christopher Dunn,
750:The world economy has lived so far under a set of ideas and institutions emanating from the advanced economies of the West. The United States gave us the doctrine of liberal, rule-based multilateralism; the system had many blemishes, but these served only to highlight the lofty principles against which, by and large, the regime operated. From Europe came democratic values, social solidarity, and for all its current problems, the most impressive feat of institutional engineering of the century, the European Union. ~ Dani Rodrik,
751:We got half the doggone MIT college of engineering here, and nobody who can fix a doggone /television/?" Dr. Joseph Abernathy glared accusingly at the clusters of young people scattered around his living room. That's /electrical/ engineering, Pop," his son told him loftily. "We're all mechanical engineers. Ask a mechanical engineer to fix your color TV, that's like asking an Ob-Gyn to look at the sore on your di-ow!" Oh, sorry," said his father, peering blandly over gold-rimmed glasses. "That your foot, Lenny? ~ Diana Gabaldon,
752:In general, software engineering teams and IT departments seemed to be at the mercy of other groups who would negotiate, cajole, intimidate, and overrule even the most defensible and objectively derived plans. Even plans based on thorough analysis and backed by years of historical data were vulnerable. Most teams, which had neither a thorough analysis method nor any historical data, were powerless at the hands of others who would push them to commit to unknown (and often completely unreasonable) deliverables. ~ David J Anderson,
753:The primary cause of disorder and lawlessness today, as throughout history, is the poverty of the many in contrast to the affluence of the few. But a new element of unrest has been added: a growing awareness that mass poverty is caused by defective institutions that prevent our harnessing the physical capabilities of science, engineering, management and labor to create general affluence; in other words, a growing awareness that poverty in any country that is or can be industrialized, is man's not nature's fault. ~ Louis O Kelso,
754:The apologists for space science always seem over-impressed by engineering trivia and make far too much of non-stick frying pans and perfect ball-bearings. To my mind, the outstanding spin-off from space research is not new technology. The real bonus has been that for the first time in human history we have had a chance to look at the Earth from space, and the information gained from seeing from the outside our azure-green planet in all its global beauty has given rise to a whole new set of questions and answers. ~ James Lovelock,
755:In this case, it’s half strategy, half engineering. The combination is going to be different in every situation, but the point is that it’s always outside-the-box, even outside-the-budget. Today, as a marketer, our task isn’t necessarily to “build a brand” or even to maintain a preexisting one. We’re better off building an army of immensely loyal and passionate users. Which is easier to track, define, and grow? Which of these is real, and which is simply an idea? And when you get that right—a brand will come naturally. ~ Ryan Holiday,
756:The underlying strategy of the Fed is to tell people, "Do you want your money to lose value in the bank, or do you want to put it in the stock market?" They're trying to push money into the stock market, into hedge funds, to temporarily bid up prices. Then, all of a sudden, the Fed can raise interest rates, let the stock market prices collapse and the people will lose even more in the stock market than they would have by the negative interest rates in the bank. So it's a pro-Wall Street financial engineering gimmick. ~ Michael Hudson,
757:They came to me because they had finally realized, after years of observation and experience, that the highest-paid personnel in engineering are frequently not those who know the most about engineering. One can, for example, hire mere technical ability in engineering, accountancy, architecture or any other profession at nominal salaries. But the person who has technical knowledge plus the ability to express ideas, to assume leadership, and to arouse enthusiasm among people—that person is headed for higher earning power. ~ Dale Carnegie,
758:With genetic engineering, we will be able to increase the complexity of our DNA, and improve the human race. But it will be a slow process, because one will have to wait about 18 years to see the effect of changes to the genetic code. By contrast, computers double their speed and memories every 18 months. There is a real danger that computers will develop intelligence and take over. We urgently need to develop direct connections to the brain so that computers can add to human intelligence rather than be in opposition. ~ Stephen Hawking,
759:Because of the tendency of engineers to focus more on engineering matters rather than on archaeology, history, or anthropology, they are often accused of stripping artifacts of their cultural context and cherrypicking the evidence. Yet as an engineer, I strongly argue that the engineering context is, in fact, a cultural context in and of itself--one that is less susceptible to ambiguity than the cultural context of mummies and potsherds, which can be added decades or even centuries after a building has been completed. ~ Christopher Dunn,
760:Much of the early engineering development of digital computers was done in universities. A few years ago, the view was commonly expressed that universities had played their part in computer design, and that the matter could now safely be left to industry. [...] Apart from the obvious functions of keeping in the public domain material that might otherwise be hidden, universities can make a special contribution by reason of their freedom from commercial considerations, including freedom from the need to follow the fashion. ~ Maurice Wilkes,
761:The pyramidlike structure of a collateralized debt obligation is a beautiful thing—if you are fascinated by the intricacies of financial engineering. A banker creates a CDO by assembling pieces of debt according to their credit ratings and their yields. The mistake made by AIG and others who were lured by them was believing that the ones with the higher credit ratings were such a sure bet that the companies did not bother to set aside much capital against them in the unlikely event that the CDO would generate losses. ~ Andrew Ross Sorkin,
762:I was born into a working class Irish Catholic family at the brutal bottom of the Great Depression. I suppose this early imprinting and conditioning made me a life-long radical. My education was mostly scientific, majoring in electrical engineering and applied math. Those imprints made me a life-long rationalist. I have become increasingly skeptical about, or detached from, the assumption that radicalism and rationalism are the only correct perspectives with which to view life, but they remain my favorite perspectives. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
763:Medicine’s focus is narrow. Medical professionals concentrate on repair of health, not sustenance of the soul. Yet—and this is the painful paradox—we have decided that they should be the ones who largely define how we live in our waning days. For more than half a century now, we have treated the trials of sickness, aging, and mortality as medical concerns. It’s been an experiment in social engineering, putting our fates in the hands of people valued more for their technical prowess than for their understanding of human needs. ~ Atul Gawande,
764:According to the prevailing notion, freedom manifests as “preference-satisfying behavior.” About the preferences themselves we are to maintain a principled silence, out of deference to the autonomy of the individual. They are said to express the authentic core of the self, and are for that reason unavailable for rational scrutiny. But this logic would seem to break down when our preferences are the object of massive social engineering, conducted not by government “nudgers” but by those who want to monetize our attention. ~ Matthew B Crawford,
765:There was a transition going on - Baghdad being the intellectual capital of the world where major advances were made in agriculture and mathematics and engineering and medicine and astronomy, and then that all sort of collapsed. And I was trying to understand how such a intellectually fertile environment can lose its compass bearing. Because I think about the creative centers today - countries, or even regions. Will Silicon Valley always be as innovative? Will the United States be innovative, or will we become complacent? ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
766:My own duty as a teacher...is not so much to interpret Beethoven, Wagner, or other masters of the past, but to give what encouragement I can to the young musicians of America. I...hope that just as this nation has already surpassed so many others in marvelous inventions and feats of engineering and commerce, and has made an honorable place for itself in literature in one short century, so it must assert itself on the...art of music...To bring about this result, we must trust the very youthful enthusiasm and patriotism of this country. ~ Antonin Dvorak,
767:People are always saying these things about how there's no need to read literature anymore-that it won't help the world. Everyone should apparently learn to speak Mandarin, and learn how to write code for computers. More young people should go into STEM fields: science, technology, engineering, and math. And that all sounds to be true and reasonable. But you can't say that what you learn in English class doesn't matter. That great writing doesn't make a difference. I'm different. It's hard to put into words, but it's true. Words matter. ~ Meg Wolitzer,
768:Standing before costly objects of technological beauty, we may be tempted to reject the possibility of awe, for fear that we could grow stupid through admiration. We may feel at risk of becoming overimpressed by architecture and engineering, of being dumbstruck by the Bombardier trains that progress driverlessly between satellites or by the General Electric GE90 engines that hang lightly off the composite wings of a Boeing 777 bound for Seoul. And yet to refuse to be awed at all might in the end be merely another kind of foolishness. ~ Alain de Botton,
769:If you ask ... the man in the street ... the human significance of mathematics, the answer of the world will be, that mathematics has given mankind a metrical and computatory art essential to the effective conduct of daily life, that mathematics admits of countless applications in engineering and the natural sciences, and finally that mathematics is a most excellent instrumentality for giving mental discipline... [A mathematician will add] that mathematics is the exact science, the science of exact thought or of rigorous thinking. ~ Cassius Jackson Keyser,
770:THE VAST MAJORITY OF ALL LEGAL IMMIGRANTS—TWO-THIRDS—GET IN ON “family reunification” policies each year. In other words, America has no say about the single largest category of immigrants and we end up with gems like Octomom, the Boston Marathon bombers, and one hundred thousand Somalis in Minnesota. Entire villages from Pakistan are dumped on the country, based not on their expertise in nuclear engineering, but because everyone in the village is related to the first guy who got in. If they’re not, in the strict sense, related, they’ll lie. In ~ Ann Coulter,
771:With this, in a powerful sense, our Question has been answered. The world, insofar as we speak of the world of Chemistry, biology, astrophysics, engineering, and everyday life, does embody beautiful ideas. The Core, which governs those domains, is profoundly rooted in concepts of symmetry and geometry, as we have seen. And it works its will, in quantum theory, through music-like rules. Symmetry really does determine structure. A pure and perfect Music of the Spheres really does animate the soul of reality. Plato and Pythagoras: We salute you! ~ Frank Wilczek,
772:In crew, contempt is important. In Boston, Boston University and Northeastern crew are treated with contempt by the college up the river. Intramural crew is treated with contempt. Nonathletic coxswains (Chinese engineering majors, poets) are treated with contempt. A true coxswain is a diminutive jock, raging against the pint size that made him the butt of so many jokes at Prep school. He runs twenty stadiums a day, his girlfriend is six feet one, and he can scream orders even when he has the flu (which he catches at least three times a winter). ~ Lisa Birnbach,
773:Choose one thing and become a master of it. Choose a second thing and become a master of that. When you become a master of two worlds, say, engineering and business, you can bring them together in a way that will a) introduce hot ideas to each other, so they can have idea sex and make idea babies that no one has seen before and b) create a competitive advantage because you can move between worlds, speak both languages, connect the tribes, mash the elements to spark fresh creative insight until you wake up with the epiphany that changes your life. ~ Justine Musk,
774:The deal [between product owners and] engineering goes like this: Product management takes 20% of the team’s capacity right off the top and gives this to engineering to spend as they see fit. They might use it to rewrite, re-architect, or re-factor problematic parts of the code base...whatever they believe is necessary to avoid ever having to come to the team and say, ‘we need to stop and rewrite [all our code].’ If you’re in really bad shape today, you might need to make this 30% or even more of the resources. However, I get nervous when I find teams ~ Gene Kim,
775:I’ve learned that your intuition about things you don’t know that much about isn’t very good,” Page said. “The way Elon talks about this is that you always need to start with the first principles of a problem. What are the physics of it? How much time will it take? How much will it cost? How much cheaper can I make it? There’s this level of engineering and physics that you need to make judgments about what’s possible and interesting. Elon is unusual in that he knows that, and he also knows business and organization and leadership and governmental issues. ~ Ashlee Vance,
776:Artificial, man-made mechanical and engineering contraptions with simple responses are complicated, but not “complex,” as they don’t have interdependencies. You push a button, say, a light switch, and get an exact response, with no possible ambiguity in the consequences, even in Russia. But with complex systems, interdependencies are severe. You need to think in terms of ecology: if you remove a specific animal you disrupt a food chain: its predators will starve and its prey will grow unchecked, causing complications and series of cascading side effects. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
777:My mistakes made were learning how to work with different groups of people. I mean, I went to school at Berkeley, which is a pretty diverse group, but working in a professional setting, I hadn't really done that before and learning about office politics, learning about interactions between different people and I made a lot of mistakes there during my time as a young person. I was 19 or 20 at the time. So, I would say those were my biggest career mistakes, but fortunately they were made in the context of an engineering co-op program and not in a professional field. ~ Leroy Chiao,
778:Other unrelenting skeptics might declare that “seeing is believing”—an approach to life that works well in many endeavors, including mechanical engineering, fishing, and perhaps dating. It’s also good, apparently, for residents of Missouri. But it doesn’t make for good science. Science is not just about seeing, it’s about measuring, preferably with something that’s not your own eyes, which are inextricably conjoined with the baggage of your brain. That baggage is more often than not a satchel of preconceived ideas, post-conceived notions, and outright bias. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
779:production.” They had created a device with a little circuit board that could control billions of dollars’ worth of infrastructure. “You cannot believe how much confidence that gave us.” Woz came to the same conclusion: “It was probably a bad idea selling them, but it gave us a taste of what we could do with my engineering skills and his vision.” The Blue Box adventure established a template for a partnership that would soon be born. Wozniak would be the gentle wizard coming up with a neat invention that he would have been happy just to give away, and Jobs would ~ Walter Isaacson,
780:If we want to postulate a deity capable of engineering all the organized complexity in the world, either instantaneously or by guiding evolution, that deity must have been vastly complex in the first place. The creationist, whether a naive Bible-thumper or an educated bishop, simply postulates an already existing being of prodigious intelligence and complexity. If we are going to allow ourselves the luxury of postulating organized complexity without offering an explanation, we might as well make a job of it and simply postulate the existence of life as we know it! ~ Richard Dawkins,
781:We will actively manage this technical debt by ensuring that we invest at least 20% of all Development and Operations cycles on refactoring, investing in automation work and architecture and non-functional requirements (NFRs, sometimes referred to as the “ilities”), such as maintainability, manageability, scalability, reliability, testability, deployability, and security. Figure 11: Invest 20% of cycles on those that create positive, user-invisible value (Source: “Machine Learning and Technical Debt with D. Sculley,” Software Engineering Daily podcast, November 17, 2015, ~ Gene Kim,
782:He looked down at the desk, at his notebook resting there with the pen on top. He had never thought of engineering as a way to escape the world; after all, engineers didn't build stories or other worlds.

Or, well, perhaps they did; perhaps, late at night, huddled around the boiler with the driver and the conductor, they told their own stories. Famous robberies in the west, derailments, perhaps even ghost trains or passengers long dead who still prowled the carriages.

Either way, Jack had turned his profession into his escape, which Ellis could respect. ~ Sam Starbuck,
783:Let me, then, define technology as a family of methods for associating and channeling other entities and forces, both human and nonhuman. It is a method, one method, for the conduct of heterogeneous engineering, for the construction of a relatively stable system of related bits and pieces with emergent properties in a hostile or indifferent environment. When I say this, I do not mean that the methods are somehow different from the forces that they channel. Technology does not act as a kind of traffic policeman that is distinct in nature from the traffic it directs. It ~ Wiebe E Bijker,
784:Strategy cannot be a useful concept if it is a synonym for success. Nor can it be a useful tool if it is confused with ambition, determination, inspirational leadership, and innovation. Ambition is drive and zeal to excel. Determination is commitment and grit. Innovation is the discovery and engineering of new ways to do things. Inspirational leadership motivates people to sacrifice for their own and the common good.1 And strategy, responsive to innovation and ambition, selects the path, identifying how, why, and where leadership and determination are to be applied. ~ Richard P Rumelt,
785:The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? ~ Peter Thiel,
786:The engineers of human souls'. There were two main problems. The first was that many people did not want their souls to be egineered, thank you very much. They were content with their souls being left as they were when they had come into this world; and when you tried to lead them, they resisted. Come to this free open-air concert, comrade. Oh, we really think you should attend. Yes, of course, it is voluntary, but it might be a mistake if you didn't show your face...
And the second problem with engineering human souls was more basic. It was this: who engineers the engineers? ~ Julian Barnes,
787:1. The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? ~ Peter Thiel,
788:The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? We ~ Peter Thiel,
789:Science has long informed the environmental movement. Now it must take the lead, because we are forced to enter an era of large-scale ecosystem engineering, and we have to know what the hell we’re doing. That sermon gets a chapter. Beavers are benevolent ecosystem engineers; so are soil-enriching earthworms; so were American Indians, who terraformed a continent; so are all of us who work on restoring natural infrastructure. A chapter on that subject leads straight to the book’s conclusion: our obligation to learn planet craft, to be as life-enhancing as any earthworm, in the big yard. ~ Stewart Brand,
790:Space travel is a dream for many men and women. I think my trip will be perceived differently by different genders because for women, a lot of time, not only space travel, it's not accessible to everyone, but is even less accessible to women, there are a lot more barriers for them especially if they live in countries where things like space travel, engineering, any science and technology-related field would be considered a more male-dominated field. And so I want to show them that there is nothing preventing woman, or making them less qualified to be involved in any of these fields. ~ Anousheh Ansari,
791:The advance of communication technology over the years has been in the direction of decreasing the matter-energy costs of storing and transmitting the markers which bear information. The efficiency of information processing can be increased by lessening the mass of the markers, making them smaller so they can be stored more compactly and transmitted more rapidly and cheaply. Over the centuries engineering progress has altered the mode in markers from stones bearing cuneiform to magnetic tape bearing electrons, and clearly some limit is being approached. ~ James Grier Miller, The Nature of Living Systems,
792:Not long after the book came out I found myself being driven to a meeting
by a professor of electrical engineering in the graduate school I of MIT. He said that after reading the book he realized that his graduate students were using on him, and had used for the ten years and more he had been teaching there, all the evasive strategies I described in the book — mumble, guess-and-look, take a wild guess and see what happens, get the teacher to answer his own questions, etc.

But as I later realized, these are the games that all humans play when others
are sitting in judgment on them. ~ John Holt,
793:Robotics, however, is much more difficult. It requires a delicate interplay of mechanical engineering, perception AI, and fine-motor manipulation. These are all solvable problems, but not at nearly the speed at which pure software is being built to handle white-collar cognitive tasks. Once that robot is built, it must also be tested, sold, shipped, installed, and maintained on-site. Adjustments to the robot’s underlying algorithms can sometimes be made remotely, but any mechanical hiccups require hands-on work with the machine. All these frictions will slow down the pace of robotic automation. ~ Kai Fu Lee,
794:4. Priceless versus worthless: The cost of materials today ranges from $0.1 per kg for wood to $4 trillion per kg for certain pharmaceuticals (reimbursable by health insurance). With revolutions in smart materials and molecular engineering, all materials and objects could be reduced to the range of $0.2 per kg (electronics, clothes, foods, cosmetics, and so on)—or people could spend more and more for less and less via clever branding, copyright and patent laws, elaborate licensing and regulatory schemes, and the like. Or is there a way of artfully combining and integrating all of the above? ~ George M Church,
795:How much of the crew has been awakened?” “Only eight, counting us.” They reach the automatic glass doors that open into the five-million-square-foot cavern that serves as a warehouse for provisions and building supplies. Affectionately called “the ark,” it is one of the great feats of human engineering and ambition. A damp, mineralized smell pervades. Massive globe lights hang down from the ceiling, stretching back into the ark as far as the eye can see. They walk toward a Humvee parked at the entrance to a tunnel, and already Pilcher is breathless, his legs threatening to seize up with cramps. ~ Blake Crouch,
796:The new players in the financial markets, the kingpins of the future who had the capacity to reshape those markets, were a different breed: the Chinese guy who had spent the previous ten years in American universities; the French particle physicist from Fermilab; the Russian aerospace engineer; the Indian PhD in electrical engineering. “There were just thousands of these people,” said Schwall. “Basically all of them with advanced degrees. I remember thinking to myself how unfortunate it was that so many engineers were joining these firms to exploit investors rather than solving public problems. ~ Michael Lewis,
797:The deal [between product owners and] engineering goes like this: Product management takes 20% of the team’s capacity right off the top and gives this to engineering to spend as they see fit. They might use it to rewrite, re-architect, or re-factor problematic parts of the code base...whatever they believe is necessary to avoid ever having to come to the team and say, ‘we need to stop and rewrite [all our code].’ If you’re in really bad shape today, you might need to make this 30% or even more of the resources. However, I get nervous when I find teams that think they can get away with much less than 20%. ~ Gene Kim,
798:Perhaps this is why The Boeing Company, one of the largest airplane design and engineering firms in the world, keeps a black book of lessons it has learned from design and engineering failures.[4] Boeing has kept this document since the company was formed, and it uses it to help modern designers learn from past attempts. Any organization that manages to do this not only increases its chances for successful projects, but also helps create an environment that can discuss and confront failure openly, instead of denying and hiding from it. It seems that software developers need to keep black books of their own. ~ Scott Berkun,
799:Ian also had issues with Elizabeth’s management, especially the way she siloed the groups off from one another and discouraged them from communicating. The reason she and Sunny invoked for this way of operating was that Theranos was “in stealth mode,” but it made no sense to Ian. At the other diagnostics companies where he had worked, there had always been cross-functional teams with representatives from the chemistry, engineering, manufacturing, quality control, and regulatory departments working toward a common objective. That was how you got everyone on the same page, solved problems, and met deadlines. ~ John Carreyrou,
800:The nuclear arms race is over, but the ethical problems raised by nonmilitary technology remain. The ethical problems arise from three "new ages" flooding over human society like tsunamis. First is the Information Age, already arrived and here to stay, driven by computers and digital memory. Second is the Biotechnology Age, due to arrive in full force early in the next century, driven by DNA sequencing and genetic engineering. Third is the Neurotechnology Age, likely to arrive later in the next century, driven by neural sensors and exposing the inner workings of human emotion and personality to manipulation. ~ Freeman Dyson,
801:Greatest engineering achievements of 20th century ranked by National Academy of Engineering:
1. Electrification
2. Automobile
3. Airplane
4. Water supply and distribution
5. Electronics
6. Radio and Television
7. Mechanization of agriculture
8. Computers
9. The telephone system
10. Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration
11. Highways
12. Spacecraft
13. The Internet
14. Imaging
15. Household appliances
16. Health technologies
17. Petroleum and Petrochemical Technologies
18. Lasers and Fiber-optics
19. Nuclear technologies
20. High performance materials ~ Henry Petroski,
802:This is shitty to say, but there's not much pathos involved in a case like that. Think about it: Little So-and-so the Fourth drowns himself Tuesday night after receiving his midterm grades in the school of civil engineering. The body goes back to Westchester, and a lounge in the library or a nature path gets named after him, and a bunch of blue-blood kids remember him fondly. Sorry. There's about one story a year like that. Poor Billy Fuckup, Jr., in his Gap khakis, the pressure of going to classes all day really got to him. If I were a better person, I would have felt badly having seen things like that. ~ Cara Hoffman,
803:The odds that Holmes could pull off this latest Houdini act while under criminal investigation were very long, but watching her confidently walk the audience through her sleek slide show helped crystallize for me how she’d gotten this far: she was an amazing saleswoman. She never once stumbled or lost her train of thought. She wielded both engineering and laboratory lingo effortlessly and she showed seemingly heartfelt emotion when she spoke of sparing babies in the NICU from blood transfusions. Like her idol Steve Jobs, she emitted a reality distortion field that forced people to momentarily suspend disbelief. ~ John Carreyrou,
804:Jobs began to accompany Wozniak to Homebrew meetings, carrying the TV monitor and helping to set things up. The meetings now attracted more than one hundred enthusiasts and had been moved to the auditorium of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Presiding with a pointer and a free-form manner was Lee Felsenstein, another embodiment of the merger between the world of computing and the counterculture. He was an engineering school dropout, a participant in the Free Speech Movement, and an antiwar activist. He had written for the alternative newspaper Berkeley Barb and then gone back to being a computer engineer. ~ Walter Isaacson,
805:Throughout this book we will refer to jobs in shorthand, simplistic terms for ease of reference—but it’s important to emphasize that a well-defined job is multilayered and complex. And that is actually a good thing. Why? Because it means that perfectly satisfying someone’s job likely requires not just creating a product, but engineering and delivering a whole set of experiences that address the many dimensions of the job and then integrating those experiences into the company’s processes (as we’ll discuss in depth later in the book). When you’ve done that well, it’s almost impossible for competitors to copy. ~ Clayton M Christensen,
806:Except for practices that incorporate design as the way they practice—for example, architecture and engineering—the art of design is not incorporated into students’ experiences in schools, despite its superiority in many situations, even to such analytical problem solving as scientists employ. The power of design as an instrument of learning is almost completely overlooked by the educational system. For example, the best way to learn how an automobile (or any other mechanism) works and to gain understanding of why it works the way it does is to design one. Moreover, it is in design that people learn what they want. ~ Russell L Ackoff,
807:San Francisco’s battles are no longer with itself but with the outside world, as it exports the European-style social ideas that drive Republican leaders and Fox News commentators into a frenzy: gay marriage, medical marijuana, universal health care, immigrant sanctuary, “living” minimum wage, bicycle-friendly streets, stricter environmental and consumer regulations. Conservatives see these San Francisco values as examples of social engineering gone mad. But in San Francisco, they’re seen as the bedrock of a decent society, one that is based on a live-and-let-live tolerance, shared sense of humanity, and openness to change. ~ David Talbot,
808:The greatest minds and the most advanced engineering went into its creation. They carved the prison out of solid rock from the face of the
mountains just north of the lake. They sealed it not only with metal, stone, and wood but also with ancient and powerful enchantments. In the end, when it was finished, it was believed to be the most secure prison in the world.”
“They must have had some really nasty criminals back then to go to so much trouble,” Hadrian said.
“No,” Myron replied matter-of-factly, “just one.”
“One?” Alric asked. “An entire prison designed to hold just one man?”
“His name was Esrahaddon. ~ Michael J Sullivan,
809:There is no fortuity in the Wright brothers’ saga as related by McCullough, no unexpected events that changed their course. Except for Orville’s startling emergence from a horrible wreck during one of his flights, there’s not even any luck. Neither brother attended college, nor had been trained in physics or engineering, yet each step they took was not only correct but in many cases brilliant, and in nearly all cases original. That every one of those steps was also achieved through excruciating patience and obsessive attention to detail does not diminish the only word that can express what Wilbur, particularly, possessed: genius. ~ Anonymous,
810:Like the legends of Kon-Tiki Viracocha [...], the South American civilizing hero, white-skinned and bearded like Quetzalcoatl and the Apkallu sages [...], who was said to have come to the Andes during a terrifying period, thousands of years in the past, "when the earth had been inundated by a great flood and plunged into darkness by the disappearance of the sun." (Exactly like Quetzalcoatl in Mexico, and the Apkallu sages in Mesopotamia, Viracocha's civilizing mission in the Andes had been to bring laws and a moral code to the survivors of the disaster, and to teach them the skills of agriculture, architecture and engineering. ~ Graham Hancock,
811:Since the soon-to-be outnumber the living; since the living have greater impact on the unborn than ever before thanks to depletion of natural systems, atmospheric disruption, toxic residue, burgeoning technology, global markets, genetic engineering, and sheer population numbers; since our scientific and historic understandings now comfortably examine processes embracing eons; and now that our plan-ahead horizon has shrunk to five years or less—it would seem that a grave disconnect is in progress. Our everhastier decisions and actions do not respond to our long-term understanding, or to the gravity of responsibility we bear. “The ~ Stewart Brand,
812:The concept of man as mass robot was both an expression of and a powerful motive force in industrialized mass society. It was the basis for behavioural engineering in commercial, economic, political and other advertising and propaganda; the expanding economy of the 'affluent society' could not subsist without such manipulation. Only by manipulating humans ever more into Skinnerian rats, robots buying automata, homeostatically adjusted conformers and opportunists (or, bluntly speaking, into morons and zombies) can this great society follow its progress toward ever increasing gross national product. ~ Ludwig von Bertalanffy, General System Theory,
813:seven questions that every business must answer: 1. The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? ~ Peter Thiel,
814:He’s a professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering at the local university. He is somewhat renowned in his field. This is what I’m told by his adoring colleagues and students at boring cocktail parties where I play the part of devoted wife. They always marvel at what it must be like to be married to the great Dr. David Foster III. They imagine, I think, that our nights are filled with romantic whisperings about fluid dynamics and heat transfer or the power of biomechanical joints. They forget that I am a writer and maintain only a cursory understanding of and interest in David’s work—just enough to assure him that my love is true. ~ Roxane Gay,
815:the seven questions that every business must answer: 1. The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? ~ Peter Thiel,
816:I Can Also Paint Around the time that he reached the unnerving milestone of turning thirty, Leonardo da Vinci wrote a letter to the ruler of Milan listing the reasons he should be given a job. He had been moderately successful as a painter in Florence, but he had trouble finishing his commissions and was searching for new horizons. In the first ten paragraphs, he touted his engineering skills, including his ability to design bridges, waterways, cannons, armored vehicles, and public buildings. Only in the eleventh paragraph, at the end, did he add that he was also an artist. “Likewise in painting, I can do everything possible,” he wrote. ~ Walter Isaacson,
817:After more than three decades and many hundreds of studies, the overwhelming scientific consensus is that GMO foods are safe to eat. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine commissioned a comprehensive study of the science, and in 2016 their report declared GMOs both safe to eat and environmentally benign. Of the scientists in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 88 percent think it’s safe to eat GMO foods. This is almost exactly the same percentage of those scientists who say climate change is real and man-made, the latter a data point regularly used to demonstrate right-wing antiscience craziness. ~ Kurt Andersen,
818:We tend to hear much more about the splendors returned than the ships that brought them or the shipwrights. It has always been that way. Even those history books enamored of the voyages of Christopher Columbus do not tell much about the builders of the Nina the Pinta and the Santa Maria or about the principle of the caravel. These spacecraft their designers builders navigators and controllers are examples of what science and engineering set free for well-defined peaceful purposes can accomplish. Those scientists and engineers should be role models for an America seeking excellence and international competitiveness. They should be on our stamps. ~ Carl Sagan,
819:When the maker's (or fixer's) activity is immediately situated within a community of use, it can be enlivened by this kind of direct perception. Then the social character of his work isn't separate from its internal or "engineering" standards; the work is improved through relationships with others. It may even be the case that what those standards are, what perfection consists of, is something that comes to light only through these iterated exchanges with others who use the product, as well as other craftsmen in the same trade. Through work that had this social character, some shared conception of the good is lit up, and becomes concrete. ~ Matthew B Crawford,
820:If I let my fingers wander idly over the keys of a typewriter it might happen that my screed made an intelligible sentence. If an army of monkeys were strumming on typewriters they might write all the books in the British Museum. ~ Arthur Stanley Eddington, The Nature of the Physical World (1928), chapter 4, p. 72. Eddington calls this "a rather classical illustration" of chance. A discussion of this concept is in William Ralph Bennett, Scientific and Engineering Problem-solving with the Computer (1976), chapter 4, p. 105. A similar quotation was attributed, apparently incorrectly, to [Thomas Henry?] Huxley by Sir James Jeans, The Mysterious Universe (1931), p. 4.,
821:seven questions that every business must answer: 1. The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? We’ve discussed these ~ Peter Thiel,
822:... "Having it all" is the phrase of a culture that, as Adam Phillips implies in 'Missing Out', is tyranized by the idea of its own potential. A few generations ago, most people didn't wake up in the morning and fret about whether or not they were living their lives to the fullest. Freedom has always been built into the American experiment, of course, but the freedom to take off and go rock-climbing for the afternoon, or to study engineering, or even to sneak in ten minutes for ourselves in the morning to read the paper- these kinds of freedoms were not, until very recently, built into our private universes of anticipation. It's important to remember that. ~ Jennifer Senior,
823:Abovitz is a technology entrepreneur with a background in biomedical engineering. He previously founded Mako Surgical, a company in Fort Lauderdale that makes a robotic arm equipped with haptic technology, which imparts a sense of touch so that orthopedic surgeons have the sensation of actually working on bones as they trigger the robot’s actions. Mako was sold to a medical technology company, Stryker, for nearly $1.7 billion in 2013. By night, Abovitz likes to rock out. He sings and plays guitar and bass in a pop-rock band called Sparkydog & Friends. And as he tells it, Magic Leap has its origins in both the robotic-surgery company and his life as a musician. ~ Anonymous,
824:The Pragmatic Programmer, a well-regarded book in the computer programming field, makes this connection between code and old-style craftsmanship more directly by quoting the medieval quarry worker’s creed in its preface: “We who cut mere stones must always be envisioning cathedrals.” The book then elaborates that computer programmers must see their work in the same way: Within the overall structure of a project there is always room for individuality and craftsmanship… One hundred years from now, our engineering may seem as archaic as the techniques used by medieval cathedral builders seem to today’s civil engineers, while our craftsmanship will still be honored. ~ Cal Newport,
825:EHMs provide favors. These take the form of loans to develop infrastructure—electric generating plants, highways, ports, airports, or industrial parks. A condition of such loans is that engineering and construction companies from our own country must build all these projects. In essence, most of the money never leaves the United States; it is simply transferred from banking offices in Washington to engineering offices in New York, Houston, or San Francisco. Despite the fact that the money is returned almost immediately to corporations that are members of the corporatocracy (the creditor), the recipient country is required to pay it all back, principal plus interest. ~ John Perkins,
826:NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory studied ten projects that pursued reuse aggressively (McGarry, Waligora, and McDermott 1989). In both the object-oriented and the functionally oriented approaches, the initial projects weren't able to take much of their code from previous projects because previous projects hadn't established a sufficient code base. Subsequently, the projects that used functional design were able to take about 35 percent of their code from previous projects. Projects that used an object-oriented approach were able to take more than 70 percent of their code from previous projects. If you can avoid writing 70 percent of your code by planning ahead, do it! ~ Steve McConnell,
827:When our children are old enough, and if we can afford to, we send them to college, where despite the recent proliferation of courses on 'happiness' and 'positive psychology,' the point is to acquire the skills not of positive thinking but of *critical* thinking, and critical thinking is inherently skeptical. The best students -- and in good colleges, also the most successful -- are the ones who raise sharp questions, even at the risk of making a professor momentarily uncomfortable. Whether the subject is literature or engineering, graduates should be capable of challenging authority figures, going against the views of their classmates, and defending novel points of view. ~ Barbara Ehrenreich,
828:The intelligence we will create from the reverse-engineering of the brain will have access to its own source code and will be able to rapidly improve itself in an accelerating iterative design cycle. Although there is considerable plasticity in the biological human brain, as we have seen, it does have a relatively fixed architecture, which cannot be significantly modified, as well as a limited capacity. We are unable to increase its 300 million pattern recognizers to, say, 400 million unless we do so nonbiologically. Once we can achieve that, there will be no reason to stop at a particular level of capability. We can go on to make it a billion pattern recognizers, or a trillion. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
829:In hiring someone to sell your product to large enterprises, the opposite is true. Knowing how your target customers think and operate, knowing their cultural tendencies, understanding how to recruit and measure the right people in the right regions of the world to maximize your sales—these things turn out to be far more valuable than knowing your own company’s product and culture. This is why when the head of engineering gets promoted from within, she often succeeds. When the head of sales gets promoted from within, she almost always fails. Asking yourself, “Do I value internal or external knowledge more for this position?” will help you determine whether to go for experience or youth. ~ Ben Horowitz,
830:Most cleantech companies crashed because they neglected one or more of the seven questions that every business must answer: 1. The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that ~ Peter Thiel,
831:Like all Roman roads, the Appian Way (Via Appia) was a marvel of both engineering and propaganda. Construction began on the roads by digging deeply into the soil to lay a foundation of rock, covering this in turn with gravel for drainage, and finally paving with virtually indestructible flagstones over which commerce rolled and armies marched. Unlike the earlier muddy tracks around much of the Mediterranean, Roman roads were meant to endure and rarely yielded to the vagaries of topography. Unless prevented by impassable mountains or impregnable swamps, the Romans built their roads straight as an arrow across the landscape. They were in fact a sermon in stone to the world—Romans do not yield. ~ Philip Freeman,
832:The flimsy things broke apart as they crashed on the sidewalk, sheets of papers fluttering off like doves released from cages.
As he turned back to Selena, he braced himself, trying to think of a way to reassure her—
Au contraire.
Selena was alive with excitement, her fangs flashing thanks to a huge smile, a giggling laugh bubbling out of her as she hung on to the door.
“Faster!” she yelled at Fritz. “Let’s go even faster!”
“As you wish, mistress!”
A fresh roar from that massive piece of German engineering under the hood sent them careening not just down the sidewalk, but right up to the very edge of the laws of physics.
Selena looked over at him. “This is the best night ever! ~ J R Ward,
833:We couldn’t figure out why until we went out and did a user study at a nearby college, actually watching students try to use Google. According to Marissa Mayer, at the time a Googler and now CEO of Yahoo, they were so accustomed to cluttered websites that “flashed, revolved, and asked you to punch the monkey” that they thought there had to be more coming.165 They weren’t searching because they were waiting for the page to finish loading. Engineering vice president Jen Fitzpatrick added: “We wound up sticking a copyright tag at the bottom of the page, not so much because we needed a copyright on the page, but because it was a way to say ‘This is the end.’” The copyright notice fixed the problem. ~ Laszlo Bock,
834:If the magician wishes to put himself into or out of any emotional state, then he should be provided with the techniques to accomplish this. The process requires no justification
   - that he wills it is sufficient. One cannot escape emotional experience in a human incarnation, and it is preferable to adopt a master rather than a slave relationship to it. The occult priest should be capable of instructing anyone in the procedures of emotional engineering. The main methods are the gnostic ones of casting oneself into a frenzied ecstacy, stilling the mind to a point of absolute quiescence, and evoking the laughter of the gods by combining laughter with the contemplation of paradox. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
835:The fullest account we have of Oannes is found in surviving fragments of the works of a Babylonian priest called Berossos who wrote in the third century BC. [...] Oannes did not do his work alone but was supposedly the leader of a group of beings known as the Seven Apkallu--the "Seven Sages"--who were said to have lived "before the flood" (a cataclysmic global deluge features prominently in many Mesopotamian traditions, including those of Sumer, Akkad, Assyria and Babylon). Alongside Oannes, these sages are portrayed as bringers of civilization who, in the most ancient past, gave humanity a moral code, arts, crafts and agriculture and taught them architectural, building and engineering skills. ~ Graham Hancock,
836:you get your competent but bored, insecure and hence stodgy teacher talking to an audience divided between engineering students, who are going to be responsible for making bridges that won’t fall down or airplanes that won’t suddenly plunge vertically into the ground at six hundred miles an hour, and who by definition get sweaty palms and vindictive attitudes when their teacher suddenly veers off track and begins raving about wild and completely nonintuitive phenomena; and physics students, who derive much of their self-esteem from knowing that they are smarter and morally purer than the engineering students, and who by definition don’t want to hear about anything that makes no fucking sense. ~ Neal Stephenson,
837:Here is my recommendation for President Trump and the new Congress. Turn immediately to our glorious national institutions, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, for a report to the nation on the key areas for science and technology investments in the coming generation. Ask them to recommend an organizational strategy for a science-based scaling up of national and global R&D efforts. Call on America’s research universities to add their own brainstorming to the work of the national academies. Later in 2017, the president and Congress should then meet in a joint session of Congress to set forth a new technology vision for the nation and an R&D strategy to achieve it. ~ Jeffrey D Sachs,
838:The Korean government also had absolute control over scarce foreign exchange (violation of foreign exchange controls could be punished with the death penalty). When combined with a carefully designed list of priorities in the use of foreign exchange, it ensured the hard-earned foreign currencies were used for importing vital machinery and industrial inputs. The Korean government heavily controlled foreign investment as well, welcoming it with open arms in certain sectors while shutting it out completely in others, according to the evolving national development plan. It also had a lax attitude towards foreign patents, encouraging 'reverse engineering' and overlooking 'pirating' of patented products. ~ Ha Joon Chang,
839:Come now, Tichy. For half a century civilization hasn't been left to its own devices. A hundred years ago a certain Dior was dictating fashions in clothing. Today this sort of regulating has embraced all walks of life. If prostheticism is voted in, I assure you, in a couple of years everyone will consider the possession of a soft, hairy, sweating body to be shameful and indecent. A body needs washing, deodorizing, caring for, and even then it breaks down, while in a prostheticized society you can snap on the loveliest creations of modern engineering. What woman doesn't want to have silver iodide instead of eyes, telescoping breasts, angel's wings, iridescent legs, and feet that sing with every step? ~ Stanis aw Lem,
840:The first change is to hire more slowly. Only 10 percent of your applicants (at best!) will be top performers, so you go through far more applicants and interviews. I say at best, because in fact the top performers in most industries aren’t actually looking for work, precisely because they are top performers who are enjoying their success right where they are. So your odds of hiring a great person based on inbound applications are low. But it’s worth the wait because, as Alan Eustace, our SVP of Knowledge, often says, “A top-notch engineer is worth three hundred times or more than an average engineer. … I’d rather lose an entire incoming class of engineering graduates than one exceptional technologist. ~ Laszlo Bock,
841:many shipwrecks and engineering disasters were blamed on faulty tables. These mathematical tables were calculated by hand, and the mistakes were simply the result of human error. This caused Babbage to exclaim, “I wish to God these calculations had been executed by steam!” This marked the beginning of an extraordinary endeavor to build a machine capable of faultlessly calculating the tables to a high degree of accuracy. In 1823 Babbage designed “Difference Engine No. 1,” a magnificent calculator consisting of 25,000 precision parts, to be built with government funding. Although Babbage was a brilliant innovator, he was not a great implementer. After ten years of toil, he abandoned “Difference Engine No. ~ Simon Singh,
842:Most cleantech companies crashed because they neglected one or more of the seven questions that every business must answer: 1. The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? ~ Peter Thiel,
843:The financial crisis of 2008 is illustrated by the following analogy. There is no doubt that the improvements in engineering have made the passenger car safer than it was 50 years ago. But that does not mean that the automobile is safe at any speed. A small bump on the road can flip the most advanced passenger car speeding 120 mph today just as surely as an older model traveling 80 mph. During the Great Moderation, risks were indeed lower, and financial firms rationally leveraged their balance sheets in response. But their leverage became too great, and all that was needed was an unexpected increase in the default rate on subprime mortgages—that “bump on the road”—to catapult the economy into a crisis. ~ Jeremy J Siegel,
844:science and reason, which has found itself in recent decades under attack on many fronts: right-wing ideologues who do not understand science; religious-right conservatives who fear science; left-wing postmodernists who do not trust science when it doesn’t support progressive tenets about human nature; extreme environmentalists who want to return to a prescientific and preindustrial agrarian society; antivaxxers who wrongly imagine that vaccinations cause autism and other maladies; anti-GMO (genetically modified food) activists who worry about Frankenfoods; and educators of all stripes who cannot articulate why Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) are so vital to a modern democratic nation. ~ Michael Shermer,
845:Even among Sedlacek's own small cell, his Viennese anti-Nazi club, it was not imagined that the pursuit of the Jews had grown quite so systematic. Not only was the story Schindler told him startling simply in moral terms: one was asked to believe that in the midst of a desperate battle, the National Socialists would devote thousands of men, the resources of precious railroads, and enormous cubic footage of cargo space, expensive techniques of engineering, a fatal margin of their research-and-development scientists, a substantial bureaucracy, whole arsenals of automatic weapons, whole magazines of ammunition, all to an extermination which had no military or economic meaning but merely a psychological one. ~ Thomas Keneally,
846:Finance is concerned with the relations between the values of securities and their risk, and with the behavior of those values. It aspires to be a practical, like physics or chemistry or electrical engineering. As John Maynard Keynes once remarked about economics, “If economists could manage to get themselves thought of as humble, competent people on a level with dentists, that would be splendid.” Dentists rely on science, engineering, empirical knowledge, and heuristics, and there are no theorems in dentistry. Similarly, one would hope that nance would be concerned with laws rather than theorems, with behavior rather than assumptions. One doesn’t seriously describe the behavior of a market with theorems. ~ Emanuel Derman,
847:Neoclassical economics has effectively insulated itself from the great advances made in science and engineering over the last 40 years. This self-imposed isolation must come to an end. For while the concepts of neoclassical economics appear difficult, they are actually quaint in comparison to the sophistication evident in today's mathematics, engineering, computing, evolutionary biology and physics. In order to advance, economics must humbly submit to learning from disciplines that it has studiously ignored for so long. Some researchers in outside fields have called for the wholesale replacement of standard economics curricula, using at least the building blocks of modern thought inherent in other disciplines. ~ Steve Keen,
848:Well...what you did in Rosewater County was far from insane. It was quite possibly the most important social experiment of our time, for it dealt on a very small scale with a problem whose queasy horrors will eventually be made world-wide by the sophistication of machines. The problem is this: How to love people who have no use?
In time, almost all men and women will become worthless as producers of goods, food, services, and more machines, as sources of practical ideas in the areas of economics, engineering, and probably medicine, too. So - if we can't find reasons and methods for treasuring human beings because they are human beings , then we might as well, as has so often been suggested, rub them out. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
849:Neither the great political and financial power structures of the world, nor the specialization-blinded professionals, nor the population in general realize that sum-totally the omni-engineering-integratable, invisible revolution in the metallurgical, chemical, and electronic arts now makes it possible to do so much more with ever fewer pounds and volumes of material, ergs of energy, and seconds of time per given technological function that it is now highly feasible to take care of everybody on Earth at a “higher standard of living than any have ever known.” It no longer has to be you or me. Selfishness is unnecessary and henceforth unrationalizable as mandated by survival. War is obsolete. ~ Buckminster Fuller, Critical Path,
850:Today I am more convinced than ever. Conceptual integrity is central to product quality. Having a system architect is the most important single step toward conceptual integrity. These principles are by no means limited to software systems, but to the design of any complex construct, whether a computer, an airplane, a Strategic Defense Initiative, a Global Positioning System. After teaching a software engineering laboratory more than 20 times, I came to insist that student teams as small as four people choose a manager and a separate architect. Defining distinct roles in such small teams may be a little extreme, but I have observed it to work well and to contribute to design success even for small teams. ~ Frederick P Brooks Jr,
851:At present there are only two land-based cranes in the world that could lift weights of this magnitude. At the very frontiers of construction technology, these are both vast, industrialized machines, with booms reaching more than 220 feet into the air, which require on-board counterweights of 160 tons to prevent them from tipping over. The preparation-time for a single lift is around six weeks and calls for the skills of specialized teams of up to 20 men.13 In other words, modern builders with all the advantages of high-tech engineering at their disposal, can barely hoist weights of 200 tons. Was it not, therefore, somewhat surprising that the builders at Giza had hoisted such weights on an almost routine basis? ~ Graham Hancock,
852:How do we change the way science is taught?

Ask anybody how many teachers truly made a difference in their life, and you never come up with more than the fingers on one hand. You remember their names, you remember what they did, you remember how they moved in front of the classroom. You know why you remember them? Because they were passionate about the subject. You remember them because they lit a flame within you. They got you excited about a subject you didn't previously care about, because they were excited about it themselves. That's what turns people on to careers in science and engineering and mathematics. That's what we need to promote. Put that in every classroom, and it will change the world. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
853:along with his ticket, passport, and luggage, Tesla still managed to make it aboard the steamship. A mutiny broke out during the voyage, and he got caught in the middle of a battle royale between crewmates. Tesla was arrested, pleaded innocence, and was released, and finally arrived to New York City on June 6, 1884. He had nothing but a few cents in his pocket, a few poems, calculations for a flying machine he dreamed of building one day, and the letter of recommendation. He went straight to meet his hero, Edison, and was starstruck. He briefly described the engineering work he had done for Edison’s company, and talked about his plans for an alternating current motor. Direct current was barely a decade old when Tesla ~ Sean Patrick,
854:The qualities of character can be arranged in triads, in each of which the first and last qualities will be extremes and vices, and the middle quality a virtue or an excellence. So between cowardice and rashness is courage; between stinginess and extravagance is liberality; between sloth and greed is ambition; between humility and pride is modesty; between secrecy and loquacity, honesty; between moroseness and buffoonery, good humor; between quarrelsomeness and flattery, friendship; between Hamlet’s indecisiveness and Quixote’s impulsiveness is self-control.49 “Right,” then, in ethics or conduct, is not different from “right” in mathematics or engineering; it means correct, fit, what works best to the best result. The ~ Will Durant,
855:I'm not saying that the world will be reduced to expedient means and ridiculous disorder of the South American republics, - that we could maybe even return to savagery, and walk through the overgrown ruins of our civilization searching for food with a gun in our hand. No; - because such a destiny and such adventures would still presuppose a vital energy, an echo of primeval ages. As the new example and the new victims of inexorable moral laws, we shall perish by what we thought was our life-giver. Engineering will make us so Americanized, progress will create such great atrophy of everything spiritual in us, that the bloody, sacrilegious or unnatural dreams of the utopians could never compare with its positive results. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
856:Originators, however, do not merely master functionalities and use them once and finally in their great creation. What always precedes invention is a lengthy period of accumulating functionalities and of experimenting with them on small problems as five-finger exercises. Often in this period of working with functionalities you can see hints of what originators will use. Five years before his revelation, Charles Townes had argued in a memo that microwave radio "has now been extended to such short wavelengths that it overlaps a region rich in molecular resonances, where quantum mechanical theory and spectroscopic techniques can provide aids to radio engineering." Molecular resonance was exactly what he would use to invent the maser. ~ W Brian Arthur,
857:This is also, I hope, a book about innovation. At a time when the United States is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, and when societies around the world are trying to build creative digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness, imagination, and sustained innovation. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology, so he built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. He and his colleagues at Apple were able to think differently: They developed not merely modest product advances based on focus groups, but whole new devices and services that consumers did not yet know they needed. ~ Walter Isaacson,
858:I don’t think we’re doing a good job as a society deciding what things are really important to do.” Page said. “I think like we’re just not educating people in this kind of general way. You should have a pretty broad engineering and scientific background. You have some leadership training and a bit of MBA training or knowledge of how to run things, organize stuff, and raise money. I don’t think most people are doing that, and it’s a big problem. Engineers are usually trained in a very fixed area. When you’re able to think about all of these disciplines together, you kind of think differently and can dream of much crazier things and how they might work. I think that’s really an important thing for the world. That’s how we make progress. ~ Ashlee Vance,
859:and tried to redesign the computers using these newer parts. The challenge he set himself was to replicate the design using the fewest components possible. Each night he would try to improve his drawing from the night before. By the end of his senior year, he had become a master. “I was now designing computers with half the number of chips the actual company had in their own design, but only on paper.” He never told his friends. After all, most seventeen-year-olds were getting their kicks in other ways. On Thanksgiving weekend of his senior year, Wozniak visited the University of Colorado. It was closed for the holiday, but he found an engineering student who took him on a tour of the labs. He begged his father to let him go there, even ~ Walter Isaacson,
860:At first, the letters were arrayed in alphabetical order, an arrangement hinted at on modern keyboards by the sequences F-G-H, J-K-L and O-P, but the fact that no two other letters are alphabetical, that the most popular letters are not only banished to the periphery but given mostly to the left hand while the right is left with a sprinkling of secondary letters, punctuation marks and little-used symbols, are vivid reminders of the extent to which Sholes had to abandon common sense and order just to make the damn thing work. There is a certain piquant irony in the thought that every time you stab ineptly at the letter a with the little finger of your left hand, you are commemorating the engineering inadequacies of a nineteenth-century inventor. ~ Bill Bryson,
861:[Computers] are developing so rapidly that even computer scientists cannot keep up with them. It must be bewildering to most mathematicians and engineers... In spite of the diversity of the applications, the methods of attacking the difficult problems with computers show a great unity, and the name of Computer Sciences is being attached to the discipline as it emerges. It must be understood, however, that this is still a young field whose structure is still nebulous. The student will find a great many more problems than answers. ~ George Forsythe (1961) "Engineering students must learn both computing and mathematics". J. Eng. Educ. 52 (1961), p. 177. as cited in (Knuth, 1972) According to Donald Knuth in this quote Forsythe coined the term "computer science".,
862:Time was minutely calculated everywhere in the vast plant so that top managers knew precisely what everyone was supposed to be doing at a given moment. Bell was struck, for instance, by how General Motors “divides the hour into ten six-minute periods…the worker is paid by the numbers of tenths of an hour he works.”27 This minute engineering of work time was connected to very long measures of time in the corporation as well. Seniority pay was finely tuned to the total number of hours a man or woman had worked for General Motors; a laborer could minutely calculate benefits of vacation time and sick leave. The micrometrics of time governed the lower echelons of white-collar offices as well as manual labor on the assembly line, in terms of promotion and benefits. ~ Richard Sennett,
863:From my experience, I perceived Bill and Hillary to share a strong friendship and business relationship. Since I knew them both to be bisexual8, the media hyped ‘affairs’ could not be what they appeared. I called them a “perversion diversion” from the real crimes Bill and Hillary were guilty of. Hillary’s act as a jilted wife was a deliberate “division decision.” Knowing the Clintons and social engineering tactics, the illusion was created to separate her from Bill in the public eye so that she would eventually run for President as intended. Just as Bill went into the office of President as a “Democrat” to make the public feel they had a change from “Republicans” leading them into the New World Order, Hillary would be the illusion of change from male Presidents. ~ Cathy O Brien,
864:Improve performance through process improvements introduced with minimal resistance. Deliver with high quality. Deliver a predictable lead time by controlling the quantity of work-in-progress. Give team members a better life through an improved work/life balance. Provide slack in the system by balancing demand against throughput. Provide a simple prioritization mechanism that delays commitment and keeps options open. Provide a transparent scheme for seeing improvement opportunities, thereby enabling change to a more collaborative culture that encourages continuous improvement. Strive for a process that enables predictable results, business agility, good governance, and the development of what the Software Engineering Institute calls a high-maturity organization. ~ David J Anderson,
865:To maximize what you get out of your college experience, I want your friends to look at your semester schedule and say “this is the weirdest schedule I’ve ever seen!”

Trust me on this one. If you want to be an engineer, take Engineering 101, and a crash course in philosophical literature. then take Engineering 102, and art appreciation. then Engineering 103, and Intro to Women’s Rights.

You will expand your knowledge and ways of looking at the world, and become a more powerful person for it. Because that way, when you encounter difficulties, you won’t only tackle the problem from the point of view of an engineer. Anybody can do that. You will be able to look at it as a scientist, a philosopher, an artist, and choose the best course of action from there. ~ Anonymous,
866:Yet, the principle of uncertainty is a bad name. In science or outside of it, we are not uncertain. Our knowledge is merely confined within a certain tolerance. We should call it the principle of tolerance. First in the engineering sense. Science has progressed, step by step, the most successful enterprise in the ascent of man, because it has understood that the exchange of information between man and nature, and man and man, can only take place with a certain tolerance. But I also use the word, passionately, about the real world. All knowledge, all information, between human beings, can only be exchanged within a play of tolerance, and that's whether it's in science, or in literature, or in religion, or in politics, or in any form of though that aspires to dogma. ~ Jacob Bronowski,
867:In this book, we will naturally be dealing primarily with the manifestations of the third level of immunity. I gather material on the biography of Homo immunologicus, guided by the assumption that this is where to find the stuff from which the forms of anthropotechnics are made. By this I mean the methods of mental and physical practising by which humans from the most diverse cultures have attempted to optimize their cosmic and immunological status in the face of vague risks of living and acute certainties of death. Only when these procedures have been grasped in a broad tableau of human 'work on oneself' can we evaluate the newest experiments in genetic engineering, to which, in the current debate, many have reduced the term 'anthropotechnics', reintroduced in 1997. ~ Peter Sloterdijk,
868:According to Petroski, real knowledge from real failure is the most powerful source of progress we have, provided we have the courage to carefully examine what happened. Perhaps this is why The Boeing Company, one of the largest airplane design and engineering firms in the world, keeps a black book of lessons it has learned from design and engineering failures.[4] Boeing has kept this document since the company was formed, and it uses it to help modern designers learn from past attempts. Any organization that manages to do this not only increases its chances for successful projects, but also helps create an environment that can discuss and confront failure openly, instead of denying and hiding from it. It seems that software developers need to keep black books of their own. ~ Scott Berkun,
869:But if tools were actually central to mental growth beyond purely animal needs, how is it that those primitive peoples, like the Australian Bushmen, who have the most rudimentary technology, nevertheless exhibit elaborate religious ceremonials, an extremely complicated kinship organization, and a complex and differentiated language? Why, further, were highly developed cultures, like those of the Maya, the Aztecs, the Peruvians, still using only the simplest handicraft equipment, though they were capable of constructing superbly planned works of engineering and architecture, like the road to Machu Pichu and Machu Pichu itself? And how is it that the Maya, who had neither machines nor draught animals, were not only great artists but masters of abstruse mathematical calculations. ~ Lewis Mumford,
870:As an author writing about software engineering, I am committed to providing the best grounding for any factual claims I make or support. To that end I will: only cite papers that I have in fact personally read refrain from indirect quotation (or other ‘telephone game’ variants) make it clear whenever I’m citing opinion or indirect quotation, as opposed to original research cite page and section numbers when available, and always when citing books whenever possible, cite papers freely available online in full text versions refrain from citing obscure or non peer-reviewed sources check that the data I’m citing actually supports the claim look for contradictory evidence as well as supporting, to avoid confirmation bias only make prudent claims, and present all plausible threats to validity. ~ Anonymous,
871:Apple’s approach, by contrast, is messier and more chaotic at the beginning, but it avoids this chronic problem of good ideas being hollowed out as they progress through the development chain. Apple calls it concurrent or parallel production. All the groups—design, manufacturing, engineering, sales—meet continuously through the product-development cycle, brainstorming, trading ideas and solutions, strategizing over the most pressing issues, and generally keeping the conversation open to a diverse group of perspectives. The process is noisy and involves far more open-ended and contentious meetings than traditional production cycles—and far more dialogue between people versed in different disciplines, with all the translation difficulties that creates. But the results speak for themselves. ~ Steven Johnson,
872:one of our earliest challenges was that users would look at the Google Web page and not type anything. We couldn’t figure out why until we went out and did a user study at a nearby college, actually watching students try to use Google. According to Marissa Mayer, at the time a Googler and now CEO of Yahoo, they were so accustomed to cluttered websites that “flashed, revolved, and asked you to punch the monkey” that they thought there had to be more coming.165 They weren’t searching because they were waiting for the page to finish loading. Engineering vice president Jen Fitzpatrick added: “We wound up sticking a copyright tag at the bottom of the page, not so much because we needed a copyright on the page, but because it was a way to say ‘This is the end.’” The copyright notice fixed the problem. ~ Laszlo Bock,
873:Apple raised $17 billion in a bond offering in 2013. Not to invest in new products or business lines, but to pay a dividend to stockholders. The company is awash with cash, but much of that money is overseas, and there would be a tax charge if it were repatriated to the USA. For many other companies, the tax-favoured status of debt relative to equity encourages financial engineering. Most large multinational companies have corporate and financial structures of mind-blowing complexity. The mechanics of these arrangements, which are mainly directed at tax avoidance or regulatory arbitrage, are understood by only a handful of specialists. Much of the securities issuance undertaken by Goldman Sachs was not ‘helping companies to grow’ but represented financial engineering of the kind undertaken at Apple. What ~ John Kay,
874:Over the years, as I listened to the engineering give-and-take over the question of artificial life-forms, I kept coming up against something obdurate inside myself, some stubborn resistance to the definition of “life” that was being promulgated. It seemed to me too reductive of what we are, too mechanistic. Even if I could not quite get myself to believe in God or the soul or the Tao or some other metaphor for the ineffable spark of life, still, as I sat there high in the balcony of the Stanford lecture hall, listening to the cyberneticists’ claims to be on the path toward the creation of a sentient being, I found myself muttering, No, that’s not right, we’re not just mechanisms, you’re missing something, there’s something else, something more. But then I had to ask myself: What else could there be? ~ Ellen Ullman,
875:At the same time, code like that of the prior section may push the complexity envelope more than it should — and, frankly, tends to disproportionately pique the interest of those holding the darker and misguided assumption that code obfuscation somehow implies talent. Because such tools tend to appeal to some people more than they probably should, I need to be clear about their scope here. This book demonstrates advanced comprehensions to teach, but in the real world, using complicated and tricky code where not warranted is both bad engineering and bad software citizenship. To repurpose a line from the first chapter: programming is not about being clever and obscure — it’s about how clearly your program communicates its purpose. Or, to quote from Python’s import this motto: Simple is better than complex. ~ Mark Lutz,
876:During a recent visit to the United States, French President François Mitterrand stopped to tour California’s Silicon Valley, where he hoped to learn more about the ingenuity and entrepreneurial drive that gave birth to so many companies there. Over lunch, Mitterrand listened as Thomas Perkins, a partner in the venture capital fund that started Genentech Inc., extolled the virtues of the risk-taking investors who finance the entrepreneurs. Perkins was cut off by Stanford University Professor Paul Berg, who won a Nobel Prize for work in genetic engineering. He asked, ‘Where were you guys in the ’50s and ’60s when all the funding had to be done in the basic science? Most of the discoveries that have fuelled [the industry] were created back then.’ Henderson and Schrage, in the Washington Post (1984) ~ Mariana Mazzucato,
877:I forgive. Cause nobody knows us : except our mothers, and they hardly do (and also tend disappointingly to die before they ought). Or our fathers, whose failings while they’re alive (and absences after they’re dead) infuriate. Or our siblings, who want us dead too cause what they know about us is that somehow we got away with not having to carry the bricks and stones like they did all those years. Cause nobody’s the slightest idea who we are, or who we were, not even we ourselves – except, that is, in the glimmer of a moment of fair business between strangers, or the nod of knowing and agreement between friends. Other than these, we go out anonymous into the insect air and all we are is the dust of colour, brief engineering of wings towards a glint of light on a blade of grass or a leaf in a summer dark. ~ Ali Smith,
878:Marconi recognized that with no revenue and no contracts and in the face of persistent skepticism, he needed more than ever to capture an ally of prominence and credibility. Through Fleming, however, Marconi also hoped to gain a benefit more tangible. His new idea, the feat he hoped would command the world’s attention once and for all, would require more power and involve greater danger, physical and fiscal, than anything he had attempted before. When it came to high-power engineering, he knew, Fleming was the man to consult. UNLIKE LODGE OR KELVIN, Fleming was susceptible to flattery and needful of attention, as evidenced by the fact that upon receiving Marconi’s telegram he made sure the London Times got a copy of it. The Times published it, as part of its coverage of Marconi’s English Channel success. ~ Erik Larson,
879:Long-Term Results The practical value of the solutions obtained is one way to determine if the subjective reports of accomplishments might be temporary euphoria. The nature of these solutions covered a broad spectrum, including: A new approach to the design of a vibratory microtome A commercial building design, accepted by the client Space-probe experiments devised to measure solar properties Design of a linear electron accelerator beam-steering device An engineering improvement to a magnetic tape recorder A chair design modeled and accepted by the manufacturer A letterhead design approved by the customer A mathematical theorem regarding NOR-gate circuits Completion of a furniture-line design A new conceptual model of a photon found to be useful A design of a private dwelling approved by the client Table 9.3 ~ James Fadiman,
880:EAMES: There's a man here. Yusuf. He formulates his own versions of the compound.
COBB: Let's go see him.
EAMES: Once you've lost your tail.
(Cobb reacts)
Back by the bar, blue tie. Came in about two minutes after we did.
COBB: Cobol Engineering?
EAMES: They pretty much own Mombasa.
Cobb glances over the balcony.
COBB: Run interference. We'll meet downstairs in half an hour.
EAMES: Back here?
COBB: Last place they'd expect.
Eames downs his drink. Rises. Walks over to the Businessman.
EAMES: Freddy!
The Businessman looks up, awkward.
EAMES: Freddy Simmonds, it is you!
Cobb nonchalantly SLIPS over the balcony DROPPING HARD into the midst of the crowd on the street below.
EAMES: (looks harder) Oh. No, it isn't.
The Businessman looks past Eames but Cobb has vanished. ~ Christopher J Nolan,
881:The intellectual ethic of a technology is rarely recognized by its inventors. They are usually so intent on solving a particular problem or untangling some thorny scientific or engineering dilemma that they don't see the broader implications of their work. The users of the technology are also usually oblivious to its ethic. They, too, are concerned with the practical benefits they gain from employing the tool. Our ancestors didn't develop or use maps in order to enhance their capacity for conceptual thinking or to bring the world's hidden structures to light. Nor did they manufacture mechanical clocks to spur the adoption of a more scientific mode of thinking. These were by-products of the technologies. But what by-products! Ultimately, it's an invention's intellectual work ethic that has the most profound effect on us. ~ Nicholas Carr,
882:When I work with experimental gadgets, like new variations on virtual reality, in a lab environment, I am always reminded of how small changes in the details of a digital design can have profound unforeseen effects on the experiences of the humans who are playing with it. The slightest change in something as seemingly trivial as the use of a button can sometimes completely alter behavior patterns.

For instance, Stanford University researcher Jeremy Bailenson has demonstrated that changing the height of one's avatar in immersive virtual reality transforms self-esteem and social self-perception. Technologies are extensions of ourselves, and, like the avatars in Jeremy's lab, our identities can be shifted by the quirks of gadgets. It is impossible to work with information technology without also engaging in social engineering. ~ Jaron Lanier,
883:Consider how the principles of the law of accelerating returns apply to the epochs we discussed in the first chapter. The combination of amino acids into proteins and of nucleic acids into strings of RNA established the basic paradigm of biology. Strings of RNA (and later DNA) that self-replicated (Epoch Two) provided a digital method to record the results of evolutionary experiments. Later on, the evolution of a species that combined rational thought (Epoch Three) with an opposable appendage (the thumb) caused a fundamental paradigm shift from biology to technology (Epoch Four). The upcoming primary paradigm shift will be from biological thinking to a hybrid combining biological and nonbiological thinking (Epoch Five), which will include “biologically inspired” processes resulting from the reverse engineering of biological brains. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
884:Most importantly, Payscale’s analysis finds that college is a very sound investment. Over a 30-year career, the graduates of a majority of schools will make at least $6,700 more per year than the average high-school graduate. That is more than enough extra income to make college worthwhile. In the 2013 rankings, Harvey Mudd, a private college with a science and engineering focus, ranks highest. On average, its graduates earn an extra $2.1 million over the span of their careers, which is an annual rate of return of 8.3% on the college investment. In the middle of the rankings, Georgia State alumni earn an extra $457,000 for a return on investment of 4.3%. Over half of the nearly 1,500 colleges have a return on investment of over 5%, and only 28 have negative returns. When you account for grants and financial aid, these numbers look even better. ~ Anonymous,
885:Nerds are used to transparency. They add value by becoming expert at a technical skill like computer programming. In engineering disciplines, a solution either works or it fails. You can evaluate someone else’s work with relative ease, as surface appearances don’t matter much. Sales is the opposite: an orchestrated campaign to change surface appearances without changing the underlying reality. This strikes engineers as trivial if not fundamentally dishonest. They know their own jobs are hard, so when they look at salespeople laughing on the phone with a customer or going to two-hour lunches, they suspect that no real work is being done. If anything, people overestimate the relative difficulty of science and engineering, because the challenges of those fields are obvious. What nerds miss is that it takes hard work to make sales look easy. SALES ~ Peter Thiel,
886:On January 28, 1983, on the eve of the launch of the Human Genome Project, Carrie Buck died in a nursing home in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. She was seventy-six years old. Her birth and death had bookended the near century of the gene. Her generation had borne witness to the scientific resurrection of genetics, its forceful entry into public discourse, its perversion into social engineering and eugenics, its postwar emergence as the central theme of the “new” biology, its impact on human physiology and pathology, its powerful explanatory power in our understanding of illness, and its inevitable intersection with questions of fate, identity, and choice. She had been one of the earliest victims of the misunderstandings of a powerful new science. And she had watched that science transform our understanding of medicine, culture, and society. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
887:Even at a cost of $100,000, a purchased piece of software is costing only about as much as one programmer-year. And delivery is immediate! Immediate at least for products that really exist, products whose developer can refer the prospect to a happy user. Moreover, such products tend to be much better documented and somewhat better maintained than homegrown software. The development of the mass market is, I believe, the most profound long-run trend in software engineering. The cost of software has always been development cost, not replication cost. Sharing that cost among even a few users radically cuts the per-user cost. Another way of looking at it is that the use of n copies of a software system effectively multiplies the productivity of its developers by n. That is an enhancement of the productivity of the discipline and of the nation. ~ Frederick P Brooks Jr,
888:Halsey was neither a genius nor even a working scholar in any academic or technical field, but he had a quality of brilliance that may have been even more important in a combat capacity. He was, it was said, “brilliant in common sense.” He knew that battles and wars were won not principally with well-drafted paperwork or subtle diplomacy or high materials and engineering ratings aboard ship, but by something quite simple and direct: placing ordnance on target. He knew, working backward from there, that the quality of the mind and spirit of the men distributing that ordnance was at least as important as the mechanical state of the weapons themselves. And he knew that small and simple acts, trivial in themselves but intangibly powerful, raised and perfected that quality; sometimes those things were as prosaic as showing up and listening to people. ~ James D Hornfischer,
889:People are as blinded by emotion as you were a few minutes ago. There are very few people these days who have eyes-to-see and ears-to-hear truth. Social engineering through cover-up, censorship, and contrived news keeps the public fearful and emotionally arguing over ancient issues like abortion, cloning, gun control, and song lyrics. People hopelessly rely on government to tell them what to do, then blindly blame and fight each other in drug and race wars designed to separate them from the truth and each other.” “People are so easily led, it’s no wonder the criminals I knew in DC refer to them as sheeple. Byrd even said that 95% of the people want to be led by the ruling 5%.” “That is a widely known fact,” Mark said, “that gives folks like me hope. We only need the majority of that 5% to know and live truth in order to have leaders like Von Raab in power. ~ Cathy O Brien,
890:What was happily proved by this early revolution is something that we perhaps need to be reminded of again today: that neither exact science nor engineering is proof against the irrationality of those that operate the system. Above all, that the strongest and most efficient of megamachines can be overthrown, that human errors are not immortal. The collapse of the Pyramid Age proved that the megamachine exists on a basis of human beliefs, which may crumble, of human decisions, which may prove fallible, and human consent, which, when the magic becomes discredited, may be withheld. The human parts that composed the megamachine were by nature mechanically imperfect: never wholly reliable. Until real machines of wood and metal could be manufactured in sufficient quantity to take the place of most of the human components, the megamachine would remain vulnerable. ~ Lewis Mumford,
891:It's not as though we're down here on Earth and the rest of the universe is out there. To begin with, we're genetically connected to each other and to all other life-forms on Earth. We're mutual participants in the biosphere. We're also chemically connected to all the other life-forms we have yet to discover. They, too, would use the same elements we find in our periodic table. They do not and cannot have some other periodic table. So we're genetically connected to each other; we're molecularly connected to other objects in the universe; and we're atomically connected to all matter in the cosmos.
For me, that is a profound thought. It is even spiritual. Science , enabled by engineering, empowered by NASA, tells us not only that we are in the universe but that the universe is in us. And for me, that sense of belonging elevates , not denigrates, the ego. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
892:One image that doesn’t exist in my computer but that I will always remember is the view from the Soyuz window as Sergey, Misha, and I backed away from the International Space Station. As well as I know the inside of the station, I’ve only seen the outside a handful of times. It’s a strange sight, glinting in the reflected sunlight, as long as a football field, its solar arrays spread out more than half an acre. It’s a completely unique structure, assembled by spacewalkers flying around the Earth at 17,500 miles per hour in a vacuum, in extremes of temperature of plus and minus 270 degrees, the work of fifteen different nations over eighteen years, thousands of people speaking different languages and using different engineering methods and standards. In some cases the station’s modules never touched one another while on Earth, but they all fit together perfectly in space. ~ Scott Kelly,
893:Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.
When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.
Learning never exhausts the mind.
Art is never finished, only abandoned.
Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.
The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art.
It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.
I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.
As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death.
Water is the driving force of all nature. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
894:It is not a dream, it is a simple feat of scientific electrical engineering, only expensive — blind, faint-hearted, doubting world! [...] Humanity is not yet sufficiently advanced to be willingly led by the discoverer's keen searching sense. But who knows? Perhaps it is better in this present world of ours that a revolutionary idea or invention instead of being helped and patted, be hampered and ill-treated in its adolescence — by want of means, by selfish interest, pedantry, stupidity and ignorance; that it be attacked and stifled; that it pass through bitter trials and tribulations, through the strife of commercial existence. So do we get our light. So all that was great in the past was ridiculed, condemned, combatted, suppressed — only to emerge all the more powerfully, all the more triumphantly from the struggle." – Nikola Tesla (at the end of his dream for Wardenclyffe) ~ Nikola Tesla,
895:Look around you,” the stranger said. “Can’t you see that we are living amongst the ruins of our civilisation?”
The words seemed to chime in with the deliberations already in Egremont’s mind, and he thought again of the disillusionment he felt over his own time spent in the corridors of power in the European Union. What good had come out of the project? A series of once great cities Americanised out of all recognition, streets thronged with homogenised consumerist outlets, a gulf between cultural and historical identity, blatant social engineering, obscenely wealthy masters of state and private enterprises, a celebrity-obsessed media, intellectual debates reduced to sound bites, a collective attention span that diminished year on year, aged people with plastic faces worshipping youth and an intelligentsia committed only to the self-destructive cause of fashionable cynicism. ~ Mark Samuels,
896:While Elizabeth was fast to catch on to engineering concepts, Sunny was often out of his depth during engineering discussions. To hide it, he had a habit of repeating technical terms he heard others using. During a meeting with Arnav’s team, he latched onto the term “end effector,” which signifies the claws at the end of a robotic arm. Except Sunny didn’t hear “end effector,” he heard “endofactor.” For the rest of the meeting, he kept referring to the fictional endofactors. At their next meeting with Sunny two weeks later, Arnav’s team brought a PowerPoint presentation titled “Endofactors Update.” As Arnav flashed it on a screen with a projector, the five members of his team stole furtive glances at one another, nervous that Sunny might become wise to the prank. But he didn’t bat an eye and the meeting proceeded without incident. After he left the room, they burst out laughing. ~ John Carreyrou,
897:It's simple. If you go to see 'Saturday Night Fever' expecting it to be good, it's a corker. However, if you go expecting it to be a crock of shit, it's that, too. Thus 'Saturday Night Fever' can exist in two mutually opposing states at the very same time, yet only by the weight of our expectations. From this principle we can deduce that any opposing states can be governed by human expectation - even, as in the case of retro-deficit-engineering, the present use of a future technology."

"I think I understand that. Does it work with any John Travolta movie?"

"Only the artistically ambiguous ones such as 'Pulp Fiction' or 'Face/Off.' 'Battlefield Earth' doesn't work, because it's a stinker no matter how much you think you're going to like it, and 'Get Shorty' doesn't work either, because you'd be hard-pressed not to enjoy it, irrespective of any preconceived notions. ~ Jasper Fforde,
898:Regardless of how we approach systemic vulnerability, once we try to strip uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure from the relational experience, we bankrupt courage by definition. Again, we know that courage is four skill sets with vulnerability at the center. So the bad news is that there’s no app for it, and regardless of what you do and where you work, you’re called to be brave in vulnerability even if your job is engineering the vulnerability out of systems. The good news is that if we can successfully develop the four courage-building skills, starting with how to rumble with vulnerability, we will have the capacity for something deeply human, invaluable to leadership, and unattainable by machines. Myth #5: Trust comes before vulnerability. We sometimes do an exercise with groups where we give people sentence stems and they fill out the answers on a Post-it note. An example: ~ Bren Brown,
899:Universities face a constant struggle to maintain their integrity, and their fundamental social role in a healthy society, in the face of external pressures. The problems are heightened with the expansion of private power in every domain, in the course of the state-corporate social engineering projects of the past several decades. . . . To defend their integrity and proper commitments is an honorable and difficult task in itself, but our sights should be set higher than that. Particularly in the societies that are more privileged, many choices are available, including fundamental institutional change, if that is the right way to proceed, and surely including scholarship that contributes to, and draws from, the never-ending popular struggles for freedom and justice. 5 Higher education is under attack not because it is failing, but because it is a potentially democratic public sphere. ~ Noam Chomsky,
900:Ideally, you want components with a flat frequency/response curve: they apply identical amounts of energy to every sound frequency, so the proper balance between high and low is maintained. Although Neat Acoustics isn’t as well known in the States, I’d heard some of their speakers demoed at a conference in Brussels once and decided I needed a pair if I could ever afford them. When I bought the house, I settled on a pair of Ultimatum XL6s. Only three feet high, they use some neat engineering tricks to generate a much fuller frequency range than you’d expect. For example, each speaker contains an isobaric bass chamber, with two drivers lined up one behind the other inside the closed compartment. With the two woofers rigged so their cones move simultaneously, you can create the same bass sound in half the cabinet space. Unfortunately, the trade-off for such a compact design is density, of ~ Joseph Reid,
901:Winfree came from a family in which no one had gone to college. He got started, he would say, by not having proper education. His father, rising from the bottom of the life insurance business to the level of vice president, moved family almost yearly up and down the East Coast, and Winfree attended than a dozen schools before finishing high school. He developed a feeling that the interesting things in the world had to do with biology and mathematics and a companion feeling that no standard combination of the two subjects did justice to what was interesting. So he decided not to take a standard approach. He took a five-year course in engineering physics at Cornell University, learning applied mathematics and a full range of hands-on laboratory styles. Prepared to be hired into military-industrial complex, he got a doctorate in biology, striving to combine experiment with theory in new ways. ~ James Gleick,
902:George B. Johnston of Enid, Oklahoma, is the safety coordinator for an engineering company. One of his responsibilities is to see that employees wear their hard hats whenever they are on the job in the field. He reported that whenever he came across workers who were not wearing hard hats, he would tell them with a lot of authority of the regulation and that they must comply. As a result he would get sullen acceptance, and often after he left, the workers would remove the hats. He decided to try a different approach. The next time he found some of the workers not wearing their hard hat, he asked if the hats were uncomfortable or did not fit properly. Then he reminded the men in a pleasant tone of voice that the hat was designed to protect them from injury and suggested that it always be worn on the job. The result was increased compliance with the regulation with no resentment or emotional upset. ~ Dale Carnegie,
903:Ren crossed his arms over his chest. "is it LoJacked?"

"Of course," Andy said indignantly. "That's my baby. I even have a kill switch on her."

"Then stop the engine."

Andy appeared downright horrified by Ren's suggestion. "Are you out of your mind? What if someone hits it for stalling? I had that thing on order for over a year. Custom hand built. The epitome of German engineering. I even paid extra for the paint on her. Ain't no way I'm going to chance someone denting my baby. Or, God forbid, totaling it."

Jess rolled his eyes at the boy's hissy fit. If he kept that up, he'd be putting Andy back in diapers.

He turned to Ren. "You take the air. I'll get a bike." Then he focused his attention on Andy again. "And you-"

Andy held his cell phone out to him. "Have an app. Track her down, get my car back, and beat the hell out of her...in that precise order. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
904:Together the five orbiters Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis, and Endeavour have flown a total of 133 successful missions, an unequaled accomplishment of engineering, management, and political savvy. But it's the two disasters that people remember, that most shape the shuttle's story. The lovely dream of spaceflight I grew up with is marred by the images of Challenger and Columbia breaking apart in the sky, the lost astronauts smiling on hopefully in their portraits, oblivious. Some people took the disasters to mean the entire space program had been a lie, that the dream itself was tainted with our fallibility. But even as a child, I knew it was more complex than that. If we want to see people take risks, we have to be prepared to sometimes see them fail. The story of American spaceflight is a story with many endings, a story of how we have weighed our achievements against our failures. ~ Margaret Lazarus Dean,
905:Even as our world is being daily transformed by breathtaking innovations in science and technology, many people continue to imagine that math and science are mostly a matter of memorizing formulas to get “the right answer.” Even engineering, which is in fact the process of creating something from scratch or putting things together in novel and non-self-evident ways, is perplexingly viewed as a mechanical or rote subject. This viewpoint, frankly, could only be held by people who never truly learned math or science, who are stubbornly installed on one side of the so-called Two Culture divide. The truth is that anything significant that happens in math, science, or engineering is the result of heightened intuition and creativity. This is art by another name, and it’s something that tests are not very good at identifying or measuring. The skills and knowledge that tests can measure are merely warm-up exercises. ~ Salman Khan,
906:Only women could bleed without injury or death; only they rose from the gore each month like a phoenix; only their bodies were in tune with the ululations of the universe and the timing of the tides. Without this innate lunar cycle, how could men have a sense of time, tides, space, seasons, movement of the universe, or the ability to measure anything at all? How could men mistress the skills of measurement necessary for mathematics, engineering, architecture, surveying—and so many other professions? In Christian churches, how could males, lacking monthly evidence of Her death and resurrection, serve the Daughter of the Goddess? In Judaism, how could they honor the Matriarch without the symbol of Her sacrifices recorded in the Old Ovariment? Thus insensible to the movements of the planets and the turning of the universe, how could men become astronomers, naturalists, scientists—or much of anything at all? ~ Gloria Steinem,
907:how to engineer prosperity. These engineering attempts come in two flavors. The first, often advocated by international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, recognizes that poor development is caused by bad economic policies and institutions, and then proposes a list of improvements these international organizations attempt to induce poor countries to adopt. (The Washington consensus makes up one such list.) These improvements focus on sensible things such as macroeconomic stability and seemingly attractive macroeconomic goals such as a reduction in the size of the government sector, flexible exchange rates, and capital account liberalization. They also focus on more microeconomic goals, such as privatization, improvements in the efficiency of public service provision, and perhaps also suggestions as to how to improve the functioning of the state itself by emphasizing anticorruption measures. ~ Daron Acemo lu,
908:individuals are concerned not
with the moral issue of realizing these standards, but with
the amoral issue of engineering a convincing impression that
these standards are being realized. Our activity, then, is
largely concerned with moral matters, but as performers we
do not have a moral concern in these moral matters. As
performers we are merchants of morality. Our day is given
over to intimate contact with the goods we display and our
minds are filled with intimate understandings of them; but it
may well be that the more attention we give to these goods,
th e more d is ta n t we feel from them and from those who are
believing enough to buy them. To use a different imagery,
the very obligation and profitablility of appearing always in
a steady moral light, of being a socialized character, forces
us to be the sort of person who is practiced in the ways of
the stage. ~ Erving Goffman,
909:If you were to zoom way out and look at the six steps of my forecasting method, you would see this duality in play. It’s not a happy accident. Scientific and technological advances depend on both ingenuity and rigorous evaluation. The future of our culture—how we communicate, work, shop, play games, and take care of ourselves—necessarily intersects with the future of science and technology. Daydreaming alone won’t bring new ideas to market; ideas require process engineering and budgeting before they can become tangible. However, too much emphasis on logic and linear thinking will kill moonshots while they’re still on the whiteboard. That is why it’s important to afford equal treatment to each hemisphere, alternating between broad creative thinking and more pragmatic, analytical assessment. When executed completely, the forces are balanced, allowing for innovation while ensuring a check-and-balance system for the future. ~ Amy Webb,
910:Every human acheivement, be it a scientific discovery, a picture, a statue, a temple, a home or a bridge, has to be conceived in the mind first-the plan thought out-before it can be made a reality, and when anything is to be attempted that involves any number of individuals-methods of coordination have to be considered-the methods have to be the best suited for such undertakings are engineering methods-the engineering of an idea towards a complete realization. Every engineer has to know the materials with which he has to work and the natural laws of these materials, as discovered by observation and experiment and formulated by mathematics and mechanics else he can not calculate the forces at his disposal; he can not compute the resistance of his materials; he can not determine the capacity and requirements of his power plant; in short, he can not make the most profitable use of his resources. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
911:us, Will had invited his camp counselor buddy, Dylan, and Dylan had brought along his roommate, this annoying kid named Sanjay. I mean, it wasn’t like there was anything wrong with Sanjay, and no, I’m not prejudiced against Indian people or anyone else. It was just awkward. The rest of us were jocks and hard partiers, and Sanjay was a skinny nerd who looked like he was about twelve years old. And that’s fine, you know? Go ahead and be a nerd if that’s what makes you happy. Go design your app or whatever. Just don’t ask me to give a shit. “Sanjay’s in the Honors College,” Dylan informed us. “Majoring in Electrical Engineering. Talk about badass.” I guess you have to give Dylan some credit. He was trying to be a good roommate, doing his best to include Sanjay in the conversation and make him feel comfortable. It was just a waste of time, that’s all. Sanjay wasn’t going to be friends with us, and we weren’t going to be friends with him. ~ Tom Perrotta,
912:Symbolist machine learning is an offshoot of the knowledge engineering school of AI. In the 1970s, so-called knowledge-based systems scored some impressive successes, and in the 1980s they spread rapidly, but then they died out. The main reason they did was the infamous knowledge acquisition bottleneck: extracting knowledge from experts and encoding it as rules is just too difficult, labor-intensive, and failure-prone to be viable for most problems. Letting the computer automatically learn to, say, diagnose diseases by looking at databases of past patients’ symptoms and the corresponding outcomes turned out to be much easier than endlessly interviewing doctors. Suddenly, the work of pioneers like Ryszard Michalski, Tom Mitchell, and Ross Quinlan had a new relevance, and the field hasn’t stopped growing since. (Another important problem was that knowledge-based systems had trouble dealing with uncertainty, of which more in Chapter 6.) ~ Pedro Domingos,
913:It was in the library that he and May had always discussed the future of the children: the studies of Dallas and his young brother Bill, Mary's incurable indifference to "accomplishments," and passion for sport and philanthropy, and the vague leanings toward "art" which had finally landed the restless and curious Dallas in the office of a rising New York architect.

The young men nowadays were emancipating themselves from the law and business and taking up all sorts of new things. If they were not absorbed in state politics or municipal reform, the chances were that they were going in for Central American archaeology, for architecture or landscape-engineering; taking a keen and learned interest in the prerevolutionary buildings of their own country, studying and adapting Georgian types, and protesting at the meaningless use of the word "Colonial." Nobody nowadays had "Colonial" houses except the millionaire grocers of the suburbs. ~ Edith Wharton,
914:In the two hundred years since the first use of clinical trials, medicine has progressed from the ideas of Galen to the wonders of gene therapy. Medicine has a long way to go, and suffers from many defects, as we shall see, but a willingness to test ideas and to learn from mistakes has transformed its performance. The irony is that while medicine has evolved rapidly, via an “open loop,” health care (i.e., the institutional question of how treatments are delivered by real people working in complex systems) has not. (The terms “closed loop” and “open loop” have particular meanings in engineering and formal systems theory, which are different from the way in which they are used in this book. So, just to reemphasize, for our purposes a closed loop is where failure doesn’t lead to progress because information on errors and weaknesses is misinterpreted or ignored; an open loop does lead to progress because the feedback is rationally acted upon.) ~ Matthew Syed,
915:Aided by the young George Pullman, who would later make a fortune building railway cars, Chesbrough launched one of the most ambitious engineering projects of the nineteenth century. Building by building, Chicago was lifted by an army of men with jackscrews. As the jackscrews raised the buildings inch by inch, workmen would dig holes under the building foundations and install thick timbers to support them, while masons scrambled to build a new footing under the structure. Sewer lines were inserted beneath buildings with main lines running down the center of streets, which were then buried in landfill that had been dredged out of the Chicago River, raising the entire city almost ten feet on average. Tourists walking around downtown Chicago today regularly marvel at the engineering prowess on display in the city’s spectacular skyline; what they don’t realize is that the ground beneath their feet is also the product of brilliant engineering. ~ Steven Johnson,
916:Page holds Musk up as a model he wishes others would emulate—a figure that should be replicated during a time in which the businessmen and politicians have fixated on short-term, inconsequential goals. “I don’t think we’re doing a good job as a society deciding what things are really important to do,” Page said. “I think like we’re just not educating people in this kind of general way. You should have a pretty broad engineering and scientific background. You should have some leadership training and a bit of MBA training or knowledge of how to run things, organize stuff, and raise money. I don’t think most people are doing that, and it’s a big problem. Engineers are usually trained in a very fixed area. When you’re able to think about all of these disciplines together, you kind of think differently and can dream of much crazier things and how they might work. I think that’s really an important thing for the world. That’s how we make progress. ~ Ashlee Vance,
917:We mean to say that Symbolism and Decadence — the negative attitude to which is indisputable to everyone except the "participants" — are genetically connected with everything brilliant and sublime created by the "unbound personality" during this period of time, from the Renaissance up to the development of electrical engineering; contrariwise, the border which they cannot cross is laid down where man understood that he was always "bound." The great continent of history, the continent of real deeds, practical needs, and more than all that, of received religion and the established Church - that is whose shore this stinking monster can never crawl into, that is where we are fleeing to from it, that is where man can always save himself. Where the monastery wall rises this surge of the faithless waves of history — no matter how strong it may become and how far it may spread around — will stop and fall back.

("On Symbolists & Decadence") ~ Vasily Rozanov,
918:I don’t think I run roughshod over people, but if something sucks, I tell people to their face. It’s my job to be honest. I know what I’m talking about, and I usually turn out to be right. That’s the culture I tried to create. We are brutally honest with each other, and anyone can tell me they think I am full of shit and I can tell them the same. And we’ve had some rip-roaring arguments, where we are yelling at each other, and it’s some of the best times I’ve ever had. I feel totally comfortable saying “Ron, that store looks like shit” in front of everyone else. Or I might say “God, we really fucked up the engineering on this” in front of the person that’s responsible. That’s the ante for being in the room: You’ve got to be able to be super honest. Maybe there’s a better way, a gentlemen’s club where we all wear ties and speak in this Brahmin language and velvet code-words, but I don’t know that way, because I am middle class from California. ~ Walter Isaacson,
919:Back to the cake. You were down to the seam of coal.” “Yeah, well, once they find the coal, they bring in more machines, extract it, haul it out, and continue blasting down to the next seam. It’s not unusual to demolish the top five hundred feet of a mountain. This takes relatively few workers. In fact, a small crew can thoroughly destroy a mountain in a matter of months.” The waitress refilled their cups and Donovan watched in silence, totally ignoring her. When she disappeared, he leaned in a bit lower and said, “Once the coal is hauled out by truck, it’s washed, which is another disaster. Coal washing creates a black sludge that contains toxic chemicals and heavy metals. The sludge is also known as slurry, a term you’ll hear often. Since it can’t be disposed of, the coal companies store it behind earthen dams in sludge ponds, or slurry ponds. The engineering is slipshod and half-assed and these things break all the time with catastrophic results. ~ John Grisham,
920:Even in engineering-driven Silicon Valley, the buzzwords of the moment call for building a “lean startup” that can “adapt” and “evolve” to an ever-changing environment. Would-be entrepreneurs are told that nothing can be known in advance: we’re supposed to listen to what customers say they want, make nothing more than a “minimum viable product,” and iterate our way to success. But leanness is a methodology, not a goal. Making small changes to things that already exist might lead you to a local maximum, but it won’t help you find the global maximum. You could build the best version of an app that lets people order toilet paper from their iPhone. But iteration without a bold plan won’t take you from 0 to 1. A company is the strangest place of all for an indefinite optimist: why should you expect your own business to succeed without a plan to make it happen? Darwinism may be a fine theory in other contexts, but in startups, intelligent design works best. ~ Peter Thiel,
921:Imagine trying to jerry-rig a Volkswagen Beetle to travel at speeds of 150 miles per hour. In 1933, Adolf Hitler commissioned Dr. Ferdinand Porsche to develop a cheap car that could get 40 miles per gallon of gas and provide a reliable form of transportation for the average German family. The result was the VW Beetle. This history, Hitler’s plan, places constraints on the ways we can modify the Beetle today; the engineering can be tweaked only so far before major problems arise and the car reaches its limit. In many ways, we humans are the fish equivalent of a hot-rod Beetle. Take the body plan of a fish, dress it up to be a mammal, then tweak and twist that mammal until it walks on two legs, talks, thinks, and has superfine control of its fingers—and you have a recipe for problems. We can dress up a fish only so much without paying a price. In a perfectly designed world—one with no history—we would not have to suffer everything from hemorrhoids to cancer. ~ Neil Shubin,
922:The first experimental determination that the speed of light was not infinite was made by the seventeenth-century Danish astronomer, Ole Romer. In 1676, Romer was attempting to solve one of the great scientific and engineering challenges of the age; telling the time at sea. Finding an accurate clock was essential to enable sailors to navigate safely across the oceans, but mechanical clocks based on pendulums or springs were not good at being bounced around on the ocean waves and soon drifted out of sync. In order to pinpoint your position on Earth you need the latitude and longitude. Latitude is easy; in the Northern Hemisphere, the angle of the North Star (Polaris) above the horizon is your latitude. In the Southern Hemisphere, things are more complicated because there is no star directly over the South Pole, but it is still possible with a little astronomical know-how and trigonometry to determine your latitude with sufficient accuracy for safe navigation. ~ Brian Cox,
923:In 1907 the American Telephone and Telegraph Company faced a crisis. The patents of its founder, Alexander Graham Bell, had expired, and it seemed in danger of losing its near-monopoly on phone services. Its board summoned back a retired president, Theodore Vail, who decided to reinvigorate the company by committing to a bold goal: building a system that could connect a call between New York and San Francisco. The challenge required combining feats of engineering with leaps of pure science. Making use of vacuum tubes and other new technologies, AT&T built repeaters and amplifying devices that accomplished the task in January 1915. On the historic first transcontinental call, in addition to Vail and President Woodrow Wilson, was Bell himself, who echoed his famous words from thirty-nine years earlier, “Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you.” This time his former assistant Thomas Watson, who was in San Francisco, replied, “It would take me a week.”1 ~ Walter Isaacson,
924:Separation of function is not to be despised, but neither should it be exalted. Separation is not an unbreakable law, but a convenience for overcoming inadequate human abilities, whether in science or engineering. As D'Arcy Thompson, one of the spiritual fathers of the general systems movement, said: As we analyze a thing into its parts or into its properties, we tend to magnify these, to exaggerate their apparent independence, and to hide from ourselves (at least for a time) the essential integrity and individuality of the composite whole. We divided the body into its organs, the skeleton into its bones, as in very much the same fashion we make a subjective analysis of the mind, according to the teaching of psychology, into component factors: but we know very well that judgement and knowledge, courage or gentleness, love or fear, have no separate existence, but are somehow mere manifestations, or imaginary coefficients, of a most complex integral.10 The ~ Gerald M Weinberg,
925:Here’s another analogy. Human beings bring only a handful of facial features to the blueprint of how we look—two eyes, two eyebrows, a nose, a mouth, a pair of cheekbones, and two ears, all pasted onto a somewhat ovular-to-round face. That particular blueprint doesn’t often vary much, either. Interestingly enough, this is about the same number of essential storytelling parts and milestones that each and every story needs to showcase in order to be successful. Now, consider this: With only these eleven variables to work with, ask yourself how often you see two people who look exactly alike. In a crowd of ten thousand faces, you would be able to differentiate each and every one of them, other than a set of twins or two in attendance. Where we humans are concerned, the miracle of originality resides in the Creator, who applies an engineering-driven process—eleven variables— to an artistic outcome. Where art is concerned, there is something to be learned from that. ~ Larry Brooks,
926:Three generations later, viewed from the standpoint of the digital age, a structure such as Hoover can appear to suffer from a kind of vulgarity of size—a thing so enormous and monolithic as to seem preindustrial, almost primitive. Like fascist architecture, that soaring wall of concrete, for all its Art Deco adornments, can strike the postmodern eye as embarrassingly elephantine and childishly simplistic. Yet one only need page through the dam’s elegant blueprints to realize that this is a machine that, in its own way, is as sophisticated as a Boeing 747—a marvel of engineering, of mathematics, of human thinking, of vision, and, yes, of art. For all these reasons, Hoover is regarded by many civil engineers as one of America’s most impressive achievements. It may not be much of an overstatement to say that, along with splitting the atom and sending the Voyager spacecraft beyond the solar system, Hoover is the most remarkable thing this country has ever pulled off. Unlike ~ Kevin Fedarko,
927:The common law does not proceed by legislation, or by imposing directives and decrees on a reluctant population. It proceeds by resolving conflicts, and discovering the rules that are implicit in those conflicts and in the behaviour that gives rise to them. Common law is discovered law, and its principles are not imposed from above but extracted from below, by judges whose aim is to do justice in the individual case, rather than to reform the conduct of mankind. Its rights are not stated but implied, and they encapsulate a vision of individual freedom rather than a politics of collective conformity. The rights dreamed up in the European Courts, by judges who do not pay the cost of imposing them, are experiments in social engineering, rather than recognitions of individual sovereignty, and this is in no matter more evident than in those clauses that have imposed the mores of the elite on a reluctant residue of Christian believers, and which are now ubiquitous in our statutory law. ~ Roger Scruton,
928:Anumber of things jump out about the Dyson story. The first is that the solution seems rather obvious in hindsight. This is often the case with innovation, and it’s something we will come back to. But now consider a couple of other aspects of the story. The first is that the creative process started with a problem, what you might even call a failure, in the existing technology. The vacuum cleaner kept blocking. It let out a screaming noise. Dyson had to keep bending down to pick up bits of trash by hand. Had everything been going smoothly Dyson would have had no motivation to change things. Moreover, he would have had no intellectual challenge to sink his teeth into. It was the very nature of the engineering problem that sparked a possible solution (a bagless vacuum cleaner). And this turns out to be an almost perfect metaphor for the creative process, whether it involves vacuum cleaners, a quest for a new brand name, or a new scientific theory. Creativity is, in many respects, a response. ~ Matthew Syed,
929:Twitter came close to melting down in the same way, but managed to recover in time to build a massive business. When Twitter began its rise in the late 2000s, it became infamous for its “Fail Whale,” a whimsical error message that appeared whenever its servers couldn’t handle the load. Unfortunately for Twitter, the Fail Whale made fairly regular appearances, especially when big news hit, such as the death of the recording artist Michael Jackson in 2009 (to be fair, Twitter was hardly the only website that had these issues when the King of Pop passed away) or the 2010 World Cup. Twitter invested serious resources into rearchitecting both its systems and its engineering processes to be more efficient. Even with this strenuous effort, it took several years to “tame” the Fail Whale; it wasn’t until after Twitter made it through the 2012 US presidential election night without melting down that the company’s then–creative director Doug Bowman announced that the Great Blue Whale had been put to death. ~ Reid Hoffman,
930:Wider lanes were, obviously, safer than narrower ones. Only they’re not. This time, the problem with the cost-benefit equation wasn’t a faulty premise, but the data itself. In order to test the wider-lanes-are-safer-lanes hypothesis, I studied every crash that occurred on the bridge over a three-year period and marked each one on a map. If that notion had been true, I reasoned, more crashes would have occurred where the lanes were narrowest, that is, at the towers. Just the opposite turned out to be the case. The towers, it turned out, were the safest places on the entire bridge; my explanation is that when lanes get very narrow motorists drive more carefully. Even though every traffic engineer in the country had been taught the gospel of wider lanes, the opposite appeared to be true: “grossly substandard lanes seemed to be the safest of all.” This was the traffic engineering equivalent of saying the Earth was round when the masses knew it was flat. Still, most engineers do not accept this fact. ~ Samuel I Schwartz,
931:Muscle and pluck forever!
What invigorates life, invigorates death,
And the dead advance as much as the living advance,
And the future is no more uncertain than the present,
And the roughness of the earth and of man encloses as much as the delicatesse of the earth and of man,
And nothing endures but personal qualities.
What do you think endures?
Do you think the great city endures?
Or a teeming manufacturing state? or a prepared constitution? or the best-built steamships?
Or hotels of granite and iron? or any chef-d’oeuvres of engineering, forts, armaments?

Away! These are not to be cherish’d for themselves;
They fill their hour, the dancers dance, the musicians play for them;
The show passes, all does well enough of course,
All does very well till one flash of defiance.

The great city is that which has the greatest man or woman;
If it be a few ragged huts, it is still the greatest city in the whole world."

-from "Song of the Broad-Axe ~ Walt Whitman,
932:Now, with their miniature robot army, three Harvard University researchers have upped the ante, assembling a massive swarm of simple, three-legged robots that can work as a team to assemble into different shapes on command. The advance, reported Thursday in the journal ­Science, is a feat of “engineering majesty,’’ said James ­McLurkin, director of the Multi-Robot Systems Lab at Rice University, who was not ­involved in the research. “Building 1,000 robots is hard,’’ McLurkin said. “Getting 1,000 robots to work together reliably is — how’d they say it in Boston? — ‘wicked hard.’ ’’ The technology is still in the early stages. These simple ­robots, which each weigh about as much as three nickels and cost $14 in parts, cannot build a skyscraper or clean up an oil spill. But they surmount several major problems in robotics, McLurkin said. The software the researchers designed allows individual ­robots to act on their own, using only information from their neighbors to achieve goals that dwarf their thumb-sized bodies. ~ Anonymous,
933:The fundamental core of contemporary Darwinism, the theory of DNA-based reproduction and evolution, is now beyond dispute among scientists. It demonstrates its power every day, contributing crucially to the explanation of planet-sized facts of geology and meteorology, through middle-sized facts of ecology and agronomy, down to the latest microscopic facts of genetic engineering. It unifies all of biology and the history of our planet into a single grand story. Like Gulliver tied down in Lilliput, it is unbudgeable, not because of some one or two huge chains of argument that might–hope against hope–have weak links in them, but because it is securely tied by hundreds of thousands of threads of evidence anchoring it to virtually every other field of knowledge. New discoveries may conceivably lead to dramatic, even 'revolutionary' shifts in the Darwinian theory, but the hope that it will be 'refuted' by some shattering breakthrough is about as reasonable as the hope that we will return to a geocentric vision and discard Copernicus. ~ Daniel C Dennett,
934:If you want to know for yourself, you must turn inward. Today, people are making serious efforts to know themselves by reading books. I am not against books. If you are reading a book to know about a nation or business or to learn engineering, it is fine. But reading a book to know about yourself is silly. You are here, alive and kicking! It is alright if you are reading a book to get inspired to take a step inward, but if you want to know something, you must look inward. You cannot read a book and know about yourself. After you are dead, if you have lived an interesting life, somebody may read about you, but when you are alive, you should not read about yourself. That is not the way to know yourself. In fact, the more learned you become, the more you realize that you actually know nothing. Only a fool who read half a book thinks he knows everything. Even if you read all the libraries of the world, you will still not know anything. But if you turn inward for just one moment, everything that is worth knowing in the existence can be known. ~ Sadhguru,
935:Most cleantech companies crashed because they neglected one or more of the seven questions that every business must answer: 1. The Engineering Question Can you create breakthrough technology instead of incremental improvements? 2. The Timing Question Is now the right time to start your particular business? 3. The Monopoly Question Are you starting with a big share of a small market? 4. The People Question Do you have the right team? 5. The Distribution Question Do you have a way to not just create but deliver your product? 6. The Durability Question Will your market position be defensible 10 and 20 years into the future? 7. The Secret Question Have you identified a unique opportunity that others don’t see? We’ve discussed these elements before. Whatever your industry, any great business plan must address every one of them. If you don’t have good answers to these questions, you’ll run into lots of “bad luck” and your business will fail. If you nail all seven, you’ll master fortune and succeed. Even getting five or six correct might work. ~ Peter Thiel,
936:Everyone is talking about what’s going on with sales, and Sergey was paying no attention, just pushing buttons on the AV system and trying to unscrew a panel to understand it,” says Levick. “And I remember thinking, this man does not give a rat’s ass about this part of the business. He doesn’t get what we do. He never will. That set the tone for me very early in terms of the two Googles—the engineering Google and this other Google, the sales and business side.” No matter how much you exceeded your sales quota, a salesperson wouldn’t be coddled as much as a guy with a computer science degree who spent all day creating code. And some tried-and-true sales methods were verboten. For instance, golf outings. “Larry and Sergey hate golf,” says Levick. “Google has never sponsored a golf event and never will.” There would be days when Google salespeople would call agencies and discover that everybody was off on a golf retreat with Yahoo. But Tim Armstrong would tell his troops, “They have to take people on golf outings because they have nothing else. ~ Steven Levy,
937:When Dad wasn’t telling us about all the amazing things he had already done, he was telling us about the wondrous things he was going to do. Like build the Glass Castle. All of Dad’s engineering skills and mathematical genius were coming together in one special project: a great big house he was going to build for us in the desert. It would have a glass ceiling and thick glass walls and even a glass staircase. The Glass Castle would have solar cells on the top that would catch the sun’s rays and convert them into electricity for heating and cooling and running all the appliances. It would even have its own water-purification system. Dad had worked out the architecture and the floor plans and most of the mathematical calculations. He carried around the blueprints for the Glass Castle wherever we went, and sometimes he’d pull them out and let us work on the design for our rooms. All we had to do was find gold, Dad said, and we were on the verge of that. Once he finished the Prospector and we struck it rich, he’d start work on our Glass Castle. ~ Jeannette Walls,
938:At two hundred fifty feet in length with a surfaced displacement of 2,200 tons, the Samisho was not a small boat. Built to the 0+2+ (1) Yuushio-class standards at Kawasaki’s shipyards in Kobe, she’d begun service in 1992, and last year she’d been brought back to the yards for a retrofit.

Now she was state of the art, an engineering and electronics marvel even by U.S. naval standards. She was a diesel boat, but she was fast, capable of a top speed submerged of more than twenty-five knots and a published diving depth in excess of one thousand feet.

Her electronic detection systems and countermeasures by Hitachi were better than anything currently in use by any navy in the world, and her new Fuji electric motors and tunnel drive were as quiet as any nuclear submarine’s propulsion system, and much simpler to operate. The Samisho could be safely operated, even on war footing, with fifty men and ten officers—less than half the crew needed to run the Los Angeles-class boats, and one-fourth the crew needed for a sub-hunting surface vessel ~ David Hagberg,
939:C. P. Snow was right about the need to respect both of “the two cultures,” science and the humanities. But even more important today is understanding how they intersect. Those who helped lead the technology revolution were people in the tradition of Ada, who could combine science and the humanities. From her father came a poetic streak and from her mother a mathematical one, and it instilled in her a love for what she called “poetical science.” Her father defended the Luddites who smashed mechanical looms, but Ada loved how punch cards instructed those looms to weave beautiful patterns, and she envisioned how this wondrous combination of art and technology could be manifest in computers.
(...)
This innovation will come from people who are able to link beauty to engineering, humanity to technology, and poetry to processors. In other words, it will come from the spiritual heirs of Ada Lovelace, creators who can flourish where the arts intersect with the sciences and who have a rebellious sense of wonder that opens them to the beauty of both. ~ Walter Isaacson,
940:I propose that what we call “consciousness” is a feeling forming a backdrop to, or attached to, a current mental event or instinct. It is best grasped by considering a common engineering architecture called layering, which allows complex systems to function efficiently and in an integrated fashion, from atoms to molecules, to cells, to circuits, to cognitive and perceptual capacities. If the brain indeed consists of different layers (in the engineering sense), then information from a micro level may be integrated at higher and higher layers until each modular unit itself produces consciousness. A layer architecture allows for new levels of functioning to arise from lower-level functioning parts that could not create the “higher level” experience alone. It is time to learn more about layering and the wonders it brings to understanding brain architecture. We are on the road to realizing that consciousness is not a “thing.” It is the result of a process embedded in an architecture, just as a democracy is not a thing but the result of a process. ~ Michael S Gazzaniga,
941:The problem with medicine and the institutions it has spawned for the care of the sick and the old is not that they have had an incorrect view of what makes life significant. The problem is that they have had almost no view at all. Medicine’s focus is narrow. Medical professionals concentrate on repair of health, not sustenance of the soul. Yet—and this is the painful paradox—we have decided that they should be the ones who largely define how we live in our waning days. For more than half a century now, we have treated the trials of sickness, aging, and mortality as medical concerns. It’s been an experiment in social engineering, putting our fates in the hands of people valued more for their technical prowess than for their understanding of human needs. That experiment has failed. If safety and protection were all we sought in life, perhaps we could conclude differently. But because we seek a life of worth and purpose, and yet are routinely denied the conditions that might make it possible, there is no other way to see what modern society has done. ~ Atul Gawande,
942:Why give a robot an order to obey orders—why aren't the original orders enough? Why command a robot not to do harm—wouldn't it be easier never to command it to do harm in the first place? Does the universe contain a mysterious force pulling entities toward malevolence, so that a positronic brain must be programmed to withstand it? Do intelligent beings inevitably develop an attitude problem? (…) Now that computers really have become smarter and more powerful, the anxiety has waned. Today's ubiquitous, networked computers have an unprecedented ability to do mischief should they ever go to the bad. But the only mayhem comes from unpredictable chaos or from human malice in the form of viruses. We no longer worry about electronic serial killers or subversive silicon cabals because we are beginning to appreciate that malevolence—like vision, motor coordination, and common sense—does not come free with computation but has to be programmed in. (…) Aggression, like every other part of human behavior we take for granted, is a challenging engineering problem! ~ Steven Pinker,
943:BILLY: Did you ever watch Star Trek?
MACHIAVELLI: Do I look like I watch Star Trek?
BILLY: It's hard to tell who's a Trekkie.
MACHIAVELLI: Billy, I ran one of the most sophisticated secret service organizations in the world. I did not have time for Star Trek. (pause) I was more of a Star Wars fan. Why do you ask?
BILLY: Well, when Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock beamed down to a planet, usually with Dr. McCoy and sometimes with Scotty from engineering...
MACHIAVELLI: Wait a minute--what's Mr. Spock again?
BILLY: A Vulcan.
MACHIAVELLI: His rank.
BILLY: The first officer.
MACHIAVELLI: So the captain, the first officer, the ship's doctor, and sometimes the engineer all beam down to a planet. Together. The entire complement of the senior officers?
BILLY: (nods)
MACHIAVELLI: And who has command of the ship?
BILLY: (shrug) I don't know. Junior officers, I guess.
MACHIAVELLI: If they worked for me I'd have them court-martialed. That sounds like a gross dereliction of duty.
BILLY: I know. I always thought it was a little odd myself. ~ Michael Scott,
944:As Page puts it, “Good ideas are always crazy until they’re not.” It’s a principle he’s tried to apply at Google. When Page and Sergey Brin began wondering aloud about developing ways to search the text inside of books, all of the experts they consulted said it would be impossible to digitize every book. The Google cofounders decided to run the numbers and see if it was actually physically possible to scan the books in a reasonable amount of time. They concluded it was, and Google has since scanned millions of books. “I’ve learned that your intuition about things you don’t know that much about isn’t very good,” Page said. “The way Elon talks about this is that you always need to start with the first principles of a problem. What are the physics of it? How much time will it take? How much will it cost? How much cheaper can I make it? There’s this level of engineering and physics that you need to make judgments about what’s possible and interesting. Elon is unusual in that he knows that, and he also knows business and organization and leadership and governmental issues. ~ Ashlee Vance,
945:Hiro and Y.T. have eaten a lot of junk food together in different joints all
over L.A. -- doughnuts, burritos, pizza, sushi, you name it -- and all Y.T. ever
talks about is her mother and the terrible job that she has with the Feds. The
regimentation. The lie-detector tests. The fact that for all the work she
does, she really has no idea what it is that the government is really working
on.
It's always been a mystery to Hiro, too, but then, that's how the government is.
It was invented to do stuff that private enterprise doesn't bother with, which
means that there's probably no reason for it; you never know what they're doing
or why. Hackers have traditionally looked upon the government's coding
sweatshops with horror and just tried to forget that all of that shit ever
existed.
But they have thousands of programmers. The programmers work twelve hours a day
out of some twisted sense of personal loyalty. Their software-engineering
techniques, while cruel and ugly, are very sophisticated. They must have been
up to something. ~ Neal Stephenson,
946:EAMES: Word is, you're not welcome in these parts.
COBB: Yeah?
EAMES: There's a price on your head from Cobol Engineering. Pretty big one, actually.
COBB: You wouldn't sell me out.
Eames looks at Cobb, offended.
EAMES: 'Course I would.
COBB: (smiles) Not when you hear what I'm selling.
A ramshackle balcony overlooking a busy street. Eames pours.
COBB: Inception.
Eames' glass stops halfway to his mouth.
COBB: Don't bother telling me it's impossible.
EAMES: It's perfectly possible. Just bloody difficult.
COBB: That's what I keep saying to Arthur.
EAMES: Arthur? You're still working with that stick-in-the-mud?
COBB: He's a good point man.
EAMES: The best. But he has no imagination. If you're going to perform inception, you need imagination.
COBB: You've done it before?
EAMES: Yes and no. We tried it. Got the idea in place, but it didn't take.
COBB: You didn't plant it deep enough?
EAMES: It's not just about depth. You need the simplest version of the idea-the one that will grow naturally in the subject's mind. Subtle art. ~ Christopher J Nolan,
947:The engineering context of precision where precision is not necessary indicates the existence of sophisticated tools. These have not been found in the archaeological record, but the existence of them must be taken into account when we consider the mountain of circumstantial evidence to support their use.
In the case of the Serapeum, the list of tools and instruments that are necessary to create the granite boxes has grown. We can say with certainty that exact measuring instruments existed, for this work and the work at Luxor and Karnak could not have been accomplished without them. They are the most important and necessary tools for such work. The wooden squares, plumb bobs, and alignment instruments on display in the Luxor and Cairo Museums are incapable of giving even the most talented craftsman the information he needs to know that his work has achieved this kind of accuracy. Even if these boxes and monuments were crafted today with modern tools, such instruments are limited in what they can measure--and they most certainly cannot explain the precision and geometry [on display]. ~ Christopher Dunn,
948:Airbus Group Ventures business to be led by Tim Dombrowski, a former partner of technology venture capital powerhouse Andreessen Horowitz. The unit’s mandate is to “invest in promising, disruptive and innovative business opportunities generated around the globe,” Airbus said on Friday. Paul Eremenko, who was director of engineering at Google’s secretive Advanced Technology and Projects organization and also worked for the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency technology incubator, will be chief executive of Airbus Group Silicon Valley technology and business innovation center, the company said. “Silicon Valley serves as a unique hub for technology breakthroughs and we see huge opportunities to learn from, and partner with the many players based there,” Airbus Chief Executive Tom Enders said in a statement. Mr. Enders has become concerned that newcomers to the industry may turn into formidable rivals to the European aerospace giant along with more traditional competitors such as Boeing Co. That’s already happening in space where entrepreneur Elon Musk’s space company, Space Exploration ~ Anonymous,
949:I’m always shocked when I run into people who don’t believe in God. I’ll even ask them, “How can you not believe that there’s a power greater than you who’s engineering this whole system of things?” Usually they’ll tell me something like, “Man, God is just some mythical fairy tale. God is no different than Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, or the Tooth Fairy.” I disagree wholeheartedly, but that mind-set is honestly one of the reasons I don’t sell that junk about holiday headliners to my daughters. Maybe it’s the Witness influence on me, but to this day I’m not a fan of holidays. I think it’s a mistake to hype your kids on Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy on one hand, and then try to sell them on God with the other. When they get older and realize Santa and the Easter Bunny aren’t real, it becomes too easy for them to dismiss God as well. “So you were lying to me about everybody else, but this God character is real?” they’ll say. “Yeah, right.” And then they’ll miss out on the affirmation, confidence, and faith that religion can provide when they’re older and really need it. ~ Charlamagne Tha God,
950:Still allergic to PowerPoints and formal presentations, he insisted that the people around the table hash out issues from various vantages and the perspectives of different departments.
Because he believed that Apple's great advantage was its integration of the whole widget- from design to hardware to software to content-he wanted all departments at the company to work together in parallel. The phrases he used were "deep collaboration" and "concurrent engineering." Instead of a development process in which a product would be passed sequentially from engineering to design to manufacturing to marketing and distribution, these various departments collaborated simultaneously. " Our method was to develop integrated products, and that meant our process had to be integrated and collaborative," Jobs said.
This approach also applied to key hires. He would have candidates meet the top leaders-Cook, Tevanian, Schiller, Rubinstein, Ive- rather than just the managers of the department where they wanted to work. " Then we all get together without the person and talk about whether they'll fit in," Jobs said. ~ Walter Isaacson,
951:As a result, anecdotes abound in the tech world about scientists, entrepreneurs, and inventors who study and train here but move to Silicon Valley or Austin or North Carolina, lured by climate and lifestyle and a more freewheeling atmosphere. Technology companies like Microsoft, Google, and Amazon have branch offices in Cambridge, but are headquartered on the West Coast. To compete on a global scale, Bostonians need to claim their place in the global conversation. Friday marks a step in that direction. At a press conference at the Ragon Institute, The Boston Globe will join Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and MGH in announcing HUBweek, a week-long festival of discussions and creative problem-solving scheduled for Oct. 3 to 10 of next year. It’s a collaborative effort to bring big ideas out from behind institutional walls. To draw participants from all over the nation, and the world, all four co-hosts are creating programming that will focus on game-changing science, technology, engineering, and art. The week will feature some central events, kicking off with a master class at Fenway Park. ~ Anonymous,
952:The next phase of the Digital Revolution will bring even more new methods of marrying technology with the creative industries, such as media, fashion, music, entertainment, education, literature, and the arts. Much of the first round of innovation involved pouring old wine—books, newspapers, opinion pieces, journals, songs, television shows, movies—into new digital bottles. But new platforms, services, and social networks are increasingly enabling fresh opportunities for individual imagination and collaborative creativity. Role-playing games and interactive plays are merging with collaborative forms of storytelling and augmented realities. This interplay between technology and the arts will eventually result in completely new forms of expression and formats of media. This innovation will come from people who are able to link beauty to engineering, humanity to technology, and poetry to processors. In other words, it will come from the spiritual heirs of Ada Lovelace, creators who can flourish where the arts intersect with the sciences and who have a rebellious sense of wonder that opens them to the beauty of both. ~ Walter Isaacson,
953:When Elon was nearly ten years old, he saw a computer for the first time, at the Sandton City Mall in Johannesburg. “There was an electronics store that mostly did hi-fi-type stuff, but then, in one corner, they started stocking a few computers,” Musk said. He felt awed right away—“It was like, ‘Whoa. Holy shit!’”—by this machine that could be programmed to do a person’s bidding. “I had to have that and then hounded my father to get the computer,” Musk said. Soon he owned a Commodore VIC-20, a popular home machine that went on sale in 1980. Elon’s computer arrived with five kilobytes of memory and a workbook on the BASIC programming language. “It was supposed to take like six months to get through all the lessons,” Elon said. “I just got super OCD on it and stayed up for three days with no sleep and did the entire thing. It seemed like the most super-compelling thing I had ever seen.” Despite being an engineer, Musk’s father was something of a Luddite and dismissive of the machine. Elon recounted that “he said it was just for games and that you’d never be able to do real engineering on it. I just said, ‘Whatever.’” While ~ Ashlee Vance,
954:This really does attack essence. Because the build-on-package phenomenon does not today affect the average MIS programmer, it is not yet very visible to the software engineering discipline. Nevertheless, it will grow rapidly, because it does attack the essence of fashioning conceptual constructs. The shrink-wrapped package provides a big module of function, with an elaborate but proper interface, and its internal conceptual structure does not have to be designed at all. High-function software products such as Excel or 4th Dimension are big modules indeed, but they serve as known, documented, tested modules with which to build customized systems. Next-level application builders get richness of function, a shorter development time, a tested component, better documentation, and radically lower cost. The difficulty, of course, is that the shrink-wrapped software package is designed as a stand-alone entity whose functions and interfaces metaprogrammers cannot change. Moreover, and more seriously, shrink-wrapped package builders seemingly have little incentive to make their products suitable as modules in a larger system. I ~ Frederick P Brooks Jr,
955:Virginia Woolf wrote famously, “About December 1910 human nature changed.” Well, one doubts it. What did change, and has been changing all through the closing decades of the 19th century, is that the intelligentsia became increasingly alienated from the bourgeois world from which it sprung, and wished to become something Higher. It wished to make novels difficult and technical – think of Woolf or Joyce – to keep them out of the hands of the uneducated and to elevate the intelligentsia to a new clerisy, a new aristocracy of the spirit. Similarly in painting, music, and philosophy. It wished to make everything difficult and technical, and it succeeded. [Economists Lawrence] Klein, [Paul] Samuelson, and [Jan] Tinbergen were middle-period modernists.

The vices of modernism come from the master vice of Pride, the vice so characteristic of an actual or wannabe aristocracy. It is prideful overreaching to think that social engineering can work, that a smart lad at a blackboard can outwit the wisdom of the world or the ages, that a piece of machinery like statistical significance can tell you how big or small a number is. ~ Deirdre N McCloskey,
956:Bill Campbell developed an excellent methodology for measuring executives in a balanced way that will help you achieve this. He breaks performance down into four distinct areas: 1. Results against objectives Once you’ve set a high standard, it will be straightforward to measure your executive against that standard. 2. Management Even if an executive does a superb job achieving her goals, that doesn’t mean she is building a strong and loyal team. It’s important to understand how well she is managing, even if she is hitting her goals. 3. Innovation It’s quite possible for an executive to hit her goal for the quarter by ignoring the future. For example, a great way for an engineering manager to hit her goals for features and dates is by building a horrible architecture, which won’t even support the next release. This is why you must look beyond the black-box results and into the sausage factory to see how things get made. 4. Working with peers This may not be intuitive at first, but executives must be effective at communicating, supporting, and getting what they need from the other people on your staff. Evaluate them along this dimension. ~ Ben Horowitz,
957:They're trying to breed a nation of techno-peasants. Educated just enough to keep things going, but not enough to ask tough questions. They encourage any meme that downplays thoughtful analysis or encourages docility or self indulgence or uniformity. In what other society do people use "smart" and "wise" as insults? We tell people "don't get smart." Those who try, those who really like to learn, we call "nerds." Look at television or the press or the trivia that passes for political debate. When a candidate DOES try to talk about the issues, the newspapers talk about his sex life. Look at Saturday morning cartoon shows. Peasants, whether they're tilling fields or stuffing circuit boards, are easier to manipulate. Don't question; just believe. Turn off your computer and Trust the Force.

Or turn your computer on and treat it like the Oracle of Delphi.

That's right. They've made education superficial and specialized. Science classes for art majors? Forget it! And how many business or engineering students get a really good grounding in the humanities? When did universities become little more than white collar vocational schools? ~ Michael Flynn,
958:In choosing to be a Psychology major, I decided to learn for the joy of learning for the first time in my life. I'd always been fascinated by human nature. What makes us act the way we do? Why do we make the same mistakes over and over? But I guess my interest is purely theoretical. I'm a Psychology major
who has no desire to work with people. This was poor planning on my part, I suppose. My parents definitely think so. But choosing passion over practicality seemed so honorable when I was a first-year student and graduation seemed so very, very far away . . .

But now, a semester away from unemployment, I realize how much better off those Engineering students really are. Sure, they're boring conversationalists that make you want to kill yourself because every story begins, “The other day? In the lab?” But people become a whole helluva lot more interesting when they're pulling down six figures, don't they? If I'm going to drag my friends out to my cardboard box, the pressure's on to provide some pretty goddamned sparkling conversation once they get there. And even with all my noble knowledge for knowledge's sake, I'm not sure I can. ~ Megan McCafferty,
959:The first eye-opener came in the 1970s, when DARPA, the Pentagon’s research arm, organized the first large-scale speech recognition project. To everyone’s surprise, a simple sequential learner of the type Chomsky derided handily beat a sophisticated knowledge-based system. Learners like it are now used in just about every speech recognizer, including Siri. Fred Jelinek, head of the speech group at IBM, famously quipped that “every time I fire a linguist, the recognizer’s performance goes up.” Stuck in the knowledge-engineering mire, computational linguistics had a near-death experience in the late 1980s. Since then, learning-based methods have swept the field, to the point where it’s hard to find a paper devoid of learning in a computational linguistics conference. Statistical parsers analyze language with accuracy close to that of humans, where hand-coded ones lagged far behind. Machine translation, spelling correction, part-of-speech tagging, word sense disambiguation, question answering, dialogue, summarization: the best systems in these areas all use learning. Watson, the Jeopardy! computer champion, would not have been possible without it. ~ Pedro Domingos,
960:creating a company for acquisition or IPO is different from building a profitable enterprise; it’s about building a sellable enterprise. Startups are not trying to earn revenue (which is a liability); they are setting themselves up to win more capital. They are not part of the real economy or even the real world but part of the process through which working assets are converted into new stockpiles of dead ones. That’s all they have really accomplished with whatever digital fad they’ve foisted onto the market or sold to yesterday’s tech winners. They thought they were engineering a new technology, when they were actually engineering a reallocation of capital. That’s why digital entrepreneurs who do win often end up becoming the next generation of venture capitalists. Everyone from Marc Andreessen (Netscape) to Sean Parker (Napster) to Peter Thiel (PayPal) to Jack Dorsey (Twitter) now runs venture funds of his own. Facebook and Google, once startups themselves, now acquire more businesses than they incubate internally. With each new generation, firms and investors leverage the startup economy more deliberately, or even cynically. After all, a win is a win. ~ Douglas Rushkoff,
961:no matter how intensely we desire certainty, we should understand that whether because of our limits or randomness or future unknowable confluences of events, something will inevitably come, unbidden, through that door. Some of it will be uplifting and inspiring, and some of it will be disastrous. We all know people who eagerly face the unknown; they engage with the seemingly intractable problems of science, engineering, and society; they embrace the complexities of visual or written expression; they are invigorated by uncertainty. That’s because they believe that, through questioning, they can do more than merely look through the door. They can venture across its threshold. There are others who venture into the unknown with surprising success but with little understanding of what they have done. Believing in their cleverness, they revel in their brilliance, telling others about the importance of taking risks. But having stumbled into greatness once, they are not eager for another trip into the unknown. That’s because success makes them warier than ever of failure, so they retreat, content to repeat what they have done before. They stay on the side of the known. ~ Ed Catmull,
962:Eric Spiegel, the head of Siemens’ US arm, laid out a vision not that far removed from Ms Huang’s when he spoke at a breakfast in Washington hosted by the McKinsey Global Institute, the consultancy’s think-tank. The German engineering company, he said, would soon begin delivering spare parts to customers via email and 3D printers, also avoiding physical borders and the usual logistical complexities of global trade. But the advances in business are also coming up against fundamental debates about privacy. The Edward Snowden revelations of US online snooping have sparked a worldwide debate about privacy and the internet. Receiving less attention is the way international trade negotiations are trying to deal with what limits, if any, ought to be set on the flow of data around the globe and how to prepare for a digital future that is already a reality in some sectors. The negotiation of a 12-country Transpacific trade partnership (TPP) has sparked debate in Australia and New Zealand over whether companies ought to be allowed to store personal banking and medical data in foreign countries, or if such sensitive information should even be allowed to cross borders freely. ~ Anonymous,
963:In the face of this difficulty [of defining "computer science"] many people, including myself at times, feel that we should ignore the discussion and get on with doing it. But as George Forsythe points out so well in a recent article*, it does matter what people in Washington D.C. think computer science is. According to him, they tend to feel that it is a part of applied mathematics and therefore turn to the mathematicians for advice in the granting of funds. And it is not greatly different elsewhere; in both industry and the universities you can often still see traces of where computing first started, whether in electrical engineering, physics, mathematics, or even business. Evidently the picture which people have of a subject can significantly affect its subsequent development. Therefore, although we cannot hope to settle the question definitively, we need frequently to examine and to air our views on what our subject is and should become. ~ Richard Hamming, 1968 Turing Award lecture, Journal of the ACM 16 (1), January 1969, p. 4. In this quote Hamming refers to George Forsythe, "What to do until the computer scientist comes", Am. Math. Monthly 75 (5), May 1968, p. 454-461.,
964:Ashima feels lonely suddenly, horribly, permanently alone, and briefly, turned away from the mirror, she sobs for her husband. She feels overwhelmed by the thought of the move she is about to make, to the city that was once home and is now in its own way foreign. She feels both impatience and indifference for all the days she still must live, for something tells her she will not go quickly as her husband did. For thirty-three years she missed her life in India. Now she will miss her job at the library, the women with whom she's worked. She will miss throwing parties. She will miss living with her daughter, the surprising companionship they have formed, going into Cambridge together to see old movies at the Brattle, teaching her to cook the food Sonia had complained of eating as a child. She will miss the opportunity to drive, as she sometimes does on her way home from the library, to the university, past the engineering building where her husband once worked. She will miss the country in which she had grown to know and love her husband. Though his ashes have been scattered into the Ganges, it is here, in this house and in this town, that he will continue to dwell in her mind. ~ Anonymous,
965:In accordance with the prevailing conceptions in the U.S., there is no infringement on democracy if a few corporations control the information system: in fact, that is the essence of democracy. In the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the leading figure of the public relations industry, Edward Bernays, explains that “the very essence of the democratic process” is “the freedom to persuade and suggest,” what he calls “the engineering of consent.” “A leader,” he continues, “frequently cannot wait for the people to arrive at even general understanding … Democratic leaders must play their part in … engineering … consent to socially constructive goals and values,” applying “scientific principles and tried practices to the task of getting people to support ideas and programs”; and although it remains unsaid, it is evident enough that those who control resources will be in a position to judge what is “socially constructive,” to engineer consent through the media, and to implement policy through the mechanisms of the state. If the freedom to persuade happens to be concentrated in a few hands, we must recognize that such is the nature of a free society. ~ Noam Chomsky,
966:EXTREME DESIGN Theologically, the space energy density demonstrates that for physical life to be possible at any time or place in the history of the universe the value of the mass density of the universe must be fine-tuned to within one part in 1060, and the value of the cosmological constant must be fine-tuned to within one part in 10120.{74} To put this in perspective, the best example of human engineering design that I am aware of is a gravity wave telescope capable of making measurements to within one part in 1023. This implies that the Creator at a minimum is ten trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion times more intelligent, knowledgeable, creative, and powerful than we humans. To word it another way, before this discovery the most profound design evidence scientists had uncovered in the cosmos was a characteristic that had to be fine-tuned to within one part in 1040. Thanks to this twenty-first century discovery, the evidence that God created and designed the universe for the benefit of life and human beings in particular has become 1080 times stronger (a hundred million trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion times stronger). ~ Hugh Ross,
967:There are, however, explicit engineering qualities associated with the pyramids that do not support the theory that it was a temple, a tomb, or a mausoleum. The redundancy of masonry in these structures is only one good argument against the tomb theory. More persuasive is the fact that Egyptologists woefully lack the material evidence to support it—there are no bodies! It is a widely held popular belief that Egyptian pyramids contained mummies, and that these mummies were actually discovered inside the pyramids. This is simply not true. These beliefs are only inferences that are reinforced by inaccurate documentaries that link the pyramids closely with the Valley of the Kings, where there are no pyramids, but where the mummies actually were found. In reality, the Giza Plateau and the Valley of the Kings are two vastly different sites, separated by hundreds of miles of desert. It is now becoming widely recognized by people who research the pyramid issue that of all the pyramids excavated in Egypt, there was not one that contained an original burial. Considering that more than eighty pyramids have been discovered in Egypt, this fact alone practically negates the tomb theory. ~ Christopher Dunn,
968:Every week seems to bring another luxuriantly creamy envelope, the thickness of a letter-bomb, containing a complex invitation – a triumph of paper engineering – and a comprehensive dossier of phone numbers, email addresses, websites, how to get there, what to wear, where to buy the gifts. Country house hotels are being block-booked, great schools of salmon are being poached, vast marquees are appearing overnight like Bedouin tent cities. Silky grey morning suits and top hats are being hired and worn with an absolutely straight face, and the times are heady and golden for florists and caterers, string quartets and Ceilidh callers, ice sculptors and the makers of disposable cameras. Decent Motown cover-bands are limp with exhaustion. Churches are back in fashion, and these days the happy couple are travelling the short distance from the place of worship to the reception on open-topped London buses, in hot-air balloons, on the backs of matching white stallions, in micro-lite planes. A wedding requires immense reserves of love and commitment and time off work, not least from the guests. Confetti costs eight pounds a box. A bag of rice from the corner shop just won’t cut it anymore. ~ David Nicholls,
969:...a final word to "the children": do you want to get suckered like your big brothers and sisters? Those saps who spent 2008 standing behind the Obamessiah swaying and chanting, "We are the dawning of the Hopeychange" like brainwashed cult extras? Sooner or later you guys have to crawl out from under the social engineering and rediscover the contrarian spirit for which youth was once known...This will be the great battle of the next generation--to reclaim your birthright from those who spent it. If you don't, the entire global order will teeter and fall. But, if you do, you will have won a great victory. Every time a politician proposes new spending, tell him he's already spent your money, get his hand out of your pocket. Every time a politician says you can stay a child until your twenty-seventh birthday, tell him, "No, you're the big baby, not me--you've spent irresponsibly, and me and my pals are the ones who are gonna have to be the adults and clean up your mess. Don't treat met like a kid when your immaturity got us into this hole." This is a battle for the American idea, and it's an epic one, but--to reprise the lamest of lame-o-lines--you can do anything you want to do. So do it. ~ Mark Steyn,
970:was once asked to give a talk to a group of science journalists who were meeting in my hometown. I decided to talk about the design of bridges, explaining how their form does not derive from a set of equations expressing the laws of physics but rather from the creative mind of the engineer. The first step in designing a bridge is for the engineer to conceive of a form in his mind’s eye. This is then translated into words and pictures so that it can be communicated to other engineers on the team and to the client who is commissioning the work. It is only when there is a form to analyze that science can be applied in a mathematical and methodical way. This is not to say that scientific principles might not inform the engineer’s conception of a bridge, but more likely they are embedded in the engineer’s experience with other, existing bridges upon which the newly conceived bridge is based. The journalists to whom I was speaking were skeptical. Surely science is essential to design, they insisted. No, it is not. And it is not a chicken-and-egg paradox. The design of engineering structures is a creative process in the same way that paintings and novels are the products of creative minds. ~ Henry Petroski,
971:> In the 21st century, intellectual capital is what will matter in the job market and will help a country grow its economy. Investments in biosciences, computers and electronics, engineering, and other growing high-tech industries have been the major differentiator in recent decades. More careers than ever now require technical skills so in order to be competitive in those fields, a nation must invest in STEM studies. Economic growth has slowed and unemployment rates have spiked, making employers much pickier about qualifications to hire. There is now an overabundance of liberal arts majors. A study from Georgetown University lists the five college majors with the highest unemployment rates (crossed against popularity): clinical psychology, 19.5 percent; miscellaneous fine arts, 16.2 percent; U.S. history, 15.1 percent; library science, 15 percent; and (tied for No. 5) military technologies and educational psychology, 10.9 percent each. Unemployment rates for STEM subjects hovered around 0 to 3 percent: astrophysics/astronomy, around 0 percent; geological and geophysics engineering, 0 percent; physical science, 2.5 percent; geosciences, 3.2 percent; and math/computer science, 3.5 percent.  ~ Philip G Zimbardo,
972:What grinds me the most is we're sending kids out into the world who don't know how to balance a checkbook, don't know how to apply for a loan, don't even know how to properly fill out a job application, but because they know the quadratic formula we consider them prepared for the world`
With that said, I'll admit even I can see how looking at the equation x -3 = 19 and knowing x =22 can be useful. I'll even say knowing x =7 and y= 8 in a problem like 9x - 6y= 15 can be helpful. But seriously, do we all need to know how to simplify (x-3)(x-3i)??
And the joke is, no one can continue their education unless they do. A student living in California cannot get into a four-year college unless they pass Algebra 2 in high school. A future psychologist can't become a psychologist, a future lawyer can't become a lawyer, and I can't become a journalist unless each of us has a basic understanding of engineering.
Of course, engineers and scientists use this shit all the time, and I applaud them! But they don't take years of theater arts appreciation courses, because a scientist or an engineer doesn't need to know that 'The Phantom of the Opoera' was the longest-running Broadway musical of all time.
Get my point? ~ Chris Colfer,
973:I believe every day should begin and end with gratitude. I practice it every day in my morning meditation. Each morning, focusing on the reverse gap, I think of five things I’m grateful for in my personal life. Then I think of five things I’m grateful for in my work and career. A typical list might look like this: PERSONAL LIFE 1.​My daughter, Eve, and her beautiful smiles 2.​The happiness I felt last night relaxing with a glass of red wine and watching Sherlock on BBC 3.​My wife and life partner 4.​The time I spent with my son building his newest Lego Star Wars creation 5.​The wonderful cup of gourmet coffee my publicist, Tania, left on my desk WORK LIFE 1.​My leadership team and the amazing talent they bring to our company 2.​A particularly great letter we received for my online course Consciousness Engineering 3.​The incredibly fun Culture Day we had in the office yesterday 4.​The fact that plans are coming together to hold our upcoming A-Fest at another amazing location 5.​Having coworkers who are friends and who greet me with hugs when I come to the office This entire practice takes me no more than ninety seconds. But it’s perhaps one of the most important and powerful ninety seconds I can spend each day. ~ Vishen Lakhiani,
974:A three-day-old human embryo is a collection of 150 cells called a blastocyst. There are, for the sake of comparison, more than 100,000 cells in the brain of a fly. The human embryos that are destroyed in stem-cell research do not have brains, or even neurons. Consequently, there is no reason to believe they can suffer their destruction in any way at all. It is worth remembered, in this context, that when a person's brain has died, we currently deem it acceptable to harvest his organs (provided he has donated them for this purpose) and bury him in the ground. If it is acceptable to treat a person whose brain has died as something less than a human being, it should be acceptable to treat a blastocyst as such. If you are concerned about suffering in this universe, killing a fly should present you with greater moral difficulties than killing a human blastocyst.

Perhaps you think that the crucial difference between a fly and a human blastocyst is to be found in the latter's potential to become a fully developed human being. But almost every cell in your body is a potential human being, given our recent advances in genetic engineering. Every time you scratch your nose, you have committed a Holocaust of potential human beings. ~ Sam Harris,
975:During World War II, rationing in Russia had made vinyl prohibitively expensive, and cheap X-ray film became the bootleg music industry’s substitute. After purchasing a used X-ray plate for a ruble or two from a medical facility, music lovers could cut the plate into a disk with scissors or a knife before having it etched with their favorite tunes. Students studying engineering, I was told, particularly excelled in this bootlegging process. But even a thawed Khrushchev regime had its standards to uphold, and in 1959 the government began a crackdown on this illicit music market. One government tactic was to flood record shops with unplayable records, many intended to damage record players. Some of these records included threatening vocals placed in the middle of a recording, which screamed at the unsuspecting listener, “You like rock and roll? Fuck you, anti-Soviet slime!” Eventually the use of bone records declined as replacement technologies, such as magnetic reel-to-reel tape, took over. But until then, bone-record makers were hunted down and sent to the Gulags. Particularly offensive to the Soviet government were bootleggers who reproduced American jazz records, music Stalin had declared a “threat to civilization.” Despite ~ Donnie Eichar,
976:It reminds one of the professional paradoxers... They, too, write as if they knew all about it. Plainly, then, the anti-mathematician must belong to the same class as the paradoxer, whose characteristic is to be wise in his ignorance, whereas the really wise man is ignorant in his wisdom. ...What is of greater importance is that the anti-mathematicians sometimes do a deal of mischief. For there are many of a neutral frame of mind, little acquainted themselves with mathematical methods, who are sufficiently impressible to be easily taken in by the gibers and to be prejudiced thereby; and, should they possess some mathematical bent, they may be hindered by their prejudice from giving it fair development. We cannot all be Newtons or Laplace's, but that there is an immense amount of moderate mathematical talent lying latent in the average man I regard as a fact; and even the moderate development implied in a working knowledge of simple algebraical equations can, with common-sense to assist, be not only the means of valuable mental discipline, but even be of commercial importance (which goes a long way with some people), should one's occupation be a branch of engineering for example. ~ Oliver Heaviside, Electromagnetic Theory (1893) Vol. 1, pp. 7-8.,
977:Approaching the Williamsburg Bridge - not really certain of how he had managed to find himself there - he experienced an extraordinary moment of buoyancy, of grace. There was a lot more traffic now, but his shifting was smooth and the sturdy little car was adroit at changing lanes. He launched himself out over the East River. He could feel the bridge humming underneath his wheels and all around him could sense the engineering of it, the forces and tensions and rivets that were all conspiring to keep him aloft. To the south, he glimpsed the Manhattan Bridge, with its Parisian air, refined, elegant, its skirts hiked to reveal tapered steel legs, and, beyond, the Brooklyn Bridge, like a great ropy strand of muscle. In the other direction lay the Queensboro Bridge, like two great iron tsarinas linking hands to dance. And before him, the city that had sheltered him and swallowed him and made him a modest fortune loomed, gray and brown, festooned with swags and boas of some misty gray stuff, a compound of harbor fog and spring dew and its own steamy exhalations. Hope had been his enemy, a frailty that he must at all costs master, for so long now that it was a moment before he was willing to concede that he had let it back into his heart. ~ Michael Chabon,
978:There is a kind of unspoken collusion going on in mainstream science education: you get your competent but bored, insecure and hence stodgy teacher talking to an audience divided between engineering students, who are going to be responsible for making bridges that won’t fall down or airplanes that won’t suddenly plunge vertically into the ground at six hundred miles an hour, and who by definition get sweaty palms and vindictive attitudes when their teacher suddenly veers off track and begins raving about wild and completely nonintuitive phenomena; and physics students, who derive much of their self-esteem from knowing that they are smarter and morally purer than the engineering students, and who by definition don’t want to hear about anything that makes no fucking sense. This collusion results in the professor saying: (something along the lines of) dust is heavier than air, therefore it falls until it hits the ground. That’s all there is to know about dust. The engineers love it because they like their issues dead and crucified like butterflies under glass. The physicists love it because they want to think they understand everything. No one asks difficult questions. And outside the windows, the dust devils continue to gambol across the campus. ~ Neal Stephenson,
979:Still another factor is compatibility with vested interests. This book, like probably every other typed document you have ever read, was typed with a QWERTY keyboard, named for the left-most six letters in its upper row. Unbelievable as it may now sound, that keyboard layout was designed in 1873 as a feat of anti-engineering. It employs a whole series of perverse tricks designed to force typists to type as slowly as possible, such as scattering the commonest letters over all keyboard rows and concentrating them on the left side (where right-handed people have to use their weaker hand). The reason behind all of those seemingly counterproductive features is that the typewriters of 1873 jammed if adjacent keys were struck in quick succession, so that manufacturers had to slow down typists. When improvements in typewriters eliminated the problem of jamming, trials in 1932 with an efficiently laid-out keyboard showed that it would let us double our typing speed and reduce our typing effort by 95 percent. But QWERTY keyboards were solidly entrenched by then. The vested interests of hundreds of millions of QWERTY typists, typing teachers, typewriter and computer salespeople, and manufacturers have crushed all moves toward keyboard efficiency for over 60 years. ~ Jared Diamond,
980:Facebook was a scary competitor because in some ways it was very much like Google. True, Facebook wasn’t built on a brilliant scientific advance as Google was, and there was no technical innovation at Facebook even close to the breathtaking Google infrastructure. But Mark Zuckerberg was in the Larry Page mold, a wildly ambitious leader with a quasi-religious trust in engineering. Zuckerberg said that Facebook would have hacker values. Ten years younger than Page and Brin—a generation in Internet time—Zuckerberg respected Google’s values but believed that the older company had lost its nimbleness and focus. He made a specialty of hiring Google people who sought the excitement of building something new. When Zuckerberg needed a strong number two to run Facebook operations, he turned to Sheryl Sandberg, who had built Google’s ad organization. As disappointing as that was to Google, what was even more alarming was the competition for engineering talent. Google could deal with its most brilliant engineers leaving to start their own companies—classic examples were the departure of Paul Buchheit (Gmail) and Bret Taylor (Google Maps) to start a company called FriendFeed. But when Facebook bought FriendFeed, both engineers happily integrated themselves into the ranks of their new employer. ~ Steven Levy,
981:In the absence of those predictions, product and strategy decisions are far more difficult and time-consuming. I often see this in my consulting practice. I’ve been called in many times to help a startup that feels that its engineering team “isn’t working hard enough.” When I meet with those teams, there are always improvements to be made and I recommend them, but invariably the real problem is not a lack of development talent, energy, or effort. Cycle after cycle, the team is working hard, but the business is not seeing results. Managers trained in a traditional model draw the logical conclusion: our team is not working hard, not working effectively, or not working efficiently. Thus the downward cycle begins: the product development team valiantly tries to build a product according to the specifications it is receiving from the creative or business leadership. When good results are not forthcoming, business leaders assume that any discrepancy between what was planned and what was built is the cause and try to specify the next iteration in greater detail. As the specifications get more detailed, the planning process slows down, batch size increases, and feedback is delayed. If a board of directors or CFO is involved as a stakeholder, it doesn’t take long for personnel changes to follow. ~ Eric Ries,
982:Porter’s aerial palace, complete with twenty-six windows, a long exhaust pipe for steam sticking out the rear, and a giant American flag fluttering over the rudders, was designed to ride beneath an immense cigar-shaped dirigible. The engineering was lunacy, but Porter’s marketing was brilliant. He proposed dispensing entirely with the notorious jumping-off hassles along the Missouri River by launching his “aerial locomotive” from New York. The coast-to-coast trip, Porter’s calculations showed, could be made in just three days—five days if the prevailing headwinds were particularly bad that week. Porter aggressively advertised his “Air Line to California” in eastern newspapers and magazines. Amazingly, over two hundred suckers paid a subscription price of $50, which included three-course meals and wine, for the inaugural balloon hop to the gold fields. That winter, a large crowd gathered in a Long Island cornfield to watch Porter test a model of his airship. But the craft never left the ground because the steam engines were far too heavy for the balloon. The would-be Porter aeronauts, however, were the lucky ones—they never had to leave in the first place. The 125 paying passengers on the first Turner and Allen Pioneer Train were not so fortunate. The Turner and Allen expedition of 1849 ~ Rinker Buck,
983:Since Leibniz there has perhaps been no man who has had a full command of all the intellectual activity of his day. Since that time, science has been increasingly the task of specialists, in fields which show a tendency to grow progressively narrower... Today there are few scholars who can call themselves mathematicians or physicists or biologists without restriction. A man may be a topologist or a coleopterist. He will be filled with the jargon of his field, and will know all its literature and all its ramifications, but, more frequently than not, he will regard the next subject as something belonging to his colleague three doors down the corridor, and will consider any interest in it on his own part as an unwarrantable breach of privacy... There are fields of scientific work, as we shall see in the body of this book, which have been explored from the different sides of pure mathematics, statistics, electrical engineering, and neurophysiology; in which every single notion receives a separate name from each group, and in which important work has been triplicated or quadruplicated, while still other important work is delayed by the unavailability in one field of results that may have already become classical in the next field. ~ Norbert Wiener, Cybernetics - Or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine (1948),
984:I want economists to quit concerning themselves with allocation problems, per se, with the problem, as it has been traditionally defined. The vocabulary of science is important here, and as T. D. Weldon once suggested, the very word "problem" in and of itself implies the presence of "solution." Once the format has been established in allocation terms, some solution is more or less automatically suggested. Our whole study becomes one of applied maximization of a relatively simple computational sort. Once the ends to be maximized are provided by the social welfare function, everything becomes computational, as my colleague, Rutledge Vining, has properly noted. If there is really nothing more to economics than this, we had as well turn it all over to the applied mathematicians. This does, in fact, seem to be the direction in which we are moving, professionally, and developments of note, or notoriety, during the past two decades consist largely in improvements in what are essentially computing techniques, in the mathematics of social engineering. What I am saying is that we should keep these contributions in perspective; I am urging that they be recognized for what they are, contributions to applied mathematics, to managerial science if you will, but not to our chosen subject field which we, for better or for worse, call "economics. ~ James M Buchanan,
985:The Roman general wanted to spare Archimedes, because he was so valuable—sort of like the Einstein of the ancient world—but some stupid Roman soldier killed him.” “There you go again,” Hazel muttered. “Stupid and Roman don’t always go together, Leo.” Frank grunted agreement. “How do you know all this, anyway?” he demanded. “Is there a Spanish tour guide around here?” “No, man,” Leo said. “You can’t be a demigod who’s into building stuff and not know about Archimedes. The guy was seriously elite. He calculated the value of pi. He did all this math stuff we still use for engineering. He invented a hydraulic screw that could move water through pipes.” Hazel scowled. “A hydraulic screw. Excuse me for not knowing about that awesome achievement.” “He also built a death ray made of mirrors that could burn enemy ships,” Leo said. “Is that awesome enough for you?” “I saw something about that on TV,” Frank admitted. “They proved it didn’t work.” “Ah, that’s just because modern mortals don’t know how to use Celestial bronze,” Leo said. “That’s the key. Archimedes also invented a massive claw that could swing on a crane and pluck enemy ships out of the water.” “Okay, that’s cool,” Frank admitted. “I love grabber-arm games.” “Well, there you go,” Leo said. “Anyway, all his inventions weren’t enough. The Romans destroyed his city. Archimedes was killed. ~ Rick Riordan,
986:Vanity metrics wreak havoc because they prey on a weakness of the human mind. In my experience, when the numbers go up, people think the improvement was caused by their actions, by whatever they were working on at the time. That is why it’s so common to have a meeting in which marketing thinks the numbers went up because of a new PR or marketing effort and engineering thinks the better numbers are the result of the new features it added. Finding out what is actually going on is extremely costly, and so most managers simply move on, doing the best they can to form their own judgment on the basis of their experience and the collective intelligence in the room. Unfortunately, when the numbers go down, it results in a very different reaction: now it’s somebody else’s fault. Thus, most team members or departments live in a world where their department is constantly making things better, only to have their hard work sabotaged by other departments that just don’t get it. Is it any wonder these departments develop their own distinct language, jargon, culture, and defense mechanisms against the bozos working down the hall? Actionable metrics are the antidote to this problem. When cause and effect is clearly understood, people are better able to learn from their actions. Human beings are innately talented learners when given a clear and objective assessment. ~ Eric Ries,
987:Eventually, in an attempt to avoid his nightmares, he began to read, late at night, which was when his motionless body felt most restless, his mind agile and clear. Yet he refused to read the Russians his grandfather had brought to his bedside, or any novels, for that matter. Those books, set in countries he had never seen, reminded him only of his confinement. Instead he read his engineering books, trying his best to keep up with his courses, solving equations by flashlight. In those silent hours, he thought often of Ghosh. “Pack a pillow and a blanket,” he heard Ghosh say. He remembered the address Ghosh had written on a page of his diary, somewhere behind the tram depot in Tollygunge. Now it was the home of a widow, a fatherless son. Each day, to bolster his spirits, his family reminded him of the future, the day he would stand unassisted, walk across the room. It was for this, each day, that his father and mother prayed. For this that his mother gave up meat on Wednesdays. But as the months passed, Ashoke began to envision another sort of future. He imagined not only walking, but walking away, as far as he could from the place in which he was born and in which he had nearly died. The following year, with the aid of a cane, he returned to college and graduated, and without telling his parents he applied to continue his engineering studies abroad. ~ Anonymous,
988:Economic growth requires investment in things—more machines, more basic facilities like highways or broadband—and in people, who need more and better education. Knowledge needs to be acquired and extended. Some of that extension is the product of new basic science, and some of it comes from the engineering that turns science into goods and services, and from the endless tweaking and improvement of design that, over time, turned a Model-T Ford into a Toyota Camry, or my clunky personal computer of 1983 into the sleek, almost weightless, and infinitely more powerful laptop on which I am writing this book. Investment in research and development enhances the flow of innovation, but new ideas can come from anywhere; the stock of knowledge is international, not national, and new ideas disperse quickly from the places where they are created. Innovation also needs entrepreneurs and risk-taking managers to find profitable ways of turning science and engineering into new products and services. This will be difficult without the right institutions. Innovators need to be free from the risk of expropriation, functioning law courts are needed to settle disputes and protect patents, and tax rates cannot be too high. When all of these conditions come together—as they have in the United States for a century and a half—we get sustained economic growth and higher living standards. ~ Angus Deaton,
989:There was no room for dust devils in the laws of physics, as least in the rigid form in which they were usually taught. There is a kind of unspoken collusion going on in mainstream science education: you get your competent but bored, insecure and hence stodgy teacher talking to an audience divided between engineering students, who are going to be responsible for making bridges that won’t fall down or airplanes that won’t suddenly plunge vertically into the ground at six hundred miles an hour, and who by definition get sweaty palms and vindictive attitudes when their teacher suddenly veers off track and begins raving about wild and completely nonintuitive phenomena; and physics students, who derive much of their self-esteem from knowing that they are smarter and morally purer than the engineering students, and who by definition don’t want to hear about anything that makes no fucking sense. This collusion results in the professor saying: (something along the lines of) dust is heavier than air, therefore it falls until it hits the ground. That’s all there is to know about dust. The engineers love it because they like their issues dead and crucified like butterflies under glass. The physicists love it because they want to think they understand everything. No one asks difficult questions. And outside the windows, the dust devils continue to gambol across the campus. ~ Neal Stephenson,
990:Rome was not the first state of organized gangsterdom, nor was it the last; but it was the only one that managed to bamboozle posterity into an almost universal admiration. Few rational men admire the Huns, the Nazis or the Soviets; but for centuries, schoolboys have been expected to read Julius Caesar's militaristic drivel ("We inflicted heavy losses upon the enemy, our own casualties being very light") and Cato's revolting incitements to war. They have been led to believe that the Romans had attained an advanced level in the sciences, the arts, law, architecture, engineering and everything else. It is my opinion that the alleged Roman achievements are largely a myth; and I feel it is time for this myth to be debunked a little. What the Romans excelled in was bullying, bludgeoning, butchering and blood baths. Like the Soviet Empire, the Roman Empire enslaved peoples whose cultural level was far above their own. They not only ruthlessly vandalized their countries, but they also looted them, stealing their art treasures, abducting their scientists and copying their technical know-how, which the Romans' barren society was rarely able to improve on. No wonder, then, that Rome was filled with great works of art. But the light of culture which Rome is supposed to have emanated was a borrowed light: borrowed from the Greeks and the other peoples that the Roman militarists had enslaved. ~ Petr Beckmann,
991:Olmsted’s greatest concern, however, was that the main, Jackson Park portion of the exposition simply was not fun. “There is too much appearance of an impatient and tired doing of sight-seeing duty. A stint to be got through before it is time to go home. The crowd has a melancholy air in this respect, and strenuous measures should be taken to overcome it.” Just as Olmsted sought to conjure an aura of mystery in his landscape, so here he urged the engineering of seemingly accidental moments of charm. The concerts and parades were helpful but were of too “stated or programmed” a nature. What Olmsted wanted were “minor incidents … of a less evidently prepared character; less formal, more apparently spontaneous and incidental.” He envisioned French horn players on the Wooded Island, their music drifting across the waters. He wanted Chinese lanterns strung from boats and bridges alike. “Why not skipping and dancing masqueraders with tambourines, such as one sees in Italy? Even lemonade peddlers would help if moving about in picturesque dresses; or cake-sellers, appearing as cooks, with flat cap, and in spotless white from top to toe?” On nights when big events in Jackson Park drew visitors away from the Midway, “could not several of the many varieties of ‘heathen,’ black, white and yellow, be cheaply hired to mingle, unobtrusively, but in full native costume, with the crowd on the Main Court? ~ Erik Larson,
992:demonstrating that the first of these, the integral fast reactor, was safe even under the circumstances that destroyed Three Mile Island 2 and would prove disastrous at Chernobyl and Fukushima. The liquid fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR), an even more advanced concept developed at Tennessee’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is fueled by thorium. More plentiful and far harder to process into bomb-making material than uranium, thorium also burns more efficiently in a reactor and could produce less hazardous radioactive waste with half-lives of hundreds, not tens of thousands, of years. Running at atmospheric pressure, and without ever reaching a criticality, the LFTR doesn’t require a massive containment building to guard against loss-of-coolant accidents or explosions and can be constructed on such a compact scale that every steel mill or small town could have its own microreactor tucked away underground. In 2015 Microsoft founder Bill Gates had begun funding research projects similar to these fourth-generation reactors in a quest to create a carbon-neutral power source for the future. By then, the Chinese government had already set seven hundred scientists on a crash program to build the world’s first industrial thorium reactor as part of a war on pollution. “The problem of coal has become clear,” the engineering director of the project said. “Nuclear power provides the only solution. ~ Adam Higginbotham,
993:It is fun to be around really, really creative makers in the second half of the chessboard, to see what they can do, as individuals, with all of the empowering tools that have been enabled by the supernova. I met Tom Wujec in San Francisco at an event at the Exploratorium. We thought we had a lot in common and agreed to follow up on a Skype call. Wujec is a fellow at Autodesk and a global leader in 3-D design, engineering, and entertainment software. While his title sounds like a guy designing hubcaps for an auto parts company, the truth is that Autodesk is another of those really important companies few people know about—it builds the software that architects, auto and game designers, and film studios use to imagine and design buildings, cars, and movies on their computers. It is the Microsoft of design. Autodesk offers roughly 180 software tools used by some twenty million professional designers as well as more than two hundred million amateur designers, and each year those tools reduce more and more complexity to one touch. Wujec is an expert in business visualization—using design thinking to help groups solve wicked problems. When we first talked on the phone, he illustrated our conversation real-time on a shared digital whiteboard. I was awed. During our conversation, Wujec told me his favorite story of just how much the power of technology has transformed his work as a designer-maker. ~ Thomas L Friedman,
994:In 1857, to encourage continued settlement of the West, Congress passed the Pacific Wagon Road Act, which among other improvements to the trail called for the surveying of a shorter route to Idaho across the bottom of the Wind Rivers and the forested Bridger-Teton wilderness to the west. Frederick W. Lander, a hotheaded but experienced explorer and engineer, was assigned the job. He made Burnt Ranch the trailhead and main supply depot for the trail-building job, which became one of the largest government-financed projects of the nineteenth century. Lander hired hundreds of workers from the new Mormon settlement at Salt Lake and supplied the enterprise with large mule-team caravans that ferried provisions and equipment from U.S. Army depots in Nebraska and eastern Wyoming. “With crowds of laborers hauling wood, erecting buildings and tending stock,” writes historian Todd Guenther, “the area was a beehive of activity.” The engineers, logging crews, and workers quickly hacked out what became known as the Lander Cutoff, which saved more than sixty miles, almost a week’s travel, across the mountains. In places, the Lander Cutoff was a steep up-and-down ride, but the route offered cooler, high terrain and plentiful water, an advantage over the scorching desert of the main ruts to the south. Eventually an estimated 100,000 pioneers took this route, and the 230-mile Lander Cutoff was considered an engineering marvel of its time. This ~ Rinker Buck,
995:WHAT IS IT, exactly, that people are really afraid of when they say they don’t like change? There is the discomfort of being confused or the extra work or stress the change may require. For many people, changing course is also a sign of weakness, tantamount to admitting that you don’t know what you are doing. This strikes me as particularly bizarre—personally, I think the person who can’t change his or her mind is dangerous. Steve Jobs was known for changing his mind instantly in the light of new facts, and I don’t know anyone who thought he was weak. Managers often see change as a threat to their existing business model—and, of course, it is. In the course of my life, the computer industry has moved from mainframes to minicomputers to workstations to desktop computers and now to iPads. Each machine had a sales, marketing, and engineering organization built around it, and thus the shift from one to the next required radical changes to the organization. In Silicon Valley, I have seen the sales forces of many computer manufacturers fight to maintain the status quo, even as their resistance to change caused their market share to be gobbled up by rivals—a short-term view that sank many companies. One good example is Silicon Graphics, whose sales force was so accustomed to selling large, expensive machines that they fiercely resisted the transition to more economical models. Silicon Graphics still exists, but I rarely hear about them anymore. ~ Ed Catmull,
996:It has been the strange fate of Tibet, once one of the most isolated places on earth, to function as a laboratory for the most ambitious and ruthless human experiments of the modern era: the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and now a state-imposed capitalism. After having suffered totalitarian communism, Tibetans now confront a dissolute capitalism, one that seeks arrogantly, and often violently, to turn all of the world's diverse humanity into middle-class consumers. But it seems wrong to think of Tibetans, as many outsiders do, as helpless victims of large, impersonal forces.
It is no accident that the Tibetans seem to have survived the large-scale Communist attempt at social engineering rather better than most people in China itself. This is at least partly due to their Buddhist belief in the primacy of empathy and compassion. And faced with an aggressively secular materialism, they may still prove, almost alone in the world, how religion, usually dismissed, and not just by Mao, as "poison," can be a source of cultural identity and moral values; how it can become a means of political protest without blinding the devout with hatred and prejudice; how it can help not only heal the shocks and pain of history- the pain that has led people elsewhere in the world into nihilistic rage- but also create a rational and ethical national culture, what may make a freer Tibet, whenever it comes about, better prepared for its state of freedom than most societies. ~ Pankaj Mishra,
997:What do we mean by thought? When do you think? Obviously, thought is the result of a response, neurological or psychological, is it not? It is the immediate response of the senses to a sensation, or it is psychological, the response of stored-up memory. There is the immediate response of the nerves to a sensation, and there is the psychological response of stored-up memory, the influence of race, group, guru, family, tradition, and so on—all of which you call thought. So, the thought process is the response of memory, is it not? You would have no thoughts if you had no memory, and the response of memory to a certain experience brings the thought process into action. What, then, is memory? If you observe your own memory and how you gather memory, you will notice that it is either factual, technical, having to do with information, with engineering, mathematics, physics, and all the rest of it—or, it is the residue of an unfinished, uncompleted experience, is it not? Watch your own memory and you will see. When you finish an experience, complete it, there is no memory of that experience in the sense of a psychological residue. There is a residue only when an experience is not fully understood, and there is no understanding of experience because we look at each experience through past memories, and therefore we never meet the new as the new, but always through the screen of the old. Therefore, it is clear that our response to experience is conditioned, always limited. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
998:The scientists, all of them, have their duties no doubt, but they do not fully use their education if they do not try to broaden their sense of responsibility toward all mankind instead of closing themselves up in a narrow specialization where they find their pleasure. Neither engineers nor other scientific men have any right to prefer their own personal peace to the happiness of mankind; their place and their duty are in the front line of struggling humanity, not in the unperturbed ranks of those who keep themselves aloof from life. If they are indifferent, or discouraged because they feel or think that they know that the situation is hopeless, it may be proved that undue pessimism is as dangerous a "religion" as any other blind creed. Indeed there is very little difference in kind between the medieval fanaticism of the "holy inquisition," and modern intolerance toward new ideas. All kinds of intellect must get together, for as long as we presuppose the situation to be hopeless, the situation will indeed be hopeless. The spirit of Human Engineering does not know the word "hopeless"; for engineers know that wrong methods are alone responsible for disastrous results, and that every situation can be successfully handled by the use of proper means. The task of engineering science is not only to know but to know how. Most of the scientists and engineers do not yet realize that their united judgment would be invincible; no system or class would care to disregard it. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
999:A humorous treatment of the rigid uniformitarian view came from Mark Twain. Although the shortening of the Mississippi River he referred to was the result of engineering projects eliminating many of the bends in the river, it is a thought-provoking spoof:
The Mississippi between Cairo and New Orleans was twelve hundred and fifteen miles long one hundred and seventy-six years ago. . . . Its length is only nine hundred and seventy-three miles at present.
Now, if I wanted to be one of those ponderous scientific people, and “let on” to prove what had occurred in the remote past by what had occurred in a given time in the recent past . . . what an opportunity is here! Geology never had such a chance, nor such exact data to argue from! . . .
In the space of one hundred and seventy-six years the Lower Mississippi has shortened itself two hundred and forty-two miles. That is an average of a trifle over one mile and a third per year. Therefore, any calm person, who is not blind or idiotic, can see that in the Old Oolitic Silurian Period, just a million years ago next November, the Lower Mississippi River was upwards of one million three hundred thousand miles long, and stuck out over the Gulf of Mexico like a fishing-rod. And by the same token any person can see that seven hundred and forty-two years from now the lower Mississippi will be only a mile and three-quarters long. . . . There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact. ~ Mark Twain,
1000:The problem that ought to concern us first is the fairly recent dismantling of our old understanding and acceptance of human limits. For a long time we knew that we were not, and could never be, “as gods.” We knew, or retained the capacity to learn, that our intelligence could get us into trouble that it could not get us out of. We were intelligent enough to know that our intelligence, like our world, is limited. We seem to have known and feared the possibility of irreparable damage. But beginning in science and engineering, and continuing, by imitation, into other disciplines, we have progressed to the belief that humans are intelligent enough, or soon will be, to transcend all limits and to forestall or correct all bad results of the misuse of intelligence. Upon this belief rests the further belief that we can have “economic growth” without limit. Economy in its original—and, I think, its proper—sense refers to household management. By extension, it refers to the husbanding of all the goods by which we live. An authentic economy, if we had one, would define and make, on the terms of thrift and affection, our connections to nature and to one another. Our present industrial system also makes those connections, but by pillage and indifference. Most economists think of this arrangement as “the economy.” Their columns and articles rarely if ever mention the land-communities and land-use economies. They never ask, in their professional oblivion, why we are willing to do permanent ecological and cultural damage “to strengthen the economy. ~ Wendell Berry,
1001:Writing and repairing software generally takes far more time and is far more expensive than initially anticipated. “Every feature that is added and every bug that is fixed,” Edward Tenner points out, “adds the possibility of some new and unexpected interaction between parts of the program.”19 De Jager concurs: “If people have learned anything about large software projects, it is that many of them miss their deadlines, and those that are on time seldom work perfectly. … Indeed, on-time error-free installations of complex computer systems are rare.”20 Even small changes to code can require wholesale retesting of entire software systems. While at MIT in the 1980s, I helped develop some moderately complex software. I learned then that the biggest problems arise from bugs that creep into programs during early stages of design. They become deeply embedded in the software’s interdependent network of logic, and if left unfixed can have cascading repercussions throughout the software. But fixing them often requires tracing out consequences that have metastasized in every direction from the original error. As the amount of computer code in our world soars (doubling every two years in consumer products alone), we need practical ways to minimize the number of bugs. But software development is still at a preindustrial stage—it remains more craft than engineering. Programmers resemble artisans: they handcraft computer code out of basic programming languages using logic, intuition, and pattern-recognition skills honed over years of experience. ~ Thomas Homer Dixon,
1002:This is great. But what I’m grasping at is an idea about a subtler goal. This thinking owes a lot to conversations with Manjula Waldron of Ohio State University, an engineering professor who also happens to be a hospital chaplain. This feels embarrassingly Zen-ish for me to spout, being a short, hypomanic guy with a Brooklyn accent, but here goes: Maybe the goal isn’t to maximize the contrast between a low baseline and a high level of activation. Maybe the idea is to have both simultaneously. Huh? Maybe the goal would be for your baseline to be something more than the mere absence of activation, a mere default, but to instead be an energized calm, a proactive choice. And for the ceiling to consist of some sort of equilibrium and equanimity threading through the crazed arousal. I have felt this a few times playing soccer, inept as I am at it, where there’s a moment when, successful outcome or not, every physiological system is going like mad, and my body does something that my mind didn’t even dream of, and the two seconds when that happened seemed to take a lot longer than it should have. But this business about the calm amid the arousal isn’t just another way of talking about “good stress” (a stimulating challenge, as opposed to a threat). Even when the stressor is bad and your heart is racing in crisis, the goal should be to somehow make the fraction of a second between each heartbeat into an instant that expands in time and allows you to regroup. There, I have no idea what I’m talking about, but I think there might be something important lurking there. Enough said. ~ Robert M Sapolsky,
1003:We need an engineering friend.” She points a finger at Carin. “Go back to Briar and hook up with an engineering student.”

“Okay, but I’ll need to actually have sex with him beforehand, so I won’t be back until,” she pretends to check the time, “ten or so.”

“We’re all college graduates,” I proclaim. “We can put this together ourselves.”

Clapping my hands, I motion for everyone to get on the floor with me. After three tries of trying to lower myself to the ground and making Hope and Carin nearly pee their pants laughing in the process, D’Andre takes pity on all of us and helps me onto my knees. Which is where Tucker finds us.

“Is this some new fertility ritual?” he drawls from the doorway, one shoulder propped against the frame. “Because she’s already pregnant, you know.”

“Get yo ass in here, white boy, and put this thing together,” D’Andre snaps. “This is ridiculous.”

“What’s ridiculous?” Tucker stops next to me, and I take the opportunity to lean against his legs. Even kneeling is hard when you’re toting around an extra thirty pounds. “We took it apart. How can you not know how to put it back together?”

D’Andre repeats his earlier excuse. “I’m an accounting major.”

Tucker rolls his eyes. “You got an Allen wrench?”

“Are you mocking us right now?” I grumble. “I don’t have any wrenches, let alone ones with names.”

He grins. “Leave this to me, darlin’. I’ll get it fixed up.”

“I want to help,” Hope volunteers. “This is like surgery, except with wood and not people.”

“Lord help us,” D’Andre mutters. ~ Elle Kennedy,
1004:The 19th and first half of the 20th century conceived of the world as chaos. Chaos was the oft-quoted blind play of atoms, which, in mechanistic and positivistic philosophy, appeared to represent ultimate reality, with life as an accidental product of physical processes, and mind as an epi-phenomenon. It was chaos when, in the current theory of evolution, the living world appeared as a product of chance, the outcome of random mutations and survival in the mill of natural selection. In the same sense, human personality, in the theories of behaviorism as well as of psychoanalysis, was considered a chance product of nature and nurture, of a mixture of genes and an accidental sequence of events from early childhood to maturity.
  Now we are looking for another basic outlook on the world -- the world as organization. Such a conception -- if it can be substantiated -- would indeed change the basic categories upon which scientific thought rests, and profoundly influence practical attitudes.
  This trend is marked by the emergence of a bundle of new disciplines such as cybernetics, information theory, general system theory, theories of games, of decisions, of queuing and others; in practical applications, systems analysis, systems engineering, operations research, etc. They are different in basic assumptions, mathematical techniques and aims, and they are often unsatisfactory and sometimes contradictory. They agree, however, in being concerned, in one way or another, with "systems," "wholes" or "organizations"; and in their totality, they herald a new approach. ~ Ludwig von Bertalanffy, General System Theory,
1005:The same effort to conserve force was also evident in war, at the tactical level. The ideal Roman general was not a figure in the heroic style, leading his troops in a reckless charge to victory or death. He would rather advance in a slow and carefully prepared march, building supply roads behind him and fortified camps each night in order to avoid the unpredictable risks of rapid maneuver. He preferred to let the enemy retreat into fortified positions rather than accept the inevitable losses of open warfare, and he would wait to starve out the enemy in a prolonged siege rather than suffer great casualties in taking the fortifications by storm. Overcoming the spirit of a culture still infused with Greek martial ideals (that most reckless of men, Alexander the Great, was actually an object of worship in many Roman households), the great generals of Rome were noted for their extreme caution. It is precisely this aspect of Roman tactics (in addition to the heavy reliance on combat engineering) that explains the relentless quality of Roman armies on the move, as well as their peculiar resilience in adversity: the Romans won their victories slowly, but they were very hard to defeat. Just as the Romans had apparently no need of a Clausewitz to subject their military energies to the discipline of political goals, it seems that they had no need of modern analytical techniques either. Innocent of the science of systems analysis, the Romans nevertheless designed and built large and complex security systems that successfully integrated troop deployments, fixed defenses, road networks, and signaling links in a coherent whole. ~ Edward N Luttwak,
1006:Having accepted a graduate fellowship in the Department of Philosophy at Cornell, I duly presented myself to begin studies for a Ph.D. One of our assignments during the first semester was to read Kant's Critique of Pure Reason from cover to cover, along with Norman Kemp Smith's commentary thereon, which was almost as voluminous. Pondering this literature, it did not take me long to conclude that these Kantian ratiocinations, brilliant though they may be, have little to do with that Sophia—that more-than-human Wisdom—of which authentic philosophy, by its very designation, is literally the love. And so, three weeks into the semester, I resigned my fellowship and left Cornell University.

"I had always been attracted to the natural world, to forests and mountains especially; and so I resolved to proceed to the great Northwest, henceforth to earn my keep as a lumberjack. No doubt I had an unrealistic and overly romanticized conception of what this entails; but in any case, at that point fate abruptly intervened. I had made my intentions known to my brother, who at the time was studying chemical engineering at Purdue University. He immediately proceeded to the chairman of the physics department to tell him about my case, going so far as to put my letter in his hands. The verdict was instant: 'Tell you brother to present himself in my office Monday morning to assume his duties as a teaching assistant.' It seems the voice of Providence had spoken: despite my very mixed feelings regarding the contemporary academic world, I was destined to pass most of my professional life in its precincts—but not in departments of philosophy! ~ Wolfgang Smith,
1007:The first step to take is to become aware that love is an art, just as living is an art; if we want to learn how to love we must proceed in the same way we have to proceed if we want to learn any other art, say music, painting, carpentry, or the art of medicine or engineering. What are the necessary steps in learning any art? The process of learning an art can be divided conveniently into two parts: one, the mastery of the theory; the other, the mastery of the practice. If I want to learn the art of medicine, I must first know the facts about the human body, and about various diseases. When I have all this theoretical knowledge, I am by no means competent in the art of medicine. I shall become a master in this art only after a great deal of practice, until eventually the results of my theoretical knowledge and the results of my practice are blended into one — my intuition, the essence of the mastery of any art. But, aside from learning the theory and practice, there is a third factor necessary to becoming a master in any art — the mastery of the art must be a matter of ultimate concern; there must be nothing else in the world more important than the art. This holds true for music, for medicine, for carpentry — and for love. And, maybe, here lies the answer to the question of why people in our culture try so rarely to learn this art, in spite of their obvious failures: in spite of the deep-seated craving for love, almost everything else is considered to be more important than love: success, prestige, money, power — almost all our energy is used for the learning of how to achieve these aims, and almost none to learn the art of loving. ~ Erich Fromm,
1008:I work in theoretical computer science: a field that doesn’t itself win Fields Medals (at least not yet), but that has occasions to use parts of math that have won Fields Medals. Of course, the stuff we use cutting-edge math for might itself be dismissed as “ivory tower self-indulgence.” Except then the cryptographers building the successors to Bitcoin, or the big-data or machine-learning people, turn out to want the stuff we were talking about at conferences 15 years ago—and we discover to our surprise that, just as the mathematicians gave us a higher platform to stand on, so we seem to have built a higher platform for the practitioners. The long road from Hilbert to Gödel to Turing and von Neumann to Eckert and Mauchly to Gates and Jobs is still open for traffic today.

Yes, there’s plenty of math that strikes even me as boutique scholasticism: a way to signal the brilliance of the people doing it, by solving problems that require years just to understand their statements, and whose “motivations” are about 5,000 steps removed from anything Caplan or Bostrom would recognize as motivation. But where I part ways is that there’s also math that looked to me like boutique scholasticism, until Greg Kuperberg or Ketan Mulmuley or someone else finally managed to explain it to me, and I said: “ah, so that’s why Mumford or Connes or Witten cared so much about this. It seems … almost like an ordinary applied engineering question, albeit one from the year 2130 or something, being impatiently studied by people a few moves ahead of everyone else in humanity’s chess game against reality. It will be pretty sweet once the rest of the world catches up to this. ~ Scott Aaronson,
1009:At time of writing, the National Education Standards and Improvement Council, set up by the Clinton Administration,61 is due to prescribe what students in grades five through twelve are supposed to know about American history. Not a single one of the thirty-one standards set up mentions the Constitution. Paul Revere is unmentioned; the Gettysburg address is briefly mentioned once. On the other hand, the early feminist Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments receives nine notices. Joseph McCarthy is mentioned nineteen times; there is no mention of the Wright brothers, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Robert E. Lee; Harriet Tubman receives six notices. The Ku Klux Klan is mentioned seventeen times; the American Federation of Labor comes up with nine appearances. The role of religion, especially Christianity, in the founding and building of the nation is totally ignored; the grandeur of the court of Mansa Musa (King of Mali in fifteenth-century Africa) is praised, and recommended as a topic for further study.62 Such standards are linked in the minds of many with “outcome-based-education” (OBE). If the “outcomes” were well balanced and not less than thoroughly cognitive (though hopefully more than cognitive), there would be few objections. But OBE has become a lightening-rod issue precisely because in the hands of many it explicitly minimizes cognitive tests and competency skills, while focusing much more attention on attitudes, group conformity, and the like. In other words, granred the postmodernism that grips many educational theorists and the political correctness that shapes their values, this begins to look like one more experiment in social engineering. ~ D A Carson,
1010:But the biggest news that month was the departure from Apple, yet again, of its cofounder, Steve Wozniak. Wozniak was then quietly working as a midlevel engineer in the Apple II division, serving as a humble mascot of the roots of the company and staying as far away from management and corporate politics as he could. He felt, with justification, that Jobs was not appreciative of the Apple II, which remained the cash cow of the company and accounted for 70% of its sales at Christmas 1984. “People in the Apple II group were being treated as very unimportant by the rest of the company,” he later said. “This was despite the fact that the Apple II was by far the largest-selling product in our company for ages, and would be for years to come.” He even roused himself to do something out of character; he picked up the phone one day and called Sculley, berating him for lavishing so much attention on Jobs and the Macintosh division. Frustrated, Wozniak decided to leave quietly to start a new company that would make a universal remote control device he had invented. It would control your television, stereo, and other electronic devices with a simple set of buttons that you could easily program. He informed the head of engineering at the Apple II division, but he didn’t feel he was important enough to go out of channels and tell Jobs or Markkula. So Jobs first heard about it when the news leaked in the Wall Street Journal. In his earnest way, Wozniak had openly answered the reporter’s questions when he called. Yes, he said, he felt that Apple had been giving short shrift to the Apple II division. “Apple’s direction has been horrendously wrong for five years,” he said. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1011:Jews and Asians are only 7 percent of the total population, and between them they dominate in fields like medicine and engineering, not to mention entrepreneurship and academics. They rarely end up in prison or gangs (this is especially true of Jews). And while they are historically poor and persecuted, they have not allowed themselves to stay in that position. Take their story and compare it to black Americans and how can we explain the canyon that separates them? I’m sure the Jesse Jacksons of the world would sooner become Holocaust deniers than admit to the real answer: Family. Education. Ambition.
Family.
Education.
Ambition.
Whenever the plight of the minority in America is discussed, you’ll notice that Jews and Asians are left out of the conversation. In fact, many school systems are now trying to figure out how to get LESS of them in advanced placement courses and prestigious colleges. They’ve become too successful, apparently. But it’s not just their success that the race mongers hate, it’s HOW they accomplished it. Their men don’t father dozens of out-of-wedlock babies with dozens of women. Their households insist on discipline and academic success. They work hard, they are driven. Asians may now be at the point where they actually enjoy preferential bias. If I’m an employer and an Asian walks in to apply for a job, I’m going to assume he’s an achiever. That’s not a stereotype, that’s called a reputation. And they’ve freaking earned it.
Family. Education. Ambition. These three things really are a recipe for success. If you don’t believe me, ask the next Asian or Jew you meet. And then make sure to take care of your co-pay on the way out. ~ Matt Walsh,
1012:I must have roamed dementedly about for a time in the streets. When I at last got back to my own place, Faustine was again there ahead of me, coiled torpid in the bed like a loathsome boa-constrictor. She was already in the never-never land where ghouls like her belonged. I covered her face with one of the pillows, pressed down upon it with the weight of my whole body, held it there until she should have been dead ten times over. Yet when I removed the pillow to look, the black of strangulation was missing from her face. She was still in that state of suspended animation that defied me, a taunting smile visible about her lips.

I had a gun in my valise, from years before when I'd been on an engineering job in the jungles of Ecuador. I got it out, looked it over. It was still in good working order, although it only had one bullet left in it. That one would be enough. She wasn't going to escape me! I pressed the muzzle to her smooth white forehead, mid-center. "Die, damn you!" I growled, and pulled the trigger back. It exploded with a crash. A film of smoke hid her face from me for a minute. When it had cleared again, I looked.

There was no bullet-hole in her skull!

A black powder-smudge marked the point of contact. The gun dropped to the floor with a thud. That ineradicable smile still glimmered up at me, as if to say: "You see? You can't." I rubbed my finger over the black; the skin was unbroken underneath. A blank cartridge, that must have been it. I raised her head; there was a rent in the sheet under it. I probed through it with two fingers. I could feel the bullet lying imbedded down in the stuffing of the mattress.

("Vampire's Honeymoon) ~ Cornell Woolrich,
1013:human nature of their origins runs counter to the prevailing cultural view of the ancient Near East. In the Genesis narrative, we see man becoming a contributor under God in the ongoing work of creation, through the development of culture. We learn that city life is not to be seen as simply a punishment for humanity after the banishment from the garden. Rather the city has inherent capacities for bringing human beings together in such a way that enhances both security and culture making. However, as can be seen in the line of Cain, these capacities, under the influence of sin and rebellion against God, can be generators of great evil. The song of Lamech, Cain’s descendant, shows the Cainite city dwellers using all their advances to form a culture of death (Gen 4:23 – 24). Here is the first clear indicator of the dual nature of the city. Its capability for enormous good — for the culture-making creation of art, science, and technology — can be used to produce tremendous evil. Henri Blocher does not consider it a coincidence that the first mention of anti-God culture making is tied to the first instance of city building, but he warns against drawing the wrong conclusion: It is no doubt significant that [in Genesis 4] progress in arts and in engineering comes from the “city” of the Cainites. Nevertheless, we are not to conclude from this that civilization as such is… the fruit of sin. Such a conclusion would lead us to Manichaeism or to the views of Jean-Jacques Rousseau… The Bible condemns neither the city (for it concludes with the vision of the City of God) nor art and engineering.14 Blocher may be responding to writers such as Geerhardus Vos, who in his Biblical Theology points to “the problem ~ Timothy J Keller,
1014:Multi-generational sexual child abuse is such a common cause of the proliferation of pedophilia that Hitler/Himmler research focused on this genetic trait for mind control purposes. While I personally could not relate to the idea of sex with a child, I had parents and brothers and sisters who did. I still believe that George Bush revealed today’s causation of the rapid rise in pedophilia through justifications I heard him state. The rape of a child renders them compliant and receptive to being led without question. This, Bush claims, would cause them to intellectually evolve at a rate rapid enough to “bring them up to speed” to grasp the artificial intelligence emanating from DARPA. He believed that this generation conditioned with photographic memory through abuse was necessary for a future he foresaw controlled by technology. Since sexual abuse enhanced photographic memory while decreasing critical analysis and free thought, there would ultimately be no free will soul expression controlling behavior. In which case, social engineering was underway to create apathy while stifling spiritual evolution. Nevertheless, to short sighted flat thinking individuals such as Bush, spiritual evolution was not a consideration anyway. Instead, controlling behavior in a population diminished by global genocide of ‘undesirables’ would result in Hitler’s ‘superior race’ surviving to claim the earth. Perceptual justifications such as these that were discussed at the Bohemian Grove certainly did not provide me with the complete big picture. It did, however, provide a view beyond the stereotyped child molester in a trench coat that helped in understanding the vast crimes and cover-ups being discussed at this seminar in Houston. ~ Cathy O Brien,
1015:This is a miracle of coevolution—the bacteria that coexist with us in our bodies enable us to exist. Microbiologist Michael Wilson notes that “each exposed surface of a human being is colonized by microbes exquisitely adapted to that particular environment.”21 Yet the dynamics of these microbial populations, and how they interact with our bodies, are still largely unknown. A 2008 comparative genomics analysis of lactic acid bacteria acknowledges that research is “just now beginning to scratch the surface of the complex relationship between humans and their microbiota.”22 Bacteria are such effective coevolutionary partners because they are highly adaptable and mutable. “Bacteria continually monitor their external and internal environments and compute functional outputs based on information provided by their sensory apparatus,” explains bacterial geneticist James Shapiro, who reports “multiple widespread bacterial systems for mobilizing and engineering DNA molecules.”23 In contrast with our eukaryotic cells, with fixed genetic material, prokaryotic bacteria have free-floating genes, which they frequently exchange. For this reason, some microbiologists consider it inappropriate to view bacteria as distinct species. “There are no species in prokaryotes,” state Sorin Sonea and Léo G. Mathieu.24 “Bacteria are much more of a continuum,” explains Lynn Margulis. “They just pick up genes, they throw away genes, and they are very flexible about that.”25 Mathieu and Sonea describe a bacterial “genetic free market,” in which “each bacterium can be compared to a two-way broadcasting station, using genes as information molecules.” Genes “are carried by a bacterium only when needed . . . as a human may carry sophisticated tools.”26 ~ Sandor Ellix Katz,
1016:In this section I have tried to demonstrate that Darwinian thinking does live up to its billing as universal acid: it turns the whole traditional world upside down, challenging the top-down image of designs flowing from that genius of geniuses, the Intelligent Designer, and replacing it with the bubble-up image of mindless, motiveless cyclical processes churning out ever-more robust combinations until they start replicating on their own, speeding up the design process by reusing all the best bits over and over. Some of these earliest offspring eventually join forces (one major crane, symbiosis), which leads to multicellularity (another major crane), which leads to the more effective exploration vehicles made possible by sexual reproduction (another major crane), which eventually leads in one species to language and cultural evolution (cranes again), which provide the medium for literature and science and engineering, the latest cranes to emerge, which in turn permits us to “go meta” in a way no other life form can do, reflecting in many ways on who and what we are and how we got here, modeling these processes in plays and novels, theories and computer simulations, and ever-more thinking tools to add to our impressive toolbox. This perspective is so widely unifying and at the same time so generous with detailed insights that one might say it’s a power tool, all on its own. Those who are still strangely repelled by Darwinian thinking must consider the likelihood that if they try to go it alone with only the hand tools of tradition, they will find themselves laboring far from the cutting edge of research on important phenomena as diverse as epidemics and epistemology, biofuels and brain architecture, molecular genetics, music, and morality. ~ Daniel C Dennett,
1017:Stanford University’s John Koza, who pioneered genetic programming in 1986, has used genetic algorithms to invent an antenna for NASA, create computer programs for identifying proteins, and invent general purpose electrical controllers. Twenty-three times Koza’s genetic algorithms have independently invented electronic components already patented by humans, simply by targeting the engineering specifications of the finished devices—the “fitness” criteria. For example, Koza’s algorithms invented a voltage-current conversion circuit (a device used for testing electronic equipment) that worked more accurately than the human-invented circuit designed to meet the same specs. Mysteriously, however, no one can describe how it works better—it appears to have redundant and even superfluous parts. But that’s the curious thing about genetic programming (and “evolutionary programming,” the programming family it belongs to). The code is inscrutable. The program “evolves” solutions that computer scientists cannot readily reproduce. What’s more, they can’t understand the process genetic programming followed to achieve a finished solution. A computational tool in which you understand the input and the output but not the underlying procedure is called a “black box” system. And their unknowability is a big downside for any system that uses evolutionary components. Every step toward inscrutability is a step away from accountability, or fond hopes like programming in friendliness toward humans. That doesn’t mean scientists routinely lose control of black box systems. But if cognitive architectures use them in achieving AGI, as they almost certainly will, then layers of unknowability will be at the heart of the system. Unknowability might be an unavoidable consequence of self-aware, self-improving software. ~ James Barrat,
1018:The Enlightenment emphasized ways of learning that weren’t subservient to human power hierarchies. Instead, Enlightenment thinking celebrates evidence-based scientific method and reasoning. The cultures of sciences and engineering used to embrace Enlightenment epistemology, but now they have been overridden by horribly regressive BUMMER epistemology. You probably know the word “meme” as meaning a BUMMER posting that can go viral. But originally, “meme” suggested a philosophy of thought and meaning. The term was coined by the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. Dawkins proposed memes as units of culture that compete and are either passed along or not, according to a pseudo-Darwinian selection process. Thus some fashions, ideas, and habits take hold, while others become extinct. The concept of memes provides a way of framing everything non-nerds do—the whole of humanities, culture, arts, and politics—as similar instances of meme competition, mere subroutines of a higher-level algorithm that nerds can master. When the internet took of, Dawkins’s ideas were in vogue, because they flattered techies. There was a ubiquitous genre of internet appreciation from the very beginning in which someone would point out the viral spread of a meme and admire how cute that was. The genre exists to this day. Memes started out as a way of expressing solidarity with a philosophy I used to call cybernetic totalism that still underlies BUMMER. Memes might seem to amplify what you are saying, but that is always an illusion. You might launch an infectious meme about a political figure, and you might be making a great point, but in the larger picture, you are reinforcing the idea that virality is truth. Your point will be undone by whatever other point is more viral. That is by design. The architects of BUMMER were meme believers. ~ Jaron Lanier,
1019:The perplexing thing was that Elon seemed to drift off into a trance at times. People spoke to him, but nothing got through when he had a certain, distant look in his eyes. This happened so often that Elon’s parents and doctors thought he might be deaf. “Sometimes, he just didn’t hear you,” said Maye. Doctors ran a series of tests on Elon, and elected to remove his adenoid glands, which can improve hearing in children. “Well, it didn’t change,” said Maye. Elon’s condition had far more to do with the wiring of his mind than how his auditory system functioned. “He goes into his brain, and then you just see he is in another world,” Maye said. “He still does that. Now I just leave him be because I know he is designing a new rocket or something.” Other children did not respond well to these dreamlike states. You could do jumping jacks right beside Musk or yell at him, and he would not even notice. He kept right on thinking, and those around him judged that he was either rude or really weird. “I do think Elon was always a little different but in a nerdy way,” Maye said. “It didn’t endear him to his peers.” For Musk, these pensive moments were wonderful. At five and six, he had found a way to block out the world and dedicate all of his concentration to a single task. Part of this ability stemmed from the very visual way in which Musk’s mind worked. He could see images in his mind’s eye with a clarity and detail that we might associate today with an engineering drawing produced by computer software. “It seems as though the part of the brain that’s usually reserved for visual processing—the part that is used to process images coming in from my eyes—gets taken over by internal thought processes,” Musk said. “I can’t do this as much now because there are so many things demanding my attention but, as a kid, it happened a lot. ~ Ashlee Vance,
1020:Ford and Arthur talking:


"This is very, very serious indeed. The Guide has been taken over. It's been bought out."
Arthur leapt up. "Oh, very serious," he shouted. "Please fill me in straight away on some corporate publishing politics! I can't tell you how much it's been on my mind of late!"
"You don't understand! There's a whole new Guide!"
"Oh!" shouted Arthur again. "Oh! Oh! Oh! I'm incoherent with excitement! I can hardly wait for it to come out to find out which are the most exciting spaceports to get bored hanging about in in some globular cluster I've never heard of. Please, can we rush to a store that's got it right this very instant?"
Ford narrowed his eyes. "This is what you call sarcasm, isn't it?"
"Do you know," bellowed Arthur, "I think it is? I really think it might just be a crazy little thing called sarcasm seeping in at the edges of my manner of speech! Ford, I have had a fucking bad night! Will you please try and take that into account while you consider what fascinating bits of badger-sputumly inconsequential trivia to assail me with next?"

...

"Temporal reverse engineering."
Arthur put his head in his hands and shook it gently from side to side.
"Is there any humane way," he moaned, "in which I can prevent you from telling me what temporary reverse bloody-whatsiting is?"

...

"I leaped out of a high-rise office window."
This cheered Arthur up. "Oh!" he said. "Why don't you do it again?"
"I did."
"Hmmm," said Arthur, disappointed. "Obviously no good came of it."

...

"What was the self-sacrifice?"
"I jettisoned half of a much-loved and I think irreplaceable pair of shoes."
"Why was that self-sacrifice?"
"Because they were mine!" said Ford, crossly.
"I think we have different value systems."
"Well, mine's better. ~ Douglas Adams,
1021:If, as I believe, the conceptual structures we construct today are too complicated to be accurately specified in advance, and too complex to be built faultlessly, then we must take a radically different approach. Let us turn to nature and study complexity in living things, instead of just the dead works of man. Here we find constructs whose complexities thrill us with awe. The brain alone is intricate beyond mapping, powerful beyond imitation, rich in diversity, self-protecting, and self-renewing. The secret is that it is grown, not built. So it must be with our software systems. Some years ago Harlan Mills proposed that any software system should be grown by incremental development.[11] That is, the system should first be made to run, even though it does nothing useful except call the proper set of dummy subprograms. Then, bit by bit it is fleshed out, with the subprograms in turn being developed into actions or calls to empty stubs in the level below. I have seen the most dramatic results since I began urging this technique on the project builders in my software engineering laboratory class. Nothing in the past decade has so radically changed my own practice, or its effectiveness. The approach necessitates top-down design, for it is a top-down growing of the software. It allows easy backtracking. It lends itself to early prototypes. Each added function and new provision for more complex data or circumstances grows organically out of what is already there. The morale effects are startling. Enthusiasm jumps when there is a running system, even a simple one. Efforts redouble when the first picture from a new graphics software system appears on the screen, even if it is only a rectangle. One always has, at every stage in the process, a working system. I find that teams can grow much more complex entities in four months than they can build. ~ Frederick P Brooks Jr,
1022:According to the prevailing notion, to be free means to be free to satisfy one’s preferences. Preferences themselves are beyond rational scrutiny; they express the authentic core of a self whose freedom is realized when there are no encumbrances to its preference-satisfying behavior. Reason is in the service of this freedom, in a purely instrumental way; it is a person’s capacity to calculate the best means to satisfy his ends. About the ends themselves we are to maintain a principled silence, out of respect for the autonomy of the individual. To do otherwise would be to risk lapsing into paternalism. Thus does liberal agnosticism about the human good line up with the market ideal of “choice.” We invoke the latter as a content-free meta-good that bathes every actual choice made in the softly egalitarian, flattering light of autonomy.
This mutually reinforcing set of posits about freedom and rationality provides the basic framework for the discipline of economics, and for “liberal theory” in departments of political science. It is all wonderfully consistent, even beautiful.
But in surveying contemporary life, it is hard not to notice that this catechism doesn’t describe our situation very well. Especially the bit about our preferences expressing a welling-up of the authentic self. Those preferences have become the object of social engineering, conducted not by government bureaucrats but by mind-bogglingly wealthy corporations armed with big data. To continue to insist that preferences express the sovereign self and are for that reason sacred—unavailable for rational scrutiny—is to put one’s head in the sand. The resolutely individualistic understanding of freedom and rationality we have inherited from the liberal tradition disarms the critical faculties we need most in order to grapple with the large-scale societal pressures we now face. ~ Matthew B Crawford,
1023:In order to understand how engineers endeavor to insure against such structural, mechanical, and systems failures, and thereby also to understand how mistakes can be made and accidents with far-reaching consequences can occur, it is necessary to understand, at least partly, the nature of engineering design. It is the process of design, in which diverse parts of the 'given-world' of the scientist and the 'made-world' of the engineer are reformed and assembled into something the likes of which Nature had not dreamed, that divorces engineering from science and marries it to art. While the practice of engineering may involve as much technical experience as the poet brings to the blank page, the painter to the empty canvas, or the composer to the silent keyboard, the understanding and appreciation of the process and products of engineering are no less accessible than a poem, a painting, or a piece of music. Indeed, just as we all have experienced the rudiments of artistic creativity in the childhood masterpieces our parents were so proud of, so we have all experienced the essence of structual engineering in our learning to balance first our bodies and later our blocks in ever more ambitious positions. We have learned to endure the most boring of cocktail parties without the social accident of either our bodies or our glasses succumbing to the force of gravity, having long ago learned to crawl, sit up, and toddle among our tottering towers of blocks. If we could remember those early efforts of ours to raise ourselves up among the towers of legs of our parents and their friends, then we can begin to appreciate the task and the achievements of engineers, whether they be called builders in Babylon or scientists in Los Alamos. For all of their efforts are to one end: to make something stand that has not stood before, to reassemble Nature into something new, and above all to obviate failure in the effort. ~ Henry Petroski,
1024:I thought the submarine environment would be a useful analogy for the space station in a number of ways, and I especially wanted my colleagues to get an up-close look at how the Navy deals with CO2. What we learned on that trip was illuminating: the Navy has their submarines turn on their air scrubbers when the CO2 concentration rises above two millimeters of mercury, even though the scrubbers are noisy and risk giving away the submarine’s location. By comparison, the international agreement on ISS says the CO2 is acceptable up to six millimeters of mercury! The submarine’s chief engineering officer explained to us that the symptoms of high CO2 posed a threat to their work, so keeping that level low was a priority. I felt that NASA should be thinking of it the same way. When I prepared for my first flight on the ISS, I got acquainted with a new carbon dioxide removal system. The lithium hydroxide cartridges were foolproof and reliable, but that system depended on cartridges that were to be thrown away after use—not very practical, since hundreds of cartridges would be required to get through a single six-month mission. So instead we now have a device called the carbon dioxide removal assembly, or CDRA, pronounced “seedra,” and it has become the bane of my existence. There are two of them—one in the U.S. lab and one in Node 3. Each weighs about five hundred pounds and looks something like a car engine. Covered in greenish brown insulation, the Seedra is a collection of electronic boxes, sensors, heaters, valves, fans, and absorbent beds. The absorbent beds use a zeolite crystal to separate the CO2 from the air, after which the lab Seedra dumps the CO2 out into space through a vacuum valve, while the Node 3 Seedra combines oxygen drawn from the CO2 with leftover hydrogen from our oxygen-generating system in a device called Sabatier. The result is water—which we drink—and methane, which is also vented overboard. ~ Scott Kelly,
1025:India is a land where contradictions will continue to abound, because there are many Indias that are being transformed, with different levels of intensity, by different forces of globalization. Each of these Indias is responding to them in different ways. Consider these coexisting examples of progress and status quo: India is a nuclear-capable state that still cannot build roads that will survive their first monsoon. It has eradicated smallpox through the length and breadth of the country, but cannot stop female foeticide and infanticide. It is a country that managed to bring about what it called the ‘green revolution’, which heralded food grain self-sufficiency for a nation that relied on external food aid and yet, it easily has the most archaic land and agricultural laws in the world, with no sign of anyone wanting to reform them any time soon. It has hundreds of millions of people who subsist on less that a dollar a day, but who vote astutely and punish political parties ruthlessly. It has an independent judiciary that once set aside even Indira Gandhi’s election to parliament and yet, many members of parliament have criminal records and still contest and win elections from prison. India is a significant exporter of intellectual capital to the rest of the world—that capital being spawned in a handful of world class institutions of engineering, science and management. Yet it is a country with primary schools of pathetic quality and where retaining children in school is a challenge. India truly is an equal opportunity employer of women leaders in politics, but it took over fifty years to recognize that domestic violence is a crime and almost as long to get tough with bride burning. It is the IT powerhouse of the world, the harbinger of the offshore services revolution that is changing the business paradigms of the developed world. But regrettably, it is also the place where there is a yawning digital divide. ~ Rama Bijapurkar,
1026:Worldwide Long Range Solutions Special Interest Group [ ¤ SIG AeR.WLRS 253787890.546]. Space Colonization Subgroup. Open discussion board.

Okay, so imagine we get past the next few rough decades and finally do what we should have back in TwenCen. Say we mine asteroids for platinum, discover the secrets of true nanotechnology, and set Von Neumann "sheep" grazing on the moon to produce boundless wealth. To listen to some of the rest of you, all our problems would then be over. The next step, star travel, and colonization of the galaxy, would be trivial.

But hold on! Even assuming we solve how to maintain long-lasting ecologies in space and get so wealthy the costs of star-flight aren't crippling, you've still got the problem of time.

I mean, most hypothetical designs show likely starships creeping along at no more than ten percent of the speed of light, a whole lot slower than those sci-fi cruisers we see zipping on three-vee. At such speeds it may take five, ten generations to reach a good colony site. Meanwhile, passengers will have to maintain villages and farms and cranky, claustrophobic grandkids, all inside their hollowed-out, spinning worldlets.

What kind of social engineering will that take? Do you know how to design a closed society that'd last so long without flying apart? Oh, I think it can be done. But don't pretend it'll be simple!

Nor will be solving the dilemma of gene pool isolation. In the arks and zoos right now, a lot of rescued species are dying off even though the microecologies are right, simply because too few individuals were included in the original mix. For a healthy gene pool you need diversity, variety, heterozygosity.

One thing's clear, no starship will make it carrying only one racial group. What'll be needed, frankly, are mongrels… people who've bred back and forth with just about everybody and seem to enjoy it. ~ David Brin,
1027:The increases in productivity brought about by Ford’s innovation were startling and revolutionized not just the automobile industry but virtually every industry serving a mass market. Introduction of “Fordist” mass production techniques became something of a fad outside America: German industry went through a period of “rationalization” in the mid-1920s as manufacturers sought to import the most “advanced” American organizational techniques.12 It was the Soviet Union’s misfortune that Lenin and Stalin came of age in this period, because these Bolshevik leaders associated industrial modernity with large-scale mass production tout court. Their view that bigger necessarily meant better ultimately left the Soviet Union, at the end of the communist period, with a horrendously overconcentrated and inefficient industrial infrastructure—a Fordism on steroids in a period when the Fordist model had ceased to be relevant. The new form of mass production associated with Henry Ford also had its own ideologist: Frederick W. Taylor, whose book The Principles of Scientific Management came to be regarded as the bible for the new industrial age.13 Taylor, an industrial engineer, was one of the first proponents of time-and-motion studies that sought to maximize labor efficiency on the factory floor. He tried to codify the “laws” of mass production by recommending a very high degree of specialization that deliberately avoided the need for individual assembly line workers to demonstrate initiative, judgment, or even skill. Maintenance of the assembly line and its fine-tuning was given to a separate maintenance department, and the controlling intelligence behind the design of the line itself was the province of white-collar engineering and planning departments. Worker efficiency was based on a strict carrot-and-stick approach: productive workers were paid a higher piece rate than less productive ones. In typical American fashion, Taylor hid ~ Francis Fukuyama,
1028:Progressivism was imported from Europe and would result in a radical break from America’s heritage. In fact, it is best described as an elitist-driven counterrevolution to the American Revolution, in which the sovereignty of the individual, natural law, natural rights, and the civil society—built on a foundation of thousands of years of enlightened thinking and human experience—would be drastically altered and even abandoned for an ideological agenda broadly characterized as “historical progress.” Progressivism is the idea of the inevitability of historical progress and the perfectibility of man—and his self-realization—through the national community or collective. While its intellectual and political advocates clothe its core in populist terminology, and despite the existence of democratic institutions and cyclical voting, progressivism’s emphasis on material egalitarianism and societal engineering, and its insistence on concentrated, centralized administrative rule, lead inescapably to varying degrees of autocratic governance. Moreover, for progressives there are no absolute or permanent truths, only passing and distant historical events. Thus even values are said to be relative to time and circumstances; there is no eternal moral order—that is, what was true and good in 1776 and before is not necessarily true and good today. Consequently, the very purpose of America’s founding is debased. To better understand this ideology, its refutation of the American heritage, and its enormous effect on modern American life, it is necessary to become acquainted with some of the most influential progressive intellectuals who, together with others, set the nation on this lamentable course. Given their prolific writings, it is neither possible nor necessary to delve into every manner of their thoughts or the differences among them in their brand of progressivism. For our purposes, it is enough to expose essential aspects of their arguments. ~ Mark R Levin,
1029:Man's sole Magic Wand in Science is observation using the five senses; any other function/tool used to produce illusions to the same data and information is that of the Occult using Esotery. After all, processing the data (i.e., mental activity that produces information) is an upper layer to that of its radiation (i.e., emission/active or reception/passive); and since esotery erroneously claim to transcend the lower layers (of data transfer and information assembly/disassembly) and enables access directly onto the spiritual realms (termed as, Consciousness) without resorting to that authentic Magic Wand for acquiring 'objects of study', the data needed will ultimately be rendered into self-generated artifacts using such a shenanigan. In other words, the Occult comprises practices and techniques using artifacts delivered by the use of Esotery for the aim of constructing some delusion of Science; this is when innocent Magic turns into Sorcery. It is the process of enforcing subjectivity rather than objectivity onto its participants and accomplices for maintaining a discipline that facilitates for spirituality to lurk into the public domain (including that of secret societies) under the pretense of being part of some universal reality rather than an individual experience confined to each person's private sphere separately. Politically speaking, it is the nastiest flavor of Socialism in action; the assault on the ownership of souls to socially modify man instead of scientifically modify the environment. It is hence just another ideology of Social Engineering which is specifically shared by the children of Gaia/Isis/whatever, and only by holding onto the principle of 'Family' as an abstract model of an atomic element in society, is one able to escape this unscientific spiritual redistribution of souls. Remember that Science is the tool which man her-/himself has developed to harvest nature for her/his own service and not vice versa! ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
1030:Minsky was an ardent supporter of the Cyc project, the most notorious failure in the history of AI. The goal of Cyc was to solve AI by entering into a computer all the necessary knowledge. When the project began in the 1980s, its leader, Doug Lenat, confidently predicted success within a decade. Thirty years later, Cyc continues to grow without end in sight, and commonsense reasoning still eludes it. Ironically, Lenat has belatedly embraced populating Cyc by mining the web, not because Cyc can read, but because there’s no other way. Even if by some miracle we managed to finish coding up all the necessary pieces, our troubles would be just beginning. Over the years, a number of research groups have attempted to build complete intelligent agents by putting together algorithms for vision, speech recognition, language understanding, reasoning, planning, navigation, manipulation, and so on. Without a unifying framework, these attempts soon hit an insurmountable wall of complexity: too many moving parts, too many interactions, too many bugs for poor human software engineers to cope with. Knowledge engineers believe AI is just an engineering problem, but we have not yet reached the point where engineering can take us the rest of the way. In 1962, when Kennedy gave his famous moon-shot speech, going to the moon was an engineering problem. In 1662, it wasn’t, and that’s closer to where AI is today. In industry, there’s no sign that knowledge engineering will ever be able to compete with machine learning outside of a few niche areas. Why pay experts to slowly and painfully encode knowledge into a form computers can understand, when you can extract it from data at a fraction of the cost? What about all the things the experts don’t know but you can discover from data? And when data is not available, the cost of knowledge engineering seldom exceeds the benefit. Imagine if farmers had to engineer each cornstalk in turn, instead of sowing the seeds and letting them grow: we would all starve. ~ Pedro Domingos,
1031:Most of the successful innovators and entrepreneurs in this book had one thing in common: they were product people. They cared about, and deeply understood, the engineering and design. They were not primarily marketers or salesmen or financial types; when such folks took over companies, it was often to the detriment of sustained innovation. “When the sales guys run the company, the product guys don’t matter so much, and a lot of them just turn off,” Jobs said. Larry Page felt the same: “The best leaders are those with the deepest understanding of the engineering and product design.”34 Another lesson of the digital age is as old as Aristotle: “Man is a social animal.” What else could explain CB and ham radios or their successors, such as WhatsApp and Twitter? Almost every digital tool, whether designed for it or not, was commandeered by humans for a social purpose: to create communities, facilitate communication, collaborate on projects, and enable social networking. Even the personal computer, which was originally embraced as a tool for individual creativity, inevitably led to the rise of modems, online services, and eventually Facebook, Flickr, and Foursquare. Machines, by contrast, are not social animals. They don’t join Facebook of their own volition nor seek companionship for its own sake. When Alan Turing asserted that machines would someday behave like humans, his critics countered that they would never be able to show affection or crave intimacy. To indulge Turing, perhaps we could program a machine to feign affection and pretend to seek intimacy, just as humans sometimes do. But Turing, more than almost anyone, would probably know the difference. According to the second part of Aristotle’s quote, the nonsocial nature of computers suggests that they are “either a beast or a god.” Actually, they are neither. Despite all of the proclamations of artificial intelligence engineers and Internet sociologists, digital tools have no personalities, intentions, or desires. They are what we make of them. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1032:All scientists, regardless of discipline, need to be prepared to confront the broadest consequences of our work—but we need to communicate its more detailed aspects as well. I was reminded of this at a recent lunch I attended with some of Silicon Valley’s greatest technology gurus. One of them said, “Give me ten to twenty million dollars and a team of smart people, and we can solve virtually any engineering challenge.” This person obviously knew a thing or two about solving technological problems—a long string of successes attested to that—but ironically, such an approach would not have produced the CRISPR-based gene-editing technology, which was inspired by curiosity-driven research into natural phenomena. The technology we ended up creating did not take anywhere near ten to twenty million dollars to develop, but it did require a thorough understanding of the chemistry and biology of bacterial adaptive immunity, a topic that may seem wholly unrelated to gene editing. This is but one example of the importance of fundamental research—the pursuit of science for the sake of understanding our natural world—and its relevance to developing new technologies. Nature, after all, has had a lot more time than humans to conduct experiments! If there’s one overarching point I hope you will take away from this book, it’s that humans need to keep exploring the world around us through open-ended scientific research. The wonders of penicillin would never have been discovered had Alexander Fleming not been conducting simple experiments with Staphylococci bacteria. Recombinant DNA research—the foundation for modern molecular biology—became possible only with the isolation of DNA-cutting and DNA-copying enzymes from gut- and heat-loving bacteria. Rapid DNA sequencing required experiments on the remarkable properties of bacteria from hot springs. And my colleagues and I would never have created a powerful gene-editing tool if we hadn’t tackled the much more fundamental question of how bacteria fight off viral infections. ~ Jennifer A Doudna,
1033:Then there is Roman engineering: the Roman roads, aqueducts, the Colosseum. Warfare, alas, has always been beneficial to engineering. Yet there are unmistakeable trends in the engineering of the gamgster states. In a healthy society, engineering design gets smarter and smarter; in gangster states, it gets bigger and bigger. In World War II, the democracies produced radar and split the atom; German basic research was far behind in these fields and devoted its efforts to projects like lenses so bog they could burn Britain, and bells so big that their sound would be lethal. (The lenses never got off the drawing board, and the bells, by the end of the war, would kill mice in a bath tub.) Roman engineering, too, was void of all subtlety. Roman roads ran absolutely straight; when they came to a mountain, they ran over the top of the mountain as pigheadedly as one of Stalin's frontal assaults. Greek soldiers used to adapt their camps to the terrain; but the Roman army, at the end of a days' march, would invariably set up exactly the same camp, no matter whether in the Alps or in Egypt. If the terrain did not correspond to the one and only model decreed by the military bureaucracy, so much the worse for the terrain; it was dug up until it fitted inti the Roman Empire. The Roman aqueducts were bigger than those that had been used centuries earlier in the ancient world; but they were administered with extremely poor knowledge of hydraulics. Long after Heron of Alexandria (1st Century A.D.) had designed water clocks, water turbines and two-cylinder water pumps, and had written works on these subjects, the Romans were still describing the performance of their aqueducts in terms of the quinaria, a measure of the cross-section of the flow, as if the volume of the flow did not also depend on its velocity. The same unit was used in charging users of large pipes tapping the aqueduct; the Roman engineers failed to realize that doubling the cross-section would more than double the flow of water. Heron could never have blundered like this. ~ Petr Beckmann,
1034:rather than just websites. Along the way he produced not only transforming products but also, on his second try, a lasting company, endowed with his DNA, that is filled with creative designers and daredevil engineers who could carry forward his vision. In August 2011, right before he stepped down as CEO, the enterprise he started in his parents’ garage became the world’s most valuable company. This is also, I hope, a book about innovation. At a time when the United States is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, and when societies around the world are trying to build creative digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness, imagination, and sustained innovation. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology, so he built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. He and his colleagues at Apple were able to think differently: They developed not merely modest product advances based on focus groups, but whole new devices and services that consumers did not yet know they needed. He was not a model boss or human being, tidily packaged for emulation. Driven by demons, he could drive those around him to fury and despair. But his personality and passions and products were all interrelated, just as Apple’s hardware and software tended to be, as if part of an integrated system. His tale is thus both instructive and cautionary, filled with lessons about innovation, character, leadership, and values. Shakespeare’s Henry V—the story of a willful and immature prince who becomes a passionate but sensitive, callous but sentimental, inspiring but flawed king—begins with the exhortation “O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend / The brightest heaven of invention.” For Steve Jobs, the ascent to the brightest heaven of invention begins with a tale of two sets of parents, and of growing up in a valley that was just learning how to turn silicon into gold. Paul Jobs with Steve, 1956 The Los Altos house with the garage where Apple was ~ Walter Isaacson,
1035:My method is different. I do not rush into actual work. When I get an idea, I start at once building it up in my imagination. I change the construction, make improvements and operate the device in my mind. It is absolutely immaterial to me whether I run my turbine in thought or test it in my shop. I even note if it is out of balance. There is no difference whatever; the results are the same. In this way I am able to rapidly develop and perfect a conception without touching anything. When I have gone so far as to embody in the invention every possible improvement I can think of and see no fault anywhere, I put into concrete form this final product of my brain. Invariably my device works as I conceived that it should, and the experiment comes out exactly as I planned it. In twenty years there has not been a single exception. Why should it be otherwise? Engineering, electrical and mechanical, is positive in results. There is scarcely a subject that cannot be examined beforehand, from the available theoretical and practical data. The carrying out into practice of a crude idea as is being generally done, is, I hold, nothing but a waste of energy, money, and time. My early affliction had however, another compensation. The incessant mental exertion developed my powers of observation and enabled me to discover a truth of great importance. I had noted that the appearance of images was always preceded by actual vision of scenes under peculiar and generally very exceptional conditions, and I was impelled on each occasion to locate the original impulse. After a while this effort grew to be almost automatic and I gained great facility in connecting cause and effect. Soon I became aware, to my surprise, that every thought I conceived was suggested by an external impression. Not only this but all my actions were prompted in a similar way. In the course of time it became perfectly evident to me that I was merely an automation endowed with power OF MOVEMENT RESPONDING TO THE STIMULI OF THE SENSE ORGANS AND THINKING AND ACTING ACCORDINGLY.

   ~ Nikola Tesla, The Strange Life of Nikola Tesla,
1036:And to say that the citizens of those rival domains did not always see eye to eye was a bit of an understatement, because each represented the antithesis of the other’s deepest values. To the engineers and the technicians who belonged to the world of the dam, Glen was no dead monolith but, rather, a living and breathing thing, a creature that pulsed with energy and dynamism. Perhaps even more important, the dam was also a triumphant capstone of human ingenuity, the culmination of a civil-engineering lineage that had seen its first florescence in the irrigation canals of ancient Mesopotamia and China, then shot like a bold arrow through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Industrial Revolution to reach its zenith here in the sun-scorched wastelands of the American Southwest. Glen embodied the glittering inspiration and the tenacious drive of the American century—a spirit that in other contexts had been responsible for harnessing the atom and putting men on the moon. As impressive as those other accomplishments may have been, nothing excelled the nobility of transforming one of the harshest deserts on earth into a vibrant garden. In the minds of its engineers and its managers, Glen affirmed everything that was right about America. To Kenton Grua and the river folk who inhabited the world of the canyon, however, the dam was an offense against nature. Thanks to Glen and a host of similar Reclamation projects along the Colorado, one of the greatest rivers in the West, had been reduced to little more than a giant plumbing system, a network of pipes and faucets and catchment tubs whose chief purpose lay in the dubious goal of bringing golf courses to Phoenix, swimming pools to Tucson, and air-conditioned shopping malls to Vegas. A magnificent waterway had been sacrificed on the altar of a technology that enabled people to prosper without limits, without balance, without any connection to the environment in which they lived—and in the process, fostered the delusion that the desert had been conquered. But in the eyes of the river folk, even that wasn’t the real cost. To ~ Kevin Fedarko,
1037:From every direction, the place is under assault—and unlike in the past, the adversary is not concentrated in a single force, such as the Bureau of Reclamation, but takes the form of separate outfits conducting smaller attacks that are, in many ways, far more insidious. From directly above, the air-tour industry has succeeded in scuttling all efforts to dial it back, most recently through the intervention of Arizona’s senators, John Kyl and John McCain, and is continuing to destroy one of the canyon’s greatest treasures, which is its silence. From the east has come a dramatic increase in uranium-mining claims, while the once remote and untrammeled country of the North Rim now suffers from an ever-growing influx of recreational ATVs. On the South Rim, an Italian real estate company recently secured approval for a massive development whose water demands are all but guaranteed to compromise many of the canyon’s springs, along with the oases that they nourish. Worst of all, the Navajo tribe is currently planning to cooperate in constructing a monstrous tramway to the bottom of the canyon, complete with a restaurant and a resort, at the confluence of the Little Colorado and the Colorado, the very spot where John Wesley Powell made his famous journal entry in the summer of 1869 about venturing “down the Great Unknown.” As vexing as all these things are, what Litton finds even more disheartening is the country’s failure to rally to the canyon’s defense—or for that matter, to the defense of its other imperiled natural wonders. The movement that he and David Brower helped build is not only in retreat but finds itself the target of bottomless contempt. On talk radio and cable TV, environmentalists are derided as “wackos” and “extremists.” The country has swung decisively toward something smaller and more selfish than what it once was, and in addition to ushering in a disdain for the notion that wilderness might have a value that extends beyond the metrics of economics or business, much of the nation ignorantly embraces the benefits of engineering and technology while simultaneously rejecting basic science. ~ Kevin Fedarko,
1038:Of course, the champions of totalitarianism protest that what they want to abolish is "only economic freedom" and that ali "other freedoms" will remain untouched. But freedom is indivisible. The distinction between an economic sphere of human life and activity and a noneconomic sphere is the worst of their fallacies. If an omnipotent authority has the power to assign to every individual the tasks he has to perform, nothing that can be called freedom and autonomy is left to him.
He has only the choice between strict obedience and death by starvation.1
Committees of experts may be called to advise the planning authority whether or not a young man should be given the opportunity to prepare himself for and to work in an intellectual or artistic field. But such an arrangement can merely rear disciples committed to the parrotIike repetition of the ideas of the preceding generation. It would bar innovators who disagree with the accepted ways of thought. No innovation would ever have been accomplished if its originator had been in need of an authorization by those from whose doctrines and methods he wanted to deviate. Hegel would not have ordained Schopenhauer or Feuerbach, nor would Professor Rau have ordained Marx or Carl Menger. If the supreme planning board is ultimately to determine which books are to be printed, who is to experiment in the laboratories and who is to paint or to sculpture, and which alterations in technological methods should be undertaken, there will be neither improvement nor progress. Individual man will become a pawn in the hands of the rulers, who in their "social engineering" will handle him as engineers handle the stuff of which they construct buildings, bridges, and machines. In every sphere of human activity an innovation is a challenge not only to ali routinists and to the experts and practitioners of traditional methods but even more to those who have in the past themselves been innovators.
It meets at the beginning chiefly stubborn opposition. Such obstacles can be overcome in a society where there is economic freedom. They are insurmountable in a socialist system. ~ Ludwig von Mises,
1039:Japan, a country that had done its best to have no contact with strangers and to seal out the rest of the world. Its economy and politics were dominated by feudal agriculture and a Confucian hierarchical social structure, and they were steadily declining. Merchants were the lowest social class, and trading with foreigners was actually forbidden except for limited contact with China and the Dutch. But then Japan had an unexpected encounter with a stranger—Commodore Matthew Perry—who burst in on July 8, 1853, demanding that Japan’s ports be open to America for trade and insisting on better treatment for shipwrecked sailors. His demands were rebuffed, but Perry came back a year later with a bigger fleet and more firepower. He explained to the Japanese the virtues of trading with other countries, and eventually they signed the Treaty of Kanagawa on March 31, 1854, opening the Japanese market to foreign trade and ending two hundred years of near isolation. The encounter shocked the Japanese political elites, forcing them to realize just how far behind the United States and other Western nations Japan had fallen in military technology. This realization set in motion an internal revolution that toppled the Tokugawa Shogunate, which had ruled Tokyo in the name of the emperor since 1603, and brought Emperor Meiji, and a coalition of reformers, in his place. They chose adaptation by learning from those who had defeated them. They launched a political, economic, and social transformation of Japan, based on the notion that if they wanted to be as strong as the West they had to break from their current cultural norms and make a wholesale adoption of Western science, technology, engineering, education, art, literature, and even clothing and architecture. It turned out to be more difficult than they thought, but the net result was that by the late nineteenth century Japan had built itself into a major industrial power with the heft to not only reverse the unequal economic treaties imposed on it by Western powers but actually defeat one of those powers—Russia—in a war in 1905. The Meiji Restoration made Japan not only more resilient but also more powerful. ~ Thomas L Friedman,
1040:In South Texas I saw three interesting things. The first was a tiny girl, maybe ten years old, driving in a 1965 Cadillac. She wasn't going very fast, because I passed her, but still she was cruising right along, with her head tilted back and her mouth open and her little hands gripping the wheel.

Then I saw an old man walking up the median strip pulling a wooden cross behind him. It was mounted on something like a golf cart with two spoked wheels. I slowed down to read the hand-lettered sign on his chest.

JACKSONVILLE
FLA OR BUST

I had never been to Jacksonville but I knew it was the home of the Gator Bowl and I had heard it was a boom town, taking in an entire county or some such thing. It seemed an odd destination for a religious pilgrim. Penance maybe for some terrible sin, or some bargain he had worked out with God, or maybe just a crazed hiker. I waved and called out to him, wishing him luck, but he was intent on his marching and had no time for idle greetings. His step was brisk and I was convinced he wouldn't bust.

The third interesting thing was a convoy of stake-bed trucks all piled high with loose watermelons and cantaloupes. I was amazed. I couldn't believe that the bottom ones weren't crushed under all that weight, exploding and spraying hazardous melon juice onto the highway. One of nature's tricks with curved surfaces. Topology! I had never made it that far in mathematics and engineering studies, and I knew now that I never would, just as I knew that I would never be a navy pilot or a Treasury agent. I made a B in Statics but I was failing in Dynamics when I withdrew from the field. The course I liked best was one called Strength of Materials. Everybody else hated it because of all the tables we had to memorize but I loved it, the sheared beam. I had once tried to explain to Dupree how things fell apart from being pulled and compressed and twisted and bent and sheared but he wouldn't listen. Whenever that kind of thing came up, he would always say - boast, the way those people do - that he had no head for figures and couldn't do things with his hands, slyly suggesting the presence of finer qualities. ~ Charles Portis,
1041:Some think that money and what it can buy will make
them happy and so concentrate on earning it. But acquiring
a better car, a nicer house, a better position, or more
comfort will never satisfy them, for they are filled with the
desire to have more. For example, some people have a
passion for cars. It is very important that their car is a good
make and the latest model; it has to have good engineering
and a quality music system. They grow very emotionally
attached to their auto and do not want it to have the
slightest dent or scratch. But their satisfaction from driving
a nice car does not last long. Soon a new model comes
out, and theirs becomes an outdated model. It pains them
to read that a faster car with more accessories and more
advanced engineering is now on the market, and in an
instant moment they lose all the pleasure they had in their
once-coveted possession. Also, their wardrobe becomes a
major problem for ignorant people. Some people want to
follow the latest clothing fashions, even though they may
not have enough money to do so. They buy an outfit that
they like and find attractive, but stop liking it when it goes
out of style or they see it on someone they do not like or,
even worse, a rival. The outfit abruptly loses its appeal and
becomes a source of irritation. In much the same way, seeing
someone wearing nicer clothing than theirs makes
them quite miserable. No matter how nice their own outfits
are, they are worried that they are no more than ordinary,
which makes then unhappy. Their habits, social activities,
material means, or possessions will not make them happy,
and their constant search for more will make them even
more miserable. When they realize that they have really
consumed and wasted all of this life’s pleasures, they generally
get “angry at life.” Unwilling to solve their problems
through belief, they remain mired in confusion and unhappiness.
Therefore, in spite of all their efforts, they remain
confused and unhappy. However, if they practiced religious
morality, they would have a joy deeper than they
could imagine. ~ Harun Yahya,
1042:… and one day, after Mahlke had learned to swim, we were lying in the grass, in the Schlagball field. I ought to have gone to the dentist, but they wouldn't let me because I was hard to replace on the team. My tooth was howling. A cat sauntered diagonally across the field and no one threw anything at it. A few of the boys were chewing or plucking at blades of grass. The cat belonged to the caretaker and was black. Hotten Sonntag rubbed his bat with a woolen stocking. My tooth marked time. The tournament had been going on for two hours. We had lost hands down and were waiting for the return game. It was a young cat, but no kitten. In the stadium, handball goals were being made thick and fast on both sides. My tooth kept saying one word, over and over again. On the cinder track the sprinters were practicing starts or limbering up. The cat meandered about. A trimotored plane crept across the sky, slow and loud, but couldn't drown out my tooth. Through the stalks of grass the caretaker's black cat showed a white bib. Mahlke was asleep. The wind was from the east, and the crematorium between the United Cemeteries and the Engineering School was operating. Mr. Mallenbrandt, the gym teacher, blew his whistle: Change sides. The cat practiced. Mahlke was asleep or seemed to be. I was next to him with my toothache. Still practicing, the cat came closer. Mahlke's Adam's apple attracted attention because it was large, always in motion, and threw a shadow. Between me and Mahlke the caretaker's black cat tensed for a leap. We formed a triangle. My tooth was silent and stopped marking time: for Mahlke's Adam's apple had become the cat's mouse. It was so young a cat, and Mahlke's whatsis was so active – in any case the cat leaped at Mahlke's throat; or one of us caught the cat and held it up to Mahlke's neck; or I, with or without my toothache, seized the cat and showed it Mahlke's mouse: and Joachim Mahlke let out a yell, but suffered only slight scratches.

And now it is up to me, who called your mouse to the attention of this cat and all cats, to write. Even if we were both invented, I should have to write. Over and over again the fellow who invented us because it's his business to invent people obliges me to take your Adam's apple in my hand and carry it to the spot that saw it win or lose. ~ G nter Grass,
1043:The world has been changing even faster as people, devices and information are increasingly connected to each other. Computational power is growing and quantum computing is quickly being realised. This will revolutionise artificial intelligence with exponentially faster speeds. It will advance encryption. Quantum computers will change everything, even human biology. There is already one technique to edit DNA precisely, called CRISPR. The basis of this genome-editing technology is a bacterial defence system. It can accurately target and edit stretches of genetic code. The best intention of genetic manipulation is that modifying genes would allow scientists to treat genetic causes of disease by correcting gene mutations. There are, however, less noble possibilities for manipulating DNA. How far we can go with genetic engineering will become an increasingly urgent question. We can’t see the possibilities of curing motor neurone diseases—like my ALS—without also glimpsing its dangers.
Intelligence is characterised as the ability to adapt to change. Human intelligence is the result of generations of natural selection of those with the ability to adapt to changed circumstances. We must not fear change. We need to make it work to our advantage.
We all have a role to play in making sure that we, and the next generation, have not just the opportunity but the determination to engage fully with the study of science at an early level, so that we can go on to fulfil our potential and create a better world for the whole human race. We need to take learning beyond a theoretical discussion of how AI should be and to make sure we plan for how it can be. We all have the potential to push the boundaries of what is accepted, or expected, and to think big. We stand on the threshold of a brave new world. It is an exciting, if precarious, place to be, and we are the pioneers.
When we invented fire, we messed up repeatedly, then invented the fire extinguisher. With more powerful technologies such as nuclear weapons, synthetic biology and strong artificial intelligence, we should instead plan ahead and aim to get things right the first time, because it may be the only chance we will get. Our future is a race between the growing power of our technology and the wisdom with which we use it. Let’s make sure that wisdom wins. ~ Stephen Hawking,
1044:You dismiss the idea that the death of Jesus—the “torture and death of a single individual in a backward part of the Middle East” — could possibly be the solution to the sorrows of our brutish existence. When I said that Jesus is good for the world because he is the life of the world, you just tossed this away. You said, “You cannot possibly ‘know’ this. Nor can you present any evidence for it.” Actually, I believe I can present evidence for what I know. But evidence comes to us like food, and that is why we say grace over it. And we are supposed to eat it, not push it around on the plate—and if we don’t give thanks, it never tastes right. But here is some evidence for you, in no particular order. The engineering that went into ankles. The taste of beer. That Jesus rose from the dead on the third day, just like he said. A woman’s neck. Bees fooling around in the flower bed. The ability of acorns to manufacture enormous oaks out of stuff they find in the air and dirt. Forgiveness of sin. Storms out of the North, the kind with lightning. Joyous laughter (diaphragm spasms to the atheistic materialist). The ocean at night with a full moon. Delta blues. The peacock that lives in my yard. Sunrise, in color. Baptizing babies. The pleasure of sneezing. Eye contact. Having your feet removed from the miry clay, and established forever on the rock. You may say none of this tastes right to you. But suppose you were to bow your head and say grace over all of it. Try it that way. You say that you cannot believe that Christ’s death on the Cross was salvation for the world because the idea is absurd. I have shown in various ways that absurdity has not been a disqualifier for any number of your current beliefs. You praise reason to the heights, yet will not give reasons for your strident and inflexible moral judgments, or why you have arbitrarily dubbed certain chemical processes “rational argument.” That’s absurd right now, and yet there you are, holding it. So for you to refuse to accept Christ because it is absurd is like a man at one end of the pool refusing to move to the other end because he might get wet. Given your premises, you will have to come up with a different reason for rejecting Christ as you do. But for you to make this move would reveal the two fundamental tenets of true atheism. One: There is no God. Two: I hate Him. ~ Anonymous,
1045:The term ‘gender’ itself is problematic. It was first used in a sense that was not simply about grammar by sexologists – the scientists of sex such as John Money in the 1950s and 1960s – who were involved in normalising intersex infants.They used the term to mean the behavioural characteristics they considered most appropriate for persons of one or other biological sex. They applied the concept of gender when deciding upon the sex category into which those infants who did not have clear physical indications of one biological sex or another should be placed (Hausman, 1995).Their purpose was not progressive.These were conservative men who believed that there should be clear differences between the sexes and sought to create distinct sex categories through their projects of social engineering. Unfortunately, the term was adopted by some feminist theorists in the 1970s, and by the late 1970s was commonly used in academic feminism to indicate the difference between biological sex and those characteristics that derived from politics and not biology, which they called ‘gender’ (Haig, 2004).

Before the term ‘gender’ was adopted, the term more usually used to describe these socially constructed characteristics was ‘sex roles’. The word ‘role’ connotes a social construction and was not susceptible to the degeneration that has a afflicted the term ‘gender’ and enabled it to be wielded so effectively by transgender activists. As the term ‘gender’ was adopted more extensively by feminists, its meaning was transformed to mean not just the socially constructed behaviour associated with biological sex, but the system of male power and women’s subordination itself, which became known as the ‘gender hierarchy’ or ‘gender order’ (Connell, 2005; Mackinnon, 1989). Gradually, older terms to describe this system, such as male domination, sex class and sex caste went out of fashion, with the effect that direct identification of the agents responsible for the subordination of women – men – could no longer be named. Gender, as a euphemism, disappeared men as agents in male violence against women, which is now commonly referred to as ‘gender violence’. Increasingly, the term ‘gender’ is used, in official forms and legislation, for instance, to stand in for the term ‘sex’ as if ‘gender’ itself is biological, and this usage has overwhelmed the feminist understanding of gender. ~ Sheila Jeffreys,
1046:I wonder how they will like Maria in Missoula, Montana? That is if I can get a job back in Missoula. I suppose that I am ticketed as a Red there now for good and will be on the general blacklist. Though you never know. You never can tell. They've no proof of what you do, and as a matter of fact they would never believe it if you told them, and my passport was valid for Spain before they issued the restrictions.

The time for getting back will not be until the fall of thirty-seven. I left in the summer of thirty-six and though the leave is for a year you do not need to be back until the fall term opens in the following year. There is a lot of time between now and the fall term. There is a lot of time between now and the day after tomorrow if you want to put it that way. No. I think there is no need to worry about the university. Just you turn up there in the fall and it will be all right. Just try and turn up there.

But it has been a strange life for a long time now. Damned if it hasn't. Spain was your work and your job, so being in Spain was natural and sound. You had worked summers on engineering projects and in the forest service building roads and in the park and learned to handle powder, so the demolition was a sound and normal job too. Always a little hasty, but sound.

Once you accept the idea of demolition as a problem it is only a problem. But there was plenty that was not so good that went with it although God knows you took it easily enough. There was the constant attempt to approximate the conditions of successful assassination that accompanied the demolition. Did big words make it more defensible? Did they make killing any more palatable? You took to it a little too readily if you ask me, he told himself. And what you will be like or just exactly what you will be suited for when you leave the service of the Republic is, to me, he thought, extremely doubtful. But my guess is you will get rid of all that by writing about it, he said. Once you write it down it is all gone. It will be a good book if you can write it. Much better than the other.

But in the meantime all the life you have or ever will have is today, tonight, tomorrow, today, tonight, tomorrow, over and over again (I hope), he thought and so you had better take what time there is and be very thankful for it. If the bridge goes bad. It does not look too good just now. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
1047:Chris Argyris, professor emeritus at Harvard Business School, wrote a lovely article in 1977,191 in which he looked at the performance of Harvard Business School graduates ten years after graduation. By and large, they got stuck in middle management, when they had all hoped to become CEOs and captains of industry. What happened? Argyris found that when they inevitably hit a roadblock, their ability to learn collapsed: What’s more, those members of the organization that many assume to be the best at learning are, in fact, not very good at it. I am talking about the well-educated, high-powered, high-commitment professionals who occupy key leadership positions in the modern corporation.… Put simply, because many professionals are almost always successful at what they do, they rarely experience failure. And because they have rarely failed, they have never learned how to learn from failure.… [T]hey become defensive, screen out criticism, and put the “blame” on anyone and everyone but themselves. In short, their ability to learn shuts down precisely at the moment they need it the most.192 [italics mine] A year or two after Wave, Jeff Huber was running our Ads engineering team. He had a policy that any notable bug or mistake would be discussed at his team meeting in a “What did we learn?” session. He wanted to make sure that bad news was shared as openly as good news, so that he and his leaders were never blind to what was really happening and to reinforce the importance of learning from mistakes. In one session, a mortified engineer confessed, “Jeff, I screwed up a line of code and it cost us a million dollars in revenue.” After leading the team through the postmortem and fixes, Jeff concluded, “Did we get more than a million dollars in learning out of this?” “Yes.” “Then get back to work.”193 And it works in other settings too. A Bay Area public school, the Bullis Charter School in Los Altos, takes this approach to middle school math. If a child misses a question on a math test, they can try the question again for half credit. As their principal, Wanny Hersey, told me, “These are smart kids, but in life they are going to hit walls once in a while. It’s vital they master geometry, algebra one, and algebra two, but it’s just as important that they respond to failure by trying again instead of giving up.” In the 2012–2013 academic year, Bullis was the third-highest-ranked middle school in California.194 ~ Laszlo Bock,
1048:You go to an auto show and see some glamorous and wildly innovative concept car on display and you think, “I’d buy that in a second.” And then five years later, the car finally comes to market and it’s been whittled down from a Ferrari to a Pinto—all the truly breakthrough features have been toned down or eliminated altogether, and what’s left looks mostly like last year’s model. The same sorry fate could have befallen the iPod as well: Ive and Jobs could have sketched out a brilliant, revolutionary music player and then two years later released a dud. What kept the spark alive? The answer is that Apple’s development cycle looks more like a coffeehouse than an assembly line. The traditional way to build a product like the iPod is to follow a linear chain of expertise. The designers come up with a basic look and feature set and then pass it on to the engineers, who figure out how to actually make it work. And then it gets passed along to the manufacturing folks, who figure out how to build it in large numbers—after which it gets sent to the marketing and sales people, who figure out how to persuade people to buy it. This model is so ubiquitous because it performs well in situations where efficiency is key, but it tends to have disastrous effects on creativity, because the original idea gets chipped away at each step in the chain. The engineering team takes a look at the original design and says, “Well, we can’t really do that—but we can do 80 percent of what you want.” And then the manufacturing team says, “Sure, we can do some of that.” In the end, the original design has been watered down beyond recognition. Apple’s approach, by contrast, is messier and more chaotic at the beginning, but it avoids this chronic problem of good ideas being hollowed out as they progress through the development chain. Apple calls it concurrent or parallel production. All the groups—design, manufacturing, engineering, sales—meet continuously through the product-development cycle, brainstorming, trading ideas and solutions, strategizing over the most pressing issues, and generally keeping the conversation open to a diverse group of perspectives. The process is noisy and involves far more open-ended and contentious meetings than traditional production cycles—and far more dialogue between people versed in different disciplines, with all the translation difficulties that creates. But the results speak for themselves. ~ Steven Johnson,
1049:Ireland, like Ukraine, is a largely rural country which suffers from its proximity to a more powerful industrialised neighbour. Ireland’s contribution to the history of tractors is the genius engineer Harry Ferguson, who was born in 1884, near Belfast.
Ferguson was a clever and mischievous man, who also had a passion for aviation. It is said that he was the first man in Great Britain to build and fly his own aircraft in 1909. But he soon came to believe that improving efficiency of food production would be his unique service to mankind. Harry Ferguson’s first two-furrow plough was attached to the chassis of the Ford Model T car converted into a tractor, aptly named Eros. This plough was mounted on the rear of the tractor, and through ingenious use of balance springs it could be raised or lowered by the driver using a lever beside his seat. Ford, meanwhile, was developing its own tractors. The Ferguson design was more advanced, and made use of hydraulic linkage, but Ferguson knew that despite his engineering genius, he could not achieve his dream on his own. He needed a larger company to produce his design. So he made an informal agreement with Henry Ford, sealed only by a handshake. This Ford-Ferguson partnership gave to the world a new type of Fordson tractor far superior to any that had been known before, and the precursor of all modern-type tractors. However, this agreement by a handshake collapsed in 1947 when Henry Ford II took over the empire of his father, and started to produce a new Ford 8N tractor, using the Ferguson system. Ferguson’s open and cheerful nature was no match for the ruthless mentality of the American businessman. The matter was decided in court in 1951. Ferguson claimed $240 million, but was awarded only $9.25 million. Undaunted in spirit, Ferguson had a new idea. He approached the Standard Motor Company at Coventry with a plan, to adapt the Vanguard car for use as tractor. But this design had to be modified, because petrol was still rationed in the post-war period. The biggest challenge for Ferguson was the move from petrol-driven to diesel-driven engines and his success gave rise to the famous TE-20, of which more than half a million were built in the UK. Ferguson will be remembered for bringing together two great engineering stories of our time, the tractor and the family car, agriculture and transport, both of which have contributed so richly to the well-being of mankind. ~ Marina Lewycka,
1050:And the main thing that was wrong was that everything seemed to have gotten just a little worse, or at best remained the same. You would have predicted that at least a few facets of everyday life would improve markedly in twenty-two years. Her father contended the War was behind it all: any person who showed a shred of talent was sucked up by UNEF; the very best fell to the Elite Conscription Act and wound up being cannon fodder. It was hard not to agree with him. Wars in the past often accelerated social reform, provided technological benefits, even sparked artistic activity. This one, however, seemed tailor-made to provide none of these positive by-products. Such improvements as had been made on late-twentieth-century technology were—like tachyon bombs and warships two kilometers long—at best, interesting developments of things that only required the synergy of money and existing engineering techniques. Social reform? The world was technically under martial law. As for art, I’m not sure I know good from bad. But artists to some extent have to reflect the temper of the times. Paintings and sculpture were full of torture and dark brooding; movies seemed static and plotless; music was dominated by nostalgic revivals of earlier forms; architecture was mainly concerned with finding someplace to put everybody; literature was damn near incomprehensible. Most people seemed to spend most of their time trying to find ways to outwit the government, trying to scrounge a few extra K’s or ration tickets without putting their lives in too much danger. And in the past, people whose country was at war were constantly in contact with the war. The newspapers would be full of reports, veterans would return from the front; sometimes the front would move right into town, invaders marching down Main Street or bombs whistling through the night air—but always the sense of either working toward victory or at least delaying defeat. The enemy was a tangible thing, a propagandist’s monster whom you could understand, whom you could hate. But this war...the enemy was a curious organism only vaguely understood, more often the subject of cartoons than nightmares. The main effect of the war on the home front was economic, unemotional-more taxes but more jobs as well. After twenty-two years, only twenty-seven returned veterans; not enough to make a decent parade. The most important fact about the war to most people was that if it ended suddenly, Earth’s economy would collapse. ~ Joe Haldeman,
1051:The first mile was torture. I passed beneath the massive stone arch at the entrance to the school, pulled off the road and threw up. I felt better and ran down the long palm-lined drive to the Old Quad. Lost somewhere in the thicket to my left was the mausoleum containing the remains of the family by whom the university had been founded. Directly ahead of me loomed a cluster of stone buildings, the Old Quad. I stumbled up the steps and beneath an archway into a dusty courtyard which, with its clumps of spindly bushes and cacti, resembled the garden of a desert monastery. All around me the turrets and dingy stone walls radiated an ominous silence, as if behind each window there stood a soldier with a musket waiting to repel any invader. I looked up at the glittering facade of the chapel across which there was a mosaic depicting a blond Jesus and four angels representing Hope, Faith, Charity, and, for architectural rather than scriptural symmetry, Love. In its gloomy magnificence, the Old Quad never failed to remind me of the presidential palace of a banana republic. Passing out of the quad I cut in front of the engineering school and headed for a back road that led up to the foothills. There was a radar installation at the summit of one of the hills called by the students the Dish. It sat among herds of cattle and the ruins of stables. It, too, was a ruin, shut down for many years, but when the wind whistled through it, the radar produced a strange trilling that could well be music from another planet. The radar was silent as I slowed to a stop at the top of the Dish and caught my breath from the upward climb. I was soaked with sweat, and my headache was gone, replaced by giddy disorientation. It was a clear, hot morning. Looking north and west I saw the white buildings, bridges and spires of the city of San Francisco beneath a crayoned blue sky. The city from this aspect appeared guileless and serene. Yet, when I walked in its streets what I noticed most was how the light seldom fell directly, but from angles, darkening the corners of things. You would look up at the eaves of a house expecting to see a gargoyle rather than the intricate but innocent woodwork. The city had this shadowy presence as if it was a living thing with secrets and memories. Its temperament was too much like my own for me to feel safe or comfortable there. I looked briefly to the south where San Jose sprawled beneath a polluted sky, ugly and raw but without secrets or deceit. Then I stretched and began the slow descent back into town. ~ Michael Nava,
1052:. . . Neither ecological nor social engineering will lead us to a conflict-free, simple path . . . Utilitarians and others who simply advise us to be happy are unhelpful, because we almost always have to make a choice either between different kinds of happiness--different things to be happy about --or between these and other things we want, which nothing to do with happiness.

. . . Do we find ourselves a species naturally free from conflict? We do not. There has not, apparently, been in our evolution a kind of rationalization which might seem a possible solution to problems of conflict--namely, a takeover by some major motive, such as the desire for future pleasure, which would automatically rule out all competing desires. Instead, what has developed is our intelligence. And this in some ways makes matters worse, since it shows us many desirable things that we would not otherwise have thought of, as well as the quite sufficient number we knew about for a start. In compensation, however, it does help us to arbitrate. Rules and principles, standards and ideals emerge as part of a priority system by which we guide ourselves through the jungle. They never make the job easy--desires that we put low on our priority system do not merely vanish--but they make it possible. And it is in working out these concepts more fully, in trying to extend their usefulness, that moral philosophy begins. Were there no conflict, it [moral philosophy] could never have arisen.

The motivation of living creatures does got boil down to any single basic force, not even an 'instinct of self-preservation.' It is a complex pattern of separate elements, balanced roughly in the constitution of the species, but always liable to need adjusting. Creatures really have divergent and conflicting desires. Their distinct motives are not (usually) wishes for survival or for means to survival, but for various particular things to be done and obtained while surviving. And these can always conflict. Motivation is fundamentally plural. . . An obsessive creature dominated constantly by one kind of motive, would not survive.

All moral doctrine, all practical suggestions about how we ought to live, depend on some belief about what human nature is like.

The traditional business of moral philosophy is attempting to understand, clarify, relate, and harmonize so far as possible the claims arising from different sides of our nature.

. . . One motive does not necessarily replace another smoothly and unremarked. There is ambivalence , conflict behavior. ~ Mary Midgley,
1053:. . . Neither ecological nor social engineering will lead us to a conflict-free, simple path . . . Utilitarians and others who simply advise us to be happy are unhelpful, because we almost always have to make a choice either between different kinds of happiness--different things to be happy _about_--or between these and other things we want, which nothing to do with happiness.

. . . Do we find ourselves a species naturally free from conflict? We do not. There has not, apparently, been in our evolution a kind of rationalization which might seem a possible solution to problems of conflict--namely, a takeover by some major motive, such as the desire for future pleasure, which would automatically rule out all competing desires. Instead, what has developed is our intelligence. And this in some ways makes matters worse, since it shows us many desirable things that we would not otherwise have thought of, as well as the quite sufficient number we knew about for a start. In compensation, however, it does help us to arbitrate. Rules and principles, standards and ideals emerge as part of a priority system by which we guide ourselves through the jungle. They never make the job easy--desires that we put low on our priority system do not merely vanish--but they make it possible. And it is in working out these concepts more fully, in trying to extend their usefulness, that moral philosophy begins. Were there no conflict, it [moral philosophy] could never have arisen.

The motivation of living creatures does got boil down to any single basic force, not even an 'instinct of self-preservation.' It is a complex pattern of separate elements, balanced roughly in the constitution of the species, but always liable to need adjusting. Creatures really have divergent and conflicting desires. Their distinct motives are not (usually) wishes for survival or for means to survival, but for various particular things to be done and obtained while surviving. And these can always conflict. Motivation is fundamentally plural. . . An obsessive creature dominated constantly by one kind of motive, would not survive.

All moral doctrine, all practical suggestions about how we ought to live, depend on some belief about what human nature is like.

The traditional business of moral philosophy is attempting to understand, clarify, relate, and harmonize so far as possible the claims arising from different sides of our nature.

. . . One motive does not necessarily replace another smoothly and unremarked. There is _ambivalence_, conflict behavior. ~ Mary Midgley,
1054:If a season like the Great Rebellion ever came to him again, he feared, it could never be in that same personal, random array of picaresque acts he was to recall and celebrate in later years at best furious and nostalgic; but rather with a logic that chilled the comfortable perversity of the heart, that substituted capability for character, deliberate scheme for political epiphany (so incomparably African); and for Sarah, the sjambok, the dances of death between Warmbad and Keetmanshoop, the taut haunches of his Firelily, the black corpse impaled on a thorn tree in a river swollen with sudden rain, for these the dearest canvases in his soul's gallery, it was to substitute the bleak, abstracted and for him rather meaningless hanging on which he now turned his back, but which was to backdrop his retreat until he reached the Other Wall, the engineering design for a world he knew with numb leeriness nothing could now keep from becoming reality, a world whose full despair he, at the vantage of eighteen years later, couldn't even find adequate parables for, but a design whose first fumbling sketches he thought must have been done the year after Jacob Marengo died, on that terrible coast, where the beach between Luderitzbucht and the cemetery was actually littered each morning with a score of identical female corpses, an agglomeration no more substantial-looking than seaweed against the unhealthy yellow sand; where the soul's passage was more a mass migration across that choppy fetch of Atlantic the wind never left alone, from an island of low cloud, like an anchored prison ship, to simple integration with the unimaginable mass of their continent; where the single line of track still edged toward a Keetmanshoop that could in no conceivable iconology be any part of the Kingdom of Death; where, finally, humanity was reduced, out of a necessity which in his loonier moments he could almost believe was only Deutsch-Sudwestafrika's (actually he knew better), out of a confrontation the young of one's contemporaries, God help them, had yet to make, humanity was reduced to a nervous, disquieted, forever inadequate but indissoluble Popular Front against deceptively unpolitical and apparently minor enemies, enemies that would be with him to the grave: a sun with no shape, a beach alien as the moon's antarctic, restless concubines in barbed wire, salt mists, alkaline earth, the Benguela Current that would never cease bringing sand to raise the harbor floor, the inertia of rock, the frailty of flesh, the structural unreliability of thorns; the unheard whimper of a dying woman; the frightening but necessary cry of the strand wolf in the fog. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
1055:I will give technology three definitions that we will use throughout the book.

The first and most basic one is that a technology is a means to fulfill a human purpose. For some technologies-oil refining-the purpose is explicit. For others- the computer-the purpose may be hazy, multiple, and changing. As a means, a technology may be a method or process or device: a particular speech recognition algorithm, or a filtration process in chemical engineering, or a diesel engine. it may be simple: a roller bearing. Or it may be complicated: a wavelength division multiplexer. It may be material: an electrical generator. Or it may be nonmaterial: a digital compression algorithm. Whichever it is, it is always a means to carry out a human purpose.

The second definition I will allow is a plural one: technology as an assemblage of practices and components. This covers technologies such as electronics or biotechnology that are collections or toolboxes of individual technologies and practices. Strictly speaking, we should call these bodies of technology. But this plural usage is widespread, so I will allow it here.

I will also allow a third meaning. This is technology as the entire collection of devices and engineering practices available to a culture. Here we are back to the Oxford's collection of mechanical arts, or as Webster's puts it, "The totality of the means employed by a people to provide itself with the objects of material culture." We use this collective meaning when we blame "technology" for speeding up our lives, or talk of "technology" as a hope for mankind. Sometimes this meaning shades off into technology as a collective activity, as in "technology is what Silicon Valley is all about." I will allow this too as a variant of technology's collective meaning. The technology thinker Kevin Kelly calls this totality the "technium," and I like this word. But in this book I prefer to simply use "technology" for this because that reflects common use.

The reason we need three meanings is that each points to technology in a different sense, a different category, from the others. Each category comes into being differently and evolves differently. A technology-singular-the steam engine-originates as a new concept and develops by modifying its internal parts. A technology-plural-electronics-comes into being by building around certain phenomena and components and develops by changing its parts and practices. And technology-general, the whole collection of all technologies that have ever existed past and present, originates from the use of natural phenomena and builds up organically with new elements forming by combination from old ones. ~ W Brian Arthur,
1056:Jack coughed slightly and offered his hand. “Hi, uh. I’m Jack.”
Kim took it. “Jack what?”
“Huh?”
“Your last name, silly.”
“Jackson.”
She blinked at him. “Your name is Jack Jackson?”
He blushed. “No, uh, my first name’s Rhett, but I hate it, so…”
He gestured to the chair and she sat. Her dress rode up several inches, exposing pleasing long lines of creamy skin. “Well, Jack, what’s your field of study?”
“Biological Engineering, Genetics, and Microbiology. Post-doc. I’m working on a research project at the institute.”
“Really? Oh, uh, my apple martini’s getting a little low.”
“I’ve got that, one second.” He scurried to the bar and bought her a fresh one. She sipped and managed to make it look not only seductive but graceful as well.
“What do you want to do after you’re done with the project?” Kim continued.
“Depends on what I find.”
She sent him a simmering smile. “What are you looking for?”
Immediately, Jack’s eyes lit up and his posture straightened. “I started the project with the intention of learning how to increase the reproduction of certain endangered species. I had interest in the idea of cloning, but it proved too difficult based on the research I compiled, so I went into animal genetics and cellular biology. It turns out the animals with the best potential to combine genes were reptiles because their ability to lay eggs was a smoother transition into combining the cells to create a new species, or one with a similar ancestry that could hopefully lead to rebuilding extinct animals via surrogate birth or in-vitro fertilization. We’re on the edge of breaking that code, and if we do, it would mean that we could engineer all kinds of life and reverse what damage we’ve done to the planet’s ecosystem.”
Kim stared. “Right. Would you excuse me for a second?”
She wiggled off back to her pack of friends by the bar. Judging by the sniggering and the disgusted glances he was getting, she wasn’t coming back.
Jack sighed and finished off his beer, massaging his forehead. “Yes, brilliant move. You blinded her with science. Genius, Jack.”
He ordered a second one and finished it before he felt smallish hands on his shoulders and a pair of soft lips on his cheek. He turned to find Kamala had returned, her smile unnaturally bright in the black lights glowing over the room. “So…how did it go with Kim?”
He shot her a flat look. “You notice the chair is empty.”
Kamala groaned. “You talked about the research project, didn’t you?”
“No!” She glared at him.
“…maybe…”
“You’re so useless, Jack.” She paused and then tousled his hair a bit. “Cheer up. The night’s still young. I’m not giving up on you.”
He smiled in spite of himself. “Yet.”
Her brown eyes flashed. “Never. ~ Kyoko M,
1057:The next time you drive into a Walmart parking lot, pause for a second to note that this Walmart—like the more than five thousand other Walmarts across the country—costs taxpayers about $1 million in direct subsidies to the employees who don’t earn enough money to pay for an apartment, buy food, or get even the most basic health care for their children. In total, Walmart benefits from more than $7 billion in subsidies each year from taxpayers like you. Those “low, low prices” are made possible by low, low wages—and by the taxes you pay to keep those workers alive on their low, low pay. As I said earlier, I don’t think that anyone who works full-time should live in poverty. I also don’t think that bazillion-dollar companies like Walmart ought to funnel profits to shareholders while paying such low wages that taxpayers must pick up the ticket for their employees’ food, shelter, and medical care. I listen to right-wing loudmouths sound off about what an outrage welfare is and I think, “Yeah, it stinks that Walmart has been sucking up so much government assistance for so long.” But somehow I suspect that these guys aren’t talking about Walmart the Welfare Queen. Walmart isn’t alone. Every year, employers like retailers and fast-food outlets pay wages that are so low that the rest of America ponies up a collective $153 billion to subsidize their workers. That’s $153 billion every year. Anyone want to guess what we could do with that mountain of money? We could make every public college tuition-free and pay for preschool for every child—and still have tens of billions left over. We could almost double the amount we spend on services for veterans, such as disability, long-term care, and ending homelessness. We could double all federal research and development—everything: medical, scientific, engineering, climate science, behavioral health, chemistry, brain mapping, drug addiction, even defense research. Or we could more than double federal spending on transportation and water infrastructure—roads, bridges, airports, mass transit, dams and levees, water treatment plants, safe new water pipes. Yeah, the point I’m making is blindingly obvious. America could do a lot with the money taxpayers spend to keep afloat people who are working full-time but whose employers don’t pay a living wage. Of course, giant corporations know they have a sweet deal—and they plan to keep it, thank you very much. They have deployed armies of lobbyists and lawyers to fight off any efforts to give workers a chance to organize or fight for a higher wage. Giant corporations have used their mouthpiece, the national Chamber of Commerce, to oppose any increase in the minimum wage, calling it a “distraction” and a “cynical effort” to increase union membership. Lobbyists grow rich making sure that people like Gina don’t get paid more. The ~ Elizabeth Warren,
1058:The First Surveyor
"The opening of the railway line! -- the Governor and all!
With flags and banners down the street, a banquet and a ball.
Hark to 'em at the station now! They're raising cheer on cheer!
'The man who brought the railway through -- our friend the engineer.'
They cheer his pluck and enterprise and engineering skill!
'Twas my old husband found the pass behind that big red hill.
Before the engineer was born we'd settled with our stock
Behind that great big mountain chain, a line of range and rock -A line that kept us starving there in weary weeks of drought,
With ne'er a track across the range to let the cattle out.
"'Twas then, with horses starved and weak and scarcely fit to crawl,
My husband went to find a way across the rocky wall.
He vanished in the wilderness -- God knows where he was gone -He hunted till his food gave out, but still he battled on.
His horses strayed ('twas well they did), they made towards the grass,
And down behind that big red hill they found an easy pass.
"He followed up and blazed the trees, to show the safest track,
Then drew his belt another hole and turned and started back.
His horses died -- just one pulled through with nothing much to spare;
God bless the beast that brought him home, the old white Arab mare!
We drove the cattle through the hills, along the new-found way,
And this was our first camping-ground -- just where I live today.
"Then others came across the range and built the township here,
And then there came the railway line and this young engineer;
He drove about with tents and traps, a cook to cook his meals,
A bath to wash himself at night, a chain-man at his heels.
And that was all the pluck and skill for which he's cheered and praised,
For after all he took the track, the same my husband blazed!
"My poor old husband, dead and gone with never a feast nor cheer;
He's buried by the railway line! -- I wonder can he hear
When by the very track he marked, and close to where he's laid,
The cattle trains go roaring down the one-in-thirty grade.
I wonder does he hear them pass, and can he see the sight
When, whistling shrill, the fast express goes flaming by at night.
352
"I think 'twould comfort him to know there's someone left to care;
I'll take some things this very night and hold a banquet there -The hard old fare we've often shared together, him and me,
Some damper and a bite of beef, a pannikin of tea:
We'll do without the bands and flags, the speeches and the fuss,
We know who ought to get the cheers -- and that's enough for us.
"What's that? They wish that I'd come down -- the oldest settler here!
Present me to the Governor and that young engineer!
Well, just you tell his Excellence, and put the thing polite,
I'm sorry, but I can't come down -- I'm dining out tonight!"
~ Banjo Paterson,
1059:Because I questioned myself and my sanity and what I was doing wrong in this situation. Because of course I feared that I might be overreacting, overemotional, oversensitive, weak, playing victim, crying wolf, blowing things out of proportion, making things up. Because generations of women have heard that they’re irrational, melodramatic, neurotic, hysterical, hormonal, psycho, fragile, and bossy. Because girls are coached out of the womb to be nonconfrontational, solicitous, deferential, demure, nurturing, to be tuned in to others, and to shrink and shut up. Because speaking up for myself was not how I learned English. Because I’m fluent in Apology, in Question Mark, in Giggle, in Bowing Down, in Self-Sacrifice. Because slightly more than half of the population is regularly told that what happens doesn’t or that it isn’t the big deal we’re making it into. Because your mothers, sisters, and daughters are routinely second-guessed, blown off, discredited, denigrated, besmirched, belittled, patronized, mocked, shamed, gaslit, insulted, bullied, harassed, threatened, punished, propositioned, and groped, and challenged on what they say. Because when a woman challenges a man, then the facts are automatically in dispute, as is the speaker, and the speaker’s license to speak. Because as women we are told to view and value ourselves in terms of how men view and value us, which is to say, for our sexuality and agreeability. Because it was drilled in until it turned subconscious and became unbearable need: don’t make it about you; put yourself second or last; disregard your feelings but not another’s; disbelieve your perceptions whenever the opportunity presents itself; run and rerun everything by yourself before verbalizing it—put it in perspective, interrogate it: Do you sound nuts? Does this make you look bad? Are you holding his interest? Are you being considerate? Fair? Sweet? Because stifling trauma is just good manners. Because when others serially talk down to you, assume authority over you, try to talk you out of your own feelings and tell you who you are; when you’re not taken seriously or listened to in countless daily interactions—then you may learn to accept it, to expect it, to agree with the critics and the haters and the beloveds, and to sign off on it with total silence. Because they’re coming from a good place. Because everywhere from late-night TV talk shows to thought-leading periodicals to Hollywood to Silicon Valley to Wall Street to Congress and the current administration, women are drastically underrepresented or absent, missing from the popular imagination and public heart. Because although I questioned myself, I didn’t question who controls the narrative, the show, the engineering, or the fantasy, nor to whom it’s catered. Because to mention certain things, like “patriarchy,” is to be dubbed a “feminazi,” which discourages its mention, and whatever goes unmentioned gets a pass, a pass that condones what it isn’t nice to mention, lest we come off as reactionary or shrill. ~ Roxane Gay,
1060:In the absence of expert [senior military] advice, we have seen each successive administration fail in the business of strategy - yielding a United States twice as rich as the Soviet Union but much less strong. Only the manner of the failure has changed. In the 1960s, under Robert S. McNamara, we witnessed the wholesale substitution of civilian mathematical analysis for military expertise. The new breed of the "systems analysts" introduced new standards of intellectual discipline and greatly improved bookkeeping methods, but also a trained incapacity to understand the most important aspects of military power, which happens to be nonmeasurable. Because morale is nonmeasurable it was ignored, in large and small ways, with disastrous effects. We have seen how the pursuit of business-type efficiency in the placement of each soldier destroys the cohesion that makes fighting units effective; we may recall how the Pueblo was left virtually disarmed when it encountered the North Koreans (strong armament was judged as not "cost effective" for ships of that kind). Because tactics, the operational art of war, and strategy itself are not reducible to precise numbers, money was allocated to forces and single weapons according to "firepower" scores, computer simulations, and mathematical studies - all of which maximize efficiency - but often at the expense of combat effectiveness.

An even greater defect of the McNamara approach to military decisions was its businesslike "linear" logic, which is right for commerce or engineering but almost always fails in the realm of strategy. Because its essence is the clash of antagonistic and outmaneuvering wills, strategy usually proceeds by paradox rather than conventional "linear" logic. That much is clear even from the most shopworn of Latin tags: si vis pacem, para bellum (if you want peace, prepare for war), whose business equivalent would be orders of "if you want sales, add to your purchasing staff," or some other, equally absurd advice. Where paradox rules, straightforward linear logic is self-defeating, sometimes quite literally. Let a general choose the best path for his advance, the shortest and best-roaded, and it then becomes the worst path of all paths, because the enemy will await him there in greatest strength...

Linear logic is all very well in commerce and engineering, where there is lively opposition, to be sure, but no open-ended scope for maneuver; a competitor beaten in the marketplace will not bomb our factory instead, and the river duly bridged will not deliberately carve out a new course. But such reactions are merely normal in strategy. Military men are not trained in paradoxical thinking, but they do no have to be. Unlike the business-school expert, who searches for optimal solutions in the abstract and then presents them will all the authority of charts and computer printouts, even the most ordinary military mind can recall the existence of a maneuvering antagonists now and then, and will therefore seek robust solutions rather than "best" solutions - those, in other words, which are not optimal but can remain adequate even when the enemy reacts to outmaneuver the first approach. ~ Edward N Luttwak,
1061:These groups were a new kind of vehicle: a hive or colony of close genetic relatives, which functioned as a unit (e.g., in foraging and fighting) and reproduced as a unit. These are the motorboating sisters in my example, taking advantage of technological innovations and mechanical engineering that had never before existed. It was another transition. Another kind of group began to function as though it were a single organism, and the genes that got to ride around in colonies crushed the genes that couldn’t “get it together” and rode around in the bodies of more selfish and solitary insects. The colonial insects represent just 2 percent of all insect species, but in a short period of time they claimed the best feeding and breeding sites for themselves, pushed their competitors to marginal grounds, and changed most of the Earth’s terrestrial ecosystems (for example, by enabling the evolution of flowering plants, which need pollinators).43 Now they’re the majority, by weight, of all insects on Earth. What about human beings? Since ancient times, people have likened human societies to beehives. But is this just a loose analogy? If you map the queen of the hive onto the queen or king of a city-state, then yes, it’s loose. A hive or colony has no ruler, no boss. The queen is just the ovary. But if we simply ask whether humans went through the same evolutionary process as bees—a major transition from selfish individualism to groupish hives that prosper when they find a way to suppress free riding—then the analogy gets much tighter. Many animals are social: they live in groups, flocks, or herds. But only a few animals have crossed the threshold and become ultrasocial, which means that they live in very large groups that have some internal structure, enabling them to reap the benefits of the division of labor.44 Beehives and ant nests, with their separate castes of soldiers, scouts, and nursery attendants, are examples of ultrasociality, and so are human societies. One of the key features that has helped all the nonhuman ultra-socials to cross over appears to be the need to defend a shared nest. The biologists Bert Hölldobler and E. O. Wilson summarize the recent finding that ultrasociality (also called “eusociality”)45 is found among a few species of shrimp, aphids, thrips, and beetles, as well as among wasps, bees, ants, and termites: In all the known [species that] display the earliest stages of eusociality, their behavior protects a persistent, defensible resource from predators, parasites, or competitors. The resource is invariably a nest plus dependable food within foraging range of the nest inhabitants.46 Hölldobler and Wilson give supporting roles to two other factors: the need to feed offspring over an extended period (which gives an advantage to species that can recruit siblings or males to help out Mom) and intergroup conflict. All three of these factors applied to those first early wasps camped out together in defensible naturally occurring nests (such as holes in trees). From that point on, the most cooperative groups got to keep the best nesting sites, which they then modified in increasingly elaborate ways to make themselves even more productive and more protected. Their descendants include the honeybees we know today, whose hives have been described as “a factory inside a fortress.”47 ~ Jonathan Haidt,
1062:The Memory Business Steven Sasson is a tall man with a lantern jaw. In 1973, he was a freshly minted graduate of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His degree in electrical engineering led to a job with Kodak’s Apparatus Division research lab, where, a few months into his employment, Sasson’s supervisor, Gareth Lloyd, approached him with a “small” request. Fairchild Semiconductor had just invented the first “charge-coupled device” (or CCD)—an easy way to move an electronic charge around a transistor—and Kodak needed to know if these devices could be used for imaging.4 Could they ever. By 1975, working with a small team of talented technicians, Sasson used CCDs to create the world’s first digital still camera and digital recording device. Looking, as Fast Company once explained, “like a ’70s Polaroid crossed with a Speak-and-Spell,”5 the camera was the size of a toaster, weighed in at 8.5 pounds, had a resolution of 0.01 megapixel, and took up to thirty black-and-white digital images—a number chosen because it fell between twenty-four and thirty-six and was thus in alignment with the exposures available in Kodak’s roll film. It also stored shots on the only permanent storage device available back then—a cassette tape. Still, it was an astounding achievement and an incredible learning experience. Portrait of Steven Sasson with first digital camera, 2009 Source: Harvey Wang, From Darkroom to Daylight “When you demonstrate such a system,” Sasson later said, “that is, taking pictures without film and showing them on an electronic screen without printing them on paper, inside a company like Kodak in 1976, you have to get ready for a lot of questions. I thought people would ask me questions about the technology: How’d you do this? How’d you make that work? I didn’t get any of that. They asked me when it was going to be ready for prime time? When is it going to be realistic to use this? Why would anybody want to look at their pictures on an electronic screen?”6 In 1996, twenty years after this meeting took place, Kodak had 140,000 employees and a $28 billion market cap. They were effectively a category monopoly. In the United States, they controlled 90 percent of the film market and 85 percent of the camera market.7 But they had forgotten their business model. Kodak had started out in the chemistry and paper goods business, for sure, but they came to dominance by being in the convenience business. Even that doesn’t go far enough. There is still the question of what exactly Kodak was making more convenient. Was it just photography? Not even close. Photography was simply the medium of expression—but what was being expressed? The “Kodak Moment,” of course—our desire to document our lives, to capture the fleeting, to record the ephemeral. Kodak was in the business of recording memories. And what made recording memories more convenient than a digital camera? But that wasn’t how the Kodak Corporation of the late twentieth century saw it. They thought that the digital camera would undercut their chemical business and photographic paper business, essentially forcing the company into competing against itself. So they buried the technology. Nor did the executives understand how a low-resolution 0.01 megapixel image camera could hop on an exponential growth curve and eventually provide high-resolution images. So they ignored it. Instead of using their weighty position to corner the market, they were instead cornered by the market. ~ Peter H Diamandis,
1063:It was discussed and decided that fear would be perpetuated globally in order that focus would stay on the negative rather than allow for soul expression to positively emerge. As people became more fearful and compliant, capacity for free thought and soul expression would diminish. There is a distinct inability to exert soul expression under mind control, and evolution of the human spirit would diminish along with freedom of thought when bombarded with constant negative terrors. Whether Bush and Cheney deliberately planned to raise a collective fear over collective conscious love is doubtful. They did not think, speak, or act in those terms. Instead, they knew that information control gave them power over people, and they were hell-bent to perpetuate it at all costs. Cheney, Bush, and other global elite ushering in the New World Order totally believed in the plan mapped out by artificial intelligence. They were allowing technology to dictate global control. “Life is like a video game,” Bush once told me at the rural multi-million dollar Lampe, Missouri CIA mind control training camp complex designed for Black Ops Special Forces where torture and virtual reality technologies were used. “Since I have access to the technological source of the plans, I dictate the rules of the game.” The rules of the game demanded instantaneous response with no time to consciously think and critically analyze. Constant conscious disruption of thought through television’s burst of light flashes, harmonics, and subconscious subliminals diminished continuity of conscious thought anyway, creating a deficit of attention that could easily be refocused into video game format. DARPA’s artificial intelligence was reliant on secrecy, and a terrifying cover for reality was chosen to divert people from the simple truth. Since people perceive aliens as being physical like them, it was decided that the technological reality could be disguised according to preconceptions. Through generations of genetic encoding dating back to the beginning of man, serpents incite an innate autogenic response system in humans to “freeze” in terror. George Bush was excited at the prospects of diverting people from truth by fear through perpetuating lizard-like serpent alien misconceptions. “People fear what they don’t know anyway. By compounding that fear with autogenic fear response, they won’t want to look into Pandora’s Box.” Through deliberate generation of fear; suppression of facts under the 1947 National Security Act; Bush’s stint as CIA director during Ford’s Administration; the Warren Commission’s whitewash of the Kennedy Assassination; secrecy artificially ensured by mind control particularly concerning DARPA, HAARP, Roswell, Montauk, etc; and with people’s fluidity of conscious thought rapidly diminishing; the secret government embraced the proverbial ‘absolute power that corrupts absolutely.’ According to New World Order plans being discussed at the Grove, plans for reducing the earth’s population was a high priority. Mass genocide of so-called “undesirables” through the proliferation of AIDS4 was high on Bush’s agenda. “We’ll annihilate the niggers at their source, beginning in South and East Africa and Haiti5.” Having heard Bush say those words is by far one of the most torturous things I ever endured. Equally as torturous to my being were the discussions on genetic engineering, human cloning, and depletion of earth’s natural resources for profit. Cheney remarked that no one would be able to think to stop technology’s plan. “I’ll destroy the planet first,” Bush had vowed. ~ Cathy O Brien,
1064:ahead of ICAO audit By Tarun Shukla | 527 words New Delhi: India's civil aviation regulator has decided to restructure its safety board and hire airline safety professionals ahead of an audit by the UN's aviation watchdog ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization). The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) announced its intent, and advertised the positions on its website. ICAO told the Indian regulator recently that it would come down to India to conduct an audit, its third in just over a decade, Mint reported on 12 February. Previous ICAO audits had highlighted the paucity of safety inspectors in DGCA. After its 2006 and 2012 audits, ICAO had placed the country in its list of 13 worst-performing nations. US regulator Federal Aviation Authority followed ICAO's 2012 audit with its own and downgraded India, effectively barring new flights to the US by Indian airlines. FAA is expected to visit India in the summer to review its downgrade. The result of the ICAO and FAA audits will have a bearing on the ability of existing Indian airlines to operate more flights to the US and some international destinations and on new airlines' ability to start flights to these destinations. The regulator plans to hire three directors of safety on short-term contracts to be part of the accident investigation board, according to the information on DGCA's website. This is first time the DGCA is hiring external staff for this board, which is critical to ascertain the reasoning for any crashes, misses or other safety related events in the country. These officers, the DGCA said on its website, must have at least 12 years of experience in aviation, specifically on the technical aspects, and have a degree in aeronautical engineering. DGCA has been asked by international regulators to hire at least 75 flight inspectors. It has only 51. India's private airlines offer better pay and perks to inspectors compared with DGCA. The aviation ministry told DGCA in January to speed up the recruitment and do whatever was necessary to get more inspectors on board, a government official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. DGCA has also announced it will hire flight operations inspectors as consultants on a short-term basis for a period of one year with a fixed remuneration of `1.25 lakh per month. "There will be a review after six months and subsequent continuation will be decided on the basis of outcome of the review," DGCA said in its advertisement. The remuneration of `1.25 lakh is higher than the salary of many existing DGCA officers. In its 2006 audit, ICAO said it found that "a number of final reports of accident and serious incident investigations carried out by the DGCA were not sent to the (member) states concerned or to ICAO when it was applicable". DGCA had also "not established a voluntary incident reporting system to facilitate the collection of safety information that may not otherwise be captured by the state's mandatory incident reporting system". In response, DGCA "submitted a corrective action plan which was never implemented", said Mohan Ranganthan, an aviation safety analyst and former member of government appointed safety council, said of DGCA. He added that the regulator will be caught out this time. Restructuring DGCA is the key to better air safety, said former director general of civil aviation M.R. Sivaraman. Hotel industry growth is expected to strengthen to 9-11% in 2015-16: Icra By P.R. Sanjai | 304 words Mumbai: Rating agency Icra Ltd on Monday said Indian hotel industry revenue growth is expected to strengthen to 9-11% in 2015-16, driven by a modest increase in occupancy and small increase in rates. "Industry wide revenues are expected to grow by 5-8% in 2014-15. Over the next 12 months, Icra expects RevPAR (revenue per available room) to improve by 7-8% driven by up to 5% pickup in occupancies and 2-3% growth in average room rates (ARR)," Icra said. Further, margins are expected to remain largely flat for 2014-15 while ~ Anonymous,
1065:64 Arts
   1. Geet vidya: art of singing.
   2. Vadya vidya: art of playing on musical instruments.
   3. Nritya vidya: art of dancing.
   4. Natya vidya: art of theatricals.
   5. Alekhya vidya: art of painting.
   6. Viseshakacchedya vidya: art of painting the face and body with color
   7. Tandula­kusuma­bali­vikara: art of preparing offerings from rice and flowers.
   8. Pushpastarana: art of making a covering of flowers for a bed.
   9. Dasana­vasananga­raga: art of applying preparations for cleansing the teeth, cloths and painting the body.
   10. Mani­bhumika­karma: art of making the groundwork of jewels.
   11. Aayya­racana: art of covering the bed.
   12. Udaka­vadya: art of playing on music in water.
   13. Udaka­ghata: art of splashing with water.
   14. Citra­yoga: art of practically applying an admixture of colors.
   15. Malya­grathana­vikalpa: art of designing a preparation of wreaths.
   16. Sekharapida­yojana: art of practically setting the coronet on the head.
   17. Nepathya­yoga: art of practically dressing in the tiring room.
   18. Karnapatra­bhanga: art of decorating the tragus of the ear.
   19. Sugandha­yukti: art of practical application of aromatics.
   20. Bhushana­yojana: art of applying or setting ornaments.
   21. Aindra­jala: art of juggling.
   22. Kaucumara: a kind of art.
   23. Hasta­laghava: art of sleight of hand.
   24. Citra­sakapupa­bhakshya­vikara­kriya: art of preparing varieties of delicious food.
   25. Panaka­rasa­ragasava­yojana: art of practically preparing palatable drinks and tinging draughts with red color.
   26. Suci­vaya­karma: art of needleworks and weaving.
   27. Sutra­krida: art of playing with thread.
   28. Vina­damuraka­vadya: art of playing on lute and small drum.
   29. Prahelika: art of making and solving riddles.
   30. Durvacaka­yoga: art of practicing language difficult to be answered by others.
   31. Pustaka­vacana: art of reciting books.
   32. Natikakhyayika­darsana: art of enacting short plays and anecdotes.
   33. Kavya­samasya­purana: art of solving enigmatic verses.
   34. Pattika­vetra­bana­vikalpa: art of designing preparation of shield, cane and arrows.
   35. Tarku­karma: art of spinning by spindle.
   36. Takshana: art of carpentry.
   37. Vastu­vidya: art of engineering.
   38. Raupya­ratna­pariksha: art of testing silver and jewels.
   39. Dhatu­vada: art of metallurgy.
   40. Mani­raga jnana: art of tinging jewels.
   41. Akara jnana: art of mineralogy.
   42. Vrikshayur­veda­yoga: art of practicing medicine or medical treatment, by herbs.
   43. Mesha­kukkuta­lavaka­yuddha­vidhi: art of knowing the mode of fighting of lambs, cocks and birds.
   44. Suka­sarika­pralapana: art of maintaining or knowing conversation between male and female cockatoos.
   45. Utsadana: art of healing or cleaning a person with perfumes.
   46. Kesa­marjana­kausala: art of combing hair.
   47. Akshara­mushtika­kathana: art of talking with fingers.
   48. Dharana­matrika: art of the use of amulets.
   49. Desa­bhasha­jnana: art of knowing provincial dialects.
   50. Nirmiti­jnana: art of knowing prediction by heavenly voice.
   51. Yantra­matrika: art of mechanics.
   52. Mlecchita­kutarka­vikalpa: art of fabricating barbarous or foreign sophistry.
   53. Samvacya: art of conversation.
   54. Manasi kavya­kriya: art of composing verse
   55. Kriya­vikalpa: art of designing a literary work or a medical remedy.
   56. Chalitaka­yoga: art of practicing as a builder of shrines called after him.
   57. Abhidhana­kosha­cchando­jnana: art of the use of lexicography and meters.
   58. Vastra­gopana: art of concealment of cloths.
   59. Dyuta­visesha: art of knowing specific gambling.
   60. Akarsha­krida: art of playing with dice or magnet.
   61. Balaka­kridanaka: art of using children's toys.
   62. Vainayiki vidya: art of enforcing discipline.
   63. Vaijayiki vidya: art of gaining victory.
   64. Vaitaliki vidya: art of awakening master with music at dawn.
   ~ Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger, Sexual Secrets,

IN CHAPTERS [22/22]



   4 Integral Yoga
   4 Cybernetics
   3 Poetry
   3 Fiction
   1 Theosophy
   1 Alchemy


   4 Norbert Wiener
   3 Walt Whitman
   3 H P Lovecraft
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta


   4 Cybernetics
   3 Whitman - Poems
   3 Lovecraft - Poems


000 - Humans in Universe, #Synergetics - Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking, #R Buckminster Fuller, #Science
  mechanical and leverage calculation capabilities of Leonardo; and in the art of shipdesign the cipher gave birth to structural and mechanical Engineering, which made
  possible the intertensioning and compressioning calculations of the ribbed structural
  --
  of safely anticipated structural Engineering and navigation.
  000.105 This new anticipatory science made large Engineering projects possible,
  but it became known to, and then was employed by, only the world's richest

07.20 - Why are Dreams Forgotten?, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   To become conscious of all the various movements of your nights, to recover them in your memory, some sort of training is necessary. The different states of the being in which you roam at night are, as you have seen, usually separate from each other. There is a gap in between two states; you jump from one to the other. There is no highway passing through all the domains of your consciousness connecting them without break or interruption. That means forgetfulness. When you leap from one into the other, you push back, that is forget, the one you leave behind. So you have to construct a bridge and very few people know how to do it; it requires more Engineering skill than to build a material bridge. You may have very wonderful experiences in sleep, but you forget them all; perhaps you remember, as I have said, the last one, the one nearest to the physical mind. The best way then to remember and become conscious of the whole night is to begin at the end and go backward. Catch hold of the last image that still persists in your memory, like the loose end of a thread and then pull, pull slowly, till image after image comes back: it is something like the unrolling of a cinema film in the reverse direction. When you lose trace, stop and concentrate a little; try to call back whatever stray bit or faint impression still persists or can be more easily revived and then again pull slowly, gently, pick up whatever shows itself, try to join the bits. In this way, after some trial and training you will be able to recover a good part of the lost underworld.
   There are, however, many ways of setting about the thing. For you must know that your nights are not all the same. Each one is different and brings its own kind of sleep and dream. As each day is different having its own particular kind of activity, each night too likewise comes with its peculiar experiences. You may think that one day is more or less exactly like the previous day, that you are doing the same thing from day to day; but it is not so. Outwardly the activities may appear to be the same, but really their nature and significance vary from one day to another. No two moments are alike in the universe. Your night too is an universe of its own kind. Each night brings its own problem and needs its own solution.

1.01 - Newtonian and Bergsonian Time, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  as possible. The chief technical result of this Engineering after
  the model of Huyghens and Newton was the age of navigation,
  --
  understood business. It is the Engineering of the mercantilists.
  To the merchant succeeded the manufacturer, and to the chro-
  --
  to the present time, the central field of Engineering has been
  the study of prime movers. Heat has been converted into usable
  --
  communication Engineering. It is this split which separates the
  age just past from that in which we are now living. Actually,
  communication Engineering can deal with currents of any size
  whatever and with the movement of engines powerful enough
  --
  Thus communication Engineering began with Gauss, Wheat-
  stone, and the first telegraphers. It received its first reasonably
  --
  of potential. The Engineering of the body is a branch of power-­
   Engineering. Even today, this is the predominating point of view
  --
  branch of communication Engineering, and its cardinal notions
  are those of message, amount of disturbance or "noise"-­a term

1.03 - Time Series, Information, and Communication, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  second law of thermodynamics in communication Engineering.
  Conversely, the greater specification of an ambiguous situation,
  --
  nication Engineering. It enables us to evaluate different systems,
  such as amplitude modulation or frequency modulation or
  --
  haps the most pressing facing communication Engineering.
  Let us now come to the prediction problem for time series
  --
  the specialist in electrical Engineering than for the reader of this
  book. They may be found elsewhere. 5

1.05 - Computing Machines and the Nervous System, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  inevitable that its present Engineering development should cast
  a new light on logic. The science of today is operational; that is,

1.07 - Cybernetics and Psychopathology, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  and so on. The same sort of thing is observed in Engineering
  constructions. Skyscrapers are limited in size by the fact that

1.439, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  D.: America is now the foremost country in industrial matters, mechanical Engineering, scientific advance and other worldly affairs. Will she come up to the same level in spiritual life also?
  M.: Certainly, she is bound to.
  D.: Thank God that it will be so! I am a partner in an Engineering firm. But it is not of vital concern to me. I try to bring spiritual ideals into the work-a-day life of the firm.
  M.: That is good. If you surrender yourself to the Higher Power all is well. That Power sees your affairs through. Only so long as you think that you are the worker you are obliged to reap the fruits of your actions. If on the other hand, you surrender yourself and recognise your individual self as only a tool of the Higher Power, that Power will take over your affairs along with the fruits of actions. You are no longer affected by them and the work goes on unhampered. Whether you recognise the Power or not the scheme of things does not alter.

1f.lovecraft - At the Mountains of Madness, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   devised by Prof. Frank H. Pabodie of our Engineering department. I had
   no wish to be a pioneer in any other field than this; but I did hope
  --
   Pabodie were present, for his Engineering knowledge might have helped
   us guess how such titanic blocks could have been handled in that
  --
   We cannot yet explain the Engineering principles used in the anomalous
   balancing and adjustment of the vast rock masses, though the function
  --
   to tell what sort of Engineering held it in place, but Danforth and I
   could merely admire and marvel. We could see mighty stone corbels and

1f.lovecraft - The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   chimneys would have formed an interesting study in Engineering. Never
   before or since had he seen such instruments or suggestions of

1f.lovecraft - The Nameless City, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Engineering skill must have been vast.
   Then a brighter flare of the fantastic flame shewed me that for which I

1.whitman - As I Sat Alone By Blue Ontarios Shores, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   In the need of poems, philosophy, politics, manners, Engineering, an
      appropriate native grand-opera, shipcraft, any craft, he or she

1.whitman - Song Of The Broad-Axe, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  Or hotels of granite and iron? or any chef-d'oeuvres of Engineering,
      forts, armaments?

1.whitman - Song Of The Exposition, #Whitman - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   With thy undaunted armies, Engineering!
   Thy pennants, Labor, loosen'd to the breeze!

2.09 - SEVEN REASONS WHY A SCIENTIST BELIEVES IN GOD, #God Exists, #Swami Sivananda Saraswati, #Hinduism
  First ::: By unwavering mathematical law we can prove that our universe was designed and executed by a great Engineering intelligence.
  Suppose you put ten pennies, marked from one to ten, into your pocket and give them a good shuffle. Now try to take them out in sequence from one to ten, putting back the coin each time and shaking them all again. Mathematically we know that your chance of first drawing number one is one in ten; of drawing one and two in succession, one in 100; of drawing one, two and three in succession, one in 1000, and so on; your chance of drawing them all, from number one to number ten in succession, would reach the unbelievable figure of one in ten billion.

2.19 - Feb-May 1939, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   Sri Aurobindo: There is no outer rule; you have to get the psychic tact which throws out the error. For example, the Mother used to feel about the soundness of houses and our engineer used to find out afterwards that her feeling was true, though she does not know architecture or Engineering. Another necessity is that one must be sincere about finding the truth by intuition. That is to say, one must not jump at the first idea and run away with it. The mind must be absolutely impartial and also one must be patient and one must wait. One must also test his intuitions.
   16 MAY 1939

3.04 - The Spirit in Spirit-Land after Death, #Theosophy, #Alice Bailey, #Occultism
   in the world all the creations of the arts, sciences, Engineering, states, governments, etc.; in short all that he has embodied in the world as original works of his spirit. Without his cooperation none of the physical reproductions of all these would be in the world. The Archetypes of these purely human creations are in the fourth region of the "Spirit-land." What man during the earthly life develops in the way of scientific discoveries, of artistic ideas and forms, of technical conceptions, bears fruit in this fourth region. It is out of this region, therefore, that artists, scientists, great inventors, draw nourishment during their stay in "Spirit-land" and increase their genius, in order, during another incarnation, to be able to assist with greater weight the further evolution of human progress. It has been said above that even this region cannot be called the "pure Spirit-land" in the full sense of the word. This is because the stage at which men have left civilization on earth continues to influence their spiritual existence. They can enjoy in "Spirit-land" only the fruits of that which it was possible for them to carry out in accordance with their gifts and the stage of
   p. 155

33.02 - Subhash, Oaten: atlas, Russell, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The life-story of this Ullaskar is a real drama, although its last stage is rather tragic. Soon after this incident he joined the Manicktolla Gardens with Barin Ghose and gave all his thought and energy to the making of a bomb. He did not know even the ABC's of bombs. He read up by himself books on Chemistry, pieced out information from all kinds of books and finally mastered all alone the principles of explosives - nobody ever taught him. His father, Dwijadas Datta, was a professor at the Sibpur Engineering College. He had something like a small iaboratory at his residence. It was here that Ullaskar took his training in secret. To what extent he had finally succeeded in his efforts was proved one day when to the first of his bombs one of our own men had to fall a martyr - Prafulla Chakravarti.
   I too had been an associate of his in this enterprise.

3-5 Full Circle, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Likewise, such cybernetic concepts as input, output, sensor, controller, effector and feedback are assumed to have just as much to do with the operation of an economic market as they do with the functioning of the human nervous system or an Engineering quality control process.
  Guiding, Motivating, and Measuring Intellectual
  --
  Although the present model relies heavily on intuitive judgements, it provides an operational basis for identifying the strategic variables and a means of organizing relevant information once it, or an estimate of it, is available. Research is being designed to focus a figurative magnifying glass and mental radar screen on each subjective value involved so as to measure it more carefully and/or to seek combinations of objective sub-variables which will yield more practical results. Value Engineering principles are being combined with cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses in an effort to determine more clearly what types of educational inputs are producing the desired educational outputs. As experimental progress continues to be made along these lines, the expectation is that more reliance can be placed on objective, measurable, demonstrable factors.6
  Translating Etbnic Bi-Lingualism Into Scientific Pan-
  --
  Another part of the challenge inheres in the global political setting in which both scientific research and education take place. Our national aspiration to send men to Mars and return them safely could be considered within this context. Because of the great economic and Engineering capabilities required, we, as a nation, might do well to consider teaming up with the Soviet Union for this venture. We know that the Russians are quite advanced in the development and application of broad-gaged cybernetic and other broad systems models to political, scientific, and economic ventures.
  In view of these considerations, along with the extremely important capabilities of unified science models, might there be something this group gathered here might be able to do to dramatize the potentials for global progress, which might result from concerted cooperative action to launch some form of this mental space vehicle? Could we, for example, initiate action leading toward a dramatic proposal that the governments of the USA and the USSR jointly appoint a global task force for exploring the possibilities of joint exploration of both physical and intellectual space?
  --
  The class's extensive term papers, written along these clearly converging lines, turned out so splendidly that I suggested the possibility of publishing them as a book. The students enthusiastically elected an editorial board, and when the book is ready, and its title decided upon, we will submit it to a publisher. Have not the Two Cultures come together, as C. P. Snow predicted, in the United States? Early in 1972, the founder of the Unification Church arrived in the United States. Sun Myung Moon is a South Korean philosopher, raised as a Christian and trained in electrical Engineering in Japan. His Church's half million profoundly dedicated members are citizens of some twenty-six countries in Asia, America, and Europe.
  At our first meeting, in which Mr. Moon was flanked by three Korean interpreters, and I by the directors of two of his American centers, he announced that he wished me to organize an international conference so that the world could become acquainted with Unified Science.

Conversations with Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Pavitra (Philippe Barbier Saint-Hilaire) (from the Sanskrit word for 'pure') was one of the very early disciples of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother. He was born in Paris, January 16, 1894. In 1914 he graduated from the cole Polytechnique with a degree in Engineering. He served in the army in World War I as an artillery officer, and after the war worked as a junior engineer in Paris, at the Ministry of transport and communication.
  He was interested in occultism, and in 1920 departed for Japan to study Zen Buddhism. In 1924 he left Japan and spend time with tantric lamas in monasteries in North China and Mongolia.

Talks 500-550, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  D.: America is now the foremost country in industrial matters, mechanical Engineering, scientific advance and other worldly affairs. Will she come up to the same level in spiritual life also?
  M.: Certainly, she is bound to.
  D.: Thank God that it will be so! I am a partner in an Engineering firm. But it is not of vital concern to me. I try to bring spiritual ideals into the work-a-day life of the firm.
  M.: That is good. If you surrender yourself to the Higher Power all is well. That Power sees your affairs through. Only so long as you think that you are the worker you are obliged to reap the fruits of your actions. If on the other hand, you surrender yourself and recognise your individual self as only a tool of the Higher Power, that Power will take over your affairs along with the fruits of actions. You are no longer affected by them and the work goes on unhampered. Whether you recognise the Power or not the scheme of things does not alter.

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  Similar graded series lead from construction Engineering through
  architecture and interior design to the hybrid 'arts and crafts' and
  --
  with a typical Engineering procedure. Exairiining a modern gramo-
  phone record with a niagnifying glass, you see a spiral curve with

The Dwellings of the Philosophers, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  (12) Translators note: Famous French Engineering school known as the X
  (13) Translators note: Each promotion is referred to as taupe (mole in English), and the students of a promotion

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun engineering

The noun engineering has 3 senses (first 2 from tagged texts)
                  
1. (6) technology, engineering ::: (the practical application of science to commerce or industry)
2. (2) engineering, engineering science, applied science, technology ::: (the discipline dealing with the art or science of applying scientific knowledge to practical problems; "he had trouble deciding which branch of engineering to study")
3. engineering, engine room ::: (a room (as on a ship) in which the engine is located)

--- Overview of verb engineer

The verb engineer has 2 senses (no senses from tagged texts)
                  
1. engineer ::: (design as an engineer; "He engineered the water supply project")
2. mastermind, engineer, direct, organize, organise, orchestrate ::: (plan and direct (a complex undertaking); "he masterminded the robbery")


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun engineering

3 senses of engineering                        

Sense 1
technology, engineering
   => application, practical application
     => use, usage, utilization, utilisation, employment, exercise
       => activity
         => act, deed, human action, human activity
           => event
             => psychological feature
               => abstraction, abstract entity
                 => entity
   => profession
     => occupation, business, job, line of work, line
       => activity
         => act, deed, human action, human activity
           => event
             => psychological feature
               => abstraction, abstract entity
                 => entity

Sense 2
engineering, engineering science, applied science, technology
   => discipline, subject, subject area, subject field, field, field of study, study, bailiwick
     => knowledge domain, knowledge base, domain
       => content, cognitive content, mental object
         => cognition, knowledge, noesis
           => psychological feature
             => abstraction, abstract entity
               => entity

Sense 3
engineering, engine room
   => room
     => area
       => structure, construction
         => artifact, artefact
           => whole, unit
             => object, physical object
               => physical entity
                 => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun engineering

2 of 3 senses of engineering                      

Sense 1
technology, engineering
   => aeronautical engineering
   => automotive technology, automotive engineering
   => chemical engineering
   => communications technology
   => computer technology
   => high technology, high tech
   => rail technology, railroading

Sense 2
engineering, engineering science, applied science, technology
   => aeronautical engineering
   => bionics
   => biotechnology, bioengineering, ergonomics
   => chemical engineering
   => civil engineering
   => electrical engineering, EE
   => computer science, computing
   => architectural engineering
   => industrial engineering, industrial management
   => information technology, IT
   => mechanical engineering
   => nanotechnology
   => nuclear engineering
   => naval engineering
   => rocketry


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun engineering

3 senses of engineering                        

Sense 1
technology, engineering
   => application, practical application
   => profession

Sense 2
engineering, engineering science, applied science, technology
   => discipline, subject, subject area, subject field, field, field of study, study, bailiwick

Sense 3
engineering, engine room
   => room




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun engineering

3 senses of engineering                        

Sense 1
technology, engineering
  -> application, practical application
   => misapplication
   => technology, engineering
  -> profession
   => learned profession
   => literature
   => architecture
   => education
   => journalism
   => politics
   => technology, engineering

Sense 2
engineering, engineering science, applied science, technology
  -> discipline, subject, subject area, subject field, field, field of study, study, bailiwick
   => occultism
   => communications, communication theory
   => major
   => frontier
   => genealogy
   => allometry
   => bibliotics
   => ology
   => science, scientific discipline
   => architecture
   => engineering, engineering science, applied science, technology
   => futurology, futuristics
   => humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts, arts
   => theology, divinity
   => military science
   => escapology
   => graphology
   => numerology
   => protology
   => theogony

Sense 3
engineering, engine room
  -> room
   => anechoic chamber
   => anteroom, antechamber, entrance hall, hall, foyer, lobby, vestibule
   => back room
   => ballroom, dance hall, dance palace
   => barroom, bar, saloon, ginmill, taproom
   => bathroom, bath
   => bedroom, sleeping room, sleeping accommodation, chamber, bedchamber
   => belfry
   => billiard room, billiard saloon, billiard parlor, billiard parlour, billiard hall
   => boardroom, council chamber
   => cardroom
   => cell, jail cell, prison cell
   => cell, cubicle
   => chamber
   => checkroom, left-luggage office
   => classroom, schoolroom
   => clean room, white room
   => cloakroom, coatroom
   => closet
   => clubroom
   => compartment
   => conference room
   => control room
   => court, courtroom
   => cubby, cubbyhole, snuggery, snug
   => cutting room
   => darkroom
   => den
   => dinette
   => dining room, dining-room
   => door
   => dressing room
   => durbar
   => engineering, engine room
   => floor, trading floor
   => furnace room
   => gallery
   => gallery, art gallery, picture gallery
   => greenroom
   => guardroom
   => hall
   => hospital room
   => kitchen
   => library
   => living room, living-room, sitting room, front room, parlor, parlour
   => locker room
   => lounge, waiting room, waiting area
   => manor hall, hall
   => poolroom
   => presence chamber
   => rathole
   => reading room
   => reception room
   => recreation room, rec room
   => rotunda
   => scriptorium
   => scullery
   => sewing room
   => shipping room
   => shower room
   => sickbay, sick berth
   => sickroom
   => smoking room
   => squad room
   => squad room
   => steam bath, steam room, vapor bath, vapour bath
   => storeroom, storage room, stowage
   => study
   => sun parlor, sun parlour, sun porch, sunporch, sunroom, sun lounge, solarium
   => surgery
   => television room, tv room
   => test room, testing room
   => toilet, lavatory, lav, can, john, privy, bathroom
   => torture chamber
   => vestry, sacristy
   => walk-in
   => war room
   => workroom




--- Grep of noun engineering
aeronautical engineering
architectural engineering
automotive engineering
bachelor of science in engineering
bioengineering
chemical engineering
civil engineering
electrical engineering
engineering
engineering school
engineering science
genetic engineering
hydraulic engineering
industrial engineering
master of science in engineering
mechanical engineering
naval engineering
nuclear engineering



IN WEBGEN [10000/3636]

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Wikipedia - Behavioral engineering -- identify behavioral issues
Wikipedia - Bengal College of Engineering & Technology for Women -- College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - Bengal College of Engineering & Technology -- College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - B Engineering Edonis -- Italian sports car based on the Bugatti EB 110
Wikipedia - Bhagalpur College of Engineering -- Government engineering college in Bhagalpur, Bihar
Wikipedia - Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University College of Engineering, Pune -- College in Maharashtra, India
Wikipedia - Bharat Wagon and Engineering -- Rolling stock manufacturer
Wikipedia - Bhilai Institute of Technology -- Private engineering college in Durg, India
Wikipedia - Binary Ninja -- Reverse-engineering platform developed by Vector 35 Inc
Wikipedia - Biochemical engineering
Wikipedia - Bioengineering
Wikipedia - Biological engineering
Wikipedia - Biologically inspired engineering
Wikipedia - Biological systems engineering
Wikipedia - Biomechanical engineering
Wikipedia - BioMedical Engineering OnLine -- Academic journal
Wikipedia - Biomedical engineering -- Application of engineering principles and design concepts to medicine and biology for healthcare, healthfood and health purposes
Wikipedia - Biomolecular engineering
Wikipedia - Biosystems engineering
Wikipedia - Biotechnology and genetic engineering in Bangladesh
Wikipedia - Birgit Penzenstadler -- German software engineering professor
Wikipedia - Birsa Institute of Technology Sindri -- Public engineering institution in Jharkhand, India
Wikipedia - B.M.S. Institute of Technology and Management -- Engineering college in Bangalore, India
Wikipedia - BMT Group -- International multidisciplinary engineering, science and technology consultancy
Wikipedia - Bokaro Institute of Technology -- Private Engineering college located in Bokaro Steel City, Jharkhand
Wikipedia - Bolaji Aluko -- Professor of chemical engineering
Wikipedia - Boston Dynamics -- Engineering and robotics design company
Wikipedia - Bottleneck (engineering)
Wikipedia - BP Mandal College of Engineering -- Government engineering college in Madhepura, Bihar
Wikipedia - Branches of engineering
Wikipedia - Branislava PeruniM-DM-^Mic -- Emeritus Professor of Control Engineering
Wikipedia - Breakthrough Starshot -- Research and engineering project by Breakthrough Initiatives
Wikipedia - Bridge Constructor Portal -- 2018 engineering simulation puzzle video game
Wikipedia - Broadcast engineering
Wikipedia - Brown, Boveri & Cie -- Swiss group of electrical engineering companies (1891-1988)
Wikipedia - Bryony James -- New Zealand engineering academic
Wikipedia - Buckland & Taylor -- Canadian engineering firm (1972-2015)
Wikipedia - Buddha Institute of Technology, Gaya -- Private engineering college in Bihar, India
Wikipedia - Buddha Polytechnic Institute -- Engineering college in Gaya, India
Wikipedia - Bug (engineering)
Wikipedia - Building services engineering
Wikipedia - Bundelkhand Institute of Engineering & Technology -- Engineering college in Uttar Pradesh
Wikipedia - Burcin Becerik-Gerber -- Turkish American engineering educator
Wikipedia - Business Engineering
Wikipedia - Business > Information Systems Engineering
Wikipedia - Business process engineering
Wikipedia - Business process reengineering
Wikipedia - Byte Code Engineering Library
Wikipedia - Caisson (engineering) -- Rigid structure to provide workers with a dry working environment below water level
Wikipedia - Caitriona Lally -- Professor of Bioengineering
Wikipedia - Calcutta Institute of Engineering and Management -- College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company -- Former Scottish shipbuilding company
Wikipedia - California Science and Engineering Fair -- Annual science fair held at the California Science Center
Wikipedia - Camellia School of Engineering & Technology -- College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - Campaign for Science and Engineering -- Organization
Wikipedia - Canadian Science and Engineering Hall of Fame
Wikipedia - Cardinal Warde -- Professor of Electrical Engineering
Wikipedia - Carlotta Berry -- American academic in the field of engineering
Wikipedia - Carlson Baker Arts -- American art fabrication and engineering firm
Wikipedia - Carnegie Mellon College of Engineering
Wikipedia - Car platform -- Similar design and engineering specs shared between multiple cars.
Wikipedia - Category:Aerospace engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Biological engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Building engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:College of Engineering, Guindy alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Science alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Science faculty
Wikipedia - Category:Computer engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Control engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Cornell University College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Design engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Duke University Pratt School of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Electromechanical engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Electronic engineering award winners
Wikipedia - Category:Engineering disciplines
Wikipedia - Category:Engineering occupations
Wikipedia - Category:Engineering projects
Wikipedia - Category:Engineering studies
Wikipedia - Category:Engineering textbooks
Wikipedia - Category:Engineering universities and colleges in Massachusetts
Wikipedia - Category:Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Fellows of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Fellows of the Indian National Academy of Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Fellows of the Institution of Engineering and Technology
Wikipedia - Category:Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Fellows of the Women's Engineering Society
Wikipedia - Category:Female Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Foreign associates of the National Academy of Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Foreign members of the Chinese Academy of Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:George Washington University School of Engineering and Applied Science alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Industrial engineering
Wikipedia - Category:John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences faculty
Wikipedia - Category:Knowledge engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Mechanical engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences
Wikipedia - Category:Members of the United States National Academy of Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Members of the University of Cambridge Department of Engineering
Wikipedia - Category:MIT School of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:MIT School of Engineering faculty
Wikipedia - Category:Ohio State University College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Penn State College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Philosophy of engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Recipients of the Padma Bhushan in science > engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Recipients of the Padma Shri in science > engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Recipients of the Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Award in Engineering Science
Wikipedia - Category:Reliability engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Reverse engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Safety engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Science and engineering awards
Wikipedia - Category:Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award recipients
Wikipedia - Category:Software engineering folklore
Wikipedia - Category:Software engineering papers
Wikipedia - Category:Software engineering researchers
Wikipedia - Category:Software engineering
Wikipedia - Category:Stanford University Department of Electrical Engineering faculty
Wikipedia - Category:Stanford University School of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Stanford University School of Engineering faculty
Wikipedia - Category:Swanson School of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Systems engineering
Wikipedia - Category:UC Berkeley College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:UC Berkeley College of Engineering faculty
Wikipedia - Category:UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science alumni
Wikipedia - Category:UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science faculty
Wikipedia - Category:University of Florida College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:University of Michigan College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science alumni
Wikipedia - Category:University of Washington College of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:USC Viterbi School of Engineering alumni
Wikipedia - Category:Women's Engineering Society
Wikipedia - Cathryn Mitchell -- Professor of Electronic & Electronic Engineering
Wikipedia - Celeste Nelson -- Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Wikipedia - Cemal Basaran -- Professor of engineering
Wikipedia - Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology, Raipur -- Indian research institute
Wikipedia - Central Philippine University - College of Engineering -- Engineering school at Central Philippine University
Wikipedia - Ceramic engineering -- The science and technology of creating objects from inorganic, non-metallic materials
Wikipedia - Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering
Wikipedia - Charter International -- British engineering firm
Wikipedia - Chemical > Engineering News
Wikipedia - Chemical engineering -- Branch of engineering
Wikipedia - Chemical reaction engineering
Wikipedia - China Machinery Engineering Corporation -- Construction and engineering company
Wikipedia - China Railway Engineering Corporation -- Chinese state-owned holding company
Wikipedia - China State Construction Engineering -- Largest construction company in the world by revenue
Wikipedia - Chinedum Osuji -- Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at University of Pennsylvania
Wikipedia - Chinese Academy of Engineering
Wikipedia - Chittagong University of Engineering & Technology -- A public university specified for engineering and technology, situated in Chittagong, Bangladesh
Wikipedia - Chuck (engineering) -- Clamp used to hold an object with radial symmetry, especially a cylinder
Wikipedia - Civil Engineering and Development Department
Wikipedia - Civil Engineering Contractors Association
Wikipedia - Civil Engineering
Wikipedia - Civil engineering -- Engineering discipline focused on physical infrastructure
Wikipedia - Civil engineer -- Engineering of infrastructure
Wikipedia - Claxton Engineering Ltd -- Engineering and services company based in Norfolk
Wikipedia - Clean room design -- Reverse-engineering without infringing copyright
Wikipedia - Cleanroom software engineering
Wikipedia - Climate engineering -- Deliberate and large-scale intervention in the EarthM-bM-^@M-^Ys climate system
Wikipedia - Clyde Engineering Co Ltd v Cowburn -- High court of Australia case
Wikipedia - CMU Software Engineering Institute
Wikipedia - Coastal engineering
Wikipedia - Cognitive engineering
Wikipedia - Coimbatore Institute of Technology -- Autonomous engineering college in India
Wikipedia - College of Aeronautical Engineering -- A College for Aeronautical Egineering Education
Wikipedia - College of Engineering, Guindy
Wikipedia - College of Engineering, Perumon -- Engineering college in Perinad, Kerala, India
Wikipedia - College of Engineering, Pune -- Engineering college in Pune, Maharashtra
Wikipedia - College of Engineering, Trivandrum -- Government Engineering College in Trivandrum
Wikipedia - Communications survivability -- telecommunications engineering ability
Wikipedia - Component-based software engineering
Wikipedia - Computational engineering
Wikipedia - Computational science and engineering
Wikipedia - Computer-aided engineering
Wikipedia - Computer-Aided Software Engineering
Wikipedia - Computer-aided software engineering
Wikipedia - Computer Engineering
Wikipedia - Computer engineering
Wikipedia - Computer Science and Engineering
Wikipedia - Computer science and engineering -- University academic program
Wikipedia - Comsys -- Japanese telecommunications construction and engineering company
Wikipedia - Confederation of Shipbuilding and Engineering Unions -- Confed
Wikipedia - Connaught Engineering -- Formula One and sports car constructor from the United Kingdom
Wikipedia - Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering
Wikipedia - Construction engineering
Wikipedia - Continental Iron Works -- American shipbuilding and engineering company
Wikipedia - Control engineering -- Engineering discipline that applies automatic control theory to design systems with desired behaviors
Wikipedia - Control panel (engineering)
Wikipedia - Control theory -- Branch of engineering and mathematics that deals with the behavior of dynamical systems with inputs, and how their behavior is modified by feedback
Wikipedia - Cooch Behar Government Engineering College -- Engineering College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - Cornell University College of Engineering -- Engineering school
Wikipedia - Corner case -- Engineering situation
Wikipedia - Corps des telecommunications -- French engineering organization
Wikipedia - Corrosion engineering
Wikipedia - Cosmos College -- Engineering and management college in Nepal
Wikipedia - Cost Engineering
Wikipedia - Cost engineering
Wikipedia - Council for the Regulation of Engineering in Nigeria -- Nigeria supreme council for engineers
Wikipedia - Crackme -- Small program designed to test a programmer's reverse engineering skills
Wikipedia - Critical mass (software engineering) -- Software engineering term; stage in the life cycle when the source code grows too complicated to effectively manage without a complete rewrite
Wikipedia - Daewoong Pharmaceutical -- Bioengineering company
Wikipedia - Daisy chain (electrical engineering)
Wikipedia - Daniel Inman -- Professor of Aerospace Engineering
Wikipedia - Danielle George -- British Professor of Radio Frequency Engineering
Wikipedia - Darbhanga College of Engineering -- Government engineering college in Darbhanga, Bihar
Wikipedia - Data and Knowledge Engineering
Wikipedia - Data > Knowledge Engineering
Wikipedia - David Agus -- English scientist, American physician, Professor of Medicine and Engineering and author
Wikipedia - David Brown Ltd. -- English engineering company
Wikipedia - David J. Mooney -- Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Wikipedia - David J. Rose -- MIT Nuclear Engineering professor
Wikipedia - David Proudfoot -- Engineering contractor, company director
Wikipedia - Dawn Bonfield -- Engineer, engineering advocate and educator
Wikipedia - Decision engineering
Wikipedia - Defense Technical Information Center -- US Department of Defense repository for research and engineering information
Wikipedia - Deformation (engineering) -- In engineering, any changes in the shape or size of an object
Wikipedia - Degrees of freedom (engineering)
Wikipedia - Dejen Aviation Engineering Industry -- Military aircraft maintenance facility
Wikipedia - Delhi College of Engineering
Wikipedia - Delta Motorsport -- English racing automobile engineering consulting firm
Wikipedia - Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford
Wikipedia - DESA company -- Iranian engineering company
Wikipedia - Design > Engineering Methodology for Organizations
Wikipedia - Distortion-limited operation -- signal-related condition in telecommunications engineering
Wikipedia - Doctor of Engineering -- Academic degree
Wikipedia - Domain (software engineering) -- target subject of a computer program
Wikipedia - Donglei Fan -- Associate professor of Mechanical Engineering
Wikipedia - Draft:ACE Moharram Bakhoum -- Egyptian engineering company
Wikipedia - Draft:Chinedum Okwudire -- American academic in the field of engineering
Wikipedia - Draft:Daniel Mendez -- Spanish German software engineering professor
Wikipedia - Draft:Dewesoft -- Slovenian engineering and electronics company
Wikipedia - Draft:Kingston Engineering College -- Engineering college in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
Wikipedia - Draft:Michael A. Hall -- Managing Director of Engineering at Hall Labs
Wikipedia - Draft:Montasser Construction Company -- Construction and civil engineering company
Wikipedia - Draft:Professor Bhaskar N. Thorat -- [Director and Professor of Chemical Engineering in ICT Mumbai-IOC Odisha Campus, Bhubaneswar]
Wikipedia - Draft:Quest Engineering Solutions, Inc. -- Massachusetts based test engineering company
Wikipedia - Draft:The Weitz Company -- American engineering company
Wikipedia - Draft:VVDN Technologies Pvt. Ltd. -- Electronics Engineering and Manufacturing Company
Wikipedia - Dr. Ambedkar Institute of Technology -- Engineering college in Bangalore, India
Wikipedia - Dr. B. R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology Jalandhar -- Public engineering institute located in Jalandhar, Punjab, India
Wikipedia - Dream Institute of Technology -- Engineering college in Kolkata
Wikipedia - Dresser-Rand -- Siemens-owned engineering and manufacturing company
Wikipedia - Dr M A Wazed Miah Textile Engineering College -- public Textile Engineering college
Wikipedia - Dr. Sudhir Chandra Sur Degree Engineering College -- College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - DSEEP -- Distributed Simulation Engineering and Execution Process
Wikipedia - Duke Electric Vehicles -- Undergraduate engineering team
Wikipedia - Dumkal Institute of Engineering & Technology -- College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - Earthquake engineering -- Interdisciplinary branch of engineering
Wikipedia - Earth systems engineering and management
Wikipedia - Earthworks (engineering)
Wikipedia - East London line extension -- Railway engineering project in London
Wikipedia - Ecole de technologie supM-CM-)rieure -- Engineering school in Quebec, Canada
Wikipedia - Ecole nationale des travaux publics de l'Etat -- French engineering school
Wikipedia - Ecole nationale supM-CM-)rieure d'ingM-CM-)nieurs de constructions aM-CM-)ronautiques -- French engineering scholl in Toulouse
Wikipedia - Ecole SupM-CM-)rieure de Chimie Physique Electronique de Lyon -- French engineering school
Wikipedia - Ecological engineering -- Use of ecology and engineering to predict, design, construct or restore, and manage ecosystems that integrate "human society with its natural environment for the benefit of both"
Wikipedia - Education Engineering Department -- Bangladesh government department
Wikipedia - Edward Yourdon -- American software engineer and pioneer in the software engineering methodology
Wikipedia - EFI Technology Inc -- Automotive electronics engineering company
Wikipedia - Egis Group -- French engineering company
Wikipedia - Eileen Harkin-Jones -- Professor of Composites Engineering
Wikipedia - Eleanor Stride -- Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Wikipedia - Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Wikipedia - Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Wikipedia - Electrical engineering technology
Wikipedia - Electrical Engineering
Wikipedia - Electrical engineering -- Field of engineering that deals with electricity, electromagnetism, and electronics
Wikipedia - Electrochemical engineering
Wikipedia - Electromechanical engineering
Wikipedia - Electromechanics -- Multidisciplinary field of engineering focusing on the interaction between electrical and mechanical systems
Wikipedia - Electronic Engineering
Wikipedia - Electronic engineering -- Electrical engineering involved in the design of electronic circuits, devices, and their systems
Wikipedia - Electronics engineering
Wikipedia - Elitte College of Engineering -- College in West Bengal
Wikipedia - Elizabeth Jane Smith (engineer) -- First woman to study engineering at a Scottish University
Wikipedia - Emanuele Foa -- Italian engineer and engineering physicist
Wikipedia - Emilia Fridman -- Israeli professor of Electrical Engineering
Wikipedia - Energoinvest -- Engineering and energy company with headquarters in Sarajevo
Wikipedia - Energy engineering
Wikipedia - Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Wikipedia - Engineering and Technology History Wiki
Wikipedia - Engineering Animation -- US software company
Wikipedia - Engineering Arm -- Division of the French Army
Wikipedia - Engineering consulting -- Profession
Wikipedia - Engineering controls -- Hazard controls that are physical changes to the workplace
Wikipedia - Engineering Council
Wikipedia - Engineering Cybernetics
Wikipedia - Engineering cybernetics
Wikipedia - Engineering Design and Management v. Burton -- Irish Supreme Court case
Wikipedia - Engineering design process
Wikipedia - Engineering design
Wikipedia - Engineering (disambiguation)
Wikipedia - Engineering drawings
Wikipedia - Engineering drawing -- A type of technical drawing used to define requirements for engineered items
Wikipedia - Engineering economics (civil engineering)
Wikipedia