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--- WIKI
Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, (22 January 1561 9 April 1626), also known as Lord Verulam, was an English philosopher and statesman who served as Attorney General and as Lord Chancellor of England. His works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution. Bacon has been called the father of empiricism. His works argued for the possibility of scientific knowledge based only upon inductive reasoning and careful observation of events in nature. Most importantly, he argued science could be achieved by use of a sceptical and methodical approach whereby scientists aim to avoid misleading themselves. Although his most specific proposals about such a method, the Baconian method, did not have a long-lasting influence, the general idea of the importance and possibility of a sceptical methodology makes Bacon the father of the scientific method. This method was a new rhetorical and theoretical framework for science, the practical details of which are still central in debates about science and methodology. Francis Bacon was a patron of libraries and developed a functional system for the cataloging of books by dividing them into three categorieshistory, poetry, and philosophywhich could further be divided into more specific subjects and subheadings. Bacon was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he rigorously followed the medieval curriculum, largely in Latin. Bacon was the first recipient of the Queen's counsel designation, which was conferred in 1597 when Elizabeth I of England reserved Bacon as her legal advisor. After the accession of James VI and I in 1603, Bacon was knighted. He was later created Baron Verulam in 1618 and Viscount St. Alban in 1621. Because he had no heirs, both titles became extinct upon his death in 1626, at 65 years. Bacon died of pneumonia, with one account by John Aubrey stating that he had contracted the condition while studying the effects of freezing on the preservation of meat. He is buried at St Michael's Church, St Albans, Hertfordshire.
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Baconian Methods The Baconian method corresponds roughly to what is known in logic as the inductive method of reasoning, of which Francis Bacon (1561-1626) was a great advocate, as contrasted with the deductive method. Considered to be the method of modern science, it consists in inferring general laws from the observation of particular instances; whereas in the deductive method, general laws are assumed because of the natural harmony of the universe, and particular instances or consequences are deduced as flowing forth from them. In the Baconian method particular phenomena are examined with the view of finding out what is essential and excluding what is nonessential, and thus establishing a general law; but the weakness of this method is that the number of particular phenomena or details to be examined in order to arrive at truth must be virtually coextensive with infinity; for in any instance a body of particular phenomena may be encountered which demands immediate readjustment or radical shiftings in opinions in process of crystallization. Actually the scientific method is a combination of both methods: we cannot interpret phenomena without having at the outset some principle in mind; moreover, no sooner have we established a general law than we begin to apply it for the discovery of other phenomena, thus using the deductive method.

Bacon, Roger: (1214-1294) Franciscan. He recognized the significance of the deductive application of principles and the necessity for experimental verification of the results. He was keenly interested in mathematics. His most famous work was called Opus majus, a veritable encyclopaedia of the sciences of his day. -- L.E.D Baconian Method: The inductive method as advanced by Francis Bacon (1561-1626). The purpose of the method was to enable man to attain mastery over nature in order to exploit it for his benefit. The mind should pass from particular facts to a more general knowledge of forms, or generalized physical properties. They are laws according to which phenomena actually proceed. He demanded an exhaustive enumeration of positive instances of occurrences of phenomena, the recording of comparative instances, in which an event manifests itself with greater or lesser intensity, and the additional registration of negative instances. Then experiments should test the observations. See Mill's Methods. -- J.J.R.

Empiricists: (Early English) By the beginning of the 17th century, the wave of search for new foundations of knowledge reached England. The country was fast growing in power and territory. Old beliefs seemed inadequate, and vast new information brought from elsewhere by merchants and scholars had to be assimilated. The feeling was in the air that a new, more practicable and more tangible approach to reality was needed. This new approach was attempted by many thinkers, among whom two, Bacon and Hobbes, were the most outstanding. Francis Bacon (1561-1626), despite his busy political career, found enough enthusiasm and time to outline requirements for the study of natural phenomena. Like Descartes, his younger contemporary in France, he felt the importance of making a clean sweep of countless unverified assumptions obstructing then the progress of knowledge. As the first pre-requisite for the investigation of nature, he advocated, therefore, an overthrow of the idols of the mind, that is, of all the preconceptions and prejudices prevalent in theories, ideas and even language. Only when one's mind is thus prepared for the study of phenomena, can one commence gathering and tabulating facts. Bacon's works, particularly Novum Organum, is full of sagacious thoughts and observations, but he seldom goes beyond general advice. As we realize it today, it was a gross exaggeration to call him "the founder of inductive logic". Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) was an empiricist of an entirely different kind. He did not attempt to work out an inductive method of investigation, but decided to apply deductive logic to new facts. Like Bacon, he keenly understood the inadequacy of medieval doctrines, particularly of those of "form" and "final cause". He felt the need for taking the study of nature anew, particularly of its three most important aspects, Matter, Man and the State. According to Hobbes, all nature is corporeal and all events have but one cause, motion. Man, in his natural state, is dominated by passion which leads him to a "war of all against all". But, contrary to animals, he is capable of using reason which, in the course of time, made him, for self-protection, to choose a social form of existence. The resulting State is, therefore, built on an implicit social contract. -- R.B.W.

Inductive Method, Induction In logic, the process of reasoning from the parts to the whole, from the particular to the general, or from the individual to the universal; contrasted with the deductive method, which reasons from the whole to the parts, from the general to the particular, from the universal to the individual. It is associated with Aristotle as contrasted with Plato, also with Francis Bacon and modern science in general. Science endeavors to establish general laws by reasoning from particular observations; but it is necessary to assume that what is true in an individual case will be true in the general case of which it is only an instance. The hypotheses thus framed are necessarily and naturally regarded as provisional, subject to modification in the light of subsequent, more extended observations of nature. This method endeavors to come to an understanding of nature by a continued process of trial and error, the formulation of its laws becoming ever wider. But an essential part of this method itself is deductive, since we continually reason back from the provisional hypotheses we have laid down to the new facts which we seek to discover in support or in refutation of them. For this reason, the method of science has often been called a deductive-inductive method. Indeed, pure induction is probably inconceivable, since we cannot enter upon a mental process unless we first entertain some general ideas. Induction and deduction are interdependent functions of the ratiocinative mind.

Natural election: The inherent desire of all things for all other things in a certain order. First employed by Francis Bacon (1561-1626) in a passage quoted by A. N. Whitehead (1861-) from the Silva Silvarum "there is a kind of election to embrace that which is agreeable and to exclude or expel that which is ingrate". First erected into a philosophical principle by John Laird (1887-) in The Idea of Value, following a suggestion m Montaigne's Essays. Value, considered as a larger category than human value, an ingredient of the natural world but regarded without its affective content. Syn. with objective value, as independent of the cognitive process. -- J.K.F.

Universals A philosophical and logical term, used in opposition to particulars. For example, matter may be called a universal, and material bodies may be called particulars; or life may be a universal, and living beings particulars. The universal is sometimes defined as that which is left when all particularities or differences have ceased to be. The question arises as to which shall be considered real. If the particulars are realities, then the universals become mere abstract ideas: thus mankind would be merely an indefinite number of human beings. But if the universal is real, then we regard particular humans as being each a manifestation on respective lower planes of man, the Heavenly Man or Qabbalistic ’Adam Qadmon. Again, if living beings are real, then life becomes an abstraction. But if life is a real entity in itself, then living beings are its particular manifestations. The philosophy which starts with universals and proceeds to particulars is called deductive: it is that of theosophy and of Pythagoras and Plato. The inductive philosophy of Aristotle and Francis Bacon proceeds from particulars to universals. Space, motion, duration, intelligence, etc., in themselves abstract realities, are regarded by theosophy as universals, whereas from the opposite viewpoint they appear as only abstractions from experience. The deductive method has its uses in applied science, but in fact it tacitly assumes certain universals and reasons back to them from particulars.

Utopia: (Gr. ou-topos, the Land of Nowhere) An expression used by Sir Thomas More in his book "De optimo reipublicae statu deque nova insular Utopia," 1516, which in the form of a novel described an ideal state. Phto's Politeia is the first famous Utopia. Plato, however, hid several predecessors and followers in this type of literature. From the Renaissance on the most famous Utopias besides Thomas More's book were: Tommaso Campanella: The City of the Sun, 1612; Francis Bacon, New Atlantis, 1627; Cabet, Voyage en Icarie, 1842; Bellamy, Looking Backward, 1888. -- W.E.



QUOTES [16 / 16 - 950 / 950]


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   11 Francis Bacon
   2 Sir Francis Bacon
   1 Mortimer J Adler
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 Alfred Korzybski

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  859 Francis Bacon
   3 Sir Francis Bacon “Of Studies” (1597)
   2 Simon Winchester
   2 Shawn Lawrence Otto
   2 Owen Wilson
   2 Mortimer J Adler
   2 Manly P Hall
   2 J D Robb
   2 Gary Taubes
   2 David Lynch
   2 Clive Barker
   2 Anonymous
   2 Alfred North Whitehead
   2 Adrian Henri

1:which no picture can express. ~ Francis Bacon,
2:A prudent question is one-half of wisdom.
   ~ Francis Bacon,
3:Silence is the sleep that nourishes wisdom." ~ Francis Bacon,
4:Hope is a good breakfast, but it is a bad supper. ~ Francis Bacon,
5:A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds." ~ Francis Bacon,
6:The sun, though it passes through dirty places, yet remains as pure as before. ~ Francis Bacon ,
7:Money is like manure, it's not worth anything unless you spread it around to help young beautiful things grow. ~ Sir Francis Bacon,
8:A little philosophy inclineth mans mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth mans minds about to religion.
   ~ Francis Bacon,
9:A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion. ~ Francis Bacon, Atheism,
10:He that gives good advice, builds with one hand; he that gives good counsel and example, builds with both; but he that gives good admonition and bad example, builds with one hand and pulls down with the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
11:He [Francis Bacon] was a devoutly religious man and was convinced that he would rather believe all the fables of antiquity than deny that the vast fabric of creation is without a mind. ~ Manly P Hall, The Bible, the Story of a Book,
12:A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion." ~ Francis Bacon, (1561-1626), an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, and author, Wikipedia.,
13:There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion." ~ Francis Bacon, (1561 - 1626), English philosopher and statesman. His works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution, Wikipedia.,
14:Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Sir Francis Bacon, The Essays,
15:(Novum Organum by Francis Bacon.)
   34. "Four species of idols beset the human mind, to which (for distinction's sake) we have assigned names, calling the first Idols of the Tribe, the second Idols of the Den, the third Idols of the Market, the fourth Idols of the Theatre.
   40. "The information of notions and axioms on the foundation of true induction is the only fitting remedy by which we can ward off and expel these idols. It is, however, of great service to point them out; for the doctrine of idols bears the same relation to the interpretation of nature as that of the confutation of sophisms does to common logic.
   41. "The idols of the tribe are inherent in human nature and the very tribe or race of man; for man's sense is falsely asserted to be the standard of things; on the contrary, all the perceptions both of the senses and the mind bear reference to man and not to the Universe, and the human mind resembles these uneven mirrors which impart their own properties to different objects, from which rays are emitted and distort and disfigure them.
   42. "The idols of the den are those of each individual; for everybody (in addition to the errors common to the race of man) has his own individual den or cavern, which intercepts and corrupts the light of nature, either from his own peculiar and singular disposition, or from his education and intercourse with others, or from his reading, and the authority acquired by those whom he reverences and admires, or from the different impressions produced on the mind, as it happens to be preoccupied and predisposed, or equable and tranquil, and the like; so that the spirit of man (according to its several dispositions), is variable, confused, and, as it were, actuated by chance; and Heraclitus said well that men search for knowledge in lesser worlds, and not in the greater or common world.
   43. "There are also idols formed by the reciprocal intercourse and society of man with man, which we call idols of the market, from the commerce and association of men with each other; for men converse by means of language, but words are formed at the will of the generality, and there arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. Nor can the definitions and explanations with which learned men are wont to guard and protect themselves in some instances afford a complete remedy-words still manifestly force the understanding, throw everything into confusion, and lead mankind into vain and innumerable controversies and fallacies.
   44. "Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre: for we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a similar nature can be still composed and made to agree with each other, the causes of the most opposite errors being generally the same. Nor, again, do we allude merely to general systems, but also to many elements and axioms of sciences which have become inveterate by tradition, implicit credence, and neglect. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
16:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Knowledge is power. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
2:Friends are thieves of time. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
3:In charity there is no excess. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
4:Boldness is a child of ignorance. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
5:The remedy is worse than the disease. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
6:Nothing is terrible except fear itself. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
7:It is impossible to love and to be wise. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
8:Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
9:A prudent question is one-half of wisdom. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
10:He that hath knowledge spareth his words. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
11:The worst men often give the best advice. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
12:Gardening is the purest of human pleasures. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
13:Silence is the sleep that nourishes wisdom. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
14:Virtue is like a rich stone, best plain set. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
15:We cannot command Nature except by obeying her. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
16:Truth is the daughter of time, not of authority. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
17:Truth ... is the sovereign good of human nature. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
18:Man prefers to believe what he prefers to be true. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
19:The great end of life is not knowledge but action. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
20:The worst solitude is to have no real friendships. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
21:A man must make his opportunity, as oft as find it. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
22:Anger makes dull men witty, but it keeps them poor. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
23:Riches are a good hand maiden, but a poor mistress. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
24:The monuments of wit survive the monuments of power. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
25:A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
26:Next to religion, let your care be to promote justice. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
27:Hurl your calumnies boldly; something is sure to stick. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
28:Beauty itself is but the sensible image of the Infinite. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
29:Chiefly the mould of a man's fortune is in his own hands. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
30:Life, an age to the miserable, and a moment to the happy. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
31:Studies serve for delight, for ornaments, and for ability. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
32:Truth emerges more readily from error than from confusion. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
33:If we do not maintain Justice, Justice will not maintain us. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
34:They that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
35:Money is like manure, of very little use except it be spread. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
36:Studies perfect nature and are perfected still by experience. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
37:The best part of beauty is that which no picture can express. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
38:All good moral philosophy is ... but the handmaid to religion. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
39:Children sweeten labours, but they make misfortunes more bitter. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
40:Nature is often hidden, sometimes overcome, seldom extinguished. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
41:The fortune which nobody sees makes a person happy and unenvied. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
42:A man that hath no virtue in himself ever envieth virtue in others. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
43:Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
44:A healthy body is the guest-chamber of the soul; a sick, its prison. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
45:Nothing doth more hurt in a state than that cunning men pass for wise. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
46:Our humanity were a poor thing but for the Divinity that stirs within us. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
47:Truth is so hard to tell, it sometimes needs fiction to make it plausible. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
48:No pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage-ground of truth. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
49:A bachelor's life is a fine breakfast, a flat lunch, and a miserable dinner. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
50:A little science estranges a man from God. A lot of science brings him back. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
51:Prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
52:Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
53:I do not believe that any man fears to be dead, but only the stroke of death. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
54:Death hath this also; that it openeth the gate to good fame, and extinguisheth envy. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
55:Death is a friend of ours; and he that is not ready to entertain him is not at home. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
56:It is a miserable state of mind to have few things to desire and many things to fear. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
57:Small amounts of philosophy lead to atheism, but larger amounts bring us back to God. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
58:A sudden bold and unexpected question doth many times surprise a man and lay him open. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
59:Prosperity is the blessing of the Old Testament, adversity is the blessing of the New. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
60:Virtue is like precious odors - most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
61:God never wrought miracle, to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
62:Death comes as a heavy blow when, known too well to others, you die unknown to yourself. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
63:Old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
64:They are ill discoverers that think there is no land, when they can see nothing but sea. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
65:The pleasure and delight of knowledge and learning, it far surpasseth all other in nature. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
66:It is not possible to run a course aright when the goal itself has not been rightly placed. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
67:Fortune is like the market, where many times, if you can stay a little, the price will fall. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
68:Seek first the virtues of the mind; and other things either will come or will not be wanted. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
69:He that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils; for time is the greatest innovator. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
70:Philosophy when superficially studied, excites doubt, when thoroughly explored, it dispels it. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
71:All knowledge and wonder (which is the seed of knowledge) is an impression of pleasure in itself. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
72:The correlative to loving our neighbors as ourselves is hating ourselves as we hate our neighbors. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
73:Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
74:Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes, and adversity is not without comforts and hopes. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
75:The desire of excessive power caused the angels to fall; the desire of knowledge caused men to fall. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
76:The subtlety of nature is greater many times over than the subtlety of the senses and understanding. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
77:Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted ... but to weigh and consider.   ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
78:If I might control the literature of the household, I would guarantee the well-being of Church and State. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
79:Men must know that in this theater of man's life it is reserved only for God and angels to be lookers on. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
80:... to invent is to discover that we know not, and not to recover or resummon that which we already know. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
81:It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
82:Costly followers are not to be liked; lest while a man maketh his train longer, he maketh his wings shorter. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
83:Human knowledge and human power meet in one; for where the cause is not known the effect cannot be produced. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
84:If a man looks sharply and attentively, he shall see Fortune; for though she is blind, she is not invisible. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
85:But men must know, that in this theatre of man's life it is reserved only for God and angels to be lookers on. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
86:It is a true rule that love is ever rewarded, either with the reciproque or with an inward and secret contempt. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
87:It is the nature of extreme self-lovers, as they will set a house on fire, and it were but to roast their eggs. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
88:If we are to achieve results never before accomplished, we must expect to employ methods never before attempted. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
89:This is certain, that a man that studieth revenge keeps his wounds green, which otherwise would heal and do well. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
90:When a man laughs at his troubles he loses a great many friends. They never forgive the loss of their prerogative. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
91:A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
92:For it is a true rule, that love is ever rewarded either with the reciproque, or with an inward and secret contempt. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
93:Good thoughts, though God accept them, yet towards men are little better than good dreams, except they be put in act. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
94:He that travelleth into a country before he hath some entrance into the language, goeth to school, and not to travel. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
95:It is not the lie that passeth through the mind, but the lie that sinketh in, and settleth in it, that doth the hurt. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
96:Men in great place are thrice servants—servants of the sovereign or state, servants of fame, and servants of business. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
97:A crowd is not company; and faces are but a gallery of pictures; and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
98:Therefore, if a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see Fortune; for though she be blind, yet she is not invisible. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
99:Truth is a good dog; but always beware of barking too close to the heels of an error, lest you get your brains kicked out. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
100:Glorious men are the scorn of wise men, the admiration of fools, the idols of parasites, and the slaves of their own vaunts. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
101:Houses are built to live in, not to look on; therefore, let use be preferred before uniformity, except where both may be had. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
102:It is a strange desire, to seek power, and to lose liberty; or to seek power over others, and to lose power over a man's self. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
103:Age appears to be best in four things; old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
104:Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
105:To be free minded and cheerfully disposed at hours of meat and sleep and of exercise is one of the best precepts of long lasting. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
106:…it is the peculiar and perpetual error of the human understanding to be more moved and excited by affirmatives than by negatives… ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
107:If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts, but if he will content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
108:He that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
109:Young men are fitter to invent than to judge, fitter for execution than for counsel, and fitter for new projects than for settled business. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
110:Certainly, in taking revenge, a man is but even with his enemy, but in passing it over, he is superior; for it is a prince's part to pardon. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
111:Therefore, as atheism is in all respects hateful, so in this, that it depriveth human nature of the means to exalt itself, above human frailty. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
112:The great atheists, indeed are hypocrites; which are ever handling holy things, but without feeling; so as they must needs be cauterized in the end. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
113:Anger is certainly a kind of baseness, as it appears well in the weakness of those subjects in whom it reigns: children, women, old folks, sick folks. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
114:Truth is a naked and open daylight, that doth not shew the masks and mummeries and triumphs of the world, half so stately and daintily as candlelights. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
115:Libraries ... are as the shrines where all the relics of ancient saints, full of true virtue, and that without delusion or imposture, are preserved and reposed. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
116:Of all virtues and dignities of the mind, goodness is the greatest, being the character of the Deity; and without it, man is a busy, mischievous, wretched thing. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
117:The human understanding is like a false mirror, which, receiving rays irregularly, distorts and discolors the nature of things by mingling its own nature with it. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
118:If money be not thy servant, it will be thy master. The covetous person cannot so properly be said to possess wealth, as that may be said to possess him or her.    ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
119:It would be an unsound fancy and self-contradictory to expect that things which have never yet been done can be done except by means which have never yet been tried. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
120:In dealing with cunning persons, we must ever consider their ends, to interpret their speeches; and it is good to say little to them, and that which they least look for. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
121:Certainly, virtue is like precious odors, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
122:There is a difference between happiness and wisdom: he that thinks himself the happiest man is really so; but he that thinks himself the wisest is generally the greatest fool. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
123:Natural abilities are like natural plants, that need pruning by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
124:There is nothing makes a man suspect much, more than to know little, and therefore men should remedy suspicion by procuring to know more, and not keep their suspicions in smother. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
125:They that deny a God destroy man's nobility, for certainly man is of kin to the beasts by his body; and if he be not of kin to God by his spirit, he is a base and ignoble creature. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
126:Little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
127:A man would do well to carry a pencil in his pocket and write down the thoughts of the moment. Those that come unsought for are commonly the most valuable, and should be secured, because they seldom return. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
128:He that gives good advice, builds with one hand; he that gives good counsel and example, builds with both; but he that gives good admonition and bad example, builds with one hand and pulls down with the other. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
129:The stage is more beholding to love than the life of man. For as to the stage, love is ever matter of comedies and now and then of tragedies; but in life it doth much mischief, sometimes like a Siren, sometimes like a Fury. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
130:Ambition is like choler; which is a humor that maketh men active, earnest, full of alacrity, and stirring, if it be not stopped. But if it be stopped, and cannot have his way, it becometh adust, and thereby malign and venomous. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
131:There is a great difference between the Idols of the human mind and the Ideas of the divine. That is to say, between certain empty dogmas, and the true signatures and marks set upon the works of creation as they are found in nature. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
132:The way of fortune is like the milkyway in the sky; which is a number of small stars, not seen asunder, but giving light together: so it is a number of little and scarce discerned virtues, or rather faculties and customs, that make men fortunate. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
133:And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes, like the warbling of music) than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
134:Let men but think over their infinite expenditure of understanding, time, and means on matters and pursuits of far less use and value; whereof, if but a small part were directed to sound and solid studies, there is no difficulty that might not be overcome. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
135:Atheism leaves a man to sense, to philosophy, to natural piety, to laws, to reputation; all of which may be guides to an outward moral virtue, even if religion vanished; but religious superstition dismounts all these and erects an absolute monarchy in the minds of men. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
136:Generally, youth is like the first cogitations, not so wise as the second. For there is a youth in thoughts, as well as in ages. And yet the invention of young men, is more lively than that of old; and imaginations stream into their minds better, and, as it were, more divinely.   ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
137:But we may go further, and affirm most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends; without which the world is but a wilderness; and even in this sense also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature and affections, is unfit for friendship, he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
138:I could not be true and constant to the argument I handle, if I were not willing to go beyond others; but yet not more willing than to have others go beyond me again: which may the better appear by this, that I have propounded my opinions naked and unarmed, not seeking to preoccupate the liberty of men's judgments by confutations. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
139:There is in man's nature a secret inclination and motion towards love of others, which, if it be not spent upon someone or a few, doth naturally spread itself towards many, and maketh men become humane and charitable, as it is seen sometimes in friars. Nuptial love maketh mankind, friendly love perfecteth it, but wanton love corrupteth and embaseth it. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
140:Leonardo did not pursue science and engineering in order to dominate nature, as Francis Bacon would advocate a century later, but always tried to learn as much as possible from nature. He was in awe of the beauty he saw in the complexity of natural forms, patterns, and processes, and aware that nature’s ingenuity was far superior to human design. Accordingly, he often used natural processes and structures as models for his own designs. ~ fritjof-capra, @wisdomtrove
141:Truth may perhaps come to the price of a pearl, that showeth best by day; but it will not rise to the price of a diamond or carbuncle, that showeth best in varied lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt that, if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would, and the like, but it would leave the minds of a number of men poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves? ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
142:There are and can be only two ways of searching into and discovering truth. The one flies from the senses and particulars to the most general axioms, and from these principles, the truth of which it takes for settled and immovable, proceeds to judgment and to the discovery of middle axioms. And this way is now in fashion. The other derives axioms from the senses and particulars, rising by a gradual and unbroken ascent, so that it arrives at the most general axioms last of all. This is the true way, but as yet untried. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Knowledge Is Power ~ Francis Bacon,
2:Knowledge is power. ~ Francis Bacon,
3:God loveth the clean. ~ Francis Bacon,
4:scientia potentia est ~ Francis Bacon,
5:Riches are for spending. ~ Francis Bacon,
6:Whatever you can, count. ~ Francis Bacon,
7:Knowledge itself is power ~ Francis Bacon,
8:Opportunity makes a thief. ~ Francis Bacon,
9:Reading maketh a full man. ~ Francis Bacon,
10:Art is man added to Nature. ~ Francis Bacon,
11:Man was formed for society. ~ Francis Bacon,
12:Aut viam inveniam aut faciam ~ Francis Bacon,
13:Friends are thieves of time. ~ Francis Bacon,
14:Mysteries are due to secrecy. ~ Francis Bacon,
15:In charity there is no excess. ~ Francis Bacon,
16:Time is the author of authors. ~ Francis Bacon,
17:Silence is the virtue of fools. ~ Francis Bacon,
18:Time is the greatest innovator. ~ Francis Bacon,
19:To choose time is to save time. ~ Francis Bacon,
20:Wonder is the seed of knowledge ~ Francis Bacon,
21:Boldness is a child of ignorance ~ Francis Bacon,
22:All will come out in the washing. ~ Francis Bacon,
23:I believe in deeply ordered chaos ~ Francis Bacon,
24:Nothing is to be feared but fear. ~ Francis Bacon,
25:...poesy is the wine of demons... ~ Francis Bacon,
26:Lie faces God and shrikns from men ~ Francis Bacon,
27:Revenge is a kind of wild justice. ~ Francis Bacon,
28:Revenge is a king of wild justice. ~ Francis Bacon,
29:Truth is a naked and open daylight ~ Francis Bacon,
30:All colours will agree in the dark. ~ Francis Bacon,
31:Always let losers have their words. ~ Francis Bacon,
32:It is natural to die as to be born. ~ Francis Bacon,
33:Praise is the reflection of virtue. ~ Francis Bacon,
34:To know truly is to know by causes. ~ Francis Bacon,
35:All bravery stands upon comparisons. ~ Francis Bacon,
36:By far the best proof is experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
37:by indignities men come to dignities ~ Francis Bacon,
38:For knowledge, too, is itself power. ~ Francis Bacon,
39:Vices of the time; vices of the man. ~ Francis Bacon,
40:A lie faces God and shrinks from man. ~ Francis Bacon,
41:By indignities men come to dignities. ~ Francis Bacon,
42:It is impossible to love and be wise. ~ Francis Bacon,
43:Science is but an image of the truth. ~ Francis Bacon,
44:The remedy is worse than the disease. ~ Francis Bacon,
45:Constancy is the foundation of virtues ~ Francis Bacon,
46:Cure the disease and kill the patient. ~ Francis Bacon,
47:God's first creature, which was light. ~ Francis Bacon,
48:Rebellions of the belly are the worst. ~ Francis Bacon,
49:States, as great engines, move slowly. ~ Francis Bacon,
50:Acorns were good until bread was found. ~ Francis Bacon,
51:A good conscience is a continual feast. ~ Francis Bacon,
52:Come home to men's business and bosoms. ~ Francis Bacon,
53:Great Hypocrites are the real atheists. ~ Francis Bacon,
54:If you can talk about it, why paint it? ~ Francis Bacon,
55:Mixture of lie doeth ever add pleasure. ~ Francis Bacon,
56:Nothing is terrible except fear itself. ~ Francis Bacon,
57:Reading maketh a full man. ~ Francis Bacon, Of Studies.,
58:States are great engines moving slowly. ~ Francis Bacon,
59:Consistency is the foundation of virtue. ~ Francis Bacon,
60:It is impossible to love and to be wise. ~ Francis Bacon,
61:Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed. ~ Francis Bacon,
62:A prudent question is one-half of wisdom. ~ Francis Bacon,
63:Books speak plain when counselors blanch. ~ Francis Bacon,
64:Great changes are easier than small ones. ~ Francis Bacon,
65:He that hath knowledge spareth his words. ~ Francis Bacon,
66:I would live to study, not study to live. ~ Francis Bacon,
67:The best armor is to keep out of gunshot. ~ Francis Bacon,
68:The place of justice is a hallowed place. ~ Francis Bacon,
69:The worst men often give the best advice. ~ Francis Bacon,
70:We only have our nervous system to paint. ~ Francis Bacon,
71:Wounds cannot be cured without searching. ~ Francis Bacon,
72:In all superstition wise men follow fools. ~ Francis Bacon,
73:Innovations, which are the births of time. ~ Francis Bacon,
74:Money is a great servant but a bad master. ~ Francis Bacon,
75:A la naturaleza se le domina obedeciendola. ~ Francis Bacon,
76:A little science estranges a man from God; ~ Francis Bacon,
77:Gardening is the purest of human pleasures. ~ Francis Bacon,
78:Money is like muck, not good unless spread. ~ Francis Bacon,
79:Silence is the sleep that nourishes wisdom. ~ Francis Bacon,
80:There is no secrecy comparable to celerity. ~ Francis Bacon,
81:To spend too much time in studies is sloth. ~ Francis Bacon,
82:A man dies as often as he loses his friends. ~ Francis Bacon,
83:A much talking judge is an ill-tuned cymbal. ~ Francis Bacon,
84:A prudent question is one-half of wisdom.
   ~ Francis Bacon,
85:Discretion in speech is more than eloquence. ~ Francis Bacon,
86:I hold every man a debtor to his profession. ~ Francis Bacon,
87:Money is a good servant, a dangerous master. ~ Francis Bacon,
88:Nobility of birth commonly abateth industry. ~ Francis Bacon,
89:Perils commonly ask to be paid in pleasures. ~ Francis Bacon,
90:Virtue is like a rich stone, best plain set. ~ Francis Bacon,
91:You can't be more horrific than life itself. ~ Francis Bacon,
92:A cat will never drown if she sees the shore. ~ Francis Bacon,
93:A young man not yet, an elder man not at all. ~ Francis Bacon,
94:It was well said that envy keeps no holidays. ~ Francis Bacon,
95:Prawdę łatwiej wyłowić z błędów niż z zamętu. ~ Francis Bacon,
96:The mold of our fortunes is in our own hands. ~ Francis Bacon,
97:Books will speak plain when counselors blanch. ~ Francis Bacon,
98:He of whom many are afraid ought to fear many. ~ Francis Bacon,
99:The cord breaketh at last by the weakest pull. ~ Francis Bacon,
100:There is no such flatterer as is a man's self. ~ Francis Bacon,
101:Without friends the world is but a wilderness. ~ Francis Bacon,
102:The folly of one man is the fortune of another. ~ Francis Bacon,
103:The punishing of wits enhances their authority. ~ Francis Bacon,
104:There is superstition in avoiding superstition. ~ Francis Bacon,
105:We cannot command Nature except by obeying her. ~ Francis Bacon,
106:All rising to great place is by a winding stair. ~ Francis Bacon,
107:Great boldness is seldom without some absurdity. ~ Francis Bacon,
108:More dangers have deceived men than forced them. ~ Francis Bacon,
109:To suffering there is a limit; to fearing, none. ~ Francis Bacon,
110:Truth is the daughter of time, not of authority. ~ Francis Bacon,
111:Truth ... is the sovereign good of human nature. ~ Francis Bacon,
112:A Man must make his opportunity,as oft as find it ~ Francis Bacon,
113:Custom is the principle magistrate of man's life. ~ Francis Bacon,
114:Deformed persons commonly take revenge on nature. ~ Francis Bacon,
115:Hope is a good breakfast, but it is a bad supper. ~ Francis Bacon,
116:It is a poore Center of a Mans Actions, Himselfe. ~ Francis Bacon,
117:A bad man is worse when he pretends to be a saint. ~ Francis Bacon,
118:All rising to a great place is by a winding stair. ~ Francis Bacon,
119:He that toucheth pitch shall be defiled therewith. ~ Francis Bacon,
120:Man prefers to believe what he prefers to be true. ~ Francis Bacon,
121:Nature cannot be commanded except by being obeyed. ~ Francis Bacon,
122:[Science is] the labor and handicraft of the mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
123:Secrecy in suits goes a great way towards success. ~ Francis Bacon,
124:The worst solitude is to have no real friendships. ~ Francis Bacon,
125:A false friend is more dangerous than an open enemy ~ Francis Bacon,
126:A man must make his opportunity, as oft as find it. ~ Francis Bacon,
127:Books must follow sciences, and not sciences books. ~ Francis Bacon,
128:Fortune makes him fool, whom she makes her darling. ~ Francis Bacon,
129:If money be not thy servant, it will be thy master. ~ Francis Bacon,
130:Man seeketh in society comfort, use and protection. ~ Francis Bacon,
131:No man's fortune can be an end worthy of his being. ~ Francis Bacon,
132:People prefer to believe what they want to be true. ~ Francis Bacon,
133:Riches are a good hand maiden, but a poor mistress. ~ Francis Bacon,
134:Spouses are great impediments to great enterprises. ~ Francis Bacon,
135:Gardening is the purest human pleasure. Francis Bacon ~ Laura Frantz,
136:Nothing is pleasant that is not spiced with variety. ~ Francis Bacon,
137:The monuments of wit survive the monuments of power. ~ Francis Bacon,
138:Half of science is putting forth the right questions. ~ Francis Bacon,
139:He who desires solitude is either an animal or a god. ~ Francis Bacon,
140:Much bending breaks the bow; much unbending the mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
141:Nothing is so mischievous as the apotheosis of error. ~ Francis Bacon,
142:A man who contemplates revenge keeps his wounds green. ~ Francis Bacon,
143:A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds. ~ Francis Bacon,
144:Be so true to thyself, as thou be not false to others. ~ Francis Bacon,
145:Great riches have sold more men than they have bought. ~ Francis Bacon,
146:He of whom many are afraid ought himself to fear many. ~ Francis Bacon,
147:Next to religion, let your care be to promote justice. ~ Francis Bacon,
148:Prosperity discovers vice, adversity discovers virtue. ~ Francis Bacon,
149:Speech of yourself ought to be seldom and well chosen. ~ Francis Bacon,
150:The job of the artist is always to deepen the mystery. ~ Francis Bacon,
151:Umysłowi ludzkiemu nie skrzydeł potrzeba, lecz ołowiu. ~ Francis Bacon,
152:Who questions much, shall learn much, and retain much. ~ Francis Bacon,
153:A man that studieth revenge keeps his own wounds green. ~ Francis Bacon,
154:Atheism is rather in the lip, than in the heart of man. ~ Francis Bacon,
155:Friendship redoubleth joys, and cutteth griefs in half. ~ Francis Bacon,
156:God hangs the greatest weights upon the smallest wires. ~ Francis Bacon,
157:Hurl your calumnies boldly; something is sure to stick. ~ Francis Bacon,
158:O life! An age to the miserable, a moment to the happy. ~ Francis Bacon,
159:The only hope [of science] ... is in genuine induction. ~ Francis Bacon,
160:Beauty itself is but the sensible image of the Infinite. ~ Francis Bacon,
161:Chiefly the mold of a man's fortune is in his own hands. ~ Francis Bacon,
162:In one and the same fire, clay grows hard and wax melts. ~ Francis Bacon,
163:Ipsa scientia potestas est. (Knowledge itself is power.) ~ Francis Bacon,
164:Life is a marshmallow, easy to chew but hard to swallow. ~ Francis Bacon,
165:It’s all so meaningless, we may as well be extraordinary. ~ Francis Bacon,
166:The worst solitute is to be destitute of true friendship. ~ Francis Bacon,
167:Studies serve for delight, for ornaments, and for ability. ~ Francis Bacon,
168:The man who fears no truths has nothing to fear from lies. ~ Francis Bacon,
169:There is no great concurrence between learning and wisdom. ~ Francis Bacon,
170:Truth emerges more readily from error than from confusion. ~ Francis Bacon,
171:Truth will sooner come out from error than from confusion. ~ Francis Bacon,
172:Everybody has his own interpretation of a painting he sees. ~ Francis Bacon,
173:If a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics. ~ Francis Bacon,
174:They are happy men whose natures sort with their vocations. ~ Francis Bacon,
175:... wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity. ~ Francis Bacon,
176:Champagne for my real friends, real pain for my sham friends ~ Francis Bacon,
177:For no man can forbid the spark nor tell whence it may come. ~ Francis Bacon,
178:If we do not maintain justice, justice will not maintain us. ~ Francis Bacon,
179:Money is like manure, its only good if you spread it around. ~ Francis Bacon,
180:The world's a bubble, and the life of man, Less than a span. ~ Francis Bacon,
181:Truth comes out of error more readily than out of confusion. ~ Francis Bacon,
182:Medical men do not know the drugs they use, nor their prices. ~ Francis Bacon,
183:Money is like manure, of very little use except it be spread. ~ Francis Bacon,
184:Studies perfect nature and are perfected still by experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
185:The best part of beauty is that which no picture can express. ~ Francis Bacon,
186:the serpent if it wants to become the dragon must eat itself. ~ Francis Bacon,
187:Why should a man be in love with his fetters, though of gold? ~ Francis Bacon,
188:All good moral philosophy is ... but the handmaid to religion. ~ Francis Bacon,
189:Money is a good servant but a bad master. —SIR FRANCIS BACON ~ Anthony Robbins,
190:So if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics. ~ Francis Bacon,
191:If vices were profitable, the virtuous man would be the sinner. ~ Francis Bacon,
192:The more a man drinketh of the world, the more it intoxicateth. ~ Francis Bacon,
193:We rise to great heights by a winding staircase of small steps. ~ Francis Bacon,
194:Who ever is out of patience is out of possession of their soul. ~ Francis Bacon,
195:Children sweeten labours, but they make misfortunes more bitter. ~ Francis Bacon,
196:He that hath a wife and children hath given hostages to fortune. ~ Francis Bacon,
197:Kebijaksanaan dalam berbicara lebih berharga daripada kefasihan. ~ Francis Bacon,
198:Nature is often hidden, sometimes overcome, seldom extinguished. ~ Francis Bacon,
199:So that every wand or staff of empire is forsooth curved at top. ~ Francis Bacon,
200:The fortune which nobody sees makes a person happy and unenvied. ~ Francis Bacon,
201:A man finds himself seven years older the day after his marriage. ~ Francis Bacon,
202:The breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air than in the hand. ~ Francis Bacon,
203:The true atheist is he whose hands are cauterized by holy things. ~ Francis Bacon,
204:They that reverence to much old times are but a scorn to the new. ~ Francis Bacon,
205:For behavior, men learn it, as they take diseases, one of another. ~ Francis Bacon,
206:If the hill will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet will go to the hill. ~ Francis Bacon,
207:Ill Fortune never crushed that man whom good fortune deceived not. ~ Francis Bacon,
208:Money is a great treasure that only increases as you give it away. ~ Francis Bacon,
209:Of all virtues and dignities of the mind, goodness is the greatest ~ Francis Bacon,
210:The less people speak of their greatness, the more we think of it. ~ Francis Bacon,
211:All rising to great place is by a winding stair. —Sir Francis Bacon, ~ Clive Barker,
212:Base and crafty cowards are like the arrow that flieth in the dark. ~ Francis Bacon,
213:I want a very ordered image, but I want it to come about by chance. ~ Francis Bacon,
214:Rather to excite your judgment briefly than to inform it tediously. ~ Francis Bacon,
215:The joys of parents are secret, and so are their grieves and fears. ~ Francis Bacon,
216:Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god. ~ Francis Bacon,
217:Why should I be angry with a man for loving himself better than me? ~ Francis Bacon,
218:For what a man would like to be true, that he more readily believes. ~ Francis Bacon,
219:Ipsa scientia potestas est.

Knowledge itself is power. ~ Francis Bacon,
220:Never any knowledge was delivered in the same order it was invented. ~ Francis Bacon,
221:Painting gave meaning to my life which without it would not have had ~ Francis Bacon,
222:Religion brought forth riches, and the daughter devoured the mother. ~ Francis Bacon,
223:There is nothing makes a man suspect much, more than to know little. ~ Francis Bacon,
224:The speaking in a perpetual hyperbole is comely in nothing but love. ~ Francis Bacon,
225:Whosoever is delighted in Solitude, is either a wild Beast or a God. ~ Francis Bacon,
226:You could say that I have no inspiration, that I only need to paint. ~ Francis Bacon,
227:Important families are like potatoes. The best parts are underground. ~ Francis Bacon,
228:The inclination to goodness is imprinted deeply in the nature of man. ~ Francis Bacon,
229:There is in human nature generally more of the fool than of the wise. ~ Francis Bacon,
230:What is truth? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer. ~ Francis Bacon,
231:Friendship increases in visiting friends, but in visiting them seldom. ~ Francis Bacon,
232:I have often thought upon death, and I find it the least of all evils. ~ Francis Bacon,
233:It Is The Wisdom Of Crocodiles, That Shed Tears When They Would Devour ~ Francis Bacon,
234:It's not what we profess but what we practice that gives us integrity. ~ Francis Bacon,
235:Lies are sufficient to breed opinion, and opinion brings on substance. ~ Francis Bacon,
236:Natural abilities are like natural plants; they need pruning by study. ~ Francis Bacon,
237:Nothing doth more hurt in a state than that cunning men pass for wise. ~ Francis Bacon,
238:The greatest trust between man and man is the trust of giving counsel. ~ Francis Bacon,
239:A graceful and pleasing figure is a perpetual letter of recommendation. ~ Francis Bacon,
240:Često sam razmišljao o smrti i zaključio da je ponajmanje od svih zala. ~ Francis Bacon,
241:Francis Bacon is one of my giant inspirations. I just love him to pieces. ~ David Lynch,
242:Nothing is more pleasant to the eye than green grass kept finely shorn. ~ Francis Bacon,
243:For bleeding inwards and shut vapours strangle soonest and oppress most. ~ Francis Bacon,
244:A man that is young in years may be old in hours if he have lost no time. ~ Francis Bacon,
245:An artist must learn to be nourished by his passions and by his despairs. ~ Francis Bacon,
246:Cleanness of body was ever deemed to proceed from a due reverence to God. ~ Francis Bacon,
247:None of the affections have been noted to fascinate and bewitch but envy. ~ Francis Bacon,
248:There is little friendship in the world, and least of all between equals. ~ Francis Bacon,
249:There is no exquisite beauty… without some strangeness in the proportion. ~ Francis Bacon,
250:The surest way to prevent seditions...is to take away the matter of them. ~ Francis Bacon,
251:In nature things move violently to their place, and calmly in their place. ~ Francis Bacon,
252:In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present. ~ Francis Bacon,
253:Many secrets of art and nature are thought by the unlearned to be magical. ~ Francis Bacon,
254:The ill and unfit choice of words wonderfully obstructs the understanding. ~ Francis Bacon,
255:Truth can never be reached by just listening to the voice of an authority. ~ Francis Bacon,
256:Truth is so hard to tell, it sometimes needs fiction to make it plausible. ~ Francis Bacon,
257:It is the wisdom of the crocodiles, that shed tears when they would devour. ~ Francis Bacon,
258:I work for posterity, these things requiring ages for their accomplishment. ~ Francis Bacon,
259:No pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage-ground of truth. ~ Francis Bacon,
260:Our humanity is a poor thing, except for the divinity that stirs within us. ~ Francis Bacon,
261:A bachelor's life is a fine breakfast, a flat lunch, and a miserable dinner. ~ Francis Bacon,
262:Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. ~ Francis Bacon,
263:There is a cunning which we in England call the rning of the cat in the pan. ~ Francis Bacon,
264:I do not believe that any man fears to be dead, but only the stroke of death. ~ Francis Bacon,
265:It is a great happiness when men's professions and their inclinations accord. ~ Francis Bacon,
266:I will never be an old man. To me old age is always 15 years older than I am. ~ Francis Bacon,
267:The genius, wit, and the spirit of a nation are discovered by their proverbs. ~ Francis Bacon,
268:There are many wise men that have secret hearts and transparent countenances. ~ Francis Bacon,
269:The virtue of prosperity is temperance, the virtue of adversity is fortitude. ~ Francis Bacon,
270:The virtue of prosperity is temperance; the virtue of adversity is fortitude. ~ Francis Bacon,
271:If I sit and daydream, the images rush by like a succession of colored slides. ~ Francis Bacon,
272:It is as hard and severe a thing to be a true politician as to be truly moral. ~ Francis Bacon,
273:I will never be an old man. To me, old age is always 15 years older than I am. ~ Francis Bacon,
274:Painting is the pattern of one's own nervous system being projected on canvas. ~ Francis Bacon,
275:That which above all other yields the sweetest smell in the air is the violet. ~ Francis Bacon,
276:There be many wise men, that have secret hearts, and transparent countenances. ~ Francis Bacon,
277:There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. ~ Francis Bacon,
278:The sun, though it passes through dirty places, yet remains as pure as before. ~ Francis Bacon,
279:Choose the life that is most useful, and habit will make it the most agreeable. ~ Francis Bacon,
280:Laws and Institutions Must Go Hand in Hand with the Progress of the Human Mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
281:Se venger, c'est se mettre au niveau de l'ennemi; pardonner, c'est le dépasser. ~ Francis Bacon,
282:The only really interesting thing is what happens between two people in a room. ~ Francis Bacon,
283:Algunos libros son probados, otros devorados, poquísimos masticados y digeridos. ~ Francis Bacon,
284:Nothing is to be feared but fear itself. Nothing grievous but to yield to grief. ~ Francis Bacon,
285:Photographs are not only points of reference... they're often triggers of ideas. ~ Francis Bacon,
286:The French are wiser than they seem, and the Spaniards seem wiser than they are. ~ Francis Bacon,
287:Virtue is like precious odours,-most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed. ~ Francis Bacon,
288:A small task if it be really daily will beat the efforts of a spasmodic Hercules. ~ Francis Bacon,
289:Excusations, cessions, modesty itself well governed, are but arts of ostentation. ~ Francis Bacon,
290:I regret not starting to paint earlier...It is one of the few things I do regret. ~ Francis Bacon,
291:I would like, in my arbitrary way, to bring one nearer to the actual human being. ~ Francis Bacon,
292:Many a man's strength is in opposition, and when he faileth, he grows out of use. ~ Francis Bacon,
293:The momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or evil. ~ Francis Bacon,
294:There is no greater wisdom than well to time the beginnings and onsets of things. ~ Francis Bacon,
295:„Cititul îl face pe om deplin, vorbirea îl face prompt, iar scrisul îl face exact. ~ Francis Bacon,
296:Fashion is only the attempt to realize art in living forms and social intercourse. ~ Francis Bacon,
297:He that cannot possibly mend his own case will do what he can to impair another's. ~ Francis Bacon,
298:The only really interesting thing is
what happens between two people in a room. ~ Francis Bacon,
299:The wonder of a single snowflake outweighs the wisdom of a million meteorologists. ~ Francis Bacon,
300:Those that want friends to open themselves unto are cannibals of their own hearts. ~ Francis Bacon,
301:When I paint I am ageless, I just have the pleasure or the difficulty of painting. ~ Francis Bacon,
302:Wives are young men's mistresses, companions for middle age, and old men's nurses. ~ Francis Bacon,
303:Fortitude is the marshal of thought, the armor of the will, and the fort of reason. ~ Francis Bacon,
304:La lectura hace al hombre completo; la conversación, ágil, y el escribir, preciso”. ~ Francis Bacon,
305:Suspicion amongst thoughts are like bats amongst birds, they never fly by twilight. ~ Francis Bacon,
306:The lame man who keeps the right road outstrips the runner who takes the wrong one. ~ Francis Bacon,
307:Who then to frail mortality shall trust But limns the water, or but writes in dust. ~ Francis Bacon,
308:As is the garden such is the gardener. A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds. ~ Francis Bacon,
309:Death is a friend of ours; and he that is not ready to entertain him is not at home. ~ Francis Bacon,
310:God Almighty first planted a garden: and indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. ~ Francis Bacon,
311:God has two textbooks - Scripture and Creation - we would do well to listen to both. ~ Francis Bacon,
312:Look to make your course regular, that men may know beforehand what they may expect. ~ Francis Bacon,
313:A just fear of an imminent danger, though be no blow given, is a lawful cause of war. ~ Francis Bacon,
314:For the things of this world cannot be made known without a knowledge of mathematics. ~ Francis Bacon,
315:God Almighty first planted a garden. And indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures. ~ Francis Bacon,
316:It is a miserable state of mind to have few things to desire and many things to fear. ~ Francis Bacon,
317:I wonder why it is that the countries with the most nobles also have the most misery? ~ Francis Bacon,
318:Small amounts of philosophy lead to atheism, but larger amounts bring us back to God. ~ Francis Bacon,
319:A sudden bold and unexpected question doth many times surprise a man and lay him open. ~ Francis Bacon,
320:I loathe my own face, and I've done self-portraits because I've had nobody else to do. ~ Francis Bacon,
321:One of the fathers saith . . . that old men go to death, and death comes to young men. ~ Francis Bacon,
322:Prosperity is the blessing of the Old Testament; adversity is the blessing of the New. ~ Francis Bacon,
323:We think according to nature. We speak according to rules. We act according to custom. ~ Francis Bacon,
324:God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. ~ Francis Bacon,
325:If a man be gracious and courteous to strangers, it shows he is a citizen of the world. ~ Francis Bacon,
326:People have discovered that they can fool the devil; but they can't fool the neighbors. ~ Francis Bacon,
327:Slander boldly, something always sticks
[Audacter calumniare, semper aliquid haeret] ~ Francis Bacon,
328:There are two ways of spreading light..to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it. ~ Francis Bacon,
329:They are ill discoverers that think there is no land when they can see nothing but sea. ~ Francis Bacon,
330:I'm just trying to make images as accurately as possible off my nervous system as I can. ~ Francis Bacon,
331:Old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read. ~ Francis Bacon,
332:The best preservative to keep the mind in health is the faithful admonition of a friend. ~ Francis Bacon,
333:They are ill discoverers that think there is no land, when they can see nothing but sea. ~ Francis Bacon,
334:Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
335:He that plots to be the only figure among ciphers [zeros], is the decay of the whole age. ~ Francis Bacon,
336:It is a secret both in nature and state, that it is safer to change many things than one. ~ Francis Bacon,
337:It's always hopeless to talk about painting - one never does anything but talk around it. ~ Francis Bacon,
338:It's such an extraordinary supple medium that you never do quite know what paint will do. ~ Francis Bacon,
339:Journeys at youth are part of the education; but at maturity, are part of the experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
340:Learning teaches how to carry things in suspense, without prejudice, till you resolve it. ~ Francis Bacon,
341:Pictures and shapes are but secondary objects and please or displease only in the memory. ~ Francis Bacon,
342:The bee enclosed and through the amber shown Seems buried in the juice which was his own. ~ Francis Bacon,
343:There arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
344:There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame as to be found false and perfidious. ~ Francis Bacon,
345:What then remains, but that we still should cry
Not to be born, or being born, to die? ~ Francis Bacon,
346:All authority must be out of a man's self, turned . . . either upon an art, or upon a man. ~ Francis Bacon,
347:I always think of myself not so much as a painter but as a medium for accident and chance. ~ Francis Bacon,
348:Sir Francis Bacon once said, ‘A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds. ~ Philippa Ballantine,
349:The greatest vicissitude of things amongst men, is the vicissitude of sects and religions. ~ Francis Bacon,
350:There arises from a bad and inapt formation of words, a wonderful obstruction to the mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
351:What, then, remains but that we still should cry, For being born, and, being born, to die? ~ Francis Bacon,
352:But the best demonstration by far is experience, if it go not beyond the actual experiment. ~ Francis Bacon,
353:Dreams, and predictions of astrology....ought to serve but for winter talk by the fireside. ~ Francis Bacon,
354:Friendship maketh daylight in the understanding, out of darkness and confusion of thoughts. ~ Francis Bacon,
355:Knowledge is a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate. ~ Francis Bacon,
356:Of great wealth there is no real use, except in its distribution, the rest is just conceit. ~ Francis Bacon,
357:The root of all superstition is that men observe when a thing hits, but not when it misses. ~ Francis Bacon,
358:Things alter for the worse spontaneously, if they be not altered for the better designedly. ~ Francis Bacon,
359:We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand and melting like a snowflake... ~ Francis Bacon,
360:Where a man cannot fitly play his own part; if he have not a friend, he may quit the stage. ~ Francis Bacon,
361:Books must follow sciences, and not sciences books. ~ Francis Bacon, Proposition touching Amendment of Laws.,
362:If a man is gracious and courteous to strangers, it shows that he is a citizen of the world. ~ Francis Bacon,
363:In taking revenge, a man is but even with his enemy; but in passing it over, he is superior. ~ Francis Bacon,
364:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon,
365:Fortune is like the market, where, many times, if you can stay a little, the price will fall. ~ Francis Bacon,
366:Hope is the most beneficial of all the affections, and doth much to the prolongation of life. ~ Francis Bacon,
367:The colors that show best by candlelight are white, carnation, and a kind of sea-water green. ~ Francis Bacon,
368:The vices of authority are chiefly four: delays, corruption, roughness and facility. Francis Bacon ~ J D Robb,
369:Believe not much them that seem to despise riches, for they despise them that despair of them. ~ Francis Bacon,
370:He that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils; for time is the greatest innovator. ~ Francis Bacon,
371:I usually accept bribes from both sides so that tainted money can never influence my decision. ~ Francis Bacon,
372:Philosophy when superficially studied, excites doubt, when thoroughly explored, it dispels it. ~ Francis Bacon,
373:Nuptial love makes mankind; friendly love perfects it; but wanton love corrupts and debases it. ~ Francis Bacon,
374:Some books are to be tasted, others are to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon,
375:Love and envy make a man pine, which other affections do not, because they are not so continual. ~ Francis Bacon,
376:Of all the things in nature, the formation and endowment of man was singled out by the ancients. ~ Francis Bacon,
377:Praise from the common people is generally false, and rather follows the vain than the virtuous. ~ Francis Bacon,
378:Some books are to be tasted, others are to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon,
379:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few are to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon,
380:There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. —Sir Francis Bacon ~ Ruta Sepetys,
381:He agreed with Francis Bacon: Old friends to trust, old wood to burn, old authors to read. ~ Lilian Jackson Braun,
382:It is a sad fate for a man to die too well known to everybody else, and still unknown to himself. ~ Francis Bacon,
383:Judges ought to remember that their office is to interpret law, and not to make law, or give law. ~ Francis Bacon,
384:Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays, Of Studies.,
385:Worthy books are not companions - they are solitudes: we lose ourselves in them and all our cares ~ Francis Bacon,
386:Ask counsel of both timesof the ancient time what is best, and of the latter time what is fittest. ~ Francis Bacon,
387:Do not wonder if the common people speak more truly than those above them: they speak more safely. ~ Francis Bacon,
388:Envy is ever joined with the comparing of a man's self; and where there is no comparison, no envy. ~ Francis Bacon,
389:Houses are built to live in, and not to look on: therefore let use be preferred before uniformity. ~ Francis Bacon,
390:Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes; adversity not without many comforts and hopes. ~ Francis Bacon,
391:The correlative to loving our neighbors as ourselves is hating ourselves as we hate our neighbors. ~ Francis Bacon,
392:The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness. ~ Francis Bacon,
393:The vices of authority are chiefly four: delays, corruption, roughness and facility. Francis Bacon More ~ J D Robb,
394:If we are to achieve things never before accomplished we must employ methods never before attempted ~ Francis Bacon,
395:Write down the thoughts of the moment. Those that come unsought for are commonly the most valuable. ~ Francis Bacon,
396:Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen, and drowns things weighty and solid. ~ Francis Bacon,
397:If there be fuel prepared, it is hard to tell whence the spark shall come that shall set it on fire. ~ Francis Bacon,
398:Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes; and adversity is not without comforts and hopes. ~ Francis Bacon,
399:Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. ~ Sir Francis Bacon “Of Studies” (1597),
400:Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted...but to weigh and consider. ~ Francis Bacon,
401:Some books should be tasted, some devoured, but only a few should be chewed and digested thoroughly. ~ Francis Bacon,
402:The desire of excessive power caused the angels to fall; the desire of knowledge caused men to fall. ~ Francis Bacon,
403:The subtlety of nature is greater many times over than the subtlety of the senses and understanding. ~ Francis Bacon,
404:We are much beholden to Machiavel and others, that write what men do, and not what they ought to do. ~ Francis Bacon,
405:For all knowledge and wonder (which is the seed of knowledge) is an impression of pleasure in itself. ~ Francis Bacon,
406:God has placed no limits to the exercise of the intellect he has given us, on this side of the grave. ~ Francis Bacon,
407:Nothing doth so much keep men out of the Church, and drive men out of the Church, as breach of unity. ~ Francis Bacon,
408:Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted ...but to weigh and consider. ~ Francis Bacon,
409:Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted... but to weigh and consider. ~ Francis Bacon,
410:Aristotle... a mere bond-servant to his logic, thereby rendering it contentious and well nigh useless. ~ Francis Bacon,
411:For my name and memory I leave to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations and the next ages. ~ Francis Bacon,
412:Nupital love maketh mankind; friendly love perfecteth it; but wanton love corrupteth, and embaseth it. ~ Francis Bacon,
413:Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. FRANCIS BACON, “OF STUDIES ~ Guy Kawasaki,
414:There was never law, or sect, or opinion did so much magnify goodness, as the Christian religion doth. ~ Francis Bacon,
415:To say that a man lieth, is as much to say, as that he is brave towards God, and a coward towards men. ~ Francis Bacon,
416:We read that we ought to forgive our enemies; but we do not read that we ought to forgive our friends. ~ Francis Bacon,
417:Whence we see spiders, flies, or ants entombed and preserved forever in amber, a more than royal tomb. ~ Francis Bacon,
418:A man were better relate himself to a statue or picture than to suffer his thoughts to pass in smother. ~ Francis Bacon,
419:...to invent is to discover that we know not, and not to recover or resummon that which we already know ~ Francis Bacon,
420:it might be a long trip, so be careful not to wear your shoes out: you might need them in the afterlife. ~ Francis Bacon,
421:Seek ye first the good things of the mind, and the rest shall be provided or its loss shall not be felt. ~ Francis Bacon,
422:The nature of things betrays itself more readily under the vexations of art than in its natural freedom. ~ Francis Bacon,
423:The zeal which begins with hypocrisy must conclude in treachery at first it deceives, at last it betrays ~ Francis Bacon,
424:Discern of the coming on of years, and think not to do the same things still; for age will not be defied. ~ Francis Bacon,
425:Every person born in the USA is endowed with life, liberty, and a substantial share of the national debt. ~ Francis Bacon,
426:If I might control the literature of the household, I would guarantee the well-being of Church and State. ~ Francis Bacon,
427:In taking revenge, a man is but even with his enemy; but in passing it over, he is superior. FRANCIS BACON ~ A C Grayling,
428:There is no comparison between that which is lost by not succeeding and that which is lost by not trying. ~ Francis Bacon,
429:We must start human society from scratch; as Francis Bacon said, we must recreate human understanding. ~ Nicolas Chamfort,
430:When Christ came into the world, peace was sung; and when He went out of the world, peace was bequeathed. ~ Francis Bacon,
431:Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays (1625), "Of Studies".,
432:REVENGE is a kind of wild justice; which the more man’s nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out. ~ Francis Bacon,
433:The genius of any single man can no more equal learning, than a private purse hold way with the exchequer. ~ Francis Bacon,
434:There is nothing more certain in nature than that it is impossible for any body to be utterly annihilated. ~ Francis Bacon,
435:All of our actions take their hue from the complexion of the heart, as landscapes their variety from light. ~ Francis Bacon,
436:Books must follow sciences, and not sciences books."

[Proposition touching Amendment of Laws] ~ Francis Bacon,
437:For friends... do but look upon good Books: they are true friends, that will neither flatter nor dissemble. ~ Francis Bacon,
438:It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
439:It is nothing won to admit men with an open door, and to receive them with a shut and reserved countenance. ~ Francis Bacon,
440:Liberty of speech invites and provokes liberty to be used again, and so bringeth much to a man's knowledge. ~ Francis Bacon,
441:Certainly fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swoln, and drowns things weighty and solid. ~ Francis Bacon,
442:If my people look as if they're in a dreadful fix, it's because I can't get them out of a technical dilemma. ~ Francis Bacon,
443:Knowledge hath in it somewhat of the serpent, and therefore where it entereth into a man it makes him swell. ~ Francis Bacon,
444:Men leave their riches either to their kindred or their friends, and moderate portions prosper best in both. ~ Francis Bacon,
445:Revenge is a kind of wild justice, which the more a man's nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out. ~ Francis Bacon,
446:For cleanness of body was ever esteemed to proceed from a due reverence to God, to society, and to ourselves. ~ Francis Bacon,
447:It is good discretion not make too much of any man at the first; because one cannot hold out that proportion. ~ Francis Bacon,
448:Quien no quiere pensar es un fanático; quien no puede pensar es un idiota; quien no osa pensar es un cobarde. ~ Francis Bacon,
449:Seek ye first the good things of the mind, and the rest will either be supplied or its loss will not be felt. ~ Francis Bacon,
450:Since custom is the principal magistrate of man's life, let men by all means endeavor to obtain good customs. ~ Francis Bacon,
451:When a traveler returneth home, let him not leave the countries where he hath traveled altogether behind him. ~ Francis Bacon,
452:All the crimes on earth do not destroy so many of the human race nor alienate so much property as drunkenness. ~ Francis Bacon,
453:But men must know, that in this theatre of man's life it is reserved only for God and angels to be lookers on. ~ Francis Bacon,
454:Painting today is pure intuition and luck and taking advantage of what happens when you splash the stuff down. ~ Francis Bacon,
455:Princes are like heavenly bodies, which cause good or evil times, and which have much veneration, but no rest. ~ Francis Bacon,
456:If a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see fortune; for though she be blind, yet she is not invisible. ~ Francis Bacon,
457:The natures and dispositions of men are, not without truth, distinguished from the predominance of the planets. ~ Francis Bacon,
458:A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds; therefore let him seasonably water the one, and destroy the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
459:As the births of living creatures at first are ill-shapen, so are all innovations, which are the births of time. ~ Francis Bacon,
460:It is not the lie that passes through the mind, but the lie that sinks in and settles in it, that does the hurt. ~ Francis Bacon,
461:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon, Essay, Of Studies.,
462:A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds; therefore like him seasonably water the one, and destroy the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
463:Francis Bacon once said, “There arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. ~ Dan Simmons,
464:It has well been said that the arch-flatterer, with whom all petty flatterers have intelligence, is a man's self. ~ Francis Bacon,
465:Out of monuments, names, words proverbs ...and the like, we do save and recover somewhat from the deluge of time. ~ Francis Bacon,
466:The voice of the people has about it something divine: for how otherwise can so many heads agree together as one? ~ Francis Bacon,
467:This is certain, that a man that studieth revenge keeps his wounds green, which otherwise would heal and do well. ~ Francis Bacon,
468:A sudden bold and unexpected question doth many times surprise a man and lay him open. —Sir Francis Bacon, 1561-1626 ~ Susan Wiggs,
469:Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is. ~ Francis Bacon,
470:Judges must beware of hard constructions and strained inferences, for there is no worse torture than that of laws. ~ Francis Bacon,
471:There Are But Two Tragedies in Life-One is One's Inability to attain One's Heart's Desire-The Other Is To Have It! ~ Francis Bacon,
472:There ought to be gardens for all months in the year, in which, severally, things of beauty may be then in season. ~ Francis Bacon,
473:When a man laughs at his troubles he loses a great many friends. They never forgive the loss of their prerogative. ~ Francis Bacon,
474:Age appears best in four things: old wood to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust and old authors to read. ~ Francis Bacon,
475:A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion ~ Francis Bacon,
476:I paint for myself. I don't know how to do anything else, anyway. Also I have to earn my living, and occupy myself. ~ Francis Bacon,
477:It was prettily devised of Aesop, The fly sat on the axle tree of the chariot wheel and said, what dust do I raise! ~ Francis Bacon,
478:Money is like manure, it's not worth anything unless you spread it around to help young beautiful things grow. ~ Sir Francis Bacon,
479:Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. ~ Francis Bacon. Essays, chapter '"Of Studies" (1625).,
480:The pencil of the Holy Ghost hath labored more in describing the afflictions of Job than the felicities of Solomon. ~ Francis Bacon,
481:They who derive their worth from their ancestors resemble potatoes, the most valuable part of which is underground. ~ Francis Bacon,
482:A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion. ~ Francis Bacon,
483:Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried, or childless men. ~ Francis Bacon,
484:For the chain of causes cannot by any force be loosed or broken, nor can nature be commanded except by being obeyed. ~ Francis Bacon,
485:It is not the lie that passeth through the mind, but the lie that sinketh in and settleth in it, that doth the hurt. ~ Francis Bacon,
486:The mystery lies in the irrationality by which you make appearance - if it is not irrational, you make illustration. ~ Francis Bacon,
487:The person is a poor judge who by an action can be disgraced more in failing than they can be honored in succeeding. ~ Francis Bacon,
488:A little philosophy inclineth mans mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth mans minds about to religion.
   ~ Francis Bacon,
489:I love Francis Bacon. I just saw a great Jackson Pollock exhibit at the Dallas Museum when I was home for Thanksgiving. ~ Owen Wilson,
490:Seek not proud riches, but such as thou mayest get justly, use soberly, distribute cheerfully, and leave contentedly. ~ Francis Bacon,
491:The simple Francis Bacon axiom, one we constantly stressed to our students, applied here: Knowledge is power. Benedict ~ Harlan Coben,
492:Es error peculiar y perpetuo del entendimiento humano el que lo mueva y lo estimule más lo afirmativo que lo negativo. ~ Francis Bacon,
493:It is in life as it is in ways, the shortest way is commonly the foulest, and surely the fairer way is not much about. ~ Francis Bacon,
494:Men in great place are thrice servants: servants of the sovereign or state, servants of fame, and servants of business. ~ Francis Bacon,
495:Boldness is ever blind, for it sees not dangers and inconveniences whence it is bad in council though good in execution. ~ Francis Bacon,
496:Men are rather beholden ... generally to chance or anything else, than to logic, for the invention of arts and sciences. ~ Francis Bacon,
497:Men suppose their reason has command over their words; still it happens that words in return exercise authority on reason ~ Francis Bacon,
498:Therefore if a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see Fortune; for though she be blind, yet she is not invisible. ~ Francis Bacon,
499:A forbidden writing is thought to be a certain spark of truth, that flies up in the face of them who seek to tread it out. ~ Francis Bacon,
500:Nothing destroys authority more than the unequal and untimely interchange of power stretched too far and relaxed too much. ~ Francis Bacon,
501:Truth is a good dog; but always beware of barking too close to the heels of an error, lest you get your brains kicked out. ~ Francis Bacon,
502:I don't think people are born artists; I think it comes from a mixture of your surroundings, the people you meet, and luck. ~ Francis Bacon,
503:Men on their side must force themselves for a while to lay their notions by and begin to familiarize themselves with facts. ~ Francis Bacon,
504:The images of men's wit and knowledge remain in books, exempted from the worry of time and capable of perpetual renovation. ~ Francis Bacon,
505:For a crowd is not company; and faces are but a gallery of pictures; and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love. ~ Francis Bacon,
506:Let the mind be enlarged... to the grandeur of the mysteries, and not the mysteries contracted to the narrowness of the mind ~ Francis Bacon,
507:Disciples do owe their masters only a temporary belief, and a suspension of their own judgment till they be fully instructed. ~ Francis Bacon,
508:A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion. ~ Francis Bacon, Atheism,
509:It is a strange desire, to seek power, and to lose liberty; or to seek power over others, and to lose power over a man's self. ~ Francis Bacon,
510:There was never miracle wrought by God to convert an atheist, because the light of nature might have led him to confess a God. ~ Francis Bacon,
511:The understanding must not therefore be supplied with wings, but rather hung with weights, to keep it from leaping and flying. ~ Francis Bacon,
512:Age appears to be best in four things; old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read. ~ Francis Bacon,
513:Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth. ~ Francis Bacon,
514:Men fear death as children fear to go in the dark; and as that natural fear in children is increased by tales, so is the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
515:Reasoning draws a conclusion, but does not make the conclusion certain, unless the mind discovers it by the path of experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
516:Certainly man is of kin to the beasts by his body; and if he be not kin to God by his spirit, he is a base and ignoble creature. ~ Francis Bacon,
517:É da natureza do amor  — como Lucano observou há dois milênios e Francis Bacon repetiu muitos séculos depois — ser refém do destino. ~ Anonymous,
518:In civil business; what first? boldness; what second and third? boldness: and yet boldness is a child of ignorance and baseness. ~ Francis Bacon,
519:It is the peculiar and perpetual error of the human understanding to be more moved and excited by affirmatives than by negatives ~ Francis Bacon,
520:Mark what a generosity and courage (a dog) will put on when he finds himself maintained by a man, who to him is instead of a God ~ Francis Bacon,
521:Vain-glorious men are the scorn of the wise, the admiration of fools, the idols of paradise, and the slaves of their own vaunts. ~ Francis Bacon,
522:A man would die, though he were neither valiant, nor miserable, only upon a weariness to do the same thing so oft, over and over. ~ Francis Bacon,
523:It is the peculiar and perpetual error of the human understanding to be more moved and excited by affirmatives than by negatives. ~ Francis Bacon,
524:Men fear death as children fear to go into the dark and as that natural fear in children is increased with tales, so is the other ~ Francis Bacon,
525:Nothing opens the heart like a true friend, to whom you may impart griefs, joys, fears, hopes...and whatever lies upon the heart. ~ Francis Bacon,
526:To be free minded and cheerfully disposed at hours of meat and sleep and of exercise is one of the best precepts of long lasting. ~ Francis Bacon,
527:Whosoever is delighted in solitude,” goes the old saying that Francis Bacon repeated, “is either a wild beast or a god. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
528:But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. ~ Francis Bacon,
529:For it is most true that a natural and secret hatred and aversation towards society in any man, hath somewhat of the savage beast. ~ Francis Bacon,
530:I confess that I have as vast contemplative ends, as I have moderate civil ends: for I have taken all knowledge to be my province. ~ Francis Bacon,
531:Some paint comes across directly onto the nervous system and other paint tells you the story in a long diatribe through the brain. ~ Francis Bacon,
532:It is a miserable state of mind to have few things to desire and many things to fear. And yet that commonly is the case of kings... ~ Francis Bacon,
533:MEN fear death, as children fear to go in the dark; and as that natural fear in children, is increased with tales, so is the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
534:Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. ~ Francis Bacon,
535:The greatest vicissitude of things amongst men, is the vicissitude of sects and religions. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays. Of Vicissitude of Things (1625),
536:Be not penny-wise. Riches have wings. Sometimes they fly away of themselves, and sometimes they must be set flying to bring in more. ~ Francis Bacon,
537:Parents who wish to train up their children in the way they should go must go in the way in which they would have their children go. ~ Francis Bacon,
538:The human understanding is of its own nature prone to suppose the existence of more order and regularity in the world than it finds. ~ Francis Bacon,
539:The human understanding of its own nature is prone to suppose the existence of more order and regularity in the world than it finds. ~ Francis Bacon,
540:This communicating of a Man's Selfe to his Frend works two contrarie effects; for it re-doubleth Joys, and cutteth Griefs in halves. ~ Francis Bacon,
541:I had rather believe all the Fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a Mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
542:In all negotiations of difficulty, a man may not look to sow and reap at once; but must prepare business, and so ripen it by degrees. ~ Francis Bacon,
543:..it often falls out that somewhat is produced of nothing; for lies are sufficient to breed opinion, and opinion brings on substance. ~ Francis Bacon,
544:There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. —Francis Bacon, Essays, Civil and Moral, “Of Beauty ~ Scott Westerfeld,
545:When a doubt is once received, men labour rather how to keep it a doubt still, than how to solve it; and accordingly bend their wits. ~ Francis Bacon,
546:All painting is an accident. But it's also not an accident, because one must select what part of the accident one chooses to preserve. ~ Francis Bacon,
547:In mathematics I can report no deficiency, except it be that men do not sufficiently understand the excellent use of Pure Mathematics. ~ Francis Bacon,
548:Even within the most beautiful landscape, in the trees, under the leaves the insects are eating each other; violence is a part of life. ~ Francis Bacon,
549:If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts, but if he will content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties. ~ Francis Bacon,
550:The errors of young men are the ruin of business, but the errors of aged men amount to this, that more might have been done, or sooner. ~ Francis Bacon,
551:For fountains, they are a Great Beauty and Refreshment, but Pools mar all, and make the Garden unwholesome, and full of Flies and Frogs. ~ Francis Bacon,
552:Good fame is like fire; when you have kindled you may easily preserve it; but if you extinguish it, you will not easily kindle it again. ~ Francis Bacon,
553:If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties ~ Francis Bacon,
554:That things are changed, and that nothing really perishes, and that the sum of matter remains exactly the same, is sufficiently certain. ~ Francis Bacon,
555:If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. ~ Francis Bacon,
556:If you dissemble sometimes your knowledge of that you are thought to know, you shall be thought, another time, to know that you know not. ~ Francis Bacon,
557:I knew a wise man that had it for a by-word, when he saw men hasten to a conclusion, "Stay a little, that we may make an end the sooner." ~ Francis Bacon,
558:I should have been, I don't know, a con-man, a robber or a prostitute. But it was vanity that made me choose painting, vanity and chance. ~ Francis Bacon,
559:The human understanding, from its peculiar nature, easily supposes a greater degree of order and equality in things than it really finds. ~ Francis Bacon,
560:Francis Bacon once remarked that “some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.” Reading ~ Mortimer J Adler,
561:If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties. ~ Francis Bacon,
562:Observation and experiment for gathering material, induction and deduction for elaborating it: these are are only good intellectual tools. ~ Francis Bacon,
563:He that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. ~ Francis Bacon,
564:The divisions of science are not like different lines that meet in one angle, but rather like the branches of trees that join in one trunk. ~ Francis Bacon,
565:For whatever deserves to exist deserves also to be known, for knowledge is the image of existence, and things mean and splendid exist alike. ~ Francis Bacon,
566:He was reputed one of the wise men that made answer to the question when a man should marry? 'A young man not yet, an elder man not at all.' ~ Francis Bacon,
567:Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend. ~ Francis Bacon,
568:If a man's wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the schoolmen; for they are cymini sectores, splitters of hairs. ~ Francis Bacon,
569:It is madness and a contradiction to expect that things which were never yet performed should be effected, except by means hitherto untried. ~ Francis Bacon,
570:Atheism leads a man to sense, to philosophy, to natural piety, to laws, to reputation: all of which may be guides to an outward moral virtue. ~ Francis Bacon,
571:Defer not charities till death; for certainly, if a man weigh it rightly, he that doth so is rather liberal of another man's than of his own. ~ Francis Bacon,
572:He that cometh to seek after knowledge, with a mind to scorn, shall be sure to find matter for his humour, but no matter for his instruction. ~ Francis Bacon,
573:Let every student of nature take this as his rule, that whatever the mind seizes upon with particular satisfaction is to be held in suspicion. ~ Francis Bacon,
574:Riches are for spending, and spending for honor and good actions; therefore extraordinary expense must be limited by the worth of the occasion. ~ Francis Bacon,
575:...the specious meditations, speculations, and theories of mankind are but a kind of insanity, only there is no one to stand by and observe it. ~ Francis Bacon,
576:Men seem neither to understand their riches nor their strength. Of the former they believe greater things than they should; of the latter, less. ~ Francis Bacon,
577:Young people are fitter to invent than to judge; fitter for execution than for counsel; and more fit for new projects than for settled business. ~ Francis Bacon,
578:Let no one think or maintain that a person can search too far or be too well studied in either the book of God's word or the book of God's works. ~ Francis Bacon,
579:One of the Seven [wise men of Greece] was wont to say: That laws were like cobwebs, where the small flies are caught and the great break through. ~ Francis Bacon,
580:And as for Mixed Mathematics, I may only make this prediction, that there cannot fail to be more kinds of them, as nature grows further disclosed. ~ Francis Bacon,
581:I don't believe art is available; it's rare and curious and should be completely isolated; one is more aware of its magic the more it is isolated. ~ Francis Bacon,
582:If a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. ~ Francis Bacon,
583:Wise sayings are not only for ornament, but for action and business, having a point or edge, whereby knots in business are pierced and discovered. ~ Francis Bacon,
584:Christopher Marlowe or Francis Bacon The author of Lear remains unshaken Willie Herbert or Mary Fitton What does it matter? The Sonnets were written. ~ Noel Coward,
585:Discretion of speech is more than eloquence, and to speak agreeably to him with whom we deal is more than to speak in good words, or in good order. ~ Francis Bacon,
586:Judges ought above all to remember the conclusion of the Roman Twelve Tables :The supreme law of all is the weal [weatlh/ well-being] of the people. ~ Francis Bacon,
587:The general root of superstition is that men observe when things hit, and not when they miss, and commit to memory the one, and pass over the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
588:Before I start painting I have a slightly ambiguous feeling: happiness is a special excitement because unhappiness is always possible a moment later. ~ Francis Bacon,
589:The master of superstition, is the people; and in all superstition, wise men follow fools; and arguments are fitted to practice, in a reversed order. ~ Francis Bacon,
590:We gave ourselves for lost men, and prepared for death. Yet we did lift up our hearts and voices to God above, who "showeth His wonders in the deep". ~ Francis Bacon,
591:A king that would not feel his crown too heavy for him, must wear it every day; but if he think it too light, he knoweth not of what metal it is made. ~ Francis Bacon,
592:If money be not thy servant, it will be thy master. The covetous man cannot so properly be said to possess wealth, as that may be said to possess him. ~ Francis Bacon,
593:People usually think according to their inclinations, speak according to their learning and ingrained opinions, but generally act according to custom. ~ Francis Bacon,
594:Philosophers make imaginary laws for imaginary commonwealths, and their discourses are as the stars, which give little light because they are so high. ~ Francis Bacon,
595:A principal fruit of friendship, is the ease and discharge of the fullness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. ~ Francis Bacon,
596:Atheism leads a man to sense, to philosophy, to natural piety, to laws, to reputation: all of which may be guides to an outward moral virtue. (c. 1625) ~ Francis Bacon,
597:In sciences that are based on supposition and opinion…the object is to command assent, not to master the thing itself. FRANCIS BACON, Novum Organum, 1620 ~ Gary Taubes,
598:Let every student of nature take this as a rule,-- that whatever his mind seizes and dwells upon with peculiar satisfaction is to be held in suspicion. ~ Francis Bacon,
599:Croesus said to Cambyses; That peace was better than war; because in peace the sons did bury their fathers, but in wars the fathers did bury their sons. ~ Francis Bacon,
600:If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties.” —Francis Bacon ~ Pete Wilson,
601:If you want to convey fact, this can only ever be done through a form of distortion. You must distort to transform what is called appearance into image. ~ Francis Bacon,
602:Brutes by their natural instinct have produced many discoveries, whereas men by discussion and the conclusions of reason have given birth to few or none. ~ Francis Bacon,
603:But we may go further, and affirm most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends; without which the world is but a wilderness. ~ Francis Bacon,
604:It is a good point of cunning for a man to shape the answer he would have in his own words and propositions, for it makes the other party stick the less. ~ Francis Bacon,
605:When any of the four pillars of government-religion, justice, counsel, and treasure-are mainly shaken or weakened, men had need to pray for fair weather. ~ Francis Bacon,
606:Of all things known to mortals, wine is the most powerful and effectual for exciting and inflaming the passions of mankind, being common fuel to them all. ~ Francis Bacon,
607:There was never law, or sect, or opinion did so much magnify goodness, as the Christian religion doth. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays. Of Goodness, and Goodness of Nature (1625),
608:The way of fortune, is like the Milken Way in the sky; which is a meeting or knot of a number of small stars; not seen asunder, but giving light together. ~ Francis Bacon,
609:For better it is to make a beginning of that which may lead to something, than to engage in a perpetual struggle and pursuit in courses which have no exit. ~ Francis Bacon,
610:In revenge a man is but even with his enemy; for it is a princely thing to pardon, and Solomon saith it is the glory of a man to pass over a transgression. ~ Francis Bacon,
611:Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. ~ Sir Francis Bacon “Of Studies” (1597),
612:The human understanding is no dry light, but receives an infusion from the will and affections... What a man had rather were true he more readily believes. ~ Francis Bacon,
613:La naturaleza del amor implica —tal como lo observó Lucano dos milenios atrás y lo repitió Francis Bacon muchos siglos más tarde— ser un rehén del destino. ~ Zygmunt Bauman,
614:Begin doing what you want to do now. We are not living in eternity. We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand and melting like a snowflake. ~ Francis Bacon,
615:Nay, number itself in armies importeth not much, where the people is of weak courage; for, as Virgil saith, It never troubles the wolf how many the sheep be. ~ Francis Bacon,
616:To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament is affection; to make judgment wholly by their rules is the humor of a scholar. ~ Francis Bacon,
617:Because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical. ~ Francis Bacon,
618:If in other sciences we should arrive at certainty without doubt and truth without error, it behooves us to place the foundations of knowledge in mathematics. ~ Francis Bacon,
619:It is rightly laid down that 'true knowledge is knowledge by causes'. Also the establishment of four causes is not bad: material, formal, efficient and final. ~ Francis Bacon,
620:Velazquez found the perfect balance between the ideal illustration which he was required to produce, and the overwhelming emotion he aroused in the spectator. ~ Francis Bacon,
621:Begin doing what you want to do now. We are not living in eternity. We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand - and melting like a snowflake. ~ Francis Bacon,
622:Libraries are as the shrine where all the relics of the ancient saints, full of true virtue, and that without delusion or imposture, are preserved and reposed. ~ Francis Bacon,
623:The first remedy or prevention is to remove, by all means possible, that material cause of sedition whereof we spake; which is, want and poverty in the estate. ~ Francis Bacon,
624:To seek to extinguish anger utterly is but a bravery of the Stoics. We have better oracles: 'Be angry, but sin not.' 'Let not the sun go down upon your wrath.' ~ Francis Bacon,
625:A good name is like precious ointment ; it filleth all round about, and will not easily away; for the odors of ointments are more durable than those of flowers. ~ Francis Bacon,
626:Begin doing what you want to do now. We are not living in eternity. We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand--and melting like a snowflake... ~ Francis Bacon,
627:Then bless thy secret growth, nor catch At noise, but thrive unseen and dumb; Keep clean, be as fruit, earn life, and watch, Till the white-wing'd reapers come. ~ Francis Bacon,
628:To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar ~ Francis Bacon,
629:No body can be healthful without exercise, neither natural body nor politic: and certainly to a kingdom or state, a just and honourable war is the true exercise. ~ Francis Bacon,
630:Of all virtues and dignities of the mind, goodness is the greatest, being the character of the Deity; and without it, man is a busy, mischievous, wretched thing. ~ Francis Bacon,
631:Virtue is like precious odours, more fragrant when they are incensed or crushed; for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue. ~ Francis Bacon,
632:I always say Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is my biggest influence. But for painters, I like many, many painters, but I love Francis Bacon the most, and Edward Hopper. ~ David Lynch,
633:I like, you may say, the glitter and colour that comes from the mouth, and I've always hoped in a sense to be able to paint the mouth like Monet painted a sunset. ~ Francis Bacon,
634:It was a high speech of Seneca that "The good things which belong to prosperity are to be wished, but the good things that belong to adversity are to be admired." ~ Francis Bacon,
635:It would be unsound fancy and self-contradictory to expect that things which have never yet been done can be done except by means which have never yet been tried. ~ Francis Bacon,
636:Lukewarm persons think they may accommodate points of religion by middle ways and witty reconcilements,--as if they would make an arbitrament between God and man. ~ Francis Bacon,
637:The human understanding is like a false mirror, which, receiving rays irregularly, distorts and discolors the nature of things by mingling its own nature with it. ~ Francis Bacon,
638:To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humour of a scholar. ~ Francis Bacon,
639:Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtile; natural philosophy, deep; morals, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays, Of Studies.,
640:The poets did well to conjoin music and medicine, in Apollo, because the office of medicine is but to tune the curious harp of man's body and reduce it to harmony. ~ Francis Bacon,
641:Look upon good books; they are true friends, that will neither flatter nor dissemble: be you but true to yourself...and you shall need no other comfort nor counsel. ~ Francis Bacon,
642:Such philosophy as shall not vanish in the fume of subtile, sublime, or delectable speculation but shall be operative to the endowment and betterment of man's life. ~ Francis Bacon,
643:The noblest works and foundations have proceeded from childless men, which have sought to express the images of their minds where those of their bodies have failed. ~ Francis Bacon,
644:There is a wisdom in this beyond the rules of physic: a man's own observation what he finds good of and what he finds hurt of is the best physic to preserve health. ~ Francis Bacon,
645:The general root of superstition : namely, that men observe when things hit, and not when they miss; and commit to memory the one, and forget and pass over the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
646:[W]hen any of the four pillars of government are mainly shaken or weakened (which are religion, justice, counsel and treasure), men had need to pray for fair weather. ~ Francis Bacon,
647:In every great time there is some one idea at work which is more powerful than any other, and which shapes the events of the time and determines their ultimate issues. ~ Francis Bacon,
648:Solomon saith, 'He that considereth the wind, shall not sow, and he that looketh to the clouds, shall not reap.' A wise man will make more opportunities, than he finds. ~ Francis Bacon,
649:Prosperity is the blessing of the Old Testament; adversity is the blessing of the New; which carrieth the greater benediction, and the clearer revelation of God’s favor. ~ Francis Bacon,
650:The cause and root of nearly all evils in the sciences is this-that while we falsely admire and extol the powers of the human mind we neglect to seek for its true helps. ~ Francis Bacon,
651:To spend too much time in them [studying] is sloth, to use them too much for ornament is affectation, to make judgment wholly by their rules is the humor* of a scholar…. ~ Francis Bacon,
652:A picture should be a re-creation of an event rather than an illustration of an object; but there is no tension in the picture unless there is a struggle with the object. ~ Francis Bacon,
653:All artists are vain, they long to be recognized and to leave something to posterity. They want to be loved, and at the same time they want to be free. But nobody is free. ~ Francis Bacon,
654:Certainly virtue is like precious odors, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue. ~ Francis Bacon,
655:For friendship maketh indeed a fair day in the affections, from storm and tempests; but it maketh daylight in the understanding, out of darkness and confusion of thoughts. ~ Francis Bacon,
656:I use all sorts of things to work with: old brooms, old sweaters, and all kinds of peculiar tools and materials... I paint to excite myself, and make something for myself. ~ Francis Bacon,
657:You cannot teach a child to take care of himself unless you will let him try to take care of himself. He will make mistakes and out of these mistakes will come his wisdom. ~ Francis Bacon,
658:Amo le ferite, gli incidenti, i malesseri, le situazioni in cui la realtà abbandona i suoi fantasmi...
Ma la bruttezza puà essere interessante e affascinante, non è così? ~ Francis Bacon,
659:Judges ought to be more learned, than witty, more reverend, than plausible, and more advised, than confident. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue. ~ Francis Bacon,
660:The End of our Foundation is the knowledge of Causes; and secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible. ~ Francis Bacon,
661:There is a cunning which we in England call "the turning of the cat" in the pan; which is, when that which a man says to another, he says it as if another had said it to him. ~ Francis Bacon,
662:For the unlearned man knows not what it is to descend into himself, or to call himself to account, nor the pleasure of that suavissima vita, indies sentire se fieri meliorem.  ~ Francis Bacon,
663:...neither is it possible to discover the more remote and deeper parts of any science, if you stand but upon the level of the same science, and ascend not to a higher science. ~ Francis Bacon,
664:There is a difference between happiness and wisdom: he that thinks himself the happiest man is really so; but he that thinks himself the wisest is generally the greatest fool. ~ Francis Bacon,
665:In things that are tender and unpleasing, it is good to break the ice by some one whose words are of less weight, and to reserve the more weighty voice to come in as by chance. ~ Francis Bacon,
666:Jika kita memulainya dengan kepastian, kita akan berakhir dengan keraguan,tetapi jika memulainya dengan keraguan, dan bersabar menghadapinya, kita akan berakhir dengan kepastian ~ Francis Bacon,
667:Generally he perceived in men of devout simplicity this opinion: that the secrets of nature were the secrets of God, part of that glory into which man is not to press too boldly. ~ Francis Bacon,
668:Natural abilities are like natural plants, that need pruning by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
669:Crafty men condemn studies; Simple men admire them; And wise men use them: For they teach not their own use: but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation. ~ Francis Bacon,
670:God has, in fact, written two books, not just one. Of course, we are all familiar with the first book he wrote, namely Scripture. But he has written a second book called creation. ~ Francis Bacon,
671:Natural abilities are like natural plants, that need pruning, by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience. ~ Francis Bacon,
672:There is nothing makes a man suspect much, more than to know little, and therefore men should remedy suspicion by procuring to know more, and not keep their suspicions in smother. ~ Francis Bacon,
673:But by far the greatest obstacle to the progress of science and to the undertaking of new tasks and provinces therein is found in this-that men despair and think things impossible. ~ Francis Bacon,
674:There was never proud man thought so absurdly well of himself, as the lover doth of the person loved; and therefore it was well said, That it is impossible to love, and to be wise. ~ Francis Bacon,
675:Aristotle... a mere bond-servant to his logic, thereby rendering it contentious... ~ Francis Bacon,
676:I have to hope that my instincts will do the right thing, because I can't erase what I have done. And if I drew something first, then my paintings would be illustrations of drawings. ~ Francis Bacon,
677:Painting is a duality and abstract painting is an entirely aesthetic thing. It always remains on one level. It is only really interesting in the beauty of its patterns or its shapes. ~ Francis Bacon,
678:The human understanding when it has once adopted an opinion (either as being the received opinion or as being agreeable to itself) draws all things else to support and agree with it. ~ Francis Bacon,
679:Man, as the minister and interpreter of nature, is limited in act and understanding by his observation of the order of nature; neither his understanding nor his power extends further. ~ Francis Bacon,
680:I'll follow, as they say, for reward. He that rewards me, God reward him. If I do grow great, I'll grow less; for I'll purge, and leave sack, and live cleanly, as a nobleman should do. ~ Francis Bacon,
681:There is no passion in the mind of man so weak, but it mates and masters the fear of death . . . Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it. ~ Francis Bacon,
682:The universe must not be narrowed down to the limit of our understanding, but our understanding must be stretched and enlarged to take in the image of the universe as it is discovered. ~ Francis Bacon,
683:Images also help me find and realise ideas. I look at hundreds of very different, contrasting images and I pinch details from them, rather like people who eat from other people`s plates. ~ Francis Bacon,
684:No artist knows in his own lifetime whether what he does will be the slightest good, because it takes at least seventy-five to a hundred years before the thing begins to sort itself out. ~ Francis Bacon,
685:Suspicions that the mind, of itself, gathers, are but buzzes; but suspicions that are artificially nourished and put into men's heads by the tales and whisperings of others, have stings. ~ Francis Bacon,
686:But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. ~ Francis Bacon, Advancement of Learning, Book I. Advantages of Learning.,
687:He that seeketh to be eminent amongst able men hath a great task; but that is ever good for the public. But he that plots to be the only figure amongst ciphers is the decay of a whole age. ~ Francis Bacon,
688:The eye of the human understanding is not a naked organ of perception (lumen siccum), but an eye imbued with moisture by Will and Passion. Man always believes what he determines to believe. ~ Francis Bacon,
689:It cannot be denied that outward accidents conduce much to fortune, favor, opportunity, death of others, occasion fitting virtue; but chiefly, the mold of a man's fortune is in his own hands ~ Francis Bacon,
690:People of age object too much, consult too long, adventure too little, repent too soon and seldom drive business home to it's conclusion, but content themselves with a mediocrity of success. ~ Francis Bacon,
691:They are the best physicians, who being great in learning most incline to the traditions of experience, or being distinguished in practice do not reflect the methods and generalities of art. ~ Francis Bacon,
692:Men ought to find the difference between saltiness and bitterness. Certainly, he that hath a satirical vein, as he maketh others afraid of his wit, so he had need be afraid of others' memory. ~ Francis Bacon,
693:The images of mens wits and knowledge remain in books. They generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages ~ Francis Bacon,
694:Again men have been kept back as by a kind of enchantment from progress in science by reverence for antiquity, by the authority of men counted great in philosophy, and then by general consent. ~ Francis Bacon,
695:I would like my pictures to look as if a human being had passed between them, like a snail, leaving a trail of the human presence and memory trace of past events, as the snail leaves its slime. ~ Francis Bacon,
696:The desire of power in excess caused the angels to fall; the desire of knowledge in excess caused man to fall: but in charity there is no excess; neither can angel nor man come in danger by it. ~ Francis Bacon,
697:Men of noble birth are noted to be envious towards new men when they rise. For the distance is altered, and it is like a deceit of the eye, that when others come on they think themselves go back. ~ Francis Bacon,
698:One always starts work with the subject, no matter how tenuous it is, and one constructs an artificial structure by which one can trap the reality of the subject-matter that one has started from. ~ Francis Bacon,
699:Salomon saith, There is no new thing upon the earth. So that as Plato had an imagination, that all knowledge was but remembrance; so Salomon giveth his sentence, that all novelty is but oblivion. ~ Francis Bacon,
700:An illustrational form tells you through the intelligence immediately what the form is about, whereas a non-illustrational form works first upon sensation and then slowly leaks back into the fact. ~ Francis Bacon,
701:First the amendment of their own minds. For the removal of the impediments of the mind will sooner clear the passages of fortune than the obtaining fortune will remove the impediments of the mind. ~ Francis Bacon,
702:I've had photographs taken for portraits because I very much prefer working from the photographs than from models... I couldn't attempt to do a portrait from photographs of somebody I didn't know. ~ Francis Bacon,
703:The essential form of knowledge... is nothing but a representation of truth: for the truth of being and the truth of knowing are one, differing no more than the direct beam and the beam reflected. ~ Francis Bacon,
704:The lame (as they say) in the path outstrip the swift who wander from it, and it is clear that the very skill and swiftness of him who runs not in the right direction must increase his aberration. ~ Francis Bacon,
705:When a bee stings, she dies. She cannot sting and live. When men sting, their better selves die. Every sting kills a better instinct. Men must not turn bees and kill themselves in stinging others. ~ Francis Bacon,
706:A man cannot speak to his son, but as a father; to his wife, but as a husband; to his enemy, but upon terms: whereas a friend may speak, as the case requires, and not as it sorteth with the person. ~ Francis Bacon,
707:The logic now in use serves rather to fix and give stability to the errors which have their foundation in commonly received notions than to help the search for truth. So it does more harm than good. ~ Francis Bacon,
708:The eye of understanding is like the eye of the sense; for as you may see great objects through small crannies or levels, so you may see great axioms of nature through small and contemptible instances. ~ Francis Bacon,
709:The light that a man receives by counsel from another is drier and purer than that which comes from his own understanding and judgment, which is ever infused and drenched in his affections and customs. ~ Francis Bacon,
710:They that deny a God destroy man's nobility; for certainly man is of kin to the beasts by his body; and, if he be not of kin to God by his spirit, he is a base and ignoble creature. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays, Of Atheism,
711:Above all, believe it, the sweetest canticle is Nunc dimittis, when a man hath obtained worthy ends and expectations. Death hath this also, that it openeth the gate to good fame, and extinguisheth envy. ~ Francis Bacon,
712:Again there is another great and powerful cause why the sciences have made but little progress; which is this. It is not possible to run a course aright when the goal itself has not been rightly placed. ~ Francis Bacon,
713:Truth is a naked and open daylight, that does not show the masques, and mummeries, and triumphs of the world, half so stately and daintily as candle-lights. . . A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure ~ Francis Bacon,
714:It is the true office of history to represent the events themselves, together with the counsels, and to leave the observations and conclusions thereupon to the liberty and faculty of every man's judgment ~ Francis Bacon,
715:Reading maketh a full man; and writing an axact man. And, therefore, if a man write little, he need have a present wit; and if he read little, he need have much cunning to seem to know which he doth not. ~ Francis Bacon,
716:There are two books laid before us to study, to prevent our falling into error; first, the volume of the Scriptures, which reveal the will of God; then the volume of the Creatures, which express His power. ~ Francis Bacon,
717:There was a young man in Rome that was very like Augustus Caesar; Augustus took knowledge of it and sent for the man, and asked him "Was your mother never at Rome?" He answered "No Sir; but my father was." ~ Francis Bacon,
718:But I account the use that a man should seek of the publishing of his own writings before his death, to be but an untimely anticipation of that which is proper to follow a man, and not to go along with him. ~ Francis Bacon,
719:Pyrrhus, when his friends congratulated to him his victory over the Romans under Fabricius, but with great slaughter of his own side, said to them, "Yes; but if we have such another victory, we are undone." ~ Francis Bacon,
720:Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. He that travelleth into a country before he hath some entrance into the language, goeth to school, and not to travel. ~ Francis Bacon,
721:That conceit, elegantly expressed by the Emperor Charles V., in his instructions to the King, his son, "that fortune hath somewhat the nature of a woman, that if she be too much wooed she is the farther off. ~ Francis Bacon,
722:He that gives good advice, builds with one hand; he that gives good counsel and example, builds with both; but he that gives good admonition and bad example, builds with one hand and pulls down with the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
723:The study of nature with a view to works is engaged in by the mechanic, the mathematician, the physician, the alchemist, and the magician; but by all as things now are with slight endeavour and scanty success. ~ Francis Bacon,
724:Being also a poet, he put Francis Bacon into doggerel: You glorify Nature and meditate on her; Why not domesticate her and regulate her? You obey Nature and sing her praise; Why not control her course and use it? ~ Will Durant,
725:He that gives good advice, builds with one hand; he that gives good counsel and example, builds with both; but he that gives good admonition and bad example, builds with one hand and pulls down with the other. ~ Francis Bacon,
726:A little philosophy inclineth man’s mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men’s minds about to religion. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays, Atheism. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 596-97.,
727:I remember Francis Bacon would say that he felt he was giving art what he thought it previously lacked. With me, it's what Yeats called the fascination with what's difficult. I'm only trying to do what I can't do. ~ Lucian Freud,
728:...it is the peculiar and perpetual error of the human intellect to be more moved and excited by affirmatives than by negatives; whereas it ought properly to hold itself indifferently disposed towards both alike. ~ Francis Bacon,
729:Men in great place are thrice servants, servants to the sovereign or state, servants of fame, and servants of business, so as they have freedom, neither in their persons, nor in their actions, nor in their times. ~ Francis Bacon,
730:Studies serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight is in privateness and retiring; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgement and execution of business. ~ Francis Bacon,
731:You want accuracy, but not representation. If you know how to make the figuration, it doesn't work. Anything you can make, you make by accident. In painting, you have to know what you do, not how, when you do it. ~ Francis Bacon,
732:The inquiry of truth, which is the love-making, or the wooing of it, the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it, and the belief of truth, which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature. ~ Francis Bacon,
733:He [Francis Bacon] was a devoutly religious man and was convinced that he would rather believe all the fables of antiquity than deny that the vast fabric of creation is without a mind. ~ Manly P Hall, The Bible, the Story of a Book,
734:Nakedness is uncomely, as well in mind as body, and it addeth no small reverence to men's manners and actions if they be not altogether open. Therefore set it down: That a habit of secrecy is both politic and moral. ~ Francis Bacon,
735:There is as much difference between the counsel that a friend giveth, and that a man giveth himself, as there is between the counsel of a friend and of a flatterer. For there is no such flatterer as is a man's self. ~ Francis Bacon,
736:He [Francis Bacon] was a devoutly religious man and was convinced that he would rather believe all the fables of antiquity than deny that the vast fabric of creation is without a mind. ~ Manly P Hall, The Bible, the Story of a Book,
737:The doctrines of religion are resolved into carefulness; carefulness into vigorousness; vigorousness into guiltlessness; guiltlessness into abstemiousness; abstemiousness into cleanliness; cleanliness into godliness. ~ Francis Bacon,
738:The productions of the mind and hand seem very numerous in books and manufactures. But all this variety lies in an exquisite subtlety and derivations from a few things already known, not in the number of axioms. VIII ~ Francis Bacon,
739:For first of all we must prepare a Natural and Experimental History, sufficient and good; and this is the foundation of all; for we are not to imagine or suppose, but to discover, what nature does or may be made to do. ~ Francis Bacon,
740:Man, being the servant and interpreter of Nature, can do and understand so much and so much only as he has observed in fact or thought of the course of nature; beyond this he neither knows anything nor can do anything. ~ Francis Bacon,
741:My praise shall be dedicated to the mind itself. The mind is the man, and the knowledge is the mind. A man is but what he knoweth. The mind is but an accident to knowledge, for knowledge is the double of that which is. ~ Francis Bacon,
742:Salomon saith, There is no new thing upon the earth. So that as Plato had an imagination, that all knowledge was but remembrance; so Salomon giveth his sentence, that all novelty is but oblivion. ~ Francis Bacon,
743:God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man’s mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men’s minds about to religion. ~ Francis Bacon,
744:I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto. ~ Francis Bacon,
745:The main importance of Francis Bacon's influence does not lie in any peculiar theory of inductive reasoning which he happened to express, but in the revolt against second-hand information of which he was a leader. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
746:Despise no new accident in your body, but ask opinion of it… There is a wisdom in this beyond the rules of physic. A man’s observation, what he finds good and of what he finds hurt of, is the best physic to preserve health. ~ Francis Bacon,
747:The stage is more beholding to love than the life of man. For as to the stage, love is ever matter of comedies and now and then of tragedies; but in life it doth much mischief, sometimes like a Siren, sometimes like a Fury. ~ Francis Bacon,
748:Habit, if wisely and skillfully formed, becomes truly a second nature; but unskillfully and unmethodically depicted, it will be as it were an ape of nature, which imitates nothing to the life, but only clumsily and awkwardly ~ Francis Bacon,
749:Human knowledge and human power meet in one; for where the cause is not known the effect cannot be produced. Nature to be commanded must be obeyed; and that which in contemplation is as the cause is in operation as the rule. ~ Francis Bacon,
750:There is no doubt but men of genius and leisure may carry our method to greater perfection, but, having had long experience, we have found none equal to it for the commodiousness it affords in working with the Understanding. ~ Francis Bacon,
751:Whoseoever is delighted in solitude, is either a wild beast or a god. Certain it is that the light that a man receiveth by counsel from another is drier and purer than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgment. ~ Francis Bacon,
752:But I find with Francis Bacon, some of the things were in the place, and someone who was connected with these schools of thought, and someone who had a motivation that equals the scope of the comedy and the tragedy in the plays. ~ Mark Rylance,
753:He that seeketh victory over his nature, let him not set himself too great, nor too small tasks; for the first will make him dejected by often failings; and the second will make him a small proceeder, though often by prevailings. ~ Francis Bacon,
754:He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?. ~ Francis Bacon,
755:I don't know who made up this sort of greatest-hits list for artists. If one artist isn't moving forward anymore, then it's assumed another one is going to take their place. With Francis Bacon's death, a whole genre of art died. ~ Georg Baselitz,
756:The rising unto place is laborious, and by pains men come to greater pains; and it is sometimes base, and by indignities men come to dignities. The standing is slippery, and the regress is either a downfall, or at least an eclipse. ~ Francis Bacon,
757:But it is not only the difficulty and labor which men take in finding out of truth, nor again that when it is found it imposeth upon men's thoughts, that doth bring lies in favor; but a natural though corrupt love of the lie itself. ~ Francis Bacon,
758:Él estaba convencido, al igual que Platón, de que la definición de la ciudadanía en una democracia es la participación en el gobierno y que, como escribió Francis Bacon: «Solo a Dios y a los ángeles les está reservado ser espectadores». ~ Anonymous,
759:My early paintings weren't that good - I was very influenced by Francis Bacon. But there was a kind of intensity there. And however influenced they may have been by other people, even my earliest paintings were recognisably my own. ~ Julian Schnabel,
760:Great art is deeply ordered. Even if within the order there may be enormously instinctive and accidental things, nevertheless they come out of a desire for ordering and for returning fact onto the nervous system in a more violent way. ~ Francis Bacon,
761:Some artists leave remarkable things which, a 100 years later, don't work at all. I have left my mark; my work is hung in museums, but maybe one day the Tate Gallery or the other museums will banish me to the cellar... you never know. ~ Francis Bacon,
762:The noblest works and foundations have proceeded from childless men, which have sought to express the image of their minds, where those of their bodies have failed. So the care of posterity is most in them that they have no posterity. ~ Francis Bacon,
763:You cannot just be working in a vast, air-conditioned loft space and think you are going to make a decent painting. Francis Bacon had a special studio built, and he felt completely emasculated in there. I have to be somewhere comfortable. ~ Peter Doig,
764:Learning hath his infancy, when it is but beginning and almost childish; then his youth, when it is luxuriant and juvenile; then his strength of years, when it is solid and reduced; and lastly his old age, when it waxeth dry and exhaust. ~ Francis Bacon,
765:Hacia el Este, la navegación por las aguas de Egipto y Palestina era, igualmente, intensa. También China y la Gran Atlántida (que ustedes llaman América), que ahora sólo cuentan con juncos y canoas, abundaba en grandes embarcaciones. Esta ~ Francis Bacon,
766:I foresee it and yet I hardly ever carry it out as I foresee it. It transforms itself by the actual paint. I don't in fact know very often what the paint will do, and it does many things which are very much better than I could make it do. ~ Francis Bacon,
767:I want to make portraits and images. I don't know how. Out of despair, I just use paint anyway. Suddenly the things you make coagulate and take on just the shape you intend. Totally accurate marks, which are outside representational marks. ~ Francis Bacon,
768:As you work, the mood grows on you. There are certain images which suddenly get hold of me and I really want to do them. But it's true to say that the excitement and possibilities are in the working and obviously can only come in the working. ~ Francis Bacon,
769:It is idle to expect any great advancement in science from the superinducing and engrafting of new things upon old. We must begin anew from the very foundations, unless we would revolve for ever in a circle with mean and contemptible progress. ~ Francis Bacon,
770:Solomon saith: There is no new thing upon
the earth. So that as Plato had an imagination,
that all knowledge was but remembrance; so
Solomon giveth his sentence, that all novelty is
but oblivion.
Francis Bacon: Essays, LVIII ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
771:I like Francis Bacon best, because Francis Bacon has terrific problems, and he knows that he is not going to solve them, but he knows also that he can escape from day to day and stay alive, and he does that because his work gives him a kick. ~ Louise Bourgeois,
772:Very few people have a natural feeling for painting, and so, of course, they naturally think that painting is an expression of the artist's mood. But it rarely is. Very often he may be in greatest despair and be painting his happiest paintings. ~ Francis Bacon,
773:Aphorisms, representing a knowledge broken, do invite men to inquire further; whereas methods, carrying the show of a total, do secure men, as if they were at furthest. ~ Francis Bacon, The Proficience and Advancement of Learning (1605), Second Book XI–XX, p. 5,
774:Beauty is as summer fruits, which are easy to corrupt, and cannot last; and for the most part it makes a dissolute youth, and an age a little out of countenance; but yet certainly again, if it light well, it maketh virtue shine, and vices blush. ~ Francis Bacon,
775:It's not what we eat but what we digest that makes us strong; not what we gain but what we save that makes us rich; not what we read but what we remember that makes us learned; and not what we profess but what we practice that gives us integrity. ~ Francis Bacon,
776:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Francis Bacon,
777:There are Idols which we call Idols of the Market. For Men associate by Discourse, and a false and improper Imposition of Words strangely possesses the Understanding, for Words absolutely force the Understanding, and put all Things into Confusion. ~ Francis Bacon,
778:We must see whether the same clock with weights will go faster at the top of a mountain or at the bottom of a mine; it is probable, if the pull of the weights decreases on the mountain and increases in the mine, that the earth has real attraction. ~ Francis Bacon,
779:Such is the way of all superstition, whether in astrology, dreams, omens, divine judgments, or the like; wherein men, having a delight in such vanities, mark the events where they are fulfilled, but where they fail, though this happen much oftener. ~ Francis Bacon,
780:I think I tend to destroy the better paintings, or those that have been better to a certain extent. I try and take them further, and they lose all their qualities, and they lose everything. I think I would say that I destroy all the better paintings. ~ Francis Bacon,
781:Jesus would have been one of the best photographers that ever existed. He was always looking at the beauty of people souls. In fact Jesus was constantly making pictures of God in people's life by looking at their souls and exposing them to his light. ~ Francis Bacon,
782:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few are to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Francis Bacon,
783:If I go to the National Gallery and I look at one of the great paintings that excite me there, it's not so much the painting that excites me as that the painting unlocks all kinds of valves of sensation within me which return me to life more violently. ~ Francis Bacon,
784:The main importance of Francis Bacon’s influence does not lie in any peculiar theory of inductive reasoning which he happened to express, but in the revolt against second-hand information of which he was a leader. ~ Alfred North Whitehead, The Aims of Education (1929),
785:Great art is always a way of concentrating, reinventing what is called fact, what we know of our existence- a reconcentration… tearing away the veils, the attitudes people acquire of their time and earlier time. Really good artists tear down those veils ~ Francis Bacon,
786:Nor is mine a trumpet which summons and excites men to cut each other to pieces with mutual contradictions, or to quarrel and fight with one another; but rather to make peace between themselves, and turning with united forces against the Nature of Things ~ Francis Bacon,
787:He considered Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton, and John Locke, whom he had studied at the College of William and Mary, to be the three most important thinkers of all time. He called them “my trinity of the three greatest men the world had ever produced. ~ Shawn Lawrence Otto,
788:Atheism leaves a man to sense, to philosophy, to natural piety, to laws, to reputation, all which may be guides to an outward moral virtue, though religion were not; but superstition dismounts all these, and erects an absolute monarchy in the minds of men. ~ Francis Bacon,
789:By this means we presume we have established for ever, a true and legitimate marriage between the Empirical and Rational faculty; whose fastidious and unfortunate divorce and separation hath troubled and disordered the whole race and generation of mankind. ~ Francis Bacon,
790:But we are not dedicating or building any Capitol or Pyramid to human Pride, but found a holy temple in the human Intellect, on the model of the Universe... For whatever is worthy of Existence is worthy of Knowledge-which is the Image (or Echo) of Existence. ~ Francis Bacon,
791:All superstition is much the same whether it be that of astrology, dreams, omen, retributive judgment, or the like, in all of which the deluded believers observe events which are fulfilled, but neglect and pass over their failure, though it be much more common. ~ Francis Bacon,
792:Through my friend Tony Shafrazi, who's an art dealer and an artist himself - he helped to show Basquiat and Keith Haring, and has worked with the Francis Bacon estate - it was really through my friendship with Tony that I developed even more of an interest in art. ~ Owen Wilson,
793:For the mind of man is far from the nature of a clear and equal glass, wherein the beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced. ~ Francis Bacon,
794:Moreover, the works already known are due to chance and experiment rather than to sciences; for the sciences we now possess are merely systems for the nice ordering and setting forth of things already invented; not methods of invention or directions for new works. ~ Francis Bacon,
795:Those herbs which perfume the air most delightfully, not passed by as the rest, but, being trodden upon and crushed, are three; that is, burnet, wild thyme and watermints. Therefore, you are to set whole alleys of them, to have the pleasure when you walk or tread. ~ Francis Bacon,
796:Aristippus said: That those that studied particular sciences, and neglected philosophy, were like Penelope's wooers, that made love to the waiting women. ~ Francis Bacon,
797:Atheism leaves a man to sense, to philosophy, to natural piety, to laws, to reputation; all of which may be guides to an outward moral virtue, even if religion vanished; but religious superstition dismounts all these and erects an absolute monarchy in the minds of men. ~ Francis Bacon,
798:Upon a given body to generate and superinduce a new nature or new natures is the work and aim of human power. To discover the Form of a given nature, or its true difference, or its causal nature, or fount of its emanation... this is the work and aim of human knowledge. ~ Francis Bacon,
799:Entre os pensamentos, as suspeitas são como morcegos, sempre voam no crepúsculo e certamente devem ser reprimidas, ou pelo menos bem vigiadas; elas levam reis à tirania, maridos ao ciúme e os homens sábios à indecisão e à melancolia, como disse o filósofo Francis Bacon. ~ Rubem Fonseca,
800:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Sir Francis Bacon “Of Studies” (1597),
801:You see, painting has now become, or all art has now become completely a game, by which man distracts himself. What is fascinating actually is, that it's going to become much more difficult for the artist, because he must really deepen the game to become any good at all. ~ Francis Bacon,
802:sejarah menjadikan orang bijaksana, puisi menjadikan orang fasih lidah, matematika menjadikan orang cerdik, filsafat menyebabkan orang berpikir dalam, moral menjadikan orang bersikap sungguh-sungguh, logika dan ilmu berpidato menjadikan orang berani mengeluarkan pendapat. ~ Francis Bacon,
803:The way of fortune is like the milky way in the sky; which is a meeting, or knot, of a number of small stars, not seen asunder, but giving light together : so are there a number of little and scarce discerned virtues, or rather faculties and customs, that make men fortunate. ~ Francis Bacon,
804:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays (1625), "Of Studies".,
805:The paintings of Francis Bacon to my eye are very beautiful. The paintings of Bosch or Goya are to my eye very beautiful. I've also stood in front of those same paintings with people who've said, 'let's get on to the Botticellis as soon as possible.' I have lingered, of course. ~ Clive Barker,
806:Generally, youth is like the first cogitations, not so wise as the second. For there is a youth in thoughts, as well as in ages. And yet the invention of young men, is more lively than that of old; and imaginations stream into their minds better, and, as it were, more divinely. ~ Francis Bacon,
807:Concerning the materials of seditions. It is a thing well to be considered; for the surest way to prevent seditions (if the times do bear it) is to take away the matter of them. For if there be fuel prepared, it is hard to tell, whence the spark shall come, that shall set it on fire. ~ Francis Bacon,
808:Learning hath his infancy, when it is but beginning and almost childish; then his youth, when it is luxuriant and juvenile; then his strength of years, when it is solid and reduced; and lastly his old age, when it waxeth dry and exhaust. ~ Francis Bacon, Essays Civil and Moral, Of Vicissitude of Things.,
809:The human understanding is moved by those things most which strike and enter the mind simultaneously and suddenly, and so fill the imagination; and then it feigns and supposes all other things to be somehow, though it cannot see how, similar to those few things by which it is surrounded. ~ Francis Bacon,
810:The registering of doubts hath two excellent uses: the one, that it saveth philosophy from errors and falsehoods; when that which is not fully appearing is not collected into assertion, whereby error might draw error, but reserved in doubt: the other, that the entry of doubts are as so many ~ Francis Bacon,
811:You shall read (saith he) that we are commanded to forgive our enemies; but you never read, that we are commanded to forgive our friends. But yet the spirit of Job was in a better tune: Shall we (saith he) take good at God's hands, and not be content to take evil also? And so of friends in a ~ Francis Bacon,
812:Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. He that traveleth into a country before he hath some entrance into the language, goeth to school, and not to travel. ~ Francis Bacon,The Essays Or Counsels, Civil And Moral, Of Francis Ld. Verulam Viscount St. Albans (1625),
813:Voltaire once wrote, “Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers.” Sir Francis Bacon added, “A prudent question is one-half of wisdom.” Indira Gandhi concluded that “the power to question is the basis of all human progress.” Great questions are clearly the quickest path to great answers. ~ Gary Keller,
814:The partitions of knowledge are not like several lines that meet in one angle, and so touch not in a point; but are like branches of a tree, that meet in a stem, which hath a dimension and quantity of entireness and continuance, before it come to discontinue and break itself into arms and boughs. ~ Francis Bacon,
815:The first question concerning the Celestial Bodies is whether there be a system, that is whether the world or universe compose together one globe, with a center, or whether the particular globes of earth and stars be scattered dispersedly, each on its own roots, without any system or common center. ~ Francis Bacon,
816:The men of experiment are like the ant, they only collect and use; the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes the middle course, it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. ~ Francis Bacon,
817:The men of experiment are like the ant, they only collect and use; the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes the middle course: it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. ~ Francis Bacon,
818:So if any man think philosophy and universality to be idle studies, he doth not consider that all professions are from thence served and supplied.  And this I take to be a great cause that hath hindered the progression of learning, because these fundamental knowledges have been studied but in passage.  ~ Francis Bacon,
819:Well, for that matter, I was also a good friend of Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Francis Bacon, Albert Einstein, and John, Paul, George, and Ringo." He pauses, seeing the blank look on my face and groaning when he says, "Christ, Ever, the Beatles!" He shakes his head and laughs. "God, you make me feel old. ~ Alyson Noel,
820:Once the human mind has favoured certain views, it pulls everything else into agreement with and support for them. Should they be outweighed by more powerful countervailing considerations, it either fails to notice these, or scorns them, or makes fine distinctions in order to neutralize and so reject them. ~ Francis Bacon,
821:I will never get tired of looking at works by Pablo Picasso. I will never get tired of looking at work by Francis Bacon or Henry Moore or Francisco Goya. You cannot tire of the work these people have made because you can look it over and over again - the same thing - and always see something different. ~ Polly Allen Mellen,
822:Before he (Francis Bacon) came along, people conducted all their arguments through a series of logical fallacies or simply shouting louder than the other guy, or, if they did use facts, they only selected ones that reinforced their prejudices and advanced their ideas.” Oberon replies “don’t they still do that? ~ Kevin Hearne,
823:Francis Bacon set out his doctrine of idols back in the sixteenth century. He said people are not inclined to live by pure experience, that it’s easier for them to pollute experience with prejudices. These prejudices are the idols. ‘The idols of the tribe,’ Bacon called them, ‘the idols of the cave’… ~ Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn,
824:Believing that I was born for the service of mankind, and regarding the care of the commonwealth as a kind of common property, which like the air and the water, belongs to everybody, I set myself to consider in what way mankind might best be served, and what service was myself best fitted by nature to perform. ~ Francis Bacon,
825:The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness. It is not like a drug; it is a particular state when everything happens very quickly, a mixture of consciousness and unconsciousness, of fear and pleasure, it's a little like making love, the physical act of love. ~ Francis Bacon,
826:The monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power, or of the hands. For have not the verses of Homer continued twenty-five hundred years, or more, without the loss of a syllable or letter; during which time infinite palaces, temples, castles, cities have been decayed and demolished? ~ Francis Bacon,
827:Believing that I was born for the service of mankind, and regarding the care of the commonwealth as a kind of common property which, like the air and the water, belongs to everybody, I set myself to consider in what way mankind might be best served, and what service I was myself best fitted by nature to perform. ~ Francis Bacon,
828:The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness. It is not like a drug; it is a particular state when everything happens very quickly, a mixture of consciousness and unconsciousness , of fear and pleasure; it's a little like making love, the physical act of love. ~ Francis Bacon,
829:It cannot be that axioms established by argumentation should avail for the discovery of new works, since the subtlety of nature is greater many times over than the subtlety of argument. But axioms duly and orderly formed from particulars easily discover the way to new particulars, and thus render sciences active. ~ Francis Bacon,
830:There is another ground of hope that must not be omitted. Let men but think over their infinite expenditure of understanding, time, and means on matters and pursuits of far less use and value; whereof, if but a small part were directed to sound and solid studies, there is no difficulty that might not be overcome. ~ Francis Bacon,
831:But this is that which will dignify and exalt knowledge: if contemplation and action be more nearly and straitly conjoined and united together than they have been: a conjunction like unto that of the highest planets, Saturn, the planet of rest and contemplation, and Jupiter, the planet of civil society and action. ~ Francis Bacon,
832:Philosophy only is the true one which reproduces most faithfully the statements of nature, and is written down, as it were, from nature's dictation, so that it is nothing but a copy and a reflection of nature, and adds nothing of its own, but is merely a repetition and echo. ~ Francis Bacon The Enlargement of Science, 1.2, ch. 3.,
833:Some men covet knowledge out of a natural curiosity and inquisitive temper; some to entertain the mind with variety and delight; some for ornament and reputation; some for victory and contention; many for lucre and a livelihood; and but few for employing the Divine gift of reason to the use and benefit of mankind. ~ Francis Bacon,
834:To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humour of a scholar. ~ Francis Bacon, "Of Studies," in The Essayes or Counsels, Civil and Moral, of Francis Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Alban (1625) as quoted in Bacon's Essays (1892) p. 128,
835:There were taken apples, and ... closed up in wax. ... After a month's space, the apple inclosed in was was as green and fresh as the first putting in, and the kernals continued white. The cause is, for that all exclusion of open air, which is ever predatory, maintaineth the body in its first freshness and moisture. ~ Francis Bacon,
836:A gated community of a historical sort, a fortress of barristers and judges who were also musicians, wine fanciers, would-be writers, fly fishermen and raconteurs. A nest of gossip and expertise, and a delightful garden still haunted by the reasonable spirit of Francis Bacon. She loved it here and never wanted to leave. ~ Ian McEwan,
837:A man that hath no virtue in himself, ever envieth virtue in others. For men's minds, will either feed upon their own good, or upon others' evil; and who wanteth the one, will prey upon the other; and whoso is out of hope, to attain to another's virtue, will seek to come at even hand, by depressing another's fortune. ~ Francis Bacon,
838:Nor do apophthegms only serve for ornament and delight, but also for action and civil use, as being the edge-tools of speech which cut and penetrate the knots of business and affairs: for occasions have their revolutions, and what has once been advantageously used may be so again, either as an old thing or a new one. ~ Francis Bacon,
839:The Syllogism consists of propositions, propositions consist of words, words are symbols of notions. Therefore if the notions themselves (which is the root of the matter) are confused and over-hastily abstracted from the facts, there can be no firmness in the superstructure. Our only hope therefore lies in a true induction. ~ Francis Bacon,
840:For it is not possible to join serpentine wisdom with columbine innocence, except men know exactly all the conditions of the serpent: his baseness and going upon his belly, his volubility and lubricity, his envy and sting, and the rest; that is, all forms and natures of evil: for without this, virtue lieth open and unfenced. ~ Francis Bacon,
841:We see then how far the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power, or of the hands. For have not some books continued twenty-five hundred years or more, without the loss of a syllable or letter; during which time infinite palaces, temples, castles, and cities have been decayed and demolished? ~ Francis Bacon,
842:We gave ourselves for lost men, and prepared for death. Yet we did lift up our hearts and voices to God above, who "showeth His wonders in the deep"; beseeching Him of His mercy, that as in the beginning He discovered the face of the deep, and brought forth dry land, so He would now discover land to us, that we might not perish. ~ Francis Bacon,
843:For many parts of Nature can neither be invented with sufficient subtlety, nor demonstrated with sufficient perspicuity, nor accommodated unto use with sufficient dexterity, without the aid and intervening of the mathematics, of which sort are perspective, music, astronomy, cosmography, architecture, engineery, and divers others. ~ Francis Bacon,
844:We see then how far the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power, or of the hands. For have not the verses of Homer continued twenty-five hundred years or more, without the loss of a syllable or letter; during which time infinite palaces, temples, castles, cities have been decayed and demolished? ~ Francis Bacon,
845:My painting is not violent, it's life that is violent. Even within the most beautiful landscape, in the trees, under the leaves, the insects are eating each other; violence is a part of life. We are born with a scream; we come into life with a scream and maybe love is a mosquito net between the fear of living and the fear of death. ~ Francis Bacon,
846:It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore, and to see ships tost upon the sea: a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle, and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below: but no pleasure is comparable to standing upon the vantage ground of truth . . . and to see the errors, and wanderings, and mists, and tempests, in the vale below. ~ Francis Bacon,
847:The dignity of this end of endowment of man's life with new commodity appeareth by the estimation that antiquity made of such as guided thereunto ; for whereas founders of states, lawgivers, extirpators of tyrants, fathers of the people, were honoured but with the titles of demigods, inventors ere ever consecrated among the gods themselves. ~ Francis Bacon,
848:man's sense is falsely asserted to be the standard of things; on the contrary, all the perceptions both of the senses and the mind bear reference to man and not to the Universe, and the human mind resembles these uneven mirrors which impart their own properties to different objects, from which rays are emitted and distort and disfigure them. ~ Francis Bacon,
849:The Scripture saith, The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God; it is not said, The fool hath thought in his heart; so as he rather saith it, by rote to himself, as that he would have, than that he can thoroughly believe it, or be persuaded of it....It appeareth in nothing more, that atheism is rather in the lip, than in the heart of man. ~ Francis Bacon,
850:Scientific truths were made explicit a mere five hundred years ago, with the work of Francis Bacon, René Descartes and Isaac Newton. In whatever manner our forebears viewed the world prior to that, it was not through a scientific lens (any more than they could view the moon and the stars through the glass lenses of the equally recent telescope). ~ Jordan Peterson,
851:Scientific truths were made explicit a mere five hundred years ago, with the work of Francis Bacon, René Descartes and Isaac Newton. In whatever manner our forebears viewed the world prior to that, it was not through a scientific lens (any more than they could view the moon and the stars through the glass lenses of the equally recent telescope). ~ Jordan B Peterson,
852:I feel that I am much freer if I'm on my own, but I'm sure that there are a lot of painters who would perhaps be even more inventive if they had people round them... I find that if I am on my own I can allow the paint to dictate to me. So the images that I'm putting down on the canvas dictate the thing to me and it gradually builds up and comes along. ~ Francis Bacon,
853:Neither the naked hand nor the understanding left to itself can effect much. It is by instruments and helps that the work is done, which are as much wanted for the understanding as for the hand. And as the instruments of the hand either give motion or guide it, so the instruments of the mind supply either suggestions for the understanding or cautions. ~ Francis Bacon,
854:If any human being earnestly desire to push on to new discoveries instead of just retaining and using the old; to win victories over Nature as a worker rather than over hostile critics as a disputant; to attain, in fact, clear and demonstrative knowlegde instead of attractive and probable theory; we invite him as a true son of Science to join our ranks. ~ Francis Bacon,
855:There is in man's nature a secret inclination and motion towards love of others, which, if it be not spent upon some one or a few, doth naturally spread itself towards many, and maketh men become humane and charitable, as it is seen sometimes in friars. Nuptial love maketh mankind, friendly love perfecteth it, but wanton love corrupteth and embaseth it. ~ Francis Bacon,
856:Mahomet made the people believe that he would call a hill to him, and from the top of it offer up his prayers for the observers of his law. The people assembled: Mahomet called the hill to come to him again and again; and when the hill stood still, he was never a whit abashed, but said, 'If the hill will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet will go to the hill.' ~ Francis Bacon,
857:There is no man doth a wrong for the wrong's sake; but thereby to purchase himself profit, or pleasure, or honour, or the like. There, why should I be angry with a man for loving himself better than me? And if any man should do wrong merely out of ill nature, why, yet it is but like the thorn or briar, which prick and scratch, because they can do no other. ~ Francis Bacon,
858:I’m very interested in sublimation. I love the way Francis Bacon talked about the grin without the cat, the sensation without the boredom of its conveyance… I’ve always wanted to be able to convey figurative imagery in a kind of shorthand, to get it across in as direct a way as possible. I want there to be a human presence without having to depict it in full. ~ Cecily Brown,
859:I feel ever so strongly that an artist must be nourished by his passions and his despairs. These things alter an artist whether for the good or the better or the worse. It must alter him. The feelings of desperation and unhappiness are more useful to an artist than the feeling of contentment, because desperation and unhappiness stretch your whole sensibility. ~ Francis Bacon,
860:Above all, every relation must be considered as suspicious, which depends in any degree upon religion, as the prodigies of Livy: And no less so, everything that is to be found in the writers of natural magic or alchemy, or such authors, who seem, all of them, to have an unconquerable appetite for falsehood and fable. ~ Francis Bacon, Novum Organum, Book II, Aphorism 29 (1620),
861:It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man’s mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men’s minds about to religion. For while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered, it may sometimes rest in them, and go no further; but when it beholdeth the chain of them, confederate and linked together, it must needs fly to Providence and Deity. ~ Francis Bacon,
862:Despite all the intellectual activity of the time there was in print no guide to the tongue, no linguistic vade mecum, no single book that Shakespeare or Martin Frobisher, Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh, Francis Bacon, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Nash, John Donne, Ben Jonson, Izaak Walton, or any of their other learned contemporaries could consult. ~ Simon Winchester,
863:Lastly, I would address one general admonition to all: that they consider what are the true ends of knowledge, and that they seek it not either for pleasure of the mind, or for contention, or for superiority to others, or for profit, or fame, or power, or any of these inferior things: but for the benefit and use of life; and that they perfect and govern it in charity. ~ Francis Bacon,
864:God Almighty first planted a Garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man, without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks. And a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately sooner than to garden finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection. ~ Francis Bacon,
865:Anger is certainly a kind of baseness; as it appears well in the weakness of those subjects in whom it reigns; children, women, old folks, sick folks. Only men must beware, that they carry their anger rather with scorn, than with fear; so that they may seem rather to be above the injury, than below it; which is a thing easily done, if a man will give law to himself in it. ~ Francis Bacon,
866:I had rather believe all the Fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, then that this universall Frame, is without a Minde. And therefore, God never wrought Miracle, to convince Atheisme, because his Ordinary Works Convince it. It is true, that a little Philosophy inclineth Mans Minde to Atheisme; But depth in Philosophy, bringeth Mens Mindes about to Religion. ~ Francis Bacon,
867:Antiquities, or remnants of history, are, as was said, tanquam tabula naufragii: when industrious persons, by an exact and scrupulous diligence and observation, out of monuments, names, words, proverbs, traditions, private records and evidences, fragments of stories, passages of books that concern not story, and the like, do save and recover somewhat from the deluge of time. ~ Francis Bacon,
868:of modern antiscientific attacks, because it takes advantage of the reasonable-sounding but incorrect idea that a “healthy debate” reveals the truth. When such a debate pits knowledge against a passionately articulated opinion, the opinion often wins. “For what a man had rather were true,” as the father of modern science, Francis Bacon, noted, “he more readily believes. ~ Shawn Lawrence Otto,
869:Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. ~ Francis Bacon,
870:I'm working for myself; what else have I got to work for? How can you work for an audience? What do you imagine an audience would want? I have got nobody to excite except myself, so I am always surprised if anyone likes my work sometimes. I suppose I'm very lucky, of course, to be able to earn my living by something that really absorbs me to try to do, if that is what you call luck. ~ Francis Bacon,
871:Knowledge is power," Francis Bacon said in a peculiarly prophetic moment. He was right; "modern" scientific knowledge has demonstrated its power for three centuries. With postmodernism, however, the situation is reversed. There is no purely objective knowledge, no truth of correspondence. Instead there are only stories, stories that, when they are believed, give the storyteller power over others. ~ James W Sire,
872:The suspect nature of these stories can be seen in the anecdote Jefferson told of Hamilton visiting his lodging in 1792 and inquiring about three portraits on the wall. “They are my trinity of the three greatest men the world has ever produced,” Jefferson replied: “Sir Francis Bacon, Sir Isaac Newton, and John Locke.” Hamilton supposedly replied, “The greatest man that ever lived was Julius Casar. ~ Ron Chernow,
873:Medicine is a science which hath been (as we have said) more professed than laboured, and yet more laboured than advanced: the labour having been, in my judgment, rather in circle than in progression. For I find much iteration, but small addition. It considereth causes of diseases, with the occasions or impulsions; the diseases themselves, with the accidents; and the cures, with the preservation. ~ Francis Bacon,
874:But by far the greatest hindrance and aberration of the human understanding proceeds from the dullness, incompetency, and deceptions of the senses; in that things which strike the sense outweigh things which do not immediately strike it, though they be more important. Hence it is that speculation commonly ceases where sight ceases; insomuch that of things invisible there is little or no observation. ~ Francis Bacon,
875:...those experiments be not only esteemed which have an immediate and present use, but those principally which are of most universal consequence for invention of other experiments, and those which give more light to the invention of causes; for the invention of the mariner's needle, which giveth the direction, is of no less benefit for navigation than the invention of the sails, which give the motion. ~ Francis Bacon,
876:For it is a false assertion that the sense of man is the measure of things.  On the contrary, all perceptions as well of the sense as of the mind are according to the measure of the individual and not according to the measure of the universe.  And the human understanding is like a false mirror; which, receiving rays irregularly, distorts and discolors the nature of things by mingling its own nature with it. ~ Francis Bacon,
877:Contemporaries only know the authority figures and the loudmouths. And the people born into power. But it takes perspective to know who's carrying the load. Nobody here has a clue who Johannes Kepler is. All they know about Galileo is that he's a teacher who got in trouble with the Inquisition. I doubt anyone's heard of Francis Bacon. Even in Britain, nobody really knows him. He's just a guy with a funny name. ~ Jack McDevitt,
878:In Philosophy, the contemplations of man do either penetrate unto God, or are circumferred to Nature, or are reflected and reverted upon himself. Out of which several inquiries there do arise three knowledges, Divine Philosophy, Natural Philosophy, and Human Philosophy or Humanity. For all things are marked and stamped with this triple character of the power of God, the difference of Nature and the use of Man. ~ Francis Bacon,
879:The human understanding is unquiet; it cannot stop or rest, and still presses onward, but in vain. Therefore it is that we cannot conceive of any end or limit to the world, but always as of necessity it occurs to us that there is something beyond... But he is no less an unskilled and shallow philosopher who seeks causes of that which is most general, than he who in things subordinate and subaltern omits to do so ~ Francis Bacon,
880:The true bounds and limitations, whereby human knowledge is confined and circumscribed,... are three: the first, that we do not so place our felicity in knowledge, as we forget our mortality: the second, that we make application of our knowledge, to give ourselves repose and contentment, and not distates or repining: the third, that we do not presume by the contemplation of Nature to attain to the mysteries of God. ~ Francis Bacon,
881:The human understanding is of its own nature prone to suppose the existence of more order and regularity in the world than it finds. And though there be many things in nature which are singular and unmatched, yet it devises for them parallels and conjugates and relatives which do not exist. Hence the fiction that all celestial bodies move in perfect circles, spirals and dragons being (except in name) utterly rejected. ~ Francis Bacon,
882:The human understanding, when any preposition has been once laid down... forces everything else to add fresh support and confirmation; and although more cogent and abundant instances may exist to the contrary, yet it either does not observe them or it despises them, or it gets rid of and rejects them by some distinction, with violent and injurious prejudice, rather than sacrifice the authority of its first conclusions. ~ Francis Bacon,
883:Since my logic aims to teach and instruct the understanding, not that it may with the slender tendrils of the mind snatch at and lay hold of abstract notions (as the common logic does), but that it may in very truth dissect nature, and discover the virtues and actions of bodies, with their laws as determined in matter; so that this science flows not merely from the nature of the mind, but also from the nature of things. ~ Francis Bacon,
884:No one has yet been found so firm of mind and purpose as resolutely to compel himself to sweep away all theories and common notions, and to apply the understanding, thus made fair and even, to a fresh examination of particulars. Thus it happens that human knowledge, as we have it, is a mere medley and ill-digested mass, made up of much credulity and much accident, and also of the childish notions which we at first imbibed. ~ Francis Bacon,
885:Children sweeten labours. But they make misfortune more bitter. They increase the care of life. But they mitigate the remembrance of death. The perpetuity of generation is common to beasts. But memory, merit and noble works are proper to men. And surely a man shall see the noblest works and foundations have proceeded from childless men which have sought to express the images of their minds where those of their bodies have failed. ~ Francis Bacon,
886:First therefore let us seek the dignity of knowledge in the archetype or first platform, which is in the attributes and acts of God, as far as they are revealed to man and may be observed with sobriety; wherein we may not seek it by the name of Learning; for all Learning is Knowledge acquired, and all Knowledge in God is original: and therefore we must look for it by another name, that of Wisdom or Sapience, as the Scriptures call it. ~ Francis Bacon,
887:Leonardo did not pursue science and engineering in order to dominate nature, as Francis Bacon would advocate a century later, but always tried to learn as much as possible from nature. He was in awe of the beauty he saw in the complexity of natural forms, patterns, and processes, and aware that nature’s ingenuity was far superior to human design. Accordingly, he often used natural processes and structures as models for his own designs. ~ Fritjof Capra,
888:I would by all means have men beware, lest Æsop's pretty fable of the fly that sate [sic] on the pole of a chariot at the Olympic races and said, 'What a dust do I raise,' be verified in them. For so it is that some small observation, and that disturbed sometimes by the instrument, sometimes by the eye, sometimes by the calculation, and which may be owing to some real change in the heaven, raises new heavens and new spheres and circles. ~ Francis Bacon,
889:A lot of young painters love to incorporate celebrity. One idea of being a painter is to use what's happening at the time. Velázquez was painting of his time. And so was Rembrandt. And Francis Bacon was painting his time in London. He was a real mover, but he saw the insect in the rose. But yes, when I do a painting, I want to take the "I did this" out of it. That's why I started using chance, like the markings on the wood. I never wanted to compose. ~ Ellsworth Kelly,
890:He that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune, for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works and of greatest merit for the public have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men, which both in affection and means have married and endowed the public. He was reputed one of the wise men that made answer to the question, when a man should marryA young man not yet, an elder man not at all. ~ Francis Bacon,
891:Young men, in the conduct and manage of actions, embrace more than they can hold; stir more than they can quiet; fly to the end, without consideration of the means and degrees; pursue some few principles, which they have chanced upon absurdly; care not to innovate, which draws unknown inconveniences; use extreme remedies at first; and, that which doubleth all errors, will not acknowledge or retract them; like an unready horse, that will neither stop nor turn. ~ Francis Bacon,
892:Nevertheless if any skillful Servant of Nature shall bring force to bear on matter, and shall vex it and drive it to extremities as if with the purpose of reducing it to nothing, then will matter (since annihilation or true destruction is not possible except by the omnipotence of God) finding itself in these straits, turn and transform itself into strange shapes, passing from one change to another till it has gone through the whole circle and finished the period. ~ Francis Bacon,
893:Take an arrow, and hold it in flame for the space of ten pulses, and when it cometh forth you shall find those parts of the arrow which were on the outsides of the flame more burned, blacked, and turned almost to coal, whereas the midst of the flame will be as if the fire had scarce touched it. This is an instance of great consequence for the discovery of the nature of flame; and sheweth manifestly, that flame burneth more violently towards the sides than in the midst. ~ Francis Bacon,
894:The human understanding when it has once adopted an opinion (either as being the received opinion or as being agreeable to itself) draws all things else to support and agree with it. And though there be a greater number and weight of instances to be found on the other side, yet these it either neglects and despises, or else by some distinction sets aside and rejects, in order that by this great and pernicious predetermination the authority of its former conclusions may remain inviolate. ~ Francis Bacon,
895:It is by discourse that men associate, and words are imposed according to the apprehension of the vulgar. And therefore the ill and unfit choice of words wonderfully obsesses the understanding. Nor do the definitions or explanations wherewith in some things learned men are wont to guard and defend themselves, by any means set the matter right. But words plainly force and overrule the understanding, and throw all into confusion, and lead men away into innumerable and inane controversies and fancies. ~ Francis Bacon,
896:The Idols of Tribe have their foundation in human nature itself, and in the tribe or race of men. For it is a false assertion that the sense of man is the measure of things. On the contrary, all perceptions as well of the sense as of the mind are according to the measure of the individual and not according to the measure of the universe. And the human understanding is like a false mirror, which, receiving rays irregularly, distorts and discolors the nature of things by mingling its own nature with it. ~ Francis Bacon,
897:To conclude, therefore, let no man upon a weak conceit of sobriety or an ill-applied moderation think or maintain that a man can search too far, or be too well studied in the book of God's word, or the book of God's works, divinity or philosophy; but rather let men endeavor an endless progress or proficience in both; only let men beware that they apply both to charity, and not to swelling; to use, and not to ostentation; and again, that they do not unwisely mingle or confound these learnings together. ~ Francis Bacon,
898:Truth may perhaps come to the price of a pearl, that showeth best by day; but it will not rise to the price of a diamond or carbuncle, that showeth best in varied lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt that, if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would, and the like, but it would leave the minds of a number of men poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves? ~ Francis Bacon,
899:I think that one of the things is that, if you are going to decide to be a painter, you have got to decide that you are not going to be afraid of making a fool of yourself. I think another thing is to be able to find subjects which really absorb you to try and do. I feel that without a subject you automatically go back into decoration because you haven't got the subject which is always eating into you to bring it back - and the greatest art always returns you to the vulnerability of the human situation. ~ Francis Bacon,
900:… for it is very probable, that the motion of gravity worketh weakly, both far from the earth, and also within the earth: the former because the appetite of union of dense bodies with the earth, in respect of the distance, is more dull: the latter, because the body hath in part attained its nature when it is some depth in the earth.

{Foreshadowing Isaac Newton's Universal Law of Gravitation (1687)} ~ Francis Bacon,
901:I would by all means have men beware, lest Aesop's pretty fable of the fly that sate on the pole of a chariot at the Olympic races and said, 'What a dust do I raise,' be verified in them. For so it is that some small observation, and that disturbed sometimes by the instrument, sometimes by the eye, sometimes by the calculation, and which may be owing to some real change in the sky, raises new skies and new spheres and circles. ~ Francis Bacon,
902:Sir Francis Bacon, believed by some to be the real author of the Shakespeare material as well as the person who masterminded and oversaw production of the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. Bacon was in charge of forty-five scholars who translated and collated the KJV, making him the forty-sixth. For a coded clue as to Bacon’s contributions, see Psalms 46—count forty-six letters from the beginning to get the word “shake” and forty-six words from the end to get the word “spear.” The number forty-six was Bacon’s cypher. ~ Jim Marrs,
903:There are and can be only two ways of searching into and discovering truth. The one flies from the senses and particulars to the most general axioms, and from these principles, the truth of which it takes for settled and immovable, proceeds to judgment and to the discovery of middle axioms. And this way is now in fashion. The other derives axioms from the senses and particulars, rising by a gradual and unbroken ascent, so that it arrives at the most general axioms last of all. This is the true way, but as yet untried. ~ Francis Bacon,
904:Another error is an impatience of doubt and haste to assertion without due and mature suspension of judgment. For the two ways of contemplation are not unlike the two ways of action commonly spoken of by the ancients; the one plain and smooth in the beginning, and in the end impassable; the other rough and troublesome in the entrance, but after a while fair and even. So it is in contemplation; if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties. ~ Francis Bacon,
905:But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge: for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason, to the benefit and use of men. ~ Francis Bacon,
906:I would address one general admonition to all, that they consider what are the true ends of knowledge, and that they seek it not either for pleasure of the mind, or for contention, or for superiority to others, or for profit, or for fame, or power, or any of these inferior things, but for the benefit and use of life; and that they perfect and govern it in charity. For it was from lust of power that the Angels fell, from lust of knowledge that man fell, but of charity there can be no excess, neither did angel or man come in danger by it. ~ Francis Bacon,
907:Nearly four centuries ago, the philosopher and scientist Sir Francis Bacon wrote about the ways in which the mind errs, and he considered the failure to consider absences among the most serious: By far the greatest impediment and aberration of the human understanding arises from [the fact that]…those things which strike the sense outweigh things which, although they may be more important, do not strike it directly. Hence, contemplation usually ceases with seeing, so much so that little or no attention is paid to things invisible.6 ~ Daniel Todd Gilbert,
908:It’s a matter of balance between deduction and induction—between reason and empiricism—and in 1620 the English philosopher Francis Bacon published his Novum Organum, or “new instrument,” which described science as a blend of sensory data and reasoned theory. Ideally, Bacon argued, one should begin with observations, then formulate a general theory from which logical predictions can be made, then check the predictions against experiment.37 If you don’t give yourself a reality check you end up with half-baked (and often fully baked) ideas, ~ Michael Shermer,
909:Another argument of hope may be drawn from this-that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels. ~ Francis Bacon,
910:In addition, it is part of our God-given vocation to find as much of that order as we can and to praise God for the wonders of creation. Johann Kepler (1571-1630), one of the pioneering giants of classical science, and Francis Bacon (1561-1626) were the most influential proponents of the importance and value of science; both stressed this religious motive for doing
science. It is our divinely given vocation to render praise to God by achieving a sounder understanding of God's handiwork. They passionately believed and advocated this view. ~ Diogenes Allen,
911:For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to consider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture." -Francis Bacon ~ Francis Bacon,
912:We are much beholden to Machiavelli and others, that write what men do, and not what they ought to do . For it is not possible to join serpentine wisdom with the columbine innocency, except men know exactly all the conditions of the serpent; his baseness and going upon his belly, his volubility and lubricity, his envy and sting, and the rest; that is, all forms and natures of evil. For without this, virtue lieth open and unfenced. Nay, an honest man can do no good upon those that are wicked, to reclaim them, without the help of the knowledge of evil. ~ Francis Bacon,
913:The great advantages of simulation and dissimulation are three. First to lay asleep opposition and to surprise. For where a man's intentions are published, it is an alarum to call up all that are against them. The second is to reserve a man's self a fair retreat: for if a man engage himself, by a manifest declaration, he must go through, or take a fall. The third is, the better to discover the mind of another. For to him that opens himself, men will hardly show themselves adverse; but will fair let him go on, and turn their freedom of speech to freedom of thought. ~ Francis Bacon,
914:To this day, we see all around us the Promethean drive to omnipotence through technology and to omniscience through science. The effecting of all things possible and the knowledge of all causes are the respective primary imperatives of technology and of science. But the motivating imperative of society continues to be the very different one of its physical and spiritual survival. It is now far less obvious than it was in Francis Bacon's world how to bring the three imperatives into harmony, and how to bring all three together to bear on problems where they superpose. ~ Gerald Holton,
915:For there is a great difference in delivery of the mathematics , which are the most abstracted of knowledges, and policy , which is the most immersed. And howsoever contention hath been moved , touching a uniformity of method in multiformity of matter, yet we see how that opinion, besides the weakness of it, hath been of ill desert towards learning, as that which taketh the way to reduce learning to certain empty and barren generalities; being but the very husks and shells of sciences, all the kernel being forced out and expulsed with the torture and press of the method. ~ Francis Bacon,
916:That Francis Bacon retains his reputation gained, is not strange to any that knows him. The unusual words wherewith he had spangled his speech, were rather gracious for their propriety than strange for their novelty, and like to serve both for occasions to report and means to remember his argument. Certain sentences of his , somewhat obscure, and as it were presuming upon their capacities will, I fear, make some of them rather admire than commend him. In sum, all is as well as words can make it, and if it please Her Majesty to add deeds, the Bacon may be too hard for the Cook. ~ Edward Coke,
917:Doctor Johnson said, that in sickness there were three things that were material; the physician, the disease, and the patient: and if any two of these joined, then they get the victory; for, Ne Hercules quidem contra duos [Not even Hercules himself is a match for two]. If the physician and the patient join, then down goes the disease; for then the patient recovers: if the physician and the disease join, that is a strong disease; and the physician mistaking the cure, then down goes the patient: if the patient and the disease join, then down goes the physician; for he is discredited. ~ Francis Bacon,
918:But when men have at hand a remedy more agreeable to their corrupt will, marriage is almost expulsed. And therefore there are with you seen infinite men that marry not, but chose rather a libertine and impure single life, than to be yoked in marriage; and many that do marry, marry late, when the prime and strength of their years is past. And when they do marry, what is marriage to them but a very bargain; wherein is sought alliance, or portion, or reputation, with some desire (almost indifferent) of issue; and not the faithful nuptial union of man and wife, that was first instituted. ~ Francis Bacon,
919:But the idols of the Market Place are the most troublesome of all: idols which have crept into the understanding through their alliances with words and names. For men believe that their reason governs words. But words turn and twist the understanding. This it is that has rendered philosophy and the sciences inactive. Words are mostly cut to the common fashion and draw the distinctions which are most obvious to the common understanding. Whenever an understanding of greater acuteness or more diligent observation would alter those lines to suit the true distinctions of nature, words complain. ~ Francis Bacon,
920:Aphorisms, except they should be ridiculous, cannot be made but of the pith and heart of sciences; for discourse of illustration is cut off; recitals of examples are cut off; discourse of connection and order is cut off; descriptions of practice are cut off. So there remaineth nothing to fill the aphorisms but some good quantity of observation; and therefore no man can suffice, nor in reason will attempt, to write aphorisms, but he that is sound and grounded. ~ Francis Bacon (1561–1626), English philosopher, statesman and essayist. The Proficience and Advancement of Learning (1605), Second Book, XI–XX p. 5,
921:It was a good answer that was made by one who when they showed him hanging in a temple a picture of those who had paid their vows as having escaped shipwreck, and would have him say whether he did not now acknowledge the power of the gods, — ‘Aye,’ asked he again, ‘but where are they painted that were drowned after their vows?’ And such is the way of all superstition, whether in astrology, dreams, omens, divine judgments, or the like; wherein men, having a delight in such vanities, mark the events where they are fulfilled, but where they fail, though this happens much oftener, neglect and pass them by. ~ Francis Bacon,
922:Nay, the same Solomon the king, although he excelled in the glory of treasure and magnificent buildings, of shipping and navigation, of service and attendance, of fame and renown, and the like, yet he maketh no claim to any of those glories, but only to the glory of inquisition of truth; for so he saith expressly, "The glory of God is to conceal a thing, but the glory of the king is to find it out;" as if, according to the innocent play of children, the Divine Majesty took delight to hide His works, to the end to have them found out; and as if kings could not obtain a greater honour than to be God's playfellows in that game ~ Francis Bacon,
923:The human understanding is no dry light, but receives infusion from the will and affections; whence proceeds sciences which may be called "sciences as one would." For what a man had rather were true he more readily believes. Therefore he rejects difficult things from impatience of research; sober things, because they narrow hope; the deeper things of nature, from supersition; the light of experience, from arrogrance and pride; things not commonly believed, out of deference to the opinion of the vulgar. Numberless in short are the ways, and sometimes imperceptible, in which the affections color and infect the understanding.

1620 - Francis Bacon ~ Carl Sagan,
924:The flat, overall illumination of Protestant ideology was all very well but for these sophisticates, pure, simple plainness was not enough. Francis Bacon, corrupt, brilliant and unlikeable, builder of his own great pair of houses, now disappeared, not far away at St Albans, famous for the pale-faced catamites he kept to warm his bed, the inventor of the English essay, later to be Lord Chancellor, and, later still, accused of corruption, to be thrown to parliament as a sop to their demands, defined in his essay ‘On Truth’ the subtle and shifting Jacobean relationship to light and beauty, to plainness and richness, to clarity and sparkle. ‘This same Truth’, he wrote, ~ Adam Nicolson,
925:All the men who are now called discoverers, in every matter ruled by thought, have been men versed in the minds of their predecessors, and learned in what had been before them. There is not one exception. I do not say that every man has made direct acquantance with the whole of his mental ancestry... But... it is remarkable how many of the greatest names in all departments of knowledge have been real antiquaries in their several subjects. I may cite among those... in science, Aristotle, Plato, Ptolemy, Euclid, Archimedes, Roger Bacon, Copernicus, Francis Bacon, Ramus, Tycho Brahe, Galileo, Napier, Descartes, Leibnitz, Newton, Locke. ~ Augustus De Morgan, A Budget of Paradoxes (1872),
926:Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books: else distilled books are, like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And, therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. ~ Francis Bacon, I. Of studie, Essaies (Jan, 1597) as quoted by E. A. Abbott, Bacon's essays (1876) Vol. 2 Essay L, Of Studies, p. 72. With Abbott's Notes related to study, pp. 247-248.,
927:Once upon a time, there was a man who was convinced that he possessed a Great Idea. Indeed, as the man thought upon the Great Idea more and more, he realized that it was not just a great idea, but the most wonderful idea ever. The Great Idea would unravel the mysteries of the universe, supersede the authority of the corrupt and error-ridden Establishment, confer nigh-magical powers upon its wielders, feed the hungry, heal the sick, make the whole world a better place, etc. etc. etc.

The man was Francis Bacon, his Great Idea was the scientific method, and he was the only crackpot in all history to claim that level of benefit to humanity and turn out to be completely right. ~ Eliezer Yudkowsky,
928:Credulity in arts and opinions... is likewise of two kinds viz., when men give too much belief to arts themselves, or to certain authors in any art. The sciences that sway the imagination more than the reason are principally three viz., astrology, natural magic, and alchemy... Alchemy may be compared to the man who told his sons that he had left them gold, buried somewhere in his vineyard; while they by digging found no gold, but by turning up the mould about the roots of the vines procured a plentiful vintage. So the search and endeavours to make gold have brought many useful inventions to light. ~ Francis Bacon, De Augmentis Scientiarum (1623) as quoted by Edward Thorpe, History of Chemistry, Vol. 1, p. 43.,
929:And yet surely to alchemy this right is due, that it may be compared to the husbandman whereof Aesop makes the fable, that when he died he told his sons that he had left unto them gold buried under the ground in his vineyard: and they digged over the ground, gold they found none, but by reason of their stirring and digging the mould about the roots of their vines, they had a great vintage the year following: so assuredly the search and stir to make gold hath brought to light a great number of good and fruitful inventions and experiments, as well for the disclosing of nature as for the use of man's life. ~ Francis Bacon,
930:Those who have handled sciences have been either men of experiment or men of dogmas. The men of experiment are like the ant, they only collect and use; the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes a middle course: it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own. Not unlike this is the true business of philosophy; for it neither relies solely or chiefly on the powers of the mind, nor does it take the matter which it gathers from natural history and mechanical experiments and lay it up in the memory whole, as it finds it, but lays it up in the understanding altered and digested. ~ Francis Bacon,
931:Atheism leaves a man to sense, to philosophy, to natural piety, to laws, to reputation; all which may be guides to an outward moral virtue, though religion were not; but superstition dismounts all these, and erecteth an absolute monarchy in the minds of men. Therefore atheism did never perturb states; for it makes men wary of themselves, as looking no further: and we see the times inclined to atheism (as the time of Augustus Cæsar) were civil times. But superstition hath been the confusion of many states, and bringeth in a new primum mobile, that ravisheth all the spheres of government. The master of superstition is the people; and in all superstition wise men follow fools; and arguments are fitted to practice, in a reversed order. ~ Francis Bacon,
932:The dilemma is this. In the modern world knowledge has been growing so fast and so enormously, in almost every field, that the probabilities are immensely against anybody, no matter how innately clever, being able to make a contribution in any one field unless he devotes all his time to it for years. If he tries to be the Rounded Universal Man, like Leonardo da Vinci, or to take all knowledge for his province, like Francis Bacon, he is most likely to become a mere dilettante and dabbler. But if he becomes too specialized, he is apt to become narrow and lopsided, ignorant on every subject but his own, and perhaps dull and sterile even on that because he lacks perspective and vision and has missed the cross-fertilization of ideas that can come from knowing something of other subjects. ~ Henry Hazlitt,
933:Look when the world hath fewest barbarous peoples, but such as commonly will not marry or generate, except they know means to live (as it is almost everywhere at this day, except Tartary), there is no danger of inundations of people; but when there be great shoals of people, which go on to populate, without foreseeing means of life and sustentation, it is of necessity that once in an age or two, they discharge a portion of their people upon other nations; which the ancient northern people were wont to do by lot; casting lots what part should stay at home, and what should seek their fortunes. When a warlike state grows soft and effeminate, they may be sure of a war. For commonly such states are grown rich in the time of their degenerating; and so the prey inviteth, and their decay in valor, encourageth a war. ~ Francis Bacon,
934:Just about anyone with intellectual ambition in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was likely to keep a commonplace book. In its most customary form, “commonplacing,” as it was called, involved transcribing interesting or inspirational passages from one’s reading, assembling a personalized encyclopedia of quotations. ... The great minds of the period—Milton, Francis_Bacon, Locke—were zealous believers in the memory-enhancing powers of the commonplace book. There is a distinct self-help quality to the early descriptions of commonplacing’s virtues: in the words of one advocate, maintaining the books enabled one to “lay up a fund of knowledge, from which we may at all times select what is useful in the several pursuits of life.” ~ Steven Berlin Johnson, "The Glass Box and the Commonplace Book," Hearst New Media lecture, April 22, 2010.,
935:«El entendimiento humano no es una luz pura, exenta de sofisticación. Influencias procedentes de la voluntad y la concupiscencia lo enturbian. De este modo se hace de las ciencias lo que se quiere. Lo que se desea creer, esto lo creemos fácilmente.

»Y, así desechamos: lo difícil, porque al investigarlo perdemos la paciencia; lo humilde y sobrio, porque no se aviene con nuestras esperanzas de grandeza; las ocultas fuerzas que mueven la naturaleza, porque somos supersticiosos; la luz de la experiencia, porque somos arrogantes y orgullosos y no queremos dar la impresión de que nuestro espíritu se ocupe en cosas viles y mutables; las opiniones nuevas y extraordinarias, porque somos afectos a las que están de moda.

»En resumen: nuestras propensiones afectivas impregnan y envenenan al entendimiento de incontables modos y, a menudo, de una manera imperceptible» ~ Francis Bacon,
936:One danger here, of course, is that once we insist or pretend that we know the answer based on premature or incomplete evidence (even if we’re pushed against our will to take such stands), we’re likely to continue to insist we’re right, even when evidence accumulates to the contrary. This is a risk in any human endeavor. When Francis Bacon pioneered the scientific method almost four hundred years ago, he was hoping to create a methodology of critical or rational thinking that would minimize this all-too-human characteristic of avoiding evidence that disagrees with any preconceptions we might have formed.*1 Without rigorous tests, as many as necessary, beliefs and preconceptions will persevere because it’s always easier to believe that a single test has been flawed, or even a few of them, than it is to accept that our belief had been incorrect. The scientific method protects against this tendency; it does not eradicate it. ~ Gary Taubes,
937:Shakespeare was not even able to perform a function that we consider today as perfectly normal and ordinary a function as reading itself. He could not, as the saying goes, “look something up.” Indeed the very phrase—when it is used in the sense of “searching for something in a dictionary or encyclopedia or other book of reference”—simply did not exist. It does not appear in the English language, in fact, until as late as 1692, when an Oxford historian named Anthony Wood used it. Since there was no such phrase until the late seventeenth century, it follows that there was essentially no such concept either, certainly not at the time when Shakespeare was writing—a time when writers were writing furiously, and thinkers thinking as they rarely had before. Despite all the intellectual activity of the time there was in print no guide to the tongue, no linguistic vade mecum, no single book that Shakespeare or Martin Frobisher, Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh, Francis Bacon, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Nash, John Donne, Ben Jonson, Izaak Walton, or any of their other learned contemporaries could consult. ~ Simon Winchester,
938:Me
if you weren't you, who would you like to be?
Paul McCartney Gustav Mahler
Alfred Jarry John Coltrane
Charlie Mingus Claude Debussy
Wordsworth Monet Bach and Blake
Charlie Parker Pierre Bonnard
Leonardo Bessie Smith
Fidel Castro Jackson Pollock
Gaudi Milton Munch and Berg
Belà Bartók Henri Rousseau
Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns
Lukas Cranach Shostakovich
Kropotkin Ringo George and John
William Burroughs Francis Bacon
Dylan Thomas Luther King
H. P. Lovecraft T. S. Eliot
D. H. Lawrence Roland Kirk
Salvatore Giuliano
Andy Warhol Paul Uzanne
Kafka Camus Ensor Rothko
Jacques Prévert and Manfred Mann
Marx Dostoevsky
Bakunin Ray Bradbury
Miles Davis Trotsky
Stravinsky and Poe
Danilo Dolci Napoleon Solo
St John of the Cross and
The Marquis de Sade
Charles Rennie Mackintosh
Rimbaud Claes Oldenburg
Adrian Mitchell and Marcel Duchamp
24
James Joyce and Hemingway
Hitchcock and Bunuel
Donald McKinlay Thelonius Monk
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Matthias Grunewald
Philip Jones Grifths and Roger McGough
Guillaume Apollinaire
Cannonball Adderley
René Magritte
Hieronymus Bosch
Stéphane Mallarmé and Alfred de Vigny
Ernst Mayakovsky and Nicolas de Stael
Hindemith Mick Jagger Durer and Schwitters
Garcia Lorca
and
last of all
me.
~ Adrian Henri,
939:I belong to a culture that includes Proust, Henry James, Tchaikovsky, Cole Porter, Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Christopher Marlowe, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Tennessee Williams, Byron, E.M. Forster, Lorca, Auden, Francis Bacon, James Baldwin, Harry Stack Sullivan, John Maynard Keynes, Dag Hammarskjold… These are not invisible men. Poor Bruce. Poor frightened Bruce. Once upon a time you wanted to be a soldier.
Bruce, did you know that an openly gay Englishman was as responsible as any man for winning the Second World War? His name was Alan Turing and he cracked the Germans' Enigma code so the Allies knew in advance what the Nazis were going to do — and when the war was over he committed suicide he was so hounded for being gay. Why don't they teach any of this in the schools? If they did, maybe he wouldn't have killed himself and maybe you wouldn't be so terrified of who you are. The only way we'll have real pride is when we demand recognition of a culture that isn't just sexual. It's all there—all through history we've been there; but we have to claim it, and identify who was in it, and articulate what's in our minds and hearts and all our creative contributions to this earth. And until we do that, and until we organize ourselves block by neighborhood by city by state into a united visible community that fights back, we're doomed. That's how I want to be defined: as one of the men who fought the war. ~ Larry Kramer,
940:I am sad that I did not see any of this myself. By the time I had received the communication on television and in my morning paper, felt the tugging pull toward Manhattan, and made my preparations to migrate, I learned that the army ants had all died.

The Art Form simply disintegrated, all at once, like one of those exploding, vanishing faces in paintings by the British artist Francis Bacon

There was no explanation, beyond the rumored, unproved possibility of cold drafts in the gallery over the weekend. Monday morning they were sluggish, moving with less precision, dully. Then, the death began, affecting first one part and then another, and within a day all 2 million were dead, swept away into large plastic bags and put outside for the engulfment and digestion by the sanitation truck.

It is a melancholy parable. I am unsure of the meaning, but I do think it has something to do with all that plastic- that, and the distance from earth. It is a long, long way from the earth of a Central American jungle to the ground floor of a gallery, especially when you consider that Manhattan itself is suspended on a kind of concrete platform, propped up by a meshwork of wires, pipes, and water mains. But I think it was chiefly the plastic, which seems to me the most unearthly of all man's creations so far. I do not believe you can suspend army ants away from the earth, on plastic, for any length of time. They will lose touch, run out of energy, and die for lack of current. ~ Lewis Thomas,
941:People often seem surprised that I choose to write science fiction and fantasy—I think they expect a history professor to write historical fiction, or literary fiction, associating academia with the kinds of novels that academic lit critics prefer. But I feel that speculative fiction, especially science fiction and fantasy, is a lot more like the pre-modern literature I spend most of my time studying than most modern literature is. Ursula Le Guin has described speculative fiction authors as “realists of a larger reality” because we imagine other ways of being, alternatives to how people live now, different worlds, and raise questions about hope and change and possibilities that different worlds contain.

....

Writing for a more distant audience, authors tended to be speculative, using exotic perspectives, fantastic creatures, imaginary lands, allegories, prophecies, stories within stories, techniques which, like science fiction and fantasy, use alternatives rather than one reality in order to ask questions, not about the way things are, but about plural ways things have been and could be. Such works have an empathy across time, expecting and welcoming an audience as alien as the other worlds that they describe. When I read Voltaire responding to Francis Bacon, responding to Petrarch, responding to Boethius, responding to Seneca, responding to Plutarch, I want to respond to them too, to pass it on. So it makes sense to me to answer in the genre people have been using for this conversation since antiquity: speculation. It’s the genre of many worlds, the many worlds that Earth has been, and will be. ~ Ada Palmer,
942:And I *know* I wrote in the above that I hate biographies and reviews that focus on the psychological, surface detail, especially when they pertain to women writers, because I think it’s really about the cult of the personality, which is essentially problematic, and I think simplistically psychologizing which biographies are so wont to do is really problematic, and dangerous, especially when dealing with complicated women who just by being writers at a certain time and age were labelled as nonconformist, or worse, hysterical or ill or crazy, and I think branding these women as femme fatales is all so often done. And I know in a way I’m contributing to this by posting their bad-ass photos, except hopefully I am humanizing them and thinking of them as complicated selves and intellects AND CELEBRATING THEM AS WRITERS as opposed to straight-up objectifying. One particular review long ago in Poetry that really got my goat was when Brian Phillips used Gertrude Stein’s line about Djuna Barnes having nice ankles as an opener in a review of her poetry, and to my mind it was meant to be entirely dismissive, as of course, Stein was being as well. Stein was many important revolutionary things to literature, but a champion of her fellow women writers she was not. They published my letter, but then let the guy write a reply and scurry to the library and actually read Nightwood, one of my all-time, all-times, and Francis Bacon’s too, there’s another anecdote. And it’s burned in my brain his response, which was as dismissive and bourgeois as the review. I don’t remember the exact wordage, but he concluded by summing up that Djuna Barnes was a minor writer. Well, fuck a duck, as Henry Miller would say. And that is how the canon gets made. ~ Kate Zambreno,
943:Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books, else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know, that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.
----
Alcuni libri devono essere gustati, altri masticati e digeriti, vale a dire che alcuni libri vanno letti solo in parte, altri senza curiosità, e altri per intero, con diligenza ed attenzione. Alcuni libri possono essere letti da altri e se ne possono fare degli estratti, ma ciò riguarderebbe solo argomenti di scarsa importanza o di libri secondari perché altrimenti i libri sintetizzati sono come l’acqua distillata, evanescente. La lettura completa la formazione di un uomo; il parlare lo fa abile, e la scrittura lo trasforma in un uomo preciso. E, pertanto, se un uomo scrive poco, deve avere una grande memoria, se parla poco ha bisogno di uno spirito arguto; se legge poco deve avere bisogno di molta astuzia in modo da far sembrare di sapere quello che non sa. Le storie fanno gli uomini saggi; i poeti arguti; la matematica sottile; la filosofia naturale profondi; la logica e la retorica abili nella discussione. ~ Francis Bacon,
944:In winter you wake up in this city, especially on Sundays, to the chiming of its innumerable bells, as though behind your gauze curtains a gigantic china teaset were vibrating on a silver tray in the pearl-gray sky. You fling the window open and the room is instantly flooded with this outer, peal-laden haze, which is part damp oxygen, part coffee and prayers. No matter what sort of pills, and how many, you've got to swallow this morning, you feel it's not over for you yet. No matter, by the same token, how autonomous you are, how much you've been betrayed, how thorough and dispiriting in your self-knowledge, you assume there is still hope for you, or at least a future. (Hope, said Francis Bacon, is a good breakfast but bad supper.) This optimism derives from the haze, from the prayer part of it, especially if it's time for breakfast. On days like this, the city indeed acquires a porcelain aspect, what with all its zinc-covered cupolas resembling teapots or upturned cups, and the tilted profile of campaniles clinking like abandoned spoons and melting in the sky. Not to mention the seagulls and pigeons, now sharpening into focus, now melting into air. I should say that, good though this place is for honeymoons, I've often thought it should be tried for divorces also - both in progress and already accomplished. There is no better backdrop for rapture to fade into; whether right or wrong, no egoist can star for long in this porcelain setting by crystal water, for it steals the show. I am aware, of course, of the disastrous consequence the above suggestion may have for hotel rates here, even in winter. Still, people love their melodrama more than architecture, and I don't feel threatened. It is surprising that beauty is valued less than psychology, but so long as such is the case, I'll be able to afford this city - which means till the end of my days, and which ushers in the generous notion of the future. ~ Joseph Brodsky,
945:The roots of Campanella’s “Solar City” (and the District of Columbia) can be found in deeper occult parallels within the literature formulated by hermetical philosophers Giovanni Pico della Mirandola and Marsilio Ficino in Renaissance Florence; both prophetically predicting the restoration of the Egyptian solar religion as the correct political theology of the planet and itself the model for a “New World” civil religion.  In another words they believed the Abrahamic solar faiths of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam would ultimately be exposed as substituted forms of Egyptian sun worship with in “New World” - the United States. It would be this “New World” that would midwife civilization from the waning Piscean Age into the “Masonic” Aquarian Age, a new age of the holy spirit. Simon Greenleaf's Druids and Campanella's Solarians are the de-facto “mediating” Joachimite order through which heavenly signs are mediated by a Sun Priest - an executive or President - who frames policy based upon his knowledge of the correspondences between science (i.e. Egyptian natural religion), grades of being, and heavenly correspondences. This polity was replicated from 1797 within the General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons with reference both to Enoch (cf. Webb’s 1797 Monitor) and the priest king Melchizedek of which the Grand Master DeWitt Clinton became the symbolic presiding executive.  This configuration is important to make because it establishes the position of the District of Columbia as a utopian ideal city in relationship to the history of mystical utopias of Sir Thomas More (Utopia, 1516), through Tommaso Campanella, and Sir Francis Bacon (The New Atlantis, 1626) in terms of the “entelechy” or interior dynamic of the occult “magic” or “science” from numinous vitalism of the hermetical Renaissance into the period of modern scientific inquiry.  DeWitt Clinton’s uncle George Clinton (1739 - 1812) resided in the District as the first Vice President to do so.  Thus its empirical utility and its mythological associations with Merkabah Kabbalah in arch and dome symbolism would have born a higher intensity of symbolic resonance than to subsequent generations. ~ Robert W Sullivan IV,
946:I Want To Paint
I want to paint
2000 dead birds crucified on a background of night
Thoughts that lie too deep for tears
Thoughts that lie too deep for queers
Thoughts that move at 186,000 miles/second
The Entry of Christ into Liverpool in 1966
The installation of Roger McGough in the Chair of Poetry at Oxford
Francis Bacon making the President's Speech at the Royal Academy dinner
I want to paint
50 life-sized nudes of Marianne Faithfull
(all of them painted from life)
Welsh Maids by Welsh Waterfalls
Heather Holden as Our Lady of Haslingden
A painting as big as Piccadilly full of neon signs and buses
Christmas decorations and beautiful girls with dark blonde hair shading their
faces
I want to paint
The assassination of the entire Royal Family
Enormous pictures of every pavingstone in Canning Street
The Beatles composing a new national anthem
Brian Patten writing poems with a flamethrower on disused ferry boats
A new cathedral 50 miles high made entirely of pram wheels
An empty Woodbine packet covered in kisses
I want to paint
A picture made from the tears of dirty-faced children in Chatham Street
I want to paint
I LOVE YOU across the steps of St. George's hall
I want to paint
Pictures
II
I want to paint
The Simultaneous and Historical Faces of Death
15
10,000 shocking pink hearts with your name on
The phantom negro postmen who bring me money in my dreams
The first plastic daffodil of spring pushing its way
Through the OMO packets in the supermarket
The portrait of every sixth-form schoolgirl in the country
A full-scale map of the world with YOU at the centre
An enormous lily-of-the-valley with every flower on a separate canvas
Life-sized jelly babies shaped like Hayley Mills
A black-and-red flag flying over Parliament
I want to paint
Every car crash on all the motorways of England
Pere Ubu at 11 o'clock at night in Lime Street
A SYSTEMATIC DERANGEMENT OF ALL THE SENSES
in black running letters 50 miles high over Liverpool
I want to paint
Pictures that children play hopscotch on
Pictures that can be used as evidence at murder trials
Pictures that can be used to advertise cornflakes
Pictures that can be used to frighten naughty children
Pictures worth their weight in money
Pictures that tramps can live in
Pictures that children would find in their stockings on Christmas morning
Pictures that teenage lovers can send each other
I want to paint
pictures
~ Adrian Henri,
947:I do not know whether it is an act of faithfulness to her or a betrayal of the dignity she never lost, to say that she had bitten her tongue, to say that there was blood flowing across her mouth and lips which my brother kept wiping away. I do not know whether I have the right to say, though I will do so, that her body was shaken with epileptic tremors and that she took enormous, terrifying breaths that went on and on until you could not believe she had the strength for them. I do not know whether, as we thought at the time, she could feel our hands on her forehead and cheek, or whether she had waited until we were both there to die.

I did not say 'I am here'. I did not say anything. Her mouth was open wide, as in those portraits by Francis Bacon of caged prisoners in their final extremity. I watched and listened to those terrifying, rattling, hoarse breaths, wondering at the strength remaining in her aged body and at the violence it still had to endure. I looked over at my brother as if he might know, as if he might understand whether she had the strength to continue. He was stroking her forehead, whispering soundlessly to her, attempting even at this moment to reach behind the veil and find her.

If you believe that she knew we were there, if you believe--I cannot be sure--that she understood what her sons needed at that instant, her eyes which had been shut and which, by being closed, made her seem completely out of our reach, suddenly opened. Blue-grey eyes, staring up into the ceiling above her sons' heads, upwards, ever upwards, fixed like an exhausted swimmer on the shore. Then her eyes closed and she took the largest, most violent breath of all, and we watched and waited, stood and looked at each other, felt for her pulse and slowly, as seconds turned into minutes, realized that she would never breathe again.

There is only one reason to tell you this, to present the scene. It is to say that what happens can never be anticipated. What happens escapes anything you can ever say about it. What happens cannot be redeemed. It can never be anything other than what it is. We tell stories as if to refuse this truth, as if to say that we make our fate, rather than simply endure it. But in truth we make nothing. We live, and we cannot shape life. It is much too great for us, too great for any words. A writer must refuse to believe this, must believe there is nothing that cannot somehow be said. Yet there at last in her presence, in the unending unfolding of that silence, which still goes on, which I still expect to be broken by another drawing in of breath, I knew that all my words could only be in vain, and that all that I had feared and all that I had anticipated could only be lived--without their help or hers. ~ Michael Ignatieff,
948:(Novum Organum by Francis Bacon.)
   34. "Four species of idols beset the human mind, to which (for distinction's sake) we have assigned names, calling the first Idols of the Tribe, the second Idols of the Den, the third Idols of the Market, the fourth Idols of the Theatre.
   40. "The information of notions and axioms on the foundation of true induction is the only fitting remedy by which we can ward off and expel these idols. It is, however, of great service to point them out; for the doctrine of idols bears the same relation to the interpretation of nature as that of the confutation of sophisms does to common logic.
   41. "The idols of the tribe are inherent in human nature and the very tribe or race of man; for man's sense is falsely asserted to be the standard of things; on the contrary, all the perceptions both of the senses and the mind bear reference to man and not to the Universe, and the human mind resembles these uneven mirrors which impart their own properties to different objects, from which rays are emitted and distort and disfigure them.
   42. "The idols of the den are those of each individual; for everybody (in addition to the errors common to the race of man) has his own individual den or cavern, which intercepts and corrupts the light of nature, either from his own peculiar and singular disposition, or from his education and intercourse with others, or from his reading, and the authority acquired by those whom he reverences and admires, or from the different impressions produced on the mind, as it happens to be preoccupied and predisposed, or equable and tranquil, and the like; so that the spirit of man (according to its several dispositions), is variable, confused, and, as it were, actuated by chance; and Heraclitus said well that men search for knowledge in lesser worlds, and not in the greater or common world.
   43. "There are also idols formed by the reciprocal intercourse and society of man with man, which we call idols of the market, from the commerce and association of men with each other; for men converse by means of language, but words are formed at the will of the generality, and there arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. Nor can the definitions and explanations with which learned men are wont to guard and protect themselves in some instances afford a complete remedy-words still manifestly force the understanding, throw everything into confusion, and lead mankind into vain and innumerable controversies and fallacies.
   44. "Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre: for we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a similar nature can be still composed and made to agree with each other, the causes of the most opposite errors being generally the same. Nor, again, do we allude merely to general systems, but also to many elements and axioms of sciences which have become inveterate by tradition, implicit credence, and neglect. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
949:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus – Tragedies
4. Sophocles – Tragedies
5. Herodotus – Histories
6. Euripides – Tragedies
7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes – Comedies
10. Plato – Dialogues
11. Aristotle – Works
12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid – Elements
14. Archimedes – Works
15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections
16. Cicero – Works
17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil – Works
19. Horace – Works
20. Livy – History of Rome
21. Ovid – Works
22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy – Almagest
27. Lucian – Works
28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations
29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus – The Enneads
32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njál
36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More – Utopia
44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays
48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan
57. René Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton – Works
59. Molière – Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics
63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve – The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler,
950:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

IN CHAPTERS [4/4]



   1 Occultism






1.49 - Thelemic Morality, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
  But I am perfectly happy about it; the one important thing (as Descartes and Francis Bacon saw) is that you should acquire and assimilate the METHOD of Thelemic thinking.
  Love is the law, love under will.

3-5 Full Circle, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  The unity of mind and feeling, the Circle of Perfection created by medieval mystics and scholastics, was shattered by the apostle of empiricism, Francis Bacon, and the parts were dispersed by his fellow empiricists, each of whose strong but little knowledge became ever more clearly a deadly dangerous thing.
  "To Bacon [and to empirical one-field specialists ever since]," Nicholson goes on, "the Circle of Perfection was no more than a `fiction', and the tendency of man to find it everywhere on earth and in the heavens one more indication of the dangerous haziness of thinking he called an `Idol of the Tribe': `The human understanding', he said, `is of its own nature prone to suppose the existence of more order and regularity in the world than it finds'".31 Thus, being human, Bacon displayed and worshiped the idol of his own new Tribe: the tribe of empirical one-field scientists who, by their nature, see individual parts of the universe, but not their structural correspondence and assembly.
  Sir Francis Bacon and his disciples were correct in shattering the spurious seventeenth century Circle, for many of the parts comprising that assembly of knowledge have proved demonstrably wrong. The scientists were also correct in patiently and tenaciously discovering the future Circle's empirically valid component parts, one by one, in spite of the deadly, excruciating irrelevance and meaninglessness of the resulting storehouse of unassembled parts, the multiversity.
  In overcoming the dangerous medieval haziness of thinking--in carrying out the 18th century's response to that challenge, fatuously called the Enlightenment--these scientists created the twentieth century's far more dangerous challenge: our deep Ensombrement, which Lippmann calls The Eclipse of the Public Philosophy19 (Chapter VIII). This was not due to viciousness or stupidity, but to the structure of evolution, inherent in the Systems-hierarchy, which poets have called the darkness before the dawn.32

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  in Francis Bacon's list of laughable objects, the first place is taken by
  'deformity'. The essence of the 'theory of degradation' is defined in
  --
  Both Cicero and Francis Bacon gave deformity a high place on their
  lists of causes for laughter. The princes of the Renaissance collected
  --
  really but a handful,' wrote Francis Bacon, 'the invention of all causes
  and all sciences would be a labour of but a few years.*
  --
  the ways of the universe had already been discovered; Francis Bacon
  and Descartes believed that to complete the edifice of science would

The Immortal, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
    Borges begins by quoting Francis Bacon's Essays, LVIII. "Salomon saith, There is no new thing upon the earth. So that as Plato had an imagination, that all knowledge was but remembrance; so Salomon giveth his sentence, that all novelty is but oblivion."
    
  --
     Francis Bacon: Essays, LVIII
  In London, in early June of the year 1929, the rare book dealer Joseph Cartaphilus, of Smyrna, offered the princess de Lucinge the six quarto minor volumes (1715-1720) of Pope's Iliad. The princess purchased them; when she took possession of them, she exchanged a few words with the dealer. He was, she says, an emaciated, grimy man with gray eyes and gray beard and singularly vague features. He expressed himself with untutored and uncorrected fluency in several languages; within scant minutes he shifted from French to English and from English to an enigmatic cross between the Spanish of Salonika and the Portuguese of Macao. In October, the princess heard from a passenger on the Zeus that Cartaphilus had died at sea while returning to Smyrna, and that he had been buried on the island of Cos.

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun francis_bacon

The noun francis bacon has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans ::: (English statesman and philosopher; precursor of British empiricism; advocated inductive reasoning (1561-1626))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun francis_bacon

1 sense of francis bacon                        

Sense 1
Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   INSTANCE OF=> statesman, solon, national leader
     => politician, politico, pol, political leader
       => leader
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher
     => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
       => intellectual, intellect
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun francis_bacon
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun francis_bacon

1 sense of francis bacon                        

Sense 1
Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   INSTANCE OF=> statesman, solon, national leader
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun francis_bacon

1 sense of francis bacon                        

Sense 1
Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
  -> statesman, solon, national leader
   => elder statesman
   => Founding Father
   => stateswoman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Acheson, Dean Acheson, Dean Gooderham Acheson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Adenauer, Konrad Adenauer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Agrippa, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alcibiades
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arafat, Yasser Arafat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ataturk, Kemal Ataturk, Kemal Pasha, Mustafa Kemal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Attlee, Clement Attlee, Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee
   HAS INSTANCE=> Augustus, Gaius Octavianus, Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, Octavian
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Balfour, Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baruch, Bernard Baruch, Bernard Mannes Baruch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Begin, Menachem Begin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ben Gurion, David Ben Gurion, David Grun
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bevin, Ernest Bevin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bismarck, von Bismarck, Otto von Bismarck, Prince Otto von Bismarck, Prince Otto Eduard Leopold von Bismarck, Iron Chancellor
   HAS INSTANCE=> Blair, Tony Blair, Anthony Charles Lynton Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bolivar, Simon Bolivar, El Libertador
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brandt, Willy Brandt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brezhnev, Leonid Brezhnev, Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brutus, Marcus Junius Brutus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burke, Edmund Burke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caesar, Julius Caesar, Gaius Julius Caesar
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cassius, Cassius Longinus, Gaius Cassius Longinus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chamberlain, Neville Chamberlain, Arthur Neville Chamberlain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterfield, Fourth Earl of Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chiang Kai-shek, Chiang Chung-cheng
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cicero, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Tully
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cincinnatus, Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemenceau, Georges Clemenceau, Georges Eugene Benjamin Clemenceau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clive, Robert Clive, Baron Clive, Baron Clive of Plassey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cosimo de Medici, Cosimo the Elder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cromwell, Oliver Cromwell, Ironsides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Davis, Jefferson Davis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dayan, Moshe Dayan
   HAS INSTANCE=> de Gaulle, General de Gaulle, Charles de Gaulle, General Charles de Gaulle, Charles Andre Joseph Marie de Gaulle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Demosthenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Deng Xiaoping, Teng Hsiao-ping, Teng Hsiaoping
   HAS INSTANCE=> de Valera, Eamon de Valera
   HAS INSTANCE=> Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, First Earl of Beaconsfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaminius, Gaius Flaminius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fox, Charles James Fox
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gandhi, Indira Gandhi, Indira Nehru Gandhi, Mrs. Gandhi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gladstone, William Gladstone, William Ewart Gladstone
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorbachev, Mikhail Gorbachev, Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Charles Grey, Second Earl Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Richard Haldane, Richard Burdon Haldane, First Viscount Haldane of Cloan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamilton, Alexander Hamilton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Havel, Vaclav Havel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hindenburg, Paul von Hindenburg, Paul Ludwig von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ho Chi Minh, Nguyen Tat Thanh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jinnah, Muhammad Ali Jinnah
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kalinin, Mikhail Kalinin, Mikhail Ivanovich Kalinin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kaunda, Kenneth Kaunda, Kenneth David Kaunda
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kenyata, Jomo Kenyata
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerensky, Aleksandr Feodorovich Kerensky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Khama, Sir Seretse Khama
   HAS INSTANCE=> Khrushchev, Nikita Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Konoe, Fumimaro Konoe, Prince Fumimaro Konoe, Konoye, Fumimaro Konoye, Prince Fumimaro Konoye
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kruger, Oom Paul Kruger, Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lorenzo de'Medici, Lorenzo the Magnificent
   HAS INSTANCE=> Machiavelli, Niccolo Machiavelli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Major, John Major, John R. Major, John Roy Major
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mandela, Nelson Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marshall, George Marshall, George Catlett Marshall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Meir, Golda Meir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Metternich, Klemens Metternich, Prince Klemens Wenzel Nepomuk Lothar von Metternich
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitterrand, Francois Mitterrand, Francois Maurice Marie Mitterrand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morris, Gouverneur Morris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mubarak, Hosni Mubarak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nansen, Fridtjof Nansen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nasser, Gamal Abdel Nasser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nehru, Jawaharlal Nehru
   HAS INSTANCE=> North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ortega, Daniel Ortega, Daniel Ortega Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paderewski, Ignace Paderewski, Ignace Jan Paderewski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pericles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, William Pitt, First Earl of Chatham, Pitt the Elder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, William Pitt, Second Earl of Chatham, Pitt the Younger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pompey, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, Pompey the Great
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Putin, Vladimir Putin, Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Radhakrishnan, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Sir Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richelieu, Duc de Richelieu, Armand Jean du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rockingham, Second Marquis of Rockingham, Charles Watson-Wentworth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sadat, Anwar Sadat, Anwar el-Sadat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schmidt, Helmut Schmidt, Helmut Heinrich Waldemar Schmidt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smith, Ian Smith, Ian Douglas Smith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smuts, Jan Christian Smuts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Suharto
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sukarno, Achmad Sukarno
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sully, Duc de Sully, Maxmilien de Bethune
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sun Yat-sen, Sun Yixian
   HAS INSTANCE=> Talleyrand, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Themistocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tito, Marshal Tito, Josip Broz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas, Getulio Dornelles Vargas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verwoerd, Hendrik Verwoerd, Hendrik Frensch Verwoerd
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waldheim, Kurt Waldheim
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walesa, Lech Walesa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warwick, Earl of Warwick, Richard Neville, Kingmaker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Weizmann, Chaim Weizmann, Chaim Azriel Weizmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wellington, Duke of Wellington, First Duke of Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, Iron Duke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wykeham, William of Wykeham
  -> philosopher
   => nativist
   => Cynic
   => eclectic, eclecticist
   => empiricist
   => epistemologist
   => esthetician, aesthetician
   => ethicist, ethician
   => existentialist, existentialist philosopher, existential philosopher
   => gymnosophist
   => libertarian
   => mechanist
   => moralist
   => naturalist
   => necessitarian
   => nominalist
   => pluralist
   => pre-Socratic
   => realist
   => Scholastic
   => Sophist
   => Stoic
   => transcendentalist
   => yogi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Abelard, Peter Abelard, Pierre Abelard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaxagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arendt, Hannah Arendt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristotle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Averroes, ibn-Roshd, Abul-Walid Mohammed ibn-Ahmad Ibn-Mohammed ibn-Roshd
   HAS INSTANCE=> Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bentham, Jeremy Bentham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bergson, Henri Bergson, Henri Louis Bergson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bruno, Giordano Bruno
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buber, Martin Buber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cassirer, Ernst Cassirer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cleanthes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Comte, Auguste Comte, Isidore Auguste Marie Francois Comte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Condorcet, Marquis de Condorcet, Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas Caritat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Confucius, Kongfuze, K'ung Futzu, Kong the Master
   HAS INSTANCE=> Democritus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Derrida, Jacques Derrida
   HAS INSTANCE=> Descartes, Rene Descartes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dewey, John Dewey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diderot, Denis Diderot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diogenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Empedocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epictetus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epicurus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haeckel, Ernst Heinrich Haeckel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hartley, David Hartley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heraclitus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herbart, Johann Friedrich Herbart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herder, Johann Gottfried von Herder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hobbes, Thomas Hobbes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hume, David Hume
   HAS INSTANCE=> Husserl, Edmund Husserl
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hypatia
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, William James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kant, Immanuel Kant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kierkegaard, Soren Kierkegaard, Soren Aabye Kierkegaard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lao-tzu, Lao-tse, Lao-zi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leibniz, Leibnitz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Locke, John Locke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lucretius, Titus Lucretius Carus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lully, Raymond Lully, Ramon Lully
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mach, Ernst Mach
   HAS INSTANCE=> Machiavelli, Niccolo Machiavelli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maimonides, Moses Maimonides, Rabbi Moses Ben Maimon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malebranche, Nicolas de Malebranche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marcuse, Herbert Marcuse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Karl Marx
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mead, George Herbert Mead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, John Mill, John Stuart Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, James Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montesquieu, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu, Charles Louis de Secondat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, G. E. Moore, George Edward Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Occam, William of Occam, Ockham, William of Ockham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Origen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ortega y Gasset, Jose Ortega y Gasset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parmenides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pascal, Blaise Pascal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Peirce, Charles Peirce, Charles Sanders Peirce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Perry, Ralph Barton Perry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plato
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plotinus
   => Popper, Karl Popper, Sir Karl Raimund Popper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pythagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Quine, W. V. Quine, Willard Van Orman Quine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Radhakrishnan, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Sir Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Reid, Thomas Reid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schopenhauer, Arthur Schopenhauer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schweitzer, Albert Schweitzer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Socrates
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spencer, Herbert Spencer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spengler, Oswald Spengler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spinoza, de Spinoza, Baruch de Spinoza, Benedict de Spinoza
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steiner, Rudolf Steiner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stewart, Dugald Stewart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Teilhard de Chardin, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thales, Thales of Miletus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Theophrastus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Weil, Simone Weil
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whitehead, Alfred North Whitehead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Sir Bernard Williams, Bernard Arthur Owen Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wittgenstein, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Ludwig Josef Johan Wittgenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Xenophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Citium
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Elea




--- Grep of noun francis_bacon
francis bacon
sir francis bacon



IN WEBGEN [10000/70]

Wikipedia - Achlys -- Ancient Greek primordial goddess of sadness
Wikipedia - A City of Sadness -- 1989 film directed by Hou Hsiao-hsien
Wikipedia - Carlos Sadness -- Spanish singer and composer
Wikipedia - Hiraeth -- Welsh term for homesickness tinged with sadness or a sense of loss
Wikipedia - Love in Sadness -- 2019 South Korean television series
Wikipedia - Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness -- The Smashing Pumpkins album
Wikipedia - Post-coital tristesse -- Feeling of sadness, anxiety, agitation or aggression after sexual intercourse
Wikipedia - Sadness -- Negative emotion
Wikipedia - Summertime Sadness -- Lana Del Rey song
Wikipedia - Triangle of Sadness -- Film by Ruben M-CM-^Vstlund
Wikipedia - Weltschmerz -- German word for deep sadness about the state of the world
Wikipedia - Wojak -- Internet meme expressing sadness
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14029.Beauty_and_Sadness
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/199142.The_Sadness_of_Christ_and_Final_Prayers_and_Benedictions
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/280679.The_Sadness_of_Sex
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35132873-vintage-sadness
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35297191.Sadness_Is_a_White_Bird
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35297191-sadness-is-a-white-bird
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38496511-the-sadness-of-beautiful-things
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40641149-when-sadness-is-at-your-door
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43466666-sunshine-sadness-and-other-floridian-effects
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7048800-the-particular-sadness-of-lemon-cake
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/846170.Malignant_Sadness
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8674687-beauty-and-sadness
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/87202.The_Edge_of_Sadness
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16069629.Carlos_Sadness
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Anime/BelladonnaOfSadness
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SadnessTropes
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SenseLossSadness
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SilenceOfSadness
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SimpleScoreOfSadness
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Music/MellonCollieAndTheInfiniteSadness
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Sadness
Santa's Apprentice(2010) - Nicholas is a 7-year-old Australian orphan who loves Christmas. The happiest day of the year for Nicholas and his friends at the orphanage is also tainted with sadness. Their greatest Christmas wish is one that may never be granted: to find a new family that they can call thei
Belladonna of Sadness (1973) ::: 7.4/10 -- Kanashimi no beradonna (original title) -- Belladonna of Sadness Poster -- An evil feudal lord rapes a village girl on her wedding night and proceeds to ruin her and her husband's lives. After she's eventually banished from her village, the girl makes a pact with the devil to gain magical ability and take revenge. Director: Eiichi Yamamoto
Inside Out (2015) ::: 8.1/10 -- PG | 1h 35min | Animation, Adventure, Comedy | 19 June 2015 (USA) -- After young Riley is uprooted from her Midwest life and moved to San Francisco, her emotions - Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness - conflict on how best to navigate a new city, house, and school. Directors: Pete Docter, Ronnie Del Carmen (co-director) Writers:
Penny Serenade (1941) ::: 7.1/10 -- Not Rated | 1h 59min | Drama, Romance | 24 April 1941 (USA) -- A couple's big dreams give way to a life full of unexpected sadness and unexpected joy. Director: George Stevens Writers: Morrie Ryskind (screen play), Martha Cheavens (story) Stars:
Re: Creators ::: TV-MA | 24min | Animation, Action, Fantasy | TV Series (2017- ) Episode Guide 22 episodes Re: Creators Poster People have created many stories. Joy, sadness, anger, deep emotion.Stories stir up emotion and captivate. However, those emotions are nothing more than the feelings of a spectator. What if... S Stars: Daiki Yamashita, Inori Minase, Mikako Komatsu
https://animanga.fandom.com/wiki/Belladonna_of_Sadness
https://characters.fandom.com/wiki/Sadness_(Inside_Out)
https://characters.fandom.com/wiki/Sadness_the_Mouse
https://diablo.fandom.com/wiki/Altar_of_Sadness
https://midnight-texas.fandom.com/wiki/Drown_the_Sadness_in_Chardonnay
Blue Reflection Ray -- -- J.C.Staff -- 24 eps -- Game -- Magic School -- Blue Reflection Ray Blue Reflection Ray -- This is a story of connecting shining emotions. -- -- Joy, sadness, anger. Feelings are a power, invisible to the eye, that every person possesses. Sometimes this power is even capable of changing the world. -- -- Hiori Hirahara always has a positive attitude and can't leave people in trouble alone. Ruki Hanari is socially awkward, she wants to get along well with others, but she doesn't know how to go about it. -- -- How will the meeting of these two wildly different girls change not only them, but the world itself? -- -- (Source: Official Site, translated) -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 13,452 5.79
Cardcaptor Sakura: Clear Card-hen Prologue - Sakura to Futatsu no Kuma -- -- Madhouse -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Fantasy Romance Shoujo -- Cardcaptor Sakura: Clear Card-hen Prologue - Sakura to Futatsu no Kuma Cardcaptor Sakura: Clear Card-hen Prologue - Sakura to Futatsu no Kuma -- After the conclusion of the Sakura Card Arc, life is going back to normal. There are no more mysteries, no more disturbances of evil, no more tests of strength. Everyone is moving on with their lives and Sakura feels a sadness in her heart. Even through the goodbyes, Sakura perseveres to keep everyone and a special someone, dear to her heart. -- OVA - Sep 13, 2017 -- 33,717 7.80
Garo: Honoo no Kokuin -- -- MAPPA -- 24 eps -- Original -- Action Demons Fantasy Magic Supernatural -- Garo: Honoo no Kokuin Garo: Honoo no Kokuin -- In the name of the king, the Valiante Kingdom launched hunts to exterminate users of witchcraft. Seventeen years later, their pursuit is still growing in both size and brutality. Unbeknownst to the citizens, the targets of these witch hunts are the secret protectors of humanity. Known as the Makai Knights and Alchemists, they have a strong will to protect people from Horrors, demons who possess souls plagued by sadness and pain. -- -- One such Makai Knight is 17-year-old Leon Luis who inherits the legendary armor of the Golden Knight Garo from his mother. Though he possesses great power, he struggles to overcome the hatred he bears from his mother's death at the hands of the kingdom. His father German, known as Zoro the Shadow Cutting Knight, is still training Leon when he is called to investigate the upsurge of Horrors in the kingdom's capital. Although German knows Leon's will is wavering, he decides to bring Leon along to continue his training. -- -- As German and Leon head to the capital, the king's amiable son Alfonso San Valiante struggles to find a solution to the growing Horror threat. But before he can do so, he is double-crossed and banished from his own kingdom. To return home, Alfonso sets out to find the help and strength he needs to reclaim the throne. During his search, he comes across Leon, whose interactions with the prince will forever change both of their fates. -- -- 123,260 7.40
Garo: Honoo no Kokuin -- -- MAPPA -- 24 eps -- Original -- Action Demons Fantasy Magic Supernatural -- Garo: Honoo no Kokuin Garo: Honoo no Kokuin -- In the name of the king, the Valiante Kingdom launched hunts to exterminate users of witchcraft. Seventeen years later, their pursuit is still growing in both size and brutality. Unbeknownst to the citizens, the targets of these witch hunts are the secret protectors of humanity. Known as the Makai Knights and Alchemists, they have a strong will to protect people from Horrors, demons who possess souls plagued by sadness and pain. -- -- One such Makai Knight is 17-year-old Leon Luis who inherits the legendary armor of the Golden Knight Garo from his mother. Though he possesses great power, he struggles to overcome the hatred he bears from his mother's death at the hands of the kingdom. His father German, known as Zoro the Shadow Cutting Knight, is still training Leon when he is called to investigate the upsurge of Horrors in the kingdom's capital. Although German knows Leon's will is wavering, he decides to bring Leon along to continue his training. -- -- As German and Leon head to the capital, the king's amiable son Alfonso San Valiante struggles to find a solution to the growing Horror threat. But before he can do so, he is double-crossed and banished from his own kingdom. To return home, Alfonso sets out to find the help and strength he needs to reclaim the throne. During his search, he comes across Leon, whose interactions with the prince will forever change both of their fates. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 123,260 7.40
Hatena☆Illusion -- -- Children's Playground Entertainment -- 12 eps -- Light novel -- Comedy Supernatural Romance Ecchi -- Hatena☆Illusion Hatena☆Illusion -- Years ago, many magical "Artifacts" were stolen and scattered throughout the world. They fell into the hands of people who were not supposed to know of their existence, causing misfortune to those who abused their power. The Hoshisato family of magicians has special access to the Artifacts, and they take it upon themselves to return them to their rightful place. -- -- Despite her inexperience, Kana "Hatena" Hoshisato wishes to aid her parents Mamoru and Maeve in their quest, doing her best to improve. Meanwhile, her childhood friend Makoto Shiranui has come to their mansion to study magic under her father's tutelage as part of a promise they made years ago. Hatena is excited to see her friend again, only to be utterly disappointed when the person she thought to be a girl all these years turns out to be a boy, leading to a bitter reunion. -- -- Before long, Makoto comes to know of the Artifacts and the true identities of the magicians he admires. Unfazed, he continues to strive to fulfill his promises and stay true to why he learns magic—to ease the sadness of people around him and, most importantly, to become a person worthy of being Hatena's partner. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 31,182 5.37
Mekakucity Records -- -- - -- 3 eps -- Music -- Music Psychological Sci-Fi -- Mekakucity Records Mekakucity Records -- Mekakucity Records follows Mekakucity Days, and continues to tell the stories of the "Mekakushi-dan" members. -- -- Yobanashi Deceive -- Tonight, again, Shuuya Kano will tell a story. This is the story of a natural born liar, whose red-eye ability grants him the power to deceive, changing his appearance on a whim. But this poor boy no longer remembers his true self. Behind the mask is Kano himself, but this story is surely another lie... right? -- -- Lost Time Memory -- In one's life, there are many choices. Shintarou Kisaragi, haunted by the decisions of his past, locks himself in his room to cope. But still, he has choices. To persevere, he may finally be able to move on. Or will he remain in the past, only to drown in his regrets? No matter his choice, he will be forced to remember. -- -- Ayano no Koufuku Riron -- Ayano Tateyama's family expands when her parents adopt three red-eyed orphans. Sadness clings to these children, but Ayano wants to be the best big sister for them. Donning a red scarf, she shows the beauty of their red eyes and starts a secret club called the Mekakushi-dan. Ayano's family is her bliss, and she will do whatever it takes to protect their happiness. -- -- Music - May 29, 2013 -- 6,662 7.53
Otsukimi Recital -- -- - -- 1 ep -- Music -- Music Psychological -- Otsukimi Recital Otsukimi Recital -- Hibiya Amamiya has experienced the worst loss possible: the life of a friend. For him, the world no longer holds a glimmer, but high school idol Momo Kisaragi has taken it upon herself to show him that there is a reason to go on. Although sadness clings to Hibiya like the full moon which shines through the night, perhaps Momo will be able to brighten his eyes once again. -- -- Music - Jul 2, 2013 -- 3,815 7.08
Tomie -- -- Studio Deen -- 2 eps -- Manga -- Drama Horror Josei Supernatural -- Tomie Tomie -- Memories, both good and bad, suffuse the high school experience. Whether it's hanging out with friends or cramming for tests, everyone has something they will remember from that time in their lives. At a certain high school, one class is faced with an event that can cause people to look back on their high school days in sadness: the death of a student. -- -- The deceased is not just any student—she's Tomie Kawakami, a popular girl with an almost otherworldly beauty. Her death was particularly gruesome: her body was dismembered and the pieces scattered. As the class tries to make sense of the situation, they are shocked when a familiar voice calls out to them from the doorway, apologizing for being late. -- -- With raven hair and a beauty mark under her left eye, this girl is the spitting image of their murdered classmate. But she can't actually be Tomie, right? -- -- Special - Apr 27, 2018 -- 19,452 5.97
A Certain Smile, a Certain Sadness
A City of Sadness
A Tale of Sorrow and Sadness
A Touch of Sadness
Beauty and Sadness
Belladonna of Sadness
In Humor and Sadness
Mad for Sadness
Masked Beauty in a Sea of Sadness
Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
My Pain and Sadness Is More Sad and Painful Than Yours
Oceans of Sadness
Sadness
Sadness (video game)
Sin, Sorrow and Sadness
Summertime Sadness
Tales from Sadness
Traces of Sadness
True Sadness



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