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object:Thomas Carlyle
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subject class:Philosophy
subject class:Poetry
subject class:Mathematics
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subject class:History


Wikipedia

--- WIKI
Thomas Carlyle (4 December 1795 5 February 1881) was a British historian, satirical writer, essayist, translator, philosopher, mathematician, and teacher. In his book On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History (1841), he argued that the actions of the "Great Man" play a key role in history, claiming that "the history of the world is but the biography of great men". Other major works include The French Revolution: A History, 3 vols (1837) and The History of Friedrich II of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great, 6 vols (185865). A respected historian, his 1837 The French Revolution was the inspiration for Charles Dickens' 1859 novel A Tale of Two Cities, and remains popular today. Carlyle's 1836 Sartor Resartus is a notable philosophical novel. A great polemicist, Carlyle coined the term "the dismal science" for economics, in his essay "Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question," which remains controversial. He also wrote articles for the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. Once a Christian, Carlyle lost his faith while attending the University of Edinburgh, later adopting a form of deism. In mathematics, he is known for the Carlyle circle, a method used in quadratic equations and for developing ruler-and-compass constructions of regular polygons.


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OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

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Infinite_Library

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1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE

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author
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Thomas Carlyle

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   5 Thomas Carlyle

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  989 Thomas Carlyle
   4 Arthur Conan Doyle
   2 Terryl L Givens
   2 Leo Tolstoy

1:History of the world is but the biography of great men.
   ~ Thomas Carlyle,
2:He who has health, has hope; and he who has hope, has everything." ~ Thomas Carlyle,
3:Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness.
   ~ Thomas Carlyle,
4:What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
5:For, as I take it, Universal History, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the great Men who have worked here. They were the leaders of men, these great ones; the modellers, patterns, and in a wide sense creators, of whatsoever the general mass of men contrived to do or attain; all things that we see standing accomplished in the world are properly the outer material result, the practical realisation and embodiment, of Thoughts that dwelt in the great Men sent into the world: the soul of the world's history, it may justly be considered, were the history of these.
   ~ Thomas Carlyle, 1966, p. 1,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Nature admits no lie. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
2:Rest is for the dead. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
3:All true work is sacred. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
4:Be not a slave of words. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
5:Laughter means sympathy. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
6:The devil has his elect. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
7:Debt is a bottomless sea. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
8:No pressure, no diamonds. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
9:The end of man is action. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
10:History is the new poetry. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
11:Man is a tool-using animal. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
12:No violent extreme endures. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
13:I want to meet my God awake. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
14:Love not Pleasure; love God. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
15:The king is the man who can. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
16:A noble book! all men's book! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
17:History is a great dust heap. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
18:Leaders: Captains of industry. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
19:Society is founded upon Cloth. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
20:Song is the heroics of speech. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
21:The actual well seen is ideal. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
22:Thirty millions, mostly fools. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
23:A man's perfection is his work. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
24:Is not light grander than fire? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
25:Wonder is the basis of worship. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
26:Worship is transcendent wonder. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
27:History: A distillation of rumor. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
28:The archenemy is the arch stupid! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
29:A man perfects himself by working. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
30:Necessity dispenseth with decorum. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
31:Thought is the parent of the deed. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
32:All great peoples are conservative. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
33:A man lives by believing something. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
34:Biography is the only true history. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
35:Close thy Byron ; open thy Goethe . ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
36:Custom doth make dotards of us all. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
37:Endurance is patience concentrated. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
38:Lies exist only to be extinguished. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
39:Silence is the eternal duty of man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
40:Society is founded on hero-worship. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
41:The mathematics of high achievement ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
42:Time has only a relative existence. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
43:Silence is more eloquent than words. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
44:Speech is silver, silence is golden. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
45:The age of miracles is forever here. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
46:Variety is the condition of harmony. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
47:Violence does even justice unjustly. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
48:History after all is the true poetry. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
49:The great soul of this world is just. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
50:Earnestness alone makes life eternity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
51:History is the distillation of rumour. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
52:Rare benevolence, the minister of God. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
53:Caution is the lower story of prudence. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
54:See deep enough, and you see musically. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
55:Affectation is the product of falsehood. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
56:Every noble work is at first impossible. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
57:Habit is the deepest law of human nature ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
58:My books are friends that never fail me. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
59:Speech is great, but silence is greater. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
60:The genuine essence of truth never dies. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
61:Thought will not work except in silence. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
62:A fair day's wages for a fair day's work. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
63:All comes out even at the end of the day. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
64:In idleness there is a perpetual despair. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
65:Reform, like charity, must begin at home. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
66:The Highest Being reveals himself in man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
67:Eyes bright, with many tears, behind them. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
68:In a certain sense all men are historians. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
69:Infinite is the help man can yield to man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
70:Of all God's creatures, Man alone is poor. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
71:Oh, give us the man who sings at his work. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
72:Speech is of time, silence is of eternity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
73:The sincere alone can recognize sincerity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
74:Without kindness there can be no true joy. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
75:All history . . . is an inarticulate Bible. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
76:He that has done nothing has known nothing. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
77:No age seemed the age of romance to itself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
78:The universe is but one vast Symbol of God. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
79:Books are a triviality. Life alone is great. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
80:Creation is great, and cannot be understood. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
81:Every man has a coward and hero in his soul. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
82:Literature is the thought of thinking souls. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
83:No ghost was every seen by two pair of eyes. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
84:Not one false man but doth uncountable evil. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
85:The press is the fourth estate of the realm. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
86:The purpose of man is in action not thought. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
87:There are remedies for all things but death. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
88:Weak eyes are fondest of glittering objects. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
89:A Fourth Estate, of Able Editors, springs up. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
90:Histories are a kind of distilled newspapers. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
91:History is philosophy teaching by experience. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
92:Man is emphatically a proselytizing creature. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
93:Not what I have, but what I do is my kingdom. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
94:Properly speaking, all true work is religion. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
95:Respectable Professors of the Dismal Science. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
96:The eye sees what it brings the power to see. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
97:The fearful unbelief is unbelief in yourself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
98:The spiritual is the parent of the practical. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
99:In books lies the soul fo the whole past time. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
100:Music is well said to be the speech of angels. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
101:The greatest fault is to be conscious of none. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
102:A thought once awakened does not again slumber. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
103:Clever men are good, but they are not the best. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
104:In every object there is inexhaustible meaning. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
105:No person is important enough to make me angry. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
106:The first duty of man is that of subduing fear. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
107:To a shower of gold most things are penetrable. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
108:Fire is the best of servants, but what a master! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
109:Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
110:One monster there is in the world, the idle man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
111:Poetry, therefore, we will call Musical Thought. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
112:The whole past is the procession of the present. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
113:A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
114:A vein of poetry exists in the hearts of all men. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
115:France was long a despotism tempered by epigrams. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
116:He that can work is born to be king of something. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
117:No man is born without ambitious worldly desires. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
118:Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
119:The coldest word was once a glowing new metaphor. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
120:A good book is the purest essence of a human soul. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
121:History is the essence of innumerable biographies. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
122:The deadliest sin were the consciousness of no sin ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
123:The real use of gunpowder is to make all men tall. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
124:Cash-payment is not the sole nexus of man with man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
125:It is a vain hope to make people happy by politics. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
126:Labor, wide as the earth, has its summit in heaven. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
127:The barrenest of all mortals is the sentimentalist. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
128:The soul gives unity to what it looks at with love. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
129:They only are wise who know that they know nothing. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
130:All reform except a moral one will prove unavailing. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
131:Isolation is the sum total of wretchedness to a man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
132:Stop a moment, cease your work, and look around you. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
133:The public is anold woman.Let her maunderand mumble. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
134:Virtue is like health: the harmony of the whole man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
135:Acorns are planted silently by some unnoticed breeze. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
136:A man without a goal is like a ship without a rudder. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
137:He who has no vision of eternity has no hold on time. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
138:How great a Possibility, how small a realized Result. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
139:The greatest mistake is to imagine that we never err. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
140:A collection of books is the best of all universities. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
141:Doubt of any kind cannot be resolved except by action. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
142:Doubt, of whatever kind, can be ended by action alone. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
143:Every man is my superior in that I may learn from him. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
144:No man sees far, most see no farther than their noses. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
145:The Present is the living sum-total of the whole Past. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
146:Feel it in thy heart and then say whether it is of God! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
147:Just in ratio as knowledge increases, faith diminishes. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
148:Just in the ratio knowledge increases, faith decreases. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
149:Life is a series of lessons that have to be understood. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
150:Nature alone is antique, and the oldest art a mushroom. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
151:Nothing is more terrible than activity without insight. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
152:With stupidity and sound digestion, man may front much. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
153:If what you have done is unjust, you have not succeeded. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
154:Look to be treated by others as you have treated others. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
155:Self-contemplation is infallibly the symptom of disease. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
156:The mystical bond of brotherhood makes all men brothers. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
157:The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
158:What you see, but can't see over is as good as infinite. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
159:All greatness is unconscious, or it is little and naught. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
160:A strong mind always hopes, and has always cause to hope. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
161:Happy the People whose Annals are blank in History Books! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
162:Let each become all that he was created capable of being. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
163:Men do less than they ought, unless they do all they can. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
164:Reality, if rightly interpreted, is grander than fiction. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
165:Silence is as deep as eternity, speech a shallow as time. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
166:Tell a person they are brave and you help them become so. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
167:The first sin in our universe was Lucifer's self conceit. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
168:The merit of originality is not novelty; it is sincerity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
169:What is philosophy but a continual battle against custom? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
170:A well-written life is almost as rare as a well-spent one. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
171:God Almighty never created a man half as wise as he looks. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
172:Is not every meanest day the confluence of two eternities? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
173:It is the heart always that sees, before the head can see. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
174:My whinstone house my castle is, I have my own four walls. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
175:Only the person of worth can recognize the worth in others. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
176:poor mortals, how ye make this earth bitter for each other. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
177:Quackery gives birth to nothing; gives death to all things. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
178:The dust of controversy is merely the falsehood flying off. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
179:The goal of yesterday will be our starting-point to-morrow. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
180:The Ideal is in thyself, the impediments too is in thyself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
181:The true university of these days is a collection of books. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
182:A witty statesman said, you might prove anything by figures. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
183:Coining "Dismal Science" as a nickname for Political Economy ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
184:Conviction is worthless unless it is converted into conduct. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
185:Intellect is the soul of man, the only immortal part of him. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
186:Love is ever the beginning of knowledge as fire is of light. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
187:Nature, after all, is still the grand agent in making poets. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
188:One is hardly sensible of fatigue while he marches to music. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
189:The latest gospel in this world is, know thy work and do it. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
190:The past is always attractive because it is drained of fear. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
191:There is endless merit in a man's knowing when to have done. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
192:There is something in man which your science cannot satisfy. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
193:Worship of a hero is transcendent admiration of a great man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
194:Egotism is the source and summary of all faults and miseries. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
195:I had a lifelong quarrel with God, but in the end we made up. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
196:Know what thou canst work at, and work at it like a Hercules. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
197:No amount of ability is of the slightest avail without honor. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
198:Writing is a dreadful labor, yet not so dreadful as Idleness. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
199:Adversity is the diamond dust Heaven polishes its jewels with. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
200:All work, even cotton-spinning, is noble; work is alone noble. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
201:Hunger whets everything, especially Suspicion and Indignation. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
202:Laughter is the cipher key wherewith we decipher the whole man ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
203:Metaphysics is the attempt of the mind to rise above the mind. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
204:The true eye for talent presupposes the true reverence for it. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
205:Faith is loyalty to some inspired teacher, some spiritual hero. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
206:A frightful dialect for the stupid, the pedant and dullard sort. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
207:A great man shows his greatness by the way he treats little men. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
208:It is the feeling of injustice that is insupportable to all men. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
209:Love is the only game that is not called on account of darkness. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
210:Skepticism means, not intellectual doubt alone, but moral doubt. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
211:The All of Things is an infinite conjugation of the verb To do . ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
212:The eternal stars shine out again, so soon as it is dark enough. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
213:To the vulgar eye, few things are wonderful that are not distant ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
214:Whose school-hours are all the days and nights of our existence. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
215:Experience of actual fact either teaches fools or abolishes them. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
216:He who has health, has hope; and he who has hope, has everything. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
217:If Hero means sincere man, why may not every one of us be a Hero? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
218:It's a man's sincerity and depth of vision that makes him a poet. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
219:Macaulay is well for awhile, but one wouldn't live under Niagara. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
220:Out of the lowest depths there is a path to the loftiest heights. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
221:There is precious instruction to be got by finding we were wrong. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
222:Heroes, it would seem, exist always and a certain worship of them. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
223:I do not believe in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
224:I've got a great ambition to die of exhaustion rather than boredom. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
225:Nothing builds self-esteem and self-confidence like accomplishment. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
226:The greatest security against sin is to be shocked at its presence. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
227:A man must indeed be a hero to appear such in the eyes of his valet. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
228:A word spoken in season, at the right moment; is the mother of ages. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
229:I grow daily to honor facts more and more, and theory less and less. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
230:Naps are a way of traveling painlessly through time into the future. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
231:Pin thy faith to no man's sleeve. Hast thou not two eyes of thy own? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
232:Pin your faith to no ones sleeves, haven't you two eyes of your own. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
233:Show me the man you honor, and I will know what kind of man you are. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
234:That monstrous tuberosity of civilised life, the capital of England. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
235:The battle that never ends is the battle of belief against disbelief ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
236:All work is as seed sown; it grows and spreads, and sows itself anew. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
237:Science must have originated in the feeling that something was wrong. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
238:The times are very bad. Very well, you are there to make them better. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
239:We arc the miracle of miracles, the great inscrutable mystery of God. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
240:What this country needs is a man who knows God other than by heresay. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
241:Every new opinion, at its starting, is precisely in a minority of one. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
242:Every noble crown is, and on Earth will forever be, a crown of thorns. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
243:For suffering and enduring there is no remedy, but striving and doing. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
244:If a man was great while living, he becomes tenfold greater when dead. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
245:Money will buy money's worth; but the thing men call fame, what is it? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
246:No good book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
247:Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
248:Eternity looks grander and kinder if time grow meaner and more hostile. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
249:In every man's writings, the character of the writer must lie recorded. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
250:Nine-tenths of the miseries and vices of mankind proceed from idleness. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
251:Once turn to practice, error and truth will no longer consort together. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
252:Trust not the heart of that man for whom old clothes are not venerable. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
253:Out of Eternity the new day is born; Into Eternity at night will return. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
254:A man&
255:Biography is the most universally pleasant and profitable of all reading. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
256:Experience is the best of school masters, only the school fees are heavy. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
257:He who would write heroic poems should make his whole life a heroic poem. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
258:Humor has justly been regarded as the finest perfection of poetic genius. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
259:I never heard tell of any clever man that came of entirely stupid people. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
260:In every phenomenon the beginning remains always the most notable moment. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
261:Poetry is the attempt which man makes to render his existence harmonious. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
262:Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
263:The greatest event for the world is the arrival of a new and wise person. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
264:We have not the love of greatness, but the love of the love of greatness. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
265:A false man found a religion? Why, a false man cannot build a brick house! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
266:Everywhere in life, the true question is not what we gain, but what we do. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
267:I have no patience whatever with these gorilla damnifications of humanity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
268:Neither in tailoring nor in legislating does man proceed by mere accident. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
269:Not brute force but only persuasion and faith are the kings of this world. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
270:Parties on the back of Parties, at war with the world and with each other. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
271:The crash of the whole solar and stellar systems could only kill you once. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
272:Woe to him, . . . who has no court of appeal against the world's judgment. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
273:And yet without labour there were no ease, no rest, so much as conceivable. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
274:If I had my way, the world would hear a pretty stern command - Exit Christ. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
275:Teaching school is but another word for sure and not very slow destruction. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
276:The best effect of any book is that it excites the reader to self activity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
277:The end of Man is an Action, and not a Thought, though it were the noblest? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
278:There is so much data available to us, but most data won't help us succeed. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
279:True friends, like ivy and the wall Both stand together, and together fall. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
280:Experience takes dreadfully high school-wages, but he teaches like no other. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
281:Imagination is a poor matter when it has to part company with understanding. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
282:Is not light grander than fire? It is the same element in a state of purity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
283:The thing is not only to avoid error, but to attain immense masses of truth. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
284:War is a quarrel between two thieves too cowardly to fight their own battle. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
285:Who is there that, in logical words, can express the effect music has on us? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
286:Work earnestly at anything, you will by degrees learn to work at all things. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
287:A man cannot make a pair of shoes rightly unless he do it in a devout manner. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
288:Courtesy is the due of man to man; not of suit-of-clothes to suit-of-clothes. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
289:Prayer is and remains always a native and deepest impulse of the soul of man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
290:Talk that does not end in any kind of action is better suppressed altogether. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
291:The English are a dumb people. They can do great acts, but not describe them. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
292:All evil is like a nightmare; the instant you stir under it, the evil is gone. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
293:Do nothing, only keep agitating, debating; and things will destroy themselves. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
294:He that has a secret should not only hide it, but hide that he has it to hide. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
295:Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
296:Originality is a thing we constantly clamour for, and constantly quarrel with. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
297:The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but rather what they miss. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
298:A person who is gifted sees the essential point and leaves the rest as surplus. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
299:It is part of my creed that the only poetry is history, could we tell it right. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
300:Secrecy is the element of all goodness; even virtue, even beauty is mysterious. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
301:Teach a parrot the terms &
302:The outer passes away; the innermost is the same yesterday, today, and forever. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
303:There are good and bad times, but our mood changes more often than our fortune. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
304:All human things do require to have an ideal in them; to have some soul in them. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
305:Dishonesty is the raw material not of quacks only, but also in great part dupes. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
306:Do the duty which lies nearest to you, the second duty will then become clearer. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
307:He is wise who can instruct us and assist us in the business of virtuous living. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
308:I don't pretend to understand the Universe - it's a great deal bigger than I am. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
309:Work is the grand cure of all the maladies and miseries that ever beset mankind. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
310:&
311:Conviction never so excellent, is worthless until it coverts itself into conduct. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
312:Let him who would move and convince others, be first moved and convinced himself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
313:A man lives by believing something: not by debating and arguing about many things. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
314:A true delineation of the smallest man is capable of interesting the greatest man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
315:The true Church of England, at this moment, lies in the Editors of the newspapers. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
316:What unknown seas of feeling lie in man, and will from time to time break through! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
317:Blessed be the God's voice; for it is true, and falsehoods have to cease before it! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
318:Heroism is the divine relation which, in all times, unites a great man to other men. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
319:Lord Bacon could as easily have created the planets as he could have written Hamlet. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
320:No man who has once heartily and wholly laughed can be altogether irreclaimably bad. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
321:Not what you possess but what you do with what you have, determines your true worth. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
322:To be true is manly, chivalrous, Christian; to be false is mean, cowardly, devilish. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
323:Hero-worship exists, has existed, and will forever exist, universally, among mankind. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
324:Narrative is linear, but action has breadth and depth as well as height and is solid. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
325:There is no heroic poem in the world but is at bottom a biography, the life of a man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
326:There is often more spiritual force in a proverb than in whole philosophical systems. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
327:Why tell me that a man is a fine speaker, if it is not the truth that he is speaking? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
328:Laughter is one of the very privileges of reason, being confined to the human species. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
329:Of a truth, men are mystically united: a mystic bond of brotherhood makes all men one. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
330:One must verify or expel his doubts, and convert them into the certainty of Yes or NO. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
331:Roguery is thought by some to be cunning and laughable: it is neither; it is devilish. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
332:The deepest depth of vulgarism is that of setting up money as the ark of the covenant. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
333:The depth of our despair measures what capability and height of claim we have to hope. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
334:If you look deep enough you will see music; the heart of nature being everywhere music. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
335:Man's earthly interests,'are all hooked and buttoned together, and held up, by Clothes. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
336:No great man lives in vain. The history of the world is but the biography of great men. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
337:Thought, true labor of any kind, highest virtue itself, is it not the daughter of Pain? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
338:.. a kind of inarticulate, unfathomable speech, which leads to the edge of the Infinite. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
339:He who could foresee affairs three days in advance would be rich for thousands of years. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
340:Histories are as perfect as the Historian is wise, and is gifted with an eye and a soul. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
341:No sadder proof can be given by a man of his own littleness than disbelief in great men. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
342:Pain was not given thee merely to be miserable under; learn from it, turn it to account. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
343:Speech that leads not to action, still more that hinders it, is a nuisance on the earth. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
344:The hell of these days is the fear of not getting along, especially of not making money. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
345:The mystery of a person, indeed, is ever divine to him that has a sense for the godlike. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
346:Little other than a red tape Talking-machine, and unhappy Bag of Parliamentary Eloquence. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
347:The courage we desire and prize is not the courage to die decently, but to live manfully. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
348:The first duty of man is to conquer fear; he must get rid of it, he cannot act till then. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
349:The past is all holy to us; the dead are all holy; even they that were wicked when alive. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
350:The steam-engine I call fire-demon and great; but it is nothing to the invention of fire. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
351:To the mean eye all things are trivial, as certainly as to the jaundiced they are yellow. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
352:A force as of madness in the hands of reason has done all that was ever done in the world. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
353:Democracy will prevail when men believe the vote of Judas as good as that of Jesus Christ. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
354:I know so little about any history. How little do I know even about the history of myself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
355:Of all your troubles, great and small, the greatest are the ones that don't happen at all. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
356:The old cathedrals are good, but the great blue dome that hangs over everything is better. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
357:We have not read an author till we have seen his object, whatever it may be, as he saw it. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
358:It is in general more profitable to reckon up our defeats than to boast of our attainments. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
359:It is through symbols that man consciously or unconsciously lives, works and has his being. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
360:Once the mind has been expanded by a big idea, it will never go back to its original state. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
361:The cut of a garment speaks of intellect and talent and the color of temperament and heart. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
362:The eye of the intellect "sees in all objects what it brought with it the means of seeing." ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
363:Woe to him that claims obedience when it is not due; woe to him that refuses it when it is. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
364:It is well said, in every sense, that a man's religion is the chief fact with regard to him. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
365:Lives the man that can figure a naked Duke of Windlestraw addressing a naked House of Lords? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
366:Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure there is one less rascal in the world. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
367:No mortal has a right to wag his tongue, much less to wag his pen, without saying something. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
368:Culture is the process by which a person becomes all that they were created capable of being. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
369:He that works and does some Poem, not he that merely says one, is worthy of the name of Poet. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
370:One life; a little gleam of Time between two Eternities; no second chance to us for evermore! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
371:That there should one man die ignorant who had capacity for knowledge, this I call a tragedy. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
372:The essence of humor is sensibility; warm, tender fellow-feeling with all forms of existence. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
373:The leafy blossoming present time springs from the whole past, remembered and unrememberable. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
374:All destruction, by violent revolution or however it be, is but new creation on a wider scale. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
375:A mind that has seen, and suffered, and done, speaks to us of what it has tried and conquered. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
376:Great is journalism. Is not every able editor a ruler of the world, being the persuader of it? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
377:If an eloquent speaker speak not the truth, is there a more horrid kind of object in creation? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
378:Love not pleasure; love God. This is the Everlasting Yea, wherein all contradiction is solved. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
379:We are not altogether here to tolerate. We are here to resist, to control and vanquish withal. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
380:Wondrous is the strength of cheerfulness, altogether past calculation its powers of endurance. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
381:Nature is the time-vesture of God that reveals Him to the wise, and hides him from the foolish. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
382:Great men are the commissioned guides of mankind, who rule their fellows because they are wiser. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
383:He who cannot withal keep his mind to himself cannot practice any considerable thing whatsoever. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
384:I have seen gleams in the face and eyes of the man that have let you look into a higher country. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
385:The word of Mohammad is a voice direct from nature's own heart - all else is wind in comparison. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
386:For every one hundred men who can stand adversity there is only one who can withstand prosperity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
387:May blessings be upon the head of Cadmus, the Phoenicians, or whoever it was that invented books. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
388:Speech is human, silence is divine, yet also brutish and dead: therefore we must learn both arts. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
389:Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do that with all thy might and leave the issues calmly to God. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
390:All human souls, never so bedarkened, love light; light once kindled spreads till all is luminous. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
391:Let me have my own way in exactly everything and a sunnier and pleasanter creature does not exist. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
392:The man of life upright has a guiltless heart, free from all dishonest deeds or thought of vanity. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
393:A poor creature who has said or done nothing worth a serious man taking the trouble of remembering. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
394:If there be no enemy there's no fight. If no fight, no victory and if no victory there is no crown. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
395:If time is precious, no book that will not improve by repeated readings deserves to be read at all. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
396:The lightning spark of thought generated in the solitary mind awakens its likeness in another mind. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
397:The three great elements of modern civilization, Gun powder, Printing, and the Protestant religion. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
398:Unity, agreement, is always silent or soft-voiced; it is only discord that loudly proclaims itself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
399:We have profoundly forgotten everywhere that Cash-payment is not the sole relation of human beings. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
400:Old age is not a matter for sorrow. It is matter for thanks if we have left our work done behind us. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
401:Wealth of a man is the number of things which he loves and blesses which he is loved and blessed by. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
402:A laugh, to be joyous, must flow from a joyous heart, for without kindness, there can be no true joy. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
403:At worst, is not this an unjust world, full of nothing but beasts of prey, four-footed or two-footed? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
404:How indestructibly the good grows, and propagates itself, even among the weedy entanglements of evil. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
405:It is the first of all problems for a man to find out what kind of work he is to do in this universe. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
406:The fine arts once divorcing themselves from truth are quite certain to fall mad, if they do not die. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
407:There is no life of a man, faithfully recorded, but is a heroic poem of its sort, rhymed or unrhymed. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
408:A background of wrath, which can be stirred up to the murderous infernal pitch, does lie in every man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
409:Man makes circumstances, and spiritually as well as economically, is the artificer of his own fortune. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
410:The difference between Socrates and Jesus? The great conscious and the immeasurably great unconscious. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
411:There is but one temple in this Universe: The Body. We speak to God whenever we lay our hands upon it. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
412:All that mankind has done, thought or been: it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of books. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
413:Conclusive facts are inseparable from inconclusive except by a head that already understands and knows. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
414:He who takes not counsel of the Unseen and Silent, from him will never come real visibility and speech. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
415:If you are ever in doubt as to whether to kiss a pretty girl, always give her the benefit of the doubt. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
416:In every object there is inexhaustible meaning; the eye sees in it what the eye brings means of seeing. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
417:Laws themselves, political Constitutions, are not our Life; but only the house wherein our Life is led. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
418:A man protesting against error is on the way towards uniting himself with all men that believe in truth. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
419:Nothing that was worthy in the past departs; no truth or goodness realized by man ever dies, or can die. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
420:Of all acts of man repentance is the most divine. The greatest of all faults is to be conscious of none. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
421:Success in life, in anything, depends upon the number of persons that one can make himself agreeable to. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
422:An everlasting lodestar, that beams the brighter in the heavens the darker here on earth grows the night. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
423:By nature man hates change; seldom will he quit his old home till it has actually fallen around his ears. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
424:Men's hearts ought not to be set against one another, but set with one another and all against evil only. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
425:After all manner of professors have done their best for us, the place we are to get knowledge is in books. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
426:A heavenly awe overshadowed and encompassed, as it still ought, and must, all earthly business whatsoever. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
427:For man is not the creature and product of Mechanism; but, in a far truer sense, its creator and producer. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
428:In private life I never knew anyone interfere with other people's disputes but he heartily repented of it. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
429:It is not a lucky word, this name impossible; no good comes of those who have it so often in their mouths. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
430:Men worship the shows of great men; the most disbelieve that there is any reality of great men to worship. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
431:&
432:Does not every true man feel that he is himself made higher by doing reverence to what is really above him? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
433:It is now almost my sole rule of life to clear myself of cants and formulas, as of poisonous Nessus shirts. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
434:There are female dandies as well as clothes-wearing men; and the former are as objectionable as the latter. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
435:And man's little Life has Duties that are great, that are alone great, and go up to Heaven and down to Hell. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
436:Democracy means despair of finding any heroes to govern you, and contented putting up with the want of them. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
437:Perfect ignorance is quiet, perfect knowledge is quiet; not so the transition from the former to the latter. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
438:Skepticism . . . is not intellectual only it is moral also, a chronic atrophy and disease of the whole soul. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
439:Democracy is, by the nature of it, a self-canceling business: and gives in the long run a net result of zero. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
440:Evil and good are everywhere, like shadow and substance; inseparable (for men) yet not hostile, only opposed. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
441:History shows that the majority of people that have done anything great have passed their youth in seclusion. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
442:If there be not a religious element in the relations of men, such relations are miserable and doomed to ruin. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
443:A person with half volition goes backwards and forwards, but makes no progress on even the smoothest of roads. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
444:Great souls are always loyally submissive, reverent to what is over them: only small mean souls are otherwise. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
445:I call that [Book of Job], apart from all theories about it, one of the grandest things ever written with pen. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
446:Man is, and was always, a block-head and dullard; much readier to feel and digest, than to think and consider. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
447:Misery which, through long ages, had no spokesman, no helper, will now be its own helper and speak for itself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
448:No iron chain, or outward force of any kind, can ever compel the soul of a person to believe or to disbelieve. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
449:There is always hope in a man that actually and earnestly works: in Idleness alone is there perpetual despair. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
450:What are your Axioms, and Categories, and Systems, and Aphorisms? Words, words... . Be not the slave of Words. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
451:Hardened round us, encasing wholly every notion we form is a wrapping of traditions, hearsay's, and mere words. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
452:Scarcely two hundred years back can Fame recollect articulately at all; and there she but maunders and mumbles. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
453:In the huge mass of evil as it rolls and swells, there is ever some good working toward deliverance and triumph. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
454:Is man’s civilization only a wrappage, through which the savage nature of him can still burst, infernal as ever? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
455:It is not honest inquiry that makes anarchy; but it is error, insincerity, half belief and untruth that make it. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
456:There are but two ways of paying debt: Increase of industry in raising income, increase of thrift in laying out. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
457:When new turns of behavior cease to appear in the life of the individual, its behavior ceases to be intelligent. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
458:Great is wisdom; infinite is the value of wisdom. It cannot be exaggerated; it is the highest achievement of man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
459:History is a mighty dramos, enacted upon the theatre of times, with suns for lamps and eternity for a background. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
460:Our grand business undoubtedly is, not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
461:Have a purpose in life, and having it, throw into your work such strength of mind and muscle as God has given you. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
462:I should say sincerity, a deep, great, genuine sincerity, is the first characteristic of all men in any way heroic. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
463:The nobleness of silence. The highest melody dwells only in silence,&
464:There is in man a higher than love of happiness; he can do without happiness, and instead thereof find blessedness. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
465:It is a mathematical fact that the casting of this pebble from my hand alters the centre of gravity of the universe. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
466:A battle is a terrible conjugation of the verb to kill: I kill, thou killest, he kills, we kill, they kill, all kill. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
467:Genuine Work alone, what thou workest faithfully, that is eternal, as the Almighty Founder and World-Builder himself. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
468:Parliament will train you to talk; and above all things to hear, with patience, unlimited quantities of foolish talk. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
469:The beginning of all wisdom is to look fixedly on clothes, or even with armed eyesight, till they become transparent. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
470:Youth is to all the glad season of life; but often only by what it hopes, not by what it attains, or what it escapes. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
471:The true epic of our times is not "Arm's and the Man," but "Tools and the Man"&
472:The only happiness a brave person ever troubles themselves in asking about, is happiness enough to get their work done. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
473:There is but one thing without honor, smitten with eternal barrenness, inability to do or to be,-insincerity, unbelief. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
474:Over the times thou hast no power. . . . Solely over one man thou hast quite absolute power. Him redeem and make honest. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
475:The Christian must be consumed by the conviction of the infinite beauty of holiness and the infinite damnability of sin. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
476:Freedom is the one purport, wisely aimed at, or unwisely, of all man's struggles, toilings and sufferings, in this earth. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
477:Might and right do differ frightfully from hour to hour, but then centuries to try it in, they are found to be identical. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
478:Nay, in every epoch of the world, the great event, parent of all others, is it not the arrival of a Thinker in the world? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
479:There is a great discovery still to be made in literature, that of paying literary men by the quantity they do not write. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
480:A sad spectacle. If they be inhabited, what a scope for misery and folly. If they be not inhabited, what a waste of space. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
481:Enjoying things which are pleasant; that is not the evil; it is the reducing of our moral self to slavery by them that is. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
482:No conquest can ever become permanent which does not show itself beneficial to the conquered as well as to the conquerors. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
483:The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man (Muhammad) are disgraceful to ourselves only. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
484:To know, to get into the truth of anything, is ever a mystic art, of which the best logic's can but babble on the surface. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
485:You can make even a parrot into a learned political economist - all he must learn are the two words "supply" and "demand." ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
486:All men, if they work not as in the great taskmaster's eye, will work wrong, and work unhappily for themselves and for you. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
487:As there is no danger of our becoming, any of us, Mahometans (i.e. Muslim), I mean to say all the good of him I justly can. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
488:Sarcasm I now see to be, in general, the language of the devil; for which reason I have long since as good as renounced it. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
489:The highest ensign that men ever met and embraced under, the Cross itself, had no meaning save an accidental extrinsic one. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
490:The insignificant, the empty, is usually the loud; and after the manner of a drum, is louder even because of its emptiness. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
491:The work an unknown good man has done is like a vein of water flowing hidden underground, secretly making the ground green. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
492:Fame, we may understand, is no sure test of merit, but only a probability of such; it is an accident, not a property of man. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
493:He that will not work according to his faculty, let him perish according to his necessity: there is no law juster than that. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
494:The block of granite which was an obstacle in the pathway of the weak, became a stepping-stone in the pathway of the strong. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
495:The suffering man ought really to consume his own smoke; there is no good in emitting smoke till you have made it into fire. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
496:Time! Time! how it brings forth and devours! And the roaring flood of existence rushes on forever similar, forever changing! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
497:A judicious man looks at Statistics, not to "get knowledge, but to save himself from having ignorance foisted &
498:All work of man is as the swimmer's: a vast ocean threatens to devour him; if he front it not bravely, it will keep its word. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
499:Government is emphatically a machine: to the discontented a taxing machine, to the contented a machine for securing property. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
500:If a book comes from the heart, it will contrive to reach other hearts; all art and author-craft are of small amount to that. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Nature admits no lie. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
2:Rest is for the dead. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
3:All true work is sacred. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
4:Be not a slave of words. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
5:Laughter means sympathy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
6:No pressure, no diamonds ~ Thomas Carlyle,
7:The devil has his elect. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
8:Debt is a bottomless sea. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
9:No pressure, no diamonds. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
10:The end of man is action. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
11:History is the new poetry. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
12:Man is a tool-using animal. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
13:No violent extreme endures. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
14:I want to meet my God awake. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
15:Love not Pleasure; love God. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
16:The king is the man who can. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
17:A noble book! all men's book! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
18:History is a great dust heap. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
19:Fame is no sure test of merit. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
20:Leaders: Captains of industry. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
21:Society is founded upon Cloth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
22:Song is the heroics of speech. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
23:The actual well seen is ideal. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
24:the worst waste, that of time. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
25:Thirty millions, mostly fools. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
26:A man's perfection is his work. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
27:Is not light grander than fire? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
28:Wonder is the basis of worship. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
29:Worship is transcendent wonder. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
30:History: A distillation of rumor. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
31:The archenemy is the arch stupid! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
32:A man perfects himself by working. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
33:Necessity dispenseth with decorum. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
34:Thought is the parent of the deed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
35:All great peoples are conservative. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
36:A man lives by believing something. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
37:Biography is the only true history. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
38:Close thy Byron ; open thy Goethe . ~ Thomas Carlyle,
39:Custom doth make dotards of us all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
40:Endurance is patience concentrated. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
41:Lies exist only to be extinguished. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
42:Silence is the eternal duty of man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
43:Society is founded on hero-worship. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
44:The mathematics of high achievement ~ Thomas Carlyle,
45:Time has only a relative existence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
46:Silence is more eloquent than words. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
47:Speech is silver, silence is golden. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
48:The age of miracles is forever here. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
49:Variety is the condition of harmony. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
50:Violence does even justice unjustly. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
51:History after all is the true poetry. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
52:Let Time and Chance combine, combine! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
53:The great soul of this world is just. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
54:Earnestness alone makes life eternity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
55:. . . everywhere a good and a bad book ~ Thomas Carlyle,
56:History is the distillation of rumour. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
57:Rare benevolence, the minister of God. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
58:Caution is the lower story of prudence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
59:See deep enough, and you see musically. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
60:Affectation is the product of falsehood. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
61:Every noble work is at first impossible. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
62:Habit is the deepest law of human nature ~ Thomas Carlyle,
63:My books are friends that never fail me. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
64:Speech is great, but silence is greater. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
65:The genuine essence of truth never dies. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
66:Thought will not work except in silence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
67:A fair day's wages for a fair day's work. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
68:All comes out even at the end of the day. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
69:In idleness there is a perpetual despair. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
70:Reform, like charity, must begin at home. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
71:The Highest Being reveals himself in man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
72:Eyes bright, with many tears, behind them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
73:In a certain sense all men are historians. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
74:Infinite is the help man can yield to man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
75:Of all God's creatures, Man alone is poor. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
76:Oh, give us the man who sings at his work. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
77:Speech is of Time, Silence is of Eternity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
78:Speech is of time, silence is of eternity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
79:The sincere alone can recognize sincerity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
80:Without kindness there can be no true joy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
81:All history . . . is an inarticulate Bible. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
82:He that has done nothing has known nothing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
83:know a Work of Art from a Daub of Artifice) ~ Thomas Carlyle,
84:No age seemed the age of romance to itself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
85:The universe is but one vast Symbol of God. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
86:Books are a triviality. Life alone is great. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
87:Creation is great, and cannot be understood. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
88:Every man has a coward and hero in his soul. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
89:Literature is the thought of thinking souls. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
90:No ghost was every seen by two pair of eyes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
91:Not one false man but doth uncountable evil. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
92:The press is the fourth estate of the realm. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
93:The purpose of man is in action not thought. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
94:There are remedies for all things but death. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
95:Weak eyes are fondest of glittering objects. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
96:A Fourth Estate, of Able Editors, springs up. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
97:Histories are a kind of distilled newspapers. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
98:History is philosophy teaching by experience. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
99:Man is emphatically a proselytizing creature. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
100:Music is well said to be the speech of angels ~ Thomas Carlyle,
101:Not what I have, but what I do is my kingdom. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
102:Properly speaking, all true work is religion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
103:Respectable Professors of the Dismal Science. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
104:The eye sees what it brings the power to see. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
105:The fearful unbelief is unbelief in yourself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
106:The spiritual is the parent of the practical. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
107:Wondrous indeed is the virtue of a true Book. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
108:In books lies the soul fo the whole past time. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
109:Music is well said to be the speech of angels. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
110:The greatest fault is to be conscious of none. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
111:A thought once awakened does not again slumber. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
112:Clever men are good, but they are not the best. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
113:In every object there is inexhaustible meaning. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
114:No person is important enough to make me angry. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
115:The first duty of man is that of subduing fear. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
116:To a shower of gold most things are penetrable. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
117:Fire is the best of servants, but what a master! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
118:Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
119:One monster there is in the world, the idle man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
120:Poetry, therefore, we will call Musical Thought. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
121:The whole past is the procession of the present. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
122:The whole universe is but a huge Symbol of god". ~ Thomas Carlyle,
123:A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
124:A vein of poetry exists in the hearts of all men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
125:France was long a despotism tempered by epigrams. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
126:He that can work is born to be king of something. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
127:No man is born without ambitious worldly desires. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
128:Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
129:The coldest word was once a glowing new metaphor. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
130:The greatest university is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
131:A good book is the purest essence of a human soul. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
132:History is the essence of innumerable biographies. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
133:The barrenest of all mortals is the sentimentalist ~ Thomas Carlyle,
134:The deadliest sin were the consciousness of no sin ~ Thomas Carlyle,
135:The greatest of faults is to be conscious of none. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
136:The real use of gunpowder is to make all men tall. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
137:Cash-payment is not the sole nexus of man with man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
138:Ceea ce devenim depinde in mare masura de ce citim. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
139:It is a vain hope to make people happy by politics. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
140:Labor, wide as the earth, has its summit in heaven. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
141:The barrenest of all mortals is the sentimentalist. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
142:The soul gives unity to what it looks at with love. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
143:They only are wise who know that they know nothing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
144:All reform except a moral one will prove unavailing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
145:Isolation is the sum total of wretchedness to a man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
146:Stop a moment, cease your work, and look around you. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
147:The greatest of faults...is to be conscious of none. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
148:The public is anold woman.Let her maunderand mumble. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
149:Virtue is like health: the harmony of the whole man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
150:We looked out on Life, with its strange scaffolding, ~ Thomas Carlyle,
151:Acorns are planted silently by some unnoticed breeze. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
152:A man without a goal is like a ship without a rudder. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
153:He who has no vision of eternity has no hold on time. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
154:How great a Possibility, how small a realized Result. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
155:The greatest mistake is to imagine that we never err. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
156:A collection of books is the best of all universities. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
157:Doubt of any kind cannot be resolved except by action. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
158:Doubt, of whatever kind, can be ended by action alone. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
159:Every man is my superior in that I may learn from him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
160:No man sees far, most see no farther than their noses. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
161:Tell a man he is brave, and you help him to become so. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
162:The Present is the living sum-total of the whole Past. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
163:Feel it in thy heart and then say whether it is of God! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
164:Just in ratio as knowledge increases, faith diminishes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
165:Just in the ratio knowledge increases, faith decreases. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
166:Life is a series of lessons that have to be understood. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
167:Nature alone is antique, and the oldest art a mushroom. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
168:Nothing is more terrible than activity without insight. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
169:Silence is deep as Eternity, speech is shallow as Time. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
170:Una vez despertado el pensamiento no vuelve a dormitar. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
171:With stupidity and sound digestion, man may front much. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
172:A well-written life is almost as rare as one well-spent. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
173:If what you have done is unjust, you have not succeeded. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
174:Look to be treated by others as you have treated others. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
175:Self-contemplation is infallibly the symptom of disease. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
176:The greatest university of all is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
177:The mystical bond of brotherhood makes all men brothers. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
178:The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
179:What you see, but can't see over is as good as infinite. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
180:All greatness is unconscious, or it is little and naught. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
181:A strong mind always hopes, and has always cause to hope. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
182:Happy the People whose Annals are blank in History Books! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
183:Happy the people whose annals are blank in history books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
184:Let each become all that he was created capable of being. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
185:Men do less than they ought, unless they do all they can. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
186:One life - a little gleam of Time between two Eternities. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
187:Reality, if rightly interpreted, is grander than fiction. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
188:Silence is as deep as eternity, speech a shallow as time. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
189:Tell a person they are brave and you help them become so. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
190:The first sin in our universe was Lucifer's self conceit. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
191:The history of the world is but a biography of great men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
192:The merit of originality is not novelty; it is sincerity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
193:What is philosophy but a continual battle against custom? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
194:A well-written life is almost as rare as a well-spent one. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
195:God Almighty never created a man half as wise as he looks. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
196:History of the world is but the biography of great men.
   ~ Thomas Carlyle,
197:Is not every meanest day the confluence of two eternities? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
198:It is the heart always that sees, before the head can see. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
199:My whinstone house my castle is, I have my own four walls. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
200:Only the person of worth can recognize the worth in others. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
201:Quackery gives birth to nothing; gives death to all things. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
202:The dust of controversy is merely the falsehood flying off. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
203:The goal of yesterday will be our starting-point to-morrow. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
204:The Ideal is in thyself, the impediments too is in thyself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
205:The true University of these days is a Collection of Books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
206:The true university of these days is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
207:A witty statesman said, you might prove anything by figures. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
208:Coining "Dismal Science" as a nickname for Political Economy ~ Thomas Carlyle,
209:Conviction is worthless unless it is converted into conduct. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
210:Intellect is the soul of man, the only immortal part of him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
211:Love is ever the beginning of knowledge as fire is of light. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
212:Nature, after all, is still the grand agent in making poets. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
213:One is hardly sensible of fatigue while he marches to music. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
214:The latest gospel in this world is, know thy work and do it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
215:The past is always attractive because it is drained of fear. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
216:There is endless merit in a man's knowing when to have done. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
217:There is something in man which your science cannot satisfy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
218:Worship of a hero is transcendent admiration of a great man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
219:Adversity is the diamond dust Heaven polishes its jewels with ~ Thomas Carlyle,
220:Egotism is the source and summary of all faults and miseries. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
221:I had a lifelong quarrel with God, but in the end we made up. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
222:Know what thou canst work at, and work at it like a Hercules. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
223:No amount of ability is of the slightest avail without honor. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
224:Not what I Have," continues he, "but what I Do is my Kingdom. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
225:O poor mortals, how ye make this earth bitter for each other. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
226:To men in their sleep there is nothing granted in this world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
227:Writing is a dreadful labor, yet not so dreadful as Idleness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
228:Adversity is the diamond dust Heaven polishes its jewels with. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
229:A great man shows his greatness by the way he treats little me ~ Thomas Carlyle,
230:All work, even cotton-spinning, is noble; work is alone noble. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
231:Hunger whets everything, especially Suspicion and Indignation. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
232:Laughter is the cipher key wherewith we decipher the whole man ~ Thomas Carlyle,
233:Metaphysics is the attempt of the mind to rise above the mind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
234:The true eye for talent presupposes the true reverence for it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
235:A man--be the heavens ever praised!--is sufficient for himself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
236:Faith is loyalty to some inspired teacher, some spiritual hero. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
237:The Present is the living sum-total of the whole Past. THOMAS CARLYLE ~ J D Robb,
238:A frightful dialect for the stupid, the pedant and dullard sort. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
239:A great man shows his greatness by the way he treats little men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
240:He who has health, has hope; and he who has hope, has everything ~ Thomas Carlyle,
241:It is the feeling of injustice that is insupportable to all men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
242:Love is the only game that is not called on account of darkness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
243:Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
244:Skepticism means, not intellectual doubt alone, but moral doubt. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
245:The All of Things is an infinite conjugation of the verb To do . ~ Thomas Carlyle,
246:The eternal stars shine out again, so soon as it is dark enough. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
247:To the vulgar eye, few things are wonderful that are not distant ~ Thomas Carlyle,
248:Whose school-hours are all the days and nights of our existence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
249:Experience of actual fact either teaches fools or abolishes them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
250:He who has health, has hope; and he who has hope, has everything. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
251:If Hero means sincere man, why may not every one of us be a Hero? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
252:It's a man's sincerity and depth of vision that makes him a poet. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
253:Macaulay is well for awhile, but one wouldn't live under Niagara. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
254:Out of the lowest depths there is a path to the loftiest heights. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
255:The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
256:There is precious instruction to be got by finding we were wrong. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
257:Heroes, it would seem, exist always and a certain worship of them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
258:I do not believe in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
259:I've got a great ambition to die of exhaustion rather than boredom. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
260:Nothing builds self-esteem and self-confidence like accomplishment. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
261:Show me the man you honor, and I will know what kind of man you are ~ Thomas Carlyle,
262:The greatest security against sin is to be shocked at its presence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
263:The tragedy of life is not so much what we suffer but what we miss. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
264:A man must indeed be a hero to appear such in the eyes of his valet. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
265:A word spoken in season, at the right moment; is the mother of ages. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
266:I grow daily to honor facts more and more, and theory less and less. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
267:Naps are a way of traveling painlessly through time into the future. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
268:Pin thy faith to no man's sleeve. Hast thou not two eyes of thy own? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
269:Pin your faith to no ones sleeves, haven't you two eyes of your own. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
270:Show me the man you honor, and I will know what kind of man you are. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
271:That monstrous tuberosity of civilised life, the capital of England. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
272:The battle that never ends is the battle of belief against disbelief ~ Thomas Carlyle,
273:Well at ease are the Sleepers for whom Existence is a shallow Dream. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
274:All work is as seed sown; it grows and spreads, and sows itself anew. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
275:Science must have originated in the feeling that something was wrong. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
276:We arc the miracle of miracles, the great inscrutable mystery of God. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
277:What this country needs is a man who knows God other than by heresay. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
278:Every new opinion, at its starting, is precisely in a minority of one. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
279:Every noble crown is, and on Earth will forever be, a crown of thorns. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
280:For suffering and enduring there is no remedy, but striving and doing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
281:If a man was great while living, he becomes tenfold greater when dead. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
282:Money will buy money's worth; but the thing men call fame, what is it? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
283:No good book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
284:The times are very bad. Very well, you are there to make them better. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
285:Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
286:Eternity looks grander and kinder if time grow meaner and more hostile. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
287:In every man's writings, the character of the writer must lie recorded. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
288:Nine-tenths of the miseries and vices of mankind proceed from idleness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
289:Once turn to practice, error and truth will no longer consort together. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
290:Thirty million, mostly fools.
[When asked the population of England] ~ Thomas Carlyle,
291:Trust not the heart of that man for whom old clothes are not venerable. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
292:Intellect is not speaking and logicising; it is seeing and ascertaining. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
293:Out of Eternity the new day is born; Into Eternity at night will return. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
294:Biography is the most universally pleasant and profitable of all reading. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
295:Experience is the best of school masters, only the school fees are heavy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
296:He who would write heroic poems should make his whole life a heroic poem. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
297:Humor has justly been regarded as the finest perfection of poetic genius. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
298:I never heard tell of any clever man that came of entirely stupid people. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
299:In every phenomenon the beginning remains always the most notable moment. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
300:Poetry is the attempt which man makes to render his existence harmonious. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
301:Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
302:Teach a parrot the terms 'supply and demand' and you've got an economist. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
303:The greatest event for the world is the arrival of a new and wise person. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
304:We have not the love of greatness, but the love of the love of greatness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
305:A false man found a religion? Why, a false man cannot build a brick house! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
306:Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness.
   ~ Thomas Carlyle,
307:Everywhere in life, the true question is not what we gain, but what we do. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
308:I have no patience whatever with these gorilla damnifications of humanity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
309:Neither in tailoring nor in legislating does man proceed by mere accident. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
310:Not brute force but only persuasion and faith are the kings of this world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
311:Parties on the back of Parties, at war with the world and with each other. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
312:The crash of the whole solar and stellar systems could only kill you once. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
313:Woe to him, . . . who has no court of appeal against the world's judgment. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
314:And yet without labour there were no ease, no rest, so much as conceivable. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
315:A well-written Life is almost as rare as a well-spent one. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Richter (1827).,
316:'Genius' which means transcendent capacity of taking trouble, first of all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
317:Go as far as you can see; when you get there you'll be able to see farther. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
318:If I had my way, the world would hear a pretty stern command - Exit Christ. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
319:Such I hold to be the genuine use of Gunpowder: that it makes all men tall. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
320:Teaching school is but another word for sure and not very slow destruction. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
321:The best effect of any book is that it excites the reader to self activity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
322:The end of Man is an Action, and not a Thought, though it were the noblest? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
323:There is so much data available to us, but most data won't help us succeed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
324:True friends, like ivy and the wall Both stand together, and together fall. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
325:Any the smallest alteration of my silent daily habits produces anarchy in me ~ Thomas Carlyle,
326:Experience takes dreadfully high school-wages, but he teaches like no other. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
327:Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see further. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
328:Imagination is a poor matter when it has to part company with understanding. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
329:Is not light grander than fire? It is the same element in a state of purity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
330:The thing is not only to avoid error, but to attain immense masses of truth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
331:War is a quarrel between two thieves too cowardly to fight their own battle. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
332:Who is there that, in logical words, can express the effect music has on us? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
333:Work earnestly at anything, you will by degrees learn to work at all things. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
334:A man cannot make a pair of shoes rightly unless he do it in a devout manner. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
335:Courtesy is the due of man to man; not of suit-of-clothes to suit-of-clothes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
336:Prayer is and remains always a native and deepest impulse of the soul of man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
337:Talk that does not end in any kind of action is better suppressed altogether. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
338:The English are a dumb people. They can do great acts, but not describe them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
339:All evil is like a nightmare; the instant you stir under it, the evil is gone. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
340:Do nothing, only keep agitating, debating; and things will destroy themselves. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
341:He that has a secret should not only hide it, but hide that he has it to hide. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
342:Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
343:Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
344:Originality is a thing we constantly clamour for, and constantly quarrel with. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
345:The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but rather what they miss. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
346:A person who is gifted sees the essential point and leaves the rest as surplus. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
347:It is part of my creed that the only poetry is history, could we tell it right. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
348:Secrecy is the element of all goodness; even virtue, even beauty is mysterious. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
349:The outer passes away; the innermost is the same yesterday, today, and forever. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
350:There are good and bad times, but our mood changes more often than our fortune. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
351:Under all speech that is good for anything there lies a silence that is better. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
352:All human things do require to have an ideal in them; to have some soul in them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
353:Dishonesty is the raw material not of quacks only, but also in great part dupes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
354:Do the duty which lies nearest to you, the second duty will then become clearer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
355:He is wise who can instruct us and assist us in the business of virtuous living. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
356:I don't pretend to understand the Universe - it's a great deal bigger than I am. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
357:Work is the grand cure of all the maladies and miseries that ever beset mankind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
358:Conviction never so excellent, is worthless until it coverts itself into conduct. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
359:Let him who would move and convince others, be first moved and convinced himself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
360:The tragedy of life is not so much what
men suffer, but rather what they miss. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
361:A man lives by believing something: not by debating and arguing about many things. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
362:A man lives by believing something; not by debating and arguing about many things. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
363:A true delineation of the smallest man is capable of interesting the greatest man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
364:Ever in the dullest existence there is a sheen either of Inspiration or of Madness ~ Thomas Carlyle,
365:Produce! Produce! Were it but the pitifullest infinitesimal fraction of a Product, ~ Thomas Carlyle,
366:The true Church of England, at this moment, lies in the Editors of the newspapers. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
367:What unknown seas of feeling lie in man, and will from time to time break through! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
368:Blessed be the God's voice; for it is true, and falsehoods have to cease before it! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
369:For a hundred that can bear adversity, there is hardly one that can bear prosperity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
370:Heroism is the divine relation which, in all times, unites a great man to other men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
371:Lord Bacon could as easily have created the planets as he could have written Hamlet. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
372:No man who has once heartily and wholly laughed can be altogether irreclaimably bad. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
373:Not what you possess but what you do with what you have, determines your true worth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
374:To be true is manly, chivalrous, Christian; to be false is mean, cowardly, devilish. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
375:Hero-worship exists, has existed, and will forever exist, universally, among mankind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
376:Narrative is linear, but action has breadth and depth as well as height and is solid. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
377:There is no heroic poem in the world but is at bottom a biography, the life of a man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
378:There is often more spiritual force in a proverb than in whole philosophical systems. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
379:Why tell me that a man is a fine speaker, if it is not the truth that he is speaking? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
380:Laughter is one of the very privileges of reason, being confined to the human species. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
381:Of a truth, men are mystically united: a mystic bond of brotherhood makes all men one. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
382:One must verify or expel his doubts, and convert them into the certainty of Yes or NO. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
383:Roguery is thought by some to be cunning and laughable: it is neither; it is devilish. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
384:The deepest depth of vulgarism is that of setting up money as the ark of the covenant. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
385:The depth of our despair measures what capability and height of claim we have to hope. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
386:If you look deep enough you will see music; the heart of nature being everywhere music. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
387:In every man's writings, the character of the writer must lie recorded. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Goethe (1828).,
388:Man's earthly interests,'are all hooked and buttoned together, and held up, by Clothes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
389:No great man lives in vain. The history of the world is but the biography of great men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
390:The best effect of any book is that it excites the reader to self-activity. —THOMAS CARLYLE, ~ Anonymous,
391:Thought, true labor of any kind, highest virtue itself, is it not the daughter of Pain? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
392:A person usually has two reasons for doing something, a good reason and the real reason. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
393:He who could foresee affairs three days in advance would be rich for thousands of years. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
394:Histories are as perfect as the Historian is wise, and is gifted with an eye and a soul. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
395:No sadder proof can be given by a man of his own littleness than disbelief in great men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
396:Pain was not given thee merely to be miserable under; learn from it, turn it to account. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
397:Speech that leads not to action, still more that hinders it, is a nuisance on the earth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
398:The hell of these days is the fear of not getting along, especially of not making money. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
399:The mystery of a person, indeed, is ever divine to him that has a sense for the godlike. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
400:Democracy, on this new occasion, finds all Kings conscious that they are but Play-actors. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
401:Democracy will prevail when men believe the vote of Judas as good as that of Jesus Christ ~ Thomas Carlyle,
402:Little other than a red tape Talking-machine, and unhappy Bag of Parliamentary Eloquence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
403:The courage we desire and prize is not the courage to die decently, but to live manfully. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
404:The first duty of man is to conquer fear; he must get rid of it, he cannot act till then. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
405:The past is all holy to us; the dead are all holy; even they that were wicked when alive. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
406:The steam-engine I call fire-demon and great; but it is nothing to the invention of fire. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
407:To the mean eye all things are trivial, as certainly as to the jaundiced they are yellow. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
408:A force as of madness in the hands of reason has done all that was ever done in the world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
409:Democracy will prevail when men believe the vote of Judas as good as that of Jesus Christ. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
410:I know so little about any history. How little do I know even about the history of myself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
411:Of all your troubles, great and small, the greatest are the ones that don't happen at all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
412:The old cathedrals are good, but the great blue dome that hangs over everything is better. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
413:We have not read an author till we have seen his object, whatever it may be, as he saw it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
414:It is in general more profitable to reckon up our defeats than to boast of our attainments. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
415:It is through symbols that man consciously or unconsciously lives, works and has his being. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
416:Once the mind has been expanded by a big idea, it will never go back to its original state. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
417:The cut of a garment speaks of intellect and talent and the color of temperament and heart. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
418:The eye of the intellect "sees in all objects what it brought with it the means of seeing." ~ Thomas Carlyle,
419:Woe to him that claims obedience when it is not due; woe to him that refuses it when it is. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
420:It is well said, in every sense, that a man's religion is the chief fact with regard to him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
421:Lives the man that can figure a naked Duke of Windlestraw addressing a naked House of Lords? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
422:Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure there is one less rascal in the world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
423:No mortal has a right to wag his tongue, much less to wag his pen, without saying something. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
424:Culture is the process by which a person becomes all that they were created capable of being. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
425:He that works and does some Poem, not he that merely says one, is worthy of the name of Poet. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
426:One life; a little gleam of Time between two Eternities; no second chance to us for evermore! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
427:That there should one man die ignorant who had capacity for knowledge, this I call a tragedy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
428:The essence of humor is sensibility; warm, tender fellow-feeling with all forms of existence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
429:The leafy blossoming present time springs from the whole past, remembered and unrememberable. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
430:All destruction, by violent revolution or however it be, is but new creation on a wider scale. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
431:A mind that has seen, and suffered, and done, speaks to us of what it has tried and conquered. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
432:Great is journalism. Is not every able editor a ruler of the world, being the persuader of it? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
433:If an eloquent speaker speak not the truth, is there a more horrid kind of object in creation? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
434:Love not pleasure; love God. This is the Everlasting Yea, wherein all contradiction is solved. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
435:Music... a kind of inarticulate, unfathomable speech, which leads to the edge of the Infinite. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
436:We are not altogether here to tolerate. We are here to resist, to control and vanquish withal. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
437:Wondrous is the strength of cheerfulness, altogether past calculation its powers of endurance. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
438:Nature is the time-vesture of God that reveals Him to the wise, and hides him from the foolish. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
439:Ve hasta donde te alcance la vista. Cuando llegues, serás capaz de ver más allá. THOMAS CARLYLE ~ Robin S Sharma,
440:Great men are the commissioned guides of mankind, who rule their fellows because they are wiser. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
441:He who cannot withal keep his mind to himself cannot practice any considerable thing whatsoever. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
442:I have seen gleams in the face and eyes of the man that have let you look into a higher country. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
443:The merit of originality is not novelty, it is sincerity. The believing man is the original man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
444:The word of Mohammad is a voice direct from nature's own heart - all else is wind in comparison. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
445:Thomas Carlyle afirmaba que «la historia del mundo no es sino la biografía de grandes hombres», ~ Walter Isaacson,
446:For every one hundred men who can stand adversity there is only one who can withstand prosperity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
447:May blessings be upon the head of Cadmus, the Phoenicians, or whoever it was that invented books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
448:Speech is human, silence is divine, yet also brutish and dead: therefore we must learn both arts. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
449:Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do that with all thy might and leave the issues calmly to God. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
450:All human souls, never so bedarkened, love light; light once kindled spreads till all is luminous. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
451:Let me have my own way in exactly everything and a sunnier and pleasanter creature does not exist. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
452:The man of life upright has a guiltless heart, free from all dishonest deeds or thought of vanity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
453:A poor creature who has said or done nothing worth a serious man taking the trouble of remembering. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
454:If there be no enemy there's no fight. If no fight, no victory and if no victory there is no crown. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
455:If time is precious, no book that will not improve by repeated readings deserves to be read at all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
456:Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
457:The lightning spark of thought generated in the solitary mind awakens its likeness in another mind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
458:The three great elements of modern civilization, Gun powder, Printing, and the Protestant religion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
459:Unity, agreement, is always silent or soft-voiced; it is only discord that loudly proclaims itself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
460:We have profoundly forgotten everywhere that Cash-payment is not the sole relation of human beings. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
461:Everywhere immeasurable Democracy rose monstrous, loud, blatant, inarticulate as the voice of Chaos. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
462:If something be not done, something will do itself one day, and in a fashion that will please nobody ~ Thomas Carlyle,
463:Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure that there is one less scoundrel in the world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
464:Old age is not a matter for sorrow. It is matter for thanks if we have left our work done behind us. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
465:Wealth of a man is the number of things which he loves and blesses which he is loved and blessed by. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
466:A laugh, to be joyous, must flow from a joyous heart, for without kindness, there can be no true joy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
467:At worst, is not this an unjust world, full of nothing but beasts of prey, four-footed or two-footed? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
468:How indestructibly the good grows, and propagates itself, even among the weedy entanglements of evil. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
469:It is the first of all problems for a man to find out what kind of work he is to do in this universe. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
470:"Love is not altogether a Delirium," says he elsewhere; "yet has it many points in common therewith." ~ Thomas Carlyle,
471:The fine arts once divorcing themselves from truth are quite certain to fall mad, if they do not die. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
472:There is no life of a man, faithfully recorded, but is a heroic poem of its sort, rhymed or unrhymed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
473:A background of wrath, which can be stirred up to the murderous infernal pitch, does lie in every man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
474:Literature, so far as it is Literature, is an ‘apocalypse of Nature,’ a revealing of the ‘open secret. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
475:Man makes circumstances, and spiritually as well as economically, is the artificer of his own fortune. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
476:The difference between Socrates and Jesus? The great conscious and the immeasurably great unconscious. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
477:The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none. —historian and essayist Thomas Carlyle ~ Carol Tavris,
478:There is but one temple in this Universe: The Body. We speak to God whenever we lay our hands upon it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
479:All that mankind has done, thought or been: it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
480:Conclusive facts are inseparable from inconclusive except by a head that already understands and knows. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
481:He who takes not counsel of the Unseen and Silent, from him will never come real visibility and speech. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
482:If you are ever in doubt as to whether to kiss a pretty girl, always give her the benefit of the doubt. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
483:In every object there is inexhaustible meaning; the eye sees in it what the eye brings means of seeing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
484:Laws themselves, political Constitutions, are not our Life; but only the house wherein our Life is led. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
485:A man protesting against error is on the way towards uniting himself with all men that believe in truth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
486:Nothing that was worthy in the past departs; no truth or goodness realized by man ever dies, or can die. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
487:Of all acts of man repentance is the most divine. The greatest of all faults is to be conscious of none. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
488:Success in life, in anything, depends upon the number of persons that one can make himself agreeable to. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
489:An everlasting lodestar, that beams the brighter in the heavens the darker here on earth grows the night. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
490:By nature man hates change; seldom will he quit his old home till it has actually fallen around his ears. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
491:His religion at best is an anxious wish; like that of Rabelais, "a great Perhaps". ~ Thomas Carlyle, Essays (1828) "Burns",
492:Men's hearts ought not to be set against one another, but set with one another and all against evil only. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
493:Thomas Carlyle supposedly said: ‘Teach a parrot the terms supply and demand and you’ve got an economist. ~ Avinash K Dixit,
494:After all manner of professors have done their best for us, the place we are to get knowledge is in books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
495:A heavenly awe overshadowed and encompassed, as it still ought, and must, all earthly business whatsoever. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
496:For man is not the creature and product of Mechanism; but, in a far truer sense, its creator and producer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
497:In private life I never knew anyone interfere with other people's disputes but he heartily repented of it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
498:It is not a lucky word, this name impossible; no good comes of those who have it so often in their mouths. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
499:Men worship the shows of great men; the most disbelieve that there is any reality of great men to worship. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
500:Does not every true man feel that he is himself made higher by doing reverence to what is really above him? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
501:It is now almost my sole rule of life to clear myself of cants and formulas, as of poisonous Nessus shirts. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
502:Keine zauberwirkende Rune ist wunderbarer als ein Buch. Bücher sind das auserlesene Besitztum der Menschen. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
503:persons, with big wigs many of them and austere aspect, whom I take to be Professors of the Dismal Science… ~ Thomas Carlyle,
504:There are female dandies as well as clothes-wearing men; and the former are as objectionable as the latter. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
505:And man's little Life has Duties that are great, that are alone great, and go up to Heaven and down to Hell. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
506:Democracy means despair of finding any heroes to govern you, and contented putting up with the want of them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
507:Perfect ignorance is quiet, perfect knowledge is quiet; not so the transition from the former to the latter. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
508:Skepticism . . . is not intellectual only it is moral also, a chronic atrophy and disease of the whole soul. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
509:A Dandy is a clothes-wearing Man, a Man whose trade, office and existence consists in the wearing of clothes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
510:Democracy is, by the nature of it, a self-canceling business: and gives in the long run a net result of zero. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
511:Evil and good are everywhere, like shadow and substance; inseparable (for men) yet not hostile, only opposed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
512:History shows that the majority of people that have done anything great have passed their youth in seclusion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
513:If there be not a religious element in the relations of men, such relations are miserable and doomed to ruin. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
514:What are your Axioms, and Categories, and Systems, and Aphorisms? Words, words.... Be not the slave of Words. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
515:A person with half volition goes backwards and forwards, but makes no progress on even the smoothest of roads. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
516:Great souls are always loyally submissive, reverent to what is over them: only small mean souls are otherwise. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
517:I call that [Book of Job], apart from all theories about it, one of the grandest things ever written with pen. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
518:Man is, and was always, a block-head and dullard; much readier to feel and digest, than to think and consider. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
519:Misery which, through long ages, had no spokesman, no helper, will now be its own helper and speak for itself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
520:No iron chain, or outward force of any kind, can ever compel the soul of a person to believe or to disbelieve. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
521:The nobleness of silence. The highest melody dwells only in silence,--the sphere melody, the melody of health. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
522:There is always hope in a man that actually and earnestly works: in Idleness alone is there perpetual despair. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
523:Hardened round us, encasing wholly every notion we form is a wrapping of traditions, hearsay's, and mere words. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
524:Scarcely two hundred years back can Fame recollect articulately at all; and there she but maunders and mumbles. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
525:All that mankind has done, thought, gained, or been; it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
526:In the huge mass of evil as it rolls and swells, there is ever some good working toward deliverance and triumph. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
527:Is man’s civilization only a wrappage, through which the savage nature of him can still burst, infernal as ever? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
528:It is not honest inquiry that makes anarchy; but it is error, insincerity, half belief and untruth that make it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
529:There are but two ways of paying debt: Increase of industry in raising income, increase of thrift in laying out. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
530:When new turns of behavior cease to appear in the life of the individual, its behavior ceases to be intelligent. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
531:Great is wisdom; infinite is the value of wisdom. It cannot be exaggerated; it is the highest achievement of man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
532:History is a mighty dramos, enacted upon the theatre of times, with suns for lamps and eternity for a background. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
533:Our grand business undoubtedly is, not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
534:The true epic of our times is not "Arm's and the Man," but "Tools and the Man"--an infinitely wider kind of epic. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
535:Have a purpose in life, and having it, throw into your work such strength of mind and muscle as God has given you. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
536:My books are friends that never fail me."

(Letter to his mother, Margaret A. Carlyle; 17 March 1817) ~ Thomas Carlyle,
537:I should say sincerity, a deep, great, genuine sincerity, is the first characteristic of all men in any way heroic. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
538:There is in man a higher than love of happiness; he can do without happiness, and instead thereof find blessedness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
539:Akan jadi apakah kita, bergantung pada apa yang kita baca setelah semua profesor menyelesaikan urusannya dengan kita ~ Thomas Carlyle,
540:It is a mathematical fact that the casting of this pebble from my hand alters the centre of gravity of the universe. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
541:We have not read an author till we have seen his object, whatever it may be, as he saw it. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Essays, Goethe's Helena.,
542:A battle is a terrible conjugation of the verb to kill: I kill, thou killest, he kills, we kill, they kill, all kill. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
543:Genuine Work alone, what thou workest faithfully, that is eternal, as the Almighty Founder and World-Builder himself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
544:Parliament will train you to talk; and above all things to hear, with patience, unlimited quantities of foolish talk. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
545:The beginning of all wisdom is to look fixedly on clothes, or even with armed eyesight, till they become transparent. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
546:Youth is to all the glad season of life; but often only by what it hopes, not by what it attains, or what it escapes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
547:If you are ever in doubt as to whether or not you should kiss a pretty girl, always give her the benefit of the doubt. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
548:A judicious man looks at Statistics, not to "get knowledge, but to save himself from having ignorance foisted 'on him". ~ Thomas Carlyle,
549:The only happiness a brave person ever troubles themselves in asking about, is happiness enough to get their work done. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
550:There is but one thing without honor, smitten with eternal barrenness, inability to do or to be,-insincerity, unbelief. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
551:Over the times thou hast no power. . . . Solely over one man thou hast quite absolute power. Him redeem and make honest. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
552:The Christian must be consumed by the conviction of the infinite beauty of holiness and the infinite damnability of sin. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
553:Freedom is the one purport, wisely aimed at, or unwisely, of all man's struggles, toilings and sufferings, in this earth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
554:Might and right do differ frightfully from hour to hour, but then centuries to try it in, they are found to be identical. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
555:Nay, in every epoch of the world, the great event, parent of all others, is it not the arrival of a Thinker in the world? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
556:There is a great discovery still to be made in literature, that of paying literary men by the quantity they do not write. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
557:A sad spectacle. If they be inhabited, what a scope for misery and folly. If they be not inhabited, what a waste of space. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
558:Enjoying things which are pleasant; that is not the evil; it is the reducing of our moral self to slavery by them that is. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
559:No conquest can ever become permanent which does not show itself beneficial to the conquered as well as to the conquerors. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
560:The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man (Muhammad) are disgraceful to ourselves only. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
561:The true University of these days is a collection of Books. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Heroes and Hero Worship (1840), The Hero as a Man of Letters.,
562:To know, to get into the truth of anything, is ever a mystic art, of which the best logic's can but babble on the surface. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
563:You can make even a parrot into a learned political economist - all he must learn are the two words "supply" and "demand." ~ Thomas Carlyle,
564:All men, if they work not as in the great taskmaster's eye, will work wrong, and work unhappily for themselves and for you. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
565:As there is no danger of our becoming, any of us, Mahometans (i.e. Muslim), I mean to say all the good of him I justly can. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
566:Providence has given to the French the empire of the land, to the English that of the sea, to the Germans that of--the air! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
567:Sarcasm I now see to be, in general, the language of the devil; for which reason I have long since as good as renounced it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
568:The highest ensign that men ever met and embraced under, the Cross itself, had no meaning save an accidental extrinsic one. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
569:The insignificant, the empty, is usually the loud; and after the manner of a drum, is louder even because of its emptiness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
570:The work an unknown good man has done is like a vein of water flowing hidden underground, secretly making the ground green. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
571:Fame, we may understand, is no sure test of merit, but only a probability of such; it is an accident, not a property of man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
572:He that will not work according to his faculty, let him perish according to his necessity: there is no law juster than that. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
573:The block of granite which is an obstacle in the pathway of the weak, becomes a stepping-stone in the pathway of the strong. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
574:The block of granite which was an obstacle in the pathway of the weak, became a stepping-stone in the pathway of the strong. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
575:The block of granite which was an obstacle in the pathway of the weak becomes a stepping-stone in the pathway of the strong. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
576:The suffering man ought really to consume his own smoke; there is no good in emitting smoke till you have made it into fire. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
577:All work of man is as the swimmer's: a vast ocean threatens to devour him; if he front it not bravely, it will keep its word. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
578:Government is emphatically a machine: to the discontented a taxing machine, to the contented a machine for securing property. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
579:If a book comes from the heart, it will contrive to reach other hearts; all art and author-craft are of small amount to that. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
580:If time is precious, no book that will not improve by repeated readings deserves to be read at all. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Essays, Goethe's Helena.,
581:Language is called the garment of thought: however, it should rather be, language is the flesh-garment, the body, of thought. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
582:One is weary of hearing about the omnipotence of money. I will say rather that, for a genuine man, it is not evil to be poor. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
583:To us also, through every star, through every blade of grass, is not God made visible if we will open our minds and our eyes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
584:When the oak is felled the whole forest echoes with it fall, but a hundred acorns are sown in silence by an unnoticed breeze. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
585:How, without clothes, could we possess the master organ, soul's seat and true pineal gland of the body social--I mean a purse? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
586:O Time! Time! how it brings forth and devours! And the roaring flood of existence rushes on forever similar, forever changing! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
587:Reform is not pleasant, but grievous; no person can reform themselves without suffering and hard work, how much less a nation. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
588:That there should one Man die ignorant who had capacity for Knowledge, this I call a tragedy. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Sartor Resartus, Bk. III, ch. 4,
589:When the oak is felled the whole forest echoes with its fall, but a hundred acorns are sown in silence by an unnoticed breeze. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
590:A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
591:Ill-health, of body or of mind, is defeat. Health alone is victory. Let all men, if they can manage it, contrive to be healthy! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
592:Is there no God, then, but at best an absentee God, sitting idle, ever since the first Sabbath, at the outside of his Universe? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
593:Stern accuracy in inquiring, bold imagination in describing, these are the cogs on which history soars or flutters and wobbles. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
594:The grand result of schooling is a mind with just vision to discern, with free force to do: the grand schoolmaster is Practice. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
595:The person who cannot laugh is not only ready for treason, and deceptions, their whole life is already a treason and deception. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
596:This world, after all our science and sciences, is still a miracle; wonderful, magical and more, to whosoever will think of it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
597:Thou fool! Nature alone is antique, and the oldest art a mushroom; that idle crag thou sittest on is six thousand years of age. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
598:Adversity is sometimes hard upon a man, but for one man who can stand prosperity, there are a hundred that will stand adversity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
599:No country can find eternal peace and comfort where the vote of Judas Iscariot is as good as the vote of the Saviour of mankind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
600:Piety does not mean that a man should make a sour face about things, and refuse to enjoy in moderation what his Maker has given. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
601:Such is the world. Understand it, despise it, love it; cheerfully hold on thy way through it, with thy eye on highest loadstars! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
602:The modern majesty consists in work. What a man can do is his greatest ornament, and he always consults his dignity by doing it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
603:All deep things are song. It seems somehow the very central essence of us, song; as if all the rest were but wrappages and hulls! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
604:Also, what mountains of dead ashes, wreck and burnt bones, does assiduous pedantry dig up from the past time and name it History. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
605:In a controversy, the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
606:For all right judgment of any man or things it is useful, nay, essential, to see his good qualities before pronouncing on his bad. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
607:Long stormy spring-time, wet contentious April, winter chilling the lap of very May; but at length the season of summer does come. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
608:Men seldom, or rather never for a length of time and deliberately, rebel against anything that does not deserve rebelling against. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
609:Of the things which man can do or make here below, by far the most momentous, wonderful and worthy are the things we call Books! – ~ Thomas Carlyle,
610:Show me the person you honor, for I know better by that the kind of person you are. For you show me what your idea of humanity is. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
611:The wise man is but a clever infant, spelling letters from a hieroglyphical prophetic book, the lexicon of which lies in eternity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
612:Democracy will itself accomplish the salutary universal change from delusive to real, and make a new blessed world of us by and by. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
613:The philosopher is he to whom the highest has descended, and the lowest has mounted up; who is the equal and kindly brother of all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
614:No person was every rightly understood until they had been first regarded with a certain feeling, not of tolerance, but of sympathy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
615:Silence, the great Empire of Silence: higher than all stars; deeper than the Kingdom of Death! It alone is great; all else is small. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
616:The secret of business is to know something that nobody else knows. The greatest of faults, I should say is to be conscious of none. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
617:All things that have been in this world, all things that are or will be in it, have to vanish: we have our sad farewell to give them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
618:Great men are the modelers, patterns, and in a wide sense creators, of whatsoever the general mass of men contrived to do and attain. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
619:Man is, properly speaking, based upon hope, he has no other possession but hope; this world of his is emphatically the place of hope. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
620:No man lives without jostling and being jostled; in all ways he has to elbow himself through the world, giving and receiving offence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
621:No man lives without jostling and being jostled; in all ways he has to elbow himself through the world, giving and receiving offense. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
622:Of all the acts of man, repentance is the most divine. The greatest of all faults . . . is to be conscious of none." (Thomas Carlyle) ~ Thomas Carlyle,
623:Of all the things which man can do or make here below, by far the most momentous, wonderful, and worthy are the things we call books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
624:Speech is too often not the art of concealing thought, but of quite stifling and suspending thought, so that there is none to conceal. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
625:The true Sovereign of the world, who moulds the world like soft wax, according to his pleasure, is he who lovingly sees into the world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
626:Under all speech that is good for anything there lies a silence that is better, Silence is deep as Eternity; speech is shallow as Time. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
627:Even in the meanest sorts of labor, the whole soul of a man is composed into a kind of real harmony the instant he sets himself to work. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
628:There needs not a great soul to make a hero; there needs a god-created soul which will be true to its origin; that will be a great soul! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
629:Instead of saying that man is the creature of circumstance, it would be nearer the mark to say that man is the architect of circumstance. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
630:O Heaven, it is mysterious, it is awful to consider that we not only carry each a future Ghost within him; but are, in very deed, Ghosts! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
631:OH, Heaven,it is mysterious,it is awful to consider
that we not only carry a future Ghost within us. but
are,in very deed, GHOSTS ! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
632:Universal history, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the Great Men who have worked here. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
633:What are your historical Facts still more your biographical Wilt thou know a man by stringing-together beadrolls of what thou namest Facts ~ Thomas Carlyle,
634:In a symbol there is concealment and yet revelation: here therefore, by Silence and by Speech acting together, comes a double significance. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
635:The world is a thing that a man must learn to despise, and even to neglect, before he can learn to reverence it, and work in it and for it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
636:A fair day's wage for a fair day's work": it is as just a demand as governed men ever made of governing. It is the everlasting right of man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
637:Before philosophy can teach by Experience, the Philosophy has to be in readiness, the Experience must be gathered and intelligibly recorded. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
638:Friendship, in the old heroic sense of that term, no longer exists. It is in reality no longer expected or recognized as a virtue among men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
639:This world, after all our science and sciences, is still a miracle; wonderful, inscrutable, magical and more, to whosoever will think of it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
640:Great men taken up in any way are profitable company. We cannot look, however imperfectly, upon a great man without gaining something by him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
641:Rightly viewed no meanest object is insignificant; all objects are as windows through which the philosophic eye looks into infinitude itself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
642:A man's felicity consists not in the outward and visible blessing of fortune, but in the inward and unseen perfections and riches of the mind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
643:In our wide world there is but one altogether fatal personage, the dunce,--he that speaks irrationally, that sees not, and yet thinks he sees. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
644:Are not our greatest men as good as lost? The men that walk daily among us, warming us, feeding us, walk shrouded in darkness, mere mythic men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
645:It is a strange trade that of advocacy. Your intellect, your highest heavenly gift is hung up in the shop window like a loaded pistol for sale. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
646:Nothing ever happens but once in all this world. What I do now I do once for all. It is over and gone, with all its eternity of solemn meaning. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
647:Imperfection clings to a person, and if they wait till they are brushed off entirely, they would spin for ever on their axis, advancing nowhere. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
648:In the long-run every Government is the exact symbol of its People, with their wisdom and unwisdom; we have to say, Like People like Government. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
649:The healthy know not of their health, but only the sick: this is the physician's aphorism, and applicable in a far wider sense than he gives it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
650:Terror itself, when once grown transcendental, becomes a kind of courage; as frost sufficiently intense, according to the poet Milton, will burn. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
651:All that Mankind has done, thought, gained or been is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of Books. They are the chosen possession of men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
652:A pygmy standing on the outward crust of this small planet, his far-reaching spirit stretches outward to the infinite, and there alone finds rest. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
653:High Air-castles are cunningly built of Words, the Words well bedded also in good Logic-mortar; wherein, however, no Knowledge will come to lodge. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
654:Labor is life: from the inmost heart of the worker rises his God-given force, the sacred celestial life-essence breathed into him by Almighty God! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
655:What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
656:Who is it that loves me and will love me forever with an affection which no chance, no misery, no crime of mine can do away? It is you, my mother. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
657:At the bottom there is no perfect history; there is none such conceivable. All past centuries have rotted down, and gone confusedly dumb and quiet. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
658:Do not be embarrassed by your mistakes. Nothing can teach us better than our understanding of them. This is one of the best ways of self-education. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
659:Great men are the inspired texts of that divine Book of Revelations, whereof a chapter is completed from epoch to epoch, and by some named History. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
660:The aristocracy of feudal parchment has passed away with a mighty rushing, and now, by a natural course, we arrive at aristocracy of the money-bag. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
661:The scandalous bronze-lacquer age of hungry animalisms, spiritual impotences, and mendacities, will have to run its course, till the pit follow it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
662:What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
663:I don't like to talk much with people who always agree with me. It is amusing to coquette with an echo for a little while, but one soon tires of it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
664:If you do not wish a man to do a thing, you had better get him to talk about it; for the more men talk, the more likely they are to do nothing else. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
665:The Orator persuades and carries all with him, he knows not how; the Rhetorician can prove that he ought to have persuaded and carried all with him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
666:What, in the devil's name, is the use of respectability, with never so many gigs and silver spoons, if thou inwardly art the pitifulness of all men? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
667:Burke said there were Three Estates in Parliament; but, in the Reporter's gallery yonder, there sat a fourth estate more important far than they all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
668:If Jesus Christ were to come today, people would not even crucify him. They would ask him to dinner, and hear what he had to say, and make fun of it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
669:It is meritorious to insist on forms; religion and all else naturally clothes itself in forms. Everywhere the formed world is the only habitable one. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
670:If those gentlemen would let me alone I should be much obliged to them. I would say, as Shakespeare would say... Sweet Friend, for Jesus sake forbear. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
671:It is a fact which escapes no one, that, generally speaking, whoso is acquainted with his worth has but a little stock to cultivate acquaintance with. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
672:They wrong man greatly who say he is to be seduced by ease. Difficulty, abnegation, martyrdom, death are the allurements that act on the heart of man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
673:Time is the silent, never-resting thing ... rolling, rushing on, swift, silent, like an all-embracing oceantide, on which we and all the universe swim. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
674:A person with a clear purpose will make progress, even on the roughest road. A person with no purpose will make no progress, even on the smoothest road. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
675:Insurrection, never so necessary, is a most sad necessity; and governors who wait for that to instruct them are surely getting into the fatalest course. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
676:Evil, once manfully fronted, ceases to be evil; there is generous battle-hope in place of dead, passive misery; the evil itself has become a kind of good. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
677:Men are grown mechanical in head and in the heart, as well as in the hand. They have lost faith in individual endeavour, and in natural force of any kind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
678:Venerable to me is the hard hand,--crooked, coarse,--wherein, notwithstanding, lies a cunning virtue, indispensably royal as of the sceptre of the planet. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
679:God gave you that gifted tongue of yours, and set it between your teeth, to make known your true meaning to us, not to be rattled like a muffin man's bell. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
680:Professors of the Dismal Science, I perceive the length of your tether is now pretty well run; and I must request you to talk a little lower in the future. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
681:To each is given a certain inward talent, a certain outward environment or fortune; to each by wisest combination of these two, a certain maximum capacity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
682:All true work is sacred. In all true work, were it but true hand work, there is something of divineness. Labor, wide as the earth, has its summit in Heaven. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
683:Everywhere the human soul stands between a hemisphere of light and another of darkness; on the confines of two everlasting empires, necessity and free will. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
684:Good breeding differs, if at all, from high breeding only as it gracefully remembers the rights of others, rather than gracefully insists on its own rights. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
685:Everywhere the human soul stands between a hemisphere of light and another of darkness on the confines of two everlasting empires, - Necessity and Free Will. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
686:There is a majesty and mystery in nature, take her as you will. The essence of poetry comes breathing to a mind that feels from every province of her empire. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
687:Music is well said to be the speech of angels; in fact, nothing among the utterances allowed to man is felt to be so divine. It brings us near to the infinite. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
688:Money, in truth, can do much, but it cannot do all. We must know the province of it, and confine it there, and even spurn it back when it wishes to get farther. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
689:So here hath been dawning Another blue day; Think, wilt thou let it Slip useless away? Out of eternity This new day is born, Into eternity At night will return. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
690:Why did not somebody teach me the constellations, and make me at home in the starry heavens, which are always overhead, and which I don't half know to this day? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
691:The world is an old woman, and mistakes any gilt farthing for a gold coin; whereby being often cheated, she will thenceforth trust nothing but the common copper. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
692:A man's religion consists, not of the many things he is in doubt of and tries to believe, but of the few he is assured of and has no need of effort for believing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
693:Economics is not a gay science. It is a dreary, desolate, and indeed quite abject and distressing one; what we might call, by way of eminence, the dismal science. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
694:A lie should be trampled on and extinguished wherever found. I am for fumigating the atmosphere when I suspect that falsehood, like pestilence, breathes around me. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
695:Friend, hast thou considered the "rugged, all-nourishing earth," as Sophocles well names her; how she feeds the sparrow on the housetop, much more her darling man? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
696:He who talks much about virtue in the abstract, begins to be suspected; it is shrewdly guessed that where there is great preaching there will be little almsgiving. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
697:Not only was Thebes built by the music of an Orpheus; but without the music of some inspired Orpheus was no city ever built, no work that man glories in ever done. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
698:Our very walking is an incessant falling; a falling and a catching of ourselves before we come actually to the pavement. It is emblematic of all things a man does. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
699:Thomas Carlyle
Carlyle combined the lit'ry life
With throwing teacups at his wife,
Remarking, rather testily,
"Oh, stop your dodging, Mrs. C.!"
~ Dorothy Parker,
700:you come to understand that history might be, as Thomas Carlyle put it, “a distillation of rumor,” or, as Napoleon said, “a set of lies generally agreed upon ~ James Alexander Thom,
701:from Thomas Carlyle that helped him lead a life free from worry: “Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand. ~ Dale Carnegie,
702:History, as it lies at the root of all science, is also the first distinct product of man's spiritual nature, his earliest expression of what may be called thought. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
703:Let a man try faithfully, manfully to be right; he will grow daily more and more right. It is at bottom the condition on which all men have to cultivate themselves. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
704:Shakespeare says, we are creatures that look before and after; the more surprising that we do not look around a little, and see what is passing under our very eyes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
705:Every day that is born into the world comes like a burst of music and rings the whole day through, and you make of it a dance, a dirge, or a life march, as you will. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
706:The all importance of clothes has sprung up in the intellect of the dandy without effort, like an instinct of genius; he is inspired with clothes, a poet of clothes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
707:The graceful minuet-dance of fancy must give place to the toilsome, thorny pilgrimage of understanding. On the transition from the age of romance to that of science. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
708:The merit of originality is not novelty; it is sincerity. The believing man is the original man; whatsoever he believes, he believes it for himself, not for another. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
709:A stammering man is never a worthless one. Physiology can tell you why. It is an excess of sensibility to the presence of his fellow creature, that makes him stammer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
710:Every human being has a right to hear what other wise human beings have spoken to him. It is one of the Rights of Men; a very cruel injustice if you deny it to a man! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
711:Man's unhappiness, as I construe, comes of his greatness; it is because there is an Infinite in him, which with all his cunning he cannot quite bury under the Finite. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
712:Man’s unhappiness, as I construe, comes of his greatness; it is because there is an Infinite in him, which with all his cunning he cannot quite bury under the Finite. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
713:If a book come from the heart, it will contrive to reach other hearts; all art and authorcraft are of small amount to that. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Heroes and Hero Worship (1840), Lecture II.,
714:In this world there is one godlike thing, the essence of all that was or ever will be of godlike in this world: the veneration done to Human Worth by the hearts of men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
715:Nothing stops the man who desires to achieve. Every obstacle is simply a course to develop his achievement muscle. It's a strengthening of his powers of accomplishment. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
716:Not our logical faculty, but our imaginative one is king over us. I might say, priest and prophet to lead us to heaven-ward, or magician and wizard to lead us hellward. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
717:History of the world is the biography of the great man. And I said: The great man always act like a thunder. He storms the skies, while others are waiting to be stormed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
718:In books lies the soul of the whole Past Time: the articulate audible voice of the Past, when the body and material substance of it has altogether vanished like a dream. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
719:In books lies the soul of the whole Past Time; the articulate audible voice of the Past, when the body and material substance of it has altogether vanished like a dream. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
720:That a Parliament, especially a Parliament with Newspaper Reporters firmly established in it, is an entity which by its very nature cannot do work, but can do talk only. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
721:I came hither [Craigenputtoch] solely with the design to simplify my way of life and to secure the independence through which I could be enabled to remain true to myself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
722:Surely of all ‘rights of man’, this right of the ignorant man to be guided by the wiser, to be, gently or forcibly, held in the true course by him, is the indisputablest. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
723:There are impertinent inquiries made; your rule is, to leave the inquirer uninformed on the matter; not, if you can help it, misinformed, but precisely as dark as he was! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
724:But indeed nobody knows what inarticulate traditions, remnants of old wisdom, priceless though quite anonymous, survive in many modern things that still have life in them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
725:Of our thinking it is but the upper surface that we shape into articulate thought; underneath the region of argument and conscious discourse lies the region of meditation. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
726:Rest is a fine medicine. Let your stomachs rest, ye dyspeptics; let your brain rest, you wearied and worried people of business; let your limbs rest, ye children of toil! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
727:There can be no acting or doing of any kind till it be recognized that there is a thing to be done; the thing once recognized, doing in a thousand shapes becomes possible. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
728:We have chosen Mahomet not as the most eminent Prophet; but as the one we are freest to speak of. He is by no means the truest of Prophets; but I do esteem him a true one. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
729:Laissez-faire, supply and demand-one begins to be weary of all that. Leave all to egotism, to ravenous greed of money, of pleasure, of applause-it is the gospel of despair. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
730:Speak not at all, in any wise, till you have somewhat to speak; care not for the reward of your speaking, but simply and with undivided mind for the truth of your speaking. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
731:The ideal is within you, and the obstacle to reaching this ideal is also within you. You already possess all the material from which to create your ideal self. —THOMAS CARLYLE ~ Leo Tolstoy,
732:In a different time, in a different place, it is always some other side of our common human nature that has been developing itself. The actual truth is the sum of all these. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
733:On the whole, I would bid you stand up to your work, whatever it may be, and not be afraid of it; not in sorrows or contradictions to yield, but to push on towards the goal. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
734:The condition of the most passionate enthusiast is to be preferred over the individual who, because of the fear of making a mistake, won't in the end affirm or deny anything ~ Thomas Carlyle,
735:The true past departs not, no truth or goodness realized by man ever dies, or can die; but all is still here, and, recognized or not, lives and works through endless change. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
736:True humor springs not more from the head than from the heart. It is not contempt; its essence is love. It issues not in laughter, but in still smiles, which lie far deeper. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
737:We do everything by custom, even believe by it; our very axioms, let us boast of free-thinking as we may, are oftenest simply such beliefs as we have never heard questioned. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
738:Every poet... finds himself born in the midst of prose. He has to struggle from the littleness and obstruction of an actual world into the freedom and infinitude of an ideal. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
739:Fancy that thou deservest to be hangedthou wilt feel it happiness to be only shot: fancy that thou deservest to be hanged ina hair halter, it will be a luxury to die in hemp. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
740:I grow daily to honour facts more and more, and theory less and less. A fact, it seems to me, is a great thing; a sentence printed, if not by God, then at least by the Devil. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
741:I pored over them,” says he, “driving my cart or walking to labor, song by song, verse by verse, carefully noticing the true, tender or sublime, from affectation and fustian. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
742:Clean undeniable right, clear undeniable might: either of these once ascertained puts an end to battle. All battle is a confused experiment to ascertain one and both of these. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
743:Midas-eared Mammonism, double-barrelled Dilettantism, and their thousand adjuncts and corollaries, are not the Law by which God Almighty has appointed this His universe to go. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
744:The infinite, absolute character of Virtue has passed into a finite, conditional one; it is no longer a worship of the Beautiful and Good; but a calculation of the Profitable. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
745:Bright, heroic, tender, true and noble was that lost treasure of my heart, who faithfully accompanied me in all the rocky ways and climbings; and I am forever poor without her. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
746:Nakedness, hunger, distress of all kinds, death itself have been cheerfully suffered, when the heart was right. It is the feeling of injustice that is insupportable to all men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
747:No nobler feeling than this, of admiration for one higher than himself, dwells in the breast of man. It is to this hour, and at all hours, the vivifying influence in man's life. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
748:Not our Logical, Mensurative faculty, but our Imaginative one is King over us; I might say, Priest and Prophet to lead us heavenward; or Magician and Wizard to lead us hellward. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
749:What is all Knowledge too but recorded Experience, and a product of History; of which, therefore, Reasoning and Belief, no less than Action and Passion, are essential materials? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
750:Hemos olvidado profundamente en todas partes que el Pago Monetario no es la única relación entre seres humanos... No es el único nexo del hombre con el hombre'
Thomas Carlyle ~ Niall Ferguson,
751:Man, it is not thy works, which are mortal, infinitely little, and the greatest no greater than the least, but only the spirit thou workest in, that can have worth or continuance. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
752:The glory of a workman, still more of a master workman, that he does his work well, ought to be his most precious possession; like the honor of a soldier, dearer to him than life. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
753:The great silent man! Looking round on the noisy inanity of the world,--words with little meaning, actions with little worth,--one loves to reflect on the great Empire of Silence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
754:Permanence, perseverance and persistence in spite of all obstacles, discouragement, and impossibilities: It is this, that in all things distinguishes the strong soul from the weak. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
755:Science has done much for us; but it is a poor science that would hide from us the great deep sacred infinitude of Nescience, on which all science swims as a mere superficial film. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
756:What the light of your mind, which is the direct inspiration of the Almighty, pronounces incredible, that, in God's name, leave uncredited. At your peril do not try believing that! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
757:Be a pattern to others, and then all will go well; for as a whole city is affected by the licentious passions and vices of great men, so it is likewise reformed by their moderation. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
758:Wise man was he who counselled that speculation should have free course, and look fearlessly towards all the thirty-two points of the compass, whithersoever and howsoever it listed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
759:Permanence, perseverance and persistence in spite of all obstacle s, discouragement s, and impossibilities: It is this, that in all things distinguishes the strong soul from the weak. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
760:The dead are all holy, even they that were base and wicked while alive. Their baseness and wickedness was not they, was but the heavy and unmanageable environment that lay round them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
761:A very sea of thought; neither calm nor clear, if you will, yet wherein the toughest pearl-diver may dive to his utmost depth, and return not only with sea-wreck but with true orients. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
762:Habit and imitation--there is nothing more perennial in us than these two. They are the source of all working, and all apprenticeship, of all practice, and all learning, in this world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
763:The authentic insight and experience of any human soul, were it but insight and experience in hewing of wood and drawing of water, is real knowledge, a real possession and acquirement. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
764:What is nature? Art thou not the living government of God? O Heaven, is it in very deed He then that ever speaks through thee, that lives and loves in thee, that lives and loves in me? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
765:Authors are the vanguard in the march of mind, the intellectual backwoodsmen, reclaiming from the idle wilderness new territories for the thought and activity of their happier brethren. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
766:(Quoted by Thomas Carlyle) The rude man requires only to see something going on. The man of more refinement must be made to feel. The man of complete refinement must be made to reflect. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
767:Whoso has sixpence is sovereign (to the length of sixpence) over all men; commands cooks to feed him, philosophers to teach him, kings to mount guard over him,to the length of sixpence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
768:A stammering man is never a worthless one. Physiology can tell you why. It is an excess of delicacy, excess of sensibility to the presence of his fellow creature, that makes him stammer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
769:In no time whatever can small critics entirely eradicate out of living men's hearts a certain altogether peculiar collar reverence for Great Men--genuine admiration, loyalty, adora-tion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
770:Oblivion is the dark page, whereon Memory writes her light-beam characters, and makes them legible; were it all light, nothing could be read there, any more than if it were all darkness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
771:The English historian Thomas Carlyle defined a person’s religion as the set of values evident in his or her actions, regardless of what the individual would claim to believe when asked. ~ Terryl L Givens,
772:We remove mountains, and make seas our smooth highway; nothing can resist us. We war with rude Nature; and, by our resistless engines, come off always victorious, and loaded with spoils. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
773:Wondrous is the strength of cheerfulness, and its power of endurance - the cheerful man will do more in the same time, will do it better, will preserve it longer, than the sad or sullen. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
774:Laws, written, if not on stone tables, yet on the azure of infinitude, in the inner heart of God's creation, certain as life, certain as death, are there, and thou shalt not disobey them. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
775:Wondrous is the strength of cheerfulness, and its power of endurance - the cheerful man will do more in the same time, will do it; better, will preserve it longer, than the sad or sullen. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
776:There are depths in man that go to the lowest hell, and heights that reach the highest heaven, for are not both heaven and hell made out of him, everlasting miracle and mystery that he is. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
777:Human Intelligence means little for most of us but Beaver Contrivance, which produces spinning-mules, cheap cotton, and large fortunes. Wisdom, unless it give us railway scrip, is not wise. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
778:The Builder of this Universe was wise, He plann'd all souls, all systems, planets, particles: The Plan He shap'd all Worlds and Æons by, Was-Heavens!-was thy small Nine-and-thirty Articles! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
779:Beautiful it is, and a gleam from the same eternal pole-star visible amid the destinies of men, that all talent, all intellect, is in the first plane moral. What a world were this otherwise! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
780:Well might the ancients make silence a god; for it is the element of all godhood, infinitude, or transcendental greatness,--at once the source and the ocean wherein all such begins and ends. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
781:What an enormous magnifier is tradition! How a thing grows in the human memory and in the human imagination, when love, worship, and all that lies in the human heart, is there to encourage it ~ Thomas Carlyle,
782:It is a thing forever changing, this of Hero-worship: different in each age, difficult to do well in any age. Indeed, the heart of the whole business of the age, one may say, is to do it well. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
783:No magic Rune is stranger than a Book. All that Mankind has done, thought, gained or been: it is lying
as in magic preservation in the pages of Books. They are the chosen possession of men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
784:The Poet who could merely sit on a chair, and compose stanzas, would never make a stanza worth much. He could not sing the Heroic warrior, unless he himself were at least a Heroic warrior too. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
785:All that Mankind has done, thought, gained or been it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of Books. They are the chosen possession of men. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Heroes and Hero Worship (1840), Lecture V.,
786:It is great, and there is no other greatness-to make one nook of God's Creation more fruitful, better, more worthy of God; to make some human heart a little wiser, manlier, happier-more blessed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
787:Man always worships something; always he sees the Infinite shadowed forth in something finite; and indeed can and must so see it in any finite thing, once tempt him well to fix his eyes thereon. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
788:Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together; that at length they may emerge, full-formed and majestic, into the daylight of Life, which they are thenceforth to rule. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
789:To say that we have a clear conscience is to utter a solecism; had we never sinned we should have had no conscience. Were defeat unknown, neither would victory be celebrated by songs of triumph. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
790:To reform a world, to reform a nation, no wise man will undertake; and all but foolish men know, that the only solid, though a far slower reformation, is what each begins and perfects on himself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
791:Battles, in these ages, are transacted by mechanism; with the slightest possible development of human individuality or spontaneity; men now even die, and kill one another, in an artificial manner. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
792:I fancy I need more than another to speak (rather than write), with such a formidable tendency to the lapidary style. I build my house of boulders. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Letter to Thomas Carlyle (30 October 1841),
793:Wealth has more and more increased, and at the same time gathered itself more and more into masses, strangely altering the old relations, and increasing the distance between the rich and the poor. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
794:In the poorest cottage are Books: is one Book, wherein for several thousands of years the spirit of man has found light, and nourishment, and an interpreting response to whatever is Deepest in him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
795:Dinners are defined as 'the ultimate act of communion;' men that can have communion in nothing else, can sympathetically eat together, can still rise into some glow of brotherhood over food and wine. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
796:Good Christian people, here lies for you an inestimable loan; take all heed thereof, in all carefulness, employ it: with high recompense, or else with heavy penalty, will it one day be required back. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
797:Painful for a person is rebellious independence, only in loving companionship with his associates does a person feel safe: Only in reverently bowing down before the higher does a person feel exalted. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
798:To believe practically that the poor and luckless are here only as a nusiance to be abraded and abated, and in some permissable manner made away with, and swept out of sight, is not an amiable faith. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
799:Armed Soldier, terrible as Death, relentless as Doom; doing God's judgement on the Enemies of God. It is a phenomenon not of joyful nature; no, but of awful, to be looked at with pious terror and awe. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
800:Idleness is worst, Idleness alone is without hope: work earnestly at anything, you will by degrees learn to work at almost all things. There is endless hope in work, were it even work at making money. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
801:One seems to believe almost all that they believe; and when they stop short and call it a Religion, and you pass on, and call it only a reminiscence of one, should you not part with the kiss of peace? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
802:There is no permanent place in this universe for evil... Evil may hide behind this fallacy and that, but it will be hunted from fallacy to fallacy until there is no more fallacy for it to hide behind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
803:Action hangs, as it were, dissolved in speech, in thoughts whereof speech is the shadow; and precipitates itself therefrom. The kind of speech in a man betokens the kind of action you will get from him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
804:Without oblivion, there is no remembrance possible. When both oblivion and memory are wise, when the general soul of man is clear, melodious, true, there may come a modern Iliad as memorial of the Past. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
805:For, strictly considered, what is all Knowledge too but recorded Experience, and a product of History; of which, therefore, Reasoning and Belief, no less than Action and Passion, are essential materials? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
806:We call that fire of the black thunder-cloud "electricity," and lecture learnedly about it, and grind the like of it out of glass and silk: but what is it? What made it? Whence comes it? Whither goes it? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
807:A man ought to inquire and find out what he really and truly has an appetite for; what suits his constitution; and that, doctors tell him, is the very thing he ought to have in general. And so with books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
808:Innumerable are the illusions and legerdemain-tricks of custom: but of all of these, perhaps the cleverest is her knack of persuading us that the miraculous, by simple repetition, ceases to be miraculous. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
809:The vulgarity of inanimate things requires time to get accustomed to; but living, breathing, bustling, plotting, planning, human vulgarity is a species of moral ipecacuanha, enough to destroy any comfort. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
810:Every poet, be his outward lot what it may, finds himself born in the midst of prose; h e has to struggle from the littleness and obstruction of an actual world into the freedom and infinitude of an ideal. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
811:Fame, we may understand, is no sure test of merit, but only a probability of such: it is an accident, not a property, of a man; like light, it can give little or nothing, but at most may show what is given. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
812:Rich as we are in biography, a well-written life is almost as rare as a well-spent one; and there are certainly many more men whose history deserves to be recorded than persons willing and able to record it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
813:Alas! while the body stands so broad and brawny, must the soul lie blinded, dwarfed, stupefied, almost annihilated? Alas! this was, too, a breath of God, bestowed in heaven, but on earth never to be unfolded! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
814:To the wisest man, wide as is his vision. Nature remains of quite infinite depth, of quite infinite expansion and all experience thereof limits itself to some few computed centuries and measured square miles. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
815:Ever, as before, does Madness remain a mysterious-terrific, altogether infernal boiling-up of the Nether Chaotic Deep, through this fair-painted Vision of Creation, which swims thereon, which we name the Real. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
816:No good book or good thing of any kind shows it best face at first. No the most common quality of in a true work of art that has excellence and depth, is that at first sight it produces a certain disappointment. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
817:Show me the man you honor; I know by that symptom, better than by any other, what kind of man you yourself are. For you show me there what your ideal of manhood is; what kind of man you long inexpressibly to be. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
818:The greatest of all heroes is One--whom we do not name here! Let sacred silence meditate that sacred matter; you will find it the ultimate perfection of a principle extant throughout man's whole history on earth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
819:Happy season of virtuous youth, when shame is still an impassable barrier, and the sacred air-cities of hope have not shrunk into the mean clay hamlets of reality; and man, by his nature, is yet infinite and free. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
820:Not on morality, but on cookery, let us build our stronghold: there brandishing our frying-pan, as censer, let us offer sweet incense to the Devil, and live at ease on the fat things he has provided for his elect! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
821:Our 'superior morality' is properly rather an 'inferior criminality' produced not by greater love of Virtue, but by greater perfection of Police; and of that far subtler and stronger Police, called Public Opinion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
822:We observe with confidence that the truly strong mind, view it as intellect or morality, or under any other aspect, is nowise the mind acquainted with its strength; that here the sign of health is unconsciousness. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
823:With union grounded on falsehood and ordering us to speak and act lies, we will not have anything to do. Peace? A brutal lethargy is peaceable; the noisome is peaceable. We hope for a living peace, not a dead one! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
824:Cash-payment never was, or could except for a few years be, the union-bond of man to man. Cash never yet paid one man fully his deserts to another; nor could it, nor can it, now or henceforth to the end of the world. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
825:Goethe's devil is a cultivated personage and acquainted with the modern sciences; sneers at witchcraft and the black art even while employing them, and doubts most things, nay, half disbelieves even his own existence. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
826:O thou who art able to write a book which once in the two centuries or oftener there is a man gifted to do, envy not him whom they name city-builder, and inexpressibly pity him whom they name conqueror or city-burner. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
827:He who first shortened the labor of Copyists by device of Movable Types was disbanding hired armies and cashiering most Kings and Senates, and creating a whole new Democratic world: he had invented the Art of printing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
828:When Pococke inquired of Grotius, where the proof was of that story of the pigeon, trained to pick peas from Mahomet's (Muhammad's) ear, and pass for an angel dictating to him? Grotius answered that there was no proof! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
829:The meaning of song goes deep. Who in logical words can explain the effect music has on us? A kind of inarticulate, unfathomable speech, which leads us to the edge of the infinite, and lets us for a moment gaze into that! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
830:Have not I myself known five hundred living soldiers sabred into crows' meat for a piece of glazed cotton, which they call their flag; which had you sold it at any market-cross, would not have brought above three groschen? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
831:No iron chain, or outward force of any kind, could ever compel the soul of man to believe or to disbelieve: it is his own indefeasible light, that judgment of his; he will reign and believe there by the grace of God alone! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
832:Statistics is a science which ought to be honourable, the basis of many most important sciences; but it is not to be carried on by steam, this science, any more than others are; a wise head is requisite for carrying it on. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
833:In the poorest cottage are Books: is one Book, wherein for several thousands of years the spirit of man has found light, and nourishment, and an interpreting response to whatever is Deepest in him. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Essays, Corn-Law Rhymes.,
834:A man perfects himself by working. Foul jungles are cleared away, fair seed-fields rise instead, and stately cities; and with the man himself first ceases to be a jungle, and foul unwholesome desert thereby. The man is now a man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
835:Our works are the mirror wherein the spirit first sees its natural lineaments. Hence, too, the folly of that impossible precept, Know theyself; till it be translated into this partially possible one, know what thou canst work at. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
836:The Persians are called the French of the East; we will call the Arabs Oriental Italians. A gifted noble people; a people of wildstrong feelings, and of iron restraint over these: the characteristic of noblemindedness, of genius. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
837:Of all the paths a man could strike into, there is, at any given moment, a best path .. A thing which, here and now, it were of all things wisest for him to do .. To find this path, and walk in it, is the one thing needful for him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
838:There is a perennial nobleness, and even sacredness, in work. Were he never so benighted, forgetful of his high calling, there is always hope in a man that actually and earnestly works: in idleness alone there is perpetual despair. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
839:In books lies the soul of the whole Past Time; the articulate audible voice of the Past, when the body and material substance of it has altogether vanished like a dream. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Heroes and Hero Worship (1840), The Hero as a Man of Letters.,
840:O thou that pinest in the imprisonment of the Actual, and criest bitterly to the gods for a kingdom wherein to rule and create, know this for a truth: the thing thou seekest is already here, "here or nowhere," couldst thou only see. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
841:Produce, produce! Were it but the pitifulest, infinitesimal fraction of a product, produce it in God's name. 'Tis the utmost thou hast in thee? Out with it then! Up, up! Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy whole might. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
842:Is not cant the materia prima of the devil, from which all falsehoods, imbecilities, abominations, body themselves, from which no true thing can come? For cant is itself the properly a double-distilled lie, the second power of a lie. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
843:We call it a Society; and go about professing openly the totalest separation, isolation. Our life is not a mutual helpfulness; but rather, cloaked under due laws-of-war, named fair competition and so forth, it is a mutual hostility. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
844:If you are looking at data over and over you better be taking away valuable insight every time. If you are constantly looking at data that isn't leading to strategic action stop wasting your time and look for more Actionable Analytics. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
845:In the true Literary Man there is thus ever, acknowledged or not by the world, a sacredness: he is the light of the world; the world's Priest; -- guiding it, like a sacred Pillar of Fire, in its dark pilgrimage through the waste of Time. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
846:In wakeful nights, as one may fancy, the wild soul of the man, tossing amid these vortices, would hail any light of a decision for them as a veritable light from Heaven; any making-up of his mind, so blessed, indispensable for him there, ~ Thomas Carlyle,
847:Before Philosophy can teach by Experience, the Philosophy has to be in readiness, the Experience must be gathered and intelligibly recorded. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Essays, On History. Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 596-97.,
848:Force, force, everywhere force; we ourselves a mysterious force in the centre of that. "There is not a leaf rotting on the highway but has Force in it: how else could it rot?" [As used in his time, by the word force, Carlyle means energy.] ~ Thomas Carlyle,
849:War is a quarrel between two thieves too cowardly to fight their own battle; therefore they take boys from one village and another village, stick them into uniforms, equip them with guns, and let them loose like wild beasts against one other. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
850:His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
851:Today is not yesterday: we ourselves change; how can our works and thoughts, if they are always to be the fittest, continue always the same? Change, indeed is painful; yet ever needful; and if memory have its force and worth, so also has hope. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
852:On the whole we must repeat the often repeated saying, that it is unworthy a religious man to view an irreligious one either with alarm or aversion; or with any other feeling than regret, and hope, and brotherly commiseration. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Essays. Voltaire,
853:A greater number of God's creatures believe in Mahomet's word at this hour than in any other word whatever. Are we to suppose that it was a miserable piece of spiritual legerdemain, this which so many creatures of the almighty have lived by and died by? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
854:Foolish men imagine that because judgment for an evil thing is delayed, there is no justice; but only accident here below. Judgment for an evil thing is many times delayed some day or two, some century or two, but it is sure as life, it is sure as death. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
855:If I say that Shakespeare is the greatest of intellects, I have said all concerning him. But there is more in Shakespeare's intellect than we have yet seen. It is what I call an unconscious intellect; there is more virtue in it that he himself is aware of. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
856:Thought once awakened does not again slumber; unfolds itself into a System of Thought; grows, in man after man, generation after generation, - till its full stature is reached, and such System of Thought can grow no farther, but must give place to another. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
857:The Bible is the truest utterance that ever came by alphabetic letters from the soul of man, through which, as through a window divinely opened, all men can look into the stillness of eternity, and discern in glimpses their far-distant, long-forgotten home. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
858:What I loved in the man was his health, his unity with himself; all people and all things seemed to find their quite peaceable adjustment with him, not a proud domineering one, as after doubtful contest, but a spontaneous-looking peaceable, even humble one. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
859:You may take my purse; but I cannot have my moral Self annihilated. The purse is any Highwayman's who might meet me with a loaded pistol: but the Self is mine and God my Maker's; it is not yours; and I will resist you to the death, and revolt against you ... ~ Thomas Carlyle,
860:The situation that has not its Duty, its Ideal, was never yet occupied by man. Yes here, in this poor, miserable, hampered, despicable Actual, wherein thou even now standest, here or nowhere is thy Ideal: work it out therefrom; and working, believe, live, be free. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
861:Neither had Watt of the Steam engine a heroic origin, any kindred with the princes of this world. The princes of this world were shooting their partridges... While this man with blackened fingers, with grim brow, was searching out, in his workshop, the Fire-secret. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
862:For ours is a most fictile world; and man is the most fingent plastic of creatures. A world not fixable; not fathomable! An unfathomable Somewhat, which is Not me; which we can work with, and live amidst--and model, miraculously in our miraculous Being, and name World. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
863:Let him who gropes painfully in darkness or uncertain light, and prays vehemently that the dawn may ripen into day, lay this precept well to heart: "Do the duty which lies nearest to thee," which thou know to be a duty! Thy second duty will already have become clearer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
864:Obedience is our universal duty and destiny; wherein whoso will not bend must break; too early and too thoroughly we cannot be trained to know that "would," in this world of ours, is a mere zero to "should," and for most part as the smallest of fractions even to "shall. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
865:The choking, sweltering, deadly, and killing rule of no rule; the consecration of cupidity and braying of folly, and dim stupidity and baseness, in most of the affairs of men. Slopshirts attainable three-halfpence cheaper by the ruin of living bodies and immortal souls. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
866:It were a real increase of human happiness, could all young men from the age of nineteen be covered under barrels, or rendered otherwise invisible; and there left to follow their lawful studies and callings, till they emerged, sadder and wiser, at the age of twenty-five. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
867:A thinking man is the worst enemy the Prince of Darkness can have; every time such an one announces himself, I doubt not there runs a shudder through the nether empire; and new emissaries are trained with new tactics, to, if possible, entrap and hoodwink and handcuff him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
868:Happy season of childhood! Kind Nature, that art to all a bountiful mother; that visitest the poor man's hut With auroral radiance; and for thy nursling hast provided a soft swathing of love and infinite hope wherein he waxes and slumbers, danced round by sweetest dreams! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
869:There must be a new world if there is to be any world at all!... These days of universal death must be days of universal new birth, if the ruin is not to be total and final! It is Time to make the dullest man consider; and ask himself, Whence he came? Whither he is bound? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
870:Whatever opinion may be formed of the extent of his dissipation in Dumfries, one fact is unquestionable, that his powers remained unimpaired to the last; it was there he produced his finest lyrics, and they are the finest, as well as the purest, that ever delighted mankind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
871:Thus must the bewildered Wanderer stand, as so many have done, shouting question after question into the Sibyl-cave of Destiny, and receive no Answer but an Echo. It is all a grim howling of wild beasts, or the shrieks of despairing, hate-filled men...
(The Everlasting No) ~ Thomas Carlyle,
872:Let one who wants to move and convince others, first be convinced and moved themselves. If a person speaks with genuine earnestness the thoughts, the emotion and the actual condition of their own heart, others will listen because we all are knit together by the tie of sympathy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
873:The most unhappy of all men is the man who cannot tell what he is going to do, who has got no work cut-out for him in the world, and does not go into it. For work is the grand cure of all the maladies and miseries that ever beset mankind,honest work, which you intend getting done. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
874:The first purpose of clothes... was not warmth or decency, but ornament.... Among wild people, we find tattooing and painting even prior to clothes. The first spiritual want of a barbarous man is decoration; as indeed we still see among the barbarous classes in civilized countries. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
875:Truly a Thinking Man is the worst enemy the Prince of Darkness can have; every time such a one announces himself, I doubt not, there runs a shudder through the Nether Empire; and new Emissaries are trained, with new tactics, to, if possible, entrap him, and hoodwink and handcuff him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
876:The best lesson which we get from the tragedy of Karbala is that Husain and his companions were rigid believers in God. They illustrated that the numerical superiority does not count when it comes to the truth and the falsehood. The victory of Husain, despite his minority, marvels me! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
877:It seems to me a great truth … that human things can not stand on selfishness, mechanical utilities, economics, and law-courts; that if there be not a religious element in the relations of men, such relations are miserable, and doomed to ruin. ~ Thomas Carlyle, letter to Thomas Chalmers (11 October 1841),
878:The civil authority, or that part of it which remained faithful to their trust and true to the ends of the covenant, did, in answer to their consciences, turn out a tyrant, in a way which the Christians in aftertimes will mention with honor, and all tyrants in the world look at with fear. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
879:We were wise indeed, could we discern truly the signs of our own time; and by knowledge of its wants and advantages, wisely adjust our own position in it. Let us, instead of gazing wildly into the obscure distance, look calmly around us, for a little, on the perplexed scene where we stand. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
880:The great law of culture is, Let each become all that he was created capable of being; expand, if possible, to his full growth; resisting all impediments, casting off all foreign, especially all noxious adhesions, and show himself at length in his own shape and stature be these what they may. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
881:What a wretched thing is all fame! A renown of the highest sort endures, say, for two thousand years. And then? Why, then, a fathomless eternity swallows it. Work for eternity; not the meagre rhetorical eternity of the periodical critics, but for the real eternity wherein dwelleth the Divine. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
882:Statistics, one may hope, will improve gradually, and become good for something. Meanwhile, it is to be feared the crabbed satirist was partly right, as things go: "A judicious man," says he, "looks at Statistics, not to get knowledge, but to save himself from having ignorance foisted on him." ~ Thomas Carlyle,
883:To prosper in this world, to gain felicity, victory and improvement, either for a man or a nation, there is but one thing requisite, That the man or nation can discern what the true regulations of the Universe are in regard to him and his pursuit, and can faithfully and steadfastly follow these. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
884:Know thyself': long enough has that poor 'self' of thine tormented thee; thou wilt never get to 'know' it, I believe! Think it not thy business, this knowing of thyself; thou art an unknowable individual: know what thou canst work at; and work at it, like a Hercules! That will be thy better plan. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
885:The situation that has not its duty, its ideal, was never yet occupied by man. Yes, here, in this poor, miserable, hampered, despicable actual, wherein thou even now standest, here or nowhere is thy ideal; work it out therefrom, and, working, believe, live, be free. Fool! the ideal is in thyself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
886:When we can drain the Ocean into mill-ponds, and bottle up the Force of Gravity, to be sold by retail, in gas jars; then may we hope to comprehend the infinitudes of man's soul under formulas of Profit and Loss; and rule over this too, as over a patent engine, by checks, and valves, and balances. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
887:Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness. He has a work, a life-purpose; he has found it, and will follow it! How, as a free-flowing channel, dug and torn by noble force through the sour mudswamp of one's existence, like an ever-deepening river there, it runs and flows ~ Thomas Carlyle,
888:A dandy is a clothes-wearing man--a man whose trade, office, and existence consist in the wearing of clothes. Every faculty of his soul, spirit, person and purse is heroically consecrated to this one object--the wearing of clothes, wisely and well; so that, as others dress to live, he lives to dress. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
889:The stifled hum of midnight, when traffic has lain down to rest, and the chariot wheels of Vanity, still rolling here and there through distant streets, are bearing her to halls roofed in and lighted to the due pitch for her; and only vice and misery, to prowl or to moan like night birds, are abroad. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
890:Strange enough how creatures of the human-kind shut their eyes to plainest facts; and by the mere inertia of Oblivion and Stupidity, live at ease in the midst of Wonders and Terrors. But indeed man is, and was always, a blockhead and dullard; much readier to feel and digest, than to think and consider. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
891:To our less philosophical readers, for example, it is now clear that the so passionate Teufelsdrockh precipitated through "a shivered Universe" in this extraordinary way, has only one of three things which he can next do: Establish himself in Bedlam; begin writing Satanic Poetry; or blow out his brains. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
892:Considering the multitude of mortals that handle the pen in these days, and can mostly spell, and write without glaring violations of grammar, the question naturally arises: How is it, then, that no work proceeds from them, bearing any stamp of authenticity and permanence; of worth for more than one day? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
893:This we take it is the grand characteristic of our age. By our skill in Mechanism, it has come to pass, that in the management ofexternal things we excel all other ages; while in whatever respects the pure moral nature, in true dignity of soul and character, we are perhaps inferior to most civilised ages. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
894:A star is beautiful; it affords pleasure, not from what it is to do, or to give, but simply by being what it is. It befits the heavens; it has congruity with the mighty space in which it dwells. It has repose; no force disturbs its eternal peace. It has freedom; no obstruction lies between it and infinity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
895:From his youth Burns had exhibited ominous symptoms of a radical disorder in his constitution. A palpitation of the heart, and a derangement of the digestive organs, were conspicuous. These were, doubtless, increased by his indulgences, which became more frequent as he drew towards the close of his career. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
896:Carlyle thought little of these Essays. "Wretched lives" is his best word for them when he is bilious and the world is all gloom; but when in another place he confesses that he was seldom happier than when writing them, we may take his condemnation as he did his bile, "with a drop of oil and a grain of salt. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
897:Manhood begins when we have in any way made truce with Necessity; begins even when we have surrendered to Necessity, as the most part only do; but begins joyfully and hopefully only when we have reconciled ourselves to Necessity; and thus, in reality, triumphed over it, and felt that in Necessity we are free. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
898:Superstition! that horrid incubus which dwelt in darkness, shunning the light, with all its racks, and poison chalices, and foul sleeping draughts, is passing away without return. Religion cannot pass away. The burning of a little straw may hide the stars of the sky; but the stars are there and will reappear. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
899:Social Science, is not a 'gay science' but rueful, which finds the secret of this universe in 'supply and demand' and reduces the duty of human governors to that of letting men alone. Not a 'gay science', no, a dreary, desolate, and indeed quite abject and distressing one; what we might call, the dismal science ~ Thomas Carlyle,
900:Cease to brag to me of America, and its model institutions and constitutions. America, too, will have to strain its energies, crack its sinews, and all but break its heart, as the rest of us have had to do, in thousand-fold wrestle with the Pythons, and mud-demons, before it can become a babitation for the gods. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
901:let him who gropes painfully in darkness or uncertain light, and prays vehemently that the dawn may ripen into day, lay this other precept well to heart, which to me was of invaluable service: ‘Do the duty which lies nearest thee,’ which thou knowest to be a Duty! Thy second duty will already have become clearer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
902:Wonderful Force of Public Opinion! We must act and walk in all points as it prescribes; follow the traffic it bids us, realize the sum of money, the degree of influence it expects of us, or we shall be lightly esteemed; certain mouthfuls of articulate wind will be blown at us, and this what mortal courage can front? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
903:No man at bottom means injustice; it is always for some obscure distorted image of a right that he contends: an obscure image diffracted, exaggerated, in the wonderfulest way by natural dimness and selfishness; getting tenfold more diffracted by exasperation of contest, till at length it become all but irrecognis-able. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
904:These Arabs, the man Mahomet, and that one century, - is it not as if a spark had fallen, one spark, on a world of what proves explosive powder, blazes heaven-high from Delhi to Granada! I said, the Great man was always as lightning out of Heaven; the rest of men waited for him like fuel, and then they too would flame. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
905:It is no very good symptom, either of nations or individuals, that they deal much in vaticination. Happy men are full of the present, for its bounty suffices them; and wise men also, for its duties engage them. Our grand business undoubtedly is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what clearly lies at hand. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
906:Heroes have gone out; quacks have come in; the reign of quacks has not ended with the nineteenth century. The sceptre is held with a firmer grasp; the empire has a wider boundary. We are all the slaves of quackery in one shape or another. Indeed, one portion of our being is always playing the successful quack to the other. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
907:Learn to be good readers, which is perhaps a more difficult thing than you imagine. Learn to be discriminative in your reading; to read faithfully, and with your best attention, all kinds of things which you have a real interest in,--a real, not an imaginary,--and which you find to be really fit for what you are engaged in. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
908:Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness. He has a work, a Life-purpose... Get your happiness out of your work or you will never know what real happiness is... Even in the meanest sorts of Labour, the whole soul of a man is composed into a kind of real harmony the instant he sets himself to work! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
909:Cherish what is dearest while you have it near you, and wait not till it is far away. Blind and deaf that we are; oh, think, if thou yet love anybody living, wait not till death sweep down the paltry little dust clouds and dissonances of the moment, and all be made at last so mournfully clear and beautiful, when it is too late. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
910:Does it ever give thee pause that men used to have a soul? Not by hearsay alone, or as a figure of speech, but as a thruth that they knew and acted upon. Verily it was another world then, but yet it is a pity we have lost the tidings of our souls. We shall have to go in search of them again or worse in all ways shall befall us. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
911:A fundamental mistake to call vehemence and rigidity strength! A man is not strong who takes convulsion-fits; though six men cannot hold him then. He that can walk under the heaviest weight without staggering, he is the strong man . . . A man who cannot hold his peace, till the time come for speaking and acting, is no right man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
912:Polemical divinity,” says he to Dr. Moore in 1787, “about this time was putting the country half mad; and I, ambitious of shining in conversation-parties on Sundays, at funerals, etc., used to puzzle Calvinism with so much heat and indiscretion, that I raised a hue-and-cry of heresy against me, which has not ceased to this hour. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
913:Does it ever give thee pause, that men used to have a soul- not by hearsay along, or as a figure of speech; but as a truth that they knew, and acted upon! Verily it was another world then... but yet it is a pity we have lost the tidings of our souls... we shall have to go in search of them again, or worse in all ways shall befall us. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
914:The Universe itself is a Monarchy and Hierarchy; large liberty of "voting" there, all manner of choice, utmost free-will, but with conditions inexorable and immeasurable annexed to every exercise of the same. A most free commonwealth of "voters;" but with Eternal Justice to preside over it, Eternal Justice enforced by Almighty Power! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
915:Philosophy dwells aloft in the Temple of Science, the divinity of its inmost shrine; her dictates descend among men, but she herself descends not : whoso would behold her must climb with long and laborious effort, nay, still linger in the forecourt, till manifold trial have proved him worthy of admission into the interior solemnities. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
916:The illimitable, silent, never-resting thing called Time, rolling, rushing on, swift, silent, like an all-embracing ocean-tide, on which we and all the Universe swim like exhalations, like apparitions which are, and then are not: this is forever very literally a miracle; a thing to strike us dumb—for we have no word to speak about it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
917:Alas! we know that ideals can never be completely embodied in practice. Ideals must ever lie a great way off--and we will thankfully content ourselves with any not intolerable approximation thereto! Let no man, as Schiller says, too querulously "measure by a scale of perfection the meager product of reality" in this poor world of ours. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
918:The weakest living creature, by concentrating his powers on a single object, can accomplish something. The strongest, by dispensing his over many, may fail to accomplish anything. The drop, by continually falling, bores its passage through the hardest rock. The hasty torrent rushes over it with hideous uproar, and leaves no trace behind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
919:So much of truth, only under an ancient obsolete vesture, but the spirit of it still true, do I find in the Paganism of old nations. Nature is still divine, the revelation of the workings of God; the Hero is still worshipable: this, under poor cramped incipient forms, is what all Pagan religions have struggled, as they could, to set forth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
920:Only perhaps in the United States, which alone of countries can do without governing,every man being at least able to live, and move off into the wilderness, let Congress jargon as it will,can such a form of so-called Government continue for any length of time to torment men with the semblance, when the indispensable substance is not there. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
921:Consider in fact, a body of six hundred and fifty-eight miscellaneous persons, set to consult about "business," with twenty-seven millions, mostly fools, assiduously listening to them, and checking and criticising them. Was there ever, since the world began, will there ever be till the world end, any "business" accomplished in these circumstances? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
922:Originality is a thing we constantly clamour for, and constantly quarrel with; as if, observes our author himself, any originality but our own could be expected to content us! In fact all strange thing are apt, without fault of theirs, to estrange us at first view, and unhappily scarcely anything is perfectly plain, but what is also perfectly common. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
923:For the superior morality, of which we hear so much, we too would desire to be thankful: at the same time, it were but blindness to deny that this superior morality is properly rather an inferior criminality, produced not by greater love of Virtue, but by greater perfection of Police; and of that far subtler and stronger Police, called Public Opinion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
924:And there are Ben [Jonson] and William Shakespeare in wit-combat, sure enough; Ben bearing down like a mighty Spanish war-ship, fraught with all learning and artillery; Shakespeare whisking away from him - whisking right through him, athwart the big bulk and timbers of him; like a miraculous Celestial Light-ship, woven all of sheet-lightning and sunbeams! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
925:How were friendship possible? In mutual devotedness to the good and true; otherwise impossible, except as armed neutrality or hollow commercial league. A man, be the heavens ever praised, is sufficient for himself; yet were ten men, united in love, capable of being and of doing what ten thousand singly would fail in. Infinite is the help man can yield to man. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
926:Contented saturnine human figures, a dozen or so of them, sitting around a large long table...Perfect equality is to be the rule; no rising or notice taken when anybody enters or leaves. Let the entering man take his place and pipe, without obligatory remarks; if he cannot smoke...let him at least affect to do so, and not ruffle the established stream of things. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
927:No sooner does a great man depart, and leave his character as public property, than a crowd of little men rushes towards it. There they are gathered together, blinking up to it with such vision as they have, scanning it from afar, hovering round it this way and that, each cunningly endeavoring, by all arts, to catch some reflex of it in the little mirror of himself. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
928:Does it even give thee pause, that men used to have a soul--
not by hearsay alone, or as a figure of speech; but as a truth
that they knew, and acted upon! Verily it was another world
then...but yet it is a pity we have lost the tidings of our
souls...we shall have to go in search of them again, or worse
in all ways shall befall us.

Thomas Carlyle ~ Mary Ann Shaffer,
929:Hero-worship is the deepest root of all; the tap-root, from which in a great degree all the rest were nourished and grown . . . Worship of a Hero is transcendent admiration of a Great Man. I say great men are still admirable; I say there is, at bottom, nothing else admirable! No nobler feeling than this of admiration for one higher than himself dwells in the breast of men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
930:All sorts of Heroes are intrinsically of the same material; that given a great soul, open to the Divine Significance of Life, then there is given a man fit to speak of this, to sing of this, to fight and work for this, in a great, victorious, enduring manner; there is given a Hero, -- the outward shape of whom will depend on the time and the environment he finds himself in. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
931:To me the Universe was all void of Life, of Purpose, of Volition, even of Hostility; it was one huge, dead, immeasurable Steam-engine, rolling on, in its dead indifference, to grind me limb from limb. Oh vast gloomy, solitary Golgotha, and Mill of Death! Why was the living banished thither companionless, conscious? Why, if there is no Devil; nay, unless the Devil is your God? ~ Thomas Carlyle,
932:Skepticism, as I said, is not intellectual only; it is moral also; a chronic atrophy and disease of the whole soul. A man lives by believing something; not by debating and arguing about many things. A sad case for him when all that he can manage to believe is something he can button in his pocket, and with one or the other organ eat and digest! Lower than that he will not get. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
933:Instead of saying that man is the creature of circumstance, it would be nearer the mark to say that man is the architect of circumstance. It is character which builds an existence out of circumstance. From the same materials one man builds palaces, another hovels; one warehouses, another villas; bricks and mortar are mortar and bricks until the architect can make them something else. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
934:I think Scandinavian Paganism, to us here, is more interesting than any other. It is, for one thing, the latest; it continued in these regions of Europe till the eleventh century; 800 years ago the Norwegians were still worshipers of Odin. It is interesting also as the creed of our fathers; the men whose blood still runs in our veins, whom doubtless we still resemble in so many ways. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
935:That great mystery of TIME, were there no other; the illimitable, silent, never-resting thing called Time, rolling, rushing on, swift, silent, like an all-embracing ocean tide, on which we and all the Universe swim like exhalations, like apparitions which are, and then are not: this is forever very literally a miracle; a thing to strike us dumb,-for we have no word to speak about it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
936:Generations are as the days of toilsome mankind; death and birth are the vesper and the matin bells that summon mankind to sleep and to rise refreshed for new advancement. What the father has made, the son can make and enjoy; but has also work of his own appointed him. Thus all things wax and roll onwards: arts, establishments, opinions, nothing is ever completed, but ever completing. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
937:Give us, O give us the man who sings at his work! Be his occupation what it may, he is equal to any of those who follow the same pursuit in silent sullenness. He will do more in the same time . . . he will do it better . . . he will persevere longer. One is scarcely sensible to fatigue while he marches to music. The very stars are said to make harmony as they revolve in their spheres. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
938:How Teufelsdrockh, now at actual hand-grips with Destiny herself, may have comported himself among these Musical and Literary dilettanti of both sexes, like a hungry lion invited to a feast of chickenweed, we can only conjecture. Perhaps in expressive silence, and abstinence: otherwise if the lion, in such case, is to feast at all, it cannot be on the chickenweed, but only on the chickens. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
939:Today

So here hath been dawning
Another blue Day:
Think wilt thou let it
Slip useless away.

Out of Eternity
This new Day is born;
Into Eternity,
At night, will return.

Behold it aforetime
No eye ever did:
So soon it forever
From all eyes is hid.

Here hath been dawning
Another blue Day:
Think wilt thou let it
Slip useless away. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
940:The Great Man's sincerity is of the kind he cannot speak of, is not conscious of: nay, I suppose, he is conscious rather of insincerity; for what man can walk accurately by the law of truth for one day? No, the Great Man does not boast himself sincere, far from that; perhaps does not ask himself if he is so: I would say rather, his sincerity does not depend on himself; he cannot help being sincere! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
941:The man who cannot wonder, who does not habitually wonder (and worship), were he President of innumerable Royal Societies, and carried the whole Mecanique Celeste and Hegel's Philosophy, and the epitome of all Laboratories and Observatories with their results, in his single head, is but a Pair of Spectacles behind which there is no Eye. Let those who have Eyes look through him, then he may be useful. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
942:Scottish philosopher Thomas Carlyle asserted, “A person with a clear purpose will make progress on even the roughest road. A person with no purpose will make no progress on even the smoothest road.” What a great image. Purpose gives you drive. It shows you a destination. It paints a picture of your future. It energizes you. And it makes obstacles and problems seem small in comparison to its importance. ~ John C Maxwell,
943:Men are to be guided only by their self-interests. Good government is a good balancing of these; and, except a keen eye and appetite for self-interest, requires no virtue in any quarter. To both parties it is emphatically a machine: to the discontented, a taxing-machine; to the contented, a machine for securing property. Its duties and its faults are not those of a father, but of an active parish-constable. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
944:Except by name, Jean Paul Friedrich Richter is little known out of Germany. The only thing connected with him, we think, that has reached this country is his saying,-imported by Madame de Staël, and thankfully pocketed by most newspaper critics,-"Providence has given to the French the empire of the land; to the English that of the sea; to the Germans that of-the air!" Richter: German humorist & prose writer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
945:Thomas Carlyle dijo: Un gran hombre muestra su grandeza en la forma en la que trata a alguien más pequeño. El valor que le das a las personas determina si eres un motivador o un manipulador de hombres. La motivación es actuar juntos para un beneficio mutuo. La manipulación es trabajar juntos para mi propio beneficio. Hay una diferencia sustancial. Con el motivador todos ganan. Con el manipulador sólo gana él mismo. ~ Zig Ziglar,
946:We are to remember what an umpire Nature is; what a greatness, composure of depth and tolerance there is in her. You take wheat to cast into the Earth's bosom; your wheat may be mixed with chaff, chopped straw, barn-sweepings, dust and all imaginable rubbish; no matter: you cast it into the kind just Earth; she grows the wheat, - the whole rubbish she silently absorbs, shrouds it in, says nothing of the rubbish. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
947:For the one enemy we have in this Universe is Stupidity, Darkness of Mind; of which darkness, again, there are many sources, every sin a source, and probably self-conceit the chief source. Darkness of mind, in every kind and variety, does to a really tragic extent abound: but of all the kinds of darkness, surely the Pedant darkness, which asserts and believes itself to be light, is the most formidable to mankind! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
948:This London City, with all of its houses, palaces, steam-engines, cathedrals, and huge immeasurable traffic an tumult, what is it but a Thought, but millions of Thoughts made into One-a huge immeasurable Spirit of a Thought, embodied in brick, in iron, smoke, dust, Palaces, Parliaments, Hackney Coaches, Katherine Docks, and the rest of it! Not a brick was made but some man had to think of the making of that brick. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
949:A man with a half volition goes backwards and forwards, and makes no way on the smoothest road; a man with a whole volition advances on the roughest, and will reach his purpose, if there be even a little worthiness in it. The man without a purpose is like a ship without a rudder - a waif, a nothing, a no man. Have a purpose in life and having it, throw such strength of mind and muscle into your work as God has given you. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
950:Man's Unhappiness, as I construe, comes of his Greatness; it is because there is an Infinite in him, with which all his cunning he cannot quite bury under the Finite... Try him with half of a Universe, of an Omnipotence, he sets to quarreling with the proprietor of the other half, and declares himself the most maltreated of men. Always there is a black spot in our sunshine: It is even, as I said, the Shadow of Ourselves. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
951:One pleasing trait of his character must not be overlooked. He superintended the formation of a subscription library in the parish, and took the whole management of it upon himself. These institutions, though common now, were not so short at the period of which we write; and it should never be forgotten that Burns was amongst the first, if not the very first, of their founders in the rural districts of southern Scotland. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
952:They have their belief, these poor Tibet people, that Providence sends down always an Incarnation of Himself into every generation. At bottom some belief in a kind of Pope! At bottom still better, a belief that there is a Greatest Man; that he is discoverable; that, once discovered, we ought to treat him with an obedience which knows no bounds. This is the truth of Grand Lamaism; the "discoverability" is the only error here. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
953:I too acknowledge the all-out omnipotence of early culture and nature; hereby we have either a doddered dwarf-bush, or a high-towering, wide-shadowing tree! either a sick yellow cabbage, or an edible luxuriant green one. Of a truth, it is the duty of all men, especially of all philosophers, to note down with accuracy the characteristic circumstances of their education,--what furthered, what hindered, what in any way modified it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
954:The errors of a wise man are literally more instructive than the truths of a fool. The wise man travels in lofty, far-seeing regions; the fool in low-lying, high-fenced lanes; retracing the footsteps of the former, to discover where he diviated, whole provinces of the universe are laid open to us; in the path of the latter, granting even that he has not deviated at all, little is laid open to us but two wheel-ruts and two hedges. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
955:The memory of that first state of Freedom and paradisiac Unconsciousness has faded away into an ideal poetic dream. We stand here too conscious of many things: with Knowledge, the symptom of Derangement, we must even do our best to restore a little Order. Life is, in few instances, and at rare intervals, the diapason of a heavenly melody; oftenest the fierce jar of disruptions and convulsions, which, do what we will, there is no disregarding. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
956:When I gaze into the stars, they look down upon me with pity from their serene and silent spaces, like eyes glistening with tears over the little lot of man. Thousands of generations, all as noisy as our own, have been swallowed up by time, and there remains no record of them any more. Yet Arcturus and Orion, Sirius and Pleiades, are still shining in their courses, clear and young, as when the shepherd first noted them in the plain of Shinar! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
957:But the whim we have of happiness is somewhat thus. By certain valuations, and averages, of our own striking, we come upon some sort of average terrestrial lot; this we fancy belongs to us by nature, and of indefeasible rights. It is simple payment of our wages, of our deserts; requires neither thanks nor complaint. Foolish soul! What act of legislature was there that thou shouldst be happy? A little while ago thou hadst no right to be at all. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
958:Look around you. Your world-hosts are all in mutiny, in confusion, destitution; on the eve of fiery wreck and madness! They will not march farther for you, on the sixpence a day and supply-demand principle; they will not; nor ought they, nor can they. Ye shall reduce them to order, begin reducing them. to order, to just subordination; noble loyalty in return for noble guidance. Their souls are driven nigh mad; let yours be sane and ever saner. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
959:We have our little theory on all human and divine things. Poetry, the workings of genius itself, which, in all times, with one or another meaning, has been called Inspiration, and held to be mysterious and inscrutable, is no longer without its scientific exposition. The building of the lofty rhyme is like any other masonry or bricklaying: we have theories of its rise, height, decline and fall -- which latter, it would seem, is now near, among all people. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
960:We are to take no counsel with flesh and blood; give ear to no vain cavils, vain sorrows and wishes; to know that we know nothing, that the worst and cruelest to our eyes is not what it seems, that we have to receive whatsoever befalls us as sent from God above, and say, "It is good and wise,--God is great! Though He slay me, yet I trust in Him." Islam means, in its way, denial of self. This is yet the highest wisdom that heaven has revealed to our earth. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
961:...true religion is a way of life; a church is an institution designed to strengthen people in the exercise of that life. The English historian Thomas Carlyle defined a person's religion as the set of values evident in his or her actions, regardless of what the individual would claim to believe when asked. Our behavior is always oriented around a goal, a set of desires and aspirations, even if we are not always fully aware of them--or willing to own them. ~ Terryl L Givens,
962:Thus has the bewildered Wanderer to stand, as so many have done, shouting question after question into the Sibyl-cave of Destiny, and receive no Answer but an Echo. It is all a grim Desert, this once-fair world of his; wherein is heard only the howling of wild beasts, or the shrieks of despairing, hate-filled men; and no Pillar of Cloud by day, and no Pillar of Fire by night, any longer guides the Pilgrim. To such length has the spirit of Inquiry carried him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
963:Poverty, we may say, surrounds a man with ready-made barriers, which if they do mournfully gall and hamper, do at least prescribe for him, and force on him, a sort of course and goal; a safe and beaten, though a circuitous, course. A great part of his guidance is secure against fatal error, is withdrawn from his control. The rich, again, has his whole life to guide, without goal or barrier, save of his own choosing, and, tempted, is too likely to guide it ill. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
964:This is the eternal law of Nature for a man, my beneficent Exeter-Hall friends; this, that he shall be permitted, encouraged, and if need be, compelled to do what work the Maker of him has intended by the making of him for this world! Not that he should eat pumpkin with never such felicity in the West India Islands is, or can be, the blessedness of our Black friend; but that he should do useful work there, according as the gifts have been bestowed on him for that. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
965:Tobacco smoke is the one element in which, by our European manners, men can sit silent together without embarrassment, and where no man is bound to speak one word more than he has actually and veritably got to say. Nay, rather every man is admonished and enjoined by the laws of honor, and even of personal ease, to stop short of that point; and at all events to hold his peace and take to his pipe again the instant he has spoken his meaning, if he chance to have any. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
966:This is the end of Prime Minister, Cardinal Archbishop Lomenie de Brienne. Flimsier mortal was seldom fated to do as weighty a mischief; to have a life as despicable-envied, an exit as frightful. Fired, as the phrase is, with ambition: blown, like a kindled rag, the sport of winds, not this way, not that way, but of all ways, straight towards such a powder-mine,—which he kindled! Let us pity the hapless Lomenie; and forgive him; and, as soon as possible, forget him. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
967:He lingered until the 21st of July, 1796, when he expired. The interest which the death of Burns excited was intense. All differences were forgotten; his genius only was thought of. On the 26th of the same month he was conveyed to the grave, followed by about ten thousand individuals of all ranks, many of whom had come from distant parts of the country to witness the solemnity. He was interred with military honors by the Dumfries volunteers, to which body he had belonged. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
968:In a symbol there is concealment and yet revelation: here therefore, by silence and by speech acting together, comes a double significance. In the symbol proper, what we can call a symbol, there is ever, more or less distinctly and directly, some embodiment and revelation of the Infinite; the Infinite is made to blend itself with the Finite, to stand visible, and as it were, attainable there. By symbols, accordingly, is man guided and commanded, made happy, made wretched. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
969:Fool! The Ideal is in thyself, the impediment too is in thyself: thy Condition is but the stuff thou art to shape that same Ideal out of: what matters whether such stuff be of this sort or that, so the Form thou give it be heroic, be poetic? O thou that pinest in the imprisonment of the Actual, and criest bitterly to the gods for a kingdom wherein to rule and create, know this of a truth: the thing thou seekest is already with thee, ‘here or nowhere,’ couldst thou only see! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
970:All that a university or final highest school. can do for us is still but what the first school began doing--teach us to read. We learn to read in various languages, in various sciences; we learn the alphabet and letters of all manner of books. But the place where we are to get knowledge, even theoretic knowledge, is the books themselves. It depends on what we read, after all manner of professors have done their best for us. The true university of these days is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
971:It is not to taste sweet things; but to do noble and true things, and vindicate himself under God's heaven as a God-made man, that the poorest son of Adam dimly longs. Show him the way of doing that, the dullest day-drudge kindles into a hero. They wrong man greatly who say he is to be seduced by ease. Difficulty, abnegation, martyrdom, death, are the allurements that act on the heart of man. Kindle the inner genial life of him, you have a flame that burns up all lower considerations. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
972:With respect to duels, indeed, I have my own ideas. Few things in this so surprising world strike me with more surprise. Two little visual spectra of men, hovering with insecure enough cohesion in the midst of the unfathomable, and to dissolve therein, at any rate, very soon, make pause at the distance of twelve paces asunder; whirl around, and simultaneously by the cunningest mechanism, explode one another into dissolution; and, offhand, become air, and non-extant--the little spitfires! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
973:If you will believe me, you who are young, yours is the golden season of life. As you have heard it called, so it verily is, the seed-time of life; in which, if you do not sow, or if you sow tares instead of wheat, you cannot expect to reap well afterwards, and you will arrive at little. And in the course of years when you come to look back, if you have not done what you have heard from your advisers,-and among many counsellors there is wisdom,-you will bitterly repent when it is too late. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
974:O thou who art able to write a Book, which once in the two centuries or oftener there is a man gifted to do, envy not him whom they name City-builder, and inexpressibly pity him whom they name Conqueror or City-burner! Thou too art a Conqueror and Victor; but of the true sort, namely over the Devil: thou too hast built what will outlast all marble and metal, and be a wonder-bringing City of the Mind, a Temple and Seminary and Prophetic Mount, whereto all kindreds of the Earth will pilgrim. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
975:Are we not Spirits, that are shaped into a body, into an Appearance; and that fade away again into air and Invisibility? Oh, Heaven, it is mysterious, it is awful to consider that we not only carry a future Ghost within us; but are, in very deed, Ghosts! These Limbs, whence had we them; this stormy Force; this life-blood with its burning Passion? They are dust and shadow; a Shadow-system gathered round our Me; wherein, through some moments or years, the Divine Essence is to be revealed in the Flesh. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
976:Taste, if it mean anything but a paltry connoisseurship, must mean a general susceptibility to truth and nobleness, a sense to discern, and a heart to love and reverence all beauty, order, goodness, wheresoever, or in whatsoever forms and accompaniments they are to be seen. This surely implies, as its chief condition, not any given external rank or situation, but a finely-gifted mind, purified into harmony with itself, into keenness and justness of vision; above all, kindled into love and generous admiration. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
977:Ye are most strong, ye Sons of the icy North, of the far East, far marching from your rugged Eastern Wildernesses, hither-ward from the gray Dawn of Time! Ye are Sons of the Jotun-land; the land of Difficulties Conquered. Difficult? You
must try this thing. Once try it with the understanding that it will and shall have to be done. Try it as ye try the paltrier thing, making of money! I will bet on you once more, against all Jo'tuns, Tailor-gods, Double-barrelled Law-wards, and Denizens of Chaos whatsoever! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
978:In the old Ages, when Universities and Schools were first instituted, this function of the schoolmaster, to teach mere speaking, was the natural one. In those healthy times, guided by silent instincts and the monition of Nature, men had from of old been used to teach themselves what it was essential to learn, by the one sure method of learning anything, practical apprenticeship to it. This was the rule for all classes; as it now is the rule, unluckily, for only one class. ~ Thomas Carlyle, Latter-Day Pamphlets, Stump-Orator 1851,
979:Some comfort it would have been, could I, like a Faust, have fancied myself tempted and tormented of the Devil; for a Hell, as I imagine, without Life, though only Diabolic Life, were more frightful: but in our age of Downpulling and Disbelief, the very Devil has been pulled down, you cannot so much as believe in a Devil. To me the Universe was all void of Life, of Purpose, of Volition, even of Hostility: it was one huge, dead, immeasurable Steam-engine, rolling on, in its dead indifference, to grind me limb from limb. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
980:THE greatest of English dramatists except Shakespeare, the first literary dictator and poet-laureate, a writer of verse, prose, satire, and criticism who most potently of all the men of his time affected the subsequent course of English letters: such was Ben Jonson, and as such his strong personality assumes an interest to us almost unparalleled, at least in his age. Ben Jonson came of the stock that was centuries after to give to the world Thomas Carlyle; for Jonson's grandfather was of Annandale, over the Solway, whence he ~ Ben Jonson,
981:Neither let mistakes and wrong directions - of which every man, in his studies and elsewhere, falls into many - discourage you. There is precious instruction to be got by finding that we are wrong. Let a man try faithfully, manfully to be right, he will grow daily more and more right. It is, at bottom, the condition which all men have to cultivate themselves. Our very walking is an incessant falling - a falling and a catching of ourselves before we come actually to the pavement! - it is emblematic of all things a man does. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
982:How such Ideals do realize themselves; and grow, wondrously, from amid the incongruous ever-fluctuating chaos of the Actual: this is what World-History, if it teach any thing, has to teach us, How they grow; and, after long stormy growth, bloom out mature, supreme; then quickly (for the blossom is brief) fall into decay; sorrowfully dwindle; and crumble down, or rush down, noisily or noiselessly disappearing. The blossom is so brief; as of some centennial Cactus-flower, which after a century of waiting shines out for hours! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
983:Venerable to me is the hard hand; crooked & coarse; wherein notwithstanding lies a cunning virtue indefeasibly royal as the Scepter of this Planet. Hardly entreated Brother! For us was thy way so bent, for us were thy straight limb & fingers so deformed; thou wert our Conscript on whom the lot fell, & fighting our battles wert so marred. For in thee too lay a God-created Form, but it is not unfolded. Encrusted must it stand with the thick adhesions & defacements of labor, & thy body, thy soul, was no to know Freedom. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
984:We were wise indeed, could we discern truly the signs of our own time; and by knowledge of its wants and advantages, wisely adjust our own position in it. Let us, instead of gazing idly into the obscure distance, look calmly around us, for a little, on the perplexed scene where we stand. Perhaps, on a more serious inspection, something of its perplexity will disappear, some of its distinctive characters and deeper tendencies more clearly reveal themselves; whereby our own relations to it, our own true aims and endeavors in it, may also become clearer. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
985:Why multiply instances? It is written, the Heavens and the Earth shall fade away like a Vesture; which indeed they are: the Time-vesture of the Eternal. Whatsoever sensibly exists, whatsoever represents Spirit to Spirit, is properly a Clothing, a suit of Raiment, put on for a season, and to be laid off. Thus in this one pregnant subject of CLOTHES, rightly understood, is included all that men have thought, dreamed, done, and been: the whole External Universe and what it holds is but Clothing; and the essence of all Science lies in the PHILOSOPHY OF CLOTHES. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
986:Multitudes now vied with each other in patronizing the rustic poet. Those who possessed at once true taste and ardent philanthropy were soon united in his praise; those who were disposed to favor any good thing belonging to Scotland, purely because it was Scottish, gladly joined the cry; while those who had hearts and understandings to be charmed without knowing why, when they saw their native customs, manners, and language, made the subjects and the materials of poesy, could not suppress that impulse of feeling which struggled to declare itself in favor of Burns. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
987:But deepest of all illusory Appearances, for hiding Wonder, as for many other ends, are your two grand fundamental world-enveloping Appearances, SPACE and TIME. These, as spun and woven for us from before Birth itself, to clothe our celestial ME for dwelling here, and yet to blind it, lie all-embracing, as the universal canvas, or warp and woof, whereby all minor Illusions, in this Phantasm Existence, weave and paint themselves. In vain, while here on Earth, shall you endeavor to strip them off; you can, at best, but rend them asunder for moments, and look through. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
988:Ever, as before, does Madness remain a mysterious-terrific, altogether infernal boiling-up of the Nether Chaotic Deep, through this fair-painted Vision of Creation, which swims thereon, which we name the Real. Was Luther's Picture of the Devil less a Reality, whether it were formed within the bodily eye, or without it? In every the wisest Soul lies a whole world of internal Madness, an authentic Demon-Empire; out of which, indeed, his world of Wisdom has been creatively built together, and now rests there, as on its dark foundations does a habitable flowery Earth rind. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
989:Not the external and physical alone is now managed by machinery, but the internal and spiritual also.... The same habit regulates not our modes of action alone, but our modes of thought and feeling. Men are grown mechanical in head and heart, as well as in hand. They have lost faith in individual endeavour, and in natural force, of any kind. Not for internal perfection, but for external combinations and arrangements, for institutions, constitutions – for Mechanism of one sort or another, do they hope and struggle. Their whole efforts, attachments, opinions, turn on mechanism, and are of a mechanical character. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
990:one of the finest volumes of poetry that ever appeared in the world issued from the provincial press of Kilmarnock. It is hardly possible to imagine with what eager admiration and delight they were every where received. They possessed in an eminent degree all those qualities which invariably contribute to render any literary work quickly and permanently popular. They were written in a phraseology of which all the powers were universally felt, and which being at once antique, familiar, and now rarely written, was therefore fitted to serve all the dignified and picturesque uses of poetry, without making it unintelligible ~ Thomas Carlyle,
991:For, as I take it, Universal History, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the great Men who have worked here. They were the leaders of men, these great ones; the modellers, patterns, and in a wide sense creators, of whatsoever the general mass of men contrived to do or attain; all things that we see standing accomplished in the world are properly the outer material result, the practical realisation and embodiment, of Thoughts that dwelt in the great Men sent into the world: the soul of the world's history, it may justly be considered, were the history of these.
   ~ Thomas Carlyle, 1966, p. 1,
992:With respect to Duels, indeed, I have my own ideas. Few things, in this so surprising world, strike me with more surprise. Two little visual Spectra of men, hovering with insecure enough cohesion in the midst of the UNFATHOMABLE, and to dissolve therein, at any rate, very soon,—make pause at the distance of twelve paces asunder; whirl round; and, simultaneously by the cunningest mechanism, explode one another into Dissolution; and off-hand become Air, and Non-extant! Deuce on it (verdammt), the little spitfires!—Nay, I think with old Hugo von Trimberg: 'God must needs laugh outright, could such a thing be, to see his wondrous Manikins here below. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
993:About the age of fourteen, he was sent to school every alternate week for the improvement of his writing. In the mean while, he was busily employed upon the operations of the farm; and, at the age of fifteen, was considered as the principal laborer upon it. About a year after this he gained three weeks of respite, which he spent with his old tutor, Murdoch, at Ayr, in revising the English grammar, and in studying the French language, in which he made uncommon progress. Ere his sixteenth year elapsed, he had considerably extended his reading. The vicinity of Mount Oliphant to Ayr afforded him facilities for gratifying what had now become a passion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
994:The unquietest humour possesses all men; ferments, seeks issue, in pamphleteering, caricaturing, projecting, declaiming; vain jangling of thought, word and deed. It is Spiritual Bankruptcy, long tolerated; verging now towards Economical Bankruptcy, and become intolerable. For from the lowest dumb rank, the inevitable misery, as was predicted, has spread upwards. In every man is some obscure feeling that his position, oppressive or else oppressed, is a false one: all men, in one or the other acrid dialect, as assaulters or as defenders, must give vent to the unrest that is in them. Of such stuff national well-being, and the glory of rulers, is not made. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
995:A man's religion is the chief fact with regard to him... By religion I do not mean here the church-creed which he professes, the articles of faith which he will sign... We see men of all kinds of professed creeds attain to almost all degrees of worth or worthlessness under each or any of them... but the thing a man does practically believe (and this is often enough without asserting it even to himself, much less to others); the thing a man does practically lay to heart, concerning his vital relations to this mysterious universe, and his duty and destiny there, that is in all cases the primary thing for him, and creatively determines all the rest. That is his religion. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
996:Nevertheless, has not a deeper meditation taught certain of every climate and age, that the WHERE and WHEN, so mysteriously inseparable from all our thoughts, are but superficial terrestrial adhesions to thought; that the seer may discern them where they mount up out of the celestial EVERYWHERE and where they mount up out of the celestial EVERYWHERE and FOREVER: have not all nations conceived their God as Omnipresent and Eternal; as existing in a universal HERE, an everlasting Now? Think well, thou too wilt find that Space is but a mode of our human Sense, so likewise Time; there is no Space and no Time: WE are—we know not what;--light-sparkles floating in the ether of Deity! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
997:We know it well; the first mad paroxysm past, our brave Gneschen collected his dismembered philosophies, and buttoned himself together; he was meek, silent, or spoke of the weather and the Journals: only by a transient knitting of those shaggy brows, by some deep flash of those eyes, glancing one knew not whether with tear-dew or with fierce fire,—might you have guessed what a Gehenna was within: that a whole Satanic School were spouting, though inaudibly, there. To consume your own choler, as some chimneys consume their own smoke; to keep a whole Satanic School spouting, if it must spout, inaudibly, is a negative yet no slight virtue, nor one of the commonest in these times. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
998:Burns, however, found an inexpressible charm in sitting down beside his wife, at his own fireside; in wandering over his own grounds; in once more putting his hand to the spade and the plough; in farming his enclosures, and managing his cattle. For some months he felt almost all that felicity which fancy had taught him to expect in his new situation. He had been for a time idle; but his muscles were not yet unbraced for rural toil. He now seemed to find a joy in being the husband of the mistress of his affections, and in seeing himself the father of children such as promised to attach him for ever to that modest, humble, and domestic life, in which alone he could hope to be permanently happy. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
999:ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to me to be such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it. “You appear to be astonished,” he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. “Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1000:It is a great shame for anyone to listen to the accusation that Islam is a lie and that Muhammad was a fabricator and a deceiver. We saw that he remained steadfast upon his principles, with firm determination; kind and generous, compassionate, pious, virtuous, with real manhood, hardworking and sincere. Besides all these qualities, he was lenient with others, tolerant, kind, cheerful and praiseworthy and perhaps he would joke and tease his companions. He was just, truthful, smart, pure, magnanimous and present-minded; his face was radiant as if he had lights within him to illuminate the darkest of nights; he was a great man by nature who was not educated in a school nor nurtured by a teacher as he was not in need of any of this. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1001:Close-viewed, their industry and function is that of dressing gracefully and eating sumptuously. As for their debauchery and depravity, it is perhaps unexampled since the era of Tiberius and Commodus. (…) Such are the shepherds of the people: and now how fares it with the flock? With the flock, as is inevitable, it fares ill, and ever worse. They are not tended, they are only regularly shorn. They are sent for, to do statute-labour, to pay statute-taxes; to fatten battle-fields (named 'Bed of honour') with their bodies, in quarrels which are not theirs; their hand and toil is in every possession of man; but for themselves they have little or no possession. Untaught, uncomforted, unfed; to pine dully in thick obscuration, in squalid destitution and obstruction: this is the lot of the millions. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1002:For there was need once more of a Divine Revelation to the torpid frivolous children of men, if they were not to sink altogether into the ape condition. And in that whirlwind of the Universe,—lights obliterated, and the torn wrecks of Earth and Hell hurled aloft into the Empyrean; black whirlwind, which made even apes serious, and drove most of them mad,—there was, to men, a voice audible; voice from the heart of things once more, as if to say: "Lying is not permitted in this Universe. The wages of lying, you behold, are death. Lying means damnation in this Universe; and Beelzebub, never so elaborately decked in crowns and mitres, is NOT God!" This was a revelation truly to be named of the Eternal, in our poor Eighteenth Century; and has greatly altered the complexion of said Century to the Historian ever since. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1003:Democracy, it may be said everywhere, is here:—for sixty years now, ever since the grand or First French Revolution, that fact has been terribly announced to all the world; in message after message, some of them very terrible indeed; and now at last all the world ought really to believe it. That the world does believe it; that even Kings now as good as believe it, and know, or with just terror surmise, that they are but temporary phantasm Play-actors, and that Democracy is the grand, alarming, imminent and indisputable Reality: this, among the scandalous phases we witnessed in the last two years, is a phasis full of hope: a sign that we are advancing closer and closer to the very Problem itself, which it will behoove us to solve or die; that all fighting and campaigning and coalitioning in regard to the existence of the Problem, is hopeless and superfluous. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1004:We would think a man insane who, instead of covering his house with a roof and putting windows in his window frames, goes out in stormy weather, and scolds the wind, the rain, and the clouds. But we all do the same when we scold and blame the evil in other people instead of fighting the evil which exists in us. It is possible to get rid of the evil inside of us, as it is possible to make a roof and windows for our house. This is possible. But it is not possible for us to destroy evil in this world, just as we cannot order the weather to change and the clouds to disappear. If, instead of teaching others, we would educate and improve ourselves, then there would be less evil in this world, and all people would live better lives. Do not be embarrassed by your mistakes. Nothing can teach us better than our understanding of them. This is one of the best ways of self-education. —THOMAS CARLYLE ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1005:What is Democracy; this huge inevitable Product of the Destinies, which is everywhere the portion of our Europe in these latter days? There lies the question for us. Whence comes it, this universal big black Democracy; whither tends it; what is the meaning of it? A meaning it must have, or it would not be here. If we can find the right meaning of it, we may, wisely submitting or wisely resisting and controlling, still hope to live in the midst of it; if we cannot find the right meaning, if we find only the wrong or no meaning in it, to live will not be possible!—The whole social wisdom of the Present Time is summoned, in the name of the Giver of Wisdom, to make clear to itself, and lay deeply to heart with an eye to strenuous valiant practice and effort, what the meaning of this universal revolt of the European Populations, which calls itself Democracy, and decides to continue permanent, may be. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1006:in Dumfries his moral career was downwards. Heron, who had some acquaintance with the matter, says, “His dissipation became still more deeply habitual; he was here more exposed than in the country to be solicited to share the revels of the dissolute and the idle; foolish young men flocked eagerly about him, and from time to time pressed him to drink with them, that they might enjoy his wit. The Caledonia Club, too, and the Dumfries-shire and Galloway Hunt, had occasional meetings in Dumfries after Burns went to reside there: and the poet was of course invited to share their conviviality, and hesitated not to accept the invitation. In the intervals between his different fits of intemperance, he suffered the keenest anguish of remorse, and horribly afflictive foresight. His Jane behaved with a degree of conjugal and maternal tenderness and prudence, which made him feel more bitterly the evil of his misconduct, although they could not reclaim him.” This is a dark picture—perhaps too dark. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1007:Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together; that at length they may emerge, full-formed and majestic, into the daylight of Life, which they are thenceforth to rule. Not William the Silent only, but all the considerable men I have known, and the most undiplomatic and unstrategic of these, forbore to babble of what they were creating and projecting. Nay, in thy own mean perplexities, do thou thyself but hold thy tongue for one day: on the morrow, how much clearer are thy purposes and duties; what wreck and rubbish have those mute workmen within thee swept away, when intrusive noises were shut out! Speech is too often not, as the Frenchman defined it, the art of concealing Thought; but of quite stifling and suspending Thought, so that there is none to conceal. Speech too is great, but not the greatest. As the Swiss Inscription says: Sprecfien ist silbern, Schweigen ist golden (Speech is silvern, Silence is golden); or as I might rather express it: Speech is of Time, Silence is of Eternity. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1008:Faust has spent his youth and manhood,
not as others do, in the sunny crowded paths of profit,
or among the rosy bowers of pleasure, but darkly and alone in the search of Truth; is it fit that Truth
should now hide herself, and his sleepless pilgrimage
towards Knowledge and Vision end in the pale
shadow of Doubt? To his dream of a glorious higher
happiness, all earthly happiness has been sacrificed;
friendship, love, the social rewards of ambition were
cheerfully cast aside, for his eye and his heart were
bent on a region of clear and supreme good ; and now,
in its stead, he finds isolation, silence, and despair.
What solace remains ? Virtue once promised to be
her own reward ; but because she does not pay him in
the current coin of worldly enjoyment, he reckons her
too a delusion; and, like Brutus, reproaches as a
shadow what he once worshipped as a substance.
Whither shall he now tend 1 For his loadstars have
gone out one by one ; and as the darkness fell, the
strong steady wind has changed into a fierce and
aimless tornado. Faust calls himself a monster,
" without object, yet without rest. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1009:This green flowery rock-built earth, the trees, the mountains, rivers, many-sounding seas;—that great deep sea of azure that swims overhead; the winds sweeping through it; the black cloud fashioning itself together, now pouring out fire, now hail and rain; what is it? Ay, what? At bottom we do not yet know; we can never know at all. It is not by our superior insight that we escape the difficulty; it is by our superior levity, our inattention, our want of insight. It is by not thinking that we cease to wonder at it. Hardened round us, encasing wholly every notion we form, is a wrappage of traditions, hearsays, mere words. We call that fire of the black thunder-cloud "electricity," and lecture learnedly about it, and grind the like of it out of glass and silk: but what is it? What made it? Whence comes it? Whither goes it? Science has done much for us; but it is a poor science that would hide from us the great deep sacred infinitude of Nescience, whither we can never penetrate, on which all science swims as a mere superficial film. This world, after all our science and sciences, is still a miracle; wonderful, inscrutable, magical and more, to whosoever will think of it. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1010:More than a century ago Thomas Carlyle described man as a "tool-using animal," as if this were the one trait that elevated him above the rest of brute creation. This overweighting of tools, weapons, physical apparatus, and machines has obscured the actual path of human development. The definition of man as a tool-using animal, even when corrected to read 'tool-making,' would have seemed strange to Plato, who attributed man's emergence from a primitive state as much to Marsyas and Orpheus, the makers of music, as to fire-stealing Prometheus, or to Hephaestus, the blacksmith-god, the sole manual worker in the Olympian pantheon.

Yet the description of man as essentially a tool-making animal has become so firmly embedded that the mere finding of fragments of little primate skulls in the neighborhood of chipped pebbles, as wit the Australopithecines of Africa, was deemed sufficient by their finder, Dr. L.S.B. Leakey, to identify the creature as in the direct line of human ascent, despite marked physical divergences from both apes and later men. Since Leakey's sub-hominids had a brain capacity about a third of Homo sapiens-less indeed than some apes-the ability to chip and use crude stone tools plainly neither called for nor by itself generated man's rich cerebral equipment. ~ Lewis Mumford,
1011:[Tolstoy] denounced [many historians'] lamentable tendency to simplify. The experts stumble onto a battlefield, into a parliament or public square, and demand, "Where is he? Where is he?" "Where is who?" "The hero, of course! The leader, the creator, the great man!" And having found him, they promptly ignore all his peers and troops and advisors. They close their eyes and abstract their Napoleon from the mud and the smoke and the masses on either side, and marvel at how such a figure could possibly have prevailed in so many battles and commanded the destiny of an entire continent. "There was an eye to see in this man," wrote Thomas Carlyle about Napoleon in 1840, "a soul to dare and do. He rose naturally to be the King. All men saw that he was such."
But Tolstoy saw differently. "Kings are the slaves of history," he declared. "The unconscious swarmlike life of mankind uses every moment of a king's life as an instrument for its purposes." Kings and commanders and presidents did not interest Tolstoy. History, his history, looks elsewhere: it is the study of infinitely incremental, imperceptible change from one state of being (peace) to another (war).
The experts claimed that the decisions of exceptional men could explain all of history's great events. For the novelist, this belief was evidence of their failure to grasp the reality of an incremental change brought about by the multitude's infinitely small actions. ~ Daniel Tammet,
1012:Thomas Carlyle, following Plato, pictures a man, a deep pagan thinker, who had grown to maturity in some hidden cave and is brought out suddenly to see the sun rise. “What would his wonder be,” exclaims Carlyle, “his rapt astonishment at the sight we daily witness with indifference! With the free, open sense of a child, yet with the ripe faculty of a man, his whole heart would be kindled by that sight.... This green flowery rock-built earth, the trees, the mountains, rivers, many-sounding seas; that great deep sea of azure that swims overhead; the winds sweeping through it; the black cloud fashioning itself together, now pouring out fire, now hail and rain; what is it? Ay, what? At bottom we do not yet know; we can never know at all.”  How different are we who have grown used to it, who have become jaded with a satiety of wonder. “It is not by our superior insight that we escape the difficulty,” says Carlyle, “it is by our superior levity, our inattention, our want of insight. It is by not thinking that we cease to wonder at it.... We call that fire of the black thundercloud electricity, and lecture learnedly about it, and grind the like of it out of glass and silk: but what is it? Whence comes it? Whither goes it? Science has done much for us; but it is a poor science that would hide from us the great deep sacred infinitude of Nescience, whither we can never penetrate, on which all science swims as a mere superficial film. This world, after all our science and sciences, is still a miracle; wonderful, inscrutable, magical and more, to whosoever will think of it.”  These penetrating, almost prophetic, ~ A W Tozer,
1013:But figure his thought, when Death is now clutching at his own heart-strings, unlooked for, inexorable! Yes, poor Louis, Death has found thee. No palace walls or life-guards, gorgeous tapestries or gilt buckram of stiffest ceremonial could keep him out; but he is here, here at thy very life-breath, and will extinguish it. Thou, whose whole existence hitherto was a chimera and scenic show, at length becomest a reality: sumptuous Versailles bursts asunder, like a dream, into void Immensity; Time is done, and all the scaffolding of Time falls wrecked with hideous clangour round thy soul: the pale Kingdoms yawn open; there must thou enter, naked, all unking'd, and await what is appointed thee! Unhappy man, there as thou turnest, in dull agony, on thy bed of weariness, what a thought is thine! Purgatory and Hell-fire, now all-too possible, in the prospect; in the retrospect,--alas, what thing didst thou do that were not better undone; what mortal didst thou generously help; what sorrow hadst thou mercy on? Do the 'five hundred thousand' ghosts, who sank shamefully on so many battle-fields from Rossbach to Quebec, that thy Harlot might take revenge for an epigram,--crowd round thee in this hour? Thy foul Harem; the curses of mothers, the tears and infamy of daughters? Miserable man! thou 'hast done evil as thou couldst:' thy whole existence seems one hideous abortion and mistake of Nature; the use and meaning of thee not yet known. Wert thou a fabulous Griffin, devouring the works of men; daily dragging virgins to thy cave;--clad also in scales that no spear would pierce: no spear but Death's? A Griffin not fabulous but real! Frightful, O Louis, seem these moments for thee.--We will pry no further into the horrors of a sinner's death-bed. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
1014:His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it. "You appear to be astonished," he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. "Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it." "To forget it!" "You see," he explained, "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skillful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones." "But the Solar System!" I protested. "What the deuce is it to me?" he interrupted impatiently; "you say that we go round the sun. If we went round the moon it would not make a pennyworth of difference to me or to my work. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1015:His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it.
“You appear to be astonished,” he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. “Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it.”
“To forget it!”
“You see,” he explained, “I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.”
“But the Solar System!” I protested.
“What the deuce is it to me?” he interrupted impatiently; “you say that we go round the sun. If we went round the moon it would not make a pennyworth of difference to me or to my work.”
I was on the point of asking him what that work might be, but something in his manner showed me that the question would be an unwelcome one. I pondered over our short conversation, however, and endeavoured to draw my deductions from it. He said that he would acquire no knowledge which did not bear upon his object. Therefore all the knowledge which he possessed was such as would be useful to him. I enumerated in my own mind all the various points upon which he had shown me that he was exceptionally well-informed. I even took a pencil and jotted them down. I could not help smiling at the document when I had completed it. It ran in this way—
SHERLOCK HOLMES—his limits.
1. Knowledge of Literature.—Nil.
2. Philosophy.—Nil.
3. Astronomy.—Nil.
4. Politics.—Feeble.
5. Botany.—Variable. Well up in belladonna,
opium, and poisons generally.
Knows nothing of practical gardening.
6. Geology.—Practical, but limited.
Tells at a glance different soils
from each other. After walks has
shown me splashes upon his trousers,
and told me by their colour and
consistence in what part of London
he had received them.
7. Chemistry.—Profound.
8. Anatomy.—Accurate, but unsystematic.
9. Sensational Literature.—Immense. He appears
to know every detail of every horror
perpetrated in the century.
10. Plays the violin well.
11. Is an expert singlestick player, boxer, and swordsman.
12. Has a good practical knowledge of British law. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,

IN CHAPTERS [2/2]



   1 Psychology
   1 Philosophy
   1 Mythology






1.03 - Supernatural Aid, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  to Thomas Carlyle's idea of the Hero King, as "Ableman" (On Heroes, HeroWorship and The Heroic in History, Lecture VI).
  66

1.09 - SKIRMISHES IN A WAY WITH THE AGE, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  I have been reading the life of Thomas Carlyle, that unconscious and
  involuntary farce, that heroico-moral interpretation of dyspeptic

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun thomas_carlyle

The noun thomas carlyle has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Carlyle, Thomas Carlyle ::: (Scottish historian who wrote about the French Revolution (1795-1881))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun thomas_carlyle

1 sense of thomas carlyle                      

Sense 1
Carlyle, Thomas Carlyle
   INSTANCE OF=> historian, historiographer
     => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
       => intellectual, intellect
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun thomas_carlyle
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun thomas_carlyle

1 sense of thomas carlyle                      

Sense 1
Carlyle, Thomas Carlyle
   INSTANCE OF=> historian, historiographer




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun thomas_carlyle

1 sense of thomas carlyle                      

Sense 1
Carlyle, Thomas Carlyle
  -> historian, historiographer
   => annalist
   => art historian
   => chronicler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arendt, Hannah Arendt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bede, Saint Bede, St. Bede, Baeda, Saint Baeda, St. Baeda, Beda, Saint Beda, St. Beda, the Venerable Bede
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carlyle, Thomas Carlyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durant, Will Durant, William James Durant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eusebius, Eusebius of Caesarea
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, John Hope Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardiner, Samuel Rawson Gardiner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibbon, Edward Gibbon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herodotus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Josephus, Flavius Josephus, Joseph ben Matthias
   HAS INSTANCE=> Knox, John Knox
   HAS INSTANCE=> Livy, Titus Livius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Macaulay, Thomas Babington Macaulay, First Baron Macaulay, Lord Macaulay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mahan, Alfred Thayer Mahan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maitland, Frederic William Maitland
   HAS INSTANCE=> McMaster, John Bach McMaster
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mommsen, Theodor Mommsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Niebuhr, Barthold George Niebuhr
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parkinson, C. Northcote Parkinson, Cyril Northcote Parkinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, James Harvey Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saxo Grammaticus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schlesinger, Arthur Schlesinger, Arthur Meier Schlesinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schlesinger, Arthur Schlesinger, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Arthur Meier Schlesinger Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stubbs, William Stubbs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tacitus, Publius Cornelius Tacitus, Gaius Cornelius Tacitus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thucydides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toynbee, Arnold Toynbee, Arnold Joseph Toynbee
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trevelyan, George Otto Trevelyan, Sir George Otto Trevelyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trevelyan, George Macaulay Trevelyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tuchman, Barbara Tuchman, Barbara Wertheim Tuchman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turner, Frederick Jackson Turner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vinogradoff, Sir Paul Gavrilovich Vinogradoff
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woodward, C. Vann Woodward, Comer Vann Woodward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Xenophon




--- Grep of noun thomas_carlyle
thomas carlyle



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