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branches ::: Lewis Carroll

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object:Lewis Carroll
class:author
subject class:Fiction
subject class:Mathematics
subject class:Poetry
subject class:Education


Wikipedia

--- WIKI
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderl and and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass. He was noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. The poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark are classified in the genre of literary nonsense. He was also a mathematician, photographer, and Anglican deacon. Carroll came from a family of high-church Anglicans, and developed a long relationship with Christ Church, Oxford, where he lived for most of his life as a scholar and teacher. Alice Liddell, daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, Henry Liddell, is widely identified as the original for Alice in Wonderland, though Carroll always denied this. Born in All Saints' Vicarage, Daresbury, Cheshire, in 1832, Carroll is commemorated at All Saints' Church, Daresbury, in its stained glass windows depicting characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In 1982, a memorial stone to Carroll was unveiled in Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey.

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Alice_in_Wonderland
Infinite_Library
Sylvie_and_Bruno

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.02_-_THE_POOL_OF_TEARS
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.05_-_ADVICE_FROM_A_CATERPILLAR
1.06_-_PIG_AND_PEPPER
1.07_-_A_MAD_TEA-PARTY
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.09_-_WHO_STOLE_THE_TARTS?
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.lc_-_Jabberwocky

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.02_-_THE_POOL_OF_TEARS
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.05_-_ADVICE_FROM_A_CATERPILLAR
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.06_-_PIG_AND_PEPPER
1.07_-_A_MAD_TEA-PARTY
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.09_-_WHO_STOLE_THE_TARTS?
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.lc_-_Jabberwocky
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
Avatars_of_the_Tortoise
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
The_Act_of_Creation_text

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Lewis Carroll

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH


TERMS ANYWHERE

as sensible as a dictionary "humour" In Lewis Carroll's {Through the Looking Glass and what Alice found there (http://www.Germany.EU.net/books/carroll/alice.html)}, in the chapter {The Garden of Live Flowers (http://www.Germany.EU.net/books/carroll/alice_21.html

burble [Lewis Carroll's "Jabberwocky"] Like {flame}, but connotes that the source is truly clueless and ineffectual (mere flamers can be competent). A term of deep contempt. "There's some guy on the phone burbling about how he got a DISK FULL error and it's all our comm software's fault." This is mainstream slang in some parts of England. [{Jargon File}]

burble ::: [Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky] Like flame, but connotes that the source is truly clueless and ineffectual (mere flamers can be competent). A term of deep error and it's all our comm software's fault. This is mainstream slang in some parts of England.[Jargon File]

Cf. B. Russell, Scientific Method in Philosophy; Lewis Carroll, "Achilles and the Tortoise," Mind.

README file ::: (convention) An introduction traditionally included in the top-level directory of a Unix source distribution, containing a pointer to more detailed be named README, or READ.ME, or rarely ReadMe or readme.txt or some other variant.In the Macintosh and IBM PC worlds, software is not usually distributed in source form, and the README is more likely to contain user-oriented material like last-minute documentation changes, error workarounds, and restrictions.The README convention probably follows the famous scene in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures In Wonderland in which Alice confronts magic munchies labelled Eat Me and Drink Me.[Jargon File] (1995-02-28)

README file "convention, documentation" A {text file} traditionally included in the top-level {directory} of a {software} distribution, containing pointers to {documentation}, credits, revision history, notes, etc. Originally found in {Unix} source distributions, the convention has spread to many other products. The file may be named README, READ.ME, ReadMe or readme.txt or some other variant. In the {Macintosh} and {IBM PC} worlds, software is not usually distributed in source form, and the README is more likely to contain user-oriented material like last-minute documentation changes, error workarounds, and restrictions. The README convention probably follows the famous scene in Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures In Wonderland" in which Alice confronts magic munchies labeled "Eat Me" and "Drink Me". [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-28)

Request For Comments "standard" (RFC) One of a series, begun in 1969, of numbered {Internet} informational documents and {standards} widely followed by commercial software and {freeware} in the {Internet} and {Unix} communities. Few RFCs are standards but all Internet standards are recorded in RFCs. Perhaps the single most influential RFC has been {RFC 822}, the Internet {electronic mail} format standard. The RFCs are unusual in that they are floated by technical experts acting on their own initiative and reviewed by the Internet at large, rather than formally promulgated through an institution such as {ANSI}. For this reason, they remain known as RFCs even once adopted as standards. The RFC tradition of pragmatic, experience-driven, after-the-fact standard writing done by individuals or small working groups has important advantages over the more formal, committee-driven process typical of {ANSI} or {ISO}. Emblematic of some of these advantages is the existence of a flourishing tradition of "joke" RFCs; usually at least one a year is published, usually on April 1st. Well-known joke RFCs have included 527 ("ARPAWOCKY", R. Merryman, UCSD; 22 June 1973), 748 ("Telnet Randomly-Lose Option", Mark R. Crispin; 1 April 1978), and 1149 ("A Standard for the Transmission of IP Datagrams on Avian Carriers", D. Waitzman, BBN STC; 1 April 1990). The first was a Lewis Carroll pastiche; the second a parody of the {TCP/IP} documentation style, and the third a deadpan skewering of standards-document legalese, describing protocols for transmitting Internet data packets by carrier pigeon. The RFCs are most remarkable for how well they work - they manage to have neither the ambiguities that are usually rife in informal specifications, nor the committee-perpetrated {misfeatures} that often haunt formal standards, and they define a network that has grown to truly worldwide proportions. {rfc.net (http://rfc.net/)}. {W3 (http://w3.org/hypertext/DataSources/Archives/RFC_sites.html)}. {JANET UK FTP (ftp://nic.ja.net/pub/newsfiles/JIPS/rfc)}. {Imperial College, UK FTP (ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/rfc/)}. {Nexor UK (http://nexor.com/public/rfc/index/rfc.html)}. {Ohio State U (http://cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/top.html)}. See also {For Your Information}, {STD}. (1997-11-10)

snark ::: [Lewis Carroll, via the Michigan Terminal System] 1. A system failure. When a user's process bombed, the operator would get the message Help, Help, Snark in MTS!2. More generally, any kind of unexplained or threatening event on a computer (especially if it might be a boojum). Often used to refer to an event or a log file entry that might indicate an attempted security violation. See snivitz.3. UUCP name of snark.thyrsus.com, home site of the Hacker Jargon File versions 2.*.*.[Jargon File]

snark [Lewis Carroll, via the Michigan Terminal System] 1. A system failure. When a user's process bombed, the operator would get the message "Help, Help, Snark in MTS!" 2. More generally, any kind of unexplained or threatening event on a computer (especially if it might be a boojum). Often used to refer to an event or a log file entry that might indicate an attempted security violation. See {snivitz}. 3. UUCP name of snark.thyrsus.com, home site of the Hacker {Jargon File} versions 2.*.*. [{Jargon File}]



QUOTES [11 / 11 - 1459 / 1459]


KEYS (10k)

   11 Lewis Carroll

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1391 Lewis Carroll
   3 Vladimir Nabokov
   3 Phil Knight
   2 Timothy Ferriss
   2 Steve Martin
   2 Siddhartha Mukherjee
   2 Paolo Bacigalupi
   2 Martin Gardner
   2 Holly Madison
   2 F Scott Fitzgerald
   2 Anonymous

1:The simple joy of being." ~ Lewis Carroll,
2:I hope you don't suppose those are real tears?" Tweedledum said. ~ Lewis Carroll,
3:I can't go back to yesterday because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
4:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
5:Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland,
6:You evidently do not suffer from "quotation-hunger" as I do! I get all the dictionaries of quotations I can meet with, as I always want to know where a quotation comes from. ~ Lewis Carroll,
7:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn't. And contrariwise, what it is, it wouldn't be. And what it wouldn't be it would. You see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
8:It's a great huge game of chess that's being played--all over the world--if this is the world at all, you know. Oh, what fun it is! How I wish I was one of them! I wouldn't mind being a Pawn, if only I might join--though of course I should like to be a Queen, best. ~ Lewis Carroll,
9:Well, it's no use your talking about waking him when you're only one of the things in his dream. You know very well you're not real...."
"If I wasn't real," Alice said, "I shouldn't be able to cry."
"I hope you don't suppose those are real tears?" Tweedledum said. ~ Lewis Carroll,
10:If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps. ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno, [T6],
11:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.
The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.
The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.
It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.
As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.

And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.

It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!
This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.
My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?

A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.
Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.

Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.
If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.
First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!
Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"
I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.
Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.
These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."
Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.
If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'
The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passage

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
Versatur urna serius ocius
Sors exitura et nos in aeternum
Exilium impositura cymbae.

Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?
And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'
We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?
And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.
I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!

"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,
'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'
Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,
Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vain
Upon the axis of its pain,
Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,
Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."

Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.
But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!

'Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:We're all mad here. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
2:It's always tea-time. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
3:Off with their heads! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
4:She's stark raving mad! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
5:Curiouser and curiouser. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
6:Burning with curiosity... ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
7:Life, what is it but a dream? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
8:With a sort of mental squint. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
9:Why, what a temper you are in! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
10:Is Life itself a dream, I wonder? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
11:Consider anything, only don’t cry! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
12:Do you suppose she's a wildflower? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
13:Sentence first, verdict afterwards. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
14:Why is a raven like a writing desk? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
15:And how do you know that you're mad? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
16:For the snark was a boojum, you see. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
17:I am fond of children - except boys. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
18:One can't believe impossible things. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
19:Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
20:We haven't any and you're too young. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
21:What I tell you three times is true. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
22:The hurrier I go, the behinder I get. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
23:People who don't think shouldn't talk. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
24:Keep your temper, said the Caterpillar. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
25:You can't be that good; you work for me. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
26:You couldn't have it if you DID want it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
27:It's a large as life and twice as natural ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
28:Everybody has won, and all must have prizes. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
29:Everything is funny, if you can laugh at it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
30:Whatever is worth doing is worth doing well. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
31:If you’ll believe in me, I’ll believe in you. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
32:... those serpents! There's no pleasing them! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
33:You would have to be half-mad to dream me up. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
34:All that matters is what we do for each other. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
35:No good fish goes anywhere without a porpoise. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
36:You won't make yourself a bit realer by crying. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
37:She who saves a single soul, saves the universe. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
38:Un-dish-cover the fish, or dishcover the riddle. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
39:I don't believe there's an atom of meaning in it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
40:Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
41:Ill try the whole cause, and condemn you to death. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
42:No Ghost of any common sense begins a conversation ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
43:The vast unfathomable sea Is but a Notion-unto me. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
44:Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
45:A thick stick in one's hand makes people respectful. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
46:In a wonderland they lie, dreaming as the days go by ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
47:You shouldn't make jokes if it makes you so unhappy. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
48:Courtesy is a small act but it packs a mighty wallop. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
49:If you don't know where you're going any road will do ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
50:It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
51:Oh, 'tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
52:I don't see how he can ever finish, if he doesn't begin. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
53:Curtsey while you're thinking what to say. It saves time. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
54:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
55:It would be so nice if something made sense for a change. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
56:Without a plan, it doesn't matter which way you're going. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
57:It was for bringing the cook tulip-roots instead of onions. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
58:Of all things, I do like a Conspiracy! It's so interesting! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
59:Do let's pretend that I'm a hungry hyena, and you're a bone! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
60:I don't think... " then you shouldn't talk, said the Hatter. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
61:I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
62:There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
63:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
64:Child of the pure, unclouded brow and dreaming eyes of wonder. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
65:Which way you ought to go depends on where you want to get to. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
66:His answer trickled through my head like water through a sieve. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
67:It's jam every other day: to-day isn't any other day, you know. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
68:Some children have the most disagreeable way of getting grown-up ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
69:The proper definition of a man is an animal that writes letters. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
70:Thy loving smile will surely hail The love-gift of a fairy tale. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
71:You used to be much more... "muchier." You've lost your muchness. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
72:The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday - but never jam today. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
73:Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
74:Yes, that's it! Said the Hatter with a sigh, it's always tea time. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
75:I cannot even pretend to feel as much interest in boys as in girls. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
76:It takes all the running you can do just to keep in the same place. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
77:Take care of the sense and the sounds will take care of themselves. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
78:We are but older children, dear, Who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
79:Photography is my one recreation and I think it should be done well. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
80:What a strange world we live in... Said Alice to the Queen of hearts ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
81:Alice: This is impossible. The Mad Hatter: Only if you believe it is. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
82:And if he left off dreaming about you, where do you suppose you'd be? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
83:Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end; then stop. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
84:I can't go back to yesterday - because I was a different person then. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
85:No, no! The adventures first, explanations take such a dreadful time. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
86:Rule Forty-two. All persons more than a mile high to leave the court. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
87:Better say nothing at all. Language is worth a thousand pounds a word! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
88:The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing her flamingo. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
89:Little Alice fell d o w n the hOle, bumped her head and bruised her soul ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
90:Alice: "How long is forever?" White Rabbit: "Sometimes, just one second." ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
91:Can you do Division? Divide a loaf by a knife - what's the answer to that? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
92:In autumn, when the leaves are brown, Take pen and ink, and write it down. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
93:It often runs in families," she remarked: "just as a love for pastry does. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
94:Sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
95:I'm doubtful about the temper of your flamingo. Shall I try the experiment? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
96:I never thought of that before! It's my opinion that you never think at all. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
97:I said you LOOKED like an egg, Sir. And some eggs are very pretty, you know. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
98:You're thinking about something, my dear, and that makes you forget to talk. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
99:Always speak the truth, think before you speak, and write it down afterwards. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
100:Read the directions and directly you will be directed in the right direction. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
101:I have seen so many extraordinary things, nothing seems extraordinary any more ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
102:That's the reason they're called lessons, because they lesson from day to day. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
103:If you do not know where you want to go, it doesn't matter which path you take. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
104:But, I nearly forgot, you must close your eyes otherwise you won't see anything. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
105:I'm not strange, weird, off, nor crazy, my reality is just different from yours. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
106:You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret... All the best people are! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
107:He was part of my dream, of course - but then I was part of his dream, too. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
108:My view of life is, that it's next to impossible to convince anybody of anything. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
109:A minute goes by so fearfully quick. You might as well try to stop a Bandersnatch! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
110:And my heart is like nothing so much as a bowl Brimming over with quivering curds! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
111:My beloved friend - one of the most unique and charming personalities of our time. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
112:She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it). ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
113:Yet what are all such gaieties to me whose thoughts are full of indices and surds? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
114:Every story has a moral you just need to be clever enough to find it - the Dutchess ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
115:In some ways, you know, people that don't exist, are much nicer than people that do. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
116:Magnitudes are algebraically represented by letter, men by men of letters, and so on. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
117:Still she haunts me, phantomwise, Alice moving under skies Never seen by waking eyes. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
118:Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas - only I don't exactly know what they are! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
119:Which form of proverb do you prefer Better late than never, or Better never than late? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
120:Why is a raven like a writing desk? - Mad Hatter I haven't the slightest idea. - Alice ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
121:Why is it that people with the most narrow of minds seem to have the widest of mouths? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
122:Tis a secret: none knows how it comes, how it goes: But the name of the secret is Love! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
123:Well that was the silliest tea party I ever went to! I am never going back there again! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
124:By which I get my wealth&
125:have i gone mad? im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
126:Why, you might just as well say that, I see what I eat, is the same as, I eat what I see. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
127:Where should I go?" -Alice. "That depends on where you want to end up." - The Cheshire Cat. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
128:Who sail on stormy seas; And that's the way I get my bread - A trifle, if you please. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
129:&
130:But, said Alice, the the world has absolutely no sens, who's stopping us from inventing one? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
131:Charles Lutwidge Dodgson's life in space-time colored his liberated life of the imagination. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
132:I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir,' said Alice, &
133:So young a child ought to know which way she's going, even if she doesn't know her own name! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
134:&
135:If everybody minded their own business... the world would go round a deal faster than it does. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
136:One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
137:I beg your pardon?' Alice said with a puzzled air. &
138:She's in that state of mind that she wants to deny SOMETHING only she doesn't know what to deny! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
139:Well, when one's lost, I suppose it's good advice to stay where you are until someone finds you. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
140:&
141:Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
142:The Good and Great must ever shun That reckless and abandoned one Who stoops to perpetrate a pun. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
143:One of the hardest things in the world is to convey a meaning accurately from one mind to another. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
144:How puzzling all these changes are! I'm never sure what I'm going to be, from one minute to another. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
145:Would you be a poet Before you've been to school? Ah, well! I hardly thought you So absolute a fool. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
146:What does it matter where my body happens to be?' he said. &
147:If you drink much from a bottle marked &
148:Is all our Life, then but a dream Seen faintly in the golden gleam Athwart Time's dark resistless stream? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
149:I can explain all the poems that were ever invented - and a good many that haven't been invented just yet. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
150:I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
151:If you limit your actions in life to things that nobody can possibly find fault with, you will not do much! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
152:I once delivered a simple ball, which I was told, had it gone far enough, would have been considered a wide ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
153:But I was thinking of a way To feed oneself on batter, And so go on from day to day Getting a little fatter. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
154:If it had grown up, it would have made a dreadfully ugly child; but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
155:I have proved by actual trial that a letter, that takes an hour to write, takes only about 3 minutes to read! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
156:In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
157:I think I should understand that better, if I had it written down: but I can't quite follow it as you say it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
158:It's too late to correct it: when you've once said a thing, that fixes it, and you must take the consequences. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
159:Abstract qualities begin With capitals alway: The True, the Good, the Beautiful- Those are the things that pay! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
160:No discussion between two persons can be of any use, until each knows clearly what it is that the other asserts. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
161:Twinkle, twinkle little bat How I wonder what you're at! Up above the world you fly, Like a tea-tray in the sky. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
162:Contrariwise, if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
163:‚ÄéYou're not the same as you were before," he said. You were much more... muchier... you've lost your muchness. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
164:I'm very brave generally,' he went on in a low voice: &
165:The Mad Hatter: "Would you like some wine?" Alice: "Yes... " The Mad Hatter: "We haven't any and you're too young. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
166:Speak roughly to your little boy and beat him when he sneezes! he only does it to annoy, because he knows it teases! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
167:&
168:The further off from England the nearer is to France- Then turn not pale, beloved snail, but come and join the dance. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
169:When I used to read fairy-tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
170:Where do you come from? And where are you going?  Look up, speak nicely, and don't twiddle your fingers all the time. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
171:Do not, oh do not indulge such a wild idea that a newspaper might err! If so what have we to trust in this age of sham? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
172:In proceeding to the dining-room, the gentleman gives one arm to the lady he escorts&
173:It is the privilege of true genius, And especially genius who opens up a new path, To make great mistakes with impunity ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
174:You could not see a cloud, because No cloud was in the sky: No birds were flying overhead - There were no birds to fly. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
175:Speak in French when you can't think of the English for a thing. Turn out your toes as you walk. And remember who you are! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
176:One thing was certain, that the white kitten had had nothing to do with it&
177:You have to run as fast as you can just to stay where you are. If you want to get anywhere, you'll have to run much faster. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
178:It is a very inconvenient habit of kittens (Alice had once made the remark) that whatever you say to them, they always purr. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
179:And, has thou slain the Jabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! He chortled in his joy. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
180:Beautiful soup! Who cares for fish, game or any other dish? Who would not give all else for two pennyworth of beautiful soup? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
181:Speak English!' said the Eaglet. &
182:One of the deepest motives (as you are aware) in the human beast (so deep that many have failed to detect it) is Alliteration. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
183:Still, as Christmas-tide comes round, They remember it again - Echo still the joyful sound "Peace on earth, good-will to men!" ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
184:Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
185:I don't like the look of it at all, said the King: however, it may kiss my hand, if it likes. I'd rather not, the Cat remarked. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
186:They've a temper, some of them - particularly verbs, they're the proudest - adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
187:I should like the whole race of nurses to be abolished: children should be with their mother as much as possible, in my opinion. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
188:It is always allowable to ask for artichoke jelly with your boiled venison; however there are houses where this is not supplied. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
189:Words mean more than we mean to express when we use them: so a whole book ought to mean a great deal more than the writer meant. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
190:Death is always sad, I suppose, to us who look forward to it: I expect it will seem very different when we can look back upon it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
191:One! two! and through and through The vorpal blade went snickersnack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
192:The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
193:There are three hundred and sixty-four days when you might get un-birthday presents, and only one for birthday presents, you know. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
194:Beware the Jabberwock, my son The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
195:The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, All on a summer day:  The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts,  And took them quite away! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
196:&
197:I have often seen a cat without a grin - but a grin without a cat - remember the cat kept appearing and disappearing slowly bit by bit. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
198:That which chiefly causes the failure of a dinner-party, is the running short&
199:&
200:I'd give all the wealth that years have piled, the slow result of life's decay, To be once more a little child for one bright summer day. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
201:she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off. The Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
202:First, I hate all theological controversy: it is wearing to the temper, and is I believe (at all events when viva voce) worse than useless. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
203:when she thought it over afterwards it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
204:Here is a golden Rule... . Write legibly. The average temper of the human race would be perceptibly sweetened, if everybody obeyedthis Rule! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
205:Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall Humpty Dumpty had a great fall All the king's horses and all the king's men Couldn't put Humpty together again ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
206:But it's no use now," thought poor Alice, "to pretend to be two people! Why, there's ahrdly enough of me left to make one respectable person! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
207:She tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
208:Well! I've often seen a cat without a grin,' thought Alice &
209:It takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
210:&
211:All too soon will Childhood gay Realise Life's sober sadness. Let's be merry while we may, Innocent and happy Fay! Elves were made for gladness! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
212:I wish I dared dispense with all costume. Naked children are so perfectly pure and lovely; but Mrs. Grundy would be furious - it would never do. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
213:And as to being in a fright, Allow me to remark That Ghosts have just as good a right  In every way, to fear the light,  As Men to fear the dark. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
214:For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
215:Either it brings tears to their eyes, or else -" "Or else what?" said Alice, for the Knight had made a sudden pause. "Or else it doesn't, you know. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
216:If he smiled much more, the ends of his mouth might meet behind, and then I don't know what would happen to his head! I'm afraid it would come off! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
217:Where one is hopelessly undecided as to what to say, there (as Confucius would have said, if they had given him the opportunity) silence is golden. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
218:But oh, beamish nephew, beware of the day, If your Snark be a Boojum! for then You will softly and suddenly vanish away, And never be met with again! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
219:I said it in Hebrew—I said it in Dutch— I said it in German and Greek; But I wholly forgot (and it vexes me much) That English is what you speak! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
220:I wish I could manage to be glad! Only I never can remember the rule.  You must be very happy, living in this wood, and being glad whenever you like! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
221:There comes a pause, for human strength will not endure to dance without cessation; and everyone must reach the point at length of absolute prostration. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
222:I'm getting rather hoarse, I fear, After so much reciting: So, if you don't object, my dear, We'll try a glass of bitter beer - I think it looks inviting. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
223:So she was considering in her own mind... whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up & picking the daisies. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
224:There's no use in comparing one's feelings between one day and the next; you must allow a reasonable interval, for the direction of change to show itself. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
225:PLAIN SUPERFICIALITY is the character of a speech, in which any two points being taken, the speaker is found to lie wholly with regard to those two points. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
226:Well, "slithy" means "lithe and slimy." "Lithe" is the same as "active."  You see it's like a portmanteau - there are two meanings packed up into one word. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
227:&
228:&
229:When you have made a thorough and reasonably long effort, to understand a thing, and still feel puzzled by it, stop, you will only hurt yourself by going on. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
230:I confess I do not admire naked boys. They always seem to me to need clothes, whereas one hardly sees why the lovely forms of girls should ever be covered up. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
231:So she sat on with closed eyes, and half believed herself in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them again, and all would change to dull reality. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
232:&
233:And thus they give the time, that Nature meant for peaceful sleep and meditative snores, to ceaseless din and mindless merriment and waste of shoes and floors. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
234:&
235:You know," he (Tweedledee) added very gravely, "it's one of the most serious things that can possibly happen to one in a battle&
236:The recent extraordinary discovery in Photography, as applied in the operations of the mind, has reduced the art of novel-writing to the merest mechanical labour. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
237:I have had prayers answered - most strangely so sometimes - but I think our Heavenly Father's loving-kindness has been even more evident in what He has refused me. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
238:Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
239:There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger! Some say to survive it: You need to be as mad as a hatter. Which luckily I am. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
240:Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
241:Alice: I simply must get through! Doorknob: Sorry, you're much too big. Simply impassible. Alice: You mean impossible? Doorknob: No, impassible. Nothing's impossible. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
242:I wish I hadn't cried so much! said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out. I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears ! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
243:You may charge me with murder&
244:Epithets, like pepper, Give zest to what you write; And if you strew them sparely, They whet the appetite: But if you lay them on too thick, You spoil the matter quite! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
245:If you want to inspire confidence, give plenty of statistics. It does not matter that they should be accurate, or even intelligible, as long as there is enough of them. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
246:When you are describing, A shape, or sound, or tint; Don't state the matter plainly, But put it in a hint; And learn to look at all things, With a sort of mental squint. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
247:I could tell you my adventures‚Äîbeginning from this morning, said Alice a little timidly; but it’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
248:This was charming, no doubt; but they shortly found out That the Captain they trusted so well Had only one notion for crossing the ocean, And that was to tingle his bell. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
249:A loaf of bread, the Walrus said, Is what we chiefly need: Pepper and vinegar besides Are very good indeed&
250:Reeling and Writhing of course, to begin with,' the Mock Turtle replied, &
251:Take my friends and my home - as an outcast I'll roam: Take the money I have in the bank: It is just what I wish, but deprive me of fish, And my life would indeed be blank. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
252:But then, shall I never get any older than I am now? That'll be a comfort, one way - never to be an old woman - but then - always to have lessons to learn! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
253:You evidently do not suffer from "quotation-hunger" as I do! I get all the dictionaries of quotations I can meet with, as I always want to know where a quotation comes from. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
254:In a Wonderland they lie, Dreaming as the days go by, Dreaming as the summers die: Ever drifting down the stream- Lingering in the golden gleam- Life, what is it but a dream? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
255:You are old Father William,' the young man said, &
256:The Red Queen shook her head. "You may call it &
257:&
258:For first you write a sentence, And then you chop it small; Then mix the bits and sort them out Just as they chance to fall: The order of the phrases makes no difference at all. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
259:If you set to work to believe everything, you will tire out the believing-muscles of your mind, and then you'll be so weak you won't be able to believe the simplest true things. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
260:Anon, to sudden silence won, In fancy they pursue The dream-child moving through the land Of wonders wild and new, In friendly chat with bird or beast - And half believe it true. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
261:Oysters,' said the Carpenter, You've had a pleasant run! Shall we be trotting home again?' But answer came there none - And this was scarcely odd, because They'd eaten every one. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
262:All in the golden afternoon Full leisurely we glide; For both our oars, with little skill, By little arms are plied, While little hands make vain pretence Our wanderings to guide. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
263:Be who you are, said the Duchess to Alice, or, if you would like it put more simply, never try to be what you might have been or could have been other than what you should have been. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
264:There are certain things&
265:Can you row?" the Sheep asked, handing her a pair of knitting-needles as she spoke. "Yes, a little&
266:The sun was shining on the sea, Shining with all his might: He did his very best to make The billows smooth and bright&
267:Come, hearken then, ere voice of dread, with bitter tiding laden, shall summon to unwelcome bed a melancholy maiden! We are but older children, dear, who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
268:&
269:The Cheshire Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. It looked good-natured, she thought: still it had very long claws and a great many teeth, so she felt it ought to be treated with respect. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
270:And if you take one from three hundred and sixty-five what remains?" "Three hundred and sixty-four, of course." Humpty Dumpty looked doubtful, "I'd rather see that done on paper," he said. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
271:There's nothing a well-regulated child hates so much as regularity. I believe a really healthy boy would thoroughly enjoy Greek Grammar&
272:When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark, And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark: But, when the tide rises and sharks are around, His voice has a timid and tremulous sound. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
273:&
274:If only I could manage, without annoyance to my family, to get imprisoned for 10 years, "without hard labour," and with the use of books and writing materials, it would be simply delightful! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
275:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?" "That depends a good deal on where you want to get to." "I don't much care where –" "Then it doesn't matter which way you go. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
276:Come back!" the Caterpillar called after her. "I've something important to say." This sounded promising, certainly. Alice turned and came back again. "Keep your temper," said the Caterpillar. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
277:I believe this thought, of the possibility of death - if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
278:Once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
279:I'll try if I know all the things I used to know. Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is - oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
280:I don't want to take up literature in a money-making spirit, or be very anxious about making large profits, but selling it at a loss is another thing altogether, and an amusement I cannot well afford. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
281:A tale begun in other days, When summer suns were glowing - A simple chime, that served to time The rhythm of your rowing - Whose echoes live in memory yet, Though envious years would say &
282:Do you know, I always thought unicorns were fabulous monsters, too? I never saw one alive before!" Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn, "if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
283:The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday-but never jam today It must come sometime to jam today, Alice objected No it can't said the Queen It's jame every other day. Today isn't any other day, you know ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
284:If there's no meaning in it," said the King, "that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any. And yet I don't know," he went on [... ]; "I seem to see some meaning in them, after all. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
285:There are days when it seems to me that in literature the most convincing depiction of the world in which we live is to be found in the phantasmagorical kingdom through which Lewis Carroll took Alice on a tour. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
286:As a general rule, do not kick the shins of the opposite gentleman under the table, if personally unaquainted with him; your pleasantry is liable to be misunderstood&
287:And ever, as the story drained The wells of fancy dry, And faintly strove that weary one To put the subject by, "The rest next time&
288:In fact, now I come to think of it, do we decide questions, at all? We decide answers, no doubt: but surely the questions decide us? It is the dog, you know, that wags the tail&
289:What do you suppose is the use of a child without any meaning? Even a joke should have some meaning&
290:I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says "Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
291:Of course it is,’ said the Duchess, who seemed ready to agree to everything that Alice said; there’s a large mustard-mine near here. And the moral of that is‚Äì The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
292:To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said &
293:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn't. And contrariwise, what it is, it wouldn't be. And what it wouldn't be it would. You see? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
294:If I was not assured by the best authority on earth that the world is to be destroyed by fire, I should conclude that the day of destruction is at hand, but brought on by means of an agent very opposite to that of heat. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
295:Mad Hatter: Why is a raven like a writing-desk? Have you guessed the riddle yet? the Hatter said, turning to Alice again. No, I give it up, Alice replied: What’s the answer? I haven’t the slightest idea, said the Hatter ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
296:&
297:Mad Hatter: Would you like a little more tea? Alice: Well, I haven't had any yet, so I can't very well take more. March Hare: Ah, you mean you can't very well take less. Mad Hatter: Yes. You can always take more than nothing. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
298:Alice came to a fork in the road. &
299:It’s a miserable story! said Bruno. It begins miserably, and it ends miserablier. I think I shall cry. Sylvie, please lend me your handkerchief. I haven’t got it with me, Sylvie whispered. Then I won’t cry, said Bruno manfully. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
300:&
301:&
302:&
303:How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail, And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale! How cheerfully he seems to grin, How neatly he spreads his claws, And welcomes little fishes in, With gently smiling jaws! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
304:Must a name mean something?" Alice asked doubtfully. Of course it must," Humpty Dumpty said with a short laugh; "my name means the shape I am - and a good handsome shape it is, too. With a name like yours, you might be any shape, almost. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
305:May we not then sometimes define insanity as an inability to distinguish which is the waking and which the sleeping life? We often dream without the least suspicion of unreality: &
306:Will you walk a little faster? said a whiting to a snail, "There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail! See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance: They are waiting on the shingle&
307:As life draws nearer to its end, I feel more and more clearly that it will not matter in the least, at the last day, what form of religion a man has professed-nay, that many who have never even heard of Christ, will in that day find themselves saved by His blood. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
308:I wonder if I've been changed in the night. Let me think. Was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is &
309:While the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it. The danger is too great of thus learning to look at solemn things in a spirit of mockery, and to seek in them opportunities for exercising wit. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
310:Who ARE You?" This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, I&
311:To me it seems that to give happiness is a far nobler goal that to attain it: and that what we exist for is much more a matter of relations to others than a matter of individual progress: much more a matter of helping others to heaven than of getting there ourselves. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
312:He said he would come in,' the White Queen went on, `because he was looking for a hippopotamus. Now, as it happened, there wasn't such a thing in the house, that morning.' Is there generally?' Alice asked in an astonished tone. Well, only on Thursdays,' said the Queen. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
313:Be what you would seem to be - or, if you'd like it put more simply - never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
314:&
315:It's a great huge game of chess that's being played&
316:Alice had begun with &
317:And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, &
318:Forbid the day when vivisection shall be practised in every college and school, and when the man of science, looking forth over a world which will then own no other sway than his, shall exult in the thought that he has made of this fair earth, if not a heaven, at least a hell for animals. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
319:I'm very much afraid I didn't mean anything but nonsense. Still, you know, words mean more than we mean to express when we use them; so a whole book ought to mean a great deal more than the writer means. So, whatever good meanings are in the book, I'm glad to accept as the meaning of the book. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
320:Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, and what is the use of a book, thought Alice, without pictures or conversation? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
321:I try to believe in as many as six impossible things before breakfast. Count them, Alice. One, there are drinks that make you shrink. Two, there are foods that make you grow. Three, animals can talk. Four, cats can disappear. Five, there is a place called Underland. Six, I can slay the Jabberwocky. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
322:When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, it means just what I choose it to mean ‚Äî neither more nor less.’ ‘The question is,’ said Alice, whether you can make words mean so many different things.’ ‘The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, which is to be master ‚Äî that’s all. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
323:Who can tell whether the parallelogram, which in our ignorance we have defined and drawn, and the whole of whose properties we profess to know, may not be all the while panting for exterior angles, sympathetic with the interior, or sullenly repining at the fact that it cannot be inscribed in a circle? ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
324:When all has been considered, it seems to me to be the irresistible intuition that infinite punishment for finite sin would be unjust, and therefore wrong. We feel that even weak and erring Man would shrink from such an act. And we cannot conceive of God as acting on a lower standard of right and wrong. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
325:You're thinking about something, my dear, and that makes you forget to talk. I can't tell you just now what the moral of that is, but I shall remember it in a bit." "Perhaps it hasn't one," Alice ventured to remark. "Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
326:I dare say you never even spoke to Time!" "Perhaps not," Alice cautiously replied; "but I know I have to beat time when I listen to music." "Ah! That accounts for it," said the Hatter. "He won't stand a beating. Now, if only you kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you like with the clock. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
327:Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on. "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least&
328:When I come upon anything-in Logic or in any other hard subject-that entirely puzzles me, I find it a capital plan to talk it over, aloud, even when I am all alone. One can explain things so clearly to one's self! And then, you know, one is so patient with one's self: one never gets irritated at one's own stupidity! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
329:And how many hours a day did you do lessons?' said Alice, in a hurry to change the subject. Ten hours the first day,' said the Mock Turtle: &
330:&
331:Alice laughed. &
332:She felt a little nervous about this; &
333:If doubtful whether to end with "yours faithfully," or "yours truly," or "yours most truly," &c. (there are at least a dozen varieties, before you reach "yours affectionately"), refer to your correspondent's last letter, and make your winding-up at least as friendly as his: in fact, even if a shade more friendly, it will do no harm! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
334:She [Alice] went on "And how do you know that you're mad?" "To begin with," said the Cat, "a dog's not mad. You grant that?" "I suppose so," said Alice. "Well, then," the Cat went on, "you see, a dog growls when it's angry, and wags it's tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad." ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
335:It is a very inconvenient habit of kittens (Alice had once made the remark) that, whatever you say to them, they always purr: "If they would only purr for &
336:Alice thought to herself, &
337:What a funny watch!’ she remarked. It tells the day of the month, and doesn’t tell what o’clock it is!’ Why should it?’ muttered the Hatter. Does YOUR watch tell you what year it is?’ Of course not,’ Alice replied very readily: but that’s because it stays the same year for such a long time together.’ Which is just the case with MINE,’ said the Hatter. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
338:I mean, what is an un-birthday present?" A present given when it isn't your birthday, of course." Alice considered a little. "I like birthday presents best," she said at last. You don't know what you're talking about!" cried Humpty Dumpty. "How many days are there in a year?" Three hundred and sixty-five," said Alice. And how many birthdays have you?" One. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
339:My hand moves because certain forces&
340:Fury said to a mousethat he met in the houselet us both go to law; I will prosecute youlet there be no denial; come, we must have a trialfor really, this morning, I've nothing to dosuch a trial, dear sir, said the mouse to the curwithout jury or judge would be wasting our breathI'll be judge, I'll be jurysaid cunning old furyI'll try the whole cause and condemn youto death ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
341:Fading, with the Night, the memory of a dead love, and the withered leaves of a blighted hope, and the sickly repinings and moody regrets that numb the best energies of the soul: and rising, broadening, rolling upward like a living flood, the manly resolve, and the dauntless will, and the heavenward gaze of faith-the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
342:Five o'clock tea" is a phrase our "rude forefathers," even of the last generation, would scarcely have understood, so completelyis it a thing of to-day; and yet, so rapid is the March of the Mind, it has already risen into a national institution, and rivals, in its universal application to all ranks and ages, and as a specific for "all the ills that flesh is heir to," the glorious Magna Charta. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
343:I maintain that any writer of a book is fully authorised in attaching any meaning he likes to a word or phrase he intends to use. If I find an author saying, at the beginning of his book, "Let it be understood that by the word &
344:Always speak the truth - think before you speak - and write it down afterwards.' &
345:It'll be no use their putting their heads down and saying "Come up again, dear!" I shall only look up and say "Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else"&
346:Who did you pass on the road?" the King went on, holding out his hand to the Messenger for some more hay. "Nobody," said the Messenger. "Quite right," said the King; "this young lady saw him too. So of course Nobody walks slower than you." "I do my best," the Messenger said in a sullen tone. "I'm sure nobody walks much faster than I do!" "He can't do that," said the King, "or else he'd have been here first. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
347:&
348:Whenever the horse stopped (which it did very often), he fell off in front; and, whenever it went on again (which it generally did rather suddenly), he fell off behind. Otherwise he kept on pretty well, except that he had a habit of now and then falling off sideways; and, as he generally did this on the side on which Alice was walking, she soon found that it was the best plan not to walk quite close to the horse. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
349:&
350:The master was an old Turtle&
351:I believe this thought, of the possibility of death - if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
352:&
353:Twenty thousand thieves landed at Hastings. These founders of the House of Lords were greedy and ferocious dragoons, sons of greedy and ferocious pirates... Such, however, is the illusion of antiquity and wealth, that decent and dignified men now existing, boast their descent from these filthy thieves, who showed a far juster conviction of their own merits, by assuming for their types the swine, goat, jackal, leopard, wolf, and snake, which they severally resembled. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
354:Cheshire Cat: If I were looking for a white rabbit, I'd ask the Mad Hatter. Alice: The Mad Hatter? Oh, no no no... Cheshire Cat: Or, you could ask the March Hare, in that direction. Alice: Oh, thank you. I think I'll see him... Cheshire Cat: Of course, he's mad, too. Alice: But I don't want to go among mad people. Cheshire Cat: Oh, you can't help that. Most everyone's mad here. [laughs maniacally; starts to disappear] Cheshire Cat: You may have noticed that I'm not all there myself. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
355:Do you hear the snow against the windowpanes, Kitty? How nice and soft it sounds! Just as if some one was kissing the window all over outside. I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says, &
356:Crawling at your feet,' said the Gnat (Alice drew her feet back in some alarm), `you may observe a Bread-and-Butterfly. Its wings are thin slices of Bread-and-butter, its body is a crust, and its head is a lump of sugar.' And what does IT live on?' Weak tea with cream in it.' A new difficulty came into Alice's head. `Supposing it couldn't find any?' she suggested. Then it would die, of course.' But that must happen very often,' Alice remarked thoughtfully. It always happens,' said the Gnat. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
357:I do not know if Alice in Wonderland was an original story-I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it-but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen story-books have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be &
358:When I’m a Duchess, she said to herself (not in a very hopeful tone though), I won’t have any pepper in my kitchen at all. Soup does very well without. Maybe it’s always pepper that makes people hot-tempered, she went on, very much pleased at having found out a new kind of rule, and vinegar that makes them sour‚Äîand camomile that makes them bitter‚Äîand‚Äîand barley-sugar and such things that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people knew that; then they wouldn’t be so stingy about it, you know‚Äî ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
359:When, as a child, I first opened my eyes on a Sunday-morning, a feeling of dismal anicipation, which began at least on the Friday,culminated. I knew what was before me, and my wish, if not my word, was "Would God it were evening!" It was no day of rest, but a day of texts, of catechisms (Watts'), of tracts about converted swearers, godly charwomen, and edifying deaths of sinners saved... . There was but one rosy spot, in the distance, all that day: and that was "bed-time," which never could come too early! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
360:This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot. At any rate I'll never go THERE again!' said Alice as she picked her way through the wood. "It's the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life! ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
361:&
362:Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman; and how she would keep, through all her riper years, the simple and loving heart of her childhood: and how she would gather about her other little children, and make their eyes bright and eager with many a strange tale, perhaps even with the dream of Wonderland of long ago: and how she would feel with all their simple sorrows, and find a pleasure in all their simple joys, remembering her own child-life, and the happy summer days. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
363:Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die. But, once realise what the true object is in life ¬ó that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, &

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:waistcoat-pocket, ~ Lewis Carroll,
2:ORANGE MARMALADE', ~ Lewis Carroll,
3:stuff and nonsense ~ Lewis Carroll,
4:we're all mad here ~ Lewis Carroll,
5:Wonderland, though ~ Lewis Carroll,
6:Alice was beginning ~ Lewis Carroll,
7:howling alternately ~ Lewis Carroll,
8:We are all mad here ~ Lewis Carroll,
9:We're add mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
10:We're all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
11:We’re all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
12:(Dinah was the cat.) ~ Lewis Carroll,
13:Down the Rabbit-Hole ~ Lewis Carroll,
14:Who Stole the Tarts? ~ Lewis Carroll,
15:deep well. Either the ~ Lewis Carroll,
16:It's always tea-time. ~ Lewis Carroll,
17:Off with their heads! ~ Lewis Carroll,
18:burning with curiosity ~ Lewis Carroll,
19:LEWIS CARROLL’S CIPHER ~ Martin Gardner,
20:She's stark raving mad! ~ Lewis Carroll,
21:we’re all mad here. I’m ~ Lewis Carroll,
22:Curiouser and curiouser! ~ Lewis Carroll,
23:Curiouser and curiouser. ~ Lewis Carroll,
24:Honey Citrus Fruit Kabab ~ Lewis Carroll,
25:the Multiplication Table ~ Lewis Carroll,
26:Who sail on stormy seas; ~ Lewis Carroll,
27:except a tiny golden key, ~ Lewis Carroll,
28:The vast unfathomable sea ~ Lewis Carroll,
29:By which I get my wealth-- ~ Lewis Carroll,
30:You've lost your muchness. ~ Lewis Carroll,
31:But I was thinking of a way ~ Lewis Carroll,
32:Ganz recht1, (wie immer2)', ~ Lewis Carroll,
33:It isn’t respectable to beg ~ Lewis Carroll,
34:And as to being in a fright, ~ Lewis Carroll,
35:unimportant--important--' as ~ Lewis Carroll,
36:Alice! A childish story take, ~ Lewis Carroll,
37:bottle that reads, "Drink me. ~ Lewis Carroll,
38:It's all in your head, Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll,
39:Life, what is it but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll,
40:With a sort of mental squint. ~ Lewis Carroll,
41:A very merry unbirthday to you ~ Lewis Carroll,
42:I wish I hadn't cried so much! ~ Lewis Carroll,
43:Why, what a temper you are in! ~ Lewis Carroll,
44:she swallowed one of the cakes, ~ Lewis Carroll,
45:before seen a rabbit with either ~ Lewis Carroll,
46:shedding gallons of tears, until ~ Lewis Carroll,
47:Birds of a feather flock together ~ Lewis Carroll,
48:Child of the pure unclouded brow ~ Lewis Carroll,
49:Is Life itself a dream, I wonder? ~ Lewis Carroll,
50:The Good and Great must ever shun ~ Lewis Carroll,
51:Consider anything, only don’t cry! ~ Lewis Carroll,
52:Do you suppose she's a wildflower? ~ Lewis Carroll,
53:I'm getting rather hoarse, I fear, ~ Lewis Carroll,
54:Is all our life then, but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll,
55:Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late! ~ Lewis Carroll,
56:THE MILLENNIUM FULCRUM EDITION 3.0 ~ Lewis Carroll,
57:The time has come,the Walrus said, ~ Lewis Carroll,
58:Who are YOU? said the Caterpillar. ~ Lewis Carroll,
59:Why is a raven like a writing desk ~ Lewis Carroll,
60:Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? ~ Lewis Carroll,
61:Sentence first, verdict afterwards. ~ Lewis Carroll,
62:Why is a raven like a writing desk? ~ Lewis Carroll,
63:Why is a raven like a writing-desk? ~ Lewis Carroll,
64:You know very well you're not real. ~ Lewis Carroll,
65:And how do you know that you're mad? ~ Lewis Carroll,
66:By-the-bye, what became of the baby? ~ Lewis Carroll,
67:For the snark was a boojum, you see. ~ Lewis Carroll,
68:I am fond of children - except boys. ~ Lewis Carroll,
69:One can't believe impossible things. ~ Lewis Carroll,
70:Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup! ~ Lewis Carroll,
71:Soup of the evening, beautiful soup! ~ Lewis Carroll,
72:We haven't any and you're too young. ~ Lewis Carroll,
73:What I tell you three times is true. ~ Lewis Carroll,
74:What's the French for fiddle-de-dee? ~ Lewis Carroll,
75:In autumn, when the leaves are brown, ~ Lewis Carroll,
76:It is better to be feared than loved. ~ Lewis Carroll,
77:Man is an animal that writes letters. ~ Lewis Carroll,
78:People who don't think shouldn't talk ~ Lewis Carroll,
79:The hurrier I go, the behinder I get. ~ Lewis Carroll,
80:You can always take more than nothing ~ Lewis Carroll,
81:And if he left off dreaming about you, ~ Lewis Carroll,
82:Are you Lewis Carroll?" Redd asked him. ~ Frank Beddor,
83:explanations take such a dreadful time ~ Lewis Carroll,
84:People who don't think shouldn't talk. ~ Lewis Carroll,
85:Perhaps it doesn't understand English, ~ Lewis Carroll,
86:We're all mad here. Im mad. You're mad ~ Lewis Carroll,
87:Alice gave a little scream of laughter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
88:at any rate, there's no harm in trying. ~ Lewis Carroll,
89:I must be shutting up like a telescope. ~ Lewis Carroll,
90:Keep your temper, said the Caterpillar. ~ Lewis Carroll,
91:Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after ~ Lewis Carroll,
92:How strange it is to be anything at all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
93:we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad. ~ Lewis Carroll,
94:You can't be that good; you work for me. ~ Lewis Carroll,
95:You couldn't have it if you DID want it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
96:You'd have to be half mad to dream me up ~ Lewis Carroll,
97:I am real!" said Alice, and began to cry. ~ Lewis Carroll,
98:It's a large as life and twice as natural ~ Lewis Carroll,
99:  Just then she heard something splashing ~ Lewis Carroll,
100:But oh, beamish nephew, beware of the day, ~ Lewis Carroll,
101:Go on till you come to the end; then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
102:...It's more like a corkscrew than a path! ~ Lewis Carroll,
103:noticed, had powdered hair that curled all ~ Lewis Carroll,
104:The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, ~ Lewis Carroll,
105:was I the same when I got up this morning? ~ Lewis Carroll,
106:It began with the tea,' the Hatter replied. ~ Lewis Carroll,
107:daresay you haven't had much practice,' said ~ Lewis Carroll,
108:Everybody has won, and all must have prizes. ~ Lewis Carroll,
109:Everything is funny, if you can laugh at it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
110:Is it mad to pray for better hallucinations? ~ Lewis Carroll,
111:...those serpents! There's no pleasing them! ~ Lewis Carroll,
112:Whatever is worth doing is worth doing well. ~ Lewis Carroll,
113:If you’ll believe in me, I’ll believe in you. ~ Lewis Carroll,
114:I think I could, if I only know how to begin. ~ Lewis Carroll,
115:Più ci cavo io per me, meno ci cavi tu per te ~ Lewis Carroll,
116:Plus bas, encore plus bas, toujours plus bas. ~ Lewis Carroll,
117:You would have to be half-mad to dream me up. ~ Lewis Carroll,
118:All that matters is what we do for each other. ~ Lewis Carroll,
119:And my heart is like nothing so much as a bowl ~ Lewis Carroll,
120:I am as late as the rabbit in Lewis Carroll. ~ Sebastian Barry,
121:Las mejores personas estan completamente locas ~ Lewis Carroll,
122:No good fish goes anywhere without a porpoise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
123:only a mouse that had slipped in like herself. ~ Lewis Carroll,
124:Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after such a ~ Lewis Carroll,
125:creatures,' (she was obliged to say 'creatures, ~ Lewis Carroll,
126:If I had but the time and you had but the brain ~ Lewis Carroll,
127:You're enough to try the patience of an oyster! ~ Lewis Carroll,
128:You won't make yourself a bit realer by crying. ~ Lewis Carroll,
129:I don’t like belonging to another person’s dream ~ Lewis Carroll,
130:It's done by everyone minding their own business ~ Lewis Carroll,
131:said the Gryphon, half to itself, half to Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll,
132:She who saves a single soul, saves the universe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
133:There are certain things--as, a spider, a ghost, ~ Lewis Carroll,
134:Un-dish-cover the fish, or dishcover the riddle. ~ Lewis Carroll,
135:Why is a raven like a writing desk? - Mad Hatter ~ Lewis Carroll,
136:Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it ~ Lewis Carroll,
137:How long is forever?
Sometimes just one second ~ Lewis Carroll,
138:I don't believe there's an atom of meaning in it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
139:This is impossible,
Only if you believe it is. ~ Lewis Carroll,
140:You may charge me with murder--or want of sense-- ~ Lewis Carroll,
141:Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
142:Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
143:Ill try the whole cause, and condemn you to death. ~ Lewis Carroll,
144:No Ghost of any common sense begins a conversation ~ Lewis Carroll,
145:No wise fish would go anywhere without a porpoise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
146:'I beg your pardon?' Alice said with a puzzled air. ~ Lewis Carroll,
147:tis love, 'tis love, that makes the world go round! ~ Lewis Carroll,
148:Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle. ~ Lewis Carroll,
149:A thick stick in one's hand makes people respectful. ~ Lewis Carroll,
150:get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, ~ Lewis Carroll,
151:In a wonderland they lie, dreaming as the days go by ~ Lewis Carroll,
152:It's a poor sort of memory that only works backward. ~ Lewis Carroll,
153:You shouldn't make jokes if it makes you so unhappy. ~ Lewis Carroll,
154:Courtesy is a small act but it packs a mighty wallop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
155:If you don't know where you're going any road will do ~ Lewis Carroll,
156:It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards. ~ Lewis Carroll,
157:Sentence first; verdict afterwards." -Queen of Hearts ~ Lewis Carroll,
158:The further off from England the nearer is to France- ~ Lewis Carroll,
159:The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours ~ Lewis Carroll,
160:Todo tiene una moraleja, solo falta saber encontrarla ~ Lewis Carroll,
161:I'm not crazy, my reality is just different than yours ~ Lewis Carroll,
162:The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours. ~ Lewis Carroll,
163:A dream is not reality but who's to say which is which? ~ Lewis Carroll,
164:dreams are not reality, but who's to say which is which ~ Lewis Carroll,
165:Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it.’ And ~ Lewis Carroll,
166:I'm not crazy. My reality is just different than yours. ~ Lewis Carroll,
167:Oh, 'tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round. ~ Lewis Carroll,
168:She’ll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets! ~ Lewis Carroll,
169:she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to ~ Lewis Carroll,
170:Well that's it: if you don't think, you shouldn't talk! ~ Lewis Carroll,
171:I don't see how he can ever finish, if he doesn't begin. ~ Lewis Carroll,
172:It's all her fancy: she never executes nobody, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
173:Oh, ’tis love, ’tis love, that makes the world go round! ~ Lewis Carroll,
174:Sino sabes a dónde vas, cualquier camino te llevará allí ~ Lewis Carroll,
175:sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing ~ Lewis Carroll,
176:Can a Thing exist without any Attributes belonging to it? ~ Lewis Carroll,
177:Curtsey while you're thinking what to say. It saves time. ~ Lewis Carroll,
178:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. ~ Lewis Carroll,
179:I'm very much afraid I didn't mean anything but nonsense. ~ Lewis Carroll,
180:It would be so nice if something made sense for a change. ~ Lewis Carroll,
181:up above the world you fly, like a tea tray in the sky... ~ Lewis Carroll,
182:Without a plan, it doesn't matter which way you're going. ~ Lewis Carroll,
183:You would have to be half mad to dream me up.” -Lewis Carroll ~ E K Blair,
184:—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to? ~ Lewis Carroll,
185:considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the ~ Lewis Carroll,
186:either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, ~ Lewis Carroll,
187:Imagination is the only weapon in the war against reality. ~ Lewis Carroll,
188:It's the stupidest tea party I ever was at in all my life! ~ Lewis Carroll,
189:Oh, there's no use talking to him. He's perfectly idiotic! ~ Lewis Carroll,
190:Twinkle, twinkle, little bat! How I wonder what you’re at! ~ Lewis Carroll,
191:I don't think..." then you shouldn't talk, said the Hatter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
192:It was for bringing the cook tulip-roots instead of onions. ~ Lewis Carroll,
193:Me doy buenos consejos a mí misma , pero rara vez los sigo. ~ Lewis Carroll,
194:Of all things, I do like a Conspiracy! It's so interesting! ~ Lewis Carroll,
195:You don't know much,' said the Duchess; 'and that's a fact. ~ Lewis Carroll,
196:You don’t know much,’ said the Duchess; ‘and that’s a fact. ~ Lewis Carroll,
197:at first, the two creatures got so close to her, one on each ~ Lewis Carroll,
198:Do let's pretend that I'm a hungry hyena, and you're a bone! ~ Lewis Carroll,
199:I don’t want to be anybody’s prisoner. I want to be a Queen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
200:I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
201:Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat; "we're all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
202:Oh, you can't help that,' said the cat. 'We're all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
203:Rabbit-Hole Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting ~ Lewis Carroll,
204:Soo--oop of the e--e--evening,
Beautiful, beautiful Soup! ~ Lewis Carroll,
205:There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! ~ Lewis Carroll,
206:You don't know much,' said the Dutchess; 'and that's a fact. ~ Lewis Carroll,
207:going into the garden at once; but, alas for poor Alice! when ~ Lewis Carroll,
208:It's ridiculous to leave all the conversation to the pudding! ~ Lewis Carroll,
209:not possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through ~ Lewis Carroll,
210:Oh! Siempre llegarás a alguna parte, si caminas lo suficiente ~ Lewis Carroll,
211:there was a real one, blazing away as brightly as the one she ~ Lewis Carroll,
212:What is the use of a book, without pictures or conversations? ~ Lewis Carroll,
213:Who cares for you? You're nothing but a pack of cards! ~ Lewis Carroll,
214:Why,' said the Dodo, 'the best way to explain it is to do it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
215:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here? ~ Lewis Carroll,
216:Child of the pure, unclouded brow and dreaming eyes of wonder. ~ Lewis Carroll,
217:Si no sabes hacia donde te dirijes, cualquier lugar te llevará ~ Lewis Carroll,
218:Which way you ought to go depends on where you want to get to. ~ Lewis Carroll,
219:His answer trickled through my head like water through a sieve. ~ Lewis Carroll,
220:It's jam every other day: to-day isn't any other day, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
221:It’s jam every other day: to-day isn’t any other day, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
222:Look after the senses and the sounds will look after themselves ~ Lewis Carroll,
223:Well, I never heard it before, but it sounds uncommon nonsense. ~ Lewis Carroll,
224:Es un tipo de memoria muy pobre la que solo funciona hacia atrás ~ Lewis Carroll,
225:If you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. Is that a bargain? ~ Lewis Carroll,
226:I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they'll ~ Lewis Carroll,
227:Some children have the most disagreeable way of getting grown-up ~ Lewis Carroll,
228:The proper definition of a man is an animal that writes letters. ~ Lewis Carroll,
229:Thy loving smile will surely hail The love-gift of a fairy tale. ~ Lewis Carroll,
230:Which way you ought to go depends on where you want to get to... ~ Lewis Carroll,
231:You used to be much more..."muchier." You've lost your muchness. ~ Lewis Carroll,
232:Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, ~ Lewis Carroll,
233:If you don't know where you are going any road can take you there ~ Lewis Carroll,
234:Por lo general, son caras ante las que pasamos sin darnos cuenta. ~ Lewis Carroll,
235:You're thinking about something, and it makes you forget to talk. ~ Lewis Carroll,
236:If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there ~ Lewis Carroll,
237:now I'm opening out like the largest telescope that ever was! Good ~ Lewis Carroll,
238:The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday - but never jam today. ~ Lewis Carroll,
239:Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance? ~ Lewis Carroll,
240:Yes, that's it! Said the Hatter with a sigh, it's always tea time. ~ Lewis Carroll,
241:Alice:How long is forever? White Rabbit:Sometimes, just one second. ~ Lewis Carroll,
242:I cannot even pretend to feel as much interest in boys as in girls. ~ Lewis Carroll,
243:If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there. ~ Lewis Carroll,
244:It takes all the running you can do just to keep in the same place. ~ Lewis Carroll,
245:Take care of the sense and the sounds will take care of themselves. ~ Lewis Carroll,
246:Thy loving smile will surely hail
The love-gift of a fairy tale. ~ Lewis Carroll,
247:We are but older children, dear, Who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ Lewis Carroll,
248:Welcome to Wonderland! Here you will meet some of literature's most ~ Lewis Carroll,
249:What a strange world we live in...Said Alice to the Queen of hearts ~ Lewis Carroll,
250:Alice tried another question. "What sort of people live about here?" ~ Lewis Carroll,
251:How can one possibly pay attention to a book with no pictures in it? ~ Lewis Carroll,
252:I can't go back to yesterday--because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
253:I’m afraid I can’t explain myself. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
254:It is not real work unless you would rather be doing something else. ~ Lewis Carroll,
255:No puedo volver al pasado porque entonces era una persona diferente. ~ Lewis Carroll,
256:Photography is my one recreation and I think it should be done well. ~ Lewis Carroll,
257:Alice: This is impossible. The Mad Hatter: Only if you believe it is. ~ Lewis Carroll,
258:And if he left off dreaming about you, where do you suppose you'd be? ~ Lewis Carroll,
259:Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end; then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
260:I can't go back to yesterday - because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
261:It's all his fancy, that: he hasn't got no sorrow, you know. Come on! ~ Lewis Carroll,
262:No, no! The adventures first, explanations take such a dreadful time. ~ Lewis Carroll,
263:Rule Forty-two. All persons more than a mile high to leave the court. ~ Lewis Carroll,
264:Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make ONE respectable person! ~ Lewis Carroll,
265:with the words 'DRINK ME' beautifully printed on it in large letters. ~ Lewis Carroll,
266:Better say nothing at all. Language is worth a thousand pounds a word! ~ Lewis Carroll,
267:We are but older children, dear,
Who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ Lewis Carroll,
268:How fond she is of finding morals in things!’ Alice thought to herself. ~ Lewis Carroll,
269:I knew who I was this morning, but I've changed a few times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
270:I knew who I was this morning, but I’ve changed a few times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
271:So she brushed away her tears, and went on, as cheerfully as she could. ~ Lewis Carroll,
272:The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing her flamingo. ~ Lewis Carroll,
273:Alice: This is impossible.
The Mad Hatter: Only if you believe it is. ~ Lewis Carroll,
274:,"I am not crazy, my reality is just different from yours."-Cheshire Cat ~ Lewis Carroll,
275:In winter, when the fields are white, I sing this song for your delight— ~ Lewis Carroll,
276:Little Alice fell d o w n the hOle, bumped her head and bruised her soul ~ Lewis Carroll,
277:No tiene utilidad volver ayer , porque entonces era una persona distinta ~ Lewis Carroll,
278:Then it doesn't matter which way you walk...-so long as I get somewhere. ~ Lewis Carroll,
279:Alice: "How long is forever?" White Rabbit: "Sometimes, just one second." ~ Lewis Carroll,
280:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
281:Sabía quién era esta mañana, pero he cambiado varias veces desde entonces ~ Lewis Carroll,
282:Sometimes I've believed more than six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
283:We CAN talk,' said the Tiger-lily: 'when there's anybody worth talking to ~ Lewis Carroll,
284:you're entirly bonkers but I'll tell you a secret all the best people are ~ Lewis Carroll,
285:Am I addressing the White Queen?' 'Well, yes, if you call that a-dressing, ~ Lewis Carroll,
286:Can you do Division? Divide a loaf by a knife - what's the answer to that? ~ Lewis Carroll,
287:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
288:It often runs in families," she remarked: "just as a love for pastry does. ~ Lewis Carroll,
289:I want a clean cup,' interrupted the Hatter: 'let's all move one place on. ~ Lewis Carroll,
290:Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?"—and she tried to curtsey ~ Lewis Carroll,
291:Sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
292:Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! ~ Lewis Carroll,
293:I'm doubtful about the temper of your flamingo. Shall I try the experiment? ~ Lewis Carroll,
294:In spring, when woods are getting green, I'll try and tell you what I mean. ~ Lewis Carroll,
295:It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
296:next thing was to eat the comfits: this caused some noise and confusion, as ~ Lewis Carroll,
297:Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
298:He was part of my dream, of course -- but then I was part of his dream, too. ~ Lewis Carroll,
299:If you don't know where you are going it doesn't matter which road you take. ~ Lewis Carroll,
300:I never thought of that before! It's my opinion that you never think at all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
301:I said you LOOKED like an egg, Sir. And some eggs are very pretty, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
302:I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears! ~ Lewis Carroll,
303:it seems to fill my head with ideas—only I don't exactly know what they are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
304:I warn you, dear child. If I lose my temper, you lose your head. Understand? ~ Lewis Carroll,
305:You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret all the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
306:You're thinking about something, my dear, and that makes you forget to talk. ~ Lewis Carroll,
307:Always speak the truth, think before you speak, and write it down afterwards. ~ Lewis Carroll,
308:by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had ~ Lewis Carroll,
309:chrysalis--you will some day, you know--and then after that into a butterfly, ~ Lewis Carroll,
310:Ella por lo general se daba excelentes consejos (aunque rara vez los seguía), ~ Lewis Carroll,
311:Read the directions and directly you will be directed in the right direction. ~ Lewis Carroll,
312:The things most people want to know about are usually none of their business. ~ Lewis Carroll,
313:What a curious feeling!” said Alice; “I must be shutting up like a telescope. ~ Lewis Carroll,
314:You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret: All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
315:You're entirely bonkers, But I'll tell you a secret, all the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
316:I have seen so many extraordinary things, nothing seems extraordinary any more ~ Lewis Carroll,
317:That's the reason they're called lessons, because they lesson from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
318:what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations? ~ Lewis Carroll,
319:Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast ~ Lewis Carroll,
320:Always speak the truth - think before you speak - and write it down afterwards. ~ Lewis Carroll,
321:But, I nearly forgot, you must close your eyes otherwise you won't see anything ~ Lewis Carroll,
322:If you do not know where you want to go, it doesn't matter which path you take. ~ Lewis Carroll,
323:Si así fue, así pudo ser; si así fuera, así podría ser; pero como no es, no es. ~ Lewis Carroll,
324:That's the reason they're called lessons...because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
325:Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
326:You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret... All the best people are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
327:Alicia: ¿Cuánto tiempo es para siempre? Conejo blanco: A veces, sólo un segundo. ~ Lewis Carroll,
328:But, I nearly forgot, you must close your eyes otherwise you won't see anything. ~ Lewis Carroll,
329:By the time she had caught the flamingo and brought it back, the fight was over, ~ Lewis Carroll,
330:I didn’t mean it!” pleaded poor Alice. “But you’re so easily offended, you know! ~ Lewis Carroll,
331:I'm not strange, weird, off, nor crazy, my reality is just different from yours. ~ Lewis Carroll,
332:I'm sure the woods look sleepy in the autumn, when the leaves are getting brown. ~ Lewis Carroll,
333:Pues la regla es: mermelada mañana y mermelada ayer... pero nunca mermelada hoy. ~ Lewis Carroll,
334:She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it) ~ Lewis Carroll,
335:'What is the use of a book', thought Alice, 'without pictures or conversations?' ~ Lewis Carroll,
336:Always speak the truth—think before you speak—and write it down afterwards.' 'I'm ~ Lewis Carroll,
337:'Always speak the truth - think before you speak - and write it down afterwards.' ~ Lewis Carroll,
338:am i insane" asked alice
"yes, but all the best people are" replied her father ~ Lewis Carroll,
339:And what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversation? ~ Lewis Carroll,
340:My view of life is, that it's next to impossible to convince anybody of anything. ~ Lewis Carroll,
341:She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it), ~ Lewis Carroll,
342:We CAN talk,' said the Tiger-lily: 'when there's anybody worth talking to.' Alice ~ Lewis Carroll,
343:When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more, nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
344:When I use a word, it means just what i choose it to mean. Neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
345:Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. There ~ Lewis Carroll,
346:Alice thought to herself "I don't see how he can ever finish, if he doesn't begin. ~ Lewis Carroll,
347:Alice: Why is a raven like a writing desk?
Hatter: I haven't the faintest idea. ~ Lewis Carroll,
348:and what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations? ~ Lewis Carroll,
349:Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
350:expeditions of Hernandez de Ckx> doYfty in 1517, and Juan de Gnijalya^ in 1518. ~ Lewis Carroll,
351:I'm afraid so.Your totally bonkers.But I tellyou a secret.All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
352:My beloved friend - one of the most unique and charming personalities of our time. ~ Lewis Carroll,
353:She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), ~ Lewis Carroll,
354:She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it). ~ Lewis Carroll,
355:Yet what are all such gaieties to me whose thoughts are full of indices and surds? ~ Lewis Carroll,
356:Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before ~ Lewis Carroll,
357:A minute goes by so fearfully quick. You might as well try to stop a Bandersnatch! ~ Lewis Carroll,
358:Bitte sage mir, welchen Weg ich gehen soll.
Das hängt davon ab, wohin du willst. ~ Lewis Carroll,
359:Every story has a moral you just need to be clever enough to find it - the Dutchess ~ Lewis Carroll,
360:If you don't know where you want to go, then it doesn't matter which path you take. ~ Lewis Carroll,
361:Se una persona ha il potere di farti cambiare umore, allora è veramente importante. ~ Lewis Carroll,
362:- Alice: per quanto tempo è per sempre?
- Bianconiglio: a volte, solo un secondo. ~ Lewis Carroll,
363:Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! 'I wonder how many miles I've ~ Lewis Carroll,
364:In most gardens they make the beds too soft – so that the flowers are always asleep. ~ Lewis Carroll,
365:In some ways, you know, people that don't exist, are much nicer than people that do. ~ Lewis Carroll,
366:Počni od početka' , reče Kralj važno, i idi sve dok ne stigneš do kraja; onda stani. ~ Lewis Carroll,
367:Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas—only I don’t exactly know what they are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
368:We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad. [...] You must be, or you wouldn't be here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
369:I always call him Lewis Carroll Carroll, because he was the first Humbert Humbert. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
370:It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' says the White Queen to Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll,
371:Magnitudes are algebraically represented by letter, men by men of letters, and so on. ~ Lewis Carroll,
372:Still she haunts me, phantomwise, Alice moving under skies Never seen by waking eyes. ~ Lewis Carroll,
373:whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up ~ Lewis Carroll,
374:Alice: Where Should I go?
Cheshire Cat: That depends, where do you want to end up? ~ Lewis Carroll,
375:I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir,' said Alice, 'Because I'm not myself you see. ~ Lewis Carroll,
376:I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin. ~ Lewis Carroll,
377:I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? ~ Lewis Carroll,
378:pues a esta curiosa criatura le gustaba mucho pretender que era dos personas a la vez. ~ Lewis Carroll,
379:She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and ~ Lewis Carroll,
380:Si todo el mundo se ocupara de sus propios asuntos , el mundo giraría mucho más rápido ~ Lewis Carroll,
381:Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas - only I don't exactly know what they are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
382:Which form of proverb do you prefer Better late than never, or Better never than late? ~ Lewis Carroll,
383:Why is a raven like a writing desk? - Mad Hatter I haven't the slightest idea. - Alice ~ Lewis Carroll,
384:Why is it that people with the most narrow of minds seem to have the widest of mouths? ~ Lewis Carroll,
385:Every story has a moral you just need to be clever enough to find it
- the Dutchess ~ Lewis Carroll,
386:I can’t explain myself, I’m afraid, sir,’ said Alice, ‘because I’m not myself, you see. ~ Lewis Carroll,
387:Oh, what fun it'll be, when they see me through the glass in here, and can't get at me! ~ Lewis Carroll,
388:Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: 'we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.' 'How ~ Lewis Carroll,
389:Tis a secret: none knows how it comes, how it goes: But the name of the secret is Love! ~ Lewis Carroll,
390:Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
391:Well that was the silliest tea party I ever went to! I am never going back there again! ~ Lewis Carroll,
392:I'm not crazy. My reality is just different than yours.
~ Lewis Carroll Cheshire Cat ~ Lewis Carroll,
393:The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things. ~ Lewis Carroll,
394:this was a book about working out who you were. About identity, constant and threatened. ~ Lewis Carroll,
395:Tumbling into a dark, Lewis Carroll labyrinth of filth, pursuing a white rabbit of smut! ~ Russell Brand,
396:What is his sorrow?" [...] "It's all his fancy, that: he hasn't got no sorrow, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
397:What is the use of a book without pictures or conversations?

-Alice in Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll,
398:You’re mad, bonkers, off your head. But I’ll tell you a secret; all the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
399:aber1 bis gestern2 (zurück zu gehen3), wäre ganz unnütz, weil4 ich da jemand Anderes war. ~ Lewis Carroll,
400:have i gone mad? im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
401:"Well, I never heard it before," said the Mock Turtle; "but it sounds uncommon nonsense." ~ Lewis Carroll,
402:Why is a raven like a writing desk? - Mad Hatter
I haven't the slightest idea. - Alice ~ Lewis Carroll,
403:Why, you might just as well say that, I see what I eat, is the same as, I eat what I see. ~ Lewis Carroll,
404:I beg your pardon?' Alice said with a puzzled air. 'I'm not offended,' said Humpty Dumpty. ~ Lewis Carroll,
405:It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards.” Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland ~ Cornelia Funke,
406:"I could have done it in a much more complicated way," said the Red Queen, immensely proud. ~ Lewis Carroll,
407:important—unimportant—unimportant—important—' as if he were trying which word sounded best. ~ Lewis Carroll,
408:When I make a word do a lot of work like that,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'I always pay it extra. ~ Lewis Carroll,
409:Where should I go?" -Alice. "That depends on where you want to end up." - The Cheshire Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
410:You mean you ca’n’t take less,” said the Hatter: “it’s very easy to take more than nothing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
411:But, said Alice, if the world has absolutely no sense, who's stopping us from inventing one? ~ Lewis Carroll,
412:But, said Alice, the the world has absolutely no sens, who's stopping us from inventing one? ~ Lewis Carroll,
413:Charles Lutwidge Dodgson's life in space-time colored his liberated life of the imagination. ~ Lewis Carroll,
414:have i gone mad?
im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
415:I ca'n't remember things as I used- and I don't keep the same size for ten minutes together! ~ Lewis Carroll,
416:It is her solidity that is magical. The wonders are not wild or strange but odd and curious. ~ Lewis Carroll,
417:Oh, there’s no use in talking to him,’ said Alice desperately: ‘he’s perfectly idiotic!’ And ~ Lewis Carroll,
418:So young a child ought to know which way she's going, even if she doesn't know her own name! ~ Lewis Carroll,
419:That's just the trouble with me,I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
420:pardon!' said the Mouse, frowning, but very politely: 'Did you speak?' 'Not I!' said the Lory ~ Lewis Carroll,
421:Still she haunts me, phantomwise,
Alice moving under skies
Never seen by waking eyes. ~ Lewis Carroll,
422:and the moral ofthat is —“Take care of the sense, and the sounds will take care of themselves. ~ Lewis Carroll,
423:¿Cuánto dura la eternidad? -preguntó Alicia-
-A veces, solo un segundo -respondió el conejo ~ Lewis Carroll,
424:I didn't know that cats could grin.'
'They all can,' said the Duchess, 'and most of 'em do. ~ Lewis Carroll,
425:If everybody minded their own business... the world would go round a deal faster than it does. ~ Lewis Carroll,
426:I learned long ago that being Lewis Carroll was infinitely more exciting than being Alice. ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
427:I've been influenced by poets as diverse as Dylan Thomas, Lewis Carroll, and Edgar Allan Poe. ~ Jack Prelutsky,
428:Begin at the beginning,' the King said gravely, 'and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
429:Ever drifting down the stream
Lingering in the golden gleam
Life, what is it but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll,
430:flamingoes and mustard both bite. And the moral of that is--"Birds of a feather flock together. ~ Lewis Carroll,
431:get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice ~ Lewis Carroll,
432:Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. - The Queen ~ Lewis Carroll,
433:One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. ~ Lewis Carroll,
434:The human mind is generally far more eager to praise and dispraise than to describe and define. ~ Lewis Carroll,
435:the reason they’re called lessons,’ the Gryphon remarked: ‘because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
436:The world is but a Thought," said he:
"The vast unfathomable sea
Is but a Notion—unto me. ~ Lewis Carroll,
437:You’re mad, bonkers, completely off your head. But I’ll tell you a secret. All the best people. ~ Lewis Carroll,
438:flamingoes and mustard both bite. And the moral of that is — “Birds of a feather flock together. ~ Lewis Carroll,
439:i fenicònteri e la senape pizzicano entrambi, e la morale è questa—'Chi si rassembra s'assembra. ~ Lewis Carroll,
440:“One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others” ~ Lewis Carroll,
441:She's in that state of mind that she wants to deny SOMETHING only she doesn't know what to deny! ~ Lewis Carroll,
442:Well, when one's lost, I suppose it's good advice to stay where you are until someone finds you. ~ Lewis Carroll,
443:Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die. ~ Lewis Carroll,
444:But if I'm not the same, the next question is 'Who in the world am I?' Ah, that's a great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll,
445:But that's just the trouble with me. I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
446:Give your evidence,' said the King; 'and don't be nervous, or I'll have you executed on the spot. ~ Lewis Carroll,
447:Not like cats ” cried the Mouse in a shrill passionate voice. “Would you like cats if you were me ~ Lewis Carroll,
448:Say, can thy noble spirit stoop
To join the gormandising troop
Who find a solace in a soup? ~ Lewis Carroll,
449:What does it matter where my body happens to be?' he said. 'My mind goes on working all the same. ~ Lewis Carroll,
450:If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic ~ Lewis Carroll,
451:If you knew Time as well as I do,’ said the Hatter, ‘you wouldn’t talk about wasting it. It’s him. ~ Lewis Carroll,
452:One of the hardest things in the world is to convey a meaning accurately from one mind to another. ~ Lewis Carroll,
453:Si conocieras el tiempo tan bien como yo m no hablarías de matarlo. El tiempo es todo un personaje ~ Lewis Carroll,
454:Y la moraleja de esto es... << Oh , el amor , el amor . El amor hace girar al mundo >> ~ Lewis Carroll,
455:Birds of a feather flock together.'' Und die Moral1 davon ist: Gleich und Gleich gesellt sich gern. ~ Lewis Carroll,
456:How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice. "You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
457:I do,” Alice hastily replied; “at least—at least I mean what I say—that’s the same thing, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
458:I don't know the meaning of half those long words, and, what's more, I don't believe you do either! ~ Lewis Carroll,
459:If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does. ~ Lewis Carroll,
460:If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic. ~ Lewis Carroll,
461:If you drink much from a bottle marked 'poison' it is certain to disagree with you sooner or later. ~ Lewis Carroll,
462:It is the one of the great secrets of life that those things are most worth doing,we do for others. ~ Lewis Carroll,
463:You’re mad, bonkers, completely off your head. But I’ll tell you a secret. All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
464:But if I’m not the same, the next question is, ‘Who in the world am I?’ Ah, that’s the great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll,
465:How puzzling all these changes are! I'm never sure what I'm going to be, from one minute to another. ~ Lewis Carroll,
466:Little Alice fell
d
o
w
n
the hOle,
bumped her head
and bruised her soul ~ Lewis Carroll,
467:Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin.’ For, ~ Lewis Carroll,
468:One novel has been all my reading, Our Mutual Friend, one of the cleverest that Dickens has written. ~ Lewis Carroll,
469:One of the deep secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. ~ Lewis Carroll,
470:she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; ~ Lewis Carroll,
471:Would you be a poet Before you've been to school? Ah, well! I hardly thought you So absolute a fool. ~ Lewis Carroll,
472:Alice felt so desperate that she was ready to ask help of any one; so, when the Rabbit came near her, ~ Lewis Carroll,
473:Begin at the beginning," the King said, very gravely, "and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
474:came trotting along in a great hurry, muttering to himself as he came, 'Oh! the Duchess, the Duchess! ~ Lewis Carroll,
475:E então a duquesa disse: A moral disso é, tome conta do sentido e os sons tomarão conta de si mesmos. ~ Lewis Carroll,
476:How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice
"You must be," said the cat, "or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
477:And never, never, dear madam, put 'Wednesday' simply as the date! That way madness lies! ~ Lewis Carroll,
478:belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too ~ Lewis Carroll,
479:conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation? ~ Lewis Carroll,
480:If you drink from the bottle called poison, it is almost certain to disagree with you sooner or later. ~ Lewis Carroll,
481:said the Knave, "I didn't write it and they can't prove that I did; there's no name signed at the end. ~ Lewis Carroll,
482:She felt very curious to know what it was all about, and crept a little way out of the wood to listen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
483:That's the reason they're called lessons," the Gryphon remarked: "because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
484:That’s the reason they’re called lessons,’ the Gryphon remarked: ‘because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
485:They're dreadfully fond of beheading people here; the great wonder is, that there's anyone left alive! ~ Lewis Carroll,
486:(as if1) she (had known3) them (all her life2). (als ob1) sie sie ihr (ganzes Leben2) (gekannt hätte3). ~ Lewis Carroll,
487:But I was thinking of a way To multiply by ten, And always, in the answer, get The question back again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
488:Only I do hope it’s my dream, and not the Red King’s! I don’t like belonging to another person’s dream, ~ Lewis Carroll,
489:Se quien era esta mañana cuando me levanté, pero creo que he debido cambiar varias veces desde entonces ~ Lewis Carroll,
490:ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: ~ Lewis Carroll,
491:very poor speaker," said the King. "You may go," said the King, and the Hatter hurriedly left the court. ~ Lewis Carroll,
492:and illustrations are in the public domain and are free to use, reproduce, or alter as desired. Cover and ~ Lewis Carroll,
493:either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. ~ Lewis Carroll,
494:Is all our Life, then but a dream Seen faintly in the golden gleam Athwart Time's dark resistless stream? ~ Lewis Carroll,
495:Well, now that we have seen each other,' said the Unicorn, 'if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. ~ Lewis Carroll,
496:Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn, "if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. ~ Lewis Carroll,
497:How do you know I’m mad?’ said Alice. ‘You must be,’ said the Cat, ‘or you wouldn’t have come here.’ Alice ~ Lewis Carroll,
498:I can explain all the poems that were ever invented - and a good many that haven't been invented just yet. ~ Lewis Carroll,
499:I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then ~ Lewis Carroll,
500:In most gardens", the Tiger-lily said, "they make the beds too soft-so that the flowers are always asleep. ~ Lewis Carroll,
501:If you limit your actions in life to things that nobody can possibly find fault with, you will not do much! ~ Lewis Carroll,
502:I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
503:I once delivered a simple ball, which I was told, had it gone far enough, would have been considered a wide ~ Lewis Carroll,
504:It is wrong from beginning to end,' said the Caterpillar decidedly, and there was silence for some minutes. ~ Lewis Carroll,
505:no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; 'I advise you to leave off this minute! ~ Lewis Carroll,
506:If it had grown up, it would have made a dreadfully ugly child; but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think. ~ Lewis Carroll,
507:if you drink much from a bottle marked 'poison,' it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later. ~ Lewis Carroll,
508:I'm very brave generally,' he went on in a low voice: 'only today I happen to have a headache.' (Tweedledum) ~ Lewis Carroll,
509:it had a sort of mixed flavor of cherry-tart, custard, pineapple, roast turkey, toffy and hot buttered toast ~ Lewis Carroll,
510:It was so long since she had been anything near the right size, that it felt quite strange at first; but she ~ Lewis Carroll,
511:—Si conocieras al Tiempo como yo —dijo el Sombrerero—, no hablarías de emplearlo o perderlo. Él es muy suyo. ~ Lewis Carroll,
512:I have proved by actual trial that a letter, that takes an hour to write, takes only about 3 minutes to read! ~ Lewis Carroll,
513:In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
514:I think I should understand that better, if I had it written down: but I can't quite follow it as you say it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
515:Alice thought to herself, 'I don't see how he can EVEN finish, if he doesn't begin.' But she waited patiently. ~ Lewis Carroll,
516:and graphic design elements and alterations are property of Bookbyte Digital and may be used as long as credit ~ Lewis Carroll,
517:How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail, And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale! ~ Lewis Carroll,
518:I pictured myself the Queen of Hearts as sort of embodiment of ungovernable passion - a blind and aimless Fury ~ Lewis Carroll,
519:It's too late to correct it: when you've once said a thing, that fixes it, and you must take the consequences. ~ Lewis Carroll,
520:La cosa no tenía nada de muy especial, [...] pero tampoco le pareció a Alicia que tuviera nada de muy extraño. ~ Lewis Carroll,
521:Surely your gladness need not be the less for the thought that you will one day see a brighter dawn than this. ~ Lewis Carroll,
522:‎You're not the same as you were before," he said. You were much more... muchier... you've lost your muchness. ~ Lewis Carroll,
523:Abstract qualities begin With capitals alway: The True, the Good, the Beautiful- Those are the things that pay! ~ Lewis Carroll,
524:'And how, who am I? I will remember, if I can! I'm determined to do it!' But being determined didn't help much. ~ Lewis Carroll,
525:Have I gone mad? I'm afraid so. You're entirely Bonkers. But I will tell you a secret, All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
526:What matter it how far we go?" his scaly friend replied."There is another shore, you know, upon the other side. ~ Lewis Carroll,
527:Have I gone mad?
I'm afraid so. You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret. All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
528:It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.” - Adventures of Alice in Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll,
529:Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown ~ Lewis Carroll,
530:No discussion between two persons can be of any use, until each knows clearly what it is that the other asserts. ~ Lewis Carroll,
531:Twinkle, twinkle little bat How I wonder what you're at! Up above the world you fly, Like a tea-tray in the sky. ~ Lewis Carroll,
532:Contrariwise, if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic. ~ Lewis Carroll,
533:The Mad Hatter: "Would you like some wine?" Alice: "Yes..." The Mad Hatter: "We haven't any and you're too young. ~ Lewis Carroll,
534:curtseying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) 'And what an ignorant little girl ~ Lewis Carroll,
535:Have I gone mad?
- I'm afraid so. You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret, all the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
536:He was part of my dream, of course—but then I was part of his dream, too. Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass ~ Richard Adams,
537:In proceeding to the dining-room, the gentleman gives one arm to the lady he escorts--it is unusual to offer both. ~ Lewis Carroll,
538:Am I mad?”

“I’m afraid so. You’re entirely bonkers! But I’ll tell you a secret… all of the best people are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
539:at least I know who Iwas when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
540:I almost wish I hadn't gone down that rabbit-hole—and yet—and yet—it's rather curious, you know, this sort of life! ~ Lewis Carroll,
541:know,' said the Mouse. 'Of course,' the Dodo replied very gravely. 'What else have you got in your pocket?' he went ~ Lewis Carroll,
542:Only the insane equate pain with success."
"The uninformed must improve their deficit, or die."
Cheshire Cat ~ Lewis Carroll,
543:They were obliged to have him with them,' the Mock Turtle said: 'no wise fish would go anywhere without a porpoise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
544:Who cares for you?' said Alice, (she had grown to her full size by this time.) 'You're nothing but a pack of cards! ~ Lewis Carroll,
545:at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
546:How cheerfully he seems to grin, How neatly spread his claws, And welcome little fishes in With gently smiling jaws! ~ Lewis Carroll,
547:Speak roughly to your little boy and beat him when he sneezes! he only does it to annoy, because he knows it teases! ~ Lewis Carroll,
548:Where do you want to go?" was his responce. "I don't know" Alice answered. "Then," said the cat, "it doesn't matter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
549:'But I don't want to go among mad people,' said Alice. 'Oh, you can't help that,' said the cat. 'We're all mad here.' ~ Lewis Carroll,
550:Ich weiß, wer ich war, als ich heute morgen aufstand, aber ich glaube, daß ich mich seitdem mehrfach verwandelt habe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
551:When I used to read fairy-tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one! ~ Lewis Carroll,
552:And ever since that," the Hatter went on in a mournful tone, "He wo'n't do a thing I ask! It's always six o'clock now. ~ Lewis Carroll,
553:It’s really dreadful,’ she muttered to herself, ‘the way all the creatures argue. It’s enough to drive one crazy!’ The ~ Lewis Carroll,
554:One thing was certain, that the white kitten had had nothing to do with it-- it was the black kitten's fault entirely. ~ Lewis Carroll,
555:Where do you come from? And where are you going? Look up, speak nicely, and don't twiddle your fingers all the time. ~ Lewis Carroll,
556:Why, Mary Ann, what ARE you doing out here? Run home this moment, and fetch me a pair of gloves and a fan! Quick, now! ~ Lewis Carroll,
557:You might just as well say,” added the March Hare, “that ‘I like what I get’ is the same thing as ‘I get what I like’! ~ Lewis Carroll,
558:about1 four inches2 deep3 and reaching half4 down the hall5. ungefähr1 vier Zoll2 tief3 und den halben4 Korridor5 lang. ~ Lewis Carroll,
559:Do not, oh do not indulge such a wild idea that a newspaper might err! If so what have we to trust in this age of sham? ~ Lewis Carroll,
560:It is the privilege of true genius, And especially genius who opens up a new path, To make great mistakes with impunity ~ Lewis Carroll,
561:Speak English!' said the Eaglet. 'I don't know the meaning of half those long words, and I don't believe you do either! ~ Lewis Carroll,
562:The Mad Hatter: "Would you like some wine?"
Alice: "Yes..."
The Mad Hatter: "We haven't any and you're too young. ~ Lewis Carroll,
563:You could not see a cloud, because No cloud was in the sky: No birds were flying overhead - There were no birds to fly. ~ Lewis Carroll,
564:Have I gone mad??'
'I'm afraid so! You're entirely bonkers! but I'll tell you a secret ..... All the best people are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
565:White Rabbit returning, splendidly dressed, with a pair of white kid gloves in one hand and a large fan in the other: he ~ Lewis Carroll,
566:You could not see a cloud, because No cloud was in the sky: No birds were flying overhead -- There were no birds to fly. ~ Lewis Carroll,
567:Alice: How long is forever?
White Rabbit: Sometimes, just one second.


Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll,
568:I ca’n’t remember things before they happen.’ ‘It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,’ the Queen remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
569:Only I don't think,' Alice went on, 'that they'd let Dinah stop in the house if it began ordering people about like that! ~ Lewis Carroll,
570:either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.) Presently she began again. 'I wonder if I shall fall right through ~ Lewis Carroll,
571:Speak in French when you can't think of the English for a thing. Turn out your toes as you walk. And remember who you are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
572:The time has come," the walrus said, "to talk of many things: Of shoes and ships - and sealing wax - of cabbages and kings ~ Lewis Carroll,
573:tied round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words "DRINK ME" beautifully printed on it in large letters. ~ Lewis Carroll,
574:Have I gone mad? I'm afraid so.
You're entirely Bonkers.
But I will tell you a secret,
All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
575:It is a very inconvenient habit of kittens (Alice had once made the remark) that whatever you say to them, they always purr. ~ Lewis Carroll,
576:Me dirías, por favor, qué camino debería tomar desde aquí?” “Eso depende en gran parte de a dónde quieres ir”, dijo el Gato. ~ Lewis Carroll,
577:Really, now you ask me,' said Alice, very much confused, 'I don't think--'

Then you shouldn't talk,' said the Hatter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
578:You have to run as fast as you can just to stay where you are. If you want to get anywhere, you'll have to run much faster. ~ Lewis Carroll,
579:And, has thou slain the Jabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! He chortled in his joy. ~ Lewis Carroll,
580:Beautiful soup! Who cares for fish, game or any other dish? Who would not give all else for two pennyworth of beautiful soup? ~ Lewis Carroll,
581:For nonsense, as Chesterton liked to tell us, is a way of looking at existence that is akin to religious humility and wonder. ~ Lewis Carroll,
582:natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice ~ Lewis Carroll,
583:shouted at the top of her voice. Nobody moved. "Who cares for you?" said Alice (she had grown to her full size by this time). ~ Lewis Carroll,
584:Speak roughly to your little boy
and beat him when he sneezes!
he only does it to annoy,
because he knows it teases! ~ Lewis Carroll,
585:'The time has come,' the walrus said, 'to talk of many things: of shoes and ships - and sealing wax - of cabbages and kings.' ~ Lewis Carroll,
586:One of the deepest motives (as you are aware) in the human beast (so deep that many have failed to detect it) is Alliteration. ~ Lewis Carroll,
587:Si no tiene sentido”, dijo el Rey, “eso nos salva de un montón de problemas, sabes, porque no hace falta que le busquemos uno. ~ Lewis Carroll,
588:Still, as Christmas-tide comes round, They remember it again - Echo still the joyful sound "Peace on earth, good-will to men!" ~ Lewis Carroll,
589:Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
590:Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
591:They've a temper, some of them - particularly verbs, they're the proudest - adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs. ~ Lewis Carroll,
592:what is the use of a book,' thought Alice, 'without pictures or conversations?'"
- Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland, Ch. 1 ~ Lewis Carroll,
593:I don't like the looks of it,' said the King: 'however, it may kis my hand, if it likes.'
'I'd rather not,' the Cat remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
594:I should like the whole race of nurses to be abolished: children should be with their mother as much as possible, in my opinion. ~ Lewis Carroll,
595:It is always allowable to ask for artichoke jelly with your boiled venison; however there are houses where this is not supplied. ~ Lewis Carroll,
596:what would become of me? They’re dreadfully fond of beheading people here: the great wonder is, that there’s any one left alive! ~ Lewis Carroll,
597:When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said in a rather scornful tone “it means just what I chose it to mean – neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
598:Words mean more than we mean to express when we use them: so a whole book ought to mean a great deal more than the writer meant. ~ Lewis Carroll,
599:and what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking!No,it'll never do to ask:perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere. ~ Lewis Carroll,
600:Death is always sad, I suppose, to us who look forward to it: I expect it will seem very different when we can look back upon it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
601:One! two! and through and through The vorpal blade went snickersnack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. ~ Lewis Carroll,
602:When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
603:Curiouser and curiouser!” Cried Alice (she was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English). ~ Lewis Carroll,
604:If everybody minded their own business,' the Duchess said in a hoarse growl, 'the world would go round a deal faster than it does. ~ Lewis Carroll,
605:If everybody minded their own business,’ the Duchess said in a hoarse growl, ‘the world would go round a deal faster than it does. ~ Lewis Carroll,
606:I pictured to myself the Queen of Hearts as a sort of embodiment of ungovernable passion— a blind and aimless Fury. —LEWIS CARROLL ~ Marissa Meyer,
607:ORANGE MARMALADE', but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody, so ~ Lewis Carroll,
608:That which chiefly causes the failure of a dinner-party, is the running short--not of meat, nor yet of drink, but of conversation. ~ Lewis Carroll,
609:The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, ~ Lewis Carroll,
610:The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth. ~ Lewis Carroll,
611:There are three hundred and sixty-four days when you might get un-birthday presents, and only one for birthday presents, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
612:When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in a rather scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
613:When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
614:Beware the Jabberwock, my son The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch! ~ Lewis Carroll,
615:'O Tiger-lily,' said Alice... 'I wish you could talk!' 'We can talk,' said the Tiger-lily: 'when there's anybody worth talking to." ~ Lewis Carroll,
616:The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, All on a summer day: The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, And took them quite away! ~ Lewis Carroll,
617:The Rabbit started violently, dropped the white kid gloves and the fan, and scurried away into the darkness as hard as he could go. ~ Lewis Carroll,
618:When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in a rather scornful tone, 'it means exactly what I choose it to mean-neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
619:Alice ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice, (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, ~ Lewis Carroll,
620:And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere. ~ Lewis Carroll,
621:Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch! ~ Lewis Carroll,
622:learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off ~ Lewis Carroll,
623:Like a fable, Night when a Milky Way goes through the other Milky Way
My hope is standing
He walked with the speed of memories ~ Lewis Carroll,
624:Mouse sandwiches and open graves?" Meredith arched an elegant eyebrow. "I think you're getting Stephen King mixed up with Lewis Carroll. ~ L J Smith,
625:so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
626:'When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less.' ~ Lewis Carroll,
627:“I don't like the look of it at all,” said the King: “however, it may kiss my hand, if it likes.” “I'd rather not,” the Cat remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
628:¿Quién soy yo, primero? Contéstenme, y luego, si me gusta ser esa persona, subiré, si no, me quedaré aquí abajo hasta que sea otra... ~ Lewis Carroll,
629:Speak in French when you can’t think of the English for a thing--
turn your toes out when you walk---
And remember who you are! ~ Lewis Carroll,
630:And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!
He chortled in his joy. ~ Lewis Carroll,
631:Creo que si, que has perdido la cabez, estás completamente loco. Pero te diré un secreto: las mejores personas lo están. (Sombrerero). ~ Lewis Carroll,
632:My dear, here we must run as fast as we can, just to stay in place. And if you wish to go anywhere you must run twice as fast as that. ~ Lewis Carroll,
633:people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think--' (she was rather glad there WAS no one listening, this time, as ~ Lewis Carroll,
634:When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, 'it
means just what I choose it to mean--neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll,
635:I didn't say there was nothing BETTER,' the King replied. 'I said there was nothing LIKE it.' Which Alice did not venture to deny. 'Who ~ Lewis Carroll,
636:I have often seen a cat without a grin - but a grin without a cat - remember the cat kept appearing and disappearing slowly bit by bit. ~ Lewis Carroll,
637:the English novel is childish because what is desired is not maturity and wisdom but a return to the safety and innocence of childhood— ~ Lewis Carroll,
638:Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what ~ Lewis Carroll,
639:hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, 'Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?' when suddenly, thump! thump! ~ Lewis Carroll,
640:Not the same thing a bit!” said the Hatter. “You might just as well say that ‘I see what I eat’ is the same thing as ‘I eat what I see’! ~ Lewis Carroll,
641:Well! I've often seen a cat without a grin,' thought Alice 'but a grin without a cat! It's the most curious thing i ever saw in my life! ~ Lewis Carroll,
642:Contrariwise,' continued Tweedledee, 'if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic. ~ Lewis Carroll,
643:I'd give all the wealth that years have piled, the slow result of life's decay, To be once more a little child for one bright summer day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
644:Oh!, é o amor, é o amor que faz o mundo girar!" "Alguém disse", Alice murmurou, "que ele gira quando cada um trata do que é da sua conta. ~ Lewis Carroll,
645:Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
646:Well! I've often seen a cat without a grin,' thought Alice; 'but a grin without a cat! It's the most curious thing I ever saw in my life! ~ Lewis Carroll,
647:One! two! and through and through
The vorpal blade went snickersnack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back. ~ Lewis Carroll,
648:she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off. The Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll,
649:- so long as I get somewhere," Alice added as an explanation.
"Oh, your sure to do that," said the Cat, "if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
650:Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up; if not, I'll stay down here till I'm someone else. ~ Lewis Carroll,
651:and her eyes immediately met those of a large caterpillar, that was sitting on the top with its arms folded, quietly smoking a long hookah, ~ Lewis Carroll,
652:daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. ~ Lewis Carroll,
653:First, I hate all theological controversy: it is wearing to the temper, and is I believe (at all events when viva voce) worse than useless. ~ Lewis Carroll,
654:Here is a golden Rule.... Write legibly. The average temper of the human race would be perceptibly sweetened, if everybody obeyedthis Rule! ~ Lewis Carroll,
655:lo mejor caigo a través de toda la tierra! ¡Qué divertido sería salir donde vive esta gente que anda cabeza abajo! Los antipáticos, creo... ~ Lewis Carroll,
656:when she thought it over afterwards it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural ~ Lewis Carroll,
657:You know what the issue is with this world? Everyone wants some magical solution to their problem and everyone refuses to believe in magic. ~ Lewis Carroll,
658:But I don’t want to go among mad people,’ Alice remarked. ‘Oh, you can’t help that,’ said the Cat: ‘we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad. ~ Lewis Carroll,
659:Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall Humpty Dumpty had a great fall All the king's horses and all the king's men Couldn't put Humpty together again ~ Lewis Carroll,
660:If there is no meaning in it," said the King, "that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any. And yet I don't know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
661:meaning in it," said the King, "that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any. Let the jury consider their verdict. ~ Lewis Carroll,
662:Alice sighed wearily. 'I think you might do something better with the time,' she said, 'than waste it in asking riddles that have no answers. ~ Lewis Carroll,
663:But it's no use now," thought poor Alice, "to pretend to be two people! Why, there's ahrdly enough of me left to make one respectable person! ~ Lewis Carroll,
664:But it's no use now," thought poor Alice, "to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person! ~ Lewis Carroll,
665:Contrariwise,' continued Tweedledee, 'if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic.' 'I ~ Lewis Carroll,
666:IN THE END… We only regret the chances we didn’t take, the relationships we were afraid to have,and the decisions we waited too long to make. ~ Lewis Carroll,
667:When I was your age, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes, I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
668:Who am I, then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else'- ~ Lewis Carroll,
669:you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
670:She tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
671:we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.' 'How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice. 'You must be,' said the Cat, 'or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
672:about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?' (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, ~ Lewis Carroll,
673:Beware the Jabberwock, my son
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch! ~ Lewis Carroll,
674:It takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ Lewis Carroll,
675:about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to ~ Lewis Carroll,
676:All too soon will Childhood gay Realise Life's sober sadness. Let's be merry while we may, Innocent and happy Fay! Elves were made for gladness! ~ Lewis Carroll,
677:Consider what a great girl you are. Consider what a long way you’ve come to-day. Consider what o’clock it is. Consider anything, only don’t cry! ~ Lewis Carroll,
678:I wish I dared dispense with all costume. Naked children are so perfectly pure and lovely; but Mrs. Grundy would be furious - it would never do. ~ Lewis Carroll,
679:Why it's simply impassible!
Alice: Why, don't you mean impossible?
Door: No, I do mean impassible. (chuckles) Nothing's impossible! ~ Lewis Carroll,
680:As she said this she looked down at her hands, and was surprised to see that she had put on one of the Rabbit's little white kid gloves while she ~ Lewis Carroll,
681:For you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
682:In summer, when the days are long, Perhaps you'll understand the song: In Autumn, when the leaves are brown, Take pen and ink, and write it down. ~ Lewis Carroll,
683:I said it in Hebrew—I said it in Dutch— I said it in German and Greek; But I wholly forgot (and it vexes me much) That English is what you speak! ~ Lewis Carroll,
684:meanwhile we'll drink your health - queen Alice's health!' she screamed at the top of her voice, and all the guests began drinking it directly... ~ Lewis Carroll,
685:Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else"--but, ~ Lewis Carroll,
686:down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good ~ Lewis Carroll,
687:For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
688:Either it brings tears to their eyes, or else -" "Or else what?" said Alice, for the Knight had made a sudden pause. "Or else it doesn't, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
689:He wasn't running," said Bruno, "and he wasn't crawling. He went struggling along like a portmanteau. And he held his chin ever so high in the air— ~ Lewis Carroll,
690:If he smiled much more, the ends of his mouth might meet behind, and then I don't know what would happen to his head! I'm afraid it would come off! ~ Lewis Carroll,
691:she soon found out that the cause of this was the fan she was holding, and she dropped it hastily, just in time to avoid shrinking away altogether. ~ Lewis Carroll,
692:Where one is hopelessly undecided as to what to say, there (as Confucius would have said, if they had given him the opportunity) silence is golden. ~ Lewis Carroll,
693:Mad Hatter: Am I going mad?
Alice: Yes, you're mad, bonkers, off the top of your head...but...I'll tell you a secret.
All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll,
694:And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle looks like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
695:Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.” - Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ Linda Kage,
696:I'd give all the wealth that years have piled,
the slow result of life's decay,
To be once more a little child
for one bright summer day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
697:Where shall I begin, please your Majesty?' he asked. 'Begin at the beginning,' the King said gravely, 'and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
698:I wish I could manage to be glad! Only I never can remember the rule. You must be very happy, living in this wood, and being glad whenever you like! ~ Lewis Carroll,
699:Poor Alice! It was as much as she could do, lying down on one side, to look through into the garden with one eye; but to get through was more hopeless ~ Lewis Carroll,
700:"Take some more tea," the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly. "I've had nothing yet," Alice replied in an offended tone, "so I can't take more." ~ Lewis Carroll,
701:semble drôle, pensa Alice, de faire des commissions pour un lapin ! Après ça, je suppose que c'est Dinah qui m'enverra faire des commissions !» Et elle ~ Lewis Carroll,
702:There comes a pause, for human strength will not endure to dance without cessation; and everyone must reach the point at length of absolute prostration ~ Lewis Carroll,
703:The voices didn’t join in this time, as she hadn’t spoken, but to her surprise, they all thought in chorus.” — LEWIS CARROLL, Through the Looking-Glass ~ Connie Willis,
704:For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. There ~ Lewis Carroll,
705:Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall
All the king's horses and all the king's men
Couldn't put Humpty together again ~ Lewis Carroll,
706:There comes a pause, for human strength will not endure to dance without cessation; and everyone must reach the point at length of absolute prostration. ~ Lewis Carroll,
707:altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?' And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown out, ~ Lewis Carroll,
708:Either it brings tears to their eyes, or else -"
"Or else what?" said Alice, for the Knight had made a sudden pause.
"Or else it doesn't, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
709:I've often seen a cat without a grin...but a grin without a cat!It's the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!"
Alice's adventures in wonderland. ~ Lewis Carroll,
710:So she was considering in her own mind...whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up & picking the daisies. ~ Lewis Carroll,
711:Tut, tut, child!’ said the Duchess. ‘Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it.’ And she squeezed herself up closer to Alice’s side as she spoke. ~ Lewis Carroll,
712:Where shall I begin, please your Majesty?" he asked.
"Begin at the beginning," the King said gravely, "and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
713:Where shall I begin, please your majesty?" she asked.
"Begin at the beginning," the king said gravely, "and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
714:box of comfits, (luckily the salt water had not got into it), and handed them round as prizes. There was exactly one a-piece all round. 'But she must have ~ Lewis Carroll,
715:For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.   There ~ Lewis Carroll,
716:I said it in Hebrew—I said it in Dutch—
I said it in German and Greek;
But I wholly forgot (and it vexes me much)
That English is what you speak! ~ Lewis Carroll,
717:Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run twice as fast as that. ~ Lewis Carroll,
718:stop. 'Well, I'd hardly finished the first verse,' said the Hatter, 'when the Queen jumped up and bawled out, "He's murdering the time! Off with his head! ~ Lewis Carroll,
719:"The horror of that moment," the King went on, "I shall never, never forget!" "You will, though," the Queen said, "if you don't make a memorandum of it." ~ Lewis Carroll,
720:There's no use in comparing one's feelings between one day and the next; you must allow a reasonable interval, for the direction of change to show itself. ~ Lewis Carroll,
721:"Well, it's no use your talking about waking him," said Tweedledum, "when you're only one of the things in his dream. You know very well you're not real." ~ Lewis Carroll,
722:PLAIN SUPERFICIALITY is the character of a speech, in which any two points being taken, the speaker is found to lie wholly with regard to those two points. ~ Lewis Carroll,
723:So she was considering in her own mind...whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up & picking the daisies... ~ Lewis Carroll,
724:I-I hardly know, Sir, just at present - at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
725:Well, "slithy" means "lithe and slimy." "Lithe" is the same as "active." You see it's like a portmanteau - there are two meanings packed up into one word. ~ Lewis Carroll,
726:you see, a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad. ~ Lewis Carroll,
727:—¡Considera qué niña más excepcional eres! ¡Considera lo muy lejos que has llegado hoy! ¡Considera la hora que es! ¡Considera cualquier cosa, pero no llores! ~ Lewis Carroll,
728:Finding meaning, like losing meaning, involves pleasure as well as pain. But then losing meaning, like finding it, does too, as the best nonsense reminds us. ~ Lewis Carroll,
729:I--I hardly know, sir, just at present-- at least I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
730:I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.” —Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ Holly Madison,
731:It sounded an excellent plan, no doubt, and very simply and neatly arranged; the only difficulty was, that she had not the smallest idea how to set about it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
732:What do you know about this business?' the King said to Alice. 'Nothing,' said Alice. 'Nothing WHATEVER?' persisted the King. 'Nothing whatever,' said Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll,
733:When you have made a thorough and reasonably long effort, to understand a thing, and still feel puzzled by it, stop, you will only hurt yourself by going on. ~ Lewis Carroll,
734:But then, shall I never get any older than I am now? That'll be a comfort, one way -- never to be an old woman -- but then -- always to have lessons to learn! ~ Lewis Carroll,
735:change to tinkling sheep- bells, and the Queen's shrill cries to the voice of the shepherd boy--and the sneeze of the baby, the shriek of the Gryphon, and all ~ Lewis Carroll,
736:I confess I do not admire naked boys. They always seem to me to need clothes, whereas one hardly sees why the lovely forms of girls should ever be covered up. ~ Lewis Carroll,
737:si l'on boit une bonne partie du contenu d'une bouteille portant l'étiquette: poison , ça ne manque presque jamais, tôt ou tard, d'être mauvais pour la santé. ~ Lewis Carroll,
738:So she sat on with closed eyes, and half believed herself in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them again, and all would change to dull reality. ~ Lewis Carroll,
739:And thus they give the time, that Nature meant for peaceful sleep and meditative snores, to ceaseless din and mindless merriment and waste of shoes and floors. ~ Lewis Carroll,
740:—Yo, señor, en realidad no sé quién soy en este momento, aunque esta mañana lo sabía muy bien cuando me levanté, ¡pero he cambiado tantas veces desde entonces! ~ Lewis Carroll,
741:Let craft, ambition, spite,
Be quenched in Reason's night,
Till weakness turn to might,
Till what is dark be light,
Till what is wrong be right! ~ Lewis Carroll,
742:She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; ~ Lewis Carroll,
743:But I was thinking of a plan
To dye one's whiskers green,
And always use so large a fan
That they could not be seen."

from The White Knights Song ~ Lewis Carroll,
744:I-I hardly know, Sir, just at present-at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
745:with a pair1 of white kid gloves2 in one hand and a large fan3 in the other4: mit einem Paar1 weißen Handschuhen2 in einer Hand und einem Fächer3 in der andern4. ~ Lewis Carroll,
746:If he smiled much more, the ends of his mouth might meet behind,' she thought: 'and then I don't know what would happen to his head! I'm afraid it would come off! ~ Lewis Carroll,
747:Let craft, ambition, spite, Be quenched in Reason's night, Till weakness turn to might, Till what is dark be light, Till what is wrong be right! Lewis Carroll ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
748:The first "o" in "borogoves" is pronounced like the "o" in "borrow." I have heard people try to give it the sound of the "o" in "worry". Such is Human Perversity. ~ Lewis Carroll,
749:The recent extraordinary discovery in Photography, as applied in the operations of the mind, has reduced the art of novel-writing to the merest mechanical labour. ~ Lewis Carroll,
750:When I was your age, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believe as many as six impossible things before breakfast."
- The White Queen ~ Lewis Carroll,
751:I have had prayers answered - most strangely so sometimes - but I think our Heavenly Father's loving-kindness has been even more evident in what He has refused me. ~ Lewis Carroll,
752:learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no ~ Lewis Carroll,
753:little glass box that was lying under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small cake, on which the words 'EAT ME' were beautifully marked in currants. ~ Lewis Carroll,
754:Now, HERE, you see, it takes all the running YOU can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ Lewis Carroll,
755:Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ Lewis Carroll,
756:Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that. ~ Lewis Carroll,
757:The Duchess! The Duchess! Oh my dear paws! Oh my fur and whiskers! She’ll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets! Where can I have dropped them, I wonder? ~ Lewis Carroll,
758:You may look in front of you, and on both sides, if you like,' said the sheep: 'but you can't look ALL round you - unless you've got eyes at the back of your head. ~ Lewis Carroll,
759:I entered my room, and undrew the window-curtains, just in time to see the sun burst in glory from his ocean-prison, and clothe the world in the light of a new day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
760:It's a pun!' the King added in an offended tone, and everybody laughed, 'Let the jury consider their verdict,' the King said, for about the twentieth time that day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
761:That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. 'I don't much care where—' said Alice. 'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
762:There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger! Some say to survive it: You need to be as mad as a hatter. Which luckily I am. ~ Lewis Carroll,
763:You know," he (Tweedledee) added very gravely, "it's one of the most serious things that can possibly happen to one in a battle--to get one's head cut off." pg. 199 ~ Lewis Carroll,
764:I am not unique in my elegiac sadness at watching reading die, in the era that celebrates Stephen King and J.K. Rowling rather than Charles Dickens and Lewis Carroll. ~ Harold Bloom,
765:Reeling and Writhing of course, to begin with,' the Mock Turtle replied, 'and the different branches of arithmetic-ambition, distraction, uglification, and derision. ~ Lewis Carroll,
766:Sería una guerra a lo Lewis Carroll, un tipo de guerra en la que un oficial estadounidense declararía cosas como: «Tuvimos que destruir la aldea para salvarla». Llegué ~ Phil Knight,
767:You might just as well say,” added the Dormouse, who seemed to be talking in its sleep, “that ‘I breathe when I sleep’ is the same thing as ‘I sleep when I breathe’! ~ Lewis Carroll,
768:Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. ~ Lewis Carroll,
769:Alice: I simply must get through! Doorknob: Sorry, you're much too big. Simply impassible. Alice: You mean impossible? Doorknob: No, impassible. Nothing's impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
770:A loaf of bread, the Walrus said, Is what we chiefly need: Pepper and vinegar besides Are very good indeed-- Now if you're ready, Oysters, dear, We can begin to feed! ~ Lewis Carroll,
771:I wish creatures wouldn't be so easily offended!", "You'll get used to it in time," said the Caterpillar; and it put the hookah into its mouth and began smoking again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
772:Pero no quiero andar entre locos”, protestó Alicia.               “Oh, no puedes evitarlo”, dijo el Gato: “todos estamos locos por aquí. Yo estoy loco. Tú estás loca”. ~ Lewis Carroll,
773:There is a place, like no place on earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger. Some say, to survive it, you need to be as mad as a hatter. Which, luckily, I am. ~ Lewis Carroll,
774:Can you row?" the Sheep asked, handing her a pair of knitting-needles as she spoke. "Yes, a little--but not on land--and not with needles--" Alice was beginning to say. ~ Lewis Carroll,
775:Epithets, like pepper, Give zest to what you write; And if you strew them sparely, They whet the appetite: But if you lay them on too thick, You spoil the matter quite! ~ Lewis Carroll,
776:If you want to inspire confidence, give plenty of statistics. It does not matter that they should be accurate, or even intelligible, as long as there is enough of them. ~ Lewis Carroll,
777:I wish I hadn't cried so much!” said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out. I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears ! ~ Lewis Carroll,
778:You may charge me with murder -
Or want of sense
(We are all of us weak at times):
But the slightest approach to a false pretence
Was never among my crimes! ~ Lewis Carroll,
779:Again, the first "o" in "borogoves" is pronounced like the "o" in "borrow." I have heard people try to give it the sound of the "o" in "worry". Such is Human Perversity. ~ Lewis Carroll,
780:Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?’ and sometimes, ‘Do bats eat cats?’ for, you see, as she couldn’t answer either question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
781:Kim ja właściwie jestem? Powiedzcie mi to naprzód: jeżeli będę chciała być tą osobą, to wrócę, a jeżeli nie, to zostanę na dole, dopóki nie zmienię się w kogoś milszego. ~ Lewis Carroll,
782:The Hatter's remark seemed to her to have no sort of meaning in it, and yet it was certainly English. "I don't quite understand you," she said, as politely as she could. ~ Lewis Carroll,
783:When you are describing, A shape, or sound, or tint; Don't state the matter plainly, But put it in a hint; And learn to look at all things, With a sort of mental squint. ~ Lewis Carroll,
784:You are old Father William,' the young man said, 'and your hair has become very white; and yet you incessantly stand on your head-do you think, at your age, it is right? ~ Lewis Carroll,
785:but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. ~ Lewis Carroll,
786:I could tell you my adventures—beginning from this morning,’ said Alice a little timidly: ‘but it’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
787:I could tell you my adventures—beginning from this morning,” said Alice a little timidly; “but it’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
788:The Red Queen shook her head. "You may call it 'nonsense' if you like," she said, "but I've heard nonsense, compared with which that would be as sensible as a dictionary! ~ Lewis Carroll,
789:This was charming, no doubt; but they shortly found out That the Captain they trusted so well Had only one notion for crossing the ocean, And that was to tingle his bell. ~ Lewis Carroll,
790:Can you row?" the Sheep asked, handing her a pair of knitting-needles as she spoke.
"Yes, a little--but not on land--and not with needles--" Alice was beginning to say. ~ Lewis Carroll,
791:I could tell you my adventures--beginning from this morning,' said Alice a little timidly: 'but it's no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
792:I wish I hadn't cried so much!” said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out.
I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears ! ~ Lewis Carroll,
793:Was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I am not the same, the next question is "Who in the world am I? ~ Lewis Carroll,
794:"In my youth," said his father, "I look to the law, And argued each case with my wife; And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw Has lasted the rest of my life." ~ Lewis Carroll,
795:So young a child," said the gentleman sitting opposite to her, (he was dressed in white paper,) "ought to know which way she's going, even if she doesn't know her own name! ~ Lewis Carroll,
796:Take my friends and my home - as an outcast I'll roam: Take the money I have in the bank: It is just what I wish, but deprive me of fish, And my life would indeed be blank. ~ Lewis Carroll,
797:The Jury had each formed a different view
Long before the indictment was read
And they all spoke at once so that none of them knew
One word that the other had said ~ Lewis Carroll,
798:I get so tired of people saying, 'Oh, you only make fantasy films and this and that', and I'm like, 'Well no, fantasy is reality', that's what Lewis Carroll showed in his work. ~ Tim Burton,
799:I wish I could manage to be glad!" the Queen said. "Only I never can remember the rule. You must be very happy, living in this wood, and being glad whenever you like! ~ Lewis Carroll,
800:What is his sorrow?' She asked the Gryphon. And the Gryphon answered, very nearly in the same words as before, 'It's all his fancy, that: he hasn't got no sorrow, you know'. ~ Lewis Carroll,
801:You evidently do not suffer from "quotation-hunger" as I do! I get all the dictionaries of quotations I can meet with, as I always want to know where a quotation comes from. ~ Lewis Carroll,
802:In a Wonderland they lie, Dreaming as the days go by, Dreaming as the summers die: Ever drifting down the stream- Lingering in the golden gleam- Life, what is it but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll,
803:You evidently do not suffer from "quotation-hunger" as I do! I get all the dictionaries of quotations I can meet with, as I always want to know where a quotation comes from. ~ Lewis Carroll,
804:Cat: Where are you going?
Alice: Which way should I go?
Cat: That depends on where you are going.
Alice: I don’t know.
Cat: Then it doesn’t matter which way you go. ~ Lewis Carroll,
805:her, calling out in a confused way, 'Prizes! Prizes!' Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her hand in her pocket, and pulled out a box of comfits, (luckily the ~ Lewis Carroll,
806:They've a temper, some of them--particularly verbs: they're the proudest--adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs--however I can manage the whole lot of them! ~ Lewis Carroll,
807:Words mean more than we mean to express when we use them,” Lewis Carroll once wrote in a letter to a friend, “so a whole book ought to mean a great deal more than the writer means. ~ Anonymous,
808:For first you write a sentence, And then you chop it small; Then mix the bits and sort them out Just as they chance to fall: The order of the phrases makes no difference at all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
809:Habla en francés cuando no te acuerdes de alguna palabra en castellano... acuérdate bien de andar con las puntas de los pies hacia afuera... y no te olvides nunca de quien eres! ~ Lewis Carroll,
810:His hair, from much running of fingers
through it, radiates in all directions and surrounds his head
like a halo of glory, or like the second Corollary of Euclid
I. 32. ~ Lewis Carroll,
811:If you set to work to believe everything, you will tire out the believing-muscles of your mind, and then you'll be so weak you won't be able to believe the simplest true things. ~ Lewis Carroll,
812:I've had nothing yet,'Alice repilied in an offended tone, 'so I can't takr more.'
'You mean you can't take less.' said the Hatter: ' it's very easy to take more than nothing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
813:Alice: I simply must get through!
Doorknob: Sorry, you're much too big. Simply impassible.
Alice: You mean impossible?
Doorknob: No, impassible. Nothing's impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
814:Anon, to sudden silence won, In fancy they pursue The dream-child moving through the land Of wonders wild and new, In friendly chat with bird or beast - And half believe it true. ~ Lewis Carroll,
815:In a Wonderland they lie, Dreaming as the days go by, Dreaming as the summers die:
Ever drifting down the stream- Lingering in the golden gleam- Life, what is it but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll,
816:The sun was shining on the sea, Shining with all his might: He did his very best to make The billows smooth and bright-- And this was odd, because it was The middle of the night. ~ Lewis Carroll,
817:Well, it's got no business there, at any rate: go and take it away!' There was a long silence after this, and Alice could only hear whispers now and then; such as, 'Sure, I don't ~ Lewis Carroll,
818:When I used to read fairy-tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one! There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! ~ Lewis Carroll,
819:All in the golden afternoon Full leisurely we glide; For both our oars, with little skill, By little arms are plied, While little hands make vain pretence Our wanderings to guide. ~ Lewis Carroll,
820:O Oysters,' said the Carpenter, You've had a pleasant run! Shall we be trotting home again?' But answer came there none - And this was scarcely odd, because They'd eaten every one. ~ Lewis Carroll,
821:What's the good of Mercator's North Poles and Equators, Tropics, Zones, and Meridian Lines?" So the Bellman would cry: and the crew would reply "They are merely conventional signs! ~ Lewis Carroll,
822:I daresay you haven't had much practice. When I was your age I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes, I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
823:would gather about her other little children, and make THEIR eyes bright and eager with many a strange tale, perhaps even with the dream of Wonderland of long ago: and how she would ~ Lewis Carroll,
824:"Write that down," the King said to the jury, and the jury eagerly wrote down all three dates on their slates, and then added them up, and reduced the answer to shillings and pence. ~ Lewis Carroll,
825:Be who you are, said the Duchess to Alice, or, if you would like it put more simply, never try to be what you might have been or could have been other than what you should have been. ~ Lewis Carroll,
826:Then the bowsprit got mixed with the rudder sometimes:
A thing, as the Bellman remarked,
That frequently happens in tropical climes,
When a vessel is, so to speak, "snarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
827:Two days wrong!" sighed the Hatter. "I told you butter wouldn't suit the works!" he added, looking angrily at the March Hare. "It was the best butter," the March Hare meekly replied. ~ Lewis Carroll,
828:All right," said the Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had gone. ~ Lewis Carroll,
829:It sounds like a horse,' Alice thought to herself. And an extremely small voice, close to her ear, said, 'You might make a joke on that—something about "horse" and "hoarse," you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
830:Alice replied, rather shyly, "I—I hardly know, Sir, just at present—at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
831:"All right", said the Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had gone. ~ Lewis Carroll,
832:Come, hearken then, ere voice of dread, with bitter tiding laden, shall summon to unwelcome bed a melancholy maiden! We are but older children, dear, who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ Lewis Carroll,
833:Let me think: was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is, Who in the world am I? ~ Lewis Carroll,
834:Oh, you ca'n't help that," said the Cat: "we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad." "How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice. "You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
835:There's nothing a well-regulated child hates so much as regularity. I believe a really healthy boy would thoroughly enjoy Greek Grammar--if only he might stand on his head to learn it! ~ Lewis Carroll,
836:When you are describing,
A shape, or sound, or tint;
Don't state the matter plainly,
But put it in a hint;
And learn to look at all things,
With a sort of mental squint. ~ Lewis Carroll,
837:back again, and looking anxiously about as it went, as if it had lost something; and she heard it muttering to itself 'The Duchess! The Duchess! Oh my dear paws! Oh my fur and whiskers! ~ Lewis Carroll,
838:Seven years and six months! Humpty Dumpty repeated thoughtfully. 'An uncomfortable sort of age. Now if you'd asked my advice, I'd have said "Leave off at seven" - but it's too late now. ~ Lewis Carroll,
839:Then fill up the glasses as quick as you can, And sprinkle the table with buttons and bran: Put cats in the coffee, and mice in the tea— And welcome Queen Alice with thirty-times-three! ~ Lewis Carroll,
840:An enormous puppy was looking down at her with large round eyes, and feebly stretching out one paw, trying to touch her. 'Poor little thing!' said Alice, in a coaxing tone, and she tried ~ Lewis Carroll,
841:We may give our human loves the unconditional allegiance which we owe only to God. Then they become gods: then they become demons. Then they will destroy us, and also destroy themselves. ~ Lewis Carroll,
842:Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?' and sometimes, 'Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she ~ Lewis Carroll,
843:The Cheshire Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. It looked good-natured, she thought: still it had very long claws and a great many teeth, so she felt it ought to be treated with respect. ~ Lewis Carroll,
844:The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things.
Of shoes and ships and sealing wax and cabbages and kings.
And why the sea is boiling hot. And whether pigs have wings. ~ Lewis Carroll,
845:Well, then,' the Cat went on, 'you see, a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad. ~ Lewis Carroll,
846:Well, then,” the Cat went on, “you see, a dog growls when it’s angry, and wags its tail when it’s pleased. Now I growl when I’m pleased, and wag my tail when I’m angry. Therefore I’m mad. ~ Lewis Carroll,
847:absurd, but they all looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could. ~ Lewis Carroll,
848:And if you take one from three hundred and sixty-five what remains?" "Three hundred and sixty-four, of course." Humpty Dumpty looked doubtful, "I'd rather see that done on paper," he said. ~ Lewis Carroll,
849:They sought it with thimbles, they sought it with care;
They pursued it with forks and hope;
They threatened its life with a railway-share;
They charmed it with smiles and soap. ~ Lewis Carroll,
850:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?" "That depends a good deal on where you want to get to." "I don't much care where –" "Then it doesn't matter which way you go. ~ Lewis Carroll,
851:I’m older than you, and must know better.” And this Alice would not allow, without knowing how old it was, and, as the Lory positively refused to tell its age, there was no more to be said. ~ Lewis Carroll,
852:When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark, And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark: But, when the tide rises and sharks are around, His voice has a timid and tremulous sound. ~ Lewis Carroll,
853:anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!' (Which was very likely true.) Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! 'I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this ~ Lewis Carroll,
854:If only I could manage, without annoyance to my family, to get imprisoned for 10 years, "without hard labour," and with the use of books and writing materials, it would be simply delightful! ~ Lewis Carroll,
855:The White Rabbit put on his spectacles. 'Where shall I begin, please your Majesty?' he asked. 'Begin at the beginning,' the King said gravely, 'and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll,
856:Come back!" the Caterpillar called after her. "I've something important to say." This sounded promising, certainly. Alice turned and came back again. "Keep your temper," said the Caterpillar. ~ Lewis Carroll,
857:A bottle that reads, "Drink me." A tea party, with a dormouse, a March Hare, and of course, one Mad Hatter. A red queen, with as much a fondness for tarts as for saying, "Off with their heads! ~ Lewis Carroll,
858:Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The Hatter's remark seemed to have no sort of meaning in it, and yet it was certainly English. 'I don't quite understand you,' she said, as politely as she could. ~ Lewis Carroll,
859:a while, finding that nothing more happened, she decided on going into the garden at once; but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found she had forgotten the little golden key, ~ Lewis Carroll,
860:but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before ~ Lewis Carroll,
861:The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright--
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night. ~ Lewis Carroll,
862:Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures ~ Lewis Carroll,
863:Although Lewis Carroll thought of The Hunting of the Snark as a nonsense ballad for children, it is hard to imagine - in fact one shudders to imagine - a child of today reading and enjoying it. ~ Martin Gardner,
864:and when she had tired1 herself out with trying, the poor2 little3 thing4 sat down and cried5. und als sie sich ganz müde1 gearbeitet hatte, setzte sich das arme2, kleine3 Ding4 hin und weinte5. ~ Lewis Carroll,
865:and when she (went back1) to the table2 for it, she found she could5 (not possibly3) reach4 it: Sie ging1a zum Tisch2 zurück1b, um es zu holen, sah aber, daß sie es unmöglich3 erreichen4 konnte5 ~ Lewis Carroll,
866:Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. 'Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) 'I hope they'll remember her saucer ~ Lewis Carroll,
867:The question is, which is to be master? That's all. They've a temper, some of them. Particularly verbs. Oh, they're the proudest! Adjectives, eh, you can do anything with, but not verbs however. ~ Lewis Carroll,
868:Unimportant, of course, I meant,' the King hastily said, and went on to himself in an undertone, 'important--unimportant-- unimportant--important--' as if he were trying which word sounded best. ~ Lewis Carroll,
869:And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.' Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon ~ Lewis Carroll,
870:Anon, to sudden silence won,
In fancy they pursue
The dream-child moving through the land
Of wonders wild and new,
In friendly chat with bird or beast -
And half believe it true. ~ Lewis Carroll,
871:Sen kimsin?" diye sordu tırtıl .Alice, biraz utanarak "ben-ben şimdi pek bilmiyorum bayım, en azından bu sabah kalktığımda kim olduğumu biliyordum ama galiba o zamandan beri birkaç defa değiştim. ~ Lewis Carroll,
872:sen kimsin?" diye sordu tırtıl. alice, biraz utanarak "ben-ben şimdi pek bilmiyorum bayım, en azından bu sabah kalktığımda kim olduğumu biliyordum ama galiba o zamandan beri birkaç defa değiştim. ~ Lewis Carroll,
873:Study your wife closely, for the next four-and-twenty hours. If your good lady doesn't exhibit something in the shape of a contradiction in that time, Heaven help you!—you have married a monster. ~ Lewis Carroll,
874:The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead -
There were no birds to fly. ~ Lewis Carroll,
875:And if you take one from three hundred and sixty-five what remains?"
"Three hundred and sixty-four, of course."
Humpty Dumpty looked doubtful, "I'd rather see that done on paper," he said. ~ Lewis Carroll,
876:A tale begun in other days, When summer suns were glowing - A simple chime, that served to time The rhythm of your rowing - Whose echoes live in memory yet, Though envious years would say 'forget. ~ Lewis Carroll,
877:He thought he saw a Rattlesnake
That questioned him in Greek:
He looked again, and found it was
The Middle of Next Week.
'The one thing I regret,' he said,
'Is that it cannot speak! ~ Lewis Carroll,
878:I believe this thought, of the possibility of death - if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. ~ Lewis Carroll,
879:imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
880:Once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. ~ Lewis Carroll,
881:Alice came to a fork in the road. 'Which road do I take?' she asked. 'Where do you want to go?' responded the Cheshire Cat. 'I don't know,' Alice answered. 'Then,' said the Cat, 'it doesn't matter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
882:But it must be borne in mind that, if there is a Scylla before me, there is also a Charybdis - and that, in my fear of being read as a jest, I may incur the darker destiny of not being read at all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
883:Come back!" the Caterpillar called after her. "I've something important to say."
This sounded promising, certainly. Alice turned and came back again.
"Keep your temper," said the Caterpillar. ~ Lewis Carroll,
884:Come up again, dear!" I shall only look up and say "Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else"--but, ~ Lewis Carroll,
885:I'll try if I know all the things I used to know. Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is - oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate! ~ Lewis Carroll,
886:Mine is a long and a sad tale!' said the Mouse, turning to Alice, and sighing. 'It is a long tail, certainly,' said Alice, looking down with wonder at the Mouse's tail; 'but why do you call it sad? ~ Lewis Carroll,
887:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"
"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to."
"I don't much care where –"
"Then it doesn't matter which way you go. ~ Lewis Carroll,
888:When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark,
And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark:
But, when the tide rises and sharks are around,
His voice has a timid and tremulous sound. ~ Lewis Carroll,
889:All in the golden afternoon
Full leisurely we glide;
For both our oars, with little skill,
By little arms are plied,
While little hands make vain pretence
Our wanderings to guide. ~ Lewis Carroll,
890:I don't want to take up literature in a money-making spirit, or be very anxious about making large profits, but selling it at a loss is another thing altogether, and an amusement I cannot well afford. ~ Lewis Carroll,
891:O Oysters,' said the Carpenter,
You've had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?'
But answer came there none -
And this was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one. ~ Lewis Carroll,
892:The time has come
The walrus said
To talk of many things:
Of shoes- and ships-
And sealing wax-
Of cabbages and kings-
And why the sae is boiling hot-
And whether pigs have wings. ~ Lewis Carroll,
893:Come, hearken then, ere voice of dread,
with bitter tiding laden,
shall summon to unwelcome bed
a melancholy maiden!
We are but older children, dear,
who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ Lewis Carroll,
894:"Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with," the Mock Turtle replied, "and the different branches of Arithmetic—Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision." ~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland, Chapter X.,
895:(for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen ~ Lewis Carroll,
896:had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; ~ Lewis Carroll,
897:Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
898:She’s my prisoner, you know!” the Red Knight said at last.… “I don’t know,” Alice said doubtfully. “I don’t want to be anyone’s prisoner. I want to be a Queen.” —Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass ~ Holly Madison,
899:The time has come," the Walrus said,
"To talk of many things:
Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
Of cabbages--and kings--
And why the sea is boiling hot--
And whether pigs have wings. ~ Lewis Carroll,
900:The time has come,” the Walrus said,        “To talk of many things: Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—        Of cabbages—and kings— And why the sea is boiling hot—        And whether pigs have wings. ~ Lewis Carroll,
901:Alice! A childish story take,
And with a gentile hand
Lay it where Childhood dreams are twined
In memory's mystic band,
Like pilgrim's withered wreath of flowers
Pluck'd in a far off land. ~ Lewis Carroll,
902:Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.. ~ Lewis Carroll,
903:Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that. —Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass ~ Phil Knight,
904:Serpent, I say again!' repeated the Pigeon, but in a more subdued tone, and added with a kind of sob, 'I've tried every way, and nothing seems to suit them!' 'I haven't the least idea what you're talking ~ Lewis Carroll,
905:„So ist es,“ sagte die Herzogin, „und die Moral davon ist – Mit Liebe und Gesange hält man die Welt im Gange!“
„Wer sagte denn,“ flüsterte Alice, „es geschehe dadurch, daß Jeder vor seiner Thüre fege. ~ Lewis Carroll,
906:Aquí, como ves, has de correr tanto como puedas para permanecer en el mismo sitio. Si quieres llegar a alguna otra parte tienes que correr por lo menos el doble de rápido. LEWIS CARROLL, A través del espejo ~ Phil Knight,
907:Come, there's no use in crying like that!" said Alice to herself, rather sharply; "i advise you to leave off this minute!" She generally gave herself very good advise, (though she very seldom followed it) ~ Lewis Carroll,
908:Do you know, I always thought unicorns were fabulous monsters, too? I never saw one alive before!" Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn, "if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. ~ Lewis Carroll,
909:The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday-but never jam today It must come sometime to jam today, Alice objected No it can't said the Queen It's jame every other day. Today isn't any other day, you know ~ Lewis Carroll,
910:Intendo dire”, disse Alice, “che uno non può fare a meno di crescere.”

“Uno forse non può”, disse Humpty Dumpty,

“ma due possono. Con un aiuto adeguato, avresti potuto fermarti a sette anni. ~ Lewis Carroll,
911:In vain we roared;in vain we tried
To rouse her into laughter:
Her pensive glances wandered wide
From orchestra to rafter -
"TIER UPON TIER!" she said,and sighed;
And silence followed after. ~ Lewis Carroll,
912:So may it be for him, and me, and all of us!" I mused. "All that is evil, and dead, and hopeless, fading with the Night that is past! All that is good, and living, and hopeful, rising with the dawn of Day! ~ Lewis Carroll,
913:As a general rule, do not kick the shins of the opposite gentleman under the table, if personally unaquainted with him; your pleasantry is liable to be misunderstood--a circumstance at all times unpleasant. ~ Lewis Carroll,
914:If there's no meaning in it," said the King, "that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any. And yet I don't know," he went on [...]; "I seem to see some meaning in them, after all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
915:I've a right to think," said Alice sharply.
"Just about as much right," said the Duchess, "as pigs have to fly."
~ Lewis Carroll Lewis Carroll: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 1865 ~ Lewis Carroll ~ Lewis Carroll,
916:The time has come,' the Walrus said,
To talk of many things:
Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —
Of cabbages — and kings —
And why the sea is boiling hot —
And whether pigs have wings ~ Lewis Carroll,
917:Alice: “Bana hangi yoldan gitmem gerektiğini söyler misin?"
Kedi: "Bu neyi istediğine ve neye ulaşmaya çalıştığına bağlı."
Alice: "Şey, bilmem ki..."
Kedi: "O zaman hangi yoldan gittiğin farketmez. ~ Lewis Carroll,
918:And ever, as the story drained The wells of fancy dry, And faintly strove that weary one To put the subject by, "The rest next time--" "It is next time!" The Happy voice cry. Thus grew the tale of Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll,
919:'Have some wine,' the March Hare said in an encouraging tone. Alice looked around the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. 'I don't see any wine,' she remarked. 'There isn't any,' said the March Hare. ~ Lewis Carroll,
920:As a general rule, do not kick the shins of the opposite gentleman under the table, if personally unacquainted with him; your pleasantry is liable to be misunderstood – a circumstance at all times unpleasant. ~ Lewis Carroll,
921:The Queen turned crimson with fury, and, after glaring at her for a moment like a wild beast, screamed 'Off with her head! Off—'
'Nonsense!' said Alice, very loudly and decidedly, and the Queen was silent. ~ Lewis Carroll,
922:There are days when it seems to me that in literature the most convincing depiction of the world in which we live is to be found in the phantasmagorical kingdom through which Lewis Carroll took Alice on a tour. ~ Dean Koontz,
923:There were a number of tiny little brooks running straight across it from side to side, and the ground between was divided up into squares by a number of little green hedges, that reached from brook to brook. ~ Lewis Carroll,
924:Call it what you like,' said the Cat. 'Do you play croquet with the Queen to-day?' 'I should like it very much,' said Alice, 'but I haven't been invited yet.' 'You'll see me there,' said the Cat, and vanished. ~ Lewis Carroll,
925:Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; 'I advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and ~ Lewis Carroll,
926:Curiouser and curiouser!” cried Alice (she was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English); “now I’m opening out like the largest telescope that ever was! Good-bye, feet! ~ Lewis Carroll,
927:In fact, now I come to think of it, do we decide questions, at all? We decide answers, no doubt: but surely the questions decide us? It is the dog, you know, that wags the tail--not the tail that wags the dog. ~ Lewis Carroll,
928:To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said 'I've a sceptre in hand, I've a crown on my head. Let the Looking-Glass creatures, whatever they be, Come and dine with the Red Queen, the White Queen, and me. ~ Lewis Carroll,
929:What do you suppose is the use of a child without any meaning? Even a joke should have some meaning-- and a child's more imporant than a joke, I hope. You couldn't deny that, even if you tried with both hands. ~ Lewis Carroll,
930:simply—"Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
931:The hedgehog was engaged in a fight with another hedgehog, which seemed to Alice an excellent opportunity for croqueting one of them with the other: the only difficulty was, that her flamingo was gone across to ~ Lewis Carroll,
932:Alice asked the Cheshire Cat, who was sitting in a tree, “What road do I take?” The cat asked, “Where do you want to go?” “I don’t know,” Alice answered. “Then,” said the cat, “it really doesn’t matter, does it? ~ Lewis Carroll,
933:And though the shadow of a sigh
May tremble through the story,
For "happy summer days" gone by,
And vanish'd summer glory--
It shall not touch with breath of bale,
The pleasance of our fairy-tale. ~ Lewis Carroll,
934:A tale begun in other days,
When summer suns were glowing -
A simple chime, that served to time
The rhythm of your rowing -
Whose echoes live in memory yet,
Though envious years would say 'forget. ~ Lewis Carroll,
935:Do you know, I always thought unicorns were fabulous monsters, too? I never saw one alive before!"

Well, now that we have seen each other," said the unicorn, "if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. ~ Lewis Carroll,
936:I thought you did,' said the Mouse. '--I proceed. "Edwin and Morcar, the earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him: and even Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable--"' 'Found ~ Lewis Carroll,
937:simply--"Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
938:No,” the Pillar says. “The Hatter was never called ‘mad’ in Lewis Carroll’s book. Not once. It’s a universal misconception.” “Really?” I retort in disbelief. “Then who was called mad in the book?” “The March Hare, ~ Cameron Jace,
939:curtseying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) 'And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere. ~ Lewis Carroll,
940:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn't. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn't be. And what wouldn't be, it would. You see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
941:«Non credere mai d'essere diversa da quella che appari agli altri di esser o d'esser stata, o che tu possa essere, e l'essere non è altro che l'essere di quell'essere ch'è l'essere dell'essere, e non diversamente.» ~ Lewis Carroll,
942:The Lion and the Unicorn were fighting for the crown:
The Lion beat the Unicorn all around the town.
Some gave them white bread, some gave them brown:
Some gave them plum-cake and drummed them out of town. ~ Lewis Carroll,
943:If, in picking a quarrel, each party declined to go more than three-eighths of the way, and if, in making friends, each was ready to go five-eighths of the way—why, there would be more reconciliations than quarrels! ~ Lewis Carroll,
944:I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says "Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
945:Of course it is,’ said the Duchess, who seemed ready to agree to everything that Alice said; ‘there’s a large mustard-mine near here. And the moral of that is– “The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours. ~ Lewis Carroll,
946:I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says, ‘Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
947:earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him: and even Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable--"' 'Found what?' said the Duck. 'Found it,' the Mouse replied rather crossly: 'of course ~ Lewis Carroll,
948:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn't. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn't be. And what it wouldn't be, it would. You see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
949:If it had grown up,' she said to herself, 'it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think.' And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, ~ Lewis Carroll,
950:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn't. And contrariwise, what it is, it wouldn't be. And what it wouldn't be it would. You see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
951:I know what you’re thinking about,” said Tweedle-dum, “But it ain’t so, nohow.” “Contrariwise,” continued Tweedledee, “if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic. ~ Lewis Carroll,
952:Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman; and how she would keep, through all her riper years, the simple and loving heart of her childhood: ~ Lewis Carroll,
953:Well, I’ll eat it,’ said Alice, ‘and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way I’ll get into the garden, and I don’t care which happens! ~ Lewis Carroll,
954:Alice asked the cheshire cat, who was sitting in a tree, "What raod do I take?"
The cat asked, "Where do you want to go?"
"I don't know", Alice answered
"Then," said the cat, "it really doesn't matter, does it? ~ Lewis Carroll,
955:I don’t suppose there’ll be a tree left standing, for ever so far around, by the time we’re finished.’” Tweedledum to tweedledee [They are fighting over a rattle]. Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, p. 156 ~ Lewis Carroll,
956:If I was not assured by the best authority on earth that the world is to be destroyed by fire, I should conclude that the day of destruction is at hand, but brought on by means of an agent very opposite to that of heat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
957:If you think we're waxworks," he said, "you ought to pay, you know.Waxworks weren't made to be looked at for nothing. Nohow!"
"Contrariwise," added the one marked 'DEE', "if you think we're alive, you ought to speak. ~ Lewis Carroll,
958:The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well. ~ Lewis Carroll,
959:When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.' 'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you CAN make words mean so many different things. ~ Lewis Carroll,
960:You might as well say,' added the Dormouse, who seemed to be talking in his sleep, 'that "I breathe when I sleep" is the same thing as "I sleep when I breathe"!'
'It is the same thing with you,' said the Hatter[...]. ~ Lewis Carroll,
961:Duchess's knee, while plates and dishes crashed around it--once more the shriek of the Gryphon, the squeaking of the Lizard's slate-pencil, and the choking of the suppressed guinea-pigs, filled the air, mixed up with the ~ Lewis Carroll,
962:And is not that a Mother’s gentle hand that undraws your curtains, and a Mother’s sweet voice that summons you to rise? To rise and forget, in the bright sunlight, the ugly dreams that frightened you so when all was dark. ~ Lewis Carroll,
963:If I wasn't real,' Alice said—half-laughing through her tears, it all seemed so ridiculous—'I shouldn't be able to cry.' 'I hope you don't suppose those are real tears?' Tweedledum interrupted in a tone of great contempt. ~ Lewis Carroll,
964:It was much pleasanter at home," thought poor Alice, "when one wasn't always growing larger and smaller, and being ordered about by mice and rabbits. I almost wish I hadn't gone down the rabbit-hole--and yet--and yet--... ~ Lewis Carroll,
965:Of course it is,’ said the Duchess, who seemed ready to agree to everything
that Alice said; ‘there’s a large mustard-mine near here. And the moral
of that is– “The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours. ~ Lewis Carroll,
966:and vinegar that makes them sour—and camomile that makes them bitter—and—and barley-sugar and such things that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people knew that: then they wouldn’t be so stingy about it, you know— ~ Lewis Carroll,
967:Why, there they are!' said the King triumphantly, pointing to the tarts on the table. 'Nothing can be clearer than that. Then again--" before she had this fit--" you never had fits, my dear, I think?' he said to the Queen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
968:Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake. ~ Lewis Carroll,
969:Alice thought the whole thing very absurd, but they all looked so grave that she did not dare to laugh; and, as she could not think of anything to say, she simply bowed, and took the thimble, looking as solemn as she could. ~ Lewis Carroll,
970:in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them again, and all would change to dull reality--the grass would be only rustling in the wind, and the pool rippling to the waving of the reeds--the rattling teacups would ~ Lewis Carroll,
971:I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says, "Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
972:overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a ~ Lewis Carroll,
973:Aquí, ya ves, hay que correr todo lo posible para quedarte en el mismo sitio. Si quieres ir a algún sitio, debes correr al menos dos veces más rápido. Lewis Carroll, Alicia a través del espejo (monólogo de la reina roja) ~ Lawrence Freedman,
974:Lewis Carroll and J. M. Barrie were very strange men, and such is the nature of the written word that their personal strangeness shines straight through all the layers of Disneyfication like X-rays through a wall. Probably ~ Neal Stephenson,
975:I see nobody on the road,' said Alice
'I only wish I had such eyes,' The King remarked in a fretful tone. 'To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance too! Why it's as much as I can do to see real people, by this light! ~ Lewis Carroll,
976:I see nobody on the road,' said Alice. 'I only wish I had such eyes,' the King remarked in a fretful tone. 'To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance, too! Why, it's as much as I can do to see real people, by this light! ~ Lewis Carroll,
977:Mad Hatter: Would you like a little more tea? Alice: Well, I haven't had any yet, so I can't very well take more. March Hare: Ah, you mean you can't very well take less. Mad Hatter: Yes. You can always take more than nothing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
978:Oh, don't go on like that!' cried the poor Queen, wringing her hands in despair. 'Consider what a great girl you are. Consider what a long way you've come today. Consider what o'clock it is. Consider anything, only don't cry! ~ Lewis Carroll,
979:"She can't do Subtraction." said the White Queen. "Can you do Division? Divide a loaf by a knife-what's the answer to that?" "I suppose-" Alice was beginning, but the Red Queen answered for her. "Bread-and-butter, of course." ~ Lewis Carroll,
980:Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not ~ Lewis Carroll,
981:"Can you do Addition?" the White Queen said. "What's one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one?" "I don't know," said Alice. "I lost count." "She can't do Addition," the Red Queen interrupted. ~ Lewis Carroll,
982:- ¡Es de... lo más... irritante... -dijo al fin- que una persona no sepa distinguir una corbata de un cinturón!
- Sé que es una terrible ignorancia por mi parte - dijo Alicia en un tono tan humilde que Tentetieso se aplacó. ~ Lewis Carroll,
983:"I see nobody on the road," said Alice. "I only wish I had such eyes," the King remarked in a fretful tone. "To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance too! Why, it's as much as I can do to see real people, by this light." ~ Lewis Carroll,
984:I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. There goes the shawl again! ~ Lewis Carroll,
985:In proceeding to the dining-room, the gentleman gives one arm to the lady he escorts—it is unusual to offer both. In proceeding to the dining-room, the gentleman gives one arm to the lady he escorts—it is unusual to offer both. ~ Lewis Carroll,
986:Speak English!" said the Eaglet. "I don't know the meaning of half those long words, and, what's more, I don't believe you do either!" And the Eaglet bend down its head to hide a smile: some of the other birds tittered audibly. ~ Lewis Carroll,
987:We met a great many other interesting people, among them Lewis Carroll, author of the immortal "Alice"--but he was only interesting to look at, for he was the silliest and shyest full-grown man I have ever met except "Uncle Remus. ~ Mark Twain,
988:How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail, And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale! 'How cheerfully he seems to grin, How neatly spread his claws, And welcome little fishes in With gently smiling jaws! ~ Lewis Carroll,
989:One day Alice came to a fork in the road and saw a Cheshire cat in a tree. ‘Which road do I take?’ she asked. ‘Where do you want to go?’ was his response. ‘I don’t know,’ Alice answered. ‘Then,’ said the cat, ‘it doesn’t matter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
990:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’ ‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat. ‘I don’t much care where—’ said Alice. ‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
991:Alice asked the Cheshire Cat who was sitting in a tree "What road do I take?"

The cat asked, "Where do you want to go?"

"I don't know " answered Alice.

"Then, said the cat, it really doesn't matter, does it? ~ Lewis Carroll,
992:And ever, as the story drained
The wells of fancy dry,
And faintly strove that weary one
To put the subject by,
"The rest next time--" "It is next time!"
The Happy voice cry.

Thus grew the tale of Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll,
993:How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail, And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale! “How cheerfully he seems to grin, How neatly spread his claws, And welcome little fishes in, With gently smiling jaws! ~ Lewis Carroll,
994:little different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is, Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle!' And she began thinking over all the children she knew that were of the same age as herself, to see if she could ~ Lewis Carroll,
995:Mad Hatter: “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?” “Have you guessed the riddle yet?” the Hatter said, turning to Alice again. “No, I give it up,” Alice replied: “What’s the answer?” “I haven’t the slightest idea,” said the Hatter ~ Lewis Carroll,
996:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?' 'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. 'I don't much care where--' said Alice. 'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
997:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’ ‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat. ‘I don’t much care where —’ said Alice. ‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
998:—¡No se pueden creer las cosas imposibles!
—Será porque no lo has intentado—le dijo la Reina—. Cuando yo tenía tu edad, lo intentaba media hora cada día... A la hora del desayuno a veces ya me había creído seis cosas imposibles. ~ Lewis Carroll,
999:Alice asked the Cheshire Cat, who was sitting in a tree, “What road do I take?”

The cat asked, “Where do you want to go?”

“I don’t know,” Alice answered.

“Then,” said the cat, “it really doesn’t matter, does it? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1000:How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail, And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale! How cheerfully he seems to grin, How neatly he spreads his claws, And welcomes little fishes in, With gently smiling jaws! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1001:There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ~ Lewis Carroll,
1002:To be sure, this is what generally happens when one eats cake; but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1003:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?' 'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. 'I don't much care where—' said Alice. 'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat. '—so ~ Lewis Carroll,
1004:How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail, And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale! 'How cheerfully he seems to grin, How neatly spread his claws, And welcome little fishes in With gently smiling jaws!' 'I'm ~ Lewis Carroll,
1005:is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain ~ Lewis Carroll,
1006:It’s a miserable story!” said Bruno. “It begins miserably, and it ends miserablier. I think I shall cry. Sylvie, please lend me your handkerchief.” “I haven’t got it with me,” Sylvie whispered. “Then I won’t cry,” said Bruno manfully. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1007:Scarce was the verdict spoken,
When that still calm was broken,
A childish form hath burst into the throng;
With tears and looks of sadness,
That bring no news of gladness,
But tell too surely something hath gone wrong! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1008:Your hair wants cutting,” said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech. “You should learn not to make personal remarks,” Alice said with some severity; “it’s very rude. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1009:Me parece que podrían hacer algo mejor con el tiempo”, dijo, “que gastarlo preguntando acertijos que no tienen respuesta”. “Si conocieras al Tiempo tan bien como yo”, dijo el Sombrerero, “no hablarías de gastarlo. ¡Es todo un caballero! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1010:So she set the little creature down, and felt quite relieved to see it trot away quietly into the wood. 'If it had grown up,' she said to herself, 'it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1011:if you'd like it put more simply---Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1012:Mad Hatter: Would you like a little more tea?
Alice: Well, I haven't had any yet, so I can't very well take more.
March Hare: Ah, you mean you can't very well take less.
Mad Hatter: Yes. You can always take more than nothing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1013:Must a name mean something?" Alice asked doubtfully. Of course it must," Humpty Dumpty said with a short laugh; "my name means the shape I am - and a good handsome shape it is, too. With a name like yours, you might be any shape, almost. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1014:on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1015:Mad Hatter: “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?”
“Have you guessed the riddle yet?” the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.
“No, I give it up,” Alice replied: “What’s the answer?”
“I haven’t the slightest idea,” said the Hatter ~ Lewis Carroll,
1016:Just look down the road and tell me if you can see either of them."
I see nobody on the road." said Alice.
I only wish I had such eyes,"the King remarked in a fretful tone. "To be able to see Nobody! And at such a distance too! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1017:A stąd morał: Bądź, kim się zdajesz, lub, jeśli wolisz prościej: Nie myśl sobie, że nie jesteś kimś innym niż mogłoby się wydawać innym że będąc kim jesteś lub mogłabyś być nie byłabyś kimś innym niż byłabyś gdybyś wydawała im się kimś innym. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1018:But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.” “How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice. “You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1019:Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! 'I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?' she said aloud. 'I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think-- ~ Lewis Carroll,
1020:This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, ‘I— I hardly know, sir, just at present — at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1021:What do you know about this business?' the King said to Alice. 'Nothing,' said Alice. 'Nothing whatever?' persisted the King. 'Nothing whatever,' said Alice. 'That's very important,' the King said, turning to the jury. They were just beginning ~ Lewis Carroll,
1022:Alice sighed wearily. "I think you might do something better with the time," she said, "than wasting it in asking riddles that have no answers." "If you knew Time as well as I do," said the Hatter, "you wouldn't talk about wasting it. It's him. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1023:I wish I hadn't cried so much!" said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out. "I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears! That will be a queer thing, to be sure! However, everything is queer today. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1024:Je vois personne sur la route", dit Alice.
"Comme je voudrais avoir d'aussi bons yeux", remarqua le roi d'un ton amer. "Voir Personne! Et à cette distance encore! Moi, tout ce dont je suis capable de voir, sous cette lumière, c'est des gens! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1025:Must a name mean something?" Alice asked doubtfully.

Of course it must," Humpty Dumpty said with a short laugh; "my name means the shape I am - and a good handsome shape it is, too. With a name like yours, you might be any shape, almost. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1026:Newtonian physics runs into problems at the subatomic level. Down there--in the land of hadrons, quarks, and Schrödinger's cat--things gent freaky. The cool rationality of Isaac Newton gives way to the bizarre unpredictability of Lewis Carroll. ~ Daniel H Pink,
1027:I wish I hadn't cried so much!' said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out. 'I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears! That will be a queer thing, to be sure! However, everything is queer to-day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1028:'What's the use of their having names the Gnat said, 'if they won't answer to them?' 'No use to them,' said Alice; 'but it's useful to the people who name them, I suppose. If not, why do things have names at all?' 'I can't say,' the Gnat replied. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1029:In un Paese delle Meraviglie essi giacciono,
Sognando mentre i giorni passano,
Sognando mentre le estati muoiono:

Eternamente scivolando lungo la corrente....
Indugiando nell'aureo bagliore...
Che cosa è la vita, se non un sogno? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1030:It’s a miserable story!” said Bruno. “It begins miserably, and it ends miserablier. I think I shall cry. Sylvie, please lend me your handkerchief.”

“I haven’t got it with me,” Sylvie whispered.

“Then I won’t cry,” said Bruno manfully. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1031:May we not then sometimes define insanity as an inability to distinguish which is the waking and which the sleeping life? We often dream without the least suspicion of unreality: 'Sleep hath its own world', and it is often as lifelike as the other. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1032:Antipathies, I think--' (she was rather glad there WAS no one listening, this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) '--but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1033:Will you walk a little faster? said a whiting to a snail, "There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail! See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance: They are waiting on the shingle--will you come and join the dance? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1034:And how many hours a day did you do lessons?” said Alice, in a hurry to change the subject. “Ten hours the first day,” said the Mock Turtle: “nine the next, and so on.” “What a curious plan!” exclaimed Alice. “That’s the reason they’re called lessons, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1035:But I don’t want to go among mad people," Alice remarked.
"Oh, you can’t help that," said the Cat: "we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad."
"How do you know I’m mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn’t have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1036:By-the-bye, what became of the baby?" said the Cat. "I'd nearly forgotten to ask."
"It turned into a pig," Alice answered very quietly, just as if the Cat had come back in a natural way.
"I thought it would," said the Cat, and vanished again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1037:A great deal of the bad writing in the world comes simply from writing too quickly. Of course you reply, “I do it to save time”. A very good object, no doubt: but what right have you to do it at your friend’s expense? Isn’t his time as valuable as yours? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1038:This question the Dodo could not answer without a great deal of thought, and it stood for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest waited in silence. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1039:No wise fish would go anywhere without a porpoise." "Wouldn't it, really?" said Alice, in a tone of great surprise. "Of course not," said the Mock Turtle. "Why, if a fish came to me, and told me he was going on a journey, I should say 'With what porpoise? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1040:Tanrım! Bugün her şey ne tuhaf! Daha dün her şey kendi olağan halindeydi. Acaba ben gece mi değiştim? Bir düşüneyim: Bu sabah kalktığımda ben ben miydim? Sanki biraz farklı gibiydim, ama ben aynı ben değilsem, o zaman yahu ben kimim? İşte asıl bilmece bu! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1041:Alice 'without pictures or conversation?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking ~ Lewis Carroll,
1042:I HAVE tasted eggs, certainly,' said Alice, who was a very truthful child; 'but little girls eat eggs quite as much as serpents do, you know.' 'I don't believe it,' said the Pigeon; 'but if they do, why then they're a kind of serpent, that's all I can say. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1043:The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday—but never jam to-day.”
“It must come sometimes to ‘jam to-day,’” Alice objected.
“No, it ca’n’t,” said the Queen. “It’s jam every other day: to-day isn’t any other day, you know ~ Lewis Carroll,
1044:Who ARE You?" This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, I--I hardly know, sir, just at present-- at least I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1045:How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!

How cheerfully he seems to grin,
How neatly he spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in,
With gently smiling jaws! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1046:I wonder if I've been changed in the night. Let me think. Was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is 'Who in the world am I?' Ah, that's the great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1047:That is not said right,' said the Caterpillar.

'Not quite right, I'm afraid,' said Alice, timidly; some of the words have got altered.'

'It is wrong from beginning to end,' said the Caterpillar decidedly, and there was silence for some minutes. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1048:Two girls walk past in gargantuan heels and dresses so tight that their skin is spilling out, and one of them says to the other, "Wait, who the fuck is Lewis Carroll?" and in my imagination I pull a gun out of my pocket, shoot them both and then shoot myself. ~ Alice Oseman,
1049:Well!” thought Alice to herself. “After such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down-stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!” (Which was very likely true.) ~ Lewis Carroll,
1050:Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!' (Which was very likely true.) ~ Lewis Carroll,
1051:Görüneceğin gibi ol,'...ya da daha bir sadeleştirirsek...'Kendinin başkalarına görünebileceğinden farklı olmadığını, önceden olan ya da olmuş olabilen halinin de, başkalarına farklı görünmüş olacak olan daha da önceki halinden farklı olmadığını asla zannetme. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1052:I wonder if I've been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is, 'Who in the world am I?' Ah, that's the great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1053:Alice, 'it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin.' For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very ~ Lewis Carroll,
1054:Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. 'Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) 'I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with ~ Lewis Carroll,
1055:ATTRIBUTE, TERM, SUBJECT, PREDICATE, PARTICULAR, UNIVERSAL--charmingly useful, if any friend should happen to ask if you have ever studied Logic. Mind you bring all seven words into your answer, and you friend will go away deeply impressed--'a sadder and a wiser ~ Lewis Carroll,
1056:As life draws nearer to its end, I feel more and more clearly that it will not matter in the least, at the last day, what form of religion a man has professed-nay, that many who have never even heard of Christ, will in that day find themselves saved by His blood. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1057:Who ARE You?”
This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly,
“I--I hardly know, sir, just at present-- at least I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1058:Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!' (Which was very likely true.) Down, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1059:It's a great huge game of chess that's being played--all over the world--if this is the world at all, you know. Oh, what fun it is! How I wish I was one of them! I wouldn't mind being a Pawn, if only I might join--though of course I should like to be a Queen, best. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1060:Aren't you sometimes frightened at being planted out here, with nobody to take care of you?'
'There's the tree in the middle,' said the Rose:'what else is it good for?'
'But what could it do, if any danger came?' Alice asked.
'It could bark,' said the Rose. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1061:People have asked the question "Can a Thing exist without any Attributes belonging to it?" It is a very puzzling question, and I'm not going to try to answer it: let us turn up our noses, and treat it with contemptuous silence, as if it really wasn't worth noticing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1062:what you would seem to be"—or if you'd like it put more simply—"Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1063:While the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it. The danger is too great of thus learning to look at solemn things in a spirit of mockery, and to seek in them opportunities for exercising wit. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1064:She stretched herself up on tiptoe and peeped over the edge and her eyes immediately met those of a large blue caterpillar, that was sitting on the top, with its arms folded, quietly smoking a long hookah and taking not the smallest notice of her or of anything else. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1065:To me it seems that to give happiness is a far nobler goal that to attain it: and that what we exist for is much more a matter of relations to others than a matter of individual progress: much more a matter of helping others to heaven than of getting there ourselves. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1066:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?” “That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat. “I don’t much care where …” said Alice. “Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat. —LEWIS CARROLL, Alice in Wonderland ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1067:busy farm-yard--while the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle's heavy sobs. Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman; and how she would keep, through ~ Lewis Carroll,
1068:poison" or not'; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker ~ Lewis Carroll,
1069:After these came the royal children; there were ten of them, and the little dears came jumping merrily along hand in hand, in couples; they were all ornamented with hearts. Next came the guests, mostly Kings and Queens, and among them Alice recognised the White Rabbit: ~ Lewis Carroll,
1070:Alice had begun with 'Let's pretend we're kings and queens;' and her sister, who liked being exact, had argued that they couldn't, because there were only two of them, and Alice hand been reduced at last to say, 'Well, you can be one of them then, and I'll be the rest. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1071:Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop ~ Lewis Carroll,
1072:And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, 'Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?' and sometimes, 'Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1073:He said he would come in,' the White Queen went on, `because he was looking for a hippopotamus. Now, as it happened, there wasn't such a thing in the house, that morning.' Is there generally?' Alice asked in an astonished tone. Well, only on Thursdays,' said the Queen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1074:schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) '--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1075:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?” “That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat. “I don’t much care where …” said Alice. “Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat. —LEWIS CARROLL, Alice in Wonderland The ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1076:Be what you would seem to be - or, if you'd like it put more simply - never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1077:I see nobody on the road,” said Alice. “I only wish that I had such eyes,” the King remarked in a fretful tone. “To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance too! Why, it’s as much as I can do to see real people, by this light!” —Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass ~ Karen Russell,
1078:Tis so,' said the Duchess: 'and the moral of that is- "Oh, 'tis love, 'tis love, that makes the world go round!"'
'Somebody said,' Alice whispered, 'that it's done by everybody minding their own business!'
'Ah, well! It means much the same thing,' said the Duchess. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1079:Alice! Come here directly, and get ready for your walk!" "Coming in a minute, nurse! But I've got to see that the mouse doesn't get out." Only I don't think,' Alice went on, 'that they'd let Dinah stop in the house if it began ordering people about like that!' By this time ~ Lewis Carroll,
1080:At the smallest levels, the universe operates according to very different rules from those of the sensual world. There are contradictions and impossibilities, paradoxes and strangenesses, a Lewis Carroll logic; yet this is the most accurate description of how reality works. ~ Ian McDonald,
1081:It'll be no use their putting their heads down and saying, 'Come up again, dear!' I shall only look up and say, 'Who am I, then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up -- if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else' -- but, oh, dear! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1082:or conversation?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit ~ Lewis Carroll,
1083:And as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came! One, two! One, two! And through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1084:He said he would come in,' the White Queen went on, `because he was looking for a hippopotamus. Now, as it happened, there wasn't such a thing in the house, that morning.'
Is there generally?' Alice asked in an astonished tone.
Well, only on Thursdays,' said the Queen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1085:that the way you manage?' Alice asked. The Hatter shook his head mournfully. 'Not I!' he replied. 'We quarrelled last March--just before he went mad, you know--' (pointing with his tea spoon at the March Hare,) '--it was at the great concert given by the Queen of Hearts, and ~ Lewis Carroll,
1086:Who are you?” said the Caterpillar. This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, “I—I hardly know, sir, just at present—at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1087:the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually TOOK A WATCH OUT OF ITS WAISTCOAT-POCKET, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1088:Ah, my dear! Let this be a lesson to you never to lose your temper!' 'Hold your tongue, Ma!' said the young Crab, a little snappishly. 'You're enough to try the patience of an oyster!' 'I wish I had our Dinah here, I know I do!' said Alice aloud, addressing nobody in particular. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1089:In Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass, the Red Queen tells Alice that the world keeps shifting so quickly under her feet that she has to keep running just to keep her position. This is our predicament with cancer: we are forced to keep running merely to keep still. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
1090:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?” “That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat. “I don’t much care where—” said Alice. “Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat. —Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll ~ Keith Ferrazzi,
1091:Talvez seja sempre a pimenta que torna as pessoas esquentadas [...] e o vinagre que as torna azedas... e a camomila que as torna amargas... e... o caramelo e essas coisas que tornam as crianças suaves. Só queria que as pessoas soubessem disto: não seriam tão sovinas com bomboms... ~ Lewis Carroll,
1092:Take off your hat," the King said to the Hatter.
"It isn't mine," said the Hatter.
"Stolen!" the King exclaimed, turning to the jury, who instantly made a memorandum of the fact.
"I keep them to sell," the Hatter added as an explanation; "I've none of my own. I'm a hatter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1093:Once upon a time there were three little sisters,' the Dormouse began in a great hurry; 'and their names were Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a well--' 'What did they live on?' said Alice, who always took a great interest in questions of eating and drinking. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1094:Rabbit came near her, she began, in a low, timid voice, 'If you please, sir--' The Rabbit started violently, dropped the white kid gloves and the fan, and skurried away into the darkness as hard as he could go. Alice took up the fan and gloves, and, as the hall was very hot, she kept ~ Lewis Carroll,
1095:Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice's first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but ~ Lewis Carroll,
1096:Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at ~ Lewis Carroll,
1097:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?” the Mad Hatter, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll ~ Victoria Danann,
1098:Alice felt so desperate that she was ready to ask help of any one: so, when the Rabbit came near her, she began, in a low, timid voice, “If you please, Sir—” The Rabbit started violently, dropped the white kid-gloves and the fan, and scurried away into the darkness as hard as he could go. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1099:buttons, and turns out his toes.' [later editions continued as follows When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark, And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark, But, when the tide rises and sharks are around, His voice has a timid and tremulous sound.] 'That's different from what ~ Lewis Carroll,
1100:Forbid the day when vivisection shall be practised in every college and school, and when the man of science, looking forth over a world which will then own no other sway than his, shall exult in the thought that he has made of this fair earth, if not a heaven, at least a hell for animals. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1101:Alice laughed . “There’s no use trying,” she said: “one can’t believe impossible things.”“I daresay you haven’t had much practice, ” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1102:Be what you would seem to be -- or, if you'd like it put more simply -- Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.
-the Duchess ~ Lewis Carroll,
1103:So she was considering, in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1104:I'm very much afraid I didn't mean anything but nonsense. Still, you know, words mean more than we mean to express when we use them; so a whole book ought to mean a great deal more than the writer means. So, whatever good meanings are in the book, I'm glad to accept as the meaning of the book. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1105:No use, no use!' said the King. 'She runs so fearfully quick. You might as well try to catch a Bandersnatch! But I'll make a memorandum about her, if you like-she's a dear good creature,' he repeated softly to himself, as he opened his memorandum-book. 'Do you spell "creature" with a double "e"? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1106:She waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this; “for it might end, you know,” said Alice to herself, “in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?” —Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ Sarai Walker,
1107:the Queen's shrill cries to the voice of the shepherd boy--and the sneeze of the baby, the shriek of the Gryphon, and all thy other queer noises, would change (she knew) to the confused clamour of the busy farm-yard--while the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock ~ Lewis Carroll,
1108:and the moral of that is —“Be what you would seem to be”— or if you’d like it put more simply —“Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1109:In Winter, when the fields are white, I sing this song for your delight. In Spring, when the woods are getting green, I’ll try and tell you what i mean. In Summer, when the days are long, perhaps you’ll understand the song. In Autumn, when the leaves are brown, take pen and ink, and write it down. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1110:The creator of Alice in Wonderland was not just an expert in poetic nonsense; Lewis Carroll (or Charles Dodgson, to use his real name) was also an Oxford mathematician with a taste for symbolic logic and a distaste, in the sunset of the Victorian era, for new-fangled maths theories and practices. ~ Sinclair McKay,
1111:When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’ ’The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’ ’The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1112:I try to believe in as many as six impossible things before breakfast. Count them, Alice. One, there are drinks that make you shrink. Two, there are foods that make you grow. Three, animals can talk. Four, cats can disappear. Five, there is a place called Underland. Six, I can slay the Jabberwocky. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1113:were placed along the course, here and there. There was no 'One, two, three, and away,' but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over. However, when they had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry again, the ~ Lewis Carroll,
1114:When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.” “The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.” “The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master — that’s all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1115:Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1116:Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversation? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1117:But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat, “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.” “How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice. “You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.” ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ by Lewis Carroll ~ Shweta Ganesh Kumar,
1118:le gustan los gatos!”, gritó el ratón con voz apasionada y penetrante. “¿Te gustarían los gatos si fueses yo?”   “Bueno, puede que no”, dijo Alicia en tono conciliador: “no se enoje. Y así y todo me encantaría presentarle a nuestra gata Dinah. Si sólo la viera, creo que le tomaría cariño a los gatos. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1119:Oh, I beg your pardon!” she exclaimed in a tone of great dismay, and began picking them up again as quickly as she could, for the accident of the gold-fish kept running in her head, and she had a vague sort of idea that they must be collected at once and put back into the jury-box, or they would die. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1120:Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on. "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know." "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that "I see what I eat" is the same thing as "I eat what I see"! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1121:Alicia, deseosa de no ofender otra vez al Lirón, empezó tímidamente:
—Es que no entiendo. ¿De dónde extraían la melaza?
—De un pozo de petróleo se extrae petróleo, ¿no? —dijo el Sombrerero—; supongo, pues, que también se podrá extraer melaza de un pozo de melaza. ¿Lo entiendes ahora, estúpida? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1122:Oysa daha dün her zamanki gibiydi. Acaba dün gece değiştim mi ben? Dur bakayım düşüneyim: bu sabah kalktığım zaman gene önceden olduğum gibi miydim acaba? Biraz değişiklik duyumsamıştım kendimde gibi geliyor. Ama eğer ben ben değilsem yeni bir sorun çıkıyor: acaba kimim? İşte asıl bilinmez bilmece bu! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1123:Well, I'd hardly finished the first verse," said the Hatter, "when the Queen bawled out 'He's murdering the time! Off with his head!'"
"How dreadfully savage!" exclaimed Alice.
"and ever since that," the Hatter went on in a mournful tone, "he wo'n't do a thing I ask! It's always six o'clock now. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1124:Who can tell whether the parallelogram, which in our ignorance we have defined and drawn, and the whole of whose properties we profess to know, may not be all the while panting for exterior angles, sympathetic with the interior, or sullenly repining at the fact that it cannot be inscribed in a circle? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1125:When all has been considered, it seems to me to be the irresistible intuition that infinite punishment for finite sin would be unjust, and therefore wrong. We feel that even weak and erring Man would shrink from such an act. And we cannot conceive of God as acting on a lower standard of right and wrong. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1126:You're thinking about something, my dear, and that makes you forget to talk. I can't tell you just now what the moral of that is, but I shall remember it in a bit." "Perhaps it hasn't one," Alice ventured to remark. "Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1127:There's nothing like eating hay when you're faint,' he remarked to her, as he munched away.

'I should think throwing cold water over you would be better,' Alice suggested, '- or some sal-volatile.'

'I didn't say there was nothing BETTER,' the King replied. 'I said there was nothing LIKE it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1128:I dare say you never even spoke to Time!" "Perhaps not," Alice cautiously replied; "but I know I have to beat time when I listen to music." "Ah! That accounts for it," said the Hatter. "He won't stand a beating. Now, if only you kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you like with the clock. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1129:And how many hours a day did you do lessons?' said Alice, in a hurry to change the subject. Ten hours the first day,' said the Mock Turtle: 'nine the next, and so on.' What a curious plan!' exclaimed Alice. That's the reason they're called lessons,' the Gryphon remarked: 'because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1130:Are there any lions or tigers about here?' she asked timidly.

'It's only the Red King snoring,' said Tweedledee.

'Come and look at him!' the brothers cried, and they each took one of Alice's hands, and led her up to where the King was sleeping.

'Isn't he a LOVELY sight?' said Tweedledum. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1131:Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.
"I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."
"Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that "I see what I eat" is the same thing as "I eat what I see"! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1132:You're thinking about something, my dear, and that makes you forget to talk. I can't tell you just now what the moral of that is, but I shall remember it in a bit."
"Perhaps it hasn't one," Alice ventured to remark.
"Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1133:Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1134:Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?' So she was ~ Lewis Carroll,
1135:And how many hours a day did you do lessons?" said Alice, in a hurry to change the subject. "Ten hours the first day," said the Mock Turtle: "nine the next, and so on." "What a curious plan!" exclaimed Alice. "That's the reason they're called lessons," the Gryphon remarked: "because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1136:When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’

’The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

’The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1137:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"
"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat.
"I don't much care where-" said Alice.
"Then it doesn't matter which way you go," said the Cat.
"-so long as I get somewhere," Alice added as an explanation. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1138:Take some more tea," the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.
"I've had nothing yet," Alice replied in an offended tone, "so I can't take more."
"You mean you can't take less," said the Hatter: "it's very easy to take more than nothing."
"Nobody asked your opinion," said Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1139:How should I know?" said Alice, surprised at her own courage. "It's no business of mine."
The Queen turned crimson with fury, and, after glaring at her for a moment like a wild beast, began screaming "Off with her head! Off with--"
"Nonsense!" said Alice, very loudly and decidedly, and the Queen was silent. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1140:¡Qué raro resulta todo hoy! Y pensar que ayer las cosas andaban como siempre. ¿Habré cambiado durante la noche? Pensemos: ¿era yo la misma cuando desperté esta mañana? Casi puedo recordar sentirme un poco distinta. Pero si no soy la misma, la siguiente pregunta es ‘¿Quién cuernos soy?’ ¡Ah, ése es el gran dilema! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1141:¡Y no pienso hacer caso de las palabras de los mayores cuando digan: "Anda, querida, sube..., te estamos esperando"! Yo los miraré desafiante desde abajo y les diré: "Antes decidme quién soy, y si me gusta esa persona, entonces subiré, pero si no me gusta me quedaré aquí y esperaré a convertirme en otra persona". ~ Lewis Carroll,
1142:O Mouse, do you know the way out of this pool? I am very tired of swimming about here, O Mouse!' (Alice thought this must be the right way of speaking to a mouse: she had never done such a thing before, but she remembered having seen in her brother's Latin Grammar, 'A mouse—of a mouse—to a mouse—a mouse—O mouse!') ~ Lewis Carroll,
1143:Alice laughed. 'There's no use trying,' she said. 'One can't believe impossible things.' I daresay you haven't had much practice,' said the Queen. 'When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. There goes the shawl again! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1144:And how do you know that you're mad? "To begin with," said the Cat, "a dog's not mad. You grant that?" I suppose so, said Alice. "Well then," the Cat went on, "you see a dog growls when it's angry, and wags it's tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1145:Dear Cook, please lend a frying-pan To me as quickly as you can.” “And wherefore should I lend it you?” “The reason, Cook, is plain to view. I wish to make an Irish stew.” “What meat is in that stew to go?” “My sister’ll be the contents!” “Oh!” “You’ll lend the pan to me, Cook?” “No!” Moral: Never stew your sister. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1146:What curious attitudes he goes into!' (For the messenger kept skipping up and down, and wriggling like an eel, as he came along, with his great hands spread out like fans on each side.)'Not at all,' said the King. 'He's an Anglo-Saxon Messenger-and those are Anglo-Saxon attitudes. He only does them when he's happy. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1147:Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

"I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."

"Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "You might just as well say that "I see what I eat" is the same thing as "I eat what I see"! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1148:When I come upon anything-in Logic or in any other hard subject-that entirely puzzles me, I find it a capital plan to talk it over, aloud, even when I am all alone. One can explain things so clearly to one's self! And then, you know, one is so patient with one's self: one never gets irritated at one's own stupidity! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1149:And how many hours a day did you do lessons?' said Alice, in a hurry to change the subject.
Ten hours the first day,' said the Mock Turtle: 'nine the next, and so on.'
What a curious plan!' exclaimed Alice.
That's the reason they're called lessons,' the Gryphon remarked: 'because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1150:bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her ~ Lewis Carroll,
1151:In most gardens' the Tiger-lily said, ' they make the beds too soft - so that the flowers are always asleep.'
This sounded a very good reason, and Alice was quite pleased to know it. 'I never thought of that before!' she said.
'It's MY opinion that you never think AT ALL,' the rose said in a rather severe tone. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1152:Well, then,” the Cat went on, “you see, a dog growls when it’s angry, and wags its tail when it’s pleased. Now I growl when I’m pleased, and wag my tail when I’m angry. Therefore I’m mad.” “I call it purring, not growling,” said Alice. “Call it what you like,” said the Cat. “Do you play croquet with the Queen to-day? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1153:Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature— at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it comes— is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1154:When I used to read fairy tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one! There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! And when I grow up, I'll write one—but I'm grown up now," she added in a sorrowful tone: "at least there's no room to grow up any more here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1155:First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she ~ Lewis Carroll,
1156:The twelve jurors were all writing very busily on the slates. "What are they doing?" Alice whispered to the Gryphon. "They can't have anything to put down yet, before the trial's begun."
"They're putting down their names," the Gryphon whispered in reply, "for fear they should forget them before the end of the trial. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1157:I dare say you never even spoke to Time!"

"Perhaps not," Alice cautiously replied; "but I know I have to beat time when I listen to music."

"Ah! That accounts for it," said the Hatter. "He won't stand a beating. Now, if only you kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you like with the clock. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1158:"She can't do sums a bit!" the Queens said together, with great emphasis. "Can you do sums?" Alice said, turning suddenly on the White Queen, for she didn't like being found fault with so much. The Queen gasped and shut her eyes. "I can do Addition, if you give me time-but I can do Subtraction, under any circumstances!" ~ Lewis Carroll,
1159:Give your evidence," said the King; "and don't be nervous, or I'll have you executed on the spot."
This did not seem to encourage the witness at all: he kept shifting from one foot to the other, looking uneasily at the Queen, and in his confusion he bit a large piece out of his teacup instead of the bread-and-butter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1160:She felt a little nervous about this; 'for it might end, you know,' said Alice to herself, 'in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?' And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle looks like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1161:Alice laughed. 'There's no use trying,' she said. 'One can't believe impossible things.'

I daresay you haven't had much practice,' said the Queen. 'When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. There goes the shawl again! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1162:One thing was certain, that the WHITE kitten had had nothing to do with it:—it was the black kitten's fault entirely. For the white kitten had been having its face washed by the old cat for the last quarter of an hour (and bearing it pretty well, considering); so you see that it COULDN'T have had any hand in the mischief. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1163:her eye fell upon a little bottle that stood near the looking-glass. There was no label this time with the words 'DRINK ME,' but nevertheless she uncorked it and put it to her lips. 'I know SOMETHING interesting is sure to happen,' she said to herself, 'whenever I eat or drink anything; so I'll just see what this bottle does. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1164:It was the White Rabbit, trotting slowly back again and looking anxiously about as it went, as if it had lost something; Alice heard it muttering to itself, "The Duchess! The Duchess! Oh, my dear paws! Oh, my fur and whiskers! She'll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets! Where can I have dropped them, I wonder?" Alice ~ Lewis Carroll,
1165:Will you walk a little faster?' said a whiting to a snail,
'There's a porpoise close behind us and he's treading on my tail.
See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance!
They are waiting on the shingle -- will you come and join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1166:Alice thought to herself, 'Then there's no use in speaking.' The voices didn't join in this time, as she hadn't spoken, but to her great surprise, they all THOUGHT in chorus (I hope you understand what THINKING IN CHORUS means—for I must confess that I don't), 'Better say nothing at all. Language is worth a thousand pounds a word! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1167:It is a very inconvenient habit of kittens (Alice had once made the remark) that, whatever you say to them, they ALWAYS purr. 'If they would only purr for "yes" and mew for "no," or any rule of that sort,' she had said, 'so that one could keep up a conversation! But how CAN you talk with a person if they always say the same thing? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1168:The Hatter was the first to break the silence. "What day of the month is it?" he said, turning to Alice: he had taken his watch out of his pocket, and was looking at it uneasily, shaking it every now and then, and holding it to his ear.   Alice considered a little, and then said "The fourth."   "Two days wrong!" sighed the Hatter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1169:Aber ich mag nicht unter verrückte Leuten gehen", bemerkte Alice.
"Oh, dagegen kann man nichts machen", sagte die Katze; "wir sind hier alle verrückt.Ich bin verrückt. Du bist verrückt."
"Woher weißt du denn, dass ich verrückt bin?", fragte Alice.
"Du musst es sein", sagte die Katze, "sonst wärst du nicht hierhergekommen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1170:Alice laughed. “There’s no use trying,” she said: “one can’t believe impossible things.” “I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” —Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass ~ Bruce Rosenblum,
1171:Alice thought to herself, 'Then there's no use in speaking.' The voices didn't join in this time, as she hadn't spoken, but to her great surprise, they all thought in chorus (I hope you understand what thinking in chorus means--for I must confess that I don't), 'Better say nothing at all. Language is worth a thousand pounds a word! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1172:How queer everything is to-day! And yesterday things went on just as usual. I wonder if I’ve been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I’m not the same, the next question is, Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1173:It is a very inconvenient habit of kittens (Alice had once made the remark) that, whatever you say to them, they always purr: "If they would only purr for 'yes,' and mew for 'no,; or any rule of that sort," she had said, "so that one could keep up a conversation! But how can you talk with a person if they always say the same thing? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1174:What a pity it wouldn't stay!' sighed the Lory, as soon as it was quite out of sight; and an old Crab took the opportunity of saying to her daughter 'Ah, my dear! Let this be a lesson to you never to lose YOUR temper!' 'Hold your tongue, Ma!' said the young Crab, a little snappishly. 'You're enough to try the patience of an oyster! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1175:If doubtful whether to end with "yours faithfully," or "yours truly," or "yours most truly," &c. (there are at least a dozen varieties, before you reach "yours affectionately"), refer to your correspondent's last letter, and make your winding-up at least as friendly as his: in fact, even if a shade more friendly, it will do no harm! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1176:You are old, Father William,” the young man said, “And your hair has become very white; And yet you incessantly stand on your head— Do you think, at your age, it is right?” “In my youth,” Father William replied to his son, “I feared it might injure the brain; But, now that I’m perfectly sure I have none, Why, I do it again and again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1177:a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again. The ~ Lewis Carroll,
1178:Cheshire Puss,' she began, rather timidly, as she did not at all know whether it would like the name: however, it only grinned a little wider. 'Come, it's pleased so far,' thought Alice, and she went on. 'Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?' 'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1179:I have tasted eggs, certainly,” said Alice, who was a very truthful child; “but little girls eat eggs quite as much as serpents do, you know.” “I don’t believe it,” said the Pigeon; “but if they do, why then they’re a kind of serpent, that’s all I can say.” This was such a new idea to Alice, that she was quite silent for a minute or two, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1180:Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice, 'without pictures or conversations?' ~ Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland p. 1.,
1181:can't explain it,' said the Gryphon hastily. 'Go on with the next verse.' 'But about his toes?' the Mock Turtle persisted. 'How could he turn them out with his nose, you know?' 'It's the first position in dancing.' Alice said; but was dreadfully puzzled by the whole thing, and longed to change the subject. 'Go on with the next verse,' the ~ Lewis Carroll,
1182:I quite agree with you,” said the Duchess; “and the moral of that is—‘Be what you would seem to be’—or, if you’d like it put more simply—‘Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1183:It seems very pretty,' she said when she had finished it, 'but it's RATHER hard to understand!' (You see she didn't like to confess, even to herself, that she couldn't make it out at all.) 'Somehow it seemed to fill my head with ideas - only I don't know exactly what they are! However, SOMEBODY killed SOMETHING: that's clear, at any rate - ~ Lewis Carroll,
1184:She [Alice] went on "And how do you know that you're mad?" "To begin with," said the Cat, "a dog's not mad. You grant that?" "I suppose so," said Alice. "Well, then," the Cat went on, "you see, a dog growls when it's angry, and wags it's tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad." ~ Lewis Carroll,
1185:Dear, dear! How queer everything is to-day! And yesterday things went on just as usual. I wonder if I've been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is, Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1186:So here's a question for you. How old did you say you were?' Alice made a short calculation, and said 'Seven years and six months.' 'Wrong!' Humpty Dumpty exclaimed triumphantly. 'You never said a word like it!' 'I though you meant "How old ARE you?"' Alice explained. 'If I'd meant that, I'd have said it,' said Humpty Dumpty. Alice didn't want ~ Lewis Carroll,
1187:My hand moves because certain forces--electric, magnetic, or whatever 'nerve-force' may prove to be--are impressed on it by my brain. This nerve-force, stored in the brain, would probably be traceable, if Science were complete, to chemical forces supplied to the brain by the blood, and ultimately derived from the food I eat and the air I breathe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1188:down stairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!' (Which was very likely true.) Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! 'I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?' she said aloud. 'I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let ~ Lewis Carroll,
1189:At last the Mouse, who seemed to be a person of authority among them, called out, ‘Sit down, all of you, and listen to me! I’ll soon make you dry enough!’ They all sat down at once, in a large ring, with the Mouse in the middle. Alice kept her eyes anxiously fixed on it, for she felt sure she would catch a bad cold if she did not get dry very soon. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1190:Her hair was the blackest I ever saw. Her eyes matched her hair. Her nose was not quite large enough, I admit. Her mouth and chin were (to quote Mr. Franklin) morsels for the gods; and her complexion (on the same undeniable authority) was as warm as the sun itself, with this great advantage over the sun, that it was always in nice order to look at. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1191:her sister, as well as she could remember them, all these strange Adventures of hers that you have just been reading about; and when she had finished, her sister kissed her, and said, 'It was a curious dream, dear, certainly: but now run in to your tea; it's getting late.' So Alice got up and ran off, thinking while she ran, as well she might, what ~ Lewis Carroll,
1192:What did they live on,” said Alice, who always took a great interest in questions of eating and drinking. “They lived on treacle,” said the Dormouse, after thinking a moment or two. “They couldn't have done that, you know,” Alice gently remarked. “They'd have been ill.” “So they were,” said the Dormouse, “very ill.” Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland ~ Carl Schmitt,
1193:Dan Murphy's diagnosis added Lia Lee to a distibguished line of epileptics that has inlcuded Soren Kierkegaard, Vincent van Gogh, Gustave Flaubert, Lewis Carroll, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky, all of whom, like many Hmong shamans, experienced powerful senses of grandeur and spiritiual passion during their seizures, and powerful creative urges in their wake. ~ Anne Fadiman,
1194:This time Alice waited patiently until it chose to speak again. In a minute or two the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and yawned once or twice, and shook itself. Then it got down off the mushroom, and crawled away in the grass, merely remarking, as it went, “One side will make you grow taller, and the other side will make you grow shorter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1195:I mean, what is an un-birthday present?" A present given when it isn't your birthday, of course." Alice considered a little. "I like birthday presents best," she said at last. You don't know what you're talking about!" cried Humpty Dumpty. "How many days are there in a year?" Three hundred and sixty-five," said Alice. And how many birthdays have you?" One. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1196:When you come to any passage you don't understand, read it again: if you still don't understand it, read it again: if you fail, even after three readings, very likely your brain is getting a little tired. In that case, put the book away, and take to other occupations, and next day, when you come to it fresh, you will very likely find that it is quite easy. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1197:thought Alice, “without pictures or conversation?” So she was considering, in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. There was nothing ~ Lewis Carroll,
1198:What a funny watch!’ she remarked. ‘It tells the day of the month, and doesn’t tell what o’clock it is!’ ‘Why should it?’ muttered the Hatter. ‘Does YOUR watch tell you what year it is?’ ‘Of course not,’ Alice replied very readily: ‘but that’s because it stays the same year for such a long time together.’ ‘Which is just the case with MINE,’ said the Hatter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1199:Baş aşağıyken nasıl böyle rahat konuşabiliyorsunuz?' diye sordu Alice, bu sırada ayaklarından onu çekip, kenardaki yığının üzerine uzattı.
Şövalye bu soru karşısında çok şaşırmıştı. 'Bedenimin nerede olduğunun ne önemi var ki?' dedi. 'Benim kafam yine aynı şekilde çalışıyor. İşin doğrusu, ne kadar baş aşağıdaysam, o kadar çok yeni şeyler keşfedebiliyorum. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1200:Do you hear the snow against the window-panes, Kitty? How nice and soft it sounds! Just as if some one was kissing the window all over outside. I wonder if the snow LOVES the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says, "Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1201:without—Maybe it's always pepper that makes people hot-tempered,' she went on, very much pleased at having found out a new kind of rule, 'and vinegar that makes them sour—and camomile that makes them bitter—and—and barley-sugar and such things that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people knew that: then they wouldn't be so stingy about it, you know— ~ Lewis Carroll,
1202:She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a came of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1203:The Unicorn looked dreamily at Alice, and said "Talk, child."
Alice could not help her lips curling up into a smile as she began: "Do you know, I always thought Unicorns were fabulous monsters, too? I never saw one alive before!"
"Well, now that we have seen each other," said the Unicorn, "If you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. Is that a bargain? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1204:What sort of people live about here?
- In THAT direction lives, lives a Hatter and in THAT direction, lives a March Hare. Visit either you like: they're both mad.
- But I don't want to go among mad people.
- Oh, you can't help that, we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
- How do you know I'm mad?
- You must be, or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1205:Wormholes were first introduced to the public over a century ago in a book written by an Oxford mathematician. Perhaps realizing that adults might frown on the idea of multiply connected spaces, he wrote the book under a pseudonym and wrote it for children. His name was Charles Dodgson, his pseudonym was Lewis Carroll, and the book was Through The Looking Glass. ~ Michio Kaku,
1206:And it certainly did seem a little provoking ('almost as if it happened on purpose,' she thought) that, though she managed to pick plenty of beautiful rushes as the boat glided by, there was always a more lovely one that she couldn't reach.
"The prettiest are always further!" she said at last, with a sigh at the obstinacy of the rushes in growing so far off. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1207:Presently she began again. 'I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think--' (she was rather glad there WAS no one listening, this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) '--but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you ~ Lewis Carroll,
1208:You are old, Father William,' the young man said,
'And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head --
Do you think, at your age, it is right?'

'In my youth,' Father William replied to his son,
'I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1209:Well, in OUR country,' said Alice, still panting a little, 'you'd generally get to somewhere else—if you ran very fast for a long time, as we've been doing.' 'A slow sort of country!' said the Queen. 'Now, HERE, you see, it takes all the running YOU can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1210:Alice: Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?
The Cheshire Cat: That depends a good deal on where you want to get to.
Alice: I don't much care where.
The Cheshire Cat: Then it doesn't much matter which way you go.
Alice: ...So long as I get somewhere.
The Cheshire Cat: Oh, you're sure to do that, if only you walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1211:Alice kept her eyes anxiously fixed on it, for she felt sure she would catch a bad cold if she did not get dry very soon.

'Ahem!' said the Mouse with an important air, 'are you all ready? This is the driest thing I know. Silence all round, if you please! "William the Conqueror, whose cause was favoured by the pope, was soon submitted to by the English [...] ~ Lewis Carroll,
1212:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?' 'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. 'I don't much care where--' said Alice. 'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat. '--so long as I get somewhere,' Alice added as an explanation. 'Oh, you're sure to do that,' said the Cat, 'if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1213:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’ ‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat. ‘I don’t much care where —’ said Alice. ‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat. ‘— so long as I get somewhere,’ Alice added as an explanation. ‘Oh, you’re sure to do that,’ said the Cat, ‘if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1214:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?” “That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat. “I don’t much care where——” said Alice. “Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat. “——so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added as an explanation. “Oh, you’re sure to do that,” said the Cat, “if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1215:number of changes she had gone through that day. 'A likely story indeed!' said the Pigeon in a tone of the deepest contempt. 'I've seen a good many little girls in my time, but never one with such a neck as that! No, no! You're a serpent; and there's no use denying it. I suppose you'll be telling me next that you never tasted an egg!' 'I have tasted eggs, certainly, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1216:-Hát te kicsoda vagy?
Kezdetnek nem volt valami biztató. Alice félénken rebegte:
-Ezt e percben aligha tudom, hogy ki voltam ma reggel, amikor fölébredtem. De azóta már rengetegszer megváltoztam.
-Hogy érted ezt?-szólt a Hernyó szigorúan.-Értelmesen beszélj.
-Sajnos, kérem, nem tudok értelmesen beszélni, mert nem az vagyok, aki vagyok, amint látni tetszik. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1217:Well, in OUR country,’ said Alice, still panting a little, ‘you’d generally get to somewhere else—if you ran very fast for a long time, as we’ve been doing.’

‘A slow sort of country!’ said the Queen. ‘Now, HERE, you see, it takes all the running YOU can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1218:What a funny watch!’ she remarked. ‘It tells the day of the month, and doesn’t tell
what o’clock it is!’
‘Why should it?’ muttered the Hatter. ‘Does YOUR watch tell you what year it is?’
‘Of course not,’ Alice replied very readily: ‘but that’s because it stays the same year for such a long time together.’
‘Which is just the case with MINE,’ said the Hatter. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1219:had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She ~ Lewis Carroll,
1220:she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1221:If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there. —LEWIS CARROLL It’s more important to have the will to grow and stay open to all the infinite possibilities than to know exactly where you’re going. That will change as you change. Goal: Stay open to any and all possibilities that present themselves to you. You never know where success and joy will turn up. ~ Demi Lovato,
1222:Fury said to a mousethat he met in the houselet us both go to law; I will prosecute youlet there be no denial; come, we must have a trialfor really, this morning, I've nothing to dosuch a trial, dear sir, said the mouse to the curwithout jury or judge would be wasting our breathI'll be judge, I'll be jurysaid cunning old furyI'll try the whole cause and condemn youto death ~ Lewis Carroll,
1223:Well, in our country," said Alice, still panting a little, "you’d generally get to somewhere else -- if you run very fast for a long time, as we’ve been doing."

"A slow sort of country!" said the Queen. "Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1224:As she said this, she came suddenly upon an open place, with a little house in it about four feet high. 'Whoever lives there,' thought Alice, 'it'll never do to come upon them this size: why, I should frighten them out of their wits!' So she began nibbling at the righthand bit again, did not venture to go near the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches high. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1225:I mean, what is an un-birthday present?"
A present given when it isn't your birthday, of course."
Alice considered a little. "I like birthday presents best," she said at last.
You don't know what you're talking about!" cried Humpty Dumpty. "How many days are there in a year?"
Three hundred and sixty-five," said Alice.
And how many birthdays have you?"
One. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1226:I maintain that any writer of a book is fully authorised in attaching any meaning he likes to a word or phrase he intends to use. If I find an author saying, at the beginning of his book, "Let it be understood that by the word 'black' I shall always mean 'white,' and by the word 'white' I shall always mean 'black,'" I meekly accept his ruling, however injudicious I think it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1227:To begin with," said the Cat, "a dog's not mad. You grant that?"
"I suppose so," said Alice
"Well, then," the Cat went on, "you see a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad."
"I call it purring, not growling," said Alice.
"Call it what you like," said the Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1228:I meant by "impenetrability" that we've had enough of that subject, and it would be just as well if you'd mention what you mean to do next, as I suppose you don't mean to stop here all the rest of your life.' 'That's a great deal to make one word mean,' Alice said in a thoughtful tone. 'When I make a word do a lot of work like that,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'I always pay it extra. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1229:When we were little," the Mock Turtle went on at last, more calmly, though still sobbing a little now and then, "we went to school in the sea. The master was an old Turtle - we used to call him Tortoise -"
"Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn't one?" Alice asked.
"We called him Tortoise because he taught us," said the Mock Turtle angrily: "really you are very dull! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1230:Fading, with the Night, the memory of a dead love, and the withered leaves of a blighted hope, and the sickly repinings and moody regrets that numb the best energies of the soul: and rising, broadening, rolling upward like a living flood, the manly resolve, and the dauntless will, and the heavenward gaze of faith-the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1231:IN ANSWER TO THE QUESTION: WHAT SCENES ONE WOULD LIKE TO HAVE FILMED Shakespeare in the part of the King's Ghost. The beheading of Louis the Sixteenth, the drums drowning his speech on the scaffold. Herman Melville at breakfast, feeling a sardine to his cat. Poe's wedding. Lewis Carroll's picnics. The Russians leaving Alaska, delighted with the deal. Shot of a seal applauding. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1232:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"
"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat.
"I don’t much care where--" said Alice.
"Then it doesn’t matter which way you go," said the Cat.
"--so long as I get SOMEWHERE," Alice added as an explanation.
"Oh, you’re sure to do that," said the Cat, "if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1233:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?'
'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat.
'I don't much care where -' said Alice.
'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat.
'- so long as I get SOMEWHERE,' Alice added as an explanation.
'Oh, you're sure to do that,' said the Cat, 'if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1234:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"
"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat.
"I don't much care where-" said Alice.
"Then it doesn't matter which way you go," said the Cat.
"- so long as I get somewhere," Alice added as an explanation.
"Oh, you're sure to do that," said the Cat, " if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1235:Will you walk a little faster?" said a whiting to a snail. "There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail. See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance! They are waiting on the shingle--will you come and join the dance? Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance? Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join the dance? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1236:{“Poderia me dizer, por favor, que caminho devo tomar para ir embora daqui?” “Depende bastante de para onde quer ir, respondeu o Gato.” “Não me importa muito para onde, disse Alice.” “Então não importa que caminho tome, disse o Gato.” “Contanto que eu chegue a algum lugar, Alice acrescentou à guisa de explicação.” “Oh, isso você vai conseguir, afirmou o Gato, desde que ande bastante. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1237:How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head though the doorway; ‘and even if my head would go through,’ thought poor Alice, ‘it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1238:[…]¿Podrías decirme, por favor, qué camino he de tomar para salir de aquí?
—Depende mucho del punto adonde quieras ir —contestó el Gato.
—Me da casi igual adónde —dijo Alicia.
—Entonces no importa qué camino sigas —dijo el Gato.
—…siempre que llegue a alguna parte —añadió Alicia, a modo de explicación.
—¡Ah!, seguro que lo consigues —dijo el Gato—, si andas lo suficiente. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1239:I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The antipathies, I think—" (she was rather glad there was no one listening, this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) "—but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand? Or Australia? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1240:I'm a poor man, your majesty," the Hatter began in a weak voice, "and I hadn't but just begun my tea, not more than a week or so, and what with the bread and butter so thin - and the twinkling of the tea-"

"The twinkling of what?" asked the King.

"It began with the tea," the Hatter said.

"Of course twinkling begins with a T!" said the King. "Do you take me for a dunce? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1241:Five o'clock tea" is a phrase our "rude forefathers," even of the last generation, would scarcely have understood, so completelyis it a thing of to-day; and yet, so rapid is the March of the Mind, it has already risen into a national institution, and rivals, in its universal application to all ranks and ages, and as a specific for "all the ills that flesh is heir to," the glorious Magna Charta. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1242:Geriye doğru yaşamak mı?' diye tekrarladı Alice büyük bir şaşkınlık içinde. 'Böyle bir şey hayatımda hiç duymadım!'
'...ama böyle yaşamanın çok büyük bir faydası var; insanın belleği iki yönlü çalışır.'
'Benimkisi kesinlikle tek yönde çalışıyor,' diye belirtti Alice. 'Henüz gerçekleşmemiş şeyleri hatırlayamam.'
'Sadece geriye doğru işleyen bir bellek zayıf bir bellektir,' dedi Kraliçe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1243:It'll be no use their putting their heads down and saying "Come up again, dear!" I shall only look up and say "Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else"--but, oh dear!' cried Alice, with a sudden burst of tears, 'I do wish they WOULD put their heads down! I am so VERY tired of being all alone here! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1244:Fury said to a mouse, That he met in the house, "Let us both go to law: I will prosecute you.—Come, I'll take no denial; We must have a trial: For really this morning I've nothing to do." Said the mouse to the cur, "Such a trial, dear Sir, With no jury or judge, would be wasting our breath." "I'll be judge, I'll be jury," Said cunning old Fury: "I'll try the whole cause, and condemn you to death. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1245:The next witness was the Duchess's cook. She carried the pepper-box in her hand, and Alice guessed who it was, even before she got into the court, by the way the people near the door began sneezing all at once. 'Give your evidence,' said the King. 'Shan't,' said the cook. The King looked anxiously at the White Rabbit, who said in a low voice, 'Your Majesty must cross-examine THIS witness.' 'Well, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1246:At any rate I'd better be getting out of the wood, for really its coming on very dark. Do you think it's going to rain?'
Tweedledum spread a large umbrella over himself and his brother, and looked up into it.
'No, I don't think it is,' he said: 'at least - not under here. Nohow.'
'But it may rain outside?'
'It may - if it chooses,' said Tweedledee: 'we've got no objection. Contrariwise. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1247:In Lewis Carroll’s poem, when the hunters finally capture the deceptive Snark, it reveals itself not to be a foreign beast, but one of the human hunters sent to trap it. And so it had turned out with cancer. Cancer genes came from within the human genome. Indeed the Greeks had been peculiarly prescient yet again in their use of the term oncos. Cancer was intrinsically “loaded” in our genome. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
1248:What mattered it to her just then that the rushes had begun to fade and to lose all their scent and beauty, from the very moment that she picked them? Even real scented rushes, you know, last only a very little while-- and these, being dream-rushes, melted away almost like snow, as they lay in heaps at her feet-- but Alice hardly noticed this, there were so many other curious things to think about. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1249:WATCH OUT OF ITS WAISTCOAT-POCKET, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In another moment ~ Lewis Carroll,
1250:Lütfen söyler misiniz, buradan ne tarafa doğru gitmeliyim?'
'Bu daha çok nereye varmak istediğine bağlı,' dedi Kedi.
'Neresi olursa olsun...' dedi Alice.
'Öyleyse ne tarafa doğru gideceğinin önemi yok,' dedi Kedi.
'Bir yerlere varayım da, gerisi önemli değil,' diye ekledi Alice, ne istediğini daha iyi anlatabilmek için.
'Kesin bir yerlere varırsın,' dedi Kedi, 'tabii yeterince yürürsen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1251:IN ANSWER TO THE QUESTION: WHAT SCENES ONE WOULD LIKE TO HAVE FILMED

Shakespeare in the part of the King's Ghost.
The beheading of Louis the Sixteenth, the drums drowning his speech on the scaffold.
Herman Melville at breakfast, feeling a sardine to his cat.
Poe's wedding.
Lewis Carroll's picnics.
The Russians leaving Alaska, delighted with the deal.
Shot of a seal applauding. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1252:"Try another Subtraction sum. Take a bone from a dog: what remains?" [asked the Red Queen] Alice considered. "The bone wouldn't remain, of course, if I took it-and the dog wouldn't remain; it would come to bite me-and I'm sure I shouldn't remain!" "Then you think nothing would remain?" said the Red Queen. "I think that's the answer." "Wrong, as usual," said the Red Queen, "the dog's temper would remain." ~ Lewis Carroll,
1253:cats.' 'Not like cats!' cried the Mouse, in a shrill, passionate voice. 'Would you like cats if you were me?' 'Well, perhaps not,' said Alice in a soothing tone: 'don't be angry about it. And yet I wish I could show you our cat Dinah: I think you'd take a fancy to cats if you could only see her. She is such a dear quiet thing,' Alice went on, half to herself, as she swam lazily about in the pool, 'and she ~ Lewis Carroll,
1254:Who did you pass on the road?' the King went on, holding out his hand to the Messenger for some more hay. 'Nobody,' said the Messenger. 'Quite right,' said the King: 'this young lady saw him too. So of course Nobody walks slower than you.' 'I do my best,' the Messenger said in a sulky tone. 'I'm sure nobody walks much faster than I do!' 'He can't do that,' said the King, 'or else he'd have been here first. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1255:Alice: Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?
The Cheshire Cat: That depends a good deal on where you want to get to.
Alice: I don't much care where.
The Cheshire Cat: Then it doesn't much matter which way you go.
Alice: ...So long as I get somewhere.
The Cheshire Cat: Oh, you're sure to do that, if only you walk long enough.”

Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll,
1256:Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called ‘un-inspired’ literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages — enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1257:Who did you pass on the road?" the King went on, holding out his hand to the Messenger for some more hay. "Nobody," said the Messenger. "Quite right," said the King; "this young lady saw him too. So of course Nobody walks slower than you." "I do my best," the Messenger said in a sullen tone. "I'm sure nobody walks much faster than I do!" "He can't do that," said the King, "or else he'd have been here first. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1258:Alice didn't like being criticised, so she began asking questions. "Aren't you sometimes frightened at being planted out here, with nobody to take care of you?" "There's the tree in the middle," said the Rose: "what else is it good for?" "But what could it do, if any danger came?" Alice asked. "It could bark," said the Rose. "It says ‘Bough-wough!' " cried a Daisy, "that's why its branches are called boughs! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1259:It'll be no use their putting their heads down and saying "Come up again, dear!"
I shall only look up and say "Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then,
if I like being that person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here
till I'm somebody else"--but, oh dear!' cried Alice, with a sudden burst
of tears, 'I do wish they WOULD put their heads down! I am so VERY tired
of being all alone here! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1260:The master was an old Turtle--we used to call him Tortoise--' Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn't one?' Alice asked. We called him Tortoise because he taught us,' said the Mock Turtle angrily; 'really you are very dull!' You ought to be ashamed of yourself for asking such a simple question,' added the Gryphon; and then they both sat silent and looked at poor Alice, who felt ready to sink into the earth. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1261:Whenever the horse stopped (which it did very often), he fell off in front; and, whenever it went on again (which it generally did rather suddenly), he fell off behind. Otherwise he kept on pretty well, except that he had a habit of now and then falling off sideways; and, as he generally did this on the side on which Alice was walking, she soon found that it was the best plan not to walk quite close to the horse. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1262:ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND Lewis Carroll THE MILLENNIUM FULCRUM EDITION 3.0 CHAPTER I Down the Rabbit-Hole Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?' So ~ Lewis Carroll,
1263:LESS BREAD! MORE TAXES!—and then all the people cheered again, and one man, who was more excited than the rest, flung his hat high into the air, and shouted (as well as I could make out) “Who roar for the Sub-Warden?” Everybody roared, but whether it was for the Sub-Warden, or not, did not clearly appear: some were shouting “Bread!” and some “Taxes!”, but no one seemed to know what it was they really wanted. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1264:For the Congregation this new movement involves the danger of learning to think that the Services are done for them; and that their bodily presence is all they need contribute. And, for Clergy and Congregation alike, it involves the danger of regarding these elaborate Services as ends in themselves, and of forgetting that they are simply means, and the very hollowest of mockeries, unless they bear fruit in our lives. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1265:'Who's been repeating all that hard stuff to you?' 'I read it in a book,' said Alice. 'But I had some poetry repeated to me, much easier than that, by - Tweedledee, I think it was.' 'As to poetry, you know,' said Humpty Dumpty, stretching out one of his great hands, 'I can repeat poetry as well as other folk, if it comes to that - ' 'Oh, it needn't come to that!' Alice hastily said, hoping to keep him from beginning. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1266:Who did you pass on the road?" the King went on, holding out his hand to the Messenger for some more hay.
"Nobody," said the Messenger.
"Quite right," said the King; "this young lady saw him too. So of course Nobody walks slower than you."
"I do my best," the Messenger said in a sullen tone. "I'm sure nobody walks much faster than I do!"
"He can't do that," said the King, "or else he'd have been here first. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1267:fury said to a mouse
that he met in the house
let us both go to law; I will prosecute you
let there be no denial; come, we must have a trial
for really, this morning, I've nothing to do
such a trial, dear sir,
said the mouse to the cur
without jury or judge
would be wasting our breath
I'll be judge, I'll be jury
said cunning old fury
I'll try the whole cause and condemn you
to death ~ Lewis Carroll,
1268:The master was an old Turtle--we used to call him Tortoise--'
Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn't one?' Alice asked.
We called him Tortoise because he taught us,' said the Mock Turtle angrily; 'really you are very dull!'
You ought to be ashamed of yourself for asking such a simple question,' added the Gryphon; and then they both sat silent and looked at poor Alice, who felt ready to sink into the earth. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1269:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?'
'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat.
'I don't much care where -' said Alice.
'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat.
'- so long as I get SOMEWHERE,' Alice added as an explanation.
'Oh, you're sure to do that,' said the Cat, 'if you only walk long enough.”
Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll,
1270:I can't believe THAT!' said Alice. 'Can't you?' the Queen said in a pitying tone. 'Try again: draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.' Alice laughed. 'There's no use trying,' she said: 'one CAN'T believe impossible things.' 'I daresay you haven't had much practice,' said the Queen. 'When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1271:Barrie and the wonderful characters he created, Lewis Carroll, even French literature, like Baudelaire or over in the States, Poe, you open those books, you open The Flowers of Evil and begin to read. If it were written today, you'd be absolutely stupefied by the work. It's this incredible period where the work is timeless, ageless. So yeah, I just love all those guys. It's my deep passion in those great 19th century writers. ~ Johnny Depp,
1272:I can’t believe THAT!” said Alice.
Can’t you?” said the Queen in a pitying tone. “Try again: draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.”
Alice laughed. “There’s no use trying,” she said, “one can’t believe impossible things.”
I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why sometimes I believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1273:You are sad," the Knight said in an anxious tone: "let me sing you a song to comfort you."
"Is it very long?" Alice asked, for she had heard a good deal of poetry that day.
"It's long," said the Knight, "but very, VERY beautiful. Everyone that hears me sing it - either it brings the TEARS into their eyes, or else -"
"Or else what?" said Alice, for the Knight had made a sudden pause.
"Or else it doesn't, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1274:"It's very good jam," said the Queen. "Well, I don't want any to-day, at any rate." "You couldn't have it if you did want it," the Queen said. "The rule is jam tomorrow and jam yesterday but never jam to-day." "It must come sometimes to "jam to-day,""Alice objected. "No it can't," said the Queen. "It's jam every other day; to-day isn't any other day, you know." "I don't understand you," said Alice. "It's dreadfully confusing." ~ Lewis Carroll,
1275:Repeat, "YOU ARE OLD, FATHER WILLIAM,"' said the Caterpillar. Alice folded her hands, and began:— 'You are old, Father William,' the young man said, 'And your hair has become very white; And yet you incessantly stand on your head— Do you think, at your age, it is right?' 'In my youth,' Father William replied to his son, 'I feared it might injure the brain; But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none, Why, I do it again and again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1276:ladies & gentlemen," the Professor began, "the Other Professor is so kind as to recite a Poem. The title of it is 'The Pig-Tale.' He never recited it before!" (General cheering among the guests.) "He will never recite it again!" (Frantic excitement, & wild cheering all down the hall, the Professor himself mounting the table in hot haste, to lead the cheering, & waving his spectacles in one hand & a spoon in the other.) ~ Lewis Carroll,
1277:When you say “hill,”’ the Queen interrupted, ‘I could show you hills, in comparison with which you’d call that a valley.’

‘No, I shouldn’t,’ said Alice, surprised into contradicting her at last: ‘a hill CAN’T be a valley, you know. That would be nonsense –’

‘The Red Queen shook her head. ‘You may call it “nonsense” if you like,’ she said, ‘but I’VE heard nonsense, compared with which that would be as sensible as a dictionary! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1278:Alice didn't think that proved it at all; however, she went on: 'And how do you know that you're mad?'
'To begin with,' said the Cat, 'a dog's not mad. You grant that?'
'I suppose so,' said Alice.
'Well then,' the Cat went on, 'you see, a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad.'
'I call it purring, not growling,' said Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1279:The great question certainly was, what? Alice looked all round her at the flowers and the blades of grass, but she did not see anything that looked like the right thing to eat or drink under the circumstances. There was a large mushroom growing near her, about the same height as herself; and when she had looked under it, and on both sides of it, and behind it, it occurred to her that she might as well look and see what was on the top of it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1280:I believe this thought, of the possibility of death - if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1281:All the time they were playing the Queen never left off quarrelling with the other players, and shouting 'Off with his head!' or 'Off with her head!' Those whom she sentenced were taken into custody by the soldiers, who of course had to leave off being arches to do this, so that by the end of half an hour or so there were no arches left, and all the players, except the King, the Queen, and Alice, were in custody and under sentence of execution. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1282:overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, 'Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!' She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps ~ Lewis Carroll,
1283:First, she dreamed of little Alice herself, and once again the tiny hands were clasped upon her knee, and the bright eager eyes were looking up into hers--she could hear the very tones of her voice, and see that queer little toss of her head to keep back the wandering hair that would always get into her eyes--and still as she listened, or seemed to listen, the whole place around her became alive the strange creatures of her little sister's dream. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1284:She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, ‘Which way? Which way?’, holding her hand on top of her head to feel which way it was growing; and she was quite surprised to find that she remained the same size. To be sure, this is what generally happens when one eats cake; but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1285:That's the effect of living backwards,' the Queen said kindly: 'it always makes one a little giddy at first—' 'Living backwards!' Alice repeated in great astonishment. 'I never heard of such a thing!' '—but there's one great advantage in it, that one's memory works both ways.' 'I'm sure MINE only works one way,' Alice remarked. 'I can't remember things before they happen.' 'It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' the Queen remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1286:For instance, take the two words "fuming" and "furious." Make up your mind that you will say both words, but leave it unsettled which you will say first. Now open your mouth and speak. If your thoughts incline ever so little towards " fuming," you will say "fuming-furious;" if they turn, by even a hair's breadth, towards "furious," you will say "furious-fuming;" but if you have the rarest of gifts, a perfectly balanced mind, you will say "frumious. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1287:After the applause, he used the quotations book to make a more subtle point, about his reality distortion field. The quote he chose was from Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass. After Alice laments that no matter how hard she tries she can't believe impossible things, the White Queen retorts, "Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast." Especially from the front rows, there was a roar of knowing laughter. ~ Walter Isaacson,
1288:General Grant invented this kind of battle at Petersburg in sixty- five." "No, he didn't--he just invented mass butchery. This kind of battle was invented by Lewis Carroll and Jules Verne and whoever wrote Undine, and country deacons bowling and marraines in Marseilles and girls seduced in the back lanes of Wurtemburg and Westphalia. Why, this was a love battle--there was a century of middle-class love spent here. This was the last love battle. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1289:Why, about you!" Tweedledee exclaimed, clapping his hands triumphantly. "And if he left off dreaming about you, where do you suppose you'd be?"
"Where I am now, of course," said Alice.
"Not you!" Tweedledee retorted contemptuously. "You'd be nowhere. Why, you're only a sort of thing in his dream!"
"If that there King was to wake," added Tweedledum, "you'd go out--bang!--just like a candle!"
"I shouldn't!" Alice exclaimed indignantly. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1290:Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.
"Exactly so," said Alice.
"Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.
"I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know."
"You might just as well say," added the Dormouse, which seemed to be talking in its sleep, "that 'I breathe
when I sleep' is the same thing as 'I sleep when I breathe! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1291:we can but stand aside, and let them Rush upon their Fate! There is scarcely anything of yours, upon which it is so dangerous to Rush, as your Fate. You may Rush upon your Potato-beds, or your Strawberry-beds, without doing much harm: you may even Rush upon your Balcony (unless it is a new house, built by contract, and with no clerk of the works) and may survive the foolhardy enterprise: but if you once Rush upon your FATE--why, you must take the consequences! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1292:Alicia, y continuó. “¿Me dirías, por favor, qué camino debería tomar desde aquí?”               “Eso depende en gran parte de a dónde quieres ir”, dijo el Gato.               “No importa mucho dónde—”, dijo Alicia.               “Entonces no importa qué camino tomas”, dijo el Gato.               “—siempre y cuando llegue a alguna parte”, agregó Alicia a manera de explicación.               “Oh, eso ocurrirá, sin duda”,  dijo el Gato, “si caminas lo suficiente”. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1293:That's the effect of living backwards,' the Queen said kindly: 'it always makes one a little giddy at first--'
'Living backwards!' Alice repeated in great astonishment. 'I never heard of such a thing!'
'--but there's one great advantage in it, that one's memory works both ways.'
‘I'm sure MINE only works one way,' Alice remarked. 'I can't remember things before they happen.'
'It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' the Queen remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1294:How is it you can talk so nicely?' Alice said, hoping to get it into a better temper by a compliment. 'I've been in many gardens before, but none of the flowers could talk.'
'Put your hand down, and feel the ground,' said the Tiger-lily. 'Then you'll know why.'
Alice did so. 'It's very hard,' she said, 'but I don't see what that has to do with it.'
'In most gardens,' the Tiger-lily said, 'they make the beds too soft - so that the flowers are always asleep. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1295:That's the effect of living backwards,' the Queen said kindly: 'it always makes one a little giddy at first--'

'Living backwards!' Alice repeated in great astonishment. 'I never heard of such a thing!'

'--but there's one great advantage in it, that one's memory works both ways.'

‘I'm sure MINE only works one way,' Alice remarked. 'I can't remember things before they happen.'

'It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' the Queen remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1296:Twenty thousand thieves landed at Hastings. These founders of the House of Lords were greedy and ferocious dragoons, sons of greedy and ferocious pirates... Such, however, is the illusion of antiquity and wealth, that decent and dignified men now existing, boast their descent from these filthy thieves, who showed a far juster conviction of their own merits, by assuming for their types the swine, goat, jackal, leopard, wolf, and snake, which they severally resembled. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1297:Oh, don't go on like that!" cried the poor Queen, wringing her hands in despair. "Consider what a great girl you are. Consider what a long way you've come today. Consider what o'clock it is. Consider anything, only don't cry!"
Alice could not help laughing at this, even in the midst of her tears. "Can you keep from crying by considering things?" she asked.
"That's that way it's done," the Queen said with great decision: "nobody can do two things at once, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1298:Do you hear the snow against the windowpanes, Kitty? How nice and soft it sounds! Just as if some one was kissing the window all over outside. I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says, 'Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.' And when they wake up in the summer, Kitty, they dress themselves all in green, and dance about - whenever the wind blows. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1299:went on, taking first one side and then the other, and making quite a conversation of it altogether; but after a few minutes she heard a voice outside, and stopped to listen. 'Mary Ann! Mary Ann!' said the voice. 'Fetch me my gloves this moment!' Then came a little pattering of feet on the stairs. Alice knew it was the Rabbit coming to look for her, and she trembled till she shook the house, quite forgetting that she was now about a thousand times as large as the Rabbit, and had ~ Lewis Carroll,
1300:I always thought they were fabulous monsters!" said the Unicorn. "Is it alive?"
"It can talk," said Haigha, solemnly.
The Unicorn looked dreamily at Alice, and said, "Talk, child."
Alice could not help her lips curling up into a smile as she began: "Do you know, I always thought Unicorns were fabulous monsters, too! I never saw one alive before!"
"Well, now that we have seen each other," said the Unicorn, "if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. Is that a bargain? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1301:Cheshire Cat: If I were looking for a white rabbit, I'd ask the Mad Hatter. Alice: The Mad Hatter? Oh, no no no... Cheshire Cat: Or, you could ask the March Hare, in that direction. Alice: Oh, thank you. I think I'll see him... Cheshire Cat: Of course, he's mad, too. Alice: But I don't want to go among mad people. Cheshire Cat: Oh, you can't help that. Most everyone's mad here. [laughs maniacally; starts to disappear] Cheshire Cat: You may have noticed that I'm not all there myself. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1302:I suppose you don’t want to lose your name?’

‘No, indeed,’ Alice said, a little anxiously.

‘And yet I don’t know,’ the Gnat went on in a careless tone: ‘only think how convenient it would be if you could manage to go home without it! For instance, if the governess wanted to call you to your lessons, she would call out “come here—,” and there she would have to leave off, because there wouldn’t be any name for her to call, and of course you wouldn’t have to go, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1303:One of the jurors had a pencil that squeaked. This of course, Alice could not stand, and she went round the court and got behind him, and very soon found an opportunity of taking it away. She did it so quickly that the poor little juror (it was Bill, the Lizard) could not make out at all what had become of it; so, after hunting all about for it, he was obliged to write with one finger for the rest of the day; and this was of very little use, as it left no mark on the slate. 'Herald, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1304:Suddenly the Professor started as if he had been electrified. "Why, I had nearly forgotten the most important part of the entertainment! The Other Professor is to recite a Tale of a Pig I mean a Pig-Tale," he corrected himself. "It has Introductory Verses at the beginning, and at the end."

It can’t have Introductory Verses at the end, can it?" said Sylvie.

Wait till you hear it," said the Professor: "then you will see. I’m not sure it hasn’t some in the middle, as well. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1305:Kusura bakmayın ama binicilikte fazla deneyimli değilsiniz,' demeye kalkıştı Alice, Şövalye'nin beşinci yuvarlanışında ona yardım ettiği sırada.
Şövalye buna çok şaşırmıştı, birazcık da kırılmıştı. 'Neden böyle söylüyorsun?'diye sordu, güçbela tekrar eyere tırmanırken, bu arada diğer tarafa düşmemek için bir eliyle Alice'in saçlarını sımsıkı tutuyordu.
'Çünkü insanlar deneyimli olduklarında, bu kadar sık düşmezler.'
'Çok deneyimim var,'dedi Şövalye büyük bir ciddiyetle: 'Çok! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1306:'Speak when you're spoken to!' The Queen sharply interrupted her. 'But if everybody obeyed that rule,' said Alice, who was always ready for a little argument, 'and if you only spoke when you were spoken to, and the other person always waited for you to begin, you see nobody would ever say anything, so that - ' 'Ridiculous!' cried the Queen. 'Why, don't you see, child - ' here she broke off with a frown, and, after thinking for a minute, suddenly changed the subject of the conversation. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1307:A few more Rules may fitly be given here, for correspondence that has unfortunately become controversial.

One is, don’t repeat yourself. When once you have said your say, fully and clearly, on a certain point, and have failed to convince your friend, drop that subject: to repeat your arguments, all over again, will simply lead to his doing the same; and so you will go on, like a Circulating Decimal. Did you ever know a Circulating Decimal come to an end? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1308:But the black kitten had been finished with earlier in the afternoon, and so, while Alice was sitting curled up in a corner of the great arm-chair, half talking to herself and half asleep, the kitten had been having a grand game of romps with the ball of worsted Alice had been trying to wind up, and had been rolling it up and down till it had all come undone again; and there it was, spread over the hearth-rug, all knots and tangles, with the kitten running after its own tail in the middle. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1309:Crawling at your feet,' said the Gnat (Alice drew her feet back in some alarm), `you may observe a Bread-and-Butterfly. Its wings are thin slices of Bread-and-butter, its body is a crust, and its head is a lump of sugar.' And what does IT live on?' Weak tea with cream in it.' A new difficulty came into Alice's head. `Supposing it couldn't find any?' she suggested. Then it would die, of course.' But that must happen very often,' Alice remarked thoughtfully. It always happens,' said the Gnat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1310:I do not know if Alice in Wonderland was an original story-I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it-but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen story-books have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'-is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1311:down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. 'Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) 'I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?' And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, 'Do ~ Lewis Carroll,
1312:When I’m a Duchess,” she said to herself (not in a very hopeful tone though), “I won’t have any pepper in my kitchen at all. Soup does very well without. Maybe it’s always pepper that makes people hot-tempered,” she went on, very much pleased at having found out a new kind of rule, “and vinegar that makes them sour—and camomile that makes them bitter—and—and barley-sugar and such things that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people knew that; then they wouldn’t be so stingy about it, you know— ~ Lewis Carroll,
1313:When, as a child, I first opened my eyes on a Sunday-morning, a feeling of dismal anicipation, which began at least on the Friday,culminated. I knew what was before me, and my wish, if not my word, was "Would God it were evening!" It was no day of rest, but a day of texts, of catechisms (Watts'), of tracts about converted swearers, godly charwomen, and edifying deaths of sinners saved.... There was but one rosy spot, in the distance, all that day: and that was "bed-time," which never could come too early! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1314:This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot. At any rate I'll never go THERE again!' said Alice as she picked her way through the wood. "It's the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1315:If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1316:No room! No room!" they cried out when they saw Alice coming. "There's plenty of room!" said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table. "Have some wine," the March Hare said in an encouraging tone. Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. "I don't see any wine," she remarked. "There isn't any," said the March Hare. "Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it," said Alice angrily. "It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1317:Cheshire Cat: If I were looking for a white rabbit, I'd ask the Mad Hatter.
Alice: The Mad Hatter? Oh, no no no...
Cheshire Cat: Or, you could ask the March Hare, in that direction.
Alice: Oh, thank you. I think I'll see him...
Cheshire Cat: Of course, he's mad, too.
Alice: But I don't want to go among mad people.
Cheshire Cat: Oh, you can't help that. Most everyone's mad here.
[laughs maniacally; starts to disappear]
Cheshire Cat: You may have noticed that I'm not all there myself. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1318:Wake up, Alice dear!' said her sister; 'Why, what a long sleep you've had!' 'Oh, I've had such a curious dream!' said Alice, and she told her sister, as well as she could remember them, all these strange Adventures of hers that you have just been reading about; and when she had finished, her sister kissed her, and said, 'It was a curious dream, dear, certainly: but now run in to your tea; it's getting late.' So Alice got up and ran off, thinking while she ran, as well she might, what a wonderful dream it had been. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1319:This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot.

At any rate I'll never go THERE again!' said Alice as she picked her way through the wood. "It's the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1320:He's dreaming now,' said Tweedledee: 'and what do you think he's dreaming about?'
Alice said 'Nobody can guess that.'
'Why, about YOU!' Tweedledee exclaimed, clapping his hands triumphantly. 'And if he left off dreaming about you, where do you suppose you'd be?'
'Where I am now, of course,' said Alice.
'Not you!' Tweedledee retorted contemptuously. 'You'd be nowhere. Why, you're only a sort of thing in his dream!'
'If that there King was to wake,' added Tweedledum, 'you'd go out—bang!—just like a candle! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1321:They very soon came upon a Gryphon, lying fast asleep in the sun. (IF you don't know what a Gryphon is, look at the picture.) 'Up, lazy thing!' said the Queen, 'and take this young lady to see the Mock Turtle, and to hear his history. I must go back and see after some executions I have ordered'; and she walked off, leaving Alice alone with the Gryphon. Alice did not quite like the look of the creature, but on the whole she thought it would be quite as safe to stay with it as to go after that savage Queen: so she waited. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1322:Fury said to a
mouse, That he
met in the
house,
"Let us
both go to
law: I will
prosecute
you. -Come,
I'll take no
denial; We
must have a
trial: For
really this
morning I've
nothin
to do."
Said the
mouse to the
cur, "Such
a trial,
dear Sir,
With
no jury
or judge,
would be
wasting
our
breath."
"I'll be
judge, I'll
be jury,"
Said
cunning
old Fury:
"I'll
try the
whole
cause,
and
condemn
you
to
death, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1323:Buralarda nasıl insanlar yaşar?'
'Şu tarafta, ' dedi Kedi, sağ pençesiyle bir yarım daire çizerek, 'Şapkacı yaşar. Şu tarafta da,' dedi, diğer pençesiyle de aynı hareketi yaparak, 'Mart Tavşan'ı yaşar. İstediğine git, nasılsa ikisi de deli.'
'Ama ben delilerin arasına gitmek istemiyorum,' dedi Alice.
'E, bu konuda elimden bir şey gelmez,' dedi Kedi. 'Burada kim deli değil ki! Ben deliyim. Sen delisin.'
'Nereden biliyorsun benim deli olduğumu,' dedi Alice.
'Öyle olmalısın,' dedi Kedi, 'Yoksa buralara gelmezdin. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1324:...Ben tam yüz bir yıl, beş ay, bir gün önce doğdum.'
'Buna inanmam!' dedi Alice.
'İnanamaz mısın?' dedi Kraliçe ona acıyarak. 'Bir daha inanmayı dene, derin derin nefes al ve gözlerini kapa.'
Alice kahkahalarla güldü. 'Böyle yapmanın hiçbir faydası yok,' dedi. 'İnsan imkansız şeylere inanamaz.'
'Öyle sanıyorum ki senin bu konuda çok fazla inanma denemen olmamış,' dedi Kraliçe. 'Ben senin yaşındayken her gün yarım saat inanma denemesi yapardım. Yaa! Bazen kahvaltıdan önce altı tane imkansız şeye inandığım olurdu... ~ Lewis Carroll,
1325:Well, it’s no use your talking about waking him, said Tweedledum, when you’re only one of the things in his dream. You know very well you’re not real.

I am real! said Alice, and began to cry.

You won’t make yourself a bit realer by crying, Tweedledee remarked: there’s nothing to cry about.

If I wasn’t real, Alice said– half laughing through her tears, it all seemed so ridiculous– I shouldn’t be able to cry.

I hope you don’t think those are real tears? Tweedledee interrupted in a tone of great contempt. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1326:But I'm not a serpent, I tell you!" said Alice. "I'm a --- I'm a ---."

"Well! What are you?" said the Pigeon. "I can see you're trying to invent something!"

"I- I'm a little girl," said Alice, rather doubtfully, as she remembered the number of changes she had gone through that day...

..."How puzzling all these changes are! I'm never sure what I'm going to be, from one munute to another! However, I've got back to my right size: the next thing is, to get into that beautiful garden- how is that to be done, I wonder? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1327:If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps. ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno, [T6],
1328:The executioner's argument was that you couldn't cut of something's head unless there was a trunk to sever it from. He'd never done anything like that in his time of life, and wasn't going to start now.

The King's argument was that anything that had a head, could be beheaded, and you weren't to talk nonsense.

The Queen's argument was that if something wasn't done about it in less than no time, she'd have everyone beheaded all round.

It was this last argument that had everyone looking so nervous and uncomfortable. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1329:Crawling at your feet,' said the Gnat (Alice drew her feet back in some alarm), `you may observe a Bread-and-Butterfly. Its wings are thin slices of Bread-and-butter, its body is a crust, and its head is a lump of sugar.'

And what does IT live on?'

Weak tea with cream in it.'

A new difficulty came into Alice's head. `Supposing it couldn't find any?' she suggested.

Then it would die, of course.'

But that must happen very often,' Alice remarked thoughtfully.

It always happens,' said the Gnat. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1330:I believe this thought, of the possibility of death — if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1331:will do, to begin with.' 'A barrowful of what?' thought Alice; but she had not long to doubt, for the next moment a shower of little pebbles came rattling in at the window, and some of them hit her in the face. 'I'll put a stop to this,' she said to herself, and shouted out, 'You'd better not do that again!' which produced another dead silence. Alice noticed with some surprise that the pebbles were all turning into little cakes as they lay on the floor, and a bright idea came into her head. 'If I eat one of these cakes,' she thought, 'it's ~ Lewis Carroll,
1332:A likely story indeed!" said the Pigeon, in a tone of the deepest contempt. "I've seen a good many little girls in my time, but never one with such a neck as that! No, no! You're a serpent; and there's no use denying it. I suppose you'll be telling me next that you never tasted an egg!"
"I have tasted eggs, certainly," said Alice, who was a very truthful child; "but little girls eat eggs quite as much as serpents do, you know."
"I don't believe it," said the Pigeon; "but if they do, then they're a kind of serpent: that's all I can say. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1333:Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice. “I’m glad they’ve begun asking riddles,—I believe I can guess that,” she added aloud. “Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?” said the March Hare. “Exactly so,” said Alice. “Then you should say what you mean,” the March Hare went on. “I do,” Alice hastily replied; “at least—at least I mean what I say—that’s the same thing, you know.” “Not the same thing a bit!” said the Hatter. “Why, you might just as well say that ‘I see what I eat’ is the same thing as ‘I eat what I see’! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1334:Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman; and how she would keep, through all her riper years, the simple and loving heart of her childhood: and how she would gather about her other little children, and make their eyes bright and eager with many a strange tale, perhaps even with the dream of Wonderland of long ago: and how she would feel with all their simple sorrows, and find a pleasure in all their simple joys, remembering her own child-life, and the happy summer days. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1335:A bottle that reads, "Drink me." A tea party, with a dormouse, a March Hare, and of course, one Mad Hatter. A red queen, with as much a fondness for tarts as for saying, "Off with their heads!" When we think of Alice and her adventures in wonderland, we often think of these amazing (and amusing) elements. Although today, your vision of Alice in Wonderland probably includes Johnny Depp and a certain visual aesthetic by Tim Burton, it's difficult not to think of the Alice stories without thinking about the food that appears within the pages of the story. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1336:them again, and all would change to dull reality--the grass would be only rustling in the wind, and the pool rippling to the waving of the reeds--the rattling teacups would change to tinkling sheep- bells, and the Queen's shrill cries to the voice of the shepherd boy--and the sneeze of the baby, the shriek of the Gryphon, and all thy other queer noises, would change (she knew) to the confused clamour of the busy farm-yard--while the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle's heavy sobs. Lastly, she pictured to herself ~ Lewis Carroll,
1337:Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die. But, once realise what the true object is in life — that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds' — but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man — and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1338:For I do not believe God means us thus to divide life into half halves - to wear a grave face on Sunday, and to think it out-of-place to even so much as mention Him on a weekday. Do you think he cares to see only kneeling figures, and to hear only tones of prayer - and that He does not also love to see the lambs leaping in the sunlight, and to hear the merry voices of the children as they roll among the hay? Surely their innocent laughter is as sweet in His ears as the grandest anthem that ever rolled up from the 'dim religious light' of some solemn cathedral? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1339:I like the Walrus best,' said Alice: `because you see he was a little sorry for the poor oysters.'

`He ate more than the Carpenter, though,' said Tweedledee. `You see he held his handkerchief in front, so that the Carpenter couldn't count how many he took: contrariwise.'

`That was mean!' Alice said indignantly. `Then I like the Carpenter best--if he didn't eat so many as the Walrus.'

`But he ate as many as he could get,' said Tweedledum.

This was a puzzler. After a pause, Alice began, `Well! They were both very unpleasant characters-- ~ Lewis Carroll,
1340:I don't know what you mean by 'glory,' " Alice said.
Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. "Of course you don't—till I tell you. I meant 'there's a nice knock-down argument for you!' "
"But 'glory' doesn't mean 'a nice knock-down argument'," Alice objected.
"When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less."
"The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."
"The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master—that's all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1341:I'm sure I'll take you with pleasure!" the Queen said. "Twopence a week, and jam every other day."
Alice couldn't help laughing, as she said, "I don't want you to hire me - and I don't care for jam."
"It's very good jam," said the Queen.
"Well, I don't want any today, at any rate."
"You couldn't have it if you did want it," the Queen said.
"The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday - but never today."
"It must come sometimes to 'jam today'," Alice objected.
"No it can't," said the Queen. "It's jam every other day: today isn't any other day, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1342:How is it you can all talk so nicely?' Alice said, hoping to get it into a better temper by a compliment. 'I've been in many gardens before, but none of the flowers could talk.' 'Put your hand down, and feel the ground,' said the Tiger-lily. 'Then you'll know why.' Alice did so. 'It's very hard,' she said, 'but I don't see what that has to do with it.' 'In most gardens,' the Tiger-lily said, 'they make the beds too soft—so that the flowers are always asleep.' This sounded a very good reason, and Alice was quite pleased to know it. 'I never thought of that before!' she said. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1343:Come, my child," I said, trying to lead her away. "Wish good-bye to the poor hare, and come and look for blackberries." "Good-bye, poor hare!" Sylvie obediently repeated, looking over her shoulder at it as we turned away. And then, all in a moment, her self-command gave way. Pulling her hand out of mine, she ran back to where the dead hare was lying, and flung herself down at its side in such an agony of grief as I could hardly have believed possible in so young a child. "Oh, my darling, my darling!" she moaned, over and over again. "And God meant your life to be so beautiful! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1344:I have a fairy by my side
Which says I must not sleep,
When once in pain I loudly cried
It said "You must not weep"
If, full of mirth, I smile and grin,
It says "You must not laugh"
When once I wished to drink some gin
It said "You must not quaff".

When once a meal I wished to taste
It said "You must not bite"
When to the wars I went in haste
It said "You must not fight".

"What may I do?" at length I cried,
Tired of the painful task.
The fairy quietly replied,
And said "You must not ask".

Moral: "You mustn't. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1345:That would never do, I'm sure,' said Alice: `the governess would never think of excusing me lessons for that. If she couldn't remember my name, she'd call me "Miss!" as the servants do.'

Well. if she said "Miss," and didn't say anything more,' the Gnat remarked, `of course you'd miss your lessons. That's a joke. I wish YOU had made it.'

Why do you wish I had made it?' Alice asked. `It's a very bad one.'

But the Gnat only sighed deeply, while two large tears came rolling down its cheeks.

You shouldn't make jokes,' Alice said, `if it makes you so unhappy. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1346:Come, my child," I said, trying to lead her away. "Wish good-bye to the poor hare, and come and look for blackberries."

"Good-bye, poor hare!" Sylvie obediently repeated, looking over her shoulder at it as we turned away. And then, all in a moment, her self-command gave way. Pulling her hand out of mine, she ran back to where the dead hare was lying, and flung herself down at its side in such an agony of grief as I could hardly have believed possible in so young a child.

"Oh, my darling, my darling!" she moaned, over and over again. "And God meant your life to be so beautiful! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1347:off, for days and days.' 'But what am I to do?' said Alice. 'Anything you like,' said the Footman, and began whistling. 'Oh, there's no use in talking to him,' said Alice desperately: 'he's perfectly idiotic!' And she opened the door and went in. The door led right into a large kitchen, which was full of smoke from one end to the other: the Duchess was sitting on a three-legged stool in the middle, nursing a baby; the cook was leaning over the fire, stirring a large cauldron which seemed to be full of soup. 'There's certainly too much pepper in that soup!' Alice said to herself, as well as she ~ Lewis Carroll,
1348:Alice had been looking over his shoulder with some curiosity. “What a funny watch!” she remarked. “It tells the day of the month, and doesn’t tell what o’clock it is!” “Why should it?” muttered the Hatter. “Does your watch tell you what year it is?” “Of course not,” Alice replied very readily: “but that’s because it stays the same year for such a long time together.” “Which is just the case with mine,” said the Hatter. Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The Hatter’s remark seemed to have no meaning in it, and yet it was certainly English. “I don’t quite understand,” she said as politely as she could. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1349:Franco Moretti in The Way of the World, his brilliant discussion of the European bildungsroman, or novel of growing-up, distinguishes the British novel from the continental European one for its greater emphasis on the child as hero or heroine. This goes, he says, with a plot that turns on the dangers posed by fairy-tale villains and schemers, trying to dispossess the child of its rightful place and inheritance—as opposed to the novel of growing-up, becoming adult, making moral errors (Stendhal, Goethe, and in Britain, Middlemarch, which Virginia Woolf called the only novel written for grown-ups). ~ Lewis Carroll,
1350:Cheshire Puss,' she began, rather timidly, as she did not at all know whether it would like the name: however, it only grinned a little wider. 'Come, it's pleased so far,' thought Alice, and she went on. 'Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?'

'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat.

'I don't much care where—' said Alice.

'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat.

'—so long as I get SOMEWHERE,' Alice added as an explanation.

'Oh, you're sure to do that,' said the Cat, 'if you only walk long enough. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1351:For a minute or two she stood looking at the house, and wondering what to do next, when suddenly a footman in livery came running out of the wood--(she considered him to be a footman because he was in livery: otherwise, judging by his face only, she would have called him a fish)--and rapped loudly at the door with his knuckles. It was opened by another footman in livery, with a round face, and large eyes like a frog; and both footmen, Alice noticed, had powdered hair that curled all over their heads. She felt very curious to know what it was all about, and crept a little way out of the wood to listen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1352:and a most curious country it was. There were a number of tiny little brooks running straight across it from side to side, and the ground between was divided up into squares by a number of little green hedges, that reached from brook to brook.
I declare it's marked out just like a large chessboard!' Alice said at last. 'There ought to be some men moving about somewhere--and so there are!' she added in a tone of delight, and her heart began to beat quick with excitement as she went on. 'It's a great huge game of chess that's being played--all over the world--if this is the world at all, you know. Oh, what fun it is! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1353:Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; 'I advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. 'But it's no use now,' thought poor Alice, 'to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make ONE respectable person! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1354:Come, there's no use in crying like that!" said Alice to herself, rather sharply; "I advise you to leave off this minute!" She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. "But it's no use now," thought poor Alice, "to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1355:Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; 'I advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. 'But it's no use now,' thought poor Alice, 'to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make ONE respectable person!' Soon ~ Lewis Carroll,
1356:I'm sure I'm not Ada for her hair goes in such long ringlets, and mine does'nt go in ringlets at all; and I'm sure I'm not Mabel, for I know all sorts of things, and she's she and I'm I, and-oh dear, how puzzling it all is! i'll try if I know all the things I used to know. Let me see: four times five is tweleve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is-oh dear! I shall never get to tewnty at that rate! However, the Multiplication- Table doesn't signify: let's try geography. London is the capital of Paris, and Paris is the capital of Rome, and Rome-no, that's all wrong, I'm certain! I must have been changed for Mabel! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1357:nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down ~ Lewis Carroll,
1358:Ne komik!' dedi Grifon yarı kendi kendine, yarı da Alice'e.
'Komik olan ne?' diye sordu Alice.
'Tabii ki o, ' dedi Grifon. 'Hepsi kendi hayali. Biliyor musun, hiç kimseyi idam ettirdiği falan yok...'
(...)
Aradan pek fazla bir zaman geçmemişti ki, Yalancı Su Kaplumbağası'nı, uzaklarda, küçük bir kayanın üstünde tek başına hüzünlü hüzünlü öylece otururken gördüler; yanına yaklaştıklarında yüreği sanki yaralıymışçasına derin derin iç çekişini duyabiliyorlardı. Alice, onun bu haline çok acıdı. 'Ne ki derdi?' diye sordu. Grifon, öncekine benzer sözcüklerle bu soruyu yanıtladı, 'Hepsi kendi hayali. Biliyor musun hiçbir derdi falan yok... ~ Lewis Carroll,
1359:The universally acknowledged genius in the perfection of this art, at least in the more difficult task of translating into a classical language, was Scott Moncrieff’s close friend, the legendary Ronald Knox, who taught at Shrewsbury in 1915 and 1916; his fabled achievements were still widely quoted there more than thirty years later. Perhaps his single most inspired tour de force is his splendidly demented translation into pseudo-Greek of Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky,” but there is also considerable delight to be derived from, among a host of other linguistic feats, the switchboard stichomythies of his Aristophanic parody, “Fragment of a Telephoniazusae. ~ Anonymous,
1360:Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.
"I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least-at least I mean what I say-that's the same thing, you know."
"Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "Why, you might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"
"You might just as well say," added the March Hare, "that 'I like what I get' is the same thing as 'I get what I like'!"
"You might just as well say," added the Dormouse, which seemed to be talking in its sleep, "that 'I breathe when I sleep' is the same thing as 'I sleep when I breathe'!"
"It is the same thing with you." said the Hatter, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1361:Bir de burası bu kadar ıssız olmasa!' dedi Alice hüzünlü bir ses tonuyla; yalnızlığı aklına gelir gelmez de kocaman iki damla gözyaşı yanaklarından aşağı süzülmeye başladı.
'Ah, yapma böyle!' diye çığlık kopardı zavallı Kraliçe, çaresizlikten ellerini ovuşturarak. 'Ne müthiş bir kız olduğunu düşün. Bugün ne uzun bir yol kat ettiğini düşün. Saatin kaç olduğunu düşün. Ne istersen onu düşün, yeter ki ağlama!'
Alice, gözyaşları içinde bile bu söylenenlere gülmeden edemedi. 'Bir şeyler düşünerek siz ağlamanızı durdurabiliyor musunuz?' diye sordu.
'Bunun tek çaresi bu;' dedi Kraliçe kararlılıkla. 'Bilirsin, hiç kimse aynı anda iki şeyi birden yapamaz... ~ Lewis Carroll,
1362:Why, what are your shoes done with?' said the Gryphon. 'I mean, what makes them so shiny?' Alice looked down at them, and considered a little before she gave her answer. 'They're done with blacking, I believe.' 'Boots and shoes under the sea,' the Gryphon went on in a deep voice, 'are done with a whiting. Now you know.' 'And what are they made of?' Alice asked in a tone of great curiosity. 'Soles and eels, of course,' the Gryphon replied rather impatiently: 'any shrimp could have told you that.' 'If I'd been the whiting,' said Alice, whose thoughts were still running on the song, 'I'd have said to the porpoise, "Keep back, please: we don't want you with us! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1363:Well, I’ll eat it,’ said Alice, ‘and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way I’ll get into the garden, and I don’t care which happens!’ She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, ‘Which way? Which way?’, holding her hand on the top of her head to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite surprised to find that she remained the same size: to be sure, this generally happens when one eats cake, but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1364:with large eyes full of tears, but said nothing. 'This here young lady,' said the Gryphon, 'she wants for to know your history, she do.' 'I'll tell it her,' said the Mock Turtle in a deep, hollow tone: 'sit down, both of you, and don't speak a word till I've finished.' So they sat down, and nobody spoke for some minutes. Alice thought to herself, 'I don't see how he can even finish, if he doesn't begin.' But she waited patiently. 'Once,' said the Mock Turtle at last, with a deep sigh, 'I was a real Turtle.' These words were followed by a very long silence, broken only by an occasional exclamation of 'Hjckrrh!' from the Gryphon, and the constant heavy sobbing ~ Lewis Carroll,
1365:The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: 'No room! No room!' they cried out when they saw Alice coming. 'There's plenty of room!' said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

'Have some wine,' the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. 'I don't see any wine,' she remarked.

'There isn't any,' said the March Hare.

'Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it,' said Alice angrily.

'It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited,' said the March Hare. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1366:Just look down the road and tell me if you can see either of them."
"I see nobody on the road." said Alice.
"I only wish I had such eyes,"the King remarked in a fretful tone. "To be able to see Nobody! And at such a distance too!”

===

“Who did you pass on the road?" the King went on, holding out his hand to the Messenger for some more hay.
"Nobody," said the Messenger.
"Quite right," said the King; "this young lady saw him too. So of course Nobody walks slower than you."
"I do my best," the Messenger said in a sullen tone. "I'm sure nobody walks much faster than I do!"
"He can't do that," said the King, "or else he'd have been here first. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1367:Dormouse had closed its eyes by this time, and was going off into a doze; but, on being pinched by the Hatter, it woke up again with a little shriek, and went on: '--that begins with an M, such as mouse-traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness-- you know you say things are "much of a muchness"--did you ever see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness?' 'Really, now you ask me,' said Alice, very much confused, 'I don't think--' 'Then you shouldn't talk,' said the Hatter. This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though ~ Lewis Carroll,
1368:- Quiero decir, ¿qué es un regalo de no-cumpleaños?
- Un regalo que te hacen cuando no es tu cumpleaños, naturalmente.
Alicia meditó un momento. <>, dijo por fin.
- ¡No sabes lo que dices! -exclamó Tentetieso- ¿Cuántos días tiene el año?
- Trescientos sesenta y cinco -dijo Alicia.
- ¿Y cuántos cumpleaños tienes?
- Uno.
- Y si restas uno a trescientos sesenta y cinco, ¿cuántos te quedan?
- Trescientos sesenta y cuatro, naturalmente.
[...]
- Lo que demuestra que hay trescientos sesenta y cuatro días en que podrías recibir regalos de no-cumpleaños.
- Desde luego -dijo Alicia.
- Frente a sólo uno de cumpleaños. ¡Te has cubierto de gloria! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1369:The name of the song is called "HADDOCKS' EYES."' 'Oh, that's the name of the song, is it?' Alice said, trying to feel interested. 'No, you don't understand,' the Knight said, looking a little vexed. 'That's what the name is CALLED. The name really IS "THE AGED AGED MAN."' 'Then I ought to have said "That's what the SONG is called"?' Alice corrected herself. 'No, you oughtn't: that's quite another thing! The SONG is called "WAYS AND MEANS": but that's only what it's CALLED, you know!' 'Well, what IS the song, then?' said Alice, who was by this time completely bewildered. 'I was coming to that,' the Knight said. 'The song really IS "A-SITTING ON A GATE": and the tune's my own invention. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1370:A BOAT beneath a sunny sky,
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July —

Children three that nestle near,
Eager eye and willing ear,
Pleased a simple tale to hear —

Long has paled that sunny sky:
Echoes fade and memories die:
Autumn frosts have slain July.

Still she haunts me, phantomwise,
Alice moving under skies
Never seen by waking eyes.

Children yet, the tale to hear,
Eager eye and willing ear,
Lovingly shall nestle near.

In a Wonderland they lie,
Dreaming as the days go by,
Dreaming as the summers die:

Ever drifting down the stream —
Lingering in the golden gleam —
Life, what is it but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1371:Cheshire Puss,' [Alice] began, rather timidly, "`But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.
Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.'
How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.
You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here.'
Alice didn't think that proved it at all; however, she went on `And how do you know that you're mad?'
To begin with,' said the Cat, `a dog's not mad. You grant that?'
I suppose so,' said Alice.
Well, then,' the Cat went on, `you see, a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1372:Would you tell me,' said Alice, a little timidly, 'why you are painting those roses?'

Five and Seven said nothing, but looked at Two. Two began in a low voice, 'Why the fact is, you see, Miss, this here ought to have been a red rose-tree, and we put a white one in by mistake; and if the Queen was to find it out, we should all have our heads cut off, you know. So you see, Miss, we're doing our best, afore she comes, to—' At this moment Five, who had been anxiously looking across the garden, called out 'The Queen! The Queen!' and the three gardeners instantly threw themselves flat upon their faces. There was a sound of many footsteps, and Alice looked round, eager to see the Queen. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1373:Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? “I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time?” she said aloud. “I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think—” (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the school-room, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) “—yes, that’s about the right distance—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to?” (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.) ~ Lewis Carroll,
1374:Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice's first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted! Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into ~ Lewis Carroll,
1375:The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright
-- And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done
-- "It's very rude of him," she said,
"To come and spoil the fun!"

The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead
-- There were no birds to fly.

In a Wonderland they lie
Dreaming as the days go by,
Dreaming as the summer die. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1376:Alicia abrió la pequeña puerta: daba un corredor diminuto, no mucho más grande que el agujero de una cueva de ratones. Se arrodilló para mirar dentro de él y vio que al fondo se abría el jardín más maravilloso que pudiera imaginarse. ¡Qué ganas tenía de salir de ese lúgubre salón y pasearse alegremente por entre esos canteros de flores brillantes y por esas frescas fuentes! Pero no podía siquiera meter la cabeza por ese corredor tan diminuto. "Y aunque pudiera -pensó Alicia-, de nada me serviría sin los hombros... ¡Cómo me gustaría poder plegarme como un telescopio!" Claro, a Alicia le habían sucedido cosas tan extraordinarias aquel día que había llegado a pensar que nada sería verdaderamente imposible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1377:They told me you had been to her, And mentioned me to him: She gave me a good character, But said I could not swim. He sent them word I had not gone (We know it to be true): If she should push the matter on, What would become of you? I gave her one, they gave him two, You gave us three or more; They all returned from him to you, Though they were mine before. If I or she should chance to be Involved in this affair, He trusts to you to set them free, Exactly as we were. My notion was that you had been (Before she had this fit) An obstacle that came between Him, and ourselves, and it. Don't let him know she liked them best, For this must ever be A secret, kept from all the rest, Between yourself and me.' – ~ Lewis Carroll,
1378:Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything: then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed: it was labelled “ORANGE MARMALADE,” but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar, for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1379:It was all very well to say "Drink me," but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. "No, I'll look first," she said, "and see whether it's marked 'poison' or not"; for she had read several nice little stories about children who got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked "poison," it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1380:Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head though the doorway; ‘and even if my head would go through,’ thought poor Alice, ‘it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin.’ For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1381:It’s a Snark!” was the sound that first came to their ears, And seemed almost too good to be true. Then followed a torrent of laughter and cheers: Then the ominous words “It’s a Boo–” Then, silence. Some fancied they heard in the air A weary and wandering sigh That sounded like “–jum!” but the others declare It was only a breeze that went by. a face in the underbrush They hunted till darkness came on, but they found Not a button, or feather, or mark, By which they could tell that they stood on the ground Where the Baker had met with the Snark. In the midst of the word he was trying to say, In the midst of his laughter and glee, He had softly and suddenly vanished away— For the Snark was a Boojum, you see. THE END. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1382:There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and, burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1383:The King and Queen of Hearts were seated on their throne when they arrived, with a great crowd assembled about them--all sorts of little birds and beasts, as well as the whole pack of cards: the Knave was standing before them, in chains, with a soldier on each side to guard him; and near the King was the White Rabbit, with a trumpet in one hand, and a scroll of parchment in the other. In the very middle of the court was a table, with a large dish of tarts upon it: they looked so good, that it made Alice quite hungry to look at them--'I wish they'd get the trial done,' she thought, 'and hand round the refreshments!' But there seemed to be no chance of this, so she began looking at everything about her, to pass away the time. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1384:There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1385:Let’s consider your age to begin with — how old are you?’

‘I’m seven and a half exactly.’

‘You needn’t say “exactually,”’ the Queen remarked: ‘I can believe it without that. Now I’ll give you something to believe. I’m just one hundred and one, five months and a day.’

‘I can’t believe that!’ said Alice.

‘Can’t you?’ the Queen said in a pitying tone. ‘Try again: draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.’

Alice laughed. ‘There’s no use trying,’ she said: ‘one can’t believe impossible things.’

‘I daresay you haven’t had much practice,’ said the Queen. ‘When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1386:There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In ~ Lewis Carroll,
1387:There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat- pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat- pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit- hole under the hedge. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1388:I should see the garden far better," said Alice to herself, "if I could get to the top of that hill: and here's a path that leads straight to it—at least, no it doesn't do that—" (after going a few yards along the path, and turning several sharp corners), "but I suppose it will at last. But how curiously it twists! It's more like a corkscrew than a path! Well, this turn goes to the hill, I suppose—no, it doesn't! This goes straight back to the house! Well then, I'll try it the other way." And so she did: wandering up and down, and trying turn after turn, but always coming back to the house, do what she would. Indeed, once, when she turned a corner rather more quickly than usual, she ran against it before she could stop herself. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1389:I'm sure those are not the right words," said poor Alice, and her eyes filled with tears again as she went on, "I must be Mabel after all, and I shall have to go and live in that poky little house, and have next to no toys to play with, and oh, ever so many lessons to learn! No, I've made up my mind about it: if I'm Mabel, I'll stay down here! It'll be no use their putting their heads down and saying 'Come up again, dear!' I shall only look up and say 'Who Am I, then? Tell me that first, and then if I like being that person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else' - but oh dear!" Cried Alice, with a sudden burst of tears, " I do wish they would put their heads down! I am so very tired of being all alone here! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1390:yet?' 'No,' said Alice. 'I don't even know what a Mock Turtle is.' 'It's the thing Mock Turtle Soup is made from,' said the Queen. 'I never saw one, or heard of one,' said Alice. 'Come on, then,' said the Queen, 'and he shall tell you his history,' As they walked off together, Alice heard the King say in a low voice, to the company generally, 'You are all pardoned.' 'Come, that's a good thing!' she said to herself, for she had felt quite unhappy at the number of executions the Queen had ordered. They very soon came upon a Gryphon, lying fast asleep in the sun. (IF you don't know what a Gryphon is, look at the picture.) 'Up, lazy thing!' said the Queen, 'and take this young lady to see the Mock Turtle, and to hear his history. I must go back ~ Lewis Carroll,
1391:the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a ~ Lewis Carroll,
1392:She waited for some time without hearing anything more: at last came a rumbling of little cart-wheels, and the sound of a good many voices all talking together: she made out the words: “Where’s the other ladder?—Why, I hadn’t to bring but one. Bill's got the other—Bill! Fetch it here, lad!—Here, put ’em up at this corner—No, tie ’em together first—they don't reach half high enough yet—Oh! they’ll do well enough. Don’t be particular—Here, Bill! catch hold of this rope—Will the roof bear?—Mind that loose slate—Oh, it’s coming down! Heads below!” (a loud crash)—“Now, who did that?—It was Bill, I fancy—Who’s to go down the chimney?—Nay, I shan’t! You do it!—That I wo’n’t, then!—Bill’s got to go down—Here, Bill! The master says you’ve got to go down the chimney! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1393:But this did not seem likely to happen. She went on and on, a long way, but wherever the road divided there were sure to be two finger-posts pointing the same way, one marked 'TO TWEEDLEDUM'S HOUSE' and the other 'TO THE HOUSE OF TWEEDLEDEE.' 'I do believe,' said Alice at last, 'that they live in the same house! I wonder I never thought of that before—But I can't stay there long. I'll just call and say "how d'you do?" and ask them the way out of the wood. If I could only get to the Eighth Square before it gets dark!' So she wandered on, talking to herself as she went, till, on turning a sharp corner, she came upon two fat little men, so suddenly that she could not help starting back, but in another moment she recovered herself, feeling sure that they must be. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1394:The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday--but never jam to-day.'
'It MUST come sometimes to "jam to-day,"' Alice objected.
'No, it can't,' said the Queen. '
It's jam every OTHER day: to-day isn't any OTHER day, you know.'
'I don't understand you,' said Alice. 'It's dreadfully confusing!'
'That's the effect of living backwards,' the Queen said kindly: 'it always makes one a little giddy at first--'
'Living backwards!' Alice repeated in great astonishment. 'I never heard of such a thing!'
'--but there's one great advantage in it, that one's memory works both ways.'
‘I'm sure MINE only works one way,' Alice remarked. 'I can't remember things before they happen.'
'It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' the Queen remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1395:Try another Subtraction sum. Take a bone from a dog: what remains?' Alice considered. 'The bone wouldn't remain, of course, if I took it—and the dog wouldn't remain; it would come to bite me—and I'm sure I shouldn't remain!' 'Then you think nothing would remain?' said the Red Queen. 'I think that's the answer.' 'Wrong, as usual,' said the Red Queen: 'the dog's temper would remain.' 'But I don't see how—' 'Why, look here!' the Red Queen cried. 'The dog would lose its temper, wouldn't it?' 'Perhaps it would,' Alice replied cautiously. 'Then if the dog went away, its temper would remain!' the Queen exclaimed triumphantly. Alice said, as gravely as she could, 'They might go different ways.' But she couldn't help thinking to herself, 'What dreadful nonsense we ARE talking! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1396:The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday--but never jam to-day.'

'It MUST come sometimes to "jam to-day,"' Alice objected.

'No, it can't,' said the Queen. '
It's jam every OTHER day: to-day isn't any OTHER day, you know.'

'I don't understand you,' said Alice. 'It's dreadfully confusing!'

'That's the effect of living backwards,' the Queen said kindly: 'it always makes one a little giddy at first--'

'Living backwards!' Alice repeated in great astonishment. 'I never heard of such a thing!'

'--but there's one great advantage in it, that one's memory works both ways.'

‘I'm sure MINE only works one way,' Alice remarked. 'I can't remember things before they happen.'

'It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' the Queen remarked. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1397:said the Caterpillar, just as if she had asked it aloud; and in another moment it was out of sight. Alice remained looking thoughtfully at the mushroom for a minute, trying to make out which were the two sides of it; and as it was perfectly round, she found this a very difficult question. However, at last she stretched her arms round it as far as they would go, and broke off a bit of the edge with each hand. 'And now which is which?' she said to herself, and nibbled a little of the right-hand bit to try the effect: the next moment she felt a violent blow underneath her chin: it had struck her foot! She was a good deal frightened by this very sudden change, but she felt that there was no time to be lost, as she was shrinking rapidly; so she set to work at once to eat some of the other bit. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1398:She tried her best to climb up one of the legs of the table, but it was too slippery; and when she had tired herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and cried.

Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself rather sharply.' I advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. 'But it's no use now,' thought poor Alice, 'to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1399:But oh!" thought Alice, suddenly jumping up, "if I don't make haste I shall have to go back through the Looking-glass, before I've seen what the rest of the house is like! Let's have a look at the garden first!" She was out of the room in a moment, and ran down stairs—or, at least, it wasn't exactly running, but a new invention for getting down stairs quickly and easily, as Alice said to herself. She just kept the tips of her fingers on the hand-rail, and floated gently down without even touching the stairs with her feet; then she floated on through the hall, and would have gone straight out at the door in the same way, if she hadn't caught hold of the door-post. She was getting a little giddy too with so much floating in the air, and was rather glad to find herself walking again in the natural way. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1400:I thought you did,' said the Mouse. `--I proceed. "Edwin and Morcar, the earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him: and even Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable--"'

`Found WHAT?' said the Duck.

`Found IT,' the Mouse replied rather crossly: `of course you know what "it" means.'

`I know what "it" means well enough, when I find a thing,' said the Duck: `it 's generally a frog or a worm. The question is, what did the archbishop find?'

The Mouse did not notice this question, but hurriedly went on, `"--found it advisable to go with Edgar Atheling to meet William and offer him the crown. William's conduct at first was moderate. But the insolence of his Normans--" How are you getting on now, my dear?' it continued, turning to Alice as it spoke. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1401:Now, what am I to do with this creature when I get it home?" when it grunted again, so violently, that she looked down into its face in some alarm. This time there could be no mistake about it: it was neither more nor less than a pig, and she felt that it would be quite absurd for her to carry it any further. | So she set the little creature down, and felt quite relieved to see it trot away quietly into the wood. "If it had grown up," she said to herself, "it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes a rather handsome pig, I think." And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself, "if one only knew the right way to change them--" when she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1402:For men like Billy and Blaise (hahaha), it comes down to how fervently they thrust their crotches at the audience. AT THE AUDIENCE. AT! THE! AUDIENCE! For men like Colt and Tristan, it’s your basic hot guy dancing. No rhythm, but looka this bicep and looka this six-pack and whaddaya think of this, though . . . aaaand thrust. Jake and Lantz actually look like they’re having a good time, dancing and playing to the audience. I do love a man who can dance. And then there’s Josh, who just looks kind of embarrassed, fumbling with his clothes and oh, did taking off my shirt reveal an incredible body? Sigh . . . This ole thing? And that’s why he’s the favorite. He’s Lewis Carroll’s snark. He’s the elusive unicorn. He’s the guy who’s model-hot but doesn’t know it. Although he did sign up for the pageant in the first place. So . . . ~ Liza Palmer,
1403:You alarm me!' said the King. 'I feel faint—Give me a ham sandwich!'

On which the Messenger, to Alice's great amusement, opened a bag that hung round his neck, and handed a sandwich to the King, who devoured it greedily.

'Another sandwich!' said the King.

'There's nothing but hay left now,' the Messenger said, peeping into the bag.

'Hay, then,' the King murmured in a faint whisper.

Alice was glad to see that it revived him a good deal. 'There's nothing like eating hay when you're faint,' he remarked to her, as he munched away.

'I should think throwing cold water over you would be better,' Alice suggested: 'or some sal-volatile.'

'I didn't say there was nothing better,' the King replied. 'I said there was nothing like it.' Which Alice did not venture to deny. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1404:Hold your tongue!’ said the Queen, turning purple. ‘I won’t!’ said Alice. ‘Off with her head!’ the Queen shouted at the top of her voice. Nobody moved. ‘Who cares for you?’ said Alice (she had grown to her full size by this time). ‘You’re nothing but a pack of cards!’ At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came flying down upon her; she gave a little scream, half of fright and half of anger, and tired to beat them off, and found herself lying on the bank, with her head in the lap of her sister, who was gently brushing away some dead leaves that had fluttered down from the trees upon her face. ‘Wake up, Alice dear!’ said her sister. ‘Why, what a long sleep you’ve had!’ So Alice got up and ran off, thinking while she ran, as well she might, what a wonderful dream it had been. Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland, 1865 ~ Lewis Carroll,
1405:The Unicorn's eye happened to fall upon Alice: he turned round rather instantly, and stood for some time looking at her with an air of the deepest surprise.
`What -- is -- this?' he said at last.
`This is a child!' Haigha replied eagerly, coming in front of Alice to introduce her. `We only found it today. It's as large as life, and twice as natural!'
`I always thought they were fabulous monsters!' said the Unicorn. 'Is it alive?'
`It can talk,' said Haigha, solemnly.
The Unicorn looked dreamily at Alice, and said `Talk, child.'
Alice could not help her lips curing up into a smile as she began: `Do you know, I always thought Unicorns were fabulous monsters, too! I never saw one alive before!'
`Well, now that we have seen each other,' said the Unicorn, `if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. Is that a bargain? ~ Lewis Carroll,
1406:The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice.
'Who are you?' said the Caterpillar.
This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, 'I — I hardly know, sir, just at present — at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.'
'What do you mean by that?' said the Caterpillar sternly. 'Explain yourself!'
'I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir' said Alice, 'because I'm not myself, you see.'
'I don't see,' said the Caterpillar.
'I'm afraid I can't put it more clearly,' Alice replied very politely, 'for I can't understand it myself to begin with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very confusing. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1407:I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?' she said aloud. 'I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) '--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?' (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.) Presently she began again. 'I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think--' (she was rather glad there ~ Lewis Carroll,
1408:if my memory serves me right, here is my genealogical line: Boccaccio, Petronius, Rabelais, Whitman, Emerson, Thoreau, Maeterlinck, Romain Rolland, Plotinus, Heraclitus, Nietzsche, Dostoievsky (and other Russian writers of the Nineteenth Century), the ancient Greek dramatists, theElizabethan dramatists (excluding Shakespeare), Theodore Dreiser, Knut Hamsun, D. H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Thomas Mann, Elie Faure, Oswald Spengler, Marcel Proust, Van Gogh, the Dadaists and Surrealists, Balzac, Lewis Carroll, Nijinsky, Rimbaud, Blaise Cendrars, Jean Giono, Celine, everything I read on Zen Buddhism, everything I read about China, India, Tibet, Arabia, Africa, and of course the Bible, the men who wrote it and especially the men who made the King James version, for it was the language of the Bible rather than its “message” which I got first and which I will never shake off. ~ Henry Miller,
1409:Can you keep from crying by considering things?' she asked.
'That's the way it's done.' the Queen said with great decision: 'nobody can do two things at once, you know. Let’s consider your age to begin with — how old are you?’
''I'm seven and a half exactly.'
'You needn’t say "exactually,"' the Queen remarked: 'I can believe it without that. Now I’ll give you something to believe. I’m just one hundred and one, five months and a day.'
'I can’t believe that!' said Alice.
'Can’t you?' the Queen said in a pitying tone. 'Try again: draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.'
Alice laughed. 'There’s no use trying,' she said: 'one can’t believe impossible things.'
'I daresay you haven’t had much practice,' said the Queen. ‘When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1410:I don't know what you mean by 'glory,'" Alice said.

Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. "Of course you don't---till I tell you. I meant 'there's a nice knock-down argument for you!'"

"But glory' doesn't mean 'a nice knock-down argument,'" Alice objected.

"When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean---neither more nor less."

"The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

"The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "Which is to be master---that's all."

Alive was too much puzzled to say anything, so after a minute Humpty Dumpty began again. "They've a temper, some of them---particularly, verbs, they're the proudest---adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs---however, I can manage the whole lot! Impenetrability! That's what I say! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1411:Alice sighed wearily. `I think you might do something better with the time,' she said, `than waste it in asking riddles that have no answers.'

`If you knew Time as well as I do,' said the Hatter, `you wouldn't talk about wasting it. It's him.'

`I don't know what you mean,' said Alice.

`Of course you don't!' the Hatter said, tossing his head contemptuously. `I dare say you never even spoke to Time!'

`Perhaps not,' Alice cautiously replied: `but I know I have to beat time when I learn music.'

`Ah! that accounts for it,' said the Hatter. `He won't stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you liked with the clock. For instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just time to begin lessons: you'd only have to whisper a hint to Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling! Half-past one, time for dinner! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1412:Alice sighed wearily. "I think you might do something better with the time," she said, "than wasting it in asking riddles that have no answers."

If you knew Time as well as I do," said the Hatter, "you wouldn't talk about wasting it. It's him."

I don't know what you mean," said Alice.

Of course you don't!" the Hatter said, tossing his head contemptuously. "I dare say you never even spoke to Time!"

Perhaps not," Alice cautiously replied: "but I know I have to beat time when I learn music."

Ah! That accounts for it," said the Hatter. "He won't stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you liked with the clock.

For instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just time to begin lessons: you'd only have to whisper a hint to Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling! Half-past one, time for dinner! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1413:What do you call yourself?" the Fawn said at last. Such a soft sweet voice it had!
"I wish I knew!" thought poor Alice. She answered, rather sadly, "Nothing, just now."
"Think again," it said: "that won't do."
Alice thought, but nothing came of it. "Please, would you tell me what you call yourself?" she said timidly, "I think that might help a little."
"I'll tell you, if you'll come a little further on," the Fawn said. "I can't remember here."
So they walked on together through the wood, Alice with her arms clasped lovingly round the soft neck of the Fawn, till they came out into another open field, and here the Fawn gave a sudden bound into the air, and shook itself free from Alice's arms. "I'm a Fawn!" it cried out in a voice of delight. "And dear me, you're a human child!" A sudden look of alarm came into its beautiful brown eyes, and in another moment it had darted away at full speed. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1414:Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice. “I’m glad they’ve begun asking riddles,—I believe I can guess that,” she added aloud. “Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?” said the March Hare. “Exactly so,” said Alice. “Then you should say what you mean,” the March Hare went on. “I do,” Alice hastily replied; “at least—at least I mean what I say—that’s the same thing, you know.” “Not the same thing a bit!” said the Hatter. “Why, you might just as well say that ‘I see what I eat’ is the same thing as ‘I eat what I see’!” “You might just as well say,” added the March Hare, “that ‘I like what I get’ is the same thing as ‘I get what I like’!” “You might just as well say,” added the Dormouse, which seemed to be talking in his sleep, “that ‘I breathe when I sleep’ is the same thing as ‘I sleep when I breathe’!” “It is the same thing with you,” said the Hatter; and here the conversation dropped, ~ Lewis Carroll,
1415:Writing in 1932, on the hundred-year anniversary of Lewis Carroll’s birth, Gilbert K. Chesterton voiced his “dreadful fear” that Alice’s story had already fallen under the heavy hands of the scholars and was becoming “cold and monumental like a classic tomb.” “Poor, poor, little Alice!” bemoaned G.K. “She has not only been caught and made to do lessons; she has been forced to inflict lessons on others. Alice is now not only a schoolgirl but a schoolmistress. The holiday is over and Dodgson is again a don. There will be lots and lots of examination papers, with questions like: (1) What do you know of the following; mimsy, gimble, haddocks’ eyes, treacle-wells, beautiful soup? (2) Record all the moves in the chess game in Through the Looking-Glass, and give diagram. (3) Outline the practical policy of the White Knight for dealing with the social problem of green whiskers. (4) Distinguish between Tweedledum and Tweedledee. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1416:What do you call yourself?' the Fawn said at last. Such a soft sweet voice it had!

'I wish I knew!' thought poor Alice. She answered, rather sadly, 'Nothing, just now.'

'Think again,' it said: 'that won't do.'

Alice thought, but nothing came of it. 'Please, would you tell me what YOU call yourself?' she said timidly. 'I think that might help a little.'

'I'll tell you, if you'll come a little further on,' the Fawn said. 'I can't remember here.'

So they walked on together through the wood, Alice with her arms clasped lovingly round the soft neck of the Fawn, till they came out into another open field, and here the Fawn gave a sudden bound into the air, and shook itself free from Alice's arms. 'I'm a Fawn!' it cried out in a voice of delight,'and, dear me! you're a human child!' A sudden look of alarm came into its beautiful brown eyes, and in another moment it had darted away at full speed. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1417:...it occurred to me, not for the first time, what a remarkably small world Britain is. That is its glory, you see--that it manages at once to be intimate and small scale, and at the same time packed to bursting with incident and interest. I am constantly filled with admiration at this--at the way you can wander through a town like Oxford and in the space of a few hundred yards pass the home of Christopher Wren, the buildings where Halley found his comet and Boyle his first law, the track where Roger Bannister ran the first sub-four-minute mile, the meadow where Lewis Carroll strolled; or how you can stand on Snow's Hill at Windsor and see, in a single sweep, Windsor Castle, the playing fields of Eton, the churchyard where Gray wrote his "Elegy," the site where The Merry Wives of Windsor was performed. Can there anywhere on earth be, in such a modest span, a landscape more packed with centuries of busy, productive attainment? ~ Bill Bryson,
1418:On no account would I do a picture which I should be unwilling to show to all the world - or at least all the artistic world. If I did not believe I could take pictures of all children without any lower motive than a pure love of Art, I would not ask it: and if I thought there was any fear of its lessening their beautiful simplicity of character, I would not ask it. I print all such pictures myself, and of course would not let any one see them without your permission. I fear you will reply that the one insuperable objection is "Mrs. Grundy"--that people will be sure to hear that such pictures have been done, and that they will talk. As to their hearing of it, I say "of course. All the world are welcome to hear of it, and I would not an any account suggest to the children to mention it—which would at once introduce an objectionable element"—but as to people talking about it, I will only quote the grand old monkish legend: They say: Quhat do they say? Lat them say! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1419:Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. 'Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) 'I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?' And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, 'Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?' and sometimes, 'Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, 'Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?' when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1420:ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND Lewis Carroll THE MILLENNIUM FULCRUM EDITION 3.0 CHAPTER I Down the Rabbit-Hole Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the ~ Lewis Carroll,
1421:Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. 'Dinah'll miss me very much to- night, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) 'I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea- time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?' And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, 'Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?' and sometimes, 'Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, 'Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?' when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1422:Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!" (Dinah was the cat.) "I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?" And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, "do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?" and sometimes, "do bats eat cats?" for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, "Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?" when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.   Alice ~ Lewis Carroll,
1423:Kral'ın başında püsküllü kırmızı uzun bir külah vardı; perperişan bir yığın gibi çöküp kalmıştı; yüksek sesle horlayıp duruyordu; Tumbadız'ın deyimiyle neredeyse gırtlağı çatlayacaktı.
Çok ince ve düşünceli bir kızcağız olan Alice, 'Umarım bu ıslak çimende üşütmez,' dedi.
'Şu an düş görüyor,' dedi Tumbadik. 'Sence düşünde ne görüyor?'
'Kim bunu bilebilir ki!' dedi Alice.
'Tabii ki seni!' diye haykırdı Tumbadik, zafer kazanmışçasına ellerini şaplatarak. 'Seni düşünde görmeseydi eğer, nerede olurdun dersin?'
'Şu an olduğum yerde tabii ki,' dedi Alice.
'Olmazdın!' diye karşılık verdi Tumbadik küçümsercesine. 'Hiçbir yerde olmazdın. Sen hepsi hepsi onun düşündeki bir şeysin!'
'Ola ki Kral uyanacak olsa,' diye ekledi Tumbadız, 'bir mum gibi...o dakika...sönerdin!'
'Sönmezdim!' diye avazı çıktığınca bağırdı Alice öfkeye kapılarak. 'Üstelik ben onun düşündeki bir şeysem, siz nesiniz o zaman?'
'Aynısı!' dedi Tumbadız.
'Tıpkısının aynısı!' diye haykırdı Tumbadik. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1424:This also seems a fitting occasion to notice the other hard words in that poem. Humpty-Dumpty’s theory, of two meanings packed into one word like a portmanteau, seems to me the right explanation for all. For instance, take the two words “fuming” and “furious.” Make up your mind that you will say both words, but leave it unsettled which you will say first. Now open your mouth and speak. If your thoughts incline ever so little towards “fuming,” you will say “fuming-furious;” if they turn, by even a hair’s breadth, towards “furious,” you will say “furious-fuming;” but if you have that rarest of gifts, a perfectly balanced mind, you will say “frumious.” Supposing that, when Pistol uttered the well-known words— “Under which king, Bezonian? Speak or die!” Justice Shallow had felt certain that it was either William or Richard, but had not been able to settle which, so that he could not possibly say either name before the other, can it be doubted that, rather than die, he would have gasped out “Rilchiam! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1425:And then, as to the mastication of the food, the mental process answering to this is simply thinking over what we read. This is a very much greater exertion of mind than the mere passive taking in the contents of our Author. So much greater an exertion is it, that, as Coleridge says, the mind often “angrily refuses” to put itself to such trouble— so much greater, that we are far too apt to neglect it altogether, and go on pouring in fresh food on the top of the undigested masses already lying there, till the unfortunate mind is fairly swamped under the flood. But the greater the exertion the more valuable, we may be sure, is the effect. One hour of steady thinking over a subject (a solitary walk is as good an opportunity for the process as any other) is worth two or three of reading only. And just consider another effect of this thorough digestion of the books we read; I mean the arranging and “ticketing,” so to speak, of the subjects in our minds, so that we can readily refer to them when we want them. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1426:These word games bothered and intrigued me. Appearing to be silly nonsense, on examination they were absolutely logical—yet they were still funny. The comedy doors opened wide, and Lewis Carroll’s clever fancies from the nineteenth century expanded my notion of what comedy could be. I began closing my show by announcing, “I’m not going home tonight; I’m going to Bananaland, a place where only two things are true, only two things: One, all chairs are green; and two, no chairs are green.” Not at Lewis Carroll’s level, but the line worked for my contemporaries, and I loved implying that the one thing I believed in was a contradiction. I also was enamored of the rhythmic poetry of e. e. cummings, and a tantalizing quote from one of his recorded lectures stayed in my head. When asked why he became a poet, he said, “Like the burlesque comedian, I am abnormally fond of that precision which creates movement.” The line, with its intriguing reference to comedy, was enigmatic, and it took me ten years to work out its meaning. ~ Steve Martin,
1427:Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand;
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"
He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1428:To be sure I was!' Humpty Dumpty said gaily, as she turned it round for
him. 'I thought it looked a little queer. As I was saying, that SEEMS
to be done right--though I haven't time to look it over thoroughly just
now--and that shows that there are three hundred and sixty-four days
when you might get un-birthday presents--'

Certainly,' said Alice.

And only ONE for birthday presents, you know. There's glory for you!'

I don't know what you mean by "glory,"' Alice said.

Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. 'Of course you don't--till I tell
you. I meant "there's a nice knock-down argument for you!"'

But "glory" doesn't mean "a nice knock-down argument,"' Alice objected.

When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, 'it
means just what I choose it to mean--neither more nor less.'

The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you CAN make words mean so many
different things.'

The question is,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'which is to be master--that's
all. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1429:Above them, one of the blackened television screens brightens, and there's an announcement about the in-flight movie. It's an animated film about a family of ducks, one that Hadley's actually see, and when Oliver groans, shes about to deny the whole thing. But then she twists around in her seat and eyes him critically.
"There's nothing wrong with ducks," she tells him, and he rolls his eyes.
"Talking ducks?"
Hadley grins. "They sing, too."
"Don't tell me," he says. "You've already seen it."
She holds up two fingers. "Twice."
"You do know it's meant for five-year-olds, right?"
"Five- to eight-year-olds, thank you very much."
"And how old are you again?"
"Old enough to appreciate our web-footed friends."
"You," he says, laughing in spite of himself, "are a mad as a hatter."
"Wait a second," Hadley says in mock horror. "Is that a reference to a...cartoon?"
No, genius. It's a reference to a famous work of literature by Lewis Carroll. But once again, I can see how well that American education is working for you. ~ Jennifer E Smith,
1430:But Hock Seng doesn’t contest the foreigner’s words. He’ll put out the bounty, regardless. If the cats are allowed to stay, the workers will start rumors that Phii Oun the cheshire trickster spirit has caused the calamity. The devil cats flicker closer. Calico and ginger, black as night—all of them fading in and out of view as their bodies take on the colors of their surroundings. They shade red as they dip into the blood pool.  Hock Seng has heard that cheshires were supposedly created by a calorie executive—some PurCal or AgriGen man, most likely—for a daughter’s birthday. A party favor for when the little princess turned as old as Lewis Carroll’s Alice.  The child guests took their new pets home where they mated with natural felines, and within twenty years, the devil cats were on every continent and Felis domesticus was gone from the face of the world, replaced by a genetic string that bred true ninety-eight percent of the time. The Green Headbands in Malaya hated Chinese people and cheshires equally, but as far as Hock Seng knows, the devil cats still thrive there.  ~ Paolo Bacigalupi,
1431:In logic class, I opened my textbook—the last place I was expecting to find comic inspiration—and was startled to find that Lewis Carroll, the supremely witty author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, was also a logician. He wrote logic textbooks and included argument forms based on the syllogism, normally presented in logic books this way: All men are mortal. Socrates is a man.                 Therefore, Socrates is mortal. But Carroll’s were more convoluted, and they struck me as funny in a new way: 1) Babies are illogical. 2) Nobody is despised who can manage a crocodile. 3) Illogical persons are despised.                      Therefore, babies cannot manage crocodiles. And: 1) No interesting poems are unpopular among people of real taste. 2) No modern poetry is free from affectation. 3) All your poems are on the subject of soap bubbles. 4) No affected poetry is popular among people of taste. 5) Only a modern poem would be on the subject of soap bubbles.                      Therefore, all your poems are uninteresting. ~ Steve Martin,
1432:Why do we love nonsense? Why do we love Lewis Carroll with his “‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe, all mimsy were the borogoves, and the mome raths outgrabe…”? Why is it that all those old English songs are full of “Fal-de-riddle-eye-do” and “Hey-nonny-nonny” and all those babbling choruses? Why is it that when we get “hep” with jazz we just go “Boody-boody-boop-de-boo” and so on, and enjoy ourselves swinging with it? It is this participation in the essential glorious nonsense that is at the heart of the world, not necessarily going anywhere. It seems that only in moments of unusual insight and illumination that we get the point of this, and find that the true meaning of life is no meaning, that its purpose is no purpose, and that its sense is non-sense. Still, we want to use the word “significant.” Is this significant nonsense? Is this a kind of nonsense that is not just chaos, that is not just blathering balderdash, but rather has in it rhythm, fascinating complexity, and a kind of artistry? It is in this kind of meaninglessness that we come to the profoundest meaning. ~ Alan W Watts,
1433:Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch ~ Lewis Carroll,
1434:You and your husband have, I think, been very fortunate to know so little, by experience, in your own case or in that of your friends, of the wicked recklessness with which people repeat things to the disadvantage of others, without a thought as to whether they have grounds for asserting what they say. I have met with a good deal of utter misrepresentation of that kind. And another result of my experience is the conviction that the opinion of "people" in general is absolutely worthless as a test of right and wrong. The only two tests I now apply to such a question as the having some particular girl-friend as a guest are, first, my own conscience, to settle whether I feel it to be entirely innocent and right, in the sight of God; secondly, the parents of my friend, to settle whether I have their full approval for what I do. You need not be shocked at my being spoken against. Anybody, who is spoken about at all, is sure to be spoken against by somebody: and any action, however innocent in itself, is liable, and not at all unlikely, to be blamed by somebody. If you limit your actions in life to things that nobody can possibly find fault with, you will not do much ~ Lewis Carroll,
1435:You are sad," the Knight said in an anxious tone: "let me sing you a song to comfort you."

"Is it very long?" Alice asked, for she had heard a good deal of poetry that day.

"It's long," said the Knight, "but it's very, very beautiful. Everybody that hears me sing it——either it brings the tears into their eyes, or else——"

"Or else what?" said Alice, for the Knight had made a sudden pause.

"Or else it doesn't, you know. The name of the song is called 'Haddocks' Eyes.'"

"Oh, that's the name of the song, is it?" Alice said, trying to feel interested.

"No, you don't understand," the Knight said, looking a little vexed. "That's what the name is called. The name really is 'The Aged Aged Man.'"

"Then I ought to have said 'That's what the song is called'?" Alice corrected herself.

"No, you oughtn't: that's quite another thing! The song is called 'Ways And Means': but that's only what it's called, you know!"

"Well, what is the song, then? " said Alice, who was by this time completely bewildered.

"I was coming to that," the Knight said. "The song really is 'A-sitting On A Gate': and the tune's my own invention. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1436:In his brief dialogue between the King and the Queen - two of the chess piece sovereigns of the Looking Glass House - Lewis Carroll captured the complementary sides of the coin we term memory The King, having experienced a "horrifying" event (being set on a table by Alice, a relative giant whom the King could neither see nor hear), expresses absolute faith in the durability of memory. The Queen, in contrast, presents a less flattering view of the capacity: that without some intervention (a memorandum), even a salient event will be forgotten. In a rare instance, the reality experienced by the King and Queen on their side of the looking glass is reflected on the drawing room side as well. Memory is at times seemingly and at other times frustratingly fallible. What is at times seemingly indelible and at other times frustratingly fallible. What is more, in true looking glass fashion, the same past experience can at one moment impinge on consciousness unbidden and at another elude deliberate attempts to recollect it. ~ Bauer, Patricia J. (2007). Remembering the times of our lives: memory in infancy and beyond. Hillsdale, N.J: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. ISBN 0-8058-5733-8. OCLC 62089961., p. 3.,
1437:Cheshire Puss,' she began, rather timidly, as she did not at all know whether it would like the name: however, it only grinned a little wider. 'Come, it's pleased so far,' thought Alice, and she went on.
'Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?'

'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat.

'I don't much care where—' said Alice.

'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat.

'—so long as I get SOMEWHERE,' Alice added as an explanation.

'Oh, you're sure to do that,' said the Cat, 'if you only walk long enough.”

Alice felt that this could not be denied, so she tried another question. `What sort of people live about here?'

`In that direction,' the Cat said, waving its right paw round, `lives a Hatter: and in that direction,' waving the other paw, `lives a March Hare. Visit either you like: they're both mad.'

`But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.

`Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: `we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.'

`How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.

`You must be,' said the Cat, `or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1438:The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?"
"Come, we shall have some fun now!", thought Alice. "I'm glad they've begun asking riddles - I believe I can guess that," she added aloud.
"Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?" said the March Hare.
"Exactly so," said Alice.
"Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.
"I do," Alice hastily replied; "At least - at least I mean what I say - that's the same thing, you know."
"Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "Why, you might just as well said that "I see what I eat" is the same thing as "I eat what I see"!".
"You might just as well say," added the March Hare, "that "I like what I get" is the same thing as "I get what I like"!".
"You might just as well say," added the Dormouse, which seemed to be talking in its sleep, "that "I breath when I sleep" is the same thing as "I sleep when I breath"!".
"It is the same thing with you," said the Hatter, and here the conversation dropped and the party sat silent for a minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn't much. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1439:INTERVIEWER

Why don’t you write tragedy?

BARTHELME

I’m fated to deal in mixtures, slumgullions, which preclude tragedy, which require a pure line. It’s a habit of mind, a perversity. Tom Hess used to tell a story, maybe from Lewis Carroll, I don’t remember, about an enraged mob storming the palace shouting “More taxes! Less bread!” As soon as I hear a proposition I immediately consider its opposite. A double-minded man—makes for mixtures.

INTERVIEWER

Apparently the Yiddish theater, to which Kafka was very addicted, includes as a typical bit of comedy two clowns, more or less identical, who appear even in sad scenes—the parting of two lovers, for instance—and behave comically as the audience is weeping. This shows up especially in The Castle.

BARTHELME

The assistants.

INTERVIEWER

And the audience doesn’t know what to do.

BARTHELME

The confusing signals, the impurity of the signal, gives you verisimilitude. As when you attend a funeral and notice, against your will, that it’s being poorly done. [...] I think of the line from the German writer Heimito von Doderer: “At first you break windows. Then you become a window yourself. ~ Donald Barthelme,
1440:Yeniden karşılaşsak bile, seni tanıyamam,' diye karşılık verdi Yumurta Adam hoşnutsuz bir ses tonuyla, tokalaşmak üzere parmaklarından birini uzatarak. 'Sen de tıpkı diğer insanlar gibisin,' dedi.
'İnsanlar genellikle yüzlerinden tanınırlar,' dedi Alice düşünceli bir ses tonuyla.
'İşte benim yakındığım şey de bu ya,' dedi Yumurta Adam. 'Senin yüzün de herkesinki gibi...iki göz,şöyle...' (başparmağıyla havada gözlerin yerini işaret ediyordu) 'ortada bir burun, altında bir ağız. Hep aynı. Örneğin burnun iki yanında iki gözün olsaydı...ya da ağzın tepende olsaydı...bu belki bir işe yarardı.'
'Ama o kadar da güzel olmazdı,' diye Alice karşı çıktı ona. Fakat Yumurta Adam sadece gözlerini yumdu ve 'Dene de gör,' dedi.
Alice, acaba bir kez daha konuşur mu diye bir dakika bekledi, ne var ki Yumurta Adam ne gözünü açtı, ne de onu dikkate aldı; Alice, bir kez daha 'Hoşçakal!' dedi ve buna karşılık alamayınca, sessizce oradan uzaklaştı; giderken kendi kendine 'Bütün bu yetersizlikleriyle (bunu yüksek sesle söylemişti, çünkü böylesine uzun bir sözcüğü söylemek büyük bir teselliydi). 'Bütün bu yetersizlikleriyle karşıma çıkıp duran bu insanlar...' Alice cümlesini bir türlü bitiremedi, çünkü koru müthiş bir sarsıntıyla sarsılıyordu. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1441:All in the golden afternoon Full leisurely we glide; For both our oars, with little skill, By little arms are plied, While little hands make vain pretence Our wanderings to guide. Ah, cruel Three! In such an hour, Beneath such dreamy weather, To beg a tale of breath too weak To stir the tiniest feather! Yet what can one poor voice avail Against three tongues together? Imperious Prima flashes forth Her edict "to begin it": In gentler tones Secunda hopes "There will be nonsense in it!" While Tertia interrupts the tale Not MORE than once a minute. Anon, to sudden silence won, In fancy they pursue The dream-child moving through a land Of wonders wild and new, In friendly chat with bird or beast— And half believe it true. And ever, as the story drained The wells of fancy dry, And faintly strove that weary one To put the subject by, "The rest next time—" "It IS next time!" The happy voices cry. Thus grew the tale of Wonderland: Thus slowly, one by one, Its quaint events were hammered out— And now the tale is done, And home we steer, a merry crew, Beneath the setting sun. Alice! A childish story take, And, with a gentle hand, Lay it where Childhood's dreams are twined In Memory's mystic band, Like pilgrim's wither'd wreath of flowers Pluck'd in a far-off land. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1442:Prefatory Poem All in the golden afternoon Full leisurely we glide; For both our oars, with little skill, By little arms are plied, While little hands make vain pretence Our wanderings to guide. Ah, cruel Three! In such an hour, Beneath such dreamy weather, To beg a tale of breath too weak To stir the tiniest feather! Yet what can one poor voice avail Against three tongues together? Imperious Prima flashes forth Her edict “to begin it”; In gentler tones Secunda hopes “There will be nonsense in it!” While Tertia interrupts the tale Not more than once a minute. Anon, to sudden silence won, In fancy they pursue The dream-child moving through a land Of wonders wild and new, In friendly chat with bird or beast— And half believe it true. And ever, as the story drained The wells of fancy dry, And faintly strove that weary one To put the subject by, “The rest next time—” “It is next time!” The happy voices cry. Thus grew the tale of Wonderland: Thus slowly, one by one, Its quaint events were hammered out— And now the tale is done, And home we steer, a merry crew, Beneath the setting sun. Alice! A childish story take, And, with a gentle hand, Lay it where Childhood’s dreams are twined In Memory’s mystic band, Like pilgrim’s wither’d wreath of flowers Pluck’d in a far-off land. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1443:Tırtıl'la Alice sessizlik içinde bir süre bakıştılar; neden sonra Tırtıl, nargilesinin marpucunu ağzından çıkarıp, cansız, uykulu bir sesle Alice'e 'Kimsin sen?' diye sordu.
Bu soru, sohbete koyulmak için çok da cesaret verici bir başlangıç değildi. Alice, oldukça mahcup bir tavırla şöyle dedi: 'Şey efendim, yani aslında şu an tam bilmiyorum. En azından bu sabah kalktığımda kim olduğumu biliyordum, ama o zamandan beri birkaç kez değiştim galiba.'
'Ne demek istiyorsun?' dedi Tırtıl sert bir tavırla. 'Kendinden söz et bakalım.'
'Kendimden söz edemem, efendim,' dedi Alice, 'çünkü ben ben değilim ki, anlatabiliyor muyum?'
'Anlatamıyorsun,' dedi Tırtıl.
'Özür dilerim, ama daha fazla açıklayamayacağım,' diye yanıt verdi Alice kibarca, 'çünkü kendim bile anlamıyorum ki bu durumu;bir gün içinde bu kadar farklı boylarda olmak insanın kafasını allak bullak ediyor.'
'Etmez,' dedi Tırtıl.
'Pekala, size henüz öyle gelmiyor olabilir,' dedi Alice, 'ama düşünün ki önce bir krizalite -hani bir gün dönüşeceksiniz ya- sonra da bir kelebeğe dönüşmek zorunda kaldığınızda, sanırım kendinizi biraz tuhaf hissedersiniz, öyle değil mi?'
'Hiç de hissetmem,' dedi Tırtıl.
'Peki, belki sizin duygularınız farklı olabilir,' dedi Alice, 'tek bildiğim, bunların bende tuhaflık yarattığı.'
'Sen!' dedi, Tırtıl tepeden bakarak, 'Kimsin sen?'
Bu soru her şeyi yeniden başa döndürmüştü. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1444:You are old, Father William,’ the young man said, ‘And your hair has become very white; And yet you incessantly stand on your head — Do you think, at your age, it is right?’ ‘In my youth,’ Father William replied to his son, ‘I feared it might injure the brain; But, now that I’m perfectly sure I have none, Why, I do it again and again.’ ‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘as I mentioned before, And have grown most uncommonly fat; Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door — Pray, what is the reason of that?’ ‘In my youth,’ said the sage, as he shook his grey locks, ‘I kept all my limbs very supple By the use of this ointment — one shilling the box — Allow me to sell you a couple?’ ‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘and your jaws are too weak For anything tougher than suet; Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak — Pray how did you manage to do it?’ ‘In my youth,’ said his father, ‘I took to the law, And argued each case with my wife; And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw, Has lasted the rest of my life.’ ‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘one would hardly suppose That your eye was as steady as ever; Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose — What made you so awfully clever?’ ‘I have answered three questions, and that is enough,’ Said his father; ‘don’t give yourself airs! Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff? Be off, or I’ll kick you down stairs! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1445:JABBERWOCKY

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand;
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"
He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

‘It seems very pretty,' she said when she had finished it, 'but it's RATHER hard to understand!' (You see she didn't like to confess, even to herself, that she couldn't make it out at all.) 'Somehow it seemed to fill my head with ideas - only I don't know exactly what they are! However, SOMEBODY killed SOMETHING: that's clear, at any rate – ~ Lewis Carroll,
1446:As children', wrote Alice Raikes (Mrs. Wilson Fox) in The Times, January 22, 1932, 'we lived in Onslow Square and used to play in the garden behind the houses. Charles Dodgson used to stay with an old uncle there, and walk up and down, his hands behind him, on the strip of lawn. One day, hearing my name, he called me to him saying, "So you are another Alice. I'm very found of Alices. Would you like to come and see something which is rather puzzling?" We followed him into his house which opened, as ours did, upon the garden, into a room full of furniture with a tall mirror standing across one corner.' "Now", he said giving me an orange, "first tell me which hand you have got that in." "The right" I said. "Now", he said, "go and stand before that glass, and tell me which hand the little girl you see there has got it in." After some perplexed contemplation, I said, "The left hand." "Exactly," he said, "and how do you explain that?" I couldn't explain it, but seeing that some solution was expected, I ventured, "If I was on the other side of the glass, wouldn't the orange still be in my right hand?" I can remember his laugh. "Well done, little Alice," he said. "The best answer I've heard yet." "I heard no more then, but in after years was told that he said that had given him his first idea for Through the Looking-Glass, a copy of which, together with each of his other books, he regularly sent me. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1447:I love the stillness of the wood;
I love the music of the rill:
I love the couch in pensive mod
Upon some silent hill.

Scarce heard, beneath yon arching trees,
The silver-crested ripples pass;
and, like a mimic brook, the breeze
Whispers among the grass.

Here from the world I win release,
Nor scorn of men, nor footstep rude,
Break into mar the holy peace
Of this great solitude.

Here may the silent tears I weep
Lull the vested spirit into rest,
As infants sob themselves to sleep
Upon a mothers breast.

But when the bitter hour is gone,
And the keen throbbing pangs are still,
Oh, sweetest then to couch alone
Upon some silent hill!

To live in joys that once have been,
To put the cold world out of sight,
And deck life's drear and barren scene
With hues of rainbow-light.

For what to man the gift of breath,
If sorrow be his lot below;
If all the day that ends in death
Be dark with clouds of woe?

Shall the poor transport of an hour
Repay long years of sore distress-
The fragrance of a lonely flower
Make glad the wilderness?

Ye golden house of life's young spring,
Of innocence, of love and truth!
Bright, beyond all imagining,
Thou fairy-dream of youth!

I'd give all wealth that years have piled,
The slow result of Life's decay,
To be once more a little child
For on bright summers day. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1448:You are old, Father William,’ the young man said,
‘And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head –
Do you think, at your age, it is right?’
‘In my youth,’ Father William replied to his son,
‘I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I’m perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again.’
‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘as I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door –
Pray, what is the reason of that?’
‘In my youth,’ said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
‘I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment – one shilling the box –
Allow me to sell you a couple?’
‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak –
Pray how did you manage to do it?’
‘In my youth,’ said his father, ‘I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.’
‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose –
What made you so awfully clever?’
‘I have answered three questions, and that is enough,’
Said his father; ‘don’t give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I’ll kick you down stairs! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1449:The March Hare took the watch and looked at it gloomily: then he dipped it into his cup of tea, and looked at it again: but he could think of nothing better to say than his first remark, 'It was the best butter, you know.' Alice had been looking over his shoulder with some curiosity. 'What a funny watch!' she remarked. 'It tells the day of the month, and doesn't tell what o'clock it is!' 'Why should it?' muttered the Hatter. 'Does your watch tell you what year it is?' 'Of course not,' Alice replied very readily: 'but that's because it stays the same year for such a long time together.' 'Which is just the case with mine,' said the Hatter. Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The Hatter's remark seemed to have no sort of meaning in it, and yet it was certainly English. 'I don't quite understand you,' she said, as politely as she could. 'The Dormouse is asleep again,' said the Hatter, and he poured a little hot tea upon its nose. The Dormouse shook its head impatiently, and said, without opening its eyes, 'Of course, of course; just what I was going to remark myself.' 'Have you guessed the riddle yet?' the Hatter said, turning to Alice again. 'No, I give it up,' Alice replied: 'what's the answer?' 'I haven't the slightest idea,' said the Hatter. 'Nor I,' said the March Hare. Alice sighed wearily. 'I think you might do something better with the time,' she said, 'than waste it in asking riddles that have no answers.' 'If you knew Time as well as I do,' said the Hatter, 'you wouldn't talk about wasting it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1450:You are old, Father William,' the young man said,
'And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head—
Do you think, at your age, it is right?'

'In my youth,' Father William replied to his son,
'I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again.'

'You are old,' said the youth, 'as I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door—
Pray, what is the reason of that?'

'In my youth,' said the sage, as he shook his grey locks,
'I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment—one shilling the box—
Allow me to sell you a couple?'

'You are old,' said the youth, 'and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak—
Pray how did you manage to do it?'

'In my youth,' said his father, 'I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.'

'You are old,' said the youth, 'one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose—
What made you so awfully clever?'

'I have answered three questions, and that is enough,'
Said his father; 'don't give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1451:See that little stream — we could walk to it in two minutes. It took the British a month to walk to it — a whole empire walking very slowly, dying in front and pushing forward behind. And another empire walked very slowly backward a few inches a day, leaving the dead like a million bloody rugs. No Europeans will ever do that again in this generation.”

“Why, they’ve only just quit over in Turkey,” said Abe. “And in Morocco —”

“That’s different. This western-front business couldn’t be done again, not for a long time. The young men think they could do it but they couldn’t. They could fight the first Marne again but not this. This took religion and years of plenty and tremendous sureties and the exact relation that existed between the classes. The Russians and Italians weren’t any good on this front. You had to have a whole-souled sentimental equipment going back further than you could remember. You had to remember Christmas, and postcards of the Crown Prince and his fiancée, and little cafés in Valence and beer gardens in Unter den Linden and weddings at the mairie, and going to the Derby, and your grandfather’s whiskers.”

“General Grant invented this kind of battle at Petersburg in sixty- five.”

“No, he didn’t — he just invented mass butchery. This kind of battle was invented by Lewis Carroll and Jules Verne and whoever wrote Undine, and country deacons bowling and marraines in Marseilles and girls seduced in the back lanes of Wurtemburg and Westphalia. Why, this was a love battle — there was a century of middle-class love spent here. This was the last love battle. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1452:Back home, we can't kill them fast enough," he says. "Even Grahamites offer blue bills for their skins. Probably the only thing they've ever done that I agreed with."

"Mmm, yes." Emiko's brow wrinkles thoughtfully. "They are too much improved for this world, I think. A natural bird has so little chance, now." She smiles slightly. "Just think if they had made New People first."

Is it mischief in her eyes? Or melancholy?

"What do you think would have happened?" Anderson asks.

Emiko doesn't meet his gaze, looks out instead at the circling cats amongst the diners. "Generippers learned too much from cheshires."

She doesn't say anything else, but Anderson can guess what's in her mind. If her kind had come first, before the generippers knew better, she would not have been made sterile. She would not have the signature tick-tock motions that make her so physically obvious. She might have even been designed as well as the military windups now operating in Vietnam—deadly and fearless. Without the lesson of the cheshires, Emiko might have had the opportunity to supplant the human species entirely with her own improved version. Instead, she is a genetic dead end. Doomed to a single life cycle, just like SoyPRO and TotalNutrient Wheat.

Another shadow cat bolts across the street, shimmering and shading through darkness. A high-tech homage to Lewis Carroll, a few dirigible and clipper ship rides, and suddenly entire classes of animals are wiped out, unequipped to fight an invisible threat.

"We would have realized our mistake," Anderson observes.

"Yes. Of course. But perhaps not soon enough. ~ Paolo Bacigalupi,
1453:PREFACE. If—and the thing is wildly possible—the charge of writing nonsense were ever brought against the author of this brief but instructive poem, it would be based, I feel convinced, on the line (in p. 18) “Then the bowsprit got mixed with the rudder sometimes.” In view of this painful possibility, I will not (as I might) appeal indignantly to my other writings as a proof that I am incapable of such a deed: I will not (as I might) point to the strong moral purpose of this poem itself, to the arithmetical principles so cautiously inculcated in it, or to its noble teachings in Natural History—I will take the more prosaic course of simply explaining how it happened. The Bellman, who was almost morbidly sensitive about appearances, used to have the bowsprit unshipped once or twice a week to be revarnished, and it more than once happened, when the time came for replacing it, that no one on board could remember which end of the ship it belonged to. They knew it was not of the slightest use to appeal to the Bellman about it—he would only refer to his Naval Code, and read out in pathetic tones Admiralty Instructions which none of them had ever been able to understand—so it generally ended in its being fastened on, anyhow, across the rudder. The helmsman* used to stand by with tears in his eyes: he knew it was all wrong, but alas! Rule 42 of the Code, “No one shall speak to the Man at the Helm,” had been completed by the Bellman himself with the words “and the Man at the Helm shall speak to no one.” So remonstrance was impossible, and no steering could be done till the next varnishing day. During these bewildering intervals the ship usually sailed backwards. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1454:The Mad Gardener's Song

He thought he saw an Elephant,
That practised on a fife:
He looked again, and found it was
A letter from his wife.
'At length I realise,' he said,
'The bitterness of Life!'

He thought he saw a Buffalo
Upon the chimney-piece:
He looked again, and found it was
His Sister's Husband's Niece.
'Unless you leave this house,' he said,
'I'll send for the Police!'

He thought he saw a Rattlesnake
That questioned him in Greek:
He looked again, and found it was
The Middle of Next Week.
'The one thing I regret,' he said,
'Is that it cannot speak!'

He thought he saw a Banker's Clerk
Descending from the bus:
He looked again, and found it was
A Hippopotamus.
'If this should stay to dine,' he said,
'There won't be much for us!'

He thought he saw a Kangaroo
That worked a coffee-mill:
He looked again, and found it was
A Vegetable-Pill.
'Were I to swallow this,' he said,
'I should be very ill!'

He thought he saw a Coach-and-Four
That stood beside his bed:
He looked again, and found it was
A Bear without a Head.
'Poor thing,' he said, 'poor silly thing!
It's waiting to be fed!'

He thought he saw an Albatross
That fluttered round the lamp:
He looked again, and found it was
A Penny-Postage Stamp.
'You'd best be getting home,' he said:
'The nights are very damp!'

He thought he saw a Garden-Door
That opened with a key:
He looked again, and found it was
A Double Rule of Three:
'And all its mystery,' he said,
'Is clear as day to me!'

He thought he saw a Argument
That proved he was the Pope:
He looked again, and found it was
A Bar of Mottled Soap.
'A fact so dread,' he faintly said,
'Extinguishes all hope! ~ Lewis Carroll,
1455:There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. 'Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse,' thought Alice; 'only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind.' The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: 'No room! No room!' they cried out when they saw Alice coming. 'There's plenty of room!' said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table. 'Have some wine,' the March Hare said in an encouraging tone. Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. 'I don't see any wine,' she remarked. 'There isn't any,' said the March Hare. 'Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it,' said Alice angrily. 'It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited,' said the March Hare. 'I didn't know it was your table,' said Alice; 'it's laid for a great many more than three.' 'Your hair wants cutting,' said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech. 'You should learn not to make personal remarks,' Alice said with some severity; 'it's very rude.' The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, 'Why is a raven like a writing-desk?' 'Come, we shall have some fun now!' thought Alice. 'I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that,' she added aloud. 'Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?' said the March Hare. 'Exactly so,' said Alice. 'Then you should say what you mean,' the March Hare went on. 'I do,' Alice hastily replied; 'at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know.' 'Not the same thing a bit!' said ~ Lewis Carroll,
1456:Imagine for a moment that you are the proud owner of a large house which you have spent years of your life painting and decorating and filling with everything you love. It's your home. It's something you've made your own, something for you to be remembered by, something that, perhaps years later, your children and grandchildren can visit and get a view of your life in. It's part of your creativity, your hard work... it's your property.

Now suppose you decide to go camping for a couple of weeks. You lock your door and assume that nobody is going to break in... but they do, and when you return home, to your horror you find that not only do these trespassers break in, but they also have quite uniquely imaginative ways of disrespecting, vandalizing and corrupting everything within your property. They light fires on your lawn, your topiary hedges are in heaps of black ashes. There's some blatantly obscene graffiti splattered across your front door, offensive images and rude words splashed on the walls and windows. Your television has been tipped over. Your photographs of family and friends have had the heads cut out of them. There's mold growing in the refrigerator, bottles of booze tipped over on the table, and cigarette smoke embedded into the carpeting. Your beloved houseplants are dead, your furniture has been stripped down and ruined. Basically, the thing you've spent years working for and creating within your lifetime has been tampered with to the point where it is just a grim joke.

So, I feel terrible for poor Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jane Austen and Lewis Carroll, who must be spinning in their graves since they have no rights to their own works of fiction anymore. I'm all for readers being able to read books for free once and only when the deceased author's copyright eventually ends. Still though, did Doyle ever think in a million years that his wonderful characters would be dragged through the mud of every pervy fanfiction that the sick internet geek can think of to create? Did Carroll ever suspect that Alice and the Hatter would become freakish clown-like goth caricatures in Tim Burton's CGI-infested films? Would Austen really want her writing to be sold as badly-formatted ebooks?

The sharing of this Public Domain content isn't really an issue. Stories are meant to be told, meant to echo onward forever. That's what makes them magical. That being said, in the Information Age, there's a real lack of respect towards the creators of this original content. If, when I've been dead for 70 years and I then no longer have the rights to my novels, somebody gets the bright idea of doing anything funny with any of those novels, my ghost is going to rise from the grave and do some serious ass-kicking. ~ Rebecca McNutt,
1457:Bu,' diye düşündü Alice, 'hiçbir şeyin adının olmadığı koru olmalı. Oraya gidersem, acaba benim adıma ne olacak. Adsız kalmak hiç de hoşuma gitmez...çünkü o zaman bana başka bir isim vermek zorunda kalacaklar, bu da hiç kuşku yok ki çirkin bir ad olacak. Ama o zaman da eski adımı alan yaratığı bulmaya çalışırken ne eğlenirim doğrusu! Bu, insanların köpeklerini kaybettiklerinde verdikleri ilanlar gibi bir şey...Fırla* diye adıyla çağırdığınız anda hemen tepki verir, pirinçten tasması var...Biri karşılık verinceye değin karşınıza çıkan her şeye *Alice diye seslendiğinizi bir hayal edin! Ama akılları varsa buna karşılık vermezler!'
Böyle dolaşıp durduğu sırada birde baktı ki koruya varmış; pek serin ve gölgeli bir yerdi burası. 'Neyse, yine de bu da bir teselli,' dedi Alice ağaçların altına girdiği anda, 'bu kadar sıcaktan bunaldıktan sonra, bu şeyin, şeyin altına girmek...neyin?' diye devam etti, o sözcüğün bir türlü aklına gelmemesinin verdiği şaşkınlıkla . 'Yani demek istiyorum ki, bu şeyin altına...şunun altına, hani işte şu!' dedi elini ağacın gövdesine değdirerek. 'Acaba bu kendine ne ad takmıştır? Hiçbir adı olmadığından eminim...Yok canım, kesinlikle yoktur!'
Düşüncelere dalarak bir dakika öylece sessiz kaldı; sonra birden yeniden başladı. 'İşte şimdi gerçekten başıma geldi! Şimdi kimim ben? Elimden gelse hatırlayacağım! Kararlıyım, anımsayacağım!' Ne ki, kararlı olmasının ona çok da bir faydası olmamıştı, büyük bir şaşkınlıktan sonra tek söyleyebildiği, 'L, biliyorum, adım L ile başlıyor!' oldu.
Tam o anda bir Yavru Alageyik çıkageldi; o kocaman uysal gözleriyle Alice'e bakıyordu; ama hiç de korkmuşa benzemiyordu.
'Buraya gel! Buraya gel!' dedi Alice, elini uzatıp onu okşamaya çalışarak; fakat Yavru Alageyik irkilerek biraz geri çekildi ve tekrardan Alice'i seyretmeye başladı.
'Adın ne?' dedi Yavru Alageyik sonunda. Öyle yumuşak, tatlı bir ses tonu vardı ki!
'Keşke bilebilseydim!' diye aklından geçirdi zavallı Alice. 'Şimdilik hiçbir şey,' dedi hüzünle.
'Bir daha düşün,' dedi Yavru Alageyik, 'böle olmaz.'
Alice düşündü, ama aklına hiçbir şey gelmiyordu. 'Lütfen söyler misin, senin adın ne?' dedi Alice çekine çekine. 'Belki bu birazcık bana yardımcı olabilir.
'Birazcık ileriye gelirsen söyleyeceğim,'dedi Yavru Alageyik. 'Burada anımsayamıyorum.'
Bunun üzerine Alice, kollarını Yavru Alageyik'in yumuşacık boynuna sevgiyle doladı ve koru boyunca başladılar birlikte yürümeye; sonunda başka bir açık alana vardılar; Yavru Alageyik burada aniden havaya zıplayarak, kendini Alice'in kollarından kurtardı. 'Ben bir Yavru Alageyik'im!' diye haykırdı sevinç içinde. 'Aman Tanrım, sen bir insan yavrususun!' Yavru'nun o güzelim kahverengi gözlerine birden bir korku çöktü ve anında dörtnala koşup oradan uzaklaştı. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1458:The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright--
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done--
"It's very rude of him," she said,
"To come and spoil the fun!"

The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying over head--
There were no birds to fly.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Were walking close at hand;
They wept like anything to see
Such quantities of sand:
"If this were only cleared away,"
They said, "it WOULD be grand!"

"If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year,
Do you suppose," the Walrus said,
"That they could get it clear?"
"I doubt it," said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

"O Oysters, come and walk with us!"
The Walrus did beseech.
"A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
Along the briny beach:
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each."

The eldest Oyster looked at him.
But never a word he said:
The eldest Oyster winked his eye,
And shook his heavy head--
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.

But four young oysters hurried up,
All eager for the treat:
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,
Their shoes were clean and neat--
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn't any feet.

Four other Oysters followed them,
And yet another four;
And thick and fast they came at last,
And more, and more, and more--
All hopping through the frothy waves,
And scrambling to the shore.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Walked on a mile or so,
And then they rested on a rock
Conveniently low:
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row.

"The time has come," the Walrus said,
"To talk of many things:
Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
Of cabbages--and kings--
And why the sea is boiling hot--
And whether pigs have wings."

"But wait a bit," the Oysters cried,
"Before we have our chat;
For some of us are out of breath,
And all of us are fat!"
"No hurry!" said the Carpenter.
They thanked him much for that.

"A loaf of bread," the Walrus said,
"Is what we chiefly need:
Pepper and vinegar besides
Are very good indeed--
Now if you're ready Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed."

"But not on us!" the Oysters cried,
Turning a little blue,
"After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!"
"The night is fine," the Walrus said
"Do you admire the view?

"It was so kind of you to come!
And you are very nice!"
The Carpenter said nothing but
"Cut us another slice:
I wish you were not quite so deaf--
I've had to ask you twice!"

"It seems a shame," the Walrus said,
"To play them such a trick,
After we've brought them out so far,
And made them trot so quick!"
The Carpenter said nothing but
"The butter's spread too thick!"

"I weep for you," the Walrus said.
"I deeply sympathize."
With sobs and tears he sorted out
Those of the largest size.
Holding his pocket handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.

"O Oysters," said the Carpenter.
"You've had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?"
But answer came there none--
And that was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one. ~ Lewis Carroll,
1459:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.
The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.
The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.
It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.
As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.

And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.

It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!
This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.
My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?

A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.
Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.

Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.
If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.
First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!
Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"
I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.
Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.
These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."
Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.
If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'
The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passage

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
Versatur urna serius ocius
Sors exitura et nos in aeternum
Exilium impositura cymbae.

Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?
And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'
We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?
And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.
I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!

"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,
'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'
Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,
Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vain
Upon the axis of its pain,
Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,
Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."

Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.
But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!

'Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno,

IN CHAPTERS [8/8]



   2 Occultism
   2 Cybernetics
   1 Integral Yoga


   2 Norbert Wiener
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Aleister Crowley


   2 Liber ABA
   2 Cybernetics


1.01 - Adam Kadmon and the Evolution, #Preparing for the Miraculous, #George Van Vrekhem, #Integral Yoga
  disappeared like the smile of Lewis Carrolls Cheshire Cat,
  and Nietzsches declaration of the death of God resounded

1.05 - Computing Machines and the Nervous System, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  go the way of Lewis Carroll's Bread-­and-­Butter Fly, and always
  die. Nevertheless, even a doomed race may show a mechanism

1.07 - Cybernetics and Psychopathology, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  on a variant of the famous principle expounded by Lewis Carroll
  in The Hunting of the Snark: "What I tell you three times is true."

3.09 - Of Silence and Secrecy, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
  should precede the other. (Cf. Lewis Carroll, where the Red
  Queen screams before she pricks her finger).1

APPENDIX I - Curriculum of A. A., #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
      Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. ::: Valuable to those who understand the Qabalah.
      Alice Through the Looking Glass, by Lewis Carroll. ::: Valuable to those who understand the Qabalah.
      The Hunting of the Snark, by Lewis Carroll. ::: Valuable to those who understand the Qabalah.
      The Arabian Nights, translated by either Sir Richard Burton or John Payne. ::: Valuable as a storehouse of oriental magick-lore.

Avatars of the Tortoise, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  and its attributes; Lewis Carroll (Mind, volume four, page 278), between the
  second premise of the syllogism and the conclusion. He relates an endless

Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  In Alice in Wonderland, published in , Lewis Carroll
  endowed the Cheshire Cat with the faculty of slowly disap

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  cate a joke. Lewis Carroll sent the following contri bution to a philo-
  sophical symposium:

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun lewis_carroll

The noun lewis carroll has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ::: (English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun lewis_carroll

1 sense of lewis carroll                        

Sense 1
Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun lewis_carroll
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun lewis_carroll

1 sense of lewis carroll                        

Sense 1
Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun lewis_carroll

1 sense of lewis carroll                        

Sense 1
Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aiken, Conrad Aiken, Conrad Potter Aiken
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alger, Horatio Alger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Algren, Nelson Algren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Andersen, Hans Christian Andersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Sherwood Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aragon, Louis Aragon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asch, Sholem Asch, Shalom Asch, Sholom Asch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asimov, Isaac Asimov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auchincloss, Louis Auchincloss, Louis Stanton Auchincloss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Austen, Jane Austen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, James Baldwin, James Arthur Baldwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baraka, Imamu Amiri Baraka, LeRoi Jones
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barth, John Barth, John Simmons Barth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barthelme, Donald Barthelme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baum, Frank Baum, Lyman Frank Brown
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beerbohm, Max Beerbohm, Sir Henry Maxmilian Beerbohm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Belloc, Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Hilaire Peter Belloc
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bellow, Saul Bellow, Solomon Bellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benchley, Robert Benchley, Robert Charles Benchley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, William Rose Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bierce, Ambrose Bierce, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boell, Heinrich Boell, Heinrich Theodor Boell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bontemps, Arna Wendell Bontemps
   HAS INSTANCE=> Borges, Jorge Borges, Jorge Luis Borges
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boswell, James Boswell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boyle, Kay Boyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradbury, Ray Bradbury, Ray Douglas Bradbury
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Charlotte Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Emily Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Currer Bell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Anne Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browne, Charles Farrar Browne, Artemus Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buck, Pearl Buck, Pearl Sydenstricker Buck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bunyan, John Bunyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burgess, Anthony Burgess
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnett, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, Edgar Rice Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, William Burroughs, William S. Burroughs, William Seward Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cabell, James Branch Cabell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvino, Italo Calvino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Canetti, Elias Canetti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cather, Willa Cather, Willa Sibert Cather
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chandler, Raymond Chandler, Raymond Thornton Chandler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cheever, John Cheever
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterton, G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert Keith Chesterton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chopin, Kate Chopin, Kate O'Flaherty Chopin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Mark Twain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cocteau, Jean Cocteau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Claudine Colette
   HAS INSTANCE=> Collins, Wilkie Collins, William Wilkie Collins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Teodor Josef Konrad Korzeniowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cooper, James Fenimore Cooper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Stephen Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> cummings, e. e. cummings, Edward Estlin Cummings
   HAS INSTANCE=> Day, Clarence Day, Clarence Shepard Day Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Defoe, Daniel Defoe
   HAS INSTANCE=> De Quincey, Thomas De Quincey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Didion, Joan Didion
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dinesen, Isak Dinesen, Blixen, Karen Blixen, Baroness Karen Blixen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Doctorow, E. L. Doctorow, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dos Passos, John Dos Passos, John Roderigo Dos Passos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoevsky, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Feodor Dostoevski, Fyodor Dostoevski, Feodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dreiser, Theodore Dreiser, Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dumas, Alexandre Dumas
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, George du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, Daphne du Maurier, Dame Daphne du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durrell, Lawrence Durrell, Lawrence George Durrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ehrenberg, Ilya Ehrenberg, Ilya Grigorievich Ehrenberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ellison, Ralph Ellison, Ralph Waldo Ellison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Farrell, James Thomas Farrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ferber, Edna Ferber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fielding, Henry Fielding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaubert, Gustave Flaubert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fleming, Ian Fleming, Ian Lancaster Fleming
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Ford Madox Ford, Ford Hermann Hueffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Forester, C. S. Forester, Cecil Scott Forester
   HAS INSTANCE=> France, Anatole France, Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaboriau, Emile Gaboriau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galsworthy, John Galsworthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaskell, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibran, Kahlil Gibran
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gjellerup, Karl Gjellerup
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gogol, Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Golding, William Golding, Sir William Gerald Golding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldsmith, Oliver Goldsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gombrowicz, Witold Gombrowicz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Jules de Goncourt, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorky, Maksim Gorky, Gorki, Maxim Gorki, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grahame, Kenneth Grahame
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grass, Gunter Grass, Gunter Wilhelm Grass
   HAS INSTANCE=> Graves, Robert Graves, Robert Ranke Graves
   HAS INSTANCE=> Greene, Graham Greene, Henry Graham Greene
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Zane Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Jakob Grimm, Jakob Ludwig Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm, Wilhelm Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haggard, Rider Haggard, Sir Henry Rider Haggard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Elizabeth Haldane, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, Edward Everett Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haley, Alex Haley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Radclyffe Hall, Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hammett, Dashiell Hammett, Samuel Dashiell Hammett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamsun, Knut Hamsun, Knut Pedersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Thomas Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Frank Harris, James Thomas Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Joel Harris, Joel Chandler Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harte, Bret Harte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hasek, Jaroslav Hasek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hawthorne, Nathaniel Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hecht, Ben Hecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Anson Heinlein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heller, Joseph Heller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesse, Hermann Hesse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyse, Paul Heyse, Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyward, DuBois Heyward, Edwin DuBois Hayward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Higginson, Thomas Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Storrow Higginson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holmes, Oliver Wendell Holmes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Howells, William Dean Howells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoyle, Edmond Hoyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hubbard, L. Ron Hubbard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Langston Hughes, James Langston Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Leigh Hunt, James Henry Leigh Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig




--- Grep of noun lewis_carroll
lewis carroll



IN WEBGEN [10000/28]

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