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branches ::: Lewis Carroll
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object:Lewis Carroll
class:author
subject class:Fiction
subject class:Mathematics
subject class:Poetry
subject class:Education


Wikipedia

--- WIKI
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderl and and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass. He was noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. The poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark are classified in the genre of literary nonsense. He was also a mathematician, photographer, and Anglican deacon. Carroll came from a family of high-church Anglicans, and developed a long relationship with Christ Church, Oxford, where he lived for most of his life as a scholar and teacher. Alice Liddell, daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, Henry Liddell, is widely identified as the original for Alice in Wonderland, though Carroll always denied this. Born in All Saints' Vicarage, Daresbury, Cheshire, in 1832, Carroll is commemorated at All Saints' Church, Daresbury, in its stained glass windows depicting characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In 1982, a memorial stone to Carroll was unveiled in Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey.


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OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Alice_in_Wonderland
Infinite_Library
Sylvie_and_Bruno

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.02_-_THE_POOL_OF_TEARS
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.05_-_ADVICE_FROM_A_CATERPILLAR
1.06_-_PIG_AND_PEPPER
1.07_-_A_MAD_TEA-PARTY
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.09_-_WHO_STOLE_THE_TARTS?
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.lc_-_Jabberwocky

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_DOWN_THE_RABBIT-HOLE
1.02_-_THE_POOL_OF_TEARS
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.05_-_ADVICE_FROM_A_CATERPILLAR
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.06_-_PIG_AND_PEPPER
1.07_-_A_MAD_TEA-PARTY
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.09_-_WHO_STOLE_THE_TARTS?
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.lc_-_Jabberwocky
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
Avatars_of_the_Tortoise
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
The_Act_of_Creation_text

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Lewis Carroll

DEFINITIONS



QUOTES [4 / 4 - 500 / 1478]


KEYS (10k)

   4 Lewis Carroll

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  489 Lewis Carroll

1:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
2:You evidently do not suffer from "quotation-hunger" as I do! I get all the dictionaries of quotations I can meet with, as I always want to know where a quotation comes from. ~ Lewis Carroll,
3:If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps. ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno, [T6],
4:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.
The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.
The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.
It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.
As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.

And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.

It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!
This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.
My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?

A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.
Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.

Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.
If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.
First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!
Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"
I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.
Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.
These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."
Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.
If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'
The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passage

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
Versatur urna serius ocius
Sors exitura et nos in aeternum
Exilium impositura cymbae.

Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?
And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'
We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?
And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.
I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!

"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,
'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'
Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,
Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vain
Upon the axis of its pain,
Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,
Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."

Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.
But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!

'Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:waistcoat-pocket, ~ Lewis Carroll
2:ORANGE MARMALADE', ~ Lewis Carroll
3:stuff and nonsense ~ Lewis Carroll
4:we're all mad here ~ Lewis Carroll
5:Wonderland, though ~ Lewis Carroll
6:Alice was beginning ~ Lewis Carroll
7:howling alternately ~ Lewis Carroll
8:We are all mad here ~ Lewis Carroll
9:We're add mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll
10:We're all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll
11:We’re all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll
12:(Dinah was the cat.) ~ Lewis Carroll
13:Down the Rabbit-Hole ~ Lewis Carroll
14:Who Stole the Tarts? ~ Lewis Carroll
15:deep well. Either the ~ Lewis Carroll
16:It's always tea-time. ~ Lewis Carroll
17:Off with their heads! ~ Lewis Carroll
18:burning with curiosity ~ Lewis Carroll
19:LEWIS CARROLL’S CIPHER ~ Martin Gardner
20:She's stark raving mad! ~ Lewis Carroll
21:we’re all mad here. I’m ~ Lewis Carroll
22:Curiouser and curiouser! ~ Lewis Carroll
23:Curiouser and curiouser. ~ Lewis Carroll
24:Honey Citrus Fruit Kabab ~ Lewis Carroll
25:the Multiplication Table ~ Lewis Carroll
26:Who sail on stormy seas; ~ Lewis Carroll
27:except a tiny golden key, ~ Lewis Carroll
28:The vast unfathomable sea ~ Lewis Carroll
29:By which I get my wealth-- ~ Lewis Carroll
30:You've lost your muchness. ~ Lewis Carroll
31:But I was thinking of a way ~ Lewis Carroll
32:Ganz recht1, (wie immer2)', ~ Lewis Carroll
33:It isn’t respectable to beg ~ Lewis Carroll
34:And as to being in a fright, ~ Lewis Carroll
35:unimportant--important--' as ~ Lewis Carroll
36:Alice! A childish story take, ~ Lewis Carroll
37:bottle that reads, "Drink me. ~ Lewis Carroll
38:It's all in your head, Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll
39:Life, what is it but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll
40:With a sort of mental squint. ~ Lewis Carroll
41:A very merry unbirthday to you ~ Lewis Carroll
42:I wish I hadn't cried so much! ~ Lewis Carroll
43:Why, what a temper you are in! ~ Lewis Carroll
44:she swallowed one of the cakes, ~ Lewis Carroll
45:before seen a rabbit with either ~ Lewis Carroll
46:shedding gallons of tears, until ~ Lewis Carroll
47:Birds of a feather flock together ~ Lewis Carroll
48:Child of the pure unclouded brow ~ Lewis Carroll
49:Is Life itself a dream, I wonder? ~ Lewis Carroll
50:The Good and Great must ever shun ~ Lewis Carroll
51:Consider anything, only don’t cry! ~ Lewis Carroll
52:Do you suppose she's a wildflower? ~ Lewis Carroll
53:I'm getting rather hoarse, I fear, ~ Lewis Carroll
54:Is all our life then, but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll
55:Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late! ~ Lewis Carroll
56:THE MILLENNIUM FULCRUM EDITION 3.0 ~ Lewis Carroll
57:The time has come,the Walrus said, ~ Lewis Carroll
58:Who are YOU? said the Caterpillar. ~ Lewis Carroll
59:Why is a raven like a writing desk ~ Lewis Carroll
60:Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? ~ Lewis Carroll
61:Sentence first, verdict afterwards. ~ Lewis Carroll
62:Why is a raven like a writing desk? ~ Lewis Carroll
63:Why is a raven like a writing-desk? ~ Lewis Carroll
64:You know very well you're not real. ~ Lewis Carroll
65:And how do you know that you're mad? ~ Lewis Carroll
66:By-the-bye, what became of the baby? ~ Lewis Carroll
67:For the snark was a boojum, you see. ~ Lewis Carroll
68:I am fond of children - except boys. ~ Lewis Carroll
69:One can't believe impossible things. ~ Lewis Carroll
70:Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup! ~ Lewis Carroll
71:Soup of the evening, beautiful soup! ~ Lewis Carroll
72:We haven't any and you're too young. ~ Lewis Carroll
73:What I tell you three times is true. ~ Lewis Carroll
74:What's the French for fiddle-de-dee? ~ Lewis Carroll
75:In autumn, when the leaves are brown, ~ Lewis Carroll
76:It is better to be feared than loved. ~ Lewis Carroll
77:Man is an animal that writes letters. ~ Lewis Carroll
78:People who don't think shouldn't talk ~ Lewis Carroll
79:The hurrier I go, the behinder I get. ~ Lewis Carroll
80:You can always take more than nothing ~ Lewis Carroll
81:And if he left off dreaming about you, ~ Lewis Carroll
82:Are you Lewis Carroll?" Redd asked him. ~ Frank Beddor
83:explanations take such a dreadful time ~ Lewis Carroll
84:People who don't think shouldn't talk. ~ Lewis Carroll
85:Perhaps it doesn't understand English, ~ Lewis Carroll
86:We're all mad here. Im mad. You're mad ~ Lewis Carroll
87:Alice gave a little scream of laughter. ~ Lewis Carroll
88:at any rate, there's no harm in trying. ~ Lewis Carroll
89:I must be shutting up like a telescope. ~ Lewis Carroll
90:Keep your temper, said the Caterpillar. ~ Lewis Carroll
91:Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after ~ Lewis Carroll
92:How strange it is to be anything at all. ~ Lewis Carroll
93:we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad. ~ Lewis Carroll
94:You can't be that good; you work for me. ~ Lewis Carroll
95:You couldn't have it if you DID want it. ~ Lewis Carroll
96:You'd have to be half mad to dream me up ~ Lewis Carroll
97:I am real!" said Alice, and began to cry. ~ Lewis Carroll
98:It's a large as life and twice as natural ~ Lewis Carroll
99:  Just then she heard something splashing ~ Lewis Carroll
100:But oh, beamish nephew, beware of the day, ~ Lewis Carroll
101:Go on till you come to the end; then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll
102:...It's more like a corkscrew than a path! ~ Lewis Carroll
103:noticed, had powdered hair that curled all ~ Lewis Carroll
104:The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, ~ Lewis Carroll
105:was I the same when I got up this morning? ~ Lewis Carroll
106:Все страньше и страньше! - вскричала Алиса ~ Lewis Carroll
107:It began with the tea,' the Hatter replied. ~ Lewis Carroll
108:daresay you haven't had much practice,' said ~ Lewis Carroll
109:Everybody has won, and all must have prizes. ~ Lewis Carroll
110:Everything is funny, if you can laugh at it. ~ Lewis Carroll
111:Is it mad to pray for better hallucinations? ~ Lewis Carroll
112:...those serpents! There's no pleasing them! ~ Lewis Carroll
113:Whatever is worth doing is worth doing well. ~ Lewis Carroll
114:If you’ll believe in me, I’ll believe in you. ~ Lewis Carroll
115:I think I could, if I only know how to begin. ~ Lewis Carroll
116:Più ci cavo io per me, meno ci cavi tu per te ~ Lewis Carroll
117:Plus bas, encore plus bas, toujours plus bas. ~ Lewis Carroll
118:You would have to be half-mad to dream me up. ~ Lewis Carroll
119:Ах, мои усики! Ах, мои ушки! Как я опаздываю! ~ Lewis Carroll
120:All that matters is what we do for each other. ~ Lewis Carroll
121:And my heart is like nothing so much as a bowl ~ Lewis Carroll
122:I am as late as the rabbit in Lewis Carroll. ~ Sebastian Barry
123:Las mejores personas estan completamente locas ~ Lewis Carroll
124:No good fish goes anywhere without a porpoise. ~ Lewis Carroll
125:only a mouse that had slipped in like herself. ~ Lewis Carroll
126:Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after such a ~ Lewis Carroll
127:creatures,' (she was obliged to say 'creatures, ~ Lewis Carroll
128:If I had but the time and you had but the brain ~ Lewis Carroll
129:You're enough to try the patience of an oyster! ~ Lewis Carroll
130:You won't make yourself a bit realer by crying. ~ Lewis Carroll
131:I don’t like belonging to another person’s dream ~ Lewis Carroll
132:It's done by everyone minding their own business ~ Lewis Carroll
133:said the Gryphon, half to itself, half to Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll
134:She who saves a single soul, saves the universe. ~ Lewis Carroll
135:There are certain things--as, a spider, a ghost, ~ Lewis Carroll
136:Un-dish-cover the fish, or dishcover the riddle. ~ Lewis Carroll
137:Why is a raven like a writing desk? - Mad Hatter ~ Lewis Carroll
138:لا يمكنني العودة للأمس لأنني كنت حينها شخص آخر.. ~ Lewis Carroll
139:Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it ~ Lewis Carroll
140:How long is forever?
Sometimes just one second ~ Lewis Carroll
141:I don't believe there's an atom of meaning in it. ~ Lewis Carroll
142:This is impossible,
Only if you believe it is. ~ Lewis Carroll
143:You may charge me with murder--or want of sense-- ~ Lewis Carroll
144:Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll
145:Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll
146:Ill try the whole cause, and condemn you to death. ~ Lewis Carroll
147:No Ghost of any common sense begins a conversation ~ Lewis Carroll
148:No wise fish would go anywhere without a porpoise. ~ Lewis Carroll
149:إذا لم تكن تدري إلى أين تذهب فكل الطرق تفي بالغرض. ~ Lewis Carroll
150:'I beg your pardon?' Alice said with a puzzled air. ~ Lewis Carroll
151:tis love, 'tis love, that makes the world go round! ~ Lewis Carroll
152:Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle. ~ Lewis Carroll
153:A thick stick in one's hand makes people respectful. ~ Lewis Carroll
154:get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, ~ Lewis Carroll
155:In a wonderland they lie, dreaming as the days go by ~ Lewis Carroll
156:It's a poor sort of memory that only works backward. ~ Lewis Carroll
157:You shouldn't make jokes if it makes you so unhappy. ~ Lewis Carroll
158:Courtesy is a small act but it packs a mighty wallop. ~ Lewis Carroll
159:If you don't know where you're going any road will do ~ Lewis Carroll
160:It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards. ~ Lewis Carroll
161:Sentence first; verdict afterwards." -Queen of Hearts ~ Lewis Carroll
162:The further off from England the nearer is to France- ~ Lewis Carroll
163:The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours ~ Lewis Carroll
164:Todo tiene una moraleja, solo falta saber encontrarla ~ Lewis Carroll
165:I'm not crazy, my reality is just different than yours ~ Lewis Carroll
166:The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours. ~ Lewis Carroll
167:A dream is not reality but who's to say which is which? ~ Lewis Carroll
168:dreams are not reality, but who's to say which is which ~ Lewis Carroll
169:Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it.’ And ~ Lewis Carroll
170:I'm not crazy. My reality is just different than yours. ~ Lewis Carroll
171:Oh, 'tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round. ~ Lewis Carroll
172:She’ll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets! ~ Lewis Carroll
173:she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to ~ Lewis Carroll
174:Well that's it: if you don't think, you shouldn't talk! ~ Lewis Carroll
175:I don't see how he can ever finish, if he doesn't begin. ~ Lewis Carroll
176:It's all her fancy: she never executes nobody, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll
177:Oh, ’tis love, ’tis love, that makes the world go round! ~ Lewis Carroll
178:Sino sabes a dónde vas, cualquier camino te llevará allí ~ Lewis Carroll
179:sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing ~ Lewis Carroll
180:Can a Thing exist without any Attributes belonging to it? ~ Lewis Carroll
181:Curtsey while you're thinking what to say. It saves time. ~ Lewis Carroll
182:If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. ~ Lewis Carroll
183:I'm very much afraid I didn't mean anything but nonsense. ~ Lewis Carroll
184:It would be so nice if something made sense for a change. ~ Lewis Carroll
185:up above the world you fly, like a tea tray in the sky... ~ Lewis Carroll
186:Without a plan, it doesn't matter which way you're going. ~ Lewis Carroll
187:You would have to be half mad to dream me up.” -Lewis Carroll ~ E K Blair
188:Лондон - столица Парижа, а Париж - столица Рима, а Рим... ~ Lewis Carroll
189:—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to? ~ Lewis Carroll
190:considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the ~ Lewis Carroll
191:either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, ~ Lewis Carroll
192:Imagination is the only weapon in the war against reality. ~ Lewis Carroll
193:It's the stupidest tea party I ever was at in all my life! ~ Lewis Carroll
194:Oh, there's no use talking to him. He's perfectly idiotic! ~ Lewis Carroll
195:Twinkle, twinkle, little bat! How I wonder what you’re at! ~ Lewis Carroll
196:I don't think..." then you shouldn't talk, said the Hatter. ~ Lewis Carroll
197:It was for bringing the cook tulip-roots instead of onions. ~ Lewis Carroll
198:Me doy buenos consejos a mí misma , pero rara vez los sigo. ~ Lewis Carroll
199:Of all things, I do like a Conspiracy! It's so interesting! ~ Lewis Carroll
200:You don't know much,' said the Duchess; 'and that's a fact. ~ Lewis Carroll
201:You don’t know much,’ said the Duchess; ‘and that’s a fact. ~ Lewis Carroll
202:at first, the two creatures got so close to her, one on each ~ Lewis Carroll
203:Do let's pretend that I'm a hungry hyena, and you're a bone! ~ Lewis Carroll
204:I don’t want to be anybody’s prisoner. I want to be a Queen. ~ Lewis Carroll
205:I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it. ~ Lewis Carroll
206:Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat; "we're all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll
207:Oh, you can't help that,' said the cat. 'We're all mad here. ~ Lewis Carroll
208:Rabbit-Hole Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting ~ Lewis Carroll
209:Soo--oop of the e--e--evening,
Beautiful, beautiful Soup! ~ Lewis Carroll
210:There ought to be a book written about me, that there ought! ~ Lewis Carroll
211:You don't know much,' said the Dutchess; 'and that's a fact. ~ Lewis Carroll
212:going into the garden at once; but, alas for poor Alice! when ~ Lewis Carroll
213:It's ridiculous to leave all the conversation to the pudding! ~ Lewis Carroll
214:not possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through ~ Lewis Carroll
215:Oh! Siempre llegarás a alguna parte, si caminas lo suficiente ~ Lewis Carroll
216:there was a real one, blazing away as brightly as the one she ~ Lewis Carroll
217:What is the use of a book, without pictures or conversations? ~ Lewis Carroll
218:Who cares for you? You're nothing but a pack of cards! ~ Lewis Carroll
219:Why,' said the Dodo, 'the best way to explain it is to do it. ~ Lewis Carroll
220:Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here? ~ Lewis Carroll
221:Child of the pure, unclouded brow and dreaming eyes of wonder. ~ Lewis Carroll
222:Si no sabes hacia donde te dirijes, cualquier lugar te llevará ~ Lewis Carroll
223:Which way you ought to go depends on where you want to get to. ~ Lewis Carroll
224:His answer trickled through my head like water through a sieve. ~ Lewis Carroll
225:It's jam every other day: to-day isn't any other day, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll
226:It’s jam every other day: to-day isn’t any other day, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll
227:Look after the senses and the sounds will look after themselves ~ Lewis Carroll
228:Well, I never heard it before, but it sounds uncommon nonsense. ~ Lewis Carroll
229:Es un tipo de memoria muy pobre la que solo funciona hacia atrás ~ Lewis Carroll
230:If you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. Is that a bargain? ~ Lewis Carroll
231:I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they'll ~ Lewis Carroll
232:Some children have the most disagreeable way of getting grown-up ~ Lewis Carroll
233:The proper definition of a man is an animal that writes letters. ~ Lewis Carroll
234:Thy loving smile will surely hail The love-gift of a fairy tale. ~ Lewis Carroll
235:Which way you ought to go depends on where you want to get to... ~ Lewis Carroll
236:You used to be much more..."muchier." You've lost your muchness. ~ Lewis Carroll
237:Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, ~ Lewis Carroll
238:If you don't know where you are going any road can take you there ~ Lewis Carroll
239:Por lo general, son caras ante las que pasamos sin darnos cuenta. ~ Lewis Carroll
240:You're thinking about something, and it makes you forget to talk. ~ Lewis Carroll
241:If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there ~ Lewis Carroll
242:now I'm opening out like the largest telescope that ever was! Good ~ Lewis Carroll
243:The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday - but never jam today. ~ Lewis Carroll
244:Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance? ~ Lewis Carroll
245:Yes, that's it! Said the Hatter with a sigh, it's always tea time. ~ Lewis Carroll
246:Alice:How long is forever? White Rabbit:Sometimes, just one second. ~ Lewis Carroll
247:I cannot even pretend to feel as much interest in boys as in girls. ~ Lewis Carroll
248:If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there. ~ Lewis Carroll
249:It takes all the running you can do just to keep in the same place. ~ Lewis Carroll
250:Take care of the sense and the sounds will take care of themselves. ~ Lewis Carroll
251:Thy loving smile will surely hail
The love-gift of a fairy tale. ~ Lewis Carroll
252:We are but older children, dear, Who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ Lewis Carroll
253:Welcome to Wonderland! Here you will meet some of literature's most ~ Lewis Carroll
254:What a strange world we live in...Said Alice to the Queen of hearts ~ Lewis Carroll
255:Alice tried another question. "What sort of people live about here?" ~ Lewis Carroll
256:How can one possibly pay attention to a book with no pictures in it? ~ Lewis Carroll
257:I can't go back to yesterday--because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll
258:I’m afraid I can’t explain myself. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll
259:It is not real work unless you would rather be doing something else. ~ Lewis Carroll
260:No puedo volver al pasado porque entonces era una persona diferente. ~ Lewis Carroll
261:Photography is my one recreation and I think it should be done well. ~ Lewis Carroll
262:Alice: This is impossible. The Mad Hatter: Only if you believe it is. ~ Lewis Carroll
263:And if he left off dreaming about you, where do you suppose you'd be? ~ Lewis Carroll
264:Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end; then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll
265:I can't go back to yesterday - because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll
266:It's all his fancy, that: he hasn't got no sorrow, you know. Come on! ~ Lewis Carroll
267:No, no! The adventures first, explanations take such a dreadful time. ~ Lewis Carroll
268:Rule Forty-two. All persons more than a mile high to leave the court. ~ Lewis Carroll
269:Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make ONE respectable person! ~ Lewis Carroll
270:with the words 'DRINK ME' beautifully printed on it in large letters. ~ Lewis Carroll
271:Better say nothing at all. Language is worth a thousand pounds a word! ~ Lewis Carroll
272:We are but older children, dear,
Who fret to find our bedtime near. ~ Lewis Carroll
273:How fond she is of finding morals in things!’ Alice thought to herself. ~ Lewis Carroll
274:I knew who I was this morning, but I've changed a few times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll
275:I knew who I was this morning, but I’ve changed a few times since then. ~ Lewis Carroll
276:So she brushed away her tears, and went on, as cheerfully as she could. ~ Lewis Carroll
277:The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing her flamingo. ~ Lewis Carroll
278:Alice: This is impossible.
The Mad Hatter: Only if you believe it is. ~ Lewis Carroll
279:,"I am not crazy, my reality is just different from yours."-Cheshire Cat ~ Lewis Carroll
280:In winter, when the fields are white, I sing this song for your delight— ~ Lewis Carroll
281:Little Alice fell d o w n the hOle, bumped her head and bruised her soul ~ Lewis Carroll
282:No tiene utilidad volver ayer , porque entonces era una persona distinta ~ Lewis Carroll
283:Then it doesn't matter which way you walk...-so long as I get somewhere. ~ Lewis Carroll
284:Alice: "How long is forever?" White Rabbit: "Sometimes, just one second." ~ Lewis Carroll
285:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll
286:Sabía quién era esta mañana, pero he cambiado varias veces desde entonces ~ Lewis Carroll
287:Sometimes I've believed more than six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll
288:We CAN talk,' said the Tiger-lily: 'when there's anybody worth talking to ~ Lewis Carroll
289:you're entirly bonkers but I'll tell you a secret all the best people are ~ Lewis Carroll
290:Παλιά ήσουν πολύ πιο..."περισσοτερότερα". Έχασες την περισσοτερότητά σου. ~ Lewis Carroll
291:Am I addressing the White Queen?' 'Well, yes, if you call that a-dressing, ~ Lewis Carroll
292:Can you do Division? Divide a loaf by a knife - what's the answer to that? ~ Lewis Carroll
293:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
294:It often runs in families," she remarked: "just as a love for pastry does. ~ Lewis Carroll
295:I want a clean cup,' interrupted the Hatter: 'let's all move one place on. ~ Lewis Carroll
296:Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?"—and she tried to curtsey ~ Lewis Carroll
297:Sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll
298:Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! ~ Lewis Carroll
299:I'm doubtful about the temper of your flamingo. Shall I try the experiment? ~ Lewis Carroll
300:In spring, when woods are getting green, I'll try and tell you what I mean. ~ Lewis Carroll
301:It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then. ~ Lewis Carroll
302:next thing was to eat the comfits: this caused some noise and confusion, as ~ Lewis Carroll
303:Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. ~ Lewis Carroll
304:He was part of my dream, of course -- but then I was part of his dream, too. ~ Lewis Carroll
305:If you don't know where you are going it doesn't matter which road you take. ~ Lewis Carroll
306:I never thought of that before! It's my opinion that you never think at all. ~ Lewis Carroll
307:I said you LOOKED like an egg, Sir. And some eggs are very pretty, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll
308:I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears! ~ Lewis Carroll
309:it seems to fill my head with ideas—only I don't exactly know what they are! ~ Lewis Carroll
310:I warn you, dear child. If I lose my temper, you lose your head. Understand? ~ Lewis Carroll
311:You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret all the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll
312:You're thinking about something, my dear, and that makes you forget to talk. ~ Lewis Carroll
313:Always speak the truth, think before you speak, and write it down afterwards. ~ Lewis Carroll
314:by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had ~ Lewis Carroll
315:chrysalis--you will some day, you know--and then after that into a butterfly, ~ Lewis Carroll
316:Ella por lo general se daba excelentes consejos (aunque rara vez los seguía), ~ Lewis Carroll
317:Read the directions and directly you will be directed in the right direction. ~ Lewis Carroll
318:The things most people want to know about are usually none of their business. ~ Lewis Carroll
319:What a curious feeling!” said Alice; “I must be shutting up like a telescope. ~ Lewis Carroll
320:You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret: All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll
321:You're entirely bonkers, But I'll tell you a secret, all the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll
322:I have seen so many extraordinary things, nothing seems extraordinary any more ~ Lewis Carroll
323:That's the reason they're called lessons, because they lesson from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll
324:what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations? ~ Lewis Carroll
325:Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast ~ Lewis Carroll
326:Always speak the truth - think before you speak - and write it down afterwards. ~ Lewis Carroll
327:But, I nearly forgot, you must close your eyes otherwise you won't see anything ~ Lewis Carroll
328:If you do not know where you want to go, it doesn't matter which path you take. ~ Lewis Carroll
329:Si así fue, así pudo ser; si así fuera, así podría ser; pero como no es, no es. ~ Lewis Carroll
330:That's the reason they're called lessons...because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll
331:Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. ~ Lewis Carroll
332:You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret... All the best people are! ~ Lewis Carroll
333:Alicia: ¿Cuánto tiempo es para siempre? Conejo blanco: A veces, sólo un segundo. ~ Lewis Carroll
334:But, I nearly forgot, you must close your eyes otherwise you won't see anything. ~ Lewis Carroll
335:By the time she had caught the flamingo and brought it back, the fight was over, ~ Lewis Carroll
336:I didn’t mean it!” pleaded poor Alice. “But you’re so easily offended, you know! ~ Lewis Carroll
337:I'm not strange, weird, off, nor crazy, my reality is just different from yours. ~ Lewis Carroll
338:I'm sure the woods look sleepy in the autumn, when the leaves are getting brown. ~ Lewis Carroll
339:Pues la regla es: mermelada mañana y mermelada ayer... pero nunca mermelada hoy. ~ Lewis Carroll
340:She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it) ~ Lewis Carroll
341:'What is the use of a book', thought Alice, 'without pictures or conversations?' ~ Lewis Carroll
342:Always speak the truth—think before you speak—and write it down afterwards.' 'I'm ~ Lewis Carroll
343:'Always speak the truth - think before you speak - and write it down afterwards.' ~ Lewis Carroll
344:am i insane" asked alice
"yes, but all the best people are" replied her father ~ Lewis Carroll
345:And what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversation? ~ Lewis Carroll
346:My view of life is, that it's next to impossible to convince anybody of anything. ~ Lewis Carroll
347:She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it), ~ Lewis Carroll
348:We CAN talk,' said the Tiger-lily: 'when there's anybody worth talking to.' Alice ~ Lewis Carroll
349:When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more, nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll
350:When I use a word, it means just what i choose it to mean. Neither more nor less. ~ Lewis Carroll
351:Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible. There ~ Lewis Carroll
352:Alice thought to herself "I don't see how he can ever finish, if he doesn't begin. ~ Lewis Carroll
353:Alice: Why is a raven like a writing desk?
Hatter: I haven't the faintest idea. ~ Lewis Carroll
354:and what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations? ~ Lewis Carroll
355:Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. ~ Lewis Carroll
356:expeditions of Hernandez de Ckx> doYfty in 1517, and Juan de Gnijalya^ in 1518. ~ Lewis Carroll
357:I'm afraid so.Your totally bonkers.But I tellyou a secret.All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll
358:My beloved friend - one of the most unique and charming personalities of our time. ~ Lewis Carroll
359:She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), ~ Lewis Carroll
360:She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it). ~ Lewis Carroll
361:Yet what are all such gaieties to me whose thoughts are full of indices and surds? ~ Lewis Carroll
362:Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before ~ Lewis Carroll
363:A minute goes by so fearfully quick. You might as well try to stop a Bandersnatch! ~ Lewis Carroll
364:Bitte sage mir, welchen Weg ich gehen soll.
Das hängt davon ab, wohin du willst. ~ Lewis Carroll
365:Every story has a moral you just need to be clever enough to find it - the Dutchess ~ Lewis Carroll
366:If you don't know where you want to go, then it doesn't matter which path you take. ~ Lewis Carroll
367:Se una persona ha il potere di farti cambiare umore, allora è veramente importante. ~ Lewis Carroll
368:- Alice: per quanto tempo è per sempre?
- Bianconiglio: a volte, solo un secondo. ~ Lewis Carroll
369:Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! 'I wonder how many miles I've ~ Lewis Carroll
370:In most gardens they make the beds too soft – so that the flowers are always asleep. ~ Lewis Carroll
371:In some ways, you know, people that don't exist, are much nicer than people that do. ~ Lewis Carroll
372:Počni od početka' , reče Kralj važno, i idi sve dok ne stigneš do kraja; onda stani. ~ Lewis Carroll
373:Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas—only I don’t exactly know what they are! ~ Lewis Carroll
374:We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad. [...] You must be, or you wouldn't be here. ~ Lewis Carroll
375:I always call him Lewis Carroll Carroll, because he was the first Humbert Humbert. ~ Vladimir Nabokov
376:It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,' says the White Queen to Alice. ~ Lewis Carroll
377:Magnitudes are algebraically represented by letter, men by men of letters, and so on. ~ Lewis Carroll
378:Still she haunts me, phantomwise, Alice moving under skies Never seen by waking eyes. ~ Lewis Carroll
379:whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up ~ Lewis Carroll
380:Alice: Where Should I go?
Cheshire Cat: That depends, where do you want to end up? ~ Lewis Carroll
381:I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir,' said Alice, 'Because I'm not myself you see. ~ Lewis Carroll
382:I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin. ~ Lewis Carroll
383:I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? ~ Lewis Carroll
384:pues a esta curiosa criatura le gustaba mucho pretender que era dos personas a la vez. ~ Lewis Carroll
385:She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and ~ Lewis Carroll
386:Si todo el mundo se ocupara de sus propios asuntos , el mundo giraría mucho más rápido ~ Lewis Carroll
387:Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas - only I don't exactly know what they are! ~ Lewis Carroll
388:Which form of proverb do you prefer Better late than never, or Better never than late? ~ Lewis Carroll
389:Why is a raven like a writing desk? - Mad Hatter I haven't the slightest idea. - Alice ~ Lewis Carroll
390:Why is it that people with the most narrow of minds seem to have the widest of mouths? ~ Lewis Carroll
391:Every story has a moral you just need to be clever enough to find it
- the Dutchess ~ Lewis Carroll
392:I can’t explain myself, I’m afraid, sir,’ said Alice, ‘because I’m not myself, you see. ~ Lewis Carroll
393:Oh, what fun it'll be, when they see me through the glass in here, and can't get at me! ~ Lewis Carroll
394:Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: 'we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.' 'How ~ Lewis Carroll
395:Tis a secret: none knows how it comes, how it goes: But the name of the secret is Love! ~ Lewis Carroll
396:Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it. ~ Lewis Carroll
397:Well that was the silliest tea party I ever went to! I am never going back there again! ~ Lewis Carroll
398:The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things. ~ Lewis Carroll
399:this was a book about working out who you were. About identity, constant and threatened. ~ Lewis Carroll
400:Tumbling into a dark, Lewis Carroll labyrinth of filth, pursuing a white rabbit of smut! ~ Russell Brand
401:What is his sorrow?" [...] "It's all his fancy, that: he hasn't got no sorrow, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll
402:What is the use of a book without pictures or conversations?

-Alice in Wonderland ~ Lewis Carroll
403:You’re mad, bonkers, off your head. But I’ll tell you a secret; all the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll
404:aber1 bis gestern2 (zurück zu gehen3), wäre ganz unnütz, weil4 ich da jemand Anderes war. ~ Lewis Carroll
405:have i gone mad? im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are. ~ Lewis Carroll
406:"Well, I never heard it before," said the Mock Turtle; "but it sounds uncommon nonsense." ~ Lewis Carroll
407:Why is a raven like a writing desk? - Mad Hatter
I haven't the slightest idea. - Alice ~ Lewis Carroll
408:Why, you might just as well say that, I see what I eat, is the same as, I eat what I see. ~ Lewis Carroll
409:I beg your pardon?' Alice said with a puzzled air. 'I'm not offended,' said Humpty Dumpty. ~ Lewis Carroll
410:It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards.” Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland ~ Cornelia Funke
411:"I could have done it in a much more complicated way," said the Red Queen, immensely proud. ~ Lewis Carroll
412:important—unimportant—unimportant—important—' as if he were trying which word sounded best. ~ Lewis Carroll
413:When I make a word do a lot of work like that,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'I always pay it extra. ~ Lewis Carroll
414:Where should I go?" -Alice. "That depends on where you want to end up." - The Cheshire Cat. ~ Lewis Carroll
415:You mean you ca’n’t take less,” said the Hatter: “it’s very easy to take more than nothing. ~ Lewis Carroll
416:But, said Alice, if the world has absolutely no sense, who's stopping us from inventing one? ~ Lewis Carroll
417:But, said Alice, the the world has absolutely no sens, who's stopping us from inventing one? ~ Lewis Carroll
418:Charles Lutwidge Dodgson's life in space-time colored his liberated life of the imagination. ~ Lewis Carroll
419:have i gone mad?
im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are. ~ Lewis Carroll
420:I ca'n't remember things as I used- and I don't keep the same size for ten minutes together! ~ Lewis Carroll
421:I'm not crazy. My reality is just different than yours.
~ Lewis Carroll Cheshire Cat ~ Lewis Carroll
422:It is her solidity that is magical. The wonders are not wild or strange but odd and curious. ~ Lewis Carroll
423:Oh, there’s no use in talking to him,’ said Alice desperately: ‘he’s perfectly idiotic!’ And ~ Lewis Carroll
424:So young a child ought to know which way she's going, even if she doesn't know her own name! ~ Lewis Carroll
425:That's just the trouble with me,I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it. ~ Lewis Carroll
426:pardon!' said the Mouse, frowning, but very politely: 'Did you speak?' 'Not I!' said the Lory ~ Lewis Carroll
427:Still she haunts me, phantomwise,
Alice moving under skies
Never seen by waking eyes. ~ Lewis Carroll
428:and the moral ofthat is —“Take care of the sense, and the sounds will take care of themselves. ~ Lewis Carroll
429:¿Cuánto dura la eternidad? -preguntó Alicia-
-A veces, solo un segundo -respondió el conejo ~ Lewis Carroll
430:I didn't know that cats could grin.'
'They all can,' said the Duchess, 'and most of 'em do. ~ Lewis Carroll
431:If everybody minded their own business... the world would go round a deal faster than it does. ~ Lewis Carroll
432:I learned long ago that being Lewis Carroll was infinitely more exciting than being Alice. ~ Joyce Carol Oates
433:I've been influenced by poets as diverse as Dylan Thomas, Lewis Carroll, and Edgar Allan Poe. ~ Jack Prelutsky
434:Begin at the beginning,' the King said gravely, 'and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll
435:Ever drifting down the stream
Lingering in the golden gleam
Life, what is it but a dream? ~ Lewis Carroll
436:flamingoes and mustard both bite. And the moral of that is--"Birds of a feather flock together. ~ Lewis Carroll
437:get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice ~ Lewis Carroll
438:Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. - The Queen ~ Lewis Carroll
439:One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. ~ Lewis Carroll
440:The human mind is generally far more eager to praise and dispraise than to describe and define. ~ Lewis Carroll
441:the reason they’re called lessons,’ the Gryphon remarked: ‘because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll
442:The world is but a Thought," said he:
"The vast unfathomable sea
Is but a Notion—unto me. ~ Lewis Carroll
443:You’re mad, bonkers, completely off your head. But I’ll tell you a secret. All the best people. ~ Lewis Carroll
444:flamingoes and mustard both bite. And the moral of that is — “Birds of a feather flock together. ~ Lewis Carroll
445:i fenicònteri e la senape pizzicano entrambi, e la morale è questa—'Chi si rassembra s'assembra. ~ Lewis Carroll
446:“One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others” ~ Lewis Carroll
447:She's in that state of mind that she wants to deny SOMETHING only she doesn't know what to deny! ~ Lewis Carroll
448:Well, when one's lost, I suppose it's good advice to stay where you are until someone finds you. ~ Lewis Carroll
449:Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die. ~ Lewis Carroll
450:But if I'm not the same, the next question is 'Who in the world am I?' Ah, that's a great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll
451:But that's just the trouble with me. I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it. ~ Lewis Carroll
452:Give your evidence,' said the King; 'and don't be nervous, or I'll have you executed on the spot. ~ Lewis Carroll
453:Not like cats ” cried the Mouse in a shrill passionate voice. “Would you like cats if you were me ~ Lewis Carroll
454:Say, can thy noble spirit stoop
To join the gormandising troop
Who find a solace in a soup? ~ Lewis Carroll
455:What does it matter where my body happens to be?' he said. 'My mind goes on working all the same. ~ Lewis Carroll
456:If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic ~ Lewis Carroll
457:If you knew Time as well as I do,’ said the Hatter, ‘you wouldn’t talk about wasting it. It’s him. ~ Lewis Carroll
458:One of the hardest things in the world is to convey a meaning accurately from one mind to another. ~ Lewis Carroll
459:Si conocieras el tiempo tan bien como yo m no hablarías de matarlo. El tiempo es todo un personaje ~ Lewis Carroll
460:Y la moraleja de esto es... << Oh , el amor , el amor . El amor hace girar al mundo >> ~ Lewis Carroll
461:Если б моя голова и прошла, - подумала бедная Алиса, - то что толку! Кому нужна голова без плечей? ~ Lewis Carroll
462:Birds of a feather flock together.'' Und die Moral1 davon ist: Gleich und Gleich gesellt sich gern. ~ Lewis Carroll
463:How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice. "You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll
464:I do,” Alice hastily replied; “at least—at least I mean what I say—that’s the same thing, you know. ~ Lewis Carroll
465:I don't know the meaning of half those long words, and, what's more, I don't believe you do either! ~ Lewis Carroll
466:If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does. ~ Lewis Carroll
467:If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic. ~ Lewis Carroll
468:If you drink much from a bottle marked 'poison' it is certain to disagree with you sooner or later. ~ Lewis Carroll
469:It is the one of the great secrets of life that those things are most worth doing,we do for others. ~ Lewis Carroll
470:You’re mad, bonkers, completely off your head. But I’ll tell you a secret. All the best people are. ~ Lewis Carroll
471:But if I’m not the same, the next question is, ‘Who in the world am I?’ Ah, that’s the great puzzle! ~ Lewis Carroll
472:How puzzling all these changes are! I'm never sure what I'm going to be, from one minute to another. ~ Lewis Carroll
473:Little Alice fell
d
o
w
n
the hOle,
bumped her head
and bruised her soul ~ Lewis Carroll
474:Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin.’ For, ~ Lewis Carroll
475:One novel has been all my reading, Our Mutual Friend, one of the cleverest that Dickens has written. ~ Lewis Carroll
476:One of the deep secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. ~ Lewis Carroll
477:she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; ~ Lewis Carroll
478:Would you be a poet Before you've been to school? Ah, well! I hardly thought you So absolute a fool. ~ Lewis Carroll
479:Alice felt so desperate that she was ready to ask help of any one; so, when the Rabbit came near her, ~ Lewis Carroll
480:Begin at the beginning," the King said, very gravely, "and go on till you come to the end: then stop. ~ Lewis Carroll
481:came trotting along in a great hurry, muttering to himself as he came, 'Oh! the Duchess, the Duchess! ~ Lewis Carroll
482:E então a duquesa disse: A moral disso é, tome conta do sentido e os sons tomarão conta de si mesmos. ~ Lewis Carroll
483:How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice
"You must be," said the cat, "or you wouldn't have come here. ~ Lewis Carroll
484:And never, never, dear madam, put 'Wednesday' simply as the date! That way madness lies! ~ Lewis Carroll
485:belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too ~ Lewis Carroll
486:conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without pictures or conversation? ~ Lewis Carroll
487:If you drink from the bottle called poison, it is almost certain to disagree with you sooner or later. ~ Lewis Carroll
488:said the Knave, "I didn't write it and they can't prove that I did; there's no name signed at the end. ~ Lewis Carroll
489:She felt very curious to know what it was all about, and crept a little way out of the wood to listen. ~ Lewis Carroll
490:That's the reason they're called lessons," the Gryphon remarked: "because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll
491:That’s the reason they’re called lessons,’ the Gryphon remarked: ‘because they lessen from day to day. ~ Lewis Carroll
492:They're dreadfully fond of beheading people here; the great wonder is, that there's anyone left alive! ~ Lewis Carroll
493:(as if1) she (had known3) them (all her life2). (als ob1) sie sie ihr (ganzes Leben2) (gekannt hätte3). ~ Lewis Carroll
494:But I was thinking of a way To multiply by ten, And always, in the answer, get The question back again. ~ Lewis Carroll
495:Only I do hope it’s my dream, and not the Red King’s! I don’t like belonging to another person’s dream, ~ Lewis Carroll
496:Se quien era esta mañana cuando me levanté, pero creo que he debido cambiar varias veces desde entonces ~ Lewis Carroll
497:ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: ~ Lewis Carroll
498:very poor speaker," said the King. "You may go," said the King, and the Hatter hurriedly left the court. ~ Lewis Carroll
499:and illustrations are in the public domain and are free to use, reproduce, or alter as desired. Cover and ~ Lewis Carroll
500:either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. ~ Lewis Carroll

IN CHAPTERS



   2 Occultism
   2 Cybernetics
   1 Integral Yoga


   2 Norbert Wiener
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Aleister Crowley


   2 Liber ABA
   2 Cybernetics


1.01 - Adam Kadmon and the Evolution, #Preparing for the Miraculous, #George Van Vrekhem, #Integral Yoga
  teenth century, when, as one author puts it, God gradually
  disappeared like the smile of Lewis Carrolls Cheshire Cat,
  and Nietzsches declaration of the death of God resounded

1.05 - Computing Machines and the Nervous System, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  not disastrous. Any race not conforming to this requirement will
  go the way of Lewis Carroll’s Bread-­and-­Butter Fly, and always
  die. Nevertheless, even a doomed race may show a mechanism

1.07 - Cybernetics and Psychopathology, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  nism. Like the computing machine, the brain probably works
  on a variant of the famous principle expounded by Lewis Carroll
  in The Hunting of the Snark: “What I tell you three times is true."

3.09 - Of Silence and Secrecy, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
  cause of the balls motion, and there is no reason why one
  should precede the other. (Cf. Lewis Carroll, where the Red
  Queen screams before she pricks her finger).1

APPENDIX I - Curriculum of A. A., #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Occultism
      Scientific Romances, by H. Hinton. ::: Valuable as an introduction to the study of the Fourth Dimension.
      Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. ::: Valuable to those who understand the Qabalah.
      Alice Through the Looking Glass, by Lewis Carroll. ::: Valuable to those who understand the Qabalah.
      The Hunting of the Snark, by Lewis Carroll. ::: Valuable to those who understand the Qabalah.
      The Arabian Nights, translated by either Sir Richard Burton or John Payne. ::: Valuable as a storehouse of oriental magick-lore.

Avatars of the Tortoise, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Bradley, between the subject and the predicate, if not between the subject
  and its attributes; Lewis Carroll (Mind, volume four, page 278), between the
  second premise of the syllogism and the conclusion. He relates an endless

Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  poachers.
  In Alice in Wonderland, published in , Lewis Carroll
  endowed the Cheshire Cat with the faculty of slowly disap

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #unset, #Zen
  Let me repeat: any two universes of discourse can be used to fabri-
  cate a joke. Lewis Carroll sent the following contri bution to a philo-
  sophical symposium:

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun lewis_carroll

The noun lewis carroll has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ::: (English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898))




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun lewis_carroll

1 sense of lewis carroll                        

Sense 1
Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity




--- Hyponyms of noun lewis_carroll
                                    




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun lewis_carroll

1 sense of lewis carroll                        

Sense 1
Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author










--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun lewis_carroll

1 sense of lewis carroll                        

Sense 1
Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aiken, Conrad Aiken, Conrad Potter Aiken
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alger, Horatio Alger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Algren, Nelson Algren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Andersen, Hans Christian Andersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Sherwood Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aragon, Louis Aragon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asch, Sholem Asch, Shalom Asch, Sholom Asch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asimov, Isaac Asimov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auchincloss, Louis Auchincloss, Louis Stanton Auchincloss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Austen, Jane Austen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, James Baldwin, James Arthur Baldwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baraka, Imamu Amiri Baraka, LeRoi Jones
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barth, John Barth, John Simmons Barth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barthelme, Donald Barthelme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baum, Frank Baum, Lyman Frank Brown
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beerbohm, Max Beerbohm, Sir Henry Maxmilian Beerbohm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Belloc, Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Hilaire Peter Belloc
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bellow, Saul Bellow, Solomon Bellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benchley, Robert Benchley, Robert Charles Benchley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, William Rose Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bierce, Ambrose Bierce, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boell, Heinrich Boell, Heinrich Theodor Boell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bontemps, Arna Wendell Bontemps
   HAS INSTANCE=> Borges, Jorge Borges, Jorge Luis Borges
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boswell, James Boswell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boyle, Kay Boyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradbury, Ray Bradbury, Ray Douglas Bradbury
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Charlotte Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Emily Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Currer Bell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Anne Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browne, Charles Farrar Browne, Artemus Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buck, Pearl Buck, Pearl Sydenstricker Buck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bunyan, John Bunyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burgess, Anthony Burgess
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnett, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, Edgar Rice Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, William Burroughs, William S. Burroughs, William Seward Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cabell, James Branch Cabell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvino, Italo Calvino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Canetti, Elias Canetti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cather, Willa Cather, Willa Sibert Cather
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chandler, Raymond Chandler, Raymond Thornton Chandler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cheever, John Cheever
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterton, G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert Keith Chesterton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chopin, Kate Chopin, Kate O'Flaherty Chopin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Mark Twain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cocteau, Jean Cocteau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Claudine Colette
   HAS INSTANCE=> Collins, Wilkie Collins, William Wilkie Collins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Teodor Josef Konrad Korzeniowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cooper, James Fenimore Cooper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Stephen Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> cummings, e. e. cummings, Edward Estlin Cummings
   HAS INSTANCE=> Day, Clarence Day, Clarence Shepard Day Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Defoe, Daniel Defoe
   HAS INSTANCE=> De Quincey, Thomas De Quincey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Didion, Joan Didion
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dinesen, Isak Dinesen, Blixen, Karen Blixen, Baroness Karen Blixen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Doctorow, E. L. Doctorow, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dos Passos, John Dos Passos, John Roderigo Dos Passos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoevsky, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Feodor Dostoevski, Fyodor Dostoevski, Feodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dreiser, Theodore Dreiser, Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dumas, Alexandre Dumas
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, George du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, Daphne du Maurier, Dame Daphne du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durrell, Lawrence Durrell, Lawrence George Durrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ehrenberg, Ilya Ehrenberg, Ilya Grigorievich Ehrenberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ellison, Ralph Ellison, Ralph Waldo Ellison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Farrell, James Thomas Farrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ferber, Edna Ferber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fielding, Henry Fielding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaubert, Gustave Flaubert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fleming, Ian Fleming, Ian Lancaster Fleming
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Ford Madox Ford, Ford Hermann Hueffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Forester, C. S. Forester, Cecil Scott Forester
   HAS INSTANCE=> France, Anatole France, Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaboriau, Emile Gaboriau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galsworthy, John Galsworthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaskell, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibran, Kahlil Gibran
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gjellerup, Karl Gjellerup
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gogol, Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Golding, William Golding, Sir William Gerald Golding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldsmith, Oliver Goldsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gombrowicz, Witold Gombrowicz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Jules de Goncourt, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorky, Maksim Gorky, Gorki, Maxim Gorki, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grahame, Kenneth Grahame
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grass, Gunter Grass, Gunter Wilhelm Grass
   HAS INSTANCE=> Graves, Robert Graves, Robert Ranke Graves
   HAS INSTANCE=> Greene, Graham Greene, Henry Graham Greene
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Zane Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Jakob Grimm, Jakob Ludwig Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm, Wilhelm Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haggard, Rider Haggard, Sir Henry Rider Haggard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Elizabeth Haldane, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, Edward Everett Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haley, Alex Haley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Radclyffe Hall, Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hammett, Dashiell Hammett, Samuel Dashiell Hammett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamsun, Knut Hamsun, Knut Pedersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Thomas Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Frank Harris, James Thomas Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Joel Harris, Joel Chandler Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harte, Bret Harte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hasek, Jaroslav Hasek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hawthorne, Nathaniel Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hecht, Ben Hecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Anson Heinlein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heller, Joseph Heller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesse, Hermann Hesse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyse, Paul Heyse, Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyward, DuBois Heyward, Edwin DuBois Hayward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Higginson, Thomas Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Storrow Higginson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holmes, Oliver Wendell Holmes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Howells, William Dean Howells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoyle, Edmond Hoyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hubbard, L. Ron Hubbard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Langston Hughes, James Langston Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Leigh Hunt, James Henry Leigh Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig










--- Grep of noun lewis_carroll
lewis carroll





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