classes ::: media,
children :::
branches ::: comics

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:comics
class:media
CYBERPUNX
  Cyberpunx is a comic book series produced by Image Comics. It is about a group of cyborg computer hacker warriors that enter into a virtual reality in order to stop an alien invasion by the Cyberlords. As a homage to Cyberpunk author William Gibson, the leading computer scientist in the story is named Karl Gibson.
  The first issue came out in March 1996. The creator of the series is Rob Liefeld; the script is by Robert Loren Fleming and the artwork is by Ching Lau.
  https://comiconlinefree.com/comic/cyberpunxlMo-6cVZisPXX7mVRoqS2189ONy6pi7bq

BRAVE OLD WORLD
  Brave Old World is a four issue comic book miniseries published by Vertigo Comics. It is about a group of computer hackers who at the turn of the year 2000 are working on a solution to the Y2K bug when they are transported back in time a hundred years to 1900.[1] The series follows their adventures as they try to build a computer using the technology of the time, in order to make their way back to their own time.
  The first issue came out in February 2000. The story is by William Messner-Loebs, and the artwork by Guy Davis and Phil Hester.[2]


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see also ::: manga, books, media

see also ::: books, manga, media

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO

books
manga
media

AUTH

BOOKS
Infinite_Library
Laughter__An_Essay_on_the_Meaning_of_the_Comic
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Heros_Journey
The_Republic
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-02-04
0_1961-03-11
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-10-02
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-06-23
0_1964-01-29
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-10-14
0_1965-08-18
0_1965-12-28
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-11-15
0_1966-12-31
0_1967-01-25
0_1967-03-22
0_1967-09-16
0_1968-01-12
0_1969-05-24
0_1969-07-23
0_1969-10-15
0_1970-05-09
0_1970-05-23
0_1970-06-27
0_1971-07-17
0_1972-04-12
02.03_-_The_Shakespearean_Word
03.11_-_Modernist_Poetry
08.08_-_The_Mind_s_Bazaar
1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.05_-_Definition_of_the_Ludicrous,_and_a_brief_sketch_of_the_rise_of_Comedy.
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.10_-_Laughter_Of_The_Gods
1.12_-_Love_The_Creator
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.26_-_Mental_Processes_-_Two_Only_are_Possible
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.72_-_Education
1951-02-15_-_Dreams,_symbolic_-_true_repose_-_False_visions_-_Earth-memory_and_history
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1951-05-05_-_Needs_and_desires_-_Discernment_-_sincerity_and_true_perception_-_Mantra_and_its_effects_-_Object_in_action-_to_serve_-_relying_only_on_the_Divine
1953-05-06
1958-02-19_-_Experience_of_the_supramental_boat_-_The_Censors_-_Absurdity_of_artificial_means
1958-07-30_-_The_planchette_-_automatic_writing_-_Proofs_and_knowledge
1f.lovecraft_-_A_Reminiscence_of_Dr._Samuel_Johnson
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.rwe_-_The_Adirondacs
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
33.05_-_Muraripukur_-_II
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
Apology
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
Gorgias
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Phaedo
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text

PRIMARY CLASS

media
SIMILAR TITLES
comics

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH


TERMS ANYWHERE

bamf /bamf/ 1. [Old X-Men comics] Notional sound made by a person or object teleporting in or out of the hearer's vicinity. Often used in {virtual reality} (especially {MUD}) electronic {fora} when a character wishes to make a dramatic entrance or exit. 2. The sound of magical transformation, used in virtual reality {fora}. [{Jargon File}]

bamf ::: /bamf/ 1. [Old X-Men comics] Notional sound made by a person or object teleporting in or out of the hearer's vicinity. Often used in virtual reality (especially MUD) electronic fora when a character wishes to make a dramatic entrance or exit.2. The sound of magical transformation, used in virtual reality fora.[Jargon File]

Dilbert "humour" A cartoon computer worker drawn by Scott Adams "scottadams@aol.com", who works in Silicon Valley. The cartoon became so popular he left his day job. The cartoon satirises typical corporate life, especially that which revolves around computers. See also: {BOFH}. {(http://unitedmedia.com/comics/dilbert/)}. (1996-10-11)

flame on "messaging, jargon" To begin or continue to {flame}. The punning reference to Marvel Comics's Human Torch is no longer widely recognised. The phrase "flame on" may actually precede the flame, in which case "flame off" will follow it. See {rave}, {burble}. [{Jargon File}] (1996-10-29)

flame on ::: (messaging, jargon) To begin or continue to flame. The punning reference to Marvel Comics's Human Torch is no longer widely recognised.The phrase flame on may actually precede the flame, in which case flame off will follow it.See rave, burble.[Jargon File] (1996-10-29)

foo "jargon" /foo/ A sample name for absolutely anything, especially programs and files (especially {scratch files}). First on the standard list of {metasyntactic variables} used in {syntax} examples. See also {bar}, {baz}, {qux}, quux, {corge}, {grault}, {garply}, {waldo}, {fred}, {plugh}, {xyzzy}, {thud}. The etymology of "foo" is obscure. When used in connection with "bar" it is generally traced to the WWII-era Army slang acronym {FUBAR}, later bowdlerised to {foobar}. However, the use of the word "foo" itself has more complicated antecedents, including a long history in comic strips and cartoons. "FOO" often appeared in the "Smokey Stover" comic strip by Bill Holman. This surrealist strip about a fireman appeared in various American comics including "Everybody's" between about 1930 and 1952. FOO was often included on licence plates of cars and in nonsense sayings in the background of some frames such as "He who foos last foos best" or "Many smoke but foo men chew". Allegedly, "FOO" and "BAR" also occurred in Walt Kelly's "Pogo" strips. In the 1938 cartoon "The Daffy Doc", a very early version of Daffy Duck holds up a sign saying "SILENCE IS FOO!". Oddly, this seems to refer to some approving or positive affirmative use of foo. It has been suggested that this might be related to the Chinese word "fu" (sometimes transliterated "foo"), which can mean "happiness" when spoken with the proper tone (the lion-dog guardians flanking the steps of many Chinese restaurants are properly called "fu dogs"). Earlier versions of this entry suggested the possibility that hacker usage actually sprang from "FOO, Lampoons and Parody", the title of a comic book first issued in September 1958, a joint project of Charles and Robert Crumb. Though Robert Crumb (then in his mid-teens) later became one of the most important and influential artists in underground comics, this venture was hardly a success; indeed, the brothers later burned most of the existing copies in disgust. The title FOO was featured in large letters on the front cover. However, very few copies of this comic actually circulated, and students of Crumb's "oeuvre" have established that this title was a reference to the earlier Smokey Stover comics. An old-time member reports that in the 1959 "Dictionary of the TMRC Language", compiled at {TMRC} there was an entry that went something like this: FOO: The first syllable of the sacred chant phrase "FOO MANE PADME HUM." Our first obligation is to keep the foo counters turning. For more about the legendary foo counters, see {TMRC}. Almost the entire staff of what became the {MIT} {AI LAB} was involved with TMRC, and probably picked the word up there. Another correspondant cites the nautical construction "foo-foo" (or "poo-poo"), used to refer to something effeminate or some technical thing whose name has been forgotten, e.g. "foo-foo box", "foo-foo valve". This was common on ships by the early nineteenth century. Very probably, hackish "foo" had no single origin and derives through all these channels from Yiddish "feh" and/or English "fooey". [{Jargon File}] (1998-04-16)

foo ::: (jargon) /foo/ A sample name for absolutely anything, especially programs and files (especially scratch files). First on the standard list of metasyntactic variables used in syntax examples. See also bar, baz, qux, quux, corge, grault, garply, waldo, fred, plugh, xyzzy, thud.The etymology of foo is obscure. When used in connection with bar it is generally traced to the WWII-era Army slang acronym FUBAR, later bowdlerised to foobar.However, the use of the word foo itself has more complicated antecedents, including a long history in comic strips and cartoons.FOO often appeared in the Smokey Stover comic strip by Bill Holman. This surrealist strip about a fireman appeared in various American comics including plates of cars and in nonsense sayings in the background of some frames such as He who foos last foos best or Many smoke but foo men chew.Allegedly, FOO and BAR also occurred in Walt Kelly's Pogo strips. In the 1938 cartoon The Daffy Doc, a very early version of Daffy Duck holds up a sign mean happiness when spoken with the proper tone (the lion-dog guardians flanking the steps of many Chinese restaurants are properly called fu dogs).Earlier versions of this entry suggested the possibility that hacker usage actually sprang from FOO, Lampoons and Parody, the title of a comic book first copies of this comic actually circulated, and students of Crumb's oeuvre have established that this title was a reference to the earlier Smokey Stover comics.An old-time member reports that in the 1959 Dictionary of the TMRC Language, compiled at TMRC there was an entry that went something like this:FOO: The first syllable of the sacred chant phrase FOO MANE PADME HUM. Our first obligation is to keep the foo counters turning.For more about the legendary foo counters, see TMRC. Almost the entire staff of what became the MIT AI LAB was involved with TMRC, and probably picked the word up there.Another correspondant cites the nautical construction foo-foo (or poo-poo), used to refer to something effeminate or some technical thing whose name has been forgotten, e.g. foo-foo box, foo-foo valve. This was common on ships by the early nineteenth century.Very probably, hackish foo had no single origin and derives through all these channels from Yiddish feh and/or English fooey.[Jargon File] (1998-04-16)

Global Network Navigator ::: (GNN) A collection of free services provided by O'Reilly & Associates.The Whole Internet Catalog describes the most useful Net resources and services with live links to those resources. The GNN Business Pages list companies on the Internet, with weekly articles on Internet trends and special events, sports, weather, and comics. There are also pages aobut travel and personal finance. .E-mail: .Telephone: (800) 998 9938 (USA), +1 (707) 829 0515 (outside USA). (1995-01-10)

Global Network Navigator (GNN) A collection of free services provided by {O'Reilly & Associates}. The Whole Internet Catalog describes the most useful Net resources and services with live links to those resources. The GNN Business Pages list companies on the Internet. The Internet Help Desk provides help in starting {Internet}q exploration. NetNews is a weekly publication that reports on the news of the {Internet}, with weekly articles on Internet trends and special events, sports, weather, and comics. There are also pages aobut travel and personal finance. {Home page (http://gnn.com/)}. E-mail: "support@gnn.com". Telephone: (800) 998 9938 (USA), +1 (707) 829 0515 (outside USA). (1995-01-10)

retcon /ret'kon/ retroactive continuity. The common situation in fiction where a new story "reveals" things about events in previous stories, usually leaving the "facts" the same (thus preserving continuity) while completely changing their interpretation. For example, revealing that a whole season of "Dallas" was a dream was a retcon. This term was once thought to have originated on the {Usenet} newsgroup {news:rec.arts.comics} but is now believed to have been used earlier in comic fandom. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-08)

retcon ::: /ret'kon/ retroactive continuity.The common situation in fiction where a new story reveals things about events in previous stories, usually leaving the facts the same (thus preserving continuity) while completely changing their interpretation. For example, revealing that a whole season of Dallas was a dream was a retcon.This term was once thought to have originated on the Usenet newsgroup rec.arts.comics but is now believed to have been used earlier in comic fandom.[Jargon File] (1994-12-08)

Yow! "exclamation" /yow/ (From "Zippy the Pinhead" comics) A favoured hacker expression of humorous surprise or emphasis. "Yow! Check out what happens when you twiddle the foo option on this display hack!" Compare {gurfle}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-03-07)

Yow! ::: (exclamation) /yow/ (From Zippy the Pinhead comics) A favoured hacker expression of humorous surprise or emphasis. Yow! Check out what happens when you twiddle the foo option on this display hack!Compare gurfle.[Jargon File] (1995-03-07)



QUOTES [0 / 0 - 799 / 799]


KEYS (10k)


NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   20 Scott McCloud
   20 Daniel Clowes
   18 Neil Gaiman
   16 Stan Lee
   14 Grant Morrison
   13 Alan Moore
   12 Marc Maron
   12 Brian Michael Bendis
   10 Jack Kirby
   9 Trina Robbins
   9 Francoise Mouly
   8 Michael Chabon
   7 Mike Madrid
   7 Kevin Feige
   7 Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero
   6 Frank Miller
   6 Dave McKean
   6 Andrew Dice Clay
   5 Sergio Aragones
   5 Ray Bradbury

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:I'm very distanced from the comics industry. I love the comics medium, but I have no time for the industry. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
2:I try to do things in comics that cannot be repeated by television, by movies, by interactive entertainment. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
3:You couldn't have small, dying children in a movie without really bringing everyone down, but you can in comics. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
4:That pompous phrase (graphic novel) was thought up by some idiot in the marketing department of DC. I prefer to call them Big Expensive Comics. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
5:Too many comics today ramble. By the time they get to the punch line, the audience has either gone to sleep, gone to the bathroom or gone to bed. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
6:Certainly, my many years working in the comics industry, creating products that I do not own, has made me rather fierce on the subject of giving up rights. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
7:I always thought Johnny Carson was just brilliant, and I used to watch him and all the comics that would be on the show every night - and I'd dream about it being me. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
8:The comics medium has some unusual features that do make it very different, in that it's combining a verbal narrative with a visual one that allows for much richer possibilities of transmitting information. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
9:Right from the outset, the prevailing mindset in British comics fandom was a radical and progressive one. We were all proto-hippies, and we all thought that comics would be greatly improved if everything was a bit psychedelic like Jim Steranko. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
10:I`ve not really been angling to be a comedian. I knew comics and I loved them and I loved being funny, but I didn't understand the whole concept of becoming one. My first couple of times on stage, I was like, "This is what I'm doing for sure." I was so excited. ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
11:I don't think stand-up is being appreciated as much as it could be and I don't think it has for a long time. There's some great stand-up comics who come to a town and if they're not a name, they don't attract a crowd but in reality there are brilliant people out there. ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
12:India is an incredibly vibrant market, which Virgin already, through Virgin Atlantic, has the pleasure of working in. I am delighted that Virgin Comics will not only help to launch the Indian comic market and spin it into the West, but will develop new and exciting talent. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
13:There's a widespread cultural barrenness across art and political culture. But there are some pockets of resistance on the extreme margins, like the techno-savvy protest movements, small press, the creator-owned comics, that seem to be getting some signs of hope for the future. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
14:There's always been this feedback between comics and films. But I think that if you take that analogy too far, if you only see comic books in terms of films, then eventually the best we can end up with is films that don't move. It would make us a poor relation to the movie industry. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
15:Everything you've ever read of mine is first-draft. This is one of the peculiarities of the comics field. By the time you're working on chapter three of your masterwork, chapter one is already in print. You can't go back and suddenly decide to make this character a woman, or have this one fall out of a window. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
16:The only real reason that I'd have for working for Hollywood is the fantastic amounts of money involved, and that isn't enough of an incentive to really give up the degree of control that I have over my work at the moment with comics. I suppose that's probably why I don't have any designs on being a screenwriter. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
17:When I was working upon the ABC books, I wanted to show different ways that mainstream comics could viably have gone, that they didn't have to follow &
18:In comics the reader is in complete control of the experience. They can read it at their own pace, and if there's a piece of dialogue that seems to echo something a few pages back, they can flip back and check it out, whereas the audience for a film is being dragged through the experience at the speed of 24 frames per second. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
19:Some comics get drunk before a show. I don't. When I get drunk, I don't want to stand in front of a bunch of people that I don't know. That does not sound comfortable. Why have all these people gathered? And why am I elevated and not facing the same way as everyone else? And what is this electric stick in my hand? I want a chair too! ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
20:I don't really have any great interest in writing for movies. Comics, to me, is a much more promising field. There's still a lot of ground to be broken in comics, whereas movies, to a degree... I don't know. They're a wonderful art form, but they're not my favorite art form. They might not even be in the top five of my favorite art forms. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
21:An extraterrestrial being, newly arrived on Earth - scrutinizing what we mainly present to our children in television, radio, movies, newspapers, magazines, the comics, and many books - might easily conclude that we are intent on teaching them murder, rape, cruelty, superstition, credulity, and consumerism. We keep at it, and through constant repetition many of them finally get it. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
22:Stand-up is an art but since it's humor and it's funny - a lot of guys that don't think it's art are probably coming from the angle that they don't want to take it so seriously. I've always looked at it as an art but I don't look at it as a pretentious art. I understand it has to be taken lightly because it is just comedy in the end, but the good stand-up comics are someone with something to say. ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:draw comics full-time, ~ Anonymous,
2:Movies help the sales of the comics. ~ Stan Lee,
3:Socrates should have written comics. ~ Mark Waid,
4:I tend to stay away from the comics. ~ Idris Elba,
5:Kid ... Comics will break your heart. ~ Jack Kirby,
6:I don't laugh out loud at comics a lot. ~ Dane Cook,
7:I used to read comics when I was a kid. ~ Jeff Bridges,
8:Comics are a gateway drug to literacy. ~ Art Spiegelman,
9:Comics are a gateway into literature. ~ Francoise Mouly,
10:I'm with you until the end of the line. ~ Marvel Comics,
11:So many comics have such low self-esteem. ~ Debra Wilson,
12:Who needs girls when you've got comics? ~ Grant Morrison,
13:Comics don't like to see other comics do well. ~ Carrot Top,
14:My mother wouldn't even let me read DC Comics. ~ Wes Craven,
15:Now we are living in the age of comics as air ~ Osamu Tezuka,
16:Creativity and Innovation produces better comics. ~ Jamal Igle,
17:Space does for comics what time does for film! ~ Scott McCloud,
18:You and what army of snaggled toothed wine sots? ~ Marvel Comics,
19:I hadn't read the Dr. Strange comics growing up. ~ Rachel McAdams,
20:I've been ready to die since before you was Born! ~ Marvel Comics,
21:I love to be able to support other women comics. ~ Rosie O Donnell,
22:Superfast beings shouldn't piss off the comics geek-girl. ~ Gini Koch,
23:People still go to Comic-Con because they love comics. ~ Rashida Jones,
24:Comics is a great medium to get a lot of stories out. ~ Sergio Aragones,
25:There is also a kind of mean-spiritedness with LA comics. ~ David Cross,
26:We, the comics that we like, we're all, like, post-humor. ~ Tim Heidecker,
27:I have 15,000 comics in a warehouse, all bagged individually. ~ Method Man,
28:I was a Marvel guy. I started reading comics when I was a kid. ~ Marc Webb,
29:I don't think I am a bible man, Alice--I love comics though. ~ Cameron Jace,
30:Hanging out with comics, all they did was make fun of me. ~ Gabriel Iglesias,
31:Comics just don't retire. They either die young or they go to 100. ~ Jeff Ross,
32:The comics are where all the crazy subconscious stuff comes out. ~ Robert Crumb,
33:Comics also led a lot of young people to science fiction. ~ Kerry James Marshall,
34:I'm not a big fan of the comics competing against each other. ~ Janeane Garofalo,
35:That's what I really wanted to do when I was 16, be in comics! ~ Annalena McAfee,
36:I read the comics long before I was ever involved with the films. ~ Shawn Ashmore,
37:Comics definitely embody the importance of practicing free speech. ~ Ted Alexandro,
38:If I die in a plane crash remember to always bag and board your comics. ~ Joe Hill,
39:I never really read comics. I bought them, and I would draw them. ~ Bobby Moynihan,
40:Jazz, rock and roll, movies and comics are the culture of America. ~ Bill Griffith,
41:The only people who like to live alone more than comics are priests. ~ Colin Quinn,
42:Comics seldom move me the way I would be moved by a novel or movie. ~ Daniel Clowes,
43:I just really respond to comics. I find it a really exciting medium. ~ Ellen Forney,
44:I think comics have far more potential than a lot of people realize. ~ Harvey Pekar,
45:The most successful comics are always the hardest-working ones. ~ Marcus Brigstocke,
46:At the end of the '60s, I was trying to enter the world of comics. ~ Sergio Aragones,
47:I love comic book movies, and Marvel Comics obviously are the best. ~ Maria Menounos,
48:I think comics have far more potential than a lot of people realize. ~ Harvey Pekar,
49:Read comics. All comics. And then cut them open to steal their power. ~ Warren Ellis,
50:I'm a comic geek, I love playing video games and I love reading comics. ~ Kellan Lutz,
51:I love comics, but I'd rather cut off my thumbs than do nothing but. ~ Molly Crabapple,
52:All through my comics career, I was always trying to reinvent the form. ~ Scott McCloud,
53:I didn't know the Green Lantern comics at all. I was a Superman reader. ~ Geoffrey Rush,
54:I'm a fan myself, so I try to write the kind of comics I want to read. ~ Grant Morrison,
55:I wasn't ever a huge fan of comics. Just not one of those kids, you know? ~ Gary Oldman,
56:I didn't read comics as a kid - though, obviously, I've read a lot since. ~ Henry Cavill,
57:Comics don't usually have very long careers, and I'm 22 years into this. ~ Jeff Foxworthy,
58:Comics is a language. It's a language most people understand intuitively. ~ Bill Griffith,
59:While many comics have a secret persona, I fundamentally want to be myself. ~ Dana Carvey,
60:Comics are words and pictures. You can do anything with words and pictures. ~ Harvey Pekar,
61:I still collect comics. I still have a great love and respect for the genre. ~ Thomas Jane,
62:Around comics, I've always been known for, oh, that's not dirty, this is dirty. ~ Bob Saget,
63:I'm not opposed to comics on the Internet. It's just not interesting to me. ~ Daniel Clowes,
64:It's definitely not the character who it is in the comics, I'll say that much. ~ James Gunn,
65:My brother is a comic-book writer, and I was always in love with comics. ~ Adrianne Palicki,
66:Well, don't tell Steve Niles but I just don't think horror works in comics. ~ Robert Kirkman,
67:Comics can definitely be subversive on the whole, but it's a stylistic thing. ~ Ted Alexandro,
68:The testosterone wafted off him like dirt off Pigpen from the Peanuts comics. ~ Susan Fanetti,
69:I never read comics as a kid. I guess I was lazy and watched cartoons instead. ~ Kirsten Dunst,
70:I'm in awe of comics that do things that I can't do, or haven't tried doing yet. ~ Brad Williams,
71:My two biggest influences are Archie comics and Dennis the Menace. ~ Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero,
72:As a boy, I devoured comics but never saw what we now describe as a picture book. ~ Anthony Browne,
73:If he ever got his hands on Scott, Jeremy would be drawing his comics from prison. ~ R G Alexander,
74:It seems to be a common denominator with a lot of comics, this low self-esteem thing. ~ Ray Romano,
75:The podcast movement was really a creative survival mechanism for standup comics. ~ Chris Hardwick,
76:I think theres too much saturated color in comics, thanks to digital color techniques. ~ Ted Naifeh,
77:Of course, I started really being a comics fan with the underground stuff in the '70s ~ Glenn Danzig,
78:The comics were not only stories to enjoy for me they were drawings that possessed me. ~ Jean Giraud,
79:comedians are people who say funny things, and comics are people who say things funny. ~ Staton Rabin,
80:Everything you see that makes you think about the comics, I think you should read into it. ~ Avi Arad,
81:I never read comics growing up. I didn't have money and I don't like to touch paper. ~ John McLaughlin,
82:I was told I make intelligent comics, and then I made a comic about a horse that pooped. ~ Kate Beaton,
83:If you look at Marvel Comics, there are very few Marvel characters I would like to write. ~ Garth Ennis,
84:We are, in the comics, the last frontier of good, wholesome family humor and entertainment. ~ Bil Keane,
85:I learned to read very early so I could read the comics, which I then started to draw. ~ Margaret Atwood,
86:Maybe the best comics are written by people who really are at ease in the comic world. ~ Terry Pratchett,
87:Deviants and losers and mutants and the loveless...were the proper readers of Marvel comics. ~ Rick Moody,
88:If comics are modern mythology, then black participation and representation is crucial. ~ Reginald Hudlin,
89:I have to confess I'm not a huge comics fan in the wider sense of comics as an art form. ~ Grant Morrison,
90:Like a lot of young people who wanted to be artists, comics were a gateway for me. ~ Kerry James Marshall,
91:A lot of comics just joke around, but it's just as important to get the truth out there. ~ Lisa Lampanelli,
92:Comic-Con is definitely grown from just being about comics to being about all forms of media. ~ Eric Wight,
93:The Pro (a creator-owned Eisner-nominated book for Image Comics, written by Garth Ennis). ~ Lynne M Thomas,
94:The reason I started to do comics for kids, the real reason is because it worked for me. ~ Francoise Mouly,
95:It's always fun when you see different comics at different weights or with different hair. ~ Hari Kondabolu,
96:I've done illustration on the side. But other than that, comics have been my main things. ~ Jaime Hernandez,
97:This gentleman is known the width and breadth of the comics world as "that bastard Klaw. ~ Michael Moorcock,
98:Comics are actually dubbed by euphemistic label of graphic novel, which became a big deal. ~ Francoise Mouly,
99:Comics have a caste system - an editor has to act in a certain way, an artist has to be humble. ~ Jack Kirby,
100:I never liked my own species. On why so many of his comics are about animals, in an interview. ~ Gary Larson,
101:It's important to continue to change and evolve in the way that the comics change and evolve. ~ David Hayter,
102:There's 54 years of X-Men comics by now, so there are a lot of characters to explore. ~ Lauren Shuler Donner,
103:I felt like I could never get enough of you even if I melted into you like snow on wet grass. ~ Marvel Comics,
104:In the sixties and seventies you could probably name all the great comics. It was still special. ~ Marc Maron,
105:I'd love to see more equal representation of female and male cartoonists on the comics page. ~ Cathy Guisewite,
106:I'm a world expert on superhero comics. I think maybe only Michael Chabon knows more than me. ~ Salman Rushdie,
107:Our hope is that the elementary reading of comics will lead to the joy of reading good books. ~ Nelson Mandela,
108:Comedy and terror and autobiography and comics and literature-they're all the same thing. To me. ~ Patton Oswalt,
109:Comics are drawings, not photographs, and as such they present a subjective view of reality. ~ Frederik L Schodt,
110:I love the medium and I love individual comics, but the business is nothing I would be proud of. ~ Daniel Clowes,
111:People have a hard time reading my comics. I think I leave things out, but I feel you should. ~ Brian Chippendale,
112:I think the best thing I learned from drawing comics is that it's a great exercise in concision. ~ Patrice Leconte,
113:What made me want to go into doing comics was I was working as a laborer with my father, a gardener. ~ Dan DeCarlo,
114:I think as time goes by you'll get female comics who are weirder - you'll get a female Mighty Boosh. ~ Jenny Eclair,
115:It wasn't until I discovered comics that I actually began to approach drawing as a possible career. ~ Scott McCloud,
116:One of the things about comics is people can linger on images and words as long as they want. ~ Kelly Sue DeConnick,
117:When anything doesn't hit with a huge laugh, as comics, it feels like, Oh no, oh no, we're sinking. ~ Tim Heidecker,
118:Adam didn’t read any comics at all. They never lived up to the kind of things he could do in his head. ~ Neil Gaiman,
119:I had no television when I was little, just a stack of old, beat-up comics from the 1950s and 1960s. ~ Daniel Clowes,
120:Really, though, I just want to make the kind of comics I wouldn't be embarrassed to read in public. ~ Jamie McKelvie,
121:In the comics, Supergirl is quite, um, buxom...so I hope people won't come to the film expecting that. ~ Helen Slater,
122:I've loved comics since I was a kid, collected them, I've always dreamed of being involved in comics. ~ Taika Waititi,
123:We're comic. We're all comics. We live in a comic time. And the worse it gets the more comic we are. ~ William Gaddis,
124:I don't think the potential for comics in nonfiction has been exploited nearly as much as it could be. ~ Scott McCloud,
125:I tend to only read comics written by friends or people I've known. And I'm not a great comic reader. ~ Grant Morrison,
126:A lot of the actresses who were around when I started, I don't know where they are. Comics stick around. ~ Margaret Cho,
127:Anyone can read comics, and if you don't it's perfectly okay to enjoy the characters in other mediums. ~ Krista Ritchie,
128:Comics is all about making it believable and helping people to get completely lost in a fictional world. ~ Dave Gibbons,
129:I'd been a fanatic of movies since I was a wee lad, so I got into the films before I got into the comics. ~ Josh Helman,
130:I have always loved Las Vegas. It's a traditional place for lounge comics to perform, and I love that. ~ Norm MacDonald,
131:Good comics gravitate to each other; you know who's your type of person by watching them onstage, hopefully. ~ B J Novak,
132:I'm just an actor who happened to love these [Marvel] comics when I was a kid, and got to rediscover them. ~ Clark Gregg,
133:I'm very distanced from the comics industry. I love the comics medium, but I have no time for the industry. ~ Alan Moore,
134:In comics at its best, words and pictures are like partners in a dancer and each one takes turns leading. ~ Scott McCloud,
135:I try to do things in comics that cannot be repeated by television, by movies, by interactive entertainment. ~ Alan Moore,
136:I've always said that I learned the English I know through two sources -- Marvel Comics and Finnegans Wake. ~ Umberto Eco,
137:When I was a kid, I would always say I would grow up and make comics. I was right about one of those things. ~ Tim Seeley,
138:I do get the comics online I guess but it's such a pain. I'd rather just get them in the paper and read them. ~ Drew Carey,
139:It's business, selling comics, you work out what sells and you don't want to muck about with it too much. ~ Eddie Campbell,
140:Then I abandoned comics for fine art because I had some romantic vision of being like Vincent Van Gogh Jr. ~ Bill Griffith,
141:The main way I start to allocate color is that it comes from the comics. That's where it all starts from. ~ Alexandra Byrne,
142:I feel like I understood the language of comics. I had a real fluidity with that medium at a very early age. ~ Daniel Clowes,
143:I never go perform somewhere alone. I've done that since day one. I've always taken other comics with me. ~ Gabriel Iglesias,
144:If you’ve read any comics, you know superheroes have a critical vulnerability: the society they protect. ~ Karen Marie Moning,
145:There are really funny alternative comics and really funny straight comics who write and perform traditionally. ~ David Cross,
146:HEY, KIDS! TAKE YOUR DICKS OUT OF THE PLAYSTATION THREE FOR ONE GOD DAMN MINUTE AND READ SOME FUCKING COMICS. ~ James Kochalka,
147:I was cast in 'Thor' back in 2009, so it sort of took me out of the running for anything tied to DC Comics. ~ Jaimie Alexander,
148:There were very few women comics when I started out doing stand-up. But I always saw that as a great advantage. ~ Carol Leifer,
149:Comics can do any kind of story. It's words and pictures, the only things it can't do are sing and dance. ~ Sean Michael Wilson,
150:If a little dreaming is dangerous, the cure for it is not to dream less but to dream more, to dream all the time ~ Marvel Comics,
151:In comedy timing is everything, but Betty White is the rarest of comics who seems to have mastered time itself. ~ Brian Williams,
152:I was into comics because these were my real male role models, even though at the time, I didn't know it. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
153:There are 10-20 times more male comics than female comics; it's something to do with the social structure of society. ~ Jo Brand,
154:Bring you comics in bed, scrape the mold off the bread, and serve you French toast again. Okay, I still get stoned. ~ Sheryl Crow,
155:The funniest jokes you know aren't from comics but relatives, friends - from your life. That's the funniest stuff. ~ Dick Gregory,
156:To the folks asking how they can become a comics writer if Marvel doesn't accept submissions... YOU WRITE COMICS!! ~ C B Cebulski,
157:Comics, for me, is being able to sing alone in the shower. I find it freeing. You just pick up a pen and get to it. ~ Shia LaBeouf,
158:I like collecting comics, I like buying comics, I like looking at comics, but I also read comics on digital readers. ~ Geoff Johns,
159:Not everyone reads comics, although most people know the major superheroes, but the majority of people play video games. ~ Jim Lee,
160:Publishing the lyric books, poetry or comics of other musicians I know. That's the thing I really want to break into! ~ Frank Iero,
161:These days, you don't just break into comics once. You have to break in again and again after each job is finished. ~ C B Cebulski,
162:You couldn't have small, dying children in a movie without really bringing everyone down, but you can in comics. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
163:Comics are stories; they're like novels or anything else. So the first thing you have to do is become a good storyteller. ~ Stan Lee,
164:I'm basically stubborn. If anyone disapproved of my being influenced by comics, I simply ignored them. ~ Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero,
165:I wouldn't necessarily have been making books about how to make comics if I'd really felt I knew how to make comics. ~ Scott McCloud,
166:We don't apologize for a joke. We are comics. We are here to make you laugh. If you don't get it, then don't watch us. ~ Joan Rivers,
167:Comedy is a great tool. We [comics] are trying to find ways to use humor to enlighten people without preaching to them. ~ Trevor Noah,
168:Scott Adams: From him, I learned how to write a three-panel comic. Probably the best pure writer on the comics page. ~ Stephan Pastis,
169:Comedy is a socially acceptable form of hostility and aggression. That is what comics do, stand the world upside down. ~ George Carlin,
170:I felt the comics grew because they became the common man's literature, the common man's art, the common man's publishing. ~ Jack Kirby,
171:Some people are worried about the future of comics and some people are busy building it. That latter group are my heroes. ~ Gail Simone,
172:I collect Wonder Woman - from comics to paraphernalia, and I even have a tattoo of her on my back. I'm a huge Wonder Woman fan! ~ Lights,
173:Comics are an international language, they can cross boundaries and generations. Comics are a bridge between all cultures. ~ Osamu Tezuka,
174:I enjoy the fact that we have these mobile comics now, which are sort of a cross between a comic book and an animated cartoon. ~ Stan Lee,
175:I had a publisher who felt comics were just for little kiddies, so he never wanted me to use words of more than two syllables. ~ Stan Lee,
176:I was not a giant comic book fan as a kid, but to the extent that I did read comics, Spider-Man was always my favorite guy. ~ J K Simmons,
177:I'm a joke comic. I tell jokes. I like writing a joke, and I like when a joke works, and I like other comics who tell jokes. ~ Dave Attell,
178:Children did not abandon comics; comics, in their drive to attain respect and artistic accomplishment, abandoned children. ~ Michael Chabon,
179:Everybody that loves Nancy loves it in a slightly condescending way. Nancy is comics reduced to their most elemental level. ~ Bill Griffith,
180:There's the shared imagery between hip-hop and comics, with some producers and emcees taking on super hero personas. ~ Ali Shaheed Muhammad,
181:Today, comics is one of the very few forms of mass communication in which individual voices still have a chance to be heard. ~ Scott McCloud,
182:And that's why people read comics, to get away from the way life works, which is quite cruel and unheroic and ends in death. ~ Grant Morrison,
183:When you combine the great stories from the comics with the action and visual excitement of the movies, it doesn't get any better! ~ Stan Lee,
184:When I was a kid, I read comics. But when I saw how funny it was, and how wonderfully absurd, I said, "You know, I gotta do this." ~ Adam West,
185:I always drew. I don't remember a time when I didn't draw. And I actually drew comics from the age of maybe ten through twelve. ~ Trina Robbins,
186:If you’re just getting into the comics, start with Runaways, a series about teenagers who discover their parents are supervillains. ~ Sam Maggs,
187:The people who worked in comics were terrific guys. I had a good association with them, and I enjoyed comics for that very reason. ~ Jack Kirby,
188:Because we're comics and we pass each other on campus, we know of each other, and a lot of the time there's a mutual respect there. ~ Marc Maron,
189:In comics, collaboration saves your life. How well you can work with an artist, a colorist, a letterer, is how good your comic is. ~ Neil Gaiman,
190:When I was writing songs, I always thought I'd make more of a career out of the drawings, the comics even more than the music. ~ Daniel Johnston,
191:A nice, easy place for freedom of speech to be eroded is comics, because comics are a natural target whenever an election comes up. ~ Neil Gaiman,
192:Comics are a particularly esoteric field where you really learn how to do it, by doing it or by learning from other practitioners. ~ Dave Gibbons,
193:I am into belly dancing. I used to only hang with comics. Now I have friends who are dancers, and my whole house has a harem feel. ~ Margaret Cho,
194:I have worked with a great many comedians as opposed to comics, although I have worked with comics as well, I make the distinction. ~ Bobby Darin,
195:I've always been very forward-looking, and it was actually kind of difficult to turn my gaze backwards to look at comics history. ~ Scott McCloud,
196:would listen to the radio on Sundays as the announcer read the comics aloud, and he would follow along on his own until he had ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
197:Then I read Greg Rucka’s run on Detective Comics – when Batwoman had the lead role – and discovered the art of J.H. Williams III. ~ Lynne M Thomas,
198:There's no rap against comics that isn't true. They were sexist, they were racist, you name it - and they kind of gloried in that. ~ Jules Feiffer,
199:The way I process things, they way I express myself, is in comics, just as poets process things that they are trying to understand. ~ Ellen Forney,
200:Through traditional realism, the comics artist can portray the world without--

--and through the cartoon, the world within. ~ Scott McCloud,
201:Comics seemed to have a handle on things. They could sort of disarm and get control over reality. I found it very comforting to laugh. ~ Marc Maron,
202:It's Christmas! You just got your Hogwarts acceptance letter, a copy of Action Comics #1, and a brand new car that runs on water! ~ Leah Rae Miller,
203:One similarity I see between peers and some of the people who read my books is that comics were definitely an outlet for us. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
204:There's a lot of guy comics who I think are funny, but I generally am more excited about a special or a show where there are females. ~ Margaret Cho,
205:The comics I hate are thieves. Nothing's more disgusting than a guy who steals another person's ideas and tries to claim them as his own. ~ Joe Rogan,
206:I love getting on You Tube to look at the old comics. I am in my element seeing guys like Jack Benny and Phil Silvers give interviews. ~ Bruce Forsyth,
207:It wasn’t until I became best friends with some fellow comics and performers that I realized being an introvert wasn’t a character flaw. ~ Amy Schumer,
208:My first work in comics had an Adult theme and I had to create a nom du plume to separate that work and my Children's entertainment. ~ Holly Golightly,
209:I have yet to see one of those Comedy Central shows with multiple standup comics that doesn't include someone the size of the Hindenburg. ~ Dick Cavett,
210:I stopped doing comics because I found the pressure really high to nail it every time. It's really difficult to be creative all the time. ~ Kate Beaton,
211:It's just an easy catchall to describe a style because there are a lot of alternative comics who are completely different from each other. ~ David Cross,
212:I wanted to create comics as soon as a I learned humans were behind them, that they were not natural phenomena like trees and boulders. ~ Art Spiegelman,
213:My wife and I take what we call our Friday comedy day off. We watch standup comics on TV. The raunchier the better. We love Eddie Izzard. ~ Gene Hackman,
214:All comics want to be musicians. There's a part of me that wants to be a serious musician. I love songs about heartache and heartbreak. ~ Sarah Silverman,
215:The anomaly is that, as a publishing venture, comics are not doing very well. As a venture that supplies other media, they're incredible. ~ Dennis O Neil,
216:There's a Marvel superhero called Black Bolt & his real name is Blackagar Boltagon & that really tells you a lot about superhero comics. ~ Jamie McKelvie,
217:The graphic style itself is influenced by a lot of very layered and detailed comics that I read as a kid, like Vagabond by Takehiko Inoue. ~ Toyin Odutola,
218:Comedy is a blood sport. It flays the truth and spurts twisted logic. In America, people become comics because we don't have bullfighting. ~ Elayne Boosler,
219:Comics were a place where captivating images lit your imagination and showed you that you can create new kinds of people and worlds. ~ Kerry James Marshall,
220:There's so much I want to do. I love emotions, I love drama, I love comedy and I also want to take action up to another level, I love comics. ~ Gina Carano,
221:That pompous phrase (graphic novel) was thought up by some idiot in the marketing department of DC. I prefer to call them Big Expensive Comics. ~ Alan Moore,
222:There were never that many women stand-up comics in the past because the power to make people laugh is also a power that gets people upset. ~ Gloria Steinem,
223:When you open box after box of old comics and they're ALL "Archie," you have suffered a trauma from which it is difficult to ever recover. ~ John McLaughlin,
224:Women, it seemed, were obliged to be thick-skinned about their own rapes, while comics remained too thin-skinned to handle even mild criticism. ~ Lindy West,
225:I've never done anything half-heartedly. It's the reason my comics did well. It's the reason my comics were drawn well. I can't do anything bad. ~ Jack Kirby,
226:With comics, you always talk about a big break, but there are a lot of big breaks in your life and not one of them makes a big difference. ~ Anthony Jeselnik,
227:If you want to draw comics, you really have to love to draw, as you will be spending many hours sitting down with a pencil or pen in your hand. ~ Dave Gibbons,
228:I hate stand-up comics; I think funny is something you are, not something you desperately try to be in front of a roomful of obnoxious people. ~ Peter Cameron,
229:Superstar comics artist Amanda Conner (Harley Quinn) even got her start in comics art by submitting outfit ideas to Katy’s 1980s reboot. Katy ~ Hope Nicholson,
230:When I was a kid, I read many more Marvel comics than I did DC. As I got older, in high school and then in college, I started reading more DC. ~ David S Goyer,
231:Women, it seemed, were obliged to be thick-skinned about their own rapes, while comics remained too thin-skinned to handle even mild criticism. I ~ Lindy West,
232:Don't be a jerk to other comics and don't let the business beat you down, stay positive and if you work your ass off you're going to get somewhere. ~ Bill Burr,
233:The ancestors of printed comics drew, painted and carved their time-paths from beginning to end, without interruption, ... the infinite canvas. ~ Scott McCloud,
234:A lot of superhero stuff now looks great but it's so difficult to read if you don't know how to read comics. I deliberately focus on the story. ~ Jamie McKelvie,
235:Comics know that time plus pain equals humor and that we can redeem even awful moments from the past by translating them into a shared experience. ~ Gina Barreca,
236:There's a very big part of me that just wants to take all of comics history and toss it on the bonfire. I'd sort of like to get on to the future. ~ Scott McCloud,
237:If you don't have that empty white space around everything in the comics, the border of the page, then it feels like you're a little claustrophobic. ~ Ed Brubaker,
238:I think it's the fact that I do something different and that I actually have some success with it. That bothers a lot of people... especially comics. ~ Carrot Top,
239:I think they [Judy Blume comics] are so different from the Dr. Strange ones are so different from the other, from the other comics which is nice. ~ Rachel McAdams,
240:Too many comics today ramble. By the time they get to the punch line, the audience has either gone to sleep, gone to the bathroom or gone to bed. ~ Phyllis Diller,
241:Comics? Honestly, that's more a matter of nostalgia for me. I think most of that energy has gone to my love of literature, and my love of film... ~ Jonathan Lethem,
242:When you get into making movies, then the physical mundane reality of life must be presented. But in comics you can jack it up and work in shorthand. ~ Walter Hill,
243:Playing video games and making comics didn’t look like raw materials for success. In fact, what we were doing looked very similar to fucking around. ~ Jerry Holkins,
244:Mike Holmes is insanely talented and his work bristles with the kind of humanity and insight that is rare in comics – or in humans, for that matter. ~ Tom Scharpling,
245:I love comics. All I've been doing is reading every day, sitting in the house. Because I've not been feeling too good, so I've been reading and reading. ~ Jason Mewes,
246:I think that superhero comics in particular are really useful for talking about big emotions and feelings, and personifying and concretizing symbols. ~ Grant Morrison,
247:What is there to say about ChUC other than it's a comedy show done the right way in the right space. Fantastic comics, welcoming audience. Always great. ~ Kyle Kinane,
248:So I'm happiest when I'm working with artists and writers, and involved in stories, whether we're talking about animation or movies or comics or television. ~ Stan Lee,
249:Certainly, my many years working in the comics industry, creating products that I do not own, has made me rather fierce on the subject of giving up rights. ~ Alan Moore,
250:When you're drawing comics, you get very involved in how the story is going to develop and you spend more time daydreaming on that particular subject. ~ Sergio Aragones,
251:I wasn't terribly aware of Catwoman. She was a DC comics character and as a kid, I wasn't terribly fond of the DC comics characters. I was a Marvel boy. ~ Benjamin Bratt,
252:My monsters were lovable monsters. I gave them names - some were evil and some were good. They made sales, and that's always been my prime object in comics. ~ Jack Kirby,
253:I have always loved horror very much. I used to write stories for DC's House of Mystery. It was one of my first jobs writing for comics, and I loved it. ~ Sergio Aragones,
254:The misconception is that standup comics are always on. I don't know any really funny comics that are annoying and constantly trying to be funny all the time. ~ Joe Rogan,
255:Black comics, they only watch Black comedians. You're a comedian; you're not just a Black comedian. You're a comedian. I try to get that through to everybody. ~ Chris Rock,
256:I never think there's any competition between films. I root for everybody's films. I especially have a fond place in my heart for graphic novels and comics. ~ Bruce Willis,
257:Marvel Comics announced that the next Captain America will be black. He has the same powers as white Captain America, except he has to show I.D. when he votes. ~ Bill Maher,
258:They are not testing comics for drugs. If our job is dependent on that, there would be three working comics in the country, and two of them would have puppets. ~ Marc Maron,
259:Comics write to their point of view. If you're an exceedingly irreverent comedian, you've got to see where that point of view fits or produces the most funny. ~ Jim Gaffigan,
260:I'm excited for the new crop of gay comics who have never been closeted, who never thought that they needed to put on a dress to tell a joke, and it's exciting. ~ Guy Branum,
261:My father was very funny, so I grew up with humor in the house. And I was always really attracted to comedies on TV. I was always really attracted to comics. ~ Susan Stroman,
262:The German and the Brazilian market is small. When we went to France they know a lot more, than just the American comics. The audience there was much different. ~ Gabriel Ba,
263:I got into underground comics fairly early on and kind of wandered away from the superhero stuff, but I was an art student and I was drawing a lot as a kid. ~ Jonathan Lethem,
264:Nobody ever asked me to do anything. Nobody knew what to do. When comics were brand new, nobody knew what kind of comics to make. So you were mostly on your own. ~ Jack Kirby,
265:I hated teenagers in comics because they were always sidekicks. And I always felt if I were a superhero, there's no way I'd pal around with some teenager, you know. ~ Stan Lee,
266:I think that all comics or humorists, or whatever we are, ask questions. That's what we're supposed to do. But I not only ask the questions, I offer solutions. ~ Roseanne Barr,
267:Seriously. Books like these, they want you to conform to their style. You don’t want to have to go make comics for a company that will control your work. ~ Jarrett J Krosoczka,
268:There's a punk rock quality to Peter Parker, that I identified with when I read the comics [Spider-Man], and that I really liked. He has this chip on his shoulder. ~ Marc Webb,
269:I was born in Detroit. I never really saw myself working in comics, I just fell into it. But it's been one of the best things to happen to a kid from Detroit. ~ Dwayne McDuffie,
270:The main difference between illustration and comics is that comics are much, much more work. Every comics page is the equivalent of six to nine illustrations. ~ Molly Crabapple,
271:It got to the point in the late 70s and early 80s that I was spending so much money buying golden age comics that I could only justify it if I got work in the media. ~ Bill Mumy,
272:We grew out of the superhero comics, but we still liked comics, so we started putting our own experiences in the stories we were doing for our own amusement. ~ Gilberto Hernandez,
273:What do the best stand-up comics have in common? They’re driven by obsession. The obsession with continuously refining a small thing can be a quest of its own. ~ Chris Guillebeau,
274:I can't think I had much of a sense of humor as long as I remained the only child. When my brother Edward came along we both became comics, making each other laugh. ~ Eudora Welty,
275:Talking about my personal life onstage, I've realized I'm not one of those comics who can do that. I can allude to it but I don't want to be a confessional performer. ~ David Rees,
276:Comics are so full of amazing work. And I can’t look at a drawing of a woman without thinking of, for instance, Wallace Wood and his amazing way of capturing beauty. ~ Frank Miller,
277:When I first got the audition for Shado, I went online and subscribed to DC Comics and read a bunch on Shado and the Yakuza, just to get to know her character better. ~ Celina Jade,
278:I've learned a heck of a lot this way [making Dark Tower comics]. I've also learned a lot from the editors at Marvel, who are always an equal part in the creative team. ~ Robin Furth,
279:I didn't read comics, growing up. I watched a lot of movies, and those were my comic books. And then, my exposure really increased by becoming affiliated with Spider-Man. ~ Emma Stone,
280:I don't care how people read their comics, I want them to read comics. I don't care if they read them on an iPad or a phone or in store, I just want them to read comics. ~ Geoff Johns,
281:I've seen too many comics who got their own shows and were undone because they worked for an executive producer who didn't understand their comedy or their sensibility. ~ Carol Leifer,
282:There are comics who treat women fairly appallingly. But I can be great friends with them because I don't tend to do that ticking of boxes: it can make life too simplistic. ~ Jo Brand,
283:When people say 'What are underground comics?' I think the best way you can define them is just the absolute freedom involved... we didn't have anyone standing over us. ~ Robert Crumb,
284:I really believe in the power of comics as an educational thing, even ones as silly as mine, because they're a gateway to the actual thing. They're like an easy entrance. ~ Kate Beaton,
285:I tried to get into comics initially after I graduated Clemson in 1994. I spent a year trying to get in, and I quit reading books because not getting in made me sad. ~ Jonathan Hickman,
286:Your days of villainy are over, Nightmare."
She scoffed. "You sound like you've read too many comics."
"You sound like you think that's a bad thing," he retorted. ~ Marissa Meyer,
287:I grew up reading comics. I was primarily an 'X-Men' fan, but I definitely dressed up as Spider-Man for Halloween when I was, like, 12 years old. Maybe younger than that. ~ Jake Epstein,
288:There's two theories to arguing with a woman. Neither one works. Will Rogers The reason that there are so few women comics is that so few women can bear being laughed at. ~ Anna Russell,
289:The reason I love comics more than anything else is that the longest story will be just a few pages. With a novel, it takes so many pages to get to one thing happening. ~ Sergio Aragones,
290:I'm 44 now and have been working in comics for most of my adult life. I've been blessed to have had the career that I've had and worked with the many awesome creators I have. ~ Jamal Igle,
291:I must have been 3 years old or less, and I remember paging through these comics, trying to figure out the stories. I couldn't read the words, so I made up my own stories. ~ Daniel Clowes,
292:In the world of late-night comics, Letterman made us feel any hometown boy from Indianapolis could poke fun at celebrities and politicians and do it right to their faces. ~ Chris Matthews,
293:Someone told me that there's a connection to Superman, that in an early edition of the Green Lantern comics, Tomar Re was the envoy to Krypton. That was fascinating to me. ~ Geoffrey Rush,
294:The fundament of a superhero is the guy in tights saving innocent people from bad things. It's amazing how infrequently that seems to happen in superhero comics these days. ~ Frank Miller,
295:The idea that comics stores, distributors and publishers simply 'give the customers what they want' is nonsense. What the customers wanted they didn't get - and they left. ~ Scott McCloud,
296:if male comics want to play the “offended” game, I can’t think of anything more embarrassingly pee-pants than throwing a tantrum because someone didn’t like your fucking joke.) ~ Anonymous,
297:I have a very low tolerance for animation. I'm used to the perfect integrity you get from drawing your own comics. There's something about that that animation always loses. ~ Daniel Clowes,
298:Comics as art. I do comics as comics, and my opportunity to tell stories. Simple. Basic. Let the characters have the excitement, not the package. That's where I come from. ~ Jaime Hernandez,
299:I remember being in a comic shop with my son, with my ten year-old son and he put his hand over my eyes. He was embarrassed about me seeing the comics at Forbidden Planet. ~ Francoise Mouly,
300:To me it's so much like Spaced in that way. Um, which I love so much, so I think fans of that and fans of the comics are going to really see that up on the screen. ~ Mary Elizabeth Winstead,
301:In the comics, it always seems like they are trying to save
the world. It seemed like one should try to make the world a better place because the
inverse makes no sense. ~ Ashlee Vance,
302:I've never done a comedy club in my life. It's weird because I don't have the same background as most comics. I don't have a history of going up and only doing eight minutes. ~ Billy Connolly,
303:The one thing you don't want to be is a sucky clean comic. I hate sucky clean comics! It's like Christian rock, bro. I'd rather listen to gospel and Christian rock. That's cheating! ~ Godfrey,
304:Your stage persona is usually a version of yourself, to varying degrees. Some folks do a full-on character, so that's different. But most comics do some version of themselves. ~ Ted Alexandro,
305:I'm in a comic book now. That was cool. That's something that I'm still sorta reeling about, 'cause I read comics as a kid. Someone drew me, and actually did a pretty good job! ~ Rutina Wesley,
306:Some comics don't like it when people talk during the set, and it does get a little bit annoying after awhile, but I basically let people dictate what jokes I'm going to do. ~ Gabriel Iglesias,
307:I have this certain vision of the way I want my comics to look; this sort of photographic realism, but with a certain abstraction that comics can give. It's kind of a fine line. ~ Daniel Clowes,
308:I'm going to take over on the Techno Comics so I'm going to be dealing in the children's merchandising type department. But that's just setting it up and having somebody run it. ~ Majel Barrett,
309:Write comic books if you love comic books so much that you want to write them. Don't write them like movies. Comics can do a lot of things that movies can't do, and vice versa. ~ Grant Morrison,
310:I was very influenced by comics. The drawing style, definitely, I was interested in. My style of drawing is largely a comic style, but it's also much more obvious than comics. ~ Raymond Pettibon,
311:Some comics really thrive on being disrespectful, especially toward women, and it's somehow understood as edgy, but I'm the opposite. I've never liked curse words for that reason. ~ Bryan Callen,
312:Gary Larson: The funniest cartoonist I’ve ever seen. His two-volume set (The Complete Far Side) should be the textbook in any course taught on how to be funny on the comics page. ~ Stephan Pastis,
313:In the history of comics and movies and music too, it's always when things are at their bottomed-out, either creatively or financially, there's more chance-taking going on. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
314:I think all comics borrow from each other. Only a few have an original voice, and I wasn't one of them. In the end, I couldn't figure out who to steal from, so I stopped doing it. ~ Steve Buscemi,
315:I was an 'Ironman' fan. It was in the '70s. I definitely liked comics and drew a lot of panels on my notebook when I should have been studying - probably why I ended up in the arts. ~ Clark Gregg,
316:My perfect night would be going out to an awesome restaurant, then heading over to the Comedy Cellar to hang out with other comics, drinking beers and making fun of each other. ~ Anthony Jeselnik,
317:Self-publishing is still my basic recommendation to anyone wanting to do comics. Do it. Do it until you get good. Do it after you get good. It's good for your spirit as a creator. ~ Kieron Gillen,
318:When I started out, some women comics were jealous of other women comics, thinking, "If she gets "The Tonight Show," I can't." My philosophy always was, "If she did, I can too." ~ Rosie O Donnell,
319:Besides, if comics have taught us anything, it's that death is rarely a permanent condition."
"But we're not superheroes," May argued.
"Speak for yourself," Jackdaw told her. ~ Cherie Priest,
320:Just looking at pictures used to be considered cheating. No longer. The graphic novel is booming. Comics, heavily illustrated texts, books with no words are now accepted as reading. ~ Jon Scieszka,
321:Stories were my passion, whether they were from books, comics or cartoons. I learned them all by heart and was as familiar with the characters as if they were members of my own family. ~ Paul Dini,
322:I used to write bits and pieces of comedy material for various comics that were at the Windmill... as well as my film job, I was under contract, I was allowed to do that and everything. ~ Val Guest,
323:I went to an art school in Brooklyn and painted Fine Art, if thats what youd call it for eight years in New York, until I saw the first underground comics in the East Village Other. ~ Bill Griffith,
324:There are very few comics that understand about exciting the crowd, and that's what I always prided myself on: giving a more confident macho attitude towards delivering material. ~ Andrew Dice Clay,
325:I'd say, don't listen to what anyone says: you're good. Go put your anorak on. Get your thick bottle-top specs. Draw your little cartoons and your comics and keep writing to the BBC. ~ Peter Capaldi,
326:I wanted to reinvent horror comics. I felt like it was my mission to open people's eyes to the fact that horror comics could be so much more than the popular perception of them. ~ Stephen R Bissette,
327:I did auditions at a club called the Comedy Connection. They wanted nothing to do with me. But one night they were doing a night of all women comics, and they invited me to do that. ~ Paula Poundstone,
328:I think those with knowledge of the comics may expect things that will not be happening in the movies. Those who don't know what has happened in the comics will be shocked at what we do. ~ Kevin Feige,
329:It was an unwritten law that black comics were not permitted to work white nightclubs. You could sing and you could dance, but you couldn't stand flat-footed and talk; that was a no-no. ~ Dick Gregory,
330:The scene reminded Lita of a Marvel Comics movie where the hero tries to blend in among mortals, but is so obviously everyone’s savior. Her savior. If he would only allow himself to be. ~ Tessa Bailey,
331:We thought everybody read comics. We didn't know we were weird. We didn't know people that collected comics were strange. It was as normal as listening to rock music on the radio. ~ Gilberto Hernandez,
332:He has no interest in comics. He doesn’t understand the difference between serious graphic novels and Saturday-morning cartoons with wide-eyed tweetybirds and floppy-limbed cats. ~ Emily St John Mandel,
333:I know a lot of people that still buy comics, go to the shop every week, I know people who read them on an iPad. My brother reads on an iPad every week, he downloads his comics every week. ~ Geoff Johns,
334:A study last year showed that the page you turn to first in the newspaper can be a predictor of how long you will live. No surprise, turning first to the Comics Pages prolongs your life. ~ Elayne Boosler,
335:For the record,” I interject, “I don’t agree with Lo. I’m not a comic book elitist.” Anyone can read comics, and if you don’t it’s perfectly okay to enjoy the characters in other mediums. ~ Krista Ritchie,
336:Growing up devouring horror comics and novels, and being inspired to become a writer because of horror novels, movies, and comic books, I always knew I was going to write a horror novel. ~ Colson Whitehead,
337:I remember 9/11; we had 'Comics Come Home' about a month after those events. That night, even the comedians were concerned. Would the audience be ready to laugh? It was a release for everyone. ~ Denis Leary,
338:Clary had demanded that Simon accompany her to her bridesmaid's dress fitting so afterwards they could shop for comics and she can feel, in her words, like "less of a frilled-up girly-girl. ~ Cassandra Clare,
339:Regular panelists on shows can be terrifying. They own that space, and many guest comics suspect they are favoured in the edit, while their own hilarious jokes end up being ejected into the ether. ~ Jo Brand,
340:So many of these comics are just frustrated singers or actors - they want to get a gig doing a sitcom. It's paint-by-the-numbers comedy, lame joke-telling. They're drawn to it as a career move. ~ Sam Kinison,
341:If a good cartoonist can make a living making his comics, he'll continue to do that; the lesser insincere cartoonist that gets a lot of press will fall by the wayside eventually. ~ Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero,
342:Comics, a lot of them, are really depressed people, and I happen to be somebody that does have a lot of confidence. That's the odd thing about my stand-up. I am very confident. I always was. ~ Andrew Dice Clay,
343:Comics were going down for the second time and here, all of a sudden, came this thing and for the next fifteen years, romance comics were about the top sellers in the field; they outsold everything. ~ Gil Kane,
344:Most - and I mean maybe 99% or more - graphic novels are simply fat comicbooks. The term is a bogus, cocked-up concept some marketing whizkid conceived to get comics on the shelves of bookstores. ~ Jim Steranko,
345:Most of the comics that I talk to I've never talked to for more than ten minutes ever. So 95 percent of the time you're really hearing the first conversation between me and that guy on the podcast. ~ Marc Maron,
346:[Comics] were viewed as the literary equivalent of bubblegum cards, meant to be poked into the spokes of a young mind where they would produce a satisfying but entirely bogus rumble of pleasure. ~ Michael Chabon,
347:I don't think comics necessarily think in literary terms. There is an element of developing your stage persona and your comedic voice, but I don't think comics see it like a character in a novel. ~ Ted Alexandro,
348:That's why when I talk to younger comics, and they say, 'Well I need this and this, and I need so and so,' I tell them they don't need nothing. All you need is some great idea and go shoot it. ~ Donnell Rawlings,
349:The whole idea of comedy, there is nothing normal about going up on stage to make strangers laugh. But I'm also not an exhibitionist like other comics. I'm not up there talking about masturbating. ~ Jim Gaffigan,
350:When I was nine years old I use to copy ( not trace ) the covers of the Donald Duck comics. Many years later I became a close friend of Jack Hannah, the director of the Donald Duck film shorts. ~ William Jackson,
351:The Joker as sadistic chaos, the Batman as merciless order. This mirror-image theme would come to define the two characters' relationship in the comics and across all media for the next forty years. ~ Glen Weldon,
352:When I was growing up in comedy, there were maybe 10 comics in the whole country. Everyone had a day job. You worked free for years in little clubs, then you got your big break and became a star. ~ Elayne Boosler,
353:I do enjoy them. I get to meet the next generation of comics and help them out. Big comics doing small shows was something that used to happen a lot more back in the day. I wish there was more of that. ~ Bill Burr,
354:When I was in the business as a young performer, it was a recognised fact that when you got to 60 you were out, because there'd be a new crop of comics coming up all the time, every 10 years or so. ~ Bruce Forsyth,
355:I confess I didn't read the 'Green Arrow' comics before coming to play Shado. The comic books are not as easily accessible in Hong Kong as they are in the States. I do enjoy superhero fiction, though. ~ Celina Jade,
356:I do know that people enjoy reading a comic book and saving it and collecting the comics. And sharing them and trading them with friends. That may be something you can't do as easily with digital comics. ~ Stan Lee,
357:Whether I'm doing music or I'm walking down the street or I'm in a record store buying a record or I walk into a comic store and I'm buying comics or having a drink with my friends, it's the same me. ~ Glenn Danzig,
358:I've been reading Ed Brubaker comics since the first appearance of Ed Brubaker comics and every single time he announces a new title I mutter to myself: ugh! I wish I would've thought of that! ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
359:Like most comics, I tried to come up with a sitcom idea that was based around my life. And it didn't work out. But maybe because it didn't work out, that's why I ended up on 'Breaking Bad;' I don't know. ~ Bill Burr,
360:I have a suspicion - I have to be careful what I say - that you might actually find the best comics actually written by people who are comics writers and who aren't setting out to do graphic novels. ~ Terry Pratchett,
361:Once there was a time when more girls than boys read comics, a time when comics for girls sold in the millions, outnumbering every other kind of comic book.
And it all started with Archie. ~ Trina Robbins,
362:With comics it's very close, like, "I don't want to say anything onstage that I wouldn't say offstage." Or vice versa. I say "faggot" in my special and in the joke I am the faggot, if that makes sense. ~ Neal Brennan,
363:The world is full of terrible things, including rape, and it is okay to joke about them. But the best comics use their art to call bullshit on those terrible parts of life and make them better, not worse. ~ Lindy West,
364:Whereas there are lots of good novels out there; there are a few good movies out there. People have been writing great poems for years, but there aren't a lot of good comics. I like trying to write them. ~ Neil Gaiman,
365:I have read countless comics books while listening to hip hop, and as a young one, I wasted countless hours practicing nunchuks to Schoolly D's "Saturday Night." I would give anything for a video of that. ~ Axel Alonso,
366:I started a radio show where I interviewed comics. And I interviewed Leno and Seinfeld and John Candy and Father Guido Sarducci and Garry Shandling, all when I was 16. And they kind of told me what to do. ~ Judd Apatow,
367:The comics medium has some unusual features that do make it very different, in that it's combining a verbal narrative with a visual one that allows for much richer possibilities of transmitting information. ~ Alan Moore,
368:It's a measure of how far I've come that I didn't bother to say, "This is impossible."

I'd gotten the hang of it now.

-Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere (comics adaptation by Mike Carey and Glenn Fabry) ~ Mike Carey,
369:I've always loved comic books. As a kid, I used to read cowboy stories and historical comics about other worlds, unknown places that would take me out of myself and which helped to develop my imagination. ~ James Herbert,
370:In today's America He (Jesus) has moved from the central figure of world history to source material for late-night comics and pundits who would not dare treat other religious leaders with such disrespect. ~ David Jeremiah,
371:I think most other comics are like, 'I'm going to do my fkin' act and that'll be that.' With me, it's like, 'What if I forget my jokes? What if I can't pull it together? This is going to be a fking disaster!' ~ Marc Maron,
372:Male comics are always coming up to me and they're like 'Hey Natasha. Don't you think you're a little attractive to be a comedian?' and I'm like 'Don't you think you're a little ugly to be talking to me?' ~ Natasha Leggero,
373:There is a visual narrative that is implicitly understandable even when you don't understand the words and in a good comic, and they are hard to find, but good comics have parallel intertwined narratives. ~ Francoise Mouly,
374:A lot of comics claimed to be political comedians when George W. Bush was in office just by calling him an idiot. For me, Obama is actually more interesting comically, because not everybody can figure it out. ~ W Kamau Bell,
375:Here's a tip for all you aspiring young comics: Don't beat up the customers. It is very difficult to get laughs from an audience when you've actually drawn blood from one of their number. It kills the mood. ~ Craig Ferguson,
376:I don't want you to think that I'm up late reading a stack of Spider-Man comics and eating a tray of lemon cookies while sucking my thumb. I'm not doing that. But I am loyal to the influences of my childhood. ~ Nicolas Cage,
377:One of my favorite comics is Love and Rockets by the Hernandez Brothers. They do such a wonderful job of showing you how the character of Maggie ages and really doesn't present that with any kind of judgment. ~ Cliff Chiang,
378:The reason I love comics is that they DON'T move, and there is NO sound. As a creator I have to evoke those elements in the drawings and writing, and the reader has to create those elements in their own minds. ~ Dave McKean,
379:There's quite an overlap between musicians - especially drummers - who have an affection and a proclivity towards comedy and comedians who fantasize about being in a band. And a lot of comics play instruments. ~ David Cross,
380:Back when Jerry Seinfeld was just another comedian hanging around the clubs, I'd imitate him to amuse myself and the other comics. The club owners would say, 'What are you doing that for? Nobody knows him.' ~ Gilbert Gottfried,
381:I would make a comic for Rolling Stone every two weeks, because they're biweekly. And then I would make weekly comics for my weekly papers. It was on two parallel tracks. And then they all got collected in a book. ~ David Rees,
382:So the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund is out there preserving and fighting for, and sometimes winning and sometimes losing, the fight for First Amendment rights in comics and, more generally, for freedom of speech. ~ Neil Gaiman,
383:But I couldn't draw as fast as she requested. Thus, I tried to create the worst abomination of a comic that I could, so as to make her not want comics anymore. That abomination, my friends, was Happy Noodle Boy. ~ Jhonen V squez,
384:Comics speak, without qualm or sophistication, to the innermost ears of the wishful self. The response is like that of a thirsty traveler who suddenly finds water in the desert - he drinks to satiation. ~ William Moulton Marston,
385:I'm only 24 so I like to think I'm still close enough to 17 to still remember what it was like. Besides, I could just fake it and get away with it... it's not like there are any teenagers that still read comics. ~ Robert Kirkman,
386:I think the genre of comics sometimes overtakes the medium, and people assume that they are kind of frivolous. If you have a good, strong story teller, they can be as affecting as any character in literature. Period. ~ Chip Kidd,
387:I am new to superhero comics, though growing up I read Archie comics, religiously. I've been doing a lot of catching up, reading what's out there and it's been wonderful to see what's going on in contemporary comics. ~ Roxane Gay,
388:Jeff Foxworthy had that whole "You might be a redneck" thing; Larry the Cable Guy had "Git-R-Done." Some comics have that hook. Dane Cook had that super finger. So I just caught on early on. I ran with "Fluffy." ~ Gabriel Iglesias,
389:I always wanted to be a writer, but Alan Moore's work and help inspired me to write comics. In some ways the biggest influence on me writing was Punk. There was the idea that you could do something by simply doing it. ~ Neil Gaiman,
390:I think I related more literally to the early 'Spider-Man' comics from Steve Ditko because it could be upfront and direct about the problems of being a kid. He captured being a teenager so beautifully. ~ Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero,
391:he beauty of this world [of comics] is there are so many stories to tell, and there's so many wonderful characters. Wonderful characters we haven't even begun to introduce - it's a world that is infinitely expandable. ~ Bruno Heller,
392:A lot of comics are kind of vampire types; we do our shows and disappear into the night. My philosophy was, this is like politics, and if I want people to know about my campaign, I'm going to go out there and shake hands. ~ Dane Cook,
393:The quickest way to defuse fear or insecurity or anger is usually humor. I think comics figure that out quickly, and, once you figure it out, you think, 'Hey, if I can do this and get paid, that would be kind of cool. ~ Billy Gardell,
394:Comics, as good as they might be, they didn't know much about performance. There aren't too many comics you could watch for an hour without getting tired. They might have good material, but it's about theater to me. ~ Andrew Dice Clay,
395:From my personal taste, it needed more of a visual style. It's so hard when you're adapting something that's so visually scrumptious like Mike Oeming's drawings. They're so unique to comics, but they're a voice. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
396:Al Plastino helped redefine Superman in the 1950s. His work on Supermans Girlfriend, Lois Lane, Adventure Comics and pretty much any title in the Superman family will be fondly remembered for years to come. He will be missed. ~ Jim Lee,
397:In film, a lot of the time you're not as engaged, it is all being given to you, and you're accepting it as it comes in, but in comics, as a reader, you are going to have to work, your imagination needs to do an awful lot. ~ Neil Gaiman,
398:I love meeting fans. The people who are fans of my books are really smart and dedicated, because some independent comics are hard to get. I will drive all the way to Pittsburgh or Detroit to put it in their hands. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
399:I tell young comics, 'Do you want this badly enough? It's there. But you have to go get it. And if you think I'm going to give you the key to the lock of that door, there is no key, there is no lock, and there is no door.' ~ Jerry Lewis,
400:Maybe I read too many comics as a kid,” Musk said. “In the comics, it always seems like they are trying to save the world. It seemed like one should try to make the world a better place because the inverse makes no sense. ~ Ashlee Vance,
401:Because of the failed take-over bid by Walt Disney Studios of Harvey Comics in 1955, the Disney studio began a rumor that Casper was the first child experimented on, and subsequently killed by, Nazi doctor Josef Mengele. ~ Conor Lastowka,
402:As a small kid, I came across things like these early Edward Gorey books in department-store bookstores. These were these really unusual objects to me. I didn't know how they fit into the comic world or into newspaper comics. ~ Ben Katchor,
403:I wouldn't want to be defined so much by comics or cartoons. My work is more narrative than that. If you take your basic cartoon, there's always a punchline or a joke at the end. My drawings don't depend on that so much. ~ Raymond Pettibon,
404:I think comics in New York are interested in being comics. And there're comics in L.A. who are touring comics, who are certainly more interested in stand-up, but a lot of L.A. stand-ups are really looking to do something else. ~ Lewis Black,
405:The only negative about doing stand-up is that you're on the road by yourself. When you're on the road with comics we just crack each other up every night going, "Can you believe they're paying us to do this? They're crazy. ~ Jeff Foxworthy,
406:They lie on their stomachs and page through comics, feeling the pleasure of being outside of school, glancing at each other now and then as if curious to learn whether their friendship will continue to exist in another place. ~ Anthony Doerr,
407:Comics in the United States have become such a caricature. You have to have incredible people doing incredible things, but in Japan it seems like the most popular comics are the comics of normal people doing normal things. ~ Frederik L Schodt,
408:It has become cliché to say I laughed until I cried, but when I'm done reading one of [Kupperman's] underground comics my shirt is literally soaking wet. This guy may have one of the best comedy brains on the planet right now. ~ Conan O Brien,
409:Though to the average person that you'll meet on an airplane, if you tell them you draw comics, they'll still have sort of the same response - not like that's seeped into the culture at large, that comics are not just for kids. ~ Daniel Clowes,
410:You remember the comics in the Daily News? Dick Tracy’s wrist radio? it’ll be everywhere, the rubes’ll all be begging to wear one, handcuffs of the future. Terrific. What they dream about at the Pentagon, worldwide martial law. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
411:And I've always loved commercials. I like working out how to organically weave a brand's message into the writing process. It's like an improv show, where comics ask the audience to throw out a word and a skit is built around it. ~ Jason Bateman,
412:What I've found in my career is that 70 to 75 percent of comics are nice and have some sense of social skills, but there are those who end up in comedy because they don't know how to socialize. I don't want to deal with that group. ~ Lewis Black,
413:The final two issues of the Englehart/Rogers/Austin collaboration, Detective Comics #475 and #476, are now esteemed alongside the greatest Batman stories ever created and would provide the seed for Tim Burton’s 1989 feature film. In ~ Glen Weldon,
414:I grew up when comics were only sold in food markets and news stands, so the direct market is vital to me. The best way to make it stronger is if everybody buys my comics in multiple copies before they buy any others. ~ Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero,
415:Comic scripts are full-on collaborations, not only with your artist, but your editors and colorists and letterers and PR folks, etc. Writing comics reminds me of my days as a journalist, working on a staff of fun, smart people. ~ Duane Swierczynski,
416:I love telling stories. And even in single images, I tend to have stories inside them. I've always loved film, but I was making drawings and paintings and photographs. And you put art and narrative together, and that really is comics. ~ Dave McKean,
417:All the subject matter I talk about isn't new; all comics talk about the same things. But it's how you talk about them or present them or what you look like up there that makes the difference between an okay comic and a great one. ~ Andrew Dice Clay,
418:I found one remaining box of comics which I had saved. When I opened it up and that smell came pouring out, that old paper smell, I was struck by a rush of memories, a sense of my childhood self that seemed to be contained in there. ~ Michael Chabon,
419:Unfortunately, I am not one of those comics where it's guaranteed that I hit it out of the park every time. You know, I am not completely reliable. It's always different, and it's a complete crapshoot whether I'm going to do well. ~ Janeane Garofalo,
420:Comics know that they do best. They might not be best to rewrite to another person's comedy, but they know what is best for them. Luckily, I come from both a writing background - with 'Workaholics' - and I also act in what I've written. ~ Adam DeVine,
421:I prefer working out of strict continuity, because no normal human being can have a firm grip on the constantly shifting bardo-like territory of a comics universe, where entire histories can be erased by a strong enough super-sneeze. ~ Grant Morrison,
422:I think comics will always be around. I think there's something nice about a comic book. People love to hold 'em, turn the pages, fold 'em up, roll 'em up, stick 'em in their back pocket, show 'em to a friend, and say, "Hey, look at this." ~ Stan Lee,
423:You go, well you can't joke about race. Well if you're from a different race and that's your experience of the world and you want to talk about that, then fine. Or you can't talk about disability, but disabled comics can talk about that. ~ Jimmy Carr,
424:A lot of comics aren't their on-screen personas; Chris Rock isn't always ranting and raving. What I do is make myself this over-the-top character that people either find endearing or they think is a joke. Then I can do anything I want. ~ Billy Eichner,
425:Children read to learn - even when they are reading fantasy, nonsense, light verse, comics or the copy on cereal packets, they are expanding their minds all the time, enlarging their vocabulary, making discoveries - it is all new to them. ~ Joan Aiken,
426:Any comic can get on the radio show and be funny. You can get that on any morning radio show or afternoon radio show. There are plenty of people who do that. It's not a difficult format, to sit around with two or three comics and be funny. ~ Marc Maron,
427:I've been using easy-to-understand DC Comics-surrogates to describe him: imagine if Darkseid's son, Orion, joined the Green Lantern Corps to train them to stop Darkseid. That's essentially what Victory is doing in the Galactic Rangers. ~ Sterling Gates,
428:The strange thing about Roman soldiers in the comics was the amount of trouble they took over their armor and their helmets, and then, after all that, they left their legs bare. It didn't make any sense at all. Weatherwise or otherwise. ~ Arundhati Roy,
429:We as comics do want an immediate response from the audience. It's really quiet on the set, and there are only the producers, and the director, so a comic is looking for someone to give a reaction, even if it is the camera guy. ~ Cedric the Entertainer,
430:Detective Comics first appeared in 1937. Superman, written and drawn by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, made his debut in Action Comics #1 in June 1938. Superman was unstoppable; soon, a million Superman comics were being sold every month.45 ~ Jill Lepore,
431:The one difference between comics and, say, cinema or prose, is that you've only got so many pages, and publishers will work to a set page count. So you have to work out how many pages you actually have and how much to allow for each story. ~ Leah Moore,
432:There's a great deal of disturbance in this country and how black feel about what happened in Katrina, and, you know, many of the comics, many of performers are in Las Vegas and New Orleans trying to raise money for what happened there ~ Michael Richards,
433:When comics came along in the 1930s there was a talent pool waiting. And one reason is so many areas were closed to Jews. Colleges, advertising agencies, many of the corporations - the doors that were closed led to the one that was open. ~ Jerry Robinson,
434:One of the wonderful things that I've always loved as an art student, what I always loved about comics, was that they are interpreted differently by different graphic artists all the time, so now film is doing that thanks to Marvel Studios. ~ Tilda Swinton,
435:If you’re not falling, you’re not really trying hard enough. JOE QUESADA Joe Quesada is an award-winning comics creator and the chief creative officer of Marvel Entertainment, who served as editor-in chief of Marvel for over a decade. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
436:Right from the outset, the prevailing mindset in British comics fandom was a radical and progressive one. We were all proto-hippies, and we all thought that comics would be greatly improved if everything was a bit psychedelic like Jim Steranko. ~ Alan Moore,
437:I started on the original comics from Stan Lee and all the artists and storytellers did from there, and I got to the graphic novel that Chris Clairmont did, which is the one Stryker comes from - God Loves, Man Kills, which is a brilliant story. ~ Josh Helman,
438:Others may dispute this, we have tried to keep that sense of experimentation and putting new people up alive. And we haven't become a show, where we're like, "We know the 20 comics who are good and we're just going to keep on recycling them." ~ Scott Aukerman,
439:The good news is that the comics field is small enough and informal enough that once you have made a comic, you have achieved your dreams: you have broken into the comics industry. The problem with breaking in, though, is that staying in is harder. ~ Greg Pak,
440:"Comic book" has come to mean a specific genre, not a story form, in people's minds. So someone will call Die Hard "a comic-book movie," when it has nothing to do with comic books. I'd rather have comics be the vehicle by which stories are told. ~ Frank Miller,
441:Comics who grew up surviving their childhood by being able to be the first one to make the joke about their weight or their hairy arms - like me - whatever they're insecure about, whatever they're apologizing for, that becomes their strength. ~ Sarah Silverman,
442:I'm still working! I think of all the other comics that didn't get the light shined on them, just because it's just how fame works, and it's unfortunate. But there are so many great comics out there who are still working, and I still see them. ~ Louie Anderson,
443:In a funny way, you could say he taught me how to write super-hero comics. He said, “What you do is you take a soap opera, and you take out all the sex scenes and replace them with people punching each other. That’s it. It’s the same structure. ~ Patrick Meaney,
444:I was a big TV kid.When I was a kid, I would go home at 3:00 and watch TV straight through to the end of Letterman at 1:30 in the morning.I was obsessed with comics.And I would watch Jerry Seinfeld and Jay Leno and study them as if it was Tolstoy. ~ Judd Apatow,
445:I try not to see new comics - their acts or their films. Part of that is professional. I don't want to be influenced. But another part is fear and jealousy. I'm afraid to see how good they might be. I don't like that emotion, but it's part of me. ~ George Carlin,
446:I don't think schooling of any sort really prepares you for real life. I don't know if art school would have prepared me to draw comics. Half of the people I know in comics went to art school, half of them didn't. Some of them went and dropped out. ~ Dave Gibbons,
447:If you get a chance, whenever you're traveling, do go to the local boutique comic book shop and don't buy your comics online 'cause those guys are going to go extinct, in a minute here, and we want to be able to have those experiences with our kids. ~ Nicolas Cage,
448:When I first got interested in comics at the time I was studying architecture and I discovered comics as a medium through listening to Art who was courting me by reading me Little Nemo and Krazy Kat by George Herriman. It was really very effective. ~ Francoise Mouly,
449:I had been writing comic books for years and I was doing them to please a publisher, who felt that comics are only read by very young children or stupid adults. And therefore, we have to keep the stories very simplistic... And those were all things I hated. ~ Stan Lee,
450:I'm a huge Marvel fan and the fact that they take the liberties that they do in filmmaking I think, if anything, that it dignifies the comics and it says, "Yeah. This is a strong enough, robust enough source. We can bend it, it's elastic. It's bouncy." ~ Tilda Swinton,
451:It's too bad for us "literary" enthusiasts, but it's the truth nevertheless -- pictures tell any story more effectively than words . . . If children will read comics . . . why isn't it advisable to give them some constructive comics to read?. ~ William Moulton Marston,
452:The magic of comics is that there are three people involved in any comic. There's whoever's writing it and whoever's drawing it. And then there's whoever's reading it because they are creating the movement. They are creating the illusion of time passing. ~ Neil Gaiman,
453:To me, comedians are the last great storytellers because they depict their stories and create their effect with so few words. In the span of a couple minutes, stand-up comics can communicate more emotion than most novels do in hours worth of reading. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
454:The comics I read as a kid were much more influenced by TV and movies. Encountering superheroes as an adult without that kind of childhood sentimentality, it just doesn't allow you, or in my case at least, it wouldn't let me take the characters seriously. ~ Garth Ennis,
455:There are certain comics that just seem like they have this perfect balance between dialogue and image that I can't not read. I'll want to save it for later, and the next thing I know, I'm reading it. That's what I'm kind of trying to do with my comics. ~ Daniel Clowes,
456:I like doing whatever interests me. It's a challenge for me to try to make good comics out of any genre I tackle. I trust my instincts in getting me through the more difficult genres for modern readers, like violent crime or horror stories. ~ Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero,
457:I live making comics. Comics is an industrial art but less suffering, because comics are for young people who are more adventurous. I do that. I live off comics, and then I write books, but when you want movies, you cannot make movies without money. ~ Alejandro Jodorowsky,
458:I went to art school, but I didn't last because in those days you couldn't take comics as a course. And they weren't even teaching you to draw real things, they were really into abstracts, and I was not into abstracts, so art school and I did not work out. ~ Trina Robbins,
459:I personally have no need to make a strict definition of the medium. I am more interested in what can be done with comics than how it can be described, and if I want to remain truly open to the creative possibilities, the less I define the medium, the better. ~ Jason Lutes,
460:It took Marvel Comics years to begin to put together any worthwhile superheroines. The first crop was, to a gal, embarrassingly disappointing. They had all the measly powers that fifties and sixties male chauvinism could contrive to bestow on a superwoman. ~ Michael Chabon,
461:The strange thing about Roman soldiers in the comics, according to Rahel, was the amount of trouble they took over their armour and their helmets, and then, after all that, they left their legs bare. It didn’t make any sense at all. Weatherwise or otherwise. ~ Arundhati Roy,
462:While we can generalize when describing a given medium as hot or cool, all media can be said to possess both hot and cool aspects to varying degrees, and part of what I try to do with comics is figure out when and how the temperature needs raising or lowering. ~ Jason Lutes,
463:I have had issues with depression all my life, and it's probably true to say there was a tendency towards it even when I was very young, during my schooldays. There was often - and this is quite common with comics - a sense of not feeling as if I belonged anywhere. ~ Jack Dee,
464:It's always interesting to see what the real enthusiasts think, but they're rarely representative of the tastes of the wider audience, so I tend to write for myself, for an imagined smart 14-year-old, and for a couple of friends who are still big comics fans. ~ Grant Morrison,
465:He selected a honey-soaked pastry and asked for strong Greek coffee and ice water, then put three bucks in the newspaper machine and selected World, Local, and Comics. He read the comics first, as always, to fortify himself. The world news was predictably bleak. ~ Joe Haldeman,
466:I didn't really get into underground comics, though I've liked some of what I've seen. Dame Darcy was very impressive to meet, really talented. In general, I've always been more interested in searching out music, so I think I miss out on a lot of underground art. ~ Neil Farber,
467:I`ve not really been angling to be a comedian. I knew comics and I loved them and I loved being funny, but I didn't understand the whole concept of becoming one. My first couple of times on stage, I was like, "This is what I'm doing for sure." I was so excited. ~ Mitch Hedberg,
468:There are a lot of comics at the top end making staggering amounts of money and selling out stadiums. I think stand-up is a more intimate thing than that. Maybe because of the kind of comedy I do. It's like a discussion, but I'm the one with the microphone. ~ Marcus Brigstocke,
469:And as a stand-up comic, that's the one thing I'm a little uncomfortable with. I'm not uncomfortable with sincerity in my regular life, but, like in terms of my product that I offer, I think that it's weird, because comics used to be way more sincere in the '80s. ~ Moshe Kasher,
470:[Being a good comedian] is a skill, but it's also a weird thing that only certain people can do. I always equate it to surgeons and how they can just cut people open and operate. Certain people are just wired differently, and I feel like comics are the same way. ~ Nick Swardson,
471:I really like dating stories, like in Betty and Veronica comics; I like David Lynch and H.P. Lovecraft for the dark gut-wrenching stuff, and I'm inspired by Miyazaki's films for the subtle heart-warming moments, as well as the moments that blew up my imagination. ~ Fred Seibert,
472:To me, Clark Kent in a phone booth and Houdini in a packing crate, they were one and the same thing," he would learnedly expound at WonderCon or Angoulême or to the editor of The Comics Journal . "You weren't the same person when you came out as when you went in. ~ Michael Chabon,
473:Glenn and I were listening to a radio show in the car, and he said, "Glass Eye Pix should do radio plays." I loved the idea of working in a different medium. We've made comics, books, movies, video games, models, advent calendars, why wouldn't we try audio plays? ~ Larry Fessenden,
474:Lo pitched Superheroes & Scones to his father as a marketing strategy for Halway Comics. But I know the idea has nothing to do with his company. What he did was buy me something of my own, something I could look forward to after college. He found me happiness… ~ Krista Ritchie,
475:Some people are just really goofy kind of guitar acts, and they go out and do these colleges and start making a fortune pretty early on. And other people - I know guys who are great comics, who've done the Letterman show many times, who still barely pay their bills. ~ Greg Giraldo,
476:What comics sacrifice and what lives they live - I know that most of their lives, their adult lives, they're sitting around or walking around with notebooks, writing things down. Usually they're fairly sensitive. Usually they're very bright. And that makes them poets. ~ Marc Maron,
477:Certainly the goal with any sort of storytelling is to have an impact, to touch on some reader's life. And in some cases, there may be stories that actually have a particular goal like that in mind. So yeah, that sort of thing does happen in comics, fairly regularly. ~ Tom Brevoort,
478:Sometimes I have young comics that ask me, "What should I do when I meet an agent or a manager and they ask me stuff?" And I say, "Well, they always usually ask, 'Where do you see yourself in five years, 10 years, 15 years?' And it's good to have an answer for that." ~ Baron Vaughn,
479:There's plenty of ways you can go and encourage people. And you should do that. But don't demonize what you do, I do, what other comics are doing, when you see people showing up and listening and responding because they've heard the messaging in the new kind of way. ~ Lizz Winstead,
480:The shows need youth. All of our comics are getting too famous to do the show regularly. The people who are regulars five years ago, a lot of them have moved on and can't do the show anymore. We can't really get Jim Gaffigan anymore, we can't get Nick Swardson anymore. ~ B J Porter,
481:I entered high school she[ my mother] said, "Well, you're a teenager now, and comics are for kids, so you shouldn't read them anymore," and I went, "Oh, okay," and I gave away what, of course, would now be thousands of dollars worth of comics to the neighborhood kids. ~ Trina Robbins,
482:I think that Spider-Man is a part of our culture. He's a perennial character. He's something that's constantly reexamined and there are so many versions of him in the comics that it was something that I thought that we could do cinematically. He belongs on the big screen. ~ Marc Webb,
483:Over the last ten years, breaking into comics has changed so much. There used to be specific ways about how to do it ... and now, just like there are so many different ways people are getting exposed to comics, there's no single way that people are breaking in anymore. ~ C B Cebulski,
484:I don't think stand-up is being appreciated as much as it could be and I don't think it has for a long time. There's some great stand-up comics who come to a town and if they're not a name, they don't attract a crowd but in reality there are brilliant people out there. ~ Mitch Hedberg,
485:I do like to keep abreast of what the hardcore vocal members of the comics-reading audience are talking about on Internet message boards, but there are so few of them, as a percentage of the buying audience, that I can't allow their opinions to dictate story direction. ~ Grant Morrison,
486:I grew up on the crime stuff. Spillane, Chandler, Jim Thompson, and noir movies like Fuller, Orson Welles, Fritz Lang. When I first showed up in New York to write comics back in the late 1970s, I came with a bunch of crime stories but everybody just wanted men in tights. ~ Frank Miller,
487:We all have an aggressive dedication to the narrative arts - comics, film, electronic gaming, and more. We spend much of our time and effort exploring those forms and have an enormous investment in the arts. We're all part of the same brotherhood as far as I'm concerned. ~ Jim Steranko,
488:The comics that are just conversing with you up there and drawing on their own life, yeah, I guess so. I guess some do political humor, some do topical humor, but the ones that I like, the ones that are appealing to me, were guys who were just talking to you about their life. ~ Ray Romano,
489:In recent years I have become more interested in making the critical ideas that I love teaching and talking about available in more forms, because many people prefer to engage with ideas in films, infographics, comics and other forms that are not traditional books or articles. ~ Dean Spade,
490:India is an incredibly vibrant market, which Virgin already, through Virgin Atlantic, has the pleasure of working in. I am delighted that Virgin Comics will not only help to launch the Indian comic market and spin it into the West, but will develop new and exciting talent. ~ Richard Branson,
491:There's a widespread cultural barrenness across art and political culture. But there are some pockets of resistance on the extreme margins, like the techno-savvy protest movements, small press, the creator-owned comics, that seem to be getting some signs of hope for the future. ~ Alan Moore,
492:I'm part of the first generation who grew up with manga [comics] and anime [animation], you know, after 'Godzilla.' I was absorbed with Ultraman on TV and in manga. The profession of game designer was created really recently. If it didn't exist, I'd probably be making anime. ~ Satoshi Tajiri,
493:I saw a lot of lousy movies and watched a ton of crappy television and read a bunch of utterly forgettable books and comics and listened to hours of junk music as a kid. And I'm still drawing profitably in my own art on some of the tawdry treasure I stored up in those years. ~ Michael Chabon,
494:I'm a spoilt brat. I thought I was just going to walk in and make movies. But I'd been my own boss for so long that all of a sudden to be facing a roomful of people who were niggling over every little scene... I just thought I'd go back and draw my comics and have a happy life. ~ Frank Miller,
495:I'm not sure anybody's ready to see me in a drama. And loving movies so much, I've seen a lot of comics try to make that transition too fast, and it can be detrimental. And I don't think I've had as much success as I need in the comedy genre to open up those opportunities. ~ Sean William Scott,
496:We didn't have television until I was about eight years old, so it was either the movies or radio. A lot of radio drama. That was our television, you know. We had to use our imagination. So it was really those two things, and the comics, that I immersed myself in as a child. ~ Jessica Hagedorn,
497:It was cool to me, as a fan of the comics, to see some of the villains that end up finding them there, and the way that they abuse Coulson before the superheroes come. I'm always, in the movies or in the animated series, getting into trouble that a superhero has to bail me out of. ~ Clark Gregg,
498:The thing that drives me crazy is when comics say 'I have low self-esteem.' No you don't. You're standing on stage asking people to pay. You don't play an instrument. You want people to pay to hear what's in your mind. You don't have low self-esteem. You might have other problems. ~ Colin Quinn,
499:Comedy is the only form of entertainment where the audience doesn't know what to expect. In an evening, you might get ten comics doing ten different things. That's not what happens when you go to hear music. There isn't a classical performance followed by a hoedown followed by rap. ~ Jon Stewart,
500:The careful reader, and even the careless reader who's had a few too many drinks, will notice that the Point of View is not all male. You'll see plenty of male nakedness here, and the women are not the rocket-breasted, uber-sexualized portrayals of women that comics often offer. ~ Peter Milligan,
501:There's always been this feedback between comics and films. But I think that if you take that analogy too far, if you only see comic books in terms of films, then eventually the best we can end up with is films that don't move. It would make us a poor relation to the movie industry. ~ Alan Moore,
502:Comics seldom move me the way I would be moved by a novel or movie. I say this as someone who would rather read comics than watch movies, listen to music, anything. But it's not an operatic medium. I hear other people talk about being moved to tears by comics. I can't imagine that. ~ Daniel Clowes,
503:I found a great deal of relief and excitement watching comics when I was very young. My grandmother was very into them and so was my grandfather. They had a profound effect on me, so I just found myself watching comedians on the after-school shows: Merv Griffin and that kind of stuff. ~ Marc Maron,
504:The pop artists did images that anybody walking down Broadway could recognize in a split second — comics, picnic tables, men’s trousers, celebrities, shower curtains, refrigerators, Coke bottles. All the great modern things that the Abstract Expressionists tried not to notice at all. ~ Andy Warhol,
505:The method of producing comics in Japan is very hectic, but it's also rewarding because it's possible to do both the story and art all by yourself. In this way, it's possibly to bring out one's individuality. If this idea appeals to you, I call on you to try drawing your own manga. ~ Akira Toriyama,
506:You know, I'm playing the Mirage in Vegas, the main room... About 5 percent of all comics end up as the main headliner on the Vegas Strip, so that's a big deal for me. Getting to do my stand-up the way I have this summer is really what I've dreamed of since I was about 10 years old. ~ Billy Gardell,
507:I was really inspired by seeing self published zines and mini-comics: seeing someone else make work that was either really personal, or was just done entirely themselves. It really showed me what was possible for my own art, and I hope that my books will inspire readers in the same way. ~ Liz Prince,
508:everyone you know in mainstream comics was discovered from their work in independent or self-published comics or other creative work in another medium. Don’t wait for Marvel or DC to discover you—just start making comics for yourself. They will be your calling cards to editors. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
509:How Much Money You Need to Retire and How to Manage Your Retirement Savings, Explained in 100 Pages or Less Mike Piper, CPA   Why is there a light bulb on the cover? In cartoons and comics, a light bulb is often used to signify a moment of clarity or sudden understanding—an “aha!” moment. ~ Mike Piper,
510:I guess in all of the obvious ways. I can afford more diapers for my children. If I want to buy a complete set of Garbage Pail Kids on Ebay I don't have to ask my wife so hard. For the most part, it's mostly the same. I keep my head down and I just work on comics for most of the time. ~ Robert Kirkman,
511:As I see it, mainstream comics now speak only to the hardcore few who stayed; conversing in a weird, garbled, visual pig latin only they can understand - rendering the term 'mainstream' a hollow joke - while the true mainstream, the other 99.9% of the populace, find enjoyment elsewhere. ~ Scott McCloud,
512:I had thought comics could only be one thing, and that was what mainstream comics were selling us. And the undergrounders proved anything you had in your head, as long as you had the skill to put it down on paper, was fair game. And I started filling sketchbooks with my own comics. ~ Stephen R Bissette,
513:I spent 10 years in professional politics and eight writing comics, and so I look at it from both sides. I don't understand the logic in being frustrated with a system, so you choose to be a part of the reason why the system is so frustrating. If everybody voted, it wouldn't be this way. ~ Andrew Aydin,
514:I had no idea what to expect! When the series began, I was new to comics, so I really had to keep my head down and plow forward so that I could learn as much about this new medium as possible. I wanted so much to do a good job and to please Stephen King and all the longtime Dark Tower fans. ~ Robin Furth,
515:All I liked to do when I was a kid was draw. My childhood was like my adult life: drawing pictures with my brother, putting the comics up on the glass window, and tracing the characters onto tracing paper or drawing paper and then coloring them. That and making things was all we ever did. ~ Maurice Sendak,
516:I found collaboration to be a terrible thing in Hollywood because there are so many people involved you have to make a thousand little compromises to every project and every single scene is a committee decision. It's maddening. But with comics you've got an artist and you've got a writer. ~ Benjamin Percy,
517:The phrase 'I just turn on my monkey and it makes me feel good' sounds very dirty, but I can't explain why. It's great to try to use expressions like that on the comics page. People want to complain but they can't, because they can't figure out quite what they should be complaining about. ~ Stephan Pastis,
518:And what better way to reinvent the form than to toss virtually 99% of everything that's been done with it and start with a brand-new canvas, reinvent it from the ground up? Digital comics gave me the opportunity to do that, and producing things digitally gave me the opportunity to do that. ~ Scott McCloud,
519:Comics aren’t for everyone.

Created by the children of immigrants, it is the medium of the outsider and the outcast, the nerd who won’t fit in.

We exist, we thrive because we recognize and amplify the voices of those who must struggle mightily to be heard.

We say, I’m here. ~ Tom King,
520:I think one of the things I always loved about the comics was this idea that this character, when he goes berserk, that white, blind rage makes him incredibly powerful, but it's also a great flaw. It's almost like he loses consciousness of what he's doing. During that he can do great damage. ~ Hugh Jackman,
521:I tend to be known for different things. I mean, there are a lot of comics or sci-fi fans out there who sort of think of me doing that kind of work, but there are just as many people who like the CD covers I've done, or the children's books I've done. So different people like different things. ~ Dave McKean,
522:The 4D style, or cosmic comics and relativistic humor, is based on Einstein's theory of relativity which I came up with 20 years ago. 4D works use the idea of the fourth dimension, time, playing on such surrealistic and amazing subjects as motion relativity, space curvature and time dilation. ~ Javad Alizadeh,
523:I was planning to sort my comic books based on level of second wave feminist influence.” “As opposed to first wave?” “Yes, well, Susan B. Anthony laid the foundation for those who have come after. It’s all really interrelated but she didn’t have direct influence over late twentieth century comics. ~ Penny Reid,
524:That's why our comics are important: they're pointing things out and laughing at the same time. There have been horrible, horrible times in history. They're mostly horrible times. But not to laugh? Not to find humor in something like dark optimism/bright pessimism - I think that's sad, frankly. ~ Lynne Tillman,
525:To me, being brave is an element that is so important with stand-up comedy. It's not essential. There are many comics who were just funny, and that's fine, too. But that's never been what I was trying to do in comedy. I was always trying to do something that involved not pandering to the audience. ~ Bill Maher,
526:With the tone of the show, like a lot of the films, the Marvel creative team has found a way to bridge really exciting stuff that has real stakes. They balance some of the action stuff that the fans of the comics really want to see with characters that people can relate to and who are very human. ~ Clark Gregg,
527:If you spend any time in Washington you'll find nerds. What happens is most of them sublimate their fixations with comics, or baseball cards, or 1960s British comedies to policy minutiae and political arcana. But, like Christians in ancient Rome, you can still spot them if you know the signals. ~ Jonah Goldberg,
528:The more films we make the more we get to deal with those pre-existing relationships. But when it comes to a movie like Ant-Man or Guardians or certainly Doctor Strange, it's just bringing to life stuff that's already been there in the comics and we finally get a chance to do it on the big screen. ~ Kevin Feige,
529:Why does the need to explain comics still exist? Because that prejudice still exists. It's fading, but it's still very strong. It's important to keep pushing the boundaries of what people know comics to be so that they are receptive to the whole world of comics, not just one or two genres of work. ~ Jessica Abel,
530:For me, there were a few things in the Spider-Man comics that I thought were really interesting. There's this story about Peter's parents and where he came from, and I thought that it was really interesting to explore the emotional consequence of someone whose parents had left them, at a very young age. ~ Marc Webb,
531:One thing I'm grateful for, and also surprised and excited about, is that I have a place in the community of comics now. In a real way. And I honor that. A lot of what I do is in support of the community and bringing new talent - talking to people that people don't know. And defining us as a community. ~ Marc Maron,
532:I like all of the early relationship strips that were collected in 'Love Is Hell,' where I pretended to be an expert in relationships and did comics like 'The Nine Types of Boyfriends,' 'Sixteen Ways to End a Relationship,' 'Twenty-Four Things Not to Say in Bed,' and other arbitrarily numbered lists. ~ Matt Groening,
533:Well, the coffeehouse audiences never know what they're going to get, and all the comics are different, as opposed to when you go to a club, and they're pretty much all telling jokes with set-ups and punchlines. Coffeehouse audiences are the most forgiving: They really listen, which is the best part. ~ Kathy Griffin,
534:I understand why so many female comics quit or change their path, because it is hard. It's hard to be a comedian, and people have so much aggression towards women. I don't really know where that comes from, but I feel a total responsibility, and I'm gonna do my part, to continue on the path that I'm on. ~ Amy Schumer,
535:The truth is I'm a dork. I collected comics. I still love cartoons. I'd rather be at home on a Friday night than out at some club… My sense of humor is that of a geek. My likes and dislikes are that of a geek. I've memorized every crappy sci-fi movie there is, but still haven't seen Schindler's List. ~ Nathan Fillion,
536:I think that comics and television, as mediums, go hand in hand. Both tell long-form, continuing stories that are parsed out into little chapters and, if are successful, continue for years and years. What that means to me, as a writer, is it tells stories of transformation and evolution as characters. ~ Robert Kirkman,
537:That's what everybody tells me. "I would've had a great comic-book collection, but my mother made me throw them away." But when I was growing up, my mother didn't care. As long as I was reading, she didn't care if my room was filled with comics. I could have saved everything. I was just too stupid to do it. ~ Stan Lee,
538:Pure evil has no real place. And that means, doesn’t it, that I have no place. Except, perhaps, in the art that repudiates evil—the vampire comics, the horror novels, the old gothic tales—or in the roaring chants of the rock stars who dramatize the battles against evil that each mortal fights within himself. ~ Anne Rice,
539:The lovely thing about writing comics for so many years is that comics is a medium that is mistaken for a genre. It's not that there are not genres within comics, but because comics tend to be regarded as a genre in itself, content becomes secondary; as long as I was doing a comic, people would pick it up. ~ Neil Gaiman,
540:With comics, you can only really learn what you're doing wrong or what works best when you see your work published. I've been publishing comics since my 20s, and still, when I flip through any of my new comics, I still only see the things that I wish I'd done better. But that's how you learn, by seeing it. ~ Ed Brubaker,
541:We [comics] create our own reality on the show. I'm in a cocoon of the character's creation. Even within that reality, he's in a cocoon. While I'm an improviser and enjoy discovery, the show follows a script. I have a pretty good idea what's going to happen. It's a very ­crafted, controlled environment. ~ Stephen Colbert,
542:Everything you've ever read of mine is first-draft. This is one of the peculiarities of the comics field. By the time you're working on chapter three of your masterwork, chapter one is already in print. You can't go back and suddenly decide to make this character a woman, or have this one fall out of a window. ~ Alan Moore,
543:I’ve thought for the last decade or so, the only actual place raw truth was seeping through in newspapers was on the Comics Pages. They were able to pull off intelligent social comment, pure truths not found elsewhere in the news pages, and had the ability to make it all funny, entertaining, and pertinent. ~ Elayne Boosler,
544:From 1940 to about 1960, I had been writing just regular comics, the way my publishers wanted me too. He didn't want me to use words of more than two syllables if I could help it. He didn't want me to waste time on worrying about good dialogue or characterization. Just give me a lot of action, lot of fight scenes. ~ Stan Lee,
545:I don't read cartoons because I think for the most part the comics don't have an interest for me. There's just nothing there these days that makes me want to go seek them out. I'm not trying to say my work wouldn't have sparked that same reaction from somebody else. There's just nothing there for me personally. ~ Gary Larson,
546:I have read many, many of these first-time published efforts and often, even though some are absolutely at pro levels of production, and have very costly printing and presentation, they lack a purpose, they merely emulate successful comics that already exist... I can't stress this enough. Have something to say. ~ Gail Simone,
547:In the sixties, in the middle sixties, suddenly comics became this hip thing, and college students and hippies were reading them. So I was one of them, and I started reading, basically it was the Marvel Renaissance at that point. It was all their new characters, Spiderman and the X-Men and the Fantastic Four. ~ Trina Robbins,
548:The only real reason that I'd have for working for Hollywood is the fantastic amounts of money involved, and that isn't enough of an incentive to really give up the degree of control that I have over my work at the moment with comics. I suppose that's probably why I don't have any designs on being a screenwriter. ~ Alan Moore,
549:I object to the hypersexualization of all the superheroines. Most of them have been hypersexualized, but especially to Wonder Woman, because she is an icon. She is up there with Superman and Batman. And she is the one who is the big influence on women. Women who don't read comics still know who Wonder Woman is. ~ Trina Robbins,
550:I looked at a lot of the comics and I tried to just get an idea from that. Not necessarily specifics of what my look would be or what the plan would be because I knew the script was evolving. I then started the discussion with Ken, who had been in discussion with you guys, intimately. And that they'd pared it down. ~ Colm Feore,
551:My internal temper tantrum tirade continued: But attracting and holding the interest of someone like Quinn Sullivan will have to go into my box of make believe with the eventual remake of Final Fantasy 7 with Playstation 3 graphics or finding an original, pristine version of Detective Comics No. 27- Batman's debut. ~ Penny Reid,
552:A comic will always be more 'personal' than a DVD or CD, both of which require electronic 'players' to decode their content. With comics, the reader is the player so the engagement with the material is always more fundamental and dynamic. Reading comics is a much less passive activity than consuming CDs and DVDs. ~ Grant Morrison,
553:I guess the basic difference is that animation is sequential in time but in spatially juxtaposed as comics are.

Each successive frame of a movie is projected on exactly the same space--the screen--while each frame of comics must occupy a different space.

Space does for comics what time does for film! ~ Scott McCloud,
554:I wasn't really that good at being a musician. And then I tried being a standup. I was an actor. I was a photographer. I tried everything. Nothing was particularly working for me, but then, as a musician, I wrote jokes for comics. And they started to buy my jokes, and that's where I thought maybe that might work. ~ Garry Marshall,
555:When I was working upon the ABC books, I wanted to show different ways that mainstream comics could viably have gone, that they didn't have to follow 'Watchmen' and the other 1980s books down this relentlessly dark route. It was never my intention to start a trend for darkness. I'm not a particularly dark individual. ~ Alan Moore,
556:Writing comics? Still the best job in the world. I sit around all day making shit up and see it illustrated, in 99% of cases, exactly as I imagined it -- if not better. I've been doing this a long time now, and I'm going to do it until I die. Which probably won't be long, given the constant insane deadline pressure. ~ Warren Ellis,
557:Despite the variety my books reflect my, perhaps foolish, tendency to place artistic above financial concerns; of enjoying the more mature themes in whatever creative form; of being on a mission to show that comics are not just for kids; and on a wider level of standing up for individuality against conformity. ~ Sean Michael Wilson,
558:I think it's what we've always tried to do, is just find a unique way in, and find a unique way to be true to what the character is from the comics and what fans are aware of and expecting. And at the same time do it in a way that mainstream audiences and as wide an audience as possible can find their own way into it. ~ Kevin Feige,
559:Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse... by Floyd Gottfredson will be warmly received by comics aficionados but should also intrigue Disney animation buffs who aren’t necessarily plugged into comic strip history... I have a feeling that this book, crafted with such obvious care, will earn Gottfredson a new legion of admirers. ~ Leonard Maltin,
560:At the Sahara, the seats are banked and most of the audience is looking down at the stage. Everybody in the business knows: Up for singers, down for comics. The people want to idealize a singer. They want to feel superior to a comic. You're trying to make them laugh. They can't laugh at someone they're looking up to. ~ Buddy Hackett,
561:I became a writer through drawing first and then a comic book obsession - Marvel Comics, in particular. I invented a world of superheroes starting in third grade with my classmate, Wai-Kwan Wong. In a classroom of forty kids, let's just say there was a lot of undirected time. But this was good because I was a dreamy boy. ~ Adam Ross,
562:She also kept the books, logging in how many kids showed up each day, who they were, and any comments they might have. Mike and I averaged $ 9.50 per week over a three-month period. We paid his sister one dollar a week and allowed her to read the comics for free, which she rarely did since she was always studying. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
563:Comics have a problem, and that is continuity - the obsession with placing the characters in an existing world, where every event is marked in canon. You're supposed to believe that these weepy star boys of now are the same gung-ho super teens fighting space monsters in the '60s, and they've only aged perhaps five years. ~ John Hodgman,
564:I just don't see why having these powers makes it necessary for all of us to become politicians, warriors, social workers, whatever. We would have tried it before if we really wanted to do it. None of us chose to spend our lives helping people before we got our powers - why should we do it now? Because comics say we should? ~ Samit Basu,
565:The comics of course, help the movies, because all of the comic fans want to see the movies. And the most amazing thing about it is these movies seem to appeal to young people, to old people, and to people all over the world. They're as popular in China and Latin America as they are here. That's really amazing and gratifying. ~ Stan Lee,
566:Still,[...] in all forms of comics the sequential artist relies upon the tacit cooperation of the reader. This cooperation is based upon the convention of reading and the common cognitive disciplines. Indeed, it is this very voluntary cooperation, so unique to comics, that underlies the contract between artist and audience. ~ Will Eisner,
567:We wanted to hear from viewers about why they watch or participate in call-ins on C-SPAN, ... Viewers of all ages and walks of life wrote to us, including actresses, stand-up comics, parents and students. What's clear after reading the entries is the impact that call-ins have had on the political conversation on the network. ~ Brian Lamb,
568:In comics the reader is in complete control of the experience. They can read it at their own pace, and if there's a piece of dialogue that seems to echo something a few pages back, they can flip back and check it out, whereas the audience for a film is being dragged through the experience at the speed of 24 frames per second. ~ Alan Moore,
569:It's the fact that fans still care. I like all the comics conventions: The smaller ones are easier, the bigger ones are exciting.... Each one I say: Never again. But they're all great.... These things are important because they keep the fans' interest alive in comics. They keep the fans reading and their imaginations stimulated. ~ Stan Lee,
570:Writing screenplays is very freeing from what you can do in comics in a lot of ways. You can change things around. I can take great delight in writing 40 pages, then just pressing delete and getting rid of it and not thinking about it ever again. Whereas in comics, if I had put that kind of effort into it, I couldn't go on. ~ Daniel Clowes,
571:The term comics long ago became obsolete and inaccurate. It merely defined the content of the early joke-based comical strips. Sequential Art is a more accurate description of the form. I first suggested it because I believed something needed to be done to correct the feeling of inferiority by artists and writers in this field. ~ Will Eisner,
572:The comics I read as a kid were all about guys in tights. But here was a guy who wore a fedora. He fought crime like they did in Marvel and DC, but he did it in the real world. I had just turned 12 when I met the Spirit and it was a strange coincidence. At the same time I discovered girls I fell out of love with guys in tights. ~ Frank Miller,
573:I love festivals because they seem like more of an artsy, supportive attitude - which benefits a more theatrical performer sometimes with having theater and other non-club venues, as well as the audience being filled with other artists. It's nice to be with other comics, as usually at other road gigs, I'm solo for the most part. ~ Maria Bamford,
574:I came up in comics doing lots of DIY self-published stuff, producing my own books, handling all the details of creation and production. And theatre is something that's really attractive to me, as it's a similarly accessible form - it has a lot of the same sort of down-and dirty DIY spirit, where you can make a lot with a little. ~ Fred Van Lente,
575:Surely comics require more effort on the part of the reader than movies or television. I'm always learning new things you can do with comics that wouldn't work in any other medium, and often they require the need to process a lot of dense information. Of course, the trick is to make the complicated seem effortless and spontaneous. ~ Daniel Clowes,
576:Jamie walks over, carrying a bag full of comics. “There you are!” I show him Valentina, pointing to the part where it says she’s autistic, and his eyebrows shoot up. “That is so cool.” “This is Josie, remember from the Skyler signing? She created it.” Jamie introduces himself, picks up a copy from the table, and buys it then and there. ~ Jen Wilde,
577:More and more, I tried to make comics in the way I like to read comics, and I found that when I read comics that are really densely packed with text, it may be rewarding when I finally do sit down and read it, but it never is going to be the first I'm going to read, and I never am fully excited to just sit down and read that comic. ~ Daniel Clowes,
578:Comics, which are really best described as an arrangement of images in a sequence that tell a story - an idea - is a very old form of graphic communication. It began with the hieroglyphics in Egypt, it first appeared in a recognizable form in the Medieval times as copper plates produced by the Catholic church to tell morality stories. ~ Will Eisner,
579:In America, there's a very long tradition of a comic strip that comes in newspapers, which is not true all over the world. To sell papers, they put color comics in. It's worked, up until now. Now these papers can't afford it. They always had minuscule ad budgets, and now the things which people probably read these papers for are gone. ~ Ben Katchor,
580:I've always believed comics should bring in things like that, and they haven't for a very long time, in general. You always get people complaining, "What's it going to look like in 10 years' time?" It's ridiculous. Everything is going to age. If you try and avoid dating it, you just end up with something that doesn't mean anything. ~ Jamie McKelvie,
581:I was scared to death because for the comics of my generation, HBO specials are like the pinnacle. I'm thinking of all these unbelievable comedians I've seen on HBO: Chris Rock, George Carlin, Damon Wayans, Richard Pryor and Billy Crystal. I started having a panic attack seeing my name in that list of people. It was pretty overwhelming. ~ Bill Burr,
582:Self-publishing in comics is core to the whole artform. There is no scarlet letter in comics as there still is, to some degree, in prose. As no publisher for a long time would publish serious work in comics, the only way a lot of it came out was because of self-publishing. Many of the greatest works of the medium are self-published. ~ Kieron Gillen,
583:That term of endearment brought back old, old memories. Robin’s mind flickered with images of herself as a tiny child, sitting in the Lazenbury’s kitchen, eating Chips Ahoy cookies and drinking apple juice, reading the comics out of the Sunday paper or watching ReBoot, Pirates of Dark Water, or Darkwing Duck on the wood-cabinet Magnavox. ~ S A Hunt,
584:Because I was new to comics, I didn't know what to expect! However, I really like working collaboratively [on Dark Tower series], since I feel that - with so many different imaginations working together - the final product is so much richer. I also feel incredibly lucky to be able to work with such an accomplished and experienced team. ~ Robin Furth,
585:In L.A., a lot of comics live here, but we don't get to spend that much time together because we've got to drive 45 minutes home, or do another set. So in San Francisco we can hang out, go for dinner - the community aspect of it is really lovely, as well as seeing people's shows that you don't normally get to see a longer version of. ~ Maria Bamford,
586:Some comics get drunk before a show. I don't. When I get drunk, I don't want to stand in front of a bunch of people that I don't know. That does not sound comfortable. Why have all these people gathered? And why am I elevated and not facing the same way as everyone else? And what is this electric stick in my hand? I want a chair too! ~ Mitch Hedberg,
587:At practically every level, the way I make comics is an act of improvising within structural boundaries. There's a rough plan, with a beginning, middle and an end, but how I get from one point to another is unknown at the outset, and a large part of what keeps me engaged. It's an exploration for me, and hopefully for the reader as well. ~ Jason Lutes,
588:Comics have the page as their real estate so you've only got that space to tell the story on. But the other thing only comics do is to have the words and pictures being simultaneous. Your brain is flicking between them and you can put in some excellent narrative devices; you can off-set things and juxtapose things between word and image. ~ Leah Moore,
589:Howard Chaykin was one of the few who dared to make mainstream comics different back in the eighties; it was guys like him, Alan Moore and Frank Miller who made sure there'd be no going back. Howard's work on The Shadow is amongst his very best: razor-sharp character work, sizzling dialogue and an unsurpassed sense of layout and design. ~ Garth Ennis,
590:I don't really have any great interest in writing for movies. Comics, to me, is a much more promising field. There's still a lot of ground to be broken in comics, whereas movies, to a degree... I don't know. They're a wonderful art form, but they're not my favorite art form. They might not even be in the top five of my favorite art forms. ~ Alan Moore,
591:Anything really well-made has the effect of making you want to do what you do-better. Abrams has always made very beautiful books. It's exciting to see this same excellence applied to the presentation of comics. Abrams ComicArts shows comics are stepping out of vaudeville and into Carnegie Hall-but the Marx Brothers will always be welcome! ~ Jon J Muth,
592:I get a lot of comics, and I can look at a comic and tell immediately whether I'll enjoy it or not. There are elements in the stories that I have no rapport with. I see dirty language, I see sleazy backgrounds; I see it reflected in the movies, the movies are comics to me. And I don't see a sleazy world. I see hope. I see a positive world. ~ Jack Kirby,
593:The girls that I grew up with, and my friends and I, we just never had interests in common. I loved comedy. I loved Saturday Night Live, Gilda Radner, Lucille Ball, and Goldie Hawn movies. I just wanted to laugh. I liked women in comedy, and I liked male comics as I got a little older. My interests just never matched up with other girls'. ~ Amy Schumer,
594:I think my printing to this day looks like the printing right out of a comic book. Actually, I always wanted to be in a comic book. I watched cartoons when I was a kid, too, and both comics and cartoons lit fire in my imagination. This realm holds a lot of interest for me, a lot of passion for me. So to be comic-ized, yeah, that's cool. ~ Nathan Fillion,
595:I don't know how comic artists feed their families, if they do. But it's a fascinating form and so I think that after a long period of nothing happening and work, nothing very impressive, we are into another golden age of comics. Unfortunately, it's not a golden age for the artists themselves economically. I don't know how they get along. ~ Jules Feiffer,
596:I'd seen all the great entertainers by the time I was 14 or 15. My mother was artistic. My father was a bookmaker, so he had access to all those nightclubs, and he was smitten by certain artists, and we would go see them. We'd see comics like Sid Caesar and Milton Berle - those kind of artists - many of whom I worked with later in my life. ~ Lainie Kazan,
597:And then as I got older, see, I think a lot of times with comics, your life kind of permeates your act. Whatever is happening in your life is what's going on on stage. So if you're angry in your life, then that's going to be on stage. If you're looking for the guy that's just going to make you laugh for an hour and forget about, that's me. ~ Billy Gardell,
598:I looked at the world of books and just went, Oh my gosh, if I'm writing novels, I'm on the same shelves as Jane Austen and Charles Dickens and Petronius - whereas with comics, they've only been doing them for a hundred years, and there's stuff that nobody's done before. I think I'll go off and do some of the stuff no one's ever done before. ~ Neil Gaiman,
599:I think continuity is the devil. I think it's constricting and restrictive, I think it's alienating and off-putting, and it inflicts an artifact of linear time as we experience it on something that exists outside of linear time as well as keeps new readership away by keeping comics a matter of trivia and history rather than actual stories. ~ Matt Fraction,
600:I don't do my show for critics. Early on I did, because I'm a nice guy and I like to be liked by everybody, and I thought, "Hey, I'm just making people laugh, what's the big deal?" There have been all different types of comics that appeal to all different types of people. Why rail on me? But yeah, they really don't like Southern acts. ~ Larry the Cable Guy,
601:One of the comics said he thought I was talented but wouldn't ever make it as a stand-up. It hurt. Looking back now, I can see clearly how experienced comics get bitter. It's a tough business, and often things don't work out the way you think they will. But rage and jealousy comics can feel for others' success is a highly toxic waste of time. ~ Amy Schumer,
602:I’ve always thought that if comics are a part of pop culture [then] they should reflect pop culture, but a lot of the time comics, superhero comics especially, just feed on themselves. For me, comics should take from every bit of pop culture that they can; they’ve got the same DNA as music and film and TV and fashion and all of these things. ~ Kieron Gillen,
603:All our songs are about real people, true events. We do write about DC Comics and things like The Replacements. It's pretty much good conversations that happen at Art Brut shows. It's like making friends - like a Wanted ad: "Man that likes the Replacements and DC Comics wants friends to drink with at venue tonight. Who's coming?" It's like that. ~ Eddie Argos,
604:Here's what I wish people wouldn't ask me: "Who are your influences?" That's a boring question. It's not even like, "What's it like to be a woman in comedy?" That question also happens often in interviews, but I at least understand where it's coming from. "Who are your influences" - I wonder if people ask that of male comics? Maybe they do. ~ Cameron Esposito,
605:I think if you have a comic perspective, almost anything that happens you tend to put through a comic filter. It's a way of coping in the short term, but has no long term effect and requires constant, endless renewal. Hence people talk of comics who are "always on." It's like constantly drugging your sensibility so you can get by with less pain. ~ Woody Allen,
606:I think there's something unique in the fact that her powers come from the same thing that powers him, and that is how we've made them have that kind of... that specifically in common, as opposed to it being something else that the comics kind of created, which has been pure romance. But they do have something uniquely special because of that. ~ Elizabeth Olsen,
607:When the time comes for my current mortal face to end- and it will come, much as I might wish this time could last forever- I will understand the man I must manufacture as my next self all the better because of the children, and their comics. And besides, the X-Men offer many powerful life lessons to which even the eldest among us should attend. ~ Seanan McGuire,
608:The graphic novel? I love comics and so, yes. I don't think we talked about that. We weren't influenced necessarily by graphic novels but we certainly, once the screenplay was done, we talked about the idea that you could continue, you could tell back story, you could do things in sort of a graphic novel world just because we kind of like that world. ~ Todd Farmer,
609:Bob Saget was known, in the comedy clubs in those days, as extremely funny but with dark humor. It was always an inside joke among comics, when he got Full House, it was, like, wow, hes playing this all-American dad kind of thing. That was not Bob Saget. His comedic style is definitely more twisted, and he has an edgier side than he showed in Full House. ~ Bob Saget,
610:The medium of comics is not necessarily about "good drawing"--"It's just an accident when it makes a nice drawing," Spiegelman explained to a curator at the MoMA--but rather about what Spiegelman calls picture-writing and Satrapi calls narrative drawing: how one person constructs a narrative that moves forward in time through both words and images. ~ Hillary L Chute,
611:I make people laugh hard; I'm a comic, that's just the way it is. And I make them laugh because I'm funny, not because I'm filthy. The subject matter is dirty, but the pictures I paint are really funny. A lot of comics don't understand that that's what it's about. It's just, "I'll be dirty and they'll laugh." Nobody's becoming a superstar that way. ~ Andrew Dice Clay,
612:There you have it, Montag. It didn’t come from the Government down. There was no dictum, no declaration, no censorship, to start with, no! Technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure carried the trick, thank God. Today, thanks to them, you can stay happy all the time, you are allowed to read comics, the good old confessions, or trade journals. ~ Ray Bradbury,
613:At conventions I could go a full hour and never see another female. At the first “Females in Comics” panel I attended, there were nine women on the panel and four people in the audience, one of whom was my husband. Powerful talents like Lea Hernandez and Devin were routinely accused of having their work actually written by their husbands or boyfriends. ~ Lynne M Thomas,
614:I do think comics are a dying art form because newspapers are a dying medium. But it's not to say that in the next generation, where there's people getting their news electronically, comics won't survive. Right now, they're still largely attached to the newspaper world. And the more they can break away from that, the more they have a chance to live on. ~ Aaron McGruder,
615:It's not like I would see anyone and be like, "Oh yes, that person looks like maybe I had an impact on them." I don't think I did. I don't think I ever was that well known, to have an impact. And I haven't seen comics that I go, "Oh, yes! That person is terribly unprepared, with their notebook, and going off on 50 tangents. There you are. That's me." ~ Janeane Garofalo,
616:All I can say on the Guilford story - and this comes more from my perspective as a father than an artist - is for parents and administrators to give so little value to the career of a public-school teacher - to allow him to be cast aside without exhausting every avenue to resolve the issue - is an obscenity worse than anything I've ever drawn in my comics. ~ Daniel Clowes,
617:If you want to be a chef or a scientist, you've got to know what the current thinking is, so if you want to write comics or draw comics find out what the very best ones are and look at them all and then you'll know where the bars are because the bars are often very high, if you are going to make a splash and make yourself known, you need to get to that level. ~ Dave McKean,
618:I think in daily newspapers, the way comic strips are treated, it's as if newspaper publishers are going out of their way to kill the medium. They're printing the comics so small that most strips are just talking heads, and if you look back at the glory days of comic strips, you can see that they were showcases for some of the best pop art ever to come out. ~ Matt Groening,
619:On a practical level, I'm uncomfortable at comedy clubs because there are so many shitty dude comics who have made my life miserable. If I go to a comedy club and I look around, I don't know which of the dudes lining the wall told me that I was too fat to get raped. It makes me nauseous. But that was a couple years ago, and meanwhile, comedy has changed a lot. ~ Lindy West,
620:Comics offers tremendous resources to all writers and artists:faithfulness, control, a chance to be heard far and wide without fear of compromise...it offers range and versatility with all the potential imagery of film and painting plus the intimacy of the written word. And all that's needed is the desire to be heard--the will to learn--and the ability to see. ~ Scott McCloud,
621:Underground comics were produced by individuals - they were the auteur variety, rather than the production-line sort of comic book aimed at pleasing a vast general audience. Mainstream comics never appealed to me: they seemed sterile in their stylistic consistency, and were quickly consumed, the stories interesting only for so long as you were reading them. ~ Phoebe Gloeckner,
622:You’ve actually just reminded me. I brought you something.” She had finally assembled the first two issues of the Dr. Eleven comics, and had had a few copies printed at her own expense. She extracted two copies each of Dr. Eleven, Vol. 1, No. 1: Station Eleven and Dr. Eleven, Vol. 1, No. 2: The Pursuit from her handbag, and passed them across the table. ~ Emily St John Mandel,
623:I really discovered [Dr.Strange] through hearing about this film and first meeting Scott [Derrickson] and getting into it and just opening up and saying, "Okay, this is, like all comics, very much of its era," and my first question was, 'How do you make this film? Why do you make this film now?' and the answers were so enticing that I was like, "I'm in." ~ Benedict Cumberbatch,
624:Comic book readers are just as abandoned by the corporate system as the creators, despite the importance supposedly given their hard-earned dollars. The average comics shop can offer only a tiny fraction of an industrywide selection that is itself extremely limited in scope. And even when readers know exactly what they want, the search can be maddeningly futile. ~ Scott McCloud,
625:Nobody knows what will work until they try it. Some of comics' biggest success stories in recent years have explored subjects that no one was writing about at the time - stories no one had any reason to think would succeed. My advice? Write what you want to read. You'll have more fun doing it - and if all else fails, you'll always have at least one loyal reader. ~ Scott McCloud,
626:Comic books sort of follow with the move - if people see the movie and if they're interested in the character and want to see more of the character, they start buying the comic books. So a good movie helps the sale of the comic books and the comic books help the movie and one hand washes the other. So, I don't think there's any reason to think that comics will die out. ~ Stan Lee,
627:I was a voracious reader and I could never understand why comics were of any less merit or importance than any other way of writing. I think the thing that keeps me with comics is there's still so much to be done. There's still this huge unplowed field, this huge unexplored wilderness, and as long as I can keep doing new things and coming up with new things, I will. ~ Neil Gaiman,
628:It's like being a stand-up comedian is what leads to being a talk-show host. That life is not cut out for a woman, being on the road at these disgusting hotels. What girls want to do that? Gross guys want to do that. I think that the dearth in female comics is just the nature of the business, but there certainly isn't a dearth anymore, so I think it's just silly. ~ Chelsea Handler,
629:I don't think comics use iconic forms - or they don't have to. But that makes them even more "cool," if I understand the idea. One has to be quite involved to make comics work. Signals have to be decoded on both the verbal and visual level, simultaneously, and the reader must do a lot of cognitive work between panels as well. Comics definitely need an engaged reader. ~ Jessica Abel,
630:Comics deal with two fundamental communicating devices: words and images. Admittedly this is an arbitrary separation. But, since in the modern world of communication they are treated as independent disciplines, it seems valid. Actually, the are derivatives of a single origin and in the skillful employment of words and images lies the expressive potential of the medium. ~ Will Eisner,
631:I always wanted to give people the more exciting version of what I think a comedian should be - because I didn't grow up with comics, I grew up with rock 'n' roll. And when I saw a lot of comics, no matter how good they might have been material-wise, I would get a little bored with them after 10 minutes, only because I feel comedians don't really know performance. ~ Andrew Dice Clay,
632:The water had got into the seams and joints of the world and washed away the glue. Lives and little universes broke their banks, mingling and bubbling over and flowing out to join the river. Plastic tricycles with peeling sticker eyes, photograph albums, Bic pens, dish brushes, barrettes, uprooted tomato plants. Comics spun giddily, socks sulked against windowsills. ~ Frances Hardinge,
633:Today, although as a whole, the industry is still male-dominated, more women are drawing comics than ever before, and there are more venues for them to see their work in print. In the 1950s, when the comic industry hit an all-time low, there was no place for women to go. Today, because of graphic novels, there's no place for aspiring women cartoonists to go but forward. ~ Trina Robbins,
634:He shucked his shorts, grabbed the newspaper off the nightstand, and plodded to the bathroom to take care of his business. Ensconced on the toilet, waiting for the semi-liquid gush that always came six hours or so after he ate Mexican food (would he never learn?), he opened the Call and rattled his way to the comics, the only part of the local paper that was worth a damn. ~ Stephen King,
635:People who know and read comics know that there's a huge diversity amongst the types of stories. Nobody ever goes 'how many more of these movies based on novels are there going to be?!'. People laugh at that question and they go novels, there are all different types of novels. But there are all different types of comic books, they just happen to have drawings on the cover! ~ Kevin Feige,
636:There's something about courting the darkness that makes some people see the truth in raw, twisted ways, as though they were shining a black light on life to illuminate the absurdity of it all. Comics tell you a truth you can only see from the underside of the psyche. At its best, comedy is prophesy and societal dream interpretation. At its worst it's just dick jokes. ~ Nadia Bolz Weber,
637:I read the Phantom comics when I was in Australia shooting 'Dead Calm'' and when one of the crew told me that there were plans for a movie, I went for it. That was in 1987 and I told (producer) Graham Burke I was going to be the Phantom. We had a laugh about that recently because you usually get what you deserve, not what you desire, and that is especially true in Hollywood! ~ Billy Zane,
638:I started drawing comics, and at first I was very influenced by the whole pop art movement, you know, Batman was on TV and all that pop art stuff? But then my next influence was in 1966, or maybe it was '65, I don't know. Somebody showed me a copy of the "East Village Other", which was an underground newspaper. And... it had comics in it! And they weren't superhero comics. ~ Trina Robbins,
639:The magic of comics is that there are three people involved in any comic: There is whoever is writing it, and whoever is drawing it, and then there's whoever is reading it, because the really important things in comics are occurring in the panel gutters, they're occurring between panels as the person reading the comics is moving you through, is creating a film in their heads. ~ Neil Gaiman,
640:When I got out of college I worked for DC comics. I worked on staff there and I also freelanced for them for about a decade. I spent two years on staff as an editor right out of college. I'm from Los Angeles and I came back here after a couple of years in New York, to go to Graduate School at USC. I wasn't thinking specifically about animation although while I'd worked at DC. ~ Greg Weisman,
641:Almost everyone working in mainstream comics started off as a starry-eyed kid reading and loving comics. We're all fans, and that's great. But when we start working on company-owned comics professionally, we have to think like storytellers instead of fans. Editors aren't looking to hire the biggest fans of the characters. They're looking to hire the best creators with the best ideas. ~ Greg Pak,
642:An extraterrestrial being, newly arrived on Earth - scrutinizing what we mainly present to our children in television, radio, movies, newspapers, magazines, the comics, and many books - might easily conclude that we are intent on teaching them murder, rape, cruelty, superstition, credulity, and consumerism. We keep at it, and through constant repetition many of them finally get it. ~ Carl Sagan,
643:Superman’s cosmopolitan decision could be interpreted simply as DC Comics attempting to appeal to the global market for Superman stuff. Less cynically, though, one blogger said, “It’s refreshing to see an alien refugee tell the United States that it’s as important to him as any other country on Earth—which, in turn, is as important to Superman as any other planet in the multiverse. ~ William Irwin,
644:My parents read the comics to me, and I fell in love with comic strips. I've collected them all of my life. I have a complete collection of all the "Buck Rogers" Sunday funnies and daily paper strips, I have all of "Prince Valiant" put away, all of "Tarzan," which appeared in the Sunday funnies in 1932 right on up through high school. So I've learned a lot from reading comics as a child. ~ Ray Bradbury,
645:I'm more than a little suspicious of humor in poems, because I think it can at times be a way of getting a reaction out of a reader, or an audience, that is something closer to relief: i.e., thank god this isn't poetry, but stand-up comedy. Some poets are really funny, but more often poets are fourth rate stand up comics at best. But they benefit from the sheer relief of the audience. ~ Matthew Zapruder,
646:few hours after I finished The Multiversity: Pax Americana #1 by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely, something happened: I got it. Now, I can’t shake the sense that I read the best superhero single issue of the year. Morrison’s Multiversity project (available digitally on comiXology and Kindle , and in our third party marketplace ) is a grand one for DC Comics: eight single issues--each a #1, and ~ Anonymous,
647:I know "accessibility" is a term that's kind of thrown around wantonly today, especially with talking about visual media. But I think that the strength of comics [is how they] really allow you to transcend those last barriers between a reader absorbing the information of an experience, and a reader being able to project themselves into the [experience of the] people about whom they're reading. ~ Nate Powell,
648:I think writing comics is predicated on being a fan - there's no either/or. I'd argue I'm an even bigger fan now than when I started because I know how the hot dogs get made. And I kinda always saw the moving parts. I think I appreciate the good ones more now that I realize how lousy the production process can be, how hard it can be, and how easily something good can get crushed in its cogs. ~ Matt Fraction,
649:The first kiss ideally signals rapture, exchange of hearts, and imminent marriage. Otherwise it is a kiss that lies. All very crude and nonsensical, and yet it is the staple myth of hundreds of comics called 'Sweethearts,' 'Romantic Secrets' and so forth. The state induced by the kiss is actually self-induced, of course, for few lips are so gifted with electric and psychedelic possibilities. ~ Germaine Greer,
650:Any platform that you use to tell stories helps you regardless of the medium regardless if they are bedtime stories that you tell your children or comics or film. Specifically what makes comics unique is that they are a storytelling device that forces you to think both visually and economically. Some might say you are limited by your imagination, but that is not true because someone has to draw it. ~ Jeph Loeb,
651:I kind of consider myself... I mean, I try to have my comedy be accessible, and if people are paying $30 to see me in a theater and they want to have their picture taken with me, it's not the end of the world. It's one of those things, where I'm not the only comic who does it. A lot of comics do it. If I'm doing a 4,000-seat venue, it might be a little bit of a different task, but it's all good. ~ Jim Gaffigan,
652:Art uses many different styles, but his voice is very consistent. He's always concise and clever and funny. That's true of somebody like Chris Ware, who has an emotional quality to his work - but it's boiled down and it's very sober and spare. Each word has great weight. Comics are not just pictures, but it is graphic design in the sense that they are composed and architected in a specific way. ~ Francoise Mouly,
653:My feeling is that it's one of the very few things that comics can do that you really can't do in any other medium. I feel like the reader accepts all of these styles, and after a certain point you can flip the pages and see a character rendered very differently than you saw on an earlier page, and it's not jarring. It suggests things that you can't suggest just in the writing or in the plotting. ~ Daniel Clowes,
654:Stand-up is an art but since it's humor and it's funny - a lot of guys that don't think it's art are probably coming from the angle that they don't want to take it so seriously. I've always looked at it as an art but I don't look at it as a pretentious art. I understand it has to be taken lightly because it is just comedy in the end, but the good stand-up comics are someone with something to say. ~ Mitch Hedberg,
655:The artists catch what's in the air. It's not because the artist "felt like it" or is a guru who channels the truth of the universe in some opaque, abstract way, or even in a realistic painting. The comics artist is someone who has the humility to set himself up in public culture and to communicate with the reader. If your image doesn't make sense, it's your problem, and I shouldn't publish it. ~ Francoise Mouly,
656:I think it's one thing if you are turning out dozens or even a hundred stories a year, you've got to have a great supporting cast behind you. Superman had a family that developed, and it's only natural that Batman has a family of sorts that developed. I think it's a great way to keep the comics interesting and varied, to appeal to different segments of an audience, to bring new perspectives to it. ~ Michael Uslan,
657:One of the problems I see with these comics on television, particularly cable television, is, since you can say anything in terms of sex and scatological references and so on, therefore, you should do it. So they all limit themselves to these subjects and this vocabulary. My objection is that it is a lack of articulateness. Irreverence is easy, but what is hard is wit. Wit is what these comedians lack. ~ Tom Lehrer,
658:I began to learn about the universe myself and take it seriously. I know the names of the stars. I know how near or far the heavenly bodies are from our own planet. I know our own place in the universe. I can feel the vastness of it inside myself. I began to realize with each passing fact what a wonderful and awesome place the universe is, and that helped me in comics because I was looking for the awesome. ~ Jack Kirby,
659:Make no mistake, everywhere you go, not just in Marvel Comics,
there's parallel universes...Here? On the surface streets: traffic, couples in love,
falafel-to-go, tourists in jogging suits licking stamps for postcards... And over the
wall behind closed doors: other things-people strapped to chairs, sleep deprivation,
the smell of piss...other things happening for "reasons of national
security ~ Joe Sacco,
660:I love writing and the little filmmaking I have attempted, but comics is the means of artistic expression that feels most comfortable to me. It's also still a largely uncharted medium with enormous unrealized potential. I like finding new ways to communicate an idea or a feeling, ways that can't be duplicated in other media, so I take great pleasure in the invention and exploration that comics necessitates. ~ Jason Lutes,
661:We love the famous. The plastic pretties. Airbrushed arses. Fantastic titties. Hunks and comics to entertain us. Make no mistake, we love the famous. We love to praise the rich, it seems. We love to raise our hopes with dreams, Wanting a piece of the luxury action, 'Cos life gives little satisfaction. We'll prop up the famous, buying in To the media con that always spins, To sell mags and rags and movie ~ Harry Whitewolf,
662:The movie style eventually known as ‘Film Noir’ served up hard-bitten crime stories featuring morally bankrupt men and mysterious femme fatales, blending violence and sexual desire into bleak tales of modern life, without clear messages of morality. The comic book industry offered younger readers its own version of the Film Noir mood with a wave of crime comics that began sweeping the newsstands around 1947. ~ Mike Madrid,
663:I just try to make comics for myself, try to give it some kind of unity throughout. That often involves tiny details. I'm never sure what's going to be obvious or what nobody will ever notice. I put stuff in my comics that I thought was blatantly obvious, and nobody noticed. And things that I think are buried in the background, everybody gets it. So I try to be consistently aware of every part of the frame. ~ Daniel Clowes,
664:I loathe high/low art distinctions in any case, so the crossing and re-crossing of that line is an act to be savored and celebrated, regardless of how it turns out. I consider that transgressive aspect of the medium one of its great strengths. In the way comics is both words and pictures while being neither, comics is the Trickster's medium, and as such I would be happy if no one ever knew what to do with it. ~ Jason Lutes,
665:Comic books themselves are getting more literate. And there are people who are screenwriters and television writers and novelists who are writing for the comics, for some reason, they love doing it and some of the art work in the comics, I mean it rivals anything you'll see hanging on the walls of museums, they're illustrations more than drawings and all the people are discovering this and they're turning on to it. ~ Stan Lee,
666:There are a lot of good comics, no doubt, but as far as the quality of the comics goes, I think what you have is a bunch of situational comics - there are black comics that work only black crowds, gay comics that do only gay crowds, and southern comics that only work down South, and so on with Asian, Latino, Indian, midgets, etc. The previous generation's comics were better because they had to make everybody laugh. ~ Chris Rock,
667:I never feel there's anything I can't do with comics. There are certain things in comics that you can't do in any other medium: for instance, in Mister Wonderful, Marshall's narration overlaps the events as they're going on. That would be difficult in film; you could blot speech out with a voiceover, but it wouldn't have the same effect. That's always of interest, to see what new things you can do in comics form. ~ Daniel Clowes,
668:I know what I as an editor respond to is a voice. A voice is not just a stylistic thing, but it means someone who really has something to say. I think a lot of what I get from books - whether they be books of comics or books of literature - is a window into somebody's mind and their way of thinking. Somehow, I can recognize some of my feelings in seeing somebody who is actually expressing their own inner reality. ~ Francoise Mouly,
669:I used to use cigarettes to indicate somebody's an outsider a lot. It gave character a seedy, disreputable, almost suicidal quality. Now cigarettes are so unused - - you can't have anybody indoors smoking. If you drew that in a restaurant, you'd have to have a panel where the manager comes over and kicks them out. Unless it's set in Europe, you can't really do that. Characters who smoke - - it dates comics, somehow. ~ Daniel Clowes,
670:There's the excitement of adding color, which I didn't know anything about until 1997 or so, when I did my first picture book. So, the kid's book in particular have been exciting for me because it forced me to go back to the work I loved as a young boy reading Sunday's supplements and comics in the Sunday papers when I was six, seven, eight, nine. And number of which have been in wonderful collections, beautifully reproduced. ~ Jules Feiffer,
671:I taught myself how to draw, and I soon found out it was what I really wanted to do. I didn't think I was going to create any great masterpieces like Rembrandt or Gauguin. I thought comics was a common form of art, and strictly American in my estimation, because America was the home of the common man - and show me the common man that can't do a comic. So comics is an American form of art that anyone can do with a pencil and paper. ~ Jack Kirby,
672:It also helps that what Dan Slott is doing with Peter Parker in the comics has elevated him to something else, so that Miles Morales at the moment is the more traditional Spider-Man figure in the universe: the high school student trying to balance high school and superheroics, and he can't catch a break. That was Peter's role, but it's not his role anymore, and it's Miles' role. That was given to me, and it's pretty cool. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
673:Nerds are running the world. Andrew Garfield made a movie [called “The Social Network”] about it. Nerds are no longer pariahs and knowing how to write computer code is longer a [mocked] quality. What was important in those early comics was this notion that Peter Parker is an outsider and how we define that in a contemporary context. That, I think, was one of the challenges for us — getting Peter Parker’s outsider status to be current. ~ Marc Webb,
674:As Stephen Krashen and Joanne Ujiie (2005) assert, “Many people are fearful that if children engage in ‘light reading,' if they read comics and magazines they will stay with this kind of reading forever, that they will never go on to more ‘serious' reading. The opposite appears to be the case. The evidence suggests that light reading provides the competence and motivation to continue reading and to read more demanding texts” (p. 6). ~ Donalyn Miller,
675:Just like in the art museum, and notions of beauty and pleasure, if the hero is always a white guy with a squared jaw or pretty woman with big breasts, then kids start thinking that's how it's supposed to be. Part of the problem was that black comic book artists were making super heroes with the same pattern as the white super heroes. When you read a lot of those comics, the black super heroes don't seem to have anything to do. ~ Kerry James Marshall,
676:Underground comics were striking in that they seemed largely unedited - in a typical book, with stories by five to ten creators, some stories would be shockingly bad, and others would be startlingly brilliant. This was a lively and exciting combination. The artwork and stories, good and bad, were all so different - I'd stare at the pages and lose track of time. This was a world where anything could happen, and I wanted to go there. ~ Phoebe Gloeckner,
677:Comics play a trite but lusty tune on the C natural keys of human nature. They rouse the most primitive, but also the most powerful, reverberations in the noisy cranial sound-box of consciousness, drowning out more subtle symphonies. Comics scorn finesse, thereby incurring the wrath of linguistic adepts. They defy the limits of accepted fact and convention, thus amortizing to apoplexy the ossified arteries of routine thought. ~ William Moulton Marston,
678:The other cool thing is, even with Jessica [Johnson], or Daredevil, I had taken a break from those characters for a while in the comics, so I can enjoy the shows without the agita. I completely love the Daredevil show. I feel no physical connection to it, because it was 10 years ago since I wrote that comic, so I can just enjoy it. And when people connect it in a positive way to me, I go, "Well, that's very f - king flattering!" ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
679:Our growing ability to eliminate the slow-moving aspects of entertainment and go hopping from one peak to another is not without cost. Stand-up comics, movie-makers and others who earn their living entertaining no longer "waste" time with setups and plot development, lest we reach for the remote and click them off our screen. The result is a loss of subtlety, anticipation and nuance and, in the process, a coarsening of our discourse. ~ William Raspberry,
680:There are so many comics about violence. I'm not entertained or amused by violence, and I'd rather not have it in my life. Sex, on the other hand, is something the vast majority of us enjoy, yet it rarely seems to be the subject of comics. Pornography is usually bland, repetitive and ugly, and, at most, 'does the job.' I always wanted to make a book that is pornographic, but is also, I hope, beautiful, and mysterious, and engages the mind. ~ Dave McKean,
681:As for comics, one has only to turn to the characteristic output of Marvel Comics, for the period from about 1961 to about 1975, to find not an expression of base and cynical impulses but of good, old-fashioned liberal humanism of a kind that may strike us today, God help us, as quaint, but which nevertheless appealed, in story after story, to ideals such as tolerance, technological optimism, and self-sacrifice for the benefit of others. ~ Michael Chabon,
682:I always get a little bit pissed off when stand-up comedy is not recognised as being as good a craft as being an actor. We give Oscars to people and it's like, 'Aw, this person is the greatest person on earth', but being an actor is pretty easy in comparison to stand-up comedy. It's no surprise that several stand-up comics have gone on to become great actors. I don't know any great actors that have gone on to become great stand-up comics. ~ Jim Jefferies,
683:The fact that we're at a point today where anybody, anywhere can put a comic book together and get it in front of the entire planet without spending a dime on printing and distribution - that's the good thing, and I think that's what's going to save [the comics industry]. These young people who have nothing to do with the industry we're in, just going out there and doing their own work and putting it out there, letting people respond to it. ~ Darwyn Cooke,
684:I'm always tempted in the back of my mind to continue to write things in the Star Trek universe, in the novels or the comics, just because I don't get to play in that universe and I don't get to hang out with those characters any more. You spend hours upon hours of your life, day after day sitting in writers' rooms, talking about these people and these situations, and it becomes very real to you. They're friends of yours, in a lot of ways. ~ Ronald D Moore,
685:Now obviously popularity isn't everything when it comes to stand up comedy, but the art form itself is better today than it ever has before. I think there are more great comics. I think the standard is higher. The critical analysis is a little harsher, but that is also good. Maybe people have a higher standard than before, maybe they are a little more judgmental, a little more brutal, that makes people work harder. It makes the stand up better. ~ Joe Rogan,
686:The unfortunate are not as miserable as the world imagines. That urchins, the handicapped, orphans, prisoners and others are much happier than people think. And that language is a trap, that a dark evolutionary force has created languages to limit human thought. That writers are overrated fools. That all religions come from ancient comic writers. And the ultimate goal of comics is same as the purpose of humanity – to break free from language. ~ Manu Joseph,
687:Alfred Hitchcock talked about planning out his movies so meticulously that when he was actually shooting and editing, it was the most boring thing in the world. But drawing comics isn't like shooting a movie. You can shoot a movie in a few days and be done with it, but drawing a comic takes years and years... That's the biggest part of doing comics: You have to create stuff that makes you want to get out of bed every morning and get to work. ~ Daniel Clowes,
688:I'm working with fragments a lot of the time and the connective tissue isn't there yet. I think of it the way comics work. You have a block here and a block here, and there's this white space in between. Somehow your mind makes the leap to connect those two blocks. Finding a way to trick your mind into connecting those blocks is one of the fun things for me about writing. You can have those leaps that will emerge into something, if you're lucky. ~ Dan Chaon,
689:I would say we had two goals when doing this CD. The first goal is to introduce people who have never seen the show before to the best comics that are on the show. And goal number two is to introduce people that they never heard of before and give you a bit more flavor of what the show is actually like. And those goals are very much in line with the philosophy of the show from the very beginning. It's the very best people who are out there. ~ Scott Aukerman,
690:Knowing Chris Bennett's Writing as I do, I expected Only Superhuman to have an imaginative plot and a compelling superheroine in Emry Blair. What I hadn't expected was for the backstory to make so much sense. Usually science is the first causality of superhero stories, tossed aside with the breezy rationalization: 'Hey, it's comics!' Only Superhuman is, to my knowledge, the first hard science superhero story. And the Story is the better for it. ~ Mike W Barr,
691:The fact is that really no comedian sets out to offend you. Some comics enjoy the challenge of taking a subject that is likely to be found offensive and trying to make it funny‚ but the object is still to make you laugh. Offense is only a calculated risk. It's highly unlikely that a comedian whose only goal was to repulse you would ever make it past an open-mic stage, far less build a long career of touring theatres and television appearances. ~ Doug Stanhope,
692:The Avengers films, ideally, in the grand plan are always big, giant linchpins. It’s like as it was in publishing, when each of the characters would go on their own adventures and then occasionally team up for a big, 12-issue mega-event. Then they would go back into their own comics, and be changed from whatever that event was. I envision the same thing occurring after this movie, because the Avengers roster is altered by the finale of this film. ~ Kevin Feige,
693:So this is me: Friday Valentina. Twenty-year old media studies student at MacArthur University. I’m short and my hair is purple this week. I wear vintage political t-shirts because they’re hilarious and tragic at the same time. I’m obsessed with superheroes—the real ones, not the ones in comics or movies or cartoons. My vlog is the Friday Report: three parts superhero news to three parts superhero snark. That’s what I call balanced journalism. ~ Tansy Rayner Roberts,
694:Are u at the airport yet? Yep. They pushed my flight back to 3 so I’m going to be sitting here awhile. That sux. What r u gonna do? Gonna hit the food court. Gonna hit it so hard it CRIES. Mom got the bike going. She’s out riding around. She wearing her helmet? Yes. I made her. Coat too. Good for you. That coat adds +5 to all armor rolls. LOL. I love u. Have a safe flight. If I die in a plane crash remember to always bag and board your comics. Love you too. ~ Joe Hill,
695:I saw the comics in the East Village Other, and they weren't superhero comics, they were all about hippies and all about things hippies were interested in. And there was one page in particular, a full page strip called "Gentle's Trip Out" signed "Panzika", and it was totally, totally psychedelic, and really, I don't know if it made any sense at all but it looked so great, and I thought, "This is what I want to do, this is my big influence," and it was. ~ Trina Robbins,
696:I have been a comic book fan nearly all my life. My fascination began as a refuge after my father left because it was within the stories told in comics that I could find heroes who fought for justice and where outcasts or misfits could find purpose and commonality. But over time I have come to love comics as a medium for its ability to tell stories with tremendous depth and emotion that in some ways go beyond what is possible solely with the written word. ~ Andrew Aydin,
697:Call it freedom, it’s based on control. Everybody connected together, impossible anybody should ever get lost, ever again. Take the next step, connect it to these cell phones, you’ve got a total Web of surveillance, inescapable. You remember the comics in the Daily News? Dick Tracy’s wrist radio? It’ll be everywhere, the rubes’ll all be begging to wear one, handcuffs of the future. Terrific. What they dream about at the Pentagon, worldwide martial law. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
698:Comedy is very interesting because you can very quickly cross into dangerous territory. I mean look at what happened, unfortunately, (in) Paris a couple of weeks ago. They were making comics - which were really satire - but it offended people. I'm not saying the reaction was justified but there's definitely a line when you're doing comedy or satire and how it might affect somebody. That's the thing you have to watch and I think you have to be respectful of it. ~ Corbin Bernsen,
699:Arguably the first female detective in comics, Sally the Sleuth has a strange history, evolving from a nudie girl in distress to a business-suit-wearing power detective a decade later.
(...)
Sally’s tales don’t end with the era of pre-comic-book pulps. She was brought back in the 1950s in Crime Smashers, a rough-and-tumble crime comic anthology series published by Culture’s sister company, Trojan. New creators handled her adventures, now in bold, full color. ~ Hope Nicholson,
700:I think it's easier for African American and white comics to be praised than it is Latinos because they think our culture or our humor is substandard. I mean, I just don't think they want to give us credit. I just don't think that they see us as important enough to be at their level. I'm the longest-produced comedy at Warner Bros. and I don't feel special. They come over and say hello. But everybody's gonna make a lot of money and I don't feel like I'm special to them. ~ George Lopez,
701:It's a mystery to me why comics have been so despised for so long. Obviously, it has to do with the history of the medium - arising out of cheaply-reprinted booklets of newspaper strips, just out to make a quick buck, followed by mostly-crappy original work. It took a while for really talented artists to move into the comic-book world from the newspapers. It really is strange that even TV commercials got respect before comics did. I have never been able to figure it out. ~ Jessica Abel,
702:When we started talking to our actors and to our directors, this is with all due respect to the film, if you want to know what we're not doing, go watch the movie. If you want to know what we're doing, it's very much steeped in the world of the comics, but it also has a life of its own and that's really what television and our films really do is that we take the best....We hope and we're very confident that this is the beginning of something that's very exciting on Netflix. ~ Jeph Loeb,
703:An extraterrestrial being, newly arrived on Earth—scrutinizing what we mainly present to our children in television, radio, movies, newspapers, magazines, the comics, and many books—might easily conclude that we are intent on teaching them murder, rape, cruelty, superstition, credulity, and consumerism. We keep at it, and through constant repetition many of them finally get it. What kind of society could we create if, instead, we drummed into them science and a sense of hope? ~ Anonymous,
704:In the Depression, besides everybody being poor, our entertainment was much more primitive and innocent. The comic strip, which I so venerated, was still a very new form. Movies had just become talkies. Radio had just gone coast to coast for the first time. Network radio had just begun when I was a kid. So all of these forms were more or less in their infancy, and feeling their oats. Comics were fresh and funny and nervy, and in a sense, defiant of the prevailing culture. ~ Jules Feiffer,
705:Something peculiar has happened. As I write, none of the Republican candidates for Senate has become a public embarrassment. On the contrary: For the first time in a decade, it is the Democratic candidates, not the Republican ones, who are fodder for late-night comics. That the Democrats are committing gaffes and causing scandals at a higher rate than Republicans not only may be decisive in the battle for the Senate. It could signal a change in our politics at large. ~ Matthew Continetti,
706:Doctor Doom was exactly the sort of bastard who would have armed al-Qaeda with death rays and killer robots if he thought for one second it would piss off the hated Reed Richards and the rest of his mortal enemies in the Fantastic Four, but here he was sobbing with the best of them, as representative not of evil, but of Marvel Comics' collective shock, struck dumb and moved to hand-drawn tears by the thought that anyone could hate America and its people enough to do this. ~ Grant Morrison,
707:Cartooning is completely different from other media: it is closely related to film and prose, other narrative forms, but the skills needed to realize a story are very different, and include not only drawing and writing dialogue and narration, but graphic design and the ability to depict time passing visually. It's a whole suite of skills that has to go into making a comics page, skills that are quite distinct from those that go into writing a page of prose, or making a film. ~ Jessica Abel,
708:I think that's there are a couple of reasons for that. One is as you're introducing the fourth and fifth versions of these MacGuffins that we've been playing with for a long time, you wanna do something different with them and not just have them be an object passed around. So the notion that something is inherent in the literal body of one of your lead heroes is interesting. And the idea that the Eye of Agamotto's a great relic over the course of Doctor Strange comics anyway. ~ Kevin Feige,
709:In animation, you may be working with 20 writers, and everybody has to write the same thing. You can't have episodes that don't feel like they belong. In comics, you're gonna write a whole run, which means it's your style that's coming through. But when you're working on a show that's collaborated with a dozen other writers, you have to have a style that blends the show together. So you can't write it the way you normally would, because your script will stand out from all the others. ~ Marv Wolfman,
710:It's one of the reasons why Spider-Man: Homecoming is so exciting. Because it's a new genre for us, a new character, the first time that Spider-Man is in our cinematic universe and you can see what he was meant to be in the comics. He's such a young teenager in comparison to these other heroes. But I think, because we're film fans who go and see everything, it's much more natural that you're inspired by other work. And then of course that influences your work, and the way you make films. ~ Kevin Feige,
711:I'm interested in the fact that comics are people who are oddly courageous in their desire and their commitment to sacrificing any sense of normalcy in their lives, any sense of security, and most of them are oddly unique individuals. Let's have a broader conversation with people that have spent their last however-many-years thinking about their lives. I mean, they're philosophers. They're poets. They're people who are on the outside looking in at the world through a different set of values. ~ Marc Maron,
712:Whatever they are, can Comics be "Art"? Of course they can. The "Art" in a piece is something independent of genre, form, or material. My feeling is that most paintings, most films, most music, most literature and, indeed, most comics fail as "Art." A masterpiece in any genre, form or material is equally "good." It's ridiculous to impose a hierarchy of value on art. The division between high and low art is one that cannot be defended because it has no correlation to aesthetic response. ~ Phoebe Gloeckner,
713:I stopped at the front desk, about to complain to the doorman, when I was confronted with a NEW doorman, my age but balding and homely and FAT. Three glazed jelly doughnuts AND two steaming cups of extra-dark HOT chocolate opened to the comics and it struck me that I was infinitely better-looking, more successful and richer than this poor bastard would ever be and so with a passing rush of sympathy I smiled and nodded a curt though not impolite good morning without lodging a complaint. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
714:The beauty with comics - and also the risk - is it is a far smaller number of voices. It's the writer and the artist and to a lesser extent the editor, who typically is the silent partner, if you've got a good enough team. Whatever you put out is the author's intent. You have to be able to defend that, of course. You have no one to hide behind, or no one to blame but yourselves, which I find refreshing because I've found in film too many times I've been blamed for other people's decisions. ~ Eric Heisserer,
715:I think my leap into TV and movies and comics is in a way natural because I'm a visual storyteller. If you look at any one of my short stories or novels, they sort of unscroll cinematically. Every scene is concrete in my mind. I can walk around the room and pick things up. I can describe at length every feature on the character, though I might only supply a glimpse of this on the page. So if I'm writing color into that I'm also writing texture, I'm pushing the image more than anything else. ~ Benjamin Percy,
716:The good part of what comics trains you to do is it trains you - especially if you've worked in mainstream comics like Marvel and DC, or if you're just doing your own independent comics - to compartmentalize things and work on multiple things at the same time. And that's a skill that is incredibly handy in Hollywood, because within the first year that you get here, you realize there's a reason why every successful person in Hollywood has like seven or eight projects up in the air at any point. ~ Ed Brubaker,
717:but most Canadians, like most Americans, have a shockingly poor grasp of their own history. Dates, people, the large and small nuances of events have all been reduced to the form and content of Classic Comics. This isn’t a complaint. It’s an acknowledgment that people are busy with other things and generally glance at the past only on holidays. Given our hectic schedules, the least I can do is to provide a little historical background so no one will feel left out when our story gets complicated. ~ Thomas King,
718:There's a thing that creeps into this conversation ... that if you complain about the depiction of women [in comics], it becomes, 'Well, but ladies - the dudes are idealized too.' And the thing is that the dudes are idealized for strength and the women are idealized for sexual availability. It's very, very different. The women's costumes are cut in such a way that I could give a cervical exam to 90% of our heroines. And I don't have a medical degree! So if I can find it, that's impressive. ~ Kelly Sue DeConnick,
719:The dirty little secret about comics is that the wall to getting published is actually not that high. You can publish your own comic. You can have your comic printed by the same people that print Marvel and DC and Image's comics for, I think, it's about $2,000 for a print run. So you can Kickstart it and get your own comic made. It depends on what is considered success to you. So if you need to be published by the Big Two to feel that you've made it, well, you should start working very hard. ~ Kelly Sue DeConnick,
720:I wasn't sure what I wanted to do with my life. I always wanted to pursue either music or comics, so when the opportunity came from comics publisher Fantagraphics for my brothers Jaime and Mario and I to make a comic book together, we jumped at the chance: "Let's just do it and see what happens." Really, we weren't sure where we were going to go with it. We thought our work was good enough to be out there, but we didn't know that the response was going to be pretty good, pretty quick. ~ Gilberto Hernandez Guerrero,
721:I recently realized that I'm gender-fluid - I didn't even know that was a term until recently - but I have a strong effeminate side and identify with women in that way. Because women would make jokes and they were all really funny, but the straight male comics always said "faggot," or they had some really awful gay joke. And so it's like, I'm just going to watch the ladies because they don't - I'm sure there are, but I couldn't even tell you one woman comic that I've ever heard say the word "faggot." ~ Pandora Boxx,
722:Pop culture. Nobody does bullshit better than us. Right? China took over manufacturing. And the Middle East has us on fossil fuels. That's just geography and politics. We're a nation of whacko immigrants. Scavengers and con men. We crossed the ocean on faith, stole some land and stone-cold made up a whole country out of nothing but balls and bullshit. Superhero comics got invented by crazy genius Jews who showed up and revamped the refugee experience into a Man of Steel sent from Krypton with a secret identity. ~ Damon Suede,
723:Simon:“I thought your parents were okay with you, you know, coming out.”
Alec: “My mother has accepted it. But my father- no, not really. Once he asked me what I thought had turned me gay.”
Isabelle: “Turned you gay? Alec, you didn’t tell me that.”
Simon:“I hope you told him you were bitten by a gay spider.”
Alec:“I’ve read Magnus’ s stash of comics so I actually know what you’re talking about. So would that give me the proportional gayness of a spider?”
Magnus:“Only if It was a really gay spider. ~ Cassandra Clare,
724:Well it's been about 100 years and every attempt at a comics writers' union has failed miserably. There is, sadly, a long history of short-term thinking and self-destructive behavior among my fellow comic book creators. No matter how many horror stories they have heard they won't even go so far as to hire themselves a lawyer when they need it. It breaks my heart. I am a very proud union member of the Writers Guild. And I can't imagine my fellow comic creators being able to pull something like this together. ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
725:Comics are reflective of what's going on in larger culture. Wonder Woman came to be in her position when women were first entering the workplace in numbers during the war. Then Wonder Woman had another rise in the '70s when Gloria Steinem latched on to her as an icon for the [feminist] movement. I think we're seeing another wave of feminism today, a fourth wave characterized by intersectionality and the internet. And I think it falls right in line that we would see another wave of superheroines coming to the fore. ~ Kelly Sue DeConnick,
726:DC Comics is the present day publisher of Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and other well-known superheroes. DC is the amalgamation of two different publishing concerns: National Comics, which produced Superman and Batman, and sister company All-American Comics, which produced Wonder Woman, Flash, and Green Lantern. The two companies merged in 1944 to form National Periodical Publications, whose comic books bore the “Superman-DC” logo. The publisher was known colloquially as “DC,” which it later adopted as its official name. ~ Mike Madrid,
727:I don't know what the comics community could do to make everyone feel welcome; I'm cynical and unsure if everyone can feel welcome, simply because so many people have conflicting ideas of what is welcoming, but I think that calling out creators and comic industry people who have harassed people and/or been abusive is a good first step. If we create a culture where those kinds of actions can no-longer go unchecked, then more people may feel welcome to participate and know that they will be heard if they experience unfairness. ~ Liz Prince,
728:The 'medium' is unaware of its attractiveness, that's all. Everyone loves comics. I've proven this to my own satisfaction by handing them out to acountants, insurance brokers, hairdressers, mothers of children, black belts, pop stars, taxi drivers, painters, lesbians, doctors etc. etc. The X-Files, Buffy, the Matrix, X-Men - mainstream culture is not what it once was when science fiction and comics fans huddled in cellars like Gnostic Christians dodging the Romans. We should come up into the light soon before we suffocate. ~ Grant Morrison,
729:So if I may give a word of advice to any young writer who, despite the odds, wants to take a shot at being funny, it is this: Steal. Steal an idea that you know is good, and try to reproduce it in a setting that you know and understand. It will become sufficiently different from the original because you are writing it, and by basing it on something good, you will be learning some of the rules of good writing as you go along. Great artists may merely be “influenced by” other artists, but comics “steal” and then conceal their loot. ~ John Cleese,
730:4
BE SO GOOD THEY CAN’T IGNORE YOU Here’s comedian Steve Martin’s advice to young comics: “Be so good they can’t ignore you.” Love it. Life favors the devoted. The more you give to life, the more life sends back. It’s just not possible for you to be great at what you do, always reaching for your brilliance and standing for excellence, and not win in the end. (Jerry Garcia of The Grateful Dead once said, “You do not merely want to be the best of the best. You want to be considered the only ones who do what you do.”) Sometimes ~ Robin S Sharma,
731:To journalists my move from comics to films to best-selling novels was resembling those little evolutionary maps too much, where you see the fish, and then it can walk, and then it's an ape and then it gets up on its hind legs and finally it is a man. I didn't like that. I didn't like the fact that there was something rather amphibious about me - at least in their heads - back when I was writing comics. So I like continuing to write comics, if only because it points out that I haven't just started to walk upright or left the water. ~ Neil Gaiman,
732:In that sense, “otaku” referred to a sudden, spontaneous, and, to most Japanese, inexplicable eruption of extreme obsessiveness among the country’s youth. One day, Japanese in their teens and twenties were normal, well-adjusted young people. The next day, or so it seemed, they were hopeless geeks who had forsaken all social skills in favor of a deep dive into—whatever. Manga (comics). Anime. Super-hard-core deviant anime porn in which tender young schoolgirls are violated by multi-tentacled octopi. Trains. It could be anything really. ~ Frank Rose,
733:I didn't know why I was coming to this room. Someone just told me to go to Sam Raimi's office. I knew that I uniquely had the comics version of his job, which was to take Spider-Man and put him into the modern day. But I thought, "Maybe he wants to tell me to cut it out." So I come in, it's in his office, and then Stan Lee comes in, and I'd only ever met Stan as a fan, not as a professional. And then they sit us down on a couch, and roll in an AV cart with a TV on it and go, "We're going to show you the first cut of Spider-Man." ~ Brian Michael Bendis,
734:It just seems like right now we’re in a place where people are being witch-hunted for expressing an opinion. Even if it’s a lousy opinion or a shitty opinion, and comics I don’t think can ever fall into the trap of any groups that want to censor what a person says or thinks or punish a person for expressing what they think. Anything you say about a social issue is going to offend half the country. I don’t care how nicely you say it, I don’t care how well you construct the joke, simply by stating the opinion, you are for something and anti something else. ~ Jim Norton,
735:It always pisses me off when I’m calling in to some Morning Zoo radio show to promote God-only-knows what—probably this book, so get ready, I’m comin’—when the DJ actually tries to convince me that there are as many female comics as male ones. Cue hypermasculine Morning Zoo Hacky McGee voice: “So Kath, I don’t know what you chicks are always complaining about.” To which I respond: “Really? Why don’t you call your local comedy club and ask for the Saturday night lineup? I guarantee you the male to female ratio is going to be about nine to one. You dick-wad. ~ Kathy Griffin,
736:But the trouble with sainthood these days is the robe-and-halo imagery that gets stuck onto it." Carl got that brooding look again. "People forget that robes were street clothes once... and still are, in a lot of places. And halos are to that fierce air of innocence what speech balloons in comics are to the sound of the voice itself. Shorthand. But most people just see an old symbol and don't bother looking behind it for the meaning. Sainthood starts to look old-fashioned, unattainable... even repellent. Actually, you can see it all around, once you learn to spot it. ~ Diane Duane,
737:I think people have this "It can't hurt to ask" mentality, which is true on some level. I get comics like, "Hey, will you look at these videos of me on MySpace?" I was like, "Well, who's gonna benefit from that? What if I don't like you?" No, I'm gonna write to a stranger and say, "Hi. You like me, and I don't like you. And now I feel bad when I didn't need to feel bad, because you put me on the spot." Or like, "Can I open for you?" Well, I've never seen you work, so no. I certainly made awkward mistakes when I was starting out, and they're just trying to have a career. ~ Todd Barry,
738:How had he got here? Only a few minutes ago he'd been a kid, riding his bike to school, collecting comics, doing homework and watching TV. Over the years, a few trappings of adulthood had insinuated themselves into his life withoutmaking significant inroads. Real adult life seemed to exist over there, somewhere as distant and unreachable as Uranus. He had no idea how people crossed over to this place, or why - the demands of being grown up seemed exhausting. Look how I work all the time. See my silky girlfriend. Watch me exchange money for food. Admire my blood pressure. ~ Meg Rosoff,
739:I had done a couple TV pilots, and a friend of mine wanted to leave comics and come work in Hollywood, and I said, "Well, you've got to understand that when you sell a TV pilot, imagine if you turned in the best issue of Batman ever, and DC was like, 'Well we love this, but we can't publish it because we have to publish this other thing by this other person." The odds are really long on getting anything made, so if you come from comics and you're still making a living in comics, that really helps because you're not desperate for someone's permission to write for a living. ~ Ed Brubaker,
740:Nowadays I’m really cranky about comics. Because most of them are just really, really poorly written soft-core. And I miss good old storytelling. And you know what else I miss? Super powers. Why is it now that everybody’s like “I can reverse the polarity of your ions!” Like in one big flash everybody’s Doctor Strange. I like the guys that can stick to walls and change into sand and stuff. I don’t understand anything anymore. And all the girls are wearing nothing, and they all look like they have implants. Well, I sound like a very old man, and a cranky one, but it’s true. ~ Joss Whedon,
741:Historically different groups find different things in each comics, as with *X-Men*. Gay readers find parallels to living a closeted lifestyle or choosing to come out and be openly gay. Black readers find a relevance to their lives growing up in America as a black guy. Picked-on brainy kids find a metaphor for being an outsider. It's a simple enough, and direct enough metaphor that it has different shades for different people. And so each reader to some degree gets out of it what they bring to it. That's one of the things I think that makes *X-Men* such a strong property. ~ Tom Brevoort,
742:When DC Comics was trying to figure out how to retool Wonder Woman’s image to make her cooler, they looked at another Diana—Diana Rigg. Rigg had caused a stir as Mrs. Emma Peel when the British TV series The Avengers was imported to the US in 1966. Mrs. Peel defined the heroine of the mod ’60s—brilliant as she was beautiful, witty, champion fencer, martial arts ex-pert, modern artist, crack shot with a pistol, and fearless secret agent. Attired in sleek black leather catsuits or mod body stockings, Emma Peel was a true force to be reckoned with, combining beauty, brains, and power. ~ Mike Madrid,
743:Most comics are not truly rebellious or creatively free. Most comics, paintings, music, etc., are derivative of other, more successful works. And it's quite often that those without much rebellious spirit are the ones to imitate it. Genuine radical expression is hard to come by, but it usually crops up when money is not a motivating factor. You can take all the liberties you want when someone else's dime is not at stake. The validation is not a threat to comics. A far greater threat to the creative freedom of artists working in any medium is self-consciousness and self-censorship. ~ Phoebe Gloeckner,
744:Comics are a "young" art form, and there is much confusion as to how to treat them. Images have more immediate impact than words, and it is not every reader who can be convinced to relax into experiencing the work for what it is - not words and pictures, but a different form, where the narrative is propelled by the blending of image, word and sequence, and where no element can be extricated and have the same meaning by itself. When this art is shown in a gallery, its "thingness" is called to attention, it is no longer experienced as "story," but rather as an artifact of the artist's process. ~ Phoebe Gloeckner,
745:I don’t think there is such a thing as a bad book for children. Every now and again it becomes fashionable among some adults to point at a subset of children’s books, a genre, perhaps, or an author, and to declare them bad books, books that children should be stopped from reading. I’ve seen it happen over and over; Enid Blyton was declared a bad author, so was R. L. Stine, so were dozens of others. Comics have been decried as fostering illiteracy. It’s tosh. It’s snobbery and it’s foolishness. There are no bad authors for children, that children like and want to read and seek out, because every child is different. ~ Neil Gaiman,
746:I borrowed a copy of Myths of the Norsemen by Roger Lancelyn Green and read and reread it with delight and puzzlement: Asgard, in this telling, was no longer a Kirbyesque Future City but was a Viking hall and collection of buildings out on the frozen wastes; Odin the all-father was no longer gentle, wise, and irascible, but instead he was brilliant, unknowable, and dangerous; Thor was just as strong as the Mighty Thor in the comics, his hammer as powerful, but he was . . . well, honestly, not the brightest of the gods; and Loki was not evil, although he was certainly not a force for good. Loki was . . . complicated. ~ Neil Gaiman,
747:I may have said that stories can have a multitude of false starts. But now that I think about it, I'm not sure there's any such thing. It's sort of like the best comics — frames burst into one another, and colours bleed between lines, and the richness of a universe is only fully graspable when you understand the prequels and crossovers and spin-offs and stuff. Like the superhero stories that veer through a thousand different incarnations, with no beginning or end. It's possible that this is a rubbish metaphor. My point is, most stories can only start when you place yourself in them.
And I think I'm ready, finally, to draw myself in mine. ~ Melissa Keil,
748:I love those dark moments in Peanuts. I love that they're in there, that Charles Schulz put the sad lonely bits of himself into the comic. I love the silliness too, the dancing Snoopy strips. The little boy Rerun drawing "basement" comics about Tarzan fighting Daffy Duck in a helicopter. Those are the bits that keep me reading. The funny parts! The fun parts. The silly bits that don't make any sense. And when I get to the sad lonely Peppermint Patty standing in a field wondering why nobody shook hands and said "good game," well, it works because that's not all she was. I try to think that way about everything. That's the kind of person I want to be. ~ Joey Comeau,
749:You know,” I tease, “you still haven’t told me why you’re here. You were…passing by? Wanted
to brag about getting a week off from school?”
“Oh. Uh, right.” Josh sort of laughs and glances out my window. “I was just wondering if you
wanted to go out.”
Holy.
Shit.
“I’m on my way to Album,” he continues, referring to a nearby comics shop. “Since we were
talking about that new Sfar earlier, I thought if you weren’t busy, you might want to come along.”
…Oh.
My heart beats like a cracked-out drummer. Josh, don’t do that to a lady. I’m still clutching the
book about the shipwreck, so I set it down to wipe my sweaty palms. “Sure". ~ Stephanie Perkins,
750:An Old Life
Snow fell in the night.
At five-fifteen I woke to a bluish
mounded softness where
the Honda was. Cat fed and coffee made,
I broomed snow off the car
and drove to the Kearsarge Mini-Mart
before Amy opened
to yank my Globe out of the bundle.
Back, I set my cup of coffee
beside Jane, still half-asleep,
murmuring stuporous
thanks in the aquamarine morning.
Then I sat in my blue chair
with blueberry bagels and strong
black coffee reading news,
the obits, the comics, and the sports.
Carrying my cup twenty feet,
I sat myself at the desk
for this day's lifelong
engagement with the one task and desire.
~ Donald Hall,
751:She’d read countless fantasy novels where the heroine was a chosen one, picked from all others to save the world, normally wearing a chainmail bikini as she hacked and slashed her way to slay the dark lord, or banish the demon back to hell. Offhand, she couldn’t recall any novel where the chosen one had simply been a case of mistaken identity. And in the books where there was no tinge of destiny, the heroine was almost always supremely competent. What was she going to do? Impress Shadye by her masterful grasp of role-playing games, creative writing, and wasting time browsing the internet and reading web-comics? She didn’t even have a homicidal rabbit with a switchblade on her side. ~ Christopher G Nuttall,
752:Jack Byrne’s Fiction House became known for its powerful, invincible female heroes. At a time when many publishers had none, Fiction House employed more than twenty women artists.46 The popularity of comics soared. Gaines, who did not tend to hire women to do anything except secretarial work, began publishing All-American Comics in 1939. That same year, Superman became the first comic-book character to have an entire comic book all to himself; he could also be heard on the radio.47 The first episode of Batman appeared in Detective Comics #27, in May 1939. Three months later, Byrne Holloway Marston, staff artist for the Marston Chronicle, drew the first installment of “The Adventures of Bobby Doone. ~ Jill Lepore,
753:All the comics are sigils. "Sigil" as a word is out of date. All this magic stuff needs new terminology because it's not what people are being told it is at all. It's not all this wearying symbolic misdirection that's being dragged up from the Victorian Age, when no-one was allowed to talk plainly and everything was in coy poetic code. The world's at a crisis point and it's time to stop bullshitting around with Qabalah and Thelema and Chaos and Information and all the rest of the metaphoric smoke and mirrors designed to make the rubes think magicians are 'special' people with special powers. It's not like that. Everyone does magic all the time in different ways. "Life" plus "significance" = magic. ~ Grant Morrison,
754:One day after the exams, the teachers sat at their desks correcting papers while the pupils read comics, played chess or cards or talked quietly in groups. Coulter at a desk in front of Thaw turned round and said, "What are ye reading?"

Thaw showed a book of critical essays on art and literature.

Coulter said accusingly, "You don't read that for fun."

"Yes, I read it for fun."

"People our age don't read that sort of book for fun. They read it to show they're superior."

"But I read this sort of book even when there's nobody around to see me."

"That shows you arenae trying to make us think you're superior, you're trying to make yourself think you're superior. ~ Alasdair Gray,
755:Mother made sure her little kids were subjected to a strict routine. We were given a timetable which covered our every waking moment, copies of which were posted by our bedside, in the sitting room and in the kitchen. Story hour meant that mother would read us novels and short stories by Guy de Maupassant, Oscar Wilde and Edmondo de Amicis. Soon we graduated to Tolstoy, Gogol and Turgenev. She read them to us in Chinese and I never realised until much later that the writers wrote them in different European languages. Comics were absolutely forbidden and so were Enid Blyton adventures and pop music. . .Lee Cyn and I soon went to a primary school nearby. . .After mother’s rigorous timetable, school became fun and easy-going. ~ Ang Swee Chai,
756:When I was a kid watching comedians on TV and listening to their records they were the only ones that could make it all seem okay. They seemed to cut through the bullshit and disarm fears and horror by being clever and funny. I don't think I could have survived my childhood without watching stand-up comics. When I started doing comedy I didn't understand show business. I just wanted to be a comedian. Now, after twenty-five years of doing stand-up and the last two years of having long conversations with over two hundred comics I can honestly say they are some of the most thoughtful, philosophical, open-minded, sensitive, insightful, talented, self-centred, neurotic, compulsive, angry, fucked-up, sweet, creative people in the world. ~ Marc Maron,
757:It wasn't until the show was almost over that I figured out what it was: the crack above my David Onica that I had asked the doorman to tell the superintendent to fix. On my way out this morning, I stopped at the front desk, about to complain to the doorman, when I was confronted with a NEW doorman, my age but balding and homely and FAT. Three glazed jelly doughnuts AND two steaming cups of extra-dark HOT CHOCOLATE lay on the desk in front of him beside a copy of the Post opened to the comics and it struck me that I was infinitely better-looking, more successful and richer than this poor bastard would ever be and so with a passing rush of sympathy I smiled and nodded a curt though not impolite good morning without lodging a complaint. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
758:Wanna know what a bullet feels like, Warren? A real one? It’s not like in the comics…I think you need to. Feel it…It’s not going to make a neat little hole. First - it’ll obliterate your internal organs. Your lung will collapse, feels like drowning…When it finally hits your spine, it’ll blow your central nervous system-…I’m talking. The pain will be unbearable, but you won’t be able to move… A bullet usually travels faster than this, of course. But the dying? It seems like it takes forever. Something, isn’t it? One tiny piece of metal destroys everything. It ripped her insides out… It took her light away. From me. From the world… And now the one person who should be here is gone - and a waste like you gets to live. A tiny piece of metal. Can you feel it now? ~ Joss Whedon,
759:...it was Sheena, Queen of the Jungle, who released the most issues. Appearing in two of the top five most prolific comics (Jumbo Comics as well as her own title) Sheena was also Queen of the Comics.
(...)
The publisher of Sheena, Fiction House, was a fascinating company. Because of a shortage of male creatives caused by World War II, Fiction House hired women for all creative roles. Artist Murphy Anderson (Superman, Hawkman), who worked for Fiction House as a teenager, remembered that only a few men were present in the office. Notable artists in the company’s bullpen include Lily Renée, who had escaped from Nazi-occupied Austria, and Marcia Snyder, a queer artist who lived with her girlfriend in Greenwich Village. Perhaps hiring so many women explains why Fiction House produced an abundance of female-centric stories. ~ Hope Nicholson,
760:The bigger the population, the more minorities. Don't step on the toes of the dog-lovers, the cat-lovers, doctors, lawyers, merchants, chiefs, Mormons, Baptists, Unitarians, second-generation Chinese, Swedes, Italians, Germans, Texans, Brooklynites, Irishmen, people from Oregon or Mexico...The bigger your market, Montag, the less you handle controversy, remember that! All the minor minorities with their navels to be kept clean. Authors, full of evil thoughts, lock up your typewriters. They did...There you have it Montag. It didn't come from the Government down. There was no dictum, no declaration, no censorship, to start with, no! Technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure carried the trick, thank God. Today, thanks to them, you can stay happy all the time, you are allowed to read comics, the good old confessions, or trade journals. ~ Ray Bradbury,
761:Hello, Master. I'm running now—but I've had time to reflect on your teachings. You say the living sometimes have to suffer to serve a larger goal. I've seen how you live by that. Well, I have a goal now, too. Justice. For myself, for my friends, for the people sacrificed to the plans of the so-called infallible. And it will definitely involve some suffering. Because, you see, I've had a vision of my own. One day, one of you is going to confess and clear my name. And to make sure, I'm going to hunt down each and every one of you. The one that confesses, lives. I don't care which one of you does it. It doesn't matter where they send you. You have a death mark, same as me. Don't look for me, Lucien. Because I'll find you. And if I do end up collapsing the Jedi Order, just remember one thing. You started it."

-Zayne Carrick, KOTR comics ~ John Jackson Miller,
762:Riley: I have to ask you something.
Heroine: Shoot…
Riley: Bear with me. I can’t believe that we haven’t discussed this yet so I’m a little nervous.
Heroine: Now I’m nervous.
Riley: You have nothing to worry about. Your life will continue just fine. It’s mine that might come crashing down here.
Riley: How do you feel about comics and superheroes?
Heroine: DC or Marvel?
Heroine: Nevermind, that’s a terrible question. I’d never want to choose. I love the ensembles. The Avengers, the X-Men, the Justice League.
Heroine: But I haven’t read any in 20 years. I’ve caught up with the movies as they’ve been released, though. Most of them have been really good.
Heroine: Are you still with me?
Riley: Yes. Sorry. I just spontaneously orgasmed.
Heroine: What?
Riley: Nothing. But I’ll talk to you later. Something just popped up. ~ Kate Canterbary,
763:I don’t even know what the big deal is. If you ask me, society really does make way too much out of it. It’s like we want to glorify the process of procreation. You have these authors like Byron who make physical familiarity out to be some amazing, soul-consuming, meaning of life, like an end-of-the-world thing, and it’s not like that. It’s…” I waved my free hand in the air, trying to find the right words. “It’s like having someone else pick your nose or floss your teeth. It requires a lot of coordination and planning. For instance, you can’t do it unless you’ve had a shower within so many hours ahead of time. If you fall out of that time window, then you have to stop reading comics or whatever you’re currently doing, go take a shower, dry off, get dressed, blah blah blah. What a hassle. I think bacteria have the right idea; humans should procreate via binary fission. ~ Penny Reid,
764:However, like Elasti-Girl and Batgirl, many of the DC’s female characters got better treatment than the heroines featured in Marvel Comics. Scanning a comic book rack in the ’60s, the covers would tell two different stories about the women starring within those pages. Wonder Woman and Supergirl starred in comic books that featured their names on the covers. These heroines were often seen performing great feats of strength like battling monsters or stopping missiles with their bare hands. Batgirl’s name might be featured prominently on a cover of Detective Comics. The Doom Patrol’s Elasti-Girl was shown in the thick of battle fighting side by side with her male compatriots. On the Marvel Comics covers, Invisible Girl, Wasp, and Marvel Girl were shown struggling in the clutches of a villain, or watching helplessly from the background as their male teammates took care of business. ~ Mike Madrid,
765:Perhaps the suspicions stemmed from the distinct lack of women in Batman’s world. True, he crafted his Bruce Wayne alter ego to be an idle playboy, which meant there were a lot of beautiful women in his life. But, the most important female figure in his world seemed only to be his sainted, slain mother, to whose memory, along with that of his late father, Bruce swore to uphold justice and thwart evil. Bruce and Batman might have had romances with girls like debutante Julie Madison or reporter Vicki Vale, but showed neither any true affection. The one female who generated the most heat with Batman was the seductive, whip-wielding jewel thief Catwoman. Of course, since she was on the wrong side of the law, any chance of a romance with Batman was immediately crushed.
(...)
Batman’s sexy foe Catwoman was deemed too racy for the new world of the Comics Code. She was gone by 1954. ~ Mike Madrid,
766:What makes it worth it though, is I love drawing. I LOVE IT. I love making comics. I love starting a new page and buying new paper, ink and brushes. I love telling stories! I love the people I work with, I love the people I meet. I love thinking about the syntax and language of comics. I love esoteric discussions about the comic book industry. I love the opportunities I’ve had in life because of comics. The second I stop loving it I will find something else to do.
Comics are hard work. Comics are relentless. Comics will break your heart. Comics are monetarily unsatisfying. Comics don’t offer much in terms of fortune and glory, but comics will give you complete freedom to tell the stories you want to tell, in ways unlike any other medium. Comics will pick you up after it knocks you down. Comics will dust you off and tell you it loves you. And you will look into it’s eyes and know it’s true, that you love comics back. ~ Becky Cloonan,
767:To answer your question as honestly as I can, I've wanted since I was very little to not have to worry about money. I've never been poverty-level poor (I mean, there's been years where I've been officially beneath the poverty line, but that wasn't poverty: that was being a student and living the Student Lifestyle), but I've been in a place where you know you can't afford a better-quality food, where you can't do certain things because of money, and I'd prefer not to have those problems if I can. I sort of have troubles with money in general, with how it determines so much of our lives but with how we all try to ignore it, but I would like to be (and stay) in a place where I can pick up some new comics and games and not worry about how much they cost.

This is terrible; you're asking me where I want to be in the future, what I want my life to be like, and the only thing I can tell you is "Man, all I know is I don't want to be POOR. ~ Ryan North,
768:You reach a certain age when reality grabs you by the scruff of the neck and shouts in your face:"Hey, look, this is what life is." And you have to open your eyes and look at it, listen to it, smell it: people who don't like you, things you don't want to do, things that hurt, things that scare you, questions without answers, feelings you don't understand, feelings you don't want but have no control over.

Reality.

When you gradually come to realise that all that stuff in books, films, television, magazines, newspapers, comics - it's all rubbish. It's got nothing to do with anything. It's all made up. It doesn't happen like that. It's not real. It means nothing. Reality is what you see when you look out of the window of a bus: dour faces, sad and temporary lives, millions of cars, metal, bricks, glass, rain, cruel laughter, ugliness, dirt, bad teeth, crippled pigeons, little kids in pushchairs who've already forgotten how to smile ... ~ Kevin Brooks,
769:The depressing majority of comics seem to be about violence of one sort or another, [...] And I just don’t enjoy violence. I can see that narratively it is often a powerful spike in a story, but I certainly don’t want to dwell on it. I don’t want it in my real life, I don’t find violence entertaining in and of itself, or exciting, or funny.

But sex is happily part of most people’s lives, and crosses the mind most days, I would say, even if it’s just watching your partner get out of bed in the morning. [...] Most pornography is pretty awful. I mean, it does the job at the most utilitarian level, but it rarely excites other areas of the mind, or the eye. It’s repetitive, bland and often a bit silly. I was interested in trying to do something that has an aesthetic beauty to it if possible, and something that tickles the intellect as well as the more basic areas of the mind. Maybe that’s not possible, and as soon as you start to think too much, it stops working as pornography. I don’t think so, but I guess it’s in the eye and mind of the viewer. ~ Dave McKean,
770:Teachers don’t always know when they’ve lit the torch paper. But MacGhiolla knew. He knew he’d entered Virgil Swain’s imagination and held up a flame when he told him of a boy who fell in love with a girl called Emer who said he could not have her unless he completed Impossible Tasks. The boy was sent to study warcraft in Scotland under the tutelage of the female warrior Scathach-the-Shadow. Scathach-the-Shadow was about twenty centuries ahead of Marvel Comics. Gaming was in the early development stages back then. One in every two gamers died. Being Scottish and a warrior meant that Scathach was ferociousness itself. She didn’t have a Console, she had a hawk with talons. The boy was sent to her to learn how to achieve the impossible, and when he did, when Scathach had brought him up through all the Levels, showed him all the Cheats, and listed him on the Roll of Honour as All-Time Number-One Player, he came back and entered the fortress where Emer was guarded. He entered it by going upriver against the current. The method he used was salmon-leaps. Not kidding. ~ Niall Williams,
771:Sometimes the way to do what you hope to do will be clear cut, and sometimes it will be almost impossible to decide whether or not you are doing the correct thing, because you'll have to balance your goals and hopes with feeding yourself, paying debts, finding work, settling for what you can get.

Something that worked for me was imagining that where I wanted to be – an author, primarily of fiction, making good books, making good comics and supporting myself through my words – was a mountain. A distant mountain. My goal.

And I knew that as long as I kept walking towards the mountain I would be all right. And when I truly was not sure what to do, I could stop, and think about whether it was taking me towards or away from the mountain. I said no to editorial jobs on magazines, proper jobs that would have paid proper money because I knew that, attractive though they were, for me they would have been walking away from the mountain. And if those job offers had come along earlier I might have taken them, because they still would have been closer to the mountain than I was at the time. ~ Neil Gaiman,
772:Although I was an imaginative child, prone to nightmares, I had persuaded my parents to take me to Madame Tussauds waxworks in London, when I was six, because I had wanted to visit the Chamber of Horrors, expecting the movie-monster Chambers of Horrors I'd read about in my comics. I had wanted to thrill to waxworks of Dracula and Frankenstein's Monster and the Wolf-man. Instead I was walked through a seemingly endless sequence of dioramas of unremarkable, glum-looking men and women who had murdered people - usually lodgers and members of their own families - and who were then murdered in turn: by handing, by the electric chair, in gas chambers. Most of them were depicted with their victims in awkward social situations - seated about a dinner table, perhaps, as their poisoned family members expired. The plaques that explained who they were also told me that the majority of them had murdered their families and sold the bodies to anatomy. It was then that the word anatomy garnered its own edge of horror for me. I did not know what anatomy was. I knew only that anatomy made people kill their children. ~ Neil Gaiman,
773:female superhero, Marston insisted, was the best answer to the critics, since “the comics’ worst offense was their bloodcurdling masculinity.” He explained, A male hero, at best, lacks the qualities of maternal love and tenderness which are as essential to a normal child as the breath of life. Suppose your child’s ideal becomes a superman who uses his extraordinary power to help the weak. The most important ingredient in the human happiness recipe still is missing—love. It’s smart to be strong. It’s big to be generous. But it’s sissified, according to exclusively masculine rules, to be tender, loving, affectionate, and alluring. “Aw, that’s girl’s stuff!” snorts our young comics reader. “Who wants to be a girl?” And that’s the point; not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength, power. Not wanting to be girls they don’t want to be tender, submissive, peaceloving as good women are. Women’s strong qualities have become despised because of their weak ones. The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman.14 ~ Jill Lepore,
774:He had been an indifferent father, better than his own, perhaps, but that was saying very little. When Tommy was still an unknown fishboy inside Rosa, Sammy had resolved never to let him feel abandoned, never to walk out on him, and until now, until tonight, he had managed to keep the promise, though there were times—the night he had decided to take that job at Gold Star Comics, for example—when it had been difficult. But the truth was that, for all his noble intentions, if you didn’t count the hours when the boy was sleeping, then Sammy had missed out on most of his childhood. Like many boys, Sammy supposed, Tommy had done most of his growing up when the man he called his father was not around, in the spaces between their infrequent hours together. Sammy wondered if the indifference that he had attributed to his own father was, after all, not the peculiar trait of one man but a universal characteristic of fathers. Maybe the “youthful wards” that he routinely assigned to his heroes—a propensity that would, from that day forward, enter into comics lore and haunt him for the rest of his life—represented the expression not of a flaw in his nature but of a deeper and more universal wish. ~ Michael Chabon,
775:Superman comics are a fable, not of strength, but of disintegration. They appeal to the preadolescent, (sic) mind not because they reiterate grandiose delusions, but because they reiterate a very deep cry for help.
Superman's two personalities can be integrated only in one thing: only in death. Only Kryptonite cuts through the disguises of both wimp and hero, and affects the man below the disguises.
And what is Kryptonite? Kryptonite is all that remains of his childhood home.
It is the remnants of that destroyed childhood home, and the fear of those remnants, which rule Superman's life. The possibility that the shards of that destroyed home might surface prevents him from being intimate- they prevent him from sharing the knowledge that the wimp and the hero are one. The fear of his childhood home prevents him from having pleasure.
He fears that to reveal his weakness, and confusion, is, perhaps indirectly, but certainly inevitably, to receive death from the person who received that information.
[...]
Far from being invulnerable, Superman is the most vulnerable of beings, because his childhood was destroyed. He can never reintegrate himself by returning to that home- it is gone. It is gone and he is living among aliens to whom he cannot even reveal his rightful name. ~ David Mamet,
776:Manga represents and extremely unfiltered view of the inner workings of their creator's minds. This is because manga are free of the massive editing and "committee"-style production used in other media like film, magazines and television. Even in American mainstream comics, the norm is to have a stable of artists, letterers, inkers, and scenario writers all under the control of the publisher. In Japan, a single artist might employ many assistants and act as a sort of "director," but he or she is usually at the core of the production process and retains control over the rights to the material created. That artists are not necessarily highly educated and deal frequently in plain subject matter only heightens the sense that manga offer the reader an extremely raw and personal view of the world.
Thus, of the more than 2 billion manga produced each year, the vast majority have a dreamlike quality. They speak to people's hope, and fears. They are where stressed-out modern urbanites daily work out their neuroses and their frustrations. Viewed in their totality, the phenomenal number of stories produced is like the constant chatter of the collective unconscious -- and articulation of the dream world. Reading manga is like peering into the unvarnished, unretouched reality of the Japanese mind. ~ Frederik L Schodt,
777:IT BEGAN WITH A GUN. On September 1, 1939, the German army invaded Poland. Two days later, Britain and France declared war on Germany. In the October 1939 issue of Detective Comics, Batman killed a vampire by shooting silver bullets into his heart. In the next issue, Batman fired a gun at two evil henchmen. When Whitney Ellsworth, DC’s editorial director, got a first look at a draft of the next installment, Batman was shooting again. Ellsworth shook his head and said, Take the gun out.1 Batman had debuted in Detective Com-ics in May 1939, the same month that the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling in United States v. Miller, a landmark gun-control case. It concerned the constitutionality of the 1934 National Firearms Act and the 1938 Federal Firearms Act, which effectively banned machine guns through prohibitive taxation, and regulated handgun ownership by introducing licensing, waiting period, and permit requirements. The National Rifle Association supported the legislation (at the time, the NRA was a sportsman’s organization). But gun manufacturers challenged it on the grounds that federal control of gun ownership violated the Second Amendment. FDR’s solicitor general said the Second Amendment had nothing to do with an individual right to own a gun; it had to do with the common defense. The court agreed, unanimously.2 ~ Jill Lepore,
778:Now let’s take up the minorities in our civilization, shall we? Bigger the population, the more minorities. Don’t step on the toes of the dog-lovers, the cat-lovers, doctors, lawyers, merchants, chiefs, Mormons, Baptists, Unitarians, second-generation Chinese, Swedes, Italians, Germans, Texans, Brooklynites, Irishmen, people from Oregon or Mexico. The people in this book, this play, this TV serial are not meant to represent any actual painters, cartographers, mechanics anywhere. The bigger your market, Montag, the less you handle controversy, remember that! All the minor minor minorities with their navels to be kept clean. Authors, full of evil thoughts, lock up your typewriters. They did. Magazines became a nice blend of vanilla tapioca. Books, so the damned snobbish critics said, were dishwater. No wonder books stopped selling, the critics said. But the public, knowing what it wanted, spinning happily, let the comic books survive. And the three-dimensional sex-magazines, of course. There you have it, Montag. It didn’t come from the Government down. There was no dictum, no declaration, no censorship, to start with, no! Technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure carried the trick, thank God. Today, thanks to them, you can stay happy all the time, you are allowed to read comics, the good old confessions, or trade journals. ~ Ray Bradbury,
779:Now let’s take up the minorities in our civilization, shall we? Bigger the population, the more minorities. Don’t step on the toes of the dog-lovers, the cat-lovers, doctors, lawyers, merchants, chiefs, Mormons, Baptists, Unitarians, second-generation Chinese, Swedes, Italians, Germans, Texans, Brooklynites, Irishmen, people from Oregon or Mexico. The people in this book, this play, this TV serial are not meant to represent any actual painters, cartographers, mechanics anywhere. The bigger your market, Montag, the less you handle controversy, remember that! All the minor minor minorities with their navels to be kept clean. Authors, full of evil thoughts, lock up your typewriters. They did. Magazines became a nice blend of vanilla tapioca. Books, so the damned snobbish critics said, were dishwater. No wonder books stopped selling, the critics said. But the public, knowing what it wanted, spinning happily, let the comic-books survive. And the three-dimensional sex-magazines, of course. There you have it, Montag. It didn’t come from the Government down. There was no dictum, no declaration, no censorship, to start with, no! Technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure carried the trick, thank God. Today, thanks to them, you can stay happy all the time, you are allowed to read comics, the good old confessions, or trade-journals. ~ Ray Bradbury,
780:Right when Marston and Peter must have been meeting with Gaines and Mayer to talk about what Wonder Woman ought to look like, a new superhero made his debut. Captain America.19 He quickly became Timely Comics’ most popular character. Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941) (illustration credit 23.7) Marston wanted his comic book’s “under-meaning,” about “a great movement now under way—the growth in the power of women,” to be embodied in the way Wonder Woman carried herself, how she dressed, and what powers she wielded. She had to be strong, and she had to be independent. Everyone agreed about the bracelets (inspired by Olive Byrne’s): it helped Gaines with his public relations problem that she could stop bullets with them; that was good for the gun problem. Also, this new superhero had to be uncommonly beautiful; she’d wear a tiara, like the crown awarded at the Miss America pageant. Marston wanted her to be opposed to war, but she had to be willing to fight for democracy. In fact, she had to be superpatriotic. Captain America wore an American flag: blue tights, red gloves, red boots, and, on his torso, red and white stripes and a white star. Like Captain America—because of Captain America—Wonder Woman would have to wear red, white, and blue, too. But, ideally, she’d also wear very little. To sell magazines, Gaines wanted his superwoman to be as naked as he could get away with. ~ Jill Lepore,
781:So in a different version of my life, I had a bicycle. My father gave it to me when I was a little girl. And I could use this bicycle to find lost things. I would ride it across an imaginary covered bridge, and the bridge would always take me wherever I needed to go. Like once my mother lost a bracelet and I rode my bike across this bridge and came out in New Hampshire, forty miles away from home. And the bracelet was there, in a restaurant called Terry’s Primo Subs. With me so far?” “Imaginary bridge, superpowered bike. Got it.” “Over the years I used my bicycle and the bridge to find all kinds of things. Missing stuffed animals or lost photos. Things like that. I didn’t go ‘finding’ often. Just once or twice a year. And as I got older, even less. It started to scare me, because I knew it was impossible, that the world isn’t supposed to work that way. When I was little, it was just pretend. But as I got older, it began to seem crazy. It began to frighten me.” “I’m surprised you didn’t use your special power to find someone who could tell you there was nothing wrong with you,” Lou said. Her eyes widened and lit with surprise, and Lou understood that in fact she had done just that. “How did you—” she began. “I read a lot of comics. It’s the logical next step,” Lou said. “Discover magic ring, seek out the Guardians of the Universe. Standard operating procedure. Who was it?” “The bridge took me to a librarian in Iowa.” “It would be a librarian. ~ Joe Hill,
782:Isabelle snorted. 'All the boys are gay. In this truck, anyway. Well, not you, Simon.'
'You noticed' said Simon.

'I think of myself as a freewheeling bisexual,' added Magnus.

'Please never say those words in front of my parents,' said Alec. 'Especially my father.'

'I thought your parents were okay with you, you know, coming out,' Simon said, leaning around Isabelle to look at Alec, who was — as he often was — scowling, and pushing his floppy dark hair out of his eyes. Aside from the occasional exchange, Simon had never talked to Alec much. He wasn’t an easy person to get to know. But, Simon admitted to himself, his own recent estrangement from his mother made him more curious about Alec’s answer than he would have been otherwise.

'My mother seems to have accepted it,' Alec said. 'But my father — no, not really. Once he asked me what I thought had turned me gay.'

Simon felt Isabelle tense next to him. 'Turned you gay?' She sounded incredulous. 'Alec, you didn’t tell me that.'

'I hope you told him you were bitten by a gay spider,' said Simon.

Magnus snorted; Isabelle looked confused. 'I’ve read Magnus’s stash of comics,' said Alec, 'so I actually know what you’re talking about' A small smile played around his mouth. 'So would that give me the proportional gayness of a spider?'

'Only if it was a really gay spider,' said Magnus, and he yelled as Alec punched him in the arm. 'Ow, okay, never mind. ~ Cassandra Clare,
783:I dare you to…”

He pauses, and I want him to say it. I want him to want a kiss, because I realize I’d do it so fast it’d make his head spin.

“I dare you to do your happy dance,” he says instead.

“Happy dance?”

“Come on, everyone has a happy dance.”

“But… I have to be extremely happy to do a happy dance. It’s not something I can just, you know, jump into.”

“How about I give you some inspiration.” He pulls his phone out of his pocket and presses a few buttons. A song with an upbeat keyboard begins, and Logan stands up. The happy lyrics say something about a birdhouse and a bee. He waves his hand at me to follow. Bouncing on the balls of his feet, he looks at me expectantly.

I stand up to face him and try to sway a little. He shakes his head as he turns the volume up.

“I just can’t, I’m not happy enough.”

“Pretend like the Natchitoches Central Chiefs just won the Super Bowl.” He bounces a little more enthusiastically.

“That’s good, I guess.” My sway becomes a little more pronounced. A smile takes hold, not because of the thought of the Chiefs winning the Super Bowl, but because Logan is such an awkward dancer. He’s gone from bouncing to alternating snaps of his fingers as he bobs his head. Plus, he’s a little off rhythm.

“There’s a Tangled marathon on in two minutes!” He has to yell over the music now.

“That’s better.” I start nodding my head to the beat.

“It’s Christmas! You just got your Hogwarts acceptance letter, a copy ofAction Comics #1, and a brand new car that runs on water!”

“Hell yeah!” I scream and let go. ~ Leah Rae Miller,
784:We are now ready to tackle Dickens. We are now ready to embrace Dickens. We are now ready to bask in Dickens. In our dealings with Jane Austen we had to make a certain effort to join the ladies in the drawing room. In the case of Dickens we remain at table with our tawny port. With Dickens we expand. It seems to me that Jane Austen's fiction had been a charming re-arrangement of old-fashioned values. In the case of Dickens, the values are new. Modern authors still get drunk on his vintage. Here, there is no problem of approach as with Austen, no courtship, no dallying. We just surrender ourselves to Dickens' voice--that is all. If it were possible I would like to devote fifty minutes of every class meeting to mute meditation, concentration, and admiration of Dickens. However my job is to direct and rationalize those meditations, that admiration. All we have to do when reading Bleak House is to relax and let our spines take over. Although we read with our minds, the seat of artistic delight is between the shoulder-blades. That little shiver behind is quite certainly the highest form of emotion that humanity has attained when evolving pure art and pure science. Let us worship the spine and its tingle. Let us be proud of being vertebrates, for we are vertebrates tipped at the head with a divine flame. The brain only continues the spine, the wick really runs through the whole length of the candle. If we are not capable of enjoying that shiver, if we cannot enjoy literature, then let us give up the whole thing and concentrate on our comics, our videos, our books-of-the-week. But I think Dickens will prove stronger. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
785:Disasterology

The Badger is the thirteenth astrological sign.
My sign. The one the other signs evicted: unanimously.

So what? ! Think I want to read about my future
in the newspaper next to the comics?

My third grade teacher told me I had no future.
I run through snow and turn around
just to make sure I’ve got a past.

My life’s a chandelier dropped from an airplane.
I graduated first in my class from alibi school.

There ought to be a healthy family cage at the zoo,
or an open field, where I can lose my mother
as many times as I need.

When I get bored, I call the cops, tell them
there’s a pervert peeking in my window!
then I slip on a flimsy nightgown, go outside,
press my face against the glass and wait…

This makes me proud to be an American

where drunk drivers ought to wear necklaces
made from the spines of children they’ve run over.

I remember my face being invented
through a windshield.

All the wounds stitched with horsehair
So the scars galloped across my forehead.

I remember the hymns cherubs sang
in my bloodstream. The way even my shadow ached
when the chubby infants stopped.

I remember wishing I could be boiled like water
and made pure again. Desire
so real it could be outlined in chalk.

My eyes were the color of palm trees
in a hurricane. I’d wake up
and my id would start the day without me.

Somewhere a junkie fixes the hole in his arm
and a racing car zips around my halo.

A good God is hard to find.

Each morning I look in the mirror
and say promise me something
don’t do the things I’ve done. ~ Jeffrey McDaniel,
786:The Glory Trumpeter
Old Eddie's face, wrinkled with river lights,
Looked like a Mississippi man's. The eyes,
Derisive and avuncular at once,
Swivelling, fixed me. They'd seen
Too many wakes, too many cathouse nights.
The bony, idle fingers on the valves
Of his knee-cradled horn could tear
Through 'Georgia on My Mind' or 'Jesus Saves'
With the same fury of indifference,
If what propelled such frenzy was despair.
Now, as the eyes sealed in the ashen flesh,
And Eddie, like a deacon at his prayer,
Rose, tilting the bright horn, I saw a flash
Of gulls and pigeons from the dunes of coal
Near my grandmother's barracks near the wharves,
I saw the sallow faces of those men
Who sighed as if they spoke into their graves
About the Negro in America. That was when
The Sunday comics sprawled out on her floor,
Sent from the States, had a particular odour,
A smell of money mingled with man's sweat.
And yet, if Eddie's features held our fate,
Secure in childhood I did not know then
A jesus-ragtime or gut-bucket blues
To the bowed heads of the lean, compliant men
Back from the states in their funereal serge,
Black, rusty Homburgs and limp waiters' ties
With honey accents and lard-coloured eyes
Was Joshua's ram's horn wailing for the Jews
Of patient bitterness or patient siege.
Now it was that as Eddie turned his back
On our young crowd out feteing, swilling liquor,
And blew, eyes closed, one foot up, out to sea,
His horned aimed at those cities of the Gulf,
Mobile and Galveston and sweetly meted
The horn of plenty through a bitter cup,
66
In lonely exaltation blaming me
For all whom race and exile have defeated,
For my own uncle in America,
That living there I could never look up.
~ Derek Walcott,
787:And against whom is this censorship directed? By way of answer, think back to the big subcultural debates of 2011 – debates about how gritty fantasy isn’t really fantasy; how epic fantasy written from the female gaze isn’t really fantasy; how women should stop complaining about sexism in comics because clearly, they just hate comics; how trying to incorporate non-Eurocentric settings into fantasy is just political correctness gone wrong and a betrayal of the genre’s origins; how anyone who finds the portrayal of women and relationships in YA novels problematic really just wants to hate on the choices of female authors and readers; how aspiring authors and bloggers shouldn’t post negative reviews online, because it could hurt their careers; how there’s no homophobia in publishing houses, so the lack of gay YA protagonists can only be because the manuscripts that feature them are bad; how there’s nothing problematic about lots of pretty dead girls on YA covers; how there’s nothing wrong with SF getting called ‘dystopia’ when it’s marketed to teenage girls, because girls don’t read SF. Most these issues relate to fear of change in the genre, and to deeper social problems like sexism and racism; but they are also about criticism, and the freedom of readers, bloggers and authors alike to critique SFF and YA novels without a backlash that declares them heretical for doing so.


It’s not enough any more to tiptoe around the issues that matter, refusing to name the works we think are problematic for fear of being ostracized. We need to get over this crushing obsession with niceness – that all fans must act nicely, that all authors must be nice to each other, that everyone must be nice about everything even when it goes against our principles – because it’s not helping us grow, or be taken seriously, or do anything other than throw a series of floral bedspreads over each new room-hogging elephant.


We, all of us, need to get critical.

Blog post: Criticism in SFF and YA ~ Foz Meadows,
788:near-deserted parking lot, both buildings looking freshly painted and hopeful for a marina in which there were no yachts. The biggest boat moored at the dock looked to be a forty-footer. Most of the others looked to be lobster boats, aged and constructed of wood. A few of the newer ones were fiberglass. The nicest of those was about thirty-five feet long, the hull painted blue, the wheelhouse painted white, the deck a honey teak. She paid attention to it because her husband stood on it, bathed in their headlights. Caleb exited the car fast. He pointed back at her, told Brian his wife was not taking things well. Rachel was happy to note Caleb limped even as he speed-walked to the boat. She, on the other hand, moved slowly, her eyes on Brian. His gaze barely left hers except for the occasional flicks in the direction of Caleb. If she’d known she’d end up killing him, would she have boarded the boat? She could turn around and go to the police. My husband is an impostor, she’d say. She imagined some smarmy desk sergeant replying, “Aren’t we all, ma’am?” Yes, she was certain, it was a crime to impersonate someone and a crime to keep two wives, but were those serious crimes? In the end, wouldn’t Brian just take a plea and it would all go away? She’d be left the laughingstock never-was, the failed print reporter who’d become a pill-addicted broadcast reporter who’d become a punch line and then a shut-in and who would keep the local comics stocked with weeks of fresh material once it was discovered that Meltdown Media Chick had married a con man with another wife and another life. She followed Caleb up the ramp to the boat. He stepped aboard. When she went to do the same, Brian offered his hand. She stared at it until he dropped it. He noticed the gun she carried. “Should I show you mine? So I feel safer?” “Be my guest.” She stepped aboard. As she did, Brian caught her by the wrist and stripped the gun from her hand in the same motion. He pulled his own gun, a .38 snub-nosed revolver, from under the flaps of his shirt and then laid them both on a table by the ~ Dennis Lehane,
789:Men always say that as the defining compliment, don’t they? She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping, who plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves threesomes and anal sex, and jams hot dogs and hamburgers into her mouth like she’s hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang bang while somehow maintaining a size 2, because Cool Girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want. Go ahead, shit on me, I don’t mind, I’m the Cool Girl.

Men actually think this girl exists. Maybe they’re fooled because so many women are willing to pretend to be this girl. For a long time Cool Girl offended me. I used to see men – friends, coworkers, strangers – giddy over these awful pretender women, and I’d want to sit these men down and calmly say: You are not dating a woman, you are dating a woman who has watched too many movies written by socially awkward men who’d like to believe that this kind of woman exists and might kiss them. I’d want to grab the poor guy by his lapels or messenger bag and say: The bitch doesn’t really love chili dogs that much – no one loves chili dogs that much! And the Cool Girls are even more pathetic: They’re not even pretending to be the woman they want to be, they’re pretending to be the woman a man wants them to be. Oh, and if you’re not a Cool Girl, I beg you not to believe that your man doesn’t want the Cool Girl. It may be a slightly different version – maybe he’s a vegetarian, so Cool Girl loves seitan and is great with dogs; or maybe he’s a hipster artist, so Cool Girl is a tattooed, bespectacled nerd who loves comics. There are variations to the window dressing, but believe me, he wants Cool Girl, who is basically the girl who likes every fucking thing he likes and doesn’t ever complain. (How do you know you’re not Cool Girl? Because he says things like: “I like strong women.” If he says that to you, he will at some point fuck someone else. Because “I like strong women” is code for “I hate strong women.”) ~ Gillian Flynn,
790:the Cool Girl. Men always say that as the defining compliment, don’t they? She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping, who plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves threesomes and anal sex, and jams hot dogs and hamburgers into her mouth like she’s hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang bang while somehow maintaining a size 2, because Cool Girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want. Go ahead, shit on me, I don’t mind, I’m the Cool Girl. Men actually think this girl exists. Maybe they’re fooled because so many women are willing to pretend to be this girl. For a long time Cool Girl offended me. I used to see men – friends, coworkers, strangers – giddy over these awful pretender women, and I’d want to sit these men down and calmly say: You are not dating a woman, you are dating a woman who has watched too many movies written by socially awkward men who’d like to believe that this kind of woman exists and might kiss them. I’d want to grab the poor guy by his lapels or messenger bag and say: The bitch doesn’t really love chili dogs that much – no one loves chili dogs that much! And the Cool Girls are even more pathetic: They’re not even pretending to be the woman they want to be, they’re pretending to be the woman a man wants them to be. Oh, and if you’re not a Cool Girl, I beg you not to believe that your man doesn’t want the Cool Girl. It may be a slightly different version – maybe he’s a vegetarian, so Cool Girl loves seitan and is great with dogs; or maybe he’s a hipster artist, so Cool Girl is a tattooed, bespectacled nerd who loves comics. There are variations to the window dressing, but believe me, he wants Cool Girl, who is basically the girl who likes every fucking thing he likes and doesn’t ever complain. (How do you know you’re not Cool Girl? Because he says things like: ‘I like strong women.’ If he says that to you, he will at some point fuck someone else. Because ‘I like strong women’ is code for ‘I hate strong women.’) ~ Gillian Flynn,
791:the Cool Girl. Men always say that as the defining compliment, don’t they? She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping, who plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves threesomes and anal sex, and jams hot dogs and hamburgers into her mouth like she’s hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang bang while somehow maintaining a size 2, because Cool Girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want. Go ahead, shit on me, I don��t mind, I’m the Cool Girl. Men actually think this girl exists. Maybe they’re fooled because so many women are willing to pretend to be this girl. For a long time Cool Girl offended me. I used to see men – friends, coworkers, strangers – giddy over these awful pretender women, and I’d want to sit these men down and calmly say: You are not dating a woman, you are dating a woman who has watched too many movies written by socially awkward men who’d like to believe that this kind of woman exists and might kiss them. I’d want to grab the poor guy by his lapels or messenger bag and say: The bitch doesn’t really love chili dogs that much – no one loves chili dogs that much! And the Cool Girls are even more pathetic: They’re not even pretending to be the woman they want to be, they’re pretending to be the woman a man wants them to be. Oh, and if you’re not a Cool Girl, I beg you not to believe that your man doesn’t want the Cool Girl. It may be a slightly different version – maybe he’s a vegetarian, so Cool Girl loves seitan and is great with dogs; or maybe he’s a hipster artist, so Cool Girl is a tattooed, bespectacled nerd who loves comics. There are variations to the window dressing, but believe me, he wants Cool Girl, who is basically the girl who likes every fucking thing he likes and doesn’t ever complain. (How do you know you’re not Cool Girl? Because he says things like: ‘I like strong women.’ If he says that to you, he will at some point fuck someone else. Because ‘I like strong women’ is code for ‘I hate strong women.’) ~ Gillian Flynn,
792:Lois Lane was part of the Superman dynamic from the very start. The intrepid star newspaper reporter had made her first appearance in 1938’s Action Comics #1, the same issue where Superman made his debut. She was infatuated with the powerful, godlike Superman, while repulsed by his meek pantywaist alter ego, her rival reporter Clark Kent. Lois’ 1940s persona of tough crusading reporter was in the mold of Hollywood dames like Rosalind Russell. Lois’ tireless effort to get her next headline, along with her impulsive personality, often put her in danger, from which Superman would have to rescue her. But the 40s Lois was no pushover. She was a modern career woman, and her dream was to get her greatest scoop: Superman’s secret identity.

The Superman/Lois Lane relationship had many complicated factors that would prevent a romance from ever reaching fruition, while still providing the right tension to sustain the relationship for decades. First off, they were literally from different worlds. Superman was the last survivor of the doomed planet Krypton, and was raised by simple midwestern farm folk. Lois Lane was very much a woman of 20th century America: emancipated, headstrong, and unwilling to take “no” for an answer.

Superman’s timid farm boy Clark Kent persona crumbled before Lois’ ferocious, emasculating temperament, while his heroic Man of Steel found himself constantly confounded by her impetuous nature. Meanwhile, the very issue of Superman’s secret identity always threw a wrench into his romance with Lois. Besides the basic duplicity, Superman becomes his own rival, squelching any chance for a healthy relationship. Superman loves Lois Lane, but tries to win her heart as meek Clark Kent, with the rationale that he wants to be sure Lois really loves him for himself, not for his glamorous superhuman persona. But since he’s created a wallflower persona that Lois will never find attractive, he sabotages any chance for love. Lois, for her part, is enamored with Superman, yet has a burning desire to discover his secret identity. Lois never considers that she risks losing Superman’s love if she learns his secret identity, or that the world may lose its champion and protector.
(...) If the Lois Lane of the ’40s owed much to the tough talking heroines of that decade’s screwball comedies, the Lois of the ’50s was defined by the medium of the new era—television. ~ Mike Madrid,
793:Reluctantly Alexander knocked on the door. After coming in, he sat by a quiet Anthony on the bed, and taking a deep breath asked, “Bud, is there anything you want to talk to me about?” “NO!” Anthony said. “Hmm. You sure?” He patted his leg, prodded him. Anthony didn’t say anything. Alexander talked to him anyway. He explained that adults every once in a while wanted to have a baby. The men had this, and the women had that, and to make a baby there needed to be some conjoining, much like a tight connection of mortise and tenon between two pieces of wood. For the conjoining to be effective, there needed to be movement (which is where the mortise and tenon analogy broke down but Anthony thankfully didn’t question it), which is probably the thing that frightened Anthony, but really it was nothing to be afraid of, it was just the essence of the grand design. To reward Alexander’s valiant efforts, Anthony stared at his father as if he had just been told his parents drank the cold blood of vampires every night before bed. “You were doing what?” And then he said, after a considerable pause, “You and Mom were trying to have a—baby?” “Um—yes.” “Did you have to do that once before—to make me?” “Um—yes.” “This is what all adults have to do to make a baby?” “Yes.” “So, Sergio’s mom has three children. Does that mean his parents had to do that... three times?” Alexander bit his lip. “Yes,” he said. “Dad,” said Anthony, “I don’t think Mom wants to have any more children. Didn’t you hear her?” “Son...” “Didn’t you hear her? Please, Dad.” Alexander stood up. “All righty then. Well, I’m glad we had this talk.” “Not me.” When he came outside, Tatiana was waiting at the table. “How did it go?” “Pretty much,” said Alexander, “like my father’s conversation went with me.” Tatiana laughed. “You better hope it went better than that. Your father wasn’t very effective.” “Your son is reading Wonder Woman comics, Tatia,” said Alexander. “I don’t know how effective anything I say is going to be very shortly.” “Wonder Woman?” “Have you seen Wonder Woman?” Alexander shook his head and went to get his cigarettes. “Never mind. Soon it’ll all become clear. So yes for building the house, or no?” “No, Shura. Just lock the door next time.” So the house went unbuilt. Wonder Woman got read, Anthony’s voice changed, he started barricading his bedroom door at night, while across the mobile home, across the kitchen and the living room, behind a locked door, “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” played on and on and on. ~ Paullina Simons,
794:Technically, Sheena predates even Superman, having first appeared in the primordial dawn of comic books in 1937. But her true origins are older than that. Sheena is often described as the female version of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ 1912 creation, Tarzan. The majority of Burroughs’ popular works revolves around a tension between the savage and the civilized, also seen in Sheena’s adventures. Burroughs’ work, like that of fellow adventure writer H. Rider Haggard, came out of the colonial era, and was written for men and boys who yearned for an escape from stifling modern life, through tales of dangerous worlds and exotic women. The common theme of these stories is that a man from the civilized world finds his way to a fantastic, often barbaric, world of adventure, where he falls in love with an intoxicating savage princess. While most of Burroughs’ heroines, like Dejah Thoris or Dian the Beautiful, were in need of rescuing, Haggard’s 1886 novel She introduced a stronger heroine. The novel’s English protagonist encounters the beautiful queen Ayesha, the ruler of a lost city in Africa. Ayesha is referred to as “she who must be obeyed,” and is a creature that provokes both fear and lust. Ayesha was the ultimate fantasy of civilized man: the beautiful, savage white queen, ruling a kingdom unhindered by the laws of modern morality. This brand of men’s fiction produced the swirling foam of exotic and erotic fantasy from which rose the jungle Venus known as Sheena.
(...)
Now that we have some historical context on these female monarchs, let’s talk about their specific origins. In the 1930s, there were several studios that produced art and stories for the various publishers who were getting into the new field of comic books. One of the most successful and prolific was the Universal Phoenix Studio, operated by two young artists named Will Eisner and Jerry Iger. In 1937, they created a female Tarzan-type character named Sheena for the British tabloid Wags. The strip was credited to the pseudonym W. Morgan Thomas, and the heroine’s name was meant to remind readers of H. Rider Haggard’s She. Demand for new comic book material was growing in the United States, and American pulp magazine publisher Fiction House was looking for material for a new comic book. Sheena made her American debut in 1938’s Jumbo Comics #1, just three months after Superman’s now legendary first appearance. She was the first female adventure character in comic books. This would be just one of her claims to fame. ~ Mike Madrid,
795:Melinda Pratt rides city bus number twelve to her cello lesson, wearing her mother's jean jacket and only one sock. Hallo, world, says Minna. Minna often addresses the world, sometimes silently, sometimes out loud. Bus number twelve is her favorite place for watching, inside and out. The bus passes cars and bicycles and people walking dogs. It passes store windows, and every so often Minna sees her face reflection, two dark eyes in a face as pale as a winter dawn. There are fourteen people on the bus today. Minna stands up to count them. She likes to count people, telephone poles, hats, umbrellas, and, lately, earrings. One girl, sitting directly in front of Minna, has seven earrings, five in one ear. She has wisps of dyed green hair that lie like forsythia buds against her neck.

There are, Minna knows, a king, a past president of the United States, and a beauty queen on the bus. Minna can tell by looking. The king yawns and scratches his ear with his little finger. Scratches, not picks. The beauty queen sleeps, her mouth open, her hair the color of tomatoes not yet ripe. The past preside of the United States reads Teen Love and Body Builder's Annual.

Next to Minna, leaning against the seat, is her cello in its zippered canvas case. Next to her cello is her younger brother, McGrew, who is humming. McGrew always hums. Sometimes he hums sentences, though most often it comes out like singing. McGrew's teachers do not enjoy McGrew answering questions in hums or song. Neither does the school principal, Mr. Ripley. McGrew spends lots of time sitting on the bench outside Mr. Ripley's office, humming.

Today McGrew is humming the newspaper. First the headlines, then the sports section, then the comics. McGrew only laughs at the headlines.

Minna smiles at her brother. He is small and stocky and compact like a suitcase. Minna loves him. McGrew always tells the truth, even when he shouldn't. He is kind. And he lends Minna money from the coffee jar he keeps beneath his mattress.

Minna looks out the bus window and thinks about her life. Her one life. She likes artichokes and blue fingernail polish and Mozart played too fast. She loves baseball, and the month of March because no one else much likes March, and every shade of brown she has ever seen. But this is only one life. Someday, she knows, she will have another life. A better one. McGrew knows this, too. McGrew is ten years old. He knows nearly everything. He knows, for instance, that his older sister, Minna Pratt, age eleven, is sitting patiently next to her cello waiting to be a woman. ~ Patricia MacLachlan,
796:Someone’s gotta do it. No one’s gonna do it. So I’ll do it. Your honor, I rise in defense of drunken astronauts. You’ve all heard the reports, delivered in scandalized tones on the evening news or as guaranteed punch lines for the late-night comics, that at least two astronauts had alcohol in their systems before flights. A stern and sober NASA has assured an anxious nation that this matter, uncovered by a NASA-commissioned study, will be thoroughly looked into and appropriately dealt with. To which I say: Come off it. I know NASA has to get grim and do the responsible thing, but as counsel for the defense—the only counsel for the defense, as far as I can tell—I place before the jury the following considerations: Have you ever been to the shuttle launchpad? Have you ever seen that beautiful and preposterous thing the astronauts ride? Imagine it’s you sitting on top of a 12-story winged tube bolted to a gigantic canister filled with 2 million liters of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. Then picture your own buddies—the “closeout crew”—who met you at the pad, fastened your emergency chute, strapped you into your launch seat, sealed the hatch and waved smiling to you through the window. Having left you lashed to what is the largest bomb on planet Earth, they then proceed 200 feet down the elevator and drive not one, not two, but three miles away to watch as the button is pressed that lights the candle that ignites the fuel that blows you into space. Three miles! That’s how far they calculate they must go to be beyond the radius of incineration should anything go awry on the launchpad on which, I remind you, these insanely brave people are sitting. Would you not want to be a bit soused? Would you be all aflutter if you discovered that a couple of astronauts—out of dozens—were mildly so? I dare say that if the standards of today’s fussy flight surgeons had been applied to pilots showing up for morning duty in the Battle of Britain, the signs in Piccadilly would today be in German. Cut these cowboys some slack. These are not wobbly Northwest Airlines pilots trying to get off the runway and steer through clouds and densely occupied airspace. An ascending space shuttle, I assure you, encounters very little traffic. And for much of liftoff, the astronaut is little more than spam in a can—not pilot but guinea pig. With opposable thumbs, to be sure, yet with only one specific task: to come out alive. And by the time the astronauts get to the part of the journey that requires delicate and skillful maneuvering—docking with the international space station, outdoor plumbing repairs in zero-G—they will long ago have peed the demon rum into their recycling units. ~ Charles Krauthammer,
797:Fiction has two uses. Firstly, it’s a gateway drug to reading. The drive to know what happens next, to want to turn the page, the need to keep going, even if it’s hard, because someone’s in trouble and you have to know how it’s all going to end … that’s a very real drive. And it forces you to learn new words, to think new thoughts, to keep going. To discover that reading per se is pleasurable. Once you learn that, you’re on the road to reading everything. And reading is key. There were noises made briefly, a few years ago, about the idea that we were living in a post-literate world, in which the ability to make sense out of written words was somehow redundant, but those days are gone: words are more important than they ever were: we navigate the world with words, and as the world slips onto the web, we need to follow, to communicate and to comprehend what we are reading. People who cannot understand each other cannot exchange ideas, cannot communicate, and translation programs only go so far.

The simplest way to make sure that we raise literate children is to teach them to read, and to show them that reading is a pleasurable activity. And that means, at its simplest, finding books that they enjoy, giving them access to those books, and letting them read them.

I don’t think there is such a thing as a bad book for children. Every now and again it becomes fashionable among some adults to point at a subset of children’s books, a genre, perhaps, or an author, and to declare them bad books, books that children should be stopped from reading. I’ve seen it happen over and over; Enid Blyton was declared a bad author, so was RL Stine, so were dozens of others. Comics have been decried as fostering illiteracy.

It’s tosh. It’s snobbery and it’s foolishness. There are no bad authors for children, that children like and want to read and seek out, because every child is different. They can find the stories they need to, and they bring themselves to stories. A hackneyed, worn-out idea isn’t hackneyed and worn out to them. This is the first time the child has encountered it. Do not discourage children from reading because you feel they are reading the wrong thing. Fiction you do not like is a route to other books you may prefer. And not everyone has the same taste as you.

Well-meaning adults can easily destroy a child’s love of reading: stop them reading what they enjoy, or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like, the 21st-century equivalents of Victorian “improving” literature. You’ll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and worse, unpleasant.

We need our children to get onto the reading ladder: anything that they enjoy reading will move them up, rung by rung, into literacy.

[from, Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming] ~ Neil Gaiman,
798:That night at the Brooklyn party, I was playing the girl who was in style, the girl a man like Nick wants: the Cool Girl. Men always say that as the defining compliment, don’t they? She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping, who plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves threesomes and anal sex, and jams hot dogs and hamburgers into her mouth like she’s hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang bang while somehow maintaining a size 2, because Cool Girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want. Go ahead, shit on me, I don’t mind, I’m the Cool Girl. Men actually think this girl exists. Maybe they’re fooled because so many women are willing to pretend to be this girl. For a long time Cool Girl offended me. I used to see men—friends, coworkers, strangers—giddy over these awful pretender women, and I’d want to sit these men down and calmly say: You are not dating a woman, you are dating a woman who has watched too many movies written by socially awkward men who’d like to believe that this kind of woman exists and might kiss them. I’d want to grab the poor guy by his lapels or messenger bag and say: The bitch doesn’t really love chili dogs that much—no one loves chili dogs that much! And the Cool Girls are even more pathetic: They’re not even pretending to be the woman they want to be, they’re pretending to be the woman a man wants them to be. Oh, and if you’re not a Cool Girl, I beg you not to believe that your man doesn’t want the Cool Girl. It may be a slightly different version—maybe he’s a vegetarian, so Cool Girl loves seitan and is great with dogs; or maybe he’s a hipster artist, so Cool Girl is a tattooed, bespectacled nerd who loves comics. There are variations to the window dressing, but believe me, he wants Cool Girl, who is basically the girl who likes every fucking thing he likes and doesn’t ever complain. (How do you know you’re not Cool Girl? Because he says things like: “I like strong women.” If he says that to you, he will at some point fuck someone else. Because “I like strong women” is code for “I hate strong women.”) I waited patiently—years—for the pendulum to swing the other way, for men to start reading Jane Austen, learn how to knit, pretend to love cosmos, organize scrapbook parties, and make out with each other while we leer. And then we’d say, Yeah, he’s a Cool Guy. But it never happened. Instead, women across the nation colluded in our degradation! Pretty soon Cool Girl became the standard girl. Men believed she existed—she wasn’t just a dreamgirl one in a million. Every girl was supposed to be this girl, and if you weren’t, then there was something wrong with you. But it’s tempting to be Cool Girl. For someone like me, who likes to win, it’s tempting to want to be the girl every guy wants. When I met Nick, I knew immediately that was what he wanted, and for him, I guess I was willing to try. I will accept my portion of blame. The thing is, I was crazy about him at first. I found him perversely exotic, a good ole Missouri boy. He was so damn nice to be around. He teased things out in me that I didn’t know existed: a lightness, a humor, an ease. It was as if he hollowed me out and filled me with feathers. He helped me be Cool ~ Gillian Flynn,
799:My interest in comics was scribbled over with a revived, energized passion for clothes, records, and music. I'd wandered in late to the punk party in 1978, when it was already over and the Sex Pistols were history.

I'd kept my distance during the first flush of the new paradigm, when the walls of the sixth-form common room shed their suburban-surreal Roger Dean Yes album covers and grew a fresh new skin of Sex Pistols pictures, Blondie pinups, Buzzcocks collages, Clash radical chic. As a committed outsider, I refused to jump on the bandwagon of this new musical fad,
which I'd written off as some kind of Nazi thing after seeing a photograph of Sid Vicious sporting a swastika armband. I hated the boys who'd cut their long hair and binned their crappy prog albums in an attempt to join in. I hated pretty much everybody without discrimination, in one way or another, and punk rockers were just something else to add to the shit list.

But as we all know, it's zealots who make the best converts. One Thursday night, I was sprawled on the settee with Top of the Pops on the telly when Poly Styrene and her band X-Ray Spex turned up to play their latest single: an exhilarating sherbet storm of raw punk psychedelia entitled "The Day the World Turned Day-Glo" By the time the last incandescent chorus played out, I was a punk. I had always been a punk. I would always be a punk. Punk brought it all together in one place for me: Michael Moorcock's Jerry Cornelius novels were punk. Peter Barnes's The Ruling Class, Dennis Potter, and The Prisoner were punk too. A Clockwork Orange was punk. Lindsay Anderson's If ... was punk. Monty Python was punk. Photographer Bob Carlos Clarke's fetish girls were punk. Comics were punk. Even Richmal Crompton's William books were punk. In fact, as it turned out, pretty much everything I liked was punk.

The world started to make sense for the first time since Mosspark Primary. New and glorious constellations aligned in my inner firmament. I felt born again. The do-your-own-thing ethos had returned with a spit and a sneer in all those amateurish records I bought and treasured-even
though I had no record player. Singles by bands who could often barely play or sing but still wrote beautiful, furious songs and poured all their young hearts, experiences, and inspirations onto records they paid for with their dole money. If these glorious fuckups could do it, so could a fuckup like me. When Jilted John, the alter ego of actor and comedian Graham Fellows, made an appearance on Top of the Pops singing about bus stops, failed romance, and sexual identity crisis, I was enthralled by his shameless amateurism, his reduction of pop music's great themes to playground name calling, his deconstruction of the macho rock voice into the effeminate whimper of a softie from Sheffield.

This music reflected my experience of teenage life as a series of brutal setbacks and disappointments that could in the end be redeemed into art and music with humor, intelligence, and a modicum of talent. This, for me, was the real punk, the genuine anticool, and I felt empowered. The losers, the rejected, and the formerly voiceless were being offered an opportunity to show what they could do to enliven a stagnant culture. History was on our side, and I had nothing to lose. I was eighteen and still hadn't kissed a girl, but perhaps I had potential. I knew I had a lot to say, and punk threw me the lifeline of a creed and a vocabulary-a soundtrack to my mission as a comic artist, a rough validation. Ugly kids, shy kids, weird kids: It was okay to be different. In fact, it was mandatory. ~ Grant Morrison,

IN CHAPTERS [3/3]



   1 Integral Yoga






0 1964-10-14, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But to me, those film shows arent the biggest obstacle, I dont think so. Whats much worse is all those comics they readthey spend their time reading those things.
   And the worst of all the worst of allis when the family arrives! Oh! Those parents are horrid beings, they tell them just the opposite of what we tell them, and then they argue and quarrel in front of them, they tell them all the familys little stories.

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  It is true that illusion, from Greek tragedy to horror comics, is also
  THE ACT OP CREATION

Thus Spoke Zarathustra text, #Thus Spoke Zarathustra, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  has since become associated with Nietzsche and the comics
  without ever losing its sarcastic tinge. In the present translation the older term, "overman," has been reinstated: it

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun comic_strip

The noun comic strip has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. comic strip, cartoon strip, strip, funnies ::: (a sequence of drawings telling a story in a newspaper or comic book)

--- Overview of noun comic

The noun comic has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                    
1. comedian, comic ::: (a professional performer who tells jokes and performs comical acts)


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun comic_strip

1 sense of comic strip                        

Sense 1
comic strip, cartoon strip, strip, funnies
   => cartoon, sketch
     => wit, humor, humour, witticism, wittiness
       => message, content, subject matter, substance
         => communication
           => abstraction, abstract entity
             => entity

Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun comic

1 sense of comic                            

Sense 1
comedian, comic
   => performer, performing artist
     => entertainer
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun comic_strip
                                    

Hyponyms of noun comic

1 sense of comic                            

Sense 1
comedian, comic
   => clown, buffoon, goof, goofball, merry andrew
   => comedienne
   => gagman, standup comedian
   => joker, jokester
   => top banana
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benny, Jack Benny, Benjamin Kubelsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burns, George Burns, Nathan Birnbaum
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caesar, Sid Caesar, Sidney Caesar
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chaplin, Charlie Chaplin, Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durante, Jimmy Durante
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fields, W. C. Fields, William Claude Dukenfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Oliver Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hill, Benny Hill, Alfred Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hope, Bob Hope, Leslie Townes Hope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keaton, Buster Keaton, Joseph Francis Keaton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lauder, Harry Lauder, Sir Harry MacLennan Lauder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Laurel, Stan Laurel, Arthur Stanley Jefferson Laurel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Martin, Steve Martin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Julius Marx, Groucho
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Leonard Marx, Chico
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Arthur Marx, Harpo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Herbert Marx, Zeppo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, Dudley Moore, Dudley Stuart John Moore


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun comic_strip

1 sense of comic strip                        

Sense 1
comic strip, cartoon strip, strip, funnies
   => cartoon, sketch

Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun comic

1 sense of comic                            

Sense 1
comedian, comic
   => performer, performing artist




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun comic_strip

1 sense of comic strip                        

Sense 1
comic strip, cartoon strip, strip, funnies
  -> cartoon, sketch
   => comic strip, cartoon strip, strip, funnies

Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun comic

1 sense of comic                            

Sense 1
comedian, comic
  -> performer, performing artist
   => actor, histrion, player, thespian, role player
   => artiste
   => baton twirler, twirler
   => comedian, comic
   => cowboy, rodeo rider
   => dancer, professional dancer, terpsichorean
   => executant
   => fire-eater, fire-swallower
   => fire walker
   => geek
   => headliner, star
   => juggler
   => magician, prestidigitator, conjurer, conjuror, illusionist
   => minstrel
   => monologist
   => musician, instrumentalist, player
   => puppeteer
   => Savoyard
   => sightreader
   => snake charmer
   => straight man, second banana
   => stripper, striptease artist, striptease, stripteaser, exotic dancer, ecdysiast, peeler
   => strongman
   => vaudevillian
   => ventriloquist




--- Grep of noun comic_strip
comic strip

Grep of noun comic
comic
comic book
comic opera
comic strip
comicality



IN WEBGEN [10000/19956]

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Wikipedia - Bane in other media -- Depictions of Bane outside comic books
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Wikipedia - Bart Allen -- Comics character
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Wikipedia - Batcopter -- Fictional comic vehicle
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Wikipedia - Black Knight (comics)
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Wikipedia - Boomerang (comics)
Wikipedia - Boomslang (comics)
Wikipedia - Boom! Studios -- American comic book and graphic novel publisher
Wikipedia - Boots and Pup -- 2005 science-fiction webcomic
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Wikipedia - Bouncing Boy -- DC Comics superhero
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Wikipedia - Box Office Poison -- Series of comic books
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Wikipedia - Brainiac 8 -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Brainiac (character) -- Recurring antagonist of DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Brainwave (character) -- DC Comics characters
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Wikipedia - Bucky (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Cable (comics)
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Wikipedia - Canadian comics -- Comic originating in Canada
Wikipedia - Cannonball (comics)
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Wikipedia - Captain America: White -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Captain America -- Fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Captain Boomerang -- Supervillain appearing in DC Comics publications and related media
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Wikipedia - Captain Marvel (DC Comics) -- Superhero
Wikipedia - Captain Marvel (Marvel Comics) -- Name of several superheroes appearing in Marvel Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Captain Marvel (Mar-Vell) -- Superhero appearing in Marvel Comics publications and related media
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Wikipedia - Cardiac (comics)
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Wikipedia - Carrion (comics)
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Wikipedia - Category:Avengers (comics) characters
Wikipedia - Category:Avengers (comics)
Wikipedia - Category:Black Widow (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Category:Chilean comics writers
Wikipedia - Category:Comic poets
Wikipedia - Category:Comics articles needing issue citations
Wikipedia - Category:Comics characters introduced in 1940
Wikipedia - Category:Comics characters introduced in 1963
Wikipedia - Category:Comics citation templates
Wikipedia - Category:Comics creators
Wikipedia - Category:Comics infobox image less alt text
Wikipedia - Category:Comics navigational boxes purge
Wikipedia - Category:Comics publishing companies
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Wikipedia - Category:DC Comics film characters
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Wikipedia - Category:DC Comics martial artists
Wikipedia - Category:DC Comics superheroes
Wikipedia - Category:DC Comics supervillains
Wikipedia - Category:Fantasy webcomics
Wikipedia - Category:French comics writers
Wikipedia - Category:Hulk (comics)
Wikipedia - Category:Lists of comics creators
Wikipedia - Category:Lists of Marvel Comics characters by organization
Wikipedia - Category:Lists of Marvel Comics characters
Wikipedia - Category:Male characters in comics
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Wikipedia - Category:Marvel Comics adapted into video games
Wikipedia - Category:Marvel Comics film characters
Wikipedia - Category:Marvel Comics male superheroes
Wikipedia - Category:Marvel Comics mutants
Wikipedia - Category:Marvel Comics superheroes
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Wikipedia - Catman (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Cat-Man (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Catwoman -- fictional character associated with DC Comics' Batman franchise
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Wikipedia - Charlton Comics -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Charlyne Yi -- American comic actress
Wikipedia - Chaste (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional mystical martial arts in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Checkmate (comics) -- Fictional covert operations agency featured in DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Cheetah (comics)
Wikipedia - Chemical King -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Chemo (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Chuck Dixon -- American comic book writer
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Wikipedia - Cipher (comics)
Wikipedia - Circe (character) -- Fictional character in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Civil War (comics) -- 2006-2007 Marvel Comics crossover storyline
Wikipedia - Civil War: Front Line -- Comic book event
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Wikipedia - ClanDestine -- Superhero comic book series
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Wikipedia - Class Comics -- Canadian comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Classics Illustrated -- American comic book series
Wikipedia - Classic X-Men -- Comic book reprint
Wikipedia - Claude Laverdure (author) -- Belgian comics artist
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Wikipedia - Clock King -- Two fictional characters, supervillains published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Close to Home (comic strip) -- American comic strip
Wikipedia - Clown (comics)
Wikipedia - Clown -- A comic performer often for children's entertainment
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Wikipedia - Coachwhip (comics)
Wikipedia - Cobra (Marvel Comics) -- Multiple characters in Marvel comics
Wikipedia - Code: Blue -- Fictional organization in comics
Wikipedia - Codename: Knockout -- Comic
Wikipedia - Collector (comics)
Wikipedia - Colossus (comics) -- Fictional superhero
Wikipedia - Comet (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Comet Queen -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Comic Arts Brooklyn -- Comic book festival in Brooklyn, New York
Wikipedia - Comic Arts Los Angeles -- Comic book festival in Los Angeles, Californoa
Wikipedia - Comic ballet
Wikipedia - Comic book archive -- File format
Wikipedia - Comic book collecting -- Hobby that treats comic books and related items as collectibles or artwork to be sought after and preserved
Wikipedia - Comic book convention -- Event with a primary focus on comic books
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Wikipedia - Comic Book Resources
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Wikipedia - Comic-book
Wikipedia - Comic book -- Publication of comics art
Wikipedia - Comic-Con International: San Diego
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Wikipedia - Comic fantasy
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Wikipedia - Comic magazine
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Wikipedia - Comic Neue
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Wikipedia - Comic opera
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Wikipedia - Comicpalooza -- Science fiction convention held in Houston, Texas
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Wikipedia - Comic relief -- The inclusion of a humorous character, scene, or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work
Wikipedia - Comics and Sequential Art -- Book by Will Eisner
Wikipedia - Comic Sans -- typeface
Wikipedia - Comics anthology -- Collection of works in the medium of comics
Wikipedia - Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Awards -- Annual award (1982-2010)
Wikipedia - Comics Code Authority -- Voluntary code to self-regulate the content of comic books in the United States
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Wikipedia - Comicsgate -- movement against progressivism in the comics industry
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Wikipedia - Comics in Focus: Chris Claremont's X-Men -- 2013 film by Patrick Meaney
Wikipedia - Comics semiotics
Wikipedia - Comics studies -- Academic study of comics and graphic novels
Wikipedia - Comic strip switcheroo
Wikipedia - Comic strip -- Short serialized comics
Wikipedia - Comics -- Creative work in which pictures and text convey information such as narratives
Wikipedia - Comics writer
Wikipedia - Comic timing -- the use of timing to enhance a comedic purpose
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Wikipedia - Comic
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Wikipedia - Computo (character) -- Fictional supervillain in DC comics universe
Wikipedia - Concerned -- 2005 parody webcomic
Wikipedia - Conspiracy (comics) -- Fictional villain group in comic books
Wikipedia - Constrictor (comics)
Wikipedia - Contemplator (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Controller (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Controllers (DC Comics) -- Fictional extraterrestrial race existing in the DC Universe
Wikipedia - Convergence (comics) -- Comics
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Wikipedia - Coppelia -- Comic ballet composed by Leo Delibes
Wikipedia - Copperhead (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Copperhead (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Copycat (Marvel Comics) -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - CoroCoro Comic -- comic magazine
Wikipedia - Corporation (comics) -- fictional organization in Marvel comics
Wikipedia - Corsair (comics) -- Fictional superhero character in the Marvel universe
Wikipedia - Corto Maltese -- Comics series
Wikipedia - Cory Walker -- American comic book artist and penciler
Wikipedia - Cosmic Boy -- Fictional character, a DC Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Cosmic Odyssey (comics) -- 1988 DC Comics science fiction mini-series
Wikipedia - Cottonmouth (Burchell Clemens) -- Fictional comic book villain
Wikipedia - Countdown to Final Crisis -- Comic book limited series published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Counter-Earth (comics)
Wikipedia - Count Nefaria -- Fictional character from Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Create a Comic Project -- Youth literacy program and webcomic
Wikipedia - Creator ownership in comics -- Business agreement for comic writer
Wikipedia - Creators (comics) -- Fictional organization in Marvel comics
Wikipedia - Creeper (DC Comics) -- fictional superhero appearing in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Creepshow (comics) -- 1982 graphic novella published by Plume
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Wikipedia - Crime Doctor (comics)
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Wikipedia - Crime SuspenStories -- Anthology crime comic
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Wikipedia - Crippler (comics) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Crisis on Infinite Earths -- Limited DC comic crossover series
Wikipedia - Crisse -- Belgian comics artist
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Wikipedia - Crossbones (character) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - CrossGen -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Crossover (Image Comics) -- American comic book series
Wikipedia - Cross Technological Enterprises -- Fictional corporation in the Marvel Comics universe
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Wikipedia - Crusaders (Marvel Comics) -- Group of fictional characters by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Crystal (comics)
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Wikipedia - Cutthroat (comics)
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Wikipedia - Cyberella -- Science fiction comic
Wikipedia - Cyber (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Cyberpunk 2077: Trauma Team -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Cyborg (comics) -- DC comics character
Wikipedia - Cyclone (Marvel Comics) -- Alias of a number of fictional characters in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Cyclops (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Cypher (comics)
Wikipedia - Cypher (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Daddy Warbucks -- Fictional character from the comic strip Little Orphan Annie
Wikipedia - Daimon Hellstrom -- Fictional character appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Daken -- Marvel Comics supervillain
Wikipedia - Dakota North (comics) -- Fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe
Wikipedia - Dale Eaglesham -- Canadian comic book illustrator
Wikipedia - Damage Control (comics) -- Fictional company appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Dan Abnett -- British comic book writer and novelist
Wikipedia - Daniel West (character) -- Character appearing in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Dan Jurgens -- American comics artist and writer
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Wikipedia - Danny Fingeroth -- American comic book writer and editor
Wikipedia - Dan Panosian -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Dan Parsons -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Dan Slott -- American comic book writer
Wikipedia - Daredevil (film) -- 2003 film based on the comic book directed by Mark Steven Johnson
Wikipedia - Daredevil (Lev Gleason Publications) -- American comic book superhero
Wikipedia - Daredevil (Marvel Comics character) -- Fictional superhero
Wikipedia - Daredevil (Marvel Comics series)
Wikipedia - Dargaud -- Publisher of comics
Wikipedia - Darkforce -- Fictional concept appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Dark Horse Comics -- American comic book and manga publisher
Wikipedia - Dark Matter (comics)
Wikipedia - Dark Nights: Metal -- DC Comics miniseries
Wikipedia - Dark Reign (comics)
Wikipedia - Dark Riders (comics)
Wikipedia - Darkseid War -- DC Comics limited series
Wikipedia - Darkseid -- Fictional character that appears in comic books published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Darkstars -- Group of fictional intergalactic policemen that appeared in comic books published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Dark X-Men -- Fictional comic book characters
Wikipedia - Darren Close -- Australian comics creator
Wikipedia - Darren Cross -- Marvel Comics supervillain
Wikipedia - Darrin Bell -- American editorial cartoonist and comic strip creator
Wikipedia - Darwin (comics)
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Wikipedia - Dave Stewart (artist) -- American comic book colorist
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Wikipedia - David Cain (comics)
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Wikipedia - David North (comics) -- Mutant comic book character
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Wikipedia - Dawn of X -- Comics event
Wikipedia - Dawnstar -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Dawud Anyabwile -- African American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Day of Judgment (comics) -- DC comic storyline
Wikipedia - Daytripper (DC Comics) -- Comic
Wikipedia - Dazzler (Marvel Comics) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - DC Animated Universe (comics) -- Fictional comic book universe
Wikipedia - DC Black Label -- Imprint of DC comics
Wikipedia - DC Comics Absolute Edition -- Series of archival quality printings of graphic novels
Wikipedia - DC Comics: Anatomy of a Metahuman -- Graphic novel
Wikipedia - DC Comics Presents -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - DC Comics
Wikipedia - DCeased -- 2019 comic book miniseries by DC Comics
Wikipedia - DC Extended Universe -- American superhero film franchise based on DC Comics
Wikipedia - DC FanDome -- Multi-genre entertainment and comic convention
Wikipedia - DC Implosion -- 1978 DC Comics cancellation purge
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Wikipedia - DC Universe (streaming service) -- Video on demand and digital comic book service
Wikipedia - DC Universe -- Shared universe of the comic stories published by DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Deadline (Marvel Comics) -- 2002 Marvel Comics mini-series
Wikipedia - Deadman (comics) -- Fictional character
Wikipedia - Deadpool v. Gambit -- 2016 limited series published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Deadpool -- Character appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Death Adder (character) -- Fictional supervillain from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Death Adder (comics)
Wikipedia - Deathbolt -- Fictional supervillain in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Death (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Deathlok -- Fictional character from Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Death's Head -- Fictional character in Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Decay (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Decimation (comics)
Wikipedia - Deep Six (comics) -- Wikimedia disambiguation page
Wikipedia - Defenders (comics) -- Group of fictional characters in Marvel Universe
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Wikipedia - Dell Publishing -- American publisher of books, magazines and comic books
Wikipedia - Demolition Man (comics)
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Wikipedia - Dennis O'Neil -- American comics writer
Wikipedia - Dennis the Menace and Gnasher -- British comic strip
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Wikipedia - Destroyer (Marvel Comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Detective Comics 27 -- Comic book depicting the debut of fictional superhero Batman
Wikipedia - Detective Comics -- Title used for two American comic book series
Wikipedia - Devastator (comics) -- Marvel comic book characters
Wikipedia - Dev-Em -- Fictional character who appears in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Deviant (comics) -- Fictional comic book race of humanoids
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Wikipedia - Diablo (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Diamondback (Rachel Leighton) -- Comic book character from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Diamond Comic Distributors -- Comic book distribution company
Wikipedia - Diana Albers -- American comic book letterer
Wikipedia - Diana Palmer (The Phantom) -- Fictional character from The Phantom comic strip
Wikipedia - Diane Nelson (comics) -- American comic media executive
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Wikipedia - Dick Tracy (character) -- Hero of the Dick Tracy comic strip
Wikipedia - Dick Tracy -- American comic strip starting 1931
Wikipedia - Diddl -- German fictional character and comic strip
Wikipedia - Didier Conrad -- French comics artist and writer
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Wikipedia - Digital Comic Museum -- digital library of comic books
Wikipedia - Digital comic -- Comic released digitally
Wikipedia - Dilbert -- American comic strip
Wikipedia - Dino Attanasio -- Belgian author of comics
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Wikipedia - Disney comics -- Comics featuring Walt Disney characters
Wikipedia - District X -- Fictional comic book location
Wikipedia - Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (comic book)
Wikipedia - Doctor Doom -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Doctor Fate (Kent Nelson) -- Comics character and superhero
Wikipedia - Doctor Faustus (comics)
Wikipedia - Doctor Hormone -- Fictional character published by Dell Comics in the 1940s
Wikipedia - Doctor Light (Arthur Light) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Doctor Mid-Nite (Pieter Cross) -- DC Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Doctor Mid-Nite -- DC Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Doctor Phosphorus -- Fictional supervillain who appeared in Batman comics
Wikipedia - Doctor Strange -- Superhero appearing in Marvel Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Doctor Sun -- Fictional character in Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Dominic Fortune -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Domino (comics) -- Marvel comics character
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Wikipedia - Donald Duck and the Mummy's Ring -- 1943 Donald Duck comic book story by Carl Barks
Wikipedia - Donald Duck (comic strip) -- 1938-1995 American comic strip
Wikipedia - Donald Duck Weekblad -- Dutch weekly comics magazine
Wikipedia - Don Heck -- American comics artist
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Wikipedia - Donna Troy -- DC Comics superheroine
Wikipedia - Don Rosa -- American comic book writer and illustrator
Wikipedia - Doom 2099 -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Doomsday Clock (comics) -- Comic
Wikipedia - Doomsday (comics)
Wikipedia - Doomsday (DC Comics) -- Fictional comic character
Wikipedia - Doonesbury -- Comic strip
Wikipedia - Doop (comics)
Wikipedia - Doorman (comics)
Wikipedia - Doppelganger (comics)
Wikipedia - Doug Brammer -- American comic book writer
Wikipedia - Doughboy (comics)
Wikipedia - DP 7 -- Fictional comic book series
Wikipedia - Dracula (comics) -- Index of articles associated with the same name
Wikipedia - Dracula (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Draft:Valiant Comics Cinematic Universe -- American superhero film franchise based on Valiant Comics
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Wikipedia - Dragon Lady Press -- Defunct Canadian comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Dragon Man -- Fictional character in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Drax the Destroyer -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Dreadnought (comics)
Wikipedia - Dreadstar -- Comics
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Wikipedia - Dream (comics)
Wikipedia - Dream of the Rarebit Fiend -- Early 20th century American comic strip
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Wikipedia - Dum Dum Dugan -- Fictional character appearing in publications from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Dummy (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Dust to Dust (comic)
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Wikipedia - Dwarves (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Eagle (British comics) -- Seminal British children's comic
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Wikipedia - Earth One (DC graphic novel series) -- DC Comics graphic novel imprint
Wikipedia - Earthwar -- Comic story arc featuring the Legion of Super-Heroes
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Wikipedia - Ebony Maw -- comic book character
Wikipedia - EC Comics -- Company
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Wikipedia - Eclipse Comics -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - E. C. Stoner -- Early African-American comic and commercial artist
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Wikipedia - Eddie Campbell -- British comics artist and cartoonist
Wikipedia - Eddy Barrows -- Brazilian comic book artist
Wikipedia - Editions Mille-M-CM-^Nles -- Canadian French-language comics publisher
Wikipedia - Ed Piskor -- American alternative comics artist
Wikipedia - Eduardo Abela -- Cuban painter and comic artist
Wikipedia - Eduardo Risso -- Argentine comics artist
Wikipedia - Edvin Biukovic -- Croatian comics artist
Wikipedia - Eel (comics)
Wikipedia - Eerie (Avon) -- Horror comic book
Wikipedia - Eerie Publications -- Publisher of comics magazines
Wikipedia - Egghead (DC Comics) -- Fictional DC comics character
Wikipedia - Egghead (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Eightball (comics) -- Comic book by Daniel Clowes
Wikipedia - Eisner Award -- American comic book award
Wikipedia - Eitri (comics)
Wikipedia - Elders of the Universe -- Fictional comic book supervillains
Wikipedia - El Diablo (comics) -- Comic character
Wikipedia - El Dorado (Super Friends) -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Electro (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Elektra (character) -- Character in publications from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Elektra (comics)
Wikipedia - Elementals (DC Comics) -- Fictional team of superheroes
Wikipedia - Elementals (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional organization in the Marvel Universe
Wikipedia - Element Lad -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Elena de' Grimani -- Italian comics illustrator (b. 1975)
Wikipedia - El Gato Negro -- Fictional American comic book superheroes
Wikipedia - Eli Woods -- English comedian and comic actor
Wikipedia - Elixir (comics)
Wikipedia - Elliot S. Maggin -- American writer of comic books, film, television and novels
Wikipedia - El Muerto -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - El plano de Ali-Gusa-No -- Comic book
Wikipedia - Elseworlds 80-Page Giant -- 1999 collection by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Elves (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - El Vibora -- defunct Spanish comics magazine
Wikipedia - Emerald Twilight -- DC comic book saga
Wikipedia - Emiliana Kampilan -- Filipino writer and comic book creator
Wikipedia - Emissaries of Evil -- Fictional comic book supervillains
Wikipedia - Emma Frost -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Emrys Killebrew -- Fictional character that appears in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Enchanters Three -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Enchantress (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Enclave (comics) -- Fictional comic book organization
Wikipedia - End of an Era (comics)
Wikipedia - Enforcer (comics) -- Fictional character
Wikipedia - Enforcers (comics) -- Fictional comic book characters
Wikipedia - Enigma (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Enrique Alcatena -- Argentine comic book artist
Wikipedia - Enrique Breccia -- Argentine comic book artist and writer
Wikipedia - Eobard Thawne -- Fictional character appearing in DC Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Epilycus -- Athenian comic poet of the Old Comedy
Wikipedia - Equus (comics)
Wikipedia - E. R. Cruz -- Filipino comics artist
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Wikipedia - Eric Basaldua -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Erik Josten -- Fictional character appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Erik Killmonger -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Erik Larsen -- Comic creator
Wikipedia - Ernie Colon -- Puerto Rican comics artist
Wikipedia - Eternals (comics) -- Group of comic book characters
Wikipedia - Eternity (comics)
Wikipedia - Ethel Muggs -- Archie Comics character
Wikipedia - Etienne Le Rallic -- French illustrator and comics artist
Wikipedia - European comics -- Comics produced in Continental Europe
Wikipedia - Everyman (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Excalibur (comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero group
Wikipedia - Executioner (comics)
Wikipedia - Exemplars (comics) -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Exiles (Marvel Comics) -- Group of fictional characters
Wikipedia - Exodus (comics)
Wikipedia - Externals -- Fictional comic book characters
Wikipedia - Extraordinary X-Men -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Extremis (comics)
Wikipedia - Eydie Gorme -- American pop singer, chanteuse, comic actress
Wikipedia - Ezekiel (comics)
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Wikipedia - Fabio Coala -- Brazilian comics artist
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Wikipedia - Faces of Evil -- DC Comics "event" in January 2009
Wikipedia - Factor Three -- Fictional comic book villain
Wikipedia - Fade from Grace -- Five-part comic series
Wikipedia - Faerie (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Fafnir (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Falcon (comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Fallen Angels (comics) -- Comics
Wikipedia - Famous Funnies -- American comic strip anthology
Wikipedia - FantaCo Enterprises -- American comic book store and publishing company
Wikipedia - Fantastic Comics (Ajax-Farrell) -- Bi-monthly comic book
Wikipedia - Fantastic Five -- Fictional comic book team
Wikipedia - Fantastic Force -- Fictional comic book superhero team
Wikipedia - Fantastic Four (comic book)
Wikipedia - Fantasy comics
Wikipedia - Farley Stillwell -- Fictional character appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Farmhand (comics) -- American comic book
Wikipedia - Fatality (character) -- Character in DC Comic universe
Wikipedia - Father Time (Marvel Comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Fawcett Comics -- Publisher
Wikipedia - FBP: Federal Bureau of Physics -- Sci-fi comic book
Wikipedia - F. C. Burnand -- British comic writer and dramatist
Wikipedia - Fear Itself (comics)
Wikipedia - Federico Pedrocchi -- Italian comics artist
Wikipedia - Felipe Smith -- American comic book writer
Wikipedia - Female comics creators
Wikipedia - Female Furies -- Group of fictional women from DC Comics
Wikipedia - Femizons -- Fictional comic book groups
Wikipedia - Femme Fatales (comics) -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Fenris (comics) -- Marvel Comics characters
Wikipedia - Fenris Wolf (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Feral (comics)
Wikipedia - Fer (comics) -- Spanish comics artist
Wikipedia - Fer-de-Lance (comics)
Wikipedia - Ferdinando Tacconi -- Italian comics artist
Wikipedia - Ferro Lad -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Fight Club 3 -- Comic book sequel
Wikipedia - Fighting American -- 1954-1955 superhero comic book
Wikipedia - Final Crisis: Legion of 3 Worlds -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Final Crisis -- Limited DC Comics crossover series
Wikipedia - Fingerprints (comics) -- Graphic novel by Richard Kelly
Wikipedia - Finish Line (comics) -- DC Comics comic book story line
Wikipedia - Finnish Nightmares -- 2015 stick figure webcomic
Wikipedia - Firebrand (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Firebrand (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Firebug (comics)
Wikipedia - Fire (comics) -- Superheroine in the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - Firefly (Boom! Studios comics) {{DISPLAYTITLE:''Firefly'' (Boom! Studios comics) -- Firefly (Boom! Studios comics) {{DISPLAYTITLE:''Firefly'' (Boom! Studios comics)
Wikipedia - Firefly (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Firelord (comics)
Wikipedia - Fire Power (comic book) -- Comic book
Wikipedia - Firepower (comics)
Wikipedia - Firestar (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Firestorm (comics)
Wikipedia - First Comics -- Company
Wikipedia - Five Go Mad in Dorset -- 1982 episode of The Comic Strip
Wikipedia - Fixer (comics) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Flamingo (comics)
Wikipedia - Flash (Barry Allen) -- Superhero appearing in DC Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Flash (comics)
Wikipedia - Flash Comics -- Comic book anthology
Wikipedia - Flash (DC Comics character) -- Several superheros in the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - Flash Gordon -- Hero of a science fiction adventure comic strip
Wikipedia - Flash (Jay Garrick) -- Fictional character in the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - Flash of Two Worlds -- Comic book story
Wikipedia - Flashpoint (comics) -- American comic book crossover story arc published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Flashpoint (Elseworlds) -- DC comic book limited series
Wikipedia - Flatman (comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Flatter -- Comics colorist
Wikipedia - Flemming Andersen -- Danish Disney comics artist
Wikipedia - Flintheart Glomgold -- Disney comics character
Wikipedia - Flook (comic strip) -- British newspaper comic strip
Wikipedia - Fluffy (comics) -- Graphic novel
Wikipedia - FLUKE Mini-Comics & Zine Festival -- Comic festival in Athens, Georgia
Wikipedia - Flux (comics)
Wikipedia - Fly (Archie Comics)
Wikipedia - Forager (character) -- DC comic character
Wikipedia - For Better or For Worse -- Canadian comic strip
Wikipedia - Force Works -- Marvel comics superhero team
Wikipedia - Forearm (comics)
Wikipedia - Foreigner (comics)
Wikipedia - Forever Evil -- 2013-2014 crossover comic book storyline
Wikipedia - Forge (comics)
Wikipedia - Forgotten One (comics)
Wikipedia - Fort Knox (comic strip) -- American comic strip
Wikipedia - Four Color -- 1939-1962 anthology comic book series
Wikipedia - Fourth World (comics) -- Comic storyline
Wikipedia - Fox Feature Syndicate -- Former comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Francesco Francavilla -- Italian comic book artist
Wikipedia - Francisco Guerrero (comics) -- Secret identity of comic book superhero El Gato Negro
Wikipedia - Franco Aureliani -- American comic book writer/artist
Wikipedia - Francois Dermaut -- French comics artist
Wikipedia - Francois Schuiten -- Belgian comic book artist
Wikipedia - Frank Brunner -- American comics artist and illustrator
Wikipedia - Frank Cho -- Korean-American comic strip and comic book creator
Wikipedia - Frankenstein (Prize Comics) -- 1940-1954 American comic book series
Wikipedia - Frankenstein's Monster (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Franklin (Peanuts) -- Peanuts comic strip character
Wikipedia - Franklin Richards (comics) -- Character from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Frank Miller (comics) -- American writer, artist, film director; known for comics books and graphic novels
Wikipedia - Frank Tieri (comics)
Wikipedia - Frank Tieri (writer) -- American comic book writer
Wikipedia - Fran Striker -- American radio and comic writer
Wikipedia - Frazz -- Comic strip
Wikipedia - Freakshow (comics)
Wikipedia - Freddy vs. Jason vs. Ash: The Nightmare Warriors -- Limited series comic book
Wikipedia - Freddy vs. Jason vs. Ash -- Limited series comic book
Wikipedia - Fred Kelly (comics) -- Canadian comic book writer
Wikipedia - Free Comic Book Day -- Promotional event for comic industry
Wikipedia - Freedom Fighters (comics)
Wikipedia - Freedom Force (comics) -- Group of fictional characters
Wikipedia - Free Spirit (comics)
Wikipedia - Fremok -- Belgian comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Frenchy the Clown -- Title character in National Lampoon's "Evil Clown Comics"
Wikipedia - Frew Publications -- Australian comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Freya (comics) -- Fictional Asgardian appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Friday (comics)
Wikipedia - Frieda (Peanuts) -- Peanuts comic strip character
Wikipedia - Frigga (character) -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Frigga (comics)
Wikipedia - Frightful Four -- Group of fictional characters in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Full Bleed Studios -- Canadian comics publisher
Wikipedia - Funny Aminals -- 1972 underground comic book
Wikipedia - Fury (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Fury (Marvel Comics) -- Marvel Comics supervillain
Wikipedia - FutureQuake -- British small press comic book
Wikipedia - Future Quest -- DC Comics crossover comic book series
Wikipedia - Gabe Jones -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Gabriel Stacy and Sarah Stacy -- Marvel Comics characters
Wikipedia - Gaea (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Gaia (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Gail Simone -- American comic book writer
Wikipedia - Galactus -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Gambit (Marvel Comics) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Gamma Flight -- Fictional comic book heroes
Wikipedia - Gamora -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Gangan Comics
Wikipedia - Gangbuster (DC Comics) -- Fictional character
Wikipedia - Gardner Fox -- American comics writer
Wikipedia - Garfield and Friends -- American animated television series with characters from the Garfield and U.S. Acres comic strips
Wikipedia - Garfield -- Comic strip created by Jim Davis
Wikipedia - Gargoyle (comics) -- Fictional superhero
Wikipedia - Garth (comics)
Wikipedia - Garth Ennis -- Northern Irish comics writer
Wikipedia - Garth Ranzz -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Gary Chaloner -- Australian comic book artist and writer
Wikipedia - Gary Groth -- American comic book editor, publisher and critic
Wikipedia - Gas Gang -- DC Comics group
Wikipedia - Gates (comics)
Wikipedia - Gay Comix -- Underground comics series
Wikipedia - Gaylord Dingler -- American stand-up comic
Wikipedia - Gearhead (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Gemini (comics) -- comics name
Wikipedia - Gender and webcomics -- Webcomics are primarily created by women and gender-variant people
Wikipedia - Gene Colan -- American comics creator and artist
Wikipedia - General Wade Eiling -- DC Comics villain
Wikipedia - General Zod -- Character from the Superman comics and related media
Wikipedia - Generation X (comics) -- Fictional comic book heroes
Wikipedia - Genesis (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Genetix (comics) -- Fictional comic book superheroes
Wikipedia - Genial Olivier -- Belgian comic series written and drawn by Jacques Devos
Wikipedia - GenM-BM-9M-BM-3 -- American fictional superhero team and comic book series
Wikipedia - Genndy Tartakovsky -- Russian-American cinema and television animator, director producer, screenwriter, storyboard artist, comic book writer, and artist
Wikipedia - Genosha -- Fictional island nation in comics published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Gentle (comics)
Wikipedia - Geof Darrow -- American comic artist
Wikipedia - George Graves (actor) -- English comic actor (1876-1949)
Wikipedia - George Perez -- American comic book artist and writer
Wikipedia - George Sherman (comics) -- American comics publicist
Wikipedia - George Stacy -- Fictional Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - George Tuska -- American comics artist
Wikipedia - Gerard Jones -- American author and comic book writer (born 1957)
Wikipedia - Gerard Way -- American singer, songwriter, musician, and comic book writer
Wikipedia - German comics -- Comic originating in Germany
Wikipedia - Gerry Alanguilan -- Comic book artist
Wikipedia - Gertrude Yorkes -- Character from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Ghaur -- Supervillain in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Ghostly Trio -- Fictional characters appearing in Harvey Comics
Wikipedia - Ghost (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Ghost (Nedor Comics) -- Fictional superhero from the Golden Age of Comics
Wikipedia - Ghost Rider (Danny Ketch) -- Marvel Comics superhero, the third person to use the name Ghost Rider
Wikipedia - Ghost Rider (Johnny Blaze) -- Marvel Comics superhero, the second person to use the name Ghost Rider
Wikipedia - Ghost Rider -- Character from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Ghost World (comics) -- Graphic novel by Daniel Clowes
Wikipedia - Gianni Schicchi -- Comic opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini
Wikipedia - Giannis Kalaitzis -- Greek comics artist and costume designer (1945-2016)
Wikipedia - Giant Days -- Comic series created by John Allison
Wikipedia - Giants (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Gibbon (comics)
Wikipedia - G.I. Combat -- American war comic (1952-87; 2012)
Wikipedia - G.I. Joe (2019 comic book) -- American comic book series
Wikipedia - Gilberton (publisher) -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Gil Kane -- Latvian-born American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Gim Allon -- Character in the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - Ginger Snaps (film) -- 2000 Canadian comic horror film directed by John Fawcett
Wikipedia - Giuseppe Camuncoli -- Italian comic book artist
Wikipedia - Giuseppe Perego -- Italian comics artist
Wikipedia - Gladstone Gander -- Disney comics character
Wikipedia - Glenn Fabry -- British comics artist
Wikipedia - Glenn Talbot -- Fictional character appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Global Guardians -- DC comics superhero team
Wikipedia - Glob (comics)
Wikipedia - Glory Grant -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Glossary of comics terminology -- Comics vocabulary
Wikipedia - Glycomics
Wikipedia - Glynis Oliver -- Comics artist
Wikipedia - G-Man Comics -- US micropublisher
Wikipedia - Goblin (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - God Is Dead (comics) -- Comic book
Wikipedia - Godzilla (comics) -- Godzilla in comics
Wikipedia - Godzilla, King of the Monsters (comic book)
Wikipedia - Gog (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Gog (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Goldbug (comics)
Wikipedia - Golden Age of Comic Books -- Comic books published between 1938 and 1956
Wikipedia - Goldie Vance -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Gold Key: Alliance -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Gold Key Comics -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Golem (short story) -- Comical short story by Lee Yeongdo
Wikipedia - Goliath (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Gomi (comics)
Wikipedia - Good girl art -- Artwork featuring attractive women in comics and pulp magazines
Wikipedia - Goodman, Lieber, Kurtzberg & Holliway -- Fictional comic book law firm
Wikipedia - Goom -- Fictional extraterrestrial in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Goran Parlov -- Croatian comic book artist
Wikipedia - Gordana Comic -- Serbian politician
Wikipedia - Gorgeous Gus -- British comic strip
Wikipedia - Gorgon (Tomi Shishido) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Gorilla Girl -- Marvel Comics fictional superheroine
Wikipedia - Gorr the God Butcher -- Fictional character in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Gorr the Golden Gorilla -- Fictional character appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Gothic Blimp Works -- Comics tabloid
Wikipedia - Grace Randolph -- American comic book writer, host, and YouTuber
Wikipedia - Grand Comics Database
Wikipedia - Grandmaster (comics)
Wikipedia - Grandmaster (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Granny Goodness -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Grant Morrison -- Scottish comic book writer, and playwright
Wikipedia - Graphic novel -- Book with primarily comics contents
Wikipedia - Grapplers (comics) -- Fictional organization in the Marvel Universe
Wikipedia - Graviton (comics) -- Marvel comics characters
Wikipedia - Graymalkin (comics)
Wikipedia - Graymalkin -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Great Lakes Avengers -- Fictional comic book heroes
Wikipedia - Great Pumpkin -- Peanuts comic strip character
Wikipedia - Greek Street (comics) -- American comic book series
Wikipedia - Green Arrow -- Fictional character from DC Comics
Wikipedia - Green Goblin -- Supervillain appearing in Marvel Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Green Lantern (comic book) -- Comic book series featuring the DC Comics heroes of the same name
Wikipedia - Green Lantern Corps -- Fictional intergalactic military/police force appearing in comics published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Green Lantern: Rebirth -- DC comic book series
Wikipedia - Green Lantern/Superman: Legend of the Green Flame -- 2000 DC Comics comic book
Wikipedia - Greg Brooks (artist) -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Greg Capullo -- American comic book artist and penciller
Wikipedia - Greg Land -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Greg Weisman -- American television and comics writer
Wikipedia - Gremlin (comics)
Wikipedia - Grey Gargoyle -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Greystone (comics)
Wikipedia - Griffin (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Grifter (character) -- Supervillain appearing in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Grim Reaper (comics) -- Supervillain in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Grizzly (comics)
Wikipedia - Groot -- Comic book and movie character
Wikipedia - Guardian (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Guardians of the Galaxy (1969 team) -- 1969 superhero team by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Guardians of the Galaxy (2008 team) -- 2008 superhero team by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Guardsman (comics) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Guglielmo Letteri -- Italian comic book artist
Wikipedia - Guido Hatzis -- Greek-Australian comic character
Wikipedia - Gunhawks -- Fictional comic book characters
Wikipedia - Gunnerkrigg Court -- Science-fantasy webcomic started in 2005
Wikipedia - Guy A. Sims -- African American comic book author
Wikipedia - Guy Davis (comics) -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Guy Gardner (character) -- DC comics fictional character
Wikipedia - Guy Gardner (comics)
Wikipedia - Gwenpool -- Fictional character appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Gwen Stacy -- Fictional Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Gyro Gearloose -- Disney comics character
Wikipedia - Hal Jordan -- Fictional superhero published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Hal Sherman -- Cartoonist and comic book artist
Wikipedia - Hamilton Hill (comics)
Wikipedia - Hammer and Anvil (comics) -- Fictional comic book villains
Wikipedia - Hammerhead (comics)
Wikipedia - H.A.M.M.E.R. -- Fictional comic book law enforcement agency
Wikipedia - Hand (comics)
Wikipedia - Hank Hall -- Fictional DC comics superhero
Wikipedia - Hank Kanalz -- American comic book writer and editor
Wikipedia - Hank Pym -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Hannah Berry -- British comics artist and writer
Wikipedia - Happy Hogan (comics)
Wikipedia - Harbinger (DC Comics) -- Fictional DC comics character
Wikipedia - Hard Boiled (comics)
Wikipedia - Harlem Heroes -- Comic strip
Wikipedia - Harley Quinn -- character from DC Comics
Wikipedia - Haroun El Poussah -- Character in the Iznogoud comics series
Wikipedia - Harper Row -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Harpy (DC Comics mythical) -- a DC Comics comic book supervillain
Wikipedia - Harpy (Denise de Sevigne) -- A DC Comics comic book supervillain
Wikipedia - Harpy (Iris Phelios) -- a DC Comics comic book supervillain
Wikipedia - Harry Donenfeld -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Harvey Bullock (character) -- Fictional character from DC Comics' Batman titles
Wikipedia - Harvey Comics -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Harvey Tolibao -- Filipino comic book artist
Wikipedia - Hasbro Comic Book Universe
Wikipedia - Haunted Tank -- Fictional DC comics feature
Wikipedia - Havok (comics)
Wikipedia - Hawkeye (Clint Barton) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Hawkgirl -- Name of several female fictional superhero characters, all owned by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Hawkman -- Fictional superhero in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Hawkshaw the Detective -- Comic strip character
Wikipedia - Hawkwoman -- Several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Hawkworld -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Headline Comics (For The American Boy) -- 1943 American comic book series
Wikipedia - Headmen -- Fictional comic book villains
Wikipedia - Health Capsules -- Syndicated comic strip
Wikipedia - Heavy Metal (magazine) -- American science fiction and fantasy comics magazine
Wikipedia - Heimdall (comics)
Wikipedia - Heimdall (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Hela (comics)
Wikipedia - Helga Jace -- Fictional character in the DC Comics Universe
Wikipedia - Hellboy -- Comic book character created by Mike Mignola
Wikipedia - Hellfire Club (comics) -- Fictional society in the Marvel Comics universe
Wikipedia - Hellfire (J. T. Slade) -- Comics character
Wikipedia - Hellgrammite (comics)
Wikipedia - Hellion (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Hellions (Marvel Comics) -- Several fictional groups in the Marvel universe
Wikipedia - H'El on Earth -- Comics storyline
Wikipedia - Henry Flint -- British comic book artist
Wikipedia - Henryk Chmielewski (comics) -- Polish comic book artist and journalist
Wikipedia - Hentai -- Japanese pornographic animation, comics, and video games
Wikipedia - Hepcats -- Comic
Wikipedia - Hepzibah (comics)
Wikipedia - Hera (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Herbie Popnecker -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Hercules (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Here (comics) -- 6-page comic by Richard McGuire
Wikipedia - Herge -- Belgian comics writer
Wikipedia - Hermes (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Heroes (comics) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Heroes in Crisis -- 2018-2019 DC Comics crossover event
Wikipedia - Heroes Reborn (comics)
Wikipedia - Heroic Age (comics)
Wikipedia - Hi-Ex -- Comics convention in Scotland, 2008-2012
Wikipedia - Hillborough Studios -- Defunct Canadian comics publisher
Wikipedia - Hippo (comics)
Wikipedia - Hippolyta (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Hippolyta (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Histoire de M. Vieux Bois -- Comic book album by Rodolphe Topffer
Wikipedia - History of American comics -- American comics history
Wikipedia - History of comics -- Aspect of history
Wikipedia - History of the DC Universe -- Comic book issue by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Hit-Monkey -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Hizli Gazeteci -- Comic strip hero from Turkey created by Necdet Sen
Wikipedia - H.M.S. Pinafore -- Comic, 2-act opera by Gilbert and Sullivan
Wikipedia - Hobgoblin (comics) -- fictional supervillain
Wikipedia - Ho Che Anderson -- Canadian cartoonist and comics artist
Wikipedia - Holiday (comics)
Wikipedia - Holocaust (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Home Grown Funnies -- 1971 underground comic book
Wikipedia - Homelander (comics) -- Fictional character
Wikipedia - Homestuck -- Multimedia webcomic by Andrew Hussie
Wikipedia - Homo mermanus -- Fictional race appearing in Marvel Comic books
Wikipedia - Honey, I Shrunk the Kids: The TV Show -- American syndicated comic science fiction sitcom
Wikipedia - Honey Lemon -- Character of Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Hood (comics)
Wikipedia - Hope Summers (comics)
Wikipedia - Horacio Altuna -- Argentine comic artist
Wikipedia - Horror comics
Wikipedia - Hounds (comics) -- Fictional comic book characters
Wikipedia - Hourman -- Fictional superhero in DC Comics
Wikipedia - House of Secrets (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - House of X and Powers of X -- Comic books
Wikipedia - Howard Bender -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Howard Chaykin -- American comic book artist and writer
Wikipedia - Howard the Duck -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Howling Commandos -- Fictional several comic book groups
Wikipedia - How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way
Wikipedia - How to Read Nancy -- Essay on a comic strip
Wikipedia - Hubert Boulard -- French comic book author
Wikipedia - Hugin and Munin (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Hulkbusters -- Fictional comic book organizations
Wikipedia - Hulk Comic
Wikipedia - Hulk -- superhero from the Marvel Comics universe
Wikipedia - Human Cannonball (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Human Fly (comics)
Wikipedia - Humanity's Last Stand -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Human Torch -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Humbug (comics)
Wikipedia - Humpty Dumpty (comics)
Wikipedia - Hunted (comics) -- Comic book storyline
Wikipedia - Hunter Zolomon -- Fictional comic book supervillain from the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - Huntress (comics)
Wikipedia - Husk (comics)
Wikipedia - Hydra (comics) -- Fictional supervillain organization
Wikipedia - Hydro-Man -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Hyperion (comics)
Wikipedia - Hyperkind -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Hypertime -- Fictional concept in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Ian Carney -- British comics animation writer
Wikipedia - Ian Churchill -- British comic book artist
Wikipedia - Ian Edginton -- British comic book writer
Wikipedia - Ian Rogers (comics)
Wikipedia - Ice (character) -- Fictional character, a comic book superhero in publications from DC Comics
Wikipedia - Ice (comics)
Wikipedia - Iceman (comics)
Wikipedia - Iceman (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - IDW Publishing -- US comic publisher
Wikipedia - Iginio Straffi -- Italian animator, illustrator, and former comic book author
Wikipedia - Ignatz Award -- US comics and cartooning award
Wikipedia - Igor Goldkind -- American comics writer
Wikipedia - Iksaka Banu -- Indonesian writer of comics and prose
Wikipedia - Illuminati (comics) -- super hero team from Marvel comics
Wikipedia - I Love You (comics) -- Romance comic (1955-1980)
Wikipedia - Il Vittorioso -- Former weekly comic magazine published in Italy
Wikipedia - Imogene Coca -- American comic actress
Wikipedia - Imperial Guard (comics) -- Fictional team appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Incognegro (comics) -- Book by Mat Johnson
Wikipedia - Independent News -- Magazine and comic book distribution company
Wikipedia - Inertia (Marvel Comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Inferno (DC Comics) -- Fictional character in the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - Infinite canvas -- Aspect of webcomics
Wikipedia - Infinite Crisis -- Comic book limited miniseries
Wikipedia - Infinity (comic book)
Wikipedia - Infinity-Man -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Infinity Watch -- Fictional comic book organizations
Wikipedia - Inheritors (comics) -- Marvel Comics fictional supervillain group
Wikipedia - Inhuman (comics) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Inhumans vs. X-Men -- Limited series published by Marvel Comics, 2016-2017
Wikipedia - Ink (comics)
Wikipedia - Inker -- Comic book or graphic novel line artist
Wikipedia - Inkpot Award -- Comics award
Wikipedia - InkyPen -- 2018 comics and manga reading application
Wikipedia - Innovation Publishing -- Defunct American comic book company
Wikipedia - Inodoro Pereyra -- Argentinian comic
Wikipedia - Insect Queen (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Intergang -- Fictional crime group in DC comics
Wikipedia - Invaders (comics) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Invasion! (2000 AD) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Invasion! (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Invincible (comics) -- Superhero in the Image Comics Universe
Wikipedia - Invisible Hood -- Fictional supuerhero in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Invisible Kid -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Invisible Woman -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Iron Fist (comics) -- Fictional superhero appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Ironheart (character) -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Ironheart (comics)
Wikipedia - Iron Man (comic book)
Wikipedia - Iron Man's armor -- Fictional powered exoskeleton worn by the comic book character Iron Man
Wikipedia - Iron Man -- Superhero appearing in Marvel Comics publications
Wikipedia - Iron Monger -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Ironwolf (comics) -- Comics character
Wikipedia - Irredeemable -- Comic book series
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Wikipedia - Isola (comics) -- comic series
Wikipedia - Italian comics -- comics originating in Italy
Wikipedia - Ivan Reis -- Comic artist
Wikipedia - Ivo Milazzo -- Italian comic book artist
Wikipedia - Iznogoud -- French comic book series
Wikipedia - IZombie (comic book) -- Comic book series published by Vertigo
Wikipedia - Jacen Burrows -- American comic book artist
Wikipedia - Jack Adler -- American comics artist
Wikipedia - Jackal (Marvel Comics character)
Wikipedia - Jack Chick -- American comics creator
Wikipedia - Jackhammer (comics) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Jack Kirby -- American comic book artist, writer and editor
Wikipedia - Jack Murdock (comics)
Wikipedia - Jack O'Lantern (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Jack Oleck -- American novelist and comic book writer (1914-1981)
Wikipedia - Jack (webcomic)
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Wikipedia - Jade (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - James O'Barr -- American graphic and comics artist
Wikipedia - James Robinson (comics)
Wikipedia - James Robinson (writer) -- British writer of comic books and screenplays
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Wikipedia - Jamie Hewlett -- English comic book artist, designer, and director
Wikipedia - Jane Foster (comics)
Wikipedia - Jane Foster -- Comic book character
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Wikipedia - Jester (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Joseph (comics)
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Wikipedia - Justice League -- Group of fictional characters of DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Karate Kid (comics)
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Wikipedia - Kingdom (comics)
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Wikipedia - Kirby: King of Comics
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Wikipedia - Kite-Eating Tree -- Peanuts comic strip character
Wikipedia - Kitty Pryde -- Fictional superhero appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Klaatu (comics)
Wikipedia - Klaw (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Klotnia przez zaklad -- Comic opera by Karol Lipinski
Wikipedia - Knight (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Knockout (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Kobane Calling -- Comic book by Zerolcalcare
Wikipedia - Kobra (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Kodansha Comics
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Wikipedia - Kono (comics)
Wikipedia - Korath the Pursuer -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Korg (comics)
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Wikipedia - Krang (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Kraven the Hunter -- fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Krazy Kat -- Comic strip
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Wikipedia - Kro (comics)
Wikipedia - Krona (comics)
Wikipedia - Kruttika Susarla -- Indian comic book writer, illustrator and graphics designer
Wikipedia - Krypton (comics)
Wikipedia - Kryptonian -- Fictional race of extraterrestrials in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Kurt Busiek -- American comic book writer
Wikipedia - Kwai (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - KyM-EM-^Mgen -- Traditional Japanese comic theater
Wikipedia - L.A. Comic Con
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Wikipedia - Laira (comics)
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Wikipedia - Landau, Luckman, and Lake -- Fictional comic book company
Wikipedia - La Pasteque -- French Canadian comics publisher
Wikipedia - Lara (comics)
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Wikipedia - Last Laugh (comics)
Wikipedia - Late Nite Comic -- Musical
Wikipedia - Laufey (comics) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic
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Wikipedia - Laurence Campbell -- British comics artist
Wikipedia - Lauren Pritchard (actress) -- American comic actress
Wikipedia - Laurent Vicomte -- French comic book author
Wikipedia - Lazarus (comics) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Leader (comics)
Wikipedia - League of Assassins -- Fictional villain group by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Leah Moore -- Columnist and comics writer
Wikipedia - Leandro Fernandez (artist) -- Argentine comic book artist
Wikipedia - Leap-Frog (comics)
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Wikipedia - Leave It to Chance -- American comic book series
Wikipedia - Le Cahier bleu -- 1994 French comic book
Wikipedia - Lee Bermejo -- American comic book writer and artist
Wikipedia - Lee Carter (comics) -- British fantasy artist
Wikipedia - Leech (comics)
Wikipedia - Lee Falk -- American comics writer
Wikipedia - Lee Salem (editor) -- American comic strip editor
Wikipedia - Legends of the Superheroes -- Television specials of DC comic book characters
Wikipedia - Legion Lost -- Limited comic book series
Wikipedia - Legion (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character from the Marvel Universe
Wikipedia - Legionnaires 3 -- Limited comics series
Wikipedia - Legion of Monsters -- Fictional comic book superhero teams
Wikipedia - Legion of Substitute Heroes -- Superhero team in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Legion of Super-Heroes -- Fictional characters in DC comics
Wikipedia - Legion of Super-Villains -- DC comics supervillain team
Wikipedia - Legion of the Unliving -- Fictional comic book superhero groups
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Wikipedia - Legs (comics)
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Wikipedia - Le Lombard -- Belgian comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Len Wein -- American comic book writer and editor
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Wikipedia - Let Me In: Crossroads -- 2010 comic series
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Wikipedia - Lev Gleason Publications -- Publisher of comic books during the 1940s and 1950s
Wikipedia - Leviathan (DC Comics) -- Fictional crime organization in DC Comics
Wikipedia - Leviathan (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional comic book villains
Wikipedia - Lev Yilmaz -- American comic artist, film maker, and publisher
Wikipedia - Lex Luthor -- Fictional character appearing in DC Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Lianhuanhua -- Early 20th century palm-sized Chinese comic books
Wikipedia - Liberty Belle (comics)
Wikipedia - Liberty Legion -- Fictional comic book superhero team
Wikipedia - Libra (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Life Foundation -- Fictional survivalist group appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Lifeguard (comics)
Wikipedia - Life in Progress -- Filipino comic strip series
Wikipedia - Lifter (comics)
Wikipedia - Li'l Abner -- 1934-1977 American comic strip by Al Capp
Wikipedia - Limbo (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Linear Men -- Fictional characters, a fictional superhero team in the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - Linus van Pelt -- Peanuts comic strip character
Wikipedia - List of AfterShock Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of alien races in DC Comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of alien races in Marvel Comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Amalgam Comics characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Amalgam Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of American comics creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of American comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of anthropomorphic comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Australian comics creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Batman comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of best-selling comic series -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Canadian comics creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comic and cartoon characters named after people -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comic-based films directed by women -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comic-based television episodes directed by women {{DISPLAYTITLE:List of comic-based television episodes directed by women -- List of comic-based television episodes directed by women {{DISPLAYTITLE:List of comic-based television episodes directed by women
Wikipedia - List of comic book conventions -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comic book supervillain debuts -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comic books -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comic creators
Wikipedia - List of comics and comic strips made into feature films -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comics awards -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comics based on Hasbro properties
Wikipedia - List of comics by country -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comics creators appearing in comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comics creators -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comics publishing companies -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of comics solicited but never published -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of cosmic entities in DC Comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of cosmic entities in Marvel Comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Cuban comic creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of DC Comics characters: A -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of DC Comics characters
Wikipedia - List of DC Comics imprints -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of DC Comics publications
Wikipedia - List of DC Comics reprint collections -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of deities in Marvel Comics -- List of deities in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - List of Disney villain characters -- List of villains in Disney productions, games and comic books
Wikipedia - List of Eagle Award nominees and winners -- Comics award-related list
Wikipedia - List of fantasy comics
Wikipedia - List of female comics creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of feminist comic books -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fictional canines in comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fictional cats in comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fictional dogs in comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fictional humanoid species in comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fictional primates in comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fictional rodents in comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fictional towns in comics
Wikipedia - List of fictional universes in animation and comics
Wikipedia - List of films based on comic strips -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of films based on comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of films based on DC Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of films based on English-language comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of films based on French-language comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of films based on Marvel Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Franco-Belgian comics magazines -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Gangan Comics manga franchises -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Hal Jordan comics collected editions -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of hidden races in DC Comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Homestuck characters -- Character list for a multimedia webcomic
Wikipedia - List of live-action films based on cartoons and comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Macedonian comics creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of magazines writing about comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: 0-9 -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: A -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: B -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: C -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: D -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: E -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: F -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: G -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: H -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: I -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: J -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: K -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: L -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: M -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: N -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: O -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: P -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: Q -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: R -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: S -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: T -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: U -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: V -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: W -- Wikipedia list
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: X -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: Y -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics characters: Z -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics demons -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics Golden Age characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics nicknames -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics people -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Marvel Comics teams and organizations -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of minicomics creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of minor DC Comics characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Mob Psycho 100 episodes -- Japanese anime series based on the webcomic created by One
Wikipedia - List of monsters in Marvel Comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of newspaper comic strips
Wikipedia - List of Nick Fury comics
Wikipedia - List of novels based on comics
Wikipedia - List of Silver Age comics creators -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Star Wars comic books -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Superman comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of teams and organizations in DC Comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Teen Titans comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television programs based on comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television series and films based on Archie Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television series and films based on Dark Horse Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television series and films based on Harvey Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television series and films based on Image Comics publications -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television series based on comic strips -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television series based on DC Comics publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of television series based on Marvel Comics publications -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of The Simpsons comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of The Walking Dead (comics) characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Thor (Marvel Comics) enemies -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Thor (Marvel Comics) supporting characters
Wikipedia - List of Thor (Marvel Comics) titles
Wikipedia - List of Transformers comics characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of TV series based on French-language comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced Dark Horse Comics projects -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced DC Comics projects -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced film projects based on Marvel Comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced films based on DC Comics imprints -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced films based on Marvel Comics imprints publications -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced Image Comics projects -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced Marvel Comics adaptations -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of unproduced television projects based on Marvel Comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of video games based on comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of video games based on DC Comics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of video game webcomics -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Watchmen characters -- Characters in a DC Comics series
Wikipedia - List of webcomic awards -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of webcomic creators -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of webcomics in print -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of webcomics with LGBT characters -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of winners and nominees of Hungarian comic awards -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of wrestling-based comic books -- none
Wikipedia - List of X-Men comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of years in comics -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - Lists of comics
Wikipedia - Lists of DC Comics characters -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - Lists of DC Comics publications -- Wikipedia list of lists article
Wikipedia - Lists of Marvel Comics characters -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - Lists of Marvel Comics publications
Wikipedia - Lists of webcomics -- Wikipedia list article
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Wikipedia - Little Orphan Annie -- 1924-2010 American comic strip
Wikipedia - Little Red-Haired Girl -- Peanuts comic strip character
Wikipedia - Livewire (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Livewires (comics) -- Fictional comic book series
Wikipedia - Living Laser -- Fictional comic book supervillain
Wikipedia - Living Lightning -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Liz Allan -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Lizard (comics)
Wikipedia - Liz Berube -- American comic book artist
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Wikipedia - Loa (comics)
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Wikipedia - Lobo (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Lobo (Dell Comics) -- Dell Comics character
Wikipedia - Lobster Johnson -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Locke & Key (TV pilot) -- TV pilot based on the same named comic
Wikipedia - Lockheed (comics)
Wikipedia - Lockjaw and the Pet Avengers -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Lockjaw (comics)
Wikipedia - Logan (comics)
Wikipedia - Loki (comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Loki (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Loners (comics) -- Mini-series of comic books
Wikipedia - Longshot (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Looker (character) -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Looter (comics)
Wikipedia - Lord Chaos -- comics name
Wikipedia - Lord Fanny -- Comic book character
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Wikipedia - Lords of Chaos and Order -- Fictional supernatural powers in DC comics
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Wikipedia - Lowell Cunningham -- American comic book author
Wikipedia - Lucha Libre (comics) -- Comic book
Wikipedia - Lucie Durbiano -- French comic book artist and illustrator
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Wikipedia - Lucifer (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Lucius Afranius (poet) -- 1st-century BC Roman comic poet
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Wikipedia - Luke Cage -- Fictional superhero appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - L'ultima Burba -- Italian comic strip series
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Wikipedia - Maaike Hartjes -- Dutch cartoonist and comics artist
Wikipedia - Ma'alefa'ak -- DC Comics supervillain
Wikipedia - Macedonia (comics) -- Autobiographical comic book
Wikipedia - Maddie Blaustein -- American voice actress and comics writer
Wikipedia - Maddie Warner -- A fictional comic book character
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Wikipedia - Madhu Muskan -- Indian comic magazine
Wikipedia - Mad (magazine) -- American comic and satirical magazine
Wikipedia - Madman (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Mad Max: Fury Road (comic book) -- 2015 comic series
Wikipedia - Madripoor -- Fictional comic book island
Wikipedia - Magazine Enterprises -- American comic book company
Wikipedia - Magdalene Visaggio -- American comic book writer
Wikipedia - Maggia (comics) -- Fictional organization
Wikipedia - Magica De Spell -- Disney comics character
Wikipedia - Magma (comics)
Wikipedia - Magnes (comic poet)
Wikipedia - Magneto (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in Marvel Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Magno (character) -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Mahabharata (comics) -- Comic book series published by Amar Chitra Katha Private Limited
Wikipedia - Mainframe (comics)
Wikipedia - Mairzy Doats -- 1943 comic song
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Wikipedia - Makkari (comics)
Wikipedia - Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson -- Writer, creator of DC Comics
Wikipedia - Malibu Comics -- Comic book company
Wikipedia - M. Alice LeGrow -- Alternative comics artist, writer, and costume designer
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Wikipedia - Malkiel (comics) -- Norwegian comic book
Wikipedia - Mammoth (comics) -- Comics
Wikipedia - Man-Bat -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Mandarin (character) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Mandarin (comics)
Wikipedia - Manga -- Comics or graphic novels created in Japan
Wikipedia - Manhua -- Style of Chinese-language comics produced in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan
Wikipedia - Manhunter (comics)
Wikipedia - Manhunters (DC Comics) -- Fictional race of robots
Wikipedia - Manhwa -- comics created in Korea
Wikipedia - Man-Killer -- Fictional comic book villain
Wikipedia - Man-Thing -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Mantis (comics) -- comics name
Wikipedia - Mantis (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Mantis (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Maple Leaf Publishing -- Defunct Canadian comics publisher
Wikipedia - Marauders (comic book)
Wikipedia - Marauders (comics) -- Group of fictional characters
Wikipedia - Marc Guggenheim -- American screenwriter, television producer, comic book writer, and novelist
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Wikipedia - Marvel 1602 -- Limited series from Marvel Comics by Neil Gaiman
Wikipedia - Marvel Age -- Comic book-sized magazine
Wikipedia - Marvel Comics 2
Wikipedia - Marvel Comics Presents -- Comic book
Wikipedia - Marvel Comics rating system -- Rating system in use at Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Marvel Comics -- Company that publishes comic books and related media
Wikipedia - Marvelman -- Fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Marvel Super-Heroes (comics) -- Comic book published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Marvel Team-Up -- Marvel Comics team-up series
Wikipedia - Marvel UK -- Imprint of Marvel Comics that has become defunct since 1995
Wikipedia - Marvel Universe -- Marvel Comics shared fictional univers
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Wikipedia - Massacre (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Master Comics
Wikipedia - Master of the World (comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Masters of Disaster (comics)
Wikipedia - Masters of Evil -- Fictional team from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Matador (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Match (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Match (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Maxima (comics)
Wikipedia - Maxima (DC Comics) -- Character from the DC Comics Superman titles
Wikipedia - Maximus (comics)
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Wikipedia - Menace (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Mephisto (comics)
Wikipedia - Mera (comics) -- Fictional superhero character
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Wikipedia - Mercury (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Merlin (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Mickey Mouse (comic strip) -- 1930-1995 American Disney comic strip
Wikipedia - Mickey Mouse Magazine -- 1935-1940 American Disney comics magazine
Wikipedia - Mickey Mouse Weekly -- British Disney comics magazine
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Wikipedia - Micronauts (comics) -- Comic book
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Wikipedia - Midgard Serpent (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character
Wikipedia - Midnight (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Military Comics -- Comic book
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Wikipedia - Millennium (comics) -- Comic book crossover story line in DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Mimic (comics)
Wikipedia - Mindless Ones -- Fictional comic book monsters
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Wikipedia - Minicomic Co-ops
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Wikipedia - Minotaur (comics)
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Wikipedia - Misfit (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Miss America (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Miss Grundy -- Archie Comics character
Wikipedia - Missing Link (comics)
Wikipedia - Miss Lasko-Gross -- American comics artist
Wikipedia - Mist (comics)
Wikipedia - Mister Fantastic -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Mister Hyde (comics) -- Supervillain
Wikipedia - Mister Mind -- Fictional character from Fawcett and DC Comics
Wikipedia - Mister Miracle -- Fictional DC Comics superhero, AKA Scott Free of the planet New Genesis
Wikipedia - Mister Mxyzptlk -- Fictional character in DC comics
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Wikipedia - Mister X (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - M (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Mockingbird (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - MODAM -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Modern Age of Comic Books -- mid-80s to present era of comic books
Wikipedia - Modern Tales -- Webcomic subscription service
Wikipedia - MODOK -- Fictional comic book character supervillains
Wikipedia - Mojo (comics)
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Wikipedia - MomoCon -- Atlanta, Georgia gaming, comics, and anime convention
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Wikipedia - Mondo (comics)
Wikipedia - Mongoose (comics)
Wikipedia - Monica (Monica's Gang) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Monica Rambeau -- Marvel Comics character
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Wikipedia - Mordru -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - More Fun Comics -- Comic
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Wikipedia - Morgan Edge -- Fictional DC comics character
Wikipedia - Morgan le Fay (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Morlocks (comics) -- Group of fictional characters
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Wikipedia - Mother Night (comics)
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Wikipedia - Multiverse (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional multiverse used by Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Myg (comics)
Wikipedia - Mylo Xyloto (comics) -- 2013 graphic novel
Wikipedia - Mys-Tech -- Fictional comic book organization
Wikipedia - Mysterio -- Supervillain appearing in Marvel Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Mystery in Space -- Sci-fi comic books
Wikipedia - Mystique (comics) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Namor -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Nate Grey -- Fictional mutant superhero in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Nathaniel Richards (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - National Comics Publications, Inc. v. Fawcett Publications, Inc. -- 1951 decision by United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
Wikipedia - National Comics Publications -- US comic book company 1946-1961
Wikipedia - National Force -- Fictional comic book organization
Wikipedia - National Lampoon Presents French Comics -- American humor book
Wikipedia - National Register of Historic Places listings in Wicomico County, Maryland
Wikipedia - Native (comics)
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Wikipedia - Neal Adams -- American comic book and commercial artist
Wikipedia - Near Death (comics)
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Wikipedia - Negasonic Teenage Warhead -- Character from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Nemesis Kid -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Neo (Marvel Comics species) -- Fictional race of superhumans
Wikipedia - Neptune (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Neron (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Neutron (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Newbury Comics -- Music retail chain in New England, United States
Wikipedia - New Genesis -- Fictional planet in the DC Comics Universe
Wikipedia - New Gods -- Fictional race appearing in the New Gods comic book series
Wikipedia - New Justice -- Comics line
Wikipedia - New Men (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional comic book characters
Wikipedia - New Mutants -- Marvel Comic series
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Wikipedia - Newspaper Enterprise Association -- American editorial column and comic strip newspaper syndication service
Wikipedia - New Warriors -- Fictional team from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - New X-Men -- Fictional comic book series
Wikipedia - Nextwave -- Fictional comic book series
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Wikipedia - Nick Bertozzi -- American comic book writer and artist
Wikipedia - Nick Cuti -- Comic artist
Wikipedia - Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (comic book)
Wikipedia - Nick Fury (comic book)
Wikipedia - Nick Fury's Howling Commandos -- Fictional comic book series
Wikipedia - Nick Fury -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Nick Manabat -- Comic artist
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Wikipedia - Night Girl -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Nighthawk (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional superhero
Wikipedia - Nightmare (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional supervillain
Wikipedia - Night Nurse (comics) -- Marvel Comics series
Wikipedia - Nightrunner (character) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Nightshade (DC Comics) -- Fictional comic book superheroine published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Nightshade (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Night Shift (comics) -- Fictional team of supervillains in the Marvel Universe
Wikipedia - Nights of Horror -- Fetish comic book series by Joe Shuster
Wikipedia - Nightstalkers (comics) -- Fictional comic book
Wikipedia - Nightwing -- DC Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Night Zero -- American webcomic
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Wikipedia - Nimrod (comics)
Wikipedia - Nintendo Comics System -- Series of comic books
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Wikipedia - Nitro (comics) -- Fictional comic book villain
Wikipedia - N'Kantu, the Living Mummy -- Comic book character
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Wikipedia - Nocturna (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Nomad (comics)
Wikipedia - No Man's Land (comics)
Wikipedia - Non (comics)
Wikipedia - Non Sequitur (comic strip) -- American comic strip
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Wikipedia - Norm Breyfogle -- American comic artist
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Wikipedia - Northlanders -- comic
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Wikipedia - Northstar (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Northwind (comics)
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Wikipedia - Nova Corps -- Fictional intergalactic military/police force appearing in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - NOW Comics -- Comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Nowhere Men -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Nuke (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Oberon (comics)
Wikipedia - Obsidian (comics) -- Fictional DC Comics superhero
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Wikipedia - Oddball (comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Odd Man (comics) -- Fictional comic book hero created by Steve Ditko
Wikipedia - Odin (character) -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Odin (comics)
Wikipedia - Odin (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Ogun (comics)
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Wikipedia - Olympians (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional comic book species
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Wikipedia - OMAC (comics)
Wikipedia - Omega (comics)
Wikipedia - One Big Happy (comic strip) -- Comic strip
Wikipedia - One-shot (comics) -- Type of comic book
Wikipedia - One Year Later -- 2006 comic book storyline event running through the books published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Onomatopoeia (comics)
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Wikipedia - Onyx (comics)
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Wikipedia - Orca (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Original Sin (comics)
Wikipedia - Origin (comics)
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Wikipedia - Orion (comics)
Wikipedia - Orka (comics) -- Fictional comic book character
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Wikipedia - Orpheus (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Outcasts (Marvel Comics mutants) -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Outcasts (Marvel Comics Subterranea) -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Outsider (comics)
Wikipedia - Outsiders (comics) -- Superhero team
Wikipedia - Overdrive (comics)
Wikipedia - Overmind (comics) -- Villain in the Marvel Comics universe
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Wikipedia - Owl (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Ox (comics)
Wikipedia - Oya (comics)
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Wikipedia - Painter (comics)
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Wikipedia - Paragons (comics)
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Wikipedia - Parasite (comics)
Wikipedia - Pariah (character) -- Character published by DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Peanuts -- Comic strip by Charles M. Schulz
Wikipedia - Peepers (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Pep Comics -- Comic book
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Wikipedia - Per Degaton -- DC Comics supervillain
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Wikipedia - Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt -- Charlton Comics character
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Wikipedia - Phalanx (comics)
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Wikipedia - Phantom (comics) -- Fictional character from The Phantom comic strip
Wikipedia - Phantom Girl -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Phantom Stranger -- Fictional comic book character
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Wikipedia - Philip Bond -- British comic book artist
Wikipedia - Philippe Buchet -- French comic book artist
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Wikipedia - Phosphorus Rex -- DC Comics supervillian
Wikipedia - Photo comics -- Comic style
Wikipedia - Phrynichus (comic poet)
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Wikipedia - Pilote -- French comic book
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Wikipedia - Piranha (comics) -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - P. J. Holden -- Irish comic artist
Wikipedia - Planet Hulk -- Marvel Comics storyline
Wikipedia - Planet of the Symbiotes -- Marvel Comics story arc
Wikipedia - Plasmus (comics)
Wikipedia - Plastic Man -- Bendy, comical superhero
Wikipedia - Plato (comic poet)
Wikipedia - Plautus -- Roman comic playwright of the Old Latin period
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Wikipedia - Pluto (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Poison Elves -- Fantasy comic
Wikipedia - Polar Boy -- DC comics character
Wikipedia - Polaris (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Porcupine (comics)
Wikipedia - Porcupine (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Portal (comics)
Wikipedia - Portal:Comics -- Wikimedia portal
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Wikipedia - Power Man and Iron Fist -- American comic book series published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Power Pack -- Fictional superhero team appearing in Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Power ring (DC Comics) -- Fictional object
Wikipedia - Prankster (comics)
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Wikipedia - Pretty, Baby, Machine -- Comic book, limited series
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Wikipedia - Primal (comics)
Wikipedia - Prime (comics)
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Wikipedia - Professor Pyg -- Fictional character in DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Professor X -- Fictional comic book character
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Wikipedia - Prometheus (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Prophet (comics) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Proteus (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Prowler (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Proxima Midnight -- comic book character
Wikipedia - Psi (comics)
Wikipedia - Psi-Force -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Psylocke -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Puck (comics)
Wikipedia - Puff Adder (character) -- Fictional comic book villain
Wikipedia - Puff Adder (comics)
Wikipedia - Puma (comics)
Wikipedia - Punch and Judy Comics -- 1944-1951 humorous comic book series
Wikipedia - Punisher Kills the Marvel Universe -- 1995 Marvel Comics one-shot by Garth Ennis
Wikipedia - Punisher -- Comic book antihero
Wikipedia - Puppet Master (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Purifiers (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional characters
Wikipedia - Pyro (Marvel Comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero
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Wikipedia - Quasar (comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Quasimodo (comics)
Wikipedia - Queen Bee (comics)
Wikipedia - Queer Visitors from the Marvelous Land of Oz -- Newspaper comic strip by L. Frank Baum
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Wikipedia - Quicksilver (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Template talk:Black Widow (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Template talk:Seiun Award - Best Comic
Wikipedia - Template talk:Thor (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Terrax -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Terrible Trio (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Terrible Trio -- Fictional supervillains in Batman comics
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Wikipedia - Testament (comics)
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Wikipedia - The Comic Book Greats
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Wikipedia - The Death of Captain America -- Comic-book story arc published by Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - The Death of Superman -- 1992 comic book storyline that occurred in DC Comics' Superman titles
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Wikipedia - The Dirty Pair -- English-language comic based on the anime
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Wikipedia - The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers -- American comic book
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Wikipedia - The Incredible Hulk (comic strip)
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Wikipedia - The Legion of Night -- Fictional comic book organization
Wikipedia - The Lightning Saga -- Comic story arc
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Wikipedia - The Man of Steel (comic book)
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Wikipedia - The New Age of DC Heroes -- Comics line
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Wikipedia - The Phantom -- Comic strip
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Wikipedia - The Right (comics)
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Wikipedia - The Terra Mosaic -- Comic story arc featuring the Legion of Super-Heroes
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Wikipedia - The Umbrella Academy -- American comic book series
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Wikipedia - The Unwritten -- Comic
Wikipedia - The Vault of Horror (book) -- Collection of eight horror comic stories
Wikipedia - The Vault of Horror (comics) -- American comic series
Wikipedia - The Vinyl Underground -- Comic
Wikipedia - The Walking Dead (comic book) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - The Witching -- Comic
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Wikipedia - The X-Files (comics) -- Comics
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Wikipedia - Thief of Thieves -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Thing (comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Thinker (DC Comics) -- Fictional character from DC Comics
Wikipedia - Thin Man (comics) -- Fictional superhero in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Thomas Jane -- American actor and comic book writer
Wikipedia - Thom Kallor -- DC Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Thor (Comico Comics) -- Comico Comics character
Wikipedia - Thor in comics -- Index of articles associated with the same name
Wikipedia - Thor (Marvel Comics) in other media
Wikipedia - Thor (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Thunder and Lightning (comics) -- Comic book characters
Wikipedia - Thunderball (comics) -- Marvel supervillain
Wikipedia - Thunderbolt (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Thunderbolt Ross -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Thunderbolts (comics) -- Group of fictional characters in Marvel comics
Wikipedia - Thunder (comics) -- Fictional superhero published by DC Comics
Wikipedia - Thunderiders -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Thunderstrike (comics)
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Wikipedia - Tiger Shark (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Tiger Shark (Marvel Comics) -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - Tigra -- Comic book character
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Wikipedia - Timber Wolf (comics)
Wikipedia - Timeline of DC Comics (1940s)
Wikipedia - Timeline of DC Comics
Wikipedia - Time Variance Authority -- Fictional comic book organization
Wikipedia - Time Warp (comics) -- Comic
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Wikipedia - Tina Anderson -- American comic writer
Wikipedia - Tinkerer (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Tintin in Tibet -- Comic book by Belgian cartoonist HergM-CM-)
Wikipedia - Tintin (magazine) -- Comic magazine from Belgium
Wikipedia - Titania (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Titania (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Titanium Man -- Fictional comic book character
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Wikipedia - Toad (comics)
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Wikipedia - Tombstone (comics)
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Wikipedia - Tom the Dancing Bug -- Comic strip
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Wikipedia - Tor (comics) -- Prehistoric human character
Wikipedia - Toronto Comic Arts Festival -- Comic book festival in Toronto, Ontario
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Wikipedia - Trident (comics) -- Trident name in comics
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Wikipedia - Trina Robbins -- American comic artist
Wikipedia - Trinity (comic book) -- The Title of two American Comic Book Series
Wikipedia - Trinity (story arc) -- Comic book crossover storyline
Wikipedia - Trinity War -- Comic book story arc
Wikipedia - Triskelion (comics)
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Wikipedia - Tumbler (comics)
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Wikipedia - Turk Barrett -- fictional character in Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Tyrannus (comics)
Wikipedia - Tyr (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Ultimate Comics: Armor Wars
Wikipedia - Ultimate Comics: Iron Man
Wikipedia - Ultimate Comics: Thor
Wikipedia - Ultimate Comics: X-Men -- Monthly comic book series
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Wikipedia - Ultimate Fantastic Four -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Ultimate Marvel -- Comic book imprint
Wikipedia - Ultimate Spider-Man -- Comic book
Wikipedia - Ultimates -- Marvel Comics series
Wikipedia - Ultimate X-Men -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Ultimo (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Ultraman (comics) -- Comic character
Wikipedia - Ultron -- Comic book character
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Wikipedia - U-Men (comics) -- Fictional comic book group
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Wikipedia - Uncanny X-Force -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Uncanny X-Men -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Uncle Remus and His Tales of Br'er Rabbit -- 1945-1972 American comic strip
Wikipedia - Uncle Sam (comics)
Wikipedia - Underground comix -- Comics genre
Wikipedia - Understanding Comics -- Comic book album
Wikipedia - Unicorn (comics)
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Wikipedia - Ursa (DC Comics)
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Wikipedia - Valiant Comics -- Company
Wikipedia - Valkyrie (Marvel Comics) -- Marvel Comics superhero
Wikipedia - Val Staples -- American comic book colorist
Wikipedia - Vampire (Marvel Comics) -- Vampires in Marvel Comics universe
Wikipedia - Vandal Savage -- DC Comics supervillain
Wikipedia - Vanessa Fisk -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Vault (comics) -- Fictional prison in the Marvel universe
Wikipedia - V-Battalion -- Fictional comic book groups
Wikipedia - Velocidad (comics)
Wikipedia - Venom (Marvel Comics character) -- Marvel Comics character
Wikipedia - Venus (comic book)
Wikipedia - Venus (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Vermin (comics)
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Wikipedia - Vertigo Comics -- Imprint of comic-book publisher DC Comics
Wikipedia - Vertigo (DC Comics)
Wikipedia - Vext -- 1999 comic book by DC Comics
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Wikipedia - Vigilante (comics)
Wikipedia - Villainy Inc. -- Fictional villain group in Wonder Woman comics
Wikipedia - Vincent Batignole -- French comic-book artist
Wikipedia - Vincent Paronnaud -- French comic artist
Wikipedia - Vin Gonzales -- Marvel Comics character
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Wikipedia - Violet (Peanuts) -- Peanuts comic strip character
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Wikipedia - Vision (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Vision (Timely Comics)
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Wikipedia - Viz (comics) -- British magazine
Wikipedia - Volla (comics)
Wikipedia - Voyager (comics) -- Fiictional character in The Avengers comics
Wikipedia - Vulcan (Marvel Comics) -- Character in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Vulture (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Vusi Ximba -- South African comic musician
Wikipedia - Wakanda -- Fictional country from Marvel Comics
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Wikipedia - Wally Wood -- American comic strip cartoonist and illustrator
Wikipedia - Walrus (comics)
Wikipedia - Walt Disney's Comics and Stories -- Anthology comic book series featuring Disney characters
Wikipedia - Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse -- 2011-2018 collection of Mickey Mouse comic strips
Wikipedia - Wanderers (comics)
Wikipedia - War and Peas -- Webcomic
Wikipedia - Ward Greene -- American writer, editor, journalist, playwright, and comic strip writer
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Wikipedia - War Heroes (comics) -- Six issue war comic set in an alternative contemporary timeline by Mark Miller
Wikipedia - War Is Hell (comics) -- Comic series
Wikipedia - Warlock (New Mutants) -- Fictional character, a cybernetic alien superhero published by Marvel Comics in new mutants series
Wikipedia - War Machine -- Comic book character
Wikipedia - War of the Green Lanterns -- comic book
Wikipedia - Warpath (comics)
Wikipedia - Warp (comics)
Wikipedia - Warren Ellis -- English comics and fiction writer
Wikipedia - Warren Pleece -- British comic artist
Wikipedia - Warren Worthington III -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Warrior Nun Areala -- US fictional comics character by Ben Dunn
Wikipedia - Warwolves -- Fictional comic book group
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Wikipedia - Wasp (comics)
Wikipedia - Watchdogs (Marvel Comics) -- Terrorist group in the Marvel Universe
Wikipedia - Watcher (comics)
Wikipedia - Watchmen -- Comics by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons
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Wikipedia - Wayne Faucher -- American comic book inker
Wikipedia - We3 -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Weapon Plus -- Fictional comic book program
Wikipedia - Weapon P.R.I.M.E. -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Weapon X -- Fictional comic book government facility
Wikipedia - Webcomic -- Comics published online
Wikipedia - Webtoon -- Digital comics originating from South Korea
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Wikipedia - Weird War Tales -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Wendigo (comics)
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Wikipedia - Werner von Strucker -- Fictional comic book character
Wikipedia - Western comics -- Comic genre
Wikipedia - Wetworks (comics) -- American comic book series
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Wikipedia - What The--?! -- Marvel Comics comic book series self-parodying the Marvel Universe
Wikipedia - Whip (comics)
Wikipedia - Whiplash (comics)
Wikipedia - Whiplash (Marvel Comics) -- comic book character
Wikipedia - Whirlwind (comics) -- Fictional comic book villain
Wikipedia - White Rabbit (comics)
Wikipedia - White Tiger (Ava Ayala) -- Comic book character from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - White Tiger (Kasper Cole) -- Marvel comic book character
Wikipedia - White Witch (comics) -- DC Comics character
Wikipedia - Whomp! -- Webcomic by Ronnie
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Wikipedia - Wicked (comics)
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Wikipedia - Widget (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Widowmaker (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Comics/DC Comics work group -- Sub-project of WikiProject Comics
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Comics/Marvel Comics work group -- Sub-project of WikiProject Comics
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Comics/Webcomics work group -- Sub-project of WikiProject Comics
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Comics -- Wikimedia subject-area collaboration
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Wikipedia - Wild Child (comics)
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Wikipedia - Wild Pack -- Fictional comic book group
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Wikipedia - Will o' the Wisp (comics)
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Wikipedia - Wilson the Wonder Athlete -- British comic strip (1943-1984)
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Wikipedia - Winter Guard (comics)
Wikipedia - Winter Guard -- Fictional comic book group
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Wikipedia - Witchy -- Fantasy webcomic
Wikipedia - Witness (comics)
Wikipedia - Wizard (magazine) -- American magazine about comic books
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Wikipedia - Wolf Cub (comics)
Wikipedia - Wolfpack (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Wolfsbane (comics)
Wikipedia - Wolverine and the X-Men (comics) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Wolverine (character) -- Fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Wolverine (comic book) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Wolverine: Origins -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Wolverine (podcast) -- Scripted podcast from Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Wolverine: The Best There Is -- Monthly comic book series
Wikipedia - Wolverine: Weapon X -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Women in Refrigerators -- Website analyzing comic book trope of female injury or death
Wikipedia - Wonder Girl -- Alias of multiple DC Comics superheroines
Wikipedia - Wonder Man (Fox Publications) -- Fictional comic book superhero
Wikipedia - Wondermark -- Webcomic by David Malki
Wikipedia - Wonder Twins -- DC Comics characters
Wikipedia - Wonder Woman: Earth One -- DC Comics series of graphic novels
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Wikipedia - Wonder Woman -- superhero appearing in DC Comics publications and related media
Wikipedia - Wong (comics)
Wikipedia - Woodstock (Peanuts) -- Peanuts comic strip character
Wikipedia - Workforce (comics)
Wikipedia - Working!! -- Japanese comic strip manga series and its adaptations
Wikipedia - Worlds Collide (comics) -- Comic
Wikipedia - World War Hulks -- Comic book storyline
Wikipedia - Wotan (comics)
Wikipedia - Wrath (comics)
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Wikipedia - Wynonna Earp -- Comic book
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Wikipedia - X-23 (2018 series) -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-23 (one-shot) -- Comic book
Wikipedia - X-23: Target X -- Comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - Xavier's Security Enforcers -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - X-Babies -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - X-Corporation -- Fictional comic book organization
Wikipedia - X-Corps -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - Xenarchus (comic poet) -- Greek comic poet of the Middle Comedy
Wikipedia - X-Factor (comics) -- Comic book superhero team
Wikipedia - X-Factor Investigations -- Fictional comic book agency
Wikipedia - Xia Da -- Chinese comics artist
Wikipedia - X-Men 2099 -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men '92 -- Limited comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men Blue -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men (comic book) -- American comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men: First Class (comics) -- Marvel comic book series starring the original X-Men
Wikipedia - X-Men Forever -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men Gold -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men: Legacy -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men Red -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men: The Hidden Years -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men Unlimited -- 2 different comic book series
Wikipedia - X-Men -- Comic book superhero team
Wikipedia - X-Nation 2099 -- Comic book series
Wikipedia - Xombi -- Fictional comics character
Wikipedia - Xorn (comics)
Wikipedia - XS (comics) -- Fictional character, a superheroine in the future of the DC Comics universe
Wikipedia - X-Statix -- Fictional comic book group
Wikipedia - X-Terminators -- Fictional comic book characters
Wikipedia - X-Treme Sanctions Executive -- Fictional comic book police force
Wikipedia - X-Treme X-Men -- Marvel Comics X-Men spin-off series
Wikipedia - Yacht Club Boys -- Quartet of American comic singers
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Wikipedia - Ymir (Marvel Comics)
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Wikipedia - Young Allies (Marvel Comics) -- Fictional comic book groups
Wikipedia - Youngblood (comics) -- Superhero team that starred in their self-titled comic book
Wikipedia - Young Justice -- Fictional DC Comics superhero team
Wikipedia - Young Liars (comics) -- Comic
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Wikipedia - Yukio (comics)
Wikipedia - Yummy Fur (comics) -- Comic book series by Chester Brown
Wikipedia - Yuri Galtsev -- Russian actor, clown, television presenter, singer and stand-up comic
Wikipedia - Zahra's Paradise -- Iranian webcomic and graphic novel
Wikipedia - Zap Comix -- American comic book publisher
Wikipedia - Zenith (comics)
Wikipedia - Zero Hour: Crisis in Time! -- Comic book
Wikipedia - Zero (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Zeus (Marvel Comics)
Wikipedia - Zit (comic) -- Comic
Wikipedia - Ziwe Fumudoh -- American comedian and comic writer
Wikipedia - Zodiac (comics) -- Group of fictional characters
Wikipedia - Zombie (comics)
Wikipedia - Zor-El -- Fictional character in the DC Comics Universe
Wikipedia - Zorglub -- Fictional character in Spirou et Fantasio comic strip series
Wikipedia - Zzzax -- Marvel comics villain
Mark Millar ::: Born: December 24, 1969; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Scott Adams ::: Born: June 8, 1957; Occupation: Comic Strip Creator;
Grant Morrison ::: Born: January 31, 1960; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Robert Kirkman ::: Born: November 30, 1978; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Chris Claremont ::: Born: November 25, 1950; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Fábio Moon ::: Born: June 5, 1976; Occupation: Comic Book Creator;
John Byrne ::: Born: July 6, 1950; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Hugo Pratt ::: Born: June 15, 1927; Died: August 20, 1995; Occupation: Comic strip creator;
Eddie Campbell ::: Born: August 10, 1955; Occupation: Comics artist;
Oliver Hardy ::: Born: January 18, 1892; Died: August 7, 1957; Occupation: Comic;
Kenneth Williams ::: Born: February 22, 1926; Died: April 15, 1988; Occupation: Comic;
Jon J Muth ::: Born: July 28, 1960; Occupation: Comic book artist;
Lord Buckley ::: Born: April 5, 1906; Died: November 12, 1960; Occupation: Comic;
Judy Gold ::: Born: November 15, 1962; Occupation: Stand-up comic;
Steve Ditko ::: Born: November 2, 1927; Occupation: Comic book writer;
Molly Shannon ::: Born: September 16, 1964; Occupation: Comic;
Imogene Coca ::: Born: November 18, 1908; Died: June 2, 2001; Occupation: Comic;
Chris Parnell ::: Born: February 5, 1967; Occupation: Comic;
Darwyn Cooke ::: Born: 1962; Died: May 14, 2016; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Matt Fraction ::: Born: December 1, 1975; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Dave Gibbons ::: Born: April 14, 1949; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Jo Koy ::: Born: June 2, 1971; Occupation: Stand-up comic;
Brian Michael Bendis ::: Born: August 18, 1967; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Greg Rucka ::: Born: November 29, 1969; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Jessi Klein ::: Born: August 17, 1975; Occupation: Stand-up comic;
Jaime Hernandez ::: Born: 1959; Occupation: Comic Book Creator;
Cheri Oteri ::: Born: September 19, 1962; Occupation: Comic;
Joe Quesada ::: Born: January 12, 1962; Occupation: Comic Book Editor;
Dan Slott ::: Born: 1967; Occupation: Comic book writer;
Jonathan Hickman ::: Born: September 3, 1972; Occupation: Comic book writer;
Rick Remender ::: Born: February 6, 1973; Occupation: Comic book writer;
Martha Raye ::: Born: August 27, 1916; Died: October 19, 1994; Occupation: Comic;
Geoff Johns ::: Born: January 25, 1973; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Tom Brevoort ::: Born: 1967; Occupation: Comic Book Editor;
Kieron Gillen ::: Born: 1975; Occupation: Comic book writer;
Dennis O'Neil ::: Born: May 3, 1939; Occupation: Comic book writer;
Bryan Talbot ::: Born: February 24, 1952; Occupation: Comic book artist;
Charles Soule ::: Born: 1842; Died: 1913; Occupation: Comic book author;
Gabriel Iglesias ::: Born: July 15, 1976; Occupation: Comic;
Ted Naifeh ::: Born: June 20, 1971; Occupation: Comic book writer;
Stan Lee ::: Born: December 28, 1922; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
Vincent Paronnaud ::: Born: 1970; Occupation: Comics artist;
David Lloyd ::: Born: 1950; Occupation: Comics artist;
Ed Brubaker ::: Born: November 17, 1966; Occupation: Comic Book Writer;
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https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6430242-the-best-comics-of-the-decade-1980-1990-volume-one
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6519892.The_Supergirls_Fashion__Feminism__Fantasy__and_the_History_of_Comic_Book_Heroines
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/652316.The_Complete_Crumb_Comics_Vol_4
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/671477.The_Great_Comic_Book_Heroes
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6784517-the-muppet-show-comic-book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/691267.All_Waldo_Comics
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6913002.King___A_Comics_Biography_The_Special_Edition
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7061700-the-last-airbender-movie-comic
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7698349-dead-comic-standing
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/772122.The_Best_American_Comics_2007
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7861285-girl-comics
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7881353-the-comic-critic-presents
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/804301.The_Irish_Comic_Tradition
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8364043-75-years-of-dc-comics-the-art-of-modern-mythmaking
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8458104-the-500-years-of-resistance-comic-book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8476855-best-erotic-comics-volume-3
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8482302-gankutsuou-comic-anthology
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/877650.Stupid_Comics_Collection
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9328882-prism-comics
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9450676-the-long-tail-from-smartercomics
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14028432.Funny_Comics
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14040602.November_Comics
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3038151.Archie_Comics
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https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/61907.Marvel_Comics
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6519190.Marvel_Comic_Staff
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6927574.Titan_Comics
Goodreads author - Archie_Comics
Goodreads author - Marvel_Comics
http://alvin.wikia.com/wiki/Special:RandomInCategory/Comics
http://community.wikia.com/wiki/Hub:Cartoons_and_Comics
http://dc-microheroes.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Charlton_Comics_Characters
http://dc-microheroes.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Fawcett_Comics
http://dc-microheroes.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Impact_Comics
http://dc-microheroes.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Quality_Comics
http://jettermars.wikia.com/wiki/Televiland_Comics_Issue
http://knitecomic.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Characters
http://knitecomic.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Comics
http://knitecomic.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Real_Life
http://korean-comic-affiliation.wikia.com/wiki/Korean_Comic_Affiliation_Wiki
http://looneytunescomics.wikia.com/
http://marvelcomics.answers.wikia.com/
http://pt-br.xmen-comics.wikia.com/wiki/Wiki_X-Men_Comics
https://aspen-mlt.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Comics
https://online-thecomic.wikia.com/api.php
http://transformers.wikia.com/wiki/The_Transformers_(Marvel_Comics)
http://www.imagecomics.wikia.com/Main_Page
http://www.malibucomicsdatabase.wikia.com/Main_Page
Kheper - comic_relief -- 12
dedroidify.blogspot - comic-on-fox-news
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https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/AwesomeMcCoolname/ComicBooks
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https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/BlindIdiotTranslation/ComicBooks
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https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/BloodKnight/ComicBooks
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https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/BodyHorror/ComicBooks
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