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object:H G Wells
class:author
subject class:Fiction
class:Literature
class:Science Fiction

--- WIKI
Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 13 August 1946) was an English writer. Prolific in many genres, he wrote dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, history, satire, biography and autobiography. His work also included two books on recreational war games. Wells is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called the "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne and the publisher Hugo Gernsback. During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of aircraft, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web. His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering. Brian Aldiss referred to Wells as the "Shakespeare of science fiction". Wells rendered his works convincing by instilling commonplace detail alongside a single extraordinary assumption dubbed Wellss law leading Joseph Conrad to hail him in 1898 as "O Realist of the Fantastic!". His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898) and the military science fiction The War in the Air (1907). Wells was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times. Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context. He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he wrote little science fiction, while he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of journalist. Novels such as Kipps and The History of Mr Polly, which describe lower-middle-class life, led to the suggestion that he was a worthy successor to Charles Dickens, but Wells described a range of social strata and even attempted, in Tono-Bungay (1909), a diagnosis of English society as a whole. Wells was a diabetic and co-founded the charity The Diabetic Association (known today as Diabetes UK) in 1934.
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H G Wells

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   1 H G Wells

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1131 H G Wells

1:Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write.
   ~ H G Wells,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP ~ H G Wells,
2:All passion is madness. ~ H G Wells,
3:Go away... I'm alright. ~ H G Wells,
4:...broken, but not beaten. ~ H G Wells,
5:The War That Will End War. ~ H G Wells,
6:Chess is a curse upon a man. ~ H G Wells,
7:I hope, or I could not live. ~ H G Wells,
8:I ran with all my might. All ~ H G Wells,
9:Hunger makes a fool of a man. ~ H G Wells,
10:This blessed gift of smoking! ~ H G Wells,
11:Time is only a kind of Space. ~ H G Wells,
12:Don't follow you,' said Filby. ~ H G Wells,
13:Have you been time travelling? ~ H G Wells,
14:What are the asses at now?” He ~ H G Wells,
15:Advertising is legalized lying. ~ H G Wells,
16:We are all members of one body. ~ H G Wells,
17:Cynicism is humor in ill health. ~ H G Wells,
18:Our true nationality is mankind. ~ H G Wells,
19:Strength is the outcome of need. ~ H G Wells,
20:Strength is the outcome of need; ~ H G Wells,
21:Cynisism is humour in ill health. ~ H G Wells,
22:For after the Battle comes quiet. ~ H G Wells,
23:I write to cover a frame of ideas. ~ H G Wells,
24:They say that terror is a disease, ~ H G Wells,
25:Why not?' said the Time Traveller. ~ H G Wells,
26:Are we all bubbles blown by a baby? ~ H G Wells,
27:Cycle trails will abound in Utopia. ~ H G Wells,
28:I'm a miserable tool," said Marvel. ~ H G Wells,
29:We must end war before war ends us. ~ H G Wells,
30:A boy is a creature of odd feelings. ~ H G Wells,
31:Go away. I'm all right. [last words] ~ H G Wells,
32:LA TIERRA DOMINADA POR LOS MARCIANOS ~ H G Wells,
33:An invisible man is a man with power. ~ H G Wells,
34:...fact takes no heed of human hopes. ~ H G Wells,
35:If we don't end war, war will end us. ~ H G Wells,
36:Ignorance is not an extension of time ~ H G Wells,
37:There's truths you have to grow into. ~ H G Wells,
38:Security sets a premium on feebleness. ~ H G Wells,
39:Beauty is in the heart of the beholder. ~ H G Wells,
40:domestic economy for her private study. ~ H G Wells,
41:Good books are the warehouses of ideas. ~ H G Wells,
42:The stranger swore briefly but vividly. ~ H G Wells,
43:To be honest, one must be inconsistent. ~ H G Wells,
44:Griffin contra mundum… with a vengeance. ~ H G Wells,
45:It is a mistake to do things too easily. ~ H G Wells,
46:... life falls into place only with God. ~ H G Wells,
47:The past is but the past of a beginning. ~ H G Wells,
48:There is no way out or round or through. ~ H G Wells,
49:The choice is: the Universe...or nothing. ~ H G Wells,
50:You can't see beauty with miserable eyes. ~ H G Wells,
51:Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo. ~ H G Wells,
52:The future is the shape of things to come. ~ H G Wells,
53:But giving drugs to a cat is no joke, Kemp! ~ H G Wells,
54:If you fell down yesterday, stand up today. ~ H G Wells,
55:I was a battleground of fear and curiosity. ~ H G Wells,
56:Few people realize the immensity of vacancy. ~ H G Wells,
57:The crisis of today is the joke of tomorrow. ~ H G Wells,
58:For neither do men live nor die in vain. Here ~ H G Wells,
59:...he was not so much a human as a civil war. ~ H G Wells,
60:plausible enough--as most wrong theories are! ~ H G Wells,
61:There is no remorse like the remorse of Chess ~ H G Wells,
62:We will peck them to death tomorrow, my dear. ~ H G Wells,
63:All people fed mainly on scones become clever. ~ H G Wells,
64:A young mistress is better than an old master. ~ H G Wells,
65:Only people who are well off can be - complex. ~ H G Wells,
66:We will peck them to death to-morrow, my dear. ~ H G Wells,
67:Religions are such stuff as dreams are made of. ~ H G Wells,
68:The man who raises a fist has run out of ideas. ~ H G Wells,
69:Fools make researches and wise men exploit them. ~ H G Wells,
70:They are mad; they are fools," said the Dog-man. ~ H G Wells,
71:Am I dreaming? Has the world gone mad--or have I? ~ H G Wells,
72:Human history is, in essence, a history of ideas. ~ H G Wells,
73:There is no liberty save wisdom and self-control. ~ H G Wells,
74:vivisectionist, and has no ambitions to take over ~ H G Wells,
75:Yet so vain is man, and so blinded by his vanity, ~ H G Wells,
76:A douche of spray blinded my brother for a moment. ~ H G Wells,
77:Because this island is full of inimical phenomena. ~ H G Wells,
78:I thought I was killing myself and I did not care. ~ H G Wells,
79:Let your love be stronger than your hate or anger. ~ H G Wells,
80:But wait a moment. Can an instantaneous cube exist? ~ H G Wells,
81:I had rather be called a journalist than an artist. ~ H G Wells,
82:Things that aren't nonsense are so hard to express. ~ H G Wells,
83:We are always getting away from the present moment. ~ H G Wells,
84:If anything is possible, then nothing is interesting ~ H G Wells,
85:If the world does not please you, you can change it. ~ H G Wells,
86:Non-violence is the policy of the vegetable kingdom. ~ H G Wells,
87:El pasado no es más que el principio de un principio. ~ H G Wells,
88:If anything is possible, then nothing is interesting. ~ H G Wells,
89:The path of least resistance is the path of the loser ~ H G Wells,
90:There are no social differences - till women come in. ~ H G Wells,
91:...the sense of my utter loneliness had been agony... ~ H G Wells,
92:What good is religion if it collapses under calamity? ~ H G Wells,
93:You can't reach your hand into the space of tomorrow! ~ H G Wells,
94:Civilization is a race between disaster and education. ~ H G Wells,
95:Mankind has got to start getting the big things right. ~ H G Wells,
96:Nobody read books, but women, parsons and idle people. ~ H G Wells,
97:Nothing remains interesting where anything may happen. ~ H G Wells,
98:The path of least resistance is the path of the loser. ~ H G Wells,
99:What really matters is what you do with what you have. ~ H G Wells,
100:It's no use locking the door after the steed is stolen. ~ H G Wells,
101:It took two years to make,' retorted the Time Traveller ~ H G Wells,
102:I am asking for Liberal Fascists, for enlightened Nazis. ~ H G Wells,
103:Not to go on all-Fours; that is the Law. Are we not Men? ~ H G Wells,
104:Thank no one. You had the need, and I had the knowledge; ~ H G Wells,
105:What was needed now was not bravery, but circumspection. ~ H G Wells,
106:extended my hands towards the sky and began thanking God. ~ H G Wells,
107:His studies were pursued but never effectually overtaken. ~ H G Wells,
108:shone kindly and steadily like the face of an old friend. ~ H G Wells,
109:We are kept keen on the grindstone of pain and necessity. ~ H G Wells,
110:Beauty doesn't make happiness; it only comes to the happy. ~ H G Wells,
111:Everyone leaves the world a little better some by leaving. ~ H G Wells,
112:I want to go ahead of Father Time with a scythe of my own. ~ H G Wells,
113:Night, the mother of fear and mystery, was coming upon me. ~ H G Wells,
114:POMPEII  “Note the ruts in roadway worn by chariot wheels. ~ H G Wells,
115:Will is stronger than fact: it can mold and overcome fact. ~ H G Wells,
116:As if there wasn't a thousand things that were never heard. ~ H G Wells,
117:But who shall dwell in these worlds if they be inhabited? . ~ H G Wells,
118:I must confess that I lost faith in the sanity of the world ~ H G Wells,
119:pointed out Mars, a bright dot of light creeping zenithward ~ H G Wells,
120:The lawgiver, of all beings, most owes the law allegiance. ~ H G Wells,
121:You've made a beast of yourself,- to the beasts you may go. ~ H G Wells,
122:There were half a dozen villas burning on the Woking border. ~ H G Wells,
123:What's it all for, Prendick? Are we bubbles blown by a baby? ~ H G Wells,
124:A [national] flag has no real significance for peaceful uses. ~ H G Wells,
125:Biologists can be just as sensitive to heresy as theologians. ~ H G Wells,
126:I never blame anyone," said Kemp. "It's quite out of fashion. ~ H G Wells,
127:It seems to me that I am more to the Left than you, Mr Stalin ~ H G Wells,
128:The chances of anything man-like on Mars are a million to one ~ H G Wells,
129:Was there, after all, ever any green door in the wall at all? ~ H G Wells,
130:When a man realizes his littleness, his greatness can appear. ~ H G Wells,
131:Men who think in lifetimes are of little use to statesmanship. ~ H G Wells,
132:Night, the mother of fear and mystery,
was coming upon me. ~ H G Wells,
133:No era el principio de un viaje; era el principio de un sueño. ~ H G Wells,
134:no more hasty meals, and weary attendance on fitful old women, ~ H G Wells,
135:Satan delights equally in statistics and in quoting scripture. ~ H G Wells,
136:Heresies are experiments in man's unsatisfied search for truth. ~ H G Wells,
137:indolent, and he was suffering greatly from gout. He abdicated. ~ H G Wells,
138:Suddenly, like a thing falling upon me from without, came fear. ~ H G Wells,
139:There’s some ex-traordinary things in books,” said the mariner. ~ H G Wells,
140:Adapt or perish, now as ever, is nature's inexorable imperative. ~ H G Wells,
141:Everyone seemed eager to talk at once, and the result was Babel. ~ H G Wells,
142:It is not much good thinking of a thing unless you think it out. ~ H G Wells,
143:Looks to me like the sort of fellow one doesn't play cards with. ~ H G Wells,
144:So long as there are sheep Nature will insist on beasts of prey. ~ H G Wells,
145:We live in a world of unused and misapplied knowledge and skill. ~ H G Wells,
146:Adapt or perish, now as ever, is Nature's inexcusable imperative. ~ H G Wells,
147:And the great difference between man and monkey is in the larynx. ~ H G Wells,
148:An idiot child screaming in a hospital." (on George Bernard Shaw) ~ H G Wells,
149:It’s a beast of a country,” said the Voice. “And pigs for people. ~ H G Wells,
150:Something—exactly like a finger and thumb it felt—nipped my nose. ~ H G Wells,
151:The greatest task of democracy, its ritual and feast - is choice. ~ H G Wells,
152:The religion of the atheist has a God-shaped blank at it's heart. ~ H G Wells,
153:The study of Nature makes a man at last as remorseless as Nature. ~ H G Wells,
154:He walked with just such a limp as I have seen in footsore tramps. ~ H G Wells,
155:I saw huge buildings rise up faint and fair, and pass like dreams. ~ H G Wells,
156:So utterly at variance is Destiny with all the little plans of men ~ H G Wells,
157:They were put into my pockets by Weena, when I traveled into Time. ~ H G Wells,
158:What is your theologian's ecstasy but Mahomet's houri in the dark? ~ H G Wells,
159:But wait until to-morrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning. ~ H G Wells,
160:He was inordinately proud of England and he abused her incessantly. ~ H G Wells,
161:So utterly at variance is Destiny with all the little plans of men. ~ H G Wells,
162:The new century will see changes that will dwarf those of the last. ~ H G Wells,
163:It is love and reason,' I said,'fleeing from all the madness of war. ~ H G Wells,
164:No hay inteligencia allí donde no hay cambio ni necesidad de cambio. ~ H G Wells,
165:The most evil institution in the world is the Roman Catholic Church. ~ H G Wells,
166:All men, however highly educated, retain some superstitious inklings. ~ H G Wells,
167:What a wonderfully complex thing! this simple seeming unity—the self! ~ H G Wells,
168:An artist who theorizes about his work is no longer artist but critic. ~ H G Wells,
169:Hunger and a lack of blood-corpuscles take all the manhood from a man. ~ H G Wells,
170:States organized for war will make war as surely as hens will lay eggs. ~ H G Wells,
171:Strength is the outcome of need; security sets a premium on feebleness. ~ H G Wells,
172:Strychnine is a grand tonic, Kemp, to take the flabbiness out of a man. ~ H G Wells,
173:The pain had passed. I thought I was killing myself and I did not care. ~ H G Wells,
174:There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change ~ H G Wells,
175:The Time Machine was left deserted on the turf among the rhododendrons. ~ H G Wells,
176:Democracy's ceremonial, its feast, it's great function, is the election. ~ H G Wells,
177:'It is love and reason,' I said, 'fleeing from all this madness of war.' ~ H G Wells,
178:There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. ~ H G Wells,
179:It's against reason," said Filby. "What reason?" said the Time Traveller. ~ H G Wells,
180:States organized for war will make war as surely as hens will lay eggs... ~ H G Wells,
181:The uglier a man's legs are, the better he plays golf. It's almost a law. ~ H G Wells,
182:If you do not want to explore an egoism you should not read autobiography. ~ H G Wells,
183:Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. ~ H G Wells,
184:The uglier a man's legs are, the better he plays golf - it's almost a law. ~ H G Wells,
185:We're in a blessed drainpipe, and we've got to crawl along it till we die. ~ H G Wells,
186:Books-bright windows in this life of ours, lit by the shining souls of men. ~ H G Wells,
187:He who does not contemplate the future is destined to be overwhelmed by it. ~ H G Wells,
188:I grew very weary and irritable with the curate’s perpetual ejaculations; I ~ H G Wells,
189:The passion for playing Chess is one of the most unaccountable in the world ~ H G Wells,
190:When Man realizes his littleness, his greatness can appear. But not before. ~ H G Wells,
191:I saw a gray-haired man a figure of hale age, sitting at a desk and writing. ~ H G Wells,
192:I surveyed the broad view of our old world under the sunset of that long day ~ H G Wells,
193:It's against reason," said Filby.
"What reason?" said the Time Traveller. ~ H G Wells,
194:I was never a great amorist, though I have loved several people very deeply. ~ H G Wells,
195:The chances against anything manlike on Mars are a million to one,” he said. ~ H G Wells,
196:Değişimin ve değişime gereksinimin olmadığı yerde akıl da yoktur. - Sayfa 124 ~ H G Wells,
197:He liked to address every man in his own language, as a good European should. ~ H G Wells,
198:Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. ~ H G Wells,
199:If there is no God, nothing matters. If there is a God, nothing else matters. ~ H G Wells,
200:It's chance, I tell you,' he interrupted, ' as everything is in a man's life. ~ H G Wells,
201:One believes in Stephen Dedalus as one believes in few characters in fiction. ~ H G Wells,
202:The air was full of sound, a defenning and confusing conflict of noises (...) ~ H G Wells,
203:There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only ~ H G Wells,
204:No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else's draft. ~ H G Wells,
205:slain, after all man’s devices had failed, by the humblest things that God, in ~ H G Wells,
206:Alışkanlık ve içgüdü çaresiz kalmadıkça doğa zekaya asla başvurmaz. - Sayfa 124 ~ H G Wells,
207:Life is real again, and the useless and cumbersome and mischievous have to die. ~ H G Wells,
208:The path of social advancement is, and must be, strewn with broken friendships. ~ H G Wells,
209:The sea was silent, the sky was silent; I was alone with the night and silence. ~ H G Wells,
210:And you cannot move at all in Time, you cannot get away from the present moment. ~ H G Wells,
211:Oh God, is there ever to be any age of happiness? Is there never to be any rest? ~ H G Wells,
212:One may as well starve one's body out of a place as to starve one's soul in one. ~ H G Wells,
213:he was one of those saturnine people who smile with the corners of the mouth down ~ H G Wells,
214:Is it any wonder that to this day this Galilean is too much for our small hearts? ~ H G Wells,
215:It was not like the beginning of a journey; it was like the beginning of a dream. ~ H G Wells,
216:Lies are the mortar that binds the savage individual man into the social masonry. ~ H G Wells,
217:One can't always be magnificent, but simplicity is always a possible alternative. ~ H G Wells,
218:What on earth would a man do with himself, if something did not stand in his way? ~ H G Wells,
219:You cannot imagine the strange colour-less delight of these intellectual desires. ~ H G Wells,
220:A darkness, a flood of darkness that opened and spread and blotted out all things. ~ H G Wells,
221:He was dressed in dark-blue serge, and had peculiarly thick, coarse, black hair. I ~ H G Wells,
222:I can best express my state of mind by saying that I wanted to be in at the death. ~ H G Wells,
223:I felt hopelessly cut off from my own kind - a strange animal in an unknown world. ~ H G Wells,
224:One cannot always be magnificent, but simplicity is always a possible alternative. ~ H G Wells,
225:They may once have been animals; but I never before saw an animal trying to think. ~ H G Wells,
226:Very simple was my explanation, and plausible enough---as most wrong theories are! ~ H G Wells,
227:Like a committee in a thieves' kitchen when someone has casually mentioned the law. ~ H G Wells,
228:[N]othing is so pleasing to perplexed unhappy people as the denunciation of others, ~ H G Wells,
229:That's what we are now—just ants. Only——"
"Yes," I said.
"We're eatable ants. ~ H G Wells,
230:The teacher, whether mother, priest, or schoolmaster, is the real maker of history. ~ H G Wells,
231:Affliction comes to us, not to make us sad but sober; not to make us sorry but wise. ~ H G Wells,
232:Crude classifications and false generalizations are the curse of the organized life. ~ H G Wells,
233:Fine hospitality," said I, "to a man who has travelled innumerable years to see you. ~ H G Wells,
234:I am a lone wolf, a solitary man, wandering through a world in which I have no part. ~ H G Wells,
235:Man is the tool-using, fire-making animal. From the outset of his terrestrial career ~ H G Wells,
236:When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. ~ H G Wells,
237:You have learned something. That always feels at first as if you had lost something. ~ H G Wells,
238:An animal may be ferocious and cunning enough, but it takes a real man to tell a lie. ~ H G Wells,
239:He lit the dining-room lamp, got out a cigar, and began pacing the room, ejaculating. ~ H G Wells,
240:Help me — and I will do great things for you. An invisible man is a man of power.” He ~ H G Wells,
241:His grey eyes shone and twinkled, and his usually pale face was flushed and animated. ~ H G Wells,
242:I had not, I said to myself, come into the future to carry on a miniature flirtation. ~ H G Wells,
243:It was not the first time that conscience has turned against the methods of research. ~ H G Wells,
244:No compulsion in the world is stronger than the urge to edit someone else's document. ~ H G Wells,
245:One of the darkest evils of our world is surely the unteachable wildness of the Good. ~ H G Wells,
246:We live in reference to past experience and not to future events, however inevitable. ~ H G Wells,
247:Affliction comes to us, not to make us sad, but sober; not to make us sorry, but wise. ~ H G Wells,
248:If my phrases shock the reader, that only shows it is high time he or she was shocked. ~ H G Wells,
249:You can show black is white by argument,' said Filby, 'but you will never convince me. ~ H G Wells,
250:You can show black is white by argument,” said Filby, “but you will never convince me. ~ H G Wells,
251:Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit? ~ H G Wells,
252:But-! I say! The common conventions of humanity-' 'Are all very well for common people. ~ H G Wells,
253:I felt amazingly confident,—it’s not particularly pleasant recalling that I was an ass. ~ H G Wells,
254:It is not reasonable that those who gamble with men's lives should not stake their own. ~ H G Wells,
255:The truly brave man is not the man who does not feel fear but the man who overcomes it. ~ H G Wells,
256:Arson, after all, is an artificial crime...A large number of houses deserve to be burnt. ~ H G Wells,
257:You are not mechanics, you are warriors. You have been trained, not to think, but to do. ~ H G Wells,
258:Bah! The thing is not a nose at all, but a bit of primordial chaos clapped on to my face. ~ H G Wells,
259:Nothing leads so straight to futility as literary ambitions without systematic knowledge. ~ H G Wells,
260:The fertilising conflict of individualities is the ultimate meaning of the personal life. ~ H G Wells,
261:A door onbust is always open to bustin’, but ye can’t onbust a door once you’ve busted en. ~ H G Wells,
262:But-! I say! The common conventions of humanity-'
'Are all very well for common people. ~ H G Wells,
263:I had made myself the most complicated and the most hopeless trap that ever a man devised. ~ H G Wells,
264:It is not reasonable that those who gamble with men's lives should not pay with their own. ~ H G Wells,
265:Hinduism is synonymous with humanism. That is its essence and its great liberating quality. ~ H G Wells,
266:How small the vastest of human catastrophes may seem, at a distance of a few million miles. ~ H G Wells,
267:Science has toiled too long forging weapons for fools to use. It is time she held her hand. ~ H G Wells,
268:I suppose everything in existence takes its colour from the average hue of our surroundings. ~ H G Wells,
269:Tell the truth and read story books;it will take you to the magical moment in a glory night. ~ H G Wells,
270:we should remember how repulsive our carnivorous habits would seem to an intelligent rabbit. ~ H G Wells,
271:Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race. ~ H G Wells,
272:Few people realise the immensity of vacancy in which the dust of the material universe swims. ~ H G Wells,
273:In relation to law I am doubtful whether, even at the present time, science has fairly begun. ~ H G Wells,
274:I suppose I am fairly alert and interested in people, and that is my most attractive quality. ~ H G Wells,
275:Every conceivable sort of silly creature that has ever been created has been sent to cross me. ~ H G Wells,
276:He staggered into the “Coach and Horses” more dead than alive, and flung his portmanteau down. ~ H G Wells,
277:I ceased even to breathe. It was ridiculous, of course, but you know that ghost-story feeling. ~ H G Wells,
278:What was this place?—this place that to his senses seemed subtly quivering like a thing alive? ~ H G Wells,
279:Yeats wrote about, who rejected the real world as too coarse and stupid for the sensitive soul ~ H G Wells,
280:But the Time Traveller had more than a touch of whim among his elements, and we distrusted him. ~ H G Wells,
281:The forceps of our minds are clumsy forceps, and crush the truth a little in taking hold of it. ~ H G Wells,
282:The sojers’ll stop ’em,” said a woman beside me, doubtfully. A haziness rose over the treetops. ~ H G Wells,
283:In all ages, far back into prehistory, we find human beings have painted and adorned themselves. ~ H G Wells,
284:I perceived with a sudden novel vividness the extraordinary folly of everything I had ever done. ~ H G Wells,
285:Tenía que ser mi única esperanza, una mísera esperanza tal vez, pero mejor que la desesperación. ~ H G Wells,
286:A world revolution to a higher social order, a world order, or utter downfall lies before us all. ~ H G Wells,
287:I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide. ~ H G Wells,
288:In a moment my hand was on the lever, and I had placed a month between myself and these monsters. ~ H G Wells,
289:Marriage isn't what it was. It's become a different thing because women have become human beings. ~ H G Wells,
290:Sailors ought never to go to church. They ought to go to hell, where it is much more comfortable. ~ H G Wells,
291:Looking at these stars suddenly dwarfed my own troubles and all the gravities of terrestrial life. ~ H G Wells,
292:You are trying to do a more difficult thing than record folk songs; you are trying to record life. ~ H G Wells,
293:An unpleasant odour would not be objected to, it is not objected to now in many continental hotels. ~ H G Wells,
294:It is when suffering finds a voice and sets our nerves quivering that this pity comes troubling us. ~ H G Wells,
295:It was one of my uncle's profoundest remarks that human beings are the only unreasonable creatures. ~ H G Wells,
296:We were not making war against Germany, we were being ordered about in the King's war with Germany. ~ H G Wells,
297:A downtrodden class... will never be able to make an effective protest until it achieves solidarity. ~ H G Wells,
298:He sighed and looked about him. 'This is no world for men,' he said. 'And yet in a way...it appeals. ~ H G Wells,
299:Mankind which began in a cave and behind a windbreak will end in the disease-soaked ruins of a slum. ~ H G Wells,
300:There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time. ~ H G Wells,
301:There is no remorse like a remorse of chess. It is a curse upon man. There is no happiness in chess. ~ H G Wells,
302:THE SUN SNARERS Section 1 THE history of mankind is the history of the attainment of external power. ~ H G Wells,
303:The crying sounded even louder out of doors. It was as if all the pain in the world had found a voice ~ H G Wells,
304:It is when suffering finds a voice and
sets our nerves quivering that this pity comes troubling us. ~ H G Wells,
305:It sounds plausible enough tonight, but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning. ~ H G Wells,
306:La pitié vient surtout nous bouleverser quand la souffrance trouve une voix pour tourmenter nos nerfs. ~ H G Wells,
307:little suspecting the meaning of the minute gleam I had seen and all that it would presently bring me. ~ H G Wells,
308:She always seemed to me, I fancy, more human than she was, perhaps because her affection was so human. ~ H G Wells,
309:when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of man. ~ H G Wells,
310:I do not believe I have any immortality. The greatest evil in the world today is the Christian religion ~ H G Wells,
311:The red tongues that went licking up my heap of wood were an altogether new and strange thing to Weena. ~ H G Wells,
312:You teach them very litter?"
"Why should we? It only leads to trouble and discontent. We amuse them. ~ H G Wells,
313:Beast!” said he. “You’re the beast. He takes his liquor like a Christian. Come out of the way, Prendick! ~ H G Wells,
314:In politics, strangely enough, the best way to play your cards is to lay them face upwards on the table. ~ H G Wells,
315:It continued to swear with that breadth and variety that distinguishes the swearing of a cultivated man. ~ H G Wells,
316:I was grotesque to the theatrical pitch, a stage miser, but I was certainly not a physical impossibility ~ H G Wells,
317:The crying sounded even louder out of doors. It was as if all the pain
in the world had found a voice ~ H G Wells,
318:The past is the beginning of the beginning and all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. ~ H G Wells,
319:Three-Dimensional representations of his Four-Dimensioned being, which is a fixed and unalterable thing. ~ H G Wells,
320:A biography should be a dissection and demonstration of how a particular human being was made and worked. ~ H G Wells,
321:I could work at a problem for years, but to wait inactive for twenty-four hours - that is another matter. ~ H G Wells,
322:I do not propose to add anything to what has already been written concerning the loss of the "Lady Vain." ~ H G Wells,
323:If your life doesn't end in failure, you haven't reached high enough. So it was failure I had to achieve. ~ H G Wells,
324:The Athenian democracy suffered much from that narrowness of patriotism which is the ruin of all nations. ~ H G Wells,
325:The true objection to slavery is not that it is unjust to the inferior but that it corrupts the superior. ~ H G Wells,
326:And through it all, this destiny was before me," he said; "this vast inheritance of which I did not dream. ~ H G Wells,
327:Losing your way on a journey is unfortunate. But, losing your reason for the journey is a fate more cruel. ~ H G Wells,
328:Room to swing a cat, it seemed was absolutely essential. It was an infrequent but indispensable operation. ~ H G Wells,
329:Sometimes I rise above my level, sometimes I fall below it, but always I fall short of the things I dream. ~ H G Wells,
330:There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness ~ H G Wells,
331:The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. ~ H G Wells,
332:...whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and it's hope. I HOPE, or I would not live. ~ H G Wells,
333:Even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of man. ~ H G Wells,
334:For all my desire to be interesting, I have to confess that for most things and people I don't give a damn. ~ H G Wells,
335:His was a darkness unbroken by a ray of thought or sensation, a dreamless inanition, a vast space of peace. ~ H G Wells,
336:The past is but the beginning of a beginning, and all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. ~ H G Wells,
337:There is no remorse like the remorse of chess. [..] It is a curse upon man. There is no happiness in chess. ~ H G Wells,
338:Zihinsel çok yönlülüğün değişim, tehlike ve belanın telafisi oluşu, gözden kaçırdığımız bir doğa yasasıdır. ~ H G Wells,
339:His landlady came to the door, loosely wrapped in dressing gown and shawl; her husband followed ejaculating. ~ H G Wells,
340:Leaders should lead as far as they can and then vanish. Their ashes should not choke the fire they have lit. ~ H G Wells,
341:—Pura casualidad. Ya se lo he dicho —interrumpió—, como todo en esta vida. Sólo los tontos no se dan cuenta. ~ H G Wells,
342:We were making the future and hardly any of us troubled to think what future we were making. And here it is! ~ H G Wells,
343:By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers. ~ H G Wells,
344:Crime and bad lives are the measure of a State's failure, all crime in the end is the crime of the community. ~ H G Wells,
345:I write as straight as I can, just as I walk as straight as I can, because that is the best way to get there. ~ H G Wells,
346:once you lose yourself, you have two choices: find the person you used to be, or lose that person completely. ~ H G Wells,
347:Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write! ~ H G Wells,
348:Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write. ~ H G Wells,
349:Endless conflicts. Endless misunderstanding. All life is that. Great and little cannot understand one another. ~ H G Wells,
350:It was Plutarch, you know, and nothing intrinsically American that prevented George Washington being a King... ~ H G Wells,
351:Mevcut edebiyatımız iyi durumda, buna şüphe yok; ama bir düşünür için, yazılmamış kitaplar çok daha çekicidir. ~ H G Wells,
352:This is day one of year one of the new epoch, -- the Epoch of the Invisible Man. I am Invisible Man the First. ~ H G Wells,
353:This isn't a war," said the artilleryman. "It never was a war, any more than there's war between man and ants. ~ H G Wells,
354:Alone-- it is wonderful how little a man can do alone! To rob a little, to hurt a little, and there is the end. ~ H G Wells,
355:I did not know it, but that was the last civilised dinner I was to eat for very many strange and terrible days. ~ H G Wells,
356:I stood staring, not as yet realising that this was death leaping from man to man in that little distant crowd. ~ H G Wells,
357:I've never really planned my life or set out to live. I happened; things happened to me. It's so with everyone. ~ H G Wells,
358:There is no liberty, save wisdom and self-control. Liberty is within--not without. It is each man's own affair. ~ H G Wells,
359:The third peculiarity of aerial warfare was that it was at once enormously destructive and entirely indecisive. ~ H G Wells,
360:I went to a box room at the top of the house and locked myself in, in order to be alone with my aching miseries. ~ H G Wells,
361:...money – leastways we thought it was money till everything smashed up, and then seemingly it was jes’ paper... ~ H G Wells,
362:one of those pertinacious tempers that would warm every day to a white heat and never again cool to forgiveness. ~ H G Wells,
363:Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write.
   ~ H G Wells,
364:The fever of war that would presently clog vein and artery, deaden nerve, and destroy brain, had yet to develop. ~ H G Wells,
365:By our daylight standard he walked out of security into darkness, danger, and death.
But did he see like that? ~ H G Wells,
366:[...] even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of man. ~ H G Wells,
367:I did not feel a bit sorry for my father. He seemed to me to be the victim of his own foolish sentimentality. The ~ H G Wells,
368:Here was the same beautiful scene, the same abundant foliage, the same splendid palaces and magnificent ruins, the ~ H G Wells,
369:In all the round world there is no meat. There used to be. But now we cannot stand the thought of slaughterhouses. ~ H G Wells,
370:Mr. Thomas Marvel hated roomy shoes, but then he hated damp. He had never properly thought out which he hated most ~ H G Wells,
371:No man goes out upon a novel expedition without misgivings.

The Secret Places of The Heart (Kindle Loc 245) ~ H G Wells,
372:Every time Europe looks across the Atlantic to see the American Eagle, it observes only the rear end of an ostrich. ~ H G Wells,
373:Il passato non è che l'inizio di un inizio, e tutto quel che è ed è stato non è altro che il crepuscolo di un'alba. ~ H G Wells,
374:This little upset across the water doesn't mean anything. Threatened men live long and threatened wars never occur. ~ H G Wells,
375:Very well," said the Voice, in a tone of relief. "Then I'm going to throw flints at you till you think differently. ~ H G Wells,
376:Debemos reflexionar en lo repugnante que parecería a un conejo dotado de inteligencia nuestras costumbres carnívoras ~ H G Wells,
377:Patriotism has become a mere national self assertion, a sentimentality of flag-cheering with no constructive duties. ~ H G Wells,
378:There's something in this starlight that loosens one's tongue. I'm an ass, and yet somehow I would like to tell you. ~ H G Wells,
379:If we do not end war - war will end us. Everybody says that, millions of people believe it, and nobody does anything. ~ H G Wells,
380:If you are in difficulties with a book, try the element of surprise: attack it at an hour when it isn't expecting it. ~ H G Wells,
381:I suppose a suicide who holds a pistol to his skull feels much the same wonder at what will come next as I felt then. ~ H G Wells,
382:It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble. ~ H G Wells,
383:Roman Catholicism is a broken and utterly desperate thing, capable only of malignant mischief in our awakening world. ~ H G Wells,
384:Success is to be measured not by wealth, power, or fame, but by the ratio between what a man is and what he might be. ~ H G Wells,
385:This has ever been the fate of energy in security; it takes to art and to eroticism, and then come languor and decay. ~ H G Wells,
386:When the history of civilization is written, it will be a biological history and Margaret Sanger will be its heroine. ~ H G Wells,
387:...and spend my days surrounded by wise books, - bright windows in this life of ours, lit by the shining souls of men. ~ H G Wells,
388:Biologically the species is the accumulation of the experiments of all its successful individuals since the beginning. ~ H G Wells,
389:Mi seguridad les hizo titubear. Los animales pueden ser muy astutos y feroces, pero sólo un hombre es capaz de mentir. ~ H G Wells,
390:Suddenly," she said, "the interest goes out of him. He forgets you. He doesn't care a rap for you—under his very nose… ~ H G Wells,
391:The immediate pressure of necessity has brightened their intellects, enlarged their powers, and hardened their hearts. ~ H G Wells,
392:There were no object lessons, and the studies of bookkeeping and French were pursued (but never effectually overtaken. ~ H G Wells,
393:This has ever been the fate of energy in security; it takes to art and to eroticism, and then comes languor and decay. ~ H G Wells,
394:After people have repeated a phrase a great number of times, they begin to realize it has meaning and may even be true. ~ H G Wells,
395:slain, after all man’s devices had failed, by the humblest things that God, in his wisdom, has put upon this earth. For ~ H G Wells,
396:We must not allow the clock and the calendar to blind us to the fact that each moment of life is a miracle and mystery. ~ H G Wells,
397:It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble. An ~ H G Wells,
398:(...) and spend my days surrounded by wise books, - bright windows in this life of ours, lit by the shining souls of men. ~ H G Wells,
399:It's like that with some people,' he said; 'whenever I got into the examination-room or anywhere everything seemed to go. ~ H G Wells,
400:It was this restlessness, this insecurity, perhaps, that drove me further and further afield in my exploring expeditions. ~ H G Wells,
401:Learn its ways, watch it, be careful of too hasty guesses at its meaning. In the end you will find clues to it all.’ Then ~ H G Wells,
402:For a time I believed that mankind had been swept out of existence, and that I stood there alone, the last man left alive. ~ H G Wells,
403:No animal will change when its conditions are good enough for present survival. And in this matter man is still an animal. ~ H G Wells,
404:There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness moves along it. ~ H G Wells,
405:Things that would have made fame of a less clever man seemed tricks in his hands. It is a mistake to do things too easily. ~ H G Wells,
406:Don't you think you would attract attention?' said the Medical Man. 'Our ancestors had no great tolerance for anachronisms. ~ H G Wells,
407:He began to realize that you cannot even fight happily with creatures that stand upon a different mental basis to yourself. ~ H G Wells,
408:She amuses me with her suspicions. Such odd ideas! In a Curate’s wife. But I hope it didn’t happen when you were in orders. ~ H G Wells,
409:Surely, if we have learned nothing else, this war has taught us pity—pity for those witless souls that suffer our dominion. ~ H G Wells,
410:The Anglo-Saxon genius for parliamentary government asserted itself; there was a great deal of talk and no decisive action. ~ H G Wells,
411:Men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. ~ H G Wells,
412:There is space in its philosophy for everyone which is one reason why India is a home to every single religion in the world. ~ H G Wells,
413:Things have been, says the legal mind, and so we are here. The creative mind says we are here because things have yet to be. ~ H G Wells,
414:We all have our time machines, don't we. Those that take us back are memories...And those that carry us forward, are dreams. ~ H G Wells,
415:But to me the future is still black and blank—is a vast ignorance, lit at a few casual places by the memory of his story. And ~ H G Wells,
416:Great land of sublimated things, thou World of Books, happy asyluum, refreshment and refuge from the world of everyday! . . . ~ H G Wells,
417:I felt all the wretcheder for the lack of a breakfast. Hunger and a lack of blood-corpuscles take all the manhood from a man. ~ H G Wells,
418:All the English flowers came from Shakespeare. I don't know what we did before his time.

The Secret Places of the Heart ~ H G Wells,
419:For the most part people went about their business with an entirely irresponsible confidence in the stability of the universe. ~ H G Wells,
420:Go to the devil!” said the stranger in a tremendous voice, and “Shut that door after you.” So that brief interview terminated. ~ H G Wells,
421:He wanted—what did he want most in life? I think his distinctive craving is best expressed as fun—fun in companionship. ~ H G Wells,
422:There are kisses and kisses, I am told, and this must have been quite the other sort from Millie's resonant signals of regard. ~ H G Wells,
423:If only I had thought of a Kodak! I could have flashed that glimpse of the Under-world in a second, and examined it at leisure. ~ H G Wells,
424:I was to discover the atrocious folly of this proceeding, but it came to my mind as an ingenious move for covering our retreat. ~ H G Wells,
425:After a lapse of fifteen years he rediscovered this interesting world, about which so many people go incredibly blind and bored. ~ H G Wells,
426:...instead of offering me a Garibaldi biscuit, she asked me with that faint lisp of hers, to 'have some squashed flies, George'. ~ H G Wells,
427:The man who had just entered the shop was a short, slight, hunched, beetle-browed man, with long arms and very short bandy legs. ~ H G Wells,
428:There is only one sort of man who is absolutely to blame for his own misery, and that is the man who finds life dull and dreary. ~ H G Wells,
429:Under the new conditions of perfect comfort and security, that restless energy, that with us is strength, would become weakness. ~ H G Wells,
430:…growing a little tiresome on account of some mysterious internal discomfort that the local practitioner diagnosed as imagination ~ H G Wells,
431:Utopia still made use of printed books ; books were still the simplest, clearest way of bringing statement before a tranquil mind. ~ H G Wells,
432:What a huge inaccessible lumber-room of thought and experience we amounted to, I thought; how much we are, how little we transmit. ~ H G Wells,
433:You see," I said, "I'm a socialist. I don't think this world was made for a small minority to dance on the faces of everyone else. ~ H G Wells,
434:A mi alrededor mi imaginación encontró cientos de enemigos silenciosos moviéndose. El terror me sobrecogió, horror de mi temeridad. ~ H G Wells,
435:It is the going out from oneself that is love and not the accident of its return. It is the expedition, whether it fail or succeed. ~ H G Wells,
436:Let your love be stronger than your hate or anger. Learn the wisdom of compromise, for it is better to bend a little than to break. ~ H G Wells,
437:Every economic dissertation and discussion reminds one more strongly than the last of the game of croquet Alice played in Wonderland ~ H G Wells,
438:Face this world. Learn its ways, watch it, be careful of too hasty guesses at its meaning. In the end you will find clues to it all. ~ H G Wells,
439:So, as I see it, the Upper-world man had drifted towards his feeble prettiness, and the Under-world to mere mechanical industry. But ~ H G Wells,
440:The cat, which is a solitary beast, is single minded and goes its way alone, but, the dog, like his master, is confused in his mind. ~ H G Wells,
441:Great and strange ideas transcending experience often have less effect upon men and women than smaller, more tangible considerations. ~ H G Wells,
442:instantaneous cube exist?' 'Don't follow you,' said Filby. 'Can a cube that does not last for any time at all, have a real existence? ~ H G Wells,
443:intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. ~ H G Wells,
444:Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no need of change. ~ H G Wells,
445:but I know it was a dull white, and had strange large greyish-red eyes; also that there was flaxen hair on its head and down its back. ~ H G Wells,
446:I don't think you fully appreciate the importance of Illusion in life, the Essential Nature of Lies and Deception of the body politic. ~ H G Wells,
447:My pockets had always puzzled Weena, but at the last she had concluded that they were an eccentric kind of vase for floral decoration. ~ H G Wells,
448:The man was running away with the rest, and selling his papers for a shilling each as he ran—a grotesque mingling of profit and panic. ~ H G Wells,
449:I must confess that my imagination refuses to see any sort of submarine doing anything but suffocating its crew and floundering at sea. ~ H G Wells,
450:...the voice was indisputable. It continued to swear with that breadth and variety that distinguishes the swearing of a cultivated man. ~ H G Wells,
451:I never yet heard of a useless thing that was not ground out of existence by evolution sooner or later. Did you? And pain gets needless. ~ H G Wells,
452:Money means in a thousand minds a thousand subtly different, roughly similar, systems of images, associations, suggestions and impulses. ~ H G Wells,
453:There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven. ~ H G Wells,
454:To love is to go living radiantly through the world. To love and be loved is to be fearless of experience and "rich" in the power to give. ~ H G Wells,
455:You may kill me, but I can hold you - and all the universe for that matter - in the grip of this small brain. I would not change. Even now ~ H G Wells,
456:Great and strange ideas transcending experience often have less effect upon men and women than smaller, more tangible considerations. Iping ~ H G Wells,
457:He blinked at the sun and dreamt that perhaps he might snare it and spare it as it went down to its resting place amidst the distant hills. ~ H G Wells,
458:I never yet heard of a useless thing that was not ground out of
existence by evolution sooner or later. Did you? And pain gets needless. ~ H G Wells,
459:Our challenge is not to educate the children we used to have or want to have, but to educate the children who come to the schoolhouse door. ~ H G Wells,
460:the haunting memory of a beauty and a happiness that filled his heart with insatiable longings that made all the interests and spectacle of ~ H G Wells,
461:This is the end and the beginning of an age. This is something far greater than the French Revolution or the Reformation and we live in it. ~ H G Wells,
462:What I want to know is, in the Middle Ages, did they do anything for Housemaid's Knee? What did they put in their hot baths after jousting? ~ H G Wells,
463:Yet the voice was indisputable. It continued to swear with that breadth and variety that distinguishes the swearing of a cultivated man. It ~ H G Wells,
464:Even now, does not an East-end worker live in such artificial conditions as practically to be cut off from the natural surface of the earth? ~ H G Wells,
465:London, ... like a bowl of viscid human fluid, boils sullenly over the rim of its encircling hills and slops messily into the home counties. ~ H G Wells,
466:I am too Occidental for a long vigil. I could work at a problem for years, but to wait inactive for twenty-four hours—that is another matter. ~ H G Wells,
467:La noche, madre del miedo y del misterio, se acercaba a mí; pero mientras la voz sonaba, a soledad y la desolación se hacían más soportables. ~ H G Wells,
468:The establishment of the world community will surely exact a price – and who can tell what that price may be? – in toil, suffering and blood. ~ H G Wells,
469:I am just a human being — solid, needing food and drink, needing covering too — But I’m invisible. You see? Invisible. Simple idea. Invisible. ~ H G Wells,
470:So long as you are alive you are just the moment, perhaps, but when you are dead then you are all your life from the first moment to the last. ~ H G Wells,
471:This is the only way I ever heard of research going. I asked a question, devised some method of getting an answer, and got - a fresh question. ~ H G Wells,
472:A certain elementary training in statistical method is becoming as necessary for everyone living in this world of today as reading and writing. ~ H G Wells,
473:It seems to me now almost incredibly wonderful that, with that swift fate hanging over us, men could go about their petty concerns as they did. ~ H G Wells,
474:The great trouble with you Americans is that you are still under the influence of that second-rate - shall I say third-rate? - mind, Karl Marx. ~ H G Wells,
475:Think of the men who have walked here!" said a tourist in the Roman Coliseum. It was a Futurist mind that answered: "Think of the men who will. ~ H G Wells,
476:his lips moving as one who repeats mystic words. 'Yes, I think I see it now,' he said after some time, brightening in a quite transitory manner. ~ H G Wells,
477:Once the command of the air is obtained by one of the contending armies, the war becomes a conflict between a seeing host and one that is blind. ~ H G Wells,
478:until under the stimulus of accumulating material, accumulating investments or other circumstances, the tide of private enterprise flowed again. ~ H G Wells,
479:With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. ~ H G Wells,
480:With wine and food, the confidence of my own table, and the necessity of reassuring my wife, I grew by insensible degrees courageous and secure. ~ H G Wells,
481:I am for world-control of production and of trade and transport, for a world coinage, and the confederation of mankind. I am for the super-State. ~ H G Wells,
482:Man is the unnatural animal, the rebel child of nature, and more and more does he turn himself against the harsh and fitful hand that reared him. ~ H G Wells,
483:Our business here is to be Utopian, to make vivid and credible, if we can, first this facet and then that, of an imaginary whole and happy world. ~ H G Wells,
484:To discover a society,' said I, `erected on a strictly communistic basis.'

`Of all the wild extravagant theories!' began the Psychologist. ~ H G Wells,
485:But, as I say, I was too
full of excitement and (a true saying, though those who have never
known danger may doubt it) too desperate to die. ~ H G Wells,
486:New and stirring things are belittled because if they are not belittled the humiliating question arises 'Why then are you not taking part in them? ~ H G Wells,
487:The power of destruction which had once been the ultimate privilege of government was now the only power left in the world--and it was everywhere. ~ H G Wells,
488:The State's your mother, your father, the totality of your interests. No discipline can be too severe for the man that denies thatby word or deed. ~ H G Wells,
489:Religion is the first thing and the last thing, and until a man has found God and been found by God, he begins at no beginning, he works to no end. ~ H G Wells,
490:Ambition—what is the good of pride of place when you cannot appear there? What is the good of the love of woman when her name must needs be Delilah? ~ H G Wells,
491:Human society is based on want. Life is based on want. Wild-eyed visionaries may dream of a world without need. Cloud-cuckoo-land. It can't be done. ~ H G Wells,
492:Clearly,' the Time Traveller proceeded, 'any real body must have extension in four directions: it must have Length, Breadth, Thickness, and—Duration. ~ H G Wells,
493:Ages ago, thousands of generations ago, man had thrust his brother man out of the ease and the sunshine. And now that brother was coming back—changed! ~ H G Wells,
494:—El verdadero artista —explicó el cuadro— es siempre un hombre ignorante. Un artista que teoriza sobre su trabajo ya no es un artista sino un crítico. ~ H G Wells,
495:our knowledge is very limited; because Nature, too, is shy and slow in our clumsy hands. Some day all this will be better organized, and still better. ~ H G Wells,
496:The science hangs like a gathering fog in a valley, a fog which begins nowhere and goes nowhere, an incidental, unmeaning inconvenience to passers-by. ~ H G Wells,
497:The too perfect security of the Upper-worlders had led them to a slow movement of degeneration, a general dwindling in size strength and intelligence. ~ H G Wells,
498:They haven't any spirit in them - no proud dreams and no proud lusts; and a man who hasn't one or the other-Lord! What is he but funk and precautions. ~ H G Wells,
499:A time will come when men will sit with history before them or with some old newspaper before them and ask incredulously,"Was there ever such a world?" ~ H G Wells,
500:There was no amazement, but only an impression of delightful rightness, of being reminded of happy things that had in some strange way been overlooked. ~ H G Wells,
501:Think of what earthquakes and floods, wars and volcanoes, have done before men! Did you think God had exempted Weybridge? He is not an insurance agent. ~ H G Wells,
502:All four Gospels agree in giving us a picture of a very definite personality. One is obliged to say, "Here was a man. This could not have been invented. ~ H G Wells,
503:Cosas que hubieran hecho la fama de un hombre menos inteligente parecían supercherías en sus manos. Es un error hacer las cosas con demasiada facilidad. ~ H G Wells,
504:The too perfect security of the Upper-worlders had led them to a slow movement of degeneration, a general dwindling in size, strength, and intelligence. ~ H G Wells,
505:In the scientific world I find just that disinterested devotion to great ends that I hope will spread at last through the entire range of human activity. ~ H G Wells,
506:All the sounds of man, the bleating of sheep, the cries of birds, the hum of insects, the stir that makes the background of our lives - all that was over. ~ H G Wells,
507:Sometimes, you have to step outside of the person you've been and remember the person you were meant to be. The person you want to be. The person you are. ~ H G Wells,
508:To Europe she was America. To America she was the gateway to the earth. But to tell the story of New York would be to write a social history of the world. ~ H G Wells,
509:childbearing becomes an evil rather than a blessing to the State; where violence comes but rarely and off-spring are secure, there is less necessity—indeed ~ H G Wells,
510:Cosas que hubieran parecido incuestionables en un hombre menos inteligente, parecían trucos en sus manos. Es un error hacer las cosas demasiado fácilmente. ~ H G Wells,
511:I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide. It had set itself steadfastly towards comfort and ease, a ~ H G Wells,
512:There's nothing wrong in suffering, if you suffer for a purpose. Our revolution didn't abolish danger or death. It simply made danger and death worthwhile. ~ H G Wells,
513:You Americans have the loveliest wine in the world, you know, but you don't realize it. You call them domestic and that's enough to start trouble anywhere. ~ H G Wells,
514:I have wasted strength, time, opportunities. Alone — it is wonderful how little a man can do alone! To rob a little, to hurt a little, and there is the end. ~ H G Wells,
515:It is highly probable that the bulk of the Jew's ancestors 'never' lived in Palestine 'at all,' which witnesses the power of historical assertion over fact. ~ H G Wells,
516:This world is out of joint. It's broken up and I doubt if it'll heal. I doubt very much if it'll heal. We are in the beginning of the sickness of the world! ~ H G Wells,
517:A real value of a talk is not how it goes but what it leaves in your memory, which is one reason perhaps why dialogues in books are always so boring to read. ~ H G Wells,
518:Entre las decenas de millares de nombres de monarcas que se apretujan en las columnas de la Historia, el nombre de Asoka brilla casi solo, como una estrella. ~ H G Wells,
519:I don't suppose any man has ever understood any woman since the beginning of things. You don't understand our imaginations, how wild our imaginations can be. ~ H G Wells,
520:I feel to think, he thinks to feel. It is I and my kind that have the wider range, because we can be impersonal as well as personal. We can escape ourselves. ~ H G Wells,
521:It is really in the end a far more humane proceeding than our earthly method of leaving children to grow into human beings, and then making machines of them. ~ H G Wells,
522:It's as if the whole world was fire and crystal and aquiver--with some sort of cotton wrappers thrown over it."

"Dust sheets," said Marjorie. "I know. ~ H G Wells,
523:Memories are not dead things, but alive; they dwindle in disuse, but they harden and develop in all sorts of queer ways if they are being continually fretted. ~ H G Wells,
524:Money, like most other inventions, had happened to mankind, and men had still to develop  to-day they have still to perfect the science and morality of money. ~ H G Wells,
525:no puedo creer que estos días recientes de tímida experimentación de teorías incompletas y de discordias mutuas sean realmente la época culminante del hombre. ~ H G Wells,
526:No tiene aspiraciones ni sueños ni anhelos imperiosos, el hombre que no tiene lo uno ni lo otro, ¡Dios mío!, ¿qué es sino un manojo de temores y precauciones? ~ H G Wells,
527:Our mental existences, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave. ~ H G Wells,
528:You said it was an empty sleeve?' he said. 'Certainly,' I said. At staring and saying nothing a barefaced man, unspectacled, starts scratch. Then very quietly he ~ H G Wells,
529:A weakly wilful being struggling to get obdurate things round impossible corners—in that symbol Mr. Polly could recognise himself and all the trouble of humanity. ~ H G Wells,
530:Countless people...will hate the New World Order...and will die protesting against it...we have to bear in mind the distress of a generation or so of malcontents. ~ H G Wells,
531:Have a good look at the thing. Look at the table too, and satisfy yourselves there is no trickery. I don't want to waste this model, and then be told I'm a quack. ~ H G Wells,
532:That won’t do,” said the policeman; “that’s murder.” “I know what country I’m in,” said the man with the beard. “I’m going to let off at his legs. Draw the bolts. ~ H G Wells,
533:There is no reason whatever to believe that the order of nature has any greater bias in favour of man than it had in favour of the ichthyosaur or the pterodactyl. ~ H G Wells,
534:These Eloi were mere fatted cattle, which the ant-like Morlocks preserved and preyed upon—probably saw to the breeding of. And there was Weena dancing at my side! ~ H G Wells,
535:The tumultuous noise resolved itself now into the disorderly mingling of many voices, the gride of many wheels, the creaking of wagons, and the staccato of hoofs. ~ H G Wells,
536:Yet across the gulf of space…intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. ~ H G Wells,
537:And being but two-and-twenty and full of enthusiasm, I said, ‘I will devote my life to this. This is worth while.’
You know what fools we are at two-and-twenty? ~ H G Wells,
538:When she was fifteen if you'd told her that when she was twenty she'd be going to bed with bald-headed men and liking it, she would have thought you very abstract. ~ H G Wells,
539:Take it as a lie—or a prophecy. Say I dreamed it in the workshop. Consider I have been speculating upon the destinies of our race until I have hatched this fiction. ~ H G Wells,
540:Life, forever dying to be born afresh, forever young and eager, will presently stand upon this Earth as upon a footstool, and stretch out its realm amidst the stars. ~ H G Wells,
541:The adolescent years of any fairly intelligent youth lie open, and will always lie healthily open, to the contagion of philosophical doubts, of scorns and new ideas. ~ H G Wells,
542:The true sweetness of chess, if it ever can be sweet, is to see a victory snatched, by some happy impertinence, out of the shadow of apparently irrevocable disaster. ~ H G Wells,
543:If after all my Atheology turns out wrong and your Theology right I feel I shall always be able to pass into Heaven (if I want to) as a friend of G.K.C.'s. Bless you. ~ H G Wells,
544:my walking powers were evidently miraculous, I was presently left alone for the first time. With a strange sense of freedom and adventure I pushed on up to the crest. ~ H G Wells,
545:Christ is the most unique person of history. No man can write a history of the human race without giving first and foremost place to the penniless Teacher of Nazareth. ~ H G Wells,
546:He said very little, but his eyes were eloquent; the clutch of his arms was eloquent. He was the playground of unspeakable emotions. These, you know, were real Magics. ~ H G Wells,
547:And with that the Time Traveller began his story as I have set it forth. He sat back in his chair at first, and spoke like a weary man. Afterwards he got more animated. ~ H G Wells,
548:At the time there was a strong feeling in the streets that the authorities were to blame for their incapacity to dispose of the invaders without all this inconvenience. ~ H G Wells,
549:Every tyranny in the world lives - and such systems have always lived - in a perpetual struggle against plain knowledge and illuminating discussion. (The Star-Begotten) ~ H G Wells,
550:He buried his nose in his pillow and went to sleep—to dream of anything rather than getting on in the world, as a sensible young man in his position ought to have done. ~ H G Wells,
551:In the next place, wonderful as it seems in a sexual world, the Martians were absolutely without sex, and therefore without any of the tumultuous emotions that arise... ~ H G Wells,
552:I perceived that I was hungry, and prepared to clamber out of the hammock which, very politely anticipating my intention, twisted round and deposited me upon the floor. ~ H G Wells,
553:Let’s be sure we’d be acting perfectly right in bustin’ that there door open. A door onbust is always open to bustin’, but ye can’t onbust a door once you’ve busted en. ~ H G Wells,
554:Nuestro destino sería el de los otros; vivir en acecho y en espera, correr y escondernos; el imperio del hombre y el terror que inspira eran cosas pasadas para siempre. ~ H G Wells,
555:A Cabinet Minister, the responsible head of thar most vital of all departments, wandering alone - grieving - sometimes near audibly lamenting - for a door, for a garden! ~ H G Wells,
556:These Eloi were mere fatted cattle, which the ant-like Morlocks preserved and preyed upon--probably saw to the breeding of. And there was Weena dancing at my side! "Then ~ H G Wells,
557:Cuando el crepúsculo se transformaba en tinieblas y los vampiros emergían de los huecos de los árboles, a cuyos pies la tierra estaba roja de deposiciones de sangre pura. ~ H G Wells,
558:My fantastic stories do not pretend to deal with possible things. They aim indeed only at the same amount of conviction as one gets in a gripping good dream.”—H. G. Wells ~ H G Wells,
559:The art of ignoring is one of the accomplishments of every well-bred girl, so carefully instilled that at last she can even ignore her own thoughts and her own knowledge. ~ H G Wells,
560:There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have to meet a huge variety of needs and dangers. ~ H G Wells,
561:But he was one of those weak creatures, void of pride, timorous, anemic, hateful souls, full of shifty cunning, who face neither God nor man, who face not even themselves. ~ H G Wells,
562:I was under the impression—that his hair covered his ears.” “I saw them as he stooped by me to put that coffee you sent to me on the table. And his eyes shine in the dark. ~ H G Wells,
563:I went over the heads of the things a man reckons desirable. No doubt invisibility made it possible to get them, but it made it impossible to enjoy them when they are got. ~ H G Wells,
564:When Barnet returned his men were already calling out for water, and all day long the line of pits suffered greatly from thirst. For food they had chocolate and bread. ‘At ~ H G Wells,
565:The professional military mind is by necessity an inferior and unimaginative mind; no man of high intellectual quality would willingly imprison his gifts in such a calling. ~ H G Wells,
566:When she was fifteen if you'd told her
that when she was twenty she'd be going
to bed with bald-headed men and liking it,
she would have thought you very abstract. ~ H G Wells,
567:A day will come when beings, now latent in our thoughts and hidden in our loins, shall stand upon Earth as a footstool and laugh, and reach out their hands amidst the stars. ~ H G Wells,
568:Find the thing you want to do most intensely, make sure that’s it, and do it with all your might. If you live, well and good. If you die, well and good. Your purpose is done ~ H G Wells,
569:It spread up the sides of the pit by the third or fourth day of our imprisonment, and its cactus-like branches formed a carmine fringe to the edges of our triangular window. ~ H G Wells,
570:To ride a bicycle properly is very like a love affair-chiefly it is a matter of faith. Believe you do it, and the thing is done; doubt, and, for the life of you, you cannot. ~ H G Wells,
571:To ride a bicycle properly is very like a love affair—chiefly it is a matter of faith. Believe you do it, and the thing is done; doubt, and, for the life of you, you cannot. ~ H G Wells,
572:He has made the cat his own. He invented a cat style, a cat society, a whole cat world. English cats that do not look and live like Louis Wain cats are ashamed of themselves. ~ H G Wells,
573:The doctrine of the Kingdom of Heaven, which was the main teaching of Jesus, is certainly one of the most revolutionary doctrines that ever stirred and changed human thought. ~ H G Wells,
574:And the great difference between man and monkey is in the larynx, he said, in the incapacity to frame delicately different sounding symbols by which thought could be sustained ~ H G Wells,
575:We are to turn our backs for a space upon the insistent examination of the thing that is, and face towards the freer air, the ampler spaces of the thing that perhaps might be. ~ H G Wells,
576:Restraint, soberness, the matured thought, the unselfish act, they are necessities of the barbarous state, the life of dangers. Dourness is man's tribute to unconquered nature. ~ H G Wells,
577:[T]hat mutual jealousy, that intolerantly keen edge of criticism, that irrational hunger for a beautiful perfection, that life and wisdom do presently and most mercifully dull. ~ H G Wells,
578:For the man who stood there shouting some incoherent explanation, was a solid gesticulating figure up to the coat-collar of him, and then — nothingness, no visible thing at all! ~ H G Wells,
579:But I was too restless to watch long; I'm too Occidental for a long vigil. I could work at a problem for years, but to wait inactive for twenty-four hours - that's another matter. ~ H G Wells,
580:Figures are the most shocking things in the world. The prettiest little squiggles of black looked at in the right light and yet consider the blow they can give you upon the heart. ~ H G Wells,
581:After telephone, kinematograph and phonograph had replaced newspaper, book schoolmaster and letter, to live outside the range of the electric cables was to live an isolated savage. ~ H G Wells,
582:But I was too restless to watch long; I'm too Occidental for a long vigil. I could work at a problem for years, but to wait inactive for twenty-four hours -- that's another matter. ~ H G Wells,
583:In the night, he must have eaten and slept; for in the morning he was himself again, active, powerful, angry, and malignant, prepared for his last great struggle against the world. ~ H G Wells,
584:I often think we do not take this business of photography in a sufficiently serious spirit. Issuing a photograph is like marriage: you can only undo the mischief with infinite woe. ~ H G Wells,
585:Sometimes I doubt if the game is worth the candle. (...) But I know if I abandoned my ambition—hardly as she uses me—I should have nothing but remorse left for the rest of my days. ~ H G Wells,
586:To-day is the day of wealth. Wealth now is power as it never was power before—it commands earth and sea and sky. All power is for those who can handle wealth. On your behalf. . . . ~ H G Wells,
587:You have, let us say, a promising politician, a rising artist that you wish to destroy. Dagger or bomb are archaic, clumsy and unreliable - but teach him, inoculate him with chess. ~ H G Wells,
588:A few minutes before, there had only been three real things before me--the immensity of the night and space and nature, my own feebleness and anguish, and the near approach of death. ~ H G Wells,
589:An invisible foot trod on his back, a ghostly patter passed downstairs, he heard the two police officers in the hall shout and run, and the front door of the house slammed violently. ~ H G Wells,
590:For fifteen years Mr. Polly was a respectable shopkeeper in Fishbourne. Years they were in which every day was tedious, and when they were gone it was as if they had gone in a flash. ~ H G Wells,
591:For my own part, I was much occupied in learning to ride the bicycle, and busy upon a series of papers discussing the probable developments of moral ideas as civilization progressed. ~ H G Wells,
592:I perceived that I was hungry, and prepared to clamber out of the hammock, which, very politely anticipating my intention, twisted round and deposited me upon all-fours on the floor. ~ H G Wells,
593:The German people are an orderly, vain, deeply sentimental and rather insensitive people. They seem to feel at their best when they are singing in chorus, saluting or obeying orders. ~ H G Wells,
594:I did not feel then that I was lonely, that I had come out from the world into a desolate place. I appreciated my loss of sympathy, but I put it down to the general inanity of things. ~ H G Wells,
595:I do not know if hell is hot or cold, or what sort of place hell may be, but this I surely know, that if there is any hell at all it will be badly lit. And it will taste like a train. ~ H G Wells,
596:Mendham was a cadaverous man with a magnificent beard. He looked,indeed, as if he had run to beard as a mustard plant runs to seed. But when he spoke you found he had a voice as well. ~ H G Wells,
597:Given as much law as that man will be able to do anything and go anywhere, an the only trace of pessimism left in the human prospect today is a faint flavour that one was born so soon. ~ H G Wells,
598:There is nothing in machinery, there is nothing in embankments and railways and iron bridges and engineering devices to oblige them to be ugly. Ugliness is the measure of imperfection. ~ H G Wells,
599:I saw white figures. Twice I fancied I saw a solitary white, ape-like creature running rather quickly up the hill, and once near the ruins I saw a leash of them carrying some dark body. ~ H G Wells,
600:I had never realised it before, but the nose is to the mind of a dog what the eye is to the mind of a seeing man. Dogs perceive the scent of a man moving as men perceive his vision. This ~ H G Wells,
601:In England we have come to rely upon a comfortable time-lag of fifty years or a century intervening between the perception that something ought to be done and a serious attempt to do it. ~ H G Wells,
602:...the Idumeans (Edomites) were...made Jews...and a Turkish people (Khazars) were mainly Jews in South Russia...The main part of Jewry never was in Judea and had never come out of Judea. ~ H G Wells,
603:The peaceful splendour of the night healed again. The moon was now past the meridian and travelling down the west. It was at its full, and very bright, riding through the empty blue sky. ~ H G Wells,
604:Civilization is in a race between education and catastrophe. Let us learn the truth and spread it as far and wide as our circumstances allow. For the truth is the greatest weapon we have. ~ H G Wells,
605:Dragging out life to the last possible second is not living to the best effect. The nearer the bone, the sweeter the meat. The best of life, Passworthy, lies nearest to the edge of death. ~ H G Wells,
606:I don't know things. I'm not good enough. I'm not refined. The more you see of me, the more you'll find me out.'
'But I'm going to help you.'
'You'll 'ave to 'elp me a fearful lot. ~ H G Wells,
607:(...) I ducked once underwater and holding my breath until movement was an agony, blundered painfully ahead, under the surface, for as long as I could. The water was in a tumult about me. ~ H G Wells,
608:The world needs something stronger than any possible rebellion against its peace. In other words it needs a federal world government embodying a new conception of human life as one whole. ~ H G Wells,
609:But who shall dwell in these worlds if they be inhabited? . . . Are we or they Lords of the World? . . . And how are all things made for man?-- KEPLER (quoted in The Anatomy of Melancholy) ~ H G Wells,
610:But who shall dwell in these worlds if they be inhabited? . . . Are we or they Lords of the World? . . . And how are all things made for man? – KEPLER (quoted in The Anatomy of Melancholy) ~ H G Wells,
611:We've got to escape from narrowness. We're a movement, not a conspiracy. We've got to radiate contacts, and have as many people aware of us as possible. That's living, modern common sense. ~ H G Wells,
612:Let us get together with other people of our sort and make over the world into a great world-civilization that will enable us to realize the promises and avoid the dangers of this new time. ~ H G Wells,
613:We locked ourselves in, and then took Moreau’s mangled body into the yard and laid it upon a pile of brushwood. Then we went into the laboratory and put an end to all we found living there. ~ H G Wells,
614:asked Kemp. “Three or four hours—the cat. The bones and sinews and the fat were the last to go, and the tips of the coloured hairs. And, as I say, the back part of the eye, tough, iridescent ~ H G Wells,
615:If ever that door offers itself to me again, I swore, I will go in out of this dust and heat, out of this dry glitter of vanity, out of these toilsome futilities. I will go and never return. ~ H G Wells,
616:Humanity had been strong, energetic, and intelligent, and had used all its abundant vitality to alter the conditions under which it lived. And now came the reaction of the altered conditions. ~ H G Wells,
617:Then suddenly the humour of the situation came into my mind: the thought of the years I had spent in study and toil to get into the future age, and now my passion of anxiety to get out of it. ~ H G Wells,
618:war is going to end not in the complete smashing up and subjugation of either side, but in a general exhaustion that will make the recrudescence of the war still possible but very terrifying. ~ H G Wells,
619:And even it seemed that I too was not a reasonable creature, but only an animal tormented with some strange disorder in its brain which sent it to wander alone, like a sheep stricken with gid. ~ H G Wells,
620:IBM is helping to greatly advance and expedite quality sampling while providing our project investigators peace of mind that the information they are gathering is securely stored and protected. ~ H G Wells,
621:I have been dying for nearly two-thirds of a year,' I said, 'and I have died enough.'

I stopped dying then and there, and in spite of moments of some provocation I have never died since. ~ H G Wells,
622:Man had been content to live in ease and delight upon the labours of his fellow-man, had taken Necessity as his watchword and excuse, and in the fullness of time Necessity had come home to him. ~ H G Wells,
623:Kemp: I demonstrated conclusively this morning that invisibility--
I.M: Never mind what YOU'VE DEMONSTRATED!--I'm starving, said the voice, and the night is--chilly for a man without clothes. ~ H G Wells,
624:The brain upon which my experiences have been written is not a particularly good one. If their were brain-shows, as there are cat and dog shows, I doubt if it would get even a third class prize. ~ H G Wells,
625:We want to get rid of the militarist not simply because he hurts and kills, but because he is an intolerable thick-voiced blockhead who stands hectoring and blustering in our way of achievement. ~ H G Wells,
626:This self-reliance, this direct dealing with the world, seemed to him, even in the height of his concern, unwomanly, a deeper injury to his own abandoned assumptions than any he had contemplated. ~ H G Wells,
627:You're a solemn prig, Prendick, a silly ass! You're always fearing and fancying. We're on the edge of things. I'm bound to cut my throat tomorrow. I'm going to have a damned Bank Holiday tonight. ~ H G Wells,
628:It is all one spectacle of forces running to waste, of people who use and do not replace, the story of a country hectic with a wasting aimless fever of trade and money-making and pleasure-seeking. ~ H G Wells,
629:There is no more evil thing in this world than race prejudice, none at all. [...] It justifies and holds together more baseness, cruelty, and abomination than any other sort of error in the world. ~ H G Wells,
630:To do such a thing would be to transcend magic. And I beheld, unclouded by doubt, a magnificent vision of all that invisibility might mean to a man — the mystery, the power, the freedom. Drawbacks ~ H G Wells,
631:You must follow me carefully. I shall have to controvert one or two ideas that are almost universally accepted. The geometry, for instance, they taught you at school is founded on a misconception. ~ H G Wells,
632:All we can do is to prepare for a universal language that will go on changing for ever. We don’t know everything. We aren’t final. I wish we could make that statement a part of the Fundamental Law. ~ H G Wells,
633:And even it seemed that I, too, was not a reasonable creature, but only an animal tormented with some strange disorder in its brain, that sent it to wander alone, like a sheep stricken with the gid. ~ H G Wells,
634:He showed it to me with all the confiding zest of a man who has been living too much alone. This seclusion was overflowing now in an excess of confidence, and I had the good luck to be the recipient. ~ H G Wells,
635:It is good to stop by the track for a space, put aside the knapsack, wipe the brows, and talk a little of the upper slopes of the mountain we think we are climbing, would but the trees let us see it. ~ H G Wells,
636:The rich had been assured of his wealth and comfort, the toiler assured of his life and work. No doubt in that perfect world there had been no unemployed problem, no social question left unsolved. And ~ H G Wells,
637:We have learned now that we cannot regard this planet as being fenced in and a secure abiding place for Man we can never anticipate the unseen good or evil that may come upon us suddenly out of space. ~ H G Wells,
638:You hit something. That alone would disconcert you. You find you have hit an Angel, and he writhes about for a minute and then sits up and addresses you. He makes no apology for his own impossibility. ~ H G Wells,
639:It was a red-flannel chest-protector, one of those large quasi-hygienic objects that with pills and medicines take the place of beneficial relics and images among the Protestant peoples of Christendom. ~ H G Wells,
640:It is only now and then, in a jungle, or amidst the towering white menace of a burnt or burning Australian forest, that Nature strips the moral veils from vegetation and we apprehend its stark ferocity. ~ H G Wells,
641:So, in the end, above ground you must have the Haves, pursuing pleasure and comfort and beauty, and below ground the Have-nots, the Workers getting continually adapted to the conditions of their labour. ~ H G Wells,
642:That these man-like creatures were in truth only bestial monsters, mere grotesque travesties of men, filled me with a vague uncertainty of their possibilities which was far worse than any definite fear. ~ H G Wells,
643:Nothing endures, nothing is precise and certain (except the mind of a pedant), perfection is the mere repudiation of that ineluctable marginal inexactitude which is the mysterious inmost quality of Being ~ H G Wells,
644:The army ages men sooner than the law and philosophy; it exposes them more freely to germs, which undermine and destroy, and it shelters them more completely from thought, which stimulates and preserves. ~ H G Wells,
645:The only true measure of success is the ratio between what we might have done and what we might have been on the one hand, and the thing we have made and the things we have made of ourselves on the other. ~ H G Wells,
646:We do our job and go. See? That is what Death is for. We work out all our little brains and all our little emotions, and then this lot begins afresh. Fresh and fresh! Perfectly simple. What's the trouble? ~ H G Wells,
647:He, I know — thought but cheerlessly of the Advancement of Mankind, and saw in the growing pile of civilization only a foolish heaping that must inevitably fall back upon and destroy its makers in the end. ~ H G Wells,
648:Fools make researches and wise men exploit them - that is our earthly way of dealing with the question, and we thank Heaven for an assumed abundance of financially impotent and sufficiently ingenious fools. ~ H G Wells,
649:It's just men and ants. There's the ants builds their cities,live their lives, have wars, revolutions, until men want them out of the way, and then they go out of the way. That's what we are now just ants. ~ H G Wells,
650:Every soul aboard stood at the bulwarks or on the seats of the steamer and stared at that distant shape, higher than the trees or church towers inland, and advancing with a leisurely parody of a human stride. ~ H G Wells,
651:So some respectable dodo in the Mauritius might have lorded it in his nest, and discussed the arrival of that shipful of pitiless sailors in want of animal food. “We will peck them to death tomorrow, my dear. ~ H G Wells,
652:Modern war, modern international hostility is, I believe, possible only through the stupid illiteracy of the mass of men and the conceit and intellectual indolence of rulers and those who feed the public mind. ~ H G Wells,
653:There is no upper limit to what individuals are capable of doing with their minds. There is no age limit that bars them from beginning. There is no obstacle that cannot be overcome if they persist and believe. ~ H G Wells,
654:We are always getting away from the present moment. Our mental existence, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave. ~ H G Wells,
655:Our chairs, being his patents, embraced and caressed us rather than submitted to be sat upon, and there was that luxurious after-dinner atmosphere when thought runs gracefully free of the trammels of precision. ~ H G Wells,
656:I was invisible, and I was only just beginning to realise the extraordinary advantage my invisibility gave me. My head was already teeming with plans of all the wild and wonderful things I had now impunity to do. ~ H G Wells,
657:Man ... can go up against gravitation in a balloon, and why should he not hope that ultimately he may be able to stop or accelerate his drift along the Time-Dimension, or even turn about and travel the other way. ~ H G Wells,
658:There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time. There is, however, a tendency to draw an unreal distinction between the former three dimensions and the latter, ~ H G Wells,
659:The serious people who took him seriously never felt quite sure of his deportment; they were somehow aware that trusting their reputations for judgment with him was like furnishing a nursery with egg-shell china. ~ H G Wells,
660:We are but phantoms ... and the phantoms of phantoms, desires like cloud-shadows and wills of straw that eddy in the wind; the days pass, use and wont carry us through as a train carries the shadow of its lights. ~ H G Wells,
661:With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. ~ H G Wells,
662:Within he felt that faint stirring of derision for the whole business of life which is the salt of the American mentality. Outwardly they are sentimental and enthusiastic and inwardly they are profoundly cynical. ~ H G Wells,
663:You know how on a flat surface, which has only two dimensions, we can represent a figure of a three-dimensional solid, and similarly they think that by models of three dimensions they could represent one of four— ~ H G Wells,
664:He extended his hand: It seemed to meet something in mid-air, and he drew it back with a sharp exclamation. "I wish you'd keep your fingers out of my eye," said the aerial voice, in a tone of savage expostulation. ~ H G Wells,
665:Very much indeed of what we call moral education is such an artificial modification and perversion of instinct; pugnacity is trained into courageous self-sacrifice, and suppressed sexuality into religious emotion. ~ H G Wells,
666:For three centuries the life of the Hebrews was like the life of a man who insists upon living in the middle of a busy thoroughfare, and is consequently being run over constantly by omnibuses and motor-lorries. Pul ~ H G Wells,
667:Pero ¿quién mora en estos mundos si están habitados?… ¿Somos nosotros o ellos los Señores del Universo?… Y ¿por qué todas las cosas han de estar hechas para el hombre? KEPLER, citado en La anatomía de la melancolía ~ H G Wells,
668:[A]fter all it was true that a girl does not go alone in the world unchallenged, nor ever has gone freely alone in the world, that evil walks abroad and dangers, and petty insults more irritating than dangers, lurk. ~ H G Wells,
669:There are men on that Commission who would steal the brakes off a mountain railway just before they went down in it...It's a struggle with suicidal imbeciles.

The Secret Places of The Heart (Kindle Location 59) ~ H G Wells,
670:The Social Contract is nothing more or less than a vast conspiracy of human beings to lie to and humbug themselves for the general Good. Lies are the mortar that bind the savage individual man into the social masonry. ~ H G Wells,
671:The worst of all things that haunt poor mortal men," said I; "and that is, in all its nakedness - 'Fear!' Fear that will not have light or sound, that will not bear with reason, that deafens and darkens and overwhelms. ~ H G Wells,
672:they had a tradition of greater solidarity. Greek was hostile to Greek; Jew stood by Jew. Wherever a Jew went, he found men of like mind and like tradition with himself. He could get shelter, food, loans, and legal help. ~ H G Wells,
673:Be a man!... What good is religion if it collapses under calamity? Think of what earthquakes and floods, wars and volcanoes, have done before to men! Did you think that God had exempted [us]? He is not an insurance agent. ~ H G Wells,
674:To the prophetic mind all history is and will continue to be a prelude. The prophetic type will steadfastly refuse to see the world as a museum; it will insist that here is a stage set for a drama that perpetually begins. ~ H G Wells,
675:By ten o’clock the police organisation, and by midday even the railway organisations, were losing coherency, losing shape and efficiency, guttering, softening, running at last in that swift liquefaction of the social body. ~ H G Wells,
676:Everywhere in the world there are ignorance and prejudice, but the greatest complex of these, with the most extensive prestige and the most intimate entanglement with traditional institutions, is the Roman Catholic Church. ~ H G Wells,
677:Now the most comprehensive conception of this new world is of one politically, socially and economically united To this end a small but increasing body of people in the world set their faces and seek to direct their lives. ~ H G Wells,
678:She had never been out of England before, she would rather die than trust herself friendless in a foreign country, and so forth. She seemed, poor woman, to imagine that the French and the Martians might prove very similar. ~ H G Wells,
679:By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain. ~ H G Wells,
680:I am an historian, I am not a believer, but I must confess as a historian that this penniless preacher from Nazareth is irrevocably the very center of history. Jesus Christ is easily the most dominant figure in all history. ~ H G Wells,
681:There is still something in everything I do that defeats me, makes me dissatisfied, challenges me to further effort. Sometimes I rise above my level, sometimes I fall below it, but always I fall short of the things I dream. ~ H G Wells,
682:We must be prepared to see an Association of Nations in conference growing into an organic system of world controls for world affairs and the keeping of the world’s peace, or we must be prepared for – a continuation of war. ~ H G Wells,
683:This mark men and women set on pleasure and pain, Prendick, is the mark of the beast upon them, the mark of the beast from which they came. Pain! Pain and pleasure - they are for us, only so long as we wriggle in the dust... ~ H G Wells,
684:people were rubbing their eyes and opening windows to stare out and ask questions, and getting dressed quickly as the first breath of the coming storm of fear blew through the streets. It was the beginning of the great panic. ~ H G Wells,
685:Another of those fools,” said Dr. Kemp. “Like that ass who ran into me this morning round a corner, with the ‘’Visible Man a-coming, sir!’ I can’t imagine what possess people. One might think we were in the thirteenth century. ~ H G Wells,
686:The fact is, the Time Traveller was one of those men who are too clever to be believed: you never felt that you saw all round him; you always suspected some subtle reserve, some ingenuity in ambush, behind his lucid frankness. ~ H G Wells,
687:After your first day of cycling, one dream is inevitable. A memory of motion lingers in the muscles of your legs, and round and round they seem to go. You ride through Dreamland on wonderful dream bicycles that change and grow. ~ H G Wells,
688:By this time I was no longer very much terrified or very miserable. I had, as it were, passed the limit of terror and despair. I felt now that my life was practically lost, and that persuasion made me capable of daring anything ~ H G Wells,
689:of the risks a man has got to take! Now the risk was inevitable, I no longer saw it in the same cheerful light. The fact is that, insensibly, the absolute strangeness of everything, the sickly jarring and swaying of the machine, ~ H G Wells,
690:Our species may yet end its strange eventful history as just the last, the cleverest of the great apes. The great ape that was clever—but not clever enough. It could escape from most things but not from its own mental confusion. ~ H G Wells,
691:There comes a moment in the day when you have written your pages in the morning, attended to your correspondence in the afternoon, and have nothing further to do. Then comes that hour when you are bored; that's the time for sex. ~ H G Wells,
692:What did it matter, since it was unreality, all of it, the pain and desire, the beginning and the end? There was no reality except this solitary road, this quite solitary road, along which on went rather puzzled, rather tired... ~ H G Wells,
693:When the mind grapples with a great and intricate problem, it makes its advances step by step, with but little realization of the gains it has made, until suddenly, with an effect of abrupt illumination, it realizes its victory. ~ H G Wells,
694:Particularly nauseous were the blank expressionless faces of people in trains and omnibuses; they seemed no more my fellow-creatures than dead bodies would be, so that I did not dare to travel unless I was assured of being alone. ~ H G Wells,
695:And I have by me, for my comfort, two strange white flowers—shrivelled now, and brown and flat and brittle—to witness that even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of man. ~ H G Wells,
696:We can't have any weak or silly. Life is real again, and the useless and cumbersome and mischievous have to die. They ought to die. They ought to be willing to die. It's a sort of disloyalty, after all, to live and taint the race. ~ H G Wells,
697:While there is a chance of the world getting through its troubles, I hold that a reasonable man has to behave as though he were sure of it. If at the end your cheerfulness in not justified, at any rate you will have been cheerful. ~ H G Wells,
698:Let’s have the facts first,” insisted Mr. Sandy Wadgers. “Let’s be sure we’d be acting perfectly right in bustin’ that there door open. A door onbust is always open to bustin’, but ye can’t onbust a door once you’ve busted en.” And ~ H G Wells,
699:nos habíamos encontrado con unas cosas que parecían insensatas caricaturas de hombres, unos animalejos con yelmos, y habíamos andado temerosos ante ellos, y nos habíamos sometido a ellos hasta que por fin no pudimos someternos más. ~ H G Wells,
700:There it must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope. I hope, or I could not live. ~ H G Wells,
701:If Max [Aitken] gets to Heaven he won't last long. He will be chucked out for trying to pull off a merger between Heaven and Hell ... after having secured a controlling interest in key subsidiary companies in both places, of course. ~ H G Wells,
702:Where there is no derision the people perish," said Chiffan.

"Now who said that?" asked Steenhold, always anxious to check his quotations. "It sounds familiar."

"I said it," said Chiffan. "Get on with your suggestions. ~ H G Wells,
703:And I have by me, for my comfort, two strange white flowers - shriveled now, and brown and flat and brittle - to witness that even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of men. ~ H G Wells,
704:I see knowledge increasing and human power increasing, I see everincreasing possibilities before life, and I see no limits set to it all. Existence impresses me as a perpetual dawn. Our lives, as I apprehend them, swim in expectation. ~ H G Wells,
705:To sit among all those unknown things before a puzzle like that is hopeless. That way lies monomania. Face this world. Learn its ways, watch it, be careful of too hasty guesses at its meaning. In the end you will find clues to it all. ~ H G Wells,
706:The Jews looked for a special savior, a messiah, who was to redeem mankind by the agreeable process of restoring the fabulous glories of David and Solomon, and bringing the whole world at last under the firm but benevolent Jewish heel. ~ H G Wells,
707:By this time I was no
longer very much terrified or very miserable. I had, as it were, passed the
limit of terror and despair. I felt now that my life was practically lost,
and that persuasion made me capable of daring anything ~ H G Wells,
708:He seemed under a chronic irritation of the greatest intensity. His habit of talking to himself in a low voice grew steadily upon him, but though Mrs. Hall listened conscientiously she could make neither head nor tail of what she heard. ~ H G Wells,
709:At times I suffer from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world about me; I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. ~ H G Wells,
710:Looking at these stars suddenly dwarfed my own troubles and all the gravities of terrestrial life. I thought of their unfathomable distance, and the slow inevitable drift of their movements out of the unknown past into the unknown future. ~ H G Wells,
711:At times I suffer from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world around me; I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. ~ H G Wells,
712:Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. ~ H G Wells,
713:Better it is toward the right conduct of life to consider what will be the end of a thing, than what is the beginning of it: for what promises fair at first may prove ill, and what seems at first a disadvantage, may prove very advantageous. ~ H G Wells,
714:I fell indeed into a morbid state, deep and enduring, and alien to fear, which has left permanent scars upon my mind. I must confess that I lost faith in the sanity of the world when I saw it suffering the painful disorder of this island. A ~ H G Wells,
715:There it must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and
not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is
more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope. I hope, or I
could not live. ~ H G Wells,
716:Anthropology has been compared to a great region, marked out indeed as within the sphere of influence of science, but unsettled and for the most part unsubdued. Like all such hinterland sciences, it is a happy hunting-ground for adventurers. ~ H G Wells,
717:We are living in 1937, and our universities, I suggest, are not half-way out of the fifteenth century. We have made hardly any changes in our conception of university organization, education, graduation, for a century - for several centuries. ~ H G Wells,
718:But by that time Lady Harman had acquired the habit of reading and the habit of thinking over what she read, and from that it is an easy step to thinking over oneself and the circumstances of one's own life. The one thing trains for the other. ~ H G Wells,
719:It doesn't follow that a nasty habit of mind is any less nasty because it's ancestral. It doesn't follow you can't cure it. Why scratch fleas for ever? Gambling, speculation, is a social disease. It's as natural and desirable as -- syphilis... ~ H G Wells,
720:Under the new conditions of perfect comfort and security, that restless energy, that with us is strength, would become weakness. Even in our own time certain tendencies and desires, once necessary to survival, are a constant source of failure. ~ H G Wells,
721:The advent of the bicycle stirred sudden and profound changes in the social life of England. It was unprecedented that a person of modest means could travel substantial distances, quickly, cheaply and without being limited to railway schedules. ~ H G Wells,
722:What good would the moon be to men? Even of their own planet what have they made but a battleground and theatre of infinite folly? Small as his world is, and short as his time, he has still in his little life down there far more than he can do. ~ H G Wells,
723:I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things which had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedly became natural an ordinary to me. I suppose everything in existence takes its colour from the average hue of our surroundings. ~ H G Wells,
724:Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have to meet a huge variety of needs and dangers. ~ H G Wells,
725:And this spreading usurpation of the world was so dexterously performed—a proteus—hundreds of banks, companies, syndicates, masked the Council's operations—that it was already far advanced before common men suspected the tyranny that had come. The ~ H G Wells,
726:Can a cube that does not last for any time at all, have a real existence?” Filby became pensive. “Clearly,” the Time Traveller proceeded, “any real body must have extension in four directions: it must have Length, Breadth, Thickness, and—Duration. ~ H G Wells,
727:This World Youth movement claims to represent and affect the politico-social activities of a grand total of forty million adherents - under the age of thirty...It may play an important and increasing role in the consolidation of a new world order. ~ H G Wells,
728:Down the mountain we shall go and down the passes, and as the valleys open the world will open, Utopia, where men and women are happy and laws are wise, and where all that is tangled and confused in human affairs has been unravelled and made right. ~ H G Wells,
729:said the man on the bridge. “Lemmeget up, you swine. I’ll show yer.” A strange disgust, a quivering repulsion came upon the Angel. He walked slowly away from the drunkard towards the man with the grindstone. “What does it all mean?” said the Angel. ~ H G Wells,
730:Since the passing of Victoria the Great there had been an accumulating uneasiness in the national life. It was as if some compact and dignified paper-weight had been lifted from people's ideas, and as if at once they had begun to blow about anyhow. ~ H G Wells,
731:...valahányszor olyan helyzet, hogy egy csomó ember érzi, hogy valamit tenni kellene: a gyöngék és azok, akik belegyöngülnek a bonyolultabb gondolkozásba, mindannyiszor a semmittevés fölöttébb jámbor és magasztos vallásában keresnek vigasztalást... ~ H G Wells,
732:[A novel by Henry James] is like a church lit but without a congregation to distract you, with every light and line focused on the high altar. And on the altar, very reverently place, intensely there, is a dead kitten, an egg-shell, a bit of string. ~ H G Wells,
733:A series of prohibitions called the Law - I had already heard them recited - battled in their minds with the deep-seated, ever-rebellious cravings of their animal natures. This Law they were perpetually repeating, I found, and - perpetually breaking. ~ H G Wells,
734:Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have to meet a huge variety of needs and dangers. 'So, ~ H G Wells,
735:Who breaks the Law -’ said Moreau, taking his eyes off his victim and turning towards us. It seemed to me there was a touch of exultation in his voice. ‘- goes back to the House of Pain,’ they all clamoured; ‘goes back to the House of Pain, O Master! ~ H G Wells,
736:borrowed the carrying strength of water and the driving force of the wind, he quickened his fire by blowing, and his simple tools, pointed first with copper and then with iron, increased and varied and became more elaborate and efficient. He sheltered ~ H G Wells,
737:Could it be possible, I thought, that such a thing as the vivisection of men was carried on here? The question shot like lightning across a tumultuous sky; and suddenly the clouded horror of my mind condensed into a vivid realisation of my own danger. ~ H G Wells,
738:Nothing could have been more obvious to the people of the early twentieth century than the rapidity with which war was becoming impossible. And as certainly they did not see it. They did not see it until the atomic bombs burst in their fumbling hands. ~ H G Wells,
739:The stranger came early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand. ~ H G Wells,
740:As mankind 'matures,' as it becomes more possible to be frank in the scrutiny of the self and others and in the publication of one's findings, biography and autobiography will take the place of fiction for the investigation and discussion of character. ~ H G Wells,
741:Few people who know of the work of Langley, Lilienthal, Pilcher, Maxim and Chanute but will be inclined to believe that long before the year 2000 A.D., and very probably before 1950, a successful aeroplane will have soared and come home safe and sound. ~ H G Wells,
742:There is, however, a tendency to draw an unreal distinction between the former three dimensions and the latter, because it happens that our consciousness moves intermittently in one direction along the latter from the beginning to the end of our lives. ~ H G Wells,
743:You cannot imagine the craving for rest that I feel—a hunger and thirst. For six long days, since my work was done, my mind has been a whirlpool, swift, unprogressive and incessant, a torrent of thoughts leading nowhere, spinning round swift and steady ~ H G Wells,
744:You cannot imagine the craving for rest that I feel-a hunger and thirst. For six long days, since my work was done, my mind has been a whirlpool, swift, unprogressive and incessant, a torrent of thoughts leading nowhere, spinning round swift and steady. ~ H G Wells,
745:Every one of these hundreds of millions of human beings is in some form seeking happiness.... Not one is altogether noble nor altogether trustworthy nor altogether consistent; and not one is altogether vile.... Not a single one but has at some time wept. ~ H G Wells,
746:When the mind grapples with a great and intricate problem, it makes its advances, it secures its positions step by step, with but little realization of the gains it has made, until suddenly, with an effect of abrupt illumination, it realizes its victory. ~ H G Wells,
747:A strange persuasion came upon me that, save for the grossness of the line, save for the grotesqueness of the forms, I had here before me the whole balance of human life in miniature, the whole interplay of instinct, reason, and fate in its simplest form. ~ H G Wells,
748:He spares no resource in telling of his dead inventions... Bare verbs he rarely tolerates. He splits infinitives and fills them up with adverbial stuffing. He presses the passing colloquialism into his service. His vast paragraphis sweat and struggle; the ~ H G Wells,
749:This is a mood, however, that comes to me now, I thank God, more rarely. I have withdrawn myself from the confusion of cities and multitudes, and spend my days surrounded by wise books,—bright windows in this life of ours, lit by the shining souls of men. ~ H G Wells,
750:When the mind grapples with a great and intricate problem, it makes its advances step by step, with but little realization of the gains it has made, until suddenly, with an effect of abrupt illumination, it realizes its victory. So it happened to Gautama. ~ H G Wells,
751:But when a man has once broken through the paper walls of everyday circumstance, those unsubstantial walls that hold so many of us securely prisoned from the cradle to the grave, he has made a discovery. If the world does not please you, you can change it. ~ H G Wells,
752:Educate the Russian or the American or the Englishman or the Irishman or Frenchman or any real northern European except German, and you get the Anarchist, that is to say the man who dreams of order without organisation - of something beyond organisation... ~ H G Wells,
753:Then I look about me at my fellow-men; and I go in fear. I see faces, keen and bright; others dull or dangerous; others, unsteady, insincere, — none that have the calm authority of a reasonable soul. I feel as though the animal was surging up through them; ~ H G Wells,
754:The catastrophe of the atomic bombs which shook men out of cities and businesses and economic relations, shook them also out of their old-established habits of thought, and out of the lightly held beliefs and prejudices that came down to them from the past. ~ H G Wells,
755:The whole world will be intelligent, educated, and co-operating; things will move faster and faster towards the subjugation of Nature. In the end, wisely and carefully we shall readjust the balance of animal and vegetable life to suit our human needs. 'This ~ H G Wells,
756:It is possible to believe that all the past is but the beginning of a beginning, and that all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. It is possible to believe that all the human mind has ever accomplished is but the dream before the awakening. ~ H G Wells,
757:Strength is the outcome of need; security sets a premium on feebleness. The work of ameliorating the conditions of life -- the true civilizing process that makes life more and more secure -- had gone steadily on to a climax... And the harvest was what I saw. ~ H G Wells,
758:Most of the social and political ills from which you suffer are under your control, given only the will and courage to change them. You can live in another and a wiser fashion if you choose to think it out and work it out. You are not awake to your own power. ~ H G Wells,
759:I was persuaded from his manner that this ignorance was a pretence. Still, I could hardly tell the man that I thought him a liar. “Pointed,” I said; “rather small and furry,—distinctly furry. But the whole man is one of the strangest beings I ever set eyes on. ~ H G Wells,
760:Para mi consuelo, tengo junto a mí dos extrañas flores blancas --ya encogidas, oscuras, apagadas y quebradizas--, que atestiguan que incluso cuando la inteligencia y la fuerza habían desaparecido, en el corazón del hombre aún residían la gratitud y la ternura. ~ H G Wells,
761:On the village green an inclined strong, down which, clinging the while to a pulley-swung handle, one could be hurled violently against a sack at the other end, came in for considerable favour among the adolescent, as also did the swings and the cocoanut shies. ~ H G Wells,
762:War is a curtain of dense black fabric across all the hopes and kindliness of mankind. Yet always it has let through some gleams of light, and not--I am not dreaming--it grows threadbare, and here and there and at a thousand points the light is breaking through. ~ H G Wells,
763:You know how on a flat surface, which has only two dimensions, we can represent a figure of a three-dimensional solid, and similarly they think that by models of three dimensions they could represent one of four—if they could master the perspective of the thing. ~ H G Wells,
764:About two-thirds of the face of Marx is beard, a vast solemn wooly uneventful beard that must have made all normal exercise impossible. It is not the sort of beard that happens to a man, it is a beard cultivated, cherished, and thrust patriarchally upon the world. ~ H G Wells,
765:In the middle of the night she woke up dreaming of huge white heads like turnips, that came trailing after her, at the end of interminable necks, and with vast black eyes. But being a sensible woman, she subdued her terrors and turned over and went to sleep again. ~ H G Wells,
766:The stranger came early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking as it seemed from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand. ~ H G Wells,
767:Y tengo, para consuelo mío, dos extrañas flores blancas —encogidas ahora, ennegrecidas, aplastadas y frágiles— para atestiguar que aun cuando la inteligencia y la fuerza habían desaparecido, la gratitud y una mutua ternura aún se alojaban en el corazón del hombre. ~ H G Wells,
768:Presently he added to himself the power of the horse and the ox, he borrowed the carrying strength of water and the driving force of the wind, he quickened his fire by blowing, and his simple tools, pointed first with copper and then with iron, increased and varied ~ H G Wells,
769:the freedom money gives the poor man is nothing to the freedom money has given the rich man. With money rich men ceased to be tied to lands, houses, stores, flocks and herds. They could change the nature and locality of their possessions with an unheard-of freedom. ~ H G Wells,
770:It isn't a natural thing to keep on worrying about the morality of one's material prosperity. These are proclivities superinduced by modern conditions of the conscience. There is a natural resistance in every healthy human being to such distressful heart-searchings. ~ H G Wells,
771:A time will come when a politician who has wilfully made war and promoted international dissension will be as sure of the dock and much surer of the noose than a private homicide. It is not reasonable that those who gamble with men's lives should not stake their own. ~ H G Wells,
772:It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger and trouble.... Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. ~ H G Wells,
773:We should strive to welcome change and challenges, because they are what help us grow. With out them we grow weak like the Eloi in comfort and security. We need to constantly be challenging ourselves in order to strengthen our character and increase our intelligence. ~ H G Wells,
774:Why did every human concern clog itself up in a tangle of routines, formalities, disciplines, imperatives? Why couldn’t one be free? Really free? Guarding one’s freedom, wasn’t freedom at all. Why couldn’t one win one’s freedom for good and all, and get on with life? ~ H G Wells,
775:A time will come when a politician who has willfully made war and promoted international dissension will be as sure of the dock and much surer of the noose than a private homicide. It is not reasonable that those who gamble with men's lives should not stake their own. ~ H G Wells,
776:We should strive to welcome change and challenges, because they are what help us grow. With out them we grow weak like the Eloi in comfort and security. We need to constantly be challenging ourselves in order to strengthen our character and increase our intelligence. ~ H G Wells,
777:There are no circumstances in the world that determined action cannot alter, unless, perhaps, they are the walls of a prison cell, and even those will dissolve and change, I am told, into the infirmary compartment, at any rate, for the man who can fast with resolution. ~ H G Wells,
778:He was certainly an intensely egotistical and unfeeling man, but the sight of his victim, his first victim, bloody and pitiful at his feet, may have released some long pent fountain of remorse which for a time may have flooded whatever scheme of action he had contrived. ~ H G Wells,
779:I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide. It had set itself steadfastly towards comfort and ease, a balanced society with security and permanency as its watchword, it had attained its hopes—to come to this at last. ~ H G Wells,
780:I saw trees growing and changing like puffs of vapour, now brown, now green; they grew, spread, shivered, and passed away. I saw huge buildings rise up faint and fair, and pass like dreams. The whole surface of the earth seemed changed—melting and flowing under my eyes. ~ H G Wells,
781:Direct popular government of a state larger than a city state had already failed therefore in Italy, because as yet there was no public education, no press, and no representative system; it had failed though these mere mechanical difficulties, before the first Punic War. ~ H G Wells,
782:In the middle years of the nineteenth century there first became abundant in this strange world of ours a class of men, men tending for the most part to become elderly, who are called, and who are very properly called, but who dislike extremely to be called--"Scientists. ~ H G Wells,
783:No lograba quitarme de la cabeza la idea de que los hombres y mujeres que conocía eran otros monstruos pasablemente humanos, animales con forma de persona, y que en cualquier momento podían comenzar a transformarse, a mostrar este o aquel síntoma de su naturaleza bestial. ~ H G Wells,
784:The situation was primordial. The Man beneath prevailed for a moment over the civilised superstructure, the Draper. He pushed at the pedals with archaic violence. So Palaeolithic man may have ridden his simple bicycle of chipped flint in pursuit of his exogamous affinity. ~ H G Wells,
785:He suffered from indigestion now nearly every afternoon in his life, but as he lacked introspection he projected the associated discomfort upon the world. Every afternoon he discovered afresh that life as a whole and every aspect of life that presented itself was "beastly. ~ H G Wells,
786:The New Deal is plainly an attempt to achieve a working socialism and avert a social collapse in America; it is extraordinarily parallel to the successive 'policies' and 'Plans' of the Russian experiment. Americans shirk the word 'socialism', but what else can one call it? ~ H G Wells,
787:But in truth, a general prohibition in a state may increase the sum of liberty, and a general permission may diminish it. It does not follow, as these people would have us believe, that a man is more free where there is least law and more restricted where there is most law. ~ H G Wells,
788:In another place was a vast array of idols—Polynesian, Mexican, Grecian, Phoenician, every country on earth I should think. And here, yielding to an irresistible impulse, I wrote my name upon the nose of a steatite monster from South America that particularly took my fancy. ~ H G Wells,
789:The history of India for many centuries had been happier, less fierce, and more dreamlike than any other history. In these favorable conditions, they built a character - meditative and peaceful and a nation of philosophers such as could nowhere have existed except in India. ~ H G Wells,
790:Cuss went straight up to the village to Bunting the vicar.
"Am I mad?" Cuss began abruptly, as he entered the shabby little study. "Do I look like an insane person?"
"What's happened?" said the vicar, putting the ammonite on the loose sheets of his forthcoming sermon. ~ H G Wells,
791:Cada vez que mergulho uma criatura viva nesse banho ardente de dor, penso: desta vez, queimarei todo o animal até extingui-lo, desta vez produzirei uma criatura racional de acordo com meu desejo. Afinal de contas, o que são dez anos? O homem está sendo aperfeiçoado há cem mil. ~ H G Wells,
792:For ages that stagger the imagination this earth spun hot and lifeless, and again for ages of equal vastness it held no life above the level of the animalculæ in a drop of ditch-water. Not only is Space from the point of view of life and humanity empty, but Time is empty also. ~ H G Wells,
793:No place is safe - no place is at peace. There is no place where a women and her daughter can hide and be at peace. The war comes through the air, bombs drop in the night. Quiet people go out in the morning, and see air-fleets passing overhead - dripping death - dripping death! ~ H G Wells,
794:Now whenever things are so that a lot of people feel they ought to be doing something, the weak, and those who go weak with a lot of complicated thinking, always make for a sort of do-nothing religion, very pious and superior, and submit to persecution and the will of the Lord. ~ H G Wells,
795:Or did a Martian sit within each, ruling, directing, using, much as a man's brain sits and rules in his body? I began to compare the things to human machines, to ask myself for the first time in my life how an ironclad or a steam engine would seem to an intelligent lower animal. ~ H G Wells,
796:In all the round world of Utopia there is no meat. There used to be, but now we cannot stand the thought of slaughterhouses. And it is impossible to find anyone who will hew a dead ox or pig. I can still remember as a boy the rejoicings over the closing of the last slaughterhouse. ~ H G Wells,
797:Now they stumbled in the shackles of humanity, lived in a fear that never died, fretted by a law they could not understand; their mock-human existence began in an agony, was one long internal struggle, one long dread of Moreau - and for what? It was the wantonness that stirred me. ~ H G Wells,
798:I do not know how far my experience is common. At times I suffer from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world about me; I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. ~ H G Wells,
799:Só havia uma coisa que me divertia: tinha um talento extraordinário para criar novas palavras. Julgo que ele acreditava que a maneira correta de falar consistia em articular palavras que não significassem nada. Chamava-lhes "Grandes Pensares", para os distinguir dos "Pequenos Pensares ~ H G Wells,
800:The thing [Henry James'] novel is about is always there. It is like a church lit but without a congregation to distract you, with every light and line focused on the high altar. And on the altar, very reverently placed, intensely there, is a dead kitten, an egg-shell, a bit of string. ~ H G Wells,
801:Los débiles y los que se vuelven débiles a causa de un continuo pensar complejo, siempre están hechos para un tipo de religión de la inacción, muy piadosa y superior y se someten a la persecución y a la voluntad del Señor. Es la energía en una explosión de temores, vuelta hacia adentro. ~ H G Wells,
802:There will be little drudgery in this better ordered world. Natural power harnessed in machines will be the general drudge. What drudgery is inevitable will be done as a service and duty for a few years or months out of each life; it will not consume nor degrade the whole life of anyone. ~ H G Wells,
803:A federation of all humanity, together with a sufficient measure of social justice, to ensure health, education, and a rough equality of opportunity to most of the children born into the world, would mean such a release and increase of human energy as to open a new phase in human history. ~ H G Wells,
804:At times I suffered from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world about me. I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. This feeling was very strong upon me that night. ~ H G Wells,
805:But the Modern Utopia must not be static but kinetic, must shape not as a permanent state but as a hopeful stage, leading to a long ascent of stages. Nowadays we do not resist and overcome the great stream of things, but rather float upon it. We build now not citadels, but ships of state. ~ H G Wells,
806:I go to London and see the busy multitudes in Fleet Street and the Strand, and it comes across my mind that they are but the ghosts of the past, haunting the streets that I have seen silent and wretched, going to and fro, phantasms in a dead city, the mockery of life in a galvanised body. ~ H G Wells,
807:The true strength of rulers and empires lies not in armies or emotions, but in the belief of men that they are inflexibly open and truthful and legal. As soon as a government departs from that standard it ceases to be anything more than 'the gang in possession,' and its days are numbered. ~ H G Wells,
808:You have dwelt overmuch upon pain. Pain is a swift distress; it ends and is forgotten. Without memory and fear pain is nothing, a contradiction to be heeded, a warning to be taken. Without pain what would life become? Pain is the master only of craven men. It is in man's power to rule it. ~ H G Wells,
809:For instance, here is a portrait of a man at eight years old, another at fifteen, another at seventeen, another at twenty-three, and so on. All these are evidently sections, as it were, Three Dimensional representations of his Four-Dimensional being, which is a fixed and unalterable thing. ~ H G Wells,
810:He had heard now of the moral decay that had followed the collapse of supernatural religion in the minds of ignoble man, the decline of public honour, the ascendency of wealth. For men who had lost their belief in God had still kept their faith in property, and wealth ruled a venial world. ~ H G Wells,
811:He, I know - for the question had been discussed among us long before the Time Machine was made - thought but cheerlessly of the Advancement of Mankind, and saw in the growing pile of civilisation only a foolish heaping that must inevitably fall back upon and destroy its makers in the end. ~ H G Wells,
812:The man’s become inhuman, I tell you,” said Kemp. “I am as sure he will establish a reign of terror — so soon as he has got over the emotions of this escape — as I am sure I am talking to you. Our only chance is to be ahead. He has cut himself off from his kind. His blood be upon his own head. ~ H G Wells,
813:Not to go on all-fours; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to suck up Drink; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to eat Fish or Flesh; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to claw the Bark of Trees; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to chase other Men; that is the Law. Are we not Men? ~ H G Wells,
814:My mood, I say, was one of exaltation. I felt as a seeing man might do, with padded feet and noiseless clothes, in a city of the blind. I experienced a wild impulse to jest, to startle people, to clap men on the back, fling people’s hats astray, and generally revel in my extraordinary advantage. ~ H G Wells,
815:The idea of a world commonweal has to be established as the criterion of political institutions, and also as the criterion of general conduct in hundreds of millions of brains. It has to dominate education everywhere in the world. When that end is achieved, then the world state will be achieved. ~ H G Wells,
816:Children of the Law,’ I said, ‘he is not dead.’ M’ling turned his sharp eyes on me. ‘He has changed his shape - he has changed his body,’ I went on. ‘For a time you will not see him. He is.. there’ - I pointed upward - ‘where he can watch you. You cannot see him. But he can see you. Fear the Law. ~ H G Wells,
817:I think that at that time none of us quite believed in the Time Machine. The fact is, the Time Traveller was one of those men who are too clever to be believed: you never felt that you saw all round him; you always suspected some subtle reserve, some ingenuity in ambush, behind his lucid frankness ~ H G Wells,
818:And before we judge them too harsly we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races....Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit? ~ H G Wells,
819:Not to go on all-fours; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to suck up Drink; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to eat Fish or Flesh; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to claw the Bark of Trees; that is the Law. Are we not Men? “Not to chase other Men; that is the Law. Are we not Men?” And ~ H G Wells,
820:For it is just this question of pain that parts
us. So long as visible or audible pain turns you sick; so long as your own
pains drive you; so long as pain underlies your propositions about
sin,—so long, I tell you, you are an animal, thinking a little less obscurely
what an animal feels. ~ H G Wells,
821:The present writer is a prophet by use and wont. He is more interested in to-morrow than he is in to-day, and the past is just material for future guessing. "Think of the men who have walked here!" said a tourist in the Roman Coliseum. It was a Futurist mind that answered: "Think of the men who will. ~ H G Wells,
822:You have turned your back on common men, on their elementary needs and their restricted time and intelligence [...] I ask: who the hell is this Joyce who demands so many waking hours of the few thousands I have still to live for a proper appreciation of his quirks and fancies and flashes of rendering? ~ H G Wells,
823:Even men who were engaged in organizing debt-serf cultivation and debt-serf industrialism in the American cotton districts, in the old rubber plantations, and in the factories of India, China, and South Italy, appeared as generous supporters of and subscribers to the sacred cause of individual liberty. ~ H G Wells,
824:I had just taken to reading. I had just discovered the art of leaving my body to sit impassive in a crumpled up attitude in a chair or sofa, while I wandered over the hills and far away in novel company and new scenes... My world began to expand very rapidly,... the reading habit had got me securely. ~ H G Wells,
825:our world; and long before this earth ceased to be molten, life upon its surface must have begun its course. The fact that it is scarcely one seventh of the volume of the earth must have accelerated its cooling to the temperature at which life could begin. It has air and water and all that is necessary ~ H G Wells,
826:It is the system of nationalist individualism that has to go....We are living in the end of the sovereign states....In the great struggle to evoke a Westernized World Socialism, contemporary governments may vanish....Countless people...will hate the new world order....and will die protesting against it. ~ H G Wells,
827:The essential question was always "Who are these fellows who give us orders? By what warrant? And how do we benefit and how does the world benefit? But they are doing no good to anyone, no real good even to themselves! This is not government and leadership; this is imposture. Why stand it?...Why stand it? ~ H G Wells,
828:If all the animals and man had been evolved in this ascendant manner, then there had been no first parents, no Eden, and no Fall. And if there had been no fall, then the entire historical fabric of Christianity, the story of the first sin and the reason for an atonement ... collapsed like a house of cards. ~ H G Wells,
829:breast this incessant water came; he blinked at the sun and dreamt that perhaps he might snare it and spear it as it went down to its resting-place amidst the distant hills. Then he was roused to convey to his brother that once indeed he had done so--at least that some one had done so--he mixed that perhaps ~ H G Wells,
830:Seeing the ease and security in which these people were living, I felt that this close resemblance of the sexes was after all what one would expect; for the strength of a man and the softness of a women, the institution of family and the differentiation of occupations are mere militant necessities of force. ~ H G Wells,
831:The character of the Open Conspiracy [the movement towards a world collective] will now be plainly displayed. It will have become a great world movement as widespread and evident as socialism or communism. It will largely have taken the place of these movements. It will be more, it will be a world religion. ~ H G Wells,
832:Then very haltingly at first, but afterwards more easily, he began to tell of the thing that was hidden in his life, the haunting memory of a beauty and a happiness that filled his heart with insatiable longings, that made all the interests and spectacle of worldly life seem dull and tedious and vain to him. ~ H G Wells,
833:My dear sir, that is just where you are wrong. That is just where the whole world has gone wrong. We are always getting away from the present movement. Our mental existences, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave. ~ H G Wells,
834:Yet he changed. That keen chisel of necessity which sharpened the tiger's claw age by age and fined down the clumsy Orchippus to the swift grace of the horse, was at work upon him--is at work upon him still. The clumsier and more stupidly fierce among him were killed soonest and oftenest; the finer hand, the quicker ~ H G Wells,
835:Let us drink more particularly to the coming of the day when men beyond there will learn to distinguish between qualitative and quantitative questions, to temper good intentions with good intelligence, and righteousness with wisdom. One of the darkest evils of our world is surely the unteachable wildness of the Good. ~ H G Wells,
836:I took my line straight away. I knew I was staking everything, but I jumped there and then. "We're on absolutely the biggest thing that has ever been invented," I said, and put the accent on "we." "If you want to keep me out of this, you'll have to do it with a gun. I'm coming down to be your fourth labourer to-morrow. ~ H G Wells,
837:Montgomery,” said I, suddenly, as the outer door closed, “why has your man pointed ears?” “Damn!” he said, over his first mouthful of food. He stared at me for a moment, and then repeated, “Pointed ears?” “Little points to them,” said I, as calmly as possible, with a catch in my breath; “and a fine black fur at the edges? ~ H G Wells,
838:It was at ten o’clock to-day that the first of all Time Machines began its career. I gave it a last tap, tried all the screws again, put one more drop of oil on the quartz rod, and sat myself in the saddle. I suppose a suicide who holds a pistol to his skull feels much the same wonder at what will come next as I felt then. ~ H G Wells,
839:Perhaps I am a man of exceptional moods. I do not know how far my experience is common. At times I suffer from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world about me; I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. ~ H G Wells,
840:Ahora sabemos lo suficiente para saber que todavía no sabemos bastante... Pero la hora se acerca de todos modos. Usted no verá la hora. Pero, entre nosotros, ustedes los ricos, los dirigentes políticos con su juego natural de las pasiones, el patriotismo, la religión y todo lo demás han liado bastante las cosas, ¿no es verdad? ~ H G Wells,
841:And she wanted to be free. It wasn't Mr. Brumley she wanted; he was but a means — if indeed he was a means — to an end. The person she wanted, the person she had always wanted — was herself. Could Mr. Brumley give her that? Would Mr. Brumley give her that? Was it conceivable he would carry sacrifice to such a pitch as that?... ~ H G Wells,
842:But there are times when the little cloud spreads, until it obscures the sky. And those times I look around at my fellow men and I am reminded of some likeness of the beast-people, and I feel as though the animal is surging up in them. And I know they are neither wholly animal nor holy man, but an unstable combination of both. ~ H G Wells,
843:He is mad,” said Kemp; “inhuman. He is pure selfishness. He thinks of nothing but his own advantage, his own safety. I have listened to such a story this morning of brutal self-seeking…. He has wounded men. He will kill them unless we can prevent him. He will create a panic. Nothing can stop him. He is going out now — furious! ~ H G Wells,
844:I had a sort of leadership against the Gang—you know it was called the Gang—a sort of compromise of scoundrelly projects and base ambitions and vast public emotional stupidities and catch-words—the Gang that kept the world noisy and blind year by year, and all the while that it was drifting, drifting towards infinite disaster. ~ H G Wells,
845:Where population is balanced and abundant, much child- bearing becomes an evil rather than a blessing of state; where violence comes but rarely offspring secure, there is less necessity-indeed there is no necessity- for an efficient family, and the specialization of the sexes with reference to their children's needs disappears. ~ H G Wells,
846:...with Penge I associate my first realisations of the wonder and beauty of twilight and night, the effect of dark walls reflecting lamplight, and the mystery of blue haze-veiled hillsides of houses, the glare of shops by night, the glowing steam and streaming sparks of railway trains and railway signals lit up in the darkness. ~ H G Wells,
847:You know that great pause that comes upon things before the dusk? Even the breeze stops in the trees. To me there is always an air of expectation about that evening stillness. The sky was clear, remote, and empty save for a few horizontal bars far down in the sunset. Well, that night the expectation took the colour of my fears. ~ H G Wells,
848:The weaving of mankind into one community does not imply the creation of a homogeneous community, but rather the reverse; the welcome and adequate utilization of distinctive quality in an atmosphere of understanding.... Communities all to one pattern, like boxes of toy soldiers, are things of the past, rather than of the future. ~ H G Wells,
849:Why are these things permitted? What sins have we done? The morning service was over, I was walking through the roads to clear my brain for the afternoon, and then—fire, earthquake, death! As if it were Sodom and Gomorrah! All our work undone, all the work— What are these Martians?
What are we? I answered, clearing my throat. ~ H G Wells,
850:I wish you'd keep your fingers out of my eye," said the aerial voice, in a tone of savage expostulation. "The fact is, I'm all here:head, hands, legs, and all the rest of it, but it happens I'm invisible. It's a confounded nuisance, but I am. That's no reason why I should be poked to pieces by every stupid bumpkin in Iping, is it? ~ H G Wells,
851:And like blots upon the landscape rose the cupolas above the ways to the Underworld. I understood now what all the beauty of the Upperworld people covered. Very pleasant was their day, as pleasant as the day of the cattle in the eld. Like the cattle, they knew of no enemies and provided against no needs. And their end was the same. ~ H G Wells,
852:Dört ayak üstüne inmemek; Kanun budur. Biz insan değil miyiz?”
“Suyu emerek içmemek; Kanun budur. Biz insan değil miyiz?”
“Balık ya da et yememek; Kanun budur. Biz insan değil miyiz?”
“Ağaç kabuklarını tırmalamamak; Kanun budur. Biz insan değil miyiz?”
“Başka insanları kovalamamak; Kanun budur. Biz insan değil miyiz? ~ H G Wells,
853:We may suggest that a nation is in effect any assembly, mixture, or confusion of people which is either afflicted by or wishes to be afflicted by a foreign office of its own, in order that it should behave collectively as if its needs, desires, and vanities were beyond comparison more important than the general welfare of humanity. ~ H G Wells,
854:But I have believed always and taught always that what God demands from man is his utmost effort to cooperate and understand. I have taught the imagination, first and most; I have made knowledge, knowledge of what man is and what man's world is and what man may be, which is the adventure of mankind, the substance of all my teaching. ~ H G Wells,
855:But you begin now to realise,” said the Invisible Man, “the full disadvantage of my condition. I had no shelter — no covering — to get clothing was to forego all my advantage, to make myself a strange and terrible thing. I was fasting; for to eat, to fill myself with unassimilated matter, would be to become grotesquely visible again. ~ H G Wells,
856:I felt naked. I felt as perhaps a bird may feel in the clear air knowing the hawk wings above and will swoop. I began to feel the need of fellowship. I wanted to question, wanted to speak, wanted to relate my experience. What is this spirit in man that urges him forever to depart from happiness, to toil and to place himself in danger? ~ H G Wells,
857:No. I cannot expect you to believe it. Take it as a lie--or a prophecy. Say I dreamed it in the workshop. Consider I have been speculating upon the destinies of our race until I have hatched this fiction. Treat my assertion of its truth as a mere stroke of art to enhance its interest. And taking it as a story, what do you think of it? ~ H G Wells,
858:The crying sounded even louder out of doors. It was as if all the pain in the world had found a voice. Yet had I known such pain was in the next room, and had it been dumb, I believe—I have thought since—I could have stood it well enough. It is when suffering finds a voice and sets our nerves quivering that this pity comes troubling us. ~ H G Wells,
859:They had certain Fixed Ideas implanted by Moreau in their minds which absolutely bounded their imaginations. They really were hypnotized, had been told certain things were impossible, and certain things were not to be done, and these prohibitions were woven into the texture of their minds beyond any possibility of disobedience or dispute. ~ H G Wells,
860:Creo que es allí, en las vastas y eternas leyes de la materia, y no en las preocupaciones, en los pecados y en los problemas cotidianos de los hombres, donde lo que en nosotros pueda haber de superior al animal debe buscar el sosiego y la esperanza. Sin esa ilusión no podría vivir. Y así, en la esperanza y la soledad, concluye mi historia. ~ H G Wells,
861:Nowhere in the world, Rud reflected, was journalism anything but a malignant and wanton power. Later on, as the Common-sense Movement grew, he had to think a lot about that. He had to spread a new system of ideas throughout the world, and journalism would neither instruct nor inform nor lend itself consistently to any sustained propaganda. ~ H G Wells,
862:Tewler Americanus in particular was irritated by a harsh logic that overrode his dearest belief in his practical isolation, whenever he chose to withdraw himself, from the affairs of the rest of the world. He had escaped from the old world and he hated to feel that he was being drawn back to share a common destiny with the rest of mankind. ~ H G Wells,
863:And there it was, on a shabby bed in a tawdry, ill-lighted bedroom, surrounded by a crowd of ignorant and excited people, broken and wounded, betrayed and unpitied, that Griffin, the first of all men to make himself invisible, Griffin, the most gifted physicist the world has ever seen, ended in infinite disaster his strange and terrible career. ~ H G Wells,
864:The crying sounded even louder out of doors. It was as if all the pain in the world had found a voice. Yet had I known such pain was in the next room, and had it been dumb, I believe — I have thought since — I could have stood it well enough. It is when suffering finds a voice and sets our nerves quivering that this pity comes troubling us. But ~ H G Wells,
865:Before, they had been beasts, their instincts fitly adapted to their surroundings, and happy as living things may be. Now they stumbled in the shackles of humanity, lived in a fear that never died, fretted by a law they could not understand; their mock-human existence, begun in an agony, was one long internal struggle, one long dread of Moreau — ~ H G Wells,
866:Over me, about me, closing in on me, embracing me ever nearer, was the Eternal, that which was before the beginning and that which triumphs over the end; that enormous void in which all light and life and being is but the thin and vanishing splendour of a falling star, the cold, the stillness, the silence, - the infinite and final Night of space. ~ H G Wells,
867:Si te gusta la literatura elegante conecta tú teléfono con Bruggles. El autor más grande de todos los tiempos. El pensador más grande de todos los tiempos. Te enseña Moral hasta la coronilla. La viva imagen de Sócrates, salvo el cogote que es el de Shakespeare. Tiene seis dedos en los pies, viste de rojo y no se lava nunca los dientes. Escúchale. ~ H G Wells,
868:In a moment I was clutched by several hands, and there was no mistaking that they were trying to haul me back. I struck another light, and waved it in their dazzled faces. You can scarce imagine how nauseatingly inhuman they looked—those pale, chinless faces and great, lidless, pinkish-grey eyes!—as they stared in their blindness and bewilderment. ~ H G Wells,
869:I felt the first inkling of a thing that presently grew quite clear in my mind, that oppressed me for many days, a sense of dethronement, a persuasion that I was no longer a master, but an animal among the animals, under the Martian heel.With us it would be as with them, to lurk and watch, to run and hide; the fear and empire of man had passed away. ~ H G Wells,
870:Alexander the Great changed a few boundaries and killed a few men. Both he and Napoleon were forced into fame by circumstances outside of themselves and by currents of the time, but Margaret Sanger made currents and circumstances. When the history of our civilization is written, it will be a biological history and Margaret Sanger will be its heroine. ~ H G Wells,
871:It was all a monstrous payment for courageous fiction, a gratuity in return for the one reality of human life--illusion. We gave them a feeling of hope and profit; we sent a tidal wave of water and confidence into their stranded affairs...Civilization is possible only through confidence, so that we can bank our money and go unarmed about the streets. ~ H G Wells,
872:As night goes round the Earth always there are hundreds of thousands of people who should be sleeping, lying awake, fearing a bully, fearing a cruel competition, dreading lest they cannot make good, ill of some illness they cannot comprehend, distressed by some irrational quarrel, maddened by some thwarted instinct or some suppressed perverted desire. ~ H G Wells,
873:But to me the future is still black and blank–is a vast ignorance, lit at a few casual places by the memory of his story. And I have by me, for my comfort, two strange white flowers –shrivelled now, and brown and flat and brittle–to witness that even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of man. ~ H G Wells,
874:There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time. There is, however, a tendency to draw an unreal distinction between the former three dimensions and the latter, because it happens that our consciousness moves intermittently in one direction along the latter from the beginning to the end of our lives. ~ H G Wells,
875:To do such a thing would be to transcend magic. And I beheld, unclouded by doubt, a magnificent vision of all that invisibility might mean to a man—the mystery, the power, the freedom. Drawbacks I saw none. You have only to think! And I, a shabby, poverty-struck, hemmed-in demonstrator, teaching fools in a provincial college, might suddenly become—this. ~ H G Wells,
876:Already he knew something of the history of the intervening years. He had heard now of the moral decay that had followed the collapse of supernatural religion in the minds of ignoble man, the decline of public honour, the ascendency of wealth. For men who had lost their belief in God had still kept their faith in property, and wealth ruled a venial world. ~ H G Wells,
877:Then suddenly the humour of the situation came into my mind: the thought of the years I had spent in study and toil to get into the future age, and now my passion of anxiety to get out of it. I had made myself the most complicated and the most hopeless trap that ever a man devised. Although it was at my own expense, I could not help myself. I laughed aloud. ~ H G Wells,
878:The time traveller proceeded, "any real body must have extension in four directions: it must have Length, Breadth, Thicknessa and Duration. But through a natural infirmity of the flesh, which I will explain to you in a moment, we incline to overlook this fact. There are really four dimentions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time. ~ H G Wells,
879:The history of mankind for the last four centuries is rather like that of an imprisoned sleeper, stirring clumsily and uneasily while the prison that restrains and shelters him catches fire, not waking but incorporating the crackling and warmth of the fire with ancient and incongruous dreams, than like that of a man consciously awake to danger and opportunity. ~ H G Wells,
880:The only path of escape he could conceive as yet for Lady Harman lay through the chivalry of some other man. That a woman could possibly rebel against one man without the sympathy and moral maintenance of another was still outside the range of Mr. Brumley's understanding. It is still outside the range of most men's understandings -- and of a great many women's. ~ H G Wells,
881:Before, they had been beasts, their instincts fitly adapted to their surrounds. Now they stumbled in the shackles of humanity, lived in a fear that never dies, fretted by a law they could not understand; their mock-human existence, begun in agony, was one long internal struggle, one long dread of Moreau--and for what? It was the wantonness of it that stirred me. ~ H G Wells,
882:An immense and ever-increasing wealth of knowledge is scattered about the world today; knowledge that would probably suffice to solve all the mighty difficulties of our age, but it is dispersed and unorganized. We need a sort of mental clearing house for the mind: a depot where knowledge and ideas are received, sorted, summarized, digested, clarified and compared ~ H G Wells,
883:store up knowledge. Contrivance followed contrivance, each making it possible for a man to do more. Always down the lengthening record, save for a set-back ever and again, he is doing more.... A quarter of a million years ago the utmost man was a savage, a being scarcely articulate, sheltering in holes in the rocks, armed with a rough-hewn flint or a fire-pointed ~ H G Wells,
884:That afternoon it seemed all disappointment. I went over the heads of the things a man reckons desirable. No doubt invisibility made it possible to get them, but it made it impossible to enjoy them when they are got. Ambition—what is the good of pride of place when you cannot appear there? What is the good of the love of woman when her name must needs be Delilah? ~ H G Wells,
885:An immense and ever-increasing wealth of knowledge is scattered about the world today; knowledge that would probably suffice to solve all the mighty difficulties of our age, but it is dispersed and unorganized. We need a sort of mental clearing house for the mind: a depot where knowledge and ideas are received, sorted, summarized, digested, clarified and compared. ~ H G Wells,
886:The thing they wanted they called the Vote, but that demand so hollow, so eyeless, had all the terrifying effect of a mask. Behind that mask was a formless invincible discontent with the lot of womanhood. It wanted, — it was not clear what it wanted, but whatever it wanted, all the domestic instincts of mankind were against admitting there was anything it could want. ~ H G Wells,
887:And in friendship and still more here, in this central business of love, accident rules it seems to me almost altogether. What personalities you will encounter in life, and have for a chief interest in life, is nearly as much a matter of chance as the drift of a grain of pollen in the pine forest. And once the light hazard has blown it has blown, never to drive again. ~ H G Wells,
888:There's lots will take things as they are--fat and stupid; and lots will be worried by a sort of feeling that it's all wrong, and that they ought to be doing something. Now whenever things are so that a lot of people feel they ought to be doing something, the weak, and those who go weak with a lot of complicated thinking, always make for a sort of do-nothing religion, ~ H G Wells,
889:Bajo las estrellas uno puede estirarse hacia arriba y llegar a la resignación cualquiera que sea la desgracia, pero en el calor y la tensión del día de trabajo caemos de nuevo, vienen la indignación y la ira y los estados de ánimo intolerables. ¡Qué pequeña es toda nuestra magnanimidad, un accidente, una fase! Hasta los santos antiguos tenían primero que huir del mundo. ~ H G Wells,
890:Professor Simon Newcomb was expounding this to the New York Mathematical Society only a month or so ago. You know how on a flat surface, which has only two dimensions, we can represent a figure of a three-dimensional solid, and similarly they think that by models of three dimensions they could represent one of four—if they could master the perspective of the thing. See? ~ H G Wells,
891:I wonder," said Graham.
Ostrog stared.
Must the world go this way?" said Graham, with his emotions at the speaking point. "Must it indeed
go in this way? Have all our hopes been vain?"
What do you mean?" said Ostrog. "Hopes?"
I came from a democratic age. And I find an aristocratic tyranny!"
Well, — but you are the chief tyrant."
Graham shook his head. ~ H G Wells,
892:There was a time when I believed in the story and the scheme of salvation, so far as I could understand it, just as I believed there was a Devil... Suddenly the light broke through to me and I knew this God was a lie... For indeed it is a silly story, and each generation nowadays swallows it with greater difficulty... Why do people go on pretending about this Christianity? ~ H G Wells,
893:Life is two things. Life is morality – life is adventure. Squire and master. Adventure rules, and morality looks up the trains in the Bradshaw. Morality tells you what is right, and adventure moves you. If morality means anything it means keeping bounds, respecting implications, respecting implicit bounds. If individuality means anything it means breaking bounds – adventure. ~ H G Wells,
894:There was something in the very air of it that exhilarated, that gave one a sense of lightness and good happening and well-being; there was something in the sight of it that made all its colour clean and perfect and subtly luminous. In the instant of coming into it one was exquisitely glad--as only in rare moments and when one is young and joyful one can be glad in this world. ~ H G Wells,
895:we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races. The Tasmanians, in spite of their human likeness, were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space of fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as ~ H G Wells,
896:She was exactly like a child. She wanted to be with me always. She tried to follow me everywhere, and on my next journey out and about it went to my heart to tire her down, and leave her at last, exhausted and calling after me rather plaintively. But the problems of the world had to be mastered. I had not, I said to myself, come into the future to carry on a miniature flirtation. ~ H G Wells,
897:The history of mankind," said Dreed, "has been a history of betrayals, the perennial betrayal of the common man by the men he has trusted."

"By the men the lazy, haphazard, childish oaf was too wilfully stupid to mistrust," said Bodisham. "The history of mankind from the very beginning has been a history of over-trusted trustees, corrupted by their unchecked opportunities. ~ H G Wells,
898:A large number of houses deserve to be burnt, most modern furniture, an overwhelming majority of pictures and books - one might go on for some time with the list. If our community was collectively anything more than a feeble idiot, it would burn most of London and Chicago, for example, an build sane and beautiful cities in the place of these pestilential heaps of private property. ~ H G Wells,
899:There seems to be no limit to the lies that honest but stupid disciples will tell for the glory of their master and for what they regard as the success of their propaganda. Men who would scorn to tell a lie in everyday life will become unscrupulous cheats and liars when they have given themselves up to propagandist work; it is one of the perplexing absurdities of our human nature. ~ H G Wells,
900:Forthwith flashes of actual flame, a bright glare leaping from one to another, sprang from the scattered group of men. It was as if some invisible jet impinged upon them and flashed into white flame. It was as if each man were suddenly and momentarily turned to fire. Then, by the light of their own destruction, I saw them staggering and falling, and their supporters turning to run. ~ H G Wells,
901:One seems to start in life," he said, "expecting something. And it doesn't happen. And it doesn't matter. One starts with ideas that things are good and things are bad—and it hasn't much relation to what is good and what is bad. I've always been the skeptaceous sort, and it's always seemed rot to me to pretend we know good from evil. It's just what I've never done. ... ~ H G Wells,
902:And before we judge of them too harshly we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races. The Tasmanians, in spite of their human likeness, were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space of fifty years. ~ H G Wells,
903:The ocean rose up around me, hiding that low, dark patch from my eyes. The daylight, the trailing glory of the sun, went streaming out of the sky, was drawn aside like some luminous curtain, and at last I looked into the blue gulf of immensity which the sunshine hides, and saw the floating hosts of stars. The sea was silent, the sky was silent. I was alone with the night and silence. ~ H G Wells,
904:I tell you, stupidity, self-protective stupidity, is the fundamental sin. No man alive has a right to contentment. No man alive has a right to mental rest. No man has any right to be as stupid as educated, Liberal men have been about that foolish affair at Geneva. Men who have any leisure, any gifts, any resources, have no right to stifle their consciences with that degree of imposture. ~ H G Wells,
905:...I suppose it is a lingering trace of Plutarch and my ineradicable boyish imagination that at bottom our State should be wise, sane, and dignified, that makes me think a country which leaves its medical and literary criticism, or indeed any such vitally important criticism, entirely to private enterprise and open to the advances of any purchaser much be in a frankly hopeless condition. ~ H G Wells,
906:It may be that we exist and cease to exist in alternations, like the minute dots in some forms of toned printing or the succession of pictures on a cinema film. It may be that reality is an illusion of movement in an eternal, static, multidimensional universe. We may be only a story written on the ground of the inconceivable; the pattern on a rug beneath the feet of the incomprehensible. ~ H G Wells,
907:Language is the nourishment of the thought of man, that serves only as it undergoes metabolism, and becomes thought and lives, and in its very living passes away. You scientific people, with your fancy of a terrible exactitude in language, of indestructible foundations built, as that Wordsworthian doggerel on the title-page of Nature says, "for aye," are marvellously without imagination! ~ H G Wells,
908:Until a man has found God and been found by God, he begins at no beginning, and works to no end. He may have friendships, his partial loyalties, his scraps of honor. But all these things fall into place and life falls into place only with God. Only with God. God, who fights through men against Blind Force and Night and Non-Existence; who is the end, who is the meaning. He is the only king. ~ H G Wells,
909:I am prepared to maintain that Honesty is essentially an anarchistic and disintegrating force in society, that communities are held together and the progress of civilization made possible only by vigorous and sometimes even, violent Lying; that the Social Contract is nothing more or less than a vast conspiracy of human beings to lie and humbug themselves and one another for the general Good. ~ H G Wells,
910:I came out for exercise, gentle exercise, and to notice the scenery and to botanise. And no sooner do I get on that accursed machine than off I go hammer and tongs; I never look to right or left, never notice a flower, never see a view - get hot, juicy, red - like a grilled chop. Get me on that machine and I have to go. I go scorching along the road, and cursing aloud at myself for doing it. ~ H G Wells,
911:So it was that the war in the air began. Men rode upon the whirlwind that night and slew and fell like archangels. The sky rained heroes upon the astonished earth. Surely the last fights of mankind were the best. What was the heavy pounding of your Homeric swordsmen, what was the creaking charge of chariots, besides this swift rush, this crash, this giddy triumph, this headlong sweep to death? ~ H G Wells,
912:Deep in the being of Mr. Polly, deep in that darkness, like a creature which has been beaten about the head and left for dead but still lives, crawled a persuasion that over and above the things that are jolly and "bits of all right," there was beauty, there was delight; that somewhere - magically inaccessible perhaps, but still somewhere - were pure and easy and joyous states of body and mind. ~ H G Wells,
913:In our growing science of hypnotism we find the promise of a possibility of replacing old inherent instincts by new suggestions, grafting upon or replacing the inherited fixed ideas. Very much indeed of what we call moral education is such an artificial modification and perversion of instinct ; pugnacity is trained into courageous self-sacrifice, and suppressed sexuality into religious emotion. ~ H G Wells,
914:A shambling, hairy, brutish, but probably very cunning creature with a big brain behind; so someone, I think it was Sir Harry Johnston, has described Homo Neanderthalensis. To this day we must still use similar terms to describe the soul of the politician. The statesman has still to oust the politician from his lairs and weapon heaps. History has still to become a record of human dignity. Finance ~ H G Wells,
915:man so soon as his first virile activity declined. Over most of the great wildernesses of earth you would have sought him in vain; only in a few temperate and sub-tropical river valleys would you have found the squatting lairs of his little herds, a male, a few females, a child or so. He knew no future then, no kind of life except the life he led. He fled the cave-bear over the rocks full of iron ~ H G Wells,
916:haz ve acının cennet ve cehennemle hiçbir ilgisi yoktur. haz ve acı- pöh! karanlıkta, senin teoloğunun esrimesinin muhammet’in hurilerinden ne farkı vardır ki. erkekler ve kadınların haz ve acı üzerine kurdukları bu pazar onların üzerindeki hayvan damgasıdır. kendisinden geldikleri hayvanın onlar üzerindeki damgası. acı! acı ve haz, bunlar sadece toz toprak içinde yuvarlandığımız sürece işe yarar. ~ H G Wells,
917:As the journalists of the time phased it, this was the epoch of the Leap into the Air. The new atomic aeroplane became indeed a mania; everyone of means was frantic to possess a thing so controllable, so secure and so free from the dust and danger of the road, and in France in the year 1943 thirty thousand of these new aeroplanes were manufactured and licensed, and soared humming softly into the sky. ~ H G Wells,
918:I doubt if these two fine, active minds [President and Mrs. Roosevelt] have ever inquiried how it is they know what they know and think as they do. Nor have they ever thought of what they might have been if they had grown up in an entirely different culture. They have the disposition of all politicians world over to deal only with made opinion. They have never inquired how it is that opinion is made. ~ H G Wells,
919:Before, they had been beasts, their instincts fitly adapted to their surroundings, and happy as living things may be. Now they stumbled in the shackles of humanity, lived in a fear that never died, fretted by a law they could not understand; their mock-human existence, begun in an agony, was one long internal struggle, one long dread of Moreau- and for what? It was the wantonness of it that stirred me. ~ H G Wells,
920:My dear sir, that is just where you are wrong. That is just where the whole world has gone wrong. We are always getting away from the present movement. Our mental existences, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave. Just as we should travel down if we began our existence fifty miles above the earth’s surface. ~ H G Wells,
921:We must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its own inferior races. The Tasmanians . . . were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space if fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit? ~ H G Wells,
922:Socialism is the preparation for that higher Anarchism; painfully, laboriously we mean to destroy false ideas of property and self, eliminate unjust laws and poisonous and hateful suggestions and prejudices, create a system of social right-dealing and a tradition of right-feeling and action. Socialism is the schoolroom of true and noble Anarchism, wherein by training and restraint we shall make free men. ~ H G Wells,
923:Perhaps I am a man of exceptional moods. I do not know how far my experience is common. At times I suffer from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world about me; I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. This feeling was very strong upon me that night. Here was another side to my dream. ~ H G Wells,
924:Marks of mental weakness,” said the Doctor. “Many of this type of degenerate show this same disposition to assume some vast mysterious credentials. One will call himself the Prince of Wales, another the Archangel Gabriel, another the Deity even. Ibsen thinks he is a Great Teacher, and Maeterlink a new Shakespeare. I’ve just been reading all about it — in Nordau. No doubt his odd deformity gave him an idea.... ~ H G Wells,
925:There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven. There is must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope. I hope, or I could not live. And so, in hope and solitude, my story ends. ~ H G Wells,
926:I had, as it were, passed the limit of terror and despair. I felt now that my life was practically lost, and that persuasion made me capable of daring anything. I had even a certain wish to encounter Moreau face to face; and as I had waded into the water, I remembered that if I were too hard pressed at least one path of escape from torment still lay open to me,—they could not very well prevent my drowning myself. ~ H G Wells,
927:No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. ~ H G Wells,
928:Oh, Lord! don't I know it's difficult! ... Don't I know that perhaps it's impossible! But it's the only way to do it. Therefore, I say, let's try to get it done. And everybody says, 'difficult, difficult,' and nobody lifts a finger to try. And the only real difficulty is that everybody for one reason or another says that it's difficult. It's against human nature. Granted! Every decent thing is. It's socialism. Who cares? ~ H G Wells,
929:Lá fora os uivos pareciam ainda mais altos. Era como se todo o sofrimento do mundo estivesse concentrado numa única voz. E no entanto eu sabia que, se toda aquela dor estivesse sendo experimentada no aposento ao lado por alguém sem voz, acredito (e penso nisso desde então) que eu poderia conviver com ela. É somente quando a dor alheia é dotada de voz e põe os nossos nervos à flor da pele que a piedade brota dentro de nós. ~ H G Wells,
930:The warm lights that once rounded off our world so completely are betrayed for what they are, smoky and guttering candles. Beyond what once seemed a casket of dutiful security is now a limitless and indifferent universe. Ours is the wisdom or there is no wisdom; ours is the decision or there is no decision. That burthen is upon each of us in the measure of our capacity. The talent has been given us and we may not bury it. ~ H G Wells,
931:They despite and hate the government more and more, but they don't know how to set about changing it. The country is dying for some sort of lead, and so far all it is getting is a crowd of fresh professional leaders. Who never get anywhere. Who do not seem to be aiming anywhere. We are living in a world of jaded politics. Poverty increases, prices rise, unemployment spreads, mines, factories stagnate, and nothing is done. ~ H G Wells,
932:Well, I do not mind telling you I have been at work upon this geometry of Four Dimensions for some time. Some of my results are curious. For instance, here is a portrait of a man at eight years old, another atfifteen, another at seventeen, another at twenty-three, and so on. All these are evidently sections, as it were, Three-Dimensional representations of his Four-Dimensioned being, which is a fixed and unalterable thing. ~ H G Wells,
933:Perhaps I am a man of exceptional moods. I do not know how far my
experience is common. At times I suffer from the strangest sense of
detachment from myself and the world about me; I seem to watch it all
from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time,
out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. This feeling
was very strong upon me that night. Here was another side to my
dream. ~ H G Wells,
934:It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble. An animal perfectly in harmony with its environment is a perfect mechanism. Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have a huge variety of needs and dangers. ~ H G Wells,
935:Next to education there must come abundant, prompt, and truthful information of what is going on in the state, and frank and free discussion of the issues of the time. Even nowadays these functions are performed only very imperfectly and badly by the press we have and by our publicists and politicians; but badly though it is done, the thing is done, and the fact that it is done at all argues that it may ultimately be done well. ~ H G Wells,
936:It [a new world order] needs only that the governments of Britain, the United States, France, Germany, and Russia should get together in order to set up an effective control of currency, credit, production, and distribution – that is to say, an effective ‘dictatorship of prosperity,’ for the whole world. The other sixty odd States would have to join in or accommodate themselves to the over-ruling decisions of these major Powers. ~ H G Wells,
937:The passion for playing chess is one of the most unaccountable in the world. It slaps the theory of natural selection in the face. It is the most absorbing of occupations. The least satisfying of desires. A nameless excrescence upon life. It annihilates a man. You have, let us say, a promising politician, a rising artist that you wish to destroy. Dagger or bomb are archaic and unreliable - but teach him, inoculate him with chess. ~ H G Wells,
938:And scattered about it, some in their overturned war-machines, some in the now rigid handling-machines, and a dozen of them stark and silent and laid in a row, were the Martians – dead! – slain by the putrefactive and disease bacteria against which their systems were unprepared; slain as the red weed was being slain; slain, after all man's devices had failed, by the humblest things that God, in his wisdom, has put upon this earth. ~ H G Wells,
939:you have saved my life.” “Chance,” he answered. “Just chance.” “I prefer to make my thanks to the accessible agent.” “Thank no one. You had the need, and I had the knowledge; and I injected and fed you much as I might have collected a specimen. I was bored and wanted something to do. If I’d been jaded that day, or hadn’t liked your face, well — it’s a curious question where you would have been now!” This damped my mood a little. “At ~ H G Wells,
940:Had Moreau had any intelligible object, I could have sympathized at least a little with him. I am not so squeamish about pain as that. I could have forgiven him a little even, had his motive been only hate. But he was so irresponsible, so utterly careless! His curiosity, his mad, aimless investigations, drove him on; and the Things were thrown out to live a year or so, to struggle and blunder and suffer, and at last to die painfully. ~ H G Wells,
941:It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble. An animal perfectly in harmony with its environment is a perfect mechanism. Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have to meet a huge variety of needs and dangers. ~ H G Wells,
942:The day of democracy is past," he said. "Past for ever. That day began with the bowmen of Crecy, it ended when marching infantry, when common men in masses ceased to win the battles of the world, when costly cannon, great ironclads, and strategic railways became the means of power. To-day is the day of wealth. Wealth now is power as it never was power before—it commands earth and sea and sky. All power is for those who can handle wealth.... ~ H G Wells,
943:Wells recognized that these crude novels correctly foresaw modern warfare as aiming at the massive destruction of the physical structures of an enemy civilization and the terrorizing if not annihilating of its noncombatant population. His Martians anticipate with uncomfortable accuracy, for example, American bombings of Dresden and Tokyo, followed by Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and boastful proclamations of “shock and awe” tactics against Iraq. ~ H G Wells,
944:Look at the way people have swung through Communism, Toryism, Liberalism -- in vast blocks. In my father's boyhood you were either a Liberal or a Conservative in England, and there you stuck, and in America you were a sturdy individualist Democrat or Republican from the cradle to the grave. But now the Voice does it -- the pervading voice. And just now
it's come to a point when a Voice -- putting it straight and clear. Straight and clear... ~ H G Wells,
945:When we've got a common philosophy and a common objective; then we can advance in open order. We shall be a great team. But we've got to make sure of that common set of ideas. Maybe we shall find our formulae difficult for some of these new types. If we keep our minds open, we may find that they are right and that our formulae have to be modified. Probably -- it's a thought that shouldn't dishearten us -- but probably we don't know everything. ~ H G Wells,
946:In times of long established peace, when the tradition of generations has established the illusion of the profoundest human security, men's minds are not greatly distressed by grotesqueness and absurdity in their political forms. It is all part of the humour and the good-humour of life. When one believes that all the tigers in the jungle are dead, it is quite amusing to walk along the jungle paths in a dressing-gown with a fan instead of a gun. ~ H G Wells,
947:As I stood there in the gathering dark I thought that in this simple explanation I had mastered the problem of the world--mastered the whole secret of these delicious people. Possibly the checks they had devised for the increase of population had succeeded too well, and their numbers had rather diminished than kept stationary. That would account for the abandoned ruins. Very simple was my explanation, and plausible enough--as most wrong theories are! ~ H G Wells,
948:Rest enough for the individual man, too much and too soon, and we call it death. But for man, no rest and no ending. He must go on, conquest beyond conquest. First this little planet and all its winds and ways, and then all the laws of mind and matter that restrain him. Then the planets about him, and, at last, out across immensities to the stars. And when he has conquered all the deep space, and all the mysteries of time, still he will be beginning. ~ H G Wells,
949:at last the raft was completed. I was delighted with it. But with a certain lack of practical sense which has always been my bane, I had made it a mile or more from the sea; and before I had dragged it down to the beach the thing had fallen to pieces. Perhaps it is as well that I was saved from launching it; but at the time my misery at my failure was so acute that for some days I simply moped on the beach, and stared at the water and thought of death. ~ H G Wells,
950:Eight-and-twenty years,' said I, 'I have lived, and never a ghost have I seen as yet.'

The old woman sat staring hard into the fire, her pale eyes wide open.

'Ay,' she broke in; 'and eight-and-twenty years you have lived and never seen the likes of this house, I reckon. There's a many things to see, when one's still but eight-and-twenty.' She swayed her head slowly from side to side. 'A many things to see and sorrow for.' ("The Red Room") ~ H G Wells,
951:For more than a thousand years this idea of the unity of Christendom, of Christendom as a sort of vast Amphictyony, whose members even in war time were restrained from many extremities by the idea of a common brotherhood and a common loyalty to the Church, dominated Europe. The history of Europe from the fifth century onward to the fifteenth is very largely the history of the failure of this great idea of a divine world to realize itself in practice. The ~ H G Wells,
952:The British Islands are small islands and our people numerically a little people. Their only claim to world importance depends upon their courage and enterprise, and a people who will not stand up to the necessity of air service planned on a world scale, and taking over thousands of aeroplanes and thousands of men from the onset of peace, has no business to pretend anything more than a second rate position in the world. We cannot be both Imperial and mean. ~ H G Wells,
953:Zihinsel çok yönlülüğün değişim, tehlike ve belanın telafisi oluşu, gözden kaçırdığımız bir doğa yasasıdır. Çevresiyle kusursuz bir âhenk içinde yaşayan bir hayvan, mükemmel bir mekanizmadır. Alışkanlık ve içgüdü çaresiz kalmadıkça doğa zekâya asla başvurmaz. Değişimin ve değişime gereksinimin olmadığı yerde akıl da yoktur. Yalnızca çok çeşitli ihtiyaçları ve tehlikeleri karşılamak zorunda olan hayvanlar zekâdan paylarını alırlar.

Çev. Volkan Gürses ~ H G Wells,
954:Jesus was a penniless teacher who wandered about the dusty sun-bit country of Judea, living upon casual gifts of food; yet he is always represented clean, combed, and sleek, in spotless raiment, erect, and with something motionless about him as though he was gliding through the air. This alone has made him unreal and incredible to many people who cannot distinguish the core of the story from the ornamental and unwise additions of the unintelligently devout. ~ H G Wells,
955:My days I devote to reading and experiments in chemistry, and I spend many of the clear nights in the study of astronomy. There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven. There it must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope. ~ H G Wells,
956:Man is now a new animal, a new and different animal; he can jump a hundred miles, see through brick walls, bombard atoms, analyse the stars, set about his business with the strength of a million horses. And so forth and so on. Yes. Yes. But all the same he goes on behaving like the weak little needy ape he used to be. He grabs, snarls, quarrels, fears, stampedes, and plays in his immense powder magazine until he seems likely to blow up the whole damned show. ~ H G Wells,
957:The darkness grew apace; a cold wind began to blow in freshening gusts from the east, and the showering white flakes in the air increased in number. From the edge of the sea came a ripple and whisper. Beyond these lifeless sounds the world was silent. Silent? It would be hard to convey the stillness of it. All the sounds of man, the bleating of sheep, the cries of birds, the hum of insects, the stir that makes the background of our lives - all that was over. ~ H G Wells,
958:They did not think politics was a great constructive process, they thought it was a kind of dog-fight. They wanted fun, they wanted spice, they wanted hits, they wanted also a chance to say "'Ear, 'ear!" in an intelligent and honourable manner and clap their hands and drum with their feet. The great constructive process in history gives so little scope for clapping and drumming and saying "'Ear, 'ear!" One might as well think of hounding on the solar system. ~ H G Wells,
959:... when the struggle seems to be drifting definitely towards a world social democracy, there may still be very great delays and disappointments before it becomes an efficient and beneficent world system. Countless people ... will hate the New World Order and will die protesting against it. When we attempt to evaluate its promise, we have to bear in mind the distress of a generation or so of malcontents, many of them quite gallant and graceful-looking people. ~ H G Wells,
960:A certain beauty in the world is no mark of God's favor, said Mr. Huss. There is no beauty one may not balance by an equal ugliness. The warthog and the hyena, the tapeworm and the stinkhorn, are equally God's creations. Nothing you have said points to anything but a cold indifference towards us of this order in which we live. Beauty happens; it is not given. Pain, suffering, happiness; there is no heed. Only in the heart of man burns the fire of righteousness. ~ H G Wells,
961:When we think of readapting mankind to a world of unity and co-operation, we have to consider that practically all the educational machinery on earth, is still in the hands of God-selling or Marx-selling combines. Everywhere in close co-operation with our nationalist governments, the oil and steel interests, our drug salesmanship, and so forth, the hirelines of these huge religious concerns, with more or less zeal and loyalty, are selling destruction to mankind. ~ H G Wells,
962:They were all intensely excited, and all overflowing with noisy expressions of their loyalty to the Law. Yet I felt an absolute assurance in my own mind that the Hyena-Swine was implicated in the rabbit-killing. A strange persuasion came upon me that, save for the grossness of the line, save for the grotesqueness of the forms, I had here before me the whole balance of human life in miniature, the whole interplay of instinct, reason, and fate in its simplest form. ~ H G Wells,
963:The Islamic teachings have left great traditions for equitable and gentle dealings and behavior, and inspire people with nobility and tolerance. These are human teachings of the highest order and at the same time practicable. These teachings brought into existence a society in which hard-heartedness and collective oppression and injustice were the least as compared with all other societies preceding it....Islam is replete with gentleness, courtesy, and fraternity. ~ H G Wells,
964:Common sense and every material reality insisted upon the unification of human life throughout the planet and the socialisation of its elementary needs, and pitted against that was the fact that every authority, every institution, every established way of thinking and living was framed to preserve the advantages of the ruling and possessing minority and the separate sovereignty of the militant states that had been evolved within the vanished circumstances of the past. ~ H G Wells,
965:Love is not only the cardinal fact in the individual life, but the most important concern of the community; after all, the way in which the young people of this generation pair off determines the fate of the nation; all the other affairs of the state are subsidiary to that. And we leave it to flushed and blundering youth to stumble on its own significance, with nothing to guide it but shocked looks and sentimental twaddle and base whisperings and cant-smeared examples. ~ H G Wells,
966:The history of our race and personal religious experience run so closely parallel as to seem to a modern observer almost the same thing; both tell of a being at first scattered and blind and utterly confused, feeling its way slowly to the serenity and salvation of an ordered and coherent purpose. That, in the simplest, is the outline of history; whether one have a religious purpose or disavow a religious purpose altogether, the lines of the outline remain the same. The ~ H G Wells,
967:Yet so vain is man, and so blinded by his vanity, that no writer, up to the very end of the nineteenth century, expressed any idea that intelligent life might have developed there far, or indeed at all, beyond its earthly level. Nor was it generally understood that since Mars is older than our earth, with scarcely a quarter of the superficial area and remoter from the sun, it necessarily follows that it is not only more distant from time's beginning but nearer its end. ~ H G Wells,
968:We are but phantoms, and the phantoms of phantoms, desires like cloud-shadows and wills of straw that eddy in the wind; the days pass, use and wont carry us through as a train carries the shadow of its lights - so be it! But one thing is real and certain, one thing is no dream-stuff, but eternal and enduring. It is the centre of my life, and all other things about it are subordinate or altogether vain. I loved her, that woman of a dream. And she and I are dead together! ~ H G Wells,
969:Mr. Polly went into the National School at six and he left the private school at fourteen, and by that time his mind was in much the same state that you would be in, dear reader, if you were operated upon for appendicitis by a well-meaning, boldly enterprising, but rather over-worked and under-paid butcher boy, who was superseded towards the climax of the operation by a left-handed clerk of high principles but intemperate habits,—that is to say, it was in a thorough mess. ~ H G Wells,
970:The ethical system of these men of the New Republic, the ethical system which will dominate the world state, will be shaped primarily to favour the procreation of what is fine and efficient and beautiful in humanity — beautiful and strong bodies, clear and powerful minds, and a growing body of knowledge — and to check the procreation of base and servile types, of fear-driven and cowardly souls, of all that is mean and ugly and bestial in the souls, bodies, or habits of men. ~ H G Wells,
971:In all the round world of Utopia there is no meat. There used to be. But now we cannot stand the thought of slaughter-houses. And, in a population that is all educated, and at about the same level of physical refinement, it is practically impossible to find anyone who will hew a dead ox or pig. We never settled the hygienic question of meat-eating at all. This other aspect decided us. I can still remember, as a boy, the rejoicings over the closing of the last slaughter-house. ~ H G Wells,
972:For that moment I touched an emotion beyond the common range of men, yet one that the boor brutes we dominate know only too well...I felt the first inkling of a thing that grew quite presently clear in my mind, that oppressed me for many days, a sense of dethronement, a persuasion that I was no longer a master, but an animal among the animals, under the Martian heel. With us it would be as with them, to lurk and watch, to run and hide; the fear and empire of man had passed away. ~ H G Wells,
973:For that moment I touched an emotion beyond the common range of men, yet one that the poor brutes we dominate know only too well...I felt the first inkling of a thing that grew quite presently clear in my mind, that oppressed me for many days, a sense of dethronement, a persuasion that I was no longer a master, but an animal among the animals, under the Martian heel. With us it would be as with them, to lurk and watch, to run and hide; the fear and empire of man had passed away. ~ H G Wells,
974:I had seen the Magic Shop from afar several times; I had passed it once or twice, a shop window of alluring little objects, magic balls, magic hens, wonderful cones, ventriloquist dolls, the material of the basket trick, packs of cards that looked all right, and all that sort of thing, but never had I thought of going in until one day, almost without warning, Gip hauled me by my finger right up to the window, and so conducted himself that there was nothing for it but to take him in. ~ H G Wells,
975:-¡Este estúpido mundo! -dijo-. ¡Qué complicado es todo! No he vivido hasta ahora. Me pregunto cuándo empezaré. Dieciséis años tiranizado por niñeras y maestros de escuela, sometido a su santa voluntad; cinco años en Londres estudiando medicina con ahínco: mala comida, alojamientos miserables, ropas raídas, vicios lamentables. Jamás conocí nada mejor. Luego, empujado a esta isla infernal... ¡Diez años aquí! ¿Y todo para qué, Prendick? ¿Somos como las pompas de jabón que soplan los niños? ~ H G Wells,
976:What is this spirit in man that urges him forever to depart from happiness and security, to toil, to place himself in danger, even to risk a reasonable certainty of death? It dawned upon me up there in the moon as a thing I ought always to have known, that man is not made simply to go about being safe and comfortable and well fed and amused. Against his interest, against his happiness he is constantly being driven to do unreasonable things. Some force not himself impels him and go he must. ~ H G Wells,
977:There's something they call the Law. Sing hymns about ‘all thine.’ They build themselves their dens, gather fruit, and pull herbs—marry even. But I can see through it all, see into their very souls, and see there nothing but the souls of beasts, beasts that perish, anger and the lusts to live and gratify themselves.—Yet they're odd; complex, like everything else alive. There is a kind of upward striving in them, part vanity, part waste sexual emotion, part waste curiosity. It only mocks me. ~ H G Wells,
978:Armament should be an illegality everywhere, and some sort of international force should patrol a treaty-bound world. Partial armament is one of those absurdities dear to moderate-minded 'reasonable' men. Armament itself is making war. Making a gun, pointing a gun, and firing it are all acts of the same order. It should be illegal to construct anywhere upon earth any mechanism for the specific purpose of killing men. When you see a gun it is reasonable to ask: 'Whom is that intended to kill?' ~ H G Wells,
979:They ought not to have let things come to this," he said, but he was never very clear even to himself who or why "They" were nor what "This" was. Some person or persons unknown was to blame. He hated these unknowns in general. But he was unable to focus his hatred into hating some responsible person or persons in particular. If only he could find who it was had neglected to do something, or had done something wrong or messed about with things, they would catch it. He'd get even with them somehow. ~ H G Wells,
980:What right have they to hope? They work ill and they want the reward of those who work well. The hope of mankind - what is it? That some day the Over-man may come, that some day the inferior, the weak and the bestial may be subdued or eliminated. Subdued if not eliminated. The world is no place for the bad, the stupid, the enervated. Their duty - it's a fine duty too! - is to due. The death of the failure! That is the path by which the beast rose to manhood, by which man goes on to higher things. ~ H G Wells,
981:Another school of opinion followed Mr. Fearenside, and either accepted the piebald view or some modification of it; as, for instance, Silas Durgan, who was heard to assert that “if he chooses to show enself at fairs he’d make his fortune in no time,” and being a bit of a theologian, compared the stranger to the man with the one talent. Yet another view explained the entire matter by regarding the stranger as a harmless lunatic. That had the advantage of accounting for everything straight away. Between ~ H G Wells,
982:Bu lanet olasıca dünya,” dedi, “her şey amma da karmaşık! Şimdiye kadar hiç hayatım olmadı. Ne zaman başlayacak merak ediyorum. On altı yıl boyunca dadıların ve öğretmenlerin kendi paşa keyiflerine göre davranmalarına katlan; beş yılı Londra’da tıp inekleyerek geçir -rezil yemekler, kötü odalar, kötü giysiler, kötü alışkanlıklar, bir hata ve- başka ne yapabilirdim bilmiyorum, sonra da bu hayvanlarla dolu adaya düş. Burada on yıl! Ne için bütün bunlar Prendick? Biz bir bebeğin şişirdiği çikletler miyiz? ~ H G Wells,
983:I think that at that time none of us quite believed in the Time Machine. The fact is, the Time Traveler was one of those men who are too clever to be believed: you never felt that you saw all round him; you always suspected some subtle reserve, some ingenuity in ambush, behind his lucid frankness. Had Filby shown the model and explained the matter in the Time Traveller's words, we should have shown him far less skepticism. For we should have perceived his motives; a pork butcher could understand Filby. ~ H G Wells,
984:And all over the countryside, he knew, on every crest and hill, where once the hedges had interlaced, and cottages, churches, inns, and farmhouses had nestled among their trees, wind wheels similar to those he saw and bearing like vast advertisements, gaunt and distinctive symbols of the new age, cast their whirling shadows and stored incessantly the energy that flowed away incessantly through all the arteries of the city. ... The great circular shapes of complaining wind-wheels blotted out the heavens. ~ H G Wells,
985:For that moment I touched an emotion beyond the common range of men, yet one the poor brutes we dominate know only too well. I felt as a rabbit might feel returning to his burrow, and suddenly confronted by the work of a dozen busy navvies digging the foundations of a house. I felt the first inkling of a thing that presently grew quite clear in my mind, that oppressed me for many days, a sense of dethronement, a persuasion that I was no longer master, but an animal among animals; under the Martian heel. ~ H G Wells,
986:I believe that now and always the conscious selection of the best for reproduction will be impossible; that to propose it is to display a fundamental misunderstanding of what individuality implies. The way of nature has always been to slay the hindmost, and there is still no other way, unless we can prevent those who would become the hindmost being born. It is in the sterilization of failure, and not in the selection of successes for breeding, that the possibility of an improvement of the human stock lies. ~ H G Wells,
987:Under this tremendous dawn of power and freedom, under a sky ablaze with promise, in the very presence of science standing like some bountiful goddess over all the squat darknesses of human life, holding patiently in her strong arms, until men chose to take them, security, plenty, the solution of riddles, the key of the bravest adventures, in her very presence, and with the earnest of her gifts in court, the world was to witness such things as the squalid spectacle of the Dass-Tata patent litigation. There ~ H G Wells,
988:He protested. "Wealth," he said, "is no sort of power at all unless you make it one. If it is so in your world it is so by inadvertency. Wealth is a State-made thing, a convention, the most artificial of powers. You can, by subtle statesmanship, contrive what it shall buy and what it shall not. In your world it would seem you have made leisure, movement, any sort of freedom, life itself, purchaseable . The more fools you! A poor working man with you is a man in discomfort and fear. No wonder your rich have power. ~ H G Wells,
989:The sky was no longer blue. North-eastward it was inky black, and out of the blackness shone brightly and steadily the pale white stars. Overhead it was a deep Indian red and starless, and south-eastward it grew brighter to a glowing scarlet where, cut by the horizon, lay the huge hull of the sun, red and motionless. The rocks about me were of a harsh reddish colour, and all the trace of life that I could see at first was the intensely green vegetation that covered every projecting point on their south-eastern face. ~ H G Wells,
990:...which I devoted chiefly to a morning's walk up the hill to the Perona springs, where I took the waters, rather for fun than with any idea of a cure, and then sat in a state of wholesome idleness on the terrace of the Source Hotel removing the inky taste by appropriately chosen refreshment. My aunt is inclined to a non-alcoholic attitude, but of late years I have found the unobtrusive exercise of my private judgment in such matters not only permissible but better for both of us. I mean I am a more cheerful companion. ~ H G Wells,
991:It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment. ~ H G Wells,
992:we are dealing with a new kind of army altogether, no longer held together in the solidarity of a common citizenship. As that tie fails, the legions discover another in esprit de corps, in their common difference from and their common interest against the general community. They begin to develop a warmer interest in their personal leaders, who secure them pay and plunder. Before the Punic Wars it was the tendency of ambitious men in Rome to court the plebeians; after that time they began to court the legions. Comparison ~ H G Wells,
993:me was the glittering desolation of the sea, the awful solitude upon which I had already suffered so much; behind me the island, hushed under the dawn, its Beast People silent and unseen. The enclosure, with all its provisions and ammunition, burnt noisily, with sudden gusts of flame, a fitful crackling, and now and then a crash. The heavy smoke drove up the beach away from me, rolling low over the distant tree-tops towards the huts in the ravine. Beside me were the charred vestiges of the boats and these four dead bodies. ~ H G Wells,
994:This sense of insecurity was falling about the entire planet and though people went on doing the things they usually did, they had none of the assurance, the happy-go-lucky "all-right" feeling, that had hitherto sustained normal men. They went on doing their customary things because they could not think of anything else to do. They tried to believe, and many did succeed in believing, that there would presently be a turn for the better. They did nothing to bring about that turn for the better; they just hoped it would occur. ~ H G Wells,
995:This — this is the dawn of a new day in human living. At the climax of that civilisation which had its beginning in the hammered flint and the fire-stick of the savage, just when it is becoming apparent that our ever-increasing needs cannot be borne indefinitely by our present sources of energy, we discover suddenly the possibility of an entirely new civilisation. The energy we need for our very existence, and with which Nature supplies us still so grudgingly, is in reality locked up in inconceivable quantities all about us. ~ H G Wells,
996:There are countless men in the world living very comfortably indeed, and running businesses that were once their own property for their creditors. There are still more who have written off princely debts and do not seem to be a "ha'p'orth the worse." And their creditors have found a balm in time and philosophy. Bankruptcy is only painful and destructive to small people and helpless people; but then for them everything is painful and destructive; it can be a very light matter to big people; it may be almost painless to a State. ~ H G Wells,
997:The real method of popular expression in Italy in those days was not the comitia tributa, but the strike and insurrection, the righteous and necessary methods of all cheated or suppressed peoples. We have seen in our own days in Great Britain a decline in the prestige of parliamentary government and a drift towards unconstitutional methods on the part of the masses through exactly the same cause, through the incurable disposition of politicians to gerrymander the electoral machine until the community is driven to explosion. For ~ H G Wells,
998:The visitor sat and listened to her retreating feet. He glanced inquiringly at the window before he removed his serviette, and resumed his meal. He took a mouthful, glanced suspiciously at the window, took another mouthful, then rose and, taking the serviette in his hand, walked across the room and pulled the blind down to the top of the white muslin that obscured the lower panes. This left the room in a twilight. This done, he returned with an easier air to the table and his meal. “The poor soul’s had an accident or an operation ~ H G Wells,
999:Can an instantaneous cube exist?' 'Don't follow you,' said Filby. 'Can a cube that does not last for any time at all, have a real existence?' Filby became pensive. 'Clearly,' the Time Traveller proceeded, 'any real body must have extension in four directions: it must have Length, Breadth, Thickness, and—Duration. But through a natural infirmity of the flesh, which I will explain to you in a moment, we incline to overlook this fact. There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time. ~ H G Wells,
1000:Things were rather larger, more obvious and rougher on the American side, but the issues were essentially the same. The general public voted and demonstrated, but its voting seemed to lead to nothing. It felt that things were done behind its back and over its head but it could never understand clearly how. It never seemed able to get sound news out of its newspapers nor good faith out of its politicians. It resisted, it fumbled, it was becoming more and more suspicious and sceptical, but it was profoundly confused and ill-informed. ~ H G Wells,
1001:You have only to play at Little Wars three or four times to realize just what a blundering thing Great War must be. Great War is at present, I am convinced, not only the most expensive game in the universe, but it is a game out of all proportion. Not only are the masses of men and material and suffering and inconvenience too monstrously big for reason, but-the available heads we have for it, are too small. That, I think, is the most pacific realization conceivable, and Little War brings you to it as nothing else but Great War can do. ~ H G Wells,
1002:I think that it [the Church] stands for everything most hostile to the mental emancipation and stimulation of mankind. It is the completest, most highly organized system of prejudices and antagonisms in existence. Everywhere in the world there are ignorance and prejudice, but the greatest complex of these, with the most extensive prestige and the most intimate entanglement with traditional institutions, is the Roman Catholic Church. It presents many faces towards the world, but everywhere it is systematic in its fight against freedom. ~ H G Wells,
1003:The brown and charred rags that hung from the sides of it, I presently recognized as the decaying vestiges of books. They had long since dropped to pieces, and every semblance of print had left them. But here and there were warped boards and cracked metallic clasps that told the tale well enough. Had I been a literary man I might, perhaps, have moralized upon the futility of all ambition. But as it was, the thing that struck me with keenest force was the enormous waste of labour to which this sombre wilderness of rotting paper testified. ~ H G Wells,
1004:But you can't be too careful of these strange new ideas and new things. You must not tamper with them. If you try to understand them, they may entangle and get hold of you, and then where will you be? Hide your mind from them, and hide them from your mind. Stick to the plain common sense of life. There will always be a tomorrow rather like today. At least so far there always has been a fairly similar tomorrow. Once or twice lately there have been jolts...

Try not to notice these jolts.

'It is no good meeting trouble halfway. ~ H G Wells,
1005:She had learnt many things since the days of her first rebellion, and she knew now that this matter of the man friend and nothing else in the world is the central issue in the emancipation of women. The difficulty of him is latent in every other restriction of which women complain. The complete emancipation of women will come with complete emancipation of humanity from jealousy — and no sooner. All other emancipations are shams until a woman may go about as freely with this man as with that, and nothing remains for emancipation when she can. ~ H G Wells,
1006:Science is a match that man has just got alight. He thought he was in a room - in moments of devotion, a temple - and that his light would be reflected from and display walls inscribed with wonderful secrets and pillars carved with philosophical systems wrought into harmony. It is a curious sensation, now that the preliminary splutter is over and the flame burns up clear, to see his hands and just a glimpse of himself and the patch he stands on visible, and around him, in place of all that human comfort and beauty he anticipated - darkness still. ~ H G Wells,
1007:Every symbiosis is in its degree underlain by hostility, and only by proper regulation and often elaborate adjustment, can the state of mutual benefit be maintained. Even in human affairs, partnerships for mutual benefit are not so easily kept up, in spite of men being endowed with intelligence and so being able to grasp the meaning of such a relation. But in lower organisms, there is no such comprehension to help keep the relationship going. Mutual partnerships are adaptations as blindly entered into and as unconsciously brought about as any others. ~ H G Wells,
1008:What, unless biological science is a mass of errors, is the cause of human intelligence and vigour? Hardship and freedom: conditions under which the active, strong, and subtle survive and the weaker go to the wall; conditions that put a premium upon the loyal alliance of capable men, upon self-restraint, patience, and decision. And the institution of the family, and the emotions that arise therein, the fierce jealousy, the tenderness for offspring, parental self-devotion, all found their justification and support in the imminent dangers of the young. ~ H G Wells,
1009:The great body of physical science, a great deal of the essential fact of financial science, and endless social and political problems are only accessible and only thinkable to those who have had a sound training in mathematical analysis, and the time may not be very remote when it will be understood that for complete initiation as an efficient citizen of one of the new great complex worldwide States that are now developing, it is as necessary to be able to compute, to think in averages and maxima and minima, as it is now to be able to read and write. ~ H G Wells,
1010:Indeed Christianity passes. Passes—it has gone! It has littered the beaches of life with churches, cathedrals, shrines and crucifixes, prejudices and intolerances, like the sea urchin and starfish and empty shells and lumps of stinging jelly upon the sands here after a tide. A tidal wave out of Egypt. And it has left a multitude of little wriggling theologians and confessors and apologists hopping and burrowing in the warm nutritious sand. But in the hearts of living men, what remains of it now? Doubtful scraps of Arianism. Phrases. Sentiments. Habits. ~ H G Wells,
1011:Indeed Christianity passes. Passes - it has gone! It has littered the beaches of life with churches, cathedrals, shrines and crucifixes, prejudices and intolerances, like the sea urchin and starfish and empty shells and lumps of stinging jelly upon the sands here after a tide. A tidal wave out of Egypt. And it has left a multitude of little wriggling theologians and confessors and apologists hopping and burrowing in the warm nutritious sand. But in the hearts of living men, what remains of it now? Doubtful scraps of Arianism. Phrases. Sentiments. Habits. ~ H G Wells,
1012:It is claimed by various religious bodies that they protect "the institution of the family". They do nothing of the sort. The family has existed since animals bred and mated and went apart to protect and rear their young. But priestly intervention has degraded this clean and simple relationship by damning unborn children with the idea that they were "conceived in sin", making illegitimacy mysteriously shameful, and keeping all the fundamental facts and possibilities of family life from young people until it is too late for them to benefit by their knowledge. ~ H G Wells,
1013:He knew clearly enough that his imagination was growing traitor to him, and yet at times it seemed the ship he sailed in, his fellow-passengers, the sailors, the wide sea, were all part of a filmy phantasmagoria that hung, scarcely veiling it, between him and a horrible real world. Then the Porroh man, thrusting his diabolical face through that curtain, was the one real and undeniable thing. At that he would get up and touch things, taste something, gnaw something, burn his hand with a match, or run a needle into himself.

("Pollock And The Porrah Man") ~ H G Wells,
1014:If I am recalling an incident very vividly I go back to the instant of its occurrence; I become absent minded, as you say. I jump back for a moment. Of course we have no means of staying back for any length of time any more than a savage or an animal has of staying six feet above the ground. But a civilized man is better off than the savage in this respect. He can go up against gravitation in a balloon, and why should we not hope that ultimately he may be able to stop or accelerate his drift along the Time Dimension; or even to turn about and travel the other way? ~ H G Wells,
1015:The crisis [the Great Depression] discovered a great man in Franklin Roosevelt...None too soon he has carried America forward to the second stage of democratic realization. His New Deal involves such collective controls of the national business that it would be absurd to call it anything but socialism, were it not for a prejudice lingering on from the old individualist days against that word...Both Roosevelt and Stalin were attempting to produce a huge, modern, scientifically organized, socialist state, the one out of a warning crisis and the other out of a chaos. ~ H G Wells,
1016:The world state must begin; it can only begin, as a propaganda cult, or as a group of propagandist cults, to which men and women must give themselves and their energies, regardless of the consequence to themselves The activities of a cult which sets itself to bring about the world-state would at first be propagandist, they would be intellectual and educational, and only as a sufficient mass of opinion and will had accumulated would they become to a predominant extent politically constructive. Such a cult must direct itself particularly to the teaching of the young. ~ H G Wells,
1017:Welles and I differed, however, in our interpretation of the results of the Munich Conference, he being optimistic, I skeptical. In a radio address on October 3, several days after the conference, in which he described the steps taken by the United States Government just prior to Munich, he said that today, perhaps more than at any time during the past two decades, there was presented the opportunity for the establishment by the nations of the world of a new world order based upon justice and upon law. It seemed to me that the colors in the picture were much darker. ~ H G Wells,
1018:Mrs. Hall was screwing up her courage to go in and ask her visitor if he would take some tea, Teddy Henfrey, the clock-jobber, came into the bar. “My sakes! Mrs. Hall,” said he, “but this is terrible weather for thin boots!” The snow outside was falling faster. Mrs. Hall agreed, and then noticed he had his bag with him. “Now you’re here, Mr. Teddy,” said she, “I’d be glad if you’d give th’ old clock in the parlour a bit of a look. ’Tis going, and it strikes well and hearty; but the hour-hand won’t do nuthin’ but point at six.” And leading the way, she went across to the ~ H G Wells,
1019:The crying sounded even louder out of doors. It was as if all the pain in the world had found a voice. Yet had I known such pain was in the next room, and had it been dumb, I believe—I have thought since—I could have stood it well enough. It is when suffering finds a voice and sets our nerves quivering that this pity comes troubling us. But in spite of the brilliant sunlight and the green fans of the trees waving in the soothing sea-breeze, the world was a confusion, blurred with drifting black and red phantasms, until I was out of earshot of the house in the stone wall. ~ H G Wells,
1020:Oliver, my professor, was a scientific bounder, a journalist by instinct, a thief of ideas,—he was always prying! And you know the knavish system of the scientific world. I simply would not publish, and let him share my credit. I went on working, I got nearer and nearer making my formula into an experiment, a reality. I told no living soul, because I meant to flash my work upon the world with crushing effect and become famous at a blow. I took up the question of pigments to fill up certain gaps. And suddenly, not by design but by accident, I made a discovery in physiology. ~ H G Wells,
1021:Why had we come to the moon? The thing presented itself to me as a perplexing problem. What is this spirit in man that urges him for ever to depart from happiness and security, to toil, to place himself in danger, to risk an even a reasonable certainty of death? It dawned upon me that there in the moon as a thing I ought always to have known, that man is not made to go about safe and comfortable and well fed and amused. ... against his interest, against his happiness, he is constantly being driven to do unreasonable things. Some force not himself impels him, and he must go. ~ H G Wells,
1022:The physiological advantages of the practice of injection are undeniable, if one thinks of the tremendous waste of human time and energy occasioned by eating and the digestive process. Our bodies are half made up of glands and tubes and organs, occupied in turning heterogeneous food into blood. The digestive processes and their reaction upon the nervous system sap our strength and colour our minds. Men go happy or miserable as they have healthy or unhealthy livers, or sound gastric glands. But the Martians were lifted above all these organic fluctuations of mood and emotion. ~ H G Wells,
1023:If we suppose a sufficient righteousness and intelligence in men to produce presently, from the tremendous lessons of history, an effective will for a world peace - that is to say, an effective will for a world law under a world government - for in no other fashion is a secure world peace conceivable - in what manner may we expect things to move towards this end? . . . It is an educational task, and its very essence is to bring to the minds of all men everywhere, as a necessary basis for world cooperation, a new telling and interpretation, a common interpretation, of history. ~ H G Wells,
1024:It was some time before I could summon resolution to go down through the trees and bushes upon the flank of the headland to the beach. At last I did it at a run; and as I emerged from the thicket upon the sand, I heard some other body come crashing after me. At that I completely lost my head with fear, and began running along the sand. Forthwith there came the swift patter of soft feet in pursuit. I gave a wild cry, and redoubled my pace. Some dim, black things about three or four times the size of rabbits went running or hopping up from the beach towards the bushes as I passed. ~ H G Wells,
1025:They know they dare not have their stuff stripped down to plain words. These Bishops and parsons with their beloved Christianity are like a man who has poisoned his wife and says her body's too sacred for a post-mortem. Nowadays, by the light we have, any ecclesiastic must be born blind or an intellectual rascal. Don't tell me. The world's had this apostolic succession of oily old humbugs from early Egypt onwards, trying to come it over people. Antiquity's no excuse. A sham is no better for being six thousand years stale. Christianity's no more use to us now than
the Pyramids. ~ H G Wells,
1026:He knew no future then, no kind of life except the life he led. He fled the cave-bear over the rocks full of iron ore and the promise of sword and spear; he froze to death upon a ledge of coal; he drank water muddy with the clay that would one day make cups of porcelain; he chewed the ear of wild wheat he had plucked and gazed with a dim speculation in his eyes at the birds that soared beyond his reach. Or suddenly he became aware of the scent of another male and rose up roaring, his roars the formless precursors of moral admonitions. For he was a great individualist, that original, ~ H G Wells,
1027:One may picture, too, the sudden shifting of the attention, the swiftly spreading coils and bellyings of that blackness advancing headlong, towering heavenward, turning the twilight to a palpable darkness, a strange and horrible antagonist of vapour striding upon its victims, men and horses near it seen dimly, running, shrieking, falling headlong, shouts of dismay, the guns suddenly abandoned, men choking and writhing on the ground, and the swift broadening-out of the opaque cone of smoke. And then night and extinction – nothing but a silent mass of impenetrable vapour hiding its dead. ~ H G Wells,
1028:Right thinking is necessarily an open process, and the only science and history of full value to men consist of what is generally and clearly known; this is surely a platitude, but we have still to discover how to preserve our centres of philosophy and research from the caking and darkening accumulations of narrow and dingy-spirited specialists. We have still to ensure that a man of learning shall be none the less a man of affairs, and that all that can be thought and known is kept plainly, honestly, and easily available to the ordinary men and women who are the substance of mankind. The ~ H G Wells,
1029:The question whether a Leblanc is still possible, the question whether it is still possible to bring about an outbreak of creative sanity in mankind, to avert this steady glide to destruction, is now one of the most urgent in the world. It is clear that the writer is temperamentally disposed to hope that there is such a possibility. But he has to confess that he sees few signs of any such breadth of understanding and steadfastness of will as an effectual effort to turn the rush of human affairs demands. The inertia of dead ideas and old institutions carries us on towards the rapids. Only ~ H G Wells,
1030:A priest is a man vowed, trained, and consecrated, a man belonging to a special corps, and necessarily with an intense esprit de corps. He has given up his life to his temple and his god. This is a very excellent thing for the internal vigour of his own priesthood, his own temple. He lives and dies for the honour of his particular god. But in the next town or village is another temple with another god. It is his constant preoccupation to keep his people from that god. Religious cults and priesthoods are sectarian by nature; they will convert, they will overcome, but they will never coalesce. ~ H G Wells,
1031:It is well to understand how empty space is. If, as we have said, the sun were a ball nine feet across, our earth would, in proportion, be the size of a one-inch ball, and at a distance of 323 yards from the sun. The moon would be a speck the size of a small pea, thirty inches from the earth. Nearer to the sun than the earth would be two other very similar specks, the planets Mercury and Venus, at a distance of 125 and 250 yards respectively. Beyond the earth would come the planets Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, at distances of 500, 1806, 3000, 6000, and 9500 yards respectively. ~ H G Wells,
1032:He went into those little gardens beneath the over-hanging, brightly-lit masses of the Savoy Hotel and the Hotel Cecil. He sat down on a seat and became aware of the talk of the two people next to him. It was the talk of a young couple evidently on the eve of marriage. The man was congratulating himself on having regular employment at last; 'they like me,' he said, 'and I like the job. If I work up—in'r dozen years or so I ought to be gettin' somethin' pretty comfortable. That's the plain sense of it, Hetty. There ain't no reason whatsoever why we shouldn't get along very decently—very decently indeed. ~ H G Wells,
1033:for the strength of a man and the softness of a woman, the institution of the family, and the differentiation of occupations are mere militant necessities of an age of physical force; where population is balanced and abundant, much childbearing becomes an evil rather than a blessing to the State; where violence comes but rarely and offspring are secure, there is less necessity—indeed there is no necessity—for an efficient family, and the specialization of the sexes with reference to their children’s needs disappears. We see some beginnings of this even in our own time, and in this future age it was complete. ~ H G Wells,
1034:The planet Mars, I scarcely need remind the reader, revolves about the sun at a mean distance of 140,000,000 miles, and the light and heat it receives from the sun is barely half of that received by this world. It must be, if the nebular hypothesis has any truth, older than our world; and long before this earth ceased to be molten, life upon its surface must have begun its course. The fact that it is scarcely one seventh of the volume of the earth must have accelerated its cooling to the temperature at which life could begin. It has air and water and all that is necessary for the support of animated existence. ~ H G Wells,
1035:Science is a match that man has just got alight. He thought he was in a room - in moments of devotion, a temple - and that his light would be reflected from and display walls inscribed with wonderful secrets and pillars carved with philosophical systems wrought into harmony. It is a curious sensation, now that the preliminary splutter is over and the flame burns up clear, to see his hands lit and just a glimpse of himself and the patch he stands on visible, and around him, in place of all that human comfort and beauty he anticipated - darkness still.
   'The Rediscovery of the Unique' Fortnightly Review (1891)

~ H G Wells,
1036:All at once you are Lord of yourself, Lord of every hour in the long, vacant day; you may go where you please, call none Sir or Madame, have a lappel free of pins, doff your black morning coat, and wear the colour of your heart, and be a Man. You grudge sleep, you grudge eating, and drinking even, their intrusion on those exquisite moments. There will be no more rising before breakfast in casual old clothing, to go dusting and getting ready in a cheerless, shutter-darkened, wrappered-up shop, no more imperious cries of, “Forward, Hoopdriver,” no more hasty meals, and weary attendance on fitful old women, for ten blessed days. ~ H G Wells,
1037:But he was one of those weak creatures, void of pride, timorous, anaemic, hateful souls, full of shifty cunning, who face neither God nor man, who face not even themselves. It is disagreeable for me to recall and write these things, but I set them down that my story may lack nothing. Those who have escaped the dark and terrible aspects of life will find my brutality, my flash of rage in our final tragedy, easy enough to blame; for they know what is wrong as well as any, but not what is possible to tortured men. But those who have been under the shadow, who have gone down at last to elemental things, will have a wider charity. ~ H G Wells,
1038:Aren't we all agreed about those things--in theory?'

In theory, yes,' said Bobby. 'But not in reality. If every one really wanted to abolish the difference of rich and poor it would be as easy as pie to find a way. There's always a way to everything if you want to do it enough. But nobody really wants to do these things. Not as we want meals. All sorts of other things people want, but wanting to have no rich and poor any more isn't real wanting; it is just a matter of pious sentiment. And so it is about war. We don't want to be poor and we don't want to be hurt or worried by war, but that's not wanting to end those things. ~ H G Wells,
1039:He came away with an exasperated sense of failure. He denounced parliamentary government root and branch that night. Parliament was doomed. The fact that it had not listened to Rud was only one little conclusive fact in a long indictment. "It has become a series of empty forms," he said. "All over the world, always, the sawdust of reality is running out of the shapes of quasi-public things. Not one British citizen in a thousand watches what is done in Parliament; not one in a thousand Americans follows the discourses of Congress. Interest has gone. Every election in the past thirty years has been fought on gross misunderstandings. ~ H G Wells,
1040:When afterwards I tried to tell my aunt, she punished me again for my wicked persistence. Then, as I said, everyone was forbidden to listen to me, to hear a word about it. Even my fairy-tale books were taken away from me for a time - because I was too 'imaginative'. Eh! Yes, they did that! My father belonged to the old school.... And my story was driven back upon myself. I whispered it to my pillow - my pillow that was often damp and salt to my whispering lips with childish tears. And I added always to my official and less fervent prayers this one heartfelt request: 'Please God I may dream of the garden. O! take me back to my garden. ~ H G Wells,
1041:That afternoon, with a sense of infinite relief, Pollock watched the flat swampy foreshore of Sulyma grow small in the distance. The gap in the long line of white surge became narrower and narrower. It seemed to be closing in and cutting him off from his trouble. The feeling of dread and worry began to slip from him bit by bit. At Sulyma belief in Porroh malignity and Porroh magic had been in the air, his sense of Porroh had been vast, pervading, threatening, dreadful. Now manifestly the domain of Porroh was only a little place, a little black band between the lea and the blue cloudy Mendi uplands.

("Pollock And The Porroh Man") ~ H G Wells,
1042:We have done much in the last few years to destroy the severe limitations of Victorian delicacy, and all of us, from princesses and prime-ministers' wives downward, talk of topics that would have been considered quite gravely improper in the nineteenth century. Nevertheless, some topics have, if anything, become more indelicate than they were, and this is especially true of the discussion of income, of any discussion that tends, however remotely, to inquire, Who is it at the base of everything who really pays in blood and muscle and involuntary submissions for your freedom and magnificence? This, indeed, is almost the ultimate surviving indecency. ~ H G Wells,
1043:The stranger went into the little parlour of the Coach and Horses about half-past five in the morning, and there he remained until near midday, the blinds down, the door shut, and none, after Hall’s repulse, venturing near him. All that time he must have fasted. Thrice he rang his bell, the third time furiously and continuously, but no one answered him. “Him and his ‘go to the devil’ indeed!” said Mrs. Hall. Presently came an imperfect rumour of the burglary at the vicarage, and two and two were put together. Hall, assisted by Wadgers, went off to find Mr. Shuckleforth, the magistrate, and take his advice. No one ventured upstairs. How the stranger occupied ~ H G Wells,
1044:Herbert George Wells, better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man and The Island of Doctor Moreau. He was a prolific writer of both fiction and non-fiction, and produced works in many different genres, including contemporary novels, history, and social commentary. He was also an outspoken socialist. His later works become increasingly political and didactic, and only his early science fiction novels are widely read today. Wells, along with Hugo Gernsback and Jules Verne, is sometimes referred to as "The Father of Science Fiction". Source: Wikipedia ~ H G Wells,
1045:For in the latter days of that passionate life that lay now so far behind him, the conception of a free and equal manhood had become a very real thing to him. He had hoped, as indeed his age had hoped, rashly taking it for granted, that the sacrifice of the many to the few would some day cease, that a day was near when every child born of woman should have a fair and assured chance of happiness. And here, after two hundred years, the same hope, still unfulfilled, cried passionately through the city. After two hundred years, he knew, greater than ever, grown with the city to gigantic proportions, were poverty and helpless labour and all the sorrows of his time. ~ H G Wells,
1046:So, in the end, above ground you must have the Haves, pursuing pleasure and comfort and beauty, and below ground the Have-nots, the Workers getting continually adapted to the conditions of their labour. Once they were there, they would no doubt have to pay rent, and not a little of it, for the ventilation of their caverns; and if they refused, they would starve or be suffocated for arrears. Such of them as were so constituted as to be miserable and rebellious would die; and, in the end, the balance being permanent, the survivors would become as well adapted to the conditions of underground life, and as happy in their way, as the Upper-world people were to theirs. ~ H G Wells,
1047:That is the germ of my great discovery. But you are wrong to say that we cannot move about in Time. For instance, if I am recalling an incident very vividly I go back to the instant of its occurrence: I become absent-minded, as you say. I jump back for a moment. Of course we have no means of staying back for any length of Time, any more than a savage or an animal has of staying six feet above the ground. But a civilized man is better off than the savage in this respect. He can go up against gravitation in a balloon, and why should he not hope that ultimately he may be able to stop or accelerate his drift along the Time-Dimension, or even turn about and travel the other way? ~ H G Wells,
1048:The history of mankind henceforth is a history of more or less blind endeavours to conceive, a common purpose in relation to which all men may live happily, and to create and develop a common consciousness and a common stock of knowledge which may serve and illuminate that purpose. In a vast variety of forms this is appearance of kings and priests and magic men was happening all over the world under Neolithic conditions. Everywhere mankind was seeking where knowledge and mastery and magic power might reside; everywhere individual men were willing, honestly or dishonestly, to rule, to direct, or to be the magic beings who would reconcile the confusions of the community. Another ~ H G Wells,
1049:I adopted all the expedients that would naturally occur to a young medical man to end these enervating experiences, but without avail. I dieted. I exercised. I would get up and dress, go out either on foot or in my car, in spite of a strong fear resistance. Fear pursued me out of those dreams. The nightmare quality hung about me and could not be shaken off. I was awake and still dreaming. Never have I seen such sinister skies as I did on those night excursions. I felt such a dread of unfamiliar shadows as I had not known even in childhood. There were times on those nocturnal drives when I could have shouted aloud for daylight as a man suffocating in a closed chamber might shout for air. ~ H G Wells,
1050:She wanted to live. She was vehemently impatient—she did not clearly know for what—to do, to be, to experience. And experience was slow in coming. All the world about her seemed to be—how can one put it?—in wrappers, like a house when people leave it in the summer. The blinds were all drawn, the sunlight kept out, one could not tell what colors these gray swathings hid. She wanted to know. And there was no intimation whatever that the blinds would ever go up or the windows or doors be opened, or the chandeliers, that seemed to promise such a blaze of fire, unveiled and furnished and lit. Dim souls flitted about her, not only speaking but it would seem even thinking in undertones.... During ~ H G Wells,
1051:You English," said Steenhold.

"You Americans," said Rud.

"When you aren't as fresh as paint," he said, "you Americans are as stale as old cabbage leaves. I'm amazed at your Labour leaders, at the sort of things you can still take seriously as Presidential Candidates. These leonine reverberators tossing their manes back in order to keep their eyes on the White House -- they belong to the Pleistocene. We dropped that sort of head in England after John Bright. When the Revolution is over and I retire, I shall retire as Hitler did, to some remote hunting-lodge, and we'll have the heads of Great Labour Leaders and Presidential Hopes stuck all round the Hall. Hippopotami won't be in it. ~ H G Wells,
1052:Viendo la desenvoltura y la seguridad en que vivían aquellas gentes, comprendí que aquel estrecho parecido de los sexos era, después de todo, lo que podía esperarse; pues la fuerza de un hombre y la delicadeza de una mujer, la institución de la familia y la diferencia de ocupaciones son simples necesidades militantes de una edad de fuerza física. Allí donde la población es equilibrada y abundante, muchos nacimientos llegan a ser un mal más que un beneficio para el Estado; allí donde la violencia es rara y la prole es segura, hay menos necesidad -realmente no existe la necesidad- de una familia eficaz, y la especialización de los sexos con referencia a las necesidades de sus hijos desaparece (p.49). ~ H G Wells,
1053:About midnight excited hails were heard from a boat about a couple of miles out at sea to the southeast of Sidmouth, and a lantern was seen waving in a strange manner to and fro and up and down. The nearer boats at once hurried towards the alarm. The adventuresome occupants of the boat, a seaman, a curate, and two schoolboys, had actually seen the monsters passing under their boat. The creatures, it seems, like most deep-sea organisms, were phosphorescent, and they had been floating, five fathoms deep or so, like creatures of moonshine through the blackness of the water, their tentacles retracted and as if asleep, rolling over and over, and moving slowly in a wedge-like formation towards the southeast. ~ H G Wells,
1054:The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. His grey eyes shone and twinkled, and his usually pale face was flushed and animated. The fire burned brightly, and the soft radiance of the incandescent lights in the lilies of silver caught the bubbles that flashed and passed in our glasses. Our chairs, being his patents, embraced and caressed us rather than submitted to be sat upon, and there was that luxurious after-dinner atmosphere when thought roams gracefully free of the trammels of precision. And he put it to us in this way—marking the points with a lean forefinger—as we sat and lazily admired his earnestness over this new paradox (as we thought it) and his fecundity. ~ H G Wells,
1055:THE TIME TRAVELLER (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. His grey eyes shone and twinkled, and his usually pale face was flushed and animated. The fire burned brightly, and the soft radiance of the incandescent lights in the lilies of silver caught the bubbles that flashed and passed in our glasses. Our chairs, being his patents, embraced and caressed us rather than submitted to be sat upon, and there was that luxurious after-dinner atmosphere when thought runs gracefully free of the trammels of precision. And he put it to us in this way—marking the points with a lean forefinger—as we sat and lazily admired his earnestness over this new paradox (as we thought it:) and his fecundity. ~ H G Wells,
1056:The new mathematics is a sort of supplement to language, affording a means of thought about form and quantity and a means of expression,more exact,compact, and ready than ordinary language. The great body of physical science, a great deal of the essential facts of financial science, and endless social and political problems are only accessible and thinkable to those who have had a sound training in mathematical analysis, and the time may not be very remote when it will be understood that for complete initiation as an efficient citizen of one of the new great complex world wide states that are now developing, it is as necessary to be able to compute, to think in averages and maxima and minima, as it is now to be able to read and write. ~ H G Wells,
1057:But nowadays -- Our weakness for the last few years has been the ineffectiveness of the Opposition. This Labour Party has never had the quality of a fighting Opposition. It has just sucked the life out of Radicalism. It has never had the definite idealism of the Whigs and Liberals. 'Give us more employment and slightly higher pay and be sure of our contentment,' says Labour. 'We're loyal. We know our place. But we don't like being unemployed.' What good is that as Opposition? It's about as much opposition as a mewing cat. We mean more than that. I tell you frankly. Our task, I take it, my task, is to reinstate that practical working Opposition which has always been Old England's alternative line of defence... For the good of all of us... ~ H G Wells,
1058:The essence of its failure was that it could not sustain unity. In its early stages its citizens, both patrician and plebeian, had a certain tradition of justice and good faith, and of the loyalty of all citizens to the law, and of the goodness of the law for all citizens; it clung to this idea of the importance of the law and of law-abidingness nearly into the first century B.C. But the unforeseen invention and development of money, the temptations and disruptions of imperial expansion, the entanglement of electoral methods, weakened and swamped this tradition by presenting old issues in new disguises under which the judgment did not recognize them, and by enabling men to be loyal to the professions of citizenship and disloyal to its spirit. ~ H G Wells,
1059:The accidental balance on the side of Progress was far slighter and infinitely more complex and delicate in its adjustments than the people of that time suspected; but that did not alter the fact that it was an effective balance. They did not realize that this age of relative good fortune was an age of immense but temporary opportunity for their kind. They complacently assumed a necessary progress towards which they had no moral responsibility. They did not realize that this security of progress was a thing still to be won or lost, and that the time to win it was a time that passed. They went about their affairs energetically enough, and yet with a curious idleness towards those threatening things. No one troubled over the real dangers of mankind. ~ H G Wells,
1060:We have taken Herodotus as an interesting specimen of what we have called the free intelligence of mankind. Now here we are dealing with a similar overflow of moral ideas into the general community. The Hebrew prophets, and the steady expansion of their ideas towards one God in all the world, is a parallel development of the free conscience of mankind. From this time onward there runs through human thought, now weakly and obscurely, now gathering power, the idea of one rule in the world, and of a promise and possibility of an active and splendid peace and happiness in human affairs. From being a temple religion of the old type, the Jewish religion becomes, to a large extent, a prophetic and creative religion of a new type. Prophet succeeds prophet. ~ H G Wells,
1061:Their bodies lay flatly on the rocks, and their eyes regarded him with evil interest: but it does not appear that Mr. Fison was afraid, or that he realized that he was in any danger. Possibly his confidence is to be ascribed to the limpness of their attitudes. But he was horrified, of course, and intensely excited and indignant at such revolting creatures preying upon human flesh. He thought they had chanced upon a drowned body. He shouted to them, with the idea of driving them off, and, finding they did not budge, cast about him, picked up a big rounded lump of rock, and flung it at one.

And then, slowly uncoiling their tentacles, they all began moving towards him - creeping at first deliberately, and making a soft purring sound to each other. ~ H G Wells,
1062:Seeing the ease and security in which these people were living, I felt that this close resemblance of the sexes was after all what one would expect; for the strength of a man and the softness of a women, the institution of the family, and the differentiation of occupations were mere militant necessities of an age of physical force; where population is balanced and abundant, much child-bearing becomes and evil rather than a blessing to the State; where violence comes but rarely and off-spring are secure, there is less necessity - indeed there is no necessity - for an effective family, and the specialization of the sexes with reference to their children's needs disappears. We see some beginnings of this even in our own time, and i this future age, it was complete. ~ H G Wells,
1063:Without world unification the species would destroy itself by the enlarged powers that had come to it. This, said the men of science, is no theory, no political alternative; it is a statement of fact. Men had to pool their political, economic and educational lives. There was no other way for them but a series of degenerative phases leading very plainly to extinction. They could not revert now. They had to go on — up or down. They had gone too far with civilisation and in societies, to sink back into a merely “animal” life again. The hold of the primates on life had always been a precarious one. Except where they were under human protection all the other great apes were extinct. Now plainly man had to go on to a larger life, a planetary existence, or perish in his turn. ~ H G Wells,
1064:The essence of the Revolution is to abolish the attainment of unqualified power of man over man either by vote-getting, money-pressure or crude terror. The Revolution repudiates profit or terror altogether as methods of human intercourse. It turns the attention of men and women back from a frantic and futile struggle for the means of power, a struggle against our primary social instincts, to an innate urgency to make and to a beneficial competition for preeminence in social service. It recalls man to a clean and creative life from the entanglements and perversion of secondary issues into which he has fallen. It replaces property and official authority by the compelling prestige of sound achievement. Eminent service remains the only source of influence left in the world . . . ~ H G Wells,
1065:It's my opinion he don't want to kill you,' said Perea - 'at least not yet. I've heard deir idea is to scar and worry a man wid deir spells, and narrow misses, and rheumatic pains, and bad dreams, and all dat, until he's sick of life. Of course, it's all talk, you know. You mustn't worry about it. But I wunder what he'll be up to next.'

'I shall have to be up to something first,' said Pollock, staring gloomily at the greasy cards that Perea was putting on the table. 'It don't suit my dignity to be followed about, and shot at, and blighted in this way. I wonder if Porroh hokey-pokey upsets your luck at cards.'

He looked at Perea suspiciously.

'Very likely it does,' said Perea warmly, shuffling. 'Dey are wonderful people.'

("Pollock And The Porrah Man") ~ H G Wells,
1066:Mrs. Lewisham looked puzzled. She realised his drift.

"You're not," she said, and dropped her voice, "an infidel?"

Lewisham nodded gloomily. “Aren’t you?” He said.

“Oh no,” said Mrs. Lewisham.

“But you don’t go to church, you don’t –”

“No, I don’t,” said Mrs. Lewisham; and then with more assurance, “But I’m not an infidel.”

“Christian?”

“I suppose so.”

“But a Christian – What do you believe?”

“Oh! To tell the truth, and do right, and not hurt and injure people and all that.”

“That’s not a Christian. A Christian is one who believes.”

“It’s what I mean by a Christian,” said Mrs. Lewisham.

“Oh! At that rate anyone’s a Christian,” said Lewisham. “We all think it’s right to do right and wrong to do wrong. ~ H G Wells,
1067:In the early evening time Dr. Kemp was sitting in his study in the belvedere on the hill overlooking Burdock. It was a pleasant little room, with three windows—north, west, and south—and bookshelves covered with books and scientific publications, and a broad writing-table, and, under the north window, a microscope, glass slips, minute instruments, some cultures, and scattered bottles of reagents. Dr. Kemp's solar lamp was lit, albeit the sky was still bright with the sunset light, and his blinds were up because there was no offence of peering outsiders to require them pulled down. Dr. Kemp was a tall and slender young man, with flaxen hair and a moustache almost white, and the work he was upon would earn him, he hoped, the fellowship of the Royal Society, so highly did he think of it. ~ H G Wells,
1068:I’ve seen hundreds of ’em, bit of breakfast in hand, running wild and shining to catch their little season-ticket train, for fear they’d get dismissed if they didn’t; working at businesses they were afraid to take the trouble to understand; skedaddling back for fear they wouldn’t be in time for dinner; keeping indoors after dinner for fear of the back streets, and sleeping with the wives they married, not because they wanted them, but because they had a bit of money that would make for safety in their one little miserable skedaddle through the world. Lives insured and a bit invested for fear of accidents. And on Sundays—fear of the hereafter. As if hell was built for rabbits! Well, the Martians will just be a godsend to these. Nice roomy cages, fattening food, careful breeding, no worry. ~ H G Wells,
1069:NO ONE would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutnised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable. ~ H G Wells,
1070:And seeing all the Hellespont covered over with the ships and all the shores and the plains of Abydos full of men, then Xerxes pronounced himself a happy man, and after that he fell to weeping. Artabanus, his uncle, therefore perceiving him the same who at first boldly declared his opinion advising Xerxes not to march against Hellas-this man, I say, having observed that Xerxes wept, asked as follows: 'O king, how far different from one another are the things which thou hast done now and a short while before now! for having pronounced thyself a happy man, thou art now shedding tears.' He said : 'Yea, for after I had reckoned up, it came into my mind to feel pity at the thought how brief was the whole life of man, seeing that of these multitudes not one will be alive when a hundred years have gone by. ~ H G Wells,
1071:During her school days, especially her earlier school days, the world had been very explicit with her, telling her what to do, what not to do, giving her lessons to learn and games to play and interests of the most suitable and various kinds. Presently she woke up to the fact that there was a considerable group of interests called being in love and getting married, with certain attractive and amusing subsidiary developments, such as flirtation and "being interested" in people of the opposite sex. She approached this field with her usual liveliness of apprehension. But here she met with a check. These interests her world promptly, through the agency of schoolmistresses, older school-mates, her aunt, and a number of other responsible and authoritative people, assured her she must on no account think about. Miss ~ H G Wells,
1072:The landscape was misty and vague. I was still on the hill-side upon which this house now stands, and the shoulder rose above me grey and dim. I saw trees growing and changing like puffs of vapour, now brown, now green; they grew, spread, shivered, and passed away. I saw huge buildings rise up faint and fair, and pass like dreams. The whole surface of the earth seemed changed—melting and flowing under my eyes. The little hands upon the dials that registered my speed raced round faster and faster. Presently I noted that the sun belt swayed up and down, from solstice to solstice, in a minute or less, and that consequently my pace was over a year a minute; and minute by minute the white snow flashed across the world, and vanished, and was followed by the bright, brief green of spring.”

―The Time Machine, ~ H G Wells,
1073:But such accounts as we have from the Romans were written in periods of panic, and the Roman could lie about his enemies with a freedom and vigour that must arouse the envy even of the modern propagandist. He could talk of Punic faith as a byword for perfidy while committing the most abominable treacheries against Carthage, and his railing accusations of systematic cruelty against this people or that were usually the prelude and excuse for some frightful massacre or enslavement or robbery on his own part. He had quite a Modern passion for self-justification. We must remember that these accounts of the savagery and frightfulness of the Huns came from a people whose chief amusement was gladiatorial shows, and whose chief method of dealing with insurrection and sedition was nailing the offender to a cross to die. ~ H G Wells,
1074:Public men in America are too public. Too accessible. This sitting on the stoop and being 'just folk' was all very well for local politics and the simple farmer days of a hundred years ago, but it's no good for world affairs. Opening flower-shows and being genial to babies and all that is out of date. These parish politics methods have to go. The ultimate leader ought to be distant, audible but far off. Show yourself and then vanish into a cloud. Marx would never have counted for one tenth of his weight as 'Charlie Marx' playing chess with the boys, and Woodrow Wilson threw away all his magic as far as Europe was concerned when he crossed the Atlantic. Before he crossed he was a god -- what a god he was! After he arrived he was just a grinning guest. I've got to be the Common Man, yes, but not common like that. ~ H G Wells,
1075:The queer thing is that we do trust you," said Bodisham. "In spite of your -- extremism."

"You'd better," said Rud with grim conviction. "I'm right. What is extremism? The whole truth and nothing but the truth. I ask you."

"It's because of his extremism you trust him," said Chiffan. "It's because in the last resort we believe in his indiscretion, and know he won't fail us even if we fail ourselves. All leadership is extravagance. Extra-vagance. Going a bit ahead."

Rud did not quite understand that. "It's because you know I'm right," he said.

"It's because," said Chiffan, letting his thoughts run away with him," to make a new world, the leader must be a fundamentally destructive man, a recklessly destructive man. He breaks his way through the jungle and we follow...We cannot do without you, Rud. ~ H G Wells,
1076:From: Love and Mr. Lewisham.



“Mrs. Lewisham looked puzzled. She realised his drift.

"You're not," she said, and dropped her voice, "an infidel?"

Lewisham nodded gloomily. “Aren’t you?” He said.

“Oh no,” said Mrs. Lewisham.

“But you don’t go to church, you don’t –”

“No, I don’t,” said Mrs. Lewisham; and then with more assurance, “But I’m not an infidel.”

“Christian?”

“I suppose so.”

“But a Christian – What do you believe?”

“Oh! To tell the truth, and do right, and not hurt and injure people and all that.”

“That’s not a Christian. A Christian is one who believes.”

“It’s what I mean by a Christian,” said Mrs. Lewisham.

“Oh! At that rate anyone’s a Christian,” said Lewisham. “We all think it’s right to do right and wrong to do wrong. ~ H G Wells,
1077:The Vicar stood aghast, with his smoking gun in his hand. It was no bird at all, but a youth with an extremely beautiful face, clad in a robe of saffron and with iridescent wings, across whose pinions great waves of colour, flushes of purple and crimson, golden green and intense blue, pursued one another as he writhed in his agony. Never had the Vicar seen such gorgeous floods of colour, not stained glass windows, not the wings of butterflies, not even the glories of crystals seen between prisms, no colours on earth could compare with them. Twice the Angel raised himself, only to fall over sideways again. Then the beating of the wings diminished, the terrified face grew pale, the floods of colour abated, and suddenly with a sob he lay prone, and the changing hues of the broken wings faded swiftly into one uniform dull grey hue. “Oh! ~ H G Wells,
1078:And then," said Sarnac, "I remember that I made a prophecy. I made it - when did I make it? Two thousand years ago? Or two weeks ago? I sat in Fanny's little sitting-room, an old-world creature amidst her old-world furnishings, and I said that men and women would not always suffer as we were suffering then. I said that we were still poor savages, living only in the bleak dawn of civilisation, and that we suffered because we were under-bred, under-trained and darkly ignorant of ourselves, that the mere fact that we knew our own unhappiness was the promise of better things and that a day would come when charity and understanding would light the world so that men and women would no longer hurt themselves and one another as they were doing now everywhere, universally, in law and in restriction and in jealousy and in hate, all round and about the earth. ~ H G Wells,
1079:Then he removed his spectacles, and everyone in the bar gasped. He took off his hat, and with a violent gesture tore at his whiskers and bandages. For a moment they resisted him. A flash of horrible anticipation passed through the bar. "Oh, my Gard!" said some one. Then off they came. It was worse than anything. Mrs. Hall, standing open-mouthed and horror-struck, shrieked at what she saw, and made for the door of the house. Everyone began to move. They were prepared for scars, disfigurements, tangible horrors, but nothing! The bandages and false hair flew across the passage into the bar, making a hobbledehoy jump to avoid them. Everyone tumbled on everyone else down the steps. For the man who stood there shouting some incoherent explanation, was a solid gesticulating figure up to the coat-collar of him, and then—nothingness, no visible thing at all! ~ H G Wells,
1080:A shell in the pit," said I, "if the worst comes to worst will kill them all."

The intense excitement of the events had no doubt left my perceptive powers in a state of erethism. I remember that dinner table with extraordinary vividness even now. My dear wife's sweet anxious face peering at me from under the pink lampshade, the white cloth with it silver and glass table furniture—for in those days even philosophical writers had luxuries—the crimson-purple wine in my glass, are photographically distinct. At the end of it I sat, tempering nuts with a cigarette, regretting Ogilvy's rashness, and denouncing the shortsighted timidity of the Martians.

So some respectable dodo in the Mauritius might have lorded it in his nest, and discussed the arrival of that shipful of pitiless sailors in want of animal food. "We will peck them to death tomorrow, my dear. ~ H G Wells,
1081:That Anarchist world, I admit, is our dream; we do believe - well, I, at any rate, believe this present world, this planet, will some day bear a race beyond our most exalted and temerarious dreams, a race begotten of our wills and the substance of our bodies, a race, so I have said it, 'who will stand upon the earth as one stands upon a footstool, and laugh and reach out their hands amidst the stars,' but the way to that is through education and discipline and law. Socialism is the preparation for that higher Anarchism; painfully, laboriously we mean to destroy false ideas of property and self, eliminate unjust laws and poisonous and hateful suggestions and prejudices, create a system of social right-dealing and a tradition of right-feeling and action. Socialism is the schoolroom of true and noble Anarchism, wherein by training and restraint we shall make free men. ~ H G Wells,
1082:The stranger did not go to church, and indeed made no difference between Sunday and the irreligious days, even in costume. He worked, as Mrs. Hall thought, very fitfully. Some days he would come down early and be continuously busy. On others he would rise late, pace his room, fretting audibly for hours together, smoke, sleep in the armchair by the fire. Communication with the world beyond the village he had none. His temper continued very uncertain; for the most part his manner was that of a man suffering under almost unendurable provocation, and once or twice things were snapped, torn, crushed, or broken in spasmodic gusts of violence. He seemed under a chronic irritation of the greatest intensity. His habit of talking to himself in a low voice grew steadily upon him, but though Mrs. Hall listened conscientiously she could make neither head nor tail of what she heard. ~ H G Wells,
1083:Sooner or later it must come out, even if other men rediscover it. And then...Governments and powers will struggle to get hither, they will fight against one another and against these moon people. It will only spread warfare and multiply the occasions of war. In a little while, in a very little while if I tell my secret, this planet to it's deepest galleries will be strewn with human dead. Other things are doubtful, but this is certain...It is not as though man had any use for the moon. What good would the moon be to men? Even of their own planet what have they made but a battleground and theatre of infinite folly? Small as his world is, and short as his time, he has still in his little life down there far more than he can do. No! Science has toiled too long forging weapons for fools to use. It is time she held her hand. Let him find it out for himself again-in a thousand years' time. ~ H G Wells,
1084:I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide. It had set itself steadfastly towards comfort and ease, a balanced society with security and permanency as its watchword, it had attained its hopes – to come to this at last. Once, life and property must have reached almost absolute safety. The rich had been assured of his wealth and comfort, the toiler assured of his life and work. No doubt in that perfect world there had been no unemployed problem, no social question left unsolved. And a great quiet had followed. ‘It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger and trouble. An animal perfectly in harmony with its environment is a perfect mechanism. Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. ~ H G Wells,
1085:it came to me then, I am sure, for the first time, how promiscuous, how higgledy-piggledy was the whole of that jumble of mines and homes, collieries and potbanks, railway yards, canals, schools, forges and blast furnaces, churches, chapels, allotment hovels, a vast irregular agglomeration of ugly smoking accidents in which men lived as happy as frogs in a dustbin. Each thing jostled and damaged the other things about it, each thing ignored the other things about it; the smoke of the furnace defiled the potbank clay, the clatter of the railway deafened the worshipers in church, the public-house thrust corruption at the school doors, the dismal homes squeezed miserably amidst the monstrosities of industrialism, with an effect of groping imbecility. Humanity choked amidst its products, and all its energy went in increasing its disorder, like a blind stricken thing that struggles and sinks in a morass. ~ H G Wells,
1086:from head to foot, and the brim of his soft felt hat hid every inch of his face but the shiny tip of his nose; the snow had piled itself against his shoulders and chest, and added a white crest to the burden he carried. He staggered into the “Coach and Horses” more dead than alive, and flung his portmanteau down. “A fire,” he cried, “in the name of human charity! A room and a fire!” He stamped and shook the snow from off himself in the bar, and followed Mrs. Hall into her guest parlour to strike his bargain. And with that much introduction, that and a couple of sovereigns flung upon the table, he took up his quarters in the inn. Mrs. Hall lit the fire and left him there while she went to prepare him a meal with her own hands. A guest to stop at Iping in the wintertime was an unheard-of piece of luck, let alone a guest who was no “haggler,” and she was resolved to show herself worthy of her good fortune. ~ H G Wells,
1087:The whole world," he said, "is going Radical again. Fundamentally. In religion. In politics. In law. The Common Man has been trying to get his Radicalism said and done plainly and clearly for a hundred and fifty years. Now we take it on. Our movement. The new wave of attack."

"And fill a ditch in our turn," said Irwell.

"Maybe we're over the last ditch," said Rud. "There must be a last ditch somewhere...

"All other revolutionary movements have been experiments so far, Christianity, the French Revolution, the Russian Revolution, and more or less failures. They were experiments in liberation and they did not liberate. The old things wriggled back. But ours may be the experiment that succeeds. We may get to the Common-sense World State. Yes -- we -- in this room...Why not? It has to come somehow, somewhen... If it doesn't come pretty soon, there won't be much of humanity left to liberate. ~ H G Wells,
1088:But when a man has once broken through the paper walls of everyday circumstance, those unsubstantial walls that hold so many of us securely prisoned from the cradle to the grave, he has made a discovery. If the world does not please you, you can change it. Determine to alter it at any price, and you can change it altogether. You may change it to something sinister and angry, to something appalling, but it may be you will change it to something brighter, something more agreeable, and at the worst something much more interesting. There is only one sort of man who is absolutely to blame for his own misery, and that is the man who finds life dull and dreary. There are no circumstances in the world that determined action cannot alter, unless perhaps they are the walls of a prison cell, and even those will dissolve and change, I am told, into the infirmary compartment at any rate, for the man who can fast with resolution. ~ H G Wells,
1089:He beheld in swift succession the incidents in the brief tale of his experience. His wretched home, his still more wretched school-days, the years of vicious life he had led since then, one act of selfish dishonour leading to another; it was all clear and pitiless now, all its squalid folly, in the cold light of the dawn. He came to the hut, to the fight with the Porroh man, to the retreat down the river to Sulyma, to the Mendi assassin and his red parcel, to his frantic endeavours to destroy the head, to the growth of his hallucination. It was a hallucination! He knew it was. A hallucination merely. For a moment he snatched at hope. He looked away from the glass, and on the bracket, the inverted head grinned and grimaced at him... With the stiff fingers of his bandaged hand he felt at his neck for the throb of his arteries. The morning was very cold, the steel blade felt like ice.

("Pollock And The Porrah Man") ~ H G Wells,
1090:But the old traditions of sectarian misdirection still in spite of a certain advance in technical efficiency, cripple and distort the general mind. "All that has been changed," cry indignant teachers under criticism. But the evidence that this teaching of theirs still fails to produce a public that is alert, critical, and capable of vigorous readjustment in the face of overwhelming danger, is to be seen in the newspapers that satisfy the Tewler public, the arguments and slogans that appeal to it, the advertisements that succeed with it, the stuff it swallows. It is a press written by Homo Tewler for Homo Tewler all up and down the scale. The Times Tewler, the Daily Mail Tewler, the Herald, the Tribune, the Daily Worker; there is no difference except a difference in scale and social atmosphere. Through them all ran the characteristic Tewler streak of willful ignorance, deliberate disingenuousness, and self-protective illusion. ~ H G Wells,
1091:After all, the sanitation and the agriculture of today are still in the rudimentary stage. The science of our time has attacked but a little department of the field of human disease, but even so, it spreads its operations very steadily and persistently. Our agriculture and horticulture destroy a weed just here and there and cultivate perhaps a score or so of wholesome plants, leaving the greater number to fight out a balance as they can. We improve our favourite plants and animals--and how few they are--gradually by selective breeding; now a new and better peach, now a seedless grape, now a sweeter and larger flower, now a more convenient breed of cattle. We improve them gradually, because our ideals are vague and tentative, and our knowledge is very limited; because Nature, too, is shy and slow in our clumsy hands. Some day all this will be better organized, and still better. That is the drift of the current in spite of the eddies. ~ H G Wells,
1092:Man is still what he was. Invincibly bestial, envious, malicious, greedy. Man, sir, unmasked and disillusioned is the same fearing, snarling, fighting beast he was a hundred thousand years ago. These are no metaphors, sir. What I tell you is the monstrous reality. The brute has been marking time and dreaming of a progress it has failed to make. Any archaeologist will tell you as much; modern man has no better skull, no better brain. Just a cave-man, more or less trained. There has been no real change, no real escape. Civilization, progress, all THAT, we are discovering, was a delusion. Nothing was secured. Nothing. For a time man built himself in, into his neat little PRESENT world of Gods and Providences, rainbow promises and so forth. It was artificial, it was artistic, fictitious. We are only beginning to realize HOW artificial. Now it is breaking down, Mr Frobisher. It is breaking down all about us and we seem unable to prevent it. ~ H G Wells,
1093:The stranger came early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking as it seemed from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand. He was wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his soft felt hat hid every inch of his face but the shiny tip of his nose; the snow had piled itself against his shoulders and chest, and added a white crest to the burden he carried. He staggered into the Coarch and Horses, more dead than alive as it seemed, and flung his portmanteau down. "A fire," he cried, "in the name of human charity! A room and a fire!" He stamped and shook the snow from off himself in the bar, and followed Mrs. Hall into her guest parlour to strike his bargain. And with that much introduction, that and a ready acquiescence to terms and a couple of sovereigns flung upon the table, he took up his quarters in the inn. ~ H G Wells,
1094:Al abrir la puerta, vio al visitante sentado en el sillón delante de la chimenea. Parecía estar medio dormido y tenía la cabeza inclinada hacia un lado. La única luz que había en la habitación era la que daba la chimenea y la poca luz que entraba por la puerta. La señora Hall no podía ver con claridad, además estaba deslumbrada, ya que acababa de encender las luces del bar. Por un momento le pareció ver que el hombre al que ella estaba mirando tenía una enorme boca abierta, una boca increíble, que le ocupaba casi la mitad del rostro. Fue una sensación momentánea: la cabeza vendada, las gafas monstruosas y ese enorme agujero debajo. Enseguida el hombre se agitó en su sillón, se levantó y se llevó la mano al rostro. La señora Hall abrió la puerta de par en par para que entrara más luz y para poder ver al visitante con claridad. Al igual que antes la servilleta, una bufanda le cubría ahora el rostro. La señora Hall pensó que seguramente habían sido las sombras. ~ H G Wells,
1095:scientists" as a class all the world over. What there is great of them is an annoyance to their fellow scientists and a mystery to the general public, and what is not is evident. There is no doubt about what is not great, no race of men have such obvious littlenesses. They live in a narrow world so far as their human intercourse goes; their researches involve infinite attention and an almost monastic seclusion; and what is left over is not very much. To witness some queer, shy, misshapen, grey-headed, self-important, little discoverer of great discoveries, ridiculously adorned with the wide ribbon of some order of chivalry and holding a reception of his fellow-men, or to read the anguish of Nature at the "neglect of science" when the angel of the birthday honours passes the Royal Society by, or to listen to one indefatigable lichenologist commenting on the work of another indefatigable lichenologist, such things force one to realise the unfaltering littleness of men. ~ H G Wells,
1096:{Wells discussing his experiences with Christianity}

I realised as if for the first time, the menace of these queer shaven men in lace and petticoats who had been intoning, responding, and going through ritual gestures at me. I realised something dreadful about them. They were thrusting an incredible and ugly lie upon the world and the world was making no such resistance as I was disposed to make to this enthronement of cruelty. Either I had to come into this immense luminous coop and submit, or I had to declare the Catholic Church, the core and substance of Christendom with all its divines, sages, saints, and martyrs, with successive thousands of believers, age after age, wrong.

...I found my doubt of his essential integrity, and the shadow of contempt it cast, spreading out from him to the whole Church and religion of which he with his wild spoutings about the agonies of Hell, had become the symbol. I felt ashamed to be sitting there in such a bath of credulity. ~ H G Wells,
1097:I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide. It had set itself steadfastly towards comfort and ease, a balanced society with security and permanency as its watchword, it had attained its hopes--to come to this at last. Once, life and property must have reached almost absolute safety. The rich had been assured of his wealth and comfort, the toiler assured of his life and work. No doubt in that perfect world there had been no unemployed problem, no social question left unsolved. And a great quiet had followed.
'It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble. An animal perfectly in harmony with its environment is a perfect mechanism.
Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have to meet a huge variety of needs and dangers. ~ H G Wells,
1098:If it were not for collectors England would be full, so to speak, of rare birds and wonderful butterflies, strange flowers and a thousand interesting things. But happily the collector prevents all that, either killing with his own hands or, by buying extravagantly, procuring people of the lower classes to kill such eccentricities as appear.
...
Eccentricity, in fact, is immorality--think over it again if you do not think so now--just as eccentricity in one's way of thinking is madness (I defy you to find another definition that will fit all the cases of either); and if a species is rare it follows that it is not Fitted to Survive. The collector is after all merely like the foot soldier in the days of heavy armour-he leaves the combatants alone and cuts the throats of those who are overthrown. So one may go through England from end to end in the summer time and see only eight or ten commonplace wild flowers, and the commoner butterflies, and a dozen or so common birds, and never be offended by any breach of the monotony. ~ H G Wells,
1099:The development of the telescope marks, indeed, a new phase in human thought, a new vision of life. It is an extraordinary thing that the Greeks, with their lively and penetrating minds, never realized the possibilities of either microscope or telescope. They made no use of the lens. Yet they lived in a world in which glass had been known and had been made beautiful for hundreds of years; they had about them glass flasks and bottles, through which they must have caught glimpses of things distorted and enlarged. But science in Greece was pursued by philosophers in an aristocratic spirit, men who, with a few such exceptions as the ingenious Archimedes and Hiero, were too proud to learn from such mere artisans as jewellers and metal- and glass-workers.

Ignorance is the first penalty of pride. The philosopher had no mechanical skill and the artisan had no philosophical education, and it was left for another age, more than a thousand years later, to bring together glass and the astronomer.

(The Earth in Space and Time §1) ~ H G Wells,
1100:These politicians impressed him as being the most shortsighted and sceptical men he had ever met. They lived in a little world that was bounded on the one side by "office" and on the other by the constituencies, and they seemed unable to imagine that it was not an eternal world. One tall man, he observed, in the year of grace 1941 was wearing a long frock-coat and a peculiar half-stiff collar reminiscent of that great parliamentary hand, Mr. Gladstone. They talked with one another about divisions; the government majority had dropped to twenty; and they talked about a scene in the House. The P.M.'s manners were becoming intolerable. Then with an air of relaxation they turned to Rud. The possibility of altering opinions in the constituencies seemed a very theoretical one to them. No doubt there were these waves of opinion in the country, and an intelligent parliamentary politician observed them and dodged about among them, but it was quite outside their technique to consider how the pressures of opinion could accumulate and be directed. ~ H G Wells,
1101:The world, I tell you, is bored -- bored now to the explosive pitch. It's bored by all this incessant war preparation. It is bored by aimless violence, now here, now there. It is tired of hatred politics. It's tired of fresh murders every day. It is not indignant, not excited; it is bored. Bored and baffled...

"I don't believe a man begins to know anything of politics until he realises the immense menace of mental fatigue, of world-wide mass boredom. It accumulates. It makes the most frightful convulsions and demoralisation possible. It makes them at last inevitable. Nobody wants fundamental changes in a world where hope and interest prevail. Then people accept their careers, settle down to them, rear children. But throw them out of work, in and out and no sense of security, deprive them of bright expectations, regiment them in masses, underfeed them, bore them with organised mass patriotism, and they begin to seep together into a common morass of discontent and impatience. Almost unconsciously...

"They're like that now. ~ H G Wells,
1102:We have already described the gatherings of the popular comitia; but that clumsy assembly in sheep pens does not convey the full extent to which the gerrymandering of popular representation could be carried in Rome. Whenever there was a new enfranchisement of citizens in Italy, there would be the most elaborate trickery and counter-trickery to enrol the new voters into as few or as many of the thirty old tribes as possible, or to put them into as few as possible new tribes. Since the vote was taken by tribes, it is obvious that however great the number of new additions made, if they were all got together into one tribe, their opinion would only count for one tribal vote, and similarly if they were crowded into just a few tribes, old or new. On the other hand, if they were put into too many tribes their effect in any particular tribe might be inconsiderable. Here was the sort of work to fascinate every smart knave in politics. The comitia tributa could be worked at times so as to vote right counter to the general feeling of the people. ~ H G Wells,
1103:It is impossible now to estimate how much of the intellectual and physical energy of the world was wasted in military preparation and equipment, but it was an enormous proportion. Great Britain spent upon army and navy money and capacity, that directed into the channels of physical culture and education would have made the British the aristocracy of the world. Her rulers could have kept the whole population learning and exercising up to the age of eighteen and made a broad-chested and intelligent man of every Bert Smallways in the islands, had they given the resources they spent in war material to the making of men. Instead of which they waggled flags at him until he was fourteen, incited him to cheer, and then turned him out of school to begin that career of private enterprise we have compactly recorded. France achieved similar imbecilities; Germany was, if possible worse; Russia under the waste and stresses of militarism festered towards bankruptcy and decay. All Europe was producing big guns and countless swarms of little Smallways. ~ H G Wells,
1104:Man began to think. There were times when he was fed, when his lusts and his fears were all appeased, when the sun shone upon the squatting-place and dim stirrings of speculation lit his eyes. He scratched upon a bone and found resemblance and pursued it and began pictorial art, moulded the soft, warm clay of the river brink between his fingers, and found a pleasure in its patternings and repetitions, shaped it into the form of vessels, and found that it would hold water. He watched the streaming river, and wondered from what bountiful breast this incessant water came; he blinked at the sun and dreamt that perhaps he might snare it and spear it as it went down to its resting-place amidst the distant hills. Then he was roused to convey to his brother that once indeed he had done so--at least that some one had done so--he mixed that perhaps with another dream almost as daring, that one day a mammoth had been beset; and therewith began fiction--pointing a way to achievement--and the august prophetic procession of tales. For scores and hundreds of centuries, ~ H G Wells,
1105:Apinamies ikävystytti minua loppujen lopuksi. Se oletti olevansa viiden sormensa ansiosta minun vertaiseni ja lörpötteli minulle kaiken aikaa mitä joutavinta soopaa. Yksi puoli siinä huvitti minua hieman: sillä oli loistava kyky muodostaa uusia sanoja. Se luullakseni uskoi, että mitääntarkoittamattomien sanojen lörpöttely ilmensi puheen syvintä olemusta. Hän kutsui sitä ”isoksi ajatteluksi”, vastakohdaksi ”pienelle ajattelulle” – tavallisten arkisten asioiden käsittelylle. Aina kun lausuin jotain, mitä se ei ymmärtänyt, se ylisti minua vuolaasti, pyysi minua toistamaan sen, opetteli ulkoa ja hoki sitä uudestaan ja uudestaan – pari sanaa väärin siellä täällä – kaikille säyseimmille eläinihmisille. Mitään selkeää ja ymmärrettävää se ei pitänyt missään arvossa. Kehittelin jonkin verran varsin erikoista ”isoa ajattelua” varta vasten apinamiehen käyttöön. Uskon nyt, että se oli älyttömin otus, minkä olen nähnyt; sille oli sille oli kehittynyt mitä mainioin inhimillisen typeryyden asteikko, ilman että se oli menettänyt hitustakaan apinan luontaisesta päättömyydestä. ~ H G Wells,
1106:After all, the sanitation and the agriculture of to-day are still in the rudimentary stage. The science of our time has attacked but a little department of the field of human disease, but even so, it spreads its operations very steadily and persistently. Our agriculture and horticulture destroy a weed just here and there and cultivate perhaps a score or so of wholesome plants, leaving the greater number to fight out a balance as they can. We improve our favourite plants and animals--and how few they are--gradually by selective breeding; now a new and better peach, now a seedless grape, now a sweeter and larger flower, now a more convenient breed of cattle. We improve them gradually, because our ideals are vague and tentative, and our knowledge is very limited; because Nature, too, is shy and slow in our clumsy hands. Some day all this will be better organized, and still better. That is the drift of the current in spite of the eddies. The whole world will be intelligent, educated, and co-operating; things will move faster and faster towards the subjugation of Nature. ~ H G Wells,
1107:It was his first definite encounter with the wary-eyed, platitudinous, evasive Labour leaders, and he realised at once the formidable barrier of
inert leadership they constituted, between the discontented masses and constructive change. They seemed to be almost entirely preoccupied by
internecine intrigues and the "discipline of the Party". They were steeped in Party professionalism. They were not in any way traitors to their cause, or wilfully reactionary, but they had no minds for a renascent world. They meant nothing, but they did not know they meant nothing. They regarded Rud just as in their time they had regarded Liberalism, Fabianism, Communism, Science, suspecting them all, learning nothing from them, blankly resistant. They did not want ideas in politics. They just wanted to be the official representatives of organised labour and make what they could by it. Their manner betrayed their invincible resolution, as strong as an animal instinct, to play politics according to the rules, to manoeuvre for positions, to dig themselves into positions -- and squat... ~ H G Wells,
1108:How often things must have been seen and dismissed as unimportant, before the speculative eye and the moment of vision came! It was Gilbert, Queen Elizabeth's court physician, who first puzzled his brains with rubbed amber and bits of glass and silk and shellac, and so began the quickening of the human mind to the existence of this universal presence. And even then the science of electricity remained a mere little group of curious facts for nearly two hundred years, connected perhaps with magnetism—a mere guess that—perhaps with the lightning. Frogs' legs must have hung by copper hooks from iron railings and twitched upon countless occasions before Galvani saw them. Except for the lightning conductor, it was 250 years after Gilbert before electricity stepped out of the cabinet of scientific curiosities into the life of the common man… . Then suddenly, in the half-century between 1880 and 1930, it ousted the steam-engine and took over traction, it ousted every other form of household heating, abolished distance with the perfected wireless telephone and the telephotograph… . ~ H G Wells,
1109:Ama Maymun Adam beni sıkıntıdan öldürüyordu, beş parmaklı olmasına güvenerek kendini benim eşitim sayıyor ve bana sürekli hızlı hızlı bir şeyler anlatıyordu... olabilecek en beter saçmalıklar. Ama onda bir tek şey beni eğlendiriyordu: Yeni kelimeler oluşturma konusunda fantastik bir yeteneği vardı. Sanırım hiçbir anlam ifade etmeyen isimler hakkında gevezelik edip durmanın konuşmanın temel amacı olduğu gibi bir fikri vardı. Bunlara, “Küçük Düşünceler” dediği günlük hayattaki makul konulardan ayırmak için “Büyük Düşünceler” diyordu. Ona anlamadığı bir şey söylemişsem buna çok memnun olur, bir daha söylememi ister, ezberler ve Hayvan Halkı’nın daha yumuşak başlılarının hepsine, arada bir kelimelerden birini de yanlış söyleyerek, sürekli tekrarlamaya başlardı. Açık ve anlaşılabilir olan hiçbir şeyle ilgilenmezdi. Onun özel kullanımı için birkaç tane çok tuhaf “Büyük Düşünce” üretmiştim. Şimdi onun karşılaştığım en aptal yaratık olduğunu düşünüyorum, insanın ayırt edici özelliğini gösteren aptallığını, hiçbir şey kaybetmeden bir maymunun doğal ahmaklığıyla, olabilecek en muhteşem şekilde birleştirmeyi başarmıştı. ~ H G Wells,
1110:The ordinary sapper is a great deal better educated than the common soldier, and they discussed the peculiar conditions of the possible fight with some acuteness. I described the Heat-Ray to them, and they began to argue among themselves. "Crawl up under cover and rush 'em, say I," said one. "Get aht!" said another. "What's cover against this 'ere 'eat? Sticks to cook yer! What we got to do is to go as near as the ground'll let us, and then drive a trench." "Blow yer trenches! You always want trenches; you ought to ha' been born a rabbit Snippy." "Ain't they got any necks, then?" said a third, abruptly--a little, contemplative, dark man, smoking a pipe. I repeated my description. "Octopuses," said he, "that's what I calls 'em. Talk about fishers of men--fighters of fish it is this time!" "It ain't no murder killing beasts like that," said the first speaker. "Why not shell the darned things strite off and finish 'em?" said the little dark man. "You carn tell what they might do." "Where's your shells?" said the first speaker. "There ain't no time. Do it in a rush, that's my tip, and do it at once." So they discussed it. ~ H G Wells,
1111:The rest of history for three and twenty centuries is threaded with the spreading out and development and interaction and the clearer and more effective statement of these main leading ideas. Slowly more and more men apprehend the reality of human brotherhood, the needlessness of wars and cruelties and oppression, the possibilities of a common purpose for the whole of our kind. In every generation thereafter there is the evidence of men seeking for that better order to which they feel our world must come. But everywhere and wherever in any man the great constructive ideas have taken hold, the hot greeds, the jealousies, the suspicions and impatience that are in the nature of every one of us, war against the struggle towards greater and broader purposes. The last twenty-three centuries of history are like the efforts of some impulsive, hasty immortal to think clearly and live rightly. Blunder follows blunder; promising beginnings end in grotesque disappointments; streams of living water are poisoned by the cup that conveys them to the thirsty lips of mankind. But the hope of men rises again at last after every disaster. . ~ H G Wells,
1112:It is not that we would oust the little people from the world,' he said, 'in order that we, who are no more than one step upwards from their littleness, may hold their world forever. It is the step we fight for an not ourselves... We are here, Brothers, to what end? To serve the spirit and the purpose that has been breathed into our lives. We fight not for ourselves - for we are but the momentary hands and eyes of the Life of the world... This earth is no resting place... We fight not for ourselves but for growth - growth that goes on forever. Tomorrow, whether we live or die, growth will conquer through us. That is the law of the spirit for ever more. To grow according to the will of God! To grow out of these cracks and crannies, out of these shadows and darknesses, into greatness and the light! Greater,' he said, speaking with slow deliberation, 'greater, my Brothers! And then - still greater. To grow, and again - to grow. To grow at last into the fellowship and understanding of God. Growing... Till the earth is no more than a footstool... Till the spirit shall have driven fear into nothingness, and spread...' He swung his arm heavenward: - 'There! ~ H G Wells,
1113:We look back through countless millions of years and see the great will to live struggling out of the intertidal slime, struggling from shape to shape and from power to power, crawling and then walking confidently upon the land, struggling generation after generation to master the air, creeping down the darkness of the deep; we see it turn upon itself in rage and hunger and reshape itself anew, we watch it draw nearer and more akin to us, expanding, elaborating itself, pursuing its relentless inconceivable purpose, until at last it reaches us and its being beats through our brains and arteries...It is possible to believe that all the past is but the beginning of a beginning, and that all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. It is possible to believe that all that the human mind has accomplished is but the dream before the awakening; out of our lineage, minds will spring that will reach back to us in our littleness to know us better than we know ourselves. A day will come, one day in the unending succession of days, when beings, beings who are now latent in our thoughts and hidden in our loins, shall stand upon this earth as one stands upon a footstool, and shall laugh and reach out their hands amidst the stars. ~ H G Wells,
1114:We have nothing to destroy," said Rud. "All these things are done for already. They are falling in all over the world. They are dead. No need for destructive activities. But if we have nothing to destroy we have much to clear away. That's different. What is needed is a brand-new common-sense reorganisation of the world's affairs, and that's what we have to give them. I can't imagine how the government sleeps of nights. I should lie awake at night listening all the time for the trickle of plaster that comes before a smash. Ever since they began blundering in the Near East and Spain, they've never done a single wise thing. This American adventure spells disaster. Plainly. Australia has protested already. India now is plainly in collapse. Everyone who has been there lately with open eyes speaks of the vague miasma of hatred in the streets. We don't get half the news from India. Just because there exists no clear idea whatever of a new India, it doesn't mean that the old isn't disintegrating. Things that are tumbling down, tumble down. They don't
wait to be shown the plans of the new building. The East crumbles. All over the world it becomes unpleasant to be a foreigner, but an Englishman now can't walk in a bazaar without a policeman behind him... ~ H G Wells,
1115:It was in a swampy village on the lagoon river behind the Turner Peninsula that Pollock's first encounter with the Porroh man occurred. The women of that country are famous for their good looks - they are Gallinas with a dash of European blood that dates from the days of Vasco da Gama and the English slave-traders, and the Porroh man, too, was possibly inspired by a faint Caucasian taint in his composition. (It's a curious thing to think that some of us may have distant cousins eating men on Sherboro Island or raiding with the Sofas.) At any rate, the Porroh man stabbed the woman to the heart as though he had been a mere low-class Italian, and very narrowly missed Pollock. But Pollock, using his revolver to parry the lightning stab which was aimed at his deltoid muscle, sent the iron dagger flying, and, firing, hit the man in the hand.

He fired again and missed, knocking a sudden window out of the wall of the hut. The Porroh man stooped in the doorway, glancing under his arm at Pollock. Pollock caught a glimpse of his inverted face in the sunlight, and then the Englishman was alone, sick and trembling with the excitement of the affair, in the twilight of the place. It had all happened in less time than it takes to read about it.

("Pollock And The Porroh Man") ~ H G Wells,
1116:It is curious to note how slowly the mechanism of the intellectual life improves. Contrast the ordinary library facilities of a middle-class English home, such as the present writer is now working in, with the inconveniences and deficiencies of the equipment of an Alexandrian writer, and one realizes the enormous waste of time, physical exertion, and attention that went on through all the centuries during which that library flourished. Before the present writer lie half a dozen books, and there are good indices to three of them. He can pick up any one of these six books, refer quickly to a statement, verify a quotation, and go on writing. Contrast with that the tedious unfolding of a rolled manuscript. Close at hand are two encyclopedias, a dictionary, an atlas of the world, a biographical dictionary, and other books of reference. They have no marginal indices, it is true; but that perhaps is asking for too much at present. There were no such resources in the world in 300 B.C. Alexandria had still to produce the first grammar and the first dictionary. This present book is being written in manuscript; it is then taken by a typist and typewritten very accurately. It can then, with the utmost convenience, be read over, corrected amply, rearranged freely, retyped, and recorrected. Fig 00346 ~ H G Wells,
1117:No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable. It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment ~ H G Wells,
1118:I have it in my mind that classification is a necessary condition of the working of the mental implement but that it is a departure from the objective truth of things, that classification is very serviceable for the practical purposes of life but a very doubtful preliminary to those fine penetrations the philosophical purpose, in its more arrogant moods, demands. All the peculiarities of my way of thinking derive from that.

I submit to you that syllogism is based on classification, that all hard logical reasoning tends to imply and is apt to imply a confidence in the objective reality of classification. Consequently in denying that I deny the absolute validity of logic. Classification and number, which in truth ignore the fine differences of objective realities, have in the past of human thought been imposed upon things. [...] The forceps of our minds are clumsy forceps, and crush the truth a little in taking hold of it.

It was about this difficulty that the mind of Plato played a little inconclusively all his life. For the most part he tended to regard the idea as the something behind reality, whereas it seems to me that the idea is the more proximate and less perfect thing, the thing by which the mind, by ignoring individual differences, attempts to comprehend an otherwise unmanageable number of unique realities. ~ H G Wells,
1119:Well, anyhow, the practical outcome of all these damn democratic ideas, is that men of our quality -- yes, damn it! we have a quality -- excuse themselves from the hard and thankless service they owe -- not to the crowd, Dick, but to the race. (Much good it will do is to shirk like that in the long run.) We will not presume, we say, no. We shrug our shoulders and leave the geese, the hungry sheep, the born followers, call them what you will, to the leaders who haven't our scruples. The poor muts swallow those dead old religions no longer fit for human consumption, and we say 'let 'em.' They devour their silly newspapers. They let themselves be distracted from public affairs by games, by gambling, by shows and coronations and every soft of mass stupidity, while the stars in their courses plot against them. We say nothing. Nothing audible. We mustn't destroy the simple faith that is marching them to disaster. We mustn't question their decisions. That wouldn't be democratic. And then we sit here and say privately that the poor riff-raff are failing to adapt themselves to those terrible new conditions -- as if they had had half a chance of knowing how things stand with them. They are shoved about by patriotisms, by obsolete religious prejudices, by racial delusions, by incomprehensible economic forces. Amid a growth of frightful machinery... ~ H G Wells,
1120:Bodisham insisted upon a series of conferences with practically all the Group present and participating. The egg of the world revolution was indeed incubated in meetings very like tutorial classes. Our dramatic and romantic dispositions would have it otherwise, but that was the course reality chose to take. It was begotten of a sentence, it was fostered in talk. In the beginning was the Word. There is no strong, silent man in the history of the world renascence.

"I've got so little to say," said Dreed, and he was the nearest approach to speechlessness in the Group.

"All the more reason for coming to listen," said Rud.

They had to understand each other, Bodisham urged, and to keep on understanding each other. "You have to talk a movement into being," he said, "and you have to keep it alert by talk. You have to write and keep on writing memoranda on the different expressions of our fundamental ideas, as fact challenges them. It is laborious but absolutely
necessary."

So long as Lenin lived, Bodisham argued, he wrote and talked and explained, and when he died progress in Russia turned its face to the wall. The hope went out of the Russian experiment. "You have to play the role of Lenin in our movement," said Bodisham. The Common-sense Party had to keep alive mentally even if it risked serious internal conflicts. Rigidity was a sign of death. Fixed creeds were the coffins of belief. ~ H G Wells,
1121:So by the beginning of the third century B.C. we find already arisen in the Western civilization of the old world three of the great structural ideas that rule the mind of contemporary mankind. We have already traced the escape of writing and knowledge from the secrets and mysteries and initiations of the old-world priesthoods, and the development of the idea of a universal knowledge, of a universally understandable and communicable history and philosophy. We have taken the figures of Herodotus and Aristotle as typical exponents of this first great idea, the idea of science-using the word science in its widest sense, to include history and signify a clear vision of man in relation to the things about him. We have traced also the generalization of religion among the Babylonians, Jews, and other Semitic peoples, from the dark worship in temples and consecrated places of some local or tribal god to the open service of one universal God of Righteousness, whose temple is the whole world. And now we have traced also the first germination of the idea of a world polity. The rest of the history of mankind is very largely the history of those three ideas of science, of a universal righteousness, and of a human commonweal, spreading out from the minds of the rare and exceptional persons and peoples in which they first originated, into the general consciousness of the race, and giving first a new colour, then a new spirit, and then a new direction to human affairs. XXIV ~ H G Wells,
1122:The bookshop of Kipps is on the left-hand side of the Hythe High Street coming from Folkestone, between the yard of the livery stable and the shop-window full of old silver and such like things—it is quite easy to find—and there you may see him for yourself and speak to him and buy this book of him if you like. He has it in stock, I know. Very delicately I've seen to that. His name is not Kipps, of course, you must understand that, but everything else is exactly as I have told you. You can talk to him about books, about politics, about going to Boulogne, about life, and the ups and downs of life. Perhaps he will quote you Buggins—from whom, by the bye, one can now buy everything a gentleman's wardrobe should contain at the little shop in Rendezvous Street, Folkestone. If you are fortunate to find Kipps in a good mood he may even let you know how he inherited a fortune "once." "Run froo it," he'll say with a not unhappy smile. "Got another afterwards—speckylating in plays. Needn't keep this shop if I didn't like. But it's something to do."...

Or he may be even more intimate. "I seen some things," he said to me once. "Raver! Life! Why! once I—I 'loped! I did—reely!"

(Of course you will not tell Kipps that he is "Kipps," or that I have put him in this book. He does not know. And you know, one never knows how people are going to take that sort of thing. I am an old and trusted customer now, and for many amiable reasons I should prefer that things remained exactly on their present footing.) ~ H G Wells,
1123:Suppose, and the facts leave us quite free to suppose it, suppose that the latent sapiens in us succeeds in its urge to rationalize life, suppose we do satisfy our dogmatic demand for freedom, equality, universal abundance, lives of achievement, hope and cooperation throughout this still largely unexplored and undeveloped planet, and find ourselves all the better for having done so. It can be done. It may be done. Suppose it done. Surely that in itself will be good living.

“But,” says that dead end; that human blight, Mr. Chamble Pewter, making his point with a squeak in his voice and tears of controversial bitterness in his eyes, “What is the good of it? Will there be any finality in your success?” he asks.

None whatever, is the answer. Why should there be? Yet a vista of innumerable happy generations, an abundance of life at present inconceivable, and at the end, not extinction necessarily, not immortality, but complete uncertainty, is surely sufficient prospect for the present. We are not yet Homo sapiens, but when at last our intermingled and selected offspring, carrying on the life that is now in us, when they, who are indeed ourselves, our heredity of body, thought and will, reassembled and enhanced, have established their claim to that title — can we doubt that they will be facing things at present unimaginable, weighing pros and cons altogether beyond our scope? They will see far and wide in an ever-growing light while we see as in a glass darkly. Things yet unimaginable. They may be good by our current orientation of things; they may be evil. Why should they not be in the nature of our good and much more than our good —“beyond good and evil? ~ H G Wells,
1124:Nella nuova situazione di agio e sicurezza perfetti, quell’energia irrequieta che per noi era forza diventa inevitabilmente debolezza. Persino nel nostro tempo certe tendenze e certi desideri, una volta necessari alla sopravvivenza, sono una fonte costante di insuccessi. Il coraggio fisico e l’amore per la battaglia, per esempio, non sono di grande aiuto all’uomo civile, anzi, possono essere un intralcio. E in uno stato di equilibrio fisico e sicurezza, il potere, intellettuale nonché fisico, sarebbe fuori luogo. Dovevo pensare che da anni innumerevoli non c’era più stato il rischio di una guerra o di qualche solitario atto di violenza, nessun pericolo da parte di animali feroci, nessuna malattia debilitante che richiedesse una costituzione sana e solida, nessun bisogno di lavorare. In una vita così, quelli che definiamo deboli sono equipaggiati bene quanto i forti, non sono più deboli. Anzi, sono più adatti, perché i forti si troverebbero logorati da un’energia che non sono in grado di sfogare. La squisita bellezza degli edifici che vedevo era senza dubbio il risultato dell’ultimo grande sforzo di un’energia ora divenuta inutile prima che il genere umano si concedesse alla perfetta armonia della nuova condizione che aveva raggiunto, la realizzazione di quel trionfo che aveva dato inizio all’ultimo grande periodo di pace. Tale è sempre stato il destino dell’energia in condizioni di sicurezza: scivola nell’arte e nell’erotismo e da lì nel languore e nella decadenza.
Ma persino questo slancio artistico alla lunga è destinato a morire, ed era quasi morto nel tempo da me visitato. Adornarsi di fiori, danzare, cantare al tramonto: ecco cosa restava dello spirito artistico e niente di più. E anche quello alla fine si sarebbe spento nell’inattività appagata. ~ H G Wells,
1125:And suddenly he became almost lyric. "For three thousand years the Common Man has been fended off from the full and glorious life he might have had, by Make Believe. For three thousand years in one form or another he has been asking for an unrestricted share in the universal welfare. He has been asking for a fair dividend from civilisation. For all that time, and still it goes on, the advantaged people, the satisfied people, the kings and priests, the owners and traders, the gentlefolk and the leaders he trusted, have been cheating him tacitly or deliberately, out of his proper share and contribution in the common life. Sometimes almost consciously, sometimes subconsciously, cheating themselves about it as well. When he called upon God, they said 'We'll take care of your God for you', and they gave him organised religion. When he calls for Justice, they say 'Everything decently and in order', and give him a nice expensive Law Court beyond his means. When he calls for order and safety too loudly they hit him on the head with a policeman's truncheon. When he sought knowledge, they told him what was good for him. And to protect him from the foreigner, so they said, they got him bombed to hell, trained him to disembowel his fellow common men with bayonets and learn what love of King and Country really means.

"All with the best intentions in the world, mind you.

"Most of these people, I tell you, have acted in perfect good faith. They manage to believe that in sustaining this idiot's muddle they are doing
tremendous things -- stupendous things -- for the Common Man. They can live lives of quiet pride and die quite edifyingly in an undernourished, sweated, driven and frustrated world. Useful public servants! Righteous self-applause! Read their bloody biographies! ~ H G Wells,
1126:ever and again we find some leader or some tribe amidst the disorder of free and independent nomads, powerful enough to force a sort of unity upon its kindred tribes, and then woe betide the nearest civilization. Down pour the united nomads on the unwarlike, unarmed plains, and there ensues a war of conquest. Instead of carrying off the booty, the conquerors settle down on the conquered land, which becomes all booty for them; the villagers and townsmen are reduced to servitude and tribute paying, they become hewers of wood and drawers of water, and the leaders of the nomads become kings and princes, masters and aristocrats. They, too, settle down, they learn many of the arts and refinements of the conquered, they cease to be lean and hungry, but for many generations they retain traces of their old nomadic habits, they hunt and indulge in open-air sports, they drive and race chariots, they regard work, especially agricultural work, as the lot of an inferior race and class. This in a thousand variations has been one of the main stories in history for the last seventy centuries or more. In the first history that we can clearly decipher we find already in all the civilized regions a distinction between a non-working ruler class and the working mass of the population. And we find, too, that after some generations, the aristocrat, having settled down, begins to respect the arts and refinements and law-abidingness, of settlement, and to lose something of his original hardihood. He intermarries, he patches up a sort of toleration between conqueror and conquered; he exchanges religious ideas and learns the lessons upon which soil and climate insist. He becomes a part of the civilization he has captured; and as he does so, events gather towards a, fresh invasion by the free adventurers of the outer world. Early ~ H G Wells,
1127:He perceived too in these still hours how little he had understood her hitherto. He had been blinded, — obsessed. He had been seeing her and himself and the whole world far too much as a display of the eternal dualism of sex, the incessant pursuit. Now with his sexual imaginings newly humbled and hopeless, with a realization of her own tremendous minimization of that fundamental of romance, he began to see all that there was in her personality and their possible relations outside that. He saw how gravely and deeply serious was her fine philanthropy, how honest and simple and impersonal her desire for knowledge and understandings. There is the brain of her at least, he thought, far out of Sir Isaac's reach. She wasn't abased by her surrenders, their simplicity exalted her, showed her innocent and himself a flushed and congested soul. He perceived now with the astonishment of a man newly awakened just how the great obsession of sex had dominated him — for how many years? Since his early undergraduate days. Had he anything to put beside her own fine detachment? Had he ever since his manhood touched philosophy, touched a social question, thought of anything human, thought of art, or literature or belief, without a glancing reference of the whole question to the uses of this eternal hunt? During that time had he ever talked to a girl or woman with an unembarrassed sincerity? He stripped his pretences bare; the answer was no. His very refinements had been no more than indicative fig-leaves. His conservatism and morality had been a mere dalliance with interests that too brutal a simplicity might have exhausted prematurely. And indeed hadn't the whole period of literature that had produced him been, in its straining purity and refinement, as it were one glowing, one illuminated fig-leaf, a vast conspiracy to keep certain matters always in mind by conspicuously covering them away? But this wonderful woman — it seemed — she hadn't them in mind! She shamed him if only by her trustful unsuspiciousness of the ancient selfish game of Him and Her that he had been so ardently playing.... He idealized and worshipped this clean blindness. He abased himself before it. ~ H G Wells,
1128:Her mind escaped between them, and went exploring for itself through the great gaps they had made in the simple obedient assumptions of her girlhood. That question originally put in Paradise, "Why shouldn't we?" came into her mind and stayed there. It is a question that marks a definite stage in the departure from innocence. Things that had seemed opaque and immutable appeared translucent and questionable. She began to read more and more in order to learn things and get a light upon things, and less and less to pass the time. Ideas came to her that seemed at first strange altogether and then grotesquely justifiable and then crept to a sort of acceptance by familiarity. And a disturbing intermittent sense of a general responsibility increased and increased in her.

You will understand this sense of responsibility which was growing up in Lady Harman's mind if you have felt it yourself, but if you have not then you may find it a little difficult to understand. You see it comes, when it comes at all, out of a phase of disillusionment. All children, I suppose, begin by taking for granted the rightness of things in general, the soundness of accepted standards, and many people are at least so happy that they never really grow out of this assumption. They go to the grave with an unbroken confidence that somewhere behind all the immediate injustices and disorders of life, behind the antics of politics, the rigidities of institutions, the pressure of custom and the vagaries of law, there is wisdom and purpose and adequate provision, they never lose that faith in the human household they acquired amongst the directed securities of home. But for more of us and more there comes a dissolution of these assurances; there comes illumination as the day comes into a candle-lit uncurtained room. The warm lights that once rounded off our world so completely are betrayed for what they are, smoky and guttering candles. Beyond what once seemed a casket of dutiful security is now a limitless and indifferent universe. Ours is the wisdom or there is no wisdom; ours is the decision or there is no decision. That burthen is upon each of us in the measure of our capacity. The talent has been given us and we may not bury it. ~ H G Wells,
1129:It doesn't take ten years of study, you don't need to go to the University, to find out that this is a damned good world gone wrong. Gone wrong, because it is being monkeyed with by people too greedy and mean and wrong-hearted altogether to do the right thing by our common world. They've grabbed it and they won't let go. They might lose their importance; they might lose their pull. Everywhere it's the same. Beware of the men you make your masters. Beware of the men you trust.

We've only got to be clear-headed to sing the same song and play the same game all over the world, we common men. We don't want Power monkeyed with, we don't want Work and Goods monkeyed with, and, above all, we don't want Money monkeyed with. That's the elements of politics everywhere. When these things go wrong, we go wrong. That's how people begin to feel it and see it in America. That's how we feel it here -- when we look into our minds. That's what common people feel everywhere. That's
what our brother whites -- "poor whites" they call them -- in those towns in South Carolina are fighting for now. Fighting our battle. Why aren't we with them? We speak the same language; we share the same blood. Who has been keeping us apart from them for a hundred and fifty-odd years? Ruling classes. Politicians. Dear old flag and all that stuff!

Our school-books never tell us a word about the American common man; and his school-books never tell him a word about us. They flutter flags between us to keep us apart. Split us up for a century and a half because of some fuss about taxing tea. And what are our wonderful Labour and Socialist and Communist leaders doing to change that? What are they doing to unite us English-speaking common men together and give us our plain desire? Are they doing anything more for us than the land barons and the
factory barons and the money barons? Not a bit of it! These labour leaders of to-day mean to be lords to-morrow. They are just a fresh set of dishonest trustees. Look at these twenty-odd platforms here! Mark their needless contradictions! Their marvellous differences on minor issues. 'Manoeuvres!' 'Intrigue.' 'Personalities.' 'Monkeying.' 'Don't trust him, trust me!' All of them at it. Mark how we common men are distracted, how we are set hunting first after one red herring and then after another, for the want of simple, honest interpretation... ~ H G Wells,
1130:That City of yours is a morbid excrescence. Wall Street is a morbid excrescence. Plainly it's a thing that has grown out upon the social body rather like -- what do you call it? -- an embolism, thrombosis, something of that sort. A sort of heart in the wrong place, isn't it? Anyhow -- there it is. Everything seems obliged to go through it now; it can hold up things, stimulate things, give the world fever or pain, and yet all the same -- is it necessary, Irwell? Is it inevitable? Couldn't we function economically quite as well without it? Has the world got to carry that kind of thing for ever?

"What real strength is there in a secondary system of that sort? It's secondary, it's parasitic. It's only a sort of hypertrophied, uncontrolled counting-house which has become dominant by falsifying the entries and intercepting payment. It's a growth that eats us up and rots everything like cancer. Financiers make nothing, they are not a productive department. They control nothing. They might do so, but they don't. They don't even control Westminster and Washington. They just watch things in order to make speculative anticipations. They've got minds that lie in wait like spiders, until the fly flies wrong. Then comes the debt entanglement. Which you can break, like the cobweb it is, if only you insist on playing the wasp. I ask you again what real strength has Finance if you tackle Finance? You can tax it, regulate its operations, print money over it without limit, cancel its claims. You can make moratoriums and jubilees. The little chaps will dodge and cheat and run about, but they won't fight. It is an artificial system upheld by the law and those who make the laws. It's an aristocracy of pickpocket area-sneaks. The Money Power isn't a Power. It's respectable as long as you respect it, and not a moment longer. If it struggles you can strangle it if you have the grip...You and I worked that out long ago, Chiffan...

"When we're through with our revolution, there will be no money in the world but pay. Obviously. We'll pay the young to learn, the grown-ups to function, everybody for holidays, and the old to make remarks, and we'll have a deuce of a lot to pay them with. We'll own every real thing; we, the common men. We'll have the whole of the human output in the market. Earn what you will and buy what you like, we'll say, but don't try to use money to get power over your fellow-creatures. No squeeze. The better the economic machine, the less finance it will need. Profit and interest are nasty ideas, artificial ideas, perversions, all mixed up with betting and playing games for money. We'll clean all that up..."

"It's been going on a long time," said Irwell.

"All the more reason for a change," said Rud. ~ H G Wells,
1131:Dr. Chanter, in his brilliant History of Human Thought in the Twentieth Century, has made the suggestion that only a very small proportion of people are capable of acquiring new ideas of political or social behaviour after they are twenty-five years old. On the other hand, few people become directive in these matters until they are between forty and fifty. Then they prevail for twenty years or more. The conduct of public affairs therefore is necessarily twenty years or more behind the living thought of the times. This is what Dr. Chanter calls the "delayed
realisation of ideas".

In the less hurried past this had not been of any great importance, but in the violent crises of the Revolutionary Period it became a primary fact. It is evident now that whatever the emergency, however obvious the new problem before our species in the nineteen-twenties, it was necessary for the whole generation that had learned nothing and could learn nothing from the Great War and its sequelae, to die out before any rational handling of world affairs could even begin. The cream of the youth of the war years had been killed; a stratum of men already middle-aged remained in control, whose ideas had already set before the Great War. It was, says Chanter, an inescapable phase. The world of the Frightened Thirties and the Brigand Forties was under the dominion of a generation of unteachable, obstinately obstructive men, blinded men, miseducating, misleading the baffled younger people for completely superseded ends. If they could have had their way, they would have blinded the whole world for ever. But the blinding was inadequate, and by the Fifties all this generation and its teachings and traditions were passing away, like a smoke-screen blown aside.

Before a few years had passed it was already incredible that in the twenties and thirties of the twentieth century the whole political life of the world was still running upon the idea of competitive sovereign empires and states. Men of quite outstanding intelligence were still planning and scheming for the "hegemony" of Britain or France or Germany or Japan; they were still moving their armies and navies and air forces and making their combinations and alliances upon the dissolving chess-board of terrestrial reality. Nothing happened as they had planned it; nothing worked out as they desired; but still with a stupefying inertia they persisted. They launched armies, they starved and massacred populations. They were like a veterinary surgeon who suddenly finds he is operating upon a human being, and with a sort of blind helplessness cuts and slashes more and more desperately, according to the best equestrian rules. The history of European diplomacy between 1914 and 1944 seems now so consistent a record of incredible insincerity that it stuns the modern mind. At the time it seemed rational behaviour. It did not seem insincere. The biographical material of the period -- and these governing-class people kept themselves in countenance very largely by writing and reading each other's biographies -- the collected letters, the collected speeches, the sapient observations of the leading figures make tedious reading, but they enable the intelligent student to realise the persistence of small-society values in that swiftly expanding scene.

Those values had to die out. There was no other way of escaping from them, and so, slowly and horribly, that phase of the moribund sovereign states concluded. ~ H G Wells,

IN CHAPTERS [0/0]









WORDNET














IN WEBGEN [10000/44]

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2654300.Supramental_Manifestation_upon_Earth
Kheper - Supramentalisation_and_Earth -- 38
Kheper - Supramentalisation -- 78
Kheper - Supramentalised_state -- 50
Kheper - Supramental_Ship -- 23
selforum - supramental awakening
selforum - supramental manifestation
selforum - supramental beings
selforum - supramental transformation of world
selforum - sri aurobindo is guide to supramental
selforum - this supramental level is to be
selforum - effect of 1956 supramental descent on
selforum - mother central or integral supramental
selforum - supramental change is far off distant
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2009/11/for-want-of-common-soul-supramental.html
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2012/05/thoughts-about-avatars-and-supramental.html
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2012/11/number-and-supramental-matrix.html
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-mathematical-formula-of-supramental.html
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-supramental-yoga-and-evolutionary.html
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2014/08/the-supramental-realisation-supramental.html
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2017/12/towards-supramental-time-vision-time.html
https://esotericotherworlds.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-supramentalised-state.html
wiki.auroville - Anniversary_of_the_Supramental_descent
wiki.auroville - Auroville's_flower_("Beauty_of_Supramental_Love")
wiki.auroville - Supramental
wiki.auroville - Supramental_action
wiki.auroville - Supramental_being
wiki.auroville - Supramental_body
wiki.auroville - Supramental_consciousness
wiki.auroville - Supramental_consciousness_as_experienced_by_Mother
wiki.auroville - Supramental_expression
wiki.auroville - Supramental_Force
wiki.auroville - Supramental_force_in_the_body
wiki.auroville - Supramental_love
wiki.auroville - Supramental_manifestation
wiki.auroville - Supramental_plane
wiki.auroville - Supramental_timeline
wiki.auroville - Supramental_transformation
wiki.auroville - Supramental_world
wiki.auroville - The_Supramental_Manifestation_upon_Earth
wiki.auroville - The_Supramental_Ship
wiki.auroville - The_Supramental_Ship_(Radio_program)
Dharmapedia - Supramentalisation
Psychology Wiki - Integral_yoga#Supramentalisation



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